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Sample records for genotype dependent expressed

  1. Dietary protein intake affects expression of genes for lipid metabolism in porcine skeletal muscle in a genotype-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingying; Li, Fengna; He, Lingyun; Tan, Bie; Deng, Jinping; Kong, Xiangfeng; Li, Yinghui; Geng, Meimei; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-04-14

    Skeletal muscle is a major site for the oxidation of fatty acids (FA) in mammals, including humans. Using a swine model, we tested the hypothesis that dietary protein intake regulates the expression of key genes for lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle. A total of ninety-six barrows (forty-eight pure-bred Bama mini-pigs (fatty genotype) and forty-eight Landrace pigs (lean genotype)) were fed from 5 weeks of age to market weight. Pigs of fatty or lean genotype were randomly assigned to one of two dietary treatments (low- or adequate-protein diet), with twenty-four individually fed pigs per treatment. Our data showed that dietary protein levels affected the expression of genes involved in the anabolism and catabolism of lipids in the longissimus dorsi and biceps femoris muscles in a genotype-dependent manner. Specifically, Bama mini-pigs had more intramuscular fat, SFA and MUFA, as well as elevated mRNA expression levels of lipogenic genes, compared with Landrace pigs. In contrast, Bama mini-pigs had lower mRNA expression levels of lipolytic genes than Landrace pigs fed an adequate-protein diet in the growing phase. These data are consistent with higher white-fat deposition in Bama mini-pigs than in Landrace pigs. In conclusion, adequate provision of dietary protein (amino acids) plays an important role in regulating the expression of key lipogenic genes, and the growth of white adipose tissue, in a genotype- and tissue-specific manner. These findings have important implications for developing novel dietary strategies in pig production.

  2. Comparative analyses of genotype dependent expressed sequence tags and stress-responsive transcriptome of chickpea wilt illustrate predicted and unexpected genes and novel regulators of plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Nasheeman; Ghai, Deepali; Barman, Pranjan; Basu, Swaraj; Gangisetty, Nagaraju; Mandal, Mihir K; Chakraborty, Niranjan; Datta, Asis; Chakraborty, Subhra

    2009-01-01

    Background The ultimate phenome of any organism is modulated by regulated transcription of many genes. Characterization of genetic makeup is thus crucial for understanding the molecular basis of phenotypic diversity, evolution and response to intra- and extra-cellular stimuli. Chickpea is the world's third most important food legume grown in over 40 countries representing all the continents. Despite its importance in plant evolution, role in human nutrition and stress adaptation, very little ESTs and differential transcriptome data is available, let alone genotype-specific gene signatures. Present study focuses on Fusarium wilt responsive gene expression in chickpea. Results We report 6272 gene sequences of immune-response pathway that would provide genotype-dependent spatial information on the presence and relative abundance of each gene. The sequence assembly led to the identification of a CaUnigene set of 2013 transcripts comprising of 973 contigs and 1040 singletons, two-third of which represent new chickpea genes hitherto undiscovered. We identified 209 gene families and 262 genotype-specific SNPs. Further, several novel transcription regulators were identified indicating their possible role in immune response. The transcriptomic analysis revealed 649 non-cannonical genes besides many unexpected candidates with known biochemical functions, which have never been associated with pathostress-responsive transcriptome. Conclusion Our study establishes a comprehensive catalogue of the immune-responsive root transcriptome with insight into their identity and function. The development, detailed analysis of CaEST datasets and global gene expression by microarray provide new insight into the commonality and diversity of organ-specific immune-responsive transcript signatures and their regulated expression shaping the species specificity at genotype level. This is the first report on differential transcriptome of an unsequenced genome during vascular wilt. PMID:19732460

  3. 5-HT(1A)-receptor over-expressing mice: genotype and sex dependent responses to antidepressants in the forced swim-test.

    PubMed

    Günther, Lydia; Rothe, Julia; Rex, André; Voigt, Jörg-Peter; Millan, Mark J; Fink, Heidrun; Bert, Bettina

    2011-09-01

    Deficiencies in serotonergic neurotransmission are involved in the pathophysiology of depression. Due to its modulatory effect on serotonin (5-HT) release, the 5-HT(1A)-receptor is thought to play a decisive role in the therapy of this mood disorder. However, it is not fully understood how antidepressant effects are mediated by pre- and postsynaptic receptor sites. In this study we examined the impact of postsynaptic 5-HT(1A)-receptor over-expression in corticolimbic areas of male and female mice on the performance in the forced swim-test (FST). Furthermore, we investigated their response to the serotonin selective reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram in comparison to the selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor reboxetine, as well as the partial 5-HT(1A)-receptor agonists, buspirone and S 15535. Additionally, these drugs were evaluated in the open field-test in order to observe effects on motor activity. The density of 5-HT(1A)-receptors in discrete corticolimbic regions was determined in detail by quantitative autoradiography with [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT to investigate genotype as well as sex dependent differences in the expression pattern. [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT binding differed depending on sex with female mice of both genotypes displaying higher receptor binding in distinct brain areas. In the FST untreated male but not female over-expressing (OE) mice showed an antidepressant-like behaviour compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Citalopram yielded an antidepressant effect without influencing locomotor activity in OE mice but not in WT mice. Reboxetine had no antidepressant-like effect in OE mice, but sex-dependently in WT mice. The two partial agonists, buspirone and S 15535 produced no antidepressant-like activity in both genotypes and sexes, but aberrant motor effects. The antidepressant-like phenotype of male transgenic mice accounts for an involvement of postsynaptic 5-HT(1A)-receptors in the FST behaviour. In addition, the selective over-expression of postsynaptic 5-HT(1A

  4. Mice expressing T4826I-RYR1 are viable but exhibit sex- and genotype-dependent susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia and muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Benjamin; Boncompagni, Simona; Feng, Wei; Yang, Tianzhong; Lopez, Jose R; Matthaei, Klaus I; Goth, Samuel R; Protasi, Feliciano; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Allen, Paul D; Pessah, Isaac N

    2012-03-01

    Mutation T4825I in the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RYR1(T4825I/+)) confers human malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS). We report a knock-in mouse line that expresses the isogenetic mutation T4826I. Heterozygous RYR1(T4826I/+) (Het) or homozygous RYR1(T4826I/T4826I) (Hom) mice are fully viable under typical rearing conditions but exhibit genotype- and sex-dependent susceptibility to environmental conditions that trigger MH. Hom mice maintain higher core temperatures than WT in the home cage, have chronically elevated myoplasmic[Ca(2+)](rest), and present muscle damage in soleus with a strong sex bias. Mice subjected to heat stress in an enclosed 37°C chamber fail to trigger MH regardless of genotype, whereas heat stress at 41°C invariably triggers fulminant MH in Hom, but not Het, mice within 20 min. WT and Het female mice fail to maintain euthermic body temperature when placed atop a bed whose surface is 37°C during halothane anesthesia (1.75%) and have no hyperthermic response, whereas 100% Hom mice of either sex and 17% of the Het males develop fulminant MH. WT mice placed on a 41°C bed maintain body temperature while being administered halothane, and 40% of the Het females and 100% of the Het males develop fulminant MH within 40 min. Myopathic alterations in soleus were apparent by 12 mo, including abnormally distributed and enlarged mitochondria, deeply infolded sarcolemma, and frequent Z-line streaming regions, which were more severe in males. These data demonstrate that an MHS mutation within the S4-S5 cytoplasmic linker of RYR1 confers genotype- and sex-dependent susceptibility to pharmacological and environmental stressors that trigger fulminant MH and promote myopathy. PMID:22131268

  5. Multivariate expression analysis of the gene network underlying sexual development in turtle embryos with temperature-dependent and genotypic sex determination.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, N

    2010-01-01

    Sexual development has long been the target of study and despite great advances in our understanding of the composition and regulation of the gene network underlying gonadogenesis, our knowledge remains incomplete. Of particular interest is the relative role that the environment and the genome play in directing gonadal formation, especially the effect of environmental temperature in directing this process in vertebrates. Comparative analyses in closely related taxa with contrasting sex-determining mechanisms should help fill this gap. Here I present a multivariate study of the regulation of the gene network underlying sexual development in turtles with temperature-dependent (TSD; Chrysemys picta) and genotypic sex determination (GSD; Apalone mutica). I combine novel data on SOX9 and DMRT1 from these species with contrasting sex-determining mechanisms for the first time with previously reported data on DAX1, SF-1 (NR5A1), WT1, and aromatase (CYP19A1) from these same taxa. Comparative expression analyses of SOX9 and DMRT1 from these and other species indicate additional elements whose expression has diverged among TSD taxa, further supporting the notion that significant evolutionary changes have accrued in the regulation of the TSD gene network in reptiles. A non-parametric MANOVA revealed that temperature had a significant effect in multivariate gene expression in C. picta that varied during embryonic development, whereas the covariation of gene expression in A. mutica was insensitive to temperature. A phenotypic trajectory analysis (PTA) of gene expression comparing both species directly indicated that the relative covariation in gene expression varied between temperatures in C. picta. Furthermore, the 25 degrees C trajectory of C. picta differed from that of A. mutica in the magnitude of gene expression change. Additional analyses revealed a stronger covariation in gene expression and a more interconnected regulatory network in A. mutica, consistent with the

  6. Genotypic to expression profiling of bovine calcium channel, voltage-dependent, alpha-2/delta subunit 1 gene, and their association with bovine mastitis among Frieswal (HFX Sahiwal) crossbred cattle of Indian origin.

    PubMed

    Deb, Rajib; Singh, Umesh; Kumar, Sushil; Kumar, Arun; Singh, Rani; Sengar, Gyanendra; Mann, Sandeep; Sharma, Arjava

    2014-04-01

    Calcium channel, voltage-dependent, alpha-2/delta subunit 1 (CACNA2D1) gene is considered to be an important noncytokine candidate gene influencing mastitis. Scanty of reports are available until today regarding the role play of CACNA2D1 gene on the susceptibility of bovine mastitis. We interrogated the CACNA2D1 G519663A [A>G] SNP by PCR-RFLP among two hundreds Frieswal (HF X Sahiwal) crossbred cattle of Indian origin. Genotypic frequency of AA (51.5, n=101) was comparatively higher than AG (35, n=70) and GG (14.5, n=29). Association of Somatic cell score (SCS) with genotypes revealed that, GG genotypes showing lesser count (less susceptible to mastitis) compare to AA and AG. Relative expression of CACNA2D1 transcript (in milk samples) was significantly higher among GG than AG and AA. Further we have also isolated blood sample from the all groups and PBMCs were cultured from each blood sample as per the standard protocol. They were treated with Calcium channel blocker and the expression level of the CACNA2D1 gene was evaluated by Real Time PCR. Results show that expression level decline in each genotypic group after treatment and expression level of GG are again significantly higher than AA and AG. Thus, it may be concluded that GG genotypic animals are favorable for selecting disease resistant breeds.

  7. Fatty acid composition of chicken breast meat is dependent on genotype-related variation of FADS1 and FADS2 gene expression and desaturating activity.

    PubMed

    Boschetti, E; Bordoni, A; Meluzzi, A; Castellini, C; Dal Bosco, A; Sirri, F

    2016-04-01

    In Western countries the dietary guidance emphasizes the need to decrease the intake of saturated fatty acids and to replace them with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), particularly long chain n-3 PUFA (LC-PUFA). The production of poultry meat having a lower fat content and healthier fatty acid (FA) profile is a hot topic for the poultry industry, and the possibility to identify genotypes able to produce meat with a higher LC-PUFA content deserves attention. The aims of the present study were to evidence in chicken (i) a genotype-related different expression of the desaturating enzymes delta-6 (Δ6, EC 1.14.99.25), delta-5 (Δ5, EC 1.14.19.) and delta-9 (Δ9, EC 1.14.19.1); (ii) the impact of the hypothesized different expression on the meat FA composition; (iii) the distribution of desaturase products in the different lipid classes. Slow (SG), medium (MG) and fast (FG) growing chickens fed the same diet were evaluated either for the relative expression of FADS1, FADS2 and SCD1 genes in liver (by q-PCR), or for the FA composition of breast meat. MG and particularly SG birds showed a greater expression of FADS2 and FADS1 genes, a higher Δ6 and Δ5 activity (estimated using desaturase indices), and consequently a higher LC-PUFA content in the breast meat than FG birds. The relationship between genotype and desaturating ability was demonstrated, with a significant impact on the PUFA content of breast meat. Due to the high consumption rate of avian meat, the identification of the best genotypes for meat production could represent an important goal not only for the food industry, but also for the improvement of human nutrition. PMID:26670346

  8. Co-dependence of genotype and dietary protein intake to affect expression on amino acid/peptide transporters in porcine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Kong, X; Li, F; Tan, B; Li, Y; Duan, Y; Yin, Y; He, J; Hu, C; Blachier, F; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    A total of 96 barrows (48 pure-bred Bama mini-pigs representing fatty genotype, and 48 Landrace pigs representing lean genotype) were randomly assigned to either a low- or adequate-protein treatment diet. The experimental period commenced at 5 weeks of age and extended to the finishing period. After euthanasia, blood and skeletal muscle samples were collected from pigs at the nursery, growing, and finishing phases. Our results indicate that the concentrations of free AAs in the plasma and muscle decreased as the age of the pigs increased. In addition, a strain × growth phase interaction (P < 0.05) was observed for the free AA pool in the plasma and muscle. The low-protein diet upregulated (P < 0.05) the mRNA levels for T1R1/T1R3 involved in glutamate binding, but downregulated (P < 0.05) the mRNA levels for PAT1, PAT2, and ASCT2, which transport neutral AAs into muscles. Bama mini-pigs had higher (P < 0.05) mRNA levels for LAT1, SNAT2, and EAAC1, but a lower (P < 0.05) mRNA level for PepT1, compared with Landrace pigs. Collectively, our findings indicate that adequate provision of dietary protein plays an important role in regulating profiles of free AA pools and expression of key AA/peptide transporters/transceptors in a genotype- and tissue-specific manner.

  9. Temperature-dependent genotype-by-genotype interaction between a pathogenic fungus and its hyperparasitic virus.

    PubMed

    Bryner, Sarah Franziska; Rigling, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The outcome of host-parasite interactions may depend not only on the genotypes of the species involved but also on environmental factors. We used the fungus Cryphonectria parasitica, the causal agent of chestnut blight, and its hyperparasitic virus, Cryphonectria hypovirus-1 (CHV1), to test for genotype-by-genotype-by-environment interactions in a host-parasite system. In C. parasitica, infection with CHV1 induces a hypovirulent phenotype with reduced virulence toward the chestnut tree (Castanea spp.) and thus controls chestnut blight in many European regions. In contrast, uninfected virulent C. parasitica have nearly eradicated the American chestnut in North America. We applied a full factorial design and assessed the fungal growth and sporulation of four C. parasitica strains, uninfected and infected with each of the four known CHV1 subtypes, at 12°, 18°, 24°, and 30°C. We found a significant (P ≤ .00001) genotype-by-genotype-by-environment interaction, demonstrating the potential for a selection mosaic. As a consequence, different host and parasite genotypes would be selected under different climatic conditions, affecting the coevolutionary dynamics of the host-parasite interaction and the course of chestnut blight epidemics. Genotype-by-genotype-by-environment interactions are essential to take into account when designing biological control strategies.

  10. Genotype-dependent lifespan effects in peptone deprived Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Stastna, Jana J; Snoek, L Basten; Kammenga, Jan E; Harvey, Simon C

    2015-11-05

    Dietary restriction appears to act as a general non-genetic mechanism that can robustly prolong lifespan. There have however been reports in many systems of cases where restricted food intake either shortens, or does not affect, lifespan. Here we analyze lifespan and the effect of food restriction via deprived peptone levels on lifespan in wild isolates and introgression lines (ILs) of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. These analyses identify genetic variation in lifespan, in the effect of this variation in diet on lifespan and also in the likelihood of maternal, matricidal, hatching. Importantly, in the wild isolates and the ILs, we identify genotypes in which peptone deprivation mediated dietary restriction reduces lifespan. We also identify, in recombinant inbred lines, a locus that affects maternal hatching, a phenotype closely linked to dietary restriction in C. elegans. These results indicate that peptone deprivation mediated dietary restriction affects lifespan in C. elegans in a genotype-dependent manner, reducing lifespan in some genotypes. This may operate by a mechanism similar to dietary restriction.

  11. Genotype-dependent lifespan effects in peptone deprived Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Stastna, Jana J.; Snoek, L. Basten; Kammenga, Jan E.; Harvey, Simon C.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary restriction appears to act as a general non-genetic mechanism that can robustly prolong lifespan. There have however been reports in many systems of cases where restricted food intake either shortens, or does not affect, lifespan. Here we analyze lifespan and the effect of food restriction via deprived peptone levels on lifespan in wild isolates and introgression lines (ILs) of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. These analyses identify genetic variation in lifespan, in the effect of this variation in diet on lifespan and also in the likelihood of maternal, matricidal, hatching. Importantly, in the wild isolates and the ILs, we identify genotypes in which peptone deprivation mediated dietary restriction reduces lifespan. We also identify, in recombinant inbred lines, a locus that affects maternal hatching, a phenotype closely linked to dietary restriction in C. elegans. These results indicate that peptone deprivation mediated dietary restriction affects lifespan in C. elegans in a genotype-dependent manner, reducing lifespan in some genotypes. This may operate by a mechanism similar to dietary restriction. PMID:26539794

  12. Association between low-activity serotonin transporter genotype and heroin dependence: behavioral and personality correlates.

    PubMed

    Gerra, G; Garofano, L; Santoro, G; Bosari, S; Pellegrini, C; Zaimovic, A; Moi, G; Bussandri, M; Moi, A; Brambilla, F; Donnini, C

    2004-04-01

    In previous studies, serotonin (5-HT) system disturbance was found involved in a variety of behavioral disorders, psychopathologies, and substance use disorders. A functional polymorphism in the promoter region of the human serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) was recently identified and the presence of the short (S) allele found to be associated with a lower level of expression of the gene, lower levels of 5-HT uptake, type 2 alcoholism, violence and suicidal behavior. In the present study, 101 heroin addicts (males, West European, Caucasians) and 101 healthy control subjects matched for race and gender, with no history of substance use disorder, have been genotyped. Aggressiveness levels were measured in both heroin addicts and controls utilizing Buss-Durkee-Hostility-Inventory (BDHI). Data about suicide attempt and violent criminal behavior in subject history have been collected. The short-short (SS) genotype frequency was significantly higher among heroin dependent individuals compared with control subjects (P = 0.025). The odds ratio for the SS genotype versus the long-long (LL) genotype frequency was 0.69, 95% Cl (0.49-0.97), when heroin addicts were compared with healthy controls. The SS genotype frequency was significantly higher among violent heroin dependent individuals compared with addicted individuals without aggressive behavior (P = 0.02). BDHI mean total scores and suspiciousness and negativism subscales scores were significantly higher in SS individuals, in comparison with LL subjects, among heroin addicts. No association was found between SS genotype and suicide history. Our data suggest that a decreased expression of the gene encoding the 5-HTT transporter, due to "S" promoter polymorphism, may be associated with an increased risk for substance use disorders, particularly in the subjects with more consistent aggressiveness and impulsiveness.

  13. Comparative analysis of gene expression in response to cold stress in diverse rice genotypes.

    PubMed

    Moraes de Freitas, Gabriela Peres; Basu, Supratim; Ramegowda, Venkategowda; Braga, Eugenia Bolacel; Pereira, Andy

    2016-02-26

    Cold stress is a major factor affecting rice (Oryza sativa) growth and productivity, limiting its distribution worldwide. Rice production is affected primarily due to its vulnerability to cold stress at seedling stage, as well as reproductive stage leading to spikelet sterility. We report here the analysis of 21 diverse rice genotypes from the USDA mini-core collection for cold tolerance and categorized their tolerance levels on the basis of reduction in growth measured by root and shoot length. The screening identified 12 cold tolerant genotypes from which six tolerant genotypes were characterized at the vegetative stage for cold tolerance and gas-exchange parameters. Two tolerant and two sensitive genotypes were used further for gene expression analysis. Lipid Transfer Protein (LTP) genes showed a clear difference in expression between cold tolerant and sensitive genotypes suggesting that they are good candidates for engineering cold tolerance in rice. Nipponbare was identified as a cold tolerant genotype with stress tolerance mechanism potentially operating via both ABA dependent and independent pathways. PMID:26855133

  14. Molecular mechanisms underlying genotype-dependent responses to dietary restriction

    PubMed Central

    Schleit, Jennifer; Johnson, Simon C.; Bennett, Christopher F.; Simko, Marissa; Trongtham, Natalie; Castanza, Anthony; Hsieh, Edward J.; Moller, Richard M.; Wasko, Brian M.; Delaney, Joe R.; Sutphin, George L.; Carr, Daniel; Murakami, Christopher J.; Tocchi, Autumn; Xian, Bo; Chen, Weiyang; Yu, Tao; Goswami, Sarani; Higgins, Sean; Holmberg, Mollie; Jeong, Ki-Soo; Kim, Jin R.; Klum, Shannon; Liao, Eric; Lin, Michael S.; Lo, Winston; Miller, Hillary; Olsen, Brady; Peng, Zhao J.; Pollard, Tom; Pradeep, Prarthana; Pruett, Dillon; Rai, Dilreet; Ros, Vanessa; Singh, Minnie; Spector, Benjamin L.; Wende, Helen Vander; An, Elroy H.; Fletcher, Marissa; Jelic, Monika; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Han, Jing-Dong J.; Kennedy, Brian K.; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Summary Dietary restriction (DR) increases lifespan and attenuates age-related phenotypes in many organisms; however, the effect of DR on longevity of individuals in genetically heterogeneous populations is not well characterized. Here we describe a large-scale effort to define molecular mechanisms that underlie genotype-specific responses to DR. The effect of DR on lifespan was determined for 166 single-gene deletion strains in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Resulting changes in mean lifespan ranged from a reduction of 79% to an increase of 103%. Vacuolar pH homeostasis, superoxide dismutase activity, and mitochondrial proteostasis were found to be strong determinants of the response to DR. Proteomic analysis of cells deficient in prohibitins revealed induction of a mitochondrial unfolded protein response (mtUPR) which has not previously been described in yeast. Mitochondrial proteotoxic stress in prohibitin mutants was suppressed by DR via reduced cytoplasmic mRNA translation. A similar relationship between prohibitins, the mtUPR, and longevity was also observed in Caenorhabditis elegans. These observations define conserved molecular processes that underlie genotype-dependent effects of DR that may be important modulators of DR in higher organisms. PMID:23837470

  15. Apolipoprotein C-I is an APOE genotype-dependent suppressor of glial activation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inheritance of the human ϵ4 allele of the apolipoprotein (apo) E gene (APOE) significantly increases the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD), in addition to adversely influencing clinical outcomes of other neurologic diseases. While apoE isoforms differentially interact with amyloid β (Aβ), a pleiotropic neurotoxin key to AD etiology, more recent work has focused on immune regulation in AD pathogenesis and on the mechanisms of innate immunomodulatory effects associated with inheritance of different APOE alleles. APOE genotype modulates expression of proximal genes including APOC1, which encodes a small apolipoprotein that is associated with Aβ plaques. Here we tested the hypothesis that APOE-genotype dependent innate immunomodulation may be mediated in part by apoC-I. Methods ApoC-I concentration in cerebrospinal fluid from control subjects of differing APOE genotypes was quantified by ELISA. Real-time PCR and ELISA were used to analyze apoC-I mRNA and protein expression, respectively, in liver, serum, cerebral cortex, and cultured primary astrocytes derived from mice with targeted replacement of murine APOE for human APOE ϵ3 or ϵ4. ApoC-I direct modulation of innate immune activity was investigated in cultured murine primary microglia and astrocytes, as well as human differentiated macrophages, using specific toll-like receptor agonists LPS and PIC as well as Aβ. Results ApoC-I levels varied with APOE genotype in humans and in APOE targeted replacement mice, with ϵ4 carriers showing significantly less apoC-I in both species. ApoC-I potently reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion from primary murine microglia and astrocytes, and human macrophages, stimulated with LPS, PIC, or Aβ. Conclusions ApoC-I is immunosuppressive. Our results illuminate a novel potential mechanism for APOE genotype risk for AD; one in which patients with an ϵ4 allele have decreased expression of apoC-I resulting in increased innate immune activity. PMID

  16. The Association of Il28b Genotype with the Histological Features of Chronic Hepatitis C Is HCV Genotype Dependent

    PubMed Central

    D’Ambrosio, Roberta; Aghemo, Alessio; De Francesco, Raffaele; Rumi, Maria Grazia; Galmozzi, Enrico; De Nicola, Stella; Cheroni, Cristina; Clark, Paul J.; Ronchi, Guido; Lampertico, Pietro; Colombo, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The interleukin 28B (IL28B) rs12979860 polymorphism is associated with treatment outcome in hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 and 4 patients. Its association with the histological features of chronic hepatitis C and disease severity needs further clarifications. To assess the correlation between IL28B genotype, HCV genotype and liver biopsy findings in untreated patients. Materials and Methods Pre-treatment liver biopsies from 335 HCV Caucasian patients (59% males, age 50 years) enrolled in the MIST study were staged for fibrosis and inflammation according to the METAVIR and the Ishak scoring systems; steatosis was dichotomized as <5% or ≥5%. IL28B was typed by Taqman Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assay. HCV genotype was 1 in 151 (45%), 2 in 99 (30%), 3 in 50 (15%) and 4 in 35 (10%) patients. IL28B genotype was CC in 117 (34%), CT in 166 (49%) and TT in 52 (15%). At univariate analysis, the IL28B CC genotype was associated with severe portal inflammation in HCV-1 patients (CC vs. CT/TT: 86% vs. 63%, p = 0.005), severe lobular inflammation in HCV-2 patients (CC vs. CT/TT: 44% vs. 23%, p = 0.03), and less fatty infiltration in HCV-1 patients (CC vs. CT/TT: 72% vs. 51%, p = 0.02). Despite the lack of any association between IL28B and fibrosis stage, in HCV-3 patients IL28B CC correlated with METAVIR F3–F4 (CC vs. CT/TT: 74% vs. 26%, p = 0.05). At multivariate analysis, the genotype CC remained associated with severe portal inflammation in HCV-1, only (Odds Ratio (OR): 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 3.24 (1.23–8.51)). IL28B genotype is associated with the histological features of chronic hepatitis C in a HCV genotype dependent manner, with CC genotype being independently associated with severe portal inflammation. PMID:24776764

  17. Water stress alters lignin content and related gene expression in two sugarcane genotypes.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Adriana Brombini; Bottcher, Alexandra; Kiyota, Eduardo; Mayer, Juliana Lischka Sampaio; Vicentini, Renato; Brito, Michael dos Santos; Creste, Silvana; Landell, Marcos G A; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2015-05-20

    The lignin deposition in the stem of two sugarcane genotypes was assessed on exposure to water stress. The lignin content and the morphoanatomical characterization of the stem indicated that IACSP94-2094 plants are more lignified than those of IACSP95-5000 genotype, under normal water supply conditions, which was especially associated with higher lignin contents in the rind of mature internodes. Water deficit had negative impact on the biomass production, mostly with IACSP94-2094 plants, possibly due to stress severity or higher susceptibility of that genotype during the stem-lengthening phase. Water deficit led to significant alterations in the expression levels of lignin biosynthesis genes and led to an approximate 60% increase of lignin content in the rind of young internodes in both genotypes. It is concluded that the young rind region was more directly affected by water stress and, depending on the genotype, a higher lignin accumulation may occur in the stem, thus implying lower quality biomass for bioethanol production.

  18. The pathogenesis of infection with minute virus of mice depends on expression of the small nonstructural protein NS2 and on the genotype of the allotropic determinants VP1 and VP2.

    PubMed

    Brownstein, D G; Smith, A L; Johnson, E A; Pintel, D J; Naeger, L K; Tattersall, P

    1992-05-01

    Neonatal C3H/He mice were oronasally inoculated with similar doses of four genotypes of minute virus of mice (MVM). MVMp, a fibroblast-specific variant, caused an asymptomatic infection. MVM(1035), a chimera which had the allotropic determinant of virulent MVMi inserted onto an MVMp background, caused a lethal infection and renal papillary infarcts, the hallmark of MVMi infection. MVMi(NS2-1990), the virulent lymphocyte-specific variant mutated to eliminate NS2 synthesis, was infectious but caused an asymptomatic infection. Sequential virus titration, histology, in situ hybridization with a full-length MVMi genomic probe, and immunohistochemistry for viral capsid antigen were used to compare the pathogenesis of infection with the four MVM genotypes. Infectious virus was recovered from multiple organs of mice infected with MVMi, MVMp, and MVM(1035) but not from mice infected with MVMi(NS2-1990). MVMp titers were lower than MVMi titers in all organs except the intestine. MVM(1035) titers were higher than MVMi titers in all organs except the blood. MVMp was localized to connective tissue elements of the intestine, to cells in mesenteric lymph nodes, and rarely to cells in other organs. MVM(1035) was localized to multiple organs and shared the same target cells, endothelium, lymphoid cells, and hematopoietic cells, as MVMi. MVM(1035) also replicated in external germinal cells of the cerebellum and smooth muscle cells of the stomach and colon, which were not targets of MVMi or MVMp infection. MVMi(NS2-1990) replicated to a limited degree in some MVMi target organs.

  19. Personalized smoking cessation: interactions between nicotine dose, dependence and quit-success genotype score.

    PubMed

    Rose, Jed E; Behm, Frédérique M; Drgon, Tomas; Johnson, Catherine; Uhl, George R

    2010-01-01

    Improving and targeting nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) are cost-effective strategies for reducing adverse health consequences for smokers. Treatment studies document the efficacy of precessation NRT and support important roles for level of nicotine dependence and precessation smoking reduction in successful quitting. However, prior work has not identified the optimal precessation dose or means for personalizing NRT. Genome-wide association has identified groups of genomic markers associated with successful quitting, allowing us to develop a v1.0 "quit-success" genotype score. We now report influences of v1.0 quit-success genotype score, level of dependence and precessation smoking reduction in a smoking cessation trial that examined effects of 21 versus 42 mg/24 h precessation NRT. Four hundred seventy-nine smokers were randomized to 21 or 42 mg NRT, initiated 2 wks prior to target quit dates. We monitored self-reported abstinence and end-expired air carbon monoxide (CO). Genotyping used Affymetrix arrays (Santa Clara, CA, USA). The primary outcome was 10-wk continuous smoking abstinence. NRT dose, level of nicotine dependence and genotype scores displayed significant interactive effects on successful quitting. Successful abstinence also was predicted by CO reductions during precessation NRT. These results document ways in which smoking cessation strategies can be personalized based on levels of nicotine dependence, genotype scores and CO monitoring. These assessments, taken together, can help match most smokers with optimal NRT doses and help rapidly identify some who may be better treated using other methods.

  20. Genotype-Dependent Effects of Dalcetrapib on Cholesterol Efflux and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rhainds, David; Brodeur, Mathieu; Feroz Zada, Yassamin; Fouodjio, René; Provost, Sylvie; Boulé, Marie; Alem, Sonia; Grégoire, Jean C.; L’Allier, Philippe L.; Ibrahim, Reda; Guertin, Marie-Claude; Mongrain, Ian; Olsson, Anders G.; Schwartz, Gregory G.; Rhéaume, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background— Dalcetrapib effects on cardiovascular outcomes are determined by adenylate cyclase 9 gene polymorphisms. Our aim was to determine whether these clinical end point results are also associated with changes in reverse cholesterol transport and inflammation. Methods and Results— Participants of the dal-OUTCOMES and dal-PLAQUE-2 trials were randomly assigned to receive dalcetrapib or placebo in addition to standard care. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein was measured at baseline and at end of study in 5243 patients from dal-OUTCOMES also genotyped for the rs1967309 polymorphism in adenylate cyclase 9. Cholesterol efflux capacity of high-density lipoproteins from J774 macrophages after cAMP stimulation was determined at baseline and 12 months in 171 genotyped patients from dal-PLAQUE-2. Treatment with dalcetrapib resulted in placebo-adjusted geometric mean percent increases in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein from baseline to end of trial of 18.1% (P=0.0009) and 18.7% (P=0.00001) in participants with the GG and AG genotypes, respectively, but the change was −1.0% (P=0.89) in those with the protective AA genotype. There was an interaction between the treatment arm and the genotype groups (P=0.02). Although the mean change in cholesterol efflux was similar among study arms in patients with GG genotype (mean: 7.8% and 7.4%), increases were 22.3% and 3.5% with dalcetrapib and placebo for those with AA genotype (P=0.005). There was a significant genetic effect for change in efflux for dalcetrapib (P=0.02), but not with placebo. Conclusions— Genotype-dependent effects on C-reactive protein and cholesterol efflux are supportive of dalcetrapib benefits on atherosclerotic cardiovascular outcomes in patients with the AA genotype at polymorphism rs1967309. Clinical Trials Registration— ClinicalTrials.gov; Unique Identifiers: NCT00658515 and NCT01059682. PMID:27418594

  1. Pollen-Stigma Adhesion in Kale Is Not Dependent on the Self-(In)Compatibility Genotype.

    PubMed Central

    Luu, D. T.; Heizmann, P.; Dumas, C.

    1997-01-01

    The adhesion of pollen on the stigmas of flowering plants is a critical step for the success of reproduction in angiosperms, long considered to present some specificity in terms of self-incompatibility. We carried out quantitative measurements of the pollen-stigma adhesion (expressed in Newtons) in kale (Brassica oleracea), using the flotation force of Archimedes exerted by dense sucrose solutions (50%, w/v) to release pollen grains fixed on the surface of stigmas. We demonstrate that pollen adhesion varies with the genotypes of the plants used as partners, but increases with time in all cases for about 30 to 60 min after pollination. There is no correlation with the self- or cross-status of the pollinations, nor with the self-compatible or -incompatible genotypes of the parents. Only late events of pollination, after the germination or arrest of the pollen tube, depend on compatibility type. Biochemical and physiological dissection of pollen-stigma adhesion points to major components of this interaction: among male components, the pollen coating, eliminated by delipidation (or modified by mutation in the case of the cer mutants of the related species Arabidopsis thaliana), plays a major role in adhesion; the genetic background of the pollen parent is also of some importance. On the female side, the developmental stage of the stigma and the protein constituents of the stigmatic pellicle are critical for pollen capture. The SLG and SLR1 proteins are not involved in the initial stages of pollen adhesion on the stigma but one or both may be involved in the later stages. PMID:12223868

  2. Environmental dependency of amphibian-ranavirus genotypic interactions: evolutionary perspectives on infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Echaubard, Pierre; Leduc, Joel; Pauli, Bruce; Chinchar, V Gregory; Robert, Jacques; Lesbarrères, David

    2014-08-01

    The context-dependent investigations of host-pathogen genotypic interactions, where environmental factors are explicitly incorporated, allow the assessment of both coevolutionary history and contemporary ecological influences. Such a functional explanatory framework is particularly valuable for describing mortality trends and identifying drivers of disease risk more accurately. Using two common North American frog species (Lithobates pipiens and Lithobates sylvaticus) and three strains of frog virus 3 (FV3) at different temperatures, we conducted a laboratory experiment to investigate the influence of host species/genotype, ranavirus strains, temperature, and their interactions, in determining mortality and infection patterns. Our results revealed variability in host susceptibility and strain infectivity along with significant host-strain interactions, indicating that the outcome of an infection is dependent on the specific combination of host and virus genotypes. Moreover, we observed a strong influence of temperature on infection and mortality probabilities, revealing the potential for genotype-genotype-environment interactions to be responsible for unexpected mortality in this system. Our study thus suggests that amphibian hosts and ranavirus strains genetic characteristics should be considered in order to understand infection outcomes and that the investigation of coevolutionary mechanisms within a context-dependent framework provides a tool for the comprehensive understanding of disease dynamics.

  3. Genotype-dependent responses to levels of sibling competition over maternal resources in mice.

    PubMed

    Hager, R; Cheverud, J M; Wolf, J B

    2012-05-01

    Research on phenotypic plasticity has often focused on how a given genotype responds to the changing physical environments such as temperature or diet. However, for many species the social environment has an equally important role because of competition for resources. During early development, the level of competition for limited (maternally provided) resources will often depend critically on the number of siblings. Therefore, competition among siblings should drive the evolution of genes that allow flexible responses to realized levels of competition and maternal resource availability. However, it is unknown whether genetically based differences between individuals exist in their response to the social environment that affect their future development. Using a quantitative trait locus approach in an experimental population of mice we demonstrate that effects of sibling number on body weight depend on individual genotype at seven loci, over and above the general negative litter size effect. Overall, these litter size-by-genotype interactions considerably modified the degree to which increasing litter size caused reduced weight. For example at one locus this effect leads to a 7% difference in body weight at week 7 between individuals experiencing the extremes of the normal range of litter sizes in our population (five to nine litter mates). The observed interaction between genotype and the competitive environment can produce differences in body weight that are similar in magnitude to the main effect of litter size on weight. Our results show that different genotypes respond to the social environment differentially and that interaction effects of genotype with litter size can be as important as genotype-independent effects of litter size. PMID:22126849

  4. Genotyping Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Copy Number Variability of the FCGRs Expressed on NK Cells.

    PubMed

    Erbe, Amy K; Wang, Wei; Gallenberger, Mikayla; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Sondel, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are one of the main effector immune cells involved in antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Upon recognition of cell-bound IgG antibodies, which occurs through Fc gamma receptors (FCGRs) expressed on the cell surface of NK cells, NK cells become activated and lyse target tumor or infected cells. The FCGRs, FCGR3A and FCGR2C, expressed on the surface of NK cells have single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that result in differential activity of NK cells. In addition to SNP genetic variation within each of these genes, the FCGRs are subject to copy number variation (CNV), which leads to variable protein expression levels on the cell surface. Studies have found that FCGR genotype for FCGR3A and FCGR2C is associated with variation in the response to immunotherapy.Due to high sequence homology within FCGR3 and FCGR2 families, there are difficulties associated with genotyping these specific receptors related to cross-amplification of non-targeted FCGRs. To improve specificity for both FCGR3A and FCGR2C, Rnase-H (RH) primers were designed to amplify specifically FCGR3A (while not co-amplifying FCGR3B) and FCGR2C (while not co-amplifying FCGR2B). In addition, fluorescently labeled locked nucleic acid (LNA) probes provide additional precision for determination of the SNPs within both FCGR3A and FCGR2C. For CNV determination, separate fluorescently labeled probes for FCGR3A, and for FCGR2C, can be used with the same RH primers for each gene. These probes can be combined in the same well with control primers/probe for a known diploid gene and used to calculate the copy number of both FCGR3A and FCGR2C. Here we provide new detailed methodology that allows for the specific amplification of these FCGRs in a single PCR reaction, allowing for genotyping of both the SNPs and CNVs using real-time PCR.

  5. Water deficit effects on tomato quality depend on fruit developmental stage and genotype.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, Julie; Urban, Laurent; Brunel, Béatrice; Bertin, Nadia

    2016-01-15

    Many studies have advocated that water deficit (WD) may exert beneficial effects on fruit quality. However, the fruit response to WD at specific developmental stages was seldom investigated, although different mechanisms could be involved at each stage and lead to different effects on final fruit quality. In the present study, a moderate WD (-60% of water supply compared to control) was applied during each of the three major phases of fruit development, namely cell division (CD), cell expansion (CE) and maturation (MT). Two cocktail tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) genotypes were studied, one producing poor quality fruits (LA1420), and the other one producing tasty fruits (PlovdivXXIVa named Plovdiv). Contrasted responses were observed between the two genotypes. For both of them, fruit fresh mass and size were not significantly reduced by WD, whatever the developmental phase affected. Osmotic regulations were likely involved in the CD treatment for LA1420 fruits, which accumulated more sugars (both on a dry and fresh matter basis) and less acids (on a dry matter basis). In the CE treatment, other adaptive strategies involving sugar metabolism and sub-cellular compartmentation were suggested. In contrast, the composition of Plovdiv fruits changed only under the MT treatment, with less sugars, acids and carotenoids compared to control fruits (both on a dry and fresh matter basis). Total ascorbic acid (AsA) was not significantly influenced by treatments in both genotypes. On their whole, results suggest that, depending on genotypes, fruits are sweeter and less acidic under WD, but that the nutritive value related to vitamin and carotenoid contents may be lessened. The sensitivity of each developmental phase highly depends on the genotype. All phases were sensitive to WD for LA1420, but only the ripening phase for Plovdiv. Interestingly, major changes in fruit composition were observed in LA1420 which presents poor fruit quality under control conditions. This suggests

  6. Water deficit effects on tomato quality depend on fruit developmental stage and genotype.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, Julie; Urban, Laurent; Brunel, Béatrice; Bertin, Nadia

    2016-01-15

    Many studies have advocated that water deficit (WD) may exert beneficial effects on fruit quality. However, the fruit response to WD at specific developmental stages was seldom investigated, although different mechanisms could be involved at each stage and lead to different effects on final fruit quality. In the present study, a moderate WD (-60% of water supply compared to control) was applied during each of the three major phases of fruit development, namely cell division (CD), cell expansion (CE) and maturation (MT). Two cocktail tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) genotypes were studied, one producing poor quality fruits (LA1420), and the other one producing tasty fruits (PlovdivXXIVa named Plovdiv). Contrasted responses were observed between the two genotypes. For both of them, fruit fresh mass and size were not significantly reduced by WD, whatever the developmental phase affected. Osmotic regulations were likely involved in the CD treatment for LA1420 fruits, which accumulated more sugars (both on a dry and fresh matter basis) and less acids (on a dry matter basis). In the CE treatment, other adaptive strategies involving sugar metabolism and sub-cellular compartmentation were suggested. In contrast, the composition of Plovdiv fruits changed only under the MT treatment, with less sugars, acids and carotenoids compared to control fruits (both on a dry and fresh matter basis). Total ascorbic acid (AsA) was not significantly influenced by treatments in both genotypes. On their whole, results suggest that, depending on genotypes, fruits are sweeter and less acidic under WD, but that the nutritive value related to vitamin and carotenoid contents may be lessened. The sensitivity of each developmental phase highly depends on the genotype. All phases were sensitive to WD for LA1420, but only the ripening phase for Plovdiv. Interestingly, major changes in fruit composition were observed in LA1420 which presents poor fruit quality under control conditions. This suggests

  7. Emissions of volatile organic compounds from hybrid poplar depend on CO2 concentration and genotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eller, A. S.; de Gouw, J. A.; Monson, R. K.

    2010-12-01

    Hybrid poplar is a fast-growing tree species that is likely to be an important source of biomass for the production of cellulose-based biofuels and may influence regional atmospheric chemistry through the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). We used proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry to measure VOC emissions from the leaves of four different hybrid poplar genotypes grown under ambient (400 ppm) and elevated (650 ppm) carbon dioxide concentration (CO2). The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether VOC emissions are different among genotypes and whether these emissions are likely to change as atmospheric CO2 rises. Methanol and isoprene made up over 90% of the VOC emissions and were strongly dependent on leaf age, with young leaves producing primarily methanol and switching to isoprene production as they matured. Monoterpene emissions were small, but tended to be higher in young leaves. Plants grown under elevated CO2 emitted smaller quantities of both methanol and isoprene, but the magnitude of the effect was dependent on genotype. Isoprene emission rates from mature leaves dropped from ~35 to ~28 nmol m-2 s-1 when plants were grown under elevated CO2. Emissions from individuals grown under ambient CO2 varied more based on genotype than those grown under elevated CO2, which means that we might expect smaller differences between genotypes in the future. Genotype and CO2 also affected how much carbon (C) individuals allocated to the production of VOCs. The emission rate of C from VOCs was 0.5 - 2% of the rate at which C was assimilated via net photosynthesis. The % C emitted was strongly related to genotype; clones from crosses between Populus deltoides and P. trichocarpa (T x D) allocated a greater % of their C to VOC emissions than clones from crosses of P. deltoids and P. nigra (D x N). Individuals from all four genotypes allocated a smaller % of their C to the emission of VOCs when they were grown under elevated CO2. These results

  8. One single nucleotide difference alters the differential expression of spliced RNAs between HBV genotypes A and D.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Chiao; Kuo, Tzer-Min; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Hu, Cheng-Po; Chen, Ya-Ling; Tsai, Yue-Lin; Chen, Mong-Liang; Chou, Yu-Chi; Chang, Chungming

    2013-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is generally classified into eight genotypes (A to H) based on genomic sequence divergence. The sequence variation among the different HBV genotypes suggests that the spliced RNAs should be different from genotype to genotype. However, the cis-acting element involved in the modulation of the distinct expression profiles of spliced HBV RNAs remains unidentified. Moreover, the biological role of splicing in the life cycle of HBV is not yet understood. In this study, spliced RNAs generated from genotypes A and D were carefully characterized in transfected HepG2 cells. The species and frequency of the spliced RNAs were dramatically different in the two genotypes. Of note, a population of multiply spliced RNAs with intron 2067-2350 excision was identified in HBV genotype A-transfected HepG2 cells, but not in genotype D transfected HepG2 cells. Further, we found a single nucleotide difference (2335) located within the polypyrimidine tract of the splice acceptor site 2350 between the two genotypes, and a single base substitution at 2335 was able to convert the splicing pattern of genotype D (or genotype A) to that of genotype A (or genotype D). These findings suggest that different unique splice sites may be preferentially used in different HBV genotypes resulting in distinct populations of spliced RNAs. The possible significance of the distinct spliced RNAs generated from the different HBV genotypes in HBV infection is discussed.

  9. Expression Quantitative Trait Loci Analysis Identifies Associations Between Genotype and Gene Expression in Human Intestine

    PubMed Central

    KABAKCHIEV, BOYKO; SILVERBERG, MARK S.

    2013-01-01

    . CONCLUSIONS eQTL analysis of intestinal tissue supports findings that some eQTL remain stable across cell types, whereas others are specific to the sampled location. Our findings confirm and expand the number of known genotypes associated with expression and could help elucidate mechanisms of intestinal disease. PMID:23474282

  10. Altered Gene Expression Profiles of Wheat Genotypes against Fusarium Head Blight

    PubMed Central

    Kosaka, Ayumi; Manickavelu, Alagu; Kajihara, Daniela; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Ban, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum is responsible for Fusarium head blight (FHB), which is a destructive disease of wheat that makes its quality unsuitable for end use. To understand the temporal molecular response against this pathogen, microarray gene expression analysis was carried out at two time points on three wheat genotypes, the spikes of which were infected by Fusarium graminearum. The greatest number of genes was upregulated in Nobeokabouzu-komugi followed by Sumai 3, whereas the minimum expression in Gamenya was at three days after inoculation (dai). In Nobeokabouzu-komugi, high expression of detoxification genes, such as multidrug-resistant protein, multidrug resistance-associated protein, UDP-glycosyltransferase and ABC transporters, in addition to systemic defense-related genes, were identified at the early stage of infection. This early response of the highly-resistant genotype implies a different resistance response from the other resistant genotype, Sumai 3, primarily containing local defense-related genes, such as cell wall defense genes. In Gamenya, the expression of all three functional groups was minimal. The differences in these molecular responses with respect to the time points confirmed the variation in the genotypes. For the first time, we report the nature of gene expression in the FHB-highly resistant cv. Nobeokabouzu-komugi during the disease establishment stage and the possible underlying molecular response. PMID:25690694

  11. Altered gene expression profiles of wheat genotypes against Fusarium head blight.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ayumi; Manickavelu, Alagu; Kajihara, Daniela; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Ban, Tomohiro

    2015-02-01

    Fusarium graminearum is responsible for Fusarium head blight (FHB), which is a destructive disease of wheat that makes its quality unsuitable for end use. To understand the temporal molecular response against this pathogen, microarray gene expression analysis was carried out at two time points on three wheat genotypes, the spikes of which were infected by Fusarium graminearum. The greatest number of genes was upregulated in Nobeokabouzu-komugi followed by Sumai 3, whereas the minimum expression in Gamenya was at three days after inoculation (dai). In Nobeokabouzu-komugi, high expression of detoxification genes, such as multidrug-resistant protein, multidrug resistance-associated protein, UDP-glycosyltransferase and ABC transporters, in addition to systemic defense-related genes, were identified at the early stage of infection. This early response of the highly-resistant genotype implies a different resistance response from the other resistant genotype, Sumai 3, primarily containing local defense-related genes, such as cell wall defense genes. In Gamenya, the expression of all three functional groups was minimal. The differences in these molecular responses with respect to the time points confirmed the variation in the genotypes. For the first time, we report the nature of gene expression in the FHB-highly resistant cv. Nobeokabouzu-komugi during the disease establishment stage and the possible underlying molecular response. PMID:25690694

  12. Environmental dependency of amphibian–ranavirus genotypic interactions: evolutionary perspectives on infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Echaubard, Pierre; Leduc, Joel; Pauli, Bruce; Chinchar, V Gregory; Robert, Jacques; Lesbarrères, David

    2014-01-01

    The context-dependent investigations of host–pathogen genotypic interactions, where environmental factors are explicitly incorporated, allow the assessment of both coevolutionary history and contemporary ecological influences. Such a functional explanatory framework is particularly valuable for describing mortality trends and identifying drivers of disease risk more accurately. Using two common North American frog species (Lithobates pipiens and Lithobates sylvaticus) and three strains of frog virus 3 (FV3) at different temperatures, we conducted a laboratory experiment to investigate the influence of host species/genotype, ranavirus strains, temperature, and their interactions, in determining mortality and infection patterns. Our results revealed variability in host susceptibility and strain infectivity along with significant host–strain interactions, indicating that the outcome of an infection is dependent on the specific combination of host and virus genotypes. Moreover, we observed a strong influence of temperature on infection and mortality probabilities, revealing the potential for genotype–genotype–environment interactions to be responsible for unexpected mortality in this system. Our study thus suggests that amphibian hosts and ranavirus strains genetic characteristics should be considered in order to understand infection outcomes and that the investigation of coevolutionary mechanisms within a context-dependent framework provides a tool for the comprehensive understanding of disease dynamics. PMID:25469155

  13. Context-dependent expression of sperm quality in the fruitfly

    PubMed Central

    Decanini, Daniel Paz; Wong, Bob B. M.; Dowling, Damian K.

    2013-01-01

    In most species, females mate multiply within a reproductive cycle, invoking post-copulatory selection on ejaculatory components. Much research has focused on disentangling the key traits important in deciding the outcomes of sperm competition and investigating patterns of covariance among these traits. Less attention has focused on the degree to which such patterns might be context-dependent. Here, we examine whether the expression of sperm viability—a widely used measure of sperm quality—and patterns of covariance between this trait and male reproductive morphologies, change across distinct age classes and across naturally occurring genotypes, when expressed in both heterozygotic (extreme outbred) and homozygotic (extreme inbred) states in the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. Older males, and heterozygous males, generally exhibited higher sperm viability. The male age effect seems at least partly explained by a positive association between sperm numbers and viability. First, old males possessed more stored sperm than young males, and second, sperm numbers and viability were also positively associated within each age class. Furthermore, we found a positive association between sperm viability and testis size, but only among heterozygous, old males. These results suggest that sperm quality is a labile trait, with expression levels that are context-dependent and shaped by multiple, potentially interacting, factors. PMID:24152695

  14. Context-dependent expression of sperm quality in the fruitfly.

    PubMed

    Decanini, Daniel Paz; Wong, Bob B M; Dowling, Damian K

    2013-01-01

    In most species, females mate multiply within a reproductive cycle, invoking post-copulatory selection on ejaculatory components. Much research has focused on disentangling the key traits important in deciding the outcomes of sperm competition and investigating patterns of covariance among these traits. Less attention has focused on the degree to which such patterns might be context-dependent. Here, we examine whether the expression of sperm viability-a widely used measure of sperm quality-and patterns of covariance between this trait and male reproductive morphologies, change across distinct age classes and across naturally occurring genotypes, when expressed in both heterozygotic (extreme outbred) and homozygotic (extreme inbred) states in the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. Older males, and heterozygous males, generally exhibited higher sperm viability. The male age effect seems at least partly explained by a positive association between sperm numbers and viability. First, old males possessed more stored sperm than young males, and second, sperm numbers and viability were also positively associated within each age class. Furthermore, we found a positive association between sperm viability and testis size, but only among heterozygous, old males. These results suggest that sperm quality is a labile trait, with expression levels that are context-dependent and shaped by multiple, potentially interacting, factors.

  15. Data on IL-6 c.-174 G>C genotype and allele frequencies in patients with coronary heart disease in dependence of cardiovascular outcome.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Stefan; Schlitt, Axel; Benten, Ann-Christin; Hofmann, Britt; Schaller, Hans-Günter; Schulz, Susanne

    2016-09-01

    In this data article we present data on the distribution of alleles and genotypes of the interleukin (IL)-6 c.-174 G>C polymorphism (rs 1800795) in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) in dependence of the incidence of new cardiovascular events (combined endpoint: myocardial infarction, stroke/TIA, cardiac death, death according to stroke) within three years follow-up. Moreover, we investigated putative associations between individual expression of IL-6 genotypes and IL-6 serum level. This investigation is a subanalysis of the article entitled "The Interleukin 6 c.-174 CC genotype is a predictor for new cardiovascular events in patients with coronary heart disease within three years follow-up" (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01045070) (Reichert et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27570807

  16. The tricks of the trait: neural implementation of personality varies with genotype-dependent serotonin levels.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Tim; Heinzel, Sebastian; Notebaert, Karolien; Dresler, Thomas; Reif, Andreas; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Jakob, Peter M; Windmann, Sabine; Fallgatter, Andreas J

    2013-11-01

    Gray's Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST) has developed into one of the most prominent personality theories of the last decades. The RST postulates a Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS) modulating the reaction to stimuli indicating aversive events. A number of psychiatric disorders including depression, anxiety disorders, and psychosomatic illnesses have been associated with extreme BIS responsiveness. In recent years, neuroimaging studies have implicated the amygdala-septo-hippocampal circuit as an important neural substrate of the BIS. However, the neurogenetic basis of the regulation of this behaviorally and clinically essential system remains unclear. Investigating the effects of two functional genetic polymorphisms (tryptophan hydroxylase-2, G-703T, and serotonin transporter, serotonin transporter gene-linked polymorphic region) in 89 human participants, we find significantly different patterns of associations between BIS scores and amygdala-hippocampus connectivity during loss anticipation for genotype groups regarding both polymorphisms. Specifically, the correlation between amygdala-hippocampus connectivity and Gray's trait anxiety scores is positive in individuals homozygous for the TPH2 G-allele, while carriers of at least one T-allele show a negative association. Likewise, individuals homozygous for the 5-HTTLPR L(A) variant display a positive association while carriers of the S/L(G) allele show a trend towards a negative association. Thus, we show converging evidence of different neural implementation of the BIS depending on genotype-dependent levels of serotonin. We provide evidence suggesting that genotype-dependent serotonin levels and thus putative changes in the efficiency of serotonergic neurotransmission might not only alter brain activation levels directly, but also more fundamentally impact the neural implementation of personality traits. We outline the direct clinical implications arising from this finding and discuss the complex interplay

  17. The tricks of the trait: neural implementation of personality varies with genotype-dependent serotonin levels.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Tim; Heinzel, Sebastian; Notebaert, Karolien; Dresler, Thomas; Reif, Andreas; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Jakob, Peter M; Windmann, Sabine; Fallgatter, Andreas J

    2013-11-01

    Gray's Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST) has developed into one of the most prominent personality theories of the last decades. The RST postulates a Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS) modulating the reaction to stimuli indicating aversive events. A number of psychiatric disorders including depression, anxiety disorders, and psychosomatic illnesses have been associated with extreme BIS responsiveness. In recent years, neuroimaging studies have implicated the amygdala-septo-hippocampal circuit as an important neural substrate of the BIS. However, the neurogenetic basis of the regulation of this behaviorally and clinically essential system remains unclear. Investigating the effects of two functional genetic polymorphisms (tryptophan hydroxylase-2, G-703T, and serotonin transporter, serotonin transporter gene-linked polymorphic region) in 89 human participants, we find significantly different patterns of associations between BIS scores and amygdala-hippocampus connectivity during loss anticipation for genotype groups regarding both polymorphisms. Specifically, the correlation between amygdala-hippocampus connectivity and Gray's trait anxiety scores is positive in individuals homozygous for the TPH2 G-allele, while carriers of at least one T-allele show a negative association. Likewise, individuals homozygous for the 5-HTTLPR L(A) variant display a positive association while carriers of the S/L(G) allele show a trend towards a negative association. Thus, we show converging evidence of different neural implementation of the BIS depending on genotype-dependent levels of serotonin. We provide evidence suggesting that genotype-dependent serotonin levels and thus putative changes in the efficiency of serotonergic neurotransmission might not only alter brain activation levels directly, but also more fundamentally impact the neural implementation of personality traits. We outline the direct clinical implications arising from this finding and discuss the complex interplay

  18. Expression-Dependent Folding of Interphase Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Jerabek, Hansjoerg; Heermann, Dieter W.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple studies suggest that chromatin looping might play a crucial role in organizing eukaryotic genomes. To investigate the interplay between the conformation of interphase chromatin and its transcriptional activity, we include information from gene expression profiles into a polymer model for chromatin that incorporates genomic loops. By relating loop formation to transcriptional activity, we are able to generate chromosome conformations whose structural and topological properties are consistent with experimental data. The model particularly allows to reproduce the conformational variations that are known to occur between highly and lowly expressed chromatin regions. As previously observed in experiments, lowly expressed regions of the simulated polymers are much more compact. Due to the changes in loop formation, the distributions of chromatin loops are also expression-dependent and exhibit a steeper decay in highly active regions. As a results of entropic interaction between differently looped parts of the chromosome, we observe topological alterations leading to a preferential positioning of highly transcribed loci closer to the surface of the chromosome territory. Considering the diffusional behavior of the chromatin fibre, the simulations furthermore show that the higher the expression level of specific parts of the chromatin fibre is, the more dynamic they are. The results exhibit that variations of loop formation along the chromatin fibre, and the entropic changes that come along with it, do not only influence the structural parameters on the local scale, but also effect the global chromosome conformation and topology. PMID:22649534

  19. Clonal Expansion of the Pseudogymnoascus destructans Genotype in North America Is Accompanied by Significant Variation in Phenotypic Expression

    PubMed Central

    Khankhet, Jordan; Vanderwolf, Karen J.; McAlpine, Donald F.; McBurney, Scott; Overy, David P.; Slavic, Durda; Xu, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Pseudogymnoascus destructans is the causative agent of an emerging infectious disease that threatens populations of several North American bat species. The fungal disease was first observed in 2006 and has since caused the death of nearly six million bats. The disease, commonly known as white-nose syndrome, is characterized by a cutaneous infection with P. destructans causing erosions and ulcers in the skin of nose, ears and/or wings of bats. Previous studies based on sequences from eight loci have found that isolates of P. destructans from bats in the US all belong to one multilocus genotype. Using the same multilocus sequence typing method, we found that isolates from eastern and central Canada also had the same genotype as those from the US, consistent with the clonal expansion of P. destructans into Canada. However, our PCR fingerprinting revealed that among the 112 North American isolates we analyzed, three, all from Canada, showed minor genetic variation. Furthermore, we found significant variations among isolates in mycelial growth rate; the production of mycelial exudates; and pigment production and diffusion into agar media. These phenotypic differences were influenced by culture medium and incubation temperature, indicating significant variation in environmental condition - dependent phenotypic expression among isolates of the clonal P. destructans genotype in North America. PMID:25122221

  20. Clonal expansion of the Pseudogymnoascus destructans genotype in North America is accompanied by significant variation in phenotypic expression.

    PubMed

    Khankhet, Jordan; Vanderwolf, Karen J; McAlpine, Donald F; McBurney, Scott; Overy, David P; Slavic, Durda; Xu, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Pseudogymnoascus destructans is the causative agent of an emerging infectious disease that threatens populations of several North American bat species. The fungal disease was first observed in 2006 and has since caused the death of nearly six million bats. The disease, commonly known as white-nose syndrome, is characterized by a cutaneous infection with P. destructans causing erosions and ulcers in the skin of nose, ears and/or wings of bats. Previous studies based on sequences from eight loci have found that isolates of P. destructans from bats in the US all belong to one multilocus genotype. Using the same multilocus sequence typing method, we found that isolates from eastern and central Canada also had the same genotype as those from the US, consistent with the clonal expansion of P. destructans into Canada. However, our PCR fingerprinting revealed that among the 112 North American isolates we analyzed, three, all from Canada, showed minor genetic variation. Furthermore, we found significant variations among isolates in mycelial growth rate; the production of mycelial exudates; and pigment production and diffusion into agar media. These phenotypic differences were influenced by culture medium and incubation temperature, indicating significant variation in environmental condition--dependent phenotypic expression among isolates of the clonal P. destructans genotype in North America. PMID:25122221

  1. Effect of genotype-nutrition interaction on growth and somatotropic gene expression in the chicken.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ruqian; Muehlbauer, Eckhard; Decuypere, Eddy; Grossmann, Roland

    2004-03-01

    The neuroendocrine system integrates genotype with external factors such as nutrition to regulate animal growth. To investigate the role of somatotropic axis in the interaction of genotype and nutrition, two series of experiments were conducted using broiler and layer chickens as a model. In the first experiment, both strains of chickens were raised on their respective standard diets and the mRNA expressions of somatotropic genes were investigated on day 5 (D5), D21, and D42 after hatching as composites of genotype and nutrition. The hypothalamic somatostatin (SS) and pituitary growth hormone (GH) mRNA expression as well as the plasma GH levels were higher in layer chickens while the opposite was true for hepatic GH receptor (GHR) mRNA. Regulation of GHR mRNA expression was found to be tissue-specific. Hepatic GHR mRNA content increased with age whereas in the muscle, the peak levels of expression were observed at D5 with significantly higher abundance ratio in the layer. To evaluate genotype-diet interaction on growth and the patterns of gene expression of both layer and broiler chickens, layers were fed broiler diet and vice versa from D1 to 42 in the second experiment. The D42 body weight of layer chickens increased by 35% when fed with broiler diet, whereas that of broiler chickens decreased by 51% when fed with layer food. The diet exchange completely reversed the patterns of hypothalamic SS and pituitary GH mRNA expression and the strain differences vanished when the comparison was made on the same diet basis. The hepatic GHR mRNA decreased by 46.1% in broilers fed with layer food, but increased by 45.6% in the layer fed with broiler diet. The strain differences were diminished but did not completely disappear on the same diet basis for hepatic GH receptor mRNA. In contrast, however, the muscle GHR mRNA expression was not affected by diet exchange and thus, was more genotype-specific. The results suggest that genes of the somatotropic axis respond to

  2. Direct evidences on bacterial growth pattern regulating pyrene degradation pathway and genotypic dioxygenase expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baowei; Huang, Jinyin; Yuan, Ke; Lin, Li; Wang, Xiaowei; Yang, Lihua; Luan, Tiangang

    2016-04-15

    Pyrene degradation by Mycobacterium sp. strain A1-PYR was investigated in the presence of nutrient broth, phenanthrene and fluoranthene, respectively. Fast bacterial growth in the nutrient broth considerably enhanced pyrene degradation rate, whereas degradation efficiency per cell was substantially decreased. The addition of nutrient broth could not alter the transcription levels of all dioxygenase genotypes. In the PAH-only substrates, bacterial growth completely relied on biological conversion of PAHs into the effective carbon sources, which led to a higher degradation efficiency of pyrene per cell than the case of nutrient broth. Significant correlations were only observed between nidA-related dioxygenase expression and pyrene degradation or bacterial growth. The highest pyrene degradation rate in the presence of phenanthrene was consistent with the highest transcription level of nidA and 4,5-pyrenediol as the sole initial metabolite. This study reveals that bacterial growth requirement can invigorate degradation of PAHs by regulating metabolic pathway and genotypic enzyme expression.

  3. FAS and FAS-L Genotype and Expression in Patients With Recurrent Pregnancy Loss

    PubMed Central

    Banzato, Priscilla Chamelete Andrade; Daher, Silvia; Traina, Évelyn; Torloni, Maria Regina; Gueuvoghlanian-Silva, Bárbara Yasmin; Puccini, Renata Fiorini; Pendeloski, Karen Priscilla Tezotto

    2013-01-01

    We assessed FAS and FAS-L gene polymorphisms and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in patients with recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL). This case–control study compared 129 women with RPL with 235 healthy multiparous women (control group). Genomic DNA and total mRNA were extracted from whole blood, and polymorphisms genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Messenger RNA expression levels were analyzed by real-time PCR. Data were analyzed by chi-square and Fisher exact tests; P < .05 was considered significant. There were no significant differences in the FAS (670 A/G) genotype or allelic frequencies between the RPL and control groups. We found significant differences in the FAS-L (844 C/T) genotype and allelic frequencies between women with RPL and controls. Patients with RPL had significantly higher FAS-L expression. Our data suggest that FAS-L gene polymorphism is associated with increased susceptibility to RPL. Moreover, women with RPL seem to abnormally express FAS-FAS-L molecules. PMID:23420824

  4. Genetic Expression Outside the Skin: Clues to Mechanisms of Genotype × Environment Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, David; Leve, Leslie D.

    2007-01-01

    The rapidly moving study of Gene × Environment interaction needs interim conceptual tools to track progress, integrate findings, and apply this knowledge to preventive intervention. We define two closely related concepts: the social mediation of the expression of genetic influences and the interaction between the entire genotype and the social environment (Genotype × Environment interaction; G×E). G×E interaction, the primary focus of this report, assesses individual differences in the full genotype using twin, sibling, and adoption designs and, for the most part, employs fine-grained analyses of relational processes in the social environment. In comparison, studies of Allele × Environment interaction (A×E) assess the influence on development of one or more measured polymorphisms as modified by environmental factors. G×E studies build on work showing how the social environment responds to genetic influences and how genetic influences shape the social environment. Recent G×E research has yielded new insight into variations in the sensitivity of the social environment to genotypic influences and provides clues to the specificity and timing of these environmental responses that can be leveraged to inform preventive interventions aimed at reducing genetic risk for problem behavior. PMID:17931431

  5. Tetraploidization events by chromosome doubling of nucellar cells are frequent in apomictic citrus and are dependent on genotype and environment

    PubMed Central

    Aleza, Pablo; Froelicher, Yann; Schwarz, Sergio; Agustí, Manuel; Hernández, María; Juárez, José; Luro, François; Morillon, Raphael; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Polyploidy is a major component of plant evolution. The citrus gene pool is essentially diploid but tetraploid plants are frequently encountered in seedlings of diploid apomictic genotypes. The main objectives of the present study were to establish the origin of these tetraploid plants and to ascertain the importance of genotypic and environmental factors on tetraploid formation. Methods Tetraploid seedlings from 30 diploid apomictic genotypes were selected by flow cytometry and genotyped with 24 single sequence repeat (SSR) markers to analyse their genetic origin. Embryo rescue was used to grow all embryos contained in polyembryonic seeds of ‘Tardivo di Ciaculli’ mandarin, followed by characterization of the plantlets obtained by flow cytometry and SSR markers to accurately establish the rate of tetraploidization events and their potential tissue location. Inter-annual variations in tetraploid seedling rates were analysed for seven genotypes. Variation in tetraploid plantlet rates was analysed between different seedlings of the same genotype (‘Carrizo’ citrange; Citrus sinensis × Poncirus trifoliata) from seeds collected in different tropical, subtropical and Mediterranean countries. Key Results Tetraploid plants were obtained for all the studied diploid genotypes, except for four mandarins. All tetraploid plants were identical to their diploid maternal line for SSR markers and were not cytochimeric. Significant genotypic and environmental effects were observed, as well as negative correlation between mean temperature during the flowering period and tetraploidy seedling rates. The higher frequencies (20 %) of tetraploids were observed for citranges cultivated in the Mediterranean area. Conclusions Tetraploidization by chromosome doubling of nucellar cells are frequent events in apomictic citrus, and are affected by both genotypic and environmental factors. Colder conditions in marginal climatic areas appear to favour the expression of

  6. Analysis of gene expression and proteomic profiles of clonal genotypes from Theobroma cacao subjected to soil flooding.

    PubMed

    Bertolde, Fabiana Z; Almeida, Alex-Alan F; Pirovani, Carlos P

    2014-01-01

    Soil flooding causes changes in gene transcription, synthesis and degradation of proteins and cell metabolism. The main objective of this study was to understand the biological events of Theobroma cacao during soil flooding-induced stress, using the analyses of gene expression and activity of key enzymes involved in fermentation, as well as the identification of differentially expressed proteins by mass spectrometry in two contrasting genotypes for flooding tolerance (tolerant - TSA-792 and susceptible - TSH-774). Soil anoxia caused by flooding has led to changes in the expression pattern of genes associated with the biosynthesis of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in leaves and roots of the two evaluated genotypes. Significant differences were observed between the enzyme activities of the two genotypes. Leaves and roots of the TSA-792 genotype showed higher ADH activity as compared to the TSH-774 genotype, whereas the activities of PDC and LDH have varied over the 96 h of soil flooding, being higher for TSA-792 genotype, at the initial stage, and TSH-774 genotype, at the final stage. Some of the identified proteins are those typical of the anaerobic metabolism-involved in glycolysis and alcoholic fermentation-and different proteins associated with photosynthesis, protein metabolism and oxidative stress. The ability to maintain glycolysis and induce fermentation was observed to play an important role in anoxia tolerance in cacao and may also serve to distinguish tolerant and susceptible genotypes in relation to this stressor.

  7. Analysis of Gene Expression and Proteomic Profiles of Clonal Genotypes from Theobroma cacao Subjected to Soil Flooding

    PubMed Central

    Bertolde, Fabiana Z.; Almeida, Alex-Alan F.; Pirovani, Carlos P.

    2014-01-01

    Soil flooding causes changes in gene transcription, synthesis and degradation of proteins and cell metabolism. The main objective of this study was to understand the biological events of Theobroma cacao during soil flooding-induced stress, using the analyses of gene expression and activity of key enzymes involved in fermentation, as well as the identification of differentially expressed proteins by mass spectrometry in two contrasting genotypes for flooding tolerance (tolerant - TSA-792 and susceptible - TSH-774). Soil anoxia caused by flooding has led to changes in the expression pattern of genes associated with the biosynthesis of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in leaves and roots of the two evaluated genotypes. Significant differences were observed between the enzyme activities of the two genotypes. Leaves and roots of the TSA-792 genotype showed higher ADH activity as compared to the TSH-774 genotype, whereas the activities of PDC and LDH have varied over the 96 h of soil flooding, being higher for TSA-792 genotype, at the initial stage, and TSH-774 genotype, at the final stage. Some of the identified proteins are those typical of the anaerobic metabolism-involved in glycolysis and alcoholic fermentation-and different proteins associated with photosynthesis, protein metabolism and oxidative stress. The ability to maintain glycolysis and induce fermentation was observed to play an important role in anoxia tolerance in cacao and may also serve to distinguish tolerant and susceptible genotypes in relation to this stressor. PMID:25289700

  8. Aphid and ladybird beetle abundance depend on the interaction of spatial effects and genotypic diversity.

    PubMed

    Genung, Mark A; Crutsinger, Gregory M; Bailey, Joseph K; Schweitzer, Jennifer A; Sanders, Nathan J

    2012-01-01

    Intraspecific variation and genotypic diversity of host-plants can affect the structure of associated arthropod communities and the dynamics of populations. Similarly, neighboring plants can also affect interactions between host-plants and their associated arthropods. However, most studies on the effects of host-plant genotypes have largely ignored the potential effects of neighboring host-plants on arthropod communities. In this study, we used a common garden experiment to ask how spatial effects of neighboring patches, along with genotype identity and genotypic diversity in tall goldenrod (Solidago altissima), affect the abundances of a common goldenrod herbivore (Uroleucon nigrotuberculatum) and their dominant predator (Harmonia axyridis, a ladybird beetle). Aphid abundance varied 80-fold among genotypes, while ladybird beetle abundance was not affected by genotype identity. Additionally, there were strong effects of neighboring plots: aphid abundance in a focal plot was positively correlated to aphid abundance in nearby plots, suggesting strong spatial patterning in the abundance of aphids. Neither aphid nor ladybird beetle abundance was affected by genotypic diversity. However, focal plot genotypic diversity mediated the strength of the neighborhood effect (i.e., strong effects for genotype polyculture focal plots and weak effects for genotype monoculture focal plots). Our results show that aphids were directly influenced by host-plant genotype identity while ladybird beetles responded mainly to prey abundance, and suggest that genotypic diversity can influence the effects of spatial processes on the plant-herbivore interactions. PMID:21805301

  9. Aphid and ladybird beetle abundance depend on the interaction of spatial effects and genotypic diversity.

    PubMed

    Genung, Mark A; Crutsinger, Gregory M; Bailey, Joseph K; Schweitzer, Jennifer A; Sanders, Nathan J

    2012-01-01

    Intraspecific variation and genotypic diversity of host-plants can affect the structure of associated arthropod communities and the dynamics of populations. Similarly, neighboring plants can also affect interactions between host-plants and their associated arthropods. However, most studies on the effects of host-plant genotypes have largely ignored the potential effects of neighboring host-plants on arthropod communities. In this study, we used a common garden experiment to ask how spatial effects of neighboring patches, along with genotype identity and genotypic diversity in tall goldenrod (Solidago altissima), affect the abundances of a common goldenrod herbivore (Uroleucon nigrotuberculatum) and their dominant predator (Harmonia axyridis, a ladybird beetle). Aphid abundance varied 80-fold among genotypes, while ladybird beetle abundance was not affected by genotype identity. Additionally, there were strong effects of neighboring plots: aphid abundance in a focal plot was positively correlated to aphid abundance in nearby plots, suggesting strong spatial patterning in the abundance of aphids. Neither aphid nor ladybird beetle abundance was affected by genotypic diversity. However, focal plot genotypic diversity mediated the strength of the neighborhood effect (i.e., strong effects for genotype polyculture focal plots and weak effects for genotype monoculture focal plots). Our results show that aphids were directly influenced by host-plant genotype identity while ladybird beetles responded mainly to prey abundance, and suggest that genotypic diversity can influence the effects of spatial processes on the plant-herbivore interactions.

  10. Improved efficiency of genotype-dependent regeneration from protoplasts of important potato cultivars.

    PubMed

    Foulger, D; Jones, M G

    1986-02-01

    The regeneration of protoplasts from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cvs. Desiree and King Edward has been significantly improved. Different shoot culture media were required for the release of viable protoplasts from cvs. Maris Piper and Desiree, and the response of protoplasts to different culture conditions depended upon the cultivar genotype of the protoplast source. Using protoplast isolation media containing 6mM CaCl2 improved protoplast viability and culture in enriched media lead to the reproducible and relatively efficient recovery of colonies from protoplasts of these cultivars. Over 70% of protoplast-derived calli from King Edward and Desiree regenerated shoots. Many shoots were grown to mature plants in soil. This is the first report of the regeneration of mature Desiree plants from protoplasts.

  11. SNP genotyping and population genomics from expressed sequences - current advances and future possibilities.

    PubMed

    De Wit, Pierre; Pespeni, Melissa H; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2015-05-01

    With the rapid increase in production of genetic data from new sequencing technologies, a myriad of new ways to study genomic patterns in nonmodel organisms are currently possible. Because genome assembly still remains a complicated procedure, and because the functional role of much of the genome is unclear, focusing on SNP genotyping from expressed sequences provides a cost-effective way to reduce complexity while still retaining functionally relevant information. This review summarizes current methods, identifies ways that using expressed sequence data benefits population genomic inference and explores how current practitioners evaluate and overcome challenges that are commonly encountered. We focus particularly on the additional power of functional analysis provided by expressed sequence data and how these analyses push beyond allele pattern data available from nonfunction genomic approaches. The massive data sets generated by these approaches create opportunities and problems as well - especially false positives. We discuss methods available to validate results from expressed SNP genotyping assays, new approaches that sidestep use of mRNA and review follow-up experiments that can focus on evolutionary mechanisms acting across the genome.

  12. Effect of genotype on duodenal expression of nutrient transporter genes in dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies have shown clear differences between dairy breeds in their feed intake and production efficiencies. The duodenum is critical in the coordination of digestion and absorption of nutrients. This study examined gene transcript abundance of important classes of nutrient transporters in the duodenum of non lactating dairy cows of different feed efficiency potential, namely Holstein-Friesian (HF), Jersey (JE) and their F1 hybrid. Duodenal epithelial tissue was collected at slaughter and stored at -80°C. Total RNA was extracted from tissue and reverse transcribed to generate cDNA. Gene expression of the following transporters, namely nucleoside; amino acid; sugar; mineral; and lipid transporters was measured using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Data were statistically analysed using mixed models ANOVA in SAS. Orthogonal contrasts were used to test for potential heterotic effects and spearman correlation coefficients calculated to determine potential associations amongst gene expression values and production efficiency variables. Results While there were no direct effects of genotype on expression values for any of the genes examined, there was evidence for a heterotic effect (P < 0.05) on ABCG8, in the form of increased expression in the F1 genotype compared to either of the two parent breeds. Additionally, a tendency for increased expression of the amino acid transporters, SLC3A1 (P = 0.072), SLC3A2 (P = 0.081) and SLC6A14 (P = 0.072) was also evident in the F1 genotype. A negative (P < 0.05) association was identified between the expression of the glucose transporter gene SLC5A1 and total lactational milk solids yield, corrected for body weight. Positive correlations (P < 0.05) were also observed between the expression values of genes involved in common transporter roles. Conclusion This study suggests that differences in the expression of sterol and amino acid transporters in the duodenum could contribute towards the

  13. Gene expression in diplosporous and sexual Eragrostis curvula genotypes with differing ploidy levels.

    PubMed

    Cervigni, Gerardo D L; Paniego, Norma; Pessino, Silvina; Selva, Juan P; Díaz, Marina; Spangenberg, Germán; Echenique, Viviana

    2008-05-01

    The molecular nature of gene expression during the initiation and progress of diplosporous apomixis is still unknown. Moreover, the basis of the close correlation between diplospory and polyploidy is not clarified yet. A comparative expression analysis was performed based on expressed sequence tags (ESTs) sequencing and differential display in an Eragrostis curvula diplosporous tetraploid genotype (T, 4x apo), a sexual diploid derivative obtained from tissue culture (D, 2x sex) and an artificial sexual tetraploid obtained from the diploid seeds after colchicine treatment (C, 4x sex). From a total of 8,884 unigenes sequenced from inflorescence-derived libraries, 112 (1.26%) showed significant differential expression in individuals with different ploidy level and/or variable reproductive mode. Independent comparisons between plants with different reproductive mode (same ploidy) or different ploidy level (same reproductive mode) allowed the identification of genes modulated in response to diplosporous development or polyploidization, respectively. Surprisingly, a group of genes (Group 3) were differentially expressed or silenced only in the 4x sex plant, presenting similar levels of expression in the 4x apo and the 2x sex genotypes. A group of randomly selected differential genes was validated by QR-PCR. Differential display analysis showed that in general the 4x apo and 4x sex expression profiles were more related and different from the 2x sex one, but confirmed the existence of Group 3-type genes, in both inflorescences and leaves. The possible biological significance for the occurrence of this particular group of genes is discussed. In silico mapping onto the rice genome was used to identify candidates mapping to the region syntenic to the diplospory locus. PMID:18311543

  14. Gene expression in diplosporous and sexual Eragrostis curvula genotypes with differing ploidy levels.

    PubMed

    Cervigni, Gerardo D L; Paniego, Norma; Pessino, Silvina; Selva, Juan P; Díaz, Marina; Spangenberg, Germán; Echenique, Viviana

    2008-05-01

    The molecular nature of gene expression during the initiation and progress of diplosporous apomixis is still unknown. Moreover, the basis of the close correlation between diplospory and polyploidy is not clarified yet. A comparative expression analysis was performed based on expressed sequence tags (ESTs) sequencing and differential display in an Eragrostis curvula diplosporous tetraploid genotype (T, 4x apo), a sexual diploid derivative obtained from tissue culture (D, 2x sex) and an artificial sexual tetraploid obtained from the diploid seeds after colchicine treatment (C, 4x sex). From a total of 8,884 unigenes sequenced from inflorescence-derived libraries, 112 (1.26%) showed significant differential expression in individuals with different ploidy level and/or variable reproductive mode. Independent comparisons between plants with different reproductive mode (same ploidy) or different ploidy level (same reproductive mode) allowed the identification of genes modulated in response to diplosporous development or polyploidization, respectively. Surprisingly, a group of genes (Group 3) were differentially expressed or silenced only in the 4x sex plant, presenting similar levels of expression in the 4x apo and the 2x sex genotypes. A group of randomly selected differential genes was validated by QR-PCR. Differential display analysis showed that in general the 4x apo and 4x sex expression profiles were more related and different from the 2x sex one, but confirmed the existence of Group 3-type genes, in both inflorescences and leaves. The possible biological significance for the occurrence of this particular group of genes is discussed. In silico mapping onto the rice genome was used to identify candidates mapping to the region syntenic to the diplospory locus.

  15. The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) pilot analysis: Multitissue gene regulation in humans

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the functional consequences of genetic variation, and how it affects complex human disease and quantitative traits, remains a critical challenge for biomedicine. We present an analysis of RNA sequencing data from 1641 samples across 43 tissues from 175 individuals, generated as part of the pilot phase of the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project. We describe the landscape of gene expression across tissues, catalog thousands of tissue-specific and shared regulatory expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) variants, describe complex network relationships, and identify signals from genome-wide association studies explained by eQTLs. These findings provide a systematic understanding of the cellular and biological consequences of human genetic variation and of the heterogeneity of such effects among a diverse set of human tissues. PMID:25954001

  16. Different Phenotypic and Genotypic Presentations in Alcohol Dependence: Age at Onset Matters*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chu; Prescott, Carol A.; Walsh, Dermot; Patterson, Diana G.; Riley, Brien P.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kuo, Po-Hsiu

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Several theoretical typology models have been proposed to classify alcoholism into more homogeneous subtypes using various criteria, for which age at onset of alcohol dependence is shared across many models. We investigated the evidence for the distinction between early- versus late-onset alcoholism by examining relevant phenotypic and genotypic variables. Method: Data are from 1,248 individuals with alcohol dependence, who were interviewed to collect detailed clinical information. Early versus late onset of alcohol dependence was defined by the age at onset of 22 years. Odds ratio (OR) and Cohen's d were calculated as effect size for comparisons of clinical features between the two groups. We adjusted interviewed age and gender in logistic regression models. Case-control genetic analyses were conducted for the association between HTR1B, SLC6A4, DRD2, and OPRμ1 genes and subgroups of alcohol dependence using a sample of 530 controls screened for alcohol problems. Results: Early-onset alcoholism exhibited significantly (p < .01) different clinical characteristics from late-onset alcoholism, including higher severity in alcohol dependence symptoms (d = 0.22) and maximum drinking quantity within 24 hours (d = 0.40), more rapid progression from regular drinking to meet alcohol dependence diagnosis (d = 1.73), higher expectancies for alcohol (d = 0.22−0.47), more comorbidity with externalizing disorders (ORs = 2.8−2.9), and greater prevalence of family alcohol use problems (d = 0.26−0.43). In addition, markers in the HTR1B and OPRμ1 genes showed genetic associations with subgroups of alcohol dependence (ORs = 1.5−2.4). Conclusions: Our findings support that subgroups of alcohol dependence defined by onset age have phenotypic and genetic differences. The early-onset subgroup had more severe features for almost every aspect we examined. Coupled with genetic association findings, age at onset of alcohol dependence may serve as a simple but important

  17. Estrogen, SNP-Dependent Chemokine Expression and Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Regulation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ming-Fen; Bongartz, Tim; Liu, Mohan; Kalari, Krishna R; Goss, Paul E; Shepherd, Lois E; Goetz, Matthew P; Kubo, Michiaki; Ingle, James N; Wang, Liewei; Weinshilboum, Richard M

    2016-03-01

    We previously reported, on the basis of a genome-wide association study for aromatase inhibitor-induced musculoskeletal symptoms, that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near the T-cell leukemia/lymphoma 1A (TCL1A) gene were associated with aromatase inhibitor-induced musculoskeletal pain and with estradiol (E2)-induced TCL1A expression. Furthermore, variation in TCL1A expression influenced the downstream expression of proinflammatory cytokines and cytokine receptors. Specifically, the top hit genome-wide association study SNP, rs11849538, created a functional estrogen response element (ERE) that displayed estrogen receptor (ER) binding and increased E2 induction of TCL1A expression only for the variant SNP genotype. In the present study, we pursued mechanisms underlying the E2-SNP-dependent regulation of TCL1A expression and, in parallel, our subsequent observations that SNPs at a distance from EREs can regulate ERα binding and that ER antagonists can reverse phenotypes associated with those SNPs. Specifically, we performed a series of functional genomic studies using a large panel of lymphoblastoid cell lines with dense genomic data that demonstrated that TCL1A SNPs at a distance from EREs can modulate ERα binding and expression of TCL1A as well as the expression of downstream immune mediators. Furthermore, 4-hydroxytamoxifen or fulvestrant could reverse these SNP-genotype effects. Similar results were found for SNPs in the IL17A cytokine and CCR6 chemokine receptor genes. These observations greatly expand our previous results and support the existence of a novel molecular mechanism that contributes to the complex interplay between estrogens and immune systems. They also raise the possibility of the pharmacological manipulation of the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in a SNP genotype-dependent fashion. PMID:26866883

  18. Social environment influences the relationship between genotype and gene expression in wild baboons.

    PubMed

    Runcie, Daniel E; Wiedmann, Ralph T; Archie, Elizabeth A; Altmann, Jeanne; Wray, Gregory A; Alberts, Susan C; Tung, Jenny

    2013-05-19

    Variation in the social environment can have profound effects on survival and reproduction in wild social mammals. However, we know little about the degree to which these effects are influenced by genetic differences among individuals, and conversely, the degree to which social environmental variation mediates genetic reaction norms. To better understand these relationships, we investigated the potential for dominance rank, social connectedness and group size to modify the effects of genetic variation on gene expression in the wild baboons of the Amboseli basin. We found evidence for a number of gene-environment interactions (GEIs) associated with variation in the social environment, encompassing social environments experienced in adulthood as well as persistent effects of early life social environment. Social connectedness, maternal dominance rank and group size all interacted with genotype to influence gene expression in at least one sex, and either in early life or in adulthood. These results suggest that social and behavioural variation, akin to other factors such as age and sex, can impact the genotype-phenotype relationship. We conclude that GEIs mediated by the social environment are important in the evolution and maintenance of individual differences in wild social mammals, including individual differences in responses to social stressors.

  19. Bacterial histo-blood group antigens contributing to genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with a microfiltration membrane.

    PubMed

    Amarasiri, Mohan; Hashiba, Satoshi; Miura, Takayuki; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Nakagomi, Osamu; Ishii, Satoshi; Okabe, Satoshi; Sano, Daisuke

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrated the genotype-dependent removal of human norovirus particles with a microfiltration (MF) membrane in the presence of bacteria bearing histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs). Three genotypes (GII.3, GII.4, and GII.6) of norovirus-like particles (NoVLPs) were mixed with three bacterial strains (Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, Escherichia coli O86:K61:B7, and Staphylococcus epidermidis), respectively, and the mixture was filtered with an MF membrane having a nominal pore size of 0.45 μm. All NoVLP genotypes were rejected by the MF membrane in the presence of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, which excreted HBGAs as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). This MF membrane removal of NoVLPs was not significant when EPS was removed from cells of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6. GII.6 NoVLP was not rejected with the MF membrane in the presence of E. coli O86:K61:B7, but the removal of EPS of E. coli O86:K61:B7 increased the removal efficiency due to the interaction of NoVLPs with the exposed B-antigen in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of E. coli O86:K61:B7. No MF membrane removal of all three genotypes was observed when S. epidermidis, an HBGA-negative strain, was mixed with NoVLPs. These results demonstrate that the location of HBGAs on bacterial cells is an important factor in determining the genotype-dependent removal efficiency of norovirus particles with the MF membrane. The presence of HBGAs in mixed liquor suspended solids from a membrane bioreactor (MBR) pilot plant was confirmed by immune-transmission electron microscopy, which implies that bacterial HBGAs can contribute to the genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with MBR using MF membrane. PMID:27095709

  20. [Genotype-dependent mice behavior in cognitive tasks. Effect of noopept].

    PubMed

    Bel'nik, A P; Ostrovskaia, R U; Poletaeva, I I

    2007-01-01

    The interstrain differences in performance of C57BL/6J, BALB/c and DBA/2J male mice in two cognitive tasks were found. Mice C57BL/6J showed good learning ability and preservation of memory traces tested 10 days after performance in a simplified version of Morris water maze. Mice BALB/c learned the task but, virtually, no long-term memory traces were revealed, whereas DBA/2J demonstrated poor learning. The effect of nootropic drug Noopept (GVS-111, N-phenil-acetyl-L-prolylglycin ethyl ether) was shown to be genotype-dependent. Its administration (0.5 mg/kg i.p., 15 min before learning) improved the long-term memory in Morris test in BALB/c mice but failed to produce any improvement in C57BL/6J. The ability of mice for extrapolation of the direction of stimulus movement differently changed after Noopept injections: the proportion of correct task solutions increased in C57BL/6J and BALB/c mice, whereas the performance of DBA/2J did not change. PMID:18592707

  1. T3SS-dependent differential modulations of the jasmonic acid pathway in susceptible and resistant genotypes of Malus spp. challenged with Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Dugé De Bernonville, Thomas; Gaucher, Matthieu; Flors, Victor; Gaillard, Sylvain; Paulin, Jean-Pierre; Dat, James F; Brisset, Marie-Noëlle

    2012-06-01

    Fire blight is a bacterial disease of Maloideae caused by Erwinia amylovora (Ea). This necrogenic enterobacterium uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject type III effectors into the plant cells to cause disease on its susceptible hosts, including economically important crops like apple and pear. The expressions of marker genes of the salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) defense regulation pathways were monitored by RT-qPCR in leaves of two apple genotypes, one susceptible and one resistant, challenged with a wild type strain, a T3SS-deficient strain or water. The transcriptional data taken together with hormone level measurements indicated that the SA pathway was similarly induced in both apple genotypes during infection by Ea. On the contrary, the data clearly showed a strong T3SS-dependent down-regulation of the JA pathway in leaves of the susceptible genotype but not in those of the resistant one. Accordingly, methyl-jasmonate treated susceptible plants displayed an increased resistance to Ea. Bacterial mutant analysis indicated that JA manipulation by Ea mainly relies on the type III effector DspA/E. Taken together, our data suggest that the T3SS-dependent down-regulation of the JA pathway is a critical step in the infection process of Malus spp. by Ea.

  2. Gene expression changes in MDBK cells infected with genotype 2 bovine viral diarrhoea virus.

    PubMed

    Neill, John D; Ridpath, Julia F

    2003-11-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea viruses (BVDVs) are ubiquitous viral pathogens of cattle. These viruses exist as one of two biotypes, cytopathic and noncytopathic, based on the ability to induce cytopathic effect in cell culture. The noncytopathic biotypes are able to establish inapparent, persistent infections in both cell culture and in bovine foetuses of less than 150 days gestation. Interactions with the host cell and the mechanism by which viral tolerance is established are unknown. To examine the changes in gene expression that occur following infection of host cells with BVDV, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), a global gene expression technology was used. SAGE allows quantitation of virtually every transcript in a cell type without prior sequence information. Transcript expression levels and identities are determined by sequencing libraries composed of concatamers of 14 base DNA fragments (tags) derived from the 3'-end of each cellular mRNA transcript. Comparison of data obtained from uninfected and BVDV genotype 2-infected cell libraries revealed changes in gene expression associated with distinct biochemical pathways or functions. Isotypes of both alpha- and beta-tubulins were down-regulated, indicating possible dysfunction in cell division and other functions where microtubules play a major role. Expression of genes encoding proteins involved in energy metabolism were expressed at essentially equivalent levels in both infected and uninfected cells. Genes encoding proteins involved in protein translation and post-translational modifications, functions necessary for viral replication, were generally up-regulated. These data indicate that following infection with BVDV, changes in gene expression occur that are beneficial for virus replication while having only minor changes in energy metabolism.

  3. RBCS1 expression in coffee: Coffea orthologs, Coffea arabica homeologs, and expression variability between genotypes and under drought stress

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In higher plants, the inhibition of photosynthetic capacity under drought is attributable to stomatal and non-stomatal (i.e., photochemical and biochemical) effects. In particular, a disruption of photosynthetic metabolism and Rubisco regulation can be observed. Several studies reported reduced expression of the RBCS genes, which encode the Rubisco small subunit, under water stress. Results Expression of the RBCS1 gene was analysed in the allopolyploid context of C. arabica, which originates from a natural cross between the C. canephora and C. eugenioides species. Our study revealed the existence of two homeologous RBCS1 genes in C. arabica: one carried by the C. canephora sub-genome (called CaCc) and the other carried by the C. eugenioides sub-genome (called CaCe). Using specific primer pairs for each homeolog, expression studies revealed that CaCe was expressed in C. eugenioides and C. arabica but was undetectable in C. canephora. On the other hand, CaCc was expressed in C. canephora but almost completely silenced in non-introgressed ("pure") genotypes of C. arabica. However, enhanced CaCc expression was observed in most C. arabica cultivars with introgressed C. canephora genome. In addition, total RBCS1 expression was higher for C. arabica cultivars that had recently introgressed C. canephora genome than for "pure" cultivars. For both species, water stress led to an important decrease in the abundance of RBCS1 transcripts. This was observed for plants grown in either greenhouse or field conditions under severe or moderate drought. However, this reduction of RBCS1 gene expression was not accompanied by a decrease in the corresponding protein in the leaves of C. canephora subjected to water withdrawal. In that case, the amount of RBCS1 was even higher under drought than under unstressed (irrigated) conditions, which suggests great stability of RBCS1 under adverse water conditions. On the other hand, for C. arabica, high nocturnal expression of RBCS1

  4. Identification of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Genotypes by Use of Rapid Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Pham Thanh, Duy; Tran Vu Thieu, Nga; Tran Thuy, Chau; Lodén, Martin; Tuin, Kiki; Campbell, James I.; Van Minh Hoang, Nguyen; Voong Vinh, Phat; Farrar, Jeremy J.; Holt, Kathryn E.; Dougan, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, the causative agent of typhoid fever, is highly clonal and genetically conserved, making isolate subtyping difficult. We describe a standardized multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) genotyping scheme targeting 11 key phylogenetic markers of the S. Typhi genome. The MLPA method demonstrated 90% concordance with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing, the gold standard for S. Typhi genotyping, and had the ability to identify isolates of the H58 haplotype, which is associated with resistance to multiple antimicrobials. Additionally, the assay permitted the detection of fluoroquinolone resistance-associated mutations in the DNA gyrase-encoding gene gyrA and the topoisomerase gene parC with a sensitivity of 100%. The MLPA methodology is simple and reliable, providing phylogenetically and phenotypically relevant genotyping information. This MLPA scheme offers a more-sensitive and interpretable alternative to the nonphylogenetic subgrouping methodologies that are currently used in reference and research laboratories in areas where typhoid is endemic. PMID:23824765

  5. The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) Project: Linking Clinical Data with Molecular Analysis to Advance Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Keen, Judy C.; Moore, Helen M.

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of how genetic mutations or variability can directly affect phenotypic outcomes, the development of disease, or determination of a tailored treatment protocol is fundamental to advancing personalized medicine. To understand how a genotype affects gene expression and specific phenotypic traits, as well as the correlative and causative associations between such, the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) Project was initiated The GTEx collection of biospecimens and associated clinical data links extensive clinical data with genotype and gene expression data to provide a wealth of data and resources to study the underlying genetics of normal physiology. These data will help inform personalized medicine through the identification of normal variation that does not contribute to disease. Additionally, these data can lead to insights into how gene variation affects pharmacodynamics and individualized responses to therapy. PMID:25809799

  6. Detecting Allelic Expression Imbalance at Candidate Genes Using 5' Exonuclease Genotyping Technology.

    PubMed

    Gahan, Jillian M; Byrne, Mikaela M; Hill, Matthew; Quinn, Emma M; Murphy, Ross T; Anney, Richard J L; Ryan, Anthony W

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation along the length of a chromosome can influence the transcription of a gene. In a heterozygous individual, this may lead to one chromosome producing different levels of RNA, compared to its paired chromosome, for a given gene. Allelic differences in gene expression can offer insight into the role of variation in transcription, and subsequently infer a route to conferring disease risk. This phenomenon is known as allele expression imbalance or AEI, which may be assayed using a PCR-based method that includes the quantification of the relative dosage of each allele (e.g., 5' exonuclease assays, TaqMan™). Importantly, in heterozygous individuals the resolution of expression imbalance is performed within a controlled system; the comparison of the alternate allele is reported relative to the wild-type, as the experiment can be performed within a single sample, controlled for background genetic information. Alternative methods for the detection of AEI include Primer-extension MALDI-TOF (Sequenom MassARRAY(®)), Next-Generation Sequencing, and SNP genotyping arrays. Here we present the methods used for the TaqMan™ approach and include a description of the SNP identification, allele-specific PCR, and analytic methods to convert allele amplification metrics to relative allele dosage.

  7. Capsule Expression and Genotypic Differences among Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Patients with Chronic or Acute Osteomyelitis▿

    PubMed Central

    Lattar, Santiago M.; Tuchscherr, Lorena P. N.; Caccuri, Roberto L.; Centrón, Daniela; Becker, Karsten; Alonso, Claudio A.; Barberis, Claudia; Miranda, Graciela; Buzzola, Fernanda R.; von Eiff, Christof; Sordelli, Daniel O.

    2009-01-01

    There is ample evidence that Staphylococcus aureus capsular polysaccharide (CP) promotes virulence. Loss of capsule expression, however, may lead to S. aureus persistence in a chronically infected host. This study was conducted to determine the relative prevalence of nonencapsulated S. aureus in patients with chronic and acute osteomyelitis. Only 76/118 (64%) S. aureus isolates from patients with osteomyelitis expressed CP, whereas all 50 isolates from blood cultures of patients with infections other than osteoarticular infections expressed CP (P = 0.0001). A significantly higher prevalence of nonencapsulated S. aureus was found in patients with chronic osteomyelitis (53%) than in those with acute osteomyelitis (21%) (P = 0.0046). S. aureus isolates obtained from multiple specimens from five of six patients with chronic osteomyelitis exhibited phenotypic (expression of CP, α-hemolysin, β-hemolysin, slime, and the small-colony variant phenotype) and/or genotypic (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and spa typing) differences. Nonencapsulated S. aureus was recovered from at least one specimen from each chronic osteomyelitis patient. Fourteen isolates obtained from two patients with acute osteomyelitis were indistinguishable from each other within each group, and all produced CP5. In conclusion, we demonstrated that nonencapsulated S. aureus is more frequently isolated from patients with chronic osteomyelitis than from those with acute osteomyelitis, suggesting that loss of CP expression may be advantageous to S. aureus during chronic infection. Our findings on multiple S. aureus isolates from individual patients allow us to suggest that selection of nonencapsulated S. aureus is likely to have occurred in the patient during long-term bone infection. PMID:19273557

  8. Expression patterns of Doppel in differential ovine PRNP genotypes: quantification using real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Zhao, C-L; Liu, L; Wu, R; Zhang, X-L

    2015-10-09

    Doppel is a homologue of cellular prion protein (PrP)-like protein (PrPC). Different tissue samples were collected from the central nervous system plus four regions of lymphoid system, eleven regions of digestive tract and two reproductive organs from four ARR/ARQ and four ARH/ARQ sheep, genotypes of the PrP gene. Total RNA was isolated from these samples, and Doppel mRNA was quantified by real-time RT-PCR using SYBR Green. Doppel mRNA expression was higher in the ovary, hypothalamus and brain than in other tissues, and it significantly differed between the two genotypes in brain, ileum, cecum, rectum, colon, and uterus. This study demonstrated that Doppel mRNA expression in sheep with ARR/ARQ or ARH/ARQ genotypes was very different. These findings could be helpful in future studies of the relationship between PrP and Doppel.

  9. IFN-stimulated gene expression is independent of the IFNL4 genotype in chronic HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, Katia; Scheri, Giuseppe Corano; Statzu, Maura; Selvaggi, Carla; Falasca, Francesca; Giustini, Noemi; Mezzaroma, Ivano; Turriziani, Ombretta; d'Ettorre, Gabriella; Antonelli, Guido; Scagnolari, Carolina

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the association between the IFNL4 rs368234815 (ΔG/TT) dinucleotide polymorphism and the IFN response during chronic HIV-1 infection. We carried out genotyping analysis and measured the expression of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) (myxovirus resistance protein A [MxA], ISG15, ISG56, apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like [APOBEC] 3F and APOBEC3G) on peripheral blood mononuclear cells collected from naïve and HAART-treated HIV-1-infected patients. There were no statistically significant differences in endogenous ISGs mRNA levels among HIV-1-positive patients bearing different IFNL4 genotypes, suggesting that ISG expression is independent of the IFNL4 genotype in HIV-1 infection. PMID:27558125

  10. Expression of zinc and cadmium responsive genes in leaves of willow (Salix caprea L.) genotypes with different accumulation characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Konlechner, Cornelia; Türktaş, Mine; Langer, Ingrid; Vaculík, Marek; Wenzel, Walter W.; Puschenreiter, Markus; Hauser, Marie-Theres

    2013-01-01

    Salix caprea is well suited for phytoextraction strategies. In a previous survey we showed that genetically distinct S. caprea plants isolated from metal-polluted and unpolluted sites differed in their zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) tolerance and accumulation abilities. To determine the molecular basis of this difference we examined putative homologues of genes involved in heavy metal responses and identified over 200 new candidates with a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) screen. Quantitative expression analyses of 20 genes in leaves revealed that some metallothioneins and cell wall modifying genes were induced irrespective of the genotype's origin and metal uptake capacity while a cysteine biosynthesis gene was expressed constitutively higher in the metallicolous genotype. The third and largest group of genes was only induced in the metallicolous genotype. These data demonstrate that naturally adapted woody non-model species can help to discover potential novel molecular mechanisms for metal accumulation and tolerance. PMID:23562959

  11. Expression of zinc and cadmium responsive genes in leaves of willow (Salix caprea L.) genotypes with different accumulation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Konlechner, Cornelia; Türktaş, Mine; Langer, Ingrid; Vaculík, Marek; Wenzel, Walter W; Puschenreiter, Markus; Hauser, Marie-Theres

    2013-07-01

    Salix caprea is well suited for phytoextraction strategies. In a previous survey we showed that genetically distinct S. caprea plants isolated from metal-polluted and unpolluted sites differed in their zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) tolerance and accumulation abilities. To determine the molecular basis of this difference we examined putative homologues of genes involved in heavy metal responses and identified over 200 new candidates with a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) screen. Quantitative expression analyses of 20 genes in leaves revealed that some metallothioneins and cell wall modifying genes were induced irrespective of the genotype's origin and metal uptake capacity while a cysteine biosynthesis gene was expressed constitutively higher in the metallicolous genotype. The third and largest group of genes was only induced in the metallicolous genotype. These data demonstrate that naturally adapted woody non-model species can help to discover potential novel molecular mechanisms for metal accumulation and tolerance.

  12. Genotype-by-environment interactions underlie the expression of pre- and post-copulatory sexually selected traits in guppies.

    PubMed

    Evans, J P; Rahman, M M; Gasparini, C

    2015-04-01

    The role that genotype-by-environment interactions (GEIs) play in sexual selection has only recently attracted the attention of evolutionary biologists. Yet GEIs can have profound evolutionary implications by compromising the honesty of sexual signals, maintaining high levels of genetic variance underlying their expression and altering the patterns of genetic covariance among fitness traits. In this study, we test for GEIs in a highly sexually dimorphic freshwater fish, the guppy Poecilia reticulata. We conducted an experimental quantitative genetic study in which male offspring arising from a paternal half-sibling breeding design were assigned to differing nutritional 'environments' (either high or low feed levels). We then determined whether the manipulation of diet quantity influenced levels of additive genetic variance and covariance for several highly variable and condition-dependent pre- and post-copulatory sexual traits. In accordance with previous work, we found that dietary limitation had strong phenotypic effects on numerous pre- and post-copulatory sexual traits. We also report evidence for significant GEI for several of these traits, which in some cases (area of iridescence and sperm velocity) reflected a change in the rank order of genotypes across different nutritional environments (i.e. ecological crossover). Furthermore, we show that genetic correlations vary significantly between nutritional environments. Notably, a highly significant negative genetic correlation between iridescent coloration and sperm viability in the high food treatment broke down under dietary restriction. Taken together, these findings are likely to have important evolutionary implications for guppies; ecological crossover may influence sexual signal reliability in unstable (nutritional) environments and contribute towards the extreme levels of polymorphism in sexual traits typically reported for this species. Furthermore, the presence of environment-specific genetic covariance

  13. Genotype-by-environment interactions underlie the expression of pre- and post-copulatory sexually selected traits in guppies.

    PubMed

    Evans, J P; Rahman, M M; Gasparini, C

    2015-04-01

    The role that genotype-by-environment interactions (GEIs) play in sexual selection has only recently attracted the attention of evolutionary biologists. Yet GEIs can have profound evolutionary implications by compromising the honesty of sexual signals, maintaining high levels of genetic variance underlying their expression and altering the patterns of genetic covariance among fitness traits. In this study, we test for GEIs in a highly sexually dimorphic freshwater fish, the guppy Poecilia reticulata. We conducted an experimental quantitative genetic study in which male offspring arising from a paternal half-sibling breeding design were assigned to differing nutritional 'environments' (either high or low feed levels). We then determined whether the manipulation of diet quantity influenced levels of additive genetic variance and covariance for several highly variable and condition-dependent pre- and post-copulatory sexual traits. In accordance with previous work, we found that dietary limitation had strong phenotypic effects on numerous pre- and post-copulatory sexual traits. We also report evidence for significant GEI for several of these traits, which in some cases (area of iridescence and sperm velocity) reflected a change in the rank order of genotypes across different nutritional environments (i.e. ecological crossover). Furthermore, we show that genetic correlations vary significantly between nutritional environments. Notably, a highly significant negative genetic correlation between iridescent coloration and sperm viability in the high food treatment broke down under dietary restriction. Taken together, these findings are likely to have important evolutionary implications for guppies; ecological crossover may influence sexual signal reliability in unstable (nutritional) environments and contribute towards the extreme levels of polymorphism in sexual traits typically reported for this species. Furthermore, the presence of environment-specific genetic covariance

  14. Molecular Phylogeny of the Psittacid Herpesviruses Causing Pacheco's Disease: Correlation of Genotype with Phenotypic Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewski, Elizabeth K.; Kaleta, Erhard F.; Phalen, David N.

    2003-01-01

    Fragments of 419 bp of the UL16 open reading frame from 73 psittacid herpesviruses (PsHVs) from the United States and Europe were sequenced. All viruses caused Pacheco's disease, and serotypes of the European isolates were known. A phylogenetic tree derived from these sequences demonstrated that the PsHVs that cause Pacheco's disease comprised four major genotypes, with each genotype including between two and four variants. With the exception of two viruses, the serotypes of the virus isolates could be predicted by the genotypes. Genotypes 1 and 4 corresponded to serotype 1 isolates, genotype 2 corresponded to serotype 2 isolates, and genotype 3 corresponded to serotype 3 isolates. The single serotype 4 virus mapped to genotype 4. DNA from a virus with a unique serotype could not be amplified with primers that amplified DNA from all other PsHVs, and its classification remains unknown. Viruses representing all four genotypes were found in both the United States and Europe, and it was therefore predicted that serotypes 1, 2, and 3 were present in the United States. Serotype 4 was represented by a single European isolate that could not be genetically distinguished from serotype 1 viruses; therefore, the presence of serotype 4 in the United States could not be predicted. Viruses of genotype 4 were found to be the most commonly associated with Pacheco's disease in macaws and conures and were least likely to be isolated in chicken embryo fibroblasts in the United States. All four genotypes caused deaths in Amazon parrots, but genotype 4 was associated with Pacheco's disease only in Amazons in Europe. Genotypes 2, 3, and 4, but not 1, were found in African grey parrots. Although parrots from the Pacific distribution represent a relatively small percentage of the total number of birds with Pacheco's disease, all four genotypes were found to cause disease in these species. PMID:14512573

  15. Nitrate Starvation Induced Changes in Root System Architecture, Carbon:Nitrogen Metabolism, and miRNA Expression in Nitrogen-Responsive Wheat Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Subodh Kumar; Rani, Manju; Bansal, Niketa; Gayatri; Venkatesh, K; Mandal, P K

    2015-11-01

    Improvement of nutrient use efficiency in cereal crops is highly essential not only to reduce the cost of cultivation but also to save the environmental pollution, reduce energy consumption for production of these chemical fertilizers, improve soil health, and ultimately help in mitigating climate change. In the present investigation, we have studied the morphological (with special emphasis on root system architecture) and biochemical responses (in terms of assay of the key enzymes involved in N assimilation) of two N-responsive wheat genotypes, at the seedling stage, under nitrate-optimum and nitrate-starved conditions grown in hydroponics. Expression profile of a few known wheat micro RNAs (miRNAs) was also studied in the root tissue. Total root size, primary root length, and first- and second-order lateral root numbers responded significantly under nitrate-starved condition. Morphological parameters in terms of root and shoot length and fresh and dry weight of roots and shoots have also been observed to be significant between N-optimum and N-starved condition for each genotypes. Nitrate reductase (NR), glutamine synthatase (GS), and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity significantly decreased under N-starved condition. Glutamine oxoglutarate amino transferase (GOGAT) and pyruvate kinase (PK) activity was found to be genotype dependent. Most of the selected miRNAs were expressed in root tissues, and some of them showed their differential N-responsive expression. Our studies indicate that one of the N-responsive genotype (NP-890) did not get affected significantly under nitrogen starvation at seedling stage. PMID:26315134

  16. Global cytosine methylation in Daphnia magna depends on genotype, environment, and their interaction.

    PubMed

    Asselman, Jana; De Coninck, Dieter I M; Vandegehuchte, Michiel B; Jansen, Mieke; Decaestecker, Ellen; De Meester, Luc; Vanden Bussche, Julie; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Janssen, Colin R; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2015-05-01

    The authors characterized global cytosine methylation levels in 2 different genotypes of the ecotoxicological model organism Daphnia magna after exposure to a wide array of biotic and abiotic environmental stressors. The present study aimed to improve the authors' understanding of the role of cytosine methylation in the organism's response to environmental conditions. The authors observed a significant genotype effect, an environment effect, and a genotype × environment effect. In particular, global cytosine methylation levels were significantly altered after exposure to Triops predation cues, Microcystis, and sodium chloride compared with control conditions. Significant differences between the 2 genotypes were observed when animals were exposed to Triops predation cues, Microcystis, Cryptomonas, and sodium chloride. Despite the low global methylation rate under control conditions (0.49-0.52%), global cytosine methylation levels upon exposure to Triops demonstrated a 5-fold difference between the genotypes (0.21% vs 1.02%). No effects were found in response to arsenic, cadmium, fish, lead, pH of 5.5, pH of 8, temperature, hypoxia, and white fat cell disease. The authors' results point to the potential role of epigenetic effects under changing environmental conditions such as predation (i.e., Triops), diet (i.e., Cryptomonas and Microcystis), and salinity. The results of the present study indicate that, despite global cytosine methylation levels being low, epigenetic effects may be important in environmental studies on Daphnia.

  17. Comt1 genotype and expression predicts anxiety and nociceptive sensitivity in inbred strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Segall, S K; Nackley, A G; Diatchenko, L; Lariviere, W R; Lu, X; Marron, J S; Grabowski-Boase, L; Walker, J R; Slade, G; Gauthier, J; Bailey, J S; Steffy, B M; Maynard, T M; Tarantino, L M; Wiltshire, T

    2010-11-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is a ubiquitously expressed enzyme that maintains basic biologic functions by inactivating catechol substrates. In humans, polymorphic variance at the COMT locus has been associated with modulation of pain sensitivity and risk for developing psychiatric disorders. A functional haplotype associated with increased pain sensitivity was shown to result in decreased COMT activity by altering mRNA secondary structure-dependent protein translation. However, the exact mechanisms whereby COMT modulates pain sensitivity and behavior remain unclear and can be further studied in animal models. We have assessed Comt1 gene expression levels in multiple brain regions in inbred strains of mice and have discovered that Comt1 is differentially expressed among the strains, and this differential expression is cis-regulated. A B2 short interspersed nuclear element (SINE) was inserted in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of Comt1 in 14 strains generating a common haplotype that correlates with gene expression. Experiments using mammalian expression vectors of full-length cDNA clones with and without the SINE element show that strains with the SINE haplotype (+SINE) have greater Comt1 enzymatic activity. +SINE mice also exhibit behavioral differences in anxiety assays and decreased pain sensitivity. These results suggest that a haplotype, defined by a 3'-UTR B2 SINE element, regulates Comt1 expression and some mouse behaviors. PMID:20659173

  18. Osteoradionecrosis in Head-and-Neck Cancer Has a Distinct Genotype-Dependent Cause

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, Andrew J.; West, Catharine M.; Risk, Janet M.; Slevin, Nick J.; Chan, Clara; Crichton, Siobhan; Rinck, Gabrielle; Howell, Dawn; Shaw, Richard J.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We performed a case-control study to establish whether the development of osteoradionecrosis (ORN) was related to a variant allele substituting T for C at -509 of the transforming growth factor-{beta}1 gene (TGF-{beta}1). Patients and Methods: A total of 140 patients, 39 with and 101 without ORN, who underwent radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer with a minimum of 2 years follow-up, were studied. None of the patients had clinical evidence of recurrence at this time. DNA extracted from blood was genotyped for the -509 C-T variant allele of the TGF-{beta}1 gene. Results: There were no significant differences in patient, cancer treatment, or tumor characteristics between the two groups. Of the 39 patients who developed ORN, 9 were homozygous for the common CC allele, 19 were heterozygous, and 11 were homozygous for the rare TT genotype. Of the 101 patients without ORN, the distribution was 56 (CC), 33 (CT), and 12 (TT). The difference in distribution was significant, giving an increased risk of ORN of 5.7 (95% CI, 1.7-19.2) for homozygote TT patients (p = 0.001) and 3.6 (95% CI, 1.3-10.0) for heterozygotes (p = 0.004) when compared with patients with the CC genotype. Postradiotherapy dentoalveolar surgery preceding the development of ORN was associated with the CC genotype (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Our findings support the postulate that the development of ORN is related to the presence of the T variant allele at -509 within the TGF-{beta}1 gene.

  19. Expression patterns of prion protein gene in differential genotypes sheep: quantification using molecular beacon real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuan; Wu, Run; Li, Fa-Di; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Zhao, Chun-Lin; Diao, Xiao-Long; Guan, Hong-Wei

    2011-06-01

    Determination of the transcription level of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is essential for understanding its role in organisms and revealing mechanism of susceptibility and resistance to scrapie. However, the expression of prion protein (PrP) mRNA in sheep has not been quantified in great detail in digestive tract which is important during scrapie spread through oral route. Herein, we report on measurement of sheep PrP mRNA using absolute quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Total RNA was isolated from five different regions of the central nervous system (CNS), four regions of lymphoid system, eleven regions of digestive tract, and two reproductive organ tissues of eight sheep of two different genotypes (ARR/ARQ and ARH/ARQ) and PrP mRNA was quantified by real-time RT-PCR using molecular beacon. The results showed that highest levels of PrP mRNA were expressed in thalamus and cerebrum (P < 0.01) of CNS examined, followed by cerebellum, spinal cord, and brain stem. In peripheral organs examined, lymph tissue showed moderate level of PrP expression similar to that in digestive tract and reproduction organs. PrP expression levels in the same tissue of different genotype sheep had significant variation. Our study provided the first detail, tissue-specific and genotype-specific data of PrP mRNA expression in sheep for further studies of pathogenesis of prion diseases.

  20. Sex-specific genotype-by-environment interactions for cuticular hydrocarbon expression in decorated crickets, Gryllodes sigillatus: implications for the evolution of signal reliability.

    PubMed

    Weddle, C B; Mitchell, C; Bay, S K; Sakaluk, S K; Hunt, J

    2012-10-01

    Phenotypic traits that convey information about individual identity or quality are important in animal social interactions, and the degree to which such traits are influenced by environmental variation can have profound effects on the reliability of these cues. Using inbred genetic lines of the decorated cricket, Gryllodes sigillatus, we manipulated diet quality to test how the cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) profiles of males and females respond across two different nutritional rearing environments. There were significant differences between lines in the CHC profiles of females, but the effect of diet was not quite statistically significant. There was no significant genotype-by-environment interaction (GEI), suggesting that environmental effects on phenotypic variation in female CHCs are independent of genotype. There was, however, a significant effect of GEI for males, with changes in both signal quantity and content, suggesting that environmental effects on phenotypic expression of male CHCs are dependent on genotype. The differential response of male and female CHC expression to variation in the nutritional environment suggests that these chemical cues may be under sex-specific selection for signal reliability. Female CHCs show the characteristics of reliable cues of identity: high genetic variability, low condition dependence and a high degree of genetic determination. This supports earlier work showing that female CHCs are used in self-recognition to identify previous mates and facilitate polyandry. In contrast, male CHCs show the characteristics of reliable cues of quality: condition dependence and a relatively higher degree of environmental determination. This suggests that male CHCs are likely to function as cues of underlying quality during mate choice and/or male dominance interactions.

  1. Generation of novel pharmacogenomic candidates in the response to methotrexate in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: correlation between gene expression and genotype

    PubMed Central

    Moncrieffe, Halima; Hinks, Anne; Ursu, Simona; Kassoumeri, Laura; Etheridge, Angela; Hubank, Mike; Martin, Paul; Weiler, Tracey; Glass, David N; Thompson, Susan D.; Thomson, Wendy; Wedderburn, Lucy R

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Little is known about mechanisms of efficacy of methotrexate (MTX) in childhood arthritis, or genetic influences upon response to MTX. The aims of this study were to use gene expression profiling to identify novel pathways/genes altered by MTX and then investigate these genes for genotype associations with response to MTX treatment. Methods Gene expression profiling before and after MTX treatment was performed on 11 children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) treated with MTX, in whom response at 6 months of treatment was defined. Genes showing the most differential gene expression after treatment were selected for SNP genotyping. Genotype frequencies were compared between non-responders and responders (ACR-Ped70). An independent cohort was available for validation. Results Gene expression profiling before and after MTX treatment revealed 1222 differentially expressed probes sets (fold change >1.7, p< 0.05) and 1065 when restricted to full responder cases only. Six highly differentially expressed genes were analysed for genetic association to response to MTX. Three SNPs in the SLC16A7 gene showed significant association with MTX response. One SNP showed validated association in an independent cohort. Conclusions This study is the first, to our knowledge, to evaluate gene expression profiles in children with JIA before and after MTX, and to analyse genetic variation in differentially expressed genes. We have identified a gene which may contribute to genetic variability in MTX response in JIA, and established as proof of principle that genes which are differentially expressed at mRNA level after drug administration may also be good candidates for genetic analysis. PMID:20827233

  2. Context-Dependent Survival Differences among Electrophoretic Genotypes in Natural Populations of the Marine Bivalve Spisula Ovalis

    PubMed Central

    David, P.; Jarne, P.

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the relationships between allozyme genotypes at nine polymorphic loci and survival in a natural population of the bivalve Spisula ovalis sampled on three occasions (1993, 1994, and 1995) in three different sites (2855 individuals analyzed). This species displays annual growth lines allowing identification of annual cohorts. Therefore we could avoid cohort mixing, a frequent bias in such studies, and evaluate the consistency of the observed effects across cohorts and sites. Significant viability differences were observed both among alleles and between heterozygotes and homozygotes at some loci. Multiple-locus heterozygosity was positively correlated with viability in the 1993-1994 period, but not in the 1994-1995 interval. The observed selective effects were significantly dependent on the cohort and the site considered. A bibliographic survey suggests that such variability is a common feature of studies analyzing heterozygosity-survival relationships. Two explanations are consistent with our results. First, allozyme genotypes may have direct effects on viability that interact with subtle environmental variation in a complex and unpredictable way. Second, allozyme genotypes may be transiently associated with other viability genes responsible for heterotic effects. In any case, the results militate against allozyme loci being themselves consistently overdominant for viability in natural populations. PMID:9136022

  3. Colonic mucosal gene expression and genotype in irritable bowel syndrome patients with normal or elevated fecal bile acid excretion

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Paula; Acosta, Andres; Busciglio, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The mucosal gene expression in rectosigmoid mucosa (RSM) in irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) is unknown. Our objectives were, first, to study mRNA expression [by RT2 PCR of 19 genes pertaining to tight junctions, immune activation, intestinal ion transport and bile acid (BA) homeostasis] in RSM in IBS-D patients (n = 47) and healthy controls (n = 17) and study expression of a selected protein (PDZD3) in 10 IBS-D patients and 4 healthy controls; second, to assess RSM mRNA expression according to genotype and fecal BA excretion (high ≥2,337 μmol/48 h); and third, to determine whether genotype or mucosal mRNA expression is associated with colonic transit or BA parameters. Fold changes were corrected for false detection rate for 19 genes studied (P < 0.00263). In RSM in IBS-D patients compared with controls, mRNA expression of GUC2AB, PDZD3, and PR2Y4 was increased, whereas CLDN1 and FN1 were decreased. One immune-related gene was upregulated (C4BP4) and one downregulated (CCL20). There was increased expression of a selected ion transport protein (PDZD3) on immunohistochemistry and Western blot in IBS-D compared with controls (P = 0.02). There were no significant differences in mucosal mRNA in 20 IBS-D patients with high compared with 27 IBS-D patients with normal BA excretion. GPBAR1 (P < 0.05) was associated with colonic transit. We concluded that mucosal ion transport mRNA (for several genes and PDZD3 protein) is upregulated and barrier protein mRNA downregulated in IBS-D compared with healthy controls, independent of genotype. There are no differences in gene expression in IBS-D with high compared with normal fecal BA excretion. PMID:25930081

  4. The Blood Group A Genotype Determines the Level of Expression of the Blood Group A on Platelets But Not the Anti-B Isotiter

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Barbara; Eichelberger, Beate; Jungbauer, Christof; Panzer, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The extent of expression of the blood group A on platelets is controversial. Further, the relation between platelets' blood group A expression and the titers of isoagglutinins has not been thoroughly investigated, so far. Methods We evaluated the relation between the genotype with platelets' blood group A and H expression estimated by flow cytometry and the titers of isoagglutinins. Results The A expression varied between genotypes and within genotypes. However, the expression in A1 was stronger than in all other genotypes (p < 0.0001). An overlap of expression levels was apparent between homozygous A1A1 and heterozygous A1 individuals. Still, The A1A1 genotype is associated with a particularly high antigen expression (p = 0.009). Platelets' A expression in A2 versus blood group O donors was also significant (p = 0.007), but there was again an overlap of expression. The secretor status had only little influence on the expression (p = 0.18). Also, isoagglutinin titers were not associated with genotypes. Conclusion: To distinguish between A1 and A2 donors may reduce incompatible platelet transfusions and therefore be favorable on platelet transfusion increment. Clinical data are needed to support this notion. PMID:26733767

  5. Differential Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Gene in Wounds of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Cases With Susceptible -1562C>T Genotypes and Wound Severity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kanhaiya; Agrawal, Neeraj K; Gupta, Sanjeev K; Mohan, Gyanendra; Chaturvedi, Sunanda; Singh, Kiran

    2014-05-25

    Coordinated extracellular matrix deposition is a prerequisite for proper wound healing which is mainly orchestrated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Diabetic wounds generally show compromised wound healing cascade and abnormal MMP9 concentration is one of the cause. Our group have recently shown that the polymorphism -1562 C>T in the promoter region of MMP9 gene is associated with pathogenesis of wound healing impairment in T2DM patients. In present study we have done expression profiling of MMP9 gene in the wound biopsy of DFU cases. Expression level of MMP9 mRNA was then compared with susceptible -1562 C>T genotypes (TT and CT) as well as with different grades of wounds. We also screened the promoter region of MMP9 gene to see the methylation state of CpGs present there. Our study suggests that levels of MMP9 mRNA increase significantly with the wound grades. Moreover, the MMP9 levels in diabetic wounds were also dependent on -1562 C>T polymorphism in the promoter region of MMP9. Diabetic wounds also showed a significant unmethylated status of MMP9 promoter compared to control wounds. In conclusion, The risk genotypes of -1562 C>T polymorphism along with lack of methylation of CpG sites in MMP9 gene promoter may result in altered expression of MMP9 in wounds of T2DM cases resulting into nonhealing chronic ulcers in them. PMID:24861096

  6. Goldfish Carassius auratus susceptibility to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus genotype IVb depends on exposure route.

    PubMed

    Getchell, Rodman G; Erkinharju, Toni; Johnson, Anna O; Davis, Benjamin W; Hatch, Emily E; Cornwell, Emily R; Bowser, Paul R

    2015-06-29

    We assessed the susceptibility of goldfish Carassius auratus to infection by genotype IVb of the viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus. Goldfish were infected by intraperitoneal injections of 106 plaque-forming units (pfu) fish-1, single bath exposure of 105 pfu ml-1 for 24 h, or consumption of 0.4 g of commercial fish feed soaked in 107 pfu per 8 fish. The mortality rate of intraperitoneal-infected goldfish was 10 to 32%, although the virus was detected by quantitative RT-PCR in 77% (65/84) of the survivors at the end of the 42 d trial, suggesting a carrier state. Severe gross lesions were observed in many of the moribund and dead goldfish such as hemorrhaging in the skin, fin, liver, kidney, brain, intestine, and eye as well as abdominal distension, bilateral exophthalmia, and splenomegaly. There was minimal morbidity or mortality in the immersion, feeding, or control groups.

  7. Galanin-expression and galanin-dependent sensory neurons are not required for itch

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Galanin is a key modulator of nociception, and it is also required for the developmental survival of a subset of C-fibre sensory neurons which are critical to the mediation of neuropathic and inflammatory pain. However, the potential modulatory roles played by galanin, or the galanin-dependent neurons, in pruritoceptive mechanisms underlying the sensation of itch have not been investigated. Findings Here we report that mice carrying a loss-of-function mutation in the galanin gene (Gal-KO) show no differences in spontaneous behavioural itch responses compared to wild-type (WT) controls. Similarly, the responses to a range of pruritogens are not significantly different between the two genotypes. Conclusions These results suggest that neither galanin expression, nor the galanin-dependent subpopulation of sensory neurons is required for itch-related behaviours. PMID:23216829

  8. The Change of Expression Configuration Affects Identity-Dependent Expression Aftereffect but Not Identity-Independent Expression Aftereffect

    PubMed Central

    Song, Miao; Shinomori, Keizo; Qian, Qian; Yin, Jun; Zeng, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of expression configuration on cross-identity expression aftereffect. The expression configuration refers to the spatial arrangement of facial features in a face for conveying an emotion, e.g., an open-mouth smile vs. a closed-mouth smile. In the first of two experiments, the expression aftereffect is measured using a cross-identity/cross-expression configuration factorial design. The facial identities of test faces were the same or different from the adaptor, while orthogonally, the expression configurations of those facial identities were also the same or different. The results show that the change of expression configuration impaired the expression aftereffect when the facial identities of adaptor and tests were the same; however, the impairment effect disappears when facial identities were different, indicating the identity-independent expression representation is more robust to the change of the expression configuration in comparison with the identity-dependent expression representation. In the second experiment, we used schematic line faces as adaptors and real faces as tests to minimize the similarity between the adaptor and tests, which is expected to exclude the contribution from the identity-dependent expression representation to expression aftereffect. The second experiment yields a similar result as the identity-independent expression aftereffect observed in Experiment 1. The findings indicate the different neural sensitivities to expression configuration for identity-dependent and identity-independent expression systems. PMID:26733922

  9. The Change of Expression Configuration Affects Identity-Dependent Expression Aftereffect but Not Identity-Independent Expression Aftereffect.

    PubMed

    Song, Miao; Shinomori, Keizo; Qian, Qian; Yin, Jun; Zeng, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of expression configuration on cross-identity expression aftereffect. The expression configuration refers to the spatial arrangement of facial features in a face for conveying an emotion, e.g., an open-mouth smile vs. a closed-mouth smile. In the first of two experiments, the expression aftereffect is measured using a cross-identity/cross-expression configuration factorial design. The facial identities of test faces were the same or different from the adaptor, while orthogonally, the expression configurations of those facial identities were also the same or different. The results show that the change of expression configuration impaired the expression aftereffect when the facial identities of adaptor and tests were the same; however, the impairment effect disappears when facial identities were different, indicating the identity-independent expression representation is more robust to the change of the expression configuration in comparison with the identity-dependent expression representation. In the second experiment, we used schematic line faces as adaptors and real faces as tests to minimize the similarity between the adaptor and tests, which is expected to exclude the contribution from the identity-dependent expression representation to expression aftereffect. The second experiment yields a similar result as the identity-independent expression aftereffect observed in Experiment 1. The findings indicate the different neural sensitivities to expression configuration for identity-dependent and identity-independent expression systems.

  10. Childhood Adversity Increases Risk for Nicotine Dependence and Interacts with α5 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Genotype Specifically in Males

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Pingxing; Kranzler, Henry R; Zhang, Huiping; Oslin, David; Anton, Raymond F; Farrer, Lindsay A; Gelernter, Joel

    2012-01-01

    The relative importance of specific genetic and environmental factors in regulating nicotine dependence (ND) risk, including the effects on specific forms of childhood adversity on smoking risk, have been understudied. Genome-wide association studies and rodent models have demonstrated that the α5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene (CHRNA5) is important in regulating nicotine intake. Childhood adversity increases the methylation level of the CHRNA5 promoter region in European Americans (EAs), an effect that was observed only in males (Zhang et al, submitted for publication). In view of this potential sex difference in the effects of early life experience on smoking, we investigated the presence of a sex-specific gene-by-environment effect of this marker on ND risk. A nonsynonymous SNP in CHRNA5 previously associated to ND and several related traits, rs16969968, was genotyped in 2206 EAs (1301 men and 905 women). The main and interactive effects of childhood adversity and rs16969968 genotype on diagnosis of ND and ND defined by dichotomized Fagerstrom test for ND (FTND) scores were explored. Men and women were analyzed separately to test for sex differences. Childhood adversity significantly increased ND risk in both sexes, and the effect in women was twice than that in men. Significant interactive effects of childhood adversity and rs16969968 genotype were observed in men (ND: OR=1.80, 95% CI=1.18–2.73, P=0.0044; FTND: OR=1.79, 95% CI=1.11–2.88, P=0.012). No interaction was found in women. This study provides evidence of a sex-specific gene × environment effect of CHRNA5 and childhood adversity on the risk for ND. PMID:22012472

  11. A time- and dose-dependent STAT1 expression system

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Nicole R; Strobl, Birgit; Bokor, Marion; Painz, Ronald; Kolbe, Thomas; Rülicke, Thomas; Müller, Mathias; Karaghiosoff, Marina

    2006-01-01

    Background The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family of transcription factors mediates a variety of cytokine dependent gene regulations. STAT1 has been mainly characterized by its role in interferon (IFN) type I and II signaling and STAT1 deficiency leads to high susceptibility to several pathogens. For fine-tuned analysis of STAT1 function we established a dimerizer-inducible system for STAT1 expression in vitro and in vivo. Results The functionality of the dimerizer-induced STAT1 system is demonstrated in vitro in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and embryonic stem cells. We show that this two-vector based system is highly inducible and does not show any STAT1 expression in the absence of the inducer. Reconstitution of STAT1 deficient cells with inducible STAT1 restores IFNγ-mediated gene induction, antiviral responses and STAT1 activation remains dependent on cytokine stimulation. STAT1 expression is induced rapidly upon addition of dimerizer and expression levels can be regulated in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore we show that in transgenic mice STAT1 can be induced upon stimulation with the dimerizer, although only at low levels. Conclusion These results prove that the dimerizer-induced system is a powerful tool for STAT1 analysis in vitro and provide evidence that the system is suitable for the use in transgenic mice. To our knowledge this is the first report for inducible STAT1 expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. PMID:17184522

  12. Nitrogen-Deficiency Stress Induces Protein Expression Differentially in Low-N Tolerant and Low-N Sensitive Maize Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Muslima; Pandey, Renu; Siddiqi, Tariq O; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Qureshi, Mohammad I; Abraham, Gerard; Vengavasi, Krishnapriya; Ahmad, Altaf

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is essential for proper plant growth and its application has proven to be critical for agricultural produce. However, for unavoidable economic and environmental problems associated with excessive use of N-fertilizers, it is an urgent demand to manage application of fertilizers. Improving the N-use efficiency (NUE) of crop plants to sustain productivity even at low N levels is the possible solution. In the present investigation, contrasting low-N sensitive (HM-4) and low-N tolerant (PEHM-2) genotypes were identified and used for comparative proteome-profiling of leaves under optimum and low N as well as restoration of low N on 3rd (NR3) and 5th (NR5) days after re-supplying N. The analysis of differential expression pattern of proteins was performed by 2-D gel electrophoresis. Significant variations in the expression of proteins were observed under low N, which were genotype specific. In the leaf proteome, 25 spots were influenced by N treatment and four spots were different between the two genotypes. Most of the proteins that were differentially accumulated in response to N level and were involved in photosynthesis and metabolism, affirming the relationship between N and carbon metabolism. In addition to this, greater intensity of some defense proteins in the low N tolerant genotype was found that may have a possible role in imparting it tolerance under N starvation conditions. The new insights generated on maize proteome in response to N-starvation and restoration would be useful toward improvement of NUE in maize. PMID:27047497

  13. Nitrogen-Deficiency Stress Induces Protein Expression Differentially in Low-N Tolerant and Low-N Sensitive Maize Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Nazir, Muslima; Pandey, Renu; Siddiqi, Tariq O.; Ibrahim, Mohamed M.; Qureshi, Mohammad I.; Abraham, Gerard; Vengavasi, Krishnapriya; Ahmad, Altaf

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is essential for proper plant growth and its application has proven to be critical for agricultural produce. However, for unavoidable economic and environmental problems associated with excessive use of N-fertilizers, it is an urgent demand to manage application of fertilizers. Improving the N-use efficiency (NUE) of crop plants to sustain productivity even at low N levels is the possible solution. In the present investigation, contrasting low-N sensitive (HM-4) and low-N tolerant (PEHM-2) genotypes were identified and used for comparative proteome-profiling of leaves under optimum and low N as well as restoration of low N on 3rd (NR3) and 5th (NR5) days after re-supplying N. The analysis of differential expression pattern of proteins was performed by 2-D gel electrophoresis. Significant variations in the expression of proteins were observed under low N, which were genotype specific. In the leaf proteome, 25 spots were influenced by N treatment and four spots were different between the two genotypes. Most of the proteins that were differentially accumulated in response to N level and were involved in photosynthesis and metabolism, affirming the relationship between N and carbon metabolism. In addition to this, greater intensity of some defense proteins in the low N tolerant genotype was found that may have a possible role in imparting it tolerance under N starvation conditions. The new insights generated on maize proteome in response to N-starvation and restoration would be useful toward improvement of NUE in maize. PMID:27047497

  14. Methamphetamine-induced locomotor changes are dependent on age, dose and genotype.

    PubMed

    Good, Renee L; Radcliffe, Richard A

    2011-03-01

    Adolescence is a critical age for addiction formation as a large percentage of pathological drug-seeking behaviors manifest during this time. The extent to which the neurotoxic effects of drugs of abuse influence subsequent drug seeking behaviors and impulsivity is an understudied area of research. Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely abused drug that produces locomotor responses ranging from behavioral sensitization to tolerance, both of which are behaviors that may relate to risk of abuse. Here we investigated the effects of age, genotype, METH dose, including a neurotoxic dose, and METH metabolism on open-field activity (OFA) to gain insight into the complex disease of drug abuse. C57Bl/6 (B6), DBA/2 (D2), and 129S6SvEv/Tac (129) mouse strains were administered saline or either a high dose (4×5 mg/kg in 2 h intervals for 2 days) or low dose (2×1 mg/kg in 24 h intervals) METH pretreatment during adolescence (post natal day (PND) 40) or early adulthood (PND 80) followed by behavioral testing with a METH (1 mg/kg) or saline challenge 40 days later. Striatal concentrations of METH and AMPH were also determined. Significant findings include: 1) METH pretreated adolescent B6 mice displayed significant sensitization for horizontal locomotion due to high dose METH pretreatment; 2) METH pretreated B6 adults showed significant tolerance for the vertical activity measure caused by low dose METH pretreatment; 3) METH pretreated adult D2 mice exhibited significant sensitization for vertical activity induced by low dose METH pretreatment, and 4) 129 mice metabolized METH significantly faster than the B6 and D2 mice, but METH pretreatment did not alter metabolism. No significant behavioral responses to either METH pretreatment dose were observed for the D2 adolescent studies or either 129 age group. Our results highlight the importance of the interactions of age, strain and METH dose on locomotor behavioral outcomes.

  15. Transcriptomics of salinity tolerance capacity in Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus): a comparison of gene expression profiles between divergent QTL genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Moira M.; Danzmann, Roy G.

    2013-01-01

    Osmoregulatory capabilities have played an important role in the evolution, dispersal, and diversification of vertebrates. To better understand the genetic architecture of hypo-osmoregulation in fishes and to determine which genes and biological processes affect intraspecific variation in salinity tolerance, we used mRNA sequence libraries from Arctic charr gill tissue to compare gene expression profiles in fish exhibiting divergent salinity tolerance quantitative trait locus (QTL) genotypes. We compared differentially expressed genes with QTL positions to gain insight about the nature of the underlying polymorphisms and examined gene expression within the context of genome organization to gain insight about the evolution of hypo-osmoregulation in fishes. mRNA sequencing of 18 gill tissue libraries produced 417 million reads, and the final reduced de novo transcriptome assembly consisted of 92,543 contigs. Families contained a similar number of differentially expressed contigs between high and low salinity tolerance capacity groups, and log2 expression ratios ranged from 10.4 to −8.6. We found that intraspecific variation in salinity tolerance capacity correlated with differential expression of immune response genes. Some differentially expressed genes formed clusters along linkage groups. Most clusters comprised gene pairs, though clusters of three, four, and eight genes were also observed. We postulated that conserved synteny of gene clusters on multiple ancestral and teleost chromosomes may have been preserved via purifying selection. Colocalization of QTL with differentially expressed genes suggests that polymorphisms in cis-regulatory elements are part of a majority of QTL. PMID:24368751

  16. Discordances between Interpretation Algorithms for Genotypic Resistance to Protease and Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Are Subtype Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Snoeck, Joke; Kantor, Rami; Shafer, Robert W.; Van Laethem, Kristel; Deforche, Koen; Carvalho, Ana Patricia; Wynhoven, Brian; Soares, Marcelo A.; Cane, Patricia; Clarke, John; Pillay, Candice; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Ariyoshi, Koya; Holguin, Africa; Rudich, Hagit; Rodrigues, Rosangela; Bouzas, Maria Belen; Brun-Vézinet, Françoise; Reid, Caroline; Cahn, Pedro; Brigido, Luis Fernando; Grossman, Zehava; Soriano, Vincent; Sugiura, Wataru; Phanuphak, Praphan; Morris, Lynn; Weber, Jonathan; Pillay, Deenan; Tanuri, Amilcar; Harrigan, Richard P.; Camacho, Ricardo; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Katzenstein, David; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke

    2006-01-01

    The major limitation of drug resistance genotyping for human immunodeficiency virus remains the interpretation of the results. We evaluated the concordance in predicting therapy response between four different interpretation algorithms (Rega 6.3, HIVDB-08/04, ANRS [07/04], and VGI 8.0). Sequences were gathered through a worldwide effort to establish a database of non-B subtype sequences, and demographic and clinical information about the patients was gathered. The most concordant results were found for nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (93%), followed by protease inhibitors (84%) and nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTIs) (76%). For therapy-naive patients, for nelfinavir, especially for subtypes C and G, the discordances were driven mainly by the protease (PRO) mutational pattern 82I/V + 63P + 36I/V for subtype C and 82I + 63P + 36I + 20I for subtype G. Subtype F displayed more discordances for ritonavir in untreated patients due to the combined presence of PRO 20R and 10I/V. In therapy-experienced patients, subtype G displayed a lot of discordances for saquinavir and indinavir due to mutational patterns involving PRO 90 M and 82I. Subtype F had more discordance for nelfinavir attributable to the presence of PRO 88S and 82A + 54V. For the NRTIs lamivudine and emtricitabine, CRF01_AE had more discordances than subtype B due to the presence of RT mutational patterns 65R + 115 M and 118I + 215Y, respectively. Overall, the different algorithms agreed well on the level of resistance scored, but some of the discordances could be attributed to specific (subtype-dependent) combinations of mutations. It is not yet known whether therapy response is subtype dependent, but the advice given to clinicians based on a genotypic interpretation algorithm differs according to the subtype. PMID:16436728

  17. Assessing numerical dependence in gene expression summaries with the jackknife expression difference.

    PubMed

    Stevens, John R; Nicholas, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Statistical methods to test for differential expression traditionally assume that each gene's expression summaries are independent across arrays. When certain preprocessing methods are used to obtain those summaries, this assumption is not necessarily true. In general, the erroneous assumption of dependence results in a loss of statistical power. We introduce a diagnostic measure of numerical dependence for gene expression summaries from any preprocessing method and discuss the relative performance of several common preprocessing methods with respect to this measure. Some common preprocessing methods introduce non-trivial levels of numerical dependence. The issue of (between-array) dependence has received little if any attention in the literature, and researchers working with gene expression data should not take such properties for granted, or they risk unnecessarily losing statistical power. PMID:22876276

  18. Genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (ALDH7A1 deficiency)

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Philippa B.; Footitt, Emma J.; Mills, Kevin A.; Tuschl, Karin; Aylett, Sarah; Varadkar, Sophia; Hemingway, Cheryl; Marlow, Neil; Rennie, Janet; Baxter, Peter; Dulac, Olivier; Nabbout, Rima; Craigen, William J.; Schmitt, Bernhard; Feillet, François; Christensen, Ernst; De Lonlay, Pascale; Pike, Mike G.; Hughes, M. Imelda; Struys, Eduard A.; Jakobs, Cornelis; Zuberi, Sameer M.

    2010-01-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy was recently shown to be due to mutations in the ALDH7A1 gene, which encodes antiquitin, an enzyme that catalyses the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent dehydrogenation of l-α-aminoadipic semialdehyde/l-Δ1-piperideine 6-carboxylate. However, whilst this is a highly treatable disorder, there is general uncertainty about when to consider this diagnosis and how to test for it. This study aimed to evaluate the use of measurement of urine l-α-aminoadipic semialdehyde/creatinine ratio and mutation analysis of ALDH7A1 (antiquitin) in investigation of patients with suspected or clinically proven pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy and to characterize further the phenotypic spectrum of antiquitin deficiency. Urinary l-α-aminoadipic semialdehyde concentration was determined by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. When this was above the normal range, DNA sequencing of the ALDH7A1 gene was performed. Clinicians were asked to complete questionnaires on clinical, biochemical, magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography features of patients. The clinical spectrum of antiquitin deficiency extended from ventriculomegaly detected on foetal ultrasound, through abnormal foetal movements and a multisystem neonatal disorder, to the onset of seizures and autistic features after the first year of life. Our relatively large series suggested that clinical diagnosis of pyridoxine dependent epilepsy can be challenging because: (i) there may be some response to antiepileptic drugs; (ii) in infants with multisystem pathology, the response to pyridoxine may not be instant and obvious; and (iii) structural brain abnormalities may co-exist and be considered sufficient cause of epilepsy, whereas the fits may be a consequence of antiquitin deficiency and are then responsive to pyridoxine. These findings support the use of biochemical and DNA tests for antiquitin deficiency and a clinical trial of pyridoxine in infants and children with

  19. Identification of Genes in a Partially Resistant Genotype of Avena sativa Expressed in Response to Puccinia coronata Infection.

    PubMed

    Loarce, Yolanda; Navas, Elisa; Paniagua, Carlos; Fominaya, Araceli; Manjón, José L; Ferrer, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Cultivated oat (Avena sativa), an important crop in many countries, can suffer significant losses through infection by the fungus Puccinia coronata, the causal agent of crown rust disease. Understanding the molecular basis of existing partial resistance to this disease might provide targets of interest for crop improvement programs. A suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) library was constructed using cDNA from the partially resistant oat genotype MN841801-1 after inoculation with the pathogen. A total of 929 genes returned a BLASTx hit and were annotated under different GO terms, including 139 genes previously described as participants in mechanisms related to the defense response and signal transduction. Among these were genes involved in pathogen recognition, cell-wall modification, oxidative burst/ROS scavenging, and abscisic acid biosynthesis, as well genes related to inducible defense responses mediated by salicylic and jasmonic acid (although none of which had been previously reported involved in strong responses). These findings support the hypothesis that basal defense mechanisms are the main systems operating in oat partial resistance to P. coronata. When the expression profiles of 20 selected genes were examined at different times following inoculation with the pathogen, the partially resistant genotype was much quicker in mounting a response than a susceptible genotype. Additionally, a number of genes not previously described in oat transcriptomes were identified in this work, increasing our molecular knowledge of this crop. PMID:27303424

  20. Identification of Genes in a Partially Resistant Genotype of Avena sativa Expressed in Response to Puccinia coronata Infection

    PubMed Central

    Loarce, Yolanda; Navas, Elisa; Paniagua, Carlos; Fominaya, Araceli; Manjón, José L.; Ferrer, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Cultivated oat (Avena sativa), an important crop in many countries, can suffer significant losses through infection by the fungus Puccinia coronata, the causal agent of crown rust disease. Understanding the molecular basis of existing partial resistance to this disease might provide targets of interest for crop improvement programs. A suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) library was constructed using cDNA from the partially resistant oat genotype MN841801-1 after inoculation with the pathogen. A total of 929 genes returned a BLASTx hit and were annotated under different GO terms, including 139 genes previously described as participants in mechanisms related to the defense response and signal transduction. Among these were genes involved in pathogen recognition, cell-wall modification, oxidative burst/ROS scavenging, and abscisic acid biosynthesis, as well genes related to inducible defense responses mediated by salicylic and jasmonic acid (although none of which had been previously reported involved in strong responses). These findings support the hypothesis that basal defense mechanisms are the main systems operating in oat partial resistance to P. coronata. When the expression profiles of 20 selected genes were examined at different times following inoculation with the pathogen, the partially resistant genotype was much quicker in mounting a response than a susceptible genotype. Additionally, a number of genes not previously described in oat transcriptomes were identified in this work, increasing our molecular knowledge of this crop. PMID:27303424

  1. Identification of Genes in a Partially Resistant Genotype of Avena sativa Expressed in Response to Puccinia coronata Infection.

    PubMed

    Loarce, Yolanda; Navas, Elisa; Paniagua, Carlos; Fominaya, Araceli; Manjón, José L; Ferrer, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Cultivated oat (Avena sativa), an important crop in many countries, can suffer significant losses through infection by the fungus Puccinia coronata, the causal agent of crown rust disease. Understanding the molecular basis of existing partial resistance to this disease might provide targets of interest for crop improvement programs. A suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) library was constructed using cDNA from the partially resistant oat genotype MN841801-1 after inoculation with the pathogen. A total of 929 genes returned a BLASTx hit and were annotated under different GO terms, including 139 genes previously described as participants in mechanisms related to the defense response and signal transduction. Among these were genes involved in pathogen recognition, cell-wall modification, oxidative burst/ROS scavenging, and abscisic acid biosynthesis, as well genes related to inducible defense responses mediated by salicylic and jasmonic acid (although none of which had been previously reported involved in strong responses). These findings support the hypothesis that basal defense mechanisms are the main systems operating in oat partial resistance to P. coronata. When the expression profiles of 20 selected genes were examined at different times following inoculation with the pathogen, the partially resistant genotype was much quicker in mounting a response than a susceptible genotype. Additionally, a number of genes not previously described in oat transcriptomes were identified in this work, increasing our molecular knowledge of this crop.

  2. The genotype-dependent influence of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes on fetal development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinglu; Zhang, Fan; Sun, Xiaolian; Choi, Ki-Young; Niu, Gang; Zhang, Guofeng; Guo, Jinxia; Lee, Seulki; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    In many cases cancer is caused by gene deficiency that is being passed along from generation to generation. Soluble carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown promising applications in the diagnosis and therapy of cancer, however, the potential relationship between cancer-prone individuals and response to CNT exposure as a prerequisite for development of personalized nanomedicine, is still poorly understood. Here we report that intravenous injections of multi-walled carbon nanotubes into p53 (a well-known cancer-susceptible gene) heterozygous pregnant mice can induce p53- dependent responses in fetal development. Larger sized multi-walled carbon nanotubes moved across the blood-placenta barrier (BPB), restricted the development of fetuses, and induced brain deformity, whereas single-walled and smaller sized multi-walled carbon nanotubes showed no or less fetotoxicity. A molecular mechanism study found that multi-walled carbon nanotubes directly triggered p53-dependent apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in response to DNA damage. Based on the molecular mechanism, we also incorporated N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an FDA approved antioxidant, to prevent CNTs induced nuclear DNA damage and reduce brain development abnormalities. Our findings suggest that CNTs might have genetic background-dependent toxic effect on the normal development of the embryo, and provide new insights into protection against nanoparticle-induced toxicity in potential clinical applications.

  3. The genotype-dependent influence of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes on fetal development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinglu; Zhang, Fan; Sun, Xiaolian; Choi, Ki-Young; Niu, Gang; Zhang, Guofeng; Guo, Jinxia; Lee, Seulki; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    In many cases cancer is caused by gene deficiency that is being passed along from generation to generation. Soluble carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown promising applications in the diagnosis and therapy of cancer, however, the potential relationship between cancer-prone individuals and response to CNT exposure as a prerequisite for development of personalized nanomedicine, is still poorly understood. Here we report that intravenous injections of multi-walled carbon nanotubes into p53 (a well-known cancer-susceptible gene) heterozygous pregnant mice can induce p53- dependent responses in fetal development. Larger sized multi-walled carbon nanotubes moved across the blood-placenta barrier (BPB), restricted the development of fetuses, and induced brain deformity, whereas single-walled and smaller sized multi-walled carbon nanotubes showed no or less fetotoxicity. A molecular mechanism study found that multi-walled carbon nanotubes directly triggered p53-dependent apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in response to DNA damage. Based on the molecular mechanism, we also incorporated N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an FDA approved antioxidant, to prevent CNTs induced nuclear DNA damage and reduce brain development abnormalities. Our findings suggest that CNTs might have genetic background-dependent toxic effect on the normal development of the embryo, and provide new insights into protection against nanoparticle-induced toxicity in potential clinical applications. PMID:24344357

  4. Hierarchical Modeling and Differential Expression Analysis for RNA-seq Experiments with Inbred and Hybrid Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lithio, Andrew; Nettleton, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The performance of inbred and hybrid genotypes is of interest in plant breeding and genetics. High-throughput sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq) has proven to be a useful tool in the study of the molecular genetic responses of inbreds and hybrids to environmental stresses. Commonly used experimental designs and sequencing methods lead to complex data structures that require careful attention in data analysis. We demonstrate an analysis of RNA-seq data from a split-plot design involving drought stress applied to two inbred genotypes and two hybrids formed by crosses between the inbreds. Our generalized linear modeling strategy incorporates random effects for whole-plot experimental units and uses negative binomial distributions to allow for overdispersion in count responses for split-plot experimental units. Variations in gene length and base content, as well as differences in sequencing intensity across experimental units, are also accounted for. Hierarchical modeling with thoughtful parameterization and prior specification allows for borrowing of information across genes to improve estimation of dispersion parameters, genotype effects, treatment effects, and interaction effects of primary interest. PMID:27110090

  5. Array-based genotyping and expression analysis of barley cv. Maythorpe and Golden Promise

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Harkamal; Wilson, Clyde; Condamine, Pascal; Ismail, Abdelbagi M; Xu, Jin; Cui, Xinping; Close, Timothy J

    2007-01-01

    Background Golden Promise is a salt-tolerant spring barley closely related to Maythorpe. Salt tolerance in Golden Promise has been attributed to a single mutation at the Ari-e locus (on 5H) resulting from irradiation of Maythorpe. Golden Promise accumulates lower shoot Na+ compared to Maythorpe when growing under saline conditions. This study focused on elucidating the genetic basis and mechanisms involved in this difference. Results The level of polymorphism between the two genotypes was explored using the Barley1 GeneChip for single feature polymorphisms (SFPs) and an oligonucleotide pool assay for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Polymorphism analyses revealed three haplotype blocks spanning 6.4 cM on chromosome 1H, 23.7 cM on chromosome 4H and 3.0 cM on 5H. The Barley1 GeneChip was used to examine transcript abundance in different tissues and stages during development. Several genes within the polymorphic haplotype blocks were differentially regulated. Additionally, a more global difference in the jasmonic acid pathway regulation was detected between the two genotypes. Conclusion The results confirm that Golden Promise and Maythorpe are genetically very closely related but establish that they are not isogenic, as previously reported, due to three polymorphic haplotype blocks. Transcriptome analysis indicates that the response of the two genotypes to salinity stress is quite different. Additionally, the response to salinity stress in the roots and shoot tissue is strikingly different. PMID:17394671

  6. Unbiased characterization of genotype-dependent metabolic regulations by metabolomic approach in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kusano, Miyako; Fukushima, Atsushi; Arita, Masanori; Jonsson, Pär; Moritz, Thomas; Kobayashi, Makoto; Hayashi, Naomi; Tohge, Takayuki; Saito, Kazuki

    2007-01-01

    Background Metabolites are not only the catalytic products of enzymatic reactions but also the active regulators or the ultimate phenotype of metabolic homeostasis in highly complex cellular processes. The modes of regulation at the metabolome level can be revealed by metabolic networks. We investigated the metabolic network between wild-type and 2 mutant (methionine-over accumulation 1 [mto1] and transparent testa4 [tt4]) plants regarding the alteration of metabolite accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana. Results In the GC-TOF/MS analysis, we acquired quantitative information regarding over 170 metabolites, which has been analyzed by a novel score (ZMC, z-score of metabolite correlation) describing a characteristic metabolite in terms of correlation. Although the 2 mutants revealed no apparent morphological abnormalities, the overall correlation values in mto1 were much lower than those of the wild-type and tt4 plants, indicating the loss of overall network stability due to the uncontrolled accumulation of methionine. In the tt4 mutant, a new correlation between malate and sinapate was observed although the levels of malate, sinapate, and sinapoylmalate remain unchanged, suggesting an adaptive reconfiguration of the network. Gene-expression correlations presumably responsible for these metabolic networks were determined using the metabolite correlations as clues. Conclusion Two Arabidopsis mutants, mto1 and tt4, exhibited the following changes in entire metabolome networks: the overall loss of metabolic stability (mto1) or the generation of a metabolic network of a backup pathway for the lost physiological functions (tt4). The expansion of metabolite correlation to gene-expression correlation provides detailed insights into the systemic understanding of the plant cellular process regarding metabolome and transcriptome. PMID:18028551

  7. Differentially methylated obligatory epialleles modulate context-dependent LAM gene expression in the honeybee Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Wedd, Laura; Kucharski, Robert; Maleszka, Ryszard

    2016-01-01

    Differential intragenic methylation in social insects has been hailed as a prime mover of environmentally driven organismal plasticity and even as evidence for genomic imprinting. However, very little experimental work has been done to test these ideas and to prove the validity of such claims. Here we analyze in detail differentially methylated obligatory epialleles of a conserved gene encoding lysosomal α-mannosidase (AmLAM) in the honeybee. We combined genotyping of progenies derived from colonies founded by single drone inseminated queens, ultra-deep allele-specific bisulfite DNA sequencing, and gene expression to reveal how sequence variants, DNA methylation, and transcription interrelate. We show that both methylated and non-methylated states of AmLAM follow Mendelian inheritance patterns and are strongly influenced by polymorphic changes in DNA. Increased methylation of a given allele correlates with higher levels of context-dependent AmLAM expression and appears to affect the transcription of an antisense long noncoding RNA. No evidence of allelic imbalance or imprinting involved in this process has been found. Our data suggest that by generating alternate methylation states that affect gene expression, sequence variants provide organisms with a high level of epigenetic flexibility that can be used to select appropriate responses in various contexts. This study represents the first effort to integrate DNA sequence variants, gene expression, and methylation in a social insect to advance our understanding of their relationships in the context of causality. PMID:26507253

  8. Differentially methylated obligatory epialleles modulate context-dependent LAM gene expression in the honeybee Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Wedd, Laura; Kucharski, Robert; Maleszka, Ryszard

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Differential intragenic methylation in social insects has been hailed as a prime mover of environmentally driven organismal plasticity and even as evidence for genomic imprinting. However, very little experimental work has been done to test these ideas and to prove the validity of such claims. Here we analyze in detail differentially methylated obligatory epialleles of a conserved gene encoding lysosomal α-mannosidase (AmLAM) in the honeybee. We combined genotyping of progenies derived from colonies founded by single drone inseminated queens, ultra-deep allele-specific bisulfite DNA sequencing, and gene expression to reveal how sequence variants, DNA methylation, and transcription interrelate. We show that both methylated and non-methylated states of AmLAM follow Mendelian inheritance patterns and are strongly influenced by polymorphic changes in DNA. Increased methylation of a given allele correlates with higher levels of context-dependent AmLAM expression and appears to affect the transcription of an antisense long noncoding RNA. No evidence of allelic imbalance or imprinting involved in this process has been found. Our data suggest that by generating alternate methylation states that affect gene expression, sequence variants provide organisms with a high level of epigenetic flexibility that can be used to select appropriate responses in various contexts. This study represents the first effort to integrate DNA sequence variants, gene expression, and methylation in a social insect to advance our understanding of their relationships in the context of causality. PMID:26507253

  9. Differentially methylated obligatory epialleles modulate context-dependent LAM gene expression in the honeybee Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Wedd, Laura; Kucharski, Robert; Maleszka, Ryszard

    2016-01-01

    Differential intragenic methylation in social insects has been hailed as a prime mover of environmentally driven organismal plasticity and even as evidence for genomic imprinting. However, very little experimental work has been done to test these ideas and to prove the validity of such claims. Here we analyze in detail differentially methylated obligatory epialleles of a conserved gene encoding lysosomal α-mannosidase (AmLAM) in the honeybee. We combined genotyping of progenies derived from colonies founded by single drone inseminated queens, ultra-deep allele-specific bisulfite DNA sequencing, and gene expression to reveal how sequence variants, DNA methylation, and transcription interrelate. We show that both methylated and non-methylated states of AmLAM follow Mendelian inheritance patterns and are strongly influenced by polymorphic changes in DNA. Increased methylation of a given allele correlates with higher levels of context-dependent AmLAM expression and appears to affect the transcription of an antisense long noncoding RNA. No evidence of allelic imbalance or imprinting involved in this process has been found. Our data suggest that by generating alternate methylation states that affect gene expression, sequence variants provide organisms with a high level of epigenetic flexibility that can be used to select appropriate responses in various contexts. This study represents the first effort to integrate DNA sequence variants, gene expression, and methylation in a social insect to advance our understanding of their relationships in the context of causality.

  10. Pupal diapause termination in Bactrocera minax: an insight on 20-hydroxyecdysone induced phenotypic and genotypic expressions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenzhong; Dong, Yongcheng; Wang, Yaohui; Andongma, Awawing A; Rashid, Muhammad A; Krutmuang, Patcharin; Niu, Changying

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese citrus fruit fly, Bactrocera minax, is an economically important pest of citrus. It exhibits pupal diapause from November to May to combat harsh environmental conditions. Such a long pupal diapause is a barrier for laboratory rearing and development of control strategies against this pest. In the present study, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) was used to break pupal diapause of B. minax by topical application. After diapause termination by 20E treated, the pupal ontogenetic processes were observed along the temporal trajectory. The pupal response time to 20E was estimated by detecting the relative expression of 20E responsive genes at different times after 20E-treatment. Results revealed that 20E could effectively terminate the pupal diapause in a dose-dependent manner and significantly shorten the time for 50% adult emergence (Et50). 20E response genes, including ecr, broad and foxo, were up-regulated within 72h, indicating these genes are involved in pupal metamorphosis and diapause termination processes. Morphological changes showed the pupal metamorphosis began ~7 days after 20E-treatment at 22 °C. This study does not only pave the way for artificial rearing in the laboratory through manipulating of pupal diapause termination, but also deepens our understanding of the underlying pupal diapause termination mechanism of B. minax. PMID:27273028

  11. Pupal diapause termination in Bactrocera minax: an insight on 20-hydroxyecdysone induced phenotypic and genotypic expressions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenzhong; Dong, Yongcheng; Wang, Yaohui; Andongma, Awawing A.; Rashid, Muhammad A.; Krutmuang, Patcharin; Niu, Changying

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese citrus fruit fly, Bactrocera minax, is an economically important pest of citrus. It exhibits pupal diapause from November to May to combat harsh environmental conditions. Such a long pupal diapause is a barrier for laboratory rearing and development of control strategies against this pest. In the present study, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) was used to break pupal diapause of B. minax by topical application. After diapause termination by 20E treated, the pupal ontogenetic processes were observed along the temporal trajectory. The pupal response time to 20E was estimated by detecting the relative expression of 20E responsive genes at different times after 20E-treatment. Results revealed that 20E could effectively terminate the pupal diapause in a dose-dependent manner and significantly shorten the time for 50% adult emergence (Et50). 20E response genes, including ecr, broad and foxo, were up-regulated within 72h, indicating these genes are involved in pupal metamorphosis and diapause termination processes. Morphological changes showed the pupal metamorphosis began ~7 days after 20E-treatment at 22 °C. This study does not only pave the way for artificial rearing in the laboratory through manipulating of pupal diapause termination, but also deepens our understanding of the underlying pupal diapause termination mechanism of B. minax. PMID:27273028

  12. Uptake by cucurbitaceae of soil-Bome contaminants depends upon plant genotype and pollutant properties.

    PubMed

    Mattina, Maryjane Incorvia; Isleyen, Mehmet; Eitzer, Brian D; Iannucci-Berger, William; White, Jason C

    2006-03-15

    Three Cucurbitaceae, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo (cv. Black Beauty, true zucchini), Cucurbita pepo L. intersubspecific cross (cv. Zephyr, summer squash), and Cucumis sativis (cv. Marketmore, cucumber), were grown in rhizotrons containing soil contaminated with three classes of highly weathered, hydrophobic organic contaminants: (1) technical chlordane, (2) dichlorodiphenylethanes (DDT and DDD) and -ethene (DDE), (3) polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and heavy metal residues. Movement of the contaminants through the soil/plant system was studied by comparing contaminant concentration in the bulk soil, the rhizosphere soil pore water, the xylem sap, and aerial tissue. This permitted, for the first time, calculation of bioconcentration factors (BCFs) based on concentration in the xylem sap versus that in the rhizosphere soil pore water. The bioconcentration factors so determined for the sum of five chlordane residues (two enantiomers of trans-chlordane, TC; two enantiomers of cis-chlordane, CC; and achiral trans-nonachlor, TN) were 36, 40, and 23 for Black Beauty, Zephyr, and Marketmore, respectively. In addition, the xylem sap of each cultivar had a consistent enantioselective profile for some of the chiral chlordane components. For the sum of dichlorodiphenylethanes and -ethene, comparable BCF values were 19, 4, and 0.8, respectively. In the case of PAHs, different BCF patterns among the cultivars were noted for three- versus four-ring compounds. Similarly, movement of heavy metals was cultivar-dependent, with cadmium BCF values 9.5, 3.5, and 0.6for Black Beauty, Zephyr, and Marketmore, respectively; the analogous BCFs for zinc were 9, 11, and 2. Thus, passage from ex planta to in planta regions of the soil/plant system is dependent not only on properties of the plant, but also on those of the pollutant. Such data will provide insight into transport mechanisms of highly hydrophobic organic contaminants, as well as heavy metal contaminants, in the soil/plant system.

  13. Finding the right motivation: genotype-dependent differences in effective reinforcements for spatial learning.

    PubMed

    Youn, Jiun; Ellenbroek, Bart A; van Eck, Inti; Roubos, Sandra; Verhage, Matthijs; Stiedl, Oliver

    2012-01-15

    Memory impairments of DBA/2J mice have been frequently reported in spatial and emotional behavior tests. However, in some memory tests involving food reward, DBA/2J mice perform equally well to C57BL/6J mice or even outperform them. Thus, it is conceivable that motivational factors differentially affect cognitive performance of different mouse strains. Therefore, spatial memory of DBA/2J and C57BL/6J mice was investigated in a modified version of the Barnes maze (mBM) test with increased complexity. The modified Barnes maze test allowed using either aversive or appetitive reinforcement, but with identical spatial cues and motor requirements. Both mouse strains acquired spatial learning in mBM tests with either reinforcement. However, DBA/2J mice learned slower than C57BL/6J mice when aversive reinforcement was used. In contrast, the two strains performed equally well when appetitive reinforcement was used. The superior performance in C57BL/6J mice in the aversive version of the mBM test was accompanied by a more frequent use of the spatial strategy. In the appetitive version of the mBM test, both strains used the spatial strategy to a similar extent. The present results demonstrate that the cognitive performance of mice depends heavily on motivational factors. Our findings underscore the importance of an effective experimental design when assessing spatial memory and challenges interpretations of impaired hippocampal function in DBA/2J mice drawn on the basis of behavior tests depending on aversive reinforcement.

  14. Basal expression studies of cystatins during specific growth stages of wheat spikes for defining their possible role in differential and stage dependent immunity against Karnal bunt (Tilletia indica).

    PubMed

    Purwar, Shalini; Marla, Soma S; Singh, U S; Kumar, Anil

    2010-03-01

    Two genotypes showing differential immunity against Karnal bunt (Tilletia indica) were used to investigate the role of three members of cystatin gene family in growth stage dependent immunity in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Three members of cystatin gene family (WC1, WC2, and WC4) were cloned and sequenced. Analysis of sequenced data showed that there was 76-99% nucleotide and protein sequence identity between different genes of the wheat cystatin. In silico amino acid sequence analysis revealed the presence of a conserved signature pattern of residues and also the functional domains were presumed to be actively involved in imparting cysteine protease inhibition capability. The semi-quantitative and quantitative levels of these members were measured by means of RT-PCR, northern blotting, western blotting, and by ELISA techniques. The members of cystatin gene family were expressed in both resistant (HD 29) and susceptible genotypes (WH 542); however, the expression level was significantly (P < 0.001) higher in resistant compared to susceptible genotype at all the stages of wheat spikes. The patterns of expression of WC2, WC4 were similar except in the levels in S(1) and S(2) stages as it remained constant (P > 0.05) in contrary to WC1 family whose expression gradually increased from S(v) to S(2) stage. According to the intensity of the detected band in RT PCR, northern blot and western blot, WC1 family seems to be expressed more than the other gene families. The immunoassay results further showed that WC1 protein was abundantly expressed in resistant genotype and high expression was observed at the S2 stage as compared to susceptible genotype (P < 0.001) suggesting that low level of expression of WC1 in S2 stage is responsible for KB infection. The results of the present study clearly indicate the role of cystatin gene family in differential and stage dependent immunity against KB.

  15. Diversity in the carotenoid profiles and the expression of genes related to carotenoid accumulation among citrus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Kato, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are not only important to the plants themselves but also are beneficial to human health. Since citrus fruit is a good source of carotenoids for the human diet, it is important to study carotenoid profiles and the accumulation mechanism in citrus fruit. Thus, in the present paper, we describe the diversity in the carotenoid profiles of fruit among citrus genotypes. In regard to carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin, violaxanthin, lycopene, and β-citraurin, the relationship between the carotenoid profile and the expression of carotenoid-biosynthetic genes is discussed. Finally, recent results of quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses of carotenoid contents and expression levels of carotenoid-biosynthetic genes in citrus fruit are shown.

  16. Diversity in the carotenoid profiles and the expression of genes related to carotenoid accumulation among citrus genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Kato, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are not only important to the plants themselves but also are beneficial to human health. Since citrus fruit is a good source of carotenoids for the human diet, it is important to study carotenoid profiles and the accumulation mechanism in citrus fruit. Thus, in the present paper, we describe the diversity in the carotenoid profiles of fruit among citrus genotypes. In regard to carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin, violaxanthin, lycopene, and β-citraurin, the relationship between the carotenoid profile and the expression of carotenoid-biosynthetic genes is discussed. Finally, recent results of quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses of carotenoid contents and expression levels of carotenoid-biosynthetic genes in citrus fruit are shown. PMID:27069398

  17. Developmental-stage-dependent transcriptional response to leukaemic oncogene expression

    PubMed Central

    Regha, Kakkad; Assi, Salam A.; Tsoulaki, Olga; Gilmour, Jane; Lacaud, Georges; Bonifer, Constanze

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is characterized by a block in myeloid differentiation the stage of which is dependent on the nature of the transforming oncogene and the developmental stage of the oncogenic hit. This is also true for the t(8;21) translocation that gives rise to the RUNX1-ETO fusion protein and initiates the most common form of human AML. Here we study the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells expressing an inducible RUNX1-ETO gene into blood cells as a model, combined with genome-wide analyses of transcription factor binding and gene expression. RUNX1-ETO interferes with both the activating and repressive function of its normal counterpart, RUNX1, at early and late stages of blood cell development. However, the response of the transcriptional network to RUNX1-ETO expression is developmental stage specific, highlighting the molecular mechanisms determining specific target cell expansion after an oncogenic hit. PMID:26018585

  18. Identification of Echinococcus granulosus microRNAs and their expression in different life cycle stages and parasite genotypes.

    PubMed

    Cucher, M; Prada, L; Mourglia-Ettlin, G; Dematteis, S; Camicia, F; Asurmendi, S; Rosenzvit, M

    2011-03-01

    The aetiological agent of cystic hydatid disease, the platyhelminth parasite Echinococcus granulosus, undergoes a series of metamorphic events during its complex life cycle. One of its developmental stages, the protoscolex, shows a remarkable degree of heterogeneous morphogenesis, being able to develop either into the vesicular or strobilar direction. Another level of complexity is added by the existence of genotypes or strains that differ in the range of intermediate hosts where they can develop and form fertile cysts. These features make E. granulosus an interesting model for developmental studies. Hence, we focused on the study of the regulation of gene expression by microRNAs (miRNAs), one of the key mechanisms that control development in metazoans and plants and which has not been analysed in E. granulosus yet. In this study, we cloned 38 distinct miRNAs, including four candidate new miRNAs that seem to be specific to Echinococcus spp. Thirty-four cloned sequences were orthologous to miRNAs already described in other organisms and were grouped in 16 metazoan miRNA families, some of them known for their role in the development of other organisms. The expression of some of the cloned miRNAs differs according to the parasite life cycle stage analysed, showing differential developmental expression. We did not detect differences in the expression of the analysed miRNAs between protoscoleces of two parasite genotypes. This work sets the scene for the study of gene regulation mediated by miRNAs in E. granulosus and provides a new approach to study the molecules involved in its developmental plasticity and intermediate host specificity. Understanding the developmental processes of E. granulosus may help to find new strategies for the control of cystic hydatid disease, caused by the metacestode stage of the parasite.

  19. Effects of ploidy and sex-locus genotype on gene expression patterns in the fire ant Solenopsis invicta

    PubMed Central

    Nipitwattanaphon, Mingkwan; Wang, John; Ross, Kenneth G.; Riba-Grognuz, Oksana; Wurm, Yannick; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Keller, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Males in many animal species differ greatly from females in morphology, physiology and behaviour. Ants, bees and wasps have a haplodiploid mechanism of sex determination whereby unfertilized eggs become males while fertilized eggs become females. However, many species also have a low frequency of diploid males, which are thought to develop from diploid eggs when individuals are homozygous at one or more sex determination loci. Diploid males are morphologically similar to haploids, though often larger and typically sterile. To determine how ploidy level and sex-locus genotype affect gene expression during development, we compared expression patterns between diploid males, haploid males and females (queens) at three developmental timepoints in Solenopsis invicta. In pupae, gene expression profiles of diploid males were very different from those of haploid males but nearly identical to those of queens. An unexpected shift in expression patterns emerged soon after adult eclosion, with diploid male patterns diverging from those of queens to resemble those of haploid males, a pattern retained in older adults. The finding that ploidy level effects on early gene expression override sex effects (including genes implicated in sperm production and pheromone production/perception) may explain diploid male sterility and lack of worker discrimination against them during development. PMID:25355475

  20. Oxygen dependent pyruvate oxidase expression and production in Streptococcus sanguinis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lan-yan; Itzek, Andreas; Chen, Zhi-yun; Kreth, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the oxygen dependent regulation of pyruvate oxidase (SpxB) gene expression and protein production in Streptococcus sanguinis (S. sanguinis). SpxB is responsible for the generation of growth-inhibiting amounts of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) able to antagonize cariogenic Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). Furthermore, the ecological consequence of H2O2 production was investigated in its self-inhibiting ability towards the producing strain. Expression of spxB was determined with quantitative Real-Time RT-PCR and a fluorescent expression reporter strain. Protein abundance was investigated with FLAG epitope engineered in frame on the C-terminal end of SpxB. Self inhibition was tested with an antagonism plate assay. The expression and protein abundance decreased in cells grown under anaerobic conditions. S. sanguinis was resistant against its own produced H2O2, while cariogenic S. mutans was inhibited in its growth. The results suggest that S. sanguinis produces H2O2 as antimicrobial substance to inhibit susceptible niche competing species like S. mutans during initial biofilm formation, when oxygen availability allows for spxB expression and Spx production. PMID:21485312

  1. A Sorghum bicolor expression atlas reveals dynamic genotype-specific expression profiles for vegetative tissues of grain, sweet and bioenergy sorghums

    SciTech Connect

    Shakoor, N; Nair, R; Crasta, O; Morris, G; Feltus, A; Kresovich, S

    2014-01-23

    Background: Effective improvement in sorghum crop development necessitates a genomics-based approach to identify functional genes and QTLs. Sequenced in 2009, a comprehensive annotation of the sorghum genome and the development of functional genomics resources is key to enable the discovery and deployment of regulatory and metabolic genes and gene networks for crop improvement. Results: This study utilizes the first commercially available whole-transcriptome sorghum microarray (Sorgh-WTa520972F) to identify tissue and genotype-specific expression patterns for all identified Sorghum bicolor exons and UTRs. The genechip contains 1,026,373 probes covering 149,182 exons (27,577 genes) across the Sorghum bicolor nuclear, chloroplast, and mitochondrial genomes. Specific probesets were also included for putative non-coding RNAs that may play a role in gene regulation (e. g., microRNAs), and confirmed functional small RNAs in related species (maize and sugarcane) were also included in our array design. We generated expression data for 78 samples with a combination of four different tissue types (shoot, root, leaf and stem), two dissected stem tissues (pith and rind) and six diverse genotypes, which included 6 public sorghum lines (R159, Atlas, Fremont, PI152611, AR2400 and PI455230) representing grain, sweet, forage, and high biomass ideotypes. Conclusions: Here we present a summary of the microarray dataset, including analysis of tissue-specific gene expression profiles and associated expression profiles of relevant metabolic pathways. With an aim to enable identification and functional characterization of genes in sorghum, this expression atlas presents a new and valuable resource to the research community.

  2. Molecular Cloning, Expression Pattern and Genotypic Effects on Glucoraphanin Biosynthetic Related Genes in Chinese Kale (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra Bailey).

    PubMed

    Yin, Ling; Chen, Changming; Chen, Guoju; Cao, Bihao; Lei, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Glucoraphanin is a plant secondary metabolite that is involved in plant defense and imparts health-promoting properties to cruciferous vegetables. In this study, three genes involved in glucoraphanin metabolism, branched-chain aminotransferase 4 (BCAT4), methylthioalkylmalate synthase 1 (MAM1) and dihomomethionine N-hydroxylase (CYP79F1), were cloned from Chinese kale (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra Bailey). Sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis identified these genes and confirmed the evolutionary status of Chinese kale. The transcript levels of BCAT4, MAM1 and CYP79F1 were higher in cotyledon, leaf and stem compared with flower and silique. BCAT4, MAM1 and CYP79F1 were expressed throughout leaf development with lower transcript levels during the younger stages. Glucoraphanin content varied extensively among different varieties, which ranged from 0.25 to 2.73 µmol·g(-1) DW (dry weight). Expression levels of BCAT4 and MAM1 were high at vegetative-reproductive transition phase, while CYP79F1 was expressed high at reproductive phase. BCAT4, MAM1 and CYP79F1 were expressed significantly high in genotypes with high glucoraphanin content. All the results provided a better understanding of the roles of BCAT4, MAM1 and CYP79F1 in the glucoraphanin biosynthesis of Chinese kale. PMID:26569208

  3. Molecular Cloning, Expression Pattern and Genotypic Effects on Glucoraphanin Biosynthetic Related Genes in Chinese Kale (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra Bailey).

    PubMed

    Yin, Ling; Chen, Changming; Chen, Guoju; Cao, Bihao; Lei, Jianjun

    2015-11-11

    Glucoraphanin is a plant secondary metabolite that is involved in plant defense and imparts health-promoting properties to cruciferous vegetables. In this study, three genes involved in glucoraphanin metabolism, branched-chain aminotransferase 4 (BCAT4), methylthioalkylmalate synthase 1 (MAM1) and dihomomethionine N-hydroxylase (CYP79F1), were cloned from Chinese kale (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra Bailey). Sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis identified these genes and confirmed the evolutionary status of Chinese kale. The transcript levels of BCAT4, MAM1 and CYP79F1 were higher in cotyledon, leaf and stem compared with flower and silique. BCAT4, MAM1 and CYP79F1 were expressed throughout leaf development with lower transcript levels during the younger stages. Glucoraphanin content varied extensively among different varieties, which ranged from 0.25 to 2.73 µmol·g(-1) DW (dry weight). Expression levels of BCAT4 and MAM1 were high at vegetative-reproductive transition phase, while CYP79F1 was expressed high at reproductive phase. BCAT4, MAM1 and CYP79F1 were expressed significantly high in genotypes with high glucoraphanin content. All the results provided a better understanding of the roles of BCAT4, MAM1 and CYP79F1 in the glucoraphanin biosynthesis of Chinese kale.

  4. Virus-Like Particle Secretion and Genotype-Dependent Immunogenicity of Dengue Virus Serotype 2 DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Galula, Jedhan U.; Shen, Wen-Fan; Chuang, Shih-Te

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus (DENV), composed of four distinct serotypes, is the most important and rapidly emerging arthropod-borne pathogen and imposes substantial economic and public health burdens. We constructed candidate vaccines containing the DNA of five of the genotypes of dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) and evaluated the immunogenicity, the neutralizing (Nt) activity of the elicited antibodies, and the protective efficacy elicited in mice immunized with the vaccine candidates. We observed a significant correlation between the level of in vitro virus-like particle secretion, the elicited antibody response, and the protective efficacy of the vaccines containing the DNA of the different DENV genotypes in immunized mice. However, higher total IgG antibody levels did not always translate into higher Nt antibodies against homologous and heterologous viruses. We also found that, in contrast to previous reports, more than 50% of total IgG targeted ectodomain III (EDIII) of the E protein, and a substantial fraction of this population was interdomain highly neutralizing flavivirus subgroup-cross-reactive antibodies, such as monoclonal antibody 1B7-5. In addition, the lack of a critical epitope(s) in the Sylvatic genotype virus recognized by interdomain antibodies could be the major cause of the poor protection of mice vaccinated with the Asian 1 genotype vaccine (pVD2-Asian 1) from lethal challenge with virus of the Sylvatic genotype. In conclusion, although the pVD2-Asian 1 vaccine was immunogenic, elicited sufficient titers of Nt antibodies against all DENV-2 genotypes, and provided 100% protection against challenge with virus of the homologous Asian 1 genotype and virus of the heterologous Cosmopolitan genotype, it is critical to monitor the potential emergence of Sylvatic genotype viruses, since vaccine candidates under development may not protect vaccinated humans from these viruses. IMPORTANCE Five genotype-specific dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) DNA vaccine

  5. The Liver MicroRNA Expression Profiles Associated With Chronic Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Genotype-4 Infection: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    El-Guendy, Nadia Mohamed; Helwa, Reham; El-Halawany, Medhat Salah; Abdel Rahman Ali, Shimaa; Tantawy Aly, Marwa; Hasan Alieldin, Nelly; Fouad, Shawky Abdel Hamid; Saeid, Hany; Abdel-Wahab, Abdel-Hady Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been repeatedly shown to play important roles in liver pathologies, including hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and liver cancer. Egypt has the highest hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection rate worldwide, predominantly involving genotype-4. Objectives In this study, we attempted to characterize the miRNA profile of the poorly studied genotype 4 of HCV in chronically infected Egyptian patients to obtain a better understanding of the disease and its complications and help in the design of better management protocols. Patients and Methods We analyzed the expression levels of a selected panel of 94 miRNAs in fresh liver biopsies collected from 50 Egyptian patients diagnosed with chronic HCV infection using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Non-parametric tests were used to analyze the expression level of each miRNA and association with the clinicopathological features of enrolled patients in this study. Results Our results revealed differential expression levels of the analyzed miRNAs compared to the normal controls. Twenty-seven miRNAs (including miR-105, miR-147, miR-149-3p, and miR-196b) showed up-regulation, while 17 miRNAs (including miR-21, miR-122, miR-199a-3p, and miR-223) showed down-regulation. An inverse correlation was observed between levels of miR-95, miR-130a, and miR-142-5p with the blood albumin level. Increased expression levels of seven miRNAs (miR-29c, miR-30c, miR-126, miR-145, miR-199a, miR-199a-3p, and miR-222) were observed with severe chronic hepatic inflammation. Several deregulated miRNAs found in this study have been previously linked to chronic liver inflammation and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development. Conclusions The identified expression profiles of some examined miRNAs might offer important points to consider for the treatment of naive patients and the management of chronically infected HCV patients in Egypt and around the world. PMID:27275163

  6. Effects of Acute Dopamine Precusor Depletion on Immediate Reward Selection Bias and Working Memory Depend on Catechol-O-methyltransferase Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Kelm, Mary Katherine; Boettiger, Charlotte A.

    2013-01-01

    Little agreement exists as to acute dopamine (DA) manipulation effects on intertemporal choice in humans. We previously found that catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met genotype predicts individual differences in immediate reward selection bias among adults. Moreover, we and others have shown that the relationship between COMT genotype and immediate reward bias is inverted in adolescents. No previous pharmacology studies testing DA manipulation effects on intertemporal choice have accounted for COMT genotype, and many have included participants in the adolescent age range (18–21) as adults. Moreover, many studies have included female subjects without strict cycle phase control, although recent evidence demonstrates that cyclic estradiol elevations interact with COMT genotype to affect DA-dependent cognition. These factors may have interacted with DA manipulations in past studies, potentially occluding detection of effects. Therefore, we predicted that among healthy adult males (ages 22–40), frontal DA tone, as indexed by COMT genotype, would interact with acute changes in DA signaling to affect intertemporal choice. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled design, we decreased central DA via administration of an amino acid beverage deficient in the DA precursors, phenylalanine and tyrosine (P/T[−]), and tested effects on immediate reward bias in a delay-discounting (DD) task and working memory (WM) in an n-back task. We found no main effect of beverage on DD or WM performance, but did find significant beverage*genotype effects. These results suggest that the effect of DA manipulations on DD depends on individual differences in frontal DA tone, which may have impeded some past efforts to characterize DA’s role in immediate reward bias in humans. PMID:23937688

  7. Field efficacy and seasonal expression profiles for terminal leaves of single and double Bacillus thuringiensis toxin cotton genotypes.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, J J; Adams, L C; Hardee, D D

    2001-12-01

    Examination of commercial Cry1Ac transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bt) cotton varieties (Bollgard, Monsanto, St. Louis, MO) and an experimental Cry1Ac + Cry2Ab transgenic Bt cotton variety (Bollgard II, Monsanto) for lepidopteran field efficacy was conducted during the 2000 growing season. In addition, a commercially available (Envirologix, Portland, ME) quantification assay (ELISA) was used to measure and profile the expression levels of Cry proteins in two of these varieties ['DP50B, Bollgard'; 'DP50BII, Bollgard II' (Delta & Pine Land, Scott, MS)]. Populations of beet army worms, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner), and soybean loopers, Pseudoplusia includens (Walker), were significantly lower (P < 0.05) in Bollgard II plots compared with Bollgard. Population numbers for fall army worms, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), and salt marsh caterpillars, Estigmene acrea (Drury), were lower in Bollgard II plots compared with Bollgard but means did not differ significantly (P > 0.05). Single and dual-toxin genotypes remained superior (P < 0.05) compared with conventional cotton against the tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens (F.). The addition of Cry2Ab had no significant (P > 0.05) impact on Cry1Ac expression in Bollgard II compared with Cry1Ac expression in Bollgard. Furthermore, throughout the season Cry2Ab was present at much higher levels in the plant compared with Cry1Ac for Bollgard II plants. Possible species-specific reasons for increased efficacy of Bollgard II over Bollgard are discussed.

  8. Cobalt stimulates HIF-1-dependent but inhibits HIF-2-dependent gene expression in liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Befani, Christina; Mylonis, Ilias; Gkotinakou, Ioanna-Maria; Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Hu, Cheng-Jun; Simos, George; Liakos, Panagiotis

    2013-11-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are transcriptional regulators that mediate the cellular response to low oxygen. Although HIF-1 is usually considered as the principal mediator of hypoxic adaptation, several tissues and different cell types express both HIF-1 and HIF-2 isoforms under hypoxia or when treated with hypoxia mimetic chemicals such as cobalt. However, the similarities or differences between HIF-1 and HIF-2, in terms of their tissue- and inducer-specific activation and function, are not adequately characterized. To address this issue, we investigated the effects of true hypoxia and hypoxia mimetics on HIF-1 and HIF-2 induction and specific gene transcriptional activity in two hepatic cancer cell lines, Huh7 and HepG2. Both hypoxia and cobalt caused rapid induction of both HIF-1α and HIF-2α proteins. Hypoxia induced erythropoietin (EPO) expression and secretion in a HIF-2-dependent way. Surprisingly, however, EPO expression was not induced when cells were treated with cobalt. In agreement, both HIF-1- and HIF-2-dependent promoters (of PGK and SOD2 genes, respectively) were activated by hypoxia while cobalt only activated the HIF-1-dependent PGK promoter. Unlike cobalt, other hypoxia mimetics such as DFO and DMOG activated both types of promoters. Furthermore, cobalt impaired the hypoxic stimulation of HIF-2, but not HIF-1, activity and cobalt-induced HIF-2α interacted poorly with USF-2, a HIF-2-specific co-activator. These data show that, despite similar induction of HIF-1α and HIF-2α protein expression, HIF-1 and HIF-2 specific gene activating functions respond differently to different stimuli and suggest the operation of oxygen-independent and gene- or tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms involving additional transcription factors or co-activators.

  9. Sulforaphane- and phenethyl isothiocyanate-induced inhibition of aflatoxin B1-mediated genotoxicity in human hepatocytes: role of GSTM1 genotype and CYP3A4 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gross-Steinmeyer, Kerstin; Stapleton, Patricia L; Tracy, Julia H; Bammler, Theo K; Strom, Stephen C; Eaton, David L

    2010-08-01

    Primary cultures of human hepatocytes were used to investigate whether the dietary isothiocyanates, sulforaphane (SFN), and phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) can reduce DNA adduct formation of the hepatocarcinogen aflatoxin B(1) (AFB). Following 48 h of pretreatment, 10 and 50 microM SFN greatly decreased AFB-DNA adduct levels, whereas 25muM PEITC decreased AFB-DNA adducts in some but not all hepatocyte preparations. Microarray and quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR analyses of gene expression in SFN and PEITC-treated hepatocytes demonstrated that SFN greatly decreased cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 mRNA but did not induce the expression of either glutathione S-transferase (GST) M1 or GSTT1. The protective effects of SFN required pretreatment; cotreatment of hepatocytes with SFN and AFB in the absence of pretreatment had no effect on AFB-DNA adduct formation. When AFB-DNA adduct formation was evaluated by GST genotype, the presence of one or two functional alleles of GSTM1 was associated with a 75% reduction in AFB-DNA adducts, compared with GSTM1 null. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that the inhibition of AFB-DNA adduct formation by SFN is dependent on changes in gene expression rather than direct inhibition of catalytic activity. Transcriptional repression of genes involved in AFB bioactivation (CYP3A4 and CYP1A2), but not transcriptional activation of GSTs, may be responsible for the protective effects of SFN. Although GSTM1 expression was not induced by SFN, the presence of a functional GSTM1 allele can afford substantial protection against AFB-DNA damage in human liver. The downregulation of CYP3A4 by SFN may have important implications for drug interactions. PMID:20442190

  10. Differentially expressed genes and proteins upon drought acclimation in tolerant and sensitive genotypes of Coffea canephora

    PubMed Central

    Marraccini, Pierre; Vinecky, Felipe; Alves, Gabriel S.C.; Ramos, Humberto J.O.; Elbelt, Sonia; Vieira, Natalia G.; Carneiro, Fernanda A.; Sujii, Patricia S.; Alekcevetch, Jean C.; Silva, Vânia A.; DaMatta, Fábio M.; Ferrão, Maria A.G.; Leroy, Thierry; Pot, David; Vieira, Luiz G.E.; da Silva, Felipe R.; Andrade, Alan C.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying drought acclimation in coffee plants by the identification of candidate genes (CGs) using different approaches. The first approach used the data generated during the Brazilian Coffee expressed sequence tag (EST) project to select 13 CGs by an in silico analysis (electronic northern). The second approach was based on screening macroarrays spotted with plasmid DNA (coffee ESTs) with separate hybridizations using leaf cDNA probes from drought-tolerant and susceptible clones of Coffea canephora var. Conilon, grown under different water regimes. This allowed the isolation of seven additional CGs. The third approach used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to identify proteins displaying differential accumulation in leaves of drought-tolerant and susceptible clones of C. canephora. Six of them were characterized by MALDI-TOF-MS/MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption-time of flight-tandem mass spectrometry) and the corresponding proteins were identified. Finally, additional CGs were selected from the literature, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to analyse the expression of all identified CGs. Altogether, >40 genes presenting differential gene expression during drought acclimation were identified, some of them showing different expression profiles between drought-tolerant and susceptible clones. Based on the obtained results, it can be concluded that factors involved a complex network of responses probably involving the abscisic signalling pathway and nitric oxide are major molecular determinants that might explain the better efficiency in controlling stomata closure and transpiration displayed by drought-tolerant clones of C. canephora. PMID:22511801

  11. [ESTIMATING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF HYPOLIPIDEMIC THERAPY WITH ROSUVASTATIN IN PATIENTS WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASE DEPENDING ON THE GENOTYPE OF LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE].

    PubMed

    Zvyagina, M V; Mal, G S; Bushueva, O Yu; Alymenko, M A; Bykanova, M A; Letova, I M; Gribovskaya, I A; Churnosov, M I; Solodilova, M A; Polonikov, A V

    2016-01-01

    Taking into account the genetic heterogeneity of hyperlipidemias, polymorphic genes involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism may explain differences in the efficacy of hypolipidemic therapy. In the present prospective and randomized study, we have investigated the efficacy of rosuvastatin (10 mg/day) in the therapy of atherogenic hyperlipidemias in a group of 62 patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), depending on the genotype of lipoprotein lipase (LPL). The pharmacological correction was carried out during one year under control of lipid metabolism parameters (total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, HDL-unrelated cholesterol, triglycerides, atherogenic index) at the baseline and on 4th, 8th, 24th and 48th week. The HindIII polymorphism (+495T > G, rs320) of the LPL gene was genotyped in all patients studied through a real-time PCR TaqMan assay. Rosuvastatin produced a significant hypolipidemic effect with respect to all investigated lipid metabolism parameters for 24 weeks of treatment. Changes in the parameters of lipid metabolism upon rosuvastatin treatment differed in patients with genotype +495GG as compared to the rest LPL genotypes. In comparison to the +495TT and TG genotypes, the genotype +495GG showed a greater reduction in total cholesterol on 8th week, and in LDL-C, HDL-unrelated cholesterol, and atherogenic index on the 48th week of rosuvastatin therapy (p <0.01). It can be suggested that the pronounced hypolipidemic effect of rosuvastatin in homozygotes +495GG of the LPL gene is associated with modulation of the LPL activity, as it has been previously reported for other statin drugs. PMID:27159952

  12. The hairless gene of the mouse: relationship of phenotypic effects with expression profile and genotype.

    PubMed

    Cachón-González, M B; San-José, I; Cano, A; Vega, J A; García, N; Freeman, T; Schimmang, T; Stoye, J P

    1999-10-01

    Various mutations of the hairless (hr) gene of mice result in hair loss and other integument defects. To examine the role of the hr gene in mouse development, the expression profile of hr has been determined by in situ hybridisation and correlated to the nature of genetic changes and morphological abnormalities in different mutant animals. Four variant alleles have been characterised at the molecular level. hr/hr mice produce reduced, but significant, levels of hr mRNA whereas other alleles contain mutations which would be expected to preclude the synthesis of functional product, demonstrating a correlation between allelic variation at the hr locus and phenotypic severity. hr expression was shown to be widespread and temporally regulated. It was identified in novel tissues such as cartilage, developing tooth, inner ear, retina, and colon as well as in skin and brain. Analysis of mice homozygous for the rhino allele of hairless revealed that, although no morphological defects were detectable in many tissues normally expressing hr, previously undescribed abnormalities were present in several tissues including inner ear, retina, and colon. These findings indicate that the hairless gene product plays a wider role in development than previously suspected. Dev Dyn 1999;216:113-126. PMID:10536052

  13. Gender-dependent effect of GSTM1 genotype on childhood asthma associated with prenatal tobacco smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chih-Chiang; Ou, Chia-Yu; Chang, Jen-Chieh; Hsu, Te-Yao; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Liu, Chieh-An; Wang, Chih-Lu; Chuang, Chia-Ju; Chuang, Hau; Liang, Hsiu-Mei; Yang, Kuender D

    2014-01-01

    It remains unclear whether the GSTM1 genotype interacts with tobacco smoke exposure (TSE) in asthma development. This study aimed to investigate the interactions among GSTM1 genotype, gender, and prenatal TSE with regard to childhood asthma development. In a longitudinal birth cohort in Taiwan, 756 newborns completed a 6-year follow-up, and 591 children with DNA samples available for GSTM1 genotyping were included in the study, and the interactive influences of gender-GSTM1 genotyping-prenatal TSE on childhood asthma development were analyzed. Among these 591 children, 138 (23.4%) had physician-diagnosed asthma at 6 years of age, and 347 (58.7%) were null-GSTM1. Prenatal TSE significantly increased the prevalence of childhood asthma in null-GSTM1 children relative to those with positive GSTM1. Further analysis showed that prenatal TSE significantly increased the risk of childhood asthma in girls with null-GSTM1. Furthermore, among the children without prenatal TSE, girls with null-GSTM1 had a significantly lower risk of developing childhood asthma and a lower total IgE level at 6 years of age than those with positive GSTM1. This study demonstrates that the GSTM1 null genotype presents a protective effect against asthma development in girls, but the risk of asthma development increases significantly under prenatal TSE.

  14. SSR genotyping.

    PubMed

    Mason, Annaliese S

    2015-01-01

    SSR genotyping involves the use of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) as DNA markers. SSRs, also called microsatellites, are a type of repetitive DNA sequence ubiquitous in most plant genomes. SSRs contain repeats of a motif sequence 1-6 bp in length. Due to this structure SSRs frequently undergo mutations, mainly due to DNA polymerase errors, which involve the addition or subtraction of a repeat unit. Hence, SSR sequences are highly polymorphic and may be readily used for detection of allelic variation within populations. SSRs are present within both genic and nongenic regions and are occasionally transcribed, and hence may be identified in expressed sequence tags (ESTs) as well as more commonly in nongenic DNA sequences. SSR genotyping involves the design of DNA-based primers to amplify SSR sequences from extracted genomic DNA, followed by amplification of the SSR repeat region using polymerase chain reaction, and subsequent visualization of the resulting DNA products, usually using gel electrophoresis. These procedures are described in this chapter. SSRs have been one of the most favored molecular markers for plant genotyping in the last 20 years due to their high levels of polymorphism, wide distribution across most plant genomes, and ease of use and will continue to be a useful tool in many species for years to come.

  15. Experience-dependent gene expression in adult visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiabin; Yamahachi, Homare; Gilbert, Charles D

    2010-03-01

    Experience-dependent plasticity of the adult visual cortex underlies perceptual learning and recovery of function following central nervous system lesions. To reveal the signal transduction cascades involved in adult cortical plasticity, we utilized a model of remapping of cortical topography following binocular retinal lesions. In this model, the lesion projection zone (LPZ) of primary visual cortex (V1) recovers visually driven activity by the sprouting of horizontal axonal connections originating from the cells in the surrounding region. To explore the molecular mechanism underlying this process, we used gene microarrays from an expression library prepared from Macaque V1. By microarray analysis of gene expression levels in the LPZ and the surrounding region, and subsequent confirmation with Quantitative Real-Time polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization, the participation of a number of genes was observed, including the Rho GTPase family. Its role in regulation of cytoskeleton assembly provides a possible link between the alteration of neural activity and cortical functional reorganization. PMID:19571270

  16. Construction of an infectious molecular clone of Japanese encephalitis virus genotype V and its derivative subgenomic replicon capable of expressing a foreign gene.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tomohiro; Abe, Makoto; Masuda, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) genotype V was originally isolated in Malaysia in 1952 and has long been restricted to the area. In 2009, sudden emergence of the genotype V in China and Korea was reported, suggesting expansion of its geographical distribution. Although studies on the genotype V are becoming more important, they have been limited partly due to lack of its infectious molecular clone. In this study, a plasmid carrying cDNA corresponding to the entire genome of JEV Muar strain, which belongs to genotype V, in the downstream of T7 promoter was constructed. Electroporation of viral RNA transcribed by T7 RNA polymerase (T7RNAP) in vitro from the plasmid led to production of progeny viruses both in mammalian and mosquito cells. Also, transfection of the infectious clone plasmid into mammalian cells expressing T7RNAP transiently or stably was demonstrated to generate infectious progenies. When the viral structural protein genes were partially deleted from the full-length cDNA, the subgenomic RNA transcribed in vitro from the modified plasmid was shown to replicate itself in mammalian cells as a replicon. The replicon carrying the firefly luciferase gene in place of the deleted structural protein genes was also shown to efficiently replicate itself and express luciferase in mammalian cells. Compared with the replicon derived from JEV genotype III (Nakayama strain), the genotype V-derived replicon appeared to be more tolerant to introduction of a foreign gene. The infectious clone and the replicons constructed in this study may serve as useful tools for characterizing JEV genotype V.

  17. Identifying differentially expressed genes in trophozoites and cysts of Acanthamoeba T4 genotype: Implications for developing new treatments for Acanthamoeba keratitis.

    PubMed

    Abedkhojasteh, Hoda; Niyyati, Maryam; Rezaei, Sasan; Mohebali, Mehdi; Farnia, Shohreh; Kazemi-Rad, Elham; Roozafzoon, Reza; Sianati, Hamed; Rezaeian, Mostafa; Heidari, Mansour

    2015-02-01

    Acanthamoeba T4 genotype is the most prevalent genotype associated with amoebic keratitis. Acanthamoeba keratitis therapy is difficult due to transformation of trophozoite to cyst stage, which hinders the treatment of the disease. Although encystation assists the organism to survive against the chemotherapeutic compounds, the precise mechanism of encystation remains poorly understood. The purpose of this work was to identify differentially expressed genes in Acanthamoeba T4 genotype which might be useful for understanding of the encystment process and may thus help develop more efficient treatment. The mRNA profile of trophozoite and cyst of Acanthamoeba T4 genotype isolated from a soft contact lens wearer were analyzed using a cDNA amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) technique. Subsequently, a real time reverse transcriptase-PCR was performed to validate the cDNA-AFLP results. Three genes, heat shock protein70 (hsp70), actin-I and elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1α) were differentially expressed during Acanthamoeba differentiation. An in silico result predicted that transformation of trophozoite to cyst could be mediated through their cooperation with the protein partners interaction. Taken together, our experimental and bioinformatics findings suggested potential functions of hsp70, EF-1α and actin-I in differentiation of Acanthamoeba T4 genotype which may be useful in the design of an efficient therapeutic strategy in AK.

  18. Influence of Populus genotype on gene expression by the wood decay fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Gaskell, Jill; Marty, Amber; Mozuch, Michael; Kersten, Philip J; Splinter BonDurant, Sandra; Sabat, Grzegorz; Azarpira, Ali; Ralph, John; Skyba, Oleksandr; Mansfield, Shawn D; Blanchette, Robert A; Cullen, Dan

    2014-09-01

    We examined gene expression patterns in the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium when it colonizes hybrid poplar (Populus alba × tremula) and syringyl (S)-rich transgenic derivatives. A combination of microarrays and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) allowed detection of a total of 9,959 transcripts and 793 proteins. Comparisons of P. chrysosporium transcript abundance in medium containing poplar or glucose as a sole carbon source showed 113 regulated genes, 11 of which were significantly higher (>2-fold, P < 0.05) in transgenic line 64 relative to the parental line. Possibly related to the very large amounts of syringyl (S) units in this transgenic tree (94 mol% S), several oxidoreductases were among the upregulated genes. Peptides corresponding to a total of 18 oxidoreductases were identified in medium consisting of biomass from line 64 or 82 (85 mol% S) but not in the parental clone (65 mol% S). These results demonstrate that P. chrysosporium gene expression patterns are substantially influenced by lignin composition.

  19. The phenotype masks the genotype: A possible new expression of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mimbacas, Adriana; Vitarella, Graciela; Souto, Jorge; Reyes, Ana Laura; Farias, Joaquina; Fernández, Mariana; Fabregat, Matias; Javiel, Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    The concept of a new form of diabetes, with signs of both types 1 and 2, has not been often considered, until recently. It is of immense interest to explore the role of the admixture that characterizes the Uruguayan population (higher and different from other Latin America countries) for the presence of such expression of that particular disease. We describe here a child who possibly presents with this expression. He had typical signs of both diabetic conditions: type 1 (young age, positive immunologic and genetic markers, ketoacidosis) and type 2 (obesity [body mass index = 36 kg/m2] and acanthosis nigricans). In spite of complying with the established guidelines, therapeutic and nutritional control, quality of life and good metabolic control, the patient's obesity had been continually increasing. Looking for a genetic explanation, we studied three single nucleotide polymorphisms involved in three different metabolic pathways (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2, insulin receptor substrate-1 and uncoupling protein-2) associated with insulin resistance. Our patient showed three mutations, GG, GA, GG, associated with insulin resistance that explains obesity associated with limited response to the commonly used drugs. According to the clinical presentation and the genetic and immunological background, we considered that this patient presents with a new form of diabetes. We have termed this particular disease “hybrid diabetes” because of the involvement of genes associated with both the classical type of diabetes. However, at least in an admixed population such as in Uruguay, clinical classification would not strictly dictate the choice of treatment.

  20. The phenotype masks the genotype: A possible new expression of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mimbacas, Adriana; Vitarella, Graciela; Souto, Jorge; Reyes, Ana Laura; Farias, Joaquina; Fernández, Mariana; Fabregat, Matias; Javiel, Gerardo

    2012-06-01

    The concept of a new form of diabetes, with signs of both types 1 and 2, has not been often considered, until recently. It is of immense interest to explore the role of the admixture that characterizes the Uruguayan population (higher and different from other Latin America countries) for the presence of such expression of that particular disease. We describe here a child who possibly presents with this expression. He had typical signs of both diabetic conditions: type 1 (young age, positive immunologic and genetic markers, ketoacidosis) and type 2 (obesity [body mass index = 36 kg/m(2)] and acanthosis nigricans). In spite of complying with the established guidelines, therapeutic and nutritional control, quality of life and good metabolic control, the patient's obesity had been continually increasing. Looking for a genetic explanation, we studied three single nucleotide polymorphisms involved in three different metabolic pathways (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2, insulin receptor substrate-1 and uncoupling protein-2) associated with insulin resistance. Our patient showed three mutations, GG, GA, GG, associated with insulin resistance that explains obesity associated with limited response to the commonly used drugs. According to the clinical presentation and the genetic and immunological background, we considered that this patient presents with a new form of diabetes. We have termed this particular disease "hybrid diabetes" because of the involvement of genes associated with both the classical type of diabetes. However, at least in an admixed population such as in Uruguay, clinical classification would not strictly dictate the choice of treatment. PMID:27625813

  1. The phenotype masks the genotype: A possible new expression of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mimbacas, Adriana; Vitarella, Graciela; Souto, Jorge; Reyes, Ana Laura; Farias, Joaquina; Fernández, Mariana; Fabregat, Matias; Javiel, Gerardo

    2012-06-01

    The concept of a new form of diabetes, with signs of both types 1 and 2, has not been often considered, until recently. It is of immense interest to explore the role of the admixture that characterizes the Uruguayan population (higher and different from other Latin America countries) for the presence of such expression of that particular disease. We describe here a child who possibly presents with this expression. He had typical signs of both diabetic conditions: type 1 (young age, positive immunologic and genetic markers, ketoacidosis) and type 2 (obesity [body mass index = 36 kg/m(2)] and acanthosis nigricans). In spite of complying with the established guidelines, therapeutic and nutritional control, quality of life and good metabolic control, the patient's obesity had been continually increasing. Looking for a genetic explanation, we studied three single nucleotide polymorphisms involved in three different metabolic pathways (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2, insulin receptor substrate-1 and uncoupling protein-2) associated with insulin resistance. Our patient showed three mutations, GG, GA, GG, associated with insulin resistance that explains obesity associated with limited response to the commonly used drugs. According to the clinical presentation and the genetic and immunological background, we considered that this patient presents with a new form of diabetes. We have termed this particular disease "hybrid diabetes" because of the involvement of genes associated with both the classical type of diabetes. However, at least in an admixed population such as in Uruguay, clinical classification would not strictly dictate the choice of treatment.

  2. The phenotype masks the genotype: A possible new expression of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mimbacas, Adriana; Vitarella, Graciela; Souto, Jorge; Reyes, Ana Laura; Farias, Joaquina; Fernández, Mariana; Fabregat, Matias; Javiel, Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    The concept of a new form of diabetes, with signs of both types 1 and 2, has not been often considered, until recently. It is of immense interest to explore the role of the admixture that characterizes the Uruguayan population (higher and different from other Latin America countries) for the presence of such expression of that particular disease. We describe here a child who possibly presents with this expression. He had typical signs of both diabetic conditions: type 1 (young age, positive immunologic and genetic markers, ketoacidosis) and type 2 (obesity [body mass index = 36 kg/m2] and acanthosis nigricans). In spite of complying with the established guidelines, therapeutic and nutritional control, quality of life and good metabolic control, the patient's obesity had been continually increasing. Looking for a genetic explanation, we studied three single nucleotide polymorphisms involved in three different metabolic pathways (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2, insulin receptor substrate-1 and uncoupling protein-2) associated with insulin resistance. Our patient showed three mutations, GG, GA, GG, associated with insulin resistance that explains obesity associated with limited response to the commonly used drugs. According to the clinical presentation and the genetic and immunological background, we considered that this patient presents with a new form of diabetes. We have termed this particular disease “hybrid diabetes” because of the involvement of genes associated with both the classical type of diabetes. However, at least in an admixed population such as in Uruguay, clinical classification would not strictly dictate the choice of treatment. PMID:27625813

  3. Basal microRNA expression patterns in reward circuitry of selectively bred high-responder and low-responder rats vary by brain region and genotype

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, David E.; Cooke, Christopher L.; Carter, Bradley S.; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Mental health disorders involving altered reward, emotionality, and anxiety are thought to result from the interaction of individual predisposition (genetic factors) and personal experience (environmental factors), although the mechanisms that contribute to an individual's vulnerability to these disorders remain poorly understood. We used an animal model of individual variation [inbred high-responder/low-responder (bHR-bLR) rodents] known to vary in reward, anxiety, and emotional processing to examine neuroanatomical expression patterns of microRNAs (miRNAs). Laser capture microdissection was used to dissect the prelimbic cortex and the nucleus accumbens core and shell prior to analysis of basal miRNA expression in bHR and bLR male rats. These studies identified 187 miRNAs differentially expressed by genotype in at least one brain region, 10 of which were validated by qPCR. Four of these 10 qPCR-validated miRNAs demonstrated differential expression across multiple brain regions, and all miRNAs with validated differential expression between genotypes had lower expression in bHR animals compared with bLR animals. microRNA (miR)-484 and miR-128a expression differences between the prelimbic cortex of bHR and bLR animals were validated by semiquantitative in situ hybridization. miRNA expression analysis independent of genotype identified 101 miRNAs differentially expressed by brain region, seven of which validated by qPCR. Dnmt3a mRNA, a validated target of miR-29b, varied in a direction opposite that of miR-29b's differential expression between bHR and bLR animals. These data provide evidence that basal central nervous system miRNA expression varies in the bHR-bLR model, implicating microRNAs as potential epigenetic regulators of key neural circuits and individual differences associated with mental health disorders. PMID:24569673

  4. Lignification in sugarcane: biochemical characterization, gene discovery, and expression analysis in two genotypes contrasting for lignin content.

    PubMed

    Bottcher, Alexandra; Cesarino, Igor; Santos, Adriana Brombini dos; Vicentini, Renato; Mayer, Juliana Lischka Sampaio; Vanholme, Ruben; Morreel, Kris; Goeminne, Geert; Moura, Jullyana Cristina Magalhães Silva; Nobile, Paula Macedo; Carmello-Guerreiro, Sandra Maria; Anjos, Ivan Antonio dos; Creste, Silvana; Boerjan, Wout; Landell, Marcos Guimarães de Andrade; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2013-12-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is currently one of the most efficient crops in the production of first-generation biofuels. However, the bagasse represents an additional abundant lignocellulosic resource that has the potential to increase the ethanol production per plant. To achieve a more efficient conversion of bagasse into ethanol, a better understanding of the main factors affecting biomass recalcitrance is needed. Because several studies have shown a negative effect of lignin on saccharification yield, the characterization of lignin biosynthesis, structure, and deposition in sugarcane is an important goal. Here, we present, to our knowledge, the first systematic study of lignin deposition during sugarcane stem development, using histological, biochemical, and transcriptional data derived from two sugarcane genotypes with contrasting lignin contents. Lignin amount and composition were determined in rind (outer) and pith (inner) tissues throughout stem development. In addition, the phenolic metabolome was analyzed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, which allowed the identification of 35 compounds related to the phenylpropanoid pathway and monolignol biosynthesis. Furthermore, the Sugarcane EST Database was extensively surveyed to identify lignin biosynthetic gene homologs, and the expression of all identified genes during stem development was determined by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Our data provide, to our knowledge, the first in-depth characterization of lignin biosynthesis in sugarcane and form the baseline for the rational metabolic engineering of sugarcane feedstock for bioenergy purposes.

  5. Lignification in Sugarcane: Biochemical Characterization, Gene Discovery, and Expression Analysis in Two Genotypes Contrasting for Lignin Content1[W

    PubMed Central

    Bottcher, Alexandra; Cesarino, Igor; Brombini dos Santos, Adriana; Vicentini, Renato; Mayer, Juliana Lischka Sampaio; Vanholme, Ruben; Morreel, Kris; Goeminne, Geert; Moura, Jullyana Cristina Magalhães Silva; Nobile, Paula Macedo; Carmello-Guerreiro, Sandra Maria; Antonio dos Anjos, Ivan; Creste, Silvana; Boerjan, Wout; Landell, Marcos Guimarães de Andrade; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is currently one of the most efficient crops in the production of first-generation biofuels. However, the bagasse represents an additional abundant lignocellulosic resource that has the potential to increase the ethanol production per plant. To achieve a more efficient conversion of bagasse into ethanol, a better understanding of the main factors affecting biomass recalcitrance is needed. Because several studies have shown a negative effect of lignin on saccharification yield, the characterization of lignin biosynthesis, structure, and deposition in sugarcane is an important goal. Here, we present, to our knowledge, the first systematic study of lignin deposition during sugarcane stem development, using histological, biochemical, and transcriptional data derived from two sugarcane genotypes with contrasting lignin contents. Lignin amount and composition were determined in rind (outer) and pith (inner) tissues throughout stem development. In addition, the phenolic metabolome was analyzed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, which allowed the identification of 35 compounds related to the phenylpropanoid pathway and monolignol biosynthesis. Furthermore, the Sugarcane EST Database was extensively surveyed to identify lignin biosynthetic gene homologs, and the expression of all identified genes during stem development was determined by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Our data provide, to our knowledge, the first in-depth characterization of lignin biosynthesis in sugarcane and form the baseline for the rational metabolic engineering of sugarcane feedstock for bioenergy purposes. PMID:24144790

  6. Chronic Cocaine Use Causes Changes in the Striatal Proteome Depending on the Endogenous Expression of Pleiotrophin.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Rodríguez, Marta; Herradón, Gonzalo; Ferrer-Alcón, Marcel; Uribarri, María; Pérez-García, Carmen

    2015-07-20

    The neurotrophic factor pleiotrophin (PTN) is upregulated in different brain areas after the administration of different drugs of abuse, including psychostimulants. PTN has been shown to prevent cocaine-induced cytotoxicity in NG108-15 and PC12 cells. We previously demonstrated that specific phosphoproteins related to neurodegeneration processes are differentially regulated in the mouse striatum by a single cocaine (15 mg/kg) administration depending on the endogenous expression of PTN. Since neurodegenerative processes are usually observed in patients exposed to toxicants for longer duration, we have now performed a striatal proteomic study using samples enriched in phosphorylated proteins from PTN knockout (PTN-/-) mice, from mice with transgenic PTN overexpression (PTN-Tg) in the brain, and from wild type (WT) mice after a chronic treatment with cocaine (15 mg/kg/day for 7 days). We have successfully identified 23 proteins significantly affected by chronic cocaine exposure, genotype, or both. Most of these proteins, including peroxiredoxin-6 (PRDX6), triosephosphate isomerase (TPI1), ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 (UCHL1), and annexins A5 (ANXA5) and A7 (ANXA7), may be of significant importance because they were previously identified in proteomic studies in animals treated with psychostimulants and/or because they are related to neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. The data support a protective role of PTN against chronic cocaine-induced neural alterations. PMID:26046300

  7. The CC genotype in HTR2A T102C polymorphism is associated with behavioral impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients

    PubMed Central

    Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Wrzosek, Małgorzata; Łukaszkiewicz, Jacek; Sadowska-Mazuryk, Joanna; Matsumoto, Halina; Śliwerska, Elżbieta; Glass, Jennifer; Burmeister, Margit; Brower, Kirk J.; Wojnar, Marcin

    2011-01-01

    High levels of impulsivity can increase the vulnerability for development of alcohol dependence. Moreover, impulsivity is considered to be a predictor of poor treatment outcomes. Few studies, however, have directly examined the genetics of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients. We analyzed the relationships between a well-recognized genetic marker of serotonin activity and levels of impulsivity as measured by both the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) and the stop-signal task among 304 alcohol-dependent patients. The stop-signal task was used as an independent, objective method of estimating the level of behavioral impulsivity, and the BIS-11 as a self-report measure of global impulsivity. Blood was collected and analyzed for the T102C (rs6313) polymorphism in the serotonin type 2A receptor gene (HTR2A). Our results indicate a significant association between high levels of behavioral impulsivity and the C/C genotype of rs6313 in alcohol-dependent patients. The CC genotype has been previously found to be associated with a reduction in 5HT2A receptors in the central nervous system. These results support the hypothesis that genetic factors are important determinants of behavioral impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients, and that the serotonin system plays an important role in establishing its level. PMID:21930285

  8. The CC genotype in HTR2A T102C polymorphism is associated with behavioral impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Wrzosek, Małgorzata; Lukaszkiewicz, Jacek; Sadowska-Mazuryk, Joanna; Matsumoto, Halina; Sliwerska, Elżbieta; Glass, Jennifer; Burmeister, Margit; Brower, Kirk J; Wojnar, Marcin

    2012-01-01

    High levels of impulsivity can increase the vulnerability for development of alcohol dependence. Moreover, impulsivity is considered to be a predictor of poor treatment outcomes. Few studies, however, have directly examined the genetics of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients. We analyzed the relationships between a well-recognized genetic marker of serotonin activity and levels of impulsivity as measured by both the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) and the stop-signal task among 304 alcohol-dependent patients. The stop-signal task was used as an independent, objective method of estimating the level of behavioral impulsivity, and the BIS-11 as a self-report measure of global impulsivity. Blood was collected and analyzed for the T102C (rs6313) polymorphism in the serotonin type 2A receptor gene (HTR2A). Our results indicate a significant association between high levels of behavioral impulsivity and the C/C genotype of rs6313 in alcohol-dependent patients. The CC genotype has been previously found to be associated with a reduction in 5HT2A receptors in the central nervous system. These results support the hypothesis that genetic factors are important determinants of behavioral impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients, and that the serotonin system plays an important role in establishing its level.

  9. Variation in salinity tolerance of four lowland genotypes of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) as assessed by growth, physiological traits, and sodium transporter gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Carrasco, Karina; Antognoni, Fabiana; Coulibaly, Amadou Konotie; Lizardi, Susana; Covarrubias, Adriana; Martínez, Enrique A; Molina-Montenegro, Marco A; Biondi, Stefania; Zurita-Silva, Andrés

    2011-11-01

    Chenopodium quinoa (Willd.) is an Andean plant showing a remarkable tolerance to abiotic stresses. In Chile, quinoa populations display a high degree of genetic distancing, and variable tolerance to salinity. To investigate which tolerance mechanisms might account for these differences, four genotypes from coastal central and southern regions were compared for their growth, physiological, and molecular responses to NaCl at seedling stage. Seeds were sown on agar plates supplemented with 0, 150 or 300mM NaCl. Germination was significantly reduced by NaCl only in accession BO78. Shoot length was reduced by 150mM NaCl in three out of four genotypes, and by over 60% at 300mM (except BO78 which remained more similar to controls). Root length was hardly affected or even enhanced at 150mM in all four genotypes, but inhibited, especially in BO78, by 300mM NaCl. Thus, the root/shoot ratio was differentially affected by salt, with the highest values in PRJ, and the lowest in BO78. Biomass was also less affected in PRJ than in the other accessions, the genotype with the highest increment in proline concentration upon salt treatment. Free putrescine declined dramatically in all genotypes under 300mM NaCl; however (spermidine+spermine)/putrescine ratios were higher in PRJ than BO78. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses of two sodium transporter genes, CqSOS1 and CqNHX, revealed that their expression was differentially induced at the shoot and root level, and between genotypes, by 300mM NaCl. Expression data are discussed in relation to the degree of salt tolerance in the different accessions.

  10. Elevated neutrophil membrane expression of proteinase 3 is dependent upon CD177 expression

    PubMed Central

    Abdgawad, M; Gunnarsson, L; Bengtsson, A A; Geborek, P; Nilsson, L; Segelmark, M; Hellmark, T

    2010-01-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) is a major autoantigen in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated systemic vasculitis (AASV), and the proportion of neutrophils expressing PR3 on their membrane (mPR3+) is increased in AASV. We have shown recently that mPR3 and CD177 are expressed on the same cells in healthy individuals. In this study we try to elucidate mechanisms behind the increased mPR3 expression in AASV and its relationship to CD177. All neutrophils in all individuals were either double-positive or double-negative for mPR3 and CD177. The proportion of double-positive neutrophils was increased significantly in AASV and systemic lupus erythematosus patients. The proportion of mPR3+/CD177+ cells was not correlated to general inflammation, renal function, age, sex, drug treatment and levels of circulating PR3. AASV patients had normal levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Pro-PR3 was found to constitute 10% of circulating PR3 but none of the mPR3. We found increased mRNA levels of both PR3 and CD177 in AASV, but they did not correlate with the proportion of double-positive cells. In cells sorted based on membrane expression, CD177–mRNA was several-fold higher in mPR3+ cells. When exogenous PR3 was added to CD177-transfected U937 cells, only CD177+ cells bound PR3 to their membrane. In conclusion, the increased membrane expression of PR3 found in AASV is not linked directly to circulating PR3 or PR3 gene transcription, but is dependent upon CD177 expression and correlated with the transcription of the CD177 gene. PMID:20491791

  11. Hepatic expression levels of interferons and interferon-stimulated genes in patients with chronic hepatitis C: A phenotype-genotype correlation study.

    PubMed

    Noureddin, M; Rotman, Y; Zhang, F; Park, H; Rehermann, B; Thomas, E; Liang, T J

    2015-01-01

    IFNL4 is linked to hepatitis C virus treatment response and type III interferons (IFNs). We studied the functional associations among hepatic expressions of IFNs and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), and treatment response to peginterferon and ribavirin. Type I IFNs (IFNA1, IFNB1), type II (IFNG), type III (IFNL1, IFNL2/3), IFNL4 and ISG hepatic expressions were measured by qPCR from in 65 chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients whose IFNL4-associated rs368234815 and IFNL3-associated rs12989760 genotype were determined. There was a robust correlation of hepatic expression within type I and type III IFNs and between type III IFNs and IFNL4 but no correlation between other IFN types. Expression of ISGs correlated with type III IFNs and IFNL4 but not with type I IFNs. Levels of ISGs and IFNL2/3 mRNAs were lower in IFNL3 rs12979860 CC patients compared with non-CC patients, and in treatment responders, compared with nonresponders. IFNL4-ΔG genotype was associated with high ISG levels and nonresponse. Hepatic levels of ISGs in CHC are associated with IFNL2/3 and IFNL4 expression, suggesting that IFNLs, not other types of IFNs, drive ISG expression. Hepatic IFNL2/3 expression is functionally linked to IFNL4 and IFNL3 polymorphisms, potentially explaining the tight association among ISG expression and treatment response.

  12. Chamber-dependent circadian expression of cardiac natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Goetze, Jens Peter; Georg, Birgitte; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2010-02-25

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) have important local functions within the myocardium, where they protect against accelerated fibrosis. As circadian expression of cardiac natriuretic peptides could be of importance in local cardiac protection against disease, we examined the diurnal changes of the mRNAs encoding ANP, BNP, and their common receptor NPR-A in atrial and ventricular myocardium. Forty eight mice were killed at the following ZT times: 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24, where ZT designates Zeitgeber; ZT 0 corresponds to lights ON and ZT 12 corresponds to lights OFF. Eight animals (4 males and 4 females) were included at each time point. Another 48 animals were killed during the second cycle of dark/dark (designated Circadian Time or CT: CT 4, CT 8, CT 12, CT 16, CT 20, and CT 24). The cellular contents of the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1 as well as ANP, BNP, and their common receptor (NPR-A) were determined using RT-PCR. Per1 and Bmal1 mRNA contents oscillated in antiphase in both atrial and ventricular regions, where Bmal1 mRNA peaked 12h out of phase relative to Per1 mRNA. ANP and NPR-A atrial mRNA contents revealed borderline significant diurnal changes, whereas ventricular BNP mRNA contents exhibited pronounced oscillation during constant darkness with nadir at CT 12 (P<0.0001). In conclusion, we report a chamber-dependent circadian profile of cardiac BNP mRNA contents, which is not paralleled by the related ANP gene. Our findings suggest that the BNP mRNA pattern could be associated with increased cardiac susceptibility and response to disease.

  13. Measles Virus Genotype D Wild Strains Suppress Interferon-Stimulated Gene Expression More Potently than Laboratory Strains in SiHa Cells.

    PubMed

    Jinushi, Masaru; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Nagano, Hideki; Hashimoto, Shin; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Himi, Tetsuo; Yokota, Shin-Ichi

    2016-06-01

    Changes in interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene (ISG) expression in cells infected with measles virus (MeV), four wild strains (belonging to different genotypes), and the laboratory strain Edmonston were examined. ISGs [MxA, 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase, and interferon regulatory factor-1] were upregulated in an MeV-infection-induced manner and in an IFN-induced manner. In MeV-infected SiHa cell lines, the MeV infection-induced expression levels were in the order of A>H1>D8>D5>D3. On the other hand, all infected cell lines abolished type I and III IFN-induced ISG expression. However, partial type II IFN-mediated induction was observed in the MeV-infected cells. The wild strain of genotype D3 was the most potent inhibitor of MeV infection-induced and IFN-induced ISG expression and generated the highest titer of infectious viral particles. Edmonston triggered the highest levels of MeV infection-induced ISG expression in SiHa cells and produced the lowest titer of infectious particles. Expression of the viral C protein was associated with suppression of MeV infection-induced and type II IFN-induced ISG expression. PMID:27035543

  14. The Study of HFE Genotypes and Its Expression Effect on Iron Status of Iranian Haemochromatosis, Iron Deficiency Anemia Patients, Iron-Taker and Non Iron-Taker Controls.

    PubMed

    Beiranvand, Elham; Abediankenari, Saeid; Rostamian, Mosayeb; Beiranvand, Behnoush; Naazeri, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    The role of HFE gene mutations or its expression in regulation of iron metabolism of hereditary haemochromatosis (HH) patients is remained controversial. Therefore here the correlation between two common HFE genotype (p.C282Y, p.H63D) and HFE gene expression with iron status in HH, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and healthy Iranian participants was studied. For this purpose genotype determination was done by polymerase chain reaction--restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Real-Time PCR was applied for evaluation of HFE gene expression. Biochemical parameters and iron consumption were also assessed. Homozygote p.H63D mutation was seen in all HH patients and p.C282Y was not observed in any member of the population. A significant correlation was observed between serum ferritin (SF) level and gender or age of HH patients. p.H63D homozygote was seen to be able to significantly increase SF and transferrin saturation (TS) level without affecting on liver function. Our results also showed that iron consumption affects on TS level increasing. HFE gene expression level of IDA patients was significantly higher than other groups. Also the HFE gene expression was negatively correlated with TS. Finally, the main result of our study showed that loss of HFE function in HH is not derived from its gene expression inhibition and much higher HFE gene expression might lead to IDA. However we propose repeating of the study for more approval of our finding.

  15. Signaling Pathways Related to Protein Synthesis and Amino Acid Concentration in Pig Skeletal Muscles Depend on the Dietary Protein Level, Genotype and Developmental Stages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingying; Li, Fengna; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tan, Bie; Li, Yinghui; Duan, Yehui; Blachier, François; Hu, Chien-An A; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Muscle growth is regulated by the homeostatic balance of the biosynthesis and degradation of muscle proteins. To elucidate the molecular interactions among diet, pig genotype, and physiological stage, we examined the effect of dietary protein concentration, pig genotype, and physiological stages on amino acid (AA) pools, protein deposition, and related signaling pathways in different types of skeletal muscles. The study used 48 Landrace pigs and 48 pure-bred Bama mini-pigs assigned to each of 2 dietary treatments: lower/GB (Chinese conventional diet)- or higher/NRC (National Research Council)-protein diet. Diets were fed from 5 weeks of age to respective market weights of each genotype. Samples of biceps femoris muscle (BFM, type I) and longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM, type II) were collected at nursery, growing, and finishing phases according to the physiological stage of each genotype, to determine the AA concentrations, mRNA levels for growth-related genes in muscles, and protein abundances of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Our data showed that the concentrations of most AAs in LDM and BFM of pigs increased (P<0.05) gradually with increasing age. Bama mini-pigs had generally higher (P<0.05) muscle concentrations of flavor-related AA, including Met, Phe, Tyr, Pro, and Ser, compared with Landrace pigs. The mRNA levels for myogenic determining factor, myogenin, myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2 A, and myostatin of Bama mini-pigs were higher (P<0.05) than those of Landrace pigs, while total and phosphorylated protein levels for protein kinase B, mTOR, and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinases (p70S6K), and ratios of p-mTOR/mTOR, p-AKT/AKT, and p-p70S6K/p70S6K were lower (P<0.05). There was a significant pig genotype-dependent effect of dietary protein on the levels for mTOR and p70S6K. When compared with the higher protein-NRC diet, the lower protein-GB diet increased (P<0.05) the levels for mTOR and p70S6K in Bama mini-pigs, but

  16. Strength, power, fiber types, and mRNA expression in trained men and women with different ACTN3 R577X genotypes.

    PubMed

    Norman, Barbara; Esbjörnsson, Mona; Rundqvist, Håkan; Osterlund, Ted; von Walden, Ferdinand; Tesch, Per A

    2009-03-01

    Alpha-actinins are structural proteins of the Z-line. Human skeletal muscle expresses two alpha-actinin isoforms, alpha-actinin-2 and alpha-actinin-3, encoded by their respective genes ACTN2 and ACTN3. ACTN2 is expressed in all muscle fiber types, while only type II fibers, and particularly the type IIb fibers, express ACTN3. ACTN3 (R577X) polymorphism results in loss of alpha-actinin-3 and has been suggested to influence skeletal muscle function. The X allele is less common in elite sprint and power athletes than in the general population and has been suggested to be detrimental for performance requiring high power. The present study investigated the association of ACTN3 genotype with muscle power during 30-s Wingate cycling in 120 moderately to well-trained men and women and with knee extensor strength and fatigability in a subset of 21 men performing isokinetic exercise. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle to determine fiber-type composition and ACTN2 and ACTN3 mRNA levels. Peak and mean power and the torque-velocity relationship and fatigability output showed no difference across ACTN3 genotypes. Thus this study suggests that R577X polymorphism in ACTN3 is not associated with differences in power output, fatigability, or force-velocity characteristics in moderately trained individuals. However, repeated exercise bouts prompted an increase in peak torque in RR but not in XX genotypes, suggesting that ACTN3 genotype may modulate responsiveness to training. Our data further suggest that alpha-actinins do not play a significant role in determining muscle fiber-type composition. Finally, we show that ACTN2 expression is affected by the content of alpha-actinin-3, which implies that alpha-actinin-2 may compensate for the lack of alpha-actinin-3 and hence counteract the phenotypic consequences of the deficiency.

  17. Large-scale analysis of differential gene expression in coffee genotypes resistant and susceptible to leaf miner–toward the identification of candidate genes for marker assisted-selection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A successful development of herbivorous insects into plant tissues depends on coordination of metabolic processes. Plants have evolved complex mechanisms to recognize such attacks, and to trigger a defense response. To understand the transcriptional basis of this response, we compare gene expression profiles of two coffee genotypes, susceptible and resistant to leaf miner (Leucoptera coffella). A total of 22000 EST sequences from the Coffee Genome Database were selected for a microarray analysis. Fluorescence probes were synthesized using mRNA from the infested and non-infested coffee plants. Array hybridization, scanning and data normalization were performed using Nimble Scan® e ArrayStar® platforms. Genes with foldchange values +/-2 were considered differentially expressed. A validation of 18 differentially expressed genes was performed in infected plants using qRT-PCR approach. Results The microarray analysis indicated that resistant plants differ in gene expression profile. We identified relevant transcriptional changes in defense strategies before insect attack. Expression changes (>2.00-fold) were found in resistant plants for 2137 genes (1266 up-regulated and 873 down-regulated). Up-regulated genes include those responsible for defense mechanisms, hypersensitive response and genes involved with cellular function and maintenance. Also, our analyses indicated that differential expression profiles between resistant and susceptible genotypes are observed in the absence of leaf-miner, indicating that defense is already build up in resistant plants, as a priming mechanism. Validation of selected genes pointed to four selected genes as suitable candidates for markers in assisted-selection of novel cultivars. Conclusions Our results show evidences that coffee defense responses against leaf-miner attack are balanced with other cellular functions. Also analyses suggest a major metabolic reconfiguration that highlights the complexity of this response. PMID

  18. Thylakoid redox signals are integrated into organellar-gene-expression-dependent retrograde signaling in the prors1-1 mutant

    PubMed Central

    Tadini, Luca; Romani, Isidora; Pribil, Mathias; Jahns, Peter; Leister, Dario; Pesaresi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Perturbations in organellar gene expression (OGE) and the thylakoid redox state (TRS) activate retrograde signaling pathways that adaptively modify nuclear gene expression (NGE), according to developmental and metabolic needs. The prors1-1 mutation in Arabidopsis down-regulates the expression of the nuclear gene Prolyl-tRNA Synthetase1 (PRORS1) which acts in both plastids and mitochondria, thereby impairing protein synthesis in both organelles and triggering OGE-dependent retrograde signaling. Because the mutation also affects thylakoid electron transport, TRS-dependent signals may likewise have an impact on the changes in NGE observed in this genotype. In this study, we have investigated whether signals related to TRS are actually integrated into the OGE-dependent retrograde signaling pathway. To this end, the chaos mutation (for chlorophyll a/b binding protein harvesting-organelle specific), which shows a partial loss of PSII antennae proteins and thus a reduction in PSII light absorption capability, was introduced into the prors1-1 mutant background. The resulting double mutant displayed a prors1-1-like reduction in plastid translation rate and a chaos-like decrease in PSII antenna size, whereas the hyper-reduction of the thylakoid electron transport chain, caused by the prors1-1 mutation, was alleviated, as determined by monitoring chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence and thylakoid phosphorylation. Interestingly, a substantial fraction of the nucleus-encoded photosynthesis genes down-regulated in the prors1-1 mutant are expressed at nearly wild-type rates in prors1-1 chaos leaves, and this recovery is reflected in the steady-state levels of their protein products in the chloroplast. We therefore conclude that signals related to photosynthetic electron transport and TRS, and indirectly to carbohydrate metabolism and energy balance, are indeed fed into the OGE-dependent retrograde pathway to modulate NGE and adjust the abundance of chloroplast proteins. PMID:23293642

  19. Oxygen-dependent regulation of aquaporin-3 expression

    PubMed Central

    Hoogewijs, David; Vogler, Melanie; Zwenger, Eveline; Krull, Sabine; Zieseniss, Anke

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether aquaporin-3 (AQP3) expression is altered in hypoxia and whether hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1 regulates the hypoxic expression. AQP3 mRNA expression was studied in L929 fibrosarcoma cells and in several tissues derived from mice that were subjected to hypoxia. Computational analysis of the AQP3 promoter revealed conserved HIF binding sites within close proximity to the translational start site, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed binding of HIF-1α to the endogenous hypoxia response elements. Furthermore, hypoxia resulted in increased expression of AQP3 mRNA in L929 fibrosarcoma cells. Consistently, shRNA-mediated knockdown of HIF-1α greatly reduced the hypoxic induction of AQP3. In addition, mRNA analysis of organs from mice exposed to inspiratory hypoxia demonstrated pronounced hypoxia-inducible expression of AQP3 in the kidney. Overall, our findings suggest that AQP3 expression can be regulated at the transcriptional level and that AQP3 represents a novel HIF-1 target gene. PMID:27800511

  20. Expressive Writing as a Therapeutic Process for Drug Dependent Women

    PubMed Central

    Meshberg-Cohen, Sarah; Svikis, Dace; McMahon, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Background Although women with Substance Use Disorders (SUD) have high rates of trauma and post-traumatic stress, many addiction programs do not offer trauma-specific treatments. One promising intervention is Pennebaker’s expressive writing, which involves daily, 20-minute writing sessions to facilitate disclosure of stressful experiences. Methods Women (N = 149) in residential treatment completed a randomized clinical trial comparing expressive writing to control writing. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to document change in psychological and physical distress from baseline to 2-week and 1-month follow-ups. Analyses also examined immediate levels of negative affect following expressive writing. Results Expressive writing participants showed greater reductions in post-traumatic symptom severity, depression, and anxiety scores, when compared to control writing participants at the 2-week follow-up. No group differences were found at the 1-month follow-up. Safety data were encouraging; while expressive writing participants showed increased negative affect immediately after each writing session, there were no differences in pre-writing negative affect scores between conditions the following day. By the final writing session, participants were able to write about traumatic/stressful events without having a spike in negative affect. Conclusions Results suggest expressive writing may be a brief, safe, low cost, adjunct to SUD treatment that warrants further study as a strategy for addressing post-traumatic distress in substance-abusing women. PMID:24588298

  1. IL36RN Mutations Affect Protein Expression and Function: A Basis for Genotype-Phenotype Correlation in Pustular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Marie; Bal, Elodie; Pei, Xue-Yuan; Madrange, Marine; Khelil, Amel; Sahel, Houria; Zenati, Akila; Makrelouf, Mohamed; Boubridaa, Khaled; Chiali, Amel; Smahi, Naima; Otsmane, Farida; Bouajar, Bakar; Marrakchi, Slaheddine; Turki, Hamida; Bourrat, Emmanuelle; Viguier, Manuelle; Hamel, Yamina; Bachelez, Hervé; Smahi, Asma

    2016-09-01

    Homozygous or compound heterozygous IL36RN gene mutations underlie the pathogenesis of psoriasis-related pustular eruptions including generalized pustular psoriasis, palmoplantar pustular psoriasis, acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau, and acute generalized exanthematous pustular eruption. We identified two unreported IL36RN homozygous mutations (c.41C>A/p.Ser14X and c.420_426del/p.Gly141MetfsX29) in patients with familial generalized pustular psoriasis. We analyzed the impact of a spectrum of IL36RN mutations on IL-36 receptor antagonist protein by using site-directed mutagenesis and expression in HEK293T cells. This enabled us to differentiate null mutations with complete absence of IL-36 receptor antagonist (the two previously unreported mutations, c.80T>C/p.Leu27Pro, c.28C>T/p.Arg10X, c.280G>T/p.Glu94X, c.368C>G/p.Thr123Arg, c.368C>T/p.Thr123Met, and c.227C>T/p.Pro76Leu) from mutations with decreased (c.95A>G/p.His32Arg, c.142C>T/p.Arg48Trp, and c.308C>T/p.Ser113Leu) or unchanged (c.304C>T/p.Arg102Trp and c.104A>G/p.Lys35Arg) protein expression. Functional assays measuring the impact of mutations on the capacity to repress IL-36-dependent activation of the NF-κB pathway showed complete functional impairment for null mutations, whereas partial or no impairment was observed for other mutations considered as hypomorphic. Finally, null mutations were associated with severe clinical phenotypes (generalized pustular psoriasis, acute generalized exanthematous pustular eruption), whereas hypomorphic mutations were identified in both localized (palmoplantar pustular psoriasis, acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau) and generalized variants. These results provide a preliminary basis for genotype-phenotype correlation in patients with deficiency of the IL-36Ra (DITRA), and suggest the involvement of other factors in the modulation of clinical expression. PMID:27220475

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor genotype is associated with brain gray and white matter tissue volumes recovery in abstinent alcohol-dependent individuals

    PubMed Central

    Mon, A.; Durazzo, T. C.; Gazdzinski, S.; Hutchison, K. E.; Pennington, D.; Meyerhoff, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have linked the methionine (Met) allele of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF ) gene to abnormal regional brain volumes in several psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. However, no neuroimaging studies assessed the effects of this allele on brain morphology in alcohol use disorders and its demonstrated change during abstinence from alcohol. Here we assessed the effects of the BDNF Val66Met (rs6265) polymorphism on regional brain tissue volumes and their recovery during short-term abstinence in treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent individuals. 3D T1 weighted magnetic resonance images from 62 individuals were acquired at 1.5 T at one week of abstinence from alcohol; 41 of the participants were rescanned at 5 weeks of abstinence. The images were segmented into gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) and cerebrospinal fluid and parcellated into regional volumes. The BDNF genotype was determined from blood samples using the TaqMan technique. Alcohol-dependent Val (Valine)/Met heterozygotes and Val homozygotes had similar regional brain volumes at either time point. However, Val homozygotes had significant GM volume increases, while Val/Met heterozygotes increased predominantly in WM volumes over the scan interval. Longitudinal increases in GM but not WM volumes were related to improvements in neurocognitive measures during abstinence. The findings suggest that functionally significant brain tissue volume recovery during abstinence from alcohol is influenced by BDNF genotype. PMID:22989210

  3. Doxycycline-dependent photoactivated gene expression in eukaryotic systems.

    PubMed

    Cambridge, Sidney B; Geissler, Daniel; Calegari, Federico; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Hasan, Mazahir T; Stewart, A Francis; Huttner, Wieland B; Hagen, Volker; Bonhoeffer, Tobias

    2009-07-01

    High spatial and temporal resolution of conditional gene expression is typically difficult to achieve in whole tissues or organisms. We synthesized two reversibly inhibited, photoactivatable ('caged') doxycycline derivatives with different membrane permeabilities for precise spatial and temporal light-controlled activation of transgenes based on the 'Tet-on' system. After incubation with caged doxycycline or caged cyanodoxycycline, we induced gene expression by local irradiation with UV light or by two-photon uncaging in diverse biological systems, including mouse organotypic brain cultures, developing mouse embryos and Xenopus laevis tadpoles. The amount of UV light needed for induction was harmless as we detected no signs of toxicity. This method allows high-resolution conditional transgene expression at different spatial scales, ranging from single cells to entire complex organisms. PMID:19503080

  4. Plasma homocysteine in adolescents depends on the interaction between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genotype, lipids and folate: a seroepidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Hernández, Valentín; Cano, Beatriz; Oya, Manuel; Gil, Ángel

    2009-01-01

    Background Many publications link high homocysteine levels to cardiovascular disease. In Spain there is little information on the prevalence of hyperhomocysteinaemia and associated vitamin factors among the general population, and less still among children. Cardiovascular risk factors in the childhood population may be related to the appearance of cardiovascular disease at adult age. The aim of this study is to establish a definition of hyperhomocysteinaemia in adolescents and to analyze the influence of vitamin and metabolic factors in homocysteine levels in this population group. Methods Descriptive, cross-sectional epidemiological study to estimate serum homocysteine, vitamin B12 and folate levels, as well as plasma total, HDL- and LDL- cholesterol in a schoolgoing population aged 13 to 17 years in Madrid, Spain. Spearman correlation analysis was performed to ascertain quantitative comparison, Pearson's χ2 test (frequency < 5, Fisher) was used for comparison of prevalences, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis test were used for comparison of means and Bonferroni correction was used for post-hoc tests. A multivariate logistic regression model was performed in the multivariate analysis. Results Based on the classic values for definition of hyperhomocysteinaemia in adults, prevalence of hyperhomocysteinaemia in the study population was: 1.26% for 15 μmol/L; and 2.52% for 12 μmol/L. Deficits in HDL cholesterol and serum folate levels yielded adjusted Odds Ratios (OR) for hyperhomocysteinemia of 2.786, 95% CI (1.089-7.126), and 5.140, 95% CI (2.347-11.256) respectively. Mutation of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T genotype also raises the risk of hyperhomocysteinaemia (CC→CT: OR = 2.362; 95% CI (1.107-5.042) CC→TT: OR = 6.124, 95% CI (2.301-16.303)) Conclusion A good definition of hyperhomocysteinaemia in adolescents is the 90th percentile, equivalent to 8.23 μmol/L. Risk factors for hyperhomocysteinaemia are cHDL and folate deficiency, and

  5. [Dependence of the genotypic characteristics of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans on the physical, chemical, and electrophysical properties of pyrites].

    PubMed

    Tupikina, O V; Kondrat'eva, T F; Karavaĭko, G I

    2005-01-01

    This study focused on the effect of physical, chemical, and electrophysical properties of two pyrites, pyrite 1, which had hole-type (p-type) conductivity, and pyrite 2, with electron-type (n-type) conductivity, on the genotypic characteristics of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strains TFV-1 and TFBk, which were isolated from different substrates. After the adaptation of the strains to the pyrites at a pulp density of 1%, pulsed-field electrophoresis revealed changes in the chromosomal DNA of strain TFV-1 adapted to pyrite 1 and strain TFBk adapted to either of the pyrite types. In pyrite-adapted strain TFBk, the plasmid composition was the same as after growth on a medium containing ferrous iron, whereas, in strain TFV-1, changes in plasmid sizes or both in plasmid sizes and plasmid number occurred. After an increase in the density of the pyrite 2 pulp from 1 to 10%, the plasmid number increased from three to four, and, after an increase in the density of the pyrite 1 pulp from 1 to 7%, the plasmid number increased from two to six. PMID:16315978

  6. [Dependence of the genotypic characteristics of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans on the physical, chemical, and electrophysical properties of pyrites].

    PubMed

    Tupikina, O V; Kondrat'eva, T F; Karavaĭko, G I

    2005-01-01

    This study focused on the effect of physical, chemical, and electrophysical properties of two pyrites, pyrite 1, which had hole-type (p-type) conductivity, and pyrite 2, with electron-type (n-type) conductivity, on the genotypic characteristics of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strains TFV-1 and TFBk, which were isolated from different substrates. After the adaptation of the strains to the pyrites at a pulp density of 1%, pulsed-field electrophoresis revealed changes in the chromosomal DNA of strain TFV-1 adapted to pyrite 1 and strain TFBk adapted to either of the pyrite types. In pyrite-adapted strain TFBk, the plasmid composition was the same as after growth on a medium containing ferrous iron, whereas, in strain TFV-1, changes in plasmid sizes or both in plasmid sizes and plasmid number occurred. After an increase in the density of the pyrite 2 pulp from 1 to 10%, the plasmid number increased from three to four, and, after an increase in the density of the pyrite 1 pulp from 1 to 7%, the plasmid number increased from two to six.

  7. Genotype-dependent molecular evolution of sheep bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prions in vitro affects their zoonotic potential.

    PubMed

    Krejciova, Zuzana; Barria, Marcelo A; Jones, Michael; Ironside, James W; Jeffrey, Martin; González, Lorenzo; Head, Mark W

    2014-09-19

    Prion diseases are rare fatal neurological conditions of humans and animals, one of which (variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease) is known to be a zoonotic form of the cattle disease bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). What makes one animal prion disease zoonotic and others not is poorly understood, but it appears to involve compatibility between the prion strain and the host prion protein sequence. Concerns have been raised that the United Kingdom sheep flock may have been exposed to BSE early in the cattle BSE epidemic and that serial BSE transmission in sheep might have resulted in adaptation of the agent, which may have come to phenotypically resemble scrapie while maintaining its pathogenicity for humans. We have modeled this scenario in vitro. Extrapolation from our results suggests that if BSE were to infect sheep in the field it may, with time and in some sheep genotypes, become scrapie-like at the molecular level. However, the results also suggest that if BSE in sheep were to come to resemble scrapie it would lose its ability to affect humans.

  8. Concordance of Increased B1 Cell Subset and Lupus Phenotypes in Mouse and Human Dependent on BLK Expression Levels

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ying-Yu; Georg, Ina; Díaz-Barreiro, Alejandro; Varela, Nieves; Lauwerys, Bernard; Kumar, Ramesh; Bagavant, Harini; Castillo-Martín, Mireia; Salem, Fadi El; Marañón, Concepción; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphisms in the BLK gene have been associated with autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), with risk correlating with reduced expression of BLK. How reduced expression of BLK causes autoimmunity is unknown. Using Blk+/+, Blk+/−, and Blk−/− mice, we show that aged female Blk+/− and Blk−/− mice produced higher anti-dsDNA IgG antibodies and developed immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis, compared to Blk+/+ mice. Starting at young age, Blk+/− and Blk−/− mice accumulated increased numbers of splenic B1a cells, which differentiated into class-switched CD138+IgG-secreting B1a cells. Increased infiltration of B1a-like cells into the kidneys was also observed in aged Blk+/− and Blk−/− mice. In human, we found that healthy individuals had BLK genotype-dependent levels of anti-dsDNA IgG antibodies as well as increased numbers of a B1-like cell population, CD19+CD3−CD20+CD43+CD27+, in peripheral blood. Furthermore, we describe the presence of B1-like cells in the tubulointerstitial space of human lupus kidney biopsies. Taken together, our study reveals a previously unappreciated role of reduced BLK expression on extraperitoneal accumulation of B1a cells in mice, and the presence of IgG autoantibodies and B1-like cells in human. PMID:25972485

  9. In Utero and Lactational Exposure to PCBs in Mice: Adult Offspring Show Altered Learning and Memory Depending on Cyp1a2 and Ahr Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Christine P.; Genter, Mary Beth; Patel, Krishna V.; Schaefer, Tori L.; Skelton, Matthew R.; Williams, Michael T.; Vorhees, Charles V.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Both coplanar and noncoplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) exhibit neurotoxic effects in animal studies, but individual congeners do not always produce the same effects as PCB mixtures. Humans genetically have > 60-fold differences in hepatic cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2)-uninduced basal levels and > 12-fold variability in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)affinity; because CYP1A2 is known to sequester coplanar PCBs and because AHR ligands include coplanar PCBs, both genotypes can affect PCB response. Objectives: We aimed to develop a mouse paradigm with extremes in Cyp1a2 and Ahr genotypes to explore genetic susceptibility to PCB-induced developmental neurotoxicity using an environmentally relevant mixture of PCBs. Methods: We developed a mixture of eight PCBs to simulate human exposures based on their reported concentrations in human tissue, breast milk, and food supply. We previously characterized specific differences in PCB congener pharmacokinetics and toxicity, comparing high-affinity–AHR Cyp1a2 wild-type [Ahrb1_Cyp1a2(+/+)], poor-affinity–AHR Cyp1a2 wild-type [Ahrd_Cyp1a2(+/+)], and high-affinity–AHR Cyp1a2 knockout [Ahrb1_Cyp1a2(–/–)] mouse lines [Curran CP, Vorhees CV, Williams MT, Genter MB, Miller ML, Nebert DW. 2011. In utero and lactational exposure to a complex mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls: toxicity in pups dependent on the Cyp1a2 and Ahr genotypes. Toxicol Sci 119:189–208]. Dams received a mixture of three coplanar and five noncoplanar PCBs on gestational day 10.5 and postnatal day (PND) 5. In the present study we conducted behavioral phenotyping of exposed offspring at PND60, examining multiple measures of learning, memory, and other behaviors. Results: We observed the most significant deficits in response to PCB treatment in Ahrb1_Cyp1a2(–/–) mice, including impaired novel object recognition and increased failure rate in the Morris water maze. However, all PCB-treated genotypes showed significant differences on

  10. Signaling Pathways Related to Protein Synthesis and Amino Acid Concentration in Pig Skeletal Muscles Depend on the Dietary Protein Level, Genotype and Developmental Stages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingying; Li, Fengna; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tan, Bie; Li, Yinghui; Duan, Yehui; Blachier, François; Hu, Chien-An A.; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Muscle growth is regulated by the homeostatic balance of the biosynthesis and degradation of muscle proteins. To elucidate the molecular interactions among diet, pig genotype, and physiological stage, we examined the effect of dietary protein concentration, pig genotype, and physiological stages on amino acid (AA) pools, protein deposition, and related signaling pathways in different types of skeletal muscles. The study used 48 Landrace pigs and 48 pure-bred Bama mini-pigs assigned to each of 2 dietary treatments: lower/GB (Chinese conventional diet)- or higher/NRC (National Research Council)-protein diet. Diets were fed from 5 weeks of age to respective market weights of each genotype. Samples of biceps femoris muscle (BFM, type I) and longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM, type II) were collected at nursery, growing, and finishing phases according to the physiological stage of each genotype, to determine the AA concentrations, mRNA levels for growth-related genes in muscles, and protein abundances of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Our data showed that the concentrations of most AAs in LDM and BFM of pigs increased (P<0.05) gradually with increasing age. Bama mini-pigs had generally higher (P<0.05) muscle concentrations of flavor-related AA, including Met, Phe, Tyr, Pro, and Ser, compared with Landrace pigs. The mRNA levels for myogenic determining factor, myogenin, myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2 A, and myostatin of Bama mini-pigs were higher (P<0.05) than those of Landrace pigs, while total and phosphorylated protein levels for protein kinase B, mTOR, and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinases (p70S6K), and ratios of p-mTOR/mTOR, p-AKT/AKT, and p-p70S6K/p70S6K were lower (P<0.05). There was a significant pig genotype-dependent effect of dietary protein on the levels for mTOR and p70S6K. When compared with the higher protein-NRC diet, the lower protein-GB diet increased (P<0.05) the levels for mTOR and p70S6K in Bama mini-pigs, but

  11. Temperature-dependent sex determination in Hd-rR medaka Oryzias latipes: gender sensitivity, thermal threshold, critical period, and DMRT1 expression profile.

    PubMed

    Hattori, R S; Gould, R J; Fujioka, T; Saito, T; Kurita, J; Strüssmann, C A; Yokota, M; Watanabe, S

    2007-01-01

    The developmental time and thermal threshold for temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD), gender differences in temperature sensitivity, the fertility of thermally sex reversed fish, and the effect of temperature on the expression of two major sex determination/differentiation genes (DMY/DMRT1bY and DMRT1) were examined in the Hd-rR strain of medaka, Oryzias latipes. Fertilized eggs were exposed from either shortly after fertilization (8-16 cells; embryonic stages 5-6) or from middle embryogenesis (heart development stage; stage 36) until hatching to temperatures ranging from 17 degrees C to 34 degrees C. Secondary sexual characteristics, gonadal histology, progeny testing, sex-linked body coloration and gene expression were used to determine phenotypic and genotypic sex. Sex determination was unaffected by low or high temperatures in genotypic (XY) males. In contrast, genotypic (XX) females treated from stages 5-6 showed increasing rates of sex reversal into phenotypic males at temperatures above 27 degrees C up to 100% at 34 degrees C. Thermal manipulation of sex was ineffective after stage 36, indicating that gonadal fate in medaka is determined considerably earlier than histological differentiation (stage 39). High temperature induced DMRT1 expression in genotypic females, which was observed already from stage 36. Sex-reversed males had histologically normal testes, were capable of sexual courtship and, with the exception of fish from 34 degrees C, sired viable progeny when mating with fertile females. These results clarify the pattern of TSD in medaka and provide important clues to understand the mechanism of sex determination in this species. They also suggest that a brief exposure to high temperature early in life could impair the fertility of medaka as adults.

  12. Context-Dependent Egr1 Expression in the Avian Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Grella, Stephanie L.; Guigueno, Mélanie F.; White, David J.; Sherry, David F.; Marrone, Diano F.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, episodic memory and spatial cognition involve context-specific recruitment of unique ensembles in the hippocampal formation (HF). Despite their capacity for sophisticated spatial (e.g., for migration) and episodic-like (e.g., for food-caching) memory, the mechanisms underlying contextual representation in birds is not well understood. Here we demonstrate environment-specific Egr1 expression as male brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) navigate environments for food reward, showing that the avian HF, like its mammalian counterpart, recruits distinct neuronal ensembles to represent different contexts. PMID:27716817

  13. Choosing Between Yeast and Bacterial Expression Systems: Yield Dependent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Rebecca S.; Malone, Christine C.; Moore, Blake P.; Burk, Melissa; Crawford, Lisa; Karr, Laurel J.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a naturally occurring fluorescent protein isolated from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. The intrinsic fluorescence of the protein is due to a chromophore located in the center of the molecule. Its usefulness has been established as a marker for gene expression and localization of gene products. GFP has recently been utilized as a model protein for crystallization studies at NASA/MSFC, both in earth-based and in microgravity experiments. Because large quantities of purified protein were needed, the cDNA of GFP was cloned into the Pichia pastoris pPICZ(alpha) C strain, with very little protein secreted into the media. Microscopic analysis prior to harvest showed gigantic green fluorescent yeast, but upon harvesting most protein was degraded. Trial fermentations of GFP cloned into pPICZ A for intracellular expression provided unsatisfactory yield. GFP cloned into E, coli was overexpressed at greater than 150 mg/liter, with purification yields at greater than 100mg/liter.

  14. Leaf aquaporin transcript abundance in peanut genotypes diverging in expression of the limited-transpiration trait when subjected to differing vapor pressure deficits and aquaporin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Devi, M Jyostna; Sinclair, Thomas R; Jain, Mukesh; Gallo, Maria

    2016-04-01

    A plant trait currently being exploited to decrease crop yield loss under water-deficit conditions is limited-transpiration rate (TRlim ) under high atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (VPD) conditions. Although limited genotype comparisons for the TRlim trait have been performed in peanut (Arachis hypogaea), no detailed study to describe the basis for this trait in peanut has been reported. Since it has been hypothesized that the TRlim trait may be a result of low leaf hydraulic conductance associated with aquaporins (AQPs), the first objective of this study was to examine a possible correlation of TRlim to leaf AQP transcriptional profiles in six peanut cultivars. Five of the studied cultivars were selected because they expressed TRlim while the cultivar York did not. Transcripts of six AQPs were measured. Under exposure to high vapor pressure deficit, cultivar C 76-16 had decreased AQP transcript abundance for four of the six AQPs but in York only one AQP had decreased abundance. The second objective was to explore the influence of AQP inhibitors mercury and silver on expression of TRlim and AQP transcription profiles. Quantitative RT-PCR data were compared in cultivars York and C 76-16, which had the extreme response in TR to VPD. Inhibitor treatment resulted in increased abundance of AQP transcripts in both. The results of these experiments indicate that AQP transcript abundance itself may not be useful in identifying genotypes expressing the TRlim trait under high VPD conditions.

  15. Influences of Gestational Obesity on Associations between Genotypes and Gene Expression Levels in Offspring following Maternal Gastrointestinal Bypass Surgery for Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Guénard, Frédéric; Lamontagne, Maxime; Bossé, Yohan; Deshaies, Yves; Cianflone, Katherine; Kral, John G.; Marceau, Picard; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Maternal obesity and excess gestational weight gain with compromised metabolic fitness predispose offspring to lifelong obesity and its comorbidities. We demonstrated that compared to offspring born before maternal gastrointestinal bypass surgery (BMS) those born after (AMS) were less obese, with less cardiometabolic risk reflected in the expression and methylation of diabetes, immune and inflammatory pathway genes. Here we examine relationships between gestational obesity and offspring gene variations on expression levels. Methods Whole-genome genotyping and gene expression analyses in blood of 22 BMS and 23 AMS offspring from 19 mothers were conducted using Illumina HumanOmni-5-Quad and HumanHT-12 v4 Expression BeadChips, respectively. Using PLINK we analyzed interactions between offspring gene variations and maternal surgical status on offspring gene expression levels. Altered biological functions and pathways were identified and visualized using DAVID and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Results Significant interactions (p ≤ 1.22x10-12) were found for 525 among the 16,060 expressed transcripts: 1.9% of tested SNPs were involved. Gene function and pathway analysis demonstrated enrichment of transcription and of cellular metabolism functions and overrepresentation of cellular stress and signaling, immune response, inflammation, growth, proliferation and development pathways. Conclusion We suggest that impaired maternal gestational metabolic fitness interacts with offspring gene variations modulating gene expression levels, providing potential mechanisms explaining improved cardiometabolic risk profiles of AMS offspring related to ameliorated maternal lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. PMID:25603303

  16. Network analysis reveals the relationship among wood properties, gene expression levels and genotypes of natural Populus trichocarpa accessions.

    PubMed

    Porth, Ilga; Klápště, Jaroslav; Skyba, Oleksandr; Friedmann, Michael C; Hannemann, Jan; Ehlting, Juergen; El-Kassaby, Yousry A; Mansfield, Shawn D; Douglas, Carl J

    2013-11-01

    High-throughput approaches have been widely applied to elucidate the genetic underpinnings of industrially important wood properties. Wood traits are polygenic in nature, but gene hierarchies can be assessed to identify the most important gene variants controlling specific traits within complex networks defining the overall wood phenotype. We tested a large set of genetic, genomic, and phenotypic information in an integrative approach to predict wood properties in Populus trichocarpa. Nine-yr-old natural P. trichocarpa trees including accessions with high contrasts in six traits related to wood chemistry and ultrastructure were profiled for gene expression on 49k Nimblegen (Roche NimbleGen Inc., Madison, WI, USA) array elements and for 28,831 polymorphic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Pre-selected transcripts and SNPs with high statistical dependence on phenotypic traits were used in Bayesian network learning procedures with a stepwise K2 algorithm to infer phenotype-centric networks. Transcripts were pre-selected at a much lower logarithm of Bayes factor (logBF) threshold than SNPs and were not accommodated in the networks. Using persistent variables, we constructed cross-validated networks for variability in wood attributes, which contained four to six variables with 94-100% predictive accuracy. Accommodated gene variants revealed the hierarchy in the genetic architecture that underpins substantial phenotypic variability, and represent new tools to support the maximization of response to selection.

  17. miR-24 and miR-205 expression is dependent on HPV onco-protein expression in keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, Declan J.; Patel, Daksha; McCance, Dennis J.

    2014-01-05

    A screen of microRNA (miRNA) expression following differentiation in human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) identified changes in several miRNAs, including miR-24 and miR-205. We investigated how expression of Human Papilloma Virus Type-16 (HPV16) onco-proteins E6 and E7 affected expression of miR-24 and miR-205 during proliferation and differentiation of HFKs. We show that the induction of both miR-24 and miR-205 observed during differentiation of HFKs is lost in HFKs expressing E6 and E7. We demonstrate that the effect on miR-205 is due to E7 activity, as miR-205 expression is dependent on pRb expression. Finally, we provide evidence that miR-24 effects in the cell may be due to targeting of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p27. In summary, these results indicate that expression of both miR-24 and miR-205 are impacted by E6 and/or E7 expression, which may be one mechanism by which HPV onco-proteins can disrupt the balance between proliferation and differentiation in keratinocytes. - Highlights: • miR-24 and miR-205 are induced during keratinocyte differentiation. • This induction is lost in keratinocytes expressing HPV onco-proteins E6 and E7. • miR-205 is dependent upon pRb expression. • miR-24 targets p27 in cycling keratinocytes.

  18. Apolipoprotein E Genotype-Dependent Paradoxical Short-Term Effects of {sup 56}Fe Irradiation on the Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, Gwendolen E.; Villasana, Laura; Dayger, Catherine; Davis, Matthew J.; Raber, Jacob

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: In humans, apolipoprotein E (apoE) is encoded by three major alleles ({epsilon}2, {epsilon}3, and {epsilon}4) and, compared to apoE3, apoE4 increases the risk of developing Alzheimer disease and cognitive impairments following various environmental challenges. Exposure to irradiation, including that of {sup 56}Fe, during space missions poses a significant risk to the central nervous system, and apoE isoform might modulate this risk. Methods and Materials: We investigated whether apoE isoform modulates hippocampus-dependent cognitive performance starting 2 weeks after {sup 56}Fe irradiation. Changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) can affect cognition and are induced by irradiation. Therefore, after cognitive testing, we assessed hippocampal ROS levels in ex vivo brain slices, using the ROS-sensitive fluorescent probe, dihydroethidium (DHE). Brain levels of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), extracellular SOD, and apoE were assessed using Western blotting analysis. Results: In the water maze, spatial memory retention was impaired by irradiation in apoE2 and apoE4 mice but enhanced by irradiation in apoE3 mice. Irradiation reduced DHE-oxidation levels in the enclosed blade of the dentate gyrus and levels of 3-NT and CuZnSOD in apoE2 but not apoE3 or apoE4 mice. Finally, irradiation increased apoE levels in apoE3 but not apoE2 or apoE4 mice. Conclusions: The short-term effects of {sup 56}Fe irradiation on hippocampal ROS levels and hippocampus-dependent spatial memory retention are apoE isoform-dependent.

  19. De novo transcriptome assembly and analysis of differentially expressed genes of two barley genotypes reveal root-zone-specific responses to salt exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Camilla Beate; Cassin, Andrew; Keeble-Gagnère, Gabriel; Doblin, Monika S.; Bacic, Antony; Roessner, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Plant roots are the first organs sensing and responding to salinity stress, manifested differentially between different root types, and also at the individual tissue and cellular level. High genetic diversity and the current lack of an assembled map-based sequence of the barley genome severely limit barley research potential. We used over 580 and 600 million paired-end reads, respectively, to create two de novo assemblies of a barley landrace (Sahara) and a malting cultivar (Clipper) with known contrasting responses to salinity. Generalized linear models were used to statistically access spatial, treatment-related, and genotype-specific responses. This revealed a spatial gene expression gradient along the barley root, with more differentially expressed transcripts detected between different root zones than between treatments. The root transcriptome also showed a gradual transition from transcripts related to sugar-mediated signaling at the root meristematic zone to those involved in cell wall metabolism in the elongation zone, and defense response-related pathways toward the maturation zone, with significant differences between the two genotypes. The availability of these additional transcriptome reference sets will serve as a valuable resource to the cereal research community, and may identify valuable traits to assist in breeding programmes. PMID:27527578

  20. Children's inferential styles, 5-HTTLPR genotype, and maternal expressed emotion-criticism: An integrated model for the intergenerational transmission of depression.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Brandon E; Uhrlass, Dorothy J; Grassia, Marie; Benas, Jessica S; McGeary, John

    2009-11-01

    The authors tested a model for the intergenerational transmission of depression integrating specific genetic (5-HTTLPR), cognitive (inferential style), and environmental (mother depressive symptoms and expressed-emotion criticism [EE-Crit]) risk factors. Supporting the hypothesis that maternal depression is associated with elevated levels of stress in children's lives, mothers with a history of major depressive disorder (MDD) exhibited higher depressive symptoms across a 6-month multiwave follow-up than mothers with no depression history. In addition, partially supporting our hypothesis, levels of maternal criticism during the follow-up were significantly related to mothers' current depressive symptoms but not to history of MDD. Finally, the authors found support for an integrated Gene x Cognition x Environment model of risk. Specifically, among children with negative inferential styles regarding their self-characteristics, there was a clear dose response of 5-HTTLPR genotype moderating the relation between maternal criticism and children's depressive symptoms, with the highest depressive symptoms during the follow-up observed among children carrying 2 copies of the 5-HTTLPR lower expressing alleles (short [S] or long [LG]) who also exhibited negative inferential styles for self-characteristics and who experienced high levels of EE-Crit. In contrast, children with positive inferential styles exhibited low depressive symptoms regardless of 5-HTTLPR genotype or level of maternal criticism.

  1. Children’s Inferential Styles, 5-HTTLPR Genotype, and Maternal Expressed Emotion-Criticism: An Integrated Model for the Intergenerational Transmission of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Gibb, Brandon E.; Uhrlass, Dorothy J.; Grassia, Marie; Benas, Jessica S.; McGeary, John

    2010-01-01

    We tested a model for the intergenerational transmission of depression integrating specific genetic (5-HTTLPR), cognitive (inferential style), and environmental (mother depressive symptoms and expressed-emotion criticism) risk factors. Supporting the hypothesis that maternal depression is associated with elevated levels of stress in children’s lives, mothers with a history of major depressive disorder (MDD) exhibited higher depressive symptoms across a 6-month multi-wave follow-up than mothers with no depression history. In addition, partially supporting our hypothesis, levels of maternal criticism during the follow-up were significantly related to mothers’ current depressive symptoms, but not history of MDD. Finally, we found support for an integrated gene × cognition × environment model of risk. Specifically, among children with negative inferential styles regarding their self-characteristics, there was a clear dose response of 5-HTTLPR genotype moderating the relation between maternal criticism and children’s depressive symptoms, with the highest depressive symptoms during the follow-up observed among children carrying two copies of the 5-HTTLPR lower expressing alleles (S or LG) who also exhibited negative inferential styles for self-characteristics and who experienced high levels of EE-Crit. In contrast, children with positive inferential styles exhibited low depressive symptoms regardless of 5-HTTLPR genotype or level of maternal criticism. PMID:19899843

  2. De novo transcriptome assembly and analysis of differentially expressed genes of two barley genotypes reveal root-zone-specific responses to salt exposure.

    PubMed

    Hill, Camilla Beate; Cassin, Andrew; Keeble-Gagnère, Gabriel; Doblin, Monika S; Bacic, Antony; Roessner, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Plant roots are the first organs sensing and responding to salinity stress, manifested differentially between different root types, and also at the individual tissue and cellular level. High genetic diversity and the current lack of an assembled map-based sequence of the barley genome severely limit barley research potential. We used over 580 and 600 million paired-end reads, respectively, to create two de novo assemblies of a barley landrace (Sahara) and a malting cultivar (Clipper) with known contrasting responses to salinity. Generalized linear models were used to statistically access spatial, treatment-related, and genotype-specific responses. This revealed a spatial gene expression gradient along the barley root, with more differentially expressed transcripts detected between different root zones than between treatments. The root transcriptome also showed a gradual transition from transcripts related to sugar-mediated signaling at the root meristematic zone to those involved in cell wall metabolism in the elongation zone, and defense response-related pathways toward the maturation zone, with significant differences between the two genotypes. The availability of these additional transcriptome reference sets will serve as a valuable resource to the cereal research community, and may identify valuable traits to assist in breeding programmes. PMID:27527578

  3. Trait Specific Expression Profiling of Salt Stress Responsive Genes in Diverse Rice Genotypes as Determined by Modified Significance Analysis of Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad R.; Bassel, George W.; Pritchard, Jeremy; Sharma, Garima P.; Ford-Lloyd, Brian V.

    2016-01-01

    Stress responsive gene expression is commonly profiled in a comparative manner involving different stress conditions or genotypes with contrasting reputation of tolerance/resistance. In contrast, this research exploited a wide natural variation in terms of taxonomy, origin and salt sensitivity in eight genotypes of rice to identify the trait specific patterns of gene expression under salt stress. Genome wide transcptomic responses were interrogated by the weighted continuous morpho-physiological trait responses using modified Significance Analysis of Microarrays. More number of genes was found to be differentially expressed under salt stressed compared to that of under unstressed conditions. Higher numbers of genes were observed to be differentially expressed for the traits shoot Na+/K+, shoot Na+, root K+, biomass and shoot Cl−, respectively. The results identified around 60 genes to be involved in Na+, K+, and anion homeostasis, transport, and transmembrane activity under stressed conditions. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis identified 1.36% (578 genes) of the entire transcriptome to be involved in the major molecular functions such as signal transduction (>150 genes), transcription factor (81 genes), and translation factor activity (62 genes) etc., under salt stress. Chromosomal mapping of the genes suggests that majority of the genes are located on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 6, and 7. The gene network analysis showed that the transcription factors and translation initiation factors formed the major gene networks and are mostly active in nucleus, cytoplasm and mitochondria whereas the membrane and vesicle bound proteins formed a secondary network active in plasma membrane and vacuoles. The novel genes and the genes with unknown functions thus identified provide picture of a synergistic salinity response representing the potentially fundamental mechanisms that are active in the wide natural genetic background of rice and will be of greater use once their roles

  4. Effects of seasonal temperature changes on DkMyb4 expression involved in proanthocyanidin regulation in two genotypes of persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.) fruit.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Takashi; Tsujimoto, Tomoyuki; Ikegami, Ayako; Yonemori, Keizo

    2011-05-01

    Persimmon fruits accumulate a large amount of proanthocyanidin (PA). Fruits of the mutant non-astringent (NA) type lose their ability to accumulate PA at an early stage of fruit development, whereas fruits of the normal astringent (A) type sustain PA accumulation until ripening. This allelotype is determined by the genotype of a single ASTRINGENCY (AST) locus. It is possible that the reduction in PA accumulation in NA-type fruits is due to phenological down-regulation of DkMyb4 (a PA regulator) and the resultant down-regulation of structural genes in the PA pathway. In this study, attempts were made to identify the regulatory mechanisms of phenological PA accumulation in A- and NA-type fruits, focusing particularly on the effects of ambient temperature. Continuous cool temperature conditions caused sustained expression of DkMyb4 in NA-type fruits, as well as in A-type fruits, resulting in increased expression of PA pathway genes and PA accumulation. However, the expression of some A/NA phenotypic marker genes was not significantly affected by the cool temperature conditions. In addition, PA composition in NA-type fruits exposed to cool temperatures differed from that in A-type fruits. These results indicate that a cool ambient temperature may have induced DkMyb4 expression and resultant PA accumulation, but did not directly affect the expression of the AST gene.

  5. Effects of aging and genotype on circadian rhythms, sleep, and clock gene expression in APPxPS1 knock-in mice, a model for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Marilyn J; Smith, J Tyler; Franklin, Kathleen M; Beckett, Tina L; Murphy, M Paul; St Clair, Daret K; Donohue, Kevin D; Striz, Martin; O'Hara, Bruce F

    2012-08-01

    Profound disruptions of circadian rhythms and sleep/wake cycles constitute a major cause of institutionalization of AD patients. This study investigated whether a rodent model of AD, APP(NLH/NLH)/PS-1(P264L/264L) (APPxPS1) mice, exhibits circadian alterations. The APPxPS1 mice were generated using CD-1/129 mice and Cre-lox knock-in technology to "humanize" the mouse amyloid (A)β sequence and create a presenilin-1 mutation identified in familial early-onset AD patients. APPxPS1 and WT mice of several ages (~4, 11, and 15 months) were monitored for circadian rhythms in wheel running, cage activity, and sleep:wake behavior. After rhythm assessment, the mice were euthanized at zeitgeber time (ZT) 2 or 10 (i.e., 2 or 10 h after lights-on) and brains were dissected. Amyloidβ levels were measured in cortical samples and brain sections of the hypothalamus and hippocampus were prepared and used for in situ hybridization of circadian or neuropeptide genes. The most significant effects of the APPxPS1 transgenes were phase delays of ~2 h in the onset of daytime wakefulness bouts (P<0.005) and peak wakefulness (P<0.02), potentially relevant to phase delays previously reported in AD patients. However, genotype did not affect the major activity peaks or phases of wheel running, wake, or general movement, which were bimodal with dominant dawn and dusk activity. Expression of Period 2 in the suprachiasmatic nucleus was affected by ZT (P<0.0001) with a marginal interaction effect of age, genotype, and ZT (P<0.08). A separate analysis of the old animals indicated a robust interaction between ZT and genotype, as well as main effects of these parameters. Aging also altered sleep (e.g., bout length and amount of daytime sleep) and the amount of wheel running and cage activity. In conclusion, the APPxPS1 knock-in mice exhibit some alterations in their sleep:wake rhythm and clock gene expression, but do not show robust, genotype-related changes in activity rhythms. The prominent daytime

  6. Expression of NMDA receptor-dependent LTP in the hippocampus: bridging the divide

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A consensus has famously yet to emerge on the locus and mechanisms underlying the expression of the canonical NMDA receptor-dependent form of LTP. An objective assessment of the evidence leads us to conclude that both presynaptic and postsynaptic expression mechanisms contribute to this type of synaptic plasticity. PMID:23339575

  7. De Novo Polymerase Activity and Oligomerization of Hepatitis C Virus RNA-Dependent RNA-Polymerases from Genotypes 1 to 5

    PubMed Central

    Bellón-Echeverría, Itxaso; Encinar, José Antonio; Martínez-Alfaro, Elisa; Pérez-Flores, Ricardo; Mas, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) shows a great geographical diversity reflected in the high number of circulating genotypes and subtypes. The response to HCV treatment is genotype specific, with the predominant genotype 1 showing the lowest rate of sustained virological response. Virally encoded enzymes are candidate targets for intervention. In particular, promising antiviral molecules are being developed to target the viral NS3/4A protease and NS5B polymerase. Most of the studies with the NS5B polymerase have been done with genotypes 1b and 2a, whilst information about other genotypes is scarce. Here, we have characterized the de novo activity of NS5B from genotypes 1 to 5, with emphasis on conditions for optimum activity and kinetic constants. Polymerase cooperativity was determined by calculating the Hill coefficient and oligomerization through a new FRET-based method. The Vmax/Km ratios were statistically different between genotype 1 and the other genotypes (p<0.001), mainly due to differences in Vmax values, but differences in the Hill coefficient and NS5B oligomerization were noted. Analysis of sequence changes among the studied polymerases and crystal structures show the αF helix as a structural component probably involved in NS5B-NS5B interactions. The viability of the interaction of αF and αT helixes was confirmed by docking studies and calculation of electrostatic surface potentials for genotype 1 and point mutants corresponding to mutations from different genotypes. Results presented in this study reveal the existence of genotypic differences in NS5B de novo activity and oligomerization. Furthermore, these results allow us to define two regions, one consisting of residues Glu128, Asp129, and Glu248, and the other consisting of residues of αT helix possibly involved in NS5B-NS5B interactions. PMID:21490973

  8. Isolation and Identification of Genes Activating Uas2-Dependent Adh2 Expression in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Donoviel, M. S.; Young, E. T.

    1996-01-01

    Two cis-acting elements have been identified that act synergistically to regulate expression of the glucose-repressed alcohol dehydrogenase 2 (ADH2) gene. UAS1 is bound by the trans-activator Adr1p. UAS2 is thought to be the binding site for an unidentified regulatory protein. A genetic selection based on a UAS2-dependent ADH2 reporter was devised to isolate genes capable of activating UAS2-dependent transcription. One set of UAS2-dependent genes contained SPT6/CRE2/SSN20. Multicopy SPT6 caused improper expression of chromosomal ADH2. A second set of UAS2-dependent clones contained a previously uncharacterized open reading frame designated MEU1 (Multicopy Enhancer of UAS2). A frame shift mutation in MEU1 abolished its ability to activate UAS2-dependent gene expression. Multicopy MEU1 expression suppressed the constitutive ADH2 expression caused by cre2-1. Disruption of MEU1 reduced endogenous ADH2 expression about twofold but had no effect on cell viability or growth. No homologues of MEU1 were identified by low-stringency Southern hybridization of yeast genomic DNA, and no significant homologues were found in the sequence data bases. A MEU1/β-gal fusion protein was not localized to a particular region of the cell. MEU1 is linked to PPR1 on chromosome XII. PMID:8807288

  9. Enhanced Gene Expression Rather than Natural Polymorphism in Coding Sequence of the OsbZIP23 Determines Drought Tolerance and Yield Improvement in Rice Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Dey, Avishek; Samanta, Milan Kumar; Gayen, Srimonta; Sen, Soumitra K; Maiti, Mrinal K

    2016-01-01

    Drought is one of the major limiting factors for productivity of crops including rice (Oryza sativa L.). Understanding the role of allelic variations of key regulatory genes involved in stress-tolerance is essential for developing an effective strategy to combat drought. The bZIP transcription factors play a crucial role in abiotic-stress adaptation in plants via abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathway. The present study aimed to search for allelic polymorphism in the OsbZIP23 gene across selected drought-tolerant and drought-sensitive rice genotypes, and to characterize the new allele through overexpression (OE) and gene-silencing (RNAi). Analyses of the coding DNA sequence (CDS) of the cloned OsbZIP23 gene revealed single nucleotide polymorphism at four places and a 15-nucleotide deletion at one place. The single-copy OsbZIP23 gene is expressed at relatively higher level in leaf tissues of drought-tolerant genotypes, and its abundance is more in reproductive stage. Cloning and sequence analyses of the OsbZIP23-promoter from drought-tolerant O. rufipogon and drought-sensitive IR20 cultivar showed variation in the number of stress-responsive cis-elements and a 35-nucleotide deletion at 5'-UTR in IR20. Analysis of the GFP reporter gene function revealed that the promoter activity of O. rufipogon is comparatively higher than that of IR20. The overexpression of any of the two polymorphic forms (1083 bp and 1068 bp CDS) of OsbZIP23 improved drought tolerance and yield-related traits significantly by retaining higher content of cellular water, soluble sugar and proline; and exhibited decrease in membrane lipid peroxidation in comparison to RNAi lines and non-transgenic plants. The OE lines showed higher expression of target genes-OsRab16B, OsRab21 and OsLEA3-1 and increased ABA sensitivity; indicating that OsbZIP23 is a positive transcriptional-regulator of the ABA-signaling pathway. Taken together, the present study concludes that the enhanced gene expression rather than

  10. The association of CTLA-4 and HLA class II autoimmune risk genotype with regulatory T cell marker expression in 5-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Jonson, C-O; Hedman, M; Karlsson Faresjö, M; Casas, R; Ilonen, J; Ludvigsson, J; Vaarala, O

    2006-07-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are involved in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance by suppression of autoreactive lymphocytes that have avoided thymic depletion. The defective function of Treg cells has recently attracted attention in autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes (T1D), rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Susceptibility to these diseases is associated with specific human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) gene polymorphisms. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between HLA class II and CTLA +49 A/G polymorphisms associated with susceptibility to T1D and the number and characteristics of Treg cells in children. Samples from 47 5-year-old children who participated in the All Babies in South-east Sweden (ABIS) follow-up study were grouped according to the presence of the T1D risk-associated HLA genotype (DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201, DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302) or neutral HLA genotypes. Lower percentages of CD4+ T cells (P = 0.03) and CD4+ CD25high cells (P = 0.06) expressing intracellular CTLA-4 were detected in samples from children with CTLA-4 +49GG compared to children with the +49AA genotype. Similarly, lower percentages of CD4+ (P = 0.002) and CD4+ CD25high (P = 0.002) cells expressing CTLA-4 were observed in children positive for HLA DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 and DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 (P = 0.04 for CD4+ and P = 0.02 for CD4+ CD25high) risk haplotypes when compared to children without these alleles. The percentage of CD25high cells among CD4+ cells was correlated inversely with CTLA-4 mRNA expression in PBMC (r = -0.56, P = 0.03). Decreased levels of CTLA-4 in CD4+ and CD4+ CD25high cells in individuals with CTLA-4 and HLA class II alleles associated with T1D may contribute to the initiation and/or progression of autoimmune response. PMID:16792673

  11. Enhanced Gene Expression Rather than Natural Polymorphism in Coding Sequence of the OsbZIP23 Determines Drought Tolerance and Yield Improvement in Rice Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Avishek; Samanta, Milan Kumar; Gayen, Srimonta; Sen, Soumitra K.; Maiti, Mrinal K.

    2016-01-01

    Drought is one of the major limiting factors for productivity of crops including rice (Oryza sativa L.). Understanding the role of allelic variations of key regulatory genes involved in stress-tolerance is essential for developing an effective strategy to combat drought. The bZIP transcription factors play a crucial role in abiotic-stress adaptation in plants via abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathway. The present study aimed to search for allelic polymorphism in the OsbZIP23 gene across selected drought-tolerant and drought-sensitive rice genotypes, and to characterize the new allele through overexpression (OE) and gene-silencing (RNAi). Analyses of the coding DNA sequence (CDS) of the cloned OsbZIP23 gene revealed single nucleotide polymorphism at four places and a 15-nucleotide deletion at one place. The single-copy OsbZIP23 gene is expressed at relatively higher level in leaf tissues of drought-tolerant genotypes, and its abundance is more in reproductive stage. Cloning and sequence analyses of the OsbZIP23-promoter from drought-tolerant O. rufipogon and drought-sensitive IR20 cultivar showed variation in the number of stress-responsive cis-elements and a 35-nucleotide deletion at 5’-UTR in IR20. Analysis of the GFP reporter gene function revealed that the promoter activity of O. rufipogon is comparatively higher than that of IR20. The overexpression of any of the two polymorphic forms (1083 bp and 1068 bp CDS) of OsbZIP23 improved drought tolerance and yield-related traits significantly by retaining higher content of cellular water, soluble sugar and proline; and exhibited decrease in membrane lipid peroxidation in comparison to RNAi lines and non-transgenic plants. The OE lines showed higher expression of target genes-OsRab16B, OsRab21 and OsLEA3-1 and increased ABA sensitivity; indicating that OsbZIP23 is a positive transcriptional-regulator of the ABA-signaling pathway. Taken together, the present study concludes that the enhanced gene expression rather

  12. Enhanced Gene Expression Rather than Natural Polymorphism in Coding Sequence of the OsbZIP23 Determines Drought Tolerance and Yield Improvement in Rice Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Dey, Avishek; Samanta, Milan Kumar; Gayen, Srimonta; Sen, Soumitra K; Maiti, Mrinal K

    2016-01-01

    Drought is one of the major limiting factors for productivity of crops including rice (Oryza sativa L.). Understanding the role of allelic variations of key regulatory genes involved in stress-tolerance is essential for developing an effective strategy to combat drought. The bZIP transcription factors play a crucial role in abiotic-stress adaptation in plants via abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathway. The present study aimed to search for allelic polymorphism in the OsbZIP23 gene across selected drought-tolerant and drought-sensitive rice genotypes, and to characterize the new allele through overexpression (OE) and gene-silencing (RNAi). Analyses of the coding DNA sequence (CDS) of the cloned OsbZIP23 gene revealed single nucleotide polymorphism at four places and a 15-nucleotide deletion at one place. The single-copy OsbZIP23 gene is expressed at relatively higher level in leaf tissues of drought-tolerant genotypes, and its abundance is more in reproductive stage. Cloning and sequence analyses of the OsbZIP23-promoter from drought-tolerant O. rufipogon and drought-sensitive IR20 cultivar showed variation in the number of stress-responsive cis-elements and a 35-nucleotide deletion at 5'-UTR in IR20. Analysis of the GFP reporter gene function revealed that the promoter activity of O. rufipogon is comparatively higher than that of IR20. The overexpression of any of the two polymorphic forms (1083 bp and 1068 bp CDS) of OsbZIP23 improved drought tolerance and yield-related traits significantly by retaining higher content of cellular water, soluble sugar and proline; and exhibited decrease in membrane lipid peroxidation in comparison to RNAi lines and non-transgenic plants. The OE lines showed higher expression of target genes-OsRab16B, OsRab21 and OsLEA3-1 and increased ABA sensitivity; indicating that OsbZIP23 is a positive transcriptional-regulator of the ABA-signaling pathway. Taken together, the present study concludes that the enhanced gene expression rather than

  13. Flow-Dependent Epigenetic DNA Methylation in Endothelial Gene Expression and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Jessilyn; Thabet, Salim; Jo, Hanjoong

    2015-07-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms that regulate endothelial cell gene expression are now emerging. DNA methylation is the most stable epigenetic mark that confers persisting changes in gene expression. Not only is DNA methylation important in rendering cell identity by regulating cell type-specific gene expression throughout differentiation, but it is becoming clear that DNA methylation also plays a key role in maintaining endothelial cell homeostasis and in vascular disease development. Disturbed blood flow causes atherosclerosis, whereas stable flow protects against it by differentially regulating gene expression in endothelial cells. Recently, we and others have shown that flow-dependent gene expression and atherosclerosis development are regulated by mechanisms dependent on DNA methyltransferases (1 and 3A). Disturbed blood flow upregulates DNA methyltransferase expression both in vitro and in vivo, which leads to genome-wide DNA methylation alterations and global gene expression changes in a DNA methyltransferase-dependent manner. These studies revealed several mechanosensitive genes, such as HoxA5, Klf3, and Klf4, whose promoters were hypermethylated by disturbed blood flow, but rescued by DNA methyltransferases inhibitors such as 5Aza-2-deoxycytidine. These findings provide new insight into the mechanism by which flow controls epigenomic DNA methylation patterns, which in turn alters endothelial gene expression, regulates vascular biology, and modulates atherosclerosis development. PMID:25953647

  14. Change of cystine/glutamate antiporter expression in ethanol-dependent rats

    PubMed Central

    Peana, Alessandra T.; Muggironi, Giulia; Bennardini, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Background: Some drugs of abuse down regulate the expression of cystine/glutamate (xCT) antiporter in the nucleus accumbens (Acb) after extinction or withdrawal. The altered level of xCT exchanger in Acb, a structure involved in ethanol reinforcement, may contribute to the pathological glutamatergic signaling, linked to addiction. We hypothesized that the expression of xCT may be changed in Acb and whole brain also in non-dependent (occasional drinkers), ethanol-dependent rats, as well as, during ethanol withdrawal. Methods: Wistar rats were made ethanol-dependent by chronic exposure to an alcoholic milk beverage (from 2.4 to 7.2% v/v ethanol). Ethanol non-dependent rats were exposed to a similar, but non-alcoholic liquid diet and self-administered ethanol (10%) twice a week. Withdrawal in ethanol-dependent rats was studied at 12 h after the last ethanol-enriched diet exposure. Immediately after the measurement of somatic signs of withdrawal, Western blot analysis with a polyclonal antibody against xCT was carried out in a naïve control group, non-dependent and ethanol-dependent rats as well as withdrawal rats, in order to study the level of xCT expression in Acb and whole brain. Results: Non-dependent rats self-administered an average dose of 1.21 ± 0.02 g/kg per session (30 min). Daily ethanol consumption during chronic exposure to the alcoholic beverage ranged from 6.30 ± 0.16 to 13.99 ± 0.66 g/kg. Ethanol dependent rats after suspension of the ethanol-enriched diet have shown significant somatic signs of withdrawal. Western blotting analysis of Acb lysates revealed that xCT was over expressed in ethanol-dependent rats whereas in whole brain preparations xCT was over expressed in both non-dependent and ethanol-dependent rats compared to control group. On the contrary, xCT expression during withdrawal was down regulated in Acb and restored to control level in whole brain preparations. Conclusions: The changes of xCT expression in both Acb and whole brain

  15. Immunophenotyping of rheumatoid arthritis reveals a linkage between HLA-DRB1 genotype, CXCR4 expression on memory CD4+ T cells, and disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Nagafuchi, Yasuo; Shoda, Hirofumi; Sumitomo, Shuji; Nakachi, Shinichiro; Kato, Rika; Tsuchida, Yumi; Tsuchiya, Haruka; Sakurai, Keiichi; Hanata, Norio; Tateishi, Shoko; Kanda, Hiroko; Ishigaki, Kazuyoshi; Okada, Yukinori; Suzuki, Akari; Kochi, Yuta; Fujio, Keishi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease that leads to destructive arthritis. Although the HLA class II locus is the strongest genetic risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis, the relationship between HLA class II alleles and lymphocyte activation remains unclear. We performed immunophenotyping of peripheral blood mononuclear cells on 91 HLA-DRB1-genotyped RA patients and 110 healthy donors. The frequency of memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells, and not Th1 and Th17 cells, was significantly associated with disease severity by multiple linear regression analysis. RA patients with one or more susceptible HLA-DR haplotypes (shared epitope: SE) displayed a significantly higher frequency of memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells. Moreover, the frequency of memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells significantly correlated with the expression level of HLA-DR on B cells, which was elevated in RA patients with SE. In vitro analysis and transcriptomic pathway analysis suggested that the interaction between HLA-DR and T cell receptors is an important regulator of memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells. Clinically, a higher frequency of memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells predicted a better response to CTLA4-Ig. Memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells may serve as a powerful biomarker for unraveling the linkage between HLA-DRB1 genotype and disease activity in RA. PMID:27385284

  16. High-Fat Diet Changes Hippocampal Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) in a Genotype- and Carbohydrate-Dependent Manner in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lane-Donovan, Courtney; Herz, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a currently incurable neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Risk factors for Alzheimer's disease include genetic risk factors, such as possession of ε4 allele of apolipoprotein E (ApoE4) over the risk-neutral ApoE3 allele, and lifestyle risk factors, such as diet and exercise. The intersection of these two sources of disease risk is not well understood. We investigated the impact of diet on ApoE levels by feeding wildtype, ApoE3, and ApoE4 targeted replacement (TR) mice with chow, high-fat, or ketogenic (high-fat, very-low-carbohydrate) diets. We found that high-fat diet affected both plasma and hippocampal levels of ApoE in an isoform-dependent manner, with high-fat diet causing a surprising reduction of hippocampal ApoE levels in ApoE3 TR mice. Conversely, the ketogenic diet had no effect on hippocampal ApoE. Our findings suggest that the use of dietary interventions to slow the progression AD should take ApoE genotype into consideration.

  17. Gene Expression-Genotype Analysis Implicates GSDMA, GSDMB, and LRRC3C as Contributors to Inflammatory Bowel Disease Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Söderman, Jan; Berglind, Linda; Almer, Sven

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the biological foundation of the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, susceptibility locus rs2872507, we have investigated the expression of 13 genes using ileal and colonic biopsies from patients with IBD (inflamed and noninflamed mucosa) or from individuals without IBD (noninflamed mucosa). The susceptibility allele was consistently associated with reduced expression of GSDMB (P = 4.1 × 10−3–7.2 × 10−10). The susceptibility allele was also associated with the increased expression of GSDMA (P = 1.6 × 10−4) and LRRC3C (P = 7.8 × 10−6) in colon tissue from individuals without IBD and with the reduced expression of PGAP3 (IBD; P = 2.0 × 10−3) and ZPBP2 (Crohn's disease; P = 7.7 × 10−4) in noninflamed ileum. Inflammation resulted in the reduced colonic expression of ERBB2, GRB7, MIEN1, and PGAP3 (P = 1.0 × 10−4–1.0 × 10−9) and the increased colonic expression of IKZF3 and CSF3 (P = 2.4 × 10−7–3.5 × 10−8). Based on our results and published findings on GSDMA, GSDMB, LRRC3C, and related proteins, we propose that this locus in part affects IBD susceptibility via effects on apoptosis and cell proliferation and believe this hypothesis warrants further experimental investigation. PMID:26484354

  18. Protein expression and genetic structure of the coral Porites lobata in an environmentally extreme Samoan back reef: Does host genotype limit phenotypic plasticity?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barshis, D.J.; Stillman, J.H.; Gates, R.D.; Toonen, R.J.; Smith, L.W.; Birkeland, C.

    2010-01-01

    The degree to which coral reef ecosystems will be impacted by global climate change depends on regional and local differences in corals' susceptibility and resilience to environmental stressors. Here, we present data from a reciprocal transplant experiment using the common reef building coral Porites lobata between a highly fluctuating back reef environment that reaches stressful daily extremes, and a more stable, neighbouring forereef. Protein biomarker analyses assessing physiological contributions to stress resistance showed evidence for both fixed and environmental influence on biomarker response. Fixed influences were strongest for ubiquitin-conjugated proteins with consistently higher levels found in back reef source colonies both pre and post-transplant when compared with their forereef conspecifics. Additionally, genetic comparisons of back reef and forereef populations revealed significant population structure of both the nuclear ribosomal and mitochondrial genomes of the coral host (FST = 0.146 P < 0.0001, FST = 0.335 P < 0.0001 for rDNA and mtDNA, respectively), whereas algal endosymbiont populations were genetically indistinguishable between the two sites. We propose that the genotype of the coral host may drive limitations to the physiological responses of these corals when faced with new environmental conditions. This result is important in understanding genotypic and environmental interactions in the coral algal symbiosis and how corals may respond to future environmental changes. ?? 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Context-dependent expression of the foraging gene in field colonies of ants: the interacting roles of age, environment and task

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Deborah M.; Greene, Michael; Kahler, John; Peteru, Swetha

    2016-01-01

    Task allocation among social insect workers is an ideal framework for studying the molecular mechanisms underlying behavioural plasticity because workers of similar genotype adopt different behavioural phenotypes. Elegant laboratory studies have pioneered this effort, but field studies involving the genetic regulation of task allocation are rare. Here, we investigate the expression of the foraging gene in harvester ant workers from five age- and task-related groups in a natural population, and we experimentally test how exposure to light affects foraging expression in brood workers and foragers. Results from our field study show that the regulation of the foraging gene in harvester ants occurs at two time scales: levels of foraging mRNA are associated with ontogenetic changes over weeks in worker age, location and task, and there are significant daily oscillations in foraging expression in foragers. The temporal dissection of foraging expression reveals that gene expression changes in foragers occur across a scale of hours and the level of expression is predicted by activity rhythms: foragers have high levels of foraging mRNA during daylight hours when they are most active outside the nests. In the experimental study, we find complex interactions in foraging expression between task behaviour and light exposure. Oscillations occur in foragers following experimental exposure to 13 L : 11 D (LD) conditions, but not in brood workers under similar conditions. No significant differences were seen in foraging expression over time in either task in 24 h dark (DD) conditions. Interestingly, the expression of foraging in both undisturbed field and experimentally treated foragers is also significantly correlated with the expression of the circadian clock gene, cycle. Our results provide evidence that the regulation of this gene is context-dependent and associated with both ontogenetic and daily behavioural plasticity in field colonies of harvester ants. Our results underscore

  20. Context-dependent expression of the foraging gene in field colonies of ants: the interacting roles of age, environment and task.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Krista K; Gordon, Deborah M; Friedman, Daniel A; Greene, Michael; Kahler, John; Peteru, Swetha

    2016-08-31

    Task allocation among social insect workers is an ideal framework for studying the molecular mechanisms underlying behavioural plasticity because workers of similar genotype adopt different behavioural phenotypes. Elegant laboratory studies have pioneered this effort, but field studies involving the genetic regulation of task allocation are rare. Here, we investigate the expression of the foraging gene in harvester ant workers from five age- and task-related groups in a natural population, and we experimentally test how exposure to light affects foraging expression in brood workers and foragers. Results from our field study show that the regulation of the foraging gene in harvester ants occurs at two time scales: levels of foraging mRNA are associated with ontogenetic changes over weeks in worker age, location and task, and there are significant daily oscillations in foraging expression in foragers. The temporal dissection of foraging expression reveals that gene expression changes in foragers occur across a scale of hours and the level of expression is predicted by activity rhythms: foragers have high levels of foraging mRNA during daylight hours when they are most active outside the nests. In the experimental study, we find complex interactions in foraging expression between task behaviour and light exposure. Oscillations occur in foragers following experimental exposure to 13 L : 11 D (LD) conditions, but not in brood workers under similar conditions. No significant differences were seen in foraging expression over time in either task in 24 h dark (DD) conditions. Interestingly, the expression of foraging in both undisturbed field and experimentally treated foragers is also significantly correlated with the expression of the circadian clock gene, cycle Our results provide evidence that the regulation of this gene is context-dependent and associated with both ontogenetic and daily behavioural plasticity in field colonies of harvester ants. Our results underscore

  1. Analysis of SLC16A11 Variants in 12,811 American Indians: Genotype-Obesity Interaction for Type 2 Diabetes and an Association With RNASEK Expression.

    PubMed

    Traurig, Michael; Hanson, Robert L; Marinelarena, Alejandra; Kobes, Sayuko; Piaggi, Paolo; Cole, Shelley; Curran, Joanne E; Blangero, John; Göring, Harald; Kumar, Satish; Nelson, Robert G; Howard, Barbara V; Knowler, William C; Baier, Leslie J; Bogardus, Clifton

    2016-02-01

    Genetic variants in SLC16A11 were recently reported to be associated with type 2 diabetes in Mexican and other Latin American populations. The diabetes risk haplotype had a frequency of 50% in Native Americans from Mexico but was rare in Europeans and Africans. In the current study, we analyzed SLC16A11 in 12,811 North American Indians and found that the diabetes risk haplotype, tagged by the rs75493593 A allele, was nominally associated with type 2 diabetes (P = 0.001, odds ratio 1.11). However, there was a strong interaction with BMI (P = 5.1 × 10(-7)) such that the diabetes association was stronger in leaner individuals. rs75493593 was also strongly associated with BMI in individuals with type 2 diabetes (P = 3.4 × 10(-15)) but not in individuals without diabetes (P = 0.77). Longitudinal analyses suggest that this is due, in part, to an association of the A allele with greater weight loss following diabetes onset (P = 0.02). Analyses of global gene expression data from adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and whole blood provide evidence that rs75493593 is associated with expression of the nearby RNASEK gene, suggesting that RNASEK expression may mediate the effect of genotype on diabetes. PMID:26487785

  2. Analysis of SLC16A11 Variants in 12,811 American Indians: Genotype-Obesity Interaction for Type 2 Diabetes and an Association With RNASEK Expression.

    PubMed

    Traurig, Michael; Hanson, Robert L; Marinelarena, Alejandra; Kobes, Sayuko; Piaggi, Paolo; Cole, Shelley; Curran, Joanne E; Blangero, John; Göring, Harald; Kumar, Satish; Nelson, Robert G; Howard, Barbara V; Knowler, William C; Baier, Leslie J; Bogardus, Clifton

    2016-02-01

    Genetic variants in SLC16A11 were recently reported to be associated with type 2 diabetes in Mexican and other Latin American populations. The diabetes risk haplotype had a frequency of 50% in Native Americans from Mexico but was rare in Europeans and Africans. In the current study, we analyzed SLC16A11 in 12,811 North American Indians and found that the diabetes risk haplotype, tagged by the rs75493593 A allele, was nominally associated with type 2 diabetes (P = 0.001, odds ratio 1.11). However, there was a strong interaction with BMI (P = 5.1 × 10(-7)) such that the diabetes association was stronger in leaner individuals. rs75493593 was also strongly associated with BMI in individuals with type 2 diabetes (P = 3.4 × 10(-15)) but not in individuals without diabetes (P = 0.77). Longitudinal analyses suggest that this is due, in part, to an association of the A allele with greater weight loss following diabetes onset (P = 0.02). Analyses of global gene expression data from adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and whole blood provide evidence that rs75493593 is associated with expression of the nearby RNASEK gene, suggesting that RNASEK expression may mediate the effect of genotype on diabetes.

  3. Volatile emissions of scented Alstroemeria genotypes are dominated by terpenes, and a myrcene synthase gene is highly expressed in scented Alstroemeria flowers.

    PubMed

    Aros, Danilo; Gonzalez, Veronica; Allemann, Rudolf K; Müller, Carsten T; Rosati, Carlo; Rogers, Hilary J

    2012-04-01

    Native to South America, Alstroemeria flowers are known for their colourful tepals, and Alstroemeria hybrids are an important cut flower. However, in common with many commercial cut flowers, virtually all the commercial Alstroemeria hybrids are not scented. The cultivar 'Sweet Laura' is one of very few scented commercial Alstroemeria hybrids. Characterization of the volatile emission profile of these cut flowers revealed three major terpene compounds: (E)-caryophyllene, humulene (also known as α-caryophyllene), an ocimene-like compound, and several minor peaks, one of which was identified as myrcene. The profile is completely different from that of the parental scented species A. caryophyllaea. Volatile emission peaked at anthesis in both scented genotypes, coincident in cv. 'Sweet Laura' with the maximal expression of a putative terpene synthase gene AlstroTPS. This gene was preferentially expressed in floral tissues of both cv. 'Sweet Laura' and A. caryophyllaea. Characterization of the AlstroTPS gene structure from cv. 'Sweet Laura' placed it as a member of the class III terpene synthases, and the predicted 567 amino acid sequence placed it into the subfamily TPS-b. The conserved sequences R(28)(R)X(8)W and D(321)DXXD are the putative Mg(2+)-binding sites, and in vitro assay of AlstroTPS expressed in Escherichia coli revealed that the encoded enzyme possesses myrcene synthase activity, consistent with a role for AlstroTPS in scent production in Alstroemeria cv. 'Sweet Laura' flowers.

  4. Glutathione transferase activity and expression patterns during grain filling in flag leaves of wheat genotypes differing in drought tolerance: Response to water deficit.

    PubMed

    Gallé, Agnes; Csiszár, Jolán; Secenji, Maria; Guóth, Adrienn; Cseuz, László; Tari, Irma; Györgyey, János; Erdei, László

    2009-11-15

    Total glutathione S-transferase (GST, EC 2.5.1.18) and glutathione peroxidase (GPOX) activity were measured spectrophotometrically in Triticum aestivum cv. MV Emese and cv. Plainsman (drought tolerant) and cv. GK Elet and Cappelle Desprez (drought-sensitive) flag leaves under control and drought stress conditions during the grain-filling period, in order to reveal possible roles of different GST classes in the senescence of flag leaves. Six wheat GSTs, members of 3 GST classes, were selected and their regulation by drought and senescence was investigated. High GPOX activity (EC 1.11.1.9) was observed in well-watered controls of the drought-tolerant Plainsman cultivar. At the same time, TaGSTU1B and TaGSTF6 sequences, investigated by real-time PCR, showed high-expression levels that increased with time, indicating that the gene products of these genes may play important roles in monocarpic senescence of wheat. Expression of these genes was also induced by drought stress in all of the four investigated cultivars, but extremely high transcript amounts were detected in cv. Plainsman. Our data indicate genotypic variations of wheat GSTs. Expression levels and early induction of two senescence-associated GSTs under drought during grain filling in flag leaves correlated with high yield stability.

  5. Susceptibility of biallelic haplotype and genotype frequencies to genotyping error.

    PubMed

    Moskvina, Valentina; Schmidt, Karl Michael

    2006-12-01

    With the availability of fast genotyping methods and genomic databases, the search for statistical association of single nucleotide polymorphisms with a complex trait has become an important methodology in medical genetics. However, even fairly rare errors occurring during the genotyping process can lead to spurious association results and decrease in statistical power. We develop a systematic approach to study how genotyping errors change the genotype distribution in a sample. The general M-marker case is reduced to that of a single-marker locus by recognizing the underlying tensor-product structure of the error matrix. Both method and general conclusions apply to the general error model; we give detailed results for allele-based errors of size depending both on the marker locus and the allele present. Multiple errors are treated in terms of the associated diffusion process on the space of genotype distributions. We find that certain genotype and haplotype distributions remain unchanged under genotyping errors, and that genotyping errors generally render the distribution more similar to the stable one. In case-control association studies, this will lead to loss of statistical power for nondifferential genotyping errors and increase in type I error for differential genotyping errors. Moreover, we show that allele-based genotyping errors do not disturb Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the genotype distribution. In this setting we also identify maximally affected distributions. As they correspond to situations with rare alleles and marker loci in high linkage disequilibrium, careful checking for genotyping errors is advisable when significant association based on such alleles/haplotypes is observed in association studies.

  6. Genotype-environment interaction expressed in the foraging behaviour of dogwhelks, Nucella lapillus (L.), under simulated environmental hazard

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, R. N.; Taylor, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    represent genotype/environment interaction that is apparently adaptive, in part, through its effect on foraging behaviour.

  7. Evaluation of resistance to aflatoxin contamination in kernels of maize genotypes using a GFP-expressing Aspergillus flavus strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluation of resistance or susceptibility of corn inbreds to infection by Aspergillus flavus was evaluated by a kernel screening assay. A GFP-expressing strain of A. flavus was used to accomplish this study to measure fungal spread and aflatoxin levels in real time. Among the four inbreds tested, ...

  8. Developmental and target-dependent regulation of vesicular glutamate transporter expression by dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Jose Alfredo; Bourque, Marie-Josée; Dal Bo, Gregory; Bourdeau, Mathieu L; Danik, Marc; Williams, Sylvain; Lacaille, Jean-Claude; Trudeau, Louis-Eric

    2008-06-18

    Mesencephalic dopamine (DA) neurons have been suggested to use glutamate as a cotransmitter. Here, we suggest a mechanism for this form of cotransmission by showing that a subset of DA neurons both in vitro and in vivo expresses vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2). Expression of VGluT2 decreases with age. Moreover, when DA neurons are grown in isolation using a microculture system, there is a marked upregulation of VGluT2 expression. We provide evidence that expression of this transporter is normally repressed through a contact-dependent interaction with GABA and other DA neurons, thus providing a partial explanation for the highly restricted expression of VGluT2 in DA neurons in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the neurotransmitter phenotype of DA neurons is both developmentally and dynamically regulated. These findings may have implications for a better understanding of the fast synaptic action of DA neurons as well as basal ganglia circuitry. PMID:18562601

  9. Relationship between stx genotype and Stx2 expression level in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 strains.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Kimiko; Ono, Hidetoshi; Iwashita, Osamu; Kurogi, Mai; Haga, Takeshi; Maeda, Ken; Goto, Yoshitaka

    2012-07-01

    To determine the expression level of Shiga toxin (Stx) 2-related toxins (Stx2 and Stx2c) produced by each of 33 Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 strains, stx2 and stx2c mRNAs (stx2-related mRNA) were measured using real-time PCR with primers that recognize sequences common to stx2 and stx2c. The amount of Stx2 and Stx2c protein was measured using a reversed passive latex agglutination (RPLA) kit. Expression of stx2-related mRNA was significantly higher in STEC O157 strains carrying the stx2 gene (i.e., stx2, stx1/stx2, or stx2/stx2c) than in most strains that carried the stx2c gene but not the stx2 gene (i.e., stx2c or stx1/stx2c). RPLA might not measure the precise amount of each toxin variant; nevertheless, stx2-inclusive strains had 40-fold higher mean toxin titers than did strains that carried the stx2c gene but not the stx2 gene, with the exception of 1 stx2c strain. Interestingly, 1 stx2c strain that was isolated from a patient with severe hemorrhagic diarrhea had the highest stx2-related mRNA expression and the highest toxin titer of all 33 STEC O157 strains. Taken together, these findings indicated that measurement of stx2-related mRNA expression could reflect differences in production levels of toxins among STEC strains.

  10. Genotype-Dependent Difference in 5-HT2C Receptor-Induced Hypolocomotion: Comparison with 5-HT2A Receptor Functional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bazovkina, Darya V.; Kondaurova, Elena M.; Naumenko, Vladimir S.; Ponimaskin, Evgeni

    2015-01-01

    In the present study behavioral effects of the 5-HT2C serotonin receptor were investigated in different mouse strains. The 5-HT2C receptor agonist MK-212 applied intraperitoneally induced significant dose-dependent reduction of distance traveled in the open field test in CBA/Lac mice. This effect was receptor-specific because it was inhibited by the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist RS102221. To study the role of genotype in 5-HT2C receptor-induced hypolocomotion, locomotor activity of seven inbred mouse strains was measured after MK-212 acute treatment. We found that the 5-HT2C receptor stimulation by MK-212 decreased distance traveled in the open field test in CBA/Lac, C57Bl/6, C3H/He, and ICR mice, whereas it failed to affect locomotor activity in DBA/2J, Asn, and Balb/c mice. We also compared the interstrain differences in functional response to 5-HT2C and 5-HT2A receptors activation measured by the quantification of receptor-mediated head-twitches. These experiments revealed significant positive correlation between 5-HT2C and 5-HT2A receptors functional responses for all investigated mouse strains. Moreover, we found that 5-HT2A receptor activation with DOI did not change locomotor activity in CBA/Lac mice. Taken together, our data indicate the implication of 5-HT2C receptors in regulation of locomotor activity and suggest the shared mechanism for functional responses mediated by 5-HT2C and 5-HT2A receptors. PMID:26380122

  11. Genotype-Dependent Difference in 5-HT2C Receptor-Induced Hypolocomotion: Comparison with 5-HT2A Receptor Functional Activity.

    PubMed

    Bazovkina, Darya V; Kondaurova, Elena M; Naumenko, Vladimir S; Ponimaskin, Evgeni

    2015-01-01

    In the present study behavioral effects of the 5-HT2C serotonin receptor were investigated in different mouse strains. The 5-HT2C receptor agonist MK-212 applied intraperitoneally induced significant dose-dependent reduction of distance traveled in the open field test in CBA/Lac mice. This effect was receptor-specific because it was inhibited by the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist RS102221. To study the role of genotype in 5-HT2C receptor-induced hypolocomotion, locomotor activity of seven inbred mouse strains was measured after MK-212 acute treatment. We found that the 5-HT2C receptor stimulation by MK-212 decreased distance traveled in the open field test in CBA/Lac, C57Bl/6, C3H/He, and ICR mice, whereas it failed to affect locomotor activity in DBA/2J, Asn, and Balb/c mice. We also compared the interstrain differences in functional response to 5-HT2C and 5-HT2A receptors activation measured by the quantification of receptor-mediated head-twitches. These experiments revealed significant positive correlation between 5-HT2C and 5-HT2A receptors functional responses for all investigated mouse strains. Moreover, we found that 5-HT2A receptor activation with DOI did not change locomotor activity in CBA/Lac mice. Taken together, our data indicate the implication of 5-HT2C receptors in regulation of locomotor activity and suggest the shared mechanism for functional responses mediated by 5-HT2C and 5-HT2A receptors. PMID:26380122

  12. Genotype-Dependent Difference in 5-HT2C Receptor-Induced Hypolocomotion: Comparison with 5-HT2A Receptor Functional Activity.

    PubMed

    Bazovkina, Darya V; Kondaurova, Elena M; Naumenko, Vladimir S; Ponimaskin, Evgeni

    2015-01-01

    In the present study behavioral effects of the 5-HT2C serotonin receptor were investigated in different mouse strains. The 5-HT2C receptor agonist MK-212 applied intraperitoneally induced significant dose-dependent reduction of distance traveled in the open field test in CBA/Lac mice. This effect was receptor-specific because it was inhibited by the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist RS102221. To study the role of genotype in 5-HT2C receptor-induced hypolocomotion, locomotor activity of seven inbred mouse strains was measured after MK-212 acute treatment. We found that the 5-HT2C receptor stimulation by MK-212 decreased distance traveled in the open field test in CBA/Lac, C57Bl/6, C3H/He, and ICR mice, whereas it failed to affect locomotor activity in DBA/2J, Asn, and Balb/c mice. We also compared the interstrain differences in functional response to 5-HT2C and 5-HT2A receptors activation measured by the quantification of receptor-mediated head-twitches. These experiments revealed significant positive correlation between 5-HT2C and 5-HT2A receptors functional responses for all investigated mouse strains. Moreover, we found that 5-HT2A receptor activation with DOI did not change locomotor activity in CBA/Lac mice. Taken together, our data indicate the implication of 5-HT2C receptors in regulation of locomotor activity and suggest the shared mechanism for functional responses mediated by 5-HT2C and 5-HT2A receptors.

  13. De novo transcriptome sequencing of Acer palmatum and comprehensive analysis of differentially expressed genes under salt stress in two contrasting genotypes.

    PubMed

    Rong, Liping; Li, Qianzhong; Li, Shushun; Tang, Ling; Wen, Jing

    2016-04-01

    Maple (Acer palmatum) is an important species for landscape planting worldwide. Salt stress affects the normal growth of the Maple leaf directly, leading to loss of esthetic value. However, the limited availability of Maple genomic information has hindered research on the mechanisms underlying this tolerance. In this study, we performed comprehensive analyses of the salt tolerance in two genotypes of Maple using RNA-seq. Approximately 146.4 million paired-end reads, representing 181,769 unigenes, were obtained. The N50 length of the unigenes was 738 bp, and their total length over 102.66 Mb. 14,090 simple sequence repeats and over 500,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified, which represent useful resources for marker development. Importantly, 181,769 genes were detected in at least one library, and 303 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between salt-sensitive and salt-tolerant genotypes. Among these DEGs, 125 were upregulated and 178 were downregulated genes. Two MYB-related proteins and one LEA protein were detected among the first 10 most downregulated genes. Moreover, a methyltransferase-related gene was detected among the first 10 most upregulated genes. The three most significantly enriched pathways were plant hormone signal transduction, arginine and proline metabolism, and photosynthesis. The transcriptome analysis provided a rich genetic resource for gene discovery related to salt tolerance in Maple, and in closely related species. The data will serve as an important public information platform to further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in salt tolerance in Maple.

  14. RRE-dependent HIV-1 Env RNA effects on Gag protein expression, assembly and release

    SciTech Connect

    López, Claudia S.; Sloan, Rachel; Cylinder, Isabel; Kozak, Susan L.; Kabat, David; Barklis, Eric

    2014-08-15

    The HIV-1 Gag proteins are translated from the full-length HIV-1 viral RNA (vRNA), whereas the envelope (Env) protein is translated from incompletely spliced Env mRNAs. Nuclear export of vRNAs and Env mRNAs is mediated by the Rev accessory protein which binds to the rev-responsive element (RRE) present on these RNAs. Evidence has shown there is a direct or indirect interaction between the Gag protein, and the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. Our current work shows that env gene expression impacts HIV-1 Gag expression and function in two ways. At the protein level, full-length Env expression altered Gag protein expression, while Env CT-deletion proteins did not. At the RNA level, RRE-containing Env mRNA expression reduced Gag expression, processing, and virus particle release from cells. Our results support models in which Gag is influenced by the Env CT, and Env mRNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export. - Highlights: • At the protein level, full-length HIV-1 Env alters Gag protein expression. • HIV-1 Env RNA expression reduces Gag levels and virus release. • Env RNA effects on Gag are dependent on the RRE. • RRE-containing Env RNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export.

  15. Hyaluronan Inhibits Tlr-4-Dependent RANKL Expression in Human Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hirabara, Shinya; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kojima, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    The Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway is activated in synovial fibroblast cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) and its ligand, RANKL, are key molecules involved in the differentiation of osteoclasts and joint destruction in RA. Hyaluronan (HA) is a major extracellular component and an important immune regulator. In this study, we show that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation significantly increases RANKL expression via a TLR-4 signaling pathway. We also demonstrate that HA suppresses LPS-induced RANKL expression, which is dependent on CD44, but not intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Our study provides evidence for HA-mediated suppression of TLR-4-dependent RANKL expression. This could present an alternative target for the treatment of destructed joint bones and cartilages in RA. PMID:27054952

  16. Compressed Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Erlich, Yaniv; Gordon, Assaf; Brand, Michael; Hannon, Gregory J.; Mitra, Partha P.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past three decades we have steadily increased our knowledge on the genetic basis of many severe disorders. Nevertheless, there are still great challenges in applying this knowledge routinely in the clinic, mainly due to the relatively tedious and expensive process of genotyping. Since the genetic variations that underlie the disorders are relatively rare in the population, they can be thought of as a sparse signal. Using methods and ideas from compressed sensing and group testing, we have developed a cost-effective genotyping protocol to detect carriers for severe genetic disorders. In particular, we have adapted our scheme to a recently developed class of high throughput DNA sequencing technologies. The mathematical framework presented here has some important distinctions from the ’traditional’ compressed sensing and group testing frameworks in order to address biological and technical constraints of our setting. PMID:21451737

  17. The calcineurin-NFAT pathway controls activity-dependent circadian gene expression in slow skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Dyar, Kenneth A.; Ciciliot, Stefano; Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio Malagoli; Pallafacchina, Giorgia; Tothova, Jana; Argentini, Carla; Agatea, Lisa; Abraham, Reimar; Ahdesmäki, Miika; Forcato, Mattia; Bicciato, Silvio; Schiaffino, Stefano; Blaauw, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Objective Physical activity and circadian rhythms are well-established determinants of human health and disease, but the relationship between muscle activity and the circadian regulation of muscle genes is a relatively new area of research. It is unknown whether muscle activity and muscle clock rhythms are coupled together, nor whether activity rhythms can drive circadian gene expression in skeletal muscle. Methods We compared the circadian transcriptomes of two mouse hindlimb muscles with vastly different circadian activity patterns, the continuously active slow soleus and the sporadically active fast tibialis anterior, in the presence or absence of a functional skeletal muscle clock (skeletal muscle-specific Bmal1 KO). In addition, we compared the effect of denervation on muscle circadian gene expression. Results We found that different skeletal muscles exhibit major differences in their circadian transcriptomes, yet core clock gene oscillations were essentially identical in fast and slow muscles. Furthermore, denervation caused relatively minor changes in circadian expression of most core clock genes, yet major differences in expression level, phase and amplitude of many muscle circadian genes. Conclusions We report that activity controls the oscillation of around 15% of skeletal muscle circadian genes independently of the core muscle clock, and we have identified the Ca2+-dependent calcineurin-NFAT pathway as an important mediator of activity-dependent circadian gene expression, showing that circadian locomotor activity rhythms drive circadian rhythms of NFAT nuclear translocation and target gene expression. PMID:26629406

  18. Genotype-dependent effect of exogenous 24-epibrassinolide on chromium-induced changes in ultrastructure and physicochemical traits in tobacco seedlings.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Syed Asad Hussain; Wang, Runfeng; Wang, Wei; Ahmed, Imrul Mosaddek; Zheng, Weite; Cao, Fangbin

    2016-09-01

    Greenhouse hydroponic experiments were carried out using three different heavy metal accumulation tobacco genotypes to evaluate how different genotypes responded to chromium (Cr) toxicity in the presence of 24-epibrassinolide (EBR; a biologically active brassinosteroid). The results showed that Cr stress caused a marked reduction in plant biomass, chlorophyll content, chlorophyll fluorescence, and photosynthesis parameters but induced malondialdehyde accumulation and ultrastructure damage, with 2010-38 (L) less affected. Foliar application of 24-epibrassinolide (0.1 μM) on Cr-stressed plants greatly alleviated Cr-induced inhibition of growth and photosynthesis, oxidative stress and ultrastructure damage, decreased Cr accumulation in different parts of leaves and roots, with the exception of the upper and lower of leaves of genotype L, and maintained ion homeostasis. Regarding genotypes, L was more tolerant than M and H, as it absorbed less Cr and also performed better in all of the studied parameters. These findings suggest a potential role for 24-epibrassinolide in Cr stress alleviation and the utilization of elite genetic resources in future breeding programs to develop low Cr accumulation genotypes. These results advocate a positive role for 24-epibrassinolide in reducing pollutant residues from health point of view.

  19. Early MyD88-dependent induction of interleukin-17A expression during Salmonella colitis.

    PubMed

    Keestra, A Marijke; Godinez, Ivan; Xavier, Mariana N; Winter, Maria G; Winter, Sebastian E; Tsolis, Renée M; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2011-08-01

    The development of T helper 17 (T(H)17) cells is a well-established adaptive mechanism for the production of interleukin-17A (IL-17A), a cytokine involved in neutrophil recruitment. However, pathways contributing to mucosal expression of IL-17A during the initial phase of a bacterial infection have received less attention. Here we used the mouse colitis model of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium infection to investigate the contribution of myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) to inflammation and mucosal IL-17A expression. Expression of IL-23 in the cecal mucosa during S. Typhimurium colitis was dependent on the presence of MyD88. Furthermore, initial expression of IL-17A at 24 h after S. Typhimurium infection was dependent on MyD88 and the receptor for IL-1β. IL-23 and IL-1β synergized in inducing expression of IL-17A in splenic T cells in vitro. In the intestinal mucosa, IL-17A was produced by three distinct T cell populations, including δγ T cells, T(H)17 cells, and CD4(-)CD8(-) T cells. The absence of IL-1β signaling or IL-17 signaling reduced CXC chemokine expression but did not alter the overall severity of pathological lesions in the cecal mucosa. In contrast, cecal pathology and neutrophil recruitment were markedly reduced in Myd88-deficient mice during the initial phases of S. Typhimurium infection. Collectively, these data demonstrate that MyD88-dependent mechanisms, including an initial expression of IL-17A, are important for orchestrating early inflammatory responses during S. Typhimurium colitis. PMID:21576324

  20. Comparative efficacy, pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic activity, and interferon stimulated gene expression of different interferon formulations in HIV/HCV genotype-1 infected patients.

    PubMed

    Osinusi, Anu; Bon, Dimitra; Nelson, Amy; Lee, Yu-Jin; Poonia, Seerat; Shivakumar, Bhavana; Cai, Shu Yi; Wood, Brad; Haagmans, Bart; Lempicki, Richard; Herrmann, Eva; Sneller, Michael; Polis, Michael; Masur, Henry; Kottilil, Shyam

    2014-02-01

    The effect of different formulations of interferon on therapeutic response in patients coinfected with HIV and HCV is unclear. In this study, the safety, tolerability, viral kinetics (VK) modeling and host responses among HIV/HCV coinfected patients treated with pegylated-IFN or albinterferon alfa-2b (AlbIFN) with weight-based ribavirin were compared. Three trials treated 57 HIV/HCV coinfected genotype-1 patients with PegIFN alfa-2b (1.5 µg/kg/week) (n = 30), PegIFN alfa-2a (180 µg/week) (n = 10), and AlbIFN (900 µg/q2week) (n = 17) in combination with weight-based ribavirin (RBV). HCV RNA, safety labs, and interferon stimulated gene expression (ISG) was evaluated. Adverse events were documented at all study visits. HCV viral kinetics using a full pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model was also evaluated. Baseline patient characteristics were similar across the three studies. All three formulations exhibited comparable safety and tolerability profiles and efficacy. VK/PK/PD parameters for all three studies as measured by mean efficiency and rate of infected cell loss were similar between the three groups. Host responses (ISG expression and immune activation markers) were similar among the three groups. All three regimens induced significant ISG at week 4 (P < 0.05) and ISG expression strongly correlated with therapeutic response (r = 0.65; P < 0.01). In summary, a comprehensive analysis of responses to three different interferon formulations in HIV/HCV coinfected patients demonstrated similar effects. Notably, interferon-based therapy results in a blunted host response followed by modest antiviral effect in HIV/HCV coinfected patients. This suggests that future treatment options that do not rely on host immune responses such as direct antiviral agents would be particularly beneficial in these difficult to treat patients. PMID:24166150

  1. Volatile emissions of scented Alstroemeria genotypes are dominated by terpenes, and a myrcene synthase gene is highly expressed in scented Alstroemeria flowers

    PubMed Central

    Aros, Danilo; Gonzalez, Veronica; Allemann, Rudolf K.; Müller, Carsten T.; Rosati, Carlo; Rogers, Hilary J.

    2012-01-01

    Native to South America, Alstroemeria flowers are known for their colourful tepals, and Alstroemeria hybrids are an important cut flower. However, in common with many commercial cut flowers, virtually all the commercial Alstroemeria hybrids are not scented. The cultivar ‘Sweet Laura’ is one of very few scented commercial Alstroemeria hybrids. Characterization of the volatile emission profile of these cut flowers revealed three major terpene compounds: (E)-caryophyllene, humulene (also known as α-caryophyllene), an ocimene-like compound, and several minor peaks, one of which was identified as myrcene. The profile is completely different from that of the parental scented species A. caryophyllaea. Volatile emission peaked at anthesis in both scented genotypes, coincident in cv. ‘Sweet Laura’ with the maximal expression of a putative terpene synthase gene AlstroTPS. This gene was preferentially expressed in floral tissues of both cv. ‘Sweet Laura’ and A. caryophyllaea. Characterization of the AlstroTPS gene structure from cv. ‘Sweet Laura’ placed it as a member of the class III terpene synthases, and the predicted 567 amino acid sequence placed it into the subfamily TPS-b. The conserved sequences R28(R)X8W and D321DXXD are the putative Mg2+-binding sites, and in vitro assay of AlstroTPS expressed in Escherichia coli revealed that the encoded enzyme possesses myrcene synthase activity, consistent with a role for AlstroTPS in scent production in Alstroemeria cv. ‘Sweet Laura’ flowers. PMID:22268153

  2. Differentially Expressed Genes in Resistant and Susceptible Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Genotypes in Response to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Renfeng; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Zhendong; Wang, Lanfen; Wang, Xiaoming; Wang, Shumin; Blair, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium wilt of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), caused by Fusarium oxysporum Schlechtend.:Fr. f.sp. phaseoli (Fop), is one of the most important diseases of common beans worldwide. Few natural sources of resistance to Fop exist and provide only moderate or partial levels of protection. Despite the economic importance of the disease across multiple crops, only a few of Fop induced genes have been analyzed in legumes. Therefore, our goal was to identify transcriptionally regulated genes during an incompatible interaction between common bean and the Fop pathogen using the cDNA amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) technique. We generated a total of 8,730 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) with 768 primer pairs based on the comparison of a moderately resistant and a susceptible genotype. In total, 423 TDFs (4.9%) displayed altered expression patterns after inoculation with Fop inoculum. We obtained full amplicon sequences for 122 selected TDFs, of which 98 were identified as annotated known genes in different functional categories based on their putative functions, 10 were predicted but non-annotated genes and 14 were not homologous to any known genes. The 98 TDFs encoding genes of known putative function were classified as related to metabolism (22), signal transduction (21), protein synthesis and processing (20), development and cytoskeletal organization (12), transport of proteins (7), gene expression and RNA metabolism (4), redox reactions (4), defense and stress responses (3), energy metabolism (3), and hormone responses (2). Based on the analyses of homology, 19 TDFs from different functional categories were chosen for expression analysis using quantitative RT-PCR. The genes found to be important here were implicated at various steps of pathogen infection and will allow a better understanding of the mechanisms of defense and resistance to Fop and similar pathogens. The differential response genes discovered here could also be used as molecular

  3. The activity of the TRP-like channel depends on its expression system

    PubMed Central

    Lev, Shaya; Katz, Ben; Minke, Baruch

    2012-01-01

    The Drosophila light activated TRP and TRPL channels have been a model for TRPC channel gating. Several gating mechanisms have been proposed following experiments conducted on photoreceptor and tissue cultured cells. However, conclusive evidence for any mechanism is still lacking. Here, we show that the Drosophila TRPL channel expressed in tissue cultured cells is constitutively active in S2 cells but is silent in HEK cells. Modulations of TRPL channel activity in different expression system by pharmacology or specific enzymes, which change the lipid content of the plasma membrane, resulted in conflicting effects. These findings demonstrate the difficulty in elucidating TRPC gating, as channel behavior is expression system dependent. However, clues on the gating mechanism may arise from understanding how different expression systems affect TRPC channel activation. PMID:22627924

  4. GalNAc-T14 promotes metastasis through Wnt dependent HOXB9 expression in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ok-Seon; Oh, Ensel; Park, Jeong-Rak; Lee, Ji-Seon; Bae, Gab-Yong; Koo, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Hyongbum; Choi, Yoon L; Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Jhingook; Cha, Hyuk-Jin

    2015-12-01

    While metastasis, the main cause of lung cancer-related death, has been extensively studied, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. A previous clinicogenomic study revealed that expression of N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (GalNAc-T14), is highly inversely correlated with recurrence-free survival in those with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) has not been determined. Here, we showed that GalNAc-T14 expression was positively associated with the invasive phenotype. Microarray and biochemical analyses revealed that HOXB9, the expression of which was increased in a GalNAc-T14-dependent manner, played an important role in metastasis. GalNAc-T14 increased the sensitivity of the WNT response and increased the stability of the β-catenin protein, leading to induced expression of HOXB9 and acquisition of an invasive phenotype. Pharmacological inhibition of β-catenin in GalNAc-T14-expressing cancer cells suppressed HOXB9 expression and invasion. A meta-analysis of clinical genomics data revealed that expression of GalNAc-T14 or HOXB9 was strongly correlated with reduced recurrence-free survival and increased hazard risk, suggesting that targeting β-catenin within the GalNAc-T14/WNT/HOXB9 axis may be a novel therapeutic approach to inhibit metastasis in NSCLC.

  5. Small molecule mediated inhibition of RORγ-dependent gene expression and autoimmune disease pathology in vivo.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Daliya; Zhao, Linlin; Wu, Lan; Palanichamy, Arumugam; Ergun, Ayla; Peng, Liaomin; Quigley, Catherine; Hamann, Stefan; Dunstan, Robert; Cullen, Patrick; Allaire, Norm; Guertin, Kevin; Wang, Tao; Chao, Jianhua; Loh, Christine; Fontenot, Jason D

    2016-04-01

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan nuclear receptor γ (RORγ) orchestrates a pro-inflammatory gene expression programme in multiple lymphocyte lineages including T helper type 17 (Th17) cells, γδ T cells, innate lymphoid cells and lymphoid tissue inducer cells. There is compelling evidence that RORγ-expressing cells are relevant targets for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Unlike Th17 cells, where RORγ expression is induced under specific pro-inflammatory conditions, γδ T cells and other innate-like immune cells express RORγ in the steady state. Small molecule mediated disruption of RORγ function in cells with pre-existing RORγ transcriptional complexes represents a significant and challenging pharmacological hurdle. We present data demonstrating that a novel, selective and potent small molecule RORγ inhibitor can block the RORγ-dependent gene expression programme in both Th17 cells and RORγ-expressing γδ T cells as well as a disease-relevant subset of human RORγ-expressing memory T cells. Importantly, systemic administration of this inhibitor in vivo limits pathology in an innate lymphocyte-driven mouse model of psoriasis. PMID:26694902

  6. Genotype at the PMEL17 locus affects social and explorative behaviour in chickens.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, A-C; Kerje, S; Andersson, L; Jensen, P

    2010-04-01

    1. We studied behaviour and brain gene expression in homozygous PMEL17 genotypes, using chickens originating from an advanced White Leghorn x red junglefowl intercross. The behavioural studies consisted of three social and one explorative behaviour test. There were significant differences between the genotypes in both social and explorative behaviour. 2. Gene expression studies showed no PMEL17 expression in brain, so the genotype differences must depend on extra-neural gene expression or expression during embryonic development. However, linkage or spurious family effects (genetic drift) can not be excluded. 3. The study strongly suggests a correlated effect between plumage colour and behaviour, and we conclude that PMEL17 may have a pleiotropic effect on social and explorative behaviour in chickens. PMID:20461577

  7. Antibody response to a T-dependent antigen requires B cell expression of complement receptors

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that antibody responses to T- dependent antigens require complement receptors expressed on either B lymphocytes or follicular dendritic cells. We have used RAG-2 deficient blastocyst complementation to create mice specifically lacking B cell complement receptors. Despite normal expression of complement receptor 1 (CR1[CD35]) and CR2 (CD21) on follicular dendritic cells, these mice have a profound defect in their capacity to mount a T-dependent antibody response. This is the first direct demonstration in vivo that B cell expression of complement receptors is required for a humoral immune response. This is the first direct demonstration in vivo that B cell expression of complement receptors is required for a humoral immune response. This suggests that CD21 and/or CD35 on B lymphocytes may be required for cellular activation, adsorptive endocytosis of antigen, recruitment to germinal centers, and/or protection from apoptosis during the humoral response to T-dependent antigens. PMID:8666942

  8. The processing of facial identity and expression is interactive, but dependent on task and experience.

    PubMed

    Yankouskaya, Alla; Humphreys, Glyn W; Rotshtein, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Facial identity and emotional expression are two important sources of information for daily social interaction. However the link between these two aspects of face processing has been the focus of an unresolved debate for the past three decades. Three views have been advocated: (1) separate and parallel processing of identity and emotional expression signals derived from faces; (2) asymmetric processing with the computation of emotion in faces depending on facial identity coding but not vice versa; and (3) integrated processing of facial identity and emotion. We present studies with healthy participants that primarily apply methods from mathematical psychology, formally testing the relations between the processing of facial identity and emotion. Specifically, we focused on the "Garner" paradigm, the composite face effect and the divided attention tasks. We further ask whether the architecture of face-related processes is fixed or flexible and whether (and how) it can be shaped by experience. We conclude that formal methods of testing the relations between processes show that the processing of facial identity and expressions interact, and hence are not fully independent. We further demonstrate that the architecture of the relations depends on experience; where experience leads to higher degree of inter-dependence in the processing of identity and expressions. We propose that this change occurs as integrative processes are more efficient than parallel. Finally, we argue that the dynamic aspects of face processing need to be incorporated into theories in this field.

  9. The Impact of IL28B Genotype and Liver Fibrosis on the Hepatic Expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 and Their Association with Treatment Outcomes in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Domagalski, Krzysztof; Pawłowska, Małgorzata; Kozielewicz, Dorota; Dybowska, Dorota; Tretyn, Andrzej; Halota, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    The strong impact of interleukin 28B (IL28B) polymorphisms on sustained virological response (SVR) after peginterferon and ribavirin treatment in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is well-known. We investigated IL28B variability and hepatic expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 in CHC patients, the relation of each with their clinical characteristics, and how they associated with responses to combined therapy. Genotyping and gene expression analysis were conducted in a selected cohort of treatment-naïve patients who underwent interferon and ribavirin treatment. Differential expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 genes was assessed from pretreatment liver biopsies using quantitative PCR. Histopathological evaluation of liver specimens was performed on the basis of the Scheuer’s modified scale. We showed that hepatic IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 expression was lower in the IL28B CC 12979860 and TT rs8099917 groups than in the CT-TT rs12979860 and TG-GG rs8099917 groups (P < 0.001). We found no differences in IP10 expression between the IL28B genotypes (P > 0.05); in contrast, IP10 expression was significantly affected by the progression of fibrosis (P = 0.007). We showed that the rs12979860 CC genotype was associated with successful treatment when compared to the rs12979860 CT-TT genotype (P = 0.004). Additionally, the expression levels of IP10, IFI27 and ISG15, but not MX1, were significantly higher in non-SVR patients than in SVR patients. The effect of variation in IL28B on the results of IFN-based treatment may be associated with changes in IFI27 and ISG15, but not with IP10. Silencing of IP10 is positive and independent from IL28B prediction of SVR, which is strongly associated with liver fibrosis in CHC patients. PMID:26115415

  10. The architecture and ppGpp-dependent expression of the primary transcriptome of Salmonella Typhimurium during invasion gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Invasion of intestinal epithelial cells by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) requires expression of the extracellular virulence gene expression programme (STEX), activation of which is dependent on the signalling molecule guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp). Recently, next-generation transcriptomics (RNA-seq) has revealed the unexpected complexity of bacterial transcriptomes and in this report we use differential RNA sequencing (dRNA-seq) to define the high-resolution transcriptomic architecture of wild-type S. Typhimurium and a ppGpp null strain under growth conditions which model STEX. In doing so we show that ppGpp plays a much wider role in regulating the S. Typhimurium STEX primary transcriptome than previously recognised. Results Here we report the precise mapping of transcriptional start sites (TSSs) for 78% of the S. Typhimurium open reading frames (ORFs). The TSS mapping enabled a genome-wide promoter analysis resulting in the prediction of 169 alternative sigma factor binding sites, and the prediction of the structure of 625 operons. We also report the discovery of 55 new candidate small RNAs (sRNAs) and 302 candidate antisense RNAs (asRNAs). We discovered 32 ppGpp-dependent alternative TSSs and determined the extent and level of ppGpp-dependent coding and non-coding transcription. We found that 34% and 20% of coding and non-coding RNA transcription respectively was ppGpp-dependent under these growth conditions, adding a further dimension to the role of this remarkable small regulatory molecule in enabling rapid adaptation to the infective environment. Conclusions The transcriptional architecture of S. Typhimurium and finer definition of the key role ppGpp plays in regulating Salmonella coding and non-coding transcription should promote the understanding of gene regulation in this important food borne pathogen and act as a resource for future research. PMID:22251276

  11. Functional expression of a heterologous nickel-dependent, ATP-independent urease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Milne, N; Luttik, M A H; Cueto Rojas, H F; Wahl, A; van Maris, A J A; Pronk, J T; Daran, J M

    2015-07-01

    In microbial processes for production of proteins, biomass and nitrogen-containing commodity chemicals, ATP requirements for nitrogen assimilation affect product yields on the energy producing substrate. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a current host for heterologous protein production and potential platform for production of nitrogen-containing chemicals, uptake and assimilation of ammonium requires 1 ATP per incorporated NH3. Urea assimilation by this yeast is more energy efficient but still requires 0.5 ATP per NH3 produced. To decrease ATP costs for nitrogen assimilation, the S. cerevisiae gene encoding ATP-dependent urease (DUR1,2) was replaced by a Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene encoding ATP-independent urease (ure2), along with its accessory genes ureD, ureF and ureG. Since S. pombe ure2 is a Ni(2+)-dependent enzyme and Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not express native Ni(2+)-dependent enzymes, the S. pombe high-affinity nickel-transporter gene (nic1) was also expressed. Expression of the S. pombe genes into dur1,2Δ S. cerevisiae yielded an in vitro ATP-independent urease activity of 0.44±0.01 µmol min(-1) mg protein(-1) and restored growth on urea as sole nitrogen source. Functional expression of the Nic1 transporter was essential for growth on urea at low Ni(2+) concentrations. The maximum specific growth rates of the engineered strain on urea and ammonium were lower than those of a DUR1,2 reference strain. In glucose-limited chemostat cultures with urea as nitrogen source, the engineered strain exhibited an increased release of ammonia and reduced nitrogen content of the biomass. Our results indicate a new strategy for improving yeast-based production of nitrogen-containing chemicals and demonstrate that Ni(2+)-dependent enzymes can be functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae.

  12. Expression of the hepatocellular chloride-dependent sulfobromophthalein uptake system in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Jacquemin, E; Hagenbuch, B; Stieger, B; Wolkoff, A W; Meier, P J

    1991-01-01

    The expression of the basolateral chloride-activated organic anion uptake system of rat hepatocytes has been studied in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Injection of oocytes with rat liver poly(A)+RNA resulted in the functional expression of chloride-dependent sulfobromophthalein (BSP) uptake within 3-5 d. This expressed chloride-dependent BSP uptake system exhibited saturation kinetics (apparent Km approximately 6.2 microM) and efficiently extracted BSP from its binding sites on BSA. Furthermore, the chloride-activated portion of BSP uptake was inhibited by bilirubin (10 microM; inhibition 53%), 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2-disulfonic acid stilbene (DIDS, 100 microM; 80%), taurocholate (100 microM; 80%), and cholate (200 microM; 95%). In contrast to results with total rat liver mRNA, injection of mRNA derived from the Na+/bile acid cotransporter cDNA (Hagenbuch, B., B. Stieger, M. Foguet, H. Lübbert, and P. J. Meier. 1991. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. In press.) had no effect on BSP uptake into oocytes. Size fractionation of total rat liver mRNA revealed that a 2.0- to 3.5-kb size-class mRNA was sufficient to express the hepatic chloride-dependent BSP uptake system. These data indicate that "expression cloning" in oocytes represents a promising approach to ultimately clone the cDNA coding for the hepatocyte high affinity, chloride-dependent organic anion uptake system. Furthermore, the results confirm that the Na+/bile acid cotransport system does not mediate BSP uptake. PMID:1752967

  13. Condition-dependent expression of melanin-based coloration in the Eurasian kestrel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piault, Romain; van den Brink, Valentijn; Roulin, Alexandre

    2012-05-01

    Melanin is the most common pigment in animal integuments and is responsible for some of the most striking ornaments. A central tenet of sexual selection theory states that melanin-based traits can signal absolute individual quality in any environment only if their expression is condition-dependent. Significant costs imposed by an ornament would ensure that only the highest quality individuals display the most exaggerated forms of the signal. Firm evidence that melanin-based traits can be condition-dependent is still rare in birds. In an experimental test of this central assumption, we report condition-dependent expression of a melanin-based trait in the Eurasian kestrel ( Falco tinnunculus). We manipulated nestling body condition by reducing or increasing the number of nestlings soon after hatching. A few days before fledging, we measured the width of sub-terminal black bands on the tail feathers. Compared to nestlings from enlarged broods, individuals raised in reduced broods were in better condition and thereby developed larger sub-terminal bands. Furthermore, in 2 years, first-born nestlings also developed larger sub-terminal bands than their younger siblings that are in poorer condition. This demonstrates that expression of melanin-based traits can be condition-dependent.

  14. Do sexual ornaments demonstrate heightened condition-dependent expression as predicted by the handicap hypothesis?

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, Samuel; Fowler, Kevin; Pomiankowski, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The handicap hypothesis of sexual selection predicts that sexual ornaments have evolved heightened condition-dependent expression. The prediction has only recently been subject to experimental investigation. Many of the experiments are of limited value as they: (i) fail to compare condition dependence in sexual ornaments with suitable non-sexual trait controls; (ii) do not adequately account for body size variation; and (iii) typically consider no stress and extreme stress manipulations rather than a range of stresses similar to those experienced in nature. There is also a dearth of experimental studies investigating the genetic basis of condition dependence. Despite the common claim that sexual ornaments are condition-dependent, the unexpected conclusion from our literature review is that there is little support from well-designed experiments. PMID:15255094

  15. Quantitating Antibody Uptake In Vivo: Conditional Dependence on Antigen Expression Levels

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Antibodies form an important class of cancer therapeutics, and there is intense interest in using them for imaging applications in diagnosis and monitoring of cancer treatment. Despite the expanding body of knowledge describing pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions of antibodies in vivo, discrepancies remain over the effect of antigen expression level on tumoral uptake with some reports indicating a relationship between uptake and expression and others showing no correlation. Procedures Using a cell line with high EpCAM expression and moderate EGFR expression, fluorescent antibodies with similar plasma clearance were imaged in vivo. A mathematical model and mouse xenograft experiments were used to describe the effect of antigen expression on uptake of these high affinity antibodies. Results As predicted by the theoretical model, under subsaturating conditions, uptake of the antibodies in such tumors is similar because localization of both probes is limited by delivery from the vasculature. In a separate experiment, when the tumor is saturated, the uptake becomes dependent on the number of available binding sites. In addition, targeting of small micrometastases is shown to be higher than larger vascularized tumors. Conclusions These results are consistent with the prediction that high affinity antibody uptake is dependent on antigen expression levels for saturating doses and delivery for subsaturating doses. It is imperative for any probe to understand whether quantitative uptake is a measure of biomarker expression or transport to the region of interest. The data provide support for a predictive theoretical model of antibody uptake, enabling it to be used as a starting point for the design of more efficacious therapies and timely quantitative imaging probes. PMID:20809210

  16. Commercially available immunoglobulins contain virus neutralizing antibodies against all major genotypes of polyomavirus BK.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, P; Pastrana, D V; Zeng, G; Huang, Y; Shapiro, R; Sood, P; Puttarajappa, C; Berger, M; Hariharan, S; Buck, C B

    2015-04-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) form the basis of immunotherapeutic strategies against many important human viral infections. Accordingly, we studied the prevalence, titer, genotype-specificity, and mechanism of action of anti-polyomavirus BK (BKV) NAbs in commercially available human immune globulin (IG) preparations designed for intravenous (IV) use. Pseudovirions (PsV) of genotypes Ia, Ib2, Ic, II, III, and IV were generated by co-transfecting a reporter plasmid encoding luciferase and expression plasmids containing synthetic codon-modified VP1, VP2, and VP3 capsid protein genes into 293TT cells. NAbs were measured using luminometry. All IG preparations neutralized all BKV genotypes, with mean EC50 titers as high as 254 899 for genotype Ia and 6,666 for genotype IV. Neutralizing titers against genotypes II and III were higher than expected, adding to growing evidence that infections with these genotypes are more common than currently appreciated. Batch to batch variation in different lots of IG was within the limits of experimental error. Antibody mediated virus neutralizing was dose dependent, modestly enhanced by complement, genotype-specific, and achieved without effect on viral aggregation, capsid morphology, elution, or host cell release. IG contains potent NAbs capable of neutralizing all major BKV genotypes. Clinical trials based on sound pharmacokinetic principles are needed to explore prophylactic and therapeutic applications of these anti-viral effects, until effective small molecule inhibitors of BKV replication can be developed.

  17. A gene expression analysis of syncytia laser microdissected from the roots of the Glycine max (soybean) genotype PI 548402 (Peking) undergoing a resistant reaction after infection by Heterodera glycines (soybean cyst nematode).

    PubMed

    Klink, Vincent P; Hosseini, Parsa; Matsye, Prachi; Alkharouf, Nadim W; Matthews, Benjamin F

    2009-12-01

    The syncytium is a nurse cell formed within the roots of Glycine max by the plant parasitic nematode Heterodera glycines. Its development and maintenance are essential for nematode survival. The syncytium appears to undergo two developmental phases during its maturation into a functional nurse cell. The first phase is a parasitism phase where the nematode establishes the molecular circuitry that during the second phase ensures a compatible interaction with the plant cell. The cytological features of syncytia undergoing susceptible or resistant reactions appear the same during the parasitism phase. Depending on the outcome of any defense response, the second phase is a period of syncytium maintenance (susceptible reaction) or failure (resistant reaction). In the analyses presented here, the localized gene expression occurring at the syncytium during the resistant reaction was studied. This was accomplished by isolating syncytial cells from Glycine max genotype Peking (PI 548402) by laser capture microdissection. Microarray analyses using the Affymetrix soybean GeneChip directly compared Peking syncytia undergoing a resistant reaction to those undergoing a susceptible reaction during the parasitism phase of the resistant reaction. Those analyses revealed lipoxygenase-9 and lipoxygenase-4 as the most highly induced genes in the resistant reaction. The analysis also identified induced levels of components of the phenylpropanoid pathway. These genes included phenylalanine ammonia lyase, chalcone isomerase, isoflavone reductase, cinnamoyl-CoA reductase and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase. The presence of induced levels of these genes implies the importance of jasmonic acid and phenylpropanoid signaling pathways locally at the site of the syncytium during the resistance phase of the resistant reaction. The analysis also identified highly induced levels of four S-adenosylmethionine synthetase genes, the EARLY-RESPONSIVE TO DEHYDRATION 2 gene and the 14-3-3 gene known as

  18. Prominin-2 expression increases protrusions, decreases caveolae and inhibits Cdc42 dependent fluid phase endocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Raman Deep Schroeder, Andreas S.; Scheffer, Luana; Holicky, Eileen L.; Wheatley, Christine L.; Marks, David L. Pagano, Richard E.

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Prominin-2 expression induced protrusions that co-localized with lipid raft markers. •Prominin-2 expression decreased caveolae, caveolar endocytosis and increased pCav1. •Prominin-2 expression inhibited fluid phase endocytosis by inactivation of Cdc42. •These endocytic effects can be reversed by adding exogenous cholesterol. •Caveolin1 knockdown restored fluid phase endocytosis in Prominin2 expressing cells. -- Abstract: Background: Membrane protrusions play important roles in biological processes such as cell adhesion, wound healing, migration, and sensing of the external environment. Cell protrusions are a subtype of membrane microdomains composed of cholesterol and sphingolipids, and can be disrupted by cholesterol depletion. Prominins are pentaspan membrane proteins that bind cholesterol and localize to plasma membrane (PM) protrusions. Prominin-1 is of great interest as a marker for stem and cancer cells, while Prominin-2 (Prom2) is reportedly restricted to epithelial cells. Aim: To characterize the effects of Prom-2 expression on PM microdomain organization. Methods: Prom2-fluorescent protein was transfected in human skin fibroblasts (HSF) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells for PM raft and endocytic studies. Caveolae at PM were visualized using transmission electron microscopy. Cdc42 activation was measured and caveolin-1 knockdown was performed using siRNAs. Results: Prom2 expression in HSF and CHO cells caused extensive Prom2-positive protrusions that co-localized with lipid raft markers. Prom2 expression significantly decreased caveolae at the PM, reduced caveolar endocytosis and increased caveolin-1 phosphorylation. Prom2 expression also inhibited Cdc42-dependent fluid phase endocytosis via decreased Cdc42 activation. Effects on endocytosis were reversed by addition of cholesterol. Knockdown of caveolin-1 by siRNA restored Cdc42 dependent fluid phase endocytosis in Prom2-expressing cells. Conclusions: Prom2 protrusions primarily

  19. Strain magnitude-dependent calcific marker expression in valvular and vascular cells.

    PubMed

    Ferdous, Zannatul; Jo, Hanjoong; Nerem, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    Aortic valve disease and atherosclerosis tend to coexist in most patients with cardiovascular disease; however, the causes and mechanisms of disease development in heart valves are still not clearly understood. To understand the contributions of the magnitude of cyclic strain (5% hypotension, 10% physiological, and 15% hypertension) in calcification, we used a model system of tissue-engineered collagen gels containing human aortic smooth muscle cells and human aortic valvular interstitial cells, both isolated from noncalcific heart transplant tissue. The compacted collagen gels were cultured in osteogenic media for 3 weeks in a custom-designed bioreactor and all assessments were performed at the end of the culture period. The major finding of this study is that bone morphogenic protein (BMP)-2 and BMP-4 and transforming growth factor-β1 mRNA expression significantly changed in response to the magnitude of applied strain in valvular cells, while the lowest expression was observed for the representative physiological strain. On the other hand, mRNA expression in vascular cells did not vary in response to the magnitude of strain. Regarding BMP-2 and BMP-4 protein expression determined by immunostaining, trends were similar to mRNA expression in vascular and valvular cells, where only valvular cells showed a varied protein expression depending on the magnitude of the strain applied. Our results suggest that cellular differences exist between vascular and valvular cells in their response to altered levels of cyclic strain during calcification. PMID:23548742

  20. Introns Regulate Gene Expression in Cryptococcus neoformans in a Pab2p Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Goebels, Carolin; Thonn, Aline; Gonzalez-Hilarion, Sara; Rolland, Olga; Moyrand, Frederique; Beilharz, Traude H.; Janbon, Guilhem

    2013-01-01

    Most Cryptococccus neoformans genes are interrupted by introns, and alternative splicing occurs very often. In this study, we examined the influence of introns on C. neoformans gene expression. For most tested genes, elimination of introns greatly reduces mRNA accumulation. Strikingly, the number and the position of introns modulate the gene expression level in a cumulative manner. A screen for mutant strains able to express functionally an intronless allele revealed that the nuclear poly(A) binding protein Pab2 modulates intron-dependent regulation of gene expression in C. neoformans. PAB2 deletion partially restored accumulation of intronless mRNA. In addition, our results demonstrated that the essential nucleases Rrp44p and Xrn2p are implicated in the degradation of mRNA transcribed from an intronless allele in C. neoformans. Double mutant constructions and over-expression experiments suggested that Pab2p and Xrn2p could act in the same pathway whereas Rrp44p appears to act independently. Finally, deletion of the RRP6 or the CID14 gene, encoding the nuclear exosome nuclease and the TRAMP complex associated poly(A) polymerase, respectively, has no effect on intronless allele expression. PMID:23966870

  1. Endotoxemia induces IκBβ/NFκB dependent ET-1 expression in hepatic macrophages

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Sarah; Gossling, Megan; Bugarini, Alejandro; Hill, Elizabeth; Anderson, Aimee L.; Rancourt, Raymond C.; Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan; El Kasmi, Karim C.; Wright, Clyde J.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated serum concentrations of the vasoactive protein ET-1 occur in the setting of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and contribute to distal organ hypoperfusion and pulmonary hypertension. Thus, understanding the cellular source and transcriptional regulation of systemic inflammatory stress-induced ET-1 expression may reveal therapeutic targets. Using a murine model of LPS-induced septic shock, we demonstrate that the hepatic macrophage is the primary source of elevated circulating ET-1, rather than the endothelium as previously proposed. Using pharmacologic inhibitors, ET-1 promoter luciferase assays, and by silencing and overexpressing NFκB inhibitory protein IκB expression, we demonstrate that LPS-induced ET-1 expression occurs via an NFκB dependent pathway. Finally, the specific role of the cRel/p65 inhibitory protein IκBβ was evaluated. Although cytoplasmic IκBβ inhibits activity of cRel containing NFκB dimers, nuclear IκBβ stabilizes NFκB/DNA binding and enhances gene expression. Using targeted pharmacologic therapies to specifically prevent IκBβ/NFκB signaling, as well as mice genetically modified to overexpress IκBβ, we show that nuclear IκBβ is both necessary and sufficient to drive LPS-induced ET-1 expression. Together, these results mechanistically link the innate immune response mediated by IκBβ/NFκB to ET-1 expression and potentially reveals therapeutic targets for patients with gram-negative septic shock. PMID:26342031

  2. Lhx4 Deficiency: Increased Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor Expression and Pituitary Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gergics, Peter; Brinkmeier, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the Lhx4, Lhx3, and Pitx2 genes can cause combined pituitary hormone deficiency and pituitary hypoplasia in both humans and mice. Not much is known about the mechanism underlying hypoplasia in these mutants beyond generally increased cell death and poorly maintained proliferation. We identified both common and unique abnormalities in developmental regulation of key cell cycle regulator gene expression in each of these three mutants. All three mutants exhibit reduced expression of the proliferative marker Ki67 and the transitional marker p57. We discovered that expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1a (Cdkn1a or p21) is expanded dorsally in the pituitary primordium of both Lhx3 and Lhx4 mutants. Uniquely, Lhx4 mutants exhibit reduced cyclin D1 expression and have auxiliary pouch-like structures. We show evidence for indirect and direct effects of LHX4 on p21 expression in αT3-1 pituitary cells. In summary, Lhx4 is necessary for efficient pituitary progenitor cell proliferation and restriction of p21 expression. PMID:25668206

  3. Cruciferous vegetable feeding alters UGT1A1 activity: diet- and genotype-dependent changes in serum bilirubin in a controlled feeding trial1

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Sandi L.; Peterson, Sabrina; Chen, Chu; Makar, Karen W.; Schwarz, Yvonne; King, Irena B; Li, Shuying S.; Li, Lin; Kestin, Mark; Lampe, Johanna W.

    2009-01-01

    Chemoprevention by isothiocyanates from cruciferous vegetables occurs partly through up-regulation of phase-II conjugating enzymes, such as UDP-glucuronosyl-transferases (UGT). UGT1A1 glucuronidates bilirubin, estrogens, and several dietary carcinogens. The UGT1A1*28 polymorphism reduces transcription compared to the wild-type, resulting in decreased enzyme activity. Isothiocyanates are metabolized by glutathione-S-transferases (GST); variants may alter isothiocyanate clearance, such that response to crucifers may vary by genotype. We evaluated, in a randomized, controlled, cross-over feeding trial in humans (n=70), 3 test diets, (single- and double-“dose” cruciferous and cruciferous plus apiaceous) compared to a fruit-and-vegetable-free basal diet. We measured serum bilirubin concentrations on days 0, 7, 11 and 14 of each 2-week feeding period to monitor UGT1A1 activity, and determined effects of UGT1A1*28 and GSTM1/GSTT1-null variants on response. Aggregate bilirubin response to all vegetable-containing diets was statistically significantly lower compared to the basal diet (p<0.03 for all). Within each UGT1A1 genotype, lower bilirubin concentrations were seen in: *1/*1 in both single and double-dose cruciferous diets compared to basal (p<0.03 for both); *1/*28 in double-dose cruciferous and cruciferous plus apiaceous compared to basal, and cruciferous plus apiaceous compared to single-dose cruciferous (p<0.02 for all); and *28/*28 in all vegetable-containing diets compared to basal (p<0.02 for all). Evaluation of the effects of diet stratified by GST genotype revealed some statistically significant genotypic differences however, the magnitude was similar and not statistically significant between genotypes. These results may have implications for altering carcinogen metabolism through dietary intervention, particularly among UGT1A1*28/*28 individuals. PMID:19336732

  4. CcpA-dependent regulation of Bacillus subtilis glutamate dehydrogenase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Belitsky, Boris R; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Sonenshein, Abraham L

    2004-06-01

    The Bacillus subtilis rocG gene, encoding catabolic glutamate dehydrogenase, was found to be subject to direct CcpA-dependent glucose repression. The effect of CcpA required the presence of both the HPr and Crh proteins. The primary CcpA binding site was identified by mutational analysis and DNase I footprinting. In the absence of inducers of the Roc pathway, rocG was still expressed at a low level due to readthrough transcription. CcpA-dependent repression of rocG readthrough transcription proved to contribute to the slow growth rate of B. subtilis cells in glucose-glutamate medium. Increased readthrough expression of rocG was shown to be partially responsible for the growth defect of ccpA strains in glucose-ammonium medium.

  5. Temperature-dependent reaction-rate expression for oxygen recombination at Shuttle entry conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoby, E. V.; Simmonds, A. L.; Gupta, R. N.

    1984-01-01

    A temperature-dependent oxygen surface reaction-rate coefficient has been determined from experimental STS-2 heating and wall temperature data at altitudes of 77.91 km, 74.98 km, and 71.29 km. The coefficient is presented in an Arrhenius form and is shown to be less temperature dependent than previous results. Finite-rate viscous-shock-layer heating rates based on this present expression have been compared with predicted heating rates using the previous rate coefficients and with experimental heating data obtained over an extensive range of STS-2 and STS-3 entry conditions. A substantial improvement is obtained in comparison of experimental data and predicted heating rates using the present oxygen reaction-rate expression.

  6. Serotype-dependent expression patterns of stabilized lipopolysaccharide aggregates in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans strains.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Haruko; Fujise, Osamu; Miura, Mayumi; Tanaka, Ayako; Hisano, Kyoko; Haraguchi, Akira; Hamachi, Takafumi; Maeda, Katsumasa

    2012-10-01

    Above a critical concentration, amphiphilic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules in an aqueous environment form aggregate structures, probably because of interactions involving hydrophobic bonds. Ionic bonds involving divalent cations stabilize these aggregate structures, making them resistant to breakdown by detergents. The aim of this study was to examine expression patterns of stabilized LPS aggregates in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a microorganism that causes periodontitis. A. actinomycetemcomitans strains of various serotypes and truncated LPS mutants were prepared for this study. Following treatment with a two-phase separation system using the detergent Triton X-114, crude LPS extracts of the study strains were separated into detergent-phase LPS (DP-LPS) and aqueous-phase LPS (AP-LPS). Repeated treatment of the aqueous phase with the two-phase separation system produced only a slight decrease in AP-LPS, suggesting that AP-LPS was resistant to the detergent and thus distinguishable from DP-LPS. The presence of divalent cations increased the yield of AP-LPS. AP-LPS expression patterns were serotype-dependent; serotypes b and f showing early expression, and serotypes a and c late expression. In addition, highly truncated LPS from a waaD (rfaD) mutant were unable to generate AP-LPS, suggesting involvement of the LPS structure in the generation of AP-LPS. The two-phase separation was able to distinguish two types of LPS with different physical states at the supramolecular structure level. Hence, AP-LPS likely represents stabilized LPS aggregates, whereas DP-LPS might be derived from non-stabilized aggregates. Furthermore, time-dependent expression of stabilized LPS aggregates was found to be serotype-dependent in A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  7. Serum withdrawal up-regulates human SIRT1 gene expression in a p53-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Shang, Linshan; Zhou, Haibin; Xia, Yu; Wang, Hui; Gao, Guimin; Chen, Bingxi; Liu, Qiji; Shao, Changshun; Gong, Yaoqin

    2009-10-01

    SIRT1, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent histone/protein deacetylase, has been extensively studied recently for its critical role in the regulation of physiology, calorie restriction and aging. Studies on laboratory mice showed that expression of SIRT1 can be induced by starvation in a p53-dependent manner and requires the p53-binding sites present in the Sirt1 promoter. However, it remains to be determined whether these findings based on rodents apply to human beings. In this paper, we characterized a putative p53-binding element in the human SIRT1 promoter that might be required for the up-regulation of SIRT1 in response to nutritional stress. The p53-binding site in the promoter of human SIRT1 is more deviant from the consensus sequence than the corresponding sequence in the mouse Sirt1. There is a C to A change at the second half site in human SIRT1, thus disrupting the core-binding element CWWG in the canonical RRRCWWGYYY. To test whether such sequence change would affect its binding with p53 and the SIRT1 expression under stress, we studied various human cell lines with different p53 status and cells with ectopic expression of functionally distinct p53. We found that serum withdrawal also up-regulates human SIRT1 gene expression in a p53-dependent manner and that the p53-binding element in SIRT1 is required for the up-regulation. Thus, the mechanism responsible for the regulation of SIRT1 expression by p53 is conserved between mice and human beings.

  8. Activity-Dependent Regulation of Substance P Expression and Topographic Map Maintenance by a Cholinergic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Shichun; Butt, Christopher M.; Pauly, James R.; Debski, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    We have assessed the role of activity in the adult frog visual system in modulating two aspects of neuronal plasticity: neurotransmitter expression and topographic map maintenance. Chronic treatment of one tectal lobe with the non-NMDA receptor antagonist, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione decreased the percentage of substance P-like immunoreactive (SP-IR) tectal cells in the untreated lobe while disrupting topographic map formation in the treated one. Treatment with the NMDA receptor antagonist d-(−)-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (d-AP-5) disrupted the topographic map but had no affect on SP-IR cells. These results indicate that maintenance of the topographic map is dependent on direct input from the glutamatergic retinal ganglion cells, whereas substance P (SP) expression is being regulated by a pathway that relays activity from one tectal lobe to the other. Such a pathway is provided by the cholinergic nucleus isthmi, which is reciprocally connected to the ipsilateral tectum and sends a projection to the contralateral one. Mecamylamine and atropine, antagonists of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, respectively, were used together to block all cholinergic activity or alone to block receptor subclass activity. All three treatments decreased SP expression and disrupted the topographic map in the treated tectal lobe. We conclude that both SP expression and topographic map maintenance in the adult optic tectum are activity-dependent processes. Although our results are consistent with the maintenance of the topographic map through an NMDA receptor-based mechanism, they suggest that SP expression is regulated by a cholinergic interaction that depends on retinal ganglion cell input only for its activation. PMID:10884319

  9. Condition-dependent expression of pre- and postcopulatory sexual traits in guppies.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Moshiur; Kelley, Jennifer L; Evans, Jonathan P

    2013-07-01

    Female choice can impose persistent directional selection on male sexually selected traits, yet such traits often exhibit high levels of phenotypic variation. One explanation for this paradox is that if sexually selected traits are costly, only the fittest males are able to acquire and allocate the resources required for their expression. Furthermore, because male condition is dependent on resource allocation, condition dependence in sexual traits is expected to underlie trade-offs between reproduction and other life-history functions. In this study we test these ideas by experimentally manipulating diet quality (carotenoid levels) and quantity in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata), a livebearing freshwater fish that is an important model for understanding relationships between pre- and post-copulatory sexually selected traits. Specifically, we test for condition dependence in the expression of pre- and postcopulatory sexual traits (behavior, ornamentation, sperm traits) and determine whether diet manipulation mediates relationships among these traits. Consistent with prior work we found a significant effect of diet quantity on the expression of both pre- and postcopulatory male traits; diet-restricted males performed fewer sexual behaviors and exhibited significant reductions in color ornamentation, sperm quality, sperm number, and sperm length than those fed ad libitum. However, contrary to our expectations, we found no significant effect of carotenoid manipulation on the expression of any of these traits, and no evidence for a trade-off in resource allocation between pre- and postcopulatory episodes of sexual selection. Our results further underscore the sensitivity of behavioral, ornamental, and ejaculate traits to dietary stress, and highlight the important role of condition dependence in maintaining the high variability in male sexual traits.

  10. Condition-dependent expression of pre- and postcopulatory sexual traits in guppies

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md Moshiur; Kelley, Jennifer L; Evans, Jonathan P

    2013-01-01

    Female choice can impose persistent directional selection on male sexually selected traits, yet such traits often exhibit high levels of phenotypic variation. One explanation for this paradox is that if sexually selected traits are costly, only the fittest males are able to acquire and allocate the resources required for their expression. Furthermore, because male condition is dependent on resource allocation, condition dependence in sexual traits is expected to underlie trade-offs between reproduction and other life-history functions. In this study we test these ideas by experimentally manipulating diet quality (carotenoid levels) and quantity in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata), a livebearing freshwater fish that is an important model for understanding relationships between pre- and post-copulatory sexually selected traits. Specifically, we test for condition dependence in the expression of pre- and postcopulatory sexual traits (behavior, ornamentation, sperm traits) and determine whether diet manipulation mediates relationships among these traits. Consistent with prior work we found a significant effect of diet quantity on the expression of both pre- and postcopulatory male traits; diet-restricted males performed fewer sexual behaviors and exhibited significant reductions in color ornamentation, sperm quality, sperm number, and sperm length than those fed ad libitum. However, contrary to our expectations, we found no significant effect of carotenoid manipulation on the expression of any of these traits, and no evidence for a trade-off in resource allocation between pre- and postcopulatory episodes of sexual selection. Our results further underscore the sensitivity of behavioral, ornamental, and ejaculate traits to dietary stress, and highlight the important role of condition dependence in maintaining the high variability in male sexual traits. PMID:23919162

  11. Condition-dependent expression of pre- and postcopulatory sexual traits in guppies.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Moshiur; Kelley, Jennifer L; Evans, Jonathan P

    2013-07-01

    Female choice can impose persistent directional selection on male sexually selected traits, yet such traits often exhibit high levels of phenotypic variation. One explanation for this paradox is that if sexually selected traits are costly, only the fittest males are able to acquire and allocate the resources required for their expression. Furthermore, because male condition is dependent on resource allocation, condition dependence in sexual traits is expected to underlie trade-offs between reproduction and other life-history functions. In this study we test these ideas by experimentally manipulating diet quality (carotenoid levels) and quantity in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata), a livebearing freshwater fish that is an important model for understanding relationships between pre- and post-copulatory sexually selected traits. Specifically, we test for condition dependence in the expression of pre- and postcopulatory sexual traits (behavior, ornamentation, sperm traits) and determine whether diet manipulation mediates relationships among these traits. Consistent with prior work we found a significant effect of diet quantity on the expression of both pre- and postcopulatory male traits; diet-restricted males performed fewer sexual behaviors and exhibited significant reductions in color ornamentation, sperm quality, sperm number, and sperm length than those fed ad libitum. However, contrary to our expectations, we found no significant effect of carotenoid manipulation on the expression of any of these traits, and no evidence for a trade-off in resource allocation between pre- and postcopulatory episodes of sexual selection. Our results further underscore the sensitivity of behavioral, ornamental, and ejaculate traits to dietary stress, and highlight the important role of condition dependence in maintaining the high variability in male sexual traits. PMID:23919162

  12. Identification of PN1, a Predominant Voltage-Dependent Sodium Channel Expressed Principally in Peripheral Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo-Aral, Juan J.; Moss, Brenda L.; He, Zhi-Jun; Koszowski, Adam G.; Whisenand, Teri; Levinson, Simon R.; Wolf, John J.; Silos-Santiago, Inmaculada; Halegoua, Simon; Mandel, Gail

    1997-02-01

    Membrane excitability in different tissues is due, in large part, to the selective expression of distinct genes encoding the voltage-dependent sodium channel. Although the predominant sodium channels in brain, skeletal muscle, and cardiac muscle have been identified, the major sodium channel types responsible for excitability within the peripheral nervous system have remained elusive. We now describe the deduced primary structure of a sodium channel, peripheral nerve type 1 (PN1), which is expressed at high levels throughout the peripheral nervous system and is targeted to nerve terminals of cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons. Studies using cultured PC12 cells indicate that both expression and targeting of PN1 is induced by treatment of the cells with nerve growth factor. The preferential localization suggests that the PN1 sodium channel plays a specific role in nerve excitability.

  13. Epigenomics and bolting tolerance in sugar beet genotypes.

    PubMed

    Hébrard, Claire; Peterson, Daniel G; Willems, Glenda; Delaunay, Alain; Jesson, Béline; Lefèbvre, Marc; Barnes, Steve; Maury, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    In sugar beet (Beta vulgaris altissima), bolting tolerance is an essential agronomic trait reflecting the bolting response of genotypes after vernalization. Genes involved in induction of sugar beet bolting have now been identified, and evidence suggests that epigenetic factors are involved in their control. Indeed, the time course and amplitude of DNA methylation variations in the shoot apical meristem have been shown to be critical in inducing sugar beet bolting, and a few functional targets of DNA methylation during vernalization have been identified. However, molecular mechanisms controlling bolting tolerance levels among genotypes are still poorly understood. Here, gene expression and DNA methylation profiles were compared in shoot apical meristems of three bolting-resistant and three bolting-sensitive genotypes after vernalization. Using Cot fractionation followed by 454 sequencing of the isolated low-copy DNA, 6231 contigs were obtained that were used along with public sugar beet DNA sequences to design custom Agilent microarrays for expression (56k) and methylation (244k) analyses. A total of 169 differentially expressed genes and 111 differentially methylated regions were identified between resistant and sensitive vernalized genotypes. Fourteen sequences were both differentially expressed and differentially methylated, with a negative correlation between their methylation and expression levels. Genes involved in cold perception, phytohormone signalling, and flowering induction were over-represented and collectively represent an integrative gene network from environmental perception to bolting induction. Altogether, the data suggest that the genotype-dependent control of DNA methylation and expression of an integrative gene network participate in bolting tolerance in sugar beet, opening up perspectives for crop improvement.

  14. Epigenomics and bolting tolerance in sugar beet genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hébrard, Claire; Peterson, Daniel G.; Willems, Glenda; Delaunay, Alain; Jesson, Béline; Lefèbvre, Marc; Barnes, Steve; Maury, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    In sugar beet (Beta vulgaris altissima), bolting tolerance is an essential agronomic trait reflecting the bolting response of genotypes after vernalization. Genes involved in induction of sugar beet bolting have now been identified, and evidence suggests that epigenetic factors are involved in their control. Indeed, the time course and amplitude of DNA methylation variations in the shoot apical meristem have been shown to be critical in inducing sugar beet bolting, and a few functional targets of DNA methylation during vernalization have been identified. However, molecular mechanisms controlling bolting tolerance levels among genotypes are still poorly understood. Here, gene expression and DNA methylation profiles were compared in shoot apical meristems of three bolting-resistant and three bolting-sensitive genotypes after vernalization. Using Cot fractionation followed by 454 sequencing of the isolated low-copy DNA, 6231 contigs were obtained that were used along with public sugar beet DNA sequences to design custom Agilent microarrays for expression (56k) and methylation (244k) analyses. A total of 169 differentially expressed genes and 111 differentially methylated regions were identified between resistant and sensitive vernalized genotypes. Fourteen sequences were both differentially expressed and differentially methylated, with a negative correlation between their methylation and expression levels. Genes involved in cold perception, phytohormone signalling, and flowering induction were over-represented and collectively represent an integrative gene network from environmental perception to bolting induction. Altogether, the data suggest that the genotype-dependent control of DNA methylation and expression of an integrative gene network participate in bolting tolerance in sugar beet, opening up perspectives for crop improvement. PMID:26463996

  15. REST mediates resolution of HIF-dependent gene expression in prolonged hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Cavadas, Miguel A. S.; Mesnieres, Marion; Crifo, Bianca; Manresa, Mario C.; Selfridge, Andrew C.; Scholz, Carsten C.; Cummins, Eoin P.; Cheong, Alex; Taylor, Cormac T.

    2015-01-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a key regulator of the cellular response to hypoxia which promotes oxygen delivery and metabolic adaptation to oxygen deprivation. However, the degree and duration of HIF-1α expression in hypoxia must be carefully balanced within cells in order to avoid unwanted side effects associated with excessive activity. The expression of HIF-1α mRNA is suppressed in prolonged hypoxia, suggesting that the control of HIF1A gene transcription is tightly regulated by negative feedback mechanisms. Little is known about the resolution of the HIF-1α protein response and the suppression of HIF-1α mRNA in prolonged hypoxia. Here, we demonstrate that the Repressor Element 1-Silencing Transcription factor (REST) binds to the HIF-1α promoter in a hypoxia-dependent manner. Knockdown of REST using RNAi increases the expression of HIF-1α mRNA, protein and transcriptional activity. Furthermore REST knockdown increases glucose consumption and lactate production in a HIF-1α- (but not HIF-2α-) dependent manner. Finally, REST promotes the resolution of HIF-1α protein expression in prolonged hypoxia. In conclusion, we hypothesize that REST represses transcription of HIF-1α in prolonged hypoxia, thus contributing to the resolution of the HIF-1α response. PMID:26647819

  16. Local Adaptation of Sun-Exposure-Dependent Gene Expression Regulation in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kita, Ryosuke; Fraser, Hunter B.

    2016-01-01

    Sun-exposure is a key environmental variable in the study of human evolution. Several skin-pigmentation genes serve as classical examples of positive selection, suggesting that sun-exposure has significantly shaped worldwide genomic variation. Here we investigate the interaction between genetic variation and sun-exposure, and how this impacts gene expression regulation. Using RNA-Seq data from 607 human skin samples, we identified thousands of transcripts that are differentially expressed between sun-exposed skin and non-sun-exposed skin. We then tested whether genetic variants may influence each individual’s gene expression response to sun-exposure. Our analysis revealed 10 sun-exposure-dependent gene expression quantitative trait loci (se-eQTLs), including genes involved in skin pigmentation (SLC45A2) and epidermal differentiation (RASSF9). The allele frequencies of the RASSF9 se-eQTL across diverse populations correlate with the magnitude of solar radiation experienced by these populations, suggesting local adaptation to varying levels of sunlight. These results provide the first examples of sun-exposure-dependent regulatory variation and suggest that this variation has contributed to recent human adaptation. PMID:27760139

  17. Plasticity of chemoreceptor gene expression: Sensory and circuit inputs modulate state-dependent chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Gruner, Matthew; van der Linden, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    Animals dramatically modify their chemosensory behaviors when starved, which could allow them to alter and optimize their food-search strategies. Dynamic changes in the gene expression of chemoreceptors may be a general mechanism underlying food and state-dependent changes in chemosensory behaviors. In our recent study,(1) we identified chemoreceptors in the ADL sensory neuron type of C. elegans that are modulated by feeding state and food availability. Here, we highllight our recent findings by which sensory inputs into ADL, neuronal outputs from ADL, and circuit inputs from the RMG interneuron, which is electrically connected to ADL, are required to regulate an ADL-expressed chemoreceptor. This sensory and circuit-mediated regulation of chemoreceptor gene expression is dependent on cell-autonomous pathways acting in ADL, e.g. KIN-29, DAF-2, OCR-2 and calcium signaling, and circuit inputs from RMG mediated by NPR-1. Based on these findings, we propose an intriguing but speculative feedback modulatory circuit mechanism by which sensory perception of food and internal state signals may be coupled to regulate ADL-expressed chemoreceptors, which may allow animals to precisely regulate and fine-tune their chemosensory neuron responses as a function of feeding state. PMID:26430563

  18. Serum-dependent expression of promyelocytic leukemia protein suppresses propagation of influenza virus

    SciTech Connect

    Iki, Shigeo; Yokota, Shin-ichi; Okabayashi, Tamaki; Yokosawa, Noriko; Nagata, Kyosuke; Fujii, Nobuhiro . E-mail: fujii@sapmed.ac.jp

    2005-12-05

    The rate of propagation of influenza virus in human adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells was found to negatively correlate with the concentration of fetal bovine serum (FBS) in the culture medium. Virus replicated more rapidly at lower FBS concentrations (0 or 2%) than at higher concentrations (10 or 20%) during an early stage of infection. Basal and interferon (IFN)-induced levels of typical IFN-inducible anti-viral proteins, such as 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase, dsRNA-activated protein kinase and MxA, were unaffected by variation in FBS concentrations. But promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) was expressed in a serum-dependent manner. In particular, the 65 to 70 kDa isoform of PML was markedly upregulated following the addition of serum. In contrast, other isoforms were induced by IFN treatment, and weakly induced by FBS concentrations. Immunofluorescence microscopy indicated that PML was mainly formed nuclear bodies in Caco-2 cells at various FBS concentrations, and the levels of the PML-nuclear bodies were upregulated by FBS. Overexpression of PML isoform consisting of 560 or 633 amino acid residues by transfection of expression plasmid results in significantly delayed viral replication rate in Caco-2 cells. On the other hand, downregulation of PML expression by RNAi enhanced viral replication. These results indicate that PML isoforms which are expressed in a serum-dependent manner suppress the propagation of influenza virus at an early stage of infection.

  19. Gene co-expression networks in human brain identify epigenetic modifications in alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Ponomarev, Igor; Wang, Shi; Zhang, Lingling; Harris, R Adron; Mayfield, R Dayne

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol abuse causes widespread changes in gene expression in human brain, some of which contribute to alcohol dependence. Previous microarray studies identified individual genes as candidates for alcohol phenotypes, but efforts to generate an integrated view of molecular and cellular changes underlying alcohol addiction are lacking. Here, we applied a novel systems approach to transcriptome profiling in postmortem human brains and generated a systemic view of brain alterations associated with alcohol abuse. We identified critical cellular components and previously unrecognized epigenetic determinants of gene co-expression relationships and discovered novel markers of chromatin modifications in alcoholic brain. Higher expression levels of endogenous retroviruses and genes with high GC content in alcoholics were associated with DNA hypomethylation and increased histone H3K4 tri-methylation, suggesting a critical role of epigenetic mechanisms in alcohol addiction. Analysis of cell type – specific transcriptomes revealed remarkable consistency between molecular profiles and cellular abnormalities in alcoholic brain. Based on evidence from this study and others, we generated a systems hypothesis for the central role of chromatin modifications in alcohol dependence that integrates epigenetic regulation of gene expression with pathophysiological and neuroadaptive changes in alcoholic brain. Our results offer implications for epigenetic therapeutics in alcohol and drug addiction. PMID:22302827

  20. Differentiation-dependent expression of retinoid-binding proteins in BFC-1 beta adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Zovich, D C; Orologa, A; Okuno, M; Kong, L W; Talmage, D A; Piantedosi, R; Goodman, D S; Blaner, W S

    1992-07-15

    Recently, we demonstrated that adipose tissue plays an important role in retinol storage and retinol-binding protein (RBP) synthesis. Our data suggested that RBP expression in adipose tissue is dependent on the state of adipocyte differentiation. To examine this possibility, we explored the differentiation-dependent expression of RBP using BFC-1 beta preadipocytes, which can be stimulated to undergo adipose differentiation. Total RNA was isolated from undifferentiated (preadipocytes) and differentiated (adipocytes) BFC-1 beta cells and analyzed by Northern blotting. RBP mRNA was not detected in the preadipocytes, but considerable RBP mRNA was present in differentiated BFC-1 beta cells. In BFC-1 beta cells, induced to differentiate with insulin and thyroid hormone, RBP mRNA was first detected after 4 days, reached a maximum level by day 10, and remained at this maximum level for at least 2 more days. Cellular retinol-binding protein was expressed at low levels in the BFC-1 beta preadipocytes and the level of expression increased for 6 days after induction to differentiate and slowly declined on later days. Neither the maximum level of RBP expression nor the day on which this level was reached was influenced by the level of retinol provided in the BFC-1 beta culture medium. BFC-1 beta cells secreted newly synthesized RBP into the culture medium at a rate of 43 +/- 14 ng RBP/24 h/10(6) adipocytes. When the BFC-1 beta adipocytes were provided 1.0 microM retinol in the medium, they accumulated the retinol and synthesized retinyl esters. These studies with BFC-1 beta cells confirm that RBP synthesis and secretion and retinol accumulation are intrinsic properties of differentiated adipocytes. Furthermore, they suggest that RBP and cellular retinol-binding protein gene expression are regulated as part of a package of genes which are modulated during adipocyte differentiation.

  1. Expression of bovine vitamin K-dependent carboxylase activity in baculovirus-infected insect cells.

    PubMed

    Roth, D A; Rehemtulla, A; Kaufman, R J; Walsh, C T; Furie, B; Furie, B C

    1993-09-15

    A vitamin K-dependent carboxylase has recently been purified from bovine liver microsomes and candidate cDNA clones have been isolated. Definitive identification of the carboxylase remains circumstantial since expression of candidate carboxylase cDNAs in mammalian cells is confounded by the presence of endogenous carboxylase activity. To overcome this problem, a recombinant strain of baculovirus (Autographa california nuclear polyhedrosis virus, AcMNPV) encoding a putative carboxylase (vbCbx/AcMNPV) was used to infect Sf9 insect cells, which we demonstrate have no endogenous carboxylase activity. Infection with vbCbx/AcMNPV conferred vitamin K-dependent carboxylase activity to Sf9 insect cells. Carboxylase activity was demonstrated to peak 2-3 days after infection with vbCbx/AcMNPV. Metabolic radiolabeling with L-[35S]methionine revealed that the 90-kDa recombinant protein is the major protein synthesized at the time of peak activity after infection. An anti-peptide antibody directed against residues 86-99 reacted with bovine liver carboxylase on Western blot analysis and immunoprecipitated recombinant carboxylase from infected Sf9 microsomal protein preparations. Since Sf9 insect cells lack endogenous vitamin K-dependent carboxylase activity, expression of carboxylase activity in Sf9 insect cells with recombinant baculovirus demonstrates that the protein encoded by this cDNA is a vitamin K-dependent gamma-glutamyl carboxylase. PMID:8378308

  2. Expression of voltage dependent potassium currents in freshly dissociated rat articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Arturo

    2006-01-01

    The electrophysiological properties of voltage dependent potassium channels from freshly dissociated rat articular chondrocytes were studied. The resting membrane potential (-42.7+/-2.0 mV) was significantly depolarized by increasing concentrations of external potassium. No change was observed when external chloride concentration was varied. Addition of TEA, 4AP, alpha-Dendrotoxin and charybdotoxin depolarized resting membrane potential. Whole cell patch clamp studies revealed the presence of outwardly rectifying currents whose kinetic and pharmacological properties suggest the expression of voltage dependent potassium channels. Two kinds of currents were observed under the same experimental conditions. The first one, most frequently observed (80%), starts activating near -50 mV, with V(1/2)=-18 mV, G(max)=0.30 pS/pF. The second kind was observed in only 10% of cases; It activates near -40 mV, with(1/2)=+28.35 mV, G(max)=0.28 pS/pF pA/pF and does not inactivates. Inactivating currents were significantly inhibited by TEA (IC(50)=1.45 mM), 4AP (IC(50)=0.64 mM), CTX (IC(50) = 10 nM), alpha-Dendrotoxin (IC(50) < 100 nM) and Margatoxin (IC(50)=28.5 nM). These results show that rat chondrocytes express voltage dependent potassium currents and suggest a role of voltage-dependent potassium channels in regulating membrane potential of rat chondrocytes.

  3. Keratin-dependent regulation of Aire and gene expression in skin tumor keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Ryan P; DePianto, Daryle J; Jacob, Justin T; Han, Minerva C; Chung, Byung-Min; Batazzi, Adriana S; Poll, Brian G; Guo, Yajuan; Han, Jingnan; Ong, SuFey; Zheng, Wenxin; Taube, Janis M; Čiháková, Daniela; Wan, Fengyi; Coulombe, Pierre A

    2015-08-01

    Expression of the intermediate filament protein keratin 17 (K17) is robustly upregulated in inflammatory skin diseases and in many tumors originating in stratified and pseudostratified epithelia. We report that autoimmune regulator (Aire), a transcriptional regulator, is inducibly expressed in human and mouse tumor keratinocytes in a K17-dependent manner and is required for timely onset of Gli2-induced skin tumorigenesis in mice. The induction of Aire mRNA in keratinocytes depends on a functional interaction between K17 and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein hnRNP K. Further, K17 colocalizes with Aire protein in the nucleus of tumor-prone keratinocytes, and each factor is bound to a specific promoter region featuring an NF-κB consensus sequence in a relevant subset of K17- and Aire-dependent proinflammatory genes. These findings provide radically new insight into keratin intermediate filament and Aire function, along with a molecular basis for the K17-dependent amplification of inflammatory and immune responses in diseased epithelia.

  4. Role of Dicer1-Dependent Factors in the Paracrine Regulation of Epididymal Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jerczynski, Olivia; Lacroix-Pépin, Nicolas; Boilard, Eric; Calvo, Ezequiel; Bernet, Agathe; Fortier, Michel A.; Björkgren, Ida; Sipilä, Petra; Belleannée, Clémence

    2016-01-01

    Dicer1 is an endoribonuclease involved in the biogenesis of functional molecules such as microRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs). These small non-coding RNAs are important regulators of post-transcriptional gene expression and participate in the control of male fertility. With the knowledge that 1) Dicer1-dependent factors are required for proper sperm maturation in the epididymis, and that 2) miRNAs are potent mediators of intercellular communication in most biological systems, we investigated the role of Dicer1-dependent factors produced by the proximal epididymis (initial segment/caput)- including miRNAs- on the regulation of epididymal gene expression in the distal epididymis regions (i.e. corpus and cauda). To this end, we performed comparative microarray and ANOVA analyses on control vs. Defb41iCre/wt;Dicer1fl/fl mice in which functional Dicer1 is absent from the principal cells of the proximal epididymis. We identified 35 and 33 transcripts that displayed significant expression level changes in the corpus and cauda regions (Fold change > 2 or < −2; p < 0.002), respectively. Among these transcripts, Zn-alpha 2-glycoprotein (Azgp1) encodes for a sperm equatorial protein whose expression in the epididymis of Dicer1 cKO mice is significantly increased compared to controls. In addition, 154 miRNAs, including miR-210, miR-672, miR-191 and miR-204, showed significantly impaired biogenesis in the absence of Dicer1 from the principal cells of the proximal epididymis (Fold change > 2 or < −2; p < 0.01). These miRNAs are secreted via extracellular vesicles (EVs) derived from the DC2 epididymal principal cell line, and their expression correlates with target transcripts involved in distinct biological pathways, as evidenced by in silico analysis. Albeit correlative and based on in silico approach, our study proposes that Dicer1-dependent factors trigger- directly or not—significant genes expression changes in distinct regions of this

  5. Interendothelial claudin-5 expression depends on cerebral endothelial cell–matrix adhesion by β1-integrins

    PubMed Central

    Osada, Takashi; Gu, Yu-Huan; Kanazawa, Masato; Tsubota, Yoshiaki; Hawkins, Brian T; Spatz, Maria; Milner, Richard; del Zoppo, Gregory J

    2011-01-01

    The hypothesis tested by these studies states that in addition to interendothelial cell tight junction proteins, matrix adhesion by β1-integrin receptors expressed by endothelial cells have an important role in maintaining the cerebral microvessel permeability barrier. Primary brain endothelial cells from C57 BL/6 mice were incubated with β1-integrin function-blocking antibody (Ha2/5) or isotype control and the impacts on claudin-5 expression and microvessel permeability were quantified. Both flow cytometry and immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that the interendothelial claudin-5 expression by confluent endothelial cells was significantly decreased in a time-dependent manner by Ha2/5 exposure relative to isotype. Furthermore, to assess the barrier properties, transendothelial electrical resistance and permeability measurements of the monolayer, and stereotaxic injection into the striatum of mice were performed. Ha2/5 incubation reduced the resistance of endothelial cell monolayers significantly, and significantly increased permeability to 40 and 150 kDa dextrans. Ha2/5 injection into mouse striatum produced significantly greater IgG extravasation than the isotype or the control injections. This study demonstrates that blockade of β1-integrin function changes interendothelial claudin-5 expression and increases microvessel permeability. Hence, endothelial cell–matrix interactions via β1-integrin directly affect interendothelial cell tight junction claudin-5 expression and brain microvascular permeability. PMID:21772312

  6. Evidence of Autoinducer-Dependent and -Independent Heterogeneous Gene Expression in Sinorhizobium fredii NGR234

    PubMed Central

    Grote, Jessica; Krysciak, Dagmar; Schorn, Andrea; Dahlke, Renate I.; Soonvald, Liina; Müller, Johannes; Hense, Burkhard A.; Schwarzfischer, Michael; Sauter, Margret; Schmeisser, Christel

    2014-01-01

    Populations of genetically identical Sinorhizobium fredii NGR234 cells differ significantly in their expression profiles of autoinducer (AI)-dependent and AI-independent genes. Promoter fusions of the NGR234 AI synthase genes traI and ngrI showed high levels of phenotypic heterogeneity during growth in TY medium on a single-cell level. However, adding very high concentrations of N-(3-oxooctanoyl-)-l-homoserine lactone resulted in a more homogeneous expression profile. Similarly, the lack of internally synthesized AIs in the background of the NGR234-ΔtraI or the NGR234-ΔngrI mutant resulted in a highly homogenous expression of the corresponding promoter fusions in the population. Expression studies with reporter fusions of the promoter regions of the quorum-quenching genes dlhR and qsdR1 and the type IV pilus gene cluster located on pNGR234b suggested that factors other than AI molecules affect NGR234 phenotypic heterogeneity. Further studies with root exudates and developing Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings provide the first evidence that plant root exudates have strong effects on the heterogeneity of AI synthase and quorum-quenching genes in NGR234. Therefore, plant-released octopine appears to play a key role in modulation of heterogeneous gene expression. PMID:25002427

  7. Fighting experience alters brain androgen receptor expression dependent on testosterone status

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng-Yu; Earley, Ryan L.; Huang, Shu-Ping; Hsu, Yuying

    2014-01-01

    Contest decisions are influenced by the outcomes of recent fights (winner–loser effects). Steroid hormones and serotonin are closely associated with aggression and therefore probably also play important roles in mediating winner–loser effects. In mangrove rivulus fish, Kryptolebias marmoratus, individuals with higher testosterone (T), 11-ketotestosterone and cortisol levels are more capable of winning, but titres of these hormones do not directly mediate winner–loser effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of winning/losing experiences on brain expression levels of the receptor genes for androgen (AR), oestrogen α/β (ERα/β), glucocorticoid (GR) and serotonin (5-HT1AR). The effect of contest experience on AR gene expression depended on T levels: repeated losses decreased, whereas repeated wins increased AR gene expression in individuals with low T but not in individuals with medium or high T levels. These results lend strong support for AR being involved in mediating winner–loser effects, which, in previous studies, were more detectable in individuals with lower T. Furthermore, the expression levels of ERα/β, 5-HT1AR and GR genes were higher in individuals that initiated contests against larger opponents than in those that did not. Overall, contest experience, underlying endocrine state and hormone and serotonin receptor expression patterns interacted to modulate contest decisions jointly. PMID:25320171

  8. Insulin inhibits hepatocyte iNOS expression induced by cytokines by an Akt-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Harbrecht, Brian G; Nweze, Ikenna; Smith, Jason W; Zhang, Baochun

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocyte inducible nitric oxide synthese (iNOS) expression is a tightly controlled pathway that mediates hepatic inflammation and hepatocyte injury in a variety of disease states. We have shown that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) regulates cytokine-induced hepatocyte iNOS expression through mechanisms that involve protein kinase B/Akt. We hypothesized that insulin, which activates Akt signaling in hepatocytes, as well as signaling through p38 and MAPK p42/p44, would regulate iNOS expression during inflammation. In primary rat hepatocytes, insulin inhibited cytokine-stimulated nitrite accumulation and iNOS expression in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of MAPK p42/p44 with PD98059 had no effect on iNOS activation, whereas SB203580 to block p38 reversed insulin's inhibitory effect. However, insulin did not increase p38 activation and inhibition of p38 signaling with a dominant negative p38 plasmid had no effect on cytokine- or insulin-mediated effects on iNOS. We found that SB203580 blocked insulin-induced Akt activation. Inhibition of Akt signaling with LY294002 or a dominant negative Akt plasmid increased cytokine-stimulated nitrite production and iNOS protein expression and blocked the inhibitory effects of insulin. NF-κB induces iNOS expression and can be regulated by Akt, but insulin had no effect on cytokine-mediated IκBα levels or NF-κB p65 translocation. Our data demonstrate that insulin inhibits cytokine-stimulated hepatocyte iNOS expression and does so through effects on Akt-mediated signaling. PMID:22038823

  9. Strain Dependent Effects of Prenatal Stress on Gene Expression in the Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Neeley, Eric W.; Berger, Ralph; Koenig, James I.; Leonard, Sherry

    2011-01-01

    Multiple animal models have been developed to recapitulate phenotypes of the human disease, schizophrenia. A model that simulates many of the cognitive and sensory deficits of the disorder is the use of random variable prenatal stress (PS) in the rat. These deficits suggest a molecular origin in the hippocampus, a brain region that plays a role in the regulation of stress. To study both hippocampal gene expression changes in offspring of prenatally stressed dams and to address genetic variability, we used a random array of prenatal stressors in three different rat strains with diverse responses to stress: Fischer, Sprague-Dawley, and Lewis rats. Candidate genes involved in stress, schizophrenia, cognition, neurotrophic effects, and immunity were selected for assessment by real-time quantitative PCR under resting conditions and following a brief exposure to restraint stress. PS resulted in significant differences in gene expression in the offspring that were strain dependent. mRNA expression for the N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subtype 2B (Grin2b) was increased, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (Tnfα) transcript was decreased in PS Sprague-Dawley and Lewis rats, but not in the Fischer rats. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) mRNA in the hippocampus was increased after an acute stress in all controls of each strain, yet a decrease was seen after acute stress in the PS Sprague-Dawley and Lewis rats. Expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (Nr3c1) was decreased in the Fischer strain when compared to Lewis or Sprague-Dawley rats, though the Fischer rats had markedly higher α7 nicotinic receptor (Chrna7) expression. The expression differences seen in these animals may be important elements of the phenotypic differences seen due to PS and genetic background. PMID:21382392

  10. 4EBP-Dependent Signaling Supports West Nile Virus Growth and Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Shives, Katherine D.; Massey, Aaron R.; May, Nicholas A.; Morrison, Thomas E.; Beckham, J. David

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a (+) sense, single-stranded RNA virus in the Flavivirus genus. WNV RNA possesses an m7GpppNm 5′ cap with 2′-O-methylation that mimics host mRNAs preventing innate immune detection and allowing the virus to translate its RNA genome through the utilization of cap-dependent translation initiation effectors in a wide variety of host species. Our prior work established the requirement of the host mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) for optimal WNV growth and protein expression; yet, the roles of the downstream effectors of mTORC1 in WNV translation are unknown. In this study, we utilize gene deletion mutants in the ribosomal protein kinase called S6 kinase (S6K) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP) pathways downstream of mTORC1 to define the role of mTOR-dependent translation initiation signals in WNV gene expression and growth. We now show that WNV growth and protein expression are dependent on mTORC1 mediated-regulation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein/eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP/eIF4E) interaction and eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F) complex formation to support viral growth and viral protein expression. We also show that the canonical signals of mTORC1 activation including ribosomal protein s6 (rpS6) and S6K phosphorylation are not required for WNV growth in these same conditions. Our data suggest that the mTORC1/4EBP/eIF4E signaling axis is activated to support the translation of the WNV genome. PMID:27763553

  11. Can Serotonin Transporter Genotype Predict Craving in Alcoholism?

    PubMed Central

    Ait-Daoud, Nassima; Roache, John D.; Dawes, Michael A.; Liu, Lei; Wang, Xin-Qun; Javors, Martin A.; Seneviratne, Chamindi; Johnson, Bankole A.

    2009-01-01

    Background We hypothesize that functional control of the serotonergic system is regulated in part by differential expression of the serotonin (5-HT) transporter (5-HTT). Alcohol-dependent individuals with the LL/LS genotype (L-carriers), compared with those with the SS genotype, have a lower 5-HT neurotransmission, which we hypothesize would be associated with higher craving for alcohol among L-carriers. We hypothesize further that acute peripheral depletion of tryptophan (5-HT’s precursor), while further reducing 5-HT function, might decrease auto-inhibition of 5-HT neuronal firing, thereby increasing 5-HT neurotransmission transiently and lowering alcohol craving. Methods We tested these hypotheses by examining whether in 34 Hispanic alcohol-dependent individuals subjective and physiological cue craving for alcohol differed by genotype, age of problem drinking onset, and tryptophan availability. Results On subjective “urge to drink” and “crave for a drink”, we found a significant (p<0.05) main effect of genotype and cue, as well as an interaction among genotype, age of problem drinking onset, and tryptophan depletion. For the physiological measure of pulse, there was a main effect of genotype. L-carriers had higher craving than their SS counterparts, an effect that decreased under tryptophan depletion. While craving in L-carriers increased the earlier the age of problem drinking onset, the opposite effect was seen in those with the SS genotype. Conclusion These results not only provide support for the hypothesis that alcoholics who are L-carriers have greater alcohol craving and possibly greater propensity for drinking but also propose that there is an important 5-HTT gene-by-environment interaction that alters cue craving response for alcohol. PMID:19426172

  12. Cryptochrome expression in the eye of migratory birds depends on their migratory status.

    PubMed

    Fusani, Leonida; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Frigato, Elena; Foà, Augusto

    2014-03-15

    Most passerine birds are nocturnal migrants. When kept in captivity during the migratory periods, these species show a migratory restlessness, or Zugunruhe. Recent studies on Sylvia warblers have shown that Zugunruhe is an excellent proxy of migratory disposition. Passerine birds can use the Earth's geomagnetic field as a compass to keep their course during their migratory flight. Among the candidate magnetoreceptive mechanisms are the cryptochromes, flavoproteins located in the retina that are supposed to perceive the magnetic field through a light-mediated process. Previous work has suggested that expression of Cryptochrome 1 (Cry1) is increased in migratory birds compared with non-migratory species. Here we tested the hypothesis that Cry1 expression depends on migratory status. Blackcaps Sylvia atricapilla were caught before fall migration and held in registration cages. When the birds were showing robust Zugunruhe, we applied a food deprivation protocol that simulates a long migratory flight. When the birds were refed after 2 days, their Zugunruhe decreased substantially, as is expected from birds that would interrupt migration for a refuelling stopover. We found that Cry1 expression was higher at night than during daytime in birds showing Zugunruhe, whereas in birds that underwent the fasting-and-refeeding protocol and reduced their levels of Zugunruhe, night Cry1 expression decreased to daytime levels. Our work shows that Cry1 expression is dependent on the presence of Zugunruhe and not on species-specific or seasonal factors, or on the birds being active versus inactive. These results support the hypothesis that cryptochromes underlie magnetoreceptive mechanisms in birds. PMID:24622895

  13. Cryptochrome expression in the eye of migratory birds depends on their migratory status.

    PubMed

    Fusani, Leonida; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Frigato, Elena; Foà, Augusto

    2014-03-15

    Most passerine birds are nocturnal migrants. When kept in captivity during the migratory periods, these species show a migratory restlessness, or Zugunruhe. Recent studies on Sylvia warblers have shown that Zugunruhe is an excellent proxy of migratory disposition. Passerine birds can use the Earth's geomagnetic field as a compass to keep their course during their migratory flight. Among the candidate magnetoreceptive mechanisms are the cryptochromes, flavoproteins located in the retina that are supposed to perceive the magnetic field through a light-mediated process. Previous work has suggested that expression of Cryptochrome 1 (Cry1) is increased in migratory birds compared with non-migratory species. Here we tested the hypothesis that Cry1 expression depends on migratory status. Blackcaps Sylvia atricapilla were caught before fall migration and held in registration cages. When the birds were showing robust Zugunruhe, we applied a food deprivation protocol that simulates a long migratory flight. When the birds were refed after 2 days, their Zugunruhe decreased substantially, as is expected from birds that would interrupt migration for a refuelling stopover. We found that Cry1 expression was higher at night than during daytime in birds showing Zugunruhe, whereas in birds that underwent the fasting-and-refeeding protocol and reduced their levels of Zugunruhe, night Cry1 expression decreased to daytime levels. Our work shows that Cry1 expression is dependent on the presence of Zugunruhe and not on species-specific or seasonal factors, or on the birds being active versus inactive. These results support the hypothesis that cryptochromes underlie magnetoreceptive mechanisms in birds.

  14. Hindlimb unweighting decreases endothelium-dependent dilation and eNOS expression in soleus not gastrocnemius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, C. R.; Schrage, W. G.; Rush, J. W.; Ray, C. A.; Price, E. M.; Hasser, E. M.; Laughlin, M. H.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that hindlimb unweighting (HLU) decreases endothelium-dependent vasodilation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) in arteries of skeletal muscle with reduced blood flow during HLU. Sprague-Dawley rats (300-350 g) were exposed to HLU (n = 15) or control (n = 15) conditions for 14 days. ACh-induced dilation was assessed in muscle with reduced [soleus (Sol)] or unchanged [gastrocnemius (Gast)] blood flow during HLU. eNOS and SOD-1 expression were measured in feed arteries (FA) and in first-order (1A), second-order (2A), and third-order (3A) arterioles. Dilation to infusion of ACh in vivo was blunted in Sol but not Gast. In arteries of Sol muscle, HLU decreased eNOS mRNA and protein content. eNOS mRNA content was significantly less in Sol FA (35%), 1A arterioles (25%) and 2A arterioles (18%). eNOS protein content was less in Sol FA (64%) and 1A arterioles (65%) from HLU rats. In arteries of Gast, HLU did not decrease eNOS mRNA or protein. SOD-1 mRNA expression was less in Sol 2A arterioles (31%) and 3A arterioles (29%) of HLU rats. SOD-1 protein content was less in Sol FA (67%) but not arterioles. SOD-1 mRNA and protein content were not decreased in arteries from Gast. These data indicate that HLU decreases endothelium-dependent vasodilation, eNOS expression, and SOD-1 expression primarily in arteries of Sol muscle where blood flow is reduced during HLU.

  15. Differentiation-Dependent KLF4 Expression Promotes Lytic Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nawandar, Dhananjay M.; Wang, Anqi; Makielski, Kathleen; Lee, Denis; Ma, Shidong; Barlow, Elizabeth; Reusch, Jessica; Jiang, Ru; Wille, Coral K.; Greenspan, Deborah; Greenspan, John S.; Mertz, Janet E.; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey; Johannsen, Eric C.; Lambert, Paul F.; Kenney, Shannon C.

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human herpesvirus associated with B-cell and epithelial cell malignancies. EBV lytically infects normal differentiated oral epithelial cells, where it causes a tongue lesion known as oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL) in immunosuppressed patients. However, the cellular mechanism(s) that enable EBV to establish exclusively lytic infection in normal differentiated oral epithelial cells are not currently understood. Here we show that a cellular transcription factor known to promote epithelial cell differentiation, KLF4, induces differentiation-dependent lytic EBV infection by binding to and activating the two EBV immediate-early gene (BZLF1 and BRLF1) promoters. We demonstrate that latently EBV-infected, telomerase-immortalized normal oral keratinocyte (NOKs) cells undergo lytic viral reactivation confined to the more differentiated cell layers in organotypic raft culture. Furthermore, we show that endogenous KLF4 expression is required for efficient lytic viral reactivation in response to phorbol ester and sodium butyrate treatment in several different EBV-infected epithelial cell lines, and that the combination of KLF4 and another differentiation-dependent cellular transcription factor, BLIMP1, is highly synergistic for inducing lytic EBV infection. We confirm that both KLF4 and BLIMP1 are expressed in differentiated, but not undifferentiated, epithelial cells in normal tongue tissue, and show that KLF4 and BLIMP1 are both expressed in a patient-derived OHL lesion. In contrast, KLF4 protein is not detectably expressed in B cells, where EBV normally enters latent infection, although KLF4 over-expression is sufficient to induce lytic EBV reactivation in Burkitt lymphoma cells. Thus, KLF4, together with BLIMP1, plays a critical role in mediating lytic EBV reactivation in epithelial cells. PMID:26431332

  16. Haematopoietic depletion in vaccine-induced neonatal pancytopenia depends on both the titre and specificity of alloantibody and levels of MHC I expression.

    PubMed

    Bell, Charlotte R; MacHugh, Niall D; Connelley, Timothy K; Degnan, Kathryn; Morrison, W Ivan

    2015-07-01

    Bovine Neonatal Pancytopenia (BNP) is a disease of calves characterised by haematopoietic depletion, mediated by ingestion of alloantibodies in colostrum. It has been linked epidemiologically to vaccination of the dams of affected calves with a particular vaccine (Pregsure) containing a novel adjuvant. Evidence suggests that BNP-alloantibodies are directed against MHC I molecules, induced by contaminant bovine cellular material from Madin-Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK) cells used in the vaccine's production. We aimed to investigate the specificity of BNP-alloantibody for bovine MHC I alleles, particularly those expressed by MDBK cells, and whether depletion of particular cell types is due to differential MHC I expression levels. A complement-mediated cytotoxicity assay was used to assess functional serum alloantibody titres in BNP-dams, Pregsure-vaccinated dams with healthy calves, cows vaccinated with an alternative product and unvaccinated controls. Alloantibody specificity was investigated using transfected mouse lines expressing the individual MHC I alleles identified from MDBK cells and MHC I-defined bovine leukocyte lines. All BNP-dams and 50% of Pregsure-vaccinated cows were shown to have MDBK-MHC I specific alloantibodies, which cross-reacted to varying degrees with other MHC I genotypes. MHC I expression levels on different blood cell types, assessed by flow cytometry, were found to correlate with levels of alloantibody-mediated damage in vitro and in vivo. Alloantibody-killed bone marrow cells were shown to express higher levels of MHC I than undamaged cells. The results provide evidence that MHC I-specific alloantibodies play a dominant role in the pathogenesis of BNP. Haematopoietic depletion was shown to be dependent on the titre and specificity of alloantibody produced by individual cows and the density of surface MHC I expression by different cell types. Collectively, the results support the hypothesis that MHC I molecules originating from MDBK cells

  17. TALE activators regulate gene expression in a position- and strand-dependent manner in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Uhde-Stone, Claudia; Cheung, Edna; Lu, Biao

    2014-01-24

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are a class of transcription factors that are readily programmable to regulate gene expression. Despite their growing popularity, little is known about binding site parameters that influence TALE-mediated gene activation in mammalian cells. We demonstrate that TALE activators modulate gene expression in mammalian cells in a position- and strand-dependent manner. To study the effects of binding site location, we engineered TALEs customized to recognize specific DNA sequences located in either the promoter or the transcribed region of reporter genes. We found that TALE activators robustly activated reporter genes when their binding sites were located within the promoter region. In contrast, TALE activators inhibited the expression of reporter genes when their binding sites were located on the sense strand of the transcribed region. Notably, this repression was independent of the effector domain utilized, suggesting a simple blockage mechanism. We conclude that TALE activators in mammalian cells regulate genes in a position- and strand-dependent manner that is substantially different from gene activation by native TALEs in plants. These findings have implications for optimizing the design of custom TALEs for genetic manipulation in mammalian cells.

  18. Topoisomerase 1 Regulates Gene Expression in Neurons through Cleavage Complex-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mabb, Angela M.; Simon, Jeremy M.; King, Ian F.; Lee, Hyeong-Min; An, Lin-Kun; Philpot, Benjamin D.; Zylka, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) inhibitors, including camptothecin and topotecan, covalently trap TOP1 on DNA, creating cleavage complexes (cc’s) that must be resolved before gene transcription and DNA replication can proceed. We previously found that topotecan reduces the expression of long (>100 kb) genes and unsilences the paternal allele of Ube3a in neurons. Here, we sought to evaluate overlap between TOP1cc-dependent and -independent gene regulation in neurons. To do this, we utilized Top1 conditional knockout mice, Top1 knockdown, the CRISPR-Cas9 system to delete Top1, TOP1 catalytic inhibitors that do not generate TOP1cc’s, and a TOP1 mutation (T718A) that stabilizes TOP1cc’s. We found that topotecan treatment significantly alters the expression of many more genes, including long neuronal genes, immediate early genes, and paternal Ube3a, when compared to Top1 deletion. Our data show that topotecan has a stronger effect on neuronal transcription than Top1 deletion, and identifies TOP1cc-dependent and -independent contributions to gene expression. PMID:27231886

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum stress increases AT1R mRNA expression via TIA-1-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Backlund, Michael; Paukku, Kirsi; Kontula, Kimmo K.; Lehtonen, Jukka Y.A.

    2016-01-01

    As the formation of ribonucleoprotein complexes is a major mechanism of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) regulation, we sought to identify novel AT1R mRNA binding proteins. By affinity purification and mass spectroscopy, we identified TIA-1. This interaction was confirmed by colocalization of AT1R mRNA and TIA-1 by FISH and immunofluorescence microscopy. In immunoprecipitates of endogenous TIA- 1, reverse transcription-PCR amplified AT1R mRNA. TIA-1 has two binding sites within AT1R 3′-UTR. The binding site proximal to the coding region is glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)-dependent whereas the distal binding site is not. TIA-1 functions as a part of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response leading to stress granule (SG) formation and translational silencing. We and others have shown that AT1R expression is increased by ER stress-inducing factors. In unstressed cells, TIA-1 binds to AT1R mRNA and decreases AT1R protein expression. Fluorescence microscopy shows that ER stress induced by thapsigargin leads to the transfer of TIA-1 to SGs. In FISH analysis AT1R mRNA remains in the cytoplasm and no longer colocalizes with TIA-1. Thus, release of TIA-1-mediated suppression by ER stress increases AT1R protein expression. In conclusion, AT1R mRNA is regulated by TIA-1 in a ER stress-dependent manner. PMID:26681690

  20. Conditional control of mammalian gene expression by tetracycline-dependent hammerhead ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Beilstein, Kim; Wittmann, Alexander; Grez, Manuel; Suess, Beatrix

    2015-05-15

    Robust synthetic devices are requisite for the construction of synthetic genetic circuits and important scientific and technological tools to control cellular processes. We developed tetracycline-dependent ribozymes, which can switch on gene expression up to 8.7-fold upon addition of tetracycline. A tetracycline aptamer was grafted onto the hammerhead ribozyme in such a way that ligand binding to the aptamers destroys a loop-loop interaction within the ribozyme thereby inhibiting ribozyme cleavage and allowing gene expression. The advantage of the presented regulatory system is its independence of any regulatory proteins. The stable integration of the ribozyme into the genome of HeLa cells indicates a low background activity in the absence of ligand. Furthermore, the ligand concentration required to robustly flip the switch does not affect cell viability and therefore allows a long-term application of the system. These properties turn the tetracycline-dependent ribozymes into a very promising tool for conditional gene expression in mammalian cells. PMID:25265236

  1. Conditional control of mammalian gene expression by tetracycline-dependent hammerhead ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Beilstein, Kim; Wittmann, Alexander; Grez, Manuel; Suess, Beatrix

    2015-05-15

    Robust synthetic devices are requisite for the construction of synthetic genetic circuits and important scientific and technological tools to control cellular processes. We developed tetracycline-dependent ribozymes, which can switch on gene expression up to 8.7-fold upon addition of tetracycline. A tetracycline aptamer was grafted onto the hammerhead ribozyme in such a way that ligand binding to the aptamers destroys a loop-loop interaction within the ribozyme thereby inhibiting ribozyme cleavage and allowing gene expression. The advantage of the presented regulatory system is its independence of any regulatory proteins. The stable integration of the ribozyme into the genome of HeLa cells indicates a low background activity in the absence of ligand. Furthermore, the ligand concentration required to robustly flip the switch does not affect cell viability and therefore allows a long-term application of the system. These properties turn the tetracycline-dependent ribozymes into a very promising tool for conditional gene expression in mammalian cells.

  2. Voltage-dependent blockade by bupivacaine of cardiac sodium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Ji, Hui; Liu, Zhirui; Ji, Yonghua; You, Xinmin; Ding, Gang; Cheng, Zhijun

    2014-08-01

    Bupivacaine ranks as the most potent and efficient drug among class I local anesthetics, but its high potential for toxic reactions severely limits its clinical use. Although bupivacaine-induced toxicity is mainly caused by substantial blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), how these hydrophobic molecules interact with the receptor sites to which they bind remains unclear. Nav1.5 is the dominant isoform of VGSCs expressed in cardiac myocytes, and its dysfunction may be the cause of bupivacaine-triggered arrhythmia. Here, we investigated the effect of bupivacaine on Nav1.5 within the clinical concentration range. The electrophysiological measurements on Nav1.5 expressed in Xenopus oocytes showed that bupivacaine induced a voltage- and concentration-dependent blockade on the peak of I Na and the half-maximal inhibitory dose was 4.51 μmol/L. Consistent with other local anesthetics, bupivacaine also induced a use-dependent blockade on Nav1.5 currents. The underlying mechanisms of this blockade may contribute to the fact that bupivacaine not only dose-dependently affected the gating kinetics of Nav1.5 but also accelerated the development of its open-state slow inactivation. These results extend our knowledge of the action of bupivacaine on cardiac sodium channels, and therefore contribute to the safer and more efficient clinical use of bupivacaine.

  3. Endothelial microparticles reduce ICAM-1 expression in a microRNA-222-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Felix; Yang, Xiaoyan; Baumann, Katharina; Przybilla, David; Schmitz, Theresa; Flender, Anna; Paul, Kathrin; Alhusseiny, Adil; Nickenig, Georg; Werner, Nikos

    2015-09-01

    Endothelial microparticles (EMP) are released from activated or apoptotic endothelial cells (ECs) and can be taken up by adjacent ECs, but their effect on vascular inflammation after engulfment is largely unknown. We sought to determine the role of EMP in EC inflammation. In vitro, EMP treatment significantly reduced tumour necrosis factor-α-induced endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 expression on mRNA and protein level, whereas there was no effect on vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression. Reduced ICAM-1 expression after EMP treatment resulted in diminished monocyte adhesion in vitro. In vivo, systemic treatment of ApoE-/- mice with EMP significantly reduced murine endothelial ICAM-1 expression. To explore the underlying mechanisms, Taqman microRNA array was performed and microRNA (miR)-222 was identified as the strongest regulated miR between EMP and ECs. Following experiments demonstrated that miR-222 was transported into recipient ECs by EMP and functionally regulated expression of its target protein ICAM-1 in vitro and in vivo. After simulating diabetic conditions, EMP derived from glucose-treated ECs contained significantly lower amounts of miR-222 and showed reduced anti-inflammatory capacity in vitro and in vivo. Finally, circulating miR-222 level was diminished in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) compared to patients without CAD. EMPs promote anti-inflammatory effects in vitro and in vivo by reducing endothelial ICAM-1 expression via the transfer of functional miR-222 into recipient cells. In pathological hyperglycaemic conditions, EMP-mediated miR-222-dependent anti-inflammatory effects are reduced.

  4. Strain-dependent variations in visceral sensitivity: relationship to stress, anxiety and spinal glutamate transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Moloney, R D; Dinan, T G; Cryan, J F

    2015-04-01

    Responses to painful stimuli differ between populations, ethnic groups, sexes and even among individuals of a family. However, data regarding visceral pain are still lacking. Thus, we investigated differences in visceral nociception across inbred and outbred mouse strains using colorectal distension. Anxiety and depression-like behaviour were assessed using the open field and forced swim test as well as the corticosterone stress response. Possible mechanistic targets [excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT-1), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and 5HT1A receptor] were also assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Adult, male, inbred and outbred mouse strains were used in all assays (inbred strains; CBA/J Hsd, C3H/HeNHsd, BALB/c OlaHsd, C57 BL/6JOlaHsd, DBA/2J RccHsd, CAST/EiJ, SM/J, A/J OlaHsd, 129P2/OlaHsd, FVB/NHan Hsd and outbred strains: Swiss Webster, CD-1). mRNA expression levels of EAAT-1, BDNF and 5HT1A receptor (HTR1A) were quantified in the lumbosacral spinal cord, amygdala and hippocampus. A significant effect of strain was found in visceral sensitivity, anxiety and depressive-like behaviours. Strain differences were also seen in both baseline and stress-induced corticosterone levels. CBA/J mice consistently exhibited heightened visceral sensitivity, anxiety behaviour and depression-like behaviour which were associated with decreased spinal EAAT-1 and hippocampal BDNF and HTR1A. Our results show the CBA/J mouse strain as a novel mouse model to unravel the complex mechanisms of brain-gut axis disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, in particular the underlying mechanisms of visceral hypersensitivity, for which there is great need. Furthermore, this study highlights the importance of genotype and the consequences for future development of transgenic strains in pain research.

  5. Strain-dependent variations in visceral sensitivity: relationship to stress, anxiety and spinal glutamate transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Moloney, R D; Dinan, T G; Cryan, J F

    2015-04-01

    Responses to painful stimuli differ between populations, ethnic groups, sexes and even among individuals of a family. However, data regarding visceral pain are still lacking. Thus, we investigated differences in visceral nociception across inbred and outbred mouse strains using colorectal distension. Anxiety and depression-like behaviour were assessed using the open field and forced swim test as well as the corticosterone stress response. Possible mechanistic targets [excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT-1), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and 5HT1A receptor] were also assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Adult, male, inbred and outbred mouse strains were used in all assays (inbred strains; CBA/J Hsd, C3H/HeNHsd, BALB/c OlaHsd, C57 BL/6JOlaHsd, DBA/2J RccHsd, CAST/EiJ, SM/J, A/J OlaHsd, 129P2/OlaHsd, FVB/NHan Hsd and outbred strains: Swiss Webster, CD-1). mRNA expression levels of EAAT-1, BDNF and 5HT1A receptor (HTR1A) were quantified in the lumbosacral spinal cord, amygdala and hippocampus. A significant effect of strain was found in visceral sensitivity, anxiety and depressive-like behaviours. Strain differences were also seen in both baseline and stress-induced corticosterone levels. CBA/J mice consistently exhibited heightened visceral sensitivity, anxiety behaviour and depression-like behaviour which were associated with decreased spinal EAAT-1 and hippocampal BDNF and HTR1A. Our results show the CBA/J mouse strain as a novel mouse model to unravel the complex mechanisms of brain-gut axis disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, in particular the underlying mechanisms of visceral hypersensitivity, for which there is great need. Furthermore, this study highlights the importance of genotype and the consequences for future development of transgenic strains in pain research. PMID:25851919

  6. Calorie restriction regulates circadian clock gene expression through BMAL1 dependent and independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sonal A.; Velingkaar, Nikkhil; Makwana, Kuldeep; Chaudhari, Amol; Kondratov, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Feeding behavior, metabolism and circadian clocks are interlinked. Calorie restriction (CR) is a feeding paradigm known to extend longevity. We found that CR significantly affected the rhythms in the expression of circadian clock genes in mice on the mRNA and protein levels, suggesting that CR reprograms the clocks both transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally. The effect of CR on gene expression was distinct from the effects of time-restricted feeding or fasting. Furthermore, CR affected the circadian output through up- or down-regulation of the expression of several clock-controlled transcriptional factors and the longevity candidate genes. CR-dependent effects on some clock gene expression were impaired in the liver of mice deficient for BMAL1, suggesting importance of this transcriptional factor for the transcriptional reprogramming of the clock, however, BMAL1- independent mechanisms also exist. We propose that CR recruits biological clocks as a natural mechanism of metabolic optimization under conditions of limited energy resources. PMID:27170536

  7. Differential Features of Microsatellite-Unstable Colorectal Carcinomas Depending on EPCAM Expression Status

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Ho; Bae, Jeong Mo; Kim, Kyung-Ju; Rhee, Ye-Young; Kim, Younghoon; Cho, Nam-Yun; Lee, Hye Seung; Chang, Mee Soo

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies have revealed that a small subset of Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal carcinomas (CRCs) is caused by a germline EPCAM deletion-induced MSH2 epimutation. Based on the finding of this genetic alteration, we investigated the implications of EPCAM expression changes in microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) CRCs. Methods Expression of EPCAM and DNA mismatch repair proteins was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 168 MSI-H CRCs. Using DNA samples of these tumors, MLH1 promoter methylation status was also determined by methylation-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction method (MethyLight). Results Among 168 MSI-H CRCs, complete loss (CL) and focal loss (FL) of EPCAM expression was observed in two (1.2%) and 22 (13.1%) cases, respectively. Both of the EPCAM-CL cases were found in MSH2-negative tumors without MLH1 promoter methylation. However, only nine of the 22 EPCAM-FL tumors had MSH2 deficiency. Of the 22 EPCAM-FL tumors, 13 showed MLH1 loss, and among them, nine cases were determined to have MLH1 methylation. EPCAM-FL was significantly associated with advanced stage (p=.043), distant metastasis (p=.003), poor differentiation (p=.001), and signet ring cell component (p=.004). Conclusions Loss of EPCAM expression is differentially associated with clinicopathological and molecular features, depending on the completeness of the loss, in MSI-H CRCs. PMID:25214859

  8. Maternal High Fat Diet Affects Offspring’s Vitamin K-Dependent Proteins Expression Levels

    PubMed Central

    Lanham, Stuart; Cagampang, Felino R.; Oreffo, Richard O. C.

    2015-01-01

    Studies suggest bone growth & development and susceptibility to vascular disease in later life are influenced by maternal nutrition, during intrauterine and early postnatal life. There is evidence for a role of vitamin K-dependent proteins (VKDPs) including Osteocalcin, Matrix-gla protein, Periostin, and Gas6, in bone and vascular development. This study extends the analysis of VKDPs previously conducted in 6 week old offspring, into offspring of 30 weeks of age, to assess the longer term effects of a maternal and postnatal high fat (HF) diet on VKDP expression. Overall a HF maternal diet and offspring diet exacerbated the bone changes observed. Sex specific and tissue specific differences were observed in VKDP expression for both aorta and femoral tissues. In addition, significant correlations were observed between femoral OCN, Periostin Gas6, and Vkor expression levels and measures of femoral bone structure. Furthermore, MGP, OCN, Ggcx and Vkor expression levels correlated to mass and fat volume, in both sexes. In summary the current study has highlighted the importance of the long-term effects of maternal nutrition on offspring bone development and the correlation of VKDPs to bone structure. PMID:26381752

  9. Electroacupuncture Upregulates SIRT1-Dependent PGC-1α Expression in SAMP8 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Weiguo; Guo, Wanqing; Wang, Feng; Li, Changzheng; Xie, Yongcai; Zheng, Xueha; Shi, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background Abnormalities of brain energy metabolism are involved in Alzheimer disease (AD). Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is a class III histone deacetylase and activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator-1α (PGC-1α), which enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and energy homeostasis. Electroacupuncture (EA) has been reported to improve brain energy metabolism in AD. However, the effect of EA on SIRT1 and PGC-1α in AD remains unclear. Material/Methods ATP levels were measured using assay kits in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice. Western blotting analysis and quantitative real-time RT-PCR were performed to measure the expression of SIRT1 and PGC-1α in the hippocampus of SAMP8 mice. PGC-1α acetylation was analyzed using immunoprecipitation. Results Compared with senescence-accelerated resistant mice 1 (SAMR1) mice, SAMP8 mice had a decline in ATP levels and the expression of SIRT1 and PGC-1α. EA treatment improved ATP levels, upregulated the expression of SIRT1 and PGC-1α, and decreased PGC-1α acetylation. Conclusions These data suggest that EA improved brain energy metabolism, potentially associated with the upregulation of SIRT1-dependent PGC-1α expression. PMID:26530101

  10. FMRP regulates an ethanol-dependent shift in GABABR function and expression with rapid antidepressant properties

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Sarah A.; Workman, Emily R.; Heaney, Chelcie F.; Niere, Farr; Namjoshi, Sanjeev; Cacheaux, Luisa P.; Farris, Sean P.; Drew, Michael R.; Zemelman, Boris V.; Harris, R. Adron; Raab-Graham, Kimberly F.

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol promotes lasting neuroadaptive changes that may provide relief from depressive symptoms, often referred to as the self-medication hypothesis. However, the molecular/synaptic pathways that are shared by alcohol and antidepressants are unknown. In the current study, acute exposure to ethanol produced lasting antidepressant and anxiolytic behaviours. To understand the functional basis of these behaviours, we examined a molecular pathway that is activated by rapid antidepressants. Ethanol, like rapid antidepressants, alters γ-aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABABR) expression and signalling, to increase dendritic calcium. Furthermore, new GABABRs are synthesized in response to ethanol treatment, requiring fragile-X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Ethanol-dependent changes in GABABR expression, dendritic signalling, and antidepressant efficacy are absent in Fmr1-knockout (KO) mice. These findings indicate that FMRP is an important regulator of protein synthesis following alcohol exposure, providing a molecular basis for the antidepressant efficacy of acute ethanol exposure. PMID:27666021

  11. Tumor-Expressed IDO Recruits and Activates MDSCs in a Treg-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Holmgaard, Rikke B; Zamarin, Dmitriy; Li, Yanyun; Gasmi, Billel; Munn, David H; Allison, James P; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2015-10-13

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has been described as a major mechanism of immunosuppression in tumors, though the mechanisms of this are poorly understood. Here, we find that expression of IDO by tumor cells results in aggressive tumor growth and resistance to T-cell-targeting immunotherapies. We demonstrate that IDO orchestrates local and systemic immunosuppressive effects through recruitment and activation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), through a mechanism dependent on regulatory T cells (Tregs). Supporting these findings, we find that IDO expression in human melanoma tumors is strongly associated with MDSC infiltration. Treatment with a selective IDO inhibitor in vivo reversed tumor-associated immunosuppression by decreasing numbers of tumor-infiltrating MDSCs and Tregs and abolishing their suppressive function. These findings establish an important link between IDO and multiple immunosuppressive mechanisms active in the tumor microenvironment, providing a strong rationale for therapeutic targeting of IDO as one of the central regulators of immune suppression.

  12. Age and stage dependency of estrogen receptor expression by lymphocyte precursors

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Hideya; Kouro, Taku; Yokota, Takafumi; Comp, Phillip C.; Kincade, Paul W.

    2001-01-01

    Sex steroids negatively regulate B lymphopoiesis in adult mice. Paradoxically, lymphocytes arise during fetal life, when estrogen levels are high and maternal lymphopoiesis is suppressed. Here we demonstrate that embryonic B lymphopoiesis was unaffected by estrogen, but sensitive to glucocorticoids. Both fetal and adult precursors contained glucocorticoid receptor transcripts, but only adult precursors expressed estrogen receptor α and β together with the androgen receptor. Fetal hematopoietic cells did not efficiently acquire functional estrogen receptors after transplantation to irradiated adult mice. Sex steroid receptors were also expressed in a stage- and developmental age-dependent fashion in human precursors. A developmental switch in responsiveness of hematopoietic cells to sex steroids may be essential for formation of the immune system. PMID:11752459

  13. Sumoylation of HDAC2 promotes NF-κB-dependent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Tobias; Kiweler, Nicole; Wolff, Katharina; Knauer, Shirley K; Brandl, André; Hemmerich, Peter; Dannenberg, Jan-Hermen; Heinzel, Thorsten; Schneider, Günter; Krämer, Oliver H

    2015-03-30

    The transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is crucial for the maintenance of homeostasis. It is incompletely understood how nuclear NF-κB and the crosstalk of NF-κB with other transcription factors are controlled. Here, we demonstrate that the epigenetic regulator histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) activates NF-κB in transformed and primary cells. This function depends on both, the catalytic activity and an intact HDAC2 sumoylation motif. Several mechanisms account for the induction of NF-κB through HDAC2. The expression of wild-type HDAC2 can increase the nuclear presence of NF-κB. In addition, the ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (RSK1) and the tumor suppressor p53 contribute to the regulation of NF-κB by HDAC2. Moreover, TP53 mRNA expression is positively regulated by wild-type HDAC2 but not by sumoylation-deficient HDAC2. Thus, sumoylation of HDAC2 integrates NF-κB signaling involving p53 and RSK1. Since HDAC2-dependent NF-κB activity protects colon cancer cells from genotoxic stress, our data also suggest that high HDAC2 levels, which are frequently found in tumors, are linked to chemoresistance. Accordingly, inhibitors of NF-κB and of the NF-κB/p53-regulated anti-apoptotic protein survivin significantly sensitize colon carcinoma cells expressing wild-type HDAC2 to apoptosis induced by the genotoxin doxorubicin. Hence, the HDAC2-dependent signaling node we describe here may offer an interesting therapeutic option. PMID:25704882

  14. Analysis of oxygen-dependent cytokine expression in human mesenchymal stem cells derived from umbilical cord.

    PubMed

    Lönne, Maren; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela; Kasper, Cornelia

    2013-07-01

    Efficient cell expansion is a basic requirement for obtaining clinically relevant numbers of mesenchymal stem cells designed for cell-based therapies or tissue-engineering application. Previous studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) cultivated under reduced atmospheric oxygen concentrations (2.5% O2) possess enhanced proliferation potential and can maintain their differentiation properties. We have analyzed the oxygen-dependent cytokine expression of human MSC derived from umbilical cord and attempted to link the results to the proliferation and differentiation capacities of these cells. By quantitative reverse transcription plus the polymerase chain reaction and by protein microarray, we measured the gene expression and intracellular protein concentration of several growth factors and growth factor receptors. Fibroblast growth factor-7, two growth factor receptors (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and stem cell factor receptor), and two growth-factor-binding proteins (insulin-like growth-factor-binding proteins 3 and 6) were over-expressed under hypoxic conditions, indicating that their signaling pathways participate in cell proliferation. On the other hand, typical differentiation factors such as bone morphogenetic protein-4, endothelial growth factor, and tissue growth factor-β1 were absent in cells cultivated under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. The absolute concentration of some intracellular cytokines was also measured for the first time under hypoxia and normoxia. Our results in combination with previous findings indicate that enhanced proliferation potential and a maintained undifferentiated cell state can be ascribed to the oxygen-dependent expression of a set of cytokines. This knowledge might help in the understanding of MSC physiology and in the achievement of directed cell fate of MSC for clinical application.

  15. VEGFR-2 Expression in Glioblastoma Multiforme Depends on Inflammatory Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Jaal, Jana; Kase, Marju; Minajeva, Ave; Saretok, Mikk; Adamson, Aidi; Junninen, Jelizaveta; Metsaots, Tõnis; Jõgi, Tõnu; Joonsalu, Madis; Vardja, Markus; Asser, Toomas

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most angiogenic tumors. However, antiangiogenic therapy has not shown significant clinical efficacy. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of inflammatory tumor microenvironment on the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2). Surgically excised primary GBM tissues were histologically examined for overall extent of inflammation (score 1–3). After immunohistochemistry, the tissue expression of ICAM-1 (optical density), the number of VEGFR-2 positive (VEGFR-2+) blood vessels (per microscopic field), and the endothelial staining intensity of VEGFR-2 (score 0–3) were determined. In GBM, the extent of inflammation was 1.9 ± 0.7 (group mean ± SD). Mean optical density of inflammatory mediator ICAM-1 was 57.0 ± 27.1 (pixel values). The number of VEGFR-2+ blood vessels and endothelial VEGFR-2 staining intensity were 6.2 ± 2.4 and 1.2 ± 0.8, respectively. A positive association was found between endothelial VEGFR-2 staining intensity and the extent of inflammation (p = 0.005). Moreover, VEGFR-2 staining intensity correlated with the expression level of ICAM-1 (p = 0.026). The expression of VEGFR-2, one of the main targets of antiangiogenic therapy, depends on GBM microenvironment. Higher endothelial VEGFR-2 levels were seen in the presence of more pronounced inflammation. Target dependence on inflammatory tumor microenvironment has to be taken into consideration when treatment approaches that block VEGFR-2 signaling are designed. PMID:26798546

  16. Age-dependent expression of forkhead box O proteins in the duodenum of rats*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pan; Zhou, Zhen-qi; Huang, Rui-hua; Zhou, Bo; Wei, Quan-wei; Shi, Fang-xiong

    2011-01-01

    The O subfamily of forkhead box (FoxO) proteins is the downstream effector of the insulin-like growth factor-1/phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B (IGF-1/PI3K/PKB) signal pathway. The objective of the present study was to examine the expressions of three members of FoxO proteins, FoxO1, FoxO3a, and FoxO4 in the duodenum of Sprague-Dawley rats at different ages. The result demonstrated that the expression of FoxO4 in rat duodenum showed an age-dependent manner. At Day 21, there were no detectable localization and expression of FoxO4 in the duodenum, while, at Months 2 and 6, localization and expression of FoxO4 were distinct. In addition, FoxO4 staining was primarily concentrated in the cell nuclei of the lamina propria around the intestinal gland of the duodenum in 2-month-old rats, but was not detectable in the same area in 6-month-old rats. Our results showed also that although FoxO3a existed in the cytoplasm of the lamina propria at a low level at the 2- and 6-month marks, it was still not detectable at Day 21. Besides, FoxO1 was not detectable in all parts and stages. Taken together, our findings suggested that the cell-specific and age-dependent expressional patterns of FoxO4 and FoxO3a proteins in the duodenum play some roles in the development and growth performance of the rat duodenum. PMID:21887848

  17. Estradiol inhibits ongoing autoimmune neuroinflammation and NFκB-dependent CCL2 expression in reactive astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Giraud, Sébastien N.; Caron, Cécile M.; Pham-Dinh, Danielle; Kitabgi, Patrick; Nicot, Arnaud B.

    2010-01-01

    Astroglial reactivity associated with increased production of NFκB-dependent proinflammatory molecules is an important component of the pathophysiology of chronic neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The use of estrogens as potential anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective drugs is a matter of debate. Using mouse experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) as a model of chronic neuroinflammation, we report that implants reproducing pregnancy levels of 17β-estradiol (E2) alleviate ongoing disease and decrease astrocytic production of CCL2, a proinflammatory chemokine that drives the local recruitment of inflammatory myeloid cells. Immunohistochemistry and confocal imaging reveal that, in spinal cord white matter EAE lesions, reactive astrocytes express estrogen receptor (ER)α (and to a lesser extent ERβ) with a preferential nuclear localization, whereas other cells including infiltrated leukocytes express ERs only in their membranes or cytosol. In cultured rodent astrocytes, E2 or an ERα agonist, but not an ERβ agonist, inhibits TNFα-induced CCL2 expression at nanomolar concentrations, and the ER antagonist ICI 182,170 blocks this effect. We show that this anti-inflammatory action is not associated with inhibition of NFκB nuclear translocation but rather involves direct repression of NFκB-dependent transcription. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further indicate that estrogen suppresses TNFα-induced NFκB recruitment to the CCL2 enhancer. These data uncover reactive astrocytes as an important target for nuclear ERα inhibitory action on chemokine expression and suggest that targeting astrocytic nuclear NFκB activation with estrogen receptor α modulators may improve therapies of chronic neurodegenerative disorders involving astroglial neuroinflammation. PMID:20404154

  18. Expression of apoptosis-related genes in liver-specific growth hormone receptor gene-disrupted mice is sex dependent.

    PubMed

    Gesing, Adam; Wang, Feiya; List, Edward O; Berryman, Darlene E; Masternak, Michal M; Lewinski, Andrzej; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata; Kopchick, John J; Bartke, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a process that affects life span and health. Mice with liver-specific disruption of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene (ie, Ghr gene) liver-specific growth hormone receptor knockout [LiGHRKO] mice), as opposed to mice with global deletion of the Ghr gene (GHRKO; Ghr-/-), are characterized by severe hepatic steatosis and lack of improved insulin sensitivity. We have previously shown that levels of proapoptotic factors are decreased in long-lived and insulin-sensitive GHRKO mice. In the current study, expression of specific apoptosis-related genes was assessed in brains, kidneys, and livers of male and female LiGHRKO and wild-type mice using real-time PCR. In the brain, expression of Caspase 3, Caspase 9, Smac/DIABLO, and p53 was decreased in females compared with males. Renal expression of Caspase 3 and Noxa also decreased in female mice. In the liver, no differences were seen between males and females. Also, no significant genotype effects were detected in the examined organs. Lack of significant genotype effect in kidneys contrasts with previous observations in GHRKO mice. Apparently, global GHR deletion induces beneficial changes in apoptotic factors, whereas liver-specific GHR disruption does not. Furthermore, sexual dimorphism may play an important role in regulating apoptosis during liver-specific suppression of the somatotrophic signaling. PMID:24550353

  19. Glucocorticoid Repression of Inflammatory Gene Expression Shows Differential Responsiveness by Transactivation- and Transrepression-Dependent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    King, Elizabeth M.; Chivers, Joanna E.; Rider, Christopher F.; Minnich, Anne; Giembycz, Mark A.; Newton, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Binding of glucocorticoid to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR/NR3C1) may repress inflammatory gene transcription via direct, protein synthesis-independent processes (transrepression), or by activating transcription (transactivation) of multiple anti-inflammatory/repressive factors. Using human pulmonary A549 cells, we showed that 34 out of 39 IL-1β-inducible mRNAs were repressed to varying degrees by the synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone. Whilst these repressive effects were GR-dependent, they did not correlate with either the magnitude of IL-1β-inducibility or the NF-κB-dependence of the inflammatory genes. This suggests that induction by IL-1β and repression by dexamethasone are independent events. Roles for transactivation were investigated using the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. However, cycloheximide reduced the IL-1β-dependent expression of 13 mRNAs, which, along with the 5 not showing repression by dexamethasone, were not analysed further. Of the remaining 21 inflammatory mRNAs, cycloheximide significantly attenuated the dexamethasone-dependent repression of 11 mRNAs that also showed a marked time-dependence to their repression. Such effects are consistent with repression occurring via the de novo synthesis of a new product, or products, which subsequently cause repression (i.e., repression via a transactivation mechanism). Conversely, 10 mRNAs showed completely cycloheximide-independent, and time-independent, repression by dexamethasone. This is consistent with direct GR transrepression. Importantly, the inflammatory mRNAs showing attenuated repression by dexamethasone in the presence of cycloheximide also showed a significantly greater extent of repression and a higher potency to dexamethasone compared to those mRNAs showing cycloheximide-independent repression. This suggests that the repression of inflammatory mRNAs by GR transactivation-dependent mechanisms accounts for the greatest levels of repression and the most potent

  20. EXPRESS: Voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels in group IV sensory afferents.

    PubMed

    Ramachandra, Renuka; Elmslie, Keith S

    2016-01-01

    Patients with intermittent claudication suffer from both muscle pain and an exacerbated exercise pressor reflex. Excitability of the group III and group IV afferent fibers mediating these functions is controlled in part by voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels. We previously found tetrodotoxin-resistant NaV1.8 channels to be the primary type in muscle afferent somata. However, action potentials in group III and IV afferent axons are blocked by TTX, supporting a minimal role of NaV1.8 channels. To address these apparent differences in NaV channel expression between axon and soma, we used immunohistochemistry to identify the NaV channels expressed in group IV axons within the gastrocnemius muscle and the dorsal root ganglia sections. Positive labeling by an antibody against the neurofilament protein peripherin was used to identify group IV neurons and axons. We show that >67% of group IV fibers express NaV1.8, NaV1.6, or NaV1.7. Interestingly, expression of NaV1.8 channels in group IV somata was significantly higher than in the fibers, whereas there were no significant differences for either NaV1.6 or NaV1.7. When combined with previous work, our results suggest that NaV1.8 channels are expressed in most group IV axons, but that, under normal conditions, NaV1.6 and/or NaV1.7 play a more important role in action potential generation to signal muscle pain and the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:27385723

  1. Altered connexin 43 expression underlies age dependent decrease of Treg cell suppressor function in NOD mice

    PubMed Central

    Kuczma, Michal; Wang, Cong-Yi; Ignatowicz, Leszek; Gourdie, Robert; Kraj, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Type I diabetes (T1D) is one of the most extensively studied autoimmune diseases but the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to T cell-mediated destruction of insulin-producing β-cells are still not well understood. Here we show that Treg cells in NOD mice undergo age-dependent loss of suppressor functions exacerbated by the decreased ability of activated effector T cells to upregulate Foxp3 and generate Treg cells in the peripheral organs. This age-dependent loss is associated with reduced intercellular communication mediated by gap junctions, which is caused by impaired upregulation and decreased expression of connexin 43. Regulatory functions can be corrected, even in T cells isolated from aged, diabetic mice, by a synergistic activity of retinoic acid, TGF-β, and IL-2, which enhance connexin 43 and Foxp3 expression in Treg cells and restore the ability of conventional CD4+ T cells to upregulate Foxp3 and generate peripherally derived Treg cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that suppression mediated by Treg cells from diabetic mice is enhanced by a novel reagent, which facilitates gap junction aggregation. In summary, our report identifies gap junction-mediated intercellular communication as an important component of the Treg cell suppression mechanism compromised in NOD mice and suggests how Treg mediated immune regulation can be improved. PMID:25911751

  2. Calcium activates the light-dependent conductance in melanopsin-expressing photoreceptors of amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Peinado, Gabriel; Osorno, Tomás; Gomez, María del Pilar; Nasi, Enrico

    2015-06-23

    Melanopsin, the photopigment of the "circadian" receptors that regulate the biological clock and the pupillary reflex in mammals, is homologous to invertebrate rhodopsins. Evidence supporting the involvement of phosphoinositides in light-signaling has been garnered, but the downstream effectors that control the light-dependent conductance remain unknown. Microvillar photoreceptors of the primitive chordate amphioxus also express melanopsin and transduce light via phospholipase-C, apparently not acting through diacylglycerol. We therefore examined the role of calcium in activating the photoconductance, using simultaneous, high time-resolution measurements of membrane current and Ca(2+) fluorescence. The light-induced calcium rise precedes the onset of the photocurrent, making it a candidate in the activation chain. Moreover, photolysis of caged Ca elicits an inward current of similar size, time course and pharmacology as the physiological photoresponse, but with a much shorter latency. Internally released calcium thus emerges as a key messenger to trigger the opening of light-dependent channels in melanopsin-expressing microvillar photoreceptors of early chordates.

  3. Calcium activates the light-dependent conductance in melanopsin-expressing photoreceptors of amphioxus

    PubMed Central

    Peinado, Gabriel; Osorno, Tomás; Gomez, María del Pilar; Nasi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Melanopsin, the photopigment of the “circadian” receptors that regulate the biological clock and the pupillary reflex in mammals, is homologous to invertebrate rhodopsins. Evidence supporting the involvement of phosphoinositides in light-signaling has been garnered, but the downstream effectors that control the light-dependent conductance remain unknown. Microvillar photoreceptors of the primitive chordate amphioxus also express melanopsin and transduce light via phospholipase-C, apparently not acting through diacylglycerol. We therefore examined the role of calcium in activating the photoconductance, using simultaneous, high time-resolution measurements of membrane current and Ca2+ fluorescence. The light-induced calcium rise precedes the onset of the photocurrent, making it a candidate in the activation chain. Moreover, photolysis of caged Ca elicits an inward current of similar size, time course and pharmacology as the physiological photoresponse, but with a much shorter latency. Internally released calcium thus emerges as a key messenger to trigger the opening of light-dependent channels in melanopsin-expressing microvillar photoreceptors of early chordates. PMID:26056310

  4. Differential expression of cell cycle regulators in CDK5-dependent medullary thyroid carcinoma tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Karine; Hillmann, Antje; Augustyn, Alexander; Plattner, Florian; Hai, Tao; Singh, Tanvir; Ramezani, Saleh; Sun, Xiankai; Pfragner, Roswitha; Minna, John D; Cote, Gilbert J; Chen, Herbert; Bibb, James A; Nwariaku, Fiemu E

    2015-05-20

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a neuroendocrine cancer of thyroid C-cells, for which few treatment options are available. We have recently reported a role for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) in MTC pathogenesis. We have generated a mouse model, in which MTC proliferation is induced upon conditional overexpression of the CDK5 activator, p25, in C-cells, and arrested by interrupting p25 overexpression. Here, we identify genes and proteins that are differentially expressed in proliferating versus arrested benign mouse MTC. We find that downstream target genes of the tumor suppressor, retinoblastoma protein, including genes encoding cell cycle regulators such as CDKs, cyclins and CDK inhibitors, are significantly upregulated in malignant mouse tumors in a CDK5-dependent manner. Reducing CDK5 activity in human MTC cells down-regulated these cell cycle regulators suggesting that CDK5 activity is critical for cell cycle progression and MTC proliferation. Finally, the same set of cell cycle proteins was consistently overexpressed in human sporadic MTC but not in hereditary MTC. Together these findings suggest that aberrant CDK5 activity precedes cell cycle initiation and thus may function as a tumor-promoting factor facilitating cell cycle protein expression in MTC. Targeting aberrant CDK5 or its downstream effectors may be a strategy to halt MTC tumorigenesis. PMID:25900242

  5. Rice transglutaminase gene: Identification, protein expression, functionality, light dependence and specific cell location.

    PubMed

    Campos, N; Castañón, S; Urreta, I; Santos, M; Torné, J M

    2013-05-01

    Transglutaminases (TGases), that catalyze post-translational modification of proteins, are scarcely known in plants. As part of a project to characterize transglutaminase genes in new plant species, the identification and characterization of a TGase in rice is presented. Using differential primers, a cDNA (tgo) of 1767bp from genomic rice DNA amplification was obtained. The primers were designed from the rice DNA sequence relatively homologous to the gene encoding active maize chloroplast TGase. Amino acid sequence of the deduced rice TGase protein (TGO) indicated that it contains the enzyme catalytic triad (Cys-His-Asp), three repeats, myristoylation domains and a leucine zipper motif. The TGO recombinant protein was characterized, showing specific activity regulation, and indicating that tgo encoded for an authentic TGase. Substrate preference and Ca(2+) dependent activity were also detected. In the rice plant TGO protein was immunolocalized in the grana chloroplasts, in protein vesicles near them, and in the bulliform cells. Immunoblot analyses, tgo mRNA expression, and TGase activity indicated that TGO expression in rice was light dependent and regulated by the illumination period. This work increases significantly our plant TGase understanding. Its functional role in rice, which is a good model system for C3 plants, is discussed.

  6. Cell-density-dependent expression of Borrelia burgdorferi lipoproteins in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Indest, K J; Ramamoorthy, R; Solé, M; Gilmore, R D; Johnson, B J; Philipp, M T

    1997-01-01

    Previously, we had identified non-OspA-OspB surface proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi that are targeted by the antibody-dependent complement-mediated killing mechanism. Here we demonstrate by Western blotting that one of these proteins, P35, is upregulated at the onset of stationary phase in vitro. Northern analysis revealed that the upregulation of P35 is at the level of transcription. In addition, the expression of an open reading frame (ORF) located downstream of the p35 gene was found to be regulated in the same fashion as that of P35. This ORF encodes a 7.5-kDa lipoprotein. The transcriptional start sites for both of these genes were determined, to aid in the identification of the putative promoter regions. Additional sequencing of the 5' flanking region of the p35 gene revealed a region of dyad symmetry 52 bp upstream of the transcription start site. Southern analysis demonstrated that the expression of these genes was not due to a cell-density-dependent rearrangement in the genome of B. burgdorferi. These findings provide an in vitro model for studying mechanisms of gene regulation in B. burgdorferi. PMID:9119447

  7. Calcium activates the light-dependent conductance in melanopsin-expressing photoreceptors of amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Peinado, Gabriel; Osorno, Tomás; Gomez, María del Pilar; Nasi, Enrico

    2015-06-23

    Melanopsin, the photopigment of the "circadian" receptors that regulate the biological clock and the pupillary reflex in mammals, is homologous to invertebrate rhodopsins. Evidence supporting the involvement of phosphoinositides in light-signaling has been garnered, but the downstream effectors that control the light-dependent conductance remain unknown. Microvillar photoreceptors of the primitive chordate amphioxus also express melanopsin and transduce light via phospholipase-C, apparently not acting through diacylglycerol. We therefore examined the role of calcium in activating the photoconductance, using simultaneous, high time-resolution measurements of membrane current and Ca(2+) fluorescence. The light-induced calcium rise precedes the onset of the photocurrent, making it a candidate in the activation chain. Moreover, photolysis of caged Ca elicits an inward current of similar size, time course and pharmacology as the physiological photoresponse, but with a much shorter latency. Internally released calcium thus emerges as a key messenger to trigger the opening of light-dependent channels in melanopsin-expressing microvillar photoreceptors of early chordates. PMID:26056310

  8. WT1-Dependent Sulfatase Expression Maintains the Normal Glomerular Filtration Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Shi, Xiaofeng; Zaia, Joseph; Jeruschke, Stefanie; Zhang, Dongsheng; Pavenstaedt, Hermann; Drenckhan, Astrid; Amann, Kerstin; Ng, Carrie; Hartwig, Sunny; Ng, Kar-Hui; Ho, Jacqueline; Kreidberg, Jordan A.; Taglienti, Mary; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; Ai, Xingbin

    2011-01-01

    Paracrine signaling between podocytes and glomerular endothelial cells through vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) maintains a functional glomerular filtration barrier. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), located on the cell surface or in the extracellular matrix, bind signaling molecules such as VEGFA and affect their local concentrations, but whether modulation of these moieties promotes normal crosstalk between podocytes and endothelial cells is unknown. Here, we found that the transcription factor Wilms' Tumor 1 (WT1) modulates VEGFA and FGF2 signaling by increasing the expression of the 6-O-endosulfatases Sulf1 and Sulf2, which remodel the heparan sulfate 6-O-sulfation pattern in the extracellular matrix. Mice deficient in both Sulf1 and Sulf2 developed age-dependent proteinuria as a result of ultrastructural abnormalities in podocytes and endothelial cells, a phenotype similar to that observed in children with WT1 mutations and in Wt1+/− mice. These kidney defects associated with a decreased distribution of VEGFA in the glomerular basement membrane and on endothelial cells. Collectively, these data suggest that WT1-dependent sulfatase expression plays a critical role in maintaining the glomerular filtration barrier by modulating the bioavailability of growth factors, thereby promoting normal crosstalk between podocytes and endothelial cells. PMID:21719793

  9. Differentiation-dependent expression of gelatinase B/matrix metalloproteinase-9 in trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Peters, T J; Albieri, A; Bevilacqua, E; Chapman, B M; Crane, L H; Hamlin, G P; Seiki, M; Soares, M J

    1999-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Rcho-1 trophoblast culture system as a model for studying trophoblast invasion and to examine stage-specific expression of enzyme(s) potentially participating in rat trophoblast giant cell invasive behavior. The invasive behavior of the differentiating Rcho-1 trophoblast cells was demonstrated using Matrigel invasion chambers. Gelatin zymography and Western blot analysis of conditioned medium from differentiating Rcho-1 trophoblast cell cultures and rat ectoplacental cone outgrowths revealed a differentiation-dependent increase in gelatinase B/matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9). Nothern blot and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses of Rcho-1 trophoblast or ectoplacental cone cells also showed increasing expression of MMP-9 accompanying cell differentiation. Rcho-1 trophoblast cells stably transfected with MMP-9 promoter/luciferase reporter constructs exhibited a differentiation-dependent increase in MMP-9 promoter activation. In conclusion, trophoblast giant cell differentiation is characterized by transcriptional activation of the MMP-9 gene and appearance of the invasive phenotype.

  10. Differential expression of cell cycle regulators in CDK5-dependent medullary thyroid carcinoma tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pozo, Karine; Hillmann, Antje; Augustyn, Alexander; Plattner, Florian; Hai, Tao; Singh, Tanvir; Ramezani, Saleh; Sun, Xiankai; Pfragner, Roswitha; Minna, John D.; Cote, Gilbert J.; Chen, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a neuroendocrine cancer of thyroid C-cells, for which few treatment options are available. We have recently reported a role for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) in MTC pathogenesis. We have generated a mouse model, in which MTC proliferation is induced upon conditional overexpression of the CDK5 activator, p25, in C-cells, and arrested by interrupting p25 overexpression. Here, we identify genes and proteins that are differentially expressed in proliferating versus arrested benign mouse MTC. We find that downstream target genes of the tumor suppressor, retinoblastoma protein, including genes encoding cell cycle regulators such as CDKs, cyclins and CDK inhibitors, are significantly upregulated in malignant mouse tumors in a CDK5-dependent manner. Reducing CDK5 activity in human MTC cells down-regulated these cell cycle regulators suggesting that CDK5 activity is critical for cell cycle progression and MTC proliferation. Finally, the same set of cell cycle proteins was consistently overexpressed in human sporadic MTC but not in hereditary MTC. Together these findings suggest that aberrant CDK5 activity precedes cell cycle initiation and thus may function as a tumor-promoting factor facilitating cell cycle protein expression in MTC. Targeting aberrant CDK5 or its downstream effectors may be a strategy to halt MTC tumorigenesis. PMID:25900242

  11. Differential expression of cell cycle regulators in CDK5-dependent medullary thyroid carcinoma tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Karine; Hillmann, Antje; Augustyn, Alexander; Plattner, Florian; Hai, Tao; Singh, Tanvir; Ramezani, Saleh; Sun, Xiankai; Pfragner, Roswitha; Minna, John D; Cote, Gilbert J; Chen, Herbert; Bibb, James A; Nwariaku, Fiemu E

    2015-05-20

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a neuroendocrine cancer of thyroid C-cells, for which few treatment options are available. We have recently reported a role for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) in MTC pathogenesis. We have generated a mouse model, in which MTC proliferation is induced upon conditional overexpression of the CDK5 activator, p25, in C-cells, and arrested by interrupting p25 overexpression. Here, we identify genes and proteins that are differentially expressed in proliferating versus arrested benign mouse MTC. We find that downstream target genes of the tumor suppressor, retinoblastoma protein, including genes encoding cell cycle regulators such as CDKs, cyclins and CDK inhibitors, are significantly upregulated in malignant mouse tumors in a CDK5-dependent manner. Reducing CDK5 activity in human MTC cells down-regulated these cell cycle regulators suggesting that CDK5 activity is critical for cell cycle progression and MTC proliferation. Finally, the same set of cell cycle proteins was consistently overexpressed in human sporadic MTC but not in hereditary MTC. Together these findings suggest that aberrant CDK5 activity precedes cell cycle initiation and thus may function as a tumor-promoting factor facilitating cell cycle protein expression in MTC. Targeting aberrant CDK5 or its downstream effectors may be a strategy to halt MTC tumorigenesis.

  12. p53-dependent SIRT6 expression protects Aβ42-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eun Sun; Choi, Hyunjung; Song, Hyundong; Hwang, Yu Jin; Kim, Ahbin; Ryu, Hoon; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia and age-related neurodegenerative disease. Elucidating the cellular changes that occur during ageing is an important step towards understanding the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. SIRT6 is a member of the mammalian sirtuin family of anti-aging genes. However, the relationship between SIRT6 and AD has not yet been elucidated. Here, we report that SIRT6 protein expression levels are reduced in the brains of both the 5XFAD AD mouse model and AD patients. Aβ42, a major component of senile plaques, decreases SIRT6 expression, and Aβ42-induced DNA damage is prevented by the overexpression of SIRT6 in HT22 mouse hippocampal neurons. Also, there is a strong negative correlation between Aβ42-induced DNA damage and p53 levels, a protein involved in DNA repair and apoptosis. In addition, upregulation of p53 protein by Nutlin-3 prevents SIRT6 reduction and DNA damage induced by Aβ42. Taken together, this study reveals that p53-dependent SIRT6 expression protects cells from Aβ42-induced DNA damage, making SIRT6 a promising new therapeutic target for the treatment of AD. PMID:27156849

  13. Targeting Activation of Specific NF-κB Subunits Prevents Stress-Dependent Atherothrombotic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Djuric, Zdenka; Kashif, Muhammed; Fleming, Thomas; Muhammad, Sajjad; Piel, David; von Bauer, Rüdiger; Bea, Florian; Herzig, Stephan; Zeier, Martin; Pizzi, Marina; Isermann, Berend; Hecker, Markus; Schwaninger, Markus; Bierhaus, Angelika; Nawroth, Peter P

    2012-01-01

    Psychosocial stress has been shown to be a contributing factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Although the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated entirely, it has been shown previously that the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is an important component of stress-activated signaling pathway. In this study, we aimed to decipher the mechanisms of stress-induced NF-κB-mediated gene expression, using an in vitro and in vivo model of psychosocial stress. Induction of stress led to NF-κB-dependent expression of proinflammatory (tissue factor, intracellular adhesive molecule 1 [ICAM-1]) and protective genes (manganese superoxide dismutase [MnSOD]) via p50, p65 or cRel. Selective inhibition of the different subunits and the respective kinases showed that inhibition of cRel leads to the reduction of atherosclerotic lesions in apolipoprotein−/− (ApoE−/−) mice via suppression of proinflammatory gene expression. This observation may therefore provide a possible explanation for ineffectiveness of antioxidant therapies and suggests that selective targeting of cRel activation may provide a novel approach for the treatment of stress-related inflammatory vascular disease. PMID:23114885

  14. Acute Vhl gene inactivation induces cardiac HIF-dependent erythropoietin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Miró-Murillo, Marta; Elorza, Ainara; Soro-Arnáiz, Inés; Albacete-Albacete, Lucas; Ordoñez, Angel; Balsa, Eduardo; Vara-Vega, Alicia; Vázquez, Silvia; Fuertes, Esther; Fernández-Criado, Carmen; Landázuri, Manuel O; Aragonés, Julián

    2011-01-01

    Von Hippel Lindau (Vhl) gene inactivation results in embryonic lethality. The consequences of its inactivation in adult mice, and of the ensuing activation of the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), have been explored mainly in a tissue-specific manner. This mid-gestation lethality can be also circumvented by using a floxed Vhl allele in combination with an ubiquitous tamoxifen-inducible recombinase Cre-ER(T2). Here, we characterize a widespread reduction in Vhl gene expression in Vhl(floxed)-UBC-Cre-ER(T2) adult mice after dietary tamoxifen administration, a convenient route of administration that has yet to be fully characterized for global gene inactivation. Vhl gene inactivation rapidly resulted in a marked splenomegaly and skin erythema, accompanied by renal and hepatic induction of the erythropoietin (Epo) gene, indicative of the in vivo activation of the oxygen sensing HIF pathway. We show that acute Vhl gene inactivation also induced Epo gene expression in the heart, revealing cardiac tissue to be an extra-renal source of EPO. Indeed, primary cardiomyocytes and HL-1 cardiac cells both induce Epo gene expression when exposed to low O(2) tension in a HIF-dependent manner. Thus, as well as demonstrating the potential of dietary tamoxifen administration for gene inactivation studies in UBC-Cre-ER(T2) mouse lines, this data provides evidence of a cardiac oxygen-sensing VHL/HIF/EPO pathway in adult mice.

  15. Maturation stage and proliferation-dependent expression of dUTPase in human T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Strahler, J R; Zhu, X X; Hora, N; Wang, Y K; Andrews, P C; Roseman, N A; Neel, J V; Turka, L; Hanash, S M

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a database of lymphoid polypeptides detected by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to aid in studies of leukemogenesis and of mutation affecting protein structure. In prior studies, we observed a 19-kDa phosphopolypeptide which was induced with proliferation in mature T cells and constitutively expressed in immature thymocytes. In this report we describe the identification of this polypeptide as the phosphorylated form of dUTPase (EC 3.6.1.23), following cDNA cloning of the gene, based on a partial amino acid sequence of the phosphopolypeptide. Studies of the expression and phosphorylation of dUTPase in human T cells indicate that accumulation and phosphorylation of dUTPase in mature T cells occur in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Interestingly, noncycling immature thymocytes express constitutively high levels of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated dUTPase. These results suggest an important role for dUTPase in immature thymocytes that is independent of proliferation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8389461

  16. Drug-dependent behaviors and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expressions in Caenorhabditis elegans following chronic nicotine exposure.

    PubMed

    Polli, Joseph R; Dobbins, Dorothy L; Kobet, Robert A; Farwell, Mary A; Zhang, Baohong; Lee, Myon-Hee; Pan, Xiaoping

    2015-03-01

    Nicotine, the major psychoactive compound in tobacco, targets nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and results in drug dependence. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans' (C. elegans) genome encodes conserved and extensive nicotinic receptor subunits, representing a useful system to investigate nicotine-induced nAChR expressions in the context of drug dependence. However, the in vivo expression pattern of nAChR genes under chronic nicotine exposure has not been fully investigated. To define the role of nAChR genes involved in nicotine-induced locomotion changes and the development of tolerance to these effects, we characterized the locomotion behavior combining the use of two systems: the Worm Tracker hardware and the WormLab software. Our results indicate that the combined system is an advantageous alternative to define drug-dependent locomotion behavior in C. elegans. Chronic (24-h dosing) nicotine exposure at 6.17 and 61.7μM induced nicotine-dependent behaviors, including drug stimulation, tolerance/adaption, and withdrawal responses. Specifically, the movement speed of naïve worms on nicotine-containing environments was significantly higher than on nicotine-free environments, suggesting locomotion stimulation by nicotine. In contrast, the 24-h 6.17μM nicotine-treated worms exhibited significantly higher speeds on nicotine-free plates than on nicotine-containing plates. Furthermore significantly increased locomotion behavior during nicotine cessation was observed in worms treated with a higher nicotine concentration of 61.7μM. The relatively low locomotion speed of nicotine-treated worms on nicotine-containing environments also indicates adaption/tolerance of worms to nicotine following chronic nicotine exposure. In addition, this study provides useful information regarding the comprehensive in vivo expression profile of the 28 "core" nAChRs following different dosages of chronic nicotine treatments. Eleven genes (lev-1, acr-6, acr-7, acr-11, lev-8, acr

  17. Expression Profiling the Temperature-Dependent Amphibian Response to Infection by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Laia; Li, Ming-Shi; Doddington, Benjamin J.; Robert, Jacques; Seidel, Judith A.; Kroll, J. Simon; Zimmerman, Lyle B.; Grassly, Nicholas C.; Garner, Trenton W. J.; Fisher, Matthew C.

    2009-01-01

    Amphibians are experiencing a panzootic of unprecedented proportions caused by the emergence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). However, all species are not equally at risk of infection, and risk is further modified by environmental variables, specifically temperature. In order to understand how, and when, hosts mount a response to Bd we analysed infection dynamics and patterns of gene expression in the model amphibian species Silurana (Xenopus) tropicalis. Mathematical modelling of infection dynamics demonstrate the existence of a temperature-dependent protective response that is largely independent of the intrinsic growth-rate of Bd. Using temporal expression-profiling by microarrays and qRT-PCR, we characterise this response in the main amphibian lymphoid tissue, the spleen. We demonstrate that clearance of Bd at the host-optimal temperature is not clearly associated with an adaptive immune response, but rather is correlated with the induction of components of host innate immunity including the expression of genes that are associated with the production of the antimicrobial skin peptide preprocareulein (PPCP) as well as inflammatory responses. We find that adaptive immunity appears to be lacking at host-optimal temperatures. This suggests that either Bd does not stimulate, or suppresses, adaptive immunity, or that trade-offs exist between innate and adaptive limbs of the amphibian immune system. At cold temperatures, S. tropicalis loses the ability to mount a PPCP-based innate response, and instead manifests a more pronounced inflammatory reaction that is characterised by the production of proteases and higher pathogen burdens. This study demonstrates the temperature-dependency of the amphibian response to infection by Bd and indicates the influence that changing climates may exert on the ectothermic host response to pathogens. PMID:20027316

  18. Regulation of glucose-dependent gene expression by the RNA helicase Dbp2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Beck, Zachary T; Cloutier, Sara C; Schipma, Matthew J; Petell, Christopher J; Ma, Wai Kit; Tran, Elizabeth J

    2014-11-01

    Cellular homeostasis requires a fine balance between energy uptake, utilization, and growth. Dbp2 is a member of the DEAD-box protein family in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with characterized ATPase and helicase activity in vitro. DEAD-box RNA helicases are a class of enzymes that utilize ATP hydrolysis to remodel RNA and/or RNA-protein (RNP) composition. Dbp2 has been proposed to utilize its helicase activity in vivo to promote RNA-protein complex assembly of both messenger (m)RNAs and long noncoding (lnc)RNAs. Previous work from our laboratory demonstrated that loss of DBP2 enhances the lncRNA-dependent transcriptional induction of the GAL genes by abolishing glucose-dependent repression. Herein, we report that either a carbon source switch or glucose deprivation results in rapid export of Dbp2 to the cytoplasm. Genome-wide RNA sequencing identified a new class of antisense hexose transporter transcripts that are specifically upregulated upon loss of DBP2. Further investigation revealed that both sense and antisense hexose transporter (HXT) transcripts are aberrantly expressed in DBP2-deficient cells and that this expression pathway can be partially mimicked in wild-type cells by glucose depletion. We also find that Dbp2 promotes ribosome biogenesis and represses alternative ATP-producing pathways, as loss of DBP2 alters the transcript levels of ribosome biosynthesis (snoRNAs and associated proteins) and respiration gene products. This suggests that Dbp2 is a key integrator of nutritional status and gene expression programs required for energy homeostasis.

  19. Bacterial Suppression of RNA Polymerase II-Dependent Host Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ambite, Ines; Lutay, Nataliya; Stork, Christoph; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2016-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) is a bacterial carrier state in the urinary tract that resembles commensalism at other mucosal sites. ABU strains often lack the virulence factors that characterize uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains and therefore elicit weak innate immune responses in the urinary tract. In addition, ABU strains are active modifiers of the host environment, which they influence by suppressing RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-dependent host gene expression. In patients inoculated with the ABU strain E. coli 83972, gene expression was markedly reduced after 24 h (>60% of all regulated genes). Specific repressors and activators of Pol II-dependent transcription were modified, and Pol II Serine 2 phosphorylation was significantly inhibited, indicating reduced activity of the polymerase. This active inhibition included disease–associated innate immune response pathways, defined by TLR4, IRF-3 and IRF-7, suggesting that ABU strains persist in human hosts by active suppression of the antibacterial defense. In a search for the mechanism of inhibition, we compared the whole genome sequences of E. coli 83972 and the uropathogenic strain E. coli CFT073. In addition to the known loss of virulence genes, we observed that the ABU strain has acquired several phages and identified the lytic Prophage 3 as a candidate Pol II inhibitor. Intact phage particles were released by ABU during in vitro growth in human urine. To address if Prophage 3 affects Pol II activity, we constructed a Prophage 3 negative deletion mutant in E. coli 83972 and compared the effect on Pol II phosphorylation between the mutant and the E. coli 83972 wild type (WT) strains. No difference was detected, suggesting that the Pol II inhibitor is not encoded by the phage. The review summarizes the evidence that the ABU strain E. coli 83972 modifies host gene expression by inhibition of Pol II phosphorylation, and discusses the ability of ABU strains to actively create an environment that

  20. Phenotypic and genotypic expression of self-incompatibility haplotypes in Arabidopsis lyrata suggests unique origin of alleles in different dominance classes.

    PubMed

    Prigoda, Nadia L; Nassuth, Annette; Mable, Barbara K

    2005-07-01

    The highly divergent alleles of the SRK gene in outcrossing Arabidopsis lyrata have provided important insights into the evolutionary history of self-incompatibility (SI) alleles and serve as an ideal model for studies of the evolutionary and molecular interactions between alleles in cell-cell recognition systems in general. One tantalizing question is how new specificities arise in systems that require coordination between male and female components. Allelic recruitment via gene conversion has been proposed as one possibility, based on the division of DNA sequences at the SRK locus into two distinctive groups: (1) sequences whose relationships are not well resolved and display the long branch lengths expected for a gene under balancing selection (Class A); and (2) sequences falling into a well-supported group with shorter branch lengths (Class B) that are closely related to an unlinked paralogous locus. The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in phenotype (site of expression assayed using allele-specific reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) or function (dominance relationships assayed through controlled pollinations) accompany the sequence-based classification. Expression of Class A alleles was restricted to floral tissues, as predicted for genes involved in the SI response. In contrast, Class B alleles, despite being tightly linked to the SI phenotype, were unexpectedly expressed in both leaves and floral tissues; the same pattern found for a related unlinked paralogous sequence. Whereas Class A included haplotypes in three different dominance classes, all Class B haplotypes were found to be recessive to all except one Class A haplotype. In addition, mapping of expression and dominance patterns onto an S-domain-based genealogy suggested that allelic dominance may be determined more by evolutionary history than by frequency-dependent selection for lowered dominance as some theories suggest. The possibility that interlocus gene

  1. Promoter Variant-Dependent mRNA Expression of the MEF2A in Longissimus Dorsi Muscle in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Starzyński, Rafał Radosław; Wicińska, Krystyna; Flisikowski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    The myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A) gene encodes a member of the myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) protein family that is involved in vertebrate skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle development and differentiation during myogenesis. According to recent studies, MEF2 genes might be major regulators of postnatal skeletal muscle growth; thus, they are considered to be important, novel candidates for muscle development and body growth in farm animals. The aim of the present study was to search for polymorphisms in the bovine MEF2A gene and analyze their effect on the MEF2A mRNA expression level in the longissimus dorsi muscle of Polish Holstein-Fresian cattle. In total, 4094 bp of the whole coding sequence and the promoter region of MEF2A were re-sequenced in 30 animals, resulting in the detection of 6 novel variants as well as one previously reported SNP. Three linked mutations in the promoter region (-780T/G, g.-768T/G, and g.-222A/G) and only two genotypes were identified in two Polish breeds (TTA/TTA and TTA/GGG). Three SNPs in the coding region [g.1599G/A (421aa), g.1626G/A (429aa), and g.1641G/A (434aa)] appeared to be silent substitutions and segregated as two intragene haplotypes: GGG and AAA. Expression analysis showed that the mutations in the promoter region are highly associated with the MEF2A mRNA level in the longissimus dorsi muscle of bulls carrying two different genotypes. The higher MEF2A mRNA level was estimated in the muscle of bulls carrying the TTA/TTA (p<0.01) genotype as compared with those with TTA/GGG. The results obtained suggest that the nucleotide sequence mutation in MEF2A might be useful marker for body growth traits in cattle. PMID:22320864

  2. Experience-Dependent Changes in Excitatory and Inhibitory Receptor Subunit Expression in Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Beston, Brett R.; Jones, David G.; Murphy, Kathryn M.

    2010-01-01

    Experience-dependent development of visual cortex depends on the balance between excitatory and inhibitory activity. This activity is regulated by key excitatory (NMDA, AMPA) and inhibitory (GABAA) receptors. The composition of these receptors changes developmentally, affecting the excitatory–inhibitory (E/I) balance and synaptic plasticity. Until now, it has been unclear how abnormal visual experience affects this balance. To examine this question, we measured developmental changes in excitatory and inhibitory receptor subunits in visual cortex following normal visual experience and monocular deprivation. We used Western blot analysis to quantify expression of excitatory (NR1, NR2A, NR2B, GluR2) and inhibitory (GABAAα1, GABAAα3) receptor subunits. Monocular deprivation promoted a complex pattern of changes in receptor subunit expression that varied with age and was most severe in the region of visual cortex representing the central visual field. To characterize the multidimensional pattern of experience-dependent change in these synaptic mechanisms, we applied a neuroinformatics approach using principal component analysis. We found that monocular deprivation (i) causes a large portion of the normal developmental trajectory to be bypassed, (ii) shifts the E/I balance in favor of more inhibition, and (iii) accelerates the maturation of receptor subunits. Taken together, these results show that monocularly deprived animals have an abnormal balance of the synaptic machinery needed for functional maturation of cortical circuits and for developmental plasticity. This raises the possibility that interventions intended to treat amblyopia may need to address multiple synaptic mechanisms to produce optimal recovery. PMID:21423524

  3. Water Channels Aquaporin 4 and -1 Expression in Subependymoma Depends on the Localization of the Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Andreas F.; Hoffmeister, Maike; Beschorner, Rudi; Ritz, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Background We analyzed aquaporin 4 and -1 expression in subependymomas, benign and slow growing brain tumors WHO grade I. Ten subependymoma cases were investigated, five of the fossa inferior and five of the fossa superior. Methods and Results Using immunohistochemistry, we observed different aquaporin expression patterns depending on localization: aquaporin 4 and -1 were detected in infratentorial subependymomas in the entire tumor tissue. In contrast, supratentorial subependymomas revealed aquaporin 4 and -1 expression only in border areas of the tumor. PCR analyses however showed no difference in aquaporin 4 expression between all subependymomas independent of localization but at higher levels than in normal brain. In contrast, aquaporin 1 RNA levels were found to be higher only in infratentorial samples compared to supratentorial and normal brain samples. The reason for the different distribution pattern of aquaporin 4 in subependymomas still remains unclear. On the cellular level, aquaporin 4 was redistributed on the surface of the tumor cells, and in freeze fracture replicas no orthogonal arrays of particles were found. This was similar to our previous findings in malignant glioblastomas. From these studies, we know that extracellular matrix molecules within the tumor like agrin and its receptor alpha-dystroglycan are involved in forming orthogonal arrays of particles. In subependymomas neither agrin nor alpha-dystroglycan were detected around blood vessels. Conclusions Taken together, we show in this study that in the benign subependymomas aquaporins 1 and 4 are dramatically redistributed and upregulated. We speculate that extracellular environments of infra- and supratentorial subependymomas are different and lead to different distribution patterns of aquaporin 4 and -1. PMID:26115524

  4. POSTNATAL DEVELOPMENT AND GENDER DEPENDENT EXPRESSION OF TIP39 IN THE RAT BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Dobolyi, Arpád; Wang, Jing; Irwin, Sarah; Usdin, Ted Björn

    2008-01-01

    Tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39) is a selective agonist of the parathyroid hormone 2 (PTH2) receptor. The topographical distributions of TIP39 and the PTH2 receptor in the brain, described in young male rats, suggested that TIP39 has limbic and endocrine functions. In the present study, we investigated the expression of TIP39 and the PTH2 receptor in male and female rat brain during postnatal development by means of in situ hybridization histochemistry, quantitative RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. TIP39’s distribution and expression levels are similar in young female and male brains. TIP39 mRNA levels peak at postnatal day 14 and subsequently decline both in the subparafascicular area and the medial paralemniscal nucleus, the two major sites where TIP39 is synthesized. A greater developmental decrease in TIP39 expression in males leads to greater levels in older females than older males. The decrease is partially reversed by pre-pubertal but not post-pubertal gonadectomy. TIP39 peptide levels in cell bodies change in parallel with mRNA levels, while TIP39 appears and disappears somewhat later in nerve fibers. In addition, TIP39 peptide levels are also sexually dimorphic in older rats. In contrast, PTH2 receptor expression in the brain does not decrease during puberty and is not sexually dimorphic even in old animals. The appearance of TIP39 during early, and decline during late, postnatal development together with the gender dependent levels in mature animals suggest that TIP39 may play a role in sexual maturation or gender specific functions. PMID:16871538

  5. Apoptosis Inducing Effect of Plumbagin on Colonic Cancer Cells Depends on Expression of COX-2

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniya, Bharathi Raja; Srinivasan, Gayathri; Mohammed Sadullah, Sakeena Sadullah; Davis, Nimitha; Baddi Reddi Subhadara, Lakshmi; Halagowder, Devaraj; Sivasitambaram, Niranjali Devaraj

    2011-01-01

    Plumbagin, a quinonoid found in the plants of the Plumbaginaceae, possesses medicinal properties. In this study we investigated the anti-proliferative and apoptotic activity of plumbagin by using two human colonic cancer cell lines, HT29 and HCT15. IC50 of Plumbagin for HCT15 and HT29 cells (22.5 µM and 62.5 µM, respectively) were significantly different. To study the response of cancer cells during treatment strategies, cells were treated with two different concentrations, 15 µM, 30 µM for HCT15 and 50 µM, 75 µM for HT29 cells. Though activation of NFκB, Caspases-3, elevated levels of TNF-α, cytosolic Cytochrome C were seen in both HCT15 cells HT29 treated with plumbagin, aberrant apoptosis with decreased level of pEGFR, pAkt, pGsk-3β, PCNA and Cyclin D1was observed only in 15 µM and 30 µM plumbagin treated HCT15 and 75 µM plumbagin treated HT29 cells. This suggests that plumbagin induces apoptosis in both HCT15 cells and HT29 treated, whereas, proliferation was inhibited only in 15 µM and 30 µM plumbagin treated HCT15 and 75 µM plumbagin treated HT29 cells, but not in 50 µM plumbagin treated HT29 cells. Expression of COX-2 was decreased in 75 µM plumbagin treated HT29 cells when compared to 50 µM plumbagin treated HT29 cells, whereas HCT15 cells lack COX. Hence the observed resistance to induction of apoptosis in 50 µM plumbagin treated HT29 cells are attributed to the expression of COX-2. In conclusion, plumbagin induces apoptosis in colonic cancer cells through TNF-α mediated pathway depending on expression of COX-2 expression. PMID:21559086

  6. Gonadal morphogenesis and gene expression in reptiles with temperature-dependent sex determination.

    PubMed

    Merchant-Larios, H; Díaz-Hernández, V; Marmolejo-Valencia, A

    2010-01-01

    In reptiles with temperature-dependent sexual determination, the thermosensitive period (TSP) is the interval in which the sex is defined during gonadal morphogenesis. One-shift experiments in a group of eggs define the onset and the end of the TSP as all and none responses, respectively. Timing for sex-undetermined (UG) and -determined gonads (DG) differs at male- (MPT) or female-producing temperatures (FPT). During the TSP a decreasing number of embryos respond to temperature shifts indicating that in this period embryos with both UG and DG exist. Although most UG correspond to undifferentiated gonads, some embryos extend UG after the onset of histological differentiation. Thus, temperature affects gonadal cells during the process of morphogenesis, but timing of commitment depends on individual embryos. A correlation between gonadal morphogenesis, TSP, and gene expression suggests that determination of the molecular pathways modulated by temperature in epithelial cells (surface epithelium and medullary cords) holds the key for a unifying hypothesis on temperature-dependent sex determination.

  7. Where is the extended phenotype in the wild? The community composition of arthropods on mature oak trees does not depend on the oak genotype.

    PubMed

    Gossner, Martin M; Brändle, Martin; Brandl, Roland; Bail, Johannes; Müller, Jörg; Opgenoorth, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Through a series of common garden experiments, it has been shown that heritable phenotypic differences between individual trees can affect arthropod communities. However, field studies under heterogeneous environmental conditions remain rare. In the present study, we investigated the genetic constitution of 121 mature oak host trees at different trophic levels from 10 sites across Bavaria, southern Germany and their associated insect communities. A total of 23,576 individuals representing 395 species of beetles and true bugs were evaluated. In particular, we determined whether the composition of arthropod communities is related to the oak genotype and whether the strength of the relationships decreases from lower to higher trophic levels, such as for phytophagous, xylophagous, zoophagous, and mycetophagous species. The genetic differentiation of oaks was assessed using eight microsatellite markers. We found no significant influence of the oak genotype on neither the full beetle and true bug community nor on any of the analyzed trophic guilds. In contrast, the community composition of the insects was highly related to the space and climate, such that the community similarity decreased with increases in spatial distance and climatic differences. The relationship with space and climate was much stronger in beetles than in true bugs, particularly in mycetophagous species. Our results suggest that spatial processes override the genetic effects of the host plant in structuring arthropod communities on oak trees. Because we used neutral markers, we cannot exclude the possibility that trait-specific markers may reveal a genetic imprint of the foundation tree species on the composition of the arthropod community. However, based on the strength of the spatial patterns in our data set, we assume that genetic differences among oaks are less important in the structuring of arthropod communities. Future whole-genome studies are required to draw a final conclusion.

  8. Where Is the Extended Phenotype in the Wild? The Community Composition of Arthropods on Mature Oak Trees Does Not Depend on the Oak Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Gossner, Martin M.; Brändle, Martin; Brandl, Roland; Bail, Johannes; Müller, Jörg; Opgenoorth, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Through a series of common garden experiments, it has been shown that heritable phenotypic differences between individual trees can affect arthropod communities. However, field studies under heterogeneous environmental conditions remain rare. In the present study, we investigated the genetic constitution of 121 mature oak host trees at different trophic levels from 10 sites across Bavaria, southern Germany and their associated insect communities. A total of 23,576 individuals representing 395 species of beetles and true bugs were evaluated. In particular, we determined whether the composition of arthropod communities is related to the oak genotype and whether the strength of the relationships decreases from lower to higher trophic levels, such as for phytophagous, xylophagous, zoophagous, and mycetophagous species. The genetic differentiation of oaks was assessed using eight microsatellite markers. We found no significant influence of the oak genotype on neither the full beetle and true bug community nor on any of the analyzed trophic guilds. In contrast, the community composition of the insects was highly related to the space and climate, such that the community similarity decreased with increases in spatial distance and climatic differences. The relationship with space and climate was much stronger in beetles than in true bugs, particularly in mycetophagous species. Our results suggest that spatial processes override the genetic effects of the host plant in structuring arthropod communities on oak trees. Because we used neutral markers, we cannot exclude the possibility that trait-specific markers may reveal a genetic imprint of the foundation tree species on the composition of the arthropod community. However, based on the strength of the spatial patterns in our data set, we assume that genetic differences among oaks are less important in the structuring of arthropod communities. Future whole-genome studies are required to draw a final conclusion. PMID:25635387

  9. Age-Dependent Brain Gene Expression and Copy Number Anomalies in Autism Suggest Distinct Pathological Processes at Young Versus Mature Ages

    PubMed Central

    Winn, Mary E.; Barnes, Cynthia Carter; Li, Hai-Ri; Weiss, Lauren; Fan, Jian-Bing; Murray, Sarah; April, Craig; Belinson, Haim; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Schork, Nicholas J.; Courchesne, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, yet the genetic underpinnings of the disorder are largely unknown. Aberrant brain overgrowth is a well-replicated observation in the autism literature; but association, linkage, and expression studies have not identified genetic factors that explain this trajectory. Few studies have had sufficient statistical power to investigate whole-genome gene expression and genotypic variation in the autistic brain, especially in regions that display the greatest growth abnormality. Previous functional genomic studies have identified possible alterations in transcript levels of genes related to neurodevelopment and immune function. Thus, there is a need for genetic studies involving key brain regions to replicate these findings and solidify the role of particular functional pathways in autism pathogenesis. We therefore sought to identify abnormal brain gene expression patterns via whole-genome analysis of mRNA levels and copy number variations (CNVs) in autistic and control postmortem brain samples. We focused on prefrontal cortex tissue where excess neuron numbers and cortical overgrowth are pronounced in the majority of autism cases. We found evidence for dysregulation in pathways governing cell number, cortical patterning, and differentiation in young autistic prefrontal cortex. In contrast, adult autistic prefrontal cortex showed dysregulation of signaling and repair pathways. Genes regulating cell cycle also exhibited autism-specific CNVs in DNA derived from prefrontal cortex, and these genes were significantly associated with autism in genome-wide association study datasets. Our results suggest that CNVs and age-dependent gene expression changes in autism may reflect distinct pathological processes in the developing versus the mature autistic prefrontal cortex. Our results raise the hypothesis that genetic dysregulation in the developing brain leads to abnormal regional patterning, excess prefrontal neurons

  10. Neural crest and mesoderm lineage-dependent gene expression in orofacial development.

    PubMed

    Bhattacherjee, Vasker; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Singh, Saurabh; Johnson, Charles; Philipose, John T; Warner, Courtney P; Greene, Robert M; Pisano, M Michele

    2007-06-01

    profiles of neural crest- and mesoderm-derived mesenchymal cells from the first branchial arch revealed over 140 genes that exhibited statistically significant differential levels of expression. The gene products of many of these differentially expressed genes have previously been linked to the development of mesoderm- or neural crest-derived tissues in the embryo. Interestingly, however, hitherto uncharacterized coding sequences with highly significant differences in expression between the two embryonic progenitor cell types were also identified. These lineage-dependent mesenchymal cell molecular fingerprints offer the opportunity to elucidate additional mechanisms governing cellular growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis of the embryonic orofacial region. The chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1, (SDF-1), was found to exhibit greater expression in mesoderm-derived mesenchyme in the branchial arch when compared with neurectoderm, suggesting a possible chemotactic role for SDF-1 in guiding the migratory neural crest cells to their destination. The novel combination of genetic labeling of the neural crest cell population by EGFP coupled with isolation of cells by LCM for gene expression analysis has enabled, for the first time, the generation of gene expression profiles of distinct embryonic cell lineages.

  11. Potential antioxidant response to coffee — A matter of genotype?

    PubMed Central

    Hassmann, Ute; Haupt, Larisa M.; Smith, Robert A.; Winkler, Swantje; Bytof, Gerhard; Lantz, Ingo; Griffiths, Lyn R.; Marko, Doris

    2014-01-01

    In a human intervention study, coffee combining natural green coffee bean constituents and dark roast products was identified as a genotype-dependent inducer of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, significantly affecting Nrf2 gene expression and downstream GST1A1 and UGT1A1 gene transcription. The observed transcriptional changes correlated with the presence of specific Nrf2 genotypes suggesting their influence on both Nrf2 and subsequent ARE-dependent GST1A1 and UGT1A1 transcription. While the presence of the − 653 SNP seems to be advantageous, resulting in higher Nrf2, GST1A1 and UGT1A1 gene transcription following coffee consumption, in contrast, the presence of the − 651 SNP significantly down-regulated the response to the study coffee. Furthermore, the presence of the B/B genotype in GST1A1 along with the frequency of the [TA]6/6 and [TA]7/7 polymorphisms in UGT1A1 appeared to significantly increase sensitivity toward coffee-induced gene transcription. This data suggests that when examining the role of the Nrf2/ARE pathway in the regulation of antioxidative and chemopreventive phase II efficacy, individual genotypes should be included when considering the potency of bioactive food/food constituents and their therapeutic potential. PMID:25606436

  12. Potential antioxidant response to coffee - A matter of genotype?

    PubMed

    Hassmann, Ute; Haupt, Larisa M; Smith, Robert A; Winkler, Swantje; Bytof, Gerhard; Lantz, Ingo; Griffiths, Lyn R; Marko, Doris

    2014-12-01

    In a human intervention study, coffee combining natural green coffee bean constituents and dark roast products was identified as a genotype-dependent inducer of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, significantly affecting Nrf2 gene expression and downstream GST1A1 and UGT1A1 gene transcription. The observed transcriptional changes correlated with the presence of specific Nrf2 genotypes suggesting their influence on both Nrf2 and subsequent ARE-dependent GST1A1 and UGT1A1 transcription. While the presence of the - 653 SNP seems to be advantageous, resulting in higher Nrf2, GST1A1 and UGT1A1 gene transcription following coffee consumption, in contrast, the presence of the - 651 SNP significantly down-regulated the response to the study coffee. Furthermore, the presence of the B/B genotype in GST1A1 along with the frequency of the [TA]6/6 and [TA]7/7 polymorphisms in UGT1A1 appeared to significantly increase sensitivity toward coffee-induced gene transcription. This data suggests that when examining the role of the Nrf2/ARE pathway in the regulation of antioxidative and chemopreventive phase II efficacy, individual genotypes should be included when considering the potency of bioactive food/food constituents and their therapeutic potential. PMID:25606436

  13. Potential antioxidant response to coffee - A matter of genotype?

    PubMed

    Hassmann, Ute; Haupt, Larisa M; Smith, Robert A; Winkler, Swantje; Bytof, Gerhard; Lantz, Ingo; Griffiths, Lyn R; Marko, Doris

    2014-12-01

    In a human intervention study, coffee combining natural green coffee bean constituents and dark roast products was identified as a genotype-dependent inducer of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, significantly affecting Nrf2 gene expression and downstream GST1A1 and UGT1A1 gene transcription. The observed transcriptional changes correlated with the presence of specific Nrf2 genotypes suggesting their influence on both Nrf2 and subsequent ARE-dependent GST1A1 and UGT1A1 transcription. While the presence of the - 653 SNP seems to be advantageous, resulting in higher Nrf2, GST1A1 and UGT1A1 gene transcription following coffee consumption, in contrast, the presence of the - 651 SNP significantly down-regulated the response to the study coffee. Furthermore, the presence of the B/B genotype in GST1A1 along with the frequency of the [TA]6/6 and [TA]7/7 polymorphisms in UGT1A1 appeared to significantly increase sensitivity toward coffee-induced gene transcription. This data suggests that when examining the role of the Nrf2/ARE pathway in the regulation of antioxidative and chemopreventive phase II efficacy, individual genotypes should be included when considering the potency of bioactive food/food constituents and their therapeutic potential.

  14. Chemotherapy-induced Dkk-1 expression by primary human mesenchymal stem cells is p53 dependent.

    PubMed

    Hare, Ian; Evans, Rebecca; Fortney, James; Moses, Blake; Piktel, Debbie; Slone, William; Gibson, Laura F

    2016-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are abundant throughout the body and regulate signaling within tumor microenvironments. Wnt signaling is an extrinsically regulated pathway that has been shown to regulate tumorigenesis in many types of cancer. After evaluating a panel of Wnt activating and inhibiting molecules, we show that primary human MSCs increase the expression of Dkk-1, an inhibitor of Wnt signaling, into the extracellular environment following chemotherapy exposure in a p53-dependent manner. Dkk-1 has been shown to promote tumor growth in several models of malignancy, suggesting that MSC-derived Dkk-1 could counteract the intent of cytotoxic chemotherapy, and that pharmacologic inhibition of Dkk-1 in patients receiving chemotherapy treatment for certain malignancies may be warranted. PMID:27586146

  15. Flunitrazepam rapidly reduces GABAA receptor subunit protein expression via a protein kinase C-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jonathan D; Price, Sally A; Bristow, David R

    1998-01-01

    Acute flunitrazepam (1 μM) exposure for 1 h reduced GABAA receptor α1 (22±4%, mean±s.e.mean) and β2/3 (21±4%) subunit protein levels in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells. This rapid decrease in subunit proteins was completely prevented by bisindolymaleimide 1 (1 μM), an inhibitor of protein kinase C, but not by N-[2-((p-bromocinnamyl)amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89, 4.8 μM), an inhibitor of protein kinases A and G. These results suggest the existence of a benzodiazepine-induced mechanism to rapidly alter GABAA receptor protein expression, that appears to be dependent on protein kinase C activity. PMID:9723942

  16. Antioxidant Houttuynia cordata extract upregulates filaggrin expression in an aryl hydrocarbon-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Doi, Kazuko; Mitoma, Chikage; Nakahara, Takeshi; Uchi, Hiroshi; Hashimoto-Hachiya, Akiko; Takahara, Masakazu; Tsuji, Gaku; Nakahara, Makiko; Furue, Masutaka

    2014-11-01

    The plant Houttuynia cordata, which is called "dokudami" in Japanese, is known as a potent antioxidant herb that has been traditionally consumed as a folk medicine for various ailments, such as diabetes, obesity, cough, fever and skin diseases, in Asia. However, its antioxidant mechanism remains largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Houttuynia cordata extract (HCE) on human keratinocytes. HCE activated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and nuclear factor E2-related factor 2, with subsequent induction of the antioxidative enzyme NAD (P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 gene. HCE inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in keratinocytes stimulated with tumor necrosis factor α or benzo(α)pyrene. Moreover, HCE upregulated the gene expression of filaggrin, an essential skin barrier protein, in an AHR-dependent manner. HCE may be beneficial for treating ROS-related photoaging and barrier-disrupted skin conditions. PMID:25816564

  17. HIF-1α restricts NF-κB-dependent gene expression to control innate immunity signals

    PubMed Central

    Bandarra, Daniel; Biddlestone, John; Mudie, Sharon; Müller, H.-Arno J.; Rocha, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia and inflammation are intimately linked. It is known that nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) regulates the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) system, but little is known about how HIF regulates NF-κB. Here, we show that HIF-1α represses NF-κB-dependent gene expression. HIF-1α depletion results in increased NF-κB transcriptional activity both in mammalian cells and in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. HIF-1α depletion enhances the NF-κB response, and this required not only the TAK-IKK complex, but also CDK6. Loss of HIF-1α results in an increased angiogenic response in mammalian cancer cells and increased mortality in Drosophila following infection. These results indicate that HIF-1α is required to restrain the NF-κB response, and thus prevents excessive and damaging pro-inflammatory responses. PMID:25510503

  18. Nonlinear Network Reconstruction from Gene Expression Data Using Marginal Dependencies Measured by DCOL

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mengyao; Wang, Xiaofei; Lu, Jianwei; Yu, Tianwei

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of networks from high-throughput expression data is an important tool to identify new regulatory relations. Given that nonlinear and complex relations exist between biological units, methods that can utilize nonlinear dependencies may yield insights that are not provided by methods using linear associations alone. We have previously developed a distance to measure predictive nonlinear relations, the Distance based on Conditional Ordered List (DCOL), which is sensitive and computationally efficient on large matrices. In this study, we explore the utility of DCOL in the reconstruction of networks, by combining it with local false discovery rate (lfdr)–based inference. We demonstrate in simulations that the new method named nlnet is effective in recovering hidden nonlinear modules. We also demonstrate its utility using a single cell RNA seq dataset. The method is available as an R package at https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/nlnet. PMID:27380516

  19. UCP2 mRNA expression is dependent on glucose metabolism in pancreatic islets

    SciTech Connect

    Dalgaard, Louise T.

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UCP2 mRNA levels are decreased in islets of Langerhans from glucokinase deficient mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UCP2 mRNA up-regulation by glucose is dependent on glucokinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of UCP2 increases GSIS of glucokinase heterozygous pancreatic islets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This may protect glucokinase deficient mice from hyperglycemic damages. -- Abstract: Uncoupling Protein 2 (UCP2) is expressed in the pancreatic {beta}-cell, where it partially uncouples the mitochondrial proton gradient, decreasing both ATP-production and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Increased glucose levels up-regulate UCP2 mRNA and protein levels, but the mechanism for UCP2 up-regulation in response to increased glucose is unknown. The aim was to examine the effects of glucokinase (GK) deficiency on UCP2 mRNA levels and to characterize the interaction between UCP2 and GK with regard to glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic islets. UCP2 mRNA expression was reduced in GK+/- islets and GK heterozygosity prevented glucose-induced up-regulation of islet UCP2 mRNA. In contrast to UCP2 protein function UCP2 mRNA regulation was not dependent on superoxide generation, but rather on products of glucose metabolism, because MnTBAP, a superoxide dismutase mimetic, did not prevent the glucose-induced up-regulation of UCP2. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was increased in UCP2-/- and GK+/- islets compared with GK+/- islets and UCP2 deficiency improved glucose tolerance of GK+/- mice. Accordingly, UCP2 deficiency increased ATP-levels of GK+/- mice. Thus, the compensatory down-regulation of UCP2 is involved in preserving the insulin secretory capacity of GK mutant mice and might also be implicated in limiting disease progression in MODY2 patients.

  20. Molecular cloning, encoding sequence, and expression of vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J F; Kahn, J S; Esteban, M

    1986-01-01

    A rabbit poxvirus genomic library contained within the expression vector lambda gt11 was screened with polyclonal antiserum prepared against vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase)-I enzyme. Five positive phage clones containing from 0.72- to 2.5-kilobase-pair (kbp) inserts expressed a beta-galactosidase fusion protein that was reactive by immunoblotting with the NTPase-I antibody. Hybridization analysis allowed the location of this gene within the vaccinia HindIIID restriction fragment. From the known nucleotide sequence of the 16-kbp vaccinia HindIIID fragment, we identified a region that contains a 1896-base open reading frame coding for a 631-amino acid protein. Analysis of the complete sequence revealed a highly basic protein, with hydrophilic COOH and NH2 termini, various hydrophobic domains, and no significant homology to other known proteins. Translational studies demonstrate that NTPase-I belongs to a late class of viral genes. This protein is highly conserved among Orthopoxviruses. Images PMID:3025846

  1. 2-Methoxyestradiol inhibits progesterone-dependent tissue factor expression and activity in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Marisol; Diaz, Jorge; Henriquez, Soledad; Bravo, Maria Loreto; Aranda, Evelyn; Oliva, Barbara; Villalon, Manuel; Kato, Sumie; Cuello, Mauricio A; Brosens, Jan J; Lange, Carol A; Owen, Gareth I

    2010-06-01

    2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME) is an endogenous metabolite of 17β-estradiol with antiangiogenic and antitumor properties, although its mechanisms of action remain unclear. Progestins in hormone replacement therapy increase the risk of breast cancer. Progesterone also enhances the procoagulant activity and invasive potential of progesterone receptor (PR)-positive breast cancer cell lines, an effect largely mediated by induction of tissue factor (TF), the cellular activator of the coagulation cascade. Here we show that 2ME abrogates the induction TF expression in progesterone-treated breast cancer cells via a mechanism that does not involve the estrogen receptor. Instead, we demonstrate that by selectively antagonizing ERK1/2 signaling in breast cancer cells, 2ME limits the transactivation potential of ligand-bound PR and inhibits the expression of endogenous progesterone targets, such as TF and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5. We further demonstrate that 2ME can alter the phosphorylation status of PR. Thus, 2ME prevents progesterone-dependent increase in breast cancer cell invasiveness and procoagulant activity by uncoupling PR from the ERK1/2 signal transduction pathway.

  2. PPARgamma-Dependent Control of Renin Expression: Molecular Mechanisms and Pathophysiological Relevance.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Vladimir T

    2013-01-01

    During the last years accumulating evidence demonstrated that the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) regulates the expression of renin gene and thus the overall renin production. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the transcriptional control of the renin gene by PPARgamma received from variety of models ranging from cell culture to transgenic animals. The molecular mechanisms of the PPARgamma action on renin are particularly interesting because they are featured by two newly described characteristics: one of them is the recently identified PPARgamma target sequence Pal3 which is specific for the human renin gene and mediates exceptionally high sensitivity to transactivation; the other is the potentiating effect of PPARgamma on the cAMP signaling in the renin-producing cells. Furthermore, I discuss the need for generating of additional transgenic animal models which are more appropriate with regard to the role of the PPARgamma-dependent regulation of the renin gene expression in human diseases such as arterial hypertension and metabolic syndrome.

  3. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide: structure of the precursor and tissue-specific expression in rat.

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, C C; Jarboe, L A; Landau, S B; Williams, E K; Wolfe, M M

    1993-01-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) is a 42-amino acid gastrointestinal regulatory peptide that stimulates insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells in the presence of glucose. Approximately 7.8 x 10(5) recombinant clones of a neonatal rat intestinal cDNA library were screened by using plaque hybridization, and three clones were identified and sequenced with the dideoxynucleotide chain-termination method. The translated amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the cDNA indicated that rat GIP was derived by proteolytic processing of a 144-amino acid precursor polypeptide. The mature peptide is flanked by a 43-amino acid NH2-terminal peptide that contains a 21-amino acid signal peptide and by a 59-amino acid COOH-terminal peptide. Analysis of the nucleotide and amino acid sequence of rat GIP revealed only two substitutions from the known human GIP peptide. The use of high-stringency RNA blot-hybridization analysis of total RNA extracted from various organs demonstrated expression of the GIP gene in the duodenum and jejunum and, to a lesser extent, in the ileum. In addition, expression of the GIP gene was observed in the submandibular salivary gland both by RNA analysis and RIA. In response to duodenal perfusion of a 20% Lipomul meal for 60 min, duodenal mucosal GIP mRNA concentrations increased by 42.8% and 48.2% at 30 and 60 min, respectively. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8446620

  4. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of calcium-dependent protein kinase in maize

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have been shown to play important roles in various physiological processes, including plant growth and development, abiotic and biotic stress responses and plant hormone signaling in plants. Results In this study, we performed a bioinformatics analysis of the entire maize genome and identified 40 CDPK genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that 40 ZmCPKs can be divided into four groups. Most maize CDPK genes exhibited different expression levels in different tissues and developmental stages. Twelve CDPK genes were selected to respond to various stimuli, including salt, drought and cold, as well as ABA and H2O2. Expression analyses suggested that maize CDPK genes are important components of maize development and multiple transduction pathways. Conclusion Here, we present a genome-wide analysis of the CDPK gene family in maize for the first time, and this genomic analysis of maize CDPK genes provides the first step towards a functional study of this gene family in maize. PMID:23815483

  5. Unexpected reduction of skin tumorigenesis on expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 6 in mouse epidermis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian; Sistrunk, Christopher; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6 are important regulators of the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, share 71% amino acid identity, and are expressed ubiquitously. As a result, it was assumed that each of these kinases plays a redundant role regulating normal and neoplastic proliferation. In previous reports, we have described the effects of CDK4 expression in transgenic mice, including the development of epidermal hyperplasia and increased malignant progression to squamous cell carcinoma. To study the role of CDK6 in epithelial growth and tumorigenesis, we generated transgenic mice carrying the CDK6 gene under the keratin 5 promoter (K5CDK6). Similar to K5CDK4 mice, epidermal proliferation increased substantially in K5CDK6 mice; however, no hyperplasia was observed. CDK6 overexpression also triggered keratinocyte apoptosis in interfollicular and follicular epidermis as a compensatory mechanism to override aberrant proliferation. Unexpectedly, CDK6 overexpression results in decreased skin tumor development compared with wild-type siblings. The inhibition in skin tumorigenesis was similar to that previously reported in K5-cyclin D3 mice. Furthermore, biochemical analysis of the K5CDK6 epidermis showed preferential complex formation between CDK6 and cyclin D3, suggesting that this particular complex plays an important role in tumor restraint. These studies provide in vivo evidence that CDK4 and CDK6 play a similar role as a mediator of keratinocyte proliferation but differ in apoptosis activation and skin tumor development.

  6. Expression and Stress-Dependent Induction of Potassium Channel Transcripts in the Common Ice Plant1

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hua; Golldack, Dortje; Katsuhara, Maki; Zhao, Chengsong; Bohnert, Hans J.

    2001-01-01

    We have characterized transcripts for three potassium channel homologs in the AKT/KAT subfamily (Shaker type) from the common ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum), with a focus on their expression during salt stress (up to 500 mm NaCl). Mkt1 and 2, Arabidopsis AKT homologs, and Kmt1, a KAT homolog, are members of small gene families with two to three isoforms each. Mkt1 is root specific; Mkt2 is found in leaves, flowers, and seed capsules; and Kmt1 is expressed in leaves and seed capsules. Mkt1 is present in all cells of the root, and in leaves a highly conserved isoform is detected present in all cells with highest abundance in the vasculature. MKT1 for which antibodies were made is localized to the plasma membrane. Following salt stress, MKT1 (transcripts and protein) is drastically down-regulated, Mkt2 transcripts do not change significantly, and Kmt1 is strongly and transiently (maximum at 6 h) up-regulated in leaves and stems. The detection and stress-dependent behavior of abundant transcripts representing subfamilies of potassium channels provides information about tissue specificity and the complex regulation of genes encoding potassium uptake systems in a halophytic plant. PMID:11161018

  7. Unexpected reduction of skin tumorigenesis on expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 6 in mouse epidermis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian; Sistrunk, Christopher; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6 are important regulators of the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, share 71% amino acid identity, and are expressed ubiquitously. As a result, it was assumed that each of these kinases plays a redundant role regulating normal and neoplastic proliferation. In previous reports, we have described the effects of CDK4 expression in transgenic mice, including the development of epidermal hyperplasia and increased malignant progression to squamous cell carcinoma. To study the role of CDK6 in epithelial growth and tumorigenesis, we generated transgenic mice carrying the CDK6 gene under the keratin 5 promoter (K5CDK6). Similar to K5CDK4 mice, epidermal proliferation increased substantially in K5CDK6 mice; however, no hyperplasia was observed. CDK6 overexpression also triggered keratinocyte apoptosis in interfollicular and follicular epidermis as a compensatory mechanism to override aberrant proliferation. Unexpectedly, CDK6 overexpression results in decreased skin tumor development compared with wild-type siblings. The inhibition in skin tumorigenesis was similar to that previously reported in K5-cyclin D3 mice. Furthermore, biochemical analysis of the K5CDK6 epidermis showed preferential complex formation between CDK6 and cyclin D3, suggesting that this particular complex plays an important role in tumor restraint. These studies provide in vivo evidence that CDK4 and CDK6 play a similar role as a mediator of keratinocyte proliferation but differ in apoptosis activation and skin tumor development. PMID:21224071

  8. Unexpected Reduction of Skin Tumorigenesis on Expression of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 6 in Mouse Epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian; Sistrunk, Christopher; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6 are important regulators of the G1 phase of the cell cycle, share 71% amino acid identity, and are expressed ubiquitously. As a result, it was assumed that each of these kinases plays a redundant role regulating normal and neoplastic proliferation. In previous reports, we have described the effects of CDK4 expression in transgenic mice, including the development of epidermal hyperplasia and increased malignant progression to squamous cell carcinoma. To study the role of CDK6 in epithelial growth and tumorigenesis, we generated transgenic mice carrying the CDK6 gene under the keratin 5 promoter (K5CDK6). Similar to K5CDK4 mice, epidermal proliferation increased substantially in K5CDK6 mice; however, no hyperplasia was observed. CDK6 overexpression also triggered keratinocyte apoptosis in interfollicular and follicular epidermis as a compensatory mechanism to override aberrant proliferation. Unexpectedly, CDK6 overexpression results in decreased skin tumor development compared with wild-type siblings. The inhibition in skin tumorigenesis was similar to that previously reported in K5-cyclin D3 mice. Furthermore, biochemical analysis of the K5CDK6 epidermis showed preferential complex formation between CDK6 and cyclin D3, suggesting that this particular complex plays an important role in tumor restraint. These studies provide in vivo evidence that CDK4 and CDK6 play a similar role as a mediator of keratinocyte proliferation but differ in apoptosis activation and skin tumor development. PMID:21224071

  9. Fibroblast Circadian Rhythms of PER2 Expression Depend on Membrane Potential and Intracellular Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Takako; Wang, Connie W.; Pan, Haiyun

    2012-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus synchronizes circadian rhythms of cells and tissues throughout the body. In SCN neurons, rhythms of clock gene expression are suppressed by manipulations that hyperpolarize the plasma membrane or lower intracellular Ca2+. However, whether clocks in other cells also depend on membrane potential and calcium is unknown. In this study, we investigate the effects of membrane potential and intracellular calcium on circadian rhythms in mouse primary fibroblasts. Rhythms of clock gene expression were monitored using a PER2::LUC knockin reporter. We found that rhythms were lost or delayed at lower (hyperpolarizing) K+ concentrations. Bioluminescence imaging revealed that this loss of rhythmicity in cultures was due to loss of rhythmicity of single cells rather than desynchrony among cells. In lower Ca2+ concentrations, rhythms were advanced or had shorter periods. Buffering intracellular Ca2+ by the calcium chelator 1,2-Bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM) or manipulation of IP3-sensitive intracellular calcium stores by thapsigargin delayed rhythms. These results suggest that the circadian clock in fibroblasts, as in SCN neurons, is regulated by membrane potential and Ca2+. Changes in intracellular Ca2+ may mediate the effects of membrane potential that we observed. PMID:22734566

  10. Molecular cloning, encoding sequence, and expression of vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase gene.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, J F; Kahn, J S; Esteban, M

    1986-12-01

    A rabbit poxvirus genomic library contained within the expression vector lambda gt11 was screened with polyclonal antiserum prepared against vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase)-I enzyme. Five positive phage clones containing from 0.72- to 2.5-kilobase-pair (kbp) inserts expressed a beta-galactosidase fusion protein that was reactive by immunoblotting with the NTPase-I antibody. Hybridization analysis allowed the location of this gene within the vaccinia HindIIID restriction fragment. From the known nucleotide sequence of the 16-kbp vaccinia HindIIID fragment, we identified a region that contains a 1896-base open reading frame coding for a 631-amino acid protein. Analysis of the complete sequence revealed a highly basic protein, with hydrophilic COOH and NH2 termini, various hydrophobic domains, and no significant homology to other known proteins. Translational studies demonstrate that NTPase-I belongs to a late class of viral genes. This protein is highly conserved among Orthopoxviruses.

  11. Seedling expression of cross-generational plasticity depends on reproductive architecture.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Marjorie R; Sultan, Sonia E

    2005-02-01

    Through adaptive cross-generational plasticity, stressed plants can alter their offspring in specific ways that promote seedling success. As yet, very little is known about the expression of such plasticity, and whether it varies within a plant due to offspring position. The effects of parental light deprivation on distinct reproductive structures were tested in the annual Polygonum hydropiper, which produces both long terminal racemes and inconspicuous axial inflorescences. Inbred replicate parents from four genetic lines were grown in full greenhouse sunlight and simulated shade, and the initial mass, germination rate, and seedling growth traits of their terminal and axial offspring measured under uniform growth chamber conditions. Although parent light environment did not significantly influence seedlings from axial achenes, growth traits of those from terminal achenes were significantly enhanced as a result of parental light deprivation. In shaded conditions where resources are limiting, P. hydropiper plants appear to prioritize terminal achenes through increased provisioning as well as specific growth changes. These results show that the expression of cross-generational plasticity may vary depending on architectural position of offspring on the maternal plant.

  12. Up-regulation of nucleotide excision repair in mouse lung and liver following chronic exposure to aflatoxin B{sub 1} and its dependence on p53 genotype

    SciTech Connect

    Mulder, Jeanne E.; Bondy, Genevieve S.; Mehta, Rekha; Massey, Thomas E.

    2014-03-01

    Aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) is biotransformed in vivo into an epoxide metabolite that forms DNA adducts that may induce cancer if not repaired. p53 is a tumor suppressor gene implicated in the regulation of global nucleotide excision repair (NER). Male heterozygous p53 knockout (B6.129-Trp53{sup tm1Brd}N5, Taconic) and wild-type mice were exposed to 0, 0.2 or 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} for 26 weeks. NER activity was assessed with an in vitro assay, using AFB{sub 1}-epoxide adducted plasmid DNA as a substrate. For wild-type mice, repair of AFB{sub 1}–N7-Gua adducts was 124% and 96% greater in lung extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm and 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} respectively, and 224% greater in liver extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm AFB{sub 1} (p < 0.05). In heterozygous p53 knockout mice, repair of AFB{sub 1}–N7-Gua was only 45% greater in lung extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm AFB{sub 1} (p < 0.05), and no effect was observed in lung extracts from mice treated with 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} or in liver extracts from mice treated with either AFB{sub 1} concentration. p53 genotype did not affect basal levels of repair. AFB{sub 1} exposure did not alter repair of AFB{sub 1}-derived formamidopyrimidine adducts in lung or liver extracts of either mouse genotype nor did it affect XPA or XPB protein levels. In summary, chronic exposure to AFB{sub 1} increased NER activity in wild-type mice, and this response was diminished in heterozygous p53 knockout mice, indicating that loss of one allele of p53 limits the ability of NER to be up-regulated in response to DNA damage. - Highlights: • Mice are chronically exposed to low doses of the mycotoxin aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}). • The effects of AFB{sub 1} and p53 status on nucleotide excision repair are investigated. • AFB{sub 1} increases nucleotide excision repair in wild type mouse lung and liver. • This increase is attenuated in p53 heterozygous mouse lung and liver. • Results portray the role of p53 in

  13. Dose-dependent microRNA expression in human fibroblasts after LET irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Olivier Charles; An, Jin; Wu, Honglu; Wang, Eugenia; Sarojini, Harshini

    Humans are exposed to various levels of radiation during spaceflight voyages. In cells, exposure to linear energy transfer (LET) radiation causes cellular damage and triggers responses controlled by unique gene-directed signaling pathways. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small ( 22- nucleotide) non-coding RNAs, which regulate gene expression generally by either degrading the messager RNA or inhibiting translation. Their implication in specific cellular response pathways is largely unknown. Here, we investigated the role of radiation-dependent changes in miRNA expression patterns after low (0.1 Gy) and high (2.0 Gy) doses of X-ray exposure in human fibroblasts, and correlated their predicted targets with the cells' genomics and proteomics profiles. A differential miRNA expression pattern was observed between low and high doses of irradiation, with early (0.5 and 2 hrs) significant changes mostly after a high dose and, late (6 and 24 hrs) significant changes after both low and high doses of irradiation. The results suggest that miRNAs may act as ‘hub' regulators of signaling pathways initially to derepress their target genes for cellular responses such as DNA repair, followed by up-regulation to suppress apoptosis, and finally down-regulation to reestablish cellular normalcy. Functional attributions are made to key microRNAs, potentially regulating known radiation biomarkers as well as radiation-responsive mechanisms of cell cycle checkpoint, proliferation and apoptosis. In summary, radiation-responsive miRNAs may have functional roles in the regulation of cell death or survival, and may become biodosimeters for radiation dose exposure. Specific microRNAs may exert a hormetic effect after low-dose radiation, and prove useful in future applications for radiation adaptive therapy and in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced damage. The confirmation of specific miRNAs as biodosimetry markers with therapeutic applications will be necessary in future functional

  14. Dynamic emotional and neural responses to music depend on performance expression and listener experience.

    PubMed

    Chapin, Heather; Jantzen, Kelly; Kelso, J A Scott; Steinberg, Fred; Large, Edward

    2010-12-16

    Apart from its natural relevance to cognition, music provides a window into the intimate relationships between production, perception, experience, and emotion. Here, emotional responses and neural activity were observed as they evolved together with stimulus parameters over several minutes. Participants listened to a skilled music performance that included the natural fluctuations in timing and sound intensity that musicians use to evoke emotional responses. A mechanical performance of the same piece served as a control. Before and after fMRI scanning, participants reported real-time emotional responses on a 2-dimensional rating scale (arousal and valence) as they listened to each performance. During fMRI scanning, participants listened without reporting emotional responses. Limbic and paralimbic brain areas responded to the expressive dynamics of human music performance, and both emotion and reward related activations during music listening were dependent upon musical training. Moreover, dynamic changes in timing predicted ratings of emotional arousal, as well as real-time changes in neural activity. BOLD signal changes correlated with expressive timing fluctuations in cortical and subcortical motor areas consistent with pulse perception, and in a network consistent with the human mirror neuron system. These findings show that expressive music performance evokes emotion and reward related neural activations, and that music's affective impact on the brains of listeners is altered by musical training. Our observations are consistent with the idea that music performance evokes an emotional response through a form of empathy that is based, at least in part, on the perception of movement and on violations of pulse-based temporal expectancies.

  15. Dynamic Emotional and Neural Responses to Music Depend on Performance Expression and Listener Experience

    PubMed Central

    Chapin, Heather; Jantzen, Kelly; Scott Kelso, J. A.; Steinberg, Fred; Large, Edward

    2010-01-01

    Apart from its natural relevance to cognition, music provides a window into the intimate relationships between production, perception, experience, and emotion. Here, emotional responses and neural activity were observed as they evolved together with stimulus parameters over several minutes. Participants listened to a skilled music performance that included the natural fluctuations in timing and sound intensity that musicians use to evoke emotional responses. A mechanical performance of the same piece served as a control. Before and after fMRI scanning, participants reported real-time emotional responses on a 2-dimensional rating scale (arousal and valence) as they listened to each performance. During fMRI scanning, participants listened without reporting emotional responses. Limbic and paralimbic brain areas responded to the expressive dynamics of human music performance, and both emotion and reward related activations during music listening were dependent upon musical training. Moreover, dynamic changes in timing predicted ratings of emotional arousal, as well as real-time changes in neural activity. BOLD signal changes correlated with expressive timing fluctuations in cortical and subcortical motor areas consistent with pulse perception, and in a network consistent with the human mirror neuron system. These findings show that expressive music performance evokes emotion and reward related neural activations, and that music's affective impact on the brains of listeners is altered by musical training. Our observations are consistent with the idea that music performance evokes an emotional response through a form of empathy that is based, at least in part, on the perception of movement and on violations of pulse-based temporal expectancies. PMID:21179549

  16. Vaccinia virus inhibits NF-κB-dependent gene expression downstream of p65 translocation.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Rebecca P; Maluquer de Motes, Carlos; Veyer, David L; Smith, Geoffrey L

    2014-03-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor kappa light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) plays a critical role in host defense against viral infection by inducing the production of proinflammatory mediators and type I interferon. Consequently, viruses have evolved many mechanisms to block its activation. The poxvirus vaccinia virus (VACV) encodes numerous inhibitors of NF-κB activation that target multiple points in the signaling pathway. A derivative of VACV strain Copenhagen, called vv811, lacking 55 open reading frames in the left and right terminal regions of the genome was reported to still inhibit NF-κB activation downstream of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), suggesting the presence of one or more additional inhibitors. In this study, we constructed a recombinant vv811 lacking the recently described NF-κB inhibitor A49 (vv811ΔA49), yielding a virus that lacked all currently described inhibitors downstream of TNF-α and IL-1β. Unlike vv811, vv811ΔA49 no longer inhibited degradation of the phosphorylated inhibitor of κBα and p65 translocated into the nucleus. However, despite this translocation, vv811ΔA49 still inhibited TNF-α- and IL-1β-induced NF-κB-dependent reporter gene expression and the transcription and production of cytokines induced by these agonists. This inhibition did not require late viral gene expression. These findings indicate the presence of another inhibitor of NF-κB that is expressed early during infection and acts by a novel mechanism downstream of p65 translocation into the nucleus.

  17. ERK Oscillation-Dependent Gene Expression Patterns and Deregulation by Stress-Response

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Katrina M.; Cummings, Brian S.; Shankaran, Harish; Scholpa, Natalie E.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2014-09-15

    Studies were undertaken to determine whether ERK oscillations regulate a unique subset of genes in human keratinocytes and subsequently, whether the p38 stress response inhibits ERK oscillations. A DNA microarray identified many genes that were unique to ERK oscillations, and network reconstruction predicted an important role for the mediator complex subunit 1 (MED1) node in mediating ERK oscillation-dependent gene expression. Increased ERK-dependent phosphorylation of MED1 was observed in oscillating cells compared to non-oscillating counterparts as validation. Treatment of keratinocytes with a p38 inhibitor (SB203580) increased ERK oscillation amplitudes and MED1 and phospho-MED1 protein levels. Bromate is a probable human carcinogen that activates p38. Bromate inhibited ERK oscillations in human keratinocytes and JB6 cells and induced an increase in phospho-p38 and decrease in phospho-MED1 protein levels. Treatment of normal rat kidney cells and primary salivary gland epithelial cells with bromate decreased phospho-MED1 levels in a reversible fashion upon treatment with p38 inhibitors (SB202190; SB203580). Our results indicate that oscillatory behavior in the ERK pathway alters homeostatic gene regulation patterns and that the cellular response to perturbation may manifest differently in oscillating vs non-oscillating cells.

  18. The prelimbic cortex is critical for context-dependent fear expression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Joo; Kim, Namsoo; Kim, Hyun Taek; Choi, June-Seek

    2013-01-01

    The ability to regulate emotional responses in various circumstances would provide adaptive advantages for an individual. Using a context-dependent fear discrimination (CDFD) task in which the tone conditioned stimulus (CS) is paired with the footshock unconditioned stimulus (US) in one context but presented alone in another context, we investigated the role of the prelimbic (PL) cortex in contextual modulation of the conditioned fear response. After 3 days of CDFD training, rats froze more to the CS presented in the fearful than in the safe context. Following bilateral lesions of the PL, rats showed similar levels of freezing to the CS in both contexts, in contrast to the sham-lesioned control animals. The lesions did not impair the rats' ability to discriminate contexts per se, as indicated by intact differential responses in a separate experiment which employed a simple context discrimination task. Consistent with the lesion data, single-unit recordings from the PL showed that the majority of CS-responsive neurons fired at a higher rate in the fearful context than in the safe context, paralleling the behavioral discrimination. Taken together, the current results suggest that the PL is involved in selective expression of conditioned fear to an explicit (tone) cue that is fully dependent on contextual information. PMID:23801949

  19. Impaired Regulation of ALDH2 Protein Expression Revealing a Yet Unknown Epigenetic Impact of rs886205 on Specific Methylation of a Negative Regulatory Promoter Region in Alcohol-Dependent Patients.

    PubMed

    Haschemi Nassab, Mani; Rhein, Mathias; Hagemeier, Lars; Kaeser, Marius; Muschler, Marc; Glahn, Alexander; Pich, Andreas; Heberlein, Annemarie; Kornhuber, Johannes; Bleich, Stefan; Frieling, Helge; Hillemacher, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Acetaldehyde, the carcinogenic metabolite of ethanol known to provoke aversive symptoms of alcohol consumption, is predominantly eliminated by aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2). Reduced ALDH2 activity correlates with low alcohol tolerance and low risk for alcohol dependence. The ALDH2 promoter polymorphism rs886205 (A>G) is associated with decreased promoter activity, but a molecular mechanism and allele-dependent ALDH2 protein expression has not been described yet. On the basis of allele-dependent epigenetic effects, we analyzed the rs886205 genotype, methylation rates of cytosine-phosphatidyl-guanine (CpG)-sites within a regulatory promoter region and ALDH2 protein levels in 82 alcohol-dependent patients during a 2-week withdrawal and compared them to 34 matched controls. Patients without the G-allele of rs886205 showed higher methylation of the promoter region than controls and readily adapted epigenetically as well as on protein level during withdrawal, while patients with the G-allele displayed retarded methylation readjustment and no change in ALDH2 protein levels. Our data provide novel insights into an unknown genetic-epigenetic interaction, revealing impaired ALDH2 protein expression in patients with the G-allele of rs886205. Additionally, we checked for an association between rs886205 and protection against alcohol dependence and found a trend association between the G-allele and protection against alcohol dependence that needs replication in a larger Caucasian cohort. PMID:26339786

  20. Dietary restriction in rats and mice: A meta-analysis and review of the evidence for genotype-dependent effects on lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Swindell, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory survival experiments have shown that dietary restriction (DR) can increase median and maximum lifespan. This paper provides a meta-analysis of laboratory experiments that have evaluated the effects of DR on lifespan in rats and mice (1934 – present). In rats, DR increased median lifespan by 14 – 45% in half of all experiments, but in mice the effects of DR have been much weaker (4 – 27%). The least favorable effects of DR on lifespan have been observed among inbred rather than non-inbred mouse strains. In fact, some inbred mouse strains do not necessarily live longer with DR, including DBA/2 male mice and several strains from the ILSXISS recombinant inbred panel. Shortening of lifespan with DR has also been observed and confirmed for ILSXISS strain 114. Importantly, all rodent studies may be biased by the effects of laboratory breeding, since one study has shown that median lifespan is not improved by DR in wild-derived mice. These findings suggest that the set of genetic backgrounds studied in rodent DR experiments should be diversified. This will broaden the scope of genotypes studied in aging research, but may also be critical for translation of findings from rodents to historically outbred and genetically heterogeneous primate species. PMID:22210149

  1. Wnt signalling suppresses voltage-dependent Na⁺ channel expression in postnatal rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wenbin; Cho, Hee Cheol; Marbán, Eduardo

    2015-03-01

    Wnt signalling plays crucial roles in heart development, but is normally suppressed postnatally. In arrhythmogenic conditions, such as cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, Wnt signalling is reactivated. To explore the potential role of Wnt signalling in arrhythmogenic electrical remodelling, we examined voltage-dependent ion channels in cardiomyocytes. Treatment of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes with either recombinant Wnt3a protein or CHIR-99021 (CHIR, a glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitor) caused a dose-dependent increase in Wnt target gene expression (Axin2 and Lef1), indicating activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Cardiac Na(+) current (INa) density was reduced by Wnt3a (-20 ± 4 vs. control -59 ± 7 pA pF(-1) , at -30 mV) or CHIR (-22 ± 5 pA pF(-1) ), without changes in steady-state activation, inactivation or repriming kinetics. Wnt3a and CHIR also produced dose-dependent reductions in the mRNA level of Scn5a (the cardiac Na(+) channel α subunit gene), as well as a 56% reduction (by Wnt3a) in the Nav 1.5 protein level. Consistent with INa reduction, action potentials in Wnt3a-treated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes had a lower upstroke amplitude (91 ± 3 vs. control 137 ± 2 mV) and decreased maximum upstroke velocity (70 ± 10 vs. control 163 ± 15 V s(-1)). In contrast, inward rectifier K(+) current and L-type Ca(2+) channels were not affected by Wnt3a treatment. Taken together, our data indicate that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway suppresses INa in postnatal cardiomyocytes and may contribute to ion channel remodelling in heart disease.

  2. Activation dependent expression of MMPs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells involves protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Saja, K; Chatterjee, Urmimala; Chatterjee, B P; Sudhakaran, P R

    2007-02-01

    Monocyte/Macrophages are integral cellular components of inflammation. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) produced by these cells play a crucial role in every aspect of inflammation. Results of the investigations on activation dependent upregulation of MMPs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in culture using different lectins as an in vitro model system to mimic inflammatory monocytes are presented. Under normal physiological conditions the monocytes produced only very low amount of MMPs in an indomethacin insensitive PG/cAMP independent manner. Zymographic analysis and ELISA showed that treatment of monocyte with lectins like concanavalin A (ConA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and Artocarpus lakoocha agglutinin (ALA) caused upregulation of MMPs and the maximum effect was produced by ALA. ALA significantly upregulated MMP-9 in a concentration and time dependent manner. Immunoblot analysis and RT-PCR confirmed ALA mediated upregulation of MMP-9 production. Inhibition of ALA effect by indomethacin and reversal of the indomethacin effect by Bt(2)cAMP indicated involvement of cAMP dependent signaling pathway. Further support for the prostaglandin mediated effect was obtained by the upregulation of cyclooxygenase by ALA. H-89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), inhibited the expression of MMP-9 indicating that ALA mediated upregulation of MMP-9 is mediated through PKA pathway. Increase in MMP production and increase in cyclooxygenase activity and inhibition of the effect of ALA on MMP production by indomethacin suggested that the ALA activated monocytes in culture can be used as an in vitro model system to study the intracellular signaling process involved in the mediation of inflammatory response.

  3. PTEN regulates angiogenesis and VEGF expression through phosphatase-dependent and -independent mechanisms in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tao; Nan, Ke-Jun; Wang, Shu-Hong; Liang, Xuan; Lu, Chuang-Xin; Guo, Hui; Wang, Wen-Juan; Ruan, Zhi-Ping

    2010-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a typical hypervascular tumor, and increased levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are associated with progression of HCC. Tumor suppression gene PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10), an important antagonist of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/adenosine triphosphate-dependent tyrosine kinase (Akt) pathway, is also commonly lost or mutated in HCC. However, the effect of PTEN on VEGF-mediated angiogenesis in HCC remains unknown. To explore this relationship, we expressed a panel of PTEN mutants in human HCC cells with low expression of PTEN (HepG2 cells). Overexpression of PTEN in HepG2 cells resulted in the downregulation of proliferation and migration of cocultured endothelial cells and decreased expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and VEGF. Similarly, using a nude mouse model, we demonstrated that PTEN decreased expression of HIF-1 and VEGF and suppressed HepG2-induced angiogenesis. This inhibitory effect was not observed in cells expressing a phosphatase-deficient PTEN mutant, suggesting that PTEN inhibits angiogenesis and VEGF through a phosphatase-dependent pathway. Strikingly, reintroducing the C2 domain of PTEN also resulted in a significant decrease in angiogenesis and VEGF expression, although it did not affect Akt phosphorylation or HIF-1 expression. In summary, this study suggests the novel viewpoint that PTEN suppresses angiogenesis and VEGF expression in HCC through both phosphatase-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

  4. Genotype and environment determine allocation to and costs of resistance in quaking aspen.

    PubMed

    Osier, Tod L; Lindroth, Richard L

    2006-06-01

    Although genetic variability and resource availability both influence plant chemical composition, little is known about how these factors interact to modulate costs of resistance, expressed as negative correlations between growth and defense. We evaluated genotype x environment effects on foliar chemistry and growth of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) by growing multiple aspen genotypes under variable conditions of light and soil nutrient availability in a common garden. Foliage was analyzed for levels of nitrogen, phenolic glycosides and condensed tannins. Bioassays of leaf quality were conducted with fourth-stadium gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) larvae. Results revealed strong effects of plant genotype, light availability and nutrient availability; the importance of each factor depended upon compound type. For example, tannin concentrations differed little among genotypes and across nutrient regimes under low light conditions, but markedly so under high light conditions. Phenolic glycoside concentrations, in contrast, were largely determined by genotype. Variation in phenolic glycoside concentrations among genotypes was the most important factor affecting gypsy moth performance. Gypsy moth biomass and development time were negatively and positively correlated, respectively, with phenolic glycoside levels. Allocation to phenolic glycosides appeared to be costly in terms of growth, but only under resource-limiting conditions. Context-dependent trade-offs help to explain why costs of allocation to resistance are often difficult to demonstrate.

  5. RNA thermometer controls temperature-dependent virulence factor expression in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Weber, Gregor G; Kortmann, Jens; Narberhaus, Franz; Klose, Karl E

    2014-09-30

    Vibrio cholerae is the bacterium that causes the diarrheal disease cholera. The bacteria experience a temperature shift as V. cholerae transition from contaminated water at lower temperatures into the 37 °C human intestine. Within the intestine, V. cholerae express cholera toxin (CT) and toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), two main virulence factors required for disease. CT and TCP expression is controlled by the transcriptional activator protein ToxT. We identified an RNA thermometer motif in the 5' UTR of toxT, with a fourU anti-Shine-Dalgarno (SD) element that base pairs with the SD sequence to regulate ribosome access to the mRNA. RNA probing experiments demonstrated that the fourU element allowed access to the SD sequence at 37 °C but not at 20 °C. Moreover, mutations within the fourU element (U5C, U7C) that strengthened base-pairing between the anti-SD and SD sequences prevented access to the SD sequence even at 37 °C. Translation of ToxT-FLAG from the native toxT UTR was enhanced at 37 °C, compared with 25 °C in both Escherichia coli and V. cholerae. In contrast, the U5C, U7C UTR prevented translation of ToxT-FLAG even at 37 °C. V. cholerae mutants containing the U5C, U7C UTR variant were unable to colonize the infant mouse small intestine. Our results reveal a previously unknown regulatory mechanism consisting of an RNA thermometer that controls temperature-dependent translation of toxT, facilitating V. cholerae virulence at a relevant environmental condition found in the human intestine.

  6. Autophagy-dependent PELI3 degradation inhibits proinflammatory IL1B expression.

    PubMed

    Giegerich, Annika Klara; Kuchler, Laura; Sha, Lisa Katharina; Knape, Tilo; Heide, Heinrich; Wittig, Ilka; Behrends, Christian; Brüne, Bernhard; von Knethen, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of TLR4 (toll-like receptor 4) is followed by a subsequent overwhelming inflammatory response, a hallmark of the first phase of sepsis. Therefore, counteracting excessive innate immunity by autophagy is important to contribute to the termination of inflammation. However, the exact molecular details of this interplay are only poorly understood. Here, we show that PELI3/Pellino3 (pellino E3 ubiquitin protein ligase family member 3), which is an E3 ubiquitin ligase and scaffold protein in TLR4-signaling, is impacted by autophagy in macrophages (MΦ) after LPS stimulation. We noticed an attenuated mRNA expression of proinflammatory Il1b (interleukin 1, β) in Peli3 knockdown murine MΦ in response to LPS treatment. The autophagy adaptor protein SQSTM1/p62 (sequestosome 1) emerged as a potential PELI3 binding partner in TLR4-signaling. siRNA targeting Sqstm1 and Atg7 (autophagy related 7), pharmacological inhibition of autophagy by wortmannin as well as blocking the lysosomal vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase by bafilomycin A1 augmented PELI3 protein levels, while inhibition of the proteasome had no effect. Consistently, treatment to induce autophagy by MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin (serine/threonine kinase)) inhibition or starvation enhanced PELI3 degradation and reduced proinflammatory Il1b expression. PELI3 was found to be ubiquitinated upon LPS stimulation and point mutation of PELI3-lysine residue 316 (Lys316Arg) attenuated Torin2-dependent degradation of PELI3. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that PELI3 colocalized with the typical autophagy markers MAP1LC3B/LC3B (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 β) and LAMP2 (lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2). Our observations suggest that autophagy causes PELI3 degradation during TLR4-signaling, thereby impairing the hyperinflammatory phase during sepsis.

  7. COX-2 dependent inflammation increases spinal Fos expression during rodent postoperative ileus

    PubMed Central

    Kreiss, C; Birder, L A; Kiss, S; VanBibber, M M; Bauer, A J

    2003-01-01

    Background and aims: Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and prostaglandins (PGs) participate in the pathogenesis of inflammatory postoperative ileus. We sought to determine whether the emerging neuronal modulator COX-2 plays a significant role in primary afferent activation during postoperative ileus using spinal Fos expression as a marker. Methods: Rats, and COX-2+/+ and COX-2−/− mice underwent simple intestinal manipulation. The effect of intestinal manipulation on Fos immunoreactivity (IR) in the L5-S1 spinal cord, in situ circumference, and postoperative leucocytic infiltrate of the intestinal muscularis was measured. Postoperative PGE2 production was measured in peritoneal lavage fluid. The dependence of these parameters on COX-2 was studied in pharmacological (DFU, Merck- Frosst, selective COX-2 inhibitor) and genetic (COX-2−/− mice) models. Results: Postoperative Fos IR increased 3.7-fold in rats and 2.2-fold in mice. Both muscularis leucocytic infiltrate and the circumference of the muscularis increased significantly in rats and COX-2+/+ mice postoperatively, indicating dilating ileus. Surgical manipulation markedly increased PGE2 levels in the peritoneal cavity. DFU pretreatment and the genetic absence of COX-2−/− prevented dilating ileus, and leucocytic infiltrate was diminished by 40% with DFU and by 54% in COX-2−/− mice. DFU reversed postsurgical intra- abdominal PGE2 levels to normal. Fos IR after intestinal manipulation was attenuated by approximately 50% in DFU treated rats and in COX-2−/− mice. Conclusions: Postoperatively, small bowel manipulation causes a significant and prolonged increase in spinal Fos expression, suggesting prolonged primary afferent activation. COX-2 plays a key role in this response. This activation of primary afferents may subsequently initiate inhibitory motor reflexes to the gut, contributing to postoperative ileus. PMID:12631664

  8. Genome-Wide Dosage-Dependent and -Independent Regulation Contributes to Gene Expression and Evolutionary Novelty in Plant Polyploids.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaoli; Zhang, Changqing; Ko, Dae Kwan; Chen, Z Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Polyploidy provides evolutionary and morphological novelties in many plants and some animals. However, the role of genome dosage and composition in gene expression changes remains poorly understood. Here, we generated a series of resynthesized Arabidopsis tetraploids that contain 0-4 copies of Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis arenosa genomes and investigated ploidy and hybridity effects on gene expression. Allelic expression can be defined as dosage dependent (expression levels correlate with genome dosages) or otherwise as dosage independent. Here, we show that many dosage-dependent genes contribute to cell cycle, photosynthesis, and metabolism, whereas dosage-independent genes are enriched in biotic and abiotic stress responses. Interestingly, dosage-dependent genes tend to be preserved in ancient biochemical pathways present in both plant and nonplant species, whereas many dosage-independent genes belong to plant-specific pathways. This is confirmed by an independent analysis using Arabidopsis phylostratigraphic map. For A. thaliana loci, the dosage-dependent alleles are devoid of TEs and tend to correlate with H3K9ac, H3K4me3, and CG methylation, whereas the majority of dosage-independent alleles are enriched with TEs and correspond to H3K27me1, H3K27me3, and CHG (H = A, T, or C) methylation. Furthermore, there is a parent-of-origin effect on nonadditively expressed genes in the reciprocal allotetraploids especially when A. arenosa is used as the pollen donor, leading to metabolic and morphological changes. Thus, ploidy, epigenetic modifications, and cytoplasmic-nuclear interactions shape gene expression diversity in polyploids. Dosage-dependent expression can maintain growth and developmental stability, whereas dosage-independent expression can facilitate functional divergence between homeologs (subfunctionalization and/or neofunctionalization) during polyploid evolution. PMID:25976351

  9. Concentration-dependent gene expression responses to flusilazole in embryonic stem cell differentiation cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Dartel, Dorien A.M. van; Pennings, Jeroen L.A.; Fonteyne, Liset J.J. de la; Brauers, Karen J.J.; Claessen, Sandra; Delft, Joost H. van; Kleinjans, Jos C.S.; Piersma, Aldert H.

    2011-03-01

    The murine embryonic stem cell test (EST) is designed to evaluate developmental toxicity based on compound-induced inhibition of embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation into cardiomyocytes. The addition of transcriptomic evaluation within the EST may result in enhanced predictability and improved characterization of the applicability domain, therefore improving usage of the EST for regulatory testing strategies. Transcriptomic analyses assessing factors critical for risk assessment (i.e. dose) are needed to determine the value of transcriptomic evaluation in the EST. Here, using the developmentally toxic compound, flusilazole, we investigated the effect of compound concentration on gene expression regulation and toxicity prediction in ESC differentiation cultures. Cultures were exposed for 24 h to multiple concentrations of flusilazole (0.54-54 {mu}M) and RNA was isolated. In addition, we sampled control cultures 0, 24, and 48 h to evaluate the transcriptomic status of the cultures across differentiation. Transcriptomic profiling identified a higher sensitivity of development-related processes as compared to cell division-related processes in flusilazole-exposed differentiation cultures. Furthermore, the sterol synthesis-related mode of action of flusilazole toxicity was detected. Principal component analysis using gene sets related to normal ESC differentiation was used to describe the dynamics of ESC differentiation, defined as the 'differentiation track'. The concentration-dependent effects on development were reflected in the significance of deviation of flusilazole-exposed cultures from this transcriptomic-based differentiation track. Thus, the detection of developmental toxicity in EST using transcriptomics was shown to be compound concentration-dependent. This study provides further insight into the possible application of transcriptomics in the EST as an improved alternative model system for developmental toxicity testing.

  10. CTGF increases vascular endothelial growth factor-dependent angiogenesis in human synovial fibroblasts by increasing miR-210 expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S-C; Chuang, S-M; Hsu, C-J; Tsai, C-H; Wang, S-W; Tang, C-H

    2014-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, a.k.a. CCN2) is inflammatory mediator and abundantly expressed in osteoarthritis (OA). Angiogenesis is essential for OA progression. Here, we investigated the role of CTGF in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production and angiogenesis in OA synovial fibroblasts (OASFs). We showed that expression of CTGF and VEGF in synovial fluid were higher in OA patients than in controls. Directly applying CTGF to OASFs increased VEGF production then promoted endothelial progenitor cells tube formation and migration. CTGF induced VEGF by raising miR-210 expression via PI3K, AKT, ERK, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)/ELK1 pathways. CTGF-mediating miR-210 upregulation repressed glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1-like (GPD1L) expression and PHD activity and subsequently promoted hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α-dependent VEGF expression. Knockdown of CTGF decreased VEGF expression and abolished OASF-conditional medium-mediated angiogenesis in vitro as well as angiogenesis in chick chorioallantoic membrane and Matrigel-plug nude mice model in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest CTGF activates PI3K, AKT, ERK, and NF-κB/ELK1 pathway, leading to the upregulation of miR-210, contributing to inhibit GPD1L expression and prolyl hydroxylases 2 activity, promoting HIF-1α-dependent VEGF expression and angiogenesis in human synovial fibroblasts. PMID:25341039

  11. Solar zenith angle-dependent asymmetries in Venusian bow shock location revealed by Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Lihui; Wan, Weixing; Fraenz, Markus; Zhang, Tielong; Dubinin, Eduard; Wei, Yong; Li, Yi; Rong, Zhaojin; Zhong, Jun; Han, Xiuhong; Futaana, Yoshifumi

    2015-06-01

    It has been long known that the Venusian bow shock (BS) location is asymmetric from the observations of the long-lived Pioneer Venus Orbiter mission. The Venus Express (VEX) mission crossed BS near perpendicularly not only in the terminator region but also in the near-subsolar and tail regions. Taking the advantage of VEX orbit geometry, we examined a large data set of BS crossings observed during the long-lasting solar minimum between solar cycles 23 and 24 and found that the Venusian BS asymmetries exhibit dependence of solar zenith angle. In the terminator and tail regions, both the magnetic pole-equator and north-south asymmetries are observed in Venusian BS location, which is similar to the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) observation near terminator. However, in the near-subsolar region, only the magnetic north-south is observed; i.e., the BS shape is indented inward over magnetic south pole and bulged outward over magnetic north pole. The absence of the magnetic pole-equator asymmetry in the near-subsolar region suggests that the magnetic pole-equator asymmetry is mainly caused by the asymmetric wave propagation rather than the ion pickup process. The evident magnetic north-south asymmetry in solar minimum, which is not observed by PVO, suggests that even during the low long-lasting solar minimum, the ion pickup process is very important in Venusian space environment.

  12. Calcium-dependent protein kinases in plants: evolution, expression and function.

    PubMed

    Valmonte, Gardette R; Arthur, Kieren; Higgins, Colleen M; MacDiarmid, Robin M

    2014-03-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) are plant proteins that directly bind calcium ions before phosphorylating substrates involved in metabolism, osmosis, hormone response and stress signaling pathways. CPKs are a large multigene family of proteins that are present in all plants studied to date, as well as in protists, oomycetes and green algae, but are not found in animals and fungi. Despite the increasing evidence of the importance of CPKs in developmental and stress responses from various plants, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of CPKs from algae to higher plants has not been undertaken. This paper describes the evolution of CPKs from green algae to plants using a broadly sampled phylogenetic analysis and demonstrates the functional diversification of CPKs based on expression and functional studies in different plant species. Our findings reveal that CPK sequence diversification into four major groups occurred in parallel with the terrestrial transition of plants. Despite significant expansion of the CPK gene family during evolution from green algae to higher plants, there is a high level of sequence conservation among CPKs in all plant species. This sequence conservation results in very little correlation between CPK evolutionary groupings and functional diversity, making the search for CPK functional orthologs a challenge.

  13. Expression, purification, and characterization of NADP+-dependent malic enzyme from the oleaginous fungus Mortierella alpina.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiayu; Hu, Xinjie; Zhang, Huaiyuan; Chen, Haiqin; Kargbo, M'balu R; Zhao, Jianxin; Song, Yuanda; Chen, Yong Q; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2014-08-01

    Malic enzymes are a class of oxidative decarboxylases that catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of malate to pyruvate and carbon dioxide, with concomitant reduction of NAD(P)+ to NAD(P)H. The NADP+-dependent malic enzyme in oleaginous fungi plays a key role in fatty acid biosynthesis. In this study, the malic enzyme-encoding complementary DNA (cDNA) (malE1) from the oleaginous fungus Mortierella alpina was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant protein (MaME) was purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The purified enzyme used NADP+ as the cofactor. The K m values for L-malate and NADP+ were 2.19±0.01 and 0.38±0.02 mM, respectively, while the V max values were 147±2 and 302±14 U/mg, respectively, at the optimal condition of pH 7.5 and 33 °C. MaME is active in the presence of Mn2+, Mg2+, Co2+, Ni2+, and low concentrations of Zn2+ rather than Ca2+, Cu2+, or high concentrations of Zn2+. Oxaloacetic acid and glyoxylate inhibited the MaME activity by competing with malate, and their K i values were 0.08 and 0.6 mM, respectively.

  14. Expression of vasopressin receptors in hamster hypothalamus is sexually dimorphic and dependent upon photoperiod.

    PubMed Central

    Dubois-Dauphin, M; Theler, J M; Zaganidis, N; Dominik, W; Tribollet, E; Pévet, P; Charpak, G; Dreifuss, J J

    1991-01-01

    The distribution of vasopressin receptors was studied in the brain of a photoperiodic animal, the Siberian hamster. Attention was focused on [3H]vasopressin binding sites located in the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus, medial tuberal nucleus, and ventral premammillary nucleus in males or females kept in long or short photoperiod conditions. Displacement experiments with structural analogs suggested that vasopressin receptors in the hamster hypothalamus are of the vasopressor (V1) type. Quantitative data obtained with a gaseous detector of beta-particles indicated that in the ventromedial nucleus and in the ventral premammillary nucleus of animals in long photoperiod, the number of beta-particles emitted per unit area was significantly greater in males than in females. In the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, in both males and females, the number of beta-particles emitted was significantly lower in short than in long photoperiod conditions. In the ventral premammillary nucleus, shortening of the photoperiod had a significant effect in reducing the amount of [3H]vasopressin bound in females, but not in males. These data suggest that, in the hamster, the control of the expression of vasopressin receptors differs among various hypothalamic nuclei and may depend on the sex and/or on the level of circulating gonadal steroids. Images PMID:1837144

  15. Protein Kinase CK2 Expression Predicts Relapse Survival in ERα Dependent Breast Cancer, and Modulates ERα Expression in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Marlon D.; Nguyen, Thu; Carriere, Patrick P.; Tilghman, Syreeta L.; Williams, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The heterotetrameric protein kinase CK2 has been associated with oncogenic transformation, and our previous studies have shown that it may affect estrogenic signaling. Here, we investigate the role of the protein kinase CK2 in regulating ERα (estrogen receptor α) signaling in breast cancer. We determined the correlation of CK2α expression with relapse free breast cancer patient survival utilizing Kaplan Meier Plotter (kmplot.com/analysis/) to mine breast cancer microarrays repositories. Patients were stratified according to ERα status, histological grade, and hormonal therapy. Luciferase reporter assays and flow cytometry were implemented to determine the impact of CK2 inhibition on ERE-mediated gene expression and expression of ERα protein. CK2α expression is associated with shorter relapse free survival among ERα (+) patients with grade 1 or 2 tumors, as well as among those patients receiving hormonal therapy. Biochemical inhibition of CK2 activity results in increased ER-transactivation as well as increased expression among ERα (+) and ERα (−) breast cancer cell lines. These findings suggest that CK2 may contribute to estrogen-independent cell proliferation and breast tumor progression, and may potentially serve as a biomarker and pharmacological target in breast cancer. PMID:26703694

  16. It depends: Approach and avoidance reactions to emotional expressions are influenced by the contrast emotions presented in the task.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Andrea; Wentura, Dirk

    2016-02-01

    Studies examining approach and avoidance reactions to emotional expressions have yielded conflicting results. For example, expressions of anger have been reported to elicit approach reactions in some studies but avoidance reactions in others. Nonetheless, the results were often explained by the same general underlying process, namely the influence that the social message signaled by the expression has on motivational responses. It is therefore unclear which reaction is triggered by which emotional expression, and which underlying process is responsible for these reactions. In order to address this issue, we examined the role of a potential moderator on approach and avoidance reactions to emotional expressions, namely the contrast emotion used in the task. We believe that different approach and avoidance reactions occur depending on the congruency or incongruency of the evaluation of the 2 emotions presented in the task. The results from a series of experiments supported these assumptions: Negative emotional expressions (anger, fear, sadness) elicited avoidance reactions if contrasted with expressions of happiness. However, if contrasted with a different negative emotional expression, anger and sadness triggered approach reactions and fear activated avoidance reactions. Importantly, these results also emerged if the emotional expression was not task-relevant. We propose that approach and avoidance reactions to emotional expressions are triggered by their evaluation if the 2 emotions presented in a task differ in evaluative connotation. If they have the same evaluative connotation, however, reactions are determined by their social message. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. Surrogate light chain expression beyond the pre-B cell stage promotes tolerance in a dose-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Kil, Laurens P; Corneth, Odilia B J; de Bruijn, Marjolein J W; Asmawidjaja, Patrick S; Krause, Arndt; Lubberts, Erik; van Loo, Pieter Fokko; Hendriks, Rudi W

    2015-02-01

    While surrogate light chain (SLC) expression is normally terminated in differentiating pre-B cells, co-expression of SLC and conventional light chains has been reported in a small population of autoreactive peripheral human B cells that accumulate in arthritic joints. Despite this association with autoimmunity the contribution of SLC expressing mature B cells to disease development is still unknown. We studied the pathogenicity of SLC(+) B cells in a panel of mice that transgenically express the SLC components VpreB and λ5 throughout B cell development. Here we report that although VpreB or λ5 expression mildly activated mature B cells, only moderate VpreB expression levels - in the absence of λ5 - enhanced IgG plasma cell formation. However, no autoantibody production was detectable in VpreB or λ5 transgenic mice and VpreB expression could not accelerate autoimmunity. Instead, moderate VpreB expression partially protected mice from induced autoimmune arthritis. In support of a tolerogenic role of SLC-transgenic B cells, we observed that in a dose-dependent manner SLC expression beyond the pre-B cell stage enhanced clonal deletion among immature and transitional B cells and rendered mature B cells anergic. These findings suggest that SLC expression does not propagate autoimmunity, but instead may impose tolerance.

  18. Effect of temperature on biomass allocation in seedlings of two contrasting genotypes of the oilseed crop Ricinus communis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Paulo R; Zanotti, Rafael F; Deflers, Carole; Fernandez, Luzimar G; Castro, Renato D de; Ligterink, Wilco; Hilhorst, Henk W M

    2015-08-01

    Ricinus communis is becoming an important crop for oil production, and studying the physiological and biochemical aspects of seedling development may aid in the improvement of crop quality and yield. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of temperature on biomass allocation in two R. communis genotypes. Biomass allocation was assessed by measuring dry weight of roots, stems, and cotyledons of seedlings grown at three different temperatures. Root length of each seedling was measured. Biomass allocation was strongly affected by temperature. Seedlings grown at 25°C and 35°C showed greater biomass than seedlings grown at 20°C. Cotyledon and stem dry weight increased for both genotypes with increasing temperature, whereas root biomass allocation showed a genotype-dependent behavior. Genotype MPA11 showed a continuous increase in root dry weight with increasing temperature, while genotype IAC80 was not able to sustain further root growth at higher temperatures. Based on metabolite and gene expression profiles, genotype MPA11 increases its level of osmoprotectant molecules and transcripts of genes encoding for antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins to a higher extent than genotype IAC80. This might be causal for the ability to maintain homeostasis and support root growth at elevated temperatures in genotype MPA11.

  19. Methylation dependent expression of the mom gene of bacteriophage Mu: deletions downstream from the methylation sites affect expression.

    PubMed Central

    Adley, C C; Bukhari, A I

    1984-01-01

    The expression of the DNA modification gene (mom) of bacteriophage Mu requires the cellular deoxyadenosine methylase (dam) and a transactivation factor from the phage. By hypothesis, the transcription of mom is activated by methylation of three GATC sequences upstream from the mom gene. We have introduced small deletions at a fourth GATC site located about 140 base pairs downstream from the primary methylation region. Some of the deletions severely affect the mom gene expression. We propose from this analysis that (1) some important elements, possibly the promoter, concerned with the expression of mom are located between nucleotides 840 and 880 from the right end of Mu and (2) the mom protein starts with the codon GTG located at position 810. We favor the hypothesis that methylation turns off transcription upstream, thereby allowing the main mom promoter to function. Images PMID:6328425

  20. Molecular hydrogen regulates gene expression by modifying the free radical chain reaction-dependent generation of oxidized phospholipid mediators

    PubMed Central

    Iuchi, Katsuya; Imoto, Akemi; Kamimura, Naomi; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Ichimiya, Harumi; Yokota, Takashi; Ohta, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed that H2 acts as a novel antioxidant to protect cells against oxidative stress. Subsequently, numerous studies have indicated the potential applications of H2 in therapeutic and preventive medicine. Moreover, H2 regulates various signal transduction pathways and the expression of many genes. However, the primary targets of H2 in the signal transduction pathways are unknown. Here, we attempted to determine how H2 regulates gene expression. In a pure chemical system, H2 gas (approximately 1%, v/v) suppressed the autoxidation of linoleic acid that proceeds by a free radical chain reaction, and pure 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PAPC), one of the major phospholipids, was autoxidized in the presence or absence of H2. H2 modified the chemical production of the autoxidized phospholipid species in the cell-free system. Exposure of cultured cells to the H2-dependently autoxidized phospholipid species reduced Ca2+ signal transduction and mediated the expression of various genes as revealed by comprehensive microarray analysis. In the cultured cells, H2 suppressed free radical chain reaction-dependent peroxidation and recovered the increased cellular Ca2+, resulting in the regulation of Ca2+-dependent gene expression. Thus, H2 might regulate gene expression via the Ca2+ signal transduction pathway by modifying the free radical-dependent generation of oxidized phospholipid mediators. PMID:26739257

  1. Describing the Frequency of Marijuana Use: Fuzziness and Context-Dependent Interpretation of Frequency Expressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matt, Georg E.; Wilson, Sandra Jo

    1994-01-01

    A fuzzy set model is offered for interpreting vague frequency expressions, such as "rarely" and "sometimes." Results with 152 undergraduates reporting marijuana use reflect different frequency expressions for the same level of use and suggest that self-report validity may be enhanced by analyzing frequency expressions as fuzzy sets. (SLD)

  2. Integrating mRNA and miRNA Weighted Gene Co-Expression Networks with eQTLs in the Nucleus Accumbens of Subjects with Alcohol Dependence.

    PubMed

    Mamdani, Mohammed; Williamson, Vernell; McMichael, Gowon O; Blevins, Tana; Aliev, Fazil; Adkins, Amy; Hack, Laura; Bigdeli, Tim; van der Vaart, Andrew D; Web, Bradley Todd; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Kalsi, Gursharan; Kendler, Kenneth S; Miles, Michael F; Dick, Danielle; Riley, Brien P; Dumur, Catherine; Vladimirov, Vladimir I

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is known to lead to gene expression changes in the brain. After performing weighted gene co-expression network analyses (WGCNA) on genome-wide mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression in Nucleus Accumbens (NAc) of subjects with alcohol dependence (AD; N = 18) and of matched controls (N = 18), six mRNA and three miRNA modules significantly correlated with AD were identified (Bonferoni-adj. p≤ 0.05). Cell-type-specific transcriptome analyses revealed two of the mRNA modules to be enriched for neuronal specific marker genes and downregulated in AD, whereas the remaining four mRNA modules were enriched for astrocyte and microglial specific marker genes and upregulated in AD. Gene set enrichment analysis demonstrated that neuronal specific modules were enriched for genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial dysfunction and MAPK signaling. Glial-specific modules were predominantly enriched for genes involved in processes related to immune functions, i.e. cytokine signaling (all adj. p≤ 0.05). In mRNA and miRNA modules, 461 and 25 candidate hub genes were identified, respectively. In contrast to the expected biological functions of miRNAs, correlation analyses between mRNA and miRNA hub genes revealed a higher number of positive than negative correlations (χ2 test p≤ 0.0001). Integration of hub gene expression with genome-wide genotypic data resulted in 591 mRNA cis-eQTLs and 62 miRNA cis-eQTLs. mRNA cis-eQTLs were significantly enriched for AD diagnosis and AD symptom counts (adj. p = 0.014 and p = 0.024, respectively) in AD GWAS signals in a large, independent genetic sample from the Collaborative Study on Genetics of Alcohol (COGA). In conclusion, our study identified putative gene network hubs coordinating mRNA and miRNA co-expression changes in the NAc of AD subjects, and our genetic (cis-eQTL) analysis provides novel insights into the etiological mechanisms of AD.

  3. Integrating mRNA and miRNA Weighted Gene Co-Expression Networks with eQTLs in the Nucleus Accumbens of Subjects with Alcohol Dependence.

    PubMed

    Mamdani, Mohammed; Williamson, Vernell; McMichael, Gowon O; Blevins, Tana; Aliev, Fazil; Adkins, Amy; Hack, Laura; Bigdeli, Tim; van der Vaart, Andrew D; Web, Bradley Todd; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Kalsi, Gursharan; Kendler, Kenneth S; Miles, Michael F; Dick, Danielle; Riley, Brien P; Dumur, Catherine; Vladimirov, Vladimir I

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is known to lead to gene expression changes in the brain. After performing weighted gene co-expression network analyses (WGCNA) on genome-wide mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression in Nucleus Accumbens (NAc) of subjects with alcohol dependence (AD; N = 18) and of matched controls (N = 18), six mRNA and three miRNA modules significantly correlated with AD were identified (Bonferoni-adj. p≤ 0.05). Cell-type-specific transcriptome analyses revealed two of the mRNA modules to be enriched for neuronal specific marker genes and downregulated in AD, whereas the remaining four mRNA modules were enriched for astrocyte and microglial specific marker genes and upregulated in AD. Gene set enrichment analysis demonstrated that neuronal specific modules were enriched for genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial dysfunction and MAPK signaling. Glial-specific modules were predominantly enriched for genes involved in processes related to immune functions, i.e. cytokine signaling (all adj. p≤ 0.05). In mRNA and miRNA modules, 461 and 25 candidate hub genes were identified, respectively. In contrast to the expected biological functions of miRNAs, correlation analyses between mRNA and miRNA hub genes revealed a higher number of positive than negative correlations (χ2 test p≤ 0.0001). Integration of hub gene expression with genome-wide genotypic data resulted in 591 mRNA cis-eQTLs and 62 miRNA cis-eQTLs. mRNA cis-eQTLs were significantly enriched for AD diagnosis and AD symptom counts (adj. p = 0.014 and p = 0.024, respectively) in AD GWAS signals in a large, independent genetic sample from the Collaborative Study on Genetics of Alcohol (COGA). In conclusion, our study identified putative gene network hubs coordinating mRNA and miRNA co-expression changes in the NAc of AD subjects, and our genetic (cis-eQTL) analysis provides novel insights into the etiological mechanisms of AD. PMID:26381263

  4. Integrating mRNA and miRNA Weighted Gene Co-Expression Networks with eQTLs in the Nucleus Accumbens of Subjects with Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Blevins, Tana; Aliev, Fazil; Adkins, Amy; Hack, Laura; Bigdeli, Tim; D. van der Vaart, Andrew; Web, Bradley Todd; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Kalsi, Gursharan; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Miles, Michael F.; Dick, Danielle; Riley, Brien P.; Dumur, Catherine; Vladimirov, Vladimir I.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is known to lead to gene expression changes in the brain. After performing weighted gene co-expression network analyses (WGCNA) on genome-wide mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression in Nucleus Accumbens (NAc) of subjects with alcohol dependence (AD; N = 18) and of matched controls (N = 18), six mRNA and three miRNA modules significantly correlated with AD were identified (Bonferoni-adj. p≤ 0.05). Cell-type-specific transcriptome analyses revealed two of the mRNA modules to be enriched for neuronal specific marker genes and downregulated in AD, whereas the remaining four mRNA modules were enriched for astrocyte and microglial specific marker genes and upregulated in AD. Gene set enrichment analysis demonstrated that neuronal specific modules were enriched for genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial dysfunction and MAPK signaling. Glial-specific modules were predominantly enriched for genes involved in processes related to immune functions, i.e. cytokine signaling (all adj. p≤ 0.05). In mRNA and miRNA modules, 461 and 25 candidate hub genes were identified, respectively. In contrast to the expected biological functions of miRNAs, correlation analyses between mRNA and miRNA hub genes revealed a higher number of positive than negative correlations (χ2 test p≤ 0.0001). Integration of hub gene expression with genome-wide genotypic data resulted in 591 mRNA cis-eQTLs and 62 miRNA cis-eQTLs. mRNA cis-eQTLs were significantly enriched for AD diagnosis and AD symptom counts (adj. p = 0.014 and p = 0.024, respectively) in AD GWAS signals in a large, independent genetic sample from the Collaborative Study on Genetics of Alcohol (COGA). In conclusion, our study identified putative gene network hubs coordinating mRNA and miRNA co-expression changes in the NAc of AD subjects, and our genetic (cis-eQTL) analysis provides novel insights into the etiological mechanisms of AD. PMID:26381263

  5. Expression of NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase in Enterobacter aerogenes and its involvement in anaerobic metabolism and H2 production.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan; Zhao, Hongxin; Zhang, Chong; Lai, Qiheng; Wu, Xi; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2009-10-01

    An expression system for NAD(+)-dependent formate dehydrogenase gene (fdh1), from Candida boidinii, was constructed and cloned into Enterobacter aerogenes IAM1183. With the fdh1 expression, the total H(2) yield was attributed to a decrease in activity of the lactate pathway and an increase of the formate pathway flux due to the NADH regeneration. Analysis of the redox state balance and ethanol-to-acetate ratio in the fdhl-expressed strain showed that increased reducing power arose from the reconstruction of NADH regeneration pathway from formate thereby contributing to the improved H(2) production.

  6. Beware of your Cre-Ation: lacZ expression impairs neuronal integrity and hippocampus-dependent memory.

    PubMed

    Reichel, J M; Bedenk, B T; Gassen, N C; Hafner, K; Bura, S A; Almeida-Correa, S; Genewsky, A; Dedic, N; Giesert, F; Agarwal, A; Nave, K-A; Rein, T; Czisch, M; Deussing, J M; Wotjak, C T

    2016-10-01

    Expression of the lacZ-sequence is a widely used reporter-tool to assess the transgenic and/or transfection efficacy of a target gene in mice. Once activated, lacZ is permanently expressed. However, protein accumulation is one of the hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases. Furthermore, the protein product of the bacterial lacZ gene is ß-galactosidase, an analog to the mammalian senescence-associated ß-galactosidase, a molecular marker for aging. Therefore we studied the behavioral, structural and molecular consequences of lacZ expression in distinct neuronal sub-populations. lacZ expression in cortical glutamatergic neurons resulted in severe impairments in hippocampus-dependent memory accompanied by marked structural alterations throughout the CNS. In contrast, GFP expression or the expression of the ChR2/YFP fusion product in the same cell populations did not result in either cognitive or structural deficits. GABAergic lacZ expression caused significantly decreased hyper-arousal and mild cognitive deficits. Attenuated structural and behavioral consequences of lacZ expression could also be induced in adulthood, and lacZ transfection in neuronal cell cultures significantly decreased their viability. Our findings provide a strong caveat against the use of lacZ reporter mice for phenotyping studies and point to a particular sensitivity of the hippocampus formation to detrimental consequences of lacZ expression. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Periadolescent amphetamine treatment causes transient cognitive disruptions and long-term changes in hippocampal LTP depending on the endogenous expression of pleiotrophin.

    PubMed

    Gramage, Esther; Del Olmo, Nuria; Fole, Alberto; Martín, Yasmina B; Herradón, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    Amphetamine treatment during adolescence causes long-term cognitive deficits in rats. Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a cytokine with important roles in the modulation of synaptic plasticity, whose levels of expression are significantly regulated by amphetamine administration. To test the possibility that the long-term consequences of periadolescent amphetamine treatment cross species and, furthermore, to test the hypothesis that PTN could be one of the factors involved in the adult cognitive deficits observed after periadolescent amphetamine administrations, we comparatively studied the long-term consequences of periadolescent amphetamine treatment (3 mg/kg intraperitoneal, daily during 10 days) in normal wild-type (PTN+/+) and in PTN genetically deficient (PTN-/-) mice. Within the first week after cessation of treatment, significant deficits in the passive avoidance and Y-maze tests were only observed in amphetamine-pretreated PTN-/- mice. However, 13 and 26 days after the last administration, we did not find significant differences in Y-maze between amphetamine- and saline-pretreated PTN-/- mice. In addition, we did not find any genotype- or treatment-related anxiogenic- or depressive-like behaviour in adult mice. Furthermore, we observed a significantly enhanced long-term potentiation (LTP) in CA1 hippocampal slices from saline-pretreated PTN-/- mice compared with saline-pretreated PTN+/+ mice. Interestingly, amphetamine pre-treatment during adolescence significantly enhanced LTP in adult PTN+/+ mice but did not cause any effect in PTN-/- mice, suggesting LTP mechanisms saturation in naïve PTN-/- mice. The data demonstrate that periadolescent amphetamine treatment causes transient cognitive deficits and long-term alterations of hippocampal LTP depending on the endogenous expression of PTN.

  8. Estrogen-negative feedback and estrous cyclicity are critically dependent upon estrogen receptor-α expression in the arcuate nucleus of adult female mice.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Shel-Hwa; Herbison, Allan E

    2014-08-01

    The location and characteristics of cells within the brain that suppress GnRH neuron activity to contribute to the estrogen-negative feedback mechanism are poorly understood. Using adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated Cre-LoxP recombination in estrogen receptor-α (ERα) floxed mice (ERα(flox/flox)), we aimed to examine the role of ERα-expressing neurons located in the arcuate nucleus (ARN) in the estrogen-negative feedback mechanism. Bilateral injection of AAV-Cre into the ARN of ERα(flox/flox) mice (n = 14) resulted in the time-dependent ablation of up to 99% of ERα-immunoreactive cell numbers throughout the rostrocaudal length of the ARN. These mice were all acyclic by 5 weeks after AAV-Cre injections with most mice in constant estrous. Control wild-type mice injected with AAV-Cre (n = 13) were normal. Body weight was not altered in ERα(flox/flox) mice. After ovariectomy, a significant increment in LH secretion was observed in all genotypes, although its magnitude was reduced in ERα(flox/flox) mice. Acute and chronic estrogen-negative feedback were assessed by administering 17β-estradiol to mice as a bolus (LH measured 3 h later) or SILASTIC brand capsule implant (LH measured 5 d later). This demonstrated that chronic estrogen feedback was absent in ERα(flox/flox) mice, whereas the acute feedback was normal. These results reveal a critical role for ERα-expressing cells within the ARN in both estrous cyclicity and the chronic estrogen negative feedback mechanism in female mice. This suggests that ARN cells provide a key indirect, transsynpatic route through which estradiol suppresses the activity of GnRH neurons.

  9. Phytochrome-dependent coordinate control of distinct aspects of nuclear and plastid gene expression during anterograde signaling and photomorphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sookyung; Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2014-01-01

    Light perception by photoreceptors impacts plastid transcription, development, and differentiation. This photoreceptor-dependent activity suggests a mechanism for photoregulation of gene expression in the nucleus and plastid that serves to coordinate expression of critical genes of these two organelles. This coordinate expression is required for proper stoichiometric accumulation of components needed for assembly of plastids, photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes and components such as phytochromes. Chloroplast-targeted sigma factors, which function together with the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase to regulate expression of plastid-encoded genes, and nuclear-encoded plastid development factors, such as GLK1 and GLK2, are targets of phytochrome regulation. Such phytochrome-dependent functions are hypothesized to allow light-dependent regulation, and feasibly tuning, of plastid components and function in response to changes in the external environment, which directly affects photosynthesis and the potential for light-induced damage. When the size and protein composition of the light-harvesting complexes are not tuned to the external environment, imbalances in electron transport can impact the cellular redox state and cause cellular damage. We show that phytochromes specifically regulate the expression of multiple factors that function to modulate plastid transcription and, thus, provide a paradigm for coordinate expression of the nuclear and plastid genomes in response to changes in external light conditions. As phytochromes respond to changes in the prevalent wavelengths of light and light intensity, we propose that specific phytochrome-dependent molecular mechanisms are used during light-dependent signaling between the nucleus and chloroplast during photomorphogenesis to coordinate chloroplast development with plant developmental stage and the external environment. PMID:24817873

  10. Immunomodulatory Effect of H. Pylori CagA Genotype and Gastric Hormones On Gastric Versus Inflammatory Cells Fas Gene Expression in Iraqi Patients with Gastroduodenal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    AL-Ezzy, Ali Ibrahim Ali

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the Immunomodulatory effects of CagA expression; pepsinogen I, II & gastrin-17 on PMNs and lymphocytes Fas expression in inflammatory and gastric cells; demographic distribution of Fas molecule in gastric tissue and inflammatory cells. METHODS: Gastroduodenal biopsies were taken from 80 patients for histopathology and H. pylori diagnosis. Serum samples were used for evaluation of pepsinogen I (PGI); (PGII); gastrin-17 (G-17). RESULTS: Significant difference (p < 0.001) in lymphocytes & PMNs Fas expression; epithelial & lamina propria Fas localization among H. pylori associated gastric disorders. No correlation between grade of lymphocytes & PMNs Fas expression in gastric epithelia; lamina propria and types of gastric disorder. Significant difference (p < 0.001) in total gastric Fas expression, epithelial Fas; lamina propria and gastric gland Fas expression according to CagA, PGI; PGII; PGI/PGII; Gastrin-17. Total gastric Fas expression has significant correlation with CagA, PGII levels. Gastric epithelial and gastric lamina propria Fas expression have significant correlation with CagA, PGI; PGII levels. Significant difference (p < 0.001) was found in lymphocytes & PMNs Fas expression; epithelial & lamina propria localization of lymphocytes & PMNs Fas expression according to CagA, PGI; PGII; PGI/PGII; Gastrin-17. Lymphocytes Fas expression have correlation with PGI, PGII, PGI/PGII. PMNs Fas expression have correlation with PGI, PGII. CONCLUSION: Fas gene expression and localization on gastric and inflammatory cells affected directly by H. pylori CagA and indirectly by gastric hormones. This contributes to progression of various gastric disorders according to severity of CagA induced gastric pathology and gastric hormones disturbance throughout the course of infection and disease. PMID:27703557

  11. Activity-dependent regulation of prestin expression in mouse outer hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yohan; Xia, Anping; Lee, Hee Yoon; Wang, Rosalie; Ricci, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Prestin is a membrane protein necessary for outer hair cell (OHC) electromotility and normal hearing. Its regulatory mechanisms are unknown. Several mouse models of hearing loss demonstrate increased prestin, inspiring us to investigate how hearing loss might feedback onto OHCs. To test whether centrally mediated feedback regulates prestin, we developed a novel model of inner hair cell loss. Injection of diphtheria toxin (DT) into adult CBA mice produced significant loss of inner hair cells without affecting OHCs. Thus, DT-injected mice were deaf because they had no afferent auditory input despite OHCs continuing to receive normal auditory mechanical stimulation and having normal function. Patch-clamp experiments demonstrated no change in OHC prestin, indicating that loss of information transfer centrally did not alter prestin expression. To test whether local mechanical feedback regulates prestin, we used TectaC1509G mice, where the tectorial membrane is malformed and only some OHCs are stimulated. OHCs connected to the tectorial membrane had normal prestin levels, whereas OHCs not connected to the tectorial membrane had elevated prestin levels, supporting an activity-dependent model. To test whether the endocochlear potential was necessary for prestin regulation, we studied TectaC1509G mice at different developmental ages. OHCs not connected to the tectorial membrane had lower than normal prestin levels before the onset of the endocochlear potential and higher than normal prestin levels after the onset of the endocochlear potential. Taken together, these data indicate that OHC prestin levels are regulated through local feedback that requires mechanoelectrical transduction currents. This adaptation may serve to compensate for variations in the local mechanical environment. PMID:25810486

  12. The Non-coding Mammary Carcinoma Susceptibility Locus, Mcs5c, Regulates Pappa Expression via Age-Specific Chromatin Folding and Allele-Dependent DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Amanda N.; Haag, Jill D.; Smits, Bart M. G.; Gould, Michael N.

    2016-01-01

    In understanding the etiology of breast cancer, the contributions of both genetic and environmental risk factors are further complicated by the impact of breast developmental stage. Specifically, the time period ranging from childhood to young adulthood represents a critical developmental window in a woman’s life when she is more susceptible to environmental hazards that may affect future breast cancer risk. Although the effects of environmental exposures during particular developmental Windows of Susceptibility (WOS) are well documented, the genetic mechanisms governing these interactions are largely unknown. Functional characterization of the Mammary Carcinoma Susceptibility 5c, Mcs5c, congenic rat model of breast cancer at various stages of mammary gland development was conducted to gain insight into the interplay between genetic risk factors and WOS. Using quantitative real-time PCR, chromosome conformation capture, and bisulfite pyrosequencing we have found that Mcs5c acts within the mammary gland to regulate expression of the neighboring gene Pappa during a critical mammary developmental time period in the rat, corresponding to the human young adult WOS. Pappa has been shown to positively regulate the IGF signaling pathway, which is required for proper mammary gland/breast development and is of increasing interest in breast cancer pathogenesis. Mcs5c-mediated regulation of Pappa appears to occur through age-dependent and mammary gland-specific chromatin looping, as well as genotype-dependent CpG island shore methylation. This represents, to our knowledge, the first insight into cellular mechanisms underlying the WOS phenomenon and demonstrates the influence developmental stage can have on risk locus functionality. Additionally, this work represents a novel model for further investigation into how environmental factors, together with genetic factors, modulate breast cancer risk in the context of breast developmental stage. PMID:27537370

  13. Hepatitis C virus depends on E-cadherin as an entry factor and regulates its expression in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Li, Qisheng; Sodroski, Catherine; Lowey, Brianna; Schweitzer, Cameron J; Cha, Helen; Zhang, Fang; Liang, T Jake

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) enters the host cell through interactions with a cascade of cellular factors. Although significant progress has been made in understanding HCV entry, the precise mechanisms by which HCV exploits the receptor complex and host machinery to enter the cell remain unclear. This intricate process of viral entry likely depends on additional yet-to-be-defined cellular molecules. Recently, by applying integrative functional genomics approaches, we identified and interrogated distinct sets of host dependencies in the complete HCV life cycle. Viral entry assays using HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpps) of various genotypes uncovered multiple previously unappreciated host factors, including E-cadherin, that mediate HCV entry. E-cadherin silencing significantly inhibited HCV infection in Huh7.5.1 cells, HepG2/miR122/CD81 cells, and primary human hepatocytes at a postbinding entry step. Knockdown of E-cadherin, however, had no effect on HCV RNA replication or internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-mediated translation. In addition, an E-cadherin monoclonal antibody effectively blocked HCV entry and infection in hepatocytes. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that E-cadherin is closely associated with claudin-1 (CLDN1) and occludin (OCLN) on the cell membrane. Depletion of E-cadherin drastically diminished the cell-surface distribution of these two tight junction proteins in various hepatic cell lines, indicating that E-cadherin plays an important regulatory role in CLDN1/OCLN localization on the cell surface. Furthermore, loss of E-cadherin expression in hepatocytes is associated with HCV-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), providing an important link between HCV infection and liver cancer. Our data indicate that a dynamic interplay among E-cadherin, tight junctions, and EMT exists and mediates an important function in HCV entry.

  14. Hepatitis C virus depends on E-cadherin as an entry factor and regulates its expression in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Li, Qisheng; Sodroski, Catherine; Lowey, Brianna; Schweitzer, Cameron J; Cha, Helen; Zhang, Fang; Liang, T Jake

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) enters the host cell through interactions with a cascade of cellular factors. Although significant progress has been made in understanding HCV entry, the precise mechanisms by which HCV exploits the receptor complex and host machinery to enter the cell remain unclear. This intricate process of viral entry likely depends on additional yet-to-be-defined cellular molecules. Recently, by applying integrative functional genomics approaches, we identified and interrogated distinct sets of host dependencies in the complete HCV life cycle. Viral entry assays using HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpps) of various genotypes uncovered multiple previously unappreciated host factors, including E-cadherin, that mediate HCV entry. E-cadherin silencing significantly inhibited HCV infection in Huh7.5.1 cells, HepG2/miR122/CD81 cells, and primary human hepatocytes at a postbinding entry step. Knockdown of E-cadherin, however, had no effect on HCV RNA replication or internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-mediated translation. In addition, an E-cadherin monoclonal antibody effectively blocked HCV entry and infection in hepatocytes. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that E-cadherin is closely associated with claudin-1 (CLDN1) and occludin (OCLN) on the cell membrane. Depletion of E-cadherin drastically diminished the cell-surface distribution of these two tight junction proteins in various hepatic cell lines, indicating that E-cadherin plays an important regulatory role in CLDN1/OCLN localization on the cell surface. Furthermore, loss of E-cadherin expression in hepatocytes is associated with HCV-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), providing an important link between HCV infection and liver cancer. Our data indicate that a dynamic interplay among E-cadherin, tight junctions, and EMT exists and mediates an important function in HCV entry. PMID:27298373

  15. The Non-coding Mammary Carcinoma Susceptibility Locus, Mcs5c, Regulates Pappa Expression via Age-Specific Chromatin Folding and Allele-Dependent DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Henning, Amanda N; Haag, Jill D; Smits, Bart M G; Gould, Michael N

    2016-08-01

    In understanding the etiology of breast cancer, the contributions of both genetic and environmental risk factors are further complicated by the impact of breast developmental stage. Specifically, the time period ranging from childhood to young adulthood represents a critical developmental window in a woman's life when she is more susceptible to environmental hazards that may affect future breast cancer risk. Although the effects of environmental exposures during particular developmental Windows of Susceptibility (WOS) are well documented, the genetic mechanisms governing these interactions are largely unknown. Functional characterization of the Mammary Carcinoma Susceptibility 5c, Mcs5c, congenic rat model of breast cancer at various stages of mammary gland development was conducted to gain insight into the interplay between genetic risk factors and WOS. Using quantitative real-time PCR, chromosome conformation capture, and bisulfite pyrosequencing we have found that Mcs5c acts within the mammary gland to regulate expression of the neighboring gene Pappa during a critical mammary developmental time period in the rat, corresponding to the human young adult WOS. Pappa has been shown to positively regulate the IGF signaling pathway, which is required for proper mammary gland/breast development and is of increasing interest in breast cancer pathogenesis. Mcs5c-mediated regulation of Pappa appears to occur through age-dependent and mammary gland-specific chromatin looping, as well as genotype-dependent CpG island shore methylation. This represents, to our knowledge, the first insight into cellular mechanisms underlying the WOS phenomenon and demonstrates the influence developmental stage can have on risk locus functionality. Additionally, this work represents a novel model for further investigation into how environmental factors, together with genetic factors, modulate breast cancer risk in the context of breast developmental stage. PMID:27537370

  16. Genes and Small RNA Transcripts Exhibit Dosage-Dependent Expression Pattern in Maize Copy-Number Alterations.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Tao; Zhang, Jianbo; Lithio, Andrew; Dash, Sudhansu; Weber, David F; Wise, Roger; Nettleton, Dan; Peterson, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Copy-number alterations are widespread in animal and plant genomes, but their immediate impact on gene expression is still unclear. In animals, copy-number alterations usually exhibit dosage effects, except for sex chromosomes which tend to be dosage compensated. In plants, genes within small duplications (<100 kb) often exhibit dosage-dependent expression, whereas large duplications (>50 Mb) are more often dosage compensated. However, little or nothing is known about expression in moderately-sized (1-50 Mb) segmental duplications, and about the response of small RNAs to dosage change. Here, we compared maize (Zea mays) plants with two, three, and four doses of a 14.6-Mb segment of chromosome 1 that contains ∼300 genes. Plants containing the duplicated segment exhibit dosage-dependent effects on ear length and flowering time. Transcriptome analyses using GeneChip and RNA-sequencing methods indicate that most expressed genes and unique small RNAs within the duplicated segments exhibit dosage-dependent transcript levels. We conclude that dosage effect is the predominant regulatory response for both genes and unique small RNA transcripts in the segmental dosage series we tested. To our knowledge this is the first analysis of small RNA expression in plant gene dosage variants. Because segmental duplications comprise a significant proportion of eukaryotic genomes, these findings provide important new insight into the regulation of genes and small RNAs in response to dosage changes. PMID:27129738

  17. Stably transfected human cell lines as fluorescent screening assay for nuclear factor KB activation dependent gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Horneck, Gerda

    2004-06-01

    Activation of the Nuclear Factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathway as a possible antiapoptotic route represents one important cellular stress response. For identifying conditions which are capable to modify this pathway, a screening assay for detection of NF-kappaB-dependent gene activation using the reporter proteins Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP) and its destabilized variant (d2EGFP) has been developed. Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK/293) cells were stably transfected with a vector carrying EGFP or d2EGFP under control of a synthetic promoter containing four copies of the NF-kappaB response element. Treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) gave rise to substantial EGFP / d2EGFP expression in up to 90 % of the cells and was therefore used to screen different stably transfected clones for induction of NF-kappaB dependent gene expression. The time course of d2EGFP expression after treatment with TNF-alpha or phorbol ester was measured using flow cytometry. Cellular response to TNF-alpha was faster than to phorbol ester. Treatment of cells with TNF-alpha and DMSO revealed antagonistic interactions of these substances in the activation NF-kappaB dependent gene expression. The detection of d2EGFP expression required FACS analysis or fluorescence microscopy, while EGFP could also be measured in the microplate reader, rendering the assay useful for high-throughput screening.

  18. TIME-DEPENDENT EFFECTS ON GENE EXPRESSION IN RAT SEMINAL VESICLE DEVELOPMENTALLY ALTERED BY IN UTERO EXPOSURE TO TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    TIME-DEPENDENT EFFECTS ON GENE EXPRESSION IN RAT SEMINAL VESICLE DEVELOPMENTALLY ALTERED BY IN UTERO EXPOSURE TO TCDD. V M Richardson', J T Hamm2, and L S Birnbaum1. 'USEPA, ORD/NHEERL/ETD, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA, 'Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, ...

  19. Following the time course of face gender and expression processing: a task-dependent ERP study.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Conroy, Berenice; Aguado, Luis; Fernández-Cahill, María; Romero-Ferreiro, Verónica; Diéguez-Risco, Teresa

    2014-05-01

    The effects of task demands and the interaction between gender and expression in face perception were studied using event-related potentials (ERPs). Participants performed three different tasks with male and female faces that were emotionally inexpressive or that showed happy or angry expressions. In two of the tasks (gender and expression categorization) facial properties were task-relevant while in a third task (symbol discrimination) facial information was irrelevant. Effects of expression were observed on the visual P100 component under all task conditions, suggesting the operation of an automatic process that is not influenced by task demands. The earliest interaction between expression and gender was observed later in the face-sensitive N170 component. This component showed differential modulations by specific combinations of gender and expression (e.g., angry male vs. angry female faces). Main effects of expression and task were observed in a later occipito-temporal component peaking around 230 ms post-stimulus onset (EPN or early posterior negativity). Less positive amplitudes in the presence of angry faces and during performance of the gender and expression tasks were observed. Finally, task demands also modulated a positive component peaking around 400 ms (LPC, or late positive complex) that showed enhanced amplitude for the gender task. The pattern of results obtained here adds new evidence about the sequence of operations involved in face processing and the interaction of facial properties (gender and expression) in response to different task demands. PMID:24594443

  20. Loss of tumour suppressor PTEN expression in renal injury initiates SMAD3- and p53-dependent fibrotic responses.

    PubMed

    Samarakoon, Rohan; Helo, Sevann; Dobberfuhl, Amy D; Khakoo, Nidah S; Falke, Lucas; Overstreet, Jessica M; Goldschmeding, Roel; Higgins, Paul J

    2015-08-01

    Deregulation of the tumour suppressor PTEN occurs in lung and skin fibrosis and diabetic and ischaemic renal injury. However, the potential role of PTEN and associated mechanisms in the progression of kidney fibrosis is unknown. Tubular and interstitial PTEN expression was dramatically decreased in several models of renal injury, including aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN), streptozotocin (STZ)-mediated injury and ureteral unilateral obstruction (UUO), correlating with Akt, p53 and SMAD3 activation and fibrosis. Stable silencing of PTEN in HK-2 human tubular epithelial cells induced dedifferentiation and CTGF, PAI-1, vimentin, α-SMA and fibronectin expression, compared to HK-2 cells expressing control shRNA. Furthermore, PTEN knockdown stimulated Akt, SMAD3 and p53(Ser15) phosphorylation, with an accompanying decrease in population density and an increase in epithelial G1 cell cycle arrest. SMAD3 or p53 gene silencing or pharmacological blockade partially suppressed fibrotic gene expression and relieved growth inhibition orchestrated by deficiency or inhibition of PTEN. Similarly, shRNA suppression of PAI-1 rescued the PTEN loss-associated epithelial proliferative arrest. Moreover, TGFβ1-initiated fibrotic gene expression is further enhanced by PTEN depletion. Combined TGFβ1 treatment and PTEN silencing potentiated epithelial cell death via p53-dependent pathways. Thus, PTEN loss initiates tubular dysfunction via SMAD3- and p53-mediated fibrotic gene induction, with accompanying PAI-1-dependent proliferative arrest, and cooperates with TGFβ1 to induce the expression of profibrotic genes and tubular apoptosis.

  1. Survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in bovine monocyte-derived macrophages is not affected by host infection status but depends on the infecting bacterial genotype.

    PubMed

    Gollnick, Nicole S; Mitchell, Rebecca M; Baumgart, Martin; Janagama, Harish K; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Schukken, Ynte H

    2007-12-15

    In this study we investigated the ability of different Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) strains to survive in bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) of cows naturally infected with M. paratuberculosis and control cows. We tested the hypotheses that infection status of cows affects macrophage killing ability and that survival of M. paratuberculosis in macrophages is dependent on the strain. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained from Johne's disease-positive (n=3) and age and stage of lactation matched Johne's disease-negative (n=3) multiparious cows. Following differentiation, MDMs were challenged in vitro with four M. paratuberculosis strains of different host specificity (cattle and sheep). Two hours and 2, 4, and 7 days after infection, ingestion, and intracellular survival of M. paratuberculosis strains were determined by fluorescence microscopy. There was no effect of the origin of MDMs (Johne's disease-positive or control animals) on phagocytosis, survival of bacteria, or macrophage survival. In contrast, important strain differences were observed. These findings suggest that some M. paratuberculosis strains interfere more successfully than others with the ability of macrophages to kill intracellular pathogens which may make it important to include strain typing when designing control programs.

  2. Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus epidemiology: HLA genotype study in 12 north eastern Italian families with two siblings affected by type I diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pinelli, L; Drei, F; Gonfiantini, E; Visentin, A; Roata, C; Ciaffoni, S; Maffeis, C

    1989-12-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the relationship between the histocompatibility antigens and type I diabetes mellitus in families living in the north-eastern part of Italy. In each family two siblings were affected by diabetes. HLA-antigens were determined with the lymphocytotoxicity test, utilizing antisera of the series A-B-C-DR. The phenotypic frequencies were compared with those observed in controls. We showed that diabetes has a strong association with HLA DR 3 and/or DR 4 antigens. In particular we registered high frequency of compound heterozygous DR 3 - DR 4 subjects, and this fact supports the hypothesis of the existence of two different genes for diabetes associated with these HLA antigens. Moreover we observed a particular haplotype segregation with a very high percentage of HLA identity between patients belonging to the same family, confirming the association between HLA and genetic susceptibility to insulin dependent diabetes. These results confirm data in the literature and, completed by other data from other patients' families living in our area, will be useful in providing reliable genetic counselling. PMID:2606174

  3. Analyses of Genotypes and Phenotypes of Ten Chinese Patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome by Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification and Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Xu; Pan, Hong; Li, Lin; Wu, Hai-Rong; Wang, Song-Tao; Bao, Xin-Hua; Jiang, Yu-Wu; Qi, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a contiguous gene syndrome that is typically caused by a deletion of the distal portion of the short arm of chromosome 4. However, there are few reports about the features of Chinese WHS patients. This study aimed to characterize the clinical and molecular cytogenetic features of Chinese WHS patients using the combination of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). Methods: Clinical information was collected from ten patients with WHS. Genomic DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood of the patients. The deletions were analyzed by MLPA and array CGH. Results: All patients exhibited the core clinical symptoms of WHS, including severe growth delay, a Greek warrior helmet facial appearance, differing degrees of intellectual disability, and epilepsy or electroencephalogram anomalies. The 4p deletions ranged from 2.62 Mb to 17.25 Mb in size and included LETM1, WHSC1, and FGFR3. Conclusions: The combined use of MLPA and array CGH is an effective and specific means to diagnose WHS and allows for the precise identification of the breakpoints and sizes of deletions. The deletion of genes in the WHS candidate region is closely correlated with the core WHS phenotype. PMID:26960370

  4. MyD88-Dependent Silencing of Transgene Expression During the Innate and Adaptive Immune Response to Helper-Dependent Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masataka; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Bertin, Terry K.; Cela, Racel; Clarke, Christian; Guenther, Margaretha; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Activation of the host innate immune response after systemic administration of adenoviral vectors constitutes a principal impediment to successful clinical gene replacement therapies. Although helper-dependent adenoviruses (HDAds) lack all viral functional genes, systemic administration of a high dose of HDAd still elicits a potent innate immune response in host animals. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are innate receptors that sense microbial products and trigger the maturation of antigen-presenting cells and cytokine production via MyD88-dependent signaling (except TLR3). Here we show that mice lacking MyD88 exhibit a dramatic reduction in proinflammatory cytokines after intravenous injection of a high dose of HDAd, and show significantly reduced induction of the adaptive immune response when compared with wild-type and TLR2-deficient mice. Importantly, MyD88–/– mice also show significantly higher and longer sustained transgene expression than do wild-type mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies using wild-type and MyD88-deficient primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts showed significant MyD88-dependent transcriptional silencing of the HDAd-encoded transgenes. Our results demonstrate that MyD88 signaling, activated by systemic delivery of HDAd, initiates an innate immune response that suppresses transgene expression at the transcriptional level before initiation of the adaptive immune response. PMID:19824822

  5. UV-B-Induced CPD Photolyase Gene Expression is Regulated by UVR8-Dependent and -Independent Pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Teranishi, Mika; Yamaguchi, Hiroko; Matsushita, Tomonao; Watahiki, Masaaki K; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Li, Shao-Shan; Hidema, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Plants have evolved various mechanisms that protect against the harmful effects of UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) on growth and development. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) photolyase, the repair enzyme for UV-B-induced CPDs, is essential for protecting cells from UV-B radiation. Expression of the CPD photolyase gene (PHR) is controlled by light with various wavelengths including UV-B, but the mechanisms of this regulation remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the regulation of PHR expression by light with various wavelengths, in particular low-fluence UV-B radiation (280 nm, 0.2 µmol m(-2) s(-1)), in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grown under light-dark cycles for 7 d and then adapted to the dark for 3 d. Low-fluence UV-B radiation induced CPDs but not reactive oxygen species. AtPHR expression was effectively induced by UV-B, UV-A (375 nm) and blue light. Expression induced by UV-A and blue light was predominantly regulated by the cryptochrome-dependent pathway, whereas phytochromes A and B played a minor but noticeable role. Expression induced by UV-B was predominantly regulated by the UVR8-dependent pathway. AtPHR expression was also mediated by a UVR8-independent pathway, which is correlated with CPD accumulation induced by UV-B radiation. These results indicate that Arabidopsis has evolved diverse mechanisms to regulate CPD photolyase expression by multiple photoreceptor signaling pathways, including UVR8-dependent and -independent pathways, as protection against harmful effects of UV-B radiation. PMID:26272552

  6. UV-B-Induced CPD Photolyase Gene Expression is Regulated by UVR8-Dependent and -Independent Pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Teranishi, Mika; Yamaguchi, Hiroko; Matsushita, Tomonao; Watahiki, Masaaki K; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Li, Shao-Shan; Hidema, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Plants have evolved various mechanisms that protect against the harmful effects of UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) on growth and development. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) photolyase, the repair enzyme for UV-B-induced CPDs, is essential for protecting cells from UV-B radiation. Expression of the CPD photolyase gene (PHR) is controlled by light with various wavelengths including UV-B, but the mechanisms of this regulation remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the regulation of PHR expression by light with various wavelengths, in particular low-fluence UV-B radiation (280 nm, 0.2 µmol m(-2) s(-1)), in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grown under light-dark cycles for 7 d and then adapted to the dark for 3 d. Low-fluence UV-B radiation induced CPDs but not reactive oxygen species. AtPHR expression was effectively induced by UV-B, UV-A (375 nm) and blue light. Expression induced by UV-A and blue light was predominantly regulated by the cryptochrome-dependent pathway, whereas phytochromes A and B played a minor but noticeable role. Expression induced by UV-B was predominantly regulated by the UVR8-dependent pathway. AtPHR expression was also mediated by a UVR8-independent pathway, which is correlated with CPD accumulation induced by UV-B radiation. These results indicate that Arabidopsis has evolved diverse mechanisms to regulate CPD photolyase expression by multiple photoreceptor signaling pathways, including UVR8-dependent and -independent pathways, as protection against harmful effects of UV-B radiation.

  7. Early MyD88-Dependent Induction of Interleukin-17A Expression during Salmonella Colitis ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Keestra, A. Marijke; Godinez, Ivan; Xavier, Mariana N.; Winter, Maria G.; Winter, Sebastian E.; Tsolis, Renée M.; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2011-01-01

    The development of T helper 17 (TH17) cells is a well-established adaptive mechanism for the production of interleukin-17A (IL-17A), a cytokine involved in neutrophil recruitment. However, pathways contributing to mucosal expression of IL-17A during the initial phase of a bacterial infection have received less attention. Here we used the mouse colitis model of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium infection to investigate the contribution of myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) to inflammation and mucosal IL-17A expression. Expression of IL-23 in the cecal mucosa during S. Typhimurium colitis was dependent on the presence of MyD88. Furthermore, initial expression of IL-17A at 24 h after S. Typhimurium infection was dependent on MyD88 and the receptor for IL-1β. IL-23 and IL-1β synergized in inducing expression of IL-17A in splenic T cells in vitro. In the intestinal mucosa, IL-17A was produced by three distinct T cell populations, including δγ T cells, TH17 cells, and CD4−CD8− T cells. The absence of IL-1β signaling or IL-17 signaling reduced CXC chemokine expression but did not alter the overall severity of pathological lesions in the cecal mucosa. In contrast, cecal pathology and neutrophil recruitment were markedly reduced in Myd88-deficient mice during the initial phases of S. Typhimurium infection. Collectively, these data demonstrate that MyD88-dependent mechanisms, including an initial expression of IL-17A, are important for orchestrating early inflammatory responses during S. Typhimurium colitis. PMID:21576324

  8. Cloning to reproduce desired genotypes.

    PubMed

    Westhusin, M E; Long, C R; Shin, T; Hill, J R; Looney, C R; Pryor, J H; Piedrahita, J A

    2001-01-01

    Cloned sheep, cattle, goats, pigs and mice have now been produced using somatic cells for nuclear transplantation. Animal cloning is still very inefficient with on average less than 10% of the cloned embryos transferred resulting in a live offspring. However successful cloning of a variety of different species and by a number of different laboratory groups has generated tremendous interest in reproducing desired genotypes. Some of these specific genotypes represent animal cell lines that have been genetically modified. In other cases there is a significant demand for cloning animals characterized by their inherent genetic value, for example prize livestock, household pets and rare or endangered species. A number of different variables may influence the ability to reproduce a specific genotype by cloning. These include species, source of recipient ova, cell type of nuclei donor, treatment of donor cells prior to nuclear transfer, and the techniques employed for nuclear transfer. At present, there is no solid evidence that suggests cloning will be limited to only a few specific animals, and in fact, most data collected to date suggests cloning will be applicable to a wide variety of different animals. The ability to reproduce any desired genotype by cloning will ultimately depend on the amount of time and resources invested in research.

  9. Spreading-rate dependent mid-ocean ridge processes expressed in Western Atlantic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangmyung David

    The Far-Offset Active-Source Imaging of Mantle (FAIM) experiment was conducted along an 800-km-long transect in the Western Atlantic to study the evolution of 108-157 m.y. lithosphere. The main transect (Line 1) crosses a transition from slow (13-14 mm/yr in half rate) to ultra-slow (˜8 mm/yr) paleo spreading rates, and thus represents an ideal setting to study spreading-rate dependent processes as expressed in lithospheric structure. This thesis presents results of four analyses efforts along this transect. We present a crustal model based on seismic refraction and wide-angle traveltime modeling, we extend the crustal model to an upper lithosphere density model using gravity constraints, we constrain Poisson's ratio in oceanic Layer 3 using converted shear-wave phases, and we consider regional lithospheric structure by analysis of geoid/topography ratios. The crustal model indicates that a transition in crustal thickness accompanies the spreading-rate change, with the crust produced at slow rates being 1.0-1.5 km thinner. The gravity modeling shows that a density model can be constructed that simultaneously satisfies observed gravity, seismic constraints on crustal thickness, and our expectation of isostasy if ˜1.3 km of low-density material is distributed into the upper 30-60 km of the mantle. This amount of material (˜1.3 km) roughly equals the difference in thickness between slow and ultra-slow spreading crust, suggesting that the thinner crust formed during very slow spreading arises due to melt retention in the mantle rather than decreased mantle melting. Modeling of mode-converted S-wave phases reveals a uniform Poisson's ratio (˜0.27) in the lower crust. Along with the observation of sharp crust/mantle boundary, this result suggests that crust along the FAIM transect is primarily melt-derived igneous crust. Geoid versus topography relationships along Line 1 and nearby parallel tracks show abrupt changes that may originate from lateral changes in mantle

  10. Ethanol increases matrix metalloproteinase-12 expression via NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Jin; Nepal, Saroj; Lee, Eung-Seok; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2013-11-15

    Matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12), an enzyme responsible for degradation of extracellular matrix, plays an important role in the progression of various diseases, including inflammation and fibrosis. Although most of those are pathogenic conditions induced by ethanol ingestion, the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 has not been explored. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 expression and its potential mechanisms in macrophages. Here, we demonstrated that ethanol treatment increased MMP-12 expression in primary murine peritoneal macrophages and RAW 264.7 macrophages at both mRNA and protein levels. Ethanol treatment also significantly increased the activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) oxidase and the expression of NADPH oxidase-2 (Nox2). Pretreatment with an anti-oxidant (N-acetyl cysteine) or a selective inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI)) prevented ethanol-induced MMP-12 expression. Furthermore, knockdown of Nox2 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented ethanol-induced ROS production and MMP-12 expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages, indicating a critical role for Nox2 in ethanol-induced intracellular ROS production and MMP-12 expression in macrophages. We also showed that ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was suppressed by transient transfection with dominant negative IκB-α plasmid or pretreatment with Bay 11-7082, a selective inhibitor of NF-κB, in RAW 264.7 macrophages. In addition, ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was also attenuated by treatment with a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK, suggesting involvement of p38 MAPK/NF-κB pathway in ethanol-induced Nox2 expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ethanol treatment elicited increase in MMP-12 expression via increase in ROS production derived from Nox2 in macrophages. PMID:23978445

  11. Ethanol increases matrix metalloproteinase-12 expression via NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Jin; Nepal, Saroj; Lee, Eung-Seok; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2013-11-15

    Matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12), an enzyme responsible for degradation of extracellular matrix, plays an important role in the progression of various diseases, including inflammation and fibrosis. Although most of those are pathogenic conditions induced by ethanol ingestion, the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 has not been explored. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 expression and its potential mechanisms in macrophages. Here, we demonstrated that ethanol treatment increased MMP-12 expression in primary murine peritoneal macrophages and RAW 264.7 macrophages at both mRNA and protein levels. Ethanol treatment also significantly increased the activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) oxidase and the expression of NADPH oxidase-2 (Nox2). Pretreatment with an anti-oxidant (N-acetyl cysteine) or a selective inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI)) prevented ethanol-induced MMP-12 expression. Furthermore, knockdown of Nox2 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented ethanol-induced ROS production and MMP-12 expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages, indicating a critical role for Nox2 in ethanol-induced intracellular ROS production and MMP-12 expression in macrophages. We also showed that ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was suppressed by transient transfection with dominant negative IκB-α plasmid or pretreatment with Bay 11-7082, a selective inhibitor of NF-κB, in RAW 264.7 macrophages. In addition, ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was also attenuated by treatment with a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK, suggesting involvement of p38 MAPK/NF-κB pathway in ethanol-induced Nox2 expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ethanol treatment elicited increase in MMP-12 expression via increase in ROS production derived from Nox2 in macrophages.

  12. Photoperiod history-dependent responses to intermediate day lengths engage hypothalamic iodothyronine deiodinase type III mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Kampf-Lassin, August; Prendergast, Brian J

    2013-04-15

    Perihypothalamic thyroid hormone signaling features prominently in the seasonal control of reproductive physiology. Triiodothyronine (T(3)) signaling stimulates gonadal development, and decrements in T(3) signaling are associated with gonadal regression. Type 3 iodothyronine deiodinase (DIO3) converts the prohormone thyroxine (T(4)) into biologically inactive 3,3',5'-triiodothyronine, and in long-day breeding Siberian hamsters exposure to long (LD) and short (SD) photoperiods, respectively, inhibit and stimulate hypothalamic dio3 mRNA expression. Reproductive responses to intermediate-duration photoperiods (IntD) occur in a history-dependent manner; IntDs are interpreted as inhibitory only when preceded by longer photoperiods. Because dio3 expression has only been evaluated under LD or SD photoperiods, it is not known whether hypothalamic dio3 encodes absolute photoperiod duration or the reproductive interpretation of photoperiod. Male Siberian hamsters with and without a prior history of LD were exposed to IntD photoperiods, and hypothalamic dio3 mRNA expression was measured 6 wk later. Hamsters with a LD photoperiod history exhibited gonadal regression in IntD and a marked upregulation of hypothalamic dio3 expression, whereas in hamsters without prior exposure to LD, gonadal responses to IntD were absent, and dio3 expression remained low. Patterns of deiodinase expression in hamsters maintained in chronic IntD photoperiods did not appear to reflect feedback effects of gonadal status. Hypothalamic expression of dio3 does not exclusively reflect ambient photoperiod, but rather the context-dependent reproductive interpretation of photoperiod. Neuroendocrine mechanisms that compare current and prior photoperiods, which permit detection of directional changes in day length, occur either upstream, or at the level, of hypothalamic dio3 expression.

  13. A primer vector system that allows temperature dependent gene amplification and expression in mammalian cells: regulation of the influenza virus NS1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Portela, A; Melero, J A; Martínez, C; Domingo, E; Ortín, J

    1985-11-25

    Influenza virus RNA segment 8 has been cloned into primer-vector pSLts1. This vector was designed to replicate in simian cells in a temperature dependent fashion by use of the SV40 tsA209 T-antigen gene. The oriented synthesis of cDNA on dT-tailed pSLts1 was performed on in vitro synthesized mRNA, and the second DNA strand was primed with an influenza-specific terminal oligodeoxynucleotide. Recombinant pSLVa232 contained the RNA segment 8 sequence directly fused to the SV40 late promoter contained in pSLts1, and followed by the SV40 polyadenylation signal. Expression of NS1 gene in transfected COS cells took place at a level comparable to that found in infected cells. When VERO cell cultures were transfected with recombinant pSLVa232, expression of the NS1 gene was temperature dependent. Close to one hundred fold increase in the amplification and expression of the cloned gene was observed after shift down of the transfected cells to permissive temperature. Vector pSLts1 and the cloning strategy described may be useful for the specific cloning and regulated expression of mRNAs of known 5'-terminal sequence.

  14. Helios transcription factor expression depends on Gsx2 and Dlx1&2 function in developing striatal matrix neurons.

    PubMed

    Martín-Ibáñez, Raquel; Crespo, Empar; Esgleas, Miriam; Urban, Noelia; Wang, Bei; Waclaw, Ronald; Georgopoulos, Katia; Martínez, Salvador; Campbell, Kenneth; Vicario-Abejón, Carlos; Alberch, Jordi; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe; Rubenstein, John L; Canals, Josep M

    2012-08-10

    Development of the nervous system is finely regulated by consecutive expression of cell-specific transcription factors. Here we show that Helios, a member of the Ikaros transcription factor family, is expressed in ectodermal and neuroectodermal-derived tissues. During embryonic development, Helios is expressed by several brain structures including the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE, the striatal anlage); the cingulated, insular and retrosplenial cortex; the hippocampus; and the accessory olfactory bulb. Moreover, Helios is also expressed by Purkinje neurons during postnatal cerebellar development. Within the LGE, Helios expression follows a dynamic spatio-temporal pattern starting at embryonic stages (E14.5), peaking at E18.5, and completely disappearing during postnatal development. Helios is expressed by a small population of nestin-positive neural progenitor cells located in the subventricular zone as well as by a larger population of immature neurons distributed throughout the mantle zone. In the later, Helios is preferentially expressed in the matrix compartment, where it colocalizes with Bcl11b and Foxp1, well-known markers of striatal projection neurons. In addition, we observed that Helios expression is not detected in Dlx1/2 and Gsx2 null mutants, while its expression is maintained in Ascl1 mutants. These findings allow us to introduce a new transcription factor in the cascade of events that take part of striatal development postulating the existence of at least 4 different neural progenitors in the LGE. An Ascl1-independent but Gsx2- & Dlx1/2-dependent precursor will express Helios defining a new lineage for a subset of matrix striatal neurons.

  15. Expression of the chemokine CXCL14 and cetuximab-dependent tumour suppression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kondo, T; Ozawa, S; Ikoma, T; Yang, X-Y; Kanamori, K; Suzuki, K; Iwabuchi, H; Maehata, Y; Miyamoto, C; Taguchi, T; Kiyono, T; Kubota, E; Hata, R-I

    2016-01-01

    Cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), has been successfully used to treat some patients with colorectal cancer and those with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). For the effective treatment, it is essential to first identify cetuximab-responsive patients. The level of EGFR expression and/or the presence of mutations in signalling molecules downstream of the EGFR pathway have been reported to be determining factors for cetuximab responsiveness in colorectal cancer patients; however, limited data have been reported for HNSCC patients. We previously reported that the chemokine CXCL14 exhibits tumour-suppressive effects against xenografted HNSCC cells, which may be classified into two groups, CXCL14-expressing and non-expressing cells under serum-starved culture conditions. Here we employed CXCL14-expressing HSC-3 cells and CXCL14-non-expressing YCU-H891 cells as representatives of the two groups and compared their responses to cetuximab and their CXCL14 expression under various conditions. The growth of xenografted tumours initiated by HSC-3 cells, which expressed CXCL14 in vivo and in vitro, was suppressed by the injection of cetuximab into tumour-bearing mice; however, neither the expression of the chemokine nor the cetuximab-dependent suppression of xenograft tumour growth was observed for YCU-H891 cells. Both types of cells expressed EGFR and neither type harboured mutations in signalling molecules downstream of EGFR that have been reported in cetuximab-resistant colon cancer patients. The inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling increased the levels of CXCL14 messenger RNA (mRNA) in HSC-3 cells, but not in YCU-H891 cells. We also observed that the CXCL14 promoter region in YCU-H891 cells was hypermethylated, and that demethylation of the promoter by treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine restored CXCL14 mRNA expression and in vivo cetuximab-mediated tumour growth suppression

  16. Dose-dependent effects of metals on gene expression in the sydney rock oyster, Saccostrea glomerata.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Daisy A; Nair, Sham V; Thompson, Emma L; Raftos, David A

    2015-09-01

    In the current study, we tested the effects of common environmental contaminants (the metals zinc and lead) on gene expression in Sydney rock oysters (Saccrostrea glomerata). Oysters were exposed to a range of metal concentrations under controlled laboratory conditions. The expression of 14 putative stress response genes was then measured using quantitative, real-time (q) PCR. The expression of all 14 genes was significantly affected (p < 0.05 vs. nonexposed controls) by at least one of the metals, and by at least one dose of metal. For 5 of the 14 target genes (actin, calmodulin, superoxide dismutase, topoisomerase I, and tubulin) the alteration of expression relative to controls was highest at intermediate (rather than high) doses of metals. Such responses may reflect adaptive (acclimation) reactions in gene expression at low to intermediate doses of contaminants, followed by a decline in expression resulting from exposure at higher doses. The data are discussed in terms of the intracellular pathways affected by metal contamination, and the relevance of such gene expression data to environmental biomonitoring.

  17. microRNA-dependent Temporal Gene Expression in the Ureteric Bud Epithelium during Mammalian Kidney Development

    PubMed Central

    Nagalakshmi, Vidya K.; Lindner, Volkhard; Wessels, Andy; Yu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Background Our previous study on mouse mutants with the ureteric bud (UB) epithelium-specific Dicer deletion (Dicer UB mutants) demonstrated the significance of UB epithelium-derived miRNAs in UB development. Results Our whole-genome transcriptional profiling showed that the Dicer mutant UB epithelium abnormally retained transcriptional features of the early UB epithelium and failed to express many genes associated with collecting duct differentiation. Further, we identified a temporal expression pattern of early UB genes during UB epithelium development in which gene expression was detected at early developmental stages and became undetectable by E14.5. In contrast, expression of early UB genes persisted at later stages in the Dicer mutant UB epithelium and increased at early stages. Our bioinformatics analysis of the abnormally persistently expressed early genes in the Dicer mutant UB epithelium showed significant enrichment of the let-7 family miRNA targets. We further identified a temporal expression pattern of let-7 miRNAs in the UB epithelium that is anti-parallel to that of some early UB genes during kidney development. Conclusions We propose a model in which the let-7 family miRNAs silence the expression of a subset of early genes in the UB epithelium at later developmental stages in order to promote collecting duct differentiation. PMID:25369991

  18. PPARgamma-dependent regulation of adenylate cyclase 6 amplifies the stimulatory effect of cAMP on renin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Desch, Michael; Schubert, Thomas; Schreiber, Andrea; Mayer, Sandra; Friedrich, Björn; Artunc, Ferruh; Todorov, Vladimir T

    2010-11-01

    The second messenger cAMP plays an important role in the regulation of renin gene expression. Nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is known to stimulate renin gene transcription acting through PPARγ-binding sequences in renin promoter. We show now that activation of PPARγ by unsaturated fatty acids or thiazolidinediones drastically augments the cAMP-dependent increase of renin mRNA in the human renin-producing cell line Calu-6. The underlying mechanism involves potentiation of agonist-induced cAMP increase and up-regulation of adenylate cyclase 6 (AC6) gene expression. We identified a palindromic element with a 3-bp spacer (Pal3) in AC6 intron 1 (AC6Pal3). AC6Pal3 bound PPARγ and mediated trans-activation by PPARγ agonist. AC6 knockdown decreased basal renin mRNA level and attenuated the maximal PPARγ-dependent stimulation of the cAMP-induced renin gene expression. AC6Pal3 decoy oligonucleotide abrogated the PPARγ-dependent potentiation of cAMP-induced renin gene expression. Treatment of mice with PPARγ agonist increased AC6 mRNA kidney levels. Our data suggest that in addition to its direct effect on renin gene transcription, PPARγ "sensitizes" renin gene to cAMP via trans-activation of AC6 gene. AC6 has been identified as PPARγ target gene with a functional Pal3 sequence.

  19. NXS2 murine neuroblastomas express increased levels of MHC class I antigens upon recurrence following NK-dependent immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Neal, Zane C; Imboden, Michael; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L; Kim, Kyung-Mann; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Surfus, Jean; Dixon, John R; Lode, Holger N; Reisfeld, Ralph A; Gillies, Stephen D; Sondel, Paul M

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated recurrent NXS2 neuroblastoma tumors that developed following NK- or T-cell-mediated immunotherapy in tumor-bearing mice. Recurrent tumors developed following an NK-dependent antitumor response using a suboptimal dose of hu14.18-IL2, a humanized IL-2 immunocytokine targeted to the GD(2)-ganglioside. This treatment initially induced complete resolution of measurable tumor in the majority of mice, followed, however, by delayed tumor recurrence in some mice. These recurrent NXS2 tumors revealed markedly enhanced (> fivefold) MHC class I antigen expression when compared with NXS2 tumors growing in PBS-treated control mice. A similar level of enhanced MHC class I antigen-expression could be induced on NXS2 cells in vitro by culturing with interferon gamma, and was associated with reduced susceptibility to both NK-cell-mediated tumor cell lysis and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in vitro. In contrast, Flt3-ligand treatment of NXS2-bearing mice induced a protective T-cell-dependent antitumor memory response. Recurrent NXS2 tumors that developed following Flt3-L therapy revealed a decreased expression of MHC class I antigens. While NXS2 tumors are susceptible to in vivo destruction following either hu14.18-IL2 or Flt3-ligand immunotherapies, these results suggest that some tumor cells may be selected to survive and progress by expressing either higher or lower levels of MHC class I antigen in order to resist either NK- or T-cell-mediated antitumor responses, respectively.

  20. Glial Expression of the Caenorhabditis elegans Gene swip-10 Supports Glutamate Dependent Control of Extrasynaptic Dopamine Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hardaway, J. Andrew; Sturgeon, Sarah M.; Snarrenberg, Chelsea L.; Li, Zhaoyu; Xu, X.Z. Shawn; Bermingham, Daniel P.; Odiase, Peace; Spencer, W. Clay; Miller, David M.; Carvelli, Lucia; Hardie, Shannon L.

    2015-01-01

    Glial cells play a critical role in shaping neuronal development, structure, and function. In a screen for Caenorhabditis elegans mutants that display dopamine (DA)-dependent, Swimming-Induced Paralysis (Swip), we identified a novel gene, swip-10, the expression of which in glia is required to support normal swimming behavior. swip-10 mutants display reduced locomotion rates on plates, consistent with our findings of elevated rates of presynaptic DA vesicle fusion using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. In addition, swip-10 mutants exhibit elevated DA neuron excitability upon contact with food, as detected by in vivo Ca2+ monitoring, that can be rescued by glial expression of swip-10. Mammalian glia exert powerful control of neuronal excitability via transporter-dependent buffering of extracellular glutamate (Glu). Consistent with this idea, swip-10 paralysis was blunted in mutants deficient in either vesicular Glu release or Glu receptor expression and could be phenocopied by mutations that disrupt the function of plasma membrane Glu transporters, most noticeably glt-1, the ortholog of mammalian astrocytic GLT1 (EAAT2). swip-10 encodes a protein containing a highly conserved metallo-β-lactamase domain, within which our swip-10 mutations are located and where engineered mutations disrupt Swip rescue. Sequence alignments identify the CNS-expressed gene MBLAC1 as a putative mammalian ortholog. Together, our studies provide evidence of a novel pathway in glial cells regulated by swip-10 that limits DA neuron excitability, DA secretion, and DA-dependent behaviors through modulation of Glu signaling. PMID:26109664

  1. Small RNA-dependent expression of secondary metabolism is controlled by Krebs cycle function in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Kasumi; Kiefer, Patrick; Reimmann, Cornelia; Keel, Christoph; Dubuis, Christophe; Rolli, Joëlle; Vorholt, Julia A; Haas, Dieter

    2009-12-11

    Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, an antagonist of phytopathogenic fungi in the rhizosphere of crop plants, elaborates and excretes several secondary metabolites with antibiotic properties. Their synthesis depends on three small RNAs (RsmX, RsmY, and RsmZ), whose expression is positively controlled by the GacS-GacA two-component system at high cell population densities. To find regulatory links between primary and secondary metabolism in P. fluorescens and in the related species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we searched for null mutations that affected central carbon metabolism as well as the expression of rsmY-gfp and rsmZ-gfp reporter constructs but without slowing down the growth rate in rich media. Mutation in the pycAB genes (for pyruvate carboxylase) led to down-regulation of rsmXYZ and secondary metabolism, whereas mutation in fumA (for a fumarase isoenzyme) resulted in up-regulation of the three small RNAs and secondary metabolism in the absence of detectable nutrient limitation. These effects required the GacS sensor kinase but not the accessory sensors RetS and LadS. An analysis of intracellular metabolites in P. fluorescens revealed a strong positive correlation between small RNA expression and the pools of 2-oxoglutarate, succinate, and fumarate. We conclude that Krebs cycle intermediates (already known to control GacA-dependent virulence factors in P. aeruginosa) exert a critical trigger function in secondary metabolism via the expression of GacA-dependent small RNAs.

  2. Interleukin-28b CC genotype predicts early treatment response and CT/TT genotypes predicts non-response in patients infected with HCV genotype 3.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Abhishak Chander; Trehanpati, Nirupma; Sukriti, Sukriti; Hissar, Syed; Midha, Vandana; Sood, Ajit; Sarin, Shiv K

    2014-04-01

    Response to antiviral therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) depends upon the genotype and host immune response. IL28b gene mutations have been shown to modulate host antiviral immune response against genotype 1. However, the predictive value of IL28b polymorphism in genotype 3 HCV patients is largely unknown. The association of IL28b polymorphism with virological response was studied in 356 patients with genotype 3 chronic HCV undergoing treatment with peg-interferon and ribavirin and was compared with matched controls. IL28b genotyping followed by DNA sequencing was performed to identify the CC, CT, or TT genotypes. Two log reduction of HCV RNA at Day 7 (Quick Viral Response, QVR) and HCV RNA negativity at Day 28 (Rapid Viral Response, RVR) were analyzed with CC and non-CC genotypes in addition to other predictors of response. The associations of alleles with the response patterns were predicted. Sustained viral response was seen in 250 (70.2%) patients and the IL28b genotype CC/CT/TT distribution was 61.1%; 30.5%; and 8.4%, respectively. The non-CC genotypes were significantly higher in non-responders when compared to responders (67.6% vs. 38.9%, P < 0.001). Interestingly, the rapid viral response in responders was observed in 72.7% with the CC genotype and in 27.2% with the non-CC genotype (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed CC genotype as an independent factor predicting the sustained viral response in patients infected with HCV genotype 3. In conclusion, the IL28b CT/TT genotype strongly correlates with treatment non-response in patients infected with HCV genotype 3 and CC genotype of IL28b is associated with higher quick viral response.

  3. Ethanol increases matrix metalloproteinase-12 expression via NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Mi Jin; Nepal, Saroj; Lee, Eung-Seok; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2013-11-15

    Matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12), an enzyme responsible for degradation of extracellular matrix, plays an important role in the progression of various diseases, including inflammation and fibrosis. Although most of those are pathogenic conditions induced by ethanol ingestion, the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 has not been explored. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 expression and its potential mechanisms in macrophages. Here, we demonstrated that ethanol treatment increased MMP-12 expression in primary murine peritoneal macrophages and RAW 264.7 macrophages at both mRNA and protein levels. Ethanol treatment also significantly increased the activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) oxidase and the expression of NADPH oxidase-2 (Nox2). Pretreatment with an anti-oxidant (N-acetyl cysteine) or a selective inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI)) prevented ethanol-induced MMP-12 expression. Furthermore, knockdown of Nox2 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented ethanol-induced ROS production and MMP-12 expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages, indicating a critical role for Nox2 in ethanol-induced intracellular ROS production and MMP-12 expression in macrophages. We also showed that ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was suppressed by transient transfection with dominant negative IκB-α plasmid or pretreatment with Bay 11-7082, a selective inhibitor of NF-κB, in RAW 264.7 macrophages. In addition, ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was also attenuated by treatment with a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK, suggesting involvement of p38 MAPK/NF-κB pathway in ethanol-induced Nox2 expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ethanol treatment elicited increase in MMP-12 expression via increase in ROS production derived from Nox2 in macrophages. - Highlights: • Ethanol increases ROS production through up-regulation of Nox2 in macrophages. • Enhanced oxidative stress contributes to ethanol

  4. State-dependent mechanisms of LTP expression revealed by optical quantal analysis.

    PubMed

    Ward, Bonnie; McGuinness, Lindsay; Akerman, Colin J; Fine, Alan; Bliss, Tim V P; Emptage, Nigel J

    2006-11-22

    The expression mechanism of long-term potentiation (LTP) remains controversial. Here we combine electrophysiology and Ca(2+) imaging to examine the role of silent synapses in LTP expression. Induction of LTP fails to change p(r) at these synapses but instead mediates an unmasking process that is sensitive to the inhibition of postsynaptic membrane fusion. Once unmasked, however, further potentiation of formerly silent synapses leads to an increase in p(r). The state of the synapse thus determines how LTP is expressed.

  5. Characterization of PROFILIN genes from allotetraploid (Gossypium hirsutum) cotton and its diploid progenitors and expression analysis in cotton genotypes differing in fiber characteristics.

    PubMed

    Argiriou, Anagnostis; Kalivas, Apostolos; Michailidis, Georgios; Tsaftaris, Athanasios

    2012-04-01

    The actin-binding protein profilin (PRF) plays an important role in cell growth and expansion by regulating the organization of the actin filaments. Recent studies have reported association between fiber elongation in cultivated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and PRF expression. In the present study, we cloned four genomic clones from allotetraploid cotton (G. hirsutum) and its putative diploid progenitors (G. arboreum and G. raimondii) designated GhPRF1_A, GhPRF1_D, GaPRF1, and GrPRF1 encoding cotton PRF and characterized their genomic structure, phylogenetic relationships and promoter structure. Sequence analysis of the coding regions of all clones resulted in a single protein product which revealed more than 80% similarity to most plant PRFs and a typical organization with an actin-binding and a polybasic phospholipid binding motif at the carboxy terminus. DNA blot hybridization suggested that PRF gene is present with more than one copy in the allotetraploid species G. hirsutum. Expression analysis performed in various organs of cultivated cotton revealed that the PRF gene was preferentially expressed in cotton fibers. Very low levels of expression were observed in whole flowers, while PRF transcripts were not detected in other organs examined. Furthermore, higher levels of expression were observed at the early stages of cotton fiber development (at 10 days post anthesis), indicative that this gene may play a major role in the early stages of cotton fiber development. Quantitation of the expression by real-time PCR revealed higher expression levels in a G. hirsutum variety with higher fiber percentage compared to a variety with lower percentage. In addition, higher levels of expression were found in cultivated allotetraploid G. barbadense cotton species with higher fiber length in comparison to cultivated allotetraploid G. hirsutum. PMID:21725637

  6. Quantum dots induced interferon beta expression via TRIF-dependent signaling pathways by promoting endocytosis of TLR4.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chia-Chi; Luo, Yueh-Hsia; Chuang, Tsung-Hsien; Lin, Pinpin

    2016-02-17

    Quantum dots (QDs) are nano-sized semiconductors. Previously, intratracheal instillation of QD705s induces persistent inflammation and remodeling in the mouse lung. Expression of interferon beta (IFN-β), involved in tissue remodeling, was induced in the mouse lung. The objective of this study was to understand the mechanism of QD705 induced interferon beta (IFN-β) expression. QD705-COOH and QD705-PEG increased IFN-β and IP-10 mRNA levels during day 1 to 90 post-exposure in mouse lungs. QD705-COOH increased IFN-β expression via Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain-containing adapter protein (TRIF) dependent Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways in macrophages RAW264.7. Silencing TRIF expression with siRNA or co-treatment with a TRIF inhibitor tremendously abolished QD705s-induced IFN-β expression. Co-treatment with a TLR4 inhibitor completely prevented IFN-β induction by QD705-COOH. QD705-COOH readily entered cells, and co-treatment with either inhibitors of endocytosis or intracellular TLRs prevented IFN-β induction. Thus, activation of the TRIF dependent TLRs pathway by promoting endocytosis of TLR4 is one of the mechanisms for immunomodulatory effects of nanoparticles.

  7. Pbx-dependent regulation of lbx gene expression in developing zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Lukowski, Chris M; Drummond, Danna Lynne; Waskiewicz, Andrew J

    2011-12-01

    Ladybird (Lbx) homeodomain transcription factors function in neural and muscle development--roles conserved from Drosophila to vertebrates. Lbx expression in mice specifies neural cell types, including dorsally located interneurons and association neurons, within the neural tube. Little, however, is known about the regulation of vertebrate lbx family genes. Here we describe the expression pattern of three zebrafish ladybird genes via mRNA in situ hybridization. Zebrafish lbx genes are expressed in distinct but overlapping regions within the developing neural tube, with strong expression within the hindbrain and spinal cord. The Hox family of transcription factors, in cooperation with cofactors such as Pbx and Meis, regulate hindbrain segmentation during embryogenesis. We have identified a novel regulatory interaction in which lbx1 genes are strongly downregulated in Pbx-depleted embryos. Further, we have produced a transgenic zebrafish line expressing dTomato and EGFP under the control of an lbx1b enhancer--a useful tool to acertain neuron location, migration, and morphology. Using this transgenic strain, we have identified a minimal neural lbx1b enhancer that contains key regulatory elements for expression of this transcription factor.

  8. RRE-dependent HIV-1 Env RNA effects on Gag protein expression, assembly and release.

    PubMed

    López, Claudia S; Sloan, Rachel; Cylinder, Isabel; Kozak, Susan L; Kabat, David; Barklis, Eric

    2014-08-01

    The HIV-1 Gag proteins are translated from the full-length HIV-1 viral RNA (vRNA), whereas the envelope (Env) protein is translated from incompletely spliced Env mRNAs. Nuclear export of vRNAs and Env mRNAs is mediated by the Rev accessory protein which binds to the rev-responsive element (RRE) present on these RNAs. Evidence has shown there is a direct or indirect interaction between the Gag protein, and the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. Our current work shows that env gene expression impacts HIV-1 Gag expression and function in two ways. At the protein level, full-length Env expression altered Gag protein expression, while Env CT-deletion proteins did not. At the RNA level, RRE-containing Env mRNA expression reduced Gag expression, processing, and virus particle release from cells. Our results support models in which Gag is influenced by the Env CT, and Env mRNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export. PMID:24971705

  9. Lox-dependent gene expression in transgenic plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

    PubMed

    Shcherbak, N; Kishchenko, O; Sakhno, L; Komarnytsky, I; Kuchuk, M

    2013-01-01

    Lox sites of the Cre/lox recombination system from bacteriophage P1 were analyzed for their ability to affect on transgene expression when inserted upstream from a gene coding sequence adjacent to the right border (RB) of T-DNA. Wild and mutated types of lox sites were tested for their effect upon bar gene expression in plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated and biolistic transformation methods. Lox-mediated expression of bar gene, recognized by resistance of transgenic plants to PPT, occurred only in plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. RT-PCR analysis confirms that PPT-resistant phenotype of transgenic plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was caused by activation of bar gene. The plasmid with promoterless gus gene together with the lox site adjacent to the RB was constructed and transferred to Nicotiana tabacum as well. Transgenic plants exhibited GUS activity and expression of gus gene was detected in plant leaves. Expression of bar gene from the vectors containing lox site near RB allowed recovery of numerous PPT-resistant transformants of such