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Sample records for geological events determining

  1. Techniques for determining probabilities of geologic events and processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, R.L. ); Mann, C.J. )

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal of this study has been to search out and evaluate existing quantitative methods for determining probabilities of events and processes in fields that seemed to be most closely related to the majority of the events considered important to long-term performance by earlier workers. These fields are thermomechanical behavior, mining engineering, hydrology, climatology, seismicity and tectonics, seismic hazard, volcanology, geochemistry, and resource exploration. Most of these events and processes can initiate, releases of the radioactive waste from a geologic repository, although geochemical processes primarily affect transport of wastes after release. The quantitative methods for determining probabilities identified here are those that have been reported in the literature, and some that could be used but have not been reported. Merits and limitations of each method have been described, and the current availability of databases adequate for determining accurate probabilities of events and processes has been appraised. A secondary goal has been to identify phenomena for which accurate probabilities cannot be determined now and areas of research that could materially improve our ability to make better probabilistic predictions in the immediate future.

  2. Techniques for determining probabilities of geologic events and processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, R.L.; Mann, C.J.

    1992-10-01

    The primary goal of this study has been to search out and evaluate existing quantitative methods for determining probabilities of events and processes in fields that seemed to be most closely related to the majority of the events considered important to long-term performance by earlier workers. These fields are thermomechanical behavior, mining engineering, hydrology, climatology, seismicity and tectonics, seismic hazard, volcanology, geochemistry, and resource exploration. Most of these events and processes can initiate, releases of the radioactive waste from a geologic repository, although geochemical processes primarily affect transport of wastes after release. The quantitative methods for determining probabilities identified here are those that have been reported in the literature, and some that could be used but have not been reported. Merits and limitations of each method have been described, and the current availability of databases adequate for determining accurate probabilities of events and processes has been appraised. A secondary goal has been to identify phenomena for which accurate probabilities cannot be determined now and areas of research that could materially improve our ability to make better probabilistic predictions in the immediate future.

  3. Seismic and geologic characteristics of drowning events on carbonate platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Erlich, R.N.; Barrett, S.F. ); Guo Bai Ju )

    1990-10-01

    Carbonate platform drowning events are recorded in Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous carbonates of the Baltimore Canyon area, offshore US East Coast, and lower Miocene carbonates of the Pearl River Mouth Basin, offshore People's Republic of China. Cursory examination of seismic data from both areas would indicate that the platforms fit the classic definition of a drowning unconformity. However, detailed lithologic and paleontologic data indicate that the depositional/erosional hiatuses vary widely in each area, from 0-25 m.y. in the Baltimore Canyon area, to a condensed section with no hiatus in the Pearl River Mouth Basin. The sedimentary sequence produced during drowning in both areas is gradational with underlying shallow platform carbonates and, in some places, overlying deeper marine limestones and shales. The generalized facies models proposed for drowning events suggest that they may appear as instantaneous or gradual changes in geologic and seismic data. Because of this resolution problem, a distinction should be made between seismically and geologically defined unconformity surfaces. The geologic characteristics of drowning events on carbonate platforms include a gradational lower (and sometimes upper) contact, chemical sedimentation (glauconite, phosphate), open-marine shelf sediments, and a variable hiatus at the upper boundary. Data from isolated open-ocean atolls (Pearl River Mouth Basin) indicate that they respond differently to drowning, showing an asymmetric decrease in shallow platform environments as drowning occurs. Proper recognition by a geoscientist of the seismic and geological characteristics of drowning events can lead to better reservoir and seal estimates, and the correct reconstruction of the depositional, tectonic, and eustatic histories of an area.

  4. Discrete-event simulation of nuclear-waste transport in geologic sites subject to disruptive events. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, S.; Ryland, S.; Peck, R.

    1980-06-19

    This report outlines a methodology to study the effects of disruptive events on nuclear waste material in stable geologic sites. The methodology is based upon developing a discrete events model that can be simulated on the computer. This methodology allows a natural development of simulation models that use computer resources in an efficient manner. Accurate modeling in this area depends in large part upon accurate modeling of ion transport behavior in the storage media. Unfortunately, developments in this area are not at a stage where there is any consensus on proper models for such transport. Consequently, our work is directed primarily towards showing how disruptive events can be properly incorporated in such a model, rather than as a predictive tool at this stage. When and if proper geologic parameters can be determined, then it would be possible to use this as a predictive model. Assumptions and their bases are discussed, and the mathematical and computer model are described.

  5. Terrestrial impactors at geological boundary events - Comets or asteroids?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    In the present evaluation of evidence presented to date for a 26-28 million year periodicity in the extinction record and the age of large, well dated terrestrial impact craters, it is noted that no simple, one-to-one relationship emerges between major asteroid and/or comet impacts, siderophile anomalies, and biological extinction events. While impacts may indeed be the major extinction-triggering event in some or even most cases, either other major events, or secondary effects of the impacts, may be the actual extinction-causing mechanism. Long term obscuration of insolation, planetary cooling, or lethal atmospheric pollution may vary among extinctions, depending on the actual state of the planet and its biota during the geological period in question. The source of 28 million year-period asteroidal impactors, moreover, remains unknown and thereby casts doubt on the entire periodicity scenario.

  6. Seismic and geologic characteristics of drowning events on carbonate platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Erlich, R.N.; Barrett, S.E. )

    1990-05-01

    Carbonate platform drowning events were recorded in Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous carbonates of the Baltimore Canyon area, and early Miocene carbonates of the Pearl River Mouth basin. Cursory examination of seismic data from both areas would suggest that the platforms appear to fit the classic definition of a drowning unconformity. Lithologic and paleontologic data however, indicate that depositional hiatuses vary widely in each area (from 0-25 Ma in the Baltimore Canyon area, to no hiatus, but a condensed section in the Pearl River Mouth basin). The sedimentary sequence produced during a drowning event (the drowning sequence) in both areas is gradational with underlying shallow platform carbonates and, in some places, overlying deeper marine limestones and shales. Facies models illustrate that drowning event, in general, can appear as instantaneous or gradual changes in lithologic and seismic data. However, evidence from platforms adjacent to continental margins (Baltimore Canyon) and isolated open ocean atolls and banks (Pearl River Mouth basin) indicates that their response to drowning is different. In addition, bypass/erosional and accretionary carbonate platforms also respond somewhat differently to drowning events. The geologic characteristics of drowning events on carbonate platforms include gradational lower (and sometimes upper) contacts, chemical sedimentation, open-marine shelf sediments, and variable loss of time at the upper boundary. Late-growth shelf margin reefs can also be a diagnostic feature of drowned platforms. Seismic characteristics include horizontal to subhorizontal basinal marine onlap and basin-parallel reflector continuity above the carbonate sequence boundary. Proper recognition of the seismic and geologic characteristics of drowning events can lead to better reservoir-seal predictions, and to correct reconstruction of the depositional and tectonic/eustatic history of an area.

  7. The Heavy Links between Geological Events and Vascular Plants Evolution: A Brief Outline

    PubMed Central

    Piombino, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Since the rise of photosynthesis, life has influenced terrestrial atmosphere, particularly the O2 and the CO2 content (the latter being originally more than 95%), changing the chemistry of waters, atmosphere, and soils. Billions of years after, a far offspring of these first unicellular forms conquered emerging lands, not only completely changing landscape, but also modifying geological cycles of deposition and erosion, many chemical and physical characteristics of soils and fresh waters, and, more, the cycle of various elements. So, there are no doubts that vascular plants modified geology; but it is true that also geology has affected (and, more, has driven) plant evolution. New software, PyRate, has determined vascular plant origin and diversification through a Bayesian analysis of fossil record from Silurian to today, particularly observing their origination and extinction rate. A comparison between PyRate data and geological history suggests that geological events massively influenced plant evolution and that also the rise of nonflowering seed plants and the fast diffusion of flowering plants can be explained, almost partly, with the environmental condition changes induced by geological phenomena. PMID:26966609

  8. The Heavy Links between Geological Events and Vascular Plants Evolution: A Brief Outline.

    PubMed

    Piombino, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Since the rise of photosynthesis, life has influenced terrestrial atmosphere, particularly the O2 and the CO2 content (the latter being originally more than 95%), changing the chemistry of waters, atmosphere, and soils. Billions of years after, a far offspring of these first unicellular forms conquered emerging lands, not only completely changing landscape, but also modifying geological cycles of deposition and erosion, many chemical and physical characteristics of soils and fresh waters, and, more, the cycle of various elements. So, there are no doubts that vascular plants modified geology; but it is true that also geology has affected (and, more, has driven) plant evolution. New software, PyRate, has determined vascular plant origin and diversification through a Bayesian analysis of fossil record from Silurian to today, particularly observing their origination and extinction rate. A comparison between PyRate data and geological history suggests that geological events massively influenced plant evolution and that also the rise of nonflowering seed plants and the fast diffusion of flowering plants can be explained, almost partly, with the environmental condition changes induced by geological phenomena.

  9. Geological Time, Biological Events and the Learning Transfer Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Claudia C.; Middendorf, Joan; Rehrey, George; Dalkilic, Mehmet M.; Cassidy, Keely

    2014-01-01

    Comprehension of geologic time does not come easily, especially for students who are studying the earth sciences for the first time. This project investigated the potential success of two teaching interventions that were designed to help non-science majors enrolled in an introductory geology class gain a richer conceptual understanding of the…

  10. Determination of carbonate carbon in geological materials by coulometric titration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engleman, E.E.; Jackson, L.L.; Norton, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    A coulometric titration is used for the determination of carbonate carbon in geological materials. Carbon dioxide is evolved from the sample by the addition of 2 M perchloric acid, with heating, and is determined by automated coulometric titration. The coulometric titration showed improved speed and precision with comparable accuracy to gravimetric and gasometric techniques. ?? 1985.

  11. Flameless atomic-absorption determination of gold in geological materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meier, A.L.

    1980-01-01

    Gold in geologic material is dissolved using a solution of hydrobromic acid and bromine, extracted with methyl isobutyl ketone, and determined using an atomic-absorption spectrophotometer equipped with a graphite furnace atomizer. A comparison of results obtained by this flameless atomic-absorption method on U.S. Geological Survey reference rocks and geochemical samples with reported values and with results obtained by flame atomic-absorption shows that reasonable accuracy is achieved with improved precision. The sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the method allows acquisition of data on the distribution of gold at or below its crustal abundance. ?? 1980.

  12. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. Geologic factors in the isolation of nuclear waste: evaluation of long-term geomorphic processes and catastrophic events

    SciTech Connect

    Mara, S.J.

    1980-03-01

    SRI International has projected the rate, duration, and magnitude of geomorphic processes and events in the Southwest and Gulf Coast over the next million years. This information will be used by the Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as input to a computer model, which will be used to simulate possible release scenarios and the consequences of the release of nuclear waste from geologic containment. The estimates in this report, although based on best scientific judgment, are subject to considerable uncertainty. An evaluation of the Quaternary history of the two study areas revealed that each had undergone geomorphic change in the last one million years. Catastrophic events were evaluated in order to determine their significance to the simulation model. Given available data, catastrophic floods are not expected to occur in the two study areas. Catastrophic landslides may occur in the Southwest, but because the duration of the event is brief and the amount of material moved is small in comparison to regional denudation, such events need not be included in the simulation model. Ashfalls, however, could result in removal of vegetation from the landscape, thereby causing significant increases in erosion rates. Because the estimates developed during this study may not be applicable to specific sites, general equations were presented as a first step in refining the analysis. These equations identify the general relationships among the important variables and suggest those areas of concern for which further data are required. If the current model indicates that geomorphic processes (taken together with other geologic changes) may ultimately affect the geologic containment of nuclear waste, further research may be necessary to refine this analysis for application to specific sites.

  13. Determination of chloride in geological samples by ion chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, S.A.; Gent, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    Samples of silicate rocks are prepared by sodium carbonate fusion and then treated by ion chromatography. The method was tested for geological standards with chloride concentration between 0.003 and 3%. Observed chloride concentrations comparedd favorably with literature values. The relative standard deviation and detection limit for the method were 8% and 7 ppm, respectively. Up to 30 determination per 24-hour period were possible. ?? 1983.

  14. Geology

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, Stephen P.

    2008-01-17

    This chapter summarizes the geology of the single-shell tank (SST) farms in the context of the region’s geologic history. This chapter is based on the information in the geology data package for the SST waste management areas and SST RFI Appendix E, which builds upon previous reports on the tank farm geology and Integrated Disposal Facility geology with information available after those reports were published.

  15. Retroactive Event Determination and Its Relativistic Roots

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Sky E.

    2011-11-29

    Quantum theory limits what we are allowed to say about the 'true' state of a quantum system if that system is unobserved. But special relativity relies fundamentally on a universal assumption about what a light particle is doing at ALL times, regardless of being observed (namely, traveling at speed c relative to any inertial observer). This constitutes a fundamental conceptual gap between the theories. In resolving this impasse we show that the state of a light particle (and hence space and time) is not objective or continuous. Time dilation and length contraction become infinite for a photon, so light has no 'experience' of event separation in space or time ({Delta}t' = 0, {Delta}x' = 0). The principle of simultaneity is applied between an inertial observer and a light particle, such that the relative speed of the two systems is c, and gamma = infinite/undefined. Although light experiences no separation between events, the Lorentz transform {Delta}t' = {gamma} ({Delta}t-{Delta}Lv/c{sup 2}) implies that the inertial observer experiences a separation between those same events of exactly {Delta}t = {Delta}L/c, a light-like separation. In other words, although light does not 'register' time or space itself, light will always be measured by an inertial observer at a position and time exactly as if it had travelled at speed c continuously through the intervening medium. This fits nicely within the limitations set by quantum mechanics. This result is connected with previous work on retroactive event determination, suggesting the ubiquitous existence of ''synchronicity''.

  16. 10 CFR 950.22 - Covered event determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Covered event determination. 950.22 Section 950.22 Energy... Covered event determination. (a) Completeness review. Upon notification of a covered event from the... with paragraph (c) of this section. (b) Covered Event Determination. The Claims Administrator...

  17. 10 CFR 950.22 - Covered event determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Covered event determination. 950.22 Section 950.22 Energy... Covered event determination. (a) Completeness review. Upon notification of a covered event from the... with paragraph (c) of this section. (b) Covered Event Determination. The Claims Administrator...

  18. 10 CFR 950.22 - Covered event determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Covered event determination. 950.22 Section 950.22 Energy... Covered event determination. (a) Completeness review. Upon notification of a covered event from the... with paragraph (c) of this section. (b) Covered Event Determination. The Claims Administrator...

  19. 10 CFR 950.22 - Covered event determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Covered event determination. 950.22 Section 950.22 Energy... Covered event determination. (a) Completeness review. Upon notification of a covered event from the... with paragraph (c) of this section. (b) Covered Event Determination. The Claims Administrator...

  20. 10 CFR 950.22 - Covered event determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Covered event determination. 950.22 Section 950.22 Energy... Covered event determination. (a) Completeness review. Upon notification of a covered event from the... with paragraph (c) of this section. (b) Covered Event Determination. The Claims Administrator...

  1. 10 CFR 950.32 - Final determination on covered events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final determination on covered events. 950.32 Section 950... Process § 950.32 Final determination on covered events. (a) If the parties reach a Final Determination on Covered Events through mediation, or Summary Binding Decision as set forth in this subpart, the...

  2. Quantative determination of geological and tectonic development under complex geological settings - Thrace Area, Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Erdogan, L.T. ); Yuekler, M.A.

    1990-05-01

    Thrace area is composed of several subbasins, formed during the middle Eocene, overlying the metamorphic and granitic rocks of the Istranca Massif. Syndepositional fault patterns and variations in sedimentary thicknesses indicate that the subbasins evolved tectonically by northeast-southwest extension from the middle Eocene to early Paleocene. From the early Paleocene to early Miocene, the northern part of the area underwent northeast-southwest extension, whereas in the middle Miocene, northwest-southeast wrench-fault assemblage resulted in a clockwise rotation of the extension axes. Consequently, the right-lateral motion of the transform faults resulted in a north-south extension which prevailed until the late Pleistocene. During the last 1 m.y., the area was subjected to a major compression leading to rapid erosion in the central part of the area. A deterministic three-dimensional basin analysis model has been applied to quantify the geological and tectonic evolution of the subbasins. A total of 72 wells were simulated to determine compaction pressure, and temperature histories of the sedimentary sequences to set up the conceptual model. The validity of the conceptual model was then checked with the simulation of six seismic profiles before the full three-dimensional simulation of the area. The trends from the computed subsidence and uplift heat flow, and compaction maps as a function of time were checked against the observed stratigraphic and sedimentological data. The excellent match between the computed trends and observed isopachs, and erosions as determined from seismic data and depositional environments, aided in the quantification of the regional stratigraphy and tectonics. The combination of the computed heat flow and uncompacted isopach maps was used in determining stress-strain relationships in the subbasins as a function of time.

  3. Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. K.; Sabins, F. F., Jr.; Rowan, L. C.; Short, N. M.

    1975-01-01

    Papers from private industry reporting applications of remote sensing to oil and gas exploration were presented. Digitally processed LANDSAT images were successfully employed in several geologic interpretations. A growing interest in digital image processing among the geologic user community was shown. The papers covered a wide geographic range and a wide technical and application range. Topics included: (1) oil and gas exploration, by use of radar and multisensor studies as well as by use of LANDSAT imagery or LANDSAT digital data, (2) mineral exploration, by mapping from LANDSAT and Skylab imagery and by LANDSAT digital processing, (3) geothermal energy studies with Skylab imagery, (4) environmental and engineering geology, by use of radar or LANDSAT and Skylab imagery, (5) regional mapping and interpretation, and digital and spectral methods.

  4. 10 CFR 950.32 - Final determination on covered events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Final determination on covered events. 950.32 Section 950.32 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STANDBY SUPPORT FOR CERTAIN NUCLEAR PLANT DELAYS Dispute Resolution... on Covered Events in any future Certification of Covered Costs related to the covered event that...

  5. 10 CFR 950.32 - Final determination on covered events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Final determination on covered events. 950.32 Section 950.32 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STANDBY SUPPORT FOR CERTAIN NUCLEAR PLANT DELAYS Dispute Resolution... on Covered Events in any future Certification of Covered Costs related to the covered event that...

  6. 10 CFR 950.32 - Final determination on covered events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Final determination on covered events. 950.32 Section 950.32 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STANDBY SUPPORT FOR CERTAIN NUCLEAR PLANT DELAYS Dispute Resolution... on Covered Events in any future Certification of Covered Costs related to the covered event that...

  7. 10 CFR 950.32 - Final determination on covered events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Final determination on covered events. 950.32 Section 950.32 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STANDBY SUPPORT FOR CERTAIN NUCLEAR PLANT DELAYS Dispute Resolution... on Covered Events in any future Certification of Covered Costs related to the covered event that...

  8. Current Events via Electronic Media: An Instructional Tool in a General Education Geology Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, T. P.

    2008-12-01

    St. Norbert College (SNC) is a liberal arts college in the Green Bay Metropolitan area with an enrollment of approximately 2100 students. All students are required to take one science course with a laboratory component as part of the general education program. Approximately 40% of all SNC students take introductory geology. Class size for this course is approximately 35 students. Each faculty member teaches one section per semester in a smart classroom A synthesis of current events via electronic media is an excellent pedagogical tool for the introductory geology course. An on-going informal survey of my introductory geology class indicates that between 75- 85% of all students in the class, mostly freshman and sophomores, do not follow the news on a regular basis in any format, i.e. print, internet, or television. Consequently, most are unaware of current scientific topics, events, trends, and relevancy. To address this issue, and develop a positive habit of the mind, a technique called In-the-News-Making-News (INMN) is employed. Each class period begins with a scientifically-related (mostly geology) online news article displayed on an overhead screen. The articles are drawn from a variety of sources that include international sites such as the BBC and CBC; national sites such as PBS, New York Times, and CNN; and local sites such as the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and the Green Bay Press Gazette. After perusing the article, additional information is often acquired by "Google" to help supplement and clarify the original article. An interactive discussion follows. Topics that are typically covered include: global climate change, basic scientific and technological discoveries, paleontology/evolution, natural disasters, mineral/ energy/ water resources, funding for science, space exploration, and other. Ancillary areas that are often touched on in the conversation include ethics, politics, economics, philosophy, education, geography, culture, or other. INMN addresses

  9. Determination of total mercury in biological and geological samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, James G.

    2005-01-01

    The analytical chemist is faced with several challenges when determining mercury in biological and geological materials. These challenges include widespread mercury contamination, both in the laboratory and the environment, possible losses of mercury during sample preparation and digestion, the wide range of mercury values commonly observed, ranging from the low nanogram per gram or per liter for background areas to hundreds of milligrams per kilogram in contaminated or ore-bearing areas, great matrix diversity, and sample heterogeneity1. These factors can be naturally occurring or anthropogenic, but must be addressed to provide a precise and accurate analysis. Although there are many instrumental methods available for the successful determination of mercury, no one technique will address all problems or all samples all of the time. The approach for the determination of mercury used at the U.S. Geological Survey, Crustal Imaging and Characterization Team, Denver Laboratories, utilizes a suite of complementary instrumental methods when approaching a study requiring mercury analyses. Typically, a study could require the analysis of waters, leachates or selective digestions of solids, vegetation, and biological materials such as tissue, bone, or shell, soils, rocks, sediments, coals, sludges, and(or) ashes. No one digestion or sample preparation method will be suitable for all of these matrices. The digestions typically employed at our laboratories include: (i) a closed-vessel microwave method using nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide, followed by digestion/dilution with a nitric acid/sodium dichromate solution, (ii) a robotic open test-tube digestion with nitric acid and sodium dichromate, (iii) a sealed Teflon? vessel with nitric acid and sodium dichromate, (iv) a sealed glass bottle with nitric acid and sodium dichromate, or (v) open test tube digestion with nitric and sulfuric acids and vanadium pentoxide. The common factor in all these digestions is that they are

  10. Determining resistivity of a geological formation using circuitry located within a borehole casing

    DOEpatents

    Vail III, William Banning

    2006-01-17

    Geological formation resistivity is determined. Circuitry is located within the borehole casing that is adjacent to the geological formation. The circuitry can measure one or more voltages across two or more voltage measurement electrodes associated with the borehole casing. The measured voltages are used by a processor to determine the resistivity of the geological formation. A common mode signal can also be reduced using the circuitry.

  11. Determination of the number of ψ' events at BESIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; N. Achasov, M.; Albayrak, O.; J. Ambrose, D.; F. An, F.; Q., An; Z. Bai, J.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; V. Bennett, J.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; M. Bian, J.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; A. Briere, R.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; F. Cao, G.; A. Cetin, S.; F. Chang, J.; Chelkov, G.; G., Chen; S. Chen, H.; C. Chen, J.; L. Chen, M.; J. Chen, S.; X., Chen; B. Chen, Y.; P. Cheng, H.; P. Chu, Y.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; L. Dai, H.; P. Dai, J.; Dedovich, D.; Y. Deng, Z.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; M. Ding, W.; Y., Ding; Y. Dong, L.; Y. Dong, M.; X. Du, S.; J., Fang; S. Fang, S.; Fava, L.; Q. Feng, C.; B. Ferroli, R.; Friedel, P.; D. Fu, C.; Gao, Y.; C., Geng; Goetzen, K.; X. Gong, W.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; H. Gu, M.; T. Gu, Y.; H. Guan, Y.; Q. Guo, A.; B. Guo, L.; T., Guo; P. Guo, Y.; L. Han, Y.; A. Harris, F.; L. He, K.; M., He; Y. He, Z.; Held, T.; K. Heng, Y.; L. Hou, Z.; C., Hu; M. Hu, H.; F. Hu, J.; T., Hu; M. Huang, G.; S. Huang, G.; S. Huang, J.; L., Huang; T. Huang, X.; Y., Huang; P. Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; S. Ji, C.; Q., Ji; P. Ji, Q.; B. Ji, X.; L. Ji, X.; L. Jiang, L.; S. Jiang, X.; B. Jiao, J.; Jiao, Z.; P. Jin, D.; S., Jin; F. Jing, F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Lai, W.; S. Lange, J.; Leyhe, M.; H. Li, C.; Cheng, Li; Cui, Li; M. Li, D.; F., Li; G., Li; B. Li, H.; C. Li, J.; K., Li; Lei, Li; J. Li, Q.; L. Li, S.; D. Li, W.; G. Li, W.; L. Li, X.; N. Li, X.; Q. Li, X.; R. Li, X.; B. Li, Z.; H., Liang; F. Liang, Y.; T. Liang, Y.; R. Liao, G.; T. Liao, X.; Lin(Lin, D.; J. Liu, B.; L. Liu, C.; X. Liu, C.; H. Liu, F.; Fang, Liu; Feng, Liu; H., Liu; B. Liu, H.; H. Liu, H.; M. Liu, H.; W. Liu, H.; P. Liu, J.; K., Liu; Y. Liu, K.; Kai, Liu; L. Liu, P.; Q., Liu; B. Liu, S.; X., Liu; B. Liu, Y.; A. Liu, Z.; Zhiqiang, Liu; Zhiqing, Liu; Loehner, H.; R. Lu, G.; J. Lu, H.; G. Lu, J.; W. Lu, Q.; R. Lu, X.; P. Lu, Y.; L. Luo, C.; X. Luo, M.; Luo, T.; L. Luo, X.; Lv, M.; L. Ma, C.; C. Ma, F.; L. Ma, H.; M. Ma, Q.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Y. Ma, X.; E. Maas, F.; Maggiora, M.; A. Malik, Q.; J. Mao, Y.; P. Mao, Z.; G. Messchendorp, J.; J., Min; J. Min, T.; E. Mitchell, R.; H. Mo, X.; C. Morales, Morales; Yu. Muchnoi, N.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nicholson, C.; B. Nikolaev, I.; Z., Ning; L. Olsen, S.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; W. Park, J.; Pelizaeus, M.; P. Peng, H.; Peters, K.; L. Ping, J.; G. Ping, R.; Poling, R.; Prencipe, E.; M., Qi; Qian, S.; F. Qiao, C.; Q. Qin, L.; S. Qin, X.; Y., Qin; H. Qin, Z.; F. Qiu, J.; H. Rashid, K.; G., Rong; D. Ruan, X.; Sarantsev, A.; D. Schaefer, B.; Shao, M.; P. Shen, C.; Y. Shen, X.; Y. Sheng, H.; R. Shepherd, M.; Y. Song, X.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; H. Sun, D.; X. Sun, G.; F. Sun, J.; S. Sun, S.; J. Sun, Y.; Z. Sun, Y.; J. Sun, Z.; T. Sun, Z.; J. Tang, C.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; H. Thorndike, E.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; S. Varner, G.; Q. Wang, B.; D., Wang; Y. Wang, D.; K., Wang; L. Wang, L.; S. Wang, L.; M., Wang; P., Wang; L. Wang, P.; J. Wang, Q.; G. Wang, S.; F. Wang, X.; L. Wang, X.; F. Wang, Y.; Z., Wang; G. Wang, Z.; Y. Wang, Z.; H. Wei, D.; B. Wei, J.; Weidenkaff, P.; G. Wen, Q.; P. Wen, S.; M., Werner; Wiedner, U.; H. Wu, L.; N., Wu; X. Wu, S.; W., Wu; Z., Wu; G. Xia, L.; X Xia, Y.; J. Xiao, Z.; G. Xie, Y.; L. Xiu, Q.; F. Xu, G.; M. Xu, G.; J. Xu, Q.; N. Xu, Q.; P. Xu, X.; R. Xu, Z.; Xue, F.; Xue, Z.; L., Yan; B. Yan, W.; H. Yan, Y.; X. Yang, H.; Y., Yang; X. Yang, Y.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; H. Ye, M.; X. Yu, B.; X. Yu, C.; W. Yu, H.; S. Yu, J.; P. Yu, S.; Z. Yuan, C.; Y., Yuan; A. Zafar, A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; X. Zhang, B.; Y. Zhang, B.; Zhang, C.; C. Zhang, C.; H. Zhang, D.; H. Zhang, H.; Y. Zhang, H.; Q. Zhang, J.; W. Zhang, J.; Y. Zhang, J.; Z. Zhang, J.; Lili, Zhang; Zhang, R.; H. Zhang, S.; J. Zhang, X.; Y. Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; H. Zhang, Y.; P. Zhang, Z.; Y. Zhang, Z.; Zhenghao, Zhang; Zhao, G.; S. Zhao, H.; W. Zhao, J.; X. Zhao, K.; Lei, Zhao; Ling, Zhao; G. Zhao, M.; Zhao, Q.; Z. Zhao, Q.; J. Zhao, S.; C. Zhao, T.; B. Zhao, Y.; G. Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; B., Zheng; P. Zheng, J.; H. Zheng, Y.; B., Zhong; Z., Zhong; L., Zhou; K. Zhou, X.; R. Zhou, X.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; J. Zhu, K.; H. Zhu, S.; L. Zhu, X.; C. Zhu, Y.; M. Zhu, Y.; S. Zhu, Y.; A. Zhu, Z.; J., Zhuang; S. Zou, B.; H. Zou, J.

    2013-06-01

    The number of ψ' events accumulated by the BESIII experiment from March 3 through April 14, 2009, is determined by counting inclusive hadronic events. The result is 106.41×(1.00±0.81%)×106. The error is systematic dominant; the statistical error is negligible.

  12. Event Coverage Detection and Event Source Determination in Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhangbing; Xing, Riliang; Duan, Yucong; Zhu, Yueqin; Xiang, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of the Internet of Underwater Things, smart things are deployed in the ocean space and establish underwater wireless sensor networks for the monitoring of vast and dynamic underwater environments. When events are found to have possibly occurred, accurate event coverage should be detected, and potential event sources should be determined for the enactment of prompt and proper responses. To address this challenge, a technique that detects event coverage and determines event sources is developed in this article. Specifically, the occurrence of possible events corresponds to a set of neighboring sensor nodes whose sensory data may deviate from a normal sensing range in a collective fashion. An appropriate sensor node is selected as the relay node for gathering and routing sensory data to sink node(s). When sensory data are collected at sink node(s), the event coverage is detected and represented as a weighted graph, where the vertices in this graph correspond to sensor nodes and the weight specified upon the edges reflects the extent of sensory data deviating from a normal sensing range. Event sources are determined, which correspond to the barycenters in this graph. The results of the experiments show that our technique is more energy efficient, especially when the network topology is relatively steady. PMID:26694394

  13. Event Coverage Detection and Event Source Determination in Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhangbing; Xing, Riliang; Duan, Yucong; Zhu, Yueqin; Xiang, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of the Internet of Underwater Things, smart things are deployed in the ocean space and establish underwater wireless sensor networks for the monitoring of vast and dynamic underwater environments. When events are found to have possibly occurred, accurate event coverage should be detected, and potential event sources should be determined for the enactment of prompt and proper responses. To address this challenge, a technique that detects event coverage and determines event sources is developed in this article. Specifically, the occurrence of possible events corresponds to a set of neighboring sensor nodes whose sensory data may deviate from a normal sensing range in a collective fashion. An appropriate sensor node is selected as the relay node for gathering and routing sensory data to sink node(s). When sensory data are collected at sink node(s), the event coverage is detected and represented as a weighted graph, where the vertices in this graph correspond to sensor nodes and the weight specified upon the edges reflects the extent of sensory data deviating from a normal sensing range. Event sources are determined, which correspond to the barycenters in this graph. The results of the experiments show that our technique is more energy efficient, especially when the network topology is relatively steady. PMID:26694394

  14. Event Coverage Detection and Event Source Determination in Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhangbing; Xing, Riliang; Duan, Yucong; Zhu, Yueqin; Xiang, Jianming

    2015-12-15

    With the advent of the Internet of Underwater Things, smart things are deployed in the ocean space and establish underwater wireless sensor networks for the monitoring of vast and dynamic underwater environments. When events are found to have possibly occurred, accurate event coverage should be detected, and potential event sources should be determined for the enactment of prompt and proper responses. To address this challenge, a technique that detects event coverage and determines event sources is developed in this article. Specifically, the occurrence of possible events corresponds to a set of neighboring sensor nodes whose sensory data may deviate from a normal sensing range in a collective fashion. An appropriate sensor node is selected as the relay node for gathering and routing sensory data to sink node(s). When sensory data are collected at sink node(s), the event coverage is detected and represented as a weighted graph, where the vertices in this graph correspond to sensor nodes and the weight specified upon the edges reflects the extent of sensory data deviating from a normal sensing range. Event sources are determined, which correspond to the barycenters in this graph. The results of the experiments show that our technique is more energy efficient, especially when the network topology is relatively steady.

  15. Determination of gait events using an externally mounted shank accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Hobbs, Sarah J; Protheroe, Laurence; Edmundson, Christopher J; Greenhalgh, Andrew

    2013-02-01

    Biomechanical analysis requires the determination of specific foot contact events. This is typically achieved using force platform information; however, when force platforms are unavailable, alternative methods are necessary. A method was developed for the determination of gait events using an accelerometer mounted to the distal tibia, measuring axial accelerations. The aim of the investigation was to determine the efficacy of this method. Sixteen participants ran at 4.0 m/s ± 5%. Synchronized tibial accelerations and vertical ground reaction forces were sampled at 1000 Hz as participants struck a force platform with their dominant foot. Events determined using the accelerometer, were compared with the corresponding events determined using the force platform. Mean errors of 1.68 and 5.46 ms for average and absolute errors were observed for heel strike and of -3.59 and 5.00 ms for toe-off. Mean and absolute errors of 5.18 and 11.47 ms were also found for the duration of the stance phase. Strong correlations (r = .96) were also observed between duration of stance obtained using the two different methods. The error values compare favorably to other alternative methods of predicting gait events. This suggests that shank-mounted accelerometers can be used to accurately and reliably detect gait events.

  16. Determination of gait events using an externally mounted shank accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Hobbs, Sarah J; Protheroe, Laurence; Edmundson, Christopher J; Greenhalgh, Andrew

    2013-02-01

    Biomechanical analysis requires the determination of specific foot contact events. This is typically achieved using force platform information; however, when force platforms are unavailable, alternative methods are necessary. A method was developed for the determination of gait events using an accelerometer mounted to the distal tibia, measuring axial accelerations. The aim of the investigation was to determine the efficacy of this method. Sixteen participants ran at 4.0 m/s ± 5%. Synchronized tibial accelerations and vertical ground reaction forces were sampled at 1000 Hz as participants struck a force platform with their dominant foot. Events determined using the accelerometer, were compared with the corresponding events determined using the force platform. Mean errors of 1.68 and 5.46 ms for average and absolute errors were observed for heel strike and of -3.59 and 5.00 ms for toe-off. Mean and absolute errors of 5.18 and 11.47 ms were also found for the duration of the stance phase. Strong correlations (r = .96) were also observed between duration of stance obtained using the two different methods. The error values compare favorably to other alternative methods of predicting gait events. This suggests that shank-mounted accelerometers can be used to accurately and reliably detect gait events. PMID:23462448

  17. The Late Guadalupian (Permian) event: when everything geologically unusual started for the Paleozoic-Mesozoic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isozaki, Y.

    2007-12-01

    The event across the Paleozoic-Mesozoic transition involves the greatest mass extinction in history and other long-term complicated geologic phenomena in various aspects on the Earth, such as Pangean rifting and superanoxia. The Permo-Triassic mid-oceanic sedimentary records documented the double-phased nature of the extinction and relevant environmental changes at the Middle and Upper Permian or Guadalupian-Lopingian boundary (G-LB) and at the Permo-Triassic boundary (P-TB). As all the coeval ocean floors of Panthalassa were lost by subduction, the dataset from the accreted mid-oceanic rocks is particularly important. The deep-sea chert recorded the double-phased remarkable faunal reorganization in radiolarians (major marine plankton in the Paleozoic), i.e., in the Late Guadalupian and at P-TB. It is noteworthy that the superanoxia (ca. 20 million year long deep-sea anoxia) started in the Late Guadalupian culminated at the P-TB. The mid-oceanic paleo-atoll carbonates primarily deposited on seamounts also recorded double-phased extinction in fusulines (a representative Late Paleozoic shallow marine benthos), double-phased negative shift of stable carbon isotope ratio in the Late Guadalupian and at P-TB, and the Phanerozoic minimum in 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratio in the Late Guadalupian. Mid-oceanic deep- and shallow-water sequences indicate that significant changes have occurred in the Permian superocean in a double-phased manner, and that everything geologically unusual started in the Late Guadalupian. These bio- and chemostratigraphical data are concordant with those from the coeval shallow marine shelf sequences around Pangea. The uniquely concentrated occurrence of rhyo-dacitic tuff beds both around G-L B and P-TB suggests that Panthalassa and eastern Tethys (South China) extensively suffered severe volcanic hazards twice almost at the same time as the G-LB and P-TB extinctions. In the framework of the 'Plume Winter' scenario (Isozaki, 2007), the double

  18. A large-scale phylogeny of Synodontis (Mochokidae, Siluriformes) reveals the influence of geological events on continental diversity during the Cenozoic.

    PubMed

    Pinton, Aurélie; Agnèse, Jean-François; Paugy, Didier; Otero, Olga

    2013-03-01

    To explain the spatial variability of fish taxa at a large scale, two alternative proposals are usually evoked. In recent years, the debate has centred on the relative roles of present and historical processes in shaping biodiversity patterns. In Africa, attempts to understand the processes that determine the large scale distribution of fishes and exploration of historical contingencies have been under-investigated given that most of the phylogenetic studies focus on the history of the Great Lakes. Here, we explore phylogeographic events in the evolutionary history of Synodontis (Mohokidae, Siluriformes) over Africa during the Cenozoic focusing on the putative role of historical processes. We discuss how known geological events together with hydrographical changes contributed to shape Synodontis biogeographical history. Synodontis was chosen on the basis of its high diversity and distribution in Africa: it consists of approximately 120 species that are widely distributed in all hydrographic basins except the Maghreb and South Africa. We propose the most comprehensive phylogeny of this catfish genus. Our results provide support for the 'hydrogeological' hypothesis, which proposes that palaeohydrological changes linked with the geological context may have been the cause of diversification of freshwater fish deep in the Tertiary. More precisely, the two main geological structures that participated to shape the hydrographical network in Africa, namely the Central African Shear zone and the East African rift system, appear as strong drivers of Synodontis diversification and evolution. PMID:23274216

  19. A large-scale phylogeny of Synodontis (Mochokidae, Siluriformes) reveals the influence of geological events on continental diversity during the Cenozoic.

    PubMed

    Pinton, Aurélie; Agnèse, Jean-François; Paugy, Didier; Otero, Olga

    2013-03-01

    To explain the spatial variability of fish taxa at a large scale, two alternative proposals are usually evoked. In recent years, the debate has centred on the relative roles of present and historical processes in shaping biodiversity patterns. In Africa, attempts to understand the processes that determine the large scale distribution of fishes and exploration of historical contingencies have been under-investigated given that most of the phylogenetic studies focus on the history of the Great Lakes. Here, we explore phylogeographic events in the evolutionary history of Synodontis (Mohokidae, Siluriformes) over Africa during the Cenozoic focusing on the putative role of historical processes. We discuss how known geological events together with hydrographical changes contributed to shape Synodontis biogeographical history. Synodontis was chosen on the basis of its high diversity and distribution in Africa: it consists of approximately 120 species that are widely distributed in all hydrographic basins except the Maghreb and South Africa. We propose the most comprehensive phylogeny of this catfish genus. Our results provide support for the 'hydrogeological' hypothesis, which proposes that palaeohydrological changes linked with the geological context may have been the cause of diversification of freshwater fish deep in the Tertiary. More precisely, the two main geological structures that participated to shape the hydrographical network in Africa, namely the Central African Shear zone and the East African rift system, appear as strong drivers of Synodontis diversification and evolution.

  20. Scale determinants of fiscal investment in geological exploration: evidence from China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Linna; Lei, Yalin

    2013-01-01

    With the continued growth in demand for mineral resources and China's efforts in increasing investment in geological prospecting, fiscal investment in geological exploration becomes a research hotspot. This paper examines the yearly relationship among fiscal investment in geological exploration of the current term, that of the last term and prices of mining rights over the period 1999-2009. Hines and Catephores' investment acceleration model is applied to describe the scale determinants of fiscal investment in geological exploration which are value-added of mining rights, value of mining rights and fiscal investment in the last term. The results indicate that when value-added of mining rights, value of mining rights or fiscal investment in the last term moves at 1 unit, fiscal investment in the current term will move 0.381, 1.094 or 0.907 units respectively. In order to determine the scale of fiscal investment in geological exploration for the current year, the Chinese government should take fiscal investment in geological exploration for the last year and the capital stock of the previous investments into account. In practice, combination of government fiscal investment in geological exploration with its performance evaluation can create a virtuous circle of capital management mechanism. PMID:24204652

  1. Scale determinants of fiscal investment in geological exploration: evidence from China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Linna; Lei, Yalin

    2013-01-01

    With the continued growth in demand for mineral resources and China's efforts in increasing investment in geological prospecting, fiscal investment in geological exploration becomes a research hotspot. This paper examines the yearly relationship among fiscal investment in geological exploration of the current term, that of the last term and prices of mining rights over the period 1999-2009. Hines and Catephores' investment acceleration model is applied to describe the scale determinants of fiscal investment in geological exploration which are value-added of mining rights, value of mining rights and fiscal investment in the last term. The results indicate that when value-added of mining rights, value of mining rights or fiscal investment in the last term moves at 1 unit, fiscal investment in the current term will move 0.381, 1.094 or 0.907 units respectively. In order to determine the scale of fiscal investment in geological exploration for the current year, the Chinese government should take fiscal investment in geological exploration for the last year and the capital stock of the previous investments into account. In practice, combination of government fiscal investment in geological exploration with its performance evaluation can create a virtuous circle of capital management mechanism.

  2. Scale Determinants of Fiscal Investment in Geological Exploration: Evidence from China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Linna; Lei, Yalin

    2013-01-01

    With the continued growth in demand for mineral resources and China's efforts in increasing investment in geological prospecting, fiscal investment in geological exploration becomes a research hotspot. This paper examines the yearly relationship among fiscal investment in geological exploration of the current term, that of the last term and prices of mining rights over the period 1999–2009. Hines and Catephores' investment acceleration model is applied to describe the scale determinants of fiscal investment in geological exploration which are value-added of mining rights, value of mining rights and fiscal investment in the last term. The results indicate that when value-added of mining rights, value of mining rights or fiscal investment in the last term moves at 1 unit, fiscal investment in the current term will move 0.381, 1.094 or 0.907 units respectively. In order to determine the scale of fiscal investment in geological exploration for the current year, the Chinese government should take fiscal investment in geological exploration for the last year and the capital stock of the previous investments into account. In practice, combination of government fiscal investment in geological exploration with its performance evaluation can create a virtuous circle of capital management mechanism. PMID:24204652

  3. An ion-selective electrode method for determination of chlorine in geological materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aruscavage, P. J.; Campbell, E.Y.

    1983-01-01

    A method is presented for the determination of chlorine in geological materials, in which a chloride-selective ion electrode is used after decomposition of the sample with hydrofluoric acid and separation of chlorine in a gas-diffusion cell. Data are presented for 30 geological standard materials. The relative standard deviation of the method is estimated to be better than 8% for amounts of chloride of 10 ??g and greater. ?? 1983.

  4. Martian Dunite NWA 2737: Petrographic Constraints on Geological History, Shock Events, and Olivine Color

    SciTech Connect

    Treiman,A.; Dyar, M.; McCanta, M.; Noble, S.; Pieters, C.

    2007-01-01

    Meteorite Northwest Africa (NWA) 2737 is the second known chassignite, an olivine-rich igneous rock with mineral compositions and isotopic ratios that suggest it formed on Mars. NWA 2737 consists of ?85% vol. olivine (Mg, molar Mg/(Mg + Fe), of 78.3 {+-} 0.4%), which is notable because it is black in hand sample and brown in thin section. Other minerals include chromite, pyroxenes (augite, pigeonite, orthopyroxene), and diaplectic glass of alkali-feldspar composition. Aqueous alteration is minimal and appears only as slight dissolution of glass. NWA 2737 formed by accumulation of olivine and chromite from a basaltic magma; the other minerals represent magma trapped among the cumulus grains. Minerals are compositionally homogeneous, consistent with chemical equilibration in late and postigneous cooling. Two-pyroxene thermometry gives equilibration temperatures 1150 C, implying a significant time spent at the basalt solidus. Olivine-spinel-pyroxene equilibria give ?825 C (possibly the T of mesostasis crystallization) at an oxidation state of QMF-1. This oxidation state is consistent with low Fe3+ in olivine (determined by EMP, Moessbauer spectra, and synchrotron micro-XANES spectroscopy) and with {approx}10% of the iron in pyroxene being Fe3+. NWA 2737 experienced two shock events. The first shock, to stage S5-S6, affected the olivine by producing in it planar deformation features, intense mosaicism and lattice strain, and abundant droplets of iron-nickel metal, 5-15 nm in diameter. At this stage the olivine became deeply colored, i.e., strongly absorbing at visible and near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths. This shock event and its thermal pulse probably occurred at {approx}170 Ma, the Ar-Ar age of NWA 2737. The colored olivine is cut by ribbons of coarser, uncolored olivine with long axes along [100] and shorter axes on {l_brace}021{r_brace} planes: These are consistent with the easy slip law for olivine [100]{l_brace}021{r_brace}, which is activated at moderate strain

  5. Volcano!: An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Geology Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  6. Gold Rush!: An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Geology Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school earth science or general science teachers to help their students learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event- based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork,…

  7. Volcano!: An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Geology Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school earth science teachers to help their students learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research,…

  8. Geological record of meltwater events at Qinghai Lake, China from the past 40 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weijian; Liu, Taibei; Wang, Hao; An, Zhisheng; Cheng, Peng; Zhu, Yizhi; Burr, G. S.

    2016-10-01

    We report here on a previously unpublished sediment core from Qinghai Lake, China, that preserves a continuous record of sedimentation for the past 40 ka. A striking feature of the record is a set of distinct meltwater events recorded at 35, 19 and 14 ka respectively. These events are manifest as distinct pulses of relatively old organic radiocarbon in the sediments. We interpret these as a signal of glacial melting in the Qinghai Lake watershed. The meltwater signals are closely correlated to temperature and precipitation records associated with deglaciation. The events at 19 ka and 14 ka correspond to well-established high latitude Melt Water Pulse (MWP) events during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 2, and the 35 ka event corresponds to a period of pervasive high lake levels in western China during late MIS 3. We interpret these anomalous dates as the result of relatively old carbon that was destabilized by the glaciers, and released into the lake as the glaciers melted. The data indicate that this process takes thousands of years. We expect that the approach employed here to identify these events is generally applicable to any lake system with a significant glacial meltwater component.

  9. The Tsunami Geology of the Bay of Bengal Shores and the Predecessors of the 2004 Indian Ocean Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, C.; Rajendran, K.; Seshachalam, S.; Andrade, V.

    2010-12-01

    The 2004 Aceh-Andaman earthquake exceeded the known Indian Ocean precedents by its 1,300-km long fault rupture and the height and reach of its tsunami. Literature of the ancient Chola dynasty (AD 9-11 centuries) of south India and the archeological excavations allude to a sea flood that crippled the historic port at Kaveripattinam, a trading hub for Southeast Asia. Here, we combine a variety of data from the rupture zone as well as the distant shores to build a tsunami history of the Bay of Bengal. A compelling set of geological proxies of possible tsunami inundation include boulder beds of Car Nicobar Island in the south and the East Island in the northernmost Andaman, a subsided fossil mangrove forest near Port Blair and a washover sedimentation identified in the Kaveripattinam coast of Tamil Nadu, south India. We have developed an extensive chronology for these geological proxies, and we analyze them in conjunction with the historical information culled from different sources for major sea surges along the Bay of Bengal shores. The age data and the depositional characteristics of these geological proxies suggest four major tsunamis in the last 2000 years in the Bay of Bengal, including the 1881 Car Nicobar tsunami. Among these, the evidence for the event of 800-1200 cal yr BP is fairly well represented on both sides of the Bay of Bengal shores. Thus, we surmise that the 800-1000-year old tsunami mimics the transoceanic reach of the 2004 Indian Ocean and the age constraints also agree with the sea surge during the Chola period. We also obtained clues for a possible medieval tsunami from the islands occurred probably a few hundred years after the Chola tsunami, but its size cannot constrained, nor its source. The convergence of ages and the multiplicity of sites would suggest at least one full size predecessor of the 2004 event 1000-800 years ago.

  10. Comparative study of activation analyses for the determination of trace halogens in geological and cosmochemical samples.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Tomoshi; Oura, Yasuji; Ebihara, Mitsuru

    2007-09-01

    Halogens (fluorine, chlorine, bromine and iodine) were determined by activation analyses (neutron activation analysis (NAA), photon activation analysis (PAA) and prompt gamma-ray analysis (PGA)) for geological and cosmochemical solid samples. We studied how each analytical method was for the determination of trace amounts of halogens in rock samples. Radiochemical NAA (RNAA) showed the highest analytical reliability for three halogens (chlorine, bromine and iodine), whereas a set of four halogens (fluorine, chlorine, bromine and iodine) could be determined in principle by radiochemical PAA (RPAA) from a single specimen. Although it is a non-destructive method, PGA showed an analytical sensitivity for chlorine comparable to those of RNAA and RPAA.

  11. Quantitative hazard assessment at Vulcano (Aeolian islands): integration of geology, event statistics and physical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellino, Pierfrancesco; de Astis, Gianfilippo; La Volpe, Luigi; Mele, Daniela; Sulpizio, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    The analysis of stratigraphy and of pyroclastic deposits particle features allowed the reconstruction of the volcanic history of La Fossa di Vulcano. An eruptive scenario driven by superficial phreatomagmatic explosions emerged. A statistical analysis of the pyroclastic Successions led to define a repetitive sequence of dilute pyroclastic density currents as the most probable events at short term, followed by fallout of dense ballistic blocks. The scale of such events is related to the amount of magma involved in each explosion. Events involving a million of cubic meters of magma are probable in view of what happened in the most recent eruptions. They led to the formation of hundreds of meters thick dilute pyroclastic density currents, moving down the volcano slope at velocities exceeding 50 m/sec. The dispersion of desnity currents affected the whole Vulcano Porto area, the Vulcanello area and also overrode the Fossa Caldera's rim, spreading over the Piano area. Similarly, older pyroclastic deposits erupted at different times (Piano Grotte dei Rossi formation, ~20-7.7 ka) from vents within La Fossa Caldera and before La Fossa Cone formation. They also were phreatomagmatic in origin and fed dilute pyroclastic density currents (PDC). They represent the eruptions with the highest magnitude on the Island. Therefore, for the aim of hazard assessment, these deposits from La Fossa Cone and La Fossa Caldera were used to depict eruptive scenarios at short term and at long term. On the base of physical models that make use of pyroclastic deposits particle features, the impact parameters for each scenario have been calculated. They are dynamic pressure and particle volumetric concentration of density currents, and impact energy of ballistic blocks. On this base, a quantitative hazard map is presented, which could be of direct use for territory planning and for the calculation of the expected damage.

  12. Iridium abundance measurements across bio-event horizons in the geological record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orth, C. J.; Attrep, M., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Geochemical studies have been performed on thousands of rock samples collected across bio-event horizons in the fossil record using INAA for about 40 common and trace elements and radiochemical isolation procedures for Os, Ir, Pt, and Au on selected samples. These studies were begun soon after the Alvarez team announced their discovery of the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) Ir anomaly in marine rock sequences in Europe. With their encouragement the Authors searched for the anomaly in nearby continental (freshwater coal swamp) deposits. In collaboration with scientists from the U.S.G.S. in Denver, the anomaly was located and it was observed that a floral crisis occurred at the same stratigraphic position as the Ir spike. Further work in the Raton Basin has turned up numerous well-preserved K-T boundary sections. Although the Authors have continued to study the K-T boundary and provide geochemical measurements for other groups trying to precisely locate it, the primary effort was turned to examining the other bio-events in the Phanerozoic, especially to those that are older than the terminal Cretaceous. A list of horizons that were examined in collaboration with paleontologists and geologists is given. Results are also given and discussed.

  13. Selenium Preconcentration in Geological Materials for Determination at sub-μ g\\ g-1 Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedard, L. P.

    2004-05-01

    Selenium is important because it is a path finder element in economic geology. It has similar geochemical properties as sulfur, but slightly less mobile and less volatile in sulfides. Although its environmental cycle is better understood, its geological cycle is almost unknown. In geological samples, Se concentration ranges 0,02-1 μ g\\ g-1. Se has many spectral interefences in ICP-MS, rendering difficult to determine. INAA detection limit for geological samples is about 10 μ g\\ g-1. The analytical difficulties are one of the main reason why the geological cycle of Se is so poorly known. The preconcentration of Se with Thiol Cotton Fiber (TCF) followed by atomic absorption (AA) has been modified to be used with INAA. The modified technique involves sample dissolution (HF-HNO3) and evaporation to dryness at low temperature (55-60 oC) to keep Se in solution. Se is converted to SeIV by adding 5-6 mol l-1 HCl and heating covered in a boiling bath (95-100oC). Sample is diluted with deionized water to obtain 0,3 - 1 mol l-1 HCl and then collected on TCF. TCF is put in a polyethylene vial for irradiation in the SLOWPOKE II reactor for 10 seconds at a neutron flux of 1015 m-2 s-1. The 162 KeV peak of 77Se (half-life 17,36 sec) is read for 20 seconds after a decay of 7 seconds. Results for certified reference materials show the TCF preconcentration technique followed by INAA provides results comparable with AA with a detection limit of approximately 0,05 μ g\\ g-1. Moreover INAA provides many advantages such as eliminating the desorption step and is less time consuming than AA.

  14. Comparison of uranium determination in some Syrian geologic samples using three reactor based methods

    PubMed

    Jubeli

    2000-04-01

    A set of 25 samples of soil, sediments, carbonate and phosphate rocks from Syria were analysed for uranium, using three reactor based methods; instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), delayed neutron counting (DNC) and one cycle of irradiation utilizing the cyclic activation system (CAS). Although the three methods are capable of irradiation samples, the last method is the least established for U determination in rocks. The measurements obtained by the three methods are compared. The results show good agreement, with a distinct linear relationship and significant positive correlation coefficients. It was concluded that the CAS method could reliably be used to rapidly determine uranium in geological samples. PMID:10800739

  15. Atomic absorption spectrometric determination of copper, zinc, and lead in geological materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Chao, T.T.

    1976-01-01

    An atomic absorption spectrometric method is described for the determination of copper, zinc, and lead in geological materials. The sample is digested with HF-HCl-H2O2; the final solution for analysis is in 10 % (v/v) HCl. Copper and zinc are determined directly by aspirating the solution into an air-acetylene flame. A separate aliquot of the solution is used for determination of lead; lead is extracted into TOPO-MIBK from the acidic solution in the presence of iodide and ascorbic acid. For a 0.50-g sample, the limits of determination are 10-2000 p.p.m. for Cu and Zn, and 5-5000 p.p.m. for Pb. As much as 40 % Fe or Ca. and 10 % Al, Mg, or Mn in the sample do not interfere. The proposed method can be applied to the determination of copper, zinc, and lead in a wide range of geological materials including iron- and manganese-rich, calcareous and carbonate samples. ?? 1976.

  16. Determination of femtogram quantities of protactinium in geologic samples by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, D.A.; Murrell, M.T.; Williams, R.W. )

    1994-04-01

    We describe a procedure for measurement of [sup 231]Pa in geologic samples by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry, using [sup 233]Pa as a spike isotope, which provides marked improvements in precision and sample size relative to established decay counting techniques. This method allows determination of as little as a few tens of femtograms of [sup 231]Pa (approximately 10[sup 3] atoms) with a conservative estimated uncertainty of [+-]1% (95% confidence level). Applications of [sup 231]Pa-[sup 235]U systematics to uranium-series geochemistry and geochronology should be greatly enhanced by this approach. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. A neutron activation analysis procedure for the determination of uranium, thorium and potassium in geologic samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aruscavage, P. J.; Millard, H.T.

    1972-01-01

    A neutron activation analysis procedure was developed for the determination of uranium, thorium and potassium in basic and ultrabasic rocks. The three elements are determined in the same 0.5-g sample following a 30-min irradiation in a thermal neutron flux of 2??1012 n??cm-2??sec-1. Following radiochemical separation, the nuclides239U (T=23.5 m),233Th (T=22.2 m) and42K (T=12.36 h) are measured by ??-counting. A computer program is used to resolve the decay curves which are complex owing to contamination and the growth of daughter activities. The method was used to determine uranium, throium and potassium in the U. S. Geological Survey standard rocks DTS-1, PCC-1 and BCR-1. For 0.5-g samples the limits of detection for uranium, throium and potassium are 0.7, 1.0 and 10 ppb, respectively. ?? 1972 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  18. An atomic-absorption method for the determination of gold in large samples of geologic materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    VanSickle, Gordon H.; Lakin, Hubert William

    1968-01-01

    A laboratory method for the determination of gold in large (100-gram) samples has been developed for use in the study of the gold content of placer deposits and of trace amounts of gold in other geologic materials. In this method the sample is digested with bromine and ethyl ether, the gold is extracted into methyl isobutyl ketone, and the determination is made by atomicabsorption spectrophotometry. The lower limit of detection is 0.005 part per million in the sample. The few data obtained so far by this method agree favorably with those obtained by assay and by other atomic-absorption methods. About 25 determinations can be made per man-day.

  19. Determination of gold in geologic materials by solvent extraction and atomic-absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huffman, Claude; Mensik, J.D.; Riley, L.B.

    1967-01-01

    The two methods presented for the determination of traces of gold in geologic materials are the cyanide atomic-absorption method and the fire-assay atomic-absorption method. In the cyanide method gold is leached with a sodium-cyanide solution. The monovalent gold is then oxidized to the trivalent state and concentrated by extracting into methyl isobutyl ketone prior to estimation by atomic absorption. In the fire-assay atomic-absorption method, the gold-silver bead obtained from fire assay is dissolved in nitric and hydrochloric acids. Gold is then concentrated by extracting into methyl isobutyl ketone prior to determination by atomic absorption. By either method concentrations as low as 50 parts per billion of gold can be determined in a 15-gram sample.

  20. Atomic-absorption determination of beryllium in geological materials by use of electrothermal atomization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, E.Y.; Simon, F.O.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described for the atomic-absorption determination of beryllium in geological materials, that utilizes electrothermal atomization after a separation by solvent extraction. Samples are decomposed with hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid in Teflon-lined pressure decomposition vessels. Beryllium is isolated by its extraction as beryllium acetylacetonate at pH 8 into xylene and back-extraction in 3M hydrochloric acid. The method has been successfully applied to the determination of beryllium in 14 U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks. Four subsamples from four bottles of each standard sample were analysed in random order. The mean beryllium contents (ppm) are: AGV-1, 1.98; PCC-1, 0.024; MAG-1, 2.84; BHVO-1, 0.90; DTS-1, 0.026; SCo-1, 1.74; SDC-1, 2.52; BCR-1, 1.44; GSP-1, 1.22; SGR-1, 0.86; QLO-1, 1.83; RGM-1, 2.21; STM-1, 8.75; G-2, 2.29. An analysis of variance shows that all the samples may be considered homogeneous at F0.95 except AGV-1 and DTS-1 which may be considered homogeneous at F0.99. ?? 1978.

  1. Using Confidence Intervals and Recurrence Intervals to Determine Precipitation Delivery Mechanisms Responsible for Mass Wasting Events.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulizio, T. P.; Bilbrey, C.; Stoyanoff, N.; Dixon, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Mass wasting events are geologic hazards that impact human life and property across a variety of landscapes. These movements can be triggered by tectonic activity, anomalous precipitation events, or both; acting to decrease the factor of safety ratio on a hillslope to the point of failure. There exists an active hazard landscape in the West Boulder River drainage of Park Co., MT in which the mechanisms of slope failure are unknown. It is known that region has not seen significant tectonic activity within the last decade, leaving anomalous precipitation events as the likely trigger for slope failures in the landscape. Precipitation can be delivered to a landscape via rainfall or snow; it was the aim of this study to determine the precipitation delivery mechanism most likely responsible for movements in the West Boulder drainage following the Jungle Wildfire of 2006. Data was compiled from four SNOTEL sites in the surrounding area, spanning 33 years, focusing on, but not limited to; maximum snow water equivalent (SWE) values in a water year, median SWE values on the date which maximum SWE was recorded in a water year, the total precipitation accumulated in a water year, etc. Means were computed and 99% confidence intervals were constructed around these means. Recurrence intervals and exceedance probabilities were computed for maximum SWE values and total precipitation accumulated in a water year to determine water years with anomalous precipitation. It was determined that the water year 2010-2011 received an anomalously high amount of SWE, and snow melt in the spring of this water year likely triggered recent mass waste movements. This data is further supported by Google Earth imagery, showing movements between 2009 and 2011. Return intervals for the maximum SWE value in 2010-11 for the Placer Basin SNOTEL site was 34 years, while return intervals for the Box Canyon and Monument Peak SNOTEL sites were 17.5 and 17 years respectively. Max SWE values lie outside the

  2. Determination of the rare-earth elements in geological materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lichte, F.E.; Meier, A.L.; Crock, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    A method of analysis of geological materials for the determination of the rare-earth elements using the Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric technique (ICP-MS) has been developed. Instrumental parameters and factors affecting analytical results have been first studied and then optimized. Samples are analyzed directly following an acid digestion, without the need for separation or preconcentration with limits of detection of 2-11 ng/g, precision of ?? 2.5% relative standard deviation, and accuracy comparable to inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis. A commercially available ICP-MS instrument is used with modifications to the sample introduction system, torch, and sampler orifice to reduce the effects of high salt content of sample solutions prepared from geologic materials. Corrections for isobaric interferences from oxide ions and other diatomic and triatomic ions are made mathematically. Special internal standard procedures are used to compensate for drift in metahmetal oxide ratios and sensitivity. Reference standard values are used to verify the accuracy and utility of the method.

  3. The Siberian Traps and the end-Permian event: Geology, geochemistry and atmospheric modeling of gas release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensen, Henrik; Stordal, Frode; Roscher, Marco; Sokalska, Ewa; Planke, Sverre

    2013-04-01

    , under current conditions, about 25 times larger than from a similar mass of CO2, i.e. the Global Warming Potential (GWP) is ~25, the climate impact of a mixture containing 60% CH4 is strongly dominated by this compound. This effect increases with the amount of available H2S as it strongly influences the lifetime of CH4 in the atmosphere by reducing the oxidation potential. The method and geological model can be applied to other boundary events with LIPs, such as the Triassic-Jurassic boundary (~3.1°C), the Toarcian event (~2.9°C), and the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (~3.5°C).

  4. Emission spectrographic determination of volatile trace elements in geologic materials by a carrier distillation technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barton, H.N.

    1986-01-01

    Trace levels of chalcophile elements that form volatile sulfide minerals are determined in stream sediments and in the nonmagnetic fraction of a heavy-mineral concentrate of stream sediments by a carrier distillation emission spectrographic method. Photographically recorded spectra of samples are visually compared with those of synthetic standards for the two sample types. Rock and soil samples may also be analyzed by comparison with the stream-sediment standards. A gallium oxide spectrochemical carrier/buffer enhances the early emission of the volatile elements. Detection limits in parts per million attained are: Sb 5, As 20, Bi 0.1, Cd 1, Cu 1, Pb 2, Ag 0.1, Zn 2, and Sn 0.1. A comparison with other methods of analysis, total-burn emission and atomic absorption spectroscopy, shows good correlation for standard reference for materials and samples from a variety of geologic terranes. ?? 1986.

  5. Determination of palladium, platinum and rhodium in geologic materials by fire assay and emission spectrography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapfty, J.; Riley, L.B.

    1968-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of palladium down to 4ppb (parts per billion, 109), platinum down to 10 ppb and rhodium down to 5 ppb in 15 g of sample. Fire-assay techniques are used to preconcentrate the platinum metals into a gold bead, then the bead is dissolved in aqua regia and diluted to volume with 1M hydrochloric acid. The solution is analysed by optical emission spectrography of the residue from 200 ??l of it evaporated on a pair of flat-top graphite electrodes. This method requires much less sample handling than most published methods for these elements. Data are presented for G-1, W-1, and six new standard rocks of the U.S. Geological Survey. The values for palladium in W-1 are in reasonable agreement with previously published data. ?? 1968.

  6. Determinants and Drivers of Infectious Disease Threat Events in Europe.

    PubMed

    Semenza, Jan C; Lindgren, Elisabet; Balkanyi, Laszlo; Espinosa, Laura; Almqvist, My S; Penttinen, Pasi; Rocklöv, Joacim

    2016-04-01

    Infectious disease threat events (IDTEs) are increasing in frequency worldwide. We analyzed underlying drivers of 116 IDTEs detected in Europe during 2008-2013 by epidemic intelligence at the European Centre of Disease Prevention and Control. Seventeen drivers were identified and categorized into 3 groups: globalization and environment, sociodemographic, and public health systems. A combination of >2 drivers was responsible for most IDTEs. The driver category globalization and environment contributed to 61% of individual IDTEs, and the top 5 individual drivers of all IDTEs were travel and tourism, food and water quality, natural environment, global trade, and climate. Hierarchical cluster analysis of all drivers identified travel and tourism as a distinctly separate driver. Monitoring and modeling such disease drivers can help anticipate future IDTEs and strengthen control measures. More important, intervening directly on these underlying drivers can diminish the likelihood of the occurrence of an IDTE and reduce the associated human and economic costs. PMID:26982104

  7. Determinants and Drivers of Infectious Disease Threat Events in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, Elisabet; Balkanyi, Laszlo; Espinosa, Laura; Almqvist, My S.; Penttinen, Pasi; Rocklöv, Joacim

    2016-01-01

    Infectious disease threat events (IDTEs) are increasing in frequency worldwide. We analyzed underlying drivers of 116 IDTEs detected in Europe during 2008–2013 by epidemic intelligence at the European Centre of Disease Prevention and Control. Seventeen drivers were identified and categorized into 3 groups: globalization and environment, sociodemographic, and public health systems. A combination of >2 drivers was responsible for most IDTEs. The driver category globalization and environment contributed to 61% of individual IDTEs, and the top 5 individual drivers of all IDTEs were travel and tourism, food and water quality, natural environment, global trade, and climate. Hierarchical cluster analysis of all drivers identified travel and tourism as a distinctly separate driver. Monitoring and modeling such disease drivers can help anticipate future IDTEs and strengthen control measures. More important, intervening directly on these underlying drivers can diminish the likelihood of the occurrence of an IDTE and reduce the associated human and economic costs. PMID:26982104

  8. Matrix effects on the determination of manganese in geological materials by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry under different flame conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Chao, T.T.

    1978-01-01

    Suppression caused by five of the seven matrix elements studied (Si, Al, Fe, Ca and Mg) was observed in the atomic-absorption determination of manganese in geological materials, when synthetic solutions and the recommended oxidizing air-acetylene flame were used. The magnitude of the suppression effects depends on (1) the kind and concentration of the interfering elements, (2) the type of acid medium, and (3) the concentration of manganese to be determined. All interferences noted are removed or alleviated by using a reducing nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The atomic-absorption method using this flame can be applied to the determination of total and extractable manganese in a wide range of geological materials without interferences. Analyses of six U.S. Geological Survey rock standards for manganese gave results in agreement with the reported values. ?? 1978.

  9. Determining the magnitude, frequency and source of prehistoric events - Is there a Holy Grail?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, James; Dominey-Howes, Dale; Chague-Goff, Catherine; Strotz, Luke; Anning, David; Bird, Deanne; Calgaro, Emma; Courtney, Claire

    2010-05-01

    Over the last five years there has been a growing body of literature on efforts to try and identify evidence for prehistoric precursors of the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami. Similar work is also being carried out in many parts of the World and evidence for palaeotsunamis is slowly emerging - this is commendable. In some cases extensive databases for individual events have been, and continue to be, assembled. The Storegga Slide off Norway is probably the most comprehensive dataset collated for a single event and provides an excellent example of how the source and magnitude of a prehistoric tsunami can be assessed. As an increasing amount of information is gathered a growing number of palaeotsunamis are being recognised as "hybrids" - events that are historic in one country and prehistoric in another. The 1700AD Cascadia event is probably the most well-known of these, although the 1575AD Chilean tsunami is another one of increasing importance. Hybrid tsunamis help us to better understand the nature and extent of palaeotsunamis in regions with short historical records - Pacific Island nations are an excellent example. Globally, we are recognising that the study of contemporary tsunamis is a multi-disciplinary field. Not surprisingly, the same applies to palaeotsunamis. The collation and interpretation of data for these prehistoric events however, is fraught with difficulties and currently nearly every palaeotsunami database that has been developed consists almost entirely of geological data. In an increasingly multidisciplinary field this is severely limiting. We provide three examples from the New Zealand palaeotsunami database - one includes a range of multidisciplinary data for a local event, another is a distantly sourced hybrid, and the final one looks at regional source identification using multiple contemporaneous deposits. This is quite a remarkable dataset, but it throws up some interesting issues. To be able to effectively identify regional and distant

  10. Neutron activation determination of iridium, gold, platinum, and silver in geologic samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Millard, H.T.

    1987-01-01

    Low-level methods for the determination of iridium and other noble metals have become increasingly important in recent years due to interest in locating abundance anomalies associated with the Cretaceous and Tertiary (K-T) boundary. Typical iridium anomalies are in the range of 1 to 100 ??g/kg (ppb). Thus methods with detection limits near 0.1 ??g/kg should be adequate to detect K-T boundary anomalies. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis methods continue to be required although instrumental neutron activation analysis techniques employing elaborate gamma-counters are under development. In the procedure developed in this study samples irradiated in the epithermal neutron facility of the U. S. Geological Survey TRIGA Reactor (Denver, Colorado) are treated with a mini-fire assay technique. The iridium, gold, and silver are collected in a 1-gram metallic lead button. Primary contaminants at this stage are arsenic and antimony. These can be removed by heating the button with a mixture of sodium perioxide and sodium hydroxide. The resulting 0.2-gram lead bead is counted in a Compton suppression spectrometer. Carrier yields are determined by reirradiation of the lead beads. This procedure has been applied to the U.S.G.S. Standard Rock PCC-1 and samples from K-T boundary sites in the Western Interior of North America. ?? 1987 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  11. Determination of rare earth elements in geological materials by inductively coupled argon plasma/atomic emission spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, J.G.; Lichte, F.E.

    1982-01-01

    Inductively coupled argon plasma/optical emission spectrometery (ICAP/OES) is useful as a simultaneous, multielement analytical technique for the determination of trace elements in geological materials. A method for the determination of trace-level rare earth elements (REE) in geological materials using an ICAP 63-channel emission spectrometer is described. Separation and preconcentration of the REE and yttrium from a sample digest are achieved by a nitric acid gradient cation exchange and hydrochloric acid anion exchange. Precision of 1-4% relative standard deviation and comparable accuracy are demonstrated by the triplicate analysis of three splits of BCR-1 and BHVO-1. Analyses of other geological materials including coals, soils, and rocks show comparable precision and accuracy.

  12. Determination of mercury in geological materials by continuous-flow, cold-vapor, atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, K.R.; Crock, J.G.

    1987-06-01

    To determine mercury in geological materials, samples are digested with nitric acid and sodium dichromate in a closed teflon vessel. After bringing to a constant weight, the digest is mixed with air and a sodium chloride-hydroxylamine hydrochloride-sulfuric acid solution and then Hg(II) is reduced to Hg/sup 0/ with stannous chloride in a continuous flow manifold. The mercury vapor is then separated and measured using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometry (CV-AAS). For a 100 mg sample the limit of detection is 20 parts-per-billion (ppb) Hg in sample. To obtain a 1% absorption signal, the described method requires 0.21 ppb Hg solution (equal to 16 ppb in sample). Precision is acceptable at less than 1.2% RSD for a 10 ppb Hg aqueous standard. Accuracy is demonstrated by the results of the analysis on standard reference materials. Several elements do interfere but the effect is minimal because either the digestion procedure does not dissolve them (e.g., Au or Pt) or they are normally of low abundance (e.g., Se or Te).

  13. Quantitative modal determination of geological samples based on X-ray multielemental map acquisition.

    PubMed

    Cossio, Roberto; Borghi, Alessandro; Ruffini, Raffaella

    2002-04-01

    Multielemental X-ray maps collected by a remote scanning system of the electron beam are processed by a dedicated software program performing accurate modal determination of geological samples. The classification of different mineral phases is based on elemental concentrations. The software program Petromod loads the maps into a database and computes a matrix consisting of numerical values proportional to the elemental concentrations. After an initial calibration, the program can perform the chemical composition calculated on the basis of a fixed number of oxygens for a selected area. In this way, it is possible to identify all the mineral phases occurring in the sample. Up to three elements can be selected to calculate the modal percentage of the identified mineral. An automated routine scans the whole set of maps and assigns each pixel that satisfies the imposed requirements to the selected phase. Repeating this procedure for every mineral phase occurring in the mapped area, a modal distribution of the rock-forming minerals can be performed. The final output consists of a digitized image, which can be further analyzed by common image analysis software, and a table containing the calculated modal percentages. The method is here applied to a volcanic and a metamorphic rock sample. PMID:12533243

  14. Quantitative modal determination of geological samples based on X-ray multielemental map acquisition.

    PubMed

    Cossio, Roberto; Borghi, Alessandro; Ruffini, Raffaella

    2002-04-01

    Multielemental X-ray maps collected by a remote scanning system of the electron beam are processed by a dedicated software program performing accurate modal determination of geological samples. The classification of different mineral phases is based on elemental concentrations. The software program Petromod loads the maps into a database and computes a matrix consisting of numerical values proportional to the elemental concentrations. After an initial calibration, the program can perform the chemical composition calculated on the basis of a fixed number of oxygens for a selected area. In this way, it is possible to identify all the mineral phases occurring in the sample. Up to three elements can be selected to calculate the modal percentage of the identified mineral. An automated routine scans the whole set of maps and assigns each pixel that satisfies the imposed requirements to the selected phase. Repeating this procedure for every mineral phase occurring in the mapped area, a modal distribution of the rock-forming minerals can be performed. The final output consists of a digitized image, which can be further analyzed by common image analysis software, and a table containing the calculated modal percentages. The method is here applied to a volcanic and a metamorphic rock sample.

  15. An analysis of dinosaurian biogeography: evidence for the existence of vicariance and dispersal patterns caused by geological events.

    PubMed Central

    Upchurch, Paul; Hunn, Craig A; Norman, David B

    2002-01-01

    As the supercontinent Pangaea fragmented during the Mesozoic era, dinosaur faunas were divided into isolated populations living on separate continents. It has been predicted, therefore, that dinosaur distributions should display a branching ('vicariance') pattern that corresponds with the sequence and timing of continental break-up. Several recent studies, however, minimize the importance of plate tectonics and instead suggest that dispersal and regional extinction were the main controls on dinosaur biogeography. Here, in order to test the vicariance hypothesis, we apply a cladistic biogeographical method to a large dataset on dinosaur relationships and distributions. We also introduce a methodological refinement termed 'time-slicing', which is shown to be a key step in the detection of ancient biogeographical patterns. These analyses reveal biogeographical patterns that closely correlate with palaeogeography. The results provide the first statistically robust evidence that, from Middle Jurassic to mid-Cretaceous times, tectonic events had a major role in determining where and when particular dinosaur groups flourished. The fact that evolutionary trees for extinct organisms preserve such distribution patterns opens up a new and fruitful direction for palaeobiogeographical research. PMID:11916478

  16. An analysis of dinosaurian biogeography: evidence for the existence of vicariance and dispersal patterns caused by geological events.

    PubMed

    Upchurch, Paul; Hunn, Craig A; Norman, David B

    2002-03-22

    As the supercontinent Pangaea fragmented during the Mesozoic era, dinosaur faunas were divided into isolated populations living on separate continents. It has been predicted, therefore, that dinosaur distributions should display a branching ('vicariance') pattern that corresponds with the sequence and timing of continental break-up. Several recent studies, however, minimize the importance of plate tectonics and instead suggest that dispersal and regional extinction were the main controls on dinosaur biogeography. Here, in order to test the vicariance hypothesis, we apply a cladistic biogeographical method to a large dataset on dinosaur relationships and distributions. We also introduce a methodological refinement termed 'time-slicing', which is shown to be a key step in the detection of ancient biogeographical patterns. These analyses reveal biogeographical patterns that closely correlate with palaeogeography. The results provide the first statistically robust evidence that, from Middle Jurassic to mid-Cretaceous times, tectonic events had a major role in determining where and when particular dinosaur groups flourished. The fact that evolutionary trees for extinct organisms preserve such distribution patterns opens up a new and fruitful direction for palaeobiogeographical research.

  17. Method and apparatus for detecting and determining event characteristics with reduced data collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Totman, Peter D. (Inventor); Everton, Randy L. (Inventor); Egget, Mark R. (Inventor); Macon, David J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting and determining event characteristics such as, for example, the material failure of a component, in a manner which significantly reduces the amount of data collected. A sensor array, including a plurality of individual sensor elements, is coupled to a programmable logic device (PLD) configured to operate in a passive state and an active state. A triggering event is established such that the PLD records information only upon detection of the occurrence of the triggering event which causes a change in state within one or more of the plurality of sensor elements. Upon the occurrence of the triggering event, the change in state of the one or more sensor elements causes the PLD to record in memory which sensor element detected the event and at what time the event was detected. The PLD may be coupled with a computer for subsequent downloading and analysis of the acquired data.

  18. In Situ Spectrophotometric Determination of pH under Geologic CO2 Sequestration Conditions: Method Development and Application

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, Christopher J.; Qafoku, Odeta; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-02-25

    Injecting massive amounts of CO2 into deep geologic formations will cause a range of coupled thermal, hydrodynamic, mechanical, and chemical changes. A significant perturbation in water-saturated formations is the pH drop in the reservoir fluids due to CO2 dissolution. Knowing the pH under geological CO2 sequestration conditions is important for a better understanding of the short- and long-term risks associated with geological CO2 sequestration and will help in the design of sustainable sequestration projects. Most previous studies on CO2-rock-brine interactions have utilized thermodynamic modeling to estimate the pH. In this work, a spectrophotometric method was developed to determine the in-situ pH in CO2-H2O-NaCl systems in the presence and absence of reservoir rock by observing the spectra of a pH indicator, bromophenol blue, with a UV-visible spectrophotometer. Effects of temperature, pressure, and ionic strength on the pH measurement were evaluated. Measured pH values in CO2-H2O-NaCl systems were compared with several thermodynamic models. Results indicate that bromophenol blue can be used to accurately determine the pH of brine in contact with supercritical CO2 under geologic CO2 sequestration conditions.

  19. Determination of arsenic, antimony, bismuth, cadmium, copper, lead, molybdenum, silver and zinc in geological materials by atomic-absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viets, J.G.; O'Leary, R. M.; Clark, Robert J.

    1984-01-01

    Arsenic, antimony, bismuth, cadmium, copper, lead, molybdenum, silver and zinc are very useful elements in geochemical exploration. In the proposed method, geological samples are fused with potassium pyrosulphate and the fusate is dissolved in a solution of hydrochloric acid, ascorbic acid and potassium iodide. When this solution is shaken with a 10% V/V Aliquat 336 - isobutyl methyl ketone organic phase, the nine elements of interest are selectively partitioned in the organic phase. All nine elements can then be determined in the organic phase using flame atomic-absorption spectrometry. The method is rapid and allows the determination of Ag and Cd at levels down to 0.1 p.p.m., Cu, Mo, and Zn down to 0.5 p.p.m., Pb, Bi and Sb down to 1 p.p.m. and As down to 5 p.p.m. in geological materials.

  20. Disc dark matter in the Galaxy and potential cycles of extraterrestrial impacts, mass extinctions and geological events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampino, Michael R.

    2015-04-01

    A cycle in the range of 26-30 Myr has been reported in mass extinctions, and terrestrial impact cratering may exhibit a similar cycle of 31 ± 5 Myr. These cycles have been attributed to the Sun's vertical oscillations through the Galactic disc, estimated to take from ˜30 to 42 Myr between Galactic plane crossings. Near the Galactic mid-plane, the Solar system's Oort Cloud comets could be perturbed by Galactic tidal forces, and possibly a thin dark matter (DM) disc, which might produce periodic comet showers and extinctions on the Earth. Passage of the Earth through especially dense clumps of DM, composed of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) in the Galactic plane, could also lead to heating in the core of the planet through capture and subsequent annihilation of DM particles. This new source of periodic heating in the Earth's interior might explain a similar ˜30 Myr periodicity observed in terrestrial geologic activity, which may also be involved in extinctions. These results suggest that cycles of geological and biological evolution on the Earth may be partly controlled by the rhythms of Galactic dynamics.

  1. Determination of the Strike and Dip of Planar Geological Structures: A Computer Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pizarro, Antonio

    1988-01-01

    Explains the use of the 3-dimensional analytic geometry method to find values for a field geology problem. Gives a description of the mathematical theory for this method which can be applied to data obtained by drilling as well as open surfaces, and a computer program. (RT)

  2. Determination of Mercury in Aqueous and Geologic Materials by Continuous Flow-Cold Vapor-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry (CVAFS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hageman, Philip L.

    2007-01-01

    New methods for the determination of total mercury in geologic materials and dissolved mercury in aqueous samples have been developed that will replace the methods currently (2006) in use. The new methods eliminate the use of sodium dichromate (Na2Cr2O7 ?2H2O) as an oxidizer and preservative and significantly lower the detection limit for geologic and aqueous samples. The new methods also update instrumentation from the traditional use of cold vapor-atomic absorption spectrometry to cold vapor-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. At the same time, the new digestion procedures for geologic materials use the same size test tubes, and the same aluminum heating block and hot plate as required by the current methods. New procedures for collecting and processing of aqueous samples use the same procedures that are currently (2006) in use except that the samples are now preserved with concentrated hydrochloric acid/bromine monochloride instead of sodium dichromate/nitric acid. Both the 'old' and new methods have the same analyst productivity rates. These similarities should permit easy migration to the new methods. Analysis of geologic and aqueous reference standards using the new methods show that these procedures provide mercury recoveries that are as good as or better than the previously used methods.

  3. Relating Nearshore Algal Blooms Determined Using Satellite Imagery to Nutrient Loading, Watershed Land Use, and Storm Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, R. J.; Hyndman, D. W.; Qi, J.; Esselman, P.; Novitski, L.; Kendall, A. D.; Martin, S. L.; Lin, S.

    2014-12-01

    The overarching goal of our project was to relate algal biomass in the coastal zone of the Great Lakes, nutrient concentrations, watershed land use, and storm events. Algal biomass was determined using MODIS and Landsat remote sensing images. Nutrient loading from rivers into coastal zones was estimated with watershed land use, soils, geology, size and precipitation records. Our models of chlorophyll a based on remote sensing images (RS inferred chl a) and nutrient loading in coastal zones were validated with measured chlorophyll concentrations in the Great Lakes and nutrients in rivers. RS-inferred chl a was related to nutrient loading from rivers, which was dependent upon recent storm events and land use in watersheds. RS-inferred chl a was more related to nutrient loads during the week preceeding measurement of chl a than other periods before or during chl measurement. This lag time is presumably related to algal growth following nutrient loading, and was non-linearly related to nutrient loading. Our results indicate that these tools will improve understanding of land use effects on algal blooms in coastal zones of the Great Lakes and will help identify priority watersheds for restoration.

  4. A conditional approach to determining the effect of anthropogenic climate change on very rare events.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, Michael; Pall, Pardeep; Zarzycki, Colin; Stone, Daithi

    2016-04-01

    Probabilistic extreme event attribution is especially difficult for weather events that are caused by extremely rare large-scale meteorological patterns. Traditional modeling techniques have involved using ensembles of climate models, either fully coupled or with prescribed ocean and sea ice. Ensemble sizes for the latter case ranges from several 100 to tens of thousand. However, even if the simulations are constrained by the observed ocean state, the requisite large-scale meteorological pattern may not occur frequently enough or even at all in free running climate model simulations. We present a method to ensure that simulated events similar to the observed event are modeled with enough fidelity that robust statistics can be determined given the large scale meteorological conditions. By initializing suitably constrained short term ensemble hindcasts of both the actual weather system and a counterfactual weather system where the human interference in the climate system is removed, the human contribution to the magnitude of the event can be determined. However, the change (if any) in the probability of an event of the observed magnitude is conditional not only on the state of the ocean/sea ice system but also on the prescribed initial conditions determined by the causal large scale meteorological pattern. We will discuss the implications of this technique through two examples; the 2013 Colorado flood and the 2014 Typhoon Haiyan.

  5. Mid Holocene Evidence of High Energy Events in the Geological Record: Sedimentary Deposits from Cauvery Delta Coast, SE Coast of India.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthikeyan, A.; Seshachalam, S.; Jonathan, M. P.; Roy, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Cauvery Basin is one of the important sedimentary basins of southern India and provides information on geological processes since the Cretaceous. Most of the studies in the basin have been carried out on the sediments representing Cretaceous with less emphasis on the Quaternary period with marine high energy event. In the present study, we present the sedimentological and micro fauna assemblages in the 150 cm long trench from the Kameshwaram village, Nagapattinam District, South East Coast of India, in order to reconstruct the past event. OSL and Carbon dating of sand layer sediments from the Cauvery Basin provide the first proxy-record of marine event from the region over the Mid Holocene. A multi proxy approach using trench sediments from Cauvery Delta Coast, East coast of Tamil Nadu provides a high resolution record of high energy event. The dating of the event layer indicates 6 and 8 kyrs also below the layer shell layer was preserved, the radio carbon date of the shell layer was 6545 BC. A combination of sedimentological parameters of grain size, sorting, geochemical analysis (XRF) of Fe, Mn, Ti, Cr, Cu, Ni, Sr, Zr and foraminifera species like Ammonia beccarri, Ammonia dentate and Asterorotalia trispinosa were identified. The sediment layers have thinning-up sequences and it starts from 130 cm to the bottom of the layer 150 cm which included shell debris, and rip-up clasts. In addition, characteristic variations in elemental content at the bottom units of Zr, Ti, Ca is showing higher concentration, which is an indicator of high-energy depositional event often associated with an increase in Ti (2.08 % to 16.016 %) and Sr (116 ppm to 275 ppm). Ca on the other hand suggests a marine influence and Fe, Mn, Cr, Ni values are showing lower concentration indicating that the high marine energy event had inundated the Nagapattinam district in SE coast of India. Based on the multiproxy evidences, we conclude that this could be a major marine event during the Mid

  6. The microwave induced plasma with optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES) in 23 elements determination in geological samples.

    PubMed

    Niedzielski, P; Kozak, L; Wachelka, M; Jakubowski, K; Wybieralska, J

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the optimisation, validation and application of the microwave induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES) dedicated for a routine determination of Ag, Al, B, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, In, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Sr, Tl, Zn, in the geological samples. The three procedures of sample preparation has been proposed: sample digestion with the use of hydrofluoric acid for determination of total concentration of elements, extraction by aqua regia for determination of the quasi-total element concentration and extraction by hydrochloric acid solution to determine contents of the elements in acid leachable fraction. The detection limits were on the level 0.001-0.121 mg L(-1) (from 0.010-0.10 to 1.2-12 mg kg(-1) depend on the samples preparation procedure); the precision: 0.20-1.37%; accuracy 85-115% (for recovery for certified standards materials analysis and parallel analysis by independent analytical techniques: X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and flame absorption spectrometry (FAAS)). The conformity of the results obtained by MIP-OES analytical procedures with the results obtained by XRF and FAAS analysis allows to propose the procedures for studies of elemental composition of the fraction of the geological samples. Additionally, the MIP-OES technique is much less expensive than ICP techniques and much less time-consuming than AAS techniques.

  7. Determination of total tin in geological materials by electrothermal atomic-absorption spectrophotometry using a tungsten-impregnated graphite furnace

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, L.; Chao, T.T.; Meier, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    An electrothermal atomic-absorption spectrophotometric method is described for the determination of total tin in geological materials, with use of a tungsten-impregnated graphite furnace. The sample is decomposed by fusion with lithium metaborate and the melt is dissolved in 10% hydrochloric acid. Tin is then extracted into trioctylphosphine oxide-methyl isobutyl ketone prior to atomization. Impregnation of the furnace with a sodium tungstate solution increases the sensitivity of the determination and improves the precision of the results. The limits of determination are 0.5-20 ppm of tin in the sample. Higher tin values can be determined by dilution of the extract. Replicate analyses of eighteen geological reference samples with diverse matrices gave relative standard deviations ranging from 2.0 to 10.8% with an average of 4.6%. Average tin values for reference samples were in general agreement with, but more precise than, those reported by others. Apparent recoveries of tin added to various samples ranged from 95 to 111% with an average of 102%. ?? 1984.

  8. Surficial geologic map of the Germantown quadrangle, Shelby County, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arsdale, Roy Van

    2004-01-01

    The depiction of geology on this map is designed to aid in urban planning and analysis of potential damage in the event of strong earthquake motion. The geologic map by itself does not analyze potential earthquake damage, but is designed to be used by seismologists who perform such analyses. The nature of geologic materials to a degree determines the severity of damage to infrastructure sustained during a strong earthquake.

  9. Global Geologic Map of Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, T.; Figueredo, P.; Greeley, R.; Hare, T.; Kolb, E.; Mullins, K.; Senske, D.; Tanaka, K.; Weiser, S.

    2008-01-01

    Europa, with its indications of a sub-ice ocean, is of keen interest to astrobiology and planetary geology. Knowledge of the global distribution and timing of Europan geologic units is a key step for the synthesis of data from the Galileo mission, and for the planning of future missions to the satellite. The first geologic map of Europa was produced at a hemisphere scale with low resolution Voyager data. Following the acquisition of higher resolution data by the Galileo mission, researchers have identified surface units and determined sequences of events in relatively small areas of Europa through geologic mapping using images at various resolutions acquired by Galileo's Solid State Imaging camera. These works provided a local to subregional perspective and employed different criteria for the determination and naming of units. Unified guidelines for the identification, mapping and naming of Europan geologic units were put forth by and employed in regional-to-hemispheric scale mapping which is now being expanded into a global geologic map. A global photomosaic of Galileo and Voyager data was used as a basemap for mapping in ArcGIS, following suggested methodology of all-stratigraphy for planetary mapping. The following units have been defined in global mapping and are listed in stratigraphic order from oldest to youngest: ridged plains material, Argadnel Regio unit, dark plains material, lineaments, disrupted plains material, lenticulated plains material and Chaos material.

  10. Linear geologic structure and magic rock discrimination as determined from infrared data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Offield, T. W.; Rowan, L. C.; Watson, R. D.

    1970-01-01

    Color infrared photographs of the Beartooth Mountains, Montana show the distribution of mafic dikes and amphibolite bodies. Lineaments that cross grassy plateaus can be identified as dikes by the marked constrast between the dark rocks and the red vegetation. Some amphibolite bodies in granitic terrain can also be detected by infrared photography and their contacts can be accurately drawn due to enchanced contrast of the two types of rock in the near infrared. Reflectance measurements made in the field for amphibolite and granite show that the granite is 25% to 50% more reflective in the near infrared than in the visible region. Further enhancement is due to less atmospheric scattering than in the visible region. Thermal infrared images of the Mill Creek, Oklahoma test site provided information on geologic faults and fracture systems not obtainable from photographs. Subtle stripes that cross outcrop and intervening soil areas and which probably record water distribution are also shown on infrared photographs.

  11. Re-Evaluating the Geological Evidence for Late Holocene Marine Incursion Events along the Guerrero Seismic Gap on the Pacific Coast of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bianchette, Thomas A; McCloskey, Terrence A; Liu, Kam-Biu

    2016-01-01

    Despite the large number of tsunamis that impact Mexico's Pacific coast, stratigraphic studies focusing on geological impacts are scanty, making it difficult to assess the long-term risks for this vulnerable region. Surface samples and six cores were taken from Laguna Mitla near Acapulco to examine sedimentological and geochemical evidence for marine incursion events. Sediment cores collected from behind the beach barrier are dominated by intercalated layers of peat and inorganic sediments, mostly silt and clay, with little or no sand. Sand- and shell-rich clastic layers with high levels of sulfur, calcium, and strontium only occur adjacent to the relict beach ridge remnants near the center of the lagoon. With the exception of one thin fine sand layer, the absence of sand in the near-shore cores and the predominance of the terrigenous element titanium in the inorganic layers, evidently eroded from the surrounding hillslopes, suggests that these large-grained intervals do not represent episodic marine incursions, but rather were likely formed by the erosion and redeposition of older marine deposits derived from the beach ridge remnants when water levels were high. These results do not support the occurrence of a large tsunami event at Laguna Mitla during the Late Holocene.

  12. Re-Evaluating the Geological Evidence for Late Holocene Marine Incursion Events along the Guerrero Seismic Gap on the Pacific Coast of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bianchette, Thomas A; McCloskey, Terrence A; Liu, Kam-Biu

    2016-01-01

    Despite the large number of tsunamis that impact Mexico's Pacific coast, stratigraphic studies focusing on geological impacts are scanty, making it difficult to assess the long-term risks for this vulnerable region. Surface samples and six cores were taken from Laguna Mitla near Acapulco to examine sedimentological and geochemical evidence for marine incursion events. Sediment cores collected from behind the beach barrier are dominated by intercalated layers of peat and inorganic sediments, mostly silt and clay, with little or no sand. Sand- and shell-rich clastic layers with high levels of sulfur, calcium, and strontium only occur adjacent to the relict beach ridge remnants near the center of the lagoon. With the exception of one thin fine sand layer, the absence of sand in the near-shore cores and the predominance of the terrigenous element titanium in the inorganic layers, evidently eroded from the surrounding hillslopes, suggests that these large-grained intervals do not represent episodic marine incursions, but rather were likely formed by the erosion and redeposition of older marine deposits derived from the beach ridge remnants when water levels were high. These results do not support the occurrence of a large tsunami event at Laguna Mitla during the Late Holocene. PMID:27571270

  13. Re-Evaluating the Geological Evidence for Late Holocene Marine Incursion Events along the Guerrero Seismic Gap on the Pacific Coast of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Bianchette, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the large number of tsunamis that impact Mexico’s Pacific coast, stratigraphic studies focusing on geological impacts are scanty, making it difficult to assess the long-term risks for this vulnerable region. Surface samples and six cores were taken from Laguna Mitla near Acapulco to examine sedimentological and geochemical evidence for marine incursion events. Sediment cores collected from behind the beach barrier are dominated by intercalated layers of peat and inorganic sediments, mostly silt and clay, with little or no sand. Sand- and shell-rich clastic layers with high levels of sulfur, calcium, and strontium only occur adjacent to the relict beach ridge remnants near the center of the lagoon. With the exception of one thin fine sand layer, the absence of sand in the near-shore cores and the predominance of the terrigenous element titanium in the inorganic layers, evidently eroded from the surrounding hillslopes, suggests that these large-grained intervals do not represent episodic marine incursions, but rather were likely formed by the erosion and redeposition of older marine deposits derived from the beach ridge remnants when water levels were high. These results do not support the occurrence of a large tsunami event at Laguna Mitla during the Late Holocene. PMID:27571270

  14. Dimension Determination of Precursive Stall Events in a Single Stage High Speed Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bright, Michelle M.; Qammar, Helen K.; Hartley, Tom T.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the dynamics for a single-stage, axial-flow, high speed compressor core, specifically, the NASA Lewis rotor stage 37. Due to the overall blading design for this advanced core compressor, each stage has considerable tip loading and higher speed than most compressor designs, thus, the compressor operates closer to the stall margin. The onset of rotating stall is explained as bifurcations in the dynamics of axial compressors. Data taken from the compressor during a rotating stall event is analyzed. Through the use of a box-assisted correlation dimension methodology, the attractor dimension is determined during the bifurcations leading to rotating stall. The intent of this study is to examine the behavior of precursive stall events so as to predict the entrance into rotating stall. This information may provide a better means to identify, avoid or control the undesirable event of rotating stall formation in high speed compressor cores.

  15. Determinants of the Price of High-Tech Metals: An Event Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wanner, Markus Gaugler, Tobias; Gleich, Benedikt; Rathgeber, Andreas

    2015-06-15

    The growing demand for high-tech products has resulted in strong growth in demand for certain minor metals. In combination with production concentrated in China, this caused strong and unpredicted price movements in recent years. As a result, manufacturing companies have to cope with additional risks. However, the detailed reasons for the price development are only partially understood. Therefore, we analyzed empirically which determinants can be assigned to price movements and performed an event study on the high-tech metals neodymium, indium, and gallium. Based on our dataset of news items, we were able to find coinciding events to almost 90% of all price jumps (recall). We showed that if any information about these events occurred with a probability of over 50% there would also be a price jump within 10 days (precision). However, the classical set of price determinants has to be extended for these specific markets, as we found unorthodox factors like holidays or weather that may be indicators for price movements. Therefore, we hope that our study supports industry for instance in performing more informed short-term planning of metals purchasing based on information about specific events.

  16. Atomic-absorption spectrometric determination of cobalt, nickel, and copper in geological materials with matrix masking and chelation-extraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Chao, T.T.; Crenshaw, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    An atomic-absorption spectrometric method is reported for the determination of cobalt, nickel, and copper in a variety of geological materials including iron- and manganese-rich, and calcareous samples. The sample is decomposed with HP-HNO3 and the residue is dissolved in hydrochloric acid. Ammonium fluoride is added to mask iron and 'aluminum. After adjustment to pH 6, cobalt, nickel, and copper are chelated with sodium diethyl-dithiocarbamate and extracted into methyl isobutyl ketone. The sample is set aside for 24 h before analysis to remove interferences from manganese. For a 0.200-g sample, the limits of determination are 5-1000 ppm for Co, Ni, and Cu. As much as 50% Fe, 25% Mn or Ca, 20% Al and 10% Na, K, or Mg in the sample either individually or in various combinations do not interfere. Results obtained on five U.S. Geological Survey rock standards are in general agreement with values reported in the literature. ?? 1979.

  17. Bedrock fluvial incision and longitudinal profile development over geologic time scales determined by fluvial terraces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazzaglia, Frank J.; Gardner, Thomas W.; Merritts, Dorothy J.

    Fluvial terraces preserve the history of river incision into bedrock over geologic time scales. In this paper we use terraces and a comparison of terrace longitudinal profiles to stream longitudinal profiles to develop a conceptual model of bedrock fluvial incision in diverse geologic, tectonic, and climatic settings. The conceptual model highlights a distinction between bedrock stream behavior in settings of relatively high versus relatively low tectonic activity. This distinction arises from the fundamentally different ways in which runoff is generated in these respective tectonic settings and the positive feedbacks that exist between topography and climate. The model allows for qualitative predictions of long profile shape that can be directly compared to the longitudinal profiles predicted by the stream power law. Our approach has the advantage of helping understand the geologic (and climatic) constraints on the wide variations in k, m, and n revealed in recent applications of the stream power law. We reconcile diverse longitudinal profile shapes and long-term rates of bedrock fluvial incision by considering how a drainage basin generates fluvial discharge and whether that discharge can produce the necessary stream power distributed across a valley bottom such that the long profile can rapidly accommodate changes in base level, climate, and/or rates of rock uplift. We propose that in tectonically active settings (Type I basins), the entire drainage basin experiences uplift which, in turn, builds steep slopes and concomitant increases in orographic precipitation that effectively generate the high peak discharges and fluvial-system wide stream power necessary to create and maintain concave-up long profiles and rates of incision equal and opposite to rates of rock uplift. Measured stream power for one of these basins is highly correlated to the width of the channel and valley bottom which argues for a conservation of energy along the profile and the apportionment

  18. Deformation rates across the San Andreas Fault system, central California determined by geology and geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, Sarah J.

    The San Andreas fault system is a transpressional plate boundary characterized by sub-parallel dextral strike-slip faults separating internally deformed crustal blocks in central California. Both geodetic and geologic tools were used to understand the short- and long-term partitioning of deformation in both the crust and the lithospheric mantle across the plate boundary system. GPS data indicate that the short-term discrete deformation rate is ˜28 mm/yr for the central creeping segment of the San Andreas fault and increases to 33 mm/yr at +/-35 km from the fault. This gradient in deformation rates is interpreted to reflect elastic locking of the creeping segment at depth, distributed off-fault deformation, or some combination of these two mechanisms. These short-term fault-parallel deformation rates are slower than the expected geologic slip rate and the relative plate motion rate. Structural analysis of folds and transpressional kinematic modeling were used to quantify long-term distributed deformation adjacent to the Rinconada fault. Folding accommodates approximately 5 km of wrench deformation, which translates to a deformation rate of ˜1 mm/yr since the start of the Pliocene. Integration with discrete offset on the Rinconada fault indicates that this portion of the San Andreas fault system is approximately 80% strike-slip partitioned. This kinematic fold model can be applied to the entire San Andreas fault system and may explain some of the across-fault gradient in deformation rates recorded by the geodetic data. Petrologic examination of mantle xenoliths from the Coyote Lake basalt near the Calaveras fault was used to link crustal plate boundary deformation at the surface with models for the accommodation of deformation in the lithospheric mantle. Seismic anisotropy calculations based on xenolith petrofabrics suggest that an anisotropic mantle layer thickness of 35-85 km is required to explain the observed shear wave splitting delay times in central

  19. Visible Geology - Interactive online geologic block modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockett, R.

    2012-12-01

    Geology is a highly visual science, and many disciplines require spatial awareness and manipulation. For example, interpreting cross-sections, geologic maps, or plotting data on a stereonet all require various levels of spatial abilities. These skills are often not focused on in undergraduate geoscience curricula and many students struggle with spatial relations, manipulations, and penetrative abilities (e.g. Titus & Horsman, 2009). A newly developed program, Visible Geology, allows for students to be introduced to many geologic concepts and spatial skills in a virtual environment. Visible Geology is a web-based, three-dimensional environment where students can create and interrogate their own geologic block models. The program begins with a blank model, users then add geologic beds (with custom thickness and color) and can add geologic deformation events like tilting, folding, and faulting. Additionally, simple intrusive dikes can be modelled, as well as unconformities. Students can also explore the interaction of geology with topography by drawing elevation contours to produce their own topographic models. Students can not only spatially manipulate their model, but can create cross-sections and boreholes to practice their visual penetrative abilities. Visible Geology is easy to access and use, with no downloads required, so it can be incorporated into current, paper-based, lab activities. Sample learning activities are being developed that target introductory and structural geology curricula with learning objectives such as relative geologic history, fault characterization, apparent dip and thickness, interference folding, and stereonet interpretation. Visible Geology provides a richly interactive, and immersive environment for students to explore geologic concepts and practice their spatial skills.; Screenshot of Visible Geology showing folding and faulting interactions on a ridge topography.

  20. Is our Future Written in the Geological Record of Oceanic Anoxic Events? The Calcareous Nannoplankton Perspective (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erba, E.

    2013-12-01

    The topical emergence of climate change as a crucial issue for society and governments has urged the understanding of the future state of the planet within the context of increasing carbon dioxide concentrations. In the near future, the ocean's uptake of CO2 is expected to rapidly decline because of surface warming, increased vertical stratification, and slowed thermohaline circulation. The Anthropocene CO2 emissions are inferred to be the cause of global warming and alteration of ocean chemistry, triggering unknown responses of marine biota in terms of extinction, innovation and/or temporary adaptations. During the Mesozoic under excess CO2 and greenhouse conditions, the ocean became depleted of oxygen, promoting the burial of massive amounts of organic matter. These episodes are named Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs) and might provide guidance as to the response of marine biota to massive CO2 releases and how and at what rate pre-perturbation conditions are eventually restored. After over three decades of research on OAEs, an impressive amount of data has been generated: there is a general consensus on the role of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) inducing CO2 increases, greenhouse climate and profound variations in chemical, physical and trophic characteristics of the ocean. OAEs can be studied to decipher the complexity of drivers and of responses within and among different organisms to CO2 pulses, extreme warmth, weathering changes, ocean fertilization and acidification to add the long-term and large-scale prospective to investigations on current, very-short-term and local responses. In Jurassic and Cretaceous oceans, coccolithophores were already a most efficient carbonate-forming group and OAEs offer the opportunity of characterizing variations in their abundance, diversity, and morphology to trace ecological affinities and adaptations to oceanic ecosystem perturbations. We quantitatively investigated the Toarcian OAE, the early Aptian OAE1a and the latest

  1. Determining the significance of associations between two series of discrete events : bootstrap methods /

    SciTech Connect

    Niehof, Jonathan T.; Morley, Steven K.

    2012-01-01

    We review and develop techniques to determine associations between series of discrete events. The bootstrap, a nonparametric statistical method, allows the determination of the significance of associations with minimal assumptions about the underlying processes. We find the key requirement for this method: one of the series must be widely spaced in time to guarantee the theoretical applicability of the bootstrap. If this condition is met, the calculated significance passes a reasonableness test. We conclude with some potential future extensions and caveats on the applicability of these methods. The techniques presented have been implemented in a Python-based software toolkit.

  2. A reevaluation of TDR propagation time determination in soils and geological media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Time domain reflectometry (TDR) is an established method for the determination of apparent dielectric permittivity and water content in soils. Using current waveform interpretation procedures, signal attenuation and variation in dielectric media properties along the transmission line can significant...

  3. Rare earth elements content in geological samples from eastern desert, Egypt, determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    El-Taher, A

    2010-09-01

    Twenty representative geological samples (tonalite, granodiorite, adamellite, syenogranite, rapakivi syenogranite, alkali feldspar granite and monzogranite) were collected from G. Kattar area in Eastern Desert, Egypt, for analysis by instrumental neutron activation as a sensitive nondestructive analytical tool for the determination of 14 rare earth elements (REEs) and to find out the following: (1) what information could be obtained about the REEs and distribution patterns of REEs in geological samples under investigation, (2) to estimate the accuracy, reproducibility and detection limit of the INAA method in case of the given samples. The samples were properly prepared together with standard reference material and simultaneously irradiated in a neutron flux of 7x10(11)n/cm(2)s in the TRIGA Mainz research reactor facilities. The gamma spectra were collected by an HPGe detector and the analysis was done by means of a computerized multichannel analyzer. The choice of the nuclear reaction, irradiation and decay times, and of the proper gamma radiation in counting are presented and discussed. The results are found to be in good agreement with certified values.

  4. Combined analysis of passive and active seismic measurements using additional geologic data for the determination of shallow subsurface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horstmann, Tobias; Brüstle, Andrea; Spies, Thomas; Schlittenhardt, Jörg; Schmidt, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    A detailed knowledge of subsurface structure is essential for geotechnical projects and local seismic hazard analyses. Passive seismic methods like microtremor measurements are widely used in geotechnical practice, but limitations and developments are still in focus of scientific discussion. The presentation outlines microtremor measurements in the context of microzonation in the scale of districts or small communities. H/V measurements are used to identify zones with similar underground properties. Subsequently a shear wave velocity (Vs) depth profile for each zone is determined by array measurements at selected sites. To reduce possible uncertainties in dispersion curve analyses of passive array measurements and ambiguities within the inversion process, we conducted an additional active seismic experiment and included available geological information. The presented work is realized in the framework of the research project MAGS2 ("Microseismic Activity of Geothermal Systems") and deals with the determination of seismic hazard analysis at sites near deep geothermal power plants in Germany. The measurements were conducted in the Upper Rhine Graben (URG) and the Bavarian molasses, where geothermal power plants are in operation. The results of the H/V- and array-measurements in the region of Landau (URG) are presented and compared to known geological-tectonic structures. The H/V measurements show several zones with similar H/V-curves which indicate homogenous underground properties. Additionally to the passive seismic measurements an active refraction experiment was performed and evaluated using the MASW method („Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves") to strengthen the determination of shear-wave-velocity depth profile. The dispersion curves for Rayleigh-waves of the active experiment support the Rayleigh-dispersion curves from passive measurements and therefore provide a valuable supplement. Furthermore, the Rayleigh-wave ellipticity was calculated to reduce

  5. Determination of indium in geological materials by electrothermal-atomization atomic absorption spectrometry with a tungsten-impregnated graphite furance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, L.; Chao, T.T.; Meier, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    The sample is fused with lithium metaborate and the melt is dissolved in 15% (v/v) hydrobromic acid. Iron(III) is reduced with ascorbic acid to avoid its coextraction with indium as the bromide into methyl isobutyl ketone. Impregnation of the graphite furnace with sodium tungstate, and the presence of lithium metaborate and ascorbic acid in the reaction medium improve the sensitivity and precision. The limits of determination are 0.025-16 mg kg-1 indium in the sample. For 22 geological reference samples containing more than 0.1 mg kg-1 indium, relative standard deviations ranged from 3.0 to 8.5% (average 5.7%). Recoveries of indium added to various samples ranged from 96.7 to 105.6% (average 100.2%). ?? 1984.

  6. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE AFTERSHOCK SEQUENCE OF THE BORAH PEAK, IDAHO, EARTHQUAKE DETERMINED FROM DIGITAL RECORDINGS OF THE EVENTS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boatwright, John

    1985-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, deployed and maintained a network of twelve digital instruments over the 2 weeks following the October 28, 1983, Borah Peak, Idaho, earthquake. The network recorded 45 events with M greater than equivalent to 3. 0, and 6 events with M less than equivalent to 4. 0. The seismic moments of the aftershocks increase with increasing hypocentral depth below 12 km. The dynamic stress drops of the events do not show any systematic variation with depth, however. Most of the events with large stress drops are clustered in the northwest limb of the aftershock distribution; the average stress drop of the southern events is 31 plus or minus 16 bars, while the average stress drop of the events in the northwest limb is 77 plus or minus 52 bars. This clustering of events with large stress drops marks an apparent stress concentration, possibly associated with the arrest of the main shock rupture propagation by a fracture barrier at depth.

  7. Flame and flameless atomic-absorption determination of tellurium in geological materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.; Hubert, A.E.

    1978-01-01

    The sample is digested with a solution of hydrobromic acid and bromine and the excess of bromine is expelled. After dilution of the solution to approximately 3 M in hydrobromic acid, ascorbic acid is added to reduce iron(III) before extraction of tellurium into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). An oxidizing air-acetylene flame is used to determine tellurium in the 0.1-20 ppm range. For samples containing 4-200 ppb of tellurium, a carbon-rod atomizer is used after the MIBK extract has been washed with 0.5 M hydrobromic acid to remove the residual iron. The flame procedure is useful for rapid preliminary monitoring, and the flameless procedure can determine tellurium at very low concentrations. ?? 1978.

  8. Determination of trace amounts of tin in geological materials by atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsch, E.P.; Chao, T.T.

    1976-01-01

    An atomic absorption method is described for the determination of traces of tin in rocks, soils, and stream sediments. A dried mixture of the sample and ammonium iodide is heated to volatilize tin tetraiodide -which is then dissolved in 5 % hydrochloric acid, extracted into TOPO-MIBK, and aspirated into a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The limit of determination is 2 p.p.m. tin and the relative standard deviation ranges from 2 to 14 %. Up to 20 % iron and 1000 p.p.m. Cu, Pb, Zn, Mn, Hg, Mo, V, or W in the sample do not interfere. As many as 50 samples can be easily analyzed per man-day. ?? 1976.

  9. Determination of arsenic in geological materials by electrothermal atomic-absorption spectrometry after hydride generation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Chao, T.T.; Welsch, E.P.

    1979-01-01

    Rock and soil samples are decomposed with HClO4-HNO3; after further treatment, arsine is generated and absorbed in a dilute silver nitrate solution. Aliquots of this solution are injected into a carbon rod atomizer. Down to 1 ppm As in samples can be determined and there are no significant interferences, even from chromium in soils. Good results were obtained for geochemical reference samples. ?? 1979.

  10. Determination of Trace Cadmium in Geological Samples by Aerosol Dilution ICP-MS with Inverse Aqua Regia Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Q.; Guo, W.; Jin, L.; Hu, S.; Chai, X.

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a trace element that occurs at ppb level in most terrestrial materials. The determination of Cd in geological samples by ICP-MS is subject to Zr and/or Mo based oxide/hydroxide interference. This study developed a valid method for the determination of Cd by Ar aerosol dilution ICP-MS with inverse aqua regia extraction (in a water bath at 95℃ for 2h). An Agilent 7700x ICP-MS (Agilent Technologies, USA) with an aerosol dilution system was used. The extraction procedure separated most of the Zr matrix (>90%) from the analyte, and the residual Zr- hydroxides and Mo-oxides or hydroxides were successfully eliminated by adding an amount of Ar to the sample aerosol prior to the plasma. Compared to the conventional operation, the amounts of oxide and hydroxide ions formed in the plasma were reduced by up to 10 times. The relative yields of the interfering oxides and hydroxides were as low as 0.012% ((94Mo16OH++95Mo16O+)/(94Mo++95Mo+)) and 0.007% (94Zr16OH+/94Zr+). Under the optimized dilution gas flow rate (0.85 L min-1) and carrier gas flow rate (0.24 L min-1), the limit of detection (LOD, 3s) for 111Cd was 1.3 ng g-1. The accuracy of the method was assessed by using two USGS SRMs (andesite AGV-2 and basalt BCR-2). The Cd contents determined for AGV-2 and BCR-2 are 0.058±0.004μg g-1 and 0.148±0.007μg g-1 (N=10), which are in good agreement with the USGS reference values (0.061μg g-1 and 0.14μg g-1). The proposed method was also applied to determine Cd contents in 65 IGGE SRMs (28 soils, 28 sediments and 9 rocks). The measured Cd levels in these samples agree well with their certified values. The developed method shows great potential for the direct determination of trace levels of Cd in geological samples.

  11. Post-processing of seismic parameter data based on valid seismic event determination

    DOEpatents

    McEvilly, Thomas V.

    1985-01-01

    An automated seismic processing system and method are disclosed, including an array of CMOS microprocessors for unattended battery-powered processing of a multi-station network. According to a characterizing feature of the invention, each channel of the network is independently operable to automatically detect, measure times and amplitudes, and compute and fit Fast Fourier transforms (FFT's) for both P- and S- waves on analog seismic data after it has been sampled at a given rate. The measured parameter data from each channel are then reviewed for event validity by a central controlling microprocessor and if determined by preset criteria to constitute a valid event, the parameter data are passed to an analysis computer for calculation of hypocenter location, running b-values, source parameters, event count, P- wave polarities, moment-tensor inversion, and Vp/Vs ratios. The in-field real-time analysis of data maximizes the efficiency of microearthquake surveys allowing flexibility in experimental procedures, with a minimum of traditional labor-intensive postprocessing. A unique consequence of the system is that none of the original data (i.e., the sensor analog output signals) are necessarily saved after computation, but rather, the numerical parameters generated by the automatic analysis are the sole output of the automated seismic processor.

  12. INAA and DNAA for uranium determination in geological samples from Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Taher, A

    2010-06-01

    Uranium isotopes found in soil, rock, water, plants, air, etc., contribute to the natural radiation exposure of the population. U concentrations in some Egyptian environmental samples like Toshki soil, Aswan iron-ore, and phosphate samples from El-Sibayia in the Nile Valley and El-Quseir in the Red Sea coast were determined using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and delayed neutron activation analysis (DNAA) in the Mainz TRIGA research reactor. The results showed that the phosphate rocks are rich natural sources of uranium among the other minerals forming the earth crust. PMID:20185320

  13. Determination of elements in National Bureau of Standards' geological Standard Reference Materials by neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.C.; Glascock, M.D.; Carni, J.J.; Vogt, J.R.; Spalding, T.G.

    1982-08-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) have been used to determine elemental concentrations in two recently issued National Bureau of Standards (NBS) Standard Reference Materials (SRM's). The results obtained are in good agreement with the certified and information values reported by NBS for those elements in each material for which comparisons are available. Average concentrations of 35 elements in SRM 278 obsidian rock and 32 elements in SRM 688 basalt rock are reported for comparison with results that may be obtained by other laboratories.

  14. A determination of surface ages of small geologic units on the terrestrial planets and satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, C.; Morota, T.; Haruyama, J.

    We propose the suitable method of determination of surface age of the planets and satellites using smaller craters than 300 m in diameter which reveal the equilibrium saturation To determine these surface ages using the crater size-frequency distribution CSFD which has been useful method in the past planetary missions recently comes up against some kind of problems These include not only primary or secondary crater problems but also statistical problems We aimed at the fact that the depth of regolith layer was growing up with time by a number of impact craterings Since the scaling laws within the impact cratering on the sufficiently thinner regolith layer compared with the cross sectional depth of craters at the area are probably the strength regime the magnitude of the CSFD in the equilibrium saturation on the thinner regolith layer could be smaller than that on the thick regolith Otherwise the modification speed of the crater morphology on the thicker regolith layer is fast Consequently the magnitude of the CSFD could become small Schultz et al 1977 We evaluate these effects which are against each other using the images of same area taken at the different sun elevations In the future lunar mission SELENE we will be able to estimate the mostly absolute surface age if the accurate relationship between the CSFD and the structure under the lunar surface will become apparent

  15. Mathematical programming (MP) model to determine optimal transportation infrastructure for geologic CO2 storage in the Illinois basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehmer, Donald E.

    Analysis of results from a mathematical programming model were examined to 1) determine the least cost options for infrastructure development of geologic storage of CO2 in the Illinois Basin, and 2) perform an analysis of a number of CO2 emission tax and oil price scenarios in order to implement development of the least-cost pipeline networks for distribution of CO2. The model, using mixed integer programming, tested the hypothesis of whether viable EOR sequestration sites can serve as nodal points or hubs to expand the CO2 delivery infrastructure to more distal locations from the emissions sources. This is in contrast to previous model results based on a point-to- point model having direct pipeline segments from each CO2 capture site to each storage sink. There is literature on the spoke and hub problem that relates to airline scheduling as well as maritime shipping. A large-scale ship assignment problem that utilized integer linear programming was run on Excel Solver and described by Mourao et al., (2001). Other literature indicates that aircraft assignment in spoke and hub routes can also be achieved using integer linear programming (Daskin and Panayotopoulos, 1989; Hane et al., 1995). The distribution concept is basically the reverse of the "tree and branch" type (Rothfarb et al., 1970) gathering systems for oil and natural gas that industry has been developing for decades. Model results indicate that the inclusion of hubs as variables in the model yields lower transportation costs for geologic carbon dioxide storage over previous models of point-to-point infrastructure geometries. Tabular results and GIS maps of the selected scenarios illustrate that EOR sites can serve as nodal points or hubs for distribution of CO2 to distal oil field locations as well as deeper saline reservoirs. Revenue amounts and capture percentages both show an improvement over solutions when the hubs are not allowed to come into the solution. Other results indicate that geologic

  16. Determination of thorium in geological materials by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry after anion exchange extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Roelandts, I.

    1983-08-01

    The exchange capacity of the resin was determined to be 1 m equiv of Th/g dry resin. Synthetic calibration standards of thorium were prepared over a large concentration range, for use as an independent method of calibration. The advantages and disadvantages of direct x-ray fluorescence analysis are discussed. The lower limit of detection has been calculated according to Currie's convention and was found to be equal to 13 ..mu..g of Th/250 mg of resin, sufficient for the range of concentrations found in Th bearing minerals and ores. Results using Canadian syenite rocks and a suite of South African reference minerals show that the proposed method appears to be relatively precise and accurate for exploration geochemistry. 1 figure, 2 tables.

  17. Practical aspects of geological prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Mallio, W.J.; Peck, J.H.

    1981-11-01

    Nuclear waste disposal requires that geology be a predictive science. The prediction of future events rests on (1) recognizing the periodicity of geologic events; (2) defining a critical dimension of effect, such as the area of a drainage basin, the length of a fault trace, etc; and (3) using our understanding of active processes the project the frequency and magnitude of future events in the light of geological principles. Of importance to nuclear waste disposal are longer term processes such as continental denudation and removal of materials by glacial erosion. Constant testing of projections will allow the practical limits of predicting geological events to be defined. 11 refs.

  18. [Determination of Sb and Bi in 24 international geological reference materials by using pressurized acid digestion-ICP-MS].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhao-chu; Gao, Shan; Liu, Xiao-ming; Yuan, Hong-lin; Liu, Ye; Diwu, Chun-rong

    2007-12-01

    The authors studied in detail the memory effect of Bi, Sb, As and Te in ICP-MS. The produced memory effects of these element were in the order of Bi>Sb>Te>As. Bi was seriously adsorbed by the polypropylene sample storing bottle and the sample introduction system in the low nitric acid medium (0.01%-1% HNO3). The washout effect of 0.1% HF was found to be better than those of 6% HNO3 and 0.1% HClO4. Under the given experiment conditions, the instrumental limit of detection was 0.001 and 0.0001 ng x mL(-1) for Sb and Bi, respectively. The authors report the determination of Sb and Bi in 24 international geological reference materials by using pressurized acid digestion-ICP-MS (including AGV-2, BHVO-2, BCR-2, etc.). Most of the results were found to be in reasonable agreement with the reported values in the literature. The authors' determined values of Sb for GSR-1 (granite; 0.30 microg x g(-1)) and JP-1 (peridotite; 0.045 microg x g(-1)) are obviously higher than those reported values. This is attributed to the efficient pressurized acid digestion, which is generally much more efficient than conventional wet digestions for insoluble minerals. PMID:18330312

  19. [Determination of Sb and Bi in 24 international geological reference materials by using pressurized acid digestion-ICP-MS].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhao-chu; Gao, Shan; Liu, Xiao-ming; Yuan, Hong-lin; Liu, Ye; Diwu, Chun-rong

    2007-12-01

    The authors studied in detail the memory effect of Bi, Sb, As and Te in ICP-MS. The produced memory effects of these element were in the order of Bi>Sb>Te>As. Bi was seriously adsorbed by the polypropylene sample storing bottle and the sample introduction system in the low nitric acid medium (0.01%-1% HNO3). The washout effect of 0.1% HF was found to be better than those of 6% HNO3 and 0.1% HClO4. Under the given experiment conditions, the instrumental limit of detection was 0.001 and 0.0001 ng x mL(-1) for Sb and Bi, respectively. The authors report the determination of Sb and Bi in 24 international geological reference materials by using pressurized acid digestion-ICP-MS (including AGV-2, BHVO-2, BCR-2, etc.). Most of the results were found to be in reasonable agreement with the reported values in the literature. The authors' determined values of Sb for GSR-1 (granite; 0.30 microg x g(-1)) and JP-1 (peridotite; 0.045 microg x g(-1)) are obviously higher than those reported values. This is attributed to the efficient pressurized acid digestion, which is generally much more efficient than conventional wet digestions for insoluble minerals.

  20. Orbit Determination and Navigation of the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morinelli, Patrick; Cosgrove, jennifer; Blizzard, Mike; Nicholson, Ann; Robertson, Mika

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the launch and early orbit activities performed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) in support of five probes comprising the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft. The FDF was tasked to support THEMIS in a limited capacity providing backup orbit determination support for validation purposes for all five THEMIS probes during launch plus 30 days in coordination with University of California Berkeley Flight Dynamics Center (UCB/FDC). The FDF's orbit determination responsibilities were originally planned to be as a backup to the UCB/FDC for validation purposes only. However, various challenges early on in the mission and a Spacecraft Emergency declared thirty hours after launch placed the FDF team in the role of providing the orbit solutions that enabled contact with each of the probes and the eventual termination of the Spacecraft Emergency. This paper details the challenges and various techniques used by the GSFC FDF team to successfully perform orbit determination for all five THEMIS probes during the early mission. In addition, actual THEMIS orbit determination results are presented spanning the launch and early orbit mission phase. Lastly, this paper enumerates lessons learned from the THEMIS mission, as well as demonstrates the broad range of resources and capabilities within the FDF for supporting critical launch and early orbit navigation activities, especially challenging for constellation missions.

  1. Orbit Determination and Navigation of the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morinelli, Patrick; Cosgrove, Jennifer; Blizzard, Mike; Robertson, Mike

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the launch and early orbit activities performed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) in support of five probes comprising the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft. The FDF was tasked to support THEMIS in a limited capacity providing backup orbit determination support for validation purposes for all five THEMIS probes during launch plus 30 days in coordination with University of California Berkeley Flight Dynamics Center (UCB/FDC)2. The FDF's orbit determination responsibilities were originally planned to be as a backup to the UCB/FDC for validation purposes only. However, various challenges early on in the mission and a Spacecraft Emergency declared thirty hours after launch placed the FDF team in the role of providing the orbit solutions that enabled contact with each of the probes and the eventual termination of the Spacecraft Emergency. This paper details the challenges and various techniques used by the GSFC FDF team to successfully perform orbit determination for all five THEMIS probes during the early mission. In addition, actual THEMIS orbit determination results are presented spanning the launch and early orbit mission phase. Lastly, this paper enumerates lessons learned from the THEMIS mission, as well as demonstrates the broad range of resources and capabilities within the FDF for supporting critical launch and early orbit navigation activities, especially challenging for constellation missions.

  2. Charles Darwin in Australia; or How To Introduce Some Local Colour to the Teaching of Evolution, Geology, Meteorology, and the Determination of Longitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholas, Frank W.

    The background to Charles Darwin's little-known visit to Australia, and the account of his experiences while here, provide some invaluable historical material for teaching evolution, geology, meteorology, and the determination of longitude. Indeed, by using his Australian experiences as a foundation, it is possible to explain the theory of…

  3. Laboratory investigations of the effects of geologic heterogeneity on groundwater salinization and flush-out times from a tsunami-like event.

    PubMed

    Vithanage, M; Engesgaard, P; Jensen, K H; Illangasekare, T H; Obeysekera, J

    2012-08-01

    This intermediate scale laboratory experimental study was designed to improve the conceptual understanding of aquifer flushing time associated with diffuse saltwater contamination of coastal aquifers due to a tsunami-like event. The motivation comes from field observations made after the tsunami in December, 2004 in South Asia. The focus is on the role and effects of heterogeneity on flushing effectiveness. A scheme that combines experimentation in a 4.8m long laboratory tank and numerical modeling was used. To demonstrate the effects of geologic heterogeneity, plume migration and flushing times were analyzed in both homogeneous and layered media and under different boundary conditions (ambient flow, saltwater infiltration rate, freshwater recharge). Saltwater and freshwater infiltrations imitate the results of the groundwater salinization from the tsunami and freshening from the monsoon rainfall. The saltwater plume behavior was monitored both through visual observations (digital photography) of the dyed salt water and using measurements taken from several electrical conductivity sensors installed through the tank walls. The variable-density, three dimensional code HST3D was used to simulate the tank experiments and understand the fate and movement of the saltwater plume under field conditions. The results from the tank experiments and modeling demonstrated that macro-scale heterogeneity significantly influenced the migration patterns and flushing times of diffuse saltwater contamination. Ambient flow had a direct influence on total flush-out time, and heterogeneity impacted flush-out times for the top part of the tank and total flush-out times. The presence of a continuous low-permeability layer caused a 40% increase in complete flush-out time due to the slower flow of salt water in the low-permeability layer. When a relatively small opening was introduced in the low-permeability layer, salt water migrated quickly into a higher-permeable layer below causing a

  4. Slow slip events in the Kii Peninsula and Shikoku, Japan detected by strain changes at the integrated observatories of Geological Survey of Japan, AIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itaba, S.; Ohtani, R.; Kitagawa, Y.; Matsumoto, N.; Koizumi, N.

    2009-12-01

    In 2006, Geological Survey of Japan (GSJ), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) started constructing integrated observatories in and around Shikoku and Kii Peninsula, Japan for research on the Tonankai and Nankai earthquakes. Two observatories were constructed at Kii Peninsula in June 2007, and ten were completed in January 2009. Each observatory has three wells where water temperature, water level (pressure) and ground motion are observed. At one of the three wells, crustal strain is also observed by a multi-component borehole strain meter. According to Automatic Tremor Monitoring System (ATMOS) of Hiroshima University, 11 tremor activities have occurred in the Kii Peninsula since June 2007. We detected strain changes related to these tremor activities. The changes can be explained by short-term slow slip events (SSEs) occurring at several segments of the plate boundary, whose locations are consistent with the tremor activities (e.g. Itaba et al., 2009a). We analyzed these SSEs with the forward method in consideration of locations of the tremors. On the other hand, the observation suggested the existence of SSEs before or without the tremors (e.g. Fukuda and Sagiya, 2008; Itaba et al., 2009b). Therefore, it is important to detect SSEs just by strain changes. We tried to decide the fault planes for SSEs only using the strain data of the observatories of AIST. Since it is difficult to detect strain changes related to SSEs at two or more observatories of AIST, we decided the fault plain by a grid-search method. As a result, the fault plains for SSEs were consistent with the locations of the tremors. References Fukuda, M. and T. Sagiya, Slow strain changes recorded at Shingu borehole station in the southeastern Kii peninsula, The 7th General Assembly of Asian Seismological Commission and The 2008 Fall meeting of Seismological Society of Japan, Tsukuba, 2008. Itaba, S., N. Koizumi, N. Matsumoto and R. Ohtani, Continuous Observation of

  5. Determination of gold and silver in geological samples by focused infrared digestion: A re-investigation of aqua regia digestion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Baker, Laura A; Brindle, Ian D

    2016-02-01

    Focused infrared radiation-based digestions, for the determination of gold and silver, can be achieved in a timeframe as short as 10-15 min, making it an attractive candidate technology for the mining industry, where very large numbers of samples are analyzed on a daily basis. An investigation was carried out into gold and silver dissolution chemistry from geological samples using this novel digestion technique. This study investigated in-depth the issue of low recoveries of gold from aqua regia (AR) digestions, reported by a number of researchers. Conventional AR digestions consistently delivered gold recoveries in a range of 69-80% of the certified values for the four certified reference materials (CRM) employed (CCU-1d, SN26, OREAS 62c, and AMiS 0274), while silver recoveries were satisfactory. By gradually shifting the HCl:HNO3 ratio (v/v) from 3:1 to a reversed 1:3 ratio, recoveries of gold and silver exhibited inverse trends. At a HCl:HNO3 ratio of 1:3, complete recovery of gold was achieved with excellent reproducibility in all CRMs. Meanwhile, silver recoveries plunged significantly at this ratio in samples with higher silver concentrations. Silver values were recovered, however, when the silver was re-solubilized by adding a small volume of concentrated HCl to the cooled reverse aqua regia digests. Recoveries of base metals, such as Fe and Cu, were satisfactory throughout and were much less sensitive to changes in the digestion medium. Using four CRMs and five real-world gold/silver containing samples, the utility of the proposed reverse aqua regia was systematically studied. The uncomplicated nature of the digestion methods reported here, that are fast, effective and inexpensive, may be useful to analysts developing/optimizing their methods for the rapid determination of Au and Ag in a variety of mineral phases, particularly where rapid results are desirable, such as in prospecting and mine development. PMID:26653468

  6. Determining the Return Period of Storm Surge Events in the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, Joy; Suarez, John Kenneth; Lapidez, John Phillip; Mendoza, Jerico; Caro, Carl Vincent; Tablazon, Judd; Ladiero, Christine; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo

    2015-04-01

    The devastating damages generated by the Tropical Cyclone Haiyan storm surges in Eastern Samar, Philippines prompted the Department of Science and Technology-Project NOAH (Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards) to calculate the return period and storm surge exceedance probability of these events. The recurrence interval or the period of return of a storm surge event is the estimated likelihood that that event would occur again. Return periods are measured through historical data denoting the interval of recurrence in average over a period of time. The exceedance probability however, is a graphical representation that describes the probability that some various levels of loss will be exceeded over a future time period or will be surpassed over a given time. DOST-Project NOAH simulates storm surge height time series using JMA storm surge model which is a numerical model based on shallow water equations. To determine the period of recurrence of storm surges with this type of intensity, the agency intends to compute the estimation of storm surge heights generated by tropical cyclones for 2-year, 5-year, 10-year, 25-year, 50-year and 100-year return periods for the Philippine coast. The storm surge time series generated from JMA combined with WXTide simulation, a software containing archives/catalogues of world-wide astronomical tides, and 5-meter resolution DEM were used as input parameters for the inundation model, which shows probable extent of flooding at a specific storm surge return period. Flo-2D two-dimensional flood routing model, a GIS integrated software tool that facilitates the creation of the flood model grid system, was used for flood hazard model. It is a simple volume conservation model composed of processor program that facilitate graphical editing and mapping of flooding details which uses continuity equation and the dynamic wave momentum equations. The measurements of storm surge return period and probable extent of coastal flooding in the

  7. High resolution chronology of late Cretaceous-early Tertiary events determined from 21,000 yr orbital-climatic cycles in marine sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbert, Timothy D.; Dhondt, Steven

    1988-01-01

    A number of South Atlantic sites cored by the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) recovered late Cretaceous and early Tertiary sediments with alternating light-dark, high-low carbonate content. The sedimentary oscillations were turned into time series by digitizing color photographs of core segments at a resolution of about 5 points/cm. Spectral analysis of these records indicates prominent periodicity at 25 to 35 cm in the Cretaceous intervals, and about 15 cm in the early Tertiary sediments. The absolute period of the cycles that is determined from paleomagnetic calibration at two sites is 20,000 to 25,000 yr, and almost certainly corresponds to the period of the earth's precessional cycle. These sequences therefore contain an internal chronometer to measure events across the K/T extinction boundary at this scale of resolution. The orbital metronome was used to address several related questions: the position of the K/T boundary within magnetic chron 29R, the fluxes of biogenic and detrital material to the deep sea immediately before and after the K/T event, the duration of the Sr anomaly, and the level of background climatic variability in the latest Cretaceous time. The carbonate/color cycles that were analyzed contain primary records of ocean carbonate productivity and chemistry, as evidenced by bioturbational mixing of adjacent beds and the weak lithification of the rhythmic sequences. It was concluded that sedimentary sequences that contain orbital cyclicity are capable of providing resolution of dramatic events in earth history with much greater precision than obtainable through radiometric methods. The data show no evidence for a gradual climatic deterioration prior to the K/T extinction event, and argue for a geologically rapid revolution at this horizon.

  8. The Precise Determination of Cd Isotope Ratio in Geological Samples by MC-ICP-MS with Ion Exchange Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, C.; Hu, S.; Wang, D.; Jin, L.; Guo, W.

    2014-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a trace element which occurs at μg g-1 level abundances in the crust. Cd isotopes have great prospects in the study of the cosmogony, the trace of anthropogenic sources, the micronutrient cycling and the ocean productivity. This study develops an optimized technique for the precise and accurate determination of Cd isotopic compositions. Cd was separated from the matrix by elution with AG-MP-1 anionic exchange chromatographic resin. The matrix elements (K, Na, Ca, Al, Fe, and Mg etc.), polyatomic interfered elements (Ge, Ga, Zr, Nb, Ru, and Mo), and isobaric interfered elements (In, Pd and most of Sn) were eluted using HCl with gradient descent concentrations (2, 0.3, 0.06, 0.012 and 0.0012 mol L-1). The same elution procedure was repeated to eliminate the residuel Sn (Sn/Cd < 0.018). The collected Cd was analyzed using MC-ICP-MS, in which the instrumental mass fractionation was controlled by a "sample-standard bracketing" technique. The recovery of Cd larger than 96.85%, and the δ114/110Cd are in the range of -1.43~+0.20‰ for ten geological reference materials (GSD-3a, GSD-5a, GSD-7a, GSD-6, GSD-9, GSD-10, GSD-11, GSD-12, GSD-23, and GSS-1). The δ114/110Cd obtained for GSS-1 soil sample relative to the NIST SRM 3108 Cd solution was 0.20, which was coherent with the literature values (0.08±0.23). This method had a precision of 0.001~0.002% (RSD), an error range of 0.06~0.14 (δ114/110Cd, 2σ), and a long-term reproducibility of 0.12 (δ114/110Cd, 2σ).

  9. How events determine spreading patterns: information transmission via internal and external influences on social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuang; Zhan, Xiu-Xiu; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Sun, Gui-Quan; Hui, Pak Ming

    2015-11-01

    Recently, information transmission models motivated by the classical epidemic propagation, have been applied to a wide-range of social systems, generally assume that information mainly transmits among individuals via peer-to-peer interactions on social networks. In this paper, we consider one more approach for users to get information: the out-of-social-network influence. Empirical analyzes of eight typical events’ diffusion on a very large micro-blogging system, Sina Weibo, show that the external influence has significant impact on information spreading along with social activities. In addition, we propose a theoretical model to interpret the spreading process via both internal and external channels, considering three essential properties: (i) memory effect; (ii) role of spreaders; and (iii) non-redundancy of contacts. Experimental and mathematical results indicate that the information indeed spreads much quicker and broader with mutual effects of the internal and external influences. More importantly, the present model reveals that the event characteristic would highly determine the essential spreading patterns once the network structure is established. The results may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of the underlying dynamics of information transmission on real social networks.

  10. Stoichiometric Determination of Nitrate Fate in Agricultural Ecosystems during Rainfall Events

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiyao

    2015-01-01

    Ecologists have found a close relationship between the concentrations of nitrate (NO3-) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in ecosystems. However, it is difficult to determine the NO3- fate exactly because of the low coefficient in the constructed relationship. In the present paper, a negative power-function equation (r2 = 0.87) was developed by using 411 NO3- data points and DOC:NO3- ratios from several agricultural ecosystems during different rainfall events. Our analysis of the stoichiometric method reveals several observations. First, the NO3- concentration demonstrated the largest changes when the DOC:NO3- ratio increased from 1 to 10. Second, the biodegradability of DOC was an important factor in controlling the NO3- concentration of agricultural ecosystems. Third, sediment was important not only as a denitrification site, but also as a major source of DOC for the overlying water. Fourth, a high DOC concentration was able to maintain a low NO3- concentration in the groundwater. In conclusion, this new stoichiometric method can be used for the accurate estimation and analysis of NO3- concentrations in ecosystems. PMID:25849210

  11. A new determination of radii and limb parameters for Pluto and Charon from mutual event lightcurves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Eliot F.; Binzel, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    Over the past several years Pluto-Charon mutual events have yielded progressively more accurate estimates of Charon's orbital elements and the radii of Pluto and Charon (e.g., Buie, Tholen, and Horne, 1992). Analysis of the 1988 stellar occultation by Pluto indicates a radius for Pluto that is about 4%, or 50 km, larger than the mutual event radius of 1151 km. One possible explanation for the discrepancy is that the mutual event modeling treats Pluto and Charon as uniformly bright disks. If they are limb-darkened, the mutual event fits could underestimate their radii. In this paper we use an independent mutual event data set (Young and Binzel, 1992) to fit for Pluto and Charon's radii in a manner independent of either object's limb profile or albedo distribution. Our least-squares solution indicates that Pluto's radius is 1164 +/- 22.9 km and Charon's radius is 621 +/- 20.6 km.

  12. Germline Methylation Patterns Determine the Distribution of Recombination Events in the Dog Genome

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Jonas; Quilez, Javier; Arndt, Peter F.; Webster, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    The positive-regulatory domain containing nine gene, PRDM9, which strongly associates with the location of recombination events in several vertebrates, is inferred to be inactive in the dog genome. Here, we address several questions regarding the control of recombination and its influence on genome evolution in dogs. First, we address whether the association between CpG islands (CGIs) and recombination hotspots is generated by lack of methylation, GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC), or both. Using a genome-wide dog single nucleotide polymorphism data set and comparisons of the dog genome with related species, we show that recombination-associated CGIs have low CpG mutation rates, and that CpG mutation rate is negatively correlated with recombination rate genome wide, indicating that nonmethylation attracts the recombination machinery. We next use a neighbor-dependent model of nucleotide substitution to disentangle the effects of CpG mutability and gBGC and analyze the effects that loss of PRDM9 has on these rates. We infer that methylation patterns have been stable during canid genome evolution, but that dog CGIs have experienced a drastic increase in substitution rate due to gBGC, consistent with increased levels of recombination in these regions. We also show that gBGC is likely to have generated many new CGIs in the dog genome, but these mostly occur away from genes, whereas the number of CGIs in gene promoter regions has not increased greatly in recent evolutionary history. Recombination has a major impact on the distribution of CGIs that are detected in the dog genome due to the interaction between methylation and gBGC. The results indicate that germline methylation patterns are the main determinant of recombination rates in the absence of PRDM9. PMID:25527838

  13. Germline methylation patterns determine the distribution of recombination events in the dog genome.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Jonas; Quilez, Javier; Arndt, Peter F; Webster, Matthew T

    2014-12-19

    The positive-regulatory domain containing nine gene, PRDM9, which strongly associates with the location of recombination events in several vertebrates, is inferred to be inactive in the dog genome. Here, we address several questions regarding the control of recombination and its influence on genome evolution in dogs. First, we address whether the association between CpG islands (CGIs) and recombination hotspots is generated by lack of methylation, GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC), or both. Using a genome-wide dog single nucleotide polymorphism data set and comparisons of the dog genome with related species, we show that recombination-associated CGIs have low CpG mutation rates, and that CpG mutation rate is negatively correlated with recombination rate genome wide, indicating that nonmethylation attracts the recombination machinery. We next use a neighbor-dependent model of nucleotide substitution to disentangle the effects of CpG mutability and gBGC and analyze the effects that loss of PRDM9 has on these rates. We infer that methylation patterns have been stable during canid genome evolution, but that dog CGIs have experienced a drastic increase in substitution rate due to gBGC, consistent with increased levels of recombination in these regions. We also show that gBGC is likely to have generated many new CGIs in the dog genome, but these mostly occur away from genes, whereas the number of CGIs in gene promoter regions has not increased greatly in recent evolutionary history. Recombination has a major impact on the distribution of CGIs that are detected in the dog genome due to the interaction between methylation and gBGC. The results indicate that germline methylation patterns are the main determinant of recombination rates in the absence of PRDM9.

  14. Using geologic conditions and multiattribute decision analysis to determine the relative favorability of selected areas for siting a high-level radioactive waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, W.; Edgar, D.E.; Baker, C.H.; Buehring, W.A.; Whitfield, R.G.; Van Luik, A.E.J.; Sood, M.K.; Flower, M.F.J.; Warren, M.F.; Jusko, M.J.; Peerenboom, J.P.; Bogner, J.E.

    1988-05-01

    A method is presented for determining the relative favorability of geologically complex areas for isolating high-level radioactive wastes. In applying the method to the northeastern region of the United States, seismicity and tectonic activity were the screening criteria used to divide the region into three areas of increasing seismotectonic risk. Criteria were then used to subdivide the area of lowest seismotectonic risk into six geologically distinct subareas including characteristics, surface-water and groundwater hydrology, potential human intrusion, site geometry, surface characteristics, and tectonic environment. Decision analysis was then used to identify the subareas most favorable from a geologic standpoint for further investigation, with a view to selecting a site for a repository. Three subareas (parts of northeastern Vermont, northern New Hampshire, and western Maine) were found to be the most favorable, using this method and existing data. However, because this study assessed relative geologic favorability, no conclusions should be drawn concerning the absolute suitability of individual subareas for high-level radioactive waste isolation. 34 refs., 7 figs., 20 tabs.

  15. International Geology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Linn

    1977-01-01

    Briefly discusses recent international programs in various areas of geology, including land-use problems, coping with geological hazards, and conserving the environment while searching for energy and mineral resources. (MLH)

  16. Mathematical Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Thomas A.

    1983-01-01

    Mathematical techniques used to solve geological problems are briefly discussed (including comments on use of geostatistics). Highlights of conferences/meetings and conference papers in mathematical geology are also provided. (JN)

  17. Geologic nozzles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner, Kieffer S.

    1989-01-01

    The importance of the low characteristic velocities of geologic fluids has not been widely recognized, and as a result, the importance of supercritical and supersonic flow in geological processes has generally been underestimated. The lateral blast at Mount St. Helens, Washington, propelled a gas heavily laden with dust into the atmosphere. Because of the low sound speed in this gas (about 100 m/s), the flow was internally supersonic. Old Faithful Geyser, Wyoming, is a converging-diverging nozzle in which liquid water refilling the conduit during the recharge cycle changes during eruption into a two-phase liquid-vapor mixture with a very low sound velocity. The high sound speed of liquid water determines the characteristics of harmonic tremor observed at the geyser during the recharge interval, whereas the low sound speed of the liquid-vapor mixture influences the fluid flow characteristics of the eruption. At the rapids of the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon, Arizona, the channel is constricted into the shape of a converging-diverging nozzle by the debris flows that enter from tributary canyons. Both subcritical and supercritical flow occur within the rapids. -from Author

  18. Phylogeographic patterns of genetic diversity in eastern Mediterranean water frogs have been determined by geological processes and climate change in the Late Cenozoic

    PubMed Central

    Akın, Çiğdem; Bilgin, C. Can; Beerli, Peter; Westaway, Rob; Ohst, Torsten; Litvinchuk, Spartak N.; Uzzell, Thomas; Bilgin, Metin; Hotz, Hansjürg; Guex, Gaston-Denis; Plötner, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    Aim Our aims were to assess the phylogeographic patterns of genetic diversity in eastern Mediterranean water frogs and to estimate divergence times using different geological scenarios. We related divergence times to past geological events and discuss the relevance of our data for the systematics of eastern Mediterranean water frogs. Location The eastern Mediterranean region. Methods Genetic diversity and divergence were calculated using sequences of two protein-coding mitochondrial (mt) genes: ND2 (1038 bp, 119 sequences) and ND3 (340 bp, 612 sequences). Divergence times were estimated in a Bayesian framework under four geological scenarios representing alternative possible geological histories for the eastern Mediterranean. We then compared the different scenarios using Bayes factors and additional geological data. Results Extensive genetic diversity in mtDNA divides eastern Mediterranean water frogs into six main haplogroups (MHG). Three MHGs were identified on the Anatolian mainland; the most widespread MHG with the highest diversity is distributed from western Anatolia to the northern shore of the Caspian Sea, including the type locality of Pelophylax ridibundus. The other two Anatolian MHGs are restricted to south-eastern Turkey, occupying localities west and east of the Amanos mountain range. One of the remaining three MHGs is restricted to Cyprus; a second to the Levant; the third was found in the distribution area of European lake frogs (P. ridibundus group), including the Balkans. Main conclusions Based on geological evidence and estimates of genetic divergence we hypothesize that the water frogs of Cyprus have been isolated from the Anatolian mainland populations since the end of the Messinian salinity crisis (MSC), i.e. since c. 5.5-5.3 Ma, while our divergence time estimates indicate that the isolation of Crete from the mainland populations (Peloponnese, Anatolia) most likely pre-dates the MSC. The observed rates of divergence imply a time window of c

  19. Phylogeographic patterns of genetic diversity in eastern Mediterranean water frogs have been determined by geological processes and climate change in the Late Cenozoic.

    PubMed

    Akın, Ciğdem; Bilgin, C Can; Beerli, Peter; Westaway, Rob; Ohst, Torsten; Litvinchuk, Spartak N; Uzzell, Thomas; Bilgin, Metin; Hotz, Hansjürg; Guex, Gaston-Denis; Plötner, Jörg

    2010-11-01

    AIM: Our aims were to assess the phylogeographic patterns of genetic diversity in eastern Mediterranean water frogs and to estimate divergence times using different geological scenarios. We related divergence times to past geological events and discuss the relevance of our data for the systematics of eastern Mediterranean water frogs. LOCATION: The eastern Mediterranean region. METHODS: Genetic diversity and divergence were calculated using sequences of two protein-coding mitochondrial (mt) genes: ND2 (1038 bp, 119 sequences) and ND3 (340 bp, 612 sequences). Divergence times were estimated in a Bayesian framework under four geological scenarios representing alternative possible geological histories for the eastern Mediterranean. We then compared the different scenarios using Bayes factors and additional geological data. RESULTS: Extensive genetic diversity in mtDNA divides eastern Mediterranean water frogs into six main haplogroups (MHG). Three MHGs were identified on the Anatolian mainland; the most widespread MHG with the highest diversity is distributed from western Anatolia to the northern shore of the Caspian Sea, including the type locality of Pelophylax ridibundus. The other two Anatolian MHGs are restricted to south-eastern Turkey, occupying localities west and east of the Amanos mountain range. One of the remaining three MHGs is restricted to Cyprus; a second to the Levant; the third was found in the distribution area of European lake frogs (P. ridibundus group), including the Balkans. MAIN CONCLUSIONS: Based on geological evidence and estimates of genetic divergence we hypothesize that the water frogs of Cyprus have been isolated from the Anatolian mainland populations since the end of the Messinian salinity crisis (MSC), i.e. since c. 5.5-5.3 Ma, while our divergence time estimates indicate that the isolation of Crete from the mainland populations (Peloponnese, Anatolia) most likely pre-dates the MSC. The observed rates of divergence imply a time window

  20. Experimental determination of trace element mobility in UK North Sea sandstones under conditions of geological CO2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carruthers, Kit; Wilkinson, Mark; Butler, Ian B.

    2016-04-01

    Offshore UK geological formations have the capacity to store > 100 years' worth of UK CO2 output from industry and power generation, if utilised for carbon capture and storage (CCS) schemes. During CO2 storage or CO2-Enhanced Oil Recovery (CO2-EOR), formation waters may be produced at the surface to be disposed of into the marine environment. Laboratory and field scale studies, with an emphasis on the effects on onshore shallow potable groundwaters, have shown that CO2 dissolution in formation waters during injection and storage acidifies the waters and promotes mobilisation from the reservoir sandstones of major and trace elements into solution. Of relevance to the UK context, eight of these elements are specifically identified as potentially hazardous to the marine environment: As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Zn. Batch experiments using simple borosilicate flasks sat on heating mantles were used in this study to determine concentrations of these 8 elements which could be leached from selected North Sea sandstones with bubbled CO2 and saline solutions, at formation temperatures. These concentration data were compared with produced water data from current UK offshore hydrocarbon extraction activities. The comparison showed that, taking the North Sea as a whole, the experimental results fall within the range of concentrations of current oil and gas activities. However, on a field-by-field basis, concentrations may be enhanced with CO2 storage, such that they are higher than waters normally produced from a particular field. Lead, nickel and zinc showed the greatest concentration increases in the experiments with the addition of CO2, with the other five elements of interest not showing any strong trends with respect to enhanced CO2. The origin of the increased trace element concentrations was investigated using sequential leaching experiments. A six step method of increasingly aggressive leaching was developed, based on modification of methods outlined by Tessier et al

  1. Dynamics of pollutant discharge in combined sewer systems during rain events: chance or determinism?

    PubMed

    Hannouche, A; Chebbo, G; Joannis, C

    2014-01-01

    A large database of continuous flow and turbidity measurements cumulating data on hundreds of rain events and dry weather days from two sites in Paris (called Quais and Clichy) and one in Lyon (called Ecully) is presented. This database is used to characterize and compare the behaviour of the three sites at the inter-events scale. The analysis is probed through three various variables: total volumes and total suspended solids (TSS) masses and concentrations during both wet and dry weather periods in addition to the contributions of diverse-origin sources to event flow volume and TSS load values. The results obtained confirm the previous findings regarding the spatial consistency of TSS fluxes and concentrations between both sites in Paris having similar land uses. Moreover, masses and concentrations are proven to be correlated between Parisian sites in a way that implies the possibility of some deterministic processes being reproducible from one catchment to another for a particular rain event. The results also demonstrate the importance of the contribution of wastewater and sewer deposits to the total events' loads and show that such contributions are not specific to Paris sewer networks.

  2. Determination of sub-microgram amounts of selenium in geological materials by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry with electrothermal atomisation after solvent extraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Chao, T.T.

    1981-01-01

    An atomic-absorption spectrophotometric method with electrothermal atomisation has been developed for the determination of selenium in geological materials. The sample is decomposed with a mixture of nitric, perchloric and hydrofluoric acids and heated with hydrochloric acid to reduce selenium to selenium (IV). Selenium is then extracted into toluene from a hydrochloric acid - hydrobromic acid medium containing iron. A few microlitres of the toluene extract are injected into a carbon rod atomiser, using a nickel solution as a matrix modifier. The limits of determination are 0.2-200 p.p.m. of selenium in a geological sample. For concentrations between 0.05 and 0.2 p.p.m., back-extraction of the selenium into dilute hydrochloric acid is employed before atomisation. Selenium values for reference samples obtained by replicate analysis are in general agreement with those reported by other workers, with relative standard deviations ranging from 4.1 to 8.8%. Recoveries of selenium spiked at two levels were 98-108%. Major and trace elements commonly encountered in geological materials do not interfere. Arsenic has a suppressing effect on the selenium signals, but only when its concentration is greater than 1000 p.p.m. Nitric acid interferes seriously with the extraction of selenium and must be removed by evaporation in the sample-digestion step.

  3. Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

    SciTech Connect

    J. King

    2004-03-31

    The primary purpose of this analysis is to evaluate seismic- and igneous-related features, events, and processes (FEPs). These FEPs represent areas of natural system processes that have the potential to produce disruptive events (DE) that could impact repository performance and are related to the geologic processes of tectonism, structural deformation, seismicity, and igneous activity. Collectively, they are referred to as the DE FEPs. This evaluation determines which of the DE FEPs are excluded from modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). The evaluation is based on the data and results presented in supporting analysis reports, model reports, technical information, or corroborative documents that are cited in the individual FEP discussions in Section 6.2 of this analysis report.

  4. An improved method for the determination of trace levels of arsenic and antimony in geological materials by automated hydride generation-atomic absorption spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, J.G.; Lichte, F.E.

    1982-01-01

    An improved, automated method for the determination of arsenic and antimony in geological materials is described. After digestion of the material in sulfuric, nitric, hydrofluoric and perchloric acids, a hydrochloric acid solution of the sample is automatically mixed with reducing agents, acidified with additional hydrochloric acid, and treated with a sodium tetrahydroborate solution to form arsine and stibine. The hydrides are decomposed in a heated quartz tube in the optical path of an atomic absorption spectrometer. The absorbance peak height for arsenic or antimony is measured. Interferences that exist are minimized to the point where most geological materials including coals, soils, coal ashes, rocks and sediments can be analyzed directly without use of standard additions. The relative standard deviation of the digestion and the instrumental procedure is less than 2% at the 50 ??g l-1 As or Sb level. The reagent-blank detection limit is 0.2 ??g l-1 As or Sb. ?? 1982.

  5. A tool for determining duration of mortality events in archaeological assemblages using extant ungulate microwear

    PubMed Central

    Rivals, Florent; Prignano, Luce; Semprebon, Gina M.; Lozano, Sergi

    2015-01-01

    The seasonality of human occupations in archaeological sites is highly significant for the study of hominin behavioural ecology, in particular the hunting strategies for their main prey-ungulates. We propose a new tool to quantify such seasonality from tooth microwear patterns in a dataset of ten large samples of extant ungulates resulting from well-known mass mortality events. The tool is based on the combination of two measures of variability of scratch density, namely standard deviation and coefficient of variation. The integration of these two measurements of variability permits the classification of each case into one of the following three categories: (1) short events, (2) long-continued event and (3) two separated short events. The tool is tested on a selection of eleven fossil samples from five Palaeolithic localities in Western Europe which show a consistent classification in the three categories. The tool proposed here opens new doors to investigate seasonal patterns of ungulate accumulations in archaeological sites using non-destructive sampling. PMID:26616864

  6. Laboratory determination of old and new targeted anticoagulant agents for prevention of bleeding and thrombotic events in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Harenberg, Job

    2016-04-01

    A two-fold prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) is established as therapeutic range for therapy with unfractionated heparin, hirudin and argatroban. The international normalized ratio (INR) of 2 to 3 is required to maintain anticoagulation in the therapeutic range of vitamin K antagonists. The therapeutic range of anti-factor Xa activity during therapy with low-molecular weight heparins and danaparoid are less well and of direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) poorly defined. The relation of aPTT and INR values to thrombotic and bleeding events are well established despite a large variation of values in affected patients. The relation of coagulation values of the other anticoagulants to clinical events is open. The value of determination in cancer patients is higher because of the increased risk for thrombotic and bleeding events of this patient group. Several activities are currently undertaken to certify methods for in vitro diagnostic testing for DAOCs. PMID:27067972

  7. Determination of aluminium, silicon and magnesium in geological matrices by delayed neutron activation analysis based on k0 instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Baidoo, I K; Dampare, S B; Opata, N S; Nyarko, B J B; Akaho, E H K; Quagraine, R E

    2013-12-01

    In this work, concentrations of silicon, aluminium and magnesium in geological matrices were determined by Neutron Activation Analysis based on k0-IAEA software. The optimum activation and delay times were found to be 5 min and 15-20 min respectively for the determination of Si via (29)Si (n,p) (29)Al reaction. The adopted irradiation scheme did not work for the determination of magnesium. Each sample was irradiated under a thermal neutron flux density of 5.0 × 10(11) ncm(-2)s(-1). Cadmium covered activation indicated that a permanent epithermal irradiation site for research reactors would be very useful for routine determination of silicon in environmental samples. PMID:23999324

  8. Field Geology/Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton; Jakes, Petr; Jaumann, Ralf; Marshall, John; Moses, Stewart; Ryder, Graham; Saunders, Stephen; Singer, Robert

    1996-01-01

    The field geology/process group examined the basic operations of a terrestrial field geologist and the manner in which these operations could be transferred to a planetary lander. Four basic requirements for robotic field geology were determined: geologic content; surface vision; mobility; and manipulation. Geologic content requires a combination of orbital and descent imaging. Surface vision requirements include range, resolution, stereo, and multispectral imaging. The minimum mobility for useful field geology depends on the scale of orbital imagery. Manipulation requirements include exposing unweathered surfaces, screening samples, and bringing samples in contact with analytical instruments. To support these requirements, several advanced capabilities for future development are recommended. Capabilities include near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy, hyper-spectral imaging, multispectral microscopy, artificial intelligence in support of imaging, x ray diffraction, x ray fluorescence, and rock chipping.

  9. Late Paleoproterozoic-Neoproterozoic multi-rifting events in the North China Craton and their geological significance: A study advance and review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Mingguo; Hu, Bo; Zhao, Taiping; Peng, Peng; Meng, Qingren

    2015-11-01

    An important Paleoproterozoic mobile belt event took place in the North China Craton (NCC), termed the Hutuo Movement. This event has been interpreted to represent cratonic reworking characterized by rifting-subduction-collision processes. The NCC then evolved into a stable platform or para-platform tectonic setting in Earth's middle age period more than ~ 1.0 Ga. Thick Late Paleoproterozoic-Neoproterozoic sedimentary sequences were extensively deposited on the early metamorphic basement. The major sedimentary basins include the Xiong'er aulacogen system in the south-central NCC, the Yan-Liao aulacogen system in the north-central NCC, the Northern marginal rift system in the northwestern NCC and the Eastern marginal rift system in the eastern NCC. The following four stages of magmatic activity are recognized in the Late Paleoproterozoic to Neoproterozoic interval: (1) ~ 1800 to 1780 Ma Xiong'er igneous province (XIP), (2) ~ 1720 to 1620 Ma anorogenic magmatic association, (3) ~ 1350 to 1320 Ma diabase sill swarms, and (4) ~ 900 Ma mafic dyke swarms. These four magmatic events suggest that the NCC was situated in an intra-plate setting for a long time from ~ 1.8 Ga to ~ 0.7 Ga or even younger, and the magmatic events were associated with multi-stage rifting activities. We document that the NCC was in a long-term extensional tectonic setting during Late Paleoproterozoic-Neoproterozoic era. The main ore deposits in this period are magmatic type iron deposits related to anorthosite-gabbro bodies, REE-Nb-Fe and Pb-Zn-Cu-Fe deposits related to Mesoproterozoic-Neoproterozoic rifts. Orogenic metal deposits are absent. There is no evidence indicating that the Grenville or other orogenic events affected the NCC. The reason for the absence of Grenvillian aged events in the NCC is probably because it was far from the edge of the Nuna supercontinent, if such a supercontinent did exist. There is another possibility that the Earth's middle age represented a particular tectonic

  10. Geologic Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, William L.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in geologic time with an introduction to the subject. Separate sections discuss the relative time scale, major divisions in geologic time, index fossils used as guides for telling the age of rocks, the atomic scale, and the age of the earth.…

  11. Engineering Geology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatheway, Allen W.

    1978-01-01

    Engineering geology remains a potpourri of applied classical geology, and 1977 witnessed an upswing in demand for these services. Traditional foundation-related work was slight, but construction related to national needs increased briskly. Major cities turned to concerns of transit waste-water treatment and solid-waste disposal. (Author/MA)

  12. Physical geology

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, B.; Porter, S.

    1987-01-01

    The book integrates current thinking on processes (plate techtonics, chemical cycles, changes throughout geologic time). It is an introduction to investigations into the way the earth works, how mountains are formed, how the atmosphere, hydrosphere, crust and mantle interact with each other. Treatments on climate, paleoclimatology and landscape evolution are included, as is a discussion on how human activity affects geological interactions.

  13. Determining the hydraulic properties of saturated, low-permeability geological materials in the laboratory: Advances in theory and practice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, M.; Takahashi, M.; Morin, R.H.; Endo, H.; Esaki, T.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The accurate hydraulic characterization of low-permeability subsurface environments has important practical significance. In order to examine this issue from the perspective of laboratory-based approaches, we review some recent advancements in the theoretical analyses of three different laboratory techniques specifically applied to low-permeability geologic materials: constant-head, constant flow-rate and transient-pulse permeability tests. Some potential strategies for effectively decreasing the time required to confidently estimate the permeability of these materials are presented. In addition, a new and versatile laboratory system is introduced that can implement any of these three test methods while simultaneously subjecting a specimen to high confining pressures and pore pressures, thereby simulating in situ conditions at great depths. The capabilities and advantages of this innovative system are demonstrated using experimental data derived from Shirahama sandstone and Inada granite, two rock types widely encountered in Japan.

  14. Species interactions determine the spatial mortality patterns emerging in plant communities after extreme events

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jinbao; Bogaert, Jan; Nijs, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Gap disturbance is assumed to maintain species diversity by creating environmental heterogeneity. However, little is known about how interactions with neighbours, such as competition and facilitation, alter the emerging gap patterns after extreme events. Using a spatially explicit community model we demonstrate that negative interactions, especially intraspecific competition, greatly promote both average gap size and gap-size diversity relative to positive interspecific interaction. This suggests that competition would promote diversity maintenance but also increase community invasibility, as large gaps with a wide size variety provide more diverse niches for both local and exotic species. Under interspecific competition, both gap metrics interestingly increased with species richness, while they were reduced under intraspecific competition. Having a wider range of species interaction strengths led to a smaller average gap size only under intraspecific competition. Increasing conspecific clumping induced larger gaps with more variable sizes under intraspecific competition, in contrast to interspecific competition. Given the range of intraspecific clumping in real communities, models or experiments based on randomly synthesized communities may yield biased estimates of the opportunities for potential colonizers to fill gaps. Overall, our “static” model on gap formation offers perspectives to better predict recolonization opportunity and thus community secondary succession under extreme event regimes. PMID:26054061

  15. Geology and geochemistry of the Macheng Algoma-type banded iron-formation, North China Craton: Constraints on mineralization events and genesis of high-grade iron ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huaying; Niu, Xianglong; Zhang, Lianchang; Pirajno, Franco; Luo, Huabao; Qin, Feng; Cui, Minli; Wang, Changle; Qi, Min

    2015-12-01

    The Macheng iron deposit is located in the eastern Hebei province of the North China Craton (NCC). It is hosted in Neoarchean metamorphic rocks of Baimiaozi formation in the Dantazi Group, consisting of biotite-leptynite, plagioclase-gneiss, plagioclase-amphibolite, migmatite, migmatitic granite and quartz schist. Geochemical analyses of the host biotite leptynite and plagioclase amphibolites show that their protoliths are both volcanics, inferred to be trachytic basalt and basaltic andesite, respectively. Based on the geochemical signature of the host rocks, together with geology of the iron deposit, it is inferred that the Macheng BIF is an Algoma-type iron exhalative formation, formed in an arc-related basin in the Neoarchean. Post-Archean Australian Shale (PAAS)-normalized rare earth elements (REEs) plus yttrium (Y) concentrations of different BIF ores with gneissic, striated and banded structure in the Macheng deposit, show similar patterns with depletions in light rare earth elements (LREEs) and middle rare earth elements (MREEs) relative to heavy rare earth elements (HREEs) and with apparently positive La, Y and Eu anomalies. Y/Ho ratios of the gneissic, striated and banded BIF ores vary from 37 to 56. These geochemical features of the BIF ores reveal their affinity with the sea water and the presence of a high-temperature hydrothermal component, indicating that both the seawater and high temperature hydrothermal fluids derived from alteration of oceanic basalts and komatiites may contribute to formation of the Macheng BIF. Geological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of the Macheng deposit recognized two kinds of high-grade iron ores. One is massive oxidized high-grade ore (Fe2O3T = 74.37-86.20 wt.%), mainly consisting of hematite with some magnetite, which shows geochemical characteristics of the gneissic, striated and banded BIF ores. The other type is magnetite high-grade ore, also massive and consisting of magnetite, with distinct characteristics

  16. A modification of the U.S. Geological Survey one-sixth order semiquantitative spectrographic method for the analysis of geologic materials that improves limits of determination of some volatile to moderately volatile elements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Detra, D.E.; Cooley, Elmo F.

    1988-01-01

    A modification of the one-sixth order semi-quantitative emission spectrographic method for the analysis of 30 elements in geologic materials (Grimes and Marranzino 1968) improves the limits of determination of some volatile to moderately volatile elements. The modification uses a compound-pendulum-mounted filter to regulate the amount of emitted light passing into the spectrograph. One hundred percent transmission of emitted light is allowed during the initial 20 seconds of the burn, then continually reduced to 40 percent over the next 32 seconds using the pendulum-mounted filter, and followed by an additional 68 seconds of burn time. The reduction of light transmission during the latter part of the burn decreases spectral background and the line emission of less volatile elements commonly responsible for problem-causing interferences. The sensitivity of the method for some geochemically important trace elements commonly determined in mineral exploration (Ag, As, Au, Be, Bi, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Sb, Sn, and Zn) is improved up to five-fold under ideal conditions without compromising precision or accuracy

  17. Comparing geotechnical to geologic estimates for past overburden in the Pierre-Hayes, South Dakota area: an argument for in-situ pressuremeter determination ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, D.S.; Nichols, T.C., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A knowledge of past overburden thickness is useful for designing underground structures such as waste repositories. This study attempts to determine if a correlation can be made between a geologic estimate and two types of geotechnical calculations of past overburden thickness. In the Pierre-Hayes area, Late Cretaceous Pierre Shales is the only bedrock present, but clasts of the Miocene Ogallala Formation were found in the Pleistocene deposits, suggesting that rocks of the Ogallala Formation once covered this area. Based on the geologic estimate, the Ogallala surface was 1100 ft higher than the present surface. Of the two types of geotechnical data acquired for the Hayes site, the laboratory overconsolidation ratios indicate a past overburden thickness value of 2300 ft, whereas the in situ pressuremeter overconsolidation ratios indicate 1318 ft. We, therefore, believe that in situ determination is a better indicator of past overburden that the laboratory results. However, why the two test results differ to this degree is unknown at present.-from Authors

  18. Determination of Os by isotope dilution-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry with the combination of laser ablation to introduce chemically separated geological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yali; Ren, Minghao; Xia, Xiaoping; Li, Congying; Sun, Weidong

    2015-11-01

    A method was developed for the determination of trace Os in geological samples by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) with the combination of chemical separation and preconcentration. Samples are digested using aqua regia in Carius tubes, and the Os analyte is converted into volatile OsO4, which is distilled and absorbed with HBr. The HBr solution is concentrated for further Os purification using the microdistillation technique. The purified Os is dissolved in 10 μl of 0.02% sucrose-0.005% H3PO4 solution and then evaporated on pieces of perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) film, resulting in the formation of a tiny object (< 3 × 104 μm2 superficial area). Using LA-ICP-MS measurements, the object can give Os signals at least 100 times higher than those provided by routine solution-ICP-MS while successfully avoiding the memory effect. The procedural blank and detection limit in the developed technique are 3.0 pg and 1.8 pg for Os, respectively when 1 g of samples is taken. Reference materials (RM) are analyzed, and their Os concentrations obtained by isotope dilution are comparable to reference or literature values. Based on the individual RM results, the precision is estimated within the range of 0.6 to 9.4% relative standard deviation (RSD), revealing that this method is applicable to the determination of trace Os in geological samples.

  19. Core evidence of paleoseismic events in Paleogene deposits of the Shulu Sag in the Bohai Bay Basin, east China, and their petroleum geologic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lijing; Jiang, Zaixing; Liu, Hui; Kong, Xiangxin; Li, Haipeng; Jiang, Xiaolong

    2015-10-01

    The Shulu Sag, located in the southwestern corner of the Jizhong Depression, Bohai Bay Basin of east China, is a NE-SW trending, elongate Cenozoic half-graben basin. The lowermost part of the third member of the Shahejie Formation in this basin is characterized by continental rudstone and calcilutite to calcisiltite facies. Based on core observation and regional geologic analysis, seismites are recognized in these lacustrine deposits, which include soft-sediment deformation structures (sedimentary dikes, hydraulic shattering, diapir structures, convolute lamination, load-flame structures, ball-and-pillow structures, loop bedding, and subsidence structures), synsedimentary faults, and seismoturbidites. In addition, mixed-source rudstones, consisting of the Paleozoic carbonate clasts and in situ calcilutite clasts in the lowermost submember of Shahejie 3, appear in the seismites, suggesting an earthquake origin. A complete representative vertical sequence in the lowermost part of the third member found in well ST1H located in the central part of the Shulu Sag shows, from the base to the top: underlying undeformed layers, synsedimentary faults, liquefied carbonate rocks, allogenetic seismoturbidites, and overlying undeformed layers. Seismites are widely distributed around this well and there are multiple sets of stacked seismites separated by undeformed sediment. The nearby NW-trending Taijiazhuang fault whose fault growth index is from 1.1 to 1.8 and the NNE-trending Xinhe fault with a fault growth index of 1.3-1.9 may be the source of the instability to create the seismites. These deformed sedimentary layers are favorable for the accumulation of oil and gas; for example, sedimentary dikes can cut through many layers and serve as conduits for fluid migration. Sedimentary faults and fractures induced by earthquakes can act as oil and gas migration channels or store petroleum products as well. Seismoturbidites and mixed-source rudstones are excellent reservoirs due to

  20. Extracting mineral system event histories from geophysical and geochemical data in geologically complex terrain - an example from the southeastern Fennoscandian Shield.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorjonen-Ward, Peter; Kontinen, Asko; Lerssi, Jouni; Mertanen, Satu; Molnar, Ferenc; O'Brien, Hugh; Pohjolainen, Esa; Halla, Jaana; Korhonen, Fawna; Mattila, Jussi

    2015-04-01

    The mineral systems concept is intended to extend and inform exploration capability, through understanding processes of metal extraction, transport and precipitation within a well-defined architectural framework, as opposed to simple - or even sophisticated - targeting of geophysical or geochemical anomalies. Given that geophysical and geochemical data represent a summation of all events and processes that have affected a body of rock, the use of advanced inversion techniques could be impeded unless we can extract an accurate event history and derive a comprehensive understanding of the history of hydrothermal events and their structural framework, even in a qualitative sense. In ideal cases, we may be able to place age constraints using isotopes or paleomagnetism, if hydrothermal mineral reactions enhance (or disperse) geochemical and geophysical signals. Given a the tendency for deformation in the brittle regime to occur preferentially by reactivation of existing zones of weakness, we might also expect a progressive linear enhancement or dilution of anomalies, where fluid-flow is focused within permeable fault zones. We illustrate these issues through an analysis of event histories and their relationship to diverse mineralization styles and episodes in the southeastern part of the Fennoscandian Shield, where the oldest mineral systems are represented by orogenic gold deposits in Neoarchean greenstone belts and the youngest events are recorded locally by Paleozoic crystallization of uraninite in repeatedly reactivated fault zones. The Neoarchean Karelian craton was subjected to thermal reworking as the foreland terrain to the 1.9-1.8 Ga Svecofennian Orogeny, as demonstrated by resetting of K-Ar, Ar-Ar, Rb-Sr and locally Pb-Pb isotopic systems in feldspars and pyrite, both within gold deposits, and regionally. However, retention of Archean strain patterns and observations of the strain state of Proterozoifc dyke swarms indicate an essentially brittle response, with

  1. Social Determinants in Communication Events in a Small Bilingual Community in New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Joseph D.

    The purpose of this report is to present an outline of actual occurrences in communication and their social determinants in the small Spanish-English bilingual community of Los Ojos, New Mexico, with some emphasis on difference in occurrences as related to age. These generalizations are linked to past and current educational practices and social…

  2. Spectroscopic determination of thermal impulse in sub-second heating events using lanthanide-doped oxide precursors and phenomenological modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Benjamin R.; Gunawidjaja, Ray; Price, Patrick; Eilers, Hergen

    2016-08-01

    Using a mixture of crystalline-Ho:ZrO2, precursor-Dy:Y2O3, and precursor-Eu:ZrO2 nanoparticles we develop thermal impulse sensors capable of measuring equivalent isothermal temperatures and durations during a heating event, with response times of <100 ms, and a temperature range of at least 673 K to 1173 K. In order to determine the temperature and duration from the sensors after the heating event we measure the sensors' fluorescence spectrum, which is then compared with lab based calibration data. By using two precursor materials with different reaction kinetics we are able to extract both temperature and duration. Based on blind sample testing we find that the sensors and calculation method are accurate for measuring temperature and duration, but currently suffer a lack of precision due to difficulties in producing homogeneously heated samples.

  3. Determination of selenium at trace levels in geologic materials by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahlberg, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Low levels of selenium (0.1-500 ppm) in both organic and inorganic geologic materials can be semiquantitatively measured by isolating Se as a thin film for presentation to an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Suitably pulverized samples are first digested by fusing with a mixture of Na2CO3 and Na2O2. The fusion cake is dissolved in distilled water, buffered with NH4Cl, and filtered to remove Si and the R2O3 group. A carrier solution of Na2TeO4, plus solid KI, hydrazine sulfate and Na2SO3, is added to the filtrate. The solution is then vacuum-filtered through a 0.45-??m pore-size filter disc. The filter, with the thin film of precipitate, is supported between two sheets of Mylar?? film for analysis. Good agreement is shown between data reported in this study and literature values reported by epithermal neutron-activation analysis and spectrofluorimetry. The method can be made quantitative by utilizing a secondary precipitation to assure complete recovery of the Se. The X-ray method offers fast turn-around time and a reasonably high production rate. ?? 1981.

  4. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory : determination of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon by wet-chemical oxidation and infrared spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkhardt, Mark R.; Kammer, James A.; Jha, Virendra K.; O'Mara-Lopez, Peggy G.; Woodworth, Mark T.

    1997-01-01

    Precision and accuracy results are described for the determination of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon (SOC) by silver-filter filtration, wet-chemical oxidation, and infrared determination of hte resulting carbon dioxide (CO2) used at the U.S. Geological Survey's nationalWater Quality Laboratory. An aliquot of raw water isfiltered through a 0.45-micrometer silver filter. The trapped organic material is oxidized using phosphoric acid and potassium persulfate in a scaled glass ampule,and the rseulting CO2 is measured by an infrared CO2 detector. The amount of CO3 is proportional to the concentration of chemically oxidizable nonpurgeable organic carbon in the sample. The SOC method detection limit for routine analysis is 0.2 milligram per liter. The average percent recovery is 97.1 percent and the average standard deviation is 11 percent.

  5. Methods for probabilistic assessments of geologic hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    Although risk analysis today is considered to include three separate aspects: (1) identifying sources of risk, (2) estimating probabilities quantitatively, and (3) evaluating consequences of risk, here, only estimation of probabilities for natural geologic events, processes, and phenomena is addressed. Ideally, evaluation of potential future hazards includes an objective determination of probabilities that has been derived from past occurrences of identical events or components contributing to complex processes or phenomena. In practice, however, data which would permit objective estimation of those probabilities of interest may not be adequate, or may not even exist. Another problem that arises normally, regardless of the extent of data, is that risk assessments involve estimating extreme values. Rarely are extreme values accurately predictable even when an empirical frequency distribution is established well by data. In the absence of objective methods for estimating probabilities of natural events or processes, subjective probabilities for the hazard must be established through Bayesian methods, expert opinion, or Delphi methods. Uncertainty of every probability determination must be stated for each component of an event, process, or phenomenon. These uncertainties also must be propagated through the quantitative analysis so that a realistic estimate of total uncertainty can be associated with each final probability estimate for a geologic hazard.

  6. The frequency and duration of Salmonella–macrophage adhesion events determines infection efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Achouri, Sarra; Wright, John A.; Evans, Lewis; Macleod, Charlotte; Fraser, Gillian; Cicuta, Pietro; Bryant, Clare E.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica causes a range of important diseases in humans and a in a variety of animal species. The ability of bacteria to adhere to, invade and survive within host cells plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Salmonella infections. In systemic salmonellosis, macrophages constitute a niche for the proliferation of bacteria within the host organism. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is flagellated and the frequency with which this bacterium collides with a cell is important for infection efficiency. We investigated how bacterial motility affects infection efficiency, using a combination of population-level macrophage infection experiments and direct imaging of single-cell infection events, comparing wild-type and motility mutants. Non-motile and aflagellate bacterial strains, in contrast to wild-type bacteria, collide less frequently with macrophages, are in contact with the cell for less time and infect less frequently. Run-biased Salmonella also collide less frequently with macrophages but maintain contact with macrophages for a longer period of time than wild-type strains and infect the cells more readily. Our results suggest that uptake of S. Typhimurium by macrophages is dependent upon the duration of contact time of the bacterium with the cell, in addition to the frequency with which the bacteria collide with the cell. PMID:25533091

  7. Ages of igneous and hydrothermal events in the Round Mountain and Manhattan gold districts, Nye County, Nevada.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shawe, D.R.; Marvin, R.F.; Andriessen, P.A.M.; Mehnert, H.H.; Merritt, V.M.

    1986-01-01

    Isotopic age determinations of rocks and minerals separated from them are applied to refining and correlating the geological history of igneous and mineralizing events in a part of the Basin and Range province. -G.J.N.

  8. Mathematical Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCammon, Richard B.

    1979-01-01

    The year 1978 marked a continued trend toward practical applications in mathematical geology. Developments included work in interactive computer graphics, factor analysis, the vanishing tons problem, universal kriging, and resource estimating. (BB)

  9. Practical Geology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Ian

    1975-01-01

    Geology is an ideal subject in which to introduce the "discovery" method of learning. Available from: National Institute of Adult Education (England and Wales), 35 Queen Anne St., London W1M OBL England. (BP)

  10. Engineering Geology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Fitzhugh T.

    1974-01-01

    Briefly reviews the increasing application of geologic principles, techniques and data to engineering practices in the areas of land use and zoning controls, resource management energy programs and other fields. (BR)

  11. MGR External Events Hazards Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    L. Booth

    1999-11-06

    The purpose and objective of this analysis is to apply an external events Hazards Analysis (HA) to the License Application Design Selection Enhanced Design Alternative 11 [(LADS EDA II design (Reference 8.32))]. The output of the HA is called a Hazards List (HL). This analysis supersedes the external hazards portion of Rev. 00 of the PHA (Reference 8.1). The PHA for internal events will also be updated to the LADS EDA II design but under a separate analysis. Like the PHA methodology, the HA methodology provides a systematic method to identify potential hazards during the 100-year Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) operating period updated to reflect the EDA II design. The resulting events on the HL are candidates that may have potential radiological consequences as determined during Design Basis Events (DBEs) analyses. Therefore, the HL that results from this analysis will undergo further screening and analysis based on the criteria that apply during the performance of DBE analyses.

  12. Global sedimentary geology program

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, R.N.; Clifton, H.E.; Weimer, R.J.

    1986-07-01

    The Society of Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists, in collaboration with the International Association of Sedimentologists and the International Union of Geological Sciences Committee on Sedimentology, is developing a new international study under the provisional title of Global Sedimentary Geology Program (GSGP). Initially, three research themes are being considered: (1) event stratigraphy-the documentation of examples of mass extinctions, eustatic fluctuations in sea level, major episodes of volcanisms, and changes in ocean composition; (2) facies models in time and space-an expansion of the existing data base of examples of facies models (e.G., deltas, fluvial deposits, and submarine fans) and global-scale study of the persistence of facies at various times in geologic history; and (3) sedimentary indices of paleogeography and tectonics-the use of depositional facies and faunas in paleogeography and in assessing the timing, locus, and characteristics of tectonism. Plans are being developed to organize pilot projects in each of these themes.

  13. Late Quaternary environmental and human events at En Gedi, reflected by the geology and archaeology of the Moringa Cave (Dead Sea area, Israel)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisker, Sorin; Porat, Roi; Davidovich, Uri; Eshel, Hanan; Lauritzen, Stein-Erik; Frumkin, Amos

    2007-09-01

    The Moringa Cave within Pleistocene sediments in the En Gedi area of the Dead Sea Fault Escarpment contains a sequence of various Pleistocene lacustrine deposits associated with higher-than-today lake levels at the Dead Sea basin. In addition it contains Chalcolithic remains and 5th century BC burials attributed to the Persian period, cemented and covered by Late Holocene travertine flowstone. These deposits represent a chain of Late Pleistocene and Holocene interconnected environmental and human events, echoing broader scale regional and global climate events. A major shift between depositional environments is associated with the rapid fall of Lake Lisan level during the latest Pleistocene. This exposed the sediments, providing for cave formation processes sometime between the latest Pleistocene (ca. 15 ka) and the Middle Holocene (ca. 4500 BC), eventually leading to human use of the cave. The Chalcolithic use of the cave can be related to a relatively moist desert environment, probably related to a shift in the location of the northern boundary of the Saharo-Arabian desert belt. The travertine layer was U-Th dated 2.46 ± 0.10 to 2.10 ± 0.04 ka, in agreement with the archaeological finds from the Persian period. Together with the inner consistency of the dating results, this strongly supports the reliability of the radiometric ages. The 2.46-2.10 ka travertine deposition within the presently dry cave suggests a higher recharge of the Judean Desert aquifer, correlative to a rising Dead Sea towards the end of the 1st millennium BC. This suggests a relatively moist local and regional climate facilitating human habitation of the desert.

  14. Carbonate "Clumped" Isotope Determination of Seawater Temperature During the End-Triassic Extinction Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammariello, R. T., Jr.; Petryshyn, V. A.; Ibarra, Y.; Greene, S. E.; Corsetti, F. A.; Bottjer, D. J.; Tripati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Stromatolites are laminated sedimentary structures that are commonly thought to be created by cyanobacteria, either through the trapping and binding of sediment, or through metabolically-induced precipitation. However, stromatolite formation is poorly understood. In general, stromatolite abundance was higher in the Proterozoic than the Phanerozoic, but notable increases in stromatolite abundance occur in association with Phanerozoic mass extinction events. Here, we focus on stromatolites from the latest Triassic Cotham Marble (United Kingdom) that are associated with the extinction interval. The end-Triassic mass extinction is coincident with large-scale volcanism in the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) and the associated breakup of Pangea. Some hypothesize that CAMP-associated increases in atmospheric CO2 led to a rise in global temperatures and ocean acidification that caused or enhanced the extinction. In order to quantify the role of climate change with respect to the end-Triassic mass extinction, we applied the carbonate "clumped" isotope paleothermometer to the well-preserved Cotham Marble stromatolites. The stromatolites were deposited in the shallow Tethys Sea, and today occur in several localities across the southwestern UK. The stromatolites alternate on the cm scale between laminated and dendrolitic microstructures and each was microdrilled for clumped isotope analysis. The two microstructures display different temperatures of formation, where the dendrolitic portions apparently grew under cooler conditions than laminated layers, and younger layers grew in cooler conditions than older layers. Our results suggest that temperature fluctuated and potentially trended towards amelioration of the warm temperatures during the deposition of the Cotham Marble.

  15. RETRIEVAL EVENTS EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    T. Wilson

    1999-11-12

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate impacts to the retrieval concept presented in the Design Analysis ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy'' (Reference 6), from abnormal events based on Design Basis Events (DBE) and Beyond Design Basis Events (BDBE) as defined in two recent analyses: (1) DBE/Scenario Analysis for Preclosure Repository Subsurface Facilities (Reference 4); and (2) Preliminary Preclosure Design Basis Event Calculations for the Monitored Geologic Repository (Reference 5) The objective of this task is to determine what impacts the DBEs and BDBEs have on the equipment developed for retrieval. The analysis lists potential impacts and recommends changes to be analyzed in subsequent design analyses for developed equipment, or recommend where additional equipment may be needed, to allow retrieval to be performed in all DBE or BDBE situations. This analysis supports License Application design and therefore complies with the requirements of Systems Description Document input criteria comparison as presented in Section 7, Conclusions. In addition, the analysis discusses the impacts associated with not using concrete inverts in the emplacement drifts. The ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy'' analysis was based on a concrete invert configuration in the emplacement drift. The scope of the analysis, as presented in ''Development Plan for Retrieval Events Evaluation'' (Reference 3) includes evaluation and criteria of the following: Impacts to retrieval from the emplacement drift based on DBE/BDBEs, and changes to the invert configuration for the preclosure period. Impacts to retrieval from the main drifts based on DBE/BDBEs for the preclosure period.

  16. Tsunami geology in paleoseismology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yuichi Nishimura,; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    The 2004 Indian Ocean and 2011 Tohoku-oki disasters dramatically demonstrated the destructiveness and deadliness of tsunamis. For the assessment of future risk posed by tsunamis it is necessary to understand past tsunami events. Recent work on tsunami deposits has provided new information on paleotsunami events, including their recurrence interval and the size of the tsunamis (e.g. [187–189]). Tsunamis are observed not only on the margin of oceans but also in lakes. The majority of tsunamis are generated by earthquakes, but other events that displace water such as landslides and volcanic eruptions can also generate tsunamis. These non-earthquake tsunamis occur less frequently than earthquake tsunamis; it is, therefore, very important to find and study geologic evidence for past eruption and submarine landslide triggered tsunami events, as their rare occurrence may lead to risks being underestimated. Geologic investigations of tsunamis have historically relied on earthquake geology. Geophysicists estimate the parameters of vertical coseismic displacement that tsunami modelers use as a tsunami's initial condition. The modelers then let the simulated tsunami run ashore. This approach suffers from the relationship between the earthquake and seafloor displacement, the pertinent parameter in tsunami generation, being equivocal. In recent years, geologic investigations of tsunamis have added sedimentology and micropaleontology, which focus on identifying and interpreting depositional and erosional features of tsunamis. For example, coastal sediment may contain deposits that provide important information on past tsunami events [190, 191]. In some cases, a tsunami is recorded by a single sand layer. Elsewhere, tsunami deposits can consist of complex layers of mud, sand, and boulders, containing abundant stratigraphic evidence for sediment reworking and redeposition. These onshore sediments are geologic evidence for tsunamis and are called ‘tsunami deposits’ (Figs. 26

  17. Discrimination Analysis of Earthquakes and Man-Made Events Using ARMA Coefficients Determination by Artificial Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    AllamehZadeh, Mostafa

    2011-12-15

    A Quadratic Neural Networks (QNNs) model has been developed for identifying seismic source classification problem at regional distances using ARMA coefficients determination by Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). We have devised a supervised neural system to discriminate between earthquakes and chemical explosions with filter coefficients obtained by windowed P-wave phase spectra (15 s). First, we preprocess the recording's signals to cancel out instrumental and attenuation site effects and obtain a compact representation of seismic records. Second, we use a QNNs system to obtain ARMA coefficients for feature extraction in the discrimination problem. The derived coefficients are then applied to the neural system to train and classification. In this study, we explore the possibility of using single station three-component (3C) covariance matrix traces from a priori-known explosion sites (learning) for automatically recognizing subsequent explosions from the same site. The results have shown that this feature extraction gives the best classifier for seismic signals and performs significantly better than other classification methods. The events have been tested, which include 36 chemical explosions at the Semipalatinsk test site in Kazakhstan and 61 earthquakes (mb = 5.0-6.5) recorded by the Iranian National Seismic Network (INSN). The 100% correct decisions were obtained between site explosions and some of non-site events. The above approach to event discrimination is very flexible as we can combine several 3C stations.

  18. A comparison of Flux transfer events' motion determined by deHoffmann-Teller technique with the Cooling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias Silveira, M. V.; Sibeck, D. G.; Gonzalez, W.; Koga, D.

    2015-12-01

    Flux transfer events (FTEs) are considered as a result of transient magnetic reconnection and are often observed in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetopause. The FTEs are responsible for transfer of mass, energy and momentum between solar wind and magnetosphere. According to FTE generation models and in situ observations, FTEs are formed in the subsolar region when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is southward while for northward IMF they should be formed in the polar cap regions. In the present study it is analyzed 58 FTE events observed by the THEMIS spacecraft. First of all, the deHoffmann-Teller technique is employed to determine the local FTE velocity and direction. Then, these parameters (velocity and direction) are compared with those predicted by the Cooling model which has largely been employed to estimate the motion of reconnected flux tubes over a modeled magnetopause under specific solar wind conditions. The calculated deHoffmann-Teller velocity and direction indicate that FTEs observed at the flanks of magnetosphere (|YGSM|≥10 Re) move antisunward and dawn/duskward. For intermediate longitudes (|YGSM|<10 Re) a combination of dusk/dawnward and southward motions is found for the present study. The comparison between the calculated FTEs' velocity/direction and those predicted by the Cooling model presents a good agreement. It is also found that 12 FTE events were observed in the equatorial region during northward IMF.

  19. Event-by-event fluctuations in a perturbative QCD + saturation + hydrodynamics model: Determining QCD matter shear viscosity in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, H.; Eskola, K. J.; Paatelainen, R.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce an event-by-event perturbative-QCD + saturation + hydro ("EKRT") framework for ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions, where we compute the produced fluctuating QCD-matter energy densities from next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD using a saturation conjecture to control soft-particle production and describe the space-time evolution of the QCD matter with dissipative fluid dynamics, event by event. We perform a simultaneous comparison of the centrality dependence of hadronic multiplicities, transverse momentum spectra, and flow coefficients of the azimuth-angle asymmetries against the LHC and RHIC measurements. We compare also the computed event-by-event probability distributions of relative fluctuations of elliptic flow and event-plane angle correlations with the experimental data from Pb +Pb collisions at the LHC. We show how such a systematic multienergy and multiobservable analysis tests the initial-state calculation and the applicability region of hydrodynamics and, in particular, how it constrains the temperature dependence of the shear viscosity-to-entropy ratio of QCD matter in its different phases in a remarkably consistent manner.

  20. Global geological map of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Head, James W.

    2011-10-01

    The surface area of Venus (∼460×106 km2) is ∼90% of that of the Earth. Using Magellan radar image and altimetry data, supplemented by Venera-15/16 radar images, we compiled a global geologic map of Venus at a scale of 1:10 M. We outline the history of geological mapping of the Earth and planets to illustrate the importance of utilizing the dual stratigraphic classification approach to geological mapping. Using this established approach, we identify 13 distinctive units on the surface of Venus and a series of structures and related features. We present the history and evolution of the definition and characterization of these units, explore and assess alternate methods and approaches that have been suggested, and trace the sequence of mapping from small areas to regional and global scales. We outline the specific defining nature and characteristics of these units, map their distribution, and assess their stratigraphic relationships. On the basis of these data, we then compare local and regional stratigraphic columns and compile a global stratigraphic column, defining rock-stratigraphic units, time-stratigraphic units, and geological time units. We use superposed craters, stratigraphic relationships and impact crater parabola degradation to assess the geologic time represented by the global stratigraphic column. Using the characteristics of these units, we interpret the geological processes that were responsible for their formation. On the basis of unit superposition and stratigraphic relationships, we interpret the sequence of events and processes recorded in the global stratigraphic column. The earliest part of the history of Venus (Pre-Fortunian) predates the observed surface geological features and units, although remnants may exist in the form of deformed rocks and minerals. We find that the observable geological history of Venus can be subdivided into three distinctive phases. The earlier phase (Fortunian Period, its lower stratigraphic boundary cannot be

  1. Determination of silver, bismuth, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in geologic materials by atomic absorption spectrometry with tricaprylylmethylammonium chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viets, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    Interferences commonly encountered in the determination of silver, bismuth, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc at crustal abundance levels are effectively eliminated using a rapid, sensitive, organic extraction technique. A potassium chlorate-hydrochloric acid digestion solubilizes the metals not tightly bound in the silicate lattice of rocks, soils, and stream sediments. The six metals are selectively extracted into a 10% Aliquat 336-MIBK organic phase in the presence of ascorbic acid and potassium iodide. Metals in the organic extract are determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry to the 0.02-ppm level for silver, cadmium, copper, and zinc and to the 0.2-ppm level for bismuth and lead with a maximum relative standard deviation of 18.8% for known reference samples. An additional hydrofluoric acid digestion may be used to determine metals substituted in the silicate lattice.

  2. Destination: Geology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Louise

    2016-04-01

    "While we teach, we learn" (Roman philosopher Seneca) One of the most beneficial ways to remember a theory or concept is to explain it to someone else. The offer of fieldwork and visits to exciting destinations is arguably the easiest way to spark a students' interest in any subject. Geology at A-Level (age 16-18) in the United Kingdom incorporates significant elements of field studies into the curriculum with many students choosing the subject on this basis and it being a key factor in consolidating student knowledge and understanding. Geology maintains a healthy annual enrollment with interest in the subject increasing in recent years. However, it is important for educators not to loose sight of the importance of recruitment and retention of students. Recent flexibility in the subject content of the UK curriculum in secondary schools has provided an opportunity to teach the basic principles of the subject to our younger students and fieldwork provides a valuable opportunity to engage with these students in the promotion of the subject. Promotion of the subject is typically devolved to senior students at Hessle High School and Sixth Form College, drawing on their personal experiences to engage younger students. Prospective students are excited to learn from a guest speaker, so why not use our most senior students to engage and promote the subject rather than their normal subject teacher? A-Level geology students embarking on fieldwork abroad, understand their additional responsibility to promote the subject and share their understanding of the field visit. They will typically produce a series of lessons and activities for younger students using their newly acquired knowledge. Senior students also present to whole year groups in seminars, sharing knowledge of the location's geology and raising awareness of the exciting destinations offered by geology. Geology fieldwork is always planned, organised and led by the member of staff to keep costs low, with recent visits

  3. Confirmation of the Planetary Microlensing Signal and Star and Planet Mass Determinations for Event OGLE-2005-BLG-169

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, D. P.; Bhattacharya, A.; Anderson, J.; Bond, I. A.; Anderson, N.; Barry, R.; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B. S.; Gilbert, E.; Gould, A.; Pfeifle, R.; Pogge, R. W.; Suzuki, D.; Terry, S.; Udalski, A.

    2015-08-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) observations of the source and lens stars for planetary microlensing event OGLE-2005-BLG-169, which confirm the relative proper motion prediction due to the planetary light curve signal observed for this event. This (and the companion Keck result) provide the first confirmation of a planetary microlensing signal, for which the deviation was only 2%. The follow-up observations determine the flux of the planetary host star in multiple passbands and remove light curve model ambiguity caused by sparse sampling of part of the light curve. This leads to a precise determination of the properties of the OGLE-2005-BLG-169Lb planetary system. Combining the constraints from the microlensing light curve with the photometry and astrometry of the HST/WFC3 data, we find star and planet masses of {M}*=0.69+/- 0.02{M}⊙ and {m}{{p}}=14.1+/- 0.9{M}\\oplus . The planetary microlens system is located toward the Galactic bulge at a distance of {D}L=4.1+/- 0.4 kpc and the projected star-planet separation is {a}\\perp =3.5+/- 0.3 AU, corresponding to a semimajor axis of a={4.0}-0.6+2.2 AU.

  4. Determination of gold, indium, tellurium and thallium in the same sample digest of geological materials by atomic-absorption spectroscopy and two-step solvent extraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubert, A.E.; Chao, T.T.

    1985-01-01

    A rock, soil, or stream-sediment sample is decomposed with hydrofluoric acid, aqua regia, and hydrobromic acid-bromine solution. Gold, thallium, indium and tellurium are separated and concentrated from the sample digest by a two-step MIBK extraction at two concentrations of hydrobromic add. Gold and thallium are first extracted from 0.1M hydrobromic acid medium, then indium and tellurium are extracted from 3M hydrobromic acid in the presence of ascorbic acid to eliminate iron interference. The elements are then determined by flame atomic-absorption spectrophotometry. The two-step solvent extraction can also be used in conjunction with electrothermal atomic-absorption methods to lower the detection limits for all four metals in geological materials. ?? 1985.

  5. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of methylene blue active substances by spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkhardt, Mark R.; Cinotto, Pete J.; Frahm, Galen W.; Woodworth, Mark T.; Pritt, Jeffrey W.

    1995-01-01

    A method for the determination of methylene blue active substances in whole-water samples by liquid-liquid extraction and spectrophotometric detection is described. Sulfate and sulfonate-based surfectants are reacted with methylene blue to form a blue-colored complex. The complex is extracted into chloroform, back-washed with an acidified phosphate-based buffer solution, and measured against external standards with a probe spectrophotometer. The method detection limt for routine analysis is 0.02 milligram per liter. The precision is plus/minus 10 percent relative standard deviation. The positive bias from nitrate and chloride and U.S. Geological Survey method O-3111-83 for methylene blue active substances is minized by adding a back-washing step.

  6. Intrusive rocks in the ophiolitic mélange of Crete - Witnesses to a Late Cretaceous thermal event of enigmatic geological position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langosch, Alexander; Seidel, Eberhard; Stosch, Heinz-Günter; Okrusch, Martin

    The ophiolitic mélange in the uppermost tectonic unit of the Cretan nappe pile contains crystalline slices which consist of a low-pressure/high-temperature metamorphic sequence and synmetamorphic intrusions, ranging in composition from diorite to granite. The plutonic rocks conform to two different igneous suites, dominated by diorites in eastern, and granites in central Crete, displaying I-type and A-type characters, respectively. Some of the granites from central Crete are classified as transitional I/S-type. They are closely associated with migmatitic paragneisses. Based on major and trace element, REE, Sr- and Nd-isotope geochemistry, the mafic members of both suites are derived from a depleted mantle source. The higher concentrations of P and Ti in the mafic members of the igneous suite in central Crete and the deviant trend of the whole suite may be explained by a different mantle source or a lower degree of partial melting. In both suites, magmatic evolution was governed by fractional crystallization of amphibole/clinopyroxene, plagioclase and minor phases. In addition, mixing or mingling of compositionally different magmas is indicated for the intrusive suite of eastern Crete whereas in central Crete the magma composition was at least partially modified through assimilation of (meta)pelites. The geochemical results suggest that the plutonic rocks formed in a supra-subduction zone setting. However, a formation during continental lithospheric extension cannot be ruled out. Published and new Rb-Sr and K-Ar dates on amphiboles and biotites from intrusive rocks and their metamorphic country rocks show that the peak of the low-P/high-T metamorphism and the intrusion of the two igneous suites testify to the same thermal event of Late Cretaceous age. A similar Late Cretaceous association of metamorphic and plutonic rocks has been described from the uppermost tectonic unit in the Attic-Cycladic Crystalline Complex. Together with the Cretan occurrences, they form a

  7. Two Cenozoic tectonic events of N-S and E-W extension in the Lhasa Terrane: Evidence from geology and geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Feng; Xu, Ji-Feng; Chen, Jian-Lin; Wu, Jian-Bin; Zeng, Yun-Chuan; Xiong, Qiu-Wei; Chen, Xue-Feng; Yu, Hong-Xia

    2016-02-01

    Cenozoic active structures in the Tibetan Plateau are mainly regional N-S trending extensional faults and grabens, and E-W trending extensional tracks that are related to the transition from syn- to post-collision between India and Asia. E-W trending tracks are parallel to the direction of Neo-Tethyan oceanic convergence and consist of extensional volcanic-sedimentary basins and magmatic dykes in the southern Lhasa Terrane, Tibet. N-S trending tracks comprise faults and grabens, which are widely developed in Tibet. It remains unknown how and when the geodynamic transition from E-W to N-S trending tectonic tracks occurred. This study describes both E-W and N-S trending tectonic tracks identified at Dazi area of southern Lhasa Terrane, where E-W trending mafic dykes intruded a granitoid and late-stage N-S trending felsic dykes cut across E-W trending mafic dykes. Zircons from four granitoid samples yield consistent crystallization ages of ca. 60 Ma and positive εHf(t) values (~+ 9). An altered dioritic vein, which cuts the mafic dykes, yields an age of ca. 53 Ma. These new dating results indicate that E-W trending dykes, which formed due to regional N-S extension, were emplaced between 60 and 53 Ma. In addition, two N-S trending monzonitic porphyritic dykes, which cut the mafic dykes, yield U-Pb zircon ages of ca. 17 Ma with moderate positive εHf(t) values (+ 3 to + 9.6), as well as a NNE-SSW trending quartz monzonitic dyke, which cuts all other types of dykes, yields U-Pb ages of ca. 13 Ma. This suggests that E-W extension took place between 17 and 13 Ma. These results, in combination with existing age data for Gangdese granitoids and mafic magmatism, indicate the occurrence of two major extensional events at 60-53 Ma and 17-13 Ma. In turn, this implies that the transition from E-W to N-S trending tectonic and the onset of E-W extension occurred at ca. 17 Ma or slightly earlier. Paleocene granitoids have geochemical characteristics that are indicative of both

  8. Teaching about time by understanding Geologic Time Scales: The Geological Society of America Geologic Time Scale and its history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissman, J. W.; Walker, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Geologic time scales, of one form or another, are used in most undergraduate geosciences courses, even including introductory physical geology or equivalent. However, satisfactory discussions of how geologic time scales originated, and how they have evolved to modern versions, are far too often conveniently or inconveniently left out of classroom discussions. Yet it is these kinds of discussions that have the potential of solidifying student appreciation of deep time and rates of geologic processes. We use the history and development of the Geological Society of America Geologic Time Scale, which reflects major developments in the fields of stratigraphy, geochronology, magnetic polarity stratigraphy, astrochronology, and chemostratigraphy, as a focus of how specific details of time scales can be used to teach about time. Advances in all of these fields have allowed many parts of the time scale to be calibrated to precisions approaching less than 0.05 %. Notable time intervals for which collaborative, multifaceted efforts have led to dramatic improvements in our understanding of the character and temporal resolution of key evolutionary events, in both marine and terrestrial environments, include the Triassic-Jurassic, Permo-Triassic, and Neoproterozoic-Phanerozoic boundaries (or transitions). Many of the details, but certainly not all, can be incorporated in discussions of how we know about geologic time in the classroom. For example, we presently understand that both the end-Permian ecological crisis and the biostratigraphic Permian-Triassic boundary, as calibrated by conodonts, lie within a ca. 700 ka long normal polarity chron. The reverse to normal polarity transition at the beginning of this chron is ca. 100 ka earlier than the ecological crisis and thus slightly older than the current estimate, based on high precision U-Pb zircon age determinations, of ca. 252.4 Ma for the Permian-Triassic boundary. This polarity transition occurred during the early part of

  9. Determination of arsenic in geological materials by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry after solvent extraction and deposition on a filter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubert, A.E.

    1983-01-01

    Rock, soil, or sediment samples are decomposed with a mixture of nitric and sulphuric adds. After reduction from arsenic(V) with ammonium thiosulphate, arsenic(III) is extracted as the chlorocomplex into benzene from a sulphuric-hydrochloric acid medium. The benzene solution is transferred onto a filter-paper disc impregnated with a solution of sodium bicarbonate and potassium sodium tartrate, and the benzene allowed to evaporate. The arsenic present is determined by X-ray fluorescence. In a 0.5-g sample, 1-1000 ppm of arsenic can be determined. The close proximity of the lead L?? peak (2?? 48.73??), to the arsenic K?? peak (2?? 48.83??) does not cause any interference, because lead is not extracted under the experimental conditions. Arsenic values obtained are in agreement with those reported for various reference samples. ?? 1983.

  10. Determination of platinum and palladium in geological materials by neutron-activation analysis after fire-assay preconcentration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowe, J.J.; Simon, F.O.

    1971-01-01

    Fire-asay preconcentration followed by neutron-activation analysis permits the determination of as little as 0.5 ppM of platinum and 0.5 ppM of palladium on a 20-g sample. Platinum and palladium are separated with carriers and beta-counted. Results for the platinum and palladium content of seven U.S.G.S. standard rocks are presented. ?? 1971.

  11. The siting record: An account of the programs of federal agencies and events that have led to the selection of a potential site for a geologic respository for high-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Lomenick, T.F.

    1996-03-01

    This record of siting a geologic repository for high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) and spent fuel describes the many investigations that culminated on December 22, 1987 in the designation of Yucca Mountain (YM), as the site to undergo detailed geologic characterization. It recounts the important issues and events that have been instrumental in shaping the course of siting over the last three and one half decades. In this long task, which was initiated in 1954, more than 60 regions, areas, or sites involving nine different rock types have been investigated. This effort became sharply focused in 1983 with the identification of nine potentially suitable sites for the first repository. From these nine sites, five were subsequently nominated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as suitable for characterization and then, in 1986, as required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), three of these five were recommended to the President as candidates for site characterization. President Reagan approved the recommendation on May 28, 1986. DOE was preparing site characterization plans for the three candidate sites, namely Deaf Smith County, Texas; Hanford Site, Washington; and YM. As a consequence of the 1987 Amendment to the NWPA, only the latter was authorized to undergo detailed characterization. A final Site Characterization Plan for Yucca Mountain was published in 1988. Prior to 1954, there was no program for the siting of disposal facilities for high-level waste (HLW). In the 1940s and 1950s, the volume of waste, which was small and which resulted entirely from military weapons and research programs, was stored as a liquid in large steel tanks buried at geographically remote government installations principally in Washington and Tennessee.

  12. Theoretical geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikeš, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Theoretical geology Present day geology is mostly empirical of nature. I claim that geology is by nature complex and that the empirical approach is bound to fail. Let's consider the input to be the set of ambient conditions and the output to be the sedimentary rock record. I claim that the output can only be deduced from the input if the relation from input to output be known. The fundamental question is therefore the following: Can one predict the output from the input or can one predict the behaviour of a sedimentary system? If one can, than the empirical/deductive method has changes, if one can't than that method is bound to fail. The fundamental problem to solve is therefore the following: How to predict the behaviour of a sedimentary system? It is interesting to observe that this question is never asked and many a study is conducted by the empirical/deductive method; it seems that the empirical method has been accepted as being appropriate without question. It is, however, easy to argument that a sedimentary system is by nature complex and that several input parameters vary at the same time and that they can create similar output in the rock record. It follows trivially from these first principles that in such a case the deductive solution cannot be unique. At the same time several geological methods depart precisely from the assumption, that one particular variable is the dictator/driver and that the others are constant, even though the data do not support such an assumption. The method of "sequence stratigraphy" is a typical example of such a dogma. It can be easily argued that all the interpretation resulting from a method that is built on uncertain or wrong assumptions is erroneous. Still, this method has survived for many years, nonwithstanding all the critics it has received. This is just one example of the present day geological world and is not unique. Even the alternative methods criticising sequence stratigraphy actually depart from the same

  13. Determination of halogens, with special reference to iodine, in geological and biological samples using pyrohydrolysis for preparation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and ion chromatography for measurement.

    PubMed

    Schnetger, B; Muramatsu, Y

    1996-11-01

    A method for determining iodine, bromine, chlorine and fluorine in geological and biological materials is described. In a quartz tube, solid material was heated to 1100 degrees C under a wet oxygen flow (pyrohydrolysis). By this process the halogens (I, Br, Cl, F) were separated from the matrix and then collected in a receiver solution. The chemical yield of iodine was determined by a radioactive tracer. ICP-MS and ion chromatographic measurements were used for the determination of the halogens. The method was optimized by investigating different experimental conditions. All four halogens can be trapped in the receiver solution from one combustion procedure. Precision and accuracy were evaluated by the analysis of environmental standard reference materials (rock, soil, milk, leaves, marine tissue). The concentrations in the materials analysed were in the ranges 0.006-50 mg kg-1 for I, 0.06-1300 mg kg-1 for Br, 50-1100 mg kg-1 for F and 400-11000 mg kg-1 for Cl. The lower values represent the practical detection limit of this method. The results obtained by the proposed method and the certified values are in good agreement.

  14. Determination of halogens, with special reference to iodine, in geological and biological samples using pyrohydrolysis for preparation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and ion chromatography for measurement.

    PubMed

    Schnetger, B; Muramatsu, Y

    1996-11-01

    A method for determining iodine, bromine, chlorine and fluorine in geological and biological materials is described. In a quartz tube, solid material was heated to 1100 degrees C under a wet oxygen flow (pyrohydrolysis). By this process the halogens (I, Br, Cl, F) were separated from the matrix and then collected in a receiver solution. The chemical yield of iodine was determined by a radioactive tracer. ICP-MS and ion chromatographic measurements were used for the determination of the halogens. The method was optimized by investigating different experimental conditions. All four halogens can be trapped in the receiver solution from one combustion procedure. Precision and accuracy were evaluated by the analysis of environmental standard reference materials (rock, soil, milk, leaves, marine tissue). The concentrations in the materials analysed were in the ranges 0.006-50 mg kg-1 for I, 0.06-1300 mg kg-1 for Br, 50-1100 mg kg-1 for F and 400-11000 mg kg-1 for Cl. The lower values represent the practical detection limit of this method. The results obtained by the proposed method and the certified values are in good agreement. PMID:8952450

  15. Simplified method for the determination of Ru, Pd, Re, Os, Ir and Pt in chromitites and other geological materials by isotope dilution ICP-MS and acid digestion.

    PubMed

    Meisel, T; Moser, J; Fellner, N; Wegscheider, W; Schoenberg, R

    2001-03-01

    A method for the determination of low Ru, Pd, Re, Os, Ir and Pt abundances in geological reference materials by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after acid digestion in a high pressure asher (HPA-S) is presented. The digestion technique is similar to that using Carius tubes but easier to handle and reaches higher temperatures. Osmium can be determined as OsO4 with ICP-MS directly after digestion through a sparging technique. The remaining elements are preconcentrated by means of anion column chromatography. The resin is digested directly without elution leading to high yields but this causes problems if Zr is present at higher levels in the silicate rich materials. The analytical results for international platinum group element (PGE) reference materials, chromitite CHR-Bkg, basalt TDB-1 and gabbro WGB-1, are presented and compared with literature data, demonstrating the validity of the described method. Although higher in concentration, PGEs determined for reference material WGB-1 were worse than for TDB-1 indicating a more inhomogeneous distribution of the platinum group mineral phases. The low PGE abundance chromitite standard, CHR-Bkg, is likely to be homogeneous for Ru, Re, Os and Ir and is recommended as a reference material for the study of chromitites. Detection limits (3s x total procedure blank) range from 0.012 ng (Re and Os) to 0.77 ng (Pt), which could be further improved by applying higher quality acids.

  16. Simplified method for the determination of Ru, Pd, Re, Os, Ir and Pt in chromitites and other geological materials by isotope dilution ICP-MS and acid digestion.

    PubMed

    Meisel, T; Moser, J; Fellner, N; Wegscheider, W; Schoenberg, R

    2001-03-01

    A method for the determination of low Ru, Pd, Re, Os, Ir and Pt abundances in geological reference materials by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after acid digestion in a high pressure asher (HPA-S) is presented. The digestion technique is similar to that using Carius tubes but easier to handle and reaches higher temperatures. Osmium can be determined as OsO4 with ICP-MS directly after digestion through a sparging technique. The remaining elements are preconcentrated by means of anion column chromatography. The resin is digested directly without elution leading to high yields but this causes problems if Zr is present at higher levels in the silicate rich materials. The analytical results for international platinum group element (PGE) reference materials, chromitite CHR-Bkg, basalt TDB-1 and gabbro WGB-1, are presented and compared with literature data, demonstrating the validity of the described method. Although higher in concentration, PGEs determined for reference material WGB-1 were worse than for TDB-1 indicating a more inhomogeneous distribution of the platinum group mineral phases. The low PGE abundance chromitite standard, CHR-Bkg, is likely to be homogeneous for Ru, Re, Os and Ir and is recommended as a reference material for the study of chromitites. Detection limits (3s x total procedure blank) range from 0.012 ng (Re and Os) to 0.77 ng (Pt), which could be further improved by applying higher quality acids. PMID:11284333

  17. Geologic Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albritton, Claude C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the historical development of the concept of geologic time. Develops the topic by using the major discoveries of geologists, beginning with Steno and following through to the discovery and use of radiometric dating. An extensive reference list is provided. (JM)

  18. City Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markle, Sandra

    1989-01-01

    This article provides information on the evolution of the building material, concrete, and suggests hands-on activities that allow students to experience concrete's qualities, test the heat absorbency of various ground surface materials, discover how an area's geology changes, and search for city fossils. A reproducible activity sheet is included.…

  19. In situ Th and U isotope determinations of low-U geological samples using laser ablation single-collector sector-field ICPMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertz-Kraus, R.; Jochum, K. P.; Sharp, W. D.; Stoll, B.; Weis, U.; Andreae, M. O.

    2009-12-01

    In situ spatially resolved U-series dating of geological and biological silicates, phosphates and carbonates (e.g., bone, speleothem, coral, and pedogenic silica and carbonate), facilitates measurement of the rates of natural processes (e.g., precipitation, crystallization) during the past 500,000 years. We present a LA-ICPMS technique for precise and accurate determination of Th and U isotopic ratios applicable to samples with U concentrations as low as 0.4 µg/g. Previously, in situ U-series determinations have been done using multi-collector ICPMS. We use a single-collector sector-field ICPMS connected to a 213 Nd:YAG laser ablation system. Precision and accuracy were determined for different matrices, such as synthetic NIST SRM 612, diverse silicate MPI-DING and USGS reference glasses, 91500 zircon, and a travertine previously analyzed by TIMS.230Th and 234U (~0.00001 to 0.0001 µg/g), required laser tracks up to 1800 µm long, rastering over a 400 x 400 µm square and measurement times of 5 to 25 minutes. We applied corrections for background (< 0.2 cps), the tails of 232Th, 235U and 238U peaks on 230Th and 234U (0.1 to 6 cps corresponding to a proportion of 0.3 to 30 % of the measured peak for 232Th and 238U concentrations of 0.003 to 10 µg/g), instrumental mass fractionation (~1 % per atomic mass unit), and differences in element sensitivity of Th and U using the certified values of the reference glasses.230Th/238U and 234U/238U determinations varies between 1.6 and 5 % depending on the extent of peak tailing corrections. We obtained 230Th/238U = 1.65 x 10-5 and 234U/238U = 5.29 x 10-5 for BCR-2G (1.7 µg/g U, 5.9 µg/g Th) which agree within 2 % and 4 %, respectively, with TIMS values (Matthews et al., 2008). For the travertine (2.5 µg/g U, 0.003 µg/g Th) the mean values for four scans (~0.14 mg sample each) are 230Th/238U = 2.47 x 10-5 and 234U/238U = 7.49 x 10-5, within 2 % of TIMS values. Matthews K. et al. (2008), Evaluation of Solid Geologic

  20. Guidelines for sample collecting and analytical methods used in the U.S. Geological Survey for determining chemical composition of coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, Vernon Emanuel; Huffman, Claude

    1976-01-01

    This report is intended to meet the many requests for information on current U.S. Geological Survey procedures in handling coal samples. In general, the exact type and number of samples of coal and associated rock to be collected are left to the best judgment of the geologist. Samples should be of unweathered coal or rock and representative of the bed or beds sampled; it is recommended that two channel samples, separated by 10 to 100 yards (10 to 100 metres) and weighing 4 to 5 pounds ( 1.8 to 2.3 kilograms) each, be collected of each 5 feet ( 1.5 metres) of vertical section. Care must be taken to avoid any sample contamination, and to record the exact locality, thickness, and stratigraphic information for each sample. Analytical methods are described for the determination of major, minor, and trace elements in coal. Hg, As, Sb, F, Se, U, and Th are determined in the raw coal, and the following 34 elements are determined after ashing the coal: Si, Al, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Fe (total), Cl, Ti, Mn, P, S (total), Cd, Li, Cu, Zn, Pb, B, Ba, Be, Co, Cr, Ga, La, Mo, Nb, Ni, Sc, Sr, Ti, V, Y, Yb, and Zr. The methods used to determine these elements include atomic absorption spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, optical emission spectroscopy, spectrophotometry, selective-ion electrode, and neutron activation analysis. A split of representative coal samples is submitted to the U.S. Bureau of Mines for proximate, ultimate, forms of sulfur, and Btu determinations.

  1. Direct determination of halogens in powdered geological and environmental samples using isotope dilution laser ablation ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulyga, Sergei F.; Heumann, Klaus G.

    2005-04-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma isotope dilution mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-IDMS) with a special laser ablation system for bulk analyses (LINA-Spark(TM)-Atomiser) was applied for direct determinations of chlorine, bromine, and iodine in rock and sediment samples. Special attention was focused on possible inter-halogen fractionations and analyte/spike isotope fractionations by using LA-ICP-MS and LA-ICP-IDMS, respectively. A variation of Br/Cl and I/Cl element intensity ratios by a factor of 1.3-3 was observed when changing the nebulizer gas flow rate in the range of 0.84-1.0 L min-1 and the laser power density in the range of 2-10 GW cm-2, respectively. When using an internal standard for halogen quantification in LA-ICP-MS, this inter-element fractionation can cause systematic errors, which can be avoided by applying the isotope dilution technique. However, at high laser power densities (>5.7 GW cm-2 for iodine and >4.0 GW cm-2 for bromine and chlorine) the corresponding measured isotope ratio of the isotope-diluted sample deviates significantly from the target value. Under optimised conditions concentrations in the range of 30 [mu]g g-1-16 × 103 [mu]g g-1 for chlorine, <2-140 [mu]g g-1 for bromine, and <0.1-31 [mu]g g-1 for iodine were determined by LA-ICP-IDMS in two sediment reference materials (SRM 1646, SRM 2704) and three rock reference samples (GS-N, Granite; BX-N, Bauxite; DT-N, Disthene), which have not been certified for these halogens. The sediment results agree well within the given uncertainties with indicative values by different methods and the results of the rock samples with those obtained by negative thermal ionisation isotope dilution mass spectrometry. The detection limits of LA-ICP-IDMS are 8 [mu]g g-1 for chlorine, 1.7 [mu]g g-1 for bromine, and 0.1 [mu]g g-1 for iodine.

  2. Three-dimensional geologic modeling to determine the spatial attributes of hydrocarbon contamination, Noval Facility Fuel Farm, El Centro, California

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.; Mutch, S.; Padgett, D.; Roche, L. )

    1994-04-01

    An investigation was conducted at the Naval Air Facility located in El Centro (NAFEC), to determine the vertical and horizontal extent of hydrocarbon contamination at the facilities fuel farm. The fuel products are the result of tank and pipeline leakage, past tank cleaning, and past disposal of fuel dispensing and filter cleaning practices. Subsurface soil and groundwater data was collected via soil borings, monitoring wells, and CPT probes. Soil, groundwater, and analytical data were integrated using the LYNX geoscience modeling system (GMS). Interactive sessions with the data visualizer helped guide the modeling and identify data gaps. Modeling results indicate a continuous surface confining clay layer to a depth of about 12 to 15 ft. Groundwater is confined beneath this clay layer and monitoring wells indicate about 3 to 5 ft of artesian head. Hydrocarbon contamination is concentrated within this clay layer from about 5 to 12 ft below the ground surface. Residual fuel products located in the groundwater are attributed to slow leakage through the confirming clay layer. LYNX was also used to compute volumes of contaminated soil to aid in remediation cost analysis. Preliminary figures indicate about 60,000 yards[sup 3] of contaminated soil. Since the contamination is primarily confined to relatively impermeable clayey soils, site remediation will likely be ex-situ land farming.

  3. Determination of rare earth elements, uranium and thorium in geological samples by ICP-MS, using an automatic fusion machine as an alkaline digestion tool.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granda, Luis; Rivera, Maria; Velasquez, Colon; Barona, Diego; Carpintero, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    At the present time, rare earth elements deposits have became in strategic resources for extraction of raw materials in order to manufacture high tech devices (computers, LCD, cell phones, batteries for hybrid vehicles, fiber optics and wind turbines) (1).The appropriate analytical determination of the REE ( rare earth elements) in sediment and rock samples , is important to find potential deposits and to recognize geological environments for identifying possible alterations and mineral occurrences. The alkaline fusion, which aim is to move the entire sample from solid to liquid state by forming water soluble complexes of boron and lithium, as a previous procedure for the determination of these elements, usually takes a lot of time due to the complexity of the analysis phase and by the addition of other reagents (Tm and HF ) (2) to compensate the lack of strict temperature control. The objective of this work is to develop an efficient alternative to alkaline digestion using an electrical fusion machine, which allows to create temperature programs with advanced process control and supports up to 5 samples simultaneously, which generates a reproducibility of the method and results during the melting step. Additionally, this new method permits the processing of a larger number of samples in a shorter time. The samples analyzed in this method were weighed into porcelain crucibles and subjected to calcination for 4 hours at 950 ° C in order to determine the Lost on Ignition (LOI ) , that serves to adjust the analytical results and to preserve the shelf life of the platinum ware. Subsequently, a fraction of the calcined sample was weighed into platinum crucibles and mixed with ultra-pure lithium metaborate ( flux ) 1:4 . The crucible was then placed in the fusion machine, which was programmed to take the sample from room temperature to 950 ° C in five minutes, make a small ramp to 970 ° C maintain that temperature for five minutes and download the melt in a 10 % v / v

  4. Determination of Fluorine in Fourteen Microanalytical Geologic Reference Materials using SIMS, EPMA, and Proton Induced Gamma Ray Emission (PIGE) Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggino, S. N.; Hervig, R. L.

    2010-12-01

    Fluorine (F) is a volatile constituent of magmas and hydrous minerals, and trace amounts of F are incorporated into nominally anhydrous minerals such as olivine and clinopyroxene. Microanalytical techniques are routinely used to measure trace amounts of F at both high sensitivity and high spatial resolution in glasses and crystals. However, there are few well-established F concentrations for the glass standards routinely used in microanalytical laboratories, particularly standards of low silica, basaltic composition. In this study, we determined the F content of fourteen commonly used microanalytical glass standards of basaltic, intermediate, and rhyolitic composition. To serve as calibration standards, five basaltic glasses with ~0.2 to 2.5 wt% F were synthesized and characterized. A natural tholeiite from the East Pacific Rise was mixed with variable amounts of CaF2. The mixture was heated in a 1 atmosphere furnace to 1440 °C at fO2 = NNO for 30 minutes and quenched in water. Portions of the run products were studied by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The EPMA used a 15 µm diameter defocused electron beam with a 15 kV accelerating voltage and a 25 nA primary current, a TAP crystal for detecting FKα X-rays, and Biotite 3 as the F standard. The F contents by EPMA agreed with the F added to the basalts after correction for mass loss during melting. The SIMS analyses used a primary beam of 16O- and detection of low-energy negative ions (-5 kV) at a mass resolution that resolved 18OH. Both microanalytical techniques confirmed homogeneity, and the SIMS calibration defined by EPMA shows an excellent linear trend with backgrounds of 2 ppm or less. Analyses of basaltic glass standards based on our synthesized calibration standards gave the following F contents and 2σ errors (ppm): ALV-519 = 83 ± 3; BCR-2G = 359 ± 6; BHVO-2G = 322 ± 15; GSA-1G = 10 ± 1; GSC-1G = 11 ± 1; GSD-1G = 19 ± 2; GSE-1G = 173 ± 1; KL2G (MPI

  5. Determination of Barium and selected rare-earth elements in geological materials employing a HpGe detector by radioisotope excited x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    LaBrecque, J.J.; Preiss, I.L.

    1984-01-01

    The laterite material (geological) from Cerro Impacto was first studied by air radiometric techniques in the 1970's and was found to have an abnormally high radioactive background. Further studies showed this deposit to be rich in thorium, columbium, barium and rare-earth elements (mostly La, Ce, Pr and Nd). A similar work has been reported for the analysis of Brazil's lateritic material from Morro do Ferro to determine elemental compositions (including barium and rare-earth elements) and its relationship to the mobilization of thorium from the deposit using a Co-57 radioisotope source. The objective of this work was to develop an analytical method to determine barium and rare-earth element present in Venezuelan lateritic material from Cerro Impacto. We have employed a method before, employing a Si(Li) detector, but due to the low detection efficiencies in the rare-earth K-lines region (about 30 KeV - 40 KeV), we have decided to study the improvement in sensitivities and detection limits using an hyperpure germanium detector.

  6. Experimentation in planetary geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cintala, Mark J.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory simulations of geological processes on the terrestrial planets are described, summarizing results published during the period 1983-1986. Included are studies of wind-driven processes on Mars and Venus (using the special wind-tunnel facilities at NASA Ames); simulations of shock-induced loss of volatiles from solids; equation-of-state determinations; impact experiments simulating cratering, spallation, regolith formation, and disruption; fluid-flow simulations of channel formation on Mars; and dust studies. The use of the microgravity environment of the Space Station for planetary-geology experiments is briefly considered.

  7. Determining the Probability that a Small Event in Brazil (magnitude 3.5 to 4.5 mb) will be Followed by a Larger Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assumpcao, M.

    2013-05-01

    A typical earthquake story in Brazil: A swarm of small earthquakes starts to occur near a small town, reaching magnitude 3.5, causing some alarm but no damage. The freightened population, not used to feeling earthquakes, calls the seismology experts who set up a local network to study the seismicity. To the usual and inevitable question "Are we going to have a larger earthquake?", the usual and standard answer "It is not possible to predict earthquakes; larger earthquakes are possible". Fearing unecessary panic, seismologists often add that "however, large earthquakes are not very likely". This vague answer has proven quite inadequate. "Not very likely" is interpreted by the population and authorities as "not going to happen, and there is not need to do anything". Before L'Aquila 2009, one case of magnitude 3.8 in Eastern Brazil was followed seven months later by a magnitude 4.9 causing serious damage to poorly built houses. One child died and the affected population felt deceived by the seismologists. In order to provide better answers than just a vague "not likely", we examined the Brazilian catalog of earthquakes for all cases of moderate magnitude (3.4 mb or larger) that were followed, up to one year later, by a larger event. We found that the chance of an event with magnitude 3.4 or larger being the foreshock of a larger magntitude is roughly 1/6. The probability of an event being a foreshock varies with magnitude from about 20% for a 3.5 mb to about 5% for a 4.5 mb. Also, given that an event in the range 3.4 to 4.3 is a foreshock, the probability that the mainshock will be 4.7 or larger is 1/6. The probability for a larger event to occur decreases with time after the occurrence of the possible foreshock with a time constant of ~70 days. Perhaps, by giving the population and civil defense a more quantitative answer (such as "the chance of a larger even is like rolling a six in a dice") may help the decision to reinforce poor houses or even evacuate people from

  8. Streptococcus pneumoniae R6 interspecies transformation: genetic analysis of penicillin resistance determinants and genome-wide recombination events.

    PubMed

    Sauerbier, Julia; Maurer, Patrick; Rieger, Martin; Hakenbeck, Regine

    2012-11-01

    Interspecies gene transfer has been implicated as the major driving force for the evolution of penicillin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Genomic alterations of S. pneumoniae R6 introduced during four successive transformations with DNA of the high-level penicillin-resistant Streptococcus mitis B6 with beta-lactam selection have now been determined and the contribution of genes to high resistance levels was analysed genetically. Essential for high level resistance to penicillins of the transformant CCCB was the combination of murM(B) (6) and the 3' region of pbp2b(B) (6) . Sequences of both genes were detected in clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae, confirming the participation of S. mitis in the global gene pool of beta-lactam resistance determinants. The S. mitis PBP1b gene which contains an authentic stop codon within the transpeptidase domain is now shown to contribute only marginal to resistance, but it is possible that the presence of its transglycosylase domain is important in the context of cognate PBPs. The genome sequence of CCCB revealed 36 recombination events, including deletion and acquisition of genes and repeat elements. A total of 78 genes were affected representing 67 kb or 3.3% of the genome, documenting extensive alterations scattered throughout the genome.

  9. Core rotational dynamics and geological events

    PubMed

    Greff-Lefftz; Legros

    1999-11-26

    A study of Earth's fluid core oscillations induced by lunar-solar tidal forces, together with tidal secular deceleration of Earth's axial rotation, shows that the rotational eigenfrequency of the fluid core and some solar tidal waves were in resonance around 3.0 x 10(9), 1.8 x 10(9), and 3 x 10(8) years ago. The associated viscomagnetic frictional power at the core boundaries may be converted into heat and would destabilize the D" thermal layer, leading to the generation of deep-mantle plumes, and would also increase the temperature at the fluid core boundaries, perturbing the core dynamo process. Such phenomena could account for large-scale episodes of continental crust formation, the generation of flood basalts, and abrupt changes in geomagnetic reversal frequency. PMID:10576731

  10. Determination of fluorine and chlorine in geological materials by induction furnace pyrohydrolysis and standard-addition ion-selective electrode measurement.

    PubMed

    Rice, T D

    1988-03-01

    Fluorine and chlorine in geological materials are volatilized by pyrohydrolysis at about 1150 degrees in a stream of oxygen (1000 ml/min) plus steam in an induction furnace. The catalyst is a 7:2:1 mixture of silica gel, tungstic oxide and potassium dihydrogen phosphate. The sample/catalyst mixture is pyrohydrolysed in a re-usable alumina crucible (already containing four drops of 1 + 3 phosphoric acid) inserted in a silica-enclosed graphite crucible. The absorption solution is buffered at pH 6.5 and spiked with 1.6 mug of fluoride and 16 mug of chloride per g of solution, to ensure rapid and linear electrode response during subsequent standard-addition measurement. The simple plastic absorption vessel has 99.5% efficiency. The 3s limits of detection are 5-10 mug/g and 40-100 mug/g for fluorine and chlorine respectively. The procedure is unsuitable for determining chlorine in coal. PMID:18964490

  11. Effective damage zone volume of fault zones and initial salinity distribution determine intensity of shallow aquifer salinization in geological underground utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, M.; Tillner, E.; Kempka, T.; Kühn, M.

    2015-06-01

    Injection of fluids into deep saline aquifers causes a pore pressure increase in the storage formation, and thus displacement of resident brines. Via hydraulically conductive faults, brine may migrate upwards into shallower aquifers, and lead to unwanted salinization of potable groundwater resources. In the present study, we investigated different scenarios for a prospective storage site close to the city of Beeskow in the Northeast German Basin by using a 3-D regional scale model (100 km × 100 km × 1.34 km) that includes four ambient fault zones. The focus was on assessing the impact of fault length and the effect of an overlying secondary reservoir as well as model boundary conditions on the potential salinization of shallow groundwater resources. We employed numerical simulations of brine injection as a representative fluid using the simulator TOUGH2-MP. Our simulation results demonstrate that pressure build-up within the reservoir determines the intensity and duration of fluid flow through the faults, and hence salinization of shallower aquifers. Application of different boundary conditions proved that these have a crucial impact on reservoir fluid displacement. If reservoir boundaries are closed, the fluid migrated upwards into the shallow aquifer, corresponds to the overall injected fluid mass. In that case, a short hydraulically conductive fault length and the presence of an overlying secondary reservoir leads only to retardation in brine displacement up to a factor of five and three, respectively. If the reservoir boundaries are open, salinization is considerably reduced: in the presence of a secondary reservoir, 33% of equivalent brine mass migrates into the shallow aquifer, if all four faults are hydraulically open over their entire length, whereas the displaced equivalent brine mass is only 12% for a single fault of two kilometres length. Taking into account the considered geological boundary conditions, the brine originates in maximum from the upper 4

  12. A cohort event monitoring to determine the adverse events following administration of mouse brain derived, inactivated Japanese Encephalitis vaccine in an endemic district in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    De Alwis, K N L S K; Abeysinghe, M R N; Wickramesinghe, A R; Wijesinghe, P R

    2014-02-12

    Introduction of human immunization reduced Japanese Encephalitis (JE) cases dramatically in Sri Lanka. However, the increased reporting of adverse events following immunization (AEFI) affected vaccine acceptance by the community. Against this background, we describe the incidence of overall AEFI and incidence and profile of AEFI, thought to be causally related to the mouse-brain derived JE vaccine. A follow-up of 9798 vaccine recipients was performed for a period of two weeks post-vaccination. Parents self-recorded observed signs and symptoms. The self-records were collected by trained supervisors. All monitored children who manifested symptom/s were investigated in details by medical officers experienced in AEFI investigations within two weeks after ending the follow-up period. Using the results of the investigation, the causality assessment was performed. The estimated cumulative incidence rate of overall AEFI was 8.6 children per 100 immunizations. The same for observed AEFI consistent with causal association to the inactivated JE vaccine was 4.3 children (95% CI-3.9-4.7%) per 100 immunizations. The most frequent AEFI was fever (81%). The frequency of high fever (>102 °F) was 26%. Other major AEFI were body ache (22%) vomiting (21%), urticaria (19%), pruritus (5%), and headache (5%). Though 83% of children with AEFI thought to be causally related to the vaccine sought medical care, only 6.6% required hospitalizations. The incidence rate of AEFI in the cohort event monitoring was several-fold higher than that reported through the national AEFI surveillance system. The incidence rate of allergic manifestations among Sri-Lankan children approached what was reported for non-endemic settings and was higher than in other JE endemic populations elsewhere. Contrary to the belief of medical practitioners and the general public, incidence of seizures was low and vaccine related other neurological manifestations were absent.

  13. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of selected carbamate pesticides in water by high-performance liquid chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner, S.L.; Johnson, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    As part of its primary responsibility concerning water as a national resource, the U.S. Geological Survey collects and analyzes samples of ground water and surface water to determine water quality. This report describes the method used since June 1987 to determine selected total-recoverable carbamate pesticides present in water samples. High- performance liquid chromatography is used to separate N-methyl carbamates, N-methyl carbamoyloximes, and an N-phenyl carbamate which have been extracted from water and concentrated in dichloromethane. Analytes, surrogate compounds, and reference compounds are eluted from the analytical column within 25 minutes. Two modes of analyte detection are used: (1) a photodiode-array detector measures and records ultraviolet-absorbance profiles, and (2) a fluorescence detector measures and records fluorescence from an analyte derivative produced when analyte hydrolysis is combined with chemical derivatization. Analytes are identified and confirmed in a three-stage process by use of chromatographic retention time, ultraviolet (UV) spectral comparison, and derivatization/fluorescence detection. Quantitative results are based on the integration of single-wavelength UV-absorbance chromatograms and on comparison with calibration curves derived from external analyte standards that are run with samples as part of an instrumental analytical sequence. Estimated method detection limits vary for each analyte, depending on the sample matrix conditions, and range from 0.5 microgram per liter to as low as 0.01 microgram per liter. Reporting levels for all analytes have been set at 0.5 microgram per liter for this method. Corrections on the basis of percentage recoveries of analytes spiked into distilled water are not applied to values calculated for analyte concentration in samples. These values for analyte concentrations instead indicate the quantities recovered by the method from a particular sample matrix.

  14. [Determination of blood alcohol level of people who are involved in a judicial event of medical importance (case report)].

    PubMed

    Alkan, N; Demircan, T

    2001-10-01

    In some cases, determination of blood alcohol level is very important. The alcohol level at the time of an event, can affect the court decision and may lead to aggravate the penalty or on the contrary an acquittal. In this article, a criminal action, in one of Turkish High Criminal Court is examined. The case was about the death of a drunk person who had fallen down from the window of his girl friend's house which is on the third floor of an apartment. This person's parent applied to public prosecutor saying that their child did not fall down but was murdered by his girl friend. During this trial, in the victim's autopsy, no alcohol detected in blood in contrast with his girl friend's testimony. Because of this contradiction, a reasonable doubt has emerged that she was the murderer in this suspicious death. However, in the further stages of trial, the reasons of no alcohol detection in the autopsy is investigated. In the basis of this case, the importance and techniques of alcohol detection in blood is discussed with literature.

  15. The onset of childhood amnesia in childhood: a prospective investigation of the course and determinants of forgetting of early-life events.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Patricia J; Larkina, Marina

    2014-01-01

    The present research was an examination of the onset of childhood amnesia and how it relates to maternal narrative style, an important determinant of autobiographical memory development. Children and their mothers discussed unique events when the children were 3 years of age. Different subgroups of children were tested for recall of the events at ages 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 years. At the later session they were interviewed by an experimenter about the events discussed 2 to 6 years previously with their mothers (early-life events). Children aged 5, 6, and 7 remembered 60% or more of the early-life events. In contrast, children aged 8 and 9 years remembered fewer than 40% of the early-life events. Overall maternal narrative style predicted children's contributions to mother-child conversations at age 3 years; it did not have cross-lagged relations to memory for early-life events at ages 5 to 9 years. Maternal deflections of the conversational turn to the child predicted the amount of information children later reported about the early-life events. The findings have implications for our understanding of the onset of childhood amnesia and the achievement of an adult-like distribution of memories in the school years. They highlight the importance of forgetting processes in explanations of the amnesia.

  16. Geologic Map of the Thaumasia Region, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dohm, Janes M.; Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Hare, Trent M.

    2001-01-01

    objective is to determine the distribution and ages of valleys. In our study, we incorporated detailed photogeologic mapping, comprehensive crater statistics (table 1), and geologic, paleotectonic, and paleoerosional Geographic Information System (GIS) databases. Sheets 1–3 show geologic units, faults and other significant structures, and valleys, respectively. To help unravel the complex geologic history of the Thaumasia region, we transferred the highly detailed geologic unit, paleotectonic, and paleoerosional information of sheets 1–3 into a multilayered GIS database for comparative analysis. The geologic information was transferred from hard copy into a digital format by scanning at 25 micron resolution on a drum scanner. The 2-bit scanned image was then converted to an x,y coordinate system using ARC/INFO's vectorization routine. The geologic unit, structural, and erosional data were transformed into the original map projection, Lambert Conformal. The average transformation root mean square error was 0.25 km (acceptable for the Thaumasia map base at 1:5,000,000 scale). After transformation, the features were properly attributed and tediously checked. Once digitized, the map data can be transformed into any map projection depending on the type of data analysis. For example, the equal-area sinusoidal projection was used for determining the precise area of geologic units (table 1). In addition to the geologic map and its attendant stratigraphic section, correlation chart, and description of map units, we include text sections that clarify the histories and temporal, spatial, and causal relations of the various geologic units and landforms of the Thaumasia region. The geologic summary section defines the sequence of major geologic events.

  17. Direct determination of the ionic charge distribution of helium and iron in He-3-rich solar energetic particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.; Scholer, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Fan, C. Y.; Fisk, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    The first direct measurement of the ionic charge distribution of the helium isotopes and of iron in (He-3)-Fe-rich solar energetic particle events is reported. No significant contribution of singly ionized helium to the events is found. The two-sigma upper limits for the He-3(+)/He-3(2+) and He-4(+)/He-4(2+) ratios are 0.02 and 0.03, respectively. The mean charge state of iron found by averaging five (He-3)-Fe-rich solar energetic particle events is 19 + or -2, significantly larger than the iron charge state for energetic solar particles in normal composition events. These results appear to favor the resonant heating model proposed by Fisk (1978). It is concluded that temperatures in the source region exceed 5 million K in the events under study.

  18. Marine Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Andel, Tjeerd H.

    Marine geology was blessed early, about 30 years ago, with two great textbooks, one by P.H. Kuenen, the other by Francis P. Shepard, but in more recent years, no one has dared synthesize a field that has become so diverse and is growing so rapidly. There are many texts written for the beginning undergraduate student, mostly by marine geologists, but none can be handed conveniently to a serious advanced student or given to a colleague interested in what the field has wrought. The reason for this regrettable state is obvious; only an active, major scholar could hope to write such a book well, but the years would pass, his students dwindle, his grants vanish. He himself might be out of date before his book was. Kennett has earned a large measure of gratitude for his attempt to undertake this task. His personal price must have been high but so are our rewards.

  19. Knob heights within circum-Caloris geologic units on Mercury: Interpretations of the geologic history of the region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackiss, S. E.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Ernst, C. M.; McBeck, J. A.; Seelos, K. D.

    2015-11-01

    The circum-Caloris geologic units show morphology consistent with ejecta-derived formation, however crater counts suggest the units formed after the basin. To determine if the surrounding units are directly related to basin formation or products of later volcanic resurfacing events, we measured the heights and densities of knobs in 22 study regions to the east of the Caloris basin in three geologic units circumferential to the basin: the Odin Formation, the Van Eyck Formation, and the Smooth Plains Formation. In these study regions the size and concentration of ejecta blocks generally decrease away from the crater rim. The morphology that superposes the knobs and the distribution of knob heights within each study region suggests that the knobs were deposited as ejecta and later embayed by one or multiple volcanic events. The distribution of knob height and concentration indicates that the knobs within the circum-Caloris units are related to the formation of the basin.

  20. Okinawa, Japan: Geologic Battleground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waymack, S. W.; Carrington, M. P.; Harpp, K. S.

    2005-12-01

    One of our main goals as instructors, particularly in introductory courses, is to impart students with an appreciation of how geology has influenced the course of human events. Despite the apparent accessibility of such topics, communicating this in a lively, relevant, and effective way often proves difficult. We use a series of historical events, the Pacific island hopping campaign of WWII, to engage students in an active, guided inquiry exercise to explore how terrain and the underlying geology of an area can shape historical events. Teams of students are assigned the role of planning either the defense or occupation of Okinawa Island, in the Ryukyu arc, in a theoretical version of the 1945 conflict. Students are given a package of information, including geologic and topographic maps, a list of military resources available to them at the time, and some historical background. Students also have access to "reconnaissance" images, 360o digital panoramas of the landscape of Okinawa, keyed to their maps. Each team has a week to plan their strategies and carry out additional research, which they subsequently bring to the table in the form of a written battle plan. With an instructor as arbiter, teams alternate drawing their maneuvers on a map of the island, to which the other team then responds. This continues one move at a time, until the instructor declares a victor. Throughout the exercise, the instructor guides students through analysis of each strategic decision in light of the island's structure and topography, with an emphasis on the appropriate interpretation of the maps. Students soon realize that an understanding of the island's terrain literally meant the difference between life and death for civilians and military participants alike in 1945. The karst landscape of Okinawa posed unique obstacles to both the Japanese and the American forces, including difficult landing sites, networks of natural caves, and sequences of hills aligned perpendicular to the

  1. Microlensing events by Proxima Centauri in 2014 and 2016: Opportunities for mass determination and possible planet detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Kailash C.; Bond, Howard E.; Anderson, Jay; Dominik, Martin E-mail: jayander@stsci.edu E-mail: md35@st-andrews.ac.uk

    2014-02-20

    We have found that Proxima Centauri, the star closest to our Sun, will pass close to a pair of faint background stars in the next few years. Using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images obtained in 2012 October, we determine that the passage close to a mag 20 star will occur in 2014 October (impact parameter 1.''6), and to a mag 19.5 star in 2016 February (impact parameter 0.''5). As Proxima passes in front of these stars, the relativistic deflection of light will cause shifts in the positions of the background stars of ∼0.5 and 1.5 mas, respectively, readily detectable by HST imaging, and possibly by Gaia and ground-based facilities such as the Very Large Telescope. Measurement of these astrometric shifts offers a unique and direct method to measure the mass of Proxima. Moreover, if Proxima has a planetary system, the planets may be detectable through their additional microlensing signals, although the probability of such detections is small. With astrometric accuracies of 0.03 mas (achievable with HST spatial scanning), centroid shifts caused by Jovian planets are detectable at separations of up to 2.''0 (corresponding to 2.6 AU at the distance of Proxima), and centroid shifts by Earth-mass planets are detectable within a small band of 8 mas (corresponding to 0.01 AU) around the source trajectories. Jovian planets within a band of about 28 mas (corresponding to 0.036 AU) around the source trajectories would produce a brightening of the source by >0.01 mag and could hence be detectable. Estimated timescales of the astrometric and photometric microlensing events due to a planet range from a few hours to a few days, and both methods would provide direct measurements of the planetary mass.

  2. Old Geology and New Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 28 May 2003

    Mangala Vallis one of the large outflow channels that channeled large quantities of water into the northern lowlands, long ago on geological timescales. This valley is one of the few in the southern hemisphere, as well as one of the few west of the Tharsis bulge. A closer look at the channel shows more recent weathering of the old water channel: the walls of the channel show small, dark slope streaks that form in dusty areas; and much of the surrounding terrain has subtle linear markings trending from the upper left to the lower right, which are probably features sculpted and streamlined by the wind. Geology still shapes the surface of Mars today, but its methods over the eons have changed.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -6, Longitude 209.6 East (150.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in

  3. Transport, vertical structure and radiative properties of dust events in southeast China determined from ground and space sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianjun; Zheng, Youfei; Li, Zhanqing; Flynn, Connor; Welton, E. J.; Cribb, Mareen

    2011-11-01

    Two dust events were detected over the Yangtze Delta region of China during March 14-17 and April 25-26 in 2009 where such dust events are uncommon. The transport behavior, spatio-temporal evolution, vertical structure, direct radiative effects, as well as induced heating rates, are investigated using a combination of ground-based and satellite-based measurements, a back-trajectory analysis, an aerosol model and a radiative transfer model. Back-trajectories, wind fields and aerosol model analyses show that the first dust originated in northern/northwestern China and the second generated in the Taklimakan desert in northwest China, and traveled across the Hexi corridor and Loess Plateau to the Yangtze Delta region (the so-called "dust corridor"). The mean lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratio (LR) during the two dust events was 38.7 ± 10.4 sr and 42.7 ± 15.2 sr, respectively. The mean aerosol depolarization ratio ( δa) for the first dust event was 0.16 ± 0.07, with a maximum value of 0.32. For the second, the mean δa was around 0.19 ± 0.06, with a maximum value of 0.29. Aerosol extinction coefficient and δa profiles for the two events were similar: two aerosol layers consisting of dust aerosols and a mixture of dust and anthropogenic pollution aerosols. The topmost aerosol layer is above 3.5 km. The maximum mean aerosol extinction coefficients were 0.5 km -1 and 0.54 km -1 at about 0.7 km and 1.1 km, respectively. Significant effects of cooling at the surface and heating in the atmosphere were found during these dust events. Diurnal mean shortwave radiative forcings (efficiencies) at the surface, the top-of-the-atmosphere and within the atmosphere were -36.8 (-80.0), -13.6 (-29.6) and 23.2 (50.4) W m -2, respectively, during the first dust event, and -48.2 (-70.9), -21.4 (-31.5) and 26.8 (39.4) W m -2, respectively, during the second dust event. Maximum heating rates occurred at 0.7 km during the first dust event and at 1.1 km during the second dust event

  4. Microlensing Events by Proxima Centauri in 2014 and 2016: Opportunities for Mass Determination and Possible Planet Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash C.; Bond, Howard E.; Anderson, Jay; Dominik, Martin

    2014-02-01

    We have found that Proxima Centauri, the star closest to our Sun, will pass close to a pair of faint background stars in the next few years. Using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images obtained in 2012 October, we determine that the passage close to a mag 20 star will occur in 2014 October (impact parameter 1.''6), and to a mag 19.5 star in 2016 February (impact parameter 0.''5). As Proxima passes in front of these stars, the relativistic deflection of light will cause shifts in the positions of the background stars of ~0.5 and 1.5 mas, respectively, readily detectable by HST imaging, and possibly by Gaia and ground-based facilities such as the Very Large Telescope. Measurement of these astrometric shifts offers a unique and direct method to measure the mass of Proxima. Moreover, if Proxima has a planetary system, the planets may be detectable through their additional microlensing signals, although the probability of such detections is small. With astrometric accuracies of 0.03 mas (achievable with HST spatial scanning), centroid shifts caused by Jovian planets are detectable at separations of up to 2.''0 (corresponding to 2.6 AU at the distance of Proxima), and centroid shifts by Earth-mass planets are detectable within a small band of 8 mas (corresponding to 0.01 AU) around the source trajectories. Jovian planets within a band of about 28 mas (corresponding to 0.036 AU) around the source trajectories would produce a brightening of the source by >0.01 mag and could hence be detectable. Estimated timescales of the astrometric and photometric microlensing events due to a planet range from a few hours to a few days, and both methods would provide direct measurements of the planetary mass. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  5. Social Determinants of Depression: Social Cohesion, Negative Life Events, and Depression Among People Living with HIV/Aids in Nigeria, West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Shittu, Rasaki O.; Issa, Baba A.; Olanrewaju, Ganiyu T.; Mahmoud, Abdulraheem O.; Odeigah, Louis O.; Sule, Abdullateef G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) continue to face persistent and deep rooted social barriers. Incidentally, studies in social determinants of depression are very limited, necessitating this study, which examined social determinants of depression and the impact of these determinants on depression. Methods: This was a hospital based, cross sectional descriptive study of three hundred adult HIV/AIDS patients, attending the HIV clinic of Kwara State Specialist Hospital, Sobi, Ilorin, Nigeria. Depressive symptoms were measured by the PHQ-9 rating scale. Three variables of social determinants of depression: socio-economic status (years of school and self-reported economic status of family), social cohesion, and negative life events were examined. Results: The self-reported economic status of the family varied from good 35(11.7%), average 162(54%), and poor among 103(34.3%) of the respondents. Social cohesion was low in 199(66.3%), fair in 65(21.7%) and high among 36(12%) of the respondents. There was significant association between social cohesion, negative life events, and depression. Conclusion and Global Health Implications: Income was the most significant socio-economic determinant. Majority had very low social cohesion and more negative life events, while those with below average years of schooling were more depressed. These are statistically significant. Social determinants of depression should be given a lot of emphasis, when addressing the issue of depression, if we are to meaningfully tackle this increasing scourge in our society.

  6. Geologic Technician New Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Stanley E.

    1970-01-01

    Describes a developing two-year geologic technician program at Bakersfield College in which a student may major in five areas - geologic drafting, land and legal, geologic assistant, engineering or paleontology. (RR)

  7. Skylab ATM/S-056 X-ray event analyzer: Instrument description, parameter determination, and analysis example (15 June 1973 1B/M3 flare)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    The Skylab ATM/S-056 X-Ray Event Analyzer, part of an X-ray telescope experiment, is described. The techniques employed in the analysis of its data to determine electron temperatures and emission measures are reviewed. The analysis of a sample event - the 15 June 1973 1B/M3 flare - is performed. Comparison of the X-Ray Event Analyzer data with that of the SolRad 9 observations indicates that the X-Ray Event Analyzer accurately monitored the sun's 2.5 to 7.25 A X-ray emission and to a lesser extent the 6.1 to 20 A emission. A mean average peak temperature of 15 million K at 1,412 UT and a mean average peak electron density (assuming a flare volume of 10 to the 13 power cu km) of 27 million/cu mm at 1,416 to 1,417 UT are deduced for the event. The X-Ray Event Analyzer data, having a 2.5 s time resolution, should be invaluable in comparisons with other high-time resolution data (e.g., radio bursts).

  8. The population determines whether and how life-history traits vary between reproductive events in an insect with maternal care.

    PubMed

    Ratz, Tom; Kramer, Jos; Veuille, Michel; Meunier, Joël

    2016-10-01

    The last reproductive event of a female is often associated with major changes in terms of both maternal and offspring life-history traits. However, the nature of these changes and the importance of population-specific environmental constraints in shaping their expression are difficult to predict and, as a consequence, poorly understood. Here, we investigated whether and how life-history traits vary between reproductive events and whether this variation is population-dependent in the European earwig Forficula auricularia. In this insect species, females produce up to two clutches during their lifetime and express extensive forms of maternal care. We conducted a common garden experiment, in which we measured 11 life-history traits of the first and second clutches of 132 females originating from three populations. Our results showed that clutch size was higher and the level of care expressed towards juveniles lower in second as compared to the first clutches in all three populations. In contrast, we found a population-specific effect on whether and how the reproductive event shaped juvenile quality and a trade-off between egg developmental time and female weight at hatching. Overall, these findings emphasise that the last reproductive event of a female entails both positive and negative effects on various life-history traits of the female herself and her clutch of juveniles. Moreover, our study stresses the importance of population idiosyncrasies on the expression and nature of such cohort-specific effects.

  9. Adaptation to numerosity requires only brief exposures, and is determined by number of events, not exposure duration.

    PubMed

    Aagten-Murphy, David; Burr, David

    2016-08-01

    Exposure to a patch of dots produces a repulsive shift in the perceived numerosity of subsequently viewed dot patches. Although a remarkably strong effect, in which the perceived numerosity can be shifted by up to 50% of the actual numerosity, very little is known about the temporal dynamics. Here we demonstrate a novel adaptation paradigm that allows numerosity adaptation to be rapidly induced at several distinct locations simultaneously. We show that not only is this adaptation to numerosity spatially specific, with different locations of the visual field able to be adapted to high, low, or neutral stimuli, but it can occur with only very brief periods of adaptation. Further investigation revealed that the adaptation effect was primarily driven by the number of unique adapting events that had occurred and not by either the duration of each event or the total duration of exposure to adapting stimuli. This event-based numerosity adaptation appears to fit well with statistical models of adaptation in which the dynamic adjustment of perceptual experiences, based on both the previous experience of the stimuli and the current percept, acts to optimize the limited working range of perception. These results implicate a highly plastic mechanism for numerosity perception, which is dependent on the number of discrete adaptation events, and also demonstrate a quick and efficient paradigm suitable for examining the temporal properties of adaptation. PMID:27580042

  10. Integrating geology and perforating

    SciTech Connect

    Araujo, P.F. de; Souza Padilha, S.T.C. de

    1997-02-01

    Perforating is a very common well completion operation. Usually, it is considered to be as simple as making holes in casing. Actually, perforating is one of the most critical tasks for establishing a path from reservoir rock to borehole form which hydrocarbons can flow to surface. The objective of this article is to relate perforating technology with geological aspects and completion type to determine the best shooting equipment (gun type, charge and differential pressure) to perform the most efficient perforating job. Several subjects related to formation geology are taken into account for a shooting job, such as: compressive strength, reservoir pressure and thickness, lithology type, porosity and permeability, ratio between horizontal and vertical permeabilities, and fluid type. Gun geometry used in the oil industry incorporates several parameters, including shot density, hole entrance diameter, gun phase and jet penetration. API tests are done on perforating guns to define applicability and performance. A new geometrical parameter is defined as the relative angle of the jet, which is the angle between the jet tunnel and formation dip. GEOCAN is a methodology which relates geology to gun geometry and type to define the most efficient gun system for perforated completions. It uses the intelligent perforating technique with the SPAN (Schlumberger Perforating Analysis) program to confirm optimum gun choice.

  11. Spacecraft Solar Particle Event (SPE) Shielding: Shielding Effectiveness as a Function of SPE model as Determined with the FLUKA Radiation Transport Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steve; Atwell, William; Reddell, Brandon; Rojdev, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of both satellite and surface neutron monitor data demonstrate that the widely utilized Exponential model of solar particle event (SPE) proton kinetic energy spectra can seriously underestimate SPE proton flux, especially at the highest kinetic energies. The more recently developed Band model produces better agreement with neutron monitor data ground level events (GLEs) and is believed to be considerably more accurate at high kinetic energies. Here, we report the results of modeling and simulation studies in which the radiation transport code FLUKA (FLUktuierende KAskade) is used to determine the changes in total ionizing dose (TID) and single-event environments (SEE) behind aluminum, polyethylene, carbon, and titanium shielding masses when the assumed form (i. e., Band or Exponential) of the solar particle event (SPE) kinetic energy spectra is changed. FLUKA simulations have fully three dimensions with an isotropic particle flux incident on a concentric spherical shell shielding mass and detector structure. The effects are reported for both energetic primary protons penetrating the shield mass and secondary particle showers caused by energetic primary protons colliding with shielding mass nuclei. Our results, in agreement with previous studies, show that use of the Exponential form of the event

  12. A Hybrid Waveform Inversion Scheme for the Determination of Locations and Moment Tensors of the Microseismic Events and the uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Droujinine, A.; Shen, P.

    2011-12-01

    In this research, we developed a new hybrid waveform inversion scheme to determine the hypocenters, origin times and moment tensors of the microseismic events induced by hydraulic fracturing. To overcome the nonlinearity in the determination of the hypocenter and origin time of a microseismic event, we perform a global search for the hypocenter (x,y,z) and origin time (t0) in a gridded four-dimensional model space, and at each grid point of the four-dimensional model space, we perform a linear inversion for the moment tensor components (M11, M22, M33, M12, M13, M23) in a six-dimensional model subspace. By this two-step approach, we find a global estimate optimum solution in the four- plus six-dimensional total model space. Then we further perform a nonlinear, gradient-based inversion for a better hypocenter and origin time of the microseismic event starting from the global estimate optimum solution. The linear inversion for the moment tensor can also be performed at each iteration of the nonlinear inversion for the hypocenter and origin time. In the grid-linear-nonlinear hybrid approach, we avoid being trapped in the local minima in the inverse problem while reducing the computational cost. The Green's functions between a monitored regions and receivers are computed by the elastic wave reciprocity. We also have performed a systematic study of the uncertainty, resolution and sensitivity of the method and found that it has superior performance in determining the hypocenter and origin time of a microseismic event over the traditional travel time methods, while being able to deliver the focal mechanism solution for the event as well. The method is tested on a dataset from a hydraulic fracturing practice in an oil reservoir.

  13. Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, S. M.

    2003-04-01

    Geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide has emerged as one of the most promising options for making deep cuts in carbon dioxide emissions. Geologic sequestration involves the two-step process of first capturing carbon dioxide by separating it from stack emissions, followed by injection and long term storage in deep geologic formations. Sedimentary basins, including depleted oil and gas reservoirs, deep unminable coal seams, and brine-filled formations, provide the most attractive storage reservoirs. Over the past few years significant advances have been made in this technology, including development of simulation models and monitoring systems, implementation of commercial scale demonstration projects, and investigation of natural and industrial analogues for geologic storage of carbon dioxide. While much has been accomplished in a short time, there are many questions that must be answered before this technology can be employed on the scale needed to make significant reductions in carbon dioxide emissions. Questions such as how long must the carbon dioxide remain underground, to what extent will geochemical reactions completely immobilize the carbon dioxide, what can be done in the event that a storage site begins to leak at an unacceptable rate, what is the appropriate risk assessment, regulatory and legal framework, and will the public view this option favorably? This paper will present recent advances in the scientific and technological underpinnings of geologic sequestration and identify areas where additional information is needed.

  14. History of Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Mott T.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: (1) geologists and the history of geology; (2) American historians and the history of geology; (3) history of geology in the 1980s; (4) sources for the history of geology (bibliographies, dictionaries, encyclopedias, handbooks, periodicals, public/official histories, compilations, and books); (5) research opportunities; and (6) other…

  15. Practical petroleum geology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the scope and content of the field of petroleum geology from the standpoint of the practicing petroleum geologist. Includes chapters on basic geological concepts, the sedimentation process, accumulation of hydrocarbons, exploration, economic examination, drilling of exploratory wells, recovering oil and gas (reservoir geology), and the relationship of geology to the petroleum industry as a whole.

  16. Provenance determination of buntsandstein artefacts from the early-medieval dorestad trading site (the Netherlands): an example of the significance of geological-mineralogical analysis in archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, Detlef; Kars, Henk

    Buntsandstein material was made by the Early-Medieval men from objects which were already imported into The Netherlands by the Romans. The conclusions concerning provenance of most of the Buntsandstein material from the Eifel based on petrographical results are further supported by logistical and archaeological evidence. The most important of the indirect criteria are the presence of several rock types of volcanic origin also coming from the Eifel and the fact that the Eifel is the geographically nearest and logistically easiest accessible source for Buntsandstein material from Dorestad. Another supporting point is the long history of Buntsandstein exploitation in the Eifel which dates back to Roman and even Celtic times. Different grain sizes of the sandstones from which the artefacts are made demonstrate that the material does not derive from only one locality for each formation, but comes from several source quarries spaced nearer or further apart. This is also supported by the presence of bleached samples which are interpreted as having been quarried already in discoloured state. Colour conversions to uniformly grey or bright, fire-like red at the surface of some artefacts testify to changes by heating during use or further bleaching by treatment with liquids or percolating waters after burial within the archaeological strata. The provenance of the raw material for the predominant amount of the Dorestad Buntsandstein artefacts from the Eifel indicates that it derived from different regions within one main source area, with only minor additional contributions coming from various other regions or even local sources. The provenance determination of the Dorestad Buntsandstein material is an outstanding case study of the significance of application of geological-mineralogical methods for unravelling archaeological problems and relationships.

  17. Native American Students' Understanding of Geologic Time Scale: 4th-8th Grade Ojibwe Students' Understanding of Earth's Geologic History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nam, Younkyeong; Karahan, Engin; Roehrig, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    Geologic time scale is a very important concept for understanding long-term earth system events such as climate change. This study examines forty-three 4th-8th grade Native American--particularly Ojibwe tribe--students' understanding of relative ordering and absolute time of Earth's significant geological and biological events. This study also…

  18. Geologic Mapping of Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yingst, R. A.; Mest, S. C.; Berman, D. C.; Garry, W. B.; Williams, D. A.; Buczkowski, D.; Jaumann, R.; Pieters, C. M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Frigeri, A.; Le Corre, L.; Preusker, F.; Raymond, C. A.; Reddy, V.; Russell, C. T.; Roatsch, T.; Schenk, P. M.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a preliminary global geologic map of Vesta, based on data from the Dawn spacecraft's High- Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) and informed by Low-Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO) data. This map is part of an iterative mapping effort; the geologic map has been refined with each improvement in resolution. Vesta has a heavily-cratered surface, with large craters evident in numerous locations. The south pole is dominated by an impact structure identified before Dawn's arrival. Two large impact structures have been resolved: the younger, larger Rheasilvia structure, and the older, more degraded Veneneia structure. The surface is also characterized by a system of deep, globe-girdling equatorial troughs and ridges, as well as an older system of troughs and ridges to the north. Troughs and ridges are also evident cutting across, and spiraling arcuately from, the Rheasilvia central mound. However, no volcanic features have been unequivocally identified. Vesta can be divided very broadly into three terrains: heavily-cratered terrain; ridge-and-trough terrain (equatorial and northern); and terrain associated with the Rheasilvia crater. Localized features include bright and dark material and ejecta (some defined specifically by color); lobate deposits; and mass-wasting materials. No obvious volcanic features are evident. Stratigraphy of Vesta's geologic units suggests a history in which formation of a primary crust was followed by the formation of impact craters, including Veneneia and the associated Saturnalia Fossae unit. Formation of Rheasilvia followed, along with associated structural deformation that shaped the Divalia Fossae ridge-and-trough unit at the equator. Subsequent impacts and mass wasting events subdued impact craters, rims and portions of ridge-and-trough sets, and formed slumps and landslides, especially within crater floors and along crater rims and scarps. Subsequent to the formation of Rheasilvia, discontinuous low-albedo deposits formed or were

  19. Applications of ISES for geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowker, David E.

    1990-01-01

    The principal applications for onboard data processing and real-time data transmission in the geological sciences are the detection of early warning signs of potential catastrophic events and the rapid assessment of impact and damage following major events. Also, the opportunity for quick look and supporting data during field investigations should not be disregarded. The Eos platforms are ideal for these applications because of the variety of earth sensing instruments and their differing modes of operation. Further study is required to define the role for each instrument and to assess how they can aid each other in establishing an improved output product.

  20. Single-Event Upset (SEU) model verification and threshold determination using heavy ions in a bipolar static RAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Smith, L. S.; Soli, G. A.; Thieberger, P.; Wegner, H. E.

    1985-01-01

    Single-Event Upset (SEU) response of a bipolar low-power Schottky-diode-clamped TTL static RAM has been observed using Br ions in the 100-240 MeV energy range and O ions in the 20-100 MeV range. These data complete the experimental verification of circuit-simulation SEU modeling for this device. The threshold for onset of SEU has been observed by the variation of energy, ion species and angle of incidence. The results obtained from the computer circuit-simulation modeling and experimental model verification demonstrate a viable methodology for modeling SEU in bipolar integrated circuits.

  1. Bringing Field Geology to a High School Audience: Connecting to the Next Generation of Scientific Minds through Science Olympiad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A. M.; Schroeder, D. M.; Van Hecke, M.

    2011-12-01

    with a number of related questions or tasks that would require them to interpret and integrate the data from those sources. Some example tasks could include the creation of topographic profiles, converting between map projections, creating geologic cross-sections, determining relative ages of a set of deposits, or assessing a specific location for potential geohazard risk. The implementation of this event in competitions across the country is an excellent opportunity for early career scientists to get involved by hosting the event at regional- or state-level competitions. We will provide information and resources for interested early career and other scientists to get involved with their local regional or state competitions as writers, proctors, mentors, etc.

  2. Age-specific vibrissae growth rates: a tool for determining the timing of ecologically important events in Steller sea lions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rea, L.D.; Christ, A.M.; Hayden, A.B.; Stegall, V.K.; Farley, S.D.; Stricker, Craig A.; Mellish, J.E.; Maniscalco, J.M.; Waite, J.N.; Burkanov, V.N.; Pitcher, K.W.

    2015-01-01

    Steller sea lions (SSL; Eumetopias jubatus) grow their vibrissae continually, providing a multiyear record suitable for ecological and physiological studies based on stable isotopes. An accurate age-specific vibrissae growth rate is essential for registering a chronology along the length of the record, and for interpreting the timing of ecologically important events. We utilized four methods to estimate the growth rate of vibrissae in fetal, rookery pup, young-of-the-year (YOY), yearling, subadult, and adult SSL. The majority of vibrissae were collected from SSL live-captured in Alaska and Russia between 2000 and 2013 (n = 1,115), however, vibrissae were also collected from six adult SSL found dead on haul-outs and rookeries during field excursions to increase the sample size of this underrepresented age group. Growth rates of vibrissae were generally slower in adult (0.44 ± 0.15 cm/mo) and subadult (0.61 ± 0.10 cm/mo) SSL than in YOY (0.87 ± 0.28 cm/mo) and fetal (0.73 ± 0.05 cm/mo) animals, but there was high individual variability in these growth rates within each age group. Some variability in vibrissae growth rates was attributed to the somatic growth rate of YOY sea lions between capture events (P = 0.014, r2 = 0.206, n = 29).

  3. Geologic Mapping of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Katherine H.

    1998-05-01

    Planetary geologic mapping involves integrating a terrestrial-based understanding of surface and subsurface processes and mapping principles to investigate scientific questions. Mars mappers must keep in mind that physical processes, such as wind and flowing water on Mars, are or were different from terrestrial processes because the planetary atmospheres have changed differently over time. Geologic mapping of Mars has traditionally been done by hand using overlays on photomosaics of Viking Orbiter and Mariner images. Photoclinometry and shadow measurements have been used to determine elevations, and the distribution and size of craters have been used to determine the relative ages of surfaces- more densely cratered surfaces are older. Some mappers are now using computer software (ranging from Photoshop to ArcInfo) to facilitate mapping, though their applications must be carefully executed so that registration of the images remains true. Images and some mapping results are now available on the internet, and new data from recent missions to Mars (Pathfinder and Surveyor) will offer clarifying information to mapping efforts. This paper consists chiefly of pictures and diagrams.

  4. Analysis of Modern Techniques for Nuclear-test Yield Determination of NTS Events Using Data From the Leo Brady Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, K. A.; Bilek, S. L.; Abbott, R. E.

    2007-12-01

    Nuclear test detection is a challenging, but important task for treaty verification. Many techniques have been developed to discriminate between an explosion and an earthquake and if an explosion is detected, to determine its yield. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has maintained the Leo Brady Seismic Network (LBSN) since 1960 to record nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), providing a unique data set for yield determination. The LBSN is comprised of five permanent stations surrounding the NTS at regional distances, and data (in digital from post 1983) exists for almost all tests. Modern seismic data processing techniques can be used with this data to apply new methods to better determine the seismic yield. Using mb(Lg) we found that, when compared to published yields, our estimates were low for events over 100 kilotons (kt) and near the published value for events under 40 kt. We are currently measuring seismic-phase amplitudes, examining body- and surface-wave spectra and using seismic waveform modeling techniques to determine the seismic yield of NTS explosions using the waveforms from the LBSN.

  5. Determining Acceptable Explosive Charge Mass Under Different Geological Conditions / Problematyka Wyznaczania Dopuszczalnych Ładunków Mw W Zróżnicowanych Warunkach Geologicznych

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyra, Józef; Sołtys, Anna; Winzer, Jan; Dworzak, Michał; Biessikirski, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    This article presents a procedure for determining the safety of explosive charges for their surrounding environment, using a limestone mine as a case study. Varied geological structures, as well as other constructions in the surrounding area of a mine, sometimes necessitate the use of two or more ground vibration propagation equations, and thus a variety of explosive charges, depending on the area of rock blasting. This is a crucial issue for the contractor, as it is important to blast the rock as few times as possible, while using the maximum amount of explosive charge for each blast. Wykonywanie robót strzałowych w górnictwie polega na odpalaniu mas materiału wybuchowego (MW) celem uzyskania dużej ilości odpowiednio rozdrobnionego urobku. W momencie zwiększonego popytu na surowce skalne zakłady górnicze zmuszone są do zwielokrotnienia wykonywania prac strzałowych aby zapewnić regularne dostawy produktu. Konsekwencją takich działań jest ponoszenie dodatkowych kosztów operacyjnych. Celem ich minimalizacji oraz uzyskania jak największej efektywności prowadzonych robót strzałowych jest wydłużanie serii, a więc stosowanie coraz to większych mas ładunków materiałów wybuchowych. Efektem takiego postępowanie jest możliwość wystąpienia w otoczeniu oddziaływania o potencjalnie szkodliwym charakterze m. in. drgania parasejsmiczne. Aby wyeliminować powyższy problem oraz zapewnić niezbędny komfort mieszkańcom, Prawo geologiczne i górnicze, Prawo ochrony środowiska i rozporządzenia wykonawcze nakładają na podmiot wykonujący roboty strzałowe obowiązek ochrony otoczenia, poprzez prowadzenie działalności profilaktycznej w zakresie kontroli, monitorowania oraz wyznaczania dopuszczalnych mas ładunków MW. W momencie gdy nie ma możliwości ograniczenia niepożądanych wpływów dynamicznych po przez zmianę parametrów siatki strzałowej czy modyfikację struktury czasowo-częstotliwościowej drgań, jedyną możliwością staje si

  6. Atomic-absorption determination of mercury in geological materials by flame and carbon-rod atomisation after solvent extraction and using co-extracted silver as a matrix modifier

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Chao, T.T.

    1983-01-01

    Based on modifications and expansion of the original Tindall's solvent extraction flame atomic-absorption procedure, an atomic-absorption spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of mercury in geological materials. The sample is digested with nitric and hydrochloric acids in a boiling water-bath. The solution is made ammoniacal and potassium iodide and silver nitrate are added. The mercury is extracted into isobutyl methyl ketone as the tetraiodomercurate(ll). Added silver is co-extracted with mercury and serves as a matrix modifier in the carbon-rod atomiser. The mercury in the isobutyl methyl ketone extract may be determined by either the flame- or the carbon-rod atomisation method, depending on the concentration level. The limits of determination are 0.05-10 p.p.m. of mercury for the carbon-rod atomisation and 1 -200 p.p.m. of mercury for the flame atomisation. Mercury values for reference samples obtained by replicate analyses are in good agreement with those reported by other workers, with relative standard deviations ranging from 2.3 to 0.9%. Recoveries of mercury spiked at two levels were 93-106%. Major and trace elements commonly found in geological materials do not interfere.

  7. The "Large" in Large Igneous Provinces: Using Digital Geological Maps to Determine the Area, Magma Flux, and Potential Environmental Impact of the Wrangellia Flood Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoates, J. S.; Greene, A. R.; Weis, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Large igneous provinces (LIPs), such as continental flood basalts and oceanic plateaus, are formed by relatively short duration, massive outpourings of basalt in intraplate settings. Their emplacement has been associated with global climatic and biotic change (e.g., end-Permian Siberian LIP). The magmatic products of a LIP typically cover an area >1 Mkm2, however erosion and exhumation may substantially reduce the original area and volume of a LIP, especially oceanic plateaus that have been tectonically dispersed during accretion (e.g., Caribbean, Wrangellia). The availability of digital geologic maps from government geologic surveys now allows for measuring the precise areal distribution of remnant LIP-products, which is essential information for estimating total volumes and ultimately potential environmental effects. The Wrangellia flood basalts represent one of the best-exposed accreted oceanic plateaus on Earth. This Triassic LIP is exposed in numerous fault-bound blocks in a belt extending discontinuously for 2300 km in the Pacific Northwest of North America. It contains exposures of submarine and subaerial volcanic rocks representing composite stratigraphic thicknesses of 3.5-6 km. From recently compiled digital geologic maps (British Columbia, Yukon, Alaska), the mapped exposures of the Wrangellia flood basalts are relatively small (25,256 km2 with 75% from Vancouver Island), which leads to minimum calculated erupted volumes of up to 1.4 x 105 km3 and an estimated magma flux of 0.03 km3/yr. The original areal distribution was substantially greater, perhaps by an order of magnitude or more, as the outcrop extent does not include regions covered by younger strata and surficial deposits nor does it account for the volcanic component of the terrane that may have been subducted. However, even this minimum volumetric output rate is comparable to recent estimates of long-term volumetric eruption rates for ocean islands such as Iceland (0.02-0.04 km3/yr) and Hawaii

  8. Using Vertical electrical sounding survey and refraction seismic survey for determining the geological layers depths, the structural features and assessment groundwater in Aqaba area in South Jordan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akawwi, Emad; Alzoubi, Abdallah; Ben Abraham, Zvi; Rahamn Abo Alades, Abdel; Alrzouq, Rami; Tiber, Gidon; Neimi, Tina

    2010-05-01

    The study area is the Aqaba region (Southern wadi Araba basin). Aqaba region area located at 87900 and 89000 North and 147000 and 158000 East (Palestine grid). Tectonically Aqaba area lies within the tectonic plate boundary along the Arabian and African plate slide. This plate boundary comprises numerous and shot fault segments. The main aims of this study are to assessing the groundwater potential and its quality, to explain the subsurface geological conditions and support the ongoing geological, environmental and hydrogeological studies. Therefore, it was anticipated that the results of the geophysical surveying will give many different important parameters as The subsurface geological features, thicknesses of the different lithological units, depth to the bed rocks and depth to the water table. The groundwater can apply an important role in ensuring sustainable water supply in the area. This study was carried out in order to assess groundwater condition, geological layers thicknesses and structural features in Aqaba area by using vertical electrical sounding (VES) surveys and refraction seismic techniques. There are three geoelectrical cross section were carried out at different sites by using the Schlumberger array. The first cross section indicated three layers of different resistivity. The second cross section indicated four layers of different resistivity. The third geoelectrical cross sections indicated three layers. The refraction seismic method also has been conducted in the same area as VES. About 12 refraction seismic profiles have been carried out in the study area. The length of the first profile was 745 m at the direction N-S. This profile indicated two different layers with a different velocities. The length of the second profile was 1320 m with E-W direction. This profile indicated two different layers. The length of the third profile was about 515 m with a direction SE-NW. It recognized two different layers with a different velocities. The fourth

  9. Geophysics & Geology Inspected.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, E. R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes findings of a recently published report of the Canadian Geoscience Council, which includes the following topics regarding college geology: facilities; teaching; undergraduate enrollments; postgraduate enrollments; geologic research; and integration of Canadian geoscience with other countries. (CS)

  10. Geologic spatial analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, R.L.; Eliason, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes the development of geologic spatial analysis research which focuses on conducting comprehensive three-dimensional analysis of regions using geologic data sets that can be referenced by latitude, longitude, and elevation/depth. (CBS)

  11. Determining the concentration of individual eruptive events of the CAMP: Distinguishing interflow hiatuses from subterranean alteration and void infilling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, P. E.; Kent, D. V.; Et-Touhami, M.

    2012-04-01

    -filled cracks in the flow and spread laterally at its base; 3) footprints of small subterranean animals. Features that could identify a significant temporal hiatus between flows absolutely require being produced at the land surface including: 1) terrestrial animal footprints too big to fit in the void; and 2) features requiring sunlight, such as in situ above-ground parts of plants, a root or possibly soil profiles terminating upward at paleohorizonatal surfaces, and possibly stromatolites. Using the above critera, most interflow and cross-cutting features in the Moroccan and eastern North America CAMP prove to be post-emplacement subterranean void fillings and alteration phenomena. There is a residuum of hiatuses that correspond to previously recognized geochemical boundaries between flow sequences or paleosecular magnetic directional groups. This weeding out of spurious hiatuses magnifies the concentration of eruptive events by reducing the inferred duration by one or two orders of magnitudes. For example the more than 30 or so individual basalt flows of the Argana and Central High Atlas basins of Morocco can be reduced to perhaps as few as 4 giant eruptions each lasting less than a hundred years or so. It is the magnitude of these events not the total volume that is most relevant CAMP kill mechanisms.

  12. History of Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bork, Kennard B.

    1983-01-01

    Highlights geological history activities during 1982. These include formation of The History of Earth Sciences Societies, publication of a new journal ("Earth Sciences History: The Journal of the History of Earth Sciences Societies"), and presentation of the first history of geology award. Comments on geological history publications are also…

  13. Geologically current plate motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, Charles; Gordon, Richard G.; Argus, Donald F.

    2010-04-01

    We describe best-fitting angular velocities and MORVEL, a new closure-enforced set of angular velocities for the geologically current motions of 25 tectonic plates that collectively occupy 97 per cent of Earth's surface. Seafloor spreading rates and fault azimuths are used to determine the motions of 19 plates bordered by mid-ocean ridges, including all the major plates. Six smaller plates with little or no connection to the mid-ocean ridges are linked to MORVEL with GPS station velocities and azimuthal data. By design, almost no kinematic information is exchanged between the geologically determined and geodetically constrained subsets of the global circuit-MORVEL thus averages motion over geological intervals for all the major plates. Plate geometry changes relative to NUVEL-1A include the incorporation of Nubia, Lwandle and Somalia plates for the former Africa plate, Capricorn, Australia and Macquarie plates for the former Australia plate, and Sur and South America plates for the former South America plate. MORVEL also includes Amur, Philippine Sea, Sundaland and Yangtze plates, making it more useful than NUVEL-1A for studies of deformation in Asia and the western Pacific. Seafloor spreading rates are estimated over the past 0.78 Myr for intermediate and fast spreading centres and since 3.16 Ma for slow and ultraslow spreading centres. Rates are adjusted downward by 0.6-2.6mmyr-1 to compensate for the several kilometre width of magnetic reversal zones. Nearly all the NUVEL-1A angular velocities differ significantly from the MORVEL angular velocities. The many new data, revised plate geometries, and correction for outward displacement thus significantly modify our knowledge of geologically current plate motions. MORVEL indicates significantly slower 0.78-Myr-average motion across the Nazca-Antarctic and Nazca-Pacific boundaries than does NUVEL-1A, consistent with a progressive slowdown in the eastward component of Nazca plate motion since 3.16 Ma. It also

  14. Geologic mapping of MTM quads 40292 and 40297: In the Utopian lowlands north of the Nilosyrtis Mensae, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Steven H.; Zimbelman, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Geologic mapping at 1:500,000 scale of the Mars transverse Mercator (MTM) quads 40292 and 40297 is being conducted under the auspices of the Mars Geologic Mapping Program. The study area is located in the southwestern portion of Utopia Planitia immediately north of the Nilosyrtis Mensae, between latitudes 37.5 and 42.5 degrees and longitudes 290 and 300 degrees. The goals of the mapping are to identify the major geologic features in the study area and to determine the sequence and scope of the geologic events that have modified the lowland side of the global dichotomy boundary in this region in order to at least partially constrain models of dichotomy boundary origin and evolution. The progress made towards achieving these goals is reported.

  15. Geology orbiter comparison study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutts, J. A. J.; Blasius, K. R.; Davis, D. R.; Pang, K. D.; Shreve, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    Instrument requirements of planetary geology orbiters were examined with the objective of determining the feasibility of applying standard instrument designs to a host of terrestrial targets. Within the basic discipline area of geochemistry, gamma-ray, X-ray fluorescence, and atomic spectroscopy remote sensing techniques were considered. Within the discipline area of geophysics, the complementary techniques of gravimetry and radar were studied. Experiments using these techniques were analyzed for comparison at the Moon, Mercury, Mars and the Galilean satellites. On the basis of these comparative assessments, the adaptability of each sensing technique was judged as a basic technique for many targets, as a single instrument applied to many targets, as a single instrument used in different mission modes, and as an instrument capability for nongeoscience objectives.

  16. Synthesis of a new molecularly imprinted polymer for sorption of the silver ions from geological and antiseptic samples for determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hashemi-Moghaddam, Hamid; Yahyazadeh, Faegheh; Vardini, Mohammad Taghi

    2014-01-01

    A new molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was synthesized using methacrylic acid (functional monomer), ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (crosslinker), 2,2'-azobisisobutironitril (initiator), silver (Ag) dithizone complex (template), and chloroform (porogenic solvent). This process was a noncovalent, bulk, thermal radical-polymerization. To compare the performance of this polymer, control polymer (nonimprinted polymer) was prepared under well-defined conditions without the use of a template. Extraction experiments were performed on the MIP and a nonimprinted polymer. Then, various parameters were optimized, such as pH, time, concentration of sample, and type of eluent for elution of Ag from polymer. In addition, interfering effects were investigated on the absorption of Ag by the MIP. This polymer was used for the rapid extraction and preconcentration of Ag from an antiseptic and geological sample. Finally, the amount of Ag was measured by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after preconcentration by the synthesized MIP, and results were compared with a direct inductively coupled plasma method. The results showed high performance of this method in preconcentration of Ag. PMID:25902996

  17. Preliminary applications of Landsat images and aerial photography for determining land-use, geologic, and hydrologic characteristics, Yampa River basin, Colorado and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heimes, F.J.; Moore, G.K.; Steele, T.D.

    1978-01-01

    Expanded energy- and recreation-related activities in the Yampa River basin, Colorado and Wyoming, have caused a rapid increase in economic development which will result in increased demand and competition for natural resources. In planning for efficient allocation of the basin 's natural resources, Landsat images and small-scale color and color-infrared photographs were used for selected geologic, hydrologic and land-use applications within the Yampa River basin. Applications of Landsat data included: (1) regional land-use classification and mapping, (2) lineament mapping, and (3) areal snow-cover mapping. Results from the Landsat investigations indicated that: (1) Landsat land-use classification maps, at a regional level, compared favorably with areal land-use patterns that were defined from available ground information, (2) lineaments were mapped in sufficient detail using recently developed techniques for interpreting aerial photographs, (3) snow cover generally could be mapped for large areas with the exception of some densely forested areas of the basin and areas having a large percentage of winter-season cloud cover. Aerial photographs were used for estimation of turbidity for eight stream locations in the basin. Spectral reflectance values obtained by digitizing photographs were compared with measured turbidity values. Results showed strong correlations (variances explained of greater than 90 percent) between spectral reflectance obtained from color photographs and measured turbidity values. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. Determination of (alpha)-dialkylamino acids and their Enantiomers in Geological Samples by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography after Dervatization with a Chiral Adduct of (omicron)-Phthaldialdehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhoa, Meixun; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    1995-01-01

    Derivatization with (omicron)-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) and the chiral thiol N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) is a convenient and sensitive technique for the HPLC detection and resolution of protein amino acid enantiomers. The kinetics of the reaction of OPA-NAC with (alpha)-dialkylamino acids was investigated. The fluorescence yield of (alpha)-dialkylamino acids was only about 10% of that of protein amino acids when the derivatization was carried out at room temperature for 1-2 min, which is the procedure generally used for protein amino acid analyses. The fluorescence yield of (alpha)-dialkylamino acids can be enhanced by up to ten-fold when the derivatization reaction time is increased to 15 min at room temperature. The OPA-NAC technique was optimized for the detection and enantiomeric resolution of a-dialkylamino acids in geological samples which contain a large excess of protein amino acids. The estimated detection limit for a-dialkylamino acids is 1-2 pmol, comparable to that for protein amino acids.

  19. Determination of porosity and facies trends in a complex carbonate reservoir, by using 3-D seismic, borehole tools, and outcrop geology

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharakis, T.G. Jr.; Comet, J.N.; Murillo, A.A.

    1996-08-01

    Mesozoic carbonate reservoirs are found in the Mediterranean Sea, off the east coast of Spain. A wide variation of porosities are found in the core samples and logs: vuggy, breccia, fractures, and cavern porosity. In addition, complex Tertiary carbonate geometries include olistostromes, breccia bodies, and reef buildups, which are found on top of Mesozoic carbonates. Predicting the porosity trends within these oil productive reservoirs requires an understanding of how primary porosity was further enhanced by secondary processes, including fractures, karstification, and dolomitization in burial conditions. Through an extensive investigation of field histories, outcrop geology, and seismic data, a series of basic reservoir styles have been identified and characterized by well log signature and seismic response. The distribution pattern of the different reservoirs styles is highly heterogeneous, but by integrating subsurface data and outcrop analogs, it is possible to distinguish field-scale and local patterns of both vertical and local variations in reservoir properties. Finally, it is important to quantify these reservoir properties through the study of seismic attributes, such as amplitude variations, and log responses at the reservoir interval. By incorporating 3-D seismic data, through the use of seismic inversion, it is possible to predict porosity trends. Further, the use of geostatistics can lead to the prediction of reservoir development within the carbonate facies.

  20. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in bottom sediment by dual capillary-column gas chromatography with electron-capture detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foreman, William T.; Connor, Brooke F.; Furlong, Edward T.; Vaught, Deborah G.; Merten, Leslie M.

    1995-01-01

    A method for the determination of 30 individual organochlorine pesticides, total toxaphene, and total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in bottom sediment is described. The method isolates the pesticides and PCBs by solvent extraction with dichlorobenzene, removes inorganic sulfur, large naturally occurring molecules, and other unwanted interferences by gel permeation chromatography, and further cleans up and class fractionates the extract using adsorption chromatography. The com- pounds then are instrumentally determined using dual capillary-column gas chromatography with electron-capture detection. Reporting limits range from 1 to 5 micrograms per kilogram for 30 individual pesticides, 50 micrograms per kilogram for total PCBs, and 200 micrograms per kilogram for total toxaphene. The method also is designed to allow the simultaneous isolation of 79 other semivolatile organic compounds from the sediment, which are separately quantified using gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection. The method was developed in support of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment program.

  1. Method of analysis at the U.S. Geological Survey California Water Science Center, Sacramento Laboratory - determination of haloacetic acid formation potential, method validation, and quality-control practices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zazzi, Barbara C.; Crepeau, Kathryn L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2005-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of haloacetic acid formation potential of water samples has been developed by the U.S. Geological Survey California Water Science Center Sacramento Laboratory. The haloacetic acid formation potential is measured by dosing water samples with chlorine under specified conditions of pH, temperature, incubation time, darkness, and residual-free chlorine. The haloacetic acids formed are bromochloroacetic acid, bromodichloroacetic acid, dibromochloroacetic acid, dibromoacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid, monobromoacetic acid, monochloroacetic acid, tribromoacetic acid, and trichloroacetic acid. They are extracted, methylated, and then analyzed using a gas chromatograph equipped with an electron capture detector. Method validation experiments were performed to determine the method accuracy, precision, and detection limit for each of the compounds. Method detection limits for these nine haloacetic acids ranged from 0.11 to 0.45 microgram per liter. Quality-control practices include the use of blanks, quality-control samples, calibration verification standards, surrogate recovery, internal standard, matrix spikes, and duplicates.

  2. DNA methylation analysis determines the high frequency of genic hypomethylation and low frequency of hypermethylation events in plasma cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Salhia, Bodour; Baker, Angela; Ahmann, Gregory; Auclair, Daniel; Fonseca, Rafael; Carpten, John

    2010-09-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy of the bone marrow, which evolves from a premalignant stage called monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). In some patients, an intermediate stage referred to as smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is clinically recognized, with the full-bore malignancy termed MM. We conducted a study to assess differential CpG methylation at 1,500 genic loci during MM progression and profiled CD138(+) plasma cells from MGUS, SMM, and MM specimens; human myeloma cell lines; and normal plasma cell (NPC) samples. We showed that the number of differentially methylated loci (DML) increased with tumor grade, and the vast majority were due to hypomethylation. Hierarchical clustering analysis revealed samples that coclustered tightly with NPC. These cases, referred to as "normal-like," contained significantly fewer DML when compared with their non-normal-like counterparts and displayed overall methylation levels resembling NPC. This study represents one of the first methylome interrogation studies in MM and points toward global hypomethylation at genic CpG loci as an important and early mechanism driving myelomagenesis. Determining the set of critical genes and pathways based on the myeloma methylome is expected to lead to an improved understanding of biological mechanisms involved in myelomagenesis. PMID:20736376

  3. An analytical program for determination and confirmation of airborne levels of chemical agent in the event of a suspected release

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, D.G.; Jakubowski, E.M.

    1995-12-31

    The Monitoring Branch Laboratory of the US Army Operations Directorate, Chemical Support Division is uniquely outfitted to respond quickly when the need arises to identify and measure atmospheric contamination levels of military unique compounds. Samples collected with a vacuum pump on solid sorbent tubes are initially screened using gas chromatography (GC) and a sulfur/phosphorus specific detector to determine and quantify the presence or absence of contaminants. Positive samples from the first stage of testing are subjected to subsequent analysis with different detectors to confirm genuine positives and eliminate false positives. Subsequent testing provides information during follow-up and site remediation activities through screening of soil and other environmental samples. Monitoring Branch uses Depot Area Air Monitoring Systems (DAAMS) technology in which a sample is collected onto a solid sorbent tube, and subsequently analyzed through thermal desorption of the sample into a gas chromatograph equipped with a simultaneous dual Flame Photometric Detector (FPD) for sulfur and phosphorus detection. Confirmation is accomplished using the same solid sorbent/thermal desorption/GC instrumentation with Atomic Emission Detection to confirm through elemental analysis and Mass Spectrophotometric Detection for structural confirmation. Soil and other environmental samples such as building debris are extracted manually using an organic solvent and analyzed using DAAMS technology and the same variety of detectors.

  4. Geomorphology in North American Geology Departments, 1971

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Sidney E.; Malcolm, Marshall D.

    1972-01-01

    Presents results of a 1970-71 survey of 350 geomorphologists and geology departments to determine what sort of geomorphology is being taught in the colleges and universities of the United States and Canada. (PR)

  5. Surficial geologic map of the southeast Memphis Quadrangle, Shelby County, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, David W.; Diehl, Sharon F.

    2004-01-01

    The depiction of geology on this map is designed to aid in urban planning and analysis of potential damage in the event of strong earthquake motion. The geologic map by itself does not analyze potential earthquake damage, but is designed to be used by seismologists who perform such analyses. Wind-deposited silt and clayey silt (loess) is the predominant surficial deposit. Loess entirely covers the upland (everyplace in the map area that is not a valley occupied by a stream) to depths of 4.5-16 m. The second most abundant deposit is silty alluvium, which is confined to the narrow floodplains and is 1-10 m thick. Sparse, unconsolidated, pebbly sand alluvium is 0.5-3 m thick and is confined to point bars and channel deposits in the narrow, incised channel of Nonconnah Creek. The nature of geologic materials to a degree determines the severity of damage to infrastructure sustained during a strong earthquake.

  6. Hydromechanical coupling in geologic processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    Earth's porous crust and the fluids within it are intimately linked through their mechanical effects on each other. This paper presents an overview of such "hydromechanical" coupling and examines current understanding of its role in geologic processes. An outline of the theory of hydromechanics and rheological models for geologic deformation is included to place various analytical approaches in proper context and to provide an introduction to this broad topic for nonspecialists. Effects of hydromechanical coupling are ubiquitous in geology, and can be local and short-lived or regional and very long-lived. Phenomena such as deposition and erosion, tectonism, seismicity, earth tides, and barometric loading produce strains that tend to alter fluid pressure. Resulting pressure perturbations can be dramatic, and many so-called "anomalous" pressures appear to have been created in this manner. The effects of fluid pressure on crustal mechanics are also profound. Geologic media deform and fail largely in response to effective stress, or total stress minus fluid pressure. As a result, fluid pressures control compaction, decompaction, and other types of deformation, as well as jointing, shear failure, and shear slippage, including events that generate earthquakes. By controlling deformation and failure, fluid pressures also regulate states of stress in the upper crust. Advances in the last 80 years, including theories of consolidation, transient groundwater flow, and poroelasticity, have been synthesized into a reasonably complete conceptual framework for understanding and describing hydromechanical coupling. Full coupling in two or three dimensions is described using force balance equations for deformation coupled with a mass conservation equation for fluid flow. Fully coupled analyses allow hypothesis testing and conceptual model development. However, rigorous application of full coupling is often difficult because (1) the rheological behavior of geologic media is complex

  7. Geologic age: using radioactive decay to determine geologic age

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1997-01-01

    At the close of the 18th century, the haze of fantasy and mysticism that tended to obscure the true nature of the Earth was being swept away. Careful studies by scientists showed that rocks had diverse origins. Some rock layers, containing clearly identifiable fossil remains of fish and other forms of aquatic animal and plant life, originally formed in the ocean. Other layers, consisting of sand grains winnowed clean by the pounding surf, obviously formed as beach deposits that marked the shorelines of ancient seas. Certain layers are in the form of sand bars and gravel banks -- rock debris spread over the land by streams. Some rocks were once lava flows or beds of cinders and ash thrown out of ancient volcanoes; others are portions of large masses of once-molten rock that cooled very slowly far beneath the Earth's surface. Other rocks were so transformed by heat and pressure during the heaving and buckling of the Earth's crust in periods of mountain building that their original features were obliterated.

  8. Risk-Based Management of Contaminated Groundwater: The Role of Geologic Heterogeneity, Exposure and Cancer Risk in Determining the Performance of Aquifer Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R.M.; Carle, S.F.; Tompson, A.F.B.

    2000-04-07

    The effectiveness of aquifer remediation is typically expressed in terms of a reduction in contaminant concentrations relative to a regulated maximum contaminant level (MCL), and is usually confined by sparse monitoring data and/or simple model calculations. Here, the effectiveness of remediation is examined from a risk-based perspective that goes beyond the traditional MCL concept. A methodology is employed to evaluate the health risk to individuals exposed to contaminated household water that is produced from groundwater. This approach explicitly accounts for differences in risk arising from variability in individual physiology and water use, the uncertainty in estimating chemical carcinogenesis for different individuals, and the uncertainties and variability in contaminant concentrations within groundwater. A hypothetical contamination scenario is developed as a case study in a saturated, alluvial aquifer underlying a real Superfund site. A baseline (unremediated) human exposure and health risk scenario, as induced by contaminated groundwater pumped from this site, is predicted and compared with a similar estimate based upon pump-and-treat exposure intervention. The predicted reduction in risk in the remediation scenario is not an equitable one--that is, it is not uniform to all individuals within a population and varies according to the level of uncertainty in prediction. The importance of understanding the detailed hydrogeologic connections that are established in the heterogeneous geologic regime between the contaminated source, municipal receptors, and remediation wells, and its relationship to this uncertainty is demonstrated. Using two alternative pumping rates, we develop cost-benefit curves based upon reduced exposure and risk to different individuals within the population, under the presence of uncertainty.

  9. The geology and geophysics of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    The current state of knowledge concerning the regional geology and geophysics of Mars is summarized. Telescopic observations of the planet are reviewed, pre-Mariner models of its interior are discussed, and progress achieved with the Mariner flybys, especially that of Mariner 9, is noted. A map of the Martian geological provinces is presented to provide a summary of the surface geology and morphology. The contrast between the northern and southern hemispheres is pointed out, and the characteristic features of the surface are described in detail. The global topography of the planet is examined along with its gravitational field, gravity anomalies, and moment of inertia. The general sequence of events in Martian geological history is briefly outlined.

  10. Rheology and density of glucose syrup and honey: Determining their suitability for usage in analogue and fluid dynamic models of geological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellart, W. P.

    2011-06-01

    glucose syrup and honey, respectively. The new results demonstrate that glucose syrups and (to a lesser degree) honeys are well suited for usage in analogue and fluid dynamic experiments to represent linear-viscous strain independent and shear rate independent rheologies to model geological processes. Glucose syrups have the added advantage of being more transparent than honeys, allowing for accurately resolving and quantifying flow patterns in the fluid during a model run.

  11. Sedimentology and petroleum geology

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorlykke, K.O. )

    1989-01-01

    This book presents an introduction to sedimentology as well as petroleum geology. It integrates both subjects, which are closely related but mostly treated separately. The author covers the basic aspects of sedimentology, sedimentary geochemistry and diagenesis. Principles of stratigraphy, seismic stratigraphy and basin modelling forms the base for the part on petroleum geology. Subjects discussed include the composition of kerogen and hydrocarbons, theories of migration and trapping of hydrocarbons and properties of reservoir rocks. Introductions to well logging and production geology are given.

  12. Geologic Map of the Umiat Quadrangle, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mull, Charles G.; Houseknecht, David W.; Pessel, G.H.; Garrity, Christopher P.

    2004-01-01

    This geologic map of the Umiat quadrangle is a compilation of previously published USGS geologic maps and unpublished mapping done for the Richfield Oil Corporation. Geologic mapping from these three primary sources was augmented with additional unpublished map data from British Petroleum Company. This report incorporates recent revisions in stratigraphic nomenclature. Stratigraphic and structural interpretations were revised with the aid of modern high-resolution color infrared aerial photographs. The revised geologic map was checked in the field during the summers of 2001 and 2002. The geologic unit descriptions on this map give detailed information on thicknesses, regional distributions, age determinations, and depositional environments. The paper version of this map is available for purchase from the USGS Store.

  13. Oligocene to Recent tectonic history of the Central Solomon intra-arc basin as determined from marine seismic reflection data and compilation of onland geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, Shane; Mann, Paul; Coffin, M. F.; Shipley, Thomas H.

    2004-10-01

    Systematic analysis of a grid of 3450 km of multichannel seismic reflection lines from the Solomon Islands constrains the late Tertiary sedimentary and tectonic history of the Solomon Island arc and its convergent interaction with the Cretaceous Ontong Java oceanic plateau (OJP). The OJP, the largest oceanic plateau on Earth, subducted beneath the northern edge of the Solomon arc in the late Neogene, but the timing and consequences of this obliquely convergent event and its role in the subduction polarity reversal process remain poorly constrained. The Central Solomon intra-arc basin (CSB), which developed in Oligocene to Recent time above the Solomon arc, provides a valuable record of the tectonic environment prior to and accompanying the OJP convergent event and the subsequent arc polarity reversal. Recognition of regionally extensive stratigraphic sequences—whose ages can be inferred from marine sedimentary sections exposed onland in the Solomon Islands—indicate four distinct tectonic phases affecting the Solomon Island arc. Phase 1: Late Oligocene-Late Miocene rifting of the northeast-facing Solomon Island arc produced basal, normal-fault-controlled, asymmetrical sequences of the CSB; the proto-North Solomon trench was probably much closer to the CSB and is inferred to coincide with the trace of the present-day Kia-Kaipito-Korigole (KKK) fault zone; this protracted period of intra-arc extension shows no evidence for interruption by an early Miocene period of convergent "soft docking" of the Ontong Java Plateau as proposed by previous workers. Phase 2: Late Miocene-Pliocene oblique convergence of the Ontong Java Plateau at the proto-North Solomon trench (KKK fault zone) and folding of the CSB and formation of the Malaita accretionary prism (MAP); the highly oblique and diachronous convergence between the Ontong Java plateau and the Solomon arc terminates intra-arc extension first in the southeast (Russell subbasin of the CSB) during the Late Miocene and

  14. Meteorites, the Moon and the History of Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marvin, Ursula B.

    1986-01-01

    Traces the historical events that linked geology with the planetary sciences. Reviews the origins of meteorities as a modern science and highlights the advances made in this area. Discusses lunar related theories and research. (ML)

  15. Biochemical monitoring of water after the Cannikin event, Amchitka Island, Alaska, August 1973

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ballance, Wilbur C.

    1973-01-01

    Radiochemical data from the Amchitka Island study area were obtained from water samples collected by the U.S. Geological Survey during August 1973. Tritium determinations were made on 86 samples collected and gross alpha and gross beta/gamma determinations were made on 38 samples. The range of data for these samples was equal or less than the range of values obtained before the Cannikin event.

  16. Reconnaissance for determining effects of land use and surficial geology on concentrations of selected elements on streambed materials from the coal-mining region, southwestern Indiana, October 1979 to March 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilber, W.G.; Boje, Rita R.

    1982-01-01

    Streambed materials were collected in October 1979 from 69 watersheds in Southwest Indiana having predominantly forested, agricultural, reclaimed, and unreclaimed mined land use to determine whether concentrations of sorbed and acid-soluble metals and trace elements were affected by land use and surficial geology. Analysis of variance indicated that 10% or more of the total variation in aluminum, arsenic, cobalt, iron, nickel, selenium, and zinc concentrations on streambed materials was accounted for by differences in land use. Concentrations of aluminum, cobalt, iron, nickel, selenium, and zinc on streambed materials smaller than 0.062-millimeter from mined watersheds were significantly greater than the concentrations of these elements on streambed materials from agricultural and forested watersheds. The greater concentrations of these elements on streambed materials are due to (1) their concentrations in mine drainage and their subsequent absorption and (or) copecipitation with the oxides and hydroxides of aluminum and iron and (2) their concentrations in coal and pyritic material in streambed materials. (USGS)

  17. Use of Ga for mass bias correction for the accurate determination of copper isotope ratio in the NIST SRM 3114 Cu standard and geological samples by MC-ICP MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Zhou, L.; Tong, S.

    2015-12-01

    The absolute determination of the Cu isotope ratio in NIST SRM 3114 based on a regression mass bias correction model is performed for the first time with NIST SRM 944 Ga as the calibrant. A value of 0.4471±0.0013 (2SD, n=37) for the 65Cu/63Cu ratio was obtained with a value of +0.18±0.04 ‰ (2SD, n=5) for δ65Cu relative to NIST 976.The availability of the NIST SRM 3114 material, now with the absolute value of the 65Cu/63Cu ratio and a δ65Cu value relative to NIST 976 makes it suitable as a new candidate reference material for Cu isotope studies. In addition, a protocol is described for the accurate and precise determination of δ65Cu values of geological reference materials. Purification of Cu from the sample matrix was performed using the AG MP-1M Bio-Rad resin. The column recovery for geological samples was found to be 100±2% (2SD, n=15).A modified method of standard-sample bracketing with internal normalization for mass bias correction was employed by adding natural Ga to both the sample and the solution of NIST SRM 3114, which was used as the bracketing standard. An absolute value of 0.4471±0.0013 (2SD, n=37) for 65Cu/63Cu quantified in this study was used to calibrate the 69Ga/71Ga ratio in the two adjacent bracketing standards of SRM 3114,their average value of 69Ga/71Ga was then used to correct the 65Cu/63Cu ratio in the sample. Measured δ65Cu values of 0.18±0.04‰ (2SD, n=20),0.13±0.04‰ (2SD, n=9),0.08±0.03‰ (2SD, n=6),0.01±0.06‰(2SD, n=4) and 0.26±0.04‰ (2SD, n=7) were obtained for five geological reference materials of BCR-2,BHVO-2,AGV-2,BIR-1a,and GSP-2,respectively,in agreement with values obtained in previous studies.

  18. The Geologic Time Spiral - A Path to the Past

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, Joseph; Newman, William; Stacy, John

    2008-01-01

    The Earth is very old - 4.5 billion years or more according to scientific estimates. Most of the evidence for an ancient Earth is contained in the rocks that form the Earth's crust. The rock layers themselves - like pages in a long and complicated history - record the events of the past, and buried within them are the remains of life - the plants and animals that evolved from organic structures that existed 3 billion years ago. Also contained in rocks once molten are radioactive elements whose isotopes provide Earth with an atomic clock. Within these rocks, 'parent' isotopes decay at a predictable rate to form 'daughter' isotopes. By determining the relative amounts of parent and daughter isotopes, the age of these rocks can be calculated. Thus, the scientific evidence from rock layers, from fossils, and from the ages of rocks as measured by atomic clocks attests to a very old Earth. See USGS Fact Sheet 2007-3015 at http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2007/3015/ for ages of geologic time periods. Ages in the spiral have been rounded from the age estimates in the Fact Sheet. B.Y., billion years; M.Y., million years. For more information, see the booklet on Geologic Time at http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/geotime/. The Geologic Time Spiral poster is available for purchase from the USGS Store.

  19. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of low-level silver by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Damrau, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    Increased awareness of the quality of water in the United States has led to the development of a method for determining low levels (0.2-5.0 microg/L) of silver in water samples. Use of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry provides a sensitive, precise, and accurate method for determining low-level silver in samples of low ionic-strength water, precipitation water, and natural water. The minimum detection limit determined for low-level silver is 0.2 microg/L. Precision data were collected on natural-water samples and SRWS (Standard Reference Water Samples). The overall percent relative standard deviation for natural-water samples with silver concentrations more than 0.2 microg/L was less than 40 percent throughout the analytical range. For the SRWS with concentrations more than 0.2 microg/L, the overall percent relative standard deviation was less than 25 percent throughout the analytical range. The accuracy of the results was determined by spiking 6 natural-water samples with different known concentrations of the silver standard. The recoveries ranged from 61 to 119 percent at the 0.5-microg/L spike level. At the 1.25-microg/L spike level, the recoveries ranged from 92 to 106 percent. For the high spike level at 3.0 microg/L, the recoveries ranged from 65 to 113 percent. The measured concentrations of silver obtained from known samples were within the Branch of Quality Assurance accepted limits of 1 1/2 standard deviations on the basis of the SRWS program for Inter-Laboratory studies.

  20. Investigation of novel rapidly synergistic cloud point extraction pattern for bismuth in water and geological samples coupling with flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiaodong; Zhao, Yu; Deng, Qingwen; Ji, Shoulian; Zhao, Xia; Guo, Jie

    2012-04-01

    Rapidly synergistic cloud point extraction (RS-CPE) greatly simplified and accelerated the procedure of traditional cloud point extraction (CPE). In order to expand the application of RS-CPE, this work was carried out after the establishment of the improved extraction technique. The new established extraction method was firstly applied for bismuth extraction and determination coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) in this work. The improved RS-CPE was accomplished in the room temperature in 1 min. Non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 (TX-100) was used as extractant. Octanol worked as cloud point revulsant and synergic reagent. TX-100 has a relatively high cloud point temperature (CPT), which limited its application in CPE. In this work, TX-100 accomplished the RS-CPE procedure in room temperature successfully. The factors influencing RS-CPE, such as concentrations of reagents, pH, conditions of phase separation, effect of environmental temperatures, salt effect and instrumental conditions, were studied systematically. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for bismuth was 4.0 μg L(-1), with sensitivity enhancement factor (EF) of 43. The proposed method greatly improved the sensitivity of FAAS for the determination of bismuth and was applied to the determination of trace bismuth in real and certified samples with satisfactory analytical results. The proposed method was rapid, simple, and sensitive.

  1. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; preparation procedure for aquatic biological material determined for trace metals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, Gerald L.

    1996-01-01

    A method for the chemical preparation of tissue samples that are subsequently analyzed for 22 trace metals is described. The tissue-preparation procedure was tested with three National Institute of Standards and Technology biological standard reference materials and two National Water Quality Laboratory homogenized biological materials. A low-temperature (85 degrees Celsius) nitric acid digestion followed by the careful addition of hydrogen peroxide (30-percent solution) is used to decompose the biological material. The solutions are evaporated to incipient dryness, reconstituted with 5 percent nitric acid, and filtered. After filtration the solutions were diluted to a known volume and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), and cold vapor-atomic absorption spectrophotometry (CV-AAS). Many of the metals were determined by both ICP-MS and ICP-AES. This report does not provide a detailed description of the instrumental procedures and conditions used with the three types of instrumentation for the quantitation of trace metals determined in this study. Statistical data regarding recovery, accuracy, and precision for individual trace metals determined in the biological material tested are summarized.

  2. Investigation of novel rapidly synergistic cloud point extraction pattern for bismuth in water and geological samples coupling with flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiaodong; Zhao, Yu; Deng, Qingwen; Ji, Shoulian; Zhao, Xia; Guo, Jie

    2012-04-01

    Rapidly synergistic cloud point extraction (RS-CPE) greatly simplified and accelerated the procedure of traditional cloud point extraction (CPE). In order to expand the application of RS-CPE, this work was carried out after the establishment of the improved extraction technique. The new established extraction method was firstly applied for bismuth extraction and determination coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) in this work. The improved RS-CPE was accomplished in the room temperature in 1 min. Non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 (TX-100) was used as extractant. Octanol worked as cloud point revulsant and synergic reagent. TX-100 has a relatively high cloud point temperature (CPT), which limited its application in CPE. In this work, TX-100 accomplished the RS-CPE procedure in room temperature successfully. The factors influencing RS-CPE, such as concentrations of reagents, pH, conditions of phase separation, effect of environmental temperatures, salt effect and instrumental conditions, were studied systematically. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for bismuth was 4.0 μg L-1, with sensitivity enhancement factor (EF) of 43. The proposed method greatly improved the sensitivity of FAAS for the determination of bismuth and was applied to the determination of trace bismuth in real and certified samples with satisfactory analytical results. The proposed method was rapid, simple, and sensitive.

  3. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of the total phosphorus by a Kjeldahl digestion method and an automated colorimetric finish that includes dialysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, Charles J.; Truitt, Earl P.

    1992-01-01

    A method to determine total phosphorus (TP) in the same digests prepared for total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) determinations is desribed. The batch, high-temperature (block digester), HG(II)-catalyzed digestion step is similar to U.S. Geological Survey methods I-2552-85/I-4552-85 and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency method 365.4 except that sample and reagent volumes are halved. Prepared digests are desolvated at 220 degrees Celsius and digested at 370 degrees Celsius in separate block digesters set at these temperatures, rather than in a single, temperature-programmed block digester. This approach is used in the method escribed here, which permits 40 calibrants, reference waters, and smaples to be digested and resolvated in about an hour. Orthophosphate ions originally present in samples, along with those released during the digestion step, are determined colorimetrically at a rate of 90 tests per hour by an automated version of the phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue procedure. About 100 microliters of digest are required per determination. The upper concentration limit is 2 milligrams per liter (mg/L) with a method detection limt of 0.01 mg/L. Repeatability for a sample containing approximately 1.6 mg/L of TP in a high suspended-solids matrix is 0.7 percent. Between-day precision for the same sample is 5.0 percent. A dialyzer in the air-segmented continuous flow analyzer provides on-line digest cleanup, eliminated particulates that otherwise would interfere in the colorimetric finish. An single-channel analyzer can process the resolvated digests from two pairs of block digesters each hour. Paired t-test analysis of TP concentrations for approximately 1,600 samples determined by the new method (U.S. Geologial Survey methods I-2610-91 and I-4610-91) and the old method (U.S. Geological Survey methods I-2600-85 and I-4600-85) revealed positive bias in the former of 0.02 to 0.04 mg/L for surface-water samples in agreement with previous studies. Concentrations of total

  4. Topographic precursors and geological structures of deep-seated catastrophic landslides caused by typhoon Talas, determined from the analysis of high-resolution DEMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigira, Masahiro; Tsou, Ching-Ying; Matsushi, Yuki

    2013-04-01

    Typhoon Talas crossed the Japanese Islands between 2 and 5 September 2011, causing more than 70 deep-seated catastrophic landslides in a Jurassic to Paleogene-Early Miocene accretion complex. Detailed examination of the topographic features of 10 large landslides before the event, recorded on DEMs with a resolution of 1 m (based on airborne laser scanner surveys), showed that all of the landslides had small scarplets near their future crowns prior to the slide, and one landslide had linear depressions along its future crown as precursor topographic features. These scarplets and linear depressions were caused by gravitational slope deformation that preceded the catastrophic failure. Strains, defined by the ratio of the length of a scarplet to the length of the whole slope (as measured along the slope line), ranged from 5% to 21%, and are the first reliable numerical data relating to the topographic precursor features of large and catastrophic landslides. Careful examination of aerial photographs from another four large landslides, for which no high-resolution DEMs were available, suggested that they also developed scarplets at their heads beforehand, which are not precisely quantified. Twelve of the 14 landslides we surveyed in the field had sliding surfaces with wedge-shaped discontinuities that consisted of faults, shear surfaces that formed during accretion, and bedding, suggesting that the buildup of pore pressure occurs readily in a gravitationally deformed rock body containing wedge-shaped discontinuities. Other types of gravitational deformation were also active; e.g., flexural toppling and buckling were each observed to have preceded one landslide.

  5. Interpreting Urban Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannibal, Joseph Timothy; Schmidt, Mark Thomas

    1991-01-01

    Describes field trips to urban locations for geological instruction. The program was developed by the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. Authors claim these field trips have been an effective and enjoyable way of conveying a wide variety of geological information to participants at all levels and backgrounds and have created favorable publicity.…

  6. People and Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides background information on the many natural resources we extract from the earth's crust, including metals, graphite, and other minerals, as well as fossil fuels. Contains teaching activities such as a geologic scavenger hunt, a geology chronology, and the recycling of aluminum. Includes a reproducible handout for the activity on aluminum.…

  7. Advances in planetary geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronow, A. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    This second issue in a new series intended to serve the planetary geology community with a form for quick and thorough communications includes (1) a catalog of terrestrial craterform structures for northern Europe; (2) abstracts of results of the Planetary Geology Program, and (3) a list of the photographic holdings of regional planetary image facilities.

  8. Radiometric Dating in Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankhurst, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Described are several aspects and methods of quantitatively measuring geologic time using a constant-rate natural process of radioactive decay. Topics include half lives and decay constants, radiogenic growth, potassium-argon dating, rubidium-strontium dating, and the role of geochronology in support of geological exploration. (DS)

  9. Glossary of geology

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, R.L.; Jackson, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    This third edition of the Glossary of Geology contains approximately 37,000 terms, or 1,000 more than the second edition. New entries are especially numerous in the fields of carbonate sedimentology, hydrogeology, marine geology, mineralogy, ore deposits, plate tectonics, snow and ice, and stratigraphic nomenclature. Many of the definitions provide background information.

  10. Geology of the Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, William P.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes some of the geologic characteristics of the Caribbean region. Discusses the use of some new techniques, including broad-range swath imaging of the sea floor that produces photograph-like images, and satellite measurement of crustal movements, which may help to explain the complex geology of the region. (TW)

  11. Advances in Planetary Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronow, A. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Advances in Planetary Geology is a new series intended to serve the planetary geology community with a form for quick and thorough communications. There are no set lists of acceptable topics or formats, and submitted manuscripts will not undergo a formal review. All submissions should be in a camera ready form, preferably spaced, and submitted to the editor.

  12. Geologic time scale bookmark

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2012-01-01

    This bookmark, designed for use with U.S. Geological Survey activities at the 2nd USA Science and Engineering Festival (April 26–29, 2012), is adapted from the more detailed Fact Sheet 2010–3059 "Divisions of Geologic Time." The information that it presents is widely sought by educators and students.

  13. Method of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey California District Sacramento Laboratory?Determination of Trihalomethane Formation Potential, Method Validation, and Quality-Control Practices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crepeau, Kathryn L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Bush, Noel

    2004-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of the trihalomethane formation potential of water samples has been developed. The trihalomethane formation potential is measured by dosing samples with chlorine under specified conditions of pH, temperature, incubation time, darkness, and residual-free chlorine, and then analyzing the resulting trihalomethanes by purge and trap/gas chromatography equipped with an electron capture detector. Detailed explanations of the method and quality-control practices are provided. Method validation experiments showed that the trihalomethane formation potential varies as a function of time between sample collection and analysis, residual-free chlorine concentration, method of sample dilution, and the concentration of bromide in the sample.

  14. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of inorganic and organic constituents in water and fluvial sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, M. J., (Edited By)

    1993-01-01

    Methods to be used to analyze samples of water, suspended sediment and bottom material for their content of inorganic and organic constituents are presented. Technology continually changes, and so this laboratory manual includes new and revised methods for determining the concentration of dissolved constituents in water, whole water recoverable constituents in water-suspended sediment samples, and recoverable concentration of constit- uents in bottom material. For each method, the general topics covered are the application, the principle of the method, interferences, the apparatus and reagents required, a detailed description of the analytical procedure, reporting results, units and significant figures, and analytical precision data. Included in this manual are 30 methods.

  15. Analysis of Geological Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Neville J.; Cosgrove, John W.

    1990-08-01

    A knowledge of structural geology is fundamental to understanding the processes by which the earth's crust has evolved. It is a subject of fundamental importance to students of geology, experienced field geologists and academic researchers as well as to petroleum and mining engineers. In contrast to many structural textbooks which dwell upon geometrical descriptions of geological structures, this book emphasises mechanical principles and the way in which they can be used to understand how and why a wide range of geological structures develop. Structures on all scales are considered but the emphasis of the book is on those that can be seen on the scale of hand specimen or outcrop. Drawing on their considerable teaching experience the authors present a coherent and lucid analysis of geological structures which will be welcomed by a wide variety of earth scientists.

  16. Geologic Mapping of the Meridiani Region, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hynek, B. M.

    2008-01-01

    The light toned bedrock that has been observed at the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity landing site is an upper layer in a sequence >600 m thick in places. These outcrops contain mineral and textural signatures that require interaction of, and possibly formation from, water. Many distinct layers are visible in the remote sensing data (e.g. Figure 1) and no work has ever characterized the full set of these materials that cover an area >3 105 km2 spanning 20 of longitude. Thus, whatever water-related process( es?) altered, and possibly formed, the rocks at the Opportunity landing site extended over a vast region of Mars. Yet many questions remain to be answered, such as: (1) in what capacity did water form and alter the deposits?, (2) what are the temporal and spatial relations with other major events known from ancient Mars?, and (3) would this type of environment have been conducive to the development of life? To address these questions we are completing a detailed geologic, stratigraphic, and thermophysical properties study of this widespread terrain. Specifically, we are drafting a 1:2M-scale geological map covering the full extent of these water-related deposits. In tandem with the mapping, Hynek and Phillips [1] have conducted a preliminary stratigraphic analysis of the stack of materials. After mapping is complete, we will study the thermophysical properties of the varied layers to derive possible compositional information of the materials. These tasks serve several purposes including gaining an understanding of the complex nature of these materials, their potential source region(s), and their timing of emplacement. All of these efforts are necessary to place the observations by the Opportunity Rover in a broader context and prepare for potential future landed missions to the region. Understanding the large-scale paleohydrology of Mars is central to NASA s goals and vital for determining if life ever arose on the planet.

  17. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of chromium in water by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLain, B.J.

    1993-01-01

    Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry is a sensitive, precise, and accurate method for the determination of chromium in natural water samples. The detection limit for this analytical method is 0.4 microg/L with a working linear limit of 25.0 microg/L. The precision at the detection limit ranges from 20 to 57 percent relative standard deviation (RSD) with an improvement to 4.6 percent RSD for concentrations more than 3 microg/L. Accuracy of this method was determined for a variety of reference standards that was representative of the analytical range. The results were within the established standard deviations. Samples were spiked with known concentrations of chromium with recoveries ranging from 84 to 122 percent. In addition, a comparison of data between graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry and direct-current plasma atomic emission spectrometry resulted in suitable agreement between the two methods, with an average deviation of +/- 2.0 microg/L throughout the analytical range.

  18. Direct ICP-MS determination of trace and ultratrace elements in geological materials after decomposition in a microwave oven. I. Quantitation of Y, Th, U and the lanthanides.

    PubMed

    Gupta, J G; Bertrand, N B

    1995-11-01

    A microwave digestion technique using a mixture of HF + HNO(3) + HCl + H(3)BO(3) was found to be effective for the rapid dissolution of various silicate rock and sediment reference samples. From the solutions thus prepared, it was possible to determine quantitatively trace and ultratrace amounts of yttrium, thorium, uranium and the lanthanides by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) without any separation of matrix elements or preconcentration. In the ICP-MS determinations, oxide and non-spectral interferences on individual masses of the rare earth element ions were corrected by the method of algebraic approach of elimination and dilution, respectively, and measurement drift was controlled by ruthenium and rhenium internal standards. The method yielded excellent results comparable with "recommended", "consensus" and "working" values of the literature for the specified elements on various well-known international reference materials such as andesite (AGV-1), basalts (BCR-1, BHVO-1, BIR-1 and BE-N), granites (G-2 and NIM-G), syenite (SY-2), gabbro (MRG-1), diabase (W-2 and DNC-1), marine mud (MAG-1), river sediment (NBS 1645), lake sediments (LKSD-1-LKSD-4) and stream sediment (GSD-1, GSD-5, GSD-6 and STSD-1-STSD-4)). New values for Er, Gd, Ho, Pr and Tm in LKSD-1-LKSD-4 and STSD-1-STSD-4, and Er, Ho, Lu, Nd, Pr, Tb, Tm and Yb in NBS 1645 are first reported in this work.

  19. Direct ICP-MS determination of trace and ultratrace elements in geological materials after decomposition in a microwave oven. I. Quantitation of Y, Th, U and the lanthanides.

    PubMed

    Gupta, J G; Bertrand, N B

    1995-11-01

    A microwave digestion technique using a mixture of HF + HNO(3) + HCl + H(3)BO(3) was found to be effective for the rapid dissolution of various silicate rock and sediment reference samples. From the solutions thus prepared, it was possible to determine quantitatively trace and ultratrace amounts of yttrium, thorium, uranium and the lanthanides by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) without any separation of matrix elements or preconcentration. In the ICP-MS determinations, oxide and non-spectral interferences on individual masses of the rare earth element ions were corrected by the method of algebraic approach of elimination and dilution, respectively, and measurement drift was controlled by ruthenium and rhenium internal standards. The method yielded excellent results comparable with "recommended", "consensus" and "working" values of the literature for the specified elements on various well-known international reference materials such as andesite (AGV-1), basalts (BCR-1, BHVO-1, BIR-1 and BE-N), granites (G-2 and NIM-G), syenite (SY-2), gabbro (MRG-1), diabase (W-2 and DNC-1), marine mud (MAG-1), river sediment (NBS 1645), lake sediments (LKSD-1-LKSD-4) and stream sediment (GSD-1, GSD-5, GSD-6 and STSD-1-STSD-4)). New values for Er, Gd, Ho, Pr and Tm in LKSD-1-LKSD-4 and STSD-1-STSD-4, and Er, Ho, Lu, Nd, Pr, Tb, Tm and Yb in NBS 1645 are first reported in this work. PMID:18966393

  20. Separation and Enrichment of Gold in Water, Geological and Environmental Samples by Solid Phase Extraction on Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Prior to its Determination by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duran, Ali; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes the application of multi-walled carbon nanotubes as a solid sorbent for the preconcentration of gold prior to its flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination. Extraction was achieved by using a glass column (15.0 cm in length and 1.0 cm in diameter). Quantitative recoveries were obtained in the pH range of 2.5-4.0; the elution step was carried out with 5.0 ml of 1.0 mol/L HNO3 in acetone. In the ligand-free study, variables such as pH, eluent type, sample volume, flow rates, and matrix effect were examined for the optimum recovery of gold ions. The gold ions were able to be pre-concentrated by a factor of 150 and their LOD was determined to be 1.71 μg/L. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the developed method, addition-recovery tests were applied for the tap water, mineral water, and sea water samples. Gold recovery studies were implemented using a wet digestion technique for mine and soil samples taken from various media, and this method was also applied for anodic slime samples taken from the factories located in the Kayseri Industrial Zone of Turkey.

  1. Separation and Enrichment of Gold in Water, Geological and Environmental Samples by Solid Phase Extraction on Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Prior to its Determination by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duran, Ali; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes the application of multi-walled carbon nanotubes as a solid sorbent for the preconcentration of gold prior to its flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination. Extraction was achieved by using a glass column (15.0 cm in length and 1.0 cm in diameter). Quantitative recoveries were obtained in the pH range of 2.5-4.0; the elution step was carried out with 5.0 ml of 1.0 mol/L HNO3 in acetone. In the ligand-free study, variables such as pH, eluent type, sample volume, flow rates, and matrix effect were examined for the optimum recovery of gold ions. The gold ions were able to be pre-concentrated by a factor of 150 and their LOD was determined to be 1.71 μg/L. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the developed method, addition-recovery tests were applied for the tap water, mineral water, and sea water samples. Gold recovery studies were implemented using a wet digestion technique for mine and soil samples taken from various media, and this method was also applied for anodic slime samples taken from the factories located in the Kayseri Industrial Zone of Turkey. PMID:26651587

  2. Quaternary Geologic Map of Connecticut and Long Island Sound Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Janet Radway; Schafer, John P.; London, Elizabeth Haley; DiGiacomo-Cohen, Mary L.; Lewis, Ralph S.; Thompson, Woodrow B.

    2005-01-01

    The Quaternary geologic map (sheet 1) and explanatory figures and cross sections (sheet 2) portray the geologic features formed in Connecticut during the Quaternary Period, which includes the Pleistocene (glacial) and Holocene (postglacial) Epochs. The Quaternary Period has been a time of development of many details of the landscape and of all the surficial deposits. At least twice in the late Pleistocene, continental ice sheets swept across Connecticut. Their effects are of pervasive importance to the present occupants of the land. The Quaternary geologic map illustrates the geologic history and the distribution of depositional environments during the emplacement of glacial and postglacial surficial deposits and the landforms resulting from those events.

  3. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of antimony by automated-hydride atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, G.E.; McLain, B.J.

    1994-01-01

    The analysis of natural-water samples for antimony by automated-hydride atomic absorption spectrophotometry is described. Samples are prepared for analysis by addition of potassium and hydrochloric acid followed by an autoclave digestion. After the digestion, potassium iodide and sodium borohydride are added automatically. Antimony hydride (stibine) gas is generated, then swept into a heated quartz cell for determination of antimony by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Precision and accuracy data are presented. Results obtained on standard reference water samples agree with means established by interlaboratory studies. Spike recoveries for actual samples range from 90 to 114 percent. Replicate analyses of water samples of varying matrices give relative standard deviations from 3 to 10 percent.

  4. Impact process: an important geological phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Skala, R

    1996-01-01

    The impact process was for a long period of time, even after a wider acceptance among the geological community, considered to be a marginal phenomenon in the Earth sciences. The first decade or two have showed an importance of the process itself and consequent events only too clearly. The present paper is a review describing the history and development of the impact hypothesis, structure and origin of impact craters, influence of huge impacts on the living environment and other aspects of the impact process from the point of view of geology s.l.

  5. Study of Bbar to Xu l nubar Decays in BBbar Events Tagged by a Fully Reconstructed B-meson Decay and Determination of |V_{ub}|

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.

    2012-07-13

    We report measurements of partial branching fractions for inclusive charmless semileptonic B decays {bar B} {yields} X{sub u}{ell}{bar {nu}}, and the determination of the CKM matrix element |V{sub ub}|. The analysis is based on a sample of 467 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. We select events in which the decay of one of the B mesons is fully reconstructed and an electron or a muon signals the semileptonic decay of the other B meson. We measure partial branching fractions {Delta}{Beta} in several restricted regions of phase space and determine the CKM element |V{sub ub}| based on four different QCD predictions. For decays with a charged lepton momentum p*{sub {ell}} > 1.0 GeV in the B meson rest frame, we obtain {Delta}{Beta} = (1.80 {+-} 0.13{sub stat.} {+-} 0.15{sub sys.} {+-} 0.02{sub theo.}) x 10{sup -3} from a maximum likelihood fit to the two-dimensional M{sub X} - q{sup 2} distribution. Here, M{sub X} refers to the invariant mass of the final state hadron X and q{sup 2} is the invariant mass squared of the charged lepton and neutrino. From this measurement we extract |V{sub ub}| = (4.31 {+-} 0.25{sub exp.} {+-} 0.16{sub theo.}) x 10{sup -3} as the arithmetic average of four results obtained from four different QCD predictions of the partial rate. We separately determine partial branching fractions for {bar B}{sup 0} and B{sup -} decays and derive a limit on the isospin breaking in {bar B} {yields} X{sub u}{ell}{bar {nu}} decays.

  6. Study of B̄→Xulν̄ decays in BB̄ events tagged by a fully reconstructed B-meson decay and determination of |Vub|

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; et al

    2012-08-07

    We report measurements of partial branching fractions for inclusive charmless semileptonic B decays B¯¯¯→Xulν¯ and the determination of the Cabibbo–Kobayashi–Maskawa (CKM) matrix element |Vub|. The analysis is based on a sample of 467×10⁶ Υ(4S)→BB¯¯¯ decays recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e⁺e⁻ storage rings. We select events in which the decay of one of the B mesons is fully reconstructed and an electron or a muon signals the semileptonic decay of the other B meson. We measure partial branching fractions ΔB in several restricted regions of phase space and determine the CKM element |Vub| based on different QCDmore » predictions. For decays with a charged lepton momentum p*l>1.0 GeV in the B meson rest frame, we obtain ΔB=(1.80±0.13stat±0.15sys±0.02theo)×10⁻³ from a fit to the two-dimensional MX-q² distribution. Here, MX refers to the invariant mass of the final state hadron X and q² is the invariant mass squared of the charged lepton and neutrino. From this measurement we extract |Vub|=(4.33±0.24exp±0.15theo)×10⁻³ as the arithmetic average of four results obtained from four different QCD predictions of the partial rate. We separately determine partial branching fractions for B¯¯¯0 and B⁻ decays and derive a limit on the isospin breaking in B¯¯¯→Xulν¯ decays.« less

  7. Ultrasound- and microwave-assisted extractions followed by hydride generation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for lead determination in geological samples.

    PubMed

    Welna, Maja; Borkowska-Burnecka, Jolanta; Popko, Malgorzata

    2015-11-01

    Followed the current idea of simplified sample pretratmet before analysis we evaluated the procedure for the determination of Pb in calcium-rich materials such as dolomites after ultrasound- or microwave- assisted extraction with diluted acids using hydride generation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (HG-ICP-OES). Corresponding Pb hydride was generated in the reaction of an acidified sample solution with NaBH4 after pre-oxidation of Pb(II) to Pb(IV) by K3[Fe(CN)6]. Several chemical (acidic media: HCl, HNO3 or CH3COOH, concentration of the reductant as well as type and concentration of oxidazing agents) and physical (reagents flow rates, reaction coil length) parameters affecting the efficiency of plumbane formation were optimized in order to improve the detectability of Pb using HG-ICP-OES. Limitation of the method derived from the matrix effects was pointed out. Employing Pb separation by HG technique allows the significant reduction of interferences caused by sample matrix constituents (mainly Ca and Mg), nevertheless they could not be overcame at all, hence calibration based on the standard addition method was recommended for Pb quantification in dolomites. Under the selected conditions, i.e. 0.3 mol L(-1) HCl, HNO3 or CH3COOH, 1.5% NaBH4 and 3.0% K3[Fe(CN)6] the limits of detection (LODs) between 2.3-5.6 μg L(-1) (3.4-6.8 μg L(-1) considering matrix effects) and the precision below 5% were achieved. The accuracy of the procedure was verified by analysis of certified reference materials (NCS DC70308 (Carbonate Rock) and NIST 14000 (Bone Ash)) and recovery test with satisfactory results of Pb recoveries ranging between 94-108% (CRMs analysis) and 92-114% (standard addition method). The applicability of the proposed method was demonstrated by the determination of Pb in dolomites used by different fertiliser factories. PMID:26452913

  8. Essential Elements of Geologic Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Elmer James

    1988-01-01

    Described is a report outline for geologic reports. Essential elements include title; abstract; introduction; stratigraphy; petrography; geochemistry; petrology; geophysics; structural geology; geologic history; modeling; economics; conclusions; and recommendations. (Author/CW)

  9. United States Geological Survey Yearbook, Fiscal Year 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1981-01-01

    It is not very often that a single event is so overwhelming that it changes public perceptions of natural hazards for generations. Perhaps for the U.S. Geological Survey, the explosive volcanic activity of Mount St. Helens began such a change. After 101 years of careful science of the Earth's past and meticulous observations and assessments of the present, predictive earth science was in full public view. However vague and faint the glimpse of the future made possible by earth science, it was enough. Warnings were issued, thousands of lives were saved, and the age of real-time geology began. The Survey's basic mission has not changed, but the power of our analytical tools has increased by several orders of magnitude. The Survey's efforts to understand Earth processes and hydrologic principles continued with the collection, during fiscal year 1980, of valuable new data on the geologic origin and framework, seismicity, and mineral and energy resources of the United States. The Survey is also responsible for classification of the leasable minerals on Federal lands and the regulation of mineral exploration and development activities on Federal and Indian lands. As the principal earth science fact-gathering agency, the Survey provides information for sound decisionmaking by government and private industry. Industry uses the Survey's information in exploring for energy and minerals and improving their efforts to make development of energy and minerals compatible with environmental protection standards. Government uses the Survey's information in conducting leasing operations on public lands, in regulating the safe design and siting of nuclear plants, and in establishing guidelines for determining and locating areas that are subject to geologic hazards such as landslides, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions. The Yearbook reports a broad range of the Survey's accomplishments during the past fiscal year and provides an overview of future directions. Many of the topics

  10. Geology of caves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, I.M.

    1991-01-01

    A cave is a natural opening in the ground extending beyond the zone of light and large enough to permit the entry of man. Occurring in a wide variety of rock types and caused by widely differing geological processes, caves range in size from single small rooms to intercorinecting passages many miles long. The scientific study of caves is called speleology (from the Greek words spelaion for cave and logos for study). It is a composite science based on geology, hydrology, biology, and archaeology, and thus holds special interest for earth scientists of the U.S. Geological Survey.

  11. Formation evaluation: Geological procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, A.

    1985-01-01

    This volume goes beyond a discussion of petroleum geology and the techniques of hydrocarbon (oil and gas) logging as a reservoir evaluation tool. It provides the logging geologist with a review of geological techniques and classification systems that will ensure the maximum development of communicable geological information. Contents include: 1. Introduction--cuttings recovery, cutting sampling, core sampling, rock classification; 2. Detrital rocks--classification, description; 3. Carbonate rocks--classification, description; 4. Chemical rocks-introduction, siliceous rocks, ferruginous rocks, aluminous rocks, phosphatic rocks, aluminous rocks, carbonaceous rocks; 5. Igneous and metamorpbic rocks; Appendix; References and Index.

  12. Development of Memory for Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratner, Hilary Horn; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examines development of event memory by determining how personally experienced events with two types of structure were reported by kindergartners and adults. Events in making and playing with clay were organized causally and temporally. Results show that adults and children used a goal-based hierarchical structure to remember events, although use…

  13. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of dissolved arsenic, boron, lithium, selenium, strontium, thallium, and vanadium using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garbarino, John R.

    1999-01-01

    The inductively coupled plasma?mass spectrometric (ICP?MS) methods have been expanded to include the determination of dissolved arsenic, boron, lithium, selenium, strontium, thallium, and vanadium in filtered, acidified natural water. Method detection limits for these elements are now 10 to 200 times lower than by former U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) methods, thus providing lower variability at ambient concentrations. The bias and variability of the method was determined by using results from spike recoveries, standard reference materials, and validation samples. Spike recoveries at 5 to 10 times the method detection limit and 75 micrograms per liter in reagent-water, surface-water, and groundwater matrices averaged 93 percent for seven replicates, although selected elemental recoveries in a ground-water matrix with an extremely high iron sulfate concentration were negatively biased by 30 percent. Results for standard reference materials were within 1 standard deviation of the most probable value. Statistical analysis of the results from about 60 filtered, acidified natural-water samples indicated that there was no significant difference between ICP?MS and former USGS official methods of analysis.

  14. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of whole-water recoverable arsenic, boron, and vanadium using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garbarino, John R.

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of in-bottle digestate by using the inductively coupled plasma?mass spectrometric (ICP?MS) method has been expanded to include arsenic, boron, and vanadium. Whole-water samples are digested by using either the hydrochloric acid in-bottle digestion procedure or the nitric acid in-bottle digestion procedure. When the hydrochloric acid in-bottle digestion procedure is used, chloride must be removed from the digestate by subboiling evaporation before arsenic and vanadium can be accurately determined. Method detection limits for these elements are now 10 to 100 times lower than U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) methods using hydride generation? atomic absorption spectrophotometry (HG? AAS) and inductively coupled plasma? atomic emission spectrometry (ICP?AES), thus providing lower variability at ambient concentrations. The bias and variability of the methods were determined by using results from spike recoveries, standard reference materials, and validation samples. Spike recoveries in reagent-water, surface-water, ground-water, and whole-water recoverable matrices averaged 90 percent for seven replicates; spike recoveries were biased from 25 to 35 percent low for the ground-water matrix because of the abnormally high iron concentration. Results for reference material were within one standard deviation of the most probable value. There was no significant difference between the results from ICP?MS and HG?AAS or ICP?AES methods for the natural whole-water samples that were analyzed.

  15. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory : determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds in sediment by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Mary C.; Iverson, Jana L.; Furlong, Edward T.; Schroeder, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    A method for the determination of 28 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and 25 alkylated PAH homolog groups in sediment samples is described. The compounds are extracted from sediment by solvent extraction, followed by partial isolation using high-performance gel permeation chromatography. The compounds are identified and uantitated using capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The report presents performance data for full-scan ion monitoring. Method detection limits in laboratory reagent matrix samples range from 1.3 to 5.1 micrograms per kilogram for the 28 PAHs. The 25 groups of alkylated PAHs are homologs of five groups of isomeric parent PAHs. Because of the lack of authentic standards, these homologs are reported semiquantitatively using a response factor from a parent PAH or a specific alkylated PAH. Precision data for the alkylated PAH homologs are presented using two different standard reference manuals produced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology: SRM 1941b and SRM 1944. The percent relative standard deviations for identified alkylated PAH homolog groups ranged from 1.55 to 6.98 for SRM 1941b and from 6.11 to 12.0 for SRM 1944. Homolog group concentrations reported under this method include the concentrations of individually identified compounds that are members of the group. Organochlorine (OC) pesticides--including toxaphene, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and organophosphate (OP) pesticides--can be isolated simultaneously using this method. In brief, sediment samples are centrifuged to remove excess water and extracted overnight with dichloromethan (95 percent) and methanol (5 percent). The extract is concentrated and then filtered through a 0.2-micrometer polytetrafluoroethylene syringe filter. The PAH fraction is isolated by quantitatively injecting an aliquot of sample onto two polystyrene-divinylbenzene gel-permeation chromatographic columns connected in series. The compounds are eluted with dichloromethane

  16. Surficial Geology of Mount Rainier National Park, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crandell, Dwight Raymond

    1969-01-01

    Much of the ground surface around Mount Rainier volcano is directly underlain by loose geologic deposits that veneer the hard rock formations. Examples of these deposits are sand and gravel bars along the rivers, ridges of loose rock debris beside the glaciers, and sloping aprons of rock fragments beneath almost every cliff. Even though they are generally thin and inconspicuous when compared with the rock formations, these surficial deposits are clues to geologic events that have profoundly influenced the shape of the park's landscape. Thus, from the character and extent of glacial deposits one can judge the age and size of former glaciers that carved the cirques and deep canyons of the park; from the mudflows which streamed down nearly every valley one can infer the age and size of huge landslides of the past that helped determine Mount Rainier's present shape; and from the pumice deposits some of the volcano's recent eruptive activity can be reconstructed. The map (plate 1, in pocket) that accompanies this description of the surficial deposits of Mount Rainier National Park shows the location of the various geologic formations, and the explanation shows the formations arranged in order of their relative age, with the oldest at the bottom. The text describes the surficial deposits in sequence from older to younger. A discussion of the pumice deposits of the park, which were not mapped, is followed by a description of the formations shown on the geologic map. Inspection of the geologic map may lead the viewer to question why the surficial deposits are shown in more detail in a zone several miles wide around the base of the volcano than elsewhere. This is partly because the zone is largely near or above timberline, relatively accessible, and the surficial deposits there can be readily recognized, differentiated, and mapped. In contrast, access is more difficult in the heavily timbered parts of the park, and surficial deposits there are generally blanketed by a dense

  17. Economic Geology (Oil & Gas)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geotimes, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Briefly reviews the worldwide developments in petroleum geology in 1971, including exploration, new fields, and oil production. This report is condensed from the October Bulletin of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. (PR)

  18. Geology of icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinnon, W. B.

    1985-01-01

    The geology of the major icy satellites of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune is discussed in terms of the four major processes that shape icy satellite surfaces: impact cratering, volcanism, tectonism, and interactions with planetary magnetospheres and solar radiation. The role of these processes in creating the differences that exist among the satellites, in particular the orderly progression of geological properties in the Jovian satellites, is emphasized. Important questions left open after the Voyager missions are summarized.

  19. Advances in Planetary Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, John A., III; Nedell, Susan S.

    1987-01-01

    The surface of Mars displays a broad range of channel and valley features. There is as great a range in morphology as in scale. Some of the features of Martian geography are examined. Geomorphic mapping, crater counts on selected surfaces, and a detailed study of drainage basins are used to trace the geologic evolution of the Margaritifer Sinus Quandrangle. The layered deposits in the Valles Marineris are described in detail and the geologic processes that could have led to their formation are analyzed.

  20. Determination of the top-quark pole mass using tt¯ + 1-jet events collected with the ATLAS experiment in 7TeV pp collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-10-19

    In this study, the normalized differential cross section for top-quark pair production in association with at least one jet is studied as a function of the inverse of the invariant mass of the tt¯ + 1-jet system. This distribution can be used for a precise determination of the top-quark mass since gluon radiation depends on the mass of the quarks. The experimental analysis is based on proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1 . The selected events were identified using themore » lepton+jets top-quark-pair decay channel, where lepton refers to either an electron or a muon. The observed distribution is compared to a theoretical prediction at next-to-leading-order accuracy in quantum chromodynamics using the pole-mass scheme. With this method, the measured value of the top-quark pole mass, mpolet , is: mpolet = 173.7 ± 1.5(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.)+1.0–0.5(theory) GeV.« less

  1. Determination of the top-quark pole mass using tt¯ + 1-jet events collected with the ATLAS experiment in 7TeV pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. 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M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-10-19

    In this study, the normalized differential cross section for top-quark pair production in association with at least one jet is studied as a function of the inverse of the invariant mass of the tt¯ + 1-jet system. This distribution can be used for a precise determination of the top-quark mass since gluon radiation depends on the mass of the quarks. The experimental analysis is based on proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1 . The selected events were identified using the lepton+jets top-quark-pair decay channel, where lepton refers to either an electron or a muon. The observed distribution is compared to a theoretical prediction at next-to-leading-order accuracy in quantum chromodynamics using the pole-mass scheme. With this method, the measured value of the top-quark pole mass, mpolet , is: mpolet = 173.7 ± 1.5(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.)+1.0–0.5(theory) GeV.

  2. The marine geological record of industrialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgwell, A.

    2007-12-01

    In the far distant future, what traces of our industrialized civilization could a hypothetical alien visitor to the Earth identify our ever having existed by? Popular perception is of landfills being excavated and species extinctions identified. However, localized terrestrial deposits and loss of only a relatively small proportion of species would be fickle candidates for reliable preservation in the geological record. Rather, the imprint of our current civilization will be seen in a global-scale dissolution-preservation event of carbonate in marine sediments, coupled to a pronounced negative carbon isotopic excursion. This is the geological fingerprint of massive carbon release to the oceans and atmosphere in injunction with the rock weathering consequences of a global warming transient. In this contribution I explore the characteristics of the future marine geological record of industrialization and draw parallels with observations recorded in sediments spanning the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum.

  3. Cassini's geological and compositional view of Tethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Katrin; Wagner, Roland; Jaumann, Ralf; Clark, Roger N.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Brown, Robert H.; Giese, Bernd; Roatsch, Thomas; Filacchione, Gianrico; Matson, Dennis; Ore, Cristina Dalle; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Baines, Kevin H.; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Krupp, Norbert; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Nicholson, Phil D.

    2016-08-01

    The Saturnian satellite Tethys exhibits geological and spectral properties, whose appearance, nature and spatial distribution partly mirror those identified on the neighboring satellites Dione and Rhea or fit to the picture how spectral surface properties are expected to change from one satellite to the other within the inner Saturnian system. However, we also identified spectral variations that are unique in the Saturnian system. Whereas geologically young surface features are characterized by pure H2O-ice composition with relatively large particles, which match the particle sizes measured for fresh surface features also on Dione and Rhea, geologically old weathered regions are dominated by submicron-sized ice particles. Our investigations confirm that the Odysseus impact event did not cause the formation of Tethys' extended graben system Ithaca Chasma. On the contrary, Odysseus might be responsible for the N-S trending 'icy' bands that mark Tethys' surface in the center of its leading and trailing hemisphere.

  4. DIGITAL GEOLOGIC MAP OF SHERMAN QUADRANGLE, NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS (CD-ROM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This compact disc contains digital data sets of the surficial geology and geologic faults for the 1:250,000-scale Sherman quadrangle, North Central Texas, and can be used to make geologic maps, and determine approximate areas and locations of various geologic units. The source d...

  5. Analysis of geologic terrain models for determination of optimum SAR sensor configuration and optimum information extraction for exploration of global non-renewable resources. Pilot study: Arkansas Remote Sensing Laboratory, part 1, part 2, and part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaupp, V. H.; Macdonald, H. C.; Waite, W. P.; Stiles, J. A.; Frost, F. S.; Shanmugam, K. S.; Smith, S. A.; Narayanan, V.; Holtzman, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Computer-generated radar simulations and mathematical geologic terrain models were used to establish the optimum radar sensor operating parameters for geologic research. An initial set of mathematical geologic terrain models was created for three basic landforms and families of simulated radar images were prepared from these models for numerous interacting sensor, platform, and terrain variables. The tradeoffs between the various sensor parameters and the quantity and quality of the extractable geologic data were investigated as well as the development of automated techniques of digital SAR image analysis. Initial work on a texture analysis of SEASAT SAR imagery is reported. Computer-generated radar simulations are shown for combinations of two geologic models and three SAR angles of incidence.

  6. Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, George E.

    2004-01-01

    Geological mapping and topical studies, primarily in the southern Acidalia Planitia/Cydonia Mensae region of Mars is presented. The overall objective was to understand geologic processes and crustal history in the northern lowland in order to assess the probability that an ocean once existed in this region. The major deliverable is a block of 6 1:500,000 scale geologic maps that will be published in 2004 as a single map at 1:1,000,000 scale along with extensive descriptive and interpretive text. A major issue addressed by the mapping was the relative ages of the extensive plains of Acidalia Planitia and the knobs and mesas of Cydonia Mensae. The mapping results clearly favor a younger age for the plains. Topical studies included a preliminary analysis of the very abundant small domes and cones to assess the possibility that their origins could be determined by detailed mapping and remote-sensing analysis. We also tested the validity of putative shorelines by using GIs to co-register full-resolution MOLA altimetry data and Viking images with these shorelines plotted on them. Of the 3 proposed shorelines in this area, one is probably valid, one is definitely not valid, and the third is apparently 2 shorelines closely spaced in elevation. Publications supported entirely or in part by this grant are included.

  7. Conduct of Geologic Field Work During Planetary Exploration: Why Geology Matters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, Dean B.

    2010-01-01

    The science of field geology is the investigative process of determining the distribution of rock units and structures on a planet s surface, and it is the first order data set that informs all subsequent studies of a planet, such as geochemistry, geochronology, geophysics or remote sensing. These allied sciences, as important as they are, derive the basis of their understanding from the knowledge of the geology of a given location. When we go back to the Moon, and on to Mars, the surface systems we deploy will need to support the conduct of field geology if these endeavors are to be scientifically useful. This lecture will consider what field geology is about - why it s important, how we do it, how the conduct of field geology informs many other sciences, and how it will affect the design of surface systems and implementation of operations in the future.

  8. Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory - Determination of Moderate-Use Pesticides and Selected Degradates in Water by C-18 Solid-Phase Extraction and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sandstrom, Mark W.; Stroppel, Max E.; Foreman, William T.; Schroeder, Michael P.

    2001-01-01

    A method for the isolation and analysis of 21 parent pesticides and 20 pesticide degradates in natural-water samples is described. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are pumped through disposable solid-phase-extraction columns that contain octadecyl-bonded porous silica to extract the analytes. The columns are dried by using nitrogen gas, and adsorbed analytes are eluted with ethyl acetate. Extracted analytes are determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring of three characteristic ions. The upper concentration limit is 2 micrograms per liter (?g/L) for most analytes. Single-operator method detection limits in reagent-water samples range from 0.00 1 to 0.057 ?g/L. Validation data also are presented for 14 parent pesticides and 20 degradates that were determined to have greater bias or variability, or shorter holding times than the other compounds. The estimated maximum holding time for analytes in pesticide-grade water before extraction was 4 days. The estimated maximum holding time for analytes after extraction on the dry solid-phase-extraction columns was 7 days. An optional on-site extraction procedure allows for samples to be collected and processed at remote sites where it is difficult to ship samples to the laboratory within the recommended pre-extraction holding time. The method complements existing U.S. Geological Survey Method O-1126-95 (NWQL Schedules 2001 and 2010) by using identical sample preparation and comparable instrument analytical conditions so that sample extracts can be analyzed by either method to expand the range of analytes determined from one water sample.

  9. Geologic controls on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anandakrishnan, Sridhar

    1993-01-01

    The stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is intertwined with its geologic history. The sub-ice geology and the possibility of active rifting and associated elevated heat-flux and volcanism might be determining factors in ice-sheet behavior. Seismic monitoring of natural events at the base of Ice Stream C reveals the presence of a young sedimentary basin beneath the ice stream. The sediments are presumed to be of glacio-marine origin, similar to those beneath Ice Stream B and in the Ross Sea. The young sediments are approximately 1/2 km thick at UpC camp, but thin abruptly southward to 100 m or less. We hypothesize the presence of a fault with a throw of 400 m to account for this (though we have not directly detected the fault), rather than invoking unrealistic basement dips. To extend these studies to critical inland regions, we suggest an expanded explosive-source seismic survey of the Byrd Subglacial Basin to determine the extent and character of the hypothesized rift basin. High-resolution seismic monitoring will detect layering in the sedimentary column, as well as possibly imaging faults directly.

  10. A Regional Guide to Iowa Landforms. Iowa Geological Survey Educational Series 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prior, Jean Cutler

    Presented is a non-technical account of the geological appearance and history of the state of Iowa. Included are Iowa's landscape features, geologic events, and processes that shaped the landscape. Maps and numerous illustrations picture the events and landforms described. Each of the state's seven principal landform regions is discussed in…

  11. Dialogue on private events

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, David C.; Eshleman, John; Brandon, Paul; Layng, T. V. Joe; McDonough, Christopher; Michael, Jack; Schoneberger, Ted; Stemmer, Nathan; Weitzman, Ray; Normand, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    In the fall of 2003, the authors corresponded on the topic of private events on the listserv of the Verbal Behavior Special Interest Group. Extracts from that correspondence raised questions about the role of response amplitude in determining units of analysis, whether private events can be investigated directly, and whether covert behavior differs from other behavior except in amplitude. Most participants took a cautious stance, noting not only conceptual pitfalls and empirical difficulties in the study of private events, but doubting the value of interpretive exercises about them. Others argued that despite such obstacles, in domains where experimental analyses cannot be done, interpretation of private events in the light of laboratory principles is the best that science can offer. One participant suggested that the notion that private events can be behavioral in nature be abandoned entirely; as an alternative, the phenomena should be reinterpreted only as physiological events. PMID:22477293

  12. Determination of total sulfur at microgram per gram levels in geological materials by oxidation of sulfur into sulfate with in situ generation of bromine using isotope dilution high-resolution ICPMS.

    PubMed

    Makishima, A; Nakamura, E

    2001-06-01

    We have developed a new, simple, and accurate method for the determination of total sulfur at microgram per gram levels in milligram-sized silicate materials with isotope dilution high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry equipped with a flow injection system. In this method, sulfur can be quantitatively oxidized by bromine into sulfate with achievement of isotope equilibrium between the sample and spike. Detection limits for 32S+ and 34S+ in the ideal solution and silicate samples were 1 and 6 ng mL(-1) and 0.07 and 0.3 microg g(-1), respectively. The total blank was 46 ng, so that a 40-mg silicate sample containing 10 mirog g(-1) sulfur can be measured with a blank correction of < 10%. This total blank can be lowered to 8 ng if a low-blank air system is used for evaporations. To evaluate the applicability of this method, we analyzed not only silicate reference materials with sulfur content of 5.25-489 microg g(-1) and sample sizes of 13-40 mg but also the Allende meteorite with a sulfur content of 2%. The reproducibility for various rock types was < 9%, even though blank corrections in some samples of low sulfur content were up to 24%. This method is suitable for analyzing geological samples as well environmental samples such as soils, sediments, and water samples.

  13. Chemical forms of sulfur in geological and archeological asphaltenes from Middle East, France, and Spain determined by sulfur K- and L-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarret, Géraldine; Connan, Jacques; Kasrai, Masoud; Bancroft, G. Michael; Charrié-Duhaut, Armelle; Lemoine, Sylvie; Adam, Pierre; Albrecht, Pierre; Eybert-Bérard, Laurent

    1999-11-01

    Asphaltene samples extracted from archeological and geological bitumens from the Middle East, France, and Spain were studied by sulfur K- and L-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy in combination with isotopic analyses (δ 13C and δD). Within each series, the samples were genetically related by their δ 13C values. The gross and elemental composition and the δD values were used to characterize the weathering state of the samples. Sulfur K- and L-edge XANES results show that in all the samples, dibenzothiophenes are the dominant forms of sulfur. In the least oxidized asphaltenes, minor species include disulfides, alkyl and aryl sulfides, and sulfoxides. With increasing alteration the proportion of oxidized sulfur (sulfoxides, sulfones, sulfonates and sulfates) increases, whereas the disulfide and sulfide content decreases. This evolution is observed in all the series, regardless of the origin of the asphaltenes. This work illustrates the advantages of XANES spectroscopy as a selective probe for determining sulfur speciation in natural samples. It also shows that S K- and L-edge XANES spectroscopy are complementary for identifying the oxidized and reduced forms of sulfur, respectively.

  14. Method of analysis and quality-assurance practices by the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group; determination of geosmin and methylisoborneol in water using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, L.R.; Ziegler, A.C.; Thurman, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    A method for the determination of two common odor-causing compounds in water, geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol, was modified and verified by the U.S. Geological Survey's Organic Geochemistry Research Group in Lawrence, Kansas. The optimized method involves the extraction of odor-causing compounds from filtered water samples using a divinylbenzene-carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane cross-link coated solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber. Detection of the compounds is accomplished using capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Precision and accuracy were demonstrated using reagent-water, surface-water, and ground-water samples. The mean accuracies as percentages of the true compound concentrations from water samples spiked at 10 and 35 nanograms per liter ranged from 60 to 123 percent for geosmin and from 90 to 96 percent for 2-methylisoborneol. Method detection limits were 1.9 nanograms per liter for geosmin and 2.0 nanograms per liter for 2-methylisoborneol in 45-milliliter samples. Typically, concentrations of 30 and 10 nanograms per liter of geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol, respectively, can be detected by the general public. The calibration range for the method is equivalent to concentrations from 5 to 100 nanograms per liter without dilution. The method is valuable for acquiring information about the production and fate of these odor-causing compounds in water.

  15. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of pesticides in water by Carbopak-B solid-phase extraction and high-preformance liquid chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner, Stephen L.; Burkhardt, Mark R.; DeRusseau, Sabrina N.

    1996-01-01

    In accordance with the needs of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA), the U.S. Geological Survey has developed and implemented a graphitized carbon-based solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatographic analytical method. The method is used to determine 41 pesticides and pesticide metabolites that are not readily amenable to gas chromatography or other high-temperature analytical techniques. Pesticides are extracted from filtered environmental water samples using a 0.5-gram graphitized carbon-based solid-phase cartridge, eluted from the cartridge into two analytical fractions, and analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode-array detection. The upper concentration limit is 1.6 micrograms per liter (=B5g/L) for most compounds. Single-operator method detection limits in organic-free water samples ranged from 0.006 to 0.032 =B5g/L= Recoveries in organic-free water samples ranged from 37 to 88 percent. Recoveries in ground- and surface-water samples ranged from 29 to 94 percent. An optional on-site extraction procedure allows for samples to be collected and processed at remote sites where it is difficult to ship samples to the laboratory within the recommended pre-extraction holding time of 7 days.

  16. Impact, and its implications for geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, Ursula B.

    1988-01-01

    The publication of seminal texts on geology and on meteoritics in the 1790s, laid the groundwork for the emergence of each discipline as a modern branch of science. Within the past three decades, impact cratering has become universally accepted as a process that sculptures the surfaces of planets and satellites throughout the solar system. Nevertheless, one finds in-depth discussions of impact processes mainly in books on the Moon or in surveys of the Solar System. The historical source of the separation between meteoritics and geology is easy to identify. It began with Hutton. Meteorite impact is an extraordinary event acting instantaneously from outside the Earth. It violates Hutton's principles, which were enlarged upon and firmly established as fundamental to the geological sciences by Lyell. The split between meteoritics and geology surely would have healed as early as 1892 if the investigations conducted by Gilbert (1843-1918) at the crater in northern Arizona had yielded convincing evidence of meteorite impact. The 1950s and 1960s saw a burgeoning of interest in impact processes. The same period witnessed the so-called revolution in the Earth Sciences, when geologists yielded up the idea of fixed continents and began to view the Earth's lithosphere as a dynamic array of horizontally moving plates. Plate tectonics, however, is fully consistent with the geological concepts inherited from Hutton: the plates slowly split, slide, and suture, driven by forces intrinsic to the globe.

  17. Determinants of high pesticide exposure events in the agricultural health cohort study from enrollment (1993-1997) through phase II (1999-2003).

    PubMed

    Payne, K; Andreotti, G; Bell, E; Blair, A; Coble, J; Alavanja, M

    2012-07-01

    We conducted an analysis of the determinants of high pesticide exposure events (HPEEs), which are defined as self-reported incidents of high exposure to pesticides, fertilizers, or other chemicals in the Agricultural Health Study, a cohort of private applicators and their spouses residing in North Carolina or Iowa, and commercial applicators residing in Iowa. We examined the risk of HPEEs occurring between enrollment (phase 1: 1993-1997) and follow-up (phase II: 1999-2003) among participants who completed the phase II questionnaire (n=43,149) by calculating hazard rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals using Cox proportional-hazard regression. During the followup period, 1,582 HPEEs were reported (3.8%). HPEE risk was significantly higher among Iowa residents, younger participants, those with a hearing deficit, a risk-taking personality, and an HPEE prior to enrollment. Among private applicators (n=30,102), larger farm size, higher frequency and duration of pesticide use, spraying pesticides with open cab windows, using a tractor cab without a charcoal filter, repairing spray equipment, wearing work clothing more than two days without changing, not removing work boots before entering the home, and storing pesticides in the home were associated with significantly higher HPEE risk. Among commercial applicators (n=2326), higher frequency of pesticide use was associated with a significantly higher HPEE risk. Among spouses (n=10,721), higher frequency of pesticide use, using an application vehicle with a cab, and storing pesticides in the home were associated with a significantly higher HPEE risk. Our findings indicate that HPEEs were associated with several modifiable pesticide handling procedures that can be targeted in safety training and education. PMID:22900431

  18. Geology, geochronology, and geochemistry of the Yinachang Fe-Cu-Au-REE deposit of the Kangdian region of SW China: Evidence for a Paleo-Mesoproterozoic tectono-magmatic event and associated IOCG systems in the western Yangtze Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lin; Ding, Jun; Deng, Jun; Peng, Hui-juan

    2015-05-01

    Numerous Fe-Cu-Au-rare earth element (REE) deposits have been identified within the Paleoproterozoic Dongchuan Group of the Kangdian region of SW China. This region hosts the Yinachang deposit, which contains more than 16.8 Mt Fe, 682.6 kt Cu, and significant amounts of Au and the REEs. Both the Haizi dolerite and a magmatic breccia in the central part of the Kangdian region are thought to be related to the Dongchuan dolerite in the northern part of this region; all three of these units provide evidence of the tectono-magmatic history of the Kunyang Rift and are closely spatially and temporally related to Fe-Cu-Au-REE mineralization in this region. Here, we present a new zircon U-Pb age for the Haizi dolerite (1764.7 ± 5.7 Ma), which is consistent with the known age of the Dongchuan dolerite (1765 ± 57 Ma), allowing the determination of the precise timing of Paleo-Mesoproterozoic intraplate mafic magmatism in this region (1.72-1.77 Ga). The breccia in this region formed during magmatism at around 1.73-1.74 Ga, as documented by zircon U-Pb dating of matrix material within the Yinachang magmatic breccia (1739 ± 13 Ma). The geochemistry of Haizi and Dongchuan dolerite samples provides evidence of intraplate extension in the Kangdian region, the majority of which was concentrated along the Kunyang Rift. The Kangdian region underwent variable degrees of extension, as evidenced by the fact that break-up in the central part of this region occurred earlier than in the north. This also led to the emplacement of deeper-sourced alkaline magmas (usually OIB-type magmas) in the central part of this region. The iron-oxide copper gold (IOCG) mineralization in the Kangdian region is associated with the upwelling of mantle material. A chalcopyrite Re-Os age of 1648 ± 14 Ma from the Yinachang Fe-Cu-Au-REE deposit obtained during this study is some 50-100 Myr younger than the timing of emplacement of the deeply sourced Haizi and Dongchuan dolerites. The Yinachang deposit is a

  19. Titan's global geologic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaska, Michael; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Schoenfeld, Ashley; Birch, Samuel; Hayes, Alexander; Williams, David A.; Solomonidou, Anezina; Janssen, Michael A.; Le Gall, Alice; Soderblom, Jason M.; Neish, Catherine; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; Cassini RADAR Team

    2016-10-01

    We have mapped the Cassini SAR imaged areas of Saturn's moon Titan in order to determine the geological properties that modify the surface [1]. We used the SAR dataset for mapping, but incorporated data from radiometry, VIMS, ISS, and SARTopo for terrain unit determination. This work extends our analyses of the mid-latitude/equatorial Afekan Crater region [2] and in the southern and northern polar regions [3]. We placed Titan terrains into six broad terrain classes: craters, mountain/hummocky, labyrinth, plains, dunes, and lakes. We also extended the fluvial mapping done by Burr et al. [4], and defined areas as potential cryovolcanic features [5]. We found that hummocky/mountainous and labyrinth areas are the oldest units on Titan, and that lakes and dunes are among the youngest. Plains units are the largest unit in terms of surface area, followed by the dunes unit. Radiometry data suggest that most of Titan's surface is covered in high-emissivity materials, consistent with organic materials, with only minor exposures of low-emissivity materials that are consistent with water ice, primarily in the mountain and hummocky areas and crater rims and ejecta [6, 7]. From examination of terrain orientation, we find that landscape evolution in the mid-latitude and equatorial regions is driven by aeolian processes, while polar landscapes are shaped by fluvial, lacrustine, and possibly dissolution or volatilization processes involving cycling organic materials [3, 8]. Although important in deciphering Titan's terrain evolution, impact processes play a very minor role in the modification of Titan's landscape [9]. We find no evidence for large-scale aqueous cryovolcanic deposits.References: [1] Lopes, R.M.C. et al. (2010) Icarus, 205, 540–558. [2] Malaska, M.J. et al. (2016) Icarus, 270, 130–161. [3] Birch et al., in revision. [4] Burr et al. (2013) GSA Bulletin 125, 299–321. [5] Lopes et al. JGR: Planets, 118, 1–20. [6] Janssen et al., (2009) Icarus, 200, 222–239. [7

  20. Geologic applications of ERTS images on the Colorado Plateau, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, A. F. H.; Billingsley, F. C.; Elston, D. P.; Lucchitta, I.; Shoemaker, E. M.

    1974-01-01

    Three areas in central and northern Arizona centered on the (1) Verde Valley, (2) Coconino Plateau, and (3) Shivwits Plateau were studied using ERTS photography. Useful applications results include: (1) upgrading of the existing state geologic map of the Verde Valley region; (2) detection of long NW trending lineaments in the basalt cap SE of Flagstaff which may be favorable locations for drilling for new water supplies; (3) tracing of the Bright Angel and Butte faults to twice their previously known length and correlating the extensions with modern seismic events, showing these faults to be present-day earthquake hazards; (4) discovering and successfully drilling perched sandstone aquifers in the Kaibab Limestone on the Coconino Plateau; and (5) determining the relationship between the Shivwits lavas and the formation of the lower Grand Canyon and showing that the lavas should be an excellent aquifer, as yet untapped.

  1. Geologic map of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Skinner, James A.; Dohm, James M.; Irwin, Rossman P.; Kolb, Eric J.; Fortezzo, Corey M.; Platz, Thomas; Michael, Gregory G.; Hare, Trent M.

    2014-01-01

    This global geologic map of Mars, which records the distribution of geologic units and landforms on the planet's surface through time, is based on unprecedented variety, quality, and quantity of remotely sensed data acquired since the Viking Orbiters. These data have provided morphologic, topographic, spectral, thermophysical, radar sounding, and other observations for integration, analysis, and interpretation in support of geologic mapping. In particular, the precise topographic mapping now available has enabled consistent morphologic portrayal of the surface for global mapping (whereas previously used visual-range image bases were less effective, because they combined morphologic and albedo information and, locally, atmospheric haze). Also, thermal infrared image bases used for this map tended to be less affected by atmospheric haze and thus are reliable for analysis of surface morphology and texture at even higher resolution than the topographic products.

  2. The geology of Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, E. M.; Lucchitta, B. K.; Wilhelms, D. E.; Plescia, J. B.; Squyres, S. W.

    1982-01-01

    A broad outline of the geologic history of Ganymede is presented, obtained from a first attempt to map the geology on a global scale and to interpret the characteristics of the observed geologic units. Features of the ancient cratered terrain such as craters and palimpsests, furrows and troughs, are discussed. The grooved terrain is described, including its sulci and cells, and the age relation of these units is considered along with the structure and origin of this terrain. The Gilgamesh Basin and Western Equatorial Basin in the post grooved terrain are treated, as are the bright and dark ray craters and the regolith. The development of all these regions and features is discussed in context. For the regolith, this includes the effect of water migration, sputtering, and thermal annealing. The histories of the ancient cratered terrain, the grooved terrain, and the post grooved terrain are presented.

  3. The geology of Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, E. M.; Lucchitta, B. K.; Wilhelms, D. E.; Plescia, J. B.; Squyres, S. W.

    A broad outline of the geologic history of Ganymede is presented, obtained from a first attempt to map the geology on a global scale and to interpret the characteristics of the observed geologic units. Features of the ancient cratered terrain such as craters and palimpsests, furrows and troughs, are discussed. The grooved terrain is described, including its sulci and cells, and the age relation of these units is considered along with the structure and origin of this terrain. The Gilgamesh Basin and Western Equatorial Basin in the post grooved terrain are treated, as are the bright and dark ray craters and the regolith. The development of all these regions and features is discussed in context. For the regolith, this includes the effect of water migration, sputtering, and thermal annealing. The histories of the ancient cratered terrain, the grooved terrain, and the post grooved terrain are presented.

  4. Geology at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    1993-05-01

    Both advocates and critics disagree on the significance and interpretation of critical geological features which bear on the safety and suitability of Yucca Mountain as a site for the construction of a high-level radioactive waste repository. Critics believe that there is sufficient geological evidence to rule the site unsuitable for further investigation. Some advocates claim that there is insufficient data and that investigations are incomplete, while others claim that the site is free of major obstacles. We have expanded our efforts to include both the critical evaluations of existing geological and geochemical data and the collection of field data and samples for the purpose of preparing scientific papers for submittal to journals. Summaries of the critical reviews are presented in this paper.

  5. Geological fakes and frauds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffell, Alastair; Majury, Niall; Brooks, William E.

    2012-02-01

    Some geological fakes and frauds are carried out solely for financial gain (mining fraud), whereas others maybe have increasing aesthetic appeal (faked fossils) or academic advancement (fabricated data) as their motive. All types of geological fake or fraud can be ingenious and sophisticated, as demonstrated in this article. Fake gems, faked fossils and mining fraud are common examples where monetary profit is to blame: nonetheless these may impact both scientific theory and the reputation of geologists and Earth scientists. The substitution or fabrication of both physical and intellectual data also occurs for no direct financial gain, such as career advancement or establishment of belief (e.g. evolution vs. creationism). Knowledge of such fakes and frauds may assist in spotting undetected geological crimes: application of geoforensic techniques helps the scientific community to detect such activity, which ultimately undermines scientific integrity.

  6. Sedimentology and petroleum geology

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorlykke, K.

    1989-01-01

    In this introduction to sedimentology and petroleum geology the subjects, which are closely related but mostly treated separately, are integrated. The first part covers the basic aspects of sedimentology, sedimentary geochemistry and diagenesis, including brief discussions of flow in rivers and channels, types of sediment transport, lake and river deposits, deltas (river-dominated, tide-dominated, and wave-dominated) and the water budget. Principles of stratigraphy, seismic stratigraphy and basin modeling form the basis for the last part on petroleum geology. Here subjects include the composition of kerogen and hydrocarbons, theories of migration and trapping of hydrocarbons and properties of reservoir rocks. Finally, short introductions to well logging and production geology are given.

  7. Alaskan North Slope Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Warren

    The discovery well for the Prudhoe Bay field, the largest oil accumulatn yet found in the United States, was drilled on the Arctic coast of Alaska by ARCO and Exxon in 1968. A decade of exploratory geology and increasingly detailed geophysical surveys, mostly by Sinclair and British Petroleum in the early years, but then by a number of companies, preceded the discovery. Systematic U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reconnaissance of the Brooks Range—the great mountain system of northern Alaska—had begun in the 1940s and was accelerated after the discovery, as was industry work. In the last decade, scientists from the Alaska Division of Geology and Geophysics and from various universities have become increasingly involved. This modestly priced two-volume work presents hitherto unavailable summaries of much of this modern work.

  8. Geological Corrections in Gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikuška, J.; Marušiak, I.

    2015-12-01

    Applying corrections for the known geology to gravity data can be traced back into the first quarter of the 20th century. Later on, mostly in areas with sedimentary cover, at local and regional scales, the correction known as gravity stripping has been in use since the mid 1960s, provided that there was enough geological information. Stripping at regional to global scales became possible after releasing the CRUST 2.0 and later CRUST 1.0 models in the years 2000 and 2013, respectively. Especially the later model provides quite a new view on the relevant geometries and on the topographic and crustal densities as well as on the crust/mantle density contrast. Thus, the isostatic corrections, which have been often used in the past, can now be replaced by procedures working with an independent information interpreted primarily from seismic studies. We have developed software for performing geological corrections in space domain, based on a-priori geometry and density grids which can be of either rectangular or spherical/ellipsoidal types with cells of the shapes of rectangles, tesseroids or triangles. It enables us to calculate the required gravitational effects not only in the form of surface maps or profiles but, for instance, also along vertical lines, which can shed some additional light on the nature of the geological correction. The software can work at a variety of scales and considers the input information to an optional distance from the calculation point up to the antipodes. Our main objective is to treat geological correction as an alternative to accounting for the topography with varying densities since the bottoms of the topographic masses, namely the geoid or ellipsoid, generally do not represent geological boundaries. As well we would like to call attention to the possible distortions of the corrected gravity anomalies. This work was supported by the Slovak Research and Development Agency under the contract APVV-0827-12.

  9. Spatial Visualization in Introductory Geology Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, S. J.

    2004-12-01

    Visualization is critical to solving most geologic problems, which involve events and processes across a broad range of space and time. Accordingly, spatial visualization is an essential part of undergraduate geology courses. In such courses, students learn to visualize three-dimensional topography from two-dimensional contour maps, to observe landscapes and extract clues about how that landscape formed, and to imagine the three-dimensional geometries of geologic structures and how these are expressed on the Earth's surface or on geologic maps. From such data, students reconstruct the geologic history of areas, trying to visualize the sequence of ancient events that formed a landscape. To understand the role of visualization in student learning, we developed numerous interactive QuickTime Virtual Reality animations to teach students the most important visualization skills and approaches. For topography, students can spin and tilt contour-draped, shaded-relief terrains, flood virtual landscapes with water, and slice into terrains to understand profiles. To explore 3D geometries of geologic structures, they interact with virtual blocks that can be spun, sliced into, faulted, and made partially transparent to reveal internal structures. They can tilt planes to see how they interact with topography, and spin and tilt geologic maps draped over digital topography. The GeoWall system allows students to see some of these materials in true stereo. We used various assessments to research the effectiveness of these materials and to document visualization strategies students use. Our research indicates that, compared to control groups, students using such materials improve more in their geologic visualization abilities and in their general visualization abilities as measured by a standard spatial visualization test. Also, females achieve greater gains, improving their general visualization abilities to the same level as males. Misconceptions that students carry obstruct

  10. Planetary geological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Solomonidou, Anezina

    2014-11-01

    In this introduction to planetary geology, we review the major geologic processes affecting the solid bodies of the solar system, namely volcanism, tectonism, impact cratering, and erosion. We illustrate the interplay of these processes in different worlds, briefly reviewing how they affect the surfaces of the Earth's Moon, Mercury, Venus and Mars, then focusing on two very different worlds: Jupiter's moon Io, the most volcanically active object in the solar system, and Saturn's moon Titan, where the interaction between a dense atmosphere and the surface make for remarkably earth-like landscapes despite the great differences in surface temperature and composition.

  11. The Geologic History of the Carbon Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundquist, E. T.; Visser, K.

    2003-12-01

    Geologists, like other scientists, tend to view the global carbon cycle through the lens of their particular training and experience. The study of Earth's history requires a view both humbled by the knowledge of past global transformations and emboldened by the imagination of details not seen in the fragments of the rock record. In studying the past behavior of the carbon cycle, geologists are both amazed by unexpected discoveries and reassured by the extent to which "the present is the key to the past." Understanding the present-day carbon cycle has become a matter of societal urgency because of concerns about the effects of human activities on atmospheric chemistry and global climate. This public limelight has had far-reaching consequences for research on the geologic history of the carbon cycle as well as for studies of its present and future. The burgeoning new "interdiscipline" of biogeochemistry claims among its adherents many geologists as well as biologists, chemists, and other scientists. The pace of discovery demands that studies of the geologic history of the carbon cycle cannot be isolated from the context of present and future events.This chapter describes the behavior of the carbon cycle prior to human influence. It describes events and processes that extend back through geologic time and include the exchange of carbon between the Earth's surface and the long-term reservoirs in the lithosphere. Chapter 8.10 emphasizes carbon exchanges that are important over years to decades, with a focus on relatively recent human influences and prospects for change during the coming century. Chapter 4.03 presents an overview of the biogeochemistry of methane, again with emphasis on relatively recent events. In these chapters as well as in the present chapter, relationships between the carbon cycle and global climate are a central concern. Together, these chapters provide an overview of how our knowledge of the present-day carbon cycle can be applied both to

  12. NADM Conceptual Model 1.0 -- A Conceptual Model for Geologic Map Information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2004-01-01

    Executive Summary -- The NADM Data Model Design Team was established in 1999 by the North American Geologic Map Data Model Steering Committee (NADMSC) with the purpose of drafting a geologic map data model for consideration as a standard for developing interoperable geologic map-centered databases by state, provincial, and federal geological surveys. The model is designed to be a technology-neutral conceptual model that can form the basis for a web-based interchange format using evolving information technology (e.g., XML, RDF, OWL), and guide implementation of geoscience databases in a common conceptual framework. The intended purpose is to allow geologic information sharing between geologic map data providers and users, independent of local information system implementation. The model emphasizes geoscience concepts and relationships related to information presented on geologic maps. Design has been guided by an informal requirements analysis, documentation of existing databases, technology developments, and other standardization efforts in the geoscience and computer-science communities. A key aspect of the model is the notion that representation of the conceptual framework (ontology) that underlies geologic map data must be part of the model, because this framework changes with time and understanding, and varies between information providers. The top level of the model distinguishes geologic concepts, geologic representation concepts, and metadata. The geologic representation part of the model provides a framework for representing the ontology that underlies geologic map data through a controlled vocabulary, and for establishing the relationships between this vocabulary and a geologic map visualization or portrayal. Top-level geologic classes in the model are Earth material (substance), geologic unit (parts of the Earth), geologic age, geologic structure, fossil, geologic process, geologic relation, and geologic event.

  13. Geology of Wisconsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madison Public Schools, WI.

    Included are a teacher's guidebook and two filmstrips, "Geology of Wisconsin," and associated materials. The following are described: outline of objectives; suggested use of the filmstrips and guidebook; outline of the filmstrip content; four pages of illustrations suitable for duplication; a test for each filmstrip; and a list of additional…

  14. Life on Guam: Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Gail

    This unit is part of a series of materials produced by a project to develop locally applicable class, lab, and field materials in ecology and social studies for Guam junior and senior high schools. While the materials were designed for Guam, they can be adapted to other localities. This unit is designed to acquaint the students with the geology of…

  15. Geological processes and evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Head, J.W.; Greeley, R.; Golombek, M.P.; Hartmann, W.K.; Hauber, E.; Jaumann, R.; Masson, P.; Neukum, G.; Nyquist, L.E.; Carr, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    Geological mapping and establishment of stratigraphic relationships provides an overview of geological processes operating on Mars and how they have varied in time and space. Impact craters and basins shaped the crust in earliest history and as their importance declined, evidence of extensive regional volcanism emerged during the Late Noachian. Regional volcanism characterized the Early Hesperian and subsequent to that time, volcanism was largely centered at Tharsis and Elysium, continuing until the recent geological past. The Tharsis region appears to have been largely constructed by the Late Noachian, and represents a series of tectonic and volcanic centers. Globally distributed structural features representing contraction characterize the middle Hesperian. Water-related processes involve the formation of valley networks in the Late Noachian and into the Hesperian, an ice sheet at the south pole in the middle Hesperian, and outflow channels and possible standing bodies of water in the northern lowlands in the Late Hesperian and into the Amazonian. A significant part of the present water budget occurs in the present geologically young polar layered terrains. In order to establish more firmly rates of processes, we stress the need to improve the calibration of the absolute timescale, which today is based on crater count systems with substantial uncertainties, along with a sampling of rocks of unknown provenance. Sample return from carefully chosen stratigraphic units could calibrate the existing timescale and vastly improve our knowledge of Martian evolution.

  16. Advances in planetary geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A wide variety of topics on planetary geology are presented. Subjects include stratigraphy and geomorphology of Copernicus, the Mamers valle region, and other selected regions of Mars and the Moon. Crater density and distribution are discussed for Callisto and the lunar surface. Spectroscopic analysis is described for Europa and Ganymede.

  17. Geology: The Active Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Geology: The Active Earth." Contents are organized into the following…

  18. Geology 12. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria.

    This publication, developed by the Ministry of Education, Province of British Columbia, Canada, is a teaching guide for the Geology 12 course. The course is intended to provide secondary school students with the background and desire to investigate their earth, its materials and its processes. The guide consists of the following four sections: (1)…

  19. Digital solar system geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, R. M.; Kozak, R. C.; Isbell, Nancy K.

    1991-01-01

    All available synoptic maps of the solid-surface bodies of the Solar System were digitized for presentation in the planned Atlas of the Solar System by Greeley and Batson. Since the last report (Batson et al., 1990), preliminary Uranian satellite maps were replaced with improved versions, Galilean satellite geology was simplified and digitized, structure was added to many maps, and the maps were converted to a standard format, with corresponding standing colors for the mapped units. Following these changes, the maps were re-reviewed by their authors and are now undergoing final editing before preparation for publication. In some cases (for Mercury, Venus, and Mars), more detailed maps were digitized and then simplified for the Atlas. Other detailed maps are planned to be digitized in the coming year for the Moon and the Galilean satellites. For most of the remaining bodies such as the Uranian satellites, the current digitized versions contain virtually all the detail that can be mapped given the available data; those versions will be unchanged for the Atlas. These digital geologic maps are archived at the digital scale of 1/16 degree/ pixel, in sinusoidal format. The availability of geology of the Solar System in a digital database will facilitate comparisons and integration with other data: digitized lunar geologic maps have already been used in a comparison with Galileo SSI observations of the Moon.

  20. Appendix E: Geology

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, Steve; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2008-01-17

    This appendix provides a detailed description of geology under the Central Plateau of the Hanford Site, emphasizing the areas around tank farms. It is to be published by client CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., as part of a larger, multi-contractor technical report.

  1. Geological and Inorganic Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, L. L.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presents a review focusing on techniques and their application to the analysis of geological and inorganic materials that offer significant changes to research and routine work. Covers geostandards, spectroscopy, plasmas, microbeam techniques, synchrotron X-ray methods, nuclear activation methods, chromatography, and electroanalytical methods.…

  2. Briefing on geological sequestration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geological sequestration (GS) is generally recognized as the injection and long-term (e.g., hundreds to thousands of years) trapping of gaseous, liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) in subsurface media – primarily saline formations, depleted or nearly depleted oil and gas...

  3. Geological Processes and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, J. W.; Greeley, R.; Golombek, M. P.; Hartmann, W. K.; Hauber, E.; Jaumann, R.; Masson, P.; Neukum, G.; Nyquist, L. E.; Carr, M. H.

    2001-04-01

    Geological mapping and establishment of stratigraphic relationships provides an overview of geological processes operating on Mars and how they have varied in time and space. Impact craters and basins shaped the crust in earliest history and as their importance declined, evidence of extensive regional volcanism emerged during the Late Noachian. Regional volcanism characterized the Early Hesperian and subsequent to that time, volcanism was largely centered at Tharsis and Elysium, continuing until the recent geological past. The Tharsis region appears to have been largely constructed by the Late Noachian, and represents a series of tectonic and volcanic centers. Globally distributed structural features representing contraction characterize the middle Hesperian. Water-related processes involve the formation of valley networks in the Late Noachian and into the Hesperian, an ice sheet at the south pole in the middle Hesperian, and outflow channels and possible standing bodies of water in the northern lowlands in the Late Hesperian and into the Amazonian. A significant part of the present water budget occurs in the present geologically young polar layered terrains. In order to establish more firmly rates of processes, we stress the need to improve the calibration of the absolute timescale, which today is based on crater count systems with substantial uncertainties, along with a sampling of rocks of unknown provenance. Sample return from carefully chosen stratigraphic units could calibrate the existing timescale and vastly improve our knowledge of Martian evolution.

  4. Geological impacts on nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter reviews the nutritional roles of mineral elements, as part of a volume on health implications of geology. The chapter addresses the absorption and post-absorptive utilization of the nutritionally essential minerals, including their physiological functions and quantitative requirements....

  5. Glacial Geology of Wisconsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madison Public Schools, WI.

    This publication is a teacher's resource and guidebook for the presentation of the three filmstrips in the "Glacial Geology of Wisconsin" series. The first filmstrip is subtitled, "Evidence of the Glaciers," the second "How the Glaciers Reshaped the Landscape," and the third "Fossils of the Ice Age." Included are a list of objectives, an outline…

  6. Geological Field Trip Guidebooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Harriet E.

    1978-01-01

    Geological field trip guidebooks, developed for use during a field trip or field conference, are considered ephemeral publications by their compilers and publishers. Too few copies are printed and little attention is paid to bibliographic format and information. These difficulties are discussed and recommendations are made to alleviate the…

  7. Public perceptions of geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Hazel; Stewart, Iain; Anderson, Mark; Pahl, Sabine; Stokes, Alison

    2014-05-01

    Geological issues are increasingly intruding on the everyday lives of ordinary people. Whether it be onshore exploration and extraction of oil and gas, deep injection of water for geothermal power or underground storage of carbon dioxide and radioactive waste, many communities across Europe are being faced with potentially contested geological activity under their backyard. As well as being able to communicate the technical aspects of such work, geoscience professionals also need to appreciate that for most people the subsurface is an unfamiliar realm. In order to engage communities and individuals in effective dialogue about geological activities, an appreciation of what 'the public' already know and what they want to know is needed, but this is a subject that is in its infancy. In an attempt to provide insight into these key issues, this study examines the concerns the public have, relating to geology, by constructing 'Mental Models' of people's perceptions of the subsurface. General recommendations for public engagement strategies will be presented based on the results of selected case studies; specifically expert and non-expert mental models for communities in the south-west of England.

  8. Geologic history of the Black Hills caves, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palmer, Arthur N.; Palmer, Margaret; Paces, James B.

    2016-01-01

    The caves reveal four phases of calcite deposition: eogenetic ferroan calcite (Mississippian replacement of sulfates); white scalenohedra in paleovoids deposited during deep post-Mississippian burial; palisade crusts formed during blockage of springs by Oligocene–Miocene continental sediments; and laminated crusts from late Pleistocene water-table fluctuations. The caves reveal more than 300 m.y. of geologic history and a close relationship to regional geologic events.

  9. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group : determination of selected herbicides and their degradation products in water using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kish, J.L.; Thurman, E.M.; Scribner, E.A.; Zimmerman, L.R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for the extraction and analysis of eight herbicides and five degradation products using solid-phase extraction from natural water samples followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry is presented in this report. This method was developed for dimethenamid; flufenacet; fluometuron and its degradation products, demethylfluometuron (DMFM), 3-(trifluromethyl)phenylurea (TFMPU), 3-(trifluromethyl)-aniline (TFMA); molinate; norflurazon and its degradation product, demethylnorflurazon; pendamethalin; the degradation product of prometryn, deisopropylprometryn; propanil; and trifluralin. The eight herbicides are used primarily in the southern United States where cotton, rice, and soybeans are produced. The exceptions are dimethenamid and flufenacet, which are used on corn in the Midwest. Water samples received by the U.S. Geological Survey's Organic Geochemistry Research Group in Lawrence, Kansas, are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then passed through disposable solid-phase extraction columns containing octadecyl-bonded porous silica (C-18) to extract the compounds. The herbicides and their degradation products are removed from the column by ethyl acetate elution. The eluate is evaporated under nitrogen, and components then are separated, identified, and quantified by injecting an aliquot of the concentrated extract into a high-resolution, fused-silica capillary column of a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer under selected-ion mode. Method detection limits ranged from 0.02 to 0.05 ?g/L for all compounds with the exception of TFMPU, which has a method detection limit of 0.32 ?g/L. The mean absolute recovery is 107 percent. This method for the determination of herbicides and their degradation products is valuable for acquiring information about water quality and compound fate and transport in water.

  10. Temporal Profiles of SEP events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Herrero, R.; del Peral, L.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Sequeiros, J.; Mueller-Mellin, R.; Kunow, H.

    2001-08-01

    This work is a preliminary study of 18 solar energetic particle (SEP) events detected by SOHO/EPHIN between 1996 and 2000. Temporal profiles of Impulsive and Gradual SEP events have been parameterized to determinate differences among SEP events depending on the magnetic connection and Physical conditions of the interplanetary transport.

  11. Geology of the southern hemisphere of Triton: No polar cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, P.; Moore, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    The bright southern hemisphere, comprising Uhlanga Regio, is perhaps the most poorly understood geologic province on Triton. The entire bright southern hemisphere has been described as a bright polar 'cap', implying a seasonal origin, or as a permanent geologic terrain distinct from the equatorial terrains. Also, thermal models have predicted seasonal migration of frosts and ices from the presently sun-lit south latitudes to the dark northern latitudes. The distribution of frosts and geologic history of this region must be determined observationally. We reexamine the geology of this terrain with the goal of answering these questions.

  12. Vesta: A Geological Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaumann, R.

    2012-04-01

    Observations from the Dawn spacecraft [1] enable the derivation of the asteroid 4Vesta's shape, facilitate mapping of the surface geology, and provide the first evidence for interpreting Vesta's geological evolution. Science data were acquired during the approach to Vesta, a circular polar (Survey) orbit at an altitude of 2700 km providing ~ 230 m/pix camera scale, and during a circular high-altitude mapping orbit (HAMO) at 700 km altitude with a camera scale of ~ 65 m/pixel. Currently Dawn is orbiting Vesta in a low-altitude mapping orbit (LAMO) at 210 km altitude, yielding a global image coverage of ~20 m/pixel at the time of EGU [2,3,4,5]. Geomorphology and distribution of surface features provide evidence for impact cratering, tectonic activity, and regolith and probable volcanic processes. Craters with dark rays, bright rays, and dark rim streaks have been observed, suggesting buried stratigraphy. The largest fresh craters retain a simple bowl-shaped morphology, with depth/diameter ratios roughly comparable to lunar values. The largest crater Rheasilvia, an ~500 km diameter depression at the south pole, includes an incomplete inward facing cuspate scarp and a large central mound surrounded by unusual complex arcuate ridge and groove patterns, and overlies an older ~400 km wide basin. A set of large equatorial troughs is related to these south polar structures. Vesta exhibits rugged topography ranging from -22 km to +19 km relative to a best fit ellipsoidal shape. Vesta's topography has a much greater range in elevation relative to its radius (15%) than do the Moon and Mars (1%) or the Earth (0.3%), but less than highly battered smaller asteroids like Lutetia (40%). This also identifies Vesta as a transitional body between asteroids and planets. The surface of Vesta exhibits very steep topographic slopes that are near the angle of repose. Impacts onto these steep surfaces, followed by slope failure, make resurfacing - due to impacts and their associated

  13. Methods of analysis by the U. S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of pesticides in water by graphitized carbon-based solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Furlong, Edward T.; Anderson, Bruce D.; Werner, Stephen L.; Soliven, Paul P.; Coffey, Laura J.; Burkhardt, Mark R.

    2001-01-01

    In 1996, the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) developed and implemented a graphitized carbon-based solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatographic analytical method to determine polar pesticide concentrations in surface- and ground-water samples. Subsequently, the NWQL developed a complementary analysis that uses high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to detect, identify, and quantify polar pesticides and pesticide metabolites in filtered water at concentrations as low as 10 nanograms per liter. This new method was designed to improve sensitivity and selectivity over the prior method, and to reduce known interferences from natural organic matter. In this new method, pesticides are extracted from filtered water samples by useing a 0.5-gram graphitized carbon-based solid-phase extraction cartridge, eluted from the cartridge, and concentrations determined by using high-perforance liquid chromatography with elecrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The upper concentratoin limit is 1.000 microgram per liter (ug/L) for most compounds. Single-operator method detection limits in organic-free water samples fortified with pesticdes at a concentration of 0.025 ug/L ranged from 0.0019 to 0.022 ug/L for all compunds in the method. The grand mean (mean of mean recoveries for individual compounds) recoveries in organic-free water samples ranged from 72 to 89 percent, fortified wit hpesticides at three concentrations between 0.025 and 0.5 ug/L. Grand mean recoveries in ground- and surface-water samples ranged from 46 to 119 percent, also fortified with pesticies at three concentrations between 0.025 and 0.5 ug/L. Long-term recoveries from reagent water spikes were used to demonstrate that 38 of 65 compounds can be reported without qualification of the quantitative result across the analytical range of the method. The remaining 27 are reported with qualified estimates of concentration because of greater variability

  14. Geologic Map Database of Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoeser, Douglas B.; Shock, Nancy; Green, Gregory N.; Dumonceaux, Gayle M.; Heran, William D.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to release a digital geologic map database for the State of Texas. This database was compiled for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Program, National Surveys and Analysis Project, whose goal is a nationwide assemblage of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and other data. This release makes the geologic data from the Geologic Map of Texas available in digital format. Original clear film positives provided by the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology were photographically enlarged onto Mylar film. These films were scanned, georeferenced, digitized, and attributed by Geologic Data Systems (GDS), Inc., Denver, Colorado. Project oversight and quality control was the responsibility of the U.S. Geological Survey. ESRI ArcInfo coverages, AMLs, and shapefiles are provided.

  15. Using Snow to Teach Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Charles

    1991-01-01

    A lesson plan, directed at middle school students and older, describes using snow to study the geological processes of solidification of molten material, sedimentation, and metamorphosis. Provides background information on these geological processes. (MCO)

  16. Geology of California. Second Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, R.M.; Webb, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    Two introductory chapters familiarize readers with basic geologic concepts. The following chapters describe the geology of each of California's 11 geomorphic provinces; the San Andreas fault and offshore geology are discussed in two separate chapters. Four appendices acquaint readers with technical words and terms, common minerals and rocks in California, geologic time, and geologic theories that pertain to California. During the 1960s evidence collected from the east Pacific sea floor off the western coast of North America gave scientists supporting data for Alfred Wegener's 1910 theory of continental drift. In addition to the confirmation of continental drift, since the 1960s scientists have discovered paleomagnetism, sea-floor spreading, exotic and suspect terranes, and polar wandering. These important concepts have had far reaching effects about how we understand the geology of California and how this region has evolved through geologic time. Improved investigative procedures enable earth scientists to comprehend previously puzzling aspects of California's geology.

  17. Use of satellite images to determine surface-water cover during the flood event of September 13, 2013, in Lyons and western Longmont, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, Christopher J.; Friesen, Beverly A.; Wilson, Earl M.; Wilds, Stanley R.; Noble, Suzanne M.

    2015-01-01

    This surface-water cover dataset was created as a timely representation of post-flood ground conditions to support response efforts. This dataset and all processed imagery and derived products were uploaded to the USGS Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS) website (http://hddsexplorer.usgs.gov/uplift/hdds/) for distribution to those responding to the flood event.

  18. U.S. Geological Survey coastal and marine geology research; recent highlights and achievements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, S. Jeffress; Barnes, Peter W.; Prager, Ellen J.

    2000-01-01

    The USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program has large-scale national and regional research projects that focus on environmental quality, geologic hazards, natural resources, and information transfer. This Circular highlights recent scientific findings of the program, which play a vital role in the USGS endeavor to understand human interactions with the natural environment and to determine how the fundamental geologic processes controlling the Earth work. The scientific knowledge acquired through USGS research and monitoring is critically needed by planners, government agencies, and the public. Effective communication of the results of this research will enable the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program to play an integral part in assisting the Nation in responding the pressing Earth science challenges of the 21st century.

  19. Conduct of Geologic Field Work During Planetary Exploration: Why Geology Matters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, Dean B.

    2010-01-01

    The science of field geology is the investigative process of determining the distribution of rock units and structures on a planet fs surface, and it is the first-order data set that informs all subsequent studies of a planet, such as geochemistry, geochronology, geophysics, or remote sensing. For future missions to the Moon and Mars, the surface systems deployed must support the conduct of field geology if these endeavors are to be scientifically useful. This lecture discussed what field geology is all about.why it is important, how it is done, how conducting field geology informs many other sciences, and how it affects the design of surface systems and the implementation of operations in the future.

  20. Geological research for public outreach and education in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skridlaite, Grazina; Guobyte, Rimante

    2013-04-01

    Successful IYPE activities and implementation of Geoheritage day in Lithuania increased public awareness in geology. A series of projects introducing geology to the general public and youth, supported by EU funds and local communities, were initiated. Researchers from the scientific and applied geology institutions of Lithuania participated in these projects and provided with the geological data. In one case, the Lithuanian Survey of Protected Areas supported the installation of a series of geological exhibitions in several regional and national parks. An animation demonstrating glacial processes was chosen for most of these because the Lithuanian surface is largely covered with sedimentary deposits of the Nemunas (Weichselian) glaciation. Researchers from the Lithuanian Geological Survey used the mapping results to demonstrate real glacial processes for every chosen area. In another case, 3D models showing underground structures of different localities were based on detailed geological maps and profiles obtained for that area. In case of the Sartai regional park, the results of previous geological research projects provided the possibility to create a movie depicting the ca. 2 Ga geological evolution of the region. The movie starts with the accretion of volcanic island arcs on the earlier continental margin at ca. 2 Ga and deciphers later Precambrian tectonic and magmatic events. The reconstruction is based on numerous scientific articles and interpretation of geophysical data. Later Paleozoic activities and following erosion sculptured the surface which was covered with several ice sheets in Quaternary. For educational purpose, a collection of minerals and rocks at the Forestry Institute was used to create an exhibition called "Cycle of geological processes". Forestry scientists and their students are able to study the interactions of geodiversity and biodiversity and to understand ancient and modern geological processes leading to a soil formation. An aging

  1. Transformational Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denning, Peter J.; Hiles, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Transformational Events is a new pedagogic pattern that explains how innovations (and other transformations) happened. The pattern is three temporal stages: an interval of increasingly unsatisfactory ad hoc solutions to a persistent problem (the "mess"), an offer of an invention or of a new way of thinking, and a period of widespread adoption and…

  2. Maintenance Event

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-07-22

    Time:  08:00 am - 08:30 am EDT Event Impact:  Science Directorate websites will ... outage Thursday morning, 7/24, to perform upgrades to the web environment and are expected to be down for about 30 minutes. ...

  3. Introduction to ore geology

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    This textbook on ore geology is for second and third year undergraduates and closely parallels the undergraduate course given in this subject at England's University of Leicester. The volume covers three major areas: (1) principles of ore geology, (2) examples of the most important types of ore deposits, and (3) mineralization in space and time. Many chapters have been thoroughly revised for this edition and a chapter on diamonds has been added. Chapters on greisen and pegmatite have also been added, the former in response to the changing situation in tin mining following the recent tin crisis, and the latter in response to suggestions from geologists in a number of overseas countries. Some chapters have been considerably expanded and new sections added, including disseminated gold deposits and unconformity-associated uranium deposits. The author also expands on the importance of viewing mineral deposits from an economic standpoint.

  4. Geology of the Caribbean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillon, William P.; Edgar, N.T.; Scanlon, K.M.; Klitgord, Kim D.

    1987-01-01

    The Venezuelan and Colombian basins are located on the Caribbean Plate whilst the Yucatan basin is on the North American Plate. The processes occurring at the boundaries between the Caribbean Plate and the adjacent North American, South American and Cocos Plates, and the resulting surface features and patterns of volcanic and earthquake activity are described. Most of the Caribbean area is floored by atypical oceanic crust and its most valuable main geologic resources identified so far are petroleum, together with sand and gravel. Geological research is being carried out with techniques for broad-range swath imaging of the seafloor, such as GLORIA, and for directly measuring the movement between plates. -J.G.Harvey

  5. Borehole geological assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spuck, W. H., III (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A method and apparatus are discussed for performing geological assessments of a formation located along a borehole, and a boring tool that bores a pair of holes into the walls of the borehole and into the surrounding strata along with a pair of probes which are installed in the holes. One of the probes applies an input such as a current or pressured fluid, and the other probe senses a corresponding input which it receives from the strata.

  6. Principles of nuclear geology

    SciTech Connect

    Aswathanarayana, U.

    1985-01-01

    This book treats the basic principles of nuclear physics and the mineralogy, geochemistry, distribution and ore deposits of uranium and thorium. The application of nuclear methodology in radiogenic heat and thermal regime of the earth, radiometric prospecting, isotopic age dating, stable isotopes and cosmic-ray produced isotopes is covered. Geological processes, such as metamorphic chronology, petrogenesis, groundwater movement, and sedimentation rate are focussed on.

  7. Geologic map of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Frederic H.; Hults, Chad P.; Mull, Charles G.; Karl, Susan M.

    2015-12-31

    This Alaska compilation is unique in that it is integrated with a rich database of information provided in the spatial datasets and standalone attribute databases. Within the spatial files every line and polygon is attributed to its original source; the references to these sources are contained in related tables, as well as in stand-alone tables. Additional attributes include typical lithology, geologic setting, and age range for the map units. Also included are tables of radiometric ages.

  8. The Geology of Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, Paul M.

    1995-01-01

    The geology of Callisto is not boring. Although cratered terrain dominates Callisto (a key end-member of the Jovian satellite system), a number of more interesting features are apparent. Cratered terrain is broken into irregular map-able bright and dark subunits that vary in albedo by a factor of 2, and several relatively smooth units are depleted of small craters. Some of these areas may have been volcanically resurfaced. Lineaments, including parallel and radial sets, may be evidence for early global tectonism. Frost deposition occurs in cold traps, and impact scars have formed from tidally disrupted comets. Geologic evidence suggests that Callisto does have a chemically differentiated crust. Central pit and central dome craters and palimpsests are common. The preferred interpretation is that a relatively ice-rich material, at depths of 5 km or more, has been mobilized during impact and exposed as domes or palimpsests. The close similarity in crater morphologies and dimensions indicates that the outermost 10 km or so of Callisto may be as differentiated as on Ganymede. The geology of cratered terrain on Callisto is simpler than that of cratered terrain on Ganymede, however. Orbital evolution and tidal heating may provide the answer to the riddle of why Callisto and Ganymede are so different (Malhotra, 1991). We should expect a few surprises and begins to answer some fundamental questions when Callisto is observed by Galileo in late 1996.

  9. Interactive geologic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Glaeser, J.D.; Krajewski, S.A.

    1984-04-01

    Improved success in finding hydrocarbons and minerals depends on developing geologic models from seismic, gravity, and magnetic data that most closely approximate real-world settings. Although data processing remains the chore of mainframe and minicomputers, interpretations and modeling of geologic and geophysical information now are best accomplished on personal computers because these computers afford the explorationist maximum freedom to shape and fine tune geophysical evaluations. Three case histories use the GEOSIM geophysical modeling systems to delineate exploration targets. The first example is Silurian Niagaran reef trends in the Michigan basin. Here, differences in seismic reef anomalies result from variations in carbonate-evaporite stratigraphy encasing the reefs, reef geometry, and reef reservoir parameters. These variations which influence real seismic-response differences can be successfully matched using appropriate geologic models in generating synthetic seismic reef anomalies. The second example applies gravity and magnetic data to seismic modeling of a Wyoming coal field. Detailed seismic stratigraphy helps locate those portions of the field having multiple seams, although it does not resolve individual economic zones. Gravity data do identify pinchout margins of multiseam zones and pinchouts between principal coals. Magnetic data are then used to delineate the burn (clinker) margin. Seismic modeling of subtle stratigraphic traps is the broader area of exploration interest contained in the first 2 examples. In the third, successfully modeled and tested examples of lateral changes in deltaic facies and of faulted, unconformity-bounded continent-margin sequences are shown to be successful guides to reinterpretation of seismic data.

  10. Wave Propagation in Jointed Geologic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Antoun, T

    2009-12-17

    Predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in a jointed geologic media remain a modern day scientific frontier. In part this is due to a lack of comprehensive understanding of the complex physical processes associated with the transient response of geologic material, and in part it is due to numerical challenges that prohibit accurate representation of the heterogeneities that influence the material response. Constitutive models whose properties are determined from laboratory experiments on intact samples have been shown to over-predict the free field environment in large scale field experiments. Current methodologies for deriving in situ properties from laboratory measured properties are based on empirical equations derived for static geomechanical applications involving loads of lower intensity and much longer durations than those encountered in applications of interest involving wave propagation. These methodologies are not validated for dynamic applications, and they do not account for anisotropic behavior stemming from direcitonal effects associated with the orientation of joint sets in realistic geologies. Recent advances in modeling capabilities coupled with modern high performance computing platforms enable physics-based simulations of jointed geologic media with unprecedented details, offering a prospect for significant advances in the state of the art. This report provides a brief overview of these modern computational approaches, discusses their advantages and limitations, and attempts to formulate an integrated framework leading to the development of predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in jointed and fractured geologic materials.

  11. Evaluating Boy Scout Geology Education, A Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintz, R. S.; Thomson, B.

    2008-12-01

    This study investigated geology knowledge acquisition by Boy Scouts through use of the Boy Scout Geology Merit Handbook. In this study, boys engaged in hands-on interactive learning following the requirements set forth in the Geology Merit Badge Handbook. The purposes of this study were to determine the amount of geology content knowledge engendered in adolescent males through the use of the Geology Merit Badge Handbook published by the Boy Scouts of America; to determine if single sex, activity oriented, free-choice learning programs can be effective in promoting knowledge development in young males; and to determine if boys participating in the Scouting program believed their participation helped them succeed in school. Members of a local Boy Scout Troop between the ages of 11 and 18 were invited to participate in a Geology Merit Badge program. Boys who did not already possess the badge were allowed to self-select participation. The boys' content knowledge of geology, rocks, and minerals was pre- and post-tested. Boys were interviewed about their school and Scouting experiences; whether they believed their Scouting experiences and work in Merit Badges contributed to their success in school. Contributing educational theories included single-sex education, informal education with free-choice learning, learning styles, hands-on activities, and the social cognitive theory concept of self-efficacy. Boys who completed this study seemed to possess a greater knowledge of geology than they obtained in school. If boys who complete the Boy Scout Geology Merit Badge receive additional geological training, their field experiences and knowledge acquired through this learning experience will be beneficial, and a basis for continued scaffolding of geologic knowledge.

  12. Life stress as a determinant of emotional well-being: development and validation of a Spanish-Language Checklist of Stressful Life Events

    PubMed Central

    Morote Rios, Roxanna; Hjemdal, Odin; Martinez Uribe, Patricia; Corveleyn, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To develop a screening instrument for investigating the prevalence and impact of stressful life events in Spanish-speaking Peruvian adults. Background: Researchers have demonstrated the causal connection between life stress and psychosocial and physical complaints. The need for contextually relevant and updated instruments has been also addressed. Methods: A sequential exploratory design combined qualitative and quantitative information from two studies: first, the content validity of 20 severe stressors (N = 46); then, a criterion-related validity process with affective symptoms as criteria (Hopkins Symptom Checklist (HSCL-25), N = 844). Results: 93% of the participants reported one to eight life events (X = 3.93, Mdn = 3, SD = 7.77). Events increase significantly until 60 years of age (Mdn = 6). Adults born in inland regions (Mdn = 4) or with secondary or technical education (Mdn = 5) reported significantly more stressors than participants born in Lima or with higher education. There are no differences by gender. Four-step hierarchical models showed that life stress is the best unique predictor (β) of HSCL anxiety, depression and general distress (p < .001). Age and gender are significant for the three criteria (p < .01, p < .001); lower education and unemployment are significant unique predictors of general distress and depression (p < .01; p < .05). Previously, the two-factor structure of the HSCL-25 was verified (Satorra–Bentler chi-square, root-mean-square error of approximation = 0.059; standardized root-mean-square residual = 0.055). Conclusion: The Spanish-Language Checklist of Stressful Life Events is a valid instrument to identify adults with significant levels of life stress and possible risk for mental and physical health (clinical utility). PMID:25750790

  13. Experimental determination of the solubility constant for magnesium chloride hydroxide hydrate (Mg 3Cl(OH) 5·4H 2O, phase 5) at room temperature, and its importance to nuclear waste isolation in geological repositories in salt formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yongliang; Deng, Haoran; Nemer, Martin; Johnsen, Shelly

    2010-08-01

    In this study, the solubility constant of magnesium chloride hydroxide hydrate, Mg 3Cl(OH) 5·4H 2O, termed as phase 5, is determined from a series of solubility experiments in MgCl 2-NaCl solutions. The solubility constant in logarithmic units at 25 °C for the following reaction, MgCl(OH)·4HO+5H=3Mg+9HO(l)+Cl is calculated as 43.21 ± 0.33 (2 σ) based on the specific interaction theory (SIT) model for extrapolation to infinite dilution. The Gibbs free energy and enthalpy of formation for phase 5 at 25 °C are derived as -3384 ± 2 (2 σ) kJ mol -1 and -3896 ± 6 (2 σ) kJ mol -1, respectively. MgO (bulk, pure MgO corresponding to the mineral periclase) is the only engineered barrier certified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for emplacement in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the US, and an Mg(OH) 2-based engineered barrier (bulk, pure Mg(OH) 2 corresponding to brucite) is to be employed in the Asse repository in Germany. Phase 5, and its similar phase, phase 3 (Mg 2Cl(OH) 3·4H 2O), could have a significant role in influencing the geochemical conditions in geological repositories for nuclear waste in salt formations where MgO or brucite is employed as engineered barriers. Based on our solubility constant for phase 5 in combination with the literature value for phase 3, we predict that the composition for the invariant point of phase 5 and phase 3 would be mMg = 1.70 and pmH = 8.94 in the Mg-Cl binary system. The recent WIPP Compliance Recertification Application Performance Assessment Baseline Calculations indicate that phase 5, instead of phase 3, is indeed a stable phase when the WIPP Generic Weep Brine (GWB), a Na-Mg-Cl-dominated brine associated with the Salado Formation, equilibrates with actinide-source-term phases, brucite, magnesium carbonates, halite and anhydrite. Therefore, phase 5 is important to the WIPP, and potentially important to other repositories in salt formations.

  14. The ISC Seismic Event Bibliography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giacomo, Domenico; Storchak, Dmitry

    2015-04-01

    The International Seismological Centre (ISC) is a not-for-profit organization operating in the UK for the last 50 years and producing the ISC Bulletin - the definitive worldwide summary of seismic events, both natural and anthropogenic - starting from the beginning of 20th century. Often researchers need to gather information related to specific seismic events for various reasons. To facilitate such task, in 2012 we set up a new database linking earthquakes and other seismic events in the ISC Bulletin to bibliographic records of scientific articles (mostly peer-reviewed journals) that describe those events. Such association allows users of the ISC Event Bibliography (www.isc.ac.uk/event_bibliography/index.php) to run searches for publications via a map-based web interface and, optionally, selecting scientific publications related to either specific events or events in the area of interest. Some of the greatest earthquakes were described in several hundreds of articles published over a period of few years. The journals included in our database are not limited to seismology but bring together a variety of fields in geosciences (e.g., engineering seismology, geodesy and remote sensing, tectonophysics, monitoring research, tsunami, geology, geochemistry, hydrogeology, atmospheric sciences, etc.) making this service useful in multidisciplinary studies. Usually papers dealing with large data set are not included (e.g., papers describing a seismic catalogue). Currently the ISC Event Bibliography includes over 17,000 individual publications from about 500 titles related to over 14,000 events that occurred in last 100+ years. The bibliographic records in the Event Bibliography start in the 1950s, and it is updated as new publications become available.

  15. Digital Geologic Map Database of Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, D. W.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Felger, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    Medicine Lake volcano, located in the southern Cascades ~55 km east-northeast of Mount Shasta, is a large rear-arc, shield-shaped volcano with an eruptive history spanning nearly 500 k.y. Geologic mapping of Medicine Lake volcano has been digitally compiled as a spatial database in ArcGIS. Within the database, coverage feature classes have been created representing geologic lines (contacts, faults, lava tubes, etc.), geologic unit polygons, and volcanic vent location points. The database can be queried to determine the spatial distributions of different rock types, geologic units, and other geologic and geomorphic features. These data, in turn, can be used to better understand the evolution, growth, and potential hazards of this large, rear-arc Cascades volcano. Queries of the database reveal that the total area covered by lavas of Medicine Lake volcano, which range in composition from basalt through rhyolite, is about 2,200 km2, encompassing all or parts of 27 U.S. Geological Survey 1:24,000-scale topographic quadrangles. The maximum extent of these lavas is about 80 km north-south by 45 km east-west. Occupying the center of Medicine Lake volcano is a 7 km by 12 km summit caldera in which nestles its namesake, Medicine Lake. The flanks of the volcano, which are dotted with cinder cones, slope gently upward to the caldera rim, which reaches an elevation of nearly 2,440 m. Approximately 250 geologic units have been mapped, only half a dozen of which are thin surficial units such as alluvium. These volcanic units mostly represent eruptive events, each commonly including a vent (dome, cinder cone, spatter cone, etc.) and its associated lava flow. Some cinder cones have not been matched to lava flows, as the corresponding flows are probably buried, and some flows cannot be correlated with vents. The largest individual units on the map are all basaltic in composition, including the late Pleistocene basalt of Yellowjacket Butte (296 km2 exposed), the largest unit on the

  16. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory : evaluation of alkaline persulfate digestion as an alternative to Kjeldahl digestion for determination of total and dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, Charles J.; Kryskalla, Jennifer R.

    2003-01-01

    Alkaline persulfate digestion was evaluated and validated as a more sensitive, accurate, and less toxic alternative to Kjeldahl digestion for routine determination of nitrogen and phosphorus in surface- and ground-water samples in a large-scale and geographically diverse study conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) between October 1, 2001, and September 30, 2002. Data for this study were obtained from about 2,100 surface- and ground-water samples that were analyzed for Kjeldahl nitrogen and Kjeldahl phosphorus in the course of routine operations at the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL). These samples were analyzed independently for total nitrogen and total phosphorus using an alkaline persulfate digestion method developed by the NWQL Methods Research and Development Program. About half of these samples were collected during nominally high-flow (April-June) conditions and the other half were collected during nominally low-flow (August-September) conditions. The number of filtered and whole-water samples analyzed from each flow regime was about equal.By operational definition, Kjeldahl nitrogen (ammonium + organic nitrogen) and alkaline persulfate digestion total nitrogen (ammonium + nitrite + nitrate + organic nitrogen) are not equivalent. It was necessary, therefore, to reconcile this operational difference by subtracting nitrate + nitrite concentra-tions from alkaline persulfate dissolved and total nitrogen concentrations prior to graphical and statistical comparisons with dissolved and total Kjeldahl nitrogen concentrations. On the basis of two-population paired t-test statistics, the means of all nitrate-corrected alkaline persulfate nitrogen and Kjeldahl nitrogen concentrations (2,066 paired results) were significantly different from zero at the p = 0.05 level. Statistically, the means of Kjeldahl nitrogen concentrations were greater than those of nitrate-corrected alkaline persulfate nitrogen concentrations. Experimental evidence strongly

  17. The encyclopedia of applied geology

    SciTech Connect

    Finkl, C.W.

    1984-01-01

    This compendium of engineering geology data includes contributions by experts from many countries. Topics center around the field of engineering geology, with special focus on landscapes, earth materials, and the ''management'' of geological processes. How to use geology to serve man is given particular attention. More than 80 entries deal with hydrology, rock structure monitoring, soil mechanics, and engineering geology. Facts are provided on earth science information and sources, electrokinetics, forensic geology, geogryology, nuclear plant siting, photogrammetry, tunnels and tunneling, urban geomorphology, and well data systems. This guide explains the geology of alluvial plains, arid lands, beaches and coasts, delataic plains, cold regions, glacial landscapes, and urban environments. Detailed analyses are given of the geotechnical properties of caliche, clay, duricrust, soil, laterite, marine sediments, and rocks.

  18. Reconciling Changes to the Geologic Time Scale, in the U.S. Geologic Names Lexicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soller, D. R.; Stamm, N. R.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Geologic Names Lexicon ("Geolex", http://ngmdb.usgs.gov/Geolex/), is a standard reference for the Nation's stratigraphic nomenclature. Geolex's content is drawn from the literature published since the late 1800's. Since that time, modifications to the geologic time scale have been significant, particularly in recent decades (e.g., the Ordovician, Carboniferous, Permian, and Quaternary), owing in part to more precise biostratigraphic zonations and advances in isotopic dating techniques. Because the definitions of geologic time intervals have been modified as more information is gathered, interpreted, and published, the geologic age of a unit as stated in a report published in, for example, 1950, may be different according to today's time scale. In order to ensure that people can search Geolex for geologic units according to today's time scale, we have updated to the modern time scale the age estimates for many geologic units. These updated age estimates are shown in Geolex's "Unit Summary" pages; the ages as originally determined are preserved in the synopsis for each publication. This presentation will focus on our methodology.

  19. Co2 geological sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu

    2004-11-18

    Human activities are increasingly altering the Earth's climate. A particular concern is that atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) may be rising fast because of increased industrialization. CO{sub 2} is a so-called ''greenhouse gas'' that traps infrared radiation and may contribute to global warming. Scientists project that greenhouse gases such as CO{sub 2} will make the arctic warmer, which would melt glaciers and raise sea levels. Evidence suggests that climate change may already have begun to affect ecosystems and wildlife around the world. Some animal species are moving from one habitat to another to adapt to warmer temperatures. Future warming is likely to exceed the ability of many species to migrate or adjust. Human production of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuels (such as at coal-fired power plants) is not likely to slow down soon. It is urgent to find somewhere besides the atmosphere to put these increased levels of CO{sub 2}. Sequestration in the ocean and in soils and forests are possibilities, but another option, sequestration in geological formations, may also be an important solution. Such formations could include depleted oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal seams, and deep saline aquifers. In many cases, injection of CO2 into a geological formation can enhance the recovery of hydrocarbons, providing value-added byproducts that can offset the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. Before CO{sub 2} gas can be sequestered from power plants and other point sources, it must be captured. CO{sub 2} is also routinely separated and captured as a by-product from industrial processes such as synthetic ammonia production, H{sub 2} production, and limestone calcination. Then CO{sub 2} must be compressed into liquid form and transported to the geological sequestration site. Many power plants and other large emitters of CO{sub 2} are located near geological formations that are amenable to CO{sub 2} sequestration.

  20. The geologic evolution of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, P. D., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    A synthesis of pre- and post-Apollo 11 studies is presented to produce an outline of the moon's geologic evolution from three lines of evidence: (1) relative ages of lunar landforms and rock types, (2) absolute ages of returned lunar samples, and (3) petrography, chemistry, and isotopic ratios of lunar rocks and soils. It is assumed that the ray craters, circular mare basins, and most intermediate circular landforms are primarily of impact origin, although many other landforms are volcanic or of hybrid origin. The moon's evolution is divided into four main stages, each including several distinct but overlapping events or processes.

  1. The comparison of different pre- and post-analysis filters for determination of exon-level alternative splicing events using Affymetrix arrays.

    PubMed

    Whistler, Toni; Chiang, Cheng-Feng; Lin, Jin-Mann; Lonergan, William; Reeves, William C

    2010-04-01

    Understanding the biologic significance of alternative splicing has been impeded by the difficulty in systematically identifying and validating transcript isoforms. Current exon array workflows suggest several different filtration steps to reduce the number of tests and increase the detection of alternative splicing events. In this study, we examine the effects of the suggested pre-analysis filtration by detection above background P value or signal intensity. This is followed post-analytically by restriction of exon expression to a fivefold change between groups, limiting the analysis to known alternative splicing events, or using the intersection of the results from different algorithms. Combinations of the filters are also examined. We find that none of the filtering methods reduces the number of technical false-positive calls identified by visual inspection. These include edge effects, nonresponsive probe sets, and inclusion of intronic and untranslated region probe sets into transcript annotations. Modules for filtering the exon microarray data on the basis of annotation features are needed. We propose new approaches to data filtration that would reduce the number of technical false-positives and therefore, impact the time spent performing visual inspection of the exon arrays.

  2. Geology of Kilauea volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.B. . Federal Center); Trusdell, F.A. . Hawaiian Volcano Observatory)

    1993-08-01

    This paper summarizes studies of the structure, stratigraphy, petrology, drill holes, eruption frequency, and volcanic and seismic hazards of Kilauea volcano. All the volcano is discussed, but the focus is on its lower east rift zone (LERZ) because active exploration for geothermal energy is concentrated in that area. Kilauea probably has several separate hydrothermal-convection systems that develop in response to the dynamic behavior of the volcano and the influx of abundant meteoric water. Important features of some of these hydrothermal-convection systems are known through studies of surface geology and drill holes. Observations of eruptions during the past two centuries, detailed geologic mapping, radiocarbon dating, and paleomagnetic secular-variation studies indicate that Kilauea has erupted frequently from its summit and two radial rift zones during Quaternary time. Petrologic studies have established that Kilauea erupts only tholeiitic basalt. Extensive ash deposits at Kilauea's summit and on its LERZ record locally violent, but temporary, disruptions of local hydrothermal-convection systems during the interaction of water or steam with magma. Recent drill holes on the LERZ provide data on the temperatures of the hydrothermal-convection systems, intensity of dike intrusion, porosity and permeability, and an increasing amount of hydrothermal alteration with depth. The prehistoric and historic record of volcanic and seismic activity indicates that magma will continue to be supplied to deep and shallow reservoirs beneath Kilauea's summit and rift zones and that the volcano will be affected by eruptions and earthquakes for many thousands of years. 71 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Geology of kilauea volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, R.B.; Trusdell, F.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes studies of the structure, stratigraphy, petrology, drill holes, eruption frequency, and volcanic and seismic hazards of Kilauea volcano. All the volcano is discussed, but the focus is on its lower cast rift zone (LERZ) because active exploration for geothermal energy is concentrated in that area. Kilauea probably has several separate hydrothermal-convection systems that develop in response to the dynamic behavior of the volcano and the influx of abundant meteoric water. Important features of some of these hydrothermal-convection systems are known through studies of surface geology and drill holes. Observations of eruptions during the past two centuries, detailed geologic mapping, radiocarbon dating, and paleomagnetic secular-variation studies indicate that Kilauea has erupted frequently from its summit and two radial rift zones during Quaternary time. Petrologic studies have established that Kilauea erupts only tholeiitic basalt. Extensive ash deposits at Kilauea's summit and on its LERZ record locally violent, but temporary, disruptions of local hydrothermal-convection systems during the interaction of water or steam with magma. Recent drill holes on the LERZ provide data on the temperatures of the hydrothermal-convection systems, intensity of dike intrusion, porosity and permeability, and an increasing amount of hydrothermal alteration with depth. The prehistoric and historic record of volcanic and seismic activity indicates that magma will continue to be supplied to deep and shallow reservoirs beneath Kilauea's summit and rift zones and that the volcano will be affected by eruptions and earthquakes for many thousands of years. ?? 1993.

  4. Terrestrial analogs, planetary geology, and the nature of geological reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Victor R.

    2014-05-01

    Analogical reasoning is critical to planetary geology, but its role can be misconstrued by those unfamiliar with the practice of that science. The methodological importance of analogy to geology lies in the formulation of genetic hypotheses, an absolutely essential component of geological reasoning that was either ignored or denigrated by most 20th century philosophers of science, who took the theoretical/ experimental methodology of physics to be the sole model for all of scientific inquiry. Following the seminal 19th century work of Grove Karl Gilbert, an early pioneer of planetary geology, it has long been recognized that broad experience with and understanding of terrestrial geological phenomena provide geologists with their most effective resource for the invention of potentially fruitful, working hypotheses. The actions of (1) forming such hypotheses, (2) following their consequences, and (3) testing those consequences comprise integral parts of effective geological practice in regard to the understanding of planetary surfaces. Nevertheless, the logical terminology and philosophical bases for such practice will be unfamiliar to most planetary scientists, both geologists and nongeologists. The invention of geological hypotheses involves both inductive inferences of the type Gilbert termed “empiric classification” and abductive inferences of a logical form made famous by the 19th century American logician Charles Sanders Peirce. The testing and corroboration of geological hypotheses relies less on the correspondence logic of theoretical/ experimental sciences, like physics, and more on the logic of consistency, coherence, and consilience that characterizes the investigative and historical sciences of interpretation exemplified by geology.

  5. U.S. Geological Survey activities, fiscal year 1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1982-01-01

    This U.S. Geological Survey Activities report for fiscal year 1981 presents a summary of the work performed between October 1, 1980 and September 30, 1981. The main sections of this report are: (1) The Year in Review; a brief overview of the significant events of the Geological Survey during fiscal year 1980; (2) Perspectives; essays focusing on specific events (rather than scientific topics) and programs involving multi-Division participation; (3) Missions, Organization, and Budget; a description of the Geological Survey 's major duties and assignments and of the organizational structure that supports its missions; and (4) Division Chapters; a description of the significant accomplishments (rather than a comprehensive program by program discussion) of each of the eight operating Divisions and Offices. Also included are supplementary information regarding key personnel, cooperators, and selected summary budgetary tables. (USGS)

  6. Determination of the source time function of seismic event by blind deconvolution of regional coda wavefield: application to December 22, 2009 explosion at Kambarata, Kyrgyzstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebe, O. G.; Guilbert, J.; Bard, P.

    2011-12-01

    At regional distance, recovering the source time function of a seismic event is a rather difficult task as the Green function is unknown due to large scattering of the waves by crust heterogeneities. Contrary to classical methods based on deterministic assessment of the Green function, this work proposes to exploit the stochastic nature of regional coda wavefield in order to extract the seismic source time function of a regional event. Since the work of Aki and Chouet 1975, it is well recognized that regional coda waves can provide stable and robust information on the source of seismic events. Unfortunately, all the proposed techniques are limited to the power spectral density of the seismic source function. A modified version of our two step spectral factorization algorithm [Sèbe et al. 2005] of coda waves has been proposed in order to include higher order statistic (HOS) blind deconvolution techniques. Assuming that the coda excitation time series is a non-Gaussian independent and identically distributed random signal, the higher order statistics, especially the tricorrelation, is able to remove the randomness of coda excitation and extract source properties. In addition, unlike classical second order approach which only provides the power spectral density, the tricorrelation keeps the information on the phase spectrum of the source, allowing the estimation of the source time function. This original blind deconvolution algorithm of coda waves has been applied on the regional records of the December 22, 2009 explosion in Kambara, Kyrgyzstan. Based on statistic analyses of the higher order cumulants, this method has been able to recover the main properties of the source time function of this detonation: two successive explosions have been identified with a time delay of about 1.7 sec and an amplitude ratio of about 2 in favour of second explosion. This successful blind recovering of high resolution source properties is an encouraging result toward the development

  7. Analysis on the use of engineered barriers for geologic isolation of spent fuel in a reference salt site repository

    SciTech Connect

    Cloninger, M.O.; Cole, C.R.; Washburn, J.F.

    1980-12-01

    A perspective on the potential durability and effectiveness requirements for the waste form, container and other engineered barriers for geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel has been developed. This perspective is based on calculated potential doses to individuals who may be exposed to radioactivity released from a repository via a groundwater transport pathway. These potential dose commitments were calculated with an integrated geosphere transport and bioshpere transport model. A sensitivity analysis was accomplished by varying four important system parameters, namely the waste radionuclide release rate from the repository, the delay prior to groundwater contact with the waste (leach initiation), aquifer flow velocity and flow path length. The nuclide retarding capacity of the geologic media, a major determinant of the isolation effectiveness, was not varied as a parameter but was held constant for a particular reference site. This analysis is limited to looking only at engineered barriers whose net effect is either to delay groundwater contact with the waste form or to limit the rate of release of radionuclides into the groundwater once contact has occurred. The analysis considers only leach incident scenarios, including a water well intrusion into the groundwater near a repository, but does not consider other human intrusion events or catastrophic events. The analysis has so far been applied to a reference salt site repository system and conclusions are presented.Basically, in nearly all cases, the regional geology is the most effective barrier to release of radionuclides to the biosphere; however, for long-lived isotopes of carbon, technetium and iodine, which were poorly sorbed on the geologic media, the geology is not very effective once a leach incident is initiated.

  8. Tectonic events in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl-Jensen, T.; Voss, P.; Larsen, T.; Pinna, L.

    2012-12-01

    In Greenland a station separation of around 400km mean that many earthquakes are only detected on one or two stations. The development of the seismic monitoring have gone from having only three seismic stations in Greenland up to the late 1990'ies, till today where there are 18 permanent stations. All stations are equipped with broadband sensors and all of the permanent stations transmit data in real time. The recent major improvement of the seismic monitoring is performed by the Greenland ice sheet monitoring network (GLISN, http://glisn.info). The primary goal of GLISN is to provide broadband seismic data for the detection of glacial earthquakes. GLISN is now fully implemented with Iridium real time data transfer is in operation at five stations. In the Ammassalik region in Southeast Greenland, where small earthquakes often are felt, data from a temporary additional station has been utilized for a study covering 9 months in 2008/9. In this period 62 local earthquakes have been analyzed and re-located. Some of the events had formerly been located from distant stations by using a universal earth model. The result of this localization was a scattered distribution of the events in the region. The locations have now been improved by using a local earth model along with phase readings from two local stations not previously included; ANG in Tasiilaq and ISOG in Isortoq. From relocating the events two zones with a higher degree of seismicity than in the rest of the region are observed. The first zone is located by felsic intrusions. The second zone is at the boundary between the Archaean Craton and the Ammasalik region where reworked Archaean gneisses are dominating the geology. During the analysis it was observed that the additional information from the local stations are of great importance for the result. Active broad band stations in Greenland

  9. Influence of successive phases of volcanic construction and erosion on Mayotte Island's hydrogeological functioning as determined from a helicopter-borne resistivity survey correlated with borehole geological and permeability data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittecoq, B.; Deparis, J.; Violette, S.; Jaouën, T.; Lacquement, F.

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to show how a multidisciplinary approach that combines geophysics, geology and hydrogeology has made it possible to: (a) significantly improve our understanding of the hydrogeological regime of the volcanic island of Mayotte, and (b) provide a new set of geophysical measurement calibration data. In 2010 a helicopter-borne geophysical survey (SkyTEM) was flown over the entire island (374 km2) with a measurement density hitherto unheard of in a volcanic environment. In addition, a database was compiled containing the geological logs of 55 boreholes. 52 of these boreholes have hydrogeological information like aquifer position and piezometric level. 21 of the boreholes have transmissivity values. Correlations were made between the inverted resistivities as obtained from the helicopter-borne TDEM profiles and the nature, age and hydrodynamic properties of the formations as obtained from the borehole data. Five hydrogeological units were mapped. These are characterized by an alternation between phases of dominant volcanic construction, with the emplacement of basaltic lavas, phonolite massifs and pyroclastic deposits, and phases of dominant erosion with the deposition of volcaniclastic material (colluvium, breccias, basaltic lavas and phonolite blocks and all materials resulting from slope slides) along the slopes and in the topographic depressions. It has also been possible to assign resistivity and permeability ranges to four of these units. Ranges that are also dependent on the age of the deposits: the younger the formation is, the greater its resistivity and the higher its permeability. The hydrogeological regime is marked by the phases of volcanic construction and erosion that succeeded one another during the geological history of Mayotte over the last 10 Ma. A conceptual model adapted to the specific geological context of this island, and differing from the Canarian and Hawaiian models, is also put forward. This model is marked by the

  10. Magellan stereo images and Venusian geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, H. J.; Saunders, R. S.; Plaut, Jeffrey J.; Parker, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    for characterization of geologic units at a scale that is not possible with Magellan altimetry or products derived from the altimetry. Relative ages of the geologic units are determined using the well-known principles of superposition and intersection. Here, the perception of relief is invaluable because superposition relations among the geological units are more readily and clearly established. The recognition of folds, faults, and fault systems, regardless of their orientations, is facilitated with stereopsis so that sequences of deformation of the geologic units can be determined and structural analyses vastly improved. Shapes of landforms are readily perceived so that they can be properly interpreted. The end result of the mapping, analyses, and interpretations is a geologic history of Venus that includes the sequences of formation and deformation of various geologic units. Measurements of relief at the finest scale possible are necessary for numerous topical studies. Standard altimetry will provide the necessary information on the relief of most large landforms, but it tends to underestimate the relief of small landforms and distorts their shapes. Although special processing of the altimeter echoes improves the estimates of the relief and shapes of some landforms, there are uncertainties in the interpretations of the echoes. Examples of topical studies requiring measurements of relief are given.

  11. Geologic map of Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, David A.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; Crown, David A.; Yff, Jessica A.; Jaeger, Windy L.; Schenk, Paul M.; Geissler, Paul E.; Becker, Tammy L.

    2011-01-01

    Io, discovered by Galileo Galilei on January 7–13, 1610, is the innermost of the four Galilean satellites of the planet Jupiter (Galilei, 1610). It is the most volcanically active object in the Solar System, as recognized by observations from six National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) spacecraft: Voyager 1 (March 1979), Voyager 2 (July 1979), Hubble Space Telescope (1990–present), Galileo (1996–2001), Cassini (December 2000), and New Horizons (February 2007). The lack of impact craters on Io in any spacecraft images at any resolution attests to the high resurfacing rate (1 cm/yr) and the dominant role of active volcanism in shaping its surface. High-temperature hot spots detected by the Galileo Solid-State Imager (SSI), Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS), and Photopolarimeter-Radiometer (PPR) usually correlate with darkest materials on the surface, suggesting active volcanism. The Voyager flybys obtained complete coverage of Io's subjovian hemisphere at 500 m/pixel to 2 km/pixel, and most of the rest of the satellite at 5–20 km/pixel. Repeated Galileo flybys obtained complementary coverage of Io's antijovian hemisphere at 5 m/pixel to 1.4 km/pixel. Thus, the Voyager and Galileo data sets were merged to enable the characterization of the whole surface of the satellite at a consistent resolution. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) produced a set of four global mosaics of Io in visible wavelengths at a spatial resolution of 1 km/pixel, released in February 2006, which we have used as base maps for this new global geologic map. Much has been learned about Io's volcanism, tectonics, degradation, and interior since the Voyager flybys, primarily during and following the Galileo Mission at Jupiter (December 1995–September 2003), and the results have been summarized in books published after the end of the Galileo Mission. Our mapping incorporates this new understanding to assist in map unit definition and to provide a global synthesis

  12. Apollo 12 Voice Transcript Pertaining to the Geology of the Landing Site, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, N. G.; Ulrich, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    An edited record of the conversions between the Apollo 12 astronauts and mission control pertaining to the geology of the landing site, is presented. All discussions and observations documenting the lunar landscape, its geologic characteristics, the rocks and soils collected and the lunar surface photographic record are included along with supplementary remarks essential to the continuity of events during the mission.

  13. The geological record of ocean acidification.

    PubMed

    Hönisch, Bärbel; Ridgwell, Andy; Schmidt, Daniela N; Thomas, Ellen; Gibbs, Samantha J; Sluijs, Appy; Zeebe, Richard; Kump, Lee; Martindale, Rowan C; Greene, Sarah E; Kiessling, Wolfgang; Ries, Justin; Zachos, James C; Royer, Dana L; Barker, Stephen; Marchitto, Thomas M; Moyer, Ryan; Pelejero, Carles; Ziveri, Patrizia; Foster, Gavin L; Williams, Branwen

    2012-03-01

    Ocean acidification may have severe consequences for marine ecosystems; however, assessing its future impact is difficult because laboratory experiments and field observations are limited by their reduced ecologic complexity and sample period, respectively. In contrast, the geological record contains long-term evidence for a variety of global environmental perturbations, including ocean acidification plus their associated biotic responses. We review events exhibiting evidence for elevated atmospheric CO(2), global warming, and ocean acidification over the past ~300 million years of Earth's history, some with contemporaneous extinction or evolutionary turnover among marine calcifiers. Although similarities exist, no past event perfectly parallels future projections in terms of disrupting the balance of ocean carbonate chemistry-a consequence of the unprecedented rapidity of CO(2) release currently taking place. PMID:22383840

  14. Geological consequences of superplumes

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, R.L. )

    1991-10-01

    Superplumes are suggested to have caused the period of constant normal magnetic polarity in mid-Cretaceous time (124-83 Ma) and, possibly, the period of constant reversed polarity in Pennsylvania-Permian time (323-248 Ma). These times coincide with increases in world temperature, deposition of black shales, oil generation, and eustatic sea level in the mid-Cretaceous, and increased coal generation and gas accumulation in the Pennsylvanian-Permian, accompanied by an intracratonic Pennsylvanian transgression of epicontinental seas. These geologic anomalies are associated with episodes of increased world-wide ocean-crust production and mantle outgassing, especially of carbon and nutrients. These superplumes originated just above the core-mantle boundary, significantly increased convection in the outer core, and stopped the magnetic field reversal process for 41 m.y. in the Cretaceous and 75 m.y. in Pennsylvanian-Permian time.

  15. Geology of National Parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoffer, Philip W.

    2008-01-01

    This is a set of two sheets of 3D images showing geologic features of many National Parks. Red-and-cyan viewing glasses are need to see the three-dimensional effect. A search on the World Wide Web will yield many sites about anaglyphs and where to get 3D glasses. Red-blue glasses will do but red-cyan glasses are a little better. This publication features a photo quiz game: Name that park! where you can explore, interpret, and identify selected park landscapes. Can you identify landscape features in the images? Can you explain processes that may have helped form the landscape features? You can get the answers online.

  16. Geologic mapping of Europa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greeley, R.; Figueredo, P.H.; Williams, D.A.; Chuang, F.C.; Klemaszewski, J.E.; Kadel, S.D.; Prockter, L.M.; Pappalardo, R.T.; Head, J. W.; Collins, G.C.; Spaun, N.A.; Sullivan, R.J.; Moore, Johnnie N.; Senske, D.A.; Tufts, B.R.; Johnson, T.V.; Belton, M.J.S.; Tanaka, K.L.

    2000-01-01

    Galileo data enable the major geological units, structures, and surface features to be identified on Europa. These include five primary units (plains, chaos, band, ridge, and crater materials) and their subunits, along with various tectonic structures such as faults. Plains units are the most widespread. Ridged plains material spans a wide range of geological ages, including the oldest recognizable features on Europa, and appears to represent a style of tectonic resurfacing, rather than cryovolcanism. Smooth plains material typically embays other terrains and units, possibly as a type of fluid emplacement, and is among the youngest material units observed. At global scales, plains are typically mapped as undifferentiated plains material, although in some areas differences can be discerned in the near infrared which might be related to differences in ice grain size. Chaos material is composed of plains and other preexisting materials that have been severely disrupted by inferred internal activity; chaos is characterized by blocks of icy material set in a hummocky matrix. Band material is arrayed in linear, curvilinear, wedge-shaped, or cuspate zones with contrasting albedo and surface textures with respect to the surrounding terrain. Bilateral symmetry observed in some bands and the relationships with the surrounding units suggest that band material forms by the lithosphere fracturing, spreading apart, and infilling with material derived from the subsurface. Ridge material is mapped as a unit on local and some regional maps but shown with symbols at global scales. Ridge material includes single ridges, doublet ridges, and ridge complexes. Ridge materials are considered to represent tectonic processes, possibly accompanied by the extrusion or intrusion of subsurface materials, such as diapirs. The tectonic processes might be related to tidal flexing of the icy lithosphere on diurnal or longer timescales. Crater materials include various interior (smooth central

  17. Geology and land use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    The geologic limitations for building sites of some areas can be overcome, in part, by skilled engineering and expensive construction practices. But the costs can be prohibitively high, and the solutions are not always completely effective. In "earthquake country," history has shown that costs are highest and risk factors most uncertain in a few easily recognized settings: unstable hill sloped, land at the edge of rapidly eroding sea cliffs, lowlands underlain by saturated estuarine mud of ill, and areas near faults capable of producing magnitude 7 or greater earthquakes. Safety immediately after an earthquake is also a concern in these places, for extreme damage and ground distortion may impede or prevent timely access by emergency equipment. 

  18. Geology of Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Chyba, C.; Head, J. W.; McCord, T.; McKinnon, W. B.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    Europa is a rocky object of radius 1565 km (slightly smaller than Earth s moon) and has an outer shell of water composition estimated to be of order 100 km thick, the surface of which is frozen. The total volume of water is about 3 x 10(exp 9) cubic kilometers, or twice the amount of water on Earth. Moreover, like its neighbor Io, Europa experiences internal heating generated from tidal flexing during its eccentric orbit around Jupiter. This raises the possibility that some of the water beneath the icy crust is liquid. The proportion of rock to ice, the generation of internal heat, and the possibility of liquid water make Europa unique in the Solar System. In this chapter, we outline the sources of data available for Europa (with a focus on the Galileo mission), review previous and on-going research on its surface geology, discuss the astrobiological potential of Europa, and consider plans for future exploration.

  19. Geologic investigations for Ohio SSC proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Pavey, R.R.

    1987-09-01

    The proposed Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) will be the world's largest and most powerful particle accelerator for high-energy particle physics research. The primary feature of this scientific instrument is a 10-ft diameter tunnel, 53 mi in circumference. The geologic setting for such a tunneling effort is of paramount importance for selection of the SSC site. The SSC study area comprises portions of 16 quadrangles within Marion, Union, Delaware, and Morrow Counties, Ohio. Very little modern geologic information was available for this area. However, the Ohio Division of Geological Survey's existing mapping and drilling programs were ideally suited to produce the geologic framework needed to determine an optimum SSC site. Thus, the Survey's commitment to the state of Ohio's SSC proposal has been substantial. Project results include a comprehensive series of maps, including glacial materials to 50 ft, bedrock topography, drift thickness, bedrock unit subcrop, and structure maps for several bedrock units. Also added to the knowledge base of this area are numerous field sections and cores, several gravity profiles, and an improved understanding of the area's glacial and bedrock stratigraphy.

  20. Environmental geology in loess areas of China

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Jianzhong )

    1988-08-01

    There are several unfavorable geological hazards in the loess area of China. The major purposes of environmental geology studies in this region are to expound the causes of these hazards and to determine treatments. Geological hazards include endemic diseases, depletion of groundwater, land subsidence, ground fissures, soil erosion, and collapsibility of loess. This article is a summary of studies regarding these hazards. Keshan disease and Kaschin-Beck disease, for example, can be prevented and cured by adding selenates to table salt. Ponds can be constructed on the loess plateau and dikes around farmlands to collect rainfall to recharge groundwater resources. Excess extraction of groundwater is the major cause of land subsidence. Ground fissures in Xi'an are primarily caused by tectonics, but over-extraction of ground water strengthens its activity. Observation stations should be established in order to forecast and prevent landslides. Planting trees in a regional shelterbelt is the primary measure necessary to prevent soil erosion. As a result of these geological studies, valuable experience in preventing collapse of loess in China has been gained.

  1. Geology, Soils and Basin-wide variations in Amazon Forest Structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesada, Carlos Alberto; Phillips, Oliver; Lopes-Gonzales, Gabriela; Lloyd, Jon; Rainfor Team

    2015-04-01

    Forest productivity, tree turnover time and above ground biomass vary across the Amazon Basin in an east-west gradient in a pattern which coincides with variations in soil nutrient availability and geology. Forest productivity rates are higher on the most nutrient rich soils close to the Andes while is lower in the ancient, highly weathered soils of central Amazonia. On the other hand above ground biomass is lower in the most productive forests and higher on the least, this being a consequence of higher tree turnover rates in the forests over less weathered and nutrient rich soils. Major geological events have influenced Amazonian soil characteristics profoundly and play an important role in explaining Basin-wide variations in forest biomass, growth and stem turnover rates. Here we show how geology and soil development combine to shape the functioning of Amazonian forests and its carbon stocks and fluxes. To assess the importance of edaphic properties in affect forest structure and dynamics, soil samples were collected in a total of 154 different forest plots across nine different Amazonian countries. Samples were analyzed for exchangeable cations, C, N, pH with various P fractions and soil physical properties also determined. Overall, forest structure and dynamics were found to be strongly and quantitatively related to edaphic conditions.

  2. Geologic Map of the Central Marysvale Volcanic Field, Southwestern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowley, Peter D.; Cunningham, Charles G.; Steven, Thomas A.; Workman, Jeremiah B.; Anderson, John J.; Theissen, Kevin M.

    2002-01-01

    The geologic map of the central Marysvale volcanic field, southwestern Utah, shows the geology at 1:100,000 scale of the heart of one of the largest Cenozoic volcanic fields in the Western United States. The map shows the area of 38 degrees 15' to 38 degrees 42'30' N., and 112 degrees to 112 degrees 37'30' W. The Marysvale field occurs mostly in the High Plateaus, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau and structurally a transition zone between the complexly deformed Great Basin to the west and the stable, little-deformed main part of the Colorado Plateau to the east. The western part of the field is in the Great Basin proper. The volcanic rocks and their source intrusions in the volcanic field range in age from about 31 Ma (Oligocene) to about 0.5 Ma (Pleistocene). These rocks overlie sedimentary rocks exposed in the mapped area that range in age from Ordovician to early Cenozoic. The area has been deformed by thrust faults and folds formed during the late Mesozoic to early Cenozoic Sevier deformational event, and later by mostly normal faults and folds of the Miocene to Quaternary basin-range episode. The map revises and updates knowledge gained during a long-term U.S. Geological Survey investigation of the volcanic field, done in part because of its extensive history of mining. The investigation also was done to provide framework geologic knowledge suitable for defining geologic and hydrologic hazards, for locating hydrologic and mineral resources, and for an understanding of geologic processes in the area. A previous geologic map (Cunningham and others, 1983, U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series I-1430-A) covered the same area as this map but was published at 1:50,000 scale and is obsolete due to new data. This new geologic map of the central Marysvale field, here published as U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Investigations Series I-2645-A, is accompanied by gravity and aeromagnetic maps of the same area and the same scale (Campbell and

  3. Events diary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    as Imperial College, the Royal Albert Hall, the Royal College of Art, the Natural History and Science Museums and the Royal Geographical Society. Under the heading `Shaping the future together' BA2000 will explore science, engineering and technology in their wider cultural context. Further information about this event on 6 - 12 September may be obtained from Sandra Koura, BA2000 Festival Manager, British Association for the Advancement of Science, 23 Savile Row, London W1X 2NB (tel: 0171 973 3075, e-mail: sandra.koura@britassoc.org.uk ). Details of the creating SPARKS events may be obtained from creating.sparks@britassoc.org.uk or from the website www.britassoc.org.uk . Other events 3 - 7 July, Porto Alegre, Brazil VII Interamerican conference on physics education: The preparation of physicists and physics teachers in contemporary society. Info: IACPE7@if.ufrgs.br or cabbat1.cnea.gov.ar/iacpe/iacpei.htm 27 August - 1 September, Barcelona, Spain GIREP conference: Physics teacher education beyond 2000. Info: www.blues.uab.es/phyteb/index.html

  4. Geologic Framework Model (GFM2000)

    SciTech Connect

    T. Vogt

    2004-08-26

    The purpose of this report is to document the geologic framework model, version GFM2000 with regard to input data, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results, and the differences between GFM2000 and previous versions. The version number of this model reflects the year during which the model was constructed. This model supersedes the previous model version, documented in Geologic Framework Model (GFM 3.1) (CRWMS M&O 2000 [DIRS 138860]). The geologic framework model represents a three-dimensional interpretation of the geology surrounding the location of the monitored geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain. The geologic framework model encompasses and is limited to an area of 65 square miles (168 square kilometers) and a volume of 185 cubic miles (771 cubic kilometers). The boundaries of the geologic framework model (shown in Figure 1-1) were chosen to encompass the exploratory boreholes and to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the unsaturated zone (UZ). The upper surface of the model is made up of the surface topography and the depth of the model is constrained by the inferred depth of the Tertiary-Paleozoic unconformity. The geologic framework model was constructed from geologic map and borehole data. Additional information from measured stratigraphic sections, gravity profiles, and seismic profiles was also considered. The intended use of the geologic framework model is to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest consistent with the level of detailed needed for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the UZ and for repository design. The model is limited by the availability of data and relative amount of geologic complexity found in an area. The geologic framework model is inherently limited by scale and content. The grid spacing used in the

  5. Age and duration of the Mississippi Valley-type mineralizing fluid flow event in the Viburnum Trend, southeast Missouri, USA, determined from palaeomagnetism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symons, David T. A.; Lewchuk, Michael T.; Leach, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper is included in the Special Publication entitled 'Dating and duration of fluid flow and fluid-rock interaction', edited by J. Parnell. The Viburnum Trend is a world-class Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) lead-zinc ore deposit in platform carbonates of the Upper Cambrian Bonneterre Dolomite in the midcontinent of the USA. Palaeomagnetic methods have been used to analyse 233 specimens from early octahedral (nine sites) and late-stage cubic (13 sites) galena ore from four mines along the c. 70 km north-south length of the Trend. The characteristic remanence is carried by single to pseudo-single domain pyrrhotite and magnetite. This is the first MVT deposit in which pyrrhotite is shown to be a remanence carrier and present in galena crystals. The remanence directions define an Early Permian mean age of 273 ?? 10 Ma for the ore-stage mineralization, a maximum duration for the mineralization event of 12 Ma, and a time difference of 5 Ma between the early octahedral and late cubic galena ore stages. The Early Permian age for the ore is consistent with models of ore genesis that invoke fluid flow from the Ouachita orogen during Ouachitan orogenesis.

  6. Synthetic geology - Exploring the "what if?" in geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klump, J. F.; Robertson, J.

    2015-12-01

    The spatial and temporal extent of geological phenomena makes experiments in geology difficult to conduct, if not entirely impossible and collection of data is laborious and expensive - so expensive that most of the time we cannot test a hypothesis. The aim, in many cases, is to gather enough data to build a predictive geological model. Even in a mine, where data are abundant, a model remains incomplete because the information at the level of a blasting block is two orders of magnitude larger than the sample from a drill core, and we have to take measurement errors into account. So, what confidence can we have in a model based on sparse data, uncertainties and measurement error? Synthetic geology does not attempt to model the real world in terms of geological processes with all their uncertainties, rather it offers an artificial geological data source with fully known properties. On the basis of this artificial geology, we can simulate geological sampling by established or future technologies to study the resulting dataset. Conducting these experiments in silico removes the constraints of testing in the field or in production, and provides us with a known ground-truth against which the steps in a data analysis and integration workflow can be validated.Real-time simulation of data sources can be used to investigate crucial questions such as the potential information gain from future sensing capabilities, or from new sampling strategies, or the combination of both, and it enables us to test many "what if?" questions, both in geology and in data engineering. What would we be able to see if we could obtain data at higher resolution? How would real-time data analysis change sampling strategies? Does our data infrastructure handle many new real-time data streams? What feature engineering can be deducted for machine learning approaches? By providing a 'data sandbox' able to scale to realistic geological scenarios we hope to start answering some of these questions.

  7. Total Petroleum Systems and Geologic Assessment of Oil and Gas Resources in the Powder River Basin Province, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anna, L. O.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey completed an assessment of the undiscovered oil and gas potential of the Powder River Basin in 2006. The assessment of undiscovered oil and gas used the total petroleum system concept, which includes mapping the distribution of potential source rocks and known petroleum accumulations and determining the timing of petroleum generation and migration. Geologically based, it focuses on source and reservoir rock stratigraphy, timing of tectonic events and the configuration of resulting structures, formation of traps and seals, and burial history modeling. The total petroleum system is subdivided into assessment units based on similar geologic characteristics and accumulation and petroleum type. In chapter 1 of this report, five total petroleum systems, eight conventional assessment units, and three continuous assessment units were defined and the undiscovered oil and gas resources within each assessment unit quantitatively estimated. Chapter 2 describes data used in support of the process being applied by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment (NOGA) project. Digital tabular data used in this report and archival data that permit the user to perform further analyses are available elsewhere on this CD-ROM. Computers and software may import the data without transcription from the Portable Document Format files (.pdf files) of the text by the reader. Because of the number and variety of platforms and software available, graphical images are provided as .pdf files and tabular data are provided in a raw form as tab-delimited text files (.tab files).

  8. Geologic mapping of Argyre Planitia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorsline, Donn S.; Parker, Timothy J.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the results from the geologic mapping of the central and southern Argyre basin of Mars. At the Mars Geologic Mapper's Meeting in Flagstaff during July, 1993, Dave Scott (United States Geological Survey, Mars Geologic Mapping Steering Committee Chair) recommended that all four quadrangles be combined into a single 1:1,000,000 scale map for publication. It was agreed that this would be cost-effective and that the decrease in scale would not compromise the original science goals of the mapping. Tim Parker completed mapping on the 1:500,000 scale base maps, for which all the necessary materials had already been produced, and included the work as a chapter in his dissertation, which was completed in the fall of 1994. Geologic mapping of the two southernmost quadrangles (MTM -55036 and MTM -55043; MTM=Mars Transverse Mercator) was completed as planned during the first year of work. These maps and a detailed draft of the map text were given a preliminary review by Dave Scott during summer, 1993. Geologic mapping of the remaining two quadrangles (MTM -50036 and MTM -50043) was completed by summer, 1994. Results were described at the Mars Geologic Mappers Meeting, held in Pocatello, Idaho, during July, 1994. Funds for the third and final year of the project have been transferred to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, where Tim Parker will revise and finalize all maps and map text for publication by the United States Geological Survey at the 1:1,000,000 map scale.

  9. Creationism, Uniformitarianism, Geology and Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, James H.

    1983-01-01

    Points out that the most basic of creationist attacks of geology, their claim that uniformitarianism is an unreliable basis for interpreting the past, fail because the uniformitarianism they describe is no longer a part of geology. Indicates that modern uniformitarianism is merely the philosophical principle of simplicity. (Author/JN)

  10. Photomicrography in the Geological Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Michael W.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the conversion of a standard biological brightfield microscope for examination of thin sections and characterize, in detail, the use of both black and white and color photomicrography in the geological sciences. Several illustrative examples on the use of transmitted and reflected polarized-light microscopy to solve geological problems…

  11. The Geophysical Revolution in Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peter J.

    1980-01-01

    Discussed is the physicists' impact on the revolution in the earth sciences particularly involving the overthrow of the fixist notions in geology. Topics discussed include the mobile earth, the route to plate tectonics, radiometric dating, the earth's magnetic field, ocean floor spreading plate boundaries, infiltration of physics into geology and…

  12. The Geologic Story of Mount Rainier

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crandell, Dwight Raymond

    1969-01-01

    an unreal quality - its white summit, nearly 3 miles high, seems to float among the clouds. We share with the populace of the entire lowland a thrill as we watch skyward the evening's setting sun reddens the volcano's western snowfields. When you approach the mountain in its lovely setting, you may find something that appeals especially to you - the scenery, the wildlife, the glaciers, or the wildflowers. Or you may feel challenged to climb to the summit. Mount Rainier and its neighboring mountains have a special allure for a geologist because he visualizes the event - some ordinary, some truly spectacular - that made the present landscape. Such is the fascination of geology. A geologist becomes trained to see 'in his mind's eye' geologic events of thousands or even millions of years ago. And, most remarkable, he can 'see' these events by studying rocks in a cliff or roadcut, or perhaps by examining earthy material that looks like common soil beneath pastureland many miles away from the volcano. Our key to understanding the geology of Mount Rainier is that each geologic event can be reconstructed - or imagined - from the rocks formed at the time of the event. With this principle as our guide, we will review the geologic ancestry of this majestic volcano and learn what is behind its scenery.

  13. Radial diffusive samplers for determination of 8-h concentration of BTEX, acetone, ethanol and ozone in ambient air during a sea breeze event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roukos, Joelle; Locoge, Nadine; Sacco, Paolo; Plaisance, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    The radial diffusive sampler Radiello ® filled with Carbograph 4 was evaluated for monitoring BTEX, ethanol and acetone concentrations for 8-hour exposure time. The sampling rates were first evaluated in an exposure chamber under standard conditions. Benzene and toluene showed the highest sampling rates with satisfactory standard deviations. Ethylbenzene and xylenes showed medium sampling rates but higher standard deviations that can be attributed to a low affinity of these compounds with the adsorbent medium for short sampling time. Acetone has a fair result because of the increase of its partial pressure in the vicinity of the adsorbent surface in the course of sampling. The Carbograph 4 adsorbent does not seem to be suitable for sampling ethanol, likely because of its high volatility. The influences of three environmental factors (temperature (T), relative humidity (RH) and concentration level (C)) on the sampling rates were also evaluated, following a fractional factorial design at two factor levels (low and high). Results were only investigated on benzene, toluene and acetone. Temperature and relative humidity are found to be the most important factors leading to variability of the benzene and toluene sampling rates. The applicability of the sampler for 8-hour sampling was demonstrated by the results of a measurement campaign carried out during a sea breeze event. Mapping of benzene, toluene and acetone concentrations showed the highest concentrations in the industrial zone following the wind direction coming from the North. Nevertheless, the sea breeze tends to reduce the spread of the industrial plumes. On the contrary, the ozone map presents the lowest concentrations at the same industrial area indicating a net consumption of ozone. The highest ozone concentrations were found in the southeastern zone suggesting a local ozone formation.

  14. Apollo 16 site geology and impact melts - Implications for the geologic history of the lunar highlands

    SciTech Connect

    Spudis, P.D.

    1984-11-15

    The geology of the Apollo 16 site is reconsidered on the basis of data from photogeology, geochemical remote sensing, and lunar samples. The site possesses an upper surface of anorthositic gabbro and related rocks. Mafic components were deposited as basin ejecta. The events involved in its geological evolution were the Nectaris impact and the Imbrium impact. The role of large, local craters in the history of the region was to serve as topographic depressions to accumulate basin ejecta. The most abundant melt composition at Apollo 16 is an aluminous variety of LKFM basalt supplied by the Nectaris impact as ejected basin impact melt. The mafic LKFM melt may have been supplied by the Imbrium impact. More aluminous melt groups are probably derived from local, small craters. The remainder of the deposits in the region are composed of anorthositic clastic debris derived from the Nectaris basin, the local crustal substrate, and Imbrium and other basins.

  15. Apollo 16 site geology and impact melts - Implications for the geologic history of the lunar highlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spudis, P. D.

    1984-01-01

    The geology of the Apollo 16 site is reconsidered on the basis of data from photogeology, geochemical remote sensing, and lunar samples. The site possesses an upper surface of anorthositic gabbro and related rocks. Mafic components were deposited as basin ejecta. The events involved in its geological evolution were the Nectaris impact and the Imbrium impact. The role of large, local craters in the history of the region was to serve as topographic depressions to accumulate basin ejecta. The most abundant melt composition at Apollo 16 is an aluminous variety of LKFM basalt supplied by the Nectaris impact as ejected basin impact melt. The mafic LKFM melt may have been supplied by the Imbrium impact. More aluminous melt groups are probably derived from local, small craters. The remainder of the deposits in the region are composed of anorthositic clastic debris derived from the Nectaris basin, the local crustal substrate, and Imbrium and other basins.

  16. Remote sensing aids geologic mapping.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knepper, D. H., Jr.; Marrs, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Remote sensing techniques have been applied to general geologic mapping along the Rio Grande rift zone in central Colorado. A geologic map of about 1,100 square miles was prepared utilizing (1) prior published and unpublished maps, (2) detailed and reconnaissance field maps made for this study, and (3) remote sensor data interpretations. The map is to be used for interpretation of the complex Cenozoic tectonic and geomorphic histories of the area. Regional and local geologic mapping can be aided by the proper application of remote sensing techniques. Conventional color and color infrared photos contain a large amount of easily-extractable general geologic information and are easily used by geologists untrained in the field of remote sensing. Other kinds of sensor data used in this study, with the exception of SLAR imagery, were generally found to be impractical or unappropriate for broad-scale general geologic mapping.

  17. The Geologic Nitrogen Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. W.; Goldblatt, C.

    2013-12-01

    N2 is the dominant gas in Earth's atmosphere, and has been so through the majority of the planet's history. Originally thought to only be cycled in significant amounts through the biosphere, it is becoming increasingly clear that a large degree of geologic cycling can occur as well. N is present in crustal rocks at 10s to 100s of ppm and in the mantle at 1s to perhaps 10s of ppm. In light of new data, we present an Earth-system perspective of the modern N cycle, an updated N budget for the silicate Earth, and venture to explain the evolution of the N cycle over time. In an fashion similar to C, N has a fast, biologically mediated cycle and a slower cycle driven by plate tectonics. Bacteria fix N2 from the atmosphere into bioavailable forms. N is then cycled through the food chain, either by direct consumption of N-fixing bacteria, as NH4+ (the primary waste form), or NO3- (the most common inorganic species in the modern ocean). Some organic material settles as sediment on the ocean floor. In anoxic sediments, NH4+ dominates; due to similar ionic radii, it can readily substitute for K+ in mineral lattices, both in sedimentary rocks and in oceanic lithosphere. Once it enters a subduction zone, N may either be volatilized and returned to the atmosphere at arc volcanoes as N2 or N2O, sequestered into intrusive igneous rocks (as NH4+?), or subducted deep into the mantle, likely as NH4+. Mounting evidence indicates that a significant amount of N may be sequestered into the solid Earth, where it may remain for long periods (100s m.y.) before being returned to the atmosphere/biosphere by volcanism or weathering. The magnitude fluxes into the solid Earth and size of geologic N reservoirs are poorly constrained. The size of the N reservoirs contained in the solid Earth directly affects the evolution of Earth's atmosphere. It is possible that N now sequestered in the solid Earth was once in the atmosphere, which would have resulted in a higher atmospheric pressure, and

  18. Raman lidar observations of a Saharan dust outbreak event: Characterization of the dust optical properties and determination of particle size and microphysical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Girolamo, Paolo; Summa, Donato; Bhawar, Rohini; Di Iorio, Tatiana; Cacciani, Marco; Veselovskii, Igor; Dubovik, Oleg; Kolgotin, Alexey

    2012-04-01

    The Raman lidar system BASIL was operational in Achern (Black Forest) between 25 May and 30 August 2007 in the framework of the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study (COPS). The system performed continuous measurements over a period of approx. 36 h from 06:22 UTC on 1 August to 18:28 UTC on 2 August 2007, capturing the signature of a severe Saharan dust outbreak episode. The data clearly reveal the presence of two almost separate aerosol layers: a lower layer located between 1.5 and 3.5 km above ground level (a.g.l.) and an upper layer extending between 3.0 and 6.0 km a.g.l. The time evolution of the dust cloud is illustrated and discussed in the paper in terms of several optical parameters (particle backscatter ratio at 532 and 1064 nm, the colour ratio and the backscatter Angström parameter). An inversion algorithm was used to retrieve particle size and microphysical parameters, i.e., mean and effective radius, number, surface area, volume concentration, and complex refractive index, as well as the parameters of a bimodal particle size distribution (PSD), from the multi-wavelength lidar data of particle backscattering, extinction and depolarization. The retrieval scheme employs Tikhonov's inversion with regularization and makes use of kernel functions for randomly oriented spheroids. Size and microphysical parameters of dust particles are estimated as a function of altitude at different times during the dust outbreak event. Retrieval results reveal the presence of a fine mode with radii of 0.1-0.2 μm and a coarse mode with radii of 3-5 μm both in the lower and upper dust layers, and the dominance in the upper dust layer of a coarse mode with radii of 4-5 μm. Effective radius varies with altitude in the range 0.1-1.5 μm, while volume concentration is found to not exceed 92 μm3 cm-3. The real and imaginary part of the complex refractive index vary in the range 1.4-1.6 and 0.004-0.008, respectively.

  19. High resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Changmin; Lin Kexiang; Liu Huaibo

    1997-08-01

    This is China`s first case study of high resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information. The key of the modelling process is to build a prototype model and using the model as a geological knowledge bank. Outcrop information used in geological modelling including seven aspects: (1) Determining the reservoir framework pattern by sedimentary depositional system and facies analysis; (2) Horizontal correlation based on the lower and higher stand duration of the paleo-lake level; (3) Determining the model`s direction based on the paleocurrent statistics; (4) Estimating the sandbody communication by photomosaic and profiles; (6) Estimating reservoir properties distribution within sandbody by lithofacies analysis; and (7) Building the reservoir model in sandbody scale by architectural element analysis and 3-D sampling. A high resolution reservoir geological model of Youshashan oil field has been built by using this method.

  20. Geological History of a Light-toned Formation Draping the Plateaus in the Region of Valles Marineris, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Deit, L.; Bourgeois, O.; Mège, D.; Le Mouélic, S.; Massé, M.; Hauber, E.; Jaumann, R.; Bibring, J.-P.

    2009-03-01

    We perform a geological analysis of layered deposits cropping out on the plateaus around Valles Marineris in order to determine their possible formation scenario and the role of water in their geological history.

  1. Geologic Sequestration Software Suite

    2013-11-04

    GS3 is the bundling of the Geological Sequestration Software Suite domain tools with the Velo wiki user interface, rich client interface, and data store. Velo is an application domain independent collaborative user environment for modeling and simulation. Velo has a web browser based wiki interface integrated with a sophisticated content management system supporting data and knowledge management required for large-scale scientific modeling projects. GS3 adds tools and capability specifically in the area of modeling subsurfacemore » reservoirs for the purpose of carbon sequestration. Velo is a core software framework to create scientific domain user environments. Velo is not tied to a specific domain although it provides novel capability needed by many application areas. A well-defined Velo integration layer allows custom applications such as GS3 to leverage the core Velo components to reduce development cost/time and ultimately provide a more capable software product. Compared with previous efforts like ECCE and SALSSA, Velo is a major advancement being a web browser based interface, having a more comprehensive data management architecture, and having intrinsic support for collaboration through the wiki. GS3 adds specific domain tools for looking at site data, developing conceptual and numerical models, building simulation input files, launching and monitoring the progress of those simulations and being able to look at and interpret simulation output.« less

  2. Geologic Sequestration Software Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Gary; Bonneville, PNNL Alain; Sivaramakrishnan, PNNL Chandrika; Purohit, PNNL Sumit; White, PNNL Signe; Lansing, PNNL Carina; Gosink, PNNL Luke; Guillen, PNNL Zoe; Moeglein, PNNL William; Gorton, PNNL Ian; PNNL,

    2013-11-04

    GS3 is the bundling of the Geological Sequestration Software Suite domain tools with the Velo wiki user interface, rich client interface, and data store. Velo is an application domain independent collaborative user environment for modeling and simulation. Velo has a web browser based wiki interface integrated with a sophisticated content management system supporting data and knowledge management required for large-scale scientific modeling projects. GS3 adds tools and capability specifically in the area of modeling subsurface reservoirs for the purpose of carbon sequestration. Velo is a core software framework to create scientific domain user environments. Velo is not tied to a specific domain although it provides novel capability needed by many application areas. A well-defined Velo integration layer allows custom applications such as GS3 to leverage the core Velo components to reduce development cost/time and ultimately provide a more capable software product. Compared with previous efforts like ECCE and SALSSA, Velo is a major advancement being a web browser based interface, having a more comprehensive data management architecture, and having intrinsic support for collaboration through the wiki. GS3 adds specific domain tools for looking at site data, developing conceptual and numerical models, building simulation input files, launching and monitoring the progress of those simulations and being able to look at and interpret simulation output.

  3. Multiwell experiment: Geology

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The general objective of the Multiwell Experiment geology study is the detailed characterization of the low-permeability gas reservoirs of the Mesaverde Formation at the MWX site. The ultimate objective of the study is the understanding of how the detailed characteristics affect completion, stimulation, and production of these reservoirs, and the successful extrapolation of this knowledge to other low-permeability reservoirs. Low-permeability sandstone reservoirs contain significant reserves of natural gas in the US, but these reserves are difficult to exploit. Much of this difficulty is attributable to an insufficient data base on the sedimentological and fracture characteristics of the reservoirs. These characteristics strongly control not only reservoir porosity and permeability, but they also control total reservoir volume, internal reservoir heterogeneity, and susceptibility of the reservoir to damage by different drilling and stimulation techniques. The recognition alone by operators that these are indeed controlling factors is a significant step in the utilization of the low-permeability reserves, and this is one of the important results of this study. However, the implementation of techniques that have been derived using the data base assembled from this study is the next step of the program. 15 refs.

  4. Areal geology of the Little Cone quadrangle, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bush, Alfred Lerner; Marsh, O.T.; Taylor, Richard Bartlett

    1958-01-01

    The Little Cone quadrangle includes an area of about 59 square miles in eastern San Miguel County in southwestern Colorado. It lies within and adjacent to the northeastern boundary of the Colorado Plateau physiographic province. The precipitous front of the San Juan Mountains lies a few miles to the east and northeast, and an outlier of the San Juans, the San Miguel Mountains, lies about a mile to the south. The quadrangle contains features characteristic of both the plateaus and the mountains, and has been affected by geologic events and processes of two different geologic environments.

  5. Cognitive factors affecting student understanding of geologic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodick, Jeff; Orion, Nir

    2003-04-01

    A critical element of the earth sciences is reconstructing geological structures and systems that have developed over time. A survey of the science education literature shows that there has been little attention given to this concept. In this study, we present a model, based on Montagnero's ([1996]) model of diachronic thinking, which describes how students reconstruct geological transformations over time. For geology, three schemes of diachronic thinking are relevant: 1. Transformation, which is a principle of change; in geology it is understood through actualistic thinking (the idea that present proceeses can be used to model the past). 2. Temporal organization, which defines the sequential order of a transformation; in geology it is based on the three-dimensional relationship among strata. 3. Interstage linkage, which is the connections between successive stages of a transformation; in geology it is based on both actualism and causal reasoning. Three specialized instruments were designed to determine the factors which influence reconstructive thinking: (a) the GeoTAT which tests diachronic thinking skills, (b) the TST which tests the relationship between spatial thinking and temporal thinking, and (c) the SFT which tests the influence of dimensional factors on temporal awareness. Based on the model constructed in this study we define the critical factors influencing reconstructive thinking: (a) the transformation scheme which influences the other diachronic schemes, (b) knowledge of geological processes, and (c) extracognitive factors. Among the students tested, there was a significant difference between Grade 9-12 students and Grade 7-8 students in their ability to reconstruct geological phenomena using diachronic thinking. This suggests that somewhere between Grades 7 and 8 it is possible to start teaching some of the logical principles used in geology to reconstruct geological structures.

  6. Semantics-informed cartography: the case of Piemonte Geological Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piana, Fabrizio; Lombardo, Vincenzo; Mimmo, Dario; Giardino, Marco; Fubelli, Giandomenico

    2016-04-01

    correlated through the whole region and described using the GeoSciML vocabularies. A hierarchical schema is provided for the Piemonte Geological Map that gives the parental relations between several orders of GeologicUnits referring to mostly recurring geological objects and main GeologicEvents, in a logical framework compliant with GeoSciML and INSPIRE data models. The classification criteria and the Hierarchy Schema used to define the GEOPiemonteMap Legend, as well as the intended meanings of the geological concepts used to achieve the overall classification schema, are explicitly described in several WikiGeo pages (implemented by "MediaWiki" open source software, https://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/MediaWiki). Moreover, a further step toward a formal classification of the contents (both data and interpretation) of the GEOPiemonteMap was triggered, by setting up an ontological framework, named "OntoGeonous", in order to achieve a thorough semantic characterization of the Map.

  7. Evaluation of thermal data for geologic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, A. B.; Palluconi, F. D.; Levine, C. J.; Abrams, M. J.; Nash, D. B.; Alley, R. E.; Schieldge, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    Sensitivity studies using thermal models indicated sources of errors in the determination of thermal inertia from HCMM data. Apparent thermal inertia, with only simple atmospheric radiance corrections to the measured surface temperature, would be sufficient for most operational requirements for surface thermal inertia. Thermal data does have additional information about the nature of surface material that is not available in visible and near infrared reflectance data. Color composites of daytime temperature, nighttime temperature, and albedo were often more useful than thermal inertia images alone for discrimination of lithologic boundaries. A modeling study, using the annual heating cycle, indicated the feasibility of looking for geologic features buried under as much as a meter of alluvial material. The spatial resolution of HCMM data is a major limiting factor in the usefulness of the data for geologic applications. Future thermal infrared satellite sensors should provide spatial resolution comparable to that of the LANDSAT data.

  8. Medium Frequency Pseudo Noise Geological Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Byerly, Kent A. (Inventor); Amini, B. Jon (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    System and methods are disclosed for transmitting and receiving electromagnetic pulses through a geological formation. A preferably programmable transmitter having an all-digital portion in a preferred embodiment may be operated at frequencies below 1 MHz without loss of target resolution by transmitting and over sampling received long PN codes. A gated and stored portion of the received signal may be correlated with the PN code to determine distances of interfaces within the geological formation, such as the distance of a water interfaces from a wellbore. The received signal is oversampled preferably at rates such as five to fifty times as high as a carrier frequency. In one method of the invention, an oil well with multiple production zones may be kept in production by detecting an approaching water front in one of the production zones and shutting down that particular production zone thereby permitting the remaining production zones to continue operating.

  9. A Comprehensive Study of Cyanobacterial Morphological and Ecological Evolutionary Dynamics through Deep Geologic Time

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Luke J.; Blank, Carrine E.

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have exerted a profound influence on the progressive oxygenation of Earth. As a complementary approach to examining the geologic record—phylogenomic and trait evolutionary analyses of extant species can lead to new insights. We constructed new phylogenomic trees and analyzed phenotypic trait data using novel phylogenetic comparative methods. We elucidated the dynamics of trait evolution in Cyanobacteria over billion-year timescales, and provide evidence that major geologic events in early Earth’s history have shaped—and been shaped by—evolution in Cyanobacteria. We identify a robust core cyanobacterial phylogeny and a smaller set of taxa that exhibit long-branch attraction artifacts. We estimated the age of nodes and reconstruct the ancestral character states of 43 phenotypic characters. We find high levels of phylogenetic signal for nearly all traits, indicating the phylogeny carries substantial predictive power. The earliest cyanobacterial lineages likely lived in freshwater habitats, had small cell diameters, were benthic or sessile, and possibly epilithic/endolithic with a sheath. We jointly analyzed a subset of 25 binary traits to determine whether rates of trait evolution have shifted over time in conjunction with major geologic events. Phylogenetic comparative analysis reveal an overriding signal of decreasing rates of trait evolution through time. Furthermore, the data suggest two major rate shifts in trait evolution associated with bursts of evolutionary innovation. The first rate shift occurs in the aftermath of the Great Oxidation Event and “Snowball Earth” glaciations and is associated with decrease in the evolutionary rates around 1.8–1.6 Ga. This rate shift seems to indicate the end of a major diversification of cyanobacterial phenotypes–particularly related to traits associated with filamentous morphology, heterocysts and motility in freshwater ecosystems. Another burst appears around the time of the Neoproterozoic

  10. A Comprehensive Study of Cyanobacterial Morphological and Ecological Evolutionary Dynamics through Deep Geologic Time.

    PubMed

    Uyeda, Josef C; Harmon, Luke J; Blank, Carrine E

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have exerted a profound influence on the progressive oxygenation of Earth. As a complementary approach to examining the geologic record-phylogenomic and trait evolutionary analyses of extant species can lead to new insights. We constructed new phylogenomic trees and analyzed phenotypic trait data using novel phylogenetic comparative methods. We elucidated the dynamics of trait evolution in Cyanobacteria over billion-year timescales, and provide evidence that major geologic events in early Earth's history have shaped-and been shaped by-evolution in Cyanobacteria. We identify a robust core cyanobacterial phylogeny and a smaller set of taxa that exhibit long-branch attraction artifacts. We estimated the age of nodes and reconstruct the ancestral character states of 43 phenotypic characters. We find high levels of phylogenetic signal for nearly all traits, indicating the phylogeny carries substantial predictive power. The earliest cyanobacterial lineages likely lived in freshwater habitats, had small cell diameters, were benthic or sessile, and possibly epilithic/endolithic with a sheath. We jointly analyzed a subset of 25 binary traits to determine whether rates of trait evolution have shifted over time in conjunction with major geologic events. Phylogenetic comparative analysis reveal an overriding signal of decreasing rates of trait evolution through time. Furthermore, the data suggest two major rate shifts in trait evolution associated with bursts of evolutionary innovation. The first rate shift occurs in the aftermath of the Great Oxidation Event and "Snowball Earth" glaciations and is associated with decrease in the evolutionary rates around 1.8-1.6 Ga. This rate shift seems to indicate the end of a major diversification of cyanobacterial phenotypes-particularly related to traits associated with filamentous morphology, heterocysts and motility in freshwater ecosystems. Another burst appears around the time of the Neoproterozoic Oxidation Event in

  11. 30 CFR 780.22 - Geologic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Geologic information shall include, at a minimum the following: (1) A description of the geology of the... adversely impacted by mining. The description shall include the areal and structural geology of the...

  12. 30 CFR 780.22 - Geologic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Geologic information shall include, at a minimum the following: (1) A description of the geology of the... adversely impacted by mining. The description shall include the areal and structural geology of the...

  13. 30 CFR 780.22 - Geologic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Geologic information shall include, at a minimum the following: (1) A description of the geology of the... adversely impacted by mining. The description shall include the areal and structural geology of the...

  14. 30 CFR 780.22 - Geologic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Geologic information shall include, at a minimum the following: (1) A description of the geology of the... adversely impacted by mining. The description shall include the areal and structural geology of the...

  15. 30 CFR 780.22 - Geologic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Geologic information shall include, at a minimum the following: (1) A description of the geology of the... adversely impacted by mining. The description shall include the areal and structural geology of the...

  16. Teachers doing science: An authentic geology research experience for teachers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemler, D.; Repine, T.

    2006-01-01

    Fairmont State University (FSU) and the West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey (WVGES) provided a small pilot group of West Virginia science teachers with a professional development session designed to mimic experiences obtained by geology majors during a typical summer field camp. Called GEOTECH, the program served as a research capstone event complimenting the participants' multi-year association with the RockCamp professional development program. GEOTECH was funded through a Improving Teacher Quality Grant administered by West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission. Over the course of three weeks, eight GEOTEACH participants learned field measurement and field data collection techniques which they then applied to the construction of a surficial geologic map. The program exposed participants to authentic scientific processes by emphasizing the authentic scientific application of content knowledge. As a secondary product, it also enhanced their appreciation of the true nature of science in general and geology particular. After the session, a new appreciation of the effort involved in making a geologic map emerged as tacit knowledge ready to be transferred to their students. The program was assessed using pre/post instruments, cup interviews, journals, artifacts (including geologic maps, field books, and described sections), performance assessments, and constructed response items. Evaluation of the accumulated data revealed an increase in participants demonstrated use of science content knowledge, an enhanced awareness and understanding of the processes and nature of geologic mapping, positive dispositions toward geologic research and a high satisfaction rating for the program. These findings support the efficacy of the experience and document future programmatic enhancements.

  17. Geological factors affecting CO2 plume distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frailey, S.M.; Leetaru, H.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the lateral extent of a CO2 plume has important implications with regards to buying/leasing pore volume rights, defining the area of review for an injection permit, determining the extent of an MMV plan, and managing basin-scale sequestration from multiple injection sites. The vertical and lateral distribution of CO2 has implications with regards to estimating CO2 storage volume at a specific site and the pore pressure below the caprock. Geologic and flow characteristics such as effective permeability and porosity, capillary pressure, lateral and vertical permeability anisotropy, geologic structure, and thickness all influence and affect the plume distribution to varying degrees. Depending on the variations in these parameters one may dominate the shape and size of the plume. Additionally, these parameters do not necessarily act independently. A comparison of viscous and gravity forces will determine the degree of vertical and lateral flow. However, this is dependent on formation thickness. For example in a thick zone with injection near the base, the CO2 moves radially from the well but will slow at greater radii and vertical movement will dominate. Generally the CO2 plume will not appreciably move laterally until the caprock or a relatively low permeability interval is contacted by the CO2. Conversely, in a relatively thin zone with the injection interval over nearly the entire zone, near the wellbore the CO2 will be distributed over the entire vertical component and will move laterally much further with minimal vertical movement. Assuming no geologic structure, injecting into a thin zone or into a thick zone immediately under a caprock will result in a larger plume size. With a geologic structure such as an anticline, CO2 plume size may be restricted and injection immediately below the caprock may have less lateral plume growth because the structure will induce downward vertical movement of the CO2 until the outer edge of the plume reaches a spill

  18. Geology of Joshua Tree National Park geodatabase

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Robert E.; Matti, Jonathan C.; Cossette, Pamela M.

    2015-09-16

    The database in this Open-File Report describes the geology of Joshua Tree National Park and was completed in support of the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and in cooperation with the National Park Service (NPS). The geologic observations and interpretations represented in the database are relevant to both the ongoing scientific interests of the USGS in southern California and the management requirements of NPS, specifically of Joshua Tree National Park (JOTR).Joshua Tree National Park is situated within the eastern part of California’s Transverse Ranges province and straddles the transition between the Mojave and Sonoran deserts. The geologically diverse terrain that underlies JOTR reveals a rich and varied geologic evolution, one that spans nearly two billion years of Earth history. The Park’s landscape is the current expression of this evolution, its varied landforms reflecting the differing origins of underlying rock types and their differing responses to subsequent geologic events. Crystalline basement in the Park consists of Proterozoic plutonic and metamorphic rocks intruded by a composite Mesozoic batholith of Triassic through Late Cretaceous plutons arrayed in northwest-trending lithodemic belts. The basement was exhumed during the Cenozoic and underwent differential deep weathering beneath a low-relief erosion surface, with the deepest weathering profiles forming on quartz-rich, biotite-bearing granitoid rocks. Disruption of the basement terrain by faults of the San Andreas system began ca. 20 Ma and the JOTR sinistral domain, preceded by basalt eruptions, began perhaps as early as ca. 7 Ma, but no later than 5 Ma. Uplift of the mountain blocks during this interval led to erosional stripping of the thick zones of weathered quartz-rich granitoid rocks to form etchplains dotted by bouldery tors—the iconic landscape of the Park. The stripped debris filled basins along the fault zones.Mountain ranges

  19. Surficial geological tools in fluvial geomorphology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.; O'connor, James; Oguchi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Environmental scientists are increasingly asked how rivers and streams have been altered by past environmental stresses, whether rivers are subject to physical or chemical hazards, how they can be restored and how they will respond to future environmental changes. These questions present substantive challenges to the discipline of fluvial geomorphology as they require a long-term understanding of river-system dynamics. Complex and non-linear responses of rivers to environmental stresses indicate that synoptic or short-term historical views of rivers will often give an incomplete understanding. Fluvial geomorphologists can address questions involving complex river behaviours by drawing from a tool box that includes the principles and methods of geology applied to the surficial geological record. A central concept in Earth Sciences holds that ‘the present is the key to the past’ (Hutton 1788, cited in Chorley et al. 1964), that is, understanding of current processes permits the interpretation of past deposits. Similarly, an understanding of the past can be key to predicting the future. A river’s depositional history can be indicative of trends or episodic behaviours that can be attributed to particular environmental stresses or forcings. Its history may indicate the role of low-frequency events such as floods or landslides in structuring a river and its floodplain or a river’s depositional history can provide an understanding of its natural characteristics to serve as a reference condition for assessments and restoration. However, the surficial geological record contained in river deposits is incomplete and biased and it presents numerous challenges of interpretation. The stratigraphic record in general has been characterized as ‘ … a lot of holes tied together with sediment’ (Ager 1993). Yet this record is critical in the development of integrated understanding of fluvial geomorphology because it provides information that is not available from other

  20. [Dealing with competing events in survival analysis].

    PubMed

    Béchade, Clémence; Lobbedez, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    Survival analyses focus on the occurrences of an event of interest, in order to determine risk factors and estimate a risk. Competing events prevent from observing the event of interest. If there are competing events, it can lead to a bias in the risk's estimation. The aim of this article is to explain why Cox model is not appropriate when there are competing events, and to present Fine and Gray model, which can help when dealing with competing risks.

  1. Precise determination of δ88Sr in rocks, minerals, and waters by double-spike TIMS: A powerful tool in the study of chemical, geologic, hydrologic and biologic processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neymark, Leonid A.; Premo, Wayne R.; Mel'nikov, Nikolay N.; Emsbo, Poul

    2014-01-01

    We present strontium isotopic (88Sr/86Sr and 87Sr/86Sr) results obtained by 87Sr–84Sr double spike thermal ionization mass-spectrometry (DS-TIMS) for several standards as well as natural water samples and mineral samples of abiogenic and biogenic origin. The detailed data reduction algorithm and a user-friendly Sr-specific stand-alone computer program used for the spike calibration and the data reduction are also presented. Accuracy and precision of our δ88Sr measurements, calculated as permil (‰) deviations from the NIST SRM-987 standard, were evaluated by analyzing the NASS-6 seawater standard, which yielded δ88Sr = 0.378 ± 0.009‰. The first DS-TIMS data for the NIST SRM-607 potassium feldspar standard and for several US Geological Survey carbonate, phosphate, and silicate standards (EN-1, MAPS-4, MAPS-5, G-3, BCR-2, and BHVO-2) are also reported. Data obtained during this work for Sr-bearing solids and natural waters show a range of δ88Sr values of about 2.4‰, the widest observed so far in terrestrial materials. This range is easily resolvable analytically because the demonstrated external error (±SD, standard deviation) for measured δ88Sr values is typically ≤0.02‰. It is shown that the “true” 87Sr/86Sr value obtained by the DS-TIMS or any other external normalization method combines radiogenic and mass-dependent mass-fractionation effects, which cannot be separated. Therefore, the “true” 87Sr/86Sr and the δ87Sr parameter derived from it are not useful isotope tracers. Data presented in this paper for a wide range of naturally occurring sample types demonstrate the potential of the δ88Sr isotope tracer in combination with the traditional radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr tracer for studying a variety of biological, hydrological, and geological processes.

  2. How do we know about Earth's history? Constructing the story of Earth's geologic history by collecting and interpreting evidence based scenarios.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruthford, Steven; DeBari, Susan; Linneman, Scott; Boriss, Miguel; Chesbrough, John; Holmes, Randall; Thibault, Allison

    2013-04-01

    Beginning in 2003, faculty from Western Washington University, Skagit Valley Community College, local public school teachers, and area tribal college members created an innovative, inquiry based undergraduate geology curriculum. The curriculum, titled "Energy and Matter in Earth's Systems," was supported through various grants and partnerships, including Math and Science Partnership and Noyce Teacher Scholarship grants from the National Science Foundation. During 2011, the authors wrote a geologic time unit for the curriculum. The unit is titled, "How Do We Know About Earth's History?" and has students actively investigate the concepts related to geologic time and methods for determining age. Starting with reflection and assessment of personal misconceptions called "Initial Ideas," students organize a series of events into a timeline. The unit then focuses on the concepts of relative dating, biostratigraphy, and historical attempts at absolute dating, including uniformitarianism, catastrophism, Halley and Joly's Salinity hypothesis, and Kelvin's Heat Loss model. With limited lecture and text, students then dive into current understandings of the age of the Earth, which include radioactive decay rates and radiometric dating. Finally, using their newfound understanding, students investigate a number of real world scenarios and create a timeline of events related to the geologic history of the Earth. The unit concludes with activities that reinforce the Earth's absolute age and direct students to summarize what they have learned by reorganizing the timeline from the "Initial Ideas" and sharing with the class. This presentation will include the lesson materials and findings from one activity titled, "The Earth's Story." The activity is located midway through the unit and begins with reflection on the question, "What are the major events in the Earth's history and when did they happen?" Students are directed to revisit the timeline of events from the "Initial Ideas

  3. Rome: sinkhole events and network of underground cavities (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisio, Stefania; Ciotoli, Giancarlo

    2016-04-01

    The anthropogenic sinkholes in the city of Rome are closely linked to the network of underground cavities produced by human activities in more than two thousand years of history. Over the past fifteen years the increased frequency of intense rainfall events, favors sinkhole formation. The risk assessment induced by anthropogenic sinkhole is really difficult. However, a susceptibility of the territory to sinkholes can be more easily determined as the probability that an event may occur in a given space, with unique geological-morphological characteristics, and in an infinite time. A sinkhole susceptibility map of the Rome territory, up to the ring road, has been constructed by using Geographically Weighted Regression technique and geostatistics. The spatial regression model includes the analysis of more than 2700 anthropogenic sinkholes (recorded from 1875 to 2015), as well as geological, morphological, hydrological and predisposing anthropogenic characteristics of the study area. The numerous available data (underground cavities, the ancient entrances to the quarry, bunkers, etc.) facilitate the creation of a series of maps. The density map of the cavity, updated to 2015, showed that more than 20 km2 of the Roman territory are affected by underground cavities. The census of sinkholes (over 2700) shows that over 30 km2 has been affected by sinkholes. The final susceptibility map highlights that inside the Ring Road about 40 km2 of the territory (about 11%) have a very high probability of triggering a sinkhole event. The susceptibility map was also compared with the data of ground subsidence (InSAR) to obtain a predictive model.

  4. Atmospheric transmission of North Atlantic Heinrich events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hostetler, S.W.; Clark, P.U.; Bartlein, P.J.; Mix, A.C.; Pisias, N.J.

    1999-01-01

    We model the response of the climate system during Heinrich event 2 (H2) by employing an atmospheric general circulation model, using boundary conditions based on the concept of a "canonical" Heinrich event. The canonical event is initialized with a full-height Laurentide ice sheet (LIS) and CLIMAP sea surface temperatures (SSTs), followed by lowering of the LIS, then warming of North Atlantic SSTs. Our modeled temperature and wind fields exhibit spatially variable responses over the Northern Hemisphere at each stage of the H2 event. In some regions the climatic responses are additive, whereas in other regions they cancel or are of opposite sign, suggesting that Heinrich event climatic variations may have left complex signatures in geologic records. We find variations in the tropical water balance and the mass balance of ice sheets, and implications for variations in terrestrial methane production from the contraction of northern permafrost regions and the expansion of tropical wetlands. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Logic tree-based GIS inference of geologic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryerson, Charles C.; Anderson, Thomas S.

    2007-10-01

    We describe the concept for a logic-tree based geographic information system (GIS) that can infer subsurface geology and material properties using geoinformatics concepts. A proof-of-concept system was devised and tested integrating the capabilities of traditional terrain- and image-analysis procedures with a GIS to manipulate geospatial data. Structured logic trees were developed to guide an analyst through an interactive, geologic analysis based on querying and mentoring heuristic logic. The hypotheses were that a GIS can be programmed to 1) follow the fundamental logic sequence developed for traditional terrain- and image analysis procedures; 2) augment that sequence with correlative geospatial data from a variety of sources; and 3) integrate the inferences and data to develop "best-guess" estimates. We also developed a method to estimate depth to bedrock, and expanded an existing method to determine water table depth. Blind evaluations indicate that an analyst can infer the correct geologic conditions 70-80% of the time using this method. This geologic analysis technique can be applied wherever an estimate of subsurface geology is needed. We apply the results of our geological analysis to the prediction of local site specific seismic propagation. Comparisons are made with synthetic seismograms computed from a limited set of geological vignettes.

  6. A primer in lunar geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R. (Editor); Schultz, P. H. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    Primary topics in lunar geology range from the evolution of the solar system to lunar photointerpretation, impact crater formation, and sampling to analyses on various Apollo lunar landing site geomorphologies.

  7. Perspectives in geology. Circular 525

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The papers in this symposium present diverse perspectives in geology, mineral resources, paleontology, and environmental concerns. Papers within the scope of EDB have been entered individually into the data base. (ACR)

  8. Planetary Geologic Mapping Handbook - 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, K. L.; Skinner, J. A.; Hare, T. M.

    2009-01-01

    Geologic maps present, in an historical context, fundamental syntheses of interpretations of the materials, landforms, structures, and processes that characterize planetary surfaces and shallow subsurfaces (e.g., Varnes, 1974). Such maps also provide a contextual framework for summarizing and evaluating thematic research for a given region or body. In planetary exploration, for example, geologic maps are used for specialized investigations such as targeting regions of interest for data collection and for characterizing sites for landed missions. Whereas most modern terrestrial geologic maps are constructed from regional views provided by remote sensing data and supplemented in detail by field-based observations and measurements, planetary maps have been largely based on analyses of orbital photography. For planetary bodies in particular, geologic maps commonly represent a snapshot of a surface, because they are based on available information at a time when new data are still being acquired. Thus the field of planetary geologic mapping has been evolving rapidly to embrace the use of new data and modern technology and to accommodate the growing needs of planetary exploration. Planetary geologic maps have been published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) since 1962 (Hackman, 1962). Over this time, numerous maps of several planetary bodies have been prepared at a variety of scales and projections using the best available image and topographic bases. Early geologic map bases commonly consisted of hand-mosaicked photographs or airbrushed shaded-relief views and geologic linework was manually drafted using mylar bases and ink drafting pens. Map publishing required a tedious process of scribing, color peel-coat preparation, typesetting, and photo-laboratory work. Beginning in the 1990s, inexpensive computing, display capability and user-friendly illustration software allowed maps to be drawn using digital tools rather than pen and ink, and mylar bases became obsolete

  9. Terrestrial and Lunar Geological Terminology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, Christian

    2009-01-01

    This section is largely a compilation of defining geological terms concepts. Broader topics, such as the ramifications for simulant design and in situ resource utilization, are included as necessary for context.

  10. Resilience of aging populations after devastating earthquake event and its determinants - A case study of the Chi-Chi earthquake in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chih-Hsuan; Hung, Hung-Chih

    2016-04-01

    1.Background Major portions of urban areas in Asia are highly exposed and vulnerable to devastating earthquakes. Many studies identify ways to reduce earthquake risk by concentrating more on building resilience for the particularly vulnerable populations. By 2020, as the United Nations' warning, many Asian countries would become 'super-aged societies', such as Taiwan. However, local authorities rarely use resilience approach to frame earthquake disaster risk management and land use strategies. The empirically-based research about the resilience of aging populations has also received relatively little attention. Thus, a challenge arisen for decision-makers is how to enhance resilience of aging populations within the context of risk reduction. This study aims to improve the understanding of the resilience of aging populations and its changes over time in the aftermath of a destructive earthquake at the local level. A novel methodology is proposed to assess the resilience of aging populations and to characterize their changes of spatial distribution patterns, as well as to examine their determinants. 2.Methods and data An indicator-based assessment framework is constructed with the goal of identifying composite indicators (including before, during and after a disaster) that could serve as proxies for attributes of the resilience of aging populations. Using the recovery process of the Chi-Chi earthquake struck central Taiwan in 1999 as a case study, we applied a method combined a geographical information system (GIS)-based spatial statistics technique and cluster analysis to test the extent of which the resilience of aging populations is spatially autocorrelated throughout the central Taiwan, and to explain why clustering of resilient areas occurs in specific locations. Furthermore, to scrutinize the affecting factors of resilience, we develop an aging population resilience model (APRM) based on existing resilience theory. Using the APRM, we applied a multivariate

  11. Q&A: Geological historian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witze, Alexandra

    2015-04-01

    The first geological map of a nation was made 200 years ago by British surveyor William Smith; the rediscovery of a first-edition copy in the archives of the Geological Society of London was announced last month (see go.nature.com/oogpht). As researchers gather for a conference to celebrate the anniversary of the 1815 chart of England and Wales, John Henry, chair of the society's history group, talks about the map and its pioneering creator.

  12. An overview of Venus geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, R. S.; Arvidson, R. E.; Head, J. W.; Schaber, G. G.; Stofan, E. R.; Solomon, S. C.

    1991-04-01

    The Magellan spacecraft is producing comprehensive image and altimetry data for the planet Venus. Initial geologic mapping of the planet reveals a surface dominated by volcanic plains and characterized by extensive volcanism and tectonic deformation. Geologic and geomorphologic units include plains terrains, tectonic terrains, and surficial material units. Understanding the origin of these units and the relation between them is an ongoing task of the Magellan team.

  13. Bedrock geologic map of Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ratcliffe, Nicholas M.; Stanley, Rolfe S.; Gale, Marjorie H.; Thompson, Peter J.; Walsh, Gregory J.; With contributions by Hatch, Norman L.; Rankin, Douglas W.; Doolan, Barry L.; Kim, Jonathan; Mehrtens, Charlotte J.; Aleinikoff, John N.; McHone, J. Gregory; Cartography by Masonic, Linda M.

    2011-01-01

    The Bedrock Geologic Map of Vermont is the result of a cooperative agreement between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the State of Vermont. The State's complex geology spans 1.4 billion years of Earth's history. The new map comes 50 years after the most recent map of the State by Charles G. Doll and others in 1961 and a full 150 years since the publication of the first geologic map of Vermont by Edward Hitchcock and others in 1861. At a scale of 1:100,000, the map shows an uncommon level of detail for State geologic maps. Mapped rock units are primarily based on lithology, or rock type, to facilitate derivative studies in multiple disciplines. The 1961 map was compiled from 1:62,500-scale or smaller maps. The current map was created to integrate more detailed (1:12,000- to 1:24,000-scale) modern and older (1:62,500-scale) mapping with the theory of plate tectonics to provide a framework for geologic, tectonic, economic, hydrogeologic, and environmental characterization of the bedrock of Vermont. The printed map consists of three oversize sheets (52 x 76 inches). Sheets 1 and 2 show the southern and northern halves of Vermont, respectively, and can be trimmed and joined so that the entire State can be displayed as a single entity. These sheets also include 10 cross sections and a geologic structure map. Sheet 3 on the front consists of descriptions of 486 map units, a correlation of map units, and references cited. Sheet 3 on the back features a list of the 195 sources of geologic map data keyed to an index map of 7.5-minute quadrangles in Vermont, as well as a table identifying ages of rocks dated by uranium-lead zircon geochronology.

  14. GIS-technologies as a mechanism to study geological structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapatov, Abish

    2014-05-01

    Earth scientists are odd, thus, solving only local tasks); - Development of specialized GIS-technology that ensures creating multi-parameter models, completing multi-criteria optimisation tasks, and issues of geological profile forecasts using miscellaneous data; - Application of the modern approach to the geological, petrological and genetic modeling of the targets in the geological zone under survey; determination of the structural and tectonic position of the Valerianovskaya SFZ and its relations to the mineralization; - A possibility to apply the GIS created for the region as a desk (local) system integrated to the regional or national bank of geospatial information with a corporate access via local and global networks.

  15. Geologic Mapping of Ascraeus Mons, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, K. J.; Williams, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Ascraeus Mons is one of the three large shield volcanoes in the Tharsis Montes province on Mars. We are conducting geologic mapping of Ascraeus in ArcMap 10.3 at 1:1,000,000 scale using a CTX dataset as a primary basemap. The CTX dataset is supplemented by HRSC, HiRISE, THEMIS, and MOLA data. Our objective is to determine the areal extent, distribution, and age relationships of different lava flow morphologies on the main flank, rift apron, and associated small-vent field of Ascraeus Mons to: (1) identify and understand changes in effusive style across the volcano, and (2) provide insight into martian magma production rates. Our mapping, thus far, at a CTX resolution (~6 m/pixel) shows a variety of effusive styles on the flanks, rift aprons, and plains on and around Ascraeus Mons. Our plan to address (1) is to create a geologic map of Ascraeus Mons. We will use this map to determine where and how different lava flows were emplaced on the flanks and surrounding plains of Ascraeus Mons. We will determine relative ages of units using the emplacement of different geological units, impacts, tectonics, and erosion via superposition relations. We will relate eruptive styles by comparing how different flows are oriented around Ascraeus Mons. Our plan for (2) is to use CTX, MOLA and HRSC datasets to determine volumes of the emplaced lava flows. The volumes will be used to calculate yield strengths and viscosities of each flow. The yield strengths and viscosities will be used to calculate magma production rates. These will prove important to better understand the history and creation of Ascraeus Mons and other volcanoes on other planetary bodies.

  16. Geochemical studies of rare earth elements in the Portuguese pyrite belt, and geologic and geochemical controls on gold distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimes, David J.; Earhart, Robert L.; de Carvalho, Delfim; Oliveira, Vitor; Oliveira, Jose T.; Castro, Paulo

    1998-01-01

    This report describes geochemical and geological studies which were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Servicos Geologicos de Portugal (SPG) in the Portuguese pyrite belt (PPB) in southern Portugal. The studies included rare earth element (REE) distributions and geological and geochemical controls on the distribution of gold. Rare earth element distributions were determined in representative samples of the volcanic rocks from five west-trending sub-belts of the PPB in order to test the usefulness of REE as a tool for the correlation of volcanic events, and to determine their mobility and application as hydrothermal tracers. REE distributions in felsic volcanic rocks show increases in the relative abundances of heavy REE and a decrease in La/Yb ratios from north to south in the Portuguese pyrite belt. Anomalous amounts of gold are distributed in and near massive and disseminated sulfide deposits in the PPB. Gold is closely associated with copper in the middle and lower parts of the deposits. Weakly anomalous concentrations of gold were noted in exhalative sedimentary rocks that are stratigraphically above massive sulfide deposits in a distal manganiferous facies, whereas anomalously low concentrations were detected in the barite-rich, proximal-facies exhalites. Altered and pyritic felsic volcanic rocks locally contain highly anomalous concentrations of gold, suggesting that disseminated sulfide deposits and the non-ore parts of massive sulfide deposits should be evaluated for their gold potential.

  17. Geologic effects of hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coch, Nicholas K.

    1994-08-01

    Hurricanes are intense low pressure systems of tropical origin. Hurricane damage results from storm surge, wind, and inland flooding from heavy rainfall. Field observations and remote sensing of recent major hurricanes such as Hugo (1989), Andrew (1992) and Iniki (1992) are providing new insights into the mechanisms producing damage in these major storms. Velocities associated with hurricanes include the counterclockwise vortex winds flowing around the eye and the much slower regional winds that steer hurricane and move it forward. Vectorial addition of theseof these two winds on the higher effective wind speed than on the left side. Coast-parallel hurricane tracks keep the weaker left side of the storm against the coast, whereas coast-normal tracks produce a wide swath of destruction as the more powerful right side of the storm cuts a swath of destruction hundreds of kilometers inland. Storm surge is a function of the wind speed, central pressure, shelf slope, shoreline configuration, and anthropogenic alterations to the shoreline. Maximum surge heights are not under the eye of the hurricane, where the pressure is lowest, but on the right side of the eye at the radius of maximum winds, where the winds are strongest. Flood surge occurs as the hurricane approaches land and drives coastal waters, and superimposed waves, across the shore. Ebb surge occurs when impounded surface water flows seaward as the storm moves inland. Flood and ebb surge damage have been greatly increased in recent hurricanes as a result of anthropogenic changes along the shoreline. Hurricane wind damage occurs on three scales — megascale, mesoscale and microscale. Local wind damage is a function of wind speed, exposure and structural resistance to velocity pressure, wind drag and flying debris. Localized extreme damage is caused by gusts that can locally exceed sustained winds by a factor of two in areas where there is strong convective activity. Geologic changes occuring in hurricanes

  18. Geological myths and reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrihansky, Lubor

    2014-05-01

    Myths are the result of man's attempts to explain noteworthy features of his environment stemming from unfounded imagination. It is unbelievable that in 21st century the explanation of evident lithospheric plates movements and origin of forces causing this movement is still bound to myths, They are the myth about mantle convection, myth about Earth's expansion, myth about mantle heterogeneities causing the movement of plates and myth about mantle plumes. From 1971 to 1978 I performed extensive study (Ostřihanský 1980) about the terrestrial heat flow and radioactive heat production of batholiths in the Bohemian Massive (Czech Republic). The result, gained by extrapolation of the heat flow and heat production relationship, revealed the very low heat flow from the mantle 17.7mW m-2 close to the site of the Quarterly volcano active only 115,000 - 15,000 years ago and its last outbreak happened during Holocene that is less than 10,000 years ago. This volcano Komorní Hůrka (Kammerbühls) was known by J. W. Goethe investigation and the digging of 300 m long gallery in the first half of XIX century to reach the basaltic plug and to confirm the Stromboli type volcano. In this way the 19th century myth of neptunists that basalt was a sedimentary deposit was disproved in spite that famous poet and scientist J.W.Goethe inclined to neptunists. For me the result of very low heat flow and the vicinity of almost recent volcanoes in the Bohemian Massive meant that I refused the hypothesis of mantle convection and I focused my investigation to external forces of tides and solar heat, which evoke volcanic effects, earthquakes and the plate movement. To disclose reality it is necessary to present calculation of acting forces using correct mechanism of their action taking into account tectonic characteristics of geologic unites as the wrench tectonics and the tectonic of planets and satellites of the solar system, realizing an exceptional behavior of the Earth as quickly rotating

  19. A Study of the Education of Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglin, R. S.; Baldridge, A. M.; Buxner, S.; Crown, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    An Evaluation and Assessment Method for Workshops in Science Education and Resources While many professional development workshops train teachers with classroom activities for students, Workshops in Science Education and Resources (WISER): Planetary Perspectives is designed to give elementary and middle school teachers the deeper knowledge necessary to be confident teaching the earth and space science content in their classrooms. Two WISER workshops, Deserts of the Solar System and Volcanoes of the Solar System, place an emphasis on participants being able to use learned knowledge to describe or 'tell the story of' a given rock. In order to understand how participants' knowledge and ability to tell the story changes with instruction, we are investigating new ways of probing the understanding of geologic processes. The study will include results from both college level geology students and teachers, focusing on their understanding of geologic processes and the rock cycle. By studying how new students process geologic information, teachers may benefit by learning how to better teach similar information. This project will help to transfer geologic knowledge to new settings and assess education theories for how people learn. Participants in this study include teachers participating in the WISER program in AZ and introductory level college students at St. Mary's College of California. Participants will be videotaped drawing out their thought process on butcher paper as they describe a given rock. When they are done, they will be asked to describe what they have put on the paper and this interview will be recorded. These techniques will be initially performed with students at St. Mary's College of California to understand how to best gather information. An evaluation of their prior knowledge and previous experience will be determined, and a code of their thought process will be recorded. The same students will complete a semester of an introductory college level Physical

  20. Creating Special Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deLisle, Lee

    2009-01-01

    "Creating Special Events" is organized as a systematic approach to festivals and events for students who seek a career in event management. This book looks at the evolution and history of festivals and events and proceeds to the nuts and bolts of event management. The book presents event management as the means of planning, organizing, directing,…

  1. Earth System Stability Through Geologic Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, D.; Bowring, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Five times in the past 500 million years, mass extinctions haveresulted in the loss of greater than three-fourths of living species.Each of these events is associated with significant environmentalchange recorded in the carbon-isotopic composition of sedimentaryrocks. There are also many such environmental events in the geologicrecord that are not associated with mass extinctions. What makes themdifferent? Two factors appear important: the size of theenvironmental perturbation, and the time scale over which it occurs.We show that the natural perturbations of Earth's carbon cycle during thepast 500 million years exhibit a characteristic rate of change overtwo orders of magnitude in time scale. This characteristic rate isconsistent with the maximum rate that limits quasistatic (i.e., nearsteady-state) evolution of the carbon cycle. We identify this rate withmarginal stability, and show that mass extinctions occur on the fast,unstable side of the stability boundary. These results suggest thatthe great extinction events of the geologic past, and potentially a"sixth extinction" associated with modern environmental change, arecharacterized by common mechanisms of instability.

  2. Health benefits of geologic materials and geologic processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finkelman, R.B.

    2006-01-01

    The reemerging field of Medical Geology is concerned with the impacts of geologic materials and geologic processes on animal and human health. Most medical geology research has been focused on health problems caused by excess or deficiency of trace elements, exposure to ambient dust, and on other geologically related health problems or health problems for which geoscience tools, techniques, or databases could be applied. Little, if any, attention has been focused on the beneficial health effects of rocks, minerals, and geologic processes. These beneficial effects may have been recognized as long as two million years ago and include emotional, mental, and physical health benefits. Some of the earliest known medicines were derived from rocks and minerals. For thousands of years various clays have been used as an antidote for poisons. "Terra sigillata," still in use today, may have been the first patented medicine. Many trace elements, rocks, and minerals are used today in a wide variety of pharmaceuticals and health care products. There is also a segment of society that believes in the curative and preventative properties of crystals (talismans and amulets). Metals and trace elements are being used in some of today's most sophisticated medical applications. Other recent examples of beneficial effects of geologic materials and processes include epidemiological studies in Japan that have identified a wide range of health problems (such as muscle and joint pain, hemorrhoids, burns, gout, etc.) that may be treated by one or more of nine chemically distinct types of hot springs, and a study in China indicating that residential coal combustion may be mobilizing sufficient iodine to prevent iodine deficiency disease. ?? 2006 MDPI. All rights reserved.

  3. Health benefits of geologic materials and geologic processes.

    PubMed

    Finkelman, Robert B

    2006-12-01

    The reemerging field of Medical Geology is concerned with the impacts of geologic materials and geologic processes on animal and human health. Most medical geology research has been focused on health problems caused by excess or deficiency of trace elements, exposure to ambient dust, and on other geologically related health problems or health problems for which geoscience tools, techniques, or databases could be applied. Little, if any, attention has been focused on the beneficial health effects of rocks, minerals, and geologic processes. These beneficial effects may have been recognized as long as two million years ago and include emotional, mental, and physical health benefits. Some of the earliest known medicines were derived from rocks and minerals. For thousands of years various clays have been used as an antidote for poisons. "Terra sigillata," still in use today, may have been the first patented medicine. Many trace elements, rocks, and minerals are used today in a wide variety of pharmaceuticals and health care products. There is also a segment of society that believes in the curative and preventative properties of crystals (talismans and amulets). Metals and trace elements are being used in some of today's most sophisticated medical applications. Other recent examples of beneficial effects of geologic materials and processes include epidemiological studies in Japan that have identified a wide range of health problems (such as muscle and joint pain, hemorrhoids, burns, gout, etc.) that may be treated by one or more of nine chemically distinct types of hot springs, and a study in China indicating that residential coal combustion may be mobilizing sufficient iodine to prevent iodine deficiency disease. PMID:17159275

  4. Understanding Oscillations of the Geological Carbon Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachan, A.; Payne, J.; Saltzman, M.; Thomas, E.; Kump, L. R.

    2015-12-01

    The geological cycling of carbon ties together the sedimentary reservoirs with Earth's biosphere and climate. Perturbations to this coupled system are recorded in the carbon isotopic composition of marine limestones (δ13Ccarb). In the past decade numerous intervals of large-amplitude oscillations in δ13Ccarbhave been identified, with a variety of explanations proposed for individual events. Yet, when data spanning the past ~1 Ga are viewed as a whole, it is clear that large-scale oscillations are a common feature of the carbon isotopic record. The ubiquity of oscillations suggests that they may share a single origin rather than having many disparate causes. Here we present a simple two-box model of the geological carbon cycle exhibiting such oscillations: the Carbon-Cycle Oscillator. Analogous to a damped mass-spring system, the burial fluxes of carbonate and phosphate in the model act like friction, whereas P supply and Corg burial act like the restoring force of the spring. When the sensitivities of P supply and Corg burial to the sizes of the C and P reservoirs, respectively, increase above a critical threshold, the model exhibits oscillations upon perturbation. We suggest that intervals with large oscillations in bulk ocean-atmosphere δ13C are characterized by a greater sensitivity of the C:P burial-ratio and ALK:P weathering-ratio to the state of the ocean-atmosphere carbon pool. In addition, moderating of the slope of that dependence in general can account for the observed decrease in the amplitude of oscillations over the past billion years. We hypothesize that factors with a unidirectional trajectory during Earth history (e.g. increased oxygenation of the deep ocean, and evolution of pelagic calcifiers) led to a decrease in the Earth System's gain and increase in its resilience over geologic time, even in the face of continuing perturbations from the solid Earth and extraterrestrial realms.

  5. Geologic processes influence the effects of mining on aquatic ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, Travis S.; Clements, William H.; Wanty, Richard B.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Church, Stanley E.; San Juan, Carma A.; Fey, David L.; Rockwell, Barnaby W.; DeWitt, Ed H.; Klein, Terry L.

    2012-01-01

    Geologic processes strongly influence water and sediment quality in aquatic ecosystems but rarely are geologic principles incorporated into routine biomonitoring studies. We test if elevated concentrations of metals in water and sediment are restricted to streams downstream of mines or areas that may discharge mine wastes. We surveyed 198 catchments classified as “historically mined” or “unmined,” and based on mineral-deposit criteria, to determine whether water and sediment quality were influenced by naturally occurring mineralized rock, by historical mining, or by a combination of both. By accounting for different geologic sources of metals to the environment, we were able to distinguish aquatic ecosystems limited by metals derived from natural processes from those due to mining. Elevated concentrations of metals in water and sediment were not restricted to mined catchments; depauperate aquatic communities were found in unmined catchments. The type and intensity of hydrothermal alteration and the mineral deposit type were important determinants of water and sediment quality as well as the aquatic community in both mined and unmined catchments. This study distinguished the effects of different rock types and geologic sources of metals on ecosystems by incorporating basic geologic processes into reference and baseline site selection, resulting in a refined assessment. Our results indicate that biomonitoring studies should account for natural sources of metals in some geologic environments as contributors to the effect of mines on aquatic ecosystems, recognizing that in mining-impacted drainages there may have been high pre-mining background metal concentrations.

  6. Geologic processes influence the effects of mining on aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Travis S; Clements, William H; Wanty, Richard B; Verplanck, Philip L; Church, Stanley E; San Juan, Carma A; Fey, David L; Rockwell, Barnaby W; DeWitt, Ed H; Klein, Terry L

    2012-04-01

    Geologic processes strongly influence water and sediment quality in aquatic ecosystems but rarely are geologic principles incorporated into routine biomonitoring studies. We test if elevated concentrations of metals in water and sediment are restricted to streams downstream of mines or areas that may discharge mine wastes. We surveyed 198 catchments classified as "historically mined" or "unmined," and based on mineral-deposit criteria, to determine whether water and sediment quality were influenced by naturally occurring mineralized rock, by historical mining, or by a combination of both. By accounting for different geologic sources of metals to the environment, we were able to distinguish aquatic ecosystems limited by metals derived from natural processes from those due to mining. Elevated concentrations of metals in water and sediment were not restricted to mined catchments; depauperate aquatic communities were found in unmined catchments. The type and intensity of hydrothermal alteration and the mineral deposit type were important determinants of water and sediment quality as well as the aquatic community in both mined and unmined catchments. This study distinguished the effects of different rock types and geologic sources of metals on ecosystems by incorporating basic geologic processes into reference and baseline site selection, resulting in a refined assessment. Our results indicate that biomonitoring studies should account for natural sources of metals in some geologic environments as contributors to the effect of mines on aquatic ecosystems, recognizing that in mining-impacted drainages there may have been high pre-mining background metal concentrations. PMID:22645817

  7. Process for structural geologic analysis of topography and point data

    DOEpatents

    Eliason, Jay R.; Eliason, Valerie L. C.

    1987-01-01

    A quantitative method of geologic structural analysis of digital terrain data is described for implementation on a computer. Assuming selected valley segments are controlled by the underlying geologic structure, topographic lows in the terrain data, defining valley bottoms, are detected, filtered and accumulated into a series line segments defining contiguous valleys. The line segments are then vectorized to produce vector segments, defining valley segments, which may be indicative of the underlying geologic structure. Coplanar analysis is performed on vector segment pairs to determine which vectors produce planes which represent underlying geologic structure. Point data such as fracture phenomena which can be related to fracture planes in 3-dimensional space can be analyzed to define common plane orientation and locations. The vectors, points, and planes are displayed in various formats for interpretation.

  8. Structural geology of the Earth's exterior.

    PubMed

    Burchfiel, B C

    1979-09-01

    Plate tectonics offers an explanation for the present motions and heterogeneity of the rocks that form the external part of the Earth. It explains the origin of the first-order heterogeneity of oceanic and continental lithospheres. Furthermore, it explains the youth and simplicity of the oceanic lithosphere and offers the potential to explain the antiquity, complexity, and evolution of the continental lithosphere. The framework of plate tectonics must be used carefully, because there are geological features within continents, particularly in the more ancient rocks, that may require alternative explanations. The task of understanding lithospheric motions through geologic time must be focused on the continents, where the major evidence for 95% of Earth history resides.IN INTERPRETING EARTH MOTIONS FROM THE GEOLOGIC RECORD, THREE NEEDS SEEM PARAMOUNT: (i) to develop a three-dimensional understanding of the kinematics, dynamics, and thermal structure of modern plate boundary systems and at the same time to recognize those geological and geophysical features that are unrelated to plate interaction; (ii) to use this understanding to reconstruct the extent and evolution of ancient systems that form the major elements of continental crust; and (iii) to determine the dynamics and evolution of systems that have no modern analogs. Decoupling along subhorizontal zones within the lithosphere may be widespread in all types of plate boundary systems. Thus, in order to interpret the motion and dynamics of the mantle correctly, it is important to know if upper lithospheric motion within boundary systems is controlled directly or indirectly by or is independent of deeper mantle motions.

  9. Structural geology of the Earth's exterior*

    PubMed Central

    Burchfiel, B. C.

    1979-01-01

    Plate tectonics offers an explanation for the present motions and heterogeneity of the rocks that form the external part of the Earth. It explains the origin of the first-order heterogeneity of oceanic and continental lithospheres. Furthermore, it explains the youth and simplicity of the oceanic lithosphere and offers the potential to explain the antiquity, complexity, and evolution of the continental lithosphere. The framework of plate tectonics must be used carefully, because there are geological features within continents, particularly in the more ancient rocks, that may require alternative explanations. The task of understanding lithospheric motions through geologic time must be focused on the continents, where the major evidence for 95% of Earth history resides. In interpreting earth motions from the geologic record, three needs seem paramount: (i) to develop a three-dimensional understanding of the kinematics, dynamics, and thermal structure of modern plate boundary systems and at the same time to recognize those geological and geophysical features that are unrelated to plate interaction; (ii) to use this understanding to reconstruct the extent and evolution of ancient systems that form the major elements of continental crust; and (iii) to determine the dynamics and evolution of systems that have no modern analogs. Decoupling along subhorizontal zones within the lithosphere may be widespread in all types of plate boundary systems. Thus, in order to interpret the motion and dynamics of the mantle correctly, it is important to know if upper lithospheric motion within boundary systems is controlled directly or indirectly by or is independent of deeper mantle motions. PMID:16592704

  10. Vestiges of life in the oldest Greenland rocks? A review of early Archean geology in the Godthabsfjord region, and reappraisal of field evidence for > 3850 Ma life on Akilia.

    PubMed

    Myers, J S; Crowley, J L

    2000-01-01

    The Godthåbsfjord region of West Greenland contains the most extensive, best exposed and most intensely studied early Archean rocks on Earth. A geological record has been described of numerous magmatic events between ~3.9 and 3.6 Ga, and evidence of life at >3.85 Ga and ~3.8-3.7 Ga has been proposed from two widely-separated localities. Some of these claims have recently been questioned, and the nature of the best preserved remnants of the oldest known terrestrial volcanic and sedimentary rocks in the Isua greenstone belt are being reinvestigated and substantially reinterpreted. The first part of this article reviews the evolution of geological research and interpretations, outlining the techniques by which the geological history has been determined and the ensuing controversies. The second part re-examines crucial field evidence upon which the antiquity of the oldest terrestrial life is claimed from the island of Akilia.

  11. Coastal landslide material loss rates associated with severe climatic events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, C.J.; Green, K.R.

    2006-01-01

    Deep-seated landslides along the California coast deliver large amounts of material to the nearshore littoral environment. Landslide movement, a combined result of slope base undercutting by waves and ground saturation, is highly episodic. Movement occurs primarily during periods of high rainfall and large waves, such as those associated with El Nin??o events. This analysis applies remote-sensing techniques to quantify the volumetric net loss rates at three specific landslide sites along the Big Sur coast over three approximately decadal time periods, two of which contained the largest El Nin??o events of the twentieth century. High-resolution historical terrain models were compared in order to provide surface-elevation change data for each landslide complex. To determine the material influx to the littoral system, the landslide complexes were divided into upper and lower slopes, and the surface-elevation change was converted to a volume loss. Some material lost from the upper slope was deposited at the slope base, not into the littoral system. We describe a method to calculate the net loss that omits the deposition volumes from the upper slope. Loss rates were found to be substantially higher during the periods in which El Nin??o events occurred. This is especially true during the period of the 1997-1998 El Nin??o, when 75% of the total material volume was lost, and loss rates were much as sixteen times higher than during non-El Nin??o periods. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  12. Geological occurrence of fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Buseck, P.R.; Tsipursky, S.J.; Wang, S. ); Hettich, R. )

    1992-01-01

    Using HRTEM imaging, the authors found C[sub 60] and C[sub 70] fullerenes in shungite, a Precambrian carbon-rich rock from Karelia, Russia. Compositionally, shungite represents coals of the meta-anthracite rank, characterized by low ash and sulfur contents, low volatile yields, and high carbon contents. The shungite occurs within metamorphosed sediments. The overlying rocks consist of gray dolomitized sandstones and poorly sorted silts and clays; the underlying rocks are not exposed. The shungite consists of masses containing up to 99% carbon. Diabase is interstratified with shungite-bearing rocks, and the shungite concentration increases with proximity to the diabase. Their sample comes from inclusions in the diabase. In the HRTEM images the fullerenes appear round (presumably roughly spherical in three dimensions), with white rims and black centers, almost identical to images of synthetic C[sub 60] molecules. Following the HRTEM observations, the fullerene identities were confirmed, first by time-of-flight mass spectrometry and then by more precise laser ablation, laser desorption, and thermal desorption ionization plus Fourier transform (FT) mass spectrometry. These measurements verified that the fullerenes were not generated by the laser ionization event. HRTEM images show that locally they occur in ordered arrays that resemble crystals of synthetic C[sub 60]. FT mass spectra show that the C-13/C-12 isotopic ratios for C[sub 60] and C[sub 70] fall within the normal range of terrestrial isotopic values.

  13. Geology of the Henry Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilbert, G.K.

    1877-01-01

    If these pages fail to give a correct account of the structure of the Henry Mountains the fault is mine and I have no excuse. In all the earlier exploration of the Rocky Mountain Region, as well as in much of the more recent survey, the geologist has merely accompanied the geographer and has had no voice in the determination of either the route or the rate of travel. When the structure of a mountain was in doubt he was rarely able to visit the points which should resolve the doubt, but was compelled to turn regretfully away. Not so in the survey of the Henry Mountains. Geological exploration had shown that they were well disposed for examination, and that they promised to give the key to a type of structure which was at best obscurely known; and I was sent by Professor Powell to make a study of them, without restriction as to my order or method. I was limited only in time, the snow stopping my work two months after it was begun. Two months would be far too short a period in which to survey a thousand square miles in Pennsylvania or Illinois, but among the Colorado Plateaus it proved sufficient. A few comprehensive views from mountain tops gave the general distribution of the formations, and the remainder of the time was spent in the examination of the localities which best displayed the peculiar features of the structure. So thorough was the display and so satisfactory the examination, that in preparing my report I have felt less than ever before the desire to revisit the field and prove my conclusions by more extended observation.

  14. The Necessity of Geologic Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    R. Linden

    2004-07-01

    Nuclear wastes are the radioactive byproducts of nuclear power generation, nuclear weapons production, and other uses of nuclear material. Experts from around the world agree that deep geologic disposal of nuclear waste in a mined repository is the most environmentally sound means of removing these potential sources of radiation from interaction with the biosphere. Of the 360 millirem of background radiation received annually by the average American, from both natural and man-made sources, less than 1 millirem results from the nuclear fuel cycle. Spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, destined for geologic disposal, are located at 126 sites in 39 states. The proposed repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is far more isolated from the general population than any sites where these radioactive materials are presently located. Only solid forms of high-level wastes will be transported for disposal in a geologic repository. For more than 50 years, nuclear materials have been safely transported in North America, Europe, and Asia, without a single significant radiation release. Since the 1950s, select panels from the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council and interagency advisory groups, and international experts selected by the OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency, have examined the environmental, ethical, and intergenerational aspects of nuclear waste disposal, plus alternatives to geologic disposal. All have concluded that deep geologic disposal in a mined repository is clearly the preferred option. The concept of deep geologic disposal is based on the analogy to ore deposits, which are formed deep within the Earth's crust, commonly remain isolated from the biosphere for millions to billions of years, and are, generally, extremely difficult to detect. Before selecting the unsaturated tuffs at Yucca Mountain, DOE evaluated salt formations, basalts, and both crystalline and sedimentary rocks. Other nations generating nuclear power also plan to use

  15. Geology Field Trips as Performance Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Callan

    2009-01-01

    One of the most important goals the author has for students in his introductory-level physical geology course is to give them the conceptual skills for solving geologic problems on their own. He wants students to leave his course as individuals who can use their knowledge of geologic processes and logic to figure out the extended geologic history…

  16. Historical Earthquakes And Their Geologic Signature On The Guerrero, Mexican Pacific Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez Herrera, M.; Rangel, V.; Kostoglodov, V.; Ruíz-Fernández, A.; Machain, M.; Caballero, M.; Goguitchaichrili, A.

    2012-12-01

    Historical, ethnographic and instrumental data show that the Pacific coast of Mexico has been exposed to destructive tsunamis over at least the past 500 years. This coast parallels the active Mexican subduction zone, where earthquakes M > 8 have been registered and are known to have triggered tsunamis. The purpose of our study was two-fold, a) to determine whether we could distinguish the geologic signature of historical earthquakes, and b) whether tsunami deposits are preserved in the tropical environments of the Barra de Potosí Bay, Guerrero coast. Multiple sites were dug and cores recovered to determine the presence, continuity and extension of a sharp basal contact between a clayish silt unit and a sand unit. The trench, pit, and monolith at Barra de Potosí yield a similar stratigraphy. Several lines of evidence using a multi-proxy approach (historical studies, interviews with local witnesses, geomorphological and geological surveys, coring and trenching, and laboratory analyses including grain size, micropaleontology, geochemistry, magnetic susceptibility and radiometric dating - Pb-210 and C-14) indicate the occurrence of two earthquakes that we link to local events: the 1985 (M 8.1) Mexico and possibly the 1907 (M 8.3) earthquake. No conclusive evidence of tsunami deposits were recognized, however an anomalous sand layer with incorporated mud clasts, shallow marine foraminifera, and the presence of organic debris in this sand bed suggests a mixture of terrestrial influence associated with the inland transport of high-energy marine material most likely from a nearshore beach environment. The radiocarbon dates provide a minimum age i.e. the maximum estimate for the period of burial of the plant material in the lower observed sand layer of ca. 2320-2050 cal yr BP (Cal BC 370 to 100). We thereby provide onshore geological evidence of historical coseismic deformation and possibly a tsunami on the Pacific coast of Mexico.

  17. Status Report on the Geology of the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Hatcher, R.D., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This report provides an introduction to the present state of knowledge of the geology of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and a cursory introduction to the hydrogeology. A detailed reported on hydrogeology is being produced in parallel to this one. An important element of this work is the construction of a modern detailed geologic map of the ORR containing subdivisions of all mappable rock units and displaying mesoscopic structural data. Understanding the geologic framework of the ORR is essential to many current and proposed activities related to land-use planning, waste management, environmental restoration, and waste remediation. This interim report is the result of cooperation between geologists in two Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) divisions, Environmental Sciences and Energy, and is a major part of one doctoral dissertation in the Department of Geological Sciences at The University of Tennessee--Knoxville. Major long-term goals of geologic investigations in the ORR are to determine what interrelationships exist between fractures systems in individual rock or tectonic units and the fluid flow regimes, to understand how regional and local geology can be used to help predict groundwater movement, and to formulate a structural-hydrologic model that for the first time would enable prediction of the movement of groundwater and other subsurface fluids in the ORR. Understanding the stratigraphic and structural framework and how it controls fluid flow at depth should be the first step in developing a model for groundwater movement. Development of a state-of-the-art geologic and geophysical framework for the ORR is therefore essential for formulating an integrated structural-hydrologic model. This report is also intended to convey the present state of knowledge of the geologic and geohydrologic framework of the ORR and vicinity and to present some of the data that establish the need for additional geologic mapping and geohydrologic studies. An additional intended

  18. Recent geologic activity on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Z.; Strom, R. G.; Blewett, D. T.; Solomon, S. C.; Head, J. W.; Watters, T. R.; Chabot, N. L.; Banks, M. E.; Chapman, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Since the MESSENGER spacecraft was inserted into orbit about Mercury in March 2011, global and targeted high-resolution image data sets have been acquired. These images support the conclusion that internal geological activity on Mercury did not end early in planetary history, as had generally been previously thought, but continued to geologically recent times. Three lines of evidence point to recent geological activity on Mercury. (1) There are smooth plains with surface areas up to 1.5×105 km2 that postdate young (morphological class 1) craters, indicating probable Kuiperian-aged volcanism. No volcanic vents, fissures, or flow fronts have been identified on these plains, suggesting that they are products of low-viscosity lavas, consistent with komatiite-like compositions of large areas on Mercury indicated by MESSENGER X-Ray Spectrometer observations. (2) Young lobate scarps transect class 1 craters as large as 30 km in diameter, indicating comparably recent crustal contraction. (3) A number of fresh-appearing, high-reflectance, irregularly shaped and rimless shallow depressions interpreted as pyroclastic vents have few superposed craters, suggesting that they have been recently active. Growing evidence from geological and geochemical observations indicates that Mercury's interior contains a higher abundance of volatile materials than was previously appreciated. Together these findings support the inference that Mercury experienced relatively recent volcanism and tectonic deformation, and the possibility that the planet is geologically active today cannot be discounted.

  19. Numerical Modelling of Geological Heterogeneity - Implications for CO2 Geological Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanson, J. L.; Kirste, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    different rock types are varied within reasonable ranges and grid spacing is refined to determine the sensitivity of the models to grid size. Variations between simulations are used to determine the differences in the partitioning of CO2 between its various storage mechanisms, and whether the differences are reflective of heterogeneities in the real system or attributed to numerical error. Initial results indicate that variations in certain parameters are more significant than others in terms of the movement and partitioning of CO2 into its various storage mechanisms. Variations in horizontal to vertical permeability contrasts, and residual liquid and gas saturation have significant impacts on the flow path of CO2 through the system, and therefore the amount of CO2 that becomes trapped residually within the pore spaces or dissolves into the formation brine. Gradual changes in heterogeneity do not seem to alter the results significantly in comparison to discrete changes, indicating that modelling heterogeneities as discrete bodies is an adequate assumption. Results imply that certain geological heterogeneities and associated parameters require more accurate representation then others when considering how CO2 will be stored within the subsurface. Although finer grid sizes increases the numerical accuracy of simulations, acute grid refinement may not be required for all purposes.

  20. Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group-Update and Additions to the Determination of Chloroacetanilide Herbicide Degradation Compounds in Water Using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, E.A.; Kish, J.L.; Zimmerman, L.R.; Thurman, E.

    2001-01-01

    An analytical method using high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1999 for the analysis of selected chloroacetanilide herbicide degradation compounds in water. These compounds were acetochlor ethane sulfonic acid (ESA), acetochlor oxanilic acid (OXA), alachlor ESA, alachlor OXA, metolachlor ESA, and metolachlor OXA. The HPLC/MS method was updated in 2000, and the method detection limits were modified accordingly. Four other degradation compounds also were added to the list of compounds that can be analyzed using HPLC/MS; these compounds were dimethenamid ESA, dimethenamid OXA, flufenacet ESA, and flufenacet OXA. Except for flufenacet OXA, good precision and accuracy were demonstrated for the updated HPLC/MS method in buffered reagent water, surface water, and ground water. The mean HPLC/MS recoveries of the degradation compounds from water samples spiked at 0.20 and 1.0 ?g/L (microgram per liter) ranged from 75 to 114 percent, with relative standard deviations of 15.8 percent or less for all compounds except flufenacet OXA, which had relative standard deviations ranging from 11.3 to 48.9 percent. Method detection levels (MDL's) using the updated HPLC/MS method varied from 0.009 to 0.045 ?g/L, with the flufenacet OXA MDL at 0.072 ?g/L. The updated HPLC/MS method is valuable for acquiring information about the fate and transport of the parent chloroacetanilide herbicides in water.