Science.gov

Sample records for geographical information systems

  1. Environmental geographic information system.

    SciTech Connect

    Peek, Dennis W; Helfrich, Donald Alan; Gorman, Susan

    2010-08-01

    This document describes how the Environmental Geographic Information System (EGIS) was used, along with externally received data, to create maps for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS) Source Document project. Data quality among the various classes of geographic information system (GIS) data is addressed. A complete listing of map layers used is provided.

  2. Geographic information systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1992-01-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) technology can be used for scientific investigations, resource management, and developmental planning. For example, a GIS might allow emergency planners to easily calculate emergency response times in the event of a natural disaster, or a GIS might be used to find wetlands that need protection form pollution.

  3. Symposium on Geographic Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felleman, John, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Six papers on geographic information systems cover the future of geographic information systems, land information systems modernization in Wisconsin, the Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (TIGER) System of the U.S. Bureau of the Census, satellite remote sensing, geographic information systems and sustainable development,…

  4. Geographic Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, William F; Delmerico, Alan M

    2009-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the development, capabilities, and utilization of geographic information systems (GIS). There are nearly an unlimited number of applications that are relevant to GIS because virtually all human interactions, natural and man-made features, resources, and populations have a geographic component. Everything happens somewhere and the location often has a role that affects what occurs. This role is often called spatial dependence or spatial autocorrelation, which exists when a phenomenon is not randomly geographically distributed. GIS has a number of key capabilities that are needed to conduct a spatial analysis to assess this spatial dependence. This chapter presents these capabilities (e.g., georeferencing, adjacency/distance measures, overlays) and provides a case study to illustrate how GIS can be used for both research and planning. Although GIS has developed into a relatively mature application for basic functions, development is needed to more seamlessly integrate spatial statistics and models.The issue of location, especially the geography of human activities, interactions between humanity and nature, and the distribution and location of natural resources and features, is one of the most basic elements of scientific inquiry. Conceptualizations and physical maps of geographic space have existed since the beginning of time because all human activity takes place in a geographic context. Representing objects in space, basically where things are located, is a critical aspect of the natural, social, and applied sciences. Throughout history there have been many methods of characterizing geographic space, especially maps created by artists, mariners, and others eventually leading to the development of the field of cartography. It is no surprise that the digital age has launched a major effort to utilize geographic data, but not just as maps. A geographic information system (GIS) facilitates the collection, analysis, and reporting of

  5. Geographic Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, William F.; Delmerico, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the development, capabilities, and utilization of geographic information systems (GIS). There are nearly an unlimited number of applications that are relevant to GIS because virtually all human interactions, natural and man-made features, resources, and populations have a geographic component. Everything happens somewhere and the location often has a role that affects what occurs. This role is often called spatial dependence or spatial autocorrelation, which exists when a phenomenon is not randomly geographically distributed. GIS has a number of key capabilities that are needed to conduct a spatial analysis to assess this spatial dependence. This chapter presents these capabilities (e.g., georeferencing, adjacency/distance measures, overlays) and provides a case study to illustrate how GIS can be used for both research and planning. Although GIS has developed into a relatively mature application for basic functions, development is needed to more seamlessly integrate spatial statistics and models. The issue of location, especially the geography of human activities, interactions between humanity and nature, and the distribution and location of natural resources and features, is one of the most basic elements of scientific inquiry. Conceptualizations and physical maps of geographic space have existed since the beginning of time because all human activity takes place in a geographic context. Representing objects in space, basically where things are located, is a critical aspect of the natural, social, and applied sciences. Throughout history there have been many methods of characterizing geographic space, especially maps created by artists, mariners, and others eventually leading to the development of the field of cartography. It is no surprise that the digital age has launched a major effort to utilize geographic data, but not just as maps. A geographic information system (GIS) facilitates the collection, analysis, and reporting of

  6. Geographic information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    Information and activities are provided to: (1) enhance the ability to distinguish between a Geographic Information System (GIS) and a data management system; (2) develop understanding of spatial data handling by conventional methods versus the automated approach; (3) promote awareness of GIS design and capabilities; (4) foster understanding of the concepts and problems of data base development and management; (5) facilitate recognition of how a computerized GIS can model conditions in the present "real world" to project conditions in the future; and (6) appreciate the utility of integrating LANDSAT and other remotely sensed data into the GIS.

  7. Geographic information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    Information and activities are provided to: (1) enhance the ability to distinguish between a Geographic Information System (GIS) and a data management system; (2) develop understanding of spatial data handling by conventional methods versus the automated approach; (3) promote awareness of GIS design and capabilities; (4) foster understanding of the concepts and problems of data base development and management; (5) facilitate recognition of how a computerized GIS can model conditions in the present "real world" to project conditions in the future; and (6) appreciate the utility of integrating LANDSAT and other remotely sensed data into the GIS.

  8. [Geographic information systems].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Vásquez, Akram; Azañedo, Diego; Bendezú-Quispe, Guido; Pacheco-Mendoza, Josmel; Chaparro, R Martín

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to geospatially explore the occurrence rates of car accidents involving pedestrians in Cercado de Lima (Lima District), Peru. Car accidents involving pedestrians recorded in the 2015 National Police Station Census of the National Statistics and Information Institute were described and georeferenced. Subsequently, a Kernel Density analysis was carried out to locate areas with high, medium, and low density events. Records of 171 car accidents involving pedestrians were studied: the types of vehicles involved were automobiles (56.7%) and smaller vehicles (22.8%). The highest percentage of car accidents involving pedestrians (38.6%) took place between 12:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. There were two densely populated areas and two areas with intermediate density for car accidents involving pedestrians, locations that were previously reported as critical due to their deficiencies and high probability of traffic accidents. The use of geographic information systems offers a quick overview of the occurrence rates of car accidents involving pedestrians to make comparisons and enable the local implementation of strategies.

  9. Geographic names information system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1987-01-01

    of the data in each of the data elements of the four data bases of GNIS. The GNIS program, which includes the automated names system and the National Gazetteer program, is a coordinated effort under the direction of Donald J. Orth, Chief of the Branch of Geographic Names. The automated system was initially developed by Sam Stulberg and Roger L. Payne. System enhancement and software development is coordinated by Judy J. Stella, head programmer for GNIS, and special projects coordinator is Louis A. Yost IV. Coordination of the research and compilation of certain gazetteers is directed by Robin D. Worcester with research assistance and support from Jon Campbell, Linda S. Davis, and Nancy Engel.

  10. GEOGRAPHIC NAMES INFORMATION SYSTEM (GNIS) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS), developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Board on Geographic Names (BGN), contains information about physical and cultural geographic features in the United States and associated areas, both current and historical, but not including roads and highways. The database also contains geographic names in Antarctica. The database holds the Federally recognized name of each feature and defines the location of the feature by state, county, USGS topographic map, and geographic coordinates. Other feature attributes include names or spellings other than the official name, feature designations, feature class, historical and descriptive information, and for some categories of features the geometric boundaries. The database assigns a unique feature identifier, a random number, that is a key for accessing, integrating, or reconciling GNIS data with other data sets. The GNIS is our Nation's official repository of domestic geographic feature names information.

  11. Maryland Automated Geographic Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    A computer based system designed for storing geographic data in a consistent and coordinated manner is described. The data are stored, retrieved, and analyzed using a 400 km sq/acre cell. Stored information can be displayed on computer maps in a manner similar to standard map graphics. The data bank contains various information for performing land use analysis in a variety of areas.

  12. Maryland Automated Geographic Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    A computer based system designed for storing geographic data in a consistent and coordinated manner is described. The data are stored, retrieved, and analyzed using a 400 km sq/acre cell. Stored information can be displayed on computer maps in a manner similar to standard map graphics. The data bank contains various information for performing land use analysis in a variety of areas.

  13. Geographic Information System Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, Chad; Casad, Christopher; Floriano, Luis G.; Hill, Tracie; Johnson, Rashida K.; Locklear, J. Mark; Penn, Stephen; Rhoulac, Tori; Shay, Adam H.; Taylor, Antone; hide

    1995-01-01

    Data was collected in order to further NASA Langley Research Center's Geographic Information System(GIS). Information on LaRC's communication, electrical, and facility configurations was collected. Existing data was corrected through verification, resulting in more accurate databases. In addition, Global Positioning System(GPS) points were used in order to accurately impose buildings on digitized images. Overall, this project will help the Imaging and CADD Technology Team (ICTT) prove GIS to be a valuable resource for LaRC.

  14. Evaluating geographic information systems technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guptill, Stephen C.

    1989-01-01

    Computerized geographic information systems (GISs) are emerging as the spatial data handling tools of choice for solving complex geographical problems. However, few guidelines exist for assisting potential users in identifying suitable hardware and software. A process to be followed in evaluating the merits of GIS technology is presented. Related standards and guidelines, software functions, hardware components, and benchmarking are discussed. By making users aware of all aspects of adopting GIS technology, they can decide if GIS is an appropriate tool for their application and, if so, which GIS should be used.

  15. Layers of Information: Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucking, Robert A.; Christmann, Edwin P.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Geographic Information System (GIS) which is capable of storing, manipulating, and displaying data allowing students to explore complex relationships through scientific inquiry. Explains applications of GIS in middle school classrooms and includes assessment strategies. (YDS)

  16. Layers of Information: Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucking, Robert A.; Christmann, Edwin P.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Geographic Information System (GIS) which is capable of storing, manipulating, and displaying data allowing students to explore complex relationships through scientific inquiry. Explains applications of GIS in middle school classrooms and includes assessment strategies. (YDS)

  17. The Oklahoma Geographic Information Retrieval System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Oklahoma Geographic Information Retrieval System (OGIRS) is a highly interactive data entry, storage, manipulation, and display software system for use with geographically referenced data. Although originally developed for a project concerned with coal strip mine reclamation, OGIRS is capable of handling any geographically referenced data for a variety of natural resource management applications. A special effort has been made to integrate remotely sensed data into the information system. The timeliness and synoptic coverage of satellite data are particularly useful attributes for inclusion into the geographic information system.

  18. Remote sensing and geographically based information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cicone, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    The incorporation of remotely sensed digital data in a computer based information system is seen to be equivalent to the incorporation of any other spatially oriented layer of data. The growing interest in such systems indicates a need to develop a generalized geographically oriented data base management system that could be made commercially available for a wide range of applications. Some concepts that distinguish geographic information systems were reviewed, and a simple model which can serve as a conceptual framework for the design of a generalized geographic information system was examined.

  19. Using geographic information systems in injury research.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Linda S

    2007-01-01

    To provide an overview of geographic information systems (GIS) and to discuss current and future applications in injury and trauma research. Literature review and discourse of GIS technology related to injury and trauma research. A search of scientific literature databases, text books, and online resources was undertaken to describe the current and prospective uses of GIS in injury and trauma research. Geographic information systems are computerized mapping systems that link information from different data sets spatially. The advantage of GIS is the capability to graphically display different attributes of an area in a way that is easily interpretable. Geographic information systems have been used to study injury rates, describe populations at risk for injury, examine access to trauma care, and develop and assess injury prevention programs. Geographic information systems are tools for injury researchers to analyze injury rates and risks and to describe their results with colorful maps and graphics that allow the public to see how injuries affect their communities.

  20. Remote sensing and geographically based information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cicone, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    A structure is proposed for a geographically-oriented computer-based information system applicable to the analysis of remote sensing digital data. The structure, intended to answer a wide variety of user needs, would permit multiple views of the data, provide independent management of data security, quality and integrity, and rely on automatic data filing. Problems in geographically-oriented data systems, including those related to line encoding and cell encoding, are considered.

  1. Geographic Information Systems: A Primer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    emulsion -based (film) or digital. Information is obtained from a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum, from ultraviolet to microwave . When... microwave . Imagery is manually or digitally interpreted. For GIS, images can be classified into thematic categories, rendering data into a map or into a...a dedicated project of circumscribed scope. Petroleum companies are interested in oil exploration and thus employ GIS for specific purposes. The

  2. Geographic information system/watershed model interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Gary T.

    1989-01-01

    Geographic information systems allow for the interactive analysis of spatial data related to water-resources investigations. A conceptual design for an interface between a geographic information system and a watershed model includes functions for the estimation of model parameter values. Design criteria include ease of use, minimal equipment requirements, a generic data-base management system, and use of a macro language. An application is demonstrated for a 90.1-square-kilometer subbasin of the Patuxent River near Unity, Maryland, that performs automated derivation of watershed parameters for hydrologic modeling.

  3. Promoting Geographic Information System Usage across Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiegel, Shaun; Kinikin, Janae

    2004-01-01

    In this article the authors discuss how they implemented and promoted Geographic Information System (GIS) applications at Weber State University (WSU), a four-year public institution with two campuses. GIS is a type of computer system made of hardware, software, and data that allows the mapping of spatially related layers that have a common…

  4. Promoting Geographic Information System Usage across Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiegel, Shaun; Kinikin, Janae

    2004-01-01

    In this article the authors discuss how they implemented and promoted Geographic Information System (GIS) applications at Weber State University (WSU), a four-year public institution with two campuses. GIS is a type of computer system made of hardware, software, and data that allows the mapping of spatially related layers that have a common…

  5. Representing Historical Knowledge in Geographic Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossner, Karl Eric

    2010-01-01

    A growing number of historical scholars in social science and humanities fields are using geographic information systems (GIS) to help investigate spatial questions and map their findings. The nature of historical data and historiographic practices present several challenges in using GIS that have been addressed only partially to date. For…

  6. Data Representations for Geographic Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Clifford A.

    1992-01-01

    Surveys the field and literature of geographic information systems (GIS) and spatial data representation as it relates to GIS. Highlights include GIS terms, data types, and operations; vector representations and raster, or grid, representations; spatial indexing; elevation data representations; large spatial databases; and problem areas and future…

  7. Representing Historical Knowledge in Geographic Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossner, Karl Eric

    2010-01-01

    A growing number of historical scholars in social science and humanities fields are using geographic information systems (GIS) to help investigate spatial questions and map their findings. The nature of historical data and historiographic practices present several challenges in using GIS that have been addressed only partially to date. For…

  8. An Overview to Geographic Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Allan B.

    1995-01-01

    Provides an introduction to geographic information systems (GIS); reviews the use of GIS in libraries; and presents some challenges, strengths, and opportunities for libraries and GIS. Discusses requirements and functions of a GIS and presents examples. Six figures illustrate the discussion. (JKP)

  9. Mapware: Educational Applications of Geographic Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinker, Robert F.

    1992-01-01

    Analyzes the applicability to mathematics and science education of geographic information systems. Gives examples of possible applications involving aerosol detection in the atmosphere, verification of satellite images, and the Kidnet Project. Sketches out a research agenda and describes needed characteristics of the software when applied to…

  10. An Introduction to Urban Geographic Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huxhold, William E.

    1991-03-01

    A nuts-and-bolts introduction to geographic information systems (GIS), this book outlines the basic concepts and diverse uses of this technology in a local government environment. Emphasizing the value of integrating data from various sources, the book provides a set of tools for improving the way public services are delivered, resources are managed, and policy decisions are made. Rather than stressing the computer technology that is so rapidly changing in the GIS industry, this book concentrates on the concepts upon which this technology is based: information systems design, computer-aided mapping, topological data structures, geographic base files, and land records systems. It also provides the latest information on the U.S. Census Bureau's TIGER files and the Global Positioning Satellite System established by the U.S. Department of Defense. Special features include fourteen case studies, a chapter describing the enormous effort required to set up and manage a typical GIS project, and an appendix on who is using GIS technology and how it is being used. Whether they run the GIS or help run the government, readers of An Introduction to Urban Geographic Information Systems will learn efficient and effective methods for improving the impact that local government has on its citizens.

  11. Advanced Data Structure and Geographic Information Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peuquet, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    The current state of the art in specified areas of Geographic Information Systems GIS technology is examined. Study of the question of very large, efficient, heterogeneous spatial databases is required in order to explore the potential application of remotely sensed data for studying the long term habitability of the Earth. Research includes a review of spatial data structures and storage, development of operations required by GIS, and preparation of a testbed system to compare Vaster data structure with NASA's Topological Raster Structure.

  12. Geographical information systems and tropical medicine

    PubMed Central

    KHAN, O. A.; DAVENHALL, W.; ALI, M.; CASTILLO-SALGADO, C.; VAZQUEZ-PROKOPEC, G.; KITRON, U.; SOARES MAGALHÃES, R. J.; CLEMENTS, A. C. A.

    2013-01-01

    In terms of their applicability to the field of tropical medicine, geographical information systems (GIS) have developed enormously in the last two decades. This article reviews some of the pertinent and representative applications of GIS, including the use of such systems and remote sensing for the mapping of Chagas disease and human helminthiases, the use of GIS in vaccine trials, and the global applications of GIS for health-information management, disease epidemiology, and pandemic planning. The future use of GIS as a decision-making tool and some barriers to the widespread implementation of such systems in developing settings are also discussed. PMID:20659391

  13. Geographic Information Systems and Web Page Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Justin

    2004-01-01

    The Facilities Engineering and Architectural Branch is responsible for the design and maintenance of buildings, laboratories, and civil structures. In order to improve efficiency and quality, the FEAB has dedicated itself to establishing a data infrastructure based on Geographic Information Systems, GIS. The value of GIS was explained in an article dating back to 1980 entitled "Need for a Multipurpose Cadastre" which stated, "There is a critical need for a better land-information system in the United States to improve land-conveyance procedures, furnish a basis for equitable taxation, and provide much-needed information for resource management and environmental planning." Scientists and engineers both point to GIS as the solution. What is GIS? According to most text books, Geographic Information Systems is a class of software that stores, manages, and analyzes mapable features on, above, or below the surface of the earth. GIS software is basically database management software to the management of spatial data and information. Simply put, Geographic Information Systems manage, analyze, chart, graph, and map spatial information. GIS can be broken down into two main categories, urban GIS and natural resource GIS. Further still, natural resource GIS can be broken down into six sub-categories, agriculture, forestry, wildlife, catchment management, archaeology, and geology/mining. Agriculture GIS has several applications, such as agricultural capability analysis, land conservation, market analysis, or whole farming planning. Forestry GIs can be used for timber assessment and management, harvest scheduling and planning, environmental impact assessment, and pest management. GIS when used in wildlife applications enables the user to assess and manage habitats, identify and track endangered and rare species, and monitor impact assessment.

  14. Recent trends in geographic information system research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, K. C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews recent contributions to the body of published research on Geographic Information Systems (GISs). Increased usages of GISs have placed a new demand upon the academic and research community and despite some lack of formalized definitions, categorizations, terminologies, and standard data structures, the community has risen to the challenge. Examinations of published GIS research, in particular on GIS data structures, reveal a healthy, active research community which is using a truly interdisciplinary approach. Future work will undoubtably lead to a clearer understanding of the problems of handling spatial data, while producing a new generation of highly sophisticated GISs.

  15. Geographic Information Systems and Web Page Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Justin

    2004-01-01

    The Facilities Engineering and Architectural Branch is responsible for the design and maintenance of buildings, laboratories, and civil structures. In order to improve efficiency and quality, the FEAB has dedicated itself to establishing a data infrastructure based on Geographic Information Systems, GIs. The value of GIS was explained in an article dating back to 1980 entitled "Need for a Multipurpose Cadastre which stated, "There is a critical need for a better land-information system in the United States to improve land-conveyance procedures, furnish a basis for equitable taxation, and provide much-needed information for resource management and environmental planning." Scientists and engineers both point to GIS as the solution. What is GIS? According to most text books, Geographic Information Systems is a class of software that stores, manages, and analyzes mapable features on, above, or below the surface of the earth. GIS software is basically database management software to the management of spatial data and information. Simply put, Geographic Information Systems manage, analyze, chart, graph, and map spatial information. At the outset, I was given goals and expectations from my branch and from my mentor with regards to the further implementation of GIs. Those goals are as follows: (1) Continue the development of GIS for the underground structures. (2) Extract and export annotated data from AutoCAD drawing files and construct a database (to serve as a prototype for future work). (3) Examine existing underground record drawings to determine existing and non-existing underground tanks. Once this data was collected and analyzed, I set out on the task of creating a user-friendly database that could be assessed by all members of the branch. It was important that the database be built using programs that most employees already possess, ruling out most AutoCAD-based viewers. Therefore, I set out to create an Access database that translated onto the web using Internet

  16. Geographic Information Systems and Web Page Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Justin

    2004-01-01

    The Facilities Engineering and Architectural Branch is responsible for the design and maintenance of buildings, laboratories, and civil structures. In order to improve efficiency and quality, the FEAB has dedicated itself to establishing a data infrastructure based on Geographic Information Systems, GIs. The value of GIS was explained in an article dating back to 1980 entitled "Need for a Multipurpose Cadastre which stated, "There is a critical need for a better land-information system in the United States to improve land-conveyance procedures, furnish a basis for equitable taxation, and provide much-needed information for resource management and environmental planning." Scientists and engineers both point to GIS as the solution. What is GIS? According to most text books, Geographic Information Systems is a class of software that stores, manages, and analyzes mapable features on, above, or below the surface of the earth. GIS software is basically database management software to the management of spatial data and information. Simply put, Geographic Information Systems manage, analyze, chart, graph, and map spatial information. At the outset, I was given goals and expectations from my branch and from my mentor with regards to the further implementation of GIs. Those goals are as follows: (1) Continue the development of GIS for the underground structures. (2) Extract and export annotated data from AutoCAD drawing files and construct a database (to serve as a prototype for future work). (3) Examine existing underground record drawings to determine existing and non-existing underground tanks. Once this data was collected and analyzed, I set out on the task of creating a user-friendly database that could be assessed by all members of the branch. It was important that the database be built using programs that most employees already possess, ruling out most AutoCAD-based viewers. Therefore, I set out to create an Access database that translated onto the web using Internet

  17. Geographic information systems (GIS) for geologic mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, S.C. . Center for Environmental Research Information)

    1993-03-01

    The computer-based Geographic Information System (GIS) is a powerful and versatile tool for preparation of geologic maps. Using GIS different types of geographically oriented information can be displayed on a common base in a flexible format that facilitates examination of relationships between the types of information. In addition, text-based and graphic information (attributes) from separate databases can be attached to points, lines or areas within the different map layers. Although GIS has enormous potential for geologic mapping, it must be used with care. Key considerations when using GIS include realistic representation of the geology, choice of an appropriate scale for the maps, and comparison of the computer-generated maps with field observations to maintain quality control. In building multilayer GIS maps, the data sources must be at a scale appropriate to the intended use. Information derived from diverse sources must be examined carefully to assure that it is valid at the scale of representation required. Examples of GIS products created for one purpose, but potentially misused for a different purpose, include formation contacts (lines) on a regional geologic map scaled up for a facility siting study or well locations on a small-scale location map subsequently contoured for contaminant plume prediction at a very large scale. In using GIS to prepare geologic maps, it is essential to have a clear rationale for the map and use an appropriate scale to depict the various layers of information. The authors of GIS-based geologic maps must be aware that the attractive, polished appearance of their products may tempt some end users to stretch and misinterpret the information displayed.

  18. Automation technology using Geographic Information System (GIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Cynthia L.

    1994-01-01

    Airport Surface Movement Area is but one of the actions taken to increase the capacity and safety of existing airport facilities. The System Integration Branch (SIB) has designed an integrated system consisting of an electronic moving display in the cockpit, and includes display of taxi routes which will warn controllers and pilots of the position of other traffic and warning information automatically. Although, this system has in test simulation proven to be accurate and helpful; the initial process of obtaining an airport layout of the taxi-routes and designing each of them is a very tedious and time-consuming process. Other methods of preparing the display maps are being researched. One such method is the use of the Geographical Information System (GIS). GIS is an integrated system of computer hardware and software linking topographical, demographic and other resource data that is being referenced. The software can support many areas of work with virtually unlimited information compatibility due to the system's open architecture. GIS will allow us to work faster with increased efficiency and accuracy while providing decision making capabilities. GIS is currently being used at the Langley Research Center with other applications and has been validated as an accurate system for that task. GIS usage for our task will involve digitizing aerial photographs of the topology for each taxi-runway and identifying each position according to its specific spatial coordinates. The information currently being used can be integrated with the GIS system, due to its ability to provide a wide variety of user interfaces. Much more research and data analysis will be needed before this technique will be used, however we are hopeful this will lead to better usage of man-power and technological capabilities for the future.

  19. Distributed Object Oriented Geographic Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Lurie, Gordon R.

    1997-02-01

    This interactive, object-oriented, distributed Geographic Information System (GIS) uses the World Wibe Web (WWW) as application medium and distribution mechanism. The software provides distributed access to multiple geo-spatial databases and presents them as if they came from a single coherent database. DOOGIS distributed access comes not only in the form of multiple geo-spatial servers but can break down a single logical server into the constituent physical servers actually storing the data. The program provides for dynamic protocol resolution and content handling allowing unknown objects from a particular server to download their handling code. Security and access privileges are negotiated dynamically with each server contacted and each access attempt.

  20. DOOGIS. Distributed Object Oriented Geographic Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Lurie, G.

    1995-06-01

    This interactive, object-oriented, distributed Geographic Information System (GIS) uses the World Wibe Web (WWW) as application medium and distribution mechanism. The software provides distributed access to multiple geo-spatial databases and presents them as if they came from a single coherent database. DOOGIS distributed access comes not only in the form of multiple geo-spatial servers but can break down a single logical server into the constituent physical servers actually storing the data. The program provides for dynamic protocol resolution and content handling allowing unknown objects from a particular server to download their handling code. Security and access privileges are negotiated dynamically with each server contacted and each access attempt.

  1. ORNL and the geographic information systems revolution

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, J.E.; Durfee, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    Explorers from competing teams race to find a mysterious lost city in the heart of Africa. The American team is continuously in touch with its Houston home base through satellite communications. In flight, team leader Karen Ross displays a map of Africa on her computer screen and notes the multicolored lines suggesting different routes from city to city and into the rain forest. Each pathway is accompanied by a precise estimate of travel time to the final destination. Zooming in on the target area, she switches to satellite images and interprets them in shades of blue, purple, and green. At each checkpoint, the team reports its progress and gets a revised estimate of arrival time. Beset by difficulties, the explorers ask for a faster route, but the computer says the alternative is too dangerous. A simulation model with data representing geology, terrain, vegetation, weather, and many other geographic factors predicts local hazards, including the impending eruption of a nearby volcano. The Americans take the faster route anyway and beat the odds. This fictional account of emerging geographic information system (GIS) technologies comes from Michael Crichton`s 1980 novel Congo, which was made into a 1995 movie. The same technologies were highlighted in Clive Cussler`s 1988 techno-thriller Treasure. In reality, GIS technology began more than a quarter of a century ago at key universities and government laboratories in the United States and Canada. Since 1969, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been among the leading institutions in this diverse, now booming field. GIS has been evolving through new forms and applications ever since.

  2. Stennis Space Center Environmental Geographic Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovely, Janette; Cohan, Tyrus

    2000-01-01

    As NASA's lead center for rocket propulsion testing, the John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) monitors and assesses the off-site impacts of such testing through its Environmental Office (SSC-EO) using acoustical models and ancillary data. The SSC-EO has developed a geographical database, called the SSC Environmental Geographic Information System (SSC-EGIS), that covers an eight-county area bordering the NASA facility. Through the SSC-EGIS, the Enivronmental Office inventories, assesses, and manages the nearly 139,000 acres that comprise Stennis Space Center and its surrounding acoustical buffer zone. The SSC-EGIS contains in-house data as well as a wide range of data obtained from outside sources, including private agencies and local, county, state, and U.S. government agencies. The database comprises cadastral/geodetic, hydrology, infrastructure, geo-political, physical geography, and socio-economic vector and raster layers. The imagery contained in the database is varied, including low-resolution imagery, such as Landsat TM and SPOT; high-resolution imagery, such as IKONOS and AVIRIS; and aerial photographs. The SSC-EGIS has been an integral part of several major projects and the model upon which similar EGIS's will be developed for other NASA facilities. The Corps of Engineers utilized the SSC-EGIS in a plan to establish wetland mitigation sites within the SSC buffer zone. Mississippi State University employed the SSC-EGIS in a preliminary study to evaluate public access points within the buffer zone. The SSC-EO has also expressly used the SSC-EGIS to assess noise pollution modeling, land management/wetland mitigation assessment, environmental hazards mapping, and protected areas mapping for archaeological sites and for threatened and endangered species habitats. The SSC-EO has several active and planned projects that will also make use of the SSC-EGIS during this and the coming fiscal year.

  3. Stennis Space Center Environmental Geographic Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovely, Janette; Cohan, Tyrus

    2000-01-01

    As NASA's lead center for rocket propulsion testing, the John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) monitors and assesses the off-site impacts of such testing through its Environmental Office (SSC-EO) using acoustical models and ancillary data. The SSC-EO has developed a geographical database, called the SSC Environmental Geographic Information System (SSC-EGIS), that covers an eight-county area bordering the NASA facility. Through the SSC-EGIS, the Enivronmental Office inventories, assesses, and manages the nearly 139,000 acres that comprise Stennis Space Center and its surrounding acoustical buffer zone. The SSC-EGIS contains in-house data as well as a wide range of data obtained from outside sources, including private agencies and local, county, state, and U.S. government agencies. The database comprises cadastral/geodetic, hydrology, infrastructure, geo-political, physical geography, and socio-economic vector and raster layers. The imagery contained in the database is varied, including low-resolution imagery, such as Landsat TM and SPOT; high-resolution imagery, such as IKONOS and AVIRIS; and aerial photographs. The SSC-EGIS has been an integral part of several major projects and the model upon which similar EGIS's will be developed for other NASA facilities. The Corps of Engineers utilized the SSC-EGIS in a plan to establish wetland mitigation sites within the SSC buffer zone. Mississippi State University employed the SSC-EGIS in a preliminary study to evaluate public access points within the buffer zone. The SSC-EO has also expressly used the SSC-EGIS to assess noise pollution modeling, land management/wetland mitigation assessment, environmental hazards mapping, and protected areas mapping for archaeological sites and for threatened and endangered species habitats. The SSC-EO has several active and planned projects that will also make use of the SSC-EGIS during this and the coming fiscal year.

  4. Geographic information system based manure application plan.

    PubMed

    Basnet, Badri B; Apan, Armando A; Raine, Steven R

    2002-02-01

    A geographic information system (GIS) based manure application plan has been developed for the site-specific application of animal waste to agricultural fields in the Westbrook sub-catchment of the Murray-Darling Basin, south-east Queensland, Australia. Sites suitable for animal waste application were identified using a GIS based weighted linear combination (WLC) model. The degree of land suitability for animal waste application was determined using a range of social, economic, environmental, and agricultural factors. As eutrophication and toxic blue-green algae blooms are a known problem in the catchment, the manure application rates were limited to the rate of crop phosphorus removal. Maximum manure application rate was calculated spatially by taking the crop nutrient (P2O5) requirement and the manure nutrient (P2O5) content into account. The environmental suitability of the fields receiving animal waste was considered in prescribing the final application rate of solid and liquid manures generated by local animal production facilities. The degree of site suitability of the agricultural fields was also used to suggest manure management practices to minimise the socio-environmental risks and increase the nutrient use efficiency of the applied manure. The amount of ammonium nitrogen (NH4-N) that would be added to the soil by satisfying the P2O5 requirement using manure sources was also calculated and an applied NH4-N map was created. This map could be used to assist farmers identify additional nitrogen requirements after manure application.

  5. Geographical epidemiology, spatial analysis and geographical information systems: a multidisciplinary glossary.

    PubMed

    Rezaeian, Mohsen; Dunn, Graham; St Leger, Selwyn; Appleby, Louis

    2007-02-01

    We provide a relatively non-technical glossary of terms and a description of the tools used in spatial or geographical epidemiology and associated geographical information systems. Statistical topics included cover adjustment and standardisation to allow for demographic and other background differences, data structures, data smoothing, spatial autocorrelation and spatial regression. We also discuss the rationale for geographical epidemiology and specific techniques such as disease clustering, disease mapping, ecological analyses, geographical information systems and global positioning systems.

  6. Geographical Information Systems: A Tool for Institutional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prather, James E.; Carlson, Christina E.

    This paper addresses the application of Geographical Information Systems (GIS), a computerized tool for associating key information by geographical location, to the institutional research function at institutions of higher education. The first section investigates the potential of GIS as an analytical and planning tool for institutional…

  7. A multi-agent system architecture for geographic information gathering.

    PubMed

    Gao, Gang-Yi; Wang, Shen-Kang

    2004-11-01

    World Wide Web (WWW) is a vast repository of information, including a great deal of geographic information. But the location and retrieval of geographic information will require a significant amount of time and effort. In addition, different users usually have different views and interests in the same information. To resolve such problems, this paper first proposed a model of geographic information gathering based on multi-Agent (MA) architecture. Then based on this model, we construct a prototype system with GML (Geography Markup Language). This system consists of three tiers-Client, Web Server and Data Resource. Finally, we expatiate on the process of Web Server.

  8. Geographic information system applications to public warning systems

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the capabilities of a geographic information system (GIS), the Integrated Emergency Management Information System (IEMIS), for planning a siren-based public warning system. The Outdoor Sound Propagation Model (OSPM) in IEMIS models warning sirens in a given area and reports the results graphically as sound pressure level contours. As implemented in IEMIS, OSPM includes graphic functions for the preparation and display of input data, display of the model's results, and management of data files. These graphic functions enable public safety personnel to plan more effectively for warning of the public.

  9. Complementarity of Historic Building Information Modelling and Geographic Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Koehl, M.; Grussenmeyer, P.; Macher, H.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we discuss the potential of integrating both semantically rich models from Building Information Modelling (BIM) and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to build the detailed 3D historic model. BIM contributes to the creation of a digital representation having all physical and functional building characteristics in several dimensions, as e.g. XYZ (3D), time and non-architectural information that are necessary for construction and management of buildings. GIS has potential in handling and managing spatial data especially exploring spatial relationships and is widely used in urban modelling. However, when considering heritage modelling, the specificity of irregular historical components makes it problematic to create the enriched model according to its complex architectural elements obtained from point clouds. Therefore, some open issues limiting the historic building 3D modelling will be discussed in this paper: how to deal with the complex elements composing historic buildings in BIM and GIS environment, how to build the enriched historic model, and why to construct different levels of details? By solving these problems, conceptualization, documentation and analysis of enriched Historic Building Information Modelling are developed and compared to traditional 3D models aimed primarily for visualization.

  10. Immune systems, geographic information systems (GIS), environment and health impacts.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Guillermo A; Cooper, Edwin L

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been related to alterations in cellular and humoral immune responses in both adaptive and innate immune systems of most animal species. These compounds share a common signaling mechanism to exert their effects on cells of the immune system, which includes the aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and the AhR nuclear translocator (ARN). Recently, the interference of AhR-ARNT with the nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB signaling pathway has been proposed as a critical event in the adverse effects on the immune system. Studies on the effects of these AhR-ARNT-related toxicants on the immune system of higher and lower phylum animals and knowledge of intracellular mechanisms of toxicity may contribute to development of biomarkers of ecotoxicant exposure and effects. Biomarkers of this kind allow sampling over extended geographic areas, in several sentinel species, including wildlife animals, and facilitate the building of risk models and risk maps of environmentally induced diseases. On the basis of location, biomarker sampled data obtained through evaluation of ecotoxicant exposure and effects on the immune system in sentinel species can be further integrated and analyzed together with other sources of environmental geographic information, or human population health data, by means of geographic information systems (GIS). The spatial analysis capability of GIS can help to evaluate the complex relationships of overlaid information and to identify areas with high risk indices or "hot spots." This integrative approach can be useful in studies contributing to support environmental and health-related policies and regulations.

  11. TIGER5---Extraction of geographic information from the TIGER system

    SciTech Connect

    Gryder, R.K.

    1992-03-01

    The need for geographic information in digital form is becoming apparent in many areas, including Emergency Response Planning and Management. The Bureau of Census recognized this need and developed an automated geographic data base, known as Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (TIGER) System, to produce the geographic products for the 1990 census. The Bureau makes the information available to the public on CD-ROM disks. As distributed, the geographic information is not directly visible, and a program is needed to display the information in a graphic form. MapInfo is a commercially available program that has the capability to display maps and allows the user to perform certain geographic analyses. MapInfo runs on a variety of low-cost platforms that may be found in an average office environment, as well as on high-performance work stations. The TIGER5 program developed by the Emergency Management Information Systems (EMIS) project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory reads files directly from the Census Bureau TIGER/Line CD-ROM and creates MapInfo Exchange Format Files that can be directly imported into MapInfo. The standard default values for scaling parameters are used, and the resulting map is in the same coordinate system as the world and state maps distributed with MapInfo.

  12. TIGER5---Extraction of geographic information from the TIGER system

    SciTech Connect

    Gryder, R.K.

    1992-03-01

    The need for geographic information in digital form is becoming apparent in many areas, including Emergency Response Planning and Management. The Bureau of Census recognized this need and developed an automated geographic data base, known as Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (TIGER) System, to produce the geographic products for the 1990 census. The Bureau makes the information available to the public on CD-ROM disks. As distributed, the geographic information is not directly visible, and a program is needed to display the information in a graphic form. MapInfo is a commercially available program that has the capability to display maps and allows the user to perform certain geographic analyses. MapInfo runs on a variety of low-cost platforms that may be found in an average office environment, as well as on high-performance work stations. The TIGER5 program developed by the Emergency Management Information Systems (EMIS) project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory reads files directly from the Census Bureau TIGER/Line CD-ROM and creates MapInfo Exchange Format Files that can be directly imported into MapInfo. The standard default values for scaling parameters are used, and the resulting map is in the same coordinate system as the world and state maps distributed with MapInfo.

  13. Plate Tectonics, Geographical Information System, paleogeography

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Thomas L.; Scotese, Christopher

    2002-05-24

    The PaleoX.framwork is a dynamically linked/loaded framework for Cocoa applications. The primary goal of this library is to standardize several elements used for working with paleogeographic data. This includes objects designed to organize information for tectonic plates, including maps, rotation objects, plate names, and designations. In addition, PaleoX provides object-oriented solutions for handling standard paleogeographic file formats from the PALEOMAP Project.

  14. Geographic Information Systems: Empowering Kinds to Make a Difference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelsen, Michael W., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Describes ArcView, a Geographic Information System (GIS) that enables K-12 classrooms to access electronic maps and information databases for specific communities. Presents actual applications of ArcView at an elementary school and a high school. Finds that students are using GIS technology to collect, analyze, and apply local data to real…

  15. Geographic Information Systems: An Instructional Tool for Earth Science Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Stephen J.

    1988-01-01

    Introduces the concept of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) as an approach for integrating and synthesizing disparate information for use in the secondary geography and earth science curriculum. Reviews basic concepts and instructional approaches to familiarize teachers with the relative simplicity of GIS implementation. (Author/GEA)

  16. The need for open geographical information systems in medicine.

    PubMed

    Appelrath, H J; Friebe, J; Grawunder, M; Wellmann, I

    2001-05-01

    This paper presents a promising approach of using component-oriented geographical information systems (GIS) to facilitate improved medical and ecological applications. The integration of administrative geographical and medical data (map overlay) allows sophisticated and advanced analysis. This can serve as a basis to detect undiscovered relationships. We hope to increase the usage of geographical information by the creation of a general framework. This approach is mainly supported by two advances in recent years. Geographical data (e.g. administrative areas) is up-to-date, consistent and covers Germany completely. In addition, enormous technological improvements in the area of high-bandwidth networks and component-based software development have been made. These advances allowed to define our general framework for the integration of GIS functions into existing and already accepted applications.

  17. Review and synthesis of problems and directions for large scale geographic information system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, A. R.; Dangermond, J.; Marble, D.; Simonett, D. S.; Tomlinson, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    Problems and directions for large scale geographic information system development were reviewed and the general problems associated with automated geographic information systems and spatial data handling were addressed.

  18. Survey of geographical information system and image processing software

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vanderzee, D.; Singh, A.

    1995-01-01

    The Global Resource Information Database—a part of the United Nations Environment Programme—conducts a bi-annual survey of geographical information system (GIS) and image processing (IP) software. This survey makes information about software products available in developing countries. The 1993 survey showed that the number of installations of GIS, IP, and related software products increased dramatically from 1991 to 1993, mostly in North America and Europe.

  19. Screening for lead exposure using a geographic information system

    SciTech Connect

    Wartenberg, D. )

    1992-12-01

    Screening programs for lead overexposure typically target high-risk populations by identifying regions with common risk markers (older housing, poverty, etc.). While more useful than untargeted screening programs, targeted programs are limited by the geographic resolution of the risk-factor information. A geographic information system can make screening programs more effective and more cost-efficient by mapping cases of overexposure, identifying high-incidence neighborhoods warranting screening, and validating risk-factor-based prediction rules. 5 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Multimodal Geographic Information Systems: Adding Haptic and Auditory Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeong, Wooseob

    2001-01-01

    This study consists of two experiments. Pitch, volume, and tempo in auditory-haptic geographic information systems were compared in terms of effectiveness for multimodal interface; volume was determined to be better. Auditory display with volume and haptic display with vibration were compared and the results showed that, in more complex geographic…

  1. Multimodal Geographic Information Systems: Adding Haptic and Auditory Display.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeong, Wooseob; Gluck, Myke

    2003-01-01

    Investigated the feasibility of adding haptic and auditory displays to traditional visual geographic information systems (GISs). Explored differences in user performance, including task completion time and accuracy, and user satisfaction with a multimodal GIS which was implemented with a haptic display, auditory display, and combined display.…

  2. Making Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Sustainable in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dascombe, Brett

    2006-01-01

    Spatial technologies, particularly Geographic Information Systems (GIS), have become invaluable and persuasive tools in society today. These technologies have also made their way into classrooms around the world and Australian teachers are leaders in implementing GIS technology into their classrooms. There is still a way to go in order to make…

  3. Geographic information systems at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, M.

    1982-01-01

    The basic functions of a Geographic Information System (GIS) and the different ways that a GIS may be implemented are described. It surveys that GIS software packages that are currently in operation at the Goddard Space Flight Center and discusses the types of applications for which they are best suited. Future plans for in-house GIS research and development are outlined.

  4. Learning the Local Political Landscape with Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, William J.

    2009-01-01

    The focus of the paper is on the transformative effect on student learning and engagement that results from using contemporary Geographic Information Systems (GIS) tools and directed reflection to engage in spatial learning about the politics (literally) surrounding the student. I report on the pedagogical advantages of using spatial analysis…

  5. Extrapolation of forest community types with a geographic information system

    Treesearch

    W.K. Clatterbuck; J. Gregory

    1991-01-01

    A geographic information system (GIS) was used to project eight forest community types from a 1,190-acre (482-ha) intensively sampled area to an unsampled 19,887-acre (8,054-ha) adjacent area with similar environments on the Western Highland Rim of Tennessee. Both physiographic and vegetative parameters were used to distinguish, extrapolate, and map communities.

  6. Towards Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Implementation: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meaney, Miriam

    2006-01-01

    "Despite its central role in real-world geography, the Geographic Information System (GIS) has had little uptake to date in School Geography." (Wiegand, 2001) This statement can be accurately applied to the author's current school setting and was the focus of her and her colleagues' case study, commenced in 2004 and continued into 2005.…

  7. Teaching "with" Rather than "about" Geographic Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Thomas C.; Bodzin, Alec M.

    2009-01-01

    Both "teaching" and "teaching" with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are "wicked problems," in the sense that they involve multiple variables that interact with one another. Effective teaching calls for both learning with understanding and transfer. The authors' own experience implementing a geography and…

  8. The poor man's Geographic Information System: plot expansion factors

    Treesearch

    Paul C. Van Deusen

    2007-01-01

    Plot expansion factors can serve as a crude Geographic Information System for users of Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data. Each FIA plot has an associated expansion factor that is often interpreted as the number of forested acres that the plot represents. The derivation of expansion factors is discussed and it is shown that the mapped plot design requires a...

  9. Teaching "with" Rather than "about" Geographic Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Thomas C.; Bodzin, Alec M.

    2009-01-01

    Both "teaching" and "teaching" with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are "wicked problems," in the sense that they involve multiple variables that interact with one another. Effective teaching calls for both learning with understanding and transfer. The authors' own experience implementing a geography and…

  10. Multimodal Geographic Information Systems: Adding Haptic and Auditory Display.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeong, Wooseob; Gluck, Myke

    2003-01-01

    Investigated the feasibility of adding haptic and auditory displays to traditional visual geographic information systems (GISs). Explored differences in user performance, including task completion time and accuracy, and user satisfaction with a multimodal GIS which was implemented with a haptic display, auditory display, and combined display.…

  11. Multimodal Geographic Information Systems: Adding Haptic and Auditory Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeong, Wooseob

    2001-01-01

    This study consists of two experiments. Pitch, volume, and tempo in auditory-haptic geographic information systems were compared in terms of effectiveness for multimodal interface; volume was determined to be better. Auditory display with volume and haptic display with vibration were compared and the results showed that, in more complex geographic…

  12. Where and Why There? Spatial Thinking with Geographic Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milson, Andrew J.; Curtis, Mary D.

    2009-01-01

    The authors developed and implemented a project for high school geography students that modeled the processes in a site selection analysis using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). They sought to explore how spatial thinking could be fostered by using the MyWorld GIS software that was designed specifically for educational uses. The task posed…

  13. Making Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Sustainable in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dascombe, Brett

    2006-01-01

    Spatial technologies, particularly Geographic Information Systems (GIS), have become invaluable and persuasive tools in society today. These technologies have also made their way into classrooms around the world and Australian teachers are leaders in implementing GIS technology into their classrooms. There is still a way to go in order to make…

  14. Case Study: Using Geographic Information Systems for Education Policy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvenon, Sean W.; Wang, Kening; McKenzie, Sarah; Airola, Denise

    2006-01-01

    Effective exploration of spatially referenced educational achievement data can help educational researchers and policy analysts accelerate interpretation of datasets to gain valuable insights. This paper illustrates the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to analyze educational achievement gaps in Arkansas. It introduces the Geographic…

  15. Learning the Local Political Landscape with Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, William J.

    2009-01-01

    The focus of the paper is on the transformative effect on student learning and engagement that results from using contemporary Geographic Information Systems (GIS) tools and directed reflection to engage in spatial learning about the politics (literally) surrounding the student. I report on the pedagogical advantages of using spatial analysis…

  16. Towards Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Implementation: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meaney, Miriam

    2006-01-01

    "Despite its central role in real-world geography, the Geographic Information System (GIS) has had little uptake to date in School Geography." (Wiegand, 2001) This statement can be accurately applied to the author's current school setting and was the focus of her and her colleagues' case study, commenced in 2004 and continued into 2005.…

  17. Where and Why There? Spatial Thinking with Geographic Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milson, Andrew J.; Curtis, Mary D.

    2009-01-01

    The authors developed and implemented a project for high school geography students that modeled the processes in a site selection analysis using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). They sought to explore how spatial thinking could be fostered by using the MyWorld GIS software that was designed specifically for educational uses. The task posed…

  18. GIS leads to more efficient route planning. [Geographic Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-26

    New computer approaches currently being developed by Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Ill., for the Gas Research Institute, Chicago, will make planning a pipeline route easier and more cost effective by combining a wide variety of geographical data for a specific area, according to GRI. The new approaches use currently available geographic information system (GIS) to store those data in digital form and present them in combinations of overlying layers. The paper describes some of the obstacles normally found along a proposed route; the options available within the GIS software; and the time and money saving advantages of the system.

  19. The NASA John C. Stennis Environmental Geographic Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohan, Tyrus

    2002-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. Introduction: Background information. Initial applications of the SSC EGIS. Ongoing projects. 2.Scope of SSC EGIS. 3. Data layers. 4. Onsite operations. 5. Landcover classifications. 6. Current activities. 7. GIS/Key. 8. Infrastructure base map - development. 9. Infrastructure base map - application. 10. Incorrected layer. 11. Corrected layer. 12. Emergency environmental response tool. 13. Future directions. 14. Bridging the gaps. 15. Environmental geographical information system.

  20. Integrating Bayesian networks and geographic information systems: good practice examples.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sandra; Low-Choy, Sama; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2012-07-01

    Bayesian networks (BNs) are becoming increasingly common in problems with spatial aspects. The degree of spatial involvement may range from spatial mapping of BN outputs based on nodes in the BN that explicitly involve geographic features, to integration of different networks based on geographic information. In these situations, it is useful to consider how geographic information systems (GISs) could be used to enhance the conceptualization, quantification, and prediction of BNs. Here, we discuss some techniques that may be used to integrate GIS and BN models, with reference to some recent literature which illustrate these approaches. We then reflect on 2 case studies based on our own experience. The first involves the integration of GIS and a BN to assess the scientific factors associated with initiation of Lyngbya majuscula, a cyanobacterium that occurs in coastal waterways around the world. The 2nd case study involves the use of GISs as an aid for eliciting spatially informed expert opinion and expressing this information as prior distributions for a Bayesian model and as input into a BN. Elicitator, the prototype software package we developed for achieving this, is also briefly described. Whereas the 1st case study demonstrates a GIS-data driven specification of conditional probability tables for BNs with complete geographical coverage for all the data layers involved, the 2nd illustrates a situation in which we do not have complete coverage and we are forced to extrapolate based on expert judgement.

  1. Integrating Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Applications into Business Courses Using Online Business Geographics Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Fred; Mangold, W. Glynn; Holmes, Terry

    2006-01-01

    Although the value of geographic information systems (GIS) technologies is recognized by practitioners and educators alike, GIS instruction has yet to make significant inroads into business curricula. In this article, the authors discuss the constraints of integrating GIS tools into business education. They develop a prototype module for…

  2. Integrating Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Applications into Business Courses Using Online Business Geographics Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Fred; Mangold, W. Glynn; Holmes, Terry

    2006-01-01

    Although the value of geographic information systems (GIS) technologies is recognized by practitioners and educators alike, GIS instruction has yet to make significant inroads into business curricula. In this article, the authors discuss the constraints of integrating GIS tools into business education. They develop a prototype module for…

  3. [Use of geographic information systems in public health].

    PubMed

    Morozova, L F

    2014-01-01

    To enhance the efficiency of epidemiological surveillance by the countrywide use of current information telecommunication technologies, diagnostic systems based on monitoring is one of the tasks of the Russian Federal Service for Consumer Rights Protection and Human Health Control in the control and prevention of parasitic diseases. The epidemiological surveillance system for parasitosis encompasses not only the monitoring and assessment of the situation, but also necessary measures if epidemic complications occur. Geographic information systems (GIS) may be successfully used for this purpose. GIS-based interactive health atlases have been created and put on the Internet and researches made.

  4. Advances in spatial epidemiology and geographic information systems.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Russell S; Delmelle, Eric; Eberth, Jan M

    2017-01-01

    The field of spatial epidemiology has evolved rapidly in the past 2 decades. This study serves as a brief introduction to spatial epidemiology and the use of geographic information systems in applied research in epidemiology. We highlight technical developments and highlight opportunities to apply spatial analytic methods in epidemiologic research, focusing on methodologies involving geocoding, distance estimation, residential mobility, record linkage and data integration, spatial and spatio-temporal clustering, small area estimation, and Bayesian applications to disease mapping. The articles included in this issue incorporate many of these methods into their study designs and analytical frameworks. It is our hope that these studies will spur further development and utilization of spatial analysis and geographic information systems in epidemiologic research.

  5. U.S.-Mexico Border Geographic Information System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parcher, Jean W.

    2008-01-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and the development of extensive geodatabases have become invaluable tools for addressing a variety of contemporary societal issues and for making predictions about the future. The United States-Mexico Geographic Information System (USMX-GIS) is based on fundamental datasets that are produced and/or approved by the national geography agencies of each country, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Instituto Nacional de Estadistica Y Geografia (INEGI) of Mexico, and the International Boundary and Water Commission (IBWC). The data are available at various scales to allow both regional and local analysis. The USGS and the INEGI have an extensive history of collaboration for transboundary mapping including exchanging digital technology and developing methods for harmonizing seamless national level geospatial datasets for binational environmental monitoring, urban growth analysis, and other scientific applications.

  6. GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEM, DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS, AND URBAN STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The full report reviews the application of Geographic Inforamtion System (GIS) technology to the field of urban stormwater modeling. The GIS literature is reviewed in the context of its use as a spatial database for urban stormwater modeling, integration of GIS and hydroloic time...

  7. GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEM, DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS, AND URBAN STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The full report reviews the application of Geographic Inforamtion System (GIS) technology to the field of urban stormwater modeling. The GIS literature is reviewed in the context of its use as a spatial database for urban stormwater modeling, integration of GIS and hydroloic time...

  8. Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System (TRAGIS) User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, PE

    2003-09-18

    The Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System (TRAGIS) model is used to calculate highway, rail, or waterway routes within the United States. TRAGIS is a client-server application with the user interface and map data files residing on the user's personal computer and the routing engine and network data files on a network server. The user's manual provides documentation on installation and the use of the many features of the model.

  9. Geographic Information Systems and Martian Data: Compatibility and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    Planning future landed Mars missions depends on accurate, informed data. This research has created and used spatially referenced instrument data from NASA missions such as the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter and the Mars Orbital Camera (MOC) on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Orbiter. Creating spatially referenced data enables its use in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) such as ArcGIS. It has then been possible to integrate this spatially referenced data with global base maps and build and populate location based databases that are easy to access.

  10. Geographic Information Systems and Martian Data: Compatibility and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    Planning future landed Mars missions depends on accurate, informed data. This research has created and used spatially referenced instrument data from NASA missions such as the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter and the Mars Orbital Camera (MOC) on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Orbiter. Creating spatially referenced data enables its use in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) such as ArcGIS. It has then been possible to integrate this spatially referenced data with global base maps and build and populate location based databases that are easy to access.

  11. Health Based Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and their Applications

    PubMed Central

    Fradelos, Evangelos C.; Papathanasiou, Ioanna V.; Mitsi, Dimitra; Tsaras, Konstantinos; Kleisiaris, Christos F.; Kourkouta, Lambrini

    2014-01-01

    Medical researches as well as the study of the Earth’s surface, better still, geography are interlinked with each other; their relationship dates from antiquity. The science of Geographic Information Systems and, by extension, Geomatics engineering belongs to a discipline which is constantly developing at a global level. This sector has many applications regarding medical / epidemiological research and generally, the social sciences. Furthermore, this discipline may act as a decision making tool in the healthcare sector and it might contribute to the formulation of policies into the healthcare sector. The use of GIS so as to solve public health issues has an exponential increase and has been vital to the understanding and treatment of health problems in different geographic areas. In recent years, the use of various information technology services and software has lead health professionals to work more effectively. PMID:25684850

  12. Health Based Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and their Applications.

    PubMed

    Fradelos, Evangelos C; Papathanasiou, Ioanna V; Mitsi, Dimitra; Tsaras, Konstantinos; Kleisiaris, Christos F; Kourkouta, Lambrini

    2014-12-01

    Medical researches as well as the study of the Earth's surface, better still, geography are interlinked with each other; their relationship dates from antiquity. The science of Geographic Information Systems and, by extension, Geomatics engineering belongs to a discipline which is constantly developing at a global level. This sector has many applications regarding medical / epidemiological research and generally, the social sciences. Furthermore, this discipline may act as a decision making tool in the healthcare sector and it might contribute to the formulation of policies into the healthcare sector. The use of GIS so as to solve public health issues has an exponential increase and has been vital to the understanding and treatment of health problems in different geographic areas. In recent years, the use of various information technology services and software has lead health professionals to work more effectively.

  13. The NASA John C. Stennis Environmental Geographic Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohan, Tyrus

    2002-01-01

    The Environmental Geographic Information System (EGIS) at Stennis Space Center (SSC) covers four counties in Mississippi and four parishes in Louisiana. The EGIS includes 410 data layers including vector and raster data from various public and private sources. These data layers provide information on natural and cultural features. SSC initially used the EGIS to: 1) Monitor on and off-site impacts of propulsion testing; 2) Classify land cover at SSC to predict the impacts of future programs. This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of ongoing projects and future applications for the EGIS.

  14. KBGIS-2: A knowledge-based geographic information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, T.; Peuquet, D.; Menon, S.; Agarwal, P.

    1986-01-01

    The architecture and working of a recently implemented knowledge-based geographic information system (KBGIS-2) that was designed to satisfy several general criteria for the geographic information system are described. The system has four major functions that include query-answering, learning, and editing. The main query finds constrained locations for spatial objects that are describable in a predicate-calculus based spatial objects language. The main search procedures include a family of constraint-satisfaction procedures that use a spatial object knowledge base to search efficiently for complex spatial objects in large, multilayered spatial data bases. These data bases are represented in quadtree form. The search strategy is designed to reduce the computational cost of search in the average case. The learning capabilities of the system include the addition of new locations of complex spatial objects to the knowledge base as queries are answered, and the ability to learn inductively definitions of new spatial objects from examples. The new definitions are added to the knowledge base by the system. The system is currently performing all its designated tasks successfully, although currently implemented on inadequate hardware. Future reports will detail the performance characteristics of the system, and various new extensions are planned in order to enhance the power of KBGIS-2.

  15. National aerial photography program as a geographic information system resource

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Light, Donald L.

    1991-01-01

    The National Aerial Photography Program (NAPP) is jointly funded by Federal agencies and States that choose to participate in a 50-50 cost sharing cooperative arrangement. The NAPP is designed to acquire black-and-white (B&W) or color infrared (CIR) photography at a scale of 1:40,000. The status of NAPP flying, now going into the first year of its second 5-year cycle, is reviewed to inform the user community of NAPP's coverage. The resolution, geometric quality and flight parameters are used to estimate the system's cartographic potential to produce orthophotoquads, digital elevation models, topographic maps and digital information to meet national map accuracy standards at 1:12,000 and 1:24,000-scale and serve as a geographic information system resource. Also, a technique is presented to compute the optimum scanning spot size (15 ??m) and storage required for converting the B&W or CIR photography to digital, machine-readable pixel form. The resulting digital NAPP data are suitable for a wide variety of new applications, including use in geographic information systems.

  16. Water quality modeling using geographic information system (GIS) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Bernard A

    1992-01-01

    Protection of the environment and natural resources at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is of great concern. The potential for surface and ground water quality problems resulting from non-point sources of pollution was examined using models. Since spatial variation of parameters required was important, geographic information systems (GIS) and their data were used. The potential for groundwater contamination was examined using the SEEPAGE (System for Early Evaluation of the Pollution Potential of Agricultural Groundwater Environments) model. A watershed near the VAB was selected to examine potential for surface water pollution and erosion using the AGNPS (Agricultural Non-Point Source Pollution) model.

  17. Application of geographic information system to distribution information support

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.M.; Tsay, M.T.; Wu, S.W.

    1996-02-01

    This paper states a distribution information support system (DISS). The system provides an environment for building a distribution database which includes both the graphic and alphanumeric data. The database can be used for inventory, facility management, engineering analysis, and map productions. Facility data or network model can be retrieved from the database. The retrieved data can then be used by application programs. With a good man-machine interface (MMI), graphic output or text reports can be viewed from the graphic screen on-line. A good DISS could also produce a practical result for strategic decisions by considering land use, value, zoning, as well as other physical restrictions. These physical restrictions are not easy to quantify, and are awkward to model with mathematics.

  18. The geographical accessibility of hospitals to the aged: a geographic information systems analysis within Illinois.

    PubMed Central

    Love, D; Lindquist, P

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This article uses geographic information systems and their related tools to empirically measure and display the geographic accessibility of the aged population to hospital facilities within Illinois. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SETTING. Geographic accessibility of Illinois' aged population is measured from each of the state's 10,796 census block groups to the state's 214 hospital facilities. Block group demographic compositions and centroids are obtained from 1990 census files. Hospital coordinates are obtained by the authors. STUDY DESIGN. Of five alternative measures of accessibility considered, empirical estimates are obtained for two: choice set and minimum distance. Access to both general hospitals and the subset having specialized geriatric facilities is measured with special attention to differences in accessibility between the aged within metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) and those outside MSAs. Cumulative accessibility distributions and their summary statistics provide a basis of comparison among subgroups. DATA COLLECTION AND EXTRACTION. Geographic information systems (GIS) and their related tools are used as a means of efficiently capturing, organizing, storing, and retrieving the required data. Hospitals and census block groups are geocoded to specific locations in the database, and aspatial attributes are assigned to the hospitals and block groups. The GIS database is queried to produce shaded isarithm and point distribution maps that show the location of hospitals relative to surrounding aged populations. CONCLUSION. The vast majority of Illinois' aged population is within close proximity to hospital facilities. Eighty percent (1,147,504 persons) of the aged in Illinois are within 4.8 miles (7.7 km) of a hospital and 11.6 miles (18.7 km) of two hospitals. However, geographic accessibility differences between the aged living in MSAs and those living outside MSAs to hospitals offering geriatric services are substantial; but there is no

  19. Assessing the cumulative effects of projects using geographic information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, Samuel F.; Canter, Larry W.

    2011-09-15

    Systems that allow users to store and retrieve spatial data, provide for analyses of spatial data, and offer highly detailed display of spatial data are referred to as geographic information systems, or more typically, GIS. Since their initial usage in the 1960s, GISs have evolved as a means of assembling and analyzing diverse data pertaining to specific geographical areas, with spatial locations of the data serving as the organizational basis for the information systems. The structure of GISs is built around spatial identifiers and the methods used to encode data for storage and manipulation. This paper examines how GIS has been used in typical environmental assessment, its use for cumulative impact assessment, and explores litigation that occurred in the United States Federal court system where GIS was used in some aspect of cumulative effects. The paper also summarizes fifteen case studies that range from area wide transportation planning to wildlife and habitat impacts, and draws together a few lessons learned from this review of literature and litigation.

  20. Geographical Information Systems and Health: Current State and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and how they can be used. It reviews the current state of GIS use in health care before identifying the barriers to more pervasive use of GIS in health. Finally, it makes recommendations for the direction of health GIS research over the next decade and concludes with a call to action to health informatics researchers to stop ignoring a tool and methodology that has such immense potential for improving the health of our communities. PMID:22844644

  1. Lived and Imagined: Information and Storytelling in Geographic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabisch, Eric Alan

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the relationship between storytelling and information in the narration of geographic space. While storytelling has historically shaped our understanding of geography, modern practices in data collection, cartography, and geographic visualization enable one-way forms of representation that remove the negotiation and…

  2. Lived and Imagined: Information and Storytelling in Geographic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabisch, Eric Alan

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the relationship between storytelling and information in the narration of geographic space. While storytelling has historically shaped our understanding of geography, modern practices in data collection, cartography, and geographic visualization enable one-way forms of representation that remove the negotiation and…

  3. Landfill site selection by using geographic information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şener, Başak; Süzen, M. Lütfi; Doyuran, Vedat

    2006-01-01

    One of the serious and growing potential problems in most large urban areas is the shortage of land for waste disposal. Although there are some efforts to reduce and recover the waste, disposal in landfills is still the most common method for waste destination. An inappropriate landfill site may have negative environmental, economic and ecological impacts. Therefore, it should be selected carefully by considering both regulations and constraints on other sources. In this study, candidate sites for an appropriate landfill area in the vicinity of Ankara are determined by using the integration of geographic information systems and multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA). For this purpose, 16 input map layers including topography, settlements (urban centers and villages), roads (Highway E90 and village roads), railways, airport, wetlands, infrastructures (pipelines and power lines), slope, geology, land use, floodplains, aquifers and surface water are prepared and two different MCDA methods (simple additive weighting and analytic hierarchy process) are implemented to a geographical information system. Comparison of the maps produced by these two different methods shows that both methods yield conformable results. Field checks also confirm that the candidate sites agree well with the selected criteria.

  4. Application of a geographic information system for radiologic emergency response

    SciTech Connect

    Best, R.G.; Doyle, J.F.

    1995-03-01

    A geographic information system (GIS) is a multifunctional analytical tool that can be used to compile available data and derive information. A GIS is a computerized database management system for the capture, storage, retrieval, analysis, and display of spatial data. Maps are the most common type of spatial data, but any type of data that can be referenced by an x-y location or geographic coordinate can be used in a GIS. In a radiological emergency, it is critical that data of all types be rapidly compiled into a common format in order to make accurate observations and informed decisions. Developing a baseline GIS for nuclear facilities would offer a significant incentive for all organizations to contribute to and utilize this powerful data management tool. The system being developed could integrate all elements of emergency planning, from the initial protective actions based on models through the emergency monitoring phase, and finally ending with the complex reentry and recovery phase. Within the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), there is a continuing effort to improve the data management and communication process. To demonstrate the potential of GIS for emergency response, the system has been utilized in interagency FRMAC exercises. An interactive GIS system has been deployed and used to analyze the available spatial data to help determine the impact of a hypothetical radiological release and to develop mitigation plans. For this application, both hardcopy and real-time spatial displays were generated with the GIS. Composite maps with different sizes, scales, and themes were produced to support the exercises.

  5. Geographic information system development in the CARETS project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, William B.; Fegeas, Robin G.; Fitzpatrick, Katherine A.; Hallam, Cheryl A.

    1977-01-01

    Experience in the development of a geographic information system to support the CARETS project has confirmed the considerable advantages that may accrue by paralleling the system development with a rational and balanced system production effort which permits the integration of the education and training of users with interim deliverable products to them. Those advantages include support for a long-term staff plan that recognizes substantial staff changes through system development and implementation, a fiscal plan that provides continuity in resources necessary for total system development, and a feedback system which allows the user to communicate his experiences in using the system. Thus far balance between system development and system production has not been achieved because of continuing large-scale spatial data processing requirements coupled with strong and insistent demands from users for immediately deliverable products from the system. That imbalance has refocussed staffing and fiscal plans from long-term system development to short- and near-term production requirements, continuously extends total system development time, and increases the possibility that later system development may reduce the usefulness of current interim products.

  6. Correlation Assessment of Climate and Geographic Distribution of Tuberculosis Using Geographical Information System (GIS).

    PubMed

    Beiranvand, Reza; Karimi, Asrin; Delpisheh, Ali; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Soleimani, Samira; Ghalavandi, Shahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) spread pattern is influenced by geographic and social factors. Nowadays Geographic Information System (GIS) is one of the most important epidemiological instrumentation identifying high-risk population groups and geographic areas of TB. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between climate and geographic distribution of TB in Khuzestan Province using GIS during 2005-2012. Through an ecological study, all 6363 patients with definite diagnosis of TB from 2005 until the end of September 2012 in Khuzestan Province, southern Iran were diagnosed. Data were recorded using TB- Register software. Tuberculosis incidence based on the climate and the average of annual rain was evaluated using GIS. Data were analyzed through SPSS software. Independent t-test, ANOVA, Linear regression, Pearson and Eta correlation coefficient with a significance level of less than 5% were used for the statistical analysis. The TB incidence was different in various geographic conditions. The highest mean of TB cumulative incidence rate was observed in extra dry areas (P= 0.017). There was a significant inverse correlation between annual rain rate and TB incidence rate (R= -0.45, P= 0.001). The lowest TB incidence rate (0-100 cases per 100,000) was in areas with the average of annual rain more than 1000 mm (P= 0.003). The risk of TB has a strong relationship with climate and the average of annual rain, so that the risk of TB in areas with low annual rainfall and extra dry climate is more than other regions. Services and special cares to high-risk regions of TB are recommended.

  7. Correlation Assessment of Climate and Geographic Distribution of Tuberculosis Using Geographical Information System (GIS)

    PubMed Central

    BEIRANVAND, Reza; KARIMI, Asrin; DELPISHEH, Ali; SAYEHMIRI, Kourosh; SOLEIMANI, Samira; GHALAVANDI, Shahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) spread pattern is influenced by geographic and social factors. Nowadays Geographic Information System (GIS) is one of the most important epidemiological instrumentation identifying high-risk population groups and geographic areas of TB. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between climate and geographic distribution of TB in Khuzestan Province using GIS during 2005–2012. Methods: Through an ecological study, all 6363 patients with definite diagnosis of TB from 2005 until the end of September 2012 in Khuzestan Province, southern Iran were diagnosed. Data were recorded using TB- Register software. Tuberculosis incidence based on the climate and the average of annual rain was evaluated using GIS. Data were analyzed through SPSS software. Independent t-test, ANOVA, Linear regression, Pearson and Eta correlation coefficient with a significance level of less than 5% were used for the statistical analysis. Results: The TB incidence was different in various geographic conditions. The highest mean of TB cumulative incidence rate was observed in extra dry areas (P= 0.017). There was a significant inverse correlation between annual rain rate and TB incidence rate (R= −0.45, P= 0.001). The lowest TB incidence rate (0–100 cases per 100,000) was in areas with the average of annual rain more than 1000 mm (P= 0.003). Conclusion: The risk of TB has a strong relationship with climate and the average of annual rain, so that the risk of TB in areas with low annual rainfall and extra dry climate is more than other regions. Services and special cares to high-risk regions of TB are recommended. PMID:27057526

  8. Improving exploration with geographical information system (GIS) technology

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, P.B.; Choiniere, M.R.; Harris, F.W. )

    1996-01-01

    Timely reliable access to data is required by Earth Scientists and Engineers evaluating geology, facilities, environment, and new business opportunities. Geographical Information System (GIS) technology has been recently implemented to provide efficient and comprehensive access to data for exploration work in Venezuela. The GIS allows rapid comparisons, queries, sorting, and evaluation of data that in the past required multiple hardware platforms, multiple software packages, paper plots, spreadsheets, and time. A vendor GIS database package formed the foundation. This GIS provided regional coverage for the entire country of Venezuela at a scale of 1:250,000. It included 36,000 wells and associated attributes, facilities, geologic maps, potential field data, and transportation networks. Essential with GIS, all of the data were transformed from multiple cartographic datums to a single map projection. Proprietary and other tabular databases were incorporated into the vendor GIS by Chevron, significantly upgrading the value of the system for company exploration. Tabular databases were either imported, linked or converted to the GIS. They included Nomad, Paradox, Oracle, Openworks, and PC-based spreadsheets containing wells, seismic, and geochemistry data. Nontabular data types incorporated into the GIS included digital outcrop log and paleosections, maps, other GIS data, Global Positioning System control points, satellite imagery and scanned photographs. The enhanced GIS has proven valuable for facilitating access to, and rapid and accurate evaluation of, large geographic areas with multiple data sources and types.

  9. Improving exploration with geographical information system (GIS) technology

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, P.B.; Choiniere, M.R.; Harris, F.W.

    1996-12-31

    Timely reliable access to data is required by Earth Scientists and Engineers evaluating geology, facilities, environment, and new business opportunities. Geographical Information System (GIS) technology has been recently implemented to provide efficient and comprehensive access to data for exploration work in Venezuela. The GIS allows rapid comparisons, queries, sorting, and evaluation of data that in the past required multiple hardware platforms, multiple software packages, paper plots, spreadsheets, and time. A vendor GIS database package formed the foundation. This GIS provided regional coverage for the entire country of Venezuela at a scale of 1:250,000. It included 36,000 wells and associated attributes, facilities, geologic maps, potential field data, and transportation networks. Essential with GIS, all of the data were transformed from multiple cartographic datums to a single map projection. Proprietary and other tabular databases were incorporated into the vendor GIS by Chevron, significantly upgrading the value of the system for company exploration. Tabular databases were either imported, linked or converted to the GIS. They included Nomad, Paradox, Oracle, Openworks, and PC-based spreadsheets containing wells, seismic, and geochemistry data. Nontabular data types incorporated into the GIS included digital outcrop log and paleosections, maps, other GIS data, Global Positioning System control points, satellite imagery and scanned photographs. The enhanced GIS has proven valuable for facilitating access to, and rapid and accurate evaluation of, large geographic areas with multiple data sources and types.

  10. [Mapping HIV prevalence in the Netherlands with geographic information systems].

    PubMed

    Op de Coul, E L M; Joore, I K; van Sighem, A; Bom, B C J; Hillebregt, M; Prins, J M; Geerlings, S E; van Bergen, J E A M

    2017-01-01

    To map regions of the Netherlands with high HIV prevalence for surveillance and prevention purposes. Information on numbers of HIV patients receiving clinical care on 31 December 2014 per postcode region was requested from the HIV monitoring foundation (SHM). These details were related to data from Statistics Netherlands on the number of residents per municipal area or district with the aid of a geographic information system (GIS). Distribution mapping showed that ten municipal areas in the Netherlands have an HIV prevalence of 2 or more per 1000 residents aged 15-60 years. We discovered the highest prevalence in Amsterdam (8.1) and suburbs, Rotterdam (3.4), The Hague (2.7) and Arnhem (2.5). Large differences were seen between districts, particularly in Amsterdam where HIV was concentrated within two districts: Central Amsterdam (9-28) and Amsterdam Southeast (5-20). In Rotterdam and The Hague, HIV prevalence rates are lower and differences between districts are smaller. Geographical analyses show differences in HIV prevalence for municipal areas and districts in big cities in the Netherlands. These data can be used for new interventions, to better focus HIV detection.

  11. A Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Imagery Approach to Historical Urban Growth Trends Around Military Installations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-05-01

    MILITARY FACILITIES, *URBAN AREAS, MILITARY OPERATIONS, INFORMATION SYSTEMS , COMPUTER APPLICATIONS, ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT, LAND AREAS, GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS , SATELLITE IMAGERY, REGIONAL PLANNING.

  12. A survey on fuzzy theory applied in geographic information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Feiquan; Cui, Weihong; Chen, Houwu

    2009-10-01

    The real world is an infinite complex and very huge systems, the phenomenon and processes in this world have many complex relations among them. It is consecutive and cannot be treated as a determined one as the traditional geographic information system does; What's more, the uncertainty and fuzziness exist in every stage of data processing of GIS, from data collection, data storage to data analysis etc, so it is very meaningful to apply fuzzy theory in GIS for its ability to handle fuzziness and uncertainty of spatial data. The paper talks about the current situation of fuzzy theory applied in GIS, including the classification of application fields, its main methods, principles etc. The detailed fields we concerned include spatial object modeling, spatial reasoning, spatial analysis, spatial data mining, and reliability analysis of GIS data and so on. Furthermore, we put forward some development foregrounds and research orientations of fuzzy theory applied in GIS.

  13. Relation between the Classical Sciences and Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulou, A.

    2012-04-01

    As is already known, in recent years, the use of satellite remote sensing and GIS is a deployable occupation. With their help, we offer the opportunity to acquire knowledge through spatial, temporal, spectral and radiometric resolutions of remote sensing systems and through analysis and incorporation of data Gis. The representation of facts and results of research on the topography and geomorphology sites of archaeological interest, visualization of them with the help of modern software, is growing. The application of innovative technological methods in classical sciences was and is certainly a challenge for scientists, especially when using them to produce results that lead to understanding the history of a place. So far the formulation of conclusions from the archaeologists was with traditional practices, through sources from the extant ancient texts and by archaeological excavations. In some cases lack of data, to find the exact position of the archaeological monument needs to take place science and technology of Geoinformatics methods and techniques that enable the management of various information from anthropogenic and natural geographic area below of a single digital environment. Since that archeology examines the evolution of historical events through the geography, geomorphology, time and culture, the results of archaeological research is rich in spatial information. The Gis is an experienced program to process these large volumes of data, particularly those referred to the geomorphology. Consequently the aim of the paper is to show us that through the help of software can visualize the archaeological monuments of the region through the geomorphologic background mainly. Having as a study area the prefecture of Arcadia owned in the Peloponnese/ Greece shows the direct relation of geomorphology with archeology through the Geographic Information Systems. Keywords: Gis, Classic science, history, geomorphology and archeology

  14. A scoping review of geographic information systems in maternal health.

    PubMed

    Makanga, Prestige T; Schuurman, Nadine; von Dadelszen, Peter; Firoz, Tabassum

    2016-07-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) are increasingly recognized tools in maternal health. To evaluate the use of GIS in maternal health and to identify knowledge gaps and opportunities. Keywords broadly related to maternal health and GIS were used to search for academic articles and gray literature. Reviewed articles focused on maternal health, with GIS used as part of the methods. Peer reviewed articles (n=40) and gray literature sources (n=30) were reviewed. Two main themes emerged: modeling access to maternal services and identifying risks associated with maternal outcomes. Knowledge gaps included a need to rethink spatial access to maternal care in low- and middle-income settings, and a need for more explicit use of GIS to account for the geographical variation in the effect of risk factors on adverse maternal outcomes. Limited evidence existed to suggest that use of GIS had influenced maternal health policy. Instead, application of GIS to maternal health was largely influenced by policy priorities in global maternal health. Investigation of the role of GIS in contributing to future policy directions is warranted, particularly for elucidating determinants of global maternal health. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Locally weighted linear combination in a vector geographic information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Brad; Rinner, Claus

    2014-07-01

    Weighted linear combination is a multi-criteria decision analysis technique that can be used by decision-makers to select an optimal location from a collection of alternative locations. Its local form takes into account the range of attribute values within a user-defined neighbourhood in accordance with the range-sensitivity principle. This research explores locally weighted linear combination in a vector-based geographic information system. A custom application in ArcGIS 10 allows the user to select a neighbourhood definition from a standard set including contiguity, distance, and k-nearest neighbours, for which local weights are generated. A case study on vulnerability to heat-related illness in Toronto is used to illustrate the technique. The impact of local weighting on the heat vulnerability index is examined using visual analysis of the spatial patterns of heat vulnerability under the global and local approaches, as well as the sensitivity of the local approach to the selected neighbourhood definition. A trade-off analysis of the local weights is also presented. The combination of socio-demographic and environmental determinants in a locally weighted index results in patterns of heat vulnerability that could support targeted hot weather response at a micro-geographic level within urban neighbourhoods.

  16. DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING PLANNING AND ANALYSIS WITH GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, J; William Austin, W; Larry Koffman, L

    2007-09-17

    From the mid-1950's through the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site produced nuclear materials for the weapons stockpile, for medical and industrial applications, and for space exploration. Although SRS has a continuing defense-related mission, the overall site mission is now oriented toward environmental restoration and management of legacy chemical and nuclear waste. With the change in mission, SRS no longer has a need for much of the infrastructure developed to support the weapons program. This excess infrastructure, which includes over 1000 facilities, will be decommissioned and demolished over the forthcoming years. Dispositioning facilities for decommissioning and deactivation requires significant resources to determine hazards, structure type, and a rough-order-of-magnitude estimate for the decommissioning and demolition cost. Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was used to help manage the process of dispositioning infrastructure and for reporting the future status of impacted facilities.

  17. Savannah River Site Geographic Information System management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, D.E.

    1992-02-01

    A plan for managing the development of Geographic Information System (GIS) applications at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in a coordinated, integrated fashion has been developed. Included in the plan are discussions on the guidance for GIS activities at the site, the overall strategy for managing GIS applications development, the specific administrative and programmatic tasks with projected completion schedules, and the organizational structure in place to direct this GIS effort. The Department of Energy-Savannah River Field Office (DOE-SR) has encouraged all primary subcontracting organizations at SRS involved with the mapping of spatial data to coordinate their efforts and be more cost effective. This plan provides a description of organized activities in 1992 for establishing a coordinated approach for developing and implementing GIS technology.

  18. Geographic information systems in public health and medicine.

    PubMed

    Mullner, Ross M; Chung, Kyusuk; Croke, Kevin G; Mensah, Edward K

    2004-06-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) are increasingly being used in public health and medicine. Advances in computer technology, the encouragement of its use by the federal government, and the wide availability of academic and commercial courses on GIS are responsible for its growth. Some view GIS as only a tool for spatial research and policy analysis, while others believe it is part of a larger emerging new science including geography, cartography, geodesy, and remote sensing. The specific advantages and problems of GIS are discussed. The greatest potential of GIS is its ability to clearly show the results of complex analyses through maps. Problems in using GIS include its costs, the need to adequately train staff, the use of appropriate spatial units, and the risk it poses to violating patient confidentiality. Lastly, the fourteen articles in this special issue devoted to GIS are introduced and briefly discussed.

  19. NATional CARBon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NATCARB)

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy R. Carr

    2006-01-09

    This report provides a brief summary of the milestone for Quarter 1 of 2006 of the NATional CARBon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NATCARB) This milestone assigns consistent symbology to the ''National CO{sub 2} Facilities'' GIS layer on the NATCARB website. As a default, CO{sub 2} sources provided by the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships and the National Group are now all one symbol type. In addition for sinks such as oil and gas fields where data is drawn from multiple partnerships, the symbology is given a single color. All these modifications are accomplished as the layer is passed through the national portal (www.natcarb.org). This documentation is sent to National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) as a Topical Report and will be included in the next Annual Report.

  20. Using geographic information systems to simulate patient access areas.

    PubMed

    Doi, Shunsuke; Inoue, Takashi; Ide, Hiroo; Nakamura, Toshihito; Fujita, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Takahiro; Takabayashi, Katsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    We constructed a simulation model with a geographic information system (GIS) to predict the future shortage of beds in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area. With a grid square method, we calculated patient numbers for every 500 square meters of the Tokyo Metropolitan Area until 2040 and estimated whether those in need could be admitted to hospitals within an hour's drive from their homes. The simulation demonstrates that after 2025 many patients may not be able to find hospitals within this time framework. The situation will be especially serious in the center of Tokyo and along the railway lines, where many senior citizens reside. We can now apply this innovative GIS method in many fields and especially for the precise estimation of future demands for and supply of medical assistance.

  1. Global Seismicity: Three New Maps Compiled with Geographic Information Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, Paul D., Jr.; Montgomery, Brian C.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents three new maps of global seismicity compiled from NOAA digital data, covering the interval 1963-1998, with three different magnitude ranges (mb): greater than 3.5, less than 3.5, and all detectable magnitudes. A commercially available geographic information system (GIS) was used as the database manager. Epicenter locations were acquired from a CD-ROM supplied by the National Geophysical Data Center. A methodology is presented that can be followed by general users. The implications of the maps are discussed, including the limitations of conventional plate models, and the different tectonic behavior of continental vs. oceanic lithosphere. Several little-known areas of intraplate or passive margin seismicity are also discussed, possibly expressing horizontal compression generated by ridge push.

  2. Geographic Information Systems to Assess External Validity in Randomized Trials.

    PubMed

    Savoca, Margaret R; Ludwig, David A; Jones, Stedman T; Jason Clodfelter, K; Sloop, Joseph B; Bollhalter, Linda Y; Bertoni, Alain G

    2017-08-01

    To support claims that RCTs can reduce health disparities (i.e., are translational), it is imperative that methodologies exist to evaluate the tenability of external validity in RCTs when probabilistic sampling of participants is not employed. Typically, attempts at establishing post hoc external validity are limited to a few comparisons across convenience variables, which must be available in both sample and population. A Type 2 diabetes RCT was used as an example of a method that uses a geographic information system to assess external validity in the absence of a priori probabilistic community-wide diabetes risk sampling strategy. A geographic information system, 2009-2013 county death certificate records, and 2013-2014 electronic medical records were used to identify community-wide diabetes prevalence. Color-coded diabetes density maps provided visual representation of these densities. Chi-square goodness of fit statistic/analysis tested the degree to which distribution of RCT participants varied across density classes compared to what would be expected, given simple random sampling of the county population. Analyses were conducted in 2016. Diabetes prevalence areas as represented by death certificate and electronic medical records were distributed similarly. The simple random sample model was not a good fit for death certificate record (chi-square, 17.63; p=0.0001) and electronic medical record data (chi-square, 28.92; p<0.0001). Generally, RCT participants were oversampled in high-diabetes density areas. Location is a highly reliable "principal variable" associated with health disparities. It serves as a directly measurable proxy for high-risk underserved communities, thus offering an effective and practical approach for examining external validity of RCTs. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Updating range surveys using a geographic information system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eidenshink, Jeffery C.; Sjaastad, David C.

    1985-01-01

    A spatial database was developed for the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation in North Dakota to demonstrate the use of a geographic information system for natural resource management. A key component of the digital database was a detailed soil survey. Range site boundaries were derived by aggregating soil mapping units on the basis on interpretations from the published soil surveys. The problem was that no range survey data including stocking rates and condition class were available for the soil-survey-derived range sites. The only available range survey was a survey that was based on range site delineations from a Missouri River Basin Inventory (MRBI) program conducted in 1961, prior to the availability of soil survey data. The MRBI survey information was correlated with the revised range sites derived from the soil surveys to device stocking rates and condition classes. A 1:24,000-scale map which included revised range site boundaries and management boundaries was produced for each township within the reservation. All polygons on the maps were uniquely labeled to permit discrimination of the potential differences in range site stocking rates due to grazing management practices. The maps and the associated polygon attribute data were merged with maps of the MRBI transect information to derive the stocking rate and condition class for each revised range site within a management unit. The resulting database components were a map of revised range site boundaries within management units and an associated tabular file containing attribute information including stocking rate and condition class.

  4. Geographic Information Office

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2004-01-01

    The Geographic Information Office (GIO) is the principal information office for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), focused on: Information Policy and Services, Information Technology, Science Information, Information Security, and the Federal Geographic Data Committee/Geospatial One Stop.

  5. KBGIS-II: A knowledge-based geographic information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Terence; Peuquet, Donna; Menon, Sudhakar; Agarwal, Pankaj

    1986-01-01

    The architecture and working of a recently implemented Knowledge-Based Geographic Information System (KBGIS-II), designed to satisfy several general criteria for the GIS, is described. The system has four major functions including query-answering, learning and editing. The main query finds constrained locations for spatial objects that are describable in a predicate-calculus based spatial object language. The main search procedures include a family of constraint-satisfaction procedures that use a spatial object knowledge base to search efficiently for complex spatial objects in large, multilayered spatial data bases. These data bases are represented in quadtree form. The search strategy is designed to reduce the computational cost of search in the average case. The learning capabilities of the system include the addition of new locations of complex spatial objects to the knowledge base as queries are answered, and the ability to learn inductively definitions of new spatial objects from examples. The new definitions are added to the knowledge base by the system. The system is performing all its designated tasks successfully. Future reports will relate performance characteristics of the system.

  6. Critical event management with geographic information system technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, John F.; Young, Jeffrey M.

    1997-02-01

    Critical event management at the Los Angeles County Regional Criminal Information Clearinghouse (LACRCIC) provides for the deconfliction of operations, such as reverse stings, arrests, undercover buys/busts, searches, surveillances, and site surveys in the Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, and San Bernardino county area. During these operations, the opportunity for officer-to-officer confrontation is high, possibly causing a worse case scenario -- officers drawing on each other resulting in friendly fire injuries or casualties. In order to prevent local, state, and federal agencies in the Los Angeles area from experiencing this scenario, the LACRCIC provides around the clock critical event management services via its secure war room. The war room maintains a multicounty detailed street-level map base and geographic information system (GIS) application to support this effort. Operations are telephoned in by the participating agencies and posted in the critical event management system by war room analysts. The application performs both a proximity search around the address and a commonality of suspects search. If a conflict is found, the system alerts the analyst by sounding an audible alarm and flashing the conflicting events on the automated basemap. The analyst then notifies the respective agencies of the conflicting critical events so coordination or rescheduling can occur.

  7. Effective 3-D surface modeling for geographic information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yüksek, K.; Alparslan, M.; Mendi, E.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we propose a dynamic, flexible and interactive urban digital terrain platform with spatial data and query processing capabilities of geographic information systems, multimedia database functionality and graphical modeling infrastructure. A new data element, called Geo-Node, which stores image, spatial data and 3-D CAD objects is developed using an efficient data structure. The system effectively handles data transfer of Geo-Nodes between main memory and secondary storage with an optimized directional replacement policy (DRP) based buffer management scheme. Polyhedron structures are used in digital surface modeling and smoothing process is performed by interpolation. The experimental results show that our framework achieves high performance and works effectively with urban scenes independent from the amount of spatial data and image size. The proposed platform may contribute to the development of various applications such as Web GIS systems based on 3-D graphics standards (e.g., X3-D and VRML) and services which integrate multi-dimensional spatial information and satellite/aerial imagery.

  8. Effective 3-D surface modeling for geographic information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yüksek, K.; Alparslan, M.; Mendi, E.

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we propose a dynamic, flexible and interactive urban digital terrain platform (DTP) with spatial data and query processing capabilities of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), multimedia database functionality and graphical modeling infrastructure. A new data element, called Geo-Node, which stores image, spatial data and 3-D CAD objects is developed using an efficient data structure. The system effectively handles data transfer of Geo-Nodes between main memory and secondary storage with an optimized Directional Replacement Policy (DRP) based buffer management scheme. Polyhedron structures are used in Digital Surface Modeling (DSM) and smoothing process is performed by interpolation. The experimental results show that our framework achieves high performance and works effectively with urban scenes independent from the amount of spatial data and image size. The proposed platform may contribute to the development of various applications such as Web GIS systems based on 3-D graphics standards (e.g. X3-D and VRML) and services which integrate multi-dimensional spatial information and satellite/aerial imagery.

  9. Watermarking 2D-vector data for geographical information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Michael; Busch, Christoph

    2002-04-01

    This paper deals with the issue of watermarking 2D-vector data which are used in Geographical Information Systems (GIS). The watermark is embedded in the tolerance range of the coordinates, where one bit of the watermarking information is represented by one PN-sequence, whose elements consist of the two values +tolerance and - tolerance. To robustly embed one bit of the watermarking information the length of the PN-sequence has to be much greater than the square maximum coordinate value leading to non-acceptable sequence lengths due to high coordinate values. To achieve a PN-sequence length that is suitable to the size of the data domain we do not consider the whole coordinate value but only those decimal digit positions of the coordinate value, where changes are significant but not violating the tolerance requirements. Due to this restriction on a smaller range of values, overflow and underflow has to be considered during the embedding process. Within the retrieval process we first extract this fraction of the coordinate value before correlating it with the PN- sequence. The proposed method is robust against attackers changing the coordinates within the tolerance range.

  10. The Geographic Information System component of the Hanford Environmental Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Tzemos, S.; Overton, E.S.

    1992-01-01

    The Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) has been developed to manage the data from the characterization and environmental monitoring of the Hanford Site. HEISGIS is the Geographic Information Systems component of HEIS. This report analyzes the HEISGIS functional requirements as articulated by the members of a GIS subcommittee established by the HEIS Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC) in a series of meetings. These functionalities are identified throughout this report, but no implementation commitment is made. This requirements analysis document will be followed by a brief list of the functionalities that will be implemented in FY91 and a description of the requisite acceptance test criteria.

  11. The Geographic Information System component of the Hanford Environmental Information System. Requirements analysis for HEISGIS

    SciTech Connect

    Tzemos, S.; Overton, E.S.

    1992-01-01

    The Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) has been developed to manage the data from the characterization and environmental monitoring of the Hanford Site. HEISGIS is the Geographic Information Systems component of HEIS. This report analyzes the HEISGIS functional requirements as articulated by the members of a GIS subcommittee established by the HEIS Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC) in a series of meetings. These functionalities are identified throughout this report, but no implementation commitment is made. This requirements analysis document will be followed by a brief list of the functionalities that will be implemented in FY91 and a description of the requisite acceptance test criteria.

  12. Geographical information system (GIS) in investigation of an outbreak.

    PubMed

    Nisha, V; Gad, Santosh S; Selvapandian, David; Suganya, V; Rajagopal, V; Suganti, Pearlin; Balraj, V; Devasundaram, Jayanth

    2005-03-01

    An outbreak of fever in a village in southern India was reported on 1st September, 2001. The first reported case presented with epistaxis and a platelet count of 27000h(1)/mm3. Clinical, laboratory and entomological evidence supported a diagnosis of dengue fever. One third of the village was affected and 3.7 % of the population presented with haemorrhagic symptoms; none were fatal. Five acute cases tested for dengue specific IgM showed that two were positive. The larvae of Aedes aegypti were discovered from domestic water collections in the village. Spatial analysis done with the help of Geographical Information Systems software (GIS) demonstrated a centrifugal spread of cases from the most affected street until it involved the entire village. Spatial analysis revealed that cases occurred in clusters and that these could not have occurred by chance. This was our first experience in producing a geo-referenced map of a village area and in spatial analysis. GIS is a novel and simple tool for outbreak investigations and the spatial analyst adds additional information to the data collected. Control of adult mosquitoes and larvae prevented the outbreak from spreading to an adjacent village.

  13. The new geographic information system in ETVA VI.PE.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xagoraris, Zafiris; Soulis, George

    2016-08-01

    ETVA VI.PE. S.A. is a member of the Piraeus Bank Group of Companies and its activities include designing, developing, exploiting and managing Industrial Areas throughout Greece. Inside ETVA VI.PE.'s thirty-one Industrial Parks there are currently 2,500 manufacturing companies established, with 40,000 employees and € 2.5 billion of invested funds. In each one of the industrial areas ETVA VI.PE guarantees the companies industrial lots of land (sites) with propitious building codes and complete infrastructure networks of water supply, sewerage, paved roads, power supply, communications, cleansing services, etc. The development of Geographical Information System for ETVA VI.PE.'s Industrial Parks started at the beginning of 1992 and consists of three subsystems: Cadastre, that manages the information for the land acquisition of Industrial Areas; Street Layout - Sites, that manages the sites sold to manufacturing companies; Networks, that manages the infrastructure networks (roads, water supply, sewerage etc). The mapping of each Industrial Park is made incorporating state-of-the-art photogrammetric, cartographic and surveying methods and techniques. Passing through the phases of initial design (hybrid GIS) and system upgrade (integrated Gis solution with spatial database), the system is currently operating on a new upgrade (integrated gIS solution with spatial database) that includes redesigning and merging the system's database schemas, along with the creation of central security policies, and the development of a new web GIS application for advanced data entry, highly customisable and standard reports, and dynamic interactive maps. The new GIS bring the company to advanced levels of productivity and introduce the new era for decision making and business management.

  14. Geographic information systems. A new tool in environmental epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Ward; Nuckols; Weigel; Maxwell; Cantor; Miller

    2000-10-01

    PURPOSE: Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are useful tools for identifying populations with potential exposure to environmental contaminants. Using a GIS, features of the local environment around an individual's home, work, or school can be described. We present two examples illustrating methods and issues in identifying populations potentially exposed to agricultural pesticides and to toxic releases from the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI).METHODS: We used USDA Farm Service Agency records as ground reference data to classify a late summer 1984 satellite image into crop species in 3 counties in Nebraska. We located residences from a case-control study of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) on the crop maps and calculated the distance to crop fields. Residences from a 4-center study of NHL were mapped and the distance to TRI sites was determined.RESULTS: Twenty-two percent of residences had crop fields within 500 meters of the home, an intermediate distance for the range of drift effects from pesticide applications. After accounting for the extent of primary drift from ground applications of pesticides, we estimated that 30 percent of residences were potentially exposed to crop pesticides. In the 4-center study, residence locations determined by address-matching methods and by a global positioning system were compared; the population 1 mile from specific TRI sites is described.CONCLUSIONS: These examples demonstrate the utility of a GIS in environmental epidemiology studies. A GIS can be a useful addition to questionnaire and other methods of exposure assessment in health studies.

  15. Spatial modeling of colonic lesions with geographic information systems.

    PubMed

    Imanieh, Mohammad Hadi; Goli, Ali; Imanieh, Mohammad Hossein; Geramizadeh, Bita

    2015-01-01

    Geographic information system (GIS) software has been used in health care systems to display and analyze spatial pattern of diseases and health services. This study was performed to assess spatial patterns of colon's pathologic lesions based on the pathologic reports and assess whether it is possible to use GIS software in health services. Archives of pathology of Namazi and Faghihi hospitals, two main referral centers of south-west of Iran, were obtained and reviewed between January 2009 and September 2011 for biopsy reports of patients who underwent colonoscopy. Abnormal biopsies were categorized into five different subgroups according to the type of pathologic specimens. By GIS, spatial patterns of colon biopsies were plotted in different maps and spatial auto-correlation of colon biopsies was calculated using the Moran's Index. A total of 4815 biopsies from 2663 different patients were reviewed, 53.8% of which were men. Abnormal biopsies were 2781 of all specimens (57.8%). Neoplastic lesions, inflammatory bowel diseases and polyps were 9.3%, 19.3% and 29.2% of total biopsies, respectively. Pathologic biopsies were more common in the distal colon. Maps of all biopsies and maps of specific pathologies were manifested in GIS. Our study showed that left-sided lesions are still more common in the Iranian population. On the other hand, surveying the right side of colon is as important as the distal part, which necessitates total colonoscopy.

  16. The NASA John C. Stennis Environmental Geographic Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohan, Tyrus; Grant, Kerry

    2002-01-01

    In addition to the Environmental Geographic Information System (EGIS) presentation, we will present two live demonstrations of a portion of the work being performed in support of environmental operations onsite and NASA-wide. These live demonstrations will showcase the NASA EGIS database through working versions of two software packages available from Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI, Inc.): ArcIMS 3.0 and either ArcView 3.2a or ArcGIS 8.0.2. Using a standard web browser, the ArcIMS demo will allow users to access a project file containing several data layers found in the EGIS database. ArcIMS is configured so that a single computer can be used as the data server and as the user interface, which allows for maximum Internet security because the computer being used will not actually be connected to the World Wide Web. Further, being independent of the Internet, the demo will run at an increased speed. This demo will include several data layers that are specific to Stennis Space Center. The EGIS database demo is a representative portion of the entire EGIS project sent to NASA Headquarters last year. This demo contains data files that are readily available at various government agency Web sites for download. Although these files contain roads, rails, and other infrastructure details, they are generalized and at a small enough scale that they provide only a general idea of each NASA center's surroundings rather than specific details of the area.

  17. Geographic information system index for the State of Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, William R.; Norris, Pamela G.

    1989-01-01

    Recently the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) has increased within Tennessee. As a result, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Tennessee State Planning Office, and the Tennessee Comptroller of the Treasury entered into an agreement to conduct a survey of GIS users within the State. Two hundred and sixty three agencies were contacted. One hundred and thirty-nine agencies maintained one or more computer system (including personal computers). Twenty-five agencies used GIS software. The number of coverages or layers that exist upon completion of the survey as computerized digital data for Tennessee was 4,741. One hundred and twenty location-specific data bases were available. The U.S. Geological Survey, National Mapping Division map accuracy standards and digital cartographic data standards were included as minimum guidelines for GIS users. General data sharing techniques were described. The most common one was the use of magnetic tapes. A GIS index data base containing the survey data was built for inquiries. A 7.5 minute quadrangle coverage of Tennessee was created to allow for identification on a quadrangle basis of existing coverages contained in the GIS data base. (USGS)

  18. Spatial Modeling of Colonic Lesions With Geographic Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Imanieh, Mohammad Hadi; Goli, Ali; Imanieh, Mohammad Hossein; Geramizadeh, Bita

    2014-01-01

    Background: Geographic information system (GIS) software has been used in health care systems to display and analyze spatial pattern of diseases and health services. Objectives: This study was performed to assess spatial patterns of colon’s pathologic lesions based on the pathologic reports and assess whether it is possible to use GIS software in health services. Patients and Methods: Archives of pathology of Namazi and Faghihi hospitals, two main referral centers of south-west of Iran, were obtained and reviewed between January 2009 and September 2011 for biopsy reports of patients who underwent colonoscopy. Abnormal biopsies were categorized into five different subgroups according to the type of pathologic specimens. By GIS, spatial patterns of colon biopsies were plotted in different maps and spatial auto-correlation of colon biopsies was calculated using the Moran’s Index. Results: A total of 4815 biopsies from 2663 different patients were reviewed, 53.8% of which were men. Abnormal biopsies were 2781 of all specimens (57.8%). Neoplastic lesions, inflammatory bowel diseases and polyps were 9.3%, 19.3% and 29.2% of total biopsies, respectively. Pathologic biopsies were more common in the distal colon. Maps of all biopsies and maps of specific pathologies were manifested in GIS. Conclusions: Our study showed that left-sided lesions are still more common in the Iranian population. On the other hand, surveying the right side of colon is as important as the distal part, which necessitates total colonoscopy. PMID:25763265

  19. The NASA John C. Stennis Environmental Geographic Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohan, Tyrus; Grant, Kerry

    2002-01-01

    In addition to the Environmental Geographic Information System (EGIS) presentation, we will present two live demonstrations of a portion of the work being performed in support of environmental operations onsite and NASA-wide. These live demonstrations will showcase the NASA EGIS database through working versions of two software packages available from Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI, Inc.): ArcIMS 3.0 and either ArcView 3.2a or ArcGIS 8.0.2. Using a standard web browser, the ArcIMS demo will allow users to access a project file containing several data layers found in the EGIS database. ArcIMS is configured so that a single computer can be used as the data server and as the user interface, which allows for maximum Internet security because the computer being used will not actually be connected to the World Wide Web. Further, being independent of the Internet, the demo will run at an increased speed. This demo will include several data layers that are specific to Stennis Space Center. The EGIS database demo is a representative portion of the entire EGIS project sent to NASA Headquarters last year. This demo contains data files that are readily available at various government agency Web sites for download. Although these files contain roads, rails, and other infrastructure details, they are generalized and at a small enough scale that they provide only a general idea of each NASA center's surroundings rather than specific details of the area.

  20. Deactivation and Decommissioning Planning and Analysis with Geographic Information Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, James S.; Koffman, Larry D.; Austin, William E.

    2008-01-15

    From the mid-1950's through the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site produced nuclear materials for the weapons stockpile, for medical and industrial applications, and for space exploration. Although SRS has a continuing defense-related mission, the overall site mission is now oriented toward environmental restoration and management of legacy chemical and nuclear waste. With the change in mission, SRS no longer has a need for much of the infrastructure developed to support the weapons program. This excess infrastructure, which includes over 1000 facilities, will be decommissioned and demolished over the forthcoming years. Dis-positioning facilities for decommissioning and deactivation requires significant resources to determine hazards, structure type, and a rough-order-of-magnitude estimate for the decommissioning and demolition cost. Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was used to help manage the process of dis-positioning infrastructure and for reporting the future status of impacted facilities. Several thousand facilities of various ages and conditions are present at SRS. Many of these facilities, built to support previous defense-related missions, now represent a potential hazard and cost for maintenance and surveillance. To reduce costs and the hazards associated with this excess infrastructure, SRS has developed an ambitious plan to decommission and demolish unneeded facilities in a systematic fashion. GIS technology was used to assist development of this plan by: providing locational information for remote facilities, identifying the location of known waste units adjacent to buildings slated for demolition, and for providing a powerful visual representation of the impact of the overall plan. Several steps were required for the development of the infrastructure GIS model. The first step involved creating an accurate and current GIS representation of the infrastructure data. This data is maintained in a Computer Aided Design

  1. Teaching Poverty with Geographic Visualization and Geographic Information Systems (GIS): A Case Study of East Buffalo and Food Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjesfjeld, Christopher D.; Jung, Jin-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Although various methods have been used to teach about poverty in the social work classroom (e.g., quantitative, historical, and qualitative), the use of geographic visualization and geographic information systems (GIS) has become a relatively new method. In our analysis of food access on the East Side of Buffalo, New York, we demonstrate the…

  2. Teaching Poverty with Geographic Visualization and Geographic Information Systems (GIS): A Case Study of East Buffalo and Food Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjesfjeld, Christopher D.; Jung, Jin-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Although various methods have been used to teach about poverty in the social work classroom (e.g., quantitative, historical, and qualitative), the use of geographic visualization and geographic information systems (GIS) has become a relatively new method. In our analysis of food access on the East Side of Buffalo, New York, we demonstrate the…

  3. A preliminary geodetic data model for geographic information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, K. M.

    2009-12-01

    Our ability to gather and assimilate integrated data collections from multiple disciplines is important for earth system studies. Moreover, geosciences data collection has increased dramatically, with pervasive networks of observational stations on the ground, in the oceans, in the atmosphere and in space. Contemporary geodetic observations from several space and terrestrial technologies contribute to our knowledge of earth system processes and thus are a valuable source of high accuracy information for many global change studies. Assimilation of these geodetic observations and numerical models into models of weather, climate, oceans, hydrology, ice, and solid Earth processes is an important contribution geodesists can make to the earth science community. Clearly, the geodetic observations and models are fundamental to these contributions. ESRI wishes to provide leadership in the geodetic community to collaboratively build an open, freely available content specification that can be used by anyone to structure and manage geodetic data. This Geodetic Data Model will provide important context for all geographic information. The production of a task-specific geodetic data model involves several steps. The goal of the data model is to provide useful data structures and best practices for each step, making it easier for geodesists to organize their data and metadata in a way that will be useful in their data analyses and to their customers. Built on concepts from the successful Arc Marine data model, we introduce common geodetic data types and summarize the main thematic layers of the Geodetic Data Model. These provide a general framework for envisioning the core feature classes required to represent geodetic data in a geographic information system. Like Arc Marine, the framework is generic to allow users to build workflow or product specific geodetic data models tailored to the specific task(s) at hand. This approach allows integration of the data with other existing

  4. Spatial assessment of Argentinean genetic admixture with geographical information systems.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Lacava, Amalia; Walier, Maja; Penacino, Gustavo; Wienker, Thomas F; Baur, Max P

    2011-08-01

    In recent years there has been much attention to Argentinean population stratification. We were interested in assessing population stratification from a geographical perspective and summarizing it in form of maps. We mapped the genetic admixture of the extant male population in central and northern Argentina on the basis of forensic Y-chromosomal haplotypes. We addressed the question which group of genetically similar individuals is predominant in this area. Haplotypes containing seven Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat polymorphisms (Y-STRs), also known as microsatellites - DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393 - were constructed for 145 individuals, recruited in 10 provinces. 97 distinct haplotypes were clustered into four clusters according to molecular distances. A genetic geostatistical analysis was conducted with the open-source geographical information system GRASS GIS. For each haplotype cluster, the according frequency was spatially interpolated over the total study area. Juxtaposing the interpolation surfaces, we screened point-wisely the maximal frequency as well as the label of the respective cluster. The screening results were combined in one summary map. We repeated this procedure for the second maximal frequencies. The resulting maps subdivide the study area into continuous regions comprising one predominant group of similar haplotypes. The first summary map divides the study area into three regions and the second summary map divides the area into four regions. The results of our analysis indicate that two groups of similar European haplotypes alternatively dominate the largest extension of the Argentinean territory. A third group, including South-American haplotypes, dominates the indigenous northwestern Argentinean area. The last group, including worldwide dispersed haplotypes, preponderates in frequency in second place in central Argentina. Our findings confirm a widespread European paternal ancestry, a substantial Amerindian

  5. Mapping Submarine Groundwater Discharge Using Radon and Geographic Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, C. M.; Rapaglia, J. P.

    2013-05-01

    Fresh submarine groundwater discharge (SGD), which is likely the fraction of SGD most important for nutrient flux into the coastal zone, is driven by terrestrial hydraulic gradients. It is, therefore, logical to utilize this information in the search for SGD. The increased precision of digital elevation models (DEM) combined with the utility of geographic information systems (GIS) enables the researcher to pinpoint flow accumulation. ArcGIS 10 was used to find and quantify flow accumulation in Port Jefferson Harbor, NY and the Niantic River, CT. Both Port Jefferson and the Niantic are of similar geology being formed by glacial moraines marked by high hydraulic conductivity. In Port Jefferson, high flow was found in the southwestern and southeastern corners of the harbor. Here folds in land elevation focused water into the corners of the harbor. In the Niantic River flow accumulation was determined near anomalously high pockets of Nitrate-Nitrogen found previous to this study. Meanwhile, although radon has been used extensively as a tracer for SGD, few studies have used radon to map it. Radon was used to investigate groundwater seepage in both locations. An in-air radon monitor, RAD7, modified with a RAD Aqua, was used in a closed loop system to detect continuous Rn levels while steaming along the coastline. It was found that in areas with high flow accumulation as determined by the GIS analysis, Rn levels were similarly elevated (636 Bq/m3). This work complements research undertaken in the Baltic Sea, Germany, although the relatively smaller spatial scale of this study was, perhaps, more useful in matching radon activities and flow accumulation. While it may not be financially or logistically sensible to do extensive radon studies, this method of mapping fresh SGD may help researchers find the preverbal needle in a haystack.

  6. Visualizing nursing workforce distribution: policy evaluation using geographic information systems.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Karen L

    2005-12-01

    Health services literature suggests that geographic information systems (GIS) are useful policy evaluation tools when policy success is dependent on location. Nursing workforce distribution is an inherently local issue and nursing shortages present serious concerns for local, state and national governments. In 1991, Missouri enacted a nurse recruitment and retention policy targeting underserved (HPSA-designated) counties. Following Institutional Review Board approval, policy effectiveness was explored using a combination of GIS data visualization, spatial and classic statistics. Results of both data visualization and statistical methods do not demonstrate an expected trend of decreasing group differences between HPSA and non-HPSA-designated counties over time. Only two of the five time periods studied had significant group differences. Between 1993 and 1995, the loss in nurse to population ratios in HPSA counties was significant (U=1020, p<0.001); however, between 1999 and 2001, the growth in nurse to population ratio changes in HPSA counties was significant (U=1032, p=0.001). The GIS data visualization and statistical techniques performed suggest that current policy definitions of underserved areas may not be effective in defining areas of nursing shortages and the existing policy implementation may not be achieving the stated goals.

  7. Utilization of Geographic Information System in Lunar Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardon, A. A.

    1992-01-01

    Substantial digital remote sensing, lunar orbital photography, Earth-based remote sensing, and mapping of a variety of surficial lunar phenomena have occurred since the advent of the Space Age. This has led to a bewildering and quite disparate collection of archival sources insofar as this digital data and its cartographic representation can be found within many countries of the world. The importance of this mapping program in support of human expansion onto our nearest planetary neighbor has been recognized. A series of small scale maps of the Moon at 1 km to 1 cm, done with the support of Geographic Information System (GIS), would serve decision makers well in the process of accessing the development of manned occupance of the Moon. Maps and the data that they are derived from are the primary way in which people explore new environments and use previously discovered data to increase the bounties of any exploration. The inherent advantage of GIS is that it would allow immediate online access on the Moon of topographically represented data with analysis either on site or from Earth.

  8. Role of geographic information system in malaria control.

    PubMed

    Sharma, V P; Srivastava, A

    1997-08-01

    In this paper we provide an account of our experience in the application of remote sensing (RS) and geographic information system (GIS) in understanding malaria transmission dynamics at the local level. Two studies have been briefly reviewed. One is the application of RS on the mosquito production in the Sanjay lake and surrounding areas in Delhi. Studies are demonstrated that remote sensing data were useful in assessing relative mosquito abundance from large water bodies. The second study was carried out in Nadiad taluka, Kheda district, Gujarat on the application of RS and GIS in a village-wise analysis of receptivity and vulnerability to malaria. For this study, remote sensed data and topo sheets of 1:50,000 and 1:125,000 were used in preparing thematic maps. Digitised overlaid maps were subjected to computer analysis using ARC/INFO 3.1 software. Malaria annual parasite incidence (API) showed relationship with water table followed by soil type, irrigation and water quality, other parameters also contributed to malaria receptivity but less significantly. Based on GIS analysis location specific malaria control strategy was suggested to achieve cost effective control of malaria on a sustainable basis.

  9. Geographical information system methodology and instruction impact on water managers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCowan, Ladonna Cecile

    Scope and method of study. Solutions addressing the dilemma of nonpoint source [NPS] pollution are dependent on education, assessment, and best management practices [BMP]. Educational programs must provide and simplify complex relationships between NPS and water quality. This study evaluates the impact of a geographical information system [GIS] methodology and its instruction to water managers by assessing changes in their attitude, perceived knowledge, and planned management practices. Findings and conclusion. Water managers knowledge and behavior were not found significantly different between the GIS and without-GIS courses. There was a significant difference between the courses for attitude. However, the significance was in favor of the without-GIS workshop. The pre- then post-survey was inadequate to establish reliable baseline data for the water managers. Over estimation to pre-survey questions generated inaccuracies in the post-survey data. The result of the course presentation had an impact on the water managers perceived knowledge, attitude and planned behavior toward water quality. GIS methodology has potential for enhances educational material for water managers.

  10. Catchment delineation and morphometric analysis using geographical information system.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Kumar, Rohitashw; Singh, P K; Singh, Manjeet; Yadav, K K; Mittal, H K

    2015-01-01

    The geographical information system (GIS) has emerged as an efficient tool in delineation of drainage patterns of watershed planning and management. The morphometric parameters of basins can address linear, areal and relief aspects. The study deals with the integrated watershed management of Baliya micro-watersheds, located in the Udaipur district of Rajasthan, India. Morphometric analysis in hydrological investigation is an important aspect and it is inevitable in the development and management of drainage basins. The determination of linear, areal and relief parameters indicate fairly good significance. The low value of the bifurcation ratio of 4.19 revealed that the drainage pattern has not been distorted by structural disturbance. The high value of the elongation ratio (0.68) compared to the circulatory ratio (0.27) indicates an elongated shape of the watershed. The high value of drainage density (5.39 km/km(2)) and stream frequency (12.32) shows that the region has impermeable subsoil material under poor vegetative cover with a low relief factor. The morphometric parameters of relief ratio (0.041) and relative relief (0.99%) show that the watershed can be treated using GIS techniques to determine the morphometric presence of dendritic drainage pattern, with a view to selecting the soil and water conservation measures and water harvesting.

  11. An integrated lake geographical information system on the third pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Lu, A.

    2016-12-01

    Alpine lakes on the Third Pole (TP) have been used as an indicator for knowing hydrologic process, evaluating water resources and understanding climate change. However, the main driving forces and climate-driven mechanisms of lake variations still remain debate. One of a reason that limits these researches is lack of the understanding of the lake hydrological characteristics. In this study, we created a lake inventory on TP, and for the first time, we established a comprehensive hydrological network for each lake mainly based on 246 scenes Landsat series images, 236 Chinese topographic maps, and SRTM DEM. According to the lake's location in the hydrological network, the lakes can be classified as closed lake, upstream lake or outflow lake. The closed lake has only inlet with no outlet. Water in the closed lake does not leave the basin by the surface runoff. The upstream lake has inlet and outlet, and the runoff will finally flow into a closed lake. The outflow lake has inlet and outlet, while the runoff will join into rivers and may eventually join into the ocean. These three kinds of lakes have different drainage modes, so their intensity and forms affected by climate change may not the same. It's necessary to distinguish them and consider them separately. The results show that there are 396 closed lakes, 472 supplying lakes and 312 outflow lakes on TP in 2010, with the area of 35,498.2 km2, 7,301.6km2, and 3,373.6 km2, respectively. Meanwhile, we determined the relationship between lakes and their supplying glaciers. What's more, an integrated lake geographical information system on the third pole has been build. This system realizes the information visualization and mainly includes two functions. If you click any lake, you can know the catchment of this lake, the streams how the runoff inputs a lake, and how a lake is connected to another lake or river. And you also can know if there are glaciers supply the lake or not, and the location and area of these

  12. Applications of Geographic Information System (GIS) analysis of Lake Uluabat.

    PubMed

    Hacısalihoğlu, Saadet; Karaer, Feza; Katip, Aslıhan

    2016-06-01

    Lake Uluabat is one of the most important wetlands in Turkey because of its rich biodiversity, lying on a migratory bird route with almost all its shores being covered by submerged plants. The lake has been protected by the Ramsar Convention since 1998. However, the Lake is threatened by natural and anthropogenic stressors as a consequence of its location. Geographic Information System (GIS) analysis is a tool that has been widely used, especially for water quality management in recent years. This study aimed to investigate the water quality and determined most polluted points using GIS analysis of the lake. Temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, chemical oxygen demand, Kjeldahl nitrogen, total phosphorus, chlorophyll-a, arsenic, boron, iron, and manganese were monitored monthly from June 2008 to May 2009, with the samples taken from 8 points in the lake. Effect of pH, relation of temperature, and Chl-a with other water quality parameters and metals are designated as statistically significant. Data were mapped using ArcGIS 9.1 software and were assessed according to the Turkish Water Pollution Control Regulations (TWPCR). The research also focused on classifying and mapping the water quality in the lake by using the spatial analysis functions of GIS. As a result, it was determined that Lake Uluabat belonged to the 4th class, i.e., highly polluted water, including any water of lower quality. A remarkable portion of the pollution in the water basin was attributed to domestic wastewater discharges, industrial and agricultural activities, and mining.

  13. Geodata Modeling and Query in Geographic Information Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adam, Nabil

    1996-01-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) deal with collecting, modeling, man- aging, analyzing, and integrating spatial (locational) and non-spatial (attribute) data required for geographic applications. Examples of spatial data are digital maps, administrative boundaries, road networks, and those of non-spatial data are census counts, land elevations and soil characteristics. GIS shares common areas with a number of other disciplines such as computer- aided design, computer cartography, database management, and remote sensing. None of these disciplines however, can by themselves fully meet the requirements of a GIS application. Examples of such requirements include: the ability to use locational data to produce high quality plots, perform complex operations such as network analysis, enable spatial searching and overlay operations, support spatial analysis and modeling, and provide data management functions such as efficient storage, retrieval, and modification of large datasets; independence, integrity, and security of data; and concurrent access to multiple users. It is on the data management issues that we devote our discussions in this monograph. Traditionally, database management technology have been developed for business applications. Such applications require, among other things, capturing the data requirements of high-level business functions and developing machine- level implementations; supporting multiple views of data and yet providing integration that would minimize redundancy and maintain data integrity and security; providing a high-level language for data definition and manipulation; allowing concurrent access to multiple users; and processing user transactions in an efficient manner. The demands on database management systems have been for speed, reliability, efficiency, cost effectiveness, and user-friendliness. Significant progress have been made in all of these areas over the last two decades to the point that many generalized database platforms

  14. Towards Sustainable Watershed Dvelopment: A Geographic Information Systems based Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2006-01-01

    With an unprecedented projection of population and urban growth in the coming decades, assessment of the long-term hydrologic impacts of land use change is crucial for optimizing management practices to control runoff and non-point source (NPS) pollution associated with sustainable watershed development. Land use change, dominated by an increase in urban/impervious areas, can have a significant impact on water resources. Non-point source (NPS) pollution is the leading cause of degraded water quality in the US and urban areas are an important source of NPS pollution. Most planners, government agencies, and consultants lack access to simple impact-assessment tools despite widespread concern over the environmental impacts of watershed development. Before investing in complex analyses and customized data collection, it is often useful to utilize simple screening analyses using data that are already available. In this paper, we discuss such a technique for long-term hydrologic impact assessment (L-THIA) that makes use of basic land use, soils and long-term rainfall data to compare the hydrologic impacts of past, present and any future land use change. Long-term daily rainfall records are used in combination with soils and land use information to calculate average annual runoff and NPS pollution at a watershed scale. Because of the geospatial nature of land use and soils data, and the increasingly widespread use of GIS by planners, government agencies and consultants, the model is integrated with a Geographic Information System (GIS) that allows convenient generation and management of model input and output data, and provides advanced visualization of the model results. An application of the L-THIA/NPS model on the Little Eagle Creek (LEC) watershed near Indianapolis, Indiana is illustrated in this paper. Three historical land use scenarios for 1973, 1984, and 1991 were analyzed to track land use change in the watershed and to assess the impacts of land use change on

  15. Use of geographic information management systems (GIMS) for nitrogen management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diker, Kenan

    1998-11-01

    Geographic Information Management Systems (GIMS) was investigated in this study to develop an efficient nitrogen management scheme for corn. The study was conducted on two experimental corn sites. The first site consisted of six non-replicated plots where the canopy reflectance of corn at six nitrogen fertilizer levels was investigated. The reflectance measurements were conducted for nadir and 75sp° view angles. Data from these plots were used to develop relationships between reflectance data and soil and plant parameters. The second site had four corn plots fertilized by different methods such as spoon-fed, pre-plant and side-dress, which created nitrogen variability within the field. Soil and plant nitrogen as well as leaf area, biomass, percent cover measurements, and canopy reflectance data were collected at various growth stages from both sites during the 1995 and 1996 growing seasons. Relationships were developed between the Nitrogen Reflectance Index (NRI) developed by Bausch et al. (1994) and soil and plant variables. Spatial dependence of data was determined by geostatistical methods; variability was mapped in ArcView. Results of this study indicated that the NRI is a better estimator of plant nitrogen status than chlorophyll meter measurements. The NRI can successfully be used to estimate the spatial distribution of soil nitrogen estimates through the plant nitrogen status as well as plant parameters and the yield potential. GIS mapping of measured and estimated soil nitrogen agreed except in locations where hot spots were measured. The NRI value of 0.95 seemed to be the critical value for plant nitrogen status especially for the 75sp° view. The nadir view tended to underestimate plant and soil parameters, whereas, the 75sp° view slightly overestimated these parameters. If available, the 75sp° view data should be used before the tasseling stage for reflectance measurements to reduce the soil background effect. However, it is sensitive to windy

  16. 77 FR 69899 - Public Conference on Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in Transportation Safety

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ... SAFETY BOARD Public Conference on Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in Transportation Safety The National Transportation Safety Board will hold a public conference on the use of the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in transportation safety on December 4-5, 2012. GIS is a rapidly expanding group...

  17. An Interface for Remote Sensing Digital Image Systems and Geographic Information Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irish, R. R.; Myers, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    An interfacing technique, zonation algorithms (ZONAL), which provides a means of utilizing LANDSAT information in a polygon-based geographic information system (GIS) is discussed. The ZONAL mechanisms are based on the use of existing GIS polynomial layer, thereby making the process entirely automated.

  18. Assessing sustainable land-use practices using geographic information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Amelie Y.

    Many prominent scientists have claimed that we need to develop environmentally sustainable practices otherwise societies may collapse. The use of Geographic Information Systems allows detailed studies that can cross disciplinary boundaries and lead to quantifiable statements as to the change of land use practices that took place in the past and those that may occur in the future. This dissertation focuses on two research topics. One that attempts to quantify the environmental consequences of parking lots located in the Midwest, USA. The other research topic focuses on the land area needed to support ethanol in the United States. In Tippecanoe County, Indiana, it was determined that parking lots occupied approximately 6.6% of the urban areas, that the area devoted to parking lots exceeded the area devoted to urban parks by a factor of 3, and that these parking lots contributed to increased runoff of pollutants. The parking lots of Tippecanoe County were estimated to be responsible for 46.5 thousand pounds of oil and grease released annually in runoff, as well as an increase of 240.6 thousand pounds of suspended solids, and 65.7 pounds of lead released when compared to pre-development conditions. A method that scales up the county wide study was also developed to determine the areal footprint of parking lots with the states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and Wisconsin. It was estimated that these four states allocate approximately 1260 square km of their land to parking lots and that this accounts for 4.97% of urban land use and over 43 million parking spaces, whereas the number of individuals in age of driving (adults over 18 years old) amounted to just over 25 million. Within the four states studied, states where urban sprawl was considered more prevalent were also states that had a higher proportion of their urban land devoted to parking lots. The second dissertation topic focused on using GIS to locate suitable sites for corn or cellulosic based ethanol

  19. [Qingshishan watershed agro-ecology information system and its application with the support of Geographic Information System (GIS)].

    PubMed

    Lu, J; Wang, Z

    2000-10-01

    Geographic Information System(GIS) is applied to establish Qingshishan Watershed Agro-Ecology Information System (QWAEIS), QWAEIS integrates spatial information such as land use, soil, water and topography with basic information such as population, climate and agricultural production. The watershed agro-ecology information was effectively analyzed and managed by QWAEIS, land suitable classes were evaluated by QWAEIS and the land evaluation result are given, QWAEIS also can support watershed planning with its spatial information.

  20. Geospatial Information and Geographic Information Systems (GIS): Current Issues and Future Challenges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-08

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Congressional Research Service 15 Other Activities and Components of FGDC and NSDI Geospatial One - Stop According...to the FGDC 2007 Annual Report,30 the Geospatial One - Stop portal is the official means of accessing metadata resources, which are published through...the National Spatial Data Clearinghouse and which are managed in NSDI. Geospatial One - Stop focuses on the discovery and access of geospatial

  1. Cartographic Encounters at the Bureau of Indian Affairs Geographic Information System Center of Calculation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    The centering processes of geographic information system (GIS) development at the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) was an extension of past cartographic encounters with American Indians through the central control of geospatial technologies, uneven development of geographic information resources, and extension of technically dependent…

  2. SEMINAR PUBLICATION: NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEM-SOLVING WITH GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Conference on Environmental Problem Solving with Geographic Information Systems was held in Cincinnati, Ohio, September 21-23, 1994. The conference was a forum for over 450 environmental professionals to exchange information and approaches on how to use geographic ...

  3. Cartographic Encounters at the Bureau of Indian Affairs Geographic Information System Center of Calculation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    The centering processes of geographic information system (GIS) development at the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) was an extension of past cartographic encounters with American Indians through the central control of geospatial technologies, uneven development of geographic information resources, and extension of technically dependent…

  4. SEMINAR PUBLICATION: NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEM-SOLVING WITH GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Conference on Environmental Problem Solving with Geographic Information Systems was held in Cincinnati, Ohio, September 21-23, 1994. The conference was a forum for over 450 environmental professionals to exchange information and approaches on how to use geographic ...

  5. Effective transfer of geographic information system (GIS) technology: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardell, Glenn; Scharfen, Greg

    1993-08-01

    Despite the remarkable growth and dissemination of GIS technology in the past decate, barriers yet remain to the full and effective application of the technology by scientific entities. This paper will broadly survey the literature and comment on issues germane to the transfer of GIS technology within and among governmental agencies, universities, and other research organizations. An intellectual framework established by formal education in geography has aided in identifying potential uses for GIS. More widespread inclusion of geographic principles into higher education curricula, using GIS as a tool for demonstration and experimentation, will be suggested. Seminars and demonstrations are useful to spark interest in GIS, but unless material learned can be directly applied to current work, they are not of lasting value. Graphical user interfaces lift GIS from the realm of programmers and put analysis capabilities into the hands of researchers and decision makers. Factors relating to cost must always be dealt with. We have found that an appropriate pilot project is a means by which risks can be minimized while capabilities of the technology can be proven in an operational setting. Technology is not an end in itself, but a means to engender human productivity and creativity; GIS provides a unified mechanism by which to visualize and manage information on the various processes within the earth's environment. Assimilation of GIS technology by the international earth science community will undoubtedly encourage multidisciplinary cooperation.

  6. GRASS/GIS (Geographic Resources Analysis Support System/Geographic Information System) Implementation Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    Cxn’triing a GRAISS GIS Databse - 15- -15- s)Surces of )igital Spotial l)ata for (;lS )ata )ata Data F Scale/ Data Media Acquistin n "I:!......." . S...infestations were identified, types and quantities of chemicals used to combat pests, and other relevant information. R arg Zoes Field survey and/or...infestation, types and quantifies of ch-micals used to combat the pest. and reconmeided date for next chemical application LA Infreaion: A comparison

  7. Geographic Information Systems as Applied to the Manipulation of Environmental Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, J. M.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Discusses two aspects of a Geographic Information System (GIS), a computerized system for processing geographic and/or mapped data and components/implementation of a GIS and GIS demonstration in natural resources management. Demonstrations related to lignite mining permit requirements in coastal zone, and location of potential landfills/hazardous…

  8. Geographic Information Systems as Applied to the Manipulation of Environmental Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, J. M.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Discusses two aspects of a Geographic Information System (GIS), a computerized system for processing geographic and/or mapped data and components/implementation of a GIS and GIS demonstration in natural resources management. Demonstrations related to lignite mining permit requirements in coastal zone, and location of potential landfills/hazardous…

  9. Geographic Health Information Systems: A Platform To Support The ‘Triple Aim’

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Marie Lynn; Ferranti, Jeffrey; Strauss, Benjamin; Neelon, Brian; Califf, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the rapid growth of electronic health data, most data systems do not connect individual patient records to data sets from outside the health care delivery system. These isolated data systems cannot support efforts to recognize or address how the physical and environmental context of each patient influences health choices and health outcomes. In this article we describe how a geographic health information system in Durham, North Carolina, links health system and social and environmental data via shared geography to provide a multidimensional understanding of individual and community health status and vulnerabilities. Geographic health information systems can be useful in supporting the Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s Triple Aim Initiative to improve the experience of care, improve the health of populations, and reduce per capita costs of health care. A geographic health information system can also provide a comprehensive information base for community health assessment and intervention for accountable care that includes the entire population of a geographic area. PMID:24019366

  10. Geographic health information systems: a platform to support the 'triple aim'.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Marie Lynn; Ferranti, Jeffrey; Strauss, Benjamin; Neelon, Brian; Califf, Robert M

    2013-09-01

    Despite the rapid growth of electronic health data, most data systems do not connect individual patient records to data sets from outside the health care delivery system. These isolated data systems cannot support efforts to recognize or address how the physical and environmental context of each patient influences health choices and health outcomes. In this article we describe how a geographic health information system in Durham, North Carolina, links health system and social and environmental data via shared geography to provide a multidimensional understanding of individual and community health status and vulnerabilities. Geographic health information systems can be useful in supporting the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Triple Aim Initiative to improve the experience of care, improve the health of populations, and reduce per capita costs of health care. A geographic health information system can also provide a comprehensive information base for community health assessment and intervention for accountable care that includes the entire population of a geographic area.

  11. Analysis of impact of geographic characteristics on suicide rate and visualization of result with Geographic Information System.

    PubMed

    Oka, Mayumi; Kubota, Takafumi; Tsubaki, Hiroe; Yamauchi, Keita

    2015-06-01

    The aim of our study was to understand the geographic characteristics of Japanese communities and the impact of these characteristics on suicide rates. We calculated the standardized mortality ratio from suicide statistics of 3318 municipalities from 1972 to 2002. Correlation analysis, multi-regression analysis and generalized additive model were used to find the relation between topographic and climatic variables and suicide rate. We visualized the relation between geographic characteristics and suicide rate on the map of Wakayama Prefecture, using the Geographic Information System. Our study showed that the geographic characteristics of each community are related with its suicide rate. The strongest factor among the geographic characteristics to increase the suicide rate was the slope of the habitable land. It is necessary to take the characteristics of each community into consideration when we work out measures of suicide prevention. Visualization of the findings on the local map should be helpful to promote understanding of problems and to share the information among various parties in charge of suicide prevention. © 2014 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  12. Using NASA Remote Sensing Data in a Geographical Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagwell, R.; Lindsay, F.; Lynnes, C.; Yang, M.

    2011-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) generates more than 2 Tb of remotely sensed data each day through multiple space-based instruments and satellite platforms. The Earth Science Data Information Systems (ESDIS) project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is focused on expanding the usage of EOS data in GIS applications, for both scientists and the general public - especially when science quality satellite products are readily obtainable in HDF-EOS format. The primary formats for NASA's EOS data are NetCDF, HDF4 (HDF-EOS2), and HDF5 (HDF-EOS5), of which the Federal Geospatial Data Committee (FGDC) only endorses NetCDF (out of a total of 64 external standards).The benefit of using a GIS includes the ability to interrelate multiple types of information assembled from a variety of sources to visualize, query, overlay, and analyze data, making it valuable to a wide range of scientific, academic and private entities. Some of the issues facing the remote sensing community for using these data include: - Most GIS systems do not readily process or are unable to utilize NASA Remote Sensing (RS) data - Many scientific users utilize specialized software to geolocate images, which presents a problem for interoperability between common systems - Headers in data files are not easily read by GIS systems - Key NASA datasets are mostly available in either HDF-EOS or NetCDF formats - GeoTIFFs cannot be directly created from HDF or NetCDF, creating a multi-step process that is not inherently user friendly (including reprojection, band extraction, and exporting) With that in mind, ESDIS has undertaken a number of steps toward aiding the use of these data by the broader GIS community: - Support raster data geometry and integration of EOS data into a GIS, with functions for image processing, modeling, and spatial analysis - Leverage relationships throughout the GIS community to enable the use of NASA RS data on the most commonly used platforms

  13. A Phenomenological Study of a Collaborative Inquiry Model for Teaching Educators Using Geographic Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Lara M. P.

    2010-01-01

    Geographic inquiry increases higher-order thinking skills which can be supported through the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The purpose of this research project examines the effect of using a Collaborative Inquiry Model (CIM) model during professional development on the rate of effective GIS implementation in K-12 classrooms. The…

  14. A Phenomenological Study of a Collaborative Inquiry Model for Teaching Educators Using Geographic Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Lara M. P.

    2010-01-01

    Geographic inquiry increases higher-order thinking skills which can be supported through the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The purpose of this research project examines the effect of using a Collaborative Inquiry Model (CIM) model during professional development on the rate of effective GIS implementation in K-12 classrooms. The…

  15. A 'user friendly' geographic information system in a color interactive digital image processing system environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. J.; Goldberg, M.

    1982-01-01

    NASA's Eastern Regional Remote Sensing Applications Center (ERRSAC) has recognized the need to accommodate spatial analysis techniques in its remote sensing technology transfer program. A computerized Geographic Information System to incorporate remotely sensed data, specifically Landsat, with other relevant data was considered a realistic approach to address a given resource problem. Questions arose concerning the selection of a suitable available software system to demonstrate, train, and undertake demonstration projects with ERRSAC's user community. The very specific requirements for such a system are discussed. The solution found involved the addition of geographic information processing functions to the Interactive Digital Image Manipulation System (IDIMS). Details regarding the functions of the new integrated system are examined along with the characteristics of the software.

  16. A 'user friendly' geographic information system in a color interactive digital image processing system environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. J.; Goldberg, M.

    1982-01-01

    NASA's Eastern Regional Remote Sensing Applications Center (ERRSAC) has recognized the need to accommodate spatial analysis techniques in its remote sensing technology transfer program. A computerized Geographic Information System to incorporate remotely sensed data, specifically Landsat, with other relevant data was considered a realistic approach to address a given resource problem. Questions arose concerning the selection of a suitable available software system to demonstrate, train, and undertake demonstration projects with ERRSAC's user community. The very specific requirements for such a system are discussed. The solution found involved the addition of geographic information processing functions to the Interactive Digital Image Manipulation System (IDIMS). Details regarding the functions of the new integrated system are examined along with the characteristics of the software.

  17. Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System -- TRAGIS, progress on improving a routing tool

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.E.; Lester, P.B.

    1998-05-01

    The Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System (TRAGIS) model provides a useful tool to calculate and analyze transportation routes for radioactive materials within the continental US. This paper outlines some of the features available in this model.

  18. Geographic exposure modeling: a valuable extension of geographic information systems for use in environmental epidemiology.

    PubMed Central

    Beyea, J

    1999-01-01

    Geographic modeling of individual exposures using air pollution modeling techniques can help in both the design of environmental epidemiologic studies and in the assignment of measures that delineate regions that receive the highest exposure in space and time. Geographic modeling can help in the interpretation of environmental sampling data associated with airborne concentration or deposition, and can act as a sophisticated interpolator for such data, allowing values to be assigned to locations between points where the data have actually been collected. Recent advances allow for quantification of the uncertainty in a geographic model and the resulting impact on estimates of association, variability, and study power. In this paper we present the terminology and methodology of geographic modeling, describe applications to date in the field of epidemiology, and evaluate the potential of this relatively new tool. PMID:10229717

  19. Design Research of TIANDITU (Map Worl)-Based Geographic Information System for Travelling Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Zhang, H.; Wang, C.

    2014-04-01

    TIANDITU (Map World) is the public version of the National Platform for Common Geospatial Information Service, and the travelling channel is TIANDITU-based geographic information platform for travelling service. With the development of tourism, traditional ways for providing travelling information cannot meet the needs of travelers. As such, the travelling channel of TIANDITU focuses on providing travel information abundantly and precisely, which integrated the geographic information data of TIANDITU Version 2.0 and the authoritative information resources from China National Tourism Administration. Furthermore, spatial positioning, category and information query of various travelling information were offered for the public in the travelling channel. This research mainly involves three important parts: the system design, key technologies of the system design and application examples. Firstly, this paper introduced the design of TIANDITU-based geographic information system for travelling service, and the general and database design were described in detail. The designs for general, database and travelling service above should consider lots of factors which illustrated in the paper in order to guarantee the efficient service. The process of system construction, the content of geographic information for travelling and system functions of geographic information for travelling are also proposed via diagram in this part. Then several key technologies were discussed, including the travelling information integration for main node and among nodes, general architecture design and management system for travelling channel, web portals and system interface. From the perspective of main technologies, this part describes how TIANDITU travelling channel can realize various functions and reach the requirements from different users. Finally, three application examples about travelling information query were listed shortly. The functions and search results are shown clearly in this

  20. Geographic information system for fusion and analysis of high-resolution remote sensing and ground truth data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Anthony; Dubois, Pascale; Leberl, Franz; Norikane, L.; Way, Jobea

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Geographic Information System for fusion and analysis of high-resolution remote sensing and ground truth data are presented. Topics covered include: scientific objectives; schedule; and Geographic Information System.

  1. Geographic information system for fusion and analysis of high-resolution remote sensing and ground truth data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Anthony; Dubois, Pascale; Leberl, Franz; Norikane, L.; Way, Jobea

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Geographic Information System for fusion and analysis of high-resolution remote sensing and ground truth data are presented. Topics covered include: scientific objectives; schedule; and Geographic Information System.

  2. Geographic information system programs for use in the water-supply-allocation permitting process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunne, Paul; Price, C.V.

    1995-01-01

    Computer programs designed for use in a geographic information system as an aid in the water-supply- allocation permitting process are described. These programs were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey during a project conducted in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. The programs enable a user to display proposed water-supply-allocation sites in a defined area together with present sites and important hydrologic and geographic features on a computer screen or on hardcopy plots. The programs are menu-driven and do not require familiarity with geographic information systems. Source codes for the programs are included in appendixes.

  3. Geographic Information System Tools for Conservation Planning: User's Manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fox, Timothy J.; Rohweder, Jason J.; Kenow, K.P.; Korschgen, C.E.; DeHaan, H.C.

    2003-01-01

    Public and private land managers desire better ways to incorporate landscape, species, and habitat relations into their conservation planning processes. We present three tools, developed for the Environmental Systems Research Institute?s ArcView 3.x platform, applicable to many types of wildlife conservation management and planning efforts. These tools provide managers and planners with the ability to rapidly assess landscape attributes and link these attributes with species-habitat information. To use the tools, the user provides a detailed land cover spatial database and develops a matrix to identify species-habitat relations for the landscape of interest. The tools are applicable to any taxa or suite of taxa for which the required data are available. The user also has the ability to interactively make polygon-specific changes to the landscape and re-examine species-habitat relations. The development of these tools has given resource managers the means to evaluate the merits of proposed landscape management scenarios and to choose the scenario that best fits the goals of the managed area.

  4. Geographic-time distribution of ambulance calls in Singapore: utility of geographic information system in ambulance deployment (CARE 3).

    PubMed

    Ong, Marcus E H; Ng, Faith S P; Overton, Jerry; Yap, Susan; Andresen, Derek; Yong, David K L; Lim, Swee Han; Anantharaman, V

    2009-03-01

    Pre-hospital ambulance calls are not random events, but occur in patterns and trends that are related to movement patterns of people, as well as the geographical epidemiology of the population. This study describes the geographic-time epidemiology of ambulance calls in a large urban city and conducts a time demand analysis. This will facilitate a Systems Status Plan for the deployment of ambulances based on the most cost effective deployment strategy. An observational prospective study looking at the geographic-time epidemiology of all ambulance calls in Singapore. Locations of ambulance calls were spot mapped using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology. Ambulance response times were mapped and a demand analysis conducted by postal districts. Between 1 January 2006 and 31 May 2006, 31,896 patients were enrolled into the study. Mean age of patients was 51.6 years (S.D. 23.0) with 60.0% male. Race distribution was 62.5% Chinese, 19.4% Malay, 12.9% Indian and 5.2% others. Trauma consisted 31.2% of calls and medical 68.8%. 9.7% of cases were priority 1 (most severe) and 70.1% priority 2 (moderate severity). Mean call receipt to arrival at scene was 8.0 min (S.D. 4.8). Call volumes in the day were almost twice those at night, with the most calls on Mondays. We found a definite geographical distribution pattern with heavier call volumes in the suburban town centres in the Eastern and Southern part of the country. We characterised the top 35 districts with the highest call volumes by time periods, which will form the basis for ambulance deployment plans. We found a definite geographical distribution pattern of ambulance calls. This study demonstrates the utility of GIS with despatch demand analysis and has implications for maximising the effectiveness of ambulance deployment.

  5. Providing access: The difference between sharing and just reporting geographical information systems and engineering information/information technology organizational data

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, F.J.

    1996-06-10

    The concept for Corporate computer-aided design (CAD)/computer-aided engineering (CAE)/geographical information systems (GIS) and engineering information (EI)/ information technology (IT), and the sharing of this information is becoming popular as organizations flatten (or perhaps become more hollow) and as their functions merge into processes. However, not much is known about information sharing: why sharing happens, whit it does not, how much sharing is desirable, and how to manage it. This paper takes a look at these important issues.

  6. Use of the vector index and geographic information system to prospectively inform West Nile virus interventions.

    PubMed

    Jones, Roderick C; Weaver, Kingsley N; Smith, Shamika; Blanco, Claudia; Flores, Cristina; Gibbs, Kevin; Markowski, Daniel; Mutebi, John-Paul

    2011-09-01

    We sought to estimate West Nile virus (WNV) activity in mosquito populations weekly at the census tract level in Chicago, IL, and to provide this information graphically. Each week we calculated a vector index (VI) for each mosquito trap then generated tract estimates using geographic information systems. During June 29-September 13, 2008, a median of 527 (60%) of 874 possible tracts per week had a VI value. Overall, 94% of the weekly VI tract estimates were 0; among those with a VI estimate greater than 0, the median was 0.33 (range 0.003-3.5). Officials deemed risk levels and weather conditions appropriate for adulticide treatments on 3 occasions, resulting in the treatment of approximately 252 linear kilometers of residential streets and alleys. Our analysis successfully converted complex, raw surveillance data into a format that highlighted areas of elevated WNV activity and facilitated the determination of appropriate response procedures.

  7. Principles of logic and the use of digital geographic information systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinove, Charles Joseph

    1986-01-01

    Digital geographic information systems allow many different types of data to be spatially and statistically analyzed. Logical operations can be performed on individual or multiple data planes by algorithms that can be implemented in computer systems. Users and creators of the systems should fully understand these operations. This paper describes the relationships of layers and features in geographic data bases and the principles of logic that can be applied by geographic information systems and suggests that a thorough knowledge of the data that are entered into a geographic data base and of the logical operations will produce results that are most satisfactory to the user. Methods of spatial analysis are reduced to their primitive logical operations and explained to further such understanding.

  8. Review of Geographic Variation and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Applications in Prescription Drug Use Research

    PubMed Central

    Wangia, Victoria; Shireman, Theresa I.

    2013-01-01

    Background While understanding geography’s role in healthcare has been an area of research for over 40 years, the application of geography-based analyses to prescription medication use is limited. The body of literature was reviewed to assess the current state of such studies to demonstrate the scale and scope of projects in order to highlight potential research opportunities. Objective To review systematically how researchers have applied geography-based analyses to medication use data. Methods Empiric, English language research articles were identified through PubMed and bibliographies. Original research articles were independently reviewed as to the medications or classes studied, data sources, measures of medication exposure, geographic units of analysis, geospatial measures, and statistical approaches. Results From 145 publications matching key search terms, forty publications met the inclusion criteria. Cardiovascular and psychotropic classes accounted for the largest proportion of studies. Prescription drug claims were the primary source, and medication exposure was frequently captured as period prevalence. Medication exposure was documented across a variety of geopolitical units such as countries, provinces, regions, states, and postal codes. Most results were descriptive and formal statistical modeling capitalizing on geospatial techniques was rare. Conclusion Despite the extensive research on small area variation analysis in healthcare, there are a limited number of studies that have examined geographic variation in medication use. Clearly, there is opportunity to collaborate with geographers and GIS professionals to harness the power of GIS technologies and to strengthen future medication studies by applying more robust geospatial statistical methods. PMID:23333430

  9. A review of geographic variation and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications in prescription drug use research.

    PubMed

    Wangia, Victoria; Shireman, Theresa I

    2013-01-01

    While understanding geography's role in healthcare has been an area of research for over 40 years, the application of geography-based analyses to prescription medication use is limited. The body of literature was reviewed to assess the current state of such studies to demonstrate the scale and scope of projects in order to highlight potential research opportunities. To review systematically how researchers have applied geography-based analyses to medication use data. Empiric, English language research articles were identified through PubMed and bibliographies. Original research articles were independently reviewed as to the medications or classes studied, data sources, measures of medication exposure, geographic units of analysis, geospatial measures, and statistical approaches. From 145 publications matching key search terms, forty publications met the inclusion criteria. Cardiovascular and psychotropic classes accounted for the largest proportion of studies. Prescription drug claims were the primary source, and medication exposure was frequently captured as period prevalence. Medication exposure was documented across a variety of geopolitical units such as countries, provinces, regions, states, and postal codes. Most results were descriptive and formal statistical modeling capitalizing on geospatial techniques was rare. Despite the extensive research on small area variation analysis in healthcare, there are a limited number of studies that have examined geographic variation in medication use. Clearly, there is opportunity to collaborate with geographers and GIS professionals to harness the power of GIS technologies and to strengthen future medication studies by applying more robust geospatial statistical methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Application of remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems to ecosystem-based urban natural resource management

    Treesearch

    Xiaohui Zhang; George Ball; Eve Halper

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated system to support urban natural resource management. With the application of remote sensing (RS) and geographic information systems (GIS), the paper emphasizes the methodology of integrating information technology and a scientific basis to support ecosystem-based management. First, a systematic integration framework is developed and...

  11. Spatial inventory integrating raster databases and point sample data. [Geographic Information System for timber inventory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahler, A. H.; Woodcock, C. E.; Logan, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    A timber inventory of the Eldorado National Forest, located in east-central California, provides an example of the use of a Geographic Information System (GIS) to stratify large areas of land for sampling and the collection of statistical data. The raster-based GIS format of the VICAR/IBIS software system allows simple and rapid tabulation of areas, and facilitates the selection of random locations for ground sampling. Algorithms that simplify the complex spatial pattern of raster-based information, and convert raster format data to strings of coordinate vectors, provide a link to conventional vector-based geographic information systems.

  12. Exploitation of Geographic Information Systems for Vehicular Destination Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    will deposit into the empty Dakka Plain and still be there an hour, or several hours, later. In Information Theory parlance, the former example contains...major sporting events, and other possibly disruptive phenomena. The result, as Figure 2.9 demonstrates, is a map showing the roads in a given extent that...K. W., Oxley, M. E., Kabrisky, M., Rogers, A. S. and Mott, S. D., The life and death of ATR /Sensor Fusion and the hope for resurrection, Proceedings

  13. Integrating Science Information Systems with Geographic Information Systems: The OPeNDAP Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornillon, P.; Holloway, D.

    2004-12-01

    The OPeNDAP data access protocol is in increasing use for remote access to data in oceanography, meteorology, land cover studies and the space sciences. At the same time there is increasing use in the geographic information science (GIS) community of protocols to remotely access data. The fundamental difference between the two approaches for remote data access relates to the semantic metadata associated with the data. In the GIS case the semantic metadata are tightly coupled with the geographic needs of GISs, specifically, earth location, projection, etc. By contrast the OPeNDAP data access protocol does not impose a semantic metadata requirement on the data provider, although the protocol does provide a mechanism for the data provider to append semantic information to the data stream. This allows for use of the protocol over a much broader range of scientific disciplines, but also results in no consistency in the semantic metadata provided with the data. The OPeNDAP protocol could be viewed as a lower level protocol than those being developed for use in the GIS community. Despite the lack of consistency in semantic metadata there is a great deal of interest in the GIS community in access to OPeNDAP-enabled servers and conversely in the scientific community in access to GIS data via OPeNDAP-enabled clients. In this presentations we explore efforts undertaken within the OPeNDAP community to address these issues. In particular, we discuss issues related to access via the Web Mapping Server, EASy and MapServer as well as efforts to serve data stored in formats designed for use in GISs such as GeoTIFF

  14. Rock River Geographic Information System: ROCK-GIS (User Manual)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    Rock River GIS application was created using Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) ArcGIS8.X software and Microsoft’s Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), which is included with ArcGIS8.X products.

  15. Using a geographical information system to plan a malaria control programme in South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Booman, M.; Durrheim, D. N.; La Grange, K.; Martin, C.; Mabuza, A. M.; Zitha, A.; Mbokazi, F. M.; Fraser, C.; Sharp, B. L.

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Sustainable control of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa is jeopardized by dwindling public health resources resulting from competing health priorities that include an overwhelming acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic. In Mpumalanga province, South Africa, rational planning has historically been hampered by a case surveillance system for malaria that only provided estimates of risk at the magisterial district level (a subdivision of a province). METHODS: To better map control programme activities to their geographical location, the malaria notification system was overhauled and a geographical information system implemented. The introduction of a simplified notification form used only for malaria and a carefully monitored notification system provided the good quality data necessary to support an effective geographical information system. RESULTS: The geographical information system displays data on malaria cases at a village or town level and has proved valuable in stratifying malaria risk within those magisterial districts at highest risk, Barberton and Nkomazi. The conspicuous west-to-east gradient, in which the risk rises sharply towards the Mozambican border (relative risk = 4.12, 95% confidence interval = 3.88-4.46 when the malaria risk within 5 km of the border was compared with the remaining areas in these two districts), allowed development of a targeted approach to control. DISCUSSION: The geographical information system for malaria was enormously valuable in enabling malaria risk at town and village level to be shown. Matching malaria control measures to specific strata of endemic malaria has provided the opportunity for more efficient malaria control in Mpumalanga province. PMID:11196490

  16. Using a geographical information system to plan a malaria control programme in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Booman, M; Durrheim, D N; La Grange, K; Martin, C; Mabuza, A M; Zitha, A; Mbokazi, F M; Fraser, C; Sharp, B L

    2000-01-01

    Sustainable control of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa is jeopardized by dwindling public health resources resulting from competing health priorities that include an overwhelming acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic. In Mpumalanga province, South Africa, rational planning has historically been hampered by a case surveillance system for malaria that only provided estimates of risk at the magisterial district level (a subdivision of a province). To better map control programme activities to their geographical location, the malaria notification system was overhauled and a geographical information system implemented. The introduction of a simplified notification form used only for malaria and a carefully monitored notification system provided the good quality data necessary to support an effective geographical information system. The geographical information system displays data on malaria cases at a village or town level and has proved valuable in stratifying malaria risk within those magisterial districts at highest risk, Barberton and Nkomazi. The conspicuous west-to-east gradient, in which the risk rises sharply towards the Mozambican border (relative risk = 4.12, 95% confidence interval = 3.88-4.46 when the malaria risk within 5 km of the border was compared with the remaining areas in these two districts), allowed development of a targeted approach to control. The geographical information system for malaria was enormously valuable in enabling malaria risk at town and village level to be shown. Matching malaria control measures to specific strata of endemic malaria has provided the opportunity for more efficient malaria control in Mpumalanga province.

  17. Application of geographical information system for lymphatic filariasis and malaria control in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Okorie, P N

    2014-06-01

    Geographical Information System (GIS) is defined as an information system used to capture, store, edit, retrieve, analyze and visualize geographically referenced data. The use of GIS is one technology that is very useful in the prevention and control of Vector Borne Diseases (VBDs) such as lymphatic filariasis (LF) and malaria which cause high morbidity and mortality in Nigeria. This paper focuses on how the use of Geographical Information System (GIS) can be harnessed for surveillance, prevention and control of LF and malaria in Nigeria. GIS can be used as an operational tool to assist with resource allocation, as a monitoring and evaluation tool and as a tool to investigate various research projects on spatial aspects of LF and malaria epidemiology. This paper provides information on the benefits and potential of using GIS as a tool for the national malaria and LF control programmes with particular reference to Nigeria.

  18. Geographic Information System (GIS) capabilities in traffic accident information management: a qualitative approach.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Valinejadi, Ali; Goodarzi, Afshin; Safari, Ameneh; Hemmat, Morteza; Majdabadi, Hesamedin Askari; Mohammadi, Ali

    2017-06-01

    Traffic accidents are one of the more important national and international issues, and their consequences are important for the political, economical, and social level in a country. Management of traffic accident information requires information systems with analytical and accessibility capabilities to spatial and descriptive data. The aim of this study was to determine the capabilities of a Geographic Information System (GIS) in management of traffic accident information. This qualitative cross-sectional study was performed in 2016. In the first step, GIS capabilities were identified via literature retrieved from the Internet and based on the included criteria. Review of the literature was performed until data saturation was reached; a form was used to extract the capabilities. In the second step, study population were hospital managers, police, emergency, statisticians, and IT experts in trauma, emergency and police centers. Sampling was purposive. Data was collected using a questionnaire based on the first step data; validity and reliability were determined by content validity and Cronbach's alpha of 75%. Data was analyzed using the decision Delphi technique. GIS capabilities were identified in ten categories and 64 sub-categories. Import and process of spatial and descriptive data and so, analysis of this data were the most important capabilities of GIS in traffic accident information management. Storing and retrieving of descriptive and spatial data, providing statistical analysis in table, chart and zoning format, management of bad structure issues, determining the cost effectiveness of the decisions and prioritizing their implementation were the most important capabilities of GIS which can be efficient in the management of traffic accident information.

  19. Geographic Information System (GIS) capabilities in traffic accident information management: a qualitative approach

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Valinejadi, Ali; Goodarzi, Afshin; Safari, Ameneh; Hemmat, Morteza; Majdabadi, Hesamedin Askari; Mohammadi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Background Traffic accidents are one of the more important national and international issues, and their consequences are important for the political, economical, and social level in a country. Management of traffic accident information requires information systems with analytical and accessibility capabilities to spatial and descriptive data. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the capabilities of a Geographic Information System (GIS) in management of traffic accident information. Methods This qualitative cross-sectional study was performed in 2016. In the first step, GIS capabilities were identified via literature retrieved from the Internet and based on the included criteria. Review of the literature was performed until data saturation was reached; a form was used to extract the capabilities. In the second step, study population were hospital managers, police, emergency, statisticians, and IT experts in trauma, emergency and police centers. Sampling was purposive. Data was collected using a questionnaire based on the first step data; validity and reliability were determined by content validity and Cronbach’s alpha of 75%. Data was analyzed using the decision Delphi technique. Results GIS capabilities were identified in ten categories and 64 sub-categories. Import and process of spatial and descriptive data and so, analysis of this data were the most important capabilities of GIS in traffic accident information management. Conclusion Storing and retrieving of descriptive and spatial data, providing statistical analysis in table, chart and zoning format, management of bad structure issues, determining the cost effectiveness of the decisions and prioritizing their implementation were the most important capabilities of GIS which can be efficient in the management of traffic accident information. PMID:28848627

  20. A Smalltalk-based extension to traditional Geographic Information Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Korp, P.A.; Lurie, G.R.; Christiansen, J.H.

    1995-11-01

    The Dynamic Environmental Effects Model{copyright} (DEEM), under development at Argonne National Laboratory, is a fully object-based modeling software system that supports distributed, dynamic representation of the interlinked processes and behavior of the earth`s surface and near-surface environment, at variable scales of resolution and aggregation. Many of these real world objects are not stored in a format conducive to efficient GIS usage. Their dynamic nature, complexity and number of possible DEEM entity classes precluded efficient integration with traditional GIS technologies due to the loosely coupled nature of their data representations. To address these shortcomings, an intelligent object-oriented GIS engine (OOGIS) was developed. This engine provides not only a spatially optimized object representation, but also direct linkages to the underlying object, its data and behaviors.

  1. Analyzing long-term changes in vegetation with geographic information system and remotely sensed data

    Treesearch

    Louis. R. Iverson; Paul. G. Risser; Paul. G. Risser

    1987-01-01

    Geographic information systems and remote sensing techniques are powerful tools in the analysis of long-term changes in vegetation and land use, especially because spatial information from two or more time intervals can be compared more readily than by manual methods. A primary restriction is the paucity of data that has been digitized from earlier periods. The...

  2. Geographical Information Systems in Victorian Secondary Schools: Current Constraints and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Peter; Gordon-Brown, Lee; Peterson, Jim; Ward, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Whilst widespread diffusion and adoption of spatial enabling technology, such as geographic information systems (GIS), is taking place within Australian public and private sectors, the same cannot be said for GIS within Australian secondary schools and state-based geography curricula. In the Australian state of Victoria, information regarding the…

  3. Renewable Energy Assessment of Bureau of Reclamation Land and Facilities Using Geographic Information Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Heimiller, D.; Haase, S.; Melius, J.

    2013-05-01

    This report summarizes results of geographic information system screening for solar and wind potential at select Bureau of Reclamation lands in the western United States. The study included both utility-scale and facility-scale potential. This study supplements information in the report titled Renewable Energy Assessment for the Bureau of Reclamation: Final Report.

  4. Geographic Information Systems Librarianship: Suggestions for Entry-Level Academic Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martindale, Jaime

    2004-01-01

    Future Geographic Information Systems (GIS) librarians face a number of challenges that other Library and Information Studies (LIS) graduates may not when preparing for a career in academic librarianship. This article discusses these challenges and offers suggestions to help entry-level GIS librarians begin successful and rewarding careers.

  5. Geographical Information Systems in Victorian Secondary Schools: Current Constraints and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Peter; Gordon-Brown, Lee; Peterson, Jim; Ward, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Whilst widespread diffusion and adoption of spatial enabling technology, such as geographic information systems (GIS), is taking place within Australian public and private sectors, the same cannot be said for GIS within Australian secondary schools and state-based geography curricula. In the Australian state of Victoria, information regarding the…

  6. Geographic Information Systems Librarianship: Suggestions for Entry-Level Academic Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martindale, Jaime

    2004-01-01

    Future Geographic Information Systems (GIS) librarians face a number of challenges that other Library and Information Studies (LIS) graduates may not when preparing for a career in academic librarianship. This article discusses these challenges and offers suggestions to help entry-level GIS librarians begin successful and rewarding careers.

  7. Technologies and standards in the information systems of the soil-geographic database of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golozubov, O. M.; Rozhkov, V. A.; Alyabina, I. O.; Ivanov, A. V.; Kolesnikova, V. M.; Shoba, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    The achievements, problems, and challenges of the modern stage of the development of the Soil-Geographic Database of Russia (SGDBR) and the history of this project are outlined. The structure of the information system of the SGDBR as an internet-based resource to collect data on soil profiles and to integrate the geographic and attribute databases on the same platform is described. The pilot project in Rostov oblast illustrates the inclusion of regional information in the SGDBR and its application for solving practical problems. For the first time in Russia, the GeoRSS standard based on the structured hypertext representation of the geographic and attribute information has been applied in the state system for the agromonitoring of agricultural lands in Rostov oblast and information exchange through the internet.

  8. An Introduction to Geographic Information Systems: Linking Maps to Databases [and] Maps for the Rest of Us: Affordable and Fun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Carl; Hane, Paula

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the impact of computerization of maps on access to business and government information that may be geographically referenced and the emergence of a new field, Geographic Information Management (GIM). Applications of hypertext/hypermedia in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are described, and software available for workstations and…

  9. Understanding the use of geographical information systems (GIS) in health informatics research: A review.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Nicola; McGuire, Suzanne

    2017-06-23

    The purpose of this literature review is to understand geographical information systems (GIS) and how they can be applied to public health informatics, medical informatics, and epidemiology. Relevant papers that reflected the use of geographical information systems (GIS) in health research were identified from four academic databases: Academic Search Complete, BioMed Central, PubMed Central, and Scholars Portal, as well as Google Scholar. The search strategy used was to identify articles with "geographic information systems", "GIS", "public health", "medical informatics", "epidemiology", and "health geography" as main subject headings or text words in titles and abstracts. Papers published between 1997 and 2014 were considered and a total of 39 articles were included to inform the authors on the use of GIS technologies in health informatics research. The main applications of GIS in health informatics and epidemiology include disease surveillance, health risk analysis, health access and planning, and community health profiling. GIS technologies can significantly improve quality and efficiency in health research as substantial connections can be made between a population's health and their geographical location. Gains in health informatics can be made when GIS are applied through research, however, improvements need to occur in the quantity and quality of data input for these systems to ensure better geographical health maps are used so that proper conclusions between public health and environmental factors may be made.

  10. The Role of Health Information Management Professionals in the Use of Geographic Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    In recent years the use of geographic information systems (GIS) in healthcare has expanded rapidly. Although the use of GIS has increased quickly, very little consensus has been reached on which healthcare professionals are best suited to be trained in and use GIS. A moderate amount of research has addressed the use of GIS in healthcare, but very little research has addressed selecting and training healthcare professionals in the area of GIS. As the use of GIS becomes more closely tied to electronic health records (EHRs), the thought arises that those best versed in EHRs, health information management (HIM) professionals, would be best suited to take on the GIS role. This mixed-methods study explored the current status of HIM professionals’ role in GIS as well as the extent to which GIS is being taught in health information educational programs. Although the findings indicate that few HIM professionals are currently using GIS in their jobs and few HIM programs are currently teaching GIS, there is interest in GIS in the future for HIM professionals and in HIM educational programs. PMID:28855855

  11. The Role of Health Information Management Professionals in the Use of Geographic Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    In recent years the use of geographic information systems (GIS) in healthcare has expanded rapidly. Although the use of GIS has increased quickly, very little consensus has been reached on which healthcare professionals are best suited to be trained in and use GIS. A moderate amount of research has addressed the use of GIS in healthcare, but very little research has addressed selecting and training healthcare professionals in the area of GIS. As the use of GIS becomes more closely tied to electronic health records (EHRs), the thought arises that those best versed in EHRs, health information management (HIM) professionals, would be best suited to take on the GIS role. This mixed-methods study explored the current status of HIM professionals' role in GIS as well as the extent to which GIS is being taught in health information educational programs. Although the findings indicate that few HIM professionals are currently using GIS in their jobs and few HIM programs are currently teaching GIS, there is interest in GIS in the future for HIM professionals and in HIM educational programs.

  12. What Influences Geography Teachers' Usage of Geographic Information Systems? A Structural Equation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lay, Jinn-Guey; Chi, Yu-Lin; Hsieh, Yeu-Sheng; Chen, Yu-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the usage of the geographic information system (GIS) among geography teachers is a crucial step in evaluating the current dissemination of GIS knowledge and skills in Taiwan's educational system. The primary contribution of this research is to further our understanding of the factors that affect teachers' GIS usage. The structural…

  13. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) Mapping of Environmental Samples across College Campuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purvis-Roberts, Kathleen L.; Moeur, Harriet P.; Zanella, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students take environmental samples at various locations around the college campuses, take geospatial coordinates with a global position systems (GPS) unit, and map their results on a geo-referenced campus map with geographical information systems (GIS) software. Nitrogen dioxide air pollution sampling is used as an…

  14. What Influences Geography Teachers' Usage of Geographic Information Systems? A Structural Equation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lay, Jinn-Guey; Chi, Yu-Lin; Hsieh, Yeu-Sheng; Chen, Yu-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the usage of the geographic information system (GIS) among geography teachers is a crucial step in evaluating the current dissemination of GIS knowledge and skills in Taiwan's educational system. The primary contribution of this research is to further our understanding of the factors that affect teachers' GIS usage. The structural…

  15. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) Mapping of Environmental Samples across College Campuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purvis-Roberts, Kathleen L.; Moeur, Harriet P.; Zanella, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students take environmental samples at various locations around the college campuses, take geospatial coordinates with a global position systems (GPS) unit, and map their results on a geo-referenced campus map with geographical information systems (GIS) software. Nitrogen dioxide air pollution sampling is used as an…

  16. Conceptual framework of a geographical information system for environment--public health surveillance in Goa.

    PubMed

    Vaz, F S; Ferreira, A M A; Motghare, D D; Kulkarni, M S

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a conceptual framework for establishing a multidiscipline Geographical Information System for environment public health surveillance in the state of Goa. Sectors networking for the Geographical Information System encompass Directorate of Health Services including peripheral health setup, Public Works Department, State Pollution Control Board, Irrigation Department, Inspectorate of Factories and Boilers, Town and Control Planning Department, Meteorological Department etc. the applications of which would predict potential outbreaks / epidemics of water borne diseases, malaria, diseases linked to pollution and would support disease control activities. In addition to health applications, the data generated would be used by the respective sectors for their other planning and programming needs.

  17. Onondaga Lake Watershed – A Geographic Information System Project Phase I – Needs assessment and spatial data framework

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freehafer, Douglas A.; Pierson, Oliver

    2004-01-01

    In the fall of 2002, the Onondaga Lake Partnership (OLP) formed a Geographic Information System (GIS) Planning Committee to begin the process of developing a comprehensive watershed geographic information system for Onondaga Lake. The goal of the Onondaga Lake Partnership geographic information system is to integrate the various types of spatial data used for scientific investigations, resource management, and planning and design of improvement projects in the Onondaga Lake Watershed. A needs-assessment survey was conducted and a spatial data framework developed to support the Onondaga Lake Partnership use of geographic information system technology. The design focused on the collection, management, and distribution of spatial data, maps, and internet mapping applications. A geographic information system library of over 100 spatial datasets and metadata links was assembled on the basis of the results of the needs assessment survey. Implementation options were presented, and the Geographic Information System Planning Committee offered recommendations for the management and distribution of spatial data belonging to Onondaga Lake Partnership members. The Onondaga Lake Partnership now has a strong foundation for building a comprehensive geographic information system for the Onondaga Lake watershed. The successful implementation of a geographic information system depends on the Onondaga Lake Partnership’s determination of: (1) the design and plan for a geographic information system, including the applications and spatial data that will be provided and to whom, (2) the level of geographic information system technology to be utilized and funded, and (3) the institutional issues of operation and maintenance of the system.

  18. Evaluation of geographic information systems for three-dimensional ground-water modeling, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turner, A. Keith; Ervin, Elisabeth M.; Downey, Joe S.; ,

    1991-01-01

    Fully three-dimensional representations of the geologic system at Yucca Mountain have been developed using a Geoscientific Information System, which is an expansion of a traditional Geographic Information Systems. These advanced, three dimensional, representations of Yucca Mountain are required to adequately evaluate the complex geologic and hydrologic conditions surrounding the site. This Geoscientific Information System will be used to store, analyze, and display site data. The system also will provide a link between geologic and hydrologic data and the numerical ground-water-flow model resulting in more easy testing of hypotheses concerning the conceptual model of the geohydrologic system at Yucca Mountain.

  19. Improving a regional outreach program in a large health system using geographic information systems.

    PubMed

    Gabbert, John P; Trine, Robert M; Bintz, Marilu

    2012-06-01

    As government-insured populations grow, commercially insured populations decrease, and declining insurance reimbursements pressure cost and revenue. Health systems must strive to improve quality while lowering costs. Large medical centers with rural sites must understand their geography and how distances impede access to services, thereby affecting patient health. Without relevant data, which can be provided through the use of geographic information systems (GIS) technology, improvement is often delayed. Gundersen Lutheran Health System, a large multi-specialty system with urban and rural sites in 3 states, is developing an evaluative outreach GIS to facilitate understanding of, and response to, rural health needs. Investing in GIS technology furthers the health system's ability to deliver superior, affordable care.

  20. Using geographical information systems mapping to identify areas presenting high risk for traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to show how geographical information systems (GIS) can be used to track and compare hospitalization rates for traumatic brain injury (TBI) over time and across a large geographical area using population based data. Results & Discussion Data on TBI hospitalizations, and geographic and demographic variables, came from the Ontario Trauma Registry Minimum Data Set for the fiscal years 1993-1994 and 2001-2002. Various visualization techniques, exploratory data analysis and spatial analysis were employed to map and analyze these data. Both the raw and standardized rates by age/gender of the geographical unit were studied. Data analyses revealed persistent high rates of hospitalization for TBI resulting from any injury mechanism between two time periods in specific geographic locations. Conclusions This study shows how geographic information systems can be successfully used to investigate hospitalizaton rates for traumatic brain injury using a range of tools and techniques; findings can be used for local planning of both injury prevention and post discharge services, including rehabilitation. PMID:22054220

  1. Exploratory spatial analysis of pilot fatality rates in general aviation crashes using geographic information systems.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Jurek G; Curriero, Frank C; Baker, Susan P; Li, Guohua

    2002-03-01

    Geographic information systems and exploratory spatial analysis were used to describe the geographic characteristics of pilot fatality rates in 1983-1998 general aviation crashes within the continental United States. The authors plotted crash sites on a digital map; rates were computed at regular grid intersections and then interpolated by using geographic information systems. A test for significance was performed by using Monte Carlo simulations. Further analysis compared low-, medium-, and high-rate areas in relation to pilot characteristics, aircraft type, and crash circumstance. Of the 14,051 general aviation crashes studied, 31% were fatal. Seventy-four geographic areas were categorized as having low fatality rates and 53 as having high fatality rates. High-fatality-rate areas tended to be mountainous, such as the Rocky Mountains and the Appalachian region, whereas low-rate areas were relatively flat, such as the Great Plains. Further analysis comparing low-, medium-, and high-fatality-rate areas revealed that crashes in high-fatality-rate areas were more likely than crashes in other areas to have occurred under instrument meteorologic conditions and to involve aircraft fire. This study demonstrates that geographic information systems are a valuable tool for injury prevention and aviation safety research.

  2. Integrating remote sensing, geographic information systems and global positioning system techniques with hydrological modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Jay Krishna; Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Ekanthalu, Vicky Shettigondahalli

    2017-07-01

    Integration of remote sensing (RS), geographic information systems (GIS) and global positioning system (GPS) are emerging research areas in the field of groundwater hydrology, resource management, environmental monitoring and during emergency response. Recent advancements in the fields of RS, GIS, GPS and higher level of computation will help in providing and handling a range of data simultaneously in a time- and cost-efficient manner. This review paper deals with hydrological modeling, uses of remote sensing and GIS in hydrological modeling, models of integrations and their need and in last the conclusion. After dealing with these issues conceptually and technically, we can develop better methods and novel approaches to handle large data sets and in a better way to communicate information related with rapidly decreasing societal resources, i.e. groundwater.

  3. Using Geographic Information Systems to Match Local Health Needs With Public Health Services and Programs

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Malcolm; Steiner, Elizabeth D.; Weden, Margaret M.; Miyashiro, Lisa; Jacobson, Dawn; Lurie, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Local health departments (LHDs) play an important role in ensuring essential public health services. Geographic information system (GIS) technology offers a promising means for LHDs to identify geographic gaps between areas of need and the reach of public health services. We examined how large LHDs could better inform planning and investments by using GIS-based methodologies to align community needs and health outcomes with public health programs. We present a framework to drive LHDs in identifying and addressing gaps or mismatches in services or health outcomes. PMID:21778479

  4. Using geographic information systems to match local health needs with public health services and programs.

    PubMed

    Dubowitz, Tamara; Williams, Malcolm; Steiner, Elizabeth D; Weden, Margaret M; Miyashiro, Lisa; Jacobson, Dawn; Lurie, Nicole

    2011-09-01

    Local health departments (LHDs) play an important role in ensuring essential public health services. Geographic information system (GIS) technology offers a promising means for LHDs to identify geographic gaps between areas of need and the reach of public health services. We examined how large LHDs could better inform planning and investments by using GIS-based methodologies to align community needs and health outcomes with public health programs. We present a framework to drive LHDs in identifying and addressing gaps or mismatches in services or health outcomes.

  5. The use of information systems to transform utilities and regulatory commissions: The application of geographic information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wirick, D.W.; Montgomery, G.E.; Wagman, D.C.; Spiers, J.

    1995-09-01

    One technology that can assist utilities remain financially viable in competitive markets and help utilities and regulators to better serve the public is information technology. Because geography is an important part of an electric, natural gas, telecommunications, or water utility, computer-based Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related Automated Mapping/Facilities Management systems are emerging as core technologies for managing an ever-expanding variety of formerly manual or paper-based tasks. This report focuses on GIS as an example of the types of information systems that can be used by utilities and regulatory commissions. Chapter 2 provides general information about information systems and effects of information on organizations; Chapter 3 explores the conversion of an organization to an information-based one; Chapters 4 and 5 set out GIS as an example of the use of information technologies to transform the operations of utilities and commissions; Chapter 6 describes the use of GIS and other information systems for organizational reengineering efforts; and Chapter 7 examines the regulatory treatment of information systems.

  6. Student Perspectives on the Teaching of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in Geography Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seremet, Mehmet; Chalkley, Brian

    2015-01-01

    In an era when graduate employability is a key concern, the teaching of geographical information systems (GIS) has become a subject of considerable interest. This paper reports on a study of the GIS student learning experience using student survey data from six UK geography undergraduate programmes. The findings show that although students'…

  7. Technology Use in Rwandan Secondary Schools: An Assessment of Teachers' Attitudes towards Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akinyemi, Felicia O.

    2016-01-01

    Technology use is evident in all spheres of human endeavour. Focusing on technology use in education, this paper examines teachers' attitudes towards geographic information system (GIS). An assessment was made of GIS teachers in Rwandan secondary schools. Key areas covered include how GIS is implemented in schools, teachers' attitudes and…

  8. Land Use Planning Exercise Using Geographic Information Systems and Digital Soil Surveys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Heidi M.; Lee, Brad D.

    2004-01-01

    Geographic information system (GIS) technology has become a valuable tool for environmental science professionals. By incorporating GIS into college-level course curricula, agricultural students become better qualified for employment opportunities. We have developed a case study-based laboratory exercise that introduces students to GIS and the…

  9. Quantifying forest fragmentation using Geographic Information Systems and Forest Inventory and Analysis plot data

    Treesearch

    Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Mark H. Hansen

    2009-01-01

    Fragmentation metrics provide a means of quantifying and describing forest fragmentation. The most common method of calculating these metrics is through the use of Geographic Information System software to analyze raster data, such as a satellite or aerial image of the study area; however, the spatial resolution of the imagery has a significant impact on the results....

  10. Analyzing Regional FIA Data In The ArcView Geographic Information System

    Treesearch

    David Reed; Scott Pugh; Pat Miles; Kurt Pregitzer

    2001-01-01

    The ArcView? Geographic Information System (GIS)is probably the GIS that is most widely used by federal and state natural resource management agencies, industries, and non-profit institutions. As such, there is a great deal of expertise and comfort with this package within the FIA user community. The North Central Research Station and Michigan Technological University...

  11. Student Perspectives on the Teaching of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in Geography Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seremet, Mehmet; Chalkley, Brian

    2015-01-01

    In an era when graduate employability is a key concern, the teaching of geographical information systems (GIS) has become a subject of considerable interest. This paper reports on a study of the GIS student learning experience using student survey data from six UK geography undergraduate programmes. The findings show that although students'…

  12. Technology Use in Rwandan Secondary Schools: An Assessment of Teachers' Attitudes towards Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akinyemi, Felicia O.

    2016-01-01

    Technology use is evident in all spheres of human endeavour. Focusing on technology use in education, this paper examines teachers' attitudes towards geographic information system (GIS). An assessment was made of GIS teachers in Rwandan secondary schools. Key areas covered include how GIS is implemented in schools, teachers' attitudes and…

  13. Enhancing the Delivery of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education through Geographic Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The Network for a Healthy California (Network) employs a Geographic Information System (GIS) to identify the target audience and plan program activities because GIS is a powerful tool for assisting in data integration and planning. This paper describes common uses of GIS by Network contractors as well as demonstrating the possibilities of GIS as a…

  14. An Evaluation of Geographic Information Systems in Social Studies Lessons: Teachers' Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aladag, Elif

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the applicability of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), used increasingly in primary and secondary education across the world, in social studies lessons in Turkey. In line with this aim, 14 social studies teachers working in the province of Aydin, Turkey received a 6-hour training course about GIS during the…

  15. Teaching Geographical Information Systems in Geography Degrees: A Critical Reassessment of Vocationalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whyatt, Duncan; Clark, Gordon; Davies, Gemma

    2011-01-01

    Geographical information systems (GIS) are in tune with the current ethos of higher education because of their perceived vocational value. However, it is particularly difficult to teach GIS vocationally. This paper critiques the claim of vocationalism. The authors use an innovative method of evaluating a module that enlists its alumni to reflect…

  16. GIS in Evaluation: Utilizing the Power of Geographic Information Systems to Represent Evaluation Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azzam, Tarek; Robinson, David

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) and how the technology can be used to enhance evaluation practice. As a tool, GIS enables evaluators to incorporate contextual features (such as accessibility of program sites or community health needs) into evaluation designs and highlights the interactions between…

  17. Web-Based Geographic Information Systems: Experience and Perspectives of Planners and the Implications for Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Göçmen, Z. Asligül

    2016-01-01

    Web-based geographic information system (GIS) technology, or web-based GIS, offers many opportunities for public planners and Extension educators who have limited GIS backgrounds or resources. However, investigation of its use in planning has been limited. The study described here examined the use of web-based GIS by public planning agencies. A…

  18. Enhancing the Delivery of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education through Geographic Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The Network for a Healthy California (Network) employs a Geographic Information System (GIS) to identify the target audience and plan program activities because GIS is a powerful tool for assisting in data integration and planning. This paper describes common uses of GIS by Network contractors as well as demonstrating the possibilities of GIS as a…

  19. Integrating Geographic Information Systems in Business School Curriculum: An Initial Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Michael A.; Arnette, Andrew N.

    2011-01-01

    Geographic information systems have experienced rapid growth and user adoption over the last four decades, due to an increasing value to the business community. However, business schools are not teaching geospatial concepts and the related location intelligence to their students. This curriculum decision seems completely at odds with business'…

  20. Teaching Introductory Geographic Information Systems through Problem-Based Learning and Public Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Read, Jane M.

    2010-01-01

    Teaching geographic information systems (GIS) requires linking concepts with technical skills, which can be challenging, especially in standard lecture and laboratory-format courses. This paper reports on an introductory undergraduate GIS course that incorporated a community-driven problem-based learning exercise as a major component of the…

  1. Multi-Mission Geographic Information System for Science Operations: A Test Case Using MSL Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calef, F. J.; Abarca, H. E.; Soliman, T.; Abercrombie, S. P.; Powell, M. W.

    2017-06-01

    The Multi-Mission Geographic Information System (MMGIS) is a NASA AMMOS project in its second year of development, built to display and query science products in a spatial context. We present our progress building this tool using MSL in situ data.

  2. Developing a Multi-Mission Geographic Information System (MMGIS) for In-Situ Planetary Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calef, F. J.; Gengl, H. E.; Parker, T. J.; Deen, R. G.

    2015-06-01

    Locating science instrument data to mm accuracy on a planet surface can be manual and time-intensive. We're developing a multi-mission geographic information system (MMGIS) to standardize georeferencing & map display of in-situ science instruments.

  3. Investigation of an anthrax outbreak in Alberta in 1999 using a geographic information system

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Robert; Rajic, Andrijana; Jenson, Chris

    2003-01-01

    A Geographic Information System was used to document an anthrax outbreak in Alberta in 1999 and to describe the physical and environmental conditions of the area. The majority of infected farms were located on poorly drained organic soils. Regulatory agencies should consider adopting this tool for animal disease outbreak investigations. PMID:12715984

  4. STRATEGIC PLAN FOR GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM (GIS) QUALITY ASSURANCE IN THE EPA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA GIS-QA Team was created to fill the gap between the EPA Quality Assurance (QA) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) communities. All EPA Offices and Regions were invited to participate. Currently, the EPA GIS-QA Team consists of members from the EPA Regional Offices...

  5. Teaching Geographical Information Systems in Geography Degrees: A Critical Reassessment of Vocationalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whyatt, Duncan; Clark, Gordon; Davies, Gemma

    2011-01-01

    Geographical information systems (GIS) are in tune with the current ethos of higher education because of their perceived vocational value. However, it is particularly difficult to teach GIS vocationally. This paper critiques the claim of vocationalism. The authors use an innovative method of evaluating a module that enlists its alumni to reflect…

  6. Teaching Introductory Geographic Information Systems through Problem-Based Learning and Public Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Read, Jane M.

    2010-01-01

    Teaching geographic information systems (GIS) requires linking concepts with technical skills, which can be challenging, especially in standard lecture and laboratory-format courses. This paper reports on an introductory undergraduate GIS course that incorporated a community-driven problem-based learning exercise as a major component of the…

  7. GIS in Evaluation: Utilizing the Power of Geographic Information Systems to Represent Evaluation Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azzam, Tarek; Robinson, David

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) and how the technology can be used to enhance evaluation practice. As a tool, GIS enables evaluators to incorporate contextual features (such as accessibility of program sites or community health needs) into evaluation designs and highlights the interactions between…

  8. Geographic Information Systems and the New York State Library: Mapping New Pathways for Library Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasser, Theresa C.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the New York State Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Clearinghouse that is run by the New York State Library and discusses hands-on GIS technology used as an enhancement to its reference services. Topics include community building, in-house projects, library database development, outreach, and the future of GIS reference. (LRW)

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEM SOLVING WITH GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS: 1994 AND 1999 CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    These two national conferences, held in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1994 and 1999, addressed the area of environmental problem solving with Geographic Information Systems. This CD-ROM is a compilation of the proceedings in PDF format. The emphasis of the conference presentations were on ...

  10. Integrating Geographic Information Systems in Business School Curriculum: An Initial Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Michael A.; Arnette, Andrew N.

    2011-01-01

    Geographic information systems have experienced rapid growth and user adoption over the last four decades, due to an increasing value to the business community. However, business schools are not teaching geospatial concepts and the related location intelligence to their students. This curriculum decision seems completely at odds with business'…

  11. An Assessment of the Use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in Teaching Geography in Singapore Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yap, Lee Yong; Tan, Geok Chin Ivy; Zhu, Xuan; Wettasinghe, Marissa C.

    2008-01-01

    In 1998, geographical information systems (GIS) were introduced to secondary schools in Singapore as a tool for teaching geography at the secondary and junior college levels. However, general observations and feedback from school teachers suggested that only a small number of secondary schools and junior colleges in Singapore were actually using…

  12. An Activity-Based Learning Approach for Key Geographical Information Systems (GIS) Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srivastava, Sanjeev Kumar; Tait, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    This study presents the effect of active learning methods of concepts in geographical information systems where students participated in a series of interlocked learning experiences. These activities spanned several teaching weeks and involved the creation of a hand drawn map that was scanned and geo-referenced with locations' coordinates derived…

  13. Web-Based Geographic Information Systems: Experience and Perspectives of Planners and the Implications for Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Göçmen, Z. Asligül

    2016-01-01

    Web-based geographic information system (GIS) technology, or web-based GIS, offers many opportunities for public planners and Extension educators who have limited GIS backgrounds or resources. However, investigation of its use in planning has been limited. The study described here examined the use of web-based GIS by public planning agencies. A…

  14. Land Use Planning Exercise Using Geographic Information Systems and Digital Soil Surveys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Heidi M.; Lee, Brad D.

    2004-01-01

    Geographic information system (GIS) technology has become a valuable tool for environmental science professionals. By incorporating GIS into college-level course curricula, agricultural students become better qualified for employment opportunities. We have developed a case study-based laboratory exercise that introduces students to GIS and the…

  15. STRATEGIC PLAN FOR GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM (GIS) QUALITY ASSURANCE IN THE EPA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA GIS-QA Team was created to fill the gap between the EPA Quality Assurance (QA) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) communities. All EPA Offices and Regions were invited to participate. Currently, the EPA GIS-QA Team consists of members from the EPA Regional Offices...

  16. Geographic Information System (GIS) Applications at a Multi-Site Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottle, Laura

    This report presents the Front Range Community College (FRCC) (Colorado) Office of Institutional Research's recent expansion of its data analysis and reporting capabilities to include a geographic information system (GIS). Utilizing ArcView GIS software, the college is better able to visualize institutional and environmental data. They have…

  17. Gaining experience with military medical situational awareness and geographic information systems in a simulated influenza epidemic.

    PubMed

    DeFraites, Robert F; Chambers, William C

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of medical situational awareness is to provide useful and actionable information for preparing and employing medical assets in support of a wide variety of operational missions around the world, and monitoring and protecting the health of the force in the face of rapidly changing health threats. Since 2005, the Medical Situational Awareness in the Theater Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration has exploited advances in information technology, geographic information systems, and open systems architecture to produce a functioning prototype of a medical situational enhancement capability. In May 2006, this prototype supported the medical staff of a combined/joint task force in a realistic command postexercise featuring a simulated outbreak of influenza during Exercise COBRA GOLD in Thailand. The proliferation and maturation of geographic information systems present many opportunities for the military medical community to improve the health of the populations for which it is responsible.

  18. IBIS - A geographic information system based on digital image processing and image raster datatype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, N. A.; Zobrist, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    IBIS (Image Based Information System) is a geographic information system which makes use of digital image processing techniques to interface existing geocoded data sets and information management systems with thematic maps and remotely sensed imagery. The basic premise is that geocoded data sets can be referenced to a raster scan that is equivalent to a grid cell data set. The first applications (St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana, and Los Angeles County) have been restricted to the design of a land resource inventory and analysis system. It is thought that the algorithms and the hardware interfaces developed will be readily applicable to other Landsat imagery.

  19. IBIS - A geographic information system based on digital image processing and image raster datatype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, N. A.; Zobrist, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    IBIS (Image Based Information System) is a geographic information system which makes use of digital image processing techniques to interface existing geocoded data sets and information management systems with thematic maps and remotely sensed imagery. The basic premise is that geocoded data sets can be referenced to a raster scan that is equivalent to a grid cell data set. The first applications (St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana, and Los Angeles County) have been restricted to the design of a land resource inventory and analysis system. It is thought that the algorithms and the hardware interfaces developed will be readily applicable to other Landsat imagery.

  20. Integrating a geographic information system, a scientific visualization system and an orographic precipitation model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hay, L.; Knapp, L.

    1996-01-01

    Investigating natural, potential, and man-induced impacts on hydrological systems commonly requires complex modelling with overlapping data requirements, and massive amounts of one- to four-dimensional data at multiple scales and formats. Given the complexity of most hydrological studies, the requisite software infrastructure must incorporate many components including simulation modelling, spatial analysis and flexible, intuitive displays. There is a general requirement for a set of capabilities to support scientific analysis which, at this time, can only come from an integration of several software components. Integration of geographic information systems (GISs) and scientific visualization systems (SVSs) is a powerful technique for developing and analysing complex models. This paper describes the integration of an orographic precipitation model, a GIS and a SVS. The combination of these individual components provides a robust infrastructure which allows the scientist to work with the full dimensionality of the data and to examine the data in a more intuitive manner.

  1. Development of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System (GIS) for the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Howard Herzog; Holly Javedan

    2009-12-31

    In this project a Carbon Management Geographical Information System (GIS) for the US was developed. The GIS stored, integrated, and manipulated information relating to the components of carbon management systems. Additionally, the GIS was used to interpret and analyze the effect of developing these systems. This report documents the key deliverables from the project: (1) Carbon Management Geographical Information System (GIS) Documentation; (2) Stationary CO{sub 2} Source Database; (3) Regulatory Data for CCS in United States; (4) CO{sub 2} Capture Cost Estimation; (5) CO{sub 2} Storage Capacity Tools; (6) CO{sub 2} Injection Cost Modeling; (7) CO{sub 2} Pipeline Transport Cost Estimation; (8) CO{sub 2} Source-Sink Matching Algorithm; and (9) CO{sub 2} Pipeline Transport and Cost Model.

  2. Toward multidisciplinary use of LANDSAT: Interfacing computerized LANDSAT analysis systems with geographic information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. L.

    1981-01-01

    The LANDSAT-geographic information system (GIS) interface must summarize the results of the LANDSAT classification over the same cells that serve as geographic referencing units for the GIS, and output these summaries on a cell-by-cell basis in a form that is readable by the input routines of the GIS. The ZONAL interface for cell-oriented systems consists of two primary programs. The PIXCEL program scans the grid of cells and outputs a channel of pixels. Each pixel contains not the reflectance values but the identifier of the cell in which the center of the pixel is located. This file of pixelized cells along with the results of a pixel-by-pixel classification of the scene produced by the LANDSAT analysis system are input to the CELSUM program which then outputs a cell-by-cell summary formatted according to the requirements of the host GIS. Cross-correlation of the LANDSAT layer with the other layers in the data base is accomplished with the analysis and display facilities of the GIS.

  3. Toward multidisciplinary use of LANDSAT: Interfacing computerized LANDSAT analysis systems with geographic information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. L.

    1981-01-01

    The LANDSAT-geographic information system (GIS) interface must summarize the results of the LANDSAT classification over the same cells that serve as geographic referencing units for the GIS, and output these summaries on a cell-by-cell basis in a form that is readable by the input routines of the GIS. The ZONAL interface for cell-oriented systems consists of two primary programs. The PIXCEL program scans the grid of cells and outputs a channel of pixels. Each pixel contains not the reflectance values but the identifier of the cell in which the center of the pixel is located. This file of pixelized cells along with the results of a pixel-by-pixel classification of the scene produced by the LANDSAT analysis system are input to the CELSUM program which then outputs a cell-by-cell summary formatted according to the requirements of the host GIS. Cross-correlation of the LANDSAT layer with the other layers in the data base is accomplished with the analysis and display facilities of the GIS.

  4. Considerations in developing geographic informations systems based on low-cost digital image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, F. M.; Dobson, M. W.

    1981-01-01

    The potential of digital image processing systems costing $20,000 or less for geographic information systems is assessed with the emphasis on the volume of data to be handled, the commercial hardware systems available, and the basic software for: (1) data entry, conversion and digitization; (2) georeferencing and geometric correction; (3) data structuring; (4) editing and updating; (5) analysis and retrieval; (6) output drivers; and (7) data management. Costs must also be considered as tangible and intangible factors.

  5. Considerations in developing geographic informations systems based on low-cost digital image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, F. M.; Dobson, M. W.

    1981-01-01

    The potential of digital image processing systems costing $20,000 or less for geographic information systems is assessed with the emphasis on the volume of data to be handled, the commercial hardware systems available, and the basic software for: (1) data entry, conversion and digitization; (2) georeferencing and geometric correction; (3) data structuring; (4) editing and updating; (5) analysis and retrieval; (6) output drivers; and (7) data management. Costs must also be considered as tangible and intangible factors.

  6. Leveraging geographic information systems in an integrated health care delivery organization.

    PubMed

    Clift, Kathryn; Scott, Luther; Johnson, Michael; Gonzalez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    A handful of the many changes resulting from the Affordable Care Act underscore the need for a geographic understanding of existing and prospective member communities. Health exchanges require that health provider networks are geographically accessible to underserved populations, and nonprofit hospitals nationwide are required to conduct community health needs assessments every three years. Beyond these requirements, health care providers are using maps and spatial analysis to better address health outcomes that are related in complex ways to social and economic factors.Kaiser Permanente is applying geographic information systems, with spatial analytics and map-based visualizations, to data sourced from its electronic medical records and from publicly and commercially available datasets. The results are helping to shape an understanding of the health needs of Kaiser Permanente members in the context of their communities. This understanding is part of a strategy to inform partnerships and interventions in and beyond traditional care delivery settings.

  7. Leveraging Geographic Information Systems in an Integrated Health Care Delivery Organization

    PubMed Central

    Clift, Kathryn; Scott, Luther; Johnson, Michael; Gonzalez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    A handful of the many changes resulting from the Affordable Care Act underscore the need for a geographic understanding of existing and prospective member communities. Health exchanges require that health provider networks are geographically accessible to underserved populations, and nonprofit hospitals nationwide are required to conduct community health needs assessments every three years. Beyond these requirements, health care providers are using maps and spatial analysis to better address health outcomes that are related in complex ways to social and economic factors. Kaiser Permanente is applying geographic information systems, with spatial analytics and map-based visualizations, to data sourced from its electronic medical records and from publicly and commercially available datasets. The results are helping to shape an understanding of the health needs of Kaiser Permanente members in the context of their communities. This understanding is part of a strategy to inform partnerships and interventions in and beyond traditional care delivery settings. PMID:24694317

  8. Monitoring the inundation extent of the Florida Everglades with AVHRR data in a geographic information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelletier, R. E.; Dow, D. D.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to develop a geographical information system capable of estimating methane and other greenhouse trace-gas fluxes from the wetlands of the Florida Everglades. Advanced very-high-resolution radiometer (AVHRR) data collected on a near-monthly basis for a year in order to monitor the seasonal dynamics of inundation extent across the Everglades is utilized in the analysis. It is noted that AVHRR data presents advantages over other remote-sensing data sources employed in covering large geographical regions due to its daily coverage with multiple opportunities during a day. This temporal resolution allows the realistic expectation of acquiring data on a frequent basis.

  9. Interfaces between statistical analysis packages and the ESRI geographic information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masuoka, E.

    1980-01-01

    Interfaces between ESRI's geographic information system (GIS) data files and real valued data files written to facilitate statistical analysis and display of spatially referenced multivariable data are described. An example of data analysis which utilized the GIS and the statistical analysis system is presented to illustrate the utility of combining the analytic capability of a statistical package with the data management and display features of the GIS.

  10. A geographic information system applied to a malaria field study in western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Hightower, A W; Ombok, M; Otieno, R; Odhiambo, R; Oloo, A J; Lal, A A; Nahlen, B L; Hawley, W A

    1998-03-01

    This paper describes use of the global positioning system (GPS) in differential mode (DGPS) to obtain highly accurate longitudes, latitudes, and altitudes of 1,169 houses, 15 schools, 40 churches, four health care centers, 48 major mosquito breeding sites, 10 borehole wells, seven shopping areas, major roads, streams, the shore of Lake Victoria, and other geographic features of interest associated with a longitudinal study of malaria in 15 villages in western Kenya. The area mapped encompassed approximately 70 km2 and included 42.0 km of roads, 54.3 km of streams, and 15.0 km of lake shore. Location data were entered into a geographic information system for map production and linkage with various databases for spatial analyses. Spatial analyses using parasitologic and entomologic data are presented as examples. Background information on DGPS is presented along with estimates of effort and expense to produce the map information.

  11. Geographic Information System in Bolivia: a Case Study for Latin America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adrien, P. M.

    1982-01-01

    Bolivia's Geological Service is concluding a successful project designed to give the Department of Oruro the capability to evaluate its natural resources using data generated by three United States satellites. A permanent integrated geographic information system was created for preparing base maps of soil characteristics, land use, geomorphology, geology, water resources and hydrology. The information compiled through the project was stored on magnetic disks and tapes to permit periodic updating, retrieval of data on specific aspects of development projects, and obtaining various data mixes to analyze aspects of prospective development projects. This is the first digital information system developed in Latin America.

  12. Geographic Information System in Bolivia: a Case Study for Latin America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adrien, P. M.

    1982-01-01

    Bolivia's Geological Service is concluding a successful project designed to give the Department of Oruro the capability to evaluate its natural resources using data generated by three United States satellites. A permanent integrated geographic information system was created for preparing base maps of soil characteristics, land use, geomorphology, geology, water resources and hydrology. The information compiled through the project was stored on magnetic disks and tapes to permit periodic updating, retrieval of data on specific aspects of development projects, and obtaining various data mixes to analyze aspects of prospective development projects. This is the first digital information system developed in Latin America.

  13. Measuring access to primary medical care: some examples of the use of geographical information systems.

    PubMed

    Parker, E B; Campbell, J L

    1998-06-01

    This paper explores the potential for geographical information system technology in defining some variables influencing the use of primary care medical services. Eighteen general practices in Scotland contributed to a study examining the accessibility of their services and their patients' use of the local Accident and Emergency Department. Geo-referencing of information was carried out through analysis of postcode data relating to practices and patients. This information was analyzed using ARC/INFO GIS software in conjunction with the ORACLE relational database and 1991 census information. The results demonstrate that GIS technology has an important role in defining and analyzing the use of health services by the population.

  14. A Geographic Information System Framework for the Management of Sensor Deployments

    PubMed Central

    Russomanno, David J.; Tritenko, Yury

    2010-01-01

    A prototype Geographic Information System (GIS) framework has been developed to map, manage, and monitor sensors with respect to other geographic features, including land base and in-plant features. The GIS framework supports geographic placement and subsequent discovery, query, and tasking of sensors in a network-centric environment using Web services. The framework couples the GIS feature placement logic of sensors with an extensible ontology which captures the capabilities, properties, protocols, integrity constraints, and other parameters of interest for a large variety of sensor types. The approach is significant in that custom, GIS-based interfaces can be rapidly developed via the integration of sensors and sensor networks into applications without having detailed knowledge of the sensors’ underlying device drivers by leveraging service-oriented computing infrastructure within the GIS framework. PMID:22399881

  15. Sensitivity of geographic information system outputs to errors in remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.; Boyd, R. K.; Gunther, F. J.; Lu, Y. C.

    1981-01-01

    The sensitivity of the outputs of a geographic information system (GIS) to errors in inputs derived from remotely sensed data (RSD) is investigated using a suitability model with per-cell decisions and a gridded geographic data base whose cells are larger than the RSD pixels. The process of preparing RSD as input to a GIS is analyzed, and the errors associated with classification and registration are examined. In the case of the model considered, it is found that the errors caused during classification and registration are partially compensated by the aggregation of pixels. The compensation is quantified by means of an analytical model, a Monte Carlo simulation, and experiments with Landsat data. The results show that error reductions of the order of 50% occur because of aggregation when 25 pixels of RSD are used per cell in the geographic data base.

  16. Sensitivity of geographic information system outputs to errors in remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.; Boyd, R. K.; Gunther, F. J.; Lu, Y. C.

    1981-01-01

    The sensitivity of the outputs of a geographic information system (GIS) to errors in inputs derived from remotely sensed data (RSD) is investigated using a suitability model with per-cell decisions and a gridded geographic data base whose cells are larger than the RSD pixels. The process of preparing RSD as input to a GIS is analyzed, and the errors associated with classification and registration are examined. In the case of the model considered, it is found that the errors caused during classification and registration are partially compensated by the aggregation of pixels. The compensation is quantified by means of an analytical model, a Monte Carlo simulation, and experiments with Landsat data. The results show that error reductions of the order of 50% occur because of aggregation when 25 pixels of RSD are used per cell in the geographic data base.

  17. A Geographic Information System framework for the management of sensor deployments.

    PubMed

    Russomanno, David J; Tritenko, Yury

    2010-01-01

    A prototype Geographic Information System (GIS) framework has been developed to map, manage, and monitor sensors with respect to other geographic features, including land base and in-plant features. The GIS framework supports geographic placement and subsequent discovery, query, and tasking of sensors in a network-centric environment using Web services. The framework couples the GIS feature placement logic of sensors with an extensible ontology which captures the capabilities, properties, protocols, integrity constraints, and other parameters of interest for a large variety of sensor types. The approach is significant in that custom, GIS-based interfaces can be rapidly developed via the integration of sensors and sensor networks into applications without having detailed knowledge of the sensors' underlying device drivers by leveraging service-oriented computing infrastructure within the GIS framework.

  18. Contribution of Geographic Information Systems and location models to planning of wastewater systems.

    PubMed

    Leitão, J P; Matos, J S; Gonçalves, A B; Matos, J L

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the contributions of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and location models towards planning regional wastewater systems (sewers and wastewater treatment plants) serving small agglomerations, i.e. agglomerations with less than 2,000 inhabitants. The main goal was to develop a decision support tool for tracing and locating regional wastewater systems. The main results of the model are expressed in terms of number, capacity and location of Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTP) and the length of main sewers. The decision process concerning the location and capacity of wastewater systems has a number of parameters that can be optimized. These parameters include the total sewer length and number, capacity and location of WWTP. The optimization of parameters should lead to the minimization of construction and operation costs of the integrated system. Location models have been considered as tools for decision support, mainly when a geo-referenced database can be used. In these cases, the GIS may represent an important role for the analysis of data and results especially in the preliminary stage of planning and design. After selecting the spatial location model and the heuristics, two greedy algorithms were implemented in Visual Basic for Applications on the ArcGIS software environment. To illustrate the application of these algorithms a case study was developed, in a rural area located in the central part of Portugal.

  19. Racial Differences in Geographic Access to Medical Care as Measured by Patient Report and Geographic Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michelle S; Grande, David T; Mitra, Nandita; Radhakrishnan, Archana; Branas, Charles C; Ward, Katelyn R; Pollack, Craig E

    2017-09-01

    Geographic access-the travel burden required to reach medical care-is an important aspect of care. Studies, which typically rely on geographic information system (GIS) calculated travel times, have found some evidence of racial disparities in spatial access to care. However, the validity of these studies depends on the accuracy of travel times by patient race. To determine if there are racial differences when comparing patient-reported and GIS-calculated travel times. Data came from the Philadelphia Area Prostate Cancer Access Study (P Access), a cohort study of men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer. We conducted cross-sectional analysis of 2136 men using multivariable linear mixed-effects models to examine the effect of race on differences in patient-reported and GIS-calculated travel times to urology and radiation oncology cancer providers. Patient-reported travel times were, on an average, longer than GIS-calculated times. For urology practices, median patient-reported travel times were 12.7 minutes longer than GIS-calculated travel times for blacks versus 7.2 minutes longer for whites. After adjusting for potential confounders, including socioeconomic status and car access, the difference was significantly greater for black patients than white patients (2.0 min; 95% confidence interval, 0.58-3.44). GIS-calculated travel time may underestimate access to care, especially for black patients. Future studies that use GIS-calculated travel times to examine racial disparities in spatial access to care might consider including patient-reported travel times and controlling for factors that might affect the accuracy of GIS-calculated travel times.

  20. Rates and patterns of deforestation in the Philippines: application of geographic information system analysis

    Treesearch

    Dawning S. Lui; Louis R. Iverson; Sandra Brown

    1993-01-01

    Land-use maps for 1934 and 1988, and a 1941 road map of the Philippines were digitized into a geographic information system. These maps were then analyzed to determine the rates of deforestation and their relationship with factors such as the distance of forests to roads and forest fragmentation (measured by perimeter-to-area ratio (P/A ratio) of forest patches) for...

  1. Traditional anthropology and geographical information systems in the collaborative study of Cassava in Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanoff, Steven

    1991-01-01

    Cross-cultural, village-level, and farmer surveys have been used with a geographical information system to describe the distribution and relative importance of cassava (manioc, yuca, Manihot esculenta) in its cultural, economic, and ecological contexts. It presents examples of data management for mapping, sample selection, cross-tabulation of characteristics, combination of data types for indices and hypothesis testing. The methods used are reviewed, and some of the main conclusions of the study are presented.

  2. Open-Source web-based geographical information system for health exposure assessment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design and development of an open source web-based Geographical Information System allowing users to visualise, customise and interact with spatial data within their web browser. The developed application shows that by using solely Open Source software it was possible to develop a customisable web based GIS application that provides functions necessary to convey health and environmental data to experts and non-experts alike without the requirement of proprietary software. PMID:22233606

  3. Traditional anthropology and geographical information systems in the collaborative study of Cassava in Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanoff, Steven

    1991-01-01

    Cross-cultural, village-level, and farmer surveys have been used with a geographical information system to describe the distribution and relative importance of cassava (manioc, yuca, Manihot esculenta) in its cultural, economic, and ecological contexts. It presents examples of data management for mapping, sample selection, cross-tabulation of characteristics, combination of data types for indices and hypothesis testing. The methods used are reviewed, and some of the main conclusions of the study are presented.

  4. Modeling travel impedance to medical care for children with birth defects using Geographic Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Delmelle, Eric M; Cassell, Cynthia H; Dony, Coline; Radcliff, Elizabeth; Tanner, Jean Paul; Siffel, Csaba; Kirby, Russell S

    2013-10-01

    Children with birth defects may face significant geographic barriers accessing medical care and specialized services. Using a Geographic Information Systems-based approach, one-way travel time and distance to access medical care for children born with spina bifida was estimated. Using 2007 road information from the Florida Department of Transportation, we built a topological network of Florida roads. Live-born Florida infants with spina bifida during 1998 to 2007 were identified by the Florida Birth Defects Registry and linked to hospital discharge records. Maternal residence at delivery and hospitalization locations were identified during the first year of life. Of 668 infants with spina bifida, 8.1% (n = 54) could not be linked to inpatient data, resulting in 614 infants. Of those 614 infants, 99.7% (n = 612) of the maternal residential addresses at delivery were successfully geocoded. Infants with spina bifida living in rural areas in Florida experienced travel times almost twice as high compared with those living in urban areas. When aggregated at county levels, one-way network travel times exhibited statistically significant spatial autocorrelation, indicating that families living in some clusters of counties experienced substantially greater travel times compared with families living in other areas of Florida. This analysis demonstrates the usefulness of linking birth defects registry and hospital discharge data to examine geographic differences in access to medical care. Geographic Information Systems methods are important in evaluating accessibility and geographic barriers to care and could be used among children with special health care needs, including children with birth defects. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Operation database petroleum GIS results: Evaluation and application of geographic information systems to exploration and production

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, C.C. ); Leonard, J.E. )

    1990-05-01

    FACT: Maps are the principle graphic tool used in exploration and production. FACT: The geographic information systems (GTS) industry exceeds $250 million annually providing powerful mapping tools to a variety of disciplines. FACT: Geographic information systems are infrequently used in exploration and production which represents less than 2% of the total GIS sphere. Therefore, Operation Database Petroleum GIS, sponsored by AAPG's Geobyte and the National Computer Graphics Association, was conceived as an information exchange between the petroleum industry and GIS vendors to address this disparity. The objective of the database was to communicate petroleum industry requirements to GIS vendors and to demonstrate the potential of GIS to the petroleum industry. Requirements, in the form of data and problems, were developed by an industry group representing major and independent oil companies. The problems included base map, well, seismic, lease, transportation, topographic, three-dimensional, and remote sensing exercises. Data included scout well data, directional surveys, production histories, seismic shot-point locations and interpretive times, geologic interpretations (tops and structure and isopach maps), leases, topography, well logs, remote sensing images, gravity contours, and geographic reference information. Over 120 GIS vendors were offered a chance to participate, and nearly 20 engaged in the exercises. This talk will focus on the process, results, and conclusions of Operation Database Petroleum GIS.

  6. Hospital distribution in a metropolitan city: assessment by a geographic information system grid modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Soo; Moon, Kyeong-Jun

    2014-05-01

    Grid models were used to assess urban hospital distribution in Seoul, the capital of South Korea. A geographical information system (GIS) based analytical model was developed and applied to assess the situation in a metropolitan area with a population exceeding 10 million. Secondary data for this analysis were obtained from multiple sources: the Korean Statistical Information Service, the Korean Hospital Association and the Statistical Geographical Information System. A grid of cells measuring 1 × 1 km was superimposed on the city map and a set of variables related to population, economy, mobility and housing were identified and measured for each cell. Socio-demographic variables were included to reflect the characteristics of each area. Analytical models were then developed using GIS software with the number of hospitals as the dependent variable. Applying multiple linear regression and geographically weighted regression models, three factors (highway and major arterial road areas; number of subway entrances; and row house areas) were statistically significant in explaining the variance of hospital distribution for each cell. The overall results show that GIS is a useful tool for analysing and understanding location strategies. This approach appears a useful source of information for decision-makers concerned with the distribution of hospitals and other health care centres in a city.

  7. Geographical Information System Model for Potential Mines Data Management Presentation in Kabupaten Gorontalo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roviana, D.; Tajuddin, A.; Edi, S.

    2017-03-01

    Mining potential in Indonesian is very abundant, ranging from Sabang to Marauke. Kabupaten Gorontalo is one of many places in Indonesia that have different types of minerals and natural resources that can be found in every district. The abundant of mining potential must be balanced with good management and ease of getting information by investors. The current issue is, (1) ways of presenting data/information about potential mines area is still manually (the maps that already capture from satellite image, then printed and attached to information board in the office) it caused the difficulties of getting information; (2) the high cost of maps printing; (3) the difficulties of regency leader (bupati) to obtain information for strategic decision making about mining potential. The goal of this research is to build a model of Geographical Information System that could provide data management of potential mines, so that the investors could easily get information according to their needs. To achieve that goal Research and Development method is used. The result of this research, is a model of Geographical Information System that implemented in an application to presenting data management of mines.

  8. A GIS-based modeling system for petroleum waste management. Geographical information system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Huang, G H; Li, J B

    2003-01-01

    With an urgent need for effective management of petroleum-contaminated sites, a GIS-aided simulation (GISSIM) system is presented in this study. The GISSIM contains two components: an advanced 3D numerical model and a geographical information system (GIS), which are integrated within a general framework. The modeling component undertakes simulation for the fate of contaminants in subsurface unsaturated and saturated zones. The GIS component is used in three areas throughout the system development and implementation process: (i) managing spatial and non-spatial databases; (ii) linking inputs, model, and outputs; and (iii) providing an interface between the GISSIM and its users. The developed system is applied to a North American case study. Concentrations of benzene, toluene, and xylenes in groundwater under a petroleum-contaminated site are dynamically simulated. Reasonable outputs have been obtained and presented graphically. They provide quantitative and scientific bases for further assessment of site-contamination impacts and risks, as well as decisions on practical remediation actions.

  9. OLYMPUS DISS - A Readily Implemented Geographic Data and Information Sharing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Necsoiu, D. M.; Winfrey, B.; Murphy, K.; McKague, H. L.

    2002-12-01

    Electronic information technology has become a crucial component of business, government, and scientific organizations. In this technology era, many enterprises are moving away from the perception that information repositories are only a tool for decision-making. Instead, many organizations are learning that information systems, which are capable of organizing and following the interrelations between information and both the short-term and strategic organizational goals, are assets themselves, with inherent value. Olympus Data and Information Sharing System (DISS) is a system developed at the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) to solve several difficult tasks associated with the management of geographical, geological and geophysical data. Three of the tasks were to (1) gather the large amount of heterogeneous information that has accumulated over the operational lifespan of CNWRA, (2) store the data in a central, knowledge-based, searchable database and (3) create quick, easy, convenient, and reliable access to that information. Faced with these difficult tasks CNWRA identified the requirements for designing such a system. Key design criteria were: (a) ability to ingest different data formats (i.e., raster, vector, and tabular data); (b) minimal expense using open-source and commercial off-the-shelf software; (c) seamless management of geospatial data, freeing up time for researchers to focus on analyses or algorithm development, rather than on time consuming format conversions; (d) controlled access; and (e) scalable architecture to meet new and continuing demands. Olympus DISS is a solution that can be easily adapted to small and mid-size enterprises dealing with heterogeneous geographic data. It uses established data standards, provides a flexible mechanism to build applications upon and output geographic data in multiple and clear ways. This abstract is an independent product of the CNWRA and does not necessarily reflect the views or

  10. Improved assessment of aviation hazards to ground facilities using a geographical information system

    SciTech Connect

    Sandquist, G.M.; Slaughter, D.M.; Kimura, C.Y.

    1996-06-03

    A computer based system for performing probabilistic safety assessments (PSAs) of aircraft crashes to ground structures is under development. The system called ACRA (aircraft crash risk assessment) employs a GIS (geographical information system) for locating, mapping, and characterizing ground structures; and a multiparameter data base system that supports the analytical PRA (probabilistic risk assessment) model for determining PSAs for aircraft crashes. The Salt Lake City International Airport (SLC) is being employed as the base case for study and application of ACRA and evaluation of the projected safety assessment.

  11. From ecological test site to geographic information system: lessons for the 1980's

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, Robert H.

    1981-01-01

    Geographic information systems were common elements in two kinds of interdisciplinary regional demonstration projects in the 1970's. Ecological test sits attempted to provide for more efficient remote-sensing data delivery for regional environmental management. Regional environmental systems analysis attempted to formally describe and model the interacting regional social and environmental processes, including the resource-use decision making process. Lessons for the 1980's are drawn from recent evaluations and assessments of these programs, focusing on cost, rates of system development and technology transfer, program coordination, integrative analysis capability, and the involvement of system users and decision makers.

  12. GISEpi: a simple geographical information system to support public health surveillance and epidemiological investigations.

    PubMed

    Nobre, F F; Braga, A L; Pinheiro, R S; Lopes, J A

    1997-05-01

    One important question for the implementation of a surveillance system concern the type of instrument that can provide timely information on the course of diseases and other health events. This may facilitate prompt implementation of prevention and intervention efforts, such as strengthening control action in one specific area or initiation of epidemiological investigation. Since health related variables of interest are often spatially distributed they require special tools for representation and analysis. Owing to their inherent ability to manage spatial information, geographical information systems (GIS) provide an excellent framework for the design of surveillance systems. This paper presents a simple information system, based on the concepts of GIS, designed for representation and elementary analysis of epidemiological data. An example of its potential use to support malaria control activities in Brazil is discussed.

  13. Estimating medically fragile population in storm surge zones: a geographic information system application.

    PubMed

    Wilson, James L; Little, Ruth; Novick, Lloyd

    2013-01-01

    To develop a simple, cost-effective method for determining the size and geographic distribution of medically fragile (MF) individuals at risk from tropical storm surges for use by emergency management planners. The study used Geographic Information System (GIS) spatially referenced layers based on secondary data sources from both state and federal levels. The study setting included the eastern North Carolina coastal counties that would be affected by tropical storm surges. The initial MF population was extrapolated from national estimates for five conditions and then applied to US Census block population. These conditions included insulin dependent diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, end stage renal disease, and patients receiving long-term oxygen treatment. The main outcome of this study was a series of local and regional maps that portrayed the geographic distribution and estimated counts of potentially at-risk MF population from a tropical storm surge scenario. Maps depicting the geographic distribution and potential numbers of MF individuals are important information for planning and preparedness in emergency management and potentially engaging the public.

  14. APR: A geographic information system based primary router for underground residential distribution design

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, E.C.; Sumic, Z. |; Venkata, S.S.

    1995-02-01

    This paper presents an automated tool for optimizing the routing of primary cables in underground residential distribution systems (URD). Although initially developed as one of the modules in Puget Sound Power and Light Co.`s automated electrical plant design program, Automated Primary Router (APR) can also be used in standalone mode. APR, implemented in a Geographic Information System (GIS)-based environment, is capable of efficiently accessing and manipulating geographically referenced data from a facilities management system database. It also provides a full-fledged Graphic User Interface, along with on-line visualization and accurate cost estimation to facilitate the design process. APR employs a heuristic search algorithm to find the best primary cable routes either for new residential developments, or for existing URD systems as part of the ongoing cable replacement program. Based on the test results, APR shows significant stability and efficiency in finding the optimal solution for primary cable routing. With this performance, APR can help distribution engineers improve the quality of URD design, producing standardized and economically justifiable primary cable routes. Because geographically referenced design data are digitally stored in the GIS database, APR further increases the reusability and accessibility of the URD design information.

  15. APR: A geographic information system based primary router for underground residential distribution design

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, E.C.; Sumic, Z. |; Venkata, S.S.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents an automated tool for optimizing the routing of primary cables in underground residential distribution systems (URD). Although initially developed as on of the modules in Puget Sound Power and Light Co.`s automated electrical plant design program, Automated Primary Router (APR) can also be used in standalone mode. APR, implemented in a Geographic Information System (GIS)-based environment, is capable of efficiently accessing and manipulating geographically referenced data from a facilities management system database. It also provides a full-fledged Graphic User Interface, along with on-line visualization and accurate cost estimation to facilitate the design process. APR employs a heuristic search algorithm to find the best primary cable routes whether for new residential developments, or for existing URD systems as part of the ongoing cable replacement program. Based on the test results, APR shows significant stability and efficiency in finding the optimal solution for primary cable routing. With this performance, APR can help distribution engineers improve the quality of URD design, producing standardized and economically justifiable primary cable routes. Because geographically referenced design data are digitally stored in the GIS database, APR further increases the reusability and accessibility of the URD design information.

  16. Modeling Travel Impedance to Medical Care for Children with Birth Defects Using Geographic Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Delmelle, Eric M.; Cassell, Cynthia H.; Dony, Coline; Radcliff, Elizabeth; Tanner, Jean Paul; Siffel, Csaba; Kirby, Russell S.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Children with birth defects may face significant geographic barriers accessing medical care and specialized services. Using a Geographic Information Systems–based approach, one-way travel time and distance to access medical care for children born with spina bifida was estimated. METHODS Using 2007 road information from the Florida Department of Transportation, we built a topological network of Florida roads. Live-born Florida infants with spina bifida during 1998 to 2007 were identified by the Florida Birth Defects Registry and linked to hospital discharge records. Maternal residence at delivery and hospitalization locations were identified during the first year of life. RESULTS Of 668 infants with spina bifida, 8.1% (n = 54) could not be linked to inpatient data, resulting in 614 infants. Of those 614 infants, 99.7% (n = 612) of the maternal residential addresses at delivery were successfully geocoded. Infants with spina bifida living in rural areas in Florida experienced travel times almost twice as high compared with those living in urban areas. When aggregated at county levels, one-way network travel times exhibited statistically significant spatial autocorrelation, indicating that families living in some clusters of counties experienced substantially greater travel times compared with families living in other areas of Florida. CONCLUSION This analysis demonstrates the usefulness of linking birth defects registry and hospital discharge data to examine geographic differences in access to medical care. Geographic Information Systems methods are important in evaluating accessibility and geographic barriers to care and could be used among children with special health care needs, including children with birth defects. PMID:23996978

  17. Geographic information system (GIS) representation of coal-bearing areas in India and Bangladesh

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trippi, Michael H.; Tewalt, Susan J.

    2011-01-01

    Geographic information system (GIS) information may facilitate energy studies, which in turn provide input for energy policy decisions. Prior to this study, no GIS file representing the occurrence of coal-bearing units in India or Bangladesh was known to exist. This Open-File Report contains downloadable shapefiles representing the coalfields of India and Bangladesh and a limited number of chemical and petrographic analyses of India and Bangladesh coal samples. Also included are maps of India and Bangladesh showing the locations of the coalfields and coal samples in the shapefiles, figures summarizing the stratigraphic units in the coalfields of India and Bangladesh, and a brief report summarizing the stratigraphy and geographic locations of coal-bearing deposits in India and Bangladesh.

  18. Analysis of Distribution of Vector-Borne Diseases Using Geographic Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Nihei, Naoko

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of vector-borne diseases is changing on a global scale owing to issues involving natural environments, socioeconomic conditions and border disputes among others. Geographic information systems (GIS) provide an important method of establishing a prompt and precise understanding of local data on disease outbreaks, from which disease eradication programs can be established. Having first defined GIS as a combination of GPS, RS and GIS, we showed the processes through which these technologies were being introduced into our research. GIS-derived geographical information attributes were interpreted in terms of point, area, line, spatial epidemiology, risk and development for generating the vector dynamic models associated with the spread of the disease. The need for interdisciplinary scientific and administrative collaboration in the use of GIS to control infectious diseases is highly warranted.

  19. Use of Admail and a geographic information system to send surveys to target populations.

    PubMed

    Paller, Claire; Christidis, Tanya; Majowicz, Shannon; Aramini, Jeff; Law, Jane; Bigelow, Phil

    2016-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the use of Canada Post Unaddressed Admail and a geographic information system (GIS) for survey distribution to a specific target population in a large, sparsely populated geographic area, and the effectiveness of this approach. Surveys were sent as Unaddressed Admail via Canada Post to a target population of people living within 5 km of a wind turbine in southwestern Ontario. The overall response rate from 8 wind farms (in 8 counties) was 8.1%. This approach has the potential to save time and money, but low response rates are common, distribution is not precise and there is potential for selection bias. Despite these flaws, Unaddressed Admail is worth consideration for delivery of information, study-recruitment materials and surveys to rural, remote and specific target populations.

  20. Predicting Ixodes scapularis abundance on white-tailed deer using geographic information systems.

    PubMed

    Glass, G E; Amerasinghe, F P; Morgan, J M; Scott, T W

    1994-11-01

    We collected 1,410 Ixodes scapularis from 139 white-tailed deer in Kent County, Maryland during the 1990 hunting season. A geographic information system was used to extract 41 environmental variables in the areas surrounding the collection sites of the deer. Stepwise linear regression was used to evaluate the association between the abundance of ticks on deer and the environmental data. A significant statistical association was observed between the abundance of I. scapularis and seven environmental variables (R = 0.69). Tick abundance was negatively correlated with urban land use patterns, wetlands, the amount of privately owned land, soils that tended to be saturated with water, and one drainage system. Tick abundance was positively correlated with well-drained, sandy soils having low water tables. These results indicate that geographically referenced environmental data may be useful in anticipating the risk of exposure to vectors over large areas.

  1. Advanced feature extraction in remote sensing using artificial intelligence and geographic information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, John E.; Friedl, Mark A.; Star, Jeffrey L.

    1988-01-01

    Traditional computer-assisted image-analysis techniques in remote sensing lag well behind human abilities in terms of both speed and accuracy. A fundamental limitation of computer-assisted techniques is their inability to assimilate a variety of different data types leading to an interpretation in a manner similar to human image interpretation. Expert systems and computer-vision techniques are proposed as a potential solution to these limitations. Some aspects of human expertise in image analysis may be codified into expert systems. Image understanding and symbolic reasoning provide a means of assimilating spatial information and spatial reasoning into the analysis procedure. Knowledge-based image-analysis systems incorporate many of these concepts and have been implemented for some well defined problem domains. Geographic information systems represent an excellent environment for this type of analysis, providing both analytic tools and contextual information to the analysis procedure.

  2. Europe and the United States: The Implementation of Geographic Information Systems in Secondary Education in Two Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bednarz, Sarah Witham; van der Schee, Joop

    2006-01-01

    Since its inception in the early 1990s, geographic information science and its related technology, geographic information systems (GIS), have diffused slowly into select groups of K-12 classrooms worldwide. The technology has not been adopted at a rate commensurate with expectations. The purpose of this article is to explore GIS implementation by…

  3. Europe and the United States: The Implementation of Geographic Information Systems in Secondary Education in Two Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bednarz, Sarah Witham; van der Schee, Joop

    2006-01-01

    Since its inception in the early 1990s, geographic information science and its related technology, geographic information systems (GIS), have diffused slowly into select groups of K-12 classrooms worldwide. The technology has not been adopted at a rate commensurate with expectations. The purpose of this article is to explore GIS implementation by…

  4. Volunteered Geographic Information in Wikipedia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Darren

    2010-01-01

    Volunteered geographic information (VGI) refers to the geographic subset of online user-generated content. Through Geobrowsers and online mapping services, which use geovisualization and Web technologies to share and produce VGI, a global digital commons of geographic information has emerged. A notable example is Wikipedia, an online collaborative…

  5. Volunteered Geographic Information in Wikipedia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Darren

    2010-01-01

    Volunteered geographic information (VGI) refers to the geographic subset of online user-generated content. Through Geobrowsers and online mapping services, which use geovisualization and Web technologies to share and produce VGI, a global digital commons of geographic information has emerged. A notable example is Wikipedia, an online collaborative…

  6. Measuring the geographic coverage of methadone maintenance programme in Hong Kong by using geographic information system (GIS)

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Tak Ting P; Lee, Shui Shan

    2008-01-01

    Objective While access and utilization form core components in assessing the effectiveness of a health service, the concept of coverage is often neglected. In this study we propose to develop a GIS-based methodological framework for the measurement of district-based geographic coverage to examine the service effectiveness of methadone treatment programme (MTP) in Hong Kong on a regular basis. Methods To overcome the incompatibility of spatial units, population data and data of heroin addiction of the year 2001 are interpolated by population-weighted and area-weighted algorithms. Standard overlay and proximity analytical functions are used to delineate altogether 20 accessible zones around each methadone clinic at a fixed 1.5 km Euclidean distance. Geographic coverage here is defined as the percentage of heroin addicts covered by a methadone clinic within the accessible zone by district. Results A total of 6413 out of 11000 reported heroin addicts are found geographically covered. The average geographic coverage in Hong Kong is 44.6%, with the figure varying from 0% to 96% by district. One district having no clinic results in 0% coverage whereas another without a clinic yields 15.3% coverage from the clinic in adjacent district. Maps illustrating district-based geographic coverage are generated. Conclusion As continuous data collection is required for a monitoring system, the simplified approach facilitates the handling of large volume data and relevant data analysis. It is concluded that the number of methadone clinics is as important as their locations. Geographic coverage could become an important consideration for monitoring harm reduction. PMID:18234088

  7. Spatial analysis of injury-related deaths in Dallas County using a geographic information system.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Adil; Gunst, Mark; Ghaemmaghami, Vafa; Gruszecki, Amy C; Urban, Jill; Barber, Robert C; Gentilello, Larry M; Shafi, Shahid

    2012-07-01

    This study applied a geographic information system (GIS) to identify clusters of injury-related deaths (IRDs) within a large urban county (26 cities; population, 2.4 million). All deaths due to injuries in Dallas County (Texas) in 2005 (N = 670) were studied, including the geographic location of the injury event. Out of 26 cities in Dallas County, IRDs were reported in 19 cities. Geospatial data were obtained from the local governments and entered into the GIS. Standardized mortality ratios (SMR, with 95% CI) were calculated for each city and the county using national age-adjusted rates. Dallas County had significantly more deaths due to homicides (SMR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.54-1.98) and IRDs as a result of gunshots (SMR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.09-1.37) than the US national rate. However, this increase was restricted to a single city (the city of Dallas) within the county, while the rest of the 25 cities in the county experienced IRD rates that were either similar to or better than the national rate, or experienced no IRDs. GIS mapping was able to depict high-risk geographic "hot spots" for IRDs. In conclusion, GIS spatial analysis identified geographic clusters of IRDs, which were restricted to only one of 26 cities in the county.

  8. Investigating Barriers to Tuberculosis Evaluation in Uganda Using Geographic Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Jennifer M.; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Miller, Cecily R.; Tatem, Andrew J.; Katamba, Achilles; Haguma, Priscilla; Handley, Margaret A.; Lucian Davis, J.

    2015-01-01

    Reducing geographic barriers to tuberculosis (TB) care is a priority in high-burden countries where patients frequently initiate, but do not complete, the multi-day TB evaluation process. Using routine cross-sectional study from six primary-health clinics in rural Uganda from 2009 to 2012, we explored whether geographic barriers affect completion of TB evaluation among adults with unexplained chronic cough. We measured distance from home parish to health center and calculated individual travel time using a geographic information systems technique incorporating roads, land cover, and slope, and measured its association with completion of TB evaluation. In 264,511 patient encounters, 4,640 adults (1.8%) had sputum smear microscopy ordered; 2,783 (60%) completed TB evaluation. Median travel time was 68 minutes for patients with TB examination ordered compared with 60 minutes without (P < 0.010). Travel time differed between those who did and did not complete TB evaluation at only one of six clinics, whereas distance to care did not differ at any of them. Neither distance nor travel time predicted completion of TB evaluation in rural Uganda, although limited detail in road and village maps restricted full implementation of these mapping techniques. Better data are needed on geographic barriers to access clinics offering TB services to improve TB diagnosis. PMID:26217044

  9. Spatial analysis of injury-related deaths in Dallas County using a geographic information system

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Adil; Gunst, Mark; Ghaemmaghami, Vafa; Gruszecki, Amy C.; Urban, Jill; Barber, Robert C.; Gentilello, Larry M.

    2012-01-01

    This study applied a geographic information system (GIS) to identify clusters of injury-related deaths (IRDs) within a large urban county (26 cities; population, 2.4 million). All deaths due to injuries in Dallas County (Texas) in 2005 (N = 670) were studied, including the geographic location of the injury event. Out of 26 cities in Dallas County, IRDs were reported in 19 cities. Geospatial data were obtained from the local governments and entered into the GIS. Standardized mortality ratios (SMR, with 95% CI) were calculated for each city and the county using national age-adjusted rates. Dallas County had significantly more deaths due to homicides (SMR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.54–1.98) and IRDs as a result of gunshots (SMR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.09–1.37) than the US national rate. However, this increase was restricted to a single city (the city of Dallas) within the county, while the rest of the 25 cities in the county experienced IRD rates that were either similar to or better than the national rate, or experienced no IRDs. GIS mapping was able to depict high-risk geographic “hot spots” for IRDs. In conclusion, GIS spatial analysis identified geographic clusters of IRDs, which were restricted to only one of 26 cities in the county. PMID:22754116

  10. Investigating Barriers to Tuberculosis Evaluation in Uganda Using Geographic Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jennifer M; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Miller, Cecily R; Tatem, Andrew J; Katamba, Achilles; Haguma, Priscilla; Handley, Margaret A; Davis, J Lucian

    2015-10-01

    Reducing geographic barriers to tuberculosis (TB) care is a priority in high-burden countries where patients frequently initiate, but do not complete, the multi-day TB evaluation process. Using routine cross-sectional study from six primary-health clinics in rural Uganda from 2009 to 2012, we explored whether geographic barriers affect completion of TB evaluation among adults with unexplained chronic cough. We measured distance from home parish to health center and calculated individual travel time using a geographic information systems technique incorporating roads, land cover, and slope, and measured its association with completion of TB evaluation. In 264,511 patient encounters, 4,640 adults (1.8%) had sputum smear microscopy ordered; 2,783 (60%) completed TB evaluation. Median travel time was 68 minutes for patients with TB examination ordered compared with 60 minutes without (P < 0.010). Travel time differed between those who did and did not complete TB evaluation at only one of six clinics, whereas distance to care did not differ at any of them. Neither distance nor travel time predicted completion of TB evaluation in rural Uganda, although limited detail in road and village maps restricted full implementation of these mapping techniques. Better data are needed on geographic barriers to access clinics offering TB services to improve TB diagnosis.

  11. SIGNe: A Geographic Information System on the Web for End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Richard, Jean-Baptiste; Toubiana, Laurent; le Mignot, Loïc; Ben Said, Mohamed; Mugnier, Claude; le Bihan-Benjamin, Christine; Jaïs, Jean Philippe; Landais, Paul

    2005-01-01

    A Web-based Geographic Information System (Web-GIS), the SIGNe (Système d'Information Géographique pour la Néphrologie), was designed for the Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (REIN) dedicated to End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). This Web-GIS was coupled to a data warehouse and embedded in an n-tier architecture designed as the Multi-Source Information System (MSIS). It allows to access views of ESRD concerning the epidemiology of the demand and the supply of care. It also provides maps matching the offer of care to the demand. It is presented with insights on the design and underlying technologies. It is dedicated to professionals and to public health care decision-makers in the domain of ESRD.

  12. Geographical information systems and air pollution simulation for Megalopolis' electric power plant in Peloponnese, Greece.

    PubMed

    Theophanides, Mike; Anastassopoulou, Jane; Theophanides, Theophile

    2014-01-01

    The growth and sophistication of geographic information systems (GIS) have propelled us into a new era of environmental analyses. Air pollution is a growing concern in populated areas as many recent studies have associated high levels of pollution with increased illnesses and mortality. The study will focus on the toxicity levels incurred by radioactive lignite-burning Power Generation facilities located in Megalopolis, Greece. An estimate of pollution emissions followed by dispersion simulations for various atmospheric conditions will be given. The exercise will be integrated with a Geographical Information System (GIS) for defining the emission sources and visualizing the dispersion of pollutants over the geographical terrain. Data samples were collected from vegetation in the surrounding areas and analyzed for radioactivity. High energy levels (up to 4-5 times higher than recommended standards, (UNCEAR, 1982) were found in several samples containing (226)Ra, (232)Th, (234)Th, (40)K and (238)U. The study concludes that air quality and vegetation of the neighbouring areas is adversely affected by industrial waste. Greater pollution controls and air quality monitoring should be applied for the benefit and health of its citizens. Radioactivity in food and water and inhaled air become very dangerous for public health thus, the levels of radioactivity should be kept within UNCEAR 1982 limits.

  13. Oil Spill Map for Indian Sea Region based on Bhuvan- Geographic Information System using Satellite Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaya kumar, L. J.; Kishore, J. K.; Kesava Rao, P.; Annadurai, M.; Dutt, C. B. S.; Hanumantha Rao, K.; Sasamal, S. K.; Arulraj, M.; Prasad, A. V. V.; Kumari, E. V. S. Sita; Satyanarayana, S. N.; Shenoy, H. P.

    2014-11-01

    Oil spills in the ocean are a serious marine disaster that needs regular monitoring for environmental risk assessment and mitigation. Recent use of Polarimetric SAR imagery in near real time oil spill detection systems is associated with attempts towards automatic and unambiguous oil spill detection based on decomposition methods. Such systems integrate remote sensing technology, geo information, communication system, hardware and software systems to provide key information for analysis and decision making. Geographic information systems (GIS) like BHUVAN can significantly contribute to oil spill management based on Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images. India has long coast line from Gujarat to Bengal and hundreds of ports. The increase in shipping also increases the risk of oil spills in our maritime zone. The availability of RISAT-1 SAR images enhances the scope to monitor oil spills and develop GIS on Bhuvan which can be accessed by all the users, such as ships, coast guard, environmentalists etc., The GIS enables realization of oil spill maps based on integration of the geographical, remote sensing, oil & gas production/infrastructure data and slick signatures detected by SAR. SAR and GIS technologies can significantly improve the realization of oil spill footprint distribution maps. Preliminary assessment shows that the Bhuvan promises to be an ideal solution to understand spatial, temporal occurrence of oil spills in the marine atlas of India. The oil spill maps on Bhuvan based GIS facility will help the ONGC and Coast Guard organization.

  14. The Design of Data Disaster Recovery of National Fundamental Geographic Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Y.; Chen, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, J.

    2014-04-01

    With the development of information technology, data security of information system is facing more and more challenges. The geographic information of surveying and mapping is fundamental and strategic resource, which is applied in all areas of national economic, defence and social development. It is especially vital to national and social interests when such classified geographic information is directly concerning Chinese sovereignty. Several urgent problems that needs to be resolved for surveying and mapping are how to do well in mass data storage and backup, establishing and improving the disaster backup system especially after sudden natural calamity accident, and ensuring all sectors rapidly restored on information system will operate correctly. For overcoming various disaster risks, protect the security of data and reduce the impact of the disaster, it's no doubt the effective way is to analysis and research on the features of storage and management and security requirements, as well as to ensure that the design of data disaster recovery system suitable for the surveying and mapping. This article analyses the features of fundamental geographic information data and the requirements of storage management, three site disaster recovery system of DBMS plan based on the popular network, storage and backup, data replication and remote switch of application technologies. In LAN that synchronous replication between database management servers and the local storage of backup management systems, simultaneously, remote asynchronous data replication between local storage backup management systems and remote database management servers. The core of the system is resolving local disaster in the remote site, ensuring data security and business continuity of local site. This article focuses on the following points: background, the necessity of disaster recovery system, the analysis of the data achievements and data disaster recovery plan. Features of this program is to use a

  15. Application of geographic information systems to waste minimization efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lyttle, T.W.; Smith, D.M.; Burns, M.; Weinrach, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), facility waste streams tend to be small but highly diverse. Initial characterization of such waste streams is often difficult in part due to a lack of tools to assist the generators themselves in completing such assessments. A methodology has been developed at LANL to allow process knowledgeable field personnel to develop baseline waste generation assessments and to evaluate potential waste minimization technology. This Process Waste Assessment (PWA) system is an application constructed within the Process Modeling System and currently being integrated with the InFoCAD Geographic Information System (GIS) . The Process Modeling System (PMS) is an object-oriented, mass balance-based, discrete-event simulation framework written using the Common Lisp Object System (CLOS) . Analytical capabilities supported within the PWA system include: complete mass balance specifications, historical characterization of selected waste streams and generation of facility profiles for materials consumption, resource utilization and worker exposure. Development activities include integration with the LANL facilities management Geographic Information System (GIS) and provisions for a Best Available Technologies (BAT) database. The environments used to develop these assessment tools will be discussed in addition to a review of initial implementation results.

  16. Geographical information systems as a tool in epidemiological assessment and wildlife disease management.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, D U; Hugh-Jones, M

    2002-04-01

    Geographical information systems (GIS) facilitate the incorporation of spatial relationships into epidemiological investigations of wildlife diseases. Consisting of data input, management, analysis and presentation components, GIS act as an integrative technology in that a range of very varied data sources can be combined which describe different aspect of the environment of wild animals. The analytical functionality of GIS is still evolving, and ranges from visual to exploratory and modelling methods. Output generated by GIS in map format has the particular advantage of allowing implicit representation of spatial dependence relationships in an intuitive manner. The technology is becoming an essential component of modern disease surveillance systems.

  17. Using geographic information systems to track polio vaccination team performance: pilot project report.

    PubMed

    Gammino, Victoria M; Nuhu, Adamu; Chenoweth, Paul; Manneh, Fadinding; Young, Randall R; Sugerman, David E; Gerber, Sue; Abanida, Emmanuel; Gasasira, Alex

    2014-11-01

    The application of geospatial data to public health problems has expanded significantly with increased access to low-cost handheld global positioning system (GPS) receivers and free programs for geographic information systems analysis. In January 2010, we piloted the application of geospatial analysis to polio supplementary immunization activities (SIAs) in northern Nigeria. SIA teams carried GPS receivers to compare hand-drawn catchment area route maps with GPS tracks of actual vaccination teams. Team tracks overlaid on satellite imagery revealed that teams commonly missed swaths of contiguous households and indicated that geospatial data can improve microplanning and provide nearly real-time monitoring of team performance.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A CARBON MANAGEMENT GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM (GIS) FOR THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect

    Howard J. Herzog

    2004-03-01

    The Lab for Energy and Environment (LFEE) at MIT is developing a Geographic Information System (GIS) for carbon management. The GIS will store, integrate, and manipulate information relating to the components of carbon management systems. Additionally, the GIS can be used to interpret and analyze the effect of developing these systems. In the first year of this three year project, we focused on two tasks: (1) specifying the system design--defining in detail the GIS data requirements, the types of analyses that can be conducted, and the forms of output we will produce, as well as designing the computer architecture of the GIS and (2) creating the ''core'' datasets--identifying data sources and converting them into a form accessible by the GIS.

  19. Geographic information systems, remote sensing, and spatial analysis activities in Texas, 2008-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2009-01-01

    Geographic information system (GIS) technology has become an important tool for scientific investigation, resource management, and environmental planning. A GIS is a computer-aided system capable of collecting, storing, analyzing, and displaying spatially referenced digital data. GIS technology is useful for analyzing a wide variety of spatial data. Remote sensing involves collecting remotely sensed data, such as satellite imagery, aerial photography, or radar images, and analyzing the data to gather information or investigate trends about the environment or the Earth's surface. Spatial analysis combines remotely sensed, thematic, statistical, quantitative, and geographical data through overlay, modeling, and other analytical techniques to investigate specific research questions. It is the combination of data formats and analysis techniques that has made GIS an essential tool in scientific investigations. This fact sheet presents information about the technical capabilities and project activities of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Texas Water Science Center (TWSC) GIS Workgroup during 2008 and 2009. After a summary of GIS Workgroup capabilities, brief descriptions of activities by project at the local and national levels are presented. Projects are grouped by the fiscal year (October-September 2008 or 2009) the project ends and include overviews, project images, and Internet links to additional project information and related publications or articles.

  20. Joint Service Common Operating Environment (COE) Common Geographic Information System functional requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Meitzler, W.D.

    1992-06-01

    In the context of this document and COE, the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are decision support systems involving the integration of spatially referenced data in a problem solving environment. They are digital computer systems for capturing, processing, managing, displaying, modeling, and analyzing geographically referenced spatial data which are described by attribute data and location. The ability to perform spatial analysis and the ability to combine two or more data sets to create new spatial information differentiates a GIS from other computer mapping systems. While the CCGIS allows for data editing and input, its primary purpose is not to prepare data, but rather to manipulate, analyte, and clarify it. The CCGIS defined herein provides GIS services and resources including the spatial and map related functionality common to all subsystems contained within the COE suite of C4I systems. The CCGIS, which is an integral component of the COE concept, relies on the other COE standard components to provide the definition for other support computing services required.

  1. Investigating Surface Bias Errors in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model using a Geographic Information System (GIS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    WRF) Model using a Geographic Information System (GIS) by Jeffrey A Smith, Theresa A Foley, John W Raby , and Brian Reen...using a Geographic Information System (GIS) by Jeffrey A Smith, Theresa A Foley, John W Raby , and Brian Reen Computational and Information Sciences...CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jeffrey A Smith, Theresa A Foley, John W Raby , and Brian Reen 5d

  2. [Use of geographical information systems in parasitic diseases and the importance of animal health economics].

    PubMed

    Ciçek, Hasan; Ciçek, Hatice; Senkul, Cetin; Tandoğan, Murat

    2008-01-01

    In the world, economical losses due to the parasitic diseases reach enormous ratios in animal production. Both developed and developing countries set aside a considerable budget to control these parasitic diseases. This situation aids in the improvement of control methods of parasitic diseases. Also, it causes new ways of investigation that includes observation, evaluation and prevention of parasitic diseases. The Geographical Information System (GIS) has recently become one of the most common methods utilized to provide disease information technology with computer supported technology in many countries. The most important qualities of GIS are the formation of a powerful database, continual updating and rapid provision of coordination related to units. Many factors are evaluated at the same time by the system and also, results from analysis of data related to disease and their causes could reduce or prevent economical losses due to parasitic disease. In this study, possible uses of Geographical Information Systems against parasitic diseases and an approach in terms of animal health economics were presented.

  3. Geographic Information System mapping as a tool to assess nonresponse bias in survey research.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Richard A; Henley, Amanda Clarke; Brouwer, Emily S; Oraefo, Adaora N; Roth, Mary T

    2007-09-01

    Surveys are a useful tool for assessing professional practice patterns, although declining response rates have caused concern over external validity. This is particularly relevant to Web-based surveys, where response rates traditionally have been lower than with paper mail surveys. In a 2005 survey of North Carolina community pharmacy managers using a Web-based data collection instrument, we achieved an overall response rate of 23%. To explore nonresponse bias using accepted methods and to test whether Geographic Information System mapping is a useful tool for assessing response bias. Cross-sectional survey of 1593 community pharmacy managers in North Carolina using a Web-based tool. Nonresponse bias was assessed quantitatively by comparing early responders with late responders (ie, wave analysis) and by comparing respondents with nonrespondents with regard to known pharmacy, pharmacist, and population characteristics. Significant variables from these analyses were then mapped using ArcGIS 9.1. Pharmacy type was identified as a predictor of response, with independent pharmacies less likely to respond than chain pharmacies (odds ratio 0.75; 95% confidence interval 0.59-0.95). This conclusion was consistent in the wave analysis and the analysis of known population characteristics. Other county-level variables such as the number of physicians per capita, income, and the percentage of residents eligible for Medicaid showed trends but were not statistically significant (P<.1). Geographic Information System mapping was able to descriptively illustrate nonresponse bias for pharmacy type but trends were more difficult to detect for statistically insignificant trends. The best way to avoid nonresponse bias is to improve response rates. When this is not possible, Geographic Information System mapping has some utility for assessing nonresponse bias, and for aggregating known population characteristics based on location. It is most useful in conjunction with other accepted

  4. Food Delivery System with the Utilization of Vehicle Using Geographical Information System (GIS) and A Star Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siregar, B.; Gunawan, D.; Andayani, U.; Sari Lubis, Elita; Fahmi, F.

    2017-01-01

    Food delivery system is one kind of geographical information systems (GIS) that can be applied through digitation process. The main case in food delivery system is the way to determine the shortest path and food delivery vehicle movement tracking. Therefore, to make sure that the digitation process of food delivery system can be applied efficiently, it is needed to add shortest path determination facility and food delivery vehicle tracking. This research uses A Star (A*) algorithm for determining shortest path and location-based system (LBS) programming for moving food delivery vehicle object tracking. According to this research, it is generated the integrated system that can be used by food delivery driver, customer, and administrator in terms of simplifying the food delivery system. Through the application of shortest path and the tracking of moving vehicle, thus the application of food delivery system in the scope of geographical information system (GIS) can be executed.

  5. A Geographic Information System approach to modeling nutrient and sediment transport

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, D.A.; Hunsaker, C.T.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Timmins, S.P.

    1993-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a water quality model to quantify nonpoint-source (NPS) pollution that uses a geographic information system (GIS) to link statistical modeling of nutrient and sediment delivery with the spatial arrangement of the parameters that drive the model. The model predicts annual nutrient and sediment loading and was developed, calibrated, and tested on 12 watersheds within the Lake Ray Roberts drainage basin in north Texas. Three physiographic regions are represented by these watersheds, and model success, as measured by the accuracy of load estimates, was compared within and across these regions.

  6. Institutional issues affecting the integration and use of remotely sensed data and geographic information systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lauer, D.T.; Estes, J.E.; Jensen, J.R.; Greenlee, D.D.

    1991-01-01

    The developers as well as the users of remotely sensed data and geographic information system (GIS) techniques are associated with nearly all types of institutions in government, industry, and academia. Individuals in these various institutions often find the barriers to accepting remote sensing and GIS are not necessarily technical in nature, but can be attributed to the institutions themselves. Several major institutional issues that affect the technologies of remote sensing and GIS are data availability, data marketing and costs, equipment availability and costs, standards and practices, education and training, and organizational infrastructures. Not only are problems associated with these issues identified, but needs and opportunities also are discussed. -from Authors

  7. Using a geographic information system to improve childhood lead-screening efforts.

    PubMed

    Graff, Robert

    2013-06-13

    The Idaho Division of Public Health conducted a pilot study to produce a lead-exposure-risk map to help local and state agencies better target childhood lead-screening efforts. Priority lead-screening areas, at the block group level, were created by using county tax assessor data and geographic information system software. A series of maps were produced, indicating childhood lead-screening prevalence in areas in which there was high potential for exposure to lead. These maps could enable development of more systematically targeted and cost-effective childhood lead-screening efforts.

  8. Forest management applications of Landsat data in a geographic information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maw, K. D.; Brass, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The utility of land-cover data resulting from Landsat MSS classification can be greatly enhanced by use in combination with ancillary data. A demonstration forest management applications data base was constructed for Santa Cruz County, California, to demonstrate geographic information system applications of classified Landsat data. The data base contained detailed soils, digital terrain, land ownership, jurisdictional boundaries, fire events, and generalized land-use data, all registered to a UTM grid base. Applications models were developed from problems typical of fire management and reforestation planning.

  9. Using a Geographic Information System to Improve Childhood Lead-Screening Efforts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Idaho Division of Public Health conducted a pilot study to produce a lead-exposure–risk map to help local and state agencies better target childhood lead-screening efforts. Priority lead-screening areas, at the block group level, were created by using county tax assessor data and geographic information system software. A series of maps were produced, indicating childhood lead-screening prevalence in areas in which there was high potential for exposure to lead. These maps could enable development of more systematically targeted and cost-effective childhood lead-screening efforts. PMID:23764346

  10. Another Look at Taurus Littrow: An Interactive Geographic Information System DataBase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coombs, Cassandra R.; Meisburger, J. L.; Nettles, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    A variety of data has been amassed for the Apollo 17 landing site, including topography, sample locations, and imagery. These data were compiled into a Geographic Information System (GIS) to analyze their interrelationships more easily. The database will allow the evaluation of the resource potential of the Taurus Littrow region pyroclastic deposits. The database also serves as a catalog for the returned lunar samples. This catalog includes rock type, size, and location. While this project specifically targets the Taurus Littrow region, it is applicable to other regions as well.

  11. Forest management applications of Landsat data in a geographic information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maw, K. D.; Brass, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The utility of land-cover data resulting from Landsat MSS classification can be greatly enhanced by use in combination with ancillary data. A demonstration forest management applications data base was constructed for Santa Cruz County, California, to demonstrate geographic information system applications of classified Landsat data. The data base contained detailed soils, digital terrain, land ownership, jurisdictional boundaries, fire events, and generalized land-use data, all registered to a UTM grid base. Applications models were developed from problems typical of fire management and reforestation planning.

  12. Using geographic information systems to maximize environmental surveillance efforts and impact.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Brian C; Adams, Sheila Denice

    2010-01-01

    There has been tremendous advancement in geographic information systems (GIS) software and hardware over the last 2 decades. This article illustrates how these advancements can be used to greatly increase the ease and efficiency of collecting environmental samples and demonstrate how environmental data collected within a GIS is more valuable because of the visualization, analysis, and historical capabilities of GIS. This article reviews 6 actual field surveys conducted using desktop GIS and field GIS by entomologists with the US Army Public Health Command (Provisional). While these examples entail entomological data, the techniques and procedures are applicable to any type of environmental data.

  13. Estimation and allocation of solid waste to bin through geographical information systems.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Ritesh; Gupta, Apurba; Kalamdhad, Ajay S; Devotta, Sukumar

    2005-10-01

    This study presents a geographical information system (GIS)-based procedure for the precise estimation of solid waste generation, computed using the local population density and income group distribution. Using a triangulated irregular network (TIN) in a GIS environment, the procedure further determines the command area for waste allocation to a particular bin which is generally located so the route slopes towards the collection points for ease of transportation by cart pullers. Computational results of bin location, type, size and the frequency of removal are presented for a typical urban area with known population density, income group distribution, road network and topology.

  14. Another Look at Taurus Littrow: An Interactive Geographic Information System DataBase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coombs, Cassandra R.; Meisburger, J. L.; Nettles, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    A variety of data has been amassed for the Apollo 17 landing site, including topography, sample locations, and imagery. These data were compiled into a Geographic Information System (GIS) to analyze their interrelationships more easily. The database will allow the evaluation of the resource potential of the Taurus Littrow region pyroclastic deposits. The database also serves as a catalog for the returned lunar samples. This catalog includes rock type, size, and location. While this project specifically targets the Taurus Littrow region, it is applicable to other regions as well.

  15. Interfacing geographic information systems and remote sensing for rural land-use analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nellis, M. Duane; Lulla, Kamlesh; Jensen, John

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in computer-based geographic information systems (GISs) are briefly reviewed, with an emphasis on the incorporation of remote-sensing data in GISs for rural applications. Topics addressed include sampling procedures for rural land-use analyses; GIS-based mapping of agricultural land use and productivity; remote sensing of land use and agricultural, forest, rangeland, and water resources; monitoring the dynamics of irrigation agriculture; GIS methods for detecting changes in land use over time; and the development of land-use modeling strategies.

  16. Incorporating Geographic Information Systems (GIS) into program evaluation: lessons from a rural medicine initiative.

    PubMed

    Booza, Jason C; Bridge, Patrick D; Neale, Anne Victoria; Schenk, Maryjean

    2010-01-01

    To address the shortage of physicians practicing in rural areas of Michigan, the Wayne State University School of Medicine developed an integrated rural core curriculum to interest students in rural practice careers. Here we focus on the evaluation strategy used to determine the extent to which students in the new rural medicine interest group who self-identified as selecting a rural clerkship or externship did secure a clinical training experience in a rural setting. Three measures of rurality were compared to determine whether students were placed in rural training settings: (1) the percentage of the county living in rural areas; (2) a county-level dichotomous measure of rural/nonrural; and (3) a dichotomous measure based on urban area boundaries within the county. Practice address and geographic data were integrated into geographic information systems software, which we used to map out rural characteristics of Michigan counties through a process called thematic mapping; this shows characteristic variation by color-shading geographic features. In addition, reference maps were created showing the boundaries of urban areas and metropolitan/micropolitan areas. Once these processes were completed, we overlaid the practice location on the contextual-level geographic features to produce a visual representation of the relationship between student placement and rural areas throughout the state. The outcome of student placement in rural practices varied by the definition of rural. We concluded that, although students were not placed in the most rural areas of Michigan, they received clerkship or externship training near rural areas or in semirural areas. This process evaluation had a direct impact on program management by highlighting gaps in preceptor recruitment. A greater effort is being made to recruit physicians for more rural areas of the state rather than urban and semirural areas. Geographic information systems mapping also defined levels of ruralism for students

  17. Geographic information systems, remote sensing, and spatial analysis activities in Texas, 2002-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, D.K.; Gary, R.H.; Wilson, Z.D.

    2007-01-01

    Geographic information system (GIS) technology has become an important tool for scientific investigation, resource management, and environmental planning. A GIS is a computer-aided system capable of collecting, storing, analyzing, and displaying spatially referenced digital data. GIS technology is particularly useful when analyzing a wide variety of spatial data such as with remote sensing and spatial analysis. Remote sensing involves collecting remotely sensed data, such as satellite imagery, aerial photography, or radar images, and analyzing the data to gather information or investigate trends about the environment or the Earth's surface. Spatial analysis combines remotely sensed, thematic, statistical, quantitative, and geographical data through overlay, modeling, and other analytical techniques to investigate specific research questions. It is the combination of data formats and analysis techniques that has made GIS an essential tool in scientific investigations. This document presents information about the technical capabilities and project activities of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Texas Water Science Center (TWSC) GIS Workgroup from 2002 through 2007.

  18. Knowledge-based geographic information systems (KBGIS): new analytic and data management tools

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, T.M.

    1988-11-01

    In its simplest form, a geographic information system (GIS) may be viewed as a data base management system in which most of the data are spatially indexed, and upon which sets of procedures operate to answer queries about spatial entities represented in the data base. Utilization of artificial intelligence (AI) techniques can enhance greatly the capabilities of a GIS, particularly in handling very large, diverse data bases involved in the earth sciences. A KBGIS has been developed by the US Geological Survey which incorporates AI techniques such as learning, expert systems, new data representation, and more. The system, which will be developed further and applied, is a prototype of the next generation of GIS's, an intelligent GIS, as well as an example of a general-purpose intelligent data handling system. The paper provides a description of KBGIS and its application, as well as the AI techniques involved.

  19. Assessment of the Volunteered Geographic Information Feedback System for the Dutch Topographical Key Register

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grus, M.; te Winkel, D.

    2015-08-01

    Since Topographical Key Register has become an open data the amount of users increased enormously. The highest grow was in the private users group. The increasing number of users and their growing demand for high actuality of the topographic data sets motivates the Dutch Kadaster to innovate and improve the Topographical Key Register (BRT). One of the initiatives was to provide a voluntary geographical information project aiming at providing a user-friendly feedback system adjusted to all kinds of user groups. The feedback system is a compulsory element of the Topographical Key Register in the Netherlands. The Dutch Kadaster is obliged to deliver a feedback system and the key-users are obliged to use it. The aim of the feedback system is to improve the quality and stimulate the usage of the data. The results of the pilot shows that the user-friendly and open to everyone feedback system contributes enormously to improve the quality of the topographic dataset.

  20. Knowledge-based geographic information systems (KBGIS): New analytic and data management tools

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albert, T.M.

    1988-01-01

    In its simplest form, a geographic information system (GIS) may be viewed as a data base management system in which most of the data are spatially indexed, and upon which sets of procedures operate to answer queries about spatial entities represented in the data base. Utilization of artificial intelligence (AI) techniques can enhance greatly the capabilities of a GIS, particularly in handling very large, diverse data bases involved in the earth sciences. A KBGIS has been developed by the U.S. Geological Survey which incorporates AI techniques such as learning, expert systems, new data representation, and more. The system, which will be developed further and applied, is a prototype of the next generation of GIS's, an intelligent GIS, as well as an example of a general-purpose intelligent data handling system. The paper provides a description of KBGIS and its application, as well as the AI techniques involved. ?? 1988 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  1. Geographic Information System and tools of spatial analysis in a pneumococcal vaccine trial.

    PubMed

    Tanskanen, Antti; Nillos, Leilani T; Lehtinen, Antti; Nohynek, Hanna; Sanvictores, Diozele Hazel M; Simões, Eric Af; Tallo, Veronica L; Lucero, Marilla G

    2012-01-20

    The goal of this Geographic Information System (GIS) study was to obtain accurate information on the locations of study subjects, road network and services for research purposes so that the clinical outcomes of interest (e.g., vaccine efficacy, burden of disease, nasopharyngeal colonization and its reduction) could be linked and analyzed at a distance from health centers, hospitals, doctors and other important services. The information on locations can be used to investigate more accurate crowdedness, herd immunity and/or transmission patterns. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of an 11-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (11PCV) was conducted in Bohol Province in central Philippines, from July 2000 to December 2004. We collected the information on the geographic location of the households (N = 13,208) of study subjects. We also collected a total of 1982 locations of health and other services in the six municipalities and a comprehensive GIS data over the road network in the area. We calculated the numbers of other study subjects (vaccine and placebo recipients, respectively) within the neighborhood of each study subject. We calculated distances to different services and identified the subjects sharing the same services (calculated by distance). This article shows how to collect a complete GIS data set for human to human transmitted vaccine study in developing country settings in an efficient and economical way. The collection of geographic locations in intervention trials should become a routine task. The results of public health research may highly depend on spatial relationships among the study subjects and between the study subjects and the environment, both natural and infrastructural. ISRCTN: ISRCTN62323832.

  2. Geographic Information System and tools of spatial analysis in a pneumococcal vaccine trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The goal of this Geographic Information System (GIS) study was to obtain accurate information on the locations of study subjects, road network and services for research purposes so that the clinical outcomes of interest (e.g., vaccine efficacy, burden of disease, nasopharyngeal colonization and its reduction) could be linked and analyzed at a distance from health centers, hospitals, doctors and other important services. The information on locations can be used to investigate more accurate crowdedness, herd immunity and/or transmission patterns. Method A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of an 11-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (11PCV) was conducted in Bohol Province in central Philippines, from July 2000 to December 2004. We collected the information on the geographic location of the households (N = 13,208) of study subjects. We also collected a total of 1982 locations of health and other services in the six municipalities and a comprehensive GIS data over the road network in the area. Results We calculated the numbers of other study subjects (vaccine and placebo recipients, respectively) within the neighborhood of each study subject. We calculated distances to different services and identified the subjects sharing the same services (calculated by distance). This article shows how to collect a complete GIS data set for human to human transmitted vaccine study in developing country settings in an efficient and economical way. Conclusions The collection of geographic locations in intervention trials should become a routine task. The results of public health research may highly depend on spatial relationships among the study subjects and between the study subjects and the environment, both natural and infrastructural. Trial registration number ISRCTN: ISRCTN62323832 PMID:22264271

  3. Geographic Information Systems Mapping of Diabetic Retinopathy in an Ocular Telemedicine Network.

    PubMed

    Jani, Pooja D; Forbes, Lauren; McDaniel, Philip; Viera, Anthony; Garg, Seema

    2017-07-01

    Minimal information exists on the use of geographic information systems mapping for visualizing access barriers to eye care for patients with diabetes. To use geographic information systems mapping techniques to visualize (1) the locations of patients participating in the North Carolina Diabetic Retinopathy Telemedicine Network, (2) the locations of primary care clinicians and ophthalmologists across the state, and (3) the travel times associated with traveling to the 5 primary care clinics in our study. Cross-sectional study conducted from January 6, 2014, to November 1, 2015, at 5 Area Health Education Center primary care clinics that serve rural and underserved populations in North Carolina. In total, 1787 patients with diabetes received retinal screening photographs with remote expert interpretation to determine the presence and severity of diabetic retinopathy. Participants included patients 18 years or older with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who presented to these 5 clinics for their routine diabetes care. Development of qualitative maps illustrating the density of patients with diabetes and their distribution around the 5 North Carolina Diabetic Retinopathy Telemedicine Network sites by zip code and the density of ophthalmologists and primary care clinicians by zip code relative to US Census Urban Areas. A travel time map was also created using road network analysis to determine all areas that can be reached by car in a user-specified amount of time. Mean (SD) age of patients was 55.4 (12.7) years. Women made up 62.7% of the study population. The study included more African American patients (55.4%) compared with white (35.5%) and Hispanic (5.8%) patients. The mean (SD) hemoglobin A1c level was 7.8% (2.4%) (to convert to proportion of total hemoglobin, multiply by 0.01), and the mean (SD) duration of diabetes was 9.2 (8.2) years. Whereas the clinics located in Greensboro, Asheville, and Fayetteville screened patients from more immediate surrounding areas, the

  4. Air pollution simulation and geographical information systems (GIS) applied to Athens International Airport.

    PubMed

    Theophanides, Mike; Anastassopoulou, Jane

    2009-07-01

    This study presents an improved methodology for analysing atmospheric pollution around airports using Gaussian-plume numerical simulation integrated with Geographical Information Systems (GIS). The new methodology focuses on streamlining the lengthy analysis process for Airport Environmental Impact Assessments by integrating the definition of emission sources, simulating and displaying the results in a GIS environment. One of the objectives of the research is to validate the methodology applied to the Athens International Airport, "Eleftherios Venizelos", to produce a realistic estimate of emission inventories, dispersion simulations and comparison to measured data. The methodology used a combination of the Emission Dispersion and Modelling System (EDMS) and the Atmospheric Dispersion and Modelling system (ADMS) to improve the analysis process. The second objective is to conduct numerical simulations under various adverse conditions (e.g. scenarios) and assess the dispersion in the surrounding areas. The study concludes that the use of GIS in environmental assessments provides a valuable advantage for organizing data and entering accurate geographical/topological information for the simulation engine. Emissions simulation produced estimates within 10% of published values. Dispersion simulations indicate that airport pollution will affect neighbouring cities such as Rafina and Loutsa. Presently, there are no measured controls in these areas. In some cases, airport pollution can contribute to as much as 40% of permissible EU levels in VOCs.

  5. Land-use planning of Volyn region (Ukraine) using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strielko, Irina; Pereira, Paulo

    2014-05-01

    Land-use development planning is carried out in order to create a favourable environment for human life, sustainable socioeconomic and spatial development. Landscape planning is an important part of land-use development that aims to meet the fundamental principles of sustainable development. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a fundamental tool to make a better landscape planning at different territorial levels, providing data and maps to support decision making. The objective of this work is to create spatio-temporal, territorial and ecological model of development of Volyn region (Ukraine). It is based on existing spatial raster and vector data and includes the analysis of territory dynamics as the aspects responsible for it. A spatial analyst tool was used to zone the areas according to their environmental components and economic activity. This analysis is fundamental to define the basic parameters of sustainability of Volyn region. To carry out this analysis, we determined the demographic capacity of districts and the analysis of spatial parameters of land use. On the basis of the existing natural resources, we observed that there is a need of landscape protection and integration of more are natural areas in the Pan-European Ecological Network. Using GIS technologies to landscape planning in Volyn region, allowed us to identify, natural areas of interest, contribute to a better resource management and conflict resolution. Geographic Information Systems will help to formulate and implement landscape policies, reform the existing administrative system of Volyn region and contribute to a better sustainable development.

  6. Evaluating the ecotourism potentials of Naharkhoran area in Gorgan using remote sensing and geographic information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oladi, Jafar; Bozorgnia, Delavar

    2010-10-01

    Ecotourism may be defined as voluntary travels to intact natural areas in order to enjoy the natural attractions as well as to get familiar with the culture of local communities. The main factor contributing to inappropriate land uses and natural resource destruction is overaggregation of ecotourists in some specific natural areas such as forests and rangelands; while other parts remain unvisited due to the lack of a proper propagation about those areas. Evaluating the ecotourism potentials of each area would lead to a wider participation of local people in natural resource conservation activities. In order to properly introduce the ecotourism potential areas, at first, we carried out land preparation practices using Geographic Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) techniques; then, the maps of height, slope and orientation were produced using the digital elevation model (DEM) of the study area. Afterwards, we overlaid these maps and the ecotourism potential areas were identified on the map. These specified areas were classified into two land uses of mass and alternative ecotourism, with three subclasses (including class1, class2 and an inappropriate class) considered for each land use. To classify the image, the training areas determined on the ground using a GPS device (Ground Positioning System) were transferred on the RS image. Subsequently, the ecotourism potential areas were determined using a hybrid method. At the final phase, these areas were compared with the areas determined on the ecotourism potential map; as a result of this comparison, the overlaid ecotourism potential areas were distinguished on the Geographic information System.

  7. How geographical information systems analysis influences the continuum of patient care.

    PubMed

    Pliskie, Jennifer; Wallenfang, Laura

    2014-01-01

    As the vast repository of data about millions of patients grows, the analysis of this information is changing the provider-patient relationship and influencing the continuum of care for broad swaths of the population. At the same time, while population health management moves from a volume-based model to a value-based one and additional patients seek care due to healthcare reform, hospitals and healthcare networks are evaluating their business models and searching for new revenue streams. Utilizing geographical information systems to model and analyze large amounts of data is helping organizations better understand the characteristics of their patient population, demographic and socioeconomic trends, and shifts in the utilization of healthcare. In turn, organizations can more effectively conduct service line planning, strategic business plans, market growth strategies, and human resource planning. Healthcare organizations that use GIS modeling can set themselves apart by making more informed and objective business strategy decisions.

  8. Relationships between esophageal cancer and spatial environment factors by using Geographic Information System.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ku-Sheng; Huo, Xia; Zhu, Guang-Hui

    2008-04-15

    To explore the relationships between esophageal cancer (EC) and climatic, geographic factors in China by using Geographic Information System, database of EC mortality of 237 sampling areas surveyed in 1990-1992 was established in Excel and linked with the digital polygon maps of study areas. Geographic and climate data of sampling areas were extracted from the raster dataset and finished in Arc/Info 9.0 and ENVI4.2 software by using spatial analysis. Spearman correlation analysis and multiple regression analysis after principal component analysis (PCA) were performed to analyze the relationship between EC and these factors. The counties that have the highest EC morality show significant aggregation. Spearman correlation analysis shows weak negative correlation between precipitation, water-heat index (WHI), highest/lowest temperature and EC mortality, and weak positive correlation between drought index (DI), wind speed, population density and EC mortality. Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that the variables associated with EC mortality were precipitation, temperature, wind speed, elevation, DI, WHI and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) of July. Our study suggested that the high-risk areas of EC in China are mostly drought and low altitude areas relatively. There were relatively lower NDVI in summer and higher wind speed in these areas. GIS can be applied to cancer epidemiology study and will exert active effect, which should be further explored.

  9. Spatial analysis of perinatal mortality rates with geographic information systems in Kocaeli, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Arslan, O; Çepni, M S; Etiler, N

    2013-04-01

    To determine the spatial patterns of perinatal mortality in Kocaeli, Turkey using geographic information systems (GIS); to examine whether regional differences exist for the period selected; and whether these differences are linked to regional risk factors. Ecological research. Data were obtained from the linked birth-death records data registry maintained by Kocaeli Provincial Health Directorate. Mortality data are added to the geodatabase on a monthly basis. Spatial patterns of mortality rates were determined with GIS by mapping the case differences in the districts, and spatial autocorrelation was used to examine the spatial pattern of mortality rates in the region. Various risk factors contributing to spatial variation of perinatal mortality were revealed in the region. Districts with high mortality rates were shown to be sensitive to these risk factors. The results of this study confirm the direct link between perinatal mortality and poor environmental conditions in the study region. The analyses applied in the study showed that some complex demographic and socio-economic factors should be associated with perinatal mortality rates to identify the geographic patterns of mortality. Implementation of spatial tools within GIS for mortality data showed the efficiency of GIS in perinatal mortality surveillance. This study also demonstrated the capability and utility of GIS to clarify the geographical distribution of perinatal mortality rates in the study area. Copyright © 2012 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mobile Technologies and Geographic Information Systems to Improve Health Care Systems: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A growing body of research has employed mobile technologies and geographic information systems (GIS) for enhancing health care and health information systems, but there is yet a lack of studies of how these two types of systems are integrated together into the information infrastructure of an organization so as to provide a basis for data analysis and decision support. Integration of data and technical systems across the organization is necessary for efficient large-scale implementation. Objective The aim of this paper is to identify how mobile technologies and GIS applications have been used, independently as well as in combination, for improving health care. Methods The electronic databases PubMed, BioMed Central, Wiley Online Library, Scopus, Science Direct, and Web of Science were searched to retrieve English language articles published in international academic journals after 2005. Only articles addressing the use of mobile or GIS technologies and that met a prespecified keyword strategy were selected for review. Results A total of 271 articles were selected, among which 220 concerned mobile technologies and 51 GIS. Most articles concern developed countries (198/271, 73.1%), and in particular the United States (81/271, 29.9%), United Kingdom (31/271, 11.4%), and Canada (14/271, 5.2%). Applications of mobile technologies can be categorized by six themes: treatment and disease management, data collection and disease surveillance, health support systems, health promotion and disease prevention, communication between patients and health care providers or among providers, and medical education. GIS applications can be categorized by four themes: disease surveillance, health support systems, health promotion and disease prevention, and communication to or between health care providers. Mobile applications typically focus on using text messaging (short message service, SMS) for communication between patients and health care providers, most prominently

  11. Mobile technologies and geographic information systems to improve health care systems: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Nhavoto, José António; Grönlund, Ake

    2014-05-08

    A growing body of research has employed mobile technologies and geographic information systems (GIS) for enhancing health care and health information systems, but there is yet a lack of studies of how these two types of systems are integrated together into the information infrastructure of an organization so as to provide a basis for data analysis and decision support. Integration of data and technical systems across the organization is necessary for efficient large-scale implementation. The aim of this paper is to identify how mobile technologies and GIS applications have been used, independently as well as in combination, for improving health care. The electronic databases PubMed, BioMed Central, Wiley Online Library, Scopus, Science Direct, and Web of Science were searched to retrieve English language articles published in international academic journals after 2005. Only articles addressing the use of mobile or GIS technologies and that met a prespecified keyword strategy were selected for review. A total of 271 articles were selected, among which 220 concerned mobile technologies and 51 GIS. Most articles concern developed countries (198/271, 73.1%), and in particular the United States (81/271, 29.9%), United Kingdom (31/271, 11.4%), and Canada (14/271, 5.2%). Applications of mobile technologies can be categorized by six themes: treatment and disease management, data collection and disease surveillance, health support systems, health promotion and disease prevention, communication between patients and health care providers or among providers, and medical education. GIS applications can be categorized by four themes: disease surveillance, health support systems, health promotion and disease prevention, and communication to or between health care providers. Mobile applications typically focus on using text messaging (short message service, SMS) for communication between patients and health care providers, most prominently reminders and advice to patients. These

  12. Teaching Spatial Analysis in Business: The Case of Geographic Information Systems in a Decision Support Systems Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mennecke, Brian E.

    Geographic information systems (GIS) are increasing in importance as a resource for collecting, managing, and analyzing data pertaining to a variety of business problems. Yet, the number of business schools that have incorporated GIS as a significant part of even one of their core business courses is quite small. Thus, little is known about how to…

  13. Description of a user-oriented geographic information system - The resource analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilmann, S. E.; Mokma, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the Resource Analysis Program, an applied geographic information system. Several applications are presented which utilized soil, and other natural resource data, to develop integrated maps and data analyses. These applications demonstrate the methods of analysis and the philosophy of approach used in the mapping system. The applications are evaluated in reference to four major needs of a functional mapping system: data capture, data libraries, data analysis, and mapping and data display. These four criteria are then used to describe an effort to develop the next generation of applied mapping systems. This approach uses inexpensive microcomputers for field applications and should prove to be a viable entry point for users heretofore unable or unwilling to venture into applied computer mapping.

  14. Description of a user-oriented geographic information system - The resource analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilmann, S. E.; Mokma, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the Resource Analysis Program, an applied geographic information system. Several applications are presented which utilized soil, and other natural resource data, to develop integrated maps and data analyses. These applications demonstrate the methods of analysis and the philosophy of approach used in the mapping system. The applications are evaluated in reference to four major needs of a functional mapping system: data capture, data libraries, data analysis, and mapping and data display. These four criteria are then used to describe an effort to develop the next generation of applied mapping systems. This approach uses inexpensive microcomputers for field applications and should prove to be a viable entry point for users heretofore unable or unwilling to venture into applied computer mapping.

  15. The Geographic Climate Information System Project (GEOCLIMA): Overview and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feidas, H.; Zanis, P.; Melas, D.; Vaitis, M.; Anadranistakis, E.; Symeonidis, P.; Pantelopoulos, S.

    2012-04-01

    The project GEOCLIMA aims at developing an integrated Geographic Information System (GIS) allowing the user to manage, analyze and visualize the information which is directly or indirectly related to climate and its future projections in Greece. The main components of the project are: a) collection and homogenization of climate and environmental related information, b) estimation of future climate change based on existing regional climate model (RCM) simulations as well as a supplementary high resolution (10 km x 10 km) simulation over the period 1961-2100 using RegCM3, c) compilation of an integrated uniform geographic database, and d) mapping of climate data, creation of digital thematic maps, and development of the integrated web GIS application. This paper provides an overview of the ongoing research efforts and preliminary results of the project. First, the trends in the annual and seasonal time series of precipitation and air temperature observations for all available stations in Greece are assessed. Then the set-up of the high resolution RCM simulation (10 km x 10 km) is discussed with respect to the selected convective scheme. Finally, the relationship of climatic variables with geophysical features over Greece such as altitude, location, distance from the sea, slope, aspect, distance from climatic barriers, land cover etc) is investigated, to support climate mapping. The research has been co-financed by the European Union (European Regional Development Fund) and Greek national funds through the Operational Program "Competitiveness and Entrepreneurship" of the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) - Research Funding Program COOPERATION 2009.

  16. Epidemiologic Investigation of Dysentery in North of Iran: Use of Geographic Information System (GIS).

    PubMed

    Nadi, Aliasghar; Abedi, Ghassem; Isazadeh, Khatoon; Rostami, Farideh; Siamian, Hasan; Hosseini, Mahbobeh; Asadi-Aliabadi, Mehran

    2016-12-01

    Dysentery is an intestinal inflammation which is created by the microorganisms attacking intestine mucus. Knowing the prevalence of this disease in different societies paves the way for programming and providing treatment and preventive measures. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the epidemiologic pattern and geographical distribution of dysentery based on GIS. This was a cross-sectional and analytical study. The dysentery cases were gathered from the section of contagious diseases in health chancellery of Mazandaran University of medical sciences through a checklist during the years 2008 to 2013. In order to analyze the data, we made use of chi-square test. Then, the GIS software was used to recognize the geographical distribution of the disease. There was reported about 653 cases affected by dysentery and the disease proportion was equal for both men and women. Most of the persons with dysentery was city dwellers. The highest rate of incidents was reported to be in Fereidunkenar in 2011, and the disease was mostly found among farmers, students, and college students. Since dysentery is a disease transmitted from water and food, and in this study, it was found out that the disease sources included using polluted water, vegetables, and lack of appropriate personal hygiene. Therefore, it is essential to take into consideration the health issues. Moreover, the suitable conditions of the geographical area which has the highest rate of incident have paved the way for dysentery occurrence. In addition, using geographic information system (GIS) as a visual instrument can help the stakeholders and officials to elaborate on the death trend and recognize the areas for optimal use of the available resources.

  17. Epidemiologic Investigation of Dysentery in North of Iran: Use of Geographic Information System (GIS)

    PubMed Central

    Nadi, Aliasghar; Abedi, Ghassem; Isazadeh, Khatoon; Rostami, Farideh; Siamian, Hasan; Hosseini, Mahbobeh; Asadi-Aliabadi, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dysentery is an intestinal inflammation which is created by the microorganisms attacking intestine mucus. Knowing the prevalence of this disease in different societies paves the way for programming and providing treatment and preventive measures. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the epidemiologic pattern and geographical distribution of dysentery based on GIS. Method: This was a cross-sectional and analytical study. The dysentery cases were gathered from the section of contagious diseases in health chancellery of Mazandaran University of medical sciences through a checklist during the years 2008 to 2013. In order to analyze the data, we made use of chi-square test. Then, the GIS software was used to recognize the geographical distribution of the disease. Findings: There was reported about 653 cases affected by dysentery and the disease proportion was equal for both men and women. Most of the persons with dysentery was city dwellers. The highest rate of incidents was reported to be in Fereidunkenar in 2011, and the disease was mostly found among farmers, students, and college students. Conclusion: Since dysentery is a disease transmitted from water and food, and in this study, it was found out that the disease sources included using polluted water, vegetables, and lack of appropriate personal hygiene. Therefore, it is essential to take into consideration the health issues. Moreover, the suitable conditions of the geographical area which has the highest rate of incident have paved the way for dysentery occurrence. In addition, using geographic information system (GIS) as a visual instrument can help the stakeholders and officials to elaborate on the death trend and recognize the areas for optimal use of the available resources. PMID:28144197

  18. Geographic Information System Software to Remodel Population Data Using Dasymetric Mapping Methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sleeter, Rachel; Gould, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Census Bureau provides decadal demographic data collected at the household level and aggregated to larger enumeration units for anonymity purposes. Although this system is appropriate for the dissemination of large amounts of national demographic data, often the boundaries of the enumeration units do not reflect the distribution of the underlying statistical phenomena. Conventional mapping methods such as choropleth mapping, are primarily employed due to their ease of use. However, the analytical drawbacks of choropleth methods are well known ranging from (1) the artificial transition of population at the boundaries of mapping units to (2) the assumption that the phenomena is evenly distributed across the enumeration unit (when in actuality there can be significant variation). Many methods to map population distribution have been practiced in geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing fields. Many cartographers prefer dasymetric mapping to map population because of its ability to more accurately distribute data over geographic space. Similar to ?choropleth maps?, a dasymetric map utilizes standardized data (for example, census data). However, rather than using arbitrary enumeration zones to symbolize population distribution, a dasymetric approach introduces ancillary information to redistribute the standardized data into zones relative to land use and land cover (LULC), taking into consideration actual changing densities within the boundaries of the enumeration unit. Thus, new zones are created that correlate to the function of the map, capturing spatial variations in population density. The transfer of data from census enumeration units to ancillary-driven homogenous zones is performed by a process called areal interpolation.

  19. Development of hardwood seed zones for Tennessee using a geographic information system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Post, L.S.; Schlarbaum, S.E.; Van Manen, F.; Cecich, R.A.; Saxton, A.M.; Schneider, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    For species that have no or limited information on genetic variation and adaptability to nonnative sites, there is a need for seed collection guidelines based on biological, climatological, and/or geographical criteria. Twenty-eight hardwood species are currently grown for reforestation purposes at the East Tennessee State Nursery. The majority of these species have had no genetic testing to define guidelines for seed collection location and can be distributed to sites that have a very different environment than that of seed origin(s). Poor survival and/or growth may result if seedlings are not adapted to environmental conditions at the planting location. To address this problem, 30 yr of Tennessee county precipitation and minimum temperature data were analyzed and grouped using a centroid hierarchical cluster analysis. The weather data and elevational data were entered into a Geographic Information System (GIS) and separately layered over Bailey's Ecoregions to develop a seed zone system for Tennessee. The seed zones can be used as a practical guideline for collecting seeds to ensure that the resulting seedlings will be adapted to planting environments.

  20. The benefits of the application of geographical information systems in public and environmental health.

    PubMed

    Scholten, H J; de Lepper, M J

    1991-01-01

    One of the most important issues in public and environmental health today concerns the type of instruments that can be used to devise quick, reliable and scientifically valid methods of rapid assessment which, in turn, can be utilized in health research and in the planning, monitoring and evaluation of health programmes. As the applications of geographical information systems (GIS) relate to the collection, storage, integration, management, retrieval, analysis and display of spatial data, it is not surprising that the potential usefulness of this new technology in the fields of health research and policy is beginning to be realized. This article seeks to demonstrate the opportunities which the use of geographical information systems can offer to research and policy on health issues. The article first describes the principles and objectives of GIS before going on to discuss hardware and software developments as well as the variety of application fields, organizations and users. Some examples of current applications are provided to illustrate the type of work being undertaken. The final sections address issues specifically related to the application of GIS in health research and policies in the European context.

  1. Surveillance around hazardous waste sites: geographic information systems and reproductive outcomes.

    PubMed

    Stallones, L; Nuckols, J R; Berry, J K

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the potential for integrating surveillance techniques in reproductive epidemiology with geographic information system technology in order to identify populations at risk around hazardous waste sites. Environmental epidemiologic studies have had problems with estimating or measuring exposures to individuals, and of detecting effects when the exposure is low, but continuous. In addition, exposures around hazardous waste sites are complex and frequently involve chemical mixtures. The birth weight of human babies has been reported to be sensitive to many environmental influences. Birth weight can be analyzed as a continuous variable or as a dichotomous one using the standard cutpoint of 2500 g or less to indicate low birth weight. It has the potential to be a powerful surveillance tool since exposures to the fetus reflect maternal and paternal exposures. The advent of recent environmental regulations pertaining to hazardous waste sites has greatly increased the availability of environmental data for many sites. The major problem with incorporating these data into epidemiologic studies has been with the logistics of data management and analysis. Computer-assisted geographic information systems hold promise in providing capabilities needed to address the data management and analysis requirements for effective epidemiologic studies around to hazardous waste sites.

  2. A vehicle emissions system using a car simulator and a geographical information system: Part 1--System description and testing.

    PubMed

    Jazcilevich, Arón D; García-Fragoso, Alejandro; García Reynoso, Agustín; Grutter, Michel; Diego-Ayala, Ulises; Lents, Jim; Davis, Nicole

    2007-10-01

    A methodology for estimating vehicular emissions comprising a car simulator, a basic traffic model, and a geographical information system is capable of estimating vehicle emissions with high time and space resolution. Because of the extent of the work conducted, this article comprises two sections: In Part 1 of this work, we describe the system and its components and use examples for testing it. In Part 2 we will study in more detail the emissions of the sample fleet using the system and will make comparisons with another emission model. The experimental data for the car simulator is obtained using on-board measuring equipment and laboratory Fourier transform IR (FTIR) measurements with a dynamometer following typical driving cycles. The car simulator uses this data to generate emission factors every second. These emission factors, together with information on car activity and velocity profiles of highways and residential and arterial roads in Mexico City in conjunction with a basic traffic model, provide emissions per second of a sample fleet. A geographical information system is used to localize these road emissions.

  3. Model of cholera dissemination using geographic information systems and fuzzy clustering means: case study, Chabahar, Iran.

    PubMed

    Pezeshki, Z; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, M; Mansourian, A; Eshrati, B; Omidi, E; Nejadqoli, I

    2012-10-01

    Cholera is spread by drinking water or eating food that is contaminated by bacteria, and is related to climate changes. Several epidemics have occurred in Iran, the most recent of which was in 2005 with 1133 cases and 12 deaths. This study investigated the incidence of cholera over a 10-year period in Chabahar district, a region with one of the highest incidence rates of cholera in Iran. Descriptive retrospective study on data of patients with Eltor and NAG cholera reported to the Iranian Centre of Disease Control between 1997 and 2006. Data on the prevalence of cholera were gathered through a surveillance system, and a spatial database was developed using geographic information systems (GIS) to describe the relation of spatial and climate variables to cholera incidences. Fuzzy clustering (fuzzy C) method and statistical analysis based on logistic regression were used to develop a model of cholera dissemination. The variables were demographic characteristics, specifications of cholera infection, climate conditions and some geographical parameters. The incidence of cholera was found to be significantly related to higher temperature and humidity, lower precipitation, shorter distance to the eastern border of Iran and local health centres, and longer distance to the district health centre. The fuzzy C means algorithm showed that clusters were geographically distributed in distinct regions. In order to plan, manage and monitor any public health programme, GIS provide ideal platforms for the convergence of disease-specific information, analysis and computation of new data for statistical analysis. Copyright © 2012 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. An evaluation of Landsat data for input to a state geographic information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, E. M.; Bly, B. G., III; Garber, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a study to evaluate Landsat digital data, categorized by land cover, for input to the Maryland Automated Geographic Information (MAGI) system, the state georeferenced data base, are presented. Good correspondence is found between the MAGI system and Landsat data for six of seven categories: forest, water, crop/pasture, medium-density residential, low-density residential, and transitional (disturbed land, construction). Discrepancies between the results are found for commercial/industrial/institutional areas which are due to differences in interpretative methodologies, not to deficiencies in either data source. It is concluded that Landsat data are suitable for future Maryland land cover inventories, and can also be used to augment MAGI system data.

  5. Integrationof Remote Sensing and Geographic information system in Ground Water Quality Assessment and Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakak, N.

    2015-04-01

    Spatial variations in ground water quality in the Khartoum state, Sudan, have been studied using geographic information system (GIS) and remote sensing technique. Gegraphical informtion system a tool which is used for storing, analyzing and displaying spatial data is also used for investigating ground water quality information. Khartoum landsat mosac image aquired in 2013was used, Arc/Gis software applied to extract the boundary of the study area, the image was classified to create land use/land cover map. The land use map,geological and soil map are used for correlation between land use , geological formations, and soil types to understand the source of natural pollution that can lower the ground water quality. For this study, the global positioning system (GPS), used in the field to identify the borehole location in a three dimentional coordinate (Latitude, longitude, and altitude), water samples were collected from 156 borehole wells, and analyzed for physico-chemical parameters like electrical conductivity, Total dissolved solid,Chloride, Nitrate, Sodium, Magnisium, Calcium,and Flouride, using standard techniques in the laboratory and compared with the standards.The ground water quality maps of the entire study area have been prepared using spatial interpolation technique for all the above parameters.then the created maps used to visualize, analyze, and understand the relationship among the measured points. Mapping was coded for potable zones, non-potable zones in the study area, in terms of water quality sutability for drinking water and sutability for irrigation. In general satellite remote sensing in conjunction with geographical information system (GIS) offers great potential for water resource development and management.

  6. Extracting topographic structure from digital elevation data for geographic information-system analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenson, Susan K.; Domingue, Julia O.

    1988-01-01

    The first phase of analysis is a conditioning phase that generates three data sets: the original OEM with depressions filled, a data set indicating the flow direction for each cell, and a flow accumulation data set in which each cell receives a value equal to the total number of cells that drain to it. The original OEM and these three derivative data sets can then be processed in a variety of ways to optionally delineate drainage networks, overland paths, watersheds for userspecified locations, sub-watersheds for the major tributaries of a drainage network, or pour point linkages between watersheds. The computer-generated drainage lines and watershed polygons and the pour point linkage information can be transferred to vector-based geographic information systems for futher analysis. Comparisons between these computergenerated features and their manually delineated counterparts generally show close agreement, indicating that these software tools will save analyst time spent in manual interpretation and digitizing.

  7. Geographic information systems (GIS) for Health Promotion and Public Health: a review.

    PubMed

    Nykiforuk, Candace I J; Flaman, Laura M

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to identify how geographic information system (GIS) applications have been used in health-related research and to critically examine the issues, strengths, and challenges inherent to those approaches from the lenses of health promotion and public health. Through the review process, conducted in 2007, it is evident that health promotion and public health applications of GIS can be generally categorized into four predominant themes: disease surveillance (n = 227), risk analysis (n = 189), health access and planning (n = 138), and community health profiling (n = 115). This review explores how GIS approaches have been used to inform decision making and discusses the extent to which GIS can be applied to address health promotion and public health questions. The contribution of this literature review will be to generate a broader understanding of how GIS-related methodological techniques and tools developed in other disciplines can be meaningfully applied to applications in public health policy, promotion, and practice.

  8. The application of geographic information systems to geochemical studies in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Preston, J; Engel, B; Lalor, G C; Vutchkov, M K

    1996-09-01

    The Centre for Nuclear Sciences (CNS) uses a raster based geographic information system (GIS), integrated with a relational database to store information on point sampled data, including concentrations of over 50 elements and/or ions in a variety of sample materials. These data are filtered in the GIS to create surface layers and are assigned colours according to percentile ranges allowing visual inspection to be used to identify significant features and trends. The database currently contains raster map layers for soils and geologic features, point site data for water and air, and vector data for roads, rivers and streams. While data are still being added to the database interesting results are already being obtained and a few instances where the GIS was used to assist in the data interpretation are reported.

  9. Morphometric analysis in geographic information systems: applications of free software GRASS and R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grohmann, Carlos Henrique

    2004-11-01

    Development and interpretation of morphometric maps are important tools in studies related to neotectonics and geomorphology; Geographic Information Systems (GIS) allows speed and precision to this process, but applied methodology will vary according to available tools and degree of knowledge of each researcher about involved software. A methodology to integrate GIS and statistics in morphometric analysis is presented for the most usual morphometric parameters—hypsometry, slope, aspect, swath profiles, lineaments and drainage density, surface roughness, isobase and hydraulic gradient. The GIS used was the Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (GRASS-GIS), an open-source project that offers an integrated environment for raster and vector analysis, image processing and maps/graphics creation. Statistical analysis of parameters can be carried out on R, a system for statistical computation and graphics, through an interface with GRASS that allows raster maps and points files to be treated as variables for analysis. The basic element for deriving morphometric maps is the digital elevation model (DEM). It can be interpolated from scattered points or contours, either in raster or vector format; it is also possible to use DEMs from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission, with 30 m of ground resolution for the USA and 90 m for other countries. Proposed methodology can be adapted according to necessities and available tools. The use of free and open-source tools guarantees access to everyone, and its increasing popularization opens new development perspectives in this research field.

  10. The use of geographical information system (GIS) technology in surface mine reclamation monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, C.

    1999-07-01

    The use of a Geographic Information System (GIS) and related technologies (e.g., Digital cartographic tools, satellite image processing systems) can benefit the planning and monitoring of open-pit mine reclamation activities. PCI Geomatics, in conjunction with Luscar Limited's Line Creek Mine, has developed a GIS-based system designed to store information relevant to planning and assessing reclamation progress. Data that existed in various formats throughout the company, and which had been collected since the mine-planning phase, was integrated into the GIS. The system is used to summarize current reclamation activities and is linked to corporate costing procedures. Monitoring of reclamation activities and quantifying change in the mine area is easily done using the spatial analysis capabilities of the GIS. Assessments of the change in reclamation areas are enhanced by using satellite image data to produce inexpensive and timely information on the land base, and allow the comparison of the health of the vegetation to reclamation areas from year to year. The implemented system substantially reduces the time needed to generate statistics and produce maps for government or internal reports. Also, there are benefits in terms of both cost and effectiveness of reclamation planning.

  11. Integration of geographic information systems and logistic multiple regression for aquatic macrophyte modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Narumalani, S.; Jensen, J.R.; Althausen, J.D.; Burkhalter, S.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1994-06-01

    Since aquatic macrophytes have an important influence on the physical and chemical processes of an ecosystem while simultaneously affecting human activity, it is imperative that they be inventoried and managed wisely. However, mapping wetlands can be a major challenge because they are found in diverse geographic areas ranging from small tributary streams, to shrub or scrub and marsh communities, to open water lacustrian environments. In addition, the type and spatial distribution of wetlands can change dramatically from season to season, especially when nonpersistent species are present. This research, focuses on developing a model for predicting the future growth and distribution of aquatic macrophytes. This model will use a geographic information system (GIS) to analyze some of the biophysical variables that affect aquatic macrophyte growth and distribution. The data will provide scientists information on the future spatial growth and distribution of aquatic macrophytes. This study focuses on the Savannah River Site Par Pond (1,000 ha) and L Lake (400 ha) these are two cooling ponds that have received thermal effluent from nuclear reactor operations. Par Pond was constructed in 1958, and natural invasion of wetland has occurred over its 35-year history, with much of the shoreline having developed extensive beds of persistent and non-persistent aquatic macrophytes.

  12. Using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to Identify the Geographic Regions Where People That Use Ground Water are Most Vulnerable to Impacts from Underground Storage

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), the vulnerability of ground water supplies to contamination from underground storage tanks (USTs) was assessed. The analysis was conducted for the 48 contiguous states, and then again for groups of states corresponding to the EPA Regio...

  13. Using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to Identify the Geographic Regions Where People That Use Ground Water are Most Vulnerable to Impacts from Underground Storage

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), the vulnerability of ground water supplies to contamination from underground storage tanks (USTs) was assessed. The analysis was conducted for the 48 contiguous states, and then again for groups of states corresponding to the EPA Regio...

  14. Geographic information systems and chronic kidney disease: racial disparities, rural residence and forecasting

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Rudolph A.; Hotchkiss, John R.; O’Hare, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of health and health care provision in the United States vary substantially across regions, and there is substantial regional heterogeneity in population density, age distribution, disease prevalence, race and ethnicity, poverty and the ability to access care. Geocoding and geographic information systems (GIS) are important tools to link patient or population location to information regarding these characteristics. In this review, we provide an overview of basic GIS concepts and provide examples to illustrate how GIS techniques have been applied to the study of kidney disease, and in particular to understanding the interplay between race, poverty, rural residence and the planning of renal services for this population. The interplay of socioeconomic status and renal disease outcomes remains an important area for investigation and recent publications have explored this relationship utilizing GIS techniques to incorporate measures of socioeconomic status and racial composition of neighborhoods. In addition, there are many potential challenges in providing care to rural patients with chronic kidney disease including long travel times and sparse renal services such as transplant and dialysis centers. Geospatially fluent analytic approaches can also inform system level analyses of health care systems and these approaches can be applied to identify an optimal distribution of dialysis facilities. GIS analysis could help untangle the complex interplay between geography, socioeconomic status, and racial disparities in chronic kidney disease, and could inform policy decisions and resource allocation as the population ages and the prevalence of renal disease increases. PMID:23065915

  15. Geographic information systems and chronic kidney disease: racial disparities, rural residence and forecasting.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Rudolph A; Hotchkiss, John R; O'Hare, Ann M

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of health and health care provision in the United States vary substantially across regions, and there is substantial regional heterogeneity in population density, age distribution, disease prevalence, race and ethnicity, poverty and the ability to access care. Geocoding and geographic information systems (GIS) are important tools to link patient or population location to information regarding these characteristics. In this review, we provide an overview of basic GIS concepts and provide examples to illustrate how GIS techniques have been applied to the study of kidney disease, and in particular to understanding the interplay between race, poverty, rural residence and the planning of renal services for this population. The interplay of socioeconomic status and renal disease outcomes remains an important area for investigation and recent publications have explored this relationship utilizing GIS techniques to incorporate measures of socioeconomic status and racial composition of neighborhoods. In addition, there are many potential challenges in providing care to rural patients with chronic kidney disease including long travel times and sparse renal services such as transplant and dialysis centers. Geospatially fluent analytic approaches can also inform system level analyses of health care systems and these approaches can be applied to identify an optimal distribution of dialysis facilities. GIS analysis could help untangle the complex interplay between geography, socioeconomic status, and racial disparities in chronic kidney disease, and could inform policy decisions and resource allocation as the population ages and the prevalence of renal disease increases.

  16. Geographic information system (G.I.S.) research project at Navajo Community College - Shiprock Campus

    SciTech Connect

    Yazzie, R.; Peter, C.; Aaspas, B.; Isely, D.; Grey, R.

    1995-12-31

    The Navajo and Hopi GIS Project was established to assess the feasibility and impact of implementing GIS techology at Tribal institutions. Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories funded the Navajo and Hopi Geographic Information System (G.I.S.) Project and assigned a mentor from LANL to help guide the project for three summer months of 1995. The six organizations involved were: LANL, LLNL, Navajo Community College, Navajo Nation Land Office, Northern Arizona University and San Juan College. The Navajo Land Office provided the system software, hardware and training. Northern Arizona University selected two students to work at Hopi Water Resource Department. Navajo Community College provided two students and two faculty members. San Juan College provided one student to work with the N.C.C. group. This made up two project teams which led to two project sites. The project sites are the Water Resource Department on the Hopi reservation and Navajo Community College in Shiprock, New Mexico.

  17. The development of a natural language interface to a geographical information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toledo, Sue Walker; Davis, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    This paper will discuss a two and a half year long project undertaken to develop an English-language interface for the geographical information system GRASS. The work was carried out for NASA by a small business, Netrologic, based in San Diego, California, under Phase 1 and 2 Small Business Innovative Research contracts. We consider here the potential value of this system whose current functionality addresses numerical, categorical and boolean raster layers and includes the display of point sets defined by constraints on one or more layers, answers yes/no and numerical questions, and creates statistical reports. It also handles complex queries and lexical ambiguities, and allows temporarily switching to UNIX or GRASS.

  18. The analysis of forest policy using Landsat multi-spectral scanner data and geographic information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, D. L.; Brass, J. A.; Norman, S. D.; Tosta-Miller, N.

    1984-01-01

    The role of Landsat multi-spectral scanner (MSS) data for forest policy analysis in the state of California has been investigated. The combined requirements for physical, socio-economic, and institutional data in policy analysis were studied to explain potential data needs. A statewide MSS data and general land cover classification was created from which country-wide data sets could be extracted for detailed analyses. The potential to combine point sample data with MSS data was examined as a means to improve specificity in estimations. MSS data was incorporated into geographic information systems to demonstrate modeling techniques using abiotic, biotic, and socio-economic data layers. The review of system configurations to help the California Department of Forestry (CDF) acquire the capability demonstrated resulted in a sequence of options for implementation.

  19. Using geographic information system tools to improve access to MS specialty care in Veterans Health Administration.

    PubMed

    Culpepper, William J; Cowper-Ripley, Diane; Litt, Eric R; McDowell, Tzu-Yun; Hoffman, Paul M

    2010-01-01

    Access to appropriate and timely healthcare is critical to the overall health and well-being of patients with chronic diseases. In this study, we used geographic information system (GIS) tools to map Veterans Health Administration (VHA) patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and their access to MS specialty care. We created six travel-time bands around VHA facilities with MS specialty care and calculated the number of VHA patients with MS who resided in each time band and the number of patients who lived more than 2 hours from the nearest specialty clinic in fiscal year 2007. We demonstrate the utility of using GIS tools in decision-making by providing three examples of how patients' access to care is affected when additional specialty clinics are added. The mapping technique used in this study provides a powerful and valuable tool for policy and planning personnel who are evaluating how to address underserved populations and areas within the VHA healthcare system.

  20. The analysis of forest policy using Landsat multi-spectral scanner data and geographic information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, D. L.; Brass, J. A.; Norman, S. D.; Tosta-Miller, N.

    1984-01-01

    The role of Landsat multi-spectral scanner (MSS) data for forest policy analysis in the state of California has been investigated. The combined requirements for physical, socio-economic, and institutional data in policy analysis were studied to explain potential data needs. A statewide MSS data and general land cover classification was created from which country-wide data sets could be extracted for detailed analyses. The potential to combine point sample data with MSS data was examined as a means to improve specificity in estimations. MSS data was incorporated into geographic information systems to demonstrate modeling techniques using abiotic, biotic, and socio-economic data layers. The review of system configurations to help the California Department of Forestry (CDF) acquire the capability demonstrated resulted in a sequence of options for implementation.

  1. Geographic information systems (GIS): an emerging method to assess demand and provision for rehabilitation services.

    PubMed

    Passalent, Laura; Borsy, Emily; Landry, Michel D; Cott, Cheryl

    2013-09-01

    To illustrate the application of geographic information systems (GIS) as a tool to assess rehabilitation service delivery by presenting results from research recently conducted to assess demand and provision for community rehabilitation service delivery in Ontario, Canada. Secondary analysis of data obtained from existing sources was used to establish demand and provision profiles for community rehabilitation services. These data were integrated using GIS software. A number of descriptive maps were produced that show the geographical distribution of service provision variables (location of individual rehabilitation health care providers and location of private and publicly funded community rehabilitation clinics) in relation to the distribution of demand variables (location of the general population; location of specific populations (i.e., residents age 65 and older) and distribution of household income). GIS provides a set of tools for describing and understanding the spatial organization of the health of populations and the distribution of health services that can aid the development of health policy and answer key research questions with respect to rehabilitation health services delivery. Implications for Rehabilitation It is important to seek out alternative and innovative methods to examine rehabilitation service delivery. GIS is a computer-based program that takes any data linked to a geographically referenced location and processes it through a software system that manages, analyses and displays the data in the form of a map, allowing for an alternative level of analysis. GIS provides a set of tools for describing and understanding the spatial organization of population health and health services that can aid the development of health policy and answer key research questions with respect to rehabilitation health services delivery.

  2. Utilizing patient geographic information system data to plan telemedicine service locations.

    PubMed

    Soares, Neelkamal; Dewalle, Joseph; Marsh, Ben

    2017-09-01

    To understand potential utilization of clinical services at a rural integrated health care system by generating optimal groups of telemedicine locations from electronic health record (EHR) data using geographic information systems (GISs). This retrospective study extracted nonidentifiable grouped data of patients over a 2-year period from the EHR, including geomasked locations. Spatially optimal groupings were created using available telemedicine sites by calculating patients' average travel distance (ATD) to the closest clinic site. A total of 4027 visits by 2049 unique patients were analyzed. The best travel distances for site groupings of 3, 4, 5, or 6 site locations were ranked based on increasing ATD. Each one-site increase in the number of available telemedicine sites decreased minimum ATD by about 8%. For a given group size, the best groupings were very similar in minimum travel distance. There were significant differences in predicted patient load imbalance between otherwise similar groupings. A majority of the best site groupings used the same small number of sites, and urban sites were heavily used. With EHR geospatial data at an individual patient level, we can model potential telemedicine sites for specialty access in a rural geographic area. Relatively few sites could serve most of the population. Direct access to patient GIS data from an EHR provides direct knowledge of the client base compared to methods that allocate aggregated data. Geospatial data and methods can assist health care location planning, generating data about load, load balance, and spatial accessibility.

  3. Field validation of food service listings: a comparison of commercial and online geographic information system databases.

    PubMed

    Seliske, Laura; Pickett, William; Bates, Rebecca; Janssen, Ian

    2012-08-01

    Many studies examining the food retail environment rely on geographic information system (GIS) databases for location information. The purpose of this study was to validate information provided by two GIS databases, comparing the positional accuracy of food service places within a 1 km circular buffer surrounding 34 schools in Ontario, Canada. A commercial database (InfoCanada) and an online database (Yellow Pages) provided the addresses of food service places. Actual locations were measured using a global positioning system (GPS) device. The InfoCanada and Yellow Pages GIS databases provided the locations for 973 and 675 food service places, respectively. Overall, 749 (77.1%) and 595 (88.2%) of these were located in the field. The online database had a higher proportion of food service places found in the field. The GIS locations of 25% of the food service places were located within approximately 15 m of their actual location, 50% were within 25 m, and 75% were within 50 m. This validation study provided a detailed assessment of errors in the measurement of the location of food service places in the two databases. The location information was more accurate for the online database, however, when matching criteria were more conservative, there were no observed differences in error between the databases.

  4. Geographic Information Systems for healthcare organizations: a primer for nursing professions.

    PubMed

    Endacott, Ruth; Kamel Boulos, Maged N; Manning, Bryan R M; Maramba, Inocencio

    2009-01-01

    The sharing of spatial information among members of the health sector can have vast strategic and operational benefits. Geographic Information Systems, or GIS, can be a key technology in optimally using this information. There are two types of applications under GIS: (1) studying health outcomes and epidemiology and (2) studying and informing healthcare delivery. With the advent of GIS that can be used over the Internet, a wider audience of decision makers and stakeholders now has the opportunity to use these technologies through something as simple as a Web browser. There is a small but growing number of published articles giving examples of using GIS for nursing practice and research. However, increased efforts are needed to make nurses, other health professionals, and health organizations aware of the possibilities of these information products for empowering their decision making. An incremental "capacity building" approach is proposed as the best way forward for sustainable and sustained nursing GIS development. The aims of this article are (1) to provide a brief nontechnical overview for readers not familiar with GIS, (2) to provide a framework for the adoption of GIS in health service organizations, and (3) to identify ways in which GIS can impact on the nursing management of patients.

  5. Applications of geographic information systems (GIS) to exploration studies in the San Juan basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.M. )

    1990-05-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) is currently applying geographic information systems (GIS) technology to develop a geologic knowledge base that will provide the framework for an integrated basin analysis for the San Juan basin. GIS technology involves the integration of mapping and data-base functions that enable the user to integrate and manipulate spatial (coordinate) data with attribute (thematic) data in order to combine complex geographic, geologic, and geophysical data sets into resultant overlay and composite maps and to conduct multivariate exploratory data analysis and have access to a variety of options for analyzing these databases. The San Juan basin, a 13,500-mi{sup 2} Laramide structural basin in northwestern New Mexico, was chosen for the pilot project. The basin encompasses a maximum of over 15,000 ft of Paleozoic to Eocene sedimentary rock and contains economic deposits of natural gas, oil, coal, and uranium. Successful exploration in this basin requires an understanding of the complex stratigraphy and structural geology controlling the distribution of these resources. GIS technology applied to the San Juan basin includes both surface and subsurface data sets that establish a three-dimensional perspective of the basin's fundamental stratigraphic and structural framework and aid in the identification of its temporal and tectonic relationships relative to origin and occurrence of its resources. Among the digital data bases used for surface mapping is the US GeoData system from the USGS's national mapping program, which includes digital elevation models (DEM) for terrain elevations: digital line graphs (DLG) for planimetric information on boundaries, transportation, hydrography, and the US Public Land Survey system; and land use and land cover (LULC) data. Additional data bases used for surface mapping include surficial geology, locations of oil and gas wells, well status, and oil and gas fields.

  6. Mapping Of Construction Waste Illegal Dumping Using Geographical Information System (GIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zainun, Noor Yasmin; Rahman, Ismail Abdul; Azwana Rothman, Rosfazreen

    2016-11-01

    Illegal dumping of solid waste not only affecting the environment but also social life of communities, hence authorities should have an effective system to cater this problem. Malaysia is experiencing extensive physical developments and this has led to an increase of construction waste illegal dumping. However, due to the lack of proper data collection, the actual figure for construction waste illegal dumping in Malaysia are not available. This paper presents a mapping of construction waste illegal dumping in Kluang district, Johor using Geographic Information System (GIS) software. Information of the dumped waste such as coordinate, photos, types of material and quantity of waste were gathered manually through site observation for three months period. For quantifying the dumped waste, two methods were used which are the first method is based on shape of the waste (pyramids or squares) while the second method is based weighing approach. All information regarding the waste was assigned to the GIS for the mapping process. Results indicated a total of 12 types of construction waste which are concrete, tiles, wood, gypsum board, mixed construction waste, brick and concrete, bricks, sand, iron, glass, pavement and tiles, and concrete at 64 points locations of illegal dumping on construction waste in Kluang. These wastes were accounted to an estimated volume of 427.2636 m3. Hopefully, this established map will assist Kluang authority to improve their solid waste management system in Kluang.

  7. Salmonella infections modelling in Mississippi using neural network and geographical information system (GIS)

    PubMed Central

    Akil, Luma; Ahmad, H Anwar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Mississippi (MS) is one of the southern states with high rates of foodborne infections. The objectives of this paper are to determine the extent of Salmonella and Escherichia coli infections in MS, and determine the Salmonella infections correlation with socioeconomic status using geographical information system (GIS) and neural network models. Methods In this study, the relevant updated data of foodborne illness for southern states, from 2002 to 2011, were collected and used in the GIS and neural networks models. Data were collected from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), MS state Department of Health and the other states department of health. The correlation between low socioeconomic status and Salmonella infections were determined using models created by several software packages, including SAS, ArcGIS @RISK and NeuroShell. Results Results of this study showed a significant increase in Salmonella outbreaks in MS during the study period, with highest rates in 2011 (47.84±24.41 cases/100 000; p<0.001). MS had the highest rates of Salmonella outbreaks compared with other states (36±6.29 cases/100 000; p<0.001). Regional and district variations in the rates were also observed. GIS maps of Salmonella outbreaks in MS in 2010 and 2011 showed the districts with higher rates of Salmonella. Regression analysis and neural network models showed a moderate correlation between cases of Salmonella infections and low socioeconomic factors. Poverty was shown to have a negative correlation with Salmonella outbreaks (R2=0.152, p<0.05). Conclusions Geographic location besides socioeconomic status may contribute to the high rates of Salmonella outbreaks in MS. Understanding the geographical and economic relationship with infectious diseases will help to determine effective methods to reduce outbreaks within low socioeconomic status communities. PMID:26940103

  8. Technical note: The use of geographical information systems software for the spatial analysis of bone microstructure.

    PubMed

    Rose, David C; Agnew, Amanda M; Gocha, Timothy P; Stout, Sam D; Field, Julie S

    2012-08-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) software is typically used for analyzing geographically distributed data, allowing users to annotate points or areas on a map and attach data for spatial analyses. While traditional GIS-based research involves geo-referenced data (points tied to geographic locations), the use of this technology has other constructive applications for physical anthropologists. The use of GIS software for the study of bone histology offers a novel opportunity to analyze the distribution of bone nano- and microstructures, relative to macrostructure and in comparison to other variables of interest, such as biomechanical loading history. This approach allows for the examination of characteristics of single histological features while considering their role at the macroscopic level. Such research has immediate promise in examining the load history of bone by surveying the functional relationship between collagen fiber orientation (CFO) and strain mode. The diversity of GIS applications that may be utilized in bone histology research is just beginning to be explored. The goal of this study is to introduce a reliable methodology for such investigation and our objective is to quantify the heterogeneity of bone microstructure over an entire cross-section of bone using ArcGIS v 9.3 (ESRI). This was accomplished by identifying the distribution of remodeling units in a human metatarsal relative to bending axes. One biomechanical hypothesis suggests that CFO, manifested by patterns of birefringence, is indicative of mode of strain during formation. This study demonstrates that GIS can be used to investigate, describe, and compare such patterns through histological mapping. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Salmonella infections modelling in Mississippi using neural network and geographical information system (GIS).

    PubMed

    Akil, Luma; Ahmad, H Anwar

    2016-03-03

    Mississippi (MS) is one of the southern states with high rates of foodborne infections. The objectives of this paper are to determine the extent of Salmonella and Escherichia coli infections in MS, and determine the Salmonella infections correlation with socioeconomic status using geographical information system (GIS) and neural network models. In this study, the relevant updated data of foodborne illness for southern states, from 2002 to 2011, were collected and used in the GIS and neural networks models. Data were collected from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), MS state Department of Health and the other states department of health. The correlation between low socioeconomic status and Salmonella infections were determined using models created by several software packages, including SAS, ArcGIS @RISK and NeuroShell. Results of this study showed a significant increase in Salmonella outbreaks in MS during the study period, with highest rates in 2011 (47.84 ± 24.41 cases/100,000; p<0.001). MS had the highest rates of Salmonella outbreaks compared with other states (36 ± 6.29 cases/100,000; p<0.001). Regional and district variations in the rates were also observed. GIS maps of Salmonella outbreaks in MS in 2010 and 2011 showed the districts with higher rates of Salmonella. Regression analysis and neural network models showed a moderate correlation between cases of Salmonella infections and low socioeconomic factors. Poverty was shown to have a negative correlation with Salmonella outbreaks (R(2)=0.152, p<0.05). Geographic location besides socioeconomic status may contribute to the high rates of Salmonella outbreaks in MS. Understanding the geographical and economic relationship with infectious diseases will help to determine effective methods to reduce outbreaks within low socioeconomic status communities. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Spatial modelling of rheumatoid arthritis in Turkey by geographic information systems (GIS).

    PubMed

    İnanır, Ahmet; Dogan, Hakan Mete; Çeçen, Osman; Dogan, Cisem Nildem

    2013-11-01

    We described the recent spatial distribution of rheumatoid arthritis in Turkey and assessed the role of environmental variables in this distribution. We developed an observed rheumatoid arthritis (RA) incidence grid map by using georeferenced rheumatoid arthritis case data (2011) from the centres of 81 provinces and the kriging method with a spherical variogram model in geographic information systems (GIS). We also modelled rheumatoid arthritis incidence in GIS by using complementary spatial database including the grid map layers of 14 environmental variables of Turkey. We conducted principle component analysis and multiple regression to investigate the relationships among variables and develop a model, respectively. The produced model was run in GIS to obtain a predicted (model) RA map. We tested the reliability of the model map by residual statistics and found the model map dependable. Observed and model incidence maps revealed the geographic distribution of rheumatoid arthritis cases in Turkey. The mean temperature, minimum temperature, maximum temperature, water vapour pressure, elevation, potential evapotranspiration, latitude, distance to seas, sunshine fraction, precipitation, longitude and aspect variables were found to have significant impacts on rheumatoid arthritis. Consequently, the model incidence map established a good background to predict rheumatoid arthritis cases following environmental changes.

  11. Mapping environmental injustices: pitfalls and potential of geographic information systems in assessing environmental health and equity.

    PubMed Central

    Maantay, Juliana

    2002-01-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have been used increasingly to map instances of environmental injustice, the disproportionate exposure of certain populations to environmental hazards. Some of the technical and analytic difficulties of mapping environmental injustice are outlined in this article, along with suggestions for using GIS to better assess and predict environmental health and equity. I examine 13 GIS-based environmental equity studies conducted within the past decade and use a study of noxious land use locations in the Bronx, New York, to illustrate and evaluate the differences in two common methods of determining exposure extent and the characteristics of proximate populations. Unresolved issues in mapping environmental equity and health include lack of comprehensive hazards databases; the inadequacy of current exposure indices; the need to develop realistic methodologies for determining the geographic extent of exposure and the characteristics of the affected populations; and the paucity and insufficiency of health assessment data. GIS have great potential to help us understand the spatial relationship between pollution and health. Refinements in exposure indices; the use of dispersion modeling and advanced proximity analysis; the application of neighborhood-scale analysis; and the consideration of other factors such as zoning and planning policies will enable more conclusive findings. The environmental equity studies reviewed in this article found a disproportionate environmental burden based on race and/or income. It is critical now to demonstrate correspondence between environmental burdens and adverse health impacts--to show the disproportionate effects of pollution rather than just the disproportionate distribution of pollution sources. PMID:11929725

  12. Automating Geographic Information Systems (GIS) through Python for the Hydrological Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, K.

    2013-12-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have many applications in the hydrological sciences. However, GIS software is often expensive and difficult to automate. This paper will demonstrate how to automate GRASS GIS software using the Python programming language. Both GRASS GIS and Python are open source projects that are free for anyone to use. Automation of GIS processes is important when dealing with large-scale geographic studies, as large GIS maps are usually divided into discrete tiles. When conducting GIS transformations on such maps, the user must repeat the action for each tile, a process that is greatly expedited through automation. The paper will work through several examples of automated GIS processes and provide complete Python codes that demonstrate correct syntax for working with GRASS GIS applications. The provided examples will demonstrate automation of the following processes 1.) using raster math to calculate foliage thickness from LIDAR and DEM data; 2.) conducting raster interpolation from a set of vector points to develop a continuous hydraulic conductivity coverage; 3.) automating raster coloration to sync the coloration of a large number of raster tiles for website display, and 4.) constructing contoured vector lines from topography rasters. These examples programs will serve as the building blocks for readers, giving them the tools to automate any GIS process using Python and GRASS GIS.

  13. Mapping environmental injustices: pitfalls and potential of geographic information systems in assessing environmental health and equity.

    PubMed

    Maantay, Juliana

    2002-04-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have been used increasingly to map instances of environmental injustice, the disproportionate exposure of certain populations to environmental hazards. Some of the technical and analytic difficulties of mapping environmental injustice are outlined in this article, along with suggestions for using GIS to better assess and predict environmental health and equity. I examine 13 GIS-based environmental equity studies conducted within the past decade and use a study of noxious land use locations in the Bronx, New York, to illustrate and evaluate the differences in two common methods of determining exposure extent and the characteristics of proximate populations. Unresolved issues in mapping environmental equity and health include lack of comprehensive hazards databases; the inadequacy of current exposure indices; the need to develop realistic methodologies for determining the geographic extent of exposure and the characteristics of the affected populations; and the paucity and insufficiency of health assessment data. GIS have great potential to help us understand the spatial relationship between pollution and health. Refinements in exposure indices; the use of dispersion modeling and advanced proximity analysis; the application of neighborhood-scale analysis; and the consideration of other factors such as zoning and planning policies will enable more conclusive findings. The environmental equity studies reviewed in this article found a disproportionate environmental burden based on race and/or income. It is critical now to demonstrate correspondence between environmental burdens and adverse health impacts--to show the disproportionate effects of pollution rather than just the disproportionate distribution of pollution sources.

  14. Role of remote sensing, geographical information system (GIS) and bioinformatics in kala-azar epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Bhunia, Gouri Sankar; Dikhit, Manas Ranjan; Kesari, Shreekant; Sahoo, Ganesh Chandra; Das, Pradeep

    2011-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis or kala-azar is a potent parasitic infection causing death of thousands of people each year. Medicinal compounds currently available for the treatment of kala-azar have serious side effects and decreased efficacy owing to the emergence of resistant strains. The type of immune reaction is also to be considered in patients infected with Leishmania donovani (L. donovani). For complete eradication of this disease, a high level modern research is currently being applied both at the molecular level as well as at the field level. The computational approaches like remote sensing, geographical information system (GIS) and bioinformatics are the key resources for the detection and distribution of vectors, patterns, ecological and environmental factors and genomic and proteomic analysis. Novel approaches like GIS and bioinformatics have been more appropriately utilized in determining the cause of visearal leishmaniasis and in designing strategies for preventing the disease from spreading from one region to another. PMID:23554714

  15. UTILIZATION OF GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY IN THE ASSESSMENT OF REGIONAL GROUND-WATER QUALITY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nebert, Douglas; Anderson, Dean

    1987-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Pesticide Programs and several State agencies in Oregon has prepared a digital spatial database at 1:500,000 scale to be used as a basis for evaluating the potential for ground-water contamination by pesticides and other agricultural chemicals. Geographic information system (GIS) software was used to assemble, analyze, and manage spatial and tabular environmental data in support of this project. Physical processes were interpreted relative to published spatial data and an integrated database to support the appraisal of regional ground-water contamination was constructed. Ground-water sampling results were reviewed relative to the environmental factors present in several agricultural areas to develop an empirical knowledge base which could be used to assist in the selection of future sampling or study areas.

  16. New insights into the application of geographical information systems and remote sensing in veterinary parasitology.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Laura; Musella, Vincenzo; Biggeri, Annibale; Cringoli, Giuseppe

    2006-11-01

    Over the past 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in the development and application of geographical information systems (GIS) and remote sensing (RS). In veterinary sciences, particularly in veterinary parasitology, GIS and RS offer powerful means for disease mapping, ecological analysis and epidemiological surveillance and have become indispensable tools for processing, analysing and visualising spatial data. They can also significantly assist with the assessment of the distribution of health-relevant environmental factors via interpolation and modelling. In this review, we first summarize general aspects of GIS and RS, and emphasize the most important applications of these tools in veterinary parasitology, including recent advances in territorial sampling. Disease mapping, spatial statistics, including Bayesian inference, ecological analyses and epidemiological surveillance are summarized in the next section and illustrated with a set of figures. Finally, a set of conclusions is put forward.

  17. [Ecosystem services evaluation based on geographic information system and remote sensing technology: a review].

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Shi-Huang; Wang, Hui-Min

    2011-12-01

    Ecosystem services evaluation is a hot topic in current ecosystem management, and has a close link with human beings welfare. This paper summarized the research progress on the evaluation of ecosystem services based on geographic information system (GIS) and remote sensing (RS) technology, which could be reduced to the following three characters, i. e., ecological economics theory is widely applied as a key method in quantifying ecosystem services, GIS and RS technology play a key role in multi-source data acquisition, spatiotemporal analysis, and integrated platform, and ecosystem mechanism model becomes a powerful tool for understanding the relationships between natural phenomena and human activities. Aiming at the present research status and its inadequacies, this paper put forward an "Assembly Line" framework, which was a distributed one with scalable characteristics, and discussed the future development trend of the integration research on ecosystem services evaluation based on GIS and RS technologies.

  18. Topographic distribution of gastritis in heavy pigs investigated by a geographic information system approach.

    PubMed

    Pascotto, Ernesto; Capraro, Diego; Tomè, Paolo; Spanghero, Mauro

    2016-05-31

    The aim of this paper was to determine the topographic distribution of gastritis lesions in pigs through an open source geographic information system (GIS) software analysis. The stomachs of 146 Italian heavy pigs were collected at slaughter and subjected to macroscopic pathological examination of the internal mucosa. A total of 623 lesions were either classified as hyperplastic or follicular (97%) with the remaining minority of lesions categorised as atrophic and simple. The hyperplastic gastritis lesions had an average surface of 77.8 cm2 and were mainly located in an oval shaped area of the fundus region of the stomach near the Curvatura ventriculi major. The follicular gastritis lesions had generally a smaller surface (40.3 cm2) and were concentrated in two distinct small areas of the pyloric region. The GIS analysis provided the opportunity to produce useful maps showing the distribution and characteristics of gastritis in pigs.

  19. Geographic information system-based identification of suitable cultivation sites for wood-cultivated ginseng.

    PubMed

    Beon, Mu Sup; Park, Jun Ho; Kang, Hag Mo; Cho, Sung Jong; Kim, Hyun

    2013-10-01

    Wood-cultivated ginseng, including roots in its dried form, is produced in forest land without using artificial facilities such as light barriers. To identify suitable sites for the propagation of wood-cultivated ginseng, factor combination technique (FCT) and linear combination technique (LCT) were used with geographic information system and the results were superimposed onto an actual wood-cultivated ginseng plantation. The LCT more extensively searched for suitable sites of cultivation than that by the FCT; further, the LCT probed wide areas considering the predominance of precipitous mountains in Korea. In addition, the LCT showed the much higher degree of overlap with the actual cultivation sites; therefore, the LCT more comprehensively reflects the cultivator's intention for site selection. On the other hand, the inclusion of additional factors for the selection of suitable cultivation sites and experts' opinions may enhance the effectiveness and accuracy of the LCT for site application.

  20. High Level Waste Tank Closure Modeling with Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    SciTech Connect

    BOLLINGER, JAMES

    2004-07-29

    Waste removal from 49 underground storage tanks located in two tank farms involves three steps: bulk waste removal, water washing to remove residual waste, and in some cases chemical cleaning to remove additional residual waste. Not all waste can be completely removed by these processes-resulting in some residual waste loading following cleaning. Completely removing this residual waste would be prohibitively expensive; therefore, it will be stabilized by filling the tanks with grout. Acceptable residual waste loading inventories were determined using one-dimensional groundwater transport modeling to predict future human exposure based on several scenarios. These modeling results have been incorporated into a geographic information systems (GIS) application for rapid evaluation of various tank closure options.

  1. Requirements and principles for the implementation and construction of large-scale geographic information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Terence R.; Menon, Sudhakar; Star, Jeffrey L.; Estes, John E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper provides a brief survey of the history, structure and functions of 'traditional' geographic information systems (GIS), and then suggests a set of requirements that large-scale GIS should satisfy, together with a set of principles for their satisfaction. These principles, which include the systematic application of techniques from several subfields of computer science to the design and implementation of GIS and the integration of techniques from computer vision and image processing into standard GIS technology, are discussed in some detail. In particular, the paper provides a detailed discussion of questions relating to appropriate data models, data structures and computational procedures for the efficient storage, retrieval and analysis of spatially-indexed data.

  2. Coproduction of flood hazard assessment with public participation geographic information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, W. H.; Houston, D.; Schubert, J.; Basolo, V.; Feldman, D.; Matthew, R.; Sanders, B. F.; Karlin, B.; Goodrich, K.; Contreras, S.; Reyes, A.; Serrano, K.; Luke, A.

    2015-12-01

    While advances in computing have enabled the development of more precise and accurate flood models, there is growing interest in the role of crowdsourced local knowledge in flood modeling and flood hazard assessment. In an effort to incorporate the "wisdom of the crowd" in the identification and mitigation of flood hazard, this public participation geographic information system (PPGIS) study leveraged tablet computers and cloud computing to collect mental maps of flooding from 166 households in Newport Beach, California. The mental maps were analyzed using GIS techniques and compared with professional hydrodynamic model of coastal flooding. The results revealed varying levels of agreement between residents' mental maps and professional model of flood risk in regions with different personal and contextual characteristics. The quantification of agreement using composite indices can help validate professional models, and can also alert planners and decisionmakers of the need to increase flood awareness among specific populations.

  3. Municipal Solid Waste Management using Geographical Information System aided methods: a mini review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Debishree; Samadder, Sukha Ranjan

    2014-11-01

    Municipal Solid Waste Management (MSWM) is one of the major environmental challenges in developing countries. Many efforts to reduce and recover the wastes have been made, but still land disposal of solid wastes is the most popular one. Finding an environmentally sound landfill site is a challenging task. This paper addresses a mini review on various aspects of MSWM (suitable landfill site selection, route optimization and public acceptance) using the Geographical Information System (GIS) coupled with other tools. The salient features of each of the integrated tools with GIS are discussed in this paper. It is also addressed how GIS can help in optimizing routes for collection of solid wastes from transfer stations to disposal sites to reduce the overall cost of solid waste management. A detailed approach on performing a public acceptance study of a proposed landfill site is presented in this study. The study will help municipal authorities to identify the most effective method of MSWM.

  4. Geographic information system-based identification of suitable cultivation sites for wood-cultivated ginseng

    PubMed Central

    Beon, Mu Sup; Park, Jun Ho; Kang, Hag Mo; Cho, Sung Jong; Kim, Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Wood-cultivated ginseng, including roots in its dried form, is produced in forest land without using artificial facilities such as light barriers. To identify suitable sites for the propagation of wood-cultivated ginseng, factor combination technique (FCT) and linear combination technique (LCT) were used with geographic information system and the results were superimposed onto an actual wood-cultivated ginseng plantation. The LCT more extensively searched for suitable sites of cultivation than that by the FCT; further, the LCT probed wide areas considering the predominance of precipitous mountains in Korea. In addition, the LCT showed the much higher degree of overlap with the actual cultivation sites; therefore, the LCT more comprehensively reflects the cultivator’s intention for site selection. On the other hand, the inclusion of additional factors for the selection of suitable cultivation sites and experts’ opinions may enhance the effectiveness and accuracy of the LCT for site application. PMID:24235864

  5. Requirements and principles for the implementation and construction of large-scale geographic information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Terence R.; Menon, Sudhakar; Star, Jeffrey L.; Estes, John E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper provides a brief survey of the history, structure and functions of 'traditional' geographic information systems (GIS), and then suggests a set of requirements that large-scale GIS should satisfy, together with a set of principles for their satisfaction. These principles, which include the systematic application of techniques from several subfields of computer science to the design and implementation of GIS and the integration of techniques from computer vision and image processing into standard GIS technology, are discussed in some detail. In particular, the paper provides a detailed discussion of questions relating to appropriate data models, data structures and computational procedures for the efficient storage, retrieval and analysis of spatially-indexed data.

  6. Using a Geographical-Information-System-Based Decision Support to Enhance Malaria Vector Control in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Chanda, Emmanuel; Mukonka, Victor Munyongwe; Mthembu, David; Kamuliwo, Mulakwa; Coetzer, Sarel; Shinondo, Cecilia Jill

    2012-01-01

    Geographic information systems (GISs) with emerging technologies are being harnessed for studying spatial patterns in vector-borne diseases to reduce transmission. To implement effective vector control, increased knowledge on interactions of epidemiological and entomological malaria transmission determinants in the assessment of impact of interventions is critical. This requires availability of relevant spatial and attribute data to support malaria surveillance, monitoring, and evaluation. Monitoring the impact of vector control through a GIS-based decision support (DSS) has revealed spatial relative change in prevalence of infection and vector susceptibility to insecticides and has enabled measurement of spatial heterogeneity of trend or impact. The revealed trends and interrelationships have allowed the identification of areas with reduced parasitaemia and increased insecticide resistance thus demonstrating the impact of resistance on vector control. The GIS-based DSS provides opportunity for rational policy formulation and cost-effective utilization of limited resources for enhanced malaria vector control. PMID:22548086

  7. [Geographic information system based spatial analysis on chronic arsenic poisoning in a tin mining area, Thailand].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianjun; Wu, Liping; Lin, Kun

    2007-05-01

    To explore the spatial features of arsenic contamination and its association with chronic arsenic poisoning in a tin mining area of Thailand. Geographic information system(GIS) was built up with integration of arsenic concentration in varied environmental media and occurring location data of chronic arsenism patients. Then, the spatial interpolation (IDW), buffer zoning, query and rank correlation analysis were applied. Groundwater and surface farming land were classified according to local environmental arsenic standards; the relative risk areas were identified. The incidence of chronic arsenic poisoning was significantly correlated with arsenic level in groundwater and soil type (P < 0.05), and insignificantly related with water soluble arsenic in soil (P > 0.05). The arsenic content in drinking water could be critical to chronic arsenic poisoning. The soil type could be an important factor affecting such poisoning. Trend analysis in GIS could provide a valuable tool for understanding the pollution situation and disease surveillance.

  8. Landfill site suitability assessment by means of geographic information system analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, M.; Monavari, S. M.; Omrani, G. A.; Shariat, M.; Hosseini, S. M.

    2015-07-01

    Open dumping is the common procedure for final disposal of municipal solid waste (MSW) in Iran. Several environmental pollution and soil degradation problems were found as a consequence of poor planning of landfills. So recognition of the MSW landfill state is required to prevent environmental problems. The objective of this research was to study the suitability of existing municipal landfill sites using geographic information system methods. Tonekabon city in the west area of Mazandaran province, northern Iran, along the southern coast of the Caspian Sea, was chosen as a case study. In order to carry out this evaluation, two guidelines were used: Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) and regional screening guidelines. The results indicate that the landfills were not located in suitable sites and also that there are few suitable locations to install the landfills.

  9. The application of geographic information systems and spatial data during Legionnaires disease outbreak responses.

    PubMed

    Bull, M; Hall, I M; Leach, S; Robesyn, E

    2012-12-06

    A literature review was conducted to highlight the application and potential benefit of using geographic information systems (GIS) during Legionnaires' disease outbreak investigations. Relatively few published sources were identified, however, certain types of data were found to be important in facilitating the use of GIS, namely: patient data, locations of potential sources (e.g. cooling towers), demographic data relating to the local population and meteorological data. These data were then analysed to gain a better understanding of the spatial relationships between cases and their environment, the cases' proximity to potential outbreak sources, and the modelled dispersion of contaminated aerosols. The use of GIS in an outbreak is not a replacement for traditional outbreak investigation techniques, but it can be a valuable supplement to a response.

  10. A Comparison of Geographic Information Systems, Complex Networks, and Other Models for Analyzing Transportation Network Topologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Natalia (Technical Monitor); Kuby, Michael; Tierney, Sean; Roberts, Tyler; Upchurch, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    This report reviews six classes of models that are used for studying transportation network topologies. The report is motivated by two main questions. First, what can the "new science" of complex networks (scale-free, small-world networks) contribute to our understanding of transport network structure, compared to more traditional methods? Second, how can geographic information systems (GIS) contribute to studying transport networks? The report defines terms that can be used to classify different kinds of models by their function, composition, mechanism, spatial and temporal dimensions, certainty, linearity, and resolution. Six broad classes of models for analyzing transport network topologies are then explored: GIS; static graph theory; complex networks; mathematical programming; simulation; and agent-based modeling. Each class of models is defined and classified according to the attributes introduced earlier. The paper identifies some typical types of research questions about network structure that have been addressed by each class of model in the literature.

  11. The Contribution of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to Geography Education and Secondary School Students' Attitudes Related to GIS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artvinli, Eyup

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the place of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in teaching geography, the general level of secondary school students' attitudes towards Geography Information Systems and whether this changes according to different variables. The population of the research consists of the students studying in Istanbul,…

  12. The application of geographic information systems technology to geologic, hydrogeologic, and environmental research

    SciTech Connect

    Tew, B.H.; Irvin, G.D.

    1994-12-31

    Spatial data are of primary importance in nearly all aspects of geological and hydrogeological research. In undertaking such research, it is fundamental that observations and phenomena be located in a georeferenced coordinant system in order to understand and visualize the distribution of these data and to discern their relationships to other observations and phenomena. For this reason, geologic studies are particularly well suited to take advantage of computer-based geographic information system (GIS) technology, which combines the data input, storage, retrieval, analysis, and manipulation functions of a relational database with automated mapping and data visualization capability. GIS allows data to be analyzed and visualized in ways that would be too time consuming, too cost prohibitive, or nearly impossible to perform using other methods. Geological applications for GIS and related technology range from basic management of locational data (e.g., water or hydrocarbon well locations, sample localities, land holdings, etc.) and associated attribute information to detailed geologic mapping and complex analyses and modeling of hydrocarbon reservoirs, aquifer systems, or drainage basins. We have implemented GIS with the primary near-term function of supporting and enhancing our geological and hydrogeological research programs. Current research applications include monitoring and modeling of nonpoint source pollutant loadings to aquifer systems and drainage basins, delineation of public water supply wellhead protection areas, hydrogeologic flow modeling, and environmental monitoring. Examples from these studies serve to illustrate the applicability and efficiency of the GIS approach to geologic research.

  13. Optimum municipal solid waste collection using geographical information system (GIS) and vehicle tracking for Pallavapuram municipality.

    PubMed

    Kanchanabhan, T E; Abbas Mohaideen, J; Srinivasan, S; Sundaram, V Lenin Kalyana

    2011-03-01

    Waste collection and transportation is the contact point between waste generators and waste management systems. A proposal for an innovative model for the collection and transportation of municipal solid waste (MSW) which is a part of a solid waste management system using a spatial geo database, integrated in a geographical information system (GIS) environment is presented. Pallavapuram is a fast-developing municipality of Chennai city in the southern suburbs about 20 km from Chennai, the state capital of Tamil Nadu in India. The disposal of MSW was previously occurring in an indiscriminate and irrational manner in the municipality. Hence in the present study an attempt was made to develop an engineered design of solid waste collection using GIS with a vehicle tracking system and final disposal by composting with investment costs. The GIS was used to analyse existing maps and data, to digitize the existing ward boundaries and to enter data about the wards and disposal sites. The proposed GIS model for solid waste disposal would give information on the planning of bins, vehicles and the optimal route. In the case of disposal, composting would be a successful strategy to accelerate the decomposition and stabilization of the biodegradable components of waste in MSW.

  14. National Carbon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NatCarb)

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Nelson; Timothy Carr

    2009-03-31

    This annual and final report describes the results of the multi-year project entitled 'NATional CARBon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NatCarb)' (http://www.natcarb.org). The original project assembled a consortium of five states (Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky and Ohio) in the midcontinent of the United States (MIDCARB) to construct an online distributed Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) covering aspects of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) geologic sequestration. The NatCarb system built on the technology developed in the initial MIDCARB effort. The NatCarb project linked the GIS information of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) into a coordinated regional database system consisting of datasets useful to industry, regulators and the public. The project includes access to national databases and GIS layers maintained by the NatCarb group (e.g., brine geochemistry) and publicly accessible servers (e.g., USGS, and Geography Network) into a single system where data are maintained and enhanced at the local level, but are accessed and assembled through a single Web portal to facilitate query, assembly, analysis and display. This project improves the flow of data across servers and increases the amount and quality of available digital data. The purpose of NatCarb is to provide a national view of the carbon capture and storage potential in the U.S. and Canada. The digital spatial database allows users to estimate the amount of CO{sub 2} emitted by sources (such as power plants, refineries and other fossil-fuel-consuming industries) in relation to geologic formations that can provide safe, secure storage sites over long periods of time. The NatCarb project worked to provide all stakeholders with improved online tools for the display and analysis of CO{sub 2} carbon capture and storage data through a single website portal (http://www.natcarb.org/). While the external project is

  15. Application of Geographic Information System (GIS) in Student Experiential Learning on Climate Change and Sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbay, G.; Sriharan, S.; Fan, C.; Prakash, A.; San Juan, F.

    2016-12-01

    Consortium of minority serving institutions including Delaware State University, Virginia State University, Morgan State University, University of Alaska Fairbanks, and Elizabeth City State University have collaborated on various student experiential learning programs to expand the technology-based education by incorporating Geographic Information System (GIS) technique to promote student learning on climate change and sustainability. Specific objectives of this collaborative programs are to: (i) develop new or enhance existing courses of Introduction to Geographic Information System (GIS) and Introduction to Remote Sensing, (ii) enhance teaching and research capabilities through faculty professional development workshops, (iii) engage minority undergraduates in GIS and remote sensing research via experiential learning activities including summer internship, workshop, and work study experience. Ultimate goal is to prepare pipeline of minority task force with skills in GIS and remote sensing application in climate sciences. Various research projects were conducted on topics such as carbon footprint, atmospheric CO2, wildlife diversity, ocean circulation, wild fires, geothermal exploration, etc. Students taking GIS and remote sensing courses often express interests to be involved in research projects to enhance their knowledge and obtain research skills. Of about 400 students trained, approximately 30% of these students were involved in research experience in our programs since 2004. The summer undergraduate research experiences (REU) have offered hands-on research experience to the students on climate change and sustainability. Previous studies indicate that students who are previously exposed to environmental science only by a single field trip or an introductory course could be still at risk of dropping out of this field in their early years of the college. The research experience, especially at early college years, would significantly increase the participation

  16. A database paradigm for the management of DICOM-RT structure sets using a geographic information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Weber; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Wang, Jason; Low, Daniel A.; Ruan, Dan

    2014-03-01

    We devise a paradigm for representing the DICOM-RT structure sets in a database management system, in such way that secondary calculations of geometric information can be performed quickly from the existing contour definitions. The implementation of this paradigm is achieved using the PostgreSQL database system and the PostGIS extension, a geographic information system commonly used for encoding geographical map data. The proposed paradigm eliminates the overhead of retrieving large data records from the database, as well as the need to implement various numerical and data parsing routines, when additional information related to the geometry of the anatomy is desired.

  17. Observing the spread of common illnesses through a community: using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for surveillance.

    PubMed

    Horst, Michael A; Coco, Andrew S

    2010-01-01

    The recent implementation of electronic medical record systems allows for the development of systems to track common illness across a defined community. With the threats of bioterrorism and pandemic illness, syndromic surveillance methodologies have become an important area of study. There has been limited study of the application of syndromic surveillance techniques to communities for tracking common illnesses to improve health system resource allocation and inform communities. We analyzed visits from 26 primary care sites and one emergency department in a health system during a 13-month period in 2007 to 2008. Visits were coded for common respiratory and gastrointestinal illnesses. Using geographic information systems techniques, we plotted home addresses and developed criteria for census tract inclusion. The spatial distribution of the illnesses patterns was analyzed using Bayesian smoothing, Kriging and SaTScan (SaTScan, Boston, MA) statistical methods. The study included 857,555 visits, 107,286 of which were in the emergency department and 750,269 in the primary care sites. Patient visits were plotted and then aggregated to census tracts. We determined that at least a median of 10 visits per week was required to provide sufficient volume in defining census tracts included in the study (109 census tracts). Weekly visit rates by census tract were plotted using nearest neighbor empirical Bayesian smoothing and Kriging to produce a continuous surface. To detect statistical clustering of weekly visit rates, we used SaTScan and identified 7 weeks with statistically significant clusters for respiratory illnesses and 8 weeks with statistically significant clusters for gastrointestinal illnesses (out of 56 weeks included in the study). After adjusting for population density, the visit rate remained consistent for respiratory illnesses (analysis of variance P = .937), but the visit rate for gastrointestinal illnesses increased in the fourth population density quartile

  18. [Design and implementation of Geographical Information System on prevention and control of cholera].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-jun; Fang, Li-qun; Wang, Duo-chun; Wang, Lu-xi; Li, Ya-pin; Li, Yan-li; Yang, Hong; Kan, Biao; Cao, Wu-chun

    2012-04-01

    To build the Geographical Information System (GIS) database for prevention and control of cholera programs as well as using management analysis and function demonstration to show the spatial attribute of cholera. Data from case reporting system regarding diarrhoea, vibrio cholerae, serotypes of vibrio cholerae at the surveillance spots and seafoods, as well as surveillance data on ambient environment and climate were collected. All the data were imported to system database to show the incidence of vibrio cholerae in different provinces, regions and counties to support the spatial analysis through the spatial analysis of GIS. The epidemic trends of cholera, seasonal characteristics of the cholera and the variation of the vibrio cholerae with times were better understood. Information on hotspots, regions and time of epidemics was collected, and helpful in providing risk prediction on the incidence of vibrio cholerae. The exploitation of the software can predict and simulate the spatio-temporal risks, so as to provide guidance for the prevention and control of the disease.

  19. Geographic information system applied to the estimation of the plant water status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Cristina; de la Rosa, Jose Mª; Temnani, Abdel; Pérez-Pastor, Alejandro

    2017-04-01

    The importance of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) at handling managing geospatial data is demonstrated in a large number of scientific and professionals disciplines that have an impact on the territory. Thus, in agriculture, it is a transversal tool that includes the recopilation of: (i) geographic information: soil-plant geolocated sensors in experimental fields, water and fertilizers consumption for each irrigation sector, energy consumption and digital surface models (ii) representation and analysis: obtaining temperature maps, aspect models, solar radiation, run-off and salinity, as well as hardware, software and the people who compose it, results in the optimization of resources (goods, energy and workforce) what it makes the farm more efficient and more beneficial for the environment. In addition, in this project, the use of new technologies, such as satellite imagery or drones with multispectral cameras, allow to obtain other parameters that are not observed with the naked eye, like the state of the crop in spectroradiometric terms (remote sensing), stressed crops through indexes like NDVI, that may lead to take decisions like: (i) irrigation variations (ii) early detection of fillings in droppers (iii) affected areas for a pest, helping to distribute the workforce efficiently (pesticide use in an optimal way). The main objective of GIS use in this project is to establish direct relationships between parameters taken from the soil and plant with image processing in four different crops, orange, peach, apricot trees and table grape. In this way, the leaf area index (LAI) can be calculated, assessing how different irrigation management affects: i) Control (CTL), irrigated to ensure non-limiting water conditions (120% of crop evapotranspiration) and ii) Regulated deficit irrigation (RDI) irrigated as CTL during critical periods and decreasing irrigation in non-critical periods. Acknowledgements This work has been funded by the European Union LIFE+ project

  20. A geographic information system for resource managers based on multi-level remote sensing data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. J.; Ridd, M. K.

    1985-01-01

    Procedures followed in developing a test case geographic information system derived primarily from remotely sensed data for the North Cache Soil Conservation District (SCD) in northern Utah are outlined. The North Cache SCD faces serious problems regarding water allocation, flood and geologic hazards, urban encroachment into prime farmland, soil erosion, and wildlife habitat. Four fundamental data planes were initially entered into the geo-referenced data base: (1) land use/land cover information for the agricultural and built-up areas of the valley obtained from various forms of aerial photography; (2) vegetation/land cover in mountains classified digitally from Landsat; (3) geomorphic terrain units derived from aerial photography and soil maps; and (4) digital terrain maps obtained from DMA digital data. The land use/vegetation/land cover information from manual photographic and Landsat interpretation were joined digitally into a single data plane with an integrated legend, and segmented into quadrangle units. These were merged with the digitized geomorphic units and the digital terrain data using a Prime 400 minicomputer. All data planes were geo-referenced to a UTM coordinate grid.

  1. A geographic information system for resource managers based on multi-level remote sensing data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. J.; Ridd, M. K.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures followed in developing a test case geographic information system derived primarily from remotely sensed data for the North Cache Soil Conservation District (SCD) in northern Utah are outlined. The North Cache SCD faces serious problems regarding water allocation, flood and geologic hazards, urban encroachment into prime farmland, soil erosion, and wildlife habitat. Four fundamental data planes were initially entered into the geo-referenced data base: (1) land use/land cover information for the agricultural and built-up areas of the valley obtained from various forms of aerial photography; (2) vegetation/land cover in mountains classified digitally from LANDSAT; (3) geomorphic terrain units derived from aerial photography and soil maps; and (4) digital terrain maps obtained from DMA digital data. The land use/vegetation/land cover information from manual photographic and LANDSAT interpretation were joined digitally into a single data plane with an integrated legend, and segmented into quadrangle units. These were merged with the digitized geomorphic units and the digital terrain data using a Prime 400 minicomputer. All data planes were geo-referenced to a UTM coordinate grid.

  2. A geographic information system for resource managers based on multi-level remote sensing data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. J.; Ridd, M. K.

    1985-01-01

    Procedures followed in developing a test case geographic information system derived primarily from remotely sensed data for the North Cache Soil Conservation District (SCD) in northern Utah are outlined. The North Cache SCD faces serious problems regarding water allocation, flood and geologic hazards, urban encroachment into prime farmland, soil erosion, and wildlife habitat. Four fundamental data planes were initially entered into the geo-referenced data base: (1) land use/land cover information for the agricultural and built-up areas of the valley obtained from various forms of aerial photography; (2) vegetation/land cover in mountains classified digitally from Landsat; (3) geomorphic terrain units derived from aerial photography and soil maps; and (4) digital terrain maps obtained from DMA digital data. The land use/vegetation/land cover information from manual photographic and Landsat interpretation were joined digitally into a single data plane with an integrated legend, and segmented into quadrangle units. These were merged with the digitized geomorphic units and the digital terrain data using a Prime 400 minicomputer. All data planes were geo-referenced to a UTM coordinate grid.

  3. Prioritizing areas for malaria control using geographical information system in Sonitpur district, Assam, India.

    PubMed

    Nath, M J; Bora, A K; Yadav, K; Talukdar, P K; Dhiman, S; Baruah, I; Singh, L

    2013-06-01

    To identify the malaria hot spots at health subcentre level in an endemic district using a geographical information system (GIS). The results will be useful for rapid retrieval of malaria information, and to prioritize malaria control efforts in identified hot spots. Extraction, analysis and synthesis of relevant data. Malaria epidemiological data from 2006 to 2009 were analysed to determine the annual parasitic index, slide positivity rate, annual blood examination rate and Plasmodium falciparum percentage for each health subcentre in the district. Maps were produced using GIS, and integrated to identify the malaria hotspots. Out of 288 health subcentres, GIS identified 10 hot spots at extremely high risk of malaria and 14 hot spots at high risk of malaria. Malaria may flare up in these hot spots whenever favourable transmission conditions arise. Health authorities have been advised to establish control measures in these selected hot spots for timely prevention. There is a need for adequate monitoring and allocation of available resources for better interventions in the malaria hotspots. The GIS model used in this study can be used, even at village or cluster level, to pin point the malaria hot spots, and information can be updated and retrieved easily. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Basic mapping principles for visualizing cancer data using Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

    PubMed

    Brewer, Cynthia A

    2006-02-01

    Maps and other data graphics may play a role in generating ideas and hypotheses at the beginning of a project. They are useful as part of analyses for evaluating model results and then at the end of a project when researchers present their results and conclusions to varied audiences, such as their local research group, decision makers, or a concerned public. Cancer researchers are gaining skill with geographic information system (GIS) mapping as one of their many tools and are broadening the symbolization approaches they use for investigating and illustrating their data. A single map is one of many possible representations of the data, so making multiple maps is often part of a complete mapping effort. Symbol types, color choices, and data classing each affect the information revealed by a map and are best tailored to the specific characteristics of data. Related data can be examined in series with coordinated classing and can also be compared using multivariate symbols that build on the basic rules of symbol design. Informative legend wording and setting suitable map projections are also basic to skilled mapmaking.

  5. Geographic information systems for real-time environmental sensing at multiple scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esswein, Samuel Thomas

    The purpose of this investigation was to design, implement, and apply a real-time geographic information system for data intensive water resource research and management. The research presented is part of an ongoing, interdisciplinary research program supporting the development of the Intelligent River ® observation instrument. The objectives of this research were to 1) design and describe software architecture for a streaming environmental sensing information system, 2) implement and evaluate the proposed information system, and 3) apply the information system for monitoring, analysis, and visualization of an urban stormwater improvement project located in the City of Aiken, South Carolina, USA. This research contributes to the fields of software architecture and urban ecohydrology. The first contribution is a formal architectural description of a streaming environmental sensing information system. This research demonstrates the operation of the information system and provides a reference point for future software implementations. Contributions to urban ecohydrology are in three areas. First, a characterization of soil properties for the study region of the City of Aiken, SC is provided. The analysis includes an evaluation of spatial structure for soil hydrologic properties. Findings indicate no detectable structure at the scales explored during the study. The second contribution to ecohydrology comes from a long-term, continuous monitoring program for bioinfiltration basin structures located in the study area. Results include an analysis of soil moisture dynamics based on data collected at multiple depths with high spatial and temporal resolution. A novel metric is introduced to evaluate the long-term performance of bioinfiltration basin structures based on soil moisture observation data. Findings indicate a decrease in basin performance over time for the monitored sites. The third contribution to the field of ecohydrology is the development and application of a

  6. Environmental factor analysis of cholera in China using remote sensing and geographical information systems.

    PubMed

    Xu, M; Cao, C X; Wang, D C; Kan, B; Xu, Y F; Ni, X L; Zhu, Z C

    2016-04-01

    Cholera is one of a number of infectious diseases that appears to be influenced by climate, geography and other natural environments. This study analysed the environmental factors of the spatial distribution of cholera in China. It shows that temperature, precipitation, elevation, and distance to the coastline have significant impact on the distribution of cholera. It also reveals the oceanic environmental factors associated with cholera in Zhejiang, which is a coastal province of China, using both remote sensing (RS) and geographical information systems (GIS). The analysis has validated the correlation between indirect satellite measurements of sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface height (SSH) and ocean chlorophyll concentration (OCC) and the local number of cholera cases based on 8-year monthly data from 2001 to 2008. The results show the number of cholera cases has been strongly affected by the variables of SST, SSH and OCC. Utilizing this information, a cholera prediction model has been established based on the oceanic and climatic environmental factors. The model indicates that RS and GIS have great potential for designing an early warning system for cholera.

  7. Building geographic information system capacity in local health departments: lessons from a North Carolina project.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Marie Lynn; Silva, Jennifer M; Overstreet Galeano, M Alicia; Brown, Jeffrey P; Campbell, Douglas S; Coley, Evelyn; Cowan, Christopher S; Harvell, Dianne; Lassiter, Jenny; Parks, Jerry L; Sandelé, Wanda

    2005-12-01

    State government, university, and local health department (LHD) partners collaborated to build the geographic information system (GIS) capacity of 5 LHDs in North Carolina. Project elements included procuring hardware and software, conducting individualized and group training, developing data layers, guiding the project development process, coordinating participation in technical conferences, providing ongoing project consultation, and evaluating project milestones. The project provided health department personnel with the skills and resources required to use sophisticated information management systems, particularly those that address spatial dimensions of public health practice. This capacity-building project helped LHDs incorporate GIS technology into daily operations, resulting in improved time and cost efficiency. Keys to success included (1) methods training rooted in problems specific to the LHD, (2) required project identification by LHD staff with associated timelines for development, (3) ongoing technical support as staff returned to home offices after training, (4) subgrants to LHDs to ease hardware and software resource constraints, (5) networks of relationships among LHDs and other professional GIS users, and (6) senior LHD leadership who supported the professional development activities being undertaken by staff.

  8. Building Geographic Information System Capacity in Local Health Departments: Lessons From a North Carolina Project

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Marie Lynn; Silva, Jennifer M.; Overstreet Galeano, M. Alicia; Brown, Jeffrey P.; Campbell, Douglas S.; Coley, Evelyn; Cowan, Christopher S.; Harvell, Dianne; Lassiter, Jenny; Parks, Jerry L.; Sandelé, Wanda

    2005-01-01

    State government, university, and local health department (LHD) partners collaborated to build the geographic information system (GIS) capacity of 5 LHDs in North Carolina. Project elements included procuring hardware and software, conducting individualized and group training, developing data layers, guiding the project development process, coordinating participation in technical conferences, providing ongoing project consultation, and evaluating project milestones. The project provided health department personnel with the skills and resources required to use sophisticated information management systems, particularly those that address spatial dimensions of public health practice. This capacity-building project helped LHDs incorporate GIS technology into daily operations, resulting in improved time and cost efficiency. Keys to success included (1) methods training rooted in problems specific to the LHD, (2) required project identification by LHD staff with associated timelines for development, (3) ongoing technical support as staff returned to home offices after training, (4) subgrants to LHDs to ease hardware and software resource constraints, (5) networks of relationships among LHDs and other professional GIS users, and (6) senior LHD leadership who supported the professional development activities being undertaken by staff. PMID:16257950

  9. Control of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Using Geographic Information Systems from 2010 to 2014 in Khuzestan Province, Iran.

    PubMed

    Ostad, Mojdeh; Shirian, Sadegh; Pishro, Fatemeh; Abbasi, Tahereh; Ai, Armin; Azimi, Farideh

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmanisis (CL) is found worldwide and is considered to be endemic in 88 countries such as Iran. Geographic information system (GIS) is a method that can create, archive, analyze traditional map and place data of the disease distribution. The aim of this study was to produce distributional maps of CL over five years and evaluate the role of GIS in control of CL in Khuzestan province where an endemic area of CL in Iran is. CL epidemiological data on the District and village levels for the period 2010-2013 were provided as census by health surveillance system in all counties and in control diseases center (CDC) of Khuzestan province. After collection of CL data, the collected data of CL from 2010 to 2013 were analyzed using GIS. The collected data of CL from 2010 to 2013 was analyzed using GIS. The endemic areas of CL during 2010-2013 were recognized using GIS maps and the control programs of CL were done in these regions based on epidemiological situation and the stratification of risk areas. During the study period, there were 4672 recorded cases of clinical cases of CL by Khuzestan Health Center. Data of GIS referring to CL patients showed that center and eastern districts of Khuzestan had a significant number of cases. In 2014 that control program was done, ten distinct of Khuzestan Province didn't show any cases of the disease. In conclusion, analyses of data distributed in the geographic spaces are increasingly appreciated in leishmaniasis control management. GIS tools promoted greater efficiency in making decisions and planning activities in the control of vector born disease such as leishmaniasis.

  10. Using linear programming and geographical information systems (GIS) to model material reuse

    SciTech Connect

    Nobel, C.E.; Keckler, S.E.; Allen, D.T.

    1998-12-31

    A material reuse model that identifies cost-optimal reuse scenarios has been developed and applied to a water reuse planning problem. The model utilizes a linear programming algorithm within a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) map-based framework. Specifically, the model integrates database operations and optimization methods with the visualization benefits and geographic analysis offered by maps. The model was applied to water reuse planning because of the many possibilities for water reuse among a set of co-located facilities. The two steps of the water reuse modeling process are: determining the feasible reuse opportunities based on quality and solving a linear program to find the cost-based optimal scenario. This paper focuses on the development, formulation, and potential of this model. The model is illustrated through a case study of the Bayport Industrial Complex in Pasadena, Texas. The case study included an industrial water treatment plant, a wastewater treatment plant, and more than forty manufacturing facilities. For a set of three industries in the Bayport complex, potential cost savings of 11 percent and water savings of 82 percent were identified. For a set of eleven industries, cost savings of 18 percent and water savings of 76 percent were found. The cost included treatment, purchase price, and an water transportation cost based on distance. This model has applicability to water reclamation project planning as well as water management in water-poor regions. Additionally, with minor modifications, the water reuse model presented here may be used to quantitatively analyze the use and reuse of other materials. Thus, this model provides a quantitative tool to promote more efficient and sustainable system-based material cycles.

  11. Control of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Using Geographic Information Systems from 2010 to 2014 in Khuzestan Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ostad, Mojdeh; Shirian, Sadegh; Pishro, Fatemeh; Abbasi, Tahereh; Ai, Armin; Azimi, Farideh

    2016-01-01

    Background Cutaneous leishmanisis (CL) is found worldwide and is considered to be endemic in 88 countries such as Iran. Geographic information system (GIS) is a method that can create, archive, analyze traditional map and place data of the disease distribution. The aim of this study was to produce distributional maps of CL over five years and evaluate the role of GIS in control of CL in Khuzestan province where an endemic area of CL in Iran is. Methods CL epidemiological data on the District and village levels for the period 2010–2013 were provided as census by health surveillance system in all counties and in control diseases center (CDC) of Khuzestan province. After collection of CL data, the collected data of CL from 2010 to 2013 were analyzed using GIS. The collected data of CL from 2010 to 2013 was analyzed using GIS. The endemic areas of CL during 2010–2013 were recognized using GIS maps and the control programs of CL were done in these regions based on epidemiological situation and the stratification of risk areas. Results During the study period, there were 4672 recorded cases of clinical cases of CL by Khuzestan Health Center. Data of GIS referring to CL patients showed that center and eastern districts of Khuzestan had a significant number of cases. In 2014 that control program was done, ten distinct of Khuzestan Province didn’t show any cases of the disease. Conclusion In conclusion, analyses of data distributed in the geographic spaces are increasingly appreciated in leishmaniasis control management. GIS tools promoted greater efficiency in making decisions and planning activities in the control of vector born disease such as leishmaniasis. PMID:27467509

  12. Equal Access to Early Childhood Education in South Korea Using the Geographic Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jin; Jang, Youn Joo

    2017-01-01

    While the importance of early childhood education is well documented, scant attention is afforded to the access to institutions for early childhood education. Uneven distribution of institutions for early childhood education in segregated metropolitan areas can cause inequality of educational opportunity. By using the Geographic Information System…

  13. Role of geographic information system (GIS) in watershed simulation by WinVAST model.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Ling; Lo, Shang-Lien; Yu, Shaw-L

    2006-10-01

    The uncertainty of modeling input will increase the simulation error, and this situation always happens in a model without user-friendly interface. WinVAST model, developed by the University of Virginia in 2003, treats an entire multi-catchment by a tree-view structure. Its extra computer programs can connect geographic information system (GIS). Model users can prepare all the necessary information in ArcGIS. Extracting information from GIS interface can not only decrease the inconvenience of data input, but also lower the uncertainty due to data preparation. The Daiyuku Creek and Qupoliao Creek in the Fei-tsui reservoir watershed in Northern Taiwan provided the setting for the case study reported herein. The required information, including slope, stream length, subbasin area, soil type and land-use condition, for WinVAST model should be prepared in a Microsoft Access database, which is the project file of WinVAST with extension mdb. In ArcGIS interface, when the soil layer, land-use layer, and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) map are prepared, all the watershed information can be created as well. This study compared the simulation results from automatically generated input and manual input. The results show that the relative simulation error resulting from the rough process of data input can be around 30% in runoff simulation, and even reach 70% in non-point source pollution (NPSP) simulation. It could conclude that GIS technology is significant for predicting watershed responses by WinVAST model, because it can efficiently reduce the uncertainty induced by input errors.

  14. Application of MODFLOW and geographic information system to groundwater flow simulation in North China Plain, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiqin; Shao, Jingli; Song, Xianfang; Zhang, Yongbo; Huo, Zhibin; Zhou, Xiaoyuan

    2008-10-01

    MODFLOW is a groundwater modeling program. It can be compiled and remedied according to the practical applications. Because of its structure and fixed data format, MODFLOW can be integrated with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology for water resource management. The North China Plain (NCP), which is the politic, economic and cultural center of China, is facing with water resources shortage and water pollution. Groundwater is the main water resource for industrial, agricultural and domestic usage. It is necessary to evaluate the groundwater resources of the NCP as an entire aquifer system. With the development of computer and internet information technology it is also necessary to integrate the groundwater model with the GIS technology. Because the geological and hydrogeological data in the NCP was mainly in MAPGIS format, the powerful function of GIS of disposing of and analyzing spatial data and computer languages such as Visual C and Visual Basic were used to define the relationship between the original data and model data. After analyzing the geological and hydrogeological conditions of the NCP, the groundwater flow numerical simulation modeling was constructed with MODFLOW. On the basis of GIS, a dynamic evaluation system for groundwater resources under the internet circumstance was completed. During the process of constructing the groundwater model, a water budget was analyzed, which showed a negative budget in the NCP. The simulation period was from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2003. During this period, the total recharge of the groundwater system was 49,374 × 106 m3 and the total discharge was 56,530 × 106 m3 the budget deficit was -7,156 × 106 m3. In this integrated system, the original data including graphs and attribution data could be stored in the database. When the process of evaluating and predicting groundwater flow was started, these data were transformed into files that the core program of MODFLOW could read. The calculated water

  15. Application of geographical information system (GIS) technology in the control of Buruli ulcer in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Kenu, Ernest; Ganu, Vincent; Calys-Tagoe, Benedict N L; Yiran, Gerald A B; Lartey, Margaret; Adanu, Richard

    2014-07-16

    Buruli ulcer (BU) disease is a chronic debilitating skin disease caused by Mycobacteriumulcerans. It is associated with areas where the water is slow-flowing or stagnant. Policy makers take the necessary strategic and policy decisions especially where to target interventions based on available evidence including spatial distribution of the disease. Unfortunately, there is limited information on the spatial distribution of BU in Ghana. The aim of the study was to use Geographical Information System (GIS) technology to show the spatial distribution and hot spots of BU in Greater Accra and Eastern Regions in Ghana. The information could then be used by decision makers to make the necessary strategic and policy decisions, especially where to target intervention. We conducted a community case search and spatial mapping in two districts in Eastern region (Akuapem South and Suhum- Kraboa-Coaltar) and two districts in Greater Accra region (Ga West and Ga South Municipalities) of Ghana to identify the spatial distribution of BU cases in the communities along the Densu River. These municipalities are already known to the Ministry of Health as having high case load of BU. Structured questionnaires on demographic characteristics, environmental factors and general practices were administered to the cases.Using the E-trex Garmin Geographical Positioning System (GPS), the location of the case patient was marked along with any important attributes of the community. ArcGIS was used to generate maps showing BU distribution and hot spots. Two hundred and fifty-seven (257) probable BU patients were enrolled in the study after the case search. These cases and their houses (or homes) were located with the GPS. The GIS maps generated showed a varying distribution of BU in the various communities. We observed clustering of BU patients downstream of the Densu River which had hitherto not been observed. There is clustering of BU in areas where the river was most contaminated. The identified

  16. System for electronic transformation and geographic correlation of satellite television information. [cloud cover photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubenskiy, V. P.; Nemkovskiy, B. L.; Rodionov, B. N.

    1974-01-01

    An electronic transformation and correlation system has been developed for the Meteor space weather system which provides transformation and scaling of the original picture, accounts for satellite flight altitude and inclinations of the optical axes of the transmitting devices, and simultaneously superposes the geographical coordinate grid on the transformed picture.

  17. System for electronic transformation and geographic correlation of satellite television information. [cloud cover photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubenskiy, V. P.; Nemkovskiy, B. L.; Rodionov, B. N.

    1974-01-01

    An electronic transformation and correlation system has been developed for the Meteor space weather system which provides transformation and scaling of the original picture, accounts for satellite flight altitude and inclinations of the optical axes of the transmitting devices, and simultaneously superposes the geographical coordinate grid on the transformed picture.

  18. A Geographic Information System framework for the dataset visualization in Wireless Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shufean, Md Abu

    In Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), collecting data from sensor nodes and analyzing them is a challenging task. A Geographic Information System (GIS) could be a better way to analyze, manage, and represent the dataset collected by sensor nodes. Motivated by these considerations, we proposed a system to visualize the WSN dataset in real time using a software implementation of the GIS framework called ArcGIS. In this research, we have implemented our proposed system where a couple of sensor nodes has been deployed to collect Dissolved Oxygen (DO) and water pH value continuously from the John Gray Center pond of Lamar University. To keep track of each sensor node we have accumulated their precise location, sensing time, and corresponding data in our lab. After analyzing couple of data storing technique, we have decided to use PostGIS (a geospatial database) to store data and developed an ArcGIS centric application. Finally, with the help of that application, a web map was designed combining all different data source layers for end users where all the technical details have been encapsulated behind a base map. This web map has been hosted in a web server so that users sitting in any location can easily access and visualize desired data with a real time update. This research work has been supported by National Science Foundation under Grants CNS-0922888 and CNS-1427838.

  19. Assessment of needs and requirements for a geographic information system for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, S.L.; Daum, M.L.; Scott, A.

    1992-11-19

    At the request of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Office of Environmental Restoration, and with the cooperation of the Safety and Environmental Protection and Plant Engineering Divisions, a Geographic Information System (GIS) Task Group has undertaken an effort to identify the data requirements, potential applications, and computing environment within which an integrated GIS could be implemented to meet the environmental and facilities management needs of the Laboratory. The Task Group held discussions with the three participating groups and with Laboratory officials. Software and hardware vendors were invited to demonstrate their products to all participants using BNL data, and private consultants discussed their GIS and database applications. After considering the needs of the three groups and other general implementation concerns, a list of ten requirements for a BNL site-wide GIS has been determined. On the basis of these considerations, three conceptual models for an integrated GIS are defined. These include a highly centralized system, a fully distributed system, and a composite model. The models differ in their allocation of responsibility for data management, applications development and GIS analysis, and local user support. Several issues remain to be resolved before an integrated GIS for the three operational groups can be fully implemented.

  20. Implementation of cartographic symbols for planetary mapping in geographic information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nass, A.; van Gasselt, S.; Jaumann, R.; Asche, H.

    2011-09-01

    The steadily growing international interest in the exploration of planets in our Solar System and many advances in the development of space-sensor technology have led to the launch of a multitude of planetary missions to Mercury, Venus, the Earth's moon, Mars and various Outer-Solar System objects, such as the Jovian and Saturnian satellites. Camera instruments carried along on these missions image surfaces in different wavelength ranges and under different viewing angles, permitting additional data to be derived, such as spectral data or digital terrain models. Such data enable researchers to explore and investigate the development of planetary surfaces by analyzing and interpreting the inventory of surface units and structures. Results of such work are commonly abstracted and represented in thematic, mostly geological and geomorphological, maps. In order to facilitate efficient collaboration among different planetary research disciplines, mapping results need to be prepared, described, managed, archived, and visualized in a uniform way. These tasks have been increasingly carried out by means of computer-based geographic information systems (GIS or GI systems) which have come to be widely employed in the field of planetary research since the last two decades. In this paper we focus on the simplification of mapping processes, putting specific emphasis on a cartographically correct visualization of planetary mapping data using GIS-based environments. We present and discuss the implementation of a set of standardized cartographic symbols for planetary mapping based on the Digital Cartographic Standard for Geologic Map Symbolization as prepared by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) for the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC). Furthermore, we discuss various options to integrate this symbol catalog into generic GI systems, and more specifically into the Environmental Systems Research Institute's (ESRI) ArcGIS environment, and focus on requirements for

  1. Geographic Information Systems-Transportation ISTEA management systems server-net prototype pooled fund study: Phase B summary

    SciTech Connect

    Espinoza, J. Jr.; Dean, C.D.; Armstrong, H.M.

    1997-06-01

    The Geographic Information System-Transportation (GIS-T) ISTEA Management Systems Server Net Prototype Pooled Fund Study represents the first national cooperative effort in the transportation industry to address the management and monitoring systems as well as the statewide and metropolitan transportation planning requirements of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA). The Study was initiated in November 1993 through the Alliance for Transportation Research and under the leadership of the New Mexico State Highway and Transportation Department. Sandia National Laboratories, an Alliance partner, and Geographic Paradigm Computing. Inc. provided technical leadership for the project. In 1992, the Alliance for Transportation Research, the New Mexico State Highway and Transportation Department, Sandia National Laboratories, and Geographic Paradigm Computing, Inc., proposed a comprehensive research agenda for GIS-T. That program outlined a national effort to synthesize new transportation policy initiatives (e.g., management systems and Intelligent Transportation Systems) with the GIS-T server net ideas contained in the NCHRP project {open_quotes}Adaptation of GIS to Transportation{close_quotes}. After much consultation with state, federal, and private interests, a project proposal based on this agenda was prepared and resulted in this Study. The general objective of the Study was to develop GIS-T server net prototypes supporting the ISTEA requirements for transportation planning and management and monitoring systems. This objective can be further qualified to: (1) Create integrated information system architectures and design requirements encompassing transportation planning activities and data. (2) Encourage the development of functional GIS-T server net prototypes. (3) Demonstrate multiple information systems implemented in a server net environment.

  2. Assessing spatial patterns of HIV knowledge in rural Mozambique using geographic information systems.

    PubMed

    Buehler, Charlotte P; Blevins, Meridith; Ossemane, Ezequiel B; González-Calvo, Lázaro; Ndatimana, Elisée; Vermund, Sten H; Sidat, Mohsin; Olupona, Omo; Moon, Troy D

    2015-03-01

    To conduct a cross-sectional mapping analysis of HIV knowledge in Zambézia Province, Mozambique, and to examine spatial patterns of HIV knowledge and associated household characteristics. A population-based cluster survey was administered in 2010; data were analysed from 201 enumeration areas in three geographically diverse districts: Alto Molócuè, Morrumbala and Namacurra. We assessed HIV knowledge scores (0-9 points) using previously validated assessment tools. Using geographic information systems (GIS), we mapped hot spots of high and low HIV knowledge. Our multivariable linear regression model estimated HIV knowledge associations with distance to nearest clinic offering antiretroviral therapy, respondent age, education, household size, number of children under five, numeracy, literacy and district of residence. We found little overall HIV knowledge in all three districts. People in Alto Molócuè knew comparatively most about HIV, with a median score of 3 (IQR 2-5) and 22 of 51 (43%) enumeration areas scoring ≥4 of 9 points. Namacurra district, closest to the capital city and expected to have the best HIV knowledge levels, had a median score of 1 (IQR 0-3) and only 3 of 57 (5%) enumeration areas scoring ≥4 points. More HIV knowledge was associated with more education, age, household size, numeracy and proximity to a health facility offering antiretroviral therapy. HIV knowledge is critical for its prevention and treatment. By pinpointing areas of poor HIV knowledge, programme planners can prioritize educational resources and outreach initiatives within the context of antiretroviral therapy expansion. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Earth Observation, Geographic Information Systems and Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Hay, S.I.; Omumbo, J.A.; Craig, M.H.; Snow, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    This review highlights the progress and current status of remote sensing (RS) and geographical information systems (GIS) as currently applied to the problem of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The burden of P. falciparum malaria in SSA is first summarized and then contrasted with the paucity of accurate and recent information on the nature and extent of the disease. This provides perspective on both the global importance of the pathogen and the potential for contribution of RS and GIS techniques. The ecology of P. falciparum malaria and its major anopheline vectors in SSA is then outlined, to provide the epidemiological background for considering disease transmission processes and their environmental correlates. Because RS and GIS are recent techniques in epidemiology, all mosquito-borne diseases are considered in this review in order to convey the range of ideas, insights and innovation provided. To conclude, the impact of these initial studies is assessed and suggestions provided on how these advances could be best used for malaria control in an appropriate and sustainable manner, with key areas for future research highlighted. PMID:10997207

  4. Lessons learned: geographic information systems and farmworkers in the Lake States.

    PubMed

    Vela Acosta, M S; Reding, D J; Cooper, S P; Gunderson, P

    2005-02-01

    Agencies serving the estimated 42,000 to 137,000 migrant and seasonal farmworkers in the Lake States (Wisconsin, Michigan, and Minnesota) face distinct challenges, including inadequate access to farmworker data to address their needs. This project developed and evaluated a geographical information system (GIS) database for compiling and displaying existing farmworker data in the Lake States. A three-step study was conducted in the Lake States: (1) a preliminary resource and needs assessment was conducted among agencies serving farmworkers, (2) a GIS product was created using data available from state agencies, and (3) the GIS product was evaluated by an advisory board of qualified occupational health and safety representatives for appropriateness, applications, and ease of use. Agencies participated by sharing their available farmworker data. The GIS product consisted of a CD-ROM with data displayed in a graphic format and downloadable spreadsheet files consolidated by county demographic, crop, housing, and migrant health clinic information. Evaluators of the GIS product found it to be an accessible, unique clearinghouse for farmworker-related data. The GIS product can become a valuable tool for agencies serving farmworkers and those researching farmworker-related issues. Agencies and health professionals require useful and comprehensive databases to track and serve farmworkers, and a multi-agency partnership using GIS technology could provide this capability. Further research is required with improved definitions and resources to apply the GIS product.

  5. Earth observation, geographic information systems and Plasmodium falciparum malaria in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Hay, S I; Omumbo, J A; Craig, M H; Snow, R W

    2000-01-01

    This review highlights the progress and current status of remote sensing (RS) and geographical information systems (GIS) as currently applied to the problem of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The burden of P. falciparum malaria in SSA is first summarized and then contrasted with the paucity of accurate and recent information on the nature and extent of the disease. This provides perspective on both the global importance of the pathogen and the potential for contribution of RS and GIS techniques. The ecology of P. falciparum malaria and its major anopheline vectors in SSA in then outlined, to provide the epidemiological background for considering disease transmission processes and their environmental correlates. Because RS and GIS are recent techniques in epidemiology, all mosquito-borne diseases are considered in this review in order to convey the range of ideas, insights and innovation provided. To conclude, the impact of these initial studies is assessed and suggestions provided on how these advances could be best used for malaria control in an appropriate and sustainable manner, with key areas for future research highlighted.

  6. Modeling the suitability of potential wetland mitigation sites with a geographic information system.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R. A.; LaGory, K. E.; Kuiper, J. A.; Environmental Assessment

    2004-03-01

    Wetland mitigation is frequently required to compensate for unavoidable impacts to wetlands. Site conditions and landscape context are critical factors influencing the functions that created wetlands perform. We developed a spatial model and used a geographic information system (GIS) to identify suitable locations for wetland mitigation sites. The model used six variables to characterize site conditions: hydrology, soils, historic condition, vegetation cover, adjacent vegetation, and land use. For each variable, a set of suitability scores was developed that indicated the wetland establishment potential for different variable states. Composite suitability scores for individual points on the landscape were determined from the weighted geometric mean of suitability scores for each variable at each point. These composite scores were grouped into five classes and mapped as a wetland mitigation suitability surface with a GIS. Sites with high suitability scores were further evaluated using information on the feasibility of site modification and project cost. This modeling approach could be adapted by planners for use in identifying the suitability of locations as wetland mitigation sites at any site or region.

  7. Identifying populations potentially exposed to agricultural pesticides using remote sensing and a Geographic Information System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, M.H.; Nuckols, J.R.; Weigel, S. J.; Cantor, K.P.; Miller, Roger S.

    2000-01-01

    Pesticides used in agriculture may cause adverse health effects among the population living near agricultural areas. However, identifying the populations most likely to be exposed is difficult. We conducted a feasibility study to determine whether satellite imagery could be used to reconstruct historical crop patterns. We used historical Farm Service Agency records as a source of ground reference data to classify a late summer 1984 satellite image into crop species in a three-county area in south central Nebraska. Residences from a population-based epidemiologic study of non-Hodgkin lymphoma were located on the crop maps using a geographic information system (GIS). Corn, soybeans, sorghum, and alfalfa were the major crops grown in the study area. Eighty-five percent of residences could be located, and of these 22% had one of the four major crops within 500 m of the residence, an intermediate distance for the range of drift effects from pesticides applied in agriculture. We determined the proximity of residences to specific crop species and calculated crop-specific probabilities of pesticide use based on available data. This feasibility study demonstrated that remote sensing data and historical records on crop location can be used to create historical crop maps. The crop pesticides that were likely to have been applied can be estimated when information about crop-specific pesticide use is available. Using a GIS, zones of potential exposure to agricultural pesticides and proximity measures can be determined for residences in a study.

  8. Mapping risk of bovine fasciolosis in the south of Brazil using Geographic Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Dutra, L H; Molento, M B; Naumann, C R C; Biondo, A W; Fortes, F S; Savio, D; Malone, J B

    2010-04-19

    Fasciolosis, caused by Fasciola hepatica, is an endemic disease of ruminants that occurs in several countries of South America where it can lead to decreased production and fertility and, in severe cases, animal death. Although very prevalent, information on the epidemiology of the disease is incomplete in Brazil. The objective of the present study was to define the prevalence of F. hepatica in the livers of cattle from slaughterhouses and correlate the data with the animal's origin (climate and altitude) using a Geographic Information System (GIS). The data was used to create an epidemiological map of fasciolosis by state (Rio Grande do Sul, Santa Catarina, Paraná), by municipality (n=530) and by year (2003-2008). Information was analyzed using a databank from slaughterhouses with Federal Inspection Services of the Ministry of Agriculture. The highest cattle infection rate was found in the two most Southern states of Rio Grande do Sul (18.7%) and Santa Catarina (10.1%). Animals from the Campanha region of Rio Grande do Sul and from the central coast area of Santa Catarina had prevalences of greater than 40%. Cattle from low altitudes municipalities were significantly more likely to have the disease (p<0.05). No significant differences were found between high or low prevalence and ambient temperatures. Risk maps resulting from this study provide information on the epidemiology and transmission of F. hepatica in Southern Brazil needed for design of appropriate control measures to control economic impacts. F. hepatica may represent an important source of zoonotic infection of humans as well; therefore these findings may be complemented by future studies on human infections in high risk areas.

  9. Electronic warfare situation analysis using a geographic information system/expert system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Sylvia; Brown, Richard

    1999-07-01

    Stressful working condition, large volume of data and complexity of the battlefield analysis process challenge even the most experienced situation analyst. An expert system tool called ExpertANALYST has previously been developed to help EW analysts process the large amount of information that current EW sensor systems collect. The expert system in the ExpertANALYST processes relatively low level data and does not consider many sources of information. In order for it to produce more sophisticated analysis, it must have access to the same information that is available to human analysts. The paper describes GIS/Expert System prototype software that extends the analysis capabilities of the expert system. The extension adds geo-spatial analysis capability through the interaction with a commercial GIS. This tool allows testing analyst- supplied hypothesis using knowledge defined in the rule base and the GIS data. Preliminary results are promising; however, the limited availability of fuzzy geo-spatial data prompts for further investigation on the use of fuzzy set- based techniques in situation analysis.

  10. A validation of ground ambulance pre-hospital times modeled using geographic information systems.

    PubMed

    Patel, Alka B; Waters, Nigel M; Blanchard, Ian E; Doig, Christopher J; Ghali, William A

    2012-10-03

    Evaluating geographic access to health services often requires determining the patient travel time to a specified service. For urgent care, many research studies have modeled patient pre-hospital time by ground emergency medical services (EMS) using geographic information systems (GIS). The purpose of this study was to determine if the modeling assumptions proposed through prior United States (US) studies are valid in a non-US context, and to use the resulting information to provide revised recommendations for modeling travel time using GIS in the absence of actual EMS trip data. The study sample contained all emergency adult patient trips within the Calgary area for 2006. Each record included four components of pre-hospital time (activation, response, on-scene and transport interval). The actual activation and on-scene intervals were compared with those used in published models. The transport interval was calculated within GIS using the Network Analyst extension of Esri ArcGIS 10.0 and the response interval was derived using previously established methods. These GIS derived transport and response intervals were compared with the actual times using descriptive methods. We used the information acquired through the analysis of the EMS trip data to create an updated model that could be used to estimate travel time in the absence of actual EMS trip records. There were 29,765 complete EMS records for scene locations inside the city and 529 outside. The actual median on-scene intervals were longer than the average previously reported by 7-8 minutes. Actual EMS pre-hospital times across our study area were significantly higher than the estimated times modeled using GIS and the original travel time assumptions. Our updated model, although still underestimating the total pre-hospital time, more accurately represents the true pre-hospital time in our study area. The widespread use of generalized EMS pre-hospital time assumptions based on US data may not be appropriate in a

  11. A validation of ground ambulance pre-hospital times modeled using geographic information systems

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Evaluating geographic access to health services often requires determining the patient travel time to a specified service. For urgent care, many research studies have modeled patient pre-hospital time by ground emergency medical services (EMS) using geographic information systems (GIS). The purpose of this study was to determine if the modeling assumptions proposed through prior United States (US) studies are valid in a non-US context, and to use the resulting information to provide revised recommendations for modeling travel time using GIS in the absence of actual EMS trip data. Methods The study sample contained all emergency adult patient trips within the Calgary area for 2006. Each record included four components of pre-hospital time (activation, response, on-scene and transport interval). The actual activation and on-scene intervals were compared with those used in published models. The transport interval was calculated within GIS using the Network Analyst extension of Esri ArcGIS 10.0 and the response interval was derived using previously established methods. These GIS derived transport and response intervals were compared with the actual times using descriptive methods. We used the information acquired through the analysis of the EMS trip data to create an updated model that could be used to estimate travel time in the absence of actual EMS trip records. Results There were 29,765 complete EMS records for scene locations inside the city and 529 outside. The actual median on-scene intervals were longer than the average previously reported by 7–8 minutes. Actual EMS pre-hospital times across our study area were significantly higher than the estimated times modeled using GIS and the original travel time assumptions. Our updated model, although still underestimating the total pre-hospital time, more accurately represents the true pre-hospital time in our study area. Conclusions The widespread use of generalized EMS pre-hospital time assumptions based

  12. Spatiotemporal change and ecological modelling of malaria in Turkey by means of geographic information systems.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Hakan Mete; Cetin, Ilhan; Egri, Mucahit

    2010-11-01

    We described the spatiotemporal change of malaria (Plasmodium vivax) in Turkey over 34 years (1975-2008), and assessed the role of environmental variables in this change. We developed seven 5-year-period raster maps by using geo-referenced malaria case data from the centres of 81 provinces and the kriging method with a spherical variogram model in a geographic information systems (GIS) model. We also modelled malaria incidence in GIS by using our average malaria incidence raster map, and complementary spatial database including the raster map layers of 14 environmental variables. We chose linear regression analysis with backward method to investigate relationships among variables and develop a model. The model was run in GIS to obtain a model incidence raster map. We tested the reliability of the model map by residual statistics, and found the model map dependable. Five-year-period maps revealed that the distribution of malaria cases moved from the East Mediterranean region to the Southeast Anatolia region due to changing human activities. The latitude, minimum temperature, distance to seas and elevation variables were found to have significant impacts on malaria. Consequently, the model incidence map established a good background for early warning systems to predict epidemics of malaria following environmental changes.

  13. Using Geographic Information Systems for Exposure Assessment in Environmental Epidemiology Studies

    PubMed Central

    Nuckols, John R.; Ward, Mary H.; Jarup, Lars

    2004-01-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) are being used with increasing frequency in environmental epidemiology studies. Reported applications include locating the study population by geocoding addresses (assigning mapping coordinates), using proximity analysis of contaminant source as a surrogate for exposure, and integrating environmental monitoring data into the analysis of the health outcomes. Although most of these studies have been ecologic in design, some have used GIS in estimating environmental levels of a contaminant at the individual level and to design exposure metrics for use in epidemiologic studies. In this article we discuss fundamentals of three scientific disciplines instrumental to using GIS in exposure assessment for epidemiologic studies: geospatial science, environmental science, and epidemiology. We also explore how a GIS can be used to accomplish several steps in the exposure assessment process. These steps include defining the study population, identifying source and potential routes of exposure, estimating environmental levels of target contaminants, and estimating personal exposures. We present and discuss examples for the first three steps. We discuss potential use of GIS and global positioning systems (GPS) in the last step. On the basis of our findings, we conclude that the use of GIS in exposure assessment for environmental epidemiology studies is not only feasible but can enhance the understanding of the association between contaminants in our environment and disease. PMID:15198921

  14. Digital terrain model (DTM) integration and three-dimensional query spaces in geographic information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Dieter; Schmidt, Dieter

    1994-08-01

    The integration of digital terrain models (DTM) in geographic information systems (GIS) implies automatically an extension of the GIS reference surface and its query space. It is trivial that a DTM is the natural boundary representation of the earth's surface. Man-made objects, for instance homes, streets, bridges, dams should be considered in a second step because these objects cannot be represented well by boundary surfaces. The link of these objects to DTM can be realized by keys and pointers. Therefore, an efficient DTM integration in GIS is the first task to be solved. The paper introduces DTM data structures represented by NIAM diagrams. Using the entity-relationship model these diagrams are very capable to describe the power of relations. Next a 3-D query space is defined keeping in mind 3-D coordinates and 2- D topological elements. Based on this query space spatial operators are derived which fit in standard SQL vocabulary. The implementation part of the paper uses the exodus storage manger to map the DTM of the Federal State Baden-Wurrtemberg in a spatial database system.

  15. A framework for landfill site selection using geographic information systems and multi criteria decision making technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mat, Nur Azriati; Benjamin, Aida Mauziah; Abdul-Rahman, Syariza; Wibowo, Antoni

    2016-10-01

    The solid waste disposal is one of the facilities which can cause harm to human health and also contribute to severe environmental pollution if it is not properly managed. Therefore, an effective decision on a landfill site selection in order to identify the most suitable area as a new landfill is very important. Since 25 years ago, the integration of geographic information systems (GIS) and multi criteria decision analysis (MCDA) has drawn significant interest among researchers. This integrated technique is commonly used for land use planning and selecting a new landfill site is one of the plan. This paper proposes a framework of landfill site selection with a consideration of resource requirement. This framework is developed by using the integration of GIS and MCDA to identify an appropriate location for landfill siting. A list of selection criteria obtained from the literature considered in selecting the best landfill site is also presented. The results of this study could later be used to help the waste management team in developing an efficient solid waste management system.

  16. Watersheds of the Oak Ridge Reservation in a geographic information system

    SciTech Connect

    Tauxe, J.

    1998-05-01

    This work develops a comprehensive set of watershed definitions for the entire Oak Ridge Reservation and surrounding area. A stream-ordering system is defined based upon the method proposed by Strahler (1952) and using 1:24,000 scale US Geological Survey (USGS) topographic maps and the locally standard S-16A Map (USGS 1987) as sources for topographic contours and locations of streams as recommended by the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS 1995). For each ordered stream, a contributing watershed or catchment area is delineated and digitized into a geographic information system (GIS), generating over 900 watershed polygons of various orders. This new dataset complements a growing database of georeferenced environmental and cultural data which exist for the Oak Ridge area and are routinely used for socioeconomic and environmental analyses. Because these watersheds are now available in a GIS format, they may be used in a variety of hydrologic analyses, including rainfall/runoff modeling, development of geomorphological parameters, and the modeling of contaminant transport in surface waters. An understanding of the relationships of watersheds to sources of contamination and to administrative and political boundaries is also essential in land use planning and the organization of environmental restoration and waste management activities.

  17. Accessibility to general practitioners in rural South Australia. A case study using geographic information system technology.

    PubMed

    Bamford, E J; Dunne, L; Taylor, D S; Symon, B G; Hugo, G J; Wilkinson, D

    To demonstrate the potential of GIS (geographic information system) technology and ARIA (Accessibility/Remoteness Index for Australia) as tools for medical workforce and health service planning in Australia. ARIA is an index of remoteness derived by measuring road distance between populated localities and service centres. A continuous variable of remoteness from 0 to 12 is generated for any location in Australia. We created a GIS, with data on location of general practitioner services in non-metropolitan South Australia derived from the database of RUMPS (Rural Undergraduate Medical Placement System), and estimated, for the 1170 populated localities in South Australia, the accessibility/inaccessibility of the 109 identified GP services. Distance from populated locality to GP services. Distance from populated locality to GP service ranged from 0 to 677 km (mean, 58 km). In all, 513 localities (43%) had a GP service within 20 km (for the majority this meant located within the town). However, for 173 populated localities (15%), the nearest GP service was more than 80 km away. There was a strong correlation between distance to GP service and ARIA value for each locality (0.69; P < 0.05). GP services are relatively inaccessible to many rural South Australian communities. There is potential for GIS and for ARIA to contribute to rational medical workforce and health service planning. Adding measures of health need and more detailed data on types and extent of GP services provided will allow more sophisticated planning.

  18. Improving polio vaccination coverage in Nigeria through the use of geographic information system technology.

    PubMed

    Barau, Inuwa; Zubairu, Mahmud; Mwanza, Michael N; Seaman, Vincent Y

    2014-11-01

    Historically, microplanning for polio vaccination campaigns in Nigeria relied on inaccurate and incomplete hand-drawn maps, resulting in the exclusion of entire settlements and missed children. The goal of this work was to create accurate, coordinate-based maps for 8 polio-endemic states in northern Nigeria to improve microplanning and support tracking of vaccination teams, thereby enhancing coverage, supervision, and accountability. Settlement features were identified in the target states, using high-resolution satellite imagery. Field teams collected names and geocoordinates for each settlement feature, with the help of local guides. Global position system (GPS) tracking of vaccination teams was conducted in selected areas and daily feedback provided to supervisors. Geographic information system (GIS)-based maps were created for 2238 wards in the 8 target states. The resulting microplans included all settlements and more-efficient team assignments, owing to the improved spatial reference. GPS tracking was conducted in 111 high-risk local government areas, resulting in improved team performance and the identification of missed/poorly covered settlements. Accurate and complete maps are a necessary part of an effective polio microplan, and tracking vaccinators gives supervisors a tool to ensure that all settlements are visited. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Geographical information system approaches for hazard mapping of dilute lahars on Montserrat, West Indies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnell, A. R.; Barclay, J.; Herd, R. A.; Phillips, J. C.; Lovett, A. A.; Cole, P.

    2012-08-01

    Many research tools for lahar hazard assessment have proved wholly unsuitable for practical application to an active volcanic system where field measurements are challenging to obtain. Two simple routing models, with minimal data demands and implemented in a geographical information system (GIS), were applied to dilute lahars originating from Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat. Single-direction flow routing by path of steepest descent, commonly used for simulating normal stream-flow, was tested against LAHARZ, an established lahar model calibrated for debris flows, for ability to replicate the main flow routes. Comparing the ways in which these models capture observed changes, and how the different modelled paths deviate can also provide an indication of where dilute lahars, do not follow behaviour expected from single-phase flow models. Data were collected over two field seasons and provide (1) an overview of gross morphological change after one rainy season, (2) details of dominant channels at the time of measurement, and (3) order of magnitude estimates of individual flow volumes. Modelling results suggested both GIS-based predictive tools had associated benefits. Dominant flow routes observed in the field were generally well-predicted using the hydrological approach with a consideration of elevation error, while LAHARZ was comparatively more successful at mapping lahar dispersion and was better suited to long-term hazard assessment. This research suggests that end-member models can have utility for first-order dilute lahar hazard mapping.

  20. The application of geographical information systems to important public health problems in Africa.

    PubMed

    Tanser, Frank C; Le Sueur, David

    2002-12-09

    Africa is generally held to be in crisis, and the quality of life for the majority of the continent's inhabitants has been declining in both relative and absolute terms. In addition, the majority of the world's disease burden is realised in Africa. Geographical information systems (GIS) technology, therefore, is a tool of great inherent potential for health research and management in Africa. The spatial modelling capacity offered by GIS is directly applicable to understanding the spatial variation of disease, and its relationship to environmental factors and the health care system. Whilst there have been numerous critiques of the application of GIS technology to developed world health problems it has been less clear whether the technology is both applicable and sustainable in an African setting. If the potential for GIS to contribute to health research and planning in Africa is to be properly evaluated then the technology must be applicable to the most pressing health problems in the continent. We briefly outline the work undertaken in HIV, malaria and tuberculosis (diseases of significant public health impact and contrasting modes of transmission), outline GIS trends relevant to Africa and describe some of the obstacles to the sustainable implementation of GIS. We discuss types of viable GIS applications and conclude with a discussion of the types of African health problems of particular relevance to the application of GIS.

  1. Geographic information system as country-level development and monitoring tool, Senegal example

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Donald G.; Howard, Stephen M.; ,

    1990-01-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) allow an investigator the capability to merge and analyze numerous types of country-level resource data. Hypothetical resource analysis applications in Senegal were conducted to illustrate the utility of a GIS for development planning and resource monitoring. Map and attribute data for soils, vegetation, population, infrastructure, and administrative units were merged to form a database within a GIS. Several models were implemented using a GIS to: analyze development potential for sustainable dryland agriculture; prioritize where agricultural development should occur based upon a regional food budget; and monitor dynamic events with remote sensing. The steps for implementing a GIS analysis are described and illustrated, and the use of a GIS for conducting an economic analysis is outlined. Using a GIS for analysis and display of results opens new methods of communication between resource scientists and decision makers. Analyses yielding country-wide map output and detailed statistical data for each level of administration provide the advantage of a single system that can serve a variety of users.

  2. A Geographic Information System procedure to quantify drainage-basin characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eash, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The Basin Characteristics System (BCS) has been developed to quantify characteristics of a drainage basin. The first of four main BCS processing steps creates four geographic information system (GIS) digital maps representing the drainage divide, the drainage network, elevation contours, and the basin length. The drainage divide and basin length are manually digitized from 1:250,000-scale topographic maps. The drainage network is extracted using GIS software from 1:100,000-scale digital line graph data. The elevation contours are generated using GIS software from 1:250,000-scale digital elevation model data. The second and third steps use software developed to assign attributes to specific features in three of the four digital maps and analyze the four maps to quantify 24 morphometric basin characteristics. The fourth step quantifies two climatic characteristics from digitized State maps of precipitation data. Compared to manual methods of measurement, the BCS provides a reduction in the time required to quantify the 26 basin characteristics. Comparison tests indicate the BCS measurements are not significantly different from manual topographic-map measurements for 11 of 12 primary drainage-basin characteristics. Tests indicate the BCS significantly underestimates basin slope. Comparison-measurement differences for basin slope, main channel slope, and basin relief appear to be due to limitations in the digital elevation model data.

  3. Knowledge-based geographic information systems on the Macintosh computer: a component of the GypsES project

    Treesearch

    Gregory Elmes; Thomas Millette; Charles B. Yuill

    1991-01-01

    GypsES, a decision-support and expert system for the management of Gypsy Moth addresses five related research problems in a modular, computer-based project. The modules are hazard rating, monitoring, prediction, treatment decision and treatment implementation. One common component is a geographic information system designed to function intelligently. We refer to this...

  4. The impact of a clinic move on vulnerable patients with chronic disease: a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis.

    PubMed

    Bazemore, Andrew; Diller, Philip; Carrozza, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Changing locations disrupts the populations served by primary health care clinics, and such changes may differentially affect access to care for vulnerable populations. Online geographic information systems mapping tools were used to define how the relocation of a family medicine center impacted access to care for black and Hispanic patients with chronic disease. Maps created from practice management data revealed a distinct shift in black and Hispanic patients with chronic disease being served in the new location. Geographic information systems tools are valuable aids in defining changing service areas of primary health care clinics.

  5. Search and selection hotel system in Surabaya based on geographic information system (GIS) with fuzzy logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purbandini, Taufik

    2016-03-01

    Surabaya is a metropolitan city in Indonesia. When the visitor has an interest in Surabaya for several days, then the visitor was looking for lodging that is closest to the interests of making it more efficient and practical. It was not a waste of time for the businessman because of congestion and so we need full information about the hotel as an inn during a stay in Surabaya began name, address of the hotel, the hotel's website, the distance from the hotel to the destination until the display of the map along the route with the help of Google Maps. This system was designed using fuzzy logic which aims to assist the user in making decisions. Design of hotel search and selection system was done through four stages. The first phase was the collection of data and as the factors that influence the decision-making along with the limit values of these factors. Factors that influence covers a distance of the hotel, the price of hotel rooms, and hotel reviews. The second stage was the processing of data and information by creating membership functions. The third stage was the analysis of systems with fuzzy logic. The steps were performed in systems analysis, namely fuzzification, inference using Mamdani, and defuzzification. The last stage was the design and construction of the system. Designing the system using use case diagrams and activity diagram to describe any process that occurs. Development system includes system implementation and evaluation systems. Implementation of mobile with Android-based system so that these applications were user friendly.

  6. Application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in Analysing Rainfall Distribution Patterns in Batu Pahat District

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadir, A. A.; Kaamin, M.; Azizan, N. S.; Sahat, S.; Bukari, S. M.; Mokhtar, M.; Ngadiman, N.; Hamid, N. B.

    2016-07-01

    Rainfall forecasting reports are crucial to provide information and warnings to the population in a particular location. The Malaysian Meteorology Department (MMD) is a department that plays an important role in monitoring the situation and issued the statement of changes in weather and provides services such as weather advisories and gives warnings when the situation requires. Uncertain weather situations normally have created panic situation, especially in big cities because of flash floods due to poor drainage management. Usually, local authorities provided rainfall data in tables, and it is difficult to analyse to acquire the rainfall trend. Therefore, Geographic Information System (GIS) applications are commonly used to generate rainfall patterns in visual formation with a combination of characteristics of rainfall data and then can be used by stakeholders to facilitate the process of analysis and forecasting rainfall. The objective of this study is to determine the pattern of rainfall distribution using GIS applications in Batu Pahat district to assist interested parties to understand and easy to analyse the rainfall data in visual form or mapping form. Rainfall data for a period of 10 years (2004-2013) and monthly data (Dec 2006 - Feb 2007) are provided by the Department of Irrigation and Drainage (DID) for 12 stations in the district of Batu Pahat, and rainfall maps in each year was obtained using the interpolation Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) method was used in this research. The rainfall map was then analyzed to identify the highest rainfall that was received during the period of study. For the conclusion, this study has proved that rainfall analysis using GIS application is efficient to be used in gaining information of rainfall patterns as the results show that the highest rainfall occurred in 2006 and 2007, and it were the years of major floods occurrence in Batu Pahat district.

  7. Using geographical information systems and cartograms as a health service quality improvement tool.

    PubMed

    Lovett, Derryn A; Poots, Alan J; Clements, Jake T C; Green, Stuart A; Samarasundera, Edgar; Bell, Derek

    2014-07-01

    Disease prevalence can be spatially analysed to provide support for service implementation and health care planning, these analyses often display geographic variation. A key challenge is to communicate these results to decision makers, with variable levels of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) knowledge, in a way that represents the data and allows for comprehension. The present research describes the combination of established GIS methods and software tools to produce a novel technique of visualising disease admissions and to help prevent misinterpretation of data and less optimal decision making. The aim of this paper is to provide a tool that supports the ability of decision makers and service teams within health care settings to develop services more efficiently and better cater to the population; this tool has the advantage of information on the position of populations, the size of populations and the severity of disease. A standard choropleth of the study region, London, is used to visualise total emergency admission values for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and bronchiectasis using ESRI's ArcGIS software. Population estimates of the Lower Super Output Areas (LSOAs) are then used with the ScapeToad cartogram software tool, with the aim of visualising geography at uniform population density. An interpolation surface, in this case ArcGIS' spline tool, allows the creation of a smooth surface over the LSOA centroids for admission values on both standard and cartogram geographies. The final product of this research is the novel Cartogram Interpolation Surface (CartIS). The method provides a series of outputs culminating in the CartIS, applying an interpolation surface to a uniform population density. The cartogram effectively equalises the population density to remove visual bias from areas with a smaller population, while maintaining contiguous borders. CartIS decreases the number of extreme positive values not present in the underlying data as can be

  8. Using a Geographic Information System to Assess Site Suitability for Managed Aquifer Recharge using Stormwater Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, E. K.; Harmon, R. E.; Beganskas, S.; Young, K. S.; Fisher, A. T.; Weir, W. B.; Lozano, S.

    2015-12-01

    We are completing a regional analysis of Santa Cruz and northern Monterey Counties, CA, to assess the conditions amenable to managed aquifer recharge using stormwater runoff. Communities and water supply agencies across CA are struggling to mitigate the ongoing drought and to develop secure and sustainable water supplies to support long-term municipal, agricultural, environmental and other needs. Enhanced storage of groundwater is an important part of this effort in many basins. This work is especially timely because of the recently enacted "Sustainable Groundwater Management Act" (SGMA), which requires the development of groundwater sustainability agencies and implementation of basin management plans in coming decades. Our analysis focuses specifically on the distributed collection of stormwater runoff, a water source that has typically been treated as a nuisance or waste, from drainages having an area on the order of 40-160 hectares. The first part of this project is a geographic information system (GIS) analysis using surface and subsurface data sets. Developing complete and accurate datasets across the study region required considerable effort to locate, assemble, co-register, patch, and reconcile information from many sources and scales. We have complete spatial coverage for surface data, but subsurface data is more limited in lateral extent. Sites that are most suitable for distributed stormwater capture supporting MAR have high soil infiltration capacity, are well-connected to an underlying aquifer with good transmissive and storage properties, and have space to receive MAR. Additional considerations include method of infiltration, slope, and land use and access. Based on initial consideration of surface data and slope, 7% of the complete study region appears to be "suitable or highly suitable" for MAR (in the top third of the rating system), but there is considerable spatial heterogeneity based on the distribution of shallow soils and bedrock geology.

  9. Integrated geographic information systems (IGIS) analysis and definition of the tectonic framework of northern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Pina, Carlos Manuel

    Crustal rupture structures reactivated in the course of the tectonic history of northern Mexico are the surface expressions of planes of weakness, in the form of simple or composite rectilinear features or slightly curved, defined as lineaments. Unless otherwise defined as strike-slip faults, lineaments are part of parallel and sub-parallel oblique convergent or oblique divergent tectonic zones cross cutting the Sierra Madre Occidental and northern Mexico, in a NW trend. These shear zones are the response to the oblique subduction of the Farallon plate beneath North America. Kinematic analysis of five selected sites in northern Mexico, three basins and two compressional shear zones, proved possible a combination of shear mechanism diagram and models from analogue materials, with satellite imagery and geographic information systems, as an aid to define strike-slip fault motion. This was done using a reverse engineering process by comparing geometries. One of the sites assessed, involving the Parras Basin, Coahuila Block (CB), San Marcos fault, a postulated PBF-1 fault, allowed for palinpastic reconstruction of the CB that corroborated the results of the vector motion defined, in addition to an extension of ˜25% in a northwest southeast direction. A GIS-based compilation and georeferenced regional structural studies by several researchers were used as ground control areas (GCA); their interpolation and interpretation, resulted in a tectonic framework map of northern Mexico. In addition, shaded relief models overlaid by the lineaments / fault layer allowed structural analyses of basins related to these major structures. Two important results were obtained from this study: the Tepehuanes-San Luis-fault (TSL) and the Guadalupe fault, named herein, displaces the Villa de Reyes graben, and the Aguascalientes graben, respectively, to the SE, confirming their left lateral vector motion; afterwards TSL was displaced south by the right lateral strike slip Taxco-San Miguel de

  10. Spatial analysis of lettuce downy mildew using geostatistics and geographic information systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, B M; van Bruggen, A H; Subbarao, K V; Pennings, G G

    2001-02-01

    ABSTRACT The epidemiology of lettuce downy mildew has been investigated extensively in coastal California. However, the spatial patterns of the disease and the distance that Bremia lactucae spores can be transported have not been determined. During 1995 to 1998, we conducted several field- and valley-scale surveys to determine spatial patterns of this disease in the Salinas valley. Geostatistical analyses of the survey data at both scales showed that the influence range of downy mildew incidence at one location on incidence at other locations was between 80 and 3,000 m. A linear relationship was detected between semivariance and lag distance at the field scale, although no single statistical model could fit the semi-variograms at the valley scale. Spatial interpolation by the inverse distance weighting method with a power of 2 resulted in plausible estimates of incidence throughout the valley. Cluster analysis in geographic information systems on the interpolated disease incidence from different dates demonstrated that the Salinas valley could be divided into two areas, north and south of Salinas City, with high and low disease pressure, respectively. Seasonal and spatial trends along the valley suggested that the distinction between the downy mildew conducive and nonconducive areas might be determined by environmental factors.

  11. Geographic Information System (GIS) modeling approach to determine the fastest delivery routes.

    PubMed

    Abousaeidi, Mohammad; Fauzi, Rosmadi; Muhamad, Rusnah

    2016-09-01

    This study involves the adoption of the Geographic Information System (GIS) modeling approach to determine the quickest routes for fresh vegetable delivery. During transport, fresh vegetables mainly deteriorate on account of temperature and delivery time. Nonetheless, little attention has been directed to transportation issues in most areas within Kuala Lumpur. In addition, perishable food normally has a short shelf life, thus timely delivery significantly affects delivery costs. Therefore, selecting efficient routes would consequently reduce the total transportation costs. The regression model is applied in this study to determine the parameters that affect route selection with respect to the fastest delivery of fresh vegetables. For the purpose of this research, ArcGIS software with network analyst extension is adopted to solve the problem of complex networks. The final output of this research is a map of quickest routes with the best delivery times based on all variables. The variables tested from regression analysis are the most effective parameters to make the flow of road networks slower. The objective is to improve the delivery services by achieving the least drive time. The main findings of this research are that Land use such as residential area and population as variables are the effective parameters on drive time.

  12. Regression modeling of streamflow, baseflow, and runoff using geographic information systems.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuanhong; Day, Rick L

    2009-02-01

    Regression models for predicting total streamflow (TSF), baseflow (TBF), and storm runoff (TRO) are needed for water resource planning and management. This study used 54 streams with >20 years of streamflow gaging station records during the period October 1971 to September 2001 in Pennsylvania and partitioned TSF into TBF and TRO. TBF was considered a surrogate of groundwater recharge for basins. Regression models for predicting basin-wide TSF, TBF, and TRO were developed under three scenarios that varied in regression variables used for model development. Regression variables representing basin geomorphological, geological, soil, and climatic characteristics were estimated using geographic information systems. All regression models for TSF, TBF, and TRO had R(2) values >0.94 and reasonable prediction errors. The two best TSF models developed under scenarios 1 and 2 had similar absolute prediction errors. The same was true for the two best TBF models. Therefore, any one of the two best TSF and TBF models could be used for respective flow prediction depending on variable availability. The TRO model developed under scenario 1 had smaller absolute prediction errors than that developed under scenario 2. Simplified Area-alone models developed under scenario 3 might be used when variables for using best models are not available, but had lower R(2) values and higher or more variable prediction errors than the best models.

  13. Use of geographic information systems for assessing groundwater pollution potential by pesticides in Central Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thapinta, Anat; Hudak, Paul F

    2003-04-01

    This study employed geographic information systems (GIS) technology to evaluate the vulnerability of groundwater to pesticide pollution in Thailand. The study area included three provinces, Kanchana Buri, Ratcha Buri, and Suphan Buri, located in west-central Thailand. Factors used for the vulnerability assessment included soil texture, slope, land use, well depth, and rainfall. These vulnerability factors were reclassified to a common scale, and a weighted average was computed to yield a vulnerability score. Vulnerability factors and weights were assigned considering pesticide concentrations in 90 wells throughout the study area. Well depth was the most significant vulnerability factor. Groundwater vulnerability maps were generated for several pesticides. The eastern, agricultural part of the study area has relatively deep wells and fine soils. Shallow wells are present in the mountainous west; however, fewer pesticides are applied in that region. Consequently, much of the study area had a medium groundwater vulnerability rating, although there were pockets of high vulnerability, for example, in agricultural areas with shallow wells. The groundwater vulnerability maps are effective for identifying locations warranting more detailed groundwater pollution and vulnerability investigations.

  14. Systematic plan of building Web geographic information system based on ActiveX control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xia; Li, Deren; Zhu, Xinyan; Chen, Nengcheng

    2003-03-01

    A systematic plan of building Web Geographic Information System (WebGIS) using ActiveX technology is proposed in this paper. In the proposed plan, ActiveX control technology is adopted in building client-side application, and two different schemas are introduced to implement communication between controls in users¡ browser and middle application server. One is based on Distribute Component Object Model (DCOM), the other is based on socket. In the former schema, middle service application is developed as a DCOM object that communicates with ActiveX control through Object Remote Procedure Call (ORPC) and accesses data in GIS Data Server through Open Database Connectivity (ODBC). In the latter, middle service application is developed using Java language. It communicates with ActiveX control through socket based on TCP/IP and accesses data in GIS Data Server through Java Database Connectivity (JDBC). The first one is usually developed using C/C++, and it is difficult to develop and deploy. The second one is relatively easy to develop, but its performance of data transfer relies on Web bandwidth. A sample application is developed using the latter schema. It is proved that the performance of the sample application is better than that of some other WebGIS applications in some degree.

  15. Merging LANDSAT Derived Land Covers into Quad-referenced Geographic Information Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J. M.; Ragan, R. M.; Lade, K. P.

    1982-01-01

    An approach for merging multiscene LANDSAT data bases into existing geographic information systems having 5-second or smaller cells is described. The approach uses the output from the State of Maryland's UNIVAC 1180-based LANDSAT classification program ASTEP (Algorithm Simulation Test and Evaluation) developed by NASA. The structure of the technique was designed to address the problems that emerged as part of the LANDSAT classification of the 64,000 square mile Chesapeake water shed involving twelve scenes. The removal of overlap among adjacent scenes, the crossreferencing of ground control points, and the isolation of the appropriate pixels from the LANDSAT data base for subsequent positioning into a file containing ancillary data referenced to a specific USGS 7 1/2 minute quadrangle sheet are described. Examples illustrate the clustering of classified LANDSAT pixels to define the dominant land use for each of 8,100 cells within a series of quadrangle sheets distributed over the State of Maryland. The approach uses a hard copy terminal tied to an ASTEP algorithm through telephone lines. A coordinate digitizing board for inputing the position of ground control points is also valuable, although manual measurements are possible. The approach is quite efficient and should be especially attractive for use on regional scale studies.

  16. Feasibility of Close-Range Photogrammetric Models for Geographic Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Luke; /Rice U.

    2011-06-22

    The objective of this project was to determine the feasibility of using close-range architectural photogrammetry as an alternative three dimensional modeling technique in order to place the digital models in a geographic information system (GIS) at SLAC. With the available equipment and Australis photogrammetry software, the creation of full and accurate models of an example building, Building 281 on SLAC campus, was attempted. After conducting several equipment tests to determine the precision achievable, a complete photogrammetric survey was attempted. The dimensions of the resulting models were then compared against the true dimensions of the building. A complete building model was not evidenced to be obtainable using the current equipment and software. This failure was likely attributable to the limits of the software rather than the precision of the physical equipment. However, partial models of the building were shown to be accurate and determined to still be usable in a GIS. With further development of the photogrammetric software and survey procedure, the desired generation of a complete three dimensional model is likely still feasible.

  17. Geographic information system-coupling sediment delivery distributed modeling based on observed data.

    PubMed

    Lee, S E; Kang, S H

    2014-01-01

    Spatially distributed sediment delivery (SEDD) models are of great interest in estimating the expected effect of changes on soil erosion and sediment yield. However, they can only be applied if the model can be calibrated using observed data. This paper presents a geographic information system (GIS)-based method to calculate the sediment discharge from basins to coastal areas. For this, an SEDD model, with a sediment rating curve method based on observed data, is proposed and validated. The model proposed here has been developed using the combined application of the revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE) and a spatially distributed sediment delivery ratio, within Model Builder of ArcGIS's software. The model focuses on spatial variability and is useful for estimating the spatial patterns of soil loss and sediment discharge. The model consists of two modules, a soil erosion prediction component and a sediment delivery model. The integrated approach allows for relatively practical and cost-effective estimation of spatially distributed soil erosion and sediment delivery, for gauged or ungauged basins. This paper provides the first attempt at estimating sediment delivery ratio based on observed data in the monsoon region of Korea.

  18. Validation of the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS) items using geographic information systems.

    PubMed

    Adams, Marc A; Ryan, Sherry; Kerr, Jacqueline; Sallis, James F; Patrick, Kevin; Frank, Lawrence D; Norman, Gregory J

    2009-01-01

    Concurrent validity of Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS) items was evaluated with objective measures of the built environment using geographic information systems (GIS). A sample of 878 parents of children 10 to 16 years old (mean age 43.5 years, SD = 6.8, 34.8% non-White, 63.8% overweight) completed NEWS and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. GIS was used to develop 1-mile street network buffers around participants' residences. GIS measures of the built environment within participants' buffers included percent of commercial and institutional land uses; number of schools and colleges, recreational facilities, parks, transit stops, and trees; land topography; and traffic congestion. Except for trees and traffic, concordance between the NEWS and GIS measures were significant, with weak to moderate effect sizes (r = -0.09 to -0.36, all P < or = 01). After participants were stratified by physical activity level, stronger concordance was observed among active participants for some measures. A sensitivity analysis of self-reported distance to 15 neighborhood destinations found a 20-minute (compared with 10- or 30-minute) walking threshold generally had the strongest correlations with GIS measures. These findings provide evidence of the concurrent validity of self-reported built environment items with objective measures. Physically active adults may be more knowledgeable about their neighborhood characteristics.

  19. Hazard, Vulnerability and Capacity Mapping for Landslides Risk Analysis using Geographic Information System (GIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sari, D. A. P.; Innaqa, S.; Safrilah

    2017-06-01

    This research analyzed the levels of disaster risk in the Citeureup sub-District, Bogor Regency, West Java, based on its potential hazard, vulnerability and capacity, using map to represent the results, then Miles and Huberman analytical techniques was used to analyze the qualitative interviews. The analysis conducted in this study is based on the concept of disaster risk by Wisner. The result shows that the Citeureup sub-District has medium-low risk of landslides. Of the 14 villages, three villages have a moderate risk level, namely Hambalang, Tajur, and Tangkil, or 49.58% of the total land area. Eleven villages have a low level of risk, namely Pasir Mukti, Sanja, Tarikolot, Gunung Sari, Puspasari, East Karang Asem, Citeureup, Leuwinutug, Sukahati, West Karang Asem West and Puspanegara, or 48.68% of the total land area, for high-risk areas only around 1.74%, which is part of Hambalang village. The analysis using Geographic Information System (GIS) prove that areas with a high risk potential does not necessarily have a high level of risk. The capacity of the community plays an important role to minimize the risk of a region. Disaster risk reduction strategy is done by creating a safe condition, which intensified the movement of disaster risk reduction.

  20. Geographical Information Systems risk assessment models for zoonotic fascioliasis in the South American Andes region.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, M V; Sainz-Elipe, S; Nieto, P; Malone, J B; Mas-Coma, S

    2005-03-01

    The WHO recognises Fasciola hepatica to be an important human health problem. The Andean countries of Peru, Bolivia and Chile are those most severely affected by this distomatosis, though areas of Ecuador, Colombia and Venezuela are also affected. As part of a multidisciplinary project, we present results of use of a Geographical Information Systems (GIS) forecast model to conduct an epidemiological analysis of human and animal fasciolosis in the central part of the Andes mountains. The GIS approach enabled us to develop a spatial and temporal epidemiological model to map the disease in the areas studied and to classify transmission risk into low, moderate and high risk areas so that areas requiring the implementation of control activities can be identified. Current results are available on a local scale for: (1) the northern Bolivian Altiplano, (2) Puno in the Peruvian Altiplano, (3) the Cajamarca and Mantaro Peruvian valleys, and (4) the Ecuadorian provinces of Azuay, Cotopaxi and Imbabura. Analysis of results demonstrated the validity of a forecast model that combines use of climatic data to calculate of forecast indices with remote sensing data, through the classification of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) maps.

  1. Investigation of Acupuncture Sensation Patterns under Sensory Deprivation Using a Geographic Information System

    PubMed Central

    Beissner, Florian; Marzolff, Irene

    2012-01-01

    The study of acupuncture-related sensations, like deqi and propagated sensations along channels (PSCs), has a long tradition in acupuncture basic research. The phenomenon itself, however, remains poorly understood. To study the connection between PSC and classical meridians, we applied a geographic information system (GIS) to analyze sketches of acupuncture sensations from healthy volunteers after laser acupuncture. As PSC can be subtle, we aimed at reducing the confounding impact of external stimuli by carrying out the experiment in a floatation tank under restricted environmental stimulation. 82.4% of the subjects experienced PSC, that is, they had line-like or 2-dimensional sensations, although there were some doubts that these were related to the laser stimulation. Line-like sensations on the same limb were averaged to calculate sensation mean courses, which were then compared to classical meridians by measuring the mean distance between the two. Distances ranged from 0.83 cm in the case of the heart (HT) and spleen (SP) meridian to 6.27 cm in the case of the kidney (KI) meridian. Furthermore, PSC was observed to “jump” between adjacent meridians. In summary, GIS has proven to be a valuable tool to study PSC, and our results suggest a close connection between PSC and classical meridians. PMID:23243458

  2. Investigation of Acupuncture Sensation Patterns under Sensory Deprivation Using a Geographic Information System.

    PubMed

    Beissner, Florian; Marzolff, Irene

    2012-01-01

    The study of acupuncture-related sensations, like deqi and propagated sensations along channels (PSCs), has a long tradition in acupuncture basic research. The phenomenon itself, however, remains poorly understood. To study the connection between PSC and classical meridians, we applied a geographic information system (GIS) to analyze sketches of acupuncture sensations from healthy volunteers after laser acupuncture. As PSC can be subtle, we aimed at reducing the confounding impact of external stimuli by carrying out the experiment in a floatation tank under restricted environmental stimulation. 82.4% of the subjects experienced PSC, that is, they had line-like or 2-dimensional sensations, although there were some doubts that these were related to the laser stimulation. Line-like sensations on the same limb were averaged to calculate sensation mean courses, which were then compared to classical meridians by measuring the mean distance between the two. Distances ranged from 0.83 cm in the case of the heart (HT) and spleen (SP) meridian to 6.27 cm in the case of the kidney (KI) meridian. Furthermore, PSC was observed to "jump" between adjacent meridians. In summary, GIS has proven to be a valuable tool to study PSC, and our results suggest a close connection between PSC and classical meridians.

  3. Multivariate model of female black bear habitat use for a Geographic Information System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Joseph D.; Dunn, James E.; Smith, Kimberly G.

    1993-01-01

    Simple univariate statistical techniques may not adequately assess the multidimensional nature of habitats used by wildlife. Thus, we developed a multivariate method to model habitat-use potential using a set of female black bear (Ursus americanus) radio locations and habitat data consisting of forest cover type, elevation, slope, aspect, distance to roads, distance to streams, and forest cover type diversity score in the Ozark Mountains of Arkansas. The model is based on the Mahalanobis distance statistic coupled with Geographic Information System (GIS) technology. That statistic is a measure of dissimilarity and represents a standardized squared distance between a set of sample variates and an ideal based on the mean of variates associated with animal observations. Calculations were made with the GIS to produce a map containing Mahalanobis distance values within each cell on a 60- × 60-m grid. The model identified areas of high habitat use potential that could not otherwise be identified by independent perusal of any single map layer. This technique avoids many pitfalls that commonly affect typical multivariate analyses of habitat use and is a useful tool for habitat manipulation or mitigation to favor terrestrial vertebrates that use habitats on a landscape scale.

  4. Assessment of groundwater quality using geographical information system (GIS), at north-east Cairo, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Shahat, M F; Sadek, M A; Mostafa, W M; Hagagg, K H

    2016-04-01

    The present investigation has been conducted to delineate the hydrogeochemical and environmental factors that control the water quality of the groundwater resources in the north-east of Cairo. A complementary approach based on hydrogeochemistry and a geographical information system (GIS) based protectability index has been employed for conducting this work. The results from the chemical analysis revealed that the groundwater of the Quaternary aquifer is less saline than that of the Miocene aquifer and the main factors that control the groundwater salinity in the studied area are primarily related to the genesis of the original recharging water modified after by leaching, dissolution, cation exchange, and fertilizer leachate. The computed groundwater quality index (WQI) falls into two categories: fair for almost all the Miocene groundwater samples, while the Quaternary groundwater samples are all have a good quality. The retarded flow and non-replenishment of the Miocene aquifer compared to the renewable active recharge of the Quaternary aquifer can explain this variation of WQI. The index and overlay approach exemplified by the DUPIT index has been used to investigate the protectability of the study aquifers against diffuse pollutants. Three categories (highly protectable less vulnerable, moderately protectable moderately vulnerable and less protectable highly vulnerable) have been determined and areally mapped.

  5. Use of a geographic information system (GIS) for targeting radon screening programs in South Dakota.

    PubMed

    Kearfott, Kimberlee J; Whetstone, Zachary D; Rafique Mir, Khwaja M

    2016-01-01

    Because (222)Rn is a progeny of (238)U, the relative abundance of uranium may be used to predict the areas that have the potential for high indoor radon concentration and therefore determine the best areas to conduct future surveys. Geographic Information System (GIS) mapping software was used to construct maps of South Dakota that included levels of uranium concentrations in soil and stream water and uranium deposits. Maps of existing populations and the types of land were also generated. Existing data about average indoor radon levels by county taken from a databank were included for consideration. Although the soil and stream data and existing recorded average indoor radon levels were sparse, it was determined that the most likely locations of elevated indoor radon would be in the northwest and southwest corners of the state. Indoor radon levels were only available for 9 out of 66 counties in South Dakota. This sparcity of data precluded a study of correlation of radon to geological features, but further motivates the need for more testing in the state. Only actual measurements should be used to determine levels of indoor radon because of the strong roles home construction and localized geology play in radon concentration. However, the data visualization method demonstrated here is potentially useful for directing resources relating to radon screening campaigns. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  6. Utilizing geographic information systems technology in the Wyoming cumulative hydrologic impact assessment modeling process

    SciTech Connect

    Hamerlinck, J.D.; Oakleaf, J.R.

    1997-12-31

    The coal-permitting process places heavy demands on both permit applicants and regulatory authorities with respect to the management and analysis of hydrologic data. Currently, this correlation is being addressed for the Powder River Basin, Wyoming by the ongoing Cumulative Hydrologic Impact Assessment (CHIA) efforts at the University of Wyoming. One critical component of the CHIA is the use of a Geographic Information System (GIS) for support, management, manipulation, pre-analysis, and display of data associated with the chosen groundwater and surface water models. This paper will discuss the methodology in using of GIS technology as an integrated tool with the MODFLOW and HEC-1 hydrologic models. Pre-existing GIS links associated with these two models served as a foundation for this effort. However, due to established standards and site specific factors, substantial modifications were performed on existing tools to obtain adequate results. The groundwater-modeling effort required the use of a refined grid in which cell sizes varied based on the relative locations of ongoing mining activities. Surface water modeling was performed in a semi-arid region with very limited topographic relief and predominantly ephemeral stream channels. These were substantial issues that presented challenges for effective GIS/model integration.

  7. Using a geographic information system (GIS) to assess pediatric surge potential after an earthquake.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Jacqueline W; Curtis, Andrew; Upperman, Jeffrey S

    2012-06-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) and geospatial technology (GT) can help hospitals improve plans for postdisaster surge by assessing numbers of potential patients in a catchment area and providing estimates of special needs populations, such as pediatrics. In this study, census-derived variables are computed for blockgroups within a 3-mile radius from Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) and from Los Angeles County-University of Southern California (LAC-USC) Medical Center. Landslide and liquefaction zones are overlaid on US Census Bureau blockgroups. Units that intersect with the hazard zones are selected for computation of pediatric surge potential in case of an earthquake. In addition, cartographic visualization and cluster analysis are performed on the entire 3-mile study area to identify hot spots of socially vulnerable populations. The results suggest the need for locally specified vulnerability models for pediatric populations. GIS and GT have untapped potential to contribute local specificity to planning for surge potential after a disaster. Although this case focuses on an earthquake hazard, the methodology is appropriate for an all-hazards approach. With the advent of Google Earth, GIS output can now be easily shared with medical personnel for broader application and improvement in planning.

  8. Applications of geographic information systems (GIS) data and methods in obesity-related research.

    PubMed

    Jia, P; Cheng, X; Xue, H; Wang, Y

    2017-04-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) data/methods offer good promise for public health programs including obesity-related research. This study systematically examined their applications and identified gaps and limitations in current obesity-related research. A systematic search of PubMed for studies published before 20 May 2016, utilizing synonyms for GIS in combination with synonyms for obesity as search terms, identified 121 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We found primary applications of GIS data/methods in obesity-related research included (i) visualization of spatial distribution of obesity and obesity-related phenomena, and basic obesogenic environmental features, and (ii) construction of advanced obesogenic environmental indicators. We found high spatial heterogeneity in obesity prevalence/risk and obesogenic environmental factors. Also, study design and characteristics varied considerably across studies because of lack of established guidance and protocols in the field, which may also have contributed to the mixed findings about environmental impacts on obesity. Existing findings regarding built environment are more robust than those regarding food environment. Applications of GIS data/methods in obesity research are still limited, and related research faces many challenges. More and better GIS data and more friendly analysis methods are needed to expand future GIS applications in obesity-related research. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  9. Sources of endocrine-disrupting compounds in North Carolina waterways: a geographic information systems approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sackett, Dana K.; Pow, Crystal Lee; Rubino, Matthew J.; Aday, D.D.; Cope, W. Gregory; Kullman, Seth W.; Rice, J.A.; Kwak, Thomas J.; Law, L.M.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs), particularly estrogenic compounds, in the environment has drawn public attention across the globe, yet a clear understanding of the extent and distribution of estrogenic EDCs in surface waters and their relationship to potential sources is lacking. The objective of the present study was to identify and examine the potential input of estrogenic EDC sources in North Carolina water bodies using a geographic information system (GIS) mapping and analysis approach. Existing data from state and federal agencies were used to create point and nonpoint source maps depicting the cumulative contribution of potential sources of estrogenic EDCs to North Carolina surface waters. Water was collected from 33 sites (12 associated with potential point sources, 12 associated with potential nonpoint sources, and 9 reference), to validate the predictive results of the GIS analysis. Estrogenicity (measured as 17β-estradiol equivalence) ranged from 0.06 ng/L to 56.9 ng/L. However, the majority of sites (88%) had water 17β-estradiol concentrations below 1 ng/L. Sites associated with point and nonpoint sources had significantly higher 17β-estradiol levels than reference sites. The results suggested that water 17β-estradiol was reflective of GIS predictions, confirming the relevance of landscape-level influences on water quality and validating the GIS approach to characterize such relationships.

  10. Using geographic information systems for radon exposure assessment in dwellings in the Oslo region, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollerud, R.; Blaasaas, K.; Ganerød, G.; Daviknes, H. K.; Aune, E.; Claussen, B.

    2014-04-01

    Radon exposures were assigned to each residential address in the Oslo region using a geographic information system (GIS) that included indoor radon measurements. The results will be used in an epidemiologic study regarding leukemia and brain cancer. The model is based on 6% of measured residential buildings. High density of indoor radon measurements allowed us to develop a buffer model where indoor radon measurements found around each dwelling were used to assign a radon value for homes lacking radon measurement. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to study the agreement between radon values from the buffer method, from indoor radon values of measured houses, and from a regression model constructed with radiometric data (eTh, eU) and bedrock geology. We obtained good agreement for both comparisons with ICC values between 0.54 and 0.68. GIS offers a useful variety of tools to study the indoor-radon exposure assessment. By using the buffer method it is more likely that geological conditions are similar within the buffer and this may take more into account the variation of radon over short distances. It is also probable that short-distance-scale correlation patterns express similarities in building styles and living habits. Although the method has certain limitations, we regard it as acceptable for use in epidemiological studies.

  11. Application of remote sensing and geographical information system for generation of runoff curve number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshram, S. Gajbhiye; Sharma, S. K.; Tignath, S.

    2017-07-01

    Watershed is an ideal unit for planning and management of land and water resources (Gajbhiye et al., IEEE international conference on advances in technology and engineering (ICATE), Bombay, vol 1, issue 9, pp 23-25, 2013a; Gajbhiye et al., Appl Water Sci 4(1):51-61, 2014a; Gajbhiye et al., J Geol Soc India (SCI-IF 0.596) 84(2):192-196, 2014b). This study aims to generate the curve number, using remote sensing and geographical information system (GIS) and the effect of slope on curve number values. The study was carried out in Kanhaiya Nala watershed located in Satna district of Madhya Pradesh. Soil map, Land Use/Land cover and slope map were generated in GIS Environment. The CN parameter values corresponding to various soil, land cover, and land management conditions were selected from Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) standard table. Curve number (CN) is an index developed by the NRCS, to represent the potential for storm water runoff within a drainage area. The CN for a drainage basin is estimated using a combination of land use, soil, and antecedent soil moisture condition (AMC). In present study effect of slope on CN values were determined. The result showed that the CN unadjusted value are higher in comparison to CN adjusted with slope. Remote sensing and GIS is very reliable technique for the preparation of most of the input data required by the SCS curve number model.

  12. Verification of a national water data base using a geographic information system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, H.E.

    1994-01-01

    The National Water Data Exchange (NAWDEX) was developed to assist users of water-resource data in the identification, location, and acquisition of data. The Master Water Data Index (MWDI) of NAWDEX currently indexes the data collected by 423 organizations from nearly 500,000 sites throughout the United Stales. The utilization of new computer technologies permit the distribution of the MWDI to the public on compact disc. In addition, geographic information systems (GIS) are now available that can store and analyze these data in a spatial format. These recent innovations could increase access and add new capabilities to the MWDI. Before either of these technologies could be employed, however, a quality-assurance check of the MWDI needed to be performed. The MWDI resides on a mainframe computer in a tabular format. It was copied onto a workstation and converted to a GIS format. The GIS was used to identify errors in the MWDI and produce reports that summarized these errors. The summary reports were sent to the responsible contributing agencies along with instructions for submitting their corrections to the NAWDEX Program Office. The MWDI administrator received reports that summarized all of the errors identified. Of the 494,997 sites checked, 93,440 sites had at least one error (18.9 percent error rate).

  13. A female black bear denning habitat model using a geographic information system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, J.D.; Hayes, S.G.; Pledger, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    We used the Mahalanobis distance statistic and a raster geographic information system (GIS) to model potential black bear (Ursus americanus) denning habitat in the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas. The Mahalanobis distance statistic was used to represent the standard squared distance between sample variates in the GIS database (forest cover type, elevation, slope, aspect, distance to streams, distance to roads, and forest cover richness) and variates at known bear dens. Two models were developed: a generalized model for all den locations and another specific to dens in rock cavities. Differences between habitat at den sites and habitat across the study area were represented in 2 new GIS themes as Mahalanobis distance values. Cells similar to the mean vector derived from the known dens had low Mahalanobis distance values, and dissimilar cells had high values. The reliability of the predictive model was tested by overlaying den locations collected subsequent to original model development on the resultant den habitat themes. Although the generalized model demonstrated poor reliability, the model specific to rock dens had good reliability. Bears were more likely to choose rock den locations with low Mahalanobis distance values and less likely to choose those with high values. The model can be used to plan the timing and extent of management actions (e.g., road building, prescribed fire, timber harvest) most appropriate for those sites with high or low denning potential. 

  14. Using geographic information systems in the delineation of wellhead protection areas

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, J.M. . Earth Sciences and Resources Inst.); Horton, C.A. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1994-03-01

    The 1986 amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act established the nationwide wellhead protection program to be administered by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Although individual states have the responsibility to implement wellhead protection, the US EPA provides technical guidance, and approves each wellhead protection plan prepared by the states. A major aspect of wellhead protection strategies is the delineation of wellhead protection areas. These are zones around municipal water supply wells that receive special land use considerations intended to minimize the threat of contamination of the wells. The US EPA has recommended several technical approaches to delineating wellhead protection areas, ranging in sophistication from simple concentric circles around wells to irregular areas determined from groundwater flow and transport analyses. Regardless of the wellhead protection area delineation technique, the resulting area surrounding the municipal well must be accurately mapped. A geographic information system (GIS) approach to mapping the results of wellhead protection area delineation is demonstrated. Using hypothetical groundwater flow regimes, each EPA recommended approach to wellhead protection area delineation is presented in a GIS format. A visual comparison of delineation techniques in terms of area and configuration of the resulting wellhead protection areas is made. Finally, the advantages of using a GIS for representing wellhead protection areas is provided.

  15. Use of a geographic information system (GIS) for targeting radon screening programs in South Dakota

    PubMed Central

    Kearfott, Kimberlee J.; Whetstone, Zachary D.; Rafique Mir, Khwaja M.

    2016-01-01

    Because 222Rn is a progeny of 238U, the relative abundance of uranium may be used to predict the areas that have the potential for high indoor radon concentration and therefore determine the best areas to conduct future surveys. Geographic Information System (GIS) mapping software was used to construct maps of South Dakota that included levels of uranium concentrations in soil and stream water and uranium deposits. Maps of existing populations and the types of land were also generated. Existing data about average indoor radon levels by county taken from a databank were included for consideration. Although the soil and stream data and existing recorded average indoor radon levels were sparse, it was determined that the most likely locations of elevated indoor radon would be in the northwest and southwest corners of the state. Indoor radon levels were only available for 9 out of 66 counties in South Dakota. This sparcity of data precluded a study of correlation of radon to geological features, but further motivates the need for more testing in the state. Only actual measurements should be used to determine levels of indoor radon because of the strong roles home construction and localized geology play in radon concentration. However, the data visualization method demonstrated here is potentially useful for directing resources relating to radon screening campaigns. PMID:26472478

  16. Analysis of northern distribution of Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) in Japan by geographical information system.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Nihei, N; Kurihara, T

    2002-01-01

    Aedes albopictus (Skuse), a mosquito vector of the dengue fever virus, is prevalent in Japan, distributed widely in Honshu Island with its northern limits between latitude 38 degrees to 40 degrees north. The factors affecting distribution of the species in the northern part of Japan were studied using the geographical information system (GIS). During 1998-2000, larval surveillance was carried out in 26 urban and rural areas in the Tohoku district, in the northern part of Honshu Island, by collecting larvae from artificial and natural habitats. Climatological analysis, using the GIS, showed that the following conditions accounted for the current distribution of Ae. albopictus: an annual mean temperature higher than 11 degrees C and a mean temperature of the coldest month, January, higher than -2 degrees C. A period with temperature above 11 degrees C in the confirmed area of the mosquito successively continues for more than 186 d per year. The accumulated temperature calculated from a temperature of 11 degrees C, which may be close to the developmental zero of Ae. albopictus, was over 1,350 degree-days. The relationship between the beginning of short-daylength, inducing egg diapause, and the monthly mean temperature during September and October necessary for successful larval development in the Tohoku district is also discussed. We also show the relationship between the current distribution of Ae. albopictus and the annual mean temperature in the United States. From these results it is predicted that Ae. albpictus will be established in some cities in northeast United States.

  17. [Evaluation of visiting nursing care using geographical information system (GIS) technology].

    PubMed

    Lee, Suk Jeong; Park, Jeong Mo

    2006-10-01

    Previous evaluation studies of the visiting nursing program explained an average change of the participants' health status, without considering socio-ecological characteristics and their impacts. However, these factors must affect individual health problems and lifestyles. For effective and appropriate community based programs, the Geographical Information System (GIS) can be utilized. GIS is a computer-based tool for mapping and analyzing things that happen on earth, and integrates statistical analysis with unique visualization. The purpose of this study was to evaluate visiting nursing care and to advocate the usefulness of planning and evaluating visiting nursing programs using Exploratory Spatial Data Analysis (ESDA) with GIS technology. One hundred eighty-four elderly participants with cerebrovascular risk factors who lived in 13 areas of one community received visiting nursing care. The data analyzed characteristics of pre-post change and autocorrelation by ESDA using GIS technology. Visiting nursing care showed an improvement in the participants' lifestyle habits, and family management ability and stress level, while the improvements were different depending on the regions. The change of family management ability and stress level correlated with neighborhoods (Morgan's I= 0.1841, 0.1675). Community health providers need to consider the individual participant's health status as well as socio-ecological factors. Analysis using GIS technology will contribute to the effective monitoring, evaluation and design of a visiting nursing program.

  18. Application of geographical information system in disposal site selection for hazardous wastes.

    PubMed

    Rezaeimahmoudi, Mehdi; Esmaeli, Abdolreza; Gharegozlu, Alireza; Shabanian, Hassan; Rokni, Ladan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a scientific method based on Geographical Information System (GIS) regarding all sustainable development measures to locate a proper landfill for disposal of hazardous wastes, especially industrial (radioactive) wastes. Seven effective factors for determining hazardous waste landfill were applied in Qom Province, central Iran. These criteria included water, slope, population centers, roads, fault, protected areas and geology. The Analysis Hierarchical Process (AHP) model based on pair comparison was used. First, the weight of each factor was determined by experts; afterwards each layer of maps entered to ARC GIS and with special weight multiplied together, finally the best suitable site was introduced. The most suitable sites for burial were in northwest and west of Qom Province and eventually five zones were introduced as the sample sites. GIs and AHP model is introduced as the technical, useful and accelerator tool for disposal site selection. Furthermore it is determined that geological factor is the most effective layer for site selection. It is suggested that geological conditions should be considered primarily then other factors are taken into consideration.

  19. The use of geographic information systems technology for salmon habitat analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, B.J.; Gordon, J.V.; Mavros, W.V.; Perry, E.M.; Pinney, C.

    1994-04-01

    Although Geographic Information Systems (GISs) have traditionally been used to analyze terrestrial animal habitats, identify migration patterns, and monitor ecosystems, they have rarely been used to understand aquatic species. The US Army Corps of Engineers is working with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and other government agencies to exploit GIS technology for improving the survival of threatened and endangered salmon in the Snake River in the states of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. The customized GIS will be used to map the physical environment of the river, to map the current biological environment, and to analyze potential impacts to both of these environments from several mitigation options. Data in both digital and textual formats have been obtained from scientists across the Pacific Northwest who are analyzing the habitats, limnology, and hydrology of the Snake River. The mitigation options focus on studying the effects of lowering the reservoirs of the Snake River in an effort to speed juvenile salmon towards the ocean. The hypothesis being examined is that faster juvenile salmon travel to the ocean may result in higher juvenile survival and greater smolt-to-adult return ratios. Lowering the Snake River reservoirs is expected to have a variety of impacts to the physical environment, including changes to water velocity, temperature, dissolved gasses, and turbidity. Each of these potential changes is being examined to assess their effects on the surrounding terrestrial wildlife and on both the anadromous and resident fish of the Snake River.

  20. Geographic information system for improving maternal and newborn health: recommendations for policy and programs.

    PubMed

    Molla, Yordanos B; Rawlins, Barbara; Makanga, Prestige Tatenda; Cunningham, Marc; Ávila, Juan Eugenio Hernández; Ruktanonchai, Corrine Warren; Singh, Kavita; Alford, Sylvia; Thompson, Mira; Dwivedi, Vikas; Moran, Allisyn C; Matthews, Zoe

    2017-01-11

    This correspondence argues and offers recommendations for how Geographic Information System (GIS) applied to maternal and newborn health data could potentially be used as part of the broader efforts for ending preventable maternal and newborn mortality. These recommendations were generated from a technical consultation on reporting and mapping maternal deaths that was held in Washington, DC from January 12 to 13, 2015 and hosted by the United States Agency for International Development's (USAID) global Maternal and Child Survival Program (MCSP). Approximately 72 participants from over 25 global health organizations, government agencies, donors, universities, and other groups participated in the meeting.The meeting placed emphases on how improved use of mapping could contribute to the post-2015 United Nation's Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), agenda in general and to contribute to better maternal and neonatal health outcomes in particular. Researchers and policy makers have been calling for more equitable improvement in Maternal and Newborn Health (MNH), specifically addressing hard-to-reach populations at sub-national levels. Data visualization using mapping and geospatial analyses play a significant role in addressing the emerging need for improved spatial investigation at subnational scale. This correspondence identifies key challenges and recommendations so GIS may be better applied to maternal health programs in resource poor settings. The challenges and recommendations are broadly grouped into three categories: ancillary geospatial and MNH data sources, technical and human resources needs and community participation.