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Sample records for genotype dependent expressed

  1. Dietary protein intake affects expression of genes for lipid metabolism in porcine skeletal muscle in a genotype-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingying; Li, Fengna; He, Lingyun; Tan, Bie; Deng, Jinping; Kong, Xiangfeng; Li, Yinghui; Geng, Meimei; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-04-14

    Skeletal muscle is a major site for the oxidation of fatty acids (FA) in mammals, including humans. Using a swine model, we tested the hypothesis that dietary protein intake regulates the expression of key genes for lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle. A total of ninety-six barrows (forty-eight pure-bred Bama mini-pigs (fatty genotype) and forty-eight Landrace pigs (lean genotype)) were fed from 5 weeks of age to market weight. Pigs of fatty or lean genotype were randomly assigned to one of two dietary treatments (low- or adequate-protein diet), with twenty-four individually fed pigs per treatment. Our data showed that dietary protein levels affected the expression of genes involved in the anabolism and catabolism of lipids in the longissimus dorsi and biceps femoris muscles in a genotype-dependent manner. Specifically, Bama mini-pigs had more intramuscular fat, SFA and MUFA, as well as elevated mRNA expression levels of lipogenic genes, compared with Landrace pigs. In contrast, Bama mini-pigs had lower mRNA expression levels of lipolytic genes than Landrace pigs fed an adequate-protein diet in the growing phase. These data are consistent with higher white-fat deposition in Bama mini-pigs than in Landrace pigs. In conclusion, adequate provision of dietary protein (amino acids) plays an important role in regulating the expression of key lipogenic genes, and the growth of white adipose tissue, in a genotype- and tissue-specific manner. These findings have important implications for developing novel dietary strategies in pig production.

  2. Genotype dependent burst of transposable element expression in crowns of hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) during cold acclimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The expression of 1,613 transposable elements (TEs) represented in the Affymetix Wheat Genome Chip was examined during cold treatment in crowns of 4 hexaploid wheat genotypes that vary in tolerance to cold and in flowering time. The TE expression profiles showed a constant level of expression throug...

  3. Nrf2-dependent gene expression is affected by the proatherogenic apoE4 genotype-studies in targeted gene replacement mice.

    PubMed

    Graeser, Anne-Christin; Boesch-Saadatmandi, Christine; Lippmann, Jana; Wagner, Anika E; Huebbe, Patricia; Storm, Niels; Höppner, Wolfgang; Wiswedel, Ingrid; Gardemann, Andreas; Minihane, Anne M; Döring, Frank; Rimbach, Gerald

    2011-10-01

    An apoE4 genotype is an important risk factor for cardiovascular and other chronic diseases. The higher cardiovascular disease risk of apoE4 carriers as compared to the apoE3 genotype has been mainly attributed to the differences in blood lipids between the two genotype subgroups. Recently, a potential protective role of the transcription factor Nrf2 in cardiovascular disease prevention has been suggested. In this study, we show that Nrf2-dependent gene expression is affected by the apoE genotype. ApoE4 vs. apoE3 mice exhibited lower hepatic Nrf2 nuclear protein levels. Furthermore, mRNA and protein levels of Nrf2 target genes including glutathione-S-transferase, heme oxygenase-1 and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, quinone 1 were significantly lower in apoE4 as compared to apoE3 mice. Lower hepatic mRNA levels of phase II enzymes, as observed in apoE4 vs. apoE3 mice, were accompanied by higher mRNA levels of phase I enzymes including Cyp26a1 and Cyp3a16. Furthermore, miRNA-144, miRNA-125b, and miRNA-29a involved in Nrf2 signaling, inflammation, and regulation of phase I enzyme gene expression were affected by the apoE genotype. We provide first evidence that Nrf2 is differentially regulated in response to the apoE genotype.

  4. Genotype-dependent expression of specific members of potato protease inhibitor gene families in different tissues and in response to wounding and nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Turrà, David; Bellin, Diana; Lorito, Matteo; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2009-05-01

    Protease inhibitors (PIs) are small ubiquitous proteins with a variety of biological functions in plants, including protein stabilization, modulation of apoptosis and defense against pathogens. Kunitz-like inhibitors (PKPIs) and proteinase inhibitors 1 (PI-1) are abundant in storage organs of potato plants and are up-regulated in other tissues in response to biotic and abiotic stress. However, little information is available on genotype-dependent regulation of individual PKPI group- and PI-1 genes. We isolated, sequenced and characterized four novel full-length PI-1 cDNAs (PPI3A2, PPI3A4, PPI2C4 and PPI2C1A) from Solanum tuberosum cv. Desirée. Specific primers were developed for PI-1 genes PPI3A2, PPI3B2 and PPI2C4 and the three PKPI homology groups A, B and C. Their expression profiles were studied by semi-quantitative RT-PCR in comparison with transcripts of the PI-1, Pin2 and PR1 gene families in various tissues, after wounding and Globodera rostochiensis infection of nematode-resistant genotypes P40 and LB7/4/c-I-7, and susceptible cv. Desirée. Individual PI-1 genes and PKPI homology groups were expressed in a tissue- and genotype-dependent manner after wounding and nematode infection. The differences in PI expression patterns were related to the intensity, type of inhibitors produced, and the kinetics of induction. Therefore, different genotype-environment combinations produce different sets of PI transcripts. Potato plants reacted to G. rostochiensis infection by modulating PKPI, PI-1 and Pin2, but not PR1 gene expression, suggesting that the jasmonic acid but not the salicylic acid defense signaling pathway is activated. PI expression profiles were not correlated with the resistance status of the potato genotype infected with G. rostochiensis.

  5. Unequal and genotype-dependent expression of mitochondrial genes in larvae of the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Curole, Jason P; Meyer, Eli; Manahan, Donal T; Hedgecock, Dennis

    2010-04-01

    Mitochondria are essential for regulation of energy metabolism, but little is known about patterns of mitochondrial genome expression in invertebrates. To explore the association of mitochondrial expression with differential growth of Crassostrea gigas, the Pacific oyster, we crossed two inbred lines to produce inbred and hybrid larvae, which grew at different rates under the same environmental conditions. Using high-throughput cloning and sequencing methods, we identified 1.1 million expressed sequence tags from the mitochondrial genome, 96.7% of which were perfect matches to genes targeted by the method. Expression varied significantly among genes, ranging over nearly four orders of magnitude, from mt:lRNA, which constituted 21% of all transcripts, to mt:CoII, which constituted less than 0.02% of all transcripts. Variable expression of genes coding for subunits of macromolecular complexes (e.g., mt:CoI and mt:CoII) implies that stoichiometry in these complexes must be regulated post-transcriptionally. Surprisingly, the mitochondrial transcriptome contained non-coding transcripts, which may play a role in the regulation of mitochondrial function. Finally, mitochondrial expression depended strongly on maternal factors and nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions, which may explain previously observed growth differences between reciprocal hybrids. Differences in mitochondrial gene expression could provide a biochemical index for the metabolic basis of genetically determined differences in larval growth.

  6. Comparative analyses of genotype dependent expressed sequence tags and stress-responsive transcriptome of chickpea wilt illustrate predicted and unexpected genes and novel regulators of plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Nasheeman; Ghai, Deepali; Barman, Pranjan; Basu, Swaraj; Gangisetty, Nagaraju; Mandal, Mihir K; Chakraborty, Niranjan; Datta, Asis; Chakraborty, Subhra

    2009-01-01

    Background The ultimate phenome of any organism is modulated by regulated transcription of many genes. Characterization of genetic makeup is thus crucial for understanding the molecular basis of phenotypic diversity, evolution and response to intra- and extra-cellular stimuli. Chickpea is the world's third most important food legume grown in over 40 countries representing all the continents. Despite its importance in plant evolution, role in human nutrition and stress adaptation, very little ESTs and differential transcriptome data is available, let alone genotype-specific gene signatures. Present study focuses on Fusarium wilt responsive gene expression in chickpea. Results We report 6272 gene sequences of immune-response pathway that would provide genotype-dependent spatial information on the presence and relative abundance of each gene. The sequence assembly led to the identification of a CaUnigene set of 2013 transcripts comprising of 973 contigs and 1040 singletons, two-third of which represent new chickpea genes hitherto undiscovered. We identified 209 gene families and 262 genotype-specific SNPs. Further, several novel transcription regulators were identified indicating their possible role in immune response. The transcriptomic analysis revealed 649 non-cannonical genes besides many unexpected candidates with known biochemical functions, which have never been associated with pathostress-responsive transcriptome. Conclusion Our study establishes a comprehensive catalogue of the immune-responsive root transcriptome with insight into their identity and function. The development, detailed analysis of CaEST datasets and global gene expression by microarray provide new insight into the commonality and diversity of organ-specific immune-responsive transcript signatures and their regulated expression shaping the species specificity at genotype level. This is the first report on differential transcriptome of an unsequenced genome during vascular wilt. PMID:19732460

  7. 5-HT(1A)-receptor over-expressing mice: genotype and sex dependent responses to antidepressants in the forced swim-test.

    PubMed

    Günther, Lydia; Rothe, Julia; Rex, André; Voigt, Jörg-Peter; Millan, Mark J; Fink, Heidrun; Bert, Bettina

    2011-09-01

    Deficiencies in serotonergic neurotransmission are involved in the pathophysiology of depression. Due to its modulatory effect on serotonin (5-HT) release, the 5-HT(1A)-receptor is thought to play a decisive role in the therapy of this mood disorder. However, it is not fully understood how antidepressant effects are mediated by pre- and postsynaptic receptor sites. In this study we examined the impact of postsynaptic 5-HT(1A)-receptor over-expression in corticolimbic areas of male and female mice on the performance in the forced swim-test (FST). Furthermore, we investigated their response to the serotonin selective reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram in comparison to the selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor reboxetine, as well as the partial 5-HT(1A)-receptor agonists, buspirone and S 15535. Additionally, these drugs were evaluated in the open field-test in order to observe effects on motor activity. The density of 5-HT(1A)-receptors in discrete corticolimbic regions was determined in detail by quantitative autoradiography with [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT to investigate genotype as well as sex dependent differences in the expression pattern. [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT binding differed depending on sex with female mice of both genotypes displaying higher receptor binding in distinct brain areas. In the FST untreated male but not female over-expressing (OE) mice showed an antidepressant-like behaviour compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Citalopram yielded an antidepressant effect without influencing locomotor activity in OE mice but not in WT mice. Reboxetine had no antidepressant-like effect in OE mice, but sex-dependently in WT mice. The two partial agonists, buspirone and S 15535 produced no antidepressant-like activity in both genotypes and sexes, but aberrant motor effects. The antidepressant-like phenotype of male transgenic mice accounts for an involvement of postsynaptic 5-HT(1A)-receptors in the FST behaviour. In addition, the selective over-expression of postsynaptic 5-HT(1A

  8. Fatty acid composition of chicken breast meat is dependent on genotype-related variation of FADS1 and FADS2 gene expression and desaturating activity.

    PubMed

    Boschetti, E; Bordoni, A; Meluzzi, A; Castellini, C; Dal Bosco, A; Sirri, F

    2016-04-01

    In Western countries the dietary guidance emphasizes the need to decrease the intake of saturated fatty acids and to replace them with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), particularly long chain n-3 PUFA (LC-PUFA). The production of poultry meat having a lower fat content and healthier fatty acid (FA) profile is a hot topic for the poultry industry, and the possibility to identify genotypes able to produce meat with a higher LC-PUFA content deserves attention. The aims of the present study were to evidence in chicken (i) a genotype-related different expression of the desaturating enzymes delta-6 (Δ6, EC 1.14.99.25), delta-5 (Δ5, EC 1.14.19.) and delta-9 (Δ9, EC 1.14.19.1); (ii) the impact of the hypothesized different expression on the meat FA composition; (iii) the distribution of desaturase products in the different lipid classes. Slow (SG), medium (MG) and fast (FG) growing chickens fed the same diet were evaluated either for the relative expression of FADS1, FADS2 and SCD1 genes in liver (by q-PCR), or for the FA composition of breast meat. MG and particularly SG birds showed a greater expression of FADS2 and FADS1 genes, a higher Δ6 and Δ5 activity (estimated using desaturase indices), and consequently a higher LC-PUFA content in the breast meat than FG birds. The relationship between genotype and desaturating ability was demonstrated, with a significant impact on the PUFA content of breast meat. Due to the high consumption rate of avian meat, the identification of the best genotypes for meat production could represent an important goal not only for the food industry, but also for the improvement of human nutrition.

  9. Co-dependence of genotype and dietary protein intake to affect expression on amino acid/peptide transporters in porcine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Kong, X; Li, F; Tan, B; Li, Y; Duan, Y; Yin, Y; He, J; Hu, C; Blachier, F; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    A total of 96 barrows (48 pure-bred Bama mini-pigs representing fatty genotype, and 48 Landrace pigs representing lean genotype) were randomly assigned to either a low- or adequate-protein treatment diet. The experimental period commenced at 5 weeks of age and extended to the finishing period. After euthanasia, blood and skeletal muscle samples were collected from pigs at the nursery, growing, and finishing phases. Our results indicate that the concentrations of free AAs in the plasma and muscle decreased as the age of the pigs increased. In addition, a strain × growth phase interaction (P < 0.05) was observed for the free AA pool in the plasma and muscle. The low-protein diet upregulated (P < 0.05) the mRNA levels for T1R1/T1R3 involved in glutamate binding, but downregulated (P < 0.05) the mRNA levels for PAT1, PAT2, and ASCT2, which transport neutral AAs into muscles. Bama mini-pigs had higher (P < 0.05) mRNA levels for LAT1, SNAT2, and EAAC1, but a lower (P < 0.05) mRNA level for PepT1, compared with Landrace pigs. Collectively, our findings indicate that adequate provision of dietary protein plays an important role in regulating profiles of free AA pools and expression of key AA/peptide transporters/transceptors in a genotype- and tissue-specific manner.

  10. The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified thousands of loci for common diseases, but for the majority of these, the mechanisms underlying disease susceptibility remain unknown. Most associated variants are not correlated with protein-coding changes, suggesting that polymorphisms in regulatory regions are likely to contribute to many disease phenotypes. The careful examination of gene expression and its relationship to genetic variation has thus become a critical next step in the elucidation of the genetic basis of common disease. Cell context is a key determinant of gene regulation; but to date, the challenge of collecting large numbers of diverse tissues in humans has largely precluded such studies outside of a few easily sampled cell types. Here we describe the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project, which will establish a resource database and associated tissue bank for the scientific community to study the relationship between genetic variation and gene expression in human tissues. PMID:23715323

  11. The magnitude of local adaptation under genotype-dependent dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Bolnick, Daniel I; Otto, Sarah P

    2013-01-01

    Dispersal moves individuals from patches where their immediate ancestors were successful to sites where their genotypes are untested. As a result, dispersal generally reduces fitness, a phenomenon known as “migration load.” The strength of migration load depends on the pattern of dispersal and can be dramatically lessened or reversed when individuals move preferentially toward patches conferring higher fitness. Evolutionary ecologists have long modeled nonrandom dispersal, focusing primarily on its effects on population density over space, the maintenance of genetic variation, and reproductive isolation. Here, we build upon previous work by calculating how the extent of local adaptation and the migration load are affected when individuals differ in their dispersal rate in a genotype-dependent manner that alters their match to their environment. Examining a one-locus, two-patch model, we show that local adaptation occurs through a combination of natural selection and adaptive dispersal. For a substantial portion of parameter space, adaptive dispersal can be the predominant force generating local adaptation. Furthermore, genetic load may be largely averted with adaptive dispersal whenever individuals move before selective deaths occur. Thus, to understand the mechanisms driving local adaptation, biologists must account for the extent and nature of nonrandom, genotype-dependent dispersal, and the potential for adaptation via spatial sorting of genotypes. PMID:24363900

  12. Association between low-activity serotonin transporter genotype and heroin dependence: behavioral and personality correlates.

    PubMed

    Gerra, G; Garofano, L; Santoro, G; Bosari, S; Pellegrini, C; Zaimovic, A; Moi, G; Bussandri, M; Moi, A; Brambilla, F; Donnini, C

    2004-04-01

    In previous studies, serotonin (5-HT) system disturbance was found involved in a variety of behavioral disorders, psychopathologies, and substance use disorders. A functional polymorphism in the promoter region of the human serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) was recently identified and the presence of the short (S) allele found to be associated with a lower level of expression of the gene, lower levels of 5-HT uptake, type 2 alcoholism, violence and suicidal behavior. In the present study, 101 heroin addicts (males, West European, Caucasians) and 101 healthy control subjects matched for race and gender, with no history of substance use disorder, have been genotyped. Aggressiveness levels were measured in both heroin addicts and controls utilizing Buss-Durkee-Hostility-Inventory (BDHI). Data about suicide attempt and violent criminal behavior in subject history have been collected. The short-short (SS) genotype frequency was significantly higher among heroin dependent individuals compared with control subjects (P = 0.025). The odds ratio for the SS genotype versus the long-long (LL) genotype frequency was 0.69, 95% Cl (0.49-0.97), when heroin addicts were compared with healthy controls. The SS genotype frequency was significantly higher among violent heroin dependent individuals compared with addicted individuals without aggressive behavior (P = 0.02). BDHI mean total scores and suspiciousness and negativism subscales scores were significantly higher in SS individuals, in comparison with LL subjects, among heroin addicts. No association was found between SS genotype and suicide history. Our data suggest that a decreased expression of the gene encoding the 5-HTT transporter, due to "S" promoter polymorphism, may be associated with an increased risk for substance use disorders, particularly in the subjects with more consistent aggressiveness and impulsiveness.

  13. Specific Gene Expression Responses to Parasite Genotypes Reveal Redundancy of Innate Immunity in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Haase, David; Rieger, Jennifer K.; Witten, Anika; Stoll, Monika; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Kalbe, Martin; Reusch, Thorsten B. H.

    2014-01-01

    Vertebrate innate immunity is the first line of defense against an invading pathogen and has long been assumed to be largely unspecific with respect to parasite/pathogen species. However, recent phenotypic evidence suggests that immunogenetic variation, i.e. allelic variability in genes associated with the immune system, results in host-parasite genotype-by-genotype interactions and thus specific innate immune responses. Immunogenetic variation is common in all vertebrate taxa and this reflects an effective immunological function in complex environments. However, the underlying variability in host gene expression patterns as response of innate immunity to within-species genetic diversity of macroparasites in vertebrates is unknown. We hypothesized that intra-specific variation among parasite genotypes must be reflected in host gene expression patterns. Here we used high-throughput RNA-sequencing to examine the effect of parasite genotypes on gene expression patterns of a vertebrate host, the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). By infecting naïve fish with distinct trematode genotypes of the species Diplostomum pseudospathaceum we show that gene activity of innate immunity in three-spined sticklebacks depended on the identity of an infecting macroparasite genotype. In addition to a suite of genes indicative for a general response against the trematode we also find parasite-strain specific gene expression, in particular in the complement system genes, despite similar infection rates of single clone treatments. The observed discrepancy between infection rates and gene expression indicates the presence of alternative pathways which execute similar functions. This suggests that the innate immune system can induce redundant responses specific to parasite genotypes. PMID:25254967

  14. Comparative analysis of gene expression in response to cold stress in diverse rice genotypes.

    PubMed

    Moraes de Freitas, Gabriela Peres; Basu, Supratim; Ramegowda, Venkategowda; Braga, Eugenia Bolacel; Pereira, Andy

    2016-02-26

    Cold stress is a major factor affecting rice (Oryza sativa) growth and productivity, limiting its distribution worldwide. Rice production is affected primarily due to its vulnerability to cold stress at seedling stage, as well as reproductive stage leading to spikelet sterility. We report here the analysis of 21 diverse rice genotypes from the USDA mini-core collection for cold tolerance and categorized their tolerance levels on the basis of reduction in growth measured by root and shoot length. The screening identified 12 cold tolerant genotypes from which six tolerant genotypes were characterized at the vegetative stage for cold tolerance and gas-exchange parameters. Two tolerant and two sensitive genotypes were used further for gene expression analysis. Lipid Transfer Protein (LTP) genes showed a clear difference in expression between cold tolerant and sensitive genotypes suggesting that they are good candidates for engineering cold tolerance in rice. Nipponbare was identified as a cold tolerant genotype with stress tolerance mechanism potentially operating via both ABA dependent and independent pathways.

  15. Nitrogen modulation of Medicago truncatula resistance to Aphanomyces euteiches depends on plant genotype.

    PubMed

    Thalineau, Elise; Fournier, Carine; Gravot, Antoine; Wendehenne, David; Jeandroz, Sylvain; Truong, Hoai-Nam

    2017-03-15

    Nitrogen (N) availability can impact plant resistance to pathogens by regulating plant immunity. To better understand the links between N nutrition and plant defence, we analysed the impact of N availability on Medicago truncatula resistance to the root pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches. This oomycete is considered as the most limiting factor for legume production. Ten plant genotypes were tested in vitro for their resistance to A. euteiches in either complete or N-deficient medium. N-deficiency led to enhanced or reduced susceptibility depending on plant genotype. Focusing on four genotypes displaying contrasted responses we determined the impact of N-deficiency on plant growth and shoot N concentration and performed expression analyses on N- and defence-related genes as well as quantification of soluble phenolics and of root contents in different amino-acids. Our analyses suggest that N modulation of plant resistance is not linked to plant response to N deprivation nor to mechanisms previously identified to be involved in plant resistance. Furthermore our studies highlight a role of glutamine in mediating susceptibility to A. euteiches in M. truncatula. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Frequency-dependent selection for rare genotypes promotes genetic diversity of a tropical palm.

    PubMed

    Browne, Luke; Karubian, Jordan

    2016-12-01

    Negative frequency-dependent selection among species is a key driver of community diversity in natural systems, but the degree to which negative frequency-dependent selection shapes patterns of survival and genetic diversity within species is poorly understood. In a 5-year field experiment, we show that seedlings of a tropical palm with rare genotypes had a pronounced survival advantage over seedlings with common genotypes, with effect sizes comparable to that of light availability. This 'rare genotype advantage' led to an increase in population-wide genetic diversity among seedlings compared to null expectations, as predicted by negative frequency-dependent selection, and increased reproductive success in adult trees with rare genotypes. These results suggest that within-species negative frequency-dependent selection of genotypes can shape genetic variation on ecologically relevant timescales in natural systems and may be a key, overlooked source of non-random mortality for tropical plants.

  17. Mechanism of the dependence of hepatitis B virus genotype G on co-infection with other genotypes for viral replication.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, T; Tanaka, Y; Watanabe, T; Iijima, S; Kani, S; Sugiyama, M; Murakami, S; Matsuura, K; Kusakabe, A; Shinkai, N; Sugauchi, F; Mizokami, M

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is classified into several genotypes. Genotype G (HBV/G) is characterised by worldwide dispersion, low intragenotypic diversity and a peculiar sequence of the precore and core region (stop codon and 36-nucleotide insertion). As a rule, HBV/G is detected in co-infection with another genotype, most frequently HBV/A2. In a previous in vivo study, viral replication of HBV/G was significantly enhanced by co-infection with HBV/A2. However, the mechanism by which co-infection with HBV/A2 enhances HBV/G replication is not fully understood. In this study, we employed 1.24-fold HBV/A2 clones that selectively expressed each viral protein and revealed that the core protein expressing construct significantly enhanced the replication of HBV/G in Huh7 cells. The introduction of the HBV/A2 core promoter or core protein or both genomic regions into the HBV/G genome showed that both the core promoter and core protein are required for efficient HBV/G replication. The effect of genotype on the interaction between foreign core protein and HBV/G showed that HBV/A2 was the strongest enhancer of HBV/G replication. Furthermore, Western blot analysis of Dane particles isolated from cultures of Huh7 cells co-transfected by HBV/G and a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter-driven HBV/A2 core protein expression construct indicated that HBV/G employed HBV/A2 core protein during particle assembly. In conclusion, HBV/G could take advantage of core proteins from other genotypes during co-infection to replicate efficiently and to effectively package HBV DNA into virions.

  18. First in Vivo Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis Transcriptomes Reveal Mechanisms of Host Exploitation, Host-Specific Gene Expression, and Expressed Genotype Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, Amy R.; DiRenzo, Graziella V.; McDonald, Caitlin A.; Lips, Karen R.; Zamudio, Kelly R.

    2016-01-01

    For generalist pathogens, host species represent distinct selective environments, providing unique challenges for resource acquisition and defense from host immunity, potentially resulting in host-dependent differences in pathogen fitness. Gene expression modulation should be advantageous, responding optimally to a given host and mitigating the costs of generalism. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), a fungal pathogen of amphibians, shows variability in pathogenicity among isolates, and within-strain virulence changes rapidly during serial passages through artificial culture. For the first time, we characterize the transcriptomic profile of Bd in vivo, using laser-capture microdissection. Comparison of Bd transcriptomes (strain JEL423) in culture and in two hosts (Atelopus zeteki and Hylomantis lemur), reveals >2000 differentially expressed genes that likely include key Bd defense and host exploitation mechanisms. Variation in Bd transcriptomes from different amphibian hosts demonstrates shifts in pathogen resource allocation. Furthermore, expressed genotype variant frequencies of Bd populations differ between culture and amphibian skin, and among host species, revealing potential mechanisms underlying rapid changes in virulence and the possibility that amphibian community composition shapes Bd evolutionary trajectories. Our results provide new insights into how changes in gene expression and infecting population genotypes can be key to the success of a generalist fungal pathogen. PMID:27856699

  19. Pollen-Stigma Adhesion in Kale Is Not Dependent on the Self-(In)Compatibility Genotype.

    PubMed Central

    Luu, D. T.; Heizmann, P.; Dumas, C.

    1997-01-01

    The adhesion of pollen on the stigmas of flowering plants is a critical step for the success of reproduction in angiosperms, long considered to present some specificity in terms of self-incompatibility. We carried out quantitative measurements of the pollen-stigma adhesion (expressed in Newtons) in kale (Brassica oleracea), using the flotation force of Archimedes exerted by dense sucrose solutions (50%, w/v) to release pollen grains fixed on the surface of stigmas. We demonstrate that pollen adhesion varies with the genotypes of the plants used as partners, but increases with time in all cases for about 30 to 60 min after pollination. There is no correlation with the self- or cross-status of the pollinations, nor with the self-compatible or -incompatible genotypes of the parents. Only late events of pollination, after the germination or arrest of the pollen tube, depend on compatibility type. Biochemical and physiological dissection of pollen-stigma adhesion points to major components of this interaction: among male components, the pollen coating, eliminated by delipidation (or modified by mutation in the case of the cer mutants of the related species Arabidopsis thaliana), plays a major role in adhesion; the genetic background of the pollen parent is also of some importance. On the female side, the developmental stage of the stigma and the protein constituents of the stigmatic pellicle are critical for pollen capture. The SLG and SLR1 proteins are not involved in the initial stages of pollen adhesion on the stigma but one or both may be involved in the later stages. PMID:12223868

  20. CYP2D6 Genotype Dependent Oxycodone Metabolism in Postoperative Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stamer, Ulrike M.; Zhang, Lan; Book, Malte; Lehmann, Lutz E.; Stuber, Frank; Musshoff, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Background The impact of polymorphic cytochrome P450 CYP2D6 enzyme on oxycodone's metabolism and clinical efficacy is currently being discussed. However, there are only spare data from postoperative settings. The hypothesis of this study is that genotype dependent CYP2D6 activity influences plasma concentrations of oxycodone and its metabolites and impacts analgesic consumption. Methods Patients received oxycodone 0.05 mg/kg before emerging from anesthesia and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for the subsequent 48 postoperative hours. Blood samples were drawn at 30, 90 and 180 minutes after the initial oxycodone dose. Plasma concentrations of oxycodone and its metabolites oxymorphone, noroxycodone and noroxymorphone were analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization. CYP2D6 genotyping was performed and 121 patients were allocated to the following genotype groups: PM (poor metabolizer: no functionally active CYP2D6 allele), HZ/IM (heterozygous subjects, intermediate metabolizers with decreased CYP2D6 activity), EM (extensive metabolizers, normal CYP2D6 activity) and UM (ultrarapid metabolizers, increased CYP2D6 activity). Primary endpoint was the genotype dependent metabolite ratio of plasma concentrations oxymorphone/oxycodone. Secondary endpoint was the genotype dependent analgesic consumption with calculation of equianalgesic doses compared to the standard non-CYP dependent opioid piritramide. Results Metabolism differed between CYP2D6 genotypes. Mean (95%-CI) oxymophone/oxycodone ratios were 0.10 (0.02/0.19), 0.13 (0.11/0.16), 0.18 (0.16/0.20) and 0.28 (0.07/0.49) in PM, HZ/IM, EM and UM, respectively (p = 0.005). Oxycodone consumption up to the 12th hour was highest in PM (p = 0.005), resulting in lowest equianalgesic doses of piritramide versus oxycodone for PM (1.6 (1.4/1.8); EM and UM 2.2 (2.1/2.3); p<0.001). Pain scores did not differ between genotypes. Conclusions In this postoperative setting, the number of

  1. Variable salinity responses of 12 alfalfa genotypes and comparative expression analyses of salt-response genes

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Devinder; Cornacchione, Monica V.; Ferreira, Jorge F. S.; Suarez, Donald L.

    2017-01-01

    Twelve alfalfa genotypes that were selected for biomass under salinity, differences in Na and Cl concentrations in shoots and K/Na ratio were evaluated in this long-term salinity experiment. The selected plants were cloned to reduce genetic variability within each genotype. Salt tolerance (ST) index of the genotypes ranged from 0.39 to 1. The most salt-tolerant genotypes SISA14-1 (G03) and AZ-90ST (G10), the top performers for biomass, exhibited the least effect on shoot number and height. SISA14-1 (G03) accumulated low Na and Cl under salinity. Most genotypes exhibited a net reduction in shoot Ca, Mg, P, Fe, and Cu, while Mn and Zn increased under salinity. Salinity reduced foliar area and stomatal conductance; while net photosynthetic rate and transpiration were not affected. Interestingly, salinity increased chlorophyll and antioxidant capacity in most genotypes; however neither parameter correlated well to ST index. Salt-tolerant genotypes showed upregulation of the SOS1, SOS2, SOS3, HKT1, AKT1, NHX1, P5CS1, HSP90.7, HSP81.2, HSP71.1, HSPC025, OTS1, SGF29 and SAL1 genes. Gene expression analyses allowed us to classify genotypes based on their ability to regulate different components of the salt tolerance mechanism. Pyramiding different components of the salt tolerance mechanism may lead to superior salt-tolerant alfalfa genotypes. PMID:28225027

  2. Variable salinity responses of 12 alfalfa genotypes and comparative expression analyses of salt-response genes.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Devinder; Cornacchione, Monica V; Ferreira, Jorge F S; Suarez, Donald L

    2017-02-22

    Twelve alfalfa genotypes that were selected for biomass under salinity, differences in Na and Cl concentrations in shoots and K/Na ratio were evaluated in this long-term salinity experiment. The selected plants were cloned to reduce genetic variability within each genotype. Salt tolerance (ST) index of the genotypes ranged from 0.39 to 1. The most salt-tolerant genotypes SISA14-1 (G03) and AZ-90ST (G10), the top performers for biomass, exhibited the least effect on shoot number and height. SISA14-1 (G03) accumulated low Na and Cl under salinity. Most genotypes exhibited a net reduction in shoot Ca, Mg, P, Fe, and Cu, while Mn and Zn increased under salinity. Salinity reduced foliar area and stomatal conductance; while net photosynthetic rate and transpiration were not affected. Interestingly, salinity increased chlorophyll and antioxidant capacity in most genotypes; however neither parameter correlated well to ST index. Salt-tolerant genotypes showed upregulation of the SOS1, SOS2, SOS3, HKT1, AKT1, NHX1, P5CS1, HSP90.7, HSP81.2, HSP71.1, HSPC025, OTS1, SGF29 and SAL1 genes. Gene expression analyses allowed us to classify genotypes based on their ability to regulate different components of the salt tolerance mechanism. Pyramiding different components of the salt tolerance mechanism may lead to superior salt-tolerant alfalfa genotypes.

  3. HPV genotyping and p16 expression in Xingu Indigenous Park, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Freitas, V G; Focchi, G R; Pereira, E R; Levi, J E; Speck, N M G; Ribalta, J C

    2016-09-16

    The association between high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes and p16 expression in indigenous women from the Xingu Indigenous Park, Brazil, was unknown. This study evaluated p16 expression in women with a histological diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 3 or higher and correlated this expression with HPV genotypes to determine possible discrepancies in the expression of this marker. We evaluated 37 previously collected samples with different HPV genotypes and high-grade lesions diagnosed based on cytology, histology, and colposcopy. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed using paraffin-embedded tissue sections and the CINtec® Histology Kit. p16 protein expression was investigated by immunostaining with an anti-p16 antibody. HPV genotyping was performed by reverse hybridization. The age of the study population ranged from 22-75 years (43.81 ± 15.89 years) and parity ranged from 1-11 (5.92 ± 2.58). Thirteen different HPV genotypes were found using the INNO-LiPA kit. Single and multiple infections by HPV were found with prevalence of single infections (P = 0.029). Comparison between HPV genotype and simple or multiple infections was highly significant; it was observed more HPV 52 followed by HPV 16 in single infections (P < 0.001). p16 expression was predominantly diffuse, which was observed in 91.7% of lesions, whereas 8.3% were focal (P < 0.001). HPV 52, HPV 16 and 31 were the most prevalent HPV types in high-grade CIN in these indigenous women. Diffuse p16 expression in high-grade CIN was not influenced by the viral genotype; however, more studies are necessary to further our understanding of this restricted group.

  4. Water deficit effects on tomato quality depend on fruit developmental stage and genotype.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, Julie; Urban, Laurent; Brunel, Béatrice; Bertin, Nadia

    2016-01-15

    Many studies have advocated that water deficit (WD) may exert beneficial effects on fruit quality. However, the fruit response to WD at specific developmental stages was seldom investigated, although different mechanisms could be involved at each stage and lead to different effects on final fruit quality. In the present study, a moderate WD (-60% of water supply compared to control) was applied during each of the three major phases of fruit development, namely cell division (CD), cell expansion (CE) and maturation (MT). Two cocktail tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) genotypes were studied, one producing poor quality fruits (LA1420), and the other one producing tasty fruits (PlovdivXXIVa named Plovdiv). Contrasted responses were observed between the two genotypes. For both of them, fruit fresh mass and size were not significantly reduced by WD, whatever the developmental phase affected. Osmotic regulations were likely involved in the CD treatment for LA1420 fruits, which accumulated more sugars (both on a dry and fresh matter basis) and less acids (on a dry matter basis). In the CE treatment, other adaptive strategies involving sugar metabolism and sub-cellular compartmentation were suggested. In contrast, the composition of Plovdiv fruits changed only under the MT treatment, with less sugars, acids and carotenoids compared to control fruits (both on a dry and fresh matter basis). Total ascorbic acid (AsA) was not significantly influenced by treatments in both genotypes. On their whole, results suggest that, depending on genotypes, fruits are sweeter and less acidic under WD, but that the nutritive value related to vitamin and carotenoid contents may be lessened. The sensitivity of each developmental phase highly depends on the genotype. All phases were sensitive to WD for LA1420, but only the ripening phase for Plovdiv. Interestingly, major changes in fruit composition were observed in LA1420 which presents poor fruit quality under control conditions. This suggests

  5. Emissions of volatile organic compounds from hybrid poplar depend on CO2 concentration and genotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eller, A. S.; de Gouw, J. A.; Monson, R. K.

    2010-12-01

    Hybrid poplar is a fast-growing tree species that is likely to be an important source of biomass for the production of cellulose-based biofuels and may influence regional atmospheric chemistry through the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). We used proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry to measure VOC emissions from the leaves of four different hybrid poplar genotypes grown under ambient (400 ppm) and elevated (650 ppm) carbon dioxide concentration (CO2). The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether VOC emissions are different among genotypes and whether these emissions are likely to change as atmospheric CO2 rises. Methanol and isoprene made up over 90% of the VOC emissions and were strongly dependent on leaf age, with young leaves producing primarily methanol and switching to isoprene production as they matured. Monoterpene emissions were small, but tended to be higher in young leaves. Plants grown under elevated CO2 emitted smaller quantities of both methanol and isoprene, but the magnitude of the effect was dependent on genotype. Isoprene emission rates from mature leaves dropped from ~35 to ~28 nmol m-2 s-1 when plants were grown under elevated CO2. Emissions from individuals grown under ambient CO2 varied more based on genotype than those grown under elevated CO2, which means that we might expect smaller differences between genotypes in the future. Genotype and CO2 also affected how much carbon (C) individuals allocated to the production of VOCs. The emission rate of C from VOCs was 0.5 - 2% of the rate at which C was assimilated via net photosynthesis. The % C emitted was strongly related to genotype; clones from crosses between Populus deltoides and P. trichocarpa (T x D) allocated a greater % of their C to VOC emissions than clones from crosses of P. deltoids and P. nigra (D x N). Individuals from all four genotypes allocated a smaller % of their C to the emission of VOCs when they were grown under elevated CO2. These results

  6. KChIP2 genotype dependence of transient outward current (Ito) properties in cardiomyocytes isolated from male and female mice

    PubMed Central

    Waldschmidt, Lara; Junkereit, Vera; Bähring, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The transient outward current (Ito) in cardiomyocytes is largely mediated by Kv4 channels associated with Kv Channel Interacting Protein 2 (KChIP2). A knockout model has documented the critical role of KChIP2 in Ito expression. The present study was conducted to characterize in both sexes the dependence of Ito properties, including current magnitude, inactivation kinetics, recovery from inactivation and voltage dependence of inactivation, on the number of functional KChIP2 alleles. For this purpose we performed whole-cell patch-clamp experiments on isolated left ventricular cardiomyocytes from male and female mice which had different KChIP2 genotypes; i.e., wild-type (KChIP2+/+), heterozygous knockout (KChIP2+/-) or complete knockout of KChIP2 (KChIP2-/-). We found in both sexes a KChIP2 gene dosage effect (i.e., a proportionality between number of alleles and phenotype) on Ito magnitude, however, concerning other Ito properties, KChIP2+/- resembled KChIP2+/+. Only in the total absence of KChIP2 (KChIP2-/-) we observed a slowing of Ito kinetics, a slowing of recovery from inactivation and a negative shift of a portion of the voltage dependence of inactivation. In a minor fraction of KChIP2-/- myocytes Ito was completely lost. The distinct KChIP2 genotype dependences of Ito magnitude and inactivation kinetics, respectively, seen in cardiomyocytes were reproduced with two-electrode voltage-clamp experiments on Xenopus oocytes expressing Kv4.2 and different amounts of KChIP2. Our results corroborate the critical role of KChIP2 in controlling Ito properties. They demonstrate that the Kv4.2/KChIP2 interaction in cardiomyocytes is highly dynamic, with a clear KChIP2 gene dosage effect on Kv4 channel surface expression but not on inactivation gating. PMID:28141821

  7. Resurrected Ceriodaphnia quadrangula highlight differences between pheno- and genotypic expressions

    PubMed Central

    Reinikainen, Marko; Åhlén, Emma

    2012-01-01

    The hatching of cladoceran ephippia from a 15-cm long sediment core was investigated, and Ceriodaphnia quadrangula clones were isolated from different sediment layers. Bosmina microfossil data were also analyzed, and compared with the corresponding data from a Pb210 dated core, which allowed us to infer the age of the sediment layers. Using changes in Bosmina microfossil morphologies, we were, furthermore, able to infer the presence of different regimes of fish predation. C. quadrangula was found to hatch in layers with an inferred age of approximately a century. Newly hatched individuals had smaller eye-size in sediment layers corresponding to high predation by young-of-the-year perch. Newly hatched individuals also generally had a marked neck-spine. In contrast, morphological characters of C. quadrangula clones reared in the laboratory over several generations showed no variation in relation to predation regime, indicating the absence of fixed genotype level changes. Furthermore, the laboratory grown clones only rarely produced a neck-spine. The results suggest phenotypic variation in response to the regime under which ephippia were produced. PMID:23301166

  8. Environmental dependency of amphibian–ranavirus genotypic interactions: evolutionary perspectives on infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Echaubard, Pierre; Leduc, Joel; Pauli, Bruce; Chinchar, V Gregory; Robert, Jacques; Lesbarrères, David

    2014-01-01

    The context-dependent investigations of host–pathogen genotypic interactions, where environmental factors are explicitly incorporated, allow the assessment of both coevolutionary history and contemporary ecological influences. Such a functional explanatory framework is particularly valuable for describing mortality trends and identifying drivers of disease risk more accurately. Using two common North American frog species (Lithobates pipiens and Lithobates sylvaticus) and three strains of frog virus 3 (FV3) at different temperatures, we conducted a laboratory experiment to investigate the influence of host species/genotype, ranavirus strains, temperature, and their interactions, in determining mortality and infection patterns. Our results revealed variability in host susceptibility and strain infectivity along with significant host–strain interactions, indicating that the outcome of an infection is dependent on the specific combination of host and virus genotypes. Moreover, we observed a strong influence of temperature on infection and mortality probabilities, revealing the potential for genotype–genotype–environment interactions to be responsible for unexpected mortality in this system. Our study thus suggests that amphibian hosts and ranavirus strains genetic characteristics should be considered in order to understand infection outcomes and that the investigation of coevolutionary mechanisms within a context-dependent framework provides a tool for the comprehensive understanding of disease dynamics. PMID:25469155

  9. Expression Quantitative Trait Loci Analysis Identifies Associations Between Genotype and Gene Expression in Human Intestine

    PubMed Central

    KABAKCHIEV, BOYKO; SILVERBERG, MARK S.

    2013-01-01

    . CONCLUSIONS eQTL analysis of intestinal tissue supports findings that some eQTL remain stable across cell types, whereas others are specific to the sampled location. Our findings confirm and expand the number of known genotypes associated with expression and could help elucidate mechanisms of intestinal disease. PMID:23474282

  10. Nitrogen-induced changes in morphological development and bacterial susceptibility of belgian endive (Cichorium intybus L.) are genotype-dependent

    PubMed

    Richard-Molard; Wuilleme; Scheel; Gresshoff; Morot-Gaudry; Limami

    1999-10-01

    Nitrogen is known to modulate plant development and resistance to pathogens. Four selected lines (Alg, NS1, NR1 and NR2) of chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) were grown on low (0.6 mM) and high (3 mM) NO(-)(3) nutrition in order to study the effect of N on the expression of three traits, namely, shoot/root ratio, chicon morphology and resistance to soft rot caused by Erwinia sp. For all genotypes, increasing N supply led to a higher shoot/root ratio, resulting from an increased shoot biomass but with no effect on root growth. In contrast, the effect of N on chicon morphology and resistance to bacteria was genotype-dependent and we distinguished two groups of lines according to their phenotypic characteristics. In the group consisting of NR1 and NR2, increasing NO(-)(3) supply during the vegetative phase made the chicon morphology switch from an opened to a closed type while resistance to bacteria was not affected by N supply. In the NS1 and Alg group, the effect of N on chicon morphology was the opposite to that observed in the NR1-NR2 group while NS1 and Alg exhibited a partial resistance to Erwinia sp. , only expressing soft-rot disease when the N supply reached 3 mM. Characterization by DNA amplification fingerprinting (DAF) allowed the generation of 110 polymorphic bands and confirmed that the lines NR1 and NR2, on the one hand, and NS1 and Alg, on the other hand, belong to two distinct genetic groups. The DAF results indicate that chicon morphology and partial resistance to Erwinia sp. are complex traits which would be amenable to quantitative trait loci analysis. The split growth phase of chicory means that any changes in chicon related to N supply during vegetative growth were mediated by a root-originating signal. No variation in root carbon content among genotypes and NO(-)(3) treatments was observed. In contrast, differences in root N content revealed the same grouping of the chicory lines, NR1 and NR2 being systematically richer in amino acids and NO(-)(3

  11. Density dependent expression of a diatom retrotransposon.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Matthew J; Schofield, Oscar; Bidle, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Retrotransposons are mobile genetic elements that encode for their own replication. Many studies have linked their expression to stress caused by environmental factors. Genome sequencing and EST libraries of the coastal diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum indicate that this organism has an active copia-like retrotransposon (Blackbeard), which is variably expressed under different culture conditions. In this study, we induce physiologic stress in P. tricornutum and measure Blackbeard expression over time. However, we find the dominant pattern of Blackbeard expression is related to cell culture density, not short-term physiologic stress. Density dependent expression of a retrotransposon in a diatom provides significant insight into the biogeography of diatom genome mutation. We suggest the shallow coastal ocean, where diatom densities are high, may be the geographic locus for generating genomic diversity in diatom lineages.

  12. Phosphoglucose isomerase genotype affects running speed and heat shock protein expression after exposure to extreme temperatures in a montane willow beetle.

    PubMed

    Rank, Nathan E; Bruce, Douglas A; McMillan, David M; Barclay, Colleen; Dahlhoff, Elizabeth P

    2007-03-01

    Eastern Sierra Nevada populations of the willow beetle Chrysomela aeneicollis commonly experience stressfully high and low environmental temperatures that may influence survival and reproduction. Allele frequencies at the enzyme locus phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) vary across a climatic latitudinal gradient in these populations, with PGI allele 1 being most common in cooler regions and PGI allele 4 in warmer ones. PGI genotypes differ in heat and cold tolerance and in expression of a 70 kDa heat shock protein. Here we examine genetic, behavioral and environmental factors affecting a performance character, running speed, for willow beetles, and assess effects of consecutive cold and heat exposure on running speed and expression of Hsp70 in the laboratory. In nature, running speed depends on air temperature and is higher for males than females. Mating beetles ran faster than single beetles, and differences among PGI genotypes in male running speed depended on the presence of females. In the laboratory, exposure to cold reduced subsequent running speed, but the amount of this reduction depended on PGI genotype and previous thermal history. Effects of exposure to heat also depended on life history stage and PGI genotype. Adults possessing allele 1 ran fastest after a single exposure to stressful temperature, whereas those possessing allele 4 ran faster after repeated exposure. Larvae possessing allele 4 ran fastest after a single stressful exposure, but running speed generally declined after a second exposure to stressful temperature. The ranking of PGI genotypes after the second exposure depended on whether a larva had been exposed to cold or heat. Effects of temperature on Hsp70 expression also varied among PGI genotypes and depended on type of exposure, especially for adults (single heat exposure, two cold exposures: PGI 1-1>1-4>4-4; other multiple extreme exposures: 4-4>1-4>1-1). There was no consistent association between alleles at other polymorphic enzyme loci

  13. The tricks of the trait: neural implementation of personality varies with genotype-dependent serotonin levels.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Tim; Heinzel, Sebastian; Notebaert, Karolien; Dresler, Thomas; Reif, Andreas; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Jakob, Peter M; Windmann, Sabine; Fallgatter, Andreas J

    2013-11-01

    Gray's Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST) has developed into one of the most prominent personality theories of the last decades. The RST postulates a Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS) modulating the reaction to stimuli indicating aversive events. A number of psychiatric disorders including depression, anxiety disorders, and psychosomatic illnesses have been associated with extreme BIS responsiveness. In recent years, neuroimaging studies have implicated the amygdala-septo-hippocampal circuit as an important neural substrate of the BIS. However, the neurogenetic basis of the regulation of this behaviorally and clinically essential system remains unclear. Investigating the effects of two functional genetic polymorphisms (tryptophan hydroxylase-2, G-703T, and serotonin transporter, serotonin transporter gene-linked polymorphic region) in 89 human participants, we find significantly different patterns of associations between BIS scores and amygdala-hippocampus connectivity during loss anticipation for genotype groups regarding both polymorphisms. Specifically, the correlation between amygdala-hippocampus connectivity and Gray's trait anxiety scores is positive in individuals homozygous for the TPH2 G-allele, while carriers of at least one T-allele show a negative association. Likewise, individuals homozygous for the 5-HTTLPR L(A) variant display a positive association while carriers of the S/L(G) allele show a trend towards a negative association. Thus, we show converging evidence of different neural implementation of the BIS depending on genotype-dependent levels of serotonin. We provide evidence suggesting that genotype-dependent serotonin levels and thus putative changes in the efficiency of serotonergic neurotransmission might not only alter brain activation levels directly, but also more fundamentally impact the neural implementation of personality traits. We outline the direct clinical implications arising from this finding and discuss the complex interplay

  14. Circadian expression of the maize catalase Cat3 gene is highly conserved among diverse maize genotypes with structurally different promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Polidoros, A N; Scandalios, J G

    1998-01-01

    The Cat3 gene of maize exhibits a transcriptionally regulated circadian rhythm. In the present study we examined the following: (1) the extent of the circadian Cat3 expression between maize genotypes of diverse origin; (2) the functional significance of a Tourist transposable element located in the Cat3 promoter of the inbred line W64A, which harbors putative regulatory elements (GATA repeat, CCAAT boxes) shown to be involved in the light induction and circadian regulation of the Arabidopsis CAB2, as well as other plant genes; and (3) aspects of the physiological role of CAT-3 in maize metabolism. Results confirm that the circadian Cat3 expression is a general phenomenon in maize. Regulation of Cat3 gene expression is not dependent on the presence of the Tourist element in the promoter of the gene nor on the presence of motifs similar to those found significant in the circadian expression of the Arabidopsis CAB2 gene. Structural diversity was revealed in the Cat3 promoters of maize genotypes of diverse origins. However, highly conserved regions with putative regulatory motifs were identified. Relevance of the conserved regions to the circadian regulation of the gene is discussed. Possible physiological roles of CAT-3 are suggested. PMID:9584112

  15. Data on IL-6 c.-174 G>C genotype and allele frequencies in patients with coronary heart disease in dependence of cardiovascular outcome.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Stefan; Schlitt, Axel; Benten, Ann-Christin; Hofmann, Britt; Schaller, Hans-Günter; Schulz, Susanne

    2016-09-01

    In this data article we present data on the distribution of alleles and genotypes of the interleukin (IL)-6 c.-174 G>C polymorphism (rs 1800795) in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) in dependence of the incidence of new cardiovascular events (combined endpoint: myocardial infarction, stroke/TIA, cardiac death, death according to stroke) within three years follow-up. Moreover, we investigated putative associations between individual expression of IL-6 genotypes and IL-6 serum level. This investigation is a subanalysis of the article entitled "The Interleukin 6 c.-174 CC genotype is a predictor for new cardiovascular events in patients with coronary heart disease within three years follow-up" (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01045070) (Reichert et al., 2016) [1].

  16. Phenotype and Genotype in a Cohort of 312 Adult Patients with Nontransfusion-Dependent Thalassemia in Northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Prayalaw, Patcharawadee; Teawtrakul, Nattiya; Jetsrisuparb, Arunee; Pongudom, Saranya; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Fucharoen, Supan

    2016-01-01

    Patients with nontransfusion-dependent thalassemia (NTDT) do not require regular blood transfusion for survival but may encounter several complications that contribute to morbidity and mortality. We report the molecular heterogeneity and hematological features of NTDT in 312 adult patients in northeast Thailand. Hemoglobin (Hb) and DNA analyses identified 177 subjects with Hb E-β-thalassemia, 1 with homozygous β0-thalassemia and 134 with Hb H, AEBart's and EEBart's diseases. For β-thalassemia, 12 different mutations including both β0- and β+-thalassemias were detected. Coinheritance of α-thalassemia as an ameliorating factor was observed in 18 of 178 cases (10.1%) with β-thalassemia. The α-globin gene triplicated haplotype (αααanti3.7) was observed in 1 case of Hb E-β0-thalassemia. The presence of the -158 (Cx2192;T) Gx03B3;-XmnI polymorphism (+/+) was found to be associated with increased Hb F expression, but its frequency in the studied subjects was low. Those with α-thalassemia included 17 with deletional and 51 nondeletional Hb H, and 63 with AEBart's and 3 with EEBart's diseases. The hematological parameters of these NTDT and genotype-phenotype relationships are presented. The diverse molecular heterogeneity of NTDT underlines the importance of complete genotyping of the patient. These results should prove useful for management planning, the prediction of clinical outcome and to improve genetic counseling for NTDT patients.

  17. Genotypic and phenotypic variation of Lewis antigen expression in geographically diverse Helicobacter pylori isolates

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Mary Ann; Zhang, William; Shah, Sunny; Sanabria-Valentín, Edgardo L.; Perez-Perez, Guillermo I.; Blaser, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is a persistent colonizer of the human gastric mucosa, which can lead to the development peptic ulcer disease and gastric adenocarcinomas. However, H. pylori can asymptomatically colonize a host for years. One factor that has been hypothesized to contribute to such persistence is the production of Lewis (Le) antigens in the lipopolysaccharide layer of the bacterial outer membrane as a form of molecular mimicry, since humans also express these antigens on their gastric mucosa. Humans and H. pylori both are polymorphic for Le expression, which is driven in H. pylori by variation at the Le synthesis loci. In this report we sought to characterize Le genotypic and phenotypic variation in geographically diverse H. pylori isolates. Materials and Methods From patients undergoing endoscopy in 29 countries, we determined Le phenotypes of 78 H. pylori strains, and performed genotyping of the galT and β-(1,3)galT loci in 113 H. pylori strains. Results Le antigen phenotyping revealed a significant (p <0.0001) association between type 1 (Lea and Leb) expression and strains of East-Asian origin. Genotyping revealed a significant correlation between strain origin and the size of the promoter region upstream of the Le synthesis gene, galT (p <0.0001). Conclusion These results indicate that the heterogeneity of human Le phenotypes are reflected in their H. pylori colonizing strains, and suggest new loci that can be studied to assess variation of Le expression. PMID:22059399

  18. Increased hepatic expression of miRNA-122 in patients infected with HCV genotype 3.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ketti G; Malta, Fernanda M; Nastri, Ana C S S; Widman, Azzo; Faria, Paola L; Santana, Rúbia A F; Alves, Venâncio A F; Carrilho, Flair J; Pinho, João R R

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects approximately 3 % of the world population. HCV targets hepatic tissue, and most infected patients develop a chronic infection. Currently, studies have demonstrated an association between HCV-RNA replication and miR-122, the most abundant microRNA in the liver. Our aim was to evaluate liver and serum expression of miR-122 in patients infected with HCV genotypes 1 and 3, and to identify possible associations between miR-122 expression and lipid profiles, HCV viral load, apolipoproteins and liver enzymes. MicroRNAs were isolated from blood and liver tissue, and miR-122 expression was quantified by real-time PCR. HCV viral load was quantified by real-time PCR and HCV genotype, and serum biomarkers were obtained from medical report. The levels of miR-122 were higher in liver than those in blood from individuals infected with HCV genotypes 1 and 3 (p < 0.0001). The tissue levels of miR-122 were higher in subjects infected with HCV genotype 3 (6.22-fold, p < 0.001). A positive correlation was observed between the blood and hepatic levels of miR-122 in patients infected with HCV genotype 1 (r = 0.302, p = 0.026); in these patients, an inverse correlation was observed between serum apolipoprotein A-II (ApoA-II) levels and the blood (r = -0.330; p = 0.014) and hepatic (r = -0.311; p = 0.020) levels of miR-122. In patients infected with HCV genotype 3, there was a positive correlation between the hepatic miR-122 and the high-density lipoprotein-HDL (r = 0.412, p = 0.036) and insulin (r = 0.478, p = 0.044). Lipid metabolism proteins and miR-122 expression levels have different relations in HCV-3- and HCV-1-infected patients.

  19. Tetraploidization events by chromosome doubling of nucellar cells are frequent in apomictic citrus and are dependent on genotype and environment

    PubMed Central

    Aleza, Pablo; Froelicher, Yann; Schwarz, Sergio; Agustí, Manuel; Hernández, María; Juárez, José; Luro, François; Morillon, Raphael; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Polyploidy is a major component of plant evolution. The citrus gene pool is essentially diploid but tetraploid plants are frequently encountered in seedlings of diploid apomictic genotypes. The main objectives of the present study were to establish the origin of these tetraploid plants and to ascertain the importance of genotypic and environmental factors on tetraploid formation. Methods Tetraploid seedlings from 30 diploid apomictic genotypes were selected by flow cytometry and genotyped with 24 single sequence repeat (SSR) markers to analyse their genetic origin. Embryo rescue was used to grow all embryos contained in polyembryonic seeds of ‘Tardivo di Ciaculli’ mandarin, followed by characterization of the plantlets obtained by flow cytometry and SSR markers to accurately establish the rate of tetraploidization events and their potential tissue location. Inter-annual variations in tetraploid seedling rates were analysed for seven genotypes. Variation in tetraploid plantlet rates was analysed between different seedlings of the same genotype (‘Carrizo’ citrange; Citrus sinensis × Poncirus trifoliata) from seeds collected in different tropical, subtropical and Mediterranean countries. Key Results Tetraploid plants were obtained for all the studied diploid genotypes, except for four mandarins. All tetraploid plants were identical to their diploid maternal line for SSR markers and were not cytochimeric. Significant genotypic and environmental effects were observed, as well as negative correlation between mean temperature during the flowering period and tetraploidy seedling rates. The higher frequencies (20 %) of tetraploids were observed for citranges cultivated in the Mediterranean area. Conclusions Tetraploidization by chromosome doubling of nucellar cells are frequent events in apomictic citrus, and are affected by both genotypic and environmental factors. Colder conditions in marginal climatic areas appear to favour the expression of

  20. Aphid and ladybird beetle abundance depend on the interaction of spatial effects and genotypic diversity.

    PubMed

    Genung, Mark A; Crutsinger, Gregory M; Bailey, Joseph K; Schweitzer, Jennifer A; Sanders, Nathan J

    2012-01-01

    Intraspecific variation and genotypic diversity of host-plants can affect the structure of associated arthropod communities and the dynamics of populations. Similarly, neighboring plants can also affect interactions between host-plants and their associated arthropods. However, most studies on the effects of host-plant genotypes have largely ignored the potential effects of neighboring host-plants on arthropod communities. In this study, we used a common garden experiment to ask how spatial effects of neighboring patches, along with genotype identity and genotypic diversity in tall goldenrod (Solidago altissima), affect the abundances of a common goldenrod herbivore (Uroleucon nigrotuberculatum) and their dominant predator (Harmonia axyridis, a ladybird beetle). Aphid abundance varied 80-fold among genotypes, while ladybird beetle abundance was not affected by genotype identity. Additionally, there were strong effects of neighboring plots: aphid abundance in a focal plot was positively correlated to aphid abundance in nearby plots, suggesting strong spatial patterning in the abundance of aphids. Neither aphid nor ladybird beetle abundance was affected by genotypic diversity. However, focal plot genotypic diversity mediated the strength of the neighborhood effect (i.e., strong effects for genotype polyculture focal plots and weak effects for genotype monoculture focal plots). Our results show that aphids were directly influenced by host-plant genotype identity while ladybird beetles responded mainly to prey abundance, and suggest that genotypic diversity can influence the effects of spatial processes on the plant-herbivore interactions.

  1. MSTN genotypes in Thoroughbred horses influence skeletal muscle gene expression and racetrack performance.

    PubMed

    McGivney, Beatrice A; Browne, John A; Fonseca, Rita G; Katz, Lisa M; Machugh, David E; Whiston, Ronan; Hill, Emmeline W

    2012-12-01

    Myostatin, encoded by the MSTN gene, is a member of the TGF-β superfamily that regulates skeletal muscle development. A MSTN SNP significantly associated with Thoroughbred horse racing phenotypes has recently been identified as well as significant reductions in Thoroughbred skeletal muscle gene expression for three transcripts 400-1500 base pairs downstream of the MSTN gene following a period of training. Together, these findings indicate that MSTN genotypes may influence MSTN gene expression. To investigate this, MSTN mRNA expression was measured in biopsies from the middle gluteal muscle from 60 untrained yearling Thoroughbreds (C/C, n = 15; C/T, n = 28; T/T, n = 17) using two independent real-time qRT-PCR assays. MSTN gene expression was also evaluated in a subset (N = 33) of these animals using samples collected after a ten-month period of training. A significant association was observed between genotype and mRNA abundance for the untrained horses (assay I, P = 0.0237; assay II, P = 0.003559), with the C/C cohort having the highest MSTN mRNA levels, the T/T group the lowest levels and the C/T group intermediate levels. Following training, there was a significant decrease in MSTN mRNA (-3.35-fold; P = 6.9 × 10(-7) ), which was most apparent for the C/C cohort (-5.88-fold, P = 0.001). These data demonstrate the tight relationship between phenotype, genotype and gene expression at the MSTN gene in Thoroughbred racehorses.

  2. Analysis of Gene Expression and Proteomic Profiles of Clonal Genotypes from Theobroma cacao Subjected to Soil Flooding

    PubMed Central

    Bertolde, Fabiana Z.; Almeida, Alex-Alan F.; Pirovani, Carlos P.

    2014-01-01

    Soil flooding causes changes in gene transcription, synthesis and degradation of proteins and cell metabolism. The main objective of this study was to understand the biological events of Theobroma cacao during soil flooding-induced stress, using the analyses of gene expression and activity of key enzymes involved in fermentation, as well as the identification of differentially expressed proteins by mass spectrometry in two contrasting genotypes for flooding tolerance (tolerant - TSA-792 and susceptible - TSH-774). Soil anoxia caused by flooding has led to changes in the expression pattern of genes associated with the biosynthesis of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in leaves and roots of the two evaluated genotypes. Significant differences were observed between the enzyme activities of the two genotypes. Leaves and roots of the TSA-792 genotype showed higher ADH activity as compared to the TSH-774 genotype, whereas the activities of PDC and LDH have varied over the 96 h of soil flooding, being higher for TSA-792 genotype, at the initial stage, and TSH-774 genotype, at the final stage. Some of the identified proteins are those typical of the anaerobic metabolism-involved in glycolysis and alcoholic fermentation-and different proteins associated with photosynthesis, protein metabolism and oxidative stress. The ability to maintain glycolysis and induce fermentation was observed to play an important role in anoxia tolerance in cacao and may also serve to distinguish tolerant and susceptible genotypes in relation to this stressor. PMID:25289700

  3. Analysis of gene expression and proteomic profiles of clonal genotypes from Theobroma cacao subjected to soil flooding.

    PubMed

    Bertolde, Fabiana Z; Almeida, Alex-Alan F; Pirovani, Carlos P

    2014-01-01

    Soil flooding causes changes in gene transcription, synthesis and degradation of proteins and cell metabolism. The main objective of this study was to understand the biological events of Theobroma cacao during soil flooding-induced stress, using the analyses of gene expression and activity of key enzymes involved in fermentation, as well as the identification of differentially expressed proteins by mass spectrometry in two contrasting genotypes for flooding tolerance (tolerant - TSA-792 and susceptible - TSH-774). Soil anoxia caused by flooding has led to changes in the expression pattern of genes associated with the biosynthesis of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in leaves and roots of the two evaluated genotypes. Significant differences were observed between the enzyme activities of the two genotypes. Leaves and roots of the TSA-792 genotype showed higher ADH activity as compared to the TSH-774 genotype, whereas the activities of PDC and LDH have varied over the 96 h of soil flooding, being higher for TSA-792 genotype, at the initial stage, and TSH-774 genotype, at the final stage. Some of the identified proteins are those typical of the anaerobic metabolism-involved in glycolysis and alcoholic fermentation-and different proteins associated with photosynthesis, protein metabolism and oxidative stress. The ability to maintain glycolysis and induce fermentation was observed to play an important role in anoxia tolerance in cacao and may also serve to distinguish tolerant and susceptible genotypes in relation to this stressor.

  4. Gene expression in diplosporous and sexual Eragrostis curvula genotypes with differing ploidy levels.

    PubMed

    Cervigni, Gerardo D L; Paniego, Norma; Pessino, Silvina; Selva, Juan P; Díaz, Marina; Spangenberg, Germán; Echenique, Viviana

    2008-05-01

    The molecular nature of gene expression during the initiation and progress of diplosporous apomixis is still unknown. Moreover, the basis of the close correlation between diplospory and polyploidy is not clarified yet. A comparative expression analysis was performed based on expressed sequence tags (ESTs) sequencing and differential display in an Eragrostis curvula diplosporous tetraploid genotype (T, 4x apo), a sexual diploid derivative obtained from tissue culture (D, 2x sex) and an artificial sexual tetraploid obtained from the diploid seeds after colchicine treatment (C, 4x sex). From a total of 8,884 unigenes sequenced from inflorescence-derived libraries, 112 (1.26%) showed significant differential expression in individuals with different ploidy level and/or variable reproductive mode. Independent comparisons between plants with different reproductive mode (same ploidy) or different ploidy level (same reproductive mode) allowed the identification of genes modulated in response to diplosporous development or polyploidization, respectively. Surprisingly, a group of genes (Group 3) were differentially expressed or silenced only in the 4x sex plant, presenting similar levels of expression in the 4x apo and the 2x sex genotypes. A group of randomly selected differential genes was validated by QR-PCR. Differential display analysis showed that in general the 4x apo and 4x sex expression profiles were more related and different from the 2x sex one, but confirmed the existence of Group 3-type genes, in both inflorescences and leaves. The possible biological significance for the occurrence of this particular group of genes is discussed. In silico mapping onto the rice genome was used to identify candidates mapping to the region syntenic to the diplospory locus.

  5. The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) pilot analysis: Multitissue gene regulation in humans

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the functional consequences of genetic variation, and how it affects complex human disease and quantitative traits, remains a critical challenge for biomedicine. We present an analysis of RNA sequencing data from 1641 samples across 43 tissues from 175 individuals, generated as part of the pilot phase of the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project. We describe the landscape of gene expression across tissues, catalog thousands of tissue-specific and shared regulatory expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) variants, describe complex network relationships, and identify signals from genome-wide association studies explained by eQTLs. These findings provide a systematic understanding of the cellular and biological consequences of human genetic variation and of the heterogeneity of such effects among a diverse set of human tissues. PMID:25954001

  6. Cold sore susceptibility gene-1 genotypes affect the expression of herpes labialis in unrelated human subjects.

    PubMed

    Kriesel, John D; Bhatia, Amiteshwar; Thomas, Alun

    2014-01-01

    Our group has recently described a gene on human chromosome 21, the Cold Sore Susceptibility Gene-1 (CSSG-1, also known as C21orf91), which may confer susceptibility to frequent cold sores in humans. We present here a genotype-phenotype analysis of CSSG-1 in a new, unrelated human population. Seven hundred fifty-eight human subjects were enrolled in a case/control Cold Sore Study. CSSG-1 genotyping, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) serotyping, demographic and phenotypic data was available from 622 analyzed subjects. Six major alleles (H1-H6) were tested for associations with each of the self-reported phenotypes. The statistical analysis was adjusted for age, sex and ethnicity. Genotype-phenotype associations were analyzed from 388 HSV1-seropositive subjects. There were significant CSSG-1 haplotype effects on annual cold sore outbreaks (P=0.006), lifetime cold sores (P=0.012) and perceived cold sore severity (P=0.012). There were relatively consistent trends toward protection from frequent and severe cold sores among those with the H3 or H5/6 haplotypes, whereas those with H1, H2, and H4 haplotypes tended to have more frequent and more severe episodes. Different alleles of the newly described gene CSSG-1 affect the expression of cold sore phenotypes in this new, unrelated human population, confirming the findings of the previous family-based study.

  7. Association of DC-SIGNR Expression in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells with DC-SIGNR Genotypes in HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Omkar; Kumar, Sanjeev; Bala, Manju; Singh, Jasbir; Hazarika, Anjali; Luthra, Kalpana

    2015-10-01

    Dendritic cell-specific intracellular adhesion molecule 3 grabbing nonintegrin related molecule (DC-SIGNR) is a C-type lectin, calcium-dependent carbohydrate-binding protein, which can act as a cell-adhesion and pathogen recognition receptor. DC-SIGNR is known to be highly expressed on liver sinusoidal cells and in the lymph nodes. However, its expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in HIV-1 infection has not been addressed. Therefore, this study determined the expression of DC-SIGNR in PBMCs of HIV-1-infected patients and healthy seronegative individuals by real-time polymerase chain reaction and assessed its correlation with CD4+ T cell counts and DC-SIGNR genotypes. A significantly higher expression of DC-SIGNR was observed in the PBMCs of HIV-1-infected patients compared with healthy seronegative individuals. Further, there was a negative correlation between DC-SIGNR expression and CD4+ T cell counts and positive with viral load, with higher DC-SIGNR expression in the PBMCs of HIV-1-infected patients with a CD4+ T cell count <200 cells/μL than those with >200 cells/μL. This is the first study to report the expression of DC-SIGNR in PBMCs of HIV-1-infected patients. A salient finding of this study is that the DC-SIGNR expression was higher in HIV-1-infected patients, and its positive correlation with viral load and negative with CD4+ T cells counts suggesting a potential role of DC-SIGNR in HIV-1 infection.

  8. Root hair length and rhizosheath mass depend on soil porosity, strength and water content in barley genotypes.

    PubMed

    Haling, Rebecca E; Brown, Lawrie K; Bengough, A Glyn; Valentine, Tracy A; White, Philip J; Young, Iain M; George, Timothy S

    2014-03-01

    Selecting plants with improved root hair growth is a key strategy for improving phosphorus-uptake efficiency in agriculture. While significant inter- and intra-specific variation is reported for root hair length, it is not known whether these phenotypic differences are exhibited under conditions that are known to affect root hair elongation. This work investigates the effect of soil strength, soil water content (SWC) and soil particle size (SPS) on the root hair length of different root hair genotypes of barley. The root hair and rhizosheath development of five root hair genotypes of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) was compared in soils with penetrometer resistances ranging from 0.03 to 4.45 MPa (dry bulk densities 1.2-1.7 g cm(-3)). A "short" (SRH) and "long" root hair (LRH) genotype was selected to further investigate whether differentiation of these genotypes was related to SWC or SPS when grown in washed graded sand. In low-strength soil (<1.43 MPa), root hairs of the LRH genotype were on average 25 % longer than that of the SRH genotype. In high-strength soil, root hair length of the LRH genotype was shorter than that in low-strength soil and did not differ from that of the SRH genotype. Root hairs were shorter in wetter soils or soils with smaller particles, and again SRH and LRH did not differ in hair length. Longer root hairs were generally, but not always, associated with larger rhizosheaths, suggesting that mucilage adhesion was also important. The root hair growth of barley was found to be highly responsive to soil properties and this impacted on the expression of phenotypic differences in root hair length. While root hairs are an important trait for phosphorus acquisition in dense soils, the results highlight the importance of selecting multiple and potentially robust root traits to improve resource acquisition in agricultural systems.

  9. The curli biogenesis genes expression level is unassociated with Enterobacter cloacae hsp60 clusters and PFGE genotypes.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Majid; Bakhshi, Bita; Najar-Peerayeh, Shahin; Behmanesh, Mehrdad

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the correlation between Enterobacter cloacae complex subspecies and clusters involved in UTI infections and specific pulsotypes, and to assess the contribution of major curli biogenesis genes (csgD, csgA) expression level to pathogenesis of clusters and genotypes. Based on the PFGE analysis, 37 different profiles were observed among which 8 profiles were common types. Real time PCR of csgD and csgA genes of 50 E. cloacae complex in relation to PFGE and hsp60 genotypes showed that all the genetic clusters are not equally involved in pathogenesis of urinary tract infections. It was elucidated in this study that isolates with common PFGE genotypes belonged to identical hsp60 clusters, and the foremost clusters (VI, III, and V) mainly comprised within PFGE common types. In our study, no significant correlation was detected between the specific hsp60 clusters or PFGE genotypes and the expression level of csgD and csgA genes (P-value > 0.05). This is the first study describing that unequivalent contribution of E. cloacae genotypes and clusters in pathogenesis of UTI, is not owing to varied curli biogenesis expression potential. The PFGE genotyping showed more discriminatory power than hsp60 genotyping for epidemiological studies and source tracking purpose.

  10. Differential expression of salt overly sensitive pathway genes determines salinity stress tolerance in Brassica genotypes.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, K; Sairam, Raj K; Bhattacharya, R C

    2012-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the role of SOS pathway in salinity stress tolerance in Brassica spp. An experiment was conducted in pot culture with 4 Brassica genotypes, i.e., CS 52 and CS 54, Varuna and T 9 subjected to two levels of salinity treatments along with a control, viz., 1.65 (S(0)), 4.50 (S(1)) and 6.76 (S(2)) dS m(-1). Salinity treatment significantly decreased relative water content (RWC), membrane stability index (MSI) and chlorophyll (Chl) content in leaves and potassium (K) content in leaf, stem and root of all the genotypes. The decline in RWC, MSI, Chl and K content was significantly less in CS 52 and CS 54 as compared to Varuna and T 9. In contrast, the sodium (Na) content increased under salinity stress in all the plant parts in all the genotypes, however, the increase was less in CS 52 and CS 54, which also showed higher K/Na ratio, and thus more favourable cellular environment. Gene expression studies revealed the existence of a more efficient salt overly sensitive pathway composed of SOS1, SOS2, SOS3 and vacuolar Na(+)/H(+) antiporter in CS 52 and CS 54 compared to Varuna and T 9. Sequence analyses of partial cDNAs showed the conserved nature of these genes, and their intra and intergenic relatedness. It is thus concluded that existence of an efficient SOS pathway, resulting in higher K/Na ratio, could be one of the major factor determining salinity stress tolerance of Brassica juncea genotypes CS 52 and CS 54.

  11. Differential expression of carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes in two contrasting tomato genotypes for lycopene content.

    PubMed

    Pandurangaiah, Shilpa; Ravishankar, Kundapura V; Shivashankar, Kodthalu S; Sadashiva, Avverahally T; Pillakenchappa, Kavitha; Narayanan, Sunil Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is one of the model plant to study carotenoid biosynthesis. In the present study, the fruit carotenoid content were quantified at different developmental stages for two contrasting genotypes, viz. IIHR-249-1 and IIHR-2866 by UPLC. Lycopene content was high in IIHR-249-1 (19.45 mg/100 g fresh weight) compared to IIHR-2866 (1.88 mg/100 g fresh weight) at the ripe stage. qPCR was performed for genes that are involved in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway to study the difference in lycopene content in fruits of both the genotypes. The expression of Phytoene synthase (PSY) increased by 36-fold and Phytoene desaturase (PDS) increased by 14-fold from immature green stage to ripe stage in IIHR-249-1. The expression of Chloroplast lycopene beta-cyclase (LCY-B) and Chromoplast lycopene beta cyclase (CYC-B) decreased gradually from the initial stage to the ripe stage in IIHR-249-1. IIHR 249-1 showed 3- and 1.8-fold decrease in gene expression for Chloroplast lycopene beta-cyclase (LCY-B) and Chromoplast lycopene beta-cyclase (CYC-B) .The F2 hybrids derived from IIHR-249-1 and IIHR-2866 were analysed at the ripe stage for lycopene content. The gene expression of Chloroplast lycopene beta-cyclase (LCY-B) and Chromoplast lycopene beta-cyclase (CYC-B) in high and low lycopene lines from F2 progenies also showed the decrease in transcript levels of both the genes in high lycopene F2 lines. We wish to suggest that the differential expression of lycopene beta-cyclases can be used in marker-assisted breeding.

  12. Analysis of the ACTN3 heterozygous genotype suggests that α-actinin-3 controls sarcomeric composition and muscle function in a dose-dependent fashion

    PubMed Central

    Hogarth, Marshall W.; Garton, Fleur C.; Houweling, Peter J.; Tukiainen, Taru; Lek, Monkol; Macarthur, Daniel G.; Seto, Jane T.; Quinlan, Kate G.R.; Yang, Nan; Head, Stewart I.; North, Kathryn N.

    2016-01-01

    A common null polymorphism (R577X) in ACTN3 causes α-actinin-3 deficiency in ∼18% of the global population. There is no associated disease phenotype, but α-actinin-3 deficiency is detrimental to sprint and power performance in both elite athletes and the general population. However, despite considerable investigation to date, the functional consequences of heterozygosity for ACTN3 are unclear. A subset of studies have shown an intermediate phenotype in 577RX individuals, suggesting dose-dependency of α-actinin-3, while others have shown no difference between 577RR and RX genotypes. Here, we investigate the effects of α-actinin-3 expression level by comparing the muscle phenotypes of Actn3+/− (HET) mice to Actn3+/+ [wild-type (WT)] and Actn3−/− [knockout (KO)] littermates. We show reduction in α-actinin-3 mRNA and protein in HET muscle compared with WT, which is associated with dose-dependent up-regulation of α-actinin-2, z-band alternatively spliced PDZ-motif and myotilin at the Z-line, and an incremental shift towards oxidative metabolism. While there is no difference in force generation, HET mice have an intermediate endurance capacity compared with WT and KO. The R577X polymorphism is associated with changes in ACTN3 expression consistent with an additive model in the human genotype-tissue expression cohort, but does not influence any other muscle transcripts, including ACTN2. Overall, ACTN3 influences sarcomeric composition in a dose-dependent fashion in mouse skeletal muscle, which translates directly to function. Variance in fibre type between biopsies likely masks this phenomenon in human skeletal muscle, but we suggest that an additive model is the most appropriate for use in testing ACTN3 genotype associations. PMID:26681802

  13. Analysis of the ACTN3 heterozygous genotype suggests that α-actinin-3 controls sarcomeric composition and muscle function in a dose-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Hogarth, Marshall W; Garton, Fleur C; Houweling, Peter J; Tukiainen, Taru; Lek, Monkol; Macarthur, Daniel G; Seto, Jane T; Quinlan, Kate G R; Yang, Nan; Head, Stewart I; North, Kathryn N

    2016-03-01

    A common null polymorphism (R577X) in ACTN3 causes α-actinin-3 deficiency in ∼ 18% of the global population. There is no associated disease phenotype, but α-actinin-3 deficiency is detrimental to sprint and power performance in both elite athletes and the general population. However, despite considerable investigation to date, the functional consequences of heterozygosity for ACTN3 are unclear. A subset of studies have shown an intermediate phenotype in 577RX individuals, suggesting dose-dependency of α-actinin-3, while others have shown no difference between 577RR and RX genotypes. Here, we investigate the effects of α-actinin-3 expression level by comparing the muscle phenotypes of Actn3(+/-) (HET) mice to Actn3(+/+) [wild-type (WT)] and Actn3(-/-) [knockout (KO)] littermates. We show reduction in α-actinin-3 mRNA and protein in HET muscle compared with WT, which is associated with dose-dependent up-regulation of α-actinin-2, z-band alternatively spliced PDZ-motif and myotilin at the Z-line, and an incremental shift towards oxidative metabolism. While there is no difference in force generation, HET mice have an intermediate endurance capacity compared with WT and KO. The R577X polymorphism is associated with changes in ACTN3 expression consistent with an additive model in the human genotype-tissue expression cohort, but does not influence any other muscle transcripts, including ACTN2. Overall, ACTN3 influences sarcomeric composition in a dose-dependent fashion in mouse skeletal muscle, which translates directly to function. Variance in fibre type between biopsies likely masks this phenomenon in human skeletal muscle, but we suggest that an additive model is the most appropriate for use in testing ACTN3 genotype associations.

  14. Effects of hepatitis B virus precore and basal core promoter mutations on the expression of viral antigens: genotype B vs C.

    PubMed

    Liu, C-J; Cheng, H-R; Chen, C-L; Chen, T-C; Tseng, T-C; Wang, Z-L; Chen, P-J; Liu, C-H; Chen, D-S; Kao, J-H

    2011-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes/mutants are known to affect natural outcomes. The virologic differences among HBV genotype, precore and basal core promoter (BCP) mutations were investigated. HBV strains were isolated from 18 hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-positive patients (nine genotype B and nine genotype C). All had precore and BCP wild-type sequences. After cloning of full-length HBV genome, the effects of viral genotype, precore and BCP mutations singly or additively on the expression of viral DNA and antigens were investigated by mutagenesis and transfection assays in Huh7 cells. Significant findings included the following: (i) expression of intracellular core protein increased when precore or BCP mutation was introduced in genotype C strains; (ii) expression of intracellular surface protein was lower in genotype C precore wild-type strain compared with genotype B; (iii) precore mutation was associated with a lower extracellular expression level of HBV DNA; (iv) secretion of hepatitis B surface antigen in genotype C was lower than that in genotype B; and (v) secretion of HBeAg in genotype B was lower than that in genotype C. No additive effect was observed by combining precore and BCP mutations. Hence, HBV genotype and precore/BCP mutations correlate with intrahepatic expression of viral antigens in vitro.

  15. Altitude-dependent Bartonella quintana genotype C in head lice, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Angelakis, Emmanouil; Diatta, Georges; Abdissa, Alemseged; Trape, Jean-François; Mediannikov, Oleg; Richet, Hervé; Raoult, Didier

    2011-12-01

    To determine the presence of Bartonella quintana in head and body lice from persons in different locations in Ethiopia, we used molecular methods. B. quintana was found in 19 (7%) genotype C head lice and in 76 (18%) genotype A body lice. B. quintana in head lice was positively linked to altitude (p = 0.014).

  16. Gene expression profiling in response to ultraviolet radiation in maize genotypes with varying flavonoid content.

    PubMed

    Casati, Paula; Walbot, Virginia

    2003-08-01

    Microarray hybridization was used to assess acclimation responses to four UV regimes by near isogenic maize (Zea mays) lines varying in flavonoid content. We found that 355 of the 2,500 cDNAs tested were regulated by UV radiation in at least one genotype. Among these, 232 transcripts are assigned putative functions, whereas 123 encode unknown proteins. UV-B increased expression of stress response and ribosomal protein genes, whereas photosynthesis-associated genes were down-regulated; lines lacking UV-absorbing pigments had more dramatic responses than did lines with these pigments, confirming the shielding role of these compounds. Sunlight filtered to remove UV-B or UV-B plus UV-A resulted in significant expression changes in many genes not previously associated with UV responses. Some pathways regulated by UV radiation are shared with defense, salt, and oxidative stresses; however, UV-B radiation can activate additional pathways not shared with other stresses.

  17. Bacterial histo-blood group antigens contributing to genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with a microfiltration membrane.

    PubMed

    Amarasiri, Mohan; Hashiba, Satoshi; Miura, Takayuki; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Nakagomi, Osamu; Ishii, Satoshi; Okabe, Satoshi; Sano, Daisuke

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrated the genotype-dependent removal of human norovirus particles with a microfiltration (MF) membrane in the presence of bacteria bearing histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs). Three genotypes (GII.3, GII.4, and GII.6) of norovirus-like particles (NoVLPs) were mixed with three bacterial strains (Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, Escherichia coli O86:K61:B7, and Staphylococcus epidermidis), respectively, and the mixture was filtered with an MF membrane having a nominal pore size of 0.45 μm. All NoVLP genotypes were rejected by the MF membrane in the presence of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, which excreted HBGAs as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). This MF membrane removal of NoVLPs was not significant when EPS was removed from cells of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6. GII.6 NoVLP was not rejected with the MF membrane in the presence of E. coli O86:K61:B7, but the removal of EPS of E. coli O86:K61:B7 increased the removal efficiency due to the interaction of NoVLPs with the exposed B-antigen in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of E. coli O86:K61:B7. No MF membrane removal of all three genotypes was observed when S. epidermidis, an HBGA-negative strain, was mixed with NoVLPs. These results demonstrate that the location of HBGAs on bacterial cells is an important factor in determining the genotype-dependent removal efficiency of norovirus particles with the MF membrane. The presence of HBGAs in mixed liquor suspended solids from a membrane bioreactor (MBR) pilot plant was confirmed by immune-transmission electron microscopy, which implies that bacterial HBGAs can contribute to the genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with MBR using MF membrane.

  18. [Genotype-dependent mice behavior in cognitive tasks. Effect of noopept].

    PubMed

    Bel'nik, A P; Ostrovskaia, R U; Poletaeva, I I

    2007-01-01

    The interstrain differences in performance of C57BL/6J, BALB/c and DBA/2J male mice in two cognitive tasks were found. Mice C57BL/6J showed good learning ability and preservation of memory traces tested 10 days after performance in a simplified version of Morris water maze. Mice BALB/c learned the task but, virtually, no long-term memory traces were revealed, whereas DBA/2J demonstrated poor learning. The effect of nootropic drug Noopept (GVS-111, N-phenil-acetyl-L-prolylglycin ethyl ether) was shown to be genotype-dependent. Its administration (0.5 mg/kg i.p., 15 min before learning) improved the long-term memory in Morris test in BALB/c mice but failed to produce any improvement in C57BL/6J. The ability of mice for extrapolation of the direction of stimulus movement differently changed after Noopept injections: the proportion of correct task solutions increased in C57BL/6J and BALB/c mice, whereas the performance of DBA/2J did not change.

  19. Genome-wide gene expression regulation as a function of genotype and age in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Viñuela, Ana; Snoek, L. Basten; Riksen, Joost A.G.; Kammenga, Jan E.

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression becomes more variable with age, and it is widely assumed that this is due to a decrease in expression regulation. But currently there is no understanding how gene expression regulatory patterns progress with age. Here we explored genome-wide gene expression variation and regulatory loci (eQTL) in a population of developing and aging C. elegans recombinant inbred worms. We found almost 900 genes with an eQTL, of which almost half were found to have a genotype-by-age effect (gxaeQTL). The total number of eQTL decreased with age, whereas the variation in expression increased. In developing worms, the number of genes with increased expression variation (1282) was similar to the ones with decreased expression variation (1328). In aging worms, the number of genes with increased variation (1772) was nearly five times higher than the number of genes with a decreased expression variation (373). The number of cis-acting eQTL in juveniles decreased by almost 50% in old worms, whereas the number of trans-acting loci decreased by ∼27%, indicating that cis-regulation becomes relatively less frequent than trans-regulation in aging worms. Of the 373 genes with decreased expression level variation in aging worms, ∼39% had an eQTL compared with ∼14% in developing worms. gxaeQTL were found for ∼21% of these genes in aging worms compared with only ∼6% in developing worms. We highlight three examples of linkages: in young worms (pgp-6), in old worms (daf-16), and throughout life (lips-16). Our findings demonstrate that eQTL patterns are strongly affected by age, and suggest that gene network integrity declines with age. PMID:20488933

  20. T3SS-dependent differential modulations of the jasmonic acid pathway in susceptible and resistant genotypes of Malus spp. challenged with Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Dugé De Bernonville, Thomas; Gaucher, Matthieu; Flors, Victor; Gaillard, Sylvain; Paulin, Jean-Pierre; Dat, James F; Brisset, Marie-Noëlle

    2012-06-01

    Fire blight is a bacterial disease of Maloideae caused by Erwinia amylovora (Ea). This necrogenic enterobacterium uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject type III effectors into the plant cells to cause disease on its susceptible hosts, including economically important crops like apple and pear. The expressions of marker genes of the salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) defense regulation pathways were monitored by RT-qPCR in leaves of two apple genotypes, one susceptible and one resistant, challenged with a wild type strain, a T3SS-deficient strain or water. The transcriptional data taken together with hormone level measurements indicated that the SA pathway was similarly induced in both apple genotypes during infection by Ea. On the contrary, the data clearly showed a strong T3SS-dependent down-regulation of the JA pathway in leaves of the susceptible genotype but not in those of the resistant one. Accordingly, methyl-jasmonate treated susceptible plants displayed an increased resistance to Ea. Bacterial mutant analysis indicated that JA manipulation by Ea mainly relies on the type III effector DspA/E. Taken together, our data suggest that the T3SS-dependent down-regulation of the JA pathway is a critical step in the infection process of Malus spp. by Ea.

  1. RBCS1 expression in coffee: Coffea orthologs, Coffea arabica homeologs, and expression variability between genotypes and under drought stress

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In higher plants, the inhibition of photosynthetic capacity under drought is attributable to stomatal and non-stomatal (i.e., photochemical and biochemical) effects. In particular, a disruption of photosynthetic metabolism and Rubisco regulation can be observed. Several studies reported reduced expression of the RBCS genes, which encode the Rubisco small subunit, under water stress. Results Expression of the RBCS1 gene was analysed in the allopolyploid context of C. arabica, which originates from a natural cross between the C. canephora and C. eugenioides species. Our study revealed the existence of two homeologous RBCS1 genes in C. arabica: one carried by the C. canephora sub-genome (called CaCc) and the other carried by the C. eugenioides sub-genome (called CaCe). Using specific primer pairs for each homeolog, expression studies revealed that CaCe was expressed in C. eugenioides and C. arabica but was undetectable in C. canephora. On the other hand, CaCc was expressed in C. canephora but almost completely silenced in non-introgressed ("pure") genotypes of C. arabica. However, enhanced CaCc expression was observed in most C. arabica cultivars with introgressed C. canephora genome. In addition, total RBCS1 expression was higher for C. arabica cultivars that had recently introgressed C. canephora genome than for "pure" cultivars. For both species, water stress led to an important decrease in the abundance of RBCS1 transcripts. This was observed for plants grown in either greenhouse or field conditions under severe or moderate drought. However, this reduction of RBCS1 gene expression was not accompanied by a decrease in the corresponding protein in the leaves of C. canephora subjected to water withdrawal. In that case, the amount of RBCS1 was even higher under drought than under unstressed (irrigated) conditions, which suggests great stability of RBCS1 under adverse water conditions. On the other hand, for C. arabica, high nocturnal expression of RBCS1

  2. Integrated Microfluidic Devices for Automated Microarray-Based Gene Expression and Genotyping Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Robin H.; Lodes, Mike; Fuji, H. Sho; Danley, David; McShea, Andrew

    Microarray assays typically involve multistage sample processing and fluidic handling, which are generally labor-intensive and time-consuming. Automation of these processes would improve robustness, reduce run-to-run and operator-to-operator variation, and reduce costs. In this chapter, a fully integrated and self-contained microfluidic biochip device that has been developed to automate the fluidic handling steps for microarray-based gene expression or genotyping analysis is presented. The device consists of a semiconductor-based CustomArray® chip with 12,000 features and a microfluidic cartridge. The CustomArray was manufactured using a semiconductor-based in situ synthesis technology. The micro-fluidic cartridge consists of microfluidic pumps, mixers, valves, fluid channels, and reagent storage chambers. Microarray hybridization and subsequent fluidic handling and reactions (including a number of washing and labeling steps) were performed in this fully automated and miniature device before fluorescent image scanning of the microarray chip. Electrochemical micropumps were integrated in the cartridge to provide pumping of liquid solutions. A micromixing technique based on gas bubbling generated by electrochemical micropumps was developed. Low-cost check valves were implemented in the cartridge to prevent cross-talk of the stored reagents. Gene expression study of the human leukemia cell line (K562) and genotyping detection and sequencing of influenza A subtypes have been demonstrated using this integrated biochip platform. For gene expression assays, the microfluidic CustomArray device detected sample RNAs with a concentration as low as 0.375 pM. Detection was quantitative over more than three orders of magnitude. Experiment also showed that chip-to-chip variability was low indicating that the integrated microfluidic devices eliminate manual fluidic handling steps that can be a significant source of variability in genomic analysis. The genotyping results showed

  3. Interactive Effects of Elevated [CO2] and Water Stress on Physiological Traits and Gene Expression during Vegetative Growth in Four Durum Wheat Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Susan; Vicente, Rubén; Amador, Amaya; Araus, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of elevated [CO2] and water stress will have an effect on the adaptation of durum wheat to future climate scenarios. For the Mediterranean basin these scenarios include the rising occurrence of water stress during the first part of the crop cycle. In this study, we evaluated the interactive effects of elevated [CO2] and moderate to severe water stress during the first part of the growth cycle on physiological traits and gene expression in four modern durum wheat genotypes. Physiological data showed that elevated [CO2] promoted plant growth but reduced N content. This was related to a down-regulation of Rubisco and N assimilation genes and up-regulation of genes that take part in C-N remobilization, which might suggest a higher N efficiency. Water restriction limited the stimulation of plant biomass under elevated [CO2], especially at severe water stress, while stomatal conductance and carbon isotope signature revealed a water saving strategy. Transcript profiles under water stress suggested an inhibition of primary C fixation and N assimilation. Nevertheless, the interactive effects of elevated [CO2] and water stress depended on the genotype and the severity of the water stress, especially for the expression of drought stress-responsive genes such as dehydrins, catalase, and superoxide dismutase. The network analysis of physiological traits and transcript levels showed coordinated shifts between both categories of parameters and between C and N metabolism at the transcript level, indicating potential genes and traits that could be used as markers for early vigor in durum wheat under future climate change scenarios. Overall the results showed that greater plant growth was linked to an increase in N content and expression of N metabolism-related genes and down-regulation of genes related to the antioxidant system. The combination of elevated [CO2] and severe water stress was highly dependent on the genotypic variability, suggesting specific genotypic

  4. Comparative Transcriptional Profiling of Two Wheat Genotypes, with Contrasting Levels of Minerals in Grains, Shows Expression Differences during Grain Filling

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sudhir P.; Jeet, Raja; Kumar, Jitendra; Shukla, Vishnu; Srivastava, Rakesh; Mantri, Shrikant S.; Tuli, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Wheat is one of the most important cereal crops in the world. To identify the candidate genes for mineral accumulation, it is important to examine differential transcriptome between wheat genotypes, with contrasting levels of minerals in grains. A transcriptional comparison of developing grains was carried out between two wheat genotypes- Triticum aestivum Cv. WL711 (low grain mineral), and T. aestivum L. IITR26 (high grain mineral), using Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array. The study identified a total of 580 probe sets as differentially expressed (with log2 fold change of ≥2 at p≤0.01) between the two genotypes, during grain filling. Transcripts with significant differences in induction or repression between the two genotypes included genes related to metal homeostasis, metal tolerance, lignin and flavonoid biosynthesis, amino acid and protein transport, vacuolar-sorting receptor, aquaporins, and stress responses. Meta-analysis revealed spatial and temporal signatures of a majority of the differentially regulated transcripts. PMID:25364903

  5. Distinct genotype-dependent differences in transcriptome responses in humans exposed to environmental carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Espín-Pérez, Almudena; de Kok, Theo M C M; Jennen, Danyel G J; Hendrickx, Diana M; De Coster, Sam; Schoeters, Greet; Baeyens, Willy; van Larebeke, Nicolas; Kleinjans, Jos C S

    2015-10-01

    Considering genetic variability in population studies focusing on the health risk assessment of exposure to environmental carcinogens may provide improved insights in individual environmental cancer risks. Therefore, the current study aims to determine the impact of genetic polymorphisms on the relationship between exposure and gene expression, by identifying exposure-dependently coregulated genes and genetic pathways. Statistical analysis based on mixed models, was performed to relate gene expression data from 134 subjects to exposure measurements of multiple carcinogens, 28 polymorphisms, age, sex and biomarkers of cancer risk. We evaluated the combined exposure to cadmium, lead, polychlorinated biphenyls, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene, hexachlorobenzene and 1-OH-pyrene, and the outcome was biologically interpreted by using ConsensusPathDB, thereby focusing on carcinogenesis-related pathways. We found generic and carcinogenesis-related pathways deregulated in both sexes, but males showed a stronger transcriptome response than females. We highlighted NOTCH1, CBR1, ITGB3, ITGA4, ADI1, HES1, NCOA2 and SMARCA2 in view of their direct link with cancer development. Two of these, NOTCH1 and ITGB3, are also known to respond to PCBs and cadmium chloride exposure in rodents and to lead in humans. Subjects carrying a high number of risk alleles appear more responsive to combined carcinogen exposure with respect to the induced expression of some of these cancer-related genes, which may be indicative of increased cancer risk as a consequence of environmental factors.

  6. Capsule Expression and Genotypic Differences among Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Patients with Chronic or Acute Osteomyelitis▿

    PubMed Central

    Lattar, Santiago M.; Tuchscherr, Lorena P. N.; Caccuri, Roberto L.; Centrón, Daniela; Becker, Karsten; Alonso, Claudio A.; Barberis, Claudia; Miranda, Graciela; Buzzola, Fernanda R.; von Eiff, Christof; Sordelli, Daniel O.

    2009-01-01

    There is ample evidence that Staphylococcus aureus capsular polysaccharide (CP) promotes virulence. Loss of capsule expression, however, may lead to S. aureus persistence in a chronically infected host. This study was conducted to determine the relative prevalence of nonencapsulated S. aureus in patients with chronic and acute osteomyelitis. Only 76/118 (64%) S. aureus isolates from patients with osteomyelitis expressed CP, whereas all 50 isolates from blood cultures of patients with infections other than osteoarticular infections expressed CP (P = 0.0001). A significantly higher prevalence of nonencapsulated S. aureus was found in patients with chronic osteomyelitis (53%) than in those with acute osteomyelitis (21%) (P = 0.0046). S. aureus isolates obtained from multiple specimens from five of six patients with chronic osteomyelitis exhibited phenotypic (expression of CP, α-hemolysin, β-hemolysin, slime, and the small-colony variant phenotype) and/or genotypic (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and spa typing) differences. Nonencapsulated S. aureus was recovered from at least one specimen from each chronic osteomyelitis patient. Fourteen isolates obtained from two patients with acute osteomyelitis were indistinguishable from each other within each group, and all produced CP5. In conclusion, we demonstrated that nonencapsulated S. aureus is more frequently isolated from patients with chronic osteomyelitis than from those with acute osteomyelitis, suggesting that loss of CP expression may be advantageous to S. aureus during chronic infection. Our findings on multiple S. aureus isolates from individual patients allow us to suggest that selection of nonencapsulated S. aureus is likely to have occurred in the patient during long-term bone infection. PMID:19273557

  7. Differentially expressed genes between drought-tolerant and drought-sensitive barley genotypes in response to drought stress during the reproductive stage

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Peiguo; Baum, Michael; Grando, Stefania; Ceccarelli, Salvatore; Bai, Guihua; Li, Ronghua; von Korff, Maria; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Graner, Andreas; Valkoun, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Drought tolerance is a key trait for increasing and stabilizing barley productivity in dry areas worldwide. Identification of the genes responsible for drought tolerance in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) will facilitate understanding of the molecular mechanisms of drought tolerance, and also facilitate the genetic improvement of barley through marker-assisted selection or gene transformation. To monitor the changes in gene expression at the transcriptional level in barley leaves during the reproductive stage under drought conditions, the 22K Affymetrix Barley 1 microarray was used to screen two drought-tolerant barley genotypes, Martin and Hordeum spontaneum 41-1 (HS41-1), and one drought-sensitive genotype Moroc9-75. Seventeen genes were expressed exclusively in the two drought-tolerant genotypes under drought stress, and their encoded proteins may play significant roles in enhancing drought tolerance through controlling stomatal closure via carbon metabolism (NADP malic enzyme, NADP-ME, and pyruvate dehydrogenase, PDH), synthesizing the osmoprotectant glycine-betaine (C-4 sterol methyl oxidase, CSMO), generating protectants against reactive-oxygen-species scavenging (aldehyde dehydrogenase,ALDH, ascorbate-dependent oxidoreductase, ADOR), and stabilizing membranes and proteins (heat-shock protein 17.8, HSP17.8, and dehydrin 3, DHN3). Moreover, 17 genes were abundantly expressed in Martin and HS41-1 compared with Moroc9-75 under both drought and control conditions. These genes were possibly constitutively expressed in drought-tolerant genotypes. Among them, seven known annotated genes might enhance drought tolerance through signalling [such as calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) and membrane steroid binding protein (MSBP)], anti-senescence (G2 pea dark accumulated protein, GDA2), and detoxification (glutathione S-transferase, GST) pathways. In addition, 18 genes, including those encoding Δl-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS), protein phosphatase 2C

  8. BDNF Val(66)Met genotype is associated with drug-seeking phenotypes in heroin-dependent individuals: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Mark K; Steinmiller, Caren L; Sliwerska, Elzbieta; Lundahl, Leslie; Burmeister, Margit

    2013-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val(66)Met genotype has been associated with neurobehavioral deficits. To examine its relevance for addiction, we examined BDNF genotype differences in drug-seeking behavior. Heroin-dependent volunteers (n = 128) completed an interview that assessed past-month naturalistic drug-seeking/use behaviors. In African Americans (n = 74), the Met allele was uncommon (carrier frequency 6.8%); thus, analyses focused on European Americans (n = 54), in whom the Met allele was common (carrier frequency 37.0%). In their natural setting, Met carriers (n = 20) reported more time- and cost-intensive heroin-seeking and more cigarette use than Val homozygotes (n = 34). BDNF Val(66)Met genotype predicted 18.4% of variance in 'weekly heroin investment' (purchasing time × amount × frequency). These data suggest that the BDNF Met allele may confer a 'preferred drug-invested' phenotype, resistant to moderating effects of higher drug prices and non-drug reinforcement. These preliminary hypothesis-generating findings require replication, but are consistent with pre-clinical data that demonstrate neurotrophic influence in drug reinforcement. Whether this genotype is relevant to other abused substances besides opioids or nicotine, or treatment response, remains to be determined.

  9. Expression of zinc and cadmium responsive genes in leaves of willow (Salix caprea L.) genotypes with different accumulation characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Konlechner, Cornelia; Türktaş, Mine; Langer, Ingrid; Vaculík, Marek; Wenzel, Walter W.; Puschenreiter, Markus; Hauser, Marie-Theres

    2013-01-01

    Salix caprea is well suited for phytoextraction strategies. In a previous survey we showed that genetically distinct S. caprea plants isolated from metal-polluted and unpolluted sites differed in their zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) tolerance and accumulation abilities. To determine the molecular basis of this difference we examined putative homologues of genes involved in heavy metal responses and identified over 200 new candidates with a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) screen. Quantitative expression analyses of 20 genes in leaves revealed that some metallothioneins and cell wall modifying genes were induced irrespective of the genotype's origin and metal uptake capacity while a cysteine biosynthesis gene was expressed constitutively higher in the metallicolous genotype. The third and largest group of genes was only induced in the metallicolous genotype. These data demonstrate that naturally adapted woody non-model species can help to discover potential novel molecular mechanisms for metal accumulation and tolerance. PMID:23562959

  10. Expression of zinc and cadmium responsive genes in leaves of willow (Salix caprea L.) genotypes with different accumulation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Konlechner, Cornelia; Türktaş, Mine; Langer, Ingrid; Vaculík, Marek; Wenzel, Walter W; Puschenreiter, Markus; Hauser, Marie-Theres

    2013-07-01

    Salix caprea is well suited for phytoextraction strategies. In a previous survey we showed that genetically distinct S. caprea plants isolated from metal-polluted and unpolluted sites differed in their zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) tolerance and accumulation abilities. To determine the molecular basis of this difference we examined putative homologues of genes involved in heavy metal responses and identified over 200 new candidates with a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) screen. Quantitative expression analyses of 20 genes in leaves revealed that some metallothioneins and cell wall modifying genes were induced irrespective of the genotype's origin and metal uptake capacity while a cysteine biosynthesis gene was expressed constitutively higher in the metallicolous genotype. The third and largest group of genes was only induced in the metallicolous genotype. These data demonstrate that naturally adapted woody non-model species can help to discover potential novel molecular mechanisms for metal accumulation and tolerance.

  11. Genetic elaborations of glandular and non-glandular trichomes in Mentha arvensis genotypes: assessing genotypic and phenotypic correlations along with gene expressions.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Anand; Lal, R K; Chanotiya, C S; Dhawan, Sunita Singh

    2017-03-01

    Mentha arvensis (corn mint) is well known for the production of menthol, a widely used commodity in pharma and flavoring industries and provides natural fragrances and products. Glandular trichomes are specialized hairs found on the aerial surface of vascular plants species producing specific secondary metabolite chemistry. Correlations were established among trichomes, oil yield, and major secondary metabolites. Nine improved, elite cultivars representing different M. arvensis genotypes were used for analysis. Phenotypic coefficient of variation (PCV) and genotypic coefficient of variation (GCV) were estimated; results indicated the presence of considerable amount of genetic variability, thereby emphasizing wide scope of selection. Positive and significant associations were found among glandular trichomes, oil yield, essential oil constituents, and leaf morphology itself, whereas morphological parameters of leaf show positive and negative correlations to average number of trichome and essential oil constituents. Average number of glandular, non-glandular trichomes, their ratios, menthol content, and trichome number showed a good heritability. Trichomes were studied microscopically in leaf parts in all varieties for analyzing their distribution pattern. The trichome number variations showed significant correlation throughout the genotypes with essential oil yield and monoterpenoid constituents. Differential changes were analyzed for Glutathione S-transferases, Glutathione reductase, Malondialdehyde, phenolics, and chlorophyll content. Gene expressions were analyzed for biosynthesis genes and selected transcription factors TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA 1 (TTG1), ENOLASE 1, GLABRA 3, GTL 1, NUCLEAR TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR Y SUBUNIT B-6, WRKY transcription factor 22, putative WRKY 33, WRKY 17, WRKY 1, and WRKY 65-like for harnessing their relation with trichome development in M. arvensis genotypes.

  12. Sibling genes as environment: Sibling dopamine genotypes and adolescent health support frequency dependent selection.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, Emily; Conley, Dalton; Siegal, Mark L

    2015-11-01

    While research consistently suggests siblings matter for individual outcomes, it remains unclear why. At the same time, studies of genetic effects on health typically correlate variants of a gene with the average level of behavioral or health measures, ignoring more complicated genetic dynamics. Using National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health data, we investigate whether sibling genes moderate individual genetic expression. We compare twin variation in health-related absences and self-rated health by genetic differences at three locations related to dopamine regulation and transport to test sibship-level cross-person gene-gene interactions. Results suggest effects of variation at these genetic locations are moderated by sibling genes. Although the mechanism remains unclear, this evidence is consistent with frequency dependent selection and suggests much genetic research may violate the stable unit treatment value assumption.

  13. Global cytosine methylation in Daphnia magna depends on genotype, environment, and their interaction.

    PubMed

    Asselman, Jana; De Coninck, Dieter I M; Vandegehuchte, Michiel B; Jansen, Mieke; Decaestecker, Ellen; De Meester, Luc; Vanden Bussche, Julie; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Janssen, Colin R; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2015-05-01

    The authors characterized global cytosine methylation levels in 2 different genotypes of the ecotoxicological model organism Daphnia magna after exposure to a wide array of biotic and abiotic environmental stressors. The present study aimed to improve the authors' understanding of the role of cytosine methylation in the organism's response to environmental conditions. The authors observed a significant genotype effect, an environment effect, and a genotype × environment effect. In particular, global cytosine methylation levels were significantly altered after exposure to Triops predation cues, Microcystis, and sodium chloride compared with control conditions. Significant differences between the 2 genotypes were observed when animals were exposed to Triops predation cues, Microcystis, Cryptomonas, and sodium chloride. Despite the low global methylation rate under control conditions (0.49-0.52%), global cytosine methylation levels upon exposure to Triops demonstrated a 5-fold difference between the genotypes (0.21% vs 1.02%). No effects were found in response to arsenic, cadmium, fish, lead, pH of 5.5, pH of 8, temperature, hypoxia, and white fat cell disease. The authors' results point to the potential role of epigenetic effects under changing environmental conditions such as predation (i.e., Triops), diet (i.e., Cryptomonas and Microcystis), and salinity. The results of the present study indicate that, despite global cytosine methylation levels being low, epigenetic effects may be important in environmental studies on Daphnia.

  14. Temporal regulation of polygalacturonase gene expression in fruits of normal, mutant, and heterozygous tomato genotypes.

    PubMed

    Biggs, M S; Handa, A K

    1989-01-01

    Molecular cloning of polygalacturonase (PG; EC 3.2. 1.15) from fruits of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill cv Rutgers) was accomplished by constructing a cDNA library from turning stage poly(A)(+) RNA in lambdagtll and immunoscreening with polyclonal antibodies raised against purified PG2. Both PG cDNA and antibody probes were used to quantify changes in PG gene expression in pericarp from normal, mutant, and heterozygous genotypes. Results show that PG mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity sequentially peak at the turning, ripe, and red ripe stages of Rutgers pericarp ripening, respectively. PG gene expression was attenuated greatly (0-15% of normal on a gram fresh weight basis) for PG mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity in five ripening-impaired mutants (rin, nor, Nr, Gr, and Long Keeper) tested. Maximum expression of the PG gene in heterozygotes of rin, nor, Nr, Gr, and Long Keeper (crosses with Rutgers) at the mRNA level was about 25, 13, 17, 5, and 62% of the Rutgers turning stage, at the protein level was about 166, 110, 15, 6, and 104% of the Rutgers ripe stage, and at the enzyme activity level was about 69, 37, 4, 1, and 50% of the Rutgers red ripe stage, respectively. No PG gene expression was found in preclimacteric fruits or vegetative tissues. PG mRNA was localized on both free and membrane-bound polyribosomes of ripening pericarp. In addition to transcriptional regulation, mechanisms contributing to mRNA stability, delayed protein accumulation, and posttranslational modifications may play important roles in the overall accumulation of PG activity during fruit ripening.

  15. Towards Systems Genetic Analyses in Barley: Integration of Phenotypic, Expression and Genotype Data into GeneNetwork

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A typical genetical genomics experiment results in three separate data sets: genotype, gene expression, and higher-order phenotypic data. Used in concert, these data sets provide the opportunity to perform genetic analysis at a systems level. The predictive power of these experiments is largely d...

  16. The effects of mitochondrial genotype on hypoxic survival and gene expression in a hybrid population of the killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus.

    PubMed

    Flight, Patrick A; Nacci, Diane; Champlin, Denise; Whitehead, Andrew; Rand, David M

    2011-11-01

    The physiological link between oxygen availability and mitochondrial function is well established. However, whether or not fitness variation is associated with mitochondrial genotypes in the field remains a contested topic in evolutionary biology. In this study, we draw on a population of the teleost fish, Fundulus heteroclitus, where functionally distinct subspecies hybridize, likely as a result of past glacial events. We had two specific aims: (i) to determine the effect of mtDNA genotype on survivorship of male and female fish under hypoxic stress and (ii) to determine the effect of hypoxic stress, sex and mtDNA genotype on gene expression. We found an unexpected and highly significant effect of sex on survivorship under hypoxic conditions, but no significant effect of mtDNA genotype. Gene expression analyses revealed hundreds of transcripts differentially regulated by sex and hypoxia. Mitochondrial transcripts and other predicted pathways were among those influenced by hypoxic stress, and a transcript corresponding to the mtDNA control region was the most highly suppressed transcript under the conditions of hypoxia. An RT-PCR experiment on the control region was consistent with microarray results. Effects of mtDNA sequence variation on genome expression were limited; however, a potentially important epistasis between mtDNA sequence and expression of a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial translation protein was discovered. Overall, these results confirm that mitochondrial regulation is a major component of hypoxia tolerance and further suggest that purifying selection has been the predominant selective force on mitochondrial genomes in these two subspecies.

  17. Effects of nutrition and genotype on prion protein (PrPC) gene expression in the fetal and maternal sheep placenta.

    PubMed

    Evoniuk, J M; Johnson, M L; Borowicz, P P; Caton, J S; Vonnahme, K A; Reynolds, L P; Taylor, J B; Stoltenow, C L; O'Rourke, K I; Redmer, D A

    2008-05-01

    For placental transmission of scrapie to occur, the normal cellular prion protein (PrPC) must be converted to an abnormal infectious form known as PrPSc. PrPC genotype influences susceptibility to contracting scrapie, but we still do not understand whether genotype or expression levels of PrPC are important in transmission of scrapie. Some evidence exists that nutrition affects expression levels of PrPC. Thus, we evaluated the effects of genotype and nutrition on PrPC mRNA and protein expression in adolescent ewes fed at control (100% of National Research Council [NRC] requirements) or restricted (60% of NRC) levels of diet intake during two periods of pregnancy (days 50-90 and days 90-130)]. Gravid uteri (n=50) from singleton pregnancies were collected at day 130, and placentomes were either separated into caruncular (CAR; maternal) or cotyledonary (COT; fetal) placenta and snap-frozen for PrPC mRNA expression or perfusion fixed for PrPC protein expression. PrPC genotypes were determined (codons 136 and 171) using SNP assay. There were no genotype effects on PrPC mRNA expression in CAR or on PrPC protein expression in either CAR or COT, but PrPC mRNA expression in COT was greater (P<0.02) when codon 136 was homozygous for alanine. Some PrPC protein-positive cells were found in the epithelium of CAR, but most were found in trophoblast binucleate and mononucleate cells of COT. In CAR, from days 90 to 130, PrPC protein abundance was greater (P=0.003) in diet-restricted ewes than in control ewes, but was less uniformly distributed (P<0.007). Additionally, in COT, from days 90 to 130, PrPC protein was less uniformly distributed (P<0.01) in diet-restricted ewes. The localized increase in PrPC protein expression, found in ewes diet-restricted late in pregnancy, may suggest a protective role for PrPC in placental biology. Further study is needed to evaluate whether nutrition, PrPC genotype, and PrPC expression levels influence placental transmission of scrapie.

  18. Nitrate Starvation Induced Changes in Root System Architecture, Carbon:Nitrogen Metabolism, and miRNA Expression in Nitrogen-Responsive Wheat Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Subodh Kumar; Rani, Manju; Bansal, Niketa; Gayatri; Venkatesh, K; Mandal, P K

    2015-11-01

    Improvement of nutrient use efficiency in cereal crops is highly essential not only to reduce the cost of cultivation but also to save the environmental pollution, reduce energy consumption for production of these chemical fertilizers, improve soil health, and ultimately help in mitigating climate change. In the present investigation, we have studied the morphological (with special emphasis on root system architecture) and biochemical responses (in terms of assay of the key enzymes involved in N assimilation) of two N-responsive wheat genotypes, at the seedling stage, under nitrate-optimum and nitrate-starved conditions grown in hydroponics. Expression profile of a few known wheat micro RNAs (miRNAs) was also studied in the root tissue. Total root size, primary root length, and first- and second-order lateral root numbers responded significantly under nitrate-starved condition. Morphological parameters in terms of root and shoot length and fresh and dry weight of roots and shoots have also been observed to be significant between N-optimum and N-starved condition for each genotypes. Nitrate reductase (NR), glutamine synthatase (GS), and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity significantly decreased under N-starved condition. Glutamine oxoglutarate amino transferase (GOGAT) and pyruvate kinase (PK) activity was found to be genotype dependent. Most of the selected miRNAs were expressed in root tissues, and some of them showed their differential N-responsive expression. Our studies indicate that one of the N-responsive genotype (NP-890) did not get affected significantly under nitrogen starvation at seedling stage.

  19. Molecular phylogeny of the psittacid herpesviruses causing Pacheco's disease: correlation of genotype with phenotypic expression.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Elizabeth K; Kaleta, Erhard F; Phalen, David N

    2003-10-01

    Fragments of 419 bp of the UL16 open reading frame from 73 psittacid herpesviruses (PsHVs) from the United States and Europe were sequenced. All viruses caused Pacheco's disease, and serotypes of the European isolates were known. A phylogenetic tree derived from these sequences demonstrated that the PsHVs that cause Pacheco's disease comprised four major genotypes, with each genotype including between two and four variants. With the exception of two viruses, the serotypes of the virus isolates could be predicted by the genotypes. Genotypes 1 and 4 corresponded to serotype 1 isolates, genotype 2 corresponded to serotype 2 isolates, and genotype 3 corresponded to serotype 3 isolates. The single serotype 4 virus mapped to genotype 4. DNA from a virus with a unique serotype could not be amplified with primers that amplified DNA from all other PsHVs, and its classification remains unknown. Viruses representing all four genotypes were found in both the United States and Europe, and it was therefore predicted that serotypes 1, 2, and 3 were present in the United States. Serotype 4 was represented by a single European isolate that could not be genetically distinguished from serotype 1 viruses; therefore, the presence of serotype 4 in the United States could not be predicted. Viruses of genotype 4 were found to be the most commonly associated with Pacheco's disease in macaws and conures and were least likely to be isolated in chicken embryo fibroblasts in the United States. All four genotypes caused deaths in Amazon parrots, but genotype 4 was associated with Pacheco's disease only in Amazons in Europe. Genotypes 2, 3, and 4, but not 1, were found in African grey parrots. Although parrots from the Pacific distribution represent a relatively small percentage of the total number of birds with Pacheco's disease, all four genotypes were found to cause disease in these species.

  20. Gender-dependent association of the functional catechol-O-methyltransferase Val158Met genotype with sensation seeking personality trait.

    PubMed

    Lang, Undine E; Bajbouj, Malek; Bajbouj, Malck; Sander, Thomas; Gallinat, Juergen

    2007-09-01

    The gene encoding cathechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) contains a common functional missense polymorphism (Val158Met) that regulates dopamine in an allele-dependent manner. A pivotal role of dopamine neurotransmission in the prefrontal cortex has been implicated in drug-seeking behavior and related personality traits, such as sensation seeking, with some evidence for a gender-specific association. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the COMT Val158Met polymorphism modulates the personality dimension, sensation seeking, in a gender-dependent manner. Study sample included 214 male (age 38.1+/-12.6 years) and 218 female (age 36.1+/-13.6 years) healthy volunteers, who were assessed with Zuckerman's sensation-seeking scale and genotyped for the Val158Met polymorphism (dbSNP:rs4680). Univariate analysis of variance showed that the sensation seeking score was significantly affected by a COMT genotype x gender interaction (F=5.330, df=2, p=0.005). The Val158Met polymorphism was associated with the sensation seeking personality trait in women only. The highest scores in the sensation-seeking scale and in three of the four subscales were observed in female subjects with the Val/Val genotype relative to women carrying the Met allele. Our results suggest that high COMT enzyme activity associated with the Val allele predisposes to high sensation seeking scores in female subjects and add to increasing evidence for a gender specific role of COMT in normal and dysfunctional behavior.

  1. Osteoradionecrosis in Head-and-Neck Cancer Has a Distinct Genotype-Dependent Cause

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, Andrew J.; West, Catharine M.; Risk, Janet M.; Slevin, Nick J.; Chan, Clara; Crichton, Siobhan; Rinck, Gabrielle; Howell, Dawn; Shaw, Richard J.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We performed a case-control study to establish whether the development of osteoradionecrosis (ORN) was related to a variant allele substituting T for C at -509 of the transforming growth factor-{beta}1 gene (TGF-{beta}1). Patients and Methods: A total of 140 patients, 39 with and 101 without ORN, who underwent radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer with a minimum of 2 years follow-up, were studied. None of the patients had clinical evidence of recurrence at this time. DNA extracted from blood was genotyped for the -509 C-T variant allele of the TGF-{beta}1 gene. Results: There were no significant differences in patient, cancer treatment, or tumor characteristics between the two groups. Of the 39 patients who developed ORN, 9 were homozygous for the common CC allele, 19 were heterozygous, and 11 were homozygous for the rare TT genotype. Of the 101 patients without ORN, the distribution was 56 (CC), 33 (CT), and 12 (TT). The difference in distribution was significant, giving an increased risk of ORN of 5.7 (95% CI, 1.7-19.2) for homozygote TT patients (p = 0.001) and 3.6 (95% CI, 1.3-10.0) for heterozygotes (p = 0.004) when compared with patients with the CC genotype. Postradiotherapy dentoalveolar surgery preceding the development of ORN was associated with the CC genotype (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Our findings support the postulate that the development of ORN is related to the presence of the T variant allele at -509 within the TGF-{beta}1 gene.

  2. Dependence of deodorant usage on ABCC11 genotype: scope for personalized genetics in personal hygiene.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Santiago; Steer, Colin D; Farrow, Alexandra; Golding, Jean; Day, Ian N M

    2013-07-01

    Earwax type and axillary odor are genetically determined by rs17822931, a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located in the ABCC11 gene. The literature has been concerned with the Mendelian trait of earwax, although axillary odor is also Mendelian. Ethnic diversity in rs17822931 exists, with higher frequency of allele A in east Asians. Influence on deodorant usage has not been investigated. In this work, we present a detailed analysis of the rs17822931 effect on deodorant usage in a large (N∼17,000 individuals) population cohort (the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC)). We found strong evidence (P=3.7 × 10(-20)) indicating differential deodorant usage according to the rs17822931 genotype. AA homozygotes were almost 5-fold overrepresented in categories of never using deodorant or using it infrequently. However, 77.8% of white European genotypically nonodorous individuals still used deodorant, and 4.7% genotypically odorous individuals did not. We provide evidence of a behavioral effect associated with rs17822931. This effect has a biological basis that can result in a change in the family's environment if an aerosol deodorant is used. It also indicates potential cost saving to the nonodorous and scope for personalized genetics usage in personal hygiene choices, with consequent reduction of inappropriate chemical exposures for some.

  3. Increased sample capacity for genotyping and expression profiling by kinetic polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Watson, Robert M; Griaznova, Olga I; Long, Christopher M; Holland, Michael J

    2004-06-01

    We fabricated and evaluated high-throughput kinetic thermal cyclers with 768-reaction capacity for kinetic polymerase chain reaction (kPCR)-based genotyping and kinetic reverse transcription (kRT)-PCR-based transcript quantitation. The system uses dye-based detection with ethidium bromide and a single DNA polymerase-based PCR or RT-PCR assay. Allele-specific detection of the two most common hereditary hemochromotosis mutant alleles, C282Y and H63D, was reliably measured by kPCR using human DNA templates as low as 10 genome equivalents per assay. Transcript profiling was performed for 16 yeast transcripts ranging in intracellular abundance over four orders of magnitude. Standard deviations of the PCR cycle threshold values determined from multiple kRT-PCR assays in three different instruments ranged from 0.11 to 0.97 PCR cycles and were reproducible, transcript specific, and instrument independent. The effects of the sin3, gal11, and snf2 knockout mutations on expression of 385 yeast genes were evaluated by kRT-PCR and compared to published values determined by high-density oligonucleotide array and/or microarray analysis for snf2 and sin3. The 768-reaction kinetic thermalcyclers, each with a capacity for more than a half million assays per year, are well suited to genomics applications such as single nucleotide polymorphism/disease association studies and genomewide transcription profiling where high sensitivity and accuracy are required.

  4. Variable salinity responses of 12 alfalfa genotypes and comparative expression analyses of salt-response genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twelve alfalfa genotypes that were selected for biomass under salinity, differences in Na and Cl concentrations in shoots and K/Na ratio were evaluated in this long-term salinity experiment. The selected plants were cloned to reduce genetic variability within each genotype. Salt tolerance (ST) index...

  5. Sex-specific genotype-by-environment interactions for cuticular hydrocarbon expression in decorated crickets, Gryllodes sigillatus: implications for the evolution of signal reliability.

    PubMed

    Weddle, C B; Mitchell, C; Bay, S K; Sakaluk, S K; Hunt, J

    2012-10-01

    Phenotypic traits that convey information about individual identity or quality are important in animal social interactions, and the degree to which such traits are influenced by environmental variation can have profound effects on the reliability of these cues. Using inbred genetic lines of the decorated cricket, Gryllodes sigillatus, we manipulated diet quality to test how the cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) profiles of males and females respond across two different nutritional rearing environments. There were significant differences between lines in the CHC profiles of females, but the effect of diet was not quite statistically significant. There was no significant genotype-by-environment interaction (GEI), suggesting that environmental effects on phenotypic variation in female CHCs are independent of genotype. There was, however, a significant effect of GEI for males, with changes in both signal quantity and content, suggesting that environmental effects on phenotypic expression of male CHCs are dependent on genotype. The differential response of male and female CHC expression to variation in the nutritional environment suggests that these chemical cues may be under sex-specific selection for signal reliability. Female CHCs show the characteristics of reliable cues of identity: high genetic variability, low condition dependence and a high degree of genetic determination. This supports earlier work showing that female CHCs are used in self-recognition to identify previous mates and facilitate polyandry. In contrast, male CHCs show the characteristics of reliable cues of quality: condition dependence and a relatively higher degree of environmental determination. This suggests that male CHCs are likely to function as cues of underlying quality during mate choice and/or male dominance interactions.

  6. Dose-dependent genotype effects of BDNF Val66Met polymorphism on default mode network in early stage Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pin-Hsuan; Tsai, Shih-Jen; Huang, Chi-Wei; Mu-En, Liu; Hsu, Shih-Wei; Lee, Chen-Chang; Chen, Nai-Ching; Chang, Ya-Ting; Lan, Min-Yu; Chang, Chiung-Chih

    2016-01-01

    In humans, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to play a pivotal role in neurocognition, and its gene contains a functional polymorphism (Val66Met) that may explain individual differences in brain volume and memory-related activity. In this study, we enrolled 186 Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients who underwent 3D T1 magnetic resonance imaging, and explored the gray matter (GM) structural covariance networks (SCN). The patients were divided into three groups according to their genotype: Met/Met (n = 45), Val/Met (n = 86) and Val/Val (n = 55). Seed-based analysis was performed focusing on four SCN networks. Neurobehavioral scores served as the major outcome factor. Only peak cluster volumes of default mode medial temporal lobe network showed significant genotype interactions, of which the interconnected peak clusters showed dose-dependent genotype effects. There were also significant correlations between the cognitive test scores and interconnected-cluster volumes, especially in the orbitofrontal cortex. These findings support the hypothesis that BDNF rs6265 polymorphisms modulate entorhinal cortex-interconnected clusters and the valine allele was associated with stronger structural covariance patterns that determined the cognitive outcomes. PMID:27494844

  7. Serum-dependent and cell cycle-dependent expression from a cytomegalovirus-based mammalian expression vector.

    PubMed

    Brightwell, G; Poirier, V; Cole, E; Ivins, S; Brown, K W

    1997-07-18

    Cytomegalovirus-based mammalian expression vectors are widely used to drive the expression of transfected genes in cultured cells. Immunofluorescent staining of the WT1 protein in 3T3 and 293 cell clones, stably transfected with a cyomegalovirus (CMV) expression vector carrying a cDNA coding for the tumour suppressor protein WT1, showed extreme cell to cell variation in the amount of recombinant protein expressed, indicative of cell cycle dependence. This was investigated further by Western blot and FACS analysis which showed that WT1 protein expression was highest in S phase and almost absent in G0/G1. Northern blot analysis of cell clones expressing sense or antisense WT1 cDNAs regulated by the CMV promoter/enhancer showed that RNA expression was also cell cycle-dependent. Western blotting of cells expressing a luciferase reporter gene driven by the CMV promoter/enhancer also showed apparent cell cycle-dependent expression. We further demonstrated that the expression of these gene constructs was serum responsive with a 10-fold increase in expression occurring 2 h after the addition of serum. These results show that the CMV promoter/enhancer system varied in its response to serum and the cell cycle state. Therefore, care must be taken when interpreting any phenotypic alterations (or lack of them) produced in cells transfected with CMV-based expression vectors.

  8. Hepatitis B virus genotypes, expression quantitative trait loci for ZNRD1-AS1 and their interactions in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Juan; Xu, Lu; Liu, Yao; Zhu, Jian; Zhu, Liguo; Hu, Zhibin; Ma, Hongxia; Liu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variants in zinc ribbon domain-containing 1 antisense RNA 1 (ZNRD1-AS1) have been reported to be associated with development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We sought to determine the influences of ZNRD1-AS1 polymorphisms and their interactions with Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes on the risk of HCC. In this study, we conducted a large population case-control study with 1,507 HBV-related HCC cases and 1,560 HBV persistent carriers. Three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ZNRD1-AS1 (rs3757328, rs6940552 and rs9261204) were genotyped using a TaqMan allelic discrimination assay, and the HBV genotypes were identified by multiplex PCR. We found consistently significant associations between the ZNRD1-AS1 rs6940552 and rs9261204 SNPs with an increased risk of HCC (additive genetic model: adjusted OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.03-1.32 for rs6940552; adjusted OR =1.20, 95% CI = 1.06-1.35 for rs9261204) and found a borderline association between rs3757328 and HCC risk. Besides, we observed a dose-dependent relationship between increasing numbers of variant alleles of the SNPs and HCC risk (P for trend <0.001). Moreover, we observed a stronger combined effect of the three SNPs on HCC risk among the subjects infected with non-B genotype HBV (adjusted OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.05-1.50) compared with HBV B-related genotypes (adjusted OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.69-1.15; P= 0.029 for heterogeneity test). We also found that a multiplicative interaction between the variant alleles and the HBV genotype significantly affected HCC susceptibility (P = 0.030). Together, these results indicate that ZNRD1-AS1 may influence HCC risk accompanied by HBV genotypes. PMID:27286450

  9. Salt-Induced Tissue-Specific Cytosine Methylation Downregulates Expression of HKT Genes in Contrasting Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suresh; Beena, Ananda Sankara; Awana, Monika; Singh, Archana

    2017-04-01

    Plants have evolved several strategies, including regulation of genes through epigenetic modifications, to cope with environmental stresses. DNA methylation is dynamically regulated through the methylation and demethylation of cytosine in response to environmental perturbations. High-affinity potassium transporters (HKTs) have accounted for the homeostasis of sodium and potassium ions in plants under salt stress. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is sensitive to soil salinity, which impedes its growth and development, resulting in decreased productivity. The differential expression of HKTs has been reported to confer tolerance to salt stress in plants. In this study, we investigated variations in cytosine methylation and their effects on the expression of HKT genes in contrasting wheat genotypes under salt stress. We observed a genotype- and tissue-specific increase in cytosine methylation induced by NaCl stress that downregulated the expression of TaHKT2;1 and TaHKT2;3 in the shoot and root tissues of Kharchia-65, thereby contributing to its improved salt-tolerance ability. Although TaHKT1;4 was expressed only in roots and was downregulated under the stress in salt-tolerant genotypes, it was not regulated through variations in cytosine methylation. Thus, understanding epigenetic regulation and the function of HKTs would enable an improvement in salt tolerance and the development of salt-tolerant crops.

  10. Colonic mucosal gene expression and genotype in irritable bowel syndrome patients with normal or elevated fecal bile acid excretion.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael; Carlson, Paula; Acosta, Andres; Busciglio, Irene

    2015-07-01

    The mucosal gene expression in rectosigmoid mucosa (RSM) in irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) is unknown. Our objectives were, first, to study mRNA expression [by RT(2) PCR of 19 genes pertaining to tight junctions, immune activation, intestinal ion transport and bile acid (BA) homeostasis] in RSM in IBS-D patients (n = 47) and healthy controls (n = 17) and study expression of a selected protein (PDZD3) in 10 IBS-D patients and 4 healthy controls; second, to assess RSM mRNA expression according to genotype and fecal BA excretion (high ≥ 2,337 μmol/48 h); and third, to determine whether genotype or mucosal mRNA expression is associated with colonic transit or BA parameters. Fold changes were corrected for false detection rate for 19 genes studied (P < 0.00263). In RSM in IBS-D patients compared with controls, mRNA expression of GUC2AB, PDZD3, and PR2Y4 was increased, whereas CLDN1 and FN1 were decreased. One immune-related gene was upregulated (C4BP4) and one downregulated (CCL20). There was increased expression of a selected ion transport protein (PDZD3) on immunohistochemistry and Western blot in IBS-D compared with controls (P = 0.02). There were no significant differences in mucosal mRNA in 20 IBS-D patients with high compared with 27 IBS-D patients with normal BA excretion. GPBAR1 (P < 0.05) was associated with colonic transit. We concluded that mucosal ion transport mRNA (for several genes and PDZD3 protein) is upregulated and barrier protein mRNA downregulated in IBS-D compared with healthy controls, independent of genotype. There are no differences in gene expression in IBS-D with high compared with normal fecal BA excretion.

  11. Studying the complex expression dependences between sets of coexpressed genes.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Mario; Casanova, Oriol; Barchino, Roberto; Flores, Jose; Querol, Enrique; Cedano, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Organisms simplify the orchestration of gene expression by coregulating genes whose products function together in the cell. The use of clustering methods to obtain sets of coexpressed genes from expression arrays is very common; nevertheless there are no appropriate tools to study the expression networks among these sets of coexpressed genes. The aim of the developed tools is to allow studying the complex expression dependences that exist between sets of coexpressed genes. For this purpose, we start detecting the nonlinear expression relationships between pairs of genes, plus the coexpressed genes. Next, we form networks among sets of coexpressed genes that maintain nonlinear expression dependences between all of them. The expression relationship between the sets of coexpressed genes is defined by the expression relationship between the skeletons of these sets, where this skeleton represents the coexpressed genes with a well-defined nonlinear expression relationship with the skeleton of the other sets. As a result, we can study the nonlinear expression relationships between a target gene and other sets of coexpressed genes, or start the study from the skeleton of the sets, to study the complex relationships of activation and deactivation between the sets of coexpressed genes that carry out the different cellular processes present in the expression experiments.

  12. The Blood Group A Genotype Determines the Level of Expression of the Blood Group A on Platelets But Not the Anti-B Isotiter

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Barbara; Eichelberger, Beate; Jungbauer, Christof; Panzer, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The extent of expression of the blood group A on platelets is controversial. Further, the relation between platelets' blood group A expression and the titers of isoagglutinins has not been thoroughly investigated, so far. Methods We evaluated the relation between the genotype with platelets' blood group A and H expression estimated by flow cytometry and the titers of isoagglutinins. Results The A expression varied between genotypes and within genotypes. However, the expression in A1 was stronger than in all other genotypes (p < 0.0001). An overlap of expression levels was apparent between homozygous A1A1 and heterozygous A1 individuals. Still, The A1A1 genotype is associated with a particularly high antigen expression (p = 0.009). Platelets' A expression in A2 versus blood group O donors was also significant (p = 0.007), but there was again an overlap of expression. The secretor status had only little influence on the expression (p = 0.18). Also, isoagglutinin titers were not associated with genotypes. Conclusion: To distinguish between A1 and A2 donors may reduce incompatible platelet transfusions and therefore be favorable on platelet transfusion increment. Clinical data are needed to support this notion. PMID:26733767

  13. The effect of dietary fish oil on weight gain and insulin sensitivity is dependent on APOE genotype in humanized targeted replacement mice

    PubMed Central

    Slim, Kenna E.; Vauzour, David; Tejera, Noemi; Voshol, Peter J.; Cassidy, Aedin; Minihane, Anne Marie

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the independent and interactive impact of the common APOE genotype and marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on the development of obesity and associated cardiometabolic dysfunction in a murine model. Human APOE3 and APOE4 targeted replacement mice were fed either a control high-fat diet (HFD) or an HFD supplemented with 3% n-3 PUFAs from fish oil (HFD + FO) for 8 wk. We established the impact of intervention on food intake, body weight, and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) mass; plasma, lipids (cholesterol and triglycerides), liver enzymes, and adipokines; glucose and insulin during an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test; and Glut4 and ApoE expression in VAT. HFD feeding induced more weight gain and higher plasma lipids in APOE3 compared to APOE4 mice (P < 0.05), along with a 2-fold higher insulin and impaired glucose tolerance. Supplementing APOE3, but not APOE4, animals with dietary n-3 PUFAs decreased body-weight gain, plasma lipids, and insulin (P < 0.05) and improved glucose tolerance, which was associated with increased VAT Glut4 mRNA levels (P < 0.05). Our findings demonstrate that an APOE3 genotype predisposes mice to develop obesity and its metabolic complications, which was attenuated by n-3 PUFA supplementation.—Slim, K. E., Vauzour, D., Tejera, N., Voshol, P. J., Cassidy, A., Minihane, A. M. The effect of dietary fish oil on weight gain and insulin sensitivity is dependent on APOE genotype in humanized targeted replacement mice. PMID:27895108

  14. Understanding the differential nitrogen sensing mechanism in rice genotypes through expression analysis of high and low affinity ammonium transporter genes.

    PubMed

    Gaur, Vikram Singh; Singh, U S; Gupta, Atul K; Kumar, Anil

    2012-03-01

    Two rice genotypes, Kalanamak 3119 (KN3119) and Pusa Basmati 1(PB1) differing in their optimum nitrogen requirements (30 and 120 kg/ha, respectively) were undertaken to study the expression of both high and low affinity ammonium transporter genes responsible for ammonium uptake. Exposing the roots of the seedlings of both the genotypes to increasing (NH(4))(2)SO(4) concentrations revealed that all the three families of rice AMT genes are expressed, some of which get altered in a genotype and concentration specific manner. This indicates that individual ammonium transporter genes have defined contributions for ammonium uptake and plant growth. Interestingly, in response to increasing nitrogen concentrations, a root specific high affinity gene, AMT1;3, was repressed in the roots of KN3119 but not in PB1 indicating the existence of a differential ammonium sensing mechanism. This also indicates that not only AMT1;3 is involved not only in ammonium uptake but may also in ammonium sensing. Further, if it can differentiate and could be used as a biomarker for nitrogen responsiveness. Expression analysis of low affinity AMT genes showed that, both AMT2;1 and AMT2;2 have high levels of expression in both roots and shoots and in KN3119 are induced at low ammonium concentrations. Expressions of AMT3 family genes were higher shoots than in the roots indicating that these genes are probably involved in the translocation and distribution of ammonium ions in leaves. The expression of the only high affinity AMT gene, AMT1;1, along with six low affinity AMT genes in the shoots suggests that low affinity AMTs in the shoots leaves are involved in supporting AMT1;1 to carry out its activities/function efficiently.

  15. The Change of Expression Configuration Affects Identity-Dependent Expression Aftereffect but Not Identity-Independent Expression Aftereffect.

    PubMed

    Song, Miao; Shinomori, Keizo; Qian, Qian; Yin, Jun; Zeng, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of expression configuration on cross-identity expression aftereffect. The expression configuration refers to the spatial arrangement of facial features in a face for conveying an emotion, e.g., an open-mouth smile vs. a closed-mouth smile. In the first of two experiments, the expression aftereffect is measured using a cross-identity/cross-expression configuration factorial design. The facial identities of test faces were the same or different from the adaptor, while orthogonally, the expression configurations of those facial identities were also the same or different. The results show that the change of expression configuration impaired the expression aftereffect when the facial identities of adaptor and tests were the same; however, the impairment effect disappears when facial identities were different, indicating the identity-independent expression representation is more robust to the change of the expression configuration in comparison with the identity-dependent expression representation. In the second experiment, we used schematic line faces as adaptors and real faces as tests to minimize the similarity between the adaptor and tests, which is expected to exclude the contribution from the identity-dependent expression representation to expression aftereffect. The second experiment yields a similar result as the identity-independent expression aftereffect observed in Experiment 1. The findings indicate the different neural sensitivities to expression configuration for identity-dependent and identity-independent expression systems.

  16. The Change of Expression Configuration Affects Identity-Dependent Expression Aftereffect but Not Identity-Independent Expression Aftereffect

    PubMed Central

    Song, Miao; Shinomori, Keizo; Qian, Qian; Yin, Jun; Zeng, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of expression configuration on cross-identity expression aftereffect. The expression configuration refers to the spatial arrangement of facial features in a face for conveying an emotion, e.g., an open-mouth smile vs. a closed-mouth smile. In the first of two experiments, the expression aftereffect is measured using a cross-identity/cross-expression configuration factorial design. The facial identities of test faces were the same or different from the adaptor, while orthogonally, the expression configurations of those facial identities were also the same or different. The results show that the change of expression configuration impaired the expression aftereffect when the facial identities of adaptor and tests were the same; however, the impairment effect disappears when facial identities were different, indicating the identity-independent expression representation is more robust to the change of the expression configuration in comparison with the identity-dependent expression representation. In the second experiment, we used schematic line faces as adaptors and real faces as tests to minimize the similarity between the adaptor and tests, which is expected to exclude the contribution from the identity-dependent expression representation to expression aftereffect. The second experiment yields a similar result as the identity-independent expression aftereffect observed in Experiment 1. The findings indicate the different neural sensitivities to expression configuration for identity-dependent and identity-independent expression systems. PMID:26733922

  17. Nitrogen-Deficiency Stress Induces Protein Expression Differentially in Low-N Tolerant and Low-N Sensitive Maize Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Nazir, Muslima; Pandey, Renu; Siddiqi, Tariq O.; Ibrahim, Mohamed M.; Qureshi, Mohammad I.; Abraham, Gerard; Vengavasi, Krishnapriya; Ahmad, Altaf

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is essential for proper plant growth and its application has proven to be critical for agricultural produce. However, for unavoidable economic and environmental problems associated with excessive use of N-fertilizers, it is an urgent demand to manage application of fertilizers. Improving the N-use efficiency (NUE) of crop plants to sustain productivity even at low N levels is the possible solution. In the present investigation, contrasting low-N sensitive (HM-4) and low-N tolerant (PEHM-2) genotypes were identified and used for comparative proteome-profiling of leaves under optimum and low N as well as restoration of low N on 3rd (NR3) and 5th (NR5) days after re-supplying N. The analysis of differential expression pattern of proteins was performed by 2-D gel electrophoresis. Significant variations in the expression of proteins were observed under low N, which were genotype specific. In the leaf proteome, 25 spots were influenced by N treatment and four spots were different between the two genotypes. Most of the proteins that were differentially accumulated in response to N level and were involved in photosynthesis and metabolism, affirming the relationship between N and carbon metabolism. In addition to this, greater intensity of some defense proteins in the low N tolerant genotype was found that may have a possible role in imparting it tolerance under N starvation conditions. The new insights generated on maize proteome in response to N-starvation and restoration would be useful toward improvement of NUE in maize. PMID:27047497

  18. Genotype-dependent responsivity to inflammatory pain: A role for TRPV1 in the periaqueductal grey.

    PubMed

    Madasu, Manish K; Okine, Bright N; Olango, Weredeselam M; Rea, Kieran; Lenihan, Róisín; Roche, Michelle; Finn, David P

    2016-11-01

    Negative affective state has a significant impact on pain, and genetic background is an important moderating influence on this interaction. The Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) inbred rat strain exhibits a stress-hyperresponsive, anxiety/depressive-like phenotype and also displays a hyperalgesic response to noxious stimuli. Transient receptor potential subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) within the midbrain periaqueductal grey (PAG) plays a key role in regulating both aversive and nociceptive behaviour. In the present study, we investigated the role of TRPV1 in the sub-columns of the PAG in formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour in WKY versus Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. TRPV1 mRNA expression was significantly lower in the dorsolateral (DL) PAG and higher in the lateral (L) PAG of WKY rats, compared with SD counterparts. There were no significant differences in TRPV1 mRNA expression in the ventrolateral (VL) PAG between the two strains. TRPV1 mRNA expression significantly decreased in the DLPAG and increased in the VLPAG of SD, but not WKY rats upon intra-plantar formalin administration. Intra-DLPAG administration of either the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin, or the TRPV1 antagonist 5'-Iodoresiniferatoxin (5'-IRTX), significantly increased formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour in SD rats, but not in WKY rats. The effects of capsaicin were likely due to TRPV1 desensitisation, given their similarity to the effects of 5'-IRTX. Intra-VLPAG administration of capsaicin or 5'-IRTX reduced nociceptive behaviour in a moderate and transient manner in SD rats, and similar effects were seen with 5'-IRTX in WKY rats. Intra-LPAG administration of 5'-IRTX reduced nociceptive behaviour in a moderate and transient manner in SD rats, but not in WKY rats. These results indicate that modulation of inflammatory pain by TRPV1 in the PAG occurs in a sub-column-specific manner. The data also provide evidence for differences in the expression of TRPV1, and differences in the effects of pharmacological modulation of TRPV1

  19. The genotype-dependent influence of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes on fetal development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinglu; Zhang, Fan; Sun, Xiaolian; Choi, Ki-Young; Niu, Gang; Zhang, Guofeng; Guo, Jinxia; Lee, Seulki; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    In many cases cancer is caused by gene deficiency that is being passed along from generation to generation. Soluble carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown promising applications in the diagnosis and therapy of cancer, however, the potential relationship between cancer-prone individuals and response to CNT exposure as a prerequisite for development of personalized nanomedicine, is still poorly understood. Here we report that intravenous injections of multi-walled carbon nanotubes into p53 (a well-known cancer-susceptible gene) heterozygous pregnant mice can induce p53- dependent responses in fetal development. Larger sized multi-walled carbon nanotubes moved across the blood-placenta barrier (BPB), restricted the development of fetuses, and induced brain deformity, whereas single-walled and smaller sized multi-walled carbon nanotubes showed no or less fetotoxicity. A molecular mechanism study found that multi-walled carbon nanotubes directly triggered p53-dependent apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in response to DNA damage. Based on the molecular mechanism, we also incorporated N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an FDA approved antioxidant, to prevent CNTs induced nuclear DNA damage and reduce brain development abnormalities. Our findings suggest that CNTs might have genetic background-dependent toxic effect on the normal development of the embryo, and provide new insights into protection against nanoparticle-induced toxicity in potential clinical applications.

  20. Identification of Genes in a Partially Resistant Genotype of Avena sativa Expressed in Response to Puccinia coronata Infection

    PubMed Central

    Loarce, Yolanda; Navas, Elisa; Paniagua, Carlos; Fominaya, Araceli; Manjón, José L.; Ferrer, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Cultivated oat (Avena sativa), an important crop in many countries, can suffer significant losses through infection by the fungus Puccinia coronata, the causal agent of crown rust disease. Understanding the molecular basis of existing partial resistance to this disease might provide targets of interest for crop improvement programs. A suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) library was constructed using cDNA from the partially resistant oat genotype MN841801-1 after inoculation with the pathogen. A total of 929 genes returned a BLASTx hit and were annotated under different GO terms, including 139 genes previously described as participants in mechanisms related to the defense response and signal transduction. Among these were genes involved in pathogen recognition, cell-wall modification, oxidative burst/ROS scavenging, and abscisic acid biosynthesis, as well genes related to inducible defense responses mediated by salicylic and jasmonic acid (although none of which had been previously reported involved in strong responses). These findings support the hypothesis that basal defense mechanisms are the main systems operating in oat partial resistance to P. coronata. When the expression profiles of 20 selected genes were examined at different times following inoculation with the pathogen, the partially resistant genotype was much quicker in mounting a response than a susceptible genotype. Additionally, a number of genes not previously described in oat transcriptomes were identified in this work, increasing our molecular knowledge of this crop. PMID:27303424

  1. Identification of Genes in a Partially Resistant Genotype of Avena sativa Expressed in Response to Puccinia coronata Infection.

    PubMed

    Loarce, Yolanda; Navas, Elisa; Paniagua, Carlos; Fominaya, Araceli; Manjón, José L; Ferrer, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Cultivated oat (Avena sativa), an important crop in many countries, can suffer significant losses through infection by the fungus Puccinia coronata, the causal agent of crown rust disease. Understanding the molecular basis of existing partial resistance to this disease might provide targets of interest for crop improvement programs. A suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) library was constructed using cDNA from the partially resistant oat genotype MN841801-1 after inoculation with the pathogen. A total of 929 genes returned a BLASTx hit and were annotated under different GO terms, including 139 genes previously described as participants in mechanisms related to the defense response and signal transduction. Among these were genes involved in pathogen recognition, cell-wall modification, oxidative burst/ROS scavenging, and abscisic acid biosynthesis, as well genes related to inducible defense responses mediated by salicylic and jasmonic acid (although none of which had been previously reported involved in strong responses). These findings support the hypothesis that basal defense mechanisms are the main systems operating in oat partial resistance to P. coronata. When the expression profiles of 20 selected genes were examined at different times following inoculation with the pathogen, the partially resistant genotype was much quicker in mounting a response than a susceptible genotype. Additionally, a number of genes not previously described in oat transcriptomes were identified in this work, increasing our molecular knowledge of this crop.

  2. Transient expression of glyoxal oxidase from the Chinese wild grape Vitis pseudoreticulata can suppress powdery mildew in a susceptible genotype.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xin; Zhao, Heqing; Xu, Yan; Wang, Yuejin

    2011-04-01

    Vitis pseudoreticulata glyoxal oxidase (VpGLOX) was previously isolated from the Chinese wild vine V. pseudoreticulata accession "Baihe-35-1" during a screen for genes that are upregulated in response to infection with grapevine powdery mildew (Erysiphe necator, PM). In the present study, a possible function of VpGLOX for defense against PM was investigated using Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression. After optimizing agro-infiltration, VpGLOX was transiently overexpressed in leaves of either PM-susceptible (accession "6-12-2") or PM-resistant (accession "6-12-6") plants. The efficiency of transfection was verified using a β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter and was found to comprise most leaf areas regardless of the initial leaf position. Upon infection with E. necator, clear differences were observed with respect to hyphal development between agro-infiltrated leaves and control groups of both, the susceptible and the resistant, genotypes. The expression of VpGLOX was followed by real-time polymerase chain reaction in both genotypes. Whereas in the susceptible host ("6-12-2") expression was found to increase only in transfected leaves and remained transient, in the resistant host ("6-12-6"), a second peak appeared later in transfected leaves, probably representing the response of the endogenous VpGLOX. The data support the interpretation that VpGLOX is sufficient to confer resistance to E. necator.

  3. Differential gene expression in senescing leaves of two silver birch genotypes in response to elevated CO2 and tropospheric ozone.

    PubMed

    Kontunen-Soppela, Sari; Riikonen, Johanna; Ruhanen, Hanna; Brosché, Mikael; Somervuo, Panu; Peltonen, Petri; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko; Auvinen, Petri; Paulin, Lars; Keinänen, Markku; Oksanen, Elina; Vapaavuori, Elina

    2010-06-01

    Long-term effects of elevated CO(2) and O(3) concentrations on gene expression in silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) leaves were studied during the end of the growing season. Two birch genotypes, clones 4 and 80, with different ozone growth responses, were exposed to 2x ambient CO(2) and/or O(3) in open-top chambers (OTCs). Microarray analyses were performed after 2 years of exposure, and the transcriptional profiles were compared to key physiological characteristics during leaf senescence. There were genotypic differences in the responses to CO(2) and O(3). Clone 80 exhibited greater transcriptional response and capacity to alter metabolism, resulting in better stress tolerance. The gene expression patterns of birch leaves indicated contrasting responses of senescence-related genes to elevated CO(2) and O(3). Elevated CO(2) delayed leaf senescence and reduced associated transcriptional changes, whereas elevated O(3) advanced leaf senescence because of increased oxidative stress. The combined treatment demonstrated that elevated CO(2) only temporarily alleviated the negative effects of O(3). Gene expression data alone were insufficient to explain the O(3) response in birch, and additional physiological and biochemical data were required to understand the true O(3) sensitivity of these clones.

  4. Hierarchical Modeling and Differential Expression Analysis for RNA-seq Experiments with Inbred and Hybrid Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lithio, Andrew; Nettleton, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The performance of inbred and hybrid genotypes is of interest in plant breeding and genetics. High-throughput sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq) has proven to be a useful tool in the study of the molecular genetic responses of inbreds and hybrids to environmental stresses. Commonly used experimental designs and sequencing methods lead to complex data structures that require careful attention in data analysis. We demonstrate an analysis of RNA-seq data from a split-plot design involving drought stress applied to two inbred genotypes and two hybrids formed by crosses between the inbreds. Our generalized linear modeling strategy incorporates random effects for whole-plot experimental units and uses negative binomial distributions to allow for overdispersion in count responses for split-plot experimental units. Variations in gene length and base content, as well as differences in sequencing intensity across experimental units, are also accounted for. Hierarchical modeling with thoughtful parameterization and prior specification allows for borrowing of information across genes to improve estimation of dispersion parameters, genotype effects, treatment effects, and interaction effects of primary interest. PMID:27110090

  5. Hierarchical Modeling and Differential Expression Analysis for RNA-seq Experiments with Inbred and Hybrid Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Lithio, Andrew; Nettleton, Dan

    2015-12-01

    The performance of inbred and hybrid genotypes is of interest in plant breeding and genetics. High-throughput sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq) has proven to be a useful tool in the study of the molecular genetic responses of inbreds and hybrids to environmental stresses. Commonly used experimental designs and sequencing methods lead to complex data structures that require careful attention in data analysis. We demonstrate an analysis of RNA-seq data from a split-plot design involving drought stress applied to two inbred genotypes and two hybrids formed by crosses between the inbreds. Our generalized linear modeling strategy incorporates random effects for whole-plot experimental units and uses negative binomial distributions to allow for overdispersion in count responses for split-plot experimental units. Variations in gene length and base content, as well as differences in sequencing intensity across experimental units, are also accounted for. Hierarchical modeling with thoughtful parameterization and prior specification allows for borrowing of information across genes to improve estimation of dispersion parameters, genotype effects, treatment effects, and interaction effects of primary interest.

  6. Uptake by cucurbitaceae of soil-Bome contaminants depends upon plant genotype and pollutant properties.

    PubMed

    Mattina, Maryjane Incorvia; Isleyen, Mehmet; Eitzer, Brian D; Iannucci-Berger, William; White, Jason C

    2006-03-15

    Three Cucurbitaceae, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo (cv. Black Beauty, true zucchini), Cucurbita pepo L. intersubspecific cross (cv. Zephyr, summer squash), and Cucumis sativis (cv. Marketmore, cucumber), were grown in rhizotrons containing soil contaminated with three classes of highly weathered, hydrophobic organic contaminants: (1) technical chlordane, (2) dichlorodiphenylethanes (DDT and DDD) and -ethene (DDE), (3) polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and heavy metal residues. Movement of the contaminants through the soil/plant system was studied by comparing contaminant concentration in the bulk soil, the rhizosphere soil pore water, the xylem sap, and aerial tissue. This permitted, for the first time, calculation of bioconcentration factors (BCFs) based on concentration in the xylem sap versus that in the rhizosphere soil pore water. The bioconcentration factors so determined for the sum of five chlordane residues (two enantiomers of trans-chlordane, TC; two enantiomers of cis-chlordane, CC; and achiral trans-nonachlor, TN) were 36, 40, and 23 for Black Beauty, Zephyr, and Marketmore, respectively. In addition, the xylem sap of each cultivar had a consistent enantioselective profile for some of the chiral chlordane components. For the sum of dichlorodiphenylethanes and -ethene, comparable BCF values were 19, 4, and 0.8, respectively. In the case of PAHs, different BCF patterns among the cultivars were noted for three- versus four-ring compounds. Similarly, movement of heavy metals was cultivar-dependent, with cadmium BCF values 9.5, 3.5, and 0.6for Black Beauty, Zephyr, and Marketmore, respectively; the analogous BCFs for zinc were 9, 11, and 2. Thus, passage from ex planta to in planta regions of the soil/plant system is dependent not only on properties of the plant, but also on those of the pollutant. Such data will provide insight into transport mechanisms of highly hydrophobic organic contaminants, as well as heavy metal contaminants, in the soil/plant system.

  7. Differentially methylated obligatory epialleles modulate context-dependent LAM gene expression in the honeybee Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Wedd, Laura; Kucharski, Robert; Maleszka, Ryszard

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Differential intragenic methylation in social insects has been hailed as a prime mover of environmentally driven organismal plasticity and even as evidence for genomic imprinting. However, very little experimental work has been done to test these ideas and to prove the validity of such claims. Here we analyze in detail differentially methylated obligatory epialleles of a conserved gene encoding lysosomal α-mannosidase (AmLAM) in the honeybee. We combined genotyping of progenies derived from colonies founded by single drone inseminated queens, ultra-deep allele-specific bisulfite DNA sequencing, and gene expression to reveal how sequence variants, DNA methylation, and transcription interrelate. We show that both methylated and non-methylated states of AmLAM follow Mendelian inheritance patterns and are strongly influenced by polymorphic changes in DNA. Increased methylation of a given allele correlates with higher levels of context-dependent AmLAM expression and appears to affect the transcription of an antisense long noncoding RNA. No evidence of allelic imbalance or imprinting involved in this process has been found. Our data suggest that by generating alternate methylation states that affect gene expression, sequence variants provide organisms with a high level of epigenetic flexibility that can be used to select appropriate responses in various contexts. This study represents the first effort to integrate DNA sequence variants, gene expression, and methylation in a social insect to advance our understanding of their relationships in the context of causality. PMID:26507253

  8. Differentially methylated obligatory epialleles modulate context-dependent LAM gene expression in the honeybee Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Wedd, Laura; Kucharski, Robert; Maleszka, Ryszard

    2016-01-01

    Differential intragenic methylation in social insects has been hailed as a prime mover of environmentally driven organismal plasticity and even as evidence for genomic imprinting. However, very little experimental work has been done to test these ideas and to prove the validity of such claims. Here we analyze in detail differentially methylated obligatory epialleles of a conserved gene encoding lysosomal α-mannosidase (AmLAM) in the honeybee. We combined genotyping of progenies derived from colonies founded by single drone inseminated queens, ultra-deep allele-specific bisulfite DNA sequencing, and gene expression to reveal how sequence variants, DNA methylation, and transcription interrelate. We show that both methylated and non-methylated states of AmLAM follow Mendelian inheritance patterns and are strongly influenced by polymorphic changes in DNA. Increased methylation of a given allele correlates with higher levels of context-dependent AmLAM expression and appears to affect the transcription of an antisense long noncoding RNA. No evidence of allelic imbalance or imprinting involved in this process has been found. Our data suggest that by generating alternate methylation states that affect gene expression, sequence variants provide organisms with a high level of epigenetic flexibility that can be used to select appropriate responses in various contexts. This study represents the first effort to integrate DNA sequence variants, gene expression, and methylation in a social insect to advance our understanding of their relationships in the context of causality.

  9. Pupal diapause termination in Bactrocera minax: an insight on 20-hydroxyecdysone induced phenotypic and genotypic expressions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenzhong; Dong, Yongcheng; Wang, Yaohui; Andongma, Awawing A.; Rashid, Muhammad A.; Krutmuang, Patcharin; Niu, Changying

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese citrus fruit fly, Bactrocera minax, is an economically important pest of citrus. It exhibits pupal diapause from November to May to combat harsh environmental conditions. Such a long pupal diapause is a barrier for laboratory rearing and development of control strategies against this pest. In the present study, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) was used to break pupal diapause of B. minax by topical application. After diapause termination by 20E treated, the pupal ontogenetic processes were observed along the temporal trajectory. The pupal response time to 20E was estimated by detecting the relative expression of 20E responsive genes at different times after 20E-treatment. Results revealed that 20E could effectively terminate the pupal diapause in a dose-dependent manner and significantly shorten the time for 50% adult emergence (Et50). 20E response genes, including ecr, broad and foxo, were up-regulated within 72h, indicating these genes are involved in pupal metamorphosis and diapause termination processes. Morphological changes showed the pupal metamorphosis began ~7 days after 20E-treatment at 22 °C. This study does not only pave the way for artificial rearing in the laboratory through manipulating of pupal diapause termination, but also deepens our understanding of the underlying pupal diapause termination mechanism of B. minax. PMID:27273028

  10. Temperature-Dependent Growth Modeling of Environmental and Clinical Legionella pneumophila Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis (MLVA) Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Sharaby, Yehonatan; Rodríguez-Martínez, Sarah; Oks, Olga; Pecellin, Marina; Mizrahi, Hila; Peretz, Avi; Brettar, Ingrid; Höfle, Manfred G; Halpern, Malka

    2017-04-15

    Legionella pneumophila causes waterborne infections resulting in severe pneumonia. High-resolution genotyping of L. pneumophila isolates can be achieved by multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA). Recently, we found that different MLVA genotypes of L. pneumophila dominated different sites in a small drinking-water network, with a genotype-related temperature and abundance regime. The present study focuses on understanding the temperature-dependent growth kinetics of the genotypes that dominated the water network. Our aim was to model mathematically the influence of temperature on the growth kinetics of different environmental and clinical L. pneumophila genotypes and to compare it with the influence of their ecological niches. Environmental strains showed a distinct temperature preference, with significant differences among the growth kinetics of the three studied genotypes (Gt4, Gt6, and Gt15). Gt4 strains exhibited superior growth at lower temperatures (25 and 30°C), while Gt15 strains appeared to be best adapted to relatively higher temperatures (42 and 45°C). The temperature-dependent growth traits of the environmental genotypes were consistent with their distribution and temperature preferences in the water network. Clinical isolates exhibited significantly higher growth rates and reached higher maximal cell densities at 37°C and 42°C than the environmental strains. Further research on the growth preferences of L. pneumophila clinical and environmental genotypes will result in a better understanding of their ecological niches in drinking-water systems as well as in the human body.IMPORTANCELegionella pneumophila is a waterborne pathogen that threatens humans in developed countries. The bacteria inhabit natural and man-made freshwater environments. Here we demonstrate that different environmental L. pneumophila genotypes have different temperature-dependent growth kinetics. Moreover, Legionella strains that belong to the same species

  11. Developmental-stage-dependent transcriptional response to leukaemic oncogene expression

    PubMed Central

    Regha, Kakkad; Assi, Salam A.; Tsoulaki, Olga; Gilmour, Jane; Lacaud, Georges; Bonifer, Constanze

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is characterized by a block in myeloid differentiation the stage of which is dependent on the nature of the transforming oncogene and the developmental stage of the oncogenic hit. This is also true for the t(8;21) translocation that gives rise to the RUNX1-ETO fusion protein and initiates the most common form of human AML. Here we study the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells expressing an inducible RUNX1-ETO gene into blood cells as a model, combined with genome-wide analyses of transcription factor binding and gene expression. RUNX1-ETO interferes with both the activating and repressive function of its normal counterpart, RUNX1, at early and late stages of blood cell development. However, the response of the transcriptional network to RUNX1-ETO expression is developmental stage specific, highlighting the molecular mechanisms determining specific target cell expansion after an oncogenic hit. PMID:26018585

  12. Gene Expression Profiling in Response to Ultraviolet Radiation in Maize Genotypes with Varying Flavonoid Content1[w

    PubMed Central

    Casati, Paula; Walbot, Virginia

    2003-01-01

    Microarray hybridization was used to assess acclimation responses to four UV regimes by near isogenic maize (Zea mays) lines varying in flavonoid content. We found that 355 of the 2,500 cDNAs tested were regulated by UV radiation in at least one genotype. Among these, 232 transcripts are assigned putative functions, whereas 123 encode unknown proteins. UV-B increased expression of stress response and ribosomal protein genes, whereas photosynthesis-associated genes were down-regulated; lines lacking UV-absorbing pigments had more dramatic responses than did lines with these pigments, confirming the shielding role of these compounds. Sunlight filtered to remove UV-B or UV-B plus UV-A resulted in significant expression changes in many genes not previously associated with UV responses. Some pathways regulated by UV radiation are shared with defense, salt, and oxidative stresses; however, UV-B radiation can activate additional pathways not shared with other stresses. PMID:12913132

  13. Exact expressions for ensemble functionals from particle number dependence.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Daniel P

    2012-05-07

    Some properties of exact ensemble density functionals can be determined by examining the particle number dependence of ground state ensemble density matrices for systems where the integer ground state energies satisfy a convexity condition. The results include the observation that the integral of the product of the functional derivative and Fukui function of functionals that can be expressed as the trace of an operator is particle number independent for particle numbers between successive integers and the integral itself is equal to the difference between functionals evaluated at successive integer particle numbers. Expressions that must be satisfied by 2nd and higher order functional derivatives are formulated and equations that must be satisfied point by point in space are derived. Using the analytic Hooke's atom model, it is shown that commonly used correlation functional approximations do not bear any resemblance to a spatially dependent expression derived from the exact second order functional derivative of the correlation functional. It is also shown that two expressions for the mutual Coulomb energy are not equal when approximate exchange and correlation functionals are used.

  14. Exogenous Transposable Elements Circumvent Identity-Based Silencing, Permitting the Dissection of Expression-Dependent Silencing[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Fultz, Dalen

    2017-01-01

    The propagation of epigenetic marks has received a great deal of attention, yet the initiation of epigenetic silencing of a new transgene, virus, or transposable element (TE) remains enigmatic. The overlapping and simultaneous function of multiple silencing mechanisms has obscured this area of investigation. Here, we revealed two broad mechanisms that can initiate silencing independently: identity-based and expression-dependent silencing. We found that identity-based silencing is targeted by 21- to 22-nucleotide or 24-nucleotide small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) generated from previously silenced regions of the genome. By transforming exogenous TEs into Arabidopsis thaliana, we circumvented identity-based silencing, allowing us to isolate and investigate the molecular mechanism of expression-dependent silencing. We found that several siRNA-generating mechanisms all trigger de novo expression-dependent RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) through RNA Polymerase V. In addition, while full-length TEs quickly progress beyond RdDM to heterochromatin formation and the final maintenance methylation state, TE fragments stall at the RdDM phase. Lastly, we found that transformation into a mutant genotype followed by introgression into the wild type does not result in the same level of silencing as direct transformation into the wild type. This demonstrates that the plant genotype during a narrow window of time at TE insertion (or transgene transformation) is key for establishing the transgenerational extent of epigenetic silencing. PMID:28193737

  15. Sex-dependent expression of TRPV1 in bladder arterioles.

    PubMed

    Phan, Thieu X; Ton, Hoai T; Chen, Yue; Basha, Maureen E; Ahern, Gerard P

    2016-11-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a major nociceptive ion channel implicated in bladder physiology and/or pathophysiology. However, the precise expression of TRPV1 in neuronal vs. nonneuronal bladder cells is uncertain. Here we used reporter mouse lines (TRPV1-Cre:tdTomato and TRPV1(PLAP-nlacZ)) to map expression of TRPV1 in postnatal bladder. TRPV1 was not detected in the urothelium, however, we found marked expression of TRPV1 lineage in sensory nerves, and surprisingly, in arterial/arteriolar smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Tomato fluorescence was prominent in the vesical arteries and in small-diameter (15-40 μm) arterioles located in the suburothelial layer with a near equal distribution in bladder dome and base. Notably, arteriolar TRPV1 expression was greater in females than in males and increased in both sexes after 90 days of age, suggesting sex hormone and age dependency. Analysis of whole bladder and vesical artery TRPV1 mRNA revealed a similar sex and developmental dependence. Pharmacological experiments confirmed functional TRPV1 protein expression; capsaicin increased intracellular Ca(2+) in ∼15% of ASM cells from wild-type female bladders, but we observed no responses to capsaicin in bladder arterioles isolated from TRPV1-null mice. Furthermore, capsaicin triggered arteriole constriction that was rapidly reversed by the TRPV1 antagonist, BCTC. These data show that predominantly in postpubertal female mice, bladder ASM cells express functional TRPV1 channels that may act to constrict arterioles. TRPV1 may therefore play an important role in regulating the microcirculation of the female bladder, and this effect may be of significance during inflammatory conditions.

  16. Oxygen dependent pyruvate oxidase expression and production in Streptococcus sanguinis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lan-yan; Itzek, Andreas; Chen, Zhi-yun; Kreth, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the oxygen dependent regulation of pyruvate oxidase (SpxB) gene expression and protein production in Streptococcus sanguinis (S. sanguinis). SpxB is responsible for the generation of growth-inhibiting amounts of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) able to antagonize cariogenic Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). Furthermore, the ecological consequence of H2O2 production was investigated in its self-inhibiting ability towards the producing strain. Expression of spxB was determined with quantitative Real-Time RT-PCR and a fluorescent expression reporter strain. Protein abundance was investigated with FLAG epitope engineered in frame on the C-terminal end of SpxB. Self inhibition was tested with an antagonism plate assay. The expression and protein abundance decreased in cells grown under anaerobic conditions. S. sanguinis was resistant against its own produced H2O2, while cariogenic S. mutans was inhibited in its growth. The results suggest that S. sanguinis produces H2O2 as antimicrobial substance to inhibit susceptible niche competing species like S. mutans during initial biofilm formation, when oxygen availability allows for spxB expression and Spx production. PMID:21485312

  17. Comparative analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) between drought-tolerant and -susceptible genotypes of chickpea under terminal drought stress

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is an important grain-legume crop that is mainly grown in rainfed areas, where terminal drought is a major constraint to its productivity. We generated expressed sequence tags (ESTs) by suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH) to identify differentially expressed genes in drought-tolerant and -susceptible genotypes in chickpea. Results EST libraries were generated by SSH from root and shoot tissues of IC4958 (drought tolerant) and ICC 1882 (drought resistant) exposed to terminal drought conditions by the dry down method. SSH libraries were also constructed by using 2 sets of bulks prepared from the RNA of root tissues from selected recombinant inbred lines (RILs) (10 each) for the extreme high and low root biomass phenotype. A total of 3062 unigenes (638 contigs and 2424 singletons), 51.4% of which were novel in chickpea, were derived by cluster assembly and sequence alignment of 5949 ESTs. Only 2185 (71%) unigenes showed significant BLASTX similarity (<1E-06) in the NCBI non-redundant (nr) database. Gene ontology functional classification terms (BLASTX results and GO term), were retrieved for 2006 (92.0%) sequences, and 656 sequences were further annotated with 812 Enzyme Commission (EC) codes and were mapped to 108 different KEGG pathways. In addition, expression status of 830 unigenes in response to terminal drought stress was evaluated using macro-array (dot blots). The expression of few selected genes was validated by northern blotting and quantitative real-time PCR assay. Conclusion Our study compares not only genes that are up- and down-regulated in a drought-tolerant genotype under terminal drought stress and a drought susceptible genotype but also between the bulks of the selected RILs exhibiting extreme phenotypes. More than 50% of the genes identified have been shown to be associated with drought stress in chickpea for the first time. This study not only serves as resource for marker discovery, but can provide

  18. A Sorghum bicolor expression atlas reveals dynamic genotype-specific expression profiles for vegetative tissues of grain, sweet and bioenergy sorghums

    SciTech Connect

    Shakoor, N; Nair, R; Crasta, O; Morris, G; Feltus, A; Kresovich, S

    2014-01-23

    Background: Effective improvement in sorghum crop development necessitates a genomics-based approach to identify functional genes and QTLs. Sequenced in 2009, a comprehensive annotation of the sorghum genome and the development of functional genomics resources is key to enable the discovery and deployment of regulatory and metabolic genes and gene networks for crop improvement. Results: This study utilizes the first commercially available whole-transcriptome sorghum microarray (Sorgh-WTa520972F) to identify tissue and genotype-specific expression patterns for all identified Sorghum bicolor exons and UTRs. The genechip contains 1,026,373 probes covering 149,182 exons (27,577 genes) across the Sorghum bicolor nuclear, chloroplast, and mitochondrial genomes. Specific probesets were also included for putative non-coding RNAs that may play a role in gene regulation (e. g., microRNAs), and confirmed functional small RNAs in related species (maize and sugarcane) were also included in our array design. We generated expression data for 78 samples with a combination of four different tissue types (shoot, root, leaf and stem), two dissected stem tissues (pith and rind) and six diverse genotypes, which included 6 public sorghum lines (R159, Atlas, Fremont, PI152611, AR2400 and PI455230) representing grain, sweet, forage, and high biomass ideotypes. Conclusions: Here we present a summary of the microarray dataset, including analysis of tissue-specific gene expression profiles and associated expression profiles of relevant metabolic pathways. With an aim to enable identification and functional characterization of genes in sorghum, this expression atlas presents a new and valuable resource to the research community.

  19. A Sorghum bicolor expression atlas reveals dynamic genotype-specific expression profiles for vegetative tissues of grain, sweet and bioenergy sorghums

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective improvement in sorghum crop development necessitates a genomics-based approach to identify functional genes and QTLs. Sequenced in 2009, a comprehensive annotation of the sorghum genome and the development of functional genomics resources is key to enable the discovery and deployment of regulatory and metabolic genes and gene networks for crop improvement. Results This study utilizes the first commercially available whole-transcriptome sorghum microarray (Sorgh-WTa520972F) to identify tissue and genotype-specific expression patterns for all identified Sorghum bicolor exons and UTRs. The genechip contains 1,026,373 probes covering 149,182 exons (27,577 genes) across the Sorghum bicolor nuclear, chloroplast, and mitochondrial genomes. Specific probesets were also included for putative non-coding RNAs that may play a role in gene regulation (e.g., microRNAs), and confirmed functional small RNAs in related species (maize and sugarcane) were also included in our array design. We generated expression data for 78 samples with a combination of four different tissue types (shoot, root, leaf and stem), two dissected stem tissues (pith and rind) and six diverse genotypes, which included 6 public sorghum lines (R159, Atlas, Fremont, PI152611, AR2400 and PI455230) representing grain, sweet, forage, and high biomass ideotypes. Conclusions Here we present a summary of the microarray dataset, including analysis of tissue-specific gene expression profiles and associated expression profiles of relevant metabolic pathways. With an aim to enable identification and functional characterization of genes in sorghum, this expression atlas presents a new and valuable resource to the research community. PMID:24456189

  20. Whole-genome characterization of a Peruvian alpaca rotavirus isolate expressing a novel VP4 genotype.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Miguel; Gonçalves, Jorge Luiz S; Dias, Helver G; Manchego, Alberto; Pezo, Danilo; Santos, Norma

    2016-11-30

    The SA44 isolate of Rotavirus A (RVA) was identified from a neonatal Peruvian alpaca presenting with diarrhea, and the full-length genome sequence of the isolate (designated RVA/Alpaca-tc/PER/SA44/2014/G3P[40]) was determined. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the isolate possessed the genotype constellation G3-P[40]-I8-R3-C3-M3-A9-N3-T3-E3-H6, which differs considerably from those of RVA strains isolated from other species of the order Artiodactyla. Overall, the genetic constellation of the SA44 strain was quite similar to those of RVA strains isolated from a bat in Asia (MSLH14 and MYAS33). Nonetheless, phylogenetic analyses of each genome segment identified a distinct combination of genes. Several sequences were closely related to corresponding gene sequences in RVA strains from other species, including human (VP1, VP2, NSP1, and NSP2), simian (VP3 and NSP5), bat (VP6 and NSP4), and equine (NSP3). The VP7 gene sequence was closely related to RVA strains from a Peruvian alpaca (K'ayra/3368-10; 99.0% nucleotide and 99.7% amino acid identity) and from humans (RCH272; 95% nucleotide and 99.0% amino acid identity). The nucleotide sequence of the VP4 gene was distantly related to other VP4 sequences and was designated as the reference strain for the new P[40] genotype. This unique genetic makeup suggests that the SA44 strain emerged from multiple reassortment events between bat-, equine-, and human-like RVA strains.

  1. Virus-Like Particle Secretion and Genotype-Dependent Immunogenicity of Dengue Virus Serotype 2 DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Galula, Jedhan U.; Shen, Wen-Fan; Chuang, Shih-Te

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus (DENV), composed of four distinct serotypes, is the most important and rapidly emerging arthropod-borne pathogen and imposes substantial economic and public health burdens. We constructed candidate vaccines containing the DNA of five of the genotypes of dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) and evaluated the immunogenicity, the neutralizing (Nt) activity of the elicited antibodies, and the protective efficacy elicited in mice immunized with the vaccine candidates. We observed a significant correlation between the level of in vitro virus-like particle secretion, the elicited antibody response, and the protective efficacy of the vaccines containing the DNA of the different DENV genotypes in immunized mice. However, higher total IgG antibody levels did not always translate into higher Nt antibodies against homologous and heterologous viruses. We also found that, in contrast to previous reports, more than 50% of total IgG targeted ectodomain III (EDIII) of the E protein, and a substantial fraction of this population was interdomain highly neutralizing flavivirus subgroup-cross-reactive antibodies, such as monoclonal antibody 1B7-5. In addition, the lack of a critical epitope(s) in the Sylvatic genotype virus recognized by interdomain antibodies could be the major cause of the poor protection of mice vaccinated with the Asian 1 genotype vaccine (pVD2-Asian 1) from lethal challenge with virus of the Sylvatic genotype. In conclusion, although the pVD2-Asian 1 vaccine was immunogenic, elicited sufficient titers of Nt antibodies against all DENV-2 genotypes, and provided 100% protection against challenge with virus of the homologous Asian 1 genotype and virus of the heterologous Cosmopolitan genotype, it is critical to monitor the potential emergence of Sylvatic genotype viruses, since vaccine candidates under development may not protect vaccinated humans from these viruses. IMPORTANCE Five genotype-specific dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) DNA vaccine

  2. Molecular Cloning, Expression Pattern and Genotypic Effects on Glucoraphanin Biosynthetic Related Genes in Chinese Kale (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra Bailey).

    PubMed

    Yin, Ling; Chen, Changming; Chen, Guoju; Cao, Bihao; Lei, Jianjun

    2015-11-11

    Glucoraphanin is a plant secondary metabolite that is involved in plant defense and imparts health-promoting properties to cruciferous vegetables. In this study, three genes involved in glucoraphanin metabolism, branched-chain aminotransferase 4 (BCAT4), methylthioalkylmalate synthase 1 (MAM1) and dihomomethionine N-hydroxylase (CYP79F1), were cloned from Chinese kale (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra Bailey). Sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis identified these genes and confirmed the evolutionary status of Chinese kale. The transcript levels of BCAT4, MAM1 and CYP79F1 were higher in cotyledon, leaf and stem compared with flower and silique. BCAT4, MAM1 and CYP79F1 were expressed throughout leaf development with lower transcript levels during the younger stages. Glucoraphanin content varied extensively among different varieties, which ranged from 0.25 to 2.73 µmol·g(-1) DW (dry weight). Expression levels of BCAT4 and MAM1 were high at vegetative-reproductive transition phase, while CYP79F1 was expressed high at reproductive phase. BCAT4, MAM1 and CYP79F1 were expressed significantly high in genotypes with high glucoraphanin content. All the results provided a better understanding of the roles of BCAT4, MAM1 and CYP79F1 in the glucoraphanin biosynthesis of Chinese kale.

  3. Dynamics of PBMC gene expression in hepatitis C virus genotype 1-infected patients during combined peginterferon/ribavirin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ming-Ying; Huang, Ching-I; Hsieh, Ming-Yen; Hsieh, Tusty-Juan; Hsi, Edward; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Tsai, Yi-Shan; Lin, Ching-Chih; Hsieh, Meng-Hsuan; Liang, Po-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Hung; Hou, Nai-Jen; Yeh, Ming-Lun; Huang, Chung-Feng; Lin, Zu-Yau; Chen, Shinn-Cherng; Huang, Jee-Fu; Chuang, Wan-Long; Dai, Chia-Yen; Yu, Ming-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) can replicate in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), which can produce interferon to defend against virus infection. We hypothesized that dynamic gene expression in PBMCs might impact the treatment efficacy of peginterferon/ribavirin in HCV patients. PBMCs were collected at baseline, 1st week and 4th week of treatment from 27 chronic HCV-1 patients with 48-week peginterferon/ribavirin therapy (screening dataset n = 7; validation dataset n = 20). A sustained virologic response (SVR) was defined as undetectable HCV RNA throughout the 24 weeks after end-of-treatment. A complete early virologic response (cEVR) was defined as negative HCV RNA at treatment week 12. Forty-three differentially expressed genes identified by Affymetrix microarray were validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Thirteen genes at week 1 and 24 genes at week 4 were upregulated in the SVR group compared with the non-SVR group. We selected 8 target genes (RSAD2, LOC26010, HERC5, HERC6, IFI44, SERPING1, IFITM3, and DDX60) at week 1 as the major components of the predictive model. This predictive model reliably stratified the responders and non-responders at week 1 (AUC = 0.89, p = 0.007 for SVR; AUC = 0.95, p = 0.003 for cEVR), especially among patients carrying the IL28B rs8099917 TT genotype (AUC = 0.89, p = 0.02 for SVR; AUC = 1.0, p = 0.008 for cEVR). The performance of this predictive model was superior to traditional predictors, including the rapid virologic response, viral load and IL28B genotype. PMID:27542257

  4. Cobalt stimulates HIF-1-dependent but inhibits HIF-2-dependent gene expression in liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Befani, Christina; Mylonis, Ilias; Gkotinakou, Ioanna-Maria; Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Hu, Cheng-Jun; Simos, George; Liakos, Panagiotis

    2013-11-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are transcriptional regulators that mediate the cellular response to low oxygen. Although HIF-1 is usually considered as the principal mediator of hypoxic adaptation, several tissues and different cell types express both HIF-1 and HIF-2 isoforms under hypoxia or when treated with hypoxia mimetic chemicals such as cobalt. However, the similarities or differences between HIF-1 and HIF-2, in terms of their tissue- and inducer-specific activation and function, are not adequately characterized. To address this issue, we investigated the effects of true hypoxia and hypoxia mimetics on HIF-1 and HIF-2 induction and specific gene transcriptional activity in two hepatic cancer cell lines, Huh7 and HepG2. Both hypoxia and cobalt caused rapid induction of both HIF-1α and HIF-2α proteins. Hypoxia induced erythropoietin (EPO) expression and secretion in a HIF-2-dependent way. Surprisingly, however, EPO expression was not induced when cells were treated with cobalt. In agreement, both HIF-1- and HIF-2-dependent promoters (of PGK and SOD2 genes, respectively) were activated by hypoxia while cobalt only activated the HIF-1-dependent PGK promoter. Unlike cobalt, other hypoxia mimetics such as DFO and DMOG activated both types of promoters. Furthermore, cobalt impaired the hypoxic stimulation of HIF-2, but not HIF-1, activity and cobalt-induced HIF-2α interacted poorly with USF-2, a HIF-2-specific co-activator. These data show that, despite similar induction of HIF-1α and HIF-2α protein expression, HIF-1 and HIF-2 specific gene activating functions respond differently to different stimuli and suggest the operation of oxygen-independent and gene- or tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms involving additional transcription factors or co-activators.

  5. T cell development critically depends on prethymic stromal patched expression.

    PubMed

    Uhmann, Anja; van den Brandt, Jens; Dittmann, Kai; Hess, Ina; Dressel, Ralf; Binder, Claudia; Lühder, Fred; Christiansen, Hans; Fassnacht, Martin; Bhandoola, Avinash; Wienands, Jürgen; Reichardt, Holger M; Hahn, Heidi

    2011-03-15

    We recently described that T cell specification in mice deficient in the Hedgehog (Hh) receptor Patched (Ptch) is blocked at the level of the common lymphoid progenitor in the bone marrow (BM). Adoptive transfer of wild-type BM in Ptch-deficient mice provides evidence that T cell development strictly depends on Ptch expression in the nonhematopoietic compartment. Transplantation experiments using BM deficient in the glucocorticoid receptor exclude any involvement of the stress hormone corticosterone in our model. Using cell-type-specific knockout mice, we show that T cell development is independent of T cell-intrinsic Ptch expression. Furthermore, Ptch expression by the thymus stroma is dispensable, as revealed by fetal thymus organ culture and thymus transplantation. In contrast, analysis of the earliest thymic progenitors in Ptch-deficient mice indicated that Ptch is required for the development or supply of thymic homing progenitors that give rise to earliest thymic progenitors. Collectively, our findings identified Ptch as an exclusive T cell-extrinsic factor necessary for proper development of T cells at their prethymic stage. This observation may be important for current considerations using Hh inhibitors upstream of Ptch in diseases accompanied by aberrant Hh signaling.

  6. Differentially expressed genes and proteins upon drought acclimation in tolerant and sensitive genotypes of Coffea canephora

    PubMed Central

    Marraccini, Pierre; Vinecky, Felipe; Alves, Gabriel S.C.; Ramos, Humberto J.O.; Elbelt, Sonia; Vieira, Natalia G.; Carneiro, Fernanda A.; Sujii, Patricia S.; Alekcevetch, Jean C.; Silva, Vânia A.; DaMatta, Fábio M.; Ferrão, Maria A.G.; Leroy, Thierry; Pot, David; Vieira, Luiz G.E.; da Silva, Felipe R.; Andrade, Alan C.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying drought acclimation in coffee plants by the identification of candidate genes (CGs) using different approaches. The first approach used the data generated during the Brazilian Coffee expressed sequence tag (EST) project to select 13 CGs by an in silico analysis (electronic northern). The second approach was based on screening macroarrays spotted with plasmid DNA (coffee ESTs) with separate hybridizations using leaf cDNA probes from drought-tolerant and susceptible clones of Coffea canephora var. Conilon, grown under different water regimes. This allowed the isolation of seven additional CGs. The third approach used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to identify proteins displaying differential accumulation in leaves of drought-tolerant and susceptible clones of C. canephora. Six of them were characterized by MALDI-TOF-MS/MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption-time of flight-tandem mass spectrometry) and the corresponding proteins were identified. Finally, additional CGs were selected from the literature, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to analyse the expression of all identified CGs. Altogether, >40 genes presenting differential gene expression during drought acclimation were identified, some of them showing different expression profiles between drought-tolerant and susceptible clones. Based on the obtained results, it can be concluded that factors involved a complex network of responses probably involving the abscisic signalling pathway and nitric oxide are major molecular determinants that might explain the better efficiency in controlling stomata closure and transpiration displayed by drought-tolerant clones of C. canephora. PMID:22511801

  7. Identifying differentially expressed genes in trophozoites and cysts of Acanthamoeba T4 genotype: Implications for developing new treatments for Acanthamoeba keratitis.

    PubMed

    Abedkhojasteh, Hoda; Niyyati, Maryam; Rezaei, Sasan; Mohebali, Mehdi; Farnia, Shohreh; Kazemi-Rad, Elham; Roozafzoon, Reza; Sianati, Hamed; Rezaeian, Mostafa; Heidari, Mansour

    2015-02-01

    Acanthamoeba T4 genotype is the most prevalent genotype associated with amoebic keratitis. Acanthamoeba keratitis therapy is difficult due to transformation of trophozoite to cyst stage, which hinders the treatment of the disease. Although encystation assists the organism to survive against the chemotherapeutic compounds, the precise mechanism of encystation remains poorly understood. The purpose of this work was to identify differentially expressed genes in Acanthamoeba T4 genotype which might be useful for understanding of the encystment process and may thus help develop more efficient treatment. The mRNA profile of trophozoite and cyst of Acanthamoeba T4 genotype isolated from a soft contact lens wearer were analyzed using a cDNA amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) technique. Subsequently, a real time reverse transcriptase-PCR was performed to validate the cDNA-AFLP results. Three genes, heat shock protein70 (hsp70), actin-I and elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1α) were differentially expressed during Acanthamoeba differentiation. An in silico result predicted that transformation of trophozoite to cyst could be mediated through their cooperation with the protein partners interaction. Taken together, our experimental and bioinformatics findings suggested potential functions of hsp70, EF-1α and actin-I in differentiation of Acanthamoeba T4 genotype which may be useful in the design of an efficient therapeutic strategy in AK.

  8. The phenotype masks the genotype: A possible new expression of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mimbacas, Adriana; Vitarella, Graciela; Souto, Jorge; Reyes, Ana Laura; Farias, Joaquina; Fernández, Mariana; Fabregat, Matias; Javiel, Gerardo

    2012-06-01

    The concept of a new form of diabetes, with signs of both types 1 and 2, has not been often considered, until recently. It is of immense interest to explore the role of the admixture that characterizes the Uruguayan population (higher and different from other Latin America countries) for the presence of such expression of that particular disease. We describe here a child who possibly presents with this expression. He had typical signs of both diabetic conditions: type 1 (young age, positive immunologic and genetic markers, ketoacidosis) and type 2 (obesity [body mass index = 36 kg/m(2)] and acanthosis nigricans). In spite of complying with the established guidelines, therapeutic and nutritional control, quality of life and good metabolic control, the patient's obesity had been continually increasing. Looking for a genetic explanation, we studied three single nucleotide polymorphisms involved in three different metabolic pathways (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2, insulin receptor substrate-1 and uncoupling protein-2) associated with insulin resistance. Our patient showed three mutations, GG, GA, GG, associated with insulin resistance that explains obesity associated with limited response to the commonly used drugs. According to the clinical presentation and the genetic and immunological background, we considered that this patient presents with a new form of diabetes. We have termed this particular disease "hybrid diabetes" because of the involvement of genes associated with both the classical type of diabetes. However, at least in an admixed population such as in Uruguay, clinical classification would not strictly dictate the choice of treatment.

  9. The phenotype masks the genotype: A possible new expression of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mimbacas, Adriana; Vitarella, Graciela; Souto, Jorge; Reyes, Ana Laura; Farias, Joaquina; Fernández, Mariana; Fabregat, Matias; Javiel, Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    The concept of a new form of diabetes, with signs of both types 1 and 2, has not been often considered, until recently. It is of immense interest to explore the role of the admixture that characterizes the Uruguayan population (higher and different from other Latin America countries) for the presence of such expression of that particular disease. We describe here a child who possibly presents with this expression. He had typical signs of both diabetic conditions: type 1 (young age, positive immunologic and genetic markers, ketoacidosis) and type 2 (obesity [body mass index = 36 kg/m2] and acanthosis nigricans). In spite of complying with the established guidelines, therapeutic and nutritional control, quality of life and good metabolic control, the patient's obesity had been continually increasing. Looking for a genetic explanation, we studied three single nucleotide polymorphisms involved in three different metabolic pathways (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2, insulin receptor substrate-1 and uncoupling protein-2) associated with insulin resistance. Our patient showed three mutations, GG, GA, GG, associated with insulin resistance that explains obesity associated with limited response to the commonly used drugs. According to the clinical presentation and the genetic and immunological background, we considered that this patient presents with a new form of diabetes. We have termed this particular disease “hybrid diabetes” because of the involvement of genes associated with both the classical type of diabetes. However, at least in an admixed population such as in Uruguay, clinical classification would not strictly dictate the choice of treatment. PMID:27625813

  10. The Role of CYP2C8 and CYP2C9 Genotypes in Losartan-Dependent Inhibition of Paclitaxel Metabolism in Human Liver Microsomes.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Yuji; Senda, Asuna; Toda, Takaki; Eliasson, Erik; Rane, Anders; Inotsume, Nobuo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to further investigate a previously identified metabolic interaction between losartan and paclitaxel, which is one of the marker substrates of CYP2C8, by using human liver microsomes (HLMs) from donors with different CYP2C8 and CYP2C9 genotypes. Although CYP2C8 and CYP2C9 exhibit genetic linkage, previous studies have yet to determine whether losartan or its active metabolite, EXP-3174 which is specifically generated by CYP2C9, is responsible for CYP2C8 inhibition. Concentrations of 6α-hydroxypaclitaxel and EXP-3174 were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography after incubations with paclitaxel, losartan or EXP-3174 in HLMs from seven donors with different CYP2C8 and CYP2C9 genotypes. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 ) values were not fully dependent on CYP2C8 genotypes. Although the degree of inhibition was small, losartan significantly inhibited the production of 6α-hydroxypaclitaxel at a concentration of 1 μmol/L in only HL20 with the CYP2C8*3/*3 genotype. HLMs with either CYP2C9*2/*2 or CYP2C9*1/*3 exhibited a lower losartan intrinsic clearance (Vmax /Km ) than other HLMs including those with CYP2C9*1/*1 and CYP2C9*1/*2. Significant inhibition of 6α-hydroxypaclitaxel formation by EXP-3174 could only be found at levels that were 50 times higher (100 μmol/L) than the maximum concentration generated in the inhibition study using losartan. These results suggest that the metabolic interaction between losartan and paclitaxel is dependent on losartan itself rather than its metabolite and that the CYP2C8 inhibition by losartan is not affected by the CYP2C9 genotype. Further study is needed to define the effect of CYP2C8 genotypes on losartan-paclitaxel interaction.

  11. Anoctamin 5 muscular dystrophy in Denmark: prevalence, genotypes, phenotypes, cardiac findings, and muscle protein expression.

    PubMed

    Witting, Nanna; Duno, Morten; Petri, Helle; Krag, Thomas; Bundgaard, Henning; Kober, Lars; Vissing, John

    2013-08-01

    Since the initial description in 2010 of anoctamin 5 deficiency as a cause of muscular dystrophy, a handful of papers have described this disease in cases of mixed populations. We report the first large regional study and present data on new aspects of prevalence, muscular and cardiac phenotypic characteristics, and muscle protein expression. All patients in our neuromuscular unit with genetically unclassified, recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2), Miyoshi-type distal myopathy (MMD) or persistent asymptomatic hyperCK-emia (PACK) were assessed for mutations in the ANO5 gene. Genetically confirmed patients were evaluated with muscular and cardiopulmonary examination. Among 40 unclassified patients (28 LGMD2, 5 MMD, 7 PACK), 20 were homozygous or compound heterozygous for ANO5 mutations, (13 LGMD2, 5 MMD, 2 PACK). Prevalence of ANO5 deficiency in Denmark was estimated at 1:100.000 and ANO5 mutations caused 11 % of our total cohort of LGMD2 cases making it the second most common LGMD2 etiology in Denmark. Eight patients complained of dysphagia and 3 dated symptoms of onset in childhood. Cardiac examinations revealed increased frequency of premature ventricular contractions. Four novel putative pathogenic mutations were discovered. Total prevalence and distribution of phenotypes of ANO5 disease in a representative regional cohort are described for the first time. A high prevalence of ANO5 deficiency was found among patients with unclassified LGMD2 (46 %) and MMD (100 %). The high incidence of reported dysphagia is a new phenotypic feature not previously reported, and cardiac investigations revealed that ANO5-patients may have an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmia.

  12. Integrated genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling reveals BCL11B as a putative oncogene in acute myeloid leukemia with 14q32 aberrations.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Saman; Sanders, Mathijs A; Zeilemaker, Annelieke; Geertsma-Kleinekoort, Wendy M C; Koenders, Jasper E; Kavelaars, Francois G; Abbas, Zabiollah G; Mahamoud, Souad; Chu, Isabel W T; Hoogenboezem, Remco; Peeters, Justine K; van Drunen, Ellen; van Galen, Janneke; Beverloo, H Berna; Löwenberg, Bob; Valk, Peter J M

    2014-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a neoplasm characterized by recurrent molecular aberrations traditionally demonstrated by cytogenetic analyses. We used high density genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling to reveal acquired cryptic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia. By genome-wide genotyping of 137 cases of primary acute myeloid leukemia, we disclosed a recurrent focal amplification on chromosome 14q32, which included the genes BCL11B, CCNK, C14orf177 and SETD3, in two cases. In the affected cases, the BCL11B gene showed consistently high mRNA expression, whereas the expression of the other genes was unperturbed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on 40 cases of acute myeloid leukemia with high BCL11B mRNA expression [2.5-fold above median; 40 out of 530 cases (7.5%)] revealed 14q32 abnormalities in two additional cases. In the four BCL11B-rearranged cases the 14q32 locus was fused to different partner chromosomes. In fact, in two cases, we demonstrated that the focal 14q32 amplifications were integrated into transcriptionally active loci. The translocations involving BCL11B result in increased expression of full-length BCL11B protein. The BCL11B-rearranged acute myeloid leukemias expressed both myeloid and T-cell markers. These biphenotypic acute leukemias all carried FLT3 internal tandem duplications, a characteristic marker of acute myeloid leukemia. BCL11B mRNA expression in acute myeloid leukemia appeared to be strongly associated with expression of other T-cell-specific genes. Myeloid 32D(GCSF-R) cells ectopically expressing Bcl11b showed decreased proliferation rate and less maturation. In conclusion, by an integrated approach involving high-throughput genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling we identified BCL11B as a candidate oncogene in acute myeloid leukemia.

  13. Integrated genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling reveals BCL11B as a putative oncogene in acute myeloid leukemia with 14q32 aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Saman; Sanders, Mathijs A.; Zeilemaker, Annelieke; Geertsma-Kleinekoort, Wendy M.C.; Koenders, Jasper E.; Kavelaars, Francois G.; Abbas, Zabiollah G.; Mahamoud, Souad; Chu, Isabel W.T.; Hoogenboezem, Remco; Peeters, Justine K.; van Drunen, Ellen; van Galen, Janneke; Beverloo, H. Berna; Löwenberg, Bob; Valk, Peter J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a neoplasm characterized by recurrent molecular aberrations traditionally demonstrated by cytogenetic analyses. We used high density genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling to reveal acquired cryptic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia. By genome-wide genotyping of 137 cases of primary acute myeloid leukemia, we disclosed a recurrent focal amplification on chromosome 14q32, which included the genes BCL11B, CCNK, C14orf177 and SETD3, in two cases. In the affected cases, the BCL11B gene showed consistently high mRNA expression, whereas the expression of the other genes was unperturbed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on 40 cases of acute myeloid leukemia with high BCL11B mRNA expression [2.5-fold above median; 40 out of 530 cases (7.5%)] revealed 14q32 abnormalities in two additional cases. In the four BCL11B-rearranged cases the 14q32 locus was fused to different partner chromosomes. In fact, in two cases, we demonstrated that the focal 14q32 amplifications were integrated into transcriptionally active loci. The translocations involving BCL11B result in increased expression of full-length BCL11B protein. The BCL11B-rearranged acute myeloid leukemias expressed both myeloid and T-cell markers. These biphenotypic acute leukemias all carried FLT3 internal tandem duplications, a characteristic marker of acute myeloid leukemia. BCL11B mRNA expression in acute myeloid leukemia appeared to be strongly associated with expression of other T-cell-specific genes. Myeloid 32D(GCSF-R) cells ectopically expressing Bcl11b showed decreased proliferation rate and less maturation. In conclusion, by an integrated approach involving high-throughput genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling we identified BCL11B as a candidate oncogene in acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:24441149

  14. Chronic Cocaine Use Causes Changes in the Striatal Proteome Depending on the Endogenous Expression of Pleiotrophin.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Rodríguez, Marta; Herradón, Gonzalo; Ferrer-Alcón, Marcel; Uribarri, María; Pérez-García, Carmen

    2015-07-20

    The neurotrophic factor pleiotrophin (PTN) is upregulated in different brain areas after the administration of different drugs of abuse, including psychostimulants. PTN has been shown to prevent cocaine-induced cytotoxicity in NG108-15 and PC12 cells. We previously demonstrated that specific phosphoproteins related to neurodegeneration processes are differentially regulated in the mouse striatum by a single cocaine (15 mg/kg) administration depending on the endogenous expression of PTN. Since neurodegenerative processes are usually observed in patients exposed to toxicants for longer duration, we have now performed a striatal proteomic study using samples enriched in phosphorylated proteins from PTN knockout (PTN-/-) mice, from mice with transgenic PTN overexpression (PTN-Tg) in the brain, and from wild type (WT) mice after a chronic treatment with cocaine (15 mg/kg/day for 7 days). We have successfully identified 23 proteins significantly affected by chronic cocaine exposure, genotype, or both. Most of these proteins, including peroxiredoxin-6 (PRDX6), triosephosphate isomerase (TPI1), ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 (UCHL1), and annexins A5 (ANXA5) and A7 (ANXA7), may be of significant importance because they were previously identified in proteomic studies in animals treated with psychostimulants and/or because they are related to neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. The data support a protective role of PTN against chronic cocaine-induced neural alterations.

  15. Genotypic analysis and latent membrane protein 1 expression of Epstein-Barr virus in extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma from Northern Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haijuan; Li, Hui; Xing, Xiaoming; Zhao, Chengquan; Luo, Bing

    2015-08-01

    As the most common NK/T-cell lymphoma in Asian countries, extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL), has unique clinical features and a strong association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In order to gain a preliminary understanding of the relationship between ENKTL and EBV, we performed genotypic analysis of EBV and investigated LMP1 expression in extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma. Our study shows that ENKTL is an EBV-associated malignancy and that A, C and F are the predominant EBV genotypes in northern China. LMP1 expression is stronger in extranasal sites than nasal sites, and the expression level is strongly correlated to ENKTL and may play an important role in the development of ENKTL.

  16. Lignification in sugarcane: biochemical characterization, gene discovery, and expression analysis in two genotypes contrasting for lignin content.

    PubMed

    Bottcher, Alexandra; Cesarino, Igor; Santos, Adriana Brombini dos; Vicentini, Renato; Mayer, Juliana Lischka Sampaio; Vanholme, Ruben; Morreel, Kris; Goeminne, Geert; Moura, Jullyana Cristina Magalhães Silva; Nobile, Paula Macedo; Carmello-Guerreiro, Sandra Maria; Anjos, Ivan Antonio dos; Creste, Silvana; Boerjan, Wout; Landell, Marcos Guimarães de Andrade; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2013-12-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is currently one of the most efficient crops in the production of first-generation biofuels. However, the bagasse represents an additional abundant lignocellulosic resource that has the potential to increase the ethanol production per plant. To achieve a more efficient conversion of bagasse into ethanol, a better understanding of the main factors affecting biomass recalcitrance is needed. Because several studies have shown a negative effect of lignin on saccharification yield, the characterization of lignin biosynthesis, structure, and deposition in sugarcane is an important goal. Here, we present, to our knowledge, the first systematic study of lignin deposition during sugarcane stem development, using histological, biochemical, and transcriptional data derived from two sugarcane genotypes with contrasting lignin contents. Lignin amount and composition were determined in rind (outer) and pith (inner) tissues throughout stem development. In addition, the phenolic metabolome was analyzed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, which allowed the identification of 35 compounds related to the phenylpropanoid pathway and monolignol biosynthesis. Furthermore, the Sugarcane EST Database was extensively surveyed to identify lignin biosynthetic gene homologs, and the expression of all identified genes during stem development was determined by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Our data provide, to our knowledge, the first in-depth characterization of lignin biosynthesis in sugarcane and form the baseline for the rational metabolic engineering of sugarcane feedstock for bioenergy purposes.

  17. Lignification in Sugarcane: Biochemical Characterization, Gene Discovery, and Expression Analysis in Two Genotypes Contrasting for Lignin Content1[W

    PubMed Central

    Bottcher, Alexandra; Cesarino, Igor; Brombini dos Santos, Adriana; Vicentini, Renato; Mayer, Juliana Lischka Sampaio; Vanholme, Ruben; Morreel, Kris; Goeminne, Geert; Moura, Jullyana Cristina Magalhães Silva; Nobile, Paula Macedo; Carmello-Guerreiro, Sandra Maria; Antonio dos Anjos, Ivan; Creste, Silvana; Boerjan, Wout; Landell, Marcos Guimarães de Andrade; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is currently one of the most efficient crops in the production of first-generation biofuels. However, the bagasse represents an additional abundant lignocellulosic resource that has the potential to increase the ethanol production per plant. To achieve a more efficient conversion of bagasse into ethanol, a better understanding of the main factors affecting biomass recalcitrance is needed. Because several studies have shown a negative effect of lignin on saccharification yield, the characterization of lignin biosynthesis, structure, and deposition in sugarcane is an important goal. Here, we present, to our knowledge, the first systematic study of lignin deposition during sugarcane stem development, using histological, biochemical, and transcriptional data derived from two sugarcane genotypes with contrasting lignin contents. Lignin amount and composition were determined in rind (outer) and pith (inner) tissues throughout stem development. In addition, the phenolic metabolome was analyzed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, which allowed the identification of 35 compounds related to the phenylpropanoid pathway and monolignol biosynthesis. Furthermore, the Sugarcane EST Database was extensively surveyed to identify lignin biosynthetic gene homologs, and the expression of all identified genes during stem development was determined by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Our data provide, to our knowledge, the first in-depth characterization of lignin biosynthesis in sugarcane and form the baseline for the rational metabolic engineering of sugarcane feedstock for bioenergy purposes. PMID:24144790

  18. The wine yeast strain-dependent expression of genes implicated in sulfide production in response to nitrogen availability.

    PubMed

    Mendes-Ferreira, Ana; Barbosa, Catarina; Jimenez-Marti, Elena; Del Olmo, Marcel Li; Mendes-Faia, Arlete

    2010-09-01

    Sulfur metabolism in S. cerevisiae is well established, but the mechanisms underlying the formation of sulfide remain obscure. Here we investigated by real time RT-PCR the dependence of expression levels of MET3, MET5/ECM17, MET10, MET16 and MET17 along with SSU1 on nitrogen availability in two wine yeast strains that produce divergent sulfide profiles. MET3 was the most highly expressed of the genes studied in strain PYCC4072, and SSU1 in strain UCD522. Strains behaved differently according to the sampling times, with UCD522 and PYCC4072 showing the highest expression levels at 120h and 72h, respectively. In the presence of 267mg assimilable N/l, the genes were more highly expressed in strain UCD522 than in PYCC4072. MET5/ECM17 and MET17 were only weakly expressed in both strains under any condition tested. MET10 and SSU1 in both strains, but MET16 only in PYCC4072, were consistently up-regulated when sulfide production was inhibited. This study illustrates that strain genotype could be important in determining enzyme activities and therefore the rate of sulfide liberation. This linkage, for some yeast strains, of sulfide production to expression levels of genes associated to sulfate assimilation and sulfur amino acid biosynthesis could be relevant for defining new strategies for genetic improvement of wine yeasts.

  19. Variation in salinity tolerance of four lowland genotypes of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) as assessed by growth, physiological traits, and sodium transporter gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Carrasco, Karina; Antognoni, Fabiana; Coulibaly, Amadou Konotie; Lizardi, Susana; Covarrubias, Adriana; Martínez, Enrique A; Molina-Montenegro, Marco A; Biondi, Stefania; Zurita-Silva, Andrés

    2011-11-01

    Chenopodium quinoa (Willd.) is an Andean plant showing a remarkable tolerance to abiotic stresses. In Chile, quinoa populations display a high degree of genetic distancing, and variable tolerance to salinity. To investigate which tolerance mechanisms might account for these differences, four genotypes from coastal central and southern regions were compared for their growth, physiological, and molecular responses to NaCl at seedling stage. Seeds were sown on agar plates supplemented with 0, 150 or 300mM NaCl. Germination was significantly reduced by NaCl only in accession BO78. Shoot length was reduced by 150mM NaCl in three out of four genotypes, and by over 60% at 300mM (except BO78 which remained more similar to controls). Root length was hardly affected or even enhanced at 150mM in all four genotypes, but inhibited, especially in BO78, by 300mM NaCl. Thus, the root/shoot ratio was differentially affected by salt, with the highest values in PRJ, and the lowest in BO78. Biomass was also less affected in PRJ than in the other accessions, the genotype with the highest increment in proline concentration upon salt treatment. Free putrescine declined dramatically in all genotypes under 300mM NaCl; however (spermidine+spermine)/putrescine ratios were higher in PRJ than BO78. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses of two sodium transporter genes, CqSOS1 and CqNHX, revealed that their expression was differentially induced at the shoot and root level, and between genotypes, by 300mM NaCl. Expression data are discussed in relation to the degree of salt tolerance in the different accessions.

  20. p53 Degradation Activity, Expression, and Subcellular Localization of E6 Proteins from 29 Human Papillomavirus Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Mesplède, Thibault; Gagnon, David; Bergeron-Labrecque, Fanny; Azar, Ibrahim; Sénéchal, Hélène; Coutlée, François

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the etiological agents of cervical cancer and other human malignancies. HPVs are classified into high- and low-risk genotypes according to their association with cancer. Host cell transformation by high-risk HPVs relies in part on the ability of the viral E6 protein to induce the degradation of p53. We report the development of a cellular assay that accurately quantifies the p53 degradation activity of E6 in vivo, based on the fusion of p53 to Renilla luciferase (RLuc-p53). This assay was used to measure the p53 degradation activities of E6 proteins from 29 prevalent HPV types and variants of HPV type 16 (HPV16) and HPV33 by determining the amount of E6 expression vector required to reduce by half the levels of RLuc-p53 (50% effective concentration [EC50]). These studies revealed an unexpected variability in the p53 degradation activities of different E6 proteins, even among active types whose EC50s span more than 2 log units. Differences in activity were greater between types than between variants and did not correlate with differences in the intracellular localization of E6, with most being predominantly nuclear. Protein and mRNA expression of the 29 E6 proteins was also examined. For 16 high-risk types, spliced transcripts that encode shorter E6*I proteins of variable sizes and abundances were detected. Mutation of the splice donor site in five different E6 proteins increased their p53 degradation activity, suggesting that mRNA splicing can limit the activity of some high-risk E6 types. The quantification of p53 degradation in vivo represents a novel tool to systematically compare the oncogenic potentials of E6 proteins from different HPV types and variants. PMID:22013048

  1. Regulation of gene expression by 17β-estradiol in the arcuate nucleus of the mouse through ERE-dependent and ERE-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jennifer A; Mamounis, Kyle J; Yasrebi, Ali; Roepke, Troy A

    2016-03-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) modulates gene expression in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) to control homeostatic functions. In the ARC, estrogen receptor (ER) α is highly expressed and is an important contributor to E2's actions, controlling gene expression through estrogen response element (ERE)-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The objective of this study was to determine if known E2-regulated genes are regulated through these mechanisms. The selected genes have been shown to regulate homeostasis and have been separated into three subsections: channels, receptors, and neuropeptides. To determine if ERE-dependent or ERE-independent mechanisms regulate gene expression, two transgenic mouse models, an ERα knock-out (ERKO) and an ERα knock-in/knock-out (KIKO), which lacks a functional ERE binding domain, were used in addition to their wild-type littermates. Females of all genotypes were ovariectomized and injected with oil or estradiol benzoate (E2B). Our results suggest that E2B regulates multiple genes through these mechanisms. Of note, Cacna1g and Kcnmb1 channel expression was increased by E2B in WT females only, suggesting an ERE-dependent regulation. Furthermore, the NKB receptor, Tac3r, was suppressed by E2B in WT and KIKO females but not ERKO females, suggesting that ERα-dependent, ERE-independent signaling is necessary for Tac3r regulation. The adrenergic receptor Adra1b was suppressed by E2B in all genotypes indicating that ERα is not the primary receptor for E2B's actions. The neuropeptide Tac2 was suppressed by E2B through ERE-dependent mechanisms. These results indicate that E2B activates both ERα-dependent and independent signaling in the ARC through ERE-dependent and ERE-independent mechanisms to control gene expression.

  2. Regulation of gene expression by 17β-estradiol in the arcuate nucleus of the mouse through ERE-dependent and ERE-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jennifer A.; Mamounis, Kyle J.; Yasrebi, Ali; Roepke, Troy A.

    2016-01-01

    17β-estradiol (E2) modulates gene expression in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) to control homeostatic functions. In the ARC, estrogen receptor (ER) α is highly expressed and is an important contributor to E2’s actions, controlling gene expression through estrogen response element (ERE)-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The objective of this study was to determine if known E2-regulated genes are regulated through these mechanisms. The selected genes have been shown to regulate homeostasis and have been separated into three subsections: channels, receptors, and neuropeptides. To determine if ERE-dependent or ERE-independent mechanisms regulate gene expression, two transgenic mouse models, an ERα knock-out (ERKO) and an ERα knock-in/knock-out (KIKO), which lacks a functional ERE binding domain, were used in addition to their wild-type littermates. Females of all genotypes were ovariectomized and injected with oil or estradiol benzoate (E2B). Our results suggest that E2B regulates multiple genes through these mechanisms. Of note, Cacna1g and Kcnmb1 channel expression was increased by E2B in WT females only, suggesting an ERE-dependent regulation. Furthermore, the NKB receptor, Tac3r, was suppressed by E2B in WT and KIKO females but not ERKO females, suggesting that ERα-dependent, ERE-independent signaling is necessary for Tac3r regulation. The adrenergic receptor Adra1b was suppressed by E2B in all genotypes indicating that ERα is not the primary receptor for E2B’s actions. The neuropeptide Tac2 was suppressed by E2B through ERE-dependent mechanisms. These results indicate that E2B activates both ERα-dependent and independent signaling in the ARC through ERE-dependent and ERE-independent mechanisms to control gene expression. PMID:26768413

  3. Allele-Dependent Differences in Quorum-Sensing Dynamics Result in Variant Expression of Virulence Genes in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Geisinger, Edward; Chen, John

    2012-01-01

    Agr is an autoinducing, quorum-sensing system that functions in many Gram-positive species and is best characterized in the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, in which it is a global regulator of virulence gene expression. Allelic variations in the agr genes have resulted in the emergence of four quorum-sensing specificity groups in S. aureus, which correlate with different strain pathotypes. The basis for these predilections is unclear but is hypothesized to involve the phenomenon of quorum-sensing interference between strains of different agr groups, which may drive S. aureus strain isolation and divergence. Whether properties intrinsic to each agr allele directly influence virulence phenotypes within S. aureus is unknown. In this study, we examined group-specific differences in agr autoinduction and virulence gene regulation by utilizing congenic strains, each harboring a unique S. aureus agr allele, enabling a dissection of agr locus-dependent versus genotype-dependent effects on quorum-sensing dynamics and virulence factor production. Employing a reporter fusion to the principal agr promoter, P3, we observed allele-dependent differences in the timing and magnitude of agr activation. These differences were mediated by polymorphisms within the agrBDCA genes and translated to significant variations in the expression of a key transcriptional regulator, Rot, and of several important exoproteins and surface factors involved in pathogenesis. This work uncovers the contribution of divergent quorum-sensing alleles to variant expression of virulence determinants within a bacterial species. PMID:22467783

  4. Genome-Wide Transcription Profiles Reveal Genotype-Dependent Responses of Biological Pathways and Gene-Families in Daphnia Exposed to Single and Mixed Stressors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the possibilities and limitations of implementing a genome-wide transcription-based approach that takes into account genetic and environmental variation to better understand the response of natural populations to stressors. When exposing two different Daphnia pulex genotypes (a cadmium-sensitive and a cadmium-tolerant one) to cadmium, the toxic cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa, and their mixture, we found that observations at the transcriptomic level do not always explain observations at a higher level (growth, reproduction). For example, although cadmium elicited an adverse effect at the organismal level, almost no genes were differentially expressed after cadmium exposure. In addition, we identified oxidative stress and polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism-related pathways, as well as trypsin and neurexin IV gene-families as candidates for the underlying causes of genotypic differences in tolerance to Microcystis. Furthermore, the whole-genome transcriptomic data of a stressor mixture allowed a better understanding of mixture responses by evaluating interactions between two stressors at the gene-expression level against the independent action baseline model. This approach has indicated that ubiquinone pathway and the MAPK serine-threonine protein kinase and collagens gene-families were enriched with genes showing an interactive effect in expression response to exposure to the mixture of the stressors, while transcription and translation-related pathways and gene-families were mostly related with genotypic differences in interactive responses to this mixture. Collectively, our results indicate that the methods we employed may improve further characterization of the possibilities and limitations of transcriptomics approaches in the adverse outcome pathway framework and in predictions of multistressor effects on natural populations. PMID:24552364

  5. Genotype and expression analysis of two inbred mouse strains and two derived congenic strains suggest that most gene expression is trans regulated and sensitive to genetic background

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Differences in gene expression may be caused by nearby DNA polymorphisms (cis regulation) or by interactions of gene control regions with polymorphic transcription factors (trans regulation). Trans acting loci are much harder to detect than cis acting loci and their effects are much more sensitive to genetic background. Results To quantify cis and trans regulation we correlated haplotype data with gene expression in two inbred mouse strains and two derived congenic lines. Upstream haplotype differences between the parental strains suggested that 30-43% of differentially expressed genes were differentially expressed because of cis haplotype differences. These cis regulated genes displayed consistent and relatively tissue-independent differential expression. We independently estimated from the congenic mice that 71-85% of genes were trans regulated. Cis regulated genes were associated with low p values (p < 0.005) for differential expression, whereas trans regulated genes were associated with values 0.005 < p < 0.05. The genes differentially expressed between congenics and controls were not a subset of those that were differentially expressed between the founder lines, showing that these were dependent on genetic background. For example, the cholesterol synthesis pathway was strongly differentially expressed in the congenic mice by indirect trans regulation but this was not observable in the parental mice. Conclusions The evidence that most gene regulation is trans and strongly influenced by genetic background, suggests that pathways that are modified by an allelic variant, may only exhibit differential expression in the specific genetic backgrounds in which they were identified. This has significant implications for the interpretation of any QTL mapping study. PMID:20529291

  6. Signaling Pathways Related to Protein Synthesis and Amino Acid Concentration in Pig Skeletal Muscles Depend on the Dietary Protein Level, Genotype and Developmental Stages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingying; Li, Fengna; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tan, Bie; Li, Yinghui; Duan, Yehui; Blachier, François; Hu, Chien-An A; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Muscle growth is regulated by the homeostatic balance of the biosynthesis and degradation of muscle proteins. To elucidate the molecular interactions among diet, pig genotype, and physiological stage, we examined the effect of dietary protein concentration, pig genotype, and physiological stages on amino acid (AA) pools, protein deposition, and related signaling pathways in different types of skeletal muscles. The study used 48 Landrace pigs and 48 pure-bred Bama mini-pigs assigned to each of 2 dietary treatments: lower/GB (Chinese conventional diet)- or higher/NRC (National Research Council)-protein diet. Diets were fed from 5 weeks of age to respective market weights of each genotype. Samples of biceps femoris muscle (BFM, type I) and longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM, type II) were collected at nursery, growing, and finishing phases according to the physiological stage of each genotype, to determine the AA concentrations, mRNA levels for growth-related genes in muscles, and protein abundances of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Our data showed that the concentrations of most AAs in LDM and BFM of pigs increased (P<0.05) gradually with increasing age. Bama mini-pigs had generally higher (P<0.05) muscle concentrations of flavor-related AA, including Met, Phe, Tyr, Pro, and Ser, compared with Landrace pigs. The mRNA levels for myogenic determining factor, myogenin, myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2 A, and myostatin of Bama mini-pigs were higher (P<0.05) than those of Landrace pigs, while total and phosphorylated protein levels for protein kinase B, mTOR, and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinases (p70S6K), and ratios of p-mTOR/mTOR, p-AKT/AKT, and p-p70S6K/p70S6K were lower (P<0.05). There was a significant pig genotype-dependent effect of dietary protein on the levels for mTOR and p70S6K. When compared with the higher protein-NRC diet, the lower protein-GB diet increased (P<0.05) the levels for mTOR and p70S6K in Bama mini-pigs, but

  7. Establishment of stable Huh-7 cell lines expressing various hepatitis C virus genotype 3a protein: an in-vitro testing system for novel anti-HCV drugs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the leading cause of chronic hepatitis which progresses to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) afflicting > 170 million people worldwide. HCV 3a is the most common genotype (about 70% of all genotypes) circulating in Pakistan. Expression of HCV individual gene of 3a would facilitate therapeutic and vaccines strategies against chronic HCV and liver Cirrhosis. The aim of the present study was the establishment of stable Huh-7 cell lines expressing structural and non structural proteins of HCV Genotype 3a Pakistani isolate obtained from chronic HCV patients. Methods Blood samples were obtained from chronic HCV-3a positive patients. HCV individual genes were amplified using PCR with gene specific primers having restriction sites. These gene amplicons were cloned in mammalian expression vector PcDNA3.1+. Huh-7 cell lines were transfected with these constructed plasmids having structural or non-structural HCV genes in confluent cells with lipofectamine. Positive clones were selected with G418 and then confirmed by genome PCR. Subsequently, transcription and expression of the integrated genes were demonstrated by RT-PCR, sequencing and Western blot analysis. Results We successfully cloned and express five HCV-3a genes in PcDNA3.1+ mammalian expression vector. Results of western blot and sequencing PCR confirmed the stable expression of these five genes. Conclusion The stable cell-lines expressing HCV-3a individual genes would be a useful tool to investigate the role of various HCV proteins on HCV disease outcome and testing of new therapeutic strategies against HCV. PMID:21711509

  8. History dependent effects on phenotypic expression of a newly emerged gene.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takao; Kashiwagi, Akiko; Mori, Kotaro; Urabe, Itaru; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2004-11-01

    In this study, we investigate the history dependence of the penetrance of a newly emerged gene. Penetrance is defined as the percentage of individuals with a given genotype who exhibit the phenotype associated with that particular genotype. Here, we used the glutamine synthetase gene and its mutants with lower fitness as model genes. They were introduced into host cells of Escherichia coli deprived of the gene, and their penetrance was measured using the host having a different history: either with or without glutamine starvation. Results show that for all genes tested, the value of penetrance was higher when they were introduced into the host cell without starvation than that when introduced into the starved cell, demonstrating the history dependence of the penetrance of a newly emerged gene. In addition, genes with lower fitness showed lower penetrance, and the effect of the difference in fitness on gene penetrance also depended on the history of the host cell.

  9. Effect of the Arg389Gly β₁-adrenoceptor polymorphism on plasma renin activity and heart rate, and the genotype-dependent response to metoprolol treatment.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Morten; Andersen, Jon T; Jimenez-Solem, Espen; Broedbaek, Kasper; Hjelvang, Brian R; Henriksen, Trine; Frandsen, Erik; Forman, Julie L; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Køber, Lars; Poulsen, Henrik E

    2012-09-01

    1. A gene-drug interaction has been indicated between β₁-adrenoceptor-selective beta-blockers and the Arg389Gly polymorphism (rs1801253) in the adrenergic beta-1 receptor gene (ADRB1). In the present study, we investigated the effect of the ADRB1 Arg389Gly polymorphism on plasma renin activity (PRA) and heart rate (HR), as well as genotype-dependent responses to metoprolol and exercise. 2. Twenty-nine healthy male subjects participated in two treatment periods (placebo and 200 mg/day metoprolol). A 15 min submaximal exercise test was performed after each treatment period and PRA and HR were measured before and after exercise. 3. Before exercise, median PRA was lower in Gly/Gly subjects than in Arg/Arg subjects after both placebo (P = 0.030) and metoprolol (P = 0.020) treatment. After placebo, the exercise-induced increase in PRA was greater in Gly/Gly than Arg/Gly and Arg/Arg subjects (P = 0.033). The linear association between log(PRA) and log(metoprolol concentration) varied significantly between genotypes (P = 0.024). In Gly/Gly subjects, PRA decreased significantly with metoprolol concentration before (P = 0.025) and after exercise (P < 0.001), whereas in Arg/Gly and Arg/Arg subjects metoprolol concentration had no effect on PRA. The effect of metoprolol concentration on PRA in Gly/Gly subjects was enhanced by exercise (P = 0.044). No significant differences in HR were seen between genotype groups. 4. Resting PRA was lower in Gly/Gly than Arg/Arg subjects and the effect of exercise and metoprolol concentration on PRA was stronger in Gly/Gly subjects than with the other two genotypes. Thus, Gly/Gly heart failure patients may require lower doses of metoprolol than other patients to block neurohumoral hyperactivity.

  10. The Study of HFE Genotypes and Its Expression Effect on Iron Status of Iranian Haemochromatosis, Iron Deficiency Anemia Patients, Iron-Taker and Non Iron-Taker Controls.

    PubMed

    Beiranvand, Elham; Abediankenari, Saeid; Rostamian, Mosayeb; Beiranvand, Behnoush; Naazeri, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    The role of HFE gene mutations or its expression in regulation of iron metabolism of hereditary haemochromatosis (HH) patients is remained controversial. Therefore here the correlation between two common HFE genotype (p.C282Y, p.H63D) and HFE gene expression with iron status in HH, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and healthy Iranian participants was studied. For this purpose genotype determination was done by polymerase chain reaction--restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Real-Time PCR was applied for evaluation of HFE gene expression. Biochemical parameters and iron consumption were also assessed. Homozygote p.H63D mutation was seen in all HH patients and p.C282Y was not observed in any member of the population. A significant correlation was observed between serum ferritin (SF) level and gender or age of HH patients. p.H63D homozygote was seen to be able to significantly increase SF and transferrin saturation (TS) level without affecting on liver function. Our results also showed that iron consumption affects on TS level increasing. HFE gene expression level of IDA patients was significantly higher than other groups. Also the HFE gene expression was negatively correlated with TS. Finally, the main result of our study showed that loss of HFE function in HH is not derived from its gene expression inhibition and much higher HFE gene expression might lead to IDA. However we propose repeating of the study for more approval of our finding.

  11. Population effects of growth hormone transgenic coho salmon depend on food availability and genotype by environment interactions.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Robert H; D'Andrade, Mark; Uh, Mitchell; Biagi, Carlo A

    2004-06-22

    Environmental risk assessment of genetically modified organisms requires determination of their fitness and invasiveness relative to conspecifics and other ecosystem members. Cultured growth hormone transgenic coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) have enhanced feeding capacity and growth, which can result in large enhancements in body size (>7-fold) relative to nontransgenic salmon, but in nature, the ability to compete for available food is a key factor determining survival fitness and invasiveness of a genotype. When transgenic and nontransgenic salmon were cohabitated and competed for different levels of food, transgenic salmon consistently outgrew nontransgenic fish and could affect the growth of nontransgenic cohorts except when food availability was high. When food abundance was low, dominant individuals emerged, invariably transgenic, that directed strong agonistic and cannibalistic behavior to cohorts and dominated the acquisition of limited food resources. When food availability was low, all groups containing transgenic salmon experienced population crashes or complete extinctions, whereas groups containing only nontransgenic salmon had good (72.0 +/- 4.3% SE) survival, and their population biomass continued to increase. Thus, effects of growth hormone transgenic salmon on experimental populations were primarily mediated by an interaction between food availability and population structure. These data, while indicative of forces which may act on natural populations, also underscore the importance of genotype by environment interactions in influencing risk assessment data for genetically modified organisms and suggest that, for species such as salmon which are derived from large complex ecosystems, considerable caution is warranted in applying data from individual studies.

  12. Large-scale analysis of differential gene expression in coffee genotypes resistant and susceptible to leaf miner–toward the identification of candidate genes for marker assisted-selection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A successful development of herbivorous insects into plant tissues depends on coordination of metabolic processes. Plants have evolved complex mechanisms to recognize such attacks, and to trigger a defense response. To understand the transcriptional basis of this response, we compare gene expression profiles of two coffee genotypes, susceptible and resistant to leaf miner (Leucoptera coffella). A total of 22000 EST sequences from the Coffee Genome Database were selected for a microarray analysis. Fluorescence probes were synthesized using mRNA from the infested and non-infested coffee plants. Array hybridization, scanning and data normalization were performed using Nimble Scan® e ArrayStar® platforms. Genes with foldchange values +/-2 were considered differentially expressed. A validation of 18 differentially expressed genes was performed in infected plants using qRT-PCR approach. Results The microarray analysis indicated that resistant plants differ in gene expression profile. We identified relevant transcriptional changes in defense strategies before insect attack. Expression changes (>2.00-fold) were found in resistant plants for 2137 genes (1266 up-regulated and 873 down-regulated). Up-regulated genes include those responsible for defense mechanisms, hypersensitive response and genes involved with cellular function and maintenance. Also, our analyses indicated that differential expression profiles between resistant and susceptible genotypes are observed in the absence of leaf-miner, indicating that defense is already build up in resistant plants, as a priming mechanism. Validation of selected genes pointed to four selected genes as suitable candidates for markers in assisted-selection of novel cultivars. Conclusions Our results show evidences that coffee defense responses against leaf-miner attack are balanced with other cellular functions. Also analyses suggest a major metabolic reconfiguration that highlights the complexity of this response. PMID

  13. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Becker Muscular Dystrophy Confirmed by Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification: Genotype-Phenotype Correlation in a Large Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Vengalil, Seena; Preethish-Kumar, Veeramani; Polavarapu, Kiran; Mahadevappa, Manjunath; Sekar, Deepha; Purushottam, Meera; Thomas, Priya Treesa; Nashi, Saraswathi

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose Studies of cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) confirmed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) have determined the clinical characteristics, genotype, and relations between the reading frame and phenotype for different countries. This is the first such study from India. Methods A retrospective genotype-phenotype analysis of 317 MLPA-confirmed patients with DMD or BMD who visited the neuromuscular clinic of a quaternary referral center in southern India. Results The 317 patients comprised 279 cases of DMD (88%), 32 of BMD (10.1%), and 6 of intermediate phenotype (1.9%). Deletions accounted for 91.8% of cases, with duplications causing the remaining 8.2%. There were 254 cases of DMD (91%) with deletions and 25 (9%) due to duplications, and 31 cases (96.8%) of BMD with deletions and 1 (3.2%) due to duplication. All six cases of intermediate type were due to deletions. The most-common mutation was a single-exon deletion. Deletions of six or fewer exons constituted 68.8% of cases. The deletion of exon 50 was the most common. The reading-frame rule held in 90% of DMD and 94% of BMD cases. A tendency toward a lower IQ and earlier wheelchair dependence was observed with distal exon deletions, though a significant correlation was not found. Conclusions The reading-frame rule held in 90% to 94% of children, which is consistent with reports from other parts of the world. However, testing by MLPA is a limitation, and advanced sequencing methods including analysis of the structure of mutant dystrophin is needed for more-accurate assessments of the genotype-phenotype correlation. PMID:28079318

  14. IL36RN Mutations Affect Protein Expression and Function: A Basis for Genotype-Phenotype Correlation in Pustular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Marie; Bal, Elodie; Pei, Xue-Yuan; Madrange, Marine; Khelil, Amel; Sahel, Houria; Zenati, Akila; Makrelouf, Mohamed; Boubridaa, Khaled; Chiali, Amel; Smahi, Naima; Otsmane, Farida; Bouajar, Bakar; Marrakchi, Slaheddine; Turki, Hamida; Bourrat, Emmanuelle; Viguier, Manuelle; Hamel, Yamina; Bachelez, Hervé; Smahi, Asma

    2016-09-01

    Homozygous or compound heterozygous IL36RN gene mutations underlie the pathogenesis of psoriasis-related pustular eruptions including generalized pustular psoriasis, palmoplantar pustular psoriasis, acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau, and acute generalized exanthematous pustular eruption. We identified two unreported IL36RN homozygous mutations (c.41C>A/p.Ser14X and c.420_426del/p.Gly141MetfsX29) in patients with familial generalized pustular psoriasis. We analyzed the impact of a spectrum of IL36RN mutations on IL-36 receptor antagonist protein by using site-directed mutagenesis and expression in HEK293T cells. This enabled us to differentiate null mutations with complete absence of IL-36 receptor antagonist (the two previously unreported mutations, c.80T>C/p.Leu27Pro, c.28C>T/p.Arg10X, c.280G>T/p.Glu94X, c.368C>G/p.Thr123Arg, c.368C>T/p.Thr123Met, and c.227C>T/p.Pro76Leu) from mutations with decreased (c.95A>G/p.His32Arg, c.142C>T/p.Arg48Trp, and c.308C>T/p.Ser113Leu) or unchanged (c.304C>T/p.Arg102Trp and c.104A>G/p.Lys35Arg) protein expression. Functional assays measuring the impact of mutations on the capacity to repress IL-36-dependent activation of the NF-κB pathway showed complete functional impairment for null mutations, whereas partial or no impairment was observed for other mutations considered as hypomorphic. Finally, null mutations were associated with severe clinical phenotypes (generalized pustular psoriasis, acute generalized exanthematous pustular eruption), whereas hypomorphic mutations were identified in both localized (palmoplantar pustular psoriasis, acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau) and generalized variants. These results provide a preliminary basis for genotype-phenotype correlation in patients with deficiency of the IL-36Ra (DITRA), and suggest the involvement of other factors in the modulation of clinical expression.

  15. Infant satiety depends on transient expression of cholecystokinin-1 receptors on ependymal cells lining the third ventricle in mice.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Tomoya; Mohammad, Shahid; Morioka, Eri; Takiguchi, Soichi; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2013-03-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a hypothetical controller for suckling and infancy body weight, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Therefore, the present study analysed the mechanisms using mice lacking the CCK-1 receptor (CCK1R-/-). Although CCK1R-/- mice displayed normal weights at birth and adulthood, CCK1R-/- pups had enlarged adipocytes and were overweight from the first to second week after birth, regardless of maternal genotype. The lacZ reporter gene assay and/or calcium imaging analysis demonstrated that CCK-1 receptors were abundant in satiety-controlling regions such as the hypothalamus, brainstem, nodose ganglion and pylorus in adults, whereas these signals were few to lacking at pre-weanling stages. At postnatal day (PD) 6, the increase in cFos expression in the medullary nucleus tractus solitarius was similarly triggered by gastrointestinal milk- or saline filling in both genotypes, further indicating immature CCK-1 receptor function in an ascending satiety-controlling system during infancy. Conversely, third ventricle ependymal tanycyte-like cells expressed CCK-1 receptors with expression peaking at PD6. At PD6, wild-type but not CCK1R-/- mice had increased cFos immunoreactivity in ependymal cells following gastrointestinal milk filling whereas the response became negligible at PD12. In addition, ependymal cFos was not increased by saline filling, indicating that these responses are dependent on CCK-1 receptors, developmental stage and nutrients. Furthermore, body weights of wild-type pups were transiently increased by blocking ependymal CCK receptor function with microinjection of a CCK-1 antagonist, but not a CCK-2 antagonist. Hence, we demonstrate de novo functions of ependymal CCK-1 receptors and reveal a new aspect of infant satiety-controlling mechanisms.

  16. Alternative oxidase 1 (Aox1) gene expression in roots of Medicago truncatula is a genotype-specific component of salt stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mhadhbi, Haythem; Fotopoulos, Vasileios; Mylona, Photini V; Jebara, Moez; Aouani, Mohamed Elarbi; Polidoros, Alexios N

    2013-01-01

    Alternative oxidase (AOX) is the central component of the non-phosphorylating alternative respiratory pathway in plants and may be important for mitochondrial function during environmental stresses. Recently it has been proposed that Aox can be used as a functional marker for breeding stress tolerant plant varieties. This requires characterization of Aox alleles in plants with different degree of tolerance in a certain stress, affecting plant phenotype in a recognizable way. In this study we examined Aox1 gene expression levels in Medicago truncatula genotypes differing in salt stress tolerance, in order to uncover any correlation between Aox expression and tolerance to salt stress. Results demonstrated a specific induction of Aox1 gene expression in roots of the tolerant genotype that presented the lowest modulation in phenotypic and biochemical stress indices such as morphologic changes, protein level, lipid peroxidation and ROS generation. Similarly, in a previous study we reported that induction of antioxidant gene expression in the tolerant genotype contributed to the support of the antioxidant cellular machinery and stress tolerance. Correlation between expression patterns of the two groups of genes was revealed mainly in 48 h treated roots. Taken together, results from both experiments suggest that M. truncatula tolerance to salt stress may in part due to an efficient control of oxidative balance thanks to (i) induction of antioxidant systems and (ii) involvement of the AOX pathway. This reinforces the conclusion that differences in antioxidant mechanisms can be essential for salt stress tolerance in M. truncatula and possibly the corresponding genes, especially Aox, could be utilized as functional marker.

  17. Plasma homocysteine in adolescents depends on the interaction between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genotype, lipids and folate: a seroepidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Hernández, Valentín; Cano, Beatriz; Oya, Manuel; Gil, Ángel

    2009-01-01

    Background Many publications link high homocysteine levels to cardiovascular disease. In Spain there is little information on the prevalence of hyperhomocysteinaemia and associated vitamin factors among the general population, and less still among children. Cardiovascular risk factors in the childhood population may be related to the appearance of cardiovascular disease at adult age. The aim of this study is to establish a definition of hyperhomocysteinaemia in adolescents and to analyze the influence of vitamin and metabolic factors in homocysteine levels in this population group. Methods Descriptive, cross-sectional epidemiological study to estimate serum homocysteine, vitamin B12 and folate levels, as well as plasma total, HDL- and LDL- cholesterol in a schoolgoing population aged 13 to 17 years in Madrid, Spain. Spearman correlation analysis was performed to ascertain quantitative comparison, Pearson's χ2 test (frequency < 5, Fisher) was used for comparison of prevalences, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis test were used for comparison of means and Bonferroni correction was used for post-hoc tests. A multivariate logistic regression model was performed in the multivariate analysis. Results Based on the classic values for definition of hyperhomocysteinaemia in adults, prevalence of hyperhomocysteinaemia in the study population was: 1.26% for 15 μmol/L; and 2.52% for 12 μmol/L. Deficits in HDL cholesterol and serum folate levels yielded adjusted Odds Ratios (OR) for hyperhomocysteinemia of 2.786, 95% CI (1.089-7.126), and 5.140, 95% CI (2.347-11.256) respectively. Mutation of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T genotype also raises the risk of hyperhomocysteinaemia (CC→CT: OR = 2.362; 95% CI (1.107-5.042) CC→TT: OR = 6.124, 95% CI (2.301-16.303)) Conclusion A good definition of hyperhomocysteinaemia in adolescents is the 90th percentile, equivalent to 8.23 μmol/L. Risk factors for hyperhomocysteinaemia are cHDL and folate deficiency, and

  18. Aging, Alzheimer's, and APOE genotype influence the expression and neuronal distribution patterns of microtubule motor protein dynactin-P50

    PubMed Central

    Aboud, Orwa; Parcon, Paul A.; DeWall, K. Mark; Liu, Ling; Mrak, Robert E.; Griffin, W. Sue T.

    2015-01-01

    Reports from neural cell cultures and experimental animal studies provide evidence of age- and disease-related changes in retrograde transport of spent or misfolded proteins destined for degradation or recycling. However, few studies address these issues in human brain from those who either age without dementia and overt neuropathology, or succumb to Alzheimer's; especially as such propensity may be influenced by APOE genotype. We studied the expression and distribution of the dynein subunit dynactin-P50, the β amyloid precursor protein (βAPP), and hyperphosphorylated tau (P-tau) in tissues and tissue sections of brains from non-demented, neuropathology-free patients and from Alzheimer patients, with either APOE ε3,3 or APOE ε4,4. We found that advanced age in patients without dementia or neuropathological change was associated with coordinated increases in dynactin-P50 and βAPP in neurons in pyramidal layers of the hippocampus. In contrast, in Alzheimer's, βAPP and dynactin were significantly reduced. Furthermore, the dynactin-P50 and βAPP that was present was located primarily in dystrophic neurites in Aβ plaques. Tissues from Alzheimer patients with APOE ε3,3 had less P-tau, more βAPP, dynactin-P50, and synaptophysin than did tissues from Alzheimer patients carrying APOE ε4,4. It is logical to conclude, then, that as neurons age successfully, there is coordination between retrograde delivery and maintenance and repair, as well as between retrograde delivery and degradation and/or recycling of spent proteins. The buildup of proteins slated for repair, synaptic viability, transport, and re-cycling in neuron soma and dystrophic neurites suggest a loss of this coordination in Alzheimer neurons. Inheritance of APOE ε3,3 rather than APOE ε4,4, is associated with neuronal resilience, suggestive of better repair capabilities, more synapses, more efficient transport, and less hyperphosphorylation of tau. We conclude that even in disease the ε3 allele is

  19. Genotype-dependent molecular evolution of sheep bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prions in vitro affects their zoonotic potential.

    PubMed

    Krejciova, Zuzana; Barria, Marcelo A; Jones, Michael; Ironside, James W; Jeffrey, Martin; González, Lorenzo; Head, Mark W

    2014-09-19

    Prion diseases are rare fatal neurological conditions of humans and animals, one of which (variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease) is known to be a zoonotic form of the cattle disease bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). What makes one animal prion disease zoonotic and others not is poorly understood, but it appears to involve compatibility between the prion strain and the host prion protein sequence. Concerns have been raised that the United Kingdom sheep flock may have been exposed to BSE early in the cattle BSE epidemic and that serial BSE transmission in sheep might have resulted in adaptation of the agent, which may have come to phenotypically resemble scrapie while maintaining its pathogenicity for humans. We have modeled this scenario in vitro. Extrapolation from our results suggests that if BSE were to infect sheep in the field it may, with time and in some sheep genotypes, become scrapie-like at the molecular level. However, the results also suggest that if BSE in sheep were to come to resemble scrapie it would lose its ability to affect humans.

  20. [Dependence of the genotypic characteristics of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans on the physical, chemical, and electrophysical properties of pyrites].

    PubMed

    Tupikina, O V; Kondrat'eva, T F; Karavaĭko, G I

    2005-01-01

    This study focused on the effect of physical, chemical, and electrophysical properties of two pyrites, pyrite 1, which had hole-type (p-type) conductivity, and pyrite 2, with electron-type (n-type) conductivity, on the genotypic characteristics of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strains TFV-1 and TFBk, which were isolated from different substrates. After the adaptation of the strains to the pyrites at a pulp density of 1%, pulsed-field electrophoresis revealed changes in the chromosomal DNA of strain TFV-1 adapted to pyrite 1 and strain TFBk adapted to either of the pyrite types. In pyrite-adapted strain TFBk, the plasmid composition was the same as after growth on a medium containing ferrous iron, whereas, in strain TFV-1, changes in plasmid sizes or both in plasmid sizes and plasmid number occurred. After an increase in the density of the pyrite 2 pulp from 1 to 10%, the plasmid number increased from three to four, and, after an increase in the density of the pyrite 1 pulp from 1 to 7%, the plasmid number increased from two to six.

  1. Increased genetic risk or protection for canine autoimmune lymphocytic thyroiditis in Giant Schnauzers depends on DLA class II genotype.

    PubMed

    Wilbe, M; Sundberg, K; Hansen, I R; Strandberg, E; Nachreiner, R F; Hedhammar, A; Kennedy, L J; Andersson, G; Björnerfeldt, S

    2010-06-01

    Dogs represent an excellent comparative model for autoimmune thyroiditis as several dog breeds develop canine lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT), which is clinically similar to Hashimoto's thyroiditis in human. We obtained evidence that dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) class II genotype function as either genetic risk factor that predisposes for CLT or as protective factor against the disease. Genetic diversity at their DLA-DRB1, -DQA1, and -DQB1 loci were defined and potential association to major histocompatibility complex II haplotypes and alleles was analyzed. Giant Schnauzers carrying the DLA-DRB1*01201/DQA1*00101/DQB1*00201 haplotype showed an increased risk (odds ratio of 6.5) for developing CLT. The same risk haplotype has, to date, been observed in three different breeds affected by this disease, Giant Schnauzer, Dobermann, and Labrador Retriever, indicating that it is a common genetic risk factor in a variety of breeds affected by this disease. Importantly, protection for development of the disease was found in dogs carrying the DLA-DRB1*01301/DQA1*00301/DQB1*00501 haplotype (odds ratio of 0.3).

  2. Physiochemical and thermal characteristics of starch isolated from a waxy wheat genotype exhibiting partial expression of Wx proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A unique wheat genotype carrying waxy type allelic composition at the Wx loci, Gunji-1, was developed and its starch properties were evaluated in comparison to parental waxy and wild type wheat varieties. Gunji-1 was null in all three of the Wx genes, but exhibited a lower level of Wx proteins than ...

  3. In Utero and Lactational Exposure to PCBs in Mice: Adult Offspring Show Altered Learning and Memory Depending on Cyp1a2 and Ahr Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Christine P.; Genter, Mary Beth; Patel, Krishna V.; Schaefer, Tori L.; Skelton, Matthew R.; Williams, Michael T.; Vorhees, Charles V.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Both coplanar and noncoplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) exhibit neurotoxic effects in animal studies, but individual congeners do not always produce the same effects as PCB mixtures. Humans genetically have > 60-fold differences in hepatic cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2)-uninduced basal levels and > 12-fold variability in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)affinity; because CYP1A2 is known to sequester coplanar PCBs and because AHR ligands include coplanar PCBs, both genotypes can affect PCB response. Objectives: We aimed to develop a mouse paradigm with extremes in Cyp1a2 and Ahr genotypes to explore genetic susceptibility to PCB-induced developmental neurotoxicity using an environmentally relevant mixture of PCBs. Methods: We developed a mixture of eight PCBs to simulate human exposures based on their reported concentrations in human tissue, breast milk, and food supply. We previously characterized specific differences in PCB congener pharmacokinetics and toxicity, comparing high-affinity–AHR Cyp1a2 wild-type [Ahrb1_Cyp1a2(+/+)], poor-affinity–AHR Cyp1a2 wild-type [Ahrd_Cyp1a2(+/+)], and high-affinity–AHR Cyp1a2 knockout [Ahrb1_Cyp1a2(–/–)] mouse lines [Curran CP, Vorhees CV, Williams MT, Genter MB, Miller ML, Nebert DW. 2011. In utero and lactational exposure to a complex mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls: toxicity in pups dependent on the Cyp1a2 and Ahr genotypes. Toxicol Sci 119:189–208]. Dams received a mixture of three coplanar and five noncoplanar PCBs on gestational day 10.5 and postnatal day (PND) 5. In the present study we conducted behavioral phenotyping of exposed offspring at PND60, examining multiple measures of learning, memory, and other behaviors. Results: We observed the most significant deficits in response to PCB treatment in Ahrb1_Cyp1a2(–/–) mice, including impaired novel object recognition and increased failure rate in the Morris water maze. However, all PCB-treated genotypes showed significant differences on

  4. Cell type-dependent expression of tubulins in Physarum

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Three alpha-tubulins and two beta-tubulins have been resolved by two- dimensional gel electrophoresis of whole cell lysates of Physarum myxamoebae or plasmodia. Criteria used to identify the tubulins included migration on two-dimensional gels with myxamoebal tubulins purified by self-assembly into microtubules in vitro, peptide mapping with Staphylococcus V8 protease and with chymotrypsin, immunoprecipitation with a monoclonal antibody specific for beta- tubulin, and, finally, hybrid selection of specific mRNA by cloned tubulin DNA sequences, followed by translation in vitro. Differential expression of the Physarum tubulins was observed. The alpha 1- and beta 1-tubulins were detected in both myxamoebae and plasmodia; alpha 2 and beta 2 were detected only in plasmodia, alpha 3 was detected only in the myxamoebal phase, and may be specific to the flagellate. Observation of more tubulin species in plasmodia than in myxamoebae was remarkable; the only microtubules detected in plasmodia are those of the mitotoic spindle, whereas myxamoebae display cytoplasmic, centriolar, flagellar, and mitotic-spindle microtubules. In vitro translation of myxamoebal and plasmodial RNAs indicated that there are distinct mRNAs, and therefore probably separate genes, for the alpha 1- , alpha 2-, beta 1-, and beta 2-tubulins. Thus, the different patterns of tubulin expression in myxamoebae and plasmodia reflect differential expression of tubulin genes. PMID:6196370

  5. Age Dependent Variability in Gene Expression in Fischer 344 ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Recent evidence suggests older adults may be a sensitive population with regard to environmental exposure to toxic compounds. One source of this sensitivity could be an enhanced variability in response. Studies on phenotypic differences have suggested that variation in response does increase with age. However, few reports address the question of variation in gene expression as an underlying cause for increased variability of phenotypic response in the aged. In this study, we utilized global analysis to compare variation in constitutive gene expression in the retinae of young (4 mos), middle-aged (11 mos) and aged (23 mos) Fischer 344 rats. Three hundred and forty transcripts were identified in which variance in expression increased from 4 to 23 mos of age, while only twelve transcripts were found for which it decreased. Functional roles for identified genes were clustered in basic biological categories including cell communication, function, metabolism and response to stimuli. Our data suggest that population stochastically-induced variability should be considered in assessing sensitivity due to old age. Recent evidence suggests older adults may be a sensitive population with regard to environmental exposure to toxic compounds. One source of this sensitivity could be an enhanced variability in response. Studies on phenotypic differences have suggested that variation in response does increase with age. However, few reports address the question of variation in

  6. Signaling Pathways Related to Protein Synthesis and Amino Acid Concentration in Pig Skeletal Muscles Depend on the Dietary Protein Level, Genotype and Developmental Stages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingying; Li, Fengna; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tan, Bie; Li, Yinghui; Duan, Yehui; Blachier, François; Hu, Chien-An A.; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Muscle growth is regulated by the homeostatic balance of the biosynthesis and degradation of muscle proteins. To elucidate the molecular interactions among diet, pig genotype, and physiological stage, we examined the effect of dietary protein concentration, pig genotype, and physiological stages on amino acid (AA) pools, protein deposition, and related signaling pathways in different types of skeletal muscles. The study used 48 Landrace pigs and 48 pure-bred Bama mini-pigs assigned to each of 2 dietary treatments: lower/GB (Chinese conventional diet)- or higher/NRC (National Research Council)-protein diet. Diets were fed from 5 weeks of age to respective market weights of each genotype. Samples of biceps femoris muscle (BFM, type I) and longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM, type II) were collected at nursery, growing, and finishing phases according to the physiological stage of each genotype, to determine the AA concentrations, mRNA levels for growth-related genes in muscles, and protein abundances of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Our data showed that the concentrations of most AAs in LDM and BFM of pigs increased (P<0.05) gradually with increasing age. Bama mini-pigs had generally higher (P<0.05) muscle concentrations of flavor-related AA, including Met, Phe, Tyr, Pro, and Ser, compared with Landrace pigs. The mRNA levels for myogenic determining factor, myogenin, myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2 A, and myostatin of Bama mini-pigs were higher (P<0.05) than those of Landrace pigs, while total and phosphorylated protein levels for protein kinase B, mTOR, and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinases (p70S6K), and ratios of p-mTOR/mTOR, p-AKT/AKT, and p-p70S6K/p70S6K were lower (P<0.05). There was a significant pig genotype-dependent effect of dietary protein on the levels for mTOR and p70S6K. When compared with the higher protein-NRC diet, the lower protein-GB diet increased (P<0.05) the levels for mTOR and p70S6K in Bama mini-pigs, but

  7. Developmental and Genotypic Variation in Leaf Wax Content and Composition, and in Expression of Wax Biosynthetic Genes in Brassica oleracea var. capitata

    PubMed Central

    Laila, Rawnak; Robin, Arif Hasan Khan; Yang, Kiwoung; Park, Jong-In; Suh, Mi Chung; Kim, Juyoung; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2017-01-01

    Cuticular waxes act as a protective barrier against environmental stresses. In the present study, we investigated developmental and genotypic variation in wax formation of cabbage lines, with a view to understand the related morphology, genetics and biochemistry. Our studies revealed that the relative expression levels of wax biosynthetic genes in the first-formed leaf of the highest-wax line remained constantly higher but were decreased in other genotypes with leaf aging. Similarly, the expression of most of the tested genes exhibited decrease from the inner leaves to the outer leaves of 5-month-old cabbage heads in the low-wax lines in contrast to the highest-wax line. In 10-week-old plants, expression of wax biosynthetic genes followed a quadratic function and was generally increased in the early developing leaves but substantially decreased at the older leaves. The waxy compounds in all cabbage lines were predominately C29-alkane, -secondary alcohol, and -ketone. Its deposition was increased with leaf age in 5-month-old plants. The high-wax lines had dense, prominent and larger crystals on the leaf surface compared to low-wax lines under scanning electron microscopy. Principal component analysis revealed that the higher expression of LTP2 genes in the lowest-wax line and the higher expression of CER3 gene in the highest-wax line were probably associated with the comparatively lower and higher wax content in those two lines, respectively. This study furthers our understanding of the relationships between the expression of wax biosynthetic genes and the wax deposition in cabbage lines. Highlight: In cabbage, expression of wax-biosynthetic genes was generally decreased in older and senescing leaves, while wax deposition was increased with leaf aging, and C29-hydrocarbon was predominant in the wax crystals. PMID:28119701

  8. Context-Dependent Egr1 Expression in the Avian Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Grella, Stephanie L.; Guigueno, Mélanie F.; White, David J.; Sherry, David F.; Marrone, Diano F.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, episodic memory and spatial cognition involve context-specific recruitment of unique ensembles in the hippocampal formation (HF). Despite their capacity for sophisticated spatial (e.g., for migration) and episodic-like (e.g., for food-caching) memory, the mechanisms underlying contextual representation in birds is not well understood. Here we demonstrate environment-specific Egr1 expression as male brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) navigate environments for food reward, showing that the avian HF, like its mammalian counterpart, recruits distinct neuronal ensembles to represent different contexts. PMID:27716817

  9. Choosing Between Yeast and Bacterial Expression Systems: Yield Dependent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Rebecca S.; Malone, Christine C.; Moore, Blake P.; Burk, Melissa; Crawford, Lisa; Karr, Laurel J.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a naturally occurring fluorescent protein isolated from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. The intrinsic fluorescence of the protein is due to a chromophore located in the center of the molecule. Its usefulness has been established as a marker for gene expression and localization of gene products. GFP has recently been utilized as a model protein for crystallization studies at NASA/MSFC, both in earth-based and in microgravity experiments. Because large quantities of purified protein were needed, the cDNA of GFP was cloned into the Pichia pastoris pPICZ(alpha) C strain, with very little protein secreted into the media. Microscopic analysis prior to harvest showed gigantic green fluorescent yeast, but upon harvesting most protein was degraded. Trial fermentations of GFP cloned into pPICZ A for intracellular expression provided unsatisfactory yield. GFP cloned into E, coli was overexpressed at greater than 150 mg/liter, with purification yields at greater than 100mg/liter.

  10. Physiological capillary regression is not dependent on reducing VEGF expression

    PubMed Central

    Olfert, I. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Investigations into physiologically-controlled capillary regression report the provocative finding that microvessel regression occurs in the face of persistent elevation of skeletal muscle vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF) expression. Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), a negative angiogenic regulator, is increasingly being observed to temporally correlate with capillary regression, suggesting that increased TSP-1 (and not reduction in VEGF per se) is needed to initiate, and likely regulate, capillary regression. Based on evidence being gleaned from physiologically-mediated regression of capillaries, it needs to be recognized that capillary regression (and perhaps capillary rarefaction with disease) is not simply the reversal of factors used to stimulate angiogenesis. Rather, the conceptual understanding that angiogenesis and capillary regression each have specific and unique requirements that are biologically constrained to opposite sides of the balance between positive and negative angioregulatory factors may shed light on why anti-VEGF therapies have not lived up to the promise in reversing angiogenesis and providing the cure that many had hoped toward fighting cancer. Emerging evidence from physiological controlled angiogenesis suggest that cases involving excessive or uncontrolled capillary expansion may be best treated by therapies designed to increase expression of negative angiogenic regulators, whereas those involving capillary rarefaction may benefit from inhibiting negative regulators (like TSP-1). PMID:26660949

  11. Conditioned taste aversion dependent regulation of amygdala gene expression.

    PubMed

    Panguluri, Siva K; Kuwabara, Nobuyuki; Kang, Yi; Cooper, Nigel; Lundy, Robert F

    2012-02-28

    The present experiments investigated gene expression in the amygdala following contingent taste/LiCl treatment that supports development of conditioned taste aversion (CTA). The use of whole genome chips and stringent data set filtering led to the identification of 168 genes regulated by CTA compared to non-contingent LiCl treatment that does not support CTA learning. Seventy-six of these genes were eligible for network analysis. Such analysis identified "behavior" as the top biological function, which was represented by 15 of the 76 genes. These genes included several neuropeptides, G protein-coupled receptors, ion channels, kinases, and phosphatases. Subsequent qRT-PCR analyses confirmed changes in mRNA expression for 5 of 7 selected genes. We were able to demonstrate directionally consistent changes in protein level for 3 of these genes; insulin 1, oxytocin, and major histocompatibility complex class I-C. Behavioral analyses demonstrated that blockade of central insulin receptors produced a weaker CTA that was less resistant to extinction. Together, these results support the notion that we have identified downstream genes in the amygdala that contribute to CTA learning.

  12. Leaf aquaporin transcript abundance in peanut genotypes diverging in expression of the limited-transpiration trait when subjected to differing vapor pressure deficits and aquaporin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Devi, M Jyostna; Sinclair, Thomas R; Jain, Mukesh; Gallo, Maria

    2016-04-01

    A plant trait currently being exploited to decrease crop yield loss under water-deficit conditions is limited-transpiration rate (TRlim ) under high atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (VPD) conditions. Although limited genotype comparisons for the TRlim trait have been performed in peanut (Arachis hypogaea), no detailed study to describe the basis for this trait in peanut has been reported. Since it has been hypothesized that the TRlim trait may be a result of low leaf hydraulic conductance associated with aquaporins (AQPs), the first objective of this study was to examine a possible correlation of TRlim to leaf AQP transcriptional profiles in six peanut cultivars. Five of the studied cultivars were selected because they expressed TRlim while the cultivar York did not. Transcripts of six AQPs were measured. Under exposure to high vapor pressure deficit, cultivar C 76-16 had decreased AQP transcript abundance for four of the six AQPs but in York only one AQP had decreased abundance. The second objective was to explore the influence of AQP inhibitors mercury and silver on expression of TRlim and AQP transcription profiles. Quantitative RT-PCR data were compared in cultivars York and C 76-16, which had the extreme response in TR to VPD. Inhibitor treatment resulted in increased abundance of AQP transcripts in both. The results of these experiments indicate that AQP transcript abundance itself may not be useful in identifying genotypes expressing the TRlim trait under high VPD conditions.

  13. Extracellular matrix protein expression is brain region dependent.

    PubMed

    Dauth, Stephanie; Grevesse, Thomas; Pantazopoulos, Harry; Campbell, Patrick H; Maoz, Ben M; Berretta, Sabina; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-05-01

    In the brain, extracellular matrix (ECM) components form networks that contribute to structural and functional diversity. Maladaptive remodeling of ECM networks has been reported in neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders, suggesting that the brain microenvironment is a dynamic structure. A lack of quantitative information about ECM distribution in the brain hinders an understanding of region-specific ECM functions and the role of ECM in health and disease. We hypothesized that each ECM protein as well as specific ECM structures, such as perineuronal nets (PNNs) and interstitial matrix, are differentially distributed throughout the brain, contributing to the unique structure and function in the various regions of the brain. To test our hypothesis, we quantitatively analyzed the distribution, colocalization, and protein expression of aggrecan, brevican, and tenascin-R throughout the rat brain utilizing immunohistochemistry and mass spectrometry analysis and assessed the effect of aggrecan, brevican, and/or tenascin-R on neurite outgrowth in vitro. We focused on aggrecan, brevican, and tenascin-R as they are especially expressed in the mature brain, and have established roles in brain development, plasticity, and neurite outgrowth. The results revealed a differentiated distribution of all three proteins throughout the brain and indicated that their presence significantly reduces neurite outgrowth in a 3D in vitro environment. These results underline the importance of a unique and complex ECM distribution for brain physiology and suggest that encoding the distribution of distinct ECM proteins throughout the brain will aid in understanding their function in physiology and in turn assist in identifying their role in disease. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1309-1336, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Influences of Gestational Obesity on Associations between Genotypes and Gene Expression Levels in Offspring following Maternal Gastrointestinal Bypass Surgery for Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Guénard, Frédéric; Lamontagne, Maxime; Bossé, Yohan; Deshaies, Yves; Cianflone, Katherine; Kral, John G.; Marceau, Picard; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Maternal obesity and excess gestational weight gain with compromised metabolic fitness predispose offspring to lifelong obesity and its comorbidities. We demonstrated that compared to offspring born before maternal gastrointestinal bypass surgery (BMS) those born after (AMS) were less obese, with less cardiometabolic risk reflected in the expression and methylation of diabetes, immune and inflammatory pathway genes. Here we examine relationships between gestational obesity and offspring gene variations on expression levels. Methods Whole-genome genotyping and gene expression analyses in blood of 22 BMS and 23 AMS offspring from 19 mothers were conducted using Illumina HumanOmni-5-Quad and HumanHT-12 v4 Expression BeadChips, respectively. Using PLINK we analyzed interactions between offspring gene variations and maternal surgical status on offspring gene expression levels. Altered biological functions and pathways were identified and visualized using DAVID and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Results Significant interactions (p ≤ 1.22x10-12) were found for 525 among the 16,060 expressed transcripts: 1.9% of tested SNPs were involved. Gene function and pathway analysis demonstrated enrichment of transcription and of cellular metabolism functions and overrepresentation of cellular stress and signaling, immune response, inflammation, growth, proliferation and development pathways. Conclusion We suggest that impaired maternal gestational metabolic fitness interacts with offspring gene variations modulating gene expression levels, providing potential mechanisms explaining improved cardiometabolic risk profiles of AMS offspring related to ameliorated maternal lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. PMID:25603303

  15. Apolipoprotein E Genotype-Dependent Paradoxical Short-Term Effects of {sup 56}Fe Irradiation on the Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, Gwendolen E.; Villasana, Laura; Dayger, Catherine; Davis, Matthew J.; Raber, Jacob

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: In humans, apolipoprotein E (apoE) is encoded by three major alleles ({epsilon}2, {epsilon}3, and {epsilon}4) and, compared to apoE3, apoE4 increases the risk of developing Alzheimer disease and cognitive impairments following various environmental challenges. Exposure to irradiation, including that of {sup 56}Fe, during space missions poses a significant risk to the central nervous system, and apoE isoform might modulate this risk. Methods and Materials: We investigated whether apoE isoform modulates hippocampus-dependent cognitive performance starting 2 weeks after {sup 56}Fe irradiation. Changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) can affect cognition and are induced by irradiation. Therefore, after cognitive testing, we assessed hippocampal ROS levels in ex vivo brain slices, using the ROS-sensitive fluorescent probe, dihydroethidium (DHE). Brain levels of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), extracellular SOD, and apoE were assessed using Western blotting analysis. Results: In the water maze, spatial memory retention was impaired by irradiation in apoE2 and apoE4 mice but enhanced by irradiation in apoE3 mice. Irradiation reduced DHE-oxidation levels in the enclosed blade of the dentate gyrus and levels of 3-NT and CuZnSOD in apoE2 but not apoE3 or apoE4 mice. Finally, irradiation increased apoE levels in apoE3 but not apoE2 or apoE4 mice. Conclusions: The short-term effects of {sup 56}Fe irradiation on hippocampal ROS levels and hippocampus-dependent spatial memory retention are apoE isoform-dependent.

  16. Written emotional expression during recovery from cocaine dependence: group and individual differences in craving intensity.

    PubMed

    Grasing, Kenneth; Mathur, Deepan; Desouza, Cherilyn

    2010-06-01

    We conducted a prospective, single-blind, parallel group, controlled trial to evaluate effects of written emotional expression in patients receiving intensive treatment for cocaine dependence in a residential-unit setting. Randomization to the emotional expression treatment produced changes in blood pressure and mood during writing sessions, possibly because of its ability to stimulate active coping behavior. At an initial follow-up visit, patients that had received written emotional expression reported lower values for craving intensity and were less likely to self-report use of cocaine. These results may indicate a therapeutic effect of written emotional expression during recovery from cocaine dependence.

  17. Network analysis reveals the relationship among wood properties, gene expression levels and genotypes of natural Populus trichocarpa accessions.

    PubMed

    Porth, Ilga; Klápště, Jaroslav; Skyba, Oleksandr; Friedmann, Michael C; Hannemann, Jan; Ehlting, Juergen; El-Kassaby, Yousry A; Mansfield, Shawn D; Douglas, Carl J

    2013-11-01

    High-throughput approaches have been widely applied to elucidate the genetic underpinnings of industrially important wood properties. Wood traits are polygenic in nature, but gene hierarchies can be assessed to identify the most important gene variants controlling specific traits within complex networks defining the overall wood phenotype. We tested a large set of genetic, genomic, and phenotypic information in an integrative approach to predict wood properties in Populus trichocarpa. Nine-yr-old natural P. trichocarpa trees including accessions with high contrasts in six traits related to wood chemistry and ultrastructure were profiled for gene expression on 49k Nimblegen (Roche NimbleGen Inc., Madison, WI, USA) array elements and for 28,831 polymorphic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Pre-selected transcripts and SNPs with high statistical dependence on phenotypic traits were used in Bayesian network learning procedures with a stepwise K2 algorithm to infer phenotype-centric networks. Transcripts were pre-selected at a much lower logarithm of Bayes factor (logBF) threshold than SNPs and were not accommodated in the networks. Using persistent variables, we constructed cross-validated networks for variability in wood attributes, which contained four to six variables with 94-100% predictive accuracy. Accommodated gene variants revealed the hierarchy in the genetic architecture that underpins substantial phenotypic variability, and represent new tools to support the maximization of response to selection.

  18. miR-24 and miR-205 expression is dependent on HPV onco-protein expression in keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, Declan J.; Patel, Daksha; McCance, Dennis J.

    2014-01-05

    A screen of microRNA (miRNA) expression following differentiation in human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) identified changes in several miRNAs, including miR-24 and miR-205. We investigated how expression of Human Papilloma Virus Type-16 (HPV16) onco-proteins E6 and E7 affected expression of miR-24 and miR-205 during proliferation and differentiation of HFKs. We show that the induction of both miR-24 and miR-205 observed during differentiation of HFKs is lost in HFKs expressing E6 and E7. We demonstrate that the effect on miR-205 is due to E7 activity, as miR-205 expression is dependent on pRb expression. Finally, we provide evidence that miR-24 effects in the cell may be due to targeting of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p27. In summary, these results indicate that expression of both miR-24 and miR-205 are impacted by E6 and/or E7 expression, which may be one mechanism by which HPV onco-proteins can disrupt the balance between proliferation and differentiation in keratinocytes. - Highlights: • miR-24 and miR-205 are induced during keratinocyte differentiation. • This induction is lost in keratinocytes expressing HPV onco-proteins E6 and E7. • miR-205 is dependent upon pRb expression. • miR-24 targets p27 in cycling keratinocytes.

  19. De novo transcriptome assembly and analysis of differentially expressed genes of two barley genotypes reveal root-zone-specific responses to salt exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Camilla Beate; Cassin, Andrew; Keeble-Gagnère, Gabriel; Doblin, Monika S.; Bacic, Antony; Roessner, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Plant roots are the first organs sensing and responding to salinity stress, manifested differentially between different root types, and also at the individual tissue and cellular level. High genetic diversity and the current lack of an assembled map-based sequence of the barley genome severely limit barley research potential. We used over 580 and 600 million paired-end reads, respectively, to create two de novo assemblies of a barley landrace (Sahara) and a malting cultivar (Clipper) with known contrasting responses to salinity. Generalized linear models were used to statistically access spatial, treatment-related, and genotype-specific responses. This revealed a spatial gene expression gradient along the barley root, with more differentially expressed transcripts detected between different root zones than between treatments. The root transcriptome also showed a gradual transition from transcripts related to sugar-mediated signaling at the root meristematic zone to those involved in cell wall metabolism in the elongation zone, and defense response-related pathways toward the maturation zone, with significant differences between the two genotypes. The availability of these additional transcriptome reference sets will serve as a valuable resource to the cereal research community, and may identify valuable traits to assist in breeding programmes. PMID:27527578

  20. Children’s Inferential Styles, 5-HTTLPR Genotype, and Maternal Expressed Emotion-Criticism: An Integrated Model for the Intergenerational Transmission of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Gibb, Brandon E.; Uhrlass, Dorothy J.; Grassia, Marie; Benas, Jessica S.; McGeary, John

    2010-01-01

    We tested a model for the intergenerational transmission of depression integrating specific genetic (5-HTTLPR), cognitive (inferential style), and environmental (mother depressive symptoms and expressed-emotion criticism) risk factors. Supporting the hypothesis that maternal depression is associated with elevated levels of stress in children’s lives, mothers with a history of major depressive disorder (MDD) exhibited higher depressive symptoms across a 6-month multi-wave follow-up than mothers with no depression history. In addition, partially supporting our hypothesis, levels of maternal criticism during the follow-up were significantly related to mothers’ current depressive symptoms, but not history of MDD. Finally, we found support for an integrated gene × cognition × environment model of risk. Specifically, among children with negative inferential styles regarding their self-characteristics, there was a clear dose response of 5-HTTLPR genotype moderating the relation between maternal criticism and children’s depressive symptoms, with the highest depressive symptoms during the follow-up observed among children carrying two copies of the 5-HTTLPR lower expressing alleles (S or LG) who also exhibited negative inferential styles for self-characteristics and who experienced high levels of EE-Crit. In contrast, children with positive inferential styles exhibited low depressive symptoms regardless of 5-HTTLPR genotype or level of maternal criticism. PMID:19899843

  1. Trait Specific Expression Profiling of Salt Stress Responsive Genes in Diverse Rice Genotypes as Determined by Modified Significance Analysis of Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad R.; Bassel, George W.; Pritchard, Jeremy; Sharma, Garima P.; Ford-Lloyd, Brian V.

    2016-01-01

    Stress responsive gene expression is commonly profiled in a comparative manner involving different stress conditions or genotypes with contrasting reputation of tolerance/resistance. In contrast, this research exploited a wide natural variation in terms of taxonomy, origin and salt sensitivity in eight genotypes of rice to identify the trait specific patterns of gene expression under salt stress. Genome wide transcptomic responses were interrogated by the weighted continuous morpho-physiological trait responses using modified Significance Analysis of Microarrays. More number of genes was found to be differentially expressed under salt stressed compared to that of under unstressed conditions. Higher numbers of genes were observed to be differentially expressed for the traits shoot Na+/K+, shoot Na+, root K+, biomass and shoot Cl−, respectively. The results identified around 60 genes to be involved in Na+, K+, and anion homeostasis, transport, and transmembrane activity under stressed conditions. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis identified 1.36% (578 genes) of the entire transcriptome to be involved in the major molecular functions such as signal transduction (>150 genes), transcription factor (81 genes), and translation factor activity (62 genes) etc., under salt stress. Chromosomal mapping of the genes suggests that majority of the genes are located on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 6, and 7. The gene network analysis showed that the transcription factors and translation initiation factors formed the major gene networks and are mostly active in nucleus, cytoplasm and mitochondria whereas the membrane and vesicle bound proteins formed a secondary network active in plasma membrane and vacuoles. The novel genes and the genes with unknown functions thus identified provide picture of a synergistic salinity response representing the potentially fundamental mechanisms that are active in the wide natural genetic background of rice and will be of greater use once their roles

  2. Effects of seasonal temperature changes on DkMyb4 expression involved in proanthocyanidin regulation in two genotypes of persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.) fruit.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Takashi; Tsujimoto, Tomoyuki; Ikegami, Ayako; Yonemori, Keizo

    2011-05-01

    Persimmon fruits accumulate a large amount of proanthocyanidin (PA). Fruits of the mutant non-astringent (NA) type lose their ability to accumulate PA at an early stage of fruit development, whereas fruits of the normal astringent (A) type sustain PA accumulation until ripening. This allelotype is determined by the genotype of a single ASTRINGENCY (AST) locus. It is possible that the reduction in PA accumulation in NA-type fruits is due to phenological down-regulation of DkMyb4 (a PA regulator) and the resultant down-regulation of structural genes in the PA pathway. In this study, attempts were made to identify the regulatory mechanisms of phenological PA accumulation in A- and NA-type fruits, focusing particularly on the effects of ambient temperature. Continuous cool temperature conditions caused sustained expression of DkMyb4 in NA-type fruits, as well as in A-type fruits, resulting in increased expression of PA pathway genes and PA accumulation. However, the expression of some A/NA phenotypic marker genes was not significantly affected by the cool temperature conditions. In addition, PA composition in NA-type fruits exposed to cool temperatures differed from that in A-type fruits. These results indicate that a cool ambient temperature may have induced DkMyb4 expression and resultant PA accumulation, but did not directly affect the expression of the AST gene.

  3. Effects of aging and genotype on circadian rhythms, sleep, and clock gene expression in APPxPS1 knock-in mice, a model for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Marilyn J; Smith, J Tyler; Franklin, Kathleen M; Beckett, Tina L; Murphy, M Paul; St Clair, Daret K; Donohue, Kevin D; Striz, Martin; O'Hara, Bruce F

    2012-08-01

    Profound disruptions of circadian rhythms and sleep/wake cycles constitute a major cause of institutionalization of AD patients. This study investigated whether a rodent model of AD, APP(NLH/NLH)/PS-1(P264L/264L) (APPxPS1) mice, exhibits circadian alterations. The APPxPS1 mice were generated using CD-1/129 mice and Cre-lox knock-in technology to "humanize" the mouse amyloid (A)β sequence and create a presenilin-1 mutation identified in familial early-onset AD patients. APPxPS1 and WT mice of several ages (~4, 11, and 15 months) were monitored for circadian rhythms in wheel running, cage activity, and sleep:wake behavior. After rhythm assessment, the mice were euthanized at zeitgeber time (ZT) 2 or 10 (i.e., 2 or 10 h after lights-on) and brains were dissected. Amyloidβ levels were measured in cortical samples and brain sections of the hypothalamus and hippocampus were prepared and used for in situ hybridization of circadian or neuropeptide genes. The most significant effects of the APPxPS1 transgenes were phase delays of ~2 h in the onset of daytime wakefulness bouts (P<0.005) and peak wakefulness (P<0.02), potentially relevant to phase delays previously reported in AD patients. However, genotype did not affect the major activity peaks or phases of wheel running, wake, or general movement, which were bimodal with dominant dawn and dusk activity. Expression of Period 2 in the suprachiasmatic nucleus was affected by ZT (P<0.0001) with a marginal interaction effect of age, genotype, and ZT (P<0.08). A separate analysis of the old animals indicated a robust interaction between ZT and genotype, as well as main effects of these parameters. Aging also altered sleep (e.g., bout length and amount of daytime sleep) and the amount of wheel running and cage activity. In conclusion, the APPxPS1 knock-in mice exhibit some alterations in their sleep:wake rhythm and clock gene expression, but do not show robust, genotype-related changes in activity rhythms. The prominent daytime

  4. Nicotine dependence measures among adolescents with psychiatric disorders: evaluating symptom expression as a function of dependence severity.

    PubMed

    Strong, David R; Brown, Richard A; Ramsey, Susan E; Myers, Mark G

    2003-10-01

    Using methods based in item response theory, we examined a structured interview assessment of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV) nicotine dependence and the Modified Fagerström Tolerance Questionnaire (mFTQ) symptoms to explore the expression of particular symptoms as a function of level of nicotine involvement in a sample of 191 adolescents with psychiatric disorders. Despite our attempts to capture a broad range of smokers, 64% of teens were daily smokers and 68% met DSM-IV criteria for nicotine dependence. This paper describes the relative severity of DSM-IV and mFTQ items, as well as each item's ability to discriminate among individuals at various levels of nicotine involvement. Comparisons across measures revealed that the mFTQ was not particularly sensitive to individual variation in DSM-IV symptom counts, suggesting the physiological components were not strongly related to the predominantly cognitive and behavioral components of the DSM-IV nicotine dependence syndrome. However, the mFTQ relative to the DSM-IV consistently showed stronger relationships to the immediate consequences of nicotine deprivation (urge, craving), supporting the conceptualization of the mFTQ as measuring nicotine exposure. These analyses provide us with some preliminary understanding of the severity of particular symptoms and the order in which symptoms are likely to be expressed across levels of nicotine dependence.

  5. Enhanced Gene Expression Rather than Natural Polymorphism in Coding Sequence of the OsbZIP23 Determines Drought Tolerance and Yield Improvement in Rice Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Avishek; Samanta, Milan Kumar; Gayen, Srimonta; Sen, Soumitra K.; Maiti, Mrinal K.

    2016-01-01

    Drought is one of the major limiting factors for productivity of crops including rice (Oryza sativa L.). Understanding the role of allelic variations of key regulatory genes involved in stress-tolerance is essential for developing an effective strategy to combat drought. The bZIP transcription factors play a crucial role in abiotic-stress adaptation in plants via abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathway. The present study aimed to search for allelic polymorphism in the OsbZIP23 gene across selected drought-tolerant and drought-sensitive rice genotypes, and to characterize the new allele through overexpression (OE) and gene-silencing (RNAi). Analyses of the coding DNA sequence (CDS) of the cloned OsbZIP23 gene revealed single nucleotide polymorphism at four places and a 15-nucleotide deletion at one place. The single-copy OsbZIP23 gene is expressed at relatively higher level in leaf tissues of drought-tolerant genotypes, and its abundance is more in reproductive stage. Cloning and sequence analyses of the OsbZIP23-promoter from drought-tolerant O. rufipogon and drought-sensitive IR20 cultivar showed variation in the number of stress-responsive cis-elements and a 35-nucleotide deletion at 5’-UTR in IR20. Analysis of the GFP reporter gene function revealed that the promoter activity of O. rufipogon is comparatively higher than that of IR20. The overexpression of any of the two polymorphic forms (1083 bp and 1068 bp CDS) of OsbZIP23 improved drought tolerance and yield-related traits significantly by retaining higher content of cellular water, soluble sugar and proline; and exhibited decrease in membrane lipid peroxidation in comparison to RNAi lines and non-transgenic plants. The OE lines showed higher expression of target genes-OsRab16B, OsRab21 and OsLEA3-1 and increased ABA sensitivity; indicating that OsbZIP23 is a positive transcriptional-regulator of the ABA-signaling pathway. Taken together, the present study concludes that the enhanced gene expression rather

  6. Enhanced Gene Expression Rather than Natural Polymorphism in Coding Sequence of the OsbZIP23 Determines Drought Tolerance and Yield Improvement in Rice Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Dey, Avishek; Samanta, Milan Kumar; Gayen, Srimonta; Sen, Soumitra K; Maiti, Mrinal K

    2016-01-01

    Drought is one of the major limiting factors for productivity of crops including rice (Oryza sativa L.). Understanding the role of allelic variations of key regulatory genes involved in stress-tolerance is essential for developing an effective strategy to combat drought. The bZIP transcription factors play a crucial role in abiotic-stress adaptation in plants via abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathway. The present study aimed to search for allelic polymorphism in the OsbZIP23 gene across selected drought-tolerant and drought-sensitive rice genotypes, and to characterize the new allele through overexpression (OE) and gene-silencing (RNAi). Analyses of the coding DNA sequence (CDS) of the cloned OsbZIP23 gene revealed single nucleotide polymorphism at four places and a 15-nucleotide deletion at one place. The single-copy OsbZIP23 gene is expressed at relatively higher level in leaf tissues of drought-tolerant genotypes, and its abundance is more in reproductive stage. Cloning and sequence analyses of the OsbZIP23-promoter from drought-tolerant O. rufipogon and drought-sensitive IR20 cultivar showed variation in the number of stress-responsive cis-elements and a 35-nucleotide deletion at 5'-UTR in IR20. Analysis of the GFP reporter gene function revealed that the promoter activity of O. rufipogon is comparatively higher than that of IR20. The overexpression of any of the two polymorphic forms (1083 bp and 1068 bp CDS) of OsbZIP23 improved drought tolerance and yield-related traits significantly by retaining higher content of cellular water, soluble sugar and proline; and exhibited decrease in membrane lipid peroxidation in comparison to RNAi lines and non-transgenic plants. The OE lines showed higher expression of target genes-OsRab16B, OsRab21 and OsLEA3-1 and increased ABA sensitivity; indicating that OsbZIP23 is a positive transcriptional-regulator of the ABA-signaling pathway. Taken together, the present study concludes that the enhanced gene expression rather than

  7. High-Fat Diet Changes Hippocampal Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) in a Genotype- and Carbohydrate-Dependent Manner in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lane-Donovan, Courtney; Herz, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a currently incurable neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease include genetic risk factors, such as possession of ε4 allele of apolipoprotein E (ApoE4) over the risk-neutral ApoE3 allele, and lifestyle risk factors, such as diet and exercise. The intersection of these two sources of disease risk is not well understood. We investigated the impact of diet on ApoE levels by feeding wildtype, ApoE3, and ApoE4 targeted replacement (TR) mice with chow, high-fat, or ketogenic (high-fat, very-low-carbohydrate) diets. We found that high-fat diet affected both plasma and hippocampal levels of ApoE in an isoform-dependent manner, with high-fat diet causing a surprising reduction of hippocampal ApoE levels in ApoE3 TR mice. Conversely, the ketogenic diet had no effect on hippocampal ApoE. Our findings suggest that the use of dietary interventions to slow the progression AD should take ApoE genotype into consideration. PMID:26828652

  8. High-Fat Diet Changes Hippocampal Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) in a Genotype- and Carbohydrate-Dependent Manner in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lane-Donovan, Courtney; Herz, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a currently incurable neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Risk factors for Alzheimer's disease include genetic risk factors, such as possession of ε4 allele of apolipoprotein E (ApoE4) over the risk-neutral ApoE3 allele, and lifestyle risk factors, such as diet and exercise. The intersection of these two sources of disease risk is not well understood. We investigated the impact of diet on ApoE levels by feeding wildtype, ApoE3, and ApoE4 targeted replacement (TR) mice with chow, high-fat, or ketogenic (high-fat, very-low-carbohydrate) diets. We found that high-fat diet affected both plasma and hippocampal levels of ApoE in an isoform-dependent manner, with high-fat diet causing a surprising reduction of hippocampal ApoE levels in ApoE3 TR mice. Conversely, the ketogenic diet had no effect on hippocampal ApoE. Our findings suggest that the use of dietary interventions to slow the progression AD should take ApoE genotype into consideration.

  9. GABRA2 alcohol dependence risk allele is associated with reduced expression of chromosome 4p12 GABAA subunit genes in human neural cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Richard; Kranzler, Henry R.; Joshi, Pujan; Shin, Dong-Guk; Covault, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic variation in a region of chromosome 4p12 that includes the GABAA-subunit gene GABRA2 has been reproducibly associated with alcohol dependence (AD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the association are unknown. This study examined correlates of in vitro gene expression of the AD-associated GABRA2 rs279858*C-allele in human neural cells using an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) model system. Methods We examined mRNA expression of chromosome 4p12 GABAA subunit genes (GABRG1, GABRA2, GABRA4, and GABRB1 in 36 human neural cell lines differentiated from iPSCs using quantitative PCR and Next Generation RNA Sequencing. mRNA expression in adult human brain was examined using the BrainCloud and Braineac datasets. Results We found significantly lower levels of GABRA2 mRNA in neural cell cultures derived from rs279858*C-allele carriers. Levels of GABRA2 RNA were correlated with those of the other three chromosome 4p12 GABAA genes, but not other neural genes. Cluster analysis based on the relative RNA levels of the four chromosome 4p12 GABAA genes identified two distinct clusters of cell lines, a low-expression cluster associated with rs279858*C-allele carriers and a high-expression cluster enriched for the rs279858*T/T genotype. In contrast, there was no association of genotype with chromosome 4p12 GABAA gene expression in post-mortem adult cortex in either the BrainCloud or Braineac datasets. Conclusions AD-associated variation in GABRA2 is associated with differential expression of the entire cluster of GABAA subunit genes on chromosome 4p12 in human iPSC-derived neural cell cultures. The absence of a parallel effect in post-mortem human adult brain samples suggests that AD-associated genotype effects on GABAA expression, although not present in mature cortex, could have effects on regulation of the chromosome 4p12 GABAA cluster during neural development. PMID:26250693

  10. [The effect of the genotype on the expressiveness of the vestigial trait and polyteny of chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster Meig].

    PubMed

    Kirpichenko, T V; Strashniuk, V Iu; Vorob'eva, L I; Shakhbazov, V G

    2002-12-01

    The effects of the Bar (B) and white (w) mutations on the expressiveness of the character vestigial (vg) and the degree of polyteny of salivary gland giant chromosomes were studied in Drosophila melanogaster. Either mutation changed both the expressiveness of vestigial and the degree of chromsome polyteny. A negative association between the vg expressiveness and the degree of chromosome polyteny was revealed and proved to be stronger in females than in males. The parameters under study were shown to differ between females and males.

  11. Sex-dependent changes in cerebellar thyroid hormone-dependent gene expression following perinatal exposure to thimerosal in rats.

    PubMed

    Khan, A; Sulkowski, Z L; Chen, T; Zavacki, A M; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E M

    2012-06-01

    Mammalian brain development is regulated by the action of thyroid hormone (TH) on target genes. We have previously shown that the perinatal exposure to thimerosal (TM, metabolized to ethylmercury) exerts neurotoxic effects on the developing cerebellum and is associated with a decrease in cerebellar D2 activity, which could result in local brain T3 deficiency. We have also begun to examine TM effect on gene expression. The objective of this study was to expand on our initial observation of altered cerebellar gene expression following perinatal TM exposure and to examine additional genes that include both TH-dependent as well as other genes critical for cerebellar development in male and female neonates exposed perinatally (G10-G15 and P5 to P10) to TM. We report here for the first time that expression of suppressor-of-white-apricot-1 (SWAP-1), a gene negatively regulated by T3, was increased in TM-exposed males (61.1% increase), but not in females; (p<0.05). Positively regulated T3-target genes, Purkinje cell protein 2 (Pcp2; p=0.07) and Forkhead box protein P4 (FoxP4; p=0.08), showed a trend towards decreased expression in TM-exposed males. The expression of deiodinase 2 (DIO2) showed a trend towards an increase in TM-exposed females, while deiodinase 3 (DIO3), transthyretin (TTR), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and reelin (RELN) was not significantly altered in either sex. Since regulation of gene splicing is vital to neuronal proliferation and differentiation, altered expression of SWAP-1 may exert wide ranging effects on multiple genes involved in the regulation of cerebellar development. We have previously identified activation of another TH-dependent gene, outer dense fiber of sperm tails 4, in the TM exposed male pups. Together, these results also show sex-dependent differences between the toxic impacts of TM in males and females. Interestingly, the genes that were activated by TM are negatively regulated by TH, supporting our hypothesis of local

  12. Protein expression and genetic structure of the coral Porites lobata in an environmentally extreme Samoan back reef: Does host genotype limit phenotypic plasticity?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barshis, D.J.; Stillman, J.H.; Gates, R.D.; Toonen, R.J.; Smith, L.W.; Birkeland, C.

    2010-01-01

    The degree to which coral reef ecosystems will be impacted by global climate change depends on regional and local differences in corals' susceptibility and resilience to environmental stressors. Here, we present data from a reciprocal transplant experiment using the common reef building coral Porites lobata between a highly fluctuating back reef environment that reaches stressful daily extremes, and a more stable, neighbouring forereef. Protein biomarker analyses assessing physiological contributions to stress resistance showed evidence for both fixed and environmental influence on biomarker response. Fixed influences were strongest for ubiquitin-conjugated proteins with consistently higher levels found in back reef source colonies both pre and post-transplant when compared with their forereef conspecifics. Additionally, genetic comparisons of back reef and forereef populations revealed significant population structure of both the nuclear ribosomal and mitochondrial genomes of the coral host (FST = 0.146 P < 0.0001, FST = 0.335 P < 0.0001 for rDNA and mtDNA, respectively), whereas algal endosymbiont populations were genetically indistinguishable between the two sites. We propose that the genotype of the coral host may drive limitations to the physiological responses of these corals when faced with new environmental conditions. This result is important in understanding genotypic and environmental interactions in the coral algal symbiosis and how corals may respond to future environmental changes. ?? 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Cezanne regulates E2F1-dependent HIF2α expression

    PubMed Central

    Moniz, Sonia; Bandarra, Daniel; Biddlestone, John; Campbell, Kirsteen J.; Komander, David; Bremm, Anja; Rocha, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mechanisms regulating protein degradation ensure the correct and timely expression of transcription factors such as hypoxia inducible factor (HIF). Under normal O2 tension, HIFα subunits are targeted for proteasomal degradation, mainly through vHL-dependent ubiquitylation. Deubiquitylases are responsible for reversing this process. Although the mechanism and regulation of HIFα by ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation has been the object of many studies, little is known about the role of deubiquitylases. Here, we show that expression of HIF2α (encoded by EPAS1) is regulated by the deubiquitylase Cezanne (also known as OTUD7B) in an E2F1-dependent manner. Knockdown of Cezanne downregulates HIF2α mRNA, protein and activity independently of hypoxia and proteasomal degradation. Mechanistically, expression of the HIF2α gene is controlled directly by E2F1, and Cezanne regulates the stability of E2F1. Exogenous E2F1 can rescue HIF2α transcript and protein expression when Cezanne is depleted. Taken together, these data reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of the expression of HIF2α, demonstrating that the HIF2α promoter is regulated by E2F1 directly and that Cezanne regulates HIF2α expression through control of E2F1 levels. Our results thus suggest that HIF2α is controlled transcriptionally in a cell-cycle-dependent manner and in response to oncogenic signalling. PMID:26148512

  14. Context-dependent expression of the foraging gene in field colonies of ants: the interacting roles of age, environment and task

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Deborah M.; Greene, Michael; Kahler, John; Peteru, Swetha

    2016-01-01

    Task allocation among social insect workers is an ideal framework for studying the molecular mechanisms underlying behavioural plasticity because workers of similar genotype adopt different behavioural phenotypes. Elegant laboratory studies have pioneered this effort, but field studies involving the genetic regulation of task allocation are rare. Here, we investigate the expression of the foraging gene in harvester ant workers from five age- and task-related groups in a natural population, and we experimentally test how exposure to light affects foraging expression in brood workers and foragers. Results from our field study show that the regulation of the foraging gene in harvester ants occurs at two time scales: levels of foraging mRNA are associated with ontogenetic changes over weeks in worker age, location and task, and there are significant daily oscillations in foraging expression in foragers. The temporal dissection of foraging expression reveals that gene expression changes in foragers occur across a scale of hours and the level of expression is predicted by activity rhythms: foragers have high levels of foraging mRNA during daylight hours when they are most active outside the nests. In the experimental study, we find complex interactions in foraging expression between task behaviour and light exposure. Oscillations occur in foragers following experimental exposure to 13 L : 11 D (LD) conditions, but not in brood workers under similar conditions. No significant differences were seen in foraging expression over time in either task in 24 h dark (DD) conditions. Interestingly, the expression of foraging in both undisturbed field and experimentally treated foragers is also significantly correlated with the expression of the circadian clock gene, cycle. Our results provide evidence that the regulation of this gene is context-dependent and associated with both ontogenetic and daily behavioural plasticity in field colonies of harvester ants. Our results underscore

  15. Context-dependent expression of the foraging gene in field colonies of ants: the interacting roles of age, environment and task.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Krista K; Gordon, Deborah M; Friedman, Daniel A; Greene, Michael; Kahler, John; Peteru, Swetha

    2016-08-31

    Task allocation among social insect workers is an ideal framework for studying the molecular mechanisms underlying behavioural plasticity because workers of similar genotype adopt different behavioural phenotypes. Elegant laboratory studies have pioneered this effort, but field studies involving the genetic regulation of task allocation are rare. Here, we investigate the expression of the foraging gene in harvester ant workers from five age- and task-related groups in a natural population, and we experimentally test how exposure to light affects foraging expression in brood workers and foragers. Results from our field study show that the regulation of the foraging gene in harvester ants occurs at two time scales: levels of foraging mRNA are associated with ontogenetic changes over weeks in worker age, location and task, and there are significant daily oscillations in foraging expression in foragers. The temporal dissection of foraging expression reveals that gene expression changes in foragers occur across a scale of hours and the level of expression is predicted by activity rhythms: foragers have high levels of foraging mRNA during daylight hours when they are most active outside the nests. In the experimental study, we find complex interactions in foraging expression between task behaviour and light exposure. Oscillations occur in foragers following experimental exposure to 13 L : 11 D (LD) conditions, but not in brood workers under similar conditions. No significant differences were seen in foraging expression over time in either task in 24 h dark (DD) conditions. Interestingly, the expression of foraging in both undisturbed field and experimentally treated foragers is also significantly correlated with the expression of the circadian clock gene, cycle Our results provide evidence that the regulation of this gene is context-dependent and associated with both ontogenetic and daily behavioural plasticity in field colonies of harvester ants. Our results underscore

  16. Genotype × genotype interactions between the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis and its grazer, the waterflea Daphnia

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Veerle; Brusciotti, Silvia; van Gremberghe, Ineke; Vyverman, Wim; Vanoverbeke, Joost; De Meester, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Toxic algal blooms are an important problem worldwide. The literature on toxic cyanobacteria blooms in inland waters reports widely divergent results on whether zooplankton can control cyanobacteria blooms or cyanobacteria suppress zooplankton by their toxins. Here we test whether this may be due to genotype × genotype interactions, in which interactions between the large-bodied and efficient grazer Daphnia and the widespread cyanobacterium Microcystis are not only dependent on Microcystis strain or Daphnia genotype but are specific to genotype × genotype combinations. We show that genotype × genotype interactions are important in explaining mortality in short-time exposures of Daphnia to Microcystis. These genotype × genotype interactions may result in local coadaptation and a geographic mosaic of coevolution. Genotype × genotype interactions can explain why the literature on zooplankton–cyanobacteria interactions is seemingly inconsistent, and provide hope that zooplankton can contribute to the suppression of cyanobacteria blooms in restoration projects. PMID:25568039

  17. Analysis of SLC16A11 Variants in 12,811 American Indians: Genotype-Obesity Interaction for Type 2 Diabetes and an Association With RNASEK Expression

    PubMed Central

    Traurig, Michael; Hanson, Robert L.; Marinelarena, Alejandra; Kobes, Sayuko; Piaggi, Paolo; Cole, Shelley; Curran, Joanne E.; Blangero, John; Göring, Harald; Kumar, Satish; Nelson, Robert G.; Howard, Barbara V.; Knowler, William C.; Baier, Leslie J.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variants in SLC16A11 were recently reported to be associated with type 2 diabetes in Mexican and other Latin American populations. The diabetes risk haplotype had a frequency of 50% in Native Americans from Mexico but was rare in Europeans and Africans. In the current study, we analyzed SLC16A11 in 12,811 North American Indians and found that the diabetes risk haplotype, tagged by the rs75493593 A allele, was nominally associated with type 2 diabetes (P = 0.001, odds ratio 1.11). However, there was a strong interaction with BMI (P = 5.1 × 10−7) such that the diabetes association was stronger in leaner individuals. rs75493593 was also strongly associated with BMI in individuals with type 2 diabetes (P = 3.4 × 10−15) but not in individuals without diabetes (P = 0.77). Longitudinal analyses suggest that this is due, in part, to an association of the A allele with greater weight loss following diabetes onset (P = 0.02). Analyses of global gene expression data from adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and whole blood provide evidence that rs75493593 is associated with expression of the nearby RNASEK gene, suggesting that RNASEK expression may mediate the effect of genotype on diabetes. PMID:26487785

  18. Analysis of SLC16A11 Variants in 12,811 American Indians: Genotype-Obesity Interaction for Type 2 Diabetes and an Association With RNASEK Expression.

    PubMed

    Traurig, Michael; Hanson, Robert L; Marinelarena, Alejandra; Kobes, Sayuko; Piaggi, Paolo; Cole, Shelley; Curran, Joanne E; Blangero, John; Göring, Harald; Kumar, Satish; Nelson, Robert G; Howard, Barbara V; Knowler, William C; Baier, Leslie J; Bogardus, Clifton

    2016-02-01

    Genetic variants in SLC16A11 were recently reported to be associated with type 2 diabetes in Mexican and other Latin American populations. The diabetes risk haplotype had a frequency of 50% in Native Americans from Mexico but was rare in Europeans and Africans. In the current study, we analyzed SLC16A11 in 12,811 North American Indians and found that the diabetes risk haplotype, tagged by the rs75493593 A allele, was nominally associated with type 2 diabetes (P = 0.001, odds ratio 1.11). However, there was a strong interaction with BMI (P = 5.1 × 10(-7)) such that the diabetes association was stronger in leaner individuals. rs75493593 was also strongly associated with BMI in individuals with type 2 diabetes (P = 3.4 × 10(-15)) but not in individuals without diabetes (P = 0.77). Longitudinal analyses suggest that this is due, in part, to an association of the A allele with greater weight loss following diabetes onset (P = 0.02). Analyses of global gene expression data from adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and whole blood provide evidence that rs75493593 is associated with expression of the nearby RNASEK gene, suggesting that RNASEK expression may mediate the effect of genotype on diabetes.

  19. Volatile emissions of scented Alstroemeria genotypes are dominated by terpenes, and a myrcene synthase gene is highly expressed in scented Alstroemeria flowers.

    PubMed

    Aros, Danilo; Gonzalez, Veronica; Allemann, Rudolf K; Müller, Carsten T; Rosati, Carlo; Rogers, Hilary J

    2012-04-01

    Native to South America, Alstroemeria flowers are known for their colourful tepals, and Alstroemeria hybrids are an important cut flower. However, in common with many commercial cut flowers, virtually all the commercial Alstroemeria hybrids are not scented. The cultivar 'Sweet Laura' is one of very few scented commercial Alstroemeria hybrids. Characterization of the volatile emission profile of these cut flowers revealed three major terpene compounds: (E)-caryophyllene, humulene (also known as α-caryophyllene), an ocimene-like compound, and several minor peaks, one of which was identified as myrcene. The profile is completely different from that of the parental scented species A. caryophyllaea. Volatile emission peaked at anthesis in both scented genotypes, coincident in cv. 'Sweet Laura' with the maximal expression of a putative terpene synthase gene AlstroTPS. This gene was preferentially expressed in floral tissues of both cv. 'Sweet Laura' and A. caryophyllaea. Characterization of the AlstroTPS gene structure from cv. 'Sweet Laura' placed it as a member of the class III terpene synthases, and the predicted 567 amino acid sequence placed it into the subfamily TPS-b. The conserved sequences R(28)(R)X(8)W and D(321)DXXD are the putative Mg(2+)-binding sites, and in vitro assay of AlstroTPS expressed in Escherichia coli revealed that the encoded enzyme possesses myrcene synthase activity, consistent with a role for AlstroTPS in scent production in Alstroemeria cv. 'Sweet Laura' flowers.

  20. Irradiation selectively inhibits expression from the androgen-dependent Pem homeobox gene promoter in sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Maiti, S; Meistrich, M L; Wilson, G; Shetty, G; Marcelli, M; McPhaul, M J; Morris, P L; Wilkinson, M F

    2001-04-01

    How radiation blocks spermatogenesis in certain strains of rats, such as LBNF(1), is not known. Because the block depends on androgen, we propose that androgen affects Sertoli cell function in irradiated LBNF(1) rats, resulting in the failure of spermatogonial differentiation. To begin to identify genes that may participate in this irradiation-induced blockade of spermatogenesis, we investigated the expression of several Sertoli genes in response to irradiation. The expression of the PEM: homeobox gene from its androgen-dependent Sertoli-specific proximal promoter (Pp) was dramatically reduced more than 100-fold in response to irradiation. In contrast, most other genes and gene products reported to be localized to the Sertoli cell, including FSH receptor (FSHR), androgen receptor (AR), SGP1, and the transcription factor CREB, did not exhibit significant changes in expression, whereas transferrin messenger RNA (mRNA) expression dramatically increased in response to irradiation. Irradiation also decreased Pp-driven PEM: mRNA levels in mouse testes (approximately 10-fold), although higher doses of irradiation than in rats were required to inhibit PEM: gene expression in testes of mice, consistent with their greater radioresistance. The decrease in Pem gene expression in mouse testis was also selective, as the expression of CREB, GATA-1, and SGP1 were little affected by irradiation. We conclude that the dramatic irradiation-triggered reduction of Pem expression in Sertoli cells is a conserved response that may be a marker for functional changes in response to irradiation.

  1. PVY(NTN) elicits a diverse gene expression response in different potato genotypes in the first 12 h after inoculation.

    PubMed

    Baebler, Spela; Krecic-Stres, Hana; Rotter, Ana; Kogovsek, Polona; Cankar, Katarina; Kok, Esther J; Gruden, Kristina; Kovac, Maja; Zel, Jana; Pompe-Novak, Marusa; Ravnikar, Maja

    2009-03-01

    Host gene expression changes in the early response to potato virus Y(NTN) interaction were compared in two differently sensitive potato cultivars: the resistant cultivar Santé and the sensitive cultivar Igor. Hybridization of potato TIGR cDNA microarrays allowed us to monitor the expression of approximately 10,000 genes simultaneously at 0.5 and 12 h post-inoculation (hpi). Microarray data, analysed by statistics and data mining, were complemented by subtraction library construction and sequence analysis to validate the findings. The expression profiles of the two cultivars were similar and faint at 0.5 hpi, but they differed substantially at 12 hpi. Although, at 0.5 hpi, cv. Santé responded by the differential expression of a greater number of genes, at 12 hpi the number was higher in cv. Igor. The majority of genes in this cultivar were down-regulated at 12 hpi, indicating a host gene shut-off. Suites of genes that exhibited altered transcript abundance in response to the virus were identified, and included genes involved in the processes of photosynthesis, perception, signalling and defence responses. The expression of the considerable number of genes associated with photosynthesis was surprisingly up-regulated as early as 0.5 hpi and down-regulated at 12 hpi in both cultivars. The expression of genes involved in perception and signalling was increased in the sensitive cultivar at 12 hpi. By contrast, a simultaneous strong defence response at the transcriptional level was evident in the resistant cultivar, as shown by the up-regulation of genes involved in brassinosteroid, polyamine and secondary metabolite biosynthesis, and of genes coding for pathogenesis-related proteins.

  2. Genotype-environment interaction expressed in the foraging behaviour of dogwhelks, Nucella lapillus (L.), under simulated environmental hazard

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, R. N.; Taylor, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    represent genotype/environment interaction that is apparently adaptive, in part, through its effect on foraging behaviour.

  3. Control of Neuropeptide Expression by Parallel Activity-dependent Pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Rojo Romanos, Teresa; Petersen, Jakob Gramstrup; Pocock, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring of neuronal activity within circuits facilitates integrated responses and rapid changes in behavior. We have identified a system in Caenorhabditis elegans where neuropeptide expression is dependent on the ability of the BAG neurons to sense carbon dioxide. In C. elegans, CO2 sensing is predominantly coordinated by the BAG-expressed receptor-type guanylate cyclase GCY-9. GCY-9 binding to CO2 causes accumulation of cyclic GMP and opening of the cGMP-gated TAX-2/TAX-4 cation channels; provoking an integrated downstream cascade that enables C. elegans to avoid high CO2. Here we show that cGMP regulation by GCY-9 and the PDE-1 phosphodiesterase controls BAG expression of a FMRFamide-related neuropeptide FLP-19 reporter (flp-19::GFP). This regulation is specific for CO2-sensing function of the BAG neurons, as loss of oxygen sensing function does not affect flp-19::GFP expression. We also found that expression of flp-19::GFP is controlled in parallel to GCY-9 by the activity-dependent transcription factor CREB (CRH-1) and the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (KIN-2) signaling pathway. We therefore show that two parallel pathways regulate neuropeptide gene expression in the BAG sensory neurons: the ability to sense changes in carbon dioxide and CREB transcription factor. Such regulation may be required in particular environmental conditions to enable sophisticated behavioral decisions to be performed. PMID:28139692

  4. Matricaria chamomilla extract inhibits both development of morphine dependence and expression of abstinence syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Gomaa, Adel; Hashem, Tahia; Mohamed, Mahmoud; Ashry, Esraa

    2003-05-01

    The effect of Matricaria chamomilla (M. chamomilla) on the development of morphine dependence and expression of abstinence was investigated in rats. The frequencies of withdrawal behavioral signs (paw tremor, rearing, teeth chattering, body shakes, ptosis, diarrhea, and urination) and weight loss induced by naloxone challenge were demonstrated in morphine-dependent rats receiving M. chamomilla extract or saline. The withdrawal behavioral manifestations and weight loss were inhibited significantly by chronic co-administration of M. chamomilla extract with morphine. Administration of a single dose of M. chamomilla before the naloxone challenge in morphine-dependent animals abolished the withdrawal behavioral manifestations. The dramatic increase of plasma cAMP induced by naloxone-precipitated abstinence was prevented by chronic co-administration of M. chamomilla extract with morphine. These results suggest that M. chamomilla extract inhibits the development of morphine dependence and expression of abstinence syndrome.

  5. Evaluation of resistance to aflatoxin contamination in kernels of maize genotypes using a GFP-expressing Aspergillus flavus strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluation of resistance or susceptibility of corn inbreds to infection by Aspergillus flavus was evaluated by a kernel screening assay. A GFP-expressing strain of A. flavus was used to accomplish this study to measure fungal spread and aflatoxin levels in real time. Among the four inbreds tested, ...

  6. Novel expression and regulation of voltage-dependent potassium channels in placentas from women with preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Hiten D; McCallum, Laura A; Kurlak, Lesia O; Greenwood, Iain A; Broughton Pipkin, Fiona; Tribe, Rachel M

    2011-09-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with structural/functional alterations in placental and maternal vasculature. Voltage-dependant potassium channels encoded by KCNQ1-5 genes have been detected in several types of blood vessels where they promote vascular relaxation. Voltage-dependant potassium channel function can be modulated by KCNE1-5-encoded accessory proteins. The aim of this study was to determine whether KCNQ and KCNE genes are differentially expressed in placentas from women with preeclampsia compared with normotensive controls and to examine any differences in those who delivered preterm (<37 weeks) or term. Placental biopsies (from midway between the cord and periphery) were obtained, with consent, from white European control (n=24; term) and preeclamptic (n=22; of whom 8 delivered before 37 weeks' gestation) women. KCNQ/KCNE and GAPDH mRNA expressions were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Protein expression/localization was assessed using immunohistochemistry. KCNQ3 and KCNE5 mRNA expressions were significantly upregulated in preeclampsia (median [interquartile range]: 1.942 [0.905 to 3.379]) versus controls (0.159 [0.088 to 0.288]; P=0.001) and exhibited a strong positive correlation with each other (P<0.001), suggesting a novel heterodimer. Enhanced protein expression of KCNQ3 and KCNE5 in preeclampsia was confirmed with localization mainly restricted to the syncytiotrophoblast. KCNQ4 and KCNE1 isoforms were suppressed in placentas from term preeclamptic women versus controls (P≤0.05). KCNQ1 mRNA expression was increased and KCNQ5 decreased in the preterm preeclamptic group versus controls (P<0.05). In summary, voltage-dependant potassium channels are expressed and markedly modulated in placentas from preeclamptic women. Differential expression of isoforms may lead to altered cell proliferation. The correlation between KCNQ3 and KCNE5 expression is indicative of a novel channel complex and warrants further investigation.

  7. T7 RNA polymerase-dependent expression of COXII in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Pinkham, J L; Dudley, A M; Mason, T L

    1994-01-01

    An in vivo expression system has been developed for controlling the transcription of individual genes in the mitochondrial genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase (T7Pol), fused to the COXIV mitchondrial import peptide and expressed under the control of either the GAL1 or the ADH1 promoter, efficiently transcribes a target gene, T7-COX2, in the mitochondrial genome. Cells bearing the T7-COX2 gene, but lacking wild-type COX2, require T7Pol for respiration. Functional expression of T7-COX2 is completely dependent on the COX2-specific translational activator Pet111p, despite additional nucleotides at the 5' end of the T7-COX2 transcript. Expression of mitochondrion-targeted T7Pol at high levels from the GAL1 promoter has no detectable effect on mitochondrial function in rho+ cells lacking the T7-COX2 target gene, but in cells with T7-COX2 integrated into the mitochondrial genome, an equivalent level of T7Pol expression causes severe respiratory deficiency. In comparison with wild-type COX2 expression, steady-state levels of T7-COX2 mRNA increase fivefold when transcription is driven by T7Pol expressed from the ADH1 promoter, yet COXII protein levels and cellular respiration rates decrease by about 50%. This discoordinate expression of mRNA and protein provides additional evidence for posttranscriptional control of COX2 expression. Images PMID:8007968

  8. Effects of cell-cycle-dependent expression on random fluctuations in protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Expression of many genes varies as a cell transitions through different cell-cycle stages. How coupling between stochastic expression and cell cycle impacts cell-to-cell variability (noise) in the level of protein is not well understood. We analyse a model where a stable protein is synthesized in random bursts, and the frequency with which bursts occur varies within the cell cycle. Formulae quantifying the extent of fluctuations in the protein copy number are derived and decomposed into components arising from the cell cycle and stochastic processes. The latter stochastic component represents contributions from bursty expression and errors incurred during partitioning of molecules between daughter cells. These formulae reveal an interesting trade-off: cell-cycle dependencies that amplify the noise contribution from bursty expression also attenuate the contribution from partitioning errors. We investigate the existence of optimum strategies for coupling expression to the cell cycle that minimize the stochastic component. Intriguingly, results show that a zero production rate throughout the cell cycle, with expression only occurring just before cell division, minimizes noise from bursty expression for a fixed mean protein level. By contrast, the optimal strategy in the case of partitioning errors is to make the protein just after cell division. We provide examples of regulatory proteins that are expressed only towards the end of the cell cycle, and argue that such strategies enhance robustness of cell-cycle decisions to the intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression. PMID:28083102

  9. Effects of cell-cycle-dependent expression on random fluctuations in protein levels.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Mohammad; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-12-01

    Expression of many genes varies as a cell transitions through different cell-cycle stages. How coupling between stochastic expression and cell cycle impacts cell-to-cell variability (noise) in the level of protein is not well understood. We analyse a model where a stable protein is synthesized in random bursts, and the frequency with which bursts occur varies within the cell cycle. Formulae quantifying the extent of fluctuations in the protein copy number are derived and decomposed into components arising from the cell cycle and stochastic processes. The latter stochastic component represents contributions from bursty expression and errors incurred during partitioning of molecules between daughter cells. These formulae reveal an interesting trade-off: cell-cycle dependencies that amplify the noise contribution from bursty expression also attenuate the contribution from partitioning errors. We investigate the existence of optimum strategies for coupling expression to the cell cycle that minimize the stochastic component. Intriguingly, results show that a zero production rate throughout the cell cycle, with expression only occurring just before cell division, minimizes noise from bursty expression for a fixed mean protein level. By contrast, the optimal strategy in the case of partitioning errors is to make the protein just after cell division. We provide examples of regulatory proteins that are expressed only towards the end of the cell cycle, and argue that such strategies enhance robustness of cell-cycle decisions to the intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression.

  10. Gestational Age-Dependent Changes in Gene Expression of Metabolic Enzymes and Transporters in Pregnant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shuster, Diana L.; Bammler, Theo K.; Beyer, Richard P.; MacDonald, James W.; Tsai, Jesse M.; Farin, Frederico M.; Hebert, Mary F.; Thummel, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy-induced changes in drug pharmacokinetics can be explained by changes in expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters and/or normal physiology. In this study, we determined gestational age-dependent expression profiles for all metabolic enzyme and transporter genes in the maternal liver, kidney, small intestine, and placenta of pregnant mice by microarray analysis. We specifically examined the expression of genes important for xenobiotic, bile acid, and steroid hormone metabolism and disposition, namely, cytochrome P450s (Cyp), UDP-glucuronosyltranserases (Ugt), sulfotransferases (Sult), and ATP-binding cassette (Abc), solute carrier (Slc), and solute carrier organic anion (Slco) transporters. Few Ugt and Sult genes were affected by pregnancy. Cyp17a1 expression in the maternal liver increased 3- to 10-fold during pregnancy, which was the largest observed change in the maternal tissues. Cyp1a2, most Cyp2 isoforms, Cyp3a11, and Cyp3a13 expression in the liver decreased on gestation days (gd) 15 and 19 compared with nonpregnant controls (gd 0). In contrast, Cyp2d40, Cyp3a16, Cyp3a41a, Cyp3a41b, and Cyp3a44 in the liver were induced throughout pregnancy. In the placenta, Cyp expression on gd 10 and 15 was upregulated compared with gd 19. Notable changes were also observed in Abc and Slc transporters. Abcc3 expression in the liver and Abcb1a, Abcc4, and Slco4c1 expression in the kidney were downregulated on gd 15 and 19. In the placenta, Slc22a3 (Oct3) expression on gd 10 was 90% lower than that on gd 15 and 19. This study demonstrates important gestational age-dependent expression of metabolic enzyme and transporter genes, which may have mechanistic relevance to drug disposition in human pregnancy. PMID:23175668

  11. Ubiquitin fusion expression and tissue-dependent targeting of hG-CSF in transgenic tobacco

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) is an important human cytokine which has been widely used in oncology and infection protection. To satisfy clinical needs, expression of recombinant hG-CSF has been studied in several organisms, including rice cell suspension culture and transient expression in tobacco leaves, but there was no published report on its expression in stably transformed plants which can serve as a more economical expression platform with potential industrial application. Results In this study, hG-CSF expression was investigated in transgenic tobacco leaves and seeds in which the accumulation of hG-CSF could be enhanced through fusion with ubiquitin by up to 7 fold in leaves and 2 fold in seeds, leading to an accumulation level of 2.5 mg/g total soluble protein (TSP) in leaves and 1.3 mg/g TSP in seeds, relative to hG-CSF expressed without a fusion partner. Immunoblot analysis showed that ubiquitin was processed from the final protein product, and ubiquitination was up-regulated in all transgenic plants analyzed. Driven by CaMV 35S promoter and phaseolin signal peptide, hG-CSF was observed to be secreted into apoplast in leaves but deposited in protein storage vacuole (PSV) in seeds, indicating that targeting of the hG-CSF was tissue-dependent in transgenic tobacco. Bioactivity assay showed that hG-CSF expressed in both seeds and leaves was bioactive to support the proliferation of NFS-60 cells. Conclusions In this study, the expression of bioactive hG-CSF in transgenic plants was improved through ubiquitin fusion strategy, demonstrating that protein expression can be enhanced in both plant leaves and seeds through fusion with ubiquitin and providing a typical case of tissue-dependent expression of recombinant protein in transgenic plants. PMID:21985646

  12. De novo transcriptome sequencing of Acer palmatum and comprehensive analysis of differentially expressed genes under salt stress in two contrasting genotypes.

    PubMed

    Rong, Liping; Li, Qianzhong; Li, Shushun; Tang, Ling; Wen, Jing

    2016-04-01

    Maple (Acer palmatum) is an important species for landscape planting worldwide. Salt stress affects the normal growth of the Maple leaf directly, leading to loss of esthetic value. However, the limited availability of Maple genomic information has hindered research on the mechanisms underlying this tolerance. In this study, we performed comprehensive analyses of the salt tolerance in two genotypes of Maple using RNA-seq. Approximately 146.4 million paired-end reads, representing 181,769 unigenes, were obtained. The N50 length of the unigenes was 738 bp, and their total length over 102.66 Mb. 14,090 simple sequence repeats and over 500,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified, which represent useful resources for marker development. Importantly, 181,769 genes were detected in at least one library, and 303 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between salt-sensitive and salt-tolerant genotypes. Among these DEGs, 125 were upregulated and 178 were downregulated genes. Two MYB-related proteins and one LEA protein were detected among the first 10 most downregulated genes. Moreover, a methyltransferase-related gene was detected among the first 10 most upregulated genes. The three most significantly enriched pathways were plant hormone signal transduction, arginine and proline metabolism, and photosynthesis. The transcriptome analysis provided a rich genetic resource for gene discovery related to salt tolerance in Maple, and in closely related species. The data will serve as an important public information platform to further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in salt tolerance in Maple.

  13. APP-dependent glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression drives neuromuscular junction formation.

    PubMed

    Stanga, Serena; Zanou, Nadège; Audouard, Emilie; Tasiaux, Bernadette; Contino, Sabrina; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; René, Frédérique; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Clotman, Frédéric; Gailly, Philippe; Dewachter, Ilse; Octave, Jean-Noël; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal

    2016-05-01

    Besides its crucial role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, the knowledge of amyloid precursor protein (APP) physiologic functions remains surprisingly scarce. Here, we show that APP regulates the transcription of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). APP-dependent regulation of GDNF expression affects muscle strength, muscular trophy, and both neuronal and muscular differentiation fundamental for neuromuscular junction (NMJ) maturation in vivo In a nerve-muscle coculture model set up to modelize NMJ formation in vitro, silencing of muscular APP induces a 30% decrease in secreted GDNF levels and a 40% decrease in the total number of NMJs together with a significant reduction in the density of acetylcholine vesicles at the presynaptic site and in neuronal maturation. These defects are rescued by GDNF expression in muscle cells in the conditions where muscular APP has been previously silenced. Expression of GDNF in muscles of amyloid precursor protein null mice corrected the aberrant synaptic morphology of NMJs. Our findings highlight for the first time that APP-dependent GDNF expression drives the process of NMJ formation, providing new insights into the link between APP gene regulatory network and physiologic functions.-Stanga, S., Zanou, N., Audouard, E., Tasiaux, B., Contino, S., Vandermeulen, G., René, F., Loeffler, J.-P., Clotman, F., Gailly, P., Dewachter, I., Octave, J.-N., Kienlen-Campard, P. APP-dependent glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression drives neuromuscular junction formation.

  14. RRE-dependent HIV-1 Env RNA effects on Gag protein expression, assembly and release

    SciTech Connect

    López, Claudia S.; Sloan, Rachel; Cylinder, Isabel; Kozak, Susan L.; Kabat, David; Barklis, Eric

    2014-08-15

    The HIV-1 Gag proteins are translated from the full-length HIV-1 viral RNA (vRNA), whereas the envelope (Env) protein is translated from incompletely spliced Env mRNAs. Nuclear export of vRNAs and Env mRNAs is mediated by the Rev accessory protein which binds to the rev-responsive element (RRE) present on these RNAs. Evidence has shown there is a direct or indirect interaction between the Gag protein, and the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. Our current work shows that env gene expression impacts HIV-1 Gag expression and function in two ways. At the protein level, full-length Env expression altered Gag protein expression, while Env CT-deletion proteins did not. At the RNA level, RRE-containing Env mRNA expression reduced Gag expression, processing, and virus particle release from cells. Our results support models in which Gag is influenced by the Env CT, and Env mRNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export. - Highlights: • At the protein level, full-length HIV-1 Env alters Gag protein expression. • HIV-1 Env RNA expression reduces Gag levels and virus release. • Env RNA effects on Gag are dependent on the RRE. • RRE-containing Env RNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export.

  15. Light-dependent expression of flg22-induced defense genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sano, Satoshi; Aoyama, Mayu; Nakai, Kana; Shimotani, Koji; Yamasaki, Kanako; Sato, Masa H; Tojo, Daisuke; Suwastika, I Nengah; Nomura, Hironari; Shiina, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplasts have been reported to generate retrograde immune signals that activate defense gene expression in the nucleus. However, the roles of light and photosynthesis in plant immunity remain largely elusive. In this study, we evaluated the effects of light on the expression of defense genes induced by flg22, a peptide derived from bacterial flagellins which acts as a potent elicitor in plants. Whole-transcriptome analysis of flg22-treated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings under light and dark conditions for 30 min revealed that a number of (30%) genes strongly induced by flg22 (>4.0) require light for their rapid expression, whereas flg22-repressed genes include a significant number of genes that are down-regulated by light. Furthermore, light is responsible for the flg22-induced accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), indicating that light is indispensable for basal defense responses in plants. To elucidate the role of photosynthesis in defense, we further examined flg22-induced defense gene expression in the presence of specific inhibitors of photosynthetic electron transport: 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) and 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-benzoquinone (DBMIB). Light-dependent expression of defense genes was largely suppressed by DBMIB, but only partially suppressed by DCMU. These findings suggest that photosynthetic electron flow plays a role in controlling the light-dependent expression of flg22-inducible defense genes.

  16. Donor dependent, interferon-γ induced HLA-DR expression on human neutrophils in vivo

    PubMed Central

    REINISCH, W; LICHTENBERGER, C; STEGER, G; TILLINGER, W; SCHEINER, O; GANGL, A; MAURER, D; WILLHEIM, M

    2003-01-01

    Neutrophils are effector cells of innate immune responses. Stimulated by interferon-γ (IFN-γ) to express HLA-DR, neutrophils acquire accessory cell functions for superantigen-mediated T cell activation. In vitro HLA-DR induction on neutrophils varies in a functionally relevant way as levels of MHC class II expression and magnitude of neutrophil induced T cell responses are correlated functions. The aim of this study was to assess whether IFN-γ induces HLA-DR on human neutrophils in a donor dependent fashion in vivo and to define regulatory events operative in MHC class II expression of neutrophils. In vivo administration of rhIFN-γ in 55 patients with renal cell carcinoma resulted in a varying increase of HLA-DR on neutrophils. By setting a cut-off for response at>10% HLA-DR positive neutrophils, HLA-DR responders (51%) were as frequent as nonresponders (49%). In vivo kinetic studies revealed a peak expression of HLA-DR on neutrophils 48 h after rhIFN-γ application, while nonresponders remained HLA-DR negative over a 72-h period. In vitro IFN-γ stimulated neutrophils recapitulated the response profiles observed in vivo. No differences in IFN-γ dependent CD64 and invariant chain expression, and IFN-γ serum levels were observed among the response subgroups. HLA-DR mRNA was detected in neutrophils from rhIFN-γ treated responders and nonresponders, HLA-DR protein solely in lysates of responder neutrophils. IFN-γ stimulated HLA-DR expression on neutrophils is subject to donor dependent variations in vivo, which result from rather post-transcriptional than transcriptional regulation. Due to their abundance in inflammatory reactions heterogeneous HLA-DR expression by neutrophils could determine the outcome of superantigen-driven diseases. PMID:12930377

  17. Transcriptomic responses to environmental temperature by turtles with temperature-dependent and genotypic sex determination assessed by RNAseq inform the genetic architecture of embryonic gonadal development

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Srihari; Literman, Robert; Neuwald, Jennifer; Severin, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Vertebrate sexual fate is decided primarily by the individual’s genotype (GSD), by the environmental temperature during development (TSD), or both. Turtles exhibit TSD and GSD, making them ideal to study the evolution of sex determination. Here we analyze temperature-specific gonadal transcriptomes (RNA-sequencing validated by qPCR) of painted turtles (Chrysemys picta TSD) before and during the thermosensitive period, and at equivalent stages in soft-shell turtles (Apalone spinifera—GSD), to test whether TSD’s and GSD’s transcriptional circuitry is identical but deployed differently between mechanisms. Our data show that most elements of the mammalian urogenital network are active during turtle gonadogenesis, but their transcription is generally more thermoresponsive in TSD than GSD, and concordant with their sex-specific function in mammals [e.g., upregulation of Amh, Ar, Esr1, Fog2, Gata4, Igf1r, Insr, and Lhx9 at male-producing temperature, and of β-catenin, Foxl2, Aromatase (Cyp19a1), Fst, Nf-kb, Crabp2 at female-producing temperature in Chrysemys]. Notably, antagonistic elements in gonadogenesis (e.g., β-catenin and Insr) were thermosensitive only in TSD early-embryos. Cirbp showed warm-temperature upregulation in both turtles disputing its purported key TSD role. Genes that may convert thermal inputs into sex-specific development (e.g., signaling and hormonal pathways, RNA-binding and heat-shock) were differentially regulated. Jak-Stat, Nf-κB, retinoic-acid, Wnt, and Mapk-signaling (not Akt and Ras-signaling) potentially mediate TSD thermosensitivity. Numerous species-specific ncRNAs (including Xist) were differentially-expressed, mostly upregulated at colder temperatures, as were unannotated loci that constitute novel TSD candidates. Cirbp showed warm-temperature upregulation in both turtles. Consistent transcription between turtles and alligator revealed putatively-critical reptilian TSD elements for male (Sf1, Amh, Amhr2) and female (Crabp2 and

  18. Growth rate regulation of lac operon expression in Escherichia coli is cyclic AMP dependent.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jong-Tar; Chang, Yu-Jen; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2003-10-23

    In contrast to the ribosomal RNA gene expression increasing with growth rate, transcription of the lac operon is downregulated by cell growth rate. In continuous culture, growth rate regulation of lac promoter was independent of carbon substrate used and its location on the chromosome. Since the lac operon is activated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), which decreases with increasing cell growth rate, expression of plac-lacZ reporter fusion was analyzed in cya mutant under various growth conditions. The results demonstrated that expression of plac-lacZ in cya mutant was both lower and growth rate independent. In addition, ppGpp (guanosine tetraphosphate) was not involved in the mechanism of growth rate regulation of the lac promoter. Thus, the results of this study indicate that cAMP mediates the growth rate-dependent regulation of lac operon expression in Escherichia coli.

  19. Volatile emissions of scented Alstroemeria genotypes are dominated by terpenes, and a myrcene synthase gene is highly expressed in scented Alstroemeria flowers

    PubMed Central

    Aros, Danilo; Gonzalez, Veronica; Allemann, Rudolf K.; Müller, Carsten T.; Rosati, Carlo; Rogers, Hilary J.

    2012-01-01

    Native to South America, Alstroemeria flowers are known for their colourful tepals, and Alstroemeria hybrids are an important cut flower. However, in common with many commercial cut flowers, virtually all the commercial Alstroemeria hybrids are not scented. The cultivar ‘Sweet Laura’ is one of very few scented commercial Alstroemeria hybrids. Characterization of the volatile emission profile of these cut flowers revealed three major terpene compounds: (E)-caryophyllene, humulene (also known as α-caryophyllene), an ocimene-like compound, and several minor peaks, one of which was identified as myrcene. The profile is completely different from that of the parental scented species A. caryophyllaea. Volatile emission peaked at anthesis in both scented genotypes, coincident in cv. ‘Sweet Laura’ with the maximal expression of a putative terpene synthase gene AlstroTPS. This gene was preferentially expressed in floral tissues of both cv. ‘Sweet Laura’ and A. caryophyllaea. Characterization of the AlstroTPS gene structure from cv. ‘Sweet Laura’ placed it as a member of the class III terpene synthases, and the predicted 567 amino acid sequence placed it into the subfamily TPS-b. The conserved sequences R28(R)X8W and D321DXXD are the putative Mg2+-binding sites, and in vitro assay of AlstroTPS expressed in Escherichia coli revealed that the encoded enzyme possesses myrcene synthase activity, consistent with a role for AlstroTPS in scent production in Alstroemeria cv. ‘Sweet Laura’ flowers. PMID:22268153

  20. Differentially Expressed Genes in Resistant and Susceptible Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Genotypes in Response to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Renfeng; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Zhendong; Wang, Lanfen; Wang, Xiaoming; Wang, Shumin; Blair, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium wilt of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), caused by Fusarium oxysporum Schlechtend.:Fr. f.sp. phaseoli (Fop), is one of the most important diseases of common beans worldwide. Few natural sources of resistance to Fop exist and provide only moderate or partial levels of protection. Despite the economic importance of the disease across multiple crops, only a few of Fop induced genes have been analyzed in legumes. Therefore, our goal was to identify transcriptionally regulated genes during an incompatible interaction between common bean and the Fop pathogen using the cDNA amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) technique. We generated a total of 8,730 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) with 768 primer pairs based on the comparison of a moderately resistant and a susceptible genotype. In total, 423 TDFs (4.9%) displayed altered expression patterns after inoculation with Fop inoculum. We obtained full amplicon sequences for 122 selected TDFs, of which 98 were identified as annotated known genes in different functional categories based on their putative functions, 10 were predicted but non-annotated genes and 14 were not homologous to any known genes. The 98 TDFs encoding genes of known putative function were classified as related to metabolism (22), signal transduction (21), protein synthesis and processing (20), development and cytoskeletal organization (12), transport of proteins (7), gene expression and RNA metabolism (4), redox reactions (4), defense and stress responses (3), energy metabolism (3), and hormone responses (2). Based on the analyses of homology, 19 TDFs from different functional categories were chosen for expression analysis using quantitative RT-PCR. The genes found to be important here were implicated at various steps of pathogen infection and will allow a better understanding of the mechanisms of defense and resistance to Fop and similar pathogens. The differential response genes discovered here could also be used as molecular

  1. Alteration of RH gene structure and expression in human dCCee and DCW-red blood cells: phenotypic homozygosity versus genotypic heterozygosity.

    PubMed

    Huang, C H

    1996-09-15

    This report describes a comparative study on the dCCee and DCW-red blood cells devoid of RhD and CcEe antigens, respectively. Southern blots showed that the two variants carried opposite deletions in the D and non-D (CcEe) genes. Rh haplotyping and exon polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay indicated that the deletions did not extend beyond the 5' region upstream from exon 1 or the 3' region downstream from exon 10 of the respective genes. This was confirmed by finding intact promoters and 3' untranslated regions in both D and non-D genes in each variant. Reverse transcriptase-PCR and cDNA sequencing showed the expression of two transcripts in each cell type. In dCCee cells, one transcript was the regular Ce form and the other occurred as a D-Ce-D hybrid whose Ce sequence spanned exons 2 through 9. In DCW-cells, the two transcripts were derived from reversely arranged hybrid genes, ie, the CW-D gene was formed by fusion of CW exon 1 with D exons 2 through 10, whereas the reverse product was formed by fusion of D exons 1 through 9 with non-D exon 10. These results indicated that DNA deletion and recombination had occurred in either cis or trans configuration and involved both RH loci in the dCCee or DCW-genome. Identification of such compound alterations correlates the genotypes with phenotypes and explains the lost Rh antigenic expression. A reinvestigation of gene organization also led to the reassignment of several 5' and 3' splice sites. Together, this study not only shows the complexity of Rh phenotypic diversity, but also points to the importance of concurrent analysis of genomic structure and transcript expression in deciphering the underlying genetic mechanisms.

  2. Differentially Expressed Genes in Resistant and Susceptible Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Genotypes in Response to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli.

    PubMed

    Xue, Renfeng; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Zhendong; Wang, Lanfen; Wang, Xiaoming; Wang, Shumin; Blair, Matthew W

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium wilt of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), caused by Fusarium oxysporum Schlechtend.:Fr. f.sp. phaseoli (Fop), is one of the most important diseases of common beans worldwide. Few natural sources of resistance to Fop exist and provide only moderate or partial levels of protection. Despite the economic importance of the disease across multiple crops, only a few of Fop induced genes have been analyzed in legumes. Therefore, our goal was to identify transcriptionally regulated genes during an incompatible interaction between common bean and the Fop pathogen using the cDNA amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) technique. We generated a total of 8,730 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) with 768 primer pairs based on the comparison of a moderately resistant and a susceptible genotype. In total, 423 TDFs (4.9%) displayed altered expression patterns after inoculation with Fop inoculum. We obtained full amplicon sequences for 122 selected TDFs, of which 98 were identified as annotated known genes in different functional categories based on their putative functions, 10 were predicted but non-annotated genes and 14 were not homologous to any known genes. The 98 TDFs encoding genes of known putative function were classified as related to metabolism (22), signal transduction (21), protein synthesis and processing (20), development and cytoskeletal organization (12), transport of proteins (7), gene expression and RNA metabolism (4), redox reactions (4), defense and stress responses (3), energy metabolism (3), and hormone responses (2). Based on the analyses of homology, 19 TDFs from different functional categories were chosen for expression analysis using quantitative RT-PCR. The genes found to be important here were implicated at various steps of pathogen infection and will allow a better understanding of the mechanisms of defense and resistance to Fop and similar pathogens. The differential response genes discovered here could also be used as molecular

  3. Recombinant expression and purification of an ATP-dependent DNA ligase from Aliivibrio salmonicida.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Adele; Pedersen, Hege

    2014-05-01

    The genome of the psychrophilic fish-pathogen Aliivibrio salmonicida encodes a putative ATP-dependent DNA ligase in addition to a housekeeping NAD-dependent enzyme. In order to study the structure and activity of the ATP dependent ligase in vitro we have undertaken its recombinant production and purification from an Escherichia coli based expression system. Expression and purification of this protein presented two significant challenges. First, the gene product was moderately toxic to E. coli cells, second it was necessary to remove the large amounts of E. coli DNA present in bacterial lysates without contamination of the protein preparation by nucleases which might interfere with future assaying. The toxicity problem was overcome by fusion of the putative ligase to large solubility tags such as maltose-binding protein (MBP) or Glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and DNA was removed by treatment with a nuclease which could be inhibited by reducing agents. As the A. salmonicida ATP-dependent DNA ligase gene encodes a predicted leader peptide, both the full-length and mature forms of the protein were produced. Both possessed ATP-dependent DNA ligase activity, but the truncated form was significantly more active. Here we detail the first reported production, purification and preliminary characterization of active A. salmonicida ATP-dependent DNA ligase.

  4. Age-Dependent TLR3 Expression of the Intestinal Epithelium Contributes to Rotavirus Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Pott, Johanna; Stockinger, Silvia; Torow, Natalia; Smoczek, Anna; Lindner, Cornelia; McInerney, Gerald; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Baumann, Ulrich; Pabst, Oliver; Bleich, André; Hornef, Mathias W.

    2012-01-01

    Rotavirus is a major cause of diarrhea worldwide and exhibits a pronounced small intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) tropism. Both human infants and neonatal mice are highly susceptible, whereas adult individuals remain asymptomatic and shed only low numbers of viral particles. Here we investigated age-dependent mechanisms of the intestinal epithelial innate immune response to rotavirus infection in an oral mouse infection model. Expression of the innate immune receptor for viral dsRNA, Toll-like receptor (Tlr) 3 was low in the epithelium of suckling mice but strongly increased during the postnatal period inversely correlating with rotavirus susceptibility, viral shedding and histological damage. Adult mice deficient in Tlr3 (Tlr3−/−) or the adaptor molecule Trif (TrifLps2/Lps2) exerted significantly higher viral shedding and decreased epithelial expression of proinflammatory and antiviral genes as compared to wild-type animals. In contrast, neonatal mice deficient in Tlr3 or Trif did not display impaired cell stimulation or enhanced rotavirus susceptibility. Using chimeric mice, a major contribution of the non-hematopoietic cell compartment in the Trif-mediated antiviral host response was detected in adult animals. Finally, a significant age-dependent increase of TLR3 expression was also detected in human small intestinal biopsies. Thus, upregulation of epithelial TLR3 expression during infancy might contribute to the age-dependent susceptibility to rotavirus infection. PMID:22570612

  5. The processing of facial identity and expression is interactive, but dependent on task and experience

    PubMed Central

    Yankouskaya, Alla; Humphreys, Glyn W.; Rotshtein, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Facial identity and emotional expression are two important sources of information for daily social interaction. However the link between these two aspects of face processing has been the focus of an unresolved debate for the past three decades. Three views have been advocated: (1) separate and parallel processing of identity and emotional expression signals derived from faces; (2) asymmetric processing with the computation of emotion in faces depending on facial identity coding but not vice versa; and (3) integrated processing of facial identity and emotion. We present studies with healthy participants that primarily apply methods from mathematical psychology, formally testing the relations between the processing of facial identity and emotion. Specifically, we focused on the “Garner” paradigm, the composite face effect and the divided attention tasks. We further ask whether the architecture of face-related processes is fixed or flexible and whether (and how) it can be shaped by experience. We conclude that formal methods of testing the relations between processes show that the processing of facial identity and expressions interact, and hence are not fully independent. We further demonstrate that the architecture of the relations depends on experience; where experience leads to higher degree of inter-dependence in the processing of identity and expressions. We propose that this change occurs as integrative processes are more efficient than parallel. Finally, we argue that the dynamic aspects of face processing need to be incorporated into theories in this field. PMID:25452722

  6. Proteomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum core metabolism: relative protein expression profiles and growth phase-dependent changes in protein expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clostridium thermocellum produces H2 and ethanol, as well as CO2, acetate, formate, and lactate, directly from cellulosic biomass. It is therefore an attractive model for biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing. Optimization of end-product yields and titres is crucial for making biofuel production economically feasible. Relative protein expression profiles may provide targets for metabolic engineering, while understanding changes in protein expression and metabolism in response to carbon limitation, pH, and growth phase may aid in reactor optimization. We performed shotgun 2D-HPLC-MS/MS on closed-batch cellobiose-grown exponential phase C. thermocellum cell-free extracts to determine relative protein expression profiles of core metabolic proteins involved carbohydrate utilization, energy conservation, and end-product synthesis. iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation) based protein quantitation was used to determine changes in core metabolic proteins in response to growth phase. Results Relative abundance profiles revealed differential levels of putative enzymes capable of catalyzing parallel pathways. The majority of proteins involved in pyruvate catabolism and end-product synthesis were detected with high abundance, with the exception of aldehyde dehydrogenase, ferredoxin-dependent Ech-type [NiFe]-hydrogenase, and RNF-type NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase. Using 4-plex 2D-HPLC-MS/MS, 24% of the 144 core metabolism proteins detected demonstrated moderate changes in expression during transition from exponential to stationary phase. Notably, proteins involved in pyruvate synthesis decreased in stationary phase, whereas proteins involved in glycogen metabolism, pyruvate catabolism, and end-product synthesis increased in stationary phase. Several proteins that may directly dictate end-product synthesis patterns, including pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductases, alcohol dehydrogenases, and a putative bifurcating hydrogenase

  7. Functional expression of a heterologous nickel-dependent, ATP-independent urease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Milne, N; Luttik, M A H; Cueto Rojas, H F; Wahl, A; van Maris, A J A; Pronk, J T; Daran, J M

    2015-07-01

    In microbial processes for production of proteins, biomass and nitrogen-containing commodity chemicals, ATP requirements for nitrogen assimilation affect product yields on the energy producing substrate. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a current host for heterologous protein production and potential platform for production of nitrogen-containing chemicals, uptake and assimilation of ammonium requires 1 ATP per incorporated NH3. Urea assimilation by this yeast is more energy efficient but still requires 0.5 ATP per NH3 produced. To decrease ATP costs for nitrogen assimilation, the S. cerevisiae gene encoding ATP-dependent urease (DUR1,2) was replaced by a Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene encoding ATP-independent urease (ure2), along with its accessory genes ureD, ureF and ureG. Since S. pombe ure2 is a Ni(2+)-dependent enzyme and Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not express native Ni(2+)-dependent enzymes, the S. pombe high-affinity nickel-transporter gene (nic1) was also expressed. Expression of the S. pombe genes into dur1,2Δ S. cerevisiae yielded an in vitro ATP-independent urease activity of 0.44±0.01 µmol min(-1) mg protein(-1) and restored growth on urea as sole nitrogen source. Functional expression of the Nic1 transporter was essential for growth on urea at low Ni(2+) concentrations. The maximum specific growth rates of the engineered strain on urea and ammonium were lower than those of a DUR1,2 reference strain. In glucose-limited chemostat cultures with urea as nitrogen source, the engineered strain exhibited an increased release of ammonia and reduced nitrogen content of the biomass. Our results indicate a new strategy for improving yeast-based production of nitrogen-containing chemicals and demonstrate that Ni(2+)-dependent enzymes can be functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae.

  8. Do sexual ornaments demonstrate heightened condition-dependent expression as predicted by the handicap hypothesis?

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, Samuel; Fowler, Kevin; Pomiankowski, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The handicap hypothesis of sexual selection predicts that sexual ornaments have evolved heightened condition-dependent expression. The prediction has only recently been subject to experimental investigation. Many of the experiments are of limited value as they: (i) fail to compare condition dependence in sexual ornaments with suitable non-sexual trait controls; (ii) do not adequately account for body size variation; and (iii) typically consider no stress and extreme stress manipulations rather than a range of stresses similar to those experienced in nature. There is also a dearth of experimental studies investigating the genetic basis of condition dependence. Despite the common claim that sexual ornaments are condition-dependent, the unexpected conclusion from our literature review is that there is little support from well-designed experiments. PMID:15255094

  9. Biomarkers of benefit from cetuximab-based therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer: interaction of EGFR ligand expression with RAS/RAF, PIK3CA genotypes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background More than half of patients with KRAS-wild type advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) fail anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies. We studied EGFR-axis messenger RNA (mRNA) expression and RAS, RAF, PIK3CA mutations in order to identify additional biomarkers of cetuximab efficacy. Methods Previously genotyped (KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA mutations) formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumour biopsies of 226 cetuximab-treated CRC patients (1st to 3rd line therapy) were assessed for mRNA expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its ligands EGF, Transofrming Growth Factor-a (TGFA), Amphiregulin (AREG) and Epiregulin (EREG) with real time quantitative PCR. Mutations were detected in 72 (31.9%) tumours for KRAS, in 6 (2.65%) for BRAF, in 7 (3.1%) for NRAS and in 37 (16.4%) for PIK3CA. Results Only PIK3CA mutations occasionally coexisted with other gene mutations. In univariate analysis, prognostic significance for survival ( from metastases until death) was seen for BRAF mutations (Hazard Ratio HR 8.1, 95% CI 3.4-19), codon 12-only KRAS mutations (HR 1.62, 95% CI 1.1-2.4), high AREG mRNA expression only in KRAS wild type CRC (HR 0.47, 95% CI 0.3-0.7) and high EREG mRNA expression irrespective of KRAS mutation status (HR 0.45, 95% CI 0.28-0.7). EREG tumoural mRNA expression was significantly associated with a 2.26-fold increased likelihood of objective response to cetuximab therapy (RECIST 1.1). In multivariate analysis, favourable predictive factors were high AREG mRNA in KRAS wild type tumours, high EREG mRNA, low Ephrin A2 receptor mRNA. Cetuximab-treated patients with AREG-low KRAS wild type CRC fared very poorly, their survival being similar to KRAS mutant CRC. Patients with KRAS codon 13 or other non-codon 12 mutations had a median survival (30 months, 95% CI 20–35) similar to that of patients with KRAS wild-type (median survival 29 months, 95% CI 25–35), in contrast to patients with KRAS codon 12 mutations who fared worse (median survival 19

  10. Commercially available immunoglobulins contain virus neutralizing antibodies against all major genotypes of polyomavirus BK.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, P; Pastrana, D V; Zeng, G; Huang, Y; Shapiro, R; Sood, P; Puttarajappa, C; Berger, M; Hariharan, S; Buck, C B

    2015-04-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) form the basis of immunotherapeutic strategies against many important human viral infections. Accordingly, we studied the prevalence, titer, genotype-specificity, and mechanism of action of anti-polyomavirus BK (BKV) NAbs in commercially available human immune globulin (IG) preparations designed for intravenous (IV) use. Pseudovirions (PsV) of genotypes Ia, Ib2, Ic, II, III, and IV were generated by co-transfecting a reporter plasmid encoding luciferase and expression plasmids containing synthetic codon-modified VP1, VP2, and VP3 capsid protein genes into 293TT cells. NAbs were measured using luminometry. All IG preparations neutralized all BKV genotypes, with mean EC50 titers as high as 254 899 for genotype Ia and 6,666 for genotype IV. Neutralizing titers against genotypes II and III were higher than expected, adding to growing evidence that infections with these genotypes are more common than currently appreciated. Batch to batch variation in different lots of IG was within the limits of experimental error. Antibody mediated virus neutralizing was dose dependent, modestly enhanced by complement, genotype-specific, and achieved without effect on viral aggregation, capsid morphology, elution, or host cell release. IG contains potent NAbs capable of neutralizing all major BKV genotypes. Clinical trials based on sound pharmacokinetic principles are needed to explore prophylactic and therapeutic applications of these anti-viral effects, until effective small molecule inhibitors of BKV replication can be developed.

  11. Estrogen regulates hepcidin expression via GPR30-BMP6-dependent signaling in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yasumasa; Tajima, Soichiro; Izawa-Ishizawa, Yuki; Kihira, Yoshitaka; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Tomita, Shuhei; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Tamaki, Toshiaki

    2012-01-01

    Hepcidin, a liver-derived iron regulatory protein, plays a crucial role in iron metabolism. It is known that gender differences exist with respect to iron storage in the body; however, the effects of sex steroid hormones on iron metabolism are not completely understood. We focused on the effects of the female sex hormone estrogen on hepcidin expression. First, ovariectomized (OVX) and sham-operated mice were employed to investigate the effects of estrogen on hepcidin expression in an in vivo study. Hepcidin expression was decreased in the livers of OVX mice compared to the sham-operated mice. In OVX mice, bone morphologic protein-6 (BMP6), a regulator of hepcidin, was also found to be downregulated in the liver, whereas ferroportin (FPN), an iron export protein, was upregulated in the duodenum. Both serum and liver iron concentrations were elevated in OVX mice relative to their concentrations in sham-operated mice. In in vitro studies, 17β-estradiol (E(2)) increased the mRNA expression of hepcidin in HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. E(2)-induced hepatic hepcidin upregulation was not inhibited by ICI 182720, an inhibitor of the estrogen receptor; instead, hepcidin expression was increased by ICI 182720. E(2) and ICI 182720 exhibit agonist actions with G-protein coupled receptor 30 (GPR30), the 7-transmembrane estrogen receptor. G1, a GPR30 agonist, upregulated hepcidin expression, and GPR30 siRNA treatment abolished E(2)-induced hepcidin expression. BMP6 expression induced by E(2) was abolished by GPR30 silencing. Finally, both E(2) and G1 supplementation restored reduced hepatic hepcidin and BMP6 expression and reversed the augmentation of duodenal FPN expression in the OVX mice. In contrast, serum hepcidin was elevated in OVX mice, which was reversed in these mice with E(2) and G1. Thus, estrogen is involved in hepcidin expression via a GPR30-BMP6-dependent mechanism, providing new insight into the role of estrogen in iron metabolism.

  12. Recombinant expression of the alternate reading frame protein (ARFP) of hepatitis C virus genotype 4a (HCV-4a) and detection of ARFP and anti-ARFP antibodies in HCV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Shehat, Michael G; Bahey-El-Din, Mohammed; Kassem, Mervat A; Farghaly, Faten A; Abdul-Rahman, Medhat H; Fanaki, Nourhan H

    2015-08-01

    HCV is a single-stranded RNA virus with a single open reading frame (ORF) that is translated into a polyprotein that is then processed to form 10 viral proteins. An additional eleventh viral protein, the alternative reading frame protein (ARFP), was discovered relatively recently. This protein results from a translational frameshift in the core region during the expression of the viral proteins. Recombinant expression of different forms of ARFP was previously done for HCV genotypes 1 and 2, and more recently, genotype 3. However, none of the previous studies addressed the expression of ARFP of HCV genotype 4a, which is responsible for 80 % of HCV infections in the Middle East and Africa. Moreover, the direct detection of the ARFP antigen in HCV-infected patients was never studied before for any HCV genotype. In the present study, recombinant ARFP derived from HCV genotype 4a was successfully expressed in E. coli and purified using metal affinity chromatography. The recombinant ARFP protein and anti-ARFP antibodies were used for detection of ARFP antigen in patients' sera, employing competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) procedures. Furthermore, the recombinant antigen was also used to detect and quantify anti-ARFP antibodies in HCV-infected Egyptian patients at different stages of pegylated interferon/ribavirin therapy, using an ELISA assay. The ARFP antigen was detectable in 69.4 % of RNA-positive sera, indicating that ARFP antigen is produced during the natural course of HCV infection. In addition, significant levels of anti-ARFP antibodies were present in 41 % of the serum samples tested. The important diagnostic value of the recombinant ARFP antigen was also demonstrated.

  13. Age-dependent differential expression profile of a novel intergenic long noncoding RNA in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kour, Sukhleen; Rath, Pramod C

    2015-11-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are ≥200 nt long, abundant class of non-protein coding RNAs that are transcribed in complex, sense- and antisense patterns from the intergenic and intronic regions of mammalian genome. Mammalian central nervous system constitutes the largest repertoire of noncoding transcripts that are known to be expressed in developmentally regulated and cell-type specific manners. Although many lncRNAs, functioning in the brain development and diseases are known, none involved in brain aging has been reported so far. Here, we report involvement of a novel, repeat sequence (simple repeats and SINES)-containing, trans-spliced, long intergenic non-protein coding RNA (lincRNA), named as LINC-RBE (rat brain expressed transcript) involved in maturation and aging of mammalian brain. The LINC-RBE is strongly expressed in the rat brain and the upstream/downstream sequences of its DNA in the chromosome 5 contain binding sites for many cell growth, survival and development-specific transcriptional factors. Through RT-PCR and RNA in situ hybridization, LINC-RBE was found to be expressed in an age-dependent manner with significantly higher level of expression in the brain of adult (16 weeks) compared to both immature (4 weeks) and old (70 weeks) rats. Moreover, the expression pattern of the LINC-RBE showed distinct association with the specific neuro-anatomical regions, cell types and sub-cellular compartments of the rat brain in an age-related manner. Thus, its expression increased from immature stage to adulthood and declined further in old age. This is a first-time report of involvement of an intergenic repeat sequence-containing lncRNA in different regions of the rat brain in an age-dependent manner.

  14. Age-dependent differential expression profile of a novel intergenic long noncoding RNA in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kour, Sukhleen; Rath, Pramod C

    2015-12-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are ≥ 200 nt long, abundant class of non-protein coding RNAs that are transcribed in complex, sense- and antisense patterns from the intergenic and intronic regions of mammalian genome. Mammalian central nervous system constitutes the largest repertoire of noncoding transcripts that are known to be expressed in developmentally regulated and cell-type specific manners. Although many lncRNAs, functioning in the brain development and diseases are known, none involved in brain aging has been reported so far. Here, we report involvement of a novel, repeat sequence (simple repeats and SINES)-containing, trans-spliced, long intergenic non-protein coding RNA (lincRNA), named as LINC-RBE (rat brain expressed transcript) involved in maturation and aging of mammalian brain. The LINC-RBE is strongly expressed in the rat brain and the upstream/downstream sequences of its DNA in the chromosome 5 contain binding sites for many cell growth, survival and development-specific transcriptional factors. Through RT-PCR and RNA in situ hybridization, LINC-RBE was found to be expressed in an age-dependent manner with significantly higher level of expression in the brain of adult (16 week) compared to both immature (4 week) and old (70 week) rats. Moreover, the expression pattern of the LINC-RBE showed distinct association with the specific neuro-anatomical regions, cell types and sub-cellular compartments of the rat brain in an age-related manner. Thus, its expression increased from immature stage to adulthood and declined further in old age. This is a first-time report of involvement of an intergenic repeat sequence-containing lncRNA in different regions of the rat brain in an age-dependent manner.

  15. Prominin-2 expression increases protrusions, decreases caveolae and inhibits Cdc42 dependent fluid phase endocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Raman Deep Schroeder, Andreas S.; Scheffer, Luana; Holicky, Eileen L.; Wheatley, Christine L.; Marks, David L. Pagano, Richard E.

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Prominin-2 expression induced protrusions that co-localized with lipid raft markers. •Prominin-2 expression decreased caveolae, caveolar endocytosis and increased pCav1. •Prominin-2 expression inhibited fluid phase endocytosis by inactivation of Cdc42. •These endocytic effects can be reversed by adding exogenous cholesterol. •Caveolin1 knockdown restored fluid phase endocytosis in Prominin2 expressing cells. -- Abstract: Background: Membrane protrusions play important roles in biological processes such as cell adhesion, wound healing, migration, and sensing of the external environment. Cell protrusions are a subtype of membrane microdomains composed of cholesterol and sphingolipids, and can be disrupted by cholesterol depletion. Prominins are pentaspan membrane proteins that bind cholesterol and localize to plasma membrane (PM) protrusions. Prominin-1 is of great interest as a marker for stem and cancer cells, while Prominin-2 (Prom2) is reportedly restricted to epithelial cells. Aim: To characterize the effects of Prom-2 expression on PM microdomain organization. Methods: Prom2-fluorescent protein was transfected in human skin fibroblasts (HSF) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells for PM raft and endocytic studies. Caveolae at PM were visualized using transmission electron microscopy. Cdc42 activation was measured and caveolin-1 knockdown was performed using siRNAs. Results: Prom2 expression in HSF and CHO cells caused extensive Prom2-positive protrusions that co-localized with lipid raft markers. Prom2 expression significantly decreased caveolae at the PM, reduced caveolar endocytosis and increased caveolin-1 phosphorylation. Prom2 expression also inhibited Cdc42-dependent fluid phase endocytosis via decreased Cdc42 activation. Effects on endocytosis were reversed by addition of cholesterol. Knockdown of caveolin-1 by siRNA restored Cdc42 dependent fluid phase endocytosis in Prom2-expressing cells. Conclusions: Prom2 protrusions primarily

  16. Coordinated steroid hormone-dependent and independent expression of multiple kallikreins in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Paliouras, Miltiadis; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2007-03-01

    The regulation of gene expression by steroid hormones plays an important role in the normal development and function of many organs, as well in the pathogenesis of endocrine-related cancers. Previous experiments have shown that many kallikrein genes are under steroid hormone regulation in breast cancer cell lines. We here examine the coordinated expression of multiple kallikrein genes in several breast cancer cell lines after steroid hormone stimulation. Breast cancer cell lines were treated with various steroid hormones and kallikrein (KLK/hK) expression of hK3 (prostate-specific antigen, PSA), hK5, hK6, hK7, hK8, hK10, hK11, hK13, and hK14 was analyzed at the RNA level via RT-PCR and at the protein level by immunofluorometric ELISA assays. We identified several distinct hK hormone-dependent and hormone-independent expression patterns. Hormone-specific modulation of expression was seen for several kallikreins in BT-474, MCF-7, and T-47D cell lines. hK6 was specifically up-regulated upon estradiol treatment in all three cell lines whereas PSA expression was induced by dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and norgestrel stimulation in BT-474 and T-47D. hK10, hK11, hK13, and hK14 were specifically up-regulated by DHT in T-47D and by estradiol in BT-474 cells. Bioinformatic analysis of upstream proximal promoter sequences for these hKs did not identify any recognizable hormone-response elements (HREs), suggesting that the coordinated activation of these four hKs represents a unique expression "cassette", utilizing a common hormone-dependent mechanism. We conclude that groups of human hKs are coordinately expressed in a steroid hormone-dependent manner. Our data supports clinical observations linking expression of multiple hKs with breast cancer prognosis.

  17. Time-dependent effects of ethanol on BK channel expression and trafficking in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Palacio, Stephanie; Velázquez-Marrero, Cristina; Marrero, Héctor G.; Seale, Garrett E.; Yudowski, Guillermo A.; Treistman, Steven N.

    2016-01-01

    Background The large conductance Ca+2 – and voltage-activated K+ channel (BK) is an important player in molecular and behavioral alcohol tolerance. Trafficking and surface expression of ion channels contribute to the development of addictive behaviors. We have previously reported that internalization of the BK channel is a component of molecular tolerance to EtOH. Methods Using primary cultures of hippocampal neurons, we combine total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, electrophysiology and biochemical techniques to explore how exposure to EtOH affects the expression and subcellular localization of endogenous BK channels over time. Results Exposure to EtOH changed the expression of endogenous BK channels in a time-dependent manner at the perimembrane area (plasma membrane and/or the area adjacent to it), while total protein levels of BK remain unchanged. These results suggest a redistribution of the channel within the neurons rather than changes in synthesis or degradation rates. Our results showed a temporally nonlinear effect of EtOH on perimembrane expression of BK. First, there was an increase in BK perimembrane expression after 10-min of EtOH exposure that remained evident after 3-hrs, though not correlated to increases in functional channel expression. In contrast, after 6-hrs of EtOH exposure we observed a significant decrease in both BK perimembrane expression and functional channel expression. Furthermore, after 24-hrs EtOH exposure, perimembrane levels of BK had returned to baseline. Conclusion We report a complex time-dependent pattern in the effect of EtOH on BK channel trafficking, including successive increases and decreases in perimembrane expression and a reduction in active BK channels after 3 and 6-hrs of EtOH exposure. Possible mechanisms underlying this multiphasic trafficking are discussed. Since molecular tolerance necessarily underlies behavioral tolerance, the time-dependent alterations we see at the level of the channel

  18. NLRC5 controls basal MHC class I gene expression in an MHC enhanceosome-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Neerincx, Andreas; Rodriguez, Galaxia M; Steimle, Viktor; Kufer, Thomas A

    2012-05-15

    Nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins play important roles in innate immune responses as pattern-recognition receptors. Although most NLR proteins act in cell autonomous immune pathways, some do not function as classical pattern-recognition receptors. One such NLR protein is the MHC class II transactivator, the master regulator of MHC class II gene transcription. In this article, we report that human NLRC5, which we recently showed to be involved in viral-mediated type I IFN responses, shuttles to the nucleus and activates MHC class I gene expression. Knockdown of NLRC5 in different human cell lines and primary dermal fibroblasts leads to reduced MHC class I expression, whereas introduction of NLRC5 into cell types with very low expression of MHC class I augments MHC class I expression to levels comparable to those found in lymphocytes. Expression of NLRC5 positively correlates with MHC class I expression in human tissues. Functionally, we show that both the N-terminal effector domain of NLRC5 and its C-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain are needed for activation of MHC class I expression. Moreover, nuclear shuttling and function depend on a functional Walker A motif. Finally, we identified a promoter sequence in the MHC class I promoter, the X1 box, to be involved in NLRC5-mediated MHC class I gene activation. Taken together, this suggested that NLRC5 acts in a manner similar to class II transactivator to drive MHC expression and revealed NLRC5 as an important regulator of basal MHC class I expression.

  19. The cpr5 mutant of Arabidopsis expresses both NPR1-dependent and NPR1-independent resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Bowling, S A; Clarke, J D; Liu, Y; Klessig, D F; Dong, X

    1997-01-01

    The cpr5 mutant was identified from a screen for constitutive expression of systemic acquired resistance (SAR). This single recessive mutation also leads to spontaneous expression of chlorotic lesions and reduced trichome development. The cpr5 plants were found to be constitutively resistant to two virulent pathogens, Pseudomonas syringae pv maculicola ES4326 and Peronospora parasitica Noco2; to have endogenous expression of the pathogenesis-related gene 1 (PR-1); and to have an elevated level of salicylic acid (SA). Lines homozygous for cpr5 and either the SA-degrading bacterial gene nahG or the SA-insensitive mutation npr1 do not express PR-1 or exhibit resistance to P. s. maculicola ES4326. Therefore, we conclude that cpr5 acts upstream of SA in inducing SAR. However, the cpr5 npr1 plants retained heightened resistance to P. parasitica Noco2 and elevated expression of the defensin gene PDF1.2, implying that NPR1-independent resistance signaling also occurs. We conclude that the cpr5 mutation leads to constitutive expression of both an NPR1-dependent and an NPR1-independent SAR pathway. Identification of this mutation indicates that these pathways are connected in early signal transduction steps and that they have overlapping functions in providing resistance. PMID:9338960

  20. Activity-dependent PSA expression regulates inhibitory maturation and onset of critical period plasticity.

    PubMed

    Di Cristo, Graziella; Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Kuhlman, Sandra J; Fu, Yu; Bélanger, Marie-Claude; Wu, Cai Zhi; Rutishauser, Urs; Maffei, Lamberto; Huang, Z Josh

    2007-12-01

    Functional maturation of GABAergic innervation in the developing visual cortex is regulated by neural activity and sensory inputs and in turn influences the critical period of ocular dominance plasticity. Here we show that polysialic acid (PSA), presented by the neural cell adhesion molecule, has a role in the maturation of GABAergic innervation and ocular dominance plasticity. Concentrations of PSA significantly decline shortly after eye opening in the adolescent mouse visual cortex; this decline is hindered by visual deprivation. The developmental and activity-dependent regulation of PSA expression is inversely correlated with the maturation of GABAergic innervation. Premature removal of PSA in visual cortex results in precocious maturation of perisomatic innervation by basket interneurons, enhanced inhibitory synaptic transmission, and earlier onset of ocular dominance plasticity. The developmental and activity-dependent decline of PSA expression therefore regulates the timing of the maturation of GABAergic inhibition and the onset of ocular dominance plasticity.

  1. Differentially expressed proteins and associated histological and disease progression changes in cotyledon tissue of a resistant and susceptible genotype of brassica napus infected with Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Garg, Harsh; Li, Hua; Sivasithamparam, Krishnapillai; Barbetti, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    Sclerotinia rot caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is one of the most serious diseases of oilseed rape. To understand the resistance mechanisms in the Brassica napus to S. sclerotiorum, comparative disease progression, histological and proteomic studies were conducted of two B. napus genotypes (resistant cv. Charlton, susceptible cv. RQ001-02M2). At 72 and 96 h post inoculation (hpi), lesion size on cotyledons was significantly (P≤0.001) smaller in the resistant Charlton. Anatomical investigations revealed impeded fungal growth (at 24 hpi and onwards) and hyphal disintegration only on resistant Charlton. Temporal changes (12, 24, 48 and 72 hpi) in protein profile showed certain enzymes up-regulated only in resistant Charlton, such as those related to primary metabolic pathways, antioxidant defence, ethylene biosynthesis, pathogenesis related proteins, protein synthesis and protein folding, play a role in mediating defence responses against S. sclerotiorum. Similarly a eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A enzyme with increased abundance in susceptible RQ001-02M2 and decreased levels in resistant Charlton has a role in increased susceptibility to this pathogen. This is the first time that the expression of these enzymes has been shown to be associated with mediating the defence response against S. sclerotinia in cotyledon tissue of a resistant cultivar of B. napus at a proteomics level. This study not only provides important new insights into the resistance mechanisms within B. napus against S. sclerotiorum, but opens the way for novel engineering of new B. napus varieties that over-express these key enzymes as a strategy to enhance resistance and better manage this devastating pathogen.

  2. Differentially Expressed Proteins and Associated Histological and Disease Progression Changes in Cotyledon Tissue of a Resistant and Susceptible Genotype of Brassica napus Infected with Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Harsh; Li, Hua; Sivasithamparam, Krishnapillai; Barbetti, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    Sclerotinia rot caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is one of the most serious diseases of oilseed rape. To understand the resistance mechanisms in the Brassica napus to S. sclerotiorum, comparative disease progression, histological and proteomic studies were conducted of two B. napus genotypes (resistant cv. Charlton, susceptible cv. RQ001-02M2). At 72 and 96 h post inoculation (hpi), lesion size on cotyledons was significantly (P≤0.001) smaller in the resistant Charlton. Anatomical investigations revealed impeded fungal growth (at 24 hpi and onwards) and hyphal disintegration only on resistant Charlton. Temporal changes (12, 24, 48 and 72 hpi) in protein profile showed certain enzymes up-regulated only in resistant Charlton, such as those related to primary metabolic pathways, antioxidant defence, ethylene biosynthesis, pathogenesis related proteins, protein synthesis and protein folding, play a role in mediating defence responses against S. sclerotiorum. Similarly a eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A enzyme with increased abundance in susceptible RQ001-02M2 and decreased levels in resistant Charlton has a role in increased susceptibility to this pathogen. This is the first time that the expression of these enzymes has been shown to be associated with mediating the defence response against S. sclerotinia in cotyledon tissue of a resistant cultivar of B. napus at a proteomics level. This study not only provides important new insights into the resistance mechanisms within B. napus against S. sclerotiorum, but opens the way for novel engineering of new B. napus varieties that over-express these key enzymes as a strategy to enhance resistance and better manage this devastating pathogen. PMID:23776450

  3. Condition-dependent expression of pre- and postcopulatory sexual traits in guppies

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md Moshiur; Kelley, Jennifer L; Evans, Jonathan P

    2013-01-01

    Female choice can impose persistent directional selection on male sexually selected traits, yet such traits often exhibit high levels of phenotypic variation. One explanation for this paradox is that if sexually selected traits are costly, only the fittest males are able to acquire and allocate the resources required for their expression. Furthermore, because male condition is dependent on resource allocation, condition dependence in sexual traits is expected to underlie trade-offs between reproduction and other life-history functions. In this study we test these ideas by experimentally manipulating diet quality (carotenoid levels) and quantity in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata), a livebearing freshwater fish that is an important model for understanding relationships between pre- and post-copulatory sexually selected traits. Specifically, we test for condition dependence in the expression of pre- and postcopulatory sexual traits (behavior, ornamentation, sperm traits) and determine whether diet manipulation mediates relationships among these traits. Consistent with prior work we found a significant effect of diet quantity on the expression of both pre- and postcopulatory male traits; diet-restricted males performed fewer sexual behaviors and exhibited significant reductions in color ornamentation, sperm quality, sperm number, and sperm length than those fed ad libitum. However, contrary to our expectations, we found no significant effect of carotenoid manipulation on the expression of any of these traits, and no evidence for a trade-off in resource allocation between pre- and postcopulatory episodes of sexual selection. Our results further underscore the sensitivity of behavioral, ornamental, and ejaculate traits to dietary stress, and highlight the important role of condition dependence in maintaining the high variability in male sexual traits. PMID:23919162

  4. Cyclin-dependent kinase complexes in developing maize endosperm: evidence for differential expression and functional specialization.

    PubMed

    Dante, Ricardo A; Sabelli, Paolo A; Nguyen, Hong N; Leiva-Neto, João T; Tao, Yumin; Lowe, Keith S; Hoerster, George J; Gordon-Kamm, William J; Jung, Rudolf; Larkins, Brian A

    2014-02-01

    Endosperm development in maize (Zea mays L.) and related cereals comprises a cell proliferation stage followed by a period of rapid growth coupled to endoreduplication. Regulation of the cell cycle in developing endosperm is poorly understood. We have characterized various subunits of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) complexes, master cell cycle regulators in all eukaryotes. A-, B-, and D-type cyclins as well as A- and B-type cyclin-dependent kinases were characterized with respect to their RNA and protein expression profiles. Two main patterns were identified: one showing expression throughout endosperm development, and another characterized by a sharp down-regulation with the onset of endoreduplication. Cyclin CYCB1;3 and CYCD2;1 proteins were distributed in the cytoplasm and nucleus of cells throughout the endosperm, while cyclin CYCD5 protein was localized in the cytoplasm of peripheral cells. CDKB1;1 expression was strongly associated with cell proliferation. Expression and cyclin-binding patterns suggested that CDKA;1 and CDKA;3 are at least partially redundant. The kinase activity associated with the cyclin CYCA1 was highest during the mitotic stage of development, while that associated with CYCB1;3, CYCD2;1 and CYCD5 peaked at the mitosis-to-endoreduplication transition. A-, B- and D-type cyclins were more resistant to proteasome-dependent degradation in endoreduplicating than in mitotic endosperm extracts. These results indicated that endosperm development is characterized by differential expression and activity of specific cyclins and CDKs, and suggested that endoreduplication is associated with reduced cyclin proteolysis via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

  5. Epigenomics and bolting tolerance in sugar beet genotypes.

    PubMed

    Hébrard, Claire; Peterson, Daniel G; Willems, Glenda; Delaunay, Alain; Jesson, Béline; Lefèbvre, Marc; Barnes, Steve; Maury, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    In sugar beet (Beta vulgaris altissima), bolting tolerance is an essential agronomic trait reflecting the bolting response of genotypes after vernalization. Genes involved in induction of sugar beet bolting have now been identified, and evidence suggests that epigenetic factors are involved in their control. Indeed, the time course and amplitude of DNA methylation variations in the shoot apical meristem have been shown to be critical in inducing sugar beet bolting, and a few functional targets of DNA methylation during vernalization have been identified. However, molecular mechanisms controlling bolting tolerance levels among genotypes are still poorly understood. Here, gene expression and DNA methylation profiles were compared in shoot apical meristems of three bolting-resistant and three bolting-sensitive genotypes after vernalization. Using Cot fractionation followed by 454 sequencing of the isolated low-copy DNA, 6231 contigs were obtained that were used along with public sugar beet DNA sequences to design custom Agilent microarrays for expression (56k) and methylation (244k) analyses. A total of 169 differentially expressed genes and 111 differentially methylated regions were identified between resistant and sensitive vernalized genotypes. Fourteen sequences were both differentially expressed and differentially methylated, with a negative correlation between their methylation and expression levels. Genes involved in cold perception, phytohormone signalling, and flowering induction were over-represented and collectively represent an integrative gene network from environmental perception to bolting induction. Altogether, the data suggest that the genotype-dependent control of DNA methylation and expression of an integrative gene network participate in bolting tolerance in sugar beet, opening up perspectives for crop improvement.

  6. Epigenomics and bolting tolerance in sugar beet genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hébrard, Claire; Peterson, Daniel G.; Willems, Glenda; Delaunay, Alain; Jesson, Béline; Lefèbvre, Marc; Barnes, Steve; Maury, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    In sugar beet (Beta vulgaris altissima), bolting tolerance is an essential agronomic trait reflecting the bolting response of genotypes after vernalization. Genes involved in induction of sugar beet bolting have now been identified, and evidence suggests that epigenetic factors are involved in their control. Indeed, the time course and amplitude of DNA methylation variations in the shoot apical meristem have been shown to be critical in inducing sugar beet bolting, and a few functional targets of DNA methylation during vernalization have been identified. However, molecular mechanisms controlling bolting tolerance levels among genotypes are still poorly understood. Here, gene expression and DNA methylation profiles were compared in shoot apical meristems of three bolting-resistant and three bolting-sensitive genotypes after vernalization. Using Cot fractionation followed by 454 sequencing of the isolated low-copy DNA, 6231 contigs were obtained that were used along with public sugar beet DNA sequences to design custom Agilent microarrays for expression (56k) and methylation (244k) analyses. A total of 169 differentially expressed genes and 111 differentially methylated regions were identified between resistant and sensitive vernalized genotypes. Fourteen sequences were both differentially expressed and differentially methylated, with a negative correlation between their methylation and expression levels. Genes involved in cold perception, phytohormone signalling, and flowering induction were over-represented and collectively represent an integrative gene network from environmental perception to bolting induction. Altogether, the data suggest that the genotype-dependent control of DNA methylation and expression of an integrative gene network participate in bolting tolerance in sugar beet, opening up perspectives for crop improvement. PMID:26463996

  7. Identification of PN1, a Predominant Voltage-Dependent Sodium Channel Expressed Principally in Peripheral Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo-Aral, Juan J.; Moss, Brenda L.; He, Zhi-Jun; Koszowski, Adam G.; Whisenand, Teri; Levinson, Simon R.; Wolf, John J.; Silos-Santiago, Inmaculada; Halegoua, Simon; Mandel, Gail

    1997-02-01

    Membrane excitability in different tissues is due, in large part, to the selective expression of distinct genes encoding the voltage-dependent sodium channel. Although the predominant sodium channels in brain, skeletal muscle, and cardiac muscle have been identified, the major sodium channel types responsible for excitability within the peripheral nervous system have remained elusive. We now describe the deduced primary structure of a sodium channel, peripheral nerve type 1 (PN1), which is expressed at high levels throughout the peripheral nervous system and is targeted to nerve terminals of cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons. Studies using cultured PC12 cells indicate that both expression and targeting of PN1 is induced by treatment of the cells with nerve growth factor. The preferential localization suggests that the PN1 sodium channel plays a specific role in nerve excitability.

  8. The mom gene of bacteriophage Mu: the mechanism of methylation-dependent expression.

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, A; Blöcker, H; Frank, R; Kahmann, R

    1986-01-01

    Transcription of the DNA modification gene (mom) of bacteriophage Mu requires methylation of three GATC sites upstream of the mom promoter by the Escherichia coli deoxyadenosine methylation function (Dam). The three sites map within a 40-bp segment termed region I. Small deletions, inversions, duplications and specific point mutations have been introduced in region I. Their effect on mom expression has been studied in dam+ and dam strains. Dam-dependent expression of the mom gene requires a specific arrangement of the three GATC sites and the presence of the methylated base in at least two of the three sites. We show that mom specific modification is regulated by a host protein. The Mom function is expressed in dam strains if they are defective in one component of the methylation-instructed mismatch correction system, mutH. We suggest that the product of mutH functions as a transcriptional repressor by binding to region I. PMID:3536483

  9. Improving subspace learning for facial expression recognition using person dependent and geometrically enriched training sets.

    PubMed

    Maronidis, Anastasios; Bolis, Dimitris; Tefas, Anastasios; Pitas, Ioannis

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, the robustness of appearance-based subspace learning techniques in geometrical transformations of the images is explored. A number of such techniques are presented and tested using four facial expression databases. A strong correlation between the recognition accuracy and the image registration error has been observed. Although it is common-knowledge that appearance-based methods are sensitive to image registration errors, there is no systematic experiment reported in the literature. As a result of these experiments, the training set enrichment with translated, scaled and rotated images is proposed for confronting the low robustness of these techniques in facial expression recognition. Moreover, person dependent training is proven to be much more accurate for facial expression recognition than generic learning.

  10. Local Adaptation of Sun-Exposure-Dependent Gene Expression Regulation in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kita, Ryosuke; Fraser, Hunter B.

    2016-01-01

    Sun-exposure is a key environmental variable in the study of human evolution. Several skin-pigmentation genes serve as classical examples of positive selection, suggesting that sun-exposure has significantly shaped worldwide genomic variation. Here we investigate the interaction between genetic variation and sun-exposure, and how this impacts gene expression regulation. Using RNA-Seq data from 607 human skin samples, we identified thousands of transcripts that are differentially expressed between sun-exposed skin and non-sun-exposed skin. We then tested whether genetic variants may influence each individual’s gene expression response to sun-exposure. Our analysis revealed 10 sun-exposure-dependent gene expression quantitative trait loci (se-eQTLs), including genes involved in skin pigmentation (SLC45A2) and epidermal differentiation (RASSF9). The allele frequencies of the RASSF9 se-eQTL across diverse populations correlate with the magnitude of solar radiation experienced by these populations, suggesting local adaptation to varying levels of sunlight. These results provide the first examples of sun-exposure-dependent regulatory variation and suggest that this variation has contributed to recent human adaptation. PMID:27760139

  11. skn-1-Dependent and -independent regulation of aip-1 expression following metabolic stress in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Annabel A; Springer, Mitchell G; Fisher, Alfred L

    2010-06-01

    Maintenance of a stable, properly folded, and catalytically active proteome is a major challenge to organisms in the face of multiple internal and external stresses which damage proteins and lead to protein misfolding. Here we show that internal metabolic stress produced by reactive intermediates resulting from tyrosine degradation triggers the expression of the aip-1 gene, which is critical in responses to the environmental toxin arsenic and the clearance of unstable polyglutamine and Abeta proteins. aip-1 acts via binding to the proteosome and enhancing proteosomal function. We find that full induction of aip-1 depends on the oxidative-stress-responsive skn-1 transcription factor but significant induction still occurs without skn-1. Importantly, activation of skn-1 with wdr-23(RNAi), which dramatically induces the expression of other skn-1 target genes, produces a minimal increase in aip-1 expression. This suggests that the previously demonstrated specificity in aip-1/AIRAP induction could reflect the actions of multiple synergistic activators, such as the heat shock factor homolog hsf-1, which we also find is required for full induction. These may be triggered by proteosome dysfunction, as we find that this event links the multiple inducers of aip-1. Together, our results show that cell stress triggers aip-1 expression by both skn-1-dependent and -independent pathways.

  12. Role of Dicer1-Dependent Factors in the Paracrine Regulation of Epididymal Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Jerczynski, Olivia; Lacroix-Pépin, Nicolas; Boilard, Eric; Calvo, Ezequiel; Bernet, Agathe; Fortier, Michel A; Björkgren, Ida; Sipilä, Petra; Belleannée, Clémence

    2016-01-01

    Dicer1 is an endoribonuclease involved in the biogenesis of functional molecules such as microRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs). These small non-coding RNAs are important regulators of post-transcriptional gene expression and participate in the control of male fertility. With the knowledge that 1) Dicer1-dependent factors are required for proper sperm maturation in the epididymis, and that 2) miRNAs are potent mediators of intercellular communication in most biological systems, we investigated the role of Dicer1-dependent factors produced by the proximal epididymis (initial segment/caput)- including miRNAs- on the regulation of epididymal gene expression in the distal epididymis regions (i.e. corpus and cauda). To this end, we performed comparative microarray and ANOVA analyses on control vs. Defb41iCre/wt;Dicer1fl/fl mice in which functional Dicer1 is absent from the principal cells of the proximal epididymis. We identified 35 and 33 transcripts that displayed significant expression level changes in the corpus and cauda regions (Fold change > 2 or < -2; p < 0.002), respectively. Among these transcripts, Zn-alpha 2-glycoprotein (Azgp1) encodes for a sperm equatorial protein whose expression in the epididymis of Dicer1 cKO mice is significantly increased compared to controls. In addition, 154 miRNAs, including miR-210, miR-672, miR-191 and miR-204, showed significantly impaired biogenesis in the absence of Dicer1 from the principal cells of the proximal epididymis (Fold change > 2 or < -2; p < 0.01). These miRNAs are secreted via extracellular vesicles (EVs) derived from the DC2 epididymal principal cell line, and their expression correlates with target transcripts involved in distinct biological pathways, as evidenced by in silico analysis. Albeit correlative and based on in silico approach, our study proposes that Dicer1-dependent factors trigger- directly or not-significant genes expression changes in distinct regions of this organ

  13. Role of Dicer1-Dependent Factors in the Paracrine Regulation of Epididymal Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jerczynski, Olivia; Lacroix-Pépin, Nicolas; Boilard, Eric; Calvo, Ezequiel; Bernet, Agathe; Fortier, Michel A.; Björkgren, Ida; Sipilä, Petra; Belleannée, Clémence

    2016-01-01

    Dicer1 is an endoribonuclease involved in the biogenesis of functional molecules such as microRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs). These small non-coding RNAs are important regulators of post-transcriptional gene expression and participate in the control of male fertility. With the knowledge that 1) Dicer1-dependent factors are required for proper sperm maturation in the epididymis, and that 2) miRNAs are potent mediators of intercellular communication in most biological systems, we investigated the role of Dicer1-dependent factors produced by the proximal epididymis (initial segment/caput)- including miRNAs- on the regulation of epididymal gene expression in the distal epididymis regions (i.e. corpus and cauda). To this end, we performed comparative microarray and ANOVA analyses on control vs. Defb41iCre/wt;Dicer1fl/fl mice in which functional Dicer1 is absent from the principal cells of the proximal epididymis. We identified 35 and 33 transcripts that displayed significant expression level changes in the corpus and cauda regions (Fold change > 2 or < −2; p < 0.002), respectively. Among these transcripts, Zn-alpha 2-glycoprotein (Azgp1) encodes for a sperm equatorial protein whose expression in the epididymis of Dicer1 cKO mice is significantly increased compared to controls. In addition, 154 miRNAs, including miR-210, miR-672, miR-191 and miR-204, showed significantly impaired biogenesis in the absence of Dicer1 from the principal cells of the proximal epididymis (Fold change > 2 or < −2; p < 0.01). These miRNAs are secreted via extracellular vesicles (EVs) derived from the DC2 epididymal principal cell line, and their expression correlates with target transcripts involved in distinct biological pathways, as evidenced by in silico analysis. Albeit correlative and based on in silico approach, our study proposes that Dicer1-dependent factors trigger- directly or not—significant genes expression changes in distinct regions of this

  14. Dynamic expression of combinatorial replication-dependent histone variant genes during mouse spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rongfang; Qi, Huayu

    2014-01-01

    Nucleosomes are basic chromatin structural units that are formed by DNA sequences wrapping around histones. Global chromatin states in different cell types are specified by combinatorial effects of post-translational modifications of histones and the expression of histone variants. During mouse spermatogenesis, spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) self-renew while undergo differentiation, events that occur in the company of constant re-modeling of chromatin structures. Previous studies have shown that testes contain highly expressed or specific histone variants to facilitate these epigenetic modifications. However, mechanisms of regulating the epigenetic changes and the specific histone compositions of spermatogenic cells are not fully understood. Using real time quantitative RT-PCR, we examined the dynamic expression of replication-dependent histone genes in post-natal mouse testes. It was found that distinct sets of histone genes are expressed in various spermatogenic cells at different stages during spermatogenesis. While gonocyte-enriched testes from mice at 2-dpp (days post partum) express pre-dominantly thirteen histone variant genes, SSC-stage testes at 9-dpp highly express a different set of eight histone genes. During differentiation stage when testes are occupied mostly by spermatocytes and spermatids, another twenty-two histone genes are expressed much higher than the rest, including previously known testis-specific hist1h1t, hist1h2ba and hist1h4c. In addition, histone genes that are pre-dominantly expressed in gonocytes and SSCs are also highly expressed in embryonic stem cells. Several of them were changed when embryoid bodies were formed from ES cells, suggesting their roles in regulating pluripotency of the cells. Further more, differentially expressed histone genes are specifically localized in either SSCs or spermatocytes and spermatids, as demonstrated by in situ hybridization using gene specific probes. Taken together, results presented here

  15. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype, tissue HCV antigens, hepatocellular expression of HLA-A,B,C, and intercellular adhesion-1 molecules. Clues to pathogenesis of hepatocellular damage and response to interferon treatment in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed Central

    Ballardini, G; Groff, P; Pontisso, P; Giostra, F; Francesconi, R; Lenzi, M; Zauli, D; Alberti, A; Bianchi, F B

    1995-01-01

    To obtain information on the mechanisms of hepatocellular damage and the determinants of response to interferon, hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype, tissue HCV antigens, hepatocellular expression of HLA-A,B,C and intercellular adhesion-1 molecules, and the number of lobular T lymphocytes were studied in 38 anti-HCV-positive patients. 14 patients did not show a primary response to interferon treatment. HCV genotype 1b was detected in 11 of them. They displayed higher scores of HCV-positive hepatocytes, HLA-A,B,C, and ICAM-1 molecules expression than with the responders. HCV-infected hepatocytes maintained the capacity to express HLA-A,B,C and ICAM-1 molecules. CD8-positive T cells in contact with infected hepatocytes and Councilman-like bodies were observed. A significant correlation was found between the number of lobular CD8-positive T cells and alanine amino transferase levels. No differences were observed in clinical, biochemical, and histological features between patients with high and low number of hepatocytes containing HCV antigens. These data suggest a prominent role of T cell-mediated cytotoxicity in the genesis of hepatocellular damage. The high expression of interferon-inducible antigens like HLA-A,B,C molecules suggests the presence of strong activation of the interferon system possibly related to high HCV replication in nonresponder patients infected with genotype 1b. Images PMID:7738174

  16. Antiproliferative effects of kisspeptin‑10 depend on artificial GPR54 (KISS1R) expression levels.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Elke; Olbrich, Teresa; Emons, Günter; Gründker, Carsten

    2013-02-01

    Kisspeptins are peptides derived from the metastasis suppressor gene KISS1 interacting with GPR54 as their corresponding receptor. The KISS1/GPR54 system is one regulator of cellular motility mechanisms leading to decreased migration and invasion. Its role in cell proliferation processes is not clearly understood. In this study, breast cancer cell lines, T47D, ZR75-1, MDA‑MB‑231, MDA‑MB‑435s, MDA‑MB‑453, HCC 70, HCC 1806, HCC 1937 and MCF‑7, were investigated for their endogenous GPR54 expression by immunocytochemistry, RT‑PCR and western blot analysis. The effect of kisspeptin‑10 on proliferation was measured in MDA‑MB‑231, MDA‑MB‑435s, HCC 1806 and MCF‑7 cells. Further experiments on proliferation were carried out with cells transfected with GPR54. All of the tested breast cancer cell lines expressed GPR54 in different amounts. No effects on proliferation were detected in the breast cancer cells expressing the receptor endogenously. In transfected neuronal cells overexpressing GPR54, proliferation was significantly inhibited by kisspeptin‑10. The results indicate that the antiproliferative action of kisspeptin depends on the nature of GPR54 expression. The effect was detected in an artificial system of cells transfected with GPR54 and not in cells expressing the receptor endogenously. Thus, the antiproliferative action of kisspeptin seems not to be important for pathophysiological processes.

  17. Fighting experience alters brain androgen receptor expression dependent on testosterone status

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng-Yu; Earley, Ryan L.; Huang, Shu-Ping; Hsu, Yuying

    2014-01-01

    Contest decisions are influenced by the outcomes of recent fights (winner–loser effects). Steroid hormones and serotonin are closely associated with aggression and therefore probably also play important roles in mediating winner–loser effects. In mangrove rivulus fish, Kryptolebias marmoratus, individuals with higher testosterone (T), 11-ketotestosterone and cortisol levels are more capable of winning, but titres of these hormones do not directly mediate winner–loser effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of winning/losing experiences on brain expression levels of the receptor genes for androgen (AR), oestrogen α/β (ERα/β), glucocorticoid (GR) and serotonin (5-HT1AR). The effect of contest experience on AR gene expression depended on T levels: repeated losses decreased, whereas repeated wins increased AR gene expression in individuals with low T but not in individuals with medium or high T levels. These results lend strong support for AR being involved in mediating winner–loser effects, which, in previous studies, were more detectable in individuals with lower T. Furthermore, the expression levels of ERα/β, 5-HT1AR and GR genes were higher in individuals that initiated contests against larger opponents than in those that did not. Overall, contest experience, underlying endocrine state and hormone and serotonin receptor expression patterns interacted to modulate contest decisions jointly. PMID:25320171

  18. Loss of ERβ expression as a common step in estrogen-dependent tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Bardin, Allison; Boulle, Nathalie; Lazennec, Gwendal; Vignon, Françoise; Pujol, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    The characterization of estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) brought new insight into the mechanisms underlying estrogen signaling. Estrogen induction of cell proliferation is a crucial step in carcinogenesis of gynecologic target tissues and the mitogenic effects of estrogen in these tissues (e.g. breast, endometrium and ovary) are well documented both in vitro and in vivo. There is also an emerging body of evidence that colon and prostate cancer growth is influenced by estrogens. In all of these tissues, most studies have shown decreased ERβ expression in cancer as compared to benign tumors or normal tissues, whereas ERα expression persists. The loss of ERβ expression in cancer cells could reflect tumor cell dedifferentiation but may also represent a critical stage in estrogen-dependent tumor progression. Modulation of the expression of ERα target genes by ERβ, or ERβ specific gene induction could indicate that ERβ has a differential effect on proliferation as compared to ERα. ERβ may exert a protective effect and thus constitute a new target for hormone therapy, e.g. via ligand specific activation. The potential distinct roles of ERα and ERβ expression in carcinogenesis, as suggested by experimental and clinical data, are discussed in this review. PMID:15369453

  19. Age- and task-dependent foraging gene expression in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Tobback, Julie; Mommaerts, Veerle; Vandersmissen, Hans Peter; Smagghe, Guy; Huybrechts, Roger

    2011-01-01

    In eusocial insects, the division of labor within a colony, based on either age or size, is correlated with a differential foraging (for) gene expression and PKG activity. This article presents in the first part a study on the for gene, encoding a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris. Cloning of the open reading frame allowed phylogenetic tracing, which showed conservation of PKGs among social insects. Our results confirm the proposed role for PKGs in division of labor. Btfor gene expression is significantly higher in the larger foragers compared with the smaller sized nurses. More importantly, we discovered an age-related decrease in Btfor expression in both nursing and foraging bumblebees. We therefore speculate that the presence of BtFOR is required for correct adaptation to new external stimuli and rapid learning for foraging. In a second series of experiments, worker bumblebees of B. terrestris were treated with two insecticides imidacloprid and kinoprene, which have shown to cause impaired foraging behavior. Compared with controls, only the latter treatment resulted in a decreased Btfor expression, which concurs with a stimulation of ovarian growth and a shift in labor toward nest-related tasks. The data are discussed in relation to Btfor expression in the complex physiological event of foraging and side-effects by pesticides.

  20. Evidence of Autoinducer-Dependent and -Independent Heterogeneous Gene Expression in Sinorhizobium fredii NGR234

    PubMed Central

    Grote, Jessica; Krysciak, Dagmar; Schorn, Andrea; Dahlke, Renate I.; Soonvald, Liina; Müller, Johannes; Hense, Burkhard A.; Schwarzfischer, Michael; Sauter, Margret; Schmeisser, Christel

    2014-01-01

    Populations of genetically identical Sinorhizobium fredii NGR234 cells differ significantly in their expression profiles of autoinducer (AI)-dependent and AI-independent genes. Promoter fusions of the NGR234 AI synthase genes traI and ngrI showed high levels of phenotypic heterogeneity during growth in TY medium on a single-cell level. However, adding very high concentrations of N-(3-oxooctanoyl-)-l-homoserine lactone resulted in a more homogeneous expression profile. Similarly, the lack of internally synthesized AIs in the background of the NGR234-ΔtraI or the NGR234-ΔngrI mutant resulted in a highly homogenous expression of the corresponding promoter fusions in the population. Expression studies with reporter fusions of the promoter regions of the quorum-quenching genes dlhR and qsdR1 and the type IV pilus gene cluster located on pNGR234b suggested that factors other than AI molecules affect NGR234 phenotypic heterogeneity. Further studies with root exudates and developing Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings provide the first evidence that plant root exudates have strong effects on the heterogeneity of AI synthase and quorum-quenching genes in NGR234. Therefore, plant-released octopine appears to play a key role in modulation of heterogeneous gene expression. PMID:25002427

  1. Abiotic surface sensing and biofilm-dependent regulation of gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Prigent-Combaret, C; Vidal, O; Dorel, C; Lejeune, P

    1999-10-01

    To get further information on bacterial surface sensing and biofilm-dependent regulation of gene expression in Escherichia coli K-12, random insertion mutagenesis with Mu dX, a mini-Mu carrying the promoterless lacZ gene, was performed with an ompR234 adherent strain, and a simple screen was developed to assess changes in gene expression in biofilm cells versus planktonic cells. This screen revealed that major changes in the pattern of gene expression occur during biofilm development: the transcription of 38% of the genes was affected within biofilms. Different cell functions were more expressed in sessile bacteria: the OmpC porin, the high-affinity transport system of glycine betaine (encoded by the proU operon), the colanic acid exopolysaccharide (wca locus, formerly called cps), tripeptidase T (pepT), and the nickel high-affinity transport system (nikA). On the other hand, the syntheses of flagellin (fliC) and of a putative protein of 92 amino acids (f92) were both reduced in biofilms. Such a genetic reprogramming of gene expression in biofilms seems to result from changes in multiple environmental physicochemical conditions. In this work, we show that bacteria within biofilms encounter higher-osmolarity conditions, greater oxygen limitation, and higher cell density than in the liquid phase.

  2. Analysis of hepatitis C virus core/NS5A protein co-localization using novel cell culture systems expressing core-NS2 and NS5A of genotypes 1-7.

    PubMed

    Galli, Andrea; Scheel, Troels K H; Prentoe, Jannick C; Mikkelsen, Lotte S; Gottwein, Judith M; Bukh, Jens

    2013-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important human pathogen infecting hepatocytes. With the advent of infectious cell culture systems, the HCV particle assembly and release processes are finally being uncovered. The HCV core and NS5A proteins co-localize on cytoplasmic lipid droplets (cLDs) or on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) at different stages of particle assembly. Current knowledge on assembly and release is primarily based on studies in genotype 2a cell culture systems; however, given the high genetic heterogeneity of HCV, variations might exist among genotypes. Here, we developed novel HCV strain JFH1-based recombinants expressing core-NS2 and NS5A from genotypes 1-7, and analysed core and NS5A co-localization in infected cells. Huh7.5 cells were transfected with RNA of core-NS2/NS5A recombinants and putative adaptive mutations were analysed by reverse genetics. Adapted core-NS2/NS5A recombinants produced infectivity titres of 10(2.5)-10(4.5) f.f.u. ml(-1). Co-localization analysis demonstrated that the core and NS5A proteins from all genotypes co-localized extensively, and there was no significant difference in protein co-localization among genotypes. In addition, we found that the core and NS5A proteins were highly associated with cLDs at 12 h post-infection but became mostly ER associated at later stages. Finally, we found that different genotypes showed varying levels of core/cLD co-localization, with a possible effect on viral assembly/release. In summary, we developed a panel of HCV genotype 1-7 core-NS2/NS5A recombinants producing infectious virus, and an immunostaining protocol detecting the core and NS5A proteins from seven different genotypes. These systems will allow, for the first time, investigation of core/NS5A interactions during assembly and release of HCV particles of all major genotypes.

  3. 4EBP-Dependent Signaling Supports West Nile Virus Growth and Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Shives, Katherine D.; Massey, Aaron R.; May, Nicholas A.; Morrison, Thomas E.; Beckham, J. David

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a (+) sense, single-stranded RNA virus in the Flavivirus genus. WNV RNA possesses an m7GpppNm 5′ cap with 2′-O-methylation that mimics host mRNAs preventing innate immune detection and allowing the virus to translate its RNA genome through the utilization of cap-dependent translation initiation effectors in a wide variety of host species. Our prior work established the requirement of the host mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) for optimal WNV growth and protein expression; yet, the roles of the downstream effectors of mTORC1 in WNV translation are unknown. In this study, we utilize gene deletion mutants in the ribosomal protein kinase called S6 kinase (S6K) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP) pathways downstream of mTORC1 to define the role of mTOR-dependent translation initiation signals in WNV gene expression and growth. We now show that WNV growth and protein expression are dependent on mTORC1 mediated-regulation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein/eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP/eIF4E) interaction and eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F) complex formation to support viral growth and viral protein expression. We also show that the canonical signals of mTORC1 activation including ribosomal protein s6 (rpS6) and S6K phosphorylation are not required for WNV growth in these same conditions. Our data suggest that the mTORC1/4EBP/eIF4E signaling axis is activated to support the translation of the WNV genome. PMID:27763553

  4. Temperature-dependent aromatase expression in developing diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin) embryos.

    PubMed

    Jeyasuria, P; Place, A R

    1997-04-01

    In the diamondback terrapin, Malaclemys terrapin, males hatch at incubation temperatures below 28 degrees C whereas females hatch at temperatures above 30 degrees C. When estrogen is applied to the eggs at male temperatures early in development, females are produced. These data suggest that the enzyme necessary for estrogen synthesis (CYP19, aromatase) in the developing gonad plays a critical role in sex determination in these vertebrates. Accordingly, we have begun an examination of the role and regulation of the aromatase gene in sex determination in the diamond back terrapin, Malaclemys terrapin. We have obtained full-length cDNAs for terrapin ovarian aromatase. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on mRNA from various tissues we have determined that aromatase is expressed in the female brain and ovary, whereas it is only expressed in the brain of the male. Brain expression of aromatase occurs before stage 15, the beginning of the temperature-dependent sex determining period. Ovarian expression occurs sometime later. To quantify expression levels, we have developed a competitive RT-PCR technique to study the ontogeny of aromatase transcript levels throughout development. The sensitivity of our assay (0.001-10 atmol of transcript) permits us to analyse individual embryonic adrenal/kidney/gonadal complexes without pooling samples. Female hatchlings (stage 26) brains express higher aromatase mRNA levels than male brains (381 +/- 80 vs 202 +/- 85 atmol/microg RNA, respectively). Similarly, ovaries express significantly higher aromatase mRNA levels than hatchling testes (352 +/- 117 vs <0.001 atmol/microg RNA, respectively).

  5. Isoniazid mediates the CYP2B6*6 genotype-dependent interaction between efavirenz and antituberculosis drug therapy through mechanism-based inactivation of CYP2A6.

    PubMed

    Court, Michael H; Almutairi, Fawziah E; Greenblatt, David J; Hazarika, Suwagmani; Sheng, Hongyan; Klein, Kathrin; Zanger, Ulrich M; Bourgea, Joanne; Patten, Christopher J; Kwara, Awewura

    2014-07-01

    Efavirenz is commonly used to treat patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis. Previous clinical studies have observed paradoxically elevated efavirenz plasma concentrations in patients with the CYP2B6*6/*6 genotype (but not the CYP2B6*1/*1 genotype) during coadministration with the commonly used four-drug antituberculosis therapy. This study sought to elucidate the mechanism underlying this genotype-dependent drug-drug interaction. In vitro studies were conducted to determine whether one or more of the antituberculosis drugs (rifampin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, or ethambutol) potently inhibit efavirenz 8-hydroxylation by CYP2B6 or efavirenz 7-hydroxylation by CYP2A6, the main mechanisms of efavirenz clearance. Time- and concentration-dependent kinetics of inhibition by the antituberculosis drugs were determined using genotyped human liver microsomes (HLMs) and recombinant CYP2A6, CYP2B6.1, and CYP2B6.6 enzymes. Although none of the antituberculosis drugs evaluated at up to 10 times clinical plasma concentrations were found to inhibit efavirenz 8-hydroxylation by HLMs, both rifampin (apparent inhibition constant [Ki] = 368 μM) and pyrazinamide (Ki = 637 μM) showed relatively weak inhibition of efavirenz 7-hydroxylation. Importantly, isoniazid demonstrated potent time-dependent inhibition of efavirenz 7-hydroxylation in both HLMs (inhibitor concentration required for half-maximal inactivation [KI] = 30 μM; maximal rate constant of inactivation [kinact] = 0.023 min(-1)) and recombinant CYP2A6 (KI = 15 μM; kinact = 0.024 min(-1)) and also formed a metabolite intermediate complex consistent with mechanism-based inhibition. Selective inhibition of the CYP2B6.6 allozyme could not be demonstrated for any of the antituberculosis drugs using either recombinant enzymes or CYP2B6*6 genotype HLMs. In conclusion, the results of this study identify isoniazid as the most likely perpetrator of this clinically important drug-drug interaction through

  6. Evidence of sexual dimorphism in placental vitamin D metabolism: Testosterone inhibits calcitriol-dependent cathelicidin expression.

    PubMed

    Olmos-Ortiz, Andrea; García-Quiroz, Janice; López-Marure, Rebeca; González-Curiel, Irma; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Olivares, Aleida; Avila, Euclides; Barrera, David; Halhali, Ali; Caldiño, Felipe; Larrea, Fernando; Díaz, Lorenza

    2016-10-01

    Male fetus and neonates show increased immune vulnerability compared to females, which results in a higher risk of perinatal infections. These differences could partially be due to sex steroids differential modulation of vitamin D metabolism; since calcitriol, the most active vitamin D metabolite, regulates immune responses and transcriptionally induces the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin in the human placenta. Calcitriol availability depends on CYP27B1 and CYP24A1 expression, the cytochromes involved in its synthesis and degradation, respectively. However, the effects of testosterone upon these enzymes and the final biological outcome upon the calcitriol-dependent immune-target cathelicidin in the placenta have not been studied. In this study we show that testosterone significantly inhibited CYP27B1 while stimulated CYP24A1 gene expression in cultured trophoblasts. These effects were accompanied by CREB activation through cAMP-independent and androgen receptor-dependent mechanisms. Male placental cotyledons showed reduced basal CYP27B1 and cathelicidin gene expression compared to females (P<0.05). Testosterone concentration was higher in the cord blood of male neonates (P=0.007), whereas cathelicidin levels were lesser compared to females (P=0.002). Altogether our results suggest that male placentas produce less cathelicidin due to decreased calcitriol bioavailability. We propose that the observed sex-dependent differences in placental vitamin D metabolism contribute in fetal responses to infections and could partially explain why the increased male fetuses immune vulnerability. Moreover, gestational hyperandrogenemia could adversely affect placental vitamin D metabolism independently of fetal sex.

  7. Cryptochrome expression in the eye of migratory birds depends on their migratory status.

    PubMed

    Fusani, Leonida; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Frigato, Elena; Foà, Augusto

    2014-03-15

    Most passerine birds are nocturnal migrants. When kept in captivity during the migratory periods, these species show a migratory restlessness, or Zugunruhe. Recent studies on Sylvia warblers have shown that Zugunruhe is an excellent proxy of migratory disposition. Passerine birds can use the Earth's geomagnetic field as a compass to keep their course during their migratory flight. Among the candidate magnetoreceptive mechanisms are the cryptochromes, flavoproteins located in the retina that are supposed to perceive the magnetic field through a light-mediated process. Previous work has suggested that expression of Cryptochrome 1 (Cry1) is increased in migratory birds compared with non-migratory species. Here we tested the hypothesis that Cry1 expression depends on migratory status. Blackcaps Sylvia atricapilla were caught before fall migration and held in registration cages. When the birds were showing robust Zugunruhe, we applied a food deprivation protocol that simulates a long migratory flight. When the birds were refed after 2 days, their Zugunruhe decreased substantially, as is expected from birds that would interrupt migration for a refuelling stopover. We found that Cry1 expression was higher at night than during daytime in birds showing Zugunruhe, whereas in birds that underwent the fasting-and-refeeding protocol and reduced their levels of Zugunruhe, night Cry1 expression decreased to daytime levels. Our work shows that Cry1 expression is dependent on the presence of Zugunruhe and not on species-specific or seasonal factors, or on the birds being active versus inactive. These results support the hypothesis that cryptochromes underlie magnetoreceptive mechanisms in birds.

  8. Mechanical stretch increases Smad3-dependent CCN2 expression in inner meniscus cells.

    PubMed

    Furumatsu, Takayuki; Kanazawa, Tomoko; Miyake, Yoshiaki; Kubota, Satoshi; Takigawa, Masaharu; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2012-11-01

    The intrinsic zone-specific properties of the menisci are determined by biomechanical environments. In this study, we examined mechanical stretch-dependent expression of multifunctional growth factor CYR61/CTGF/NOV (CCN) 2, and investigated the role of CCN2 in meniscus cells. Uni-axial cyclic tensile strain (CTS) was applied using a STB-140 system. CTS-induced expression of CCN2 and α1(I) collagen (COL1A1) was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. The distribution of CCN2 and Smad2/3 in stretched cells was investigated by immunohistochemical analysis. Smad2/3-dependent CCN2 transactivation was measured by luciferase reporter assay. The relationship between Smad2/3 and CTS-induced CCN2 transcription was investigated by chromatin immunoprecipitation. CTS stimulated gene expression of CCN2 and COL1A1 in inner meniscus cells, but not in outer meniscus cells. Recombinant CCN2 increased COL1A1 expression only in inner meniscus cells. CCN2 synthesis and nuclear translocalization of phosphorylated Smad2/3 in inner meniscus cells were stimulated by CTS. The CCN2 promoter activity was synergistically enhanced by overexpressed Smad3 in stretched inner meniscus cells, but was not by Smad2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that CTS increased the association between Smad3 and the Smad-binding element on the CCN2 proximal promoter in inner meniscus cells. Our results suggest that stretch-induced CCN2 may have a crucial role in regulating COL1A1 expression in the inner meniscus.

  9. Hindlimb unweighting decreases endothelium-dependent dilation and eNOS expression in soleus not gastrocnemius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, C. R.; Schrage, W. G.; Rush, J. W.; Ray, C. A.; Price, E. M.; Hasser, E. M.; Laughlin, M. H.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that hindlimb unweighting (HLU) decreases endothelium-dependent vasodilation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) in arteries of skeletal muscle with reduced blood flow during HLU. Sprague-Dawley rats (300-350 g) were exposed to HLU (n = 15) or control (n = 15) conditions for 14 days. ACh-induced dilation was assessed in muscle with reduced [soleus (Sol)] or unchanged [gastrocnemius (Gast)] blood flow during HLU. eNOS and SOD-1 expression were measured in feed arteries (FA) and in first-order (1A), second-order (2A), and third-order (3A) arterioles. Dilation to infusion of ACh in vivo was blunted in Sol but not Gast. In arteries of Sol muscle, HLU decreased eNOS mRNA and protein content. eNOS mRNA content was significantly less in Sol FA (35%), 1A arterioles (25%) and 2A arterioles (18%). eNOS protein content was less in Sol FA (64%) and 1A arterioles (65%) from HLU rats. In arteries of Gast, HLU did not decrease eNOS mRNA or protein. SOD-1 mRNA expression was less in Sol 2A arterioles (31%) and 3A arterioles (29%) of HLU rats. SOD-1 protein content was less in Sol FA (67%) but not arterioles. SOD-1 mRNA and protein content were not decreased in arteries from Gast. These data indicate that HLU decreases endothelium-dependent vasodilation, eNOS expression, and SOD-1 expression primarily in arteries of Sol muscle where blood flow is reduced during HLU.

  10. Topoisomerase 1 Regulates Gene Expression in Neurons through Cleavage Complex-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mabb, Angela M.; Simon, Jeremy M.; King, Ian F.; Lee, Hyeong-Min; An, Lin-Kun; Philpot, Benjamin D.; Zylka, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) inhibitors, including camptothecin and topotecan, covalently trap TOP1 on DNA, creating cleavage complexes (cc’s) that must be resolved before gene transcription and DNA replication can proceed. We previously found that topotecan reduces the expression of long (>100 kb) genes and unsilences the paternal allele of Ube3a in neurons. Here, we sought to evaluate overlap between TOP1cc-dependent and -independent gene regulation in neurons. To do this, we utilized Top1 conditional knockout mice, Top1 knockdown, the CRISPR-Cas9 system to delete Top1, TOP1 catalytic inhibitors that do not generate TOP1cc’s, and a TOP1 mutation (T718A) that stabilizes TOP1cc’s. We found that topotecan treatment significantly alters the expression of many more genes, including long neuronal genes, immediate early genes, and paternal Ube3a, when compared to Top1 deletion. Our data show that topotecan has a stronger effect on neuronal transcription than Top1 deletion, and identifies TOP1cc-dependent and -independent contributions to gene expression. PMID:27231886

  11. Histone Deacetylase 7 Promotes Toll-like Receptor 4-dependent Proinflammatory Gene Expression in Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Shakespear, Melanie R.; Hohenhaus, Daniel M.; Kelly, Greg M.; Kamal, Nabilah A.; Gupta, Praveer; Labzin, Larisa I.; Schroder, Kate; Garceau, Valerie; Barbero, Sheila; Iyer, Abishek; Hume, David A.; Reid, Robert C.; Irvine, Katharine M.; Fairlie, David P.; Sweet, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Broad-spectrum inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs) constrain Toll-like receptor (TLR)-inducible production of key proinflammatory mediators. Here we investigated HDAC-dependent inflammatory responses in mouse macrophages. Of the classical Hdacs, Hdac7 was expressed at elevated levels in inflammatory macrophages (thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages) as compared with bone marrow-derived macrophages and the RAW264 cell line. Overexpression of a specific, alternatively spliced isoform of Hdac7 lacking the N-terminal 22 amino acids (Hdac7-u), but not the Refseq Hdac7 (Hdac7-s), promoted LPS-inducible expression of Hdac-dependent genes (Edn1, Il-12p40, and Il-6) in RAW264 cells. A novel class IIa-selective HDAC inhibitor reduced recombinant human HDAC7 enzyme activity as well as TLR-induced production of inflammatory mediators in thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages. Both LPS and Hdac7-u up-regulated the activity of the Edn1 promoter in an HDAC-dependent fashion in RAW264 cells. A hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1 binding site in this promoter was required for HDAC-dependent TLR-inducible promoter activity and for Hdac7- and HIF-1α-mediated trans-activation. Coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that both Hdac7-u and Hdac7-s interacted with HIF-1α, whereas only Hdac7-s interacted with the transcriptional repressor CtBP1. Thus, Hdac7-u positively regulates HIF-1α-dependent TLR signaling in macrophages, whereas an interaction with CtBP1 likely prevents Hdac7-s from exerting this effect. Hdac7 may represent a potential inflammatory disease target. PMID:23853092

  12. Age-Dependent Hepatic UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase Gene Expression and Activity in Children

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Elizabeth; Mehboob, Huma; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Mirkov, Snezana; Zhang, Min; Liu, Wanqing

    2016-01-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are important phase II drug metabolism enzymes. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between age and changes in mRNA expression and activity of major human hepatic UGTs, as well as to understand the potential regulatory mechanism underlying this relationship. Using previously generated data, we investigated age-dependent mRNA expression levels of 11 hepatic UGTs (UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, UGT1A5, UGT1A6, UGT1A9, UGT2B4, UGT2B7, UGT2B10, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17) and 16 transcription factors (AHR, AR, CAR, ESR2, FXR, GCCR, HNF1a, HNF3a, HNF3b, HNF4a, PPARA, PPARG, PPARGC, PXR, SP1, and STAT3) in liver tissue of donors (n = 38) ranging from 0 to 25 years of age. We also examined the correlation between age and microsomal activities using 14 known UGT drug substrates in the liver samples (n = 19) of children donors. We found a statistically significant increase (nominal p < 0.05) in the expression of UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, UGT1A5, UGT1A6, UGT2B7, and UGT2B17, as well as glucuronidation activities of serotonin, testosterone, and vorinostat during the first 25 years of life. Expression of estrogen receptor 1 and pregnane X receptor, two strong UGT transcriptional regulators, were significantly correlated with both age and UGT mRNA expression (p ≤ 0.05). These results suggest that both UGT expression and activity increase during childhood and adolescence, possibly driven in part by hormonal signaling. Our findings may help explain inter-patient variability in response to medications among children. PMID:27899892

  13. Endothelial microparticles reduce ICAM-1 expression in a microRNA-222-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Felix; Yang, Xiaoyan; Baumann, Katharina; Przybilla, David; Schmitz, Theresa; Flender, Anna; Paul, Kathrin; Alhusseiny, Adil; Nickenig, Georg; Werner, Nikos

    2015-09-01

    Endothelial microparticles (EMP) are released from activated or apoptotic endothelial cells (ECs) and can be taken up by adjacent ECs, but their effect on vascular inflammation after engulfment is largely unknown. We sought to determine the role of EMP in EC inflammation. In vitro, EMP treatment significantly reduced tumour necrosis factor-α-induced endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 expression on mRNA and protein level, whereas there was no effect on vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression. Reduced ICAM-1 expression after EMP treatment resulted in diminished monocyte adhesion in vitro. In vivo, systemic treatment of ApoE-/- mice with EMP significantly reduced murine endothelial ICAM-1 expression. To explore the underlying mechanisms, Taqman microRNA array was performed and microRNA (miR)-222 was identified as the strongest regulated miR between EMP and ECs. Following experiments demonstrated that miR-222 was transported into recipient ECs by EMP and functionally regulated expression of its target protein ICAM-1 in vitro and in vivo. After simulating diabetic conditions, EMP derived from glucose-treated ECs contained significantly lower amounts of miR-222 and showed reduced anti-inflammatory capacity in vitro and in vivo. Finally, circulating miR-222 level was diminished in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) compared to patients without CAD. EMPs promote anti-inflammatory effects in vitro and in vivo by reducing endothelial ICAM-1 expression via the transfer of functional miR-222 into recipient cells. In pathological hyperglycaemic conditions, EMP-mediated miR-222-dependent anti-inflammatory effects are reduced.

  14. Validated context-dependent associations of coronary heart disease risk with genotype variation in the chromosome 9p21 region: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study

    PubMed Central

    Lusk, Christine M.; Dyson, Greg; Clark, Andrew G.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Markers of the chromosome 9p21 region are regarded as the strongest and most reliably significant genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals for Coronary heart disease (CHD) risk; this was recently confirmed by the CARDIoGRAMplusC4D Consortium meta-analysis. However, while these associations are significant at the population level, they may not be clinically relevant predictors of risk for all individuals. We describe here the results of a study designed to address the question: What is the contribution of context defined by traditional risk factors in determining the utility of DNA sequence variations marking the 9p21 region for explaining variation in CHD risk? We analyzed a sample of 7,589 (3,869 females and 3,720 males) European American participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. We confirmed CHD-SNP genotype associations for two 9p21 region marker SNPs previously identified by the CARDIoGRAMplusC4D Consortium study, of which ARIC was a part. We then tested each marker SNP genotype effect on prediction of CHD within sub-groups of the ARIC sample defined by traditional CHD risk factors by applying a novel multi-model strategy, PRIM. We observed that the effects of SNP genotypes in the 9p21 region were strongest in a subgroup of hypertensives. We subsequently validated the effect of the region in an independent sample from the Copenhagen City Heart Study. Our study suggests that marker SNPs identified as predictors of CHD risk in large population based GWAS may have their greatest utility in explaining risk of disease in particular sub-groups characterized by biological and environmental effects measured by the traditional CHD risk factors. PMID:24889828

  15. Calorie restriction regulates circadian clock gene expression through BMAL1 dependent and independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sonal A.; Velingkaar, Nikkhil; Makwana, Kuldeep; Chaudhari, Amol; Kondratov, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Feeding behavior, metabolism and circadian clocks are interlinked. Calorie restriction (CR) is a feeding paradigm known to extend longevity. We found that CR significantly affected the rhythms in the expression of circadian clock genes in mice on the mRNA and protein levels, suggesting that CR reprograms the clocks both transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally. The effect of CR on gene expression was distinct from the effects of time-restricted feeding or fasting. Furthermore, CR affected the circadian output through up- or down-regulation of the expression of several clock-controlled transcriptional factors and the longevity candidate genes. CR-dependent effects on some clock gene expression were impaired in the liver of mice deficient for BMAL1, suggesting importance of this transcriptional factor for the transcriptional reprogramming of the clock, however, BMAL1- independent mechanisms also exist. We propose that CR recruits biological clocks as a natural mechanism of metabolic optimization under conditions of limited energy resources. PMID:27170536

  16. Influence of development on Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase expression: isoform- and tissue-dependency.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Luciane B; Quintas, Luis Eduardo M; Noël, François

    2002-02-01

    The four isoforms of the catalytic subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase identified in rats differ in their affinities for ions and ouabain. Moreover, its expression is tissue-specific, developmentally and hormonally regulated. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the influence of age on the ratio and density of these isoforms in crude membrane preparations from rat brain hemispheres, brainstem, heart ventricles and kidneys. In all tissues investigated, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity was higher in adults than in neonates but brain tissues presented the most remarkable differences. In these tissues, ouabain inhibition curves for Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity revealed the presence of two processes with different sensitivities to ouabain. An increase of approximately sixfold in the expression of the high affinity isoforms was observed between newborn and adult rats. In contrast, the low affinity isoform increased only approximately twofold in brainstem whereas it increased ninefold in brain hemispheres. Unlike brain tissues, a decrease (almost fourfold) in the number of high affinity ouabain binding sites was observed during ontogenesis of the heart. Although limited by the inability to resolve alpha(2) and alpha(3) isoforms, present data indicate that the influence of development on the expression of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase depends not only on the isoform, but also on the tissue where the enzyme is expressed.

  17. p53-dependent expression of CXCR5 chemokine receptor in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mitkin, Nikita A; Hook, Christina D; Schwartz, Anton M; Biswas, Subir; Kochetkov, Dmitry V; Muratova, Alisa M; Afanasyeva, Marina A; Kravchenko, Julia E; Bhattacharyya, Arindam; Kuprash, Dmitry V

    2015-03-19

    Elevated expression of chemokine receptors in tumors has been reported in many instances and is related to a number of survival advantages for tumor cells including abnormal activation of prosurvival intracellular pathways. In this work we demonstrated an inverse correlation between expression levels of p53 tumor suppressor and CXCR5 chemokine receptor in MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line. Lentiviral transduction of MCF-7 cells with p53 shRNA led to elevated CXCR5 at both mRNA and protein levels. Functional activity of CXCR5 in p53-knockdown MCF-7 cells was also increased as shown by activation of target gene expression and chemotaxis in response to B-lymphocyte chemoattractant CXCL13. Using deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis of the cxcr5 gene promoter and enhancer elements, we demonstrated that p53 appears to act upon cxcr5 promoter indirectly, by repressing the activity of NFκB transcription factors. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter gene analysis, we further demonstrated that p65/RelA was able to bind the cxcr5 promoter in p53-dependent manner and to directly transactivate it when overexpressed. Through the described mechanism, elevated CXCR5 expression may contribute to abnormal cell survival and migration in breast tumors that lack functional p53.

  18. Cloning, expression, purification and characterization of an iron-dependent regulator protein from Thermobifida fusca.

    PubMed

    Granger, Joseph B; Lu, Zeyu; Ferguson, Jordan B; Santa Maria, Peter J; Novak, Walter R P

    2013-12-01

    Iron-dependent regulators (IdeRs) control the transcription of a variety of genes associated with iron homeostasis in Gram-positive bacteria. In this study we report the cloning of a putative IdeR gene from the moderate thermophile Thermobifida fusca into the pET-21a(+) expression vector. The expressed protein, Tf-IdeR, was purified using immobilized metal affinity and size-exclusion chromatography, and yielded approximately 12-16 mg of protein per liter of culture. The purified Tf-IdeR protein binds the tox operator sequence in the presence of divalent metal ions. Two Tf-IdeR binding sites were identified in the T. fusca genome upstream of a putative enterobactin exporter and a putative ABC-type multidrug transporter.

  19. FMRP regulates an ethanol-dependent shift in GABABR function and expression with rapid antidepressant properties

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Sarah A.; Workman, Emily R.; Heaney, Chelcie F.; Niere, Farr; Namjoshi, Sanjeev; Cacheaux, Luisa P.; Farris, Sean P.; Drew, Michael R.; Zemelman, Boris V.; Harris, R. Adron; Raab-Graham, Kimberly F.

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol promotes lasting neuroadaptive changes that may provide relief from depressive symptoms, often referred to as the self-medication hypothesis. However, the molecular/synaptic pathways that are shared by alcohol and antidepressants are unknown. In the current study, acute exposure to ethanol produced lasting antidepressant and anxiolytic behaviours. To understand the functional basis of these behaviours, we examined a molecular pathway that is activated by rapid antidepressants. Ethanol, like rapid antidepressants, alters γ-aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABABR) expression and signalling, to increase dendritic calcium. Furthermore, new GABABRs are synthesized in response to ethanol treatment, requiring fragile-X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Ethanol-dependent changes in GABABR expression, dendritic signalling, and antidepressant efficacy are absent in Fmr1-knockout (KO) mice. These findings indicate that FMRP is an important regulator of protein synthesis following alcohol exposure, providing a molecular basis for the antidepressant efficacy of acute ethanol exposure. PMID:27666021

  20. Growth condition-dependent Esp expression by Enterococcus faecium affects initial adherence and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Van Wamel, Willem J B; Hendrickx, Antoni P A; Bonten, Marc J M; Top, Janetta; Posthuma, George; Willems, Rob J L

    2007-02-01

    A genetic subpopulation of Enterococcus faecium, called clonal complex 17 (CC-17), is strongly associated with hospital outbreaks and invasive infections. Most CC-17 strains contain a putative pathogenicity island encoding the E. faecium variant of enterococcal surface protein (Esp). Western blotting, flow cytometric analyses, and electron microscopy showed that Esp is expressed and exposed on the surface of E. faecium, though Esp expression and surface exposure are highly varied among different strains. Furthermore, Esp expression depends on growth conditions like temperature and anaerobioses. When grown at 37 degrees C, five of six esp-positive E. faecium strains showed significantly increased levels of surface-exposed Esp compared to bacteria grown at 21 degrees C, which was confirmed at the transcriptional level by real-time PCR. In addition, a significant increase in surface-exposed Esp was found in half of these strains when grown at 37 degrees C under anaerobic conditions compared to the level in bacteria grown under aerobic conditions. Finally, amounts of surface-exposed Esp correlated with initial adherence to polystyrene (R(2) = 0.7146) and biofilm formation (R(2) = 0.7535). Polystyrene adherence was competitively inhibited by soluble recombinant N-terminal Esp. This study demonstrates that Esp expression on the surface of E. faecium (i) varies consistently between strains, (ii) is growth condition dependent, and (iii) is quantitatively correlated with initial adherence and biofilm formation. These data indicate that E. faecium senses and responds to changing environmental conditions, which might play a role in the early stages of infection when bacteria transit from oxygen-rich conditions at room temperature to anaerobic conditions at body temperature. In addition, variation of surface exposure may explain the contrasting findings reported on the role of Esp in biofilm formation.

  1. Estradiol inhibits ongoing autoimmune neuroinflammation and NFκB-dependent CCL2 expression in reactive astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Giraud, Sébastien N.; Caron, Cécile M.; Pham-Dinh, Danielle; Kitabgi, Patrick; Nicot, Arnaud B.

    2010-01-01

    Astroglial reactivity associated with increased production of NFκB-dependent proinflammatory molecules is an important component of the pathophysiology of chronic neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The use of estrogens as potential anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective drugs is a matter of debate. Using mouse experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) as a model of chronic neuroinflammation, we report that implants reproducing pregnancy levels of 17β-estradiol (E2) alleviate ongoing disease and decrease astrocytic production of CCL2, a proinflammatory chemokine that drives the local recruitment of inflammatory myeloid cells. Immunohistochemistry and confocal imaging reveal that, in spinal cord white matter EAE lesions, reactive astrocytes express estrogen receptor (ER)α (and to a lesser extent ERβ) with a preferential nuclear localization, whereas other cells including infiltrated leukocytes express ERs only in their membranes or cytosol. In cultured rodent astrocytes, E2 or an ERα agonist, but not an ERβ agonist, inhibits TNFα-induced CCL2 expression at nanomolar concentrations, and the ER antagonist ICI 182,170 blocks this effect. We show that this anti-inflammatory action is not associated with inhibition of NFκB nuclear translocation but rather involves direct repression of NFκB-dependent transcription. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further indicate that estrogen suppresses TNFα-induced NFκB recruitment to the CCL2 enhancer. These data uncover reactive astrocytes as an important target for nuclear ERα inhibitory action on chemokine expression and suggest that targeting astrocytic nuclear NFκB activation with estrogen receptor α modulators may improve therapies of chronic neurodegenerative disorders involving astroglial neuroinflammation. PMID:20404154

  2. Exact expression for the diffusion propagator in a family of time-dependent anharmonic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampaoli, J. A.; Strier, D. E.; Batista, C.; Drazer, German; Wio, H. S.

    1999-09-01

    We have obtained the exact expression of the diffusion propagator in the time-dependent anharmonic potential V(x,t)=12a(t)x2+b ln x. The underlying Euclidean metric of the problem allows us to obtain analytical solutions for a whole family of the elastic parameter a(t), exploiting the relation between the path integral representation of the short time propagator and the modified Bessel functions. We have also analyzed the conditions for the appearance of a nonzero flow of particles through the infinite barrier located at the origin (b<0).

  3. Fur Is Involved in Manganese-Dependent Regulation of mntA (sitA) Expression in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Platero, Raúl; Peixoto, Lucía; O'Brian, Mark R.; Fabiano, Elena

    2004-01-01

    Fur is a transcriptional regulator involved in iron-dependent control of gene expression in many bacteria. In this work we analyzed the phenotype of a fur mutant in Sinorhizobium meliloti, an α-proteobacterium that fixes N2 in association with host plants. We demonstrated that some functions involved in high-affinity iron transport, siderophore production, and iron-regulated outer membrane protein expression respond to iron in a Fur-independent manner. However, manganese-dependent expression of the MntABCD manganese transport system was lost in a fur strain as discerned by constitutive expression of a mntA::gfp fusion reporter gene in the mutant. Thus, Fur directly or indirectly regulates a manganese-dependent function. The data indicate a novel function for a bacterial Fur protein in mediating manganese-dependent regulation of gene expression. PMID:15240318

  4. Genotype-dependent alleviation effects of exogenous GSH on salinity stress in cotton is related to improvement in chlorophyll content, photosynthetic performance, and leaf/root ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Wasim; Ahmed, Imrul Mosaddek; Chen, Xianhong; Wu, Feibo

    2017-04-01

    Soil salinity is a major abiotic stress that is constraining crop growth and productivity. Greenhouse hydroponic experiments were performed using salt-sensitive (cv. Zhongmian 41) and tolerant (Zhong 9806) cotton seedlings to evaluate how different genotypes responded to salinity stress in the presence of exogenous GSH (reduced glutathione). Cotton plants grown in 150 mM NaCl showed severe reduction in plant height, root length, and shoot and root fresh/dry weight. Salinity also caused reduction in photosynthesis and chlorophyll content, but increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) content. However, the reduction was more in Zhongmian 41 compared to Zhong 9806. Importantly, Sodium concentration was increased in the two genotypes and the induction was more in Zhongmian 41. Calcium and magnesium concentration was decreased in Zhongmian 41; however, in Zhong 9806 there were no significant differences relative to control. Addition of 50 mg L(-1) GSH in150 mM NaCl solution (Na + GSH) significantly alleviated salinity stress. Compared with salinity treatment alone (NaCl), Na + GSH increased fresh and dry weight of the root, stem, and leaf, photosynthesis, and chlorophyll content. Obvious ultrastructural alterations were observed in the saline-treated leaf- and root-tip cells. Exogenous GSH greatly ameliorated the salinity-induced damage on the leaf/root ultrastructure, especially in Zhongmian 41.These results advocate a positive role for GSH in alleviation of salinity, which is related to significant improvement in chlorophyll content, photosynthetic performance, and leaf/root ultrastructure.

  5. Multicenter collaborative study for standardization of Candida albicans genotyping using a polymorphic microsatellite marker.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; MacCallum, Donna M; Lott, Timothy J; Sampaio, Paula; Serna, Maria-José Buitrago; Grenouillet, Fréderic; Klaassen, Corné H W; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2010-07-01

    Microsatellite-based genotyping for Candida albicans can give discrepant results between laboratories when expressed in fragment sizes, because their determination depends on electrophoretic conditions. The interlaboratory reproducibility was assessed in six laboratories provided with an allelic ladder. Despite variations in size determinations, alleles were correctly assigned, making data transportable between laboratories.

  6. Multicenter Collaborative Study for Standardization of Candida albicans Genotyping Using a Polymorphic Microsatellite Marker▿

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; MacCallum, Donna M.; Lott, Timothy J.; Sampaio, Paula; Serna, Maria-José Buitrago; Grenouillet, Fréderic; Klaassen, Corné H. W.; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2010-01-01

    Microsatellite-based genotyping for Candida albicans can give discrepant results between laboratories when expressed in fragment sizes, because their determination depends on electrophoretic conditions. The interlaboratory reproducibility was assessed in six laboratories provided with an allelic ladder. Despite variations in size determinations, alleles were correctly assigned, making data transportable between laboratories. PMID:20427694

  7. Postnatal neurodevelopmental expression and glutamate-dependent regulation of the ZNF804A rodent homologue.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eric H; Kirtley, Anne; Chandon, Toni-Shay S; Borger, Philip; Husain-Krautter, Sehba; Vingtdeux, Valerie; Malhotra, Anil K

    2015-10-01

    The zinc finger protein ZNF804A rs1344706 variant is a replicated genome-wide significant risk variant for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. While its association with altered brain structure and cognition in patients and healthy risk allele carriers is well documented, the characteristics and function of the gene in the brain remains poorly understood. Here, we used in situ hybridization to determine mRNA expression levels of the ZNF804A rodent homologue, Zfp804a, across multiple postnatal neurodevelopmental time points in the rat brain. We found changes in Zfp804a expression in the rat hippocampus, frontal cortex, and thalamus across postnatal neurodevelopment. Zfp804a mRNA peaked at postnatal day (P) 21 in hippocampal CA1 and DG regions and was highest in the lower cortical layers of frontal cortex at P1, possibly highlighting a role in developmental migration. Using immunofluorescence, we found that Zfp804a mRNA and ZFP804A co-localized with neurons and not astrocytes. In primary cultured cortical neurons, we found that Zfp804a expression was significantly increased when neurons were exposed to glutamate [20μM], but this increase was blocked by the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist MK-801. Expression of Comt, Pde4b, and Drd2, genes previously shown to be regulated by ZNF804A overexpression, was also significantly changed in an NMDA-dependent manner. Our results describe, for the first time, the unique postnatal neurodevelopmental expression of Zfp804a in the rodent brain and demonstrate that glutamate potentially plays an important role in the regulation of this psychiatric susceptibility gene. These are critical steps toward understanding the biological function of ZNF804A in the mammalian brain.

  8. Retinoic acid-dependent regulation of miR-19 expression elicits vertebrate axis defects

    PubMed Central

    Franzosa, Jill A.; Bugel, Sean M.; Tal, Tamara L.; La Du, Jane K.; Tilton, Susan C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is involved in multifarious and complex functions necessary for vertebrate development. RA signaling is reliant on strict enzymatic regulation of RA synthesis and metabolism. Improper spatiotemporal expression of RA during development can result in vertebrate axis defects. microRNAs (miRNAs) are also pivotal in orchestrating developmental processes. While mechanistic links between miRNAs and axial development are established, the role of miRNAs in regulating metabolic enzymes responsible for RA abundance during axis formation has yet to be elucidated. Our results uncovered a role of miR-19 family members in controlling RA metabolism through the regulation of CYP26A1 during vertebrate axis formation. Global miRNA expression profiling showed that developmental RA exposure suppressed the expression of miR-19 family members during zebrafish somitogenesis. A reporter assay confirmed that cyp26a1 is a bona fide target of miR-19 in vivo. Transient knockdown of miR-19 phenocopied axis defects caused by RA exposure. Exogenous miR-19 rescued the axis defects induced by RA exposure. Taken together, these results indicate that the teratogenic effects of RA exposure result, in part, from repression of miR-19 expression and subsequent misregulation of cyp26a1. This highlights a previously unidentified role of miR-19 in facilitating vertebrate axis development via regulation of RA signaling.—Franzosa, J. A., Bugel, S. M., Tal, T. L., La Du, J. K., Tilton, S. C., Waters, K. M., Tanguay, R. L. Retinoic acid-dependent regulation of miR-19 expression elicits vertebrate axis defects. PMID:23975936

  9. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II expression in motor neurons: effect of axotomy.

    PubMed

    Lund, L M; McQuarrie, I G

    1997-11-20

    Although Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent (CaM) protein kinase II isoforms are present in the nervous system in high amounts, many aspects of in vivo expression, localization, and function remain unexplored. During development, CaM kinase IIalpha and IIbeta are differentially expressed. Here, we examined CaM kinase II isoforms in Sprague-Dawley rat sciatic motor neurons before and after axotomy. We cut the L4-5 spinal nerves unilaterally and exposed the proximal nerve stumps to a fluoroprobe, to retrogradely label the neurons of origin. Anti-CaM kinase IIbeta antibody showed immunoreactivity in motor neurons, which decreased to low levels by 4 days after axotomy. We found a similar response by in situ hybridization with riboprobes. The decrease in expression of mRNA and protein was confined to fluorescent motor neurons. For CaM kinase IIalpha, in situ hybridization showed that the mRNA was in sciatic motor neurons, with a density unaffected by axotomy. However, these neurons were also enlarged, suggesting an up-regulation of expression. Northern blots confirmed an mRNA increase. We were unable to find CaM kinase IIalpha immunoreactivity before or after axotomy in sciatic motor neuron cell bodies, suggesting that CaM kinase IIalpha is in the axons or dendrites, or otherwise unavailable to the antibody. Using rats with crush lesions, we radiolabeled axonal proteins being synthesized in the cell body and used two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with Western blots to identify CaM kinase IIalpha as a component of slow axonal transport. This differential regulation and expression of kinase isoforms suggests separate and unique intracellular roles. Because we find CaM kinase IIbeta down-regulates during axonal regrowth, its role in these neurons may be related to synaptic transmission. CaM kinase IIalpha appears to support axonal regrowth.

  10. Activity-Dependent Bidirectional Regulation of GAD Expression in a Homeostatic Fashion Is Mediated by BDNF-Dependent and Independent Pathways.

    PubMed

    Hanno-Iijima, Yoko; Tanaka, Masami; Iijima, Takatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic synaptic plasticity, or synaptic scaling, is a mechanism that tunes neuronal transmission to compensate for prolonged, excessive changes in neuronal activity. Both excitatory and inhibitory neurons undergo homeostatic changes based on synaptic transmission strength, which could effectively contribute to a fine-tuning of circuit activity. However, gene regulation that underlies homeostatic synaptic plasticity in GABAergic (GABA, gamma aminobutyric) neurons is still poorly understood. The present study demonstrated activity-dependent dynamic scaling in which NMDA-R (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor) activity regulated the expression of GABA synthetic enzymes: glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and 67 (GAD65 and GAD67). Results revealed that activity-regulated BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) release is necessary, but not sufficient, for activity-dependent up-scaling of these GAD isoforms. Bidirectional forms of activity-dependent GAD expression require both BDNF-dependent and BDNF-independent pathways, both triggered by NMDA-R activity. Additional results indicated that these two GAD genes differ in their responsiveness to chronic changes in neuronal activity, which could be partially caused by differential dependence on BDNF. In parallel to activity-dependent bidirectional scaling in GAD expression, the present study further observed that a chronic change in neuronal activity leads to an alteration in neurotransmitter release from GABAergic neurons in a homeostatic, bidirectional fashion. Therefore, the differential expression of GAD65 and 67 during prolonged changes in neuronal activity may be implicated in some aspects of bidirectional homeostatic plasticity within mature GABAergic presynapses.

  11. Breast cancer risk associated with gene expression and genotype polymorphisms of the folate-metabolizing MTHFR gene: a case-control study in a high altitude Ecuadorian mestizo population.

    PubMed

    López-Cortés, Andrés; Echeverría, Carolina; Oña-Cisneros, Fabián; Sánchez, María Eugenia; Herrera, Camilo; Cabrera-Andrade, Alejandro; Rosales, Felipe; Ortiz, Malena; Paz-Y-Miño, César

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the leading cause of cancer-related death among women in 2014. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), methionine synthase (MTR), and MTR reductase (MTRR) are enzymes that play an important role in folate metabolism. The single nucleotide polymorphisms, MTHFR C677T, A1298C, MTR A2756G, and MTRR A66G, alter plasmatic folate and homocysteine concentrations, causing problems during the repairment, synthesis, and methylation of the genetic material. Therefore, it is essential to know how BC risk is associated with histopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics, genotype polymorphisms, and gene expression in a high altitude Ecuadorian mestizo population. DNA was extracted from 195 healthy and 114 affected women. Genotypes were determined by restriction enzymes and genomic sequencing. mRNA was extracted from 26 glandular breast tissue samples, both from cancerous tissue and healthy tissue adjacent to the tumor. Relative gene expression was determined with the comparative Livak method (2(-ΔΔCT)). We found significant association between the rs1801133 (A222V) genotypes and an increased risk of BC development: C/T (odds ratio [OR] = 1.8; 95 % confidence interval [CI] = 1.1-3.2; P = 0.039), T/T (OR = 2.9; 95 % CI = 1.2-7.2; P = 0.025), and C/T + T/T (OR = 1.9; 95 % CI = 1.1-3.3; P = 0.019). Regarding relative gene expression, we found significant mRNA subexpression between the combined genotypes C/T + T/T (rs1801133) and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) (P = 0.034). In brief, the MTHFR gene and its protein could act as potential predictive biomarkers of BC, especially TNBC among the high altitude Ecuadorian mestizo population.

  12. KCNE gene expression is dependent on the proliferation and mode of activation of leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Solé, Laura; Vallejo-Gracia, Albert; Roig, Sara R.; Serrano-Albarrás, Antonio; Marruecos, Laura; Manils, Joan; Gómez, Diana; Soler, Concepció; Felipe, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channels are tightly regulated during the immune system response. Leukocytes have a limited repertoire of Kv channels, whose physiological role is under intense investigation. A functional Kv channel is an oligomeric complex composed of pore-forming and ancillary subunits. The KCNE gene family is a novel group of modulatory Kv channel elements in leukocytes. Here, we characterized the gene expression of KCNEs (1–5) in leukocytes and investigated their regulation during leukocyte proliferation and mode of activation. Murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages, human Jurkat T-lymphocytes and human Raji B-cells were analyzed. KCNEs (1–5) are expressed in all leukocytes lineages. Most KCNE mRNAs show cell cycle-dependent regulation and are differentially regulated under specific insults. Our results further suggest a new and yet undefined physiological role for KCNE subunits in the immune system. Putative associations of these ancillary proteins with Kv channels would yield a wide variety of biophysically and pharmacologically distinct channels that fine-tune the immunological response. PMID:23327879

  13. KCNE gene expression is dependent on the proliferation and mode of activation of leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Solé, Laura; Vallejo-Gracia, Albert; Roig, Sara R; Serrano-Albarrás, Antonio; Marruecos, Laura; Manils, Joan; Gómez, Diana; Soler, Concepció; Felipe, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-dependent K (+) (Kv) channels are tightly regulated during the immune system response. Leukocytes have a limited repertoire of Kv channels, whose physiological role is under intense investigation. A functional Kv channel is an oligomeric complex composed of pore-forming and ancillary subunits. The KCNE gene family is a novel group of modulatory Kv channel elements in leukocytes. Here, we characterized the gene expression of KCNEs (1-5) in leukocytes and investigated their regulation during leukocyte proliferation and mode of activation. Murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages, human Jurkat T-lymphocytes and human Raji B-cells were analyzed. KCNEs (1-5) are expressed in all leukocytes lineages. Most KCNE mRNAs show cell cycle-dependent regulation and are differentially regulated under specific insults. Our results further suggest a new and yet undefined physiological role for KCNE subunits in the immune system. Putative associations of these ancillary proteins with Kv channels would yield a wide variety of biophysically and pharmacologically distinct channels that fine-tune the immunological response.

  14. Co-dependence between trypanosome nuclear lamina components in nuclear stability and control of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Maishman, Luke; Obado, Samson O.; Alsford, Sam; Bart, Jean-Mathieu; Chen, Wei-Ming; Ratushny, Alexander V.; Navarro, Miguel; Horn, David; Aitchison, John D.; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.; Field, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is a filamentous structure subtending the nuclear envelope and required for chromatin organization, transcriptional regulation and maintaining nuclear structure. The trypanosomatid coiled-coil NUP-1 protein is a lamina component functionally analogous to lamins, the major lamina proteins of metazoa. There is little evidence for shared ancestry, suggesting the presence of a distinct lamina system in trypanosomes. To find additional trypanosomatid lamina components we identified NUP-1 interacting proteins by affinity capture and mass-spectrometry. Multiple components of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) and a second coiled-coil protein, which we termed NUP-2, were found. NUP-2 has a punctate distribution at the nuclear periphery throughout the cell cycle and is in close proximity to NUP-1, the NPCs and telomeric chromosomal regions. RNAi-mediated silencing of NUP-2 leads to severe proliferation defects, gross alterations to nuclear structure, chromosomal organization and nuclear envelope architecture. Further, transcription is altered at telomere-proximal variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) expression sites (ESs), suggesting a role in controlling ES expression, although NUP-2 silencing does not increase VSG switching. Transcriptome analysis suggests specific alterations to Pol I-dependent transcription. NUP-1 is mislocalized in NUP-2 knockdown cells and vice versa, implying that NUP-1 and NUP-2 form a co-dependent network and identifying NUP-2 as a second trypanosomatid nuclear lamina component. PMID:27625397

  15. Calcium activates the light-dependent conductance in melanopsin-expressing photoreceptors of amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Peinado, Gabriel; Osorno, Tomás; Gomez, María del Pilar; Nasi, Enrico

    2015-06-23

    Melanopsin, the photopigment of the "circadian" receptors that regulate the biological clock and the pupillary reflex in mammals, is homologous to invertebrate rhodopsins. Evidence supporting the involvement of phosphoinositides in light-signaling has been garnered, but the downstream effectors that control the light-dependent conductance remain unknown. Microvillar photoreceptors of the primitive chordate amphioxus also express melanopsin and transduce light via phospholipase-C, apparently not acting through diacylglycerol. We therefore examined the role of calcium in activating the photoconductance, using simultaneous, high time-resolution measurements of membrane current and Ca(2+) fluorescence. The light-induced calcium rise precedes the onset of the photocurrent, making it a candidate in the activation chain. Moreover, photolysis of caged Ca elicits an inward current of similar size, time course and pharmacology as the physiological photoresponse, but with a much shorter latency. Internally released calcium thus emerges as a key messenger to trigger the opening of light-dependent channels in melanopsin-expressing microvillar photoreceptors of early chordates.

  16. Cell Type Dependent Regulation of Multidrug Resistance-1 Gene Expression by AML1-ETO

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Robert; Boyapati, Anita; Zhang, Dong-Er

    2007-01-01

    The AML1-ETO fusion protein is generated from the 8;21 chromosome translocation that is commonly identified in acute myeloid leukemia. AML1-ETO is a DNA binding transcription factor and has been demonstrated to play a critical role in promoting leukemogenesis. Therefore, it is important to define the molecular mechanism of AML1-ETO in the regulation of gene expression. Here, we report that the effect of AML1-ETO on the promoter of multidrug resistance-1 (MDR1) gene, a known AML1-ETO target, is highly cell type specific. Besides observing repression of the MDR1 promoter in C33A and CV-1 cells as reported previously, AML1-ETO strongly activated the promoter in K562 and B210 cells. More importantly, this activation required both the AML1 and ETO portions of the fusion protein, but did not depend on the AML1 binding site in MDR1 promoter. Furthermore, results from promoter deletion analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays suggested that this activation effect was likely through the influence of the general transcription machinery rather than promoter-specific factors. Based on these data, we propose that AML1-ETO may have opposing effects on gene expression depending on the various conditions of the cellular environment. PMID:17590361

  17. Calcium activates the light-dependent conductance in melanopsin-expressing photoreceptors of amphioxus

    PubMed Central

    Peinado, Gabriel; Osorno, Tomás; Gomez, María del Pilar; Nasi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Melanopsin, the photopigment of the “circadian” receptors that regulate the biological clock and the pupillary reflex in mammals, is homologous to invertebrate rhodopsins. Evidence supporting the involvement of phosphoinositides in light-signaling has been garnered, but the downstream effectors that control the light-dependent conductance remain unknown. Microvillar photoreceptors of the primitive chordate amphioxus also express melanopsin and transduce light via phospholipase-C, apparently not acting through diacylglycerol. We therefore examined the role of calcium in activating the photoconductance, using simultaneous, high time-resolution measurements of membrane current and Ca2+ fluorescence. The light-induced calcium rise precedes the onset of the photocurrent, making it a candidate in the activation chain. Moreover, photolysis of caged Ca elicits an inward current of similar size, time course and pharmacology as the physiological photoresponse, but with a much shorter latency. Internally released calcium thus emerges as a key messenger to trigger the opening of light-dependent channels in melanopsin-expressing microvillar photoreceptors of early chordates. PMID:26056310

  18. Drug-dependent behaviors and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expressions in Caenorhabditis elegans following chronic nicotine exposure.

    PubMed

    Polli, Joseph R; Dobbins, Dorothy L; Kobet, Robert A; Farwell, Mary A; Zhang, Baohong; Lee, Myon-Hee; Pan, Xiaoping

    2015-03-01

    Nicotine, the major psychoactive compound in tobacco, targets nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and results in drug dependence. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans' (C. elegans) genome encodes conserved and extensive nicotinic receptor subunits, representing a useful system to investigate nicotine-induced nAChR expressions in the context of drug dependence. However, the in vivo expression pattern of nAChR genes under chronic nicotine exposure has not been fully investigated. To define the role of nAChR genes involved in nicotine-induced locomotion changes and the development of tolerance to these effects, we characterized the locomotion behavior combining the use of two systems: the Worm Tracker hardware and the WormLab software. Our results indicate that the combined system is an advantageous alternative to define drug-dependent locomotion behavior in C. elegans. Chronic (24-h dosing) nicotine exposure at 6.17 and 61.7μM induced nicotine-dependent behaviors, including drug stimulation, tolerance/adaption, and withdrawal responses. Specifically, the movement speed of naïve worms on nicotine-containing environments was significantly higher than on nicotine-free environments, suggesting locomotion stimulation by nicotine. In contrast, the 24-h 6.17μM nicotine-treated worms exhibited significantly higher speeds on nicotine-free plates than on nicotine-containing plates. Furthermore significantly increased locomotion behavior during nicotine cessation was observed in worms treated with a higher nicotine concentration of 61.7μM. The relatively low locomotion speed of nicotine-treated worms on nicotine-containing environments also indicates adaption/tolerance of worms to nicotine following chronic nicotine exposure. In addition, this study provides useful information regarding the comprehensive in vivo expression profile of the 28 "core" nAChRs following different dosages of chronic nicotine treatments. Eleven genes (lev-1, acr-6, acr-7, acr-11, lev-8, acr

  19. Dynamic actin remodeling during epithelial-mesenchymal transition depends on increased moesin expression.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Jennifer; Srivastava, Jyoti; Madson, Nikki; Wittmann, Torsten; Barber, Diane L

    2011-12-01

    Remodeling of actin filaments is necessary for epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT); however, understanding of how this is regulated in real time is limited. We used an actin filament reporter and high-resolution live-cell imaging to analyze the regulated dynamics of actin filaments during transforming growth factor-β-induced EMT of mammary epithelial cells. Progressive changes in cell morphology were accompanied by reorganization of actin filaments from thin cortical bundles in epithelial cells to thick, parallel, contractile bundles that disassembled more slowly but remained dynamic in transdifferentiated cells. We show that efficient actin filament remodeling during EMT depends on increased expression of the ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) protein moesin. Cells suppressed for moesin expression by short hairpin RNA had fewer, thinner, and less stable actin bundles, incomplete morphological transition, and decreased invasive capacity. These cells also had less α-smooth muscle actin and phosphorylated myosin light chain in cortical patches, decreased abundance of the adhesion receptor CD44 at membrane protrusions, and attenuated autophosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase. Our findings suggest that increased moesin expression promotes EMT by regulating adhesion and contractile elements for changes in actin filament organization. We propose that the transciptional program driving EMT controls progressive remodeling of actin filament architectures.

  20. Targeting Activation of Specific NF-κB Subunits Prevents Stress-Dependent Atherothrombotic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Djuric, Zdenka; Kashif, Muhammed; Fleming, Thomas; Muhammad, Sajjad; Piel, David; von Bauer, Rüdiger; Bea, Florian; Herzig, Stephan; Zeier, Martin; Pizzi, Marina; Isermann, Berend; Hecker, Markus; Schwaninger, Markus; Bierhaus, Angelika; Nawroth, Peter P

    2012-01-01

    Psychosocial stress has been shown to be a contributing factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Although the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated entirely, it has been shown previously that the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is an important component of stress-activated signaling pathway. In this study, we aimed to decipher the mechanisms of stress-induced NF-κB-mediated gene expression, using an in vitro and in vivo model of psychosocial stress. Induction of stress led to NF-κB-dependent expression of proinflammatory (tissue factor, intracellular adhesive molecule 1 [ICAM-1]) and protective genes (manganese superoxide dismutase [MnSOD]) via p50, p65 or cRel. Selective inhibition of the different subunits and the respective kinases showed that inhibition of cRel leads to the reduction of atherosclerotic lesions in apolipoprotein−/− (ApoE−/−) mice via suppression of proinflammatory gene expression. This observation may therefore provide a possible explanation for ineffectiveness of antioxidant therapies and suggests that selective targeting of cRel activation may provide a novel approach for the treatment of stress-related inflammatory vascular disease. PMID:23114885

  1. Maturation stage and proliferation-dependent expression of dUTPase in human T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Strahler, J R; Zhu, X X; Hora, N; Wang, Y K; Andrews, P C; Roseman, N A; Neel, J V; Turka, L; Hanash, S M

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a database of lymphoid polypeptides detected by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to aid in studies of leukemogenesis and of mutation affecting protein structure. In prior studies, we observed a 19-kDa phosphopolypeptide which was induced with proliferation in mature T cells and constitutively expressed in immature thymocytes. In this report we describe the identification of this polypeptide as the phosphorylated form of dUTPase (EC 3.6.1.23), following cDNA cloning of the gene, based on a partial amino acid sequence of the phosphopolypeptide. Studies of the expression and phosphorylation of dUTPase in human T cells indicate that accumulation and phosphorylation of dUTPase in mature T cells occur in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Interestingly, noncycling immature thymocytes express constitutively high levels of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated dUTPase. These results suggest an important role for dUTPase in immature thymocytes that is independent of proliferation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8389461

  2. Bacterial Suppression of RNA Polymerase II-Dependent Host Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ambite, Ines; Lutay, Nataliya; Stork, Christoph; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2016-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) is a bacterial carrier state in the urinary tract that resembles commensalism at other mucosal sites. ABU strains often lack the virulence factors that characterize uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains and therefore elicit weak innate immune responses in the urinary tract. In addition, ABU strains are active modifiers of the host environment, which they influence by suppressing RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-dependent host gene expression. In patients inoculated with the ABU strain E. coli 83972, gene expression was markedly reduced after 24 h (>60% of all regulated genes). Specific repressors and activators of Pol II-dependent transcription were modified, and Pol II Serine 2 phosphorylation was significantly inhibited, indicating reduced activity of the polymerase. This active inhibition included disease–associated innate immune response pathways, defined by TLR4, IRF-3 and IRF-7, suggesting that ABU strains persist in human hosts by active suppression of the antibacterial defense. In a search for the mechanism of inhibition, we compared the whole genome sequences of E. coli 83972 and the uropathogenic strain E. coli CFT073. In addition to the known loss of virulence genes, we observed that the ABU strain has acquired several phages and identified the lytic Prophage 3 as a candidate Pol II inhibitor. Intact phage particles were released by ABU during in vitro growth in human urine. To address if Prophage 3 affects Pol II activity, we constructed a Prophage 3 negative deletion mutant in E. coli 83972 and compared the effect on Pol II phosphorylation between the mutant and the E. coli 83972 wild type (WT) strains. No difference was detected, suggesting that the Pol II inhibitor is not encoded by the phage. The review summarizes the evidence that the ABU strain E. coli 83972 modifies host gene expression by inhibition of Pol II phosphorylation, and discusses the ability of ABU strains to actively create an environment that

  3. Sleep-Dependent Gene Expression in the Hippocampus and Prefrontal Cortex Following Long-Term Potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Romcy-Pereira, Rodrigo N.; Erraji-Benchekroun, Loubna; Smyrniotopoulos, Peggy; Ogawa, Sonoko; Mello, Claudio V.; Sibille, Etienne; Pavlides, Constantine

    2009-01-01

    The activity-dependent transcription factor zif268 is re-activated in sleep following hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). However, the activation of secondary genes, possibly involved in modifying local synaptic strengths and ultimately stabilizing memory traces during sleep, has not yet been studied. Here, we investigated changes in hippocampal and cortical gene expression at a time point subsequent to the previously reported initial zif268 re-activation during sleep. Rats underwent unilateral hippocampal LTP and were assigned to SLEEP or AWAKE groups. Eighty minutes after a long rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) episode (or an equivalent amount of time for awake group) animals had their hippocampi dissected and processed for gene microarray hybridization. Prefrontal and parietal cortices were also collected for qRT-PCR analysis. The microarray analysis identified 28 up-regulated genes in the hippocampus: 11 genes were enhanced in the LTPed hemisphere of sleep animals; 13 genes were enhanced after sleep, regardless of hemisphere; and 4 genes were enhanced in LTPed hemisphere, regardless of behavioral state. qRT-PCR analysis confirmed the upregulation of aif-1 and sc-65 during sleep. Moreover, we observed a down-regulation of the purinergic receptor, P2Y4R in the LTP hemisphere of awake animals and a trend for the protein kinase, CaMKI to be up-regulated in the LTP hemisphere of sleep animals. In the prefrontal cortex, we showed a significant LTP-dependent down-regulation of gluR1 and spinophilin specifically during sleep. Zif268 was downregulated in sleep regardless of the hemisphere. No changes in gene expression were observed in the parietal cortex. Our findings indicate that a set of synaptic plasticity-related genes have their expression modulated during sleep following LTP, which can reflect biochemical events associated with reshaping of synaptic connections in sleep following learning. PMID:19389414

  4. Mitochondrial impairment increases FL-PINK1 levels by calcium-dependent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Sánchez, Rubén; Gegg, Matthew E; Bravo-San Pedro, José M; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Alvarez-Erviti, Lydia; Pizarro-Estrella, Elisa; Gutiérrez-Martín, Yolanda; Alvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Fuentes, José M; González-Polo, Rosa Ana; Schapira, Anthony H V

    2014-02-01

    Mutations of the PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) gene are a cause of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). This gene encodes a mitochondrial serine/threonine kinase, which is partly localized to mitochondria, and has been shown to play a role in protecting neuronal cells from oxidative stress and cell death, perhaps related to its role in mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy. In this study, we report that increased mitochondrial PINK1 levels observed in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells after carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophelyhydrazone (CCCP) treatment were due to de novo protein synthesis, and not just increased stabilization of full length PINK1 (FL-PINK1). PINK1 mRNA levels were significantly increased by 4-fold after 24h. FL-PINK1 protein levels at this time point were significantly higher than vehicle-treated, or cells treated with CCCP for 3h, despite mitochondrial content being decreased by 29%. We have also shown that CCCP dissipated the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and induced entry of extracellular calcium through L/N-type calcium channels. The calcium chelating agent BAPTA-AM impaired the CCCP-induced PINK1 mRNA and protein expression. Furthermore, CCCP treatment activated the transcription factor c-Fos in a calcium-dependent manner. These data indicate that PINK1 expression is significantly increased upon CCCP-induced mitophagy in a calcium-dependent manner. This increase in expression continues after peak Parkin mitochondrial translocation, suggesting a role for PINK1 in mitophagy that is downstream of ubiquitination of mitochondrial substrates. This sensitivity to intracellular calcium levels supports the hypothesis that PINK1 may also play a role in cellular calcium homeostasis and neuroprotection.

  5. Niche-Dependent Gene Expression Profile of Intratumoral Heterogeneous Ovarian Cancer Stem Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Abelson, Sagi; Shamai, Yeela; Berger, Liron; Skorecki, Karl; Tzukerman, Maty

    2013-01-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity challenges existing paradigms for anti-cancer therapy. We have previously demonstrated that the human embryonic stem cells (hESC)-derived cellular microenvironment in immunocompromised mice, enables functional distinction of heterogeneous tumor cells, including cells which do not grow into a tumor in a conventional direct tumor xenograft platform. We have identified and characterized six cancer cell subpopulations each clonally expanded from a single cell, derived from human ovarian clear cell carcinoma of a single tumor, to demonstrate striking intratumoral phenotypic heterogeneity that is dynamically dependent on the tumor growth microenvironment. These cancer cell subpopulations, characterized as cancer stem cell subpopulations, faithfully recapitulate the full spectrum of histological phenotypic heterogeneity known for human ovarian clear cell carcinoma. Each of the six subpopulations displays a different level of morphologic and tumorigenic differentiation wherein growth in the hESC-derived microenvironment favors growth of CD44+/aldehyde dehydrogenase positive pockets of self-renewing cells that sustain tumor growth through a process of tumorigenic differentiation into CD44-/aldehyde dehydrogenase negative derivatives. Strikingly, these derivative cells display microenvironment-dependent plasticity with the capacity to restore self-renewal markers and CD44 expression. In the current study, we delineate the distinct gene expression and epigenetic profiles of two such subpopulations, representing extremes of phenotypic heterogeneity in terms of niche-dependent self-renewal and tumorigenic differentiation. By combining Gene Set Enrichment, Gene Ontology and Pathway-focused array analyses with methylation status, we propose a suite of robust differences in tumor self-renewal and differentiation pathways that underlie the striking intratumoral phenotypic heterogeneity which characterize this and other solid tumor malignancies. PMID

  6. Where is the extended phenotype in the wild? The community composition of arthropods on mature oak trees does not depend on the oak genotype.

    PubMed

    Gossner, Martin M; Brändle, Martin; Brandl, Roland; Bail, Johannes; Müller, Jörg; Opgenoorth, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Through a series of common garden experiments, it has been shown that heritable phenotypic differences between individual trees can affect arthropod communities. However, field studies under heterogeneous environmental conditions remain rare. In the present study, we investigated the genetic constitution of 121 mature oak host trees at different trophic levels from 10 sites across Bavaria, southern Germany and their associated insect communities. A total of 23,576 individuals representing 395 species of beetles and true bugs were evaluated. In particular, we determined whether the composition of arthropod communities is related to the oak genotype and whether the strength of the relationships decreases from lower to higher trophic levels, such as for phytophagous, xylophagous, zoophagous, and mycetophagous species. The genetic differentiation of oaks was assessed using eight microsatellite markers. We found no significant influence of the oak genotype on neither the full beetle and true bug community nor on any of the analyzed trophic guilds. In contrast, the community composition of the insects was highly related to the space and climate, such that the community similarity decreased with increases in spatial distance and climatic differences. The relationship with space and climate was much stronger in beetles than in true bugs, particularly in mycetophagous species. Our results suggest that spatial processes override the genetic effects of the host plant in structuring arthropod communities on oak trees. Because we used neutral markers, we cannot exclude the possibility that trait-specific markers may reveal a genetic imprint of the foundation tree species on the composition of the arthropod community. However, based on the strength of the spatial patterns in our data set, we assume that genetic differences among oaks are less important in the structuring of arthropod communities. Future whole-genome studies are required to draw a final conclusion.

  7. NusA-dependent transcription termination prevents misregulation of global gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Smarajit; Yakhnin, Alexander V.; Sebastian, Aswathy; Albert, Istvan; Babitzke, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsic transcription terminators consist of an RNA hairpin followed by a U-rich tract, and these signals can trigger termination without the involvement of additional factors. Although NusA is known to stimulate intrinsic termination in vitro, the in vivo targets and global impact of NusA are not known because it is essential for viability. Using genome-wide 3′ end-mapping on an engineered Bacillus subtilis NusA depletion strain, we show that weak suboptimal terminators are the principle NusA substrates. Moreover, a subclass of weak non-canonical terminators was identified that completely depend on NusA for effective termination. NusA-dependent terminators tend to have weak hairpins and/or distal U-tract interruptions, supporting a model in which NusA is directly involved in the termination mechanism. Depletion of NusA altered global gene expression directly and indirectly via readthrough of suboptimal terminators. Readthrough of NusA-dependent terminators caused misregulation of genes involved in essential cellular functions, especially DNA replication and metabolism. We further show that nusA is autoregulated by a transcription attenuation mechanism that does not rely on antiterminator structures. Instead, NusA-stimulated termination in its 5′ UTR dictates the extent of transcription into the operon, thereby ensuring tight control of cellular NusA levels. PMID:27571753

  8. Induction of carcinoma cell migration on vitronectin by NF-kappa B-dependent gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Yebra, M; Filardo, E J; Bayna, E M; Kawahara, E; Becker, J C; Cheresh, D A

    1995-01-01

    Integrin alpha v beta 5 promotes FG carcinoma cell adhesion to vitronectin yet requires protein kinase C (PKC) activation for migration on this ligand. Here we report that this PKC-dependent cell motility event requires NF-kappaB-dependent transcription. Specifically, a component within nuclear extracts prepared from PKC-stimulated FG cells exhibited a significant increase in binding activity to a synthetic oligonucleotide containing a consensus kappa B sequence. These nuclear DNA-binding complexes were shown to be comprised of p65 and p50 NF-kappaB/rel family members and appeared functionally active because they promoted transcription of a reporter construct containing a kappa B site. The NF-kappa B activation event was directly linked to the alpha v beta 5 motility response because the NF-kappa B-binding oligonucleotide, when introduced into FG cells, inhibited cell migration on vitronectin but not on collagen and had no effect on cell adhesion to either ligand. These results suggest that the detected DNA-binding complexes interact with kappa B transcriptional elements to regulate gene expression required for alpha v beta 5-dependent cell motility on vitronectin. Images PMID:7579698

  9. Identification of context-dependent expression quantitative trait loci in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Zhernakova, Daria V; Deelen, Patrick; Vermaat, Martijn; van Iterson, Maarten; van Galen, Michiel; Arindrarto, Wibowo; van 't Hof, Peter; Mei, Hailiang; van Dijk, Freerk; Westra, Harm-Jan; Bonder, Marc Jan; van Rooij, Jeroen; Verkerk, Marijn; Jhamai, P Mila; Moed, Matthijs; Kielbasa, Szymon M; Bot, Jan; Nooren, Irene; Pool, René; van Dongen, Jenny; Hottenga, Jouke J; Stehouwer, Coen D A; van der Kallen, Carla J H; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Li, Yang; Tigchelaar, Ettje F; de Klein, Niek; Beekman, Marian; Deelen, Joris; van Heemst, Diana; van den Berg, Leonard H; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; van Greevenbroek, Marleen M J; Veldink, Jan H; Boomsma, Dorret I; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Wijmenga, Cisca; Slagboom, P Eline; Swertz, Morris A; Isaacs, Aaron; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Jansen, Rick; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Franke, Lude

    2017-01-01

    Genetic risk factors often localize to noncoding regions of the genome with unknown effects on disease etiology. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) help to explain the regulatory mechanisms underlying these genetic associations. Knowledge of the context that determines the nature and strength of eQTLs may help identify cell types relevant to pathophysiology and the regulatory networks underlying disease. Here we generated peripheral blood RNA-seq data from 2,116 unrelated individuals and systematically identified context-dependent eQTLs using a hypothesis-free strategy that does not require previous knowledge of the identity of the modifiers. Of the 23,060 significant cis-regulated genes (false discovery rate (FDR) ≤ 0.05), 2,743 (12%) showed context-dependent eQTL effects. The majority of these effects were influenced by cell type composition. A set of 145 cis-eQTLs depended on type I interferon signaling. Others were modulated by specific transcription factors binding to the eQTL SNPs.

  10. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of Bacillus subtilis genes involved in ATP-dependent nuclease synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, J; Venema, G

    1991-01-01

    The genes encoding the subunits of the Bacillus subtilis ATP-dependent nuclease (add genes) have been cloned. The genes were located on an 8.8-kb SalI-SmaI chromosomal DNA fragment. Transformants of a recBCD deletion mutant of Escherichia coli with plasmid pGV1 carrying this DNA fragment showed ATP-dependent nuclease activity. Three open reading frames were identified on the 8.8-kb SalI-SmaI fragment, which could encode three proteins with molecular masses of 135 (AddB protein), 141 (AddA protein), and 28 kDa. Only the AddB and AddA proteins are required for ATP-dependent exonuclease activity. Both the AddB and AddA proteins contained a conserved amino acid sequence for ATP binding. In the AddA protein, a number of small regions were present showing a high degree of sequence similarity with regions in the E. coli RecB protein. The AddA protein contained six conserved motifs which were also present in the E. coli helicase II (UvrD protein) and the Rep helicase, suggesting that these motifs are involved in the DNA unwinding activity of the enzyme. When linked to the T7 promoter, a high level of expression was obtained in E. coli. Images PMID:1646786

  11. Water Channels Aquaporin 4 and -1 Expression in Subependymoma Depends on the Localization of the Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Andreas F.; Hoffmeister, Maike; Beschorner, Rudi; Ritz, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Background We analyzed aquaporin 4 and -1 expression in subependymomas, benign and slow growing brain tumors WHO grade I. Ten subependymoma cases were investigated, five of the fossa inferior and five of the fossa superior. Methods and Results Using immunohistochemistry, we observed different aquaporin expression patterns depending on localization: aquaporin 4 and -1 were detected in infratentorial subependymomas in the entire tumor tissue. In contrast, supratentorial subependymomas revealed aquaporin 4 and -1 expression only in border areas of the tumor. PCR analyses however showed no difference in aquaporin 4 expression between all subependymomas independent of localization but at higher levels than in normal brain. In contrast, aquaporin 1 RNA levels were found to be higher only in infratentorial samples compared to supratentorial and normal brain samples. The reason for the different distribution pattern of aquaporin 4 in subependymomas still remains unclear. On the cellular level, aquaporin 4 was redistributed on the surface of the tumor cells, and in freeze fracture replicas no orthogonal arrays of particles were found. This was similar to our previous findings in malignant glioblastomas. From these studies, we know that extracellular matrix molecules within the tumor like agrin and its receptor alpha-dystroglycan are involved in forming orthogonal arrays of particles. In subependymomas neither agrin nor alpha-dystroglycan were detected around blood vessels. Conclusions Taken together, we show in this study that in the benign subependymomas aquaporins 1 and 4 are dramatically redistributed and upregulated. We speculate that extracellular environments of infra- and supratentorial subependymomas are different and lead to different distribution patterns of aquaporin 4 and -1. PMID:26115524

  12. Ras modulation of superoxide activates ERK-dependent fibronectin expression in diabetes-induced renal injuries.

    PubMed

    Lin, C-L; Wang, F-S; Kuo, Y-R; Huang, Y-T; Huang, H-C; Sun, Y-C; Kuo, Y-H

    2006-05-01

    Although previous studies have demonstrated that diabetic nephropathy is attributable to early extracellular matrix accumulation in glomerular mesangial cells, the molecular mechanism by which high glucose induces matrix protein deposition remains not fully elucidated. Rat mesangial cells pretreated with or without inhibitors were cultured in high-glucose or advanced glycation end product (AGE) conditions. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were given superoxide dismutase (SOD)-conjugated propylene glycol to scavenge superoxide. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, fibronectin expression, Ras, ERK, p38, and c-Jun activation of glomerular mesangial cells or urinary albumin secretion were assessed. Superoxide, not nitric oxide or hydrogen peroxide, mediated high glucose- and AGE-induced TGF-beta1 and fibronectin expression. Pretreatment with diphenyliodonium, not allopurinol or rotenone, reduced high-glucose and AGE augmentation of superoxide synthesis and fibronection expression. High glucose and AGEs rapidly enhanced Ras activation and progressively increased cytosolic ERK and nuclear c-Jun activation. Inhibiting Ras by manumycin A reduced the stimulatory effects of high glucose and AGEs on superoxide and fibronectin expression. SOD or PD98059 pretreatment reduced high-glucose and AGE promotion of ERK and c-Jun activation. Exogenous SOD treatment in diabetic rats significantly attenuated diabetes induction of superoxide, urinary albumin excretion, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, TGF-beta1, and fibronectin immunoreactivities in renal glomerular mesangial cells. Ras induction of superoxide activated ERK-dependent fibrosis-stimulatory factor and extracellular matrix gene transcription of mesangial cells. Reduction of oxidative stress by scavenging superoxide may provide an alternative strategy for controlling diabetes-induced early renal injury.

  13. Two mechanisms for putrescine-dependent transcriptional expression of the putrescine aminotransferase gene, ygjG, in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Sik; Shin, Hyun-Chul; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2014-09-01

    In this study, on evaluating the physiological function and mechanism of putrescine, we found that putrescine supplementation (1 mM) increases transcription of the putrescine aminotransferase gene, ygjG. Putrescine-dependent expression was confirmed by measuring β-galactosidase activity and with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. To understand the role of putrescine in ygjG expression, we genetically characterized and found that a knockout mutation in an alternative sigma factor, rpoS, abolished putrescine-dependent ygjG-lacZ expression. In the rpoS mutant, RpoS overexpression complemented the mutant phenotype. However, RpoS overexpression induced ygjG-lacZ expression with putrescine supplementation but not without supplementation. We also found that the loss of putrescine-dependent ygjG-lacZ expression induced by rpoS was completely restored under nitrogen-starvation conditions. The putrescine-dependent expression of ygjG-lacZ under this condition was clearly dependent on another alternative sigma factor, rpoN, and its cognate activator ntrC. These results show that rpoS is required for putrescine-dependent ygjG-lacZ expression, but the effect of putrescine on this expression is not caused by simple modulation of RpoS synthesis. Putrescine-dependent expression of ygjG-lacZ was controlled by at least two sigma factors: rpoS under excess nitrogen conditions and rpoN under nitrogen-starvation conditions. These results suggest that putrescine plays an important role in the nitrogen regulation system.

  14. Age-dependent brain gene expression and copy number anomalies in autism suggest distinct pathological processes at young versus mature ages.

    PubMed

    Chow, Maggie L; Pramparo, Tiziano; Winn, Mary E; Barnes, Cynthia Carter; Li, Hai-Ri; Weiss, Lauren; Fan, Jian-Bing; Murray, Sarah; April, Craig; Belinson, Haim; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Schork, Nicholas J; Courchesne, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, yet the genetic underpinnings of the disorder are largely unknown. Aberrant brain overgrowth is a well-replicated observation in the autism literature; but association, linkage, and expression studies have not identified genetic factors that explain this trajectory. Few studies have had sufficient statistical power to investigate whole-genome gene expression and genotypic variation in the autistic brain, especially in regions that display the greatest growth abnormality. Previous functional genomic studies have identified possible alterations in transcript levels of genes related to neurodevelopment and immune function. Thus, there is a need for genetic studies involving key brain regions to replicate these findings and solidify the role of particular functional pathways in autism pathogenesis. We therefore sought to identify abnormal brain gene expression patterns via whole-genome analysis of mRNA levels and copy number variations (CNVs) in autistic and control postmortem brain samples. We focused on prefrontal cortex tissue where excess neuron numbers and cortical overgrowth are pronounced in the majority of autism cases. We found evidence for dysregulation in pathways governing cell number, cortical patterning, and differentiation in young autistic prefrontal cortex. In contrast, adult autistic prefrontal cortex showed dysregulation of signaling and repair pathways. Genes regulating cell cycle also exhibited autism-specific CNVs in DNA derived from prefrontal cortex, and these genes were significantly associated with autism in genome-wide association study datasets. Our results suggest that CNVs and age-dependent gene expression changes in autism may reflect distinct pathological processes in the developing versus the mature autistic prefrontal cortex. Our results raise the hypothesis that genetic dysregulation in the developing brain leads to abnormal regional patterning, excess prefrontal neurons

  15. Age-Dependent Brain Gene Expression and Copy Number Anomalies in Autism Suggest Distinct Pathological Processes at Young Versus Mature Ages

    PubMed Central

    Winn, Mary E.; Barnes, Cynthia Carter; Li, Hai-Ri; Weiss, Lauren; Fan, Jian-Bing; Murray, Sarah; April, Craig; Belinson, Haim; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Schork, Nicholas J.; Courchesne, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, yet the genetic underpinnings of the disorder are largely unknown. Aberrant brain overgrowth is a well-replicated observation in the autism literature; but association, linkage, and expression studies have not identified genetic factors that explain this trajectory. Few studies have had sufficient statistical power to investigate whole-genome gene expression and genotypic variation in the autistic brain, especially in regions that display the greatest growth abnormality. Previous functional genomic studies have identified possible alterations in transcript levels of genes related to neurodevelopment and immune function. Thus, there is a need for genetic studies involving key brain regions to replicate these findings and solidify the role of particular functional pathways in autism pathogenesis. We therefore sought to identify abnormal brain gene expression patterns via whole-genome analysis of mRNA levels and copy number variations (CNVs) in autistic and control postmortem brain samples. We focused on prefrontal cortex tissue where excess neuron numbers and cortical overgrowth are pronounced in the majority of autism cases. We found evidence for dysregulation in pathways governing cell number, cortical patterning, and differentiation in young autistic prefrontal cortex. In contrast, adult autistic prefrontal cortex showed dysregulation of signaling and repair pathways. Genes regulating cell cycle also exhibited autism-specific CNVs in DNA derived from prefrontal cortex, and these genes were significantly associated with autism in genome-wide association study datasets. Our results suggest that CNVs and age-dependent gene expression changes in autism may reflect distinct pathological processes in the developing versus the mature autistic prefrontal cortex. Our results raise the hypothesis that genetic dysregulation in the developing brain leads to abnormal regional patterning, excess prefrontal neurons

  16. Chloromethane-dependent expression of the cmu gene cluster of Hyphomicrobium chloromethanicum.

    PubMed

    Borodina, Elena; McDonald, Ian R; Murrell, J Colin

    2004-07-01

    The methylotrophic bacterium Hyphomicrobium chloromethanicum CM2 can utilize chloromethane (CH(3)Cl) as the sole carbon and energy source. Previously genes cmuB, cmuC, cmuA, and folD were shown to be essential for the growth of Methylobacterium chloromethanicum on CH(3)Cl. These CH(3)Cl-specific genes were subsequently detected in H. chloromethanicum. Transposon and marker exchange mutagenesis studies were carried out to identify the genes essential for CH(3)Cl metabolism in H. chloromethanicum. New developments in genetic manipulation of Hyphomicrobium are presented in this study. An electroporation protocol has been optimized and successfully applied for transformation of mutagenesis plasmids into H. chloromethanicum to generate stable CH(3)Cl-negative mutants. Both transposon and marker exchange mutageneses were highly applicable for genetic analysis of Hyphomicrobium. A reliable and reproducible selection procedure for screening of CH(3)Cl utilization-negative mutants has also been developed. Mutational inactivation of cmuB, cmuC, or hutI resulted in strains that were unable to utilize CH(3)Cl or to express the CH(3)Cl-dependent polypeptide CmuA. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that cmuB, cmuC, cmuA, fmdB, paaE, hutI, and metF formed a single cmuBCA-metF operon and were coregulated and coexpressed in H. chloromethanicum. This finding led to the conclusion that, in cmuB and cmuC mutants, impaired expression of cmuA was likely to be due to a polar effect of the defective gene (cmuB or cmuC) located upstream (5') of cmuA. The detrimental effect of mutation in hutI on the upstream (5')-located cmuA is not clear but indicated that all the genes located within the cmuBCA-metF operon are coordinately expressed. Expression of the cmuBCA-metF transcript was also shown to be strictly CH(3)Cl inducible and was not repressed by the alternative C(1) substrate methanol. Sequence analysis of a transposon mutant (D20) led to the discovery of the previously

  17. Potential antioxidant response to coffee — A matter of genotype?

    PubMed Central

    Hassmann, Ute; Haupt, Larisa M.; Smith, Robert A.; Winkler, Swantje; Bytof, Gerhard; Lantz, Ingo; Griffiths, Lyn R.; Marko, Doris

    2014-01-01

    In a human intervention study, coffee combining natural green coffee bean constituents and dark roast products was identified as a genotype-dependent inducer of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, significantly affecting Nrf2 gene expression and downstream GST1A1 and UGT1A1 gene transcription. The observed transcriptional changes correlated with the presence of specific Nrf2 genotypes suggesting their influence on both Nrf2 and subsequent ARE-dependent GST1A1 and UGT1A1 transcription. While the presence of the − 653 SNP seems to be advantageous, resulting in higher Nrf2, GST1A1 and UGT1A1 gene transcription following coffee consumption, in contrast, the presence of the − 651 SNP significantly down-regulated the response to the study coffee. Furthermore, the presence of the B/B genotype in GST1A1 along with the frequency of the [TA]6/6 and [TA]7/7 polymorphisms in UGT1A1 appeared to significantly increase sensitivity toward coffee-induced gene transcription. This data suggests that when examining the role of the Nrf2/ARE pathway in the regulation of antioxidative and chemopreventive phase II efficacy, individual genotypes should be included when considering the potency of bioactive food/food constituents and their therapeutic potential. PMID:25606436

  18. Up-regulation of nucleotide excision repair in mouse lung and liver following chronic exposure to aflatoxin B{sub 1} and its dependence on p53 genotype

    SciTech Connect

    Mulder, Jeanne E.; Bondy, Genevieve S.; Mehta, Rekha; Massey, Thomas E.

    2014-03-01

    Aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) is biotransformed in vivo into an epoxide metabolite that forms DNA adducts that may induce cancer if not repaired. p53 is a tumor suppressor gene implicated in the regulation of global nucleotide excision repair (NER). Male heterozygous p53 knockout (B6.129-Trp53{sup tm1Brd}N5, Taconic) and wild-type mice were exposed to 0, 0.2 or 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} for 26 weeks. NER activity was assessed with an in vitro assay, using AFB{sub 1}-epoxide adducted plasmid DNA as a substrate. For wild-type mice, repair of AFB{sub 1}–N7-Gua adducts was 124% and 96% greater in lung extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm and 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} respectively, and 224% greater in liver extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm AFB{sub 1} (p < 0.05). In heterozygous p53 knockout mice, repair of AFB{sub 1}–N7-Gua was only 45% greater in lung extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm AFB{sub 1} (p < 0.05), and no effect was observed in lung extracts from mice treated with 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} or in liver extracts from mice treated with either AFB{sub 1} concentration. p53 genotype did not affect basal levels of repair. AFB{sub 1} exposure did not alter repair of AFB{sub 1}-derived formamidopyrimidine adducts in lung or liver extracts of either mouse genotype nor did it affect XPA or XPB protein levels. In summary, chronic exposure to AFB{sub 1} increased NER activity in wild-type mice, and this response was diminished in heterozygous p53 knockout mice, indicating that loss of one allele of p53 limits the ability of NER to be up-regulated in response to DNA damage. - Highlights: • Mice are chronically exposed to low doses of the mycotoxin aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}). • The effects of AFB{sub 1} and p53 status on nucleotide excision repair are investigated. • AFB{sub 1} increases nucleotide excision repair in wild type mouse lung and liver. • This increase is attenuated in p53 heterozygous mouse lung and liver. • Results portray the role of p53 in

  19. Flunitrazepam rapidly reduces GABAA receptor subunit protein expression via a protein kinase C-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jonathan D; Price, Sally A; Bristow, David R

    1998-01-01

    Acute flunitrazepam (1 μM) exposure for 1 h reduced GABAA receptor α1 (22±4%, mean±s.e.mean) and β2/3 (21±4%) subunit protein levels in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells. This rapid decrease in subunit proteins was completely prevented by bisindolymaleimide 1 (1 μM), an inhibitor of protein kinase C, but not by N-[2-((p-bromocinnamyl)amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89, 4.8 μM), an inhibitor of protein kinases A and G. These results suggest the existence of a benzodiazepine-induced mechanism to rapidly alter GABAA receptor protein expression, that appears to be dependent on protein kinase C activity. PMID:9723942

  20. HIF-1α restricts NF-κB-dependent gene expression to control innate immunity signals

    PubMed Central

    Bandarra, Daniel; Biddlestone, John; Mudie, Sharon; Müller, H.-Arno J.; Rocha, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia and inflammation are intimately linked. It is known that nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) regulates the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) system, but little is known about how HIF regulates NF-κB. Here, we show that HIF-1α represses NF-κB-dependent gene expression. HIF-1α depletion results in increased NF-κB transcriptional activity both in mammalian cells and in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. HIF-1α depletion enhances the NF-κB response, and this required not only the TAK-IKK complex, but also CDK6. Loss of HIF-1α results in an increased angiogenic response in mammalian cancer cells and increased mortality in Drosophila following infection. These results indicate that HIF-1α is required to restrain the NF-κB response, and thus prevents excessive and damaging pro-inflammatory responses. PMID:25510503

  1. Chemotherapy-induced Dkk-1 expression by primary human mesenchymal stem cells is p53 dependent.

    PubMed

    Hare, Ian; Evans, Rebecca; Fortney, James; Moses, Blake; Piktel, Debbie; Slone, William; Gibson, Laura F

    2016-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are abundant throughout the body and regulate signaling within tumor microenvironments. Wnt signaling is an extrinsically regulated pathway that has been shown to regulate tumorigenesis in many types of cancer. After evaluating a panel of Wnt activating and inhibiting molecules, we show that primary human MSCs increase the expression of Dkk-1, an inhibitor of Wnt signaling, into the extracellular environment following chemotherapy exposure in a p53-dependent manner. Dkk-1 has been shown to promote tumor growth in several models of malignancy, suggesting that MSC-derived Dkk-1 could counteract the intent of cytotoxic chemotherapy, and that pharmacologic inhibition of Dkk-1 in patients receiving chemotherapy treatment for certain malignancies may be warranted.

  2. The ATP-Dependent RNA Helicase DDX3X Modulates Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Khadivjam, Bita; Stegen, Camille; Hogue-Racine, Marc-Aurèle; El Bilali, Nabil; Döhner, Katinka; Sodeik, Beate; Lippé, Roger

    2017-04-15

    The human protein DDX3X is a DEAD box ATP-dependent RNA helicase that regulates transcription, mRNA maturation, and mRNA export and translation. DDX3X concomitantly modulates the replication of several RNA viruses and promotes innate immunity. We previously showed that herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), a human DNA virus, incorporates DDX3X into its mature particles and that DDX3X is required for optimal HSV-1 infectivity. Here, we show that viral gene expression, replication, and propagation depend on optimal DDX3X protein levels. Surprisingly, DDX3X from incoming viral particles was not required for the early stages of the HSV-1 infection, but, rather, the protein controlled the assembly of new viral particles. This was independent of the previously reported ability of DDX3X to stimulate interferon type I production. Instead, both the lack and overexpression of DDX3X disturbed viral gene transcription and thus subsequent genome replication. This suggests that in addition to its effect on RNA viruses, DDX3X impacts DNA viruses such as HSV-1 by an interferon-independent pathway.IMPORTANCE Viruses interact with a variety of cellular proteins to complete their life cycle. Among them is DDX3X, an RNA helicase that participates in most aspects of RNA biology, including transcription, splicing, nuclear export, and translation. Several RNA viruses and a limited number of DNA viruses are known to manipulate DDX3X for their own benefit. In contrast, DDX3X is also known to promote interferon production to limit viral propagation. Here, we show that DDX3X, which we previously identified in mature HSV-1 virions, stimulates HSV-1 gene expression and, consequently, virion assembly by a process that is independent of its ability to promote the interferon pathway.

  3. Dendritic remodeling of hippocampal neurons is associated with altered NMDA receptor expression in alcohol dependent rats

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Miranda C.; Kim, Airee; Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged alcohol exposure has been previously shown to impair the structure and function of the hippocampus, although the underlying structural and biochemical alterations contributing to these deleterious effects are unclear. Also unclear is whether these changes persist into prolonged periods of abstinence. Previous work from our lab utilizing a clinically relevant rodent model of alcohol consumption demonstrated that alcohol dependence (induced by chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure or CIE) decreases proliferation and survival of neural stem cells in the hippocampal subgranular zone and hippocampal neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, implicating this region of the cortex as particularly sensitive to the toxic effects of prolonged ethanol exposure. For this study, we investigated seven weeks of CIE-induced morphological changes (dendritic complexity and dendritic spine density) of dentate gyrus (DG) granule cell neurons, CA3, and CA1 pyramidal neurons and the associated alterations in biochemical markers of synaptic plasticity and toxicity (NMDA receptors and PSD-95) in the hippocampus in ethanol-experienced Wistar rats 3h (CIE) and 21 days (protracted abstinence) after the last ethanol vapor exposure. CIE reduced dendritic arborization of DG neurons and this effect persisted into protracted abstinence. CIE enhanced dendritic arborization of pyramidal neurons and this effect did not persist into protracted abstinence. The architectural changes in dendrites did not correlate with alterations in dendritic spine density, however, they were associated with increases in the expression of pNR2B, total NR2B, and total NR2A immediately following CIE with expression levels returning to control levels in prolonged abstinence. Overall, these data provide the evidence that CIE produces profound changes in hippocampal structural plasticity and in molecular tools that maintain hippocampal structural plasticity, and these alterations may underlie cognitive dysfunction

  4. UCP2 mRNA expression is dependent on glucose metabolism in pancreatic islets

    SciTech Connect

    Dalgaard, Louise T.

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UCP2 mRNA levels are decreased in islets of Langerhans from glucokinase deficient mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UCP2 mRNA up-regulation by glucose is dependent on glucokinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of UCP2 increases GSIS of glucokinase heterozygous pancreatic islets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This may protect glucokinase deficient mice from hyperglycemic damages. -- Abstract: Uncoupling Protein 2 (UCP2) is expressed in the pancreatic {beta}-cell, where it partially uncouples the mitochondrial proton gradient, decreasing both ATP-production and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Increased glucose levels up-regulate UCP2 mRNA and protein levels, but the mechanism for UCP2 up-regulation in response to increased glucose is unknown. The aim was to examine the effects of glucokinase (GK) deficiency on UCP2 mRNA levels and to characterize the interaction between UCP2 and GK with regard to glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic islets. UCP2 mRNA expression was reduced in GK+/- islets and GK heterozygosity prevented glucose-induced up-regulation of islet UCP2 mRNA. In contrast to UCP2 protein function UCP2 mRNA regulation was not dependent on superoxide generation, but rather on products of glucose metabolism, because MnTBAP, a superoxide dismutase mimetic, did not prevent the glucose-induced up-regulation of UCP2. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was increased in UCP2-/- and GK+/- islets compared with GK+/- islets and UCP2 deficiency improved glucose tolerance of GK+/- mice. Accordingly, UCP2 deficiency increased ATP-levels of GK+/- mice. Thus, the compensatory down-regulation of UCP2 is involved in preserving the insulin secretory capacity of GK mutant mice and might also be implicated in limiting disease progression in MODY2 patients.

  5. High-risk HPV genotypes and P16INK4a expression in a cohort of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Tan, Louise Soo Yee; Fredrik, Petersson; Ker, Liang; Yu, Feng Gang; Wang, De Yun; Goh, Boon Cher; Loh, Kwok Seng; Lim, Chwee Ming

    2016-12-27

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), especially HPV16 genotype, is associated with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). We aim to determine the prevalence and characterize the high-risk (HR)-HPV genotypes in head and neck SCC (HNSCC) in a South-East Asian multi-ethnic society in Singapore and examine its prognostic significance.159 HNSCC archival tissue samples were retrieved and tumour DNA was screened for 18 HR-HPV genotypes using a PCR-based assay (Qiagen, digene HPV genotyping RH test). P16 protein overexpression was identified using immunohistochemistry (IHC). Statistical correlation between clinical outcomes were performed between HPV-positive and negative HNSCC patients.Six HR-HPVs (HPV16, 18, 31, 45, 56, 68) were detected in 90.6% of HNSCC; and 79.9% had multiple HPV genotypes detected. HPV31 and HPV45 were the most prevalent (79.2% and 87.4%, respectively); and HPV16 was predominantly found in OPSCC (p < 0.001). HPV-DNA PCR assay yielded a high sensitivity (96%) but low specificity (11%) when compared to p16 immunohistochemistry as the reference standard.P16-positive HNSCC was predominantly observed in OPSCC (73.7%; p = 0.005); and p16-positive OPSCC exhibited improved overall survival compared to p16-negative OPSCC (p = 0.022). Similarly, smoking and alcohol consumption were poor prognostic factors of overall survival (p = 0.007; p = 0.01) in OPSCC patients.HR-HPVs were identified in 90.6% of HNSCC patients using the HPV-DNA PCR assay. This test had a poor specificity when compared to p16 IHC; making it an unreliable detection technique in selecting patients for radiation dose de-escalation treatment protocol. P16-positive tumor was predominantly found in the oropharynx these patients demonstrated better overall survival than those with p16-negative OPSCC.

  6. High-risk HPV genotypes and P16INK4a expression in a cohort of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Louise Soo Yee; Fredrik, Petersson; Ker, Liang; Yu, Feng Gang; Wang, De Yun; Goh, Boon Cher; Loh, Kwok Seng; Lim, Chwee Ming

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), especially HPV16 genotype, is associated with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). We aim to determine the prevalence and characterize the high-risk (HR)-HPV genotypes in head and neck SCC (HNSCC) in a South-East Asian multi-ethnic society in Singapore and examine its prognostic significance. 159 HNSCC archival tissue samples were retrieved and tumour DNA was screened for 18 HR-HPV genotypes using a PCR-based assay (Qiagen, digene HPV genotyping RH test). P16 protein overexpression was identified using immunohistochemistry (IHC). Statistical correlation between clinical outcomes were performed between HPV-positive and negative HNSCC patients. Six HR-HPVs (HPV16, 18, 31, 45, 56, 68) were detected in 90.6% of HNSCC; and 79.9% had multiple HPV genotypes detected. HPV31 and HPV45 were the most prevalent (79.2% and 87.4%, respectively); and HPV16 was predominantly found in OPSCC (p < 0.001). HPV-DNA PCR assay yielded a high sensitivity (96%) but low specificity (11%) when compared to p16 immunohistochemistry as the reference standard. P16-positive HNSCC was predominantly observed in OPSCC (73.7%; p = 0.005); and p16-positive OPSCC exhibited improved overall survival compared to p16-negative OPSCC (p = 0.022). Similarly, smoking and alcohol consumption were poor prognostic factors of overall survival (p = 0.007; p = 0.01) in OPSCC patients. HR-HPVs were identified in 90.6% of HNSCC patients using the HPV-DNA PCR assay. This test had a poor specificity when compared to p16 IHC; making it an unreliable detection technique in selecting patients for radiation dose de-escalation treatment protocol. P16-positive tumor was predominantly found in the oropharynx these patients demonstrated better overall survival than those with p16-negative OPSCC. PMID:27893418

  7. Fibroblast Circadian Rhythms of PER2 Expression Depend on Membrane Potential and Intracellular Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Takako; Wang, Connie W.; Pan, Haiyun

    2012-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus synchronizes circadian rhythms of cells and tissues throughout the body. In SCN neurons, rhythms of clock gene expression are suppressed by manipulations that hyperpolarize the plasma membrane or lower intracellular Ca2+. However, whether clocks in other cells also depend on membrane potential and calcium is unknown. In this study, we investigate the effects of membrane potential and intracellular calcium on circadian rhythms in mouse primary fibroblasts. Rhythms of clock gene expression were monitored using a PER2::LUC knockin reporter. We found that rhythms were lost or delayed at lower (hyperpolarizing) K+ concentrations. Bioluminescence imaging revealed that this loss of rhythmicity in cultures was due to loss of rhythmicity of single cells rather than desynchrony among cells. In lower Ca2+ concentrations, rhythms were advanced or had shorter periods. Buffering intracellular Ca2+ by the calcium chelator 1,2-Bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM) or manipulation of IP3-sensitive intracellular calcium stores by thapsigargin delayed rhythms. These results suggest that the circadian clock in fibroblasts, as in SCN neurons, is regulated by membrane potential and Ca2+. Changes in intracellular Ca2+ may mediate the effects of membrane potential that we observed. PMID:22734566

  8. Molecular cloning, encoding sequence, and expression of vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J F; Kahn, J S; Esteban, M

    1986-01-01

    A rabbit poxvirus genomic library contained within the expression vector lambda gt11 was screened with polyclonal antiserum prepared against vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase)-I enzyme. Five positive phage clones containing from 0.72- to 2.5-kilobase-pair (kbp) inserts expressed a beta-galactosidase fusion protein that was reactive by immunoblotting with the NTPase-I antibody. Hybridization analysis allowed the location of this gene within the vaccinia HindIIID restriction fragment. From the known nucleotide sequence of the 16-kbp vaccinia HindIIID fragment, we identified a region that contains a 1896-base open reading frame coding for a 631-amino acid protein. Analysis of the complete sequence revealed a highly basic protein, with hydrophilic COOH and NH2 termini, various hydrophobic domains, and no significant homology to other known proteins. Translational studies demonstrate that NTPase-I belongs to a late class of viral genes. This protein is highly conserved among Orthopoxviruses. Images PMID:3025846

  9. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide induces cytokine expression, lipolysis, and insulin resistance in human adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Timper, Katharina; Grisouard, Jean; Sauter, Nadine S; Herzog-Radimerski, Tanja; Dembinski, Kaethi; Peterli, Ralph; Frey, Daniel M; Zulewski, Henryk; Keller, Ulrich; Müller, Beat; Christ-Crain, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    Obesity-related insulin resistance is linked to a chronic state of systemic and adipose tissue-derived inflammation. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is an incretin hormone also acting on adipocytes. We investigated whether GIP affects inflammation, lipolysis, and insulin resistance in human adipocytes. Human subcutaneous preadipocyte-derived adipocytes, differentiated in vitro, were treated with human GIP to analyze mRNA expression and protein secretion of cytokines, glycerol, and free fatty acid release and insulin-induced glucose uptake. GIP induced mRNA expression of IL-6, IL-1β, and the IL-1 receptor antagonist IL-1Ra, whereas TNFα, IL-8, and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 remained unchanged. Cytokine induction involved PKA and the NF-κB pathway as well as an autocrine IL-1 effect. Furthermore, GIP potentiated IL-6 and IL-1Ra secretion in the presence of LPS, IL-1β, and TNFα. GIP induced lipolysis via activation of hormone-sensitive lipase and was linked to NF-κB activation. Finally, chronic GIP treatment impaired insulin-induced glucose uptake possibly due to the observed impaired translocation of glucose transporter GLUT4. In conclusion, GIP induces an inflammatory and prolipolytic response via the PKA -NF-κB-IL-1 pathway and impairs insulin sensitivity of glucose uptake in human adipocytes.

  10. Fibroblast circadian rhythms of PER2 expression depend on membrane potential and intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Takako; Wang, Connie W; Pan, Haiyun; Welsh, David K

    2012-07-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus synchronizes circadian rhythms of cells and tissues throughout the body. In SCN neurons, rhythms of clock gene expression are suppressed by manipulations that hyperpolarize the plasma membrane or lower intracellular Ca(2+). However, whether clocks in other cells also depend on membrane potential and calcium is unknown. In this study, the authors investigate the effects of membrane potential and intracellular calcium on circadian rhythms in mouse primary fibroblasts. Rhythms of clock gene expression were monitored using a PER2::LUC knockin reporter. Rhythms were lost or delayed at lower (hyperpolarizing) K(+) concentrations. Bioluminescence imaging revealed that this loss of rhythmicity in cultures was due to loss of rhythmicity of single cells rather than loss of synchrony among cells. In lower Ca(2+) concentrations, rhythms were advanced or had shorter periods. Buffering intracellular Ca(2+) by the calcium chelator 1,2-Bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM) or manipulation of inositol triphosphate (IP(3))-sensitive intracellular calcium stores by thapsigargin delayed rhythms. These results suggest that the circadian clock in fibroblasts, as in SCN neurons, is regulated by membrane potential and Ca(2+). Changes in intracellular Ca(2+) may mediate the effects of membrane potential observed in this study.

  11. Unexpected reduction of skin tumorigenesis on expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 6 in mouse epidermis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian; Sistrunk, Christopher; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6 are important regulators of the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, share 71% amino acid identity, and are expressed ubiquitously. As a result, it was assumed that each of these kinases plays a redundant role regulating normal and neoplastic proliferation. In previous reports, we have described the effects of CDK4 expression in transgenic mice, including the development of epidermal hyperplasia and increased malignant progression to squamous cell carcinoma. To study the role of CDK6 in epithelial growth and tumorigenesis, we generated transgenic mice carrying the CDK6 gene under the keratin 5 promoter (K5CDK6). Similar to K5CDK4 mice, epidermal proliferation increased substantially in K5CDK6 mice; however, no hyperplasia was observed. CDK6 overexpression also triggered keratinocyte apoptosis in interfollicular and follicular epidermis as a compensatory mechanism to override aberrant proliferation. Unexpectedly, CDK6 overexpression results in decreased skin tumor development compared with wild-type siblings. The inhibition in skin tumorigenesis was similar to that previously reported in K5-cyclin D3 mice. Furthermore, biochemical analysis of the K5CDK6 epidermis showed preferential complex formation between CDK6 and cyclin D3, suggesting that this particular complex plays an important role in tumor restraint. These studies provide in vivo evidence that CDK4 and CDK6 play a similar role as a mediator of keratinocyte proliferation but differ in apoptosis activation and skin tumor development.

  12. Structure and expression of mouse mitochondrial voltage dependent anion channel genes

    SciTech Connect

    Craigen, W.J.; Lovell, R.S.; Sampson, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    Voltage dependent anion channels (VDACs) are small abundant proteins of the outer mitochondrial membrane that interact with the adenine nucleotide translocater and bind glycerol kinase and hexokinase. Kinase binding is developmentally regulated, tissue specific, and increased in various tumor cell lines. VDACs are also components of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor and GABA{sub A} receptor. Two human VDAC cDNAs have previously been reported, and expression of these isoforms appears ubiquitous. Genomic Southern analysis suggests the presence of other as yet uncharacterised VDAC genes. To study VDAC function in a mammal more amenable to experimental manipulation, we have isolated three mouse VDAC genes by cDNA cloning from a mouse brain cDNA library. DNA sequencing of the cDNAs shows that they share 65-75% amino acid identity. Northern analysis indicates that MVDAC1 is expressed most highly in kidney, heart, and brain. Using an MVDAC3 3{prime} untranslated exon as a probe, three distinct transcripts can be detected. The gene structure for MVDAC3 and MVDAC2 has been completed and suggests that the VDAC isoforms did not arise by gene duplication and divergence. The intron/exon boundaries are not conserved between MVDAC1 and MVDAC3, and MVDAC2 appears to be encoded by a single intronless gene.

  13. Construction of Nef-positive doxycycline-dependent HIV-1 variants using bicistronic expression elements

    SciTech Connect

    Velden, Yme U. van der; Kleibeuker, Wendy; Harwig, Alex; Klaver, Bep; Siteur-van Rijnstra, Esther; Frankin, Esmay; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T.

    2016-01-15

    Conditionally replicating HIV-1 variants that can be switched on and off at will are attractive tools for HIV research. We previously developed a genetically modified HIV-1 variant that replicates exclusively when doxycycline (dox) is administered. The nef gene in this HIV-rtTA variant was replaced with the gene encoding the dox-dependent rtTA transcriptional activator. Because loss of Nef expression compromises virus replication in primary cells and precludes studies on Nef function, we tested different approaches to restore Nef production in HIV-rtTA. Strategies that involved translation via an EMCV or synthetic internal ribosome entry site (IRES) failed because these elements were incompatible with efficient virus replication. Fusion protein approaches with the FMDV 2A peptide and human ubiquitin were successful and resulted in genetically-stable Nef-expressing HIV-rtTA strains that replicate more efficiently in primary T-cells and human immune system (HIS) mice than Nef-deficient variants, thus confirming the positive effect of Nef on in vivo virus replication. - Highlights: • Different approaches to encode additional proteins in the HIV-1 genome were tested. • IRES translation elements are incompatible with efficient HIV-1 replication. • Ubiquitin and 2A fusion protein approaches allow efficient HIV-1 replication. • Doxycycline-controlled HIV-1 variants that encode all viral proteins were developed. • Nef stimulates HIV-rtTA replication in primary cells and human immune system mice.

  14. Proinflammatory stimuli regulate endothelial hyaluronan expression and CD44/HA-dependent primary adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Mohamadzadeh, M; DeGrendele, H; Arizpe, H; Estess, P; Siegelman, M

    1998-01-01

    The localization of circulating leukocytes within inflamed tissues occurs as the result of interactions with and migration across vascular endothelium, and is governed, in part, by the expression of adhesion molecules on both cell types. Recently, we have described a novel primary adhesion interaction between the structurally activated form of the adhesion molecule CD44 on lymphocytes and its major ligand hyaluronan on endothelial cells under physiologic laminar flow conditions, and have proposed that this interaction functions in an extravasation pathway for lymphocytes in vascular beds at sites of inflammation. While the regulation of activated CD44 on leukocytes has been characterized in depth, regulation of hyaluronate (HA) on endothelial cells has not been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate that the expression of HA on cultured endothelial cell lines and primary endothelial cultures is inducible by the proinflammatory cytokines TNFalpha and IL-1beta, as well as bacterial lipopolysaccharide. In addition, this inducibility appears strikingly restricted to endothelial cells derived from microvascular, but not large vessel, sources. The elevated HA levels thus induced result in increased CD44-dependent adhesive interactions in both nonstatic shear and laminar flow adhesion assays. Changes in mRNA levels for the described HA synthetic and degradative enzymes were not found, suggesting other more complex mechanisms of regulation. Together, these data add to the selectin and immunoglobulin gene families a new inducible endothelial adhesive molecule, hyaluronan, and help to further our understanding of the potential physiologic roles of the CD44/HA interaction; i.e., local cytokine production within inflamed vascular beds may enhance surface hyaluronan expression on endothelial cells, thereby creating local sites receptive to the CD44/HA interaction and thus extravasation of inflammatory cells. PMID:9421471

  15. Dose-dependent microRNA expression in human fibroblasts after LET irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Olivier Charles; An, Jin; Wu, Honglu; Wang, Eugenia; Sarojini, Harshini

    Humans are exposed to various levels of radiation during spaceflight voyages. In cells, exposure to linear energy transfer (LET) radiation causes cellular damage and triggers responses controlled by unique gene-directed signaling pathways. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small ( 22- nucleotide) non-coding RNAs, which regulate gene expression generally by either degrading the messager RNA or inhibiting translation. Their implication in specific cellular response pathways is largely unknown. Here, we investigated the role of radiation-dependent changes in miRNA expression patterns after low (0.1 Gy) and high (2.0 Gy) doses of X-ray exposure in human fibroblasts, and correlated their predicted targets with the cells' genomics and proteomics profiles. A differential miRNA expression pattern was observed between low and high doses of irradiation, with early (0.5 and 2 hrs) significant changes mostly after a high dose and, late (6 and 24 hrs) significant changes after both low and high doses of irradiation. The results suggest that miRNAs may act as ‘hub' regulators of signaling pathways initially to derepress their target genes for cellular responses such as DNA repair, followed by up-regulation to suppress apoptosis, and finally down-regulation to reestablish cellular normalcy. Functional attributions are made to key microRNAs, potentially regulating known radiation biomarkers as well as radiation-responsive mechanisms of cell cycle checkpoint, proliferation and apoptosis. In summary, radiation-responsive miRNAs may have functional roles in the regulation of cell death or survival, and may become biodosimeters for radiation dose exposure. Specific microRNAs may exert a hormetic effect after low-dose radiation, and prove useful in future applications for radiation adaptive therapy and in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced damage. The confirmation of specific miRNAs as biodosimetry markers with therapeutic applications will be necessary in future functional

  16. NFATc1 Mediates HDAC-Dependent Transcriptional Repression of Osteocalcin Expression During Osteoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Min-Kyung; Yeo, Hyeonju; Zayzafoon, Majd

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported that the in vivo and in vitro suppression of Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells (NFAT) signaling increases osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. To investigate the mechanism by which NFATc1 regulates osteoblast differentiation, we established an osteoblast cell line that overexpresses a constitutively active NFATc1 (ca-NFATc1). The activation of NFATc1 significantly inhibits osteoblast differentiation and function, demonstrated by inhibition of alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization as well as a decrease in gene expression of early and late markers of osteoblast differentiation such as osterix and osteocalcin, respectively. By focusing on the specific role of NFATc1 during late differentiation, we discovered that the inhibition of osteocalcin gene expression by NFATc1 was associated with a repression of the osteocalcin promoter activity, and a decrease in TCF/LEF transactivation. Also, overexpression of NFATc1 completely blocked the decrease in total histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity during osteoblast differentiation and prevented the hyperacetylation of histones H3 and H4. Mechanistically, we show by Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay that the overexpression of NFATc1 sustains the binding of HDAC3 on the proximal region of the osteocalcin promoter, resulting in complete hypoacetylation of histones H3 and H4 when compared to GFP-expressing osteoblasts. In contrast, the inhibition of NFATc1 nuclear translocation either by cyclosporin or by using primary mouse osteoblasts with deleted calcineurin b1 prevents HDAC3 from associating with the proximal regulatory site of the osteocalcin promoter. These preliminary results suggest that NFATc1 acts as a transcriptional co-repressor of osteocalcin promoter possibly in an HDAC-dependent manner. PMID:19463978

  17. ERK Oscillation-Dependent Gene Expression Patterns and Deregulation by Stress-Response

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Katrina M.; Cummings, Brian S.; Shankaran, Harish; Scholpa, Natalie E.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2014-09-15

    Studies were undertaken to determine whether ERK oscillations regulate a unique subset of genes in human keratinocytes and subsequently, whether the p38 stress response inhibits ERK oscillations. A DNA microarray identified many genes that were unique to ERK oscillations, and network reconstruction predicted an important role for the mediator complex subunit 1 (MED1) node in mediating ERK oscillation-dependent gene expression. Increased ERK-dependent phosphorylation of MED1 was observed in oscillating cells compared to non-oscillating counterparts as validation. Treatment of keratinocytes with a p38 inhibitor (SB203580) increased ERK oscillation amplitudes and MED1 and phospho-MED1 protein levels. Bromate is a probable human carcinogen that activates p38. Bromate inhibited ERK oscillations in human keratinocytes and JB6 cells and induced an increase in phospho-p38 and decrease in phospho-MED1 protein levels. Treatment of normal rat kidney cells and primary salivary gland epithelial cells with bromate decreased phospho-MED1 levels in a reversible fashion upon treatment with p38 inhibitors (SB202190; SB203580). Our results indicate that oscillatory behavior in the ERK pathway alters homeostatic gene regulation patterns and that the cellular response to perturbation may manifest differently in oscillating vs non-oscillating cells.

  18. HES1 Is a Master Regulator of Glucocorticoid Receptor-Dependent Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Revollo, Javier R.; Oakley, Robert H.; Lu, Nick Z.; Kadmiel, Mahita; Gandhavadi, Maheer; Cidlowski, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Hairy and enhancer of split-1 (HES1) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that is a key regulator of development and organogenesis. However, little is known about the role of HES1 after birth. Glucocorticoids, primary stress hormones that are essential for life, regulate numerous homeostatic processes that permit vertebrates to cope with physiological challenges. The molecular actions of glucocorticoids are mediated by glucocorticoid receptor-dependent regulation of nearly 25% of the genome. We now establish a genome wide molecular link between HES1 and glucocorticoid receptors that controls the ability of cells and animals to respond to stress. Glucocorticoid signaling rapidly and robustly silenced HES1 expression. This glucocorticoid-dependent repression of HES1 was necessary for the glucocorticoid receptor to regulate many of its target genes. Mice with conditional knockout of HES1 in the liver exhibited an expanded glucocorticoid receptor signaling profile and aberrant metabolic phenotype. Our results indicate that HES1 acts as a master repressor, the silencing of which is required for proper glucocorticoid signaling. PMID:24300895

  19. DNA polymerase β-dependent cell survival independent of XRCC1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Julie K.; Gassman, Natalie R.; Dunigan, Brittany B.; Stefanick, Donna F.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2014-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is a primary mechanism for repair of base lesions in DNA such as those formed by exposure to the DNA methylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Both DNA polymerase β (pol β)- and XRCC1-deficient mouse fibroblasts are hypersensitive to MMS. This is linked to a repair deficiency as measured by accumulation of strand breaks and poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). The interaction between pol β and XRCC1 is important for recruitment of pol β to sites of DNA damage. Endogenous DNA damage can substitute for MMS-induced damage such that BER deficiency as a result of either pol β- or XRCC1-deletion is associated with sensitivity to PARP inhibitors. Pol β shRNA was used to knock down pol β in Xrcc1+/+ and Xrcc1−/− mouse fibroblasts. We determined whether pol β-mediated cellular resistance to MMS and PARP inhibitors resulted entirely from coordination with XRCC1 within the same BER sub-pathway. We find evidence for pol β- dependent cell survival independent of XRCC1 expression for both types of agents. The results suggest a role for pol β-dependent, XRCC1-independent repair. PAR immunofluorescence data are consistent with the hypothesis of a decrease in repair in both pol β knock down cell variants. PMID:25541391

  20. Trimethylguanosine capping selectively promotes expression of Rev-dependent HIV-1 RNAs.

    PubMed

    Yedavalli, Venkat S R K; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2010-08-17

    5'-mRNA capping is an early modification that affects pre-mRNA synthesis/splicing, RNA cytoplasmic transport, and mRNA translation and turnover. In eukaryotes, a 7-methylguanosine (m7G) cap is added to newly transcribed RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) transcripts. A subset of RNAP II-transcribed cellular RNAs, including small nuclear RNA (snRNA), small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA), and telomerase RNA, is further hypermethylated at the exocyclic N2 of the guanosine to create a trimethylguanosine (TMG)-capped RNA. Some of these TMG-capped RNAs are transported within the nucleus and from the nucleus to the cytoplasm by the CRM-1 (required for chromosome region maintenance) protein. CRM-1 is also used to export Rev/RRE-dependent unspliced/ partially spliced HIV-1 RNAs. Here we report that like snRNAs and snoRNAs, some Rev/RRE-dependent HIV-1 RNAs are TMG-capped. The methyltransferase responsible for TMG modification of HIV-1 RNAs is the human PIMT (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-interacting protein with methyltransferase) protein. TMG capping of unspliced/partially spliced HIV-1 RNAs represents a new regulatory mechanism for selective expression.

  1. Wnt signalling suppresses voltage-dependent Na⁺ channel expression in postnatal rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wenbin; Cho, Hee Cheol; Marbán, Eduardo

    2015-03-01

    Wnt signalling plays crucial roles in heart development, but is normally suppressed postnatally. In arrhythmogenic conditions, such as cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, Wnt signalling is reactivated. To explore the potential role of Wnt signalling in arrhythmogenic electrical remodelling, we examined voltage-dependent ion channels in cardiomyocytes. Treatment of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes with either recombinant Wnt3a protein or CHIR-99021 (CHIR, a glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitor) caused a dose-dependent increase in Wnt target gene expression (Axin2 and Lef1), indicating activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Cardiac Na(+) current (INa) density was reduced by Wnt3a (-20 ± 4 vs. control -59 ± 7 pA pF(-1) , at -30 mV) or CHIR (-22 ± 5 pA pF(-1) ), without changes in steady-state activation, inactivation or repriming kinetics. Wnt3a and CHIR also produced dose-dependent reductions in the mRNA level of Scn5a (the cardiac Na(+) channel α subunit gene), as well as a 56% reduction (by Wnt3a) in the Nav 1.5 protein level. Consistent with INa reduction, action potentials in Wnt3a-treated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes had a lower upstroke amplitude (91 ± 3 vs. control 137 ± 2 mV) and decreased maximum upstroke velocity (70 ± 10 vs. control 163 ± 15 V s(-1)). In contrast, inward rectifier K(+) current and L-type Ca(2+) channels were not affected by Wnt3a treatment. Taken together, our data indicate that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway suppresses INa in postnatal cardiomyocytes and may contribute to ion channel remodelling in heart disease.

  2. MicroRNA 203 expression in keratinocytes is dependent on regulation of p53 levels by E6.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Declan J; McDade, Simon S; Patel, Daksha; McCance, Dennis J

    2010-10-01

    A screen of microRNA (miRNA) expression following differentiation in human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) identified changes in several miRNAs, including miRNA 203 (miR-203), which has previously been shown to play an important role in epithelial cell biology by regulating p63 levels. We investigated how expression of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) oncoproteins E6 and E7 affected miR-203 expression during proliferation and differentiation of HFKs. We demonstrated that miR-203 expression is reduced in HFKs where p53 function is compromised, either by the viral oncoprotein E6 or by knockout of p53 using short hairpin RNAs (p53i). We show that the induction of miR-203 observed during calcium-induced differentiation of HFKs is significantly reduced in HFKs expressing E6 and in p53i HFKs. Induction of miR-203 in response to DNA damage is also reduced in the absence of p53. We report that proliferation of HFKs is dependent on the level of miR-203 expression and that overexpression of miR-203 can reduce overproliferation in E6/E7-expressing and p53i HFKs. In summary, these results indicate that expression of miR-203 is dependent on p53, which may explain how expression of HPV16 E6 can disrupt the balance between proliferation and differentiation, as well as the response to DNA damage, in keratinocytes.

  3. Autophagy-dependent PELI3 degradation inhibits proinflammatory IL1B expression.

    PubMed

    Giegerich, Annika Klara; Kuchler, Laura; Sha, Lisa Katharina; Knape, Tilo; Heide, Heinrich; Wittig, Ilka; Behrends, Christian; Brüne, Bernhard; von Knethen, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of TLR4 (toll-like receptor 4) is followed by a subsequent overwhelming inflammatory response, a hallmark of the first phase of sepsis. Therefore, counteracting excessive innate immunity by autophagy is important to contribute to the termination of inflammation. However, the exact molecular details of this interplay are only poorly understood. Here, we show that PELI3/Pellino3 (pellino E3 ubiquitin protein ligase family member 3), which is an E3 ubiquitin ligase and scaffold protein in TLR4-signaling, is impacted by autophagy in macrophages (MΦ) after LPS stimulation. We noticed an attenuated mRNA expression of proinflammatory Il1b (interleukin 1, β) in Peli3 knockdown murine MΦ in response to LPS treatment. The autophagy adaptor protein SQSTM1/p62 (sequestosome 1) emerged as a potential PELI3 binding partner in TLR4-signaling. siRNA targeting Sqstm1 and Atg7 (autophagy related 7), pharmacological inhibition of autophagy by wortmannin as well as blocking the lysosomal vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase by bafilomycin A1 augmented PELI3 protein levels, while inhibition of the proteasome had no effect. Consistently, treatment to induce autophagy by MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin (serine/threonine kinase)) inhibition or starvation enhanced PELI3 degradation and reduced proinflammatory Il1b expression. PELI3 was found to be ubiquitinated upon LPS stimulation and point mutation of PELI3-lysine residue 316 (Lys316Arg) attenuated Torin2-dependent degradation of PELI3. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that PELI3 colocalized with the typical autophagy markers MAP1LC3B/LC3B (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 β) and LAMP2 (lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2). Our observations suggest that autophagy causes PELI3 degradation during TLR4-signaling, thereby impairing the hyperinflammatory phase during sepsis.

  4. Calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase from Neurospora crassa. Molecular cloning and expression of recombinant catalytic subunit.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, S; Tamura, J; Giri, P R; Polli, J W; Kincaid, R L

    1991-09-25

    A cDNA for the catalytic subunit of a calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein phosphatase was cloned from Neurospora crassa. The open reading frame of 1557 base pairs encoded a protein of Mr approximately 59,580 and was followed by a 3'-untranslated region of 363 base pairs including the poly(A) tail. Based on primer extension analysis, the mRNA transcript in vivo was 2403 base pairs. Expression of this CaM-protein phosphatase mRNA was developmentally regulated, being highest during early mycelial growth; production of the corresponding protein followed mRNA with a time lag of 8-12 h. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of genomic DNA revealed three small introns, the positions of which coincided with those in the mouse gene, indicating evolutionary conservation of these structures. The deduced sequence showed approximately 75% identity with the mammalian homologue, calcineurin, in aligned regions. A region of 40 amino acids preceding the CaM-binding domain was essentially unchanged, suggesting conservation of a crucial interaction site. Three small segments in the carboxyl half of the protein were unrelated to the mammalian gene and may constitute "variable regions" that confer substrate specificity to the enzyme. An active recombinant catalytic subunit was expressed in bacteria and purified by CaM-Sepharose chromatography. This preparation was stimulated 2- 3-fold by CaM and showed a p-nitrophenol phosphatase activity equal to that of the bovine brain holoenzyme, although its dephosphorylation of phosphoprotein substrates was markedly different. These findings demonstrate that the catalytic subunit of this phosphatase can exhibit high activity in the absence of its intrinsic Ca(2+)-binding subunit.

  5. Compound C Increases Sestrin2 Expression via Mitochondria-Dependent ROS Production.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kyuhwa; Seo, Suho; Ki, Sung Hwan; Shin, Sang Mi

    2016-01-01

    Compound C is a widely used chemical inhibitor that down-regulates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. However, it has been suggested that compound C exerts AMPK-independent effects in various cells. Here, we investigated whether compound C induces Sestrin2 (SESN2), an antioxidant enzyme induced by diverse stress. In addition, the mechanism responsible for SESN2 induction by compound C was determined. Our results showed that compound C increased SESN2 protein expression in HepG2 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The induction of SESN2 mRNA was also observed in cells treated with compound C. Increase of SESN2 luciferase activity confirmed transcriptional regulation by compound C and this substance also increased nuclear factor erythroid 2 (NF-E2)-related factor-2 (Nrf2) phosphorylation, which implies that Nrf2 was involved in SESN2 induction. Next, we sought to demonstrate whether production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accompanied SESN2 expression. Compound C increased ROS production, but this effect was prevented by pretreatment with antioxidants or the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor. Moreover, cyclosporin A, an inhibitor of pore formation in the mitochondrial membrane, attenuated compound C-induced SESN2 induction. However, overexpression of a constitutively active form of AMPK was not able to abolish SESN2 induction by compound C, which implies that its action is independent of AMPK inhibition. In conclusion, this is the first study demonstrating that compound C alters mitochondrial function and induces ROS production, which ultimately leads to phosphorylation of Nrf2 and induction of SESN2.

  6. Genome-Wide Dosage-Dependent and -Independent Regulation Contributes to Gene Expression and Evolutionary Novelty in Plant Polyploids.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaoli; Zhang, Changqing; Ko, Dae Kwan; Chen, Z Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Polyploidy provides evolutionary and morphological novelties in many plants and some animals. However, the role of genome dosage and composition in gene expression changes remains poorly understood. Here, we generated a series of resynthesized Arabidopsis tetraploids that contain 0-4 copies of Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis arenosa genomes and investigated ploidy and hybridity effects on gene expression. Allelic expression can be defined as dosage dependent (expression levels correlate with genome dosages) or otherwise as dosage independent. Here, we show that many dosage-dependent genes contribute to cell cycle, photosynthesis, and metabolism, whereas dosage-independent genes are enriched in biotic and abiotic stress responses. Interestingly, dosage-dependent genes tend to be preserved in ancient biochemical pathways present in both plant and nonplant species, whereas many dosage-independent genes belong to plant-specific pathways. This is confirmed by an independent analysis using Arabidopsis phylostratigraphic map. For A. thaliana loci, the dosage-dependent alleles are devoid of TEs and tend to correlate with H3K9ac, H3K4me3, and CG methylation, whereas the majority of dosage-independent alleles are enriched with TEs and correspond to H3K27me1, H3K27me3, and CHG (H = A, T, or C) methylation. Furthermore, there is a parent-of-origin effect on nonadditively expressed genes in the reciprocal allotetraploids especially when A. arenosa is used as the pollen donor, leading to metabolic and morphological changes. Thus, ploidy, epigenetic modifications, and cytoplasmic-nuclear interactions shape gene expression diversity in polyploids. Dosage-dependent expression can maintain growth and developmental stability, whereas dosage-independent expression can facilitate functional divergence between homeologs (subfunctionalization and/or neofunctionalization) during polyploid evolution.

  7. APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... high level of triglycerides in the blood, and atherosclerosis that develops at an early age. APOE genotyping ... and is associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis . People with these genotypes could be predisposed to ...

  8. Glutamatergic Preoptic Area Neurons That Express Leptin Receptors Drive Temperature-Dependent Body Weight Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Qualls-Creekmore, Emily; Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Jiang, Yanyan; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf; Morrison, Christopher D.; Derbenev, Andrei V.; Zsombok, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The preoptic area (POA) regulates body temperature, but is not considered a site for body weight control. A subpopulation of POA neurons express leptin receptors (LepRbPOA neurons) and modulate reproductive function. However, LepRbPOA neurons project to sympathetic premotor neurons that control brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis, suggesting an additional role in energy homeostasis and body weight regulation. We determined the role of LepRbPOA neurons in energy homeostasis using cre-dependent viral vectors to selectively activate these neurons and analyzed functional outcomes in mice. We show that LepRbPOA neurons mediate homeostatic adaptations to ambient temperature changes, and their pharmacogenetic activation drives robust suppression of energy expenditure and food intake, which lowers body temperature and body weight. Surprisingly, our data show that hypothermia-inducing LepRbPOA neurons are glutamatergic, while GABAergic POA neurons, originally thought to mediate warm-induced inhibition of sympathetic premotor neurons, have no effect on energy expenditure. Our data suggest a new view into the neurochemical and functional properties of BAT-related POA circuits and highlight their additional role in modulating food intake and body weight. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Brown adipose tissue (BAT)-induced thermogenesis is a promising therapeutic target to treat obesity and metabolic diseases. The preoptic area (POA) controls body temperature by modulating BAT activity, but its role in body weight homeostasis has not been addressed. LepRbPOA neurons are BAT-related neurons and we show that they are sufficient to inhibit energy expenditure. We further show that LepRbPOA neurons modulate food intake and body weight, which is mediated by temperature-dependent homeostatic responses. We further found that LepRbPOA neurons are stimulatory glutamatergic neurons, contrary to prevalent models, providing a new view on thermoregulatory neural circuits. In summary, our study

  9. Concentration-dependent gene expression responses to flusilazole in embryonic stem cell differentiation cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Dartel, Dorien A.M. van; Pennings, Jeroen L.A.; Fonteyne, Liset J.J. de la; Brauers, Karen J.J.; Claessen, Sandra; Delft, Joost H. van; Kleinjans, Jos C.S.; Piersma, Aldert H.

    2011-03-01

    The murine embryonic stem cell test (EST) is designed to evaluate developmental toxicity based on compound-induced inhibition of embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation into cardiomyocytes. The addition of transcriptomic evaluation within the EST may result in enhanced predictability and improved characterization of the applicability domain, therefore improving usage of the EST for regulatory testing strategies. Transcriptomic analyses assessing factors critical for risk assessment (i.e. dose) are needed to determine the value of transcriptomic evaluation in the EST. Here, using the developmentally toxic compound, flusilazole, we investigated the effect of compound concentration on gene expression regulation and toxicity prediction in ESC differentiation cultures. Cultures were exposed for 24 h to multiple concentrations of flusilazole (0.54-54 {mu}M) and RNA was isolated. In addition, we sampled control cultures 0, 24, and 48 h to evaluate the transcriptomic status of the cultures across differentiation. Transcriptomic profiling identified a higher sensitivity of development-related processes as compared to cell division-related processes in flusilazole-exposed differentiation cultures. Furthermore, the sterol synthesis-related mode of action of flusilazole toxicity was detected. Principal component analysis using gene sets related to normal ESC differentiation was used to describe the dynamics of ESC differentiation, defined as the 'differentiation track'. The concentration-dependent effects on development were reflected in the significance of deviation of flusilazole-exposed cultures from this transcriptomic-based differentiation track. Thus, the detection of developmental toxicity in EST using transcriptomics was shown to be compound concentration-dependent. This study provides further insight into the possible application of transcriptomics in the EST as an improved alternative model system for developmental toxicity testing.

  10. Progressive inactivation of the expression of an erythroid transcriptional factor in GM- and G-CSF-dependent myeloid cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Crotta, S; Nicolis, S; Ronchi, A; Ottolenghi, S; Ruzzi, L; Shimada, Y; Migliaccio, A R; Migliaccio, G

    1990-01-01

    The transcriptional binding protein NFE-1 (also called GF-1 and Ery-f1) is thought to play a necessary, but not sufficient, role in the regulation of differentiation-related gene expression in a subset of hematopoietic lineages (erythroid, megakaryocytic, and basophil-mast cell). In order to clarify the mechanism which underlies the lineage-specificity of the NFE-1 expression, as well as the relationship between the expression of this factor and growth factor responsiveness, we have evaluated the capacity of erythropoietin (Epo)-, granulomonocytic (GM)-colony stimulating factor (CSF)-, and granulocyte (G)-CSF-dependent subclones derived from the interleukin 3 (IL-3)-dependent cell line 32D, to express 1) NFE-1 mRNA, 2) NFE-1-related nuclear proteins, and 3) chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) activity when transfected with a CAT gene under the control of NFE-1 cognate sequences. NFE-1 mRNA was found to be expressed not only in cells with mast cell (IL-3-dependent 32D) and erythroid (Epo-dependent 32D Epo1) phenotypes, but also in cells with predominantly granulocyte/macrophage properties, such as the GM-CSF- (early myelomonocytic) and G-CSF- (myelocytic) dependent subclones of 32D. However, a gradient of expression, correlating with the lineage, the stage of differentiation, and the growth factor responsiveness of the cell lines, was found among the different subclones: Epo greater than or equal to IL-3 greater than GM-CSF greater than G-CSF. Binding experiments demonstrated NFE-1 activity in all cell lines except the G-CSF-dependent line. Function of the NFE-1 protein was assessed by the expression of the CAT gene linked to the SV40 promoter and a mutant (-175 T----C) HPFH gamma-globin promoter. High level CAT expression was seen only in the Epo1 cells although low level expression was also seen in the parent 32D. These results demonstrate that the specificity of the expression of NFE-1 for the erythroid--megakaryocytic--mast cell lineages is obtained by

  11. Differential physiological and molecular response of barley genotypes to water deficit.

    PubMed

    de Mezer, Mateusz; Turska-Taraska, Anna; Kaczmarek, Zygmunt; Glowacka, Katarzyna; Swarcewicz, Barbara; Rorat, Tadeusz

    2014-07-01

    Changes in physiological parameters (relative water content (RWC), biomass, water use efficiency (WUE), net photosynthetic yield (PN) and quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm)), in proline and sugar content, and expression profile of genes reported to be associated with the barley response to water deficit, including LEA genes, NHX1, Hsdr4, BLT101 and genes encoding transcription factors (HvDREB1, HvABF1, HvABI5 and HvZIP1), were analyzed in seedlings of nine barley genotypes subjected to a progressive increase in water deficit. Seedlings of all genotypes wilted when the soil water content (SWC) declined from 65% (control conditions) to 10% (severe drought conditions), but recovered turgor within a few hours of re-watering. However, when severe drought conditions were prolonged for a week, large differences in survival characteristics were observed between genotypes after re-watering. Multivariate analysis of the changes in physiological and molecular characteristics allowed several different homogenous groups within the genotypes to be distinguished, depending on stress intensity. Furthermore, integration between the stress-response traits was found and was shown to vary depending on the genotype and the stress level. Based on analysis of physiological traits and survival characteristics, two barley genotypes with high adaptability to the stress conditions (cv. Saida and breeding line Cam/B1), and two with low adaptability (cv. Express and breeding line Harmal), were identified. In addition, only changes in expression of the genes HvZIP1, encoding a b-ZIP-type transcription factor, and Hsdr4, encoding a protein of unknown function, were shown to be linked with adaptability of barley to water deficit. In summary, physiological and molecular data revealed large, stress-level-dependent differences between the barley cultivars and breeding lines tested in their response to water deficit.

  12. Calcium-dependent protein kinases in plants: evolution, expression and function.

    PubMed

    Valmonte, Gardette R; Arthur, Kieren; Higgins, Colleen M; MacDiarmid, Robin M

    2014-03-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) are plant proteins that directly bind calcium ions before phosphorylating substrates involved in metabolism, osmosis, hormone response and stress signaling pathways. CPKs are a large multigene family of proteins that are present in all plants studied to date, as well as in protists, oomycetes and green algae, but are not found in animals and fungi. Despite the increasing evidence of the importance of CPKs in developmental and stress responses from various plants, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of CPKs from algae to higher plants has not been undertaken. This paper describes the evolution of CPKs from green algae to plants using a broadly sampled phylogenetic analysis and demonstrates the functional diversification of CPKs based on expression and functional studies in different plant species. Our findings reveal that CPK sequence diversification into four major groups occurred in parallel with the terrestrial transition of plants. Despite significant expansion of the CPK gene family during evolution from green algae to higher plants, there is a high level of sequence conservation among CPKs in all plant species. This sequence conservation results in very little correlation between CPK evolutionary groupings and functional diversity, making the search for CPK functional orthologs a challenge.

  13. Hypoxia increases sirtuin 1 expression in a hypoxia-inducible factor-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Dioum, Elhadji M; Hogg, Richard T; Gerard, Robert D; Garcia, Joseph A

    2011-04-22

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are stress-responsive transcriptional regulators of cellular and physiological processes involved in oxygen metabolism. Although much is understood about the molecular machinery that confers HIF responsiveness to oxygen, far less is known about HIF isoform-specific mechanisms of regulation, despite the fact that HIF-1 and HIF-2 exhibit distinct biological roles. We recently determined that the stress-responsive genetic regulator sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) selectively augments HIF-2 signaling during hypoxia. However, the mechanism by which Sirt1 maintains activity during hypoxia is unknown. In this report, we demonstrate that Sirt1 gene expression increases in a HIF-dependent manner during hypoxia in Hep3B and in HT1080 cells. Impairment of HIF signaling affects Sirt1 deacetylase activity as decreased HIF-1 signaling results in the appearance of acetylated HIF-2α, which is detected without pharmacological inhibition of Sirt1. We also find that Sirt1 augments HIF-2 mediated, but not HIF-1 mediated, transcriptional activation of the isolated Sirt1 promoter. These data in summary reveal a bidirectional link of HIF and Sirt1 signaling during hypoxia.

  14. NHE1 expression at wound margins increases time-dependently during physiological healing.

    PubMed

    Haverkampf, Sonja; Heider, Judith; Weiß, Katharina T; Berneburg, Mark; Karrer, Sigrid; Schreml, Stephan; Haubner, Frank; Ettl, Tobias; Schreml, Julia; Hedtrich, Sarah; von Süßkind-Schwendi, Marietta; Dissemond, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    Wound repair is an orchestrated process, encompassing the phases of inflammation, proliferation and tissue remodeling. In this context, sodium hydrogen exchanger 1 (NHE1) is crucial to epidermal barrier integrity and acidification. Recently, we found that extracellular pH (pHe) on wound surfaces is dramatically increased initially after barrier disruption, and that pHe decreases gradually during physiological healing. Additionally, we have shown that spatial NHE1-patterns account for pHe-gradients on surfaces of chronic wounds. Here, we show that NHE1-expression is very low at margins initially after wounding and that it increases massively during the time-course of physiolgical healing. This finding is in accordance with the decrease of pHe on wound surfaces, which we reported on in previous works. Thus, we show that NHE1 is an interesting target when it comes to modification of surface pHe on wounds, both acute and chronic, and that NHE1 is time-dependently regulated in physiological healing.

  15. Expression of vasopressin receptors in hamster hypothalamus is sexually dimorphic and dependent upon photoperiod.

    PubMed Central

    Dubois-Dauphin, M; Theler, J M; Zaganidis, N; Dominik, W; Tribollet, E; Pévet, P; Charpak, G; Dreifuss, J J

    1991-01-01

    The distribution of vasopressin receptors was studied in the brain of a photoperiodic animal, the Siberian hamster. Attention was focused on [3H]vasopressin binding sites located in the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus, medial tuberal nucleus, and ventral premammillary nucleus in males or females kept in long or short photoperiod conditions. Displacement experiments with structural analogs suggested that vasopressin receptors in the hamster hypothalamus are of the vasopressor (V1) type. Quantitative data obtained with a gaseous detector of beta-particles indicated that in the ventromedial nucleus and in the ventral premammillary nucleus of animals in long photoperiod, the number of beta-particles emitted per unit area was significantly greater in males than in females. In the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, in both males and females, the number of beta-particles emitted was significantly lower in short than in long photoperiod conditions. In the ventral premammillary nucleus, shortening of the photoperiod had a significant effect in reducing the amount of [3H]vasopressin bound in females, but not in males. These data suggest that, in the hamster, the control of the expression of vasopressin receptors differs among various hypothalamic nuclei and may depend on the sex and/or on the level of circulating gonadal steroids. Images PMID:1837144

  16. VHL-dependent regulation of a β-dystroglycan glycoform and glycogene expression in renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    AGGELIS, VASSILIS; CRAVEN, RACHEL A.; PENG, JIANHE; HARNDEN, PATRICIA; SCHAFFER, LANA; HERNANDEZ, GILBERTO E.; HEAD, STEVEN R.; MAHER, EAMONN R.; TONGE, ROBERT; SELBY, PETER J.; BANKS, ROSAMONDE E.

    2013-01-01

    Identification of novel biomarkers and targets in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remains a priority and one cellular compartment that is a rich potential source of such molecules is the plasma membrane. A shotgun proteomic analysis of cell surface proteins enriched by cell surface biotinylation and avidin affinity chromatography was explored using the UMRC2- renal cancer cell line, which lacks von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumour suppressor gene function, to determine whether proteins of interest could be detected. Of the 814 proteins identified ∼22% were plasma membrane or membrane-associated, including several with known associations with cancer. This included β-dystroglycan, the transmembrane subunit of the DAG1 gene product. VHL-dependent changes in the form of β-dystroglycan were detected in UMRC2−/+VHL transfectants. Deglycosylation experiments showed that this was due to differential sialylation. Analysis of normal kidney cortex and conventional RCC tissues showed that a similar change also occurred in vivo. Investigation of the expression of genes involved in glycosylation in UMRC2−/+VHL cells using a focussed microarray highlighted a number of enzymes involved in sialylation; upregulation of bifunctional UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase (GNE) was validated in UMRC2− cells compared with their +VHL counterparts and also found in conventional RCC tissue. These results implicate VHL in the regulation of glycosylation and raise interesting questions regarding the extent and importance of such changes in RCC. PMID:23970118

  17. Targeting reverse tetracycline-dependent transactivator to murine mammary epithelial cells that express the progesterone receptor.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Atish; Soyal, Selma M; Fernandez-Valdivia, Rodrigo; DeMayo, Francesco J; Lydon, John P

    2007-10-01

    Through an established gene-targeting strategy, reverse tetracycline-dependent transactivator (rtTA) was targeted downstream of the murine progesterone receptor (PR) promoter. Mice were generated in which one (PR(+/rtTA)) or both (PR(rtTA/rtTA)) PR alleles harbor the rtTA insertion. The PR(+/rtTA) and PR(rtTA/rtTA) knockins exhibit phenotypes identical to the normal and the progesterone receptor knockout mouse, respectively. Crossed with the TZA reporter, which carries the TetO-LacZ responder transgene, the PR(+/rtTA)/TZA and PR(rtTA/rtTA)/TZA bigenics exhibit doxycycline-induced beta-galactosidase activity specifically in progesterone responsive target tissues such as the mammary gland, uterus, ovary, and pituitary gland. In the case of the PR(+/rtTA)/TZA mammary epithelium, dual immunofluorescence demonstrated that PR expression and doxycycline-induced beta-galactosidase activity colocalized; beta-galactosidase was not detected in the absence of doxycycline. Although both the PR(+/rtTA) and PR(rtTA/rtTA) knockins represent innovative animal models with which to further query progesterone's mechanism of action in vivo, the PR(rtTA/rtTA) mouse in particular promises to provide unique insight into the paracrine mechanism of action, which underpins progesterone's involvement in mammary morphogenesis with obvious implications for extending our understanding of this steroid's role in breast cancer progression.

  18. Effect of temperature on biomass allocation in seedlings of two contrasting genotypes of the oilseed crop Ricinus communis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Paulo R; Zanotti, Rafael F; Deflers, Carole; Fernandez, Luzimar G; Castro, Renato D de; Ligterink, Wilco; Hilhorst, Henk W M

    2015-08-01

    Ricinus communis is becoming an important crop for oil production, and studying the physiological and biochemical aspects of seedling development may aid in the improvement of crop quality and yield. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of temperature on biomass allocation in two R. communis genotypes. Biomass allocation was assessed by measuring dry weight of roots, stems, and cotyledons of seedlings grown at three different temperatures. Root length of each seedling was measured. Biomass allocation was strongly affected by temperature. Seedlings grown at 25°C and 35°C showed greater biomass than seedlings grown at 20°C. Cotyledon and stem dry weight increased for both genotypes with increasing temperature, whereas root biomass allocation showed a genotype-dependent behavior. Genotype MPA11 showed a continuous increase in root dry weight with increasing temperature, while genotype IAC80 was not able to sustain further root growth at higher temperatures. Based on metabolite and gene expression profiles, genotype MPA11 increases its level of osmoprotectant molecules and transcripts of genes encoding for antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins to a higher extent than genotype IAC80. This might be causal for the ability to maintain homeostasis and support root growth at elevated temperatures in genotype MPA11.

  19. Surrogate light chain expression beyond the pre-B cell stage promotes tolerance in a dose-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Kil, Laurens P; Corneth, Odilia B J; de Bruijn, Marjolein J W; Asmawidjaja, Patrick S; Krause, Arndt; Lubberts, Erik; van Loo, Pieter Fokko; Hendriks, Rudi W

    2015-02-01

    While surrogate light chain (SLC) expression is normally terminated in differentiating pre-B cells, co-expression of SLC and conventional light chains has been reported in a small population of autoreactive peripheral human B cells that accumulate in arthritic joints. Despite this association with autoimmunity the contribution of SLC expressing mature B cells to disease development is still unknown. We studied the pathogenicity of SLC(+) B cells in a panel of mice that transgenically express the SLC components VpreB and λ5 throughout B cell development. Here we report that although VpreB or λ5 expression mildly activated mature B cells, only moderate VpreB expression levels - in the absence of λ5 - enhanced IgG plasma cell formation. However, no autoantibody production was detectable in VpreB or λ5 transgenic mice and VpreB expression could not accelerate autoimmunity. Instead, moderate VpreB expression partially protected mice from induced autoimmune arthritis. In support of a tolerogenic role of SLC-transgenic B cells, we observed that in a dose-dependent manner SLC expression beyond the pre-B cell stage enhanced clonal deletion among immature and transitional B cells and rendered mature B cells anergic. These findings suggest that SLC expression does not propagate autoimmunity, but instead may impose tolerance.

  20. Molecular hydrogen regulates gene expression by modifying the free radical chain reaction-dependent generation of oxidized phospholipid mediators

    PubMed Central

    Iuchi, Katsuya; Imoto, Akemi; Kamimura, Naomi; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Ichimiya, Harumi; Yokota, Takashi; Ohta, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed that H2 acts as a novel antioxidant to protect cells against oxidative stress. Subsequently, numerous studies have indicated the potential applications of H2 in therapeutic and preventive medicine. Moreover, H2 regulates various signal transduction pathways and the expression of many genes. However, the primary targets of H2 in the signal transduction pathways are unknown. Here, we attempted to determine how H2 regulates gene expression. In a pure chemical system, H2 gas (approximately 1%, v/v) suppressed the autoxidation of linoleic acid that proceeds by a free radical chain reaction, and pure 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PAPC), one of the major phospholipids, was autoxidized in the presence or absence of H2. H2 modified the chemical production of the autoxidized phospholipid species in the cell-free system. Exposure of cultured cells to the H2-dependently autoxidized phospholipid species reduced Ca2+ signal transduction and mediated the expression of various genes as revealed by comprehensive microarray analysis. In the cultured cells, H2 suppressed free radical chain reaction-dependent peroxidation and recovered the increased cellular Ca2+, resulting in the regulation of Ca2+-dependent gene expression. Thus, H2 might regulate gene expression via the Ca2+ signal transduction pathway by modifying the free radical-dependent generation of oxidized phospholipid mediators. PMID:26739257

  1. Expression of NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase in Enterobacter aerogenes and its involvement in anaerobic metabolism and H2 production.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan; Zhao, Hongxin; Zhang, Chong; Lai, Qiheng; Wu, Xi; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2009-10-01

    An expression system for NAD(+)-dependent formate dehydrogenase gene (fdh1), from Candida boidinii, was constructed and cloned into Enterobacter aerogenes IAM1183. With the fdh1 expression, the total H(2) yield was attributed to a decrease in activity of the lactate pathway and an increase of the formate pathway flux due to the NADH regeneration. Analysis of the redox state balance and ethanol-to-acetate ratio in the fdhl-expressed strain showed that increased reducing power arose from the reconstruction of NADH regeneration pathway from formate thereby contributing to the improved H(2) production.

  2. Do voltage-dependent K+ channels require Ca2+? A critical test employing a heterologous expression system.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, C M; Miller, C

    1990-01-01

    Removal of Ca2+ from the solution bathing neurons is known in many cases to alter the gating properties of voltage-dependent K+ channels and to induce a large, nonselective "leak" conductance. We used a heterologous expression system to test whether the leak conductance observed in neurons is mediated by voltage-dependent K+ channels in an altered, debased conformation. Voltage-dependent K+ channels were expressed in an insect cell line infected with a recombinant baculovirus carrying the cDNA for Drosophila Shaker "A-type" K+ channels. These expressed channels respond to low Ca2+ identically to voltage-dependent K+ channels in native neuronal membranes; upon removal of external Ca2+, Shaker K+ currents disappear and are replaced by a steady, nonselective leak conductance. However, control cells devoid of Shaker channels were free of any voltage-dependent conductances and did not generate a leak when external Ca2+ was removed. These results show that Ca2+ is essential for proper function of voltage-dependent K+ channels and is required to stabilize the native conformations of these membrane proteins. PMID:2217187

  3. Age dependent nitro-oxidative load and melatonin receptor expression in the spleen and immunity of goat Capra hircus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amaresh Kumar; Haldar, Chandana

    2014-12-01

    The decline in the plasma level of melatonin has been associated with increased oxidative stress in the physiological system while aging. The increased levels of oxidants are known to augment the nitro-oxidative stress, which induces the apoptotic factors in lymphoid organs leading to age dependent immunosenescence. There are no reports to date that can suggest how the age dependent nitro-oxidative stress can influence the melatonin membrane MT1/MT2R expression and immune status of any small ruminant. In the present study, we noted the expression of melatonin receptors MT1R and MT2R and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) along with the apoptotic markers (viz. Bcl-2, Bax and Pro-caspase-3) in the spleen of young, middle-aged and old-aged Indian goat Capra hircus. The lymphocyte proliferation was also recorded along with the total nitrite and nitrate ion concentration (NOx) in the spleen and plasma. An age dependent decline in MT1R and MT2R expressions and lymphocyte proliferation with increased level of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and iNOS expression was noted. An increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and a decreased Pro-caspase-3 expression were observed in the spleen of goat with an age dependent decline in the peripheral melatonin level. This decline in melatonin along with reduced melatonin receptor (MT1/MT2) expression and elevated RNS level in the spleen with aging might have an important role in the regulation of immune function of goats. Our observations suggest that the age-associated immunosenescence observed in goats can be a consequence of declining melatonin and its receptor expression and induction of apoptotic factors influenced by the increased RNS level that deteriorates the proper functioning of the spleen.

  4. Oral benzo[a]pyrene-induced cancer: two distinct types in different target organs depend on the mouse Cyp1 genotype

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhanquan; Dragin, Nadine; Miller, Marian L.; Stringer, Keith F.; Johansson, Elisabet; Chen, Jing; Uno, Shigeyuki; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Rubio, Carlos A.; Nebert, Daniel W.

    2010-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a prototypical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) found in combustion processes. Cytochrome P450 1A1 and 1B1 enzymes (CYP1A1, CYP1B1) can both detoxify PAHs and activate them to cancer-causing reactive intermediates. Following high dosage of oral BaP (125 mg/kg/day), ablation of the mouse Cyp1a1 gene causes immunosuppression and death within ~28 days, whereas Cyp1(+/+) wild-type mice remain healthy for >12 months on this regimen. In the present study, male Cyp1(+/+) wild-type, Cyp1a1(−/−) and Cyp1b1(−/−) single-knockout, and Cyp1a1/1b1(−/−) double-knockout mice received a lower dose (12.5 mg/kg/day) of oral BaP. Tissues from 16 different organs––including proximal small intestine (PSI), liver, preputial gland duct (PGD)––were evaluated; microarray cDNA expression and >30 mRNA levels were measured. Cyp1a1(−/−) mice revealed markedly increased CYP1B1 mRNA levels in the PSI, and between 8 and 12 weeks developed unique PSI adenomas and adenocarcinomas. Cyp1a1/1b1(−/−) mice showed no PSI tumors but instead developed squamous cell carcinoma of the PGD. Cyp1(+/+) and Cyp1b1(−/−) mice remained healthy with no remarkable abnormalities in any tissue examined. PSI adenocarcinomas exhibited striking up-regulation of the Xist gene, suggesting epigenetic silencing of specific genes on the Y-chromosome; the Rab30 oncogene was up-regulated; the Nr0b2 tumor suppressor gene was down-regulated; paradoxical over-expression of numerous immunoglobulin kappa and heavy chain variable genes was found––although the adenocarcinoma showed no immunohistochemical evidence of being lymphatic in origin. This oral BaP mouse paradigm represents an example of “gene-environment interactions” in which the same exposure of carcinogen results in altered target organ and tumor type, as a function of just one or two globally absent genes. PMID:20127859

  5. Expression of truncated bile salt-dependent lipase variant in pancreatic pre-neoplastic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Emmanuelle; Crenon, Isabelle; Silvy, Françoise; Del Grande, Jean; Mougel, Alice; Barea, Dolores; Fina, Frederic; Bernard, Jean-Paul; Ouaissi, Mehdi; Lombardo, Dominique; Mas, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a dismal disease. The lack of specific symptoms still leads to a delay in diagnosis followed by death within months for most patients. Exon 11 of the bile salt-dependent lipase (BSDL) gene encoding variable number of tandem repeated (VNTR) sequences has been involved in pancreatic pathologies. We hypothesized that BSDL VNTR sequences may be mutated in PDAC. The amplification of BSDL VNTR from RNA extracted from pancreatic SOJ-6 cells allowed us to identify a BSDL amplicon in which a cytosine residue is inserted in a VNTR sequence. This insertion gives rise to a premature stop codon, resulting in a truncated protein and to a modification of the C-terminal amino-acid sequence; that is PRAAHG instead of PAVIRF. We produced antibodies directed against these sequences and examined pancreatic tissues from patients with PDAC and PanIN. Albeit all tissues were positive to anti-PAVIRF antibodies, 72.2% of patient tissues gave positive reaction with anti-PRAAHG antibodies, particularly in dysplastic areas of the tumor. Neoplastic cells with ductal differentiation were not reactive to anti-PRAAHG antibodies. Some 70% of PanIN tissues were also reactive to anti-PRAAHG antibodies, suggesting that the C insertion occurs early during pancreatic carcinogenesis. Data suggest that anti-PRAAHG antibodies were uniquely reactive with a short isoform of BSDL specifically expressed in pre-neoplastic lesions of the pancreas. The detection of truncated BSDL reactive to antibodies against the PRAAHG C-terminal sequence in pancreatic juice or in pancreatic biopsies may be a new tool in the early diagnosis of PDAC. PMID:27602750

  6. Skeletal muscle disuse induces fibre type-dependent enhancement of Na(+) channel expression.

    PubMed

    Desaphy, J F; Pierno, S; Léoty, C; George, A L; De Luca, A; Camerino, D C

    2001-06-01

    Slow-twitch and fast-twitch muscle fibres have specific contractile properties to respond to specific needs. Since sodium current density is higher in fast-twitch than in slow-twitch fibres, sodium channels contribute to the phenotypic feature of myofibres. Phenotype determination is not irreversible: after periods of rat hindlimb unloading (HU), a model of hypogravity, a slow-to-fast transition occurs together with atrophy in the antigravity slow-twitch soleus muscle. Using cell-attached patch-clamp and northern blot analyses, we looked at sodium channel expression in soleus muscles after 1-3 weeks of HU in rats. We found that sodium channels in fast-twitch flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibres, soleus muscle fibres and 1- to 3-week HU soleus muscle fibres showed no difference in unitary conductance, open probability and voltage-dependencies of activation, fast inactivation and slow inactivation. However, muscle disuse increased sodium current density in soleus muscle fibres 2-fold, 2.5-fold and 3-fold after 1, 2 and 3 weeks of HU, respectively. The concentration of mRNA for the skeletal muscle sodium channel alpha subunit increased 2-fold after 1 week of HU but returned to the control level after 3 weeks of HU. In contrast, the concentration of mRNA for the ubiquitous sodium channel beta(1) subunit was unchanged after 1 week and had increased by 30% after 3 weeks of HU. The tetrodotoxin sensitivity of sodium currents in 3-week HU soleus muscles and the lack of mRNA signal for the juvenile skeletal muscle sodium channel alpha subunit excluded denervation in our experiments. The observed increase in sodium current density may reduce the resistance to fatigue of antigravity muscle fibres, an effect that may contribute to muscle impairment in humans after space flight or after long immobilization.

  7. The Non-coding Mammary Carcinoma Susceptibility Locus, Mcs5c, Regulates Pappa Expression via Age-Specific Chromatin Folding and Allele-Dependent DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Amanda N.; Haag, Jill D.; Smits, Bart M. G.; Gould, Michael N.

    2016-01-01

    In understanding the etiology of breast cancer, the contributions of both genetic and environmental risk factors are further complicated by the impact of breast developmental stage. Specifically, the time period ranging from childhood to young adulthood represents a critical developmental window in a woman’s life when she is more susceptible to environmental hazards that may affect future breast cancer risk. Although the effects of environmental exposures during particular developmental Windows of Susceptibility (WOS) are well documented, the genetic mechanisms governing these interactions are largely unknown. Functional characterization of the Mammary Carcinoma Susceptibility 5c, Mcs5c, congenic rat model of breast cancer at various stages of mammary gland development was conducted to gain insight into the interplay between genetic risk factors and WOS. Using quantitative real-time PCR, chromosome conformation capture, and bisulfite pyrosequencing we have found that Mcs5c acts within the mammary gland to regulate expression of the neighboring gene Pappa during a critical mammary developmental time period in the rat, corresponding to the human young adult WOS. Pappa has been shown to positively regulate the IGF signaling pathway, which is required for proper mammary gland/breast development and is of increasing interest in breast cancer pathogenesis. Mcs5c-mediated regulation of Pappa appears to occur through age-dependent and mammary gland-specific chromatin looping, as well as genotype-dependent CpG island shore methylation. This represents, to our knowledge, the first insight into cellular mechanisms underlying the WOS phenomenon and demonstrates the influence developmental stage can have on risk locus functionality. Additionally, this work represents a novel model for further investigation into how environmental factors, together with genetic factors, modulate breast cancer risk in the context of breast developmental stage. PMID:27537370

  8. Analyses of Genotypes and Phenotypes of Ten Chinese Patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome by Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification and Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Xu; Pan, Hong; Li, Lin; Wu, Hai-Rong; Wang, Song-Tao; Bao, Xin-Hua; Jiang, Yu-Wu; Qi, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a contiguous gene syndrome that is typically caused by a deletion of the distal portion of the short arm of chromosome 4. However, there are few reports about the features of Chinese WHS patients. This study aimed to characterize the clinical and molecular cytogenetic features of Chinese WHS patients using the combination of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). Methods: Clinical information was collected from ten patients with WHS. Genomic DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood of the patients. The deletions were analyzed by MLPA and array CGH. Results: All patients exhibited the core clinical symptoms of WHS, including severe growth delay, a Greek warrior helmet facial appearance, differing degrees of intellectual disability, and epilepsy or electroencephalogram anomalies. The 4p deletions ranged from 2.62 Mb to 17.25 Mb in size and included LETM1, WHSC1, and FGFR3. Conclusions: The combined use of MLPA and array CGH is an effective and specific means to diagnose WHS and allows for the precise identification of the breakpoints and sizes of deletions. The deletion of genes in the WHS candidate region is closely correlated with the core WHS phenotype. PMID:26960370

  9. Genotype-dependence of gabapentin and pregabalin sensitivity: the pharmacogenetic mediation of analgesia is specific to the type of pain being inhibited.

    PubMed

    Chesler, Elissa J; Ritchie, Jennifer; Kokayeff, Anna; Lariviere, William R; Wilson, Sonya G; Mogil, Jeffrey S

    2003-12-01

    The antiepileptic drug, gabapentin, and another structurally related compound, pregabalin, are increasingly employed in the pharmacotherapy of chronic pain states, although their primary mechanism of action remains a topic of active study. A genomic approach to the study of these drugs may elucidate their potentially novel mechanisms. We examined the heritability of sensitivity to analgesia from gabapentin and pregabalin as a precursor to linkage mapping efforts. Accordingly, 11 inbred mouse strains were tested for inhibition of nociception by gabapentin or pregabalin (50-300 mg/kg, i.p.) in two different preclinical assays of inflammatory pain, the formalin test (5% formalin; 20 microl) and zymosan thermal hyperalgesia on the paw-withdrawal test (3 mg/ml zymosan; 20 microl). Significant strain-dependence of drug action was noted in each case, indicating that sensitivity to these analgesics is heritable. Furthermore, the pattern of strain sensitivities to gabapentin and pregabalin were mostly similar, supporting the notion that they act via similar genetic and physiological mechanisms. However, there was virtually no correlation between strain sensitivities to pregabalin inhibition of formalin nociception and zymosan thermal hyperalgesia. In light of previous data from our laboratory and others regarding morphine analgesia, we now establish and empirically demonstrate the general principle that pharmacogenetic mechanisms underlying analgesic sensitivity are specific to the type of pain being inhibited. This has considerable implications for ongoing pharmacogenetic investigations and, more generally, for the choices of preclinical models of pain used in drug development.

  10. TIME-DEPENDENT EFFECTS ON GENE EXPRESSION IN RAT SEMINAL VESICLE DEVELOPMENTALLY ALTERED BY IN UTERO EXPOSURE TO TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    TIME-DEPENDENT EFFECTS ON GENE EXPRESSION IN RAT SEMINAL VESICLE DEVELOPMENTALLY ALTERED BY IN UTERO EXPOSURE TO TCDD. V M Richardson', J T Hamm2, and L S Birnbaum1. 'USEPA, ORD/NHEERL/ETD, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA, 'Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, ...

  11. Stably transfected human cell lines as fluorescent screening assay for nuclear factor KB activation dependent gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Horneck, Gerda

    2004-06-01

    Activation of the Nuclear Factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathway as a possible antiapoptotic route represents one important cellular stress response. For identifying conditions which are capable to modify this pathway, a screening assay for detection of NF-kappaB-dependent gene activation using the reporter proteins Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP) and its destabilized variant (d2EGFP) has been developed. Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK/293) cells were stably transfected with a vector carrying EGFP or d2EGFP under control of a synthetic promoter containing four copies of the NF-kappaB response element. Treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) gave rise to substantial EGFP / d2EGFP expression in up to 90 % of the cells and was therefore used to screen different stably transfected clones for induction of NF-kappaB dependent gene expression. The time course of d2EGFP expression after treatment with TNF-alpha or phorbol ester was measured using flow cytometry. Cellular response to TNF-alpha was faster than to phorbol ester. Treatment of cells with TNF-alpha and DMSO revealed antagonistic interactions of these substances in the activation NF-kappaB dependent gene expression. The detection of d2EGFP expression required FACS analysis or fluorescence microscopy, while EGFP could also be measured in the microplate reader, rendering the assay useful for high-throughput screening.

  12. AP-2α-dependent regulation of Bcl-2/Bax expression affects apoptosis in the trophoblast.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Jia, Liting; Cui, Shihong; Shi, Ying; Chang, Aimin; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Zhan

    2012-12-01

    Enhanced apoptosis of the cytotrophoblast in early pregnancy is associated with a high risk of preeclampsia. We and others have previously reported that the transcriptional factor, activator protein AP-2α, suppressed trophoblast migration and invasion. However, it is not clear whether AP-2α affects apoptosis in trophoblast cells and whether it regulates expression of apoptosis-related factors Bcl-2 and Bax. We analyzed the expression of AP-2α, Bcl-2 and Bax in placental tissues in severe preeclamptic pregnancies and normotensive pregnancies using immunohistochemistry and real time-PCR. Further, apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometric analysis in the human trophoblastic cell line, BeWo cells, in which AP-2α expression was transiently overexpressed or down-regulated by siRNA. There was significantly higher expression of AP-2α and Bax, but lower expression of Bcl-2 in severe preeclampsia placentas as compared to the control placentas. Overexpression of AP-2α in BeWo cells led to an increased rate of apoptosis, whereas apoptosis was decreased when AP-2α expression was reduced. Furthermore, overexpression of AP-2α increased Bax expression and decreased Bcl-2 expression, whereas down-regulation of AP-2α expression resulted in a decrease in Bax expression and an increase in Bcl-2 expression. AP-2α regulates expression of Bcl-2 and Bax and apoptosis in BeWo cells. These results suggest that AP-2α-mediated regulation of Bcl-2 and Bax regulation influences apoptosis which in turn leads to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

  13. Basal expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene is dependent on protein kinase A activity.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, R A; Matthews, R P; Idzerda, R L; McKnight, G S

    1995-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) functions as a Cl- channel that becomes activated after phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). We demonstrate that PKA also plays a crucial role in maintaining basal expression of the CFTR gene in the human colon carcinoma cell line T84. Inhibition of PKA activity by expression of a dominant-negative regulatory subunit or treatment with the PKA-selective inhibitor N-[2-(p-bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89) caused a complete suppression of CFTR gene expression without affecting other constitutively active genes. Basal expression of a 2.2-kb region of the CFTR promoter linked to a luciferase reporter gene (CFTR-luc) exhibited the same dependence on PKA. The ability of cAMP to induce CFTR over basal levels is cell-type specific. In T84 cells, both the endogenous CFTR gene and CFTR-luc exhibited only a modest inducibility (approximately 2-fold), whereas in the human choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3, CFTR-luc could be induced at least 4-fold. A variant cAMP-response element is present at position -48 to -41 in the CFTR promoter, and mutation of this sequence blocks basal expression. We conclude that cAMP, acting through PKA, is an essential regulator of basal CFTR gene expression and may mediate an induction of CFTR in responsive cell types. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7543684

  14. Following the time course of face gender and expression processing: a task-dependent ERP study.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Conroy, Berenice; Aguado, Luis; Fernández-Cahill, María; Romero-Ferreiro, Verónica; Diéguez-Risco, Teresa

    2014-05-01

    The effects of task demands and the interaction between gender and expression in face perception were studied using event-related potentials (ERPs). Participants performed three different tasks with male and female faces that were emotionally inexpressive or that showed happy or angry expressions. In two of the tasks (gender and expression categorization) facial properties were task-relevant while in a third task (symbol discrimination) facial information was irrelevant. Effects of expression were observed on the visual P100 component under all task conditions, suggesting the operation of an automatic process that is not influenced by task demands. The earliest interaction between expression and gender was observed later in the face-sensitive N170 component. This component showed differential modulations by specific combinations of gender and expression (e.g., angry male vs. angry female faces). Main effects of expression and task were observed in a later occipito-temporal component peaking around 230 ms post-stimulus onset (EPN or early posterior negativity). Less positive amplitudes in the presence of angry faces and during performance of the gender and expression tasks were observed. Finally, task demands also modulated a positive component peaking around 400 ms (LPC, or late positive complex) that showed enhanced amplitude for the gender task. The pattern of results obtained here adds new evidence about the sequence of operations involved in face processing and the interaction of facial properties (gender and expression) in response to different task demands.

  15. Critical period for estrogen-dependent motoneuron dendrite growth is coincident with ERα expression in target musculature.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Lauren M; Sengelaub, Dale R

    2013-01-01

    The spinal cord of rats contains the sexually dimorphic, steroid-sensitive motoneurons of the spinal nucleus of the bulbocavernosus (SNB). In males, SNB dendrite growth is dependent on gonadal steroids: dendrite growth is inhibited after castration, but supported in androgen- or estrogen-treated castrated males. Furthermore, estrogenic support of SNB dendrite growth is mediated by estrogen action at the target musculature, inhibited by estrogen receptor (ER) blockade at the muscle and supported by local estradiol treatment. However, this estrogenic support is restricted to the early postnatal period, after which the morphology of SNB dendrites is insensitive to estrogens. To test if the developmentally restricted effects of estrogens on SNB dendrite growth coincide with the transient expression of ER in the target musculature, ERα expression was assessed during development and in adulthood. ERα expression in extra-Muscle fiber cells was greatest from postnatal day 7 (P7) to P14 and declined after P21. Because this pattern of ERα expression coincided with the period of estrogen-dependent dendrite growth, we tested if limiting hormone exposure to the period of maximal ERα expression in extra-muscle fiber cells could fully support estrogen-dependent SNB dendrite growth. We restricted estradiol treatment in castrated males from P7 to P21 and assessed SNB dendritic morphology at P28. Treating castrates with estradiol implants at the muscle from P7 to P21 supported dendrite growth to normal levels through P28. These data suggest that the transient ERα expression in target muscle could potentially define the critical period for estrogen-dependent dendrite growth in SNB motoneurons.

  16. Preference for Western diet coadapts in High Runner mice and affects voluntary exercise and spontaneous physical activity in a genotype-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Wendy; Meek, Thomas H; Schutz, Heidi; Dlugosz, Elizabeth M; Garland, Theodore

    2017-02-01

    Do animals evolve (coadapt) to choose diets that positively affect their performance abilities? We addressed this question from a microevolutionary perspective by examining preference for Western diet (WD: high in fat and sugar, but lower in protein) versus standard rodent chow in adults of both sexes from 4 lines of mice selectively bred for high levels of voluntary wheel running (High Runner or HR lines) and 4 non-selected control (C) lines. We also assessed whether food preference or substitution affects physical activity (wheel running and/or spontaneous physical activity [SPA] in the attached home cages). In experiment 1 (generation 56), mice were given 6days of wheel acclimation (as is used routinely to pick breeders in the selection experiment) prior to a 2-day food choice trial. In experiment 2 (generation 56), 17days of wheel acclimation allowed mice to reach a stable level of daily running, followed by a 7-day food-choice trial. In experiment 3 (generation 58), mice had 6days of wheel acclimation with standard chow, after which half were switched to WD for two days. In experiment 1, WD was highly preferred by all mice, with somewhat greater preference in male C mice. In experiment 2, wheel running increased and SPA decreased continuously for the first 14days of adult wheel testing, followed by 3-day plateaus in both. During the subsequent 7-day food choice trial, HR mice of both sexes preferred WD significantly more than did C mice; moreover, wheel running increased in all groups except males from C lines, with the increase being significantly greater in HR than C, while SPA declined further in all groups. In experiment 3, the effect of being switched to WD depended on both linetype and sex. On standard chow, only HR females showed a significant change in wheel running during nights 7+8, increasing by 10%. In contrast, when switched to WD, C females (+28%), HR females (+33%), and HR males (+10%) all significantly increased their daily wheel

  17. MHC class I expression dependent on bacterial infection and parental factors in whitefish embryos (Salmonidae).

    PubMed

    Clark, Emily S; Wilkins, Laetitia G E; Wedekind, Claus

    2013-10-01

    Ecological conditions can influence not only the expression of a phenotype, but also the heritability of a trait. As such, heritable variation for a trait needs to be studied across environments. We have investigated how pathogen challenge affects the expression of MHC genes in embryos of the lake whitefish Coregonus palaea. In order to experimentally separate paternal (i.e. genetic) from maternal and environmental effects, and determine whether and how stress affects the heritable variation for MHC expression, embryos were produced in full-factorial in vitro fertilizations, reared singly, and exposed at 208 degree days (late-eyed stage) to either one of two strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens that differ in their virulence characteristics (one increased mortality, while both delayed hatching time). Gene expression was assessed 48 h postinoculation, and virulence effects of the bacterial infection were monitored until hatching. We found no evidence of MHC class II expression at this stage of development. MHC class I expression was markedly down-regulated in reaction to both pseudomonads. While MHC expression could not be linked to embryo survival, the less the gene was expressed, the earlier the embryos hatched within each treatment group, possibly due to trade-offs between immune function and developmental rate or further factors that affect both hatching timing and MHC expression. We found significant additive genetic variance for MHC class I expression in some treatments. That is, changes in pathogen pressures could induce rapid evolution in MHC class I expression. However, we found no additive genetic variance in reaction norms in our study population.

  18. Expression and action of cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase Ialpha in inflammatory hyperalgesia in rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Tao, Y X; Hassan, A; Haddad, E; Johns, R A

    2000-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have shown a role for the nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling pathway in the development of spinal hyperalgesia. However, the roles of effectors for cyclic guanosine monophosphate are not fully understood in the processing of pain in the spinal cord. The present study showed that cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase Ialpha but not Ibeta was localized in the neuronal bodies and processes, and was distributed primarily in the superficial laminae of the spinal cord. Intrathecal administration of a selective inhibitor of cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase Ialpha, Rp-8-[(4-chlorophenyl)thio]-cGMPS triethylamine, produced a significant antinociception demonstrated by the decrease in the number of flinches and shakes in the formalin test. This was accompanied by a marked reduction in formalin-induced c-fos expression in the spinal dorsal horn. Moreover, cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase Ialpha protein expression was dramatically increased in the lumbar spinal cord 96 h after injection of formalin into a hindpaw, which occurred mainly in the superficial laminae on the ipsilateral side of a formalin-injected hindpaw. This up-regulation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase Ialpha expression was completely blocked not only by a neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole, and a soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, but also by an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, dizocilpine maleate (MK-801). The present results indicate that noxious stimulation not only initially activates but also later up-regulates cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase Ialpha expression in the superficial laminae via an N-methyl-D-aspartate-nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling pathway, suggesting that cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase Ialpha may play an

  19. Smad3-dependent CCN2 mediates fibronectin expression in human skin dermal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Trupta; Qin, Zhaoping; Quan, Chunji; Lin, Zhenhua

    2017-01-01

    The potential involvement of connective tissue growth factor (CCN2/CTGF) in extracellular matrix (ECM) production is recognized. However, the role CCN2 in fibronectin (FN) gene expression has remained incompletely understood and even controversial. Here we report that CCN2 is absolutely necessary for FN expression in primary human skin dermal fibroblasts, the major cells responsible for ECM production in skin. Gain- and loss-of-function approaches demonstrate that CCN2 is an essential component of FN expression in both basal and stimulation by TGF-β signaling, the major regulator of FN expression. CCN2 is significantly induced by Smad3, a critical mediator of TGF-β signaling. CCN2 acts as a downstream mediator of TGF-β/Smad signaling and acting synergistically with TGF-β to regulate FN gene expression. Finally, we observed that CCN2 and FN predominantly expressed in the dermis of normal human skin, stromal tissues of skin squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and simultaneously induced in wounded human skin in vivo. These findings provide evidence that CCN2 is responsible for mediating the stimulatory effects of TGF-β/Smad on FN gene expression, and attenuation of CCN2 expression may benefit to reduce fibrotic ECM microenvironment in disease skin. PMID:28267785

  20. MICA Expression Is Regulated by Cell Adhesion and Contact in a FAK/Src-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Moncayo, Gerald; Lin, Da; McCarthy, Michael T.; Watson, Aleksandra A.; O’Callaghan, Christopher A.

    2017-01-01

    MICA is a major ligand for the NKG2D immune receptor, which plays a key role in activating natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T cells. We analyzed NKG2D ligand expression on a range of cell types and could demonstrate that MICA expression levels were closely linked to cellular growth mode. While the expression of other NKG2D ligands was largely independent of cell growth mode, MICA expression was mainly found on cells cultured as adherent cells. In addition, MICA surface expression was reduced through increase in cell–cell contact or loss of cell–matrix adherence. Furthermore, we found that the reduction in MICA expression was modulated by focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/Src signaling and associated with increased susceptibility to NK cell-mediated killing. While the mechanisms of tumor immune evasion are not fully understood, the reduction of MICA expression following loss of attachment poises a potential way by which metastasizing tumor cells avoid immune detection. The role of FAK/Src in this process indicates a potential therapeutic approach to modulate MICA expression and immune recognition of tumor cells during metastasis. PMID:28154561

  1. Interleukin-28b CC genotype predicts early treatment response and CT/TT genotypes predicts non-response in patients infected with HCV genotype 3.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Abhishak Chander; Trehanpati, Nirupma; Sukriti, Sukriti; Hissar, Syed; Midha, Vandana; Sood, Ajit; Sarin, Shiv K

    2014-04-01

    Response to antiviral therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) depends upon the genotype and host immune response. IL28b gene mutations have been shown to modulate host antiviral immune response against genotype 1. However, the predictive value of IL28b polymorphism in genotype 3 HCV patients is largely unknown. The association of IL28b polymorphism with virological response was studied in 356 patients with genotype 3 chronic HCV undergoing treatment with peg-interferon and ribavirin and was compared with matched controls. IL28b genotyping followed by DNA sequencing was performed to identify the CC, CT, or TT genotypes. Two log reduction of HCV RNA at Day 7 (Quick Viral Response, QVR) and HCV RNA negativity at Day 28 (Rapid Viral Response, RVR) were analyzed with CC and non-CC genotypes in addition to other predictors of response. The associations of alleles with the response patterns were predicted. Sustained viral response was seen in 250 (70.2%) patients and the IL28b genotype CC/CT/TT distribution was 61.1%; 30.5%; and 8.4%, respectively. The non-CC genotypes were significantly higher in non-responders when compared to responders (67.6% vs. 38.9%, P < 0.001). Interestingly, the rapid viral response in responders was observed in 72.7% with the CC genotype and in 27.2% with the non-CC genotype (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed CC genotype as an independent factor predicting the sustained viral response in patients infected with HCV genotype 3. In conclusion, the IL28b CT/TT genotype strongly correlates with treatment non-response in patients infected with HCV genotype 3 and CC genotype of IL28b is associated with higher quick viral response.

  2. Photoperiod history-dependent responses to intermediate day lengths engage hypothalamic iodothyronine deiodinase type III mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Kampf-Lassin, August; Prendergast, Brian J

    2013-04-15

    Perihypothalamic thyroid hormone signaling features prominently in the seasonal control of reproductive physiology. Triiodothyronine (T(3)) signaling stimulates gonadal development, and decrements in T(3) signaling are associated with gonadal regression. Type 3 iodothyronine deiodinase (DIO3) converts the prohormone thyroxine (T(4)) into biologically inactive 3,3',5'-triiodothyronine, and in long-day breeding Siberian hamsters exposure to long (LD) and short (SD) photoperiods, respectively, inhibit and stimulate hypothalamic dio3 mRNA expression. Reproductive responses to intermediate-duration photoperiods (IntD) occur in a history-dependent manner; IntDs are interpreted as inhibitory only when preceded by longer photoperiods. Because dio3 expression has only been evaluated under LD or SD photoperiods, it is not known whether hypothalamic dio3 encodes absolute photoperiod duration or the reproductive interpretation of photoperiod. Male Siberian hamsters with and without a prior history of LD were exposed to IntD photoperiods, and hypothalamic dio3 mRNA expression was measured 6 wk later. Hamsters with a LD photoperiod history exhibited gonadal regression in IntD and a marked upregulation of hypothalamic dio3 expression, whereas in hamsters without prior exposure to LD, gonadal responses to IntD were absent, and dio3 expression remained low. Patterns of deiodinase expression in hamsters maintained in chronic IntD photoperiods did not appear to reflect feedback effects of gonadal status. Hypothalamic expression of dio3 does not exclusively reflect ambient photoperiod, but rather the context-dependent reproductive interpretation of photoperiod. Neuroendocrine mechanisms that compare current and prior photoperiods, which permit detection of directional changes in day length, occur either upstream, or at the level, of hypothalamic dio3 expression.

  3. Gender-dependent expression of alpha and beta estrogen receptors in human nontumor and tumor lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Fasco, Michael J; Hurteau, Gregory J; Spivack, Simon D

    2002-02-25

    more often in the lungs of women than men; (2) ERbeta is expressed with approximately equal frequency in the lungs of both genders; and (3) tumors display a higher frequency of both receptor types than nontumors in women. We hypothesize that these putative gender-dependent differences in ERalpha and ERbeta expression could contribute unique phenotypic characteristics to lung cancer development or progression in women.

  4. Kinetic analysis of aptazyme-regulated gene expression in a cell-free translation system: modeling of ligand-dependent and -independent expression.

    PubMed

    Kobori, Shungo; Ichihashi, Norikazu; Kazuta, Yasuaki; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2012-08-01

    Aptazymes are useful as RNA-based switches of gene expression responsive to several types of compounds. One of the most important properties of the switching ability is the signal/noise (S/N) ratio, i.e., the ratio of gene expression in the presence of ligand to that in the absence of ligand. The present study was performed to gain a quantitative understanding of how the aptazyme S/N ratio is determined by factors involved in gene expression, such as transcription, RNA self-cleavage, RNA degradation, protein translation, and their ligand dependencies. We performed switching of gene expression using two on-switch aptazymes with different properties in a cell-free translation system, and constructed a kinetic model that quantitatively describes the dynamics of RNA and protein species involved in switching. Both theoretical and experimental analyses consistently demonstrated that factors determining both the absolute value and the dynamics of the S/N ratio are highly dependent on the routes of translation in the absence of ligand: translation from the ligand-independently cleaved RNA or leaky translation from the noncleaved RNA. The model obtained here is useful to assess the factors that restrict the S/N ratio and to improve aptazymes more efficiently.

  5. Small RNA-dependent expression of secondary metabolism is controlled by Krebs cycle function in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Kasumi; Kiefer, Patrick; Reimmann, Cornelia; Keel, Christoph; Dubuis, Christophe; Rolli, Joëlle; Vorholt, Julia A; Haas, Dieter

    2009-12-11

    Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, an antagonist of phytopathogenic fungi in the rhizosphere of crop plants, elaborates and excretes several secondary metabolites with antibiotic properties. Their synthesis depends on three small RNAs (RsmX, RsmY, and RsmZ), whose expression is positively controlled by the GacS-GacA two-component system at high cell population densities. To find regulatory links between primary and secondary metabolism in P. fluorescens and in the related species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we searched for null mutations that affected central carbon metabolism as well as the expression of rsmY-gfp and rsmZ-gfp reporter constructs but without slowing down the growth rate in rich media. Mutation in the pycAB genes (for pyruvate carboxylase) led to down-regulation of rsmXYZ and secondary metabolism, whereas mutation in fumA (for a fumarase isoenzyme) resulted in up-regulation of the three small RNAs and secondary metabolism in the absence of detectable nutrient limitation. These effects required the GacS sensor kinase but not the accessory sensors RetS and LadS. An analysis of intracellular metabolites in P. fluorescens revealed a strong positive correlation between small RNA expression and the pools of 2-oxoglutarate, succinate, and fumarate. We conclude that Krebs cycle intermediates (already known to control GacA-dependent virulence factors in P. aeruginosa) exert a critical trigger function in secondary metabolism via the expression of GacA-dependent small RNAs.

  6. Dose-dependent effects of metals on gene expression in the sydney rock oyster, Saccostrea glomerata.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Daisy A; Nair, Sham V; Thompson, Emma L; Raftos, David A

    2015-09-01

    In the current study, we tested the effects of common environmental contaminants (the metals zinc and lead) on gene expression in Sydney rock oysters (Saccrostrea glomerata). Oysters were exposed to a range of metal concentrations under controlled laboratory conditions. The expression of 14 putative stress response genes was then measured using quantitative, real-time (q) PCR. The expression of all 14 genes was significantly affected (p < 0.05 vs. nonexposed controls) by at least one of the metals, and by at least one dose of metal. For 5 of the 14 target genes (actin, calmodulin, superoxide dismutase, topoisomerase I, and tubulin) the alteration of expression relative to controls was highest at intermediate (rather than high) doses of metals. Such responses may reflect adaptive (acclimation) reactions in gene expression at low to intermediate doses of contaminants, followed by a decline in expression resulting from exposure at higher doses. The data are discussed in terms of the intracellular pathways affected by metal contamination, and the relevance of such gene expression data to environmental biomonitoring.

  7. Age-dependent expression of osteochondrosis-related genes in equine leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, L.; Piquemal, D.; Lejeune, J. P.; Vander Heyden, L.; Noguier, F.; Bruno, R.; Sandersen, C.; Serteyn, D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:  Osteochondrosis (OC) is a developmental disease in horses which has a significant impact on the horse's welfare and performance. The early disturbance in the process of endochondral ossification progresses to inflammatory and repair processes in older horses. Previously, differentially expressed genes in leukocytes of OC-affected horses have been identified. The aim of the present study is to detect age-related changes in these differentially expressed genes. Materials and Methods:  The expression of OC-related genes was analysed by real-time PCR and subsequent statistical analysis (ΔΔCT) in the leukocytes of 135 Belgian Warmblood horses divided into three different age groups: <12 months (n=47), 18–24 months (n=50) >30 months (n=38). Results:  Relative expression of genes of horses less than 12 months of age showed significant induction of the genes MGAT4A, PRKCG, MHCI, ApoB, ApoB3G, B4GALT6 and a significantly lower expression of the genes OAS3. Horses of 18–24 months of age, showed a significantly higher expression of the genes TBC1D9, MGAT4A, IFIH1, MHCIIa and MMP1. Horses of more than 30 months of age showed a significantly higher expression of the genes MGAT4A, HP, SECTM1 compared with their age-matched control groups. Conclusions:  The study demonstrates that OC-related genes are differentially expressed in horses of different ages compared with their age-matched controls. Some of the genes may be implicated in cell signalling and differentiation as well as carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and inflammation. However, the causal relationship between the differentially expressed genes and the development and progression of the OC lesions needs to be determined. PMID:26392886

  8. HIV-1 gag expression is quantitatively dependent on the ratio of native and optimized codons.

    PubMed

    Kofman, Alexander; Graf, Marcus; Bojak, Alexandra; Deml, Ludwig; Bieler, Kurt; Kharazova, Alexandra; Wolf, Hans; Wagner, Ralf

    2003-01-01

    There is a significant variation of codon usage bias among different species and even among genes within the same organisms. Codon optimization, this is, gene redesigning with the use of codons preferred for the specific expression system, results in improved expression of heterologous genes in bacteria, plants, yeast, mammalian cells, and transgenic animals. The mechanisms preventing expression of genes with rare or low-usage codons at adequate levels are not completely elucidated. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) represents an interesting model for studying how differences in codon usage affect gene expression in heterologous systems. Construction of synthetic genes with optimized codons demonstrated that the codon-usage effects might be a major impediment to the efficient expression of HIV gag/pol and env gene products in mammalian cells. According to another hypothesis, the poor expression of HIV structural proteins even without HIV context is attributed to the so-called cis-acting inhibitory elements (INS), which are located within the protein-coding region. They consist of AU-rich sequences and may be inactivated through the introduction of multiple mutations over the large regions of gag gene. In our work, we evaluated expression of hybrid HIV-1 gag mRNAs where wild-type (A-rich) gag sequences were combined with artificial sequences. In such "humanized" gag fragments with adapted codon usage, AT-content was significantly reduced in favor of G and C nucleotides without any changes in protein sequence. We show that wild-type gag sequences negatively influence expression of gag-reporter, and the addition of fragments with optimized codons to gag mRNA partially rescues its expression. The results demonstrate that the expression of HIV-1 gag is determined by the ratio of optimized and rare codons within mRNA. Our data also indicates that some wtgag fragments counteract the influence of the other wtgag sequences, which cause the inhibition of gag expression. The

  9. Ethanol increases matrix metalloproteinase-12 expression via NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Mi Jin; Nepal, Saroj; Lee, Eung-Seok; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2013-11-15

    Matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12), an enzyme responsible for degradation of extracellular matrix, plays an important role in the progression of various diseases, including inflammation and fibrosis. Although most of those are pathogenic conditions induced by ethanol ingestion, the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 has not been explored. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 expression and its potential mechanisms in macrophages. Here, we demonstrated that ethanol treatment increased MMP-12 expression in primary murine peritoneal macrophages and RAW 264.7 macrophages at both mRNA and protein levels. Ethanol treatment also significantly increased the activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) oxidase and the expression of NADPH oxidase-2 (Nox2). Pretreatment with an anti-oxidant (N-acetyl cysteine) or a selective inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI)) prevented ethanol-induced MMP-12 expression. Furthermore, knockdown of Nox2 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented ethanol-induced ROS production and MMP-12 expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages, indicating a critical role for Nox2 in ethanol-induced intracellular ROS production and MMP-12 expression in macrophages. We also showed that ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was suppressed by transient transfection with dominant negative IκB-α plasmid or pretreatment with Bay 11-7082, a selective inhibitor of NF-κB, in RAW 264.7 macrophages. In addition, ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was also attenuated by treatment with a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK, suggesting involvement of p38 MAPK/NF-κB pathway in ethanol-induced Nox2 expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ethanol treatment elicited increase in MMP-12 expression via increase in ROS production derived from Nox2 in macrophages. - Highlights: • Ethanol increases ROS production through up-regulation of Nox2 in macrophages. • Enhanced oxidative stress contributes to ethanol

  10. Arecoline induced disruption of expression and localization of the tight junctional protein ZO-1 is dependent on the HER 2 expression in human endometrial Ishikawa cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Approximately 600 million people chew Betel nut, making this practice the fourth most popular oral habit in the world. Arecoline, the major alkaloid present in betel nut is one of the causative agents for precancerous lesions and several cancers of mouth among those who chew betel nut. Arecoline can be detected in the human embryonic tissue and is correlated to low birth weight of newborns whose mothers chew betel nut during pregnancy, suggesting that arecoline can induce many systemic effects. However, few reports exist as to the effects of arecoline in human tissues other than oral cancer cell lines. Furthermore, in any system, virtually nothing is known about the cellular effects of arecoline treatment on membrane associated signaling components of human cancer cells. Results Using the human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell line, we investigated the effects of arecoline on expression, localization and functional connections between the ZO-1 tight junction protein and the HER2 EGF receptor family member. Treatment of Ishikawa cells with arecoline coordinately down-regulated expression of both ZO-1 and HER2 protein and transcripts in a dose dependent manner. Biochemical fractionation of cells as well as indirect immunofluorescence revealed that arecoline disrupted the localization of ZO-1 to the junctional complex at the cell periphery. Compared to control transfected cells, ectopic expression of exogenous HER2 prevented the arecoline mediated down-regulation of ZO-1 expression and restored the localization of ZO-1 to the cell periphery. Furthermore, treatment with dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid reported to up-regulate expression of HER2 in Ishikawa cells, precluded arecoline from down-regulating ZO-1 expression and disrupting ZO-1 localization. Conclusion Arecoline is known to induce precancerous lesions and cancer in the oral cavity of betel nut users. The arecoline down-regulation of ZO-1 expression and subcellular distribution suggests

  11. Expression of BDNF and TrkB Phosphorylation in the Rat Frontal Cortex During Morphine Withdrawal are NO Dependent.

    PubMed

    Peregud, Danil I; Yakovlev, Alexander A; Stepanichev, Mikhail Yu; Onufriev, Mikhail V; Panchenko, Leonid F; Gulyaeva, Natalia V

    2016-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) mediates pharmacological effects of opiates including dependence and abstinence. Modulation of NO synthesis during the induction phase of morphine dependence affects manifestations of morphine withdrawal syndrome, though little is known about mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. Neurotrophic and growth factors are involved in neuronal adaptation during opiate dependence. NO-dependent modulation of morphine dependence may be mediated by changes in expression and activity of neurotrophic and/or growth factors in the brain. Here, we studied the effects of NO synthesis inhibition during the induction phase of morphine dependence on the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) as well as their receptors in rat brain regions after spontaneous morphine withdrawal in dependent animals. Morphine dependence in rats was induced within 6 days by 12 injections of morphine in increasing doses (10-100 mg/kg), and NO synthase inhibitor L-N(G)-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (10 mg/kg) was given 1 h before each morphine injection. The expression of the BDNF, GDNF, NGF, IGF1, and their receptors in the frontal cortex, striatum, hippocampus, and midbrain was assessed 40 h after morphine withdrawal. L-NAME treatment during morphine intoxication resulted in an aggravation of the spontaneous morphine withdrawal severity. Morphine withdrawal was accompanied by upregulation of BDNF, IGF1, and their receptors TrkB and IGF1R, respectively, on the mRNA level in the frontal cortex, and only BDNF in hippocampus and midbrain. L-NAME administration during morphine intoxication decreased abstinence-induced upregulation of these mRNAs in the frontal cortex, hippocampus and midbrain. L-NAME prevented from abstinence-induced elevation of mature but not pro-form of BDNF polypeptide in the frontal cortex. While morphine abstinence did not affect Trk

  12. Dkk1-dependent inhibition of Wnt signaling activates Hesx1 expression through its 5' enhancer and directs forebrain precursor development.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Kazunari; Kondoh, Hisato

    2014-05-01

    Development of the anterior forebrain precursor (AFBP) in the anterior neural plate (ANP) depends on the activation of the Hesx1 transcription factor gene. The Hesx1-expression domain of the ANP is underlain by Dkk1-expressing tissues, initially proximal-most anterior visceral endoderm (AVE), and later anterior mesendoderm (AME). As Dkk1-null embryos fail to develop the Hesx1-expressing domain, it is likely that Wnt signal inhibition in the ANP is required for the Hesx1 activation. To investigate the regulation of the AFBP development, we took advantage of epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs), which develop into the ANP in the absence of activin signaling. Expression of Hesx1 and Six3, both involved in the AFBP development, was strongly activated 2 days after activin removal and concomitant addition of Wnt signal inhibitors, Dkk1 or XAV939. Furthermore, we showed that activation of the 720-bp Hesx1 5' enhancer is responsible for Hesx1 expression in the AFBP and depends on Wnt signal inhibition. In addition, we showed that Wnt inhibition during the first day has larger impact on the activation of Hesx1 and Six3 than the second day, suggesting that in embryos Wnt inhibition caused by the AVE-derived Dkk1, rather than the AME-derived Dkk1, contributes greatly in the establishment of the AFBP.

  13. Quantum dots induced interferon beta expression via TRIF-dependent signaling pathways by promoting endocytosis of TLR4.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chia-Chi; Luo, Yueh-Hsia; Chuang, Tsung-Hsien; Lin, Pinpin

    2016-02-17

    Quantum dots (QDs) are nano-sized semiconductors. Previously, intratracheal instillation of QD705s induces persistent inflammation and remodeling in the mouse lung. Expression of interferon beta (IFN-β), involved in tissue remodeling, was induced in the mouse lung. The objective of this study was to understand the mechanism of QD705 induced interferon beta (IFN-β) expression. QD705-COOH and QD705-PEG increased IFN-β and IP-10 mRNA levels during day 1 to 90 post-exposure in mouse lungs. QD705-COOH increased IFN-β expression via Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain-containing adapter protein (TRIF) dependent Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways in macrophages RAW264.7. Silencing TRIF expression with siRNA or co-treatment with a TRIF inhibitor tremendously abolished QD705s-induced IFN-β expression. Co-treatment with a TLR4 inhibitor completely prevented IFN-β induction by QD705-COOH. QD705-COOH readily entered cells, and co-treatment with either inhibitors of endocytosis or intracellular TLRs prevented IFN-β induction. Thus, activation of the TRIF dependent TLRs pathway by promoting endocytosis of TLR4 is one of the mechanisms for immunomodulatory effects of nanoparticles.

  14. Characterization of PROFILIN genes from allotetraploid (Gossypium hirsutum) cotton and its diploid progenitors and expression analysis in cotton genotypes differing in fiber characteristics.

    PubMed

    Argiriou, Anagnostis; Kalivas, Apostolos; Michailidis, Georgios; Tsaftaris, Athanasios

    2012-04-01

    The actin-binding protein profilin (PRF) plays an important role in cell growth and expansion by regulating the organization of the actin filaments. Recent studies have reported association between fiber elongation in cultivated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and PRF expression. In the present study, we cloned four genomic clones from allotetraploid cotton (G. hirsutum) and its putative diploid progenitors (G. arboreum and G. raimondii) designated GhPRF1_A, GhPRF1_D, GaPRF1, and GrPRF1 encoding cotton PRF and characterized their genomic structure, phylogenetic relationships and promoter structure. Sequence analysis of the coding regions of all clones resulted in a single protein product which revealed more than 80% similarity to most plant PRFs and a typical organization with an actin-binding and a polybasic phospholipid binding motif at the carboxy terminus. DNA blot hybridization suggested that PRF gene is present with more than one copy in the allotetraploid species G. hirsutum. Expression analysis performed in various organs of cultivated cotton revealed that the PRF gene was preferentially expressed in cotton fibers. Very low levels of expression were observed in whole flowers, while PRF transcripts were not detected in other organs examined. Furthermore, higher levels of expression were observed at the early stages of cotton fiber development (at 10 days post anthesis), indicative that this gene may play a major role in the early stages of cotton fiber development. Quantitation of the expression by real-time PCR revealed higher expression levels in a G. hirsutum variety with higher fiber percentage compared to a variety with lower percentage. In addition, higher levels of expression were found in cultivated allotetraploid G. barbadense cotton species with higher fiber length in comparison to cultivated allotetraploid G. hirsutum.

  15. In Your Face: Startle to Emotional Facial Expressions Depends on Face Direction

    PubMed Central

    Michalsen, Henriette; Øvervoll, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Although faces are often included in the broad category of emotional visual stimuli, the affective impact of different facial expressions is not well documented. The present experiment investigated startle electromyographic responses to pictures of neutral, happy, angry, and fearful facial expressions, with a frontal face direction (directed) and at a 45° angle to the left (averted). Results showed that emotional facial expressions interact with face direction to produce startle potentiation: Greater responses were found for angry expressions, compared with fear and neutrality, with directed faces. When faces were averted, fear and neutrality produced larger responses compared with anger and happiness. These results are in line with the notion that startle is potentiated to stimuli signaling threat. That is, a forward directed angry face may signal a threat toward the observer, and a fearful face directed to the side may signal a possible threat in the environment. PMID:28321290

  16. In Your Face: Startle to Emotional Facial Expressions Depends on Face Direction.

    PubMed

    Åsli, Ole; Michalsen, Henriette; Øvervoll, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Although faces are often included in the broad category of emotional visual stimuli, the affective impact of different facial expressions is not well documented. The present experiment investigated startle electromyographic responses to pictures of neutral, happy, angry, and fearful facial expressions, with a frontal face direction (directed) and at a 45° angle to the left (averted). Results showed that emotional facial expressions interact with face direction to produce startle potentiation: Greater responses were found for angry expressions, compared with fear and neutrality, with directed faces. When faces were averted, fear and neutrality produced larger responses compared with anger and happiness. These results are in line with the notion that startle is potentiated to stimuli signaling threat. That is, a forward directed angry face may signal a threat toward the observer, and a fearful face directed to the side may signal a possible threat in the environment.

  17. Age and sex dependent changes in liver gene expression during the life cycle of the rat

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Age- and sex-related susceptibility to adverse drug reactions and disease is a key concern in understanding drug safety and disease progression. We hypothesize that the underlying suite of hepatic genes expressed at various life cycle stages will impact susceptibility to adverse drug reactions. Understanding the basal liver gene expression patterns is a necessary first step in addressing this hypothesis and will inform our assessments of adverse drug reactions as the liver plays a central role in drug metabolism and biotransformation. Untreated male and female F344 rats were sacrificed at 2, 5, 6, 8, 15, 21, 52, 78, and 104 weeks of age. Liver tissues were collected for histology and gene expression analysis. Whole-genome rat microarrays were used to query global expression profiles. Results An initial list of differentially expressed genes was selected using criteria based upon p-value (p < 0.05) and fold-change (+/- 1.5). Three dimensional principal component analyses revealed differences between males and females beginning at 2 weeks with more divergent profiles beginning at 5 weeks. The greatest sex-differences were observed between 8 and 52 weeks before converging again at 104 weeks. K-means clustering identified groups of genes that displayed age-related patterns of expression. Various adult aging-related clusters represented gene pathways related to xenobiotic metabolism, DNA damage repair, and oxidative stress. Conclusions These results suggest an underlying role for genes in specific clusters in potentiating age- and sex-related differences in susceptibility to adverse health effects. Furthermore, such a comprehensive picture of life cycle changes in gene expression deepens our understanding and informs the utility of liver gene expression biomarkers. PMID:21118493

  18. Age-dependent Wnt gene expression in bone and during the course of osteoblast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rauner, Martina; Sipos, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Wnt signaling is vital for osteoblast differentiation and recently has been associated with aging. Because impaired osteoblastogenesis is a cellular characteristic of age-induced bone loss, we investigated whether this process is associated with an altered expression of Wnt signaling-related proteins in bone and osteoblasts. Bone marrow cells were isolated from male C57BL/6 mice, aged 6 weeks, 6 months, and 18 months, respectively. Osteogenic differentiation was induced for 3 weeks and assessed using alizarin red staining. Gene expression of Wnt1, 3a, 4, 5a, 5b, 7b, 9b, 10b, lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP)-5/6, as well as dickkopf-1 (Dkk-1), sclerostin, and secreted frizzled related protein-1 (sFRP-1) was determined in bone tissue and osteoblasts on days 7, 14, and 21 by real-time RT-PCR. Osteoblast differentiation was significantly reduced in aged mice compared with young and adult mice. In bone tissue, expression levels of all genes assessed were decreased in adult and old mice, respectively, compared with young mice. Mature osteoblasts of aged compared with those of young mice showed enhanced expression of Wnt9b, LRP-6, and Dkk-1, and decreased expression of Wnt5a and 7b. In early osteoblasts, mRNA levels of Wnt1, 5a, 5b, and 7b were increased significantly in aged mice. The expression of Wnt3a, 4, LRP-5, and sclerostin was not altered in aged osteoblasts. In conclusion, osteoblastic expression of each Wnt-related protein is regulated individually by aging. The overall decreased expression of Wnt-related proteins in bone tissue of aged mice underlines the newly discovered association of Wnt signaling with aging. PMID:19424851

  19. Uterine micro-environment and estrogen-dependent regulation of osteopontin expression in mouse blastocyst.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qing-Zhen; Qi, Qian-Rong; Chen, Ying-Xian; Xu, Wang-Ming; Liu, Qian; Yang, Jing

    2013-07-11

    Embryo implantation is a highly synchronized bioprocess between an activated blastocyst and a receptive uterus. In mice, successful implantation relies on the dynamic interplay of estrogen and progesterone; however, the key mediators downstream of these hormones that act on blastocyst competency and endometrium receptivity acquisition are largely unknown. In this study, we showed that the expression of osteopontin (OPN) in mouse blastocysts is regulated by ovarian estrogen and uterine micro-environment. OPN mRNA is up-regulated in mouse blastocyst on day 4 of pregnancy, which is associated with ovarian estrogen secretion peak. Hormone treatment in vivo demonstrated that OPN expression in a blastocyst is regulated by estrogen through an estrogen receptor (ER). Our results of the delayed and activated implantation model showed that OPN expression is induced after estrogen injection. While estrogen treatment during embryo culture in vitro showed less effect on OPN expression, the tubal ligation model on day 3 of pregnancy confirmed that the regulation of estrogen on OPN expression in blastocyst might, through some specific cytokines, have existed in a uterine micro-environment. Collectively, our study presents that estrogen regulates OPN expression and it may play an important role during embryo implantation by activating blastocyst competence and facilitating the endometrium acceptable for active blastocyst.

  20. Lox-dependent gene expression in transgenic plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

    PubMed

    Shcherbak, N; Kishchenko, O; Sakhno, L; Komarnytsky, I; Kuchuk, M

    2013-01-01

    Lox sites of the Cre/lox recombination system from bacteriophage P1 were analyzed for their ability to affect on transgene expression when inserted upstream from a gene coding sequence adjacent to the right border (RB) of T-DNA. Wild and mutated types of lox sites were tested for their effect upon bar gene expression in plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated and biolistic transformation methods. Lox-mediated expression of bar gene, recognized by resistance of transgenic plants to PPT, occurred only in plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. RT-PCR analysis confirms that PPT-resistant phenotype of transgenic plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was caused by activation of bar gene. The plasmid with promoterless gus gene together with the lox site adjacent to the RB was constructed and transferred to Nicotiana tabacum as well. Transgenic plants exhibited GUS activity and expression of gus gene was detected in plant leaves. Expression of bar gene from the vectors containing lox site near RB allowed recovery of numerous PPT-resistant transformants of such important crops as Beta vulgaris, Brassica napus, Lactuca sativa and Solanum tuberosum. Our results demonstrate that the lox site sequence adjacent to the RB can be used to control bar gene expression in transgenic plants.

  1. Gene Expression Profile of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase IIα in Rat's Hippocampus during Morphine Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Amiri, Shahin; Rafieenia, Fatemeh; Rostamzadeh, Jalal

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) which is highly expressed in the hippocampus is known to play a pivotal role in reward-related memories and morphine dependence. Methods In the present study, repeated morphine injections once daily for 7 days was done to induce morphine tolerance in male Wistar rats, after which gene expression profile of α-isoform of CaMKII (CaMKIIα) in the hippocampus was evaluated upon discontinuation of morphine injection over 21 days of morphine withdrawal. Control groups received saline for 7 consecutive days. For gene expression study, rats’ brains were removed and the hippocampus was dissected in separate groups on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 since discontinuation of of morphine injection. A semi-quantitative RT-PCR method was used to evaluate the gene expression profile. Results Tolerance to morphine was verified by a significant decrease in morphine analgesia in a hotplate test on day 8 (one day after the final repeated morphine injections). Results showed that gene expression of CaMKIIα at mRNA level on day 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 of morphine withdrawal was significantly altered as compared to the saline control group. Post hoc Tukey's test revealed a significantly enhanced CaMKIIα gene expression on day 14. Discussion It can be concluded that CaMKIIα gene expression during repeated injections of morphine is increased and this increase continues up to 14 days of withdrawal then settles at a new set point. Therefore, the strong morphine reward-related memory in morphine abstinent animals may, at least partly be attributed to, the up-regulation of CaMKIIα in the hippocampus over 14 days of morphine withdrawal. PMID:25337341

  2. Healthy sheep that differ in scrapie associated PRNP genotypes exhibit significant differences of expression pattern associated with immune response and cell-to-cell signalling in retropharyngeal lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Komolka, Katrin; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Schwerin, Manfred

    2013-04-15

    The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis whether prion protein gene (PRNP) associated scrapie susceptibility is connected with physiological changes in tissue involved in pathogen uptake, migration and propagation. Jejunum, ileal Peyer's patches, retropharyngeal lymph nodes, brain stem and liver of healthy and non scrapie-infected sheep with PRNP genotypes representing the scrapie risk class R1 (scrapie-resistant) and R5 (scrapie-susceptible), respectively, were comparatively analysed by microarray technology and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT qPCR). Significantly higher expression levels of genes involved in immune response and cell communication pathways in retropharyngeal lymph nodes of R1 sheep in comparison with R5 animals strongly suggest PRNP associated physiological processes with impact as an early barrier in pathogen defence. Equal expression patterns in brain stem suggest no physiological differences in brain of healthy R1 and R5 animals. In addition, similar expression pattern in liver indicates that there are no transcriptional differences in genes of the hepatic energy metabolism between animals of scrapie classes R1 and R5.

  3. Interleukin-6 upregulates paraoxonase 1 gene expression via an AKT/NF-κB-dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chi-Chih; Hsueh, Chi-Mei; Chen, Chiu-Yuan; Chen, Tzu-Hsiu; Hsu, Shih-Lan

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •IL-6 could induce PON1 gene expression. •IL-6 increased NF-κB protein expression and NF-κB-p50 and -p65 subunits nuclear translocation. •IL-6-induced PON1 up-regulation was through an AKT/NF-κB pathway. -- Abstract: The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between paraoxonase 1 (PON1) and atherosclerosis-related inflammation. In this study, human hepatoma HepG2 cell line was used as a hepatocyte model to examine the effects of the pro-inflammatory cytokines on PON1 expression. The results showed that IL-6, but not TNF-α and IL-1β, significantly increased both the function and protein level of PON1; data from real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that the IL-6-induced PON1 expression occurred at the transcriptional level. Increase of IκB kinase activity and IκB phosphorylation, and reduction of IκB protein level were also observed in IL-6-treated HepG2 cells compared with untreated culture. This event was accompanied by increase of NF-κB-p50 and -p65 nuclear translocation. Moreover, treatment with IL-6 augmented the DNA binding activity of NF-κB. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB activation by PDTC and BAY 11-7082, markedly suppressed the IL-6-mediated PON1 expression. In addition, IL-6 increased the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase B (PKB, AKT). An AKT inhibitor LY294002 effectively suppressed IKK/IκB/NF-κB signaling and PON1 gene expression induced by IL-6. Our findings demonstrate that IL-6 upregulates PON1 gene expression through an AKT/NF-κB signaling axis in human hepatocyte-derived HepG2 cell line.

  4. Nidogen-1 regulates laminin-1-dependent mammary-specific gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Pujuguet, Philippe; Simian, Marina; Liaw, Jane; Timpl, Rupert; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J..

    2000-02-01

    Nidogen-1 (entactin) acts as a bridge between the extracellular matrix molecules laminin-1 and type IV collagen, and thus participates in the assembly of basement membranes. To investigate the role of nidogen-1 in regulating cell-type-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium, we designed a culture microecosystem in which each component, including epithelial cells, mesenchymal cells, lactogenic hormones and extracellular matrix, could be controlled. We found that primary and established mesenchymal and myoepithelial cells synthesized and secreted nidogen-1, whereas expression was absent in primary and established epithelial cells. In an epithelial cell line containing mesenchymal cells, nidogen-1 was produced by the mesenchymal cells but deposited between the epithelial cells. In this mixed culture, mammary epithelial cells express b-casein in the presence of lactogenic hormones. Addition of either laminin-1 plus nidogen-1, or laminin-1 alone to mammary epithelial cells induced b- casein production. We asked whether recombinant nidogen-1 alone could signal directly for b-casein. Nidogen-1 did not induce b-casein synthesis in epithelial cells, but it augmented the inductive capacity of laminin-1. These data suggest that nidogen-1 can cooperate with laminin-1 to regulate b-casein expression. Addition of full length nidogen-1 to the mixed cultures had no effect on b-casein gene expression; however, a nidogen-1 fragment containing the laminin-1 binding domain, but lacking the type IV collagen-binding domain, had a dominant negative effect on b-casein expression. These data point to a physiological role for nidogen-1 in the basement membrane-induced gene expression by epithelial cells.

  5. PECA: a novel statistical tool for deconvoluting time-dependent gene expression regulation.

    PubMed

    Teo, Guoshou; Vogel, Christine; Ghosh, Debashis; Kim, Sinae; Choi, Hyungwon

    2014-01-03

    Protein expression varies as a result of intricate regulation of synthesis and degradation of messenger RNAs (mRNA) and proteins. Studies of dynamic regulation typically rely on time-course data sets of mRNA and protein expression, yet there are no statistical methods that integrate these multiomics data and deconvolute individual regulatory processes of gene expression control underlying the observed concentration changes. To address this challenge, we developed Protein Expression Control Analysis (PECA), a method to quantitatively dissect protein expression variation into the contributions of mRNA synthesis/degradation and protein synthesis/degradation, termed RNA-level and protein-level regulation respectively. PECA computes the rate ratios of synthesis versus degradation as the statistical summary of expression control during a given time interval at each molecular level and computes the probability that the rate ratio changed between adjacent time intervals, indicating regulation change at the time point. Along with the associated false-discovery rates, PECA gives the complete description of dynamic expression control, that is, which proteins were up- or down-regulated at each molecular level and each time point. Using PECA, we analyzed two yeast data sets monitoring the cellular response to hyperosmotic and oxidative stress. The rate ratio profiles reported by PECA highlighted a large magnitude of RNA-level up-regulation of stress response genes in the early response and concordant protein-level regulation with time delay. However, the contributions of RNA- and protein-level regulation and their temporal patterns were different between the two data sets. We also observed several cases where protein-level regulation counterbalanced transcriptomic changes in the early stress response to maintain the stability of protein concentrations, suggesting that proteostasis is a proteome-wide phenomenon mediated by post-transcriptional regulation.

  6. ASIC2a-dependent increase of ASIC3 surface expression enhances the sustained component of the currents

    PubMed Central

    Kweon, Hae-Jin; Cho, Jin-Hwa; Jang, Il-Sung; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-gated cation channels widely expressed in the nervous system. Proton sensing by ASICs has been known to mediate pain, mechanosensation, taste transduction, learning and memory, and fear. In this study, we investigated the differential subcellular localization of ASIC2a and ASIC3 in heterologous expression systems. While ASIC2a targeted the cell surface itself, ASIC3 was mostly accumulated in the ER with partial expression in the plasma membrane. However, when ASIC3 was co-expressed with ASIC2a, its surface expression was markedly increased. By using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay, we confirmed the heteromeric association between ASIC2a and ASIC3 subunits. In addition, we observed that the ASIC2a-dependent surface trafficking of ASIC3 remarkably enhanced the sustained component of the currents. Our study demonstrates that ASIC2a can increase the membrane conductance sensitivity to protons by facilitating the surface expression of ASIC3 through herteromeric assembly. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(10): 542-547] PMID:27241858

  7. RB/PLK1-dependent induced pathway by SLAMF3 expression inhibits mitosis and control hepatocarcinoma cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bouhlal, Hicham; Singh, Amrathlal Rabbind; Ossart, Christèle; Reignier, Aline; Hocini, Hakim; Fouquet, Gregory; Baghami, Mohammed Al; Eugenio, Mélanie Simoes; Nguyen-Khac, Eric; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Marcq, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Polo-like kinase PLK1 is a cell cycle protein that plays multiple roles in promoting cell cycle progression. Among the many roles, the most prominent role of PLK1 is to regulate the mitotic spindle formation checkpoint at the M-phase. Recently we reported the expression of SLAMF3 in Hepatocytes and show that it is down regulated in tumor cells of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We also show that the forced high expression level of SLAMF3 in HCC cells controls proliferation by inhibiting the MAPK ERK/JNK and the mTOR pathways. In the present study, we provide evidence that the inhibitory effect of SLAMF3 on HCC proliferation occurs through Retinoblastoma (RB) factor and PLK1-dependent pathway. In addition to the inhibition of MAPK ERK/JNK and the mTOR pathways, expression of SLAMF3 in HCC retains RB factor in its hypophosphorylated active form, which in turn inactivates E2F transcription factor, thereby repressing the expression and activation of PLK1. A clear inverse correlation was also observed between SLAMF3 and PLK expression in patients with HCC. In conclusion, the results presented here suggest that the tumor suppressor potential of SLAMF3 occurs through activation of RB that represses PLK1. We propose that the induction of a high expression level of SLAMF3 in cancerous cells could control cellular mitosis and block tumor progression. PMID:26799423

  8. Species-Specific Dibutyl Phthalate Fetal Testis Endocrine Disruption Correlates with Inhibition of SREBP2-Dependent Gene Expression Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kamin J.; McDowell, Erin N.; Viereck, Megan P.; Xia, Jessie Q.

    2011-01-01

    Fetal rat phthalate exposure produces a spectrum of male reproductive tract malformations downstream of reduced Leydig cell testosterone production, but the molecular mechanism of phthalate perturbation of Leydig cell function is not well understood. By bioinformatically examining fetal testis expression microarray data sets from susceptible (rat) and resistant (mouse) species after dibutyl phthalate (DBP) exposure, we identified decreased expression of several metabolic pathways in both species. However, lipid metabolism pathways transcriptionally regulated by sterol regulatory element–binding protein (SREBP) were inhibited in the rat but induced in the mouse, and this differential species response corresponded with repression of the steroidogenic pathway. In rats exposed to 100 or 500 mg/kg DBP from gestational days (GD) 16 to 20, a correlation was observed between GD20 testis steroidogenic inhibition and reductions of testis cholesterol synthesis endpoints including testis total cholesterol levels, Srebf2 gene expression, and cholesterol synthesis pathway gene expression. SREBP2 expression was detected in all fetal rat testis cells but was highest in Leydig cells. Quantification of SREBP2 immunostaining showed that 500 mg/kg DBP exposure significantly reduced SREBP2 expression in rat fetal Leydig cells but not in seminiferous cords. By Western analysis, total rat testis SREBP2 levels were not altered by DBP exposure. Together, these data suggest that phthalate-induced inhibition of fetal testis steroidogenesis is closely associated with reduced activity of several lipid metabolism pathways and SREBP2-dependent cholesterologenesis in Leydig cells. PMID:21266533

  9. Transgenic expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 results in epidermal hyperplasia, hypertrophy, and severe dermal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Miliani de Marval, P L; Gimenez-Conti, I B; LaCava, M; Martinez, L A; Conti, C J; Rodriguez-Puebla, M L

    2001-07-01

    In a previous report we have described the effects of expression of D-type cyclins in epithelial tissues of transgenic mice. To study the involvement of the D-type cyclin partner cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) in epithelial growth and differentiation, transgenic mice were generated carrying the CDK4 gene under the control of a keratin 5 promoter. As expected, transgenic mice showed expression of CDK4 in the epidermal basal-cell layer. Epidermal proliferation increased dramatically and basal cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy were observed. The hyperproliferative phenotype of these transgenic mice was independent of D-type cyclin expression because no overexpression of these proteins was detected. CDK4 and CDK2 kinase activities increased in transgenic animals and were associated with elevated binding of p27(Kip1) to CDK4. Expression of CDK4 in the epidermis results in an increased spinous layer compared with normal epidermis, and a mild hyperkeratosis in the cornified layer. In addition to epidermal changes, severe dermal fibrosis was observed and part of the subcutaneous adipose tissue was replaced by connective tissue. Also, abnormal expression of keratin 6 associated with the hyperproliferative phenotype was observed in transgenic epidermis. This model provides in vivo evidence for the role of CDK4 as a mediator of proliferation in epithelial cells independent of D-type cyclin expression.