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Sample records for geobacillus sp strain

  1. Complete genome sequences of Geobacillus sp. WCH70, a thermophilic strain isolated from wood compost.

    PubMed

    Brumm, Phillip J; Land, Miriam L; Mead, David A

    2016-01-01

    Geobacillus sp. WCH70 was one of several thermophilic organisms isolated from hot composts in the Middleton, WI area. Comparison of 16 S rRNA sequences showed the strain may be a new species, and is most closely related to G. galactosidasius and G. toebii. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2009 (CP001638). The genome of Geobacillus species WCH70 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,893,306 bp with an average G + C content of 43 %, and two circular plasmids of 33,899 and 10,287 bp with an average G + C content of 40 %. Among sequenced organisms, Geobacillus sp. WCH70 shares highest Average Nucleotide Identity (86 %) with G. thermoglucosidasius strains, as well as similar genome organization. Geobacillus sp. WCH70 appears to be a highly adaptable organism, with an exceptionally high 125 annotated transposons in the genome. The organism also possesses four predicted restriction-modification systems not found in other Geobacillus species.

  2. Complete genome sequences of Geobacillus sp. WCH70, a thermophilic strain isolated from wood compost

    SciTech Connect

    Brumm, Phillip; Land, Miriam L.; Mead, David

    2016-04-27

    Geobacillus sp. WCH70 was one of several thermophilic organisms isolated from hot composts in the Middleton, WI area. Comparison of 16 S rRNA sequences showed the strain may be a new species, and is most closely related to G. galactosidasius and G. toebii. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2009 (CP001638). The genome of Geobacillus species WCH70 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,893,306 bp with an average G + C content of 43 %, and two circular plasmids of 33,899 and 10,287 bp with an average G + C content of 40 %. Among sequenced organisms, Geobacillus sp. WCH70 shares highest Average Nucleotide Identity (86 %) with G. thermoglucosidasius strains, as well as similar genome organization. Geobacillus sp. WCH70 appears to be a highly adaptable organism, with an exceptionally high 125 annotated transposons in the genome. The organism also possesses four predicted restriction-modification systems not found in other Geobacillus species.

  3. Complete genome sequences of Geobacillus sp. WCH70, a thermophilic strain isolated from wood compost

    DOE PAGES

    Brumm, Phillip; Land, Miriam L.; Mead, David

    2016-04-27

    Geobacillus sp. WCH70 was one of several thermophilic organisms isolated from hot composts in the Middleton, WI area. Comparison of 16 S rRNA sequences showed the strain may be a new species, and is most closely related to G. galactosidasius and G. toebii. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2009 (CP001638). The genome of Geobacillus species WCH70 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,893,306 bp with an average G + C content of 43 %, and two circular plasmids of 33,899 and 10,287 bp with anmore » average G + C content of 40 %. Among sequenced organisms, Geobacillus sp. WCH70 shares highest Average Nucleotide Identity (86 %) with G. thermoglucosidasius strains, as well as similar genome organization. Geobacillus sp. WCH70 appears to be a highly adaptable organism, with an exceptionally high 125 annotated transposons in the genome. The organism also possesses four predicted restriction-modification systems not found in other Geobacillus species.« less

  4. Biotransformation of eugenol via protocatechuic acid by thermophilic Geobacillus sp. AY 946034 strain.

    PubMed

    Giedraityte, Gražina; Kalėdienė, Lilija

    2014-04-01

    The metabolic pathway of eugenol degradation by thermophilic Geobacillus sp. AY 946034 strain was analyzed based on the lack of data about eugenol degradation by thermophiles. TLC, GC-MS, and biotransformation with resting cells showed that eugenol was oxidized through coniferyl alcohol, and ferulic and vanillic acids to protocatechuic acid before the aromatic ring was cleaved. The cell-free extract of Geobacillus sp. AY 946034 strain grown on eugenol showed a high activity of eugenol hydroxylase, feruloyl-CoA synthetase, vanillate-O-demethylase, and protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase. The key enzyme, protocatechuate 3,4- dioxygenase, which plays a crucial role in the degradation of various aromatic compounds, was purified 135-fold to homogeneity with a 34% overall recovery from Geobacillus sp. AY 946034. The relative molecular mass of the native enzyme was about 450 ± 10 kDa and was composed of the non-identical subunits. The pH and temperature optima for enzyme activity were 8 and 60°C, respectively. The half-life of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase at the optimum temperature was 50 min.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Thermophilic Geobacillus sp. Strain Sah69, Isolated from Saharan Soil, Southeast Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Bezuidt, Oliver K. I.; Makhalanyane, Thulani P.; Gomri, Mohamed A.; Kharroub, Karima

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus spp. are potential sources of novel enzymes, such as those involved in the degradation of recalcitrant polymers. Here, we report a Geobacillus genome that may help reveal genomic differences between this strain and publicly available representatives of the same genus from diverse niches. PMID:26679578

  6. Antimicrobial Protein Candidates from the Thermophilic Geobacillus sp. Strain ZGt-1: Production, Proteomics, and Bioinformatics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Alkhalili, Rawana N.; Bernfur, Katja; Dishisha, Tarek; Mamo, Gashaw; Schelin, Jenny; Canbäck, Björn; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni

    2016-01-01

    A thermophilic bacterial strain, Geobacillus sp. ZGt-1, isolated from Zara hot spring in Jordan, was capable of inhibiting the growth of the thermophilic G. stearothermophilus and the mesophilic Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella typhimurium on a solid cultivation medium. Antibacterial activity was not observed when ZGt-1 was cultivated in a liquid medium; however, immobilization of the cells in agar beads that were subjected to sequential batch cultivation in the liquid medium at 60 °C showed increasing antibacterial activity up to 14 cycles. The antibacterial activity was lost on protease treatment of the culture supernatant. Concentration of the protein fraction by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis separation and analysis of the gel for antibacterial activity against G. stearothermophilus showed a distinct inhibition zone in 15–20 kDa range, suggesting that the active molecule(s) are resistant to denaturation by SDS. Mass spectrometric analysis of the protein bands around the active region resulted in identification of 22 proteins with molecular weight in the range of interest, three of which were new and are here proposed as potential antimicrobial protein candidates by in silico analysis of their amino acid sequences. Mass spectrometric analysis also indicated the presence of partial sequences of antimicrobial enzymes, amidase and dd-carboxypeptidase. PMID:27548162

  7. Gold nanoparticles synthesized by Geobacillus sp. strain ID17 a thermophilic bacterium isolated from Deception Island, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of microorganisms in the synthesis of nanoparticles emerges as an eco-friendly and exciting approach, for production of nanoparticles due to its low energy requirement, environmental compatibility, reduced costs of manufacture, scalability, and nanoparticle stabilization compared with the chemical synthesis. Results The production of gold nanoparticles by the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus sp. strain ID17 is reported in this study. Cells exposed to Au3+ turned from colourless into an intense purple colour. This change of colour indicates the accumulation of intracellular gold nanoparticles. Elemental analysis of particles composition was verified using TEM and EDX analysis. The intracellular localization and particles size were verified by TEM showing two different types of particles of predominant quasi-hexagonal shape with size ranging from 5–50 nm. The mayority of them were between 10‒20 nm in size. FT-IR was utilized to characterize the chemical surface of gold nanoparticles. This assay supports the idea of a protein type of compound on the surface of biosynthesized gold nanoparticles. Reductase activity involved in the synthesis of gold nanoparticles has been previously reported to be present in others microorganisms. This reduction using NADH as substrate was tested in ID17. Crude extracts of the microorganism could catalyze the NADH-dependent Au3+ reduction. Conclusions Our results strongly suggest that the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by ID17 is mediated by enzymes and NADH as a cofactor for this biological transformation. PMID:23919572

  8. Geobacillus debilis sp. nov., a novel obligately thermophilic bacterium isolated from a cool soil environment, and reassignment of Bacillus pallidus to Geobacillus pallidus comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Banat, Ibrahim M; Marchant, Roger; Rahman, Thahira J

    2004-11-01

    Several aerobic, motile, rod-shaped, thermophilic, spore-forming Geobacillus bacteria predominantly giving a Gram-positive staining reaction were isolated from a cool soil environment in Northern Ireland and taxonomically investigated. Two isolates, F10 and Tf(T), showed low 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to recognized members of the genus Geobacillus. Phylogenetic tree investigation using neighbour-joining, maximum-likelihood and parsimony methods indicated that strains F10 and Tf(T) represent a single novel species, for which the name Geobacillus debilis sp. nov. is proposed, with type strain Tf(T) (=DSM 16016(T)=NCIMB 13995(T)) and which belongs to a subgroup of the genus Geobacillus comprising Geobacillus toebii and Geobacillus caldoxylosilyticus. However, G. debilis showed closest affinities to Bacillus pallidus, which we propose should become Geobacillus pallidus comb. nov.

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Novel Denitrifying Bacterium Geobacillus sp. SG-01 Strain from Wood Chips Composted with Swine Manure

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Seung-Hak; Cho, Jin-Kook; Lee, Soon-Youl; Abanto, Oliver D.; Kim, Soo-Ki; Ghosh, Chiranjit; Lim, Joung-Soo; Hwang, Seong-Gu

    2013-01-01

    Nitrate contamination in ground and surface water is an increasingly serious environmental problem and only a few bacterial strains have been identified that have the ability to remove nitrogen pollutants from wastewater under thermophilic conditions. We therefore isolated thermophilic facultative bacterial strains from wood chips that had been composted with swine manure under aerated high temperature conditions so as to identify strains with denitrifying ability. Nine different colonies were screened and 3 long rod-shaped bacterial strains designated as SG-01, SG-02, and SG-03 were selected. The strain SG-01 could be differentiated from SG-02 and SG-03 on the basis of the method that it used for sugar utilization. The 16S rRNA genes of this strain also had high sequence similarity with Geobacillus thermodenitrificans 465T (99.6%). The optimal growth temperatures (55°C), pH values (pH 7.0), and NaCl concentrations (1%) required for the growth of strain SG-01 were established. This strain reduced 1.18 mM nitrate and 1.45 mM nitrite in LB broth after 48 h of incubation. These results suggest that the G. thermodenitrificans SG-01 strain may be useful in the removal of nitrates and nitrites from wastewater generated as a result of livestock farming. PMID:25049754

  10. Complete genome sequences of Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52, a xylan-degrading strain isolated from obsidian hot spring in Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Brumm, Phillip; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren J; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Chang, Yun-Juan; Mead, David A

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 was isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA under permit from the National Park Service. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2011 (CP002835). Based on 16S rRNA genes and average nucleotide identity, Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 and the related Geobacillus sp. Y412MC61 appear to be members of a new species of Geobacillus. The genome of Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,628,883 bp, an average G + C content of 52 % and one circular plasmid of 45,057 bp and an average G + C content of 45 %. Y412MC52 possesses arabinan, arabinoglucuronoxylan, and aromatic acid degradation clusters for degradation of hemicellulose from biomass. Transport and utilization clusters are also present for other carbohydrates including starch, cellobiose, and α- and β-galactooligosaccharides.

  11. Complete genome sequences of Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52, a xylan-degrading strain isolated from obsidian hot spring in Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Brumm, Phillip; Land, Miriam L.; Hauser, Loren J.; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Chang, Yun-Juan; Mead, David A.

    2015-10-19

    Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 was isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA under permit from the National Park Service. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2011 (CP002835). Based on 16S rRNA genes and average nucleotide identity, Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 and the related Geobacillus sp. Y412MC61 appear to be members of a new species of Geobacillus. The genome of Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,628,883 bp, an average G+C content of 52 % and one circular plasmid of 45,057 bp and an average G+C content of 45 %. Y412MC52 possesses arabinan, arabinoglucuronoxylan, and aromatic acid degradation clusters for degradation of hemicellulose from biomass. Lastly, transport and utilization clusters are also present for other carbohydrates including starch, cellobiose, and α- and β-galactooligosaccharides.

  12. Complete genome sequences of Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52, a xylan-degrading strain isolated from obsidian hot spring in Yellowstone National Park

    DOE PAGES

    Brumm, Phillip; Land, Miriam L.; Hauser, Loren J.; ...

    2015-10-19

    Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 was isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA under permit from the National Park Service. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2011 (CP002835). Based on 16S rRNA genes and average nucleotide identity, Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 and the related Geobacillus sp. Y412MC61 appear to be members of a new species of Geobacillus. The genome of Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,628,883 bp, an average G+C content of 52 % and one circular plasmid of 45,057 bp andmore » an average G+C content of 45 %. Y412MC52 possesses arabinan, arabinoglucuronoxylan, and aromatic acid degradation clusters for degradation of hemicellulose from biomass. Lastly, transport and utilization clusters are also present for other carbohydrates including starch, cellobiose, and α- and β-galactooligosaccharides.« less

  13. Thermostable hemicellulases of a bacterium, Geobacillus sp. DC3, isolated from the former Homestake Gold Mine in Lead, South Dakota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A thermophilic strain, Geobacillus sp. DC3, capable of producing hemicellulolytic enzymes was isolated from the 1.5-km depth of the former Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota. The DC3 strain expressed a high level of extracellular endoxylanase at 39.5 U/mg protein with additional hemicellulase...

  14. An improved agar medium for growth of Geobacillus thermoglucosidarius strains.

    PubMed

    Javed, M; Baghaei-Yazdi, N; Qin, W; Amartey, S

    2017-01-01

    Geobacillus species have potential applications in many biotechnological processes. They are fastidious in their vitamin and amino acid requirements. A new semi-defined agar medium (SDM) was developed which gave consistently high viable cell counts of various G. thermoglucosidasius strains (5×10(8)-6×10(8)cfu/ml) under aerobic conditions at 70°C.

  15. Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of a Novel Thermophilic Monofunctional Catalase from Geobacillus sp. CHB1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Catalases are widely used in many scientific areas. A catalase gene (Kat) from Geobacillus sp. CHB1 encoding a monofunctional catalase was cloned and recombinant expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli), which was the first time to clone and express this type of catalase of genus Geobacillus strains as far as we know. This Kat gene was 1,467 bp in length and encoded a catalase with 488 amino acid residuals, which is only 81% similar to the previously studied Bacillus sp. catalase in terms of amino acid sequence. Recombinant catalase was highly soluble in E. coli and made up 30% of the total E. coli protein. Fermentation broth of the recombinant E. coli showed a high catalase activity level up to 35,831 U/mL which was only lower than recombinant Bacillus sp. WSHDZ-01 among the reported catalase production strains. The purified recombinant catalase had a specific activity of 40,526 U/mg and Km of 51.1 mM. The optimal reaction temperature of this recombinant enzyme was 60°C to 70°C, and it exhibited high activity over a wide range of reaction temperatures, ranging from 10°C to 90°C. The enzyme retained 94.7% of its residual activity after incubation at 60°C for 1 hour. High yield and excellent thermophilic properties are valuable features for this catalase in industrial applications. PMID:27579320

  16. Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of a Novel Thermophilic Monofunctional Catalase from Geobacillus sp. CHB1.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xianbo; Chen, Jichen; Lin, Chenqiang; Lin, Xinjian

    2016-01-01

    Catalases are widely used in many scientific areas. A catalase gene (Kat) from Geobacillus sp. CHB1 encoding a monofunctional catalase was cloned and recombinant expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli), which was the first time to clone and express this type of catalase of genus Geobacillus strains as far as we know. This Kat gene was 1,467 bp in length and encoded a catalase with 488 amino acid residuals, which is only 81% similar to the previously studied Bacillus sp. catalase in terms of amino acid sequence. Recombinant catalase was highly soluble in E. coli and made up 30% of the total E. coli protein. Fermentation broth of the recombinant E. coli showed a high catalase activity level up to 35,831 U/mL which was only lower than recombinant Bacillus sp. WSHDZ-01 among the reported catalase production strains. The purified recombinant catalase had a specific activity of 40,526 U/mg and K m of 51.1 mM. The optimal reaction temperature of this recombinant enzyme was 60°C to 70°C, and it exhibited high activity over a wide range of reaction temperatures, ranging from 10°C to 90°C. The enzyme retained 94.7% of its residual activity after incubation at 60°C for 1 hour. High yield and excellent thermophilic properties are valuable features for this catalase in industrial applications.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius NCIMB 11955, the Progenitor of a Bioethanol Production Strain

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Lili; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The industrially important thermophile Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius has the potential to produce chemicals and fuels from biomass-derived sugar feedstocks. Here, we present the genome sequence of strain NCIMB 11955, the progenitor of an ethanologenic industrial strain, revealing 11 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 2 indels compared to strain DSM 2542 and two novel plasmids. PMID:27688322

  18. Novel thermostable endo-xylanase cloned and expressed from bacterium Geobacillus sp. WSUCF1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A gene encoding a GH10 endo-xylanase from Geobacillus sp. WSUCF1 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant endo-xylanase (37 kDa) exhibited high specific activity of 461.0 U/ mg of protein. Endo-xylanase was optimally active on birchwood xylan at 70°C and pH 6.5. Zn2+ and Ca2+ ions i...

  19. Characterization of a thermostable raw-starch hydrolyzing α-amylase from deep-sea thermophile Geobacillus sp.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Cai, Menghao; Huang, Mengmeng; He, Hao; Lu, Jian; Zhou, Xiangshan; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2015-10-01

    A deep-sea thermophile, Geobacillus sp. 4j, was identified to grow on starch and produce thermostable amylase. N-terminally truncated form of Geobacillus sp. 4j α-amylase (Gs4j-amyA) was fused at its N-terminal end with the signal peptide of outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of Escherichia coli. The enzyme was over-expressed in E. coli BL21 with a maximum extracellular production of 130U/ml in shake flask. The yield of the transformant increased 22-fold as compared with that of the wild strain. The recombinant enzyme purified to apparent homogeneity by metal-affinity chromatography, exhibited a molecular mass of 62kDa. It displayed the maximal activity at 60-65°C and pH 5.5. Its half-life (t1/2) at 80°C was 4.25h with a temperature deactivation energy of 166.3kJ/mol. Compared to three commonly used commercial α-amylases, the Gs4j-amyA exhibited similar thermostable performance to BLA but better than BAA and BSA. It also showed a universally efficient raw starch hydrolysis performance superior to commercial α-amylases at an acidic pH approaching nature of starch slurry. As a new acidic-resistant thermostable α-amylase, it has the potential to bypass the industrial gelatinization step in raw starch hydrolysis.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of a Thermophilic Desulfurization Bacterium, Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius Strain W-2

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Li, Mingchang; Guo, Shuyi

    2016-01-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius strain W-2 is a thermophilic bacterium isolated from a deep-subsurface oil reservoir in northern China, which is capable of degrading organosulfur compounds. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of G. thermoglucosidasius strain W-2, which may help to elucidate the genetic basis of biodegradation of organosulfur pollutants under heated conditions. PMID:27491977

  1. Genomic analysis of six new Geobacillus strains reveals highly conserved carbohydrate degradation architectures and strategies

    PubMed Central

    Brumm, Phillip J.; De Maayer, Pieter; Mead, David A.; Cowan, Don A.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we report the whole genome sequences of six new Geobacillus xylanolytic strains along with the genomic analysis of their capability to degrade carbohydrates. The six sequenced Geobacillus strains described here have a range of GC contents from 43.9% to 52.5% and clade with named Geobacillus species throughout the entire genus. We have identified a ~200 kb unique super-cluster in all six strains, containing five to eight distinct carbohydrate degradation clusters in a single genomic region, a feature not seen in other genera. The Geobacillus strains rely on a small number of secreted enzymes located within distinct clusters for carbohydrate utilization, in contrast to most biomass-degrading organisms which contain numerous secreted enzymes located randomly throughout the genomes. All six strains are able to utilize fructose, arabinose, xylose, mannitol, gluconate, xylan, and α-1,6-glucosides. The gene clusters for utilization of these seven substrates have identical organization and the individual proteins have a high percent identity to their homologs. The strains show significant differences in their ability to utilize inositol, sucrose, lactose, α-mannosides, α-1,4-glucosides and arabinan. PMID:26029180

  2. Characteristics of Newly Isolated Geobacillus sp. ZY-10 Degrading Hydrocarbons in Crude Oil.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yumei; Ning, Zhanguo; Yang, Fan; Li, Xianzhen

    2015-01-01

    An obligately thermophilic strain ZY-10 was isolated from the crude oil in a high-temperature oilfield, which was capable of degrading heavy crude oil. Phenotypic and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the isolate should be grouped in the genus Geobacillus, which shared thd highest similarity (99%) of the 16S rDNA sequence to Geobacillus stearothermophilus. However, the major cellular fatty acid iso-15:0 (28.55%), iso-16:0 (24.93%), iso-17:0 (23.53%) and the characteristics including indole production, tolerance to NaN3 and carbohydrate fermentation showed some difference from the recognized species in the genus Geobacillus. The isolate could use tridecane, hexadecane, octacosane and hexatridecane as sole carbon source for cell growth, and the digesting rate of long-chain alkane was lower than that of short-chain alkane. When the isolate was cultured in the heavy crude oil supplement with inorganic salts and trace yeast extract, the concentration of short-chain alkane was significantly increased and the content of long-chain alkane was decreased, suggesting that the larger hydrocarbon components in crude oil were degraded into shorter-chain alkane. Strain ZY-10 would be useful for improving the mobility of crude oil and upgrading heavy crude oil in situ.

  3. Thermophilic fermentation of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol by a novel Geobacillus strain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acetoin and 2,3-butanediol are two important biorefinery platform chemicals. They are currently fermented below 40°C using mesophilic strains, but the processes often suffer from bacterial contamination. Results This work reports the isolation and identification of a novel aerobic Geobacillus strain XT15 capable of producing both of these chemicals under elevated temperatures, thus reducing the risk of bacterial contamination. The optimum growth temperature was found to be between 45 and 55°C and the medium initial pH to be 8.0. In addition to glucose, galactose, mannitol, arabionose, and xylose were all acceptable substrates, enabling the potential use of cellulosic biomass as the feedstock. XT15 preferred organic nitrogen sources including corn steep liquor powder, a cheap by-product from corn wet-milling. At 55°C, 7.7 g/L of acetoin and 14.5 g/L of 2,3-butanediol could be obtained using corn steep liquor powder as a nitrogen source. Thirteen volatile products from the cultivation broth of XT15 were identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, and their derivatives including a novel metabolite 2,3-dihydroxy-3-methylheptan-4-one, accounted for a total of about 96% of all the volatile products. In contrast, organic acids and other products were minor by-products. α-Acetolactate decarboxylase and acetoin:2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol oxidoreductase in XT15, the two key enzymes in acetoin metabolic pathway, were found to be both moderately thermophilic with the identical optimum temperature of 45°C. Conclusions Geobacillus sp. XT15 is the first naturally occurring thermophile excreting acetoin and/or 2,3-butanediol. This work has demonstrated the attractive prospect of developing it as an industrial strain in the thermophilic fermentation of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol with improved anti-contamination performance. The novel metabolites and enzymes identified in XT15 also indicated its strong promise as a precious

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Geobacillus sp. Isolate T6, a Thermophilic Bacterium Collected from a Thermal Spring in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Elio M.; Berretta, Marcelo F.; Benintende, Graciela B.; Zandomeni, Rubén O.

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus sp. isolate T6 was collected from a thermal spring in Salta, Argentina. The draft genome sequence (3,767,773 bp) of this isolate is represented by one major scaffold of 3,46 Mbp, a second one of 207 kbp, and 20 scaffolds of <13 kbp. The assembled sequences revealed 3,919 protein-coding genes. PMID:26184933

  5. Immobilization of Lipase from Geobacillus sp. and Its Application in Synthesis of Methyl Salicylate.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Kamal Kumar; Saun, Nitin Kumar; Gupta, Reena

    2017-04-03

    The present study showed unique properties of an alkaline, thermophilic lipase of Geobacillus sp. which was isolated from soil of hot spring. The study was aimed to investigate the optimum immobilization conditions of lipase onto silica gel matrix (100-200 mesh) by surface adsorption method and its application in the synthesis of methyl salicylate. Lipase immobilized by surface adsorption onto silica pretreated with 4% glutaraldehyde showed 74.67% binding of protein and the optimum binding time for glutaraldehyde was found to be 2 h. The enzyme showed maximum activity at temperature 55°C, incubation time of 10 min at pH 9.5 of Tris buffer (0.1 M). Free as well as immobilized lipase was more specific to p-NPP (20 mM). All the metal ions and detergents used had inhibitory effect on free as well as immobilized enzyme. The silica immobilized enzyme was reused for hydrolysis and it retained almost 40.78% of its original activity up to 4(th) cycle. On optimizing different parameters such as molar ratio, incubation time, temperature, amount of enzyme, amount of molecular sieve, the % yield of methyl salicylate was found to be 82.94.

  6. (13)C metabolic flux analysis of the extremely thermophilic, fast growing, xylose-utilizing Geobacillus strain LC300.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Lauren T; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2016-01-01

    Thermophiles are increasingly used as versatile hosts in the biotechnology industry. One of the key advantages of thermophiles is the potential to achieve high rates of feedstock conversion at elevated temperatures. The recently isolated Geobacillus strain LC300 grows extremely fast on xylose, with a doubling time of less than 30 min. In the accompanying paper, the genome of Geobacillus LC300 was sequenced and annotated. In this work, we have experimentally validated the metabolic network model using parallel (13)C-labeling experiments and applied (13)C-metabolic flux analysis to quantify precise metabolic fluxes. Specifically, the complete set of singly labeled xylose tracers, [1-(13)C], [2-(13)C], [3-(13)C], [4-(13)C], and [5-(13)C]xylose, was used for the first time. Isotopic labeling of biomass amino acids was measured by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Isotopic labeling of carbon dioxide in the off-gas was also measured by an on-line mass spectrometer. The (13)C-labeling data was then rigorously integrated for flux elucidation using the COMPLETE-MFA approach. The results provided important new insights into the metabolism of Geobacillus LC300, its efficient xylose utilization pathways, and the balance between carbon, redox and energy fluxes. The pentose phosphate pathway, glycolysis and TCA cycle were found to be highly active in Geobacillus LC300. The oxidative pentose phosphate pathway was also active and contributed significantly to NADPH production. No transhydrogenase activity was detected. Results from this work provide a solid foundation for future studies of this strain and its metabolic engineering and biotechnological applications.

  7. Genome Sequence of the Multiple-Protease-Producing Strain Geobacillus thermoleovorans N7, a Thermophilic Bacterium Isolated from Paniphala Hot Spring, West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Sucharita; Mukherjee, Trinetra; Sen, Urmimala; Roy, Chayan; Rameez, Moidu Jameela; Ghosh, Wriddhiman

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Geobacillus thermoleovorans strain N7 (MCC 3175), isolated from Paniphala Hot Spring, West Bengal, India, which contains genes that encode several industrially and medically important thermostable enzymes like neutral protease, xylose isomerase, rhamnogalacturonan acetylesterase, nitrate and nitrite reductase, l-asparaginase, glutaminase, and RNase P. PMID:27789644

  8. Genome Sequence of the Multiple-Protease-Producing Strain Geobacillus thermoleovorans N7, a Thermophilic Bacterium Isolated from Paniphala Hot Spring, West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sucharita; Mukherjee, Trinetra; Sen, Urmimala; Roy, Chayan; Rameez, Moidu Jameela; Ghosh, Wriddhiman; Mukhopadhyay, Subhra Kanti

    2016-10-27

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Geobacillus thermoleovorans strain N7 (MCC 3175), isolated from Paniphala Hot Spring, West Bengal, India, which contains genes that encode several industrially and medically important thermostable enzymes like neutral protease, xylose isomerase, rhamnogalacturonan acetylesterase, nitrate and nitrite reductase, l-asparaginase, glutaminase, and RNase P.

  9. Highly active metallocarboxypeptidase from newly isolated Geobacillus strain SBS-4S: cloning and characterization.

    PubMed

    Tayyab, Muhammad; Rashid, Naeem; Angkawidjaja, Clement; Kanaya, Shigenori; Akhtar, Muhammad

    2011-03-01

    The carboxypeptidase gene from Geobacillus SBS-4S was cloned and sequenced. The sequence analysis displayed the gene consists of an open reading frame of 1503 nucleotides encoding a protein of 500 amino acids (CBP(SBS)). The amino acid sequence comparison revealed that CBP(SBS) exhibited a highest homology of 41.6% (identity) with carboxypeptidase Taq from Thermus aquaticus among the characterized proteases. CBP(SBS) contained an active site motif (265)HEXXH(269) which is conserved in family-M32 of carboxypeptidases. The gene was expressed with His-Tag utilizing Escherichia coli expression system and purified to apparent homogeneity. The purified CBP(SBS) showed highest activity at pH 7.5 and 70°C. The enzyme activity was metal ion dependent. Among metal ions highest activity was found in the presence of Co(2+). Thermostability studies of CBP(SBS) by circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated the melting temperature of the protein around 77°C. The enzyme exhibited K(m) and V(max) values of 14 mM and 10526 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) when carbobenzoxy-alanine-arginine was used as substrate. k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) valves were 10175 s(-1) and 726 mM(-1) s(-1). To our knowledge this is the highest ever reported enzyme activity of a metallocarboxypeptidase and the first characterization of a metallocarboxypeptidase from genus Geobacillus.

  10. Genetic engineering of Geobacillus spp.

    PubMed

    Kananavičiūtė, Rūta; Čitavičius, Donaldas

    2015-04-01

    Members of the genus Geobacillus are thermophiles that are of great biotechnological importance, since they are sources of many thermostable enzymes. Because of their metabolic versatility, geobacilli can be used as whole-cell catalysts in processes such as bioconversion and bioremediation. The effective employment of Geobacillus spp. requires the development of reliable methods for genetic engineering of these bacteria. Currently, genetic manipulation tools and protocols are under rapid development. However, there are several convenient cloning vectors, some of which replicate autonomously, while others are suitable for the genetic modification of chromosomal genes. Gene expression systems are also intensively studied. Combining these tools together with proper techniques for DNA transfer, some Geobacillus strains were shown to be valuable producers of recombinant proteins and industrially important biochemicals, such as ethanol or isobutanol. This review encompasses the progress made in the genetic engineering of Geobacillus spp. and surveys the vectors and transformation methods that are available for this genus.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Geobacillus icigianus Strain G1w1T Isolated from Hot Springs in the Valley of Geysers, Kamchatka (Russian Federation)

    PubMed Central

    Bryanskaya, Alla V.; Logacheva, Maria D.; Kotenko, Anastasia V.; Peltek, Sergey E.

    2014-01-01

    The Geobacillus icigianus G1w1T strain was isolated from sludge samples of unnamed vaporing hydrothermal (97°С) outlets situated in a geyser in the Troinoy region (Valley of Geysers, Kronotsky Nature Reserve, Kamchatka, Russian Federation; 54°25′51.40″N, 160°7′41.40″E). The sequenced and annotated genome is 3,457,810 bp and encodes 3,342 genes. PMID:25342695

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Geobacillus icigianus Strain G1w1T Isolated from Hot Springs in the Valley of Geysers, Kamchatka (Russian Federation).

    PubMed

    Bryanskaya, Alla V; Rozanov, Aleksey S; Logacheva, Maria D; Kotenko, Anastasia V; Peltek, Sergey E

    2014-10-23

    The Geobacillus icigianus G1w1(T) strain was isolated from sludge samples of unnamed vaporing hydrothermal (97°С) outlets situated in a geyser in the Troinoy region (Valley of Geysers, Kronotsky Nature Reserve, Kamchatka, Russian Federation; 54°25'51.40″N, 160°7'41.40″E). The sequenced and annotated genome is 3,457,810 bp and encodes 3,342 genes.

  13. Complete genome sequence of Geobacillus strain Y4.1MC1, a novel CO-utilizing Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius strain isolated from Bath Hot Spring in Yellowstone National Park

    DOE PAGES

    Brumm, Phillip; Land, Miriam L.; Hauser, Loren John; ...

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius Y4.1MC1 was isolated from a boiling spring in the lower geyser basin of Yellowstone National Park. We present this species is of interest because of its metabolic versatility. The genome consists of one circular chromosome of 3,840,330 bp and a circular plasmid of 71,617 bp with an average GC content of 44.01%. The genome is available in the GenBank database (NC_014650.1 and NC_014651.1). In addition to the expected metabolic pathways for sugars and amino acids, the Y4.1MC1 genome codes for two separate carbon monoxide utilization pathways, an aerobic oxidation pathway and an anaerobic reductive acetyl CoA (Wood-Ljungdahl) pathway.more » This is the first report of a nonanaerobic organism with the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. Also, this anaerobic pathway permits the strain to utilize H2 and fix CO2 present in the hot spring environment. Y4.1MC1 and its related species may play a significant role in carbon capture and sequestration in thermophilic ecosystems and may open up new routes to produce biofuels and chemicals from CO, H2, and CO2.« less

  14. Complete genome sequence of Geobacillus strain Y4.1MC1, a novel CO-utilizing Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius strain isolated from Bath Hot Spring in Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Brumm, Phillip; Land, Miriam L.; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Chang, Yun-Juan; Mead, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius Y4.1MC1 was isolated from a boiling spring in the lower geyser basin of Yellowstone National Park. We present this species is of interest because of its metabolic versatility. The genome consists of one circular chromosome of 3,840,330 bp and a circular plasmid of 71,617 bp with an average GC content of 44.01%. The genome is available in the GenBank database (NC_014650.1 and NC_014651.1). In addition to the expected metabolic pathways for sugars and amino acids, the Y4.1MC1 genome codes for two separate carbon monoxide utilization pathways, an aerobic oxidation pathway and an anaerobic reductive acetyl CoA (Wood-Ljungdahl) pathway. This is the first report of a nonanaerobic organism with the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. Also, this anaerobic pathway permits the strain to utilize H2 and fix CO2 present in the hot spring environment. Y4.1MC1 and its related species may play a significant role in carbon capture and sequestration in thermophilic ecosystems and may open up new routes to produce biofuels and chemicals from CO, H2, and CO2.

  15. A group IIC-type intron interrupts the rRNA methylase gene of Geobacillus stearothermophilus strain 10.

    PubMed

    Moretz, Samuel E; Lampson, Bert C

    2010-10-01

    Group IIC introns insert next to the stem-loop structure of rho-independent transcription terminators, thus avoiding intact genes. The insertion sites of 17 copies of the G.st.I1 intron from Geobacillus stearothermophilus were compared. One copy of the intron was found to interrupt an open reading frame (ORF) encoding an rRNA methylase.

  16. Draft Genome Sequences of Achromobacter piechaudii GCS2, Agrobacterium sp. Strain SUL3, Microbacterium sp. Strain GCS4, Shinella sp. Strain GWS1, and Shinella sp. Strain SUS2 Isolated from Consortium with the Hydrocarbon-Producing Alga Botryococcus braunii.

    PubMed

    Jones, Katy J; Moore, Karen; Sambles, Christine; Love, John; Studholme, David J; Aves, Stephen J

    2016-01-14

    A variety of bacteria associate with the hydrocarbon-producing microalga Botryococcus braunii, some of which may influence its growth. We report here the genome sequences for Achromobacter piechaudii GCS2, Agrobacterium sp. strain SUL3, Microbacterium sp. strain GCS4, and Shinella sp. strains GWS1 and SUS2, isolated from a laboratory culture of B. braunii, race B, strain Guadeloupe.

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Achromobacter piechaudii GCS2, Agrobacterium sp. Strain SUL3, Microbacterium sp. Strain GCS4, Shinella sp. Strain GWS1, and Shinella sp. Strain SUS2 Isolated from Consortium with the Hydrocarbon-Producing Alga Botryococcus braunii

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Katy J.; Moore, Karen; Love, John

    2016-01-01

    A variety of bacteria associate with the hydrocarbon-producing microalga Botryococcus braunii, some of which may influence its growth. We report here the genome sequences for Achromobacter piechaudii GCS2, Agrobacterium sp. strain SUL3, Microbacterium sp. strain GCS4, and Shinella sp. strains GWS1 and SUS2, isolated from a laboratory culture of B. braunii, race B, strain Guadeloupe. PMID:26769927

  18. Highly thermostable GH39 ß-xylosidase from a Geobacillus sp. strain WSUCF1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Complete enzymatic hydrolysis of xylan to xylose requires the action of endoxylanase and ß-xylosidase. ß-xylosidases play an important part in hydrolyzing xylo-oligosaccharides to xylose. Thermostable ß-xylosidases have been a focus of attention as industrially important enzymes due to th...

  19. Calcium Carbonate Formation by Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 8806 and Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 8807

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Brady D.; William A. Apel; Michelle R. Walton

    2006-12-01

    Precipitation of CaCO3 catalyzed by the growth and physiology of cyanobacteria in the Genus Synechococcus represents a potential mechanism for sequestration of CO2 produced during the burning of coal for power generation. Microcosm experiments were performed in which Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 and Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8807 were tested for their ability to calcify when exposed to a fixed calcium concentration of 3.4 mM and bicarbonate concentrations of 0.5, 1.25 and 2.5 mM. Disappearance of soluble calcium was used as an indicator of CaCO3 formation; results from metabolically active microcosms were compared to controls with no cells or no carbonate added. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 removed calcium continuously over the duration of the experiment with approximately 18.6 mg of calcium in the solid phase. Calcium removal occurred over a two-day time period when Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8807 was tested and only 8.9 mg of calcium was removed in the solid phase. The ability of the cyanobacteria to create an alkaline growth environment appeared to be the primary factor responsible for CaCO3 precipitation in these experiments. Removal of inorganic carbon by fixation into biomass was insignificant compared to the mass of inorganic carbon removed by incorporation into the growing CaCO3 solid.

  20. Characterisation of a new thermoalkaliphilic bacterium for the production of high-quality hemp fibres, Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius strain PB94A.

    PubMed

    Valladares Juárez, A G; Dreyer, J; Göpel, P K; Koschke, N; Frank, D; Märkl, H; Müller, R

    2009-06-01

    Novel thermophilic and alkaliphilic bacteria for the processing of bast fibres were isolated using hemp pectin as substrate. The strain PB94A, which showed the highest growth rate (micro = 0.5/h) was identified as Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius (DSM 21625). The strain grew optimally at 60 degrees C and pH 8.5. During growth on citrus pectin, the strain produced pectinolytic lyases, which were excreted into the medium. In contrast to the commercially available pectinase Bioprep 3000 L, the enzymes from G. thermoglucosidasius PB94A converted pectin isolated from hemp fibres. In addition to hemp pectin, the culture supernatant also degraded citrus, sugar beet and apple pectin and polygalacturonic acid. When hemp fibres were incubated with the cell-free fermentation broth of G. thermoglucosidasius PB94A, the fineness of the fibres increased. The strain did not produce any cellulases, which is important in order to avoid damaging the fibres during incubation. Therefore, these bacteria or their enzymes can be used to produce fine high-quality hemp fibres.

  1. Analysis of Metabolic Pathways and Fluxes in a Newly Discovered Thermophilic and Ethanol-Tolerant Geobacillus Strain

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Sapra, Rajat; Joyner, Dominique; Hazen, Terry C.; Myers, Samuel; Reichmuth, David; Blanch, Harvey; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-01-20

    A recently discovered thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius M10EXG, ferments a range of C5 (e.g., xylose) and C6 sugars (e.g., glucose) and istolerant to high ethanol concentrations (10percent, v/v). We have investigated the central metabolism of this bacterium using both in vitro enzyme assays and 13C-based flux analysis to provide insights into the physiological properties of this extremophile and explore its metabolism for bio-ethanol or other bioprocess applications. Our findings show that glucose metabolism in G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG proceeds via glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the TCA cycle; the Entner?Doudoroff pathway and transhydrogenase activity were not detected. Anaplerotic reactions (including the glyoxylate shunt, pyruvate carboxylase, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) were active, but fluxes through those pathways could not be accuratelydetermined using amino acid labeling. When growth conditions were switched from aerobic to micro-aerobic conditions, fluxes (based on a normalized glucose uptake rate of 100 units (g DCW)-1 h-1) through the TCA cycle and oxidative pentose phosphate pathway were reduced from 64+-3 to 25+-2 and from 30+-2 to 19+-2, respectively. The carbon flux under micro-aerobic growth was directed formate. Under fully anerobic conditions, G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG used a mixed acid fermentation process and exhibited a maximum ethanol yield of 0.38+-0.07 mol mol-1 glucose. In silico flux balance modeling demonstrates that lactate and acetate production from G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG reduces the maximum ethanol yieldby approximately threefold, thus indicating that both pathways should be modified to maximize ethanol production.

  2. Genome sequence of Sphingomonas sp. strain PAMC 26605, isolated from Arctic lichen (Ochrolechia sp.).

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung Chul; Ahn, Do Hwan; Lee, Jong Kyu; Kim, Su Jin; Hong, Soon Gyu; Kim, Eun Hye; Park, Hyun

    2012-03-01

    The endosymbiotic bacterium Sphingomonas sp. strain PAMC 26605 was isolated from Arctic lichens (Ochrolechia sp.) on the Svalbard Islands. Here we report the draft genome sequence of this strain, which could provide further insights into the symbiotic mechanism of lichens in extreme environments.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Aeromonas sp. Strain EERV15

    PubMed Central

    Ehsani, Elham; Barrantes, Israel; Vandermaesen, Johanna; Geffers, Robert; Jarek, Michael; Boon, Nico; Springael, Dirk; Pieper, Dietmar H.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Aeromonas sp. strain EERV15 isolated from sand filter. The organism most closely related to Aeromonas sp. EERV15 is Aeromonas veronii B565, with an average 83% amino acid sequence similarity of putatively encoded protein open reading frames. PMID:27540061

  4. Isolation and Characterization of a Geobacillus thermoleovorans Strain from an Ultra-Deep South African Gold Mine

    SciTech Connect

    Deflaun, Mary F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Dong, Hailiang; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Onstott, T. C.; Balkwill, David L.; Streger, Sheryl H.; Stackebrandt, E.; Knoessen, S.; van Heerden, E.

    2007-03-08

    A thermophilic, facultative bacterium was isolated from a depth of 3.1 km below ground surface in an ultradeep gold mine in South Africa. This isolate, designated GE-7, was cultivated from pH 8.0, 600C fissure water. GE-7 grows optimally at 650C, pH 6.5 on a wide range of carbon substrates including GE-7 is a long rod-shaped bacterium (4-6 µm long x 0.5 wide) with terminal endospores and flagella, in addition to O2, can also utilize nitrate as an electron acceptor. Phylogenetic analysis of GE-7 16S rDNA sequence revealed high sequence similarity with G. thermoleovorans DSM 5366T (99.6%), however, certain phenotypic characteristics of GE-7 were distinct from this and other strains of G. thermoleovorans previously described.

  5. Metabolism of glyphosate in Pseudomonas sp. strain LBr.

    PubMed

    Jacob, G S; Garbow, J R; Hallas, L E; Kimack, N M; Kishore, G M; Schaefer, J

    1988-12-01

    Metabolism of glyphosate (N-phosphonomethylglycine) by Pseudomonas sp. strain LBr, a bacterium isolated from a glyphosate process waste stream, was examined by a combination of solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and analysis of the phosphonate composition of the growth medium. Pseudomonas sp. strain LBr was capable of eliminating 20 mM glyphosate from the growth medium, an amount approximately 20-fold greater than that reported for any other microorganism to date. The bacterium degraded high levels of glyphosate, primarily by converting it to aminomethylphosphonate, followed by release into the growth medium. Only a small amount of aminomethylphosphonate (about 0.5 to 0.7 mM), which is needed to supply phosphorus for growth, could be metabolized by the microorganism. Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of strain LBr grown on 1 mM [2-13C,15N]glyphosate showed that about 5% of the glyphosate was degraded by a separate pathway involving breakdown of glyphosate to glycine, a pathway first observed in Pseudomonas sp. strain PG2982. Thus, Pseudomonas sp. strain LBr appears to possess two distinct routes for glyphosate detoxification.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Subantarctic Rhodococcus sp. Strain 1139

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Anthony L.; Charleston, Michael A.; Britz, Margaret L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The draft genome sequence of subantarctic Rhodococcus sp. strain 1139 is reported here. The genome size is 7.04 Mb with high G+C content (62.3%) and it contains a large number of genes involved in lipid synthesis. This lipid synthesis system is characteristic of oleaginous Actinobacteria, which are of interest for biofuel production. PMID:28385836

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus sp. Strain NPS 308

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Sato, Keiko; Imamura, Keigo; Hoshino, Tomonori; Nishiguchi, Miyuki; Hasuwa, Tomoyuki; Moriuchi, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Fujiwara, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus sp. strain NPS 308, isolated from an 8-year-old girl diagnosed with infective endocarditis, likely presents a novel species of Streptococcus. Here, we present a complete genome sequence of this species, which will contribute to better understanding of the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. PMID:28007849

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Archangium sp. Strain Cb G35

    PubMed Central

    Adaikpoh, Barbara I.; Dowd, Scot E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In an effort to explore myxobacterial natural product biosynthetic pathways, the draft genome sequence of Archangium sp. strain Cb G35 has been obtained. Analysis of the genome using antiSMASH predicts 49 natural product biosynthetic pathways. This genome will contribute to the investigation of myxobacterial secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways. PMID:28232451

  9. Metabolism of 2-, 3- and 4-hydroxybenzoates by soil isolates Alcaligenes sp. strain PPH and Pseudomonas sp. strain PPD.

    PubMed

    Deveryshetty, Jaigeeth; Suvekbala, V; Varadamshetty, Gautham; Phale, Prashant S

    2007-03-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain PPD and Alcaligenes sp. strain PPH isolated from soil by enrichment culture technique utilize 2-, 3- and 4-hydroxybenzoates as the sole source of carbon and energy. The degradation pathways were elucidated by performing whole-cell O(2) uptake, enzyme activity and induction studies. Depending on the mixture of carbon source and the preculture condition, strain PPH was found to degrade 2-hydroxybenzoate either via the catechol or gentisate route and has both salicylate 1-hydroxylase and salicylate 5-hydroxylase. Strain PPD utilizes 2-hydroxybenzoate via gentisate. Both strains degrade 3- and 4-hydroxybenzoate via gentisate and protocatechuate, respectively. Enzymes were induced by respective hydroxybenzoate. Growth pattern, O(2) uptake and enzyme activity profiles on the mixture of three hydroxybenzoates as a carbon source suggest coutilization by both strains. When 3- or 4-hydroxybenzoate grown culture was used as an inoculum, strain PPH failed to utilize 2-hydroxybenzoate via catechol, indicating the modulation of the metabolic pathways, thus generating metabolic diversity.

  10. Denitrification ability of rhizobial strains isolated from Lotus sp.

    PubMed

    Monza, Jorge; Irisarri, Pilar; Díaz, Pedro; Delgado, Ma Jesús; Mesa, Socorro; Bedmar, Eulogio J

    2006-01-01

    Ten rhizobial strains isolated from Lotus sp. have been characterized by their ability to denitrify. Out of the 10 strains, the five slow-growing isolates grew well under oxygen-limiting conditions with nitrate as a sole nitrogen source, and accumulated nitrous oxide in the growth medium when acetylene was used to inhibit nitrous oxide reductase activity. All five strains contained DNA homologous to the Bradyrhizobium japonicum nirK, norBDQ and nosZ genes. In contrast, fast-growing lotus rhizobia were incapable of growing under nitrate-respiring conditions, and did not accumulate nitrous oxide in the growth medium. DNA from each of the five fast-growing strains showed a hybridization band with the B. japonicum nirK gene but not with norBDQ and nosZ genes. Partial 16S rDNA gene sequencing revealed that fast-growing strains could be identified as Mesorhizobium loti species and the slow-growers as Bradyrhizobium sp.

  11. Natural transformation of Thermotoga sp. strain RQ7

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Thermotoga species are organisms of enormous interest from a biotechnological as well as evolutionary point of view. Genetic modifications of Thermotoga spp. are often desired in order to fully release their multifarious potentials. Effective transformation of recombinant DNA into these bacteria constitutes a critical step of such efforts. This study aims to establish natural competency in Thermotoga spp. and to provide a convenient method to transform these organisms. Results Foreign DNA was found to be relatively stable in the supernatant of a Thermotoga culture for up to 6 hours. Adding donor DNA to T. sp. strain RQ7 at its early exponential growth phase (OD600 0.18 ~ 0.20) resulted in direct acquisition of the DNA by the cells. Both T. neapolitana chromosomal DNA and Thermotoga-E. coli shuttle vectors effectively transformed T. sp. strain RQ7, rendering the cells resistance to kanamycin. The kan gene carried by the shuttle vector pDH10 was detected by PCR from the plasmid extract of the transformants, and the amplicons were verified by restriction digestions. A procedure for natural transformation of Thermotoga spp. was established and optimized. With the optimized method, T. sp. strain RQ7 sustained a transformation frequency in the order of 10-7 with both genomic and plasmid DNA. Conclusions T. sp. strain RQ7 cells are naturally transformable during their early exponential phase. They acquire DNA from both closely and distantly related species. Both chromosomal DNA and plasmid DNA serve as suitable substrates for transformation. Our findings lend a convenient technical tool for the genetic engineering of Thermotoga spp. PMID:24884561

  12. Purification and Characterization of a New Thermostable, Haloalkaline, Solvent Stable, and Detergent Compatible Serine Protease from Geobacillus toebii Strain LBT 77

    PubMed Central

    Riahi, Yosra; Belhadj, Omrane

    2016-01-01

    A new thermostable, haloalkaline, solvent stable SDS-induced serine protease was purified and characterized from a thermophilic Geobacillus toebii LBT 77 newly isolated from a Tunisian hot spring. This study reveals the potential of the protease from Geobacillus toebii LBT 77 as an additive to detergent with spectacular proprieties described for the first time. The protease was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by Sephadex G-75 and DEAE-Cellulose chromatography. It was a monomeric enzyme with molecular weight of 30 kDa. The optimum pH, temperature, and NaCl for maximum protease activity were 13.0, 95°C, and 30%, respectively. Activity was stimulated by Ca2+, Mg2+, DTNB, β-mercaptoethanol, and SDS. The protease was extremely stable even at pH 13.25, 90°C, and 30% NaCl and in the presence of hydrophilic, hydrophobic solvents at high concentrations. The high compatibility with ionic, nonionic, and commercial detergents confirms the utility as an additive to cleaning products. Kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of protease revealed Km = 1 mg mL−1,  Vmax = 217.5 U mL−1, Kcat/Km = 99 mg mL−1 S−1, Ea = 51.5 kJ mol−1, and ΔG⁎ = 56.5 kJ mol−1. PMID:27069928

  13. Microbial Degradation of Chlorogenic Acid by a Sphingomonas sp. Strain.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuping; Wang, Xiaoyu; Nie, Xueling; Zhang, Zhan; Yang, Zongcan; Nie, Cong; Tang, Hongzhi

    2016-08-01

    In order to elucidate the metabolism of chlorogenic acid by environmental microbes, a strain of Sphingomonas sp. isolated from tobacco leaves was cultured under various conditions, and chlorogenic acid degradation and its metabolites were investigated. The strain converting chlorogenic acid was newly isolated and identified as a Sphingomonas sp. strain by 16S rRNA sequencing. The optimal conditions for growth and chlorogenic acid degradation were 37 °C and pH 7.0 with supplementation of 1.5 g/l (NH4)2SO4 as the nitrogen source and 2 g/l chlorogenic acid as the sole carbon source. The maximum chlorogenic acid tolerating capability for the strain was 5 g/l. The main metabolites were identified as caffeic acid, shikimic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The analysis reveals the biotransformation mechanism of chlorogenic acid in microbial cells isolated from the environment.

  14. Genome sequence of Sphingomonas sp. strain PAMC 26621, an Arctic-lichen-associated bacterium isolated from a Cetraria sp.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoungseok; Shin, Seung Chul; Lee, Jungeun; Kim, Su Jin; Kim, Bum-Keun; Hong, Soon Gyu; Kim, Eun Hye; Park, Hyun

    2012-06-01

    The lichen-associated bacterial strain Sphingomonas sp. PAMC 26621 was isolated from an Arctic lichen Cetraria sp. on Svalbard Islands. Here we report the draft genome sequence of this strain, which could provide novel insights into the molecular principles of lichen-microbe interactions.

  15. Complete genome sequence of Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; St. John, Franz J.; Rice, John D.; Dickstein, Ellen; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Brettin, Thomas; Han, James; Woyke, Tanja; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Pati, Amrita; Martin, Joel; Copeland, Alex; Land, Miriam L.; Goodwin, Lynne; Jones, Jeffrey B.; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, Keelnathan T.; Preston, James F.

    2012-01-01

    Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, an aggressively xylanolytic bacterium isolated from sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) wood, is able to efficiently depolymerize, assimilate and metabolize 4-O-methylglucuronoxylan, the predominant structural component of hardwood hemicelluloses. A basis for this capability was first supported by the identification of genes and characterization of encoded enzymes and has been further defined by the sequencing and annotation of the complete genome, which we describe. In addition to genes implicated in the utilization of β-1,4-xylan, genes have also been identified for the utilization of other hemicellulosic polysaccharides. The genome of Paenibacillus sp. JDR-2 contains 7,184,930 bp in a single replicon with 6,288 protein-coding and 122 RNA genes. Uniquely prominent are 874 genes encoding proteins involved in carbohydrate transport and metabolism. The prevalence and organization of these genes support a metabolic potential for bioprocessing of hemicellulose fractions derived from lignocellulosic resources. PMID:22675593

  16. Complete genome sequence of Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; St. John, Franz J.; Dickstein, Ellen; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Brettin, Thomas S; Han, James; Woyke, Tanja; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Pati, Amrita; Martin, Joel; Copeland, A; Land, Miriam L; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Jones, Jeffrey B.; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, Keelnathan T.; Preston, James F.

    2012-01-01

    Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, an aggressively xylanolytic bacterium isolated from sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) wood, is able to efficiently depolymerize, assimilate and metabolize 4-O-methylglucuronoxylan, the predominant structural component of hardwood hemicelluloses. A basis for this capability was first supported by the identification of genes and characterization of encoded enzymes and has been further defined by the sequencing and annotation of the complete genome, which we describe. In addition to genes implicated in the utilization of -1,4-xylan, genes have also been identified for the utilization of other hemicellulosic polysaccharides. The genome of Paenibacillus sp. JDR-2 contains 7,184,930 bp in a single replicon with 6,288 protein-coding and 122 RNA genes. Uniquely prominent are 874 genes encoding proteins involved in carbohydrate transport and metabolism. The prevalence and organization of these genes support a metabolic potential for bioprocessing of hemicellulose fractions derived from lignocellulosic resources.

  17. Complete genome sequence of Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2.

    PubMed

    Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; St John, Franz J; Rice, John D; Dickstein, Ellen; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Brettin, Thomas; Han, James; Woyke, Tanja; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Pati, Amrita; Martin, Joel; Copeland, Alex; Land, Miriam L; Goodwin, Lynne; Jones, Jeffrey B; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, Keelnathan T; Preston, James F

    2012-03-19

    Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, an aggressively xylanolytic bacterium isolated from sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) wood, is able to efficiently depolymerize, assimilate and metabolize 4-O-methylglucuronoxylan, the predominant structural component of hardwood hemicelluloses. A basis for this capability was first supported by the identification of genes and characterization of encoded enzymes and has been further defined by the sequencing and annotation of the complete genome, which we describe. In addition to genes implicated in the utilization of β-1,4-xylan, genes have also been identified for the utilization of other hemicellulosic polysaccharides. The genome of Paenibacillus sp. JDR-2 contains 7,184,930 bp in a single replicon with 6,288 protein-coding and 122 RNA genes. Uniquely prominent are 874 genes encoding proteins involved in carbohydrate transport and metabolism. The prevalence and organization of these genes support a metabolic potential for bioprocessing of hemicellulose fractions derived from lignocellulosic resources.

  18. First Draft Genome Sequences of Neisseria sp. Strain 83E34 and Neisseria sp. Strain 74A18, Previously Identified as CDC Eugonic Fermenter 4b Species

    PubMed Central

    Greninger, Alexander L.; Streithorst, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    We report the first draft genome sequences of two isolates previously classified as CDC EF-4b species, Neisseria sp. 83E34 and Neisseria sp. 74A18. Both strains were isolated from patients with animal bites and likely constitute novel genomospecies with average nucleotide identities of <95% to other sequenced strains. PMID:27834718

  19. Chemotaxis of Silicibacter sp. Strain TM1040 toward Dinoflagellate Products†

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Todd R.; Hnilicka, Kristin; Dziedzic, Amanda; Desplats, Paula; Belas, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The α-proteobacteria phylogenetically related to the Roseobacter clade are predominantly responsible for the degradation of organosulfur compounds, including the algal osmolyte dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP). Silicibacter sp. strain TM1040, isolated from a DMSP-producing Pfiesteria piscicida dinoflagellate culture, degrades DMSP, producing 3-methylmercaptopropionate. TM1040 possesses three lophotrichous flagella and is highly motile, leading to a hypothesis that TM1040 interacts with P. piscicida through a chemotactic response to compounds produced by its dinoflagellate host. A combination of a rapid chemotaxis screening assay and a quantitative capillary assay were used to measure chemotaxis of TM1040. These bacteria are highly attracted to dinoflagellate homogenates; however, the response decreases when homogenates are preheated to 80°C. To help identify the essential attractant molecules within the homogenates, a series of pure compounds were tested for their ability to serve as attractants. The results show that TM1040 is strongly attracted to amino acids and DMSP metabolites, while being only mildly responsive to sugars and the tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. Adding pure DMSP, methionine, or valine to the chemotaxis buffer resulted in a decreased response to the homogenates, indicating that exogenous addition of these chemicals blocks chemotaxis and suggesting that DMSP and amino acids are essential attractant molecules in the dinoflagellate homogenates. The implication of Silicibacter sp. strain TM1040 chemotaxis in establishing and maintaining its interaction with P. piscicida is discussed. PMID:15294804

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Microbacterium sp. Strain Alg239_V18, an Actinobacterium Retrieved from the Marine Sponge Spongia sp.

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Elham; Gonçalves, Jorge M. S.; Reis, Margarida

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we describe the draft genome sequence of Microbacterium sp. strain Alg239_V18, an actinobacterium retrieved from the marine sponge Spongia sp. Genome annotation revealed a vast gene repertoire involved in antibiotic and heavy metal-resistance, and a versatile carbohydrate assimilation metabolism with potential for chitin utilization. PMID:28104653

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Microbacterium sp. Strain Alg239_V18, an Actinobacterium Retrieved from the Marine Sponge Spongia sp.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Elham; Gonçalves, Jorge M S; Reis, Margarida; Costa, Rodrigo

    2017-01-19

    Here, we describe the draft genome sequence of Microbacterium sp. strain Alg239_V18, an actinobacterium retrieved from the marine sponge Spongia sp. Genome annotation revealed a vast gene repertoire involved in antibiotic and heavy metal-resistance, and a versatile carbohydrate assimilation metabolism with potential for chitin utilization.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Deep-Sea Alteromonas sp. Strain V450 Isolated from the Marine Sponge Leiodermatium sp.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Nolan H.; McCarthy, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The proteobacterium Alteromonas sp. strain V450 was isolated from the Atlantic deep-sea sponge Leiodermatium sp. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this strain, with a genome size of approx. 4.39 Mb and a G+C content of 44.01%. The results will aid deep-sea microbial ecology, evolution, and sponge-microbe association studies. PMID:28153886

  3. Reclassification of Geobacillus pallidus (Scholz et al. 1988) Banat et al. 2004 as Aeribacillus pallidus gen. nov., comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Miñana-Galbis, David; Pinzón, Dora L; Lorén, J Gaspar; Manresa, Angels; Oliart-Ros, Rosa M

    2010-07-01

    Although Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus, two genera of thermophilic bacteria close to the genus Bacillus, have only been described recently, the number of species in these genera has increased rapidly. Four thermophilic, lipolytic strains (DR01, DR02, DR03 and DR04) isolated from a hot spring in Veracruz (Mexico), which could not be identified phenotypically, were subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Three strains were identified as belonging to the genus Anoxybacillus, but strain DR03 was identified as Geobacillus pallidus. This result led us to perform a phylogenetic analysis of the genera Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus based on 16S rRNA gene sequences from all the type strains of these genera. Phylogenetic trees showed three major clusters, Anoxybacillus-Geobacillus tepidamans, Geobacillus sensu stricto and Geobacillus pallidus, while the 16S rRNA gene sequences of G. pallidus (DR03 and the type strain) showed low similarity to sequences of Anoxybacillus (92.5-95.1 %) and Geobacillus (92.8-94.5 %) species, as well as to Bacillus subtilis (92.2-92.4 %). In addition, G. pallidus could be differentiated from Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus on the basis of DNA G+C content and fatty acid and polar lipid profiles. From these results, it is proposed that Geobacillus pallidus should be classified in a novel genus, for which we propose the name Aeribacillus, as Aeribacillus pallidus gen. nov., comb. nov. The type strain of Aeribacillus pallidus is H12(T) (=ATCC 51176(T) =DSM 3670(T) =LMG 19006(T)).

  4. Biodegradation of 2-nitrotoluene by Pseudomonas sp. strain JS42.

    PubMed Central

    Haigler, B E; Wallace, W H; Spain, J C

    1994-01-01

    A strain of Pseudomonas sp. was isolated from nitrobenzene-contaminated soil and groundwater on 2-nitrotoluene as the sole source of carbon, energy, and nitrogen. Bacterial cells growing on 2-nitrotoluene released nitrite into the growth medium. The isolate also grew on 3-methylcatechol, 4-methylcatechol, and catechol. 2-Nitrotoluene, 3-methylcatechol, and catechol stimulated oxygen consumption by intact cells regardless of the growth substrate. Crude extracts from the isolate contained catechol 2,3-dioxygenase and 2-hydroxy-6-oxohepta-2,4-dienoate hydrolase activity. The results suggest that 2-nitrotoluene is subject to initial attack by a dioxygenase enzyme that forms 3-methylcatechol with concomitant release of nitrite. The 3-methylcatechol is subsequently degraded via the meta ring fission pathway. PMID:7944378

  5. Complete genome sequence of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsu, Cindy H.; Barabote, Ravi; Thompson, Sue; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Brettin, Thomas; Han, Cliff; Beasley, Federico; Chen, Weimin; Konopka, Allan; Xie, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 is a species in the genus Arthrobacter Conn and Dimmick 1947, in the family Micrococcaceae and class Actinobacteria. A number of Arthrobacter genome sequences have been completed because of their important role in soil, especially bioremediation. This isolate is of special interest because it is tolerant to multiple metals and it is extremely resistant to elevated concentrations of chromate. The genome consists of a 4,698,945 bp circular chromosome and three plasmids (96,488, 115,507, and 159,536 bp, a total of 5,070,478 bp), coding 4,536 proteins of which 1,257 are without known function. This genome was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program. PMID:24501649

  6. Complete genome sequence of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsu, C. H.; Barabote, Ravi; Thompson, Sue; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Brettin, T.; Han, Cliff F.; Beasley, Federico; Chen, Weimin; Konopka, Allan; Xie, Gary

    2013-09-30

    Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 is a species in the genus Arthrobacter Conn and Dimmick 1947, in the family Micrococcaceae and class Actinobacteria. A number of Arthrobacter genome sequences have been completed because of their important role in soil, especially bioremediation. This isolate is of special interest because it is tolerant to multiple metals and it is extremely resistant to elevated concentrations of chromate. The genome consists of a 4,698,945 bp circular chromosome and three plasmids (96,488, 115,507, and 159,536 bp, a total of 5,070,478 bp), coding 4,536 proteins of which 1,257 are without known function. This genome was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program.

  7. Dienelactone hydrolase from Pseudomonas sp. strain B13.

    PubMed Central

    Ngai, K L; Schlömann, M; Knackmuss, H J; Ornston, L N

    1987-01-01

    Dienelactone hydrolase (EC 3.1.1.45) catalyzes the conversion of cis- or trans-4-carboxymethylenebut-2-en-4-olide (dienelactone) to maleylacetate. An approximately 24-fold purification from extracts of 3-chlorobenzoate-grown Pseudomonas sp. strain B13 yielded a homogeneous preparation of the enzyme. The purified enzyme crystallized readily and proved to be a monomer with a molecular weight of about 30,000. Each dienelactone hydrolase molecule contains two cysteinyl side chains. One of these was readily titrated by stoichiometric amounts of p-chloromercuribenzoate, resulting in inactivation of the enzyme; the inactivation could be reversed by the addition of dithiothreitol. The other cysteinyl side chain appeared to be protected in the native protein against chemical reaction with p-chloromercuribenzoate. The properties of sulfhydryl side chains in dienelactone hydrolase resembled those that have been characterized for bacterial 4-carboxymethylbut-3-en-4-olide (enol-lactone) hydrolases (EC 3.1.1.24), which also are monomers with molecular weights of about 30,000. The amino acid composition of the dienelactone hydrolase resembled the amino acid composition of enol-lactone hydrolase from Pseudomonas putida, and alignment of the NH2-terminal amino acid sequence of the dienelactone hydrolase with the corresponding sequence of an Acinetobacter calcoaceticus enol-lactone hydrolase revealed sequence identity at 8 of the 28 positions. These observations foster the hypothesis that the lactone hydrolases share a common ancestor. The lactone hydrolases differed in one significant property: the kcat of dienelactone hydrolase was 1,800 min-1, an order of magnitude below the kcat observed with enol-lactone hydrolases. The relatively low catalytic activity of dienelactone hydrolase may demand its production at the high levels observed for induced cultures of Pseudomonas sp. strain B13. PMID:3804973

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Gordonia sp. Strain UCD-TK1 (Phylum Actinobacteria)

    PubMed Central

    Koenigsaecker, Tynisha M.; Coil, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of Gordonia sp. strain UCD-TK1. The assembly contains 5,470,576 bp in 98 contigs. This strain was isolated from a disinfected ambulatory surgery center. PMID:27738036

  9. Genome Sequence of Arcobacter sp. Strain LA11, Isolated from the Abalone Haliotis discus

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Yukino

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arcobacter sp. strain LA11 was isolated from the gut of the abalone Haliotis discus. Here, we present the annotation and analysis of the draft genome of this strain, which is involved in nitrogen metabolism. PMID:28302779

  10. Mechanism of Algal Aggregation by Bacillus sp. Strain RP1137

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Ryan J.

    2014-01-01

    Alga-derived biofuels are one of the best alternatives for economically replacing liquid fossil fuels with a fungible renewable energy source. Production of fuel from algae is technically feasible but not yet economically viable. Harvest of dilute algal biomass from the surrounding water remains one of the largest barriers to economic production of algal biofuel. We identified Bacillus sp. strain RP1137 in a previous study and showed that this strain can rapidly aggregate several biofuel-producing algae in a pH- and divalent-cation-dependent manner. In this study, we further characterized the mechanism of algal aggregation by RP1137. We show that aggregation of both algae and bacteria is optimal in the exponential phase of growth and that the density of ionizable residues on the RP1137 cell surface changes with growth stage. Aggregation likely occurs via charge neutralization with calcium ions at the cell surface of both algae and bacteria. We show that charge neutralization occurs at least in part through binding of calcium to negatively charged teichoic acid residues. The addition of calcium also renders both algae and bacteria more able to bind to hydrophobic beads, suggesting that aggregation may occur through hydrophobic interactions. Knowledge of the aggregation mechanism may enable engineering of RP1137 to obtain more efficient algal harvesting. PMID:24771029

  11. Mechanism of algal aggregation by Bacillus sp. strain RP1137.

    PubMed

    Powell, Ryan J; Hill, Russell T

    2014-07-01

    Alga-derived biofuels are one of the best alternatives for economically replacing liquid fossil fuels with a fungible renewable energy source. Production of fuel from algae is technically feasible but not yet economically viable. Harvest of dilute algal biomass from the surrounding water remains one of the largest barriers to economic production of algal biofuel. We identified Bacillus sp. strain RP1137 in a previous study and showed that this strain can rapidly aggregate several biofuel-producing algae in a pH- and divalent-cation-dependent manner. In this study, we further characterized the mechanism of algal aggregation by RP1137. We show that aggregation of both algae and bacteria is optimal in the exponential phase of growth and that the density of ionizable residues on the RP1137 cell surface changes with growth stage. Aggregation likely occurs via charge neutralization with calcium ions at the cell surface of both algae and bacteria. We show that charge neutralization occurs at least in part through binding of calcium to negatively charged teichoic acid residues. The addition of calcium also renders both algae and bacteria more able to bind to hydrophobic beads, suggesting that aggregation may occur through hydrophobic interactions. Knowledge of the aggregation mechanism may enable engineering of RP1137 to obtain more efficient algal harvesting.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Brevibacillus sp. Strain BAB-2500, a Strain That Might Play an Important Role in Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, M. N.; Sharma, A.; Pandit, A. S.; Pandya, R. V.; Saxena, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    A Gram-positive bacterium, Brevibacillus sp. strain BAB-2500, was isolated as a lab contaminant in Gandhinagar, Gujarat, India. The draft genome (5.3 Mb) of the strain possesses genes for the reduction of arsenate and aluminum. These findings might provide insights into the utilization of this strain for improving crop production. PMID:23472223

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of the Electricigen Acidiphilium sp. Strain PM (DSM 24941)

    PubMed Central

    San Martin-Uriz, Patxi; Gomez, Manuel J.; Arcas, Aida; Bargiela, Rafael; Amils, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Acidiphilium sp. strain PM (DSM 24941) was isolated from Rio Tinto's acidic, heavy metal-rich waters. Voltammetry experiments revealed that this strain is capable of electricity production even under aerobic conditions. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Acidiphilium sp. PM and a preliminary genome analysis that reveals a versatile respiratory metabolism. PMID:21914891

  14. Complete genome sequence of the fenitrothion-degrading Burkholderia sp. strain YI23.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jong Sung; Choi, Beom Soon; Choi, Ah Young; Kim, Kyung Duk; Kim, Dong In; Choi, Ik Young; Ka, Jong-Ok

    2012-02-01

    Burkholderia species are ubiquitous in soil environments. Many Burkholderia species isolated from various environments have the potential to biodegrade man-made chemicals. Burkholderia sp. strain YI23 was isolated from a golf course soil and identified as a fenitrothion-degrading bacterium. In this study, we report the complete genome sequence of Burkholderia sp. strain YI23.

  15. Genome sequence of the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Bacillus sp. strain 916.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Luo, Chuping; Chen, Zhiyi

    2012-10-01

    Bacillus sp. strain 916, isolated from the soil, showed strong activity against Rhizoctonia solani. Here, we present the high-quality draft genome sequence of Bacillus sp. strain 916. Its 3.9-Mb genome reveals a number of genes whose products are possibly involved in promotion of plant growth or antibiosis.

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of the Streptothricin-Producing Strain Streptomyces sp. fd2-tb

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Biao; Yu, Yucong; Cen, Xufeng; Zhu, Yongqiang; Dai, Ruixue; Wang, Xianwei

    2015-01-01

    Streptomyces sp. fd2-tb can produce streptothricin class antibiotics with broad antimicrobial spectra. To better understand the mechanism of streptothricin biosynthesis and to assess the capacity of this strain in secondary metabolism, we report the draft genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. strain fd2-tb. PMID:26514767

  17. Finished Genome Sequence of the Unicellular Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6714.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Matthias; Klähn, Stephan; Voss, Björn; Stüber, Kurt; Huettel, Bruno; Reinhardt, Richard; Hess, Wolfgang R

    2014-07-31

    Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6714 is a unicellular cyanobacterium closely related to the popular model organism Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. A combination of PacBio SMRT and Illumina GAIIx data results in a highly accurate finished genome sequence that provides a reliable resource for further comparative analyses.

  18. Complete genome sequence of deoxynivalenol-degrading bacterium Devosia sp. strain A16.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xianchao; Zhu, Ziwei; Zhou, Yidong; Ji, Fang; Yao, Zhenyu; Shi, Jianrong; Xu, Jianhong

    2016-01-20

    The strain A16, capable of degrading deoxynivalenol was isolated from a wheat field and identified preliminarily as Devosia sp. Here, we present the genome sequence of the Devosia sp. A16, which has a size of 5,032,994 bp, with 4913 coding sequences (CDSs). The annotated full genome sequence of the Devosia sp. A16 strain might shed light on the function of its degradation.

  19. Draft Genome Sequences of Seven Thermophilic Spore-Forming Bacteria Isolated from Foods That Produce Highly Heat-Resistant Spores, Comprising Geobacillus spp., Caldibacillus debilis, and Anoxybacillus flavithermus

    PubMed Central

    Berendsen, Erwin M.; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H. J.; Krawczyk, Antonina O.; de Jong, Anne; van Heel, Auke; Holsappel, Siger; Eijlander, Robyn T.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genomes of five strains of Geobacillus spp., one Caldibacillus debilis strain, and one draft genome of Anoxybacillus flavithermus, all thermophilic spore-forming Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:27151781

  20. Dichloromethane dehalogenase of Hyphomicrobium sp. strain DM2.

    PubMed Central

    Kohler-Staub, D; Leisinger, T

    1985-01-01

    Dichloromethane dehalogenase, a highly inducible glutathione-dependent enzyme catalyzing the conversion of dichloromethane into formaldehyde and inorganic chloride, was purified fivefold with 60% yield from Hyphomicrobium sp. strain DM2. The electrophoretically homogeneous purified enzyme exhibited a specific activity of 17.3 mkat/kg of protein. Its pH optimum was 8.5. The enzyme was stable at -20 degrees C for at least 6 months. A subunit molecular weight of 33,000 was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Gel filtration of native dichloromethane dehalogenase yielded a molecular weight of 195,000. Subunit cross-linking with dimethyl suberimidate confirmed the hexameric tertiary structure of the enzyme. Dichloromethane dehalogenase was highly specific for dihalomethanes. Its apparent Km values were 30 microM for CH2Cl2, 15 microM for CH2BrCl, 13 microM for CH2Br2, 5 microM for CH2I2, and 320 microM for glutathione. Several chlorinated aliphatic compounds inhibited the dichloromethane dehalogenase activity of the pure enzyme. The Ki values of the competitive inhibitors 1,2-dichloroethane and 1-chloropropane were 3 and 56 microM, respectively. Images PMID:3988708

  1. Genome sequence of Oceanicaulis sp. strain HTCC2633, isolated from the Western Sargasso Sea.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyun-Myung; Kang, Ilnam; Vergin, Kevin L; Lee, Kiyoung; Giovannoni, Stephen J; Cho, Jang-Cheon

    2011-01-01

    The genus Oceanicaulis represents dimorphic rods that were originally isolated from a marine dinoflagellate. Here, we announce the genome sequence of Oceanicaulis sp. strain HTCC2633, isolated by dilution-to-extinction culturing from the Sargasso Sea. The genome information of strain HTCC2633 indicates a chemoorganotrophic way of life of this strain.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Rheinheimera sp. Strain SA_1 Isolated from Iron Backwash Sludge in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Josephin; Liere, Karsten; Szewzyk, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Rheinheimera sp. strain SA_1 is an iron-depositing bacterium for which we report a draft genome sequence. Strain SA_1 was isolated from iron backwash sludge of a waterworks in Germany. The Illumina MiSeq technique was used to sequence the genome of the strain. PMID:27540074

  3. CitA (citrate) and DcuS (C4-dicarboxylate) sensor kinases in thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus and Geobacillus thermodenitrificans.

    PubMed

    Graf, Sabrina; Broll, Constanze; Wissig, Juliane; Strecker, Alexander; Parowatkin, Maria; Unden, Gottfried

    2016-01-01

    The thermophilic Geobacillus thermodenitrificans and Geobacillus kaustophilus are able to use citrate or C4-dicarboxylates like fumarate or succinate as the substrates for growth. The genomes of the sequenced Geobacillus strains (nine strains) each encoded a two-component system of the CitA family. The sensor kinase of G. thermodenitrificans (termed CitAGt) was able to replace CitA of Escherichia coli (CitAEc) in a heterologous complementation assay restoring expression of the CitAEc-dependent citC-lacZ reporter gene and anaerobic growth on citrate. Complementation was specific for citrate. The sensor kinase of G. kaustophilus (termed DcuSGk) was able to replace DcuSEc of E. coli. It responded in the heterologous expression system to C4-dicarboxylates and to citrate, suggesting that DcuSGk is, like DcuSEc, a C4-dicarboxylate sensor with a side-activity for citrate. DcuSGk, unlike the homologous DctS from Bacillus subtilis, required no binding protein for function in the complementation assay. Thus, the thermophilic G. thermodenitrificans and G. kaustophilus contain citrate and C4-dicarboxylate sensor kinases of the CitA and DcuS type, respectively, and retain function and substrate specificity under mesophilic growth conditions in E. coli.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Shewanella sp. Strain CP20

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Carla; Martin Tay, Qi Xiang; Sun, Shuyang

    2015-01-01

    Shewanella sp. CP20 is a marine bacterium that survives ingestion by Tetrahymena pyriformis and is expelled from the protozoan within membrane-bound vacuoles, where the bacterial cells show long-term survival. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Shewanella sp. CP20 and discuss the potential mechanisms facilitating intraprotozoan survival. PMID:25858840

  5. Growth in Coculture Stimulates Metabolism of the Phenylurea Herbicide Isoproturon by Sphingomonas sp. Strain SRS2

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Sebastian R.; Ronen, Zeev; Aamand, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Metabolism of the phenylurea herbicide isoproturon by Sphingomonas sp. strain SRS2 was significantly enhanced when the strain was grown in coculture with a soil bacterium (designated strain SRS1). Both members of this consortium were isolated from a highly enriched isoproturon-degrading culture derived from an agricultural soil previously treated regularly with the herbicide. Based on analysis of the 16S rRNA gene, strain SRS1 was assigned to the β-subdivision of the proteobacteria and probably represents a new genus. Strain SRS1 was unable to degrade either isoproturon or its known metabolites 3-(4-isopropylphenyl)-1-methylurea, 3-(4-isopropylphenyl)-urea, or 4-isopropyl-aniline. Pure culture studies indicate that Sphingomonas sp. SRS2 is auxotrophic and requires components supplied by association with other soil bacteria. A specific mixture of amino acids appeared to meet these requirements, and it was shown that methionine was essential for Sphingomonas sp. SRS2. This suggests that strain SRS1 supplies amino acids to Sphingomonas sp. SRS2, thereby leading to rapid metabolism of 14C-labeled isoproturon to 14CO2 and corresponding growth of strain SRS2. Proliferation of strain SRS1 suggests that isoproturon metabolism by Sphingomonas sp. SRS2 provides unknown metabolites or cell debris that supports growth of strain SRS1. The role of strain SRS1 in the consortium was not ubiquitous among soil bacteria; however, the indigenous soil microflora and some strains from culture collections also stimulate isoproturon metabolism by Sphingomonas sp. strain SRS2 to a similar extent. PMID:12089031

  6. Whole-genome sequence of Enterobacter sp. strain SST3, an endophyte isolated from Jamaican sugarcane (Saccharum sp.) stalk tissue.

    PubMed

    Gan, Han Ming; McGroty, Sean E; Chew, Teong Han; Chan, Kok Gan; Buckley, Larry J; Savka, Michael A; Hudson, André O

    2012-11-01

    Enterobacter sp. strain SST3 is an endophytic bacterium isolated from Saccharum spp. Here we present its annotated draft genome that may shed light on its role as a bacterial endophyte of sugarcane. To our knowledge, this is the first genome announcement of a sugarcane-associated bacterium from the genus Enterobacter.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Carbendazim-Degrading Mycobacterium sp. Strain djl-10

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qiaoyun; Yang, Wei; Wang, Xinfeng

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium sp. strain djl-10, an efficient degrader of carbendazim, was isolated from a carbendazim manufacturing wastewater treatment system. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of djl-10, which consists of a chromosome and three plasmids. PMID:28232422

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of the Versatile Alkane-Degrading Bacterium Aquabacterium sp. Strain NJ1.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Hisako; Shiwa, Yuh; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Zylstra, Gerben J

    2014-12-04

    The draft genome sequence of a soil bacterium, Aquabacterium sp. strain NJ1, capable of utilizing both liquid and solid alkanes, was deciphered. This is the first report of an Aquabacterium genome sequence.

  9. Influence of heavy metals on the activity of antioxidant enzymes in the metal resistant strains of Ochrobactrum and Bacillus sp.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sanjeev; Barai, Prabir Kumar; Maiti, Tushar K

    2013-11-01

    Three bacterial strains, a cadmium resistant Ochrobactrum sp. designated as CdSP9 and two strains of Bacillus sp. named PbSP6 and AsSP9 resistant to lead and arsenate, respectively were characterized here with respect to their oxidative enzyme activities. The bacterial strains were grown in basal medium supplemented with 50 microg ml(-1) of respective elements to determine the changes in the level of oxidative enzymes. The superoxide dismutase activity increased in all three isolates, but the catalase activity and malondialdehyde concentration were relatively more in CdSP9 than PbSP6 and AsSP9. The glutathione peroxidase, however, remained almost uninduced in CdSP9 but was enhanced in PbSP6 and AsSP9. A possible role of these enzymes in metal tolerance is evident from these results.

  10. Antibiofilm Activity of the Marine Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain 3J6▿

    PubMed Central

    Dheilly, Alexandra; Soum-Soutéra, Emmanuelle; Klein, Géraldine L.; Bazire, Alexis; Compère, Chantal; Haras, Dominique; Dufour, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Biofilm formation results in medical threats or economic losses and is therefore a major concern in a variety of domains. In two-species biofilms of marine bacteria grown under dynamic conditions, Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain 3J6 formed mixed biofilms with Bacillus sp. strain 4J6 but was largely predominant over Paracoccus sp. strain 4M6 and Vibrio sp. strain D01. The supernatant of Pseudoalteromonas sp. 3J6 liquid culture (SN3J6) was devoid of antibacterial activity against free-living Paracoccus sp. 4M6 and Vibrio sp. D01 cells, but it impaired their ability to grow as single-species biofilms and led to higher percentages of nonviable cells in 48-h biofilms. Antibiofilm molecules of SN3J6 were able to coat the glass surfaces used to grow biofilms and reduced bacterial attachment about 2-fold, which might partly explain the biofilm formation defect but not the loss of cell viability. SN3J6 had a wide spectrum of activity since it affected all Gram-negative marine strains tested except other Pseudoalteromonas strains. Biofilm biovolumes of the sensitive strains were reduced 3- to 530-fold, and the percentages of nonviable cells were increased 3- to 225-fold. Interestingly, SN3J6 also impaired biofilm formation by three strains belonging to the human-pathogenic species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica, and Escherichia coli. Such an antibiofilm activity is original and opens up a variety of applications for Pseudoalteromonas sp. 3J6 and/or its active exoproducts in biofilm prevention strategies. PMID:20363799

  11. Genetic toolbox for controlled expression of functional proteins in Geobacillus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Pogrebnyakov, Ivan; Jendresen, Christian Bille

    2017-01-01

    Species of genus Geobacillus are thermophilic bacteria and play an ever increasing role as hosts for biotechnological applications both in academia and industry. Here we screened a number of Geobacillus strains to determine which industrially relevant carbon sources they can utilize. One of the strains, G. thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93, was then chosen to develop a toolbox for controlled gene expression over a wide range of levels. It includes a library of semi-synthetic constitutive promoters (76-fold difference in expression levels) and an inducible promoter from the xylA gene. A library of synthetic in silico designed ribosome binding sites was also created for further tuning of translation. The PxylA was further used to successfully express native and heterologous xylanases in G. thermoglucosidasius. This toolbox enables fine-tuning of gene expression in Geobacillus species for metabolic engineering approaches in production of biochemicals and heterologous proteins. PMID:28152017

  12. Molecular Identification of Two Strains of Phellinus sp. by Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Two species of cultivated Phellinus sp. were identified as P. baumii by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence analysis. The fruit bodies of the examined strains were similar to those of naturally occurring strains, having a bracket-like form, yellow-to-orange color, and poroid hymenial surfaces. The DNA sequences of ITS region of both strains showed a homology of 99% with ITS1 to ITS2 sequences of P. (Inonotus) baumii strain PB0806. PMID:22783119

  13. Revision of the taxonomic status of type strains of Mesorhizobium loti and reclassification of strain USDA 3471T as the type strain of Mesorhizobiumerdmanii sp. nov. and ATCC 33669T as the type strain of Mesorhizobiumjarvisii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Hidalgo, Pilar; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha Helena; Flores-Félix, José David; Rivas, Raúl; Igual, José M; Mateos, Pedro F; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; León-Barrios, Milagros; Peix, Álvaro; Velázquez, Encarna

    2015-06-01

    The species Mesorhizobim loti was isolated from nodules of Lotus corniculatus and its type strain deposited in several collections. Some of these type strains, such as those deposited in the USDA and ATCC collections before 1990, are not coincident with the original strain, NZP 2213T, deposited in the NZP culture collection. The analysis of the 16S rRNA gene showed that strains USDA 3471T and ATCC 33669T formed independent branches from that occupied by Mesorhizobium loti NZP 2213T and related to those occupied by Mesorhizobium opportunistum WSM2075T and Mesorhizobium huakuii IFO 15243T, respectively, with 99.9 % similarity in both cases. However, the analysis of concatenated recA, atpD and glnII genes with similarities lower than 96, 98 and 94 %, respectively, between strains USDA 3471T and M. opportunistum WSM2075T and between strains ATCC 33669T and M. huakuii IFO 15243T, indicated that the strains USDA 3471T and ATCC 33669T represent different species of the genus Mesorhizobium. These results were confirmed by DNA-DNA hybridization experiments and phenotypic characterization. Therefore, the two strains were reclassified as representatives of the two species Mesorhizobium erdmanii sp. nov. (type strain USDA 3471T = CECT 8631T = LMG 17826t2T) and Mesorhizobium jarvisii sp. nov. (type strain ATCC 33669T = CECT 8632T = LMG 28313T).

  14. Improvement of strain Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH190 for tannase production by induced mutation.

    PubMed

    Zakipour-Molkabadi, E; Hamidi-Esfahani, Z; Sahari, M A; Azizi, M H

    2013-11-01

    In the search for an efficient producer of tannase, Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH190 was subjected to mutagenesis using heat treatment and strain EZ-ZH290 was isolated. The maximum tannase in this mutant strain was 4.32 U/mL with an incubation period of 84 h as compared to wild strain EZ-ZH190 where the incubation period was 96 h with a maximum enzyme activity of 4.33 U/mL. Also, the Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH290 tannase had a maximum activity at 40 °C and pH 5.5. Then, the spores of strain EZ-ZH290 were subjected to γ irradiation mutagenesis and strain EZ-ZH390 was isolated. Strain EZ-ZH390 exhibited higher tannase activity (7.66 U/mL) than the parent strain EZ-ZH290. It was also found that Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH390 tannase had an optimum activity at 35 °C and a broad pH profile with an optimum at pH 5.5. The tannase pH stability of Penicillium sp. EZ-ZH390 and its maximum production of tannase followed the same trend for five generations confirming the occurrence of stable mutant. This paper is shown that γ irradiation can mutate the Penicillium sp. leading to increase the tannase production.

  15. Specificity of monoclonal antibodies to strains of Dickeya sp. that cause bacterial heart rot of pineapple.

    PubMed

    Peckham, Gabriel D; Kaneshiro, Wendy S; Luu, Van; Berestecky, John M; Alvarez, Anne M

    2010-10-01

    During a severe outbreak of bacterial heart rot that occurred in pineapple plantations on Oahu, Hawaii, in 2003 and years following, 43 bacterial strains were isolated from diseased plants or irrigation water and identified as Erwinia chrysanthemi (now Dickeya sp.) by phenotypic, molecular, and pathogenicity assays. Rep-PCR fingerprint patterns grouped strains from pineapple plants and irrigation water into five genotypes (A-E) that differed from representatives of other Dickeya species, Pectobacterium carotovorum and other enteric saprophytes isolated from pineapple. Monoclonal antibodies produced following immunization of mice with virulent type C Dickeya sp. showed only two specificities. MAb Pine-1 (2D11G1, IgG1 with kappa light chain) reacted to all 43 pineapple/water strains and some reference strains (D. dianthicola, D. chrysanthemi, D. paradisiaca, some D. dadantii, and uncharacterized Dickeya sp.) but did not react to reference strains of D. dieffenbachiae, D. zeae, or one of the two Malaysian pineapple strains. MAb Pine-2 (2A7F2, IgG3 with kappa light chain) reacted to all type B, C, and D strains but not to any A or E strains or any reference strains except Dickeya sp. isolated from Malaysian pineapple. Pathogenicity tests showed that type C strains were more aggressive than type A strains when inoculated during cool months. Therefore, MAb Pine-2 distinguishes the more virulent type C strains from less virulent type A pineapple strains and type E water strains. MAbs with these two specificities enable development of rapid diagnostic tests that will distinguish the systemic heart rot pathogen from opportunistic bacteria associated with rotted tissues. Use of the two MAbs in field assays also permits the monitoring of a known subpopulation and provides additional decision tools for disease containment and management practices.

  16. Draft Genome Sequence for Caulobacter sp. Strain OR37, a Bacterium Tolerant to Heavy Metals

    PubMed Central

    Utturkar, Sagar M.; Brzoska, Ryann M.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Epstein, Slava E.; Palumbo, Anthony V.

    2013-01-01

    Caulobacter sp. strain OR37 belongs to the class Alphaproteobacteria and was isolated from subsurface sediments in Oak Ridge, TN. Strain OR37 is noteworthy due to its tolerance to high concentrations of heavy metals, such as uranium, nickel, cobalt, and cadmium, and we present its draft genome sequence here. PMID:23792749

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Microbacterium sp. Strain UCD-TDU (Phylum Actinobacteria)

    PubMed Central

    Bendiks, Zachary A.; Lang, Jenna M.; Darling, Aaron E.; Coil, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Microbacterium sp. strain UCD-TDU, a member of the phylum Actinobacteria. The assembly contains 3,746,321 bp (in 8 scaffolds). This strain was isolated from a residential toilet as part of an undergraduate student research project to sequence reference genomes of microbes from the built environment. PMID:23516225

  18. Draft Genome Sequence for Ralstonia sp. Strain OR214, a Bacterium with Potential for Bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Utturkar, Sagar M.; Brzoska, Ryann M.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Epstein, Slava E.; Palumbo, Anthony V.

    2013-01-01

    Ralstonia sp. strain OR214 belongs to the class Betaproteobacteria and was isolated from subsurface sediments in Oak Ridge, TN. A member of this genus has been described as a potential bioremediation agent. Strain OR214 is tolerant to various heavy metals, such as uranium, nickel, cobalt, and cadmium. We present its draft genome sequence here. PMID:23792748

  19. Reduction of Selenite to Elemental Red Selenium by Pseudomonas sp. strain CA5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Pseudomonas sp. that may be useful in bioremediation projects was isolated from soil. The strain is of potential value because it reduces selenite to elemental red selenium and is unusual in that it was resistant to high concentrations of both selenate and selenite. Cell of the strain removed 1....

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of the Efficient Bioflocculant-Producing Bacterium Paenibacillus sp. Strain A9

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-liang; Hu, Xiao-min

    2013-01-01

    Paenibacillus sp. strain A9 is an important bioflocculant-producing bacterium, isolated from a soil sample, and is pale pink-pigmented, aerobic, and Gram-positive. Here, we report the draft genome sequence and the initial findings from a preliminary analysis of strain A9, which is a novel species of Paenibacillus. PMID:23618713

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of the Efficient Bioflocculant-Producing Bacterium Paenibacillus sp. Strain A9.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin-Hui; Liu, Jin-Liang; Hu, Xiao-Min

    2013-04-25

    Paenibacillus sp. strain A9 is an important bioflocculant-producing bacterium, isolated from a soil sample, and is pale pink-pigmented, aerobic, and Gram-positive. Here, we report the draft genome sequence and the initial findings from a preliminary analysis of strain A9, which is a novel species of Paenibacillus.

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of Neptuniibacter sp. Strains LFT 1.8 and ATR 1.1

    PubMed Central

    Diéguez, A. L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We present the draft genomes of two strains previously identified as Neptuniibacter sp. LFT 1.8 (= CECT 8936 = DSM 100781) and ATR 1.1 (= CECT 8938 = DSM 100783) isolated from larvae of great scallops (Pecten maximus) and seawater, respectively. Both strains surely constitute two novel species in this genus, with putative applications for aromatic compound degradation. PMID:28153896

  3. Draft Genome Sequences of Neptuniibacter sp. Strains LFT 1.8 and ATR 1.1.

    PubMed

    Diéguez, A L; Romalde, J L

    2017-02-02

    We present the draft genomes of two strains previously identified as Neptuniibacter sp. LFT 1.8 (= CECT 8936 = DSM 100781) and ATR 1.1 (= CECT 8938 = DSM 100783) isolated from larvae of great scallops (Pecten maximus) and seawater, respectively. Both strains surely constitute two novel species in this genus, with putative applications for aromatic compound degradation.

  4. Genome Sequence of Marinobacter sp. Strain MCTG268 Isolated from the Cosmopolitan Marine Diatom Skeletonema costatum

    PubMed Central

    Whitman, William B.; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Pillay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N.; Woyke, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Marinobacter sp. strain MCTG268 was isolated from the cosmopolitan marine diatom Skeletonema costatum and can degrade oil hydrocarbons as sole sources of carbon and energy. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 4,449,396 bp with 4,157 genes and an average G+C content of 57.0%. PMID:27609918

  5. Genome Sequence of Marinobacter sp. Strain MCTG268 Isolated from the Cosmopolitan Marine Diatom Skeletonema costatum.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Whitman, William B; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Pillay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N; Woyke, Tanja

    2016-09-08

    Marinobacter sp. strain MCTG268 was isolated from the cosmopolitan marine diatom Skeletonema costatum and can degrade oil hydrocarbons as sole sources of carbon and energy. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 4,449,396 bp with 4,157 genes and an average G+C content of 57.0%.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Arthrobacter sp. Strain UCD-GKA (Phylum Actinobacteria).

    PubMed

    Kincheloe, Gregory N; Eisen, Jonathan A; Coil, David A

    2017-02-09

    Here we present the draft genome of Arthrobacter sp. strain UCD-GKA. The assembly contains 4,930,274 bp in 33 contigs. This strain was isolated from the handle of a weight bar in the UC Davis Activities and Recreation Center.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Leucobacter sp. Strain UCD-THU (Phylum Actinobacteria)

    PubMed Central

    Holland-Moritz, Hannah E.; Bevans, Dakota R.; Lang, Jenna M.; Darling, Aaron E.; Coil, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Here we present the draft genome of Leucobacter sp. strain UCD-THU. The genome contains 3,317,267 bp in 11 scaffolds. This strain was isolated from a residential toilet as part of an undergraduate project to sequence reference genomes of microbes from the built environment. PMID:23792744

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Sphingomonas sp. Strain NIC1, an Efficient Nicotine-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiongyu; Wang, Weiwei; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomonas sp. strain NIC1, an efficient nicotine-degrading bacterium, was isolated from tobacco leaves. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of strain NIC1, which contains one circular chromosome and two circular plasmids. The genomic information will provide insights into its molecular mechanism for nicotine degradation. PMID:27417841

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. Strain CCA1, Isolated from Leaf Soil

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Zen-ichiro; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain CCA1 was isolated from leaf soil collected in Higashi-Hiroshima City in Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan. Here, we present a draft genome sequence of this strain. The genome consists of 24 contigs for a total of 6,993,992 bp, 8,917 predicted coding sequences, and a GC content of 67.2%. PMID:27932657

  10. Functional genomic approaches for understanding the mode of action of Bacillus sp biocontrol strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Complete genome sequencing of several Bacillus sp. strains has shed new light on the mode of action of these antagonists of plant pathogens. The use of genomic data mining tools provided the ability to quickly determine the potential of these strains to produce bioactive secondary metabolites. Our B...

  11. Butyric acid from anaerobic fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates by Clostridium sp. strain RPT-4213

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel Clostridium sp. strain RPT-4213 was found producing butyrate under strict anaerobic conditions. This strain produced 9.47 g L-1 butyric acid from MRS media (0.48 g/g glucose). RPT-4213 was also used to ferment dilute acid pretreated hydrolysates including wheat straw (WSH), corn fiber (CFH...

  12. Complete genome sequence of Clostridium sp. strain BNL1100, a cellulolytic mesophile isolated from corn stover.

    PubMed

    Li, Luen-Luen; Taghavi, Safiyh; Izquierdo, Javier A; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    We present the full genome sequence of Clostridium sp. strain BNL1100, a Gram-positive, endospore-forming, lignocellulolytic bacterium isolated from a corn stover enrichment culture. The 4,613,747-bp genome of strain BNL1100 contains 4,025 putative protein-coding genes, of which 103 are glycoside hydrolases, the highest detected number in cluster III clostridia.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Arthrobacter sp. Strain UCD-GKA (Phylum Actinobacteria)

    PubMed Central

    Kincheloe, Gregory N.; Coil, David A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here we present the draft genome of Arthrobacter sp. strain UCD-GKA. The assembly contains 4,930,274 bp in 33 contigs. This strain was isolated from the handle of a weight bar in the UC Davis Activities and Recreation Center. PMID:28183767

  14. Production of Oxygenated Fatty Acids from Vegetable Oils by Flavobacterium sp. Strain DS5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavobacterium sp. strain DS5 (NRRL B-14859) was used to convert two vegetable oils, olive oil and soybean oil, directly to oxygenated fatty acids such as 10-ketostearic acid (10-KSA) and 10-hydroxystearic acid (10-HSA). Lipase addition to the culture was required because strain DS5 did not induce ...

  15. Genome Sequence of Prosthecochloris sp. Strain CIB 2401 of the Phylum Chlorobi.

    PubMed

    Nabhan, Shaza; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Liu, Zhenfeng; Bryant, Donald A; Overmann, Jörg

    2016-11-03

    To date, only 13 genomes of green sulfur bacteria (family Chlorobiaceae) have been sequenced. The sequenced strains do not cover the full phylogenetic diversity of the family. We determined the complete genome sequence of Prosthecochloris sp. strain CIB 2401, thereby increasing the genome information for the poorly represented marine Chlorobiaceae.

  16. Genome Sequence of Prosthecochloris sp. Strain CIB 2401 of the Phylum Chlorobi

    PubMed Central

    Nabhan, Shaza; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Liu, Zhenfeng

    2016-01-01

    To date, only 13 genomes of green sulfur bacteria (family Chlorobiaceae) have been sequenced. The sequenced strains do not cover the full phylogenetic diversity of the family. We determined the complete genome sequence of Prosthecochloris sp. strain CIB 2401, thereby increasing the genome information for the poorly represented marine Chlorobiaceae. PMID:27811102

  17. Genome sequence and description of Nesterenkonia massiliensis sp. nov. strain NP1T

    PubMed Central

    Edouard, Sophie; Sankar, Senthil; Dangui, Nicole Prisca Makaya; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Michelle, Caroline; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2014-01-01

    Nesterenkonia massiliensis sp. nov., strain NP1T, is the type strain of Nesterenkonia massiliensis sp. nov., a new species within the genus Nesterenkonia. This strain, whose genome is described here, was isolated from the feces of a 32-year-old French woman suffering from AIDS and living in Marseille. Nesterenkonia massiliensis is a Gram-positive aerobic coccus. Here, we describe the features of this bacterium, together with the complete genome sequencing and annotation. The 2,726,371 bp long genome (one chromosome but no plasmid) contains 2,663 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes, including 1 rRNA operon. PMID:25197469

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of Type Strain Sediminibacterium salmoneum NJ-44 and Sediminibacterium sp. Strain C3, a Novel Strain Isolated from Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Ayarza, Joaquín M.; Figuerola, Eva L. M.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Sediminibacterium comprises species present in diverse natural and engineered environments. Here, we report for the first time the genome sequences of the type strain Sediminibacterium salmoneum NJ-44 (NBRC 103935) and Sediminibacterium sp. strain C3 (BNM541), isolated from activated sludge, a valuable model for the study of substrate-dependent autoaggregation. PMID:24435857

  19. [Phylogenetic analysis of the genes for naphthalene and phenanthrene degradation in Burkholderia sp. strains].

    PubMed

    Izmalkova, T Yu; Sazonova, O I; Kosheleva, I A; Boronin, A M

    2013-06-01

    The genetic systems responsible for naphthalene and phenanthrene catabolism have been analyzed in the five strains of Burkholderia sp. isolated from soil samples (West Siberia) contaminated by heavy residual fuel oil and in the strain Burkholderia sp. BS3702 from the laboratory collection isolated from soil samples of the coke gas works (Vidnoe, Moscow oblast). The results of this work demonstrate that naphthalene and phenanthrene degradation in the above strains is encoded by the sequences not homologous to the classical nah genes of pseudomonades. In the Burkholderia sp. BS3702 strain, the initial stages of phenanthrene degradation and the subsequent stages of salicylate degradation are controlled by the sequences of different evolutionary origins (phn and nag genes).

  20. Complete Genome of Serratia sp. Strain FGI 94, a Strain Associated with Leaf-Cutter Ant Fungus Gardens.

    PubMed

    Aylward, Frank O; Tremmel, Daniel M; Starrett, Gabriel J; Bruce, David C; Chain, Patrick; Chen, Amy; Davenport, Karen W; Detter, Chris; Han, Cliff S; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia N; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Markowitz, Victor; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Nolan, Matt; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Pitluck, Sam; Teshima, Hazuki; Deshpande, Shweta; Goodwin, Lynne; Woyke, Tanja; Currie, Cameron R

    2013-03-14

    Serratia sp. strain FGI 94 was isolated from a fungus garden of the leaf-cutter ant Atta colombica. Analysis of its 4.86-Mbp chromosome will help advance our knowledge of symbiotic interactions and plant biomass degradation in this ancient ant-fungus mutualism.

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus strain Y4.12MC10, a Novel Paenibacillus lautus strain Isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring in Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, David; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, A; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Chertkov, Olga; Zhang, Xiaojing; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Woyke, Tanja; Brumm, Catherine; Hochstein, Rebecca; Schoenfeld, Thomas; Brumm, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    Paenibacillus speciesY412MC10 was one of a number of organisms initially isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA. The isolate Y412MC10 was initially classified as a Geobacillus sp. based on its isolation conditions and similarity to other organisms isolated from hot springs at Yellowstone National Park. Comparison of 16 S rRNA sequences within the Bacillales indicated that Geobacillus sp.Y412MC10 clustered with Paenibacillus species and not Geobacillus; the 16S rRNA analysis indicated the organism was a strain of Paenibacillus lautus. Lucigen Corp. prepared genomic DNA and the genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. The genome of Paenibacillus lautus strain Y412MC10 consists of one circular chromosome of 7,121,665 bp with an average G+C content of 51.2%. The Paenibacillus sp.Y412MC10 genome sequence was deposited at the NCBI in October 2009 (NC{_}013406). Comparison to other Paenibacillus species shows the organism lacks nitrogen fixation, antibiotic production and social interaction genes reported in other Paenibacilli. Over 25% of the proteins predicted by the Y412MC10 genome share no identity with the closest sequenced Paenibacillus species; most of these are predicted hypothetical proteins and their specific function in the environment is unknown.

  2. Biological behavior of plasmid in Rhizobium sp. strain S25 from Tephrosia candida.

    PubMed

    Zou, X; Feng, X L; Chen, W X; Li, F D

    1998-09-01

    Rhizobium sp. strain S25 was isolated from the nodule on Tephrosia candida in Hainan Province, China. The strain showed high stress tolerance. The plasmid profile of strain S25, examined by the Eckhardt procedure, indicated that the strain harbors only one plasmid with an estimated size of 150 kb. The plasmid was shown to carry nod and nif genes by hybridization with probes of nodABC and nifHDK genes. Plasmid curing was carried out using the Bacillus subtilis sacB to generate derivatives of strain S25. In comparison with the parent strain S25, the cured derivative lost its ability to nodulate the host plant. Loss of the plasmid reduced significantly the strain's tolerance to acid, nitrous, and multiple antibiotics. The properties of the cured strain also indicated that the plasmid was involved in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. Reintroduction of the plasmid from S25 in the cured derivative restored its original biological phenotypes.

  3. Genome characteristics of facultatively symbiotic Frankia sp. strains reflect host range and host plant biogeography

    PubMed Central

    Normand, Philippe; Lapierre, Pascal; Tisa, Louis S.; Gogarten, Johann Peter; Alloisio, Nicole; Bagnarol, Emilie; Bassi, Carla A.; Berry, Alison M.; Bickhart, Derek M.; Choisne, Nathalie; Couloux, Arnaud; Cournoyer, Benoit; Cruveiller, Stephane; Daubin, Vincent; Demange, Nadia; Francino, Maria Pilar; Goltsman, Eugene; Huang, Ying; Kopp, Olga R.; Labarre, Laurent; Lapidus, Alla; Lavire, Celine; Marechal, Joelle; Martinez, Michele; Mastronunzio, Juliana E.; Mullin, Beth C.; Niemann, James; Pujic, Pierre; Rawnsley, Tania; Rouy, Zoe; Schenowitz, Chantal; Sellstedt, Anita; Tavares, Fernando; Tomkins, Jeffrey P.; Vallenet, David; Valverde, Claudio; Wall, Luis G.; Wang, Ying; Medigue, Claudine; Benson, David R.

    2007-01-01

    Soil bacteria that also form mutualistic symbioses in plants encounter two major levels of selection. One occurs during adaptation to and survival in soil, and the other occurs in concert with host plant speciation and adaptation. Actinobacteria from the genus Frankia are facultative symbionts that form N2-fixing root nodules on diverse and globally distributed angiosperms in the “actinorhizal” symbioses. Three closely related clades of Frankia sp. strains are recognized; members of each clade infect a subset of plants from among eight angiosperm families. We sequenced the genomes from three strains; their sizes varied from 5.43 Mbp for a narrow host range strain (Frankia sp. strain HFPCcI3) to 7.50 Mbp for a medium host range strain (Frankia alni strain ACN14a) to 9.04 Mbp for a broad host range strain (Frankia sp. strain EAN1pec.) This size divergence is the largest yet reported for such closely related soil bacteria (97.8%–98.9% identity of 16S rRNA genes). The extent of gene deletion, duplication, and acquisition is in concert with the biogeographic history of the symbioses and host plant speciation. Host plant isolation favored genome contraction, whereas host plant diversification favored genome expansion. The results support the idea that major genome expansions as well as reductions can occur in facultative symbiotic soil bacteria as they respond to new environments in the context of their symbioses. PMID:17151343

  4. Identification of metabolites from the degradation of fluoranthene by Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, I; Freeman, J P; Evans, F E; Cerniglia, C E

    1993-01-01

    Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1, previously shown to extensively mineralize high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in pure culture and in sediments, degrades fluoranthene to 9-fluorenone-1-carboxylic acid. In this study, 10 other fluoranthene metabolites were isolated from ethyl acetate extracts of the culture medium by thin-layer and high-performance liquid chromatographic methods. On the basis of comparisons with authentic compounds by UV spectrophotometry and thin-layer chromatography as well as gas chromatography-mass spectral and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analyses, the metabolites were identified as 8-hydroxy-7-methoxyfluoranthene, 9-hydroxyfluorene, 9-fluorenone, 1-acenaphthenone, 9-hydroxy-1-fluorenecarboxylic acid, phthalic acid, 2-carboxybenzaldehyde, benzoic acid, phenylacetic acid, and adipic acid. Authentic 9-hydroxyfluorene and 9-fluorenone were metabolized by Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1. A pathway for the catabolism of fluoranthene by Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1 is proposed. PMID:8481006

  5. Complete genome sequence of the marine planctomycete Pirellula sp. strain 1

    PubMed Central

    Glöckner , F. O.; Kube, M.; Bauer , M.; Teeling, H.; Lombardot, T.; Ludwig, W.; Gade, D.; Beck, A.; Borzym, K.; Heitmann, K.; Rabus, R.; Schlesner, H.; Amann, R.; Reinhardt , R.

    2003-01-01

    Pirellula sp. strain 1 (“Rhodopirellula baltica”) is a marine representative of the globally distributed and environmentally important bacterial order Planctomycetales. Here we report the complete genome sequence of a member of this independent phylum. With 7.145 megabases, Pirellula sp. strain 1 has the largest circular bacterial genome sequenced so far. The presence of all genes required for heterolactic acid fermentation, key genes for the interconversion of C1 compounds, and 110 sulfatases were unexpected for this aerobic heterotrophic isolate. Although Pirellula sp. strain 1 has a proteinaceous cell wall, remnants of genes for peptidoglycan synthesis were found. Genes for lipid A biosynthesis and homologues to the flagellar L- and P-ring protein indicate a former Gram-negative type of cell wall. Phylogenetic analysis of all relevant markers clearly affiliates the Planctomycetales to the domain Bacteria as a distinct phylum, but a deepest branching is not supported by our analyses. PMID:12835416

  6. Bacillus rubiinfantis sp. nov. strain mt2T, a new bacterial species isolated from human gut

    PubMed Central

    Tidjiani Alou, M.; Rathored, J.; Khelaifia, S.; Michelle, C.; Brah, S.; Diallo, B.A.; Raoult, D.; Lagier, J.-C.

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus rubiinfantis sp. nov. strain mt2T is the type strain of B. rubiinfantis sp. nov., isolated from the fecal flora of a child with kwashiorkor in Niger. It is Gram-positive facultative anaerobic rod belonging to the Bacillaceae family. We describe the features of this organism alongside the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 4 311 083 bp long genome (one chromosome but no plasmid) contains 4028 protein-coding gene and 121 RNA genes including nine rRNA genes. PMID:27076912

  7. Bacillus nakamurai sp. nov., a black pigment producing strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two isolates of a Gram-positive, strictly aerobic, motile, rod-shaped, endospore-forming bacterium were identified during a survey of the Bacillus diversity of the Agriculture Research Service Culture Collection. These strains were originally isolated from soil and have a phenotype of producing a da...

  8. Genome sequence of the lupin-nodulating Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1417.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Wayne; Terpolilli, Jason; Melino, Vanessa; Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; De Meyer, Sofie; Tiwari, Ravi; Yates, Ronald; O'Hara, Graham; Howieson, John; Ninawi, Mohamed; Teshima, Hazuki; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Wei, Chia-Lin; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, I-Min; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Peters, Lin; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-12-20

    Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1417 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective nitrogen (N2) fixing root nodule of Lupinus sp. collected in Papudo, Chile, in 1995. However, this microsymbiont is a poorly effective N2 fixer with the legume host Lupinus angustifolius L.; a lupin species of considerable economic importance in both Chile and Australia. The symbiosis formed with L. angustifolius produces less than half of the dry matter achieved by the symbioses with commercial inoculant strains such as Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM471. Therefore, WSM1417 is an important candidate strain with which to investigate the genetics of effective N2 fixation in the lupin-bradyrhizobia symbioses. Here we describe the features of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1417, together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 8,048,963 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in a single scaffold of 2 contigs, contains 7,695 protein-coding genes and 77 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 20 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Program.

  9. Genome sequence of the lupin-nodulating Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1417

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Wayne; Terpolilli, Jason; Melino, Vanessa; Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; De Meyer, Sofie; Tiwari, Ravi; Yates, Ronald; O’Hara, Graham; Howieson, John; Ninawi, Mohamed; Teshima, Hazuki; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Wei, Chia-Lin; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, I-Min; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Peters, Lin; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1417 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective nitrogen (N2) fixing root nodule of Lupinus sp. collected in Papudo, Chile, in 1995. However, this microsymbiont is a poorly effective N2 fixer with the legume host Lupinus angustifolius L.; a lupin species of considerable economic importance in both Chile and Australia. The symbiosis formed with L. angustifolius produces less than half of the dry matter achieved by the symbioses with commercial inoculant strains such as Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM471. Therefore, WSM1417 is an important candidate strain with which to investigate the genetics of effective N2 fixation in the lupin-bradyrhizobia symbioses. Here we describe the features of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1417, together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 8,048,963 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in a single scaffold of 2 contigs, contains 7,695 protein-coding genes and 77 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 20 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Program. PMID:24976884

  10. Isolation and characterisation of Nocardioides sp. SP12, an atrazine-degrading bacterial strain possessing the gene trzN from bulk- and maize rhizosphere soil.

    PubMed

    Piutti, S; Semon, E; Landry, D; Hartmann, A; Dousset, S; Lichtfouse, E; Topp, E; Soulas, G; Martin-Laurent, F

    2003-04-11

    We report the characterisation of Nocardioides sp. SP12, an atrazine-degrading bacteria isolated from atrazine-treated bulk- and maize rhizosphere soil. Based on 16S rDNA alignment, strain SP12 showed close phylogenic relationships with Nocardioides sp. C157 and Nocardioides simplex. Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of strain SP12 were longer than those of other Nocardioides sp. and present Ala- and Ile-tRNA unlike Actinomycetales. Nocardioides sp. SP12 presents a novel atrazine catabolic pathway combining trzN with atzB and atzC. Atrazine biodegradation ends in a metabolite that co-eluted in HPLC with cyanuric acid. This metabolite shows an absorption spectrum identical to that of cyanuric acid with a maximal absorption at 214.6 nm. The mass of the atrazine metabolite is in concordance with that of cyanuric acid according to mass spectrometry analysis. Quantitative PCR revealed that the ITS sequence of Nocardioides sp. SP12 was at a lower number than the one of trzN in atrazine-treated soil samples. It suggests that trzN could also be present in other atrazine degrading bacteria. The numbers of trzN and ITS sequences of Nocardioides sp. SP12 were higher in the maize rhizosphere than in bulk soil.

  11. Draft genome sequence of Thermoactinomyces sp. strain AS95 isolated from a Sebkha in Thamelaht, Algeria.

    PubMed

    Bezuidt, Oliver K I; Gomri, Mohamed A; Pierneef, Rian; Van Goethem, Marc W; Kharroub, Karima; Cowan, Don A; Makhalanyane, Thulani P

    2016-01-01

    The members of the genus Thermoactinomyces are known for their protein degradative capacities. Thermoactinomyces sp. strain AS95 is a Gram-positive filamentous bacterium, isolated from moderately saline water in the Thamelaht region of Algeria. This isolate is a thermophilic aerobic bacterium with the capacity to produce extracellular proteolytic enzymes. This strain exhibits up to 99 % similarity with members of the genus Thermoactinomyces, based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. Here we report on the phenotypic features of Thermoactinomyces sp. strain AS95 together with the draft genome sequence and its annotation. The genome of this strain is 2,558,690 bp in length (one chromosome, but no plasmid) with an average G + C content of 47.95 %, and contains 2550 protein-coding and 60 RNA genes together with 64 ORFs annotated as proteases.

  12. Bile acids are new products of a marine bacterium, Myroides sp. strain SM1.

    PubMed

    Maneerat, Suppasil; Nitoda, Teruhiko; Kanzaki, Hiroshi; Kawai, Fusako

    2005-06-01

    Strain SM1 was isolated as a biosurfactant-producing microorganism from seawater and presumptively identified as Myroides sp., based on morphology, biochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA sequence. The strain produced surface-active compounds in marine broth, which were purified, using emulsification activity for n-hexadecane as an indicator. The purified compounds were identified by thin-layer chromatography, (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectra and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry as cholic acid, deoxycholic acid and their glycine conjugates. Type strains of the genus Myroides, M. odoratus JCM7458 and M. odoramitimus JCM7460, also produced these compounds. Myroides sp. strain SM1 possessed a biosynthetic route to cholic acid from cholesterol. Thus, bile acids were found as new products of prokaryotic cells, genus Myroides.

  13. Phenotypic and physiological changes in Acinetobacter sp. strain DR1 with exogenous plasmid.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungsoon; Park, Woojun

    2011-01-01

    The genus Acinetobacter has been recognized to take up exogenous DNA from the environment. In this study, we conducted natural transformation with a novel diesel-degrading Acinetobacter sp. strain, designated strain DR1, using the broad host range plasmid pRK415. Many factors, including temperature, quantities of DNA, and aeration have proven critically important for efficient natural transformation. Interestingly, the Acinetobacter sp. strain DR1 (pRK415) differed both phenotypically and physiologically from the wild-type strain in several regards, including motility, biofilm formation ability, and responses to oxidative stress: the transformed cells were rendered more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and cumene hydroperoxide, and their motilities and biofilm formation activity were also attenuated. Our data demonstrated that caution should be exercised when conducting genetic manipulation with plasmids, due to the possibility that phenotypic and physiological changes in the host might occur along with the uptake of plasmids.

  14. Alkaloids from an algicolous strain of Talaromyces sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haibin; Li, Fang; Ji, Naiyun

    2016-03-01

    Compounds isolated and identified in a culture of the alga-endophytic fungus Talaromyces sp. cf-16 included two naturally occurring alkaloids, 2-[( S)-hydroxy(phenyl)methyl]-3-methylquinazolin-4(3H)-one ( 1a) and 2-[( R)-hydroxy(phenyl)methyl]-3-methylquinazolin-4(3H)-one ( 1b), that were identified for the first time. In addition, seven known compounds ( 2- 8) were obtained from the culture. Following chiral column chromatography, compounds 1a and 1b were identified as enantiomers by spectroscopic analyses and quantum chemical calculations. Bioassay results showed that 5 was more toxic to brine shrimp than the other compounds, and that 3- 6 could inhibit Staphylococcus aureus.

  15. Genome sequence of the acid-tolerant strain Rhizobium sp. LPU83.

    PubMed

    Wibberg, Daniel; Tejerizo, Gonzalo Torres; Del Papa, María Florencia; Martini, Carla; Pühler, Alfred; Lagares, Antonio; Schlüter, Andreas; Pistorio, Mariano

    2014-04-20

    Rhizobia are important members of the soil microbiome since they enter into nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with different legume host plants. Rhizobium sp. LPU83 is an acid-tolerant Rhizobium strain featuring a broad-host-range. However, it is ineffective in nitrogen fixation. Here, the improved draft genome sequence of this strain is reported. Genome sequence information provides the basis for analysis of its acid tolerance, symbiotic properties and taxonomic classification.

  16. Infection of Amblyomma ovale by Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Londoño, Andrés F; Díaz, Francisco J; Valbuena, Gustavo; Gazi, Michal; Labruna, Marcelo B; Hidalgo, Marylin; Mattar, Salim; Contreras, Verónica; Rodas, Juan D

    2014-10-01

    Our goal was to understand rickettsial spotted fevers' circulation in areas of previous outbreaks reported from 2006 to 2008 in Colombia. We herein present molecular identification and isolation of Rickettsia sp. Atlantic rainforest strain from Amblyomma ovale ticks, a strain shown to be pathogenic to humans. Infected ticks were found on dogs and a rodent in Antioquia and Córdoba Provinces. This is the first report of this rickettsia outside Brazil, which expands its known range considerably.

  17. Comparison of two multimetal resistant bacterial strains: Enterobacter sp. YSU and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia ORO2.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Andrew; Vinayak, Anubhav; Benton, Cherise; Esbenshade, Aaron; Heinselman, Carlisle; Frankland, Daniel; Kulkarni, Samatha; Kurtanich, Adrienne; Caguiat, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    The Y-12 plant in Oak Ridge, TN, which manufactured nuclear weapons during World War II and the Cold War, contaminated East Fork Poplar Creek with heavy metals. The multimetal resistant bacterial strain, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Oak Ridge strain O2 (S. maltophilia O2), was isolated from East Fork Poplar Creek. Sequence analysis of 16s rDNA suggested that our working strain of S. maltophilia O2 was a strain of Enterobacter. Phylogenetic tree analysis and biochemical tests confirmed that it belonged to an Enterobacter species. This new strain was named Enterobacter sp. YSU. Using a modified R3A growth medium, R3A-Tris, the Hg(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Au(III), Cr(VI), Ag(I), As(III), and Se(IV) MICs for a confirmed strain of S. maltophilia O2 were 0.24, 0.33, 5, 5, 0.25, 7, 0.03, 14, and 40 mM, respectively, compared to 0.07, 0.24, 0.8, 3, 0.05, 0.4, 0.08, 14, and 40 mM, respectively, for Enterobacter sp. YSU. Although S. maltophilia O2 was generally more metal resistant than Enterobacter sp. YSU, in comparison to Escherichia coli strain HB101, Enterobacter sp. YSU was resistant to Hg(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Au(III), Ag(I), As(III), and Se(IV). By studying metal resistances in these two strains, it may be possible to understand what makes one microorganism more metal resistant than another microorganism. This work also provided benchmark MICs that can be used to evaluate the metal resistance properties of other bacterial isolates from East Fork Poplar Creek and other metal contaminated sites.

  18. Degradation of 4-fluorophenol by Arthrobacter sp. strain IF1

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Maria Isabel M.; Marchesi, Julian R.

    2008-01-01

    A Gram-positive bacterial strain capable of aerobic biodegradation of 4-fluorophenol (4-FP) as the sole source of carbon and energy was isolated by selective enrichment from soil samples collected near an industrial site. The organism, designated strain IF1, was identified as a member of the genus Arthrobacter on the basis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence analysis. Arthrobacter strain IF1 was able to mineralize 4-FP up to concentrations of 5 mM in batch culture. Stoichiometric release of fluoride ions was observed, suggesting that there is no formation of halogenated dead-end products during 4-FP metabolism. The degradative pathway of 4-FP was investigated using enzyme assays and identification of intermediates by gas chromatography (GC), GC–mass spectrometry (MS), high-performance liquid chromatography, and liquid chromatography–MS. Cell-free extracts of 4-FP-grown cells contained no activity for catechol 1,2-dioxygenase or catechol 2,3-dioxygenase, which indicates that the pathway does not proceed through a catechol intermediate. Cells grown on 4-FP oxidized 4-FP, hydroquinone, and hydroxyquinol but not 4-fluorocatechol. During 4-FP metabolism, hydroquinone accumulated as a product. Hydroquinone could be converted to hydroxyquinol, which was further transformed into maleylacetic acid and β-ketoadipic acid. These results indicate that the biodegradation of 4-FP starts with a 4-FP monooxygenase reaction that yields benzoquinone, which is reduced to hydroquinone and further metabolized via the β-ketoadipic acid pathway. PMID:18228015

  19. Discovery of rare and highly toxic microcystins from lichen-associated cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I.

    PubMed

    Oksanen, Ilona; Jokela, Jouni; Fewer, David P; Wahlsten, Matti; Rikkinen, Jouko; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2004-10-01

    The production of hepatotoxic cyclic heptapeptides, microcystins, is almost exclusively reported from planktonic cyanobacteria. Here we show that a terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I isolated from a lichen association produces six different microcystins. Microcystins were identified with liquid chromatography-UV mass spectrometry by their retention times, UV spectra, mass fragmentation, and comparison to microcystins from the aquatic Nostoc sp. strain 152. The dominant microcystin produced by Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I was the highly toxic [ADMAdda(5)]microcystin-LR, which accounted for ca. 80% of the total microcystins. We assigned a structure of [DMAdda(5)]microcystin-LR and [d-Asp(3),ADMAdda(5)]microcystin-LR and a partial structure of three new [ADMAdda(5)]-XR type of microcystin variants. Interestingly, Nostoc spp. strains IO-102-I and 152 synthesized only the rare ADMAdda and DMAdda subfamilies of microcystin variants. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated congruence between genes involved directly in microcystin biosynthesis and the 16S rRNA and rpoC1 genes of Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I. Nostoc sp. strain 152 and the Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I are distantly related, revealing a sporadic distribution of toxin production in the genus Nostoc. Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I is closely related to Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 and other symbiotic Nostoc strains and most likely belongs to this species. Together, this suggests that other terrestrial and aquatic strains of the genus Nostoc may have retained the genes necessary for microcystin biosynthesis.

  20. Discovery of Rare and Highly Toxic Microcystins from Lichen-Associated Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain IO-102-I

    PubMed Central

    Oksanen, Ilona; Jokela, Jouni; Fewer, David P.; Wahlsten, Matti; Rikkinen, Jouko; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2004-01-01

    The production of hepatotoxic cyclic heptapeptides, microcystins, is almost exclusively reported from planktonic cyanobacteria. Here we show that a terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I isolated from a lichen association produces six different microcystins. Microcystins were identified with liquid chromatography-UV mass spectrometry by their retention times, UV spectra, mass fragmentation, and comparison to microcystins from the aquatic Nostoc sp. strain 152. The dominant microcystin produced by Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I was the highly toxic [ADMAdda5]microcystin-LR, which accounted for ca. 80% of the total microcystins. We assigned a structure of [DMAdda5]microcystin-LR and [d-Asp3,ADMAdda5]microcystin-LR and a partial structure of three new [ADMAdda5]-XR type of microcystin variants. Interestingly, Nostoc spp. strains IO-102-I and 152 synthesized only the rare ADMAdda and DMAdda subfamilies of microcystin variants. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated congruence between genes involved directly in microcystin biosynthesis and the 16S rRNA and rpoC1 genes of Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I. Nostoc sp. strain 152 and the Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I are distantly related, revealing a sporadic distribution of toxin production in the genus Nostoc. Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I is closely related to Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 and other symbiotic Nostoc strains and most likely belongs to this species. Together, this suggests that other terrestrial and aquatic strains of the genus Nostoc may have retained the genes necessary for microcystin biosynthesis. PMID:15466511

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus sp. Strain IcdP1 Shows Diverse Catabolic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Jie; Miao, Li-Li; Liu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of Rhodococcus sp. strain IcdP1 is presented here. This organism was shown to degrade a broad range of high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organochlorine pesticides. The sequence data can be used to predict genes for xenobiotic biodegradation and metabolism. PMID:26139718

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Multitrait Plant Growth-Promoting Bacillus sp. Strain RZ2MS9

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Bruna Durante; Taniguti, Lucas Mitsuo; Almeida, Jaqueline Raquel; Azevedo, João Lúcio

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus sp. strain RZ2MS9 is a multitrait soybean and maize growth-promoting bacterium isolated in Brazil from guarana’s rhizosphere. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of RZ2MS9 and its genes involved in many features related to plant growth promotion. PMID:28007854

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Enterobacter sp. Strain ODB01, a Bacterium That Degrades Crude Oil

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Hui; Yang, Hui; Li, Peiwang; Wang, Chong; Zhou, Haiyan; Zhou, Hui; Pan, Hu; Yu, Ye

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterobacter sp. strain ODB01, which was isolated from the Changqing oil field, can degrade crude oil efficiently and use crude oil as its sole source of carbon and energy. We report the complete genome sequence of ODB01. The results promote its application in the remediation of petroleum contaminants. PMID:28280034

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of a Tropical Freshwater Cyanobacterium, Limnothrix sp. Strain P13C2

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Boon Fei; Gin, Karina Yew-Hoong

    2016-01-01

    A nonaxenic unialgal culture of Limnothrix sp. strain P13C2 was obtained through multiple subculturing of an inoculum obtained from a tropical freshwater lake. Here, we report the genome of P13C2 of 4.6 Mbp, extracted from the metagenome of this coculture. PMID:27795269

  5. OXIDATION OF BIPHENYL BY A MULTICOMPONENT ENZYME SYSTEM FROM PSEUDOMONAS SP. STRAIN LB400

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 grows on biphenyl as the sole carbon and energy source. This organism also cooxidizes several chlorinated biphenyl congeners. Biphenyl dioxygenase activity in cell extract required addition of NAD(P)H as an electron donor for the conversion of bipheny...

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of a Benzo[a]pyrene-Degrading Bacterium, Olleya sp. Strain ITB9

    PubMed Central

    Okai, Masahiko; Watanabe, Akihiro; Ishida, Masami

    2015-01-01

    Olleya sp. ITB9 is a benzo[a]pyrene-degrading bacterium, isolated from surface water near a waste treatment plant at Tokyo Bay, Japan. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of this strain, which consists of 58 contigs corresponding to 3.4 Mb and a G+C content of 31.2%. PMID:26564047

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Achromobacter sp. Strain AR476-2, Isolated from a Cellulolytic Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Daniel; Romero, Cintia M.; Fernandez, Pablo M.; Ferrero, Marcela A.

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter sp. AR476-2 is a noncellulolytic strain previously isolated from a cellulolytic consortium selected from samples of insect gut. Its genome sequence could contribute to the unraveling of the complex interaction of microorganisms and enzymes involved in the biodegradation of lignocellulosic biomass in nature. PMID:27340069

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Achromobacter sp. Strain AR476-2, Isolated from a Cellulolytic Consortium.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Daniel; Romero, Cintia M; Fernandez, Pablo M; Ferrero, Marcela A; Martinez, M Alejandra

    2016-06-23

    Achromobacter sp. AR476-2 is a noncellulolytic strain previously isolated from a cellulolytic consortium selected from samples of insect gut. Its genome sequence could contribute to the unraveling of the complex interaction of microorganisms and enzymes involved in the biodegradation of lignocellulosic biomass in nature.

  9. Complete genome sequence of the bioleaching bacterium Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Alonso; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Valdés, Natalia; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter; Orellana, Omar; Levicán, Gloria

    2016-03-20

    We describe the complete genome sequence of Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1, an acidophilic bioleaching bacterium isolated from an acid mine drainage (AMD). This work provides data to gain insights about adaptive response of Leptospirillum spp. to the extreme conditions of bioleaching environments.

  10. Oxidation of polychlorinated biphenyls by Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 and Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, D T; Cruden, D L; Haddock, J D; Zylstra, G J; Brand, J M

    1993-01-01

    Biphenyl-grown cells and cell extracts prepared from biphenyl-grown cells of Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 oxidize a much wider range of chlorinated biphenyls than do analogous preparations from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707. These results are attributed to differences in the substrate specificity of the biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenases from both organisms. PMID:8331086

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain PLSV, an Ulvan-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Kopel, Moran; Helbert, William; Henrissat, Bernard; Doniger, Tirza

    2014-01-01

    We present the draft genome sequence of Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain PLSV, isolated from the feces of an Aplysia sea slug. The addition of the PLSV genome to the existing genomes of three other ulvan-degrading bacterial species will enhance our understanding of ulvan utilization. PMID:25502665

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Cyanobacterium sp. Strain IPPAS B-1200 with a Unique Fatty Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Starikov, Alexander Y.; Usserbaeva, Aizhan A.; Sinetova, Maria A.; Sarsekeyeva, Fariza K.; Zayadan, Bolatkhan K.; Ustinova, Vera V.; Kupriyanova, Elena V.; Los, Dmitry A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome of Cyanobacterium sp. IPPAS strain B-1200, isolated from Lake Balkhash, Kazakhstan, and characterized by the unique fatty acid composition of its membrane lipids, which are enriched with myristic and myristoleic acids. The approximate genome size is 3.4 Mb, and the predicted number of coding sequences is 3,119. PMID:27856596

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of a Novel Luteimonas sp. Strain from Coral Mucus, Hawai‘i

    PubMed Central

    Miller, James M.; Rowley, Sonia J.

    2016-01-01

    Luteimonas sp. strain JM171 was cultivated from mucus collected around the coral Porites lobata. The JM171 draft genome of 2,992,353 bp contains 2,672 protein-coding open reading frames, 45 tRNA coding regions, and encodes a putative globin-coupled diguanylate cyclase, JmGReg. PMID:27811107

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of the Pyrene-Degrading Bacterium Cycloclasticus sp. Strain P1

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Qiliang; Li, Weiwei; Wang, Baojiang; Yu, Zhiwei

    2012-01-01

    Cycloclasticus sp. strain P1 was isolated from deep-sea sediments of the Pacific Ocean and characterized as a unique bacterium in the degradation of pyrene, a four-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). Here we report the complete genome of P1 and genes associated with PAH degradation. PMID:23144416

  15. Study of Biochemical Pathways and Enzymes Involved in Pyrene Degradation by Mycobacterium sp. Strain KMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyrene degradation is known in bacteria. In this study, Mycobacterium sp. Strain KMS was used to study the metabolites produced during, and enzymes involved in, pyrene degradation. Several key metabolites, including pyrene-4,5-dione, cis-4,5-pyrene-dihydrodiol, phenanthrene-4,5-dicarboxylic acid, ...

  16. Genome Sequence of the Mycorrhiza Helper Bacterium Streptomyces sp. Strain AcH 505

    PubMed Central

    Feldhahn, L.; Buscot, F.; Wubet, T.

    2015-01-01

    A draft genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. strain AcH 505 is presented here. The genome encodes 22 secondary metabolite gene clusters and a large arsenal of secreted proteins, and their comparative and functional analyses will help to advance our knowledge of symbiotic interactions and fungal and plant biomass degradation. PMID:25838498

  17. Gene Structures and Regulation of the Alkane Hydroxylase Complex in Acinetobacter sp. Strain M-1

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Akio; Ishige, Takeru; Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Kato, Nobuo

    2001-01-01

    In the long-chain n-alkane degrader Acinetobacter sp. strain M-1, two alkane hydroxylase complexes are switched by controlling the expression of two n-alkane hydroxylase-encoding genes in response to the chain length of n-alkanes, while rubredoxin and rubredoxin ruductase are encoded by a single gene and expressed constitutively. PMID:11160120

  18. Genome sequence of the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Bacillus sp. strain JS.

    PubMed

    Song, Ju Yeon; Kim, Hyun A; Kim, Ji-Seoung; Kim, Seon-Young; Jeong, Haeyoung; Kang, Sung Gyun; Kim, Byung Kwon; Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Lee, Choong Hoon; Yu, Dong Su; Kim, Beom Seok; Kim, Sun-Hyung; Kwon, Suk Yoon; Kim, Jihyun F

    2012-07-01

    Volatile and nonvolatile compounds emitted from the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Bacillus sp. strain JS enhance the growth of tobacco and lettuce. Here, we report the high-quality genome sequence of this bacterium. Its 4.1-Mb genome reveals a number of genes whose products are possibly involved in promotion of plant growth or antibiosis.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Curtobacterium sp. Strain UCD-KPL2560 (Phylum Actinobacteria).

    PubMed

    Klein, Brian A; Lemon, Katherine P; Faller, Lina L; Jospin, Guillaume; Eisen, Jonathan A; Coil, David A

    2016-10-06

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of the actinobacterium Curtobacterium sp. strain UCD-KPL2560, which was isolated from the running surface of an indoor track field house in Medford, MA, USA (42.409716°N, -71.115169°W). The genome assembly contains 3,480,487 bp in 156 contigs.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Dietzia sp. Strain UCD-THP (Phylum Actinobacteria)

    PubMed Central

    Diep, Amanda L.; Lang, Jenna M.; Darling, Aaron E.; Coil, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of an actinobacterium, Dietzia sp. strain UCD-THP, isolated from a residential toilet handle. The assembly contains 3,915,613 bp. The genome sequences of only two other Dietzia species have been published, those of Dietzia alimentaria and Dietzia cinnamea. PMID:23661480

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Kocuria sp. Strain UCD-OTCP (Phylum Actinobacteria)

    PubMed Central

    Coil, David A.; Doctor, Jessica I.; Lang, Jenna M.; Darling, Aaron E.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of Kocuria sp. strain UCD-OTCP, a member of the phylum Actinobacteria, isolated from a restaurant chair cushion. The assembly contains 3,791,485 bp (G+C content of 73%) and is contained in 68 scaffolds. PMID:23661474

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Hemolysin-Containing Carnobacterium sp. Strain CP1 Isolated from the Antarctic

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Sidong; Wang, Xing; Zhang, Di; Jing, Xiaohuan; Zhang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Carnobacterium sp. strain CP1 was isolated from Antarctic sandy soil and predicted to be a novel species belonging to the genus Carnobacterium. Herein, we report the complete genome sequence, which consists of a circular 2,605,518-bp chromosome and an 8,883-bp plasmid with G+C contents of 38.13% and 31.63%, respectively. PMID:27445381

  3. Draft Genome Sequences of Kosmotoga sp. Strain DU53 and Kosmotoga arenicorallina S304

    PubMed Central

    Pollo, Stephen M. J.; Charchuk, Rhianna

    2016-01-01

    Here, we announce the draft genome sequences of two thermophilic Thermotogae bacteria: Kosmotoga sp. strain DU53, isolated from a continental oil reservoir, and Kosmotoga arenicorallina, isolated from hydrothermal sediments. The sequences will provide further insight into evolution of the Kosmotogales. PMID:27313308

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Curtobacterium sp. Strain UCD-KPL2560 (Phylum Actinobacteria)

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Brian A.; Faller, Lina L.; Jospin, Guillaume; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Coil, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of the actinobacterium Curtobacterium sp. strain UCD-KPL2560, which was isolated from the running surface of an indoor track field house in Medford, MA, USA (42.409716°N, -71.115169°W). The genome assembly contains 3,480,487 bp in 156 contigs. PMID:27795241

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of the Acetylene-Fermenting Pelobacter sp. Strain SFB93

    PubMed Central

    Baesman, Shaun M.; Fierst, Janna L.; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Dunlap, Darren S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acetylene fermentation is a rare metabolism that was previously reported as being unique to Pelobacter acetylenicus. Here, we report the genome sequence of Pelobacter sp. strain SFB93, an acetylene-fermenting bacterium isolated from sediments collected in San Francisco Bay, CA. PMID:28183760

  6. Genome Sequence of Dehalobacter sp. Strain TeCB1, Able To Respire Chlorinated Benzenes

    PubMed Central

    Alfán-Guzmán, Ricardo; Ertan, Haluk; Manefield, Mike

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dehalobacter sp. strain TeCB1 was isolated from groundwater contaminated with a mixture of organohalides and is able to respire 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene. Here, we report its 3.13-Mb draft genome sequence. PMID:28232453

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Antarctic Pseudomonas sp. Strain KG01 with Full Potential for Biotechnological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, María S.; Lira, Felipe; Martínez, José L.; Olivares, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a free-living psychrotolerant, Pseudomonas sp. strain KG01, isolated from an Antarctic soil sample and displaying interesting antimicrobial and surfactant activities. The sequence is 6.3 Mb long and includes 5,648 predicted-coding sequences. PMID:26294625

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Antarctic Pseudomonas sp. Strain KG01 with Full Potential for Biotechnological Applications.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, María S; Lira, Felipe; Martínez, José L; Olivares, Jorge; Marshall, Sergio H

    2015-08-20

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a free-living psychrotolerant, Pseudomonas sp. strain KG01, isolated from an Antarctic soil sample and displaying interesting antimicrobial and surfactant activities. The sequence is 6.3 Mb long and includes 5,648 predicted-coding sequences.

  9. Genome Sequence of the Alkaline-Tolerant Cellulomonas sp. Strain FA1

    DOE PAGES

    Cohen, Michael F.; Hu, Ping; Nguyen, My Vu; ...

    2015-06-18

    We present the genome of the cellulose-degrading Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1 isolated from an actively serpentinizing highly alkaline spring. Knowledge of this genome will enable studies into the molecular basis of plant material degradation in alkaline environments and inform the development of lignocellulose bioprocessing procedures for biofuel production.

  10. Genome Sequence of the Thermophilic Cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus sp. Strain NK55a.

    SciTech Connect

    Stolyar, Sergey; Liu, Zhenfeng; Thiel, Vera; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Pinel, Nicolas; Nelson, William C.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Romine, Margaret F.; Haruta, Shin; Schuster, Stephan C.; Bryant, Donald A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2014-01-02

    The genome of the unicellular cyanobacterium, Thermosynechococcus sp. strain NK55a, isolated from Nakabusa hot spring, comprises a single, circular, 2.5-Mb chromosome. The genome is predicted to encode 2358 protein coding genes, including genes for all typical cyanobacterial photosynthetic and metabolic functions. No genes encoding hydrogenases or nitrogenase were identified.

  11. Genome Sequence of the Alkaline-Tolerant Cellulomonas sp. Strain FA1

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Michael F.; Hu, Ping; Nguyen, My Vu; Kamennaya, Nina; Brown, Natasha; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Torok, Tamas

    2015-06-18

    We present the genome of the cellulose-degrading Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1 isolated from an actively serpentinizing highly alkaline spring. Knowledge of this genome will enable studies into the molecular basis of plant material degradation in alkaline environments and inform the development of lignocellulose bioprocessing procedures for biofuel production.

  12. OXIDATION OF POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS BY PSEUDOMONAS SP. STRAIN LB400 AND PSEUDOMONAS PSEUDOALCALIGENES KF707

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biphenyl-grown cells and cell extracts prepared from biphenyl-grown cells of Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 oxidize a much wider range of chlorinated biphenyls than do analogous preparations from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707. These results are attributed to differences in th...

  13. Transformation of carbon tetrachloride via sulfur and oxygen substitution by Pseudomonas sp. strain KC.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, T A; Crawford, R L

    1995-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain KC transforms carbon tetrachloride into carbon dioxide and nonvolatile products, without chloroform as an intermediate. To define the pathway for hydrolysis, nonvolatile products were analyzed. Condensation products containing the carbon atom of carbon tetrachloride as carbonyl and thioxo moieties were identified, indicating the intermediacy of phosgene and thiophosgene in the pathway. PMID:7721711

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Lysinibacillus sp. Strain A1, Isolated from Malaysian Tropical Soil

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian Woon; Chang, Chien-Yi; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Xin-Yue

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we describe the genome of Lysinibacillus sp. strain A1, which was isolated from tropical soil. Analysis of its genome sequence shows the presence of a gene encoding for a putative peptidase responsible for nitrogen compounds. PMID:25814592

  15. Whole-Genome Analysis of Quorum-Sensing Burkholderia sp. Strain A9

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian Woon; Tee, Kok Keng; Chang, Chien-Yi; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Xin-Yue

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia spp. rely on N-acyl homoserine lactone as quorum-sensing signal molecules which coordinate their phenotype at the population level. In this work, we present the whole genome of Burkholderia sp. strain A9, which enables the discovery of its N-acyl homoserine lactone synthase gene. PMID:25745000

  16. Complete genome sequence of the acetylene-fermenting Pelobacter sp. strain SFB93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutton, John M.; Baesman, Shaun; Fierst, Janna L.; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Dunlap, Darren S.; Akob, Denise M.

    2017-01-01

    Acetylene fermentation is a rare metabolism that was previously reported as being unique to Pelobacter acetylenicus. Here, we report the genome sequence of Pelobacter sp. strain SFB93, an acetylene-fermenting bacterium isolated from sediments collected in San Francisco Bay, CA.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter sp. Strain NCu2D-2 Isolated from a Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Blaschke, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Whole-genome sequencing of Acinetobacter sp. strain NCu2D-2, isolated from the trachea of a mouse, revealed the presence of a plasmid of 309,964 bp with little overall similarity to known plasmids and enriched in insertion sequences (ISs) closely related to IS elements known from the nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii. PMID:28126932

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus sp. Strain DMB5, Acclimatized and Enriched for Catabolizing Anthropogenic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jenny; Shah, Binal; Jain, Kunal; Parmar, Nidhi; Hinsu, Ankit; Patel, Namrata

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Paenibacillus sp. strain DMB5, isolated from polluted sediments of the Kharicut Canal, Vatva, India, having a genome size of 7.5 Mbp and 7,077 coding sequences. The genome of this dye-degrading bacterium provides valuable information on the microbe-mediated biodegradation of anthropogenic compounds. PMID:27034501

  19. Screening of mutant strain Streptomyces mediolani sp. AC37 for (-)-8-O-methyltetrangomycin production enhancement.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Jakeline Trejos; Sturdíková, Maria; Brezová, Vlasta; Svajdlenka, Emil; Novotová, Marta

    2012-12-01

    Streptomyces mediolani sp. AC37 was isolated from the root system of higher plant Taxus baccata and produced metabolite identified as (-)-8-O-methyltetrangomycin according to LC/MS/MS analysis. In our screening program for improvements of bioactive secondary metabolites from plant associate streptomycetes, mutation was used as a tool for the induction of genetic variations for selection of higher (-)-8-O-methyltetrangomycin producers of isolates. S. mediolani sp. AC37 was treated with UV irradiation and chemical mutagenic treatment (N-nitroso-N-methyl-urea). The radical scavenging and antioxidant capacity of (-)-8-O-methyltetrangomycin and extracts isolated from mutants were tested using EPR spin trapping technique and ABTS(·+) assay. Comparison of electron microscopic images of Streptomyces sp. AC37 and mutant strains of Streptomyces sp. AC37 revealed substantial differences in morphology and ultrastructure.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Labrenzia sp. Strain CP4, Isolated from a Self-Regenerating Biocathode Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Eddie, Brian J.; Malanoski, Anthony P.; Hervey, W. Judson; Lin, Baochuan

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the complete genome sequence of Labrenzia sp. strain CP4, isolated from an electricity-consuming marine biocathode biofilm. Labrenzia sp. strain CP4 consists of a circular 5.2 Mbp chromosome and an 88 Kbp plasmid. PMID:27174270

  1. Genome Sequence of Carbon Dioxide-Sequestering Serratia sp. Strain ISTD04 Isolated from Marble Mining Rocks.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Gazara, Rajesh Kumar; Verma, Sandhya; Kumar, Madan; Verma, Praveen Kumar; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2016-10-20

    The Serratia sp. strain ISTD04 has been identified as a carbon dioxide (CO2)-sequestering bacterium isolated from marble mining rocks in the Umra area, Rajasthan, India. This strain grows chemolithotrophically on media that contain sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) as the sole carbon source. Here, we report the genome sequence of 5.07 Mb Serratia sp. ISTD04.

  2. Draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas sp. strain M47T1, carried by Bursaphelenchus xylophilus isolated from Pinus pinaster.

    PubMed

    Proença, Diogo Neves; Espírito Santo, Christophe; Grass, Gregor; Morais, Paula V

    2012-09-01

    The draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas sp. strain M47T1, carried by the Bursaphelenchus xylophilus pinewood nematode, the causative agent of pine wilt disease, is presented. In Pseudomonas sp. strain M47T1, genes that make this a plant growth-promoting bacterium, as well as genes potentially involved in nematotoxicity, were identified.

  3. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Hosseini Salekdeh, Ghasem; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated. PMID:26725518

  4. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-04

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated.

  5. Bacillus sp. strain DJ-1, potent arsenic hypertolerant bacterium isolated from the industrial effluent of India.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Dhaval N; Flora, S J S; Kalia, Kiran

    2009-07-30

    Arsenic hypertolerant bacterial cells were isolated from the common industrial effluent treatment plant, Vapi, India. Strain DJ-1 sustaining 400 mM, As (V) out of 16 bacterial strains was identified as Bacillus sp. strain DJ-1 through 16S rRNA ribotyping. The maximum arsenic accumulation of 9.8+/-0.5 mg g(-1) (dry weight) was observed during stationary phase of growth. Intracellular compartmentalization has shown 80% of arsenic accumulation in cytoplasm. The lack of arsC gene and arsenate reductase activity indicated that Bacillus sp. strain DJ-1 may lack classical ars operon and detoxification may be mediated through some novel mechanism. The arsenite binding protein was purified by affinity chromatography and characterized as DNA protection during starvation (DPS) protein by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The induction of DPS showed the adaptation of bacteria in arsenic stress condition and/or in detoxification mechanism, relies on its ability to bind with arsenic. These results indicate the hypertolerance with higher intracellular accumulation of arsenic by Bacillus sp. strain DJ-1, which could be mediated by DPS protein thus signifying this organism is a potential candidate for the removal of arsenic from industrial wastewater, which needs further study.

  6. Genome sequence of the Ornithopus/Lupinus-nodulating Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM471

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Wayne; De Meyer, Sofie; Terpolilli, Jason; Melino, Vanessa; Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; Tiwari, Ravi; Howieson, John; Yates, Ronald; O’Hara, Graham; Ninawi, Mohamed; Lu, Megan; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Wei, Chia-Lin; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, I-Min; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM471 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective nitrogen- (N2) fixing root nodule formed on the annual legume Ornithopus pinnatus (Miller) Druce growing at Oyster Harbour, Albany district, Western Australia in 1982. This strain is in commercial production as an inoculant for Lupinus and Ornithopus. Here we describe the features of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM471, together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 7,784,016 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in 1 scaffold of 2 contigs, contains 7,372 protein-coding genes and 58 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 20 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Program. PMID:24976882

  7. Genome sequence of the Ornithopus/Lupinus-nodulating Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM471.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Wayne; De Meyer, Sofie; Terpolilli, Jason; Melino, Vanessa; Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; Tiwari, Ravi; Howieson, John; Yates, Ronald; O'Hara, Graham; Ninawi, Mohamed; Lu, Megan; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Wei, Chia-Lin; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, I-Min; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-12-20

    Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM471 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective nitrogen- (N2) fixing root nodule formed on the annual legume Ornithopus pinnatus (Miller) Druce growing at Oyster Harbour, Albany district, Western Australia in 1982. This strain is in commercial production as an inoculant for Lupinus and Ornithopus. Here we describe the features of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM471, together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 7,784,016 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in 1 scaffold of 2 contigs, contains 7,372 protein-coding genes and 58 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 20 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Program.

  8. Secondary substrate utilization of methylene chloride by an isolated strain of Pseudomonas sp.

    PubMed Central

    LaPat-Polasko, L T; McCarty, P L; Zehnder, A J

    1984-01-01

    Secondary substrate utilization of methylene chloride was analyzed by using Pseudomonas sp. strain LP. Both batch and continuously fed reactors demonstrated that this strain was capable of simultaneously consuming two substrates at different concentrations: the primary substrate at the higher concentration (milligrams per liter) and the secondary substrate at the lower concentration (micrograms per liter). The rate of methylene chloride utilization at trace concentrations was greater in the presence of the primary substrate, acetate, than without it. However, when the substrate roles were changed, the acetate secondary substrate utilization rate was less when methylene chloride was present. Thus, substrate interactions are important in the kinetics of secondary substrate utilization. Pseudomonas sp. strain LP showed a preference toward degrading methylene chloride over acetate, whether it was the primary or secondary substrate, providing it was below an inhibitory concentration of ca. 10 mg/liter. PMID:6721491

  9. Expression of the Nitroarene Dioxygenase Genes in Comamonas sp. Strain JS765 and Acidovorax sp. Strain JS42 Is Induced by Multiple Aromatic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Lessner, Daniel J.; Parales, Rebecca E.; Narayan, Shakti; Gibson, David T.

    2003-01-01

    This work reports a genetic analysis of the expression of nitrobenzene dioxygenase (NBDO) in Comamonas sp. strain JS765 and 2-nitrotoluene dioxygenase (2NTDO) in Acidovorax sp. strain JS42. Strains JS765 and JS42 possess identical LysR-type regulatory proteins, NbzR and NtdR, respectively. NbzR/NtdR is homologous to NahR, the positive salicylate-responsive transcriptional activator of the naphthalene degradation genes in Pseudomonas putida G7. The genes encoding NBDO and 2NTDO in each strain are cotranscribed, and transcription starts at the same site within identical promoter regions for each operon. Results from a lacZ reporter gene fusion demonstrated that expression of NBDO and 2NTDO is induced by multiple aromatic compounds, including an array of nitroaromatic compounds (nitrobenzene, 2-, 3-, and 4-nitrotoluene, 2,4- and 2,6-dinitrotoluene, and aminodinitrotoluenes), as well as salicylate and anthranilate. The nitroaromatic compounds appear to be the actual effector molecules. Analysis of β-galactosidase and 2NTDO activities with strain JS42 demonstrated that NtdR was required for induction by all of the inducing compounds, high basal-level expression of 2NTDO, and complementation of a JS42 ntdR null mutant. Complementation with the closely related regulators NagR (from Ralstonia sp. strain U2) and NahR restored only induction by the archetype inducers, salicylate or salicylate and anthranilate, respectively, and did not restore the high basal level of expression of 2NTDO. The mechanism of 2NTDO gene regulation in JS42, and presumably that of NBDO gene regulation in JS765, appear similar to that of NahR-regulated genes in Pseudomonas putida G7. However, NbzR and NtdR appear to have evolved a broader specificity in JS42 and JS765, allowing for recognition of nitroaromatic compounds while retaining the ability to respond to salicylate and anthranilate. NtdR is also the first example of a nitroarene-responsive LysR-type transcriptional activator. PMID:12813084

  10. Characterization of a novel feather-degrading Bacillus sp. strain.

    PubMed

    Werlang, Patricia Orosco; Brandelli, Adriano

    2005-01-01

    Feather waste is generated in large amounts as a byproduct of commercial poultry processing. This residue is almost pure keratin, which is not easily degradable by common proteolytic enzymes. A feather-degrading bacterium was isolated from poultry feathers in decomposition. The strain identified as kr16 showed important feather-degrading activity when grown on basal medium containing 10 g/L of native feather as the source of energy, carbon, and nitrogen. The isolate was characterized according to the phenotypical characteristics and biochemical profiling that belong to the Bacillus genus. Keratinolytic activity of this isolate was monitored during cultivation of the bacterium on raw feathers at different temperatures. Maximum growth and feather-degrading activity were observed at 30-37 degrees C. The keratinolytic enzyme had a pH optimum ranging from 8.0 to 11.0 and a temperature optimum of 45-65 degrees C. The keratinase was strongly inhibited by EDTA and the metal ions Hg2+ and Sn2+.

  11. Biodegradation of 4-nitrotoluene by Pseudomonas sp. strain 4NT.

    PubMed Central

    Haigler, B E; Spain, J C

    1993-01-01

    A strain of Pseudomonas spp. was isolated from nitrobenzene-contaminated soil on 4-nitrotoluene as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. The organism also grew on 4-nitrobenzaldehyde, and 4-nitrobenzoate. 4-Nitrobenzoate and ammonia were detected in the culture fluid of glucose-grown cells after induction with 4-nitrotoluene. Washed suspensions of 4-nitrotoluene- or 4-nitrobenzoate-grown cells oxidized 4-nitrotoluene, 4-nitrobenzaldehyde, 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol, and protocatechuate. Extracts from induced cells contained 4-nitrobenzaldehyde dehydrogenase, 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol dehydrogenase, and protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase activities. Under anaerobic conditions, cell extracts converted 4-nitrobenzoate or 4-hydroxylaminobenzoate to protocatechuate. Conversion of 4-nitrobenzoate to protocatechuate required NADPH. These results indicate that 4-nitrotoluene was degraded by an initial oxidation of the methyl group to form 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol, which was converted to 4-nitrobenzoate via 4-nitrobenzaldehyde. The 4-nitrobenzoate was reduced to 4-hydroxylaminobenzoate, which was converted to protocatechuate. A protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase catalyzed meta-ring fission of the protocatechuate. The detection of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde and 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and 4-nitrotoluene oxygenase activities in 4-nitrobenzoate-grown cells suggests that 4-nitrobenzoate is an inducer of the 4-nitrotoluene degradative pathway. PMID:8357257

  12. Strategy for improving extracellular lipolytic activities by a novel thermotolerant Staphylococcus sp. strain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Extracellular bacterial lipases received much attention for their substrate specificity and their ability to function under extreme environments (pH, temperature...). Many staphylococci produced lipases which were released into the culture medium. Reports of extracellular thermostable lipases from Staphylococcus sp. and active in alkaline conditions are not previously described. Results This study focused on novel strategies to increase extracellular lipolytic enzyme production by a novel Staphylococcus sp. strain ESW. The microorganism needed neutral or alkaline pH values between 7.0 and 12.0 for growth. For pH values outside this range, cell growth seemed to be significantly inhibited. Staphylococcus sp. culture was able to grow within a wide temperature range (from 30 to 55°C). The presence of oils in the culture medium leaded to improvements in cells growth and lipolytic enzyme activity. On the other hand, although chemical surfactants leaded to an almost complete inhibition of growth and lipolytic enzyme production, their addition along the culture could affect the location of the enzyme. In addition, our results showed that this novel Staphylococcus sp. strain produced biosurfactants simultaneously with lipolytic activity, when soapstock (The main co-product of the vegetable oil refining industry), was used as the sole carbon source. Conclusion A simultaneous biosurfactant and extracellular lipolytic enzymes produced bacterial strain with potential application in soap stock treatment PMID:22078466

  13. Herbaspirillum sp. strain GW103 alleviates salt stress in Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gun Woong; Lee, Kui-Jae; Chae, Jong-Chan

    2016-05-01

    Mutual interactions between plant and rhizosphere bacteria facilitate plant growth and reduce risks of biotic and abiotic stresses. The present study demonstrates alleviation of salt stress in Brassica rapa L. ssp. perkinensis (Chinese cabbage) by Herbaspirillum sp. strain GW103 isolated from rhizosphere soil of Phragmites australis. The strain was capable of producing plant beneficial factors, such as auxin, siderophore, and 1-aminocylopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase. Treatment of strain GW103 on Chinese cabbage under salt stress increased K(+)/Na(+) ratio in roots generating balance in the ratio of ion homeostasis and consequently contributed to the increase of biomass. In addition, root colonization potential of the strain was observed by green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagging approach. These results strongly suggest the beneficial impact of strain GW103 by inducing the alleviation of salt stress and development of stress tolerance in Chinese cabbage via plant-microbe interaction.

  14. Cesium Accumulation and Growth Characteristics of Rhodococcus erythropolis CS98 and Rhodococcus sp. Strain CS402

    PubMed Central

    Tomioka, Noriko; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Yagi, Osami

    1994-01-01

    Growth and cesium accumulation characteristics of two cesium-accumulating bacteria isolated from soils were investigated. Rhodococcus erythropolis CS98 and Rhodococcus sp. strain CS402 accumulated high levels of cesium (approximately 690 and 380 μmol/g [dry weight] of cells or 92 and 52 mg/g [dry weight] of cells, respectively) after 24 h of incubation in the presence of 0.5 mM cesium. The optimum pH for cesium uptake by both Rhodococcus strains was 8.5. Rubidium and cesium assumed part of the role of potassium in the growth of both Rhodococcus strains. Potassium and rubidium inhibited cesium accumulation by these Rhodococcus strains. It is likely that both Rhodococcus strains accumulated cesium through a potassium transport system. PMID:16349312

  15. Draft genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain BR 3267, an elite strain recommended for cowpea inoculation in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Simões-Araújo, Jean Luiz; Leite, Jakson; Passos, Samuel Ribeiro; Xavier, Gustavo Ribeiro; Rumjanek, Norma Gouvêa; Zilli, Jerri Édson

    The strain BR 3267 is a nitrogen-fixing symbiotic bacteria isolated from soil of semi-arid area of Brazilian Northeast using cowpea as the trap plant. This strain is used as commercial inoculant for cowpea and presents high efficient in nitrogen fixation as consequence of its adaptation potential to semi-arid conditions. We report here the draft genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain BR 3267, an elite bacterium used as inoculant for cowpea. Whole genome sequencing of BR 3267 using Illumina MiSeq sequencing technology has 55 scaffolds with a total genome size of 7,904,309bp and C+G 63%. Annotation was added by the RAST prokaryotic genome annotation service and has shown 7314 coding sequences and 52 RNA genes.

  16. Transmission dynamics of Bartonella sp. strain OE 1-1 in Sundevall's jirds (Meriones crassus).

    PubMed

    Morick, Danny; Krasnov, Boris R; Khokhlova, Irina S; Gottlieb, Yuval; Harrus, Shimon

    2013-02-01

    A high prevalence of Bartonella infection is found in many natural systems; however, the transmission dynamics leading to observations of these infections is not fully understood. The capability of Xenopsylla ramesis fleas to serve as competent vectors of Bartonella sp. OE 1-1 (a strain closely related to the zoonotic Bartonella elizabethae) to Meriones crassus jirds was investigated. Naïve X. ramesis fleas were placed for 72 h on naïve jirds or jirds that were either experimentally or naturally infected with Bartonella sp. strain OE 1-1, after which they were placed on naïve jirds. Postfeeding, 69 to 100% of the fleas collected from each Bartonella-positive jird contained Bartonella DNA, and all naïve jirds became positive for Bartonella sp. OE 1-1 after infestation with the infected fleas. In addition, maternal transmission of Bartonella sp. OE 1-1 in jirds was tested by mating 5 Bartonella-positive and 5 naïve female jirds with 10 naïve male jirds in the absence of fleas. Fifteen offspring were delivered by each group. Cultures of blood drawn from all offspring on days 35 and 47 postdelivery were found to be negative for Bartonella. A single spleen sample from the offspring of a Bartonella-positive mother was found molecularly positive for Bartonella sp. OE 1-1. This study demonstrates that X. ramesis fleas are competent vectors of Bartonella sp. OE 1-1 to M. crassus jirds and indicates that maternal transmission is probably not the major transmission route from female jirds to their offspring. We suggest that the dynamics of Bartonella sp. OE 1-1 in the M. crassus jird population in nature is mostly dependent on its vectors.

  17. Genome sequence of the aerobic bacterium Bacillus sp. strain FJAT-13831.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guohong; Liu, Bo; Lin, Naiquan; Tang, Weiqi; Tang, Jianyang; Lin, Yingzhi

    2012-12-01

    Bacillus sp. strain FJAT-13831 was isolated from the no. 1 pit soil of Emperor Qin's Terracotta Warriors in Xi'an City, People's Republic of China. The isolate showed a close relationship to the Bacillus cereus group. The draft genome sequence of Bacillus sp. FJAT-13831 was 4,425,198 bp in size and consisted of 5,567 genes (protein-coding sequences [CDS]) with an average length of 782 bp and a G+C value of 36.36%.

  18. Genome Sequence of the Aerobic Bacterium Bacillus sp. Strain FJAT-13831

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guohong; Lin, Naiquan; Tang, Weiqi; Tang, Jianyang; Lin, Yingzhi

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus sp. strain FJAT-13831 was isolated from the no. 1 pit soil of Emperor Qin's Terracotta Warriors in Xi'an City, People's Republic of China. The isolate showed a close relationship to the Bacillus cereus group. The draft genome sequence of Bacillus sp. FJAT-13831 was 4,425,198 bp in size and consisted of 5,567 genes (protein-coding sequences [CDS]) with an average length of 782 bp and a G+C value of 36.36%. PMID:23144388

  19. Submerged culture screening of two strains of Streptomyces sp. with high keratinolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Kirchner, O; Bautista-Ramirez, M E; Segura-Granados, M

    1998-01-01

    Keratinases can be used for the production of potentially important hydrolyzed proteins and chemicals. This study investigated the keratinolytic activity of Streptomyces sp on keratinaceous materials like wool. High levels of proteolytic and keratinolytic activity were obtained after 96 h of culture when two Streptomyces sp strains were grown on basal medium containing mineral salts and 3% (w/v) of defatted wool as a source of energy, carbon, and nitrogen. The cell-free culture filtrates exhibited rapid proteolytic digestion of keratin powder. Currently, the authors are testing whether the enzymatic activity obtained is in fact keratinolytic, and not only an alkaline protease activity.

  20. Simultaneous fermentation of glucose and xylose to butanol by Clostridium sp. strain BOH3.

    PubMed

    Xin, Fengxue; Wu, Yi-Rui; He, Jianzhong

    2014-08-01

    Cellulose and hemicellulose constitute the major components in sustainable feedstocks which could be used as substrates for biofuel generation. However, following hydrolysis to monomer sugars, the solventogenic Clostridium will preferentially consume glucose due to transcriptional repression of xylose utilization genes. This is one of the major barriers in optimizing lignocellulosic hydrolysates that produce butanol. Unlike studies on existing bacteria, this study demonstrates that newly reported Clostridium sp. strain BOH3 is capable of fermenting 60 g/liter of xylose to 14.9 g/liter butanol, which is similar to the 14.5 g/liter butanol produced from 60 g/liter of glucose. More importantly, strain BOH3 consumes glucose and xylose simultaneously, which is shown by its capability for generating 11.7 g/liter butanol from a horticultural waste cellulosic hydrolysate containing 39.8 g/liter glucose and 20.5 g/liter xylose, as well as producing 11.9 g/liter butanol from another horticultural waste hemicellulosic hydrolysate containing 58.3 g/liter xylose and 5.9 g/liter glucose. The high-xylose-utilization capability of strain BOH3 is attributed to its high xylose-isomerase (0.97 U/mg protein) and xylulokinase (1.16 U/mg protein) activities compared to the low-xylose-utilizing solventogenic strains, such as Clostridium sp. strain G117. Interestingly, strain BOH3 was also found to produce riboflavin at 110.5 mg/liter from xylose and 76.8 mg/liter from glucose during the fermentation process. In summary, Clostridium sp. strain BOH3 is an attractive candidate for application in efficiently converting lignocellulosic hydrolysates to biofuels and other value-added products, such as riboflavin.

  1. Production of proteasome inhibitor syringolin A by the endophyte Rhizobium sp. strain AP16.

    PubMed

    Dudnik, Alexey; Bigler, Laurent; Dudler, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Syringolin A, the product of a mixed nonribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthase encoded by the syl gene cluster, is a virulence factor secreted by certain Pseudomonas syringae strains. Together with the glidobactins produced by a number of beta- and gammaproteobacterial human and animal pathogens, it belongs to the syrbactins, a structurally novel class of proteasome inhibitors. In plants, proteasome inhibition by syringolin A-producing P. syringae strains leads to the suppression of host defense pathways requiring proteasome activity, such as the ones mediated by salicylic acid and jasmonic acid. Here we report the discovery of a syl-like gene cluster with some unusual features in the alphaproteobacterial endophyte Rhizobium sp. strain AP16 that encodes a putative syringolin A-like synthetase whose components share 55% to 65% sequence identity (72% to 79% similarity) at the amino acid level. As revealed by average nucleotide identity (ANI) calculations, this strain likely belongs to the same species as biocontrol strain R. rhizogenes K84 (formely known as Agrobacterium radiobacter K84), which, however, carries a nonfunctional deletion remnant of the syl-like gene cluster. Here we present a functional analysis of the syl-like gene cluster of Rhizobium sp. strain AP16 and demonstrate that this endophyte synthesizes syringolin A and some related minor variants, suggesting that proteasome inhibition by syrbactin production can be important not only for pathogens but also for endophytic bacteria in the interaction with their hosts.

  2. A promising strain of Streptomyces sp. with agricultural traits for growth promotion and disease management.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mansoor; Dharni, Seema; Abdul-Khaliq; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar; Samad, Abdul; Gupta, Mahesh Kumar

    2012-08-01

    A bacterial strain, Streptomyces sp. CIMAP- A1 was isolated from Geranium rhizosphere and identified by morphological, physiological, biochemical and molecular characters (16S rDNA gene sequence). Phylogenetically, it was found most closely related to S. vinacendrappus, strain NRRL-2363 with 99% sequence similarity. The strain had potential antagonistic activity (in vitro) against wide range of phytopathogenic fungi like Stemphylium sp., Botrytis cinerea, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Colletotrichum spp., Curvularia spp., Corynespora cassicola and Thielavia basicola. The extracellular secondary metabolites produced by the strain in the culture filtrates significantly inhibited the spore germination, growth of germ tube of the germinated spores and radial growth of Alternaria alternata, Colletotrichum acutatum, Curvularia andropogonis and Fusarium moniliforme. The extraction of culture filtrate with solvents and purification by following VLC and PTLC methods always yielded a 10th fraction antifungal compound showing activity against wide range of phytopathogenic fungi. The strain was able to produce siderophores and indole-3-acetic acid. The strain was found to enhance the growth and biomass production of Geranium. It increased 11.3% fresh shoot biomass of Geranium and 21.7% essential oil yield.

  3. Identification and Regulation of Genes for Cobalamin Transport in the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Adam A.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is a cobalamin auxotroph and utilizes this coenzyme solely for the synthesis of l-methionine by methionine synthase (MetH). Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is unable to synthesize cobalamin de novo, and because of the large size of this tetrapyrrole, an active-transport system must exist for cobalamin uptake. Surprisingly, no cobalamin transport system was identified in the initial annotation of the genome of this organism. With more sophisticated in silico prediction tools, a btuB-cpdA-btuC-btuF operon encoding components putatively required for a B12 uptake (btu) system was identified. The expression of these genes was predicted to be controlled by a cobalamin riboswitch. Global transcriptional profiling by high-throughput RNA sequencing of a cobalamin-independent form of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 grown in the absence or presence of cobalamin confirmed regulation of the btu operon by cobalamin. Pérez et al. (A. A. Pérez, Z. Liu, D. A. Rodionov, Z. Li, and D. A. Bryant, J Bacteriol 198:2743–2752, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.00475-16) developed a cobalamin-dependent yellow fluorescent protein reporter system in a Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 variant that had been genetically modified to allow cobalamin-independent growth. This reporter system was exploited to validate components of the btu uptake system by assessing the ability of targeted mutants to transport cobalamin. The btuB promoter and a variant counterpart mutated in an essential element of the predicted cobalamin riboswitch were fused to a yfp reporter. The combined data indicate that the btuB-cpdA-btuF-btuC operon in this cyanobacterium is transcriptionally regulated by a cobalamin riboswitch. IMPORTANCE With a cobalamin-regulated reporter system for expression of yellow fluorescent protein, genes previously misidentified as encoding subunits of a siderophore transporter were shown to encode components of cobalamin

  4. Molecular detection of the human pathogenic Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest in Amblyomma dubitatum ticks from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Monje, Lucas D; Nava, Santiago; Eberhardt, Ayelen T; Correa, Ana I; Guglielmone, Alberto A; Beldomenico, Pablo M

    2015-02-01

    To date, three tick-borne pathogenic Rickettsia species have been reported in different regions of Argentina, namely, R. rickettsii, R. parkeri, and R. massiliae. However, there are no reports available for the presence of tick-borne pathogens from the northeastern region of Argentina. This study evaluated the infection with Rickettsia species of Amblyomma dubitatum ticks collected from vegetation and feeding from capybaras (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) in northeastern Argentina. From a total of 374 A. dubitatum ticks collected and evaluated by PCR for the presence of rickettsial DNA, 19 were positive for the presence of Rickettsia bellii DNA, two were positive for Rickettsia sp. strain COOPERI, and one was positive for the pathogenic Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest. To our knowledge, this study is the first report of the presence of the human pathogen Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest and Rickettsia sp. strain COOPERI in Argentina. Moreover, our findings posit A. dubitatum as a potential vector for this pathogenic strain of Rickettsia.

  5. Strain identification and quorum sensing inhibition characterization of marine-derived Rhizobium sp. NAO1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hong; Zhu, Xiaoshan; Yu, Shenchen; Chen, Lu; Jin, Hui; Cai, Zhonghua

    2017-01-01

    A novel strategy for combating pathogens is through the ongoing development and use of anti-quorum sensing (QS) treatments such as therapeutic bacteria or their anti-QS substances. Relatively little is known about the bacteria that inhabit the open ocean and of their potential anti-pathogenic attributes; thus, in an initiative to identify these types of therapeutic bacteria, planktonic microbes from the North Atlantic Ocean were collected, isolated, cultured and screened for anti-QS activity. Screening analysis identified one such strain, Rhizobium sp. NAO1. Extracts of Rhizobium sp. NAO1 were identified via ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) analysis. They were shown to contain N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based QS analogues (in particular, the N-butyryl homoserine lactone (C4-AHL) analogue) and could disrupt biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. QS inhibition was confirmed using confocal scanning laser microscopy and growth curves, and it was shown to occur in a dose-dependent manner without affecting bacterial growth. Secondary metabolites of Rhizobium sp. NAO1 inhibited PAO1 pathogenicity by downregulating AHL-mediated virulence factors such as elastase activity and siderophore production. Furthermore, as a result of biofilm structure damage, the secondary metabolite products of Rhizobium sp. NAO1 significantly increased the sensitivity of PAO1 to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Our results demonstrated that Rhizobium sp. strain NAO1 has the ability to disrupt P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm architecture, in addition to attenuating P. aeruginosa PAO1 virulence factor production and pathogenicity. Therefore, the newly identified ocean-derived Rhizobium sp. NAO1 has the potential to serve as a QS inhibitor and may be a new microbial resource for drug development.

  6. Physiological characteristics of Thiomicrospira sp. strain L-12 isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby, E.G.; Jannasch, H.W.

    1982-01-01

    Growth of the obligately chemolithotrophic Thiomicrospira sp. strain L-12, isolated from a hydrothermal vent at a depth of 2,550 m in the Galapagos Rift region, was optimal at pH 8 and required 200 mM Na/sup +/ and divalent ions (Ca/sup 2 +/ and Mg/sup 2 +/). The organism was microaerophilic and tolerated 300 ..mu..M sulfide without a decrease in the rate of CO/sub 2/ incorporation. Growth and CO/sub 2/ incorporation occurred within the temperature range of 10 to 35/sup 0/C, with both optimal at 25/sup 0/C. At the in situ pressure of 250 atm, the rate of CO/sub 2/ incorporation was reduced by 25% relative to that measured at 1 atm; it was entirely suppressed at 500 atm. The results of this physiological characterization suggest that Thiomicrospira sp. strain L-12 can be an active autotroph in the hydrothermal environment.

  7. A stable organic free radical in anaerobic benzylsuccinate synthase of Azoarcus sp. strain T.

    PubMed

    Krieger, C J; Roseboom, W; Albracht, S P; Spormann, A M

    2001-04-20

    The novel enzyme benzylsuccinate synthase initiates anaerobic toluene metabolism by catalyzing the addition of toluene to fumarate, forming benzylsuccinate. Based primarily on its sequence similarity to the glycyl radical enzymes, pyruvate formate-lyase and anaerobic ribonucleotide reductase, benzylsuccinate synthase was speculated to be a glycyl radical enzyme. In this report we use EPR spectroscopy to demonstrate for the first time that active benzylsuccinate synthase from the denitrifying bacterium Azoarcus sp. strain T harbors an oxygen-sensitive stable organic free radical. The EPR signal of the radical was centered at g = 2.0021 and was characterized by a major 2-fold splitting of about 1.5 millitesla. The strong similarities between the EPR signal of the benzylsuccinate synthase radical and that of the glycyl radicals of pyruvate formate-lyase and anaerobic ribonucleotide reductase provide evidence that the benzylsuccinate synthase radical is located on a glycine residue, presumably glycine 828 in Azoarcus sp. strain T benzylsuccinate synthase.

  8. Biodegradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1

    PubMed Central

    Tallur, Preeti N.; Mulla, Sikandar I.; Megadi, Veena B.; Talwar, Manjunatha P.; Ninnekar, Harichandra Z.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroid pesticide cypermethrin is a environmental pollutant because of its widespread use, toxicity and persistence. Biodegradation of such chemicals by microorganisms may provide an cost-effective method for their detoxification. We have investigated the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 in various matrices such as, polyurethane foam (PUF), polyacrylamide, sodium alginate and agar. The optimum temperature and pH for the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. were found to be 30 °C and 7.0, respectively. The rate of degradation of 10 and 20 mM of cypermethrin by freely suspended cells were compared with that of immobilized cells in batches and semi-continuous with shaken cultures. PUF-immobilized cells showed higher degradation of cypermethrin (10 mM and 20 mM) than freely suspended cells and cells immobilized in other matrices. The PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 were retain their degradation capacity. Thus, they can be reused for more than 32 cycles, without losing their degradation capacity. Hence, the PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. could potentially be used in the bioremediation of cypermethrin contaminated water. PMID:26413046

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Arcobacter sp. Strain LFT 1.7 Isolated from Great Scallop (Pecten maximus) Larvae.

    PubMed

    Diéguez, A L; Romalde, J L

    2017-02-09

    Arcobacter sp. strain LFT 1.7 was isolated from great scallop (Pecten maximus) larvae. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain LFT 1.7 formed an independent lineage in the genus Arcobacter The draft genome of LFT 1.7 was sequenced to determine the taxonomic position and ecological function of this strain.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Arcobacter sp. Strain LFT 1.7 Isolated from Great Scallop (Pecten maximus) Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Diéguez, A. L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arcobacter sp. strain LFT 1.7 was isolated from great scallop (Pecten maximus) larvae. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain LFT 1.7 formed an independent lineage in the genus Arcobacter. The draft genome of LFT 1.7 was sequenced to determine the taxonomic position and ecological function of this strain. PMID:28183771

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Agrobacterium sp. Strain R89-1, a Morphine Alkaloid-Biotransforming Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Kyslíková, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Agrobacterium sp. strain R89-1 isolated from composted wastes of Papaver somniferum can effectively biotransform codeine/morphine into 14-OH-derivatives. Here, we present a 4.7-Mb assembly of the R89-1 strain genome. The draft shows that the strain R89-1 represents a distinct phylogenetic lineage within the genus Agrobacterium. PMID:27056219

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of a Polydroxyalkanoate-Synthesizing Bacterium, Bacillus sp. Strain PJC48, Isolated from Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jin-Jin; Zhou, Ying; Lu, Jian-Jiang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genome sequence of a Bacillus strain is capable of synthesizing polyhydroxyalkanoates, and Bacillus sp. is considered a platform strain for the production of many biodegradable materials. Here, we present the sequence of the PJC48 strain genome, which is composed of three chromatin structures, an extracellular structure, and a cytoskeleton. PMID:28280031

  13. Noncontiguous finished genome sequence and description of Paenibacillus ihumii sp. nov. strain AT5

    PubMed Central

    Togo, A.H.; Khelaifia, S.; Lagier, J.-C.; Caputo, A.; Robert, C.; Fournier, P.-E.; Maraninchi, M.; Valero, R.; Raoult, D.; Million, M.

    2016-01-01

    Paenibacillus ihumii sp. nov. strain AT5 (= CSUR 1981 = DSM 100664) is the type strain of P. ihumii. This bacterium was isolated from a stool sample from a morbidly obese French patient using the culturomics approach. The genome of this Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic, motile and spore-forming bacillus is 5 924 686 bp long. Genomic analysis identified 253 (5%) of 3812 genes as ORFans and at least 2599 (50.03%) of 5194 orthologous proteins not shared with the closest phylogenetic species. PMID:26958346

  14. A new fungal isolate, Penidiella sp. strain T9, accumulates the rare earth element dysprosium.

    PubMed

    Horiike, Takumi; Yamashita, Mitsuo

    2015-05-01

    With an aim to develop a highly efficient method for the recovery of rare earth elements (REEs) by using microorganisms, we attempted to isolate dysprosium (Dy)-accumulating microorganisms that grow under acidic conditions from environmental samples containing high concentrations of heavy metals. One acidophilic strain, T9, which was isolated from an abandoned mine, decreased the concentration of Dy in medium that contained 100 mg/liter Dy to 53 mg/liter Dy after 3 days of cultivation at pH 2.5. The Dy content in the cell pellet of the T9 strain was 910 μg/mg of dry cells. The T9 strain also accumulated other REEs. Based on the results of 28S-D1/D2 rRNA gene sequencing and morphological characterization, we designated this fungal strain Penidiella sp. T9. Bioaccumulation of Dy was observed on the cell surface of the T9 strain by elemental mapping using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Our results indicate that Penidiella sp. T9 has the potential to recover REEs such as Dy from mine drainage and industrial liquid waste under acidic conditions.

  15. A New Fungal Isolate, Penidiella sp. Strain T9, Accumulates the Rare Earth Element Dysprosium

    PubMed Central

    Horiike, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    With an aim to develop a highly efficient method for the recovery of rare earth elements (REEs) by using microorganisms, we attempted to isolate dysprosium (Dy)-accumulating microorganisms that grow under acidic conditions from environmental samples containing high concentrations of heavy metals. One acidophilic strain, T9, which was isolated from an abandoned mine, decreased the concentration of Dy in medium that contained 100 mg/liter Dy to 53 mg/liter Dy after 3 days of cultivation at pH 2.5. The Dy content in the cell pellet of the T9 strain was 910 μg/mg of dry cells. The T9 strain also accumulated other REEs. Based on the results of 28S-D1/D2 rRNA gene sequencing and morphological characterization, we designated this fungal strain Penidiella sp. T9. Bioaccumulation of Dy was observed on the cell surface of the T9 strain by elemental mapping using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Our results indicate that Penidiella sp. T9 has the potential to recover REEs such as Dy from mine drainage and industrial liquid waste under acidic conditions. PMID:25710372

  16. Transformation of Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413 by transgenic sugar beet DNA.

    PubMed

    Gebhard, F; Smalla, K

    1998-04-01

    The ability of Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413(pFG4 delta nptII) to take up and integrate transgenic plant DNA based on homologous recombination was studied under optimized laboratory conditions. Restoration of nptII, resulting in kanamycin-resistant transformants, was observed with plasmid DNA, plant DNA, and homogenates carrying the gene nptII. Molecular analysis showed that some transformants not only restored the 317-bp deletion but also obtained additional DNA.

  17. Genome Sequence of the Agar-Degrading Marine Bacterium Alteromonadaceae sp. Strain G7

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Min-Jung; Song, Ju Yeon; Kim, Byung Kwon; Chi, Won-Jae; Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Choi, Soobeom; Chang, Yong-Keun

    2012-01-01

    Here, we present the high-quality draft genome sequence of the agar-degrading marine gammaproteobacterium Alteromonadaceae sp. strain G7, which was isolated from coastal seawater to be utilized as a bioresource for production of agar-derived biofuels. The 3.91-Mb genome contains a number of genes encoding algal polysaccharide-degrading enzymes such as agarases and sulfatases. PMID:23209220

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Ammonia-Producing Acinetobacter sp. Strain MCC2139 from Dairy Effluent

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Debasmita; Thakur, Ashoke Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of an ammonia-producing, esculin-hydrolyzing, catalase-positive, gram-negative bacterium, Acinetobacter sp. strain MCC2139. This bacterium, isolated from dairy sludge and with optimum growth at 37°C, has a genome size of 2,967,280 bp with a G+C content of 42.3%. PMID:23814111

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Halomonas sp. HG01, a Polyhydroxyalkanoate-Accumulating Strain Isolated from Peru

    PubMed Central

    Cardinali-Rezende, Juliana; Nahat, Rafael Augusto Teodoro Pereira de Souza; Guzmán Moreno, César Wilber; Carreño Farfán, Carmen Rosa; Silva, Luiziana Ferreira; Taciro, Marilda Keico

    2016-01-01

    Halomonas sp. strain HG01, isolated from a salt mine in Peru, is a halophilic aerobic heterotrophic bacterium accumulating poly-3-hydroxybutyrate and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) from different carbon sources. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this isolate, which was found to be 3,665,487 bp long, with a G+C content of 68%. PMID:26798101

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of a Novel Marinobacter sp. Strain from Honolulu Harbor, Hawai‘i

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Siobhan L.; Saito, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Marinobacter sp. strain X15-166BT was cultivated from sediment in Honolulu Harbor, Hawai‘i. The X15-166BT draft genome of 3,490,661 bp encodes 3,115 protein-coding open reading frames. We anticipate that the genome will provide insights into the strain’s lifestyle and the evolution of Marinobacter. PMID:27932650

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain PAB 2.2 Isolated from Abrolhos Bank (Brazil)

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Bruno S. O.; Nobrega, Maria S.; Leomil, Luciana; Tschoeke, Diogo A.; Garcia, Gizele D.; Dias, Graciela; Thompson, Cristiane C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We present here the draft genome sequence of Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain PAB 2.2, isolated from water of Parcel de Abrolhos coral reef (17°57′32.7″; 38°30′20.3″), on Abrolhos Bank, at a depth of 12 m. The assembly consists of 4,434,635 bp and contains 40 contigs, with a G+C content of 41.60%. PMID:28280012

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain PAB 2.2 Isolated from Abrolhos Bank (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Silva, Bruno S O; Nobrega, Maria S; Leomil, Luciana; Tschoeke, Diogo A; Garcia, Gizele D; Dias, Graciela; Thompson, Cristiane C; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2017-03-09

    We present here the draft genome sequence of Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain PAB 2.2, isolated from water of Parcel de Abrolhos coral reef (17°57'32.7″; 38°30'20.3″), on Abrolhos Bank, at a depth of 12 m. The assembly consists of 4,434,635 bp and contains 40 contigs, with a G+C content of 41.60%.

  3. Middle-thermophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria Thiomonas sp. RAN5 strain for hydrogen sulfide removal.

    PubMed

    Asano, Ryoki; Hirooka, Kayako; Nakai, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is one of the most toxic and offensively odorous gases and is generated in anaerobic bioreactors. A middle-thermophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium (SOB), Thiomonas sp. strain RAN5, was isolated and applied for H2S removal from both artificial and anaerobically digested gas. When a bioreactor containing medium inoculated with RAN5 was aerated continuously with artificial gas (containing 100 ppm H2S) at 45 degrees C for 156 hr, the H2S concentration in the vented gas was reduced by 99%. This was not affected by the presence of other microbes in the bioreactor The H2S removal efficiency of the RAN5 bioreactor for anaerobically digested gas was greater than 99% at influent H2S concentrations ranging from 2 to 1800 ppm; the efficiency decreased to 90% at influent H2S concentrations greater than 2000 ppm. Thiomonas sp. strain RAN5 cannot survive at room temperature, and thus its leakage from a wastewater treatment plant would not damage sewage systems. These data suggest that Thiomonas sp. strain RAN5 may be a useful microorganism for H2S removal.

  4. Conversion of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal and Related Alkylhydroxyquinolines by Rhodococcus sp. Strain BG43

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S.; Niewerth, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    A bacterial strain, which based on the sequences of its 16S rRNA, gyrB, catA, and qsdA genes, was identified as a Rhodococcus sp. closely related to Rhodococcus erythropolis, was isolated from soil by enrichment on the Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone], a quorum sensing signal employed by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The isolate, termed Rhodococcus sp. strain BG43, cometabolically degraded PQS and its biosynthetic precursor 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone (HHQ) to anthranilic acid. HHQ degradation was accompanied by transient formation of PQS, and HHQ hydroxylation by cell extracts required NADH, indicating that strain BG43 has a HHQ monooxygenase isofunctional to the biosynthetic enzyme PqsH of P. aeruginosa. The enzymes catalyzing HHQ hydroxylation and PQS degradation were inducible by PQS, suggesting a specific pathway. Remarkably, Rhodococcus sp. BG43 is also capable of transforming 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide to PQS. It thus converts an antibacterial secondary metabolite of P. aeruginosa to a quorum sensing signal molecule. PMID:25239889

  5. Conversion of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal and Related Alkylhydroxyquinolines by Rhodococcus sp. Strain BG43.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S; Niewerth, Heiko; Fetzner, Susanne

    2014-12-01

    A bacterial strain, which based on the sequences of its 16S rRNA, gyrB, catA, and qsdA genes, was identified as a Rhodococcus sp. closely related to Rhodococcus erythropolis, was isolated from soil by enrichment on the Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone], a quorum sensing signal employed by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The isolate, termed Rhodococcus sp. strain BG43, cometabolically degraded PQS and its biosynthetic precursor 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone (HHQ) to anthranilic acid. HHQ degradation was accompanied by transient formation of PQS, and HHQ hydroxylation by cell extracts required NADH, indicating that strain BG43 has a HHQ monooxygenase isofunctional to the biosynthetic enzyme PqsH of P. aeruginosa. The enzymes catalyzing HHQ hydroxylation and PQS degradation were inducible by PQS, suggesting a specific pathway. Remarkably, Rhodococcus sp. BG43 is also capable of transforming 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide to PQS. It thus converts an antibacterial secondary metabolite of P. aeruginosa to a quorum sensing signal molecule.

  6. Biodegradation of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether by Co-Metabolism with a Pseudomonas sp. Strain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shanshan; Wang, Shan; Yan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Co-metabolic bioremediation is supposed to be an impressive and promising approach in the elimination technology of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), which was found to be a common pollutant worldwide in the ground or underground water in recent years. In this paper, bacterial strain DZ13 (which can co-metabolically degrade MTBE) was isolated and named as Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 based on the result of 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Strain DZ13 could grow on n-alkanes (C5-C8), accompanied with the co-metabolic degradation of MTBE. Diverse n-alkanes with different carbon number showed a significant influence on the degradation rate of MTBE and accumulation of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). When Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 co-metabolically degraded MTBE with n-pentane as the growth substrate, a higher MTBE-degrading rate (Vmax = 38.1 nmol/min/mgprotein, Ks = 6.8 mmol/L) and lower TBA-accumulation was observed. In the continuous degradation experiment, the removal efficiency of MTBE by Pseudomonas sp. Strain DZ13 did not show an obvious decrease after five times of continuous addition. PMID:27608032

  7. A New Alkali-Thermostable Azoreductase from Bacillus sp. Strain SF

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Jürgen; Kandelbauer, Andreas; Erlacher, Angelika; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur; Gübitz, Georg M.

    2004-01-01

    A screening for dye-decolorizing alkali-thermophilic microorganisms resulted in a Bacillus sp. strain isolated out of the wastewater drain of a textile finishing company. An NADH-dependent azoreductase of this strain, Bacillus sp. strain SF, was found to be responsible for the decolorization of azo dyes. This enzyme was purified by a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation and anion-exchange and affinity chromatography and had a molecular mass of 61.6 kDa and an isoelectric point at pH 5.3. The pH optimum of the azoreductase depended on the substrate and was within the range of pHs 8 to 9, while the temperature maximum was reached at 80°C. Decolorization only took place in the absence of oxygen and was enhanced by FAD, which was not consumed during the reaction. A 26% similarity of this azoreductase to chaperonin Cpn60 from a Bacillus sp. was found by peptide mass mapping experiments. Substrate specificities of the azoreductase were studied by using synthesized model substrates based on di-sodium-(R)-benzyl-azo-2,7-dihydroxy-3,6-disulfonyl-naphthaline. Those dyes with NO2 substituents, especially in the ortho position, were degraded fastest, while analogues with a methyl substitution showed the lowest degradation rates. PMID:14766562

  8. Complete genome sequence of the lignin-degrading bacterium Klebsiella sp. strain BRL6-2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to discover anaerobic bacteria capable of lignin degradation, we isolated Klebsiella sp. strain BRL6-2 on minimal media with alkali lignin as the sole carbon source. This organism was isolated anaerobically from tropical forest soils collected from the Bisley watershed at the Ridge site in the El Yunque National Forest in Puerto Rico, USA, part of the Luquillo Long-Term Ecological Research Station. At this site, the soils experience strong fluctuations in redox potential and are characterized by cycles of iron oxidation and reduction. Genome sequencing was targeted because of its ability to grow on lignin anaerobically and lignocellulolytic activity via in vitro enzyme assays. The genome of Klebsiella sp. strain BRL6-2 is 5.80 Mbp with no detected plasmids, and includes a relatively small arsenal of genes encoding lignocellulolytic carbohydrate active enzymes. The genome revealed four putative peroxidases including glutathione and DyP-type peroxidases, and a complete protocatechuate pathway encoded in a single gene cluster. Physiological studies revealed Klebsiella sp. strain BRL6-2 to be relatively stress tolerant to high ionic strength conditions. It grows in increasing concentrations of ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium acetate) up to 73.44 mM and NaCl up to 1.5 M. PMID:25566348

  9. Photoacclimation of Prochlorococcus sp. (Prochlorophyta) Strains Isolated from the North Atlantic and the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed Central

    Partensky, F.; Hoepffner, N.; Li, WKW.; Ulloa, O.; Vaulot, D.

    1993-01-01

    Two Atlantic (SARG and NATL1) strains and one Mediterranean (MED) strain of Prochlorococcus sp., a recently discovered marine, free-living prochlorophyte, were grown over a range of "white" irradiances (lg) and under low blue light to examine their photoacclimation capacity. All three strains contained divinyl (DV) chlorophylls (Chl) a and b, both distinguishable from "normal" Chls by their red-shifted blue absorption maximum, a Chl c-like pigment at low concentration, zeaxanthin, and [alpha]-carotene. The presence of two phaeophytin b peaks in acidified extracts from both Atlantic strains grown at high lg suggests that these strains also had a normal Chl b-like pigment. In these strains, the total Chl b to DV-Chl a molar ratio decreased from about 1 at 7.5 [mu]mol quanta m-2 s-1 to 0.4 to 0.5 at 133 [mu]mol quanta m-2 s-1. In contrast, the MED strain always had a low DV-Chl b to DV-Chl a molar ratio, ranging between 0.13 at low lg and 0.08 at high lg. The discrepancies between the Atlantic and MED strains could result from differences either in the number of light-harvesting complexes (LHC) II per photosystem II or in the Chl b-binding capacity of the apoproteins constituting LHC II. Photosynthesis was saturated at approximately 5 fg C(fg Chl)-1 h-1 or 6 fg C cell-1 h-1, and growth was saturated at approximately 0.45 d-1 for both MED and SARG strains at 18[deg]C, but saturating irradiances differed between strains. Atlantic strains exhibited increased light-saturated rates and quantum yield for carbon fixation under blue light. PMID:12231684

  10. Substrate Specificities and Availability of Fucosyltransferase and β-Carotene Hydroxylase for Myxol 2′-Fucoside Synthesis in Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120 Compared with Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Mochimaru, Mari; Masukawa, Hajime; Maoka, Takashi; Mohamed, Hatem E.; Vermaas, Wim F. J.; Takaichi, Shinichi

    2008-01-01

    To elucidate the biosynthetic pathways of carotenoids, especially myxol 2′-glycosides, in cyanobacteria, Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 (also known as Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120) and Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 deletion mutants lacking selected proposed carotenoid biosynthesis enzymes and GDP-fucose synthase (WcaG), which is required for myxol 2′-fucoside production, were analyzed. The carotenoids in these mutants were identified using high-performance liquid chromatography, field desorption mass spectrometry, and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance. The wcaG (all4826) deletion mutant of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 produced myxol 2′-rhamnoside and 4-ketomyxol 2′-rhamnoside as polar carotenoids instead of the myxol 2′-fucoside and 4-ketomyxol 2′-fucoside produced by the wild type. Deletion of the corresponding gene in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 (sll1213; 79% amino acid sequence identity with the Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 gene product) produced free myxol instead of the myxol 2′-dimethyl-fucoside produced by the wild type. Free myxol might correspond to the unknown component observed previously in the same mutant (H. E. Mohamed, A. M. L. van de Meene, R. W. Roberson, and W. F. J. Vermaas, J. Bacteriol. 187:6883-6892, 2005). These results indicate that in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, but not in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, rhamnose can be substituted for fucose in myxol glycoside. The β-carotene hydroxylase orthologue (CrtR, Alr4009) of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 catalyzed the transformation of deoxymyxol and deoxymyxol 2′-fucoside to myxol and myxol 2′-fucoside, respectively, but not the β-carotene-to-zeaxanthin reaction, whereas CrtR from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 catalyzed both reactions. Thus, the substrate specificities or substrate availabilities of both fucosyltransferase and CrtR were different in these species. The biosynthetic pathways of carotenoids in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 are discussed. PMID:18708496

  11. H2, N2, and O2 metabolism by isolated heterocysts from Anabaena sp. strain CA.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R L; Kumar, D; Zhang, X K; Tabita, F R; Van Baalen, C

    1985-01-01

    Metabolically active heterocysts isolated from wild-type Anabaena sp. strain CA showed high rates of light-dependent acetylene reduction and hydrogen evolution. These rates were similar to those previously reported in heterocysts isolated from the mutant Anabaena sp. strain CA-V possessing fragile vegetative cell walls. Hydrogen production was observed with isolated heterocysts. The ratio of C2H4 to H2 produced ranged from 0.9 to 1.2, and H2 production exhibited unique biphasic kinetics consisting of a 1 to 2-min burst of hydrogen evolution followed by a lower, steady-state rate of hydrogen production. This burst was found to be dependent upon the length of the dark period immediately preceding illumination and may be related to dark-to-light ATP transients. The presence of 100 nM NiCl2 in the growth medium exerted an effect on both acetylene reduction and hydrogen evolution in the isolated heterocysts from strain CA. H2-stimulated acetylene reduction was increased from 2.0 to 3.2 mumol of C2H4 per mg (dry weight) per h, and net hydrogen production was abolished. A phenotypic Hup- mutant (N9AR) of Anabaena sp. strain CA was isolated which did not respond to nickel. In isolated heterocysts from N9AR, ethylene production rates were the same under both 10% C2H2-90% Ar and 10% C2H2-90% H2 with or without added nickel, and net hydrogen evolution was not affected by the presence of 100 nM Ni2+. Isolated heterocysts from strain CA were shown to have a persistent oxygen uptake of 0.7 mumol of O2 per mg (dry weight) per h, 35% of the rate of whole filaments, at air saturating O2 levels, indicating that O2 impermeability is not a requirement for active heterocysts. PMID:3921524

  12. Iron corrosion induced by nonhydrogenotrophic nitrate-reducing Prolixibacter sp. strain MIC1-1.

    PubMed

    Iino, Takao; Ito, Kimio; Wakai, Satoshi; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Ohkuma, Moriya; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2015-03-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of metallic materials imposes a heavy economic burden. The mechanism of MIC of metallic iron (Fe(0)) under anaerobic conditions is usually explained as the consumption of cathodic hydrogen by hydrogenotrophic microorganisms that accelerates anodic Fe(0) oxidation. In this study, we describe Fe(0) corrosion induced by a nonhydrogenotrophic nitrate-reducing bacterium called MIC1-1, which was isolated from a crude-oil sample collected at an oil well in Akita, Japan. This strain requires specific electron donor-acceptor combinations and an organic carbon source to grow. For example, the strain grew anaerobically on nitrate as a sole electron acceptor with pyruvate as a carbon source and Fe(0) as the sole electron donor. In addition, ferrous ion and l-cysteine served as electron donors, whereas molecular hydrogen did not. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain MIC1-1 was a member of the genus Prolixibacter in the order Bacteroidales. Thus, Prolixibacter sp. strain MIC1-1 is the first Fe(0)-corroding representative belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes. Under anaerobic conditions, Prolixibacter sp. MIC1-1 corroded Fe(0) concomitantly with nitrate reduction, and the amount of iron dissolved by the strain was six times higher than that in an aseptic control. Scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that microscopic crystals of FePO4 developed on the surface of the Fe(0) foils, and a layer of FeCO3 covered the FePO4 crystals. We propose that cells of Prolixibacter sp. MIC1-1 accept electrons directly from Fe(0) to reduce nitrate.

  13. Complete genome sequences of Krokinobacter sp. strain 4H-3-7-5 and Lacinutrix sp. strain 5H-3-7-4, polysaccharide-degrading members of the family Flavobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Klippel, Barbara; Lochner, Adriane; Bruce, David C; Davenport, Karen Walston; Detter, Chris; Goodwin, Lynne A; Han, James; Han, Shunsheng; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam L; Nolan, Matt; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pennacchio, Len; Pitluck, Sam; Tapia, Roxanne; Woyke, Tanja; Wiebusch, Sigrid; Basner, Alexander; Abe, Fumiyoshi; Horikoshi, Koki; Keller, Martin; Antranikian, Garabed

    2011-09-01

    Two members of the family Flavobacteriaceae were isolated from subseafloor sediments using artificial seawater with cellulose, xylan, and chitin as the sole carbon and energy sources. Here, we present the complete genome sequences of Krokinobacter sp. strain 4H-3-7-5 and Lacinutrix sp. strain 5H-3-7-4, which both encode putatively novel enzymes involved in cellulose, hemicellulose, and chitin metabolism.

  14. Preliminary studies of new strains of Trametes sp. from Argentina for laccase production ability.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, María Isabel; Tejerina, Marcos Raúl; Sawostjanik-Afanasiuk, Silvana Soledad; Giorgio, Ernesto Martin; Barchuk, Mónica Lucrecia; Zapata, Pedro Darío; Villalba, Laura Lidia

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative enzymes secreted by white rot fungi can be applied in several technological processes within the paper industry, biofuel production and bioremediation. The discovery of native strains from the biodiverse Misiones (Argentina) forest can provide useful enzymes for biotechnological purposes. In this work, we evaluated the laccase and manganese peroxidase secretion abilities of four newly discovered strains of Trametes sp. that are native to Misiones. In addition, the copper response and optimal pH and temperature for laccase activity in culture supernatants were determined. The selected strains produced variable amounts of laccase and MnP; when Cu(2+) was added, both enzymes were significantly increased. Zymograms showed that two isoenzymes were increased in all strains in the presence of Cu(2+). Strain B showed the greatest response to Cu(2+) addition, whereas strain A was more stable at the optimal temperature and pH. Strain A showed interesting potential for future biotechnological approaches due to the superior thermo-stability of its secreted enzymes.

  15. Monooxygenase-mediated 1,2-dichloroethane degradation by Pseudomonas sp. strain DCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Hage, J.C.; Hartmans, S.

    1999-06-01

    A bacterial strain, designated Pseudomonas sp. strain DCA1, was isolated from a 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA)-degrading biofilm. Strain DCA1 utilizes DCA as the sole carbon and energy source and does not require additional organic nutrients, such as vitamins, for optimal growth. The affinity of strain DCA1 for DCA is very high, with a K{sub m} value below the detection limit of 0.5 {micro}M. Instead of a hydrolytic dehalogenation, as in other DCA utilizers, the first step in DCA degradation in strain DCA1 is an oxidation reaction. Oxygen and NAD(P)H are required for this initial step. Propene was converted to 1,2-epoxypropane by DCA-grown cells and competitively inhibited DCA degradation. The authors concluded that a monooxygenase is responsible for the first step in DCA degradation in strain DCA1. Oxidation of DCA probably results in the formation of the unstable intermediate 1,2-dichloroethanol, which spontaneously releases chloride, yielding chloroacetaldehyde. The DCA degradation pathway is strain DCA1 proceeds from chloroacetaldehyde via chloroacetic acid and presumably glycolic acid, which is similar to degradation routes observed in other DCA-utilizing bacteria.

  16. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1743 - an effective microsymbiont of an Indigofera sp. growing in Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Eshraghi, Leila; De Meyer, Sofie E.; Tian, Rui; Seshadri, Rekha; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Tiwari, Ravi; Yates, Ron; Howieson, John; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-10-26

    Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1743 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of an Indigofera sp. WSM1743 was isolated from a nodule recovered from the roots of an Indigofera sp. growing 20 km north of Carnarvon in Australia. It is slow growing, tolerates up to 1 % NaCl and is capable of growth at 37 °C. Here we describe the features of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1743, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. Finally, the 8,341,956 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged into 163 scaffolds and 167 contigs, contains 7908 protein-coding genes and 75 RNA-only encoding genes and was sequenced as part of the Root Nodule Bacteria chapter of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  17. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1743 - an effective microsymbiont of an Indigofera sp. growing in Australia

    DOE PAGES

    Eshraghi, Leila; De Meyer, Sofie E.; Tian, Rui; ...

    2015-10-26

    Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1743 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of an Indigofera sp. WSM1743 was isolated from a nodule recovered from the roots of an Indigofera sp. growing 20 km north of Carnarvon in Australia. It is slow growing, tolerates up to 1 % NaCl and is capable of growth at 37 °C. Here we describe the features of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1743, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. Finally, the 8,341,956 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged into 163 scaffolds and 167more » contigs, contains 7908 protein-coding genes and 75 RNA-only encoding genes and was sequenced as part of the Root Nodule Bacteria chapter of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.« less

  18. Isolation and characterization of bacterial strains Paenibacillus sp. and Bacillus sp. for kraft lignin decolorization from pulp paper mill waste.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Ram; Singh, Shail; Krishna Reddy, M M; Patel, D K; Purohit, Hemant J; Kapley, Atya

    2008-12-01

    Eight aerobic bacterial strains were isolated from pulp paper mill waste and screened for tolerance of kraft lignin (KL) using the nutrient enrichment technique in mineral salt media (MSM) agar plate (15 g/L) amended with different concentrations of KL (100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 ppm) along with 1% glucose and 0.5% peptone (w/v) as additional carbon and nitrogen sources. The strains ITRC S6 and ITRC S8 were found to have the most potential for tolerance of the highest concentration of KL. These organisms were characterized by biochemical tests and further 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) sequencing, which showed 96.5% and 95% sequence similarity of ITRC S(6) and ITRC S(8) and confirmed them as Paenibacillus sp. and Bacillus sp., respectively. KL decolorization was routinely monitored with a spectrophotometer and further confirmed by HPLC analysis. Among eight strains, ITRC S(6) and ITRC S(8) were found to degrade 500 mg/L of KL up to 47.97% and 65.58%, respectively, within 144 h of incubation in the presence of 1% glucose and 0.5% (w/v) peptone as a supplementary source of carbon and nitrogen. In the absence of glucose and peptone, these bacteria were unable to utilize KL. The analysis of lignin degradation products by GC-MS analysis revealed the formation of various acids as lignin monomers which resulted in a decrease in pH and a major change in the chromatographic profile of the bacterial degraded sample as compared to the control clear indications of biochemical modification of KL due to the bacterial ligninolytic system by ITRC S(6), namely, acetic acid, propanoic acid, butanoic acid, guaiacol, hexanoic acid, and ITRC S(8), namely acetic acid, propanoic acid, ethanedioic acid, furan carboxylic acid, 2-propanoic acid, butanoic acid, 3-acetoxybutyric acid, propanedioic acid, acetoguiacone, 1,2,3-thiadiazole, 5-carboxaldixime, 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxyphenol, and dibutyl phthalate, indicating the bacterium characteristic to degrade G and S units of lignin polymer.

  19. Molecular detection of Rickettsia bellii and Rickettsia sp. strain Colombianensi in ticks from Cordoba, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Jorge; Mattar, Salim

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide molecular evidence of Rickettsia spp. in ticks collected from 2 sites of Cordoba. From May to June 2009, 1069 Amblyomma cajennense ticks were removed from 40 capybaras (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) in a rural locality of Monteria. Furthermore, 458 Amblyomma sp. larvae and 20 Amblyomma sp. nymphs were collected in a rural locality of Los Cordobas (Cordoba) by drag sampling on vegetation (n=1547). Ticks were grouped into pools and tested for rickettsial infection by real-time PCR targeting the rickettsial gene gltA. Subsequently, PCR targeting for gltA, ompA, ompB, and 16S rRNA, sequencing, and phylogenetic analyses were undertaken. Rickettsial DNA was detected in 10 (4.6%) out of 214 pools of ticks by RT-PCR. Five (33%) of free-living Amblyomma sp. larval pools were positive, as well as 5 (2.6%) pools from A. cajennense. Only the gltA gene was amplified from 5 pools of free-living larvae. The nucleotide sequences were 100% identical to R. bellii by BLAST. Only one pool from A. cajennense was positive for gltA, ompA, ompB, and 16S rRNA. The partial nucleotide sequences of these genes were 100% identical to nucleotide sequences of the same genes of a new proposed species Candidatus Rickettsia sp. strain Colombianensi. This is the first report of R. bellii in ticks in Colombia and the second report of detection of Candidatus Rickettsia sp. strain Colombianensi. These Rickettsia species are still considered of unknown pathogenicity. Further studies are needed to characterize the ecological and potential pathogenic role of these 2 Rickettsia species found in Cordoba.

  20. 40 CFR 180.1120 - Streptomyces sp. strain K61; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1120 Streptomyces sp. strain K61; exemption from the requirement... of a tolerance in or on all raw agricultural commodities when used as a fungicide for the...

  1. Whole-Genome Sequence of Enteractinococcus helveticum sp. nov. Strain UASWS1574 Isolated from Industrial Used Waters

    PubMed Central

    Crovadore, Julien; Calmin, Gautier; Chablais, Romain; Cochard, Bastien

    2016-01-01

    We report here the whole-genome shotgun sequences of the strain UASWS1574 of the undescribed Enteractinococcus helveticum sp. nov., isolated from used water. This is the first genome registered for the whole genus. PMID:27469945

  2. 40 CFR 180.1120 - Streptomyces sp. strain K61; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1120 Streptomyces sp. strain K61; exemption from the requirement... of a tolerance in or on all raw agricultural commodities when used as a fungicide for the...

  3. The cloned 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase gene from Sinorhizobium sp. strain BL3 in Rhizobium sp. strain TAL1145 promotes nodulation and growth of Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Tittabutr, Panlada; Awaya, Jonathan D; Li, Qing X; Borthakur, Dulal

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the role of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase of symbionts in nodulation and growth of Leucaena leucocephala. The acdS genes encoding ACC deaminase were cloned from Rhizobium sp. strain TAL1145 and Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 in multicopy plasmids, and transferred to TAL1145. The BL3-acdS gene greatly enhanced ACC deaminase activity in TAL1145 compared to the native acdS gene. The transconjugants of TAL1145 containing the native or BL3 acdS gene could grow in minimal media containing 1.5mM ACC, whereas BL3 could tolerate up to 3mM ACC. The TAL1145 acdS gene was inducible by mimosine and not by ACC, while the BL3 acdS gene was highly inducible by ACC and not by mimosine. The transconjugants of TAL1145 containing the native- and BL3-acdS genes formed nodules with greater number and sizes, and produced higher root mass on L. leucocephala than by TAL1145. This study shows that the introduction of multiple copies of the acdS gene increased ACC deaminase activities of TAL1145 and enhanced its symbiotic efficiency on L. leucocephala.

  4. Identification, Purification and Characterization of Laterosporulin, a Novel Bacteriocin Produced by Brevibacillus sp. Strain GI-9

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pradip Kumar; Chittpurna; Ashish; Sharma, Vikas; Patil, Prabhu B.; Korpole, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacteriocins are antimicrobial peptides that are produced by bacteria as a defense mechanism in complex environments. Identification and characterization of novel bacteriocins in novel strains of bacteria is one of the important fields in bacteriology. Methodology/Findings The strain GI-9 was identified as Brevibacillus sp. by 16 S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The bacteriocin produced by strain GI-9, namely, laterosporulin was purified from supernatant of the culture grown under optimal conditions using hydrophobic interaction chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC. The bacteriocin was active against a wide range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. MALDI-TOF experiments determined the precise molecular mass of the peptide to be of 5.6 kDa and N-terminal sequencing of the thermo-stable peptide revealed low similarity with existing antimicrobial peptides. The putative open reading frame (ORF) encoding laterosporulin and its surrounding genomic region was fished out from the draft genome sequence of GI-9. Sequence analysis of the putative bacteriocin gene did not show significant similarity to any reported bacteriocin producing genes in database. Conclusions We have identified a bacteriocin producing strain GI-9, belonging to the genus Brevibacillus sp. Biochemical and genomic characterization of laterosporulin suggests it as a novel bacteriocin with broad spectrum antibacterial activity. PMID:22403615

  5. Purification and characterization of hydroquinone dioxygenase from Sphingomonas sp. strain TTNP3

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hydroquinone-1,2-dioxygenase, an enzyme involved in the degradation of alkylphenols in Sphingomonas sp. strain TTNP3 was purified to apparent homogeneity. The extradiol dioxygenase catalyzed the ring fission of hydroquinone to 4-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde and the degradation of chlorinated and several alkylated hydroquinones. The activity of 1 mg of the purified enzyme with unsubstituted hydroquinone was 6.1 μmol per minute, the apparent Km 2.2 μM. ICP-MS analysis revealed an iron content of 1.4 moles per mole enzyme. The enzyme lost activity upon exposure to oxygen, but could be reactivated by Fe(II) in presence of ascorbate. SDS-PAGE analysis of the purified enzyme yielded two bands of an apparent size of 38 kDa and 19 kDa, respectively. Data from MALDI-TOF analyses of peptides of the respective bands matched with the deduced amino acid sequences of two neighboring open reading frames found in genomic DNA of Sphingomonas sp strain TTNP3. The deduced amino acid sequences showed 62% and 47% identity to the large and small subunit of hydroquinone dioxygenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens strain ACB, respectively. This heterotetrameric enzyme is the first of its kind found in a strain of the genus Sphingomonas sensu latu. PMID:21906340

  6. Genome Sequence of a Typical Ultramicrobacterium, Curvibacter sp. Strain PAE-UM, Capable of Phthalate Ester Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dan; Hao, Zhenyu; Sun, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Curvibacter sp. strain PAE-UM, isolated from river sediment, is a typical ultramicrobacterium capable of phthalate ester degradation. The genome of Curvibacter sp. PAE-UM consists of 3,284,473 bp, and its information will provide insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying its degradation ability. PMID:26769923

  7. Draft genome sequence of Paenisporosarcina sp. strain TG-20, a psychrophilic bacterium isolated from the basal ice of Taylor Glacier.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Hyuck; Koh, Hye Yeon; Lee, Sung Gu; Doyle, Shawn; Christner, Brent C; Kim, Hak Jun

    2012-12-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Paenisporosarcina sp. strain TG-20, which is 4.12 Mb in size and consists of 4,071 protein-coding genes and 76 RNA genes. The genome sequence of Paenisporosarcina sp. TG-20 may provide useful information about molecular adaptations that enhance survival in icy subsurface environments.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Limnobacter sp. Strain CACIAM 66H1, a Heterotrophic Bacterium Associated with Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Fábio Daniel Florêncio; Lima, Alex Ranieri Jerônimo; Moraes, Pablo Henrique Gonçalves; Siqueira, Andrei Santos; Dall'Agnol, Leonardo Teixeira; Baraúna, Anna Rafaella Ferreira; Martins, Luisa Carício; Oliveira, Karol Guimarães; de Lima, Clayton Pereira Silva; Nunes, Márcio Roberto Teixeira; Vianez-Júnior, João Lídio Silva Gonçalves; Gonçalves, Evonnildo Costa

    2016-05-19

    Ecological interactions between cyanobacteria and heterotrophic prokaryotes are poorly known. To improve the genomic studies of heterotrophic bacterium-cyanobacterium associations, the draft genome sequence (3.2 Mbp) of Limnobacter sp. strain CACIAM 66H1, found in a nonaxenic culture of Synechococcus sp. (cyanobacteria), is presented here.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Paenisporosarcina sp. Strain TG-20, a Psychrophilic Bacterium Isolated from the Basal Ice of Taylor Glacier

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Hyuck; Koh, Hye Yeon; Lee, Sung Gu; Doyle, Shawn; Christner, Brent C.

    2012-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Paenisporosarcina sp. strain TG-20, which is 4.12 Mb in size and consists of 4,071 protein-coding genes and 76 RNA genes. The genome sequence of Paenisporosarcina sp. TG-20 may provide useful information about molecular adaptations that enhance survival in icy subsurface environments. PMID:23144390

  10. Genome Sequence of a Typical Ultramicrobacterium, Curvibacter sp. Strain PAE-UM, Capable of Phthalate Ester Degradation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dan; Hao, Zhenyu; Sun, Rui; Bartlam, Mark; Wang, Yingying

    2016-01-14

    Curvibacter sp. strain PAE-UM, isolated from river sediment, is a typical ultramicrobacterium capable of phthalate ester degradation. The genome of Curvibacter sp. PAE-UM consists of 3,284,473 bp, and its information will provide insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying its degradation ability.

  11. Whole-Genome Sequences of Two Closely Related Bacteria, Actinomyces sp. Strain Chiba101 and Actinomyces denticolens DSM 20671T

    PubMed Central

    Ishige, Taichiro; Sekigawa, Yuriko; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Torii, Yasushi; Yokoyama, Eiji; Ishiwata, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Moriyuki; Tamura, Tomohiko; Azuma, Ryozo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Actinomyces sp. strain Chiba101, isolated from an arthritic leg joint of a pig raised in Japan, is a bacterium closely related to Actinomyces denticolens. Here, we deciphered the complete genome sequence of Actinomyces sp. Chiba101 and the high-quality draft genome sequence of A. denticolens DSM 20671T. PMID:28385845

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of a Potential Novel Bacillus sp. Strain, FJAT-18017, Isolated from a Potato Field

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guo-Hong; Wang, Jie-Ping; Che, Jian-Mei; Chen, Qian-Qian

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacillus sp. strain FJAT-18017 was isolated from a potato field in Xinjiang, China. This paper is the first report, to our knowledge, to demonstrate the fully sequenced and completely annotated genome of Bacillus sp. FJAT-18017. The genome size is 5,265,521 bp. The average G+C content was 42.42%. PMID:28104649

  13. Complementation of Cobalamin Auxotrophy in Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002 and Validation of a Putative Cobalamin Riboswitch In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Adam A.; Liu, Zhenfeng; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Li, Zhongkui

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The euryhaline cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 has an obligate requirement for exogenous vitamin B12 (cobalamin), but little is known about the roles of this compound in cyanobacteria. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that only the terminal enzyme in methionine biosynthesis, methionine synthase, requires cobalamin as a coenzyme in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. Methionine synthase (MetH) catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from N5-methyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate to l-homocysteine during l-methionine synthesis and uses methylcobalamin as an intermediate methyl donor. Numerous bacteria and plants alternatively employ a cobalamin-independent methionine synthase isozyme, MetE, that catalyzes the same methyl transfer reaction as MetH but uses N5-methyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate directly as the methyl donor. The cobalamin auxotrophy of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 was complemented by using the metE gene from the closely related cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 73109, which possesses genes for both methionine synthases. This result suggests that methionine biosynthesis is probably the sole use of cobalamin in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. Furthermore, a cobalamin-repressible gene expression system was developed in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 that was used to validate the presence of a cobalamin riboswitch in the promoter region of metE from Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 73109. This riboswitch acts as a cobalamin-dependent transcriptional attenuator for metE in that organism. IMPORTANCE Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is a cobalamin auxotroph because, like eukaryotic marine algae, it uses a cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase (MetH) for the final step of l-methionine biosynthesis but cannot synthesize cobalamin de novo. Heterologous expression of metE, encoding cobalamin-independent methionine synthase, from Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 73109, relieved this auxotrophy and enabled the construction of a truly

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of the Microbispora sp. Strain ATCC-PTA-5024, Producing the Lantibiotic NAI-107.

    PubMed

    Sosio, Margherita; Gallo, Giuseppe; Pozzi, Roberta; Serina, Stefania; Monciardini, Paolo; Bera, Agnieska; Stegmann, Evi; Weber, Tilmann

    2014-01-23

    We report the draft genome sequence of Microbispora sp. strain ATCC-PTA-5024, a soil isolate that produces NAI-107, a new lantibiotic with the potential to treat life-threatening infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens. The draft genome of strain Microbispora sp. ATCC-PTA-5024 consists of 8,543,819 bp, with a 71.2% G+C content and 7,860 protein-coding genes.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of the Microbispora sp. Strain ATCC-PTA-5024, Producing the Lantibiotic NAI-107

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Giuseppe; Pozzi, Roberta; Serina, Stefania; Monciardini, Paolo; Bera, Agnieska; Stegmann, Evi; Weber, Tilmann

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Microbispora sp. strain ATCC-PTA-5024, a soil isolate that produces NAI-107, a new lantibiotic with the potential to treat life-threatening infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens. The draft genome of strain Microbispora sp. ATCC-PTA-5024 consists of 8,543,819 bp, with a 71.2% G+C content and 7,860 protein-coding genes. PMID:24459268

  16. Degradation of hydrogen sulfide by Xanthomonas sp. strain DY44 isolated from peat

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Kyeoungsuk; Hirai, Mitsuyo; Shoda, Makoto )

    1992-04-01

    Xanthomonas sp. strain DY44, capable of degrading H{sub 2}S, was isolated from dimethyl disulfide-acclimated peat. This bacterium removed H{sub 2}S either as a single gas or in the presence of the sulfur-containing compounds methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, and dimethyl disulfide. The maximum specific H{sub 2}S removal rate, obtained in the late stationary phase, was 3.92 mmol g of dry cells{sup {minus}1}h{sup {minus}1} (6.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}16} mol cell{sup {minus}1}h{sup {minus}1}) at pH 7 and 30C through a batch experiment in a basal mineral medium. Since Xanthomonas sp. Strain DY44 exhibited no autotrophic growth with H{sub 2}S, the H{sub 2}S removal was judged not to be a consequence of chemolithotrophic activity. By using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the metabolic product of H{sub 2}S oxidation was determined to be polysulfide, which has properties very similar to those of elemental sulfur. Autoclaved cells (120C, 20 min) did not show H{sub 2}S degradation, but cells killed by {gamma}-irradiation and cell extracts both oxidized H{sub 2}S, suggesting the existence of a heat-labile intracellular enzymatic system for H{sub 2}S oxidation. When Xanthomonas sp. strain DY44 was inoculated into fibrous peat, this strain degraded H{sub 2}S without lag time, suggesting that it will be a good candidate for maintaining high H{sub 2}S removability in the treatment of exhaust gases.

  17. Complete genome sequence, metabolic model construction and phenotypic characterization of Geobacillus LC300, an extremely thermophilic, fast growing, xylose-utilizing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Lauren T; Long, Christopher P; Venkataramanan, Keerthi P; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2015-11-01

    We have isolated a new extremely thermophilic fast-growing Geobacillus strain that can efficiently utilize xylose, glucose, mannose and galactose for cell growth. When grown aerobically at 72 °C, Geobacillus LC300 has a growth rate of 2.15 h(-1) on glucose and 1.52 h(-1) on xylose (doubling time less than 30 min). The corresponding specific glucose and xylose utilization rates are 5.55 g/g/h and 5.24 g/g/h, respectively. As such, Geobacillus LC300 grows 3-times faster than E. coli on glucose and xylose, and has a specific xylose utilization rate that is 3-times higher than the best metabolically engineered organism to date. To gain more insight into the metabolism of Geobacillus LC300 its genome was sequenced using PacBio's RS II single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing platform and annotated using the RAST server. Based on the genome annotation and the measured biomass composition a core metabolic network model was constructed. To further demonstrate the biotechnological potential of this organism, Geobacillus LC300 was grown to high cell-densities in a fed-batch culture, where cells maintained a high xylose utilization rate under low dissolved oxygen concentrations. All of these characteristics make Geobacillus LC300 an attractive host for future metabolic engineering and biotechnology applications.

  18. Nodulation of Lupinus albus by Strains of Ochrobactrum lupini sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Martha E.; Willems, Anne; Abril, Adriana; Planchuelo, Ana-María; Rivas, Raúl; Ludeña, Dolores; Mateos, Pedro F.; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; Velázquez, Encarna

    2005-01-01

    The nodulation of legumes has for more than a century been considered an exclusive capacity of a group of microorganisms commonly known as rhizobia and belonging to the α-Proteobacteria. However, in the last 3 years four nonrhizobial species, belonging to α and β subclasses of the Proteobacteria, have been described as legume-nodulating bacteria. In the present study, two fast-growing strains, LUP21 and LUP23, were isolated from nodules of Lupinus honoratus. The phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S and 23S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolates belong to the genus Ochrobactrum. The strains were able to reinfect Lupinus plants. A plasmid profile analysis showed the presence of three plasmids. The nodD and nifH genes were located on these plasmids, and their sequences were obtained. These sequences showed a close resemblance to the nodD and nifH genes of rhizobial species, suggesting that the nodD and nifH genes carried by strain LUP21T were acquired by horizontal gene transfer. A polyphasic study including phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and molecular features of the strains isolated in this study showed that they belong to a new species of the genus Ochrobactrum for which we propose the name Ochrobactrum lupini sp. nov. Strain LUP21T (LMG 20667T) is the type strain. PMID:15746334

  19. Localization of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in Mycobacterium sp. VKM Ac-1815D mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Egorova, O V; Nikolayeva, V M; Suzina, N E; Donova, M V

    2005-04-01

    The localization of mycobacterial 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17beta-OH SDH) was studied using cell fractionation and cytochemical investigation. Mycobacterium sp. Et1 mutant strain derived from Mycobacterium sp. VKM Ac-1815D and characterized by increased 17beta-OH SDH activity was used as a model organism. Subcellular distribution study showed both soluble and membrane-bound forms of mycobacterial 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. The cytochemical method based on a copper ferrocyanide procedure followed by electron microscopic visualization was applied in order to investigate the intracellular localization of bacterial 17beta-OH SDH in more detail. The enzyme was found to be located in the peripheral cytoplasmic zone adjoining the cytoplasmic membrane (CM). 17beta-OH SDH was loosely membrane bound and easily released into the environment under the cell integrity failure.

  20. Degradation of sulfonamide antibiotics by Microbacterium sp. strain BR1 - elucidating the downstream pathway.

    PubMed

    Ricken, Benjamin; Fellmann, Oliver; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Schäffer, Andreas; Corvini, Philippe François-Xavier; Kolvenbach, Boris Alexander

    2015-12-25

    Microbacterium sp. strain BR1 is among the first bacterial isolates which were proven to degrade sulfonamide antibiotics. The degradation is initiated by an ipso-substitution, initiating the decay of the molecule into sulfur dioxide, the substrate specific heterocyclic moiety as a stable metabolite and benzoquinone imine. The latter appears to be instantaneously reduced to p-aminophenol, as that in turn was detected as the first stable intermediate. This study investigated the downstream pathway of sulfonamide antibiotics by testing the strain's ability to degrade suspected intermediates of this pathway. While p-aminophenol was degraded, degradation products could not be identified. Benzoquinone was shown to be degraded to hydroquinone and hydroquinone in turn was shown to be degraded to 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene. The latter is assumed to be the potential substrate for aromatic ring cleavage. However, no products from the degradation of 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene could be identified. There are no signs of accumulation of intermediates causing oxidative stress, which makes Microbacterium sp. strain BR1 an interesting candidate for industrial waste water treatment.

  1. Cesium and strontium tolerant Arthrobacter sp. strain KMSZP6 isolated from a pristine uranium ore deposit.

    PubMed

    Swer, Pynskhem Bok; Joshi, Santa Ram; Acharya, Celin

    2016-12-01

    Arthrobacter sp. KMSZP6 isolated from a pristine uranium ore deposit at Domiasiat located in North-East India exhibited noteworthy tolerance for cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr). The strain displayed a high minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 400 mM for CsCl and for SrCl2. Flow cytometric analysis employing membrane integrity indicators like propidium iodide (PI) and thiazole orange (TO) indicated a greater sensitivity of Arthrobacter cells to cesium than to strontium. On being challenged with 75 mM of Cs, the cells sequestered 9612 mg Cs g(-1) dry weight of cells in 12 h. On being challenged with 75 mM of Sr, the cells sequestered 9989 mg Sr g(-1) dry weight of cells in 18 h. Heat killed cells exhibited limited Cs and Sr binding as compared to live cells highlighting the importance of cell viability for optimal binding. The association of the metals with Arthrobacter sp. KMSZP6 was further substantiated by Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) coupled with Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. This organism tolerated up to 1 kGy (60)Co-gamma rays without loss of survival. The present report highlights the superior tolerance and binding capacity of the KMSZP6 strain for cesium and strontium over other earlier reported strains and reveals its potential for bioremediation of nuclear waste.

  2. Molecular Characterization and Substrate Specificity of Nitrobenzene Dioxygenase from Comamonas sp. Strain JS765

    PubMed Central

    Lessner, Daniel J.; Johnson, Glenn R.; Parales, Rebecca E.; Spain, Jim C.; Gibson, David T.

    2002-01-01

    Comamonas sp. strain JS765 can grow with nitrobenzene as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. We report here the sequence of the genes encoding nitrobenzene dioxygenase (NBDO), which catalyzes the first step in the degradation of nitrobenzene by strain JS765. The components of NBDO were designated ReductaseNBZ, FerredoxinNBZ, OxygenaseNBZα, and OxygenaseNBZβ, with the gene designations nbzAa, nbzAb, nbzAc, and nbzAd, respectively. Sequence analysis showed that the components of NBDO have a high level of homology with the naphthalene family of Rieske nonheme iron oxygenases, in particular, 2-nitrotoluene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain JS42. The enzyme oxidizes a wide range of substrates, and relative reaction rates with partially purified OxygenaseNBZ revealed a preference for 3-nitrotoluene, which was shown to be a growth substrate for JS765. NBDO is the first member of the naphthalene family of Rieske nonheme iron oxygenases reported to oxidize all of the isomers of mono- and dinitrotoluenes with the concomitant release of nitrite. PMID:11823201

  3. Production of S-(+)-ibuprofen from a nitrile compound by Acinetobacter sp. strain AK226.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, K; Ueno, Y; Otsubo, K; Kawakami, K; Komatsu, K

    1990-01-01

    S-(+)-2-(4'-Isobutylphenyl)propionic acid [S-(+)-ibuprofen] was produced from racemic 2-(4'-isobutylphenyl)propionitrile (Ibu-CN) by an isolated bacterial strain, Acinetobacter sp. strain AK226. Ammonium acetate, acetonitrile, or n-butyronitrile as a carbon source in the culture medium was effective for bacterial growth and induction of this activity. The optimum pH of the reaction was around 8.0. S-(+)-Ibuprofen formed from Ibu-CN by resting cells was present in a 95% enantiomeric excess. Acinetobacter sp. strain AK226 appeared to possess a nitrilase for Ibu-CN because 2-(4'-isobutylphenyl)propionamide was not detected in the reaction mixture and 2-(4'-isobutylphenyl)propionamide was not hydrolyzed to S-(+)-ibuprofen. Since S-(+)-ibuprofen was preferentially produced while the R enantiomer of Ibu-CN was left almost intact over the time course of the reaction, the putative nitrilase appeared to be highly specific for the S enantiomer of Ibu-CN. PMID:2285318

  4. Minimal Streptomyces sp. strain C5 daunorubicin polyketide biosynthesis genes required for aklanonic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Rajgarhia, V B; Strohl, W R

    1997-01-01

    The structure of the Streptomyces sp. strain C5 daunorubicin type II polyketide synthase (PKS) gene region is different from that of other known type II PKS gene clusters. Directly downstream of the genes encoding ketoacylsynthase alpha and beta (KS alpha, KS beta) are two genes (dpsC, dpsD) encoding proteins of unproven function, both absent from other type II PKS gene clusters. Also in contrast to other type II PKS clusters, the gene encoding the acyl carrier protein (ACP), dpsG, is located about 6.8 kbp upstream of the genes encoding the daunorubicin KS alpha and KS beta. In this work, we demonstrate that the minimal genes required to produce aklanonic acid in heterologous hosts are dpsG (ACP), dauI (regulatory activator), dpsA (KS alpha), dpsB (KS beta), dpsF (aromatase), dpsE (polyketide reductase), and dauG (putative deoxyaklanonic acid oxygenase). The two unusual open reading frames, dpsC (KASIII homolog lacking a known active site) and dpsD (acyltransferase homolog), are not required to synthesize aklanonic acid. Additionally, replacement of dpsD or dpsCD in Streptomyces sp. strain C5 with a neomycin resistance gene (aphI) results in mutant strains that still produced anthracyclines. PMID:9098068

  5. Effects of nano bamboo charcoal on PAHs-degrading strain Sphingomonas sp. GY2B.

    PubMed

    She, Bojia; Tao, Xueqin; Huang, Ting; Lu, Guining; Zhou, Zhili; Guo, Chuling; Dang, Zhi

    2016-03-01

    Nano bamboo charcoal (NBC) has been commonly used in the production of textiles, plastics, paint, etc. However, little is known regarding their effects towards the microorganisms. The effects of NBC on phenanthrene degrading strain Sphingomonas sp. GY2B were investigated in the present study. Results showed that the addition of NBC could improve the phenanthrene removal by Sphingomonas sp. GY2B, with removal efficiencies increased by 10.29-18.56% in comparison to the control at 24h, and phenanthrene was almost completely removed at 48h. With the presence of low dose of NBC (20 and 50mgL(-1)), strain GY2B displayed a better growth at 6h, suggesting that NBC was beneficial to the growth of GY2B and thus resulting in the quick removal of phenanthrene from water. However, the growth of strain GY2B in high dose of NBC (200mgL(-1)) was inhibited at 6h, and the inhibition could be attenuated and eliminated after 12h. NBC-effected phenanthrene solubility experiment suggested that NBC makes a negligible contribution to the solubilization of phenanthrene in water. Results of electronic microscopy analysis (SEM and TEM) indicated NBC may interact with the cell membrane, causing the enhanced membrane permeability and then NBC adsorbed on the membrane would enter into the cells. The findings of this work would provide important information for the future usage and long-term environmental risk assessment of NBC.

  6. Reclassification of strains MAFF 303099T and R7A into Mesorhizobiumjaponicum sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Hidalgo, Pilar; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha Helena; Flores-Félix, José David; Igual, José M; Sanjuán, Juan; León-Barrios, Milagros; Peix, Alvaro; Velázquez, Encarna

    2016-12-01

    In this work we revise the taxonomic status of the Lotus-nodulating strains MAFF 303099T and R7A isolated in Japan and New Zealand, respectively. Their 16S rRNA gene sequences are identical and show 98.0, 99.7, 99.8 and 99.9 % similarity values with respect to Mesorhizobium loti NZP 2213T, M. jarvisii ATCC 33669T, M. huakuii USDA 4779T (=CCBAU 2609T) and M. erdmanii USDA 3471T, respectively. The analysis of recA and glnII gene sequeces showed that M. jarvisii ATCC 33669T and M. huakuii USDA 4779T (=CCBAU 2609T) are the most closely related strains to MAFF 303099T and R7A, with similarity values suggesting that these two strains belong to a different species for which MAFF 303099T is selected as the type strain. The DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain MAFF 303099T and its closest phylogenetic relatives ranged from 53 to 60 % in average. Strains MAFF 303099T and R7A presented slight differences in the proportions of C18 : 1ω7c 11-methyl and C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c fatty acids with respect to M. jarvisii ATCC 33669T and M. huakuii USDA 4779T, and also in several phenotypic characteristics. Therefore, we propose the reclassification of these two strains into a novel species named Mesorhizobium japonicum sp. nov., with the type strain being MAFF 303099T (=LMG 29417T=CECT 9101T).

  7. Bacillus mesophilum sp. nov., strain IITR-54T, a novel 4-chlorobiphenyl dechlorinating bacterium.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Natesan; Singh, Nitin Kumar; Bajaj, Abhay; Kumar, Rajendran Mathan; Kaur, Gurwinder; Kaur, Navjot; Bala, Monu; Kumar, Anand; Mayilraj, Shanmugam

    2014-07-01

    The taxonomic position of a Gram-positive, endospore-forming bacterium isolated from soil sample collected from an industrial site was analyzed by a polyphasic approach. The strain designated as IITR-54T matched most of the phenotypic and chemical characteristics of the genus Bacillus and represents a novel species. It was found to biodegrade 4-chlorobiphenyl through dechlorination and was isolated through enrichment procedure from an aged polychlorinated biphenyl-contaminated soil. Both resting cell assay and growth under aerobic liquid conditions using 4-chlorobiphenyl as sole source of carbon along with 0.01% yeast extract, formation of chloride ions was measured. 16S rRNA (1,489 bases) nucleotide sequence of isolated strain was compared with those of closely related Bacillus type strains and confirmed that the strain belongs to the genus Bacillus. Strain IITR-54T differs from all other species of Bacillus by at least 2.1% at the 16S rRNA level, and the moderately related species are Bacillus oceanisediminis (97.9%) followed by Bacillus infantis (97.7%), Bacillus firmus (97.4%), Bacillus drentensis (97.3%), Bacillus circulans (97.2%), Bacillus soli (97.1%), Bacillus horneckiae (97.1%), Bacillus pocheonensis (97.1%) and Bacillus bataviensis (97.1%), respectively. The cell wall peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid and the major isoprenoid quinone was MK-7. Major fatty acids are iso-C15:0 (32.4%) and anteiso-C15:0 (27.4%). Predominant polar lipids are diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. The results of physiological and biochemical tests allowed the genotypic and phenotypic distinctiveness of strain IITR-54T with its phylogenetic relatives and suggest that the strain IITR-54T should be recognized as a novel species, for which the name Bacillus mesophilum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is IITR-54T (=MTCC 11060T=JCM 19208T).

  8. Hydrogen production of a salt tolerant strain Bacillus sp. B2 from marine intertidal sludge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongyan; Wang, Guangce

    2012-01-01

    To isolate a salt tolerant hydrogen-producing bacterium, we used the sludge from the intertidal zone of a bathing beach in Tianjin as inoculum to enrich hydrogen-producing bacteria. The sludge was treated by heat-shock pretreatment with three different temperature (80, 100 and 121°C) respectively. A hydrogen-producing bacterium was isolated from the sludge pretreated at 80°C by sandwich plate technique and identified using microscopic examination and 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis. The isolated bacterium was named as Bacillus sp. B2. The present study examined the hydrogen-producing ability of Bacillus sp. B2. The strain was able to produce hydrogen over a wide range of initial pH from 5.0 to 10.0, with an optimum at pH 7.0. The level of hydrogen production was also affected by the salt concentration. Strain B2 has unique capability to adapt high salt concentration. It could produce hydrogen at the salt concentration from 4 to 60‰. The maximum of hydrogen-producing yield of strain B2 was 1.65 ± 0.04 mol H(2)/mol glucose (mean ± SE) at an initial pH value of 7.0 in marine culture conditions. Hydrogen production under fresh culture conditions reached a higher level than that in marine ones. As a result, it is likely that Bacillus sp. B2 could be applied to biohydrogen production using both marine and fresh organic waste.

  9. Raoultella sp. strain L03 fixes N2 in association with micropropagated sugarcane plants.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ting; Ou-Yang, Xue-Qing; Yang, Li-Tao; Li, Yang-Rui; Song, Xiu-Peng; Zhang, Ge-Min; Gao, Yi-Jing; Duan, Wei-Xing; An, Qianli

    2016-08-01

    N2 -fixing bacteria belonging to the genus Raoultella of the family Enterobacteriaceae are widely associated with plants. Raoultella sp. strain L03 was isolated from surface-sterilized sugarcane roots. In this study, we inoculated the strain L03 to microbe-free micropropagated plantlets of the main sugarcane cultivar ROC22 grown in Guangxi, China and determined N2 -fixation and association between strain L03 and sugarcane plants. Inoculation of strain L03 increased plant biomass, total N, N concentration and chlorophyll, and relieved N-deficiency symptoms of plants under an N-limiting condition. An (15) N isotope dilution assay revealed (15) N isotope dilution in the inoculated sugarcane plants and incorporation of the fixed (14) N from air into chlorophyll. Moreover, a gfp-tagged and antibiotic-resistant L03 strain was reisolated from surface-sterilized sugarcane plants and was detected in plant tissues by fluorescent microscopy. This study for the first time demonstrates that a Raoultella bacterium is able to fix N2 in association with the plant host.

  10. Characterization of triclosan metabolism in Sphingomonas sp. strain YL-JM2C

    PubMed Central

    Mulla, Sikandar I.; Wang, Han; Sun, Qian; Hu, Anyi; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is one of the most widespread emerging contaminants and has adverse impact on aquatic ecosystem, yet little is known about its complete biodegradation mechanism in bacteria. Sphingomonas sp, strain YL-JM2C, isolated from activated sludge of a wastewater treatment plant, was very effective on degrading TCS. Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to optimize the conditions like temperature and pH. From RSM, the optimal TCS degradation conditions were found to be 30 °C and pH 7.0. Under optimal conditions, strain YL-JM2C completely mineralized TCS (5 mg L−1) within 72 h. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed that 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2-chlorohydroquinone and hydroquinone are three main by-products of TCS. Furthermore, stable isotope experimental results revealed that the 13C12-TCS was completely mineralized into CO2 and part of heavier carbon (13C) of labeled TCS was utilized by strain YL-JM2C to synthesize fatty acids (PLFAs). Cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and degradation test results suggested that the strain could enhance degradation capacity of TCS through increasing CSH. In addition, the bacterium also completely degraded spiked TCS (5 mg L−1) in wastewater collected from the wastewater treatment plant. Hence, these results suggest that the strain has potential to remediate TCS in the environment. PMID:26912101

  11. Characterization of triclosan metabolism in Sphingomonas sp. strain YL-JM2C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulla, Sikandar I.; Wang, Han; Sun, Qian; Hu, Anyi; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2016-02-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is one of the most widespread emerging contaminants and has adverse impact on aquatic ecosystem, yet little is known about its complete biodegradation mechanism in bacteria. Sphingomonas sp, strain YL-JM2C, isolated from activated sludge of a wastewater treatment plant, was very effective on degrading TCS. Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to optimize the conditions like temperature and pH. From RSM, the optimal TCS degradation conditions were found to be 30 °C and pH 7.0. Under optimal conditions, strain YL-JM2C completely mineralized TCS (5 mg L‑1) within 72 h. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed that 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2-chlorohydroquinone and hydroquinone are three main by-products of TCS. Furthermore, stable isotope experimental results revealed that the 13C12-TCS was completely mineralized into CO2 and part of heavier carbon (13C) of labeled TCS was utilized by strain YL-JM2C to synthesize fatty acids (PLFAs). Cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and degradation test results suggested that the strain could enhance degradation capacity of TCS through increasing CSH. In addition, the bacterium also completely degraded spiked TCS (5 mg L‑1) in wastewater collected from the wastewater treatment plant. Hence, these results suggest that the strain has potential to remediate TCS in the environment.

  12. Hexavalent Chromium Removal by a Paecilomyces sp. Fungal Strain Isolated from Environment

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas-González, Juan F.; Acosta-Rodríguez, Ismael

    2010-01-01

    A resistant and capable fungal strain in removing hexavalent chromium was isolated from an environment near of Chemical Science Faculty, located in the city of San Luis Potosí, Mexico. The strain was identified as Paecilomyces sp., by macro- and microscopic characteristics. Strain resistance of the strain to high Cr (VI) concentrations and its ability to reduce chromium were studied. When it was incubated in minimal medium with glucose, another inexpensive commercial carbon source like unrefined and brown sugar or glycerol, in the presence of 50 mg/L of Cr (VI), the strain caused complete disappearance of Cr (VI), with the concomitant production of Cr (III) in the growth medium after 7 days of incubation, at 28°C, pH 4.0, 100 rpm, and an inoculum of 38 mg of dry weight. Decrease of Cr (VI) levels from industrial wastes was also induced by Paecilomyces biomass. These results indicate that reducing capacity of chromate resistant filamentous fungus Cr (VI) could be useful for the removal of Cr (VI) pollution. PMID:20634988

  13. Metabolic Engineering of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 for Isobutanol Production

    PubMed Central

    Varman, Arul M.; Xiao, Yi; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2013-01-01

    Global warming and decreasing fossil fuel reserves have prompted great interest in the synthesis of advanced biofuels from renewable resources. In an effort to address these concerns, we performed metabolic engineering of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 to develop a strain that can synthesize isobutanol under both autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. With the expression of two heterologous genes from the Ehrlich pathway, the engineered strain can accumulate 90 mg/liter of isobutanol from 50 mM bicarbonate in a gas-tight shaking flask. The strain does not require any inducer (i.e., isopropyl β-d-1-thiogalactopyranoside [IPTG]) or antibiotics to maintain its isobutanol production. In the presence of glucose, isobutanol synthesis is only moderately promoted (titer = 114 mg/liter). Based on isotopomer analysis, we found that, compared to the wild-type strain, the mutant significantly reduced its glucose utilization and mainly employed autotrophic metabolism for biomass growth and isobutanol production. Since isobutanol is toxic to the cells and may also be degraded photochemically by hydroxyl radicals during the cultivation process, we employed in situ removal of the isobutanol using oleyl alcohol as a solvent trap. This resulted in a final net concentration of 298 mg/liter of isobutanol under mixotrophic culture conditions. PMID:23183979

  14. Competitiveness of a Bradyrhizobium sp. strain in soils containing indigenous rhizobia.

    PubMed

    Bogino, Pablo; Banchio, Erika; Bonfiglio, Carlos; Giordano, Walter

    2008-01-01

    The success of rhizobial inoculation on plant roots is often limited by several factors, including environmental conditions, the number of infective cells applied, the presence of competing indigenous (native) rhizobia, and the inoculation method. Many approaches have been taken to solve the problem of inoculant competition by naturalized populations of compatible rhizobia present in soil, but so far without a satisfactory solution. We used antibiotic resistance and molecular profiles as tools to find a reliable and accurate method for competitiveness assay between introduced Bradyrhizobium sp. strains and indigenous rhizobia strains that nodulate peanut in Argentina. The positional advantage of rhizobia soil population for nodulation was assessed using a laboratory model in which a rhizobial population is established in sterile vermiculite. We observed an increase in nodule number per plant and nodule occupancy for strains established in vermiculite. In field experiments, only 9% of total nodules were formed by bacteria inoculated by direct coating of seed, whereas 78% of nodules were formed by bacteria inoculated in the furrow at seeding. In each case, the other nodules were formed by indigenous strains or by both strains (inoculated and indigenous). These findings indicate a positional advantage of native rhizobia or in-furrow inoculated rhizobia for nodulation in peanut.

  15. Biodegradation of nitroglycerin in porous media and potential for bioaugmentation with Arthrobacter sp. strain JBH1.

    PubMed

    Husserl, Johana; Hughes, Joseph B

    2013-07-01

    Nitroglycerin (NG) is a toxic explosive found as a contaminant of soil and groundwater. Several microbial strains are capable of partially reducing the NG molecule to dinitro or mononitroesters. Recently, a strain capable of growing on NG as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen (Arthrobacter sp. strain JBH1) was isolated from contaminated soil. Despite the widespread presence of microbial strains capable of transforming NG in contaminated soils and sediments, the extent of NG biodegradation at contaminated sites is still unknown. In this study column experiments were conducted to investigate the extent of microbial degradation of NG in saturated porous media, specifically after bioaugmentation with JBH1. Initial experiments using sterile, low sorptivity sand, showed mineralization of NG after bioaugmentation with JBH1 in the absence of sources of carbon and nitrogen other than NG. Results could be modeled using a first order degradation rate of 0.14d(-1). Further experiments conducted using contaminated soil with high organic carbon content (highly sorptive) resulted in column effluents that did not contain NG although high dinitroester concentrations were observed. Bioaugmentation with JBH1 in sediments containing strains capable of partial transformation of NG resulted in complete mineralization of NG and faster degradation rates.

  16. Production and characterization of L-fucose dehydrogenase from newly isolated Acinetobacter sp. strain SA-134.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, Takashi; Morita, Noriyuki

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms producing L-fucose dehydrogenase were screened from soil samples, and one of the isolated bacterial strains SA-134 was identified as Acinetobacter sp. by 16S rDNA gene analysis. The strain grew well utilizing L-fucose as a sole source of carbon, but all other monosaccharides tested such as D-glucose and D-arabinose did not support the growth of the strain in the absence of L-fucose. D-Arabinose inhibited the growth even in the culture medium containing L-fucose. Although the strain grew on some organic acids and amino acids such as citric acid and L-alanine as sole sources of carbon, the enzyme was produced only in the presence of L-fucose. The fucose dehydrogenase was purified to apparently homogeneity from the strain, and the native enzyme was a monomer of 25 kD. L-Fucose and D-arabinose were good substrates for the enzyme, but L-galactose was a poor substrate. The enzyme acted on both NAD(+) and NADP(+) in the similar manner.

  17. Mineralization of 4-aminobenzenesulfonate (4-ABS) by Agrobacterium sp. strain PNS-1.

    PubMed

    Singh, Poonam; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre; Iyengar, Leela; Gurunath, Ramanathan

    2006-12-01

    A bacterial strain, PNS-1, isolated from activated sludge, could utilize sulphanilic acid (4-ABS) as the sole organic carbon and energy source under aerobic conditions. Determination and comparison of 16S r DNA sequences showed that the strain PNS-1 is closely related to the species of Agrobacterium genus. Growth on 4-ABS was accompanied with ammonia and sulfate release. TOC results showed complete mineralization of sulphanilic acid. This strain was highly specific for 4-ABS as none of the sulphonated aromatics used in the present study including other ABS isomers were utilized. Strain PNS-1 could, however, utilize all the tested monocyclic aromatic compounds devoid of a sulfonate group. No intermediates could be detected either in the growth phase or with dense cell suspensions. Presence of chloramphenicol completely inhibited 4-ABS degradation by cells pregrown on succinate, indicating that degradation enzymes are inducible. No plasmid could be detected in the Agrobacterium sp. Strain PNS-1 suggesting that 4-ABS degradative genes may be chromosomal encoded.

  18. Degradation of toxaphene by Bjerkandera sp. strain BOL13 using waste biomass as a cosubstrate.

    PubMed

    Lacayo Romero, Martha; Terrazas, Enrique; van Bavel, Bert; Mattiasson, Bo

    2006-07-01

    The white-rot fungus Bjerkandera sp. strain BOL13 was capable of degrading toxaphene when supplied with wood chips, wheat husk or cane molasses as cosubstrates in batch culture experiments. Approximately 85% of toxaphene was removed when wheat husk was the main substrate. The production of lignin peroxidase was only stimulated when wheat husk was present in the liquid medium. Although xylanase was always detected, wheat husk supported the highest xylanase production. A negligible amount of beta-glucosidase and cellulase were found in the batch culture medium. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of toxaphene degradation by white-rot fungi.

  19. Two new antibiotic pyridones produced by a marine fungus, Trichoderma sp. strain MF106.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Oesker, Vanessa; Wiese, Jutta; Schmaljohann, Rolf; Imhoff, Johannes F

    2014-03-06

    Two unusual pyridones, trichodin A (1) and trichodin B (2), together with the known compound, pyridoxatin (3), were extracted from mycelia and culture broth of the marine fungus, Trichoderma sp. strain MF106 isolated from the Greenland Seas. The structures of the new compounds were characterized as an intramolecular cyclization of a pyridine basic backbone with a phenyl group. The structure and relative configuration of the new compounds were established by spectroscopic means. The new compound 1 and the known compound 3 showed antibiotic activities against the clinically relevant microorganism, Staphylococcus epidermidis, with IC₅₀ values of 24 μM and 4 μM, respectively.

  20. Two New Antibiotic Pyridones Produced by a Marine Fungus, Trichoderma sp. Strain MF106

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bin; Oesker, Vanessa; Wiese, Jutta; Schmaljohann, Rolf; Imhoff, Johannes F.

    2014-01-01

    Two unusual pyridones, trichodin A (1) and trichodin B (2), together with the known compound, pyridoxatin (3), were extracted from mycelia and culture broth of the marine fungus, Trichoderma sp. strain MF106 isolated from the Greenland Seas. The structures of the new compounds were characterized as an intramolecular cyclization of a pyridine basic backbone with a phenyl group. The structure and relative configuration of the new compounds were established by spectroscopic means. The new compound 1 and the known compound 3 showed antibiotic activities against the clinically relevant microorganism, Staphylococcus epidermidis, with IC50 values of 24 μM and 4 μM, respectively. PMID:24663111

  1. X-ray crystal structure of a malonate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain AAC.

    PubMed

    Wilding, Matthew; Scott, Colin; Peat, Thomas S; Newman, Janet

    2017-01-01

    The NAD-dependent malonate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase KES23460 from Pseudomonas sp. strain AAC makes up half of a bicistronic operon responsible for β-alanine catabolism to produce acetyl-CoA. The KES23460 protein has been heterologously expressed, purified and used to generate crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction studies. The crystals belonged to space group P212121 and diffracted X-rays to beyond 3 Å resolution using the microfocus beamline of the Australian Synchrotron. The structure was solved using molecular replacement, with a monomer from PDB entry 4zz7 as the search model.

  2. Draft genome sequence of Sulfurospirillum sp. strain MES, reconstructed from the metagenome of a microbial electrosynthesis system

    DOE PAGES

    Ross, Daniel E.; Marshall, Christopher W.; May, Harold D.; ...

    2015-01-15

    A draft genome of Sulfurospirillum sp. strain MES was isolated through taxonomic binning of a metagenome sequenced from a microbial electrosynthesis system (MES) actively producing acetate and hydrogen. The genome contains the nosZDFLY genes, which are involved in nitrous oxide reduction, suggesting the potential role of this strain in denitrification.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deep-Sea Basidiomycetous Yeast Cryptococcus sp. Strain Mo29 Reveals Its Biotechnological Potential

    PubMed Central

    Rédou, Vanessa; Kumar, Abhishek; Hainaut, Matthieu; Henrissat, Bernard; Record, Eric; Barbier, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus sp. strain Mo29 was isolated from the Rainbow hydrothermal site on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of this basidiomycetous yeast strain, which has highlighted its biotechnological potential as revealed by the presence of genes involved in the synthesis of secondary metabolites and biotechnologically important enzymes. PMID:27389259

  4. Draft genome sequence of Sulfurospirillum sp. strain MES, reconstructed from the metagenome of a microbial electrosynthesis system

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Daniel E.; Marshall, Christopher W.; May, Harold D.; Norman, R. Sean

    2015-01-15

    A draft genome of Sulfurospirillum sp. strain MES was isolated through taxonomic binning of a metagenome sequenced from a microbial electrosynthesis system (MES) actively producing acetate and hydrogen. The genome contains the nosZDFLY genes, which are involved in nitrous oxide reduction, suggesting the potential role of this strain in denitrification.

  5. Complete genome sequence of Methylocystis sp. strain SC2, an aerobic methanotroph with high-affinity methane oxidation potential.

    PubMed

    Dam, Bomba; Dam, Somasri; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Liesack, Werner

    2012-11-01

    Methylocystis sp. strain SC2 is an aerobic type II methanotroph isolated from a highly polluted aquifer in Germany. A specific trait of the SC2 strain is the expression of two isozymes of particulate methane monooxygenase with different methane oxidation kinetics. Here we report the complete genome sequence of this methanotroph that contains not only a circular chromosome but also two large plasmids.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Methylobacterium sp. Strain ARG-1 Isolated from the White-Rot Fungus Armillaria gallica

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Caitlin; Kowalski, Caitlin; Zebrowski, Jessica; Tulchinskaya, Yevgeniya; Tai, Albert K.; James-Pederson, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Methylobacterium sp. strain ARG-1 was isolated from a cell culture of hyphal tips of the white-rot fungus Armillaria gallica. We describe here the sequencing, assembly, and annotation of its genome, confirming the presence of genes involved in methylotrophy. This is the first genome announcement of a strain of Methylobacterium associated with A. gallica. PMID:27257212

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of a Selenite- and Tellurite-Reducing Marine Bacterium, Lysinibacillus sp. Strain ZYM-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yonghe; Dong, Yuxuan; Zhang, Yiwen; Che, Lin; Pan, Haixia

    2016-01-01

    Lysinibacillus sp. ZYM-1, a Gram-positive strain isolated from marine sediments, reduces selenite and tellurite efficiently. Meanwhile, it also exhibits high resistance to Zn2+ and Mn2+. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain ZYM-1, which contains genes related to selenite and tellurite reduction and also metal resistance. PMID:26769938

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Endophytic Herbaspirillum sp. Strain WT00C, a Tea Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wei; Zhan, Guiting; Liu, Weilin; Zhu, Rong; Yu, Xuejing; Li, Yang; Li, Yadong; Wu, Wenhua

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endophytic Herbaspirillum sp. strain WT00C was isolated from tea plant (Camellia sinensis L.). Here, we report the 6.08 Mb draft genome sequence of this strain, providing bioinformation about its agronomic benefits and capability to reduce selenate/selenite into red elemental selenium. PMID:28302787

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Sulfurospirillum sp. Strain MES, Reconstructed from the Metagenome of a Microbial Electrosynthesis System

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Christopher W.; May, Harold D.

    2015-01-01

    A draft genome of Sulfurospirillum sp. strain MES was isolated through taxonomic binning of a metagenome sequenced from a microbial electrosynthesis system (MES) actively producing acetate and hydrogen. The genome contains the nosZDFLY genes, which are involved in nitrous oxide reduction, suggesting the potential role of this strain in denitrification. PMID:25593246

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Asaia sp. Strain SF2.1, an Important Member of the Microbiome of Anopheles Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Shane, Jackie L.; Bongio, Nicholas J.; Favia, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Asaia spp. are abundant members of the microbiota of Anopheles mosquitoes, the principle vectors of malaria. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Asaia sp. strain SF2.1. This strain is under development as a platform to deliver antimalarial peptides and proteins to adult female Anopheles mosquitoes. PMID:24407652

  11. Sulfur-selective desulfurization of dibenzothiophene and diesel oil by newly isolated Rhodococcus sp. strains.

    PubMed

    Castorena, Gladys; Suárez, Claudia; Valdez, Idania; Amador, Guadalupe; Fernández, Luis; Le Borgne, Sylvie

    2002-09-24

    New desulfurizing bacteria able to convert dibenzothiophene into 2-hydroxybiphenyl and sulfate were isolated from contaminated soils collected in Mexican refineries. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis showed they were different from previously reported Rhodococcus erythropolis desulfurizing strains. According to 16S rRNA gene sequencing and fatty acid analyses, these new isolates belonged to the genus Rhodococcus. These strains could desulfurize 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene which is one of the most difficult dibenzothiophene derivatives to remove by hydrodesulfurization. A deeply hydrodesulfurized diesel oil containing significant amounts of 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene was treated with Rhodococcus sp. IMP-S02 cells. Up to 60% of the total sulfur was removed and all the 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene disappeared as a result of this treatment.

  12. Modeling of competitive mutualistic relationships. Application to cellulose degradation by Streptomyces sp. strains.

    PubMed

    Thierie, Jacques; Penninckx, Michel J

    2007-12-01

    A "cascade" model depicts microbial degradation of a complex nutrient/substrate through a succession of intermediate compounds. Each stage is characterized by a particular species producing a typical degradation enzyme induced by its own degradation product. The final compound of the cascade consists of a single assimilable substrate used by all species. This results in a competition situation, whereas the contribution of all strains to the production of a complete set of efficient enzymes generates a mutualistic relationship. The model was shown to be appropriate to describe degradation of cellulose by a consortium of Streptomyces sp. strains. The simplicity and the model capacity for generalization are promising and could be used for various degradation processes both at laboratory and environmental scales.

  13. [Biodegradation Characteristics and Kinetics of p-nitrophenol by Strain Arthrobacter sp. CN2].

    PubMed

    Ren, Lei; Shi, Yan-hua; Jia, Yang; Yao, Xue-song; Ruth, Nahurira; Mi, Chun-xia; Yan, Yan-chun

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the application potential of the p-nitrophenol-degrading bacterium Arthrobacter sp. CN2 in practice, the effects of pH, salinity and additional carbon source were determined, and the degradation kinetics of p-nitrophenol was analyzed. Strain CN2 could degrade p-nitrophenol efficiently in a wide range of pH (7.0-8.0) and elevated salinity (0-60 g · L(-1)). Investigation of additional glucose found that 0.5% of glucose could significantly increase the degrading speed and the time to reach 90% of degradation rate was shortened by 16 hours. These results indicated that strain CN2 could degrade p-nitrophenol efficiently under different conditions and had a great potential for application in practice.

  14. Cellular Response of Sinorhizobium sp. Strain A2 during Arsenite Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Koh; Huang, He; Hamamura, Natsuko

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a widely distributed toxic element in the environment and microorganisms have developed resistance mechanisms in order to tolerate it. The cellular response of the chemoorganotrophic arsenite (As[III])-oxidizing α-Proteobacteria, Sinorhizobium sp. strain A2, to arsenic was examined in the present study. Several proteins associated with arsenite oxidase and As resistance were shown to be accumulated in the presence of As(III). A shift in central carbon metabolism from the tricarboxylic acid pathway to glyoxylate pathway was also observed in response to oxidative stress. Our results revealed the strategy of the As(III)-oxidizing Sinorhizobium strain to mitigate arsenic toxicity and oxidative damage by multiple metabolic adaptations. PMID:26477790

  15. Global proteomic analysis of the chromate response in Arthrobacter sp strain FB24.

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, K. L.; Turse, J. E.; Nicora, C. D.; Lipton, M. S.; Tollaksen, S. L.; Lindberg, C.; Babnigg, G.; Giometti, C. S.; Nakatsu, C. H.; Thompson, D. K.; Konopka, A. E.; Biosciences Division; Purdue Univ.; PNNL

    2009-04-01

    A global proteomic evaluation of the response of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 to 5 and 20 mM Cr(VI) was conducted using both two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/LC-MS/MS). The changes in protein expression found with 2-DGE indicate alterations in central metabolism and amino acid synthesis. Proteome coverage increased from 22% with 2-DGE to 71% with LC/LC-MS/MS. The proteins exhibiting the highest levels of expression under Cr(VI) stress suggest intracellular sulfur limitation, which could be driven by competition for the sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) transporter by the chromate (CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) ion. These results are consistent with the growth defects seen with strain FB24 when Cr(VI) concentrations exceeded 5 mM.

  16. Global Proteomic Analysis of the Chromate Response in Arthrobacter sp strain FB24

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, Kristene L.; Turse, Joshua E.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Tollaksen, Sandra L.; Lindberg, Carl; Babbnig, Gyorgy; Giometti, Carol S.; Nakatsu, Cindy N.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Konopka, Allan

    2009-04-01

    A global proteomic evaluation of the response of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 to 5 mM and 20 mM Cr(VI) was conducted using both two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC/LC-MS/MS). The changes in protein expression found with 2-DGE indicate alterations in central metabolism and amino acid synthesis. Proteome coverage increased from 22% with 2-DGE to 71% with LC/LC-MS/MS. The proteins exhibiting the highest levels of expression under Cr(VI) stress suggest intracellular sulfur limitation, which could be driven by competition for the sulfate (SO42-) transporter by the chromate (CrO42-) ion. These results are consistent with the growth defects seen with strain FB24 when Cr(VI) concentrations exceed 5 mM.

  17. [Carotenogenesis of five strains of the algae Dunaliella sp. (Chlorophyceae) isolated from Venezuelan hypersaline lagoons].

    PubMed

    Guevara, Miguel; Lodeiros, César; Gómez, Olga; Lemus, Nathalie; Núñez, Paulino; Romero, Lolymar; Vásquez, Aléikar; Rosales, Néstor

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated discontinuous cultures (Algal medium at 0.5 mM of NaNO3, and 27% NaCI) of five strains of Dunaliella sp. isolated from Venezuelan hypersaline lagoons (Araya, Coche, Peonia, Cumaraguas. and Boca Chica) and one strain from a reference collection (Dunaliella salina, LB1644). Cultures were maintained to 25+/-1 degrees C, with constant aeration, photoperiod 12:12, and two light intensities (195 and 390 microE.m(-2).s(-1)) during 30 days. Cell count was recorded on a daily basis using a Neubaüer camera. Totals of chlorophyll a and carotenoids were measured at the end of the experiment. The largest cellular densities were measured during the smallest light intensities. The strain with the largest cellular density was isolated from Boca Chica (8 xl0(6) and 2.5 xl0(6) cel.ml(-1) a 390 and 195microE.m(-2).s(-1), respectively). The increment of light intensity produced a significant reduction of growth rates in all strains. Totals of carotenoids by volume were as large as 390 microE.m(-2).s(-1). Strains LB 1644, from Coche and Araya were those that produced the largest amount of carotenoids (38.4; 32.8 and 21.0 microg.ml(-1), respectively). Differences total carotenoids by cell between treatments were significant. The largest concentration was 390 microE.m(-2).s(-1). The strains LB 1644 and Coche produced the highest values of carotenes (137.14 and 106.06 pg.cel(-1), respectively). Differences in the relation carotenoid:chlorophyll a between the strains at various light intensities was significant. Strains LB1644 presented the largest value of the relation carotenoids:chlorophyll a (20:1) at 195 microE.m(-2).s(-1). No significant differences were detected in the strain Coche (15:1). All the other strains showed relations lower than one. Our results suggest that the strains of Coche and Araya show potential to be used in the biotechnology of carotenoids production.

  18. areABC Genes Determine the Catabolism of Aryl Esters in Acinetobacter sp. Strain ADP1

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rheinallt M.; Collier, Lauren S.; Neidle, Ellen L.; Williams, Peter A.

    1999-01-01

    Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1 is able to grow on a range of esters of aromatic alcohols, converting them to the corresponding aromatic carboxylic acids by the sequential action of three inducible enzymes: an areA-encoded esterase, an areB-encoded benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase, and an areC-encoded benzaldehyde dehydrogenase. The are genes, adjacent to each other on the chromosome and transcribed in the order areCBA, were located 3.5 kbp upstream of benK. benK, encoding a permease implicated in benzoate uptake, is at one end of the ben-cat supraoperonic cluster for benzoate catabolism by the β-ketoadipate pathway. Two open reading frames which may encode a transcriptional regulator, areR, and a porin, benP, separate benK from areC. Each are gene was individually expressed to high specific activity in Escherichia coli. The relative activities against different substrates of the cloned enzymes were, within experimental error, identical to that of wild-type Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1 grown on either benzyl acetate, benzyl alcohol, or 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol as the carbon source. The substrate preferences of all three enzymes were broad, encompassing a range of substituted aromatic compounds and in the case of the AreA esterase, different carboxylic acids. The areA, areB, and areC genes were individually disrupted on the chromosome by insertion of a kanamycin resistance cassette, and the rates at which the resultant strains utilized substrates of the aryl ester catabolic pathway were severely reduced as determined by growth competitions between the mutant and wild-type strains. PMID:10419955

  19. Hypervariable pili and flagella genes provide suitable new targets for DNA high-resolution melt-based genotyping of dairy Geobacillus spp.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Kanika; Seale, R Brent; Deeth, Hilton C; Turner, Mark S

    2014-10-01

    Although nonpathogenic in nature, spores of Geobacillus are able to attach to surfaces, germinate, and form biofilms, allowing rapid multiplication and persistence within milk powder processing plants, causing final product contamination, and eventually leading to a loss of revenue in terms of downgraded product quality. As a result, Geobacillus spp. have been found to be common contaminants of milk powder worldwide. Genotyping methods can help in gaining insight into the ecology and transmission of these thermophilic bacteria within and between dairy processing plants. The objective of this study was to use the assembled draft genomes of two Geobacillus spp. to identify and test new hypervariable genotyping targets for differentiating closely related dairy Geobacillus isolates. The two Geobacillus spp. strains obtained from high spore count powders were obtained in 2010 (isolate 7E) and in 1995 (isolate 126) and were previously shown to be of same genotype based on a variable number tandem repeat genotyping method. Significant nucleotide sequence variation was found in genes encoding pili and flagella, which were further investigated as suitable loci for a new high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA)-based genotyping method. Three genes encoding pulG (containing prepilin-type N-terminal cleavage domain), pilT (pili retraction protein), and fliW (flagellar assembly protein) were selected as targets for the new pili/flagella gene (PilFla) HRMA genotyping method. The three-gene-based PilFla-HRMA genotyping method differentiated 35 milk powder Geobacillus spp. isolates into 19 different genotype groups (D = 0.93), which compared favorably to the previous method (which used four variable number tandem repeat loci) that generated 16 different genotype groups (D = 0.90). In conclusion, through comparative genomics of two closely related dairy Geobacillus strains, we have identified new hypervariable regions that prove to be useful targets for highly discriminatory genotyping.

  20. Genome Sequence of Halomonas sp. Strain MCTG39a, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading and Exopolymeric Substance-Producing Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Whitman, William B; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Pillay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-07-16

    Halomonas sp. strain MCTG39a was isolated from coastal sea surface water based on its ability to utilize n-hexadecane. During growth in marine medium the strain produces an amphiphilic exopolymeric substance (EPS) amended with glucose, which emulsifies a variety of oil hydrocarbon substrates. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 4,979,193 bp with 4,614 genes and an average G+C content of 55.0%.

  1. Genome Sequence of Halomonas sp. Strain MCTG39a, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading and Exopolymeric Substance-Producing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Whitman, William B.; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Pillay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N.; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Halomonas sp. strain MCTG39a was isolated from coastal sea surface water based on its ability to utilize n-hexadecane. During growth in marine medium the strain produces an amphiphilic exopolymeric substance (EPS) amended with glucose, which emulsifies a variety of oil hydrocarbon substrates. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 4,979,193 bp with 4,614 genes and an average G+C content of 55.0%. PMID:26184945

  2. Complete genome sequence of Frondihabitans sp. strain PAMC28766, a novel carotenoid-producing and radiation-resistant strain isolated from an Antarctic lichen.

    PubMed

    Han, So-Ra; Yu, Sang-Cheol; Kang, Seunghyun; Park, Hyun; Oh, Tae-Jin

    2016-05-20

    Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of Frondihabitans sp. strain PAMC28766, which was found to consist of three plasmids, one chromosome (4,345,897bp), and a series of genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis and nucleotide excision repair. An analysis of the Frondihabitans sp. PAMC28766 genome will improve our understanding of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway. Furthermore, the sequence data will provide novel insight into UV radiation-resistance in extremely cold environments.

  3. Plasmid localization and organization of melamine degradation genes in Rhodococcus sp. strain Mel.

    PubMed

    Dodge, Anthony G; Wackett, Lawrence P; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2012-03-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain Mel was isolated from soil by enrichment and grew in minimal medium with melamine as the sole N source with a doubling time of 3.5 h. Stoichiometry studies showed that all six nitrogen atoms of melamine were assimilated. The genome was sequenced by Roche 454 pyrosequencing to 13× coverage, and a 22.3-kb DNA region was found to contain a homolog to the melamine deaminase gene trzA. Mutagenesis studies showed that the cyanuric acid hydrolase and biuret hydrolase genes were clustered together on a different 17.9-kb contig. Curing and gene transfer studies indicated that 4 of 6 genes required for the complete degradation of melamine were located on an ∼265-kb self-transmissible linear plasmid (pMel2), but this plasmid was not required for ammeline deamination. The Rhodococcus sp. strain Mel melamine metabolic pathway genes were located in at least three noncontiguous regions of the genome, and the plasmid-borne genes encoding enzymes for melamine metabolism were likely recently acquired.

  4. Functional characterization of a soybean growth stimulator Bradyrhizobium sp. strain SR-6 showing acylhomoserine lactone production.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amanat; Ayesha; Hameed, Sohail; Imran, Asma; Iqbal, Mazhar; Iqbal, Javed; Oresnik, Ivan J

    2016-09-01

    A soybean nodule endophytic bacterium Bradyrhizobium sp. strain SR-6 was characterized for production of acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) as quorum sensing molecules. Mass spectrometry analysis of AHLs revealed the presence of C6-HSL, 3OH-C6-HSL, C8-HSL, C10-HSL, 3oxoC10-HSL, 3oxo-C12-HSL and 3OH-C12-HSL which are significantly different from those reported earlier in soybean symbionts. Purified AHL extracts significantly improved wheat and soybean seedling growth and root hair development along with increased soybean nodulation under axenic conditions. A positive correlation was observed among in vivo nitrogenase and catalase enzyme activities of the strain SR-6. Transmission electron microscopic analysis showed the cytochemical localization of catalase activity within the bacteroids, specifically attached to the peribacteroidal membrane. Root and nodule colonization proved rhizosphere competence of SR-6. The inoculation of SR-6 resulted in increased shoot length (13%), plant dry matter (50%), grain weight (16%), seed yield (20%) and N-uptake (14%) as compared to non-inoculated soybean plants. The symbiotic bacterium SR-6 has potential to improve soybean growth and yield in sub-humid climate of Azad Jammu and Kashmir region of Pakistan. The production and mass spectrometric profiling of AHLs as well as in vivo cytochemical localization of catalase enzyme activity in soybean Bradyrhizobium sp. have never been reported earlier elsewhere before our these investigations.

  5. Composition of the carbohydrate granules of the cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneegurt, M. A.; Sherman, D. M.; Sherman, L. A.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142 is an aerobic, unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium that temporally separates O2-sensitive N2 fixation from oxygenic photosynthesis. The energy and reducing power needed for N2 fixation appears to be generated by an active respiratory apparatus that utilizes the contents of large interthylakoidal carbohydrate granules. We report here on the carbohydrate and protein composition of the granules of Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142. The carbohydrate component is a glucose homopolymer with branches every nine residues and is chemically identical to glycogen. Granule-associated protein fractions showed temporal changes in the number of proteins and their abundance during the metabolic oscillations observed under diazotrophic conditions. There also were temporal changes in the protein pattern of the granule-depleted supernatant fractions from diazotrophic cultures. None of the granule-associated proteins crossreacted with antisera directed against several glycogen-metabolizing enzymes or nitrogenase, although these proteins were tentatively identified in supernatant fractions. It is suggested that the granule-associated proteins are structural proteins required to maintain a complex granule architecture.

  6. Physiological conditions for nitrogen fixation in a unicellular marine cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. strain SF1.

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, H; Shanmugam, K T

    1987-01-01

    A marine, unicellular, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium was isolated from the blades of a brown alga, Sargassum fluitans. This unicellular cyanobacterium, identified as Synechococcus sp. strain SF1, is capable of photoautotrophic growth with bicarbonate as the sole carbon source and dinitrogen as the sole nitrogen source. Among the organic carbon compounds tested, glucose and sucrose supported growth. Of the nitrogen compounds tested, with bicarbonate serving as the carbon source, both ammonia and nitrate produced the highest growth rates. Most amino acids failed to support growth when present as sole sources of nitrogen. Nitrogenase activity in Synechococcus sp. strain SF1 was induced after depletion of ammonia from the medium. This activity required the photosynthetic utilization of bicarbonate, but pyruvate and hydrogen gas were also effective sources of reductant for nitrogenase activity. Glucose, fructose, and sucrose also supported nitrogenase activity but to a lesser extent. Optimum light intensity for nitrogenase activity was found to be 70 microE/m2 per s, while the optimum oxygen concentration in the gas phase for nitrogenase activity was about 1%. A hydrogenase activity was coinduced with nitrogenase activity. It is proposed that this light- and oxygen-insensitive hydrogenase functions in recycling the hydrogen produced by nitrogenase under microaerobic conditions. PMID:3119563

  7. Impact of bio-augmentation with Sphingomonas sp. strain TTNP3 in membrane bioreactors degrading nonylphenol.

    PubMed

    Cirja, Magdalena; Hommes, Gregor; Ivashechkin, Pavel; Prell, Jürgen; Schäffer, Andreas; Corvini, Philippe F X; Lenz, Markus

    2009-08-01

    This study evaluates the potential of bio-augmentation to improve the degradation of recalcitrant nonylphenol during the wastewater treatment in membrane bioreactors (MBR). One MBR containing activated sludge was bio-augmented using multistep inoculation with freeze dried Sphingomonas sp. strain TTNP3, whereas a second control reactor contained activated sludge solely. The (14)C-labeled-nonylphenol isomer (4-[1-ethyl-1,3-dimethylpentyl]phenol) was applied as a single pulse. Bio-augmentation resulted in an immediate increase of dissolved radioactivity in the effluent in comparison to the control reactor (13% and 2% of initially applied radioactivity after 1 day, respectively). After 5 days of operation, the retentate of the bio-augmented reactor contained only 7% of the initial radioactivity in contrast to 50% in the control reactor. The radioactivity associated to the mixed liquor suspended solids, i.e., the suspension of biomass and other solids on the retentate side of the membrane, was mainly found as non-extractable residues that were increasingly formed during prolonged reactor operation, especially for the control MBR. HPLC-LSC and GC-MS(n) analyses revealed that the bio-augmented reactor produced more polar hydroquinone as main degradation intermediate, whereas the control reactor effluent contained a complex mixture of apolar compounds with shortened oxidized alkyl chains. Thus, the apparent differences in the behavior of nonylphenol between the reactors were due to the catabolism of nonylphenol conferred by bio-augmentation with Sphingomonas sp. strain TTNP3.

  8. Physiological factors affecting carbon tetrachloride dehalogenation by the denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain KC.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, T A; Crawford, R L

    1993-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain KC was grown on a medium with a low content of transition metals in order to examine the conditions for carbon tetrachloride (CT) transformation. Several carbon sources, including acetate, glucose, glycerol, and glutamate, were able to support CT transformation. The chelators 2,2'-dipyridyl and 1,10-phenanthroline stimulated CT transformation in a rich medium that otherwise did not support this activity. Low (< 10 microM) additions of dissolved iron(II), iron(III), and cobalt(II), as well as an insoluble iron(III) compound, ferric oxyhydroxide, inhibited CT transformation. The addition of 50 microM iron to actively growing cultures resulted in delayed inhibition of CT transformation. CT transformation was seen in aerobic cultures of KC, but with reduced efficiency compared with denitrifying cultures. Inhibition of CT transformation by iron was also seen in aerobically grown cultures. Optimal conditions were used in searching for effective CT transformation activity among denitrifying enrichments grown from samples of aquifer material. No activity comparable to that of Pseudomonas sp. strain KC was found among 16 samples tested. PMID:8517754

  9. Crystallization of the extracellular rubber oxygenase RoxA from Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, Maren; Braaz, Reinhard; Jendrossek, Dieter; Einsle, Oliver

    2008-02-01

    The extracellular rubber-degrading enzyme rubber oxygenase A (RoxA) from Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y has been crystallized and diffraction data have been collected to high resolution. Rubber oxygenase A (RoxA) from Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y is an extracellular dioxygenase that is capable of cleaving the double bonds of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) into short-chain isoprene units with 12-oxo-4,8-dimethyl-trideca-4,8-diene-1-al (ODTD) as the major cleavage product. Crystals of the dihaem c-type cytochrome RoxA were grown by sitting-drop vapour diffusion using polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. RoxA crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.4, b = 97.1, c = 101.1 Å, β = 98.39°, resulting in two monomers per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected to a limiting resolution of 1.8 Å. Despite a protein weight of 74.1 kDa and only two iron sites per monomer, phasing was successfully carried out by multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion.

  10. Recovery of an environmental Chlamydia strain from activated sludge by co-cultivation with Acanthamoeba sp.

    PubMed

    Collingro, Astrid; Poppert, Sven; Heinz, Eva; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Essig, Andreas; Schweikert, Michael; Wagner, Michael; Horn, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    Chlamydiae are a unique group of obligate intracellular bacteria comprising important pathogens of vertebrates as well as symbionts of free-living amoebae. Although there is ample molecular evidence for a huge diversity and wide distribution of chlamydiae in nature, environmental chlamydiae are currently represented by only few isolates. This paper reports the recovery of a novel environmental chlamydia strain from activated sludge by co-cultivation with Acanthamoeba sp. The recovered environmental chlamydia strain UV-7 showed the characteristic morphology of chlamydial developmental stages as revealed by electron microscopy and was identified as a new member of the family Parachlamydiaceae (98.7 % 16S rRNA sequence similarity to Parachlamydia acanthamoebae). Infection studies suggested that Parachlamydia sp. UV-7 is not confined to amoeba hosts but is also able to invade mammalian cells. These findings outline a new straightforward approach to retrieving environmental chlamydiae from nature without prior, tedious isolation and cultivation of their natural host cells, and lend further support to suggested implications of environmental chlamydiae for public health.

  11. Rapid Aggregation of Biofuel-Producing Algae by the Bacterium Bacillus sp. Strain RP1137

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Ryan J.

    2013-01-01

    Algal biofuels represent one of the most promising means of sustainably replacing liquid fuels. However, significant challenges remain before alga-based fuels become competitive with fossil fuels. One of the largest challenges is the ability to harvest the algae in an economical and low-energy manner. In this article, we describe the isolation of a bacterial strain, Bacillus sp. strain RP1137, which can rapidly aggregate several algae that are candidates for biofuel production, including a Nannochloropsis sp. This bacterium aggregates algae in a pH-dependent and reversible manner and retains its aggregation ability after paraformaldehyde fixation, opening the possibility for reuse of the cells. The optimal ratio of bacteria to algae is described, as is the robustness of aggregation at different salinities and temperatures. Aggregation is dependent on the presence of calcium or magnesium ions. The efficiency of aggregation of Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1 is between 70 and 95% and is comparable to that obtained by other means of harvest; however, the rate of harvest is fast, with aggregates forming in 30 s. PMID:23892750

  12. Rapid aggregation of biofuel-producing algae by the bacterium Bacillus sp. strain RP1137.

    PubMed

    Powell, Ryan J; Hill, Russell T

    2013-10-01

    Algal biofuels represent one of the most promising means of sustainably replacing liquid fuels. However, significant challenges remain before alga-based fuels become competitive with fossil fuels. One of the largest challenges is the ability to harvest the algae in an economical and low-energy manner. In this article, we describe the isolation of a bacterial strain, Bacillus sp. strain RP1137, which can rapidly aggregate several algae that are candidates for biofuel production, including a Nannochloropsis sp. This bacterium aggregates algae in a pH-dependent and reversible manner and retains its aggregation ability after paraformaldehyde fixation, opening the possibility for reuse of the cells. The optimal ratio of bacteria to algae is described, as is the robustness of aggregation at different salinities and temperatures. Aggregation is dependent on the presence of calcium or magnesium ions. The efficiency of aggregation of Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1 is between 70 and 95% and is comparable to that obtained by other means of harvest; however, the rate of harvest is fast, with aggregates forming in 30 s.

  13. Achromobacter denitrificans strain SP1 efficiently remediates di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, S; Josh, M K Sarath; Binod, P; Devi, R Sudha; Balachandran, S; Anderson, Robin C; Benjamin, Sailas

    2015-02-01

    This study describes how Achromobacter denitrificans strain SP1, a novel isolate from heavily plastics-contaminated sewage sludge efficiently consumed the hazardous plasticizer, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) as carbon source supplemented in a simple basal salt medium (BSM). Response surface methodology was employed for the statistical optimization of the process parameters such as temperature (32°C), agitation (200 rpm), DEHP concentration (10 mM), time (72 h) and pH (8.0). At these optimized conditions, experimentally observed DEHP degradation was 63%, while the predicted value was 59.2%; and the correlation coefficient between them was 0.998, i.e., highly significant and fit to the predicted model. Employing GC-MS analysis, the degradation pathway was partially deduced with intermediates such as mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate and 2-ethyl hexanol. Briefly, this first report describes A. denitrificans strain SP1 as a highly efficient bacterium for completely remediating the hazardous DEHP (10 mM) in 96 h in BSM (50% consumed in 60 h), which offers great potentials for efficiently cleaning the DEHP-contaminated environments such as soil, sediments and water upon its deployment.

  14. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles by a new strain of Streptomyces sp. compared with Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Alani, Faiez; Moo-Young, Murray; Anderson, William

    2012-03-01

    Locally isolated strains of a thermoalkalotolerant Streptomyces sp. and Aspergillus fumigatus were used for the in vitro biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles from AgNO(3) solutions. An autolysed cell-free culture filtrate from each strain was used, indicating that the formation mechanism depends on intra-cellular components for both organisms, since culture broths had no significant nanoparticle formation potential. Nanoparticle formation was indicated by a change of the solution from colourless or light brown to dark brown after 24 h or more, and UV-visible spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the formation by both organisms. The initial formation kinetics were faster with Aspergillus, but formation continued for a longer period with Streptomyces, resulting in higher concentrations after 48 h. Transmission electron microscope images revealed well dispersed nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 15 to 45 nm from A. fumigatus, while those from Streptomyces sp. had a narrower size distribution of 15-25 nm. The higher productivity and preferred narrower size distribution of Streptomyces, together with its well established industrial use, may make it the preferred choice for further optimization studies.

  15. Metabolism of dibenzo-p-dioxin by Sphingomonas sp. strain RW1

    SciTech Connect

    Wittich, R.M.; Wilkes, H.; Sinnwell, V.; Francke, W.; Fortnagel, P. )

    1992-03-01

    In the course of screening for dibenzo-p-dioxin-utilizing bacteria, a Sphingomonas sp. strain was isolated from enrichment cultures inoculated with water samples from the river Elbe. The isolate grew with both the biaryl ethers dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (DF) as the sole sources of carbon and energy, showing doubling times of about 8 and 5 h, respectively. Biodegradation of the two aromatic compounds initially proceeded after an oxygenolytic attack at the angular position adjacent to the ether bridge, producing 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxydiphenyl ether or 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxybiphenyl from the initially formed dihydrodiols, which represent extremely unstable hemiacetals. Results obtained from determinations of enzyme activities and oxygen consumption suggest meta cleavage of the trihydroxy compounds. During dibenzofuran degradation, hydrolysis of 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-6-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-hexa-2,4-dienoate yielded salicylate, which was branched into the catechol meta cleavage pathway and the gentisate pathway. Catechol obtained from the product of meta ring fission of 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxydiphenyl ether was both ortho and meta cleaved by Sphingomonas sp. strain RW1 when this organism was grown with dibenzo-p-dioxin.

  16. Biosurfactant production by a CO2 sequestering Bacillus sp. strain ISTS2.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Smita; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    A chemolithotrophic bacterium, Bacillus sp. strain ISTS2, produced biosurfactant when enriched in the chemostat in presence of sodium bicarbonate as carbon source was evaluated for carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and biosurfactant production. CO2 sequestration efficiency of the bacterium was determined by enzymatic activity of carbonic anhydrase and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). Biosurfactant production ability at 100 mM NHCO3 and 5% CO2 was screened by surface and interfacial tension measurement, emulsification stability test, hydrophobicity test, contact angle measurement, bacterial adhesion to hydrocarbon and purified by silica gel column (60-120 mesh). Thin layer chromatography (TLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed that the crude biosurfactant of ISTS2 were composed of lipopeptides and free fatty acids (FA) and its hydrophobic fraction contained five kinds of fatty acids (FA) with chain lengths of C14-C19. Thus Bacillus sp. strain IST2 can be used as a cleaner bioprocess for the utilization of industrial CO2 as alternate substrate.

  17. Metabolism of dibenzofuran by pseudomonas sp. strain HH69 and the mixed culture HH27

    SciTech Connect

    Fortnagel, P.; Harms, H.; Wittich, R.M. ); Krohn, S.; Meyer, H.; Sinnwell, V.; Wilkes, H.; Francke, W. )

    1990-04-01

    A Pseudomonas sp. strain, HH69, and a mixed culture, designated HH27, were isolated by selective enrichment from soil samples. The pure strain and the mixed culture grew aerobically on dibenzofuran as the sole source of carbon and energy. Degradation proceeded via salicylic acid which was branched into the gentisic acid and the catechol pathway. Both salicylic acid and gentisic acid accumulated in the culture medium of strain HH69. The acids were slowly metabolized after growth ceased. The enzymes responsible for their metabolism showed relatively low activities. Besides the above-mentioned acids, 2-hydroxyacetophenone, benzopyran-4-one (chrome), several 2-substituted chroman-4-ones, and traces of the four isomeric monohydroxydibenzofurans were identified in the culture medium. 2,2{prime},3-Trihydroxybiphenyl was isolated from the medium of a dibenzofuran-converting mutant derived from parent strain HH69, which can no longer grow on dibenzofuran. This gives evidence for a novel type of dioxygenases responsible for the attack on the biarylether structure of the dibenzofuran molecule. A meta-fission mechanism for cleavage of the dihydroxylated aromatic nucleus of 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxybiphenyl is suggested as the next enzymatic step in the degradative pathway.

  18. Karyotype rearrangements and telomere analysis in Myzus persicae (Hemiptera, Aphididae) strains collected on Lavandula sp. plants

    PubMed Central

    Mandrioli, Mauro; Zanasi, Federica; Manicardi, Gian Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Karyotype analysis of nine strains of the peach-potato aphid Myzus persicae (Sulzer, 1776), collected on Lavandula sp. plants, evidenced showed that five of them had a standard 2n = 12 karyotype, one possessed a fragmentation of the X chromosome occurring at the telomere opposite to the NOR-bearing one and three strains had a chromosome number 2n = 11 due to a non-reciprocal translocation of an autosome A3 onto an A1 chromosome. Interestingly, the terminal portion of the autosome A1 involved in the translocation was the same in all the three strains, as evidenced by FISH with the histone cluster as a probe. The study of telomeres in the Myzus persicae strain with the X fission evidenced that telomerase synthesised de novo telomeres at the breakpoints resulting in the stabilization of the chromosomal fragments. Lastly, despite the presence of a conserved telomerase, aphid genome is devoid of genes coding for shelterin, a complex of proteins involved in telomere functioning frequently reported as conserved in eukaryotes. The absence of this complex, also confirmed in the genome of other arthropods, suggests that the shift in the sequence of the telomeric repeats has been accompanied by other changes in the telomere components in arthropods in respect to other metazoans. PMID:25610541

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. Strain CCGE-LA001, Isolated from Field Nodules of the Enigmatic Wild Bean Phaseolus microcarpus.

    PubMed

    Servín-Garcidueñas, Luis E; Rogel, Marco A; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Zayas-Del Moral, Alejandra; Sánchez, Federico; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2016-03-17

    We present the complete genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain CCGE-LA001, a nitrogen-fixing bacterium isolated from nodules of Phaseolus microcarpus. Strain CCGE-LA001 represents the first sequenced bradyrhizobial strain obtained from a wild Phaseolus sp. Its genome revealed a large and novel symbiotic island.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. Strain CCGE-LA001, Isolated from Field Nodules of the Enigmatic Wild Bean Phaseolus microcarpus

    PubMed Central

    Servín-Garcidueñas, Luis E.; Rogel, Marco A.; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Zayas-del Moral, Alejandra; Sánchez, Federico

    2016-01-01

    We present the complete genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain CCGE-LA001, a nitrogen-fixing bacterium isolated from nodules of Phaseolus microcarpus. Strain CCGE-LA001 represents the first sequenced bradyrhizobial strain obtained from a wild Phaseolus sp. Its genome revealed a large and novel symbiotic island. PMID:26988045

  1. Preliminary characterization of the probiotic properties of Candida famata and Geobacillus thermoleovorans

    PubMed Central

    Mahdhi, A; Hmila, Z; Behi, A; Bakhrouf, A

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective Probiotics are live microbial feed supplements which beneficially affect the host animal by improving its intestinal microbial balance, producing metabolites which inhibit the colonization or growth of other microorganisms or by competing with them for resources such as nutrients or space. The aim of this study was to investigate the probiotic properties of Candida famata and Geobacillus thermoleovorans. Material and Methods In this study, yeast and bacterial strains isolated from pure oil waste were identified using Api 50 CHB and Api Candida Systems and their probiotic properties were studied through antimicrobial activity, biofilm production, adherence assay and enzymatic characterization. Results and Conclusion According to biochemical analyses, these strains corresponded to Geobacillus thermoleovorans and Candida famata. Antagonism assay results showed that the tested strains have an inhibitory effect against tested pathogenic bacteria. The yeast Candida famata was unable to produce biofilm on Congo Red Agar (CRA), while the bacterial strain was a slime producer. Adherence assays to abiotic surfaces revealed that the investigated strains were fairly adhesive to polystyrene with values ranging from 0.18 to 0.34 at 595 nm. The enzymatic characterization revealed that the tested strains expressed enzymes such as phosphatase alkaline, esterase lipase (C8), amylase, lipase, lecitenase and caseinase. The obtained results may allow the isolated strains to be considered as having the potential to be candidate probiotics. PMID:22347595

  2. High-Level Chromate Resistance in Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 Requires Previously Uncharacterized Accessory Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, Kristene L.; Nakatsu, Cindy N.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Konopka, Allan

    2009-09-24

    The annotated genome sequence of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 revealed a chromate resistance determinant (CRD): a cluster of 8 genes located on a 10.6 kb fragment of a 96 kb plasmid. The CRD includes chrA, which encodes a putative chromate efflux protein, and three genes with amino acid similarities to the amino and carboxy termini of ChrB, a putative regulatory protein. There are also three novel genes that have not been previously associated with chromate resistance in other bacteria; they encode an oxidoreductase (most similar to malate:quinone oxidoreductase), a functionally unknown protein with a WD40 repeat domain and a lipoprotein. A chromate-sensitive mutant (strain D11) was generated by curing FB24 of its 96-kb plasmid. Elemental analysis indicated that chromate-exposed cells of strain D11 accumulated three times more chromium than strain FB24. Introduction of the CRD into strain D11 conferred chromate resistance comparable to wild-type levels, whereas deletion of specific regions of the CRD led to decreased resistance. Using real-time reverse transcriptase PCR, we show that expression of each gene within the CRD is specifically induced in response to chromate but not by lead, hydrogen peroxide or arsenate. Higher levels of chrA expression were achieved when the chrB orthologs and the WD40 repeat domain genes were present, suggesting their regulatory roles. Collectively, our findings indicate that chromate resistance in strain FB24 is primarily achieved by plasmid-mediated chromate efflux with the contribution of previously unrecognized accessory genes.

  3. Localization of polyamine enhancement of protein synthesis to subcellular components of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim.

    PubMed Central

    Rosano, C L; Bunce, S C; Hurwitz, C

    1983-01-01

    At 5 mM Mg2+, spermidine stimulation of polyphenylalanine synthesis by cell-free extracts of Escherichia coli was found to be about 30 times greater than that by extracts of Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim, a unique organism which lacks detectable levels of spermidine. By means of reconstitution experiments, the target of spermidine stimulation was localized to the protein fraction of the highspeed supernatant component (S-100) of E. coli and was absent from, or deficient in, the S-100 fraction of Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim. The spermidine stimulation did not appear to be due to the presence in the E. coli S-100 fraction of ribosomal protein S1, elongation factors, or E. coli aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. The failure to observe spermidine stimulation by the Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim S-100 fraction was also not due to a spermidine-enhanced polyuridylic acid degradation. The synthesis of polyphenylalanine by Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim extracts was stimulated by putrescine and by S-(+)-2-hydroxyputrescine to a greater degree than was synthesis by E. coli extracts. The enhancement by putrescine and by S-(+)-2-hydroxyputrescine with Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim extracts was found to be due to effects on its ribosomes. PMID:6336736

  4. Complete genome sequence of Hymenobacter sp. strain PAMC26554, an ionizing radiation-resistant bacterium isolated from an Antarctic lichen.

    PubMed

    Oh, Tae-Jin; Han, So-Ra; Ahn, Do-Hwan; Park, Hyun; Kim, Augustine Yonghwi

    2016-06-10

    A Gram-negative, rod-shaped, red-pink in color, and UV radiation-resistant bacterium Hymenobacter sp. strain PAMC26554 was isolated from Usnea sp., an Antarctic lichen, and belongs to the class of Cytophagia and the phylum of Bacteroidetes. The complete genome of Hymenobacter sp. PAMC26554 consists of one chromosome (5,244,843bp) with two plasmids (199,990bp and 6421bp). The genomic sequence indicates that Hymenobacter sp. strain PAMC26554 possesses several genes involved in the nucleotide excision repair pathway that protects damaged DNA. This complete genome information will help us to understand its adaptation and novel survival strategy in the Antarctic extreme cold environment.

  5. Lactococcus lactis SpOx Spontaneous Mutants: a Family of Oxidative-Stress-Resistant Dairy Strains§

    PubMed Central

    Rochat, Tatiana; Gratadoux, Jean-Jacques; Corthier, Gérard; Coqueran, Bérard; Nader-Macias, Maria-Elena; Gruss, Alexandra; Langella, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Numerous industrial bacteria generate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which may inhibit the growth of other bacteria in mixed ecosystems. We isolated spontaneous oxidative-stress-resistant (SpOx) Lactococcus lactis mutants by using a natural selection method with milk-adapted strains on dairy culture medium containing H2O2. Three SpOx mutants displayed greater H2O2 resistance. One of them, SpOx3, demonstrated better behavior in different oxidative-stress situations: (i) higher long-term survival upon aeration in LM17 and milk and (ii) the ability to grow with H2O2-producing Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii strains. Furthermore, the transit kinetics of the SpOx3 mutant in the digestive tract of a human flora-associated mouse model was not affected. PMID:15870374

  6. A Tetrahydrofolate-Dependent Methyltransferase Catalyzing the Demethylation of Dicamba in Sphingomonas sp. Strain Ndbn-20

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Li; Yu, Lin-Lu; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Xie, Xiang-Ting; Tao, Qing; Yan, Xin; Hong, Qing; Qiu, Ji-Guo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sphingomonas sp. strain Ndbn-20 degrades and utilizes the herbicide dicamba as its sole carbon and energy source. In the present study, a tetrahydrofolate (THF)-dependent dicamba methyltransferase gene, dmt, was cloned from the strain, and three other genes, metF, dhc, and purU, which are involved in THF metabolism, were found to be located downstream of dmt. A transcriptional study revealed that the four genes constituted one transcriptional unit that was constitutively transcribed. Lysates of cells grown with glucose or dicamba exhibited almost the same activities, which further suggested that the dmt gene is constitutively expressed in the strain. Dmt shared 46% and 45% identities with the methyltransferases DesA and LigM from Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6, respectively. The purified Dmt catalyzed the transfer of methyl from dicamba to THF to form the herbicidally inactive metabolite 3,6-dichlorosalicylic acid (DCSA) and 5-methyl-THF. The activity of Dmt was inhibited by 5-methyl-THF but not by DCSA. The introduction of a codon-optimized dmt gene into Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced resistance against dicamba. In conclusion, this study identified a THF-dependent dicamba methyltransferase, Dmt, with potential applications for the genetic engineering of dicamba-resistant crops. IMPORTANCE Dicamba is a very important herbicide that is widely used to control more than 200 types of broadleaf weeds and is a suitable target herbicide for the engineering of herbicide-resistant transgenic crops. A study of the mechanism of dicamba metabolism by soil microorganisms will benefit studies of its dissipation, transformation, and migration in the environment. This study identified a THF-dependent methyltransferase, Dmt, capable of catalyzing dicamba demethylation in Sphingomonas sp. Ndbn-20, and a preliminary study of its enzymatic characteristics was performed. Introduction of a codon-optimized dmt gene into Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced resistance against dicamba

  7. New metabolites in the degradation of fluorene by Arthrobacter sp. strain F101.

    PubMed Central

    Casellas, M; Grifoll, M; Bayona, J M; Solanas, A M

    1997-01-01

    Identification of new metabolites and demonstration of key enzyme activities support and extend the pathways previously reported for fluorene metabolism by Arthrobacter sp. strain F101. Washed-cell suspensions of strain F101 with fluorene accumulated 9-fluorenone, 4-hydroxy-9-fluorenone, 3-hydroxy-1-indanone, 1-indanone, 2-indanone, 3-(2-hydroxyphenyl) propionate, and a compound tentatively identified as a formyl indanone. Incubations with 2-indanone produced 3-isochromanone. The growth yield with fluorene as a sole source of carbon and energy corresponded to an assimilation of about 34% of fluorene carbon. About 7.4% was transformed into 9-fluorenol, 9-fluorenone, and 4-hydroxy-9-fluorenone. Crude extracts from fluorene-induced cells showed 3,4-dihydrocoumarin hydrolase and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activities. These results and biodegradation experiments with the identified metabolites indicate that metabolism of fluorene by Arthrobacter sp. strain F101 proceeds through three independent pathways. Two productive routes are initiated by dioxygenation at positions 1,2 and 3,4, respectively. meta cleavage followed by an aldolase reaction and loss of C-1 yield the detected indanones. Subsequent biological Baeyer-Villiger reactions produce the aromatic lactones 3,4-dihydrocoumarin and 3-isochromanone. Enzymatic hydrolysis of the former gives 3-(2-hydroxyphenyl) propionate, which could be a substrate for a beta oxidation cycle, to give salicylate. Further oxidation of the latter via catechol and 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde connects with the central metabolism, allowing the utilization of all fluorene carbons. Identification of 4-hydroxy-9-fluorenone is consistent with an alternative pathway initiated by monooxygenation at C-9 to give 9-fluorenol and then 9-fluorenone. Although dioxygenation at 3,4 positions of the ketone apparently occurs, this reaction fails to furnish a subsequent productive oxidation of this compound. PMID:9055403

  8. Pathway and Evolutionary Implications of Diphenylamine Biodegradation by Burkholderia sp. Strain JS667▿

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Kwanghee A.; Spain, Jim C.

    2009-01-01

    Diphenylamine (DPA) is a common contaminant at munitions-contaminated sites as well as at aniline manufacturing sites. Little is known about the biodegradation of the compound, and bacteria able to use DPA as the growth substrate have not been reported. Burkholderia sp. strain JS667 and Ralstonia sp. strain JS668 were isolated by selective enrichment from DPA-contaminated sediment. The isolates grew aerobically with DPA as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. During induction of DPA degradation, stoichiometric amounts of aniline accumulated and then disappeared, which suggested that aniline is on the DPA degradation pathway. Genes encoding the enzymes that catalyze the initial steps in DPA degradation were cloned from the genomic DNA of strain JS667. The Escherichia coli clone catalyzed stoichiometric transformation of DPA to aniline and catechol. Transposon mutagenesis, the sequence similarity of putative open reading frames to those of well-characterized dioxygenases, and 18O2 experiments support the conclusion that the initial reaction in DPA degradation is catalyzed by a multicomponent ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase. DPA is converted to aniline and catechol via dioxygenation at the 1,2 position of the aromatic ring and spontaneous rearomatization. Aniline and catechol are further biodegraded by the well-established aniline degradation pathway. Genes that encode the complete aniline degradation pathway were found 12 kb downstream of the genes that encode the initial dioxygenase. Expression of the relevant dioxygenases was confirmed by reverse transcription-PCR analysis. Both the sequence similarity and the gene organization suggest that the DPA degradation pathway evolved recently by the recruitment of two gene clusters that encode the DPA dioxygenase and aniline degradation pathway. PMID:19251893

  9. Draft genome sequence of Rhodococcus sp. strain P14, a biodegrader of high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Qin, Fujun; Qiao, Jing; Li, Gangmin; Shen, Chenghui; Huang, Tongwang; Hu, Zhong

    2012-07-01

    The genus Rhodococcus is known for its ability to degrade various xenobiotic compounds. Rhodococcus sp. strain P14 isolated from crude oil-contaminated sediments can degrade mineral oil and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The draft genome sequence of Rhodococcus sp. P14 was obtained using Solexa technology, which provided an invaluable genetic background for further investigation of the ability of P14 to degrade xenobiotic compounds.

  10. Toxicological effects of selective herbicides on plant growth promoting activities of phosphate solubilizing Klebsiella sp. strain PS19.

    PubMed

    Ahemad, Munees; Saghir Khan, Md

    2011-02-01

    This study examines the effect of four herbicides, quizalafop-p-ethyl, clodinafop, metribuzin and glyphosate, on plant growth promoting activities like phosphate solubilization, siderophores, indole acetic acid, exo-polysaccharides, hydrogen cyanide and ammonia production by herbicide tolerant Klebsiella sp. strain PS19. The strain was isolated from mustard rhizosphere. The selected herbicides were applied two to three times at the recommended rates. Klebsiella sp. strain PS19 tolerated a concentration of 1600 μg/ml each of quizalafop-p-ethyl and clodinafop, and 3200 and 2800 μg/ml of metribuzin and glyphosate, respectively. The activities of Klebsiella sp. strain PS19 observed under in vitro environment were persistent in the presence of all herbicides at lower rates. The plant growth promoting activities even-though decreased regularly, but was not lost completely, as the concentration of each herbicide was increased from the recommended to three times of higher doses. Among all herbicides, quizalafop-p-ethyl, generally, showed maximum toxicity to plant growth promoting activities of Klebsiella sp. strain PS19. As an example, 40, 80 and 120 μg/l of quizalafop-p-ethyl added to liquid culture Pikovskaya medium, decreased phosphate solubilizing activity of strain PS19 by 93, 95 and 97%, respectively over untreated control. The study revealed that the higher rates of herbicides though decreased the plant growth promoting activity but it did not completely inhibit the metabolic activities of strain PS19. The herbicide tolerance together with growth promoting activities observed under herbicide stress suggests that Klebsiella sp. strain PS19 could be used as bacterial preparation for facilitating the growth and yields of crops even in soils polluted with herbicides.

  11. Metabolism of 2-methylpropene (isobutylene) by the aerobic bacterium Mycobacterium sp. strain ELW1.

    PubMed

    Kottegoda, Samanthi; Waligora, Elizabeth; Hyman, Michael

    2015-03-01

    An aerobic bacterium (Mycobacterium sp. strain ELW1) that utilizes 2-methylpropene (isobutylene) as a sole source of carbon and energy was isolated and characterized. Strain ELW1 grew on 2-methylpropene (growth rate = 0.05 h(-1)) with a yield of 0.38 mg (dry weight) mg 2-methylpropene(-1). Strain ELW1 also grew more slowly on both cis- and trans-2-butene but did not grow on any other C2 to C5 straight-chain, branched, or chlorinated alkenes tested. Resting 2-methylpropene-grown cells consumed ethene, propene, and 1-butene without a lag phase. Epoxyethane accumulated as the only detected product of ethene oxidation. Both alkene consumption and epoxyethane production were fully inhibited in cells exposed to 1-octyne, suggesting that alkene oxidation is initiated by an alkyne-sensitive, epoxide-generating monooxygenase. Kinetic analyses indicated that 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane is rapidly consumed during 2-methylpropene degradation, while 2-methyl-2-propen-1-ol is not a significant metabolite of 2-methylpropene catabolism. Degradation of 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane by 2-methylpropene-grown cells led to the accumulation and further degradation of 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate, two sequential metabolites previously identified in the aerobic microbial metabolism of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Growth of strain ELW1 on 2-methylpropene, 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane, 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol, and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate was fully inhibited when cobalt ions were omitted from the growth medium, while growth on 3-hydroxybutyrate and other substrates was unaffected by the absence of added cobalt ions. Our results suggest that, like aerobic MTBE- and TBA-metabolizing bacteria, strain ELW1 utilizes a cobalt/cobalamin-dependent mutase to transform 2-hydroxyisobutyrate. Our results have been interpreted in terms of their impact on our understanding of the microbial metabolism of alkenes and ether oxygenates.

  12. Metabolism of 2-Methylpropene (Isobutylene) by the Aerobic Bacterium Mycobacterium sp. Strain ELW1

    PubMed Central

    Kottegoda, Samanthi; Waligora, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    An aerobic bacterium (Mycobacterium sp. strain ELW1) that utilizes 2-methylpropene (isobutylene) as a sole source of carbon and energy was isolated and characterized. Strain ELW1 grew on 2-methylpropene (growth rate = 0.05 h−1) with a yield of 0.38 mg (dry weight) mg 2-methylpropene−1. Strain ELW1 also grew more slowly on both cis- and trans-2-butene but did not grow on any other C2 to C5 straight-chain, branched, or chlorinated alkenes tested. Resting 2-methylpropene-grown cells consumed ethene, propene, and 1-butene without a lag phase. Epoxyethane accumulated as the only detected product of ethene oxidation. Both alkene consumption and epoxyethane production were fully inhibited in cells exposed to 1-octyne, suggesting that alkene oxidation is initiated by an alkyne-sensitive, epoxide-generating monooxygenase. Kinetic analyses indicated that 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane is rapidly consumed during 2-methylpropene degradation, while 2-methyl-2-propen-1-ol is not a significant metabolite of 2-methylpropene catabolism. Degradation of 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane by 2-methylpropene-grown cells led to the accumulation and further degradation of 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate, two sequential metabolites previously identified in the aerobic microbial metabolism of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Growth of strain ELW1 on 2-methylpropene, 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane, 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol, and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate was fully inhibited when cobalt ions were omitted from the growth medium, while growth on 3-hydroxybutyrate and other substrates was unaffected by the absence of added cobalt ions. Our results suggest that, like aerobic MTBE- and TBA-metabolizing bacteria, strain ELW1 utilizes a cobalt/cobalamin-dependent mutase to transform 2-hydroxyisobutyrate. Our results have been interpreted in terms of their impact on our understanding of the microbial metabolism of alkenes and ether oxygenates. PMID:25576605

  13. Isolation of a bacterial strain, Acinetobacter sp. from centrate wastewater and study of its cooperation with algae in nutrients removal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Lu, Qian; Wang, Qin; Liu, Wen; Wei, Qian; Ren, Hongyan; Ming, Caibing; Min, Min; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2017-03-22

    Algae were able to grow healthy on bacteria-containing centrate wastewater in a pilot-scale bioreactor. The batch experiment indicated that the co-cultivation of algae and wastewater-borne bacteria improved the removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand and total phosphorus in centrate wastewater to 93.01% and 98.78%, respectively. A strain of beneficial aerobic bacteria, Acinetobacter sp., was isolated and its biochemical characteristics were explored. Synergistic cooperation was observed in the growth of algae and Acinetobacter sp. Removal efficiencies of some nutrients were improved significantly by the co-cultivation of algae and Acinetobacter sp. After treatment, residual nutrients in centrate wastewater reached the permissible discharge limit. The cooperation between algae and Acinetobacter sp. was in part attributed to the exchange of carbon dioxide and oxygen between the algae and bacteria. This synergetic relationship between algae and Acinetobacter sp. provided a promising way to treat the wastewater by improving the nutrients removal and biomass production.

  14. Ecotoxicological assessment of PAHs and their dead-end metabolites after degradation by Mycobacterium sp. strain SNP11.

    PubMed

    Pagnout, Christophe; Rast, Claudine; Veber, Anne-Marie; Poupin, Pascal; Férard, Jean-François

    2006-10-01

    Mycobacterium sp. SNP11 has a high PAH biodegradation potential. In this paper, the toxicity of pyrene, fluoranthene, phenanthrene, and their dead-end metabolites, accumulated in the media after biodegradation by Mycobacterium sp. SNP11, were evaluated by a screening battery of acute, chronic, and genotoxic tests. According to the bioassays, performed on bacteria (Vibrio fischeri, Salmonella typhimurium strains TA1535/pSK1002, TA97a, TA98, TA100), algae (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata), and crustaceans (Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia), total disappearance or a very significant reduction of the (geno)toxic potential was observed after PAH degradation by Mycobacterium sp. SNP11.

  15. Biodegradation of buprofezin by Rhodococcus sp. strain YL-1 isolated from rice field soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Zhang, Ji; Wu, Zhi-Guo; Cao, Li; Yan, Xin; Li, Shun-Peng

    2012-03-14

    A buprofezin-degrading bacterium, YL-1, was isolated from rice field soil. YL-1 was identified as Rhodococcus sp. on the basis of the comparative analysis of 16S rDNA sequences. The strain could use buprofezin as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen for growth and was able to degrade 92.4% of 50 mg L(-1) buprofezin within 48 h in liquid culture. During the degradation of buprofezin, four possible metabolites, 2-tert-butylimino-3-isopropyl-1,3,5-thiadiazinan-4-one, N-tert-butyl-thioformimidic acid formylaminomethyl ester, 2-isothiocyanato-2-methyl-propane, and 2-isothiocyanato-propane, were identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity was strongly induced during the degradation of buprofezin. A novel microbial biodegradation pathway for buprofezin was proposed on the basis of these metabolites. The inoculation of soils treated with buprofezin with strain YL-1 resulted in a higher degradation rate than that observed in noninoculated soils, indicating that strain YL-1 has the potential to be used in the bioremediation of buprofezin-contaminated environments.

  16. [Isolation of a methane-utilizing Klebsiella sp. strain and its application for detecting methane].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Guo, Jun; Wang, Yujun; Yang, Yujing; Pang, Jinmei; Yang, Suping; Zhao, Gengui; Dong, Chuan

    2009-05-01

    We have isolated a strain C611 that used methane as the sole carbon sources for growth from paddy soil in Taiyuan of Shanxi province. Based on the physiological characteristics and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, we identified the strain as Klebsiella sp.. We used statistic-based experimental design (RSM) to optimize the culture conditions for C611 strain. The optimum conditions were as follows: temperature of 24.4 degrees C, inoculum volume of 6.7% and methane content of 25%. We studied the response time and the relationship between consumption of dissolved oxygen and methane gas contents with PVA-H3BO3 immobilized cell of C611 using electrochemical method. The response time was no more than 100 s of this reaction system, and the linear range of detection of methane content was from 0 to 10%. The standard gas sample 3% methane was measured by this method with the mean content value of 3.09%, RSD of 3.48%, and the relative error of 3%. Hence, it has the potential in developing biosensor for methane.

  17. Fatty aldehyde dehydrogenases in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N: role in hexadecanol metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, M E; Finnerty, W R

    1985-01-01

    The role of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenases (FALDHs) in hexadecane and hexadecanol metabolism was studied in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N. Two distinct FALDHs were demonstrated in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N: a membrane-bound, NADP-dependent FALDH activity induced 5-, 15-, and 9-fold by growth on hexadecanol, dodecyl aldehyde, and hexadecane, respectively, and a constitutive, NAD-dependent, membrane-localized FALDH. The NADP-dependent FALDH exhibited apparent Km and Vmax values for decyl aldehyde of 5.0, 13.0, 18.0, and 18.3 microM and 537.0, 500.0, 25.0, and 38.0 nmol/min in hexadecane-, hexadecanol-, ethanol-, palmitate-grown cells, respectively. FALDH isozymes ald-a, ald-b, and ald-c were demonstrated by gel electrophoresis in extracts of hexadecane- and hexadecanol-grown cells. ald-a, ald-b, and ald-d were present in dodecyl aldehyde-grown cells, while palmitate-grown control cells contained ald-b and ald-d. Dodecyl aldehyde-negative mutants were isolated and grouped into two phenotypic classes based on growth: class 1 mutants were hexadecane and hexadecanol negative and class 2 mutants were hexadecane and hexadecanol positive. Specific activity of NADP-dependent FALDH in Ald21 (class 1 mutant) was 85% lower than that of wild-type FALDH, while the specific activity of Ald24 (class 2 mutant) was 55% greater than that of wild-type FALDH. Ald21R, a dodecyl aldehyde-positive revertant able to grow on hexadecane, hexadecanol, and dodecyl aldehyde, exhibited a 100% increase in the specific activity of the NADP-dependent FALDH. The oxidation of [3H]hexadecane byAld21 yielded the accumulation of 61% more fatty aldehyde than the wild type, while Ald24 accumulated 27% more fatty aldehyde, 95% more fatty alcohol, and 65% more wax ester than the wild type. This study provides genetic and physiological evidence for the role of fatty aldehyde as an essential metabolic intermediate and NADP-dependent FALDH as a key enzyme in the dissimilation of hexadecane, hexadecanol

  18. Extracellular signal molecule(s) involved in the carbon starvation response of marine Vibrio sp. strain S14.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, S; Ostling, J; Charlton, T; de Nys, R; Takayama, K; Kjelleberg, S

    1998-01-01

    The role of exogenous metabolites as putative signal molecules mediating and/or regulating the carbon starvation adaptation program in Vibrio sp. strain S14 was investigated. Addition of the stationary-phase supernatant extract (SSE) of Vibrio sp. strain S14 to logarithmic-phase cells resulted in a significant number of carbon starvation-induced proteins being up-regulated. Halogenated furanones, putative antagonists of acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs), inhibited the synthesis of proteins specifically induced upon carbon starvation. The effect of the furanone was the opposite of that caused by SSE with respect to the up- and down-regulation of protein expression, indicating that both the furanone and the putative signalling molecules were acting on the same regulatory pathway. Culturability was rapidly lost when Vibrio sp. strain S14 was starved in the presence of the furanone at a low concentration. The furanone also had a negative effect on the ability of carbon-starved cells to mount resistance against UV irradiation and hydrogen peroxide exposure. The SSE of Vibrio sp. strain S14 had the ability to provide cross-protection against the loss in viability caused by the furanone. We have further demonstrated that the SSE taken from low- as well as high-cell-density cultures of Vibrio sp. strain S14 induced luminescence in Vibrio harveyi. Taken together, the results in this report provide evidence that Vibrio sp. strain S14 produces extracellular signalling metabolites during carbon and energy starvation and that these molecules play an important role in the expression of proteins crucial to the development of starvation- and stress-resistant phenotypes.

  19. Isolation and Characterization of an Atypical Metschnikowia sp. Strain from the Skin Scraping of a Dermatitis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kuan, Chee Sian; Ismail, Rokiah; Kwan, Zhenli; Yew, Su Mei; Yeo, Siok Koon; Chan, Chai Ling; Toh, Yue Fen; Na, Shiang Ling; Lee, Kok Wei; Hoh, Chee-Choong; Yee, Wai-Yan; Ng, Kee Peng

    2016-01-01

    A yeast-like organism was isolated from the skin scraping sample of a stasis dermatitis patient in the Mycology Unit Department of Medical Microbiology, University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The isolate produced no pigment and was not identifiable using chromogenic agar and API 20C AUX. The fungus was identified as Metschnikowia sp. strain UM 1034, which is close to that of Metschnikowia drosophilae based on ITS- and D1/D2 domain-based phylogenetic analysis. However, the physiology of the strain was not associated to M. drosophilae. This pathogen exhibited low sensitivity to all tested azoles, echinocandins, 5-flucytosine and amphotericin B. This study provided insight into Metschnikowia sp. strain UM 1034 phenotype profiles using a Biolog phenotypic microarray (PM). The isolate utilized 373 nutrients of 760 nutrient sources and could adapt to a broad range of osmotic and pH environments. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation of Metschnikowia non-pulcherrima sp. from skin scraping, revealing this rare yeast species as a potential human pathogen that may be misidentified as Candida sp. using conventional methods. Metschnikowia sp. strain UM 1034 can survive in flexible and diverse environments with a generalist lifestyle. PMID:27280438

  20. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Parapiptadenia rigida-nodulating Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413

    DOE PAGES

    De Meyer, Sofie E.; Fabiano, Elena; Tian, Rui; ...

    2015-06-04

    We report that Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from a root nodule of Parapiptadenia rigida collected at the Angico plantation, Mandiyu, Uruguay, in December 2006. A survey of symbionts of P. rigida in Uruguay demonstrated that this species is nodulated predominantly by Burkholderia microsymbionts. Moreover, Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 is a highly efficient nitrogen fixing symbiont with this host. Currently, the only other sequenced isolate to fix with this host is Cupriavidus sp. UYPR2.512. Therefore, Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 was selected for sequencing on the basis of its environmental and agriculturalmore » relevance to issues in global carbon cycling, alternative energy production, and biogeochemical importance, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413, together with sequence and annotation. The 10,373,764 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 336 scaffolds of 342 contigs, contains 9759 protein-coding genes and 77 RNA-only encoding genes.« less

  1. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Parapiptadenia rigida-nodulating Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413

    SciTech Connect

    De Meyer, Sofie E.; Fabiano, Elena; Tian, Rui; Van Berkum, Peter; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Howieson, John; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-06-04

    We report that Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from a root nodule of Parapiptadenia rigida collected at the Angico plantation, Mandiyu, Uruguay, in December 2006. A survey of symbionts of P. rigida in Uruguay demonstrated that this species is nodulated predominantly by Burkholderia microsymbionts. Moreover, Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 is a highly efficient nitrogen fixing symbiont with this host. Currently, the only other sequenced isolate to fix with this host is Cupriavidus sp. UYPR2.512. Therefore, Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 was selected for sequencing on the basis of its environmental and agricultural relevance to issues in global carbon cycling, alternative energy production, and biogeochemical importance, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413, together with sequence and annotation. The 10,373,764 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 336 scaffolds of 342 contigs, contains 9759 protein-coding genes and 77 RNA-only encoding genes.

  2. Isolation and Characterization of an Atypical Metschnikowia sp. Strain from the Skin Scraping of a Dermatitis Patient.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Chee Sian; Ismail, Rokiah; Kwan, Zhenli; Yew, Su Mei; Yeo, Siok Koon; Chan, Chai Ling; Toh, Yue Fen; Na, Shiang Ling; Lee, Kok Wei; Hoh, Chee-Choong; Yee, Wai-Yan; Ng, Kee Peng

    2016-01-01

    A yeast-like organism was isolated from the skin scraping sample of a stasis dermatitis patient in the Mycology Unit Department of Medical Microbiology, University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The isolate produced no pigment and was not identifiable using chromogenic agar and API 20C AUX. The fungus was identified as Metschnikowia sp. strain UM 1034, which is close to that of Metschnikowia drosophilae based on ITS- and D1/D2 domain-based phylogenetic analysis. However, the physiology of the strain was not associated to M. drosophilae. This pathogen exhibited low sensitivity to all tested azoles, echinocandins, 5-flucytosine and amphotericin B. This study provided insight into Metschnikowia sp. strain UM 1034 phenotype profiles using a Biolog phenotypic microarray (PM). The isolate utilized 373 nutrients of 760 nutrient sources and could adapt to a broad range of osmotic and pH environments. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation of Metschnikowia non-pulcherrima sp. from skin scraping, revealing this rare yeast species as a potential human pathogen that may be misidentified as Candida sp. using conventional methods. Metschnikowia sp. strain UM 1034 can survive in flexible and diverse environments with a generalist lifestyle.

  3. Rhizosphere colonization and arsenic translocation in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) by arsenate reducing Alcaligenes sp. strain Dhal-L.

    PubMed

    Cavalca, Lucia; Corsini, Anna; Bachate, Sachin Prabhakar; Andreoni, Vincenza

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, six arsenic-resistant strains previously isolated were tested for their plant growth promoting characteristics and heavy metal resistance, in order to choose one model strain as an inoculum for sunflower plants in pot experiments. The aim was to investigate the effect of arsenic-resistant strain on sunflower growth and on arsenic uptake from arsenic contaminated soil. Based on plant growth promoting characteristics and heavy metal resistance, Alcaligenes sp. strain Dhal-L was chosen as an inoculum. Beside the ability to reduce arsenate to arsenite via an Ars operon, the strain exhibited 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase activity and it was also able to produce siderophore and indole acetic acid. Pot experiments were conducted with an agricultural soil contaminated with arsenic (214 mg kg⁻¹). A real time PCR method was set up based on the quantification of ACR3(2) type of arsenite efflux pump carried by Alcaligenes sp. strain Dhal-L, in order to monitor presence and colonisation of the strain in the bulk and rhizospheric soil. As a result of strain inoculation, arsenic uptake by plants was increased by 53 %, whereas ACR3(2) gene copy number in rhizospheric soil was 100 times higher in inoculated than in control pots, indicating the colonisation of strain. The results indicated that the presence of arsenate reducing strains in the rhizosphere of sunflower influences arsenic mobilization and promotes arsenic uptake by plant.

  4. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Parapiptadenia rigida-nodulating Cupriavidus sp. strain UYPR2.512

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. strain UYPR2.512 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from a root nodule of Parapiptadenia rigida grown in soils from a native forest of Uruguay. Here we describe the features of Cupriavidus sp. strain UYPR2.512, together with sequence and annotation. The 7,858,949 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 365 scaffolds of 369 contigs, contains 7,411 protein-coding genes and 76 RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal. PMID:26203327

  5. Draft genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. strain F1, a potential source for glycoside hydrolases isolated from Brazilian soil.

    PubMed

    Melo, Ricardo Rodrigues de; Persinoti, Gabriela Felix; Paixão, Douglas Antonio Alvaredo; Squina, Fábio Márcio; Ruller, Roberto; Sato, Helia Harumi

    2017-02-10

    Here, we show the draft genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. F1, a strain isolated from soil with great potential for secretion of hydrolytic enzymes used to deconstruct cellulosic biomass. The draft genome assembly of Streptomyces sp. strain F1 has 69 contigs with a total genome size of 8,142,296bp and G+C 72.65%. Preliminary genome analysis identified 175 proteins as Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes, being 85 glycoside hydrolases organized in 33 distinct families. This draft genome information provides new insights on the key genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes involved in biomass deconstruction employed by soil bacteria.

  6. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Parapiptadenia rigida-nodulating Cupriavidus sp. strain UYPR2.512

    DOE PAGES

    De Meyer, Sofie E.; Fabiano, Elena; Tian, Rui; ...

    2015-04-11

    Cupriavidus sp. strain UYPR2.512 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from a root nodule of Parapiptadenia rigida grown in soils from a native forest of Uruguay. Here we describe the features of Cupriavidus sp. strain UYPR2.512, together with sequence and annotation. We find the 7,858,949 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 365 scaffolds of 369 contigs, contains 7,411 protein-coding genes and 76 RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal.

  7. Effectiveness of ultrasound for the destruction of Mycobacterium sp. strain (6PY1).

    PubMed

    Al Bsoul, Abeer; Magnin, Jean-Pierre; Commenges-Bernole, Nadine; Gondrexon, Nicolas; Willison, John; Petrier, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound is widely used to disinfect drinking water and wastewater due to its strong physical and chemical effects on microorganisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ultrasound on the destruction of Mycobacterium strain 6PY1. Ultrasound waves (20 kHz or 612 kHz) were used to treat aqueous suspensions of Mycobacterium at different volumes, initial bacterial concentrations, and power densities. At the same power density and the same exposure time, sonication at high frequency resulted in a lower destruction of Mycobacterium sp. 6PY1 (35.5%) than sonication at low frequency (93%). The percentage of removal was not significantly affected by the volume of the irradiated suspension (150-300 ml) or the initial cell concentration (2.15 x 10(-3)-1.4 x 10(-2)mg protein L(-1)). At low frequency, the removal percentage of Mycobacterium sp. 6PY1 increased with increasing the power density, with a constant level reached after a certain power density. At high frequency, the removal percentage of Mycobacterium sp. 6PY1 increased with increasing the power density. The mechanism of cell killing was investigated by examining the effects of OH() radical scavengers such as sodium carbonate. At high frequency the presence of sodium carbonate suppressed the removal process. However, at low frequency the removal process was not affected, thus indicating that OH() radicals have a negligible role in this case. The latter result was supported by ten time's H(2)O(2) production at high frequency greater than that at low frequency.

  8. Isolation and characterization of a Sphingomonas sp. strain F-7 degrading fenvalerate and its use in bioremediation of contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fang B; Shan, Sheng D; Luo, Lin P; Guan, Li B; Qin, Hua

    2013-01-01

    A fenvalerate-degrading bacterial strain F-7 was isolated from long-term contaminated sludge. Based on morphological, physiological and biochemical characterization, and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence, strain F-7 was identified as Sphingomonas sp. The bacterium could utilize fenvalerate as the sole source of carbon. An amount measuring 100 mg L(-1) fenvalerate was completely degraded within 72 h and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) was detected as a major metabolite. The result indicates that S. sp. F-7 might metabolize fenvalerate by hydrolysis of carboxylester linkage. It was capable of degrading permethrin, fenpropathrin, beta-cypermethrin, cyhalothrin, deltamethrin, bifenthrin and 3-PBA. Further studies demonstrated that the strain was multi-resistant to heavy metals and antibiotics. In addition, degradative enzymes involved were confirmed as intracellular distributed and constitutively expressed. Furthermore, application of the strain was found to accelerate the removal of fenvalerate in soil. This is the first report of fenvalerate degrading strain isolated from S. sp. These results might help with future research in better understanding of pyrethroid biodegradation and highlight S. sp. F-7 might have potential for practical application in bioremediation of fenvalerate-contaminated sites.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Curtobacterium sp. Strain ER1/6, an Endophytic Strain Isolated from Citrus sinensis with Potential To Be Used as a Biocontrol Agent.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Leandro Maza; Alves, João Marcelo Pereira; Oliveira, Liliane Santana; Gruber, Arthur; Padilla, Gabriel; Araújo, Welington Luiz

    2016-11-17

    Herein, we report a draft genome sequence of the endophytic Curtobacterium sp. strain ER1/6, isolated from a surface-sterilized Citrus sinensis branch, and it presented the capability to control phytopathogens. Functional annotation of the ~3.4-Mb genome revealed 3,100 protein-coding genes, with many products related to known ecological and biotechnological aspects of this bacterium.

  10. Glaciimonas alpina sp. nov. isolated from alpine glaciers and reclassification of Glaciimonas immobilis Cr9-12 as the type strain of Glaciimonas alpina sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Frasson, David; Udovičić, Matije; Frey, Beat; Lapanje, Aleš; Zhang, De-Chao; Margesin, Rosa; Sievers, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Psychrophilic bacterial strains were isolated from alpine glaciers in Switzerland and characterized taxonomically. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis of partial 16S rRNA and rpoB genes, three of those strains, strain 79 ( = CCOS 247), strain 4/58 ( = CCOS 250) and strain 4/56 ( = CCOS 258) clustered together with strain Cr9-12T and separately from the type strains Glaciimonas immobilis Cr9-30T and Glaciimonas singularis LMG 27070T. Strain Cr9-12T has been previously described as a strain of G. immobilis. The three newly isolated strains were compared phenotypically with strain Cr9-12T and with the type strains of the species G. immobilis and G. singularis. Cr9-12T and the three novel strains from an alpine glacier in Switzerland were Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, rod-shaped and psychrophilic and showed good growth throughout a temperature range of 1-20 °C and characteristically oxidized d-mannitol, l-fucose and bromosuccinic acid. The predominant cellular fatty acids of strain Cr9-12T and the three novel strains were summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or iso-C15 : 0 2-OH), C16 : 0 and C18 : 1ω7c. The respiratory quinone of these strains was ubiquinone 8 (UQ-8). The genomic DNA G+C content of Cr9-12T was 49.2 mol%. The combined data from phenotypic, phylogenetic and DNA-DNA relatedness studies strongly support the reclassification of strain Cr9-12T as representing a novel species. This strain and the isolates 79 ( = CCOS 247), 4/58 ( = CCOS 250) and 4/56 ( = CCOS 258) are representatives of a novel species of the genus Glaciimonas, for which the name Glaciimonas alpina sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Glaciimonas alpina is Cr9-12T ( = CCOS 761T = DSM 22814T).

  11. Oxidation of biphenyl by a multicomponent enzyme system from Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400.

    PubMed Central

    Haddock, J D; Nadim, L M; Gibson, D T

    1993-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 grows on biphenyl as the sole carbon and energy source. This organism also cooxidizes several chlorinated biphenyl congeners. Biphenyl dioxygenase activity in cell extract required addition of NAD(P)H as an electron donor for the conversion of biphenyl to cis-2,3-dihydroxy-2,3-dihydrobiphenyl. Incorporation of both atoms of molecular oxygen into the substrate was shown with 18O2. The nonlinear relationship between enzyme activity and protein concentration suggested that the enzyme is composed of multiple protein components. Ion-exchange chromatography of the cell extract gave three protein fractions that were required together to restore enzymatic activity. Similarities with other multicomponent aromatic hydrocarbon dioxygenases indicated that biphenyl dioxygenase may consist of a flavoprotein and iron-sulfur proteins that constitute a short electron transport chain involved in catalyzing the incorporation of both atoms of molecular oxygen into the aromatic ring. Images PMID:8419290

  12. Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate) Synthesis Genes in Azotobacter sp. Strain FA8

    PubMed Central

    Pettinari, M. Julia; Vázquez, Gustavo J.; Silberschmidt, Daniel; Rehm, Bernd; Steinbüchel, Alexander; Méndez, Beatriz S.

    2001-01-01

    Genes responsible for the synthesis of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) in Azotobacter sp. FA8 were cloned and analyzed. A PHB polymerase gene (phbC) was found downstream from genes coding for β-ketothiolase (phbA) and acetoacetyl-coenzyme A reductase (phbB). A PHB synthase mutant was obtained by gene inactivation and used for genetic studies. The phbC gene from this strain was introduced into Ralstonia eutropha PHB-4 (phbC-negative mutant), and the recombinant accumulated PHB when either glucose or octanoate was used as a source of carbon, indicating that this PHB synthase cannot incorporate medium-chain-length hydroxyalkanoates into PHB. PMID:11679365

  13. Synthetic Biology Toolbox for Controlling Gene Expression in the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The application of synthetic biology requires characterized tools to precisely control gene expression. This toolbox of genetic parts previously did not exist for the industrially promising cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. To address this gap, two orthogonal constitutive promoter libraries, one based on a cyanobacterial promoter and the other ported from Escherichia coli, were built and tested in PCC 7002. The libraries demonstrated 3 and 2.5 log dynamic ranges, respectively, but correlated poorly with E. coli expression levels. These promoter libraries were then combined to create and optimize a series of IPTG inducible cassettes. The resultant induction system had a 48-fold dynamic range and was shown to out-perform Ptrc constructs. Finally, a RBS library was designed and tested in PCC 7002. The presented synthetic biology toolbox will enable accelerated engineering of PCC 7002. PMID:25216157

  14. Saccharification of corn fiber using enzymes from Aureobasidium sp. strain NRRL Y-2311-1

    SciTech Connect

    Leathers, T.D.; Gupta, S.C.

    1996-06-01

    Crude enzyme preparations from Aureobasidium sp. strain NRRL Y-2311-1 were characterized and tested for the capacity to saccharify corn fiber. Cultures grown on xylan, corn fiber, and alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP)-pretreated corn fiber produced specific levels of endoxylanase, amylase, protease, cellulose, and other activities. Using equal units of endoxylanase activity, crude enzymes from AHP-pretreated corn fiber cultures were most effective in saccharification. Multiple enzyme activities were implicated in this process. Pretreatment of corn fiber with AHP nearly doubled the susceptibility of hemicellulose to enzymatic digestion. Up to 138 mg xylose, 125 mg arabinose, and 490 mg glucose were obtained per g pretreated corn fiber under conditions tested. 31 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Identification and cloning of genes involved in specific desulfurization dibenzothiophene by Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8

    SciTech Connect

    Denome, S.A.; Young, K.D.; Olson, E.S. )

    1993-09-01

    The presence of sulfur in coal and petroleum contributes to corrosion of production and refining equipment and burning these high-sulfur products emits sulfur oxides to the atmosphere. Microorganisms that can enzymatically release organically bound sulfur from organic components of coal or petroleum or from dibenzothiophene (DBT) could reduce the sulfur content of high sulfur fuels without depleting their British thermal unit value. Two major pathways for microbial metabolism of DBT have been proposed. Some of the genes for the DPT degradative pathway have been isolated and characterized. However, no genes for the desulfurization pathway have been identified. This paper reports the isolation from Rhodoccus sp. strain IGTS8 pf a set of genes that confer a specific desulfurization phenotype to mutants and to a related organism, R. fascians D188-5, that is normally unable to desulfurize DBT. 38 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Antifungal activity of violacein purified from a novel strain of Chromobacterium sp. NIIST (MTCC 5522).

    PubMed

    Sasidharan, Anju; Sasidharan, Nishanth Kumar; Amma, Dileepkumar Bhaskaran Nair Saraswathy; Vasu, Radhakrishnan Kokkuvayil; Nataraja, Anupama Vijaya; Bhaskaran, Krishnakumar

    2015-10-01

    A novel strain of Chromobacterium sp. NIIST (MTCC 5522) producing high level of purple blue bioactive compound violacein was isolated from clay mine acidic sediment. During 24 h aerobic incubation in modified Luria Bertani medium, around 0.6 g crude violacein was produced per gram of dry weight biomass. An inexpensive method for preparing crystalline, pure violacein from crude pigment was developed (12.8 mg violacein/L) and the pure compound was characterized by different spectrometric methods. The violacein prepared was found effective against a number of plant and human pathogenic fungi and yeast species such as Cryptococcus gastricus, Trichophyton rubrum, Fusarium oxysporum, Rhizoctonia solani, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium expansum, and Candida albicans. The best activity was recorded against Trichophyton rubrum (2 -g/ml), a human pathogen responsible for causing athlete-s foot infection. This is the first report of antifungal activity of purified violacein against pathogenic fungi and yeast.

  17. Unique modification of adenine in genomic DNA of the marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. strain NIBB 1067.

    PubMed Central

    Zehr, J P; Ohki, K; Fujita, Y; Landry, D

    1991-01-01

    The genomic DNA of the marine nonheterocystous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. strain NIBB 1067 was found to be highly resistant to DNA restriction endonucleases. The DNA was digested extensively by the restriction enzyme DpnI, which requires adenine methylation for activity. The DNA composition, determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), was found to be 69% AT. Surprisingly, it was found that a modified adenine which was not methylated at the usual N6 position was present and made up 4.7 mol% of the nucleosides in Trichodesmium DNA (15 mol% of deoxyadenosine). In order for adenine residues to be modified at this many positions, there must be many modifying enzymes or at least one of the modifying enzymes must have a degenerate recognition site. The reason(s) for this extensive methylation has not yet been determined but may have implications for the ecological success of this microorganism in nature. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:1657876

  18. Biodegradation of 3-nitrotyrosine by Burkholderia sp. strain JS165 and Variovorax paradoxus JS171.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Shirley F; Spain, Jim C

    2006-02-01

    The cascade of reactive nitrogen species generated from nitric oxide causes modification of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids in a wide range of organisms. 3-Nitrotyrosine is one of the most common products of the action of reactive nitrogen species on proteins. Although a great deal is known about the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine, the subsequent metabolism of this compound is a mystery. Variovorax paradoxus JS171 and Burkholderia sp. strain JS165 were isolated from soil slurries when 3-nitrotyrosine was provided as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. During growth on 3-nitrotyrosine stoichiometric amounts of nitrite were released along with approximately one-half of the theoretically available ammonia. The catabolic pathway involving oxidative denitration is distinct from the pathway for tyrosine metabolism. The facile isolation and the specific, regulated pathway for 3-nitrotyrosine degradation in natural ecosystems suggest that there is a significant flux of 3-nitrotyrosine in such environments.

  19. Paired cloning vectors for complementation of mutations in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, C. Peter Wolk; Fan, Qing; Zhou, Ruanbao; Huang, Guocun; Lechno-Yossef, Sigal; Kuritz, Tanya; Wojciuch, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The clones generated in a sequencing project represent a resource for subsequent analysis of the organism whose genome has been sequenced. We describe an interrelated group of cloning vectors that either integrate into the genome or replicate, and that enhance the utility, for developmental and other studies, of the clones used to determine the genomic sequence of the cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. One integrating vector is a mobilizable BAC vector that was used both to generate bridging clones and to complement transposon mutations. Upon addition of a cassette that permits mobilization and selection, pUC-based sequencing clones can also integrate into the genome and thereupon complement transposon mutations. The replicating vectors are based on cyanobacterial plasmid pDU1, whose sequence we report, and on broad-host-range plasmid RSF1010. The RSF1010- and pDU1-based vectors provide the opportunity to express different genes from either cell-type-specific or -generalist promoters, simultaneously from different plasmids in the same cyanobacterial cells. We show that pDU1 ORF4 and its upstream region play an essential role in the replication and copy number of pDU1, and that ORFs alr2887 and alr3546 (hetF{sub A}) of Anabaena sp. are required specifically for fixation of dinitrogen under oxic conditions.

  20. Photoheterotrophic Fluxome in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 and Its Implications for Cyanobacterial Bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    You, Le; He, Lian

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated metabolic responses in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 to photosynthetic impairment. We used 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU; a photosystem II inhibitor) to block O2 evolution and ATP/NADPH generation by linear electron flow. Based on 13C-metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) and RNA sequencing, we have found that Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 employs a unique photoheterotrophic metabolism. First, glucose catabolism forms a cyclic route that includes the oxidative pentose phosphate (OPP) pathway and the glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (PGI) reaction. Glucose-6-phosphate is extensively degraded by the OPP pathway for NADPH production and is replenished by the reversed PGI reaction. Second, the Calvin cycle is not fully functional, but RubisCO continues to fix CO2 and synthesize 3-phosphoglycerate. Third, the relative flux through the complete tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and succinate dehydrogenase is small under heterotrophic conditions, indicating that the newly discovered cyanobacterial TCA cycle (via the γ-aminobutyric acid pathway or α-ketoglutarate decarboxylase/succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase) plays a minimal role in energy metabolism. Fourth, NAD(P)H oxidation and the cyclic electron flow (CEF) around photosystem I are the two main ATP sources, and the CEF accounts for at least 40% of total ATP generation from photoheterotrophic metabolism (without considering maintenance loss). This study not only demonstrates a new topology for carbohydrate oxidation but also provides quantitative insights into metabolic bioenergetics in cyanobacteria. PMID:25535269

  1. Compositional and toxicological evaluation of the diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneegurt, M. A.; Arieli, B.; McKeehen, J. D.; Stephens, S. D.; Nielsen, S. S.; Saha, P. R.; Trumbo, P. R.; Sherman, L. A.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Compositional analyses of Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142 showed high protein (50-60%) and low fat (0.4-1%) content, and the ability to synthesize vitamin B12. The amino acid profile indicated that Cyanothece sp. was a balanced protein source. Fatty acids of the 18:3n-3 type were also present. Mineral analyses indicated that the cellular biomass may be a good source of Fe, Zn and Na. Caloric content was 4.5 to 5.1 kcal g dry weight-1 and the carbon content was approximately 40% on a dry weight basis. Nitrogen content was 8 to 9% on a dry weight basis and total nucleic acids were 1.3% on a dry weight basis. Short-term feeding studies in rats followed by histopathology found no toxicity or dietary incompatibility problems. The level of uric acid and allantoin in urine and tissues was low, suggesting no excess of nucleic acids, as sometimes reported in the past for a cyanobacteria-containing diet. The current work discusses the potential implications of these results for human nutrition applications.

  2. DL-7-azatryptophan and citrulline metabolism in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 1F.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C H; Van Baalen, C; Tabita, F R

    1987-01-01

    An alternative route for the primary assimilation of ammonia proceeds via glutamine synthetase-carbamyl phosphate synthetase and its inherent glutaminase activity in Anabaena sp. strain 1F, a marine filamentous, heterocystous cyanobacterium. Evidence for the presence of this possible alternative route to glutamate was provided by the use of amino acid analogs as specific enzyme inhibitors, enzymological studies, and radioistopic labeling experiments. The amino acid pool patterns of continuous cultures of Anabaena sp. strain 1F were markedly influenced by the nitrogen source. A relatively high concentration of glutamate was maintained in the amino acid pools of all cultures irrespective of the nitrogen source, reflecting the central role of glutamate in nitrogen metabolism. The addition of 1.0 microM azaserine increased the intracellular pools of glutamate and glutamine. All attempts to detect any enzymatic activity for glutamate synthase by measuring the formation of L-[14C]glutamate from 2-keto-[1-14C]glutarate and glutamine failed. The addition of 10 microM DL-7-azatryptophan caused a transient accumulation of intracellular citrulline and alanine which was not affected by the presence of chloramphenicol. The in vitro activity of carbamyl phosphate synthetase and glutaminase increased severalfold in the presence of azatryptophan. Results from radioisotopic labeling experiments with [14C]bicarbonate and L-[1-14C]ornithine also indicated that citrulline was formed via carbamyl phosphate synthetase and ornithine transcarbamylase. In addition to its effects on nitrogen metabolism, azatryptophan also affected carbon metabolism by inhibiting photosynthetic carbon assimilation and photosynthetic oxygen evolution. Images PMID:2880834

  3. Dinitrogenase-Driven Photobiological Hydrogen Production Combats Oxidative Stress in Cyanothece sp. Strain ATCC 51142

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Melnicki, Matthew R.; Charania, Moiz A.; Hill, Eric A.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Beliaev, Alexander S.; Wright, Aaron T.; Nojiri, H.

    2016-10-14

    ABSTRACT

    Photobiologically synthesized hydrogen (H2) gas is carbon neutral to produce and clean to combust, making it an ideal biofuel.Cyanothecesp. strain ATCC 51142 is a cyanobacterium capable of performing simultaneous oxygenic photosynthesis and H2production, a highly perplexing phenomenon because H2evolving enzymes are O2sensitive. We employed a system-levelin vivochemoproteomic profiling approach to explore the cellular dynamics of protein thiol redox and how thiol redox mediates the function of the dinitrogenase NifHDK, an enzyme complex capable of aerobic hydrogenase activity. We found that NifHDK responds to intracellular redox conditions and may act as an emergency electron valve to prevent harmful reactive oxygen species formation in concert with other cell strategies for maintaining redox homeostasis. These results provide new insight into cellular redox dynamics useful for advancing photolytic bioenergy technology and reveal a new understanding for the biological function of NifHDK.

    IMPORTANCEHere, we demonstrate that high levels of hydrogen synthesis can be induced as a protection mechanism against oxidative stress via the dinitrogenase enzyme complex inCyanothecesp. strain ATCC 51142. This is a previously unknown feature of cyanobacterial dinitrogenase, and we anticipate that it may represent a strategy to exploit cyanobacteria for efficient and scalable hydrogen production. We utilized a chemoproteomic approach to capture thein situdynamics of reductant partitioning within the cell, revealing proteins and reactive thiols that may be involved in redox sensing and signaling. Additionally, this method is widely applicable across biological systems to achieve a greater understanding of how cells navigate their environment

  4. Cometabolism of 3,4-dichlorobenzoate by Acinetobacter sp. strain 4-CB1.

    PubMed Central

    Adriaens, P; Focht, D D

    1991-01-01

    When Acinetobacter sp. strain 4-CB1 was grown on 4-chlorobenzoate (4-CB), it cometabolized 3,4-dichlorobenzoate (3,4-DCB) to 3-chloro-4-hydroxybenzoate (3-C-4-OHB), which could be used as a growth substrate. No cometabolism of 3,4-DCB was observed when Acinetobacter sp. strain 4-CB1 was grown on benzoate. 4-Carboxyl-1,2-benzoquinone was formed as an intermediate from 3,4-DCB and 3-C-4-OHB in aerobic and anaerobic resting-cell incubations and was the major transient intermediate found when cells were grown on 3-C-4-OHB. The first dechlorination step of 3,4-DCB was catalyzed by the 4-CB dehalogenase, while a soluble dehalogenase was responsible for dechlorination of 3-C-4-OHB. Both enzymes were inducible by the respective chlorinated substrates, as indicated by oxygen uptake experiments. The dehalogenase activity on 3-C-4-OHB, observed in crude cell extracts, was 109 and 44 nmol of 3-C-4-OHB min-1 mg of protein-1 under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively. 3-Chloro-4-hydroxybenzoate served as a pseudosubstrate for the 4-hydroxybenzoate monooxygenase by effecting oxygen and NADH consumption without being hydroxylated. Contrary to 4-CB metabolism, the results suggest that 3-C-4-OHB was not metabolized via the protocatechuate pathway. Despite the ability of resting cells grown on 4-CB or 3-C-4-OHB to carry out all of the necessary steps for dehalogenation and catabolism of 3,4-DCB, it appeared that 3,4-DCB was unable to induce the necessary 4-CB dehalogenase for the initial p-dehalogenation step.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2036004

  5. Structure of the detoxification catalyst mercuric ion reductase from Bacillus sp. strain RC607

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiering, N.; Kabsch, W.; Moore, M. J.; Distefano, M. D.; Walsh, C. T.; Pai, E. F.

    1991-07-01

    SEVERAL hundred million tons of toxic mercurials are dispersed in the biosphere1. Microbes can detoxify organo-mercurials and mercury salts through sequential action of two enzymes, organomercury lyase2 and mercuric ion reductase (MerA) 3-5. The latter, a homodimer with homology to the FAD-dependent disulphide oxidoreductases6, catalyses the reaction NADPH + Hg(II) --> NADP+ + H+Hg(0), one of the very rare enzymic reactions with metal substrates. Human glutathione reductase7,8 serves as a reference molecule for FAD-dependent disulphide reductases and between its primary structure9 and that of MerA from Tn501 (Pseudomonas), Tn21 (Shigella), pI258 (Staphylococcus) and Bacillus, 25-30% of the residues have been conserved10,11. All MerAs have a C-terminal extension about 15 residues long but have very varied N termini. Although the enzyme from Streptomyces lividans has no addition, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Tn5Ol and Bacillus sp. strain RC607 it has one and two copies respectively of a domain of 80-85 residues, highly homologous to MerP, the periplasmic component of proteins encoded by the mer operon11. These domains can be proteolytically cleaved off without changing the catalytic efficiency3. We report here the crystal structure of MerA from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus sp. strain RC607. Analysis of its complexes with nicotinamide dinucleotide substrates and the inhibitor Cd(II) reveals how limited structural changes enable an enzyme to accept as substrate what used to be a dangerous inhibitor. Knowledge of the mode of mercury ligation is a prerequisite for understanding this unique detoxification mechanism.

  6. Structure of the detoxification catalyst mercuric ion reductase from Bacillus sp. strain RC607.

    PubMed

    Schiering, N; Kabsch, W; Moore, M J; Distefano, M D; Walsh, C T; Pai, E F

    1991-07-11

    Several hundred million tons of toxic mercurials are dispersed in the biosphere. Microbes can detoxify organo-mercurials and mercury salts through sequential action of two enzymes, organomercury lyase and mercuric ion reductase (MerA). The latter, a homodimer with homology to the FAD-dependent disulphide oxidoreductases, catalyses the reaction NADPH + Hg(II)----NADP+ + H+ + Hg(0), one of the very rare enzymic reactions with metal substrates. Human glutathione reductase serves as a reference molecule for FAD-dependent disulphide reductases and between its primary structure and that of MerA from Tn501 (Pseudomonas), Tn21 (Shigella), p1258 (Staphylococcus) and Bacillus, 25-30% of the residues have been conserved. All MerAs have a C-terminal extension about 15 residues long but have very varied N termini. Although the enzyme from Streptomyces lividans has no addition, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Tn501 and Bacillus sp. strain RC607 it has one and two copies respectively of a domain of 80-85 residues, highly homologous to MerP, the periplasmic component of proteins encoded by the mer operon. These domains can be proteolytically cleaved off without changing the catalytic efficiency. We report here the crystal structure of MerA from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus sp. strain RC607. Analysis of its complexes with nicotinamide dinucleotide substrates and the inhibitor Cd(II) reveals how limited structural changes enable an enzyme to accept as substrate what used to be a dangerous inhibitor. Knowledge of the mode of mercury ligation is a prerequisite for understanding this unique detoxification mechanism.

  7. Genome sequence of three Psychrobacter sp. strains with potential applications in bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Lasa, Aide; Romalde, Jesús L

    2017-06-01

    To date, the genus Psychrobacter consists of 37 recognized species isolated from different sources, however they are more frequently found in cold and other non-polar environments of low water activity. Some strains belonging to the genus have shown different enzymatic activities with potential applications in bioremediation or food industry. In the present study, the whole genome sequences of three Psychrobacter-like strains (C 20.9, Cmf 22.2 and Rd 27.2) isolated from reared clams in Galicia (Spain) are described. The sequenced genomes resulted in an assembly size of 3,143,782 bp for C 20.9 isolate, 3,168,467 bp for Cmf 22.2 isolate and 3,028,386 bp for Rd 27.2 isolate. Among the identified coding sequences of the genomes, mercury detoxification and biogeochemistry genes were found, as well as genes related to heavy metals and antibiotic resistance. Also virulence-related features were identified such as the siderophore vibrioferrin or an aerobactin-like siderophore. The phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene suggested that these strains may represent novel species of the Psychrobacter genus. The genome sequences of the Psychrobacter sp. strains have been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession numbers MRYA00000000 (Cmf 22.2), MRYB00000000 (Rd 27.2) and MRYC00000000 (C 20.9), and the sequences could be found at the site https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/PRJNA353858.

  8. Metabolism of hydroxydibenzofurans, methoxydibenzofurans, acetoxydibenzofurans, and nitrodibenzofurans by Sphingomonas sp. strain HH69

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, H. |; Wittich, R.M.; Fortnagel, P.

    1995-07-01

    The metabolism of 11 substituted dibenzofurans by the dibenzofuran-degrading Sphingomonas sp. strain HH69 was investigated. Strain HH69 utilizes 2-, 3-, and 4-acetoxydibenzofuran as well as 2-, 3-, and 4-hydroxydibenzofuran as sole sources of carbon and energy. The degradation of acetoxydibenzofurans is initiated by hydrolysis of the ester bonds, yielding the corresponding hydroxydibenzofurans and acetate. Strain HH69 grew on 2-methoxydibenzofuran only after it was adapted to the utilization of 5-methoxysalicylic acid, whereas 3- and 4-methoxydibenzofuran as well as 2- and 3-nitrodibenzofuran were only cooxidized. During the breakdown of all eight hydroxy-, methoxy-, and nitrodibenzofurans studied here, the corresponding substituted salicylic acids accumulated in the culture broth. In the cases of 2- and 3-hydroxydibenzofuran as well as 2- and 3-nitrodibenzofuran, salicylic acid was also formed. Those four dibenzofurans which did not serve as carbon sources for strain HH69 were converted to a nonutilizable salicylic acid derivative. From turnover experiments with the mutant HH69/II, which is deficient in meta-cleavage, 2,2{prime}, 3,4{prime}-tetrahydroxybiphenyl, 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxy-5{prime}-methoxybiphenyl, 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxy-5{prime}-nitrobiphenyl, and 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxy-4{prime}-nitrobiphenyl were isolated as the main products formed from 3-hydroxydibenzofuran, 2-methoxydibenzofuran, and 2- and 3-nitrodibenzo-furan, respectively. These results indicate significant regioselectivity for the dioxygenolytic cleavage of the ether bond of these monosubstituted dibenzofurans, with a preference for the nonsubstituted aromatic nucleus. Substituted trihydroxybiphenyls are converted further by meta-cleavage followed by the removal of the side chain of the resulting product. A stepwise degradation of this side chain was found to be involved in the metabolism of 2-hydroxydibenzofuran. 34 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Metabolism of Hydroxydibenzofurans, Methoxydibenzofurans, Acetoxydibenzofurans, and Nitrodibenzofurans by Sphingomonas sp. Strain HH69

    PubMed Central

    Harms, H.; Wilkes, H.; Wittich, R.; Fortnagel, P.

    1995-01-01

    The metabolism of 11 substituted dibenzofurans by the dibenzofuran-degrading Sphingomonas sp. strain HH69 was investigated. Strain HH69 utilizes 2-, 3-, and 4-acetoxydibenzofuran as well as 2-, 3-, and 4-hydroxydibenzofuran as sole sources of carbon and energy. The degradation of acetoxydibenzofurans is initiated by hydrolysis of the ester bonds, yielding the corresponding hydroxydibenzofurans and acetate. Strain HH69 grew on 2-methoxydibenzofuran only after it was adapted to the utilization of 5-methoxysalicylic acid, whereas 3- and 4-methoxydibenzofuran as well as 2- and 3-nitrodibenzofuran were only cooxidized. During the breakdown of all eight hydroxy-, methoxy-, and nitrodibenzofurans studied here, the corresponding substituted salicylic acids accumulated in the culture broth. In the cases of 2- and 3-hydroxydibenzofuran as well as 2- and 3-nitrodibenzofuran, salicylic acid was also formed. Those four dibenzofurans which did not serve as carbon sources for strain HH69 were converted to a nonutilizable salicylic acid derivative. From turnover experiments with the mutant HH69/II, which is deficient in meta-cleavage, 2,2(prm1),3,4(prm1)-tetrahydroxybiphenyl, 2,2(prm1),3-trihydroxy-5(prm1)-methoxybiphenyl, 2,2(prm1),3-trihydroxy-5(prm1)-nitrobiphenyl, and 2,2(prm1),3-trihydroxy-4(prm1)-nitrobiphenyl were isolated as the main products formed from 3-hydroxydibenzofuran, 2-methoxydibenzofuran, and 2- and 3-nitrodibenzofuran, respectively. These results indicate significant regioselectivity for the dioxygenolytic cleavage of the ether bond of these monosubstituted dibenzofurans, with a preference for the nonsubstituted aromatic nucleus. Substituted trihydroxybiphenyls are converted further by meta-cleavage followed by the removal of the side chain of the resulting product. A stepwise degradation of this side chain was found to be involved in the metabolism of 2-hydroxydibenzofuran. PMID:16535067

  10. Newly isolated bacterial strains belonging to Bacillaceae (Bacillus sp.) and Micrococcaceae accelerate death of the honey bee mite, Varroa destructor (V. jacobsoni), in laboratory assays.

    PubMed

    Tsagou, Vasiliki; Lianou, Alexandra; Lazarakis, Dimitrios; Emmanouel, Nikolaos; Aggelis, George

    2004-03-01

    Newly isolated bacterial strains belonging to Bacillaceae (Bacillus sp.), Micrococcaceae and three unidentified strains were tested for their pathogenicity against the mite, Varroa destructor. The Bacillus sp. strain and two of the strains belonging to the Micrococcaceae family significantly decreased the time for 50% mortality of the mite population (up to 57%) and hence may be potential control agents. In in vitro bioassay whole cells, extracellular broth and cellular extract of the Bacillus sp. strain effectively killed the mites, suggesting that both endotoxins and exotoxins contributed to the killing.

  11. Taxonomy of haemolytic and/or proteolytic strains of the genus Acinetobacter with the proposal of Acinetobacter courvalinii sp. nov. (genomic species 14 sensu Bouvet & Jeanjean), Acinetobacter dispersus sp. nov. (genomic species 17), Acinetobacter modestus sp. nov., Acinetobacter proteolyticus sp. nov. and Acinetobacter vivianii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Alexandr; Radolfova-Krizova, Lenka; Maixnerova, Martina; Vrestiakova, Eliska; Jezek, Petr; Sedo, Ondrej

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to define the taxonomic status of 40 haemolytic and/or proteolytic strains of the genus Acinetobacter which were previously classified into five putative species termed as genomic species 14BJ (n=9), genomic species 17 (n=9), taxon 18 (n=7), taxon 19 (n=6) and taxon 20 (n=9). The strains were recovered mostly from human clinical specimens or soil and water ecosystems and were highly diverse in geographical origin and time of isolation. Comparative analysis of the rpoB and gyrB gene sequences of all strains, and the whole-genome sequences of selected strains, showed that these putative species formed five respective, well-supported clusters within a distinct clade of the genus Acinetobacter which typically, although not exclusively, encompasses strains with strong haemolytic activity. The whole-genome-based average nucleotide identity (ANIb) values supported the species status of each of these clusters. Moreover, the distinctness and coherence of the clusters were supported by whole-cell profiling based on MALDI-TOF MS. Congruent with these findings were the results of metabolic and physiological testing. We conclude that the five putative taxa represent respective novel species, for which the names Acinetobacter courvalinii sp. nov. (type strain ANC 3623T=CCUG 67960T=CIP 110480T=CCM 8635T), Acinetobacter dispersus sp. nov. (type strain ANC 4105T=CCUG 67961T=CIP 110500T=CCM 8636T), Acinetobacter modestus sp. nov. (type strain NIPH 236T=CCUG 67964T=CIP 110444T=CCM 8639T), Acinetobacter proteolyticus sp. nov. (type strain NIPH 809T=CCUG 67965T=CIP 110482T = CCM 8640T) and Acinetobacter vivianii sp. nov. (type strain NIPH 2168T=CCUG 67967T=CIP 110483T=CCM 8642T) are proposed.

  12. Genome sequence of Bacillus sp. strain HYC-10, isolated from intestinal tract contents from a marine fish (Mugil cephalus).

    PubMed

    Lai, Qiliang; Liu, Yang; Shao, Zongze

    2012-12-01

    Bacillus sp. strain HYC-10 was isolated with intestinal tract content of a fish, Mugil cephalus, captured from the sea close to Xiamen Island, China. Here, we present the draft genome of strain HYC-10, which contains 3,611,918 bp with a G+C content of 41.30% and contains 3,687 protein-coding genes and 33 tRNA genes.

  13. Engineering resistance to phage GVE3 in Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius.

    PubMed

    van Zyl, Leonardo Joaquim; Taylor, Mark Paul; Trindade, Marla

    2016-02-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius is a promising platform organism for the production of biofuels and other metabolites of interest. G. thermoglucosidasius fermentations could be subject to bacteriophage-related failure and financial loss. We develop two strains resistant to a recently described G. thermoglucosidasius-infecting phage GVE3. The phage-encoded immunity gene, imm, was overexpressed in the host leading to phage resistance. A phage-resistant mutant was isolated following expression of a putative anti-repressor-like protein and phage challenge. A point mutation was identified in the polysaccharide pyruvyl transferase, csaB. A double crossover knockout mutation of csaB confirmed its role in the phage resistance phenotype. These resistance mechanisms appear to prevent phage DNA injection and/or lysogenic conversion rather than just reducing efficiency of plating, as no phage DNA could be detected in resistant bacteria challenged with GVE3 and no plaques observed even at high phage titers. Not only do the strains developed here shed light on the biological relationship between the GVE3 phage and its host, they could be employed by those looking to make use of this organism for metabolite production, with reduced occurrence of GVE3-related failure.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudozyma brasiliensis sp. nov. Strain GHG001, a High Producer of Endo-1,4-Xylanase Isolated from an Insect Pest of Sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Juliana Velasco de Castro; Dos Santos, Renato Augusto Corrêa; Borges, Thuanny A; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2013-12-19

    Here, we present the nuclear and mitochondrial genome sequences of Pseudozyma brasiliensis sp. nov. strain GHG001. P. brasiliensis sp. nov. is the closest relative of Pseudozyma vetiver. P. brasiliensis sp. nov. is capable of growing on xylose or xylan as a sole carbon source and has great biotechnological potential.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudozyma brasiliensis sp. nov. Strain GHG001, a High Producer of Endo-1,4-Xylanase Isolated from an Insect Pest of Sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Juliana Velasco de Castro; dos Santos, Renato Augusto Corrêa; Borges, Thuanny A.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present the nuclear and mitochondrial genome sequences of Pseudozyma brasiliensis sp. nov. strain GHG001. P. brasiliensis sp. nov. is the closest relative of Pseudozyma vetiver. P. brasiliensis sp. nov. is capable of growing on xylose or xylan as a sole carbon source and has great biotechnological potential. PMID:24356824

  16. Anilofos Tolerance and Its Mineralization by the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PUPCCC 64

    PubMed Central

    Singh, D. P.; Khattar, J. I. S.; Kaur, Mandeep; Kaur, Gurdeep; Gupta, Meenu; Singh, Yadvinder

    2013-01-01

    This study deals with anilofos tolerance and its mineralization by the common rice field cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PUPCCC 64. The organism tolerated anilofos up to 25 mg L−1. The herbicide caused inhibitory effects on photosynthetic pigments of the test organism in a dose-dependent manner. The organism exhibited 60, 89, 96, 85 and 79% decrease in chlorophyll a, carotenoids, phycocyanin, allophycocyanin and phycoerythrin, respectively, in 20 mg L−1 anilofos on day six. Activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase increased by 1.04 to 1.80 times over control cultures in presence of 20 mg L−1 anilofos. Glutathione content decreased by 26% while proline content was unaffected by 20 mg L−1 anilofos. The test organism showed intracellular uptake and metabolized the herbicide. Uptake of herbicide by test organism was fast during initial six hours followed by slow uptake until 120 hours. The organism exhibited maximum anilofos removal at 100 mg protein L−1, pH 8.0 and 30°C. Its growth in phosphate deficient basal medium in the presence of anilofos (2.5 mg L−1) indicated that herbicide was used by the strain PUPCCC 64 as a source of phosphate. PMID:23382844

  17. Natural Electrotransformation of Lightning-Competent Pseudomonas sp. Strain N3 in Artificial Soil Microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Cérémonie, Hélène; Buret, François; Simonet, Pascal; Vogel, Timothy M.

    2006-01-01

    The lightning-competent Pseudomonas sp. strain N3, recently isolated from soil, has been used to study the extent of natural electrotransformation (NET) or lightning transformation as a horizontal gene transfer mechanism in soil. The variation of electrical fields applied to the soil with a laboratory-scale lightning system provides an estimate of the volume of soil affected by NET. Based on the range of the electric field that induces NET of Pseudomonas strain N3, the volume of soil, where NET could occur, ranges from 2 to 950 m3 per lightning strike. The influence of DNA parameters (amount, size, and purity) and DNA soil residence time were also investigated. NET frequencies (electrotransformants/recipient cells) ranged from 10−8 for cell lysate after 1 day of residence in soil to 4 × 10−7 with a purified plasmid added immediately before the lightning. The electrical field gradient (in kilovolts per cm) also played a role as NET frequencies ranging from 1 × 10−5 at 2.3 kV/cm to 1.7 × 10−4 at 6.5 kV/cm. PMID:16597934

  18. 2,4-Dinitrotoluene dioxygenase from Burkholderia sp. strain DNT: similarity to naphthalene dioxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Suen, W C; Haigler, B E; Spain, J C

    1996-01-01

    2,4-Dinitrotoluene (DNT) dioxygenase from Burkholderia sp. strain DNT catalyzes the initial oxidation of DNT to form 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (MNC) and nitrite. The displacement of the aromatic nitro group by dioxygenases has only recently been described, and nothing is known about the evolutionary origin of the enzyme systems that catalyze these reactions. We have shown previously that the gene encoding DNT dioxygenase is localized on a degradative plasmid within a 6.8-kb NsiI DNA fragment (W.-C. Suen and J. C. Spain, J. Bacteriol. 175:1831-1837, 1993). We describe here the sequence analysis and the substrate range of the enzyme system encoded by this fragment. Five open reading frames were identified, four of which have a high degree of similarity (59 to 78% identity) to the components of naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) from Pseudomonas strains. The conserved amino acid residues within NDO that are involved in cofactor binding were also identified in the gene encoding DNT dioxygenase. An Escherichia coli clone that expressed DNT dioxygenase converted DNT to MNC and also converted naphthalene to (+)-cis-(1R,2S)-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene. In contrast, the E. coli clone that expressed NDO did not oxidize DNT. Furthermore, the enzyme systems exhibit similar broad substrate specificities and can oxidize such compounds as indole, indan, indene, phenetole, and acenaphthene. These results suggest that DNT dioxygenase and the NDO enzyme system share a common ancestor. PMID:8759857

  19. Enhanced caffeine degradation by immobilised cells of Leifsonia sp. strain SIU.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Salihu; Shukor, Mohd Y; Syed, Mohd A; Johari, Wan L W; Shamaan, Nor A; Sabullah, Mohd K; Ahmad, Siti A

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study, we isolated Leifsonia sp. strain SIU, a new bacterium from agricultured soil. The bacterium was tested for its ability to degrade caffeine. The isolate was encapsulated in gellan gum and its ability to degrade caffeine was compared with the free cells. The optimal caffeine degradation was attained at a gellan gum concentration of 0.75% (w/v), a bead size of 4 mm diameter, and 250 beads per 100 mL of medium. At a caffeine concentration of 0.1 g/L, immobilised cells of the strain SIU degraded caffeine within 9 h, which is faster when compared to the case of free cells, in which it took 12 h to degrade. The immobilised cells degraded caffeine completely within 39 and 78 h at 0.5 and 1.0 g/L, while the free cells took 72 and 148 h at 0.5 and 1.0 g/L, respectively. At higher caffeine concentrations, immobilised cells exhibited a higher caffeine degradation rate. At concentrations of 1.5 and 2.0 g/L, caffeine-degrading activities of both immobilised and free cells were inhibited. The immobilised cells showed no loss in caffeine-degrading activity after being used repeatedly for nine 24-h cycles. The effect of heavy metals on immobilised cells was also tested. This study showed an increase in caffeine degradation efficiency when the cells were encapsulated in gellan gum.

  20. Effect of NaCl on aerobic denitrification by strain Achromobacter sp. GAD-3.

    PubMed

    Gui, Mengyao; Chen, Qian; Ni, Jinren

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the effect of NaCl on aerobic denitrification by a novel aerobic denitrifier strain Achromobacter sp. GAD-3. Results indicated that the aerobic denitrification process was inhibited by NaCl concentrations ≥20 g L(-1), leading to lower nitrate removal rates (1.67∼4.0 mg L(-1) h(-1)), higher nitrite accumulation (50.2∼87.4 mg L(-1)), and increasing N2O emission ratios (13∼72 mg L(-1)/mg L(-1)). Poor performance of aerobic denitrification at high salinity was attributed to the suppression of active microbial biomass and electron donating capacity of strain GAD-3. Further studies on the corresponding inhibition of the denitrifying gene expression by higher salinities revealed the significant sensitivity order of nosZ (for N2O reductase) > cnorB (for NO reductase) ≈ nirS (for cytochrome cd(1) nitrite reductase) > napA (for periplasmic nitrate reductase), accompanied with a time-lapse expression between nosZ and cnorB based on reverse transcription and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis. The insights into the effect of NaCl on aerobic denitrification are of great significance to upgrade wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) containing varying levels of salinity.

  1. Multiple mechanisms of uranium immobilization by Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6.

    PubMed

    Sivaswamy, Vaideeswaran; Boyanov, Maxim I; Peyton, Brent M; Viamajala, Sridhar; Gerlach, Robin; Apel, William A; Sani, Rajesh K; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kemner, Kenneth M; Borch, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    Removal of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solution was studied using a Gram-positive facultative anaerobe, Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6, under anaerobic, non-growth conditions in bicarbonate and PIPES buffers. Inorganic phosphate was released by cells during the experiments providing ligands for formation of insoluble U(VI) phosphates. Phosphate release was most probably the result of anaerobic hydrolysis of intracellular polyphosphates accumulated by ES6 during aerobic growth. Microbial reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) was also observed. However, the relative magnitudes of U(VI) removal by abiotic (phosphate-based) precipitation and microbial reduction depended on the buffer chemistry. In bicarbonate buffer, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy showed that U in the solid phase was present primarily as a non-uraninite U(IV) phase, whereas in PIPES buffer, U precipitates consisted primarily of U(VI)-phosphate. In both bicarbonate and PIPES buffer, net release of cellular phosphate was measured to be lower than that observed in U-free controls suggesting simultaneous precipitation of U and PO₄³⁻. In PIPES, U(VI) phosphates formed a significant portion of U precipitates and mass balance estimates of U and P along with XAFS data corroborate this hypothesis. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) of samples from PIPES treatments indeed showed both extracellular and intracellular accumulation of U solids with nanometer sized lath structures that contained U and P. In bicarbonate, however, more phosphate was removed than required to stoichiometrically balance the U(VI)/U(IV) fraction determined by XAFS, suggesting that U(IV) precipitated together with phosphate in this system. When anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), a known electron shuttle, was added to the experimental reactors, the dominant removal mechanism in both buffers was reduction to a non-uraninite U(IV) phase. Uranium

  2. Metabolic Engineering of the Actinomycete Amycolatopsis sp. Strain ATCC 39116 towards Enhanced Production of Natural Vanillin

    PubMed Central

    Fleige, Christian; Meyer, Florian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Gram-positive bacterium Amycolatopsis sp. ATCC 39116 is used for the fermentative production of natural vanillin from ferulic acid on an industrial scale. The strain is known for its outstanding tolerance to this toxic product. In order to improve the productivity of the fermentation process, the strain's metabolism was engineered for higher final concentrations and molar yields. Degradation of vanillin could be decreased by more than 90% through deletion of the vdh gene, which codes for the central vanillin catabolism enzyme, vanillin dehydrogenase. This mutation resulted in improvement of the final concentration of vanillin by more than 2.2 g/liter, with a molar yield of 80.9%. Further improvement was achieved with constitutive expression of the vanillin anabolism genes ech and fcs, coding for the enzymes feruloyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase (fcs) and enoyl-CoA hydratase/aldolase (ech). The transcription of both genes was shown to be induced by ferulic acid, which explains the unwanted adaptation phase in the fermentation process before vanillin was efficiently produced by the wild-type cells. Through the constitutive and enhanced expression of the two genes, the adaptation phase was eliminated and a final vanillin concentration of 19.3 g/liter, with a molar yield of 94.9%, was obtained. Moreover, an even higher final vanillin concentration of 22.3 g/liter was achieved, at the expense of a lower molar yield, by using an improved feeding strategy. This is the highest reported vanillin concentration reached in microbial fermentation processes without extraction of the product. Furthermore, the vanillin was produced almost without by-products, with a molar yield that nearly approached the theoretical maximum. IMPORTANCE Much effort has been put into optimization of the biotechnological production of natural vanillin. The demand for this compound is growing due to increased consumer concerns regarding chemically produced food additives. Since this

  3. Genome Sequence of the Deep-Sea Denitrifier Pseudomonas sp. Strain MT-1, Isolated from the Mariana Trench.

    PubMed

    Fujinami, Shun; Oikawa, Yuji; Araki, Takuma; Shinmura, Yui; Midorikawa, Ryota; Ishizaka, Hikari; Kato, Chiaki; Horikoshi, Koki; Ito, Masahiro; Tamegai, Hideyuki

    2014-12-18

    Pseudomonas sp. strain MT-1 was the first deep-sea denitrifier isolated and characterized from mud recovered from a depth of 11,000 m in the Mariana Trench. We report here the genome sequence of this bacterium, which contributes to our understanding of denitrification and bioenergetics in the deep sea.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the Polyextremophilic Halorubrum sp. Strain AJ67, Isolated from Hyperarsenic Lakes in the Argentinian Puna

    PubMed Central

    Burguener, Germán F.; Maldonado, Marcos J.; Revale, Santiago; Fernández Do Porto, Darío; Rascován, Nicolás; Vázquez, Martín; Farías, María Eugenia; Marti, Marcelo A.

    2014-01-01

    Halorubrum sp. strain AJ67, an extreme halophilic UV-resistant archaeon, was isolated from Laguna Antofalla in the Argentinian Puna. The draft genome sequence suggests the presence of potent enzyme candidates that are essential for survival under multiple environmental extreme conditions, such as high UV radiation, elevated salinity, and the presence of critical arsenic concentrations. PMID:24503991

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of the Polyextremophilic Exiguobacterium sp. Strain S17, Isolated from Hyperarsenic Lakes in the Argentinian Puna

    PubMed Central

    Ordoñez, Omar F.; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Kurth, Daniel; Gorriti, Marta F.; Revale, Santiago; Cortez, Néstor; Vazquez, Martin P.; Farías, María E.

    2013-01-01

    Exiguobacterium sp. strain S17 is a moderately halotolerant, arsenic-resistant bacterium that was isolated from Laguna Socompa stromatolites in the Argentinian Puna. The draft genome sequence suggests potent enzyme candidates that are essential for survival under multiple environmental extreme conditions, such as high levels of UV radiation, elevated salinity, and the presence of critical arsenic concentrations. PMID:23887911

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Polyextremophilic Exiguobacterium sp. Strain S17, Isolated from Hyperarsenic Lakes in the Argentinian Puna.

    PubMed

    Ordoñez, Omar F; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Kurth, Daniel; Gorriti, Marta F; Revale, Santiago; Cortez, Néstor; Vazquez, Martin P; Farías, María E; Turjanski, Adrian G

    2013-07-25

    Exiguobacterium sp. strain S17 is a moderately halotolerant, arsenic-resistant bacterium that was isolated from Laguna Socompa stromatolites in the Argentinian Puna. The draft genome sequence suggests potent enzyme candidates that are essential for survival under multiple environmental extreme conditions, such as high levels of UV radiation, elevated salinity, and the presence of critical arsenic concentrations.

  7. Draft genome sequence of Thauera sp. strain SWB20, isolated from a Singapore wastewater treatment facility using gel microdroplets

    DOE PAGES

    Dichosa, Armand E. K.; Davenport, Karen W.; Li, Po-E; ...

    2015-03-19

    In this study, we report here the genome sequence of Thauera sp. strain SWB20, isolated from a Singaporean wastewater treatment facility using gel microdroplets (GMDs) and single-cell genomics (SCG). This approach provided a single clonal microcolony that was sufficient to obtain a 4.9-Mbp genome assembly of an ecologically relevant Thauera species.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Rahnella sp Strain Y9602, a Gammaproteobacterium Isolate from Metal- and Radionuclide-Contaminated Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Robert J; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, James; Han, Cliff; Held, Brittany; Mikhailova, Natalia; Nolan, Matt; Pennacchio, Len; Pitluck, Sam; Tapia, Roxanne; Woyke, Tanja; Sobeckya, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Rahnella sp. strain Y9602 is a gammaproteobacterium isolated from contaminated subsurface soils that is capable of promoting uranium phosphate mineralization as a result of constitutive phosphatase activity. Here we report the first complete genome sequence of an isolate belonging to the genus Rahnella.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Alcanivorax sp. Strain KX64203 Isolated from Deep-Sea Sediments of Iheya North, Okinawa Trough

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Gao, Qiang; Hou, Zhanhui; Gao, Dahai

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the draft genome sequence of Alcanivorax sp. strain KX64203, isolated from deep-sea sediment samples. The reads generated by an Ion Torrent PGM were assembled into contigs, with a total size of 4.76 Mb. The data will improve our understanding of the strain’s function in alkane degradation. PMID:27563046

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Turicibacter sp. Strain H121, Isolated from the Feces of a Contaminated Germ-Free Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Auchtung, T. A.; Holder, M. E.; Gesell, J. R.; Ajami, N. J.; Duarte, R. T. D.; Itoh, K.; Caspi, R. R.; Petrosino, J. F.; Horai, R.

    2016-01-01

    Turicibacter bacteria are commonly detected in the gastrointestinal tracts and feces of humans and animals, but their phylogeny, ecological role, and pathogenic potential remain unclear. We present here the first complete genome sequence of Turicibacter sp. strain H121, which was isolated from the feces of a mouse line contaminated following germ-free derivation. PMID:27013036

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Frankia sp. Strain BMG5.12, a Nitrogen-Fixing Actinobacterium Isolated from Tunisian Soils

    PubMed Central

    Nouioui, Imen; Beauchemin, Nicholas; Cantor, Michael N.; Chen, Amy; Detter, J. Chris; Furnholm, Teal; Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Goodwin, Lynne; Gtari, Maher; Han, Cliff; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Hua, Susan Xinyu; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Mikhailova, Natalia; Nordberg, Henrik P.; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Sen, Arnab; Sur, Saubashya; Szeto, Ernest; Thakur, Subarna; Wall, Luis; Wei, Chia-Lin; Woyke, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Members of the actinomycete genus Frankia form a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with 8 different families of actinorhizal plants. We report a draft genome sequence for Frankia sp. strain BMG5.12, a nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium isolated from Tunisian soils with the ability to infect Elaeagnus angustifolia and Myrica gale. PMID:23846272

  12. Near-Complete Genome Sequence of Thalassospira sp. Strain KO164 Isolated from a Lignin-Enriched Marine Sediment Microcosm

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Hannah L.; O’Dell, Kaela B.; Utturkar, Sagar; McBride, Kathryn R.; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Brown, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Thalassospira sp. strain KO164 was isolated from eastern Mediterranean seawater and sediment laboratory microcosms enriched on insoluble organosolv lignin under oxic conditions. The near-complete genome sequence presented here will facilitate analyses into this deep-ocean bacterium’s ability to degrade recalcitrant organics such as lignin. PMID:27881538

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Frankia sp. Strain BCU110501, a Nitrogen-Fixing Actinobacterium Isolated from Nodules of Discaria trinevis

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Luis G.; Beauchemin, Nicholas; Cantor, Michael N.; Chaia, Eugenia; Chen, Amy; Detter, J. Chris; Furnholm, Teal; Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Goodwin, Lynne; Gtari, Maher; Han, Cliff; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Hua, Susan Xinyu; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Mikhailova, Natalia; Nordberg, Henrik P.; Nouioui, Imen; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Sen, Arnab; Sur, Saubashya; Szeto, Ernest; Thakur, Subarna; Wei, Chia-Lin; Woyke, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Frankia forms a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with actinorhizal plants. We report a draft genome sequence for Frankia sp. strain BCU110501, a nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium isolated from nodules of Discaria trinevis grown in the Patagonia region of Argentina. PMID:23846281

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Frankia sp. Strain BMG5.12, a Nitrogen-Fixing Actinobacterium Isolated from Tunisian Soils.

    PubMed

    Nouioui, Imen; Beauchemin, Nicholas; Cantor, Michael N; Chen, Amy; Detter, J Chris; Furnholm, Teal; Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Goodwin, Lynne; Gtari, Maher; Han, Cliff; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Hua, Susan Xinyu; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Mikhailova, Natalia; Nordberg, Henrik P; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Sen, Arnab; Sur, Saubashya; Szeto, Ernest; Thakur, Subarna; Wall, Luis; Wei, Chia-Lin; Woyke, Tanja; Tisa, Louis S

    2013-07-11

    Members of the actinomycete genus Frankia form a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with 8 different families of actinorhizal plants. We report a draft genome sequence for Frankia sp. strain BMG5.12, a nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium isolated from Tunisian soils with the ability to infect Elaeagnus angustifolia and Myrica gale.

  15. Near-Complete Genome Sequence of Thalassospira sp. Strain KO164 Isolated from a Lignin-Enriched Marine Sediment Microcosm.

    PubMed

    Woo, Hannah L; O'Dell, Kaela B; Utturkar, Sagar; McBride, Kathryn R; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Brown, Steven D; Hazen, Terry C

    2016-11-23

    Thalassospira sp. strain KO164 was isolated from eastern Mediterranean seawater and sediment laboratory microcosms enriched on insoluble organosolv lignin under oxic conditions. The near-complete genome sequence presented here will facilitate analyses into this deep-ocean bacterium's ability to degrade recalcitrant organics such as lignin.

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Frankia sp. Strain DC12, an Atypical, Noninfective, Ineffective Isolate from Datisca cannabina

    PubMed Central

    Beauchemin, Nicholas; Cantor, Michael N.; Furnholm, Teal; Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Goodwin, Lynne; Copeland, Alex; Gtari, Maher; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Mikhailova, Natalia; Nouioui, Imen; Oshone, Rediet; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Pati, Amrita; Sen, Arnab; Shapiro, Nicole; Szeto, Ernest; Wall, Luis; Wishart, Jessie; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Frankia sp. strain DC12, isolated from root nodules of Datisca cannabina, is a member of the fourth lineage of Frankia, which is unable to reinfect actinorhizal plants. Here, we report its 6.88-Mbp high-quality draft genome sequence, with a G+C content of 71.92% and 5,858 candidate protein-coding genes. PMID:26251504

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Frankia sp. Strain DC12, an Atypical, Noninfective, Ineffective Isolate from Datisca cannabina.

    PubMed

    Tisa, Louis S; Beauchemin, Nicholas; Cantor, Michael N; Furnholm, Teal; Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Goodwin, Lynne; Copeland, Alex; Gtari, Maher; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Mikhailova, Natalia; Nouioui, Imen; Oshone, Rediet; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Pati, Amrita; Sen, Arnab; Shapiro, Nicole; Szeto, Ernest; Wall, Luis; Wishart, Jessie; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-08-06

    Frankia sp. strain DC12, isolated from root nodules of Datisca cannabina, is a member of the fourth lineage of Frankia, which is unable to reinfect actinorhizal plants. Here, we report its 6.88-Mbp high-quality draft genome sequence, with a G+C content of 71.92% and 5,858 candidate protein-coding genes.

  18. Genome Sequence of Bacillus sp. Strain UMTAT18 Isolated from the Dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamiyavanichii Found in the Straits of Malacca

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Gan Han; Mohd Noor, Mohd Ezhar; Sung, Yeong Yik; Usup, Gires

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus sp. strain UMTAT18 was isolated from the harmful dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamiyavanichii. Its genome consists of 5,479,367 bp with 5,546 open reading frames, 102 tRNAs, and 29 rRNAs. Gene clusters for biosynthesis of nonribosomal peptides, bacteriocin, and lantipeptide were identified. It also contains siderophore and genes related to stress tolerance. PMID:27795265

  19. Genome sequence of the leaf-colonizing Bacterium Bacillus sp. strain 5B6, isolated from a cherry tree.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Kwon; Chung, Joon-hui; Kim, Seon-Young; Jeong, Haeyoung; Kang, Sung Gyun; Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Lee, Choong Hoon; Song, Ju Yeon; Yu, Dong Su; Ryu, Choong-Min; Kim, Jihyun F

    2012-07-01

    Plant growth-promoting bacteria colonize various habitats, including the phyllosphere. Here, we present the high-quality draft genome sequence of Bacillus sp. strain 5B6, which was isolated from the leaf of a cherry tree. The 3.9-Mb genome uncovers its potential for understanding the nature of leaf colonization as well as antibiosis against plant pathogens.

  20. Whole-Genome Sequence of Mesorhizobium hungaricum sp. nov. Strain UASWS1009, a Potential Resource for Agricultural and Environmental Uses

    PubMed Central

    Crovadore, Julien; Cochard, Bastien; Calmin, Gautier; Chablais, Romain; Schulz, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    We report here the whole-genome shotgun sequences of the strain UASWS1009 of the species Mesorhizobium hungaricum sp. nov., which are different from any other known Mesorhizobium species. This is the first genome registered for this new species, which could be considered as a potential resource for agriculture and environmental uses. PMID:27738050

  1. Genome Sequence of the Facultative Anaerobic Arsenite-Oxidizing and Nitrate-Reducing Bacterium Acidovorax sp. Strain NO1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yinyan; Li, Hang; Rensing, Christopher; Zhao, Kai; Johnstone, Laurel

    2012-01-01

    Acidovorax sp. strain NO1, isolated from gold mine soil, was shown to be a facultative anaerobic arsenite-oxidizing and nitrate-reducing bacterium. The reported draft genome predicts the presence of genes involved in arsenic metabolism, nitrate reduction, phosphate transport, and multiple metal resistances and indicates putative horizontal gene transfer events. PMID:22374962

  2. Modular synthase-encoding gene involved in α-olefin biosynthesis in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

    PubMed

    Mendez-Perez, Daniel; Begemann, Matthew B; Pfleger, Brian F

    2011-06-01

    A gene involved in the production of medium-chain α-olefins was identified in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. The gene encodes a large multidomain protein with homology to type I polyketide synthases, suggesting a route for hydrocarbon biosynthesis from fatty acids via an elongation decarboxylation mechanism.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Haloferax sp. Strain ATB1, Isolated from a Semi-Arid Region in the Brazilian Caatinga.

    PubMed

    Castro, Wendel de Oliveira; Torres-Ballesteros, Adriana Maria; Nakayama, Cristina Rossi; Melo, Itamar Soares; Pellizari, Vivian Helena; Silva, Artur; Ramos, Rommel Thiago Jucá

    2014-08-14

    Organisms in the Haloferax genus are extreme halophiles that grow in environments with pH values between 4 and 12, and temperatures between 0°C and 60°C. In the present study, a draft of the first Haloferax sp. strain ATB1 genome isolated from the region of Cariri (in Paraíba State, Brazil) is presented.

  4. Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 responds to nitrogen deprivation with a cascade-like sequence of transcriptional activations.

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Y; Wolk, C P

    1997-01-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 adapts to deprivation of fixed nitrogen by undergoing physiological and genetic changes that include formation of N2-fixing heterocysts. Whether or not certain of the genes involved are interdependently expressed has been studied. PMID:8982007

  5. Complete genome sequence of the Streptomyces sp. strain CdTB01, a bacterium tolerant to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Geng; Yang, Hui; Zhou, Hui; Wang, Chong; Fu, Fuhua; Yu, Ye; Lu, Xiangyang; Tian, Yun

    2016-07-10

    Streptomyces sp. Strain CdTB01, which is tolerant to high concentrations of heavy metals, particularly cadmium, was isolated from soil contaminated with heavy metals. Two contigs with total genome size of 10.19Mb were identified in the whole genome sequencing and assembly, and numerous homologous genes known to be involved in heavy metal resistance were found in the genome.

  6. Whole-Genome Sequence of Streptococcus parauberis Strain SP-llh, Isolated from Cows with Mastitis in Western China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Longhai; Yang, Feng; Li, Xinpu; Luo, Jinyin; Zhang, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus parauberis strain SP-llh was isolated from cows with mastitis in western China in 2015. The 2,522,235-bp genome sequence consists of 46 large contigs in 14 scaffolds and contains 2,620 predicted protein-coding genes, with a G+C content of 35.3%. PMID:28082485

  7. Complete genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. strain CFMR 7, a natural rubber degrading actinomycete isolated from Penang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Nanthini, Jayaram; Chia, Kim-Hou; Thottathil, Gincy P; Taylor, Todd D; Kondo, Shinji; Najimudin, Nazalan; Baybayan, Primo; Singh, Siddharth; Sudesh, Kumar

    2015-11-20

    Streptomyces sp. strain CFMR 7, which naturally degrades rubber, was isolated from a rubber plantation. Whole genome sequencing and assembly resulted in 2 contigs with total genome size of 8.248 Mb. Two latex clearing protein (lcp) genes which are responsible for rubber degrading activities were identified.

  8. Cutinase-like enzyme from the yeast Cryptococcus sp. strain S-2 hydrolyzes polylactic acid and other biodegradable plastics.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Kazuo; Kamini, Numbi Ramudu; Ikeda, Hiroko; Iefuji, Haruyuki

    2005-11-01

    A purified lipase from the yeast Cryptococcus sp. strain S-2 exhibited remote homology to proteins belonging to the cutinase family rather than to lipases. This enzyme could effectively degrade the high-molecular-weight compound polylactic acid, as well as other biodegradable plastics, including polybutylene succinate, poly (epsilon-caprolactone), and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate).

  9. Growth of Arthrobacter sp. strain JBH1 on nitroglycerin as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Husserl, Johana; Spain, Jim C; Hughes, Joseph B

    2010-03-01

    Arthrobacter sp. strain JBH1 was isolated from nitroglycerin-contaminated soil by selective enrichment. Detection of transient intermediates and simultaneous adaptation studies with potential intermediates indicated that the degradation pathway involves the conversion of nitroglycerin to glycerol via 1,2-dinitroglycerin and 1-mononitroglycerin, with concomitant release of nitrite. Glycerol then serves as the source of carbon and energy.

  10. Construction of new synthetic biology tools for the control of gene expression in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

    PubMed

    Zess, Erin K; Begemann, Matthew B; Pfleger, Brian F

    2016-02-01

    Predictive control of gene expression is an essential tool for developing synthetic biological systems. The current toolbox for controlling gene expression in cyanobacteria is a barrier to more in-depth genetic analysis and manipulation. Towards relieving this bottleneck, this work describes the use of synthetic biology to construct an anhydrotetracycline-based induction system and adapt a trans-acting small RNA (sRNA) system for use in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. An anhydrotetracycline-inducible promoter was developed to maximize intrinsic strength and dynamic range. The resulting construct, PEZtet , exhibited tight repression and a maximum 32-fold induction upon addition of anhydrotetracycline. Additionally, a sRNA system based on the Escherichia coli IS10 RNA-IN/OUT regulator was adapted for use in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. This system exhibited 70% attenuation of target gene expression, providing a demonstration of the use of sRNAs for differential gene expression in cyanobacteria. These systems were combined to produce an inducible sRNA system, which demonstrated 59% attenuation of target gene expression. Lastly, the role of Hfq, a critical component of sRNA systems in E. coli, was investigated. Genetic studies showed that the Hfq homolog in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 did not impact repression by the engineered sRNA system. In summary, this work describes new synthetic biology tools that can be applied to physiological studies, metabolic engineering, or sRNA platforms in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

  11. Genomic Insights into Aquimarina sp. Strain EL33, a Bacterial Symbiont of the Gorgonian Coral Eunicella labiata

    PubMed Central

    Keller-Costa, Tina; Silva, Rúben; Lago-Lestón, Asunción

    2016-01-01

    To address the metabolic potential of symbiotic Aquimarina spp., we report here the genome sequence of Aquimarina sp. strain EL33, a bacterium isolated from the gorgonian coral Eunicella labiata. This first-described (to our knowledge) animal-associated Aquimarina genome possesses a sophisticated repertoire of genes involved in drug/antibiotic resistance and biosynthesis. PMID:27540075

  12. Genome Sequence of the Arsenic-Resistant Haladaptatus sp. Strain R4 Isolated from Ramnagar, West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Urmimala; Mukherjee, Trinetra; Bose, Sucharita; Roy, Chayan; Rameez, Moidu Jameela; Ghosh, Wriddhiman

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of Haladaptatus sp. strain R4, a halophilic archaea that produces an orange-pink pigment and is capable of growing in a wide salinity range. The genome assembly shows genes for arsenic resistance, siderophore production, trehalose and glycine betaine biosynthesis, uptake and transporters of sodium, potassium, and chloride ions. PMID:27660791

  13. [Probiotic features of carotene producing strains Bacillus sp. 1.1 and B. amyloliquefaciens UCM B-5113].

    PubMed

    Avdeeva, L V; Nechypurenko, O O; Kharhota, M A

    2015-01-01

    Researched probiotic properties of carotinproducing strains Bacillus sp. 1.1 and B. amyloliquefaciens UCM B-5113. It was established that Bacillus sp. 1.1 characterized by high and middle antagonistic activity against museums and actual test cultures and B. amyloliquefaciens UCM B-5113 shown middle and low activity. They grew up and formed a pigment at pH 6.0 in the presence of 0.4% bile. Bacillus sp. 1.1 and B. amyloliquefaciens UCM B-5113 were avirulent, had low antagonistic activity and characterized by susceptibility to antimicrobial agents, excluding colistin. The results suggested the possibility to create based on Bacillus sp. 1.1 and B. amyloliquefaciens UCM B-5113 probiotic preparation.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Thalassotalea sp. Strain ND16A Isolated from Eastern Mediterranean Sea Water Collected from a Depth of 1,055 Meters

    SciTech Connect

    Stelling, Savannah C.; Techtmann, Stephen M.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Alshibli, Noor K.; Brown, Steven D.; Hazen, Terry C.

    2014-11-26

    Thalassotalea sp. strain ND16A belongs to the family Colwelliaceae and was isolated from eastern Mediterranean Sea water at a depth of 1,055 m. Members of Colwelliaceae are ubiquitous marine heterotrophs. Lastly, here we report the draft genome sequence of Thalassotalea sp. strain ND16A, a member of the newly described genus Thalassotalea.

  15. Genome sequence of Vibrio sp. strain EJY3, an agarolytic marine bacterium metabolizing 3,6-anhydro-L-galactose as a sole carbon source.

    PubMed

    Roh, Hanseong; Yun, Eun Ju; Lee, Saeyoung; Ko, Hyeok-Jin; Kim, Sujin; Kim, Byung-Yong; Song, Heesang; Lim, Kwang-il; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Choi, In-Geol

    2012-05-01

    The metabolic fate of 3,6-anhydro-L-galactose (L-AHG) is unknown in the global marine carbon cycle. Vibrio sp. strain EJY3 is an agarolytic marine bacterium that can utilize L-AHG as a sole carbon source. To elucidate the metabolic pathways of L-AHG, we have sequenced the complete genome of Vibrio sp. strain EJY3.

  16. Arsenic Sensing and Resistance System in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    López-Maury, Luis; Florencio, Francisco J.; Reyes, José C.

    2003-01-01

    Arsenic is one of the most important global environmental pollutants. Here we show that the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 contains an arsenic and antimony resistance operon consisting of three genes: arsB, encoding a putative arsenite and antimonite carrier, arsH, encoding a protein of unknown function, and arsC, encoding a putative arsenate reductase. While arsB mutant strains were sensitive to arsenite, arsenate, and antimonite, arsC mutants were sensitive only to arsenate. The arsH mutant strain showed no obvious phenotype under the conditions tested. In vivo the arsBHC operon was derepressed by oxyanions of arsenic and antimony (oxidation state, +3) and, to a lesser extent, by bismuth (oxidation state, +3) and arsenate (oxidation state, +5). In the absence of these effectors, the operon was repressed by a transcription repressor of the ArsR/SmtB family, encoded by an unlinked gene termed arsR. Thus, arsR null mutants showed constitutive derepression of the arsBHC operon. Expression of the arsR gene was not altered by the presence of arsenic or antimony compounds. Purified recombinant ArsR protein binds to the arsBHC promoter-operator region in the absence of metals and dissociates from the DNA in the presence of Sb(III) or As(III) but not in the presence of As(V), suggesting that trivalent metalloids are the true inducers of the system. DNase I footprinting experiments indicate that ArsR binds to two 17-bp direct repeats, with each one consisting of two inverted repeats, in the region from nucleotides −34 to + 17 of the arsBHC promoter-operator. PMID:12949088

  17. Survival Strategies of the Plant-Associated Bacterium Enterobacter sp. Strain EG16 under Cadmium Stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanmei; Chao, Yuanqing; Li, Yaying; Lin, Qingqi; Bai, Jun; Tang, Lu; Wang, Shizhong; Ying, Rongrong; Qiu, Rongliang

    2016-01-04

    Plant-associated bacteria are of great interest because of their potential use in phytoremediation. However, their ability to survive and promote plant growth in metal-polluted soils remains unclear. In this study, a soilborne Cd-resistant bacterium was isolated and identified as Enterobacter sp. strain EG16. It tolerates high external Cd concentrations (Cd(2+) MIC, >250 mg liter(-1)) and is able to produce siderophores and the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), both of which contribute to plant growth promotion. Surface biosorption in this strain accounted for 31% of the total Cd accumulated. The potential presence of cadmium sulfide, shown by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, suggested intracellular Cd binding as a Cd response mechanism of the isolate. Cd exposure resulted in global regulation at the transcriptomic level, with the bacterium switching to an energy-conserving mode by inhibiting energy-consuming processes while increasing the production of stress-related proteins. The stress response system included increased import of sulfur and iron, which become deficient under Cd stress, and the redirection of sulfur metabolism to the maintenance of intracellular glutathione levels in response to Cd toxicity. Increased production of siderophores, responding to Cd-induced Fe deficiency, not only is involved in the Cd stress response systems of EG16 but may also play an important role in promoting plant growth as well as alleviating the Cd-induced inhibition of IAA production. The newly isolated strain EG16 may be a suitable candidate for microbially assisted phytoremediation due to its high resistance to Cd and its Cd-induced siderophore production, which is likely to contribute to plant growth promotion.

  18. Lauric Acid Production in a Glycogen-Less Strain of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    PubMed Central

    Work, Victoria H.; Melnicki, Matthew R.; Hill, Eric A.; Davies, Fiona K.; Kucek, Leo A.; Beliaev, Alexander S.; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2015-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Pasteur culture collection 7002 was genetically engineered to synthesize biofuel-compatible medium-chain fatty acids (FAs) during photoautotrophic growth. Expression of a heterologous lauroyl-acyl carrier protein (C12:0-ACP) thioesterase with concurrent deletion of the endogenous putative acyl-ACP synthetase led to secretion of transesterifiable C12:0 FA in CO2-supplemented batch cultures. When grown at steady state over a range of light intensities in a light-emitting diode turbidostat photobioreactor, the C12-secreting mutant exhibited a modest reduction in growth rate and increased O2 evolution relative to the wild-type (WT). Inhibition of (i) glycogen synthesis by deletion of the glgC-encoded ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) and (ii) protein synthesis by nitrogen deprivation were investigated as potential mechanisms for metabolite redistribution to increase FA synthesis. Deletion of AGPase led to a 10-fold decrease in reducing carbohydrates and secretion of organic acids during nitrogen deprivation consistent with an energy spilling phenotype. When the carbohydrate-deficient background (ΔglgC) was modified for C12 secretion, no increase in C12 was achieved during nutrient replete growth, and no C12 was recovered from any strain upon nitrogen deprivation under the conditions used. At steady state, the growth rate of the ΔglgC strain saturated at a lower light intensity than the WT, but O2 evolution was not compromised and became increasingly decoupled from growth rate with rising irradiance. Photophysiological properties of the ΔglgC strain suggest energy dissipation from photosystem II and reconfiguration of electron flow at the level of the plastoquinone pool. PMID:25964950

  19. Cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase production by new Bacillus sp. strains isolated from brazilian soil

    PubMed Central

    Menocci, Vivian; Goulart, Antonio José; Adalberto, Paulo Roberto; Tavano, Olga Luisa; Marques, Daniela Parreira; Contiero, Jonas; Monti, Rubens

    2008-01-01

    Three strains of Bacillus sp. (BACRP, BACNC-1 and BACAR) were isolated from soil adhered to cassava husk. CGTase specific activity for the three isolated strains was higher when cultivated at 40°C. Potato starch, cassava starch, maltodextrin and glucose were used as carbon source and growth temperatures varied from 25 to 55°C. The three isolates presented higher CGTase specific activity when cultivated with potato starch at 40°C. Isolated BACRP and BACAR presented specific activity of 4.0×10–3 and 2.2×10–3 U/mg prot at pH 7.0, respectively, when cultivated in mediums added with NaCl 2%; at pH 10,0 their activities were of 3.4×10–3 and 3.0×10–3 U/mg prot, respectively, in the same concentration of NaCl. On the other hand, the isolated BACNC-1 presented activity specific of 2.4×10–3 U/mg prot when cultivated at pH 7.0 added of NaCl 1%, and at pH 10.0 the specific activity was of 3.4×10–3 U/mg prot without NaCl addition. This work also showed the presence of cyclodextrins formed during fermentation process and that precipitation with acetone or lyophilization followed by dialysis was efficient at removing CDs (cyclodextrins), thus, eliminating interference in the activity assays. The enzyme produced by the BACAR strain was partially purified and β-CD was liberated as a reaction product. PMID:24031289

  20. Characterisation of a cold adapted esterase and mutants from a psychotolerant Pseudomonas sp. strain.

    PubMed

    Dong, Juan; Gasmalla, Mohammed A A; Zhao, Wei; Sun, Jingtao; Liu, Wenyu; Wang, Mingming; Han, Liang; Yang, Ruijin

    2016-07-13

    A cold-adapted esterase-producing strain named T1-39 was isolated from Glacier No.1, Tianshan, China, and identified as Pseudomonas sp. from 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The esterase (EstT1-39) secreted by this strain preferentially hydrolyzed esters of glycerol with short- and medium-chain fatty acids. Mutants of T1-39 were generated by the atmospheric and room-temperature plasma (ARTP) method and screened for enhanced esterase activity. Among all the mutants, strain TB11 had 4.45-fold higher esterase productivity than T1-39, with high genetic stability over 10 generations of continuous cultivation. Maximum activity of EstT1-39 and EstTB11 was observed at 30°C, pH 9.0 and 25°C, pH 8.5, respectively. EstTB11 was thermally more stable (50°C for 1 hour) and active over a broader pH range than EstT1-39. EstTB11 also retained 38% of its maximal activity at 0°C and was found to be able to hydrolyze milk fats into short- and medium-chain fatty acids at 4°C. The characteristics of EstT1-39 made it a cold-adapted enzyme and the EstTB11 from the mutant, with its higher activity at lower temperatures, may be suitable for the production of aromas and flavors in the dairy industry. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Three dehalogenases and physiological restraints in the biodegradation of haloalkanes by Arthrobacter sp. strain HA1.

    PubMed Central

    Scholtz, R; Messi, F; Leisinger, T; Cook, A M

    1988-01-01

    Arthrobacter sp. strain HA1 utilizes 18 C2-to-C8 1-haloalkanes for growth and synthesizes an inducible 1-bromoalkane debrominase of unknown physiological function (R. Scholtz, T. Leisinger, F. Suter, and A.M. Cook, J. Bacteriol. 169:5016-5021, 1987) in addition to an inducible 1-chlorohexane halidohydrolase which dehalogenates some 50 substrates, including alpha, omega-dihaloalkanes. alpha, omega-Dihaloalkanes were utilized by cultures of strain HA1 under certain conditions only. C9 and C8 homologs prevented growth. At suitable concentrations, C7-to-C5 homologs could serve as sole sources of carbon and energy for growth. C4 and C3 homologs could be utilized only in the presence of a second substrate (e.g., butanol), and the C2 homolog was not degraded. Kinetics of growth and substrate utilization indicated that cells of strain HA1 growing in butanol-salts medium could be used to test whether compounds induced the 1-chlorohexane halidohydrolase. No gratuitous induction of synthesis of the enzyme was observed. Many enzyme substrates (e.g., bromobenzene) did not induce synthesis of the enzyme, though the enzyme sequence to degrade the product (phenol) was present. Some inducers (e.g., bromomethane) were enzyme substrates but not growth substrates. In an attempt to find a physiological role for the 1-bromoalkane debrominase, we observed that several long-chain haloaliphatic compounds (greater than C9; e.g., 1-bromohexadecane and 1-chlorohexadecane) were utilized for growth and that induced cells could dehalogenate several 1-haloalkanes (at least C4 to C16). The dehalogenation of the long-chain compounds could not be assayed in the cell extract, so we presume that a third haloalkane dehalogenase was present.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3223767

  2. Survival Strategies of the Plant-Associated Bacterium Enterobacter sp. Strain EG16 under Cadmium Stress

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanmei; Li, Yaying; Lin, Qingqi; Bai, Jun; Tang, Lu; Wang, Shizhong; Ying, Rongrong

    2016-01-01

    Plant-associated bacteria are of great interest because of their potential use in phytoremediation. However, their ability to survive and promote plant growth in metal-polluted soils remains unclear. In this study, a soilborne Cd-resistant bacterium was isolated and identified as Enterobacter sp. strain EG16. It tolerates high external Cd concentrations (Cd2+ MIC, >250 mg liter−1) and is able to produce siderophores and the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), both of which contribute to plant growth promotion. Surface biosorption in this strain accounted for 31% of the total Cd accumulated. The potential presence of cadmium sulfide, shown by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, suggested intracellular Cd binding as a Cd response mechanism of the isolate. Cd exposure resulted in global regulation at the transcriptomic level, with the bacterium switching to an energy-conserving mode by inhibiting energy-consuming processes while increasing the production of stress-related proteins. The stress response system included increased import of sulfur and iron, which become deficient under Cd stress, and the redirection of sulfur metabolism to the maintenance of intracellular glutathione levels in response to Cd toxicity. Increased production of siderophores, responding to Cd-induced Fe deficiency, not only is involved in the Cd stress response systems of EG16 but may also play an important role in promoting plant growth as well as alleviating the Cd-induced inhibition of IAA production. The newly isolated strain EG16 may be a suitable candidate for microbially assisted phytoremediation due to its high resistance to Cd and its Cd-induced siderophore production, which is likely to contribute to plant growth promotion. PMID:26729719

  3. Geobacter lovleyi sp. nov. Strain SZ, a Novel Metal-Reducing and Tetrachloroethene-Dechlorinating Bacterium†

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Youlboong; Fletcher, Kelly E.; Ritalahti, Kirsti M.; Apkarian, Robert P.; Ramos-Hernández, Natalia; Sanford, Robert A.; Mesbah, Noha M.; Löffler, Frank E.

    2006-01-01

    A bacterial isolate, designated strain SZ, was obtained from noncontaminated creek sediment microcosms based on its ability to derive energy from acetate oxidation coupled to tetrachloroethene (PCE)-to-cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) dechlorination (i.e., chlororespiration). Hydrogen and pyruvate served as alternate electron donors for strain SZ, and the range of electron acceptors included (reduced products are given in brackets) PCE and trichloroethene [cis-DCE], nitrate [ammonium], fumarate [succinate], Fe(III) [Fe(II)], malate [succinate], Mn(IV) [Mn(II)], U(VI) [U(IV)], and elemental sulfur [sulfide]. PCE and soluble Fe(III) (as ferric citrate) were reduced at rates of 56.5 and 164 nmol min−1 mg of protein−1, respectively, with acetate as the electron donor. Alternate electron acceptors, such as U(VI) and nitrate, did not inhibit PCE dechlorination and were consumed concomitantly. With PCE, Fe(III) (as ferric citrate), and nitrate as electron acceptors, H2 was consumed to threshold concentrations of 0.08 ± 0.03 nM, 0.16 ± 0.07 nM, and 0.5 ± 0.06 nM, respectively, and acetate was consumed to 3.0 ± 2.1 nM, 1.2 ± 0.5 nM, and 3.6 ± 0.25 nM, respectively. Apparently, electron acceptor-specific acetate consumption threshold concentrations exist, suggesting that similar to the hydrogen threshold model, the measurement of acetate threshold concentrations offers an additional diagnostic tool to delineate terminal electron-accepting processes in anaerobic subsurface environments. Genetic and phenotypic analyses classify strain SZ as the type strain of the new species, Geobacter lovleyi sp. nov., with Geobacter (formerly Trichlorobacter) thiogenes as the closest relative. Furthermore, the analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered from PCE-dechlorinating consortia and chloroethene-contaminated subsurface environments suggests that Geobacter lovleyi belongs to a distinct, dechlorinating clade within the metal-reducing Geobacter group. Substrate versatility

  4. Effects of nitrogen and carbon sources on the production of inulinase from strain Bacillus sp. SG113

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrailov, Simeon; Ivanova, Viara

    2016-03-01

    The effects of the carbon and nitrogen substrates on the growth of Bacillus sp. SG113 strain were studied. The use of organic nitrogen sources (peptone, beef extract, yeast extract, casein) leads to rapid cellular growth and the best results for the Bacillus strain were obtained with casein hydrolysate. From the inorganic nitrogen sources studied, the (NH4) 2SO4 proved to be the best nitrogen source. Casein hydrolysate and (NH4) 2SO4 stimulated the invertase synthesis. In the presence of Jerusalem artichoke, onion and garlic extracts as carbon sources the strain synthesized from 6 to 10 times more inulinase.

  5. Soluble methane monooxygenase gene clusters from trichloroethylene-degrading Methylomonas sp. strains and detection of methanotrophs during in situ bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Shigematsu, Toru; Hanada, Satoshi; Eguchi, Masahiro; Kamagata, Yoichi; Kanagawa, Takahiro; Kurane; Ryuichiro

    1999-12-01

    The soluble MMO (sMMO) gene clusters from group 1 methanotrophs were characterized. An 9.1-kb KpmI fragment from Methylomonas sp. strain KSWIII and a 7.5-kb SalI fragment from methylomonas sp. strain KSPIII which contained the sMMO gene clusters were cloned and sequenced. The sequences of these two fragments were almost identical. The sMMO gene clusters in the fragment consisted of six open reading frames which were 52 to 79% similar to the corresponding genes of previously described sMMO gene clusters of the group 2 and group 10 methanotrophs. The phylogenetic analysis of the predicted amino acid sequences of sMMO demonstrated that the sMMOs from these strains were closer to that from M. capsulatus Bath in the group X methanotrophs than to those from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b and Methylocystis sp. strain M in the group 2 methanotrophs. Based on the sequence data of sMMO genes of the strains and other methanotrophs, the authors designed a new PCR primer to amplify sMMO gene fragments of all the known methanotrophs harboring the mmoX gene. The primer set was successfully used for detecting methanotrophs in the ground-water of trichloroethylene-contaminated sites during in situ-biostimulation treatments.

  6. A novel competence gene, comP, is essential for natural transformation of Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413.

    PubMed Central

    Porstendörfer, D; Drotschmann, U; Averhoff, B

    1997-01-01

    Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413 (= ATCC 33305), a nutritionally versatile bacterium, has an extremely efficient natural transformation system. Here we describe the generation of eight transformation-affected mutants of Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413 by insertional mutagenesis. These mutants were found by Southern blot analysis and complementation studies to result from single nptII marker insertions at different chromosomal loci. DNA binding and uptake studies with one mutant, T205, revealed that the transformation deficiency of this mutant results from a complete lack of DNA binding and, therefore, uptake activity. A novel competence gene essential for natural transformation, named comP, was cloned by complementation of mutant T205. The nucleotide sequence of comP was determined, and its deduced 15-kDa polypeptide displays significant similarities to type IV pilins. Analysis of the ultrastructure of a transformation-deficient comP mutant and the transformation-competent wild-type strain revealed that both are covered with bundle-forming thin fimbriae (3 to 4 nm in diameter) and individual thick fimbriae (6 nm in diameter). These results provide evidence that the pilinlike ComP is unrelated to the piluslike structures of strain BD413. Taking all data into account, we propose that ComP functions as a major subunit of an organelle acting as a channel or pore mediating DNA binding and/or uptake in Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413. PMID:9361398

  7. Nitric Oxide Mediates Biofilm Formation and Symbiosis in Silicibacter sp. Strain TrichCH4B

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Minxi; Smith, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important signaling role in all domains of life. Many bacteria contain a heme-nitric oxide/oxygen binding (H-NOX) protein that selectively binds NO. These H-NOX proteins often act as sensors that regulate histidine kinase (HK) activity, forming part of a bacterial two-component signaling system that also involves one or more response regulators. In several organisms, NO binding to the H-NOX protein governs bacterial biofilm formation; however, the source of NO exposure for these bacteria is unknown. In mammals, NO is generated by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and signals through binding the H-NOX domain of soluble guanylate cyclase. Recently, several bacterial NOS proteins have also been reported, but the corresponding bacteria do not also encode an H-NOX protein. Here, we report the first characterization of a bacterium that encodes both a NOS and H-NOX, thus resembling the mammalian system capable of both synthesizing and sensing NO. We characterized the NO signaling pathway of the marine alphaproteobacterium Silicibacter sp. strain TrichCH4B, determining that the NOS is activated by an algal symbiont, Trichodesmium erythraeum. NO signaling through a histidine kinase-response regulator two-component signaling pathway results in increased concentrations of cyclic diguanosine monophosphate, a key bacterial second messenger molecule that controls cellular adhesion and biofilm formation. Silicibacter sp. TrichCH4B biofilm formation, activated by T. erythraeum, may be an important mechanism for symbiosis between the two organisms, revealing that NO plays a previously unknown key role in bacterial communication and symbiosis. PMID:25944856

  8. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Lebeckia ambigua-nodulating Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176

    DOE PAGES

    De Meyer, Sofie E.; Tian, Rui; Seshadri, Rekha; ...

    2015-10-16

    We report that Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective N2-fixing root nodule of Lebeckia ambigua collected in Nieuwoudtville, Western Cape of South Africa, in October 2007. This plant persists in infertile, acidic and deep sandy soils, and is therefore an ideal candidate for a perennial based agriculture system in Western Australia. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176, which represents a potential inoculant quality strain for L. ambigua, together with sequence and annotation. The 9,065,247 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in 13 scaffolds of 65 contigs,more » contains 8369 protein-coding genes and 128 RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal (Project ID 882).« less

  9. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Lebeckia ambigua-nodulating Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176

    SciTech Connect

    De Meyer, Sofie E.; Tian, Rui; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, TBK; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Yates, Ron; Howieson, John; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-10-16

    We report that Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective N2-fixing root nodule of Lebeckia ambigua collected in Nieuwoudtville, Western Cape of South Africa, in October 2007. This plant persists in infertile, acidic and deep sandy soils, and is therefore an ideal candidate for a perennial based agriculture system in Western Australia. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176, which represents a potential inoculant quality strain for L. ambigua, together with sequence and annotation. The 9,065,247 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in 13 scaffolds of 65 contigs, contains 8369 protein-coding genes and 128 RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal (Project ID 882).

  10. First genomic analysis of the broad-host-range Rhizobium sp. LPU83 strain, a member of the low-genetic diversity Oregon-like Rhizobium sp. group.

    PubMed

    Tejerizo, Gonzalo Torres; Del Papa, María Florencia; Draghi, Walter; Lozano, Mauricio; Giusti, María de Los Ángeles; Martini, Carla; Salas, María Eugenia; Salto, Ileana; Wibberg, Daniel; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Weidner, Stefan; Schlüter, Andreas; Lagares, Antonio; Pistorio, Mariano

    2011-08-20

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is the most cultivated forage legume for cattle and animal feeding, occupying about 32 million hectares over the world. Management of the N₂-fixing symbiosis of this plant to maximize crop production is therefore an important objective. A fundamental constraint to this aim emerges when a moderately low soil pH hampers the establishment of an effective symbiosis with indigenous and/or inoculated rhizobia. Besides the association of alfalfa with Ensifer (Sinorhizobium) meliloti, this legume is able to establish a symbiosis with Ensifer (Sinorhizobium) medicae and with less characterized types of rhizobia, such as the Oregon-like strains, Rhizobium sp. Or191 initially isolated in the USA, and the Rhizobium sp. LPU83 strain, from Argentina. These strains are acid-tolerant, highly competitive for acidic-soil-alfalfa nodulation, but inefficient for biological nitrogen fixation with alfalfa. These features position the Oregon-like rhizobia as strains of potential risk in agricultural soils compared with the efficient symbiont E. meliloti. Moreover, the collected genetic information has revealed that the genomic structure of these rhizobial isolates is complex in terms of sequence similarities shared with other rhizobia. Such a "patched" genetic composition has obviously imposed severe restrictions to the classical taxonomy of these rhizobia. In this work we summarize the accumulated knowledge about the Oregon-like rhizobia and present a phylogenetic analysis based on genome sequence data of Rhizobium sp. LPU83 obtained by a high-throughput sequencing on the Genome Sequencer FLX Titanium platform. The accessibility of the complete genomic sequence will release up more experimental possibilities since this information will then enable biochemical studies as well as proteomics and transcriptomics approaches.

  11. Two Master Switch Regulators Trigger A40926 Biosynthesis in Nonomuraea sp. Strain ATCC 39727

    PubMed Central

    Lo Grasso, Letizia; Maffioli, Sonia; Sosio, Margherita; Bibb, Mervyn; Puglia, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The actinomycete Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727 produces the glycopeptide A40926, the precursor of dalbavancin. Biosynthesis of A40926 is encoded by the dbv gene cluster, which contains 37 protein-coding sequences that participate in antibiotic biosynthesis, regulation, immunity, and export. In addition to the positive regulatory protein Dbv4, the A40926-biosynthetic gene cluster encodes two additional putative regulators, Dbv3 and Dbv6. Independent mutations in these genes, combined with bioassays and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analyses, demonstrated that Dbv3 and Dbv4 are both required for antibiotic production, while inactivation of dbv6 had no effect. In addition, overexpression of dbv3 led to higher levels of A40926 production. Transcriptional and quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analyses showed that Dbv4 is essential for the transcription of two operons, dbv14-dbv8 and dbv30-dbv35, while Dbv3 positively controls the expression of four monocistronic transcription units (dbv4, dbv29, dbv36, and dbv37) and of six operons (dbv2-dbv1, dbv14-dbv8, dbv17-dbv15, dbv21-dbv20, dbv24-dbv28, and dbv30-dbv35). We propose a complex and coordinated model of regulation in which Dbv3 directly or indirectly activates transcription of dbv4 and controls biosynthesis of 4-hydroxyphenylglycine and the heptapeptide backbone, A40926 export, and some tailoring reactions (mannosylation and hexose oxidation), while Dbv4 directly regulates biosynthesis of 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine and other tailoring reactions, including the four cross-links, halogenation, glycosylation, and acylation. IMPORTANCE This report expands knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms used to control the biosynthesis of the glycopeptide antibiotic A40926 in the actinomycete Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727. A40926 is the precursor of dalbavancin, approved for treatment of skin infections by Gram-positive bacteria. Therefore, understanding the regulation of its biosynthesis

  12. Purification and sequence analysis of 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol oxygenase from Burkholderia sp. strain DNT.

    PubMed Central

    Haigler, B E; Suen, W C; Spain, J C

    1996-01-01

    4-Methyl-5-nitrocatechol (MNC) is an intermediate in the degradation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene by Burkholderia sp. strain DNT. In the presence of NADPH and oxygen, MNC monooxygenase catalyzes the removal of the nitro group from MNC to form 2-hydroxy-5-methylquinone. The gene (dntB) encoding MNC monooxygenase has been previously cloned and characterized. In order to examine the properties of MNC monooxygenase and to compare it with other enzymes, we sequenced the gene encoding the MNC monooxygenase and purified the enzyme from strain DNT. dntB was localized within a 2.2-kb ApaI DNA fragment. Sequence analysis of this fragment revealed an open reading frame of 1,644 bp with an N-terminal amino acid sequence identical to that of purified MNC monooxygenase from strain DNT. Comparison of the derived amino acid sequences with those of other genes showed that DntB contains the highly conserved ADP and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) binding motifs characteristic of flavoprotein hydroxylases. MNC monooxygenase was purified to homogeneity from strain DNT by anion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a single protein with a molecular weight of 60,200, which is consistent with the size determined from the gene sequence. The native molecular weight determined by gel filtration was 65,000, which indicates that the native enzyme is a monomer. It used either NADH or NADPH as electron donors, and NADPH was the preferred cofactor. The purified enzyme contained 1 mol of FAD per mol of protein, which is also consistent with the detection of an FAD binding motif in the amino acid sequence of DntB. MNC monooxygenase has a narrow substrate specificity. MNC and 4-nitrocatechol are good substrates whereas 3-methyl-4-nitrophenol, 3-methyl-4-nitrocatechol, 4-nitrophenol, 3-nitrophenol, and 4-chlorocatechol were not. These studies suggest that MNC monooxygenase is a flavoprotein that shares some properties with

  13. Biochemical Characterization of 3-Methyl-4-nitrophenol Degradation in Burkholderia sp. Strain SJ98.

    PubMed

    Min, Jun; Lu, Yang; Hu, Xiaoke; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Several strains have been reported to grow on 3-methyl-4-nitrophenol (3M4NP), the primary breakdown product of the excessively used insecticide fenitrothion. However, the microbial degradation of 3M4NP at molecular and biochemical levels remains unknown. Here, methyl-1,4-benzoquinone (MBQ) and methylhydroquinone (MHQ), rather than catechol proposed previously, were identified as the intermediates before ring cleavage during 3M4NP degradation by Burkholderia sp. strain SJ98. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that the pnpABA1CDEF cluster involved in para-nitrophenol (PNP) and 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol (2C4NP) catabolism was also likely responsible for 3M4NP degradation in this strain. Purified PNP 4-monooxygenase (PnpA) is able to catalyze the monooxygenation of 3M4NP to MBQ and exhibited an apparent K m value of 20.3 ± 2.54 μM for 3M4NP, and pnpA is absolutely necessary for the catabolism of 3M4NP by gene knock-out and complementation. PnpB, a 1,4-benzoquinone reductase catalyzes the reduction of MBQ to MHQ, and also found to enhance PnpA activity in vitro in the conversion of 3M4NP to MBQ. By sequential catalysis assays, PnpCD, PnpE, and PnpF were likely involved in the lower pathway of 3M4NP catabolism. Although NpcCD, NpcE, and NpcF are able to catalyze the sequential conversion of MHQ in vitro, these enzymes are unlikely involved in 3M4NP catabolism because their coding genes were not upregulated by 3M4NP induction in vivo. These results revealed that the enzymes involved in PNP and 2C4NP catabolism were also responsible for 3M4NP degradation in strain SJ98. This fills a gap in our understanding of the microbial degradation of 3M4NP at molecular and biochemical levels and also provides another example to illustrate the adaptive flexibility in microbial catabolism for structurally similar compounds.

  14. Evaluating the application of Microbacterium sp. strain BR1 for the removal of sulfamethoxazole in full-scale membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Fenu, A; Donckels, B M R; Beffa, T; Bemfohr, C; Weemaes, M

    2015-01-01

    Microbacterium sp. strain BR1 is a bacterial strain that recently received attention for its capability to mineralize sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and other sulfonamides. In this study, the survival of Microbacterium sp. in municipal sludge waters was tested in batch experiments to explore optimal process conditions. Inoculation of Microbacterium sp. was subsequently performed in a pilot membrane bioreactor (MBR) operated in two configurations: treating full-scale MBR permeate (post-treatment) and treating raw municipal wastewater. SMX removal by Microbacterium sp. could not be proved in any of the configurations, except for SMX concentrations far higher than the ones normally found in municipal wastewater. By use of molecular tools (fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis) a low capability to survive in activated sludge systems was assessed. After inoculation, Microbacterium sp. was reduced to a small fraction of the viable biomass. The observed growth rate appeared to be many times lower than the one of typical activated sludge micro-organisms. Possibilities of application in full-scale municipal wastewater treatment are scarce.

  15. Improvement of Fish Sauce Quality by Strain CMC5-3-1: A Novel Species of Staphylococcus sp.

    PubMed

    Udomsil, Natteewan; Rodtong, Sureelak; Tanasupawat, Somboon; Yongsawatdigul, Jirawat

    2015-09-01

    Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 and CMS5-7-5 isolated from fermented fish sauce at 3 to 7 mo, respectively, showed different characteristics on protein hydrolysis and volatile formation. These Gram-positive cocci were able to grow in up to 15% NaCl with the optimum at 0.5% to 5% NaCl in tryptic soy broth. Based on ribosomal 16S rRNA gene sequences, Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 and CMS5-7-5 showed 99.0% similarity to that of Staphylococcus piscifermentans JCM 6057(T) , but DNA-DNA relatedness was <30%, indicating that they were likely to be new species. DNA relatedness between these 2 strains was only 65%, suggesting that they also belonged to different species. The α-amino group content of 6-month-old fish sauce inoculated with Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 was 740.5 mM, which was higher than that inoculated by the strain CMS5-7-5 (662.14 mM, P < 0.05). Histamine was not produced during fermentations with both strains. Fish sauce inoculated with Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 showed the highest content of total glutamic acid (P < 0.05). The major volatile compound detected in fish sauce inoculated with Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 was 2-methypropanal, contributing to the desirable dark chocolate note. Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 could be applied as a starter culture to improve the umami and aroma of fish sauce.

  16. Characterization of a new Providencia sp. strain X1 producing multiple xylanases on wheat bran.

    PubMed

    Raj, Abhay; Kumar, Sharad; Singh, Sudheer Kumar; Kumar, Mahadeo

    2013-01-01

    Providencia sp. strain X1 showing the highest xylanase activity among six bacterial isolates was isolated from saw-dust decomposing site. Strain X1 produced cellulase-free extracellular xylanase, which was higher in wheat bran medium than in xylan medium, when cultivated at pH 8.0 and 35°C. Zymogram analysis of crude preparation of enzymes obtained while growing on wheat bran and birchwood xylan revealed the presence of seven and two distinct xylanases with estimated molecular weight of 33; 35; 40; 48; 60; 75; and 95 kDa and 33 and 44 kDa, respectively. The crude xylanases were produced on wheat bran medium and showed optimum activity at pH 9.0 and 60°C. The thermotolerance studies showed activity retention of 100% and 85% at 40°C and 60°C after 30 min preincubation at pH 9.0. It was tolerant to lignin, ferulic acid, syringic acid, and guaiacol and retained 90% activity after ethanol treatment. The enzyme preparation was also tolerant to methanol and acetone and showed good activity retention in the presence of metal ions such as Fe2+, Mg2+, Zn2+, and Ca2+. The crude enzyme preparation was classified as endoxylanase based on the product pattern of xylan hydrolysis. Pretreatment of kraft pulp with crude xylanases for 3 h at 60°C led to a decrease in kappa number by 28.5%. The properties of present xylanases make them potentially useful for industrial applications.

  17. Transcriptomic Analysis of Xylan Utilization Systems in Paenibacillus sp. Strain JDR-2

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Neha; Crooks, Casey; St. John, Franz

    2014-01-01

    Xylans, including methylglucuronoxylans (MeGXn) and methylglucuronoarabinoxylans (MeGAXn), are the predominant polysaccharides in hemicellulose fractions of dicots and monocots available for conversion to biofuels and chemicals. Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 (Pjdr2) efficiently depolymerizes MeGXn and MeGAXn and assimilates the generated oligosaccharides, resulting in efficient saccharification and subsequent metabolism of these polysaccharides. A xylan utilization regulon encoding a cell-associated GH10 (glycoside hydrolase family 10) endoxylanase, transcriptional regulators, ABC (ATP binding cassette) transporters, an intracellular GH67 α-glucuronidase, and other glycoside hydrolases contributes to complete metabolism. This GH10/GH67 system has been proposed to account for preferential utilization of xylans compared to free oligo- and monosaccharides. To identify additional genes contributing to MeGXn and MeGAXn utilization, the transcriptome of Pjdr2 has been sequenced following growth on each of these substrates as well as xylose and arabinose. Increased expression of genes with different substrates identified pathways common or unique to the utilization of MeGXn or MeGAXn. Coordinate upregulation of genes comprising the GH10/GH67 xylan utilization regulon is accompanied with upregulation of genes encoding a GH11 endoxylanase and a GH115 α-glucuronidase, providing evidence for a novel complementary pathway for processing xylans. Elevated expression of genes encoding a GH43 arabinoxylan arabinofuranohydrolase and an arabinose ABC transporter on MeGAXn but not on MeGXn supports a process in which arabinose may be removed extracellularly followed by its rapid assimilation. Further development of Pjdr2 for direct conversion of xylans to targeted products or introduction of these systems into fermentative strains of related bacteria may lead to biocatalysts for consolidated bioprocessing of hemicelluloses released from lignocellulose. PMID:25527555

  18. Reinvestigation of Brevibacterium sp. Strain KY-4313 as a Source of Canthaxanthin

    PubMed Central

    Nelis, H. J.; De Leenheer, A. P.

    1989-01-01

    The hydrocarbon-utilizing Brevibacterium sp. strain KY-4313 was reevaluated for its potential to produce canthaxanthin, a carotenoid pigment of strong commercial interest. Three approaches were used to optimize the canthaxanthin yield from this organism, i.e., the preparation of mutants, the addition of supposedly carotenogenic chemicals to the growth medium, and growth promotion. Following treatment of the parent strain with N-nitrosomethylurea, a presumed mutant was isolated which showed a 32% increase in cellular canthaxanthin content. No effective carotenogenic chemicals were found in connection with hydrocarbon fermentations, in which mainly growth promotion through periodic medium renewal proved conducive to enhanced pigment production. Carotenogenesis could be stimulated in brain heart infusion broth by adding alcohols or retinol. Improved growth in this medium was generally not associated with higher canthaxanthin yields. Both superior growth and pigment levels were obtained in a newly designed medium based on fumaric acid-molasses. The maximum yields of canthaxanthin in shake flasks were (in milligrams per liter) 4.2 (brain heart infusion broth plus propanol-zinc sulfate), 3.6 (hydrocarbon medium), and 9.3 (fumaric acid-molasses), which represent a significant improvement over the originally reported optimal result (1 mg/liter). The corresponding yields of echinenone, the direct precursor of canthaxanthin, were 1.2, 1.6, and 2.3 mg/liter, respectively. Two-liter hydrocarbon batch fermentations involving medium renewal maximally produced 7.2 mg of canthaxanthin and 3.7 mg of echinenone per liter. PMID:16348027

  19. Pathways for degrading TNT by Thu-Z: a Pantoea sp. strain.

    PubMed

    Zou, Liangdong; Lu, Diannan; Liu, Zheng

    2012-12-01

    2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT), an extensively used and versatile explosive, is harmful in soil and water. In the present study, four bacterial strains capable of degrading TNT have been isolated from contaminated sites and named as Thu-A, Thu-B, Thu-C, and Thu-Z. Thu-Z, which gave the highest degradation efficiency compared to the others, was assigned to the genus Pantoea according to its 16S rRNA gene. Similarities in both biochemical properties and morphology suggested that Thu-Z was a Pantoea sp. strain. Thu-Z was proved to be capable of using TNT as a sole nitrogen source by cleaving NO(2) from the nitroaromatic ring by direct aromatic ring reduction. Under nitrogen-limited conditions, 96.6 % N of TNT was consumed by Thu-Z for growth, which was determined in terms of NaNO(2). Trace nitro reduction metabolites such as 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene (24Dam) and 2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene (26Dam) were identified in the presence of (NH(4))(2)SO(4). On the other hand, 4,4',6,6'-tetranitro-2,2'-azoxytoluene (22Azo) and 2,2',6,6'-tetranitro-4,4'-azoxytoluene (44Azo) were detected in the absence of (NH(4))(2)SO(4). These indicated the existence of a dual pathway for Thu-Z, while the direct aromatic ring reduction was predominant. Addition of a nitrogen source ((NH(4))(2)SO(4)) after inoculation stimulated the growth of Thu-Z and accelerated TNT degradation.

  20. Atrazine chlorohydrolase from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP: gene sequence, enzyme purification, and protein characterization.

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, M L; Sadowsky, M J; Wackett, L P

    1996-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP metabolizes atrazine to carbon dioxide and ammonia via the intermediate hydroxyatrazine. The genetic potential to produce hydroxyatrazine was previously attributed to a 1.9-kb AvaI DNA fragment from strain ADP (M. L. de Souza, L. P. Wackett, K. L. Boundy-Mills, R. T. Mandelbaum, and M. J. Sadowsky, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 61:3373-3378, 1995). In this study, sequence analysis of the 1.9-kb AvaI fragment indicated that a single open reading frame, atzA, encoded an activity transforming atrazine to hydroxyatrazine. The open reading frame for the chlorohydrolase was determined by sequencing to be 1,419 nucleotides and encodes a 473-amino-acid protein with a predicted subunit molecular weight of 52,421. The deduced amino acid sequence matched the first 10 amino acids determined by protein microsequencing. The protein AtzA was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation and anion-exchange chromatography. The subunit and holoenzyme molecular weights were 60,000 and 245,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel filtration chromatography, respectively. The purified enzyme in H2(18)O yielded [18O]hydroxyatrazine, indicating that AtzA is a chlorohydrolase and not an oxygenase. The most related protein sequence in GenBank was that of TrzA, 41% identity, from Rhodococcus corallinus NRRL B-15444R. TrzA catalyzes the deamination of melamine and the dechlorination of deethylatrazine and desisopropylatrazine but is not active with atrazine. AtzA catalyzes the dechlorination of atrazine, simazine, and desethylatrazine but is not active with melamine, terbutylazine, or desethyldesisopropylatrazine. Our results indicate that AtzA is a novel atrazine-dechlorinating enzyme with fairly restricted substrate specificity and contributes to the microbial hydrolysis of atrazine to hydroxyatrazine in soils and groundwater. PMID:8759853

  1. Cloning of a Novel Arylamidase Gene from Paracoccus sp. Strain FLN-7 That Hydrolyzes Amide Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Yin, Jin-Gang; Hang, Bao-Jian; Cai, Shu; Li, Shun-Peng

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial isolate Paracoccus sp. strain FLN-7 hydrolyzes amide pesticides such as diflubenzuron, propanil, chlorpropham, and dimethoate through amide bond cleavage. A gene, ampA, encoding a novel arylamidase that catalyzes the amide bond cleavage in the amide pesticides was cloned from the strain. ampA contains a 1,395-bp open reading frame that encodes a 465-amino-acid protein. AmpA was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and homogenously purified using Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. AmpA is a homodimer with an isoelectric point of 5.4. AmpA displays maximum enzymatic activity at 40°C and a pH of between 7.5 and 8.0, and it is very stable at pHs ranging from 5.5 to 10.0 and at temperatures up to 50°C. AmpA efficiently hydrolyzes a variety of secondary amine compounds such as propanil, 4-acetaminophenol, propham, chlorpropham, dimethoate, and omethoate. The most suitable substrate is propanil, with Km and kcat values of 29.5 μM and 49.2 s−1, respectively. The benzoylurea insecticides (diflubenzuron and hexaflumuron) are also hydrolyzed but at low efficiencies. No cofactor is needed for the hydrolysis activity. AmpA shares low identities with reported arylamidases (less than 23%), forms a distinct lineage from closely related arylamidases in the phylogenetic tree, and has different biochemical characteristics and catalytic kinetics with related arylamidases. The results in the present study suggest that AmpA is a good candidate for the study of the mechanism for amide pesticide hydrolysis, genetic engineering of amide herbicide-resistant crops, and bioremediation of amide pesticide-contaminated environments. PMID:22544249

  2. NolL of Rhizobium sp. Strain NGR234 Is Required for O-Acetyltransferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Berck, S.; Perret, X.; Quesada-Vincens, D.; Promé, J.-C.; Broughton, W. J.; Jabbouri, S.

    1999-01-01

    Following (iso)flavonoid induction, nodulation genes of the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 elaborate a large family of lipooligosaccharidic Nod factors (NodNGR factors). When secreted into the rhizosphere of compatible legumes, these signal molecules initiate root hair deformation and nodule development. The nonreducing glucosamine residue of NodNGR factors are N acylated, N methylated, and mono- or biscarbamoylated, while position C-6 of the reducing extremity is fucosylated. This fucose residue is normally 2-O methylated and either sulfated or acetylated. Here we present an analysis of all acetylated NodNGR factors, which clearly shows that the acetate group may occupy position C-3 or C-4 of the fucose moiety. Disruption of the flavonoid-inducible nolL gene, which is preceded by a nod box, results in the synthesis of NodNGR factors that lack the 3-O- or 4-O-acetate groups. Interestingly, the nodulation capacity of the mutant NGRΩnolL is not impaired, whereas introduction of the nod box::nolL construct into the related strain Rhizobium fredii USDA257 extends the host range of this bacterium to Calopogonium caeruleum, Leucaena leucocephala, and Lotus halophilus. Nod factors produced by a USDA257(pnolL) transconjugant were also acetylated. The nod box::nolL construct was also introduced into ANU265 (NGR234 cured of its symbiotic plasmid), along with extra copies of the nodD1 gene. When permeabilized, these cells possessed acetyltransferase activity, although crude extracts did not. PMID:9922261

  3. Isolation of Paenibacillus sp. and Variovorax sp. strains from decaying woods and characterization of their potential for cellulose deconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ghio, Silvina; Lorenzo, Gonzalo Sabarís Di; Lia, Verónica; Talia, Paola; Cataldi, Angel; Grasso, Daniel; Campos, Eleonora

    2012-01-01

    Prospection of cellulose-degrading bacteria in natural environments allows the identification of novel cellulases and hemicellulases that could be useful in second-generation bioethanol production. In this work, cellulolytic bacteria were isolated from decaying native forest soils by enrichment on cellulose as sole carbon source. There was a predominance of Gram positive isolates that belonged to the phyla Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Many primary isolates with cellulolytic activity were not pure cultures. From these consortia, isolation of pure constituents was attempted in order to test the hypothesis whether microbial consortia are needed for full degradation of complex substrates. Two isolates, CB1-2-A-5 and VG-4-A-2, were obtained as the pure constituents of CB1-2 and VG-4 consortia, respectively. Based on 16S RNA sequence, they could be classified as Variovorax paradoxus and Paenibacillus alvei. Noteworthy, only VG-4 consortium showed measurable xylan degrading capacity and signs of filter paper degradation. However, no xylan or filter paper degrading capacities were observed for the pure cultures isolated from it, suggesting that other members of this consortium were necessary for these hydrolyzing activities. Our results indicated that Paenibacillus sp. and Variovorax sp. as well as VG-4 consortium, might be a useful source of hydrolytic enzymes. Moreover, although Variovorax sp. had been previously identified in metagenomic studies of cellulolytic communities, this is the first report on the isolation and characterization of this microorganism as a cellulolytic genus.

  4. Isolation of Paenibacillus sp. and Variovorax sp. strains from decaying woods and characterization of their potential for cellulose deconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ghio, Silvina; Lorenzo, Gonzalo Sabarís Di; Lia, Verónica; Talia, Paola; Cataldi, Angel; Grasso, Daniel; Campos, Eleonora

    2012-01-01

    Prospection of cellulose-degrading bacteria in natural environments allows the identification of novel cellulases and hemicellulases that could be useful in second-generation bioethanol production. In this work, cellulolytic bacteria were isolated from decaying native forest soils by enrichment on cellulose as sole carbon source. There was a predominance of Gram positive isolates that belonged to the phyla Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Many primary isolates with cellulolytic activity were not pure cultures. From these consortia, isolation of pure constituents was attempted in order to test the hypothesis whether microbial consortia are needed for full degradation of complex substrates. Two isolates, CB1-2-A-5 and VG-4-A-2, were obtained as the pure constituents of CB1-2 and VG-4 consortia, respectively. Based on 16S RNA sequence, they could be classified as Variovorax paradoxus and Paenibacillus alvei. Noteworthy, only VG-4 consortium showed measurable xylan degrading capacity and signs of filter paper degradation. However, no xylan or filter paper degrading capacities were observed for the pure cultures isolated from it, suggesting that other members of this consortium were necessary for these hydrolyzing activities. Our results indicated that Paenibacillus sp. and Variovorax sp. as well as VG-4 consortium, might be a useful source of hydrolytic enzymes. Moreover, although Variovorax sp. had been previously identified in metagenomic studies of cellulolytic communities, this is the first report on the isolation and characterization of this microorganism as a cellulolytic genus. PMID:23301200

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Curtobacterium sp. Strain ER1/6, an Endophytic Strain Isolated from Citrus sinensis with Potential To Be Used as a Biocontrol Agent

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Leandro Maza; Alves, João Marcelo Pereira; Oliveira, Liliane Santana; Padilla, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a draft genome sequence of the endophytic Curtobacterium sp. strain ER1/6, isolated from a surface-sterilized Citrus sinensis branch, and it presented the capability to control phytopathogens. Functional annotation of the ~3.4-Mb genome revealed 3,100 protein-coding genes, with many products related to known ecological and biotechnological aspects of this bacterium. PMID:27856581

  6. Screening and characterization of a thermostable lipase from marine Streptomyces sp. strain W007.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dongjuan; Lan, Dongming; Xin, Ruipu; Yang, Bo; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    A screening method along with the combination of genome sequence of microorganism, pairwise alignment, and lipase classification was used to search the thermostable lipase. Then, a potential thermostable lipase (named MAS1) from marine Streptomyces sp. strain W007 was expressed in Pichia pastoris X-33, and the biochemical properties were characterized. Lipase MAS1 belongs to the subfamily I.7, and it has 38% identity to the well-characterized Bacillus subtilis thermostable lipases in the subfamily I.4. The purified enzyme was estimated to be 29 kDa. The enzyme showed optimal temperature at 40 °C, and retained more than 80% of initial activity after 1 H incubation at 60 °C, suggesting that MAS1 was a thermostable lipase. MAS1 was an alkaline enzyme with optimal pH value at 7.0 and had stable activity for 12 H of incubation at pH 6.0-9.0. It was stable and retained about 90% of initial activity in the presence of Cu(2+) , Ca(2+) , Ni(2+) , and Mg(2+) , whereas 89.05% of the initial activity was retained when ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid was added. MAS1 showed the tolerance to organic solvents, but was inhibited by various surfactants. MAS1 was verified to be a triglyceride lipase and could hydrolyze triacylglycerol and diacylglycerol. The result represents a good example for researchers to discover thermostable lipase for industrial application.

  7. A further insight into the mechanism of Ag + biosorption by Lactobacillus sp. strain A09

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhongyu; Zhou, Chaohui; Wu, Jianming; Zhou, Jianzhang; Wang, Lin

    2005-04-01

    The mechanism of Ag + biosorption by resting cell of Lactobacillus sp. strain A09 has been further investigated at the molecular level using spectroscopic techniques. The values of estimated equilibrium constants, rate constants, half-life periods and apparent enthalpies of the binding reaction were calculated via the determination of Ag + adsorbed by the biomass using atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). The reductive ratio of the Ag + to Ag 0 by the A09 biomass was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Analysis for sulfur and nitrogen atomic contents in dry powder of the biomass with EA-1110 elemental analysis (EA) showed that amino acid residues retaining the reductive property of Ag + to Ag 0 are very small quantity, whereas glucose content in the hydrolysates of the biomass analyzed by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-vis) indicated that the amount of reducing sugars in the biomass is much larger than 2.71%. The fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometry on blank and silver-loaded biomass demonstrated that the chemical functional group such as the free aldehyde group of the hemiacetalic hydroxyl group from reducing sugars, i.e. the hydrolysates of the polysaccharides from the cell wall plays a leading role in serving as the electron donor for reducing the Ag + to Ag 0. This result was further supported by characterizations on the interaction of the Ag + with glucose using X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD) and FTIR spectroscopy.

  8. Multiple forms of bile salt hydrolase from Lactobacillus sp. strain 100-100.

    PubMed Central

    Lundeen, S G; Savage, D C

    1992-01-01

    Four isozymes of bile salt hydrolase (BSH) have been purified from the cytosol of cells of Lactobacillus sp. strain 100-100. The four proteins were designated BSH A, B, C, and D. They eluted from anion-exchange high-pressure liquid chromatography columns at 0.15, 0.18, 0.21, and 0.25 M NaCl, respectively. They are catalytically similar, except that the Vmax of BSH D is about 10-fold lower than those of the other three isozymes. All four proteins consist of one or two polypeptides. The peptides have molecular weights of 42,000 and 38,000 and are designated alpha and beta, respectively. The approximate native molecular weights of BSH A, B, C, and D are 115,000, 105,000, 95,000, and 80,000, respectively. The native proteins are probably trimers; the four isozymes are the array of possible subunit combinations alpha 3, alpha 2 beta 1, alpha 1 beta 2, and beta 3 for A, B, C, and D, respectively. The two subunits are antigenically distinct. Polyclonal antibodies raised against BSH A (all alpha peptide) react in Western blots (immunoblots) only with proteins containing the alpha peptide; such antibodies raised against BSH D (all beta peptide) react only with proteins containing the beta peptide. The amino acid compositions of the two peptides differ. This is the first report of a bacterium that makes four BSH isozymes. Images PMID:1429446

  9. Kinetics of Molybdenum Reduction to Molybdenum Blue by Bacillus sp. Strain A.rzi

    PubMed Central

    Othman, A. R.; Bakar, N. A.; Halmi, M. I. E.; Johari, W. L. W.; Ahmad, S. A.; Jirangon, H.; Syed, M. A.; Shukor, M. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Molybdenum is very toxic to agricultural animals. Mo-reducing bacterium can be used to immobilize soluble molybdenum to insoluble forms, reducing its toxicity in the process. In this work the isolation of a novel molybdate-reducing Gram positive bacterium tentatively identified as Bacillus sp. strain A.rzi from a metal-contaminated soil is reported. The cellular reduction of molybdate to molybdenum blue occurred optimally at 4 mM phosphate, using 1% (w/v) glucose, 50 mM molybdate, between 28 and 30°C and at pH 7.3. The spectrum of the Mo-blue product showed a maximum peak at 865 nm and a shoulder at 700 nm. Inhibitors of bacterial electron transport system (ETS) such as rotenone, sodium azide, antimycin A, and potassium cyanide could not inhibit the molybdenum-reducing activity. At 0.1 mM, mercury, copper, cadmium, arsenic, lead, chromium, cobalt, and zinc showed strong inhibition on molybdate reduction by crude enzyme. The best model that fitted the experimental data well was Luong followed by Haldane and Monod. The calculated value for Luong's constants pmax, Ks, Sm, and n was 5.88 μmole Mo-blue hr−1, 70.36 mM, 108.22 mM, and 0.74, respectively. The characteristics of this bacterium make it an ideal tool for bioremediation of molybdenum pollution. PMID:24369531

  10. Characterization of a sodium dodecyl sulphate-degrading Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY15 from Antarctic soil.

    PubMed

    Halmi, M I E; Hussin, W S W; Aqlima, A; Syed, M A; Ruberto, L; MacCormack, W P; Shukor, M Y

    2013-11-01

    A bacterium capable of biodegrading surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) was isolated from Antarctic soil. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY15 based on carbon utilization profiles using Biolog GN plates and partial 16S rDNA molecular phylogeny. Growth characteristic studies showed that the bacterium grew optimally at 10 degrees C, 7.25 pH, 1 g l(-1) SDS as a sole carbon source and 2 g l(-1) ammonium sulphate as nitrogen source. Growth was completely inhibited at 5 g l(-1) SDS. At a tolerable initial concentration of 2 g l(-1), approximately 90% of SDS was degraded after an incubation period of eight days. The best growth kinetic model to fit experimental data was the Haldane model of substrate inhibition with a correlation coefficient value of 0.97. The maximum growth rate was 0.372 hr(-1) while the saturation constant or half velocity constant (Ks) and inhibition constant (Ki), were 0.094% and 11.212 % SDS, respectively. Other detergent tested as carbon sources at 1 g l(-1) was Tergitol NP9, Tergitol 15S9, Witconol 2301 (methyl oleate), sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), benzethonium chloride, and benzalkonium chloride showed Tergitol NP9, Tergitol 15S9, Witconol 2301 and the anionic SDBS supported growth with the highest growth exhibited by SDBS.

  11. Toluene and ethylbenzene oxidation by purified naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4.

    PubMed

    Lee, K; Gibson, D T

    1996-09-01

    Purified naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4 oxidized toluene to benzyl alcohol and benzaldehyde by reactions involving benzylic monooxygenation and dioxygen-dependent alcohol oxidation, respectively. Xylene and nitrotoluene isomers were also oxidized to substituted benzyl alcohol and benzaldehyde derivatives. NDO oxidized ethylbenzene sequentially through (S)-1-phenethyl alcohol (77% enantiomeric excess) and acetophenone to 2-hydroxyacetophenone. In addition, NDO also oxidized ethylbenzene through styrene to (R)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol (74% enantiomeric excess) by reactions involving desaturation and dihydroxylation, respectively. Isotope experiments with 18O2, H2 18O, and D2O suggest that 1-phenethyl alcohol is oxidized to acetophenone by a minor reaction involving desaturation followed by tautomerization. The major reaction in the conversion of 1-phenethyl alcohol and benzyl alcohol to acetophenone and benzaldehyde, respectively, probably involves monohydroxylation to form a gem-diol intermediate which stereospecifically loses the incoming hydroxyl group to leave the carbonyl product. These results are compared with similar reactions catalyzed by cytochrome P-450.

  12. Acquired thermotolerance and heat shock in the extremely thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus sp. strain B12.

    PubMed

    Trent, J D; Osipiuk, J; Pinkau, T

    1990-03-01

    The extreme thermophile Sulfolobus sp. strain B12 exhibits an acquired thermotolerance response. Thus, survival of cells from a 70 degrees C culture at the lethal temperature of 92 degrees C was enhanced by as much as 6 orders of magnitude over a 2-h period if the culture was preheated to 88 degrees C for 60 min or longer before being exposed to the lethal temperature. In eubacteria and eucaryotes, acquired thermotolerance correlates with the induced synthesis of a dozen or so proteins known as heat shock proteins. In this Sulfolobus species, it correlates with the preferential synthesis of primarily one major protein (55 kilodaltons) and, to a much lesser extent, two minor proteins (28 and 35 kilodaltons). Since the synthesis of all other proteins was radically reduced and these proteins were apparently not degraded or exported, their relative abundance within the cell increased during the time the cells were becoming thermotolerant. They could not yet be related to known heat shock proteins. In immunoassays, they were not cross-reactive with antibodies against heat shock proteins from Escherichia coli (DnaK and GroE), which are highly conserved between eubacteria and eucaryotes. However, it appears that if acquired thermotolerance depends on the synthesis of protective proteins, then in this extremely thermophilic archaebacterium it depends primarily on one protein.

  13. Isomaltulose synthase from Klebsiella sp. strain LX3: gene cloning and characterization and engineering of thermostability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daohai; Li, Xianzhen; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2002-06-01

    The gene (palI) encoding isomaltulose synthase (PalI) from a soil bacterial isolate, Klebsiella sp. strain LX3, was cloned and characterized. PalI converts sucrose into isomaltulose, trehalulose, and trace amounts of glucose and fructose. Sequence domain analysis showed that PalI contains an alpha-amylase domain and (beta/alpha)(8)-barrel structures, suggesting that it belongs to the alpha-amylase family. Sequence alignment indicated that the five amino acid residues of catalytic importance in alpha-amylases and glucosyltransferases (Asp(241), Glu(295), Asp(369), His(145), and His(368)) are conserved in PalI. Purified recombinant PalI displayed high catalytic efficiency, with a Km of 54.6 +/- 1.7 mM for sucrose, and maximum activity (approximately 328.0 +/- 2.5 U/mg) at pH 6.0 and 35 degrees C. PalI activity was strongly inhibited by Fe3+ and Hg2+ and was enhanced by Mn2+ and Mg2+. The half-life of PalI was 1.8 min at 50 degrees C. Replacement of selected amino acid residues by proline significantly increased the thermostability of PalI. Simultaneous replacement of Glu(498) and Arg(310) with proline resulted in an 11-fold increase in the half-life of PalI at 50 degrees C.

  14. Kinetics of molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue by Bacillus sp. strain A.rzi.

    PubMed

    Othman, A R; Bakar, N A; Halmi, M I E; Johari, W L W; Ahmad, S A; Jirangon, H; Syed, M A; Shukor, M Y

    2013-01-01

    Molybdenum is very toxic to agricultural animals. Mo-reducing bacterium can be used to immobilize soluble molybdenum to insoluble forms, reducing its toxicity in the process. In this work the isolation of a novel molybdate-reducing Gram positive bacterium tentatively identified as Bacillus sp. strain A.rzi from a metal-contaminated soil is reported. The cellular reduction of molybdate to molybdenum blue occurred optimally at 4 mM phosphate, using 1% (w/v) glucose, 50 mM molybdate, between 28 and 30 °C and at pH 7.3. The spectrum of the Mo-blue product showed a maximum peak at 865 nm and a shoulder at 700 nm. Inhibitors of bacterial electron transport system (ETS) such as rotenone, sodium azide, antimycin A, and potassium cyanide could not inhibit the molybdenum-reducing activity. At 0.1 mM, mercury, copper, cadmium, arsenic, lead, chromium, cobalt, and zinc showed strong inhibition on molybdate reduction by crude enzyme. The best model that fitted the experimental data well was Luong followed by Haldane and Monod. The calculated value for Luong's constants p max, K(s), S(m), and n was 5.88 μmole Mo-blue hr(-1), 70.36 mM, 108.22 mM, and 0.74, respectively. The characteristics of this bacterium make it an ideal tool for bioremediation of molybdenum pollution.

  15. HAF, hepatoma aggregation factor produced by Streptomyces sp. strain No. A-6143.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Nakano, N; Nagatomi, Y; Tominaga, H; Nakazono, N; Itai, M; Uyeda, M; Shibata, M

    1990-08-01

    We searched for a new cell aggregation factor for hepatoma AH109A cells, and found one we called HAF in the culture filtrate of Streptomyces sp. strain No. A-6143 isolated from a soil sample. HAF was purified by salting-out with ammonium sulfate. DEAE-cellulose column chromatography, gel filtration on Sephadex G-100, and hydroxylapatite column chromatography, HAF was glycoprotein which had a molecular weight of about 73,000. HAF was stable from pH 6 to 8 at 37 degrees C and up to 40 degrees C at pH 8.0 and the aggregation activity of HAF was maximum around pH 8 at 30 degrees C. The activity was not influenced by some saccharides, but it was inhibited by EDTA and EGTA: moreover HAF activity was restored by the addition of calcium ions. HAF aggregated hepatoma AH136B and COS-7 cells as well as hepatoma AH109A cells, but it was inert to other cancer cells and human erythrocytes. These properties proved that HAF is completely different from other aggregation factors for cancer cells so far reported.

  16. Oxidation of aminonitrotoluenes by 2,4-DNT dioxygenase of Burkholderia sp. strain DNT.

    PubMed

    Leungsakul, Thammajun; Keenan, Brendan G; Mori, Masa-aki; Morton, Martha D; Stuart, James D; Smets, Barth F; Wood, Thomas K

    2006-02-05

    Aminonitrotoluenes form rapidly from the reduction of dinitrotoluenes (DNTs) which are priority pollutants and animal carcinogens. For example, 4-amino-2-nitrotoluene (4A2NT) and 2A4NT accumulate from the reduction of 2,4-DNT during its aerobic biodegradation. Here, we show that 2,4-DNT dioxygenase (DDO) from Burkholderia sp. strain DNT oxidizes the aminonitrotoluenes 2A3NT, 2A6NT, 4A3NT, and 5A2NT to 2-amino-3-nitrobenzylalcohol, 2-amino-4-nitro-m-cresol and 3-amino-5-nitro-p-cresol, 4-amino-3-nitrobenzylalcohol and aminonitrocresol, and 2-amino-5-nitro-o-cresol, respectively. 2A5NT and 3A4NT are oxidized to aminonitrocresols and/or aminonitrobenzylalcohols, and 4A2NT is oxidized to aminonitrocresol. Only 2A4NT, a reduced compound derived from 2,4-DNT, was not oxidized by DDO or its three variants. The alpha subunit mutation I204Y resulted in two to fourfold faster oxidization of the aminonitrotoluenes. Though these enzymes are dioxygenases, they acted like monooxygenases by adding a single hydroxyl group, which did not result in the release of nitrite.

  17. Oxidative Pathway for the Biodegradation of Nitrobenzene by Comamonas sp. Strain JS765

    PubMed Central

    Nishino, S. F.; Spain, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the biodegradation of nitrobenzene by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes JS45 proceeds by the reduction of nitrobenzene through nitrosobenzene and hydroxylaminobenzene, followed by rearrangement to 2-aminophenol, which then undergoes meta ring cleavage. We report here the isolation of a Comamonas sp. that uses an oxidative pathway for the complete mineralization of nitrobenzene. The isolate, designated strain JS765, uses nitrobenzene as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. Nitrobenzene-grown cells oxidized nitrobenzene, with the stoichiometric release of nitrite. Extracts of nitrobenzene-grown JS765 showed high levels of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity that were not abolished by heating the cell extracts to 60(deg)C for 10 min. The ring cleavage product had an absorbance maximum at 375 nm, consistent with that of 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde. Both NAD-dependent dehydrogenase and NAD-independent hydrolase activities towards 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde were induced in extracts of nitrobenzene-grown cells. Catechol accumulated in the reaction mixture when cells preincubated with 3-chlorocatechol were incubated with nitrobenzene. Conversion of nitrobenzene to catechol by induced cells in the presence of 3-chlorocatechol and (sup18)O(inf2) demonstrated the simultaneous incorporation of two atoms of oxygen, which indicated that the initial reaction was dioxygenation. The results indicate that the catabolic pathway involves an initial dioxygenase attack on nitrobenzene with the release of nitrite and formation of catechol, which is subsequently degraded by a meta cleavage pathway. PMID:16535050

  18. Multiple fission in Allogromia sp., strain NF (Foraminiferida): release, dispersal, and ultrastructure of offspring.

    PubMed

    Bowser, S S; McGee-Russell, S M; Rieder, C L

    1984-05-01

    The release, dispersal, and ultrastructure of juveniles arising through multiple fission in the benthic foraminiferan Allogromia sp., strain NF (Lee & Pierce, 1963) has been examined by light and electron microscopy. An extensive reticulopodial network participates in the dispersal of fully differentiated young as they emerge from the fragmented parental test. During the earliest stages of release, offspring are of two classes--aroused and unaroused. Unaroused juveniles, which have not extended pseudopods, attach externally to the network and are transported bidirectionally along its surface. Aroused juveniles, which have extended pseudopods and are in protoplasmic continuity with the network, move quickly to the periphery of the network. Within 24 h, juveniles establish a communal "feeding reticulum" in which dispersed individuals are in protoplasmic continuity with neighbors via a common reticulopodial network. At the ultrastructural level, the cell body cytoplasm of unaroused juveniles contains numerous patches of a paracrystalline material, which disappears as their pseudopodia are extended to join the communal feeding reticulum. This paracrystalline material therefore appears to be a temporary reservoir of precursors required for pseudopod construction.

  19. Acquired thermotolerance and heat shock in the extremely thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus sp. strain B12

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.D.; Osipiuk, J.; Pinkau, T. )

    1990-03-01

    The extreme thermophile Sulfolobus sp. strain B12 exhibits an acquired thermotolerance response. Thus, survival of cells from a 70{degrees}C culture at the lethal temperature of 92{degrees}C was enhanced by as much as 6 orders of magnitude over a 2-h period if the culture was preheated to 88{degrees}C for 60 min or longer before being exposed to the lethal temperature. In eubacteria and eucaryotes, acquired thermotolerance correlates with the induced synthesis of a dozen or so proteins known as heat shock proteins. In this Sulfolobus species, it correlates with the preferential synthesis of primarily one major protein (55 kilodaltons) and, to a much lesser extent, two minor proteins (28 and 35 kilodaltons). Since the synthesis of all other proteins was radically reduced and these proteins were apparently not degraded or exported, their relative abundance within the cell increased during the time the cells were becoming thermotolerant. They could not yet be related to known heat shock proteins. In immunoassays, they were not cross-reactive with antibodies against heat shock proteins from Escherichia coli (DnaK and GroE), which are highly conserved between eubacteria and eucaryotes. However, it appears that if acquired thermotolerance depends on the synthesis of protective proteins, then in this extremely thermophilic archaebacterium it depends primarily on one protein.

  20. Rhizobium sp. Strain NGR234 Possesses a Remarkable Number of Secretion Systems▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Schmeisser, Christel; Liesegang, Heiko; Krysciak, Dagmar; Bakkou, Nadia; Le Quéré, Antoine; Wollherr, Antje; Heinemeyer, Isabelle; Morgenstern, Burkhard; Pommerening-Röser, Andreas; Flores, Margarita; Palacios, Rafael; Brenner, Sydney; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Schmitz, Ruth A.; Broughton, William J.; Perret, Xavier; Strittmatter, Axel W.; Streit, Wolfgang R.

    2009-01-01

    Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 is a unique alphaproteobacterium (order Rhizobiales) that forms nitrogen-fixing nodules with more legumes than any other microsymbiont. We report here that the 3.93-Mbp chromosome (cNGR234) encodes most functions required for cellular growth. Few essential functions are encoded on the 2.43-Mbp megaplasmid (pNGR234b), and none are present on the second 0.54-Mbp symbiotic plasmid (pNGR234a). Among many striking features, the 6.9-Mbp genome encodes more different secretion systems than any other known rhizobia and probably most known bacteria. Altogether, 132 genes and proteins are linked to secretory processes. Secretion systems identified include general and export pathways, a twin arginine translocase secretion system, six type I transporter genes, one functional and one putative type III system, three type IV attachment systems, and two putative type IV conjugation pili. Type V and VI transporters were not identified, however. NGR234 also carries genes and regulatory networks linked to the metabolism of a wide range of aromatic and nonaromatic compounds. In this way, NGR234 can quickly adapt to changing environmental stimuli in soils, rhizospheres, and plants. Finally, NGR234 carries at least six loci linked to the quenching of quorum-sensing signals, as well as one gene (ngrI) that possibly encodes a novel type of autoinducer I molecule. PMID:19376903

  1. Oxidation of naphthalene by a multicomponent enzyme system from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816.

    PubMed Central

    Ensley, B D; Gibson, D T; Laborde, A L

    1982-01-01

    The initial reactions in the oxidation of naphthalene by Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816 involves the enzymatic incorporation of one molecule of oxygen into the aromatic nucleus to form (+)-cis-(1R,2S)-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene. The enzyme catalyzing this reaction, naphthalene dioxygenase, was resolved into three protein components, designated A, B, and C, by DEAE-cellulose chromatography. Incubation of naphthalene with components A, B, and C in the presence of NADH resulted in the formation of (+)-cis-(1R,2S)-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene. The ratio of oxygen and NADH utilization to product formation was 1:1:1. NADPH also served as an electron donor for naphthalene oxygenation. However, its activity was less than 50% of that observed with NADH. Component A showed NAD(P)H-cytochrome c reductase activity which was stimulated by the addition of flavin adenine dinucleotide and flavin mononucleotide. A similar stimulation was observed when these flavin nucleotides were added to the naphthalene dioxygenase assay system. These preliminary observations indicate that naphthalene dioxygenase has properties in common with both monooxygenase and dioxygenase multicomponent enzyme systems. Images PMID:7037744

  2. Trehalose promotes Rhodococcus sp. strain YYL colonization in activated sludge under tetrahydrofuran (THF) stress

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhixing; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Haixia; Lv, Zhenmei

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the role of compatible solutes in changing the microbial community structure in bioaugmentation systems. In this study, we investigated the influence of trehalose as a biostimulant on the microbial community in tetrahydrofuran (THF)-treated wastewater bioaugmentation systems with Rhodococcus sp. YYL. Functional gene profile changes were used to study the variation in the microbial community. Soluble di-iron monooxygenases (SDIMO), particularly group-5 SDIMOs (i.e., tetrahydrofuran and propane monooxygenases), play a significant role in the initiation of the ring cleavage of tetrahydrofuran. Group-5 SDIMOs genes are enriched upon trehalose addition, and exogenous tetrahydrofuran monooxygenase (thmA) genes can successfully colonize bioaugmentation systems. Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) have a significant role in catalyzing the region- and stereospecific oxidation of non-activated hydrocarbons, and THF was reported to inhibit P450s in the environment. The CYP153 family was chosen as a representative P450 to study the inhibitory effects of THF. The results demonstrated that CYP153 family genes exhibited significant changes upon THF treatment and that trehalose helped maintain a rich diversity and high abundance of CYP153 family genes. Biostimulation with trehalose could alleviate the negative effects of THF stress on microbial diversity in bioaugmentation systems. Our results indicated that trehalose as a compatible solute plays a significant role for environmental strains under extreme conditions. PMID:26029182

  3. Purification, biochemical characterization, and genetic cloning of the phytase produced by Burkholderia sp. strain a13.

    PubMed

    Graminho, Eduardo Rezende; Takaya, Naoki; Nakamura, Akira; Hoshino, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    A phytase-producing bacterium, Burkholderia sp. a13 (JCM 30421), was isolated from Lake Kasumigaura by enrichment cultivation using minimum medium containing phytic acid as the sole phosphorus source. The phytase production by strain a13 was induced by the presence of phytic acid and repressed by the addition of glucose. The purified enzyme had a molecular weight of 44 kDa and a phytase activity of 174 μmol min(-1) mg(-1). The enzyme showed broad substrate specificity, but the highest activity was observed with phytic acid. The enzyme activity was strongly inhibited by Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Hg(2+), and iodoacetic acid, indicating the requirement of a thiol group for the activity. Genetic cloning reveals that the mature portion of this enzyme consists of 428 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 46 kDa. The amino acid sequence showed the highest similarity to the phytase produced by Hafnia alvei with 48% identity; it also contained histidine acid phosphatase (HAP) motifs (RHGXRXP and HD), indicating the classification of this enzyme in the HAP phytase family. We have successfully expressed the cloned gene in Escherichia coli from its putative initiation codon, showing that the gene actually encodes the phytase.

  4. Xylanase production by Burkholderia sp. DMAX strain under solid state fermentation using distillery spent wash.

    PubMed

    Mohana, Sarayu; Shah, Amita; Divecha, Jyoti; Madamwar, Datta

    2008-11-01

    Xylanase production by a newly isolated strain of Burkholderia sp. was studied under solid state fermentation using anaerobically treated distillery spent wash. Response surface methodology (RSM) involving Box-Behnken design was employed for optimizing xylanase production. The interactions between distillery effluent concentration, initial pH, moisture ratio and inoculum size were investigated and modeled. Under optimized conditions, xylanase production was found to be in the range of 5200-5600 U/g. The partially purified enzyme recovered after ammonium sulphate fractionation showed maximum activity at 50 degrees C and pH 8.6. Kinetic parameters like Km and Vmax for xylan were found to be 12.75 mg/ml and 165 micromol/mg/min. In the presence of metal ions such as Ca2+, Co2+, Mn2+, Ba2+, Mg2+ and protein disulphide reducing agents such as beta-mercaptoethanol and dithiotheritol (DTT) the activity of enzyme increased, where as strong inhibition of enzyme activity was observed in the presence of Cu2+, Ag+, Fe2+ and SDS. The crude enzyme hydrolysed lignocellulosic substrate, wheat bran as well as industrial pulp.

  5. Oxidative pathway for the biodegradation of nitrobenzene by Comamonas sp. strain JS765

    SciTech Connect

    Nishino, S.F.; Spain, J.C.

    1995-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that the biodegradation of nitrobenzene by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes JS45 proceeds by the reduction of nitrobenzene through nitrosobenzene and hydroxylaminobenzene, followed by rearrangement to 2-aminophenol, which then undergoes meta ring cleavage. We report here the isolation of a Comamonas sp. that uses an oxidative pathway for the complete mineralization of nitrobenzene. The isolate, designated strain JS765, uses nitrobenzene as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. Nitrobenzene-grown cells oxidized nitrobenzene, with the stoichiometric release of nitrite. Extracts of nitrobenzene-grown JS765 showed high levels of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity that were not abolished by heating the cell extracts to 60{degrees}C for 10 min. The ring cleavage product had an absorbance maximum at 375 nm, consistent with that of 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde. Both NAD-dependent dehydrogenase and NAD-indipendent hydrolase activities towards 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde were induced in extracts of nitrobenzene-grown cells. Catechol accumulated in the reaction mixture when cells preincubated with 3-chloracatechol were incubated with nitrobenzene. Conversion of nitrobenzene to catechol by induced cells in the presence of 3-chlorocatechol and {sup 13}O{sub 2} demonstrated the simultaneous incorporation of two atoms of oxygen, which indicated that the initial reaction was dioxygenation. Their results indicate that the catabolic pathway involves an initial dioxygenase attack on nitrobenzene with the release of nitrite and formation of catechol, which is subsequently degraded by a meta cleavage pathway. 37 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Response surface optimization for efficient dye removal by isolated strain Pseudomonas sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, Shanmugam; Perumalsamy, Muthiah; Prabhuy, Harinarayan Janardhana; AhmedBasha, Chiya; Anantharaman, Narayan

    2012-09-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) involving the central composite design (CCD) was employed to optimize three important process variables for the decolourization of synthetic dye solutions containing Remazol Turquoise Blue (RTB) and Reactive Black 5 (RB5) with isolated bacterial strain Pseudomonas sp. The interaction between three variables i.e. Initial concentration of dye, carbon source and nitrogen source were studied and modeled. According to the Analysis of variance (ANOVA) results the predicted results were found to be in good agreement with experimental results ( R 2: 0.9726; Adj R 2: 0.9480 for RTB and R 2: 0.9789; Adj R 2: 0.9750 for RB5) which indicated excellent evaluation of experimental data from the second order polynomial regression model. Mathematical models were developed by the proposed system, for each process variable showed the effect of each factor and their interactions on biodecolourization process. The optimum concentrations of Dye, Carbon source, and Nitrogen source were found to be 20 mgL-1, 1.5 g/L and 1.5 g/L, respectively for RTB and RB5 to obtain maximum dye removing capacity. Predicted values were validated with experimental results, which indicated appropriateness of the employed model and the success of RSM.

  7. Response surface optimization for efficient dye removal by isolated strain Pseudomonas sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, Shanmugam; Perumalsamy, Muthiah; Prabhuy, Harinarayan; AhmedBasha, Chiya; Anantharaman, Narayan

    2012-09-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) involving the central composite design (CCD) was employed to optimize three important process variables for the decolourization of synthetic dye solutions containing Remazol Turquoise Blue (RTB) and Reactive Black 5 (RB5) with isolated bacterial strain Pseudomonas sp. The interaction between three variables i.e. Initial concentration of dye, carbon source and nitrogen source were studied and modeled. According to the Analysis of variance (ANOVA) results the predicted results were found to be in good agreement with experimental results (R 2: 0.9726; Adj R 2: 0.9480 for RTB and R 2: 0.9789; Adj R 2: 0.9750 for RB5) which indicated excellent evaluation of experimental data from the second order polynomial regression model. Mathematical models were developed by the proposed system, for each process variable showed the effect of each factor and their interactions on biodecolourization process. The optimum concentrations of Dye, Carbon source, and Nitrogen source were found to be 20 mgL-1, 1.5 g/L and 1.5 g/L, respectively for RTB and RB5 to obtain maximum dye removing capacity. Predicted values were validated with experimental results, which indicated appropriateness of the employed model and the success of RSM.

  8. Purification and properties of glutathione reductase from the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 7119.

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, A; Rivas, J; Losada, M

    1984-01-01

    An NADPH-glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) has been purified 6,000-fold to electrophoretic homogeneity from the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 7119. The purified enzyme exhibits a specific activity of 249 U/mg and is characterized by being a dimeric flavin adenine dinucleotide-containing protein with a ratio of absorbance at 280 nm to absorbance at 462 nm of 5.8, a native molecular weight of 104,000, a Stokes radius of 4.13 nm, and a pI of 4.02. The enzyme activity is inhibited by sulfhydryl reagents and heavy-metal ions, especially in the presence of NADPH, with oxidized glutathione behaving as a protective agent. As is the case with the same enzyme from other sources, the kinetic data are consistent with a branched mechanism. Nevertheless, the cyanobacterial enzyme presents three distinctive features with respect to that isolated from non-photosynthetic organisms: (i) absolute specificity for NADPH, (ii) an alkaline optimum pH value of ca. 9.0, and (iii) strong acidic character of the protein, as estimated by column chromatofocusing. The kinetic parameters are very similar to those found for the chloroplast enzyme, but the molecular weight is lower, being comparable to that of non-photosynthetic microorganisms. A protective function, analogous to that assigned to the chloroplast enzyme, is suggested. Images PMID:6425264

  9. Isolation of a Paenibacillus sp. Strain and Structural Elucidation of Its Broad-Spectrum Lipopeptide Antibiotic

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yaoqi; Huang, En; Yuan, Chunhua; Zhang, Liwen

    2012-01-01

    This research was initiated to search for novel antimicrobial compounds produced by food or environmental microorganisms. A new bacterial strain, designated OSY-SE, which produces a unique and potent antimicrobial agent was isolated from soil. The isolate was identified as a Paenibacillus sp. through cultural, biochemical, and genetic analyses. An antimicrobial compound was extracted from Paenibacillus OSY-SE with acetonitrile and purified using liquid chromatography. After analyses by mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the antimicrobial compound was determined to be a cyclic lipopeptide consisting of a C15 fatty acyl (FA) chain and 13 amino acids. The deduced sequence is FA-Orn-Val-Thr-Orn-Ser-Val-Lys-Ser-Ile-Pro-Val-Lys-Ile. The carboxyl-terminal Ile is connected to Thr by ester linkage. The new compound, designated paenibacterin, showed antagonistic activities against most Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria tested, including Listeria monocytogenes, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Paenibacterin is resistant to trypsin, lipase, α-glucosidase, and lysozyme. Its antimicrobial activity was lost after digestion by pronase and polymyxin acylase. Paenibacterin is readily soluble in water and fairly stable to exposure to heat and a wide range of pH values. The new isolate and its antimicrobial agent are being investigated for usefulness in food and medical applications. PMID:22367082

  10. Whole Genome Sequence Analysis of an Alachlor and Endosulfan Degrading Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 Isolated from Ochlockonee River, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Ashish; Chauhan, Ashvini; Ewida, Ayman Y.I.; Stothard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We recently isolated Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 from Ochlockonee River, Florida and demonstrated potent biodegradative activity against two commonly used pesticides- alachlor [(2-chloro-2`,6`-diethylphenyl-N (methoxymethyl)acetanilide)] and endosulfan [(6,7,8,9,10,10-hexachloro-1,5,5a,6,9,9a-hexahydro-6,9methano-2,3,4-benzo(e)di-oxathiepin-3-oxide], respectively. To further identify the repertoire of metabolic functions possessed by strain 2385, a draft genome sequence was obtained, assembled, annotated and analyzed. The genome sequence of Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 consisted of 1,460,461,440 bases which assembled into 175 contigs with an N50 contig length of 50,109 bases and a coverage of 600x. The genome size of this strain was estimated at 2,431,226 base pairs with a G+C content of 72.8 and a total number of 2,268 putative genes. RAST annotated a total of 340 subsystems in the genome of strain 2385 along with the presence of 2,177 coding sequences. A genome wide survey indicated that that strain 2385 harbors a plethora of genes to degrade other pollutants including caprolactam, PAHs (such as naphthalene), styrene, toluene and several chloroaromatic compounds. PMID:27672405

  11. Anoxybacillus sp. Strain UARK-01, a New Thermophilic Soil Bacterium with Hyperthermostable Alkaline Laccase Activity.

    PubMed

    Al-Kahem Al-Balawi, Thamir H; Wood, Adam L; Solis, Alexis; Cooper, Ted; Barabote, Ravi D

    2017-04-08

    We describe the isolation and characteristics of a novel thermophilic bacterium from soil. The organism is a member of the Anoxybacillus genus based on phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. The 16S rRNA of the organism shares >99% sequence identity with those of two species, Anoxybacillus rupiensis and A. geothermalis. We named this isolate as Anoxybacillus sp. strain UARK-01. UARK-01 grows optimally in the presence of oxygen at 55 °C and pH 8. It grew excellently in the presence of lignin as the sole carbon source. Culture supernatant from UARK-01 grown on lignin was rich in laccase activity. The laccase activity was optimal at 90 °C and pH 9, and there was comparable activity at 80 and 100 °C. The crude laccase decolorized approximately 75% of Congo Red in 7 h under optimal conditions. A single laccase gene was identified from the draft genome sequence of Anoxybacillus sp. UARK-01. The UARK-01 laccase (Anox_Lacc) was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli and was partially purified. The partially purified Anox_Lacc decolorized approximately 1.64+/0.21 nanomoles of Congo Red per microgram protein in 30 min at 90 °C and pH 9. Anox_Lacc is a member of the multicopper polyphenol oxidoreductase laccase family (pfam02578 Cu-oxidase_4) and has novel characteristics. Multiple sequence analysis of Anox_Lacc with six homologs from the family revealed four conserved copper ligands and several new residues that are fully conserved. Anox_Lacc is enriched in leucine, glutamine, and lysine, and it contains fewer alanine, arginine, glycine, and serine residues. Skewed amino acid composition of Anox_Lacc likely contributes to the exceptional thermochemical properties of the laccase activity from UARK-01. Both lignin utilization and production of hyperthermostable alkaline laccase are new findings in the Anoxybacillus genus.

  12. Reclassification of rhizosphere bacteria including strains causing corky root of lettuce and proposal of Rhizorhapis suberifaciens gen. nov., comb. nov., Sphingobium mellinum sp. nov., Sphingobium xanthum sp. nov. and Rhizorhabdus argentea gen. nov., sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Francis, Isolde M; Jochimsen, Kenneth N; De Vos, Paul; van Bruggen, Ariena H C

    2014-04-01

    The genus Rhizorhapis gen. nov. (to replace the illegitimate genus name Rhizomonas) is proposed for strains of Gram-negative bacteria causing corky root of lettuce, a widespread and important lettuce disease worldwide. Only one species of the genus Rhizomonas was described, Rhizomonas suberifaciens, which was subsequently reclassified as Sphingomonas suberifaciens based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and the presence of sphingoglycolipid in the cell envelope. However, the genus Sphingomonas is so diverse that further reclassification was deemed necessary. Twenty new Rhizorhapis gen. nov.- and Sphingomonas-like isolates were obtained from lettuce or sow thistle roots, or from soil using lettuce seedlings as bait. These and previously reported isolates were characterized in a polyphasic study including 16S rRNA gene sequencing, DNA-DNA hybridization, DNA G+C content, whole-cell fatty acid composition, morphology, substrate oxidation, temperature and pH sensitivity, and pathogenicity to lettuce. The isolates causing lettuce corky root belonged to the genera Rhizorhapis gen. nov., Sphingobium, Sphingopyxis and Rhizorhabdus gen. nov. More specifically, we propose to reclassify Rhizomonas suberifaciens as Rhizorhapis suberifaciens gen. nov., comb. nov. (type strain, CA1(T) = LMG 17323(T) = ATCC 49355(T)), and also propose the novel species Sphingobium xanthum sp. nov., Sphingobium mellinum sp. nov. and Rhizorhabdus argentea gen. nov., sp. nov. with the type strains NL9(T) ( = LMG 12560(T) = ATCC 51296(T)), WI4(T) ( = LMG 11032(T) = ATCC 51292(T)) and SP1(T) ( = LMG 12581(T) = ATCC 51289(T)), respectively. Several strains isolated from lettuce roots belonged to the genus Sphingomonas, but none of them were pathogenic.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Criibacterium bergeronii gen. nov., sp. nov., Strain CCRI-22567T, Isolated from a Vaginal Sample from a Woman with Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Maheux, Andrée F.; Bérubé, Ève; Boudreau, Dominique K.; Raymond, Frédéric; Corbeil, Jacques; Roy, Paul H.

    2016-01-01

    Criibacterium bergeronii gen. nov., sp. nov., CCRI-22567 is the type strain of the new genus Criibacterium. The strain was isolated from a woman with bacterial vaginosis. The genome assembly comprised 2,384,460 bp, with 34.4% G+C content. This is the first genome announcement of a strain belonging to the genus Criibacterium. PMID:27587833

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Criibacterium bergeronii gen. nov., sp. nov., Strain CCRI-22567T, Isolated from a Vaginal Sample from a Woman with Bacterial Vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Maheux, Andrée F; Bérubé, Ève; Boudreau, Dominique K; Raymond, Frédéric; Corbeil, Jacques; Roy, Paul H; Boissinot, Maurice; Omar, Rabeea F

    2016-09-01

    Criibacterium bergeronii gen. nov., sp. nov., CCRI-22567 is the type strain of the new genus Criibacterium The strain was isolated from a woman with bacterial vaginosis. The genome assembly comprised 2,384,460 bp, with 34.4% G+C content. This is the first genome announcement of a strain belonging to the genus Criibacterium.

  15. Genome sequence of Nitrosomonas sp. strain AL212, an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium sensitive to high levels of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Yuichi; Yuichi, Suwa; Norton, Jeanette M; Bollmann, Annette; Klotz, Martin G; Stein, Lisa Y; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J; Arp, Daniel J; Goodwin, Lynne A; Chertkov, Olga; Held, Brittany; Bruce, David; Detter, J Chris; Detter, Janine C; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff S

    2011-09-01

    Nitrosomonas sp. strain AL212 is an obligate chemolithotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacterium (AOB) that was originally isolated in 1997 by Yuichi Suwa and colleagues. This organism belongs to Nitrosomonas cluster 6A, which is characterized by sensitivity to high ammonia concentrations, higher substrate affinity (lower K(m)), and lower maximum growth rates than strains in Nitrosomonas cluster 7, which includes Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrosomonas eutropha. Genome-informed studies of this ammonia-sensitive cohort of AOB are needed, as these bacteria are found in freshwater environments, drinking water supplies, wastewater treatment systems, and soils worldwide.

  16. Influence of Carbon Sources and Electron Shuttles on Ferric Iron Reduction by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    SciTech Connect

    Dr Robin Gerlach; Erin K. Field; Sridhar Viamajala; Brent M. Peyton; William A. Apel; Al B. Cunningham

    2011-09-01

    Microbially reduced iron minerals can reductively transform a variety of contaminants including heavy metals, radionuclides, chlorinated aliphatics, and nitroaromatics. A number of Cellulomonas spp. strains, including strain ES6, isolated from aquifer samples obtained at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington, have been shown to be capable of reducing Cr(VI), TNT, natural organic matter, and soluble ferric iron [Fe(III)]. This research investigated the ability of Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to reduce solid phase and dissolved Fe(III) utilizing different carbon sources and various electron shuttling compounds. Results suggest that Fe(III) reduction by and growth of strain ES6 was dependent upon the type of electron donor, the form of iron present, and the presence of synthetic or natural organic matter, such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) or humic substances. This research suggests that Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 could play a significant role in metal reduction in the Hanford subsurface and that the choice of carbon source and organic matter addition can allow for independent control of growth and iron reduction activity.

  17. Biodegradation of the Herbicide 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid by a New Isolated Strain of Achromobacter sp. LZ35.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhen-Yuan; Zhang, Long; Zhao, Yan; Yan, Xin; Li, Shun-Peng; Gu, Tao; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2017-02-01

    In this study, a bacterial strain of Achromobacter sp. LZ35, which was capable of utilizing 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxy acetic acid (MCPA) as the sole sources of carbon and energy for growth, was isolated from the soil in a disused pesticide factory in Suzhou, China. The optimal 2,4-D degradation by strain LZ35 occurred at 30 °C and pH 8.0 when the initial 2,4-D concentration was 200 mg L(-1). Strain LZ35 harbored the conserved 2,4-D/alpha-ketoglutarate dioxygenase (96%) and 2,4-dichlorophenol hydroxylase (99%), and catabolized 2,4-D via the intermediate 2,4-dichlorophenol. The inoculation of 7.8 × 10(6) CFU g(-1) soil of strain LZ35 cells to 2,4-D-contaminated soil could efficiently remove over 75 and 90% of 100 and 50 mg L(-1) 2,4-D in 12 days and significantly released the phytotoxicity of maize caused by the 2,4-D residue. This is the first report of an Achromobacter sp. strain that was capable of mineralizing both 2,4-D and MCPA. This study provides us a promising candidate for its application in the bioremediation of 2,4-D- or MCPA-contaminated sites.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Donghicola sp. Strain KarMa, a Model Organism for Monomethylamine-Degrading Nonmethylotrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zecher, Karsten; Suleiman, Marcel; Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Philipp, Bodo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The C1-compound monomethylamine can serve as a nitrogen, carbon, and energy source for heterotrophic bacteria. The marine alphaproteobacterium Donghicola sp. strain KarMa can use monomethylamine as a source only for nitrogen and not for carbon. Its draft genome sequence is presented here and reveals putative gene clusters for the methylamine dehydrogenase and the N-methylglutamate pathways for monomethylamine metabolism. PMID:28209825

  19. Isolation and identification of berberine and berberrubine metabolites by berberine-utilizing bacterium Rhodococcus sp. strain BD7100.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kazuki; Takeda, Hisashi; Wakana, Daigo; Sato, Fumihiko; Hosoe, Tomoo

    2016-05-01

    Based on the finding of a novel berberine (BBR)-utilizing bacterium, Rhodococcus sp. strain BD7100, we investigated the degradation of BBR and its analog berberrubine (BRU). Resting cells of BD7100 demethylenated BBR and BRU, yielding benzeneacetic acid analogs. Isolation of benzeneacetic acid analogs suggested that BD7100 degraded the isoquinoline ring of the protoberberine skeleton. This work represents the first report of cleavage of protoberberine skeleton by a microorganism.

  20. The Draft Genome Sequence of Xanthomonas sp. Strain Mitacek01 Expands the Pangenome of a Genus of Plant Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Couger, M B; Hanafy, Radwa A; Mitacek, Rachel M; Budd, Connie; French, Donald P; Hoff, Wouter D; Elshahed, Mostafa S; Youssef, Noha H

    2015-12-10

    We report the draft genome sequence of Xanthomonas sp. strain Mitacek01, isolated from an indoor environment vending machine surface with frequent human use in Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA, as part of the Student-Initiated Microbial Discovery project. The genome has a total size of 3,617,426 bp and a contig N50 of 1,906,967 bp.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Cellulomonas sp. Strain B6 Isolated from Subtropical Forest Soil

    PubMed Central

    Piccinni, Florencia; Murua, Yanina; Ghio, Silvina; Talia, Paola; Rivarola, Máximo

    2016-01-01

    Cellulomonas sp. strain B6 was isolated from a subtropical forest soil sample and presented (hemi)cellulose-degrading activity. We report here its draft genome sequence, with an estimated genome size of 4 Mb, a G+C content of 75.1%, and 3,443 predicted protein-coding sequences, 92 of which are glycosyl hydrolases involved in polysaccharide degradation. PMID:27563050

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Cellulomonas sp. Strain B6 Isolated from Subtropical Forest Soil.

    PubMed

    Piccinni, Florencia; Murua, Yanina; Ghio, Silvina; Talia, Paola; Rivarola, Máximo; Campos, Eleonora

    2016-08-25

    Cellulomonas sp. strain B6 was isolated from a subtropical forest soil sample and presented (hemi)cellulose-degrading activity. We report here its draft genome sequence, with an estimated genome size of 4 Mb, a G+C content of 75.1%, and 3,443 predicted protein-coding sequences, 92 of which are glycosyl hydrolases involved in polysaccharide degradation.

  3. Molecular Cloning, Nucleotide Sequence, and Expression of Genes Encoding a Polycyclic Aromatic Ring Dioxygenase from Mycobacterium sp. Strain PYR-1

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ashraf A.; Wang, Rong-Fu; Cao, Wei-Wen; Doerge, Daniel R.; Wennerstrom, David; Cerniglia, Carl E.

    2001-01-01

    Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1 degrades high-molecular-weight polycyclic hydrocarbons (PAHs) primarily through the introduction of both atoms of molecular oxygen by a dioxygenase. To clone the dioxygenase genes involved in PAH degradation, two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis of PAH-induced proteins from cultures of Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1 was used to detect proteins that increased after phenanthrene, dibenzothiophene, and pyrene exposure. Comparison of proteins from induced and uninduced cultures on 2D gels indicated that at least six major proteins were expressed (105, 81, 52, 50, 43, and 13 kDa). The N-terminal sequence of the 50-kDa protein was similar to those of other dioxygenases. A digoxigenin-labeled oligonucleotide probe designed from this protein sequence was used to screen dioxygenase-positive clones from a genomic library of Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1. Three clones, each containing a 5,288-bp DNA insert with three genes of the dioxygenase system, were obtained. The genes in the DNA insert, from the 5′ to the 3′ direction, were a dehydrogenase, the dioxygenase small (β)-subunit, and the dioxygenase large (α)-subunit genes, arranged in a sequence different from those of genes encoding other bacterial dioxygenase systems. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the large α subunit did not cluster with most of the known α-subunit sequences but rather with three newly described α subunits of dioxygenases from Rhodococcus spp. and Nocardioides spp. The genes from Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1 were subcloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli with the pBAD/ThioFusion system. The functionality of the genes for PAH degradation was confirmed in a phagemid clone containing all three genes, as well as in plasmid subclones containing the two genes encoding the dioxygenase subunits. PMID:11472934

  4. Metabolism of the Aliphatic Nitramine 4-Nitro-2,4-Diazabutanal by Methylobacterium sp. Strain JS178

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    sp. Strain JS178 Diane Fournier,1 Sandra Trott,2t Jalal Hawari,l* and Jim Spain3 Biotechnology Research Institute, National Research Council of...Canada, Montreal, Quebec H4P 2R2, Canada\\· U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida 324032; and Department of Civil and...by the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete * Corresponding author. Mailing address: Biotechnology Research Institute, National Research Council of

  5. Purification and properties of ferredoxinNAP, a component of naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816.

    PubMed Central

    Haigler, B E; Gibson, D T

    1990-01-01

    One of the three components of the naphthalene dioxygenase occurring in induced cells of Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816 has been purified to homogeneity. The protein contained 2 g-atoms each of iron and acid-labile sulfur and had an apparent molecular weight of 13,600. The evidence indicates that it is a ferredoxin-type protein that functions as an intermediate electron transfer protein in naphthalene dioxygenase activity. PMID:2294093

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Salinarchaeum sp. Strain HArcht-Bsk1T, Isolated from Hypersaline Lake Baskunchak, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Dominova, I. N.; Sorokin, D. Y.; Kublanov, I. V.; Patrushev, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of a novel halophilic archaeon, Salinarchaeum sp. strain HArcht-Bsk1T, was determined using next-generation sequencing. The genome comprises a 3,255,260-bp circular chromosome with a G+C content of 66.7%. Automatic annotation of the genome revealed a single rRNA operon, 45 tRNAs, and 3,013 protein-coding gene sequences. PMID:23868130

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Cellulosimicrobium sp. Strain MM, Isolated from Arsenic-Rich Microbial Mats of a Himalayan Hot Spring

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anukriti; Hira, Princy; Shakarad, Mallikarjun

    2014-01-01

    Microbial mats situated at the Manikaran hot springs (>95°C) are characterized by their high arsenic content (140 ppb), qualifying as a stressed niche. Here, we report the annotated draft genome (3.85 Mb) of Cellulosimicrobium sp. strain MM, isolated from these microbial mats, consisting of 3,718 coding sequences, with an average % G+C of 74.4%. PMID:25301656

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Magnetospirillum sp. Strain XM-1, Isolated from the Xi’an City Moat, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinzhao; Zhang, Tongwei; Lin, Wei; Zhang, Bingfang; Cai, Yao; Yang, Caiyun; Li, Jinhua; Xu, Huangtao

    2016-01-01

    The magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum sp. strain XM-1 was recently isolated from the Xi’an City moat, China. It belongs to the Rhodospirillaceae family in the Alphaproteobacteria class. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of XM-1. The genome contains a single circular chromosome of 4,825,187 bp and a plasmid of 167,290 bp. PMID:27795283

  9. Magnesium-Calcite Crystal Formation Mediated by the Thermophilic Bacterium Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius Requires Calcium and Endospores.

    PubMed

    Murai, Rie; Yoshida, Naoto

    2016-11-01

    Fresh Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius cells grown on soybean-casein digest nutrient agar were inoculated as a parent colony 1 cm in diameter on the surface of an agar gel containing acetate and calcium ions (calcite-promoting hydrogel) and incubated at 60 °C for 4 days, after which magnesium-calcite single crystals of 50-130 µm in size formed within the parent colony. Addition of EDTA, polyacrylic acid or N,N-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide to the calcite-forming hydrogel inhibited the parent colony from forming magnesium-calcite crystals. Inoculation of G. thermoglucosidasius on calcite-forming hydrogel containing 5 µM cadmium and 20 µM zinc resulted in a decrease in the sporulation rate from 55 to 7-8 %. Magnesium-calcite synthesis decreased relative to the sporulation rate. G. thermoglucosidasius exhibited higher adsorption/absorbance of calcium than other Geobacillus sp. that do not mediate calcite formation and higher levels of magnesium accumulation. Calcium ions contained in the calcite-promoting hydrogel and magnesium ions concentrated in G. thermoglucosidasius cells serve as the elements for magnesium-calcite synthesis. The observed decreases in sporulation rate and magnesium-calcite formation support the hypothesis that endospores act as nuclei for the synthesis of magnesium-calcite single crystals.

  10. Efficient biodegradation of phenanthrene by a novel strain Massilia sp. WF1 isolated from a PAH-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haizhen; Lou, Jun; Gu, Haiping; Luo, Xiaoyan; Yang, Li; Wu, Laosheng; Liu, Yong; Wu, Jianjun; Xu, Jianming

    2016-07-01

    A novel phenanthrene (PHE)-degrading strain Massilia sp. WF1, isolated from PAH-contaminated soil, was capable of degrading PHE by using it as the sole carbon source and energy in a range of pH (5.0-8.0), temperatures (20-35 °C), and PHE concentrations (25-400 mg L(-1)). Massilia sp. WF1 exhibited highly effective PHE-degrading ability that completely degraded 100 mg L(-1) of PHE over 2 days at optimal conditions (pH 6.0, 28 °C). The kinetics of PHE biodegradation by Massilia sp. WF1 was well represented by the Gompertz model. Results indicated that PHE biodegradation was inhibited by the supplied lactic acid but was promoted by the supplied carbon sources of glucose, citric acid, and succinic acid. Salicylic acid (SALA) and phthalic acid (PHTA) were not utilized by Massilia sp. WF1 and had no obvious effect on PHE biodegradation. Only two metabolites, 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid (1H2N) and PHTA, were identified in PHE biodegradation process. Quantitatively, nearly 27.7 % of PHE was converted to 1H2N and 30.3 % of 1H2N was further metabolized to PHTA. However, the PHTA pathway was broken and the SALA pathway was ruled out in PHE biodegradation process by Massilia sp. WF1.

  11. Purification, Characterization, and Substrate Specificities of Multiple Xylanases from Streptomyces sp. Strain B-12-2

    PubMed Central

    Elegir, Graziano; Szakács, George; Jeffries, Thomas W.

    1994-01-01

    The endoxylanase complex from Streptomyces sp. strain B-12-2 was purified and characterized. The organism forms five distinct xylanases in the absence of significant cellulase activity when grown on oat spelt xylan. This is the largest number of endoxylanases yet reported for a streptomycete. On the basis of their physiochemical characteristics, they can be divided into two groups: the first group (xyl 1a and xyl 1b) consists of low-molecular-mass (26.4 and 23.8 kDa, respectively) neutral- to high-pI (6.5 and 8.3, respectively) endoxylanases. Group 1 endoxylanases are unable to hydrolyze aryl-β-d-cellobioside, have low levels of activity against xylotetraose (X4) and limited activity against xylopentaose, produce little or no xylose, and form products having a higher degree of polymerization with complex substrates. These enzymes apparently carry out transglycosylation. The second group (xyl 2, xyl 3, and xyl 4) consists of high-molecular-mass (36.2, 36.2, and 40.5 kDa, respectively), low-pI (5.4, 5.0, and 4.8, respectively) xylanases. Group 2 endoxylanases are able to hydrolyze aryl-β-d-cellobioside, show higher levels of activity against X4, and hydrolyze xylopentaose completely with the formation of xylobiose and xylotriose plus limited amounts of X4 and xylose. The enzymes display intergroup synergism when acting on kraft pulp. Despite intragroup similarities, each enzyme exhibited a unique action pattern and physiochemical characteristic. xyl 2 was highly glycosylated, and xyl 1b (but no other enzyme) was completely inhibited by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. Images PMID:16349337

  12. AmyM, a Novel Maltohexaose-Forming α-Amylase from Corallococcus sp. Strain EGB

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhoukun; Wu, Jiale; Zhang, Biying; Wang, Fei; Ye, Xianfeng; Huang, Yan; Huang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    A novel α-amylase, AmyM, was purified from the culture supernatant of Corallococcus sp. strain EGB. AmyM is a maltohexaose-forming exoamylase with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa. Based on the results of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry and peptide mass fingerprinting of AmyM and by comparison to the genome sequence of Corallococcus coralloides DSM 2259, the AmyM gene was identified and cloned into Escherichia coli. amyM encodes a secretory amylase with a predicted signal peptide of 23 amino acid residues, which showed no significant identity with known and functionally verified amylases. amyM was expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) cells with a hexahistidine tag. The signal peptide efficiently induced the secretion of mature AmyM in E. coli. Recombinant AmyM (rAmyM) was purified by Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) affinity chromatography, with a specific activity of up to 14,000 U/mg. rAmyM was optimally active at 50°C in Tris-HCl buffer (50 mM; pH 7.0) and stable at temperatures of <50°C. rAmyM was stable over a wide range of pH values (from pH 5.0 to 10.0) and highly tolerant to high concentrations of salts, detergents, and various organic solvents. Its activity toward starch was independent of calcium ions. The Km and Vmax of recombinant AmyM for soluble starch were 6.61 mg ml−1 and 44,301.5 μmol min−1 mg−1, respectively. End product analysis showed that maltohexaose accounted for 59.4% of the maltooligosaccharides produced. These characteristics indicate that AmyM has great potential in industrial applications. PMID:25576603

  13. Two novel phycoerythrin-associated linker proteins in the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain WH8102.

    PubMed

    Six, Christophe; Thomas, Jean-Claude; Thion, Laurent; Lemoine, Yves; Zal, Frank; Partensky, Frédéric

    2005-03-01

    The recent availability of the whole genome of Synechococcus sp. strain WH8102 allows us to have a global view of the complex structure of the phycobilisomes of this marine picocyanobacterium. Genomic analyses revealed several new characteristics of these phycobilisomes, consisting of an allophycocyanin core and rods made of one type of phycocyanin and two types of phycoerythrins (I and II). Although the allophycocyanin appears to be similar to that found commonly in freshwater cyanobacteria, the phycocyanin is simpler since it possesses only one complete set of alpha and beta subunits and two rod-core linkers (CpcG1 and CpcG2). It is therefore probably made of a single hexameric disk per rod. In contrast, we have found two novel putative phycoerythrin-associated linker polypeptides that appear to be specific for marine Synechococcus spp. The first one (SYNW2000) is unusually long (548 residues) and apparently results from the fusion of a paralog of MpeC, a phycoerythrin II linker, and of CpeD, a phycoerythrin-I linker. The second one (SYNW1989) has a more classical size (300 residues) and is also an MpeC paralog. A biochemical analysis revealed that, like MpeC, these two novel linkers were both chromophorylated with phycourobilin. Our data suggest that they are both associated (partly or totally) with phycoerythrin II, and we propose to name SYNW2000 and SYNW1989 MpeD and MpeE, respectively. We further show that acclimation of phycobilisomes to high light leads to a dramatic reduction of MpeC, whereas the two novel linkers are not significantly affected. Models for the organization of the rods are proposed.

  14. Two Novel Phycoerythrin-Associated Linker Proteins in the Marine Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Strain WH8102

    PubMed Central

    Six, Christophe; Thomas, Jean-Claude; Thion, Laurent; Lemoine, Yves; Zal, Frank; Partensky, Frédéric

    2005-01-01

    The recent availability of the whole genome of Synechococcus sp. strain WH8102 allows us to have a global view of the complex structure of the phycobilisomes of this marine picocyanobacterium. Genomic analyses revealed several new characteristics of these phycobilisomes, consisting of an allophycocyanin core and rods made of one type of phycocyanin and two types of phycoerythrins (I and II). Although the allophycocyanin appears to be similar to that found commonly in freshwater cyanobacteria, the phycocyanin is simpler since it possesses only one complete set of α and β subunits and two rod-core linkers (CpcG1 and CpcG2). It is therefore probably made of a single hexameric disk per rod. In contrast, we have found two novel putative phycoerythrin-associated linker polypeptides that appear to be specific for marine Synechococcus spp. The first one (SYNW2000) is unusually long (548 residues) and apparently results from the fusion of a paralog of MpeC, a phycoerythrin II linker, and of CpeD, a phycoerythrin-I linker. The second one (SYNW1989) has a more classical size (300 residues) and is also an MpeC paralog. A biochemical analysis revealed that, like MpeC, these two novel linkers were both chromophorylated with phycourobilin. Our data suggest that they are both associated (partly or totally) with phycoerythrin II, and we propose to name SYNW2000 and SYNW1989 MpeD and MpeE, respectively. We further show that acclimation of phycobilisomes to high light leads to a dramatic reduction of MpeC, whereas the two novel linkers are not significantly affected. Models for the organization of the rods are proposed. PMID:15716439

  15. Effects Exerted by Transcriptional Regulator PcaU from Acinetobacter sp. Strain ADP1

    PubMed Central

    Trautwein, Gaby; Gerischer, Ulrike

    2001-01-01

    Protocatechuate degradation is accomplished in a multistep inducible catabolic pathway in Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1. The induction is brought about by the transcriptional regulator PcaU in concert with the inducer protocatechuate. PcaU, a member of the new IclR family of transcriptional regulators, was shown to play a role in the activation of transcription at the promoter for the structural pca genes, leaving open the participation of additional activators. In this work we show that there is no PcaU-independent transcriptional activation at the pca gene promoter. The minimal inducer concentration leading to an induction response is 10−5 M protocatechuate. The extent of expression of the pca genes was observed to depend on the nature of the inducing carbon source, and this is assumed to be caused by different internal levels of protocatechuate in the cells. The basal level of expression was shown to be comparatively high and to vary depending on the noninducing carbon source independent of PcaU. In addition to the activating function, in vivo results suggest a repressing function for PcaU at the pca gene promoter in the absence of an elevated inducer concentration. Expression at the pcaU gene promoter is independent of the growth condition but is subject to strong negative autoregulation. We propose a model in which PcaU exerts a repressor function both at its own promoter and at the structural gene promoter and in addition functions as an activator of transcription at the structural gene promoter at elevated inducer concentration. PMID:11208784

  16. Acetoacetyl Coenzyme A Reductase and Polyhydroxybutyrate Synthesis in Rhizobium (Cicer) sp. Strain CC 1192

    PubMed Central

    Chohan, Shahid N.; Copeland, Les

    1998-01-01

    Biochemical controls that regulate the biosynthesis of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) were investigated in Rhizobium (Cicer) sp. strain CC 1192. This species is of interest for studying PHB synthesis because the polymer accumulates to a large extent in free-living cells but not in bacteroids during nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) plants. Evidence is presented that indicates that CC 1192 cells retain the enzymic capacity to synthesize PHB when they differentiate from the free-living state to the bacteroid state. This evidence includes the incorporation by CC 1192 bacteroids of radiolabel from [14C]malate into 3-hydroxybutyrate which was derived by chemically degrading insoluble material from bacteroid pellets. Furthermore, the presence of an NADPH-dependent acetoacetyl coenzyme A (CoA) reductase, which was specific for R-(−)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA and NADP+ in the oxidative direction, was demonstrated in extracts from free-living and bacteroid cells of CC 1192. Activity of this enzyme in the reductive direction appeared to be regulated at the biochemical level mainly by the availability of substrates. The CC 1192 cells also contained an NADH-specific acetoacetyl-CoA reductase which oxidized S-(+)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA. A membrane preparation from CC 1192 bacteroids readily oxidized NADH but not NADPH, which is suggested to be a major source of reductant for nitrogenase. Thus, a high ratio of NADPH to NADP+, which could enhance delivery of reductant to nitrogenase, could also favor the reduction of acetoacetyl-CoA for PHB synthesis. This would mean that fine controls that regulate the partitioning of acetyl-CoA between citrate synthase and 3-ketothiolase are important in determining whether PHB accumulates. PMID:9687441

  17. Evidence for a novel pathway in the degradation of fluorene by Pseudomonas sp. strain F274.

    PubMed Central

    Grifoll, M; Selifonov, S A; Chapman, P J

    1994-01-01

    A fluorene-utilizing microorganism, identified as a species of Pseudomonas, was isolated from soil severely contaminated from creosote use and was shown to accumulate six major metabolites from fluorene in washed-cell incubations. Five of these products were identified as 9-fluorenol, 9-fluorenone, (+)-1,1a-dihydroxy-1-hydro-9-fluorenone, 8-hydroxy-3,4-benzocoumarin, and phthalic acid. This last compound was also identified in growing cultures supported by fluorene. Fluorene assimilation into cell biomass was estimated to be approximately 50%. The structures of accumulated products indicate that a previously undescribed pathway of fluorene catabolism is employed by Pseudomonas sp. strain F274. This pathway involves oxygenation of fluorene at C-9 to give 9-fluorenol, which is then dehydrogenated to the corresponding ketone, 9-fluorenone. Dioxygenase attack on 9-fluorenone adjacent to the carbonyl group gives an angular diol, 1,1a-dihydroxy-1-hydro-9-fluorenone. Identification of 8-hydroxy-3,4-benzocoumarin and phthalic acid suggests that the five-membered ring of the angular diol is opened first and that the resulting 2'-carboxy derivative of 2,3-dihydroxy-biphenyl is catabolized by reactions analogous to those of biphenyl degradation, leading to the formation of phthalic acid. Cell extracts of fluorene-grown cells possessed high levels of an enzyme characteristic of phthalate catabolism, 4,5-dihydroxyphthalate decarboxylase, together with protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase. On the basis of these findings, a pathway of fluorene degradation is proposed to account for its conversion to intermediary metabolites. A range of compounds with structures similar to that of fluorene was acted on by fluorene-grown cells to give products consistent with the initial reactions proposed. PMID:8074523

  18. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Profiling of Anabaena sp. Strain 90 under Inorganic Phosphorus Stress

    PubMed Central

    Teikari, Jonna; Österholm, Julia; Kopf, Matthias; Battchikova, Natalia; Wahlsten, Matti; Aro, Eva-Mari; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic phosphorus (Pi) is one of the main growth-limiting factors of diazotrophic cyanobacteria. Due to human activity, the availability of Pi has increased in water bodies, resulting in eutrophication and the formation of massive cyanobacterial blooms. In this study, we examined the molecular responses of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 90 to phosphorus deprivation, aiming at the identification of candidate genes to monitor the Pi status in cyanobacteria. Furthermore, this study increased the basic understanding of how phosphorus affects diazotrophic and bloom-forming cyanobacteria as a major growth-limiting factor. Based on RNA sequencing data, we identified 246 differentially expressed genes after phosphorus starvation and 823 differentially expressed genes after prolonged Pi limitation, most of them related to central metabolism and cellular growth. The transcripts of the genes related to phosphorus transport and assimilation (pho regulon) were most upregulated during phosphorus depletion. One of the most increased transcripts encodes a giant protein of 1,869 amino acid residues, which contains, among others, a phytase-like domain. Our findings predict its crucial role in phosphorus starvation, but future studies are still needed. Using two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), we found 43 proteins that were differentially expressed after prolonged phosphorus stress. However, correlation analysis unraveled an association only to some extent between the transcriptomic and proteomic abundances. Based on the present results, we suggest that the method used for monitoring the Pi status in cyanobacterial bloom should contain wider combinations of pho regulon genes (e.g., PstABCS transport systems) in addition to the commonly used alkaline phosphatase gene alone. PMID:26025890

  19. Isolation of high-salinity-tolerant bacterial strains, Enterobacter sp., Serratia sp., Yersinia sp., for nitrification and aerobic denitrification under cyanogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Mpongwana, N; Ntwampe, S K O; Mekuto, L; Akinpelu, E A; Dyantyi, S; Mpentshu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Cyanides (CN(-)) and soluble salts could potentially inhibit biological processes in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), such as nitrification and denitrification. Cyanide in wastewater can alter metabolic functions of microbial populations in WWTPs, thus significantly inhibiting nitrifier and denitrifier metabolic processes, rendering the water treatment processes ineffective. In this study, bacterial isolates that are tolerant to high salinity conditions, which are capable of nitrification and aerobic denitrification under cyanogenic conditions, were isolated from a poultry slaughterhouse effluent. Three of the bacterial isolates were found to be able to oxidise NH(4)-N in the presence of 65.91 mg/L of free cyanide (CN(-)) under saline conditions, i.e. 4.5% (w/v) NaCl. The isolates I, H and G, were identified as Enterobacter sp., Yersinia sp. and Serratia sp., respectively. Results showed that 81% (I), 71% (G) and 75% (H) of 400 mg/L NH(4)-N was biodegraded (nitrification) within 72 h, with the rates of biodegradation being suitably described by first order reactions, with rate constants being: 4.19 h(-1) (I), 4.21 h(-1) (H) and 3.79 h(-1) (G), respectively, with correlation coefficients ranging between 0.82 and 0.89. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rates were 38% (I), 42% (H) and 48% (G), over a period of 168 h with COD reduction being highest at near neutral pH.

  20. Altererythrobacter estronivorus sp. nov., an Estrogen-Degrading Strain Isolated from Yundang Lagoon of Xiamen City in China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Dan; Ma, Cong; Hu, Anyi; Zhang, Fangfang; Hu, Hongbo; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2016-05-01

    A novel gram-negative, non-spore-forming, mobile, estrogen-degrading strain, MH-B5(T), was isolated from Yundang Lagoon in Xiamen city of China. Growth of this strain occurred between 4 and 40 °C (optimum at 35 °C), pH 5.5-10.0 (7.5), 0.0-7 % NaCl (1-2 %). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain MH-B5(T) belonged to the genus Altererythrobacter family Erythrobacteraceae, showing the highest sequence similarity (96.6 %) to Altererythrobacter xinjiangensis S3-63(T). The dominant cellular fatty acid was C18:1 ω7c and/or C18:1 ω6c (57.98 %). The major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone 10, and major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, sphingoglycolipid, phospholipid, and phosphatidylcholine. Strain MH-B5(T) did not contain bacteriochlorophyll a. The draft genome sequence of strain MH-B5(T) comprised about 3.67 Mb, with an average G+C content of 60 mol%. On the basis of data from its morphology, chemotaxonomy, 16S rRNA gene sequence and genome sequence, strain MH-B5(T) represents a novel species, for which the name Altererythrobacter estronivorus sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is MH-B5(T) (=CCTCC AB2012025(T)=DSM 25986(T)).