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Sample records for genting highlands malaysia

  1. Diversity of Fusarium Species from Highland Areas in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Manshor, Nurhazrati; Rosli, Hafizi; Ismail, Nor Azliza; Salleh, Baharuddin; Zakaria, Latiffah

    2012-01-01

    Fusarium is a cosmopolitan and highly diversified genus of saprophytic, phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi. However, the existence and diversity of a few species of Fusarium are restricted to a certain area or climatic condition. The present study was conducted to determine the occurrence and diversity of Fusarium species in tropical highland areas in Malaysia and to compare with those in temperate and subtropical regions. A series of sampling was carried out in 2005 to 2009 at several tropical highland areas in Malaysia that is: Cameron Highlands, Fraser Hills and Genting Highlands in Pahang; Penang Hill in Penang; Gunung Jerai in Kedah; Kundasang and Kinabalu Park in Sabah; Kubah National Park and Begunan Hill in Sarawak. Sampling was done randomly from various hosts and substrates. Isolation of Fusarium isolates was done by using pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB) agar and 1449 isolates of Fusarium were successfully recovered. Based on morphological characteristics, 20 species of Fusarium were identified. The most prevalent species occurring on the highlands areas was F. solani (66.1%) followed by F. graminearum (8.5%), F. oxysporum (7.8%), F. semitectum (5.7%), F. subglutinans (3.5%) and F. proliferatum (3.4%). Other Fusarium species, namely F. avenaceum, F. camptoceras, F. chlamydosporum, F. compactum, F. crookwellense, F. culmorum, F. decemcellulare, F. equiseti, F. nygamai, F. poae, F. proliferatum, F. sacchari, F. sporotrichioides, F. sterilihyphosum and F. verticillioides accounted for 1% recoveries. The present study was the first report on the occurrences of Fusarium species on highland areas in Malaysia. PMID:24575229

  2. Prediction of sedimentation using integration of RS, RUSLE model and GIS in Cameron Highlands, Pahang, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, A. H. A.; Lihan, T.; Rahim, S. A.; Musthapha, M. A.; Idris, W. M. R.; Rahman, Z. A.

    2013-11-01

    Soil erosion and sediment yield are strongly affected by land use change. Spatially distributed erosion models are of great interest to predict soil erosion loss and sediment yield. Hence, the objective of this study was to determine sediment yield using Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) model in Geographical Information System (GIS) environment at Cameron Highlands, Pahang, Malaysia. Sediment yield at the study area was determined using RUSLE model in GIS environment The RUSLE factors were computed by utilizing information on rainfall erosivity (R) using interpolation of rainfall data, soil erodibility (K) using soil map and field measurement, vegetation cover (C) using satellite images, length and steepness (LS) using contour map and conservation practices using satellite images based on land use/land cover. Field observations were also done to verify the predicted sediment yield. The results indicated that the rate of sediment yield in the study area ranged from very low to extremely high. The higher SY value can be found at middle and lower catchments of Cameron Highland. Meanwhile, the lower SY value can be found at the north part of the study area. Sediment yield value turned out to be higher close to the river due to the topographic characteristic, vegetation type and density, climate and land use within the drainage basin.

  3. Probable Maximum Precipitation (PMP) over mountainous region of Cameron Highlands- Batang Padang Catchment of Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidek, L. M.; Mohd Nor, M. D.; Rakhecha, P. R.; Basri, H.; Jayothisa, W.; Muda, R. S.; Ahmad, M. N.; Razad, A. Z. Abdul

    2013-06-01

    The Cameron Highland Batang Padang (CHBP) catchment situated on the main mountain range of Peninsular Malaysia is of large economical importance where currently a series of three dams (Sultan Abu Bakar, Jor and Mahang) exist in the development of water resources and hydropower. The prediction of the design storm rainfall values for different return periods including PMP values can be useful to review the adequacy of the current spillway capacities of these dams. In this paper estimates of the design storm rainfalls for various return periods and also the PMP values for rainfall stations in the CHBP catchment have been computed for the three different durations of 1, 3 & 5 days. The maximum values for 1 day, 3 days and 5 days PMP values are found to be 730.08mm, 966.17mm and 969.0mm respectively at Station number 4513033 Gunung Brinchang. The PMP values obtained were compared with previous study results undertaken by NAHRIM. However, the highest ratio of 1 day, 3 day and 5 day PMP to highest observed rainfall are found to be 2.30, 1.94 and 1.82 respectively. This shows that the ratio tend to decrease as the duration increase. Finally, the temporal pattern for 1 day, 3day and 5 days have been developed based on observed extreme rainfall at station 4513033 Gunung Brinchang for the generation of Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) in dam break analysis.

  4. Willingness to pay for highlands' agro-tourism recreational facility: A case of Boh Tea plantation, Cameron Highlands, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A, Syamsul Herman M.; M, Nur A'in C.; S, Ahmad; S, Ramachandran

    2014-03-01

    The increase in tourist demand for highland experience is inevitable. Cameron Highlands, established as a Tea Plantation Estate during the British Colonial era in 1929, has evolved into a major highland tourism destination providing a cool climatic experience coupled with scenic beauty in the midst of Tudor concept architecture which enhances the destinations historical value. Realising such tourism potential, the Boh Plantation management has provided a visitor centre as recreational facility for tourist utilisation. However, the absence in imposing an entrance fee has left a vacuum in determining the recreational economic value of this facility as the benefit of this agro-tourism product to tourists remains unknown. It would be important for the management to identify the benefit since the development and maintenance of the facility is costly. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to estimate the benefit of such establishment in highlands area by assessing visitor's Willingness to pay (WTP). The study examines, explores and debates the issues in a critical yet supportive environment especially highlands. The study obtained 179 usable questionnaires from visitors during weekends, weekdays and public holidays. The result showed that 59% of the visitors were willing to pay for the agro-tourism product. The WTP was estimated at RM 7.21 (1.81). Three factors were found to be influencing WTP which were monthly income, years of education and perception on scenery. Although the study was conducted post development, the finding indicated the WTP for current management practise. Should the management change its style, it would also affect WTP and also the total economic value. Since WTP is established concept, the finding of the study reflects on the opportunities, barriers and challenges inherent in embracing post-disciplinary approaches to research and suggest ways to further enhance the approach.

  5. Heavy rainfall intensity triggering the landslide at Sungai Ruil Cameron Highland Malaysia - A Case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaafar, K. B.

    2012-04-01

    Landslide in the village of Sungai Ruil, Brinchang, Cameron Highlands, Malaysia occurred on August 7, 2011 at 5:50 pm. This incident has caused six houses buried by debris or mud which engaged seven fatalities and two injuries This landslide has been classified as landslide debris flow. Total area of the village involved is around 40 hectares whilst the catchment area of the village is around 80 hectares. The landslide forensic investigation was carried out to identify the caused of the failure. There are three methods in conducting the study that involved geological mapping and interpretation for assessment of geological hazards. The second method is the debris flow hazard assessment in all the drainage including rainfall analysis. The rainfall analysis was carried out to produce the snake line and critical line. The third method is an analysis of slope stability in locations with high potential of slope failure in the area. There are three factors identified that resulted from this incident. The first factor is the presence of geological factors weakness (covered by colluviums), weathered material, orientation and location of adversely discontinuities and relict slope failure. While the second factor is the appearance of the morphology of hilly terrain, presence of channel order 0 or 'ephemeral drainage' and river bed gradient more than 35 degrees. The third factor is human activity that build water barrier. While the high intensity of rainfall in a short period of time is believed to be a triggering factor. This paper will discuss in detail on how intensity and duration of rainfall induce the landslide and predict the threshold value at the area.

  6. Use of multi-temporal SPOT-5 satellite images for land degradation assessment in Cameron Highlands, Malaysia using Geospatial techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nampak, Haleh; Pradhan, Biswajeet

    2016-07-01

    Soil erosion is the common land degradation problem worldwide because of its economic and environmental impacts. Therefore, land-use change detection has become one of the major concern to geomorphologists, environmentalists, and land use planners due to its impact on natural ecosystems. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the relationship between land use/cover changes and land degradation in the Cameron highlands (Malaysia) through multi-temporal remotely sensed satellite images and ancillary data. Land clearing in the study area has resulted increased soil erosion due to rainfall events. Also unsustainable development and agriculture, mismanagement and lacking policies contribute to increasing soil erosion rates. The LULC distribution of the study area was mapped for 2005, 2010, and 2015 through SPOT-5 satellite imagery data which were classified based on object-based classification. A soil erosion model was also used within a GIS in order to study the susceptibility of the areas affected by changes to overland flow and rain splash erosion. The model consists of four parameters, namely soil erodibility, slope, vegetation cover and overland flow. The results of this research will be used in the selection of the areas that require mitigation processes which will reduce their degrading potential. Key words: Land degradation, Geospatial, LULC change, Soil erosion modelling, Cameron highlands.

  7. A spatial decision support system (SDSS) for sustainable tourism planning in Cameron Highlands, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminu, M.; Matori, A. N.; Yusof, K. W.

    2014-02-01

    The study describes a methodological approach based on an integrated use of Geographic Information System (GIS) and Analytic Network Process (ANP) of Multi Criteria Evaluation (MCE) to determine nature conservation and tourism development priorities among the highland areas. A set of criteria and indicators were defined to evaluate the highlands biodiversity conservation and tourism development. Pair wise comparison technique was used in order to support solution of a decision problem by evaluating possible alternatives from different perspectives. After the weights have been derived from the pairwise comparison technique, the next step was to compute the unweighted supermatrix, weighted supermatrix and the limit matrix. The limit matrix was normalized to obtain the priorities and the results transferred into GIS environment. Elements evaluated and ranked were represented by criterion maps. Map layers reflecting the opinion of different experts involved were summed using the weighted overlay approach of GIS. Subsequently sustainable tourism development scenarios were generated. The generation of scenarios highlighted the critical issues of the decision problem because it allows one to gradually narrow down a problem.

  8. New locality record of Isomyia paurogonita Fang & Fan, 1986 (Diptera: Calliphoridae) from Peninsular Malaysia and Borneo.

    PubMed

    Heo, C C; Aisha, S; Kurahashi, H; Omar, B

    2013-03-01

    Isomyia paurogonita Fang & Fan, 1986 (Diptera: Calliphoridae), a rare species of the subfamily Rhiniinae (tribe Cosminini) was recorded for the first time in Malaysia. We collected one male and two females during a field trip conducted at Genting Highland, Pahang, peninsular Malaysia in May 2011. A 3-day old cow liver was offered as attractant and dipterans collected were transferred to the laboratory for specimens processing and identification. The adults of I. paurogonita were attracted to the odour and then captured by using a sweep net. Isomyia paurogonita was also recorded from two other localities in Peninsular and Malaysian Borneo, namely Gombak Utara, Selangor and Sibu, Sarawak.

  9. Description of a new species of Simulium (Gomphostilbia) (Diptera: Simuliidae) from Cameron's Highlands, Peninsular Malaysia, with keys to 18 species of the Simulium asakoae species-group.

    PubMed

    Takaoka, Hiroyuki; Sofian-Azirun, Mohd; Hashim, Rosli

    2013-11-01

    Simulium (Comphostilbia) izuae sp. nov. is described from female, male, pupal, and larval specimens collected from Cameron's Highlands, Peninsular Malaysia. This new species is placed in the asakoae species-group of the subgenus Gomphostilbia. The pupa of this new species is characterized by the gill with eight long filaments arranged as (3 + 3) + 2 filaments, of which the ventral pair of filaments is borne on a stalk that is always shorter than the common basal stalk. Taxonomic notes to distinguish this new species from five other Malaysian species and 12 other species of the asakoae species-group from other countries are given. Keys to identify all 18 species of the asakoae species-group are also provided for females, males, pupae, and mature larvae.

  10. Malaysia.

    PubMed

    1985-12-01

    The 1984 Current Population Estimates on 2 Malaysian states, Sabah and Sarawak, has just been published by the Department of Statistics. This report, which describes population trends between 1980-84, is part of a new series aimed at providing information on current population estimates. The population of Sabah grew at an annual rate of 3.7% in 1980-84, while growth rates were 2.4% for Sarawak and 2.5% for Peninsular Malaysia. Of sabah's 1984 population of 1.2 million, 1 million were classified as indigenous persons and .2 million were Chinese. In Sarawak the population was 1.4 million, 1 million of whom were indigenous and .4 million were Chinese. 39% of Sarawak's 1984 population consisted of persons below 15 years of age and 4% were age 65 years or over. In Sabah, these proportions were 44% and 2%, respectively. Also recently published is a population report for the state of Melake based on data from the 1980 Census. According to the Census, Melaka had a population of 464,754 persons, representing 3.4% of Malaysia's total population of 13.7 million. The Census enumerated 81,102 households, with an average of 5.4 persons in each. During the 1970-80 intercensal period, Melaka's annual growth rate was 1%. About 23% of the population lived in urban areas. The median age of the population was 19.4 years in 1980, which is 2.9 years older than in 1970. The total fertility rate was 4/woman in 1980. 65% of those aged 12 years and over had completed a primary education, and 77% of those aged 10 years and over were literate.

  11. Malaysia.

    PubMed

    1980-10-01

    The official government policy in Malaysia is to reduce the rate of population growth through decreasing fertility levels and a program of economic and social restructuring. Population policy was conceived as encompassing wider dimensions than family planning, with emphasis on spatial distribution policies. The first Population and Housing Census was undertaken by the government in 1970. Regular decennial census taking occurred between 1891 and 1957. Birth and death registrations are considered incomplete. Population issues are integrated by various organizations into their ongoing programs such as those of the Ministries of Health, Education or Agriculture. The National Family Planning Board, an interministerial body in the Prime Minister's Department, has input from development planning units. A population studies group was established within the Economic Planning Unit. The total 1980 population was 13,640,000; the rate of population growth was 2.6 from 1975-80. Life expectancy was 61.3. Morbidity and mortality rates have dropped because of disease control and malnutrition reduction. 7.4% of the population are foreign born. Spatial distribution is to be adjusted through rural land development and resettlement; promotion of industrial development in low-income states; development of new growth centers and towns; and, urban development and renewal.

  12. Use of high resolution Airborne Laser Scanning data for landslide interpretation under mixed forest and tropical rainforest: case study in Barcelonnette, France and Cameron Highlands, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azahari Razak, Khamarrul; Straatsma, Menno; van Westen, Cees; Malet, Jean-Philippe; de Jong, Steven M.

    2010-05-01

    Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) is the state of the art technology for topographic mapping over a wide variety of spatial and temporal scales. It is also a promising technique for identification and mapping of landslides in a forested mountainous landscape. This technology demonstrates the ability to pass through the gaps between forest foliage and record the terrain height under vegetation cover. To date, most of the images either derived from satellite imagery, aerial-photograph or synthetic aperture radar are not appropriate for visual interpretation of landslide features that are covered by dense vegetation. However, it is a necessity to carefully map the landslides in order to understand its processes. This is essential for landslide hazard and risk assessment. This research demonstrates the capabilities of high resolution ALS data to recognize and identify different types of landslides in mixed forest in Barcelonnette, France and tropical rainforest in Cameron Highlands, Malaysia. ALS measurements over the 100-years old forest in Bois Noir catchment were carried out in 2007 and 2009. Both ALS dataset were captured using a Riegl laser scanner. First and last pulse with density of one point per meter square was derived from 2007 ALS dataset, whereas multiple return (of up to five returns) pulse was derived from July 2009 ALS dataset, which consists of 60 points per meter square over forested terrain. Generally, this catchment is highly affected by shallow landslides which mostly occur beneath dense vegetation. It is located in the dry intra-Alpine zone and represented by the climatic of the South French Alps. In the Cameron Highlands, first and last pulse data was captured in 2004 which covers an area of up to 300 kilometres square. Here, the Optech laser scanner was used under the Malaysian national pilot study which has slightly low point density. With precipitation intensity of up to 3000 mm per year over rugged topography and elevations up to 2800 m a

  13. I Remember Highlander

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams-Hawkins, Maria

    2016-01-01

    "I Remember Highlander" reflects on the life choices of Marion Barry and Herman Henning Jr., fraternity brothers who sought the same goal but took different paths. The essay examines cultural and family situations that shaped lives and decisions.

  14. Egg phenotype differentiation in sympatric cuckoo Cuculus canorus gentes.

    PubMed

    Antonov, Anton; Stokke, B G; Vikan, J R; Fossøy, F; Ranke, P S; Røskaft, E; Moksnes, A; Møller, A P; Shykoff, J A

    2010-06-01

    The brood parasitic common cuckoo Cuculus canorus consists of gentes, which typically parasitize only a single host species whose eggs they often mimic. Where multiple cuckoo gentes co-exist in sympatry, we may expect variable but generally poorer mimicry because of host switches or inter-gens gene flow via males if these also contribute to egg phenotypes. Here, we investigated egg trait differentiation and mimicry in three cuckoo gentes parasitizing great reed warblers Acrocephalus arundinaceus, marsh warblers Acrocephalus palustris and corn buntings Miliaria calandra breeding in close sympatry in partially overlapping habitat types. The three cuckoo gentes showed a remarkable degree of mimicry to their three host species in some but not all egg features, including egg size, a hitherto largely ignored feature of egg mimicry. Egg phenotype matching for both background and spot colours as well as for egg size has been maintained in close sympatry despite the possibility for gene flow.

  15. The Ozark Highlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ethridge, Max

    2009-01-01

    The Ozark Highlands include diverse topographic, geologic, soil, and hydrologic conditions that support a broad range of habitat types. The landscape features rugged uplands - some peaks higher than 2,500 feet above sea level - with exposed rock and varying soil depths and includes extensive areas of karst terrain. The Highlands are characterized by extreme biological diversity and high endemism (uniqueness of species). Vegetation communities are dominated by open oak-hickory and shortleaf pine woodlands and forests. Included in this vegetation matrix is an assemblage of various types of fens, forests, wetlands, fluvial features, and carbonate and siliceous glades. An ever-growing human population in the Ozark Highlands has become very dependent on reservoirs constructed on major rivers in the region and, in some cases, groundwater for household and public water supply. Because of human population growth in the Highlands and increases in industrial and agricultural activities, not only is adequate water quantity an issue, but maintaining good water quality is also a challenge. Point and nonpoint sources of excessive nutrients are an issue. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) partnership programs to monitor water quality and develop simulation tools to help stakeholders better understand strategies to protect the quality of water and the environment are extremely important. The USGS collects relevant data, conducts interpretive studies, and develops simulation tools to help stakeholders understand resource availability and sustainability issues. Stakeholders dependent on these resources are interested in and benefit greatly from evolving these simulation tools (models) into decision support systems that can be used for adaptive management of water and ecological resources. The interaction of unique and high-quality biological and hydrologic resources and the effects of stresses from human activities can be evaluated best by using a multidisciplinary approach that the USGS

  16. Creating Highlander Wherever You Are

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Susan; Mullett, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    Highlander Research and Education Center serves as a catalyst for grassroots organizing and movement building. This article focuses on an interview with education coordinator Susan Williams who has worked at Highlander for 26 years. We discuss how others can and do create powerful popular education experiences anywhere, whether they have a…

  17. Spotlight: Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Patriquin, W

    1988-03-01

    Focus is on Malaysia -- its population and land area, its total fertility rate and mortality rate, economic development, contraceptive usage, and population policy. In 1987 Malaysia's population was estimated to be 16.1 million with births 31/1000 population and deaths 7/1000 population. The rate of natural increase is 2.4%, the total fertility rate 3.9 children/woman, and the infant mortality rate 30/1000 live births. Ethnically, Malaysia is made up of several distinct groups. Indigenous Malays are the most numerous -- about 50% of the population. Their unique characteristics include that they are Moslem, rural, and usually of lower economic status. Chinese make up the 2nd largest group of Malaysians, nearly 1/3 of the population. This group is active in trade, business, and finance and possesses considerable economic power. About 10% of the population is of Indian descent. Malaysia has experienced much economic growth. Traditional exports grew in volume and value during the 1970; the petroleum sector expanded so rapidly it accounts for 1/4 of all exports. One reason for Malaysia's rapid economic growth is the government's promotion of industrialization and foreign investment. According to the 1982 contraceptive prevalence survey, 42% of currently married women 15-44 years were using contraception. The government considers the current rate of national increase to be satisfactory, but in 1984 it adopted a population policy to more than quadruple its population in 2100 to 70 million. It intends to accomplish this by instituting pronatalist incentives to help the fall in the national growth rate. The government's rationale for more population growth is that a larger domestic population could better support industrial growth that otherwise might be stymied by "protectionist policies practiced by developed countries." Incentives to encourage fertility include income-tax deductions and maternity benefits for women who have up to 5 children.

  18. Highland/Lowland contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The smooth plains of Elysium embay the blocky broken up highlands of Aeolis. The plains have been interpreted by researchers to be possibly mudflows or lava flows.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -0.8, Longitude 170.8 East (189.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  19. Singapore, Malaysia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This view of the Malay Peninsula shows the city state of Singapore, Malaysia (1.5N, 104.0E) with all its urban, industrial and commercial land use areas. Singapore is located at the south tip of the Malay peninsula separated by the Johor Strait. The prosporous island state, once Asia's major trade center, is now highly industrialized despite its small size and its ideal location has made this island a hub of trade, shipping and service industries.

  20. 75 FR 60840 - Highland Capital Management, L.P. and Highland Funds I; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... delegate portfolio management responsibilities of all or a portion of the Series to one or more subadvisers... COMMISSION Highland Capital Management, L.P. and Highland Funds I; Notice of Application September 27, 2010.... Applicants: Highland Capital Management, L.P. (the ``Adviser'') and Highland Funds I (the ``Trust''...

  1. HIGHLAND RIDGE ROADLESS AREA, NEVADA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitebread, Donald H.; Brown, S. Don

    1984-01-01

    The mineral-resource potential of the Highland Ridge Roadless Area, Nevada was evaluated on the basis of results from field investigations. One area along the west border of the Highland Ridge Roadless Area has substantiated mineral-resource potential for tungsten. Several other areas are classed as having probable mineral-resource potential, based mainly upon anomalously high values of tungsten, lead, silver, and zinc in concentrates of stream sediments. Most of the roadless area is underlain by rocks in the upper plate of the Snake Range decollement, and is considered to have little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. No energy resource potential was identified in the area.

  2. Detection of tropical landslides using airborne lidar data and multi imagery: A case study in genting highland, pahang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamsin, I.; Zulkarnain, M.; Razak, K. A.; Rizal, S.

    2014-02-01

    The landslide geomorphological system in a tropical region is complex, and its understanding often depends on the completeness and correctness of landslide inventorization. In mountainous regions, landslides pose a significant impact and are known as an important geomorphic process in shaping major landscape in the tropics. A modern remote sensing based approach has revolutionized the landslide investigation in a forested terrain. Optical satellite imagery, aerial photographs and synthetic aperture radar images are less effective to create reliable tropical DTMs for landslide recognition, and even so in the forested equatorial regions. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) data have been used to construct the digital terrain model (DTM) under dense vegetation, but its reliability for landslide recognition in the tropics remains surprisingly unknown. The present study aims at providing better insight into the use of airborne laser scanning (ALS) data. For the bare-earth extraction, several prominent filtering algorithms and surface interpolation methods, i.e. progressive TIN densitification, morphological, and command prompt from Lastool are evaluated in a qualitative analysis, aiming at removing non-ground points while preserving important landslide features. As a result, a large landslide can be detected using OOA. Small landslides remain unrecognized. Three out of five landslides can be detected, with a 60 percent overall accuracy.

  3. Malaria in Highlands of Ecuador since 1900

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Fiona F.

    2012-01-01

    A recent epidemic of malaria in the highlands of Bolivia and establishment of multiple Anopheles species mosquitoes in the highlands of Ecuador highlights the reemergence of malaria in the Andes Mountains in South America. Because malaria was endemic to many highland valleys at the beginning of the 20th century, this review outlines the 20th century history of malaria in the highlands of Ecuador, and focuses on its incidence (e.g., geographic distribution) and elimination from the northern highland valleys of Pichincha and Imbabura and the role of the Guayaquil to Quito railway in creating highland larval habitat and inadvertently promoting transportation of the vector and parasite. Involvement of control organizations in combating malaria in Ecuador is also outlined in a historical context. PMID:22469234

  4. Imagery Exercises for Young Highland Dancers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Irene L.; Munroe-Chandler, Krista J.

    2017-01-01

    Scottish Highland Dance (Highland Dance), known for its accompaniment of bagpipe music and traditional wearing of the kilt, has captured the interest of many dancers and spectators worldwide. It requires strength, stamina, coordination, and very controlled movements. Such intricate technique and movements can be difficult to master, especially for…

  5. A highland sample strategy for Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehon, Rene A.

    1994-01-01

    Potential landing sites are confined to latitudes between 0 deg and 30 deg N and surfaces below 0 km elevation. The landing ellipse is 100 x 200 km oriented N 74 deg E. The constraints essentially eliminate the slopes of Elysium Mons, Olympus Mons, Tharsis Ridge, Lunae Plaunum, all the southern highlands, and almost all the Noachian material of Arabia Terra. Those areas that remain as potential landing sites are chiefly lowland plains of Amazonis Chryse, Isidis, and Elysium Planitia. Any attempt to sample highland material further constrains the possible landing sites by eliminating areas of Hesperian or Amazonian lavas and sediments. One possible sampling strategy is to sample materials within those few 'highland' terrains that extend to low elevations. A second strategy is to sample materials at the mouth of an outflow channel that drains from the highlands. Potential landing sites include outflow channel material at the edge of Chryse Planitia and highland materials bordering southern Amazonis Planitia.

  6. Dragons in the mist: three new species of Pseudocalotes Fitzinger (Squamata: Agamidae) from the sky island archipelago of Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Grismer, L Lee; Quah, Evan S H; Wood, Perry L Jr; Anuar, Shahrul; Muin, Abdul; Davis, Hayden R; Murdoch, Matthew L; Grismer, Jesse L; Cota, Michael; Cobos, Anthony J

    2016-07-07

    An integrative taxonomic analysis is used to delimit and describe three new species of Pseudocalotoes from the sky island archipelago of the Banjaran (=mountain range) Titiwangsa of Peninsular Malaysia. Pseudocalotes drogon sp. nov., from Fraser's Hill, Pahang is basal to the sister species P. larutensis from Bukit Larut, Perak in the Banjaran Bintang and the new species P. rhaegal sp. nov. from Cameron Highlands, Pahang. Pseudocalotes drogon sp. nov. is differentiated from all other species of Psuedocalotes by having the combination of a flat rostrum; seven postrostrals; an interparietal; 11 circumorbitals; five canthals; 7-10 superciliaries; one scale between the rostral and nasal; nine supralabials; eight infralabials; 10 postnasal-suborbital scales; four postmentals; five or six sublabials; five or six chinshields; 47 smooth, wide, gular scales; weak transverse gular and antehumeral folds; two enlarged scales between the ear and eye; enlarged upper and lower posttemporals; a single enlarged supratympanic; no enlarged postrictals; three large scales bordering the dorsal margin of the ear opening; large pretympanic scales; eight scales in the nuchal crest not separated by a gap; enlarged vertebral scales extending to the tip of the tail; keeled and non-plate-like scales on flanks; 51 midbody scales; midventrals smaller than dorsals; 19 subdigital lamellae on the fourth finger; 23 subdigital lamellae on the fourth toe; preaxial scales on third toe enlarged and spinose; subdigital lamellae not unicarinate; HW/HL 0.52; HL/SVL 0.31; no elbow or knee patches; and a male dewlap color of lime-green bearing a central yellow spot. Pseudocalotes rhaegal sp. nov. is differentiated from all other Psuedocalotes by having the combination of a convex rostrum; 6-8 postrostrals; an interparietal; nine or 10 circumorbitals; five canthals; 7-10 superciliaries; one or two scales between the rostral and nasal scales; eight or nine supralabials; seven or eight infralabials; 11 or 12

  7. Female Prisoners in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teh, Yik Koon

    2006-01-01

    This is a study on 422 female prisoners in peninsular Malaysia. More than half of the female prisoners are foreigners, mainly from Indonesia and Thailand. This study surveys the background of the respondents and identifies factors that may have influenced them to commit the offences. Female prisoners in Malaysia, particularly those who are…

  8. Highland crust at the Apollo 14 site: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, John W.

    1993-01-01

    Recent petrologic studies of pristine nonmare samples from the Apollo 14 site have demonstrated the unique character of the western highlands crust. Many of the lithologies which occur here are not found at other highland sites or represent unique variations of more common lithologies. Rare highland samples found at the Apollo 12 site have petrologic and geochemical affinities with the Apollo 14 highland suite and the two sites taken together constitute what can be called the Western Highland Province. Rocks of the Western Highland Province are geochemically distinct from similar lithologies found at eastern highland sites (Apollo 15, Apollo 16, Apollo 17, and the Luna sites) -- a fact which adds further complications to current petrogenetic models for the lunar crust. Nonetheless, an understanding of how the Western Highlands Province formed and why it differs from highland crust in the east is crucial to our overall understanding of primordial lunar differentiation and petrogenesis.

  9. Mapping of government land encroachment in Cameron Highlands using multiple remote sensing datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zin, M. H. M.; Ahmad, B.

    2014-02-01

    The cold and refreshing highland weather is one of the factors that give impact to socio-economic growth in Cameron Highlands. This unique weather of the highland surrounded by tropical rain forest can only be found in a few places in Malaysia. It makes this place a famous tourism attraction and also provides a very suitable temperature for agriculture activities. Thus it makes agriculture such as tea plantation, vegetable, fruits and flowers one of the biggest economic activities in Cameron Highlands. However unauthorized agriculture activities are rampant. The government land, mostly forest area have been encroached by farmers, in many cases indiscriminately cutting down trees and hill slopes. This study is meant to detect and assess this encroachment using multiple remote sensing datasets. The datasets were used together with cadastral parcel data where survey lines describe property boundary, pieces of land are subdivided into lots of government and private. The general maximum likelihood classification method was used on remote sensing image to classify the land-cover in the study area. Ground truth data from field observation were used to assess the accuracy of the classification. Cadastral parcel data was overlaid on the classification map in order to detect the encroachment area. The result of this study shows that there is a land cover change of 93.535 ha in the government land of the study area between years 2001 to 2010, nevertheless almost no encroachment took place in the studied forest reserve area. The result of this study will be useful for the authority in monitoring and managing the forest.

  10. Night Pass over Malaysia

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video showing night lights over Malaysia was taken by the crew of Expedition 28 aboard the International Space Station. This sequence of shots was taken on Aug. 21, 2011, from 19:33:05 to 19:3...

  11. Adult Education in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junid, Yusof bin

    1971-01-01

    In Malaysia, education and training programs are expected to play a vital role in promoting national unity, i.e., through such things as language standardization and goodwill courses for non-Malays. (Author/SP)

  12. Chemistry of the Apollo 11 highland component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laul, J. C.; Papike, J. J.; Simon, S. B.; Shearer, C. K.

    1983-01-01

    Thirty-eight Apollo 11 lunar highland fragments from coarse fines 10085 have been subjected to petrologic and chemical study. Six major chemical groups are identified: (a) high-K KREEP; (b) anorthosite with a 10X chondrite positive Eu anomaly and anorthosite with 30X positive Eu anomaly; (c) ANT; (d) LKFM; (e) anorthositic gabbro with no Eu anomaly, with a positive Eu anomaly, and with a negative Eu anomaly; and (f) dominant Highland component, 2X-10X chondrite with a positive 10X-14X Eu anomaly. Newly recognized groups are presented based on the REE patterns: (a) ANT group with 5X La and a 22X positive Eu anomaly; (b) 10X flat with 14X positive Eu anomaly; and (c) 2-3X flat with a 10X positive Eu anomaly. The highland suite is very low in K and REE, and is overall quite similar to the Apollo 16 suite.

  13. Rock types present in lunar highland soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    Several investigators have studied soils from the lunar highlands with the objective of recognizing the parent rocks that have contributed significant amounts of material to these soils. Comparing only major element data, and thus avoiding the problems induced by individual classifications, these data appear to converge on a relatively limited number of rock types. The highland soils are derived from a suite of highly feldspathic rocks comprising anorthositic gabbros (or norites), high alumina basalts, troctolites, and less abundant gabbroic (or noritic) anorthosites, anorthosites, and KREEP basalts.

  14. Applications of PIXE to biological and biomedical samples at the university of gent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maenhaut, W.; Vandenhaute, J.; Duflou, H.; De Reuck, J.

    1987-03-01

    The research on biological and biomedical samples, conducted at the University of Gent during the last 4-5 years and using PIXE as analytical technique, is presented. Our optimized sample/target preparation methods are described, and the accuracy and precision obtainable with them are discussed. Two comprehensive biological/biomedical research projects, initiated at Gent, are presented. The first aims at investigating possible trace element changes in tissues of experimental animals (rats) as a result of liver necrosis or cirrhosis, induced by intraperitoneal injection with CCl 4. The second project involves the determination of the regional distribution of trace elements in the human brain. Eight elements, i.e. K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Se and Rb, are being measured in up to 50 different regions of 12 normal brains, and in selected brain regions from patients with neurological disorders. Some of the results of the two projects are discussed.

  15. Physiographic Sections of the Guiana Highlands, Venezuela and Guyana.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    and Guiana Highlands , all physiographic provinces. To subdivide the Guiana Highlands into smaller units the geology, geomorphic features, soils, and...This report discusses the nature of the Guiana Shield and delimits meaningful subdivisions. The Shield contains the Guiana Lowlands, Guiana Hills...formulation of three physiographic sections, the Sierra de Imataca, the Tepui Section, and the Western Highlands Section.

  16. Highland Elementary School. Learning by Example Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fager, Jennifer

    As part of a series of stories about real-world schools that have achieved substantial success in school improvement over multiple-year periods, this report provides an in-depth look at one school's efforts to improve student learning. The school profiled is Highland Elementary School, located in Salem, Oregon, serving a student population of…

  17. A Report on the Highlander Folk School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassara, Beverly B.

    The Highlander Folk School was founded as an alternative kind of education with no academic admission requirements, no examinations or grades, and no set curriculum. Hard times were caused by lack of funds and the radical nature of its purpose--to help poor people know their rights and stand up for them. As an undergraduate, Myles Horton, its…

  18. The Highlander Heritage: Education for Social Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjerandsen, Carl

    1983-01-01

    Founded in 1932 at Monteagle, Tennessee, Highlander has functioned as a residential school, serving a variety of constituencies. Throughout its history, it has sought to help disadvantaged victims of injustice and poverty, principally in the South, to learn how to change their conditions. (SSH)

  19. Mercury pollution in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hajeb, Parvaneh; Jinap, S; Ismail, Ahmad; Mahyudin, Nor Ainy

    2012-01-01

    Although several studies have been published on levels of mercury contamination of the environment, and of food and human tissues in Peninsular Malaysia, there is a serious dearth of research that has been performed in East Malaysia (Sabah and Sarawak). Industry is rapidly developing in East Malaysia, and, hence, there is a need for establishing baseline levels of mercury contamination in environmental media in that part of the country by performing monitoring studies. Residues of total mercury and inorganic in food samples have been determined in nearly all previous studies that have been conducted; however, few researchers have analyzed samples for the presence of methlymercury residues. Because methylmercury is the most toxic form of mercury, and because there is a growing public awareness of the risk posed by methylmercury exposure that is associated with fish and seafood consumption, further monitoring studies on methylmercury in food are also essential. From the results of previous studies, it is obvious that the economic development in Malaysia, in recent years, has affected the aquatic environment of the country. Primary areas of environmental concern are centered on the rivers of the west Peninsular Malaysian coast, and the coastal waters of the Straits of Malacca, wherein industrial activities are rapidly expanding. The sources of existing mercury input to both of these areas of Malaysia should be studied and identified. Considering the high levels of mercury that now exists in human tissues, efforts should be continued, and accelerated in the future, if possible, to monitor mercury contamination levels in the coastal states, and particularly along the west Peninsular Malaysian coast. Most studies that have been carried out on mercury residues in environmental samples are dated, having been conducted 20-30 years ago; therefore, the need to collect much more and more current data is urgent. Furthermore, establishing baseline levels of mercury exposure to

  20. Time Series Analysis of Heavy Metal Concentrations along the Watershed Gradient in Cameron Highlands: Geospatial Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haron, S. H.; Ismail, B. S.; Mispan, M. R.; Abd Rahman, N. F.; Khalid, K.; Rasid, M. Z. Abdul; Sidek, L. M.

    2016-03-01

    Heavy metal, particularly cadmium, lead, and arsenic, constitute a significant potential threat to human health. Some metals are extremely toxic to humans and the toxic heavy metals of greatest concern include cadmium, lead, and arsenic. The objective of the study conducted was to determine the accumulation and distribution status of heavy metal cadmium (Cd) in the sediment of Bertam River from September 2014 to February 2015 in the agricultural areas of Cameron Highlands, Malaysia. The sediment samples were collected randomly in three replicates from ten sampling points in the agricultural areas of Cameron Highlands. The heavy metals in the sediment were extracted using the wet acid method and the sample concentrations are then tested for metal concentrations by the spectrography method using Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) spectrography. Inverse distance weighting (IDW) was used to create a map of metal concentrations for a point on the polygon dataset spatial interpolation. There is an increasing trend of Cd from the upstream to downstream stations along Bertam River during the rainy season. The activity range of Cd is 0.07 to 2.83 µg/g during the rainy season, whereas, during the dry season, Cd activity ranged from 0.26-0.83µg/g.

  1. Impact Crater Deposits in the Martian Highlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mest, S. C.; Crown, D. a.

    2005-01-01

    The martian highlands of Noachis Terra (20-30 deg S, 20-50 deg E), Tyrrhena Terra (0-30 deg S, 50- 100 deg E) and Terra Cimmeria (0-60 deg S, 120-170 deg E) preserve long and complex histories of degradation, but the relative effects of such factors as fluvial, eolian, and mass wasting processes have not been well constrained. The effects of this degradation are best observed on large (D greater than 10 km) impact craters that characterize the ancient highlands. Some craters exhibit distinct interior deposits, but precise origins of these deposits are enigmatic; infilling may occur by sedimentary (e.g., fluvial, lacustrine, eolian), mass wasting and (or) volcanic processes.

  2. Pyroxene poikiloblastic rocks from the lunar highlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bence, A. E.; Papike, J. J.; Sueno, S.; Delano, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    The results of detailed petrographic, X-ray, electron microprobe, ion probe, and Ar-40/Ar-39 age studies of pyroxene poikiloblastic breccias, an important lunar highlands lithology, are interpreted to indicate that high grade metamorphic recrystallization occurred over wide regions of the moon at about 4.0 G.y. This metamorphism was probably related to a period of high meteorite influx at that time. The temperatures achieved were highly variable but in some cases were sufficiently intense to cause varying degrees of partial melting of the precursor highlands breccias. A complete spectrum of metamorphic grades from only slight recrystallization to virtually complete melting would be expected in such a model. Such a spectrum is observed in the Apollo 16 rocks.

  3. Cultural Astronomy in the Armenian Highland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmanyan, S. V.; Suvaryan, Yu. M.; Mickaelian, A. M. (Eds.)

    2016-12-01

    The book contains 29 articles of the Proceedings of the Young Scientists Conference "Cultural Astronomy in the Armenian Highland" held at the Armenian National Academy of Sciences on 20-23 June 2016. It consists of 4 main sections: "Introductory", "Cultural Astronomy", "Archaeoastronomy", "Scientific Tourism and Journalism, Astronomical Education and Amateur Astronomy". The book may be interesting to astronomers, culturologists, philologists, linguists, historians, archaeologists, art historians, ethnographers and to other specialists, as well as to students.

  4. Country Profiles, Malaysia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzuki, Ariffin Bin; Peng, J. Y.

    A profile of Malaysia is sketched in this paper. Emphasis is placed on the nature, scope, and accomplishments of population activities in the country. Topics and sub-topics include: location and description of the country; population (size, growth patterns, age structure, urban/rural distribution, ethnic and religious composition, migration,…

  5. Print Advertisements in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashim, Azirah

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines print advertisements in Malaysia to determine how advertisers seek to achieve their primary goal of persuading or influencing an audience by the use of both language and visuals. It describes the main component moves and rhetorical strategies used by writers to articulate the communicative purpose of the genre and the language…

  6. Education Reforms in Malaysia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yunus, Aida Suraya Muhammad

    Malaysia's agenda in the late 1990s involved making the transition from an industrial economy to a knowledge-based economy. Thus, the more traditional purpose of education, that is, to produce an educated person, needs to be reevaluated. If the nation's Vision 2020 is to become a reality, the educational program needs to make a fundamental shift…

  7. The lunar highland melt-rock suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Papike, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Size can be used as a criterion to select 18 large (larger than 1 cm) samples from among 148 melt-rock fragments of all sizes. This selection provides a suite of large samples which represent the important chemical variants among highland melt rocks; each large sample has enough material for a number of sample-destructive studies, as well as for future reference. Cluster analysis of the total data base of 148 highland melt rocks shows six distinct groups: anorthosite, gabbroic anorthosite, anorthositic gabbro ('highland basalt'), low K Fra Mauro, intermediate-K Fra Mauro, and high-K. Large samples are available for four of the melt-rock groups (gabbroic anorthosite, anorthositic gabbro, low-K Fra Mauro, and intermediate-K Fra Mauro). This sample selection reveals two subgroups of anorthositic gabbro (one anorthite-poor with negative Eu anomaly and one anorthite-rich without Eu anomaly). There is a sharp distinction between those Apollo 16 melt rocks and glasses which have both been classified as 'gabbroic anorthosite'.

  8. Radionuclides at Descartes in the central highlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Throium, uranium, potassium, aluminium-26, and sodium-22 were measured by nondestructive gamma ray spectrometry in six soil and two rock samples gathered by Apollo 16 in the lunar central highlands. The soil samples probably include both major geologic formations in the vicinity, the Cayley and Descartes Formations, although it is possible that the Descartes Formation is not represented. The rock samples have low concentrations of primordial radionuclides. The Al concentrations were lower than could be expected from the high abundance of alumina in the Apollo 16 soils reported earlier, but this could be due to lower concentrations of target elements in these soils, sampling depth variations, or regolithic mixing (exposure age variations).

  9. Highland macrolichen flora of Northwestern Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jae-Seoun; Wang, Li-Song; Oh, Soon-Ok; Kim, Gyoung Hee; Lim, Kwang-Mi; Jung, Jae-Sung; Koh, Young Jin

    2005-06-01

    Fifty-six species in 36 genera of macrolichens are reported from the Zhongdian area, northwest Yunnan, China during the lichenological expedition for highland macrolichen survey in June, 2004. More than 60% of these species have not been reported in South Korea. All of the 182 collected specimens are deposited in the Korean Lichen Research Institute (KoLRI) at Sunchon National University in Korea, and some of them are duplicated in the lichen herbarium, Crytogamic Herbarium, Kunming Institute of Botany, Academia Sinica (KUN-L) in China. This is the first report on the macrolichen flora in the visited areas.

  10. Notes on Pandanus atrocarpus Griff and P. tectorius Parkinson in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azahana, A.; Wickneswari, R.; Noraini, T.; Nordahlia, A. S.; Solihani, N. S.; Nurnida, M. K.

    2015-09-01

    A study was conducted on two species of Pandanus, to investigate the occurrence of P. atrocarpus Griff and P. tectorius Parkinson in Peninsular Malaysia. Traditionally their leaves are used as woven materials to make mats, baskets and hats. The objective of this study was to evaluate the current status on occurrence of these two species in Peninsular Malaysia. Field data on plant localities and morphological traits were recorded. Digital images of all characters were captured for comparative analysis. Leaf and root tissues of 19 individuals of P. atrocarpus and seven individuals of P. tectorius were collected for anatomical and micromorphological studies. Pandanus atrocarpus could be easily found at riverside areas in Kelantan and Langkawi, rubber plantations in Perak and Terengganu, at highland areas in Pahang and at the beach areas in Kedah. Meanwhile P. tectorius is commonly found in the coastal areas of Johor, Terengganu, Kedah, Selangor and can found to grow on rocky cliffs too.

  11. A note on: "A Gaussian-product stochastic Gent-McWilliams parameterization"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Malte F.

    2017-02-01

    This note builds on a recent article by Grooms (2016), which introduces a new stochastic parameterization for eddy buoyancy fluxes. The closure proposed by Grooms accounts for the fact that eddy fluxes arise as the product of two approximately Gaussian variables, which in turn leads to a distinctly non-Gaussian distribution. The directionality of the stochastic eddy fluxes, however, remains somewhat ad-hoc and depends on the reference frame of the chosen coordinate system. This note presents a modification of the approach proposed by Grooms, which eliminates this shortcoming. Eddy fluxes are computed based on a stochastic mixing length model, which leads to a frame invariant formulation. As in the original closure proposed by Grooms, eddy fluxes are proportional to the product of two Gaussian variables, and the parameterization reduces to the Gent and McWilliams parameterization for the mean buyoancy fluxes.

  12. Global update: Malaysia.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    Malaysia produces more condoms than any other country in the world, yet it has one of the lowest per capita condom usage rates. The official number of HIV-infected persons and of persons with AIDS in Malaysia is 5140 and 72, respectively. People working in AIDS prevention efforts believe the actual number of HIV-infected people is closer to 50,000 and climbing. People working in AIDS prevention efforts believe the actual number of HIV-infected people is closer to 50,000 and climbing. Public health officials report that AIDS is spreading rapidly through Malaysia's relatively large population of IV drug users. The Ministry of Health wants to introduce comprehensive and pragmatic efforts to stem the AIDS epidemic. They include sex education in schools, ways to prevent IV drug users from sharing needles, promotion of condoms among high risk groups, and screening to monitor HIV transmission. Islamic and Catholic groups oppose these program and policy measures, however. The new director of the Ministry's AIDS prevention unit announced during a meeting of health officials that a return to the teaching of Islam and adoption of Islamic values are the means to deal with AIDS. He suggested that boys and girls be separated, television be rigorously censored, and that Muslim scholars not be limited to mosques to do their teaching. The government has greatly increased the 1993 AIDS budget with all of the funds dedicated to blood screening, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and health education. The deputy health minister noted that the NGOs are supposed to address the more sensitive issues. The government does not allow any of the funds to directly go to condom promotion or programs for IV drug users, however.

  13. Key environments: Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Cranbrook, The Earl of.

    1987-01-01

    After a century of scientific investigation, it is now possible to understand Malaysia's complex ecosystem as an essential prerequisite to the successful management for conservation and long term productivity in the area. Contents: The physical setting: Forest types and forest zonation; The dipterocarps; Forest palms; Forest bamboos; Herbaceous flowering plants; Ferns; Higher fungi; Forest tree biology; Forest management; Mammals; Genetic diversity and evolution; Mammals; Distribution and ecology, Earl of Cranbook, Birds; Termites in rain forests; Forest lepidoptera; Freshwaters; Animal conservation strategies; People of the forest.

  14. Classic to postclassic in highland central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Dumond, D E; Muller, F

    1972-03-17

    The data and argument we have presented converge on three points. 1) With the decline and abandonment of Teotihuacan by the end of the Metepec phase (Teotihuacan IV), the valleys of Mexico and of Puebla-Tlax-cala witnessed the development of a ceramic culture that was represented, on the one hand, by obvious Teotihuacan derivations in presumably ritual ware and possible Teotihuacan derivations in simpler pottery of red-on-buff, and, on the other hand, by elements that seem to represent a resurgence of Preclassic characteristics. Whether the development is explained through a measure of outside influence or as a local phenomenon, the direct derivation of a substantial portion of the complex from Classic Teotihuacan is unmistakable. This transitional horizon predated the arrival of plumbate tradeware in highland central Mexico. 2) The transitional horizon coincided with (and no doubt was an integral part of) an alteration of Classic settlement patterns so drastic that it must bespeak political disruption. Nevertheless, there is no evidence that the Postclassic center of Tula represented a significant force in the highlands at that time. There is no evidence that the center of Cholula, which may even have been substantially abandoned during the previous period, was able to exert any force at this juncture; it appears more likely that Cholula was largely reoccupied after the abandonment of Teotihuacan. There is no direct evidence of domination by Xochicalco or any other known major foreign center, although some ceramic traits suggest that relatively minor influences may have emanated from Xochicalco; unfortunately, the state of research at that center does not permit a determination at this time. Thus the most reasonable view on the basis of present evidence is that the abandonment of Teotihuacan was not the direct result of the strength of another centralized power, although some outside populations may have been involved in a minor way. Whatever the proximate cause

  15. Apennine Front revisited - Diversity of Apollo 15 highland rock types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, Marilyn M.; Marvin, Ursula B.; Vetter, Scott K.; Shervais, John W.

    1988-01-01

    The Apollo 15 landing site is geologically the most complex of the Apollo sites, situated at a mare-highland interface within the rings of two of the last major basin-forming impacts. Few of the Apollo 15 samples are ancient highland rocks derived from the early differentiation of the moon, or impact melts from major basin impacts. Most of the samples are regolith breccias containing abundant clasts of younger volcanic mare and KREEP basalts. The early geologic evolution of the region can be understood only by examining the small fragments of highland rocks found in regolith breccias and soils. Geochemical and petrologic studies of clasts and matrices of three impact melt breccias and four regolith breccias are presented. Twelve igneous and metamorphic rocks show extreme diversity and include a new type of ferroan norite. Twenty-five samples of highland impact melt are divided into groups based on composition. These impact melts form nearly a continuum over more than an order of magnitude in REE concentrations. This continuum may result from both major basin impacts and younger local events. Highland rocks from the Apennine Front include most of the highland rock types found at all of the other sites. An extreme diversity of highland rocks is a fundamental characteristic of the Apennine Front and is a natural result of its complex geologic evolution.

  16. Delta hepatitis in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sinniah, M; Dimitrakakis, M; Tan, D S

    1986-06-01

    Sera from one hundred and fifty nine Malaysian individuals were screened for the prevalence of delta markers. These included 15 HBsAg positive homosexuals, 16 acute hepatitis B cases, 9 chronic hepatitis B patients, 13 healthy HBsAg carriers and 106 intravenous (i.v.) drug abusers, of whom 27 were positive for HBsAg only and the rest were anti-HBc IgG positive but HBsAg negative. The prevalence of delta markers in the homosexuals was found to be 6.7%, in the HBsAg positive drug abusers 17.8%, in acute hepatitis B cases 12.5%. No evidence of delta infection was detected in healthy HBsAg carriers, chronic hepatitis B cases and HBsAg negative i.v. drug abusers. With reference to i.v. drug abusers, the prevalence of delta markers was higher in Malays (23%) than in Chinese (7%) although the latter had a higher HBsAg carrier rate. Although the HBsAg carrier rate in the homosexuals was high, their delta prevalence rate was low as compared to drug abusers. In Malaysia, as in other non-endemic regions, hepatitis delta virus transmission appeared to occur mainly via the parenteral and sexual routes. This is the first time in Malaysia that a reservoir of delta infection has been demonstrated in certain groups of the population at high risk for hepatitis B.

  17. Hydrated Minerals in the Martian Southern Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wray, James J.; Seelos, F. P.; Murchie, S. L.; Squyres, S. W.

    2008-09-01

    Hydrated minerals including sulfates, phyllosilicates, and hydrated silica have been observed on the surface of Mars by the orbital near-infrared spectrometers OMEGA and CRISM [1,2]. Global maps from OMEGA [3,4] show that km-scale and larger exposures of these minerals are scattered widely throughout the planet's low and mid latitudes, but are relatively rare. Yet CRISM has found hundreds to thousands of Fe/Mg-phyllosilicate exposures in the highlands of Terra Tyrrhena alone [2], suggesting that smaller exposures may be much more common. To search for such exposures, we have surveyed the browse products from all PDS-released CRISM targeted observations (as of July 2008) across a large fraction of the Southern highlands, including the Noachis, Cimmeria, and Sirenum regions. Sulfates are observed in Noachian-aged terrains in each of these regions, including as far South as -63º latitude, suggesting that sulfate formation may have occurred locally or regionally throughout a large fraction of Martian history. Some of our strongest phyllosilicate detections occur adjacent to inferred chloride-bearing deposits [5] in Terra Sirenum. Also in Sirenum, the D 100 km Columbus crater contains light-toned, hydrated sulfate-bearing layers overlying materials that contain both a kaolin group clay and Fe/Mg-smectite clay, in different locations. However, phyllosilicates do not appear predominantly associated with impact craters in the regions surveyed, in contrast with Terra Tyrrhena [2]. We are currently searching for additional hydrated mineral exposures using CRISM multispectral data, providing further detail on their global distribution and identifying local areas of interest for future focused studies. [1] Bibring, J.-P. et al. (2005) Science 307, 1576-1581. [2] Mustard, J. F. et al. (2008) Nature 454, 305-309. [3] Bibring, J.-P. et al. (2006) Science 312, 400-404. [4] Poulet, F. et al. (2007) Mars 7, Abs. #3170. [5] Osterloo M. M. et al. (2008) Science 319, 1651-1654.

  18. Ancient and Medieval Cosmology in Armenian Highland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmanyan, Sona V.; Mickaelian, Areg M.

    2016-12-01

    Humankind has always sought to recognize the nature of various sky related phenomena and tried to give them explanations. It is especially vivid in ancient cultures, many of which are related to the Middle East. The purpose of this study is to identify ancient Armenian's pantheistic and cosmological perceptions, world view, notions and beliefs. By this study we answer the question "How did the Universe work in Ancient Armenian Highland?" The paper focuses on the structure of the Universe and many phenomena of nature that have always had major influence on ancient Armenians thinking. Here we weave together astronomy, anthropology and mythology of Armenia, and scientific thinking revealed in local astronomy traditions. The initial review of the study covers Moses of Khoren, Yeznik of Koghb, Anania Shirakatsi and other 5th-7th centuries historians' and scientists' records about the Universe related superstitious beliefs and cosmological understanding. By discussing and comparing Universe structure in various regional traditions, myths, folk songs and phraseological units we very often came across "seven worlds", "seven earths" and "seven layers" concepts. We draw parallels between scientific and mythological Earth and Heaven and thus find similar number of layers on both of the ancient and modern thinking. In the article we also give some details about the tripartite structure of the Universe and how these parts are connected with axis. This axis is either a column or a Cosmic Tree (Kenatz Tsar). In Armenian culture the preliminary meanings of the Kenatz Tsar are more vivid in folk songs (Jan gyulums), plays, epic, and so on, which was subsequently mixed with religious and spiritual views. We conclude that the perception of the Universe structure and celestial objects had a significant impact on culture and worldview of the people of the Armenian Highland; particularly it was one of the bases of the regional cultural diversity.

  19. Sustainable Land Management in the Ethiopian Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haile, Mitiku; Nyssen, Jan; Araya, Tesfay

    2014-05-01

    Through centuries of farming practices the farmers and pastoralists in Ethiopia were managing their land resources pertaining to the needs of prevalent populations. With an increasing population and growing demands, more land was put under cultivation. Subsequently forest areas were cleared, encroaching agriculture into steep slopes and areas that were not suitable for agricultural activities. Land degradation and particularly soil erosion by water not only reduced the productivity of the land but also aggravated the effects of drought, such as famine and migration. Obvious signs of degradation in the highlands of Ethiopia are wide gullies swallowing fertile lands and rock outcrops making farming a risky business. But also less visible sheet erosion processes result in a tremendous loss of fertile topsoil, particularly on cropland. Efforts have been made by the farming communities to mitigate land degradation by developing local practices of conserving soil and water. With keen interest and openness one can observe such indigenous practices in all corners of Ethiopia. Notwithstanding these practices, there were also efforts to introduce other soil and water conservation interventions to control erosion and retain the eroded soils. Since the early 1980s numerous campaigns were carried out to build terraces in farmlands and sloping areas. Major emphasis was given to structural technologies rather than on vegetative measures. Currently the landscape of the northern highlands is dotted with millions of hectares of terraced fields and in some places with planned watershed management interventions including exclosures. Apparently these interventions were introduced without prior investigating the detailed problems and conservation needs of the local population. Intensive research is undertaken on the processes of degradation, the impact of the different intervention measures and the role of communities in sustainably managing their land. This paper attempts to review the

  20. Impact melt in small lunar highland craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plescia, J. B.; Cintala, M. J.

    2012-03-01

    Impact melt deposits have been identified in small, simple impact craters within the lunar highlands. Such deposits are rare, but have been observed in craters as small as 170 m diameter. The melt occurs as well-defined pools on the crater floor, as well as veneers on the inner crater wall and stringers of material extending over the rim and away from the crater. Model calculations indicate that the amount of melt formed in craters 100-2000 m diameter would amount to a few to ˜106 m3, representing <1% of the crater volume. Thus, significant, visible impact melt deposits would not be expected in such small craters as most of the melt material that was formed would be ejected. Variations in the properties of the projectile or the target cannot account for the amount of observed melt; the amount of melt produced is largely insensitive to such variations. Rather, we suggest that these small melt-containing craters represent near-vertical impacts in which the axes of melting and melt motion are essentially straight down, toward the base of the transient cavity. For a given event energy under vertical impact conditions, the volume of melt produced would be greater than in an oblique impact and the momentum of the material would be directed vertically downward with minimal lateral momentum such that most of the melt is retained within the crater interior. Since vertical impacts are relatively rare, such small craters with visible, interior melt deposits are rare. While we focus here on the highlands, such craters also occur on the maria.

  1. What Lunar Meteorites Tell Us About the Lunar Highlands Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korotev, R. L.; Jolliff, B. L.; Zeigler, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    The first meteorite to be found1 that was eventually (1984) recognized to have originated from the Moon is Yamato 791197. The find date, November 20, 1979, was four days after the end of the first Conference on the Lunar Highland Crust. Since then, >75 other lunar meteorites have been found, and these meteorites provide information about the lunar highlands that was not known from studies of the Apollo and Luna samples

  2. New York/New Jersey Highlands -- ecological and economic sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, C.

    1997-08-01

    The New York/New Jersey Highlands region is one million acres of Appalachian ridges and valleys that stretch from the Hudson to the Delaware River. The spatial relationship of Highlands to the New York/New Jersey metropolitan area provides a unique opportunity for regional development. The New Jersey Highlands Region, stretching from the Hudson River to the Delaware River, is an area critical to the overall environmental quality of the nation`s largest metropolitan area. However, there is substantial development pressure in this region. The way in which the Highlands Region is developed in the near future will have long-lasting effects. Patterns of population density, water use, pollution and resource consumption are difficult to rectify once established. All indications point to the Highlands becoming the latest addition to the urban sprawl of the New York/New Jersey metropolitan areas. Great cooperation and motivation would be required to change this pattern. This paper will attempt to explore the ecological merits of a Highland greenway proposal, the economic impacts and possible planning techniques which might effect a win/win situation.

  3. Diagnosis of Cystic Echinococcosis, Central Peruvian Highlands

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Armando E.; Zhang, Wenbao; McManus, Donald P.; Lopera, Luis; Ninaquispe, Berenice; Garcia, Hector H.; Rodríguez, Silvia; Verastegui, Manuela; Calderon, Carmen; Pan, William K.Y.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated prevalence of cystic echinococcosis (CE) in a central Peruvian Highland district by using 4 diagnostic methods: ultrasonography for 949 persons, radiography for 829, and 2 serologic tests for 929 (2 immunoblot formats using bovine hydatid cyst fluid [IBCF] and recombinant EpC1 glutathione S-transferase [rEpC1-GST] antigens). For the IBCF and rEpC1-GST testing, prevalence of liver and pulmonary CE was 4.7% and 1.1% and seropositivity was 8.9% and 19.7%, respectively. Frequency of seropositive results for IBCF and rEpC1-GST testing was 35.7% and 16.7% (all hepatic cysts), 47.1% and 29.4% (hepatic calcifications excluded), and 22.2% and 33.3% (lung cysts), respectively. Weak immune response against lung cysts, calcified cysts, small cysts, and cysts in sites other than lung and liver might explain the poor performance of the serodiagnostic tests. We confirm that CE is highly endemic to Peru and emphasize the limited performance of available serologic assays in the field. PMID:18258119

  4. Comparison pesticide residue levels in the surface of Bertam River in Cameron Highlands, Pahang

    SciTech Connect

    Haron, S. H. Ismail, B. S.

    2015-09-25

    The presence of pesticide residues in the surface water of Bertam River in the agricultural areas of Cameron Highlands in Pahang, Malaysia was monitored from May to October 2014. The sampling sites were located at 10 sampling points along the Bertam River in the vegetable planting areas. The extraction method of the pesticide (organophosphate/pyrethroid) from the river samples used solid phase extraction followed by gas chromatography (with electron capture detector, ECD). Insecticides, cypermethrin and chlorpyrifos were found in the surface water of Bertam River. High level concentrations of those insecticides in the river were observed during the period from May to October 2014, a period which included both seasons (wet and dry seasons). The highest concentration of 2.66 µg/mL and 1.23 µg/mL of cypermethrin was observed during the wet and dry seasons respectively. This could be due to the frequent usage of the above-mentioned insecticides coupled with contamination that could have originated from the application sites. Meanwhile, the lowest concentration detected in the surface water was chlorpyrifos (0.11 µg/mL and 0.17 µg/mL) during the dry and wet seasons, respectively.

  5. Comparison pesticide residue levels in the surface of Bertam River in Cameron Highlands, Pahang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haron, S. H.; Ismail B., S.

    2015-09-01

    The presence of pesticide residues in the surface water of Bertam River in the agricultural areas of Cameron Highlands in Pahang, Malaysia was monitored from May to October 2014. The sampling sites were located at 10 sampling points along the Bertam River in the vegetable planting areas. The extraction method of the pesticide (organophosphate/pyrethroid) from the river samples used solid phase extraction followed by gas chromatography (with electron capture detector, ECD). Insecticides, cypermethrin and chlorpyrifos were found in the surface water of Bertam River. High level concentrations of those insecticides in the river were observed during the period from May to October 2014, a period which included both seasons (wet and dry seasons). The highest concentration of 2.66 µg/mL and 1.23 µg/mL of cypermethrin was observed during the wet and dry seasons respectively. This could be due to the frequent usage of the above-mentioned insecticides coupled with contamination that could have originated from the application sites. Meanwhile, the lowest concentration detected in the surface water was chlorpyrifos (0.11 µg/mL and 0.17 µg/mL) during the dry and wet seasons, respectively.

  6. Tartarus Colles: A sampling of the Martian highlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murchie, Scott; Treiman, Allan

    1994-01-01

    Several of the most fundamental issues about the geology of Mars can be addressed using information on composition and structure of the plateau plains ('highlands') that cover approximately half the planet. The units that compose the highlands are interpreted as a mixture of volcanic, fluvial, lacustrine, and impact ejecta deposits. A more precise inventory of differing of igneous and sedimentary lithologies in highland rock units would not only lead to a better understanding of how the plateau plains formed, but would also clarify the nature of the surface environment during the first 800 m.y. of martian history. Structural features including bedforms, joints, and small faults that are unresolved from orbit record a history of the emplacement and deformation of the highlands. In addition, weathering products present in this very ancient terrain represent a mineralogic record of past climate and of the pathways by which bedrock is altered chemically. Their similarity or dissimilarity to bright soils observed spectroscopically and in situ at the Viking Lander sites will be evidence for the relative roles of regional sources and global eolian transport in producing the widespread cover of 'dust.' Unfortunately, these issues are difficult to address in the plateau plains proper, because bedrock is covered by mobile sand and weathering products, which dominate both surface composition and remotely measurable spectral properties. However, the 'Tartarus Colles' site, located at 11.41 deg N, 197.69 deg W at an elevation of -1 km, provides an excellent opportunity to address the highland geology within the mission constraints of Mars Pathfinder. The site is mapped as unit HNu, and consists of knobby remnants of deeply eroded highlands. It contains rolling hills, but lacks steep escarpments and massifs common in most highland remnants, and is free of large channels that would have removed colluvium from eroded upper portions of the stratigraphic column. These

  7. Tartarus Colles: A sampling of the Martian highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murchie, Scott; Treiman, Allan

    Several of the most fundamental issues about the geology of Mars can be addressed using information on composition and structure of the plateau plains ('highlands') that cover approximately half the planet. The units that compose the highlands are interpreted as a mixture of volcanic, fluvial, lacustrine, and impact ejecta deposits. A more precise inventory of differing of igneous and sedimentary lithologies in highland rock units would not only lead to a better understanding of how the plateau plains formed, but would also clarify the nature of the surface environment during the first 800 m.y. of martian history. Structural features including bedforms, joints, and small faults that are unresolved from orbit record a history of the emplacement and deformation of the highlands. In addition, weathering products present in this very ancient terrain represent a mineralogic record of past climate and of the pathways by which bedrock is altered chemically. Their similarity or dissimilarity to bright soils observed spectroscopically and in situ at the Viking Lander sites will be evidence for the relative roles of regional sources and global eolian transport in producing the widespread cover of 'dust.' Unfortunately, these issues are difficult to address in the plateau plains proper, because bedrock is covered by mobile sand and weathering products, which dominate both surface composition and remotely measurable spectral properties. However, the 'Tartarus Colles' site, located at 11.41 deg N, 197.69 deg W at an elevation of -1 km, provides an excellent opportunity to address the highland geology within the mission constraints of Mars Pathfinder. The site is mapped as unit HNu, and consists of knobby remnants of deeply eroded highlands. It contains rolling hills, but lacks steep escarpments and massifs common in most highland remnants, and is free of large channels that would have removed colluvium from eroded upper portions of the stratigraphic column. These

  8. Focus on Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Forman, L T

    1979-01-01

    Prospects for a stable, prospering economy in Malaysia appear threatened by an uneven distribution of wealth among non-Malay, particularly Chinese, residents. Native Malays, Bumiputra, have benefitted from the government's 20 year New Economic Policy, a system of subsidies to correct economic imbalances among the races. Malay corporate ownership has increased from 2.4% in 1970 to 28% in 1979. However, equity must increase by 26% annually to meet NEP targets. Without the GNP expanding 7-8% yearly, the government will be tempted to acquire assets at low prices. 70% of the total Malay ownership was held by public enterprises holding equity in trust. An elite group of Bumiputra will own a fair number of shares reserved by 1970. 1/5 of the population of Kuala Lumpur are squatters. Among these groups, communal tension is high. The Chinese businessmen are most resistant to native management. Since they control private domestic investment, they have political power. The Industrial Coordination Act (ICA), which gives power to civil servants through a licensing system, protects the system. The Asian Foundation supports management training, business development, and university demonstration projects in legal aid, solar energy, and community psychiatry. Malaysian competence in English enables widespread distribution of the Books for Asia program.

  9. Guiana Highlands, Shaded Relief and Colored Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    These two images show exactly the same area in South America, the Guiana Highlands straddling the borders of Venezuela, Guyana and Brazil. The image on the left was created using the best global topographic data set previously available, the U.S. Geological Survey's GTOPO30. In contrast, the image on the right was generated with a new data set recently released by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) called SRTM30, which represents a significant improvement in our knowledge of the topography of much of the world.

    GTOPO30, with a resolution of about 928 meters (1496 feet), was developed over a three-year period and published in 1996, and since then has been the primary source of digital elevation data for scientists and analysts involved in global studies. However, since it was compiled from a number of different map sources with varying attributes, the data for some parts of the globe were inconsistent or of low quality.

    The SRTM data, on the other hand, were collected within a ten-day period using the same instrument in a uniform fashion, and were processed into elevation data using consistent processing techniques. Thus SRTM30 provides a new resource of uniform quality for all parts of the Earth, and since the data, which have an intrinsic resolution of about 30 meters, were averaged and resampled to match the GTOPO30 sample spacing and format, and can be used by the same computer software without modification.

    The Guiana Highlands are part of the Guyana Shield, which lies in northeast South America and represent one of the oldest land surfaces in the world. Chemical weathering over many millions of years has created a landscape of flat-topped table mountains with dramatic, steep cliffs with a large number of spectacular waterfalls. For example Angel Falls, at 979 meters the highest waterfall in the world, plunges from Auyan Tebuy, part of a mesa of the type that may have been the

  10. Isostatic compensation of equatorial highlands on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucinskas, Algis B.; Turcotte, Donald L.

    1994-01-01

    Spherical harmonic models for Venus' global topography and gravity incorporating Magellan data are used to test isostatic compensation models in five 30 deg x 30 deg regions representative of the main classes of equatorial highlands. The power spectral density for the harmonic models obeys a power-law scaling with spectral slope Beta approximately 2 (Brown noise) for the topography and Beta approximately 3 (Kaula's law) for the geoid, similar to what is observed for Earth. The Venus topography spectrum has lower amplitudes than Earth's which reflects the dominant lowland topography on Venus. Observed degree geoid to topography ratios (GTRs) on Venus are significantly smaller than degree GTRs for uncompensated topography, indicative of substantial compensation. Assuming a global Airy compensation, most of the topography is compensated at depths greater than 100 km, suggesting a thick lithosphere on Venus. For each region considered we obtain a regional degree of compensation C from a linear regression of Bouguer anomaly versus Bouguer gravity data. Geoid anomaly (N) versus topography variation (h) data for each sample were compared, in the least-squares sense, to theoretical correlations for Pratt, Airy, and thermal thinning isostasy models yielding regional GTR, zero-elevation crustal thickness (H), and zero elevation thermal lithosphere thickness (y(sub L(sub 0)), respectively. We find the regional compensation to be substantial (C approximately 52-80%), and the h, N data correlations in the chosen areas can be explained by isostasy models applicable on the Earth and involving variations in crustal thickness (Airy) and/or lithospheric (thermal thinning) thickness. However, a thick crust and lithosphere (y(sub L(sub 0)) approximately 300 km) must be assumed for Venus.

  11. Martian Highlands at Night in Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This nighttime temperature image from the camera system on NASA's Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows the ancient, heavily cratered surface of the highlands between Isidis and Elysium Planitia. The image is entered near 9 degrees north latitude, 109 degrees east longitude, and covers an area approximately 32 kilometers (20 miles) wide by 120 kilometers (75 miles) long. The bright 'splashes' extending outward from the three large craters are the remnants of the rocky material thrown out when the impact occurred. The nighttime temperature differences are due primarily to differences in the abundance of rocky materials that retain their heat at night and stay relatively warm. Fine grained dust and sand cool off more rapidly at night. The circular rims of the craters in this region are warm at night, showing that rocks are still present on the steep walls inside the craters. The 'splash' ejecta patterns are also warmer than their surroundings, and are covered by material that was blasted out when the craters formed. The temperatures in this scene vary from approximately -105 degrees Celsius (-157 degrees Fahrenheit)(darkest) to -75 degrees Celsius (-103 degrees Fahrenheit) (lightest). This image was acquired using the instrument's infrared Band 9, centered at 12.6 micrometers. North is toward the left in this image.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science in Washington, D.C. Investigators at Arizona State University in Tempe, the University of Arizona in Tucson and NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, operate the science instruments. Additional science partners are located at the Russian Aviation and Space Agency and at Los Alamos National Laboratories, New Mexico. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin

  12. Respiratory Toxicity of Lunar Highland Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Lam, Chiu-wing; Wallace, William T.

    2009-01-01

    Lunar dust exposures occurred during the Apollo missions while the crew was on the lunar surface and especially when microgravity conditions were attained during rendezvous in lunar orbit. Crews reported that the dust was irritating to the eyes and in some cases respiratory symptoms were elicited. NASA s vision for lunar exploration includes stays of 6 months on the lunar surface hence the health effects of periodic exposure to lunar dust need to be assessed. NASA has performed this assessment with a series of in vitro and in vivo tests on authentic lunar dust. Our approach is to "calibrate" the intrinsic toxicity of lunar dust by comparison to a nontoxic dust (TiO2) and a highly toxic dust (quartz) using intratrachael instillation of the dusts in mice. A battery of indices of toxicity is assessed at various time points after the instillations. Cultures of selected cells are exposed to test dusts to assess the adverse effects on the cells. Finally, chemical systems are used to assess the nature of the reactivity of various dusts and to determine the persistence of reactivity under various environmental conditions that are relevant to a space habitat. Similar systems are used to assess the dissolution of the dust. From these studies we will be able to set a defensible inhalation exposure standard for aged dust and predict whether we need a separate standard for reactive dust. Presently-available data suggest that aged lunar highland dust is slightly toxic, that it can adversely affect cultured cells, and that the surface reactivity induced by grinding the dust persists for a few hours after activation.

  13. Left ventricular adaptation to high altitude: speckle tracking echocardiography in lowlanders, healthy highlanders and highlanders with chronic mountain sickness.

    PubMed

    Dedobbeleer, Chantal; Hadefi, Alia; Pichon, Aurelien; Villafuerte, Francisco; Naeije, Robert; Unger, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Hypoxic exposure depresses myocardial contractility in vitro, but has been associated with indices of increased cardiac performance in intact animals and in humans, possibly related to sympathetic nervous system activation. We explored left ventricular (LV) function using speckle tracking echocardiography and sympathetic tone by spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) in recently acclimatized lowlanders versus adapted or maladapted highlanders at high altitude. Twenty-six recently acclimatized lowlanders, 14 healthy highlanders and 12 highlanders with chronic mountain sickness (CMS) were studied. Control measurements at sea level were also obtained in the lowlanders. Altitude exposure in the lowlanders was associated with slightly increased blood pressure, decreased LV volumes and decreased longitudinal strain with a trend to increased prevalence of post-systolic shortening (p = 0.06), whereas the low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) ratio increased (1.62 ± 0.81 vs. 5.08 ± 4.13, p < 0.05) indicating sympathetic activation. Highlanders had a similarly raised LF/HF ratio, but no alteration in LV deformation. Highlanders with CMS had no change in LV deformation, no significant increase in LF/HF, but decreased global HRV still suggestive of increased sympathetic tone, and lower mitral E/A ratio compared to healthy highlanders. Short-term altitude exposure in lowlanders alters indices of LV systolic function and increases sympathetic nervous system tone. Life-long altitude exposure in highlanders is associated with similar sympathetic hyperactivity, but preserved parameters of LV function, whereas diastolic function may be altered in those with CMS. Altered LV systolic function in recently acclimatized lowlanders may be explained by combined effects of hypoxia and changes in loading conditions.

  14. Two new species of Scirtothrips genus-group (Thripidae) of Northern Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ng, Y F; Mound, L A

    2016-03-07

    The survey of Thysanoptera in peninsular Malaysia has been concentrated largely in areas growing crops and flowers around Kuala Lumpur, and the Cameron Highlands, and there are few records of these insects from native forests particularly in the northern part of the country. The two species described here were collected during a recent visit to Belum-Temengor Forest Complex, in Perak State, part of the second largest forested area on the peninsular, and connected to the Bang Lang National Park, in Yala Province, Thailand. This forest has been well known as home to a number of endangered animals, including Malayan tigers and Asian elephants, as well as remarkable plant species such as Rafflesia with the world's largest flowers (Abdullah et al. 2011). Despite this, forest areas are facing a major challenge from the insatiable demand for timber, palm oil and minerals, with an 80% increase in deforestation rate in Malaysia between 1990 and 2005 (FAO 2010). Forested land in peninsular Malaysia has been estimated at 5.88 million-ha or 44% of total area, but the coverage of reserved virgin forest is about 0.40 % or 23,002-ha (Dahlan 2008).

  15. History of Neurosurgery in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    RAFFIQ, Azman; ABDULLAH, Jafri Malin; HASPANI, Saffari; ADNAN, Johari Siregar

    2015-01-01

    The development of neurosurgical services and training in Malaysia began in 1963, with the first centre established in its capital city at Hospital Kuala Lumpur, aimed to provide much needed neurosurgical services and training in the field of neurology and neurosurgery. This center subsequently expanded in 1975 with the establishment of the Tunku Abdul Rahman Neuroscience Institute (IKTAR); which integrated the three allied interdependent disciplines of neurosurgery, neurology and psychiatry. The establishment of this institute catalysed the rapid expansion of neurosurgical services in Malaysia and paved the way for development of comprehensive training for doctors, nurses, and paramedics. This culminated in the establishments of a local comprehensive neurosurgery training program for doctors in 2001; followed by a training program for nurses and paramedics in 2006. To date, there are more than 60 neurosurgeons providing expert care in 11 centers across Malaysia, along with trained personnel in the field of neurosciences. PMID:27006632

  16. Developing a Malaysia flood model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haseldine, Lucy; Baxter, Stephen; Wheeler, Phil; Thomson, Tina

    2014-05-01

    Faced with growing exposures in Malaysia, insurers have a need for models to help them assess their exposure to flood losses. The need for an improved management of flood risks has been further highlighted by the 2011 floods in Thailand and recent events in Malaysia. The increasing demand for loss accumulation tools in Malaysia has lead to the development of the first nationwide probabilistic Malaysia flood model, which we present here. The model is multi-peril, including river flooding for thousands of kilometres of river and rainfall-driven surface water flooding in major cities, which may cause losses equivalent to river flood in some high-density urban areas. The underlying hazard maps are based on a 30m digital surface model (DSM) and 1D/2D hydraulic modelling in JFlow and RFlow. Key mitigation schemes such as the SMART tunnel and drainage capacities are also considered in the model. The probabilistic element of the model is driven by a stochastic event set based on rainfall data, hence enabling per-event and annual figures to be calculated for a specific insurance portfolio and a range of return periods. Losses are estimated via depth-damage vulnerability functions which link the insured damage to water depths for different property types in Malaysia. The model provides a unique insight into Malaysian flood risk profiles and provides insurers with return period estimates of flood damage and loss to property portfolios through loss exceedance curve outputs. It has been successfully validated against historic flood events in Malaysia and is now being successfully used by insurance companies in the Malaysian market to obtain reinsurance cover.

  17. Predicting potential effects of climate change on Ozark Highlands streams

    SciTech Connect

    Willson, G.D.; Rabeni, C.F.; Galat, D.L. )

    1993-06-01

    The Ozark Highlands biogeographic area centers on two National Park Service units: Ozark National Scenic Riverways in Missouri and Buffalo National River in Arkansas. The Ozark Highlands is part of a national network of 20 research sites established to determine the potential influence of global change on ecosystems and their adaptability. The Ozark Highlands program will integrate historic and proxy stream flows, fluvial geomorphology, and trophic-level responses in streams to model aquatic systems under mid-continent, climate change scenarios. Climate change in Ozarks streams will likely alter hydrologic/geomorphic patterns and disrupt community structure and ecological processes. Initially, the program has focused on defining variation inherent in stream systems and how ecological processes and biota respond to that variability.

  18. EARTHSHINE ON A YOUNG MOON: EXPLAINING THE LUNAR FARSIDE HIGHLANDS

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Arpita; Wright, Jason T.; Sigurðsson, Steinn

    2014-06-20

    The lunar farside highlands problem refers to the curious and unexplained fact that the farside lunar crust is thicker, on average, than the nearside crust. Here we recognize the crucial influence of Earthshine, and propose that it naturally explains this hemispheric dichotomy. Since the accreting Moon rapidly achieved synchronous rotation, a surface and atmospheric thermal gradient was imposed by the proximity of the hot, post-giant impact Earth. This gradient guided condensation of atmospheric and accreting material, preferentially depositing crust-forming refractories on the cooler farside, resulting in a primordial bulk chemical inhomogeneity that seeded the crustal asymmetry. Our model provides a causal solution to the lunar highlands problem: the thermal gradient created by Earthshine produced the chemical gradient responsible for the crust thickness dichotomy that defines the lunar highlands.

  19. Malaria vector productivity in relation to the highland environment in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Minakawa, Noboru; Omukunda, Elizabeth; Zhou, Guofa; Githeko, Andrew; Yan, Guiyun

    2006-09-01

    The reasons for the resurgence of malaria in the African highlands have been subject of debate. Because vector abundance is important for malaria transmission, gaining a better understanding of vector biology is a key to understanding the mechanisms of highland malaria. We studied vector productivity in relation to the highland environment and compared productivity between lowland and highland sites. We found lower vector productivity in the highland and in wetlands where the temperature was lower. Immature stage development time was significantly longer in the highland site. Development time was significantly shorter in aquatic habitats in cultivated areas than in wetlands, and survival rate was significantly higher in cultivated areas. Fecundity was significantly lower in the highland site. These findings suggest that changes in local temperature and land use contribute to an increase of malaria vectors in the highland.

  20. Assessment Profile of Malaysia: High-Stakes External Examinations Dominate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Saw Lan

    2010-01-01

    Malaysia is a federation of 13 states located in South-east Asia. The country consists of two geographical regions; Peninsular Malaysia (also known as West Malaysia) and Malaysian Borneo (also known as East Malaysia) separated by the South China Sea. The educational administration in Malaysia is highly centralised with four hierarchical levels;…

  1. "Free Primary Education" in Lesotho and the Disadvantages of the Highlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urwick, James

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the effects of national policies associated with "Education for All" on a disadvantaged region, the highlands of Lesotho. Since 2000 a programme of "Free Primary Education" has improved the position of the highlands in access to primary schooling; nevertheless, highland primary schools compare poorly with…

  2. Hydrogeology of the Mogollon Highlands, central Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, John T.C.; Steinkampf, William C.; Flynn, Marilyn E.

    2005-01-01

    The Mogollon Highlands, 4,855 square miles of rugged, mountainous terrain at the southern edge of the Colorado Plateau in central Arizona, is characterized by a bedrock-dominated hydrologic system that results in an incompletely integrated regional ground-water system, flashy streamflow, and various local water-bearing zones that are sensitive to drought. Increased demand on the water resources of the area as a result of recreational activities and population growth have made necessary an increased understanding of the hydrogeology of the region. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study of the geology and hydrology of the region in cooperation with the Arizona Department of Water Resources under the auspices of the Arizona Rural Watershed Initiative, a program launched in 1998 to assist rural areas in dealing with water-resources issues. The study involved the analysis of geologic maps, surface-water and ground-water flow, and water and rock chemical data and spatial relationships to characterize the hydrogeologic framework. The study area includes the southwestern corner of the Colorado Plateau and the Mogollon Rim, which is the eroded edge of the plateau. A 3,000- to 4,000-foot sequence of early to late Paleozoic sedimentary rocks forms the generally south-facing scarp of the Mogollon Rim. The area adjacent to the edge of the Mogollon Rim is an erosional landscape of rolling, step-like terrain exposing Proterozoic metamorphic and granitic rocks. Farther south, the Sierra Ancha and Mazatzal Mountain ranges, which are composed of various Proterozoic rocks, flank an alluvial basin filled with late Cenozoic sediments and volcanic flows. Eight streams with perennial to intermittent to ephemeral flow drain upland regions of the Mogollon Rim and flow into the Salt River on the southern boundary or the Verde River on the western boundary. Ground-water flow paths generally are controlled by large-scale fracture systems or by karst features in carbonate rocks. Stream

  3. Migrant labor absorption in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Nayagam, J

    1992-01-01

    The use of migrant workers to ease labor shortages caused by rapid industrialization in Malaysia during the twentieth century is examined. "This paper will focus on: (1) the extent, composition and distribution of migrant workers; (2) the labor shortage and absorption of migrant workers; and (3) the role of migrant workers in the government's economic restructuring process."

  4. The Mountaineer-Malaysia Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeff

    1997-01-01

    A 26-day summer field course of West Virginia University's (WVU) Recreation and Parks Department took students to Malaysia's mountains and rainforests to observe how Malaysians are managing national parks, problem elephants, and population pressures on parks. The adventure provided powerful learning experiences. Further exchanges between WVU and…

  5. Child Care Services in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pheng, Liew Sau

    2007-01-01

    Malaysia is a multi-ethnic, multi-racial, and multi-religious country with a population of more than 25 million people who live in the Peninsular and the States of Sabah and Sarawak on Borneo Island. It is a harmonious and peaceful nation comprised of Malays, who are the ethnic majority, followed by Chinese, Indians, Ibans, Kadazandusuns, and…

  6. Primary Teacher Education in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Chin Phoi; Yee, Chin Peng

    2012-01-01

    In Malaysia the training of primary school teachers is solely carried out by teacher training institutes which offer the Bachelor of Teaching with Honors (Primary education) program and was first launched in 2007. This program prepares primary school teachers specializing in various subjects or major and is carried out in 27 teacher training…

  7. Descartes highlands: Possible analogs around the Orientale Basin, part D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Two possible analogs, although not entirely satisfactory, offer reasonable alternatives to the volcanic interpretation of the Descartes highlands. Reconsideration of this complex terrain, prompted by the preliminary results of the Apollo 16 mission, will lead to the revision of some theories on lunar volcanism and also to a better understanding of the landforms caused by the formation of multi-ring basins.

  8. Unraveling the Origin of the Lunar Highlands Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L. M. V.

    2010-09-01

    The nonmare rocks that dominate the highlands of the Moon are particularly fascinating because they tell us about the origin of the most ancient crust. Two random samples of highlands rocks arrived to Earth as lunar meteorites Allan Hills (ALH) A81005 and Dhofar 309. Researchers Allan Treiman, Amy Maloy, Juliane Gross (Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston) and Chip Shearer (University of New Mexico) took a look at a particular kind of fragment inside these meteorites so geochemically distinct from other highlands materials as to warrant further investigations of their mineral, bulk, and trace element compositions. The attention-grabbing fragments are magnesium-rich anorthositic granulites that tell part of the story of lunar crustal evolution, though the details of the story are still being worked out. Magnesian anorthositic granulites, found in several distinct lunar meteorites, may represent a widespread rock type in the highlands, a notion supported by remote sensing chemical data. These fragments could be metamorphosed relicts of KREEP-free plutons that intruded into the plagioclase-rich ancient crust.

  9. INTERACTIVE HABITAT MODELS FOR MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLAND STREAM FISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In most wadeable streams of the Mid-Atlantic Highland region of the eastern United States, habitat alteration resulting from development in the watershed is the primary stressor for fish. Models that predict the presence of stream fish species based on habitat characteristics ca...

  10. Malaria in the African highlands: past, present and future.

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, S. W.; Martens, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Many of the first European settlers in Africa sought refuge from the heat and diseases of the plains by moving to the cool and salubrious highlands. Although many of the highlands were originally malaria free, there has been a progressive rise in the incidence of the disease over the last 50 years, largely as a consequence of agroforestry development, and it has been exacerbated by scarce health resources. In these areas of fringe transmission where the malaria pattern is unstable, epidemics may be precipitated by relatively subtle climatic changes. Since there is little immunity against the disease in these communities, outbreaks can be devastating, resulting in a substantial increase in morbidity and death among both children and adults. We present here the results obtained using a mathematical model designed to identify these epidemic-prone regions in the African highlands and the differences expected to occur as a result of projected global climate change. These highlands should be recognized as an area of special concern. We further recommend that a regional modelling approach should be adopted to assess the extent and severity of this problem and help improve disease surveillance and the quality of health care delivered in this unstable ecosystem. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:9615495

  11. On the age of KREEP. [in lunar highland rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palme, H.

    1977-01-01

    It is noted that the variable Rb-Sr model ages of lunar highland rocks containing a significant amount of KREEP basalt may be best explained by some fractionation of Rb from Sr during metamorphism 3.9 billion years ago, but the uniformity of the KREEP-type trace-element pattern in different highland samples indicates that elements such as the rare earth were hardly fractionated at all during the metamorphic event. Data are presented which show that the Rb/Sr fractionation 3.9 billion years ago was due to Rb mobilization alone in most cases and that this fractionation can be accounted for by coupling of Rb to other, less volatile incompatible elements. Variations of Rb in lunar highland rocks are analyzed, a correction method is applied for the Rb/Sr fractionation, and results are evaluated separately for Apollo 16 VHA and KREEP basalts, Apollo 17 noritic breccias, Apollo 14 KREEP breccias, Apollo 15 KREEP basalts, and Apollo 15-KREEP-enriched breccias. Evidence for volatilization of alkalis from glasses of impact origin is summarized, and an apparent correlation is discussed between meteoritic component (as given by the Ir/Au ratio) and rock type (as given by the U or Rb content) for many lunar highland samples.

  12. Virulence diversity of Uromyces Appendiculatus in the Highlands of Guatemala

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The common bean is planted throughout Guatemala, especially in the highlands of the South East, North East, and South West regions. In these regions, temperatures fluctuate between 16 y 20 °C and the average rain precipitation is about 1000 mm. These conditions are optimum for the rust disease and b...

  13. A preliminary report on ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) recovered from forensic entomological studies conducted in different ecological habitats in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chen, C D; Nazni, W A; Lee, H L; Hashim, R; Abdullah, N A; Ramli, R; Lau, K W; Heo, C C; Goh, T G; Izzul, A A; Sofian-Azirun, M

    2014-06-01

    This study reported the ant species that were recovered from monkey carcasses in three different ecological habitats in Malaysia. The study was conducted from 9 May - 10 October 2007, 6 May - 6 August 2008 and 26 May - 14 July 2009 in forested area (Gombak, Selangor), coastal area (Tanjong Sepat, Selangor) and highland area (Bukit Cincin, Pahang), respectively. Monkey carcass was used as a model for human decomposition in this study. A total of 4 replicates were used in each of the study sites. Ants were observed to prey on eggs, larvae, pupae and newly emerged flies. This study found that ant species could be found at all stages of decomposition, indicating that ants were not a significant indicator for faunal succession. However, different species of ants were obtained from monkey carcasses placed in different ecological habitats. Cardiocondyla sp. was only found on carcasses placed in the coastal area; while Pheidole longipes, Hypoponera sp. and Pachycondyla sp. were solely found on carcasses placed in the highland area. On the other hand, Pheidologeton diversus and Paratrechina longicornis were found in several ecological habitats. These data suggests that specific ant species can act as geographic indicators for different ecological habitats in forensic entomology cases in Malaysia.

  14. Distribution of nitrate in the unsaturated zone, Highland-East Highlands area, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, John M.; Bradford, Wesley L.

    1980-01-01

    Nitrogen in the unsaturated soil zone in the Highland-East Highlands area of San Bernardino County, Calif., has been suspected as the source of nitrate in water from wells. Plans to recharge the local aquifers with imported surface water would raise the water table and intercept that nitrogen. This study was made to describe the distribution of inorganic nitrogen and other chemical constituents and nitrogen-using bacteria in the unsaturated zone, to relate nitrogen occurrences, in a general way, to present and historical land use, and to attempt to predict nitrogen concentrations in ground water after recharge. Some generalized correlations between nitrogen occurrence and land use were observed. In 11 of 13 test holes, the maximum nitrate-nitrogen (NO3--N) concentrations occurred within 10 feet of the surface, suggesting that the major source of nitrogen is from the surface at these sites. Test holes were ranked according to maximum NO3--N in the top 10 feet, total NO3--N in the top 10 feet, and total NO3--N in the top 40 feet. In all three rankings, the top seven test holes were the same--five in or near present or historical agricultural areas (primarily citrus groves), one in a feedlot, and one adjacent to an abandoned sewage-treatment plant. Two test holes in historically uninhabited areas ranked lowest. The control test hole in an uninhabited area ranked high in geometric mean of ammonium-nitrogen concentration (NH4+-N), suggesting that present in freshly weathered granite. The geometric means of NH4+-N concentrations in six of eight citrus-related test holes were significantly lower than in the control hole, suggesting that irrigation in citrus groves may have created conditions favoring nitrification of the primary NH4+-N. Rank correlation analyses between various measurements in test holes showed that high NO3--N concentrations tend to occur with high specific conductance and chloride concentrations in soil extracts. If recharge is carried out as planned

  15. Population trends in Malaysia: 1970-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Saharani Abdul; Ghani, Puzziawati Ab; Daud, Noorizam

    2014-12-01

    The size of population in Malaysia had reached 28.3 million in 2010 and is expected to increase to 38.6 million in the next 30 years. This demographic milestone that is causing renewed attention to the challenges caused by population growth. This paper looks at the last 40 years of changes in Malaysia population structure due to the changes in demographic phenomenon using data obtained from the Department of Statistics Malaysia. The principal finding of this research indicates that population structure in Malaysia had changed dramatically from the year 1970 to 2010. At the same time, Malaysia has completed its demographic transition in less than four decades. The fall in fertility and mortality rates have led to an improvement in the life expectancy of the population which has resulted an ageing population in Malaysia.

  16. Malaysia implements the integrated approach.

    PubMed

    1977-01-01

    Malaysia has implemented an integrated approach in providing family planning services to eligible couples. In 1964 the government of Malaysia adopted a national family planning program, and implementation began in the urban areas and extended into the rural areas. Other agencies are involved in providing family planning services and information including the Federation of Family Planning Associations, the Ministry of Health, the National Family Planning Board, and the Federal Land Development Authority. The number of women practicing contraception has increased from 20,726 in 1967 to 533,646 by 1976. and other methods, 3.9%, respectively. There has been an increase in the percentage of acceptors between ages 15-29 from 56% in 1968 to 71.3% in 1975. The 2nd Malaysian national plan will use a multidisciplinary approach to the problem.

  17. Debris flow study in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrin Jaafar, Kamal

    2016-04-01

    The phenomenon of debris flow occurs in Malaysia occasionally. The topography of Peningsular Malysia is characterized by the central mountain ranges running from south to north. Several parts of hilly areas with steep slopes, combined with high saturation of soil strata that deliberately increase the pore water pressure underneath the hill slope. As a tropical country Malaysia has very high intensity rainfall which is triggered the landslide. In the study area where the debris flow are bound to occur, there are a few factors that contribute to this phenomenon such as high rainfall intensity, very steep slope which an inclination more than 35 degree and sandy clay soil type which is easily change to liquidity soil. This paper will discuss the study of rainfall, mechanism, modeling and design of mitigation measure to avoid repeated failure in future in same area.

  18. Geospatializing The Klang Gate Quartz Ridge in Malaysia: A Technological Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azahari Razak, Khamarrul; Mohamad, Zakaria; Zaki Ibrahim, Mohd; Azad Rosle, Qalam; Hattanajmie Abd Wahab, Mohd; Abu Bakar, Rabieahtul; Mohd Akib, Wan Abdul Aziz Wan

    2015-04-01

    Establishment of inventories on geological heritage, or geoheritage resources is a step forward for a comprehensive geoheritage management leading to a better conservation at national and global levels. Compiling and updating inventory of geoheritage is a tedious process and even so in a tropical environment. Malaysia has a tremendous list of geodiversity and generating its national database is a multi-institutional effort and worthwhile investment. However, producing accurate and reliable characteristics of such landform and spectacular geological features remained elusive. The advanced and modern mapping techniques have revolutionized the mapping, monitoring and modelling of the earth surface processes and landforms. Yet the methods for quantification of geodiversity physical features are not fully utilized in Malaysia for a better understanding its processes and activity. This study provides a better insight into the use of advanced active remote sensing technology for characterizing the forested Quartz Ridge in Malaysia. We have developed the novel method and tested in the Klang Gates Quartz Ridge, Selangor. The granitic country rock made up by quartz mineral is known as the longest quartz ridge in Malaysia and characterized by rugged topography, steep slopes, densely vegetated terrain and also rich-biodiversity area. This study presents an integrated field methodological framework and processing scheme by taking into account the climatic, topographic, geologic, and anthropogenic challenges in an equatorial region. Advanced terrestrial laser scanning system was used to accurately capture, map and model the ridge carried out within a relatively stringent time period. The high frequency Global Navigation Satellite System and modern Total Station coupled with the optical satellite and radar imageries and also advanced spatial analysis were fully utilized in the field campaign and data assessment performed during the recent monsoon season. As a result, the mapping

  19. Tropical Airborne LiDAR for Landslide Assessment in Malaysia: a technical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd Manap, Mohamad; Azhari Razak, Khamarrul; Mohamad, Zakaria; Ahmad, Azhari; Ahmad, Ferdaus; Mohamad Zin, Mazlan; A'zad Rosle, Qalam

    2015-04-01

    Malaysia has faced a substantial number of landslide events every year. Cameron Highlands, Pahang is one of the badly areas affected by slope failures characterized by extreme climate, rugged topographic and weathered geological structures in a tropical environment. A high frequency of landslide occurrence in the hilly areas is predominantly due to the geological materials, tropical monsoon seasons and uncontrolled agricultural activities. Therefore the Government of Malaysia through the Prime Minister Department has allocated a special budget to conduct national level hazard and risk mapping project through Minerals and Geoscience Department Malaysia, the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment. The primary aim of this project is to provide slope hazard risk information for a better slope management in Malaysia. In addition this project will establish national infrastructure for geospatial information on the geological terrain and slope by emphasizing the disaster risk throughout the country. The areas of interest are located in the three different selected areas i.e. Cameron Highlands (275 square kilometers), Ipoh (200 square kilometers) and Cheras Kajang -- Batang kali (650 square kilometers). These areas are selected based on National Slope Master Plan (2009 -- 2023) that endorsed by Malaysia Government Cabinet. The national hazard and risk mapping project includes six parts of major tasks: (1) desk study and mobilization, (2) airborne LiDAR data acquisition and analysis, (3) field data acquisition and verification, (4) hazard and risk for natural terrain, (5) hazard and risk analysis for man-made slope and (6) Man-made slope mitigation/preventive measures. The project was authorized in September, 2014 and will be ended in March, 2016. In this paper, the main focus is to evaluate the suitability of integrated capability of airborne- and terrestrial LiDAR data acquisition and analysis, and also digital photography for regional landslide assessment. The

  20. Mortality rates decline in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    1991-11-01

    Experiencing remarkable decreases in mortality rates over the past 3 decades, Malaysia currently has one of the lowest mortality rates among developing countries, a rate that compares favorably with those of developed countries. Between 1957 and 1989, the crude death rate dropped from 12.4/1000 population to 4.6. Over the same period, Malaysia recorded even greater decreases in the infant mortality rate, from 75.5/1000 births to 15.2. The Maternal mortality rate also declined from 1.48 in 1970 to 0.24 in 1988. The data indicates that mortality rates vary from state to state, and that rural areas have a higher mortality than urban areas. According to a study by the National Population and Family Development Board, the use of maternal and child health services has played an important role in reducing neonatal, perinatal, infant, child, and maternal mortality rates. Nearly all women in Malaysia receive antenatal services. While the country has achieved great gains on mortality rates, programs focusing on specific age and socioeconomic groups could lead to even greater reductions. The Minister for National Unity and Social Development, Dato Napsiah Omar, has called for the development of programs designed to improve the population's quality of life.

  1. Electricity energy outlook in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, C. S.; Maragatham, K.; Leong, Y. P.

    2013-06-01

    Population and income growth are the key drivers behind the growing demand for energy. Demand for electricity in Malaysia is always growing in tandem with its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growth. The growth for electricity in Malaysia forecasted by Economic Planning Unit (EPU) has shown an increase of 3.52% in 2012 compared to 3.48% in 2011. This growth has been driven by strong demand growth from commercial and domestic sectors. The share of electricity consumption to total energy consumption has increased from 17.4% in 2007 to 21.7% in 2012. The total electricity production was reported at 122.12TWh in 2012, where gas is still the major fuel source contributing to 52.7% of the total generation fuel mix of electricity followed by Coal, 38.9%, hydro, 7.3%, oil, 1% and others, 0.2%. This paper aims to discuss the energy outlook particularly the electricity production and ways toward greener environment in electricity production in Malaysia

  2. Malaysia (country/area statements).

    PubMed

    1985-09-01

    According to this statement presented to the Committee on Population of the UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, Malaysia by 1984 achieved a crude death rate of 5.3/1000, an infant mortality rate of 17/1000 live births, and a 1983 life expectancy at birth of 67.6 for males and 72.3 for females due primarily to socioeconomic development, better nutrition, and a health system covering 95% of the rural population. Substantial mortality differentials still exist between Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah, and Sarawak, between urban and rural areas, and among ethnic groups. Differences in the coverage and quality of mortality statistics also exist. 83.2% of Malaysia's total population of 15.5 million is in Peninsular Malaysia, 7.3% in Sabah, and 9.5% in Sarawak. In Peninsular Malaysia, 55.1% are Malays, 33.9% Chinese, and 10.3% Indians. About 40% of the population is urban, and 39% is under age 15. The average annual rate of growth declined from 2.6% in the 1960s to 2.3% in the 1970s. The total fertility rate fell from 5.1 children in 1970 to 4.1 in 1980. A rise in age at 1st marriage and reduction in marital fertility have been partly offset by an increase in the proportion of women of childbearing age. The population is projected to grow to about 22 million by the year 2000. Chinese and Indians are expected to approach replacement level fertility by that year, but Malay fertility is expected to remain high for some time. Internal migration, 45% of which is intrarural, increased markedly in the 1970s, probably due to rapid modernization, industrialization, land development, and regional imbalances in economic development. In absolute terms a total of 410,000 persons moved from rural to urban areas during the 1970s. Important progress has been made in regional development programs, but further regional development requires resolution of problems related to internal migration and greater efforts to relocate industries in the less developed areas. The

  3. The Lunar Highland Crust: Complex or Simple Petrogenesis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. R.; Koeberl, C.

    1992-07-01

    Following the general acceptance of the magma ocean hypothesis, models for the evolution of the highland crust of the Moon have become increasingly complicated, just as religious and philosophical systems have always diverged from the teachings of their founder. Three components make up the highland crust: the ferroan anorthosite, which crystallizes early from the magma ocean, depletes the deep interior in Eu, and adds a large Eu enrichment to the crust. KREEP, choked with incompatible trace elements from the residual 2% melt resulting from the crystallization of the magma ocean is pervasively mixed into the crust by cratering. KREEP adds a deep Eu depletion, with high abundances of the other REE parallel to those of the ferroan anorthosites. The third well-recognized component is the Mg Suite, commonly about 100-200 Ma younger, with intermediate REE patterns parallel to the ferroan anorthosites and KREEP (Fig. 1). If the highland crust were formed from many igneous events, in which the Mg suite comes from several separate plutons, crystallization and separation of mineral phases would surely result in REE patterns with diverse slopes, as is observed on Earth. This does not seem to have occurred. For example, the deep-seated troctolite 76535 has a well-established age of 4236 +- 15 Ma (Premo and Tatsumoto, 1992), much younger than the 4440 +- 20 Ma crystallization age of the lunar crust (Carlson and Lugmair, 1988), and the 4400-Ma closure ages for the source regions of the lunar mare basalts. If 76535 formed as a separate intrusion by partial melting during "serial magmatism" 200 Ma after the ferroan anorthosites crystallized, why is its REE pattern parallel to those of all the other highland rocks (Fig. 1)? Two explanations seem viable. The first possibility is that a diverse crust may have been homogenized by cratering. Alternatively, only one major igneous event produced the lunar highland crust. All subsequent complexity in ages and production of "igneous

  4. Hydrogeology and groundwater quality of Highlands County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spechler, Rick M.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater is the main source of water supply in Highlands County, Florida. As the demand for water in the county increases, additional information about local groundwater resources is needed to manage and develop the water supply effectively. To address the need for additional data, a study was conducted to evaluate the hydrogeology and groundwater quality of Highlands County. Total groundwater use in Highlands County has increased steadily since 1965. Total groundwater withdrawals increased from about 37 million gallons per day in 1965 to about 107 million gallons per day in 2005. Much of this increase in water use is related to agricultural activities, especially citrus cultivation, which increased more than 300 percent from 1965 to 2005. Highlands County is underlain by three principal hydrogeologic units. The uppermost water-bearing unit is the surficial aquifer, which is underlain by the intermediate aquifer system/intermediate confining unit. The lowermost hydrogeologic unit is the Floridan aquifer system, which consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer, as many as three middle confining units, and the Lower Floridan aquifer. The surficial aquifer consists primarily of fine-to-medium grained quartz sand with varying amounts of clay and silt. The aquifer system is unconfined and underlies the entire county. The thickness of the surficial aquifer is highly variable, ranging from less than 50 to more than 300 feet. Groundwater in the surficial aquifer is recharged primarily by precipitation, but also by septic tanks, irrigation from wells, seepage from lakes and streams, and the lateral groundwater inflow from adjacent areas. The intermediate aquifer system/intermediate confining unit acts as a confining layer (except where breached by sinkholes) that restricts the vertical movement of water between the surficial aquifer and the underlying Upper Floridan aquifer. The sediments have varying degrees of permeability and consist of permeable limestone, dolostone, or

  5. Chloride-bearing materials in the southern highlands of Mars.

    PubMed

    Osterloo, M M; Hamilton, V E; Bandfield, J L; Glotch, T D; Baldridge, A M; Christensen, P R; Tornabene, L L; Anderson, F S

    2008-03-21

    Chlorides commonly precipitate during the evaporation of surface water or groundwater and during volcanic outgassing. Spectrally distinct surface deposits consistent with chloride-bearing materials have been identified and mapped using data from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System. These deposits are found throughout regions of low albedo in the southern highlands of Mars. Geomorphologic evidence from orbiting imagery reveals these deposits to be light-toned relative to their surroundings and to be polygonally fractured. The deposits are small (< approximately 25 km(2)) but globally widespread, occurring in middle to late Noachian terrains with a few occurrences in early Hesperian terrains. The identification of chlorides in the ancient southern highlands suggests that near-surface water was available and widespread in early Martian history.

  6. Lunar highland rock types: Their implications for impact induced fractionation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, W. C.; Warner, J. L.; Simonds, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    The first step in a petrologic study must be a classification based on observed textures and mineralogy. Lunar rocks, may be classified into three major groups: (1) coarse-grained igneous rocks, (2) fine-grained igneous rocks and (3) breccias. Group 1 is interpreted as primitive lunar crustal rocks that display various degrees of crushing and/or annealing. Group 2 is interpreted as volcanic rocks. Group 3 is interpreted as resulting from impacts on the lunar surface and is subdivided on the basis of matrix textures into fragmental breccias, crystalline breccias that have been annealed, and crystalline breccias with igneous matrices. A synthesis of the relevant data concerning lunar highlands polymict breccias from the fields of petrography, chemistry, photogeology, and impact studies compels the prediction that the breccias should have homogeneous matrices from rock to rock within regions of the highlands of limited size where impact mixing has been efficient and extensive.

  7. Mission Applications of a HIAD for the Mars Southern Highlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winski, Richard; Bose, Dave; Komar, David R.; Samareh, Jamshid

    2013-01-01

    Recent discoveries of evidence of a flowing liquid in craters throughout the Mars Southern Highlands, like Terra Sirenum, have spurred interest in sending science missions to those locations; however, these locations are at elevations that are much higher (0 to +4 km MOLA) than any previous landing site (-1 to -4 km MOLA). New technologies may be needed to achieve a landing at these sites with significant payload mass to the surface. A promising technology is the hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerator (HIAD); a number of designs have been advanced but the stacked torus has been recently successfully flight tested in the IRVE-2 and IRVE-3 projects through the NASA Langley Research Center. This paper will focus on a variety of mission applications of the stacked torus type attached HIAD to the Mars southern highlands.

  8. An Exploration of African Students in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lian, Irene Tan Ai

    2011-01-01

    The exploratory study is an attempt to understand the reasons that prompted African students to study in Malaysia, the challenges encountered and the coping strategies used. The research on such topics among international students is well documented, but studies on international students in Malaysia are scarce. The sample included 155 African…

  9. Economic Education in Malaysia: A Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    This report provides a brief description of economic education in Malaysia and indicates interest, on the part of various Asian countries, i.e., Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Thailand, and the Philippines, in the establishment of economic education programs. (Editor/RK)

  10. Islam and Economic Growth in Malaysia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    performance. Indonesia is an interesting case to study because of its similarities with Malaysia in terms of multi-ethnic societies and cultures ...Malaysia and Indonesia , they became the majority. Islam survives despite vast differences in ethnic backgrounds, languages, culture , and historical...legitimacy.34 Throughout Indonesia and Malaya, Islam was integrated into popular culture . Sufi missionaries and village teachers settled widely and made

  11. Homeschool in Malaysia: A Foresight Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim-Soon, Ng; Rahman Bin Ahmad, Abd; Bin Sulaiman, Muhammad Ibrahim; Sirisa, Ng Mei Xin

    2015-01-01

    Homeschooling in Malaysia is a form of alternative education that emphasizes quality education based on moral values and beliefs while strengthening family bonds. This alternative form of education is being practiced by a growing number of families in Malaysia. As such, the Ministry of Education has given the green light for intending parents who…

  12. The Evolution of Special Education in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lay Wah; Low, Hui Min

    2014-01-01

    This article traces the evolution of special education in Malaysia across four chronological stages: before and during the early colonial period (before 1900), pre-independence (1900-1957), post-independence (1957-1990) and modern Malaysia (1990 to the present), through document analysis. By placing current issues and trends within a historical…

  13. Mafic rocks of the Adirondack Highlands: One suite or many

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, P.R. . New York State Museum)

    1993-03-01

    Mafic rocks in the granulite facies terrane of the Adirondack Highlands form at least 3 and possibly as many as 6 groups, based on field, petrographic, and geochemical criteria. Most abundant is the olivine metagabbro-amphibolite group (OMA), equivalent to the mafic suite'' of Olson (J. Petrol. 33:471, 1992). OMA occurs in irregular to tabular bodies, locally with intrusive relations, in all major rock types in the E and central Highlands. OMA is strongly olivine normative and forms a continuous differentiation series (Olson, 1992). Plagioclase-two pyroxene-garnet granulites (PGG) form dikes up to several m wide, in anorthositic host rocks. PGG are ferrogabbroic or ferrodioritic and approximately silica saturated. Two subgroups differ sharply in Mg, P, and trace elements. Ferrodiorite and monzodiorite gneisses (FMG), quartz normative and commonly migmatitic, occur in several large bodies in the NE Highlands and as extensive thin sheets in the W and SE Highlands, in association with anorthositic rocks. Three subgroups are distinguishable using Mg/Fe ratios and trace elements. Major element least-squares modeling suggests that both PGG and FMG could be derived by fractionation of gabbroic anorthosite liquids. A differentiation series is not evident, however, and both trace element (Ba, Rb, Sr, Zr and REE) data and normative plagioclase (An [>=] plag. in anorthosite) indicate a more complex origin. One subgroup of FMG may be early cumulates of the mangerite-charnockite suite. The chemistry of OMA, PGG, and FMG reflects their evolved nature and cannot be readily interpreted in terms of magma sources.

  14. Biological correlates of modernization in a Guatemalan highland municipio.

    PubMed

    Scholl, T O; Odell, M E

    1976-01-01

    The demographic correlates of modernization were studied in a municipio of the Guatemalan highlands using, as indicators of modernization, the introduction of chemical fertilizers and of a religous revitalization movement. Accion Catolica. Records, taken from interviews, of 340 women divided into declines (decennial groups) within ten-year birth cohorts extending from before 1925 to 1954, were checked for representativeness against the birth registries for the entire municipio for the years 1965-69.

  15. Genesis of highland basalt breccias - A view from 66095

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, J. R., Jr.; Taylor, L. A.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microprobe and defocused beam analyses of the lunar highland breccia sample 66095 show it consists of a fine-grained subophitic matrix containing a variety of mineral and lithic clasts, such as intergranular and cataclastic ANT, shocked and unshocked plagioclase, and basalts. Consideration of the chemistries of both matrix and clasts provides a basis for a qualitative three-component mixing model consisting of an ANT plutonic complex, a Fra Mauro basalt, and minor meteoric material.

  16. Independent Molecular Basis of Convergent Highland Adaptation in Maize.

    PubMed

    Takuno, Shohei; Ralph, Peter; Swarts, Kelly; Elshire, Rob J; Glaubitz, Jeffrey C; Buckler, Edward S; Hufford, Matthew B; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    Convergent evolution is the independent evolution of similar traits in different species or lineages of the same species; this often is a result of adaptation to similar environments, a process referred to as convergent adaptation. We investigate here the molecular basis of convergent adaptation in maize to highland climates in Mesoamerica and South America, using genome-wide SNP data. Taking advantage of archaeological data on the arrival of maize to the highlands, we infer demographic models for both populations, identifying evidence of a strong bottleneck and rapid expansion in South America. We use these models to then identify loci showing an excess of differentiation as a means of identifying putative targets of natural selection and compare our results to expectations from recently developed theory on convergent adaptation. Consistent with predictions across a wide parameter space, we see limited evidence for convergent evolution at the nucleotide level in spite of strong similarities in overall phenotypes. Instead, we show that selection appears to have predominantly acted on standing genetic variation and that introgression from wild teosinte populations appears to have played a role in highland adaptation in Mexican maize.

  17. Prehistoric human impact on rainforest biodiversity in highland New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Haberle, Simon G

    2007-02-28

    In the highlands of New Guinea, the development of agriculture as an indigenous innovation during the Early Holocene is considered to have resulted in rapid loss of forest cover, a decrease in forest biodiversity and increased land degradation over thousands of years. But how important is human activity in shaping the diversity of vegetation communities over millennial time-scales? An evaluation of the change in biodiversity of forest habitats through the Late Glacial transition to the present in five palaeoecological sites from highland valleys, where intensive agriculture is practised today, is presented. A detailed analysis of the longest and most continuous record from Papua New Guinea is also presented using available biodiversity indices (palynological richness and biodiversity indicator taxa) as a means of identifying changes in diversity. The analysis shows that the collapse of key forest habitats in the highland valleys is evident during the Mid - Late Holocene. These changes are best explained by the adoption of new land management practices and altered disturbance regimes associated with agricultural activity, though climate change may also play a role. The implications of these findings for ecosystem conservation and sustainability of agriculture in New Guinea are discussed.

  18. The histology of the carotid bodies in highlanders from Ladakh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Q.; Heath, D.; Smith, P.; Norboo, T.

    1988-12-01

    A histological study was made of the carotid bodies in a boy and three adult male highlanders born and residing between altitudes of 3300 m to 4200 m in Ladakh. The carotid bodies were enlarged in two of the men, and in all four subjects showed increased numbers and enlargement of the dark variants of the chief cells of the glomic tissue. In these dark cells the cytoplasm was voluminous, formed streamers and contained many intracytoplasmic vesicles of which some had mused to form larger vesicles that appeared to have discharged from the cell surface. Immunohistochemical studies showed that these cells contained considerable amounts of the peptide met-enkephalin. It is thus considered that prominence of dark cells containing this peptide is characteristic of sustained exposure of the carotid bodies to hypobaric hypoxia. In the middle-aged highlander there was a prominence of sustentacular cells which encroached upon the cores of chief cells and this may be associated with the characteristic loss of hypoxic ventilatory response in the highlander.

  19. Independent Molecular Basis of Convergent Highland Adaptation in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Takuno, Shohei; Ralph, Peter; Swarts, Kelly; Elshire, Rob J.; Glaubitz, Jeffrey C.; Buckler, Edward S.; Hufford, Matthew B.; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Convergent evolution is the independent evolution of similar traits in different species or lineages of the same species; this often is a result of adaptation to similar environments, a process referred to as convergent adaptation. We investigate here the molecular basis of convergent adaptation in maize to highland climates in Mesoamerica and South America, using genome-wide SNP data. Taking advantage of archaeological data on the arrival of maize to the highlands, we infer demographic models for both populations, identifying evidence of a strong bottleneck and rapid expansion in South America. We use these models to then identify loci showing an excess of differentiation as a means of identifying putative targets of natural selection and compare our results to expectations from recently developed theory on convergent adaptation. Consistent with predictions across a wide parameter space, we see limited evidence for convergent evolution at the nucleotide level in spite of strong similarities in overall phenotypes. Instead, we show that selection appears to have predominantly acted on standing genetic variation and that introgression from wild teosinte populations appears to have played a role in highland adaptation in Mexican maize. PMID:26078279

  20. The Mg-suite and the highland crust: An unsolved enigma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Stuart Ross; Norman, Marc D.; Esat, Tezer M.

    1993-01-01

    Most of the rocks returned from the highlands are polymict breccias, pulverized by the massive bombardment. However, some monomict breccias with low siderophile element contents are considered to be 'pristine' rocks that represent the original igneous components making up the highland crust. Three principal pristine constituents make up the lunar highland crust: ferroan anorthosites, the Mg-suite, and KREEP. A discussion of these three constituents is presented.

  1. Malaysia mental health country profile.

    PubMed

    Parameshvara Deva, M

    2004-01-01

    Malaysia is a tropical country in the heart of south east Asia with a population of 24 million people of diverse ethnic, cultural and religious backgrounds living in harmony in 330,000 km(2) of land on the Asian mainland and Borneo. Malaysia, which lies on the crossroads of trade between east and west Asia, has an ancient history as a centre of trading attracting commerce between Europe, west Asia, India and China. It has had influences from major powers that dominated the region throughout its history. Today the country, after independence in 1957, has embarked on an ambitious development project to make it a developed country by 2020. In this effort the economy has changed from one producing raw material to one manufacturing consumer goods and services and the colonial health system has been overhauled and social systems strengthened to provide better services for its people. The per capita income, which was under 1,000 US dollars at independence, has now passed 4,000 US dollars and continues to grow, with the economy largely based on strong exports that amount to over 100 billion US dollars. The mental health system that was based on institutional care in four mental hospitals at independence from British colonial rule in 1957 with no Malaysian psychiatrists is today largely based on over 30 general hospital psychiatric units spread throughout the country. With three local postgraduate training programmes in psychiatry and 12 undergraduate departments of psychiatry in the country--all started after independence--there is now a healthy development of mental health services. This is being supplemented by a newly established primary care mental health service that covers community mental health by integrating mental health into primary health care. Mental health care at the level of psychiatrists rests with about 140 psychiatrists most of whom had undertaken a four-year masters course in postgraduate psychiatry in Malaysia since 1973. However, there continues to be

  2. Chemical mixing model studies of lunar orbital geochemical data - Apollo 16 and 17 highlands compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spudis, P. D.; Hawke, B. R.

    1982-01-01

    Chemical mixing model studies of lunar geochemical data for the central and Taurus-Littrow lunar highlands were performed utilizing pristine highland rock types as end member compositions. The central highlands show considerable diversity in composition; anorthosite is the principal rock type in the Apollo 16/Descartes region, while norite predominates in the highlands west of the landing site. This change in crustal composition is coincident with a major color boundary seen in earth-based multispectral data and probably represents the presence of distinct geochemical provinces within the central highlands. The Taurus-Littrow highlands are dominated by norite; anorthosite is far less abundant than in the central highlands. This suggests that the impact target for the Serenitatis basin was different than that of the Nectaris basin and further strengthens the hypothesis that the lunar highlands are petrologically heterogeneous on a regional basis. It is suggested that the lunar highlands should be viewed in terms of geochemical provinces that have undergone distinct and complex igneous and impact histories.

  3. Medical Tourism in Malaysia: Prospect and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tourism, combined with the phrase medical, seems to be a new form of tourism which has gained huge popularity in recent decades. Though, a number of literatures available with regard to the tourism industry and the competitiveness of the destination, however, the major aspects which determine the satisfaction of medical tourists are hardly focused specifically on Malaysia. There is a lack of empirical evidence in this area of study which needs to be bridged. Hence, this study aimed at investigating the various factors contributing towards the development of medical tourism in Malaysia. Methods: As the purpose of the research was to find out various factors contributing towards the development of medical tourism in Malaysia, so this study used Structural Equation modeling (SEM) for data analysis. The target population for this study consisted of the medical tourists coming to Malaysia with the primary intension of seeking medical procedures other than sightseeing. A total sample size of 266 was collected through non-probability judgment sampling during the period between December 2012 and February 2013. Results: The result confirms that destination competitiveness and service quality play an important role in the medical tourist’s mind towards medical tourism aspect in Malaysia. Thus, Malaysia need to promote various medical success stories together with the services they offer to attract more foreign patients. Conclusion: This study contributes to the theoretical development in the tourism industry by offering the structured relationship among various aspects contributing towards the development of medical tourism in Malaysia. PMID:26056632

  4. Green commercial building insurance in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu Xin Ou; Chew, Boon Cheong; Loo, Heoy Shin; Tan, Lay Hong

    2017-03-01

    Green building construction is growing tremendously globally even in Malaysia. Currently, there are approximate 636 buildings have registered and to be certified with Green Building Index. Among these buildings, 45 buildings have already fulfilled the requirements and fully certified. The other buildings still under provisional certification stage. Malaysia had adopted Green Building Index in 2009 to support a move to promote green building concept. Malaysia starts to move towards green building because Malaysian construction and building industry realizes that both energy consumed and waste produced are reduced without irreversible impacts to ecosystems. Consequently, insurance companies such as Fireman's Fund from America has started the green building insurance policies for their green building in the year of 2006, while Malaysia still remain the coverage for green buildings using conventional property insurance. There are lacks of efforts to be seen from insurance companies to propose green building insurance for these green buildings. There are a few factors which can take into consideration for insurance companies to start the very first green building insurance in Malaysia. Although there are challenges, some efficient strategies have been identified to overcome the problems. The methods used in this research topic is qualitative research. The results obtained shows that green commercial building insurance has a huge business opportunity in Malaysia because the number of green commercial buildings are increasing tremendously in Malaysia. It is a favor to implement green building insurance in Malaysia. Furthermore, insurance companies can consider to add in extra coverage in standard building policy to provide extra protection for non-certified green buildings which have the intention to rebuilt in green when damage happens. Generally, it is very important to introduce green commercial buildings insurance into Malaysia so that all of the green commercial

  5. Malaysia -U.S. Relations: Influencing Factors and its Impact on Malaysia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    and the U.S. as a combination of critism and cooperation? What are the impacts of these relations on Malaysia? How best can understanding of the...relations between Malaysia and the U.S. as a combination of critism and cooperation? What are the impacts of these relations on Malaysia? How best...ideal was now increasingly condemned by some 5 as authoritarian and conformist. The theory and practice of multi-culturalism began to prevail

  6. A ferroelectric model for the low emissivity highlands on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, M. K.; Arvidson, R. E.; Brackett, R. A.; Fegley, B.

    1994-03-01

    A model to explain the low emissivity venusian highlands is proposed utilizing the temperature-dependent dielectric constant of ferroelectric minerals. Ferroelectric minerals are known to occur in alkaline and carbonite rocks, both of which are plausible for Venus. Ferroelectric minerals possess extremely high dielectric constants (105) over small temperature intervals and are only required in minor (much less than 1%) abundances to explain the observed emissivities. The ferroelectric model can account for: (1) the observed reduction in emissivity with increased altitude, (2) the abrupt return to normal emissivities at highest elevations, and (3) the variations in the critical elevation observed from region to region.

  7. A new species of Parakari (Ephemeroptera: Baetidae) from Guiana Highlands.

    PubMed

    Derka, Tomáš; Nieto, Carolina; Svitok, Marek

    2015-10-08

    The genus Parakari was described from Guiana Highlands in southeastern Venezuela by Nieto & Derka in 2011 for two species inhabiting streams draining isolated, flat-topped table mountains called tepuis. A description of a third representative, Parakari roraimensis sp. n., is given here based on material collected from a coldwater stream at the foothills of Roraima-tepui (SE Venezuela). Detailed morphological descriptions of mature nymph and female adult are given. A differential diagnosis and a key to nymphs of the three Parakari species are provided.

  8. Radioisotope production and its utilization in Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Yusof, A.b.A.

    1985-01-01

    The PUSPATI TRIGA MARK II research reactor in Malaysia was commissioned in 1982 and production of radioisotope commenced 2 years later. However, radioisotopes have been utilized in the country since 1960 with medical applications pioneering the field, and later followed by usage in industry and agricultural research. Currently, Malaysia spends more than M$1.5 million (US$0.65 million) annually on the import of radioisotopes and associated products. This paper briefly describes the present status of radioisotope utilization in Malaysia. Radioisotopes are being used in the fields of medicine, industry (NDT and quality control, nuclear gauging, radiotracer), agriculture (animal production, food irradiation, soil-plant relationship and mutation breeding studies) and also in environmental control and basic science research. The paper also gives an account of radioisotope production in Malaysia, its facilities and target handling technique.

  9. WATERSHED RESTORATION AND FISHERIES MANAGEMENT IN THE MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation is about watershed restoration and fisheries management in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands. The goal of the Canaan Valley Institue is to develop and implement solutions to restore damaged areas and protect aquatic systems in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands. A decision ana...

  10. A New Turnaround Model: Michigan's Highland Park Goes Charter. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spalding, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    This brief examines the series of events that led to the Highland Park school district being converted to a system of charter public schools in 2012. Used as a strategy to help the district eliminate its large fiscal debt while still providing resident students with a local public school option, Highland Park's charter conversion is one of the…

  11. Mineralogical and Chemical Characterization of Lunar Highland Regolith: Lessons Learned from Mare Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, L. A.; Cahill, J. T.; Patchen, A.; Pieters, C.; Morris, R.; Keller, L. P.; McKay, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    The Lunar Soil Characterization Consortium has begun study of the <45 m fractions of ten representative highland soils, chosen for their contrasting maturities. Difficulties are addressed in the modal and chemical analyses of these highland soils. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Hiding in the highlands: evolution of a frog species complex of the genus Ptychadena in the Ethiopian highlands.

    PubMed

    Freilich, Xenia; Tollis, Marc; Boissinot, Stéphane

    2014-02-01

    The Ethiopian highlands are a biodiversity hotspot characterized by a high level of endemism, particularly in amphibians. Frogs of the genus Ptychadena have experienced an evolutionary radiation in these highlands. Thus, this group provides an excellent opportunity to study the process of speciation in this important biogeographic area. We sequenced two mitochondrial (16S and COI) and four nuclear (Rag-1, CXCR4, NCX1 and Tyr) genes in a sample of 236 frogs from 49 Ethiopian localities. Phylogenetic analyses of the mitochondrial genes revealed the presence of eight divergent mitochondrial lineages. We uncovered a near perfect concordance between these lineages and genetic clusters based on nuclear sequences. A Bayesian species delimitation analysis confirmed that these eight lineages correspond to eight genetically isolated populations which may represent eight species. Some of these species have already been recognized due to their distinct morphology (P. cooperi, P. nana and P. erlangeri) but we determined that the species P. neumanni is a complex of 5 cryptic species, thus increasing substantially the number of species in this genus and for this country. We resolved the phylogeny of Ethiopian highland Ptychadena using a species tree approach and determined that Ptychadena species group on the phylogeny according to their habitat preference. We propose that the diversity of Ethiopian Ptychadena results from an early phase of specialization to distinct elevations followed by a phase of ecological diversification within each elevational range. We estimated that the early phase of diversification of Ethiopian Ptychadena probably occurred in the late Miocene and the most recent speciation events in the late-Pliocene or Pleistocene.

  13. Malaysia: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Khin, J.A. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that the Malaysian government announced tax incentives for fiscal year 1991/92 by cutting export duties on crude oil to encourage companies to develop more oil fields. The export duty exemption on cost recovery oil was increased from the current 20% to 50% on April 1, 1991. Nearly 115,200 sq mi of shallow-water acreage off Malaysia has been awarded to PS contractors, leaving only about five blocks remaining. Therefore, Petronas plans to award deeper water blocks (water depths of 655 ft or more) in the second half of this year, once terms are finalized. It is understood that these areas will be offshore of Sarawak and Sabah, covering in excess of 38,000 sq mi. Petronas the that there would be some improvement in the PSC terms for the deep-water areas.

  14. Federation of Malaysia. Country profile.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, L

    1985-01-01

    The 1984 population of Malaysia has been estimated at 14.7 million and the population growth rate averaged 2.3% in 1970-80. Population growth is officially encouraged to form a substantial home market for economic development. Toward this end, the 1985 budget has increased tax deductions for families with 5 children. The capital city of Kuala Lumpur is the largest metropolitan area (1 million population) and the Federal Territory is the most densely populated region. Immigration is strictly controlled by the government, and the percentage of foreign-born citizens was 5% in 1980. China, India, and Pakistan are decreasing in importance as countries of origin. Internal mobility, however, is increasing. Rural-rural migration accounted for 45% of internal migration in 1970-80 and was largely motivated by family reasons. Only 7% of Malaysians are estimated to move in search of work. Racial tensions led the government to grant special economic privileges to native-born Islamic Malays. The greatest proportion of the population is centered in the lowest age groups. The percentage of females 15-29 years of age rose from 26% in 1970 to 30% in 1980 and is expected to continue to rise. Fertility is on the decline. The majority of households in the country involve nuclear families. There has been an increase in the number of men and women who delay marriage or remain single. Education is widely available for children aged 6-15 years and those who meet certain academic standards receive free education up to age 19 years. The current labor force is estimated at 5.4 million, with an annual growth rate of 3.1%. Malaysia's per capita income (US $1860 in 1982) is among the highest in Southeast Asia and the gross national product increased by an average annual rate of 8% in 1970-81. The government plans to move toward the development of heavier industries and more manufacturing concerns.

  15. Lunar highland melt rocks - Chemistry, petrology and silicate mineralogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Papike, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    A selected suite containing several of the largest samples of lunar highland melt rocks includes impact melt specimens (anorthositic gabbro, low-K Fra Mauro) and volcanic specimens (intermediate-K Fra Mauro). Although previous assumptions of LKFM volcanism have fallen into disfavor, no fatal arguments against this hypothesis have been presented, and the evidence of a possibly 'inherited igneous' olivine-plagioclase cosaturation provides cause for keeping a volcanic LKFM hypothesis viable. Comparisons of silicate mineralogy with melt rock compositions provide information on the specimen's composition and cooling history. Plagioclase-rock compositions can be matched to the experimentally determined equilibria for appropriate samples to identify melt rocks with refractory anorthitic clasts. Olivine-rock compositions indicate that melt rock vitrophyres precipitate anomalously Fe-rich olivine; the cause of this anomaly is not immediately evident. The Al-Ti and Ca-Fe-Mg zonation in pyroxene provide information on relative cooling rates of highland melt rocks, but Cr- and Al-content (where Al-rich low-Ca pyroxene cores are preserved in rapidly cooled samples) can be correlated with composition of the host rock.

  16. Lunar highlands volcanism implications from Luna 20 and Apollo 16

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilshire, H.G.; Wilhelms, D.E.; Howard, K.A.

    1974-01-01

    Highlands materials sampled at the Apollo 16 and Luna 20 sites represent units of distinctive morphology that are widespread on the lunar nearside. Samples from the Apollo 16 site represent hilly and furrowed materials of the Descartes highlands and Cayley Formation. Materials were collected by Luna 20 from terrain resembling the Descartes terrain. Most photogeologic interpretations of these units favored volcanic origins, but the samples fail to support this interpretation. Luna 20 soil fragments are mainly glassy microbreccia with lithic inclusions of fine-grained hornfels; less than 3 percent of the fragments have textures of volcanic rocks, and most of these are likely crystalline products of impact melting. Apollo 16 soils formed on ejecta derived from a plutonic anorthosite-norite-troctolite suite. The similarity of Luna 20 soils indicates that these too formed as regolith on ejecta of anorthosite-norite-troctolitc composition. Interpretation of the samples from the two locations now suggests that hilly and furrowed terrains, previously thought to be of volcanic origin, are impact ejecta; in view of the plutonic nature of the source rocks and their extensive fusion and metamorphism, it is likely that the ejecta were derived from multiring basins. At one point, the Apollo 16 site, the Cayley Formation is composed of basin ejecta.

  17. Non-native species in the vascular flora of highlands and mountains of Iceland.

    PubMed

    Wasowicz, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    The highlands and mountains of Iceland are one of the largest remaining wilderness areas in Europe. This study aimed to provide comprehensive and up-to-date data on non-native plant species in these areas and to answer the following questions: (1) How many non-native vascular plant species inhabit highland and mountainous environments in Iceland? (2) Do temporal trends in the immigration of alien species to Iceland differ between highland and lowland areas? (3) Does the incidence of alien species in the disturbed and undisturbed areas within Icelandic highlands differ? (4) Does the spread of non-native species in Iceland proceed from lowlands to highlands? and (5) Can we detect hot-spots in the distribution of non-native taxa within the highlands? Overall, 16 non-native vascular plant species were detected, including 11 casuals and 5 naturalized taxa (1 invasive). Results showed that temporal trends in alien species immigration to highland and lowland areas are similar, but it is clear that the process of colonization of highland areas is still in its initial phase. Non-native plants tended to occur close to man-made infrastructure and buildings including huts, shelters, roads etc. Analysis of spatio-temporal patterns showed that the spread within highland areas is a second step in non-native plant colonization in Iceland. Several statically significant hot spots of alien plant occurrences were identified using the Getis-Ord Gi* statistic and these were linked to human disturbance. This research suggests that human-mediated dispersal is the main driving force increasing the risk of invasion in Iceland's highlands and mountain areas.

  18. Non-native species in the vascular flora of highlands and mountains of Iceland

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The highlands and mountains of Iceland are one of the largest remaining wilderness areas in Europe. This study aimed to provide comprehensive and up-to-date data on non-native plant species in these areas and to answer the following questions: (1) How many non-native vascular plant species inhabit highland and mountainous environments in Iceland? (2) Do temporal trends in the immigration of alien species to Iceland differ between highland and lowland areas? (3) Does the incidence of alien species in the disturbed and undisturbed areas within Icelandic highlands differ? (4) Does the spread of non-native species in Iceland proceed from lowlands to highlands? and (5) Can we detect hot-spots in the distribution of non-native taxa within the highlands? Overall, 16 non-native vascular plant species were detected, including 11 casuals and 5 naturalized taxa (1 invasive). Results showed that temporal trends in alien species immigration to highland and lowland areas are similar, but it is clear that the process of colonization of highland areas is still in its initial phase. Non-native plants tended to occur close to man-made infrastructure and buildings including huts, shelters, roads etc. Analysis of spatio-temporal patterns showed that the spread within highland areas is a second step in non-native plant colonization in Iceland. Several statically significant hot spots of alien plant occurrences were identified using the Getis-Ord Gi* statistic and these were linked to human disturbance. This research suggests that human-mediated dispersal is the main driving force increasing the risk of invasion in Iceland’s highlands and mountain areas. PMID:26844017

  19. Regional air pollution over Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krysztofiak, G.; Catoire, V.; Dorf, M.; Grossmann, K.; Hamer, P. D.; Marécal, V.; Reiter, A.; Schlager, H.; Eckhardt, S.; Jurkat, T.; Oram, D.; Quack, B.; Atlas, E.; Pfeilsticker, K.

    2012-12-01

    During the SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere) campaign in Nov. and Dec. 2011 a number of polluted air masses were observed in the marine and terrestrial boundary layer (0 - 2 km) and in the free troposphere (2 - 12 km) over Borneo/Malaysia. The measurements include isoprene, CO, CO2, CH4, N2O, NO2, SO2 as primary pollutants, O3 and HCHO as secondary pollutants, and meteorological parameters. This set of trace gases can be used to fingerprint different sources of local and regional air pollution (e.g., biomass burning and fossil fuel burning, gas flaring on oil rigs, emission of ships and from urban areas, volcanic emissions, and biogenic emissions). Individual sources and location can be identified when the measurements are combined with a nested-grid regional scale chemical and meteorological model and lagrangian particle dispersion model (e.g., CCATT-BRAMS and FLEXPART). In the case of the former, emission inventories of the primary pollutants provide the basis for the trace gas simulations. In this region, the anthropogenic influence on air pollution seems to dominate over natural causes. For example, CO2 and CH4 often show strong correlations with CO, suggesting biomass burning or urban fossil fuel combustion dominates the combustion sources. The study of the CO/CO2 and CH4/CO ratios can help separate anthropogenic combustion from biomass burning pollution sources. In addition, these ratios can be used as a measure of combustion efficiency to help place the type of biomass burning particular to this region within the wider context of fire types found globally. On several occasions, CH4 enhancements are observed near the ocean surface, which are not directly correlated with CO enhancements thus indicating a non-combustion-related CH4 source. Positive correlations between SO2 and CO show the anthropogenic influence of oil rigs located in the South China Sea. Furthermore, SO2 enhancements are observed without any increase in CO

  20. Are the Equatorial Highlands on Venus formed by mantle plume diapirs?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Several origins have been proposed for the Equatorial Highlands on Venus, including spreading centers and plume-related uplift. Recently, the spreading center hypothesis has been shown to be incompatible with the measured geoid and topography variations over the highlands. It is also difficult to reconcile the range of geoid anomalies over the highlands with a steady-state plum model. There is a large variation in admittance values (geoid/topography ratios) among highland regions. This variation suggests that different uplifted regions represent distinct stages in a time dependent process. It has been proposed that the Beta Regio, Thetis Regio, Ovda Regio, and Artemis Plateau Equatorial Highland Regions are formed by large mantel diapirs. According to this model, topography and geoid height decrease with increasing age of the highland, as the diapir spreads out beneath the lithosphere. In order to determine if the diapir model is compatible with the sequence of tectonic and volcanic events recorded in the surface geology of the highlands, a series of finite difference calculations were made of the ascent and partial melting of a spherical thermal diapir in an incompressible, infinite Prandtl number, isoviscous fluid.

  1. 78 FR 22237 - Trade Mission to Philippines and Malaysia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... International Trade Administration Trade Mission to Philippines and Malaysia AGENCY: International Trade... executive led education industry trade mission to Manila, Philippines and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from... the Philippines and Malaysia. The mission will include one-on-one appointments with potential...

  2. Bangsa Malaysia and Recent Malaysian English Language Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridge, Brian

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyses Malaysia's English language policies, especially since the mid 1990s, in the light of more recent claims for a united Malaysian nation (under the banner of "bangsa Malaysia") and in the context of English language and its potential for Malaysia to forge more of an externalised identity. It examines the impact of…

  3. Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program: Malaysia 1995. Participants' Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malaysian-American Commission on Educational Exchange, Kuala Lumpur.

    These reports and lesson plans were developed by teachers and coordinators who traveled to Malaysia during the summer of 1995 as part of the U.S. Department of Education's Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program. Sections of the report include: (1) "Gender and Economics: Malaysia" (Mary C. Furlong); (2) "Malaysia: An Integrated,…

  4. 2006 Toyota Highlander-6395 Hyrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Highlander hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTEDW21A160006395). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. 2006 Toyota Highlander-5681 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Highlander hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTEDW21A860005681). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  6. Rebel girls? Unplanned pregnancy and colonialism in highlands Papua, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Butt, Leslie; Munro, Jenny

    2007-01-01

    In highlands Papua, Indonesia, rapid social change under a colonial system of governance has created novel sexual opportunities for young indigenous women. Recent scholarship has viewed similar youthful sexual practices that challenge the status quo as expressions of personal agency. By looking at how young women and their families cope with unplanned pregnancies, we suggest that a more viable analytic approach would be to view sexuality, pregnancy and childbirth as a single unit of analysis. From this perspective, young women's experiences are primarily ones of constraint. Case studies offer insights into the ways a political context of colonial domination limits options and choices for young women who have children born out of wedlock. In particular, this paper describes how the 'settler gaze' - omnipresent colonial norms and judgments - creates regulatory effects in the realm of reproduction.

  7. Cytotoxicity screening of endemic plants from Guayana highlands.

    PubMed

    Guil-Guerrero, José Luis; Campra, Pablo

    2009-08-01

    A chemical-ecology approach has been used to screen plants growing in Guyana Highlands as an indicator of production of biologically active secondary metabolites. Extracts of leaves from 19 species, most of them endemic in this area, and collected at the top of Roraima Tepui (2,723 m) were screened in vitro at different concentrations for their potential cytotoxic activity against three tumour cell lines: HT29 (colon), A549 (lung) and MDA-MB-231 (breast). MTT (tetrazolium blue) colorimetric assay was employed as cytotoxicity test. Extracts of nine species caused less than 30% growth in at least one cell line. From these species, high cytotoxic activity was detected in Casearia sylvestris var. lingua and Ledotamnus sessiliflorus extracts; medium activity was found in Cyathea sp. Two other species, Cyrilla racemiflora and Heliamphora minor showed lower but significant cytotoxicity. Further cytotoxicity-directed fractionation of these extracts would be advisable to isolate and identify the active principles of these plants.

  8. Report on von Willebrand Disease in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Periayah, Mercy Halleluyah; Halim, Ahmad Sukari; Saad, Arman Zaharil Mat; Yaacob, Nik Soriani; Karim, Faraizah Abdul

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Von Willebrand disease (vWD) is an inherited hemostatic disorder that affects the hemostasis pathway. The worldwide prevalence of vWD is estimated to be 1% of the general population but only 0.002% in Malaysia. AIM: Our present paper has been written to disclose the statistical counts on the number of vWD cases reported from 2011 to 2013. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This article is based on sociodemographic data, diagnoses and laboratory findings of vWD in Malaysia. A total of 92 patients were reported to have vWD in Malaysia from 2011 to 2013. RESULTS: Sociodemographic-analysis revealed that 60% were females, 63% were of the Malay ethnicity, 41.3% were in the 19-44 year old age group and 15.2% were from Sabah, with the East region having the highest registered number of vWD cases. In Malaysia, most patients are predominately affected by vWD type 1 (77.2%). Factor 8, von Willebrand factor: Antigen and vWF: Collagen-Binding was the strongest determinants in the laboratory profiles of vWD. CONCLUSION: This report has been done with great interest to provide an immense contribution from Malaysia, by revealing the statistical counts on vWD from 2011-2013. PMID:27275342

  9. The use of magical plants by curanderos in the Ecuador highlands

    PubMed Central

    Cavender, Anthony P; Albán, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Although the use of plants for treating supernaturally caused illnesses (e.g., soul loss, evil wind, witchcraft) has been documented in the Ecuador highlands, so-called magical plants have received much less focused attention than plants used for treating naturalistic disorders. Drawing on interviews done in 2002 and 2003 with 116 curanderos residing in the Ecuador highlands, this paper examines the characteristics of plants identified as magical, how they are used, and how the study of magical plants provides insights into the mindscape of residents of the highlands. PMID:19161618

  10. Modeling of gold production in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muda, Nora; Ainuddeen, Nasihah Rasyiqah; Ismail, Hamizun; Umor, Mohd Rozi

    2013-04-01

    This study was conducted to identify the main factors that contribute to the gold production and hence determine the factors that affect to the development of the mining industry in Malaysia. An econometric approach was used by performing the cointegration analysis among the factors to determine the existence of long term relationship between the gold prices, the number of gold mines, the number of workers in gold mines and the gold production. The study continued with the Granger analysis to determine the relationship between factors and gold production. Results have found that there are long term relationship between price, gold production and number of employees. Granger causality analysis shows that there is only one way relationship between the number of employees with gold production in Malaysia and the number of gold mines in Malaysia.

  11. The nature of rays and sources of highland material in Mare Crisium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, T. A.; El-Baz, F.

    1978-01-01

    Although highland fragments are rare in the Luna 24 core, they should provide an important source of information on the sequence of formation and lithology of lunar east-limb basins. The numerous rays that cross the Crisium basin suggest several sources of highland materials. Both deposition of primary ejecta and reworking of local material were most likely responsible for the formation of ray systems in Mare Crisium. In addition to the fact that Luna 24 landed near the uprange end of a Giordano Bruno ray, incomplete sampling of the uppermost layer and formation of the ray by reworking of in situ regolith suggest that its materials may be scarce or not present in the core. Highland fragments present are most likely to be representative of several highland sources.

  12. IDENTIFICATION AND LOCATION OF FUNDAMENTAL FISH ASSEMBLAGES IN THE MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To predict fish community response to environmental restoration in the Highlands Region one must first have information on fish abundance and diversity. We used data collected by the US Environmental Protection Agency's EMAP (Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program) to i...

  13. Composition of the Lunar Highland Crust and Mantle and Its Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtake, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Uemoto, K.

    2016-05-01

    Recent remote sensing data suggest that extremely pure anorthosite (PAN) layer is a main component of the lunar highland crust and presence of crustal material with higher Mg# on the farside than the nearside.

  14. Connecticut Highlands Technical Report - Documentation of the Regional Rainfall-Runoff Model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahearn, Elizabeth A.; Bjerklie, David M.

    2010-01-01

    This report provides the supporting data and describes the data sources, methodologies, and assumptions used in the assessment of existing and potential water resources of the Highlands of Connecticut and Pennsylvania (referred to herein as the “Highlands”). Included in this report are Highlands groundwater and surface-water use data and the methods of data compilation. Annual mean streamflow and annual mean base-flow estimates from selected U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) gaging stations were computed using data for the period of record through water year 2005. The methods of watershed modeling are discussed and regional and sub-regional water budgets are provided. Information on Highlands surface-water-quality trends is presented. USGS web sites are provided as sources for additional information on groundwater levels, streamflow records, and ground- and surface-water-quality data. Interpretation of these data and the findings are summarized in the Highlands study report.

  15. Using lunar sounder imagery to distinguish surface from subsurface reflectors in lunar highlands areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Bonnie L.; Carter, James L.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a method using the Apollo 17 Lunar Sounder imagery data which appears capable of filtering out off-nadir surface noise from highland area profiles, so that subsurface features may now be detected in highland areas as well as mare areas. Previously, this had been impossible because the rough topography in the highland areas created noise in the profiles which could not be distinguished from subsurface echoes. The new method is an image processing procedure involving the computerized selection of pixels which represent intermediate echo intensity values, then manually removing those pixels from the profile. Using this technique, a subsurface feature with a horizontal extent of about 150 km, at a calculated depth of approximately 3 km, has been detected beneath the crater Riccioli in the highlands near Oceanus Procellarum. This result shows that the ALSE data contain much useful information that remains to be extracted and used.

  16. Emergence or improved detection of Japanese encephalitis virus in the Himalayan highlands?

    PubMed Central

    Baylis, Matthew; Barker, Christopher M.; Caminade, Cyril; Joshi, Bhoj R.; Pant, Ganesh R.; Rayamajhi, Ajit; Reisen, William K.; Impoinvil, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in the Himalayan highlands is of significant veterinary and public health concern and may be related to climate warming and anthropogenic landscape change, or simply improved surveillance. To investigate this phenomenon, a One Health approach focusing on the phylogeography of JEV, the distribution and abundance of the mosquito vectors, and seroprevalence in humans and animal reservoirs would be useful to understand the epidemiology of Japanese encephalitis in highland areas. PMID:26956778

  17. LEPTOSPIROSIS INCIDENCE AND MORTALITY IN MALAYSIA.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei Leong; Soelar, Shahrul Aiman; Mohd Suan, Mohd Azri; Hussin, Narwani; Cheah, Wee Kooi; Verasahib, Khebir; Goh, Pik Pin

    2016-05-01

    Leptospirosis is endemic in Southeast Asia, Central and South America, the Caribbean, and Oceania. Malaysia was categorized as a probable endemic country without any available data. Thus, this study was conducted to determine incidence, case fatality rate and mortality rate of leptospirosis. Leptospirosis is a notifiable disease in Malaysia since 2010 whereby probable or confirmed cases must be notified to relevant health district office. There were 3,665 and 4,457 probable and laboratory confirmed leptospirosis cases notified in 2012 and 2013, respectively. In the 2-year period, the most common age group of patients was 19 years old or less (23.3%) with male:female ratio of 2.61:1. Students consisted about 16.9% of patients, followed by agriculture-based or plantation workers (14.7%). Overall age-standardized incidence rate of leptospirosis in Malaysia for 2012 and 2013 was 29.02 per 100,000. Overall case fatality rate was 1.47% for 2-year period and overall age-standardized mortality rate was 0.45 per 100,000. Leptospirosis is an emerging public health concern in Malaysia and may pose a significant health impact and burden to the nation in the coming years if not well controlled.

  18. Father Involvement among Malay Muslims in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juhari, Rumaya; Yaacob, Siti Nor; Talib, Mansor Abu

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on findings from a study of 989 fathers of school-going children aged 10 through 16 from intact families in rural and urban areas in Selangor, Malaysia. The study aims to explore the factors that affect father involvement among Malay Muslims. Results indicate that fathers' education, marital quality, and number of children are…

  19. International Reports on Literacy Research: Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David, Maya K.; Amer, Aly Anwar

    2004-01-01

    Maya K. David reports an interesting view of reading in Malaysia through the eyes of graduate student Mohd Nazri bin Hamid (2003), who conducted an exploratory study about the culture of reading in an academy of Islamic studies. The purposes of Nazri's investigation were (a) to examine undergraduate students' reading habits, (b) to offer a…

  20. The Teachers' Activity Centres of Malaysia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Diljit

    This paper describes the development of the Teachers' Activity Centers (TACs) in Malaysia. The TACs evolved from Local Resource Centers and District Resource Centers of the 1970s and 1980s. The 350 TACs in the country were initially supplied with basic tools for the production of teaching-learning resources. With administrative reorganization, the…

  1. Bilingualism and National Development in Malaysia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozog, A. Conrad K.

    1993-01-01

    Malaysia's long tradition of English medium instruction and bilingualism officially ended in 1970. This paper reviews the role of bilingualism in the development of the country, including the role of a bilingual population in national development and the possible effects of the abandonment of bilingual education. (Contains 38 references.)…

  2. Human Capital and Technology Development in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awang, Halimah

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the development of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and its relation to the development of human capital in Malaysia as a country undergoing transformation into an ICT-driven and knowledge-based society. Education and training, being the key variable of human capital, is examined in terms of the government…

  3. OUTLINE OF VOCATIONAL TRAINING IN MALAYSIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Dept. of Labour and National Service, Perth.

    THE FEDERATION OF MALAYSIA HAD A 1964 POPULATION OF 9,000,000. SPECIALIZATION IN A FEW EXPORT PRODUCTS, NOTABLY RUBBER AND TIN, HAS BEEN THE BASIS OF THE ECONOMY. EDUCATION IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION AND EFFORT IS BEING MADE TO ESTABLISH MALAY AS THE NATIONAL LANGUAGE. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION EXTENDS FOR 6 YEARS TO THE LOWER…

  4. Burnout among Female Teachers in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukundan, Jayakaran; Ahour, Touran

    2011-01-01

    This study is an attempt to survey the burnout level of female teachers in Malaysia and determine the likely factors that are associated with this phenomenon. The subjects of the study were 437 female teachers from primary, secondary, and tertiary levels. A demographic questionnaire was used to collect the data regarding the individual…

  5. Education in Malaysia: Towards Vision 2020.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Molly N. N.

    1999-01-01

    Analyzes the relationship between educational development and Malaysia's sociopolitical and economic context. Under the Vision 2020 rubric, liberalized educational policies are leading to a more democratic, privatized, and decentralized educational system. Curricular revisions stressing basic skills, moral values, and individual development are…

  6. Inclusive Education in Malaysia: Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelas, Zalizan M.; Ali, Manisah Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Malaysia's move towards inclusion was given impetus by its participation in workshops and conferences set up under the auspices of the United Nations (UNESCO 1990; UN 1993; UNESCO 1994). Inclusive education was introduced in the Education Act 1996 as part of the continuum of services available for children with special needs. The purpose of this…

  7. Mass Communication in Malaysia: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tee, Lim Huck, Comp; Sarachandran, V.V., Comp.

    This bibliography lists published and unpublished material relating to mass communications in Malaysia, 1945 to 1973. Most of the items listed are written in English and Malay, and a limited number are in Chinese. The bibliography is divided into 21 sections: bibliography and reference material; communication theory, research methods;…

  8. Privatization of Higher Education in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sivalingam, G.

    2007-01-01

    The study will trace the external factors influencing the liberalization, deregulation and privatization of higher education in Malaysia from 1970 to the present and to analyze the effects of liberalization, deregulation and privatization on the modes of privatization and the internal restructuring of institutions of higher learning to increase…

  9. The genetic history of Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Norhalifah, Hanim Kamis; Syaza, Fatnin Hisham; Chambers, Geoffrey Keith; Edinur, Hisham Atan

    2016-07-15

    This article explores the genetic history of the various sub-populations currently living in Peninsular Malaysia. This region has received multiple waves of migrants like the Orang Asli in prehistoric times and the Chinese, Indians, Europeans and Arabs during historic times. There are three highly distinct lineages that make up the Orang Asli; Semang, Senoi and Proto-Malays. The Semang, who have 'Negrito' characteristics, represent the first human settlers in Peninsular Malaysia arriving from about 50,000ya. The Senoi later migrated from Indochina and are a mix between an Asian Neolithic population and the Semang. These Asian genomes probably came in before Austroasiatic languages arrived between 5000 and 4000years ago. Semang and Senoi both now speak Austro-Asiatic languages indicative of cultural diffusion from Senoi to Semang. In contrast, the Proto-Malays who came last to the southern part of this region speak Austronesian language and are Austronesians with some Negrito admixture. It is from this group that the contemporary Malays emerged. Here we provide an overview of the best available genetic evidences (single nucleotide polymorphisms, mitochondrial DNA, Y-chromosome, blood groups, human platelet antigen, human leukocyte antigen, human neutrophil antigen and killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor) supporting the complex genetic history of Peninsular Malaysia. Large scale sampling and high throughput genetic screening programmes such as those using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism analyses have provided insights into various ancestral and admixture genetic fractions in this region. Given the now extensive admixture present in the contemporary descendants of ancient sub-populations in Peninsular Malaysia, improved reconstruction of human migration history in this region will require new evidence from ancient DNA in well-preserved skeletons. All other aspects of the highly diverse and complex genetic makeup in Peninsular Malaysia should be

  10. New Elemental Maps of the Nearside Lunar Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, J. A.; Grande, M.; Bisi, M. M.

    2011-12-01

    A set of elemental maps obtained by the Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS) and covering the Southern Nearside Lunar Highland region will be presented. This region broadly covers the area below 10 S latitude and between -10 to +30 E longitude. It has never been the subject of a sample return mission; the nearest ground truth measurements are Apollo 16 at 8.56 S, 15.3 E and Surveyor 7 at 41 S, -11 E - this is mainly due to the uneven, mountainous terrain which makes spacecraft landings hazardous. The region has very high relief, with large slopes and rough surface features - these characteristics complicate the analysis of X-ray fluorescence analysis. Chandrayaan-1 flew at a time coinciding with a predicted increase in solar activity. For an X-ray fluorescence instrument, which relies on incident solar X-rays to illuminate the surface, this increase in activity would be enough to guarantee ~100% surface coverage in Mg, Al and Si, and significant areas in Fe, Ti, and Ca. However, the solar cycle was delayed, and instead C1XS launched into the quietest solar conditions seen in 100 years. Regardless, the excellent stability and low noise level of the instrument meant that small flares (A and B class) were able to generate statistically significant findings. The elements mapped will include Magnesium, Silicon and Aluminium, as well as relevant elemental ratios. These will be compared to other datasets including Lunar Prospector, Clementine and M3 mineral maps.

  11. Pristine highland clasts in consortium breccia 14305 Petrology and geochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Shervais, J.W.; Taylor, L.A.

    1984-11-15

    Data are presented on the petrography and mineral chemistry of six pristine highland clasts chipped from the polymict lunar breccia 14305. Major and trace elements in the clasts were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis, and mineral analyses were performed by electron microprobe. Mg-suite clasts have eastern geochemical affinities, reaffirming the importance of local variations in geochemistry. These local variations are superimposed on the moon-wide, longitudinal variations noted by Warren and Wasson (1980). Alkali anorthosites and Mg-suite troctolites and anorthosites are not comagmatic, and cannot be related to a single parent magma by either fractional crystallization or variable assimilation of KREEP. Both magma suites may have assimilated varied amounts of KREEP into distinct parent magmas. Alternatively, alkali anorthosites may have crystallized directly from a KREEP-basalt parent magma. A thick crust of ferroan anorthosite probably never existed on the western lunar nearside, or was removed by basin-forming impacts prior to intrusion of later plutonic suites.

  12. Local biologies and HIV/AIDS in highlands Papua, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Butt, Leslie

    2013-03-01

    The province of Papua, Indonesia has one of the fastest growing rates of HIV infection in Asia. Within volatile political conditions, HIV has reached generalized epidemic status for indigenous Papuans. This article explores the merits of using the concept of local biologies as an analytic tool to assess the range of factors which affect a local pattern of untreated HIV and rapid onset of AIDS. A research team conducted 32 in-depth interviews with HIV-positive indigenous persons and 15 interviews with health care workers in urban and peri-urban sites in the central highlands region. The results show fear of gossip and stigmatization, regional political conditions and gaps in care interweave to create local biological conditions of evasion of care and rapid onset of AIDS. The normative emphasis in contemporary scholarship on stigma as shaping subjective responses to HIV needs to be complemented by a full assessment of the physiological impact of health services, and the ways political conditions trickle down and mediate local biological patterns. The concept of local biologies is highly effective for explaining the full scope of possible factors affecting the intersection of social and physical realms for HIV-positive persons.

  13. Figurines, flint clay sourcing, the Ozark Highlands, and Cahokian acquisition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emerson, T.E.; Hughes, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    At the pinnacle of Eastern Woodlands' prehistoric cultural development, Cahokia has been interpreted as a political and economic power participating in prestige-goods exchanges and trade networks stretching from the Great Plains to the South Atlantic. Among the more spectacular of the Cahokian elite artifacts were stone pipes and figurines made from a distinctive red stone previously identified as Arkansas bauxite. In this research, we used a combination of X-ray diffraction, sequential acid dissolution, and inductively coupled plasma analyses to establish the source of the raw material used in the manufacture of the red figurines and pipes that epitomize the Cahokian-style. Our research demonstrates that these objects were made of locally available flint clays. This finding, in conjunction with other evidence, indicate Cahokian exploitation of many mineral and stone resources focuses on the northern Ozark Highlands to the exclusion of other areas. These findings indicate that we must reassess the direction, extent, and role of Cahokian external contacts and trade in elite goods. Copyright ?? 2000 by the Society for American Archaeology.

  14. Nomadic ecology shaped the highland geography of Asia's Silk Roads.

    PubMed

    Frachetti, Michael D; Smith, C Evan; Traub, Cynthia M; Williams, Tim

    2017-03-08

    There are many unanswered questions about the evolution of the ancient 'Silk Roads' across Asia. This is especially the case in their mountainous stretches, where harsh terrain is seen as an impediment to travel. Considering the ecology and mobility of inner Asian mountain pastoralists, we use 'flow accumulation' modelling to calculate the annual routes of nomadic societies (from 750 m to 4,000 m elevation). Aggregating 500 iterations of the model reveals a high-resolution flow network that simulates how centuries of seasonal nomadic herding could shape discrete routes of connectivity across the mountains of Asia. We then compare the locations of known high-elevation Silk Road sites with the geography of these optimized herding flows, and find a significant correspondence in mountainous regions. Thus, we argue that highland Silk Road networks (from 750 m to 4,000 m) emerged slowly in relation to long-established mobility patterns of nomadic herders in the mountains of inner Asia.

  15. Watershed morphology of highland and mountain ecoregions in eastern Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Splinter, D.K.; Dauwalter, D.C.; Marston, R.A.; Fisher, W.L.

    2011-01-01

    The fluvial system represents a nested hierarchy that reflects the relationship among different spatial and temporal scales. Within the hierarchy, larger scale variables influence the characteristics of the next lower nested scale. Ecoregions represent one of the largest scales in the fluvial hierarchy and are defined by recurring patterns of geology, climate, land use, soils, and potential natural vegetation. Watersheds, the next largest scale, are often nested into a single ecoregion and therefore have properties that are indicative of a given ecoregion. Differences in watershed morphology (relief, drainage density, circularity ratio, relief ratio, and ruggedness number) were evaluated among three ecoregions in eastern Oklahoma: Ozark Highlands, Boston Mountains, and Ouachita Mountains. These ecoregions were selected because of their high-quality stream resources and diverse aquatic communities and are of special management interest to the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. One hundred thirty-four watersheds in first-through fourth-order streams were compared. Using a nonparametric, two-factor analysis of variance (?? = 0.05) we concluded that the relief, drainage density, relief ratio, and ruggedness number all changed among ecoregion and stream order, whereas circularity ratio only changed with stream order. Our study shows that ecoregions can be used as a broad-scale framework for watershed management. ?? 2011 by Association of American Geographers.

  16. Rural Income and Forest Reliance in Highland Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado Córdova, José Pablo; Wunder, Sven; Smith-Hall, Carsten; Börner, Jan

    2013-05-01

    This paper estimates rural household-level forest reliance in the western highlands of Guatemala using quantitative methods. Data were generated by the way of an in-depth household income survey, repeated quarterly between November 2005 and November 2006, in 11 villages ( n = 149 randomly selected households). The main sources of income proved to be small-scale agriculture (53 % of total household income), wages (19 %) and environmental resources (14 %). The latter came primarily from forests (11 % on average). In the poorest quintile the forest income share was as high as 28 %. All households harvest and consume environmental products. In absolute terms, environmental income in the top quintile was 24 times higher than in the lowest. Timber and poles, seeds, firewood and leaf litter were the most important forest products. Households can be described as `regular subsistence users': the share of subsistence income is high, with correspondingly weak integration into regional markets. Agricultural systems furthermore use important inputs from surrounding forests, although forests and agricultural uses compete in household specialization strategies. We find the main household determinants of forest income to be household size, education and asset values, as well as closeness to markets and agricultural productivity. Understanding these common but spatially differentiated patterns of environmental reliance may inform policies aimed at improving livelihoods and conserving forests.

  17. Rural income and forest reliance in highland Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Prado Córdova, José Pablo; Wunder, Sven; Smith-Hall, Carsten; Börner, Jan

    2013-05-01

    This paper estimates rural household-level forest reliance in the western highlands of Guatemala using quantitative methods. Data were generated by the way of an in-depth household income survey, repeated quarterly between November 2005 and November 2006, in 11 villages (n = 149 randomly selected households). The main sources of income proved to be small-scale agriculture (53 % of total household income), wages (19 %) and environmental resources (14 %). The latter came primarily from forests (11 % on average). In the poorest quintile the forest income share was as high as 28 %. All households harvest and consume environmental products. In absolute terms, environmental income in the top quintile was 24 times higher than in the lowest. Timber and poles, seeds, firewood and leaf litter were the most important forest products. Households can be described as 'regular subsistence users': the share of subsistence income is high, with correspondingly weak integration into regional markets. Agricultural systems furthermore use important inputs from surrounding forests, although forests and agricultural uses compete in household specialization strategies. We find the main household determinants of forest income to be household size, education and asset values, as well as closeness to markets and agricultural productivity. Understanding these common but spatially differentiated patterns of environmental reliance may inform policies aimed at improving livelihoods and conserving forests.

  18. Pristine highland clasts in consortium breccia 14305 Petrology and geochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, J. W.; Taylor, L. A.; Laul, J. C.; Smith, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Data are presented on the petrography and mineral chemistry of six pristine highland clasts chipped from the polymict lunar breccia 14305. Major and trace elements in the clasts were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis, and mineral analyses were performed by electron microprobe. Mg-suite clasts have 'eastern' geochemical affinities, reaffirming the importance of local variations in geochemistry. These local variations are superimposed on the moon-wide, longitudinal variations noted by Warren and Wasson (1980). Alkali anorthosites and Mg-suite troctolites and anorthosites are not comagmatic, and cannot be related to a single parent magma by either fractional crystallization or variable assimilation of KREEP. Both magma suites may have assimilated varied amounts of KREEP into distinct parent magmas. Alternatively, alkali anorthosites may have crystallized directly from a KREEP-basalt parent magma. A thick crust of ferroan anorthosite probably never existed on the western lunar nearside, or was removed by basin-forming impacts prior to intrusion of later plutonic suites.

  19. Seroincidence of porcine T. solium infection in the Peruvian highlands.

    PubMed

    Garcia, H H; Gonzalez, A E; Gavidia, C; Falcon, N; Bernal, T; Verastegui, M; Rodriguez, S; Tsang, V C W; Gilman, R H

    2003-04-15

    We performed repeated serological sampling of pigs in an endemic area of the Peruvian highlands (eight villages) to assess the feasibility of detecting incident cases of Taenia solium infection as indicators of ongoing transmission of the parasite. A total of 2245 samples corresponding to 1548 pigs were collected in three sampling rounds (n=716, 926, and 603, respectively). Village-period specific seroprevalences of antibodies by enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB) assay varied from 39% (95% CI: 34, 44) to 76% (95% CI: 72, 79). The prevalence of cysticercosis increased with the age of the pigs (similarly for both sexes). Around 40% of pigs were re-sampled at the end of each 4-month period. Crude incidence risks were 48% (57/120, 95% CI: 43-52) and 58% (111/192, 95% CI: 54-61) for each period. A proportion of seropositive animals became seronegative at the end of each period (23 and 15%). Incidence varied by the village, and the exposure period, and was higher in males than females (but did not differ by age).

  20. Characterization and simulation of the quantity and quality of water in the Highland Lakes, Texas, 1983-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raines, Timothy H.; Rast, Walter

    1999-01-01

    Results from the simulations indicate that saline inflows to the Highland Lakes similar to those of the releases from Natural Dam Salt Lake during 1987–89 are unlikely to cause large increases in future concentrations of dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate in the Highland Lakes. The results also indicate that high-salinity water will continue to be diluted as it is transported downstream through the Highland Lakes, even during extended dry periods.

  1. Systematics and natural history of Southeast Asian Rock Geckos (genus Cnemaspis Strauch, 1887) with descriptions of eight new species from Malaysia, Thailand, and Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Grismer, L Lee; Wood, Perry L; Anuar, Shahrul; Riyanto, Awal; Ahmad, Norhayati; Muin, Mohd A; Sumontha, Montri; Grismer, Jesse L; Onn, Chan Kin; Quah, Evan S H; Pauwels, Olivier S A

    2014-10-31

    A well-supported and well-resolved phylogeny based on a concatenated data set from one mitochondrial and two nuclear genes, six morphological characters, and nine color pattern characters for 44 of the 50 species of the Southeast Asian Rock Geckos (genus Cnemaspis Strauch, 1887) is consistent with the previous taxonomy of Cnemaspis based solely on morphology and color pattern. Cnemaspis is partitioned into four major clades that collectively contain six species groups. The monophyly of all clades and species groups is strongly supported and they are parapatrically distributed across well-established, biogeographical regions ranging from southern Vietnam westward through southern Indochina, southward through the Thai-Malay Peninsula, then eastward to Borneo. Eight new species (Cnemaspis omari sp. nov. from the Thai-Malaysian border; C. temiah sp. nov. from Cameron Highlands, Pahang, Malaysia; C. stongensis sp. nov. from Gunung Stong, Kelantan, Malaysia; C. hangus sp. nov. from Bukit Hangus, Pahang, Malaysia; C. sundagekko sp. nov. from Pulau Siantan, Indonesia; C. peninsularis sp. nov. from southern Peninsular Malaysia and Singapore, and C. mumpuniae sp. nov. and C. sundainsula sp. nov. from Pulau Natuna Besar, Indonesia) are described based on morphology and color pattern and all but C. sundagekko sp. nov. are included in the phylogenetic analyses. Cnemaspis kendallii is polyphyletic and a composite of six species. An updated taxonomy consistent with the phylogeny is proposed for all 50 species and is based on 25 morphological and 53 color pattern characters scored across 594 specimens. Cladogenetic events and biogeographical relationships within Cnemaspis were likely influenced by this group's low vagility and the cyclical patterns of geographical and environmental changes in Sundaland over the last 25 million years and especially within the last 2.5 million years. The phylogeny indicates that nocturnality, diurnality, substrate preferences, and the presence of

  2. 78 FR 50381 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Malaysia: Final Affirmative Countervailing Duty Determination

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Malaysia: Final Affirmative... subsidies are being provided to producers and exporters of certain frozen warmwater shrimp from Malaysia...) Sdn. Bhd., and Charoen Pokphand Foods (Malaysia) Sdn. Bhd., (collectively, the Asia...

  3. 78 FR 33345 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Malaysia: Preliminary Countervailing Duty Determination

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Malaysia: Preliminary Countervailing... shrimp) from Malaysia. The period of investigation (POI) is January 1, 2011, through December 31, 2011... Malaysia,'' dated concurrently with this notice (Preliminary Decision Memorandum). For this...

  4. Formation of Australian continental margin highlands driven by plate-mantle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, R. Dietmar; Flament, Nicolas; Matthews, Kara J.; Williams, Simon E.; Gurnis, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Passive margin highlands occur on most continents on Earth and play a critical role in the cycle of weathering, erosion, and atmospheric circulation. Yet, in contrast to the well-developed understanding of collisional mountain belts, such as the Alps and Himalayas, the origin of less elevated (1-2 km) passive margin highlands is still unknown. The eastern Australian highlands are a prime example of these plateaus, but compared to others they have a well-documented episodic uplift history spanning 120 million years. We use a series of mantle convection models to show that the time-dependent interaction of plate motion with mantle downwellings and upwellings accounts for the broad pattern of margin uplift phases. Initial dynamic uplift of 400-600 m from 120-80 Ma was driven by the eastward motion of eastern Australia's margin away from the sinking eastern Gondwana slab, followed by tectonic quiescence to about 60 Ma in the south (Snowy Mountains). Renewed uplift of ∼700 m in the Snowy Mountains is propelled by the gradual motion of the margin over the edge of the large Pacific mantle upwelling. In contrast the northernmost portion of the highlands records continuous uplift from 120 Ma to present-day totalling about 800 m. The northern highlands experienced a continuous history of dynamic uplift, first due to the end of subduction to the east of Australia, then due to moving over a large passive mantle upwelling. In contrast, the southern highlands started interacting with the edge of the large Pacific mantle upwelling ∼ 40- 50 million years later, resulting in a two-phase uplift history. Our results are in agreement with published uplift models derived from river profiles and the Cretaceous sediment influx into the Ceduna sub-basin offshore southeast Australia, reflecting the fundamental link between dynamic uplift, fluvial erosion and depositional pulses in basins distal to passive margin highlands.

  5. MtDNA analysis reveals enriched pathogenic mutations in Tibetan highlanders

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Longli; Zheng, Hong-Xiang; Zhang, Menghan; Yan, Shi; Li, Lei; Liu, Lijun; Liu, Kai; Hu, Kang; Chen, Feng; Ma, Lifeng; Qin, Zhendong; Wang, Yi; Wang, Xiaofeng; Jin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan highlanders, including Tibetans, Monpas, Lhobas, Dengs and Sherpas, are considered highly adaptive to severe hypoxic environments. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) might be important in hypoxia adaptation given its role in coding core subunits of oxidative phosphorylation. In this study, we employed 549 complete highlander mtDNA sequences (including 432 random samples) to obtain a comprehensive view of highlander mtDNA profile. In the phylogeny of a total of 36,914 sequences, we identified 21 major haplogroups representing founding events of highlanders, most of which were coalesced in 10 kya. Through founder analysis, we proposed a three-phase model of colonizing the plateau, i.e., pre-LGM Time (30 kya, 4.68%), post-LGM Paleolithic Time (16.8 kya, 29.31%) and Neolithic Time (after 8 kya, 66.01% in total). We observed that pathogenic mutations occurred far more frequently in 22 highlander-specific lineages (five lineages carrying two pathogenic mutations and six carrying one) than in the 6,857 haplogroups of all the 36,914 sequences (P = 4.87 × 10−8). Furthermore, the number of possible pathogenic mutations carried by highlanders (in average 3.18 ± 1.27) were significantly higher than that in controls (2.82 ± 1.40) (P = 1.89 × 10−4). Considering that function-altering and pathogenic mutations are enriched in highlanders, we therefore hypothesize that they may have played a role in hypoxia adaptation. PMID:27498855

  6. [Capabilities of the application of the perspective technique during the medical supply of the outfits in highlands].

    PubMed

    Belevitin, A B; Shelepov, A M; Soldatov, E A; Shurupov, D A

    2010-07-01

    During the organization of the medical evacuation of the outfits in highlands it is necessary to consider that the workability of the stretchermen in highland goes down to 50% and more; equipment of the aid man must corresponds to the conditions of the highlands (immobilize vacuum mattress--IVMv-01, collapsible immobilize pinion stretchers--IPS-01); application of the wheel-type machines and helicopters is difficult and dangerously. Application of the modern techniques of informational support, unmanned drones and others modern techniques requires the output of new organization principles of the system of the medical evacuation in highlands.

  7. Sprouting Buds of Zebrafish Research in Malaysia: First Malaysia Zebrafish Disease Model Workshop.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Kazuhide Shaun; Tan, Pei Jean; Patel, Vyomesh

    2016-04-01

    Zebrafish is gaining prominence as an important vertebrate model for investigating various human diseases. Zebrafish provides unique advantages such as optical clarity of embryos, high fecundity rate, and low cost of maintenance, making it a perfect complement to the murine model equivalent in biomedical research. Due to these advantages, researchers in Malaysia are starting to take notice and incorporate the zebrafish model into their research activities. However, zebrafish research in Malaysia is still in its infancy stage and many researchers still remain unaware of the full potential of the zebrafish model or have limited access to related tools and techniques that are widely utilized in many zebrafish laboratories worldwide. To overcome this, we organized the First Malaysia Zebrafish Disease Model Workshop in Malaysia that took place on 11th and 12th of November 2015. In this workshop, we showcased how the zebrafish model is being utilized in the biomedical field in international settings as well as in Malaysia. For this, notable international speakers and those from local universities known to be carrying out impactful research using zebrafish were invited to share some of the cutting edge techniques that are used in their laboratories that may one day be incorporated in the Malaysian scientific community.

  8. Review of the Burden of Esophageal Cancer in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Siti-Azrin, Ab Hamid; Wan-Nor-Asyikeen, Wan Adnan; Norsa'adah, Bachok

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the top leading causes of cancer-related deaths in Malaysia. To date, neither the prevalence nor incidence of esophageal cancer nationally have been recorded. Esophageal cancer remains a major and lethal health problem even if it is not common in Malaysia. The late presentation of esophageal cancer makes it a difficult and challenging medical problem. Therefore, more governmental and non-governmental organizations of Malaysia should emphasize primary and secondary prevention strategies.

  9. The Proposed U.S.-Malaysia Free Trade Agreement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-26

    DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Proposed U.S.- Malaysia Free Trade 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...This report addresses the proposed U.S.- Malaysia free trade agreement (FTA). It provides an...legislative procedures to be followed if the proposed FTA is presented to Congress for approval. The proposed U.S.- Malaysia FTA is of interest to Congress

  10. Geographical distribution of Musa gracilis Holttum in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norfazlina, B.; Wickneswari, R.; Choong, C. Y.

    2016-11-01

    Musa gracilis (Musaceae) is placed under section Callimusa and was considered endemic to Peninsular Malaysia. The objective of this study was to evaluate the current occurrence of Musa gracilis in Peninsular Malaysia. The coordinates of each population was recorded using the Global Positioning System (GPS) and mapped to show the geographical distribution of Musa gracilis. This study revealed that Musa gracilis exhibits specific pattern of distribution, which exists only in a lowland areas on the eastern and southern part of Peninsular Malaysia.

  11. Malaysia: Political, Security, Economic, and Trade Issues Considered

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-13

    3.7 % (2006) Natural Resources: Petroleum, natural gas, tin, minerals, palm oil , rubber U.S. Trade: Malaysia is the United States’ 10th largest trade...eight workers in Malaysia are employed in agriculture, animal husbandry, fishing, or forestry. Rice and palm oil are two crops of particular importance...of rice. The latter is important for economic reasons, as palm oil is a traditional major export crop for Malaysia . Malaysia’s manufacturing sector

  12. The LHT (Lunar Highlands Type) Regolith Simulant Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeser, Douglas; Wilson, Steve; Weinstein, Michael; Rickman, Douglas; Lowers, Heather; Meeker, Gregory; Schrader, Christian; McLemore, Carole; Fikes, John

    2008-01-01

    Three NU-LHT (NASA/USGS-Lunar Highlands Type) regolith simulants have been produced to date: NU-LHT-1M, -ID, and -2M. A fourth simulant is currently in production: NU-LHT-3C. The "M" (medium) designation indicates a simulant with a grain size of <1 mm, "D" (dust) a simulant with a grain size of <36 microns, and "C" (coarse) a simulant with a 10 cm maximum particle size. The composition of these simulants is based on a NASA average Apollo 16 regolith chemical composition, However, the mixing model used to create our simulants is based on cationic nonnative mineral proportions derived from the target chemical composition to approximate lunar modal mineralogy rather than chemical composition per se. Accordingly, the amount of plagioclase, pyroxenes, olivine, and trace minerals in the simulant crystalline fraction approximates that of the lunar regolith. We also added synthetic agglutinate in amounts approximate for low-medium regolith maturity. A pure glass fraction was also added to simulate other types of lunar glasses present in the regolith. In addition, the 3C simulant will include synthetic impact melt breccia clasts for the >1 cm particles. The bulk raw materials used to create these simulants include clinopyroxene-norite, anorthosite, hartzburgite and noritic mill waste from the Stillwater Mine, Nye, MT, and olivine from the Twin Sisters dunite, WA. Added trace minerals include beach sand ilmenite, chromite, synthetic p-tricaicium phosphate (whitiockite), gem grade fluor-apatite, and pyrite. The agglutinate, glasses, and synthetic breccia were designed and prepared at an industrial plasma melting facility in Boulder, CO, using Stillwater mill waste feedstock for the melt. These simulants do not include nanophase-feO. The M and C simulant grain size distribution (down to 0.4 microns) approximates that of Apollo 16 regolith and the regolith in general.

  13. Arthritis in the highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Pile, K D; Richens, J E; Laurent, R M; Bhatia, K; Prasad, M L; Lupiwa, T; Hudson, B J; Tapsall, J; McPetrie, R

    1993-01-01

    Acute polyarthritis is an important cause of morbidity in many tropical countries. Classification has often been difficult, with the term tropical polyarthritis used for those in whom a diagnosis could not be made. The implication that this is a distinct entity is probably incorrect, with likely causes being septic arthritis or post-infective reactive arthritis. This study aimed to determine the types of arthritis found in 43 patients (30 men) presenting consecutively to the Goroka Base Hospital in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea. Gonococcal arthritis was diagnosed in eight patients (six men) on the basis of isolation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from the joint aspirate. In all cases the N gonorrhoeae was identified by the closed culture system on chocolate agar, but not always by routine plating. There were no specific clinical features that identified patients with a gonococcal septic arthritis. The remaining 34 patients had an undifferentiated oligoarthritis. The pattern of arthritis in men and women was of a lower limb pauciarticular arthritis with a predilection for the knee and ankle joints. A total of 30% of male patients had a history of urethral discharge and 44% of all patients had preceding diarrhoea. Arthritis was the only feature in 59% of patients and in 32% there was an associated enthesitis. In this study most patients had an oligoarthritis consistent with a reactive arthritis or a septic arthritis due to N gonorrhoeae. Broth inoculation of synovial fluid was the best method to isolate N gonorrhoeae, with standard methods for gonococcal isolation failing in some patients. It is recommended that the term 'tropical polyarthritis' is no longer used as it does not refer to a specific entity but consists of several known arthritides.

  14. Highland cattle and Radix labiata, the hosts of Fascioloides magna

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fascioloides magna is a pathogenic fluke introduced to Europe ca 140 years ago. As it is spreading over the continent, new intermediate and definitive hosts might be involved in transmission of the parasite. In Europe, several studies reported potential new intermediate snail hosts (Radix spp.) for F. magna, and also several cases of fascioloidosis of wild and domestic animals were published. However, the data based on molecular and histological analyses confirming these findings remained unreported. This study aims to refer to unique findings of F. magna in European snails and domestic animals (the first observation in the Czech Republic in the last 30 years) and demonstrate the use of molecular techniques in determination of F. magna. Results Two snails of R. labiata naturally infected with F. magna were found; mature cercariae and daughter rediae were observed. Maturity of cercariae was checked by histological methods, however, their ability to encyst was not confirmed. Co-infection of F. magna and Fasciola hepatica in the liver of two highland cattle bulls was proved. Adult fasciolid flukes producing eggs were found in the liver pseudocysts (F. magna) and the bile ducts (F. hepatica). Identification of intermediate hosts, intramolluscan stages, adult flukes and eggs was performed by sequencing the ITS2 region. Connection of F. magna pseudocysts with the gut (via the bile ducts) was not confirmed by means of histological and coprological examinations. Conclusions For the first time, Radix labiata was confirmed as the snail host for F. magna under natural conditions and, together with the finding of F. magna infection in cattle, we can expect further transmission of F. magna from wildlife to livestock in localities shared by these hosts. PMID:24517409

  15. Spatial patterns of seaweed distribution in Malaysia using GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Du Hai; Sim, Jillian Ooi Lean; Fauzi, Rosmadi; Moi, Phang Siew

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this article is to represent spatial patterns of seaweed distribution in Malaysia. Seaweeds have been collected since 1984 along coastlines of 4675 km of peninsular Malaysia, Sabah, and Sarawak. However, there is no seaweed database and they cannot be displayed in a geographic view. Therefore, a database with 805 georeferenced observations was setup and GIS is used to analyze seaweed diversity based on this database. The highest number of observations is 94 which occur along east coastline of peninsular Malaysia. The highest number of species richness is 82 which are also along east coastline of peninsular Malaysia. Rhodophyta has the highest species richness while Chlorophyta has the least species richness.

  16. Temperature and population density determine reservoir regions of seasonal persistence in highland malaria

    PubMed Central

    Siraj, Amir S.; Bouma, Menno J.; Santos-Vega, Mauricio; Yeshiwondim, Asnakew K.; Rothman, Dale S.; Yadeta, Damtew; Sutton, Paul C.; Pascual, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of malaria persistence in highly seasonal environments such as highlands and desert fringes requires identifying the factors behind the spatial reservoir of the pathogen in the low season. In these ‘unstable’ malaria regions, such reservoirs play a critical role by allowing persistence during the low transmission season and therefore, between seasonal outbreaks. In the highlands of East Africa, the most populated epidemic regions in Africa, temperature is expected to be intimately connected to where in space the disease is able to persist because of pronounced altitudinal gradients. Here, we explore other environmental and demographic factors that may contribute to malaria's highland reservoir. We use an extensive spatio-temporal dataset of confirmed monthly Plasmodium falciparum cases from 1995 to 2005 that finely resolves space in an Ethiopian highland. With a Bayesian approach for parameter estimation and a generalized linear mixed model that includes a spatially structured random effect, we demonstrate that population density is important to disease persistence during the low transmission season. This population effect is not accounted for in typical models for the transmission dynamics of the disease, but is consistent in part with a more complex functional form of the force of infection proposed by theory for vector-borne infections, only during the low season as we discuss. As malaria risk usually decreases in more urban environments with increased human densities, the opposite counterintuitive finding identifies novel control targets during the low transmission season in African highlands. PMID:26631558

  17. Ranking Malaria Risk Factors to Guide Malaria Control Efforts in African Highlands

    PubMed Central

    Protopopoff, Natacha; Van Bortel, Wim; Speybroeck, Niko; Van Geertruyden, Jean-Pierre; Baza, Dismas; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Coosemans, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Malaria is re-emerging in most of the African highlands exposing the non immune population to deadly epidemics. A better understanding of the factors impacting transmission in the highlands is crucial to improve well targeted malaria control strategies. Methods and Findings A conceptual model of potential malaria risk factors in the highlands was built based on the available literature. Furthermore, the relative importance of these factors on malaria can be estimated through “classification and regression trees”, an unexploited statistical method in the malaria field. This CART method was used to analyse the malaria risk factors in the Burundi highlands. The results showed that Anopheles density was the best predictor for high malaria prevalence. Then lower rainfall, no vector control, higher minimum temperature and houses near breeding sites were associated by order of importance to higher Anopheles density. Conclusions In Burundi highlands monitoring Anopheles densities when rainfall is low may be able to predict epidemics. The conceptual model combined with the CART analysis is a decision support tool that could provide an important contribution toward the prevention and control of malaria by identifying major risk factors. PMID:19946627

  18. Compositional Gradients Across Mare and Highlands Contacts: The Importance and Geological Implication of Lateral Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Mustard, J. F.

    1997-07-01

    Variation in mare abundance across mare-highland contact depends on the relative importance of vertical and lateral mass transport. Nonlinear spectral mixing analysis of Clementine VIS-NIR data of the Grimaldi basin indicates that the abundance of mare and highland are approximately equal to 50% at the geologic contact and the amount of mare materials transported to the highlands is approximately equal to the amount of highland materials to the mare. Thus, vertical mixing is relatively unimportant except near the contact. There are apparently two mixing zones, a steep mixing gradient near the mare and highland contact and a more diffuse zone that extends some distance from the contact. The net transfer of mare across the geologic contact can be approximated by a diffusion process since the transport is a random process driven by impact cratering. We have developed a diffusion model and the results indicate that a typical profile of mare abundance requires two superimposed diffusion curves to match this compositional gradients. A third curve is found to be statistically invalid. The two diffusion parameters can be related to the geologic processes of regolith reworking and development that created the variations. This suggests that there are at least two superimposed processes at work, the one is the reworking of the surface ejecta debris having a larger diffusion coefficient, the other is the development of new regolith from subsurface layers having smaller diffusion coefficient.

  19. Temperature and population density determine reservoir regions of seasonal persistence in highland malaria.

    PubMed

    Siraj, Amir S; Bouma, Menno J; Santos-Vega, Mauricio; Yeshiwondim, Asnakew K; Rothman, Dale S; Yadeta, Damtew; Sutton, Paul C; Pascual, Mercedes

    2015-12-07

    A better understanding of malaria persistence in highly seasonal environments such as highlands and desert fringes requires identifying the factors behind the spatial reservoir of the pathogen in the low season. In these 'unstable' malaria regions, such reservoirs play a critical role by allowing persistence during the low transmission season and therefore, between seasonal outbreaks. In the highlands of East Africa, the most populated epidemic regions in Africa, temperature is expected to be intimately connected to where in space the disease is able to persist because of pronounced altitudinal gradients. Here, we explore other environmental and demographic factors that may contribute to malaria's highland reservoir. We use an extensive spatio-temporal dataset of confirmed monthly Plasmodium falciparum cases from 1995 to 2005 that finely resolves space in an Ethiopian highland. With a Bayesian approach for parameter estimation and a generalized linear mixed model that includes a spatially structured random effect, we demonstrate that population density is important to disease persistence during the low transmission season. This population effect is not accounted for in typical models for the transmission dynamics of the disease, but is consistent in part with a more complex functional form of the force of infection proposed by theory for vector-borne infections, only during the low season as we discuss. As malaria risk usually decreases in more urban environments with increased human densities, the opposite counterintuitive finding identifies novel control targets during the low transmission season in African highlands.

  20. Cofiring biomass with coal: Opportunities for Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, A. A.; Shamsuddin, A. H.

    2013-06-01

    Malaysia generated 108,175 GWh of electricity in 2010 where 39.51 % was sourced from coal. Coal power generation is also planned to overtake natural gas as the main fuel for electricity generation within the next two decades. Malaysia also has a vast biomass resource that is currently under-utilised for electricity generation. This paper studies the option of cofiring biomass in existing Malaysian coal power plants to increase the nation's renewable energy mix as well as to reduce its power sector carbon dioxide emission. Benefits of cofiring to the nation were discussed and agricultural residues from palm oil and paddy was identified as a potential source of biomass for cofiring. It was also found that there is a willingness for cofiring by stakeholders but barriers existed in the form of technical issues and lack of clear direction and mechanism.

  1. Infanticide and illegal infant abandonment in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Razali, Salmi; Kirkman, Maggie; Ahmad, S Hassan; Fisher, Jane

    2014-10-01

    Infant abandonment and infanticide are poorly understood in Malaysia. The information available in the public arena comes predominantly from anecdotal sources. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence and characteristics of infanticide and illegal infant abandonment in Malaysia and to estimate annual rates for the most recent decade. Summaries of data about infanticide and illegal infant abandonment were gathered from police records; the annual number of live births was ascertained from the national registry. The estimated inferred infanticide rates for Malaysia were compared with the infanticide rates among countries of very high, high, medium, and low rankings on the Human Development, Gender Inequality, and Gini indices. From 1999 to 2011, 1,069 cases of illegal infant abandonment were recorded and 1,147 people were arrested as suspected perpetrators. The estimated inferred infanticide rate fluctuated between 4.82 and 9.11 per 100,000 live births, a moderate rate relative to the infanticide rates of other countries. There are substantial missing data, with details undocumented for about 78-87% of cases and suspected perpetrators. Of the documented cases, it appeared that more boys than girls were victims and that suspected perpetrators were predominantly Malays who were women, usually mothers of the victim; the possibility of arrest bias must be acknowledged. Economic and social inequality, particularly gender inequality, might contribute to the phenomena of infanticide and abandonment. Strategies to reduce rates of infanticide and illegal infant abandonment in Malaysia will require strengthening of the surveillance system and attention to the gender-based inequalities that underpin human development.

  2. Aspects of obstetrical defibrination in West Malaysia.

    PubMed

    White, J C; Chan, L K; Lau, K S; Sen, D K

    1976-06-01

    Five patients illustrate various aspects of obstetrical defibrination in West Malaysia, resulting from exaggeration of changes in fibrinolytic-coagulation equilibrium that occur at delivery. Hypofibrinogenaemia and fibrinolysis may occur in association or either feature predominate. These patients are from a population in which a variety of genetic and environmental factors may interact, e.g. abnormal haemoglobins, cold agglutinins, viral and other infections, introducing additional complications.

  3. The Politics of Meritocracy in Malaysia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    emphasizing personal contributions rather than privileges should be investigated . This paper weighs the merits of affirmative action policies and meritocracy...be investigated . This paper weighs the merits of affirmative action policies and meritocracy as approaches to national integration in Malaysia, and...ways of life and is segregated, to some extent, by their place of residence, education and occupation. This imbalance of economic development has not

  4. Human infection with Dirofilaria repens in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, K C; Pathmanathan, R; Krishnan, R

    1996-09-01

    Human dirofilariasis is a rare infection in Malaysia. Thus far, only two human cases have been reported viz. Dirofilaria immitis and D. (Nochtiella) repens and in both instances, adult worms were recovered from infected patients. The two cases reported in the present study, one from Melaka and the other from Penang, were diagnosed histologically. Based on the diagnostic criteria for identifying Dirofilaria in tissue sections, the parasites were identified as D. (Nochtiella) repens.

  5. Aging in Multi-ethnic Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Tey, Nai Peng; Siraj, Saedah Binti; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul Bahyah Binti; Chin, Ai Vyrn; Tan, Maw Pin; Sinnappan, Glaret Shirley; Müller, Andre Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Multiethnic Malaysia provides a unique case study of divergence in population aging of different sociocultural subgroups within a country. Malaysia represents 3 major ethnicities in Asia-the Malay, Chinese, and Indian. The 3 ethnic groups are at different stages of population aging, as they have undergone demographic transition at different pace amidst rapid social and economic changes. Between 1991 and 2010, the Malaysian population aged 60 and over has more than doubled from about 1 million to 2.2 million, and this is projected to rise to about 7 million or 17.6% of the projected population of 40 million by 2040. In 2010, the aging index ranged from 22.8% among the Bumiputera (Malays and other indigenous groups), to 31.4% among the Indians and 55.0% among the Chinese. Population aging provides great challenges for Malaysia's social and economic development. The increasing prevalence of noncommunicable diseases in older adults, coupled with the erosion of the traditional family support system has increased demands on health care services with an overwhelming need for multidisciplinary and specialized geriatric care. Following the adoption of the National Policy for the Elderly in 1995, issues of population aging have gained increasing attention, especially among researchers. There is an urgent need to increase public awareness, develop infrastructure, as well as support action oriented research that will directly translate to comprehensive and cohesive social strategies, policies, and legislation to protect not just the current older Malaysians but the future of all Malaysians.

  6. Micronutrient status and intervention programs in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Khor, Geok Lin

    2005-06-01

    Approximately 70% of the world's malnourished children live in Asia, giving that region the highest concentration of childhood malnutrition worldwide. Prevalence of stunting and underweight are high especially in south Asia where one in every two preschool children is stunted. Iron-deficiency anemia affects 40%-50% of preschool and primary schoolchildren. Nearly half of all vitamin A deficiency and xerophthalmia in the world occurs in south and southeast Asia. Iodine deficiency disorders have resulted in high goiter rates in India, Pakistan, and parts of Indonesia. Compared with other developing countries in Asia, the nutrition situation in Malaysia is considerably better, owing to rapid economic and socioeconomic development that has occurred since Malaysia gained its independence in 1957. Prevalence of undernutrition and micronutrient deficiency is markedly lower in Malaysian children. Nonetheless, undernutrition in the form of underweight, stunting, and anemia can be found in poor communities throughout the country. A prevalence of 25% underweight and 35% stunting is reported among young children from poor rural households. Anemia and subclinical forms of vitamin A deficiency were reported in children under 5 years old. Typical of a country in nutrition transition, Malaysia faces the dual burden of malnutrition in children, with the persistence of under-nutrition problems especially among the poor and the emerging overweight problem especially in urban areas. Since 1996, nutrition programs of the government sector are coordinated under the National Plan of Action for Nutrition. These activities and other nutrition intervention efforts by other agencies are discussed in this paper.

  7. Young thrust-fault scarps in the highlands - Evidence for an initially totally molten moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, A. B.; Gunga, H.-C.

    1985-01-01

    Attention is given to thermoelastic stress calculations implying that if only the outer few hundreds of km of a moon with a cool interior were initially molten, the lunar highlands should not have young compressional tectonic features. Extrapolations from Apollo panoramic images showing young thrust faults in the highlands suggest that about 2000 thrust fault scarps exist on the highlands, generally occurring in series or complexes of four or five scarps that are on average 5 km long. The ages of the scarps range from 60 + or - 30 to 680 + or - 250 my, with a possible factor bias of +2 to -4. The scarps are the youngest endogenic features on the moon, and indicate that the moon was initially molten.

  8. The early Martian environment: Clues from the cratered highlands and the Precambrian Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craddock, R. A.; Maxwell, T. A.

    1993-01-01

    There is abundant geomorphic evidence to suggest that Mars once had a much denser and warmer atmosphere than present today. Outflow channel, ancient valley networks, and degraded impact craters in the highlands all suggest that ancient Martian atmospheric conditions supported liquid water on the surface. The pressure, composition, and duration of this atmosphere is largely unknown. However, we have attempted to place some constraints on the nature of the early Martian atmosphere by analyzing morphologic variations of highland impact crater populations, synthesizing results of other investigators, and incorporating what is know about the geologic history of the early Earth. This is important for understanding the climatic evolution of Mars, the relative abundance of martian volatiles, and the nature of highland surface materials.

  9. Preliminary evaluation of the Highland Rim aquifer system in Tennessee for receiving injected wastes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    The EPA has authority under the Safe Drinking Water Act to protect underground sources of drinking water from contamination by deep well injection. An aquifer, however, may be exempted from protection and used for injected wastes where the aquifer meets criteria established in the Agency 's Underground Injection Control program. The Highland Rim aquifer system in Tennessee consists of Mississippian age carbonate rocks and occurs from the Valley and Ridge of East Tennessee to west of the Tennessee River. This aquifer contains potable water and is an important source of drinking water for municipal and domestic supplies on the Highland Rim. The Highland Rim aquifer system under parts of the Cumberland Plateau is not currently used as a source of drinking water and is not expected to be used in the future. These areas meet parts of the EPA 's Underground Injection Control criteria for exempting aquifers to receive injected waste. (Author 's abstract)

  10. Tracing the climate and anthropogenic influence on the central Kenya highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omuombo, Christine; Olago, Daniel; Williamson, David; Huguet, Arnaud

    2013-04-01

    Soil and sediment samples were collected from Lakes Rutundu (2500m), Sacred (2200m) and Nkunga (1800m) located on the eastern slopes of Mount Kenya. The samples were mainly composed of silty clay and clay fractions. A suite of geochemical and mineralogical analyses was carried out in order to reconstruct the climatic and anthropogenic influence on the highland ecosystem using modern and palaeodata. These analyses included total carbon (TC), Total Nitrogen (TN), Stable carbon and Nitrogen isotopes, elemental composition and organic chemistry. Indications are that the central Kenya highland ecotones have distinct responses to definite triggers of wet and dry climatic phases, which are marked alongside wide spread anthropogenic influence on a climate gradient. The changes observed provide insight into the collective influence of the biogeochemical cycle during the late Holocene in the east Africa highland where not much information has been published earlier.

  11. Altitudinal changes in malaria incidence in highlands of Ethiopia and Colombia.

    PubMed

    Siraj, A S; Santos-Vega, M; Bouma, M J; Yadeta, D; Ruiz Carrascal, D; Pascual, M

    2014-03-07

    The impact of global warming on insect-borne diseases and on highland malaria in particular remains controversial. Temperature is known to influence transmission intensity through its effects on the population growth of the mosquito vector and on pathogen development within the vector. Spatiotemporal data at a regional scale in highlands of Colombia and Ethiopia supplied an opportunity to examine how the spatial distribution of the disease changes with the interannual variability of temperature. We provide evidence for an increase in the altitude of malaria distribution in warmer years, which implies that climate change will, without mitigation, result in an increase of the malaria burden in the densely populated highlands of Africa and South America.

  12. Pervasive Layering in the Lunar Highland Crust: Evidence from Apollos 15, 16,and 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, Paul D., Jr.; Yang, Tiffany

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents results of a photogeologic reconnaissance of 70 mm photographs taken on the lunar surface during the Apollo 15, 16, and 17 missions, whose primary objective was to investigate the lunar highland crust. Photographs at all three sites, notably the Apennine Front, show pervasive layered structure. These layers are easily distinguished from lighting artifacts, and are considered genuine crustal structures. Their number, thickness, and extent implies that they are lava flows, not ejecta blankets or intrusive features. They appear to be the upper part of the earliest lunar crust, possibly forming a layer tens of kilometers thick. Remote sensing studies (X-ray fluorescence and reflectance spectroscopy), indicate that the highland crust is dominantly a feldspathic basalt. It is concluded that the highland layers represent a global crust formed by eruptions of high-alumina basalt in the first few hundred million years of the Moon's history.

  13. Procrustean science - Indigenous siderophiles in the lunar highlands, according to Delano and Ringwood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, E.

    1978-01-01

    Several objections are raised to the contention of Delano and Ringwood (1978) that the siderophiles in the lunar highlands are mainly of indigenous rather than meteoritic origin. It is argued that the rejection of 29 pristine lunar rocks characterized by low siderophilic abundances, plutonic textures and high age on the supposition that they are impact melts is unjustified by petrographic evidence. It is further contended that the approach used by Delano and Ringwood leads to spurious excesses of Au, Ni and volatiles, which disappear when the highland composition is based on pristine lunar rocks rather than undercorrected breccias. Large, systematic depletions relative to terrestrial oceanic tholeiites are revealed by other derivations of abundances in lunar highland materials.

  14. Female spirit cults as a window on gender relations in the highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Stewart, P J; Strathern, A

    1999-09-01

    Early writings on male cults in the highlands of Papua New Guinea tended to stress the exclusion of women and the collective agency of men. Looking at a subset of these cults from the Western and Southern Highlands Provinces, centering on Female Spirit figures, the authors argue that in these cases the cults are better understood as expressions of a collaborative model, in which gendered cooperation, both in practice and in terms of ritual symbolism, is activated in order to produce fertility and wealth. Positive collaboration is involved as well as structural complementarity. The collaborative model is therefore suggested as an alternative to the model of "male exclusivity" in the analysis of certain cult practices in these parts of the New Guinea highlands region.

  15. GPS Constraints on the Spatial Distribution of Extension in the Ethiopian Highlands and Main Ethiopian Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amere, Y. B.; Bendick, R. O.; Fisseha, S.; Lewi, E.; Reilinger, R. E.; King, R. W.; Kianji, G.

    2014-12-01

    27 campaign and 17 continuous GPS sites spanning the Ethiopian Highlands, Main Ethiopian Rift (MER), and Somali Platform in Ethiopia and Eritrea were measured for varying durations between 1995 and 2014. Velocities at these sites show that present day strain in NE Africa is not localized only in the Afar depression and MER system. Rather, velocities as high as 6 mm/yr relative to stable Nubia occur in the central Ethiopian highlands west of the rift bounding faults; the northern and southern Ethiopian highlands host velocities as high as 3 mm/yr. These approach the magnitude of Nubia-Somalia spreading accommodated within the rift itself of 6 + 1 mm/yr with an azimuth of N770E. The combination of distributed low strain rate deformation contiguous with higher strain rate plate boundary deformation is similar to that expressed in other tectonically active continental settings like Basin and Range and Tibetan Plateau.Keywords: deformation, localized, distributed, strain, stable Nubia.

  16. Another novel subgenotype of hepatitis B virus genotype C from papuans of Highland origin.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Takako; Nugrahaputra, Victor Eka; Amin, Mochamad; Hayashi, Yoshitake; Hotta, Hak; Lusida, Maria Inge

    2011-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes and subtypes have been identified worldwide. As HBV genotypes/subtypes, the HBV subgenotypes seem to be associated with their geographical distribution and ethnic origin. A previous study showed the novel HBV subgenotype C6 based on the complete genome sequences of isolates in Papua, Indonesia. In the present study, further characterization of HBV in Jayapura (capital of Papua Province), particularly from native people of Papua originating from the highland (highland Papuans) and those from the lowland (lowland Papuans) were examined. Of 32 HBV isolates from both highland and lowland Papuan blood donors with HBsAg positive, part of the S gene and the core gene sequences were analyzed. Analyses of some isolates from highland Papuans were confirmed by the complete genome sequences. Most HBV isolates were classified into genotype C (78.1%), followed by genotype B (18.8%), and genotype D (3.1%). The subtype adr was predominant (71.9%), followed by adw2 (25.1%), and ayw2 (3.1%). As with previous findings, phylogenetic analyses revealed that most HBV isolates from Papuans, C/adr, belonged to subgenotype C6. Interestingly, some C/adr isolates from highland Papuans formed a distinct cluster from all reported subgenotypes of HBV/C, and they differed from HBV/C1-C10 by 4.2-7.2% over the complete genome. SimPlot analysis showed no evidence of recombination with HBV/C1-C10. The isolated life and closed social systems of highland Papuans, even though some have been moving to Jayapura, likely contribute to the formation of this unique cluster of infection with a novel subgenotype of HBV, named C11.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA markers reveal high genetic diversity but low genetic differentiation in the black fly Simulium tani Takaoka & Davies along an elevational gradient in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Low, Van Lun; Adler, Peter H; Takaoka, Hiroyuki; Ya'cob, Zubaidah; Lim, Phaik Eem; Tan, Tiong Kai; Lim, Yvonne A L; Chen, Chee Dhang; Norma-Rashid, Yusoff; Sofian-Azirun, Mohd

    2014-01-01

    The population genetic structure of Simulium tani was inferred from mitochondria-encoded sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunits I (COI) and II (COII) along an elevational gradient in Cameron Highlands, Malaysia. A statistical parsimony network of 71 individuals revealed 71 haplotypes in the COI gene and 43 haplotypes in the COII gene; the concatenated sequences of the COI and COII genes revealed 71 haplotypes. High levels of genetic diversity but low levels of genetic differentiation were observed among populations of S. tani at five elevations. The degree of genetic diversity, however, was not in accordance with an altitudinal gradient, and a Mantel test indicated that elevation did not have a limiting effect on gene flow. No ancestral haplotype of S. tani was found among the populations. Pupae with unique structural characters at the highest elevation showed a tendency to form their own haplotype cluster, as revealed by the COII gene. Tajima's D, Fu's Fs, and mismatch distribution tests revealed population expansion of S. tani in Cameron Highlands. A strong correlation was found between nucleotide diversity and the levels of dissolved oxygen in the streams where S. tani was collected.

  18. Gravity and topography of Venusian highlands: Implications for formation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smrekar, Suzanne Elizabeth

    Gravity and topography data are used to determine the apparent compensation depths (ADC's) of thirteen venusian regions. The depths are interpreted in terms of the likely tectonic origins of each area. First, three geologically distinct regions are studied in detail by inverting Pioneer Venus line of sight gravity data to obtain a model of vertical gravity over Bell Regio (possible hot spot), Tellus Regio (tessera terrain), and Leda Planitia (plains). The admittance spectra, the geoid to topography ratio (GTR), and the ADC for each region are found. Each area has a distinct gravity signature. The shallow ADC at Tellus Regio (approximately 25 km) indicates that crustal compensation, possibly with some thermal compensation, is most likely. The large ADC (approximately 175 km) and GTR (20 m/km) along with an unusual admittance spectra at Bell Regio indicate that some dynamic compensation is necessary; crustal or thermal compensation may also be present. Leda Planitia has an intermediate ADC (approximately 65 km), which indicates either thermal or crustal compensation. Second, ADC's and GTR's for 12 venusian highland regions are estimated directly from the topography and line of sight gravity data. These features are: Asteria, Atla, Bell, Beta, Ovda, Phoebe, Tellus, Thetis, and Ulfrun Regiones; Nokomis, Gula, and Sappho Montes. The ADC's range is 50-270 km; the GTR's range is 7-31 m/km. Two distinct GTR groups are apparent. The lower GTR group is best modeled by compensation due to thermal thinning of the lithosphere; some minor component of dynamic or crustal compensation may also be present. A fit to the upper GTR group requires dynamic compensation; a lesser contribution from thermal or crustal compensation may also be present. Upper mantle convection without a low viscosity zone can fit the data. Although the convection parameters are not well constrained, the best fit occurs for a conductive lid thickness of 105 km and a Rayleigh number of 105. These results

  19. Workshop on Pristine Highlands Rocks and the early History of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longhi, J. (Editor); Ryder, G. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Oxide composition of the Moon, evidence for an initially totally molten Moon, geophysical contraints on lunar composition, random sampling of a layered intrusion, lunar highland rocks, early evolution of the Moon, mineralogy and petrology of the pristine rocks, relationship of the pristine nonmore rocks to the highlands soils and breccias, ferroan anorthositic norite, early lunar igneous history, compositional variation in ferroan anosthosites, a lunar magma ocean, deposits of lunar pristine rocks, lunar and planetary compositions and early fractionation in the solar nebula, Moon composition models, petrogenesis in a Moon with a chondritic refractory lithophile pattern, a terrestrial analog of lunar ilmenite bearing camulates, and the lunar magma ocean are summarized.

  20. Geochemistry and stratigraphic relations of middle Proterozoic rocks of the New Jersey Highlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Volkert, Richard A.; Drake, Avery Ala

    1999-01-01

    Middle Proterozoic rocks of the New Jersey Highlands consist of a basement of dacitic, tonalitic, trondhjemitic, and charnockitic rocks that constitute the Losee metamorphic suite. These rocks are unconformably overlain by a layered supracrustal sequence of quartzo-feldspathic and calcareous rocks. Abundant sheets of hornblende- and biotite-bearing rocks of the Byram intrusive suite and clinopyroxene-bearing rocks of the Lake Hopatcong intrusive suite were synkinematically emplaced at about 1,090 Ma. These intrusive suites constitute the Vernon Supersuite. The postorogenic Mount Eve Granite has been dated at 1,020?4 Ma and is confined to the extreme northern Highlands.

  1. Thinking Skill Education and Transformational Progress in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Othman, Nooraini; Mohamad, Khairul Azmi

    2014-01-01

    This paper intends to highlight the issues in thinking skills development and efforts made in addressing these issues in Malaysia. The education system in Malaysia has undergone a huge transformational progress particularly in the field related to the development of thinking skill. Traditionally, thinking skill was not specifically cultivated in…

  2. Students' Biotechnology Literacy: The Pillars of STEM Education in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahri, Nurnadiah Mohamed; Suryawati, Evi; Osman, Kamisah

    2014-01-01

    Biotechnology has been widely applied in various products throughout the 21st century. Malaysia selected the biotechnology sector as one of the key strategic technologies that would enable Malaysia to transform into a fully developed nation by the year 2020. However, to date, there has been very little research on the level of biotechnology…

  3. A Visual Analysis of Festive Television Commercials in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Lean Mei

    2011-01-01

    Malaysia is a multiracial country with a diverse range of religions, leading to a broad range of religious festivals throughout the year. In recent years, corporate giants such as Petronas, Telekom Malaysia (TM), Tenaga and Astro have taken to airing television commercials (TVCs) that contain a local touch when greeting their customers. Perhaps…

  4. An Analysis of Globalization and Higher Education in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arokiasamy, Anantha Raj A.

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to examine the impact of globalization on private higher education in Malaysia. The impact of globalization and the development of knowledge-based economy have caused much dramatic change to the character and functions of higher education in Malaysia. The major trend is the reforming and restructuring of private higher education in…

  5. Multicultural Early Childhood Education: Practices and Challenges in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phoon, Hooi San; Abdullah, Melissa Ng Lee Yen; Abdullah, Anna Christina

    2013-01-01

    Multicultural early childhood education is necessary in a culturally diverse country like Malaysia. Preschool teachers play an important role in implementing multicultural education in the classroom. This paper reports the findings of a self-report questionnaire involving 854 preschool teachers in Malaysia. The preschool teachers disclosed their…

  6. Household Expenditures on Private Tutoring: Emerging Evidence from Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenayathulla, Husaina Banu

    2013-01-01

    Private tutoring has been a burgeoning phenomenon in Malaysia for decades. This study examines the determinants of private tutoring expenditures in Malaysia using the 2004/2005 Household Expenditures Survey and applies hurdle regression models to the data. The results indicate that total household expenditures, household head's level of education,…

  7. The Development of Teacher Education in Malaysia: Problems and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Molly N. N.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews patterns of teacher education in Malaysia, highlighting current problems and challenges, discussing recent reforms and policy initiatives in the domain of teacher education, and introducing three articles that focus on: teacher education for Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages in Malaysia, training of school counselors in…

  8. Counseling in Malaysia: History, Current Status, and Future Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    See, Ching Mey; Ng, Kok-Mun

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the history of counseling in Malaysia, provides an update of its current status, and discusses some anticipated future trends for the profession in light of recent developments in the country. Counseling in Malaysia began with school guidance in the 1960s and has now achieved recognition as a profession in…

  9. Malaysia's Multimedia Super Corridor and Roles of Information Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Edna

    In Malaysia, the government is supporting the diffusion of the Internet and is spearheading a project to bring Malaysia into the information age, by helping to design a smart city called the Multimedia Super Corridor (MSC). The MSC is being planned as a high-technology center where world-class multimedia companies can develop state-of-the-art…

  10. Trade in Higher Education Services in Malaysia: Key Policy Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tham, Siew Yean

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, Malaysia has emerged as an unexpected contender in the world market for international students in higher education. Recognizing this sector as a potential new source of growth and export revenue, Malaysia aims to become a regional hub for higher education. In view of this, the objectives of this paper are to profile the pattern of…

  11. Human Rights and Internal Security in Malaysia: Rhetoric and Reality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    Sarawak occupy the northeast part of the island of Borneo. The total Malaysian population, based on 2002 statistics , is approximately 24 million.45...1999,” (Budget Speech, House of Representatives, Kuala Lumpur, 21 October 1998). 45 Malaysia Department of Statistics , Malaysia: Monthly Statistical

  12. Combining Education and Work; Experiences in Asia and Oceania: Malaysia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murugasu, V.

    Work oriented education has been tied to national development in Malaysia since the 1960's. Increasing population, unemployment, and shortages of skilled manpower led the government to relate education more closely to work and develop technical and vocational education. Malaysia extended basic education to lower secondary manpower needs; and…

  13. A Model of Homeschooling Based on Technology in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alias, Norlidah; Rahman, Mohd. Nazri Abdul; Siraj, Saedah; Ibrahim, Ruslina

    2013-01-01

    Homeschooling in Malaysia is a form of alternative education that emphasizes quality education based on moral values and belief in strengthening family ties. The purpose of this study is to produce a model of homeschooling technology-based learning activities in Malaysia as a guideline to improve the quality of education, curriculum and organize…

  14. Satisfaction from Academic Activities among Medical Students in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Naggar, Redhwan A.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.

    2013-01-01

    There is a lack of data about the levels of satisfaction among medical students in regards to their academic activities in Malaysia. Therefore, the objective of this study was to fill the gap in the existing knowledge. A cross sectional study was carried out at the International medical school, the Management and Science University of Malaysia,…

  15. Beginning Teachers as Policy Workers in Malaysia and New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Vivienne Ruth; Young, Sharon; Blanch, Keely; Smith, Lee

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the Malaysia government initiated twinned primary teacher education arrangements with five Southern Hemisphere higher education institutions (HEIs). Participating students completed their teacher education in both Malaysia and a partner HEI. In this paper, we consider the preliminary findings of a comparative study tracking the beginning…

  16. Innovation Management and Performance Framework for Research University in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowang, Tan Owee; Long, Choi Sang; Rasli, Amran

    2015-01-01

    Institutions of Higher Learning (IHL) in Malaysia are recognized as the core of new innovation development. This paper empirically studies one of IHLs in Malaysia with the objectives to gauge the perceived important level of success factors for innovation management, and to examine the relationship between innovation management success factors…

  17. Not Plain Sailing: Malaysia's Language Choice in Policy and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashim, Azirah

    2009-01-01

    This paper focusses on language and education issues in Malaysia as they have unfolded in the context of nation building, societal multilingualism and globalization from independence to the present day. The paper first examines the origin and nature of language and medium-of-instruction policies in Malaysia and the rationale for them. Secondly, it…

  18. Contemporary Challenges and Changes: Principals' Leadership Practices in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Michelle; Adams, Donnie; Joo, Mabel Tan Hwee; Muniandy, Vasu; Perera, Corinne Jaqueline; Harris, Alma

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the findings from a contemporary study of principals' leadership practices in Malaysia as part of the 7 System Leadership Study. Recent policy developments within Malaysia have increased principals' accountability and have underlined the importance of the role of the principals in transforming school performance and student…

  19. A Study of Quality Assurance Practices in the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sim, Helen Khoo Chooi; Idrus, Rozhan M.

    2004-01-01

    This article looks at the quality assurance practices amongst three (3) groups of staff in the School of Distance Education, Universiti Sains Malaysia, i.e. lecturers, resident tutors and support staff. 9 dimensions of the Quality Assurance Practices i.e. Staff Development, Planning, Work Process, Team Work, Prioritise Customers, Performance…

  20. West Meets East in Malaysia and Singapore. Participants' Papers. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program 1999 (Malaysia and Singapore).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malaysian-American Commission on Educational Exchange, Kuala Lumpur.

    These projects were completed by participants in the Fulbright-Hays summer seminar in Malaysia and Singapore in 1999. The participants represented various regions of the U.S. and different grade levels and subject areas. The seminar offered a comprehensive overview of how the people of Malaysia and Singapore live, work, and strive towards their…

  1. STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES FOR DETERMINATION AND PREDICTION OF FUNDAMENTAL FISH ASSEMBLAGES OF THE MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A statistical software tool, Stream Fish Community Predictor (SFCP), based on EMAP stream sampling in the mid-Atlantic Highlands, was developed to predict stream fish communities using stream and watershed characteristics. Step one in the tool development was a cluster analysis t...

  2. PREDICTION OF FUNDAMENTAL ASSEMBLAGES OF MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLAND STREAM FISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A statistical software tool, the Stream Fish Assemblage Predictor (SFAP), based on stream sampling data collected by the EPA in the mid-Atlantic Highlands, was developed to predict potential stream fish communities using characteristics of the stream and its watershed.
    Step o...

  3. Constraints on the Impact-Accreted Carapace Hypothesis for the Lunar Farside Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, P. H.

    2012-03-01

    The recent proposal that the an impact-accreted carapace accounts for the greater thickness of the Moon's farside highlands crust is not plausible. The carapace would not have appropriately low density, nor the appropriate Al_2O_3-rich composition.

  4. 77 FR 58181 - Power Resources, Inc., Smith Ranch Highland Uranium Project; License Renewal Request, Opportunity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... certificate). Based upon this information, the Secretary will establish an electronic docket for the hearing in this proceeding if the Secretary has not already established an electronic docket. Information... COMMISSION Power Resources, Inc., Smith Ranch Highland Uranium Project; License Renewal Request,...

  5. Geochronology and petrogenesis of the western highlands alkali suite: Radiogenic isotopic evidence from Apollo 14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Gregory A.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Halliday, Alex N.

    1993-03-01

    Several rocks of alkalic affinity, from the western highlands of the Moon, have been analyzed for their Nd and Sr isotopic compositions. One sample yields a Sm-Nd mineral isochron of 4110 = 41 Ma. This age, in conjunction with U-Pb zircon ages on two other alkalic rocks from the Apollo 14 landing site suggests a distinct western highlands 'event' which was approximately 100 Ma in duration. Since the last dregs of the lunar magma ocean likely crystallized prior to 4.3 Ga, this alkalic 'event' may have included the re-melting of evolved plutons or the remobilization of urKREEP trapped liquid from upper mantle cumulates. Alkalic lithologies such as granites and felsites have been known from the Moon since the earliest days of the Apollo lunar sample returns. However, not until 1977 were alkali-rich rocks recognized from typical highlands suites such as ferroan anorthosites (FAN) and norites and Mg-suite rocks. In the intervening years, several other alkali suite samples have been discovered and characterized, mostly through labor-intesive breccia pull-apart studies of clasts and analyses of coarse-fine fractions of soils. We will speculate on the origins of this suite of lunar highlands rocks.

  6. Interaction of MC1R and PMEL alleles on solid coat colors in Highland cattle.

    PubMed

    Schmutz, Sheila M; Dreger, Dayna L

    2013-02-01

    Six solid colors occur in Highland cattle: black, dun, silver dun and red, yellow, and white. These six coat colors are explained by a non-epistatic interaction of the genotypes at the MC1R and PMEL genes. A three base pair deletion in the PMEL gene leading to the deletion of a leucine from the signal peptide is observed in dilute-colored Highland cattle (c.50_52delTTC, p.Leu18del). The mutant PMEL allele acts in a semi-dominant manner. Dun Galloway cattle also have one copy of the deletion allele, and silver dun Galloway cattle have two copies. The presence of two adjacent leucine residues at the site of this deletion is highly conserved in human, horse, mouse and chicken as well as in cattle with undiluted coat colors. Highland and Galloway cattle thus exhibit a similar dose-dependent dilution effect based on the number of PMEL :c.50_51delTTC alleles, as Charolais cattle with PMEL :c.64G>A alleles. The PMEL :c.64G>A allele was not found in Highland or Galloway cattle.

  7. Competing for Coffee Space: Development-Induced Displacement in the Central Highlands of Vietnam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doutriaux, Sylvie; Geisler, Charles; Shively, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Vietnam has emerged as the world's second largest producer of coffee. The benefits of this expanding coffee economy are substantial but not universal; their distribution follows ethnic lines despite government commitment to equalize welfare. Focusing on Dak Lak Province in Vietnam's Central Highlands, we investigate this commercial transformation…

  8. Profiles of the Highland Lao Communities in the United States. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Doua; North, David

    This collection of statistical data on the 90 Highland Lao communities in the United States is designed to help members of those communities and people working in refugee-serving agencies to better assist this refugee group. Information was provided by community leaders, state refugee coordinators, and county human resource officials in 1988.…

  9. 76 FR 58850 - Highland Capital Management, L.P., et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Highland Capital Management, L.P., et al.; Notice of Application September 15, 2011. AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission (``Commission''). ACTION: Notice of an application under section 6(c)...

  10. Highland Children's Education Project: A Pilot Project on Bilingual Education in Cambodia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleborg, Jorn

    2005-01-01

    The report was produced by UNESCO in partnership with CARE International in Cambodia for the "Highland Children's Education Project" (HCEP) to show how bilingual primary education has been implemented among the Tampuen and Kreung ethnic minority groups in six remote villages in the northeastern province of Ratanakiri, Cambodia. Central…

  11. Incorporating Scottish Highland Games and Activities into Your Physical Education Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prewitt, Steven L.; Hannon, James C.; Brusseau, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce a potentially new and exciting group of activities that can be taught in physical education. Activities based on Scottish Highland Games can be an interesting way to incorporate history and literature into the curriculum, as well as introduce students to a variety of unique physical activities. This…

  12. Compositional gradients across mare-highland contacts - The importance of lateral mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Mustard, J. F.; He, G.

    1997-03-01

    The relative importance of vertical vs lateral mass transport on the moon has been the object of much debate. With the new multispectral observations provided by the Clementine spacecraft, we can now quantitatively analyze the magnitude of transport and assess the processes contributing to the observed distributions. We are currently analyzing a number of mare-highland boundaries but most analyzed thus far exhibit similar systematics to that observed in the Grimaldi Basin. On the basis of these results of observation, we seek to interpret and model the observed variation of mare/highland abundance through the use of a mathematical model that can quantitatively reproduce spatial distributions and the absolute concentrations of 'exotic' components on the mare or highland side. In this analysis, we use a nonlinear model, which is more accurate for the intimate mixing expected in lunar surface. On the basis of nonlinear spectral mixing analysis, two critical issues are clarified: (1) there are apparently two distinct mixing zones, one near the contact that is very steep (5-15 percent/km) the other far from the contact that is very gentle (below 2 percent/km); (2) the distribution of mare and highland across the contact is remarkably symmetric.

  13. Economic Determinants of Academic Failure and School Desertion in the Guatemala Highlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvajal, Manuel J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Explores, from an economic perspective, elementary school system adequacy in the rural, indigenous Guatemalan highlands. Estimates least-squares coefficients and elasticities separately for academic failure and school abandonment for each of four indigenous groups. The model explains academic failure better than school desertion. A national policy…

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INDEX OF BIOTIC INTEGRITY FOR THE MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    From 1993 to 1996, fish assemblage data were collected from 309 wadeable streams in the U.S. Mid-Atlantic Highlands region as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program. Stream sites were selected with a probabilistic sampl...

  15. Cross-Sectional Comparison of Sleep-Disordered Breathing in Native Peruvian Highlanders and Lowlanders.

    PubMed

    Pham, Luu V; Meinzen, Christopher; Arias, Rafael S; Schwartz, Noah G; Rattner, Adi; Miele, Catherine H; Smith, Philip L; Schneider, Hartmut; Miranda, J Jaime; Gilman, Robert H; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y; Checkley, William; Schwartz, Alan R

    2017-03-01

    Pham, Luu V., Christopher Meinzen, Rafael S. Arias, Noah G. Schwartz, Adi Rattner, Catherine H. Miele, Philip L. Smith, Hartmut Schneider, J. Jaime Miranda, Robert H. Gilman, Vsevolod Y. Polotsky, William Checkley, and Alan R. Schwartz. Cross-sectional comparison of sleep-disordered breathing in native Peruvian highlanders and lowlanders. High Alt Med Biol. 18:11-19, 2017.

  16. Building Climate Resilience in the Blue Nile/Abay Highlands: A Role for Earth System Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Zaitchik, Benjamin F.; Simane, Belay; Habib, Shahid; Anderson, Martha C.; Ozdogan, Mutlu; Foltz, Jeremy D.

    2012-01-01

    The Blue Nile (Abay) Highlands of Ethiopia are characterized by significant interannual climate variability, complex topography and associated local climate contrasts, erosive rains and erodible soils, and intense land pressure due to an increasing population and an economy that is almost entirely dependent on smallholder, low-input agriculture. As a result, these highland zones are highly vulnerable to negative impacts of climate variability. As patterns of variability and precipitation intensity alter under anthropogenic climate change, there is concern that this vulnerability will increase, threatening economic development and food security in the region. In order to overcome these challenges and to enhance sustainable development in the context of climate change, it is necessary to establish climate resilient development strategies that are informed by best-available Earth System Science (ESS) information. This requirement is complicated by the fact that climate projections for the Abay Highlands contain significant and perhaps irreducible uncertainties. A critical challenge for ESS, then, is to generate and to communicate meaningful information for climate resilient development in the context of a highly uncertain climate forecast. Here we report on a framework for applying ESS to climate resilient development in the Abay Highlands, with a focus on the challenge of reducing land degradation. PMID:22470302

  17. Morphological dynamics of gully systems in the subhumid Ethiopian Highlands: The Debre Mawi watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gully expansion in the Ethiopian highlands dissects vital agricultural lands with the eroded materials adversely impacting downstream resources, for example as they accumulate in reservoirs. While gully expansion and rehabilitation have been more extensively researched in the semi-arid region of Eth...

  18. Participatory community-based gully rehabilitation on the Ethiopian Highlands: the case of Birr watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the last fifty years, sediment concentrations in the Ethiopian highlands have increased two- to three-fold. The current severity of gully erosion is a major cause of increased sediment loads, but gully rehabilitation has proven to be challenging as success rates have been small. This paper descri...

  19. Biophysical and economic assessment of a community-based rehabilitated gully in the Ethiopian highlands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the last fifty years, sediment concentrations in the Ethiopian highlands have increased two- to three-fold. The current severity of gully erosion is a major cause of increased sediment loads, but gully rehabilitation has proven to be challenging, with limited success. This paper describes gully r...

  20. 77 FR 68854 - Highland Associates, Inc. and Financial Investors Trust; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ... COMMISSION Highland Associates, Inc. and Financial Investors Trust; Notice of Application November 9, 2012... Investors Trust (the ``Trust''), on behalf of the Redmont Resolute Fund I and Redmont Resolute Fund II (the... appropriate in the public interest and consistent with the protection of investors and the purposes...

  1. Response of soil respiration to experimental warming in a highland barley of the Tibet.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhi-Ming; Shen, Zhen-Xi; Fu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Highland barley is an important dominant crop in the Tibet and the croplands of the Tibet are experiencing obvious climatic warming. However, information about how soil respiration will respond to climatic warming in the highland barley system is still lacking. A field warming experiment using infrared heaters with two warming magnitudes was conducted in a highland barley system of the Tibet in May 2014. Five daily cycles of soil respiration was measured using a CO2 flux system (Li-8100, Li-COR Biosciences, Lincoln, NE, USA) during the period from early June to early September in 2014. The high and low experimental warming significantly increased soil temperature by 1.98 and 1.52 °C over the whole study period, respectively. The high experimental warming significantly decreased soil moisture. Soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity did not significantly change under both the high and low experimental warming. The response of soil respiration to experimental warming did not linearly correlate with warming magnitudes because a greater experimental warming resulted in a higher soil drying. Our findings suggested that clarifying the response of soil CO2 production and its temperature sensitivity to climatic warming need consider water availability in the highland barley system of the Tibet.

  2. Constraints on Sources of Strong Crustal Magnetism in the Southern Highlands of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, C. A.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic models, guided by results of gravity-topography admittance studies, suggest that the anomaly pattern in the central southern highlands of Mars results from large blocks of coherently magnetized crust separated by 'non-magnetic' areas. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Educational and Occupational Attainment of Migrants and Nonmigrants from a Colombian Highland Community. Research Paper 63.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haney, Wava G.

    This research report focuses on the educational, migrational, and occupational characteristics of the rural-born people from various class origins in a highland minifundia community near Bogota, Colombia. Three main objectives are to describe the nature of growth and adjustment in the labor force under conditions of rapid population growth and…

  4. Making Hope and History Rhyme: Reflections on Popular Education and Leadership Following a Visit to Highlander

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Bríd; Finnegan, Fergal

    2016-01-01

    This article draws on our backgrounds as adult educators in Ireland and our experience at Highlander in 2014. We review our development as critical educators, exposed to deep inequalities in Irish society. We explore role of popular education in fostering social change, beginning with the commitment to equality and freedom, whereby, we produce…

  5. Citizens Advisory Committees for Virginia Highlands Community College. A Handbook of Information, Policies, and Procedures. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Highlands Community Coll., Abingdon.

    At Virginia Highlands Community College (VHCC), citizens advisory committees (CACs) were instrumental in the initiation of the first programs and services at the college and have continued to suggest needed additions, deletions, and modifications of offerings as the college has grown. This handbook outlines basic guidelines and procedures for…

  6. Building climate resilience in the Blue Nile/Abay Highlands: a role for Earth system sciences.

    PubMed

    Zaitchik, Benjamin F; Simane, Belay; Habib, Shahid; Anderson, Martha C; Ozdogan, Mutlu; Foltz, Jeremy D

    2012-02-01

    The Blue Nile (Abay) Highlands of Ethiopia are characterized by significant interannual climate variability, complex topography and associated local climate contrasts, erosive rains and erodible soils, and intense land pressure due to an increasing population and an economy that is almost entirely dependent on smallholder, low-input agriculture. As a result, these highland zones are highly vulnerable to negative impacts of climate variability. As patterns of variability and precipitation intensity alter under anthropogenic climate change, there is concern that this vulnerability will increase, threatening economic development and food security in the region. In order to overcome these challenges and to enhance sustainable development in the context of climate change, it is necessary to establish climate resilient development strategies that are informed by best-available Earth System Science (ESS) information. This requirement is complicated by the fact that climate projections for the Abay Highlands contain significant and perhaps irreducible uncertainties. A critical challenge for ESS, then, is to generate and to communicate meaningful information for climate resilient development in the context of a highly uncertain climate forecast. Here we report on a framework for applying ESS to climate resilient development in the Abay Highlands, with a focus on the challenge of reducing land degradation.

  7. Improving efficacy of landscape interventions in the (semi) humid Ethiopian Highlands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite millions of dollars invested in soil and water conservation practices and other landscape interventions in Ethiopian highlands and billions of hours of food-for-work farm labor, sediment concentration in rivers is increasing. Possible ways to reverse the current trend has been investigated b...

  8. Highland High School Vocational Television; a Salt Lake Schools Exemplary Vocational Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagle, LaMar C.

    The Highland High School (Salt Lake City, Utah) vocational television production program was designed to provide students with marketable skills in color television studio operation. Among the skills covered in the program were camera set-up and operation, video engineering, production switching, directing, television lighting, audio engineering,…

  9. Geochronology and petrogenesis of the western highlands alkali suite: Radiogenic isotopic evidence from Apollo 14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Gregory A.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Halliday, Alex N.

    1993-01-01

    Several rocks of alkalic affinity, from the western highlands of the Moon, have been analyzed for their Nd and Sr isotopic compositions. One sample yields a Sm-Nd mineral isochron of 4110 = 41 Ma. This age, in conjunction with U-Pb zircon ages on two other alkalic rocks from the Apollo 14 landing site suggests a distinct western highlands 'event' which was approximately 100 Ma in duration. Since the last dregs of the lunar magma ocean likely crystallized prior to 4.3 Ga, this alkalic 'event' may have included the re-melting of evolved plutons or the remobilization of urKREEP trapped liquid from upper mantle cumulates. Alkalic lithologies such as granites and felsites have been known from the Moon since the earliest days of the Apollo lunar sample returns. However, not until 1977 were alkali-rich rocks recognized from typical highlands suites such as ferroan anorthosites (FAN) and norites and Mg-suite rocks. In the intervening years, several other alkali suite samples have been discovered and characterized, mostly through labor-intesive breccia pull-apart studies of clasts and analyses of coarse-fine fractions of soils. We will speculate on the origins of this suite of lunar highlands rocks.

  10. GPS constraints on broad scale extension in the Ethiopian Highlands and Main Ethiopian Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birhanu, Yelebe; Bendick, Rebecca; Fisseha, Shimeles; Lewi, Elias; Floyd, Michael; King, Robert; Reilinger, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Measurements from GPS sites spanning the Ethiopian Highlands, Main Ethiopian Rift, and Somali Platform in Ethiopia and Eritrea show that present-day finite strain rates throughout NE Africa can be approximated at the continent scale by opening on the MER. Most sites in the Ethiopian Highlands are consistent with the motion of the Nubian plate at the level of 1 mm/yr with 95% confidence. However, sites at least as far as 60 km west of the rift show higher velocities relative to the stable Nubian frame of 1-2 mm/yr, requiring a combination of localized and distributed deformation to accommodate the African extensional domain. Off-rift velocities are consistent with ongoing strain related to either high gravitational potential energy or intrusive magmatism away from midrift magmatic segments either on the western rift margin or within the Ethiopian Highlands, especially when combined with likely rheological differences between the Ethiopian Rift and Highlands. Velocities from the Somali Platform are less well determined with uncertainties and residuals from a Somali frame definition at the level of 2-3 mm/yr but without spatially correlated residuals.

  11. DECISION TOOL FOR RIPARIAN ECOSYSTEM MANAGMENT IN THE MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the Canaan Valley Highlands of the Mid-Atlantic, riparian zone restoration has been identified as a critical watershed management practice not only for the ecosystem services provided but also for the potential socioeconomic growth from environmental investment and job creatio...

  12. An unusual case of urinary incontinence in an intersex West Highland white terrier.

    PubMed

    Connery, Neil A; Spotswood, Tim

    2012-11-01

    A 5-year-old neutered female West Highland white terrier dog was presented with a history of congenital urinary incontinence that had become refractory to medical management. Complex urogenital anomalies including urethrovestibular and vestibuloperineal fistulae with low vulvar position along with a penoclitoris were present. Vaginectomy with perineal urethral reconstruction resolved the incontinence.

  13. A Study of Service-Learning at Virginia Highlands Community College and Mountain Empire Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Alice

    This qualitative study was conducted to explore student perceptions of service learning as well as the importance of service learning to community college students. Data were collected through interviews with 24 community college participants from Virginia Highlands Community College and Mountain Empire Community College, both in southwest…

  14. The Bulk Density of the Tyrrhena Patera Highland Volcano, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grott, M.; Wieczorek, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Tyrrhena Patera is a low-relief, central-vent volcano located in the southern highlands of Mars, northeast of the Hellas impact basin. The main edifice contains few primary lave flow features and the flanks of the volcano are heavily eroded, indicating that they are composed of friable material which could have been formed by pyroclastic flows. The volcano itself was emplaced in the Noachian, but was subsequently modified during the Hesperian period, with episodes of resurfacing - probably driven by erosion - stretching well into the Amazonian period. Resurfacing of the caldera rille floor and upper shield probably mark the cessation of volcanic activity at Tyrrhena Patera around 800 Ma ago, and the geological evidence suggests that activity at Tyrrhena Patera transitioned from dominantly explosive to dominantly effusive eruptions. In summary, Tyrrhena Patera is generally thought to be predominantly composed of multi-layered, compacted ignimbrite deposits. The Tyrrhena Patera volcano is associated with a well localized positive free-air gravity anomaly and a good correlation exists with the features topography. We have used the latest gravity field model for Mars expanded up to degree and order 110 to model the localized admittance spectrum at Tyrrhena Patera considering surface as well as subsurface loading. We use a spherical cap localization window with a cap diameter of 7 degrees and a spherical harmonic bandwidth of 37. Ignoring the lowest degree terms that may be influenced by the Tharsis signal, we analyze the localized admittance in the degree range 42 to 57. The observed admittance is then compared to a forward model which is localized in the same manner as the data. In this way, we have quantified the range of admissible load densities as well as the admissible magnitude of a potentially present subsurface load. Modelling suggests that load densities need to be between 3290 and 3450 kg/m3 if no subsurface loads are present. If subsurface loads in the form

  15. Zoonotic parasites from exotic meat in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Fazly, Z A; Nurulaini, R; Shafarin, M S; Fariza, N J; Zawida, Z; Muhamad, H Y; Adnan, M; Premaalatha, B; Erwanas, A I; Zaini, C M; Ong, C C; Chandrawathani, P

    2013-09-01

    Four zoonotic parasites, Sarcocystis spp., Toxoplasma gondii, Trichinella spp. and Taenia spp were screened in exotic meats. A total of forty-six (n=46) meat samples from various species of exotic animals were received from all the 14 states in Malaysia from January 2012 to April 2012. All exotic meat samples were examined macroscopically and histologically for the four zoonotic parasites. Results by histological examination of exotic meats showed the presence of Sarcocystis and Toxoplasma cysts at 8.7% (n=4) and 4.3% (n=2) respectively. No Trichinella spp. and Taenia spp. were found.

  16. The burden of terrorism in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Abul Aziz, Azhar

    2003-01-01

    In the peace-loving, moderate and progressive country of Muslim-dominated Malaysia, violence generally is alien to the culture. Terrorism initially took shape during the post-independence, communist era by jungle recalcitrant actions. In recent years, this has been superceded by a more internationally related trend of violence. Only very few incidents were based locally, while the majority were linked to international groups or organizations abroad, including the Kumpulan Mujahidin Malaysia (KMM), Jemaah Islamiyah (JI), and the Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG). Kidnapping with ransom seemed to have been the most commone modus operandi, while killing and robbery accounted for very few of these incidents. The number of victims in each event so far has been small, and smaller for those physically harmed or killed. This pattern of terrorist attacks suggests that the current level of provision of emergency medical services is sufficient to handle such incidents. Recent advances in local emergency medicine also have witnessed the establishment of various teaching and training modules, a pivotal role played by university hospitals and supported by the Ministry of Health. However, the spate of ongoing events of mass destruction such as the conflict in Israel/Palestine, wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the World Trade Center and Pentagon tragedies of 11 September 2001, and the Bali bombing in Indonesia, remain as great concerns to Malaysians. Both the government and the people of Malaysia abhor such unjustified uses of terror, and take every measure to curtail them. The National Security Council policies of Arahan No. 18 and Arahan No. 20 detail specific roles and responsibilities of various agencies in managing terrorism and disasters respectively, while the use of the stern Internal Security Act that allows indefinite detention without trial, evidently has been an efficient intelligence and security apparatus. With more recent developments of terrorist events regionally and globally

  17. Bulk hydrogen abundances in the lunar highlands: Measurements from orbital neutron data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, David J.; Peplowski, Patrick N.; Plescia, Jeffrey B.; Greenhagen, Benjamin T.; Maurice, Sylvestre; Prettyman, Thomas H.

    2015-07-01

    The first map of bulk hydrogen concentrations in the lunar highlands region is reported. This map is derived using data from the Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer (LP-NS). We resolve prior ambiguities in the interpretation of LP-NS data with respect to non-polar hydrogen concentrations by comparing the LP-NS data with maps of the 750 nm albedo reflectance, optical maturity, and the wavelength position of the thermal infrared Christiansen Feature. The best explanation for the variations of LP-NS epithermal neutron data in the lunar highlands is variable amounts of solar-wind-implanted hydrogen. The average hydrogen concentration across the lunar highlands and away from the lunar poles is 65 ppm. The highest hydrogen values range from 120 ppm to just over 150 ppm. These values are consistent with the range of hydrogen concentrations from soils and regolith breccias at the Apollo 16 highlands landing site. Based on a moderate-to-strong correlation of epithermal neutrons and orbit-based measures of surface maturity, the map of highlands hydrogen concentration represents a new global maturity index that can be used for studies of the lunar soil maturation process. We interpret these hydrogen concentrations to represent a bulk soil property related to the long-term impact of the space environment on the lunar surface. Consequently, the derived hydrogen concentrations are not likely related to the surficial enhancements (top tens to hundreds of microns) or local time variations of OH/H2O measured with spectral reflectance data.

  18. Detailed mapping of detached plateaus and knobby terrain across the highland/lowland boundary on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, H.; Semeniuk, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The present-day boundary between the cratered highlands and northern lowland plains on Mars represent a major physiographic landform. In some regions there is clear evidence of a southward migration of this boundary. The authors have mapped features which may be relict pieces of highlands; flat-topped, angular mesas which we call detached plateaus, knobby terrain and partial craters to determine where ancient cratered terrain may have been in the past. Most of the detached plateaus and knobby terrain lie along or slightly north of the present-day highland boundary, but significant occurrences are also found at high northern latitudes in several locations. They have also identified, mapped and measured all symmetric knobs visible on the 1:2,000,000 controlled photomosaics with the long dimension greater than or equal to 10 km and classified them by shape. Between +65/sup 0/ and -45/sup 0/ there are 1634 such features, many of which are concentrated along the highland/lowland boundary or around the rims of major impact basins such as Isidis, Argyre and Hellas. The most common shape is elliptical (79%) followed by circular (11%) and triangular or wedge-shaped (6%). Globally, all types share a similar decrease in number with increasing size. Regionally, there are significant differences in the size-frequency distributions that seem to be related to their locations; whether the knobs are associated with impact basin rims, the highland/lowland boundary or volcanic plains. There are similar variations in the shape-size characteristics of the elliptical knobs.

  19. The meteorology of the Western Indian Ocean, and the influence of the East African Highlands.

    PubMed

    Slingo, Julia; Spencer, Hilary; Hoskins, Brian; Berrisford, Paul; Black, Emily

    2005-01-15

    This paper reviews the meteorology of the Western Indian Ocean and uses a state-of-the-art atmospheric general circulation model to investigate the influence of the East African Highlands on the climate of the Indian Ocean and its surrounding regions. The new 44-year re-analysis produced by the European Centre for Medium range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) has been used to construct a new climatology of the Western Indian Ocean. A brief overview of the seasonal cycle of the Western Indian Ocean is presented which emphasizes the importance of the geography of the Indian Ocean basin for controlling the meteorology of the Western Indian Ocean. The principal modes of inter-annual variability are described, associated with El Nino and the Indian Ocean Dipole or Zonal Mode, and the basic characteristics of the subseasonal weather over the Western Indian Ocean are presented, including new statistics on cyclone tracks derived from the ECMWF re-analyses. Sensitivity experiments, in which the orographic effects of East Africa are removed, have shown that the East African Highlands, although not very high, play a significant role in the climate of Africa, India and Southeast Asia, and in the heat, salinity and momentum forcing of the Western Indian Ocean. The hydrological cycle over Africa is systematically enhanced in all seasons by the presence of the East African Highlands, and during the Asian summer monsoon there is a major redistribution of the rainfall across India and Southeast Asia. The implied impact of the East African Highlands on the ocean is substantial. The East African Highlands systematically freshen the tropical Indian Ocean, and act to focus the monsoon winds along the coast, leading to greater upwelling and cooler sea-surface temperatures.

  20. Tsunami risk mapping simulation for Malaysia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teh, S.Y.; Koh, H. L.; Moh, Y.T.; De Angelis, D. L.; Jiang, J.

    2011-01-01

    The 26 December 2004 Andaman mega tsunami killed about a quarter of a million people worldwide. Since then several significant tsunamis have recurred in this region, including the most recent 25 October 2010 Mentawai tsunami. These tsunamis grimly remind us of the devastating destruction that a tsunami might inflict on the affected coastal communities. There is evidence that tsunamis of similar or higher magnitudes might occur again in the near future in this region. Of particular concern to Malaysia are tsunamigenic earthquakes occurring along the northern part of the Sunda Trench. Further, the Manila Trench in the South China Sea has been identified as another source of potential tsunamigenic earthquakes that might trigger large tsunamis. To protect coastal communities that might be affected by future tsunamis, an effective early warning system must be properly installed and maintained to provide adequate time for residents to be evacuated from risk zones. Affected communities must be prepared and educated in advance regarding tsunami risk zones, evacuation routes as well as an effective evacuation procedure that must be taken during a tsunami occurrence. For these purposes, tsunami risk zones must be identified and classified according to the levels of risk simulated. This paper presents an analysis of tsunami simulations for the South China Sea and the Andaman Sea for the purpose of developing a tsunami risk zone classification map for Malaysia based upon simulated maximum wave heights. ?? 2011 WIT Press.

  1. Proximate determinants of fertility in peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Tey, Nai Peng; Ng, Sor Tho; Yew, Siew Yong

    2012-05-01

    The continuing decline in fertility despite a contraction in contraceptive use in Peninsular Malaysia since the mid-1980s has triggered considerable interest in the reasons behind this phenomenon, such as increase in abortion, sterility, and out-of-wedlock pregnancy. Fertility decline has been attributed to rapid socioeconomic development, which can only influence fertility through the intermediate variables. Application of vital statistics, population census, and survey data of Peninsular Malaysia on Bongaarts's model vindicates that marriage postponement and contraceptive use are the 2 most important proximate determinants of fertility, but the effects are not uniform across the ethnic groups. For instance, the predicted total fertility rate for Chinese and Malays are 2.9 and 1.6, respectively, compared with the observed level of 3.0 and 1.9. Postpartum infecundability and abortion also play a part in explaining ethnic fertility differentials. The fertility inhibiting effects of these proximate determinants have significant implications on reproductive health and future population growth.

  2. Prehospital emergency medical services in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hisamuddin, N A R Nik; Hamzah, M Shah; Holliman, C James

    2007-05-01

    Once a very slowly developing country in a Southeast Asia region, Malaysia has undergone considerable change over the last 20 years after the government changed its focus from agriculture to developing more industry and technology. The well-known "Vision 2020," introduced by the late Prime Minister, set a target for the nation to be a developed country in the Asia region by the year 2020. As the economy and standard of living have improved, the demand from the public for a better health care system, in particular, emergency medical services (EMS), has increased. Despite the effort by the government to improve the health care system in Malaysia, EMS within the country are currently limited, best described as being in the "developing" phase. The Ministry of Health, Ministry of Education, Civil Defense, and non-governmental organizations such as Red Crescent and St. John's Ambulance, provide the current ambulance services. At the present time, there are no uniform medical control or treatment protocols, communication systems, system management, training or education, or quality assurance policies. However, the recent development of and interest in an Emergency Medicine training program has gradually led to improved EMS and prehospital care.

  3. Child-to-Child programme in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Kasim, M S; Abraham, S

    1982-09-01

    Even though Malaysia is a relatively prosperous country amongst the developing nations, it is still be set by problems of a rapidly increasing population. The economic cake is also unevenly distributed and there are pockets of poverty in the slums surrounding the towns as well as in the rural areas. Added to that is the problem of ignorance and superstition especially amongst its adult population. It is due to these problems that the Child-to-Child programme has found special application in Malaysia. The Child-to-Child has been introduced through either the government agencies or the voluntary organizations. Through the Ministry of Education, the concept has found its ways through the schools and the state department of education. The Ministry of Information and Broadcasting has also introduced the concept of Child-to-Child in the media. The voluntary organizations have also introduced the concept of Child-to-Child in their projects. The Sang Kancil project has to some extent used the idea in the running of its activities. The Health and Nutrition Education House have found that by applying the concept and using older children to help in running its activities, its over all objective which is the improvement of the health of the children in the slums could be reached more easily.

  4. Thorium: Issues and prospects in Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    AL-Areqi, Wadeeah M.; Majid, Amran Ab.; Sarmani, Sukiman; Bahri, Che Nor Aniza Che Zainul

    2015-04-29

    In Malaysia, thorium exists in minerals and rare earth elements production residue. The average range of thorium content in Malaysian monazite and xenotime minerals was found about 70,000 and 15,000 ppm respectively. About 2,636 tonnes of Malaysian monazite was produced for a period of 5 years (2006-2010) and based on the above data, it can be estimated that Malaysian monazite contains about 184.5 tonnes of thorium. Although thorium can become a major radiological problem to our environment, but with the significant deposit of thorium in Malaysian monazite, it has a prospect as a future alternative fuel in nuclear technology. This paper will discuss the thorium issues in Malaysia especially its long term radiological risks to public health and environment at storage and disposal stages, the prospect of exploring and producing high purity thorium from our rare earth elements minerals for future thorium based reactor. This paper also highlights the holistic approach in thorium recovery from Malaysian rare earth element production residue to reduce its radioactivity and extraction of thorium and rare earth elements from the minerals with minimum radiological impact to health and environment.

  5. Building EOS capability for Malaysia - the options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subari, M. D.; Hassan, A.

    2014-06-01

    Earth observation satellite (EOS) is currently a major tool to monitor earth dynamics and increase human understanding of earth surface process. Since the early 80s, Malaysia has been using EOS images for various applications, such as weather forecasting, land use mapping, agriculture, environment monitoring and others. Until now, all EOS images were obtained from foreign satellite systems. Realising on the strategic need of having its own capability, Malaysia embarked into EOS development programs in the early 90s. Starting with TiungSAT-1, a micro-satellite carrying small camera, then followed by RazakSAT, a small satellite carrying 2.5 m panchromatic (PAN) medium-aperture-camera, the current satellite program development, the RazakSAT-2, designed to carry a 1.0 m high resolution PAN and 4.0m multi-spectral camera, would become a strategic initiative of the government in developing and accelerating the nation's capability in the area of satellite technology and its application. Would this effort continue until all needs of the remote sensing community being fulfilled by its own EOS? This paper will analyze the intention of the Malaysian government through its National Space Policy and other related policy documents, and proposes some policy options on this. Key factors to be considered are specific data need of the EOS community, data availability and the more subjective political motivations such as national pride.

  6. Ethnic fertility differentials in Peninsular Malaysia and Singapore.

    PubMed

    Saw, S H

    1990-01-01

    Differences in fertility between the three major ethnic groups (Malays, Chinese and Indians) in Peninsular Malaysia and Singapore have existed since before the onset of fertility decline in the late 1950s and remain today, although the relative positions and the actual differences have changed due to the varying rates of decline. By 1987, the Malays experienced the highest fertility and the Chinese the lowest in both countries but in Singapore the Malay fertility was lower than the Chinese fertility in Peninsular Malaysia. The fertility differentials will lead to changes in the ethnic composition in both countries but more so in Peninsular Malaysia.

  7. The Lunar Highland Crust: The Origin of the MG Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. R.; Norman, M. D.; Esat, T.

    1993-07-01

    Norites, troctolites, dunites, spinel troctolites and gabbronorites form the Mg suite, which constitutes perhaps 20% of the highland crust. Their ages range from about 4.43 b.y. down to about 4.17 b.y. The Mg suite does not appear to be related to crystallization from the magma ocean. These rock types commonly have Mg# > 90 and so are "primitive," but also contain high concentrations of incompatible elements, typical of highly "evolved" igneous rocks. An origin by mixing of these two distinct components, one "primitive" to account for the major elements (particularly the high Mg#), and the other "evolved" to account for the high trace-element abundances, is suggested by these contradictory petrochemical characteristics. The source of the highly evolved trace-element component is clearly KREEP. The source of the "primitive" Mg-rich component is less clear. Many theories propose that the Mg-suite rocks are derived from different plutons that intruded the crust as separate igneous intrusions. However, all Mg-suite rocks have REE patterns parallel to those of KREEP and the ferroan anorthosites. This characteristic is compatible with mixing, but should not be expected to be duplicated in many separate igneous intrusions. The Mg suite also contains Mg-rich orthopyroxene, a mineral lacking in most mare basalts, so that the source regions of the mare basalts were distinct from those of the Mg suite. During crystallization of the lunar magma ocean, Mg-rich minerals accumulate on the bottom of the magma chamber at depths probably exceeding 400 km. It has been suggested that massive overturning of the crystal pile has occurred to bring these Mg-rich minerals close to the surface. The source regions of the mare basalts were solid by 4400 m.y. with only the minor KREEP component remaining liquid until about 4360 m.y. Thus the lunar interior was effectively solid, although still hot, at the time of the formation of the Mg suite. It thus seems difficult to envisage a massive

  8. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF A MACROINVERTEBRATE BIOTIC INTEGRITY INDEX (MBII) FOR REGIONALLY ASSESSING MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The multimetric Macroinvertebrate Biotic Integrity Index (MBII) was developed from data collected at 574 wadeable stream reaches in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands region (MAHR) by the USEPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP). Over 100 candidate metrics were eval...

  9. Supporting Effective Feed-in Tariff Development in Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    2016-04-01

    Since 2011, Malaysia's overarching policy framework for clean energy development, the New Energy Policy, has led to significant deployment of renewable energy and energy efficiency. Building on the New Energy Policy, Malaysia mandated adoption of a renewable energy feed-in tariff (FiT) mechanism under the 2011 Renewable Energy Act. In 2013, Malaysia's Sustainable Energy Development Authority partnered with the Clean Energy Solutions Center and the Clean Energy Regulators Initiative (CERI), via the Ask an Expert service, to implement FiT policies and expand renewable energy development. Through collaboration between the government of Malaysia and the Clean Energy Solutions Center, concrete policy action was supported and implemented, building a strong framework to expand and catalyze clean energy development.

  10. Sexuality education in Malaysia: perceived issues and barriers by professionals.

    PubMed

    Khalaf, Zahra Fazli; Low, Wah Yun; Merghati-Khoei, Effat; Ghorbani, Behzad

    2014-07-01

    This research explored the perspectives of Malaysian professionals on the issues and barriers affecting the implementation of sexuality education in Malaysia. This qualitative study involved in-depth interviews with 15 key professionals working in the field of sexuality and reproductive health in Malaysia. Thematic analysis was selected to analyze data. Barriers to sexuality education were perceived from 5 aspects: feasibility, acceptability, accountability, strategies, and community unawareness. Respondents believed that implementing national sexuality education is a time-consuming project. They regarded Malaysian multicultural society as a barrier to national sexuality education, and they believed that school-based sexuality education is not easily accomplished in Malaysia; also abstinence-only policy restricts the access of young people to accurate information. Lack of community involvement was perceived as a key concern to sexuality education. Campaigning to promote awareness of families, teachers, community leaders, and policy makers are recommended to help establishing national sexuality education in Malaysia.

  11. Security Options for Malaysia in the 1990s.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-08

    The British decision provoked fears in Malaysia concerning security. A series of Five Power Conferences involving Britain, Australia, New Zealand ...23 December 1986, New Zealand announced the phasing out of its infantry battalion from Singapore. Malaysia and Singapore expressed that the withdrawal...signalled a lack of confidence in the region and would have destabilizing effects.2 8 New Zealand firmly believes that its future defence policies

  12. Trends in sustainable landfilling in Malaysia, a developing country.

    PubMed

    Fauziah, S H; Agamuthu, P

    2012-07-01

    In Malaysia, landfills are being filled up rapidly due to the current daily generation of approximately 30,000 tonnes of municipal solid waste. This situation creates the crucial need for improved landfilling practices, as sustainable landfilling technology is yet to be achieved here. The objective of this paper is to identify and evaluate the development and trends in landfilling practices in Malaysia. In 1970, the disposal sites in Malaysia were small and prevailing waste disposal practices was mere open-dumping. This network of relatively small dumps, typically located close to population centres, was considered acceptable for a relatively low population of 10 million in Malaysia. In the 1980s, a national programme was developed to manage municipal and industrial wastes more systematically and to reduce adverse environmental impacts. The early 1990s saw the privatization of waste management in many parts of Malaysia, and the establishment of the first sanitary landfills for MSW and an engineered landfill (called 'secure landfill' in Malaysia) for hazardous waste. A public uproar in 2007 due to contamination of a drinking water source from improper landfilling practices led to some significant changes in the government's policy regarding the country's waste management strategy. Parliament passed the Solid Waste and Public Cleansing Management (SWPCM) Act 2007 in August 2007. Even though the Act is yet to be implemented, the government has taken big steps to improve waste management system further. The future of the waste management in Malaysia seems somewhat brighter with a clear waste management policy in place. There is now a foundation upon which to build a sound and sustainble waste management and disposal system in Malaysia.

  13. Motorcycle safety programmes in Malaysia: how effective are they?

    PubMed

    Radin Umar, R S

    2006-06-01

    This paper presents the approach taken by the Malaysian Government to contain motorcycle casualties in Malaysia. It involves the exposure control, crash prevention, behaviour modification and injury control related to humans, vehicles and the environment based on pre-crash, crash and post-crash scenarios of motorcycle accidents. These initiatives emanated mainly from the research and development carried out by the Road Safety Research Centre at Universiti Putra Malaysia. Recent outcomes from these initiatives are presented and their impact is highlighted.

  14. Determinant of securitization asset pricing in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakri, M. H.; Ali, R.; Ismail, S.; Sufian, F.; Baharom, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Malaysian firms have been reported involve in Asset Back Securities since 1986s where Cagamas is a pioneer. This research aims to examine the factor influencing primary market spread. Least square method and regression analysis are applied for the study period 2004-2012. The result shows one determinants in internal regression model and three determinants in external regression influence or contribute to the primary market spread and are statistically significant in developing the securitization in Malaysia. It can be concluded that transaction size significantly contribute to the determinant primary market spread in internal regression model while liquidity, transaction size and crisis is significant in both regression model. From five hypotheses, three hypotheses support that the determinants have a relationship with primary market spread.

  15. Accident characteristics of injured motorcyclists in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Pang, T Y; Umar, R S; Azhar, A A; Ahmad, M M; Nasir, M T; Harwant, S

    2000-03-01

    This study examines the accident characteristics of injured motorcyclists in Malaysia. The aim of this study is to identify the characteristics of motorcyclists who are at higher fatality risk and subsequently be the targeted group for the fatality-reduction countermeasures. A total of 412 motorcycle crash victims with serious or fatal injuries were analysed. The results showed that the injured motorcyclists were predominant young, novice riders of less than 3 years licensure and male. A fatal outcome was more likely to be associated with a larger engine capacity motorcycle, collision with a heavy vehicle, head on collision, and collision at a non-junction road. In contrast, a non-fatal outcome was more likely to be associated with a small engine capacity motorcycle, collision with another motorcycle or passenger car, junction accidents, and side or rear collisions.

  16. Mineralogy, petrology and chemistry of ANT-suite rocks from the lunar highlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinz, M.; Keil, K.

    1977-01-01

    Anorthositic-noritic-troctolitic (ANT) rocks are the oldest and most abundant rocks of the lunar surface, and comprise about 90% of the suite of the lunar highlands. Consideration is given to the mineralogy, petrology, bulk chemistry, and origin of ANT-suite rocks. Problems associated in classifying and labeling lunar highland rocks because of textural complexities occurring from impact modifications are discussed. The mineralogy of ANT-suite rocks, dominated by plagioclase, olivine and pyrozene, and containing various minor minerals, is outlined. The petrology of ANT-suite rocks is reviewed along with the major element bulk composition of these rocks, noting that they are extremely depleted in K2O and P2O5. Various models describing the origin of ANT-suite rocks are summarized, and it is suggested that this origin involves a parental liquid of high-alumina basalt with low Fe/Fe+Mg.

  17. Fieldpath Lunar Meteorite Graves Nunataks 06157, a Magnesian Piece of the Lunar Highlands Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, Ryan A.; Korotev, R. L.; Korotev, R. L.

    2012-01-01

    To date, 49 feldspathic lunar meteorites (FLMs) have been recovered, likely representing a minimum of 35 different sample locations in the lunar highlands. The compositional variability among FLMs far exceeds the variability observed among highland samples in the Apollo and Luna sample suites. Here we will discuss in detail one of the compositional end members of the FLM suite, Graves Nunataks (GRA) 06157, which was collected by the 2006-2007 ANSMET field team. At 0.79 g, GRA 06157 is the smallest lunar meteorite so far recovered. Despite its small size, its highly feldspathic and highly magnesian composition are intriguing. Although preliminary bulk compositions have been reported, thus far no petrographic descriptions are in the literature. Here we expand upon the bulk compositional data, including major-element compositions, and provide a detailed petrographic description of GRA 06157.

  18. Complications of bush thoracotomy in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Wallace, J; Tharion, J

    1995-03-01

    Bush thoracotomy is still practised in the South Western Highlands of Papua New Guinea, by traditional bush doctors. These bush thoracotomies are performed with the aim of letting out the 'bad blood' that is believed to have collected in the body cavities following injuries. During a 3 year period between 1989 and 1992, 183 patients with complications of bush thoracotomy were treated at the Sopas Hospital in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea. Of these patients, 55 had chest wall infections only, without any pleural involvement. Of the patients with empyemas, 14 were treated by decortication of the empyema with one death and all remaining patients were treated by drainage procedures with one death. We recommend early treatment by adequate drainage of the empyema and, where feasible, early decortication. Continuing education to eradicate the procedure, and provision of adequate surgical facilities for management of complications, should be the long-term aim for this continuing problem.

  19. Water security and its challenges for Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, M. A.; Nor, M. A. M.; P, Leong Y.

    2013-06-01

    Water Security in Malaysia is a national issue. The Malaysian water services industry faces issues which need to be tackled immediately for it to be viable and sustainable. Among them are the decentralized water services sector, ineffective governance structure, unsustainable tariffs, huge investments required to develop the water supply and sewerage infrastructure, inefficient operation by the operators and high non-revenue water (NRW) losses. In Malaysia, the "Sectorial" approach embedded in the present water management system and its transformation towards "Integrated Water Resources Management" (IWRM), is still in a state of inertia. This paper presents the need to transform, from a "Supply" Management mode (a characteristic of a developing country) to a "Water Demand" Management mode (a characteristic of a developed country). Issues on "Water Demand" Management for the Environment which can be a threat to the need for sustainable development for biodiversity are highlighted here. Reliable water accounting systems are found still lacking in this country, especially in the Agriculture and Environmental Sectors, where figures are still highly based on "traditional" assumptions. Water Quality deterioration remains an issue especially for the Water Supply and Environment Sectors. Available surface water resource is depleting in many regions and states in the Peninsular. Apart from the Reduce, Reuse and Recycle (3R) option for surface water, another option would be to begin a concerted effort for groundwater exploitation. However there are still grey areas of knowledge in the groundwater resources in this country for affirmative decisions and development of appropriate policies. It is also found that, there are no concerted plans to prepare the public for the change from "Supply" Management to "Demand" Management. In a developed nation, this change is through stakeholder platforms and supported by appropriate policies, rules and regulations that are based on

  20. The medical auxiliary in rural Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chen, P C

    1973-05-05

    One of the steps taken by the government to break the cycle of poverty and ill-health in rural Malaysia is the establishment of a rural health service. Initially, the health unit served 50,000 people; it consisted of 1 main health center; 4 health subcenters, and 20 midwife stations. By the end of 1970, 44 main health centers, 180 health subcenters, and 943 midwife stations were in operation, creating a great demand for all types of health personnel: professional, paramedical, and auxiliary. Doctors are unevenly distributed in West Malaysia: in urban areas, the ratio of doctors to population is 1 to 1500; in rural areas, the ratio is 1 to 25,000. Paramedicals are unevenly distributed too. The scarcity of professionals in rural areas is attributed to professionals' demand for high salaries and the corresponding requirement of professional and social settings which rural areas cannot provide. The rural health unit utilized the tiered pyramidal system for staffing, with heavy reliance on auxiliary personnel. This system enabled the rapid expansion of rural health services, helping reach over a third of the population in just 15 years. As a consequence, infant, toddler and maternal mortality rates declined substantially. Traditional birth attendants, or kampong bidans, are currently being trained, on an experimental basis, simple principles of hygiene and family planning. With the enforcement of the Midwives Act in 1971, indigenous midwives have not been permitted to register as legitimate midwives and are now subject to supervision by health authorities. Future plans include retraining single-purpose midwives in child health and nursing, and giving all assistant nurses midwifery training. The aim is to make these 2 auxiliaries multipurpose community nurse-midwives. Experiences of developed countries show that demand for auxiliaries will continue to increase with the growth of professional personnel.

  1. Patients’ beliefs about generic medicines in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Zhi Y.; Hassali, Mohamed A.; Alrasheedy, Alian A.; Saleem, Fahad; Yahaya, Abdul H.; Aljadhey, Hisham

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acceptance of generic medicines by patients is an essential factor given that they are the end users of these medicines. In fact, adequate knowledge and positive perceptions are prerequisite to patients’ acceptance and use of generic medicines. Objective: To assess the current belief and views of patients about generic medicines in Malaysia. Method: This was a self-administered questionnaire-based study. The study was conducted with patients visiting outpatient pharmacy department at a tertiary care hospital in Malaysia. The Malaysian version of Generic Medicines Scale (GMS) was used. The GMS consists of two subscales: efficacy and similarity of generic medicines to original brand medicines. The efficacy subscale consists of 10 items while the similarity subscale consists of 6 items. The responses to the items were framed as a five-point Likert scale (1=strongly disagree to 5=strongly agree). Results: A total of 202 out of 300 patients participated in the study, giving a response rate of 67.3%. In this study, only 49% of them (n=99) knew the term ‘generic medicine’. Moreover, only 53.5% of the respondents (n=108) believed that the efficacy of generic medicines was the same as original brand medicines. In terms of quality, only 44% of the respondents (n=89) disagreed that generic medicines were of a lower quality. About one third (n=65, 32.2%) believed that generic medicines were cheaper because they were less efficacious. In terms of side effects, 44.5% of the respondents (n=90) believed that generic medicines had the same side effect profile as original brand medicines. Conclusions: The study finding showed that almost half of the respondents had negative belief in generic medicines. Similarly, many patients were not aware of the similarities and differences between generic and original brand medicines. Therefore, there is a need to provide patients with adequate information about generic medicines. PMID:25580171

  2. Molecular typing of Sporothrix schenckii isolates from cats in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Kano, Rui; Okubo, Miki; Siew, Han Hock; Kamata, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko

    2015-04-01

    Epidemiological data on the aetiologic agents of feline sporotrichosis in Malaysia have not been reported, though human sporotrichosis in Malaysia is reported to be transmitted primarily via cat scratch. To the best of our knowledge, the present report is the first study of the molecular epidemiology of Sporothrix schenckii isolates from cats with sporotrichosis in Malaysia. In the present work, we characterised 18 clinical isolates from cats in Malaysia based on molecular properties, including sequence analyses of the calmodulin gene and the rDNA ITS region and selective PCR of mating type (MAT) loci. In this study, isolates from feline sporotrichosis were identified as a S. schenckii sensu stricto by sequence analyses of the calmodulin gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. Notably, phylogenetic analysis of the ITS confirmed assignment to clinical clade D (and not C) of S. schenckii sensu stricto. Therefore, clinical clade D of S. schenckii sensu stricto appeared to be the prevailing source of feline sporotrichosis in Malaysia. The ratio of MAT1-1-1:MAT1-2-1 in these Malaysian isolates was found to be 1 : 0. This result suggested that a clonal strain of S. schenckii is the prevailing causative agent of feline sporotrichosis in Malaysia.

  3. Review of air pollution and health impacts in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Afroz, Rafia; Hassan, Mohd Nasir; Ibrahim, Noor Akma

    2003-06-01

    In the early days of abundant resources and minimal development pressures, little attention was paid to growing environmental concerns in Malaysia. The haze episodes in Southeast Asia in 1983, 1984, 1991, 1994, and 1997 imposed threats to the environmental management of Malaysia and increased awareness of the environment. As a consequence, the government established Malaysian Air Quality Guidelines, the Air Pollution Index, and the Haze Action Plan to improve air quality. Air quality monitoring is part of the initial strategy in the pollution prevention program in Malaysia. Review of air pollution in Malaysia is based on the reports of the air quality monitoring in several large cities in Malaysia, which cover air pollutants such as Carbon monoxide (CO), Sulphur Dioxide (SO2), Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2), Ozone (O3), and Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM). The results of the monitoring indicate that Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) and Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) are the predominant pollutants. Other pollutants such as CO, O(x), SO2, and Pb are also observed in several big cities in Malaysia. The air pollution comes mainly from land transportation, industrial emissions, and open burning sources. Among them, land transportation contributes the most to air pollution. This paper reviews the results of the ambient air quality monitoring and studies related to air pollution and health impacts.

  4. The vernon supersuite: Mesoproterozoic A-type granitoid rocks in the New Jersey highlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Volkert, R.A.; Drake, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    Abundant Mesoproterozoic A-type granitoid rocks of two intrusive suites underlie approximately 50 percent of the New Jersey Highlands. These rocks, the Byram Intrusive and Lake Hopatcong Intrusive Suites, consist of granite, alaskite, quartz monzonite, monzonite, and minor pegmatite. Byram and Lake Hopatcong rocks, although different mineralogically, are similar geochemically and contain overlapping abundances of most major and trace elements. Petrographic relationships, geochronology, field relationships, and geochemical similarities support a comagmatic origin for both suites. They constitute the here named Vernon Supersuite.

  5. Cosmogenic nuclide evidence for low weathering and denudation in the wet, tropical highlands of Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Hewawasam, Tilak; Kubik, Peter W.

    2004-09-01

    Some of the lowest weathering and erosion rates in any mountain range in the world have been measured using cosmogenic nuclides in the steep, humid, tropical highlands of Sri Lanka. The total preanthropogenic denudation rates were measured in creek sediments and soil samples from unperturbed rain forest sites, bedrock from mountain crests, and bedrock from inselbergs. Denudation rates are in the range of 5-30 t km-2 yr-1 (2-11 mm ky-1). These rates average denudation over the last 50-250 ky. Weathering exports in rivers draining the mountainous Central Highlands show that silicate weathering rates are also low, varying from 5 to 20 t km-2 yr-1 today (2-7 mm ky-1), but they represent a significant fraction of the total denudation. All these observations run contrary to the conventional geomorphologic and geochemical wisdom that would predict rapid erosion for highlands of high relief, temperatures, and precipitation. We speculate that the high relief in Sri Lanka represents the remnant of a geomorphic block that was uplifted during rifting at 130 Ma or even earlier and that was reduced to the interior of the island by rapid receding of escarpments after continental breakup. It is possible that throughout this history, hillslopes, where not exposing bare bedrock, were protected by thick weathered profiles. Such clay-rich layers would inhibit silicate weathering by shielding bedrock from weathering agents. In the absence of landscape rejuvenation, physical erosion rates are low, and fresh mineral surfaces are not being supplied. The observation that wet, steep, tropical highlands can have low rates of rock weathering and erosion has some potentially profound implications for the long-term controls of atmospheric CO2 budgets: High temperature and precipitation, which are much invoked though controversial agents for silicate dissolution and CO2 drawdown, become ineffective in promoting weathering in areas that are not tectonically active.

  6. Century scale climate change in the central highlands of Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J. De; J Sonnadara, D. U.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, an analysis of century scale climate trends in the central highlands of Sri Lanka is presented. Monthly rainfall and temperature records of the period 1869-2006 from five climatological stations were analyzed. The trend is calculated by the least square regression analysis and the significance of the observed trend is estimated using the Mann-Kendall statistic. The results clearly show that there is a statistically significant decrease in annual rainfall in the western slopes of the central highlands. Throughout the last century, the annual reduction of rainfall in Nuwara Eliya which is at an altitude of 1895 m was 5.2 mm/year. The decrease is largely due to the reduction in southwest monsoon rainfall which contributes to 75% of the total reduction. No significant change was observed on the eastern side of the central highlands which receives rainfall predominantly from the northeast monsoons. The mean annual temperature in the mountainous region shows a uniform increasing trend which is in line with the 100-year global temperature increase of 0.8 ± 0.2∘C. Kandy, which is at an altitude of 477 m and closely linked with the rainfall climatology of Nuwara Eliya, showed no significant change in the mean annual temperature. If the current trend continues, in another 100 years, western and eastern slopes of central highlands will receive the same amount of rainfall from the southwest monsoon and the northeast monsoon which will have far reaching consequences for Sri Lanka's economy and the ecology of the hill country.

  7. Building climate resilience in the Blue Nile/Abay Highlands: a framework for action.

    PubMed

    Simane, Belay; Zaitchik, Benjamin F; Mesfin, Desalegn

    2012-02-01

    Ethiopia has become warmer over the past century and human induced climate change will bring further warming over the next century at unprecedented rates. On the average, climate models show a tendency for higher mean annual rainfall and for wetter conditions, in particular during October, November and December, but there is much uncertainty about the future amount, distribution, timing and intensity of rainfall. Ethiopia's low level of economic development, combined with its heavy dependence on agriculture and high population growth rate make the country particularly susceptible to the adverse effects of climate change. Nearly 90% of Ethiopia's population lives in the Highlands, which include the critical Blue Nile (Abay) Highlands--a region that holds special importance due to its role in domestic agricultural production and international water resources. A five year study of climate vulnerability and adaptation strategies in communities of Choke Mountain, located in the center of the Abay Highlands, has informed a proposed framework for enhancing climate resilience in communities across the region. The framework is motivated by the critical need to enhance capacity to cope with climate change and, subsequently, to advance a carbon neutral and climate resilient economy in Ethiopia. The implicit hypothesis in applying a research framework for this effort is that science-based information, generated through improved understanding of impacts and vulnerabilities of local communities, can contribute to enhanced resilience strategies. We view adaptation to climate change in a wider context of changes, including, among others, market conditions, the political-institutional framework, and population dynamics. From a livelihood perspective, culture, historical settings, the diversity of income generation strategies, knowledge, and education are important factors that contribute to adaptive capacities. This paper reviews key findings of the Choke Mountain study, describes

  8. Population of Aedes sp in Highland of Wonosobo District and Its Competence as A Dengue Vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, Martini; Widjanarko, Bagoes; Hestiningsih, Retno; Purwantisari, Susiana; Yuliawati, Sri

    2017-02-01

    The increased cases of dengue fever have occurred in the highland of Wonosobo District, and the epidemic taken place in 2009 had 59.3 cases per 100,000 populations. This study aimed to describe of vector competence of the mosquitoes as a dengue vector in the highland of Wonosobo District, Central Java Province. The serial laboratory work was done to measure of vector competence complementary with vector bionomic study. The samples were 20 villages, which were located at Wonosobo sub district. Every village was observed about 15-20 houses. The observed variables were vector competition, bionomic and transovarial infection level, and titer of virus on the mosquitoes after injection. Immunohistochemistry or IHC methods were used to identify transovarial infection status. The number of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus were almost similar and both were found indoors or outdoors. Based on HI and OI index, the larvae density in the highland was enough high than standard of the program. Transovarial infection was found on Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus. Environment parameters such as temperature and relative humidity fulfilled the optimum requirement to support the vectors’ life cycle. Transovarial infection has been proven, thus, it indicates that the local transmission has been occurred in this area. Titer of virus was also increasing after day per day. This indicate that the mosquitoes has the ability being vector. As used to do in other area, it is important to conduct breeding places elimination (PSN) indoors as well as outdoors, through active participation of the community in highland area.

  9. Calcite-graphite thermometry of the Franklin Marble, New Jersey Highlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, W.H.; Volkert, R.A.; Meredith, M.T.; Rader, E.L.

    2006-01-01

    We present new stable-isotope data for the Mesoproterozoic Franklin Marble from outcrops along an 80-km traverse parallel to and across strike of the structural grain of the western New Jersey Highlands. Calcite and dolomite from marble have an average ??13C of 0.35??? ?? 0.73??? PDB (n = 46) and a more limited range than other Mesoproterozoic marbles from the Adirondacks and the Canadian Grenville Province. The small range of ??13C values from the New Jersey samples is consistent with the preservation of a primary marine isotopic signature and limited postdepositional isotopic modification, except proximal to Zn or Fe ore deposits and fault zones. Fractionations between calcite and well-formed graphite (??13C[Cal-Gr]) for analyzed Franklin Marble samples average 3.31???. ?? 0.25??? (n = 34), and dolomite-graphite fractionations average 3.07??? ?? 0.30??? (n = 6). Taken together, these indicate an average temperature of 769?? ?? 43??C during metamorphism associated with the Ottawan Orogeny in the New Jersey Highlands. Thus, carbon isotope fractionations demonstrate that the Franklin Marble was metamorphosed at granulite facies conditions. Metamorphic temperatures are relatively constant for the area sampled and overprint the metamorphosed carbonatehosted Zn-Fe-Mn ore deposits. The results of this study support recent work proposing that pressure and temperature conditions during Ottawan orogenesis did not vary greatly across faults that partition the Highlands into structural blocks. ?? 2006 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  10. Cuticular hydrocarbons corroborate the distinction between lowland and highland Natal fruit fly (Tephritidae, Ceratitis rosa) populations

    PubMed Central

    Vaníčková, Lucie; Břízová, Radka; Pompeiano, Antonio; Ekesi, Sunday; Meyer, Marc De

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The cuticular hydrocarbons (CHs) and morphology of two Ceratitis rosa Karsch (Diptera: Tephritidae) populations, putatively belonging to two cryptic taxa, were analysed. The chemical profiles were characterised by two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection. CHs of Ceratitis rosa that originated from the lowlands and highlands of Kenya comprised of n-alkanes, monomethylalkanes, dimethylalkanes and unsaturated hydrocarbons in the range of the carbon backbone from C14 to C37. Hydrocarbons containing C29, C31, C33 and C35 carbon atoms predominated in these two populations. 2-Methyltriacontane was the predominant compound in both populations. Quantitative differences in the distribution of hydrocarbons of different chain lengths, mainly the C22, C32, C33 and C34 compounds of these two populations, were observed despite indistinct qualitative differences in these hydrocarbons. Morphological analyses of male legs confirmed that the flies belong to different morphotypes of Ceratitis rosa previously labelled as R1 and R2 for lowland and highland populations, respectively. A statistical analysis of the CH compositions of the putative R1 and R2 species showed distinct interspecific identities, with several CHs specific for each of the lowland and highland populations. This study supports a hypothesis that the taxon Ceratitis rosa consists of at least two biological species. PMID:26798275

  11. Paraglacial fluvial bedrock incision in postglacial landscapes: the NW Scottish Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitbread, Katie; Jansen, John; Bishop, Paul; Fabel, Derek

    2010-05-01

    Glacial landscape forms are inherited by rivers following deglaciation. Hillslopes and valley floors configured by glacial erosion control the distribution of bedrock channels and potential sites for fluvial incision. The importance of 'stream power' parameters, channel slope and drainage area (discharge), in controlling the rate of incision is widely accepted, but the rate, timing and mechanisms of incision have yet to be quantified in these settings. The dual controls of glacially conditioned bedrock slopes and sediment supply set two of the key boundary conditions for temporally and spatially dynamic fluvial bedrock incision. Measurement of incision rates in these settings is key to understanding the influence of controls on fluvial erosion, and the role of the process in long-term evolution of deglaciated landscapes. In tectonically-passive, hard-rock terrains, such as the Scottish Highlands, incisional fluvial features such as bedrock channels, gorges and waterfalls are common on glacially carved valley steps. Here we report preliminary data on fluvial incision rates measured with cosmogenic 10Be. Our results confirm a postglacial age of bedrock straths in the NW Scottish Highlands and indicate a vertical incision rate of 0.3 mm/yr into resistant quartzites. Further work will explore erosion mechanisms and rates of incision across the Scottish Highlands, and assess controls on fluvial incision, including the potential role of paraglacial sediment.

  12. Characteristics of soils in selected maize growing sites along altitudinal gradients in East African highlands

    PubMed Central

    Njuguna, Elijah; Gathara, Mary; Nadir, Stanley; Mwalusepo, Sizah; Williamson, David; Mathé, Pierre-Etienne; Kimani, Jackson; Landmann, Tobias; Juma, Gerald; Ong’amo, George; Gatebe, Erastus; Ru, Bruno Le; Calatayud, Paul-andré

    2015-01-01

    Maize is the main staple crop in the East African Mountains. Understanding how the edaphic characteristics change along altitudinal gradients is important for maximizing maize production in East African Highlands, which are the key maize production areas in the region. This study evaluated and compared the levels of some macro and micro-elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na and P) and other soil parameters (pH, organic carbon content, soil texture [i.e. % Sand, % Clay and % Silt], cation exchange capacity [CEC], electric conductivity [EC], and water holding capacity [HC]). Soil samples were taken from maize plots along three altitudinal gradients in East African highlands (namely Machakos Hills, Taita Hills and Mount Kilimanjaro) characterized by graded changes in climatic conditions. For all transects, pH, Ca, K and Mg decreased with the increase in altitude. In contrast, % Silt, organic carbon content, Al and water holding capacity (HC) increased with increasing altitude. The research provides information on the status of the physical–chemical characteristics of soils along three altitudinal ranges of East African Highlands and includes data available for further research. PMID:26509187

  13. A general cratering-history model and its implications for the lunar highlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronow, A.

    1978-01-01

    Through analysis of a large number of Monte Carlo and Markov Chain simulations, a model for determining crater accumulation and crater obliteration histories has been derived. The model generally applies to populations of large craters. It predicts that the following relationships hold for subequilibrium-density crater populations: (1) the more negative the production function's exponent, alpha (N near D super alpha) the lower the crater density at which the population size-frequency distribution will significantly depart from its production function; (2) the more negative the production function's exponent, the less obliteration a crater population will sustain after a set number of impacts. Application of the model to the lunar highlands implies (1) the production function for the large craters is highly structured, resembling the observed size-frequency distribution and not the function N near D to the -2; (2) even the densely cratered highlands have not attained crater saturation or equilibrium. Direct simulations of the highlands' crater population supports the model's implications.

  14. Rust and schreibersite in Apollo 16 highland rocks - Manifestations of volatile-element mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, R. H.; Taylor, L. A.

    1982-01-01

    Rust is a manifestation of halogen and volatile-metal mobility in the lunar environment. Schreibersite is stable as the primary phosphorus-bearing phase in the highland rocks, a consequence of the inherently low oxygen fugacity within impact-generated melts. Apatite and whitlockite are subordinate in these rocks. The partitioning of P into phosphide in impact-generated melts, and the failure of phosphate to crystallize, effects a decoupling of the halogens and phosphorus. Of the Apollo 16 rocks, 63% contain rust, 70% contain schreibersite, and 52% contain both phases, thereby establishing the pervasiveness of volatile-elements throughout the highland rocks. The major portion of these volatile-bearing phases occur in impact melt-rocks or in breccia matrices. Rhabdites of schreibersite in some of the FeNi grains indicate that there is a meteoritic contribution to the phosphorus in these rocks. Cl/P2O5 ratios in lunar highland rocks are a function of secondary effects, with any apparent Cl-P correlations being coincidential. The present observations preclude the validity of models based on such elemental ratios in these rocks. The presence of rust in the clast laden matrices of pristine rocks indicates fugitive element localization. Pristine clasts may have been contaminated. The basis for a pristine volatile chemistry is questioned.

  15. Resurfacing of the Martian Highlands in the Amenthes and Tyrrhena region

    SciTech Connect

    Craddock, R.A.; Maxwell, T.A. )

    1990-08-30

    The southern cratered highlands of Mars contain a large population of flat-floored, rimless craters which have previously been interpreted to have formed by aeolian mantling or flood volcanism. Neither of these geologic processes accurately explains the observed morphology or the crater statistics. Geologic mapping in the Amenthes and Tyrrhena region indicates that craters with this morphology occur on undulating intercrater materials near the dichotomy boundary and on more rugged materials farther into the highlands containing numerous ancient valley networks. Cumulative size-frequency distribution curves indicate ages of N(5) = 790 (early to middle Noachian) and N(5) = 540 (middle Noachian) for the cratered plateau and cratered highland materials, respectively, opposite the observed stratigraphic relations. For crater diameters >16 km the population of impact craters is consistent with stratigraphy, but the population of smaller craters in the region indicates the importance of resurfacing. Superposed, fresh craters indicate a resurfacing event that ceased at N(5) = 200-250 (late Noachian to early Hesperian). Crater counts divided into 5{degree} latitudinal bins show an increase in the number of craters between the 8- and 50-km-diameter range with increasing northerly latitudes, suggesting that the resurfacing was not a single event. Statistical modelling of an erosive event capable of removing the continuous ejecta deposits from the craters, eroding them to reduce the apparent diameter, and simultaneously burying smaller eroded craters explains both the morphology of the flat-floored, rimless craters, and their population distribution.

  16. Two new species of shrews (Soricidae) from the western highlands of Guatemala

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodman, Neal

    2010-01-01

    The broad-clawed shrews (Soricomorpha: Soricidae: Cryptotis) encompass a clade of 5 species—Cryptotis alticolus (Merriam), C. goldmani (Merriam), C. goodwini Jackson, C. griseoventris Jackson, and C. peregrinus (Merriam)—that is known collectively as the Cryptotis goldmani group and is characterized by broadened forefeet, elongated and broadened fore claws, and broadened humeri. These shrews are distributed in highland regions from central Mexico to Honduras. Two broad-clawed shrews, C. goodwini and C. griseoventris, occur in southern Mexico and Guatemala and are presumed sister species whose primary distinguishing feature is the larger size of C. goodwini. In an investigation of variation within and between these 2 species, I studied characteristics of the postcranial skeleton. Statistical analyses of a variety of character suites indicate that the forelimb morphology in this group exhibits less intraspecific variation and greater interspecific variation than cranio-mandibular morphology, although most skull characters support groupings based on forelimb characters. Together, these characters define 4 distinct groups among the specimens examined. C. griseoventris is restricted to the northern highlands of Chiapas, Mexico, and C. goodwini occurs in the southern highlands of Chiapas and Guatemala. Herein, I describe 2 new species of broad-clawed shrews from the Sierra de los Cuchumatanes, Guatemala.

  17. Water balance and irrigation water pumping of Lake Merdada for potato farming in Dieng Highland, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Fadlillah, Lintang N; Widyastuti, M

    2016-08-01

    Lakes provide water resources for domestic use, livestock, irrigational use, etc. Water availability of lakes can be estimated using lake water balance. Lake water balance is calculated from the water input and output of a lake. Dieng Highland has several volcanic lakes in its surroundings. Lake Merdada in Dieng Highland has been experiencing extensive water pumping for several years more than other lakes in the surrounding area. It provides irrigation water for potato farming in Dieng Highland. The hydrological model of this lake has not been studied. The modeled water balance in this research uses primary data, i.e., bathymetric data, soil texture, and outflow discharge, as well as secondary data, i.e., rainfall, temperature, Landsat 7 ETM+ band 8 image, and land use. Water balance input components consist of precipitation on the surface area, surface (direct) runoff from the catchment area, and groundwater inflow and outflow (G net), while the output components consist of evaporation, river outflow, and irrigation. It shows that groundwater is the dominant input and output of the lake. On the other hand, the actual irrigation water pumping plays the leading role as human-induced alteration of outflow discharge. The maximum irrigation pumping modeling shows that it will decrease lake storage up to 37.14 % per month and may affect the ecosystem inside the lake.

  18. Global occurrence trend of high-Ca pyroxene on lunar highlands and its implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, S.; Nakamura, R.; Matsunaga, T.; Ogawa, Y.; Ishihara, Y.; Morota, T.; Hirata, N.; Ohtake, M.; Hiroi, T.; Yokota, Y.; Haruyama, J.

    2015-05-01

    We present details of the global distribution of high-Ca pyroxene (HCP)-rich sites in the lunar highlands based on the global data set of hyperspectral reflectance obtained by the SELENE Spectral Profiler. Most HCP-rich sites in the lunar highlands are found at fresh impact craters. In each crater, most of the detection points are distributed on the ejecta, rim, and floor of the impact craters rather than the central peaks, while the central peaks are dominated by purest anorthosite (PAN). This indicates that HCP-rich materials originate from relatively shallower regions of the lunar crust than PAN. In addition, while all ray craters with sizes larger than ˜40 km possess HCP-rich materials, small fresh craters with sizes less than ˜6-10 km do not, indicating that the uppermost mixing layers in the lunar crust are not dominated by HCP. Based on these results, we propose that in the upper lunar crust, a HCP-rich zone overlying the PAN layer exists below the uppermost mixing layer. This HCP-rich zone may originate from interstitial melt during the formation of the flotation anorthositic cumulate, while an impact ejecta origin, impact melt origin, and/or magmatic intrusion into the upper lunar crust may also account for the occurrence of HCP-rich sites in the highlands.

  19. Procrustean science - Indigenous siderophiles in the lunar highlands, according to Delano and Ringwood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, E.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to show that Delano and Ringwood (1978) reached the conclusion that the siderophiles in the lunar highlands are mainly of indigenous rather than meteoric origin by stretching and chopping the evidence to fit a preconceived mold. In determining the abundance of siderophiles and volatiles in the lunar highlands, Delano and Ringwood rejected evidence supplied by pristine rocks uncontaminated by meteoric debris, on the basis that these rocks are impact melts. It is argued that there is no evidence that complete melting and slow freezing needed for settling of metal is ever attained in lunar impacts. Moreover, some of the meteorite-free rocks are clasts within, and hence older than the siderophile-rich breccias that Delano and Ringwood consider more pristine. If one uses the pristine highland rocks to determine an indigenous component, no problems with enrichment of Zn, Ge, As, Ag, Sb, and Au in the indigenous component relative to mare basalts are encountered, since the pristine rocks show no significant enrichment in these elements.

  20. Agaricus section Arvenses: three new species in highland subtropical Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Gui, Yang; Zhu, Guo-S; Callac, Philippe; Hyde, Kevin-D; Parra, Luis-A; Chen, Jie; Yang, Tong-J; Huang, Wan-B; Gong, Guang-L; Liu, Zuo-Y

    2015-03-01

    Agaricus is a genus of saprobic basidiomycetes with more than 400 species recognized worldwide, with about 50 species known in China. Our objective was to investigate three new species of section Arvenses in highland subtropical Southwest China. Agaricus guizhouensis is a new species characterized by a white pileus with yellowish squamules, small ellipsoid spores and cheilocystidia with yellowish-brown pigments; another new species, Agaricus longistipes is recognized by its slender stipe, and its elongate-ellipsoid basidiospores; the third new one, Agaricus megalocarpus is remarkable by its large size and its pileus surface covered with fine brown squamules. It is firstly reported for Guizhou Province that Agaricus abruptibulbus, Agaricus flocculosipes, and Agaricus subrufescens are illustrated. Two probable new species require further studying. A phylogenetic analyses of rDNA-ITS sequence data belonging to section Arvenses showed that the section Arvenses is monophyletic and can be subdivided in five branches, the branch of A. subrufescens and four clades (A-D). The eight species from highland subtropical Southwest China were distributed in all five branches, indicating that this highland is at the climatic crossroads. The white pileus trait and the potential interest are discussed. These data suggest a potential species richness that remains to be discovered.

  1. Magnesian anorthosites from the western highlands of the Moon: Isotope geochemistry and petrogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Gregory A.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Halliday, Alex N.

    1993-01-01

    Breccias from the Apollo 14 landing site have provided a wealth of information on the genesis of the lunar highlands. Various pristine rock-types have been discovered in relative abundance including rare ferroan anorthosites and alkali-suite and magnesian-suite rocks. Mineral-chemical and radiogenic isotopic data are reported here for a newly discovered Mg-suite anorthosite from Apollo 14, sample 14303,347. Meyer et al. reported U-Pb zircon analyses of Mg-suite highlands rocks from the western limb of the Moon. We have compiled these ages and generated a weighted average age of 4211 = 6 Ma; some 200 Ma younger than ferroan anorthosites. Utilizing this age for Mg-anorthosite 14303,347, our data results in an initial epsilon(sub Nd) value of -1.0 and initial Sr-87/Sr-86 of 0.69915. Based on trace-element, isotopic, and mineral-chemical data, the western highlands Mg-suite is interpreted to be crustal precipitates of a picritic magma, which assimilated KREEPy trapped liquid from upper-mantle cumulates during its transport to the crust.

  2. Development of Lunar Highland REgolith Simulants, NU-LHT-1M,-2M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeser, D. B.; Wilson, S. A.; Fikes, J.; McLemore, C.; Rickman, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    As part of a collaborative agreement between the U.S, Geological Survey (USGS) and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) lunar highland simulants are being produced to support engineers and scientists in developing the technologies required to put a base on the moon by 2024. Two simulants have been produced to date: NU-LHT-1M and -2M (NASA/USGS-Lunar Highlands Type-l & 2 Medium-grained). Using starting material chiefly collected from the Stillwater Mine, Nye, MT, blending protocols were developed based on normative mineralogy calculated from average chemistry, for the Apollo 16 regolith. New technologies using a high temperature remotely coupled plasma melter were developed to generate both high quality and agglutinitic glasses that simulate the glassy components of the regolith. Detailed chemical, mineralogical and physical properties analysis of NU-LHT-1M indicate that it is overall a good surrogate for highlands lunar regolith (our new simulant LHT-2M has not be analyzed yet). The primary difference between 1M and 2M was the inclusion of trace mineralogy (phosphates and sulfide). Plans will also be presented on the future direction of the simulant project.

  3. Dr Roger McNeill and public health in the Highlands and islands of Scotland.

    PubMed

    Sheets, J W

    2011-12-01

    Roger McNeill was born in 1853 on Colonsay in the Inner Hebrides, the son of a cattle herder. He graduated with a degree in medicine from Edinburgh University, where he studied with Joseph Lister, among others. After working in London during a smallpox epidemic, he received a gold medal and honours for his M.D. thesis in 1881. McNeill returned to Scotland as the Resident Medical Officer at Gesto Hospital on the Isle of Skye. From there, he launched and published the first statistical research about the health of Highland crofters. His was an illustrious yet understated career in public health: he was the first president of the Caledonian Medical Society (1881-82), he earned a Diploma in Public Health from Cambridge University (1889), he was the first Medical Officer of Health for Argyll (1890-1924), wrote The Prevention of Epidemics and the Construction and Management of Isolation Hospitals (1894), and was the first witness before Parliament's Dewar Committee in Oban in 1912. McNeill and other members of the Caledonian Medical Society testified about medical services in remote Scotland, encouraging a revolution in healthcare throughout the Highlands and Islands. The committee's report led to the foundation of the Highlands and Islands Medical Service, a forerunner of the National Health Service established in 1948.

  4. Thorium concentrations in the lunar surface. V - Deconvolution of the central highlands region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, A. E.; Etchegaray-Ramirez, M. I.; Haines, E. L.

    1982-01-01

    The distribution of thorium in the lunar central highlands measured from orbit by the Apollo 16 gamma-ray spectrometer is subjected to a deconvolution analysis to yield improved spatial resolution and contrast. Use of two overlapping data fields for complete coverage also provides a demonstration of the technique's ability to model concentrations several degrees beyond the data track. Deconvolution reveals an association between Th concentration and the Kant Plateau, Descartes Mountain and Cayley plains surface formations. The Kant Plateau and Descartes Mountains model with Th less than 1 part per million, which is typical of farside highlands but is infrequently seen over any other nearside highland portions of the Apollo 15 and 16 ground tracks. It is noted that, if the Cayley plains are the result of basin-forming impact ejecta, the distribution of Th concentration with longitude supports an origin from the Imbrium basin rather than the Nectaris or Orientale basins. Nectaris basin materials are found to have a Th concentration similar to that of the Descartes Mountains, evidence that the latter may have been emplaced as Nectaris basin impact deposits.

  5. Kodamaea transpacifica f.a., sp. nov., a yeast species isolated from ephemeral flowers and insects in the Galapagos Islands and Malaysia: further evidence for ancient human transpacific contacts.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Larissa F D; Carvajal Barriga, Enrique Javier; Barahona, Patricia Portero; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A

    2013-11-01

    Twenty-four yeast strains were isolated from ephemeral flowers of Ipomoea spp. and Datura sp. and their associated insects in the Galápagos Archipelago, Ecuador, and from Ipomoea spp. and associated insects in the Cameron Highlands, Malaysia. Sequences of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit rRNA gene indicated that these strains belong to a novel yeast species of the Kodamaea clade, although the formation of ascospores was not observed. The closest relative is Candida restingae. The human-mediated dispersion of this species by transpacific contacts in ancient times is suggested. The name Kodamaea transpacifica f.a., sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate these isolates. The type strain is CLQCA-24i-070(T) ( = CBS 12823(T) = NCYC 3852(T)); MycoBank number MB 803609.

  6. Bahasa Indonesia and Bahasa Malaysia--Parallel Development of Language Siblings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bostock, William

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the historical development of Bahasa Indonesia, the official language of the Republic of Indonesia, and Bahasa Malaysia, the official language of the Federation of Malaysia. (30 references) (Author/CK)

  7. Remote sensing for studying atmospheric aerosols in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanniah, Kasturi D.; Kamarul Zaman, Nurul A. F.

    2015-10-01

    The aerosol system is Southeast Asia is complex and the high concentrations are due to population growth, rapid urbanization and development of SEA countries. Nevertheless, only a few studies have been carried out especially at large spatial extent and on a continuous basis to study atmospheric aerosols in Malaysia. In this review paper we report the use of remote sensing data to study atmospheric aerosols in Malaysia and document gaps and recommend further studies to bridge the gaps. Satellite data have been used to study the spatial and seasonal patterns of aerosol optical depth (AOD) in Malaysia. Satellite data combined with AERONET data were used to delineate different types and sizes of aerosols and to identify the sources of aerosols in Malaysia. Most of the aerosol studies performed in Malaysia was based on station-based PM10 data that have limited spatial coverage. Thus, satellite data have been used to extrapolate and retrieve PM10 data over large areas by correlating remotely sensed AOD with ground-based PM10. Realising the critical role of aerosols on radiative forcing numerous studies have been conducted worldwide to assess the aerosol radiative forcing (ARF). Such studies are yet to be conducted in Malaysia. Although the only source of aerosol data covering large region in Malaysia is remote sensing, satellite observations are limited by cloud cover, orbital gaps of satellite track, etc. In addition, relatively less understanding is achieved on how the atmospheric aerosol interacts with the regional climate system. These gaps can be bridged by conducting more studies using integrated approach of remote sensing, AERONET and ground based measurements.

  8. Rural poverty and development in West Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Peacock, F

    1981-07-01

    Rural poverty in West Malaysia during the 1957-1970 period is examined. The period covered was 1 of a high rate of growth combined with an increasing inequality of income and worsening poverty. During the 1955-1970 period, a large amount of development funds, manpower, and expertise was directed towards a reduction of West Malaysia's rural poverty. Despite these efforts, rural poverty increased. Over the period under review, the share of income going to the richest 20% of the population increased from 50% to 56%; the share going to the middle 20% of the population remained constant at 20%; the poorest 60% of the population saw their share of income decline from 30% to 24%. The poorest 40% of the population received only 11.6% of income in 1970. They were predominantly rural, with this sector accounting for 87% of all poverty. The 3 development plans of this period set high aggregate growth rates as the primary targets and emphasized productivity and income in the rural sector. Rural development has not been sold short; the total funding figure of $2,209.46 million represents 40% of all development spending between 1956 and 1970. The money funded 3 broad areas of rural development: replanting of smallholder rubber with high-yielding clones; increasing rice production; and opening new land. The strategy has been to concentrate upon raising the yields from existing farmland and expanding into new areas of settlement. The problem of dealing with poverty in West Malaysia was made worse by the rapid rate of population increase. The population increase of 1,657,000 was absorbed into the traditional smallholder sector, very largely in exisitng areas of settlement. Over the same period, the modern sector of agriculture, the rubber estates, reduced their labor force by 30,000 as they moved into the cultivation of oil palm, a crop requiring less labor. Some of the additional agricultural workers were placed on new land under government land-development and resettlement

  9. Mixing Across a Simple Mare-Highland Contact in the Grimaldi Basin: New Insights from Clementine UV/VIS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Mustard, J. F.; He, G.

    1996-03-01

    The investigation of the composition of mare-highland boundaries carried out by Mustard et al. using multispectral images from the Galileo Solid State Imaging (SSI) instrument reveals the existence of three distinct mixing systematics across the mare-highland contacts in the region of southwestern Procellarum. The three basic types are narrow, moderate, and complex mixing gradients, and each implies a different set of fundamental processes that have contributed to the observed gradients. However, the 4 km resolution of the Galileo SSI data is too low to critically evaluate the exact properties of these boundaries, particularly in areas with rapidly changing abundances. The higher spatial resolution of Clementine UV/VIS data ( ~200 m/pixel, 5 filters between 0.415- 1.0 am-micrometers) allows the contact of mare-highland to be addressed in more detail. We have begun a series of studies to characterize and model mixing across mare-highland boundaries using these data, beginning with simple boundaries (sharp geologic contact, simple superposition of mare on highland). In this study, the contact between the Grimaldi mare and the highland on the southern edge is investigated through the spectral mixture analysis of Clementine UV/VIS data. Our preliminary analyses reveals the boundary consists of three mixing zones: moderate, steep, and moderate. The moderate zones on the mare and highland sides of the contact are approximately 30km wide, while the steep zone is ~6-8 km wide. We are currently examining other such simple boundaries to determine if the physical dimensions and properties are consistent across the moon, and thus a chracteristic properties of simple boundaries.

  10. A View into Successful Teaching Techniques: Teaching Malay Language as a Foreign Language in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baharudin, Mazlina; Sadik, Azlina Md

    2016-01-01

    This paper will highlight successful teaching techniques used in class in teaching the Malay Language 1 course in Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM). The course is to equip foreign students for their studies and also as means of basic communication with the locals in Malaysia. In Malaysia, the emphasis in Malay language teaching are focused to…

  11. 78 FR 35643 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... COMMISSION Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam..., Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam of frozen warmwater shrimp, provided for in subheadings 0306.17.00, 1605.21... found to be subsidized by the Governments of China, India, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam and that...

  12. 75 FR 64778 - Request for Comments on Negotiating Objectives With Respect to Malaysia's Participation in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... Malaysia's participation in the ongoing negotiations of a Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade agreement, and notice of public hearing. SUMMARY: The United States intends to commence negotiations with Malaysia as part of the ongoing negotiations of a TPP trade agreement. Including Malaysia in the...

  13. 75 FR 36679 - Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From China, Malaysia, and Thailand; Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... COMMISSION Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From China, Malaysia, and Thailand; Determinations On the basis...)), that revocation of the antidumping duty orders on polyethylene retail carrier bags from China, Malaysia... Publication 4160 (June 2010), entitled Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags from China, Malaysia, and...

  14. History of neurosciences at the School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Idris, Badrisyah; Sayuti, Sani; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2007-02-01

    Universiti Sains Malaysia is the only institution in Malaysia which incorporates all fields of the neurosciences under one roof. The integration of basic and clinical neurosciences has made it possible for this institution to become an excellent academic and research centre. This article describes the history, academic contributions and scientific progress of neurosciences at Universiti Sains Malaysia.

  15. Changing State-University Relations: The Experiences of Japan and Lessons for Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirat, Morshidi; Kaur, Sarjit

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the changing state-university relations in Japan and Malaysia. Its main objective is to identify and examine possible lessons for Malaysia, based on the Japanese experience. Notably, since the late 1970s, Malaysia has been looking towards Japan as a model for socio-economic development (the "look-east" Policy)…

  16. 78 FR 62583 - Welded Stainless Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... International Trade Administration Welded Stainless Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and the Socialist... stainless pressure pipe from Malaysia, Thailand, and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam.\\1\\ The notice of... Welded Stainless Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam:...

  17. 78 FR 35253 - Welded Stainless Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... International Trade Administration Welded Stainless Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and the Socialist... stainless pressure pipe (welded stainless pipe) from Malaysia, Thailand, and the Socialist Republic of... Imposition of Antidumping Duties on Imports of Welded Stainless Pressure Pipe from Malaysia, Thailand,...

  18. Impacts of Institutional Characteristics on International Students' Choice of Private Higher Education Institutions in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Migin, Melissa W.; Falahat, Mohammad; Yajid, Mohd Shukri Ab; Khatibi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, Malaysia has witnessed an influx of foreign students in the local higher education institutions with the aggressive support from the Malaysian government to build Malaysia as the educational hub within the region. This is in line with Malaysia's aspiration to be a global education hub by year 2020. Besides the country level…

  19. Cross-Cultural Perspectives in Counseling: Mental Health Conceptions in Malaysia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohamed, Othman

    The general societal pattern in Malaysia is reflected by the distinct multi-racial composition of the population, comprised of Malays, Chinese, and Indians. In Malaysia, ethnicity determines the varied differences in the socio-cultural and religious diversity of the population. Organized modern medical services have existed in Malaysia since…

  20. Sustainable WEE management in Malaysia: present scenarios and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaul Hasan Shumon, Md; Ahmed, S.

    2013-12-01

    Technological advances have resulted development of a lot of electronic products for continuously increasing number of customers. As the customer taste and features of these products change rapidly, the life cycles have come down tremendously. Therefore, a large volume of e-wastes are now emanated every year. This scenario is very much predominant in Malaysia. On one hand e-wastes are becoming environmental hazards and affecting the ecological imbalance. On the other, these wastes are remaining still economically valuable. In Malaysia, e-waste management system is still in its nascent state. This paper describes the current status of e-waste generation and recycling and explores issues for future e-waste management system in Malaysia from sustainable point of view. As to draw some factual comparisons, this paper reviews the e-waste management system in European Union, USA, Japan, as a benchmark. Then it focuses on understanding the Malaysian culture, consumer discarding behavior, flow of the materials in recycling, e-waste management system, and presents a comparative view with the Swiss e-waste system. Sustainable issues for e-waste management in Malaysia are also presented. The response adopted so far in collection and recovery activities are covered in later phases. Finally, it investigates the barriers and challenges of e-waste system in Malaysia.

  1. Analysis of lead content in herbal preparations in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ang, H H; Lee, E L; Matsumoto, K

    2003-08-01

    In Malaysia, the phase 3 registration for traditional medicines was implemented on 1 January 1992 under the Control of Drugs and Cosmetics Regulation 1984, emphasizing quality, efficacy and safety (including the detection of the presence of heavy metals) in all pharmaceutical dosage forms of traditional medicine preparations. Therefore, a total of 100 products in various pharmaceutical dosage forms of a herbal preparation, were analysed for lead content using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Results showed that 8% (eight products) possessed 10.64-20.72 ppm of lead, and therefore, do not comply with the quality requirement for traditional medicines in Malaysia. One of these products, M-Tongkat Ali (exhibited 10.64 +/-0.37 ppm of lead), was in fact already registered with the DCA Malaysia. The rest, Sukarno Tongkat Ali, Eurycoma Madu, Super Pill Tongkat Ali, Force Pill Tongkat Ali, Tender Pill Tongkat Ali, Super Pill Tongkat Ali Plus and Great Pill Tongkat Ali Plus have not registered with the DCA Malaysia and exhibited 12.24-20.72 ppm of lead. Although this study showed that only 92% of the products complied with the quality requirement for traditional medicines in Malaysia, however, they cannot be assumed safe from lead contamination because of batch-to-batch inconsistency.

  2. Policy trends of extended producer responsibility in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Agamuthu, P; Victor, Dennis

    2011-09-01

    This paper seeks to examine the provisions for extended producer responsibility (EPR) within the Malaysian environmental and waste management policies and to determine its existing practice and future prospects in Malaysia. Malaysian waste generation has been increasing drastically where solid waste generation was estimated to increase from about 9.0 million tonnes in 2000 to about 10.9 million tonnes in 2010, to about 12.8 million tonnes in 2015 and finally to about 15.6 million tonnes in 2020. Malaysian e-waste was estimated to be about 652 909 tonnes in 2006 and was estimated to increase to about 706 000 tonnes in 2010 and finally to about 1.2 million tonnes in 2020. The projected increasing generation of both solid waste and scheduled wastes is expected to burden the country's resources and environment in managing these wastes in a sustainable manner. The concept of EPR is provided for in the Malaysia waste management system via the Environmental Quality Act 1974 and the Solid Waste and Public Cleansing Management Act 2007. However, these provisions in the policy are generic in nature without relevant regulations to enable its enforcement and as such the concept of EPR still remains on paper whereas the existing practice of EPR in Malaysia is limited through voluntary participation. In conclusion, policy trends of EPR in Malaysia seem to indicate that Malaysia may be embarking on the path towards EPR through the enactment of an EPR regulation.

  3. A nonlinear model of gold production in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, Norashikin; Muda, Nora; Umor, Mohd Rozi

    2014-06-01

    Malaysia is a country which is rich in natural resources and one of it is a gold. Gold has already become an important national commodity. This study is conducted to determine a model that can be well fitted with the gold production in Malaysia from the year 1995-2010. Five nonlinear models are presented in this study which are Logistic model, Gompertz, Richard, Weibull and Chapman-Richard model. These model are used to fit the cumulative gold production in Malaysia. The best model is then selected based on the model performance. The performance of the fitted model is measured by sum squares error, root mean squares error, coefficient of determination, mean relative error, mean absolute error and mean absolute percentage error. This study has found that a Weibull model is shown to have significantly outperform compare to the other models. To confirm that Weibull is the best model, the latest data are fitted to the model. Once again, Weibull model gives the lowest readings at all types of measurement error. We can concluded that the future gold production in Malaysia can be predicted according to the Weibull model and this could be important findings for Malaysia to plan their economic activities.

  4. Malaysia urges ASEAN to tackle AIDS crisis.

    PubMed

    2000-08-07

    Urgent action is needed to fight the alarming spread of HIV/AIDS that infected 1.3 million people in Southeast Asia last year alone, Malaysia's foreign minister said July 24, 2000. Syed Hamid said the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) should tackle at regional and national level an epidemic that was taking its most drastic toll among the region's youth. "HIV/AIDS not only represents a major public health and social problem but is a serious challenge to development as well," Syed Hamid told the opening ceremony of ASEAN's 33rd annual foreign ministers' meeting. The crisis requires commitment at the "highest political level," he said, warning that HIV/AIDS could become a transnational problem within the 10-member group. Foreign ministers have recommended their leaders discuss the crisis later this year at an informal summit in Singapore and hold a summit on HIV/AIDS in conjunction with the 7th ASEAN Summit in Brunei next year. "I think people recognized the importance and the adverse impacts on our social development," Syed Hamid told reporters later. "I think it is a real issue that we cannot run away from." Among ASEAN members, Thailand, Cambodia, and Myanmar have some of the highest infection rates in Asia of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

  5. Radiological study of Mersing District, Johor, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Alajerami, Yasser; Aliyu, Abubakar Sadiq; Bt Basri, Nor Afifah

    2013-04-01

    A potential site has been selected for a nuclear power plant (NPP) in Mersing District of Malaysia. This study aims at providing the base line data of this district for the first time, in line with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for NPP sitting criteria. The mean dose rate, mean population weighted dose rate and annual effective dose are found to be 140 nGy h-1, 0.836 mSv y-1 and 0.857 mSv, respectively. A hyper Purity Germanium Detector (HPGe) is used in determining the activity concentrations of 232Th, 226Ra and 40K. The activity concentration ranges from 16±1 to 410±15 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, 17±1 to 271±8 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra and 13±3 to 1434±57 Bq kg-1 for 40K. In addition, a Low Background Alpha Beta Series 5 XLB Automatic was used in the determination of gross alpha and gross beta activity. The result ranges from 202±50 to 2325±466 Bq kg-1 for gross alpha and 164±17 to 2447±103 Bq kg-1 for gross beta. Contour maps were produced for isodose, activity concentration of 232Th, 226Ra, 40K, gross alpha and gross beta for the study area. The results are compared with UNSCEAR (2000).

  6. Sexual Education In Malaysia: Accepted Or Rejected?

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Mutalip, Siti Syairah; Mohamed, Ruzianisra

    2012-01-01

    Background: Introduction to sexual education in schools was suggested by the Malaysian government as one of the effort taken in the aim to reduce the sexual-related social problems among Malaysian teenagers nowadays. This study was proposed in the aim to determine the rate of acceptance among adolescents on the implementation of sexual education in schools. Methods: This study was conducted using questionnaires distributed to 152 pre-degree students in Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), Kampus Puncak Alam, Selangor, Malaysia. Obtained data were statistically analyzed. Results: Almost half (49.3%) of the respondents agreed that sexual education might help to overcome the social illness among school teenagers. Besides, a large number (77.6%) of respondents also agreed that this module should be incorporated with other core subjects compare to the feedback received on the implementation of this module on its own (28.9%). Conclusion: These results have provided some insight towards the perception of sexual education among the teenagers. Since most of the respondents agreed with this idea, so it might be a sign that the implementation of sexual education is almost accepted by the adolescents. PMID:23113207

  7. Vaccine preventable meningitis in Malaysia: epidemiology and management.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Hannah C; Jefferies, Johanna M C; Clarke, Stuart C

    2015-06-01

    Worldwide bacterial meningitis accounts for more than one million cases and 135,000 deaths annually. Profound, lasting neurological complications occur in 9-25% of cases. This review confirms the greatest risk from bacterial meningitis is in early life in Malaysia. Much of the disease burden can be avoided by immunization, particularly against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Despite inclusion of the Hib vaccine in the National Immunisation Programme and the licensure of pneumococcal vaccines, these two species are the main contributors to bacterial meningitis in Malaysia, with Neisseria meningitidis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, causing a smaller proportion of disease. The high Hib prevalence may partly be due to dated, small-scale studies limiting the understanding of the current epidemiological situation. This highlights the need for larger, better quality surveillance from Malaysia to evaluate the success of Hib immunization and to help guide immunization policy for vaccines against S. pneumoniae and N. meningitidis.

  8. Diagnosis of an imported Plasmodium ovale wallikeri infection in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Liew, Jonathan Wee Kent; Mahmud, Rohela; Tan, Lian Huat; Lau, Yee Ling

    2016-01-06

    Plasmodium ovale is rare and not exactly known to be autochthonous in Malaysia. There are two distinct forms of the parasite, namely P. ovale curtisi (classic form) and P. ovale wallikeri (variant form). Here, the first sequence confirmed case of an imported P. ovale wallikeri infection in Malaysia is presented. Microscopy found Plasmodium parasites with morphology similar to P. ovale or Plasmodium vivax in the blood films. Further confirmation using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the small-subunit rRNA gene of the parasite was unsuccessful. Genus-specific PCR was then performed and the product was sequenced and analysed. Sequence analyses confirmed the aetiological agent as P. ovale wallikeri. New species-specific primers (rOVA1v and rOVA2v) were employed and P. ovale wallikeri was finally confirmed. The findings highlight the need to look out for imported malaria infections in Malaysia and the importance of a constantly updated and validated diagnostic technique.

  9. Molecular detection of Ehrlichia canis in dogs in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Mojgan; Lim, Sue Yee; Watanabe, Mahira; Sharma, Reuben S K; Cheng, Nadzariah A B Y; Watanabe, Malaika

    2013-01-01

    An epidemiological study of Ehrlichia canis infection in dogs in Peninsular Malaysia was carried out using molecular detection techniques. A total of 500 canine blood samples were collected from veterinary clinics and dog shelters. Molecular screening by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed using genus-specific primers followed by PCR using E. canis species-specific primers. Ten out of 500 dogs were positive for E. canis. A phylogenetic analysis of the E. canis Malaysia strain showed that it was grouped tightly with other E. canis strains from different geographic regions. The present study revealed for the first time, the presence of genetically confirmed E. canis with a prevalence rate of 2.0% in naturally infected dogs in Malaysia.

  10. Health care delivery in Malaysia: changes, challenges and champions.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Susan; Beh, LooSee; Nordin, Rusli Bin

    2011-09-05

    Since 1957, there has been major reorganization of health care services in Malaysia. This article assesses the changes and challenges in health care delivery in Malaysia and how the management in health care processes has evolved over the years including equitable health care and health care financing. The health care service in Malaysia is changing towards wellness service as opposed to illness service. The Malaysian Ministry of Health (MOH), being the main provider of health services, may need to manage and mobilize better health care services by providing better health care financing mechanisms. It is recommended that partnership between public and private sectors with the extension of traditional medicine complementing western medicine in medical therapy continues in the delivery of health care.

  11. Health imperatives in foreign policy: the case of Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Barraclough, Simon; Phua, Kai-Lit

    2007-03-01

    Malaysia's global, regional and bilateral international health relations are surveyed against the historical backdrop of the country's foreign policy. Malaysia has always participated in multilateral agencies, most notably the World Health Organization, as such agencies are part of the longstanding fabric of "good international citizenship". The threats of infectious diseases to human health and economic activity have caused an intensification and an organizational formalization of Malaysian health diplomacy, both regionally and bilaterally. Such diplomacy has also established a basis for developing a wider set of cooperative relationships that go beyond responding to the threat of pandemics. As Malaysia approaches "developed" status, its health sector is becoming increasingly integrated into the global economy through joint research and development ventures and transnational investment. At the same time, it will have the technological, financial and human resources to play an expanded altruistic role in global and regional health.

  12. A Review on Assessment and Treatment for Depression in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Mukhtar, Firdaus; Oei, Tian P. S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aimed to review the literature on depression that focused on its assessment and treatment in Malaysia. PsycINFO, Medline, local journals were searched, and 18 published articles were included in this paper. Results indicate that research on depression in Malaysia, particularly validation studies and psychotherapy research, was weak and fragmented, with minimal empirical evidence available. Pharmacotherapy still dominated the treatment for depression, and, in terms of psychotherapy, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) was recently practiced, but only a few studies have reported on the treatment efficacy of CBT. Major limitations of studies were noted, and, consequently, the problems that are associated with the implementation and future direction of clinical and research on depression in Malaysia were discussed. In short, the contribution of empirical research on the assessment and treatment for depression remained inconsistent and fragmented and urgently in need of further empirical investigation. PMID:21804939

  13. Probability distribution of extreme share returns in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zin, Wan Zawiah Wan; Safari, Muhammad Aslam Mohd; Jaaman, Saiful Hafizah; Yie, Wendy Ling Shin

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the suitable probability distribution to model the extreme share returns in Malaysia. To achieve this, weekly and monthly maximum daily share returns are derived from share prices data obtained from Bursa Malaysia over the period of 2000 to 2012. The study starts with summary statistics of the data which will provide a clue on the likely candidates for the best fitting distribution. Next, the suitability of six extreme value distributions, namely the Gumbel, Generalized Extreme Value (GEV), Generalized Logistic (GLO) and Generalized Pareto (GPA), the Lognormal (GNO) and the Pearson (PE3) distributions are evaluated. The method of L-moments is used in parameter estimation. Based on several goodness of fit tests and L-moment diagram test, the Generalized Pareto distribution and the Pearson distribution are found to be the best fitted distribution to represent the weekly and monthly maximum share returns in Malaysia stock market during the studied period, respectively.

  14. Issues and framework of environmental health in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mokhtar, Mazlin Bin; Murad, Wahid

    2010-04-01

    Environmental health problems in Malaysia are mostly attributed to atmospheric pollution, water pollution, climate change, ozone depletion, and solid waste management, as well as toxic, chemical, and hazardous waste management. The Ministry of Health, Malaysia, has been vigorously pursuing the environmental health agenda by collaborating with other agencies at district, state, national, and international levels. This article discusses the issues and management framework of environmental health in Malaysia. Some issues requiring further investigation in order to clearly understand the trade-off between atmospheric change and environmental health are suggested. These suggestions are developed with particular reference to appraisals concerned with the development and implementation of environmental policy, programs, and practice. Research on the relevant issues is discussed and a framework is built involving a comprehensive review of the literature and existing framework of Malaysian environmental health.

  15. Health care delivery in Malaysia: changes, challenges and champions

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Susan; Beh, LooSee; Nordin, Rusli Bin

    2011-01-01

    Since 1957, there has been major reorganization of health care services in Malaysia. This article assesses the changes and challenges in health care delivery in Malaysia and how the management in health care processes has evolved over the years including equitable health care and health care financing. The health care service in Malaysia is changing towards wellness service as opposed to illness service. The Malaysian Ministry of Health (MOH), being the main provider of health services, may need to manage and mobilize better health care services by providing better health care financing mechanisms. It is recommended that partnership between public and private sectors with the extension of traditional medicine complementing western medicine in medical therapy continues in the delivery of health care. PMID:28299064

  16. Depth-to-Diameter Ratio and Slopes in Small Lunar Highland Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanti, P.; Robinson, M. S.; Stelling, R.

    2012-12-01

    Geomorphology of small lunar highland craters is quantified with digital elevation models (DEM) that cover 540 craters. From these new data we measured apparent depth (Ra), apparent diameter (Da) and wall slopes. While photogrammetric studies exist from Apollo era data [2,3], the lower end of the crater size spectrum is not well represented and the statistics for craters with diameters 150 meters or less is sparse. The slope of log-scale depth-vs.-diameter fit was ~0.9 (Figure 1). Previous studies [3] with both mare and highland craters (Da >330m) had slopes of ~1, so this result was somewhat expected, although the highland data density was poor in this size regime in the earlier works. However, it was found that a straight line represented the depth-vs.-diameter data better than a power law relation (goodness-of-fit 0.97 compared to 0.6) which is interesting since larger craters are found to change shape allometrically [4]. The median value of the depth-to-diameter ratio was ~0.13 which is also unexpected for small craters (usually ~0.2). Wall slopes were relatively shallow (median ~ 8°) with ~95% of the data at slopes less than 18°. Slopes decreased with crater size (Figure 2), with a sharp drop at diameters more than 35m after which the rate of change was small. Decrease in slope with size was observed earlier with Apollo data [2], but for larger craters (Da >1Km). References: [1] Robinson, M.S. et al (2010),Space Sci. Rev.,150,81-124;[2] Pike, R.J.(1977) Proceedings of the Symposium on Planetary Cratering Mechanics, Arizona, Pergamon Press.,489-509;[3] Pike, R.J.(1977) Lunar Science Conference,3, 3427-3436;[4] Pike, R.J(1967) J. Geophys. Res. 72, 8, 2099-2106

  17. Elephantiasis of non-filarial origin (podoconiosis) in the highlands of north-western Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Wanji, S; Tendongfor, N; Esum, M; Che, J N; Mand, S; Tanga Mbi, C; Enyong, P; Hoerauf, A

    2008-09-01

    Lymphoedema, a condition of localized fluid retention, results from a compromised lymphatic system. Although one common cause in the tropics is infection with filarial worms, non-filarial lymphoedema, also known as podoconiosis, has been reported among barefoot farmers in volcanic highland zones of Africa, Central and South America and north-western India. There are conflicting reports on the causes of lymphoedema in the highland regions of Cameroon, where the condition is of great public-health importance. To characterise the focus of lymphoedema in the highlands of the North West province of Cameroon and investigate its real causes, a cross-sectional study was carried out on the adults (aged > or =15 years) living in the communities that fall within the Ndop and Tubah health districts. The subjects, who had to have lived in the study area for at least 10 years, were interviewed, examined clinically, and, when possible, checked for microfilaraemia. The cases of lymphoedema confirmed by ultrasonography and a random sample of the other subjects were also tested for filarial antigenaemia. The interviews, which explored knowledge, attitudes and perceptions (KAP) relating to lymphoedema, revealed that the condition was well known, with each study community having a local name for it. Of the 834 individuals examined clinically, 66 (8.1%) had lymphoedema of the lower limb, with all the clinical stages of this condition represented. None of the 792 individuals examined parasitologically, however, had microfilariae of W. bancrofti (or any other filarial parasite) in their peripheral blood, and only one (0.25%) of the 399 individuals tested for the circulating antigens of W. bancrofti gave a positive result. In addition, none of the 504 mosquitoes caught landing on human bait in the study area and dissected was found to harbour any stage of W. bancrofti. These findings indicate that the elephantiasis seen in the North West province of Cameroon is of non-filarial origin.

  18. Landscape determinants and remote sensing of anopheline mosquito larval habitats in the western Kenya highlands

    PubMed Central

    Mushinzimana, Emmanuel; Munga, Stephen; Minakawa, Noboru; Li, Li; Feng, Chen-chieh; Bian, Ling; Kitron, Uriel; Schmidt, Cindy; Beck, Louisa; Zhou, Guofa; Githeko, Andrew K; Yan, Guiyun

    2006-01-01

    Background In the past two decades the east African highlands have experienced several major malaria epidemics. Currently there is a renewed interest in exploring the possibility of anopheline larval control through environmental management or larvicide as an additional means of reducing malaria transmission in Africa. This study examined the landscape determinants of anopheline mosquito larval habitats and usefulness of remote sensing in identifying these habitats in western Kenya highlands. Methods Panchromatic aerial photos, Ikonos and Landsat Thematic Mapper 7 satellite images were acquired for a study area in Kakamega, western Kenya. Supervised classification of land-use and land-cover and visual identification of aquatic habitats were conducted. Ground survey of all aquatic habitats was conducted in the dry and rainy seasons in 2003. All habitats positive for anopheline larvae were identified. The retrieved data from the remote sensors were compared to the ground results on aquatic habitats and land-use. The probability of finding aquatic habitats and habitats with Anopheles larvae were modelled based on the digital elevation model and land-use types. Results The misclassification rate of land-cover types was 10.8% based on Ikonos imagery, 22.6% for panchromatic aerial photos and 39.2% for Landsat TM 7 imagery. The Ikonos image identified 40.6% of aquatic habitats, aerial photos identified 10.6%, and Landsate TM 7 image identified 0%. Computer models based on topographic features and land-cover information obtained from the Ikonos image yielded a misclassification rate of 20.3–22.7% for aquatic habitats, and 18.1–25.1% for anopheline-positive larval habitats. Conclusion One-metre spatial resolution Ikonos images combined with computer modelling based on topographic land-cover features are useful tools for identification of anopheline larval habitats, and they can be used to assist to malaria vector control in western Kenya highlands. PMID:16480523

  19. Low Rates of Weathering and Erosion in Wet, Steep, Tropical Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Blanckenburg, F.; Hewawasam, T.

    2003-12-01

    The Central Highlands of the island of Sri Lanka feature all the ingredients usually thought to promote high rates of weathering: crystalline rocks, warm climate, high rates of precipitation. Also the high relief (steep mountains of up to 2500m altitude) would potentially generate high rates of physical erosion, which in turn promotes weathering by providing fresh mineral surfaces. An analysis of the rates of total erosion, using cosmogenic nuclides, excluding the effects of anthropogenic perturbance [1], was performed on various parts of the landscape (bedrock, surface soil, river sediment). The results suggest that all parts of the Highlands erode at 5-15mm/ky only. Rates of chemical weathering, determined by analysing major cations in river water, further suggest that most of this denudation is chemical. These rates of erosion are amongst the lowest world-wide for any sloping area analysed to date with cosmogenic nuclides. No relationship between climate and erosion is apparent for these areas. For Sri Lanka, we suggest that rock weathering has been low for millions of years due to (a) development of a clay-rich surface layer protecting rocks from corrosive fluids; (b) thick vegetation inhibiting removal of this layer; and (c), most importantly, absence of recent tectonic activity that would rejuvenate the landscape and promote physical erosion. Therefore, climate does not appear to exert controls over rock weathering if active tectonic forcing is absent. 1 T. Hewawasam, F. von Blanckenburg, M. Schaller and W. Kubik, Increase of human over natural erosion rates in tropical highlands constrained by cosmogenic nuclides, Geology 31, 795-600, 2003.

  20. Understanding the Chronology and Occupation Dynamics of Oversized Pit Houses in the Southern Brazilian Highlands

    PubMed Central

    Gregorio de Souza, Jonas; Robinson, Mark; Corteletti, Rafael; Cárdenas, Macarena Lucia; Wolf, Sidnei; Iriarte, José; Mayle, Francis; DeBlasis, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    A long held view about the occupation of southern proto-Jê pit house villages of the southern Brazilian highlands is that these sites represent cycles of long-term abandonment and reoccupation. However, this assumption is based on an insufficient number of radiocarbon dates for individual pit houses. To address this problem, we conducted a programme of comprehensive AMS radiocarbon dating and Bayesian modelling at the deeply stratified oversized pit House 1, Baggio I site (Cal. A.D. 1395–1650), Campo Belo do Sul, Santa Catarina state, Brazil. The stratigraphy of House 1 revealed an unparalleled sequence of twelve well preserved floors evidencing a major change in occupation dynamics including five completely burnt collapsed roofs. The results of the radiocarbon dating allowed us to understand for the first time the occupation dynamics of an oversized pit house in the southern Brazilian highlands. The Bayesian model demonstrates that House 1 was occupied for over two centuries with no evidence of major periods of abandonment, calling into question previous models of long-term abandonment. In addition, the House 1 sequence allowed us to tie transformations in ceramic style and lithic technology to an absolute chronology. Finally, we can provide new evidence that the emergence of oversized domestic structures is a relatively recent phenomenon among the southern proto-Jê. As monumental pit houses start to be built, small pit houses continue to be inhabited, evidencing emerging disparities in domestic architecture after AD 1000. Our research shows the importance of programmes of intensive dating of individual structures to understand occupation dynamics and site permanence, and challenges long held assumptions that the southern Brazilian highlands were home to marginal cultures in the context of lowland South America. PMID:27384341

  1. Building Climate Resilience in the Blue Nile/Abay Highlands: A Framework for Action

    PubMed Central

    Simane, Belay; Zaitchik, Benjamin F.; Mesfin, Desalegn

    2012-01-01

    Ethiopia has become warmer over the past century and human induced climate change will bring further warming over the next century at unprecedented rates. On the average, climate models show a tendency for higher mean annual rainfall and for wetter conditions, in particular during October, November and December, but there is much uncertainty about the future amount, distribution, timing and intensity of rainfall. Ethiopia’s low level of economic development, combined with its heavy dependence on agriculture and high population growth rate make the country particularly susceptible to the adverse effects of climate change. Nearly 90% of Ethiopia’s population lives in the Highlands, which include the critical Blue Nile (Abay) Highlands—a region that holds special importance due to its role in domestic agricultural production and international water resources. A five year study of climate vulnerability and adaptation strategies in communities of Choke Mountain, located in the center of the Abay Highlands, has informed a proposed framework for enhancing climate resilience in communities across the region. The framework is motivated by the critical need to enhance capacity to cope with climate change and, subsequently, to advance a carbon neutral and climate resilient economy in Ethiopia. The implicit hypothesis in applying a research framework for this effort is that science-based information, generated through improved understanding of impacts and vulnerabilities of local communities, can contribute to enhanced resilience strategies. We view adaptation to climate change in a wider context of changes, including, among others, market conditions, the political-institutional framework, and population dynamics. From a livelihood perspective, culture, historical settings, the diversity of income generation strategies, knowledge, and education are important factors that contribute to adaptive capacities. This paper reviews key findings of the Choke Mountain study

  2. Understanding the Chronology and Occupation Dynamics of Oversized Pit Houses in the Southern Brazilian Highlands.

    PubMed

    Gregorio de Souza, Jonas; Robinson, Mark; Corteletti, Rafael; Cárdenas, Macarena Lucia; Wolf, Sidnei; Iriarte, José; Mayle, Francis; DeBlasis, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    A long held view about the occupation of southern proto-Jê pit house villages of the southern Brazilian highlands is that these sites represent cycles of long-term abandonment and reoccupation. However, this assumption is based on an insufficient number of radiocarbon dates for individual pit houses. To address this problem, we conducted a programme of comprehensive AMS radiocarbon dating and Bayesian modelling at the deeply stratified oversized pit House 1, Baggio I site (Cal. A.D. 1395-1650), Campo Belo do Sul, Santa Catarina state, Brazil. The stratigraphy of House 1 revealed an unparalleled sequence of twelve well preserved floors evidencing a major change in occupation dynamics including five completely burnt collapsed roofs. The results of the radiocarbon dating allowed us to understand for the first time the occupation dynamics of an oversized pit house in the southern Brazilian highlands. The Bayesian model demonstrates that House 1 was occupied for over two centuries with no evidence of major periods of abandonment, calling into question previous models of long-term abandonment. In addition, the House 1 sequence allowed us to tie transformations in ceramic style and lithic technology to an absolute chronology. Finally, we can provide new evidence that the emergence of oversized domestic structures is a relatively recent phenomenon among the southern proto-Jê. As monumental pit houses start to be built, small pit houses continue to be inhabited, evidencing emerging disparities in domestic architecture after AD 1000. Our research shows the importance of programmes of intensive dating of individual structures to understand occupation dynamics and site permanence, and challenges long held assumptions that the southern Brazilian highlands were home to marginal cultures in the context of lowland South America.

  3. Sister Lab Program Prospective Partner Nuclear Profile: Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Bissani, M; Tyson, S

    2006-12-14

    The Malaysian Deputy Prime Minister Tun Dr Ismail Abdul Rahman suggested in the early 1970s that Malaysia should have a role in the development of nuclear science and technology for peaceful purposes. Accordingly, the Center for the Application of Nuclear Energy (CRANE) was established, with a focus on the development of a scientific and technical pool critical to a national nuclear power program. The Malaysian Cabinet next established the Tun Ismail Atomic Research Center (TIARC) under the Ministry of Science, Technology and the Environment on 19 September 1972, at a site in Bangi, about 35 km south of Kuala Lampur. On 28 June 1982, the PUSPATI reactor, a 1-MW TRIGA MK-II research reactor, first reached criticality. On 10 August 1994, TIARC was officially renamed as the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT). In addition to radioisotope production and neutron radiography conducted at the PUSPATI research reactor, MINT also supports numerous programs employing nuclear technology for medicine, agriculture and industry, and has been involved in both bilateral and multilateral technical cooperation to extend its capabilities. As an energy exporting country, Malaysia has felt little incentive to develop a nuclear energy program, and high level opposition within the government discouraged it further. A recent statement by Malaysia's Science, Technology and Innovation Minister supported this view, indicating that only a near-catastrophic jump in world oil prices might change the government's view. However, the rate at which Malaysia is using its natural gas and oil reserves is expected to force it to reassess the role of nuclear energy in the near future. In addition, the government does intend to construct a radioactive waste repository to dispose of naturally occurring radioactive materials (extracted during tin mining, in particular). Also, Malaysia's growing economy could encourage expansion in Malaysia's existing nuclear-applications programs

  4. Glucose intolerance associated with hypoxia in people living at high altitudes in the Tibetan highland

    PubMed Central

    Okumiya, Kiyohito; Sakamoto, Ryota; Ishimoto, Yasuko; Kimura, Yumi; Fukutomi, Eriko; Ishikawa, Motonao; Suwa, Kuniaki; Imai, Hissei; Chen, Wenling; Kato, Emiko; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Kasahara, Yoriko; Fujisawa, Michiko; Wada, Taizo; Wang, Hongxin; Dai, Qingxiang; Xu, Huining; Qiao, Haisheng; Ge, Ri-Li; Norboo, Tsering; Tsering, Norboo; Kosaka, Yasuyuki; Nose, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Takayoshi; Tsukihara, Toshihiro; Ando, Kazuo; Inamura, Tetsuya; Takeda, Shinya; Ishine, Masayuki; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Matsubayashi, Kozo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To clarify the association between glucose intolerance and high altitudes (2900–4800 m) in a hypoxic environment in Tibetan highlanders and to verify the hypothesis that high altitude dwelling increases vulnerability to diabetes mellitus (DM) accelerated by lifestyle change or ageing. Design Cross-sectional epidemiological study on Tibetan highlanders. Participants We enrolled 1258 participants aged 40–87 years. The rural population comprised farmers in Domkhar (altitude 2900–3800 m) and nomads in Haiyan (3000–3100 m), Ryuho (4400 m) and Changthang (4300–4800 m). Urban area participants were from Leh (3300 m) and Jiegu (3700 m). Main outcome measure Participants were classified into six glucose tolerance-based groups: DM, intermediate hyperglycaemia (IHG), normoglycaemia (NG), fasting DM, fasting IHG and fasting NG. Prevalence of glucose intolerance was compared in farmers, nomads and urban dwellers. Effects of dwelling at high altitude or hypoxia on glucose intolerance were analysed with the confounding factors of age, sex, obesity, lipids, haemoglobin, hypertension and lifestyle, using multiple logistic regression. Results The prevalence of DM (fasting DM)/IHG (fasting IHG) was 8.9% (6.5%)/25.1% (12.7%), respectively, in all participants. This prevalence was higher in urban dwellers (9.5% (7.1%)/28.5% (11.7%)) and in farmers (8.5% (6.1%)/28.5% (18.3%)) compared with nomads (8.2% (5.7%)/15.7% (9.7%)) (p=0.0140/0.0001). Dwelling at high altitude was significantly associated with fasting IHG+fasting DM/fasting DM (ORs for >4500 and 3500–4499 m were 3.59/4.36 and 2.07/1.76 vs <3500 m, respectively). After adjusting for lifestyle change, hypoxaemia and polycythaemia were closely associated with glucose intolerance. Conclusions Socioeconomic factors, hypoxaemia and the effects of altitudes >3500 m play a major role in the high prevalence of glucose intolerance in highlanders. Tibetan highlanders may be vulnerable to glucose

  5. Evaluation of the degree of mycophilia-mycophobia among highland and lowland inhabitants from Chiapas, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mushrooms generate strong and contrasting feelings ranging from extreme aversion to intense liking. To categorize these attitudes, Wasson and Wasson coined the dichotomic terms “mycophilia” and “mycophobia” in 1957. In Mesoamerica these categories have been associated to ecological regions. Highland peoples are viewed as mycophiles, whereas lowland inhabitants are considered mycophobes. However, this division is based on little empirical evidence and few indicators. This study questioned whether mycophilia and mycophobia are indeed related to ecological regions through the evaluation of 19 indicators tested in the highlands and lowlands of Chiapas, Mexico. Methods The heterogeneity of attitudes toward mushrooms was explored in terms of ecological region and sociocultural variables. Information was obtained through structured interviews in 10 communities in Los Altos de Chiapas (highlands) and the Selva Lacandona (lowlands). We analyzed indicators separately through χ2 tests and multivariate techniques. The Mycophilia-Mycophobia Index was also used in the analysis. To assess which factors better explain the distribution of attitudes, we built 11 models using the Beta probability-density function and compared them with the Akaike Information Criterion. Results Most people had positive attitudes in both ecological regions. The classification and ordination analyses found two large groups comprising both highland and lowland towns. Contrary to expectation if mycophilia and mycophobia were mutually exclusive, all the fitted probability distributions were bell-shaped; indicating these attitudes behave as a continuous variable. The model best supported by data included occupation and ethnicity. Indigenous peasants had the highest degree of mycophilia. Discussion Results suggest the studied populations tend to be mycophilic and that their attitudes are not dichotomic, but rather a gradient. Most people occupied intermediate degrees of mycophilia

  6. Geology of a Portion of the Martian Highlands: MTMs -20002, -20007, -25002 and -25007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortezzo, C. M.; Williams, K. K.

    2009-01-01

    As part of a continuing study to understand the relationship between valleys and highland resurfacing through geologic mapping, we are continuing to map seven MTM quads in portions of the Margaritifer, Arabia, and Noachis Terrae. Results from this mapping will also help constrain the role and extent of past water in the region. The MTMs are grouped in two different areas: a 4-quadrangle area (-20002, -20007, -25002, -25007) and an L-shaped area (-15017, -20017, -20022) within the region [1-5]. This abstract focuses on the geologic units and history from mapping in the 4-quadrangle area, but includes a brief update on the L-shaped map area.

  7. Nature and evolution of the early Martian atmosphere: Evidence from highland crater populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craddock, Robert A.; Maxwell, Ted A.

    1992-01-01

    Release of water in a CO2 rich atmosphere by precipitation and channel forming processes has led to speculation on the creation of Martian carbonate deposits. On Mars water probably was not on the surface long enough to allow eroded material to concentrate, raise the pH, and induce the formation of carbonates. This suggests that the Martian primordial atmosphere could be thinner (approximately 5 bars) and still allow highland degradation to occur over a long period of time (.45 to 1.2 billion years).

  8. Composition of the lunar highland crust from near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieters, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    An attempt is made to synthesize NIR reflectance spectra of the lunar highlands to obtain global information about the composition of the lunar near-side crust. Major rock types identified include noritic, anorthositic, gabbric, and troctolitic compositions. Seventy-five percent of the areas that represent samples from the upper 1-2 km of lunar crust exhibit noritic compositions with different amounts of pyroxene and/or brecciation alteration. The data demonstrate that the lunar near-side crust is clearly mineralogically heterogeneous, both laterally and vertically, and not well mixed below 1-2 km.

  9. Distribution of 28 elements in size fractions of lunar mare and highlands soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boynton, W. V.; Wasson, J. T.

    1977-01-01

    Four volatile, six siderophile and 18 generally lithophile elements were determined in six sieve fractions of mare soil 15100 (moderately mature) and seven sieve fractions of highlands soil 66080 (highly mature). Previous work (Boynton et al., 1976) showed that the volatile elements in lunar soils were enriched in the finest size fraction relative to the coarsest factors by up to about 20. The present investigation tests Boynton's interpretation that the distribution pattern of the volatiles indicates the presence of two components: a volume-correlated component having volatile concentrations independent of grain size and a surface-correlated component with concentration increasing with decreasing grain size.

  10. Seir Model for Transmission of Dengue Fever in Selangor Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syafruddin, S.; Noorani, M. S. M.

    In this paper, we study a system of differential equations that models the population dynamics of SEIR vector transmission of dengue fever. The model studied breeding value based on the number of reported cases of dengue fever in Selangor because the state had the highest case in Malaysia. The model explains that maximum level of human infection rate of dengue fever achieved in a very short period. It is also revealed that there existed suitability result between theoretical and empirical calculation using the model. The result of SEIR model will hopefully provide an insight into the spread of dengue fever in Selangor Malaysia and basic form for modeling this area.

  11. Promoting water hydraulics in Malaysia: A green educational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Ahmad Anas; Zaili, Zarin Syukri; Hassan, Siti Nor Habibah; Tuan, Tee Boon; Saadun, Mohd Noor Asril; Ibrahim, Mohd Qadafie

    2014-10-01

    In promoting water hydraulics in Malaysia, this paper presents research development of water hydraulics educational training system for secondary and tertiary levels in Malaysia. Water hydraulics trainer with robotic attachment has been studied in order to promote the usefulness of such educational tools in promoting sustainability and green technology in the country. The trainer is being developed in order to allow constructive curriculum development and continuous marketing research for the effectiveness and usefulness of using water in hydraulic power trainer. The research on water-based hydraulic trainer is now possible with the current development in water hydraulics technology.

  12. The needs of digital games content rating system in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Ros Syammimi; Shiratuddin, Norshuhada

    2016-08-01

    Numerous studies revealed that playing digital games with adverse contents can lead to negative effects. Therefore, this article presents a review of the harmful contents and the detrimental effects of playing digital games. Violent and sexual contents of digital games, digital games scenarios in Malaysia, and review of existing content rating system are covered. The review indicates that Malaysia should have its own digital games content ratings system to control the contents and inform the users about the contents of the games that they wish to consume.

  13. Rising caesarean section rates in public hospitals in Malaysia 2006.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, J

    2008-12-01

    The caesarean section rate in Malaysian public hospitals has increased to 15.7% from 10.5% in the year 2000. There are inter-state variations in the rate ranging from a high of 25.4% in Melaka to 10.9% in Sabah. The West Coast states generally had a higher caesarean section rate than the East Coast states as well as East Malaysia. It would be prudent for Malaysia to implement stringent caesarean audits to ensure that rising caesarean section rates are kept in check.

  14. Changing patterns of clinical malaria since 1965 among a tea estate population located in the Kenyan highlands*

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, G. D.; Biomndo, K.; Hay, S. I.; Snow, R. W.

    2012-01-01

    The changing epidemiology of clinical malaria since 1965 among hospitalized patients was studied at a group of tea estates in the western highlands of Kenya. These data indicate recent dramatic increases in the numbers of malaria admissions (6·5 to 32·5% of all admissions), case fatality (1·3 to 6%) and patients originating from low-risk, highland areas (34 to 59%). Climate change, environmental management, population migration, and breakdown in health service provision seem unlikely explanations for this changing disease pattern. The coincident arrival of chloroquine resistance during the late 1980s in the sub-region suggests that drug resistance is a key factor in the current pattern and burden of malaria among this highland population. PMID:10974991

  15. The nutrition and health transition in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Noor, Mohd Ismail

    2002-02-01

    The accelerated phase of industrialisation and urbanisation in recent decades has inevitably brought about changes in the lifestyle of Malaysians. Changes in dietary habits and sedentary lifestyles are known to be associated with changes in health and increased prevalence of chronic diseases in the population. The objective of this paper is to provide a better understanding of the link between demographic variables and food consumption patterns related to the nutrition transition in Malaysia. This review uses various reports and publications from several ministries and selected local studies. The statistics compiled over the last two decades have shown that as the population achieves affluence, intakes of calories, fats and sugars increase, which may account for the substantial increase in food importation bills over the same period. Similarly, the rapid growth of the fast food industry during the last decade has added another dimension to the change in food consumption patterns of Malaysians. With the exception of a study on adolescents, the prevalences of overweight and obesity in children and adults are not strictly comparable due to the difference in body mass index (BMI) cut-off points in children and the study protocol in adults, and hence should not be misinterpreted as trends. The recent recommendation to lower the BMI cut-off points for Asians would only increase the magnitude of the existing prevalence among adults. The need to promote healthy nutrition for the population must be pursued vigorously, as the escalation of nutrition-related chronic degenerative diseases - once an urban phenomenon--has now spread to the rural population at an alarming rate. This paper indicates that the problem is real and needs urgent attention because it may be just the tip of the iceberg.

  16. Regional landfills methane emission inventory in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Abushammala, Mohammed F M; Noor Ezlin Ahmad Basri; Basri, Hassan; Ahmed Hussein El-Shafie; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H

    2011-08-01

    The decomposition of municipal solid waste (MSW) in landfills under anaerobic conditions produces landfill gas (LFG) containing approximately 50-60% methane (CH(4)) and 30-40% carbon dioxide (CO(2)) by volume. CH(4) has a global warming potential 21 times greater than CO(2); thus, it poses a serious environmental problem. As landfills are the main method for waste disposal in Malaysia, the major aim of this study was to estimate the total CH(4) emissions from landfills in all Malaysian regions and states for the year 2009 using the IPCC, 1996 first-order decay (FOD) model focusing on clean development mechanism (CDM) project applications to initiate emission reductions. Furthermore, the authors attempted to assess, in quantitative terms, the amount of CH(4) that would be emitted from landfills in the period from 1981-2024 using the IPCC 2006 FOD model. The total CH(4) emission using the IPCC 1996 model was estimated to be 318.8 Gg in 2009. The Northern region had the highest CH(4) emission inventory, with 128.8 Gg, whereas the Borneo region had the lowest, with 24.2 Gg. It was estimated that Pulau Penang state produced the highest CH(4) emission, 77.6 Gg, followed by the remaining states with emission values ranging from 38.5 to 1.5 Gg. Based on the IPCC 1996 FOD model, the total Malaysian CH( 4) emission was forecast to be 397.7 Gg by 2020. The IPCC 2006 FOD model estimated a 201 Gg CH(4) emission in 2009, and estimates ranged from 98 Gg in 1981 to 263 Gg in 2024.

  17. Distribution and fate of HCH isomers and DDT metabolites in a tropical environment–case study Cameron Highlands–Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The serious impact effects of persistent organic pollutants such as organochlorine pesticides, especially dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane family (DDTs) and hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs) have been causing widespread concern, despite effective control on their manufacturing, agricultural and vector practices. In that, in addition to the previous global limitations on DDTs usage, α-HCH, β-HCH and lindane have also became an on-going topic of global relevance based on the latest Stockholm Convention list on 10th of May 2009. Concentrations of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane family (DDTs) and hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs) were determined by GC-ECD in Cameron Highlands, the main vegetables and flowers farming area in Malaysia as an agricultural tropical environment. A total of 112 surface water and sediment samples at eight points were collected along the main rivers in the area namely Telom and Bertam in the dry and wet seasons of 2011. Results Total concentration of HCH isomers ranged from not detected to 25.03 ng/L in the water (mean of 5.55 ±6.0 ng/L), while, it ranged from 0.002 to 59.17 ng/g (mean of 8.06±9.39 ng/g) in the sediment. Total concentration of DDT and its metabolites in the water samples varied from not detected to 8.0 ng/L (mean of 0.90±1.66 ng/g), whereas, it was in the range of 0.025 to 23.24 ng/g (mean of 2.55±4.0 ng/g) in the surface sediment samples. The ratio of HCHs and DDTs composition indicated an obvious historical usage and new inputs of these pesticides. Among alpha, beta, gamma and delta isomers of HCH, gamma was the most dominant component in the sediment and water as well. Some seasonal variations in the level of selected pesticides were noted. Conclusions The results illustrate distribution, behaviour and fate of HCHs, and DDTs have closely connected with topological and meteorological properties of the area beyond their chemical characterizations. The features of environmental circumstances exceed one or

  18. Geology of the Terra Cimmeria-Utopia Planitia Highland Lowland Transitional Zone: Final Technical Approach and Scientific Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, J. A., Jr.; Tanaka, K. L.

    2010-01-01

    The southern Utopia highland-lowland transitional zone extends from northern Terra Cimmeria to southern Utopia Planitia and contains broad, bench-like platforms with depressions, pitted cones, tholi, and lobate flows. The locally occurring geologic units and landforms contrast other transitional regions and record a spatially partitioned geologic history. We systematically delineated and described the geologic units and landforms of the southern Utopia-Cimmeria highland-lowland transitional zone for the production of a 1:1,000,000-scale geologic map (MTMs 10237, 15237, 20237, 10242, 15242, 20242, 10247, 15247, and 20247). Herein, we present technical and scientific results of this mapping project.

  19. Grain and tortilla quality in landraces and improved maize grown in the highlands of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Carrillo, Gricelda; García-Lara, Silverio; Salinas-Moreno, Yolanda; Bergvinson, David J; Palacios-Rojas, Natalia

    2011-06-01

    The maize produced in the highlands of Mexico (>2,400 masl) is generally not accepted by the flour and masa and tortilla industry. The objective of this work was to evaluate the grain quality and tortilla properties of maize landraces commonly grown in the highlands of Mexico and compare them with improved germplasm (hybrids). Germplasm analysis included 11 landraces, 32 white hybrids, and six yellow hybrids. Grain quality was analyzed for a range of physical and chemical factors, as well as for alkaline cooking quality. Landrace grains tended to be heterogeneous in terms of size, hardness and color. All landraces had soft-intermediate grains with an average flotation index (FI) of 61%. In contrast, hybrid grains were homogenous in size and color, and harder than landrace grains, with a FI of 38%. Protein, free sugars, oil and phenolic content in landraces were higher than in the hybrids. Significant correlations were found between phenolic content and tortilla color (r= -0.60; p<0.001). Three landraces were identified as appropriate for the masa and tortilla industry, while all the hybrids evaluated fulfilled the requirements of this industry.

  20. Pasture degradation modifies the water and carbon cycles of the Tibetan highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babel, W.; Biermann, T.; Coners, H.; Falge, E.; Seeber, E.; Ingrisch, J.; Schleuß, P.-M.; Gerken, T.; Leonbacher, J.; Leipold, T.; Willinghöfer, S.; Schützenmeister, K.; Shibistova, O.; Becker, L.; Hafner, S.; Spielvogel, S.; Li, X.; Xu, X.; Sun, Y.; Zhang, L.; Yang, Y.; Ma, Y.; Wesche, K.; Graf, H.-F.; Leuschner, C.; Guggenberger, G.; Kuzyakov, Y.; Miehe, G.; Foken, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau has a significant role with regard to atmospheric circulation and the monsoon in particular. Changes between a closed plant cover and open bare soil are one of the striking effects of land use degradation observed with unsustainable range management or climate change, but experiments investigating changes of surface properties and processes together with atmospheric feedbacks are rare and have not been undertaken in the world's two largest alpine ecosystems, the alpine steppe and the Kobresia pygmaea pastures of the Tibetan Plateau. We connected measurements of micro-lysimeter, chamber, 13C labelling, and eddy covariance and combined the observations with land surface and atmospheric models, adapted to the highland conditions. This allowed us to analyse how three degradation stages affect the water and carbon cycle of pastures on the landscape scale within the core region of the Kobresia pygmaea ecosystem. The study revealed that increasing degradation of the Kobresia turf affects carbon allocation and strongly reduces the carbon uptake, compromising the function of Kobresia pastures as a carbon sink. Pasture degradation leads to a shift from transpiration to evaporation while a change in the sum of evapotranspiration over a longer period cannot be confirmed. The results show an earlier onset of convection and cloud generation, likely triggered by a shift in evapotranspiration timing when dominated by evaporation. Consequently, precipitation starts earlier and clouds decrease the incoming solar radiation. In summary, the changes in surface properties by pasture degradation found on the highland have a significant influence on larger scales.

  1. Pasture degradation modifies the water and carbon cycles of the Tibetan highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babel, W.; Biermann, T.; Coners, H.; Falge, E.; Seeber, E.; Ingrisch, J.; Schleuß, P.-M.; Gerken, T.; Leonbacher, J.; Leipold, T.; Willinghöfer, S.; Schützenmeister, K.; Shibistova, O.; Becker, L.; Hafner, S.; Spielvogel, S.; Li, X.; Xu, X.; Sun, Y.; Zhang, L.; Yang, Y.; Ma, Y.; Wesche, K.; Graf, H.-F.; Leuschner, C.; Guggenberger, G.; Kuzyakov, Y.; Miehe, G.; Foken, T.

    2014-06-01

    The Tibetan Plateau has a significant role with regard to atmospheric circulation and the monsoon in particular. Changes between a closed plant cover and open bare soil are one of the striking effects of land use degradation observed with unsustainable range management or climate change, but experiments coupling changes of surface properties and processes with atmospheric feedbacks are rare and have not been undertaken in the world's two largest alpine ecosystems, the alpine steppe and the Kobresia pygmaea pastures of the Tibetan plateau. We coupled measurements of micro-lysimeter, chamber, 13C labeling, and eddy-covariance and combined the observations with land surface and atmospheric models, adapted to the highland conditions. This allowed us to analyze how three degradation stages affect the water and carbon cycle of pastures on the landscape scale within the core region of the Kobresia pygmaea ecosystem. The study revealed that increasing degradation of the Kobresia turf affects carbon allocation and strongly reduces the carbon uptake, compromising the function of Kobresia pastures as a carbon sink. Pasture degradation leads to a shift from transpiration to evaporation while the total sum of evapotranspiration remains unaffected. The results show an earlier onset of convection and cloud generation, likely triggered by enhanced evaporation. Consequently, precipitation starts earlier and clouds decrease the incoming solar radiation. In summary, the changes in surface properties by pasture degradation found on the highland have a~significant influence on larger scales.

  2. Mesoproterozoic graphite deposits, New Jersey Highlands: Geologic and stable isotopic evidence for possible algal origins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Volkert, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Graphite deposits of Mesoproterozoic age are locally abundant in the eastern New Jersey Highlands, where they are hosted by sulphidic biotite-quartz-feldspar gneiss, metaquartzite, and anatectic pegmatite. Gneiss and metaquartzite represent a shallow marine shelf sequence of locally organic-rich sand and mud. Graphite from massive deposits within metaquartzite yielded ??13C values of -26 ?? 2??? (1??), and graphite from massive deposits within biotite-quartz-feldspar gneiss yielded ??13C values of -23 ??4???. Disseminated graphite from biotite-quartz-feldspar gneiss country rock was -22 ??3???, indistinguishable from the massive deposits hosted by the same lithology. Anatectic pegmatite is graphitic only where generated from graphite-bearing host rocks; one sample gave a ??13C value of -15???. The ??34S values of trace pyrrhotite are uniform within individual deposits, but vary from 0 to 9??? from one deposit to another. Apart from pegmatitic occurrences, evidence is lacking for long-range mobilization of carbon during Grenvillian orogenesis or post-Grenvillian tectonism. The field, petrographic, and isotope data suggest that massive graphite was formed by granulite-facies metamorphism of Proterozoic accumulations of sedimentary organic matter, possibly algal mats. Preservation of these accumulations in the sedimentary environment requires anoxic basin waters or rapid burial. Anoxia would also favour the accumulation of dissolved ferrous iron in basin waters, which may explain some of the metasediment-hosted massive magnetite deposits in the New Jersey Highlands. ?? 2000 NRC.

  3. Comparative assessment of lowland and highland Smallholder farmers' vulnerability to climate variability in Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayal, D. Y., Sr.; Abshare, M. W. M.; Desta, S. D.; Filho, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    Desalegn Yayeh Ayal P.O.BOX 150129 Addis Ababa University Ethiopia Mobil +251910824784 Abstract Smallholder farmers' near term scenario (2010-2039) vulnerability nature and magnitude was examined using twenty-two exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity vulnerability indicators. Assessment of smallholder farmers' vulnerability to climate variability revealed the importance of comprehending exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity induces. Due to differences in level of change in rainfall, temperature, drought frequency, their environmental interaction and variations on adaptive capacity the nature and magnitude of smallholder farmers vulnerability to physical, biological and epidemiological challenges of crop and livestock production varied within and across agro-ecologies. Highlanders' sensitive relates with high population density, erosion and crop disease and pest damage occurrence. Whereas lowlanders will be more sensitive to high crop disease and pest damage, provenance of livestock disease, absence of alternative water sources, less diversified agricultural practices. However, with little variations in the magnitude and nature of vulnerability, both highlanders and lowlanders are victims of climate variability and change. Given the ever increasing population, temperature and unpredictable nature of rainfall variability, the study concluded that future adaptation strategies should capitalize on preparing smallholder farmers for both extremes- excess rainfall and flooding on the one hand and severe drought on the other.

  4. Earliest Pottery on New Guinea Mainland Reveals Austronesian Influences in Highland Environments 3000 Years Ago.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Dylan; Summerhayes, Glenn R; Ford, Anne; Scott, James M; Denham, Tim; Field, Judith; Dickinson, William R

    2015-01-01

    Austronesian speaking peoples left Southeast Asia and entered the Western Pacific c.4000-3000 years ago, continuing on to colonise Remote Oceania for the first time, where they became the ancestral populations of Polynesians. Understanding the impact of these peoples on the mainland of New Guinea before they entered Remote Oceania has eluded archaeologists. New research from the archaeological site of Wañelek in the New Guinea Highlands has broken this silence. Petrographic and geochemical data from pottery and new radiocarbon dating demonstrates that Austronesian influences penetrated into the highland interior by 3000 years ago. One potsherd was manufactured along the northeast coast of New Guinea, whereas others were manufactured from inland materials. These findings represent the oldest securely dated pottery from an archaeological context on the island of New Guinea. Additionally, the pottery comes from the interior, suggesting the movements of people and technological practices, as well as objects at this time. The antiquity of the Wañelek pottery is coincident with the expansion of Lapita pottery in the Western Pacific. Such occupation also occurs at the same time that changes have been identified in subsistence strategies in the archaeological record at Kuk Swamp suggesting a possible link between the two.

  5. Molecular Characterization Reveals Diverse and Unknown Malaria Vectors in the Western Kenyan Highlands.

    PubMed

    St Laurent, Brandyce; Cooke, Mary; Krishnankutty, Sindhu M; Asih, Puji; Mueller, John D; Kahindi, Samuel; Ayoma, Elizabeth; Oriango, Robin M; Thumloup, Julie; Drakeley, Chris; Cox, Jonathan; Collins, Frank H; Lobo, Neil F; Stevenson, Jennifer C

    2016-02-01

    The success of mosquito-based malaria control is dependent upon susceptible bionomic traits in local malaria vectors. It is crucial to have accurate and reliable methods to determine mosquito species composition in areas subject to malaria. An unexpectedly diverse set of Anopheles species was collected in the western Kenyan highlands, including unidentified and potentially new species carrying the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. This study identified 2,340 anopheline specimens using both ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer region 2 and mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 loci. Seventeen distinct sequence groups were identified. Of these, only eight could be molecularly identified through comparison to published and voucher sequences. Of the unidentified species, four were found to carry P. falciparum by circumsporozoite enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and polymerase chain reaction, the most abundant of which had infection rates comparable to a primary vector in the area, Anopheles funestus. High-quality adult specimens of these unidentified species could not be matched to museum voucher specimens or conclusively identified using multiple keys, suggesting that they may have not been previously described. These unidentified vectors were captured outdoors. Diverse and unknown species have been incriminated in malaria transmission in the western Kenya highlands using molecular identification of unusual morphological variants of field specimens. This study demonstrates the value of using molecular methods to compliment vector identifications and highlights the need for accurate characterization of mosquito species and their associated behaviors for effective malaria control.

  6. Structure of the lunar crust at highland site Apollo Station 16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goins, N. R.; Dainty, A. M.; Toksoz, M. N.

    1981-01-01

    The seismic crustal structure of the moon is known in the region of Oceanus Procellarum from the analysis of artificial impact data. To extend this knowledge we have used data from natural lunar seismic events to search for secondary seismic wave arrivals in the form of peg-leg multiples caused by reflections at crustal interfaces and converted arrivals caused by refractions at crustal interfaces. A polarization filter has been applied to the data to enhance the rectilinear particle motion expected for the onset of these body wave arrivals in the scattered coda of lunar seismograms. The results of this work tentatively indicate that the highland site at station 16 has a 75 km thick crust with an intermediate 20 km interface, compared to the 60 km crust and 20 km interface in Oceanus Procellarum, a mare region. Since the 20 km upper crust appears to exist at both highland and mare sites, it probably does not represent a mare basalt layer but rather a more general feature of the crust. Crustal thickness may partially control elevation by isostasy.

  7. Genetic diversity and population structure of Scottish Highland red deer (Cervus elaphus) populations: a mitochondrial survey.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Espona, S; Pérez-Barbería, F J; Goodall-Copestake, W P; Jiggins, C D; Gordon, I J; Pemberton, J M

    2009-02-01

    The largest population of red deer (Cervus elaphus) in Europe is found in Scotland. However, human impacts through hunting and introduction of foreign deer stock have disturbed the population's genetics to an unknown extent. In this study, we analysed mitochondrial control region sequences of 625 individuals to assess signatures of human and natural historical influence on the genetic diversity and population structure of red deer in the Scottish Highlands. Genetic diversity was high with 74 haplotypes found in our study area (115 x 87 km). Phylogenetic analyses revealed that none of the individuals had introgressed mtDNA from foreign species or subspecies of deer and only suggested a very few localized red deer translocations among British localities. A haplotype network and population analyses indicated significant genetic structure (Phi(ST)=0.3452, F(ST)=0.2478), largely concordant with the geographical location of the populations. Mismatch distribution analysis and neutrality tests indicated a significant population expansion for one of the main haplogroups found in the study area, approximately dated c. 8200 or 16 400 years ago when applying a fast or slow mutation rate, respectively. Contrary to general belief, our results strongly suggest that native Scottish red deer mtDNA haplotypes have persisted in the Scottish Highlands and that the population retains a largely natural haplotype diversity and structure in our study area.

  8. Preliminary findings on identification of mycorrhizal fungi from diverse orchids in the Central Highlands of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Yokoya, Kazutomo; Zettler, Lawrence W; Kendon, Jonathan P; Bidartondo, Martin I; Stice, Andrew L; Skarha, Shannon; Corey, Laura L; Knight, Audrey C; Sarasan, Viswambharan

    2015-11-01

    The Orchid flora of Madagascar is one of the most diverse with nearly 1000 orchid taxa, of which about 90% are endemic to this biodiversity hotspot. The Itremo Massif in the Central Highlands of Madagascar with a Highland Subtropical climate range encompasses montane grassland, igneous and metamorphic rock outcrops, and gallery and tapia forests. Our study focused on identifying culturable mycorrhizae from epiphytic, lithophytic, and terrestrial orchid taxa to understand their diversity and density in a spatial matrix that is within the protected areas. We have collected both juvenile and mature roots from 41 orchid taxa for isolating their orchid mycorrhizal fungi (OMF), and to culture, identify, and store in liquid nitrogen for future studies. Twelve operational taxonomic units (OTUs), of three known orchid mycorrhizal genera, were recognized by analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of 85 isolates, and, by comparing with GenBank database entries, each OTU was shown to have closely related fungi that were also found as orchid associates. Orchid and fungal diversity were greater in gallery forests and open grasslands, which is very significant for future studies and orchid conservation. As far as we know, this is the first ever report of detailed identification of mycorrhizal fungi from Madagascar. This study will help start to develop a programme for identifying fungal symbionts from this unique biodiversity hotspot, which is undergoing rapid ecosystem damage and species loss. The diversity of culturable fungal associates, their density, and distribution within the Itremo orchid hotspot areas will be discussed.

  9. Earliest Pottery on New Guinea Mainland Reveals Austronesian Influences in Highland Environments 3000 Years Ago

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, Dylan; Summerhayes, Glenn R.; Ford, Anne; Scott, James M.; Denham, Tim; Field, Judith; Dickinson, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Austronesian speaking peoples left Southeast Asia and entered the Western Pacific c.4000-3000 years ago, continuing on to colonise Remote Oceania for the first time, where they became the ancestral populations of Polynesians. Understanding the impact of these peoples on the mainland of New Guinea before they entered Remote Oceania has eluded archaeologists. New research from the archaeological site of Wañelek in the New Guinea Highlands has broken this silence. Petrographic and geochemical data from pottery and new radiocarbon dating demonstrates that Austronesian influences penetrated into the highland interior by 3000 years ago. One potsherd was manufactured along the northeast coast of New Guinea, whereas others were manufactured from inland materials. These findings represent the oldest securely dated pottery from an archaeological context on the island of New Guinea. Additionally, the pottery comes from the interior, suggesting the movements of people and technological practices, as well as objects at this time. The antiquity of the Wañelek pottery is coincident with the expansion of Lapita pottery in the Western Pacific. Such occupation also occurs at the same time that changes have been identified in subsistence strategies in the archaeological record at Kuk Swamp suggesting a possible link between the two. PMID:26331310

  10. Anti-erosion stone bunds influence rodent dynamics and crop damage in Ethiopian highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meheretu, Yonas; Welegerima, Kiros; Teferi, Mekonen; Yirga, Gidey; Haile, Mitiku; Sluydts, Vincent; Bauer, Hans; Nyssen, Jan; Deckers, Jozef; Leirs, Herwig

    2014-05-01

    In areas of subsistence agriculture, a variety of soil conservation methods have been implemented in the last few decades to improve crop yields, however these can have unintended consequences such as providing habitat for rodent pests. We studied rodent population dynamics and estimated crop damage in high and low stone bund density fields for four cropping seasons in Tigray highlands, northern Ethiopia. Stone bunds are physical structures for soil and water conservation, and potentially habitat for rodents. We used a general model to relate the proportion of crop damage to rodent abundance, stone bund density and crop stages. We found a positive correlation between rodent abundance and crop damage, and significant variation in rodent abundance and crop damage between high and low stone bund density fields. Furthermore, crop damage also varied significantly between crop stages. We concluded that Mastomys awashensis and Arvicanthis dembeensis were the two most important crop pests in the highlands causing significant damage. Fields with high stone bund density (~10 m average distance apart) harbor more rodents and endure a significantly higher proportion of crop damage compared to fields with lower stone bund density (~15 m average distance apart). The fact that rodent abundances peaked during the reproductive stage of the crop and around harvest implies the need for management intervention before these crop stages are attained.

  11. Lunar highland rock types: Their implications for impact-induced fractionation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, W. C.; Warner, J. L.; Simonds, C. H.

    1977-01-01

    Lunar rocks may be classified into three major groups: (1) coarse-grained igneous rocks, (2) fine-grained igneous rocks, and (3) breccias. Group 1 is interpreted as primitive lunar crustal rocks that display various degrees of crushing and/or annealing. Group 2 is interpreted as volcanic rocks. Group 3 is interpreted as resulting from impacts on the lunar surface and is subdivided on the basis of matrix textures into fragmental breccias, crystalline breccias that have been annealed, and crystalline breccias with igneous matrices. A synthesis of the data concerning lunar highlands polymict breccias compels the prediction that the breccias should have homogeneous matrices from rock to rock within regions of the highlands of limited size where impact mixing has been efficient and extensive. But the returned breccias, even from one landing site, display a wide range in composition. This incompatibility between prediction and observation is a paradox that may be resolved by a process that acts after impact mixing to cause a differentiation of the breccia compositions. Partial melting of the local average crustal composition (as modeled by the average soil composition for each site) and separation of melt and residue in ejecta and/or fall-back blankets are compatible with the reviewed data and may resolve the paradox.

  12. Large scale cratering of the lunar highlands - Some Monte Carlo model considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, F.; Gibbons, R. V.; Hill, R. E.; Gault, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the scale and intensity of the moon's early, large scale meteoritic bombardment, a Monte Carlo computer model simulated the effects of all lunar craters greater than 800 m in diameter, for example, the number of times and depths specific fractions of the entire lunar surface were cratered. The model used observed crater size frequencies and crater-geometries compatible with the suggestions of Pike (1974) and Dence (1973); it simulated bombardment histories up to a factor of 10 more intense than those reflected by the present-day crater number density of the lunar highlands. For the present-day cratering record the model yields the following: approximately 25% of the entire lunar surface has not been cratered deeper than 100 m; 50% may have been cratered to 2-3 km depth; less than 5% of the surface has been cratered deeper than about 15 km. A typical highland site has suffered 1-2 impacts. Corresponding values for more intense bombardment histories are also presented, though it must remain uncertain what the absolute intensity of the moon's early meteorite bombardment was.

  13. The bulk-Moon MgO/FeO ratio: A highlands perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    Compositional data for nonmare (highlands) samples suggest that the Moon's mg ratio (MgO/FeO) is higher than general estimates. Geochemically representative highlands soils have mg ratios of 0.66 (Apollo 16), 0.69 (Luna 20) and 0.73 (ALHA81005). These soils are mixtures of unrelated pristine nonmare rocks, of which there are at least three groups: Mg-rich rocks, ferroan anorthosites, and KREEP. Other than Mg-rich rocks, virtually all pristine rocks have mg 0.65. Thus, assuming the mixing process that sampled Mg-rich materials was random, the average mg of Mg-rich parent magmas was probably at least 0.70. More direct evidence can be derived from the Mg-rich rocks themselves. Nine of them have bulk-rock mg 0.87. Two (15445 A and 67435 PST) contain Fo(92) olivine. Production of melts that crystallized Fo(92) olivine implies that the mg ratios of source regions in lunar mantle were commensurably high. A quantification of this constraint is developed assuming that the parent melts formed by equilibrium (batch) partial melting. Implications of the model are discussed.

  14. [Claw size of Scottish Highland Cows after pasture and housing periods].

    PubMed

    Nuss, K; Kolp, E; Braun, U; Weidmann, E; Hässig, M

    2014-09-01

    The claws of pastured Scottish Highland Cattle are large and this may raise the question if regular claw trimming is necessary. Therefore, the claws of the right thoracic and pelvic limbs were measured in 22 Scottish Highland cows 4 times 8 weeks apart. The cows were kept on various alpine pastures before the first measurement, on a two-hectare low-land pasture before the second measurement, in a welfare-compliant straw-bedded free stall before the third measurement and on alpine pasture before the fourth measurement. Housing conditions significantly affected claw dimensions. The claws were composed of dry, hard horn during pasture periods, and had prominent weight-bearing hoof-wall borders and soles with a natural axial slope. Long dorsal walls and heels and a greater symmetry were common. Claw lesions were absent. In contrast, free-stall housing was associated with shorter toes and steeper toe angles, but white line deterioration, heel horn erosion, wearing of the axial slope and hoof wall edges were common.

  15. Terminological Creation and Language Shift in Malaysia's Legal System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Terminology is a central theme of debate about language shift in Malaysia's judicial system--sometimes seen as the last bastion of the colonial language. Advocates of more Malay in courtroom argument and professional practice often point to the Institute of Language and Literature's creation of thousands of terms to equip the national language for…

  16. Libraries in West Malaysia and Singapore; A Short History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tee, Edward Lim Huck

    An attempt is made to trace the history of every major library in Malay and Singapore. Social and recreational club libraries are not included, and school libraries are not extensively covered. Although it is possible to trace the history of Malaysia's libraries back to the first millenium of the Christian era, there are few written records…

  17. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH PREGNANCY AMONG UNMARRIED WOMEN IN MALAYSIA.

    PubMed

    Zain, Norhasmah Mohd; Low, Wah Yun; Othman, Sajaratulnisah

    2015-05-01

    Pregnancy among unmarried women may have negative social and health implications in Malaysia. The number of pregnancies among unmarried women has increased in Malaysia, but the socio-demographic profile of these women is unclear. This study aims to evaluate the characteristics of unmarried pregnant women and the factors associated with unmarried pregnancies among young women in Malaysia. We conducted a cross sectional study at six hospitals and six women's shelters in Peninsular Malaysia during 2011-2012. Unmarried pregnant women were compared with married pregnant women. Participants were interviewed using a structured questionnaire asking for socio-demographic data, family background, risky sexual behavior, social support and pregnancy details. A total of 484 women (239 unmarried and 245 married) were included in the study. Most unmarried subjects were adolescents, from urban areas, from a low socioeconomic group, and lived with parents prior to pregnancy. Age (OR=0.67; 95% CI: 0.61-0.74), studying status (OR=17.33; 95% CI: 2.65-113.19), alcohol use (OR=40.46; 95% CI: 2.51-652.38) exposure to pornographic material (OR=13.48; 95% CI: 3.24-56.01), contraceptive use (OR=0.20; 95% CI: 0.08-0.51), and social support (OR=0.90; 95% CI: 0.86-0.94) were all associated with unmarried pregnancy. These factors need to be considered when.designing an intervention program.

  18. IT and Multimedia in Technical and Vocational Education in Malaysia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mustapha, Ramlee B.

    Development of information technology (IT) and the Multimedia Super Corridor (MSC) project has placed Malaysia within the global interconnectivity along with other developed nations. Types of IT applications are e-learning, e-mail, discussion group mailing lists, bulletin board systems, chat mode, newsgroups, Internet, tutorial, hypermedia, and…

  19. Individualism-Collectivism and Job Satisfaction between Malaysia and Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noordin, Fauziah; Jusoff, Kamaruzaman

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: One of the main issues that many organizations will face in the coming years is the management of increasing diversity in the workforce. The purpose of this paper is to examine the levels of individualism and collectivism of managers in two different cultural environments, that is, Malaysia and Australia. Design/methodology/approach: Data…

  20. National Integration in Multicultural School Setting in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordin, Abu Bakar; Alias, Norlidah; Siraj, Saedah

    2013-01-01

    Malaysia is a multicultural country constituting three major ethno-cultural groups, Malay and Bumiputera, Chinese and Indian. Owing to its diverse cultures attempts through a number of channels, politics, economics and social were made to bring about national integration. School is thought to be the most effective platform to bring about national…

  1. Acquisition of Scientific Literature in Developing Countries. 2: Malaysia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taib, Rosna

    1989-01-01

    Describes the acquisition of scientific literature by academic libraries in Malaysia. The discussion covers the impact of government policies, library acquisition policies, the selection process, acquisition of special materials, the role of gifts and exchanges, and problems with customs clearance and censorship. Progress in cooperative…

  2. Seafloor in the Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 Search Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Walter H. F.; Marks, Karen M.

    2014-05-01

    On the morning of 8 March 2014, Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, lost contact with air traffic control shortly after takeoff and vanished. While the world waited for any sign of the missing aircraft and the 239 people on board, authorities and scientists began to investigate what little information was known about the plane's actual movements.

  3. WHO DOES WHAT IN HUMAN FACTORS/ERGONOMICS IN MALAYSIA?

    PubMed

    Ahasan, Rabiul

    2014-12-01

    Individuals' expertise in human factors and ergonomics in Malaysia was studied with a view to aiding in gauging the confusion and conjectures of the expertise in this area. The choices and preferences of individuals in dealing with the current issues of human factors and ergonomics were examined. The authors suggest the ways to meet ethical challenges in their work and professions.

  4. Curriculum Orientation of Lecturers in Teacher Training College in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salleh, Halimatussaadiah; Hamdan, Abdul Rahim; Yahya, Fauziah; Jantan, Hafsah

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum development in teacher training college can be facilitated by indentifying the lecturers curriculum orientation. This study focuses on curriculum orientation of lecturer in Teacher Training Colleges (TTC) in Malaysia. Data were collected through questionnaire survey using the Curriculum Orientation Inventory, an instrument developed by…

  5. Learning Values about Languages in the Multilingual Preschools of Malaysia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Ellen C.

    In multilingual nations, young children learn early about the social and educational importance that adults attribute to different languages. In Malaysia, parents express their values about languages by choosing specific kindergartens. Preschools' language values are reflected in the amount of time devoted and the seriousness of approach to each…

  6. Teaching Efficacy of Universiti Putra Malaysia Science Student Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakar, Abd. Rahim; Konting, Mohd. Majid; Jamian, Rashid; Lyndon, Novel

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was to access teaching efficacy of Universiti Putra Malaysia Science student teachers. The specific objectives were to determine teaching efficacy of Science student teachers in terms of student engagement; instructional strategies; classroom management and teaching with computers in classroom; their satisfaction with…

  7. Overview of atmospheric aerosol studies in Malaysia: Known and unknown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanniah, Kasturi Devi; Kaskaoutis, Dimitris G.; San Lim, Hwee; Latif, Mohd Talib; Kamarul Zaman, Nurul Amalin Fatihah; Liew, Juneng

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols particularly those originated from anthropogenic sources can affect human health, air quality and the regional climate system of Southeast Asia (SEA). Population growth, and rapid urbanization associated with economic development in the SEA countries including Malaysia have resulted in high aerosol concentrations. Moreover, transboundary smoke plumes add more aerosols to the atmosphere in Malaysia. Nevertheless, the aerosol monitoring networks and/or field studies and research campaigns investigating the various aerosol properties are not so widespread over Malaysia. In the present work, we summarize and discuss the results of previous studies that investigated the aerosol properties over Malaysia by means of various instrumentation and techniques, focusing on the use of remote sensing data to examine atmospheric aerosols. Furthermore, we identify gaps in this research field and recommend further studies to bridge these knowledge gaps. More specifically gaps are identified in (i) monitoring aerosol loading and composition over urban areas, (ii) examining the influence of dust, (iii) assessing radiative effects of aerosols, (iv) measuring and modelling fine particles and (v) quantifying the contribution of long range transport of aerosols. Such studies are crucial for understanding the optical, physical and chemical properties of aerosols and their spatio-temporal characteristics over the region, which are useful for modelling and prediction of aerosols' effects on air quality and climate system.

  8. Internationalizing Higher Education in Malaysia: Government Policies and University's Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tham, Siew Yean

    2013-01-01

    The intensity of internationalization has increased with an escalation in internationalization activities, leading to increasing student, program, and institutional mobility. In Malaysia, the internationalization of higher education in terms of student mobility has changed tremendously in the last two decades as the country has shifted from a…

  9. Lexical Borrowings in the ESL Classrooms in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thirusanku, Jantmary; Yunus, Melor Md

    2013-01-01

    This paper attempts to show the use of lexical borrowings in ten teaching materials used by the English as Second Language (ESL) teachers in the ESL classrooms in the National Secondary Schools in the Klang district in Selangor, Malaysia. It also discusses the general and pedagogical implications involved in using lexical borrowings. This paper…

  10. Language Shift in the Tamil Communities of Malaysia and Singapore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiffman, Harold F.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the position of Tamil as the language of an ethnic minority in Malaysia and Singapore, placing the issue of Tamil and language maintenance within the larger sociolinguistic milieu in the two countries and drawing conclusions about the role of language policy and planning in the determination of linguistic outcomes. (SM)

  11. Business Communication Needs of Japanese Companies in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Yeoh Lee; Mahadi, Tengku Sepora Tengku; Singh, Manjet Kaur Mehar

    2016-01-01

    Business relationship between Japan and Malaysia has developed very quickly in recent years. This has caused a dramatic increase in the need for individuals who possess language skills to function in Japanese businesses. In order to investigate the needs of our Malaysian graduates, a survey was conducted involving graduates of Japanese language…

  12. Family Counseling in Malaysia: Current Issues and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noor, Norhayati Mohd.

    2014-01-01

    The study is carried out to explore the issues and practices in family counselling among the family counsellors at few counseling centres in Malaysia. Qualitative approach of single case embedded units was used for the study. Data collection was done using in-depth interview, observation and document analysis with 12 family counsellors. The data…

  13. Professional Development Needs of English Language Teachers in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khandehroo, Koroush; Mukundan, Jayakaran; Alavi, Zhinoos Kamal

    2011-01-01

    This study surveyed the professional development (PD) needs of school English language teachers at Melaka State in Malaysia. With close cooperation with the Department of Language at the Ministry of Education, the whole population of English language teachers had been studied on their types of professional development needs in instructional…

  14. Application of a Data Mining Model and It's Cross Application for Landslide Hazard Analysis: a Case Study in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Biswajeet; Lee, Saro; Shattri, Mansor

    This paper deals with landslide hazard analysis and cross-application using Geographic Information System (GIS) and remote sensing data for Cameron Highland, Penang Island and Selangor in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to cross-apply and verify a spatial probabilistic model for landslide hazard analysis. Landslide locations were identified in the study area from interpretation of aerial photographs and field surveys. Topographical/geological data and satellite images were collected and processed using GIS and image processing tools. There are ten landslide inducing parameters which are considered for the landslide hazard analysis. These parameters are topographic slope, aspect, curvature and distance from drainage, all derived from the topographic database; geology and distance from lineament, derived from the geologic database; landuse from Landsat satellite images; soil from the soil database; precipitation amount, derived from the rainfall database; and the vegetation index value from SPOT satellite images. These factors were analyzed using an artificial neural network model to generate the landslide hazard map. Each factor's weight was determined by the back-propagation training method. Then the landslide hazard indices were calculated using the trained back-propagation weights, and finally the landslide hazard map was generated using GIS tools. Landslide hazard maps were drawn for these three areas using artificial neural network model derived not only from the data for that area but also using the weight for each parameters, one of the statistical model, calculated from each of the other two areas (nine maps in all) as a cross-check of the validity of the method. For verification, the results of the analyses were compared, in each study area, with actual landslide locations. The verification results showed sufficient agreement between the presumptive hazard map and the existing data on landslide areas.

  15. Equity in health care financing: The case of Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chai Ping; Whynes, David K; Sach, Tracey H

    2008-01-01

    Background Equitable financing is a key objective of health care systems. Its importance is evidenced in policy documents, policy statements, the work of health economists and policy analysts. The conventional categorisations of finance sources for health care are taxation, social health insurance, private health insurance and out-of-pocket payments. There are nonetheless increasing variations in the finance sources used to fund health care. An understanding of the equity implications would help policy makers in achieving equitable financing. Objective The primary purpose of this paper was to comprehensively assess the equity of health care financing in Malaysia, which represents a new country context for the quantitative techniques used. The paper evaluated each of the five financing sources (direct taxes, indirect taxes, contributions to Employee Provident Fund and Social Security Organization, private insurance and out-of-pocket payments) independently, and subsequently by combined the financing sources to evaluate the whole financing system. Methods Cross-sectional analyses were performed on the Household Expenditure Survey Malaysia 1998/99, using Stata statistical software package. In order to assess inequality, progressivity of each finance sources and the whole financing system was measured by Kakwani's progressivity index. Results Results showed that Malaysia's predominantly tax-financed system was slightly progressive with a Kakwani's progressivity index of 0.186. The net progressive effect was produced by four progressive finance sources (in the decreasing order of direct taxes, private insurance premiums, out-of-pocket payments, contributions to EPF and SOCSO) and a regressive finance source (indirect taxes). Conclusion Malaysia's two tier health system, of a heavily subsidised public sector and a user charged private sector, has produced a progressive health financing system. The case of Malaysia exemplifies that policy makers can gain an in depth

  16. Forest Cover Mapping in Iskandar Malaysia Using Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanniah, K. D.; Mohd Najib, N. E.; Vu, T. T.

    2016-09-01

    Malaysia is the third largest country in the world that had lost forest cover. Therefore, timely information on forest cover is required to help the government to ensure that the remaining forest resources are managed in a sustainable manner. This study aims to map and detect changes of forest cover (deforestation and disturbance) in Iskandar Malaysia region in the south of Peninsular Malaysia between years 1990 and 2010 using Landsat satellite images. The Carnegie Landsat Analysis System-Lite (CLASlite) programme was used to classify forest cover using Landsat images. This software is able to mask out clouds, cloud shadows, terrain shadows, and water bodies and atmospherically correct the images using 6S radiative transfer model. An Automated Monte Carlo Unmixing technique embedded in CLASlite was used to unmix each Landsat pixel into fractions of photosynthetic vegetation (PV), non photosynthetic vegetation (NPV) and soil surface (S). Forest and non-forest areas were produced from the fractional cover images using appropriate threshold values of PV, NPV and S. CLASlite software was found to be able to classify forest cover in Iskandar Malaysia with only a difference between 14% (1990) and 5% (2010) compared to the forest land use map produced by the Department of Agriculture, Malaysia. Nevertheless, the CLASlite automated software used in this study was found not to exclude other vegetation types especially rubber and oil palm that has similar reflectance to forest. Currently rubber and oil palm were discriminated from forest manually using land use maps. Therefore, CLASlite algorithm needs further adjustment to exclude these vegetation and classify only forest cover.

  17. Malaysia/Singapore: Where Asian Cultures Meet. Participants' Papers. Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program, 2001 (Malaysia and Singapore).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malaysian-American Commission on Educational Exchange, Kuala Lumpur.

    The general objective of the Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program is to help U.S. educators enhance their international understanding and increase their knowledge of the people and culture of other countries. This particular program offered participants an overview of life in Malaysia and Singapore through seminars and other activities.…

  18. Application of Serological Tools and Spatial Analysis to Investigate Malaria Transmission Dynamics in Highland Areas of Southwest Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Caroline A.; Cook, Jackie; Nanyunja, Sarah; Bruce, Jane; Bhasin, Amit; Drakeley, Chris; Roper, Cally; Pearce, Richard; Rwakimari, John B.; Abeku, Tarekegn A.; Corran, Patrick; Cox, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Serological markers, combined with spatial analysis, offer a comparatively more sensitive means by which to measure and detect foci of malaria transmission in highland areas than traditional malariometric indicators. Plasmodium falciparum parasite prevalence, seroprevalence, and seroconversion rate to P. falciparum merozoite surface protein-119 (MSP-119) were measured in a cross-sectional survey to determine differences in transmission between altitudinal strata. Clusters of P. falciparum parasite prevalence and high antibody responses to MSP-119 were detected and compared. Results show that P. falciparum prevalence and seroprevalence generally decreased with increasing altitude. However, transmission was heterogeneous with hotspots of prevalence and/or seroprevalence detected in both highland and highland fringe altitudes, including a serological hotspot at 2,200 m. Results demonstrate that seroprevalence can be used as an additional tool to identify hotspots of malaria transmission that might be difficult to detect using traditional cross-sectional parasite surveys or through vector studies. Our study findings identify ways in which malaria prevention and control can be more effectively targeted in highland or low transmission areas via serological measures. These tools will become increasingly important for countries with an elimination agenda and/or where malaria transmission is becoming patchy and focal, but receptivity to malaria transmission remains high. PMID:27022156

  19. Constituting Antebellum African American Identity: Resistance, Violence, and Masculinity in Henry Highland Garnet's (1843) "Address to the Slaves"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jasinski, James

    2007-01-01

    In August 1843 Presbyterian minister Henry Highland Garnet delivered his "Address to the Slaves of the United States of America" to the National Convention of Colored Citizens in Buffalo, NY. While often read (and almost as often dismissed) as either an unqualified call for a violent slave rebellion or, at the least, a celebration of…

  20. Protein nitration, lipid peroxidation and DNA damage at high altitude in acclimatized lowlanders and native highlanders: relation with oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sanchari; Dutta, Arkadeb; Singh, Som Nath; Ray, Uday Sankar

    2010-04-30

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species have been reported to be increased due to hypobaric hypoxia. It was hypothesized that lowlanders are more susceptible to protein nitration, lipid peroxidation and DNA damage at high altitude than highlanders and formation of these biomarkers may have strong correlation with oxygen consumption. Male volunteers were randomly selected and categorized into 3 groups, i.e. lowlanders at sea level (LL-SL, n=10), lowlanders at an altitude of 4560 m (LL-HA, n=10) and highlanders (HAN, n=10). Volunteers performed maximal aerobic exercise. Resting and post-exercise blood samples were taken at sea level and high altitude. Both resting and maximum oxygen consumption showed positive correlation with stress markers. LL-HA showed increased 3-nitrotyrosine and lipid hydroperoxide than LL-SL at rest. 3-Nitrotyrosine and lipid hydroperoxide increased after exercise in 3 groups, but percentage increase was higher in HAN than LL-SL and LL-HA. LL-SL and HAN showed significant DNA damage after exercise. Results indicate that resting oxygen consumption is positively correlated with nitrosative and oxidative stress markers irrespective of environmental condition and adaptation levels. Lowlanders have shown higher susceptibility to hypoxic insult than highlanders at rest, but when subjected to exercise test, they showed better tolerance to hypoxia than highlanders.

  1. Vital warmth and well-being: steambathing as household therapy among the Tzeltal and Tzotzil Maya of highland Chiapas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Groark, Kevin P

    2005-08-01

    Among the Maya, the cultural history of steambathing spans more than two millennia. Although it has largely disappeared from the lowlands, household-level steambathing persists in several highland Maya communities in Chiapas, Mexico. In this article, I present an overview of therapeutic steambathing among the Tzeltal and Tzotzil Maya. Through an extended discussion of the beliefs and practices surrounding steambathing, I develop several features of highland Maya thinking about physical health and "well-being". In particular, I examine a set of ethnophysiological representations relating to the "thermal" nature of functional bodies, and the relationship of these models to the maintenance and restoration of health. The highland Maya have articulated an elaborate understanding of physical health and well-being coded in an idiom of "vital warmth", and directed toward the preservation and augmentation of the endogenous heat necessary for vitality and vigor. These models simultaneously reflect empirical understandings of bodily states in health and illness, as well as metaphorical assumptions about the thermal nature of functional psychosocial identities. Steambathing draws on and reinforces these models, constituting a core cultural technology for radically altering the thermal state of the patient, an experience which the highland Maya regard as deeply beneficial. The paper closes with a discussion of recent biomedical research into the physiological effects of hyperthermal therapies.

  2. Associations between trematode infections in cattle and freshwater snails in highland and lowland areas of Iringa Rural District, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Nzalawahe, Jahashi; Kassuku, Ayub A; Stothard, J Russell; Coles, Gerald C; Eisler, Mark C

    2015-09-01

    The epidemiology of trematode infections in cattle was investigated within highland and lowland areas of Iringa Rural District, in southern Tanzania. Fecal samples were collected from 450 cattle in 15 villages at altitudes ranging from 696 to 1800 m above the sea level. Freshwater snails were collected from selected water bodies and screened for emergence of cercariae. The infection rates in cattle were Fasciola gigantica 28·2%, paramphistomes 62·8% and Schistosoma bovis 4·8%. Notably, prevalence of trematode infections in cattle was much higher in highland (altitude > 1500 m) as compared with lowland (altitude < 1500 m) areas and was statistically significant (P-value = 0·000) for F. gigantica and paramphistomes but not for S. bovis. The snails collected included Lymnaea natalensis, Bulinus africanus, Bulinus tropicus, Bulinus forskali, Biomphalaria pfeifferi, Melanoides tuberculata and Bellamya constricta with a greater proportion of highland (75%) than lowland (36%) water bodies harbouring snails. Altitude is a major factor shaping the epidemiology of F. gigantica and paramphistomes infections in cattle in Iringa Rural District with greater emphasis upon control needed in highland areas.

  3. Improving efficacy of landscape interventions in the (sub) humid Ethiopian highlands by improved understanding of runoff processes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite millions of dollars invested in soil and water conservation practices and other landscape interventions in the Ethiopian highlands and billions of hours of food-for-work farm labor, sediment concentration in rivers is increasing. Possible ways to reverse the current trend have been investiga...

  4. Building climate resilience in the Blue Nile/Abay Highlands: Part II-arole for earth system sciences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Blue Nile (Abay) Highlands of Ethiopia are characterized by significant interannual climate variability, dissected topography and associated local climate contrasts, erosive rains and erodible soils, and intense land pressure due to an increasing population and an economy that is almost entirely...

  5. Highland Russet: A Full Season, Processing Variety with High Yields of Uniform U.S. No. 1 Tubers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Highland Russet is a late-season potato variety with light russet skin notable for its high yield of uniform U.S. No. 1 tubers, and good processing and culinary qualities. It resulted from a 1990 cross between Ranger Russet and Russet Legend and has been evaluated for over 15 years in public and ind...

  6. Microrefugia and species persistence in the Galápagos highlands: a 26,000-year paleoecological perspective.

    PubMed

    Collins, Aaron F; Bush, Mark B; Sachs, Julian P

    2013-01-01

    The Galápagos Islands are known to have experienced significant drought during the Quaternary. The loss of mesophytic upland habitats has been suggested to underlie the relatively lower endemism of upland compared with lowland plant assemblages. A fossil pollen record spanning the last 26,000 years from an upland bog on Santa Cruz Island, revealed the persistent presence of highland pollen and spore types during the last glacial maximum and a millennial-scale series of droughts in the mid Holocene. The absence of lowland taxa and presence of mesic taxa led to the conclusion that the highland flora of the Galápagos persisted during both these periods. The resiliency of the highland flora of the Galápagos to long-term drought contradicts an earlier hypothesis that an extinction of highland taxa occurred during the last glacial maximum and that rapid Holocene speciation created the modern plant assemblage within the last 10,000 years. Based on the palynological data, we suggest that, even during the height of glacial and Holocene droughts, cool sea-surface temperatures and strong trade-wind activity would have promoted persistent ground level cloudiness that provided the necessary moisture inputs to maintain microrefugia for mesophytic plants. Although moist conditions were maintained, the lack of precipitation caused the loss of open water habitat during such events, and accounts for the known extinctions of species such as Azolla sp., and Elatine sp., while other moisture dependent taxa, i.e., Cyathea weatherbyana, persisted.

  7. COMPARING STRENGTHS OF GEOGRAPHIC AND NONGEOGRAPHIC CLASSIFICATIONS OF STREAM BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES IN THE MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) sampled - 500 wadeable streams in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands region of the US during the late spring of 1993 to 1995 for a variety of physical, chemical, and biological indicat...

  8. An ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants used in the eastern highlands of Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Eastern Highlands area of Papua New Guinea (PNG) has a rich tradition of medicinal plant use. However, rapid modernization is resulting in the loss of independent language traditions and consequently a loss of individuals knowledgeable in medicinal plant use. This report represents a program to document and preserve traditional knowledge concerning medicinal plant use in PNG. This report documents and compares traditional plant use in the Eastern Highlands districts of Unggai-Bena, Okapa, and Obura-Wonenara, and puts these new records in context of previously documented PNG medicinal plant use. Methods This manuscript is an annotated combination of Traditional Medicines survey reports generated by UPNG trainees using a survey questionnaire titled “Information sheet on traditional herbal reparations and medicinal plants of PNG”. The Traditional Medicines survey project is supported by WHO, US NIH and PNG governmental health care initiatives and funding. Results Overall, after “poisoning” (synonymous with “magic”) the most commonly recorded ailments addressed by medicinal plant use were pain, gynecological disease, gastrointestinal maladies, anemia or malnutrition and malaria. However, the recorded indications for plant use varied widely amongst the different survey locations. Unlike many areas of PNG, mixing of ingredients was the most common mode of preparation recorded, except for two areas where the consumption of fresh plant material was more common. Throughout the Eastern Highlands oral administration was most common, with topical application second. Overall, leaves were most commonly used in the preparations of the healers interviewed, followed by bark and stems. Several new medicinal uses of plants were also documented. Conclusions Collaboration between the WHO, UPNG and the PNG Department of Health initiated Traditional Medicine survey program in order to preserve traditional knowledge concerning medicinal plant use in PNG. This

  9. Remote sensing studies of anorthosite and other highland lithologies of Earth's Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Chris Allan

    Ground-based and spacecraft remote sensing data were used to investigate the lithology of various highlands regions of Earth's Moon and the stratigraphic relationships among lithologic types. Telescopic near-infrared reflection spectra of high spectral resolution were used to determine lithologies exposed at numerous locations on the lunar nearside. Multispectral imagery obtained by the Galileo and Clementine, spacecraft was compared with the results of interpretation of ground-based telescopic reflectance spectra. An iron mapping technique utilizing the spacecraft data was used to identify anorthosite on the lunar farside. Chapter 2 focuses on the Humorum basin region of the nearside. Anorthosite was identified in parts of the mare-bounding ring of Humorum, excavated by fresh craters from beneath the slightly more mafic material that dominates the surface of the highlands in this region. A region to the northwest appears anomalous in optical and radar data sets. Principal components analyses of ground-based spectra and multispectral imagery of this area suggests that mare basalt was excavated by Letronne crater and that at least some cryptomare is present in the region as well. Chapter 3 reports the results of analyses of numerous spectra of the Grimaldi basin region. Noritic anorthosite and anorthositic norite are the most common highland rock types present in the material emplaced there by both the Grimaldi and Orientale basin-forming impacts. Some outcrops of pure anorthosite have been exposed from beneath this more mafic material by craters on or near the inner rings of Grimaldi. Chapter 4 considers the distribution and modes of occurrence of anorthosite throughout the lunar surface. Anorthosite is associate with the inner rings of other nearside basins, including Orientale and Nectaris. On the farside, the distribution of anorthosite appears to be controlled in large part by the giant South Pole-Aitken basin. Areas near the rim of the basin were covered by

  10. Surveying the Newly Digitized Apollo Metric Images for Highland Fault Scarps on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, N. R.; Pritchard, M. E.; Bell, J. F.; Watters, T. R.; Robinson, M. S.; Lawrence, S.

    2009-12-01

    The presence and distribution of thrust faults on the Moon have major implications for lunar formation and thermal evolution. For example, thermal history models for the Moon imply that most of the lunar interior was initially hot. As the Moon cooled over time, some models predict global-scale thrust faults should form as stress builds from global thermal contraction. Large-scale thrust fault scarps with lengths of hundreds of kilometers and maximum relief of up to a kilometer or more, like those on Mercury, are not found on the Moon; however, relatively small-scale linear and curvilinear lobate scarps with maximum lengths typically around 10 km have been observed in the highlands [Binder and Gunga, Icarus, v63, 1985]. These small-scale scarps are interpreted to be thrust faults formed by contractional stresses with relatively small maximum (tens of meters) displacements on the faults. These narrow, low relief landforms could only be identified in the highest resolution Lunar Orbiter and Apollo Panoramic Camera images and under the most favorable lighting conditions. To date, the global distribution and other properties of lunar lobate faults are not well understood. The recent micron-resolution scanning and digitization of the Apollo Mapping Camera (Metric) photographic negatives [Lawrence et al., NLSI Conf. #1415, 2008; http://wms.lroc.asu.edu/apollo] provides a new dataset to search for potential scarps. We examined more than 100 digitized Metric Camera image scans, and from these identified 81 images with favorable lighting (incidence angles between about 55 and 80 deg.) to manually search for features that could be potential tectonic scarps. Previous surveys based on Panoramic Camera and Lunar Orbiter images found fewer than 100 lobate scarps in the highlands; in our Apollo Metric Camera image survey, we have found additional regions with one or more previously unidentified linear and curvilinear features on the lunar surface that may represent lobate thrust

  11. The Topography and Basin Deposits of the Equatorial Highlands: A MGS-Viking Synergistic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. M.; Howard, A. D.; Schenk, P. M.

    1999-09-01

    We are using Digital Terrain Models (DTM) to evaluate the sequence and extent of various landform-modifying processes that have shaped the martian equatorial highlands using models that simulates these processes on a three-dimensional synthetic landscape. This modeling emulates the following processes: (1) cratering; (2) fluvial erosion and sedimentation; (3) weathering and mass wasting; (4) aeolian erosion and deposition; (5) groundwater flow and groundwater sapping; and (6) volcanic deposition of different emplacement modes. The models have been successfully used to predict the evolution of terrestrial landscapes. The models provide explicit simulations of landform development and thusly predict the topographic evolution of the surface and final landscape form. We generate combined Viking-MOLA DTMs, so that we have absolute regional and high resolution topographic information. With our DTMs we are able to much more realistically evaluate the evolution of specific locations within the cratered uplands of Mars than would be possible from either data set alone. Results of this analysis have direct import to Mars Surveyor Program landing site selection and science. We have selected three areas for our initial studies: (1) the south edge of the "hematite" deposit detected by TES and observed to be bordered by scarps and knobs exhibiting layers in Viking and MOC SPO images located at 2 degS, 4 degW; (2) a typical example of equatorial cratered highlands at 2 degN, 240.5 degW; and (3) a site at 5 degS and 264 degW just south of the Isidis rim that is heavily dissected by channels. These regions were optimally imaged by Viking for the generation of DTMs, lie within the Mars 2001 landing constraints, and are potential locations for fluvial or lacustrine deposits. Our initial analysis of the later sites indicates that fluvial erosion for large solitary channels probably took the form of sapping, whereas denser networks of small channels may have formed at least in part

  12. Three-dimensional geometric morphometric analysis of talar morphology in extant gorilla taxa from highland and lowland habitats.

    PubMed

    Knigge, Ryan P; Tocheri, Matthew W; Orr, Caley M; Mcnulty, Kieran P

    2015-01-01

    Western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) are known to climb significantly more often than eastern gorillas (Gorilla beringei), a behavioral distinction attributable to major differences in their respective habitats (i.e., highland vs. lowland). Genetic evidence suggests that the lineages leading to these taxa began diverging from one another between approximately 1 and 3 million years ago. Thus, gorillas offer a special opportunity to examine the degree to which morphology of recently diverged taxa may be "fine-tuned" to differing ecological requirements. Using three-dimensional (3D) geometric morphometrics, we compared talar morphology in a sample of 87 specimens including western (lowland), mountain (highland), and grauer gorillas (lowland and highland populations). Talar shape was captured with a series of landmarks and semilandmarks superimposed by generalized Procrustes analysis. A between-group principal components analysis of overall talar shape separates gorillas by ecological habitat and by taxon. An analysis of only the trochlea and lateral malleolar facet identifies subtle variations in trochlear shape between western lowland and lowland grauer gorillas, potentially indicative of convergent evolution of arboreal adaptations in the talus. Lastly, talar shape scales differently with centroid size for highland and lowland gorillas, suggesting that ankle morphology may track body-size mediated variation in arboreal behaviors differently depending on ecological setting. Several of the observed shape differences are linked biomechanically to the facilitation of climbing in lowland gorillas and to stability and load-bearing on terrestrial substrates in the highland taxa, providing an important comparative model for studying morphological variation in groups known only from fossils (e.g., early hominins).

  13. Ancient Astronomical Hieroglyphs of the Armenian Highland and their Echo in Architectural Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter-Gulanyan, Ani

    2014-10-01

    The credo-spiritual structure formed as a result of astronomical knowledge in the Armenian Highland and recognition of the universe, with its symbolistic signs - which, in our opinion, were expressed in particular by astronomic horoscope hieroglyphs - have had their worship and spiritual speculative feedback both in architecture and in different other arts, especially in symbolic jewelry. A visible link is noticed between the shift of constellations and the civilization development phases. Identification of archeological sources gives the ground to conclude that Armenia has been one of the centers of astronomy. The astronomical signs, having a local origin and having formed ancient astronomical-worship, spiritual-credo structure, have found the feedback of its developments also in other biospheres with respective unique manifestations, in both ancient pagan church architecture and the Christian church architecture, both as a volume form and as a spiritual ideology, with its credosymbolistic signs.

  14. Geochemistry of the lunar highlands as revealed by measurements of thermal neutrons

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Andrew W.; Lawrence, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Thermal neutron emissions from the lunar surface provide a direct measure of bulk elemental composition that can be used to constrain the chemical properties of near‐surface (depth <1 m) lunar materials. We present a new calibration of the Lunar Prospector thermal neutron map, providing a direct link between measured count rates and bulk elemental composition. The data are used to examine the chemical and mineralogical composition of the lunar surface, with an emphasis on constraining the plagioclase concentration across the highlands. We observe that the regions of lowest neutron absorption, which correspond to estimated plagioclase concentrations of >85%, are generally associated with large impact basins and are colocated with clusters of nearly pure plagioclase identified with spectral reflectance data. PMID:27830110

  15. Indications for Caesarean sections in a rural hospital in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Mark, Terence B; Radcliffe, Jim; Laman, Moses

    2014-07-01

    We retrospectively documented indications for Caesarean sections in a rural district level hospital in the highlands of Papua New Guinea. Over a 53-month study period, 745 Caesarean sections were performed. Prolonged labour, previous history of Caesarean section, cephalopelvic disproportion, malpresentation and fetal distress accounted for over 88% of Caesarean sections performed. In older mothers (aged >30 years), antepartum haemorrhage (Fisher exact test, P = 0.05) and multiple indications (P = 0.001) were leading reasons for Caesarean sections while cephalopelvic disproportion (P = 0.005) was the leading indication in younger mothers. Further prospective studies incorporating perinatal and maternal mortality rates are required to optimise the value of Caesarean sections at district level hospitals in Papua New Guinea.

  16. The fractured Moon: Production and saturation of porosity in the lunar highlands from impact cratering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, Jason M.; Evans, Alexander J.; Johnson, Brandon C.; Melosh, H. Jay; Miljković, Katarina; Phillips, Roger J.; Andrews-Hanna, Jeffrey C.; Bierson, Carver J.; Head, James W.; Milbury, Colleen; Neumann, Gregory A.; Nimmo, Francis; Smith, David E.; Solomon, Sean C.; Sori, Michael M.; Wieczorek, Mark A.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2015-09-01

    We have analyzed the Bouguer anomaly (BA) of ~1200 complex craters in the lunar highlands from Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory observations. The BA of these craters is generally negative, though positive BA values are observed, particularly for smaller craters. Crater BA values scale inversely with crater diameter, quantifying how larger impacts produce more extensive fracturing and dilatant bulking. The Bouguer anomaly of craters larger than 93-19+47 km in diameter is independent of crater size, indicating that there is a limiting depth to impact-generated porosity, presumably from pore collapse associated with either overburden pressure or viscous flow. Impact-generated porosity of the bulk lunar crust is likely in a state of equilibrium for craters smaller than ~30 km in diameter, consistent with an ~8 km thick lunar megaregolith, whereas the gravity signature of larger craters is still preserved and provides new insight into the cratering record of even the oldest lunar surfaces.

  17. Lake trout demographics in relation to burbot and coregonine populations in the Algonquin Highlands, Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carl, L.M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that lake trout populations change in relation to cisco, lake whitefish, round whitefish and burbot populations in lakes in the Algonquin Highlands region of Ontario. Lake trout population change is greatest where cisco and lake whitefish are present. Lake trout populations in lakes without either coregonine tend to have small adults and many juveniles. Where cisco or lake whitefish are present, adult lake trout are large, juvenile abundance is low, and the stock-recruit relationship appears to be uncoupled likely due to a larval bottleneck. Lake trout populations in these lakes may be sensitive to overfishing and recruitment failure. Lake trout populations do not appear to change in relation to round whitefish. There appears to be an indirect positive change on juvenile lake trout abundance through reductions in the density of benthic coregonines in the presence of large, hypolimnetic burbot. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  18. Geochemistry of the lunar highlands as revealed by measurements of thermal neutrons.

    PubMed

    Peplowski, Patrick N; Beck, Andrew W; Lawrence, David J

    2016-03-01

    Thermal neutron emissions from the lunar surface provide a direct measure of bulk elemental composition that can be used to constrain the chemical properties of near-surface (depth <1 m) lunar materials. We present a new calibration of the Lunar Prospector thermal neutron map, providing a direct link between measured count rates and bulk elemental composition. The data are used to examine the chemical and mineralogical composition of the lunar surface, with an emphasis on constraining the plagioclase concentration across the highlands. We observe that the regions of lowest neutron absorption, which correspond to estimated plagioclase concentrations of >85%, are generally associated with large impact basins and are colocated with clusters of nearly pure plagioclase identified with spectral reflectance data.

  19. The relationship between the Guinea Highlands and the West African offshore rainfall maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, H. L.; Young, G. S.; Evans, J. L.; Fuentes, J. D.; Núñez Ocasio, K. M.

    2017-01-01

    Satellite rainfall estimates reveal a consistent rainfall maximum off the West African coast during the monsoon season. An analysis of 16 years of rainfall in the monsoon season is conducted to explore the drivers of such copious amounts of rainfall. Composites of daily rainfall and midlevel meridional winds centered on the days with maximum rainfall show that the day with the heaviest rainfall follows the strongest midlevel northerlies but coincides with peak low-level moisture convergence. Rain type composites show that convective rain dominates the study region. The dominant contribution to the offshore rainfall maximum is convective development driven by the enhancement of upslope winds near the Guinea Highlands. The enhancement in the upslope flow is closely related to African easterly waves propagating off the continent that generate low-level cyclonic vorticity and convergence. Numerical simulations reproduce the observed rainfall maximum and indicate that it weakens if the African topography is reduced.

  20. A transient heating event in the history of a highlands troctolite from Apollo 12 soil 12033

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, U. B.; Walker, D.

    1985-01-01

    A 2-mm particle, consisting of a troctolite clast attached to a small amount of glassy soil breccia, was found in a thin section of grains from Apollo 12 sample 12033,66. A description is given of the evolutionary history of the troctolite, taking into account the unique texture. It appears that the particle was broken from its parent rock and projected to Oceanus Procellarum from a source area in the highlands. Before, during, or after the flight, the troctolite was welded to a soil breccia by a minor amount of melting along the contact. It is argued that two separate heating events may be involved. The hypothesis is considered that the partial remelting and quenching of the troctolite took place very rapidly. Attention is given to melting experiments which test and confirm this hypothesis.

  1. Regional tectonic analysis of Venus equatorial highlands and comparison with Earth-based Magellan radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David R.; Wetherill, George

    1993-01-01

    Research on regional tectonic analysis of Venus equatorial highlands and comparison with earth-based and Magellan radar images is presented. Over the past two years, the tectonic analysis of Venus performed centered on global properties of the planet, in order to understand fundamental aspects of the dynamics of the mantle and lithosphere of Venus. These include studies pertaining to the original constitutive and thermal character of the planet, as well as the evolution of Venus through time, and the present day tectonics. Parameterized convection models of the Earth and Venus were developed. The parameterized convection code was reformulated to model Venus with an initially hydrous mantle to determine how the cold-trap could affect the evolution of the planet.

  2. Village rural water supplies in the Western Highlands Province of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Wohlfahrt, D J; Kukyuwa, K

    1982-09-01

    The 1980's have been declared the "International Water Supply and Sanitation Decade". The Papua New Guinea (PNG) Government has committed itself to spending K2.5 million between 1982-1985 on rural water supplies. The experience for such a programme in the Western Highlands is reviewed. Between 1975 and June 1981 there were 101 installation, 69 of which were inspected. Of these, 40.6% were working. Within one year 40% had broken down; after 4 years, 90% had broken down. Contributing factors to break downs were; the use of a cheap and inefficient hand pump on wells; use of plastic rather than metal pipes in reticulated water supplies; weaknesses in the design of reticulated supplies; and difficulties with regular maintenance. It is recommended that the government take steps to solve these problems before it commits itself to a significantly increased expenditure on rural water supplies.

  3. Cordierite-spinel troctolite, a new magnesium-rich lithology from the lunar highlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, Ursula B.; Carey, J. William; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.

    1989-01-01

    A clast of spineltroctolite containing 8 percent cordierite (Mg2,Al4Si5O18) has been identified among the constituents of Apollo 15 regolith breccia 15295. The cordierite and associated anorthite, forsteritic olivine, and pleonaste spinel represent a new, Mg-rich lunar highlands lithology that formed by metamorphism of an igneous spinel cumulate. The cordierite-forsterite pair in the assemblage is stable at a maximum pressure of 2.5 kilobars, equivalent to a depth of 50 kilometers, or 10 kilometers above the lunar crust-mantle boundary. The occurrence of the clast indicates that spinel cumulates are a more important constituent of the lower lunar crust than has been recognized. The rarity of cordierite-spinel troctolite among lunar rock samples suggests that it is excavated only by large impact events, such as the one that formed the adjacent Imbrium Basin.

  4. Proximal base stress fracture of the second metatarsal in a Highland dancer.

    PubMed

    Watson, Hannah Isabella; O'Donnell, Barry; Hopper, Graeme Philip; Chang, Winston

    2013-06-26

    A 15-year-old female Highland dancer presented to the accident and emergency department with an ankle inversion injury on a background of several weeks of pain in the right foot. A radiograph of the right foot demonstrated a stress fracture at the base of the second metatarsal. She was treated conservatively with a below knee removable supportive walking boot with a rocker bottom sole. She re-presented to the accident and emergency department 3 weeks later with pins and needles in the right foot; she was given crutches to use along side the supportive walking boot. Radiographs 12 weeks after the first presentation showed healing of the stress fracture. The patient was now asymptomatic of the injury. She was unable to fully train for 12 weeks due to the injury. Conservative management was successful in this patient.

  5. Engima of a thermal anomaly - A TM/AVHRR study of the volcanic Arabian highlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blodget, H. W.; Andre, C. G.; Masuoka, P. M.

    1987-01-01

    Discovery of a large thermal anomaly in the western Arabian highlands on Landsat TM imagery is reported. The anomaly, 15 C warmer than surroundings, forms a 2-km-wide arc around the southern flank of Jebel Chada, a volcano active in 1256 AD. It is recorded by AVHRR imagery as well, despite the 1.1-km spatial resolution of this sensor. Air photos and geologic maps show no bedrock unit that corresponds to the anomaly. Digital techniques were applied to the TM and AVHRR data, including contrast enhancement, density slicing, principal components analysis, and construction of multiband composite images. It is concluded that the anomaly results from a thin cover of volcanic ash or cinder that is optically indistinguishable from underlying basalt, rather than from internal (volcanic or hydrologic) heat sources.

  6. Distribution and provenance of lunar highland rock types at North Ray Crater, Apollo 16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeffler, D.; Ostertag, R.; Borchardt, R.; Malley, J.; Rehfeldt, A.; Reimold, W. U.

    1982-01-01

    In connection with its selenographic setting in the central lunar highlands, the Apollo 16 landing site in the Descartes area is highly important as a prime sampling area for rocks which formed as part of the primordial crust and as a key location for the analysis of the deformation and transport of crustal material by impact processes. The present investigation is concerned with the North Ray crater, which is located on the N-S running boundary between the smooth Cayley plains to the west and the Descartes mountains to the east. Attention is given to aspects of selenography and location of samples, the ejecta distribution of post-Cayley impact craters, sample classification, the frequency distribution of rock types in the North Ray Crater ejecta, an interpretation of compositional and age data, a model of the target stratigraphy and excavation of North Ray Crater, and implications for the emplacement and provenance of North Ray target rocks.

  7. Detailed regional predictions of N2O and NO emissions from a tropical highland rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharahi Ghehi, N.; Werner, C.; Hufkens, K.; Kiese, R.; Van Ranst, E.; Nsabimana, D.; Wallin, G.; Klemedtsson, L.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Boeckx, P.

    2013-01-01

    Tropical forest soils are a significant source for the greenhouse gas N2O as well as for NO, a precursor of tropospheric ozone. However, current estimates are uncertain due to the limited number of field measurements. Furthermore, there is considerable spatial and temporal variability of N2O and NO emissions due to the variation of environmental conditions such as soil properties, vegetation characteristics and meteorology. In this study we used a process-based model (ForestDNDC-tropica) to estimate N2O and NO emissions from tropical highland forest (Nyungwe) soils in southwestern Rwanda. To extend the model inputs to regional scale, ForestDNDC-tropica was linked to an exceptionally large legacy soil dataset. There was agreement between N2O and NO measurements and the model predictions though the ForestDNDC-tropica resulted in considerable lower emissions for few sites. Low similarity was specifically found for acidic soil with high clay content and reduced metals, indicating that chemo-denitrification processes on acidic soils might be under-represented in the current ForestDNDC-tropica model. The results showed that soil bulk density and pH are the most influential factors driving spatial variations in soil N2O and NO emissions for tropical forest soils. The area investigated (1113 km2) was estimated to emit ca. 439 ± 50 t N2O-N yr-1 (2.8-5.5 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr-1) and 244 ± 16 t NO-N yr-1 (0.8-5.1 kg N ha-1 yr-1). Consistent with less detailed studies, we confirm that tropical highland rainforest soils are a major source of atmospheric N2O and NO.

  8. A ferroan region of the lunar highlands as recorded in meteorites MAC88104 and MAC88105

    SciTech Connect

    Jolliff, B.L.; Korotev, R.L.; Haskin, L.A. )

    1991-11-01

    MacAlpine Hills 88104 and 88105 (MAC88104/5) are paired meteorites of noritic anorthosite composition from the lunar highlands. MAC88105 is a breccia composed mainly of melt-breccia clasts in a fine-grained, fragmental, and partly glassy matrix. The most abundant melt lithologies are feldspathic and are similar in composition to the bulk meteorite. Other melt lithologies include feldspathic melt rocks, mafic melt breccias, and a rare melt breccia relatively enriched in incompatible trace elements. Subordinate lithic clasts are granulitic breccias and ferroan (relatively low Mg/(Mg + Fe)) igneous lithologies, including troctolitic anorthosite, anorthositic norite, gabbronorite, and anorthosite. Igneous clasts having mafic mineral compositions more magnesian than Fo{sub 55} and En{sub 60} were not observed. Rare fragments of glass spheres and shards as well as glass clasts indicate that the meteorite was derived from an immature regolith. The bulk composition of MAC88105 is characterized by a molar Mg/(Mg + Fe) ratio of 0.62, at the extreme low end of the range for meteorites from the lunar highlands. Its low concentrations of incompatible trace elements and feldspathic bulk composition (29% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), suggests that it, like the other lunar meteorites, formed at a site far removed from the areas sampled by the Apollo missions. Similarities in mineral compositions among the different lithologies of the breccia and the distribution of mineral fragments suggest that most components of the meteorite were derived from a crustal section dominated by material with a noritic anorthosite composition and an affinity of the ferroan suite of plutonic rocks.

  9. Madagascar Highland erosion: What can we learn from the archive precipitation data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imola Szabó, Amanda; Raveloson, Andrea; Székely, Balázs

    2014-05-01

    In Madagascar, soil erosion is significant even when it is compared to world averages, resulting in special geomorphic forms known as lavakas appearing in the Highland regions of the island. The development of these features is due to rather unique multifactorial environmental conditions. Among many factors (geology, soil composition, human influence, etc.) the spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation is a key factor. The presence of the dry and wet season seems to be responsible for the enhanced generation of small cracks that might eventually lead to the development of a gully. However, the way of the development of such gully erosions are unknown. To what extent of the actual precipitation pattern to what extent the weather contributes to the aforementioned phenomenon has not yet been studied in great detail. The aim of our research is to study the climatic and weather conditions of lavaka-prone areas for the last decades. The typical cyclonal pattern affects the Madagascar Highlands in various ways. The precipitation and the soil moisture data show that the spatial distribution can be correlated with the appearance of lavakas to a given extent, however the local distribution cannot be explained only based on the precipitation pattern. The severity of the wet season varies strongly in the various decades leading to different precipitation maxima in January-March period. In general the effectiveness of the gully erosion is thought to be highly enhanced if the run-off of the area show large temporal variations. According to our studies this variability is quite high in certain seasons, and, despite of the low spatial resolution, related to the lavaka-prone areas. However, neither the amount of the precipitation, nor the variability alone cannot explain the high variation found in the spatial density and length distribution. Further multidisciplinary studies are necessary to draw conclusions about lavaka formation and describe the process of lavaka

  10. Plasma soluble erythropoietin receptor is decreased during sleep in Andean highlanders with Chronic Mountain Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Corante, Noemí; Anza-Ramírez, Cecilia; Figueroa-Mujíca, Rómulo; Vizcardo-Galindo, Gustavo; Mercado, Andy; Macarlupú, José Luis; León-Velarde, Fabiola

    2016-01-01

    Excessive erythrocytosis (EE) is the main sign of Chronic Mountain Sickness (CMS), a highly prevalent syndrome in Andean highlanders. Low pulse O2 saturation (SpO2) during sleep and serum androgens have been suggested to contribute to EE in CMS patients. However, whether these factors have a significant impact on the erythropoietin (Epo) system leading to EE is still unclear. We have recently shown that morning soluble Epo receptor (sEpoR), an endogenous Epo antagonist, is decreased in CMS patients suggesting increased Epo availability (increased Epo/sEpoR). The present study aimed to characterize the nocturnal concentration profile of sEpoR and Epo and their relationship with SpO2, Hct, and serum testosterone in healthy highlanders (HH) and CMS patients. Epo and sEpoR concentrations were evaluated every 4 h (6 PM to 6 AM) and nighttime SpO2 was continuously monitored (10 PM to 6 AM) in 39 male participants (CMS, n = 23; HH, n = 16) aged 21-65 yr from Cerro de Pasco, Peru (4,340 m). CMS patients showed higher serum Epo concentrations throughout the night and lower sEpoR from 10 PM to 6 AM. Consequently, Epo/sEpoR was significantly higher in the CMS group at every time point. Mean sleep-time SpO2 was lower in CMS patients compared with HH, while the percentage of sleep time spent with SpO2 < 80% was higher. Multiple-regression analysis showed mean sleep-time SpO2 and Epo/sEpoR as significant predictors of hematocrit corrected for potential confounders (age, body mass index, and testosterone). Testosterone levels were associated neither with Hct nor with erythropoietic factors. In conclusion, our results show sustained erythropoietic stimulus driven by the Epo system in CMS patients, further enhanced by a continuous exposure to accentuated nocturnal hypoxemia. PMID:27125843

  11. Spatial and temporal runoff processes in the degraded Ethiopian Highlands: the Anjeni Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayabil, H. K.; Tebebu, T. Y.; Stoof, C. R.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2015-04-01

    As runoff mechanisms in the Ethiopian highlands are not well understood, performance of many soil and water conservation measures is inadequate because of ineffective placement outside the major runoff source areas. To improve understanding of the runoff generating mechanisms in these highlands, we monitored runoff volumes from 24 runoff plots constructed in the 113 ha Anjeni watershed, where historic data of rainfall and stream discharge were available. In addition, we assessed the effectiveness of charcoal and crop rooting depth in reducing runoff, in which we compared the effect of lupine (a deep-rooted crop) to that of barley. Daily rainfall, surface runoff, and root zone moisture content were measured during the monsoon seasons of 2012 and 2013 (with all plots being tilled in 2012, but only barley plots in 2013). In addition, long-term surface runoff (from four plots) and outlet discharge data from the research site (1989-1993) was analyzed and compared with our observations. Results showed that the degree of soil degradation and soil disturbance (tillage) were significant factors affecting plot runoff responses. As expected runoff was greater from more degraded soils, while tilled plots had greater soil storage and thus less runoff. Overall, barley plots produced significantly less runoff than lupine plots. Specifically, considerable difference was observed for smaller rainfall events (ca. <20 mm) in 2013, when lupine plots (non-tilled) resulted in greater runoff than barley plots (tilled). This suggests that plot rainfall-runoff relationships are greatly affected by root-zone storage, which is directly affected by soil degradation and tillage practices.

  12. Plasma soluble erythropoietin receptor is decreased during sleep in Andean highlanders with Chronic Mountain Sickness.

    PubMed

    Villafuerte, Francisco C; Corante, Noemí; Anza-Ramírez, Cecilia; Figueroa-Mujíca, Rómulo; Vizcardo-Galindo, Gustavo; Mercado, Andy; Macarlupú, José Luis; León-Velarde, Fabiola

    2016-07-01

    Excessive erythrocytosis (EE) is the main sign of Chronic Mountain Sickness (CMS), a highly prevalent syndrome in Andean highlanders. Low pulse O2 saturation (SpO2) during sleep and serum androgens have been suggested to contribute to EE in CMS patients. However, whether these factors have a significant impact on the erythropoietin (Epo) system leading to EE is still unclear. We have recently shown that morning soluble Epo receptor (sEpoR), an endogenous Epo antagonist, is decreased in CMS patients suggesting increased Epo availability (increased Epo/sEpoR). The present study aimed to characterize the nocturnal concentration profile of sEpoR and Epo and their relationship with SpO2, Hct, and serum testosterone in healthy highlanders (HH) and CMS patients. Epo and sEpoR concentrations were evaluated every 4 h (6 PM to 6 AM) and nighttime SpO2 was continuously monitored (10 PM to 6 AM) in 39 male participants (CMS, n = 23; HH, n = 16) aged 21-65 yr from Cerro de Pasco, Peru (4,340 m). CMS patients showed higher serum Epo concentrations throughout the night and lower sEpoR from 10 PM to 6 AM. Consequently, Epo/sEpoR was significantly higher in the CMS group at every time point. Mean sleep-time SpO2 was lower in CMS patients compared with HH, while the percentage of sleep time spent with SpO2 < 80% was higher. Multiple-regression analysis showed mean sleep-time SpO2 and Epo/sEpoR as significant predictors of hematocrit corrected for potential confounders (age, body mass index, and testosterone). Testosterone levels were associated neither with Hct nor with erythropoietic factors. In conclusion, our results show sustained erythropoietic stimulus driven by the Epo system in CMS patients, further enhanced by a continuous exposure to accentuated nocturnal hypoxemia.

  13. The pioneer study of fog detection and horizontal precipitation measurement at subtropical highland of Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, P. H.; Lai, K. L.

    2010-07-01

    Heavy rainfall in highland caused by the interaction of tropical storms and sharp terrain is one of the major natural disasters in Taiwan. But there is no quantitative measurement on the fog and its horizontal precipitation (HP) to estimate the storage of water by plants in the highland region of Taiwan. In this pioneer study, we studied the fog detection and its horizontal precipitation amount, existence length and monthly variation at Kuan-Wu recreation area in Shei-Pa National Park of Taiwan. The 20-year (1988~2007) record length of meteorological data at Kuan-Wu was analyzed first to build up the background information of the local weather. The FDID (fog detection and interception device) including two fog detectors, two fog collectors and auto-shooting digital camera was delivered in this field program. The parallel experiment indoor with a fog tunnel also confirms the performance of polypropylene net used in FDID. FDID has collected data in the field over one year, and the preliminary results show that some components of FDID present the capability of fog event detection and give quantitative data of fog interception. The digital images in 5-min interval via fog collector data detected over 90% happening of fog event in the data available days. Through the RGB diagnosis in different pixel domains (different distances to the camera) on the digital images, the fog events are distinguished into light, medium and heavy fog events. The characteristics of daily and monthly variations of fog events could be explained through the terrain and local climate effects well. We also found the horizontal precipitation from fog provides ~11% extra water amount in the no-rain days. The happened possibility of fog & stratus cloud with The MTSAT geostationary IR channels by Central Weather Bureau is also validated by the FDID in-situ measurement. It shows that the remote sensing product of fog detection in nighttime has good correlation with FDID ground measurement.

  14. Evaluating indigenous grass species as on-site sediment trapping measures, northwest Ethiopian highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekonnen, Mulatie; Keesstra, Saskia; Ritsema, Coen; Stroosnijder, Leo; Baartman, Jantiene

    2016-04-01

    Although many studies have been conducted to evaluate the sediment trapping efficacy (STE) of grass species as an on-site sediment trapping measure, still a lot of grass species are availab1e of which their STE is unknown. Lack of information on the STE of such grass species has a negative influence on their acceptance and practical application by the users. Therefore, this study was conducted at Debre Mewi watershed, northwestern Ethiopian highlands, to evaluate the STE of four locally dominant indigenous grass species (Desho, Senbelet, Akirma and Sebez) and one exotic species (Vetiver) using plot experiments. On average, the annual runoff produced was found to be 79; 64; 69; 71; 74; 75 l m-2, which resulted in 7; 1.7; 2.9; 3.6; 4.5 and 5.6 kg m-2 yr-1 of sediment yield on the Control, Desho, Vetiver, Senbelet, Akirma and Sebez plots, respectively. Desho had a trapping efficacy of 76 % because of its fast growth and lateral spreading nature. Vetiver and Senbelet reduced the transported sediment with 59 % and 49 % STE, respectively. Because of their slow growth nature, Akirma and Sebez showed low STEs, 36 % and 20 %, respectively. The grass species were found to be important sources of livestock feed in addition to trapping sediment and reducing soil loss. Desho, Senbelet, Akirma, Vetiver and Sebez provided 132, 106, 76, 69 and 51 t ha-1 yr-1 fresh biomass, respectively. The indigenous grass species provided a practical means to reduce sediment yield, therefore, it can be concluded that such indigenous grass species can be used as an on-site sediment trapping measure in the northwestern highlands of Ethiopia.

  15. Venus' radar-bright highlands: Different signatures and materials on Ovda Regio and on Maxwell Montes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, Allan; Harrington, Elise; Sharpton, Virgil

    2016-12-01

    Venus' highlands appear much brighter than its lowland plains in reflected radar, which has been explained by several conflicting hypotheses. We study this transition at higher spatial and elevation resolution than previously possible by combining Magellan synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images with Magellan SAR stereo elevations. We confirm that SAR backscatter over Ovda Regio (5°N to 15°S) grades from low to high as elevation increases (2-4.5 km above the datum), and then drops precipitously above ∼4.5 km (T= ∼702 K). This pattern is consistent with presence of a substance that undergoes a phase transition from ferroelectric to normal dielectric at ∼700 K; the mineral chlorapatite is a likely candidate. This pattern is seen across Ovda, on other near-equatorial highlands, and on some shield volcanoes like the Tepev Montes. We also confirm that Maxwell Montes (60-68°N) shows a different pattern; its surface transitions abruptly from low backscatter to high backscatter at ∼4.5 km above the datum, and remains so to nearly its highest elevations (∼10 km). This pattern is consistent with the presence of a semiconductor material either precipitated from the atmosphere (e.g., a frost) or produced by atmosphere-surface interaction. If a ferroelectric substance were in the rock at Maxwell (as at Ovda), it could be invisible beneath the coating of semiconductor material. However, the absence of a semiconductor material on Ovda requires either that [1] the atmosphere compositions at Maxwell and Ovda are substantially different, or [2] that the semiconductor at Maxwell forms by atmosphere-surface reaction (not as an atmospheric precipitate) and that the surface materials at Ovda and Maxwell are substantially different.

  16. Forming the lunar farside highlands by accretion of a companion moon.

    PubMed

    Jutzi, M; Asphaug, E

    2011-08-03

    The most striking geological feature of the Moon is the terrain and elevation dichotomy between the hemispheres: the nearside is low and flat, dominated by volcanic maria, whereas the farside is mountainous and deeply cratered. Associated with this geological dichotomy is a compositional and thermal variation, with the nearside Procellarum KREEP (potassium/rare-earth element/phosphorus) Terrane and environs interpreted as having thin, compositionally evolved crust in comparison with the massive feldspathic highlands. The lunar dichotomy may have been caused by internal effects (for example spatial variations in tidal heating, asymmetric convective processes or asymmetric crystallization of the magma ocean) or external effects (such as the event that formed the South Pole/Aitken basin or asymmetric cratering). Here we consider its origin as a late carapace added by the accretion of a companion moon. Companion moons are a common outcome of simulations of Moon formation from a protolunar disk resulting from a giant impact, and although most coplanar configurations are unstable, a ∼1,200-km-diameter moon located at one of the Trojan points could be dynamically stable for tens of millions of years after the giant impact. Most of the Moon's magma ocean would solidify on this timescale, whereas the companion moon would evolve more quickly into a crust and a solid mantle derived from similar disk material, and would presumably have little or no core. Its likely fate would be to collide with the Moon at ∼2-3 km s(-1), well below the speed of sound in silicates. According to our simulations, a large moon/Moon size ratio (∼0.3) and a subsonic impact velocity lead to an accretionary pile rather than a crater, contributing a hemispheric layer of extent and thickness consistent with the dimensions of the farside highlands and in agreement with the degree-two crustal thickness profile. The collision furthermore displaces the KREEP-rich layer to the opposite hemisphere

  17. An efficient semi-distributed hillslope erosion model for the subhumid Ethiopian Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilahun, S. A.; Guzman, C. D.; Zegeye, A. D.; Engda, T. A.; Collick, A. S.; Rimmer, A.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2013-03-01

    Erosion modeling has been generally scaling up from plot scale but not based on landscape topographic position, which is a main variable in saturation excess runoff. In addition, predicting sediment loss in Africa has been hampered by using models developed in western countries and do not perform as well in the monsoon climate prevailing in most of the continent. The objective of this paper is to develop a simple erosion model that can be used in the Ethiopian Highlands in Africa. We base our sediment prediction on a simple distributed saturated excess hydrology model that predicts surface runoff from severely degraded lands and from bottom lands that become saturated during the rainy season and estimates interflow and baseflow from the remaining portions of the landscape. By developing an equation that relates surface runoff to sediment concentration generated from runoff source areas, assuming that baseflow and interflow are sediment-free, we were able to predict daily sediment concentrations from the Anjeni watershed with a Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency ranging from 0.64 to 0.78 using only two calibrated sediment parameters. Anjeni is a 113 ha watershed in the 17.4 million ha Blue Nile Basin in the Ethiopian Highlands. The discharge of the two watersheds was predicted with Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency values ranging from 0.80 to 0.93. The calibrated values in Anjeni for degraded (14%) and saturated (2%) runoff source area were in agreement with field evidence. The analysis suggests that identifying the runoff source areas and predicting the surface runoff correctly is an important step in predicting the sediment concentration.

  18. An efficient semi-distributed hillslope erosion model for the sub humid Ethiopian Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilahun, S. A.; Guzman, C. D.; Zegeye, A. D.; Engda, T. A.; Collick, A. S.; Rimmer, A.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2012-02-01

    During the last two decades, saturated excess runoff has become accepted as the main source for overland flow in humid regions. Erosion modeling has generally not kept up with this new reality and predictions are often not based on landscape topographic position, which is a main variable in saturation excess runoff. In addition, predicting sediment loss in Africa has been hampered by using models that have been developed in western countries and do not perform as well in the monsoon climate prevailing in most of the continent. The objective of this paper is to develop a simple erosion model that can be used in the Ethiopian highlands in Africa. We base our sediment prediction on a simple distributed saturated excess hydrology model that predicts surface runoff from severely degraded lands and from bottom lands that become saturated during the rainy season and estimates interflow and base flow from the remaining portions of the landscape. By developing an equation that relates surface runoff to sediment concentration generated from runoff source areas, assuming that base flow and interflow are sediment free, we were able to predict daily sediment concentrations from the Anjeni Watershed and Blue Nile Basin with a Nash Sutcliffe efficiency ranging from 0.64 to 0.77 using only two calibrated sediment parameters. Anjeni is a 113 ha watershed in the 17.4 million ha Blue Nile Basin in the Ethiopian Highlands. The daily flows were predicted with Nash Sutcliffe efficiency values ranging from 0.80 to 0.93 if degraded areas were assumed the major sediment source areas and covered 14% of the Anjeni watershed and 20% of the Blue Nile basin. The analysis suggests that identifying the runoff source areas and predicting the surface runoff correctly is an important step in predicting the sediment concentration.

  19. Highland mountain hiking and coronary artery disease: exercise tolerance and effects on left ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Huonker, M; Schmidt-Trucksäss, A; Sorichter, S; Irmer, M; Dürr, H; Lehmann, M; Keul, J

    1997-12-01

    Physical exercise has become a well-established concept in the secondary prevention of coronary artery disease. We investigated the exercise requirements of extensive highland mountain hiking (8.7 km, 470 m to 1220 m over sea level, average incline 8.5%, mean walking velocity < 3 km x h-1) in 11 regularly exercising male patients with history of MI and stable coronary artery disease (CAD; mean age +/- SD:61.0 +/- 3.9 yr) and 9 age-matched male healthy controls (CO; mean age +/- SD:61.2 +/- 5.0 yr). All subjects underwent continuous ECG monitoring; arterial blood pressure and blood lactate concentrations were measured several times during mountain hiking. Before and after exercise, cardiac dimensions and functions were assessed by two-dimensional echocardiography and Doppler echocardiography. The mean exercise levels for heart rate and blood lactate were compared with the corresponding data of a multistage upright cycle ergometry. Clinical manifestations of coronary insufficiency, left ventricular myocardial dysfunction, or cardiac arrhythmias > Lown IIIb were not observed in any case. No significant differences in left atrial and left ventricular dimensions and no changes in systolic left ventricular function compared with the preexercise values were found after the mountain hike tour. Doppler echocardiography demonstrated significant changes in diastolic left ventricular function in CAD, but not in CO. The peak exercise intensity during mountain hiking was equivalent to a workload of 100-125 W (1.25-1.5 W x kg-1 body weight) in a multistage upright cycle ergometry. Extensive highland mountain hiking may be a low risk alternative within the outpatient rehabilitation program for secondary prevention of CAD for MI patients with a cycle ergometric exercise tolerance > 1.5 W x kg-1 body weight.

  20. Hydrops associated with chondrodysplasia of the fetus in a miniature Scottish Highland cow.

    PubMed

    Catalina Cabrera, L; McNabb, Bret R; Woods, Sarah E; Cartoceti, Andrew N; Busch, Rosie C

    2016-03-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 2-year-old primiparous miniature Scottish Highland cow with an unknown breeding date was evaluated for suspected hydrops. CLINICAL FINDINGS Transabdominal and transrectal ultrasonographic examination identified a large amount of hypoechoic fluid within an enlarged uterus; the fetus could not be identified. Presence of a severely distended uterus and concerns regarding associated health risks to the cow led to the decision to induce labor. Although fluids were expelled, parturition did not progress further over the following 48 hours. Vaginal examination revealed a partially dilated cervix and an abnormally shaped fetus that was too large to pass vaginally. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Supportive care was provided to the cow, and a stillborn bull calf was delivered by cesarean section. Grossly evident chondrodystrophic dwarfism with hydrocephalus, compatible with so-called bulldog calf malformations, was confirmed by diagnostic imaging and histopathologic evaluation. The cow recovered from surgery uneventfully and was discharged from the hospital the following day. Genetic analysis of DNA from hair roots collected from the sire and dam confirmed both were carriers of an aggrecan-1 gene mutation (bulldog dwarfism1) previously associated with dwarfism and bulldog calf malformations in Dexter cattle. CLINICAL RELEVANCE To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bulldog calf malformations associated with an aggrecan-1 gene mutation in miniature Scottish Highland cattle, confirming that at least 1 genetic mutation associated with this condition is found in cattle breeds other than Dexter. The findings highlighted the clinical importance of testing for known genetic diseases in breeding cattle, particularly among miniature breeds.

  1. Malaysia’s Participation in a United Nations Standing Force: A Question of National Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Amali bin Ahmad, Malaysian Army, 76 pages This thesis investigates whether Malaysia , as a small state, should participate in a United Nations (UN...many parties. In analyzing whether Malaysia should participate in a UN standing force, this paper explores the concept of comprehensive security to...implemented by Malaysia as its national security strategy, participation in a UN standing force would incur substantially more cost and pose greater risks to

  2. Contributions to Industrial Development of Science and Technology Institutions in Malaysia and Opportunities for Bilateral Cooperation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    Motorola Research Center in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Research activities in the private sector are likely to increase in South - east Asia in response to...Policies. Kuala Lumpur: University of Malaya Cooperative Bookstore, 1975. Hughes, Helen. "The Manufacturing Industry Sector," in South - east Asia’s...Malaysia, or the Peninsula, and East Malaysia, which includes the states of Sabah and Sarawak. Although East Malaysia accounts for 60%b of the nation’s

  3. Legislating separation and solidarity in plural societies: the Chinese in Indonesia and Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Julie Chernov; Sadiq, Kamal

    2010-01-01

    The Chinese minority plays a dominant role in the economies of Indonesia and Malaysia, a fact that evokes indigenous resentment. However, Indonesia and Malaysia dealt differently with the issue. Malaysia legislated the Malays into the economy and protected Chinese citizenship, making them an integral part of a multicultural state. By contrast, New Order Indonesia adopted policies of economic manipulation, forced assimilation, and unequal citizenship. Only when the New Order regime fell did Chinese integration begin. The policy trajectories of Indonesia and Malaysia offer important lessons for plural states.

  4. A solar power plant for Curtin University Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanichamy, C.

    2016-03-01

    The Curtin University, Sarawak Malaysia (Curtin Sarawak) is the first and largest offshore campus of Curtin University in Perth, Western Australia, and the first foreign university to be established in East Malaysia in partnership with the Sarawak State Government. Today's major concern of Curtin is its monthly electrical energy consumption and the electricity bill since its monthly energy consumption exceeds 0.3 Million kWh, and the corresponding electricity bill surpasses RM 95000. Such a situation necessitates Curtin to curtail the heavy energy consumption with immediate effect. Introducing Renewable Energy Source such as PV Solar Systems is a cost-effective and environmental friendly solution to reduce the exponential increase in energy consumption charges of Curtin. Hence, this paper proposes a 90 kW solar power plant for Curtin Sarawak.

  5. Portfolio optimization for index tracking modelling in Malaysia stock market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siew, Lam Weng; Jaaman, Saiful Hafizah; Ismail, Hamizun

    2016-06-01

    Index tracking is an investment strategy in portfolio management which aims to construct an optimal portfolio to generate similar mean return with the stock market index mean return without purchasing all of the stocks that make up the index. The objective of this paper is to construct an optimal portfolio using the optimization model which adopts regression approach in tracking the benchmark stock market index return. In this study, the data consists of weekly price of stocks in Malaysia market index which is FTSE Bursa Malaysia Kuala Lumpur Composite Index from January 2010 until December 2013. The results of this study show that the optimal portfolio is able to track FBMKLCI Index at minimum tracking error of 1.0027% with 0.0290% excess mean return over the mean return of FBMKLCI Index. The significance of this study is to construct the optimal portfolio using optimization model which adopts regression approach in tracking the stock market index without purchasing all index components.

  6. Cervical cancer screening in Malaysia: Are targeted interventions necessary?

    PubMed

    Dunn, Richard A; Tan, Andrew K G

    2010-09-01

    This study examines the determinants of Papanicolaou Smear Test (PST) screening for cervical cancer among women in Malaysia. Attention is focused on the reasons different population subgroups give for non-screening. We find that Indian women are the least likely to have had a PST and also the least likely to know the reasons why one is screened. Malay women are less likely than Chinese women to have received a PST and are more likely to report embarrassment as the reason for not being tested. Urban women are less likely than rural women to have been tested and more likely to state lack of time as the reason. These results suggest targeted interventions may be necessary to increase screening rates in Malaysia.

  7. Determinants of dietary supplements use among adolescents in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sien, Yeo Pei; Sahril, Norhafizah; Abdul Mutalip, Mohd Hatta; Zaki, Nor Azian Mohd; Abdul Ghaffar, Suhaila

    2014-09-01

    Dietary supplements use is relatively widespread in some countries but knowledge of supplements consumption in Malaysia is limited, more so among adolescents. This study aimed to investigate the determinants of dietary supplements use among Malaysian adolescents using multiple logistic regressions analysis. Data from the Malaysia School-based Nutrition Survey 2012 based on a 2-stage stratified sampling was used. The prevalence of vitamin/mineral supplements and food supplements intake among adolescents was 54.1% and 40.2%, respectively. Usage was significantly higher among younger adolescents and among boys. Dietary supplements were also taken mostly by those who thought they were underweight. The most common vitamin/mineral supplements and food supplements consumed were vitamin C and bee products. The main reason for taking supplements was parents' instruction. These findings can be useful for developing health communications on supplement use targeted to adolescents and their parents.

  8. River and fish pollution in Malaysia: A green ergonomics perspective.

    PubMed

    Poon, Wai Ching; Herath, Gamini; Sarker, Ashutosh; Masuda, Tadayoshi; Kada, Ryohei

    2016-11-01

    Human activities, such as industrial, agricultural, and domestic pursuits, discharge effluents into riverine ecological systems that contains aquatic resources, such as fish, which are also used by humans. We conducted case studies in Malaysia to investigate the impacts of these human activities on water and fish resources, as well as on human well-being from an ergonomics perspective. This research shows that a green ergonomics approach can provide us with useful insights into sustainable relationships between humans and ecology in facilitating human well-being in consideration of the overall performance of the social-ecological system. Heavy metal concentrations contained in the effluents pollute river water and contaminate fish, eventually creating significant health risks and economic costs for residents, including the polluters. The study suggests a number of policy interventions to change human behavior and achieve greater collaboration between various levels of government, academia, civil society, and businesses to help establish sustainable relationships between humans and ecology in Malaysia.

  9. Municipal solid waste management in Malaysia: Practices and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Manaf, Latifah Abd Samah, Mohd Armi Abu; Zukki, Nur Ilyana Mohd

    2009-11-15

    Rapid economic development and population growth, inadequate infrastructure and expertise, and land scarcity make the management of municipal solid waste become one of Malaysia's most critical environmental issues. The study is aimed at evaluating the generation, characteristics, and management of solid waste in Malaysia based on published information. In general, the per capita generation rate is about 0.5-0.8 kg/person/day in which domestic waste is the primary source. Currently, solid waste is managed by the Ministry of Housing and Local Government, with the participation of the private sector. A new institutional and legislation framework has been structured with the objectives to establish a holistic, integrated, and cost-effective solid waste management system, with an emphasis on environmental protection and public health. Therefore, the hierarchy of solid waste management has given the highest priority to source reduction through 3R, intermediate treatment and final disposal.

  10. Genetic counseling services and development of training programs in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juliana Mei-Har; Thong, Meow-Keong

    2013-12-01

    Genetic counseling service is urgently required in developing countries. In Malaysia, the first medical genetic service was introduced in 1994 at one of the main teaching hospitals in Kuala Lumpur. Two decades later, the medical genetic services have improved with the availability of genetic counseling, genetic testing and diagnosis, for both paediatric conditions and adult-onset inherited conditions, at four main centers of medical genetic services in Malaysia. Prenatal diagnosis services and assisted reproductive technologies are available at tertiary centres and private medical facilities. Positive developments include governmental recognition of Clinical Genetics as a subspecialty, increased funding for genetics services, development of medical ethics guidelines, and establishment of support groups. However, the country lacked qualified genetic counselors. Proposals were presented to policy-makers to develop genetic counseling courses. Challenges encountered included limited resources and public awareness, ethical dilemmas such as religious and social issues and inadequate genetic health professionals especially genetic counselors.

  11. Some epidemiological aspects and economic costs of injuries in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Arokiasamy, J T; Krishnan, R

    1994-01-01

    Injuries are one of the leading causes of death in the world. In Malaysia, injuries form one of the three main causes of mortality. They are also an important cause of permanent and temporary disability and work absenteeism in the productive age group. Increasing affluence and industrialization coupled with growing population and transportation needs in rapidly developing countries like Malaysia have resulted in a surge of road and occupational injuries. Three quarters of fatalities due to road, occupational, drowning and home injuries occur in those below 45 years of age. A majority of injuries in these categories are attributed to "human" factors and therefore can be prevented by public education and enforced training of workers. The total annual economic loss due to all types of injuries is estimated to be 2 billion Malaysian Ringgit (US$1 = MR2.76 approximately). The government is currently in the process of setting up full-time departments for road safety and occupational health and safety.

  12. Financial development and sectoral CO2 emissions in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Maji, Ibrahim Kabiru; Habibullah, Muzafar Shah; Saari, Mohd Yusof

    2017-03-01

    The paper examines the impacts of financial development on sectoral carbon emissions (CO2) for environmental quality in Malaysia. Since the financial sector is considered as one of the sectors that will contribute to Malaysian economy to become a developed country by 2020, we utilize a cointegration method to investigate how financial development affects sectoral CO2 emissions. The long-run results reveal that financial development increases CO2 emissions from the transportation and oil and gas sector and reduces CO2 emissions from manufacturing and construction sectors. However, the elasticity of financial development is not significant in explaining CO2 emissions from the agricultural sector. The results for short-run elasticities were also consistent with the long-run results. We conclude that generally, financial development increases CO2 emissions and reduces environmental quality in Malaysia.

  13. Contribution to the Pteridophyte Flora of Langkawi Archipelago, Peninsular Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Maideen, Haja; Damanhuri, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The pteridophyte flora of Langkawi Archipelago consists of 130 species, 1 subspecies and 12 varieties in 68 genera and 27 families. This value represents 22.1% of the 647 taxa at the species level and below reported for Peninsular Malaysia. Of the 143 recorded taxa of pteridophytes at the species level and below, 8 species in 2 genera and 2 families are lycophytes and the other 135 taxa in 66 genera and 25 families are monilophytes or ferns. PMID:26868714

  14. The Evolution of Malaysias Immigration Policy Since 1970

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    MALAYSIA’S IMMIGRATION POLICY SINCE 1970 by Michelle B. Avila March 2015 Thesis Advisor: Michael Malley Second Reader: Tristan Mabry THIS...8217s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS THE EVOLUTION OF MALAYSIA’S IMMIGRATION POLICY SINCE 1970 6. AUTHOR(S) Michelle B. Avila 7...in this thesis are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Govemment. IRB

  15. Temporal changes and variability in temperature series over Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhaila, Jamaludin

    2015-02-01

    With the current concern over climate change, the descriptions on how temperature series changed over time are very useful. Annual mean temperature has been analyzed for several stations over Peninsular Malaysia. Non-parametric statistical techniques such as Mann-Kendall test and Theil-Sen slope estimation are used primarily for assessing the significance and detection of trends, while a nonparametric Pettitt's test and sequential Mann-Kendall test are adopted to detect any abrupt climate change. Statistically significance increasing trends for annual mean temperature are detected for almost all studied stations with the magnitude of significant trend varied from 0.02°C to 0.05°C per year. The results shows that climate over Peninsular Malaysia is getting warmer than before. In addition, the results of the abrupt changes in temperature using Pettitt's and sequential Mann-Kendall test reveal the beginning of trends which can be related to El Nino episodes that occur in Malaysia. In general, the analysis results can help local stakeholders and water managers to understand the risks and vulnerabilities related to climate change in terms of mean events in the region.

  16. Cost of Dengue Vector Control Activities in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Packierisamy, P Raviwharmman; Ng, Chiu-Wan; Dahlui, Maznah; Inbaraj, Jonathan; Balan, Venugopalan K; Halasa, Yara A; Shepard, Donald S

    2015-11-01

    Dengue fever, an arbovirus disease transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, has recently spread rapidly, especially in the tropical countries of the Americas and Asia-Pacific regions. It is endemic in Malaysia, with an annual average of 37,937 reported dengue cases from 2007 to 2012. This study measured the overall economic impact of dengue in Malaysia, and estimated the costs of dengue prevention. In 2010, Malaysia spent US$73.5 million or 0.03% of the country's GDP on its National Dengue Vector Control Program. This spending represented US$1,591 per reported dengue case and US$2.68 per capita population. Most (92.2%) of this spending occurred in districts, primarily for fogging. A previous paper estimated the annual cost of dengue illness in the country at US$102.2 million. Thus, the inclusion of preventive activities increases the substantial estimated cost of dengue to US$175.7 million, or 72% above illness costs alone. If innovative technologies for dengue vector control prove efficacious, and a dengue vaccine was introduced, substantial existing spending could be rechanneled to fund them.

  17. Coxiella Detection in Ticks from Wildlife and Livestock in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Jing-Jing; Lim, Fang-Shiang; Chen, Fezshin; Phoon, Wai-Hong; Khor, Chee-Sieng; Pike, Brian L.; Chang, Li-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have shown that ticks harbor Coxiella-like bacteria, which are potentially tick-specific endosymbionts. We recently described the detection of Coxiella-like bacteria and possibly Coxiella burnetii in ticks found from rural areas in Malaysia. In the present study, we collected ticks, including Haemaphysalis bispinosa, Haemaphysalis hystricis, Dermacentor compactus, Dermacentor steini, and Amblyomma sp. from wildlife and domesticated goats from four different locations in Malaysia. Coxiella 16s rRNA genomic sequences were detected by PCR in 89% of ticks tested. Similarity analysis and phylogenetic analyses of the 16s rRNA and rpoB partial sequences were performed for 10 representative samples selected based on the tick species, sex, and location. The findings here suggested the presence of C. burnetii in two samples, each from D. steini and H. hystricis. The sequences of both samples clustered with published C. burnetii sequences. The remaining eight tick samples were shown to harbor 16s rRNA sequences of Coxiella-like bacteria, which clustered phylogenetically according to the respective tick host species. The findings presented here added to the growing evidence of the association between Coxiella-like bacteria and ticks across species and geographical boundaries. The importance of C. burnetii found in ticks in Malaysia warrants further investigation. PMID:27763821

  18. Cost of Dengue Vector Control Activities in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Packierisamy, P. Raviwharmman; Ng, Chiu-Wan; Dahlui, Maznah; Inbaraj, Jonathan; Balan, Venugopalan K.; Halasa, Yara A.; Shepard, Donald S.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever, an arbovirus disease transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, has recently spread rapidly, especially in the tropical countries of the Americas and Asia-Pacific regions. It is endemic in Malaysia, with an annual average of 37,937 reported dengue cases from 2007 to 2012. This study measured the overall economic impact of dengue in Malaysia, and estimated the costs of dengue prevention. In 2010, Malaysia spent US$73.5 million or 0.03% of the country's GDP on its National Dengue Vector Control Program. This spending represented US$1,591 per reported dengue case and US$2.68 per capita population. Most (92.2%) of this spending occurred in districts, primarily for fogging. A previous paper estimated the annual cost of dengue illness in the country at US$102.2 million. Thus, the inclusion of preventive activities increases the substantial estimated cost of dengue to US$175.7 million, or 72% above illness costs alone. If innovative technologies for dengue vector control prove efficacious, and a dengue vaccine was introduced, substantial existing spending could be rechanneled to fund them. PMID:26416116

  19. Concentration of trace elements on branded cigarette in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azman, Muhammad Azfar; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Rahman, Irman Abdul; Hamzah, Suhaimi; Rahman, Shamsiah Abdul; Elias, Md Suhaimi; Abdullah, Nazaratul Ashifa; Hashim, Azian; Shukor, Shakirah Abd

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco is a plant that is used as a recreational drug since the beginning of its use by the Native Americans. Now with the development of the tobacco industry, smoking has become a norm for the public in Malaysia. Trace elements in plants are mostly due to the uptake processes from the soils into the roots of the plants. The concentration of the elements may also be influenced by the elements contained in the water and also fertilizers. This paper aim to analyze the concentration of the trace elements contained in the branded cigarettes sold in Malaysia by utilizing the neutron activation analysis. The tobaccos were taken out from the cigarettes. The collected samples were air dried and passed through 2 mm sieve. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) has been used for the determination of trace elements. Samples were activated in the Nuclear Malaysia Triga Mark II reactor with a neutron flux of 2.0 x 1012 n cm-2 s-1. The samples then were analyzed using ORTEC Gamma Spectrometer a co-axial n-type HPGe detector with resolution of 2.0 keV at 1332 keV and relative efficiency of 20%. The data obtained could help in assessing the concentration of the trace elements that complying with the standard limitation dose proposed by World Health Organization (WHO).

  20. Exploratory study on Marine SDI implementation in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarmidi, Zakri; Mohd Shariff, Abdul Rashid; Rodzi Mahmud, Ahmad; Zaiton Ibrahim, Zelina; Halim Hamzah, Abdul

    2016-06-01

    This paper discusses the explanatory study of the implementation of spatial data sharing between Malaysia's marine organisations. The survey method was selected with questionnaire as an instrument for data collection and analysis. The aim of the questionnaire was to determine the critical factors in enabling marine spatial data sharing in Malaysia, and the relationship between these indicators. A questionnaire was sent to 48 marine and coastal organisations in Malaysia, with 84.4% of respondents answering the questionnaire. The respondents selected were people who involved directly with GIS application in the organisations. The results show there are three main issues in implementing spatial data sharing; (1) GIS planning and implementation in the organisation, (2) spatial data sharing knowledge and implementation in the organisation and (3) collaboration to enable spatial data sharing within and between organisations. To improve GIS implementation, spatial data sharing implementation and collaboration in enabling spatial data sharing, a conceptual collaboration model was proposed with components of marine GIS strategic planning, spatial data sharing strategies and collaboration strategy.

  1. Clinical Profile and Visual Outcome of Ocular Bartonellosis in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chai Lee; Fhun, Lai Chan; Abdul Gani, Nor Hasnida; Muhammed, Julieana; Tuan Jaafar, Tengku Norina

    2017-01-01

    Background. Ocular bartonellosis can present in various ways, with variable visual outcome. There is limited data on ocular bartonellosis in Malaysia. Objective. We aim to describe the clinical presentation and visual outcome of ocular bartonellosis in Malaysia. Materials and Methods. This was a retrospective review of patients treated for ocular bartonellosis in two ophthalmology centers in Malaysia between January 2013 and December 2015. The diagnosis was based on clinical features, supported by a positive Bartonella spp. serology. Results. Of the 19 patients in our series, females were predominant (63.2%). The mean age was 29.3 years. The majority (63.2%) had unilateral involvement. Five patients (26.3%) had a history of contact with cats. Neuroretinitis was the most common presentation (62.5%). Azithromycin was the antibiotic of choice (42.1%). Concurrent systemic corticosteroids were used in approximately 60% of cases. The presenting visual acuity was worse than 6/18 in approximately 60% of eyes; on final review, 76.9% of eyes had a visual acuity better than 6/18. Conclusion. Ocular bartonellosis tends to present with neuroretinitis. Azithromycin is a viable option for treatment. Systemic corticosteroids may be considered in those with poor visual acuity on presentation. PMID:28265290

  2. Concentration of trace elements on branded cigarette in Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Azman, Muhammad Azfar Hamzah, Suhaimi; Rahman, Shamsiah Abdul; Elias, Md Suhaimi; Abdullah, Nazaratul Ashifa; Hashim, Azian; Shukor, Shakirah Abd; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Rahman, Irman Abdul

    2016-01-22

    Tobacco is a plant that is used as a recreational drug since the beginning of its use by the Native Americans. Now with the development of the tobacco industry, smoking has become a norm for the public in Malaysia. Trace elements in plants are mostly due to the uptake processes from the soils into the roots of the plants. The concentration of the elements may also be influenced by the elements contained in the water and also fertilizers. This paper aim to analyze the concentration of the trace elements contained in the branded cigarettes sold in Malaysia by utilizing the neutron activation analysis. The tobaccos were taken out from the cigarettes. The collected samples were air dried and passed through 2 mm sieve. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) has been used for the determination of trace elements. Samples were activated in the Nuclear Malaysia Triga Mark II reactor with a neutron flux of 2.0 x 10{sup 12} n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. The samples then were analyzed using ORTEC Gamma Spectrometer a co-axial n-type HPGe detector with resolution of 2.0 keV at 1332 keV and relative efficiency of 20%. The data obtained could help in assessing the concentration of the trace elements that complying with the standard limitation dose proposed by World Health Organization (WHO)

  3. A comparative study of road traffic accidents in West Malaysia.

    PubMed Central

    Silva, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of road traffic accidents in developing countries is now becoming a cause for concern. This is more so as preventive measures have not kept pace with economic progress and development. This paper reviews the present situation in West Malaysia, one of the better developed countries of the East, during the period 1970 to 1975. A comparative study has been made between the United States and Malaysia. To enable the urgency of the problem in developing countries to be appreciated the increases in the country's population and in the number of vehicles in use and their relation to the lesser increase in road mileage over the period of study have been discussed. The study has considered every aspect of the causative factors leading to traffic accidents, such as the effects of weather, seasonal variation, and road and lighting conditions. The common human errors leading to accidents have been discussed. Other factors, such as the ethnic distribution in Malaysia, and their relation to road accidents have shown the effect of the social structure on the problems. The data evaluated in this study make it clear that preventive measures are very necessary in underdeveloped as well as in developed countries. PMID:718073

  4. A comparative study of road traffic accidents in West Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Silva, J F

    1978-11-01

    The problem of road traffic accidents in developing countries is now becoming a cause for concern. This is more so as preventive measures have not kept pace with economic progress and development. This paper reviews the present situation in West Malaysia, one of the better developed countries of the East, during the period 1970 to 1975. A comparative study has been made between the United States and Malaysia. To enable the urgency of the problem in developing countries to be appreciated the increases in the country's population and in the number of vehicles in use and their relation to the lesser increase in road mileage over the period of study have been discussed. The study has considered every aspect of the causative factors leading to traffic accidents, such as the effects of weather, seasonal variation, and road and lighting conditions. The common human errors leading to accidents have been discussed. Other factors, such as the ethnic distribution in Malaysia, and their relation to road accidents have shown the effect of the social structure on the problems. The data evaluated in this study make it clear that preventive measures are very necessary in underdeveloped as well as in developed countries.

  5. Slope Hazard and Risk Assessment in the Tropics: Malaysia' Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad, Zakaria; Azahari Razak, Khamarrul; Ahmad, Ferdaus; Manap, Mohamad Abdul; Ramli, Zamri; Ahmad, Azhari; Mohamed, Zainab

    2015-04-01

    The increasing number of geological hazards in Malaysia has often resulted in casualties and extensive devastation with high mitigation cost. Given the destructive capacity and high frequency of disaster, Malaysia has taken a step forward to address the multi-scale landslide risk reduction emphasizing pre-disaster action rather than post-disaster reaction. Slope hazard and risk assessment in a quantitative manner at regional and national scales remains challenging in Malaysia. This paper presents the comprehensive methodology framework and operational needs driven by modern and advanced geospatial technology to address the aforementioned issues in the tropics. The Slope Hazard and Risk Mapping, the first national project in Malaysia utilizing the multi-sensor LIDAR has been critically implemented with the support of multi- and trans-disciplinary partners. The methodological model has been formulated and evaluated given the complexity of risk scenarios in this knowledge driven project. Instability slope problems in the urban, mountainous and tectonic landscape are amongst them, and their spatial information is of crucial for regional landslide assessment. We develop standard procedures with optimal parameterization for susceptibility, hazard and risk assessment in the selected regions. Remarkably, we are aiming at producing an utmost complete landslide inventory in both space and time. With the updated reliable terrain and landscape models, the landslide conditioning factor maps can be accurately derived depending on the landslide types and failure mechanisms which crucial for hazard and risk assessment. We also aim to improve the generation of elements at risk for landslide and promote integrated approaches for a better disaster risk analysis. As a result, a new tool, notably multi-sensor LIDAR technology is a very promising tool for an old geological problem and its derivative data for hazard and risk analysis is an effective preventive measure in Malaysia

  6. Mapping Medusae Fossae Formation materials in the southern highlands of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, S. K.; Balme, M. R.; Hagermann, A.; Murray, J. B.; Muller, J.-P.

    2010-10-01

    The Medusae Fossae Formation (MFF) is an extensive deposit (2.2 × 10 6 km 2, Bradley, B.A., Sakimoto, S.E.H., Frey, H., Zimbelman, J.R. [2002]. J. Geophys. Res. 107, 5058) of wind-eroded material of widely debated origin, which unconformably overlies a considerable area of the crustal dichotomy boundary on Mars. The MFF shows a variety of layering patterns, erosional styles and channel-like forms and has been mapped into five main outcrops and three geological members according to exposure and stratigraphy (Scott, D.H., Tanaka, K.L., 1986. USGS Map I-1802-A; Greeley, R., Guest, J.E., 1987. Map I-1802-B; Zimbelman, J.R., Crown, D., Jenson, D., 1996. Lunar Planet. Sci. XXVII. Abstract #1748.). Away from the three main lobes are numerous outliers of MFF materials. These have mainly been reported in the northern lowlands regions (Keszthelyi, L., Jaeger, W.L., and HiRISE team, 2008. Lunar Planet. Sci. XXXIX. Abstract #2420.) but few studies have examined the possibility of MFF outliers on high ground south of the dichotomy boundary. We have searched Mars Orbiter Camera Narrow Angle (MOC NA) images for outliers in this region. Our observations show that there are many MFF outliers on the southern highlands. The characteristics of the outliers indicate materials which overlie the underlying terrain for they appear widely in dips, craters and topographic lows. The surfaces are typified by yardang fields and have a similar patchy and discontinuous nature to materials of the upper member of the MFF. Most have consistent lineation orientations across the wider area which match the dominant orientation of yardangs in the main MFF outcrops. Furthermore, elevation data shows that the maximum, minimum and mean elevations of these newly discovered outliers are closest to those of the upper member of the MFF. We therefore conclude that these deposits are MFF outliers and that they probably represent remnant upper member material. We suggest that there might be two possible

  7. Physical and chemical properties of young soils of the Icelandic highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gísladóttir, Guðrún; Mankasingh, Utra

    2015-04-01

    Most of the Icelandic soils are of volcanic origin, classified as andisols (carbon content 1-12%), many of which are strongly affected by erosion and so, formation of new soils is of great interest. The effect of land cover type on the weathering patterns and the formation of new soils are of interest. The southern Icelandic highlands are characterised by harsh climate, shallow soils and limited vegetation cover. We hypothesise that in the highland regions of Iceland the progression of land cover from unvegetated to vegetated sites will impact soil development. This study describes the physical and chemical properties of highland soils in Iceland. Soil samples were collected from 12 sites in September 2013, nine sites were fully vegetated and three unvegetated: grassland (G1-G8), with moss, Carex Bigelowii and dwarf shrubs, sandy fluvial wetland (S) and unvegetated gravels (M1-M3). All soils with vegetative cover were characterized by weak or structureless soil ranging in texture from loamy sand to silty clay loam, while at unvegetated sites soil texture was structureless and sandy. On average, the bulk density of soils (range 0.53 - 1.16 g cm-3) were lower at vegetated sites than unvegetated sites. The soil depth is greater in the vegetated sites, indicating greater soil development. The average % carbon (%C), % nitrogen (%N), overall % soil organic matter (%SOM), of vegetated sites were higher than for unvegetated sites, indicating the difference in soil development: vegetated sites (mean), 1.60%C, 0.10%N, 4.9%SOM; unvegetated sites (mean), 0.27%C, 0.02%N, 1.81%SOM. All soils had significant amounts of amorphous clay minerals such as allophone, imogolite, ferrihydrite or aluminium-humus complexes and also high aluminium and iron percentages, and high phosphate retention. All of which are characteristic for andisols. There were strong associations between Fe and Al and the soil C, which are indicative of Al and Fe complexed with humus or allophane and ferrihydrite

  8. SURVEY REPORT OF HIGHLANDS TRANSFER IN SANRIKU REGION OF THE 2011 OFF THE PACIFIC COAST OF TOHOKU EARTHQUAKE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Tsuyoshi; Fujiu, Makoto; Numada, Muneyoshi; Ohara, Miho; Meguro, Kimiro

    During the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake, Tohoku region suffered extensive damage by tsunami. The Tohoku region coast of the Pacific Ocean has been repeatedly damaged by tsunami in the past. Therefore, mitigation measures, such as highland transfer, education, construction of Tsunami protection wall, and training of evacuation have been taken by the government and the citizen. However, consciousness faded with the passage of time and same mistake was repeated. This report introduced the history of highland transfer carried out in affected areas and its effects on damage reduction due to the Tsunami. Also, it described the results of field survey and interview survey conducted with local residents of Ofunato and Toni from 26th March to 1th May 2011 by the authors.

  9. Ice in the northern lowlands and southern highlands of Mars and its enrichment beneath the Elysium lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cave, J. A.

    1993-06-01

    A detailed analysis of the impact crater characteristics in the Elysium region and in portions of Amenthes, Amazonis, Mare Tyrrhenum, Aeolis, Memnonia, Cebrenia, and Diacria regions is carried out using satellite imagery, to investigate the lateral and vertical ice distribution in the Martian northern lowlands and southern highlands. It found that the ground ice is widespread but its distribution is nonuniform in terms of depth and concentration. In particular, the deeper regolith appears to be considerably more ice-rich than the near-surface layers. The depth of the transition from the ice-poor to the ice-rich material depends on the latitude, while the relative concentration of the ice varies according to the geological situation. The results suggest that a variety of emplacement and transfer mechanisms have operated in the past, including the redistribution of ice from the highlands to the lowlands, and the juvenile enrichmment of the ground ice in the Elysium Volcanic province.

  10. Petrology and chemistry of Apollo 17 regolith breccias - A history of mixing of highland and mare regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, S. B.; Papike, J. J.; Gosselin, D. C.; Laul, J. C.; Hughes, S. S.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented of petrological and chemical analyses of ten Apollo 17 breccias, showing that two of these consist predominantly of highland material, seven are mare-dominated, and one is a welded volcanic glass deposit; all were formed at or near the Apollo 17 site, and all contain both mare and highland components. The data are indicative of the Apollo 17 breccias formation from immature source regolith. The breccias are considered to be formed locally after an eruption of basalt and orange glass at the site. Since the formation of the breccias, the regolith at the Apollo 17 site has become more mature, and the orange glass abundance has been somewhat decreased by mixing. One of the sample may contain a previously unreported volcanic glass type.

  11. 76 FR 21854 - Notice of Decision To Authorize the Importation of Fresh Rambutan Fruit From Malaysia and Vietnam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-19

    ... Importation of Fresh Rambutan Fruit From Malaysia and Vietnam AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection... importation into the continental United States of fresh rambutan fruit (Nephelium lappaceum) from Malaysia and... noxious weeds via the importation of fresh rambutan fruit from Malaysia and Vietnam. DATES: Effective...

  12. 76 FR 67473 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings from Italy, Malaysia, and The Philippines; Institution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings from Italy, Malaysia, and The Philippines; Institution of... From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION... antidumping duty orders on stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Italy, Malaysia, and the...

  13. The Best Practices for Professional Development of Vocational Educators in Teaching Competencies among APEC Economies: A Case Study of Malaysia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mustapha, Ramlee B.

    Research has documented that vocational education and training (VET) is critical to Malaysia's industrial development. Rapid technological changes and increased global competition have exacerbated the challenges associated with delivery of quality VET in Malaysia. The barriers to improving VET in Malaysia and ways of overcoming those barriers,…

  14. 76 FR 49725 - Notice of Decision To Authorize the Importation of Fresh Papaya Fruit From Malaysia into the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-11

    ... Importation of Fresh Papaya Fruit From Malaysia into the Continental United States AGENCY: Animal and Plant... authorize the importation into the continental United States of fresh papaya fruit from Malaysia. Based on... weeds via the importation of fresh papaya fruit from Malaysia. DATES: Effective Date: August 11,...

  15. Characteristics of Impact Craters and Interior Deposits: Analysis of the Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Volatiles in the Highlands of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mest, S. C.

    2005-01-01

    The martian southern highlands contain impact craters that display pristine to degraded morphologies, and preserve a record of degradation that can be attributed to fluvial, eolian, mass wasting, volcanic and impact-related processes. However, the relative degree of modification by these processes and the amounts of material contributed to crater interiors are not well constrained. Impact craters (D>10 km) within Terra Cimmeria (0deg-60degS, 190deg-240degW), Terra Tyrrhena (0deg-30degS, 260deg-310degW) and Noachis Terra (20deg-50degS, 310deg-340degW) are being examined to better understand the degradational history and evolution of highland terrains. The following scientific objectives will be accomplished. 1) Determine the geologic processes that modified impact craters (and surrounding highland terrains). 2) Determine the sources (e.g. fluvial, lacustrine, eolian, mass wasting, volcanic, impact melt) and relative amounts of material composing crater interior deposits. 3) Document the relationships between impact crater degradation and highland fluvial systems. 4) Determine the spatial and temporal relationships between degradational processes on local and regional scales. And 5) develop models of impact crater (and highland) degradation that can be applied to these and other areas of the martian highlands. The results of this study will be used to constrain the geologic, hydrologic and climatic evolution of Mars and identify environments in which subsurface water might be present or evidence for biologic activity might be preserved.

  16. Paleozoological Data Suggest Euroamerican Settlement Did Not Displace Ursids and North American Elk from Lowlands to Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee Lyman, R.

    2011-05-01

    The hypothesis that Euroamerican settlement displaced some populations of large mammal taxa from lowland plains habitats to previously unoccupied highland mountain habitats was commonly believed in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. By the middle twentieth century biologists had come to favor the hypothesis that Euroamerican colonization resulted in the extirpation of populations of large mammal in lowland habitats and those taxa survived in pre-existing relict populations in the highlands. Why modern biologists changed their minds is unclear. There is no historical evidence that unequivocally favors one hypothesis over the other. The low-elevation Columbia Basin of eastern Washington state in the northwestern United States is surrounded by forested mountains. The majority of historical records (1850 AD or younger) of black bear ( Ursus americanus), brown bear ( Ursus arctos), and North American elk ( Cervus elaphus) occur in mountainous, coniferous forest habitats. Paleozoological records of these taxa ≤ 10,000 year old and >160 year old in both highland and lowland habitats suggest the displacement hypothesis does not apply to ursids and elk in this area. These taxa seem to have been more or less ubiquitous in the area prior to Euroamerican colonization (ca. 1850 AD), and were extirpated from lowland habitats after colonization. Recent colonization of lowland shrub-steppe habitats by elk in particular, although historically unprecedented, must be categorized as recolonization rather than an invasion. Whether a species is classified as indigenous or nonindigenous may influence management activities focused on that species. The paleozoological record indicates ursids and elk are indigenous to the highland forest habitats of eastern Washington.

  17. Microrefugia and species persistence in the Galápagos highlands: a 26,000-year paleoecological perspective

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Aaron F.; Bush, Mark B.; Sachs, Julian P.

    2013-01-01

    The Galápagos Islands are known to have experienced significant drought during the Quaternary. The loss of mesophytic upland habitats has been suggested to underlie the relatively lower endemism of upland compared with lowland plant assemblages. A fossil pollen record spanning the last 26,000 years from an upland bog on Santa Cruz Island, revealed the persistent presence of highland pollen and spore types during the last glacial maximum and a millennial-scale series of droughts in the mid Holocene. The absence of lowland taxa and presence of mesic taxa led to the conclusion that the highland flora of the Galápagos persisted during both these periods. The resiliency of the highland flora of the Galápagos to long-term drought contradicts an earlier hypothesis that an extinction of highland taxa occurred during the last glacial maximum and that rapid Holocene speciation created the modern plant assemblage within the last 10,000 years. Based on the palynological data, we suggest that, even during the height of glacial and Holocene droughts, cool sea-surface temperatures and strong trade-wind activity would have promoted persistent ground level cloudiness that provided the necessary moisture inputs to maintain microrefugia for mesophytic plants. Although moist conditions were maintained, the lack of precipitation caused the loss of open water habitat during such events, and accounts for the known extinctions of species such as Azolla sp., and Elatine sp., while other moisture dependent taxa, i.e., Cyathea weatherbyana, persisted. PMID:24348520

  18. Late Proterozoic diabase dikes of the New Jersey Highlands; a remnant of Iapetan rifting in the north-central Appalachians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Volkert, R.A.; Puffer, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    Diabase dikes of widespread occurrence intrude only middle Proterozoic rocks in the New Jersey Highlands. These dikes are enriched in TiO2, P2O5, Zr, and light rare earth elements, and have compositions that range from tholeiitic to alkalic. Dike descriptions, field relations, petrography, geochemistry, petrogenesis, and tectonic setting are discussed. The data are consistent with emplacement in a rift-related, within-plate environment and suggest a correlation with other occurrences of late Proterozoic Appalachian basaltic magmatism.

  19. Ice in the northern lowlands and southern highlands of Mars and its enrichment beneath the Elysium Lavas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cave, Julie A.

    1992-01-01

    The simultaneously examination of ejecta mobility, crater morphology, and surface features has enabled several conclusions to be drawn regarding the location of subsurface ice in the region. The ice distribution is shown to be highly dependent upon latitude and geological situation; in particular, pronounced differences in the distribution between the highland and lowlands are seen, and concentrations of ice were detected beneath the Elysium lavas.

  20. Insights into the Timing, Origin, and Deformation of the Highland Mountains Gneiss Dome in Southwestern Montana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Lane Markes

    The Highland Mountains of southwestern Montana offer a unique view of the Archean igneous and metamorphic rocks within the Great Falls tectonic zone (GFTZ). A Paleoproterozoic structural gneiss dome has been interpreted in the southern extent of the Highland Mountains. The ˜ 130km2 of exhumed metamorphic rocks and gneiss dome exposed in the Highland Mountains are the primary focus of this research. The formation of the Highland Mountains gneiss dome is proposed to be directly related to a northwest-side down detachment (the Steels Pass shear zone) that formed during terrane collision along the GFTZ. The field investigation determined foliation and lineation orientation measurements taken at 65 stations. Twenty-two field oriented samples were obtained from a variety of rock types distributed across the ˜ 24 km2 field area. Three field-based domains were established from the lithology, foliation, and lineation observations. Full-section X-ray maps of three sample thin-sections were collected via EPMA to identify all monazite grains. Twenty-eight grains were mapped at high-spatial resolution (0.3--6.0 mum). Thin section micro-structures observed show effects of a multistage deformation history with both dynamic and static recrystallization processes. Monazite geochronology of one thin section revealed two distinct populations of monazite grains; Archean (˜ 2.5 Ga) and Mesoproterozoic (˜ 1.5 Ga). The older population represents the crystallization age of either, or both the Medicine Hat block and the Wyoming province terranes. The younger population is hypothesized to have grown during deformation/alteration associated with the formation of the Belt-Purcell Rift Basin.