Science.gov

Sample records for geomagnetic cut-off rigidity

  1. Upper cut-off rigidity for corotation anisotropy during solar activity cycles 20 and 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.; Riker, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    At the Eleventh International Conference on Cosmic Rays in 1969, the results of a study of the solar diurnal variations of solar rays observed during the ascending phase of solar activity cycle twenty was discussed. The diurnal variation, observed underground during 1965-68 period, and results from an extraterrestrial anisotropy having a continuously increasing upper cut-off rigidity R sub c were reported. However, the coupling functions applicable to underground telescopes were controversial then. This situation has improved now. Those results wsere re-examined and extended to cover the period 1965-78. The coupling functions given by Murakami et al. for underground muons and those given by Lockwood and Weber for neutron monitors were used showed that a great deal of care should be exercised in the value of R sub c was calculated. Although numerical values of R sub c are a little different, the trend for 1965-68 period remains unchanged. Highest value of R sub c occur in 1970 and the lowest value occurs in 1976.

  2. Fifty years of progress in geomagnetic cutoff rigidity determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, D. F.; Shea, M. A.

    2009-11-01

    This paper is a review of the progress made in geomagnetic cutoff rigidity calculations over the past 50 years. Determinations of cosmic ray trajectories, and hence cutoff rigidities, using digital computers began in 1956 and progressed slowly until 1962 when McCracken developed an efficient computer program to determine cosmic ray trajectories in a high degree simulation of the geomagnetic field. The application of this cosmic ray trajectory technique was limited by the available computer power. As computers became faster it was possible to determine vertical cutoff rigidity values for cosmic ray stations and coarse world grids; however, the computational effort required was formidable for the computers of the 1960s. Since most cosmic ray experiments were conducted on the surface of the Earth, the vertical cutoff rigidity was adopted as a standard reference value. The effective cutoff value derived from trajectory calculations appeared to be adequate for ordering cosmic ray data from latitude surveys. As the geomagnetic field evolution became more apparent, it was found necessary to update the world grid of cutoff rigidity values using more accurate descriptions of the geomagnetic field. In the 1970s and 1980s it became possible to do experimental verification of the accuracy of these cosmic ray cutoff determinations and also to design experiments based on these cutoff rigidity calculations. The extensive trajectory calculations done in conjunction with the HEAO-3 satellite and a comparison between these experimental measurements and the trajectory calculations verified the Störmer theory prediction regarding angular cutoff variations and also confirmed that the structure of the first order penumbra is very stable and could be used for isotope separation. Contemporary work in improving cutoff rigidities seems to be concentrating on utilizing improved magnetospheric models in an effort to determine more accurate geomagnetic cutoff values. When using geomagnetic

  3. The geomagnetic cutoff rigidities at high latitudes for different solar wind and geomagnetic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, W.; Qin, G.

    2016-01-01

    Studying the access of the cosmic rays (CRs) into the magnetosphere is important to understand the coupling between the magnetosphere and the solar wind. In this paper we numerically studied CRs' magnetospheric access with vertical geomagnetic cutoff rigidities using the method proposed by Smart and Shea (1999). By the study of CRs' vertical geomagnetic cutoff rigidities at high latitudes we obtain the CRs' window (CRW) whose boundary is determined when the vertical geomagnetic cutoff rigidities drop to a value lower than a threshold value. Furthermore, we studied the area of CRWs and found out they are sensitive to different parameters, such as the z component of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), the solar wind dynamic pressure, AE index, and Dst index. It was found that both the AE index and Dst index have a strong correlation with the area of CRWs during strong geomagnetic storms. However, during the medium storms, only AE index has a strong correlation with the area of CRWs, while Dst index has a much weaker correlation with the area of CRWs. This result on the CRW can be used for forecasting the variation of the cosmic rays during the geomagnetic storms.

  4. Geomagnetic Cutoff Rigidity Computer Program: Theory, Software Description and Example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, D. F.; Shea, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    The access of charged particles to the earth from space through the geomagnetic field has been of interest since the discovery of the cosmic radiation. The early cosmic ray measurements found that cosmic ray intensity was ordered by the magnetic latitude and the concept of cutoff rigidity was developed. The pioneering work of Stoermer resulted in the theory of particle motion in the geomagnetic field, but the fundamental mathematical equations developed have 'no solution in closed form'. This difficulty has forced researchers to use the 'brute force' technique of numerical integration of individual trajectories to ascertain the behavior of trajectory families or groups. This requires that many of the trajectories must be traced in order to determine what energy (or rigidity) a charged particle must have to penetrate the magnetic field and arrive at a specified position. It turned out the cutoff rigidity was not a simple quantity but had many unanticipated complexities that required many hundreds if not thousands of individual trajectory calculations to solve. The accurate calculation of particle trajectories in the earth's magnetic field is a fundamental problem that limited the efficient utilization of cosmic ray measurements during the early years of cosmic ray research. As the power of computers has improved over the decades, the numerical integration procedure has grown more tractable, and magnetic field models of increasing accuracy and complexity have been utilized. This report is documentation of a general FORTRAN computer program to trace the trajectory of a charged particle of a specified rigidity from a specified position and direction through a model of the geomagnetic field.

  5. The Development of a Dynamic Geomagnetic Cutoff Rigidity Model for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, D. F.; Shea, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a computer model of geomagnetic vertical cutoffs applicable to the orbit of the International Space Station. This model accounts for the change in geomagnetic cutoff rigidity as a function of geomagnetic activity level. This model was delivered to NASA Johnson Space Center in July 1999 and tested on the Space Radiation Analysis Group DEC-Alpha computer system to ensure that it will properly interface with other software currently used at NASA JSC. The software was designed for ease of being upgraded as other improved models of geomagnetic cutoff as a function of magnetic activity are developed.

  6. Effect of local perturbations of the geomagnetic field on cosmic ray cutoff rigidities at Jungfraujoch and Kiel

    SciTech Connect

    Flueckiger, E.O.; Smart, D.F.; Shea, M.A.

    1983-09-01

    We have investigated the effect of local perturbations of the geomagnetic field on the vertical cosmic ray cutoff rigidities at Jungfraujoch and Kiel as representative mid-latitude neutron monitor stations. The main, effective, and Stoermer vertical cutoff rigidities and their changes were determined by utilizing the trajectory-tracing technique in a magnetic field which is modeled as a simple dipole field to which the disturbance field is superposed. It was found that the cosmic ray cutoff rigidities are most sensitive to variations of the z component of the geomagnetic field at geomagnetic latitudes -20/sup 0/<..lambda..<+30/sup 0/ and at longitudes within 90/sup 0/ to the east of these northern hemisphere stations. Furthermore, cutoff rigidity variations at Kiel are predominantly due to changes of the geomagnetic field within geocentric distances 2.5R/sub E/rigidities are caused almost exclusively by magnetic disturbances within 1R/sub E/rigidities on the radial, latitudinal and longitudinal structure of the magnetic perturbations is given explicitly. The results are discussed with respect to the theory by Treiman (1953) describing the effect of a ring current on cosmic ray cutoff rigidities. It is also shown that for the analysis of the characteristic properties of the correlation between cutoff rigidity variations and specific geomagnetic perturbations the rigidity corresponding to the first ''discontinuity band'' of the rigidity spectrum is an extremely useful parameter.

  7. Magnetospheric effects of cosmic rays. 1. Long-term changes in the geomagnetic cutoff rigidities for the stations of the global network of neutron monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdevskii, B. B.; Abunin, A. A.; Kobelev, P. G.; Gushchina, R. T.; Belov, A. V.; Eroshenko, E. A.; Yanke, V. G.

    2016-07-01

    Vertical geomagnetic cutoff rigidities are obtained for the stations of the global network of neutron monitors via trajectory calculations for each year of the period from 1950 to 2020. Geomagnetic cutoff rigidities are found from the model of the Earth's main field International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) for 1950-2015, and the forecast until 2020 is provided. In addition, the geomagnetic cutoff rigidities for the same period are obtained by Tsyganenko model T89 (Tsyganenko, 1989) with the average annual values of the Kp-index. In each case, the penumbra is taken into account in the approximation of the flat and power spectra of variations of cosmic rays. The calculation results show an overall decrease in geomagnetic cutoff rigidities, which is associated with the overall decrease and restructuring of the geomagnetic field during the reporting period, at almost all points.

  8. 49 CFR 229.93 - Safety cut-off device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Safety cut-off device. 229.93 Section 229.93 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Equipment § 229.93 Safety cut-off device. The fuel line shall have a safety cut-off device that— (a)...

  9. Investigation of cosmic ray cutoff rigidity changes caused by the disturbed geomagnetic field of the storm in March 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernova, Elena; Tyasto, Marta; Danilova, Olga; Sdobnov, Valerii

    2016-04-01

    One of important factors determining the space weather are cosmic rays the cutoff rigidities of which vary appreciably under the influence of disturbances in the interplanetary space and the Earth's magnetosphere. This report is concerned with changes in the geomagnetic cutoff rigidities (thresholds) of cosmic rays computed for the period of a strong geomagnetic storm of March 2012. This disturbed period was characterized by the solar wind speed of more than 700 km/s and Dst-index at the minimum Dst-variation equal to -143 nT. The theoretical vertical effective geomagnetic cutoff rigidities were calculated for a number of stations by using the Tsyganenko TS01 model and trajectory tracing method in a magnetic field of a disturbed magnetosphere. The theoretical cutoff rigidities were compared with the experimental ones obtained by the global spectrographic survey method on base of the data from the worldwide neutron monitor network. The correlation coefficients between the theoretical and experimental thresholds for different stations were 0.5 - 0.7. Combined analysis of temporal variations in the theoretical and experimental geomagnetic thresholds and their relations with the solar wind and IMF parameters showed that the change in the theoretical geomagnetic thresholds correlated well with the Dst and Bz variations at all the stations under study. The correlation of the experimental geomagnetic thresholds with the Dst-variation and Bz was much lower. At the same time, the correlation of the solar wind velocity V with the changes in the experimental thresholds was better than with the theoretical thresholds. A similar situation was observed for the storms of November 2004 and September 2005.

  10. Study of the Relationship Between Forbush Decrease and Geomagnetic Storm Events Using Dst Index.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominic, Obiegbuna; Okeke, Fransisca; Okpala, Kingsley

    Abstract A study of the relationship between Forbush decreases (FD) and geomagnetic storms have been carried out using the Dst index. Most important space weather effects including FDs are associated with geomagnetic disturbances (storms). The rigidity cut off of cosmic rays, is related to the latitude of measurement and are affected by geomagnetic disturbances. Four (4) stations hosted by the Bartol research institute, University of Delaware provided continuous CR counts for this study. Clear signatures of Forbush decreases associated with storms happening on days of Kp >7 from 1980-1989 were examined to deduce the level of modulation of CR counts during geomagnetic storms. Enhancement of the count rates are observed during simultaneous Forbush decreases associated with large storms. FD correlated well with Dst for all of the stations with no significant difference observed with regards to rigidity. The anomalous enhancement during the simultaneous FD showed stronger association depending on rigidity and the implications of these results

  11. 27-day variation of the GCR intensity based on corrected and uncorrected for geomagnetic disturbances data of neutron monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alania, M. V.; Modzelewska, R.; Wawrzynczak, A.; Sdobnov, V. E.; Kravtsova, M. V.

    2015-08-01

    We study 27-day variations of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity for 2005-2008 period of the solar cycle #23. We use neutron monitors (NMs) data corrected and uncorrected for geomagnetic disturbances. Besides the limited time intervals when the 27-day variations are clearly established, always exist some feeble 27-day variations in the GCR intensity related to the constantly present weak heliolongitudinal asymmetry in the heliosphere. We calculate the amplitudes of the 27-day variation of the GCR intensity based on the NMs data corrected and uncorrected for geomagnetic disturbances. We show that these amplitudes do not differ for NMs with cut-off rigidities smaller than 4-5 GV comparing with NMs of higher cut-off rigidities. Rigidity spectrum of the 27-day variation of the GCR intensity found in the uncorrected data is soft while it is hard in the case of the corrected data. For both cases exists definite tendency of softening the temporal changes of the 27-day variation's rigidity spectrum in period of 2005 to 2008 approaching the minimum of solar activity. We believe that a study of the 27-day variation of the GCR intensity based on the data uncorrected for geomagnetic disturbances should be carried out by NMs with cut-off rigidities smaller than 4-5 GV.

  12. The use of the McIlwain L-parameter to estimate cosmic ray vertical cutoff rigidities for different epochs of the geomagnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shea, M. A.; Smart, D. F.; Gentile, L. C.

    1985-01-01

    Secular changes in the geomagnetic field between 1955 and 1980 have been large enough to produce significant differences in both the verical cutoff rigidities and in the L-value for a specified position. A useful relationship employing the McIlwain L-parameter to estimate vertical cutoff rigidities has been derived for the twenty-five year period.

  13. Cut-off wall system for subsurface liquid containment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.; Khan, F.

    1997-12-31

    The subject of this paper is the use of a Cut-off Wall System (CWS) in conjunction with conventional soil bentonite slurry walls. The system is a vertical subsurface containment solution for isolating contaminated soils and groundwater in situ, thereby enhancing protection of the environment. The CWS is composed of geomembrane panels and specially designed connectors that form an interlocking subsurface vertical barrier wall. This system provides a cost effective, easily installed, positive cut-off for isolation of mixed and hazardous wastes, and wastes from uncontrolled releases. This application will address manufacturing, fabrication, installation, strength, QA/QC, chemical compatibility, and permeability.

  14. A Preliminary Investigation of Three Compromise Methods for Establishing Cut-Off Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Craig N.; Melican, Gerald J.

    The study compares three methods for establishing cut-off scores that effect a compromise between absolute cut-offs based on item difficulty and relative cut-offs based on expected passing rates. Each method coordinates these two types of information differently. The Beuk method obtains judges' estimates of an absolute cut-off and an expected…

  15. 49 CFR 229.93 - Safety cut-off device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Safety cut-off device. 229.93 Section 229.93 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Internal...

  16. 49 CFR 229.93 - Safety cut-off device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Safety cut-off device. 229.93 Section 229.93 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Internal...

  17. 49 CFR 229.93 - Safety cut-off device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Safety cut-off device. 229.93 Section 229.93 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Internal...

  18. 49 CFR 229.93 - Safety cut-off device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Safety cut-off device. 229.93 Section 229.93 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Internal...

  19. Temporal Changes in the Rigidity Spectrum of Forbush Decreases Based on Neutron Monitor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alania, M. V.; Wawrzynczak, A.; Sdobnov, V. E.; Kravtsova, M. V.

    2013-09-01

    The Forbush decrease (Fd) of the Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity and disturbances in the Earth's magnetic field generally take place simultaneously and are caused by the same phenomenon, namely a coronal mass ejection (CME) or a shock wave created after violent processes in the solar atmosphere. The magnetic cut-off rigidity of the Earth's magnetic field changes because of the disturbances, leading to additional changes in the GCR intensity observed by neutron monitors and muon telescopes. Therefore, one may expect distortion in the temporal changes in the power-law exponent of the rigidity spectrum calculated from neutron monitor data without correcting for the changes in the cut-off rigidity of the Earth's magnetic field. We compare temporal changes in the rigidity spectrum of Fds calculated from neutron monitor data corrected and uncorrected for the geomagnetic disturbances. We show some differences in the power-law exponent of the rigidity spectrum of Fds, particularly during large disturbances of the cut-off rigidity of the Earth's magnetic field. However, the general features of the temporal changes in the rigidity spectrum of Fds remain valid as they were found in our previous study. Namely, at the initial phase of the Fd, the rigidity spectrum is relatively soft and it gradually becomes hard up to the time of the minimum level of the GCR intensity. Then during the recovery phase of the Fd, the rigidity spectrum gradually becomes soft. This confirms that the structural changes of the interplanetary magnetic field turbulence in the range of frequencies of 10-6 - 10-5 Hz are generally responsible for the time variations in the rigidity spectrum we found during the Fds.

  20. Rigidity Dependence of Cosmic Ray Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal Mishra, Rekha; Mishra, Rajesh Kumar

    2012-07-01

    The various observed harmonics of the cosmic ray variation may be understood on a unified basis if the free space cosmic ray anisotropy is non-sinusoidal in form. The major objective of this paper is to study the first three harmonics of cosmic ray intensity on geo-magnetically quiet days over the period 1965-1990 for Deep River, Goose Bay and Tokyo neutron monitoring stations. The amplitude of first harmonic remains high for Deep River having low cutoff rigidity as compared to Tokyo neutron monitor having high cutoff rigidity on quiet days. The diurnal amplitude significantly decreases in 1987 at Deep River and in 1986 at Tokyo during solar activity minimum years. The diurnal time of maximum significantly shifts to an earlier time as compared to the corotational direction at both the stations having different cutoff rigidities. The time of maximum for first harmonic significantly shifts towards later hours and for second harmonic it shifts towards earlier hours at low cutoff rigidity station i.e. Deep River as compared to the high cut off rigidity station i.e. Tokyo on quiet days. The amplitude of second/third harmonics shows a good positive correlation with solar wind velocity, while the others (i.e. amplitude and phase) have no significant correlation on quiet days. The solar wind velocity significantly remains in the range 350 to 425 km/s i.e. being nearly average on quiet days. The amplitude and direction of the anisotropy on quiet days are weakly dependent on high-speed solar wind streams for these neutron monitoring stations of low and high cutoff rigidity threshold. Keywords: cosmic ray, cut off rigidity, quiet days, harmonics.

  1. Brilliant high harmonic sources with extended cut-off

    SciTech Connect

    Seres, Josef; Spielmann, Christian; Seres, Enikoe

    2010-02-02

    The most challenging application of time resolved spectroscopy is to directly watch the structural and electronic dynamics. Here we present several ways for realizing laser driven x-ray sources, offering atomic spatial and temporal resolution. Our approaches are based on high harmonic generation and include quasi-phase matching in two successive gas jets, extending the cut-off by high harmonic generation in an ion channel, and amplification of HHG in a plasma based amplifier.

  2. Preliminary Study of the 400-Year Geomagnetic Cutoff Rigidity Changes, Cosmic Rays and Possible Climate Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, Margaret Ann; Smart, D. F.

    2003-07-01

    The studies of Friis-Christensen and Svensmark reported a variation of 34% in the global cloud cover between 1980 and 1995 that appeared to be correlated with the change in galactic cosmic radiation flux over the solar cycle. Using world grids of vertical cutoff rigidities calculated over a 400-year interval and assuming constant solar modulation over that period, we find that the cosmic ray flux over the glob e has increased by 18 percent. This change is equivalent to the cosmic ray flux at high latitude locations over a solar cycle. We also find that the change in the cosmic ray flux over the 400-year interval is not uniformly distributed. We suggest that the long-term change in the cosmic radiation impinging at the top of the atmosphere at specific locations on the glob e should be considered in studies of possible relationships between cosmic radiation and climate.

  3. Variations of the vertical cutoff rigidities for the world wide neutron monitor network during 1950-2020.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Dorman

    2016-07-01

    Vertical cutoff rigidities for the world wide neutron monitor network are obtained with one year resolution during the period of 1950-2020 by the method of trajectory calculations. The models of Definitive Geomagnetic Reference Field and International Geomagnetic Reference Field have been used. Besides, cutoff rigidities for the whole period were obtained using model by Tsyganenko Ts89 with involving yearly mean values of Kp index. In each case an estimation of penumbra contribution was made in approximation of flat and low spectra (index in variations spectrum 0 and -1) of cosmic ray variations. The results testify total decrease of cut off rigidities practically in the all locations, which is apparently connected to the common decrease of magnetic field in a considered period.

  4. Energetics of southeastern Pacific cut-off lows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Manoel Alonso; Piva, Everson Dal

    2016-06-01

    The existence of cut-off lows (COLs) over South Pacific and South America is often associated with adverse weather events such as intense precipitation over the central region of South America, frost episodes in southern Brazil and the development of Andes lee cyclones and intense cyclones over the southern coast of Brazil. Despite this importance, the formation and maintenance mechanisms of the COLs are not well understood. To detail the significant variability in terms of the eddy kinetic energy equation for fifty cases of COLs that formed over the southeastern Pacific Ocean is the aim of this study. Only the cases of COLs that formed over the ocean and remained there during most of their life were chosen. The main terms of the equation [ageostrophic flux convergence (AFC), baroclinic conversion (BRC) and barotropic conversion (BRT)] were calculated using the 6-hourly gridded data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/Department of Energy reanalysis. The formation mechanism of the COLs was associated with BRC and AFC. During the midlife period, the BRC term converted eddy kinetic energy to eddy potential energy and the AFC had a positive contribution until 6 h after the midlife point. In the dissipation phase, the BRC term remained positive and AFC became negative. The BRT extracted kinetic energy from the COL during the entire life cycle. The AFC term was the most important in all phases of the cut-off lifetime, and it was the responsible for extending the cut-off lifetime while the others terms were negatives.

  5. A parametric study of cut-off corrugated surface properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mentzer, C. A.; Peters, L., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Corrugated horns involve a junction between the corrugated surface and a conducting groundplane. Proper horn design requires an understanding of the electromagnetic properties of the corrugated surface and this junction. Therefore, an integral equation solution has been used to study the influence of corrugation density and shape on the power loss. Surface current, and the scattering from a groundplane-corrugated surface junction. Both square and vee shape corrugations have been considered over the range of corrugation depths where the surface acts as a cut-off corrugated surface.

  6. Permeability porosity relationships (K, Phi cut-off)

    SciTech Connect

    Djettou, F.; Reda, H.

    1995-08-01

    Several reservoirs of Lower Devonian in Ghadames basin present porosities greater than 10 Pu, but during the test they are rather impermeable. It seems that this phenomena extends to BERKINE and Rhourd Messaoud areas. This seriously affect the estimation of recovery reserves. The best we can do is to study and try to understand reservoir problems. The method we choose is based on statistical analysis of test results and their comparison with core and log measurements. It concerns mainly cummulative curves of productive and non-productive tests (dry test). This involves about 20 wells where are can define: Siegenian with: Fine grained in BBK and ROM Coarse grained toward BRN - Emsian is rather homogeneous in the region. The sand cut-off porosity is greater than 11 Pu. However the reservoir can`t produce itself then we can not take account in reserve estimation. In conclusion, a sandy reservoir of Lower Devonian in Ghadames basin may be very porous (11-12%) and impermeable while in the other cases reservoirs can produce with porosity of 7 or 8 Po. However a HC definition based on cut-off porosity in Ghadames basin should be done before net pay an recovery reserves estimation.

  7. Polypharmacy Cut-Off for Gait and Cognitive Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Pothier, Kristell; Morello, Remy; Lelong-Boulouard, Véronique; Lescure, Pascale; Bocca, Marie-Laure; Marcelli, Christian; Descatoire, Pablo; Chavoix, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Polypharmacy is a well-established risk factor for falls, and these are one of the major health problems that affect the quality of life as people age. However, the risk of mobility and cognitive impairments consecutive to polypharmacy has been little addressed, despite the association between these adverse outcomes and falls. Moreover, the rare polypharmacy cut-offs were all but one arbitrarily determined. Objective: Studying relationships between polypharmacy and both mobility and cognitive impairments, and statistically determining a cut-off point in the number of medicinal molecule beyond which polypharmacy has deleterious consequences with respect to mobility and cognitive impairment. Methods: We enrolled 113 community-dwelling adults aged 55 years and older with a fall history, with or without injury, in the previous year. We carefully collected information about daily medicinal molecules taken. We assessed basic mobility and global cognition with the Time-Up-and-Go and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) test, respectively (clinicaltrials.gov NCT02292316). Results: Timed-Up and Go test and MoCA scores were both significantly correlated with the number of molecule, used. Receiver Operating Characteristic curves indicate, with high prediction (p < 0.002), that daily consumption of five or more molecules is associated with risk for both impaired mobility and global cognition. These relationships were independent of the number of comorbidities and of the pharmacological class. Conclusion: Community-dwelling adults aged 55 years and older who take five or more daily medicinal molecules are at high risk for both mobility and cognitive impairments. Physicians and patients should be aware of these new findings, especially when there are multiple prescribers involved in the care of the patient.

  8. Polypharmacy Cut-Off for Gait and Cognitive Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Pothier, Kristell; Morello, Remy; Lelong-Boulouard, Véronique; Lescure, Pascale; Bocca, Marie-Laure; Marcelli, Christian; Descatoire, Pablo; Chavoix, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Polypharmacy is a well-established risk factor for falls, and these are one of the major health problems that affect the quality of life as people age. However, the risk of mobility and cognitive impairments consecutive to polypharmacy has been little addressed, despite the association between these adverse outcomes and falls. Moreover, the rare polypharmacy cut-offs were all but one arbitrarily determined. Objective: Studying relationships between polypharmacy and both mobility and cognitive impairments, and statistically determining a cut-off point in the number of medicinal molecule beyond which polypharmacy has deleterious consequences with respect to mobility and cognitive impairment. Methods: We enrolled 113 community-dwelling adults aged 55 years and older with a fall history, with or without injury, in the previous year. We carefully collected information about daily medicinal molecules taken. We assessed basic mobility and global cognition with the Time-Up-and-Go and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) test, respectively (clinicaltrials.gov NCT02292316). Results: Timed-Up and Go test and MoCA scores were both significantly correlated with the number of molecule, used. Receiver Operating Characteristic curves indicate, with high prediction (p < 0.002), that daily consumption of five or more molecules is associated with risk for both impaired mobility and global cognition. These relationships were independent of the number of comorbidities and of the pharmacological class. Conclusion: Community-dwelling adults aged 55 years and older who take five or more daily medicinal molecules are at high risk for both mobility and cognitive impairments. Physicians and patients should be aware of these new findings, especially when there are multiple prescribers involved in the care of the patient. PMID:27630572

  9. Diagnostics principle of microwave cut-off probe for measuring absolute electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Hyun-Su

    2014-08-15

    A generalized diagnostics principle of microwave cut-off probe is presented with a full analytical solution. In previous studies on the microwave cut-off measurement of weakly ionized plasmas, the cut-off frequency ω{sub c} of a given electron density is assumed to be equal to the plasma frequency ω{sub p} and is predicted using electromagnetic simulation or electric circuit model analysis. However, for specific plasma conditions such as highly collisional plasma and a very narrow probe tip gap, it has been found that ω{sub c} and ω{sub p} are not equal. To resolve this problem, a generalized diagnostics principle is proposed by analytically solving the microwave cut-off condition Re[ε{sub r,eff}(ω = ω{sub c})] = 0. In addition, characteristics of the microwave cut-off condition are theoretically tested for correct measurement of the absolute electron density.

  10. Cut-off fuel exhaust mechanism in fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeuchi, H.

    1988-08-23

    This patent describes a fuel injection pump having an exhaust means for exhausting fuel from the fuel pump at the time of cut-off of fuel flow through the pump, comprising: a pump body for positioning in a pump space for containing fuel to be pumped, the pump body having a fuel passage extending thereinto from the pump space and a valve means in the fuel passage; a plunger barrel mounted in the pump body and having a plunger bore therein and a fuel intake port extending through the plunger barrel from a position opposite the inner end of the fuel passage into the plunger bore; a plunger rotatably and slidably mounted in the plunger bore and defining a pressurizing chamber at the inner end of the plunger bore; the plunger barrel having an oil passage extending from the end within which the pressurizing chamber is defined to the periphery of the plunger barrel; the pump body having a lead hole therethrough from a position opposite the end of the oil passage at the periphery of the plunger barrel to the outside of the pump body, and further having an oil chamber extending thereinto from a position on the pump body near the end of the oil passage and an exhaust passage extending from the inner part of the oil chamber to the outside of the pump body and opening into the pump space; a valve housing mounted on the pump body over the end of the lead hole and the opening into the oil chamber and having a valve guide hole therein opening into the oil chamber and having a valve seat around the end thereof and having an oil induction hole therethrough from a position opposite the end of the lead hole and into the valve guide hole.

  11. Tentative colistin epidemiological cut-off value for Salmonella spp.

    PubMed

    Agersø, Yvonne; Torpdahl, Mia; Zachariasen, Camilla; Seyfarth, Annemette; Hammerum, Anette M; Nielsen, Eva Møller

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this research was to determine minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) population distributions for colistin for Salmonella on subtype level. Furthermore, we wanted to determine if differences in MIC for colistin could be explained by mutations in pmrA or pmrB encoding proteins involved in processes that influence the binding of colistin to the cell membrane. During 2008-2011, 6,583 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica isolates of human origin and 1931 isolates of animal/meat origin were collected. The isolates were serotyped, and susceptibility was tested towards colistin (range 1-16 mg/L). Moreover, 37 isolates were tested for mutations in pmrA and pmrB by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. MIC distribution for colistin at serotype level showed that Salmonella Dublin (n=198) followed by Salmonella Enteritidis (n=1247) were less susceptible than "other" Salmonella serotypes originating from humans (n=5,274) and Salmonella Typhimurium of animal/meat origin (n=1794). MIC was ≤1 mg/L for 98.9% of "other" Salmonella serotypes originating from humans, 99.4% of Salmonella Typhimurium, 61.3% of Salmonella Enteritidis, and 12.1% of Salmonella Dublin isolates. Interestingly, Salmonella Dublin and Salmonella Enteritidis belong to the same O-group (O:1, 9,12), suggesting that surface lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of the cell (O-antigen) play a role in colistin susceptibility. The epidemiological cut-off value of >2 mg/L for colistin suggested by European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) is placed inside the distribution for both Salmonella Dublin and Salmonella Enteritidis. All tested Salmonella Dublin isolates, regardless of MIC colistin value, had identical pmrA and pmrB sequences. Missense mutations were found only in pmrA in one Salmonella Reading and in pmrB in one Salmonella Concord isolate, both with MIC of ≤1 for colistin. In conclusion, our study indicates that missense mutations are not necessarily

  12. Design of non-polarizing cut-off filters based on dielectric-metal-dielectric stacks.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qing-Yuan; Luo, Hai-Han; Zheng, Yu-Xiang; Liu, Ding-Quan

    2013-08-12

    Cut-off filters are usually operating at oblique incidence and exhibit polarization dependence properties. We propose a simple approach to design cut-off filters with low linear polarization sensitivity (LPS) based on dielectric-metal-dielectric (DMD) stacks. The designing method is derived from the theory of optical film characteristic matrix. The admittance loci of the film are adjusted to achieve similar spectral properties of s- and p-polarized light at oblique incidence. Different film structures are designed non-polarizing at different angles of incidence with the method. The results show that the designing method is efficient for designing non-polarizing cut-off filters, which are widely used in non-polarizing optical system.

  13. Calculating broad neutron resonances in a cut-off Woods-Saxon potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Á.; Noszály, Cs.; Salamon, P.; Vertse, T.

    2015-07-01

    In a cut-off Woods-Saxon (CWS) potential with realistic depth S -matrix poles being far from the imaginary wave number axis form a sequence where the distances of the consecutive resonances are inversely proportional with the cut-off radius value, which is an unphysical parameter. Other poles lying closer to the imaginary wave number axis might have trajectories with irregular shapes as the depth of the potential increases. Poles being close repel each other, and their repulsion is responsible for the changes of the directions of the corresponding trajectories. The repulsion might cause that certain resonances become antibound and later resonances again when they collide on the imaginary axis. The interaction is extremely sensitive to the cut-off radius value, which is an apparent handicap of the CWS potential.

  14. The large scale cosmic microwave background cut-off and the tensor-to-scalar ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, Gavin; Contaldi, Carlo R E-mail: c.contaldi@imperial.ac.uk

    2008-01-15

    We show that if inflation lasts just longer than the required 60 or so e-folds (N), both scalar and tensor contributions to the cosmic microwave background power spectra are expected to show a cut-off. However the behaviour of the scalar-to-tensor ratio on large scales depends on whether inflation is preceded by a kinetic dominated (KD) or radiation dominated stage. Future experiments may be able to distinguish between the two behaviours and thus shed light on the nature of the low-l cut-off. In particular if the cut-off is due to a KD stage the ratio is expected to grow on large scales. If observed, this would challenge our current understanding of the overall probability of inflation lasting for N greater than 60.

  15. Variations in the short wavelength cut-off of the solar UV spectra.

    PubMed

    Parisi, A V; Turner, J

    2006-03-01

    Cloud and solar zenith angle (SZA) are two major factors that influence the magnitude of the biologically damaging UV (UVBD) irradiances for humans. However, the effect on the short wavelength cut-off due to SZA and due to clouds has not been investigated for biologically damaging UV for cataracts. This research aims to investigate the influence of cloud and SZA on the short wavelength cut-off of the spectral UVBD for cataracts. The spectral biologically damaging UV for cataracts on a horizontal plane was calculated by weighting the spectral UV measured with a spectroradiometer with the action spectrum for the induction of cataracts in a porcine lens. The UV spectra were obtained on an unshaded plane at a latitude of 29.5 degrees S. The cut-off wavelength (lambdac) was defined as the wavelength at which the biologically damaging spectral irradiance was 0.1% of the maximum biologically damaging irradiance for that scan. For the all sky conditions, the short wavelength cut-off ranged by 12 nm for the SZA range of 5 to 80 degrees and the maximum in the spectral UVBD ranged by 15 nm. Similarly, for the cloud free cases, the short wavelength cut-off ranged by 9 nm for the same SZA range. Although, cloud has a large influence on the magnitude of the biologically damaging UV for cataracts, the influence of cloud on the short wavelength cut-off for the biologically damaging UV for cataracts is less than the influence of the solar zenith angle.

  16. Theoretical and experimental study of the microwave cut-off probe for electron density measurements in low-temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li Bin; Li Hong; Wang Huihui; Xie Jinlin; Liu Wandong

    2011-10-01

    The microwave cut-off probe for the electron density measurement in low-temperature plasmas is described in this article. It is based on the wave cutoff in an unmagnetized plasma. The measurement principle is analyzed theoretically using a model of plasma slab. Because of the high-pass characteristic of plasma, the waves above the cut-off frequency can penetrate the plasma slab, whereas the lower frequency waves are reflected from the cut-off layer. Therefore, an obvious critical point can be observed in the wave transmission spectrum. The abscissa of the critical point indicates the cut-off frequency, which is directly related to the maximum electron density between transmitting/receiving antennas of the cut-off probe. The measured electron densities are in agreement with the data obtained by the Langmuir probe. Experimental results show that the microwave cut-off probe can be used to diagnose the plasmas with a wide range of parameters.

  17. A New Regularization Mechanism for the Boltzmann Equation Without Cut-Off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestre, Luis

    2016-11-01

    We apply recent results on regularity for general integro-differential equations to derive a priori estimates in Hölder spaces for the space homogeneous Boltzmann equation in the non cut-off case. We also show an a priori estimate in {L^∞} which applies in the space inhomogeneous case as well, provided that the macroscopic quantities remain bounded.

  18. The INTEGRAL high energy cut-off distribution of Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malizia, Angela; Ubertini, Pietro; Bird, Antony; Bazzano, Angela; Stephen, John; Molina, Manuela; Bassani, Loredana

    We present the primary continuum parameters, the photon index and the high energy cut-off, of Seyfert galaxies extracted from the INTEGRAL complete sample of AGN. We performed a broad band (0.3-100 keV) spectral analysis by fitting simultaneously the soft and hard X-ray spectra obtained by XMM and INTEGRAL/IBIS-Swift/BAT respectively in order to investigate the general properties of these parameters in particular their distribution and mean values. We present the mean photon index for the t type 1 and type 2 objects of the whole sample as well as their mean high energy cut-off. This is the first time that the cut-off energy is constrained in a such large number of AGN. Using the main parameters of the primary continuum, we are able to obtain the actual physical parameters of the Comptonizing region i.e. the plasma temperature kTe the optical depth tau. Finally, with the high S/N spectra starting to come from NuSTAR it will soon be possible to better constrain the cut-off values in many AGN, allowing the determination of more physical models and so to better understand the continuum emission and geometry of the region surrounding black holes.

  19. A Defensible Model for Determining a Minimal Cut-Off Score for Criterion Referenced Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernknopf, Stan; And Others

    The effectiveness of a model for determining a minimal cut-off score for criterion-referenced tests was examined. The model, based upon techniques presented originally by Nedelsky and by Angoff, was first used in conjunction with a multiple choice test developed for use in certifying school counselors in Georgia. A "knowledge estimation panel" was…

  20. Optimal Cut-Off Values of Lymph Node Ratio Predicting Recurrence in Papillary Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seul Gi; Ho, Joon; Choi, Jung Bum; Kim, Tae Hyung; Kim, Min Jhi; Ban, Eun Jeong; Lee, Cho Rok; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Jung, Sang Geun; Jo, Young Suk; Lee, Jandee; Chung, Woong Youn

    2016-02-01

    Regional lymph node (LN) metastasis has a significant impact for prediction of recurrence in patients with papillary thyroid cancers (PTC); however, the prognostic value of the lymph node ratio (LNR), which is defined as the ratio of the number of metastatic LNs to the total number of investigated LNs, is controversial. In this study, we determined the optimal cut-off values of LNRs for the prediction of recurrence in PTC patients.This large cohort study retrospectively evaluated 2294 patients who had undergone total thyroidectomy for PTC at a single institution from October 1985 to June 2009. The prediction probability of central LNR (cLNR, level VI) and total LNR (tLNR, levels II-VI) were estimated by binominal logistic regression analysis. Hazard ratios of the cut-off LNR values for cancer recurrence were calculated for relevant covariates using multivariate Cox regression analyses. Kaplan-Meier analyses were also utilized to assess the effects of estimated LNR cut-off values on recurrence-free survival (RFS).Of the 2294 patients, 138 (6.0%) presented cancer recurrence during the follow-up period (median duration = 107.1 months). The prediction probability indicated that LNRs of 0.4 and 0.5 for central LN and total LN, respectively, are optimal cut-off values for precise prediction with minimization of outliers. Multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed that cLNR ≥0.4 was independently predictive of recurrence in patients with N0 and N1a PTCs (hazard ratio [HR]: 7.016, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.72-12.986, P < 0.001) and that tLNR ≥0.5 indicated a significantly increased risk of recurrence in patients with N1b PTCs (HR: 2.372, 95% CI: 1.458-3.860, P < 0.001). In addition, Kaplan-Meier analyses clearly demonstrated that these LNR cut-off values are precisely operational in RFS estimation.The cut-off LNR values of 0.4 and 0.5 for cLNR and tLNR, respectively, were identified. Risk stratification combined with these LNR cut-off values may prove

  1. Optimal Cut-Off Values of Lymph Node Ratio Predicting Recurrence in Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seul Gi; Ho, Joon; Choi, Jung Bum; Kim, Tae Hyung; Kim, Min Jhi; Ban, Eun Jeong; Lee, Cho Rok; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Jung, Sang Geun; Jo, Young Suk; Lee, Jandee; Chung, Woong Youn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Regional lymph node (LN) metastasis has a significant impact for prediction of recurrence in patients with papillary thyroid cancers (PTC); however, the prognostic value of the lymph node ratio (LNR), which is defined as the ratio of the number of metastatic LNs to the total number of investigated LNs, is controversial. In this study, we determined the optimal cut-off values of LNRs for the prediction of recurrence in PTC patients. This large cohort study retrospectively evaluated 2294 patients who had undergone total thyroidectomy for PTC at a single institution from October 1985 to June 2009. The prediction probability of central LNR (cLNR, level VI) and total LNR (tLNR, levels II–VI) were estimated by binominal logistic regression analysis. Hazard ratios of the cut-off LNR values for cancer recurrence were calculated for relevant covariates using multivariate Cox regression analyses. Kaplan–Meier analyses were also utilized to assess the effects of estimated LNR cut-off values on recurrence-free survival (RFS). Of the 2294 patients, 138 (6.0%) presented cancer recurrence during the follow-up period (median duration = 107.1 months). The prediction probability indicated that LNRs of 0.4 and 0.5 for central LN and total LN, respectively, are optimal cut-off values for precise prediction with minimization of outliers. Multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed that cLNR ≥0.4 was independently predictive of recurrence in patients with N0 and N1a PTCs (hazard ratio [HR]: 7.016, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.72–12.986, P < 0.001) and that tLNR ≥0.5 indicated a significantly increased risk of recurrence in patients with N1b PTCs (HR: 2.372, 95% CI: 1.458–3.860, P < 0.001). In addition, Kaplan–Meier analyses clearly demonstrated that these LNR cut-off values are precisely operational in RFS estimation. The cut-off LNR values of 0.4 and 0.5 for cLNR and tLNR, respectively, were identified. Risk stratification combined with these LNR cut-off

  2. Efficacy of lower cut off value of serum prostate specific antigen in diagnosis of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Rashid, M M; Alam, A K M K; Habib, A K M K; Rahman, H; Hossain, A K M S; Salam, M A; Rahman, S

    2012-12-01

    Indications of prostate biopsy are high serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) value and or abnormal digital rectal examination (DRE) findings. Although serum PSA value of 4 ng/ml is the most commonly used threshold for recommending prostate biopsy, significant proportion of men harbor prostate cancer even when their serum PSA values are less than 4.0 ng/ml. Therefore present study was designed to determine the performance status of serum PSA in lower cut-off values. This hospital based prospective study was conducted in the Department of Urology of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) and Comfort Nursing Home Pvt. Ltd, Dhaka from July 2009 to October 2010. Two hundred six male patients aged over 50 years having lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and serum PSA more than 2.5 ng/ml were prepared for prostate biopsy. Trans rectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided biopsy was done. The test statistics used to analyze the data were descriptive statistics, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value, ROC curve. For all analytical tests, the level of significance was set at 0.05 and p < 0.05 was considered significant. In 2.5-4 serum PSA range, 28.26% (13 out of 46) of all malignancy were found, which would be missed if we take cut off value 4. At 2.5 PSA cut-off, Sensitivity 91.3%, Specificity 14.37%, PPV 23.46%, NPV 85.18%, Efficacy 31.55%. At 4 PSA cut-off value, Sensitivity 71.73%, Specificity 46.25%, PPV 27.73%, NPV 85.05%, Efficacy 51.94%. So it can be concluded that, for early diagnosis of prostate cancer cut-off value of serum PSA of 2.5 ng/ml can be recommended as an indication for prostate biopsy.

  3. Multiple Sclerosis Questionnaire for Job Difficulties (MSQ-Job): definition of the cut-off score.

    PubMed

    Schiavolin, Silvia; Giovannetti, Ambra Mara; Leonardi, Matilde; Brenna, Greta; Brambilla, Laura; Confalonieri, Paolo; Frangiamore, Rita; Mantegazza, Renato; Moscatelli, Marco; Clerici, Valentina Torri; Cortese, Francesca; Covelli, Venusia; Ponzio, Michela; Zaratin, Paola; Raggi, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) mainly affects people of working age. The Multiple Sclerosis Questionnaire for Job Difficulties (MSQ-Job) was designed to measure difficulties in work-related tasks. Our aim is to define cut-off score of MSQ-Job to identify potential critical situations that might require specific attention. A sample of patients with MS completed the MSQ-Job, WHODAS 2.0 and MSQOL-54 respectively for work difficulties, disability and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) evaluation. K-means Cluster Analysis was used to divide the sample in three groups on the basis of HRQoL and disability. ANOVA test was performed to compare the response pattern between these groups. The cut-off score was defined using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses for MSQ-Job total and count of MSQ-Job items scores ≥3: a score value corresponding to the maximum of the sensitivity-to-specificity ratio was chosen as the cut-off. Out of 180 patients enrolled, twenty were clustered in the higher severity group. The area under the ROC curve was 0.845 for the MSQ-Job total and 0.859 for the count of MSQ-Job items scores ≥3 while the cut-off score was 15.8 for MSQ-Job total and 8 for count of items scored ≥3. We recommend the use of MSQ-Job with this calculation as cut-off for identifying critical situations, e.g. in vocational rehabilitation services, where work-related difficulties have a significant impact in terms of lower quality of life and higher disability.

  4. The INTEGRAL High-energy Cut-off Distribution of Type 1 Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malizia, A.; Molina, M.; Bassani, L.; Stephen, J. B.; Bazzano, A.; Ubertini, P.; Bird, A. J.

    2014-02-01

    In this Letter we present the primary continuum parameters, the photon index Γ, and the high-energy cut-off E c of 41 type-1 Seyfert galaxies extracted from the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) complete sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We performed broadband (0.3-100 keV) spectral analysis by simultaneously fitting the soft and hard X-ray spectra obtained by XMM and INTEGRAL/IBIS-Swift/BAT, respectively, in order to investigate the general properties of these parameters, in particular their distribution and mean values. We find a mean photon index of 1.73 with a standard deviation of 0.17 and a mean high-energy cut-off of 128 keV with a standard deviation of 46 keV for the whole sample. This is the first time that the cut-off energy is constrained in such a large number of AGNs. We have 26 measurements of the cut-off, which corresponds to 63% of the entire sample, distributed between 50 and 200 keV. There are a further 11 lower limits mostly below 300 keV. Using the main parameters of the primary continuum, we have been able to obtain the actual physical parameters of the Comptonizing region, i.e., the plasma temperature kT e from 20 to 100 keV and the optical depth τ < 4. Finally, with the high signal-to-noise ratio spectra starting to come from NuSTAR it will soon be possible to better constrain the cut-off values in many AGNs, allowing the determination of more physical models and thus better understand the continuum emission and geometry of the region surrounding black holes.

  5. THE INTEGRAL HIGH-ENERGY CUT-OFF DISTRIBUTION OF TYPE 1 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Malizia, A.; Molina, M.; Bassani, L.; Stephen, J. B.; Bazzano, A.; Ubertini, P.; Bird, A. J.

    2014-02-20

    In this Letter we present the primary continuum parameters, the photon index Γ, and the high-energy cut-off E {sub c} of 41 type-1 Seyfert galaxies extracted from the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) complete sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We performed broadband (0.3-100 keV) spectral analysis by simultaneously fitting the soft and hard X-ray spectra obtained by XMM and INTEGRAL/IBIS-Swift/BAT, respectively, in order to investigate the general properties of these parameters, in particular their distribution and mean values. We find a mean photon index of 1.73 with a standard deviation of 0.17 and a mean high-energy cut-off of 128 keV with a standard deviation of 46 keV for the whole sample. This is the first time that the cut-off energy is constrained in such a large number of AGNs. We have 26 measurements of the cut-off, which corresponds to 63% of the entire sample, distributed between 50 and 200 keV. There are a further 11 lower limits mostly below 300 keV. Using the main parameters of the primary continuum, we have been able to obtain the actual physical parameters of the Comptonizing region, i.e., the plasma temperature kT {sub e} from 20 to 100 keV and the optical depth τ < 4. Finally, with the high signal-to-noise ratio spectra starting to come from NuSTAR it will soon be possible to better constrain the cut-off values in many AGNs, allowing the determination of more physical models and thus better understand the continuum emission and geometry of the region surrounding black holes.

  6. "Cut-off" effect of antioxidants and/or probes of variable lipophilicity in microheterogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Aliaga, Carolina; López de Arbina, Amaia; Rezende, Marcos Caroli

    2016-09-01

    The activities of two hydrophilic (ascorbic acid and Trolox) and two hydrophobic (α-tocopherol and BHT) antioxidants were measured by reaction with a series of 4-alkanoyloxyTEMPO radical probes 1 in buffered (pH 7), aqueous, micellar solutions of reduced Triton-X 100. In all cases, a cut-off effect was observed, in line with previous observations of the same effect for the partitioning of probe series 1 in this medium. These results support an interpretation of the cut-off effect in food emulsions, based on the "amphiphobic" nature of either the antioxidants or probes: competition between two molecular moieties, for the micellar hydrophobic core, tends to expose a reacting fragment differently to a more hydrophilic microenvironment, as the probe or antioxidant hydrophobicity increases.

  7. "Cut-off" effect of antioxidants and/or probes of variable lipophilicity in microheterogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Aliaga, Carolina; López de Arbina, Amaia; Rezende, Marcos Caroli

    2016-09-01

    The activities of two hydrophilic (ascorbic acid and Trolox) and two hydrophobic (α-tocopherol and BHT) antioxidants were measured by reaction with a series of 4-alkanoyloxyTEMPO radical probes 1 in buffered (pH 7), aqueous, micellar solutions of reduced Triton-X 100. In all cases, a cut-off effect was observed, in line with previous observations of the same effect for the partitioning of probe series 1 in this medium. These results support an interpretation of the cut-off effect in food emulsions, based on the "amphiphobic" nature of either the antioxidants or probes: competition between two molecular moieties, for the micellar hydrophobic core, tends to expose a reacting fragment differently to a more hydrophilic microenvironment, as the probe or antioxidant hydrophobicity increases. PMID:27041306

  8. Measurement of electron density with the phase-resolved cut-off probe method

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, J. H.; Kim, D. W.; Na, B. K.; You, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Shin, Y. H.

    2011-07-15

    The phase resolved cut-off probe method, a precise measurement method for the electron density, was recently proposed [J. H. Kwon et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 081502 (2010)]. This paper presents the measurements of electron density using the method under various experimental conditions (different pressures, powers, chamber volumes, and discharge sources). The result shows that the method is not only in good agreement with the previous method using wave transmittance under various experimental conditions but it is also able to find the cut-off point clearly even under difficult conditions such as high pressure ({approx} 1 Torr), high discharge power, and small plasma volume. The details of the experimental setup, the operating mechanism of the probe method, and the data processing procedure (algorithm) are also addressed. Furthermore, the reliability of the measurement method is investigated by using an electromagnetic field simulation with cold plasma model (CST-Drude model, Computer Simulation Technology).

  9. A LGG Arrangement for Cut-Off of the Projectile Sabot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioilev, Andrey G.; Bebenin, Gennady V.; Kalmykov, Petr N.; Shlyapnikov, Georgy P.; Lapichev, Nikolay V.; Salnikov, Aleksander V.; Sokolov, Sergey S.; Motlokhov, Vladimir N.

    2009-03-01

    Usually, light gas guns (LGG) are used to accelerate projectiles for experimental study of spacecraft shielding performance under impact of space debris. A projectile is placed into polymeric non-split sabot to provide obturation of gas in the LGG barrel. After exit from the barrel, the sabot or its fragments that fly after the projectile, should be separated (cut-off) or deviated from the projectile flight-line. According to a novel approach, a special guard ring mounted at the barrel muzzle is used for fragmentation of a spherical projectile sabot at exit from the LGG barrel, and thin plastic bonded HE placed at the surface of a bush in the guard-plate is used to cut-off the sabot fragments. This approach was tried by numerical simulation and proved by experimental testing.

  10. Edge plasmons and cut-off behavior of graphene nano-ribbon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Haowen; Teng, Jinghua; Palacios, Tomás; Chua, Soojin

    2016-07-01

    Graphene nano-ribbon waveguides with ultra-short plasmon wavelength are a promising candidate for nanoscale photonic applications. Graphene edge plasmons are the fundamental and lowest losses mode. Through finite element method, edge plasmons show large effective refractive index and strong field confinement on nanoscale ribbons. The edge plasmons follow a k1/2 dispersion relation. The wavelengths of the edge plasmons and center plasmons differ by a fixed factor. The width of edge plasmon is inversely proportional to wave vector of edge plasmon kedge. Edge defects associate with graphene nano-ribbon induce extra losses and reduce the propagation length. Cut-off width of edge plasmons reduces with increasing frequency. Cut-off width of center plasmon is enlarged by edge component but the enlargement effect diminishing with the increase of kedge. The results are important for the application of graphene plasmon towards ultra-compact photonic devices.

  11. Evaluation of Serum Cotinine Cut-Off to Distinguish Smokers From Nonsmokers in the Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Kiwoong; Yang, Song-Hyun; Moon, Chul-Jin; Lee, Eun Hee; Park, Hyosoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Cotinine has been widely used as an objective marker to identify current smokers. We conducted this study to address the absence of Korean studies investigating the efficacy of immunoassays and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for the detection of serum cotinine and to determine the optimal serum cotinine cut-off level for differentiating current smokers from nonsmokers. Methods Serum specimens were obtained from 120 subjects. They were randomly chosen to represent a broad distribution of urine cotinine levels based on a retrospective review of questionnaires and results of urine cotinine levels. We determined serum cotinine levels using the IMMULITE 2000 XPi Immunoassay System (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc., USA) and LC-MS/MS (API-4000, Applied Biosystems, USA). Correlation was analyzed between IMMULITE serum cotinine, urine cotinine, and LC-MS/MS serum cotinine levels. ROC curve was analyzed to identify the optimal IMMULITE serum cotinine cut-off level for differentiating current smokers from nonsmokers. Results IMMULITE serum cotinine levels correlated with both urine cotinine and LC-MS/MS serum cotinine levels, with correlation coefficients of 0.958 and 0.986, respectively. The optimal serum cotinine cut-off level for distinguishing current smokers from nonsmokers was 13.2 ng/mL (95.7% sensitivity, 94.1% specificity) using IMMULITE. Conclusions This is the first study to investigate the use of LC-MS/MS for the measurement of serum cotinine and to determine the optimal serum cotinine cut-off level for the IMMULITE immunoassay. Our results could provide guidelines for differentiating current smokers from nonsmokers in the Korean population. PMID:27374707

  12. Introduction of a distance cut-off into structural alignment by the double dynamic programming algorithm.

    PubMed

    Toh, H

    1997-08-01

    Two approximations were introduced into the double dynamic programming algorithm, in order to reduce the computational time for structural alignment. One of them was the so-called distance cut-off, which approximately describes the structural environment of each residue by its local environment. In the approximation, a sphere with a given radius is placed at the center of the side chain of each residue. The local environment of a residue is constituted only by the residues with side chain centers that are present within the sphere, which is expressed by a set of center-to-center distances from the side chain of the residue to those of all the other constituent residues. The residues outside the sphere are neglected from the local environment. Another approximation is associated with the distance cut-off, which is referred to here as the delta N cut-off. If two local environments are similar to each other, the numbers of residues constituting the environments are expected to be similar. The delta N cut-off was introduced based on the idea. If the difference between the numbers of the constituent residues of two local environments is greater than a given threshold value, delta N, the evaluation of the similarity between the local environments is skipped. The introduction of the two approximations dramatically reduced the computational time for structural alignment by the double dynamic programming algorithm. However, the approximations also decreased the accuracy of the alignment. To improve the accuracy with the approximations, a program with a two-step alignment algorithm was constructed. At first, an alignment was roughly constructed with the approximations. Then, the epsilon-suboptimal region for the alignment was determined. Finally, the double dynamic programming algorithm with full structural environments was applied to the residue pairs within the epsilon-suboptimal region to produce an improved alignment.

  13. Comparative study of the bound states of static screened Coulomb and cut-off Coulomb potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, David; Varshni, Y. P.

    1984-05-01

    Accurate eigenvalues (eight to six significant figures) and critical screening parameters are calculated for a two-particle system interacting through (a) a static screened Coulomb potential (SSCP), and (b) a cut-off Coulomb potential (COCP). A comparison of the results shows that as far as bound states are concerned it is not possible to simulate a SSCP by a COCP by a suitable scaling of the screening length.

  14. Validity of Alternative Cut-Off Scores for the Back-Saver Sit and Reach Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looney, Marilyn A.; Gilbert, Jennie

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if currently used FITNESSGRAM[R] cut-off scores for the Back Saver Sit and Reach Test had the best criterion-referenced validity evidence for 6-12 year old children. Secondary analyses of an existing data set focused on the passive straight leg raise and Back Saver Sit and Reach Test flexibility scores of…

  15. Optimal body fat percentage cut-offs for obesity in Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Wang, Chen; Bao, Yuqian; Peng, Liangpu; Gu, Huilin; Jia, Weiping

    2012-04-01

    Obesity results in an increased risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and Type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Body fat percentage (BF%) is a common index of body composition. The aim of the present study was to determine the optimal BF% cut-offs for obesity to predict MetS and T2DM in Chinese adults. The baseline study group comprised 3916 Chinese adults (age 30-70 years of age); 2033 subjects without MetS or T2DM were followed up for a maximum of 5.5 years. The BF% was estimated using bioelectrical impedance analysis. Optimal BF% cut-offs were analysed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to measure the association between obesity at baseline defined by BF% and newly developed MetS and T2DM. Mean BF% levels were lower in men than in women (23.9 ± 6.1% vs 33.5 ± 7.1%, respectively; P < 0.01). For men, the optimal BF% cut-offs for the prediction of MetS and T2DM were 25.45% and 26.65%, respectively; for women, the corresponding values were 34.95% and 36.55%. Subjects with high BF% (≥ 25% in men; ≥ 35% in women) had higher risks of incident MetS or T2DM than those with low BF% (< 25% in men; < 35% in women). The relative risks were 3.43 (95% confidence intervals (CI) 2.59-4.54) and 2.92 (95% CI 1.85-4.60), respectively. The optimal BF% cut-offs for obesity for the prediction of MetS and T2DM in Chinese men and women were around 25% and 35%, respectively.

  16. Cut-off point for the trail making test to predict unsafe driving after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seong Youl; Lee, Jae Shin; Oh, Young Ju

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the cut-off point of the Trail Making Test in predicting the risk of unsafe driving in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 81 stroke patients with a driver’s license participated in this study. The DriveABLE Cognitive Assessment Tool, Trail Making Test-A, and Trail Making Test-B evaluations were conducted in all participants. All participants were classified into the safety or risk groups based on the DriveABLE Cognitive Assessment Tool evaluation results. The Trail Making Test results underwent a receiver operating characteristic analysis in each group. [Results] The results of the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the cut-off point for Trail Making Test-A was 32 seconds and the cut-off point for Trail Making Test-B was 79 seconds. The positive predictive values of the Trail Making Test-A and Trail Making Test-B were 98.3% and 98.3%, respectively, and the negative predictive values of the Trail Making Test-A and Trail Making Test-B were 81.0% and 73.9%, respectively. [Conclusion] The Trail Making Test is a useful tool for predicting the risk of unsafe driving in stroke patients. This tool is expected to be used more actively for screening stroke drivers with respect to their cognitive function. PMID:27512277

  17. Cut-off point for the trail making test to predict unsafe driving after stroke.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seong Youl; Lee, Jae Shin; Oh, Young Ju

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the cut-off point of the Trail Making Test in predicting the risk of unsafe driving in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 81 stroke patients with a driver's license participated in this study. The DriveABLE Cognitive Assessment Tool, Trail Making Test-A, and Trail Making Test-B evaluations were conducted in all participants. All participants were classified into the safety or risk groups based on the DriveABLE Cognitive Assessment Tool evaluation results. The Trail Making Test results underwent a receiver operating characteristic analysis in each group. [Results] The results of the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the cut-off point for Trail Making Test-A was 32 seconds and the cut-off point for Trail Making Test-B was 79 seconds. The positive predictive values of the Trail Making Test-A and Trail Making Test-B were 98.3% and 98.3%, respectively, and the negative predictive values of the Trail Making Test-A and Trail Making Test-B were 81.0% and 73.9%, respectively. [Conclusion] The Trail Making Test is a useful tool for predicting the risk of unsafe driving in stroke patients. This tool is expected to be used more actively for screening stroke drivers with respect to their cognitive function.

  18. Evaluation of novel large cut-off ultrafiltration membranes for adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) concentration.

    PubMed

    Nestola, Piergiuseppe; Martins, Duarte L; Peixoto, Cristina; Roederstein, Susanne; Schleuss, Tobias; Alves, Paula M; Mota, José P B; Carrondo, Manuel J T

    2014-01-01

    The purification of virus particles and viral vectors for vaccine and gene therapy applications is gaining increasing importance in order to deliver a fast, efficient, and reliable production process. Ultrafiltration (UF) is a widely employed unit operation in bioprocessing and its use is present in several steps of the downstream purification train of biopharmaceuticals. However, to date few studies have thoroughly investigated the performance of several membrane materials and cut-offs for virus concentration/diafiltration. The present study aimed at developing a novel class of UF cassettes for virus concentration/diafiltration. A detailed study was conducted to evaluate the effects of (i) membrane materials, namely polyethersulfone (PES), regenerated cellulose (RC), and highly cross-linked RC (xRC), (ii) nominal cut-off, and (iii) UF device geometry at different production scales. The results indicate that the xRC cassettes with a cut-off of approximately 500 kDa are able to achieve a 10-fold concentration factor with 100% recovery of particles with a process time twice as fast as that of a commercially available hollow fiber. DNA and host cell protein clearances, as well as hydraulic permeability and fouling behavior, were also assessed.

  19. Applicability of a cut-off reflector for grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, M. K.; Sawhney, K. J. S.

    2003-11-01

    The applicability of a cut-off reflector, instead of the commonly used multilayer reflector, for grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence (GI-XRF) analysis is demonstrated. Owing to the precise angular adjustment possible in the total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometer developed in house, it is possible to adjust the cut-off reflector so as to pass all X-ray energies up to Cu-K α, eliminating Cu-K β and higher X-ray energies emitted from a Cu target X-ray generator. The advantage of this technique is that one gets a higher flux of Cu-K α radiation (>98%) compared to 80-90% from a good quality multilayer optics. Moreover, the same cut-off reflector, used at different grazing angles, serves the purpose for different primary beam energies. The suitability of such an arrangement for GI-XRF analysis for surface characterization has been demonstrated by analyzing a 50 ng aqueous residue of Fe on top of a float glass substrate. The GI-XRF results thus obtained are compared with those obtained using a multilayer monochromator in the primary beam as well as with theoretical calculations.

  20. Systematic review of the evidence for Trails B cut-off scores in assessing fitness-to-drive

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Mononita; Molnar, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Background Fitness-to-drive guidelines recommend employing the Trail Making B Test (a.k.a. Trails B), but do not provide guidance regarding cut-off scores. There is ongoing debate regarding the optimal cut-off score on the Trails B test. The objective of this study was to address this controversy by systematically reviewing the evidence for specific Trails B cut-off scores (e.g., cut-offs in both time to completion and number of errors) with respect to fitness-to-drive. Methods Systematic review of all prospective cohort, retrospective cohort, case-control, correlation, and cross-sectional studies reporting the ability of the Trails B to predict driving safety that were published in English-language, peer-reviewed journals. Results Forty-seven articles were reviewed. None of the articles justified sample sizes via formal calculations. Cut-off scores reported based on research include: 90 seconds, 133 seconds, 147 seconds, 180 seconds, and < 3 errors. Conclusions There is support for the previously published Trails B cut-offs of 3 minutes or 3 errors (the ‘3 or 3 rule’). Major methodological limitations of this body of research were uncovered including (1) lack of justification of sample size leaving studies open to Type II error (i.e., false negative findings), and (2) excessive focus on associations rather than clinically useful cut-off scores. PMID:23983828

  1. Defining a BMI Cut-Off Point for the Iranian Population: The Shiraz Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Babai, Mohammad Ali; Arasteh, Peyman; Hadibarhaghtalab, Maryam; Naghizadeh, Mohammad Mehdi; Salehi, Alireza; Askari, Alireza; Homayounfar, Reza

    2016-01-01

    In this study we evaluated and redefined the optimum body mass index (BMI) cut-off point for the Iranian population based on metabolic syndrome (MeS) risk factors. We further evaluated BMI cut-off points with and without waist circumference (WC) as a cofactor of risk and compared the differences. This study is part of the largest surveillance programs conducted in Shiraz, Iran, termed the Shiraz Heart study. Our study sample included subjects between the ages of 20 to 65 years old. After excluding pregnant women, those with missing data and those with comorbid disease, a total of 12283 made up the study population. The participants underwent a series of tests and evaluations by trained professionals in accordance with WHO recommendations. Hypertension, abnormal fasting blood sugar (FBS), triglyceride (TG) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) (in the context of the definition of metabolic syndrome) were prevalent among 32.4%, 27.6%, 42.1 and 44.2% of our participants, respectively. Women displayed higher rates of overall obesity compared to men (based on the definition by the WHO as higher than 30 kg/m2). Regarding MeS, 38.9% of our population had the all symptoms of MeS which was more prevalent among women (41.5% vs. 36%). When excluding WC in the definition of MeS, results showed that males tend to show a higher rate of metabolic risk factors (19.2% vs. 15.6%). Results of multivariate analysis showed that parallel to an increase in BMI, the odds ratio (OR) for acquiring each component of the metabolic syndrome increased (OR = 1.178; CI: 1.166–1.190). By excluding WC, the previous OR decreased (OR = 1.105; CI: 1.093–1.118). Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed that the optimum BMI cut-off point for predicting metabolic syndrome was 26.1 kg/m2 and 26.2 kg/m2 [Accuracy (Acc) = 69% and 61%, respectively)] for males and females, respectively. The overall BMI cut-off for both sexes was 26.2 kg/m2 (Acc = 65%) with sensitivity and

  2. Defining a BMI Cut-Off Point for the Iranian Population: The Shiraz Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Babai, Mohammad Ali; Arasteh, Peyman; Hadibarhaghtalab, Maryam; Naghizadeh, Mohammad Mehdi; Salehi, Alireza; Askari, Alireza; Homayounfar, Reza

    2016-01-01

    In this study we evaluated and redefined the optimum body mass index (BMI) cut-off point for the Iranian population based on metabolic syndrome (MeS) risk factors. We further evaluated BMI cut-off points with and without waist circumference (WC) as a cofactor of risk and compared the differences. This study is part of the largest surveillance programs conducted in Shiraz, Iran, termed the Shiraz Heart study. Our study sample included subjects between the ages of 20 to 65 years old. After excluding pregnant women, those with missing data and those with comorbid disease, a total of 12283 made up the study population. The participants underwent a series of tests and evaluations by trained professionals in accordance with WHO recommendations. Hypertension, abnormal fasting blood sugar (FBS), triglyceride (TG) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) (in the context of the definition of metabolic syndrome) were prevalent among 32.4%, 27.6%, 42.1 and 44.2% of our participants, respectively. Women displayed higher rates of overall obesity compared to men (based on the definition by the WHO as higher than 30 kg/m2). Regarding MeS, 38.9% of our population had the all symptoms of MeS which was more prevalent among women (41.5% vs. 36%). When excluding WC in the definition of MeS, results showed that males tend to show a higher rate of metabolic risk factors (19.2% vs. 15.6%). Results of multivariate analysis showed that parallel to an increase in BMI, the odds ratio (OR) for acquiring each component of the metabolic syndrome increased (OR = 1.178; CI: 1.166-1.190). By excluding WC, the previous OR decreased (OR = 1.105; CI: 1.093-1.118). Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed that the optimum BMI cut-off point for predicting metabolic syndrome was 26.1 kg/m2 and 26.2 kg/m2 [Accuracy (Acc) = 69% and 61%, respectively)] for males and females, respectively. The overall BMI cut-off for both sexes was 26.2 kg/m2 (Acc = 65%) with sensitivity and

  3. Cut-off values of blessed dementia rating scale and its clinical application in elderly Taiwanese.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan-Han; Lai, Chiou-Lian; Lin, Ruey-Tay; Tai, Chih-Ta; Liu, Ching-Kuan

    2006-08-01

    Although the Blessed Dementia Rating Scale (BDRS), a clinical screening instrument, has been applied extensively, no suitable cut-off values and clinical application have been proposed, particularly in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the precursor of dementia. The BDRS, Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), and Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR) were administrated in people aged 65 years and above, who were enrolled from southern Taiwan with multistep stratified random sampling and followed-up for 2 years. All subjects (total number = 3,027), with new onset of MCI (defined as CDR = 0.5) in the first year and dementia (defined as CDR > or = 1) in the second and third years were subjected to statistical analysis. In distinguishing normal from MCI, except in the literate group aged 65-74 years, MMSE was superior to BDRS, with cut-off values of 1 in both literate groups aged 65-74 years and > or = 75 years, and 1.5 and 2 in less educated groups aged 65-74 and > or = 75 years, respectively. In distinguishing MCI from dementia, BDRS had cut-off values of 2.5 in both literate groups aged 65-74 and > or = 75 years, and 2.5 and 3 in less educated groups aged 65-74 and > or = 75 years, respectively. These values were better than those for MMSE in all groups. BDRS might be considered as a better tool than MMSE to screen for MCI and dementia in the increasing proportion of literate elderly aged 65-74 years in the aging population. PMID:16911919

  4. Sensitivity studies of spin cut-off models on fission fragment observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thulliez, L.; Litaize, O.; Serot, O.

    2016-03-01

    A fission fragment de-excitation code, FIFRELIN, is being developed at CEA Cadarache. It allows probing the characteristics of the prompt emitted particles, neutrons and gammas, during the de-excitation process of fully accelerated fission fragments. The knowledge of the initial states of the fragments is important to accurately reproduce the fission fragment observables. In this paper a sensitivity study of various spin cut-off models, completely defining the initial fission fragment angular momentum distribution has been performed. This study shows that the choice of the model has a significant impact on gamma observables such as spectrum and multiplicity and almost none on the neutron observables.

  5. Dimensional versus cut-off renormalization and the nucleon-nucleon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Angsula; Adhikari, Sadhan K.; Talukdar, B.

    1998-10-01

    The role of dimensional regularization is discussed and compared with that of cut-off regularization in some quantum mechanical problems with ultraviolet divergence in two and three dimensions with special emphasis on the nucleon-nucleon interaction. Both types of renormalizations are performed for attractive divergent one- and two-term separable potentials, a divergent tensor potential, and the sum of a delta function and its derivatives. We allow energy-dependent couplings, and determine the form that these couplings should take if equivalence between the two regularization schemes is to be enforced. We also perform renormalization of an attractive separable potential superposed on an analytic divergent potential.

  6. Interstellar Flow Longitude from Pickup Ion Cut-off Observations at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, E.; Lee, M. A.; Gloeckler, G.; Drews, C.

    2015-12-01

    The precise determination of the interstellar neutral (ISN) flow direction is important in several different ways. As a cardinal axis of the heliosphere it has strong leverage on the plane subtended by the ISN velocity and interstellar magnetic field vector, which controls the shape of the heliosphere and its interaction with the interstellar medium. The observation of the ISN flow through the heliosphere for several decades has initiated a discussion about potential temporal variations in the ISN flow. To tackle these questions, a precision measurement of the ISN flow velocity vector is needed over a long time period. Recent efforts to obtain a consistent ISN vector and temperature with Ulysses and IBEX point to remaining uncertainties and potential systematic effects. In particular, IBEX measurements provide a very precise relation between ISN flow longitude and speed via the hyperbolic trajectory equation, but they contain larger uncertainties separately for longitude and speed. Pickup ion (PUI) observations of the ISN flow pattern at 1 AU can provide a complementary determination of the flow longitude with high precision. The interstellar PUI cut-off speed is a function of the ratio of the radial ISN flow component and the solar wind speed at the observer location [Möbius et al., 1999, GRL, 26, 3181]. We have compared STEREO A PLASTIC observations with a simple analytic model of the cut-off and performed a Pearson correlation analysis of the cut-off as a function of ecliptic longitude with its mirrored function. The two complementary approaches demonstrate that the ISN flow longitude can be obtained with a precision on the order of 0.1o. The cut-off speed is much less sensitive to systematic effects on PUIs, such as variations in the solar wind parameters, ionization, and transport. ACE SWICS, STEREO PLASTIC, and SOHO CTOF data are available that span almost two decades, which will allow long term studies with high precision. The availability of O and Ne PUI

  7. Performance of S-cambered profiles with cut-off trailing edges

    SciTech Connect

    Chacko, B.; Balabaskaran, V.; Tulapurkara, E.G.; Krishna, H.C.R. )

    1994-09-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of an S-cambered profile are studies under forward and reversed flow conditions. The profile chord is cut by 3, 6, and 9 percent of the chord at the sharp trailing edge end and the performances of these profiles are compared. It is found that with increase in length of cutting the lift coefficient increases in forward direction and decreases in reverse direction of flow. cutting off the sharp trailing edge improves the lift-drag characteristics in forward mode and deteriorates in the reverse mode.

  8. Cut-Off Values of Visceral Adiposity to Predict NAFLD in Brazilian Obese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Grotti Clemente, Ana Paula; Molin Netto, Bárbara Dal; Ganen, Aline di Piano; Tock, Lian; Arisa Caranti, Danielle; de Mello, Marco Túlio; Tufik, Sergio; Dâmaso, Ana R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The present study aimed at determining cut-off points of visceral fat to predict NAFLD and analyzed metabolic disorders of obese adolescents. Methods. Cross-sectional study involved 165 obese adolescents ranged in age from 15 to 19 years. Glycemia, hepatic transaminases, lipid profile, and insulin resistance were analyzed. Visceral and subcutaneous fat were measured by ultrasound and body composition by plesthysmography. Results. The NAFLD adolescents had significantly higher values for body mass, BMI-for-age, BMI, total fat, waist circumference, and visceral fat when compared with non-NAFLD obese adolescents in both genders. Moreover, there were significant positive correlations between visceral fat with the variables BMI-for-age (r = 0.325,), TG (r = 0.277), AST (r = 0.509), ALT (r = 0.519), WC (r = 0.390), and visceral/subcutaneous ratio (r = 0.790) for NAFLD group. Total fat, triglycerides, and visceral fat were the independent predictors to NAFLD. Analysis of the ROC curves revealed cut-off points of visceral fat of 4.47 cm for girls and 4.21 cm for boys. Conclusions. The results may suggest that abdominal ultrasonography procedure may be a safe alternative method of assessing visceral adiposity aiming to be considered to the development of preventive and treatment strategies in obese individuals. This clinial trial is registered with ClinicalTrial.gov (NCT01358773). PMID:24381750

  9. The warm dark matter halo mass function below the cut-off scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo, Raul E.; Hahn, Oliver; Abel, Tom

    2013-10-01

    Warm dark matter (WDM) cosmologies are a viable alternative to the cold dark matter (CDM) scenario. Unfortunately, an accurate scrutiny of the WDM predictions with N-body simulations has proven difficult due to numerical artefacts. Here, we report on cosmological simulations that, for the first time, are devoid of those problems, and thus are able to accurately resolve the WDM halo mass function well below the cut-off. We discover a complex picture, with perturbations at different evolutionary stages populating different ranges in the halo mass function. On the smallest mass scales we can resolve, identified objects are typically centres of filaments that are starting to collapse. On intermediate mass scales, objects typically correspond to fluctuations that have collapsed and are in the process of relaxation, whereas the high-mass end is dominated by objects similar to haloes identified in CDM simulations. We then explicitly show how the formation of low-mass haloes is suppressed, which translates into a strong cut-off in the halo mass function. This disfavours some analytic formulations that predict a halo mass function that would extend well below the free streaming mass. We argue for a more detailed exploration of the formation of the smallest structures expected to form in a given cosmology, which, we foresee, will advance our overall understanding of structure formation.

  10. Vibrations of an elastic cylindrical shell near the lowest cut-off frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplunov, J.; Manevitch, L. I.; Smirnov, V. V.

    2016-05-01

    A new asymptotic approximation of the dynamic equations in the two-dimensional classical theory of thin-elastic shells is established for a circular cylindrical shell. It governs long wave vibrations in the vicinity of the lowest cut-off frequency. At a fixed circumferential wavenumber, the latter corresponds to the eigenfrequency of in-plane vibrations of a thin almost inextensible ring. It is stressed that the well-known semi-membrane theory of cylindrical shells is not suitable for tackling a near-cut-off behaviour. The dispersion relation within the framework of the developed formulation coincides with the asymptotic expansion of the dispersion relation originating from full two-dimensional shell equations. Asymptotic analysis also enables refining the geometric hypotheses underlying various ad hoc set-ups, including the assumption on vanishing of shear and circumferential mid-surface deformations used in the semi-membrane theory. The obtained results may be of interest for dynamic modelling of elongated cylindrical thin-walled structures, such as carbon nanotubes.

  11. Short-range Cut-Off of the Summed-Up van der Waals Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Abhirup; Perdew, John P.

    2015-03-01

    van der Waals interactions are important in typical van der Waals-bound systems such as noble-gas, hydrocarbon, alkali and alkaline-earth dimers. The summed-up van der Waals series works well and gives an accurate result at large separation between two atoms. But it has a strong singularity at short non-zero separation, where the two atoms touch. In this work we remove that singularity with a reasonable and physical choice of the cut-off distance. Only one fitting parameter has been introduced for the short-range cut off. The parameter in our model has been optimized for each system, and a system-averaged value has been used to get the final binding energy curves. When this correction is added to the binding energy curve from the semilocal density functional meta-GGA-MS2, we get vdW- corrected binding energy curve. These curves are compared with the results of other vdW-corrected methods such as PBE-D2 and vdW-DF2 .Binding energy curves are in reasonable agreement with those from experiment. These curves also predict reasonably good equilibrium bond length. Supported by NSF (DMR).

  12. Open Skies and monitoring a fissile materials cut-off treaty

    SciTech Connect

    Allentuck, J.; Lemley, J.R.

    1995-09-01

    The Treaty on Open Skies (Open Skies) is intended among other things to provide, in the words of its preamble, means ``to facilitate the monitoring of compliance with existing or future arms control agreements.`` Open Skies permits overflights of the territory of member states by aircraft equipped with an array of sensors of various types. Their types and capabilities are treaty-limited. To find useful application in monitoring a cut-off treaty Open Skies would need to be amended. The number of signatories would need to be expanded so as to provide greater geographical coverage, and restrictions on sensor-array capabilities would need to be relaxed. To facilitate the detection of impending violations of a cut-off convention by Open Skies overflights, the data base provided by parties to the former should include among other things an enumeration of existing and former fuel cycle and research facilities including those converted to other uses, their precise geographic location, and a site plan.

  13. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) to determine cut-off points of biomarkers in lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Heidi L; Niwas, Santosh; Grizzle, William E; Piyathilake, Chandrika

    The role of biomarkers in disease prognosis continues to be an important investigation in many cancer studies. In order for these biomarkers to have practical application in clinical decision making regarding patient treatment and follow-up, it is common to dichotomize patients into those with low vs. high expression levels. In this study, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, area under the curve (AUC) of the ROC, sensitivity, specificity, as well as likelihood ratios were calculated to determine levels of growth factor biomarkers that best differentiate lung cancer cases versus control subjects. Selected cut-off points for p185(erbB-2) and EGFR membrane appear to have good discriminating power to differentiate control tissues versus uninvolved tissues from patients with lung cancer (AUC = 89% and 90%, respectively); while AUC increased to at least 90% for selected cut-off points for p185(erbB-2) membrane, EGFR membrane, and FASE when comparing between control versus carcinoma tissues from lung cancer cases. Using data from control subjects compared to patients with lung cancer, we presented a simple and intuitive approach to determine dichotomized levels of biomarkers and validated the value of these biomarkers as surrogate endpoints for cancer outcome.

  14. oA novel nonparametric approach for estimating cut-offs in continuous risk indicators with application to diabetes epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Epidemiological and clinical studies, often including anthropometric measures, have established obesity as a major risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. Appropriate cut-off values for anthropometric parameters are necessary for prediction or decision purposes. The cut-off corresponding to the Youden-Index is often applied in epidemiology and biomedical literature for dichotomizing a continuous risk indicator. Methods Using data from a representative large multistage longitudinal epidemiological study in a primary care setting in Germany, this paper explores a novel approach for estimating optimal cut-offs of anthropomorphic parameters for predicting type 2 diabetes based on a discontinuity of a regression function in a nonparametric regression framework. Results The resulting cut-off corresponded to values obtained by the Youden Index (maximum of the sum of sensitivity and specificity, minus one), often considered the optimal cut-off in epidemiological and biomedical research. The nonparametric regression based estimator was compared to results obtained by the established methods of the Receiver Operating Characteristic plot in various simulation scenarios and based on bias and root mean square error, yielded excellent finite sample properties. Conclusion It is thus recommended that this nonparametric regression approach be considered as valuable alternative when a continuous indicator has to be dichotomized at the Youden Index for prediction or decision purposes. PMID:19744332

  15. Determination of hair ketamine cut-off value from Hong Kong ketamine users by LC-MS/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Leung, K Wing; Wong, Zack C F; Ho, Janet Y M; Yip, Ada W S; Ng, Jenny S C; Ip, Stanley P H; Ng, Winki Y Y; Ho, Karen K L; Duan, Ran; Zhu, Kevin Y; Tsim, Karl W K

    2016-02-01

    Ketamine is one of the most frequent abused drugs in Hong Kong and South-East Asia, and the cases of ketamine abused have been reported worldwide. Hair has been commonly used as a specimen for the proof of chronic drug abused because of its non-invasiveness and long detection windows. The determinations of ketamine in hair with varieties of state-of-the-art instruments and detection methods have been developed in the past decade; however, the cut-off value for ketamine abuser has not been developed according to the international guidelines. The aim of this study is to propose a cut-off value for ketamine in hair by analyzing ketamine and its metabolite norketamine by LC-MS/MS method in a population of ketamine users in Hong Kong. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) for ketamine and norketamine were 20pg/mg and 100pg/mg, respectively. From 977 ketamine abusers, the cut-off value for ketamine in hair was proposed to be 400pg/mg of hair. This proposed cut-off value is the concentration of hair ketamine when over 90% of samples are being detected with the presence of norketamine, which is a proof of ketamine abuse. This value could be applied as a screening or occupational cut-off for reference. PMID:26750989

  16. Distributions of the S-matrix poles in Woods-Saxon and cut-off Woods-Saxon potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamon, P.; Baran, Á.; Vertse, T.

    2016-08-01

    The positions of the l = 0S-matrix poles are calculated in generalized Woods-Saxon (GWS) potential and in cut-off generalized Woods-Saxon (CGWS) potential. The solutions of the radial equations are calculated numerically for the CGWS potential and analytically for GWS using the formalism of Gy. Bencze [1]. We calculate CGWS and GWS cases at small non-zero values of the diffuseness in order to approach the square well potential and to be able to separate effects of the radius parameter and the cut-off radius parameter. In the case of the GWS potential the wave functions are reflected at the nuclear radius therefore the distances of the resonant poles depend on the radius parameter of the potential. In CGWS potential the wave function can be reflected at larger distance where the potential is cut to zero and the derivative of the potential does not exist. The positions of most of the resonant poles do depend strongly on the cut-off radius of the potential, which is an unphysical parameter. Only the positions of the few narrow resonances in potentials with barrier are not sensitive to the cut-off distance. For the broad resonances the effect of the cut-off cannot be corrected by using a suggested analytical form of the first order perturbation correction.

  17. Estimation of cut-off wavelength of rare earth doped single-mode fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jagneet; Thyagarajan, K.; Pal, B. P.

    1999-11-01

    A new empirical relation is proposed describing spectral variation of mode-field radius (MFR) as inferred from measurements in the far-field of the fiber. It is shown that using this relation, it is possible to estimate the cut-off wavelength ( λc) of the fiber. The proposed technique is successfully tested through measurements made on two standard step index single-mode fibers, as well as on an erbium doped fiber (EDF) having λc falling within its strong absorption band around 980 nm. This empirical formula is more accurate than the widely used Marcuse's formula to describe spectral dependence of MFR determined through measurements made in the fiber's far-field. The proposed technique is especially suited for estimation of λc of doped fibers in which λc falls within an absorption band.

  18. Percentile curves for body fatness and cut-offs to define malnutrition in Russians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, D. V.; Rudnev, S. G.; Starunova, O. A.; Eryukova, T. A.; Kolesnikov, V. A.; Ponomareva, E. G.; Soboleva, N. P.; Sterlikov, S. A.

    2013-04-01

    Here, we report first results of the large-scale ongoing bioelectrical impedance body composition study in Russians. By the end of 2012, 216 out of 800 Russian Health Centres submitted raw bioimpedance data on 844,221 adults and children aged 5-80 years, representing nearly 0.6% of the Russian population, who were accessed cross-sectionally using the same type of bioimpedance meter, ABC-01 Medas. Estimates of overweight, obesity, and normal weight obesity prevalence in the general population, as well as characteristics of diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the conventional WHO BMI-based criteria of obesity depending on age are obtained. The smoothed reference centile curves for percentage fat mass are constructed, and localized cut-offs for fatness and thinness are provided that can be used both at the individual and epidemiological levels.

  19. Instantaneous BeiDou+GPS RTK positioning with high cut-off elevation angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teunissen, P. J. G.; Odolinski, R.; Odijk, D.

    2014-04-01

    As the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) has become operational in the Asia-Pacific region, it is of importance to better understand as well as demonstrate the capabilities that a combination of BeiDou with GPS brings to positioning. In this contribution, a formal and empirical analysis is given of the single-epoch RTK positioning capabilities of such a combined system. This will be done for the single- and dual-frequency case, and in comparison with the BDS- and GPS-only performances. It will be shown that with the combined system, when more satellites are available, much larger than the customary cut-off elevations can be used. This is important, as such measurement set-up will significantly increase the GNSS applicability in constrained environments, such as e.g. in urban canyons or when low-elevation multipath is present.

  20. Why did Van Gogh cut off his ear? The problem of alternative explanations in psychobiography.

    PubMed

    Runyan, W M

    1981-06-01

    One of the tasks of personality psychology is to explain the behavior of individual human beings. Vincent Van Gogh, for example, cut off the lower half of his left ear and gave it to a prostitute. More than a dozen different explanations of his actions have been proposed. Is one of these explanations true, are all of them true, or, perhaps, are none of them true? And how can we know? This incident is examined in order to explore some of the problems in applying personality theories to the life of a single individual. A sequential procedure for generating and critically evaluating alternative explanatory conjectures is presented a a partial, although not a complete, solution to the problem of multiple interpretations.

  1. The influence of cut off lows on sulfate burdens over the North Atlantic during April, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Benkovitz, C.M.; Miller, M.A.; Schwartz, S.E.; Kwon, O.U.

    2001-01-14

    The authors have presented examples from a modeling study of the development of sulfur burdens over North America, the North Atlantic Ocean and Europe during April, 1987 using observation-derived meteorological data to represent the actual conditions for this period, focusing on the influence of cut-off lows on SO{sub 2} and sulfate column burdens over the North Atlantic Ocean. The analysis demonstrates that these systems can serve either as sources or sinks of sulfate, and that the major factor governing their resulting effect is the position during its formative stages relative to (a) sources of moisture, and (b) sulfur emissions, which regulates the availability of sulfur, cloud liquid water for sulfur oxidation, and the amount of precipitation for sulfate removal produced in the later stages of the life cycle.

  2. Role of neutron and proton system in spin cut off parameter and entropy of 89,90Y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmatinejad, A.; Razavi, R.; Kakavand, T.

    2015-09-01

    The nuclear level densities, entropies and spin cut off parameters have been determined in 89,90Y nuclei using the BCS model with inclusion of pairing interaction. The results have a good agreement with the recent experimental data on the level densities measured by the Oslo group. In addition, the entropy excess of 90Y compared to 89Y as a function of temperature has been extracted. Also, the role of neutron and proton systems in the entropy excess as well as the spin cut off excess have been investigated using the entropy excess ratio and spin cut off excess ratio introduced in our previous publication. The role of the neutron system at low temperatures, the temperatures below critical temperature, in the semi-magic nucleus 89Y is similar compared to the closed shell proton system in the tin isotopes.

  3. Cut-off point for WHOQOL-bref as a measure of quality of life of older adults

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Patrícia Aparecida Barbosa; Soares, Sônia Maria; Santos, Joseph Fabiano Guimarães; Silva, Líliam Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To propose a cut-off for the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Bref (WHOQOL-bref) as a predictor of quality of life in older adults. METHODS Cross-sectional study with 391 older adults registered in the Northwest Health District in Belo Horizonte, MG, Southeastern Brazil, between October 8, 2010 and May 23, 2011. The older adults’ quality of life was measured using the WHOQOL-bref. The analysis was rationalized by outlining two extreme and simultaneous groups according to perceived quality of life and satisfaction with health (quality of life good/satisfactory – good or very good self-reported quality of life and being satisfied or very satisfied with health – G5; and poor/very poor quality of life – poor or very poor self-reported quality of life and feeling dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with health – G6). A Receiver-Operating Characteristic curve (ROC) was created to assess the diagnostic ability of different cut-off points of the WHOQOL-bref. RESULTS ROC curve analysis indicated a critical value 60 as the optimal cut-off point for assessing perceived quality of life and satisfaction with health. The area under the curve was 0.758, with a sensitivity of 76.8% and specificity of 63.8% for a cut-off of ≥ 60 for overall quality of life (G5) and sensitivity 95.0% and specificity of 54.4% for a cut-off of < 60 for overall quality of life (G6). CONCLUSIONS Diagnostic interpretation of the ROC curve revealed that cut-off < 60 for overall quality of life obtained excellent sensitivity and negative predictive value for tracking older adults with probable worse quality of life and dissatisfied with health. PMID:25119934

  4. Deciding on Interferon-Free Treatment for Chronic Hepatitis C: Updating Liver Stiffness Cut-Off Values to Maximize Benefit

    PubMed Central

    Colli, Agostino; Fraquelli, Mirella; Prati, Daniele; Riva, Alessia; Berzuini, Alessandra; Conte, Dario; Aghemo, Alessio; Colombo, Massimo; Casazza, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In a perspective of economic constraints the prioritizing of patients to IFN-free regimens is mainly based on the determination of liver stiffness by transient elastography (TE). Being a continuous variable the interpretation of TE results requires the identification of cut-off values, to date set to maximize diagnostic accuracy even if such values should be better based on more helpful outcome prediction endpoints. Aim To define the TE cut-off values in different clinical scenarios, including new IFN-free regimens, and to balance the clinical benefits versus harms in treated and untreated patients. Methods We assessed the accuracy of TE in staging 728 consecutive HCV patients and the distribution of TE values in 1,001 blood donors. Ten experts quantified the expected harm/benefit ratio for 6 scenarios resulting from 2 stages of liver disease (F≥2 or F≥3) and 3 treatment regimens: PEGIFN+ribavirin, PEGIFN+RBV+first-generation protease inhibitor, and IFN-free regimens. The optimal TE cut-off values were identified using the Metz equation. Results The estimated mean expected harm/benefit ratio for IFN-free regimens was 1/8.3 in patients with F≥2 and 1/10 in those with F≥3. The resulting optimal cut-off values were respectively 4.5 kPa with sensitivity at 99% and specificity at 12%, and 6.8 kPa with sensitivity at 94% and specificity at 41%. These cut-off values are lower than those maximizing accuracy and allow to reduce the number of false negative results. Conclusions The optimal TE cut-off values to prioritize patients for IFN-free regimens, are sensibly lower than those used to maximize diagnostic accuracy. PMID:27723770

  5. Age and education-matched cut-off scores for the revised German/Swiss-German version of ECAS.

    PubMed

    Loose, Markus; Burkhardt, Christian; Aho-Özhan, Helena; Keller, Jürgen; Abdulla, Susanne; Böhm, Sarah; Kollewe, Katja; Uttner, Ingo; Abrahams, Sharon; Petri, Susanne; Weber, Markus; Ludolph, Albert C; Lulé, Dorothée

    2016-01-01

    The Edinburgh Cognitive and Behavioural ALS Screen (ECAS) has been developed to assess cognition and behaviour in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Cognitive impairments of ALS-specific and ALS-non-specific functions can be determined using cut-off scores based on performance of healthy subjects. However, detailed analyses show that older healthy subjects perform worse than younger ones, whereas highly-educated individuals perform better than those with lower education levels. As a consequence, this study presents new age and education matched cut-off scores for the revised German/Swiss-German version of the ECAS based on the performance of 86 healthy subjects. PMID:27027323

  6. Age and education-matched cut-off scores for the revised German/Swiss-German version of ECAS.

    PubMed

    Loose, Markus; Burkhardt, Christian; Aho-Özhan, Helena; Keller, Jürgen; Abdulla, Susanne; Böhm, Sarah; Kollewe, Katja; Uttner, Ingo; Abrahams, Sharon; Petri, Susanne; Weber, Markus; Ludolph, Albert C; Lulé, Dorothée

    2016-01-01

    The Edinburgh Cognitive and Behavioural ALS Screen (ECAS) has been developed to assess cognition and behaviour in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Cognitive impairments of ALS-specific and ALS-non-specific functions can be determined using cut-off scores based on performance of healthy subjects. However, detailed analyses show that older healthy subjects perform worse than younger ones, whereas highly-educated individuals perform better than those with lower education levels. As a consequence, this study presents new age and education matched cut-off scores for the revised German/Swiss-German version of the ECAS based on the performance of 86 healthy subjects.

  7. Shear avalanches in metallic glasses under nanoindentation: Deformation units and rate dependent strain burst cut-off

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, X. L.; Wang, G.; Gao, Y. L.; Zhai, Q. J.; Chan, K. C.; Ren, J. L.

    2013-09-02

    Indented metallic glasses at the nanoscale deform via strain bursts. Conventional continuum descriptions are not appropriate for such highly stochastic, intermittent deformations. In this study, after a statistical analysis of strain bursts in five metallic glasses, the dependence of the cut-off of the strain burst size on deformation units and loading rate is established. For soft metallic glasses with smaller deformation units, cut-off of the strain burst size truncates the scale-free behavior at larger strain burst sizes. For hard metallic glasses, scale-free behavior occurs in a wide range of strain burst sizes.

  8. High Discrepancy in Abdominal Obesity Prevalence According to Different Waist Circumference Cut-Offs and Measurement Methods in Children: Need for Age-Risk-Weighted Standardized Cut-Offs?

    PubMed Central

    Prodam, Flavia; Fuiano, Nicola; Diddi, Giuliana; Petri, Antonella; Bellone, Simonetta; Bona, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Background Waist circumference (WC) is a good proxy measure of central adiposity. Due to the multiplicity of existing WC cut-offs and different measurement methods, the decision to use one rather than another WC chart may lead to different prevalence estimates of abdominal obesity in the same population. Aim of our study was to assess how much the prevalence of abdominal obesity varies in Italian schoolchildren using the different available WC cut-offs. Methods We measured WC at just above the uppermost lateral border of the right ilium in 1062 Italian schoolchildren aged 7–14 years, 499 living in Northern Italy and 563 in Southern Italy. Abdominal obesity was defined as WC ≥90th percentile for gender and age according to nine WC charts. Results We found an extremely high variability in the prevalence of abdominal obesity detected in our study-populations according to the different WC charts, ranging in the overall group from 9.1% to 61.4%. In Northern Italy children it varied from 2.4% to 35.7%, and in Southern ones from 15.1% to 84.2%. Conclusions On the basis of the chosen WC cut-offs the prevalence of abdominal obesity varies widely, because percentile-charts are strongly influenced by the population status in a particular moment. A further rate of variability may lay on the site of WC measurement and on the statistical method used to calculate WC cut-offs. Risk-weighted WC cut-offs measured in a standardized anatomic site and calculated by the appropriate method are needed to simply identify by WC measurement those children at high risk of cardio-metabolic complications to whom specific and prompt health interventions should be addressed. PMID:26745148

  9. Definition of advanced age in HIV infection: looking for an age cut-off.

    PubMed

    Blanco, José R; Jarrín, Inmaculada; Vallejo, Manuel; Berenguer, Juan; Solera, Carmen; Rubio, Rafael; Pulido, Federico; Asensi, Victor; del Amo, Julia; Moreno, Santiago

    2012-09-01

    The age of 50 has been considered as a cut-off to discriminate older subjects within HIV-infected people according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). However, the International AIDS Society (IAS) mentions 60 years of age and the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) makes no consideration. We aimed to establish an age cut-off that could differentiate response to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and, therefore, help to define advanced age in HIV-infected patients. CoRIS is an open, prospective, multicenter cohort of HIV adults naive to HAART at entry (January 2004 to October 2009). Survival, immunological response (IR) (CD4 increase of more than 100 cell/ml), and virological response (VR) (HIV RNA less than 50 copies/ml) were compared among 5-year age intervals at start of HAART using Cox proportional hazards models, stratified by hospital and adjusted for potential confounders. Among 5514 patients, 2726 began HAART. During follow-up, 2164 (79.4%) patients experienced an IR, 1686 (61.8%) a VR, and 54 (1.9%) died. Compared with patients aged <25 years at start of HAART, those aged 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 65-59, and 70 or older were 32% (aHR: 0.68, 95% CI: 0.52-0.87), 29% (aHR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.53-0.96), 34% (aHR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.46-0.95), 39% (aHR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.37-1.00), and 43% (aHR: 0.57, 95% CI: 0.31-1.04) less likely to experience an IR. The VR was similar across all age groups. Finally, patients aged 50-59 showed a 3-fold increase (aHR: 3.58; 95% CI: 1.07-11.99) in their risk of death compared to those aged <30 years. In HIV infection, patients aged ≥50 years have a poorer immunological response to HAART and a poorer survival. This age could be used to define medically advanced age in HIV-infected people.

  10. Establishing pathological cut-offs of brain atrophy rates in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    De Stefano, Nicola; Stromillo, Maria Laura; Giorgio, Antonio; Bartolozzi, Maria Letizia; Battaglini, Marco; Baldini, Mariella; Amato, Maria Pia; Sormani, Maria Pia

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess whether it is feasible to establish specific cut-off values able to discriminate ‘physiological’ or ‘pathological’ brain volume rates in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods The study was based on the analysis of longitudinal MRI data sets of patients with MS (n=206, 87% relapsing–remitting, 7% secondary progressive and 6% primary progressive) and healthy controls (HC; n=35). Brain atrophy rates were computed over a mean follow-up of 7.5 years (range 1–12) for patients with MS and 6.3 years (range 1–12.5) for HC with the SIENA software and expressed as annualised per cent brain volume change (PBVC/y). A weighted (on the follow-up length) receiver operating characteristic analysis and the area under the curve (AUC) were used for statistics. Results The weighted PBVC/y was −0.51±0.27% in patients with MS and −0.27±0.15% in HC (p<0.0001). There was a significant age-related difference in PBVC/y between HC older and younger than 35 years of age (p=0.02), but not in patients with MS (p=0.8). The cut-off of PBVC/y, as measured by SIENA that could maximise the accuracy in discriminating patients with MS from HC, was −0.37%, with 67% sensitivity and 80% specificity. According to the observed distribution, values of PBVC/y as measured by SIENA that could define a pathological range were above −0.52% with 95% specificity, above −0.46% with 90% specificity and above −0.40% with 80% specificity. Conclusions Our evidence-based criteria provide values able to discriminate the presence or absence of ‘pathological’ brain volume loss in MS with high specificity. Such results could be of great value in a clinical setting, particularly in assessing treatment efficacy in MS. PMID:25904813

  11. Quantum fields and poisson processes: Interaction of a cut-off boson field with a quantum particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Jacqueline; Gaveau, Bernard; Rideau, Guy

    1985-01-01

    The solution of the Schrödinger equation for a boson field interacting with a quantum particle is written as an expectation on a Poisson process counting the variations of the boson-occupation numbers for each momentum. An energy cut-off is needed for the expectation to be meaningful.

  12. Dynamic monitoring of menopause hormone therapy and defining the cut-off value of endometrial thickness during uterine bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Qiu; Yang, Jun; Zhao, Qiaoling; Li, Fen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of low-dose tibolone therapy on ovarian area, uterine volume and endometrial thickness, and define the cut-off value of endometrial thickness for curettage during uterine bleeding. We followed 619 postmenopausal women, aged 40-60 years, for two years. There were 301 subjects in the low-dose tibolone treatment group and 318 subjects in the control group. The ovarian area, uterine volume and endometrial thickness in all participants were measured by transvaginal ultrasound prior to, one and two years post enrollment, respectively. Endometrial specimens were collected from all subjects with abnormal uterine bleeding during the follow-up period. We found that the uterine volume in the treatment group was greater than that in the control group, and the difference was significant (P<0.05), but there were no significant differences in ovarian area and endometrial thickness between the two groups (P>0.05). When the cut-off value for endometrial thickness was 7.35 mm, the sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 79.07%, respectively, and 85.71% and 93.02% when 7.55 mm was set as the cut-off during tibolone therapy. The results indicate that low-dose tibolone therapy may postpone uterine atrophy and the cut-off value of endometrial thickness may be appropriately adjusted for curettage. PMID:27533929

  13. On determining the most appropriate test cut-off value: the case of tests with continuous results

    PubMed Central

    Habibzadeh, Parham; Yadollahie, Mahboobeh

    2016-01-01

    There are several criteria for determination of the most appropriate cut-off value in a diagnostic test with continuous results. Mostly based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, there are various methods to determine the test cut-off value. The most common criteria are the point on ROC curve where the sensitivity and specificity of the test are equal; the point on the curve with minimum distance from the left-upper corner of the unit square; and the point where the Youden’s index is maximum. There are also methods mainly based on Bayesian decision analysis. Herein, we show that a proposed method that maximizes the weighted number needed to misdiagnose, an index of diagnostic test effectiveness we previously proposed, is the most appropriate technique compared to the aforementioned ones. For determination of the cut-off value, we need to know the pretest probability of the disease of interest as well as the costs incurred by misdiagnosis. This means that even for a certain diagnostic test, the cut-off value is not universal and should be determined for each region and for each disease condition. PMID:27812299

  14. 40 CFR 53.53 - Test for flow rate accuracy, regulation, measurement accuracy, and cut-off.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the flow rate cut-off test, download the archived data from the test sampler and verify that the... recording at intervals not to exceed 5 minutes. (4) Flow measurement adaptor (40 CFR part 50, appendix L.... (7) Teflon sample filter, as specified in section 6 of 40 CFR part 50, appendix L (if required)....

  15. Anthropometric parameters' cut-off points and predictive value for metabolic syndrome in women from Cartagena, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Mora-García, Gustavo José; Gómez-Camargo, Doris; Mazenett, Enrique; Alario, Ángelo; Fortich, Álvaro; Gómez-Alegría, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    Objective. To estimate anthropometric parameters' (APs) cut-off points and association for metabolic syndrome (MetS). Materials and methods. A cross-sectional study was carried out with a total of 434 adult women from Cartagena de Indias, Colombia, in 2012. APs measured were waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI), body adiposity index (BAI), waist-hip ratio (WHR) and waist-height ratio (WHtR). Cut-off points were estimated by a receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC). Logistic regression was applied to estimate possible associations. Results. Cut-off points for WC, BMI, BAI, WHR and WHtR were 85 cm, 28 kg/m(2), 39%, 0.80 and 56, respectively. Only WHtR was associated to MetS (OR=1.11, CI95% [1.07-1.15]). Conclusion. WC cut-off point was higher than those proposed for Latin-American women by the Joint Interim Statement (JIS). WHtR had a low predictive value for MetS. PMID:25014421

  16. 40 CFR 53.53 - Test for flow rate accuracy, regulation, measurement accuracy, and cut-off.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (7) Teflon sample filter, as specified in section 6 of 40 CFR part 50, appendix L (if required). (d... Procedures for Testing Physical (Design) and Performance Characteristics of Reference Methods and Class I and..., measurement accuracy, and cut-off. (a) Overview. This test procedure is designed to evaluate a...

  17. Anthropometric parameters' cut-off points and predictive value for metabolic syndrome in women from Cartagena, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Mora-García, Gustavo José; Gómez-Camargo, Doris; Mazenett, Enrique; Alario, Ángelo; Fortich, Álvaro; Gómez-Alegría, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    Objective. To estimate anthropometric parameters' (APs) cut-off points and association for metabolic syndrome (MetS). Materials and methods. A cross-sectional study was carried out with a total of 434 adult women from Cartagena de Indias, Colombia, in 2012. APs measured were waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI), body adiposity index (BAI), waist-hip ratio (WHR) and waist-height ratio (WHtR). Cut-off points were estimated by a receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC). Logistic regression was applied to estimate possible associations. Results. Cut-off points for WC, BMI, BAI, WHR and WHtR were 85 cm, 28 kg/m(2), 39%, 0.80 and 56, respectively. Only WHtR was associated to MetS (OR=1.11, CI95% [1.07-1.15]). Conclusion. WC cut-off point was higher than those proposed for Latin-American women by the Joint Interim Statement (JIS). WHtR had a low predictive value for MetS.

  18. Flexible Lab-Tailored Cut-Offs for Suitability of Formalin-Fixed Tumor Samples for Diagnostic Mutational Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Sara; Tondat, Fabrizio; Pacchioni, Donatella; Molinaro, Luca; Barreca, Antonella; Macrì, Luigia; Chiusa, Luigi; di Celle, Paola Francia; Cassoni, Paola; Sapino, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The selection of proper tissues from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tumors before diagnostic molecular testing is responsibility of the pathologist and represents a crucial step to produce reliable test results. The international guidelines suggest two cut-offs, one for the percentage and one for the number of tumor cells, in order to enrich the tumor content before DNA extraction. The aim of the present work was two-fold: to evaluate to what extent a low percentage or absolute number of tumor cells can be qualified for somatic mutation testing; and to determine how assay sensitivities can guide pathologists towards a better definition of morphology-based adequacy cut-offs. We tested 1797 tumor specimens from melanomas, colorectal and lung adenocarcinomas. Respectively, their BRAF, K-RAS and EGFR genes were analyzed at specific exons by mutation-enriched PCR, pyrosequencing, direct sequencing and real-time PCR methods. We demonstrate that poorly cellular specimens do not modify the frequency distribution of either mutated or wild-type DNA samples nor that of specific mutations. This observation suggests that currently recommended cut-offs for adequacy of specimens to be processed for molecular assays seem to be too much stringent in a laboratory context that performs highly sensitive routine analytical methods. In conclusion, new cut-offs are needed based on test sensitivities and documented tumor heterogeneity. PMID:25844806

  19. 26 CFR 1.585-7 - Elective cut-off method of changing from the reserve method of section 585.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Elective cut-off method of changing from the...). Example 3. Assume the same facts as in Examples 1 and 2. Also assume that on December 31, 1990, the... loans is $25 million. In 1991 M collects $21 million of its outstanding pre-disqualification loans...

  20. 26 CFR 1.585-7 - Elective cut-off method of changing from the reserve method of section 585.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Elective cut-off method of changing from the...). Example 3. Assume the same facts as in Examples 1 and 2. Also assume that on December 31, 1990, the... loans is $25 million. In 1991 M collects $21 million of its outstanding pre-disqualification loans...

  1. A general equation to obtain multiple cut-off scores on a test from multinomial logistic regression.

    PubMed

    Bersabé, Rosa; Rivas, Teresa

    2010-05-01

    The authors derive a general equation to compute multiple cut-offs on a total test score in order to classify individuals into more than two ordinal categories. The equation is derived from the multinomial logistic regression (MLR) model, which is an extension of the binary logistic regression (BLR) model to accommodate polytomous outcome variables. From this analytical procedure, cut-off scores are established at the test score (the predictor variable) at which an individual is as likely to be in category j as in category j+1 of an ordinal outcome variable. The application of the complete procedure is illustrated by an example with data from an actual study on eating disorders. In this example, two cut-off scores on the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) scores are obtained in order to classify individuals into three ordinal categories: asymptomatic, symptomatic and eating disorder. Diagnoses were made from the responses to a self-report (Q-EDD) that operationalises DSM-IV criteria for eating disorders. Alternatives to the MLR model to set multiple cut-off scores are discussed.

  2. Age-adjusted high-sensitivity troponin T cut-off value for risk stratification of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Kaeberich, Anja; Seeber, Valerie; Jiménez, David; Kostrubiec, Maciej; Dellas, Claudia; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Pruszczyk, Piotr; Konstantinides, Stavros; Lankeit, Mareike

    2015-05-01

    High-sensitivity troponin T (hsTnT) helps in identifying pulmonary embolism patients at low risk of an adverse outcome. In 682 normotensive pulmonary embolism patients we investigate whether an optimised hsTnT cut-off value and adjustment for age improve the identification of patients at elevated risk. Overall, 25 (3.7%) patients had an adverse 30-day outcome. The established hsTnT cut-off value of 14 pg·mL(-1) retained its high prognostic value (OR (95% CI) 16.64 (2.24-123.74); p=0.006) compared with the cut-off value of 33 pg·mL(-1) calculated by receiver operating characteristic analysis (7.14 (2.64-19.26); p<0.001). In elderly (aged ≥75 years) patients, an age-optimised hsTnT cut-off value of 45 pg·mL(-1) but not the established cut-off value of 14 pg·mL(-1) predicted an adverse outcome. An age-adjusted hsTnT cut-off value (≥14 pg·mL(-1) for patients aged <75 years and ≥45 pg·mL(-1) for patients aged ≥75 years) provided additive and independent prognostic information on top of the simplified pulmonary embolism severity index (sPESI) and echocardiography (OR 4.56 (1.30-16.01); p=0.018, C-index=0.77). A three-step approach based on the sPESI, hsTnT and echocardiography identified 16.6% of all patients as being at higher risk (12.4% adverse outcome). Risk assessment of normotensive pulmonary embolism patients was improved by the introduction of an age-adjusted hsTnT cut-off value. A three-step approach helped identify patients at higher risk of an adverse outcome who might benefit from advanced therapy.

  3. Prevalence and correlates of high red blood cell folate concentrations in the Canadian population using 3 proposed cut-offs.

    PubMed

    Colapinto, Cynthia K; O'Connor, Deborah L; Dubois, Lise; Tremblay, Mark S

    2015-10-01

    A distinct shift towards higher folate concentrations has emerged in Canada. These higher concentrations have known benefits, including prevention of neural tube defects, but concerns have been raised regarding potential associations with adverse health outcomes. The aim of this research was to propose cut-offs for high red blood cell (RBC) folate concentrations and identify their correlates. RBC folate was measured in a nationally representative cross-sectional sample of Canadians (N = 5248) aged 6 to 79 years. RBC folate concentrations were adjusted from the IMMULITE 2000 immunoassay to a microbiologic assay. The population was characterized at 3 RBC folate cut-offs: 1450 nmol/L, 1800 nmol/L, and 2150 nmol/L. We used t tests to examine differences by age, sex, income, and body mass index (BMI) at each cut-off and logistic regression to explore associations with folic acid supplement intake. The prevalence of high RBC folate was 16%, 6%, and 2% at thresholds of 1450 nmol/L, 1800 nmol/L, and 2150 nmol/L, respectively. Females, those aged 60 to 79 years, and overweight or obese participants had the greatest prevalence of having high RBC folate at each cut-off. Folic acid supplement users were more likely than non-users to have high RBC folate concentrations. Older age, higher BMI, and folic acid supplement use were identified as correlates of high folate status. A high RBC folate concentration cut-off will advance the field towards consistent measurement and reporting of high folate status. This may facilitate future investigation of associations between RBC folate concentrations at the upper end of the distribution and health outcomes. PMID:26319565

  4. Validation of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide cut-off values for risk stratification of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Lankeit, Mareike; Jiménez, David; Kostrubiec, Maciej; Dellas, Claudia; Kuhnert, Katherina; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Pruszczyk, Piotr; Konstantinides, Stavros

    2014-06-01

    The optimal N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) cut-off value for risk stratification of pulmonary embolism remains controversial. In this study we validated and compared different proposed NT-proBNP cut-off values in 688 normotensive patients with pulmonary embolism. During the first 30 days, 28 (4.1%) patients reached the primary outcome (pulmonary embolism-related death or complications) and 29 (4.2%) patients died. Receiver operating characteristic analysis yielded an area under the curve of 0.70 (0.60-0.80) for NT-proBNP. A cut-off value of 600 pg·mL(-1) was associated with the best prognostic performance (sensitivity 86% and specificity 50%) and the highest odds ratio (6.04 (95% CI 2.07-17.59), p=0.001) compared to the cut-off values of 1000, 500 or 300 pg·mL(-1). Using multivariable logistic regression analysis, NT-proBNP ≥ 600 pg·mL(-1) had a prognostic impact on top of that of the simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index and right ventricular dysfunction on echocardiography (OR 4.27 (95% CI 1.22-15.01); p=0.024, c-index 0.741). The use of a stepwise approach based on the simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index, NT-proBNP ≥ 600 pg·mL(-1) and echocardiography helped optimise risk assessment. Our findings confirm the prognostic value of NT-proBNP and suggest that a cut-off value of 600 pg·mL(-1) is most appropriate for risk stratification of normotensive patients with pulmonary embolism. NT-proBNP should be used in combination with a clinical score and an imaging procedure for detecting right ventricular dysfunction.

  5. Azole susceptibility of Malassezia pachydermatis and Malassezia furfur and tentative epidemiological cut-off values.

    PubMed

    Cafarchia, Claudia; Iatta, Roberta; Immediato, Davide; Puttilli, Maria Rita; Otranto, Domenico

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) distribution and the epidemiological cut-off values (ECVs) of Malassezia pachydermatis and Malassezia furfur isolates for fluconazole (FLZ), itraconazole (ITZ), posaconazole (POS), and voriconazole (VOR). A total of 62 M. pachydermatis strains from dogs with dermatitis and 78 M. furfur strains from humans with bloodstream infections (BSI) were tested by a modified broth microdilution Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) method. ITZ and POS displayed lower MICs than VOR and FLZ, regardless of the Malassezia species. The MIC data for azoles of M. pachydermatis were four two-fold dilutions lower than those of M. furfur. Based on the ECVs, about 94% of Malassezia strains might be categorized within susceptible population for all azoles, except for FLZ, and azole cross-resistance was detected in association with FLZ in M. pachydermatis but not in M. furfur.The study proposes, for the first time, tentative azole ECVs for M. pachydermatis and M. furfur for monitoring the emergence of isolates with decreased susceptibilities and shows that the azole MIC distribution varied according to the Malassezia species tested, thus suggesting the usefulness of determining the susceptibility profile for effective treatment of each species. PMID:26162472

  6. Susceptibility profile and epidemiological cut-off values of Cryptococcus neoformans species complex from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Susana; Isla, Maria G; Szusz, Wanda; Vivot, Walter; Altamirano, Rodrigo; Davel, Graciela

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological cut-off values (ECVs) based on minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) distribution have been recently proposed for some antifungal drug/Cryptococcus neoformans combinations. However, these ECVs vary according to the species studied, being serotypes and the geographical origin of strains, variables to be considered. The aims were to define the wild-type (WT) population of the C. neoformans species complex (C. neoformans) isolated from patients living in Argentina, and to propose ECVs for six antifungal drugs. A total of 707 unique C. neoformans isolates obtained from HIV patients suffering cryptococcal meningitis were studied. The MIC of amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole and posaconazole was determined according to the EDef 7.2 (EUCAST) reference document. The MIC distribution, MIC50 , MIC90 and ECV for each of these drugs were calculated. The highest ECV, which included ≥95% of the WT population modelled, was observed for flucytosine and fluconazole (32 μg ml(-1) each). For amphotericin B, itraconazole, voriconazole and posaconazole, the ECVs were: 0.5, 0.5, 0.5 and 0.06 μg ml(-1) respectively. The ECVs determined in this study may aid in identifying the C. neoformans strains circulating in Argentina with decreased susceptibility to the antifungal drugs tested. PMID:26865081

  7. Sloshing in the Liquid Hydrogen and Liquid Oxygen Propellant Tanks After Main Engine Cut Off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sura; West, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is designing and developing the Main Propulsion System (MPS) for Ares launch vehicles. Propellant sloshing in the liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) propellant tanks after Main Engine Cut Off (MECO) was modeled using the Volume of Fluid (VOF) module of the computational fluid dynamics code, CFD-ACE+. The present simulation shows that there is substantial sloshing side forces acting on the LH2 tank during the deceleration of the vehicle after MECO. The LH2 tank features a side wall drain pipe. The side loads result from the residual propellant mass motion in the LH2 tank which is initiated by the stop of flow into the drain pipe at MECO. The simulations show that radial force on the LH2 tank wall is less than 50 lbf and the radial moment calculated based up through the center of gravity of the vehicle is predicted to be as high as 300 lbf-ft. The LO2 tank features a bottom dome drain system and is equipped with sloshing baffles. The remaining LO2 in the tank slowly forms a liquid column along the centerline of tank under the zero gravity environments. The radial force on the LO2 tank wall is predicted to be less than 100 lbf. The radial moment calculated based on the center of gravity of the vehicle is predicted as high as 4500 lbf-ft just before MECO and dropped down to near zero after propellant draining stopped completely.

  8. FACTORS AFFECTING THE HYDRAULIC BARRIER PERFORMANCE OF SOIL-BENTONITE MIXTURE CUT-OFF WALL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, Atsushi; Inui, Toru; Katsumi, Takeshi; Kamon, Masashi; Araki, Susumu

    Containment technique using cut-off walls is a valid method against contaminants in subsurface soil and/or groundwater. This paper states laboratory testing results on hydraulic barrier performance of Soil-Bentonite (SB), which is made by mixing bentonite with in-situ soil. Since the bentonite swelling is sensitive to chemicals, chemical compatibility is important for the hydraulic barrier performance of SB. Hydraulic conductivity tests using flexible-wall permeameter were conducted on SB specimens with various types and concentrations of chemicals in the pore water and/or in the permeant and with various bentonite powder contents. As a result, hydraulic barrier performance of SB was influenced by the chemical concentration in the pore water of original soil and bentonite powder content. In the case that SB specimens have damage parallel to the permeating direction, no significant leakage in the SB occurs by the self-sealing property of SB. In addition, the hydraulic conductivity values of SB have excellent correlation with their plastic indexes and swelling pr essures, thus these properties of SB have some possibility to be indicators for estimation of the hydraulic barrier performance of SB.

  9. Mechanically robust 39 GHz cut-off frequency graphene field effect transistors on flexible substrates.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Pallecchi, Emiliano; Haque, Samiul; Borini, Stefano; Avramovic, Vanessa; Centeno, Alba; Amaia, Zurutuza; Happy, Henri

    2016-08-01

    Graphene has been regarded as a promising candidate channel material for flexible devices operating at radio-frequency (RF). In this work we fabricated and fully characterized double bottom-gate graphene field effect transistors on flexible polymer substrates for high frequency applications. We report a record high as-measured current gain cut-off frequency (ft) of 39 GHz. The corresponding maximum oscillation frequency (fmax) is 13.5 GHz. These state of the art high frequency performances are stable against bending, with a typical variation of around 10%, for a bending radius of up to 12 mm. To demonstrate the reliability of our devices, we performed a fatigue stress test for RF-GFETs which were dynamically bend tested 1000 times at 1 Hz. The devices are mechanically robust, and performances are stable with typical variations of 15%. Finally we investigate thermal dissipation, which is a critical parameter for flexible electronics. We show that at the optimum polarization the normalized power dissipated by the GFETs is about 0.35 mW μm(-2) and that the substrate temperature is around 200 degree centigrade. At a higher power, irreversible degradations of the performances are observed. Our study on state of the art flexible GFETs demonstrates mechanical robustness and stability upon heating, two important elements to assess the potential of GFETs for flexible electronics. PMID:27396243

  10. Susceptibility profile and epidemiological cut-off values of Cryptococcus neoformans species complex from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Susana; Isla, Maria G; Szusz, Wanda; Vivot, Walter; Altamirano, Rodrigo; Davel, Graciela

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological cut-off values (ECVs) based on minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) distribution have been recently proposed for some antifungal drug/Cryptococcus neoformans combinations. However, these ECVs vary according to the species studied, being serotypes and the geographical origin of strains, variables to be considered. The aims were to define the wild-type (WT) population of the C. neoformans species complex (C. neoformans) isolated from patients living in Argentina, and to propose ECVs for six antifungal drugs. A total of 707 unique C. neoformans isolates obtained from HIV patients suffering cryptococcal meningitis were studied. The MIC of amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole and posaconazole was determined according to the EDef 7.2 (EUCAST) reference document. The MIC distribution, MIC50 , MIC90 and ECV for each of these drugs were calculated. The highest ECV, which included ≥95% of the WT population modelled, was observed for flucytosine and fluconazole (32 μg ml(-1) each). For amphotericin B, itraconazole, voriconazole and posaconazole, the ECVs were: 0.5, 0.5, 0.5 and 0.06 μg ml(-1) respectively. The ECVs determined in this study may aid in identifying the C. neoformans strains circulating in Argentina with decreased susceptibility to the antifungal drugs tested.

  11. Accuracy of Cameriere's cut-off value for third molar in assessing 18 years of age.

    PubMed

    De Luca, S; Biagi, R; Begnoni, G; Farronato, G; Cingolani, M; Merelli, V; Ferrante, L; Cameriere, R

    2014-02-01

    Due to increasingly numerous international migrations, estimating the age of unaccompanied minors is becoming of enormous significance for forensic professionals who are required to deliver expert opinions. The third molar tooth is one of the few anatomical sites available for estimating the age of individuals in late adolescence. This study verifies the accuracy of Cameriere's cut-off value of the third molar index (I3M) in assessing 18 years of age. For this purpose, a sample of orthopantomographs (OPTs) of 397 living subjects aged between 13 and 22 years (192 female and 205 male) was analyzed. Age distribution gradually decreases as I3M increases in both males and females. The results show that the sensitivity of the test was 86.6%, with a 95% confidence interval of (80.8%, 91.1%), and its specificity was 95.7%, with a 95% confidence interval of (92.1%, 98%). The proportion of correctly classified individuals was 91.4%. Estimated post-test probability, p was 95.6%, with a 95% confidence interval of (92%, 98%). Hence, the probability that a subject positive on the test (i.e., I3M<0.08) was 18 years of age or older was 95.6%.

  12. The Objective Borderline Method (OBM): A Probability-Based Model for Setting up an Objective Pass/Fail Cut-Off Score in Medical Programme Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulruf, Boaz; Turner, Rolf; Poole, Phillippa; Wilkinson, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The decision to pass or fail a medical student is a "high stakes" one. The aim of this study is to introduce and demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of a new objective standard-setting method for determining the pass/fail cut-off score from borderline grades. Three methods for setting up pass/fail cut-off scores were compared: the…

  13. Mechanically robust 39 GHz cut-off frequency graphene field effect transistors on flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Pallecchi, Emiliano; Haque, Samiul; Borini, Stefano; Avramovic, Vanessa; Centeno, Alba; Amaia, Zurutuza; Happy, Henri

    2016-07-01

    Graphene has been regarded as a promising candidate channel material for flexible devices operating at radio-frequency (RF). In this work we fabricated and fully characterized double bottom-gate graphene field effect transistors on flexible polymer substrates for high frequency applications. We report a record high as-measured current gain cut-off frequency (ft) of 39 GHz. The corresponding maximum oscillation frequency (fmax) is 13.5 GHz. These state of the art high frequency performances are stable against bending, with a typical variation of around 10%, for a bending radius of up to 12 mm. To demonstrate the reliability of our devices, we performed a fatigue stress test for RF-GFETs which were dynamically bend tested 1000 times at 1 Hz. The devices are mechanically robust, and performances are stable with typical variations of 15%. Finally we investigate thermal dissipation, which is a critical parameter for flexible electronics. We show that at the optimum polarization the normalized power dissipated by the GFETs is about 0.35 mW μm-2 and that the substrate temperature is around 200 degree centigrade. At a higher power, irreversible degradations of the performances are observed. Our study on state of the art flexible GFETs demonstrates mechanical robustness and stability upon heating, two important elements to assess the potential of GFETs for flexible electronics.Graphene has been regarded as a promising candidate channel material for flexible devices operating at radio-frequency (RF). In this work we fabricated and fully characterized double bottom-gate graphene field effect transistors on flexible polymer substrates for high frequency applications. We report a record high as-measured current gain cut-off frequency (ft) of 39 GHz. The corresponding maximum oscillation frequency (fmax) is 13.5 GHz. These state of the art high frequency performances are stable against bending, with a typical variation of around 10%, for a bending radius of up to 12 mm. To

  14. New proposal for the serum ascites albumin gradient cut-off value in Chinese ascitic patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Serum ascites albumin gradient (SAAG) has been recognized as a reliable marker in the differential diagnosis of ascites. The etiological background of cirrhosis is rather different between western countries and eastern countries. The threshold of SAAG in Chinese ascitic patients has not been evaluated yet. The aim of this study was to define a new reasonable threshold of SAAG in Chinese ascitic patients. Methods Adult patients with ascites admitted to the Shanghai Changzheng Hospital from Jan 2004 to Jun 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The diagnostic criteria for cirrhotic ascites are clinical manifestations, radiological features and esophageal-gastric varicosis, or histopathology. Serum was detected by chemical method using a commercial kit. We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to achieve maximal sensitivity and specificity of SAAG. Results The mean value of SAAG in portal-hypertension-related ascites was significantly higher than that in the non-portal-hypertension-related ascites (21.15 ± 4.38 g/L vs 7.48 ± 3.64 g/L, P = 0.002). The SAAG cut-off value under 12.50 g/L predicted portal hypertension ascites with the sensitivity of 99.20%, specificity of 95.10% and accuracy of 97.65%. Conclusions SAAG is useful to distinguish portal-hypertension-related ascites and non-portal-hypertension-related ascites, and 12.50 g/L might present as a more reasonable threshold in Chinese ascitic patients. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1602582638991860. PMID:23971938

  15. Sloshing in Liquid Hydrogen and LOX Propellant Tanks After Main Engine Cut-off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sura

    2011-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is designing and developing the Main Propulsion System (MPS) for Ares launch vehicles. The objective of this study is to calculate the sloshing forces and moments in the LH2 and LO2 propellant tanks using a CFD/VOF analysis under realistic flight conditions. Propellant sloshing in the liquid hydrogen (LH2) and the liquid oxygen (LO2) propellant tanks after Main Engine Cut Off (MECO) was modeled using the Volume of Fluid (VOF) module of the computational fluid dynamics code, CFD-ACE+. The present simulation shows that there are substantial sloshing side forces acting on the LH2 tank during the deceleration of the vehicle after MECO. The LH2 tank features a side wall drain pipe. The side loads result from the residual propellant mass motion in the LH2 tank which is initiated by the stop of flow into the drain pipe at MECO. The simulations show that radial force on the LH2 tank wall is less than 50 lbf and the radial moment calculated based up the center of gravity of the vehicle is predicted to be as high as 300 lbf-ft. The LO2 tank features a bottom dome drain system and is equipped with sloshing baffles. The remaining LO2 in the tank slowly forms a liquid column along the centerline of tank under the zero gravity environments. The radial force on the LO2 tank wall is predicted less than 100 lbf. The radial moment calculated based on the center of gravity of the vehicle is predicted as high as 4500 lbf-ft just before MECO and dropped down to near zero after propellant draining stopped completely.

  16. Identification and climatology of cut-off lows near the tropopause.

    PubMed

    Nieto, R; Sprenger, M; Wernli, H; Trigo, R M; Gimeno, L

    2008-12-01

    Cut-off low pressure systems (COLs) are defined as closed lows in the upper troposphere that have become completely detached from the main westerly current. These slow-moving systems often affect the weather conditions at the earth's surface and also work as a mechanism of mass transfer between the stratosphere and the troposphere, playing a significant role in the net flow of tropospheric ozone. In the first part of this work we provide a comprehensive summary of results obtained in previous studies of COLs. Following this, we present three long-term climatologies of COLs. The first two climatologies are based on the conceptual model of a COL, using European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analyses (1958-2002) and National Centers for Environmental Prediction-National Center for Atmospheric Research (1948-2006) reanalysis data sets. The third climatology uses a different method of detection, which is based on using potential vorticity as the physical parameter of diagnosis. This approach was applied only to the ECMWF reanalysis data. The final part of the paper is devoted to comparing results obtained by these different climatologies in terms of areas of preferential occurrence, life span, and seasonal cycle. Despite some key differences, the three climatologies agree in terms of the main areas of COL occurrence, namely (1) southwestern Europe, (2) the eastern north Pacific coast, and (3) the north China-Siberian region. However, it is also shown that the detection of these areas of main COL occurrence, as obtained using the potential vorticity approach, depends on the level of isentropic analysis used. PMID:19076419

  17. Galactomannan Assay and Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis - Comparison of the Test Performance at an in-house and the Kit Cut-off

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Nikhilesh Ravikumar; Sudharma, Arun Ramachandran; Jairaj, Vinutha; Mathew, Joshila

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis (IPA) is an important opportunistic infection with a high degree of mortality and morbidity. Galactomannan assay (GM assay) is found to be useful for diagnosis of IPA in patients with neutropenia. However the utility of this assay has not been evaluated in a mixed patient population with other co-morbid conditions. Though a kit cut-off of 0.5 has been recommended for the diagnosis of IPA, studies have reported a higher sensitivity with cut-offs more than 0.5. Aim To establish an in-house cut-off and compare its utility with the kit cut-off to diagnose and categorize IPA as proven, probable and possible in patients with varied underlying risk factors. Materials and Methods This observational study was done in St John’s Medical College, Bangalore, Karnataka, India from January 2013-December 2014. GM assay was performed on 25 each of healthy controls and clinically diagnosed cases of IPA. The in-house cut-off was calculated by plotting the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (ROC). Results The in-house cut-off was calculated to be 0.52. Using this and the kit cut-off (0.5), the Sensitivity, Specificity, Positive Predictive Value (PPV) and the Negative Predictive Value (NPV) were found to be 75%, 79%, 76%, 82% and 79%, 71%, 77%, 82% respectively. Diabetes mellitus was found to be associated with more than 50% of the patients. Conclusion The established in house cut-off using healthy controls and patients with clinical diagnosis of IPA was not significantly different from that of the kit cut-off. Using either of these cut-offs, we could re-categorize two of the possible IPA cases in the probable group. This study helped to understand the clinical utility of this assay even in a mixed patient population with multiple co-morbidities. PMID:27656435

  18. Improved nonparametric estimation of the optimal diagnostic cut-off point associated with the Youden index under different sampling schemes.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jingjing; Samawi, Hani; Linder, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    A diagnostic cut-off point of a biomarker measurement is needed for classifying a random subject to be either diseased or healthy. However, the cut-off point is usually unknown and needs to be estimated by some optimization criteria. One important criterion is the Youden index, which has been widely adopted in practice. The Youden index, which is defined as the maximum of (sensitivity + specificity -1), directly measures the largest total diagnostic accuracy a biomarker can achieve. Therefore, it is desirable to estimate the optimal cut-off point associated with the Youden index. Sometimes, taking the actual measurements of a biomarker is very difficult and expensive, while ranking them without the actual measurement can be relatively easy. In such cases, ranked set sampling can give more precise estimation than simple random sampling, as ranked set samples are more likely to span the full range of the population. In this study, kernel density estimation is utilized to numerically solve for an estimate of the optimal cut-off point. The asymptotic distributions of the kernel estimators based on two sampling schemes are derived analytically and we prove that the estimators based on ranked set sampling are relatively more efficient than that of simple random sampling and both estimators are asymptotically unbiased. Furthermore, the asymptotic confidence intervals are derived. Intensive simulations are carried out to compare the proposed method using ranked set sampling with simple random sampling, with the proposed method outperforming simple random sampling in all cases. A real data set is analyzed for illustrating the proposed method.

  19. Gestational Age-specific Cut-off Values Are Needed for Diagnosis of Subclinical Hypothyroidism in Early Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Sung; Kim, Byoung Jae; Oh, Sohee; Lee, Da Young; Hwang, Kyu Ri; Jeon, Hye Won; Lee, Seung Mi

    2015-09-01

    During the first trimester of pregnancy, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) >2.5 mIU/L has been suggested as the universal criterion for subclinical hypothyroidism. However, TSH levels change continuously during pregnancy, even in the first trimester. Therefore the use of a fixed cut-off value for TSH may result in a different diagnosis rate of subclinical hypothyroidism according to gestational age. The objective of this study was to obtain the normal reference range of TSH during the first trimester in Korean gravida and to determine the diagnosis rate of subclinical hypothyroidism using the fixed cut-off value (TSH >2.5 mIU/L). The study population consisted of pregnant women who were measured for TSH during the first trimester of pregnancy (n=492) and nonpregnant women (n=984). Median concentration of TSH in pregnant women was lower than in non-pregnant women. There was a continuous decrease of median TSH concentration during the first trimester of pregnancy (median TSH concentration: 1.82 mIU/L for 3+0 to 6+6 weeks; 1.53 mIU/L for 7+0 to 7+6 weeks; and 1.05 mIU/L for 8+0 to 13+6 weeks). Using the fixed cut-off value of TSH >2.5 mIU/L, the diagnosis rate of subclinical hypothyroidism decreased significantly according to the gestational age (GA) at TSH (25% in 3+0 to 6+6 weeks, 13% in 7+0 to 7+6 weeks, and 9% for 8+0 to 13+6 weeks, P<0.001), whereas the diagnosis rate was 5% in all GA with the use of a GA-specific cut-off value (P=0.995). Therefore, GA-specific criteria might be more appropriate for the diagnosis of subclinical hypothyroidism.

  20. Cut-Off Value for Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire in Predicting Surgical Success in Patients with Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Azimi, Parisa; Benzel, Edward C.

    2016-01-01

    Various factors related to predict surgical success were studied; however, a standard cut-off point for the Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire (PSQ) measure has not yet been established for a favorable surgical outcome for lumbar disc herniation (LDH). This study was to find the optimal cut-off point on the PSQ to distinguish surgical success in patients with LDH. A total of 154 patients with LDH consecutively referred to our clinic were enrolled into this prospective study between February 2011 and January 2014. All participants completed the PSQ. Patients completed the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score before surgery, and at 2 years after surgery. Surgical success was defined as a 13-point improvement from the baseline ODI scores. The cut-off value for PSQ was determined by the receiver-operating characteristic curve (ROC). The mean age of patients was 49.3±9.6 years, and there were 80 women. The mean time for follow-up assessment was 31±5 months (range 24–35). Post-surgical success was 79.9% (n = 123) at 2 years follow up. The mean score for the total PSQ, PSQ-minor, and PSQ-moderate were 6.0 (SD = 1.6), 5.4 (SD = 1.9) and 6.5 (SD = 1.7), respectively. Total PSQ score was also significantly correlated with the total scores of the ODI. The optimal total PSQ cut-off point was determined as > 5.2 to predict surgical success in LDH patients, with 80.0% sensitivity and 75.6% specificity (AUC-0.814, 95% CI 0.703–0.926). This study showed that the PSQ could be considered a parameter for predicting surgical success in patients with LDH, and can be useful in clinical practice. PMID:27494617

  1. Improved nonparametric estimation of the optimal diagnostic cut-off point associated with the Youden index under different sampling schemes.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jingjing; Samawi, Hani; Linder, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    A diagnostic cut-off point of a biomarker measurement is needed for classifying a random subject to be either diseased or healthy. However, the cut-off point is usually unknown and needs to be estimated by some optimization criteria. One important criterion is the Youden index, which has been widely adopted in practice. The Youden index, which is defined as the maximum of (sensitivity + specificity -1), directly measures the largest total diagnostic accuracy a biomarker can achieve. Therefore, it is desirable to estimate the optimal cut-off point associated with the Youden index. Sometimes, taking the actual measurements of a biomarker is very difficult and expensive, while ranking them without the actual measurement can be relatively easy. In such cases, ranked set sampling can give more precise estimation than simple random sampling, as ranked set samples are more likely to span the full range of the population. In this study, kernel density estimation is utilized to numerically solve for an estimate of the optimal cut-off point. The asymptotic distributions of the kernel estimators based on two sampling schemes are derived analytically and we prove that the estimators based on ranked set sampling are relatively more efficient than that of simple random sampling and both estimators are asymptotically unbiased. Furthermore, the asymptotic confidence intervals are derived. Intensive simulations are carried out to compare the proposed method using ranked set sampling with simple random sampling, with the proposed method outperforming simple random sampling in all cases. A real data set is analyzed for illustrating the proposed method. PMID:26756282

  2. Some Factors Affecting the Reproducibility of Penetration and the Cut-Off of Oil Sprays for Fuel-injection Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beardsley, E G

    1928-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in connection with a general research on fuel-injection for aircraft. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the factors controlling the reproducibility of spray penetration and secondary discharges after cut-off. The development of single sprays from automatic injection valves was recorded by means of special high-speed photographic apparatus capable of taking 25 consecutive pictures of the moving spray at a rate of 4,000 per second. The effect of two types of injection valves, injection-valve tube length, initial pressure in the injection-valve tube, speed of the injection control mechanism, and time of spray cut-off, on the reproducibility of spray penetration, and on secondary discharges were investigated. It was found that neither type of injection valve materially affected spray reproducibility. The initial pressure in the injection-valve tube controlled the reproducibility of spray penetrations. An increase in the initial pressure or in the length of the injection-valve tube slightly increased the spray penetration within the limits of this investigation. The speed of the injection-control mechanism did not affect the penetration. Analysis of the results indicates that secondary discharges were caused in this apparatus by pressure waves initiated by the rapid opening of the cut-off valve. The secondary discharges were eliminated in this investigation by increasing the length of the injection-valve tube. (author)

  3. Insulin sensitivity indices: a proposal of cut-off points for simple identification of insulin-resistant subjects.

    PubMed

    Radikova, Z; Koska, J; Huckova, M; Ksinantova, L; Imrich, R; Vigas, M; Trnovec, T; Langer, P; Sebokova, E; Klimes, I

    2006-05-01

    Demanding measurement of insulin sensitivity using clamp methods does not simplify the identification of insulin resistant subjects in the general population. Other approaches such as fasting- or oral glucose tolerance test-derived insulin sensitivity indices were proposed and validated with the euglycemic clamp. Nevertheless, a lack of reference values for these indices prevents their wider use in epidemiological studies and clinical practice. The aim of our study was therefore to define the cut-off points of insulin resistance indices as well as the ranges of the most frequently obtained values for selected indices. A standard 75 g oral glucose tolerance test was carried out in 1156 subjects from a Caucasian rural population with no previous evidence of diabetes or other dysglycemias. Insulin resistance/sensitivity indices (HOMA-IR, HOMA-IR2, ISI Cederholm, and ISI Matsuda) were calculated. The 75th percentile value as the cut-off point to define IR corresponded with a HOMA-IR of 2.29, a HOMA-IR2 of 1.21, a 25th percentile for ISI Cederholm, and ISI Matsuda of 57 and 5.0, respectively. For the first time, the cut-off points for selected indices and their most frequently obtained values were established for groups of subjects as defined by glucose homeostasis and BMI. Thus, insulin-resistant subjects can be identified using this simple approach. PMID:16804799

  4. Geomagnetism applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, Wallace H.

    1995-01-01

    The social uses of geomagnetism include the physics of the space environment, satellite damage, pipeline corrosion, electric power-grid failure, communication interference, global positioning disruption, mineral-resource detection, interpretation of the Earth's formation and structure, navigation, weather, and magnetoreception in organisms. The need for continuing observations of the geomagnetic field, together with careful archiving of these records and mechanisms for dissemination of these data, is emphasized.

  5. High frequency cut-off in 1/f conductivity noise of hole-doped La1‑x Ca x MnO3 manganite single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybytek, Jacek; Fink-Finowicki, Jan; Puźniak, Roman; Jung, Grzegorz

    2016-05-01

    High frequency bias and temperature-dependent Lorentzian cut-off has been observed in the 1/f spectra of the conductivity fluctuations in low hole-doped ferromagnetic insulating La1‑x Ca x MnO3 manganite at low temperatures. The cut-off frequency depends on dc current bias and temperature. The high frequency cut-off has been tentatively associated with intrinsic limits of the appearance of 1/f noise in the hopping regime of the Coulomb glass state. The assumption is validated by the fact that the Efros–Shklovskii temperature {{T}\\text{ES}} , estimated from the fit of the model to the experimentally measured temperature dependence of the cut-off frequency, has the same value as the temperature {{T}\\text{ES}} evaluated independently from the temperature dependence of the resistivity in the corresponding temperature range.

  6. Elevated d-dimer cut-off values for computed tomography pulmonary angiography—d-dimer correlates with location of embolism

    PubMed Central

    Kubak, Mateuzs Piotr; Borthne, Arne; Ruud, Espen Asak; Ashraf, Haseem

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute pulmonary embolism (APE) is a potentially fatal condition, and making a timely diagnosis can be challenging. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has become the modality of choice, and this contributes to the increasing load on emergency room CT scanners. Our purpose was to investigate whether an elevated d-dimer cut-off could reduce the demand for CTPA while maintaining a high sensitivity and negative predictive value (NPV). Methods We retrospectively reviewed all patients referred for CTPA with suspicion of APE in 2012, and collected d-dimer values and CTPA results. We investigated the diagnostic performance of d-dimer using a 0.5 mg/L cut-off and an age adjusted cut-off. We also evaluated a new and elevated cut-off. Cases were categorized according to their CTPA result into: no embolism, peripheral embolism, lobar embolism and central embolism. Finally we investigated a possible correlation between d-dimer values and location of embolism. Results We included 1,051 CTPAs, from which 216 (21%) showed pulmonary embolism. There were concomitant d-dimer analyses in 822 CTPA examinations. The current 0.5 mg/L cut-off achieved a sensitivity and NPV of 99%. The age-adjusted cut-off achieved a sensitivity and NPV of 98%, and our suggested cut-off of 0.9 mg/L achieved a sensitivity and NPV of 97%. Conclusions We conclude that the elevated d-dimer cut-off of 0.9 mg/L achieved a high sensitivity and NPV, while reducing the number of CTPA by 27%. The correlation between d-dimer values and location of embolisms supports the suggestion of an elevated d-dimer value. PMID:27386486

  7. Critical evaluation of energy intake data using fundamental principles of energy physiology: 1. Derivation of cut-off limits to identify under-recording.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, G R; Black, A E; Jebb, S A; Cole, T J; Murgatroyd, P R; Coward, W A; Prentice, A M

    1991-12-01

    This paper uses fundamental principles of energy physiology to define minimum cut-off limits for energy intake below which a person of a given sex, age and body weight could not live a normal life-style. These have been derived from whole-body calorimeter and doubly-labelled water measurements in a wide range of healthy adults after due statistical allowance for intra- and interindividual variance. The tabulated cut-off limits, which depend on sample size and duration of measurements, identify minimum plausible levels of energy expenditure expressed as a multiple of basal metabolic rate (BMR). CUT-OFF 1 tests whether reported energy intake measurements can be representative of long-term habitual intake. It is set at 1.35 x BMR for cases where BMR has been measured rather than predicted. CUT-OFF 2 tests whether reported energy intakes are a plausible measure of the food consumed during the actual measurement period, and is always more liberal than CUT-OFF 1 since it has to allow for the known measurement imprecision arising from the high level of day-to-day variability in food intake. The cut-off limits can be used to evaluate energy intake data. Results falling below these limits must be recognized as being incompatible with long-term maintenance of energy balance and therefore with long-term survival.

  8. Accuracy and cut-off point selection in three-class classification problems using a generalization of the Youden index.

    PubMed

    Nakas, Christos T; Alonzo, Todd A; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T

    2010-12-10

    We study properties of the index J(3), defined as the accuracy, or the maximum correct classification, for a given three-class classification problem. Specifically, using J(3) one can assess the discrimination between the three distributions and obtain an optimal pair of cut-off points c(1)

  9. Accuracy of cut-off value by measurement of third molar index: Study of a Colombian sample.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Stefano; Aguilar, Lina; Rivera, Marcela; Palacio, Luz Andrea Velandia; Riccomi, Giulia; Bestetti, Fiorella; Cameriere, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to test the accuracy of cut-off value of 0.08 by measurement of third molar index (I3M) in assessing legal adult age of 18 years in a sample of Colombian children and young adults. Digital orthopantomographs of 288 Colombian children and young adults (163 girls and 125 boys), aged between 13 and 22 years, were analysed. Concordance correlation coefficient (ρc) and κ statistics (Cohen's Kappa coefficient) showed that repeatability and reproducibility are high for both intra- and inter-observer error. κ statistics for intra- and inter-observer agreement in decision on adult or minor was 0.913 and 0.877, respectively. Age distribution gradually decreases as I3M increases in both girls and boys. For girls, the sensitivity test was 95.1% (95% CI 87.1%-95%) and specificity was 93.8% (95% CI 87.1%-98.8%). The proportion of correctly classified individuals was 95.1%. For boys, the sensitivity test was 91.7% (95% CI 85.1%-96.8%) and specificity was 90.6% (95% CI 82.1%-97.8%). The proportion of correctly classified individuals was 89.7%. The cut-off value of 0.08 is highly useful to determine if a subject is 18 years of age or older or not. PMID:26898677

  10. Accuracy of cut-off value by measurement of third molar index: Study of a Colombian sample.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Stefano; Aguilar, Lina; Rivera, Marcela; Palacio, Luz Andrea Velandia; Riccomi, Giulia; Bestetti, Fiorella; Cameriere, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to test the accuracy of cut-off value of 0.08 by measurement of third molar index (I3M) in assessing legal adult age of 18 years in a sample of Colombian children and young adults. Digital orthopantomographs of 288 Colombian children and young adults (163 girls and 125 boys), aged between 13 and 22 years, were analysed. Concordance correlation coefficient (ρc) and κ statistics (Cohen's Kappa coefficient) showed that repeatability and reproducibility are high for both intra- and inter-observer error. κ statistics for intra- and inter-observer agreement in decision on adult or minor was 0.913 and 0.877, respectively. Age distribution gradually decreases as I3M increases in both girls and boys. For girls, the sensitivity test was 95.1% (95% CI 87.1%-95%) and specificity was 93.8% (95% CI 87.1%-98.8%). The proportion of correctly classified individuals was 95.1%. For boys, the sensitivity test was 91.7% (95% CI 85.1%-96.8%) and specificity was 90.6% (95% CI 82.1%-97.8%). The proportion of correctly classified individuals was 89.7%. The cut-off value of 0.08 is highly useful to determine if a subject is 18 years of age or older or not.

  11. STS-114: Engine Cut-Off Sensors Are a No-Go: Teaching Notes for NASA Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Khadijah S.; Johnson, Grace K.

    2013-01-01

    This case study format is intended to simulate the experience of facing the same difficult challenges and making the same critical decisions as managers, engineers, and scientists in the Space Shuttle Program. It has been designed for use in the classroom setting to help students develop skills related to decision-making. Students will read about the engine cut-off sensor anomaly which created challenges during the STS-114 mission and have the opportunity to make decisions as lead NASA engineers and Mission Management Team members. Included within this document are three case study presentation options - class discussion, group activity, and open-ended research. Please read the full case prior to in-class presentation to allow ample time for students' analysis and reflection, as well as to prepare additional questions. activities or exercises, material selection, etc. Depending upon the setting of your presentation and the number of participants, please choose at least one presentation format beforehand and plan accordingly. You may expect the following learning objectives by using the proposed formats. Learning Objectives: To enable students to experience the responsibilities of NASA management, engineers, and analysis; to discover possible procedures for investigating system anomalies; to become familiar with the liquid hydrogen low level engine cut-off sensor, including its function, connecting components, and location within the Space Shuttle; and to encourage critical analysis and stimulating discussion of Space Shuttle mission challenges.

  12. Dependence Image Quality On The Type Of Filter And The Cut-Off Value in SPECT Reconstruction Using FBP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alireza, Sadremomtaz; Payvand, Taherparvar

    2011-12-01

    Image reconstruction is an important part of nuclear medicare imagmg technique. Different types of image reconstruction have been used for this propose. Despite of the fact that there are new techniques of image reconstruction, still filtered back projection method is widely used due to its simplicity and speed. Since nuclear medicine images are noisy due to less available photon statistics in the acquired images, therefore using proper filter to reduce the noise with keeping the proper signal is important. Two important parameters in most filters are the cut-off frequency and (in some cases of filters) the orders of the filter function Determining the optimal cut-off frequency for use in low pass filtering is an important part of establishing an image reconstruction strategy for clinical use. In this paper we present the result of examined filters which provide the best image quality by calculation of FWHM 1 -Line source and 2-Line sources. With this result, the best filter with specific parameter for LSF and 2-line sources is selected and the results are interpreted.

  13. Mid-wavelength infrared InAsSb/InSb nBn detector with extended cut-off wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soibel, Alexander; Ting, David Z.; Hill, Cory J.; Fisher, Anita M.; Hoglund, Linda; Keo, Sam. A.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2016-09-01

    We extended the cut-off wavelength λc of bulk InAsSb nBn detectors to λc = 4.6 μm at T = 200 K by incorporating series of single InSb monolayer into InAsSb absorber. Detectors with 2 μm thick absorber showed a temperature independent quantum efficiency QEm≈ 0.45 for back-side illumination without antireflection coating. The dark current density was jd = 5 × 10-6 A/cm2 at T = 150 K, and increased to jd = 2 × 10-3 A/cm2 at T = 200 K. At temperatures of T = 150 K and below, the demonstrated photodetectors operate in the background limited performance mode, with detectivity D*(λ) = 3-6 × 1011 cm Hz0.5/W for the background temperature of 300 K, and f/2 field of view.

  14. Therapeutic Efficacy and Cost Effectiveness of High Cut-Off Dialyzers Compared to Conventional Dialysis in Patients with Cast Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Curti, Adriano; Schwarz, Albin; Trachsler, Johannes; Tomonaga, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    Background High Cut-Off (HCO) dialysis membranes efficiently reduce serum free light chain (FLC) concentrations and may improve renal recovery and survival from multiple myeloma (MM) associated renal failure with cast nephropathy. However, clinical trials comparing dialysis with HCO versus conventional filters are lacking. The aim of this study was to assess clinical outcomes and economic impact of HCO dialyzers compared to conventional hemodialysis membranes in cast nephropathy. Methods Multicenter retrospective analysis of 19 patients treated for renal failure from FLC associated cast nephropathy with standard induction chemotherapy (bortezomib/dexamethasone). We compared hemodialysis treatment with High Cut-Off (n = 12) versus conventional dialyzers (n = 7). Primary endpoint was survival; secondary endpoints were renal recovery, renal function and treatment costs. Results At 12 months, patient survival was 25% in the HCO group versus 0% in controls (p = NS). A tendency towards faster renal recovery (p = 0.066) and better renal function at 3, 6 and 12 months (p = 0.109) after diagnosis of MM was noted in the HCO group. Complete renal response rate was achieved in 10.5 and 0% of HCO and control patients, respectively, partial renal response in 15.8 and 5.3%, and minor renal response in 26.3 and 15.8%, respectively. Both patient survival and renal recovery were significantly correlated with the extent of free light chain (FLC) reduction in serum. Median treatment costs were CHF 230’000 and 223’000 (p = NS) in the HCO and control group, respectively. Conclusions Hemodialysis treatment with HCO membranes for cast nephropathy tended towards better survival as well as faster and better recovery of renal function versus conventional dialyzers. Moreover, total medical costs were comparable between groups. In the absence of results from randomized prospective trials on this topic, the use of HCO dialyzers in patients with renal failure from cast nephropathy may be

  15. Cut-Offs and Response Criteria for the Hospital Universitario La Princesa Index (HUPI) and Their Comparison to Widely-Used Indices of Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Castrejón, Isabel; Ortiz, Ana M.; Toledano, Esther; Castañeda, Santos; García-Vadillo, Alberto; Carmona, Loreto

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate cut-off points and to establish response criteria for the Hospital Universitario La Princesa Index (HUPI) in patients with chronic polyarthritis. Methods Two cohorts, one of early arthritis (Princesa Early Arthritis Register Longitudinal [PEARL] study) and other of long-term rheumatoid arthritis (Estudio de la Morbilidad y Expresión Clínica de la Artritis Reumatoide [EMECAR]) including altogether 1200 patients were used to determine cut-off values for remission, and for low, moderate and high activity through receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis. The areas under ROC (AUC) were compared to those of validated indexes (SDAI, CDAI, DAS28). ROC analysis was also applied to establish minimal and relevant clinical improvement for HUPI. Results The best cut-off points for HUPI are 2, 5 and 9, classifying RA activity as remission if ≤2, low disease activity if >2 and ≤5), moderate if >5 and <9 and high if ≥9. HUPI’s AUC to discriminate between low-moderate activity was 0.909 and between moderate-high activity 0.887. DAS28’s AUCs were 0.887 and 0.846, respectively; both indices had higher accuracy than SDAI (AUCs: 0.832 and 0.756) and CDAI (AUCs: 0.789 and 0.728). HUPI discriminates remission better than DAS28-ESR in early arthritis, but similarly to SDAI. The HUPI cut-off for minimal clinical improvement was established at 2 and for relevant clinical improvement at 4. Response criteria were established based on these cut-off values. Conclusions The cut-offs proposed for HUPI perform adequately in patients with either early or long term arthritis. PMID:27603313

  16. Comparison of Interferon-γ Release Assay to Two Cut-Off Points of Tuberculin Skin Test to Detect Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Primary Health Care Workers

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Fernanda Mattos; do Prado, Thiago Nascimento; Pinheiro, Jair dos Santos; Peres, Renata Lyrio; Lacerda, Thamy Carvalho; Loureiro, Rafaela Borge; Carvalho, Jose Américo; Fregona, Geisa; Dias, Elias Santos; Cosme, Lorrayne Beliqui; Rodrigues, Rodrigo Ribeiro; Riley, Lee Wood; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Noia

    2014-01-01

    Background An interferon-γ release assay, QuantiFERON-TB (QFT) test, has been introduced an alternative test for the diagnosis of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI). Here, we compared the performance of QFT with tuberculin skin test (TST) measured at two different cut-off points among primary health care work (HCW) in Brazil. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out among HCWs in four Brazilian cities with a known history of high incidence of TB. Results of the QFT were compared to TST results based on both ≥5 mm and ≥10 mm as cut-off points. Results We enrolled 632 HCWs. When the cut-off value of ≥10 mm was used, agreement between QFT and TST was 69% (k = 0.31), and when the cut-off of ≥5 mm was chosen, the agreement was 57% (k = 0.22). We investigated possible factors of discordance of TST vs QFT. Compared to the TST−/QFT− group, risk factors for discordance in the TST+/QFT− group with TST cut-off of ≥5 mm included age between 41–45 years [OR = 2.70; CI 95%: 1.32–5.51] and 46–64 years [OR = 2.04; CI 95%: 1.05–3.93], BCG scar [OR = 2.72; CI 95%: 1.40–5.25], and having worked only in primary health care [OR = 2.30; CI 95%: 1.09–4.86]. On the other hand, for the cut-off of ≥10 mm, BCG scar [OR = 2.26; CI 95%: 1.03–4.91], being a household contact of a TB patient [OR = 1.72; CI 95%: 1.01–2.92] and having had a previous TST [OR = 1.66; CI 95%: 1.05–2.62], were significantly associated with the TST+/QFT− group. No statistically significant associations were found among the TST−/QFT+ discordant group with either TST cut-off value. Conclusions Although we identified BCG vaccination to contribute to the discordance at both TST cut-off measures, the current Brazilian recommendation for the initiation of LTBI treatment, based on information gathered from medical history, TST, chest radiograph and physical examination, should not be changed. PMID:25137040

  17. Cross section of reaction 181Ta(p,nγ) 181W and the influence of the spin cut-off parameter on the cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun-Jie; Hu, Bi-Tao

    2011-12-01

    In this work, the program Cindy was modified to calculate the formation cross section of each energy level of residual nucleus 181W resulting from the reaction 181Ta(p,nγ) 181W. The concerned cross sections calculated at proton energy Ep = 4.5-8.5 MeV agreed well with experimental results. The influence of the spin cut-off parameter in the energy level density model on the cross section was studied. The obtained results show that the influence of spin cut-off is obvious for lower energy levels.

  18. Cut-off value of FEV1/FEV6 as a surrogate for FEV1/FVC for detecting airway obstruction in a Korean population

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyung Soo; Jung, Ji Ye; Park, Moo Suk; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Se Kyu; Chang, Joon; Song, Joo Han

    2016-01-01

    Background Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)/forced expiratory volume in 6 seconds (FEV6) has been proposed as an alternative to FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) for detecting airway obstruction. A fixed cut-off value for FEV1/FEV6 in a Korean population is lacking. We investigated a fixed cut-off for FEV1/FEV6 as a surrogate for FEV1/FVC for detecting airway obstruction. Materials and methods We used data obtained in the 5 years of the Fifth and Sixth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. A total of 14,978 participants aged ≥40 years who underwent spirometry adequately were the study cohort. “Airway obstruction” was a fixed cut-off FEV1/FVC <70% according to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines. We also used European Respiratory Society/Global Lung Initiative 2012 equations for the FEV1/FVC lower limit of normal. Results Among the 14,978 participants (43.5% male, 56.5% female; mean age: 56.9 years for men and 57.0 years for women), 14.0% had obstructive lung function according to a fixed cut-off FEV1/FVC <70%. Optimal FEV1/FEV6 cut-off for predicting FEV1/FVC <70% was 75% using receiver operating characteristic curve analyses (area under receiver operating characteristic curve =0.989, 95% confidence interval 0.987–0.990). This fixed cut-off of FEV1/FEV6 showed 93.8% sensitivity, 94.8% specificity, 74.7% positive predictive value, 98.9% negative predictive value, and 0.8 Cohen’s kappa coefficient. When compared with FEV1/FVC < lower limit of normal, FEV1/FEV6 <75% tended to over-diagnose airflow limitation (just like a fixed cut-off of FEV1/FVC <70%). When grouped according to age and FEV1 (%), FEV1/FEV6 <75% diagnosed more airway obstruction in older participants and mild–moderate stages compared with FEV1/FVC <70%. Conclusion A valid fixed cut-off for detecting airway obstruction in a Korean population is FEV1/FEV6 of 75%, but should be used with caution in older individuals and those with

  19. Determinants of self-reported smoking and misclassification during pregnancy, and analysis of optimal cut-off points for urinary cotinine: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Aurrekoetxea, Juan J; Murcia, Mario; Rebagliato, Marisa; López, María José; Castilla, Ane Miren; Santa-Marina, Loreto; Guxens, Mónica; Fernández-Somoano, Ana; Espada, Mercedes; Lertxundi, Aitana; Tardón, Adonina; Ballester, Ferran

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence and factors associated with smoking and misclassification in pregnant women from INMA (INfancia y Medio Ambiente, Environment and Childhood) project, Spain, and to assess the optimal cut-offs for urinary cotinine (UC) that best distinguish daily and occasional smokers with varying levels of second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure. Design We used logistic regression models to study the relationship between sociodemographic variables and self-reported smoking and misclassification (self-reported non-smokers with UC >50 ng/ml). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to calculate the optimal cut-off point for discriminating smokers. The cut-offs were also calculated after stratification among non-smokers by the number of sources of SHS exposure. The cut-off points used to discriminate smoking status were the level of UC given by Youden's index and for 50 and 100 ng/ml for daily smokers, or 25 and 50 ng/ml for occasional smokers. Participants At the third trimester of pregnancy, 2263 pregnant women of the INMA Project were interviewed between 2004 and 2008 and a urine sample was collected. Results Prevalence of self-reported smokers at the third trimester of pregnancy was 18.5%, and another 3.9% misreported their smoking status. Variables associated with self-reported smoking and misreporting were similar, including born in Europe, educational level and exposure to SHS. The optimal cut-off was 82 ng/ml (95% CI 42 to 133), sensitivity 95.2% and specificity 96.6%. The area under the ROC curve was 0.986 (95% CI 0.982 to 0.990). The cut-offs varied according to the SHS exposure level being 42 (95% CI 27 to 57), 82 (95% CI 46 to 136) and 106 ng/ml (95% CI 58 to 227) for not being SHS exposed, exposed to one, and to two or more sources of SHS, respectively. The optimal cut-off for discriminating occasional smokers from non-smokers was 27 ng/ml (95% CI 11 to 43). Conclusions Prevalence of smoking during pregnancy in

  20. Waist circumference cut-off in relation to body mass index and percentage of body fat in adult women from Merida, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Datta Banik, Sudip; Dickinson, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Waist circumference (WC) as an index of central obesity is related to body mass index (BMI) and percent body fat (PBF). Waist circumference data were analyzed to identify a WC cut-off for adult women with respect to BMI-based obesity (≥ 30 kg/m²) and PBF. The sample was 138 women aged 22 to 41 years with Maya ancestry (based on surnames) in Merida, Yucatan, measured during 2011 - 2013. Anthropometric parameters included height, body weight (BW), and BMI. The PBF was estimated by bioelectrical impedance. Estimated cut-offs per centimeter WC (80 - 99 cm) were predicted by BMI for obesity (≥ 30 kg m⁻²; binomial: Yes = 1, No = 0) and PBF (continuous variable) using binary logistic regression analyses. Mean age was 32 years, mean BMI was 29 kg m(-2) and mean WC was 89 cm. The sample exhibited high PBF (44 %), and high rates of overweight (44%) and obesity (40%). The threshold WC (≥ 93 cm) had high sensitivity (80%), specificity (82%), Youden Index value (0.62), and correct classification rate (82%). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 88 %. The WC ≥ 93 cm cut-off had corresponding values for mean BMI (34 kg m⁻²) and PBF (47%). The optimal WC cut-off at 93 cm significantly identified central obesity for BMI ≥ 30 kg m⁻² and PBF for this sample. PMID:26425848

  1. Quantum fields and poisson processes II: Interaction of boson-boson and boson-fermion fields with a cut-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, J.; Gaveau, B.; Rideau, G.

    1985-05-01

    Quantum field evolutions are written as expectation values with respect to Poisson processes in two simple models: interaction of two boson fields (with conservation of the number of particles in one field) and interaction of a boson with a fermion field. The introduction of a cut-off ensures that the expectation values are well-defined.

  2. Waist circumference cut-off in relation to body mass index and percentage of body fat in adult women from Merida, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Datta Banik, Sudip; Dickinson, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Waist circumference (WC) as an index of central obesity is related to body mass index (BMI) and percent body fat (PBF). Waist circumference data were analyzed to identify a WC cut-off for adult women with respect to BMI-based obesity (≥ 30 kg/m²) and PBF. The sample was 138 women aged 22 to 41 years with Maya ancestry (based on surnames) in Merida, Yucatan, measured during 2011 - 2013. Anthropometric parameters included height, body weight (BW), and BMI. The PBF was estimated by bioelectrical impedance. Estimated cut-offs per centimeter WC (80 - 99 cm) were predicted by BMI for obesity (≥ 30 kg m⁻²; binomial: Yes = 1, No = 0) and PBF (continuous variable) using binary logistic regression analyses. Mean age was 32 years, mean BMI was 29 kg m(-2) and mean WC was 89 cm. The sample exhibited high PBF (44 %), and high rates of overweight (44%) and obesity (40%). The threshold WC (≥ 93 cm) had high sensitivity (80%), specificity (82%), Youden Index value (0.62), and correct classification rate (82%). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 88 %. The WC ≥ 93 cm cut-off had corresponding values for mean BMI (34 kg m⁻²) and PBF (47%). The optimal WC cut-off at 93 cm significantly identified central obesity for BMI ≥ 30 kg m⁻² and PBF for this sample.

  3. The Objective Borderline method (OBM): a probability-based model for setting up an objective pass/fail cut-off score in medical programme assessments.

    PubMed

    Shulruf, Boaz; Turner, Rolf; Poole, Phillippa; Wilkinson, Tim

    2013-05-01

    The decision to pass or fail a medical student is a 'high stakes' one. The aim of this study is to introduce and demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of a new objective standard-setting method for determining the pass/fail cut-off score from borderline grades. Three methods for setting up pass/fail cut-off scores were compared: the Regression Method, the Borderline Group Method, and the new Objective Borderline Method (OBM). Using Year 5 students' OSCE results from one medical school we established the pass/fail cut-off scores by the abovementioned three methods. The comparison indicated that the pass/fail cut-off scores generated by the OBM were similar to those generated by the more established methods (0.840 ≤ r ≤ 0.998; p < .0001). Based on theoretical and empirical analysis, we suggest that the OBM has advantages over existing methods in that it combines objectivity, realism, robust empirical basis and, no less importantly, is simple to use.

  4. Using Logistic Regression for Validating or Invalidating Initial Statewide Cut-Off Scores on Basic Skills Placement Tests at the Community College Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Secolsky, Charles; Krishnan, Sathasivam; Judd, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    The community colleges in the state of New Jersey went through a process of establishing statewide cut-off scores for English and mathematics placement tests. The colleges wanted to communicate to secondary schools a consistent preparation that would be necessary for enrolling in Freshman Composition and College Algebra at the community college…

  5. Cosmological properties and reconstruction of scalar field models of the Holographic Dark Energy model with Granda-Oliveros cut-off in Kaluza-Klein cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasqua, Antonio; Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Assaf, Khudhair A.; Salako, Ines G.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study the properties of the Holographic Dark Energy (HDE) model in the context of Kaluza-Klein (KK) cosmology with infrared cut-off given by the recently proposed by Granda-Oliveros cut-off, which contains a term proportional to the time derivative of the Hubble parameter and one proportional to the Hubble parameter squared. Moreover, this cut-off is characterized by two free parameters which are the proportional constants of the two terms of the cut-off. We derive the expression of the Equation of State (EoS) parameter ωD and of the deceleration parameter q for both non-interacting and interacting Dark Sectors and in the limiting case of a flat Dark Dominated Universe. Moreover, we study the squared speed of the sound vs2 and the statefinder diagnostic \\{r,s\\} in order to understand the cosmological properties of the model considered. We also develop a correspondence between the model considered and three scalar field models: the tachyon, the k-essence and the quintessence ones.

  6. A new three-component signal model to objectively select power Doppler wall filter cut-off velocity for quantitative microvascular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfarnawany, Mai; Lacefield, James C.

    2013-03-01

    The wall-filter selection curve (WFSC) method was developed to automatically select cut-off velocities for high-frequency power Doppler imaging. Selection curves are constructed by plotting color pixel density (CPD) as a function of wall filter cut-off velocity. A new three-component mathematical model is developed to guide the design of an online implementation of the method for in vivo imaging. The model treats Doppler imaging as a signal detection task in which the scanner must distinguish intravascular pixels from perivascular and extravascular pixels and includes a cost function to identify the optimum cut-off velocity that provides accurate vascular quantification and minimizes the effect of color pixel artifacts on visualization of vascular structures. The goodness of fit of the three-component model to flow-phantom data is significantly improved compared to a previous two-component model (F test, p < 0:005). Simulations using the new model indicate that selection curves should be sampled using at least 100 cut-off velocities to ensure robust performance of the automated WFSC method and determine an upper bound on CPD variability that ensures reliable vascular quantification accuracy, defined as CPD within 5% of the reference vascular volume fraction. Results of the simulations also provide evidence that limiting the selection of the cut-off velocity to a binary choice between the middle and right end of the characteristic interval is sufficient to meet the quantification accuracy goal. The model provides an intuitive, empirical description of the relationship between system settings and blood-flow detection performance in power Doppler imaging.

  7. Collector optimization for tradeoff between breakdown voltage and cut-off frequency in SiGe HBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qiang; Zhang, Wan-Rong; Jin, Dong-Yue; Ding, Chun-Bao; Zhao, Yan-Xiao; Lu, Dong

    2014-11-01

    As is well known, there exists a tradeoff between the breakdown voltage BVCEO and the cut-off frequency fT for a standard heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT). In this paper, this tradeoff is alleviated by collector doping engineering in the SiGe HBT by utilizing a novel composite of P+ and N- doping layers inside the collector-base (CB) space-charge region (SCR). Compared with the single N-type collector, the introduction of the thin P+ layers provides a reverse electric field weakening the electric field near the CB metallurgical junction without changing the field direction, and the thin N- layer further effectively lowers the electric field near the CB metallurgical junction. As a result, the electron temperature near the CB metallurgical junction is lowered, consequently suppressing the impact ionization, thus BVCEO is improved with a slight degradation in fT. The results show that the product of fT × BVCEO is improved from 309.51 GHz·V to 326.35 GHz·V.

  8. Establishing abdominal height cut-offs and their association with conventional indices of obesity among Arab children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Al-Daghri, Nasser; Alokail, Majed; Al-Attas, Omar; Sabico, Shaun; Kumar, Sudhesh

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Obesity, particularly childhood obesity is common in the Middle East, but no studies have examined the relationship of sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) or abdominal height to conventional markers of obesity in this region. This is the first study to document the association of SAD with measures of obesity among Arab children and adolescents. METHODS: Nine hundred sixty-four Saudi children aged 5-17 years (365 prepubertal, including 146 boys and 219 girls; 249 pubertal, including 125 boys and 124 girls; and 350 postpubertal, including 198 boys and 152 girls) were included in this cross-sectional study. RESULTS: SAD was significantly correlated with indices of obesity regardless of gender, but was strongest among pubertal boys. The cut-off values were as follows: for prepubertal children, 14 cm (equivalent to 50th percentile among girls and 60th percentile among boys); for pubertal children, 15 cm for girls (30th percentile) and 16 cm for boys (50th percentile), and for postpubertal, 21.5 cm for girls (70th percentile) and 22 cm for boys (80th percentile). CONCLUSION: SAD is a reliable indicator of visceral obesity among Arab children and adolescents in particular. Prospective studies should be done to determine whether such an association translates to a promising risk factor for hard endpoints such as diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease. PMID:20427937

  9. Investigation of the performance of cement-bentonite cut-off walls in aggressive ground at a disused gasworks site

    SciTech Connect

    Tedd, P.; Holton, I.R.; Butcher, A.P.; Wallace, S.

    1997-12-31

    There has been an increased use of cement-bentonite slurry trench cut-off walls to control the lateral migration of pollution in the UK. Concerns inevitably exist about their performance in chemically aggressive ground particularly in the long term. To address some of the uncertainties a programme of field and laboratory research is being undertaken at a disused gasworks in the UK. Elevated levels of sulphate and other contaminants are present on the site and could potentially change the properties of the cement-bentonite. Two boxes, 10m square in plan, by 5m deep have been constructed, one with and one without an HDPE membrane, to isolate parts of the site. Local hydraulic gradients across the walls have been created by pumping from within the boxes. Isolated lengths of wall have been constructed which are being used to assess and develop in-situ testing techniques such as the piezocone for measuring permeability, strength and overall integrity of the wall.

  10. On a holographic dark energy model with a Nojiri-Odintsov cut-off in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshudyan, Martiros

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we consider the models of the accelerated expanding large scale universe (according to general relativity) containing a generalized holographic dark energy with a Nojiri-Odintsov cut-off. The second component of the darkness is assumed to be the pressureless cold dark matter according to observed symmetries of the large scale universe. Moreover, we assume specific forms of the interaction between these two components and besides the cosmographic analysis, we discuss appropriate results from Om and Om3 analysis and organize a closer look to the models via the statefinder hierarchy analysis, too. In this way we study mainly impact of the interaction on the dynamics of the background of our universe (within specific forms of interaction). To complete the cosmographic analysis, the present day values of the statefinder parameters (r,s) and (ω^'_{de}, ω_{de}) has been estimated for all cases and the validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics is demonstrated. Our study showed that theoretical results from considered phenomenological models are consistent with the available observational data and symmetries.

  11. High switching speed copper phthalocyanine thin film transistors with cut-off frequency up to 25 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zeying; Wang, Dong Xing; Zhang, Yongshuang; Wang, Yueyue

    2015-12-01

    The characteristics of high frequency and high speed are demonstrated in vertical structure organic thin film transistors (VOTFTs) fabricated by DC magnetron sputtering and vacuum evaporation. The saturated current-voltage characteristics can be determined by drain-source negative bias voltage. Responsive frequency of the device is as high as 20 kHz when rectangular wave dynamic signal is applied to the gate-source electrode, and switch characteristic time reaches the microsecond. The unsaturated current-voltage characteristics are observed when the drain-source bias voltage is positive. In the condition of VDS = 3 V and VGS = 0 V, the drain-source current IDS is 2.986 × 10-5 A, and the current density is 1.194 mA/cm2. Cut-off frequency fc is 25 kHz when a small sine wave dynamic signal is applied to the gate-source electrode. The volt-ampere characteristic of VOTFTs transfers from linear to nonlinear with increasing of drain-source bias voltage.

  12. Accuracy of a cut-off value based on the third molar index: Validation in an Australian population.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Daniel; Karkhanis, Shalmira; Flavel, Ambika; Collini, Federica; DeLuca, Stefano; Cameriere, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    According to Recommendation N°196 of the Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC), the age at which a child reaches adulthood for the purposes of criminal law should be 18 years in all Australian jurisdictions. With specific reference to age at majority, the only tooth with development spanning adolescence (and thus the legally relevant 18 years of age) is the third molar, which limits the number of methods that can be applied from those available in the published literature. The aim of the present study is to test the accuracy of the third molar index (I3M=0.08), based on the correlation between chronological age and normalized measures of the open apices and height of the third mandibular molar, in order to assess the legal adult age of 18 years. Digital orthopantomographs of 143 living Australian subjects (72 boys and 71 girls) are analyzed. The results demonstrate that the sensitivity is 0.90 in boys and 0.90 in girls; associated specificity values are 0.85 and 0.87 respectively. We conclude that the cut-off value of I3M=0.08 is statistically robust and thus valid for forensic application in an Australian population.

  13. Treatment of Acute Renal Failure Secondary to Multiple Myeloma with Chemotherapy and Extended High Cut-Off Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Colin A.; Bradwell, Arthur R.; Cook, Mark; Basnayake, Kolitha; Basu, Supratik; Harding, Stephen; Hattersley, John; Evans, Neil D.; Chappel, Mike J.; Sampson, Paul; Foggensteiner, Lukas; Adu, Dwomoa; Cockwell, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Extended hemodialysis using a high cut-off dialyzer (HCO-HD) removes large quantities of free light chains in patients with multiple myeloma. However, the clinical utility of this method is uncertain. This study assessed the combination of chemotherapy and HCO-HD on serum free light chain concentrations and renal recovery in patients with myeloma kidney (cast nephropathy) and dialysis-dependent acute renal failure. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: An open-label study of the relationship between free light chain levels and clinical outcomes in 19 patients treated with standard chemotherapy regimens and HCO-HD. Results: There were sustained early reductions in serum free light chain concentrations (median 85% [range 50 to 97]) in 13 patients. These 13 patients became dialysis independent at a median of 27 d (range 13 to 120). Six patients had chemotherapy interrupted because of early infections and did not achieve sustained early free light chain reductions; one of these patients recovered renal function (at 105 d) the remaining 5 patients did not recover renal function. Patients who recovered renal function had a significantly improved survival (P < 0.012). Conclusion: In dialysis-dependent acute renal failure secondary to myeloma kidney, patients who received uninterrupted chemotherapy and extended HCO-HD had sustained reductions in serum free light chain concentrations and recovered independent renal function. PMID:19339414

  14. Accuracy of a cut-off value based on the third molar index: Validation in an Australian population.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Daniel; Karkhanis, Shalmira; Flavel, Ambika; Collini, Federica; DeLuca, Stefano; Cameriere, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    According to Recommendation N°196 of the Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC), the age at which a child reaches adulthood for the purposes of criminal law should be 18 years in all Australian jurisdictions. With specific reference to age at majority, the only tooth with development spanning adolescence (and thus the legally relevant 18 years of age) is the third molar, which limits the number of methods that can be applied from those available in the published literature. The aim of the present study is to test the accuracy of the third molar index (I3M=0.08), based on the correlation between chronological age and normalized measures of the open apices and height of the third mandibular molar, in order to assess the legal adult age of 18 years. Digital orthopantomographs of 143 living Australian subjects (72 boys and 71 girls) are analyzed. The results demonstrate that the sensitivity is 0.90 in boys and 0.90 in girls; associated specificity values are 0.85 and 0.87 respectively. We conclude that the cut-off value of I3M=0.08 is statistically robust and thus valid for forensic application in an Australian population. PMID:27427495

  15. Forecasts of solar and geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joselyn, Joann

    1987-01-01

    Forecasts of solar and geomagnetic activity are critical since these quantities are such important inputs to the thermospheric density models. At this time in the history of solar science there is no way to make such a forecast from first principles. Physical theory applied to the Sun is developing rapidly, but is still primitive. Techniques used for forecasting depend upon the observations over about 130 years, which is only twelve solar cycles. It has been noted that even-numbered cycles systematically tend to be smaller than the odd-numbered ones by about 20 percent. Another observation is that for the last 12 cycle pairs, an even-numbered sunspot cycle looks rather like the next odd-numbered cycle, but with the top cut off. These observations are examples of approximate periodicities that forecasters try to use to achieve some insight into the nature of an upcoming cycle. Another new and useful forecasting aid is a correlation that has been noted between geomagnetic indices and the size of the next solar cycle. Some best estimates are given concerning both activities.

  16. The Vector Matching Method in Geomagnetic Aiding Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhongguo; Zhang, Jinsheng; Zhu, Wenqi; Xi, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a geomagnetic matching navigation method that utilizes the geomagnetic vector is developed, which can greatly improve the matching probability and positioning precision, even when the geomagnetic entropy information in the matching region is small or the geomagnetic contour line’s variety is obscure. The vector iterative closest contour point (VICCP) algorithm that is proposed here has better adaptability with the positioning error characteristics of the inertial navigation system (INS), where the rigid transformation in ordinary ICCP is replaced with affine transformation. In a subsequent step, a geomagnetic vector information fusion algorithm based on Bayesian statistical analysis is introduced into VICCP to improve matching performance further. Simulations based on the actual geomagnetic reference map have been performed for the validation of the proposed algorithm. PMID:27447645

  17. The Vector Matching Method in Geomagnetic Aiding Navigation.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhongguo; Zhang, Jinsheng; Zhu, Wenqi; Xi, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a geomagnetic matching navigation method that utilizes the geomagnetic vector is developed, which can greatly improve the matching probability and positioning precision, even when the geomagnetic entropy information in the matching region is small or the geomagnetic contour line's variety is obscure. The vector iterative closest contour point (VICCP) algorithm that is proposed here has better adaptability with the positioning error characteristics of the inertial navigation system (INS), where the rigid transformation in ordinary ICCP is replaced with affine transformation. In a subsequent step, a geomagnetic vector information fusion algorithm based on Bayesian statistical analysis is introduced into VICCP to improve matching performance further. Simulations based on the actual geomagnetic reference map have been performed for the validation of the proposed algorithm. PMID:27447645

  18. Combined Effect of an Atmospheric River and a Cut-off Low in Hiroshima Flooding Event on August 19, 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayabu, Y. N.; Hirota, N.; Kato, M.; Arakane, S.

    2015-12-01

    An extraordinary precipitation over 100 mmhr-1in Hiroshima on August 19, 2014, caused a flash flood which resulted in 74 fatalities and collapse of 330 houses. In order to examine the meteorological background of this flooding event, we carried out a detailed analysis utilizing rain gauge data, satellite precipitation dataset, and a meso scale and a global scale objective analyses provided from the Japan Meteorological Agency. Then, we performed numerical experiments using a nonhydrostatic compressible equation model called the Cloud-Resolving Storm Simulator (CReSS). As a result, a combined effect of an atmospheric river (AR) and a cut-off low (COL) in this flooding event was elucidated. During the event, a filamentary transport of moisture extending from the Indochina Peninsula to the Japanese Islands was observed along the southern side of the subtropical jet, forming an AR. This AR had a deep structure with an amount of free tropospheric moisture comparable to that of the boundary layer. Concurrently, there was a COL, detached from the Mid-Pacific Trough, moving northwestward toward the Japanese Archipelago. With various sensitivity experiments, we concluded that a mid-tropospheric instability associated with the cold core of the COL and a dynamical ascent induced in its foreside, collaboratively worked with the anomalous moisture in the free troposphere associated with the AR, to extraordinarily enhance the precipitation over Hiroshima region. An orographic effect to concentrate the precipitation in this region was also confirmed. An implication on a difference in effects of AR in this event with a climatologically moist boundary layer, from those in the US west coast with a very dry environment, was also obtained. Acknowledgment: This study is supported by the Environment Research and Technology Development Fund (2-1503) of the Ministry of the Environment, Japan, and by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan.

  19. Reproducibility of Her2/neu scoring in gastric cancer and assessment of the 10% cut-off rule.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Hans-Michael; Warneke, Viktoria S; Böger, Christine; Garbrecht, Nele; Jüttner, Eva; Klapper, Wolfram; Mathiak, Micaela; Oschlies, Ilske; Rudolph, Ursula; Stuhlmann-Laeisz, Christiane; Trick, David; Röcken, Christoph; Hufnagl, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The application of Trastuzumab on gastric cancer patients is based on Her2/neu immunostaining. The testing method relies on visual estimation of both membranous staining intensity, and positive tumor ratio with respect to a 10% cutoff. We evaluated the effect of inter- and intraobserver variations of both factors on therapeutic decision, especially if the positive tumor ratio hovers around the 10% cutoff. Ten pathologists scored 12 Her2/neu immunohistologically stained whole sections of gastric cancer. Applying the common rules for Her2/neu testing for gastric cancer, they separately noted the strongest identifiable staining intensity and the corresponding positive tumor ratio. Scoring was done repeatedly using the microscope, plain virtual microscopy, and virtual microscopy with a manual outline drawing function. Agreements on the strongest identified staining intensities were moderate. Overall concordance correlation coefficients of positive tumor ratios ranged from 0.55 to 0.81. Reproducibility was not improved by virtual microscopy. Pathologists have a good ability to estimate ratios of clearly demarcated areas, but gradients in staining intensities hinder reproducible visual demarcation of positive tumor areas. When hovering around the 10% positive tumor ratio cutoff there is a risk of misinterpretation of the staining results. This could lead to a denial of Trastuzumab therapy. Assessment of Her2/neu expression should be carried out by experienced pathologists because they can more reproducibly rate membranous staining intensities. The low reproducibility of positive tumor ratio is inherent in the testing method and cannot be improved by virtual microscopy. Therefore, we propose to reconsider the 10% cut-off limit.

  20. A cautionary note about the cross-national and clinical validity of cut-off points for the Maslach Burnout Inventory.

    PubMed

    Schaufeli, W B; Van Dierendonck, D

    1995-06-01

    In the present study, burnout scores of three samples, as measured with the Maslach Burnout Inventory, were compared: (1) the normative American sample from the test-manual (N = 10,067), (2) the normative Dutch sample (N = 3,892), and (3) a Dutch outpatient sample (N = 142). Generally, the highest burnout scores were found for the outpatient sample, followed by the American and Dutch normative samples, respectively. Slightly different patterns were noted for each of the three components. Probably sampling bias, i.e., the healthy worker effect, or cultural value patterns, i.e., femininity versus masculinity, might be responsible for the results. It is concluded that extreme caution is required when cut-off points are used to classify individuals by burnout scores; only nation-specific and clinically derived cut-off points should be employed.

  1. Serological diagnosis of pneumococcal infection in children with pneumonia using protein antigens: A study of cut-offs with positive and negative controls.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Dafne Carvalho; Borges, Igor Carmo; Ivaska, Lauri; Peltola, Ville; Meinke, Andreas; Barral, Aldina; Käyhty, Helena; Ruuskanen, Olli; Nascimento-Carvalho, Cristiana Maria

    2016-06-01

    The etiological diagnosis of infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in children is difficult, and the use of indirect techniques is frequently warranted. We aimed to study the use of pneumococcal proteins for the serological diagnosis of pneumococcal infection in children with pneumonia. We analyzed paired serum samples from 13 Brazilian children with invasive pneumococcal pneumonia (positive control group) and 23 Finnish children with viral pharyngitis (negative control group), all aged <5years-old. Children with pharyngitis were evaluated for oropharyngeal colonization, and none of them carried S. pneumoniae. We used a multiplex bead-based assay with eight proteins: Ply, CbpA, PspA1 and 2, PcpA, PhtD, StkP and PcsB. The optimal cut-off for increase in antibody level for the diagnosis of pneumococcal infection was determined for each antigen by ROC curve analysis. The positive control group had a significantly higher rate of ≥2-fold rise in antibody levels against all pneumococcal proteins, except Ply, compared to the negative controls. The cut-off of ≥2-fold increase in antibody levels was accurate for pneumococcal infection diagnosis for all investigated antigens. However, there was a substantial increase in the accuracy of the test with a cut-off of ≥1.52-fold rise in antibody levels for PcpA. When using the investigated protein antigens for the diagnosis of pneumococcal infection, the detection of response against at least one antigen was highly sensitive (92.31%) and specific (91.30%). The use of serology with pneumococcal proteins is a promising method for the diagnosis of pneumococcal infection in children with pneumonia. The use of a ≥2-fold increase cut-off is adequate for most pneumococcal proteins. PMID:26928648

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of deep vein thrombosis is increased by analysis using combined optimal cut-off values of postoperative plasma D-dimer levels

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, YONG; LI, JIE; LIU, YANG; ZHANG, WEIGUO

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of analysis using optimal cut-off values of plasma D-dimer levels in the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). A total of 175 orthopedic patients with DVT and 162 patients without DVT were included in the study. Ultrasonic color Doppler imaging was performed on lower limb veins prior to and following orthopedic surgery in order to determine the types of orthopedic conditions that were present. An enzyme-linked fluorescent assay was performed to detect the expression levels of D-dimer in plasma, and receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to predict the occurrence of DVT on the basis of the expression levels of D-dimer. After surgery, the expression levels of D-dimer in the plasma of DVT patients were significantly higher in comparison with those in orthopedic patients without DVT (P<0.05). When the patients were divided into subgroups according to the underlying orthopedic condition, the expression levels of D-dimer in the plasma of each subgroup were higher 1 day after orthopedic surgery in comparison to those prior to surgery (P<0.05). The diagnostic accuracy achieved using combined optimal cut-off values at 1 and 3 days post-surgery was significantly higher than the accuracy when using a single optimal cut-off value (P<0.05). In conclusion, detection of D-dimer expression levels at 1 day post-orthopedic surgery may be important in predicting DVT. In addition, the diagnostic accuracy of DVT is significantly increased by analysis using combined optimal cut-off values of D-dimer plasma expression levels. PMID:27168793

  3. Optimal Elasticity cut-off value for discriminating Healthy to Pathological Fibrotic patients employing Fuzzy C-Means automatic segmentation in Liver Shear Wave Elastography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatos, Ilias; Tsantis, Stavros; Skouroliakou, Aikaterini; Theotokas, Ioannis; Zoumpoulis, Pavlos S.; Kagadis, George C.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine an optimal elasticity cut-off value for discriminating Healthy from Pathological fibrotic patients by means of Fuzzy C-Means automatic segmentation and maximum participation cluster mean value employment in Shear Wave Elastography (SWE) images. The clinical dataset comprised 32 subjects (16 Healthy and 16 histological or Fibroscan verified Chronic Liver Disease). An experienced Radiologist performed SWE measurement placing a region of interest (ROI) on each subject's right liver lobe providing a SWE image for each patient. Subsequently Fuzzy C-Means clustering was performed on every SWE image utilizing 5 clusters. Mean Stiffness value and pixels number of each cluster were calculated. The mean stiffness value feature of the cluster with maximum pixels number was then fed as input for ROC analysis. The selected Mean Stiffness value feature an Area Under the Curve (AUC) of 0.8633 with Optimum Cut-off value of 7.5 kPa with sensitivity and specificity values of 0.8438 and 0.875 and balanced accuracy of 0.8594. Examiner's classification measurements exhibited sensitivity, specificity and balanced accuracy value of 0.8125 with 7.1 kPa cutoff value. A new promising automatic algorithm was implemented with more objective criteria of defining optimum elasticity cut-off values for discriminating fibrosis stages for SWE. More subjects are needed in order to define if this algorithm is an objective tool to outperform manual ROI selection.

  4. Optical coherence tomography derived cut-off value of uncovered stent struts to predict adverse clinical outcomes after drug-eluting stent implantation.

    PubMed

    Won, Hoyoun; Shin, Dong-Ho; Kim, Byeong-Keuk; Mintz, Gary S; Kim, Jung-Sun; Ko, Young-Guk; Choi, Donghoon; Jang, Yangsoo; Hong, Myeong-Ki

    2013-08-01

    Although the presence of uncovered struts may be associated with occurrence of stent thrombosis, the impact of uncovered struts detected routinely by optical coherence tomography (OCT) on subsequent long-term clinical outcomes remains unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the cut-off value of uncovered struts that predicted adverse clinical outcomes after drug eluting stent (DES) implantation. Major safety events (MSEs, a composite occurrence of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, and stent thrombosis) were evaluated in 489 DES-treated patients (535 lesions) during the median 851 days after follow-up OCT. MSEs occurred in six patients (four definite stent thrombosis and two sudden cardiac death). The best cut-off value of percentage of uncovered struts for predicting MSE was 5.9 % using the maximal χ(2) method: area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve = 0.779, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 0.648-0.910, p = 0.019, a sensitivity of 83.3 % and a specificity of 70.3 %. Independent predictors for MSE were post-intervention minimal lumen diameter (odds ratio 0.019, 95 % CI = 0.001-0.513, p = 0.018) and percentage of uncovered struts ≥5.9 % (odds ratio 19.781, 95 % CI = 2.071-188.968, p = 0.010). A greater percentage of uncovered struts (the cut-off value of ≥5.9 % uncovered struts) might be significantly associated with occurrence of MSE after DES implantation. PMID:23615849

  5. Return to Work: A Cut-Off of FIM Gain with Montebello Rehabilitation Factor Score in Order to Identify Predictive Factors in Subjects with Acquired Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Return to work (RTW) for people with acquired brain injury (ABI) represents a main objective of rehabilitation: this work presents a strong correlation between personal well-being and quality of life. The aim of this study is to investigate the prognostic factors that can predict RTW after ABI (traumatic or non- traumatic aetiology) in patients without disorders of consciousness (e.g. coma, vegetative or minimally conscious state) at the beginning of their admission to rehabilitation. At the end of a 6-month follow-up after discharge, data were successfully collected in 69 patients. The rehabilitation effectiveness (functional Recovery) between admission and discharge was assessed by Functional Independent Measure (FIM) gain, through the Montebello Rehabilitation Factor Score (MRFS), which was obtained as follows: (discharge FIM—admission FIM)/(Maximum possible FIM—Admission FIM) x 100. The cut-off value (criterion) deriving from MRFS, which helped identify RTW patients, resulted in .659 (sn 88.9%; sp 52.4%). Considering the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the MRFS data, the multivariable binary logistic regression analysis presented 62.96% of correct RTW classification cases, 80.95% of non-RTW leading to an overall satisfactory predictability of 73.91%. The results of the present study suggest that occupational therapy intervention could modify cut-off in patients with an MFRS close to target at the end of an in-hospital rehabilitative program thus developing their capabilities and consequently surpassing cut-off itself. PMID:27780215

  6. Geomagnetic transmission of solar energetic protons during the geomagnetic disturbances of October 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boberg, P. R.; Tylka, A. J.; Adams J. H., JR.; Flueckiger, E. O.; Kobel, E.

    1995-01-01

    Orbit-averaged geomagnetic transmission measurements during the large solar energetic particle events of October 1989 are presented using proton data from the NOAA-10 and GOES-7 satellies. The measurements are compared to geomagnetic transmission calculations determined by tracing particle trajectories through the combination of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) model and the 1989 Tsyganenko magnetospheric magnetic field model. The effective 'ring current' parameter in the 1989 Tsyganenko model based on the Dst data. Results are compared to calculations employing only the IGRF and to a parameterization of geomagnetically quiet-time cutoff rigidities derived from Cosmos/intercosmos observations. The 3-hour orbit-averaged results have approximately 15% accuracy during the October 1989 events.

  7. Endogenous gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) concentrations in post-mortem specimens and further recommendation for interpretative cut-offs.

    PubMed

    Andresen-Streichert, Hilke; Jensen, P; Kietzerow, J; Schrot, M; Wilke, N; Vettorazzi, E; Mueller, A; Iwersen-Bergmann, S

    2015-01-01

    When interpreting gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) concentrations in post-mortem specimens, a possible increase in GHB concentrations because of post-mortem generation must be considered. In this study, endogenous GHB concentrations in post-mortem biological fluids were investigated. Additionally, we review post-mortem GHB concentrations already published in the literature. Heart and peripheral blood samples, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, and vitreous humor were collected from 64 autopsies in subjects where the cause of death excluded GHB exposure. Sample analysis was carried out either on the day of autopsy or later after immediate freezing and storage at -20 °C. GHB concentrations in venous blood samples (n = 61) were <0.6-28.7 mg/L (mean 11.9 mg/L; median 10.6 mg/L), <0.6-65.3 mg/L (mean 15.2 mg/L; median 12.8 mg/L) in heart blood (n = 56), <0.6-25.1 mg/L (mean 6.0 mg/L; median 3.8 mg/L) in urine (n = 50), <0.6-39.0 mg/L (mean 9.6 mg/L; median 7.5 mg/L), in vitreous humor (n = 54), and <0.6-24.0 mg/L (mean 4.2 mg/L; median 3.2 mg/L) in cerebrospinal fluid (n = 52). There was no significant difference between GHB concentrations in cases where there were signs of beginning putrefaction at the time of autopsy (n = 9) and cases without obvious signs of putrefaction. In one case with advanced putrefaction, the GHB concentration in venous blood was 32.7 mg/L. In conclusion, for post-mortem venous blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid, an interpretative cut-off of 30 mg/L for GHB concentrations is suggested in cases where GHB analysis is conducted on the day of sample collection at autopsy or if samples have been stored at -20 °C immediately after collection.

  8. Effect of Accelerometer Cut-Off Points on the Recommended Level of Physical Activity for Obesity Prevention in Children

    PubMed Central

    Dygrýn, Jan; Mitáš, Josef; Jakubec, Lukáš; Frömel, Karel

    2016-01-01

    There is no general consensus regarding which accelerometer cut-off point (CoP) is most acceptable to estimate the time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in children and choice of an appropriate CoP primarily remains a subjective decision. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the influence of CoP selection on the mean MVPA and to define the optimal thresholds of MVPA derived from different accelerometer CoPs to avoid overweight/obesity and adiposity in children aged 7 to 12 years. Three hundred six children participated. Physical activity (PA) was monitored for seven consecutive days using an ActiGraph accelerometer (model GT3X) and the intensity of PA was estimated using the five most frequently published CoPs. Body adiposity was assessed using a multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis. There was found a wide range of mean levels of MVPA that ranged from 27 (Puyau CoP) to 231 min∙d–1 (Freedson 2005 CoP). A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis indicated that the optimal thresholds for counts per minute (cpm) and MVPA derived from the Puyau CoP was the most useful in classifying children according to their body mass index (BMI) and fat mass percentage (FM%). In the total sample, the optimal thresholds of the MVPA derived from the Puyau CoP were 22 and 23 min∙d–1 when the categories based on BMI and FM%, respectively, were used. The children who did not meet these optimal thresholds had a significantly increased risk of being overweight/obese (OR = 2.88, P < 0.01) and risk of having excess fat mass (OR = 2.41, P < 0.01). In conclusion, the decision of selecting among various CoPs significantly influences the optimal levels of MVPA. The Puyau CoP of 3 200 cmp seems to be the most useful for defining the optimal level of PA for pediatric obesity prevention. PMID:27723835

  9. Prevalence of body mass index and body weight cut-off points for in vitro fertilization treatment at U.S. clinics and current clinic weight loss strategy recommendations.

    PubMed

    Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M; Grant, Breănna L

    2015-09-01

    The goal of this study was to determine how many clinics providing in vitro fertilization (IVF) in the United States require a body mass index (BMI) or body weight cut-off point to determine treatment eligibility. US clinics listed as members on the Society of Assisted Reproduction website in late 2013 were contacted by phone between January and March 2014. Clinic personnel were asked if a BMI or body weight cut-off points was used to determine IVF treatment eligibility and what strategies they recommended for their patients to achieve a healthy body weight. Of the 379 clinics contacted, 347 responded (92% response rate) and 35% (n = 120) reported using a BMI or body weight cut-off points to determine eligibility for IVF treatment. Mean BMI (± SD) cut-off points was 38.4 ± 5.2 kg/m(2) and mean body weight (± SD) cut-off points was 130.2 ± 14.8 kg. Of the clinics using a set cut-off points, half (46%) provided no weight loss recommendations for patients. A sizable portion of US IVF clinics report a required or preferred BMI or body weight cut-off points for treatment. Despite this, most clinics did not provide a recommended program or approach for weight loss with very few clinics reporting an in-house program.

  10. The Cut-Off Level of Recombinant Human TSH-Stimulated Thyroglobulin in the Follow-Up of Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kowalska, Aldona; Pałyga, Iwona; Gąsior-Perczak, Danuta; Walczyk, Agnieszka; Trybek, Tomasz; Słuszniak, Anna; Mężyk, Ryszard; Góźdź, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Background The treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) ends in full recovery in 80% of cases. However, in 20% of cases local recurrences or distant metastases are observed, for this reason DTC patients are under life-long follow-up. The most sensitive marker for recurrence is stimulated thyroglobulin (Tg) which, together with neck ultrasound (US), enables correct diagnosis in nearly all cases of the active disease. For many years the only known stimulation was a 4–5 week withdrawal from the L-T4 therapy (THW). For the last couple of years stimulation with the use of recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) has been available. This method of stimulation may have a significant influence in obtaining the Tg level. However, it is important to determine the cut-off level for rhTSH-stimulated Tg (rhTSH/Tg). Materials and Methods This is a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients from one facility who have qualified over a period of two years for repeated radioiodine therapy (RIA). In our facility the ablation effectiveness evaluation is always carried out with the use of rhTSH, with the repeated therapy following THW. Such a procedure enables two Tg measurements in the same patient after both types of stimulation within 4–5 weeks. The obtained values were compared, cut-off levels in THW conditions were used (2.0 ng/ml for patients in remission and 10.0 ng/ml for patients with an active disease). In order to determine the cut-off level for rhTSH/Tg, regression analysis and ROC curves were used. Results In 63 patients the Tg measurement of both methods of stimulation were obtained. It was observed that there was a high correlation between rhTSH/Tg and THW/Tg. However, the rhTSH/Tg level was significantly lower than THW/ Tg. The rhTSH/ Tg cut-off levels which corresponded to the 2.0 ng/ml and 10.0 ng/ml limits for THW/Tg were calculated and the values were 0.6 ng/ml and 2.3 ng/ml respectively. Conclusions The method of stimulation has a significant impact on the

  11. High birth weight in a suburban hospital in Cameroon: an analysis of the clinical cut-off, prevalence, predictors and adverse outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Choukem, Simeon-Pierre; Njim, Tsi; Atashili, Julius; Hamilton-Shield, Julian P; Mbu, Robinson

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims High birth weight (HBW) increases the risk of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Its prevalence and adverse outcomes may be reduced if risk factors are identified and managed during pregnancy. The cut-off value for HBW remains debatable. The objectives of this study were to identify the optimal cut-off value and determine the prevalence, predictors and adverse outcomes of HBW in a suburban area of Cameroon. Design A 6-year retrospective register analysis and a 3-month prospective phase. Setting A secondary care level (regional) hospital in the city of Buea (southwest region of Cameroon). Participants Women who delivered in this hospital over a 6-year period (retrospective phase) and consenting pregnant mothers and their infants (singletons, born at >28 weeks gestation) (prospective phase). Outcome measures 90th centile of birth weights; prevalence of HBW defined as birth weight above the 90th centile; sociodemographic, maternal and obstetrical factors associated with HBW; maternal and neonatal adverse outcomes of HBW. Results Of the 4941 newborns reviewed in registers, the 90th centile of birth weights was 3850 g. Using this new cut-off, we obtained a prevalence of 14.0% for HBW in the 200 newborns included in the prospective phase. This was significantly higher than the prevalence (9.5%) yielded when the traditional cut-off of 4000 g was used (p=0.003). None of the factors assessed was independently associated with HBW. Newborns with HBW were more likely to have shoulder dystocia (p<0.01), and their mothers more likely to suffer from prolonged labour (p=0.01) and postpartum haemorrhage (p<0.01). Conclusions The results of this study suggest that the cut-off for HBW in this population should be 3850 g. Thus, 3 of every 10 babies born with HBW in this hospital are likely not receiving optimal postnatal care because 4000 g is currently used to qualify for additional support. PMID:27357199

  12. Fatty acid ethyl esters in hair as alcohol markers: estimating a reliable cut-off point by evaluation of 1,057 autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Hastedt, Martin; Bossers, Lydia; Krumbiegel, Franziska; Herre, Sieglinde; Hartwig, Sven

    2013-06-01

    Alcohol abuse is a widespread problem, especially in Western countries. Therefore, it is important to have markers of alcohol consumption with validated cut-off points. For many years research has focused on analysis of hair for alcohol markers, but data on the performance and reliability of cut-off values are still lacking. Evaluating 1,057 cases from 2005 to 2011, included a large sample group for the estimation of an applicable cut-off value when compared to earlier studies on fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in hair. The FAEEs concentrations in hair, police investigation reports, medical history, and the macroscopic and microscopic alcohol-typical results from autopsy, such as liver, pancreas, and cardiac findings, were taken into account in this study. In 80.2 % of all 1,057 cases pathologic findings that may be related to alcohol abuse were reported. The cases were divided into social drinkers (n = 168), alcohol abusers (n = 502), and cases without information on alcohol use. The median FAEEs concentration in the group of social drinkers was 0.302 ng/mg (range 0.008-14.3 ng/mg). In the group of alcohol abusers a median of 1.346 ng/mg (range 0.010-83.7 ng/mg) was found. Before June 2009 the hair FAEEs test was routinely applied to a proximal hair segment of 0-6 cm, changing to a routinely investigated hair length of 3 cm after 2009, as proposed by the Society of Hair Testing (SoHT). The method showed significant differences between the groups of social drinkers and alcoholics, leading to an improvement in the postmortem detection of alcohol abuse. Nevertheless, the performance of the method was rather poor, with an area under the curve calculated from receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve AUC) of 0.745. The optimum cut-off value for differentiation between social and chronic excessive drinking calculated for hair FAEEs was 1.08 ng/mg, with a sensitivity of 56 % and a specificity of 80 %. In relation to the "Consensus on Alcohol Markers 2012

  13. Abdominal rigidity

    MedlinePlus

    Rigidity of the abdomen ... is a sore area inside the belly or abdomen, the pain will get worse when a hand ... Causes can include: Abscess inside the abdomen Appendicitis ... small intestine, large bowel, or gallbladder ( gastrointestinal ...

  14. The Use of Innovative Two-Component Cluster Analysis and Serodiagnostic Cut-Off Methods to Estimate Prevalence of Pertussis Reinfections.

    PubMed

    van Twillert, Inonge; Bonačić Marinović, Axel A; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A M; Kuipers, Betsy; Berbers, Guy A M; van der Maas, Nicoline A T; Verheij, Theo J M; Versteegh, Florens G A; Teunis, Peter F M; van Els, Cécile A C M

    2016-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis circulates even in highly vaccinated countries affecting all age groups. Insight into the scale of concealed reinfections is important as they may contribute to transmission. We therefore investigated whether current single-point serodiagnostic methods are suitable to estimate the prevalence of pertussis reinfection. Two methods based on IgG-Ptx plasma levels alone were used to evaluate the proportion of renewed seroconversions in the past year in a cohort of retrospective pertussis cases ≥ 24 months after a proven earlier symptomatic infection. A Dutch population database was used as a baseline. Applying a classical 62.5 IU/ml IgG-Ptx cut-off, we calculated a seroprevalence of 15% in retrospective cases, higher than the 10% observed in the population baseline. However, this method could not discriminate between renewed seroconversion and waning of previously infection-enhanced IgG-Ptx levels. Two-component cluster analysis of the IgG-Ptx datasets of both pertussis cases and the general population revealed a continuum of intermediate IgG-Ptx levels, preventing the establishment of a positive population and the comparison of prevalence by this alternative method. Next, we investigated the complementary serodiagnostic value of IgA-Ptx levels. When modelling datasets including both convalescent and retrospective cases we obtained new cut-offs for both IgG-Ptx and IgA-Ptx that were optimized to evaluate renewed seroconversions in the ex-cases target population. Combining these cut-offs two-dimensionally, we calculated 8.0% reinfections in retrospective cases, being below the baseline seroprevalence. Our study for the first time revealed the shortcomings of using only IgG-Ptx data in conventional serodiagnostic methods to determine pertussis reinfections. Improved results can be obtained with two-dimensional serodiagnostic profiling. The proportion of reinfections thus established suggests a relatively increased period of protection to renewed

  15. The Use of Innovative Two-Component Cluster Analysis and Serodiagnostic Cut-Off Methods to Estimate Prevalence of Pertussis Reinfections

    PubMed Central

    van Twillert, Inonge; Bonačić Marinović, Axel A.; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A. M.; Kuipers, Betsy; Berbers, Guy A. M.; van der Maas, Nicoline A. T.; Verheij, Theo J. M.; Versteegh, Florens G. A.; Teunis, Peter F. M.; van Els, Cécile A. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis circulates even in highly vaccinated countries affecting all age groups. Insight into the scale of concealed reinfections is important as they may contribute to transmission. We therefore investigated whether current single-point serodiagnostic methods are suitable to estimate the prevalence of pertussis reinfection. Two methods based on IgG-Ptx plasma levels alone were used to evaluate the proportion of renewed seroconversions in the past year in a cohort of retrospective pertussis cases ≥ 24 months after a proven earlier symptomatic infection. A Dutch population database was used as a baseline. Applying a classical 62.5 IU/ml IgG-Ptx cut-off, we calculated a seroprevalence of 15% in retrospective cases, higher than the 10% observed in the population baseline. However, this method could not discriminate between renewed seroconversion and waning of previously infection-enhanced IgG-Ptx levels. Two-component cluster analysis of the IgG-Ptx datasets of both pertussis cases and the general population revealed a continuum of intermediate IgG-Ptx levels, preventing the establishment of a positive population and the comparison of prevalence by this alternative method. Next, we investigated the complementary serodiagnostic value of IgA-Ptx levels. When modelling datasets including both convalescent and retrospective cases we obtained new cut-offs for both IgG-Ptx and IgA-Ptx that were optimized to evaluate renewed seroconversions in the ex-cases target population. Combining these cut-offs two-dimensionally, we calculated 8.0% reinfections in retrospective cases, being below the baseline seroprevalence. Our study for the first time revealed the shortcomings of using only IgG-Ptx data in conventional serodiagnostic methods to determine pertussis reinfections. Improved results can be obtained with two-dimensional serodiagnostic profiling. The proportion of reinfections thus established suggests a relatively increased period of protection to renewed

  16. Bovine Tuberculosis in Cattle in the Highlands of Cameroon: Seroprevalence Estimates and Rates of Tuberculin Skin Test Reactors at Modified Cut-Offs

    PubMed Central

    Awah-Ndukum, J.; Kudi, A. C.; Bah, G. S.; Bradley, G.; Tebug, S. F.; Dickmu, P. L.; Njakoi, H. N.; Agharih, W. N.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain epidemiological estimates of bovine tuberculosis (TB) prevalence in cattle in the highlands of Cameroon using two population-based tuberculin skin test (TST) surveys in the years 2009 and 2010. However, prior to the TST survey in 2010, blood was collected from already chosen cattle for serological assay. Anti-bovine TB antibodies was detected in 37.17% of tested animals and bovine TB prevalence estimates were 3.59%–7.48%, 8.92%–13.25%, 11.77%–17.26% and 13.14%–18.35% for comparative TST at ≥4 mm, ≥3 mm and ≥2 mm cut-off points and single TST, respectively. The agreement between TST and lateral flow was generally higher in TST positive than in TST negative subjects. The K coefficients were 0.119, 0.234, 0.251 and 0.254 for comparative TST at ≥4 mm, ≥3 mm and ≥2 mm cut-off points and the single TST groups, respectively. Chi square statistics revealed that strong (P < 0.05; χ2 > 48) associations existed between seroprevalence rates and TST reactors. The study suggested that using lateral flow assay and TST at severe interpretations could improve the perception of bovine TB in Cameroon. The importance of defining TST at modified cut-offs and disease status by post-mortem detection and mycobacterial culture of TB lesions in local environments cannot be overemphasised. PMID:22567547

  17. Energy-averaged electron-ion momentum transport cross section in the Born Approximation and Debye-Hückel potential: Comparison with the cut-off theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghloul, Mofreh R.; Bourham, Mohamed A.; Doster, J. Michael

    2000-02-01

    An exact analytical expression for the energy-averaged electron-ion momentum transport cross section in the Born approximation and Debye-Hückel exponentially screened potential has been derived and compared with the formulae given by other authors. A quantitative comparison between cut-off theory and quantum mechanical perturbation theory has been presented. Based on results from the Born approximation and Spitzer's formula, a new approximate formula for the quantum Coulomb logarithm has been derived and shown to be more accurate than previous expressions.

  18. Energy-averaged electron-ion momentum transport cross section in the Born approximation and Debye-Hückel potential: Comparison with the cut-off theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghloul, Mofreh R.; Bourham, Mohamed A.; Doster, J. Michael

    2000-04-01

    An exact analytical expression for the energy-averaged electron-ion momentum transport cross section in the Born approximation and Debye-Hückel exponentially screened potential has been derived and compared with the formulae given by other authors. A quantitative comparison between cut-off theory and quantum mechanical perturbation theory has been presented. Based on results from the Born approximation and Spitzer's formula, a new approximate formula for the quantum Coulomb logarithm has been derived and shown to be more accurate than previous expressions.

  19. Optimal cut-off points of fasting plasma glucose for two-step strategy in estimating prevalence and screening undiagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes in Harbin, China.

    PubMed

    Bao, Chundan; Zhang, Dianfeng; Sun, Bo; Lan, Li; Cui, Wenxiu; Xu, Guohua; Sui, Conglan; Wang, Yibaina; Zhao, Yashuang; Wang, Jian; Li, Hongyuan

    2015-01-01

    To identify optimal cut-off points of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) for two-step strategy in screening abnormal glucose metabolism and estimating prevalence in general Chinese population. A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted on 7913 people aged 20 to 74 years in Harbin. Diabetes and pre-diabetes were determined by fasting and 2 hour post-load glucose from the oral glucose tolerance test in all participants. Screening potential of FPG, cost per case identified by two-step strategy, and optimal FPG cut-off points were described. The prevalence of diabetes was 12.7%, of which 65.2% was undiagnosed. Twelve percent or 9.0% of participants were diagnosed with pre-diabetes using 2003 ADA criteria or 1999 WHO criteria, respectively. The optimal FPG cut-off points for two-step strategy were 5.6 mmol/l for previously undiagnosed diabetes (area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve of FPG 0.93; sensitivity 82.0%; cost per case identified by two-step strategy ¥261), 5.3 mmol/l for both diabetes and pre-diabetes or pre-diabetes alone using 2003 ADA criteria (0.89 or 0.85; 72.4% or 62.9%; ¥110 or ¥258), 5.0 mmol/l for pre-diabetes using 1999 WHO criteria (0.78; 66.8%; ¥399), and 4.9 mmol/l for IGT alone (0.74; 62.2%; ¥502). Using the two-step strategy, the underestimates of prevalence reduced to nearly 38% for pre-diabetes or 18.7% for undiagnosed diabetes, respectively. Approximately a quarter of the general population in Harbin was in hyperglycemic condition. Using optimal FPG cut-off points for two-step strategy in Chinese population may be more effective and less costly for reducing the missed diagnosis of hyperglycemic condition.

  20. Optimal cut-off points of fasting plasma glucose for two-step strategy in estimating prevalence and screening undiagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes in Harbin, China.

    PubMed

    Bao, Chundan; Zhang, Dianfeng; Sun, Bo; Lan, Li; Cui, Wenxiu; Xu, Guohua; Sui, Conglan; Wang, Yibaina; Zhao, Yashuang; Wang, Jian; Li, Hongyuan

    2015-01-01

    To identify optimal cut-off points of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) for two-step strategy in screening abnormal glucose metabolism and estimating prevalence in general Chinese population. A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted on 7913 people aged 20 to 74 years in Harbin. Diabetes and pre-diabetes were determined by fasting and 2 hour post-load glucose from the oral glucose tolerance test in all participants. Screening potential of FPG, cost per case identified by two-step strategy, and optimal FPG cut-off points were described. The prevalence of diabetes was 12.7%, of which 65.2% was undiagnosed. Twelve percent or 9.0% of participants were diagnosed with pre-diabetes using 2003 ADA criteria or 1999 WHO criteria, respectively. The optimal FPG cut-off points for two-step strategy were 5.6 mmol/l for previously undiagnosed diabetes (area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve of FPG 0.93; sensitivity 82.0%; cost per case identified by two-step strategy ¥261), 5.3 mmol/l for both diabetes and pre-diabetes or pre-diabetes alone using 2003 ADA criteria (0.89 or 0.85; 72.4% or 62.9%; ¥110 or ¥258), 5.0 mmol/l for pre-diabetes using 1999 WHO criteria (0.78; 66.8%; ¥399), and 4.9 mmol/l for IGT alone (0.74; 62.2%; ¥502). Using the two-step strategy, the underestimates of prevalence reduced to nearly 38% for pre-diabetes or 18.7% for undiagnosed diabetes, respectively. Approximately a quarter of the general population in Harbin was in hyperglycemic condition. Using optimal FPG cut-off points for two-step strategy in Chinese population may be more effective and less costly for reducing the missed diagnosis of hyperglycemic condition. PMID:25785585

  1. Optimal Cut-Off Points of Fasting Plasma Glucose for Two-Step Strategy in Estimating Prevalence and Screening Undiagnosed Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes in Harbin, China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bo; Lan, Li; Cui, Wenxiu; Xu, Guohua; Sui, Conglan; Wang, Yibaina; Zhao, Yashuang; Wang, Jian; Li, Hongyuan

    2015-01-01

    To identify optimal cut-off points of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) for two-step strategy in screening abnormal glucose metabolism and estimating prevalence in general Chinese population. A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted on 7913 people aged 20 to 74 years in Harbin. Diabetes and pre-diabetes were determined by fasting and 2 hour post-load glucose from the oral glucose tolerance test in all participants. Screening potential of FPG, cost per case identified by two-step strategy, and optimal FPG cut-off points were described. The prevalence of diabetes was 12.7%, of which 65.2% was undiagnosed. Twelve percent or 9.0% of participants were diagnosed with pre-diabetes using 2003 ADA criteria or 1999 WHO criteria, respectively. The optimal FPG cut-off points for two-step strategy were 5.6 mmol/l for previously undiagnosed diabetes (area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve of FPG 0.93; sensitivity 82.0%; cost per case identified by two-step strategy ¥261), 5.3 mmol/l for both diabetes and pre-diabetes or pre-diabetes alone using 2003 ADA criteria (0.89 or 0.85; 72.4% or 62.9%; ¥110 or ¥258), 5.0 mmol/l for pre-diabetes using 1999 WHO criteria (0.78; 66.8%; ¥399), and 4.9 mmol/l for IGT alone (0.74; 62.2%; ¥502). Using the two-step strategy, the underestimates of prevalence reduced to nearly 38% for pre-diabetes or 18.7% for undiagnosed diabetes, respectively. Approximately a quarter of the general population in Harbin was in hyperglycemic condition. Using optimal FPG cut-off points for two-step strategy in Chinese population may be more effective and less costly for reducing the missed diagnosis of hyperglycemic condition. PMID:25785585

  2. Investigation and reduction of sub-microgram peptide loss using molecular weight cut-off fractionation prior to mass spectrometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Robert; Wang, Jingxin; Wellner, Daniel; Li, Lingjun

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates the suitability of molecular weight cut-off membrane-based centrifugal filter devices (MWCO) for sub-microgram peptide enrichment passing through the membrane by introduction of methanol and a salt modifier. Using a neuropeptide standard, bradykinin, a reduction in sample loss of over two orders of magnitude is demonstrated with and without undigested protein present. Additionally, a bovine serum albumin (BSA) tryptic digestion was investigated and 27 tryptic peptides were identified using MALDI mass spectrometry whereas only two BSA tryptic peptides were identified after MWCO separation using H2O. The protocol presented here enhances recovery from MWCO separation for sub-μg peptide samples. PMID:23019164

  3. A preliminary evaluation of the occurrence and characteristics of cut-off ponds of the Maryland shores of the Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    Under the auspices of the Maryland Power Plant Siting Program, a preliminary investigation of occurrence and characteristics of cut-off ponds in the Maryland portion of the Chesapeake Bay was conducted. These small ponds occur commonly along the Bay shore. A sand berm separates the freshwaters of the ponds from the saline waters of the Bay; this berm is occasionally breached permitting interchange between ponds and Bay. A survey of aerial maps and photographs has revealed approximately 1800 ponds bordering the mid and upper Bay.

  4. Geomagnetic cutoffs: a review for space dosimetry applications.

    PubMed

    Smart, D F; Shea, M A

    1994-10-01

    The earth's magnetic field acts as a shield against charged particle radiation from interplanetary space, technically described as the geomagnetic cutoff. The cutoff rigidity problem (except for the dipole special case) has "no solution in closed form". The dipole case yields the Stormer equation which has been repeatedly applied to the earth in hopes of providing useful approximations of cutoff rigidities. Unfortunately the earth's magnetic field has significant deviations from dipole geometry, and the Stormer cutoffs are not adequate for most applications. By application of massive digital computer power it is possible to determine realistic geomagnetic cutoffs derived from high order simulation of the geomagnetic field. Using this technique, "world-grids" of directional cutoffs for the earth's surface and for a limited number of satellite altitudes have been derived. However, this approach is so expensive and time consuming it is impractical for most spacecraft orbits, and approximations must be used. The world grids of cutoff rigidities are extensively used as lookup tables, normalization points and interpolation aids to estimate the effective geomagnetic cutoff rigidity of a specific location in space. We review the various options for estimating the cutoff rigidity for earth-orbiting satellites.

  5. Triceps and Subscapular Skinfold Thickness Percentiles and Cut-Offs for Overweight and Obesity in a Population-Based Sample of Schoolchildren and Adolescents in Bogota, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; López-Cifuentes, Mario Ferney; Correa-Bautista, Jorge Enrique; González-Ruíz, Katherine; González-Jiménez, Emilio; Córdoba-Rodríguez, Diana Paola; Vivas, Andrés; Triana-Reina, Hector Reynaldo; Schmidt-RioValle, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of skinfold thickness is an objective measure of adiposity. The aims of this study were to establish Colombian smoothed centile charts and LMS L (Box-Cox transformation), M (median), and S (coefficient of variation) tables for triceps, subscapular, and triceps + subscapular skinfolds; appropriate cut-offs were selected using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis based on a population-based sample of children and adolescents in Bogotá, Colombia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 9618 children and adolescents (55.7% girls; age range of 9-17.9 years). Triceps and subscapular skinfold measurements were obtained using standardized methods. We calculated the triceps + subscapular skinfold (T + SS) sum. Smoothed percentile curves for triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness were derived using the LMS method. ROC curve analyses were used to evaluate the optimal cut-off point of skinfold thickness for overweight and obesity, based on the International Obesity Task Force definitions. Subscapular and triceps skinfolds and T + SS were significantly higher in girls than in boys (p < 0.001). The ROC analysis showed that subscapular and triceps skinfolds and T + SS have a high discriminatory power in the identification of overweight and obesity in the sample population in this study. Our results provide sex- and age-specific normative reference standards for skinfold thickness values from a population from Bogotá, Colombia. PMID:27669294

  6. Triceps and Subscapular Skinfold Thickness Percentiles and Cut-Offs for Overweight and Obesity in a Population-Based Sample of Schoolchildren and Adolescents in Bogota, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; López-Cifuentes, Mario Ferney; Correa-Bautista, Jorge Enrique; González-Ruíz, Katherine; González-Jiménez, Emilio; Córdoba-Rodríguez, Diana Paola; Vivas, Andrés; Triana-Reina, Hector Reynaldo; Schmidt-RioValle, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of skinfold thickness is an objective measure of adiposity. The aims of this study were to establish Colombian smoothed centile charts and LMS L (Box–Cox transformation), M (median), and S (coefficient of variation) tables for triceps, subscapular, and triceps + subscapular skinfolds; appropriate cut-offs were selected using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis based on a population-based sample of children and adolescents in Bogotá, Colombia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 9618 children and adolescents (55.7% girls; age range of 9–17.9 years). Triceps and subscapular skinfold measurements were obtained using standardized methods. We calculated the triceps + subscapular skinfold (T + SS) sum. Smoothed percentile curves for triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness were derived using the LMS method. ROC curve analyses were used to evaluate the optimal cut-off point of skinfold thickness for overweight and obesity, based on the International Obesity Task Force definitions. Subscapular and triceps skinfolds and T + SS were significantly higher in girls than in boys (p < 0.001). The ROC analysis showed that subscapular and triceps skinfolds and T + SS have a high discriminatory power in the identification of overweight and obesity in the sample population in this study. Our results provide sex- and age-specific normative reference standards for skinfold thickness values from a population from Bogotá, Colombia. PMID:27669294

  7. Triceps and Subscapular Skinfold Thickness Percentiles and Cut-Offs for Overweight and Obesity in a Population-Based Sample of Schoolchildren and Adolescents in Bogota, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; López-Cifuentes, Mario Ferney; Correa-Bautista, Jorge Enrique; González-Ruíz, Katherine; González-Jiménez, Emilio; Córdoba-Rodríguez, Diana Paola; Vivas, Andrés; Triana-Reina, Hector Reynaldo; Schmidt-RioValle, Jacqueline

    2016-09-24

    The assessment of skinfold thickness is an objective measure of adiposity. The aims of this study were to establish Colombian smoothed centile charts and LMS L (Box-Cox transformation), M (median), and S (coefficient of variation) tables for triceps, subscapular, and triceps + subscapular skinfolds; appropriate cut-offs were selected using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis based on a population-based sample of children and adolescents in Bogotá, Colombia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 9618 children and adolescents (55.7% girls; age range of 9-17.9 years). Triceps and subscapular skinfold measurements were obtained using standardized methods. We calculated the triceps + subscapular skinfold (T + SS) sum. Smoothed percentile curves for triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness were derived using the LMS method. ROC curve analyses were used to evaluate the optimal cut-off point of skinfold thickness for overweight and obesity, based on the International Obesity Task Force definitions. Subscapular and triceps skinfolds and T + SS were significantly higher in girls than in boys (p < 0.001). The ROC analysis showed that subscapular and triceps skinfolds and T + SS have a high discriminatory power in the identification of overweight and obesity in the sample population in this study. Our results provide sex- and age-specific normative reference standards for skinfold thickness values from a population from Bogotá, Colombia.

  8. Analysis of the acoustic cut-off frequency and high-frequency peaks in six Kepler stars with stochastically excited pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, A.; García, R. A.; Pérez Hernández, F.; Mathur, S.

    2015-11-01

    Gravito-acoustic modes in the Sun and other stars propagate in resonant cavities with a frequency below a given limit known as the cut-off frequency. At higher frequencies, waves are no longer trapped in the stellar interior and become traveller waves. In this article, we study six pulsating solar-like stars at different evolutionary stages observed by the NASA Kepler mission. These high signal-to-noise targets show a peak structure that extends at very high frequencies and are good candidates for studying the transition region between the modes and interference peaks or pseudo-modes. Following the same methodology successfully applied on Sun-as-a-star measurements, we uncover the existence of pseudo-modes in these stars with one or two dominant interference patterns depending on the evolutionary stage of the star. We also infer their cut-off frequency as the midpoint between the last eigenmode and the first peak of the interference patterns. Using ray theory we show that, while the period of one of the interference patterns is very close to half the large separation, the period of the other interference pattern depends on the time phase of mixed waves, thus carrying additional information on the stellar structure and evolution. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. One strategy to enhance electrochemical properties of Ni-based cathode materials under high cut-off voltage for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Longwei; Jiang, Feng; Cao, Yanbing; Hu, Guorong; Du, Ke; Peng, Zhongdong

    2016-10-01

    Well-distributed, nano-sized and amorphous or crystalized NaTi2(PO4)3 (NTP) coating layer with high ionic conductivity is successfully introduced onto the surface of LiNi0.6Co0.2Mn0.2O2 (LNCM) particles by a simple and effective mechanical activation method followed by adjusting the reheating temperature appropriately. The promoting influence of NTP coating on the structure stability, cycle life and high rate capability under elevated cut-off voltage has been investigated in-depth. Particularly for the crystalized NTP-coated LNCM, the main reason for the enhanced electrochemical performance can be attributed to the NTP layer with rhombohedral structure providing convenient and low activation barrier diffusion pathways for Li+ ions to insert/extract the interface of electrode/electrolyte. Besides, the NTP-coated layer with stable structure can effectively inhibit the surface side reaction during the long charge/discharge process under high cut-off voltage, which will reduce the harmful insulative by-products. It's worth mentioning that the cyclic stability of crystalized NTP-coated LNCM between 3.0 and 4.6 V is also improved significantly even under the rigorous test environment.

  10. Understanding capacity fade in silicon based electrodes for lithium-ion batteries using three electrode cells and upper cut-off voltage studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, Shane D.; Loveridge, M. J.; Lain, Michael J.; Ferrari, Stefania; Polzin, Bryant J.; Bhagat, Rohit; Dashwood, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Commercial Li-ion batteries are typically cycled between 3.0 and 4.2 V. These voltages limits are chosen based on the characteristics of the cathode (e.g. lithium cobalt oxide) and anode (e.g. graphite). When alternative anode/cathode chemistries are studied the same cut-off voltages are often, mistakenly, used. Silicon (Si) based anodes are widely studied as a high capacity alternative to graphite for Lithium-ion batteries. When silicon-based anodes are paired with high capacity cathodes (e.g. Lithium Nickel Cobalt Aluminium Oxide; NCA) the cell typically suffers from rapid capacity fade. The purpose of this communication is to understand how the choice of upper cut-off voltage affects cell performance in Si/NCA cells. A careful study of three-electrode cell data will show that capacity fade in Si/NCA cells is due to an ever-evolving silicon voltage profile that pushes the upper voltage at the cathode to >4.4 V (vs. Li/Li+). This behaviour initially improves cycle efficiency, due to liberation of new lithium, but ultimately reduces cycling efficiency, resulting in rapid capacity fade.

  11. Soro West: A non-seismically defined, fault cut-off prospect in the Papuan Fold and Thrust Belt, Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W.F.; Swift, C.M. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Soro West is a fault cut-off prospect located in the frontal portion of the Papuan Fold and Thrust Belt. Prospective Toro and Imburu sandstones are interpreted to be in the hanging wall of the Soro Thrust. Truncation against the thrust, both updip and through lateral ramps, provides the trapping mechanism. The Soro West Prospect was defined using geological, geochemical, remote sensing, and geophysical data. The definition and location of the trap is a primary risk and work was focused on this aspect. Surface geological data (lithology, strikes, and dips) topography and synthetic aperture radar imagery were incorporated into the evaluation. Statistical curvature analysis techniques helped define the shape of the structure and the locations of the lateral ramps. Strontium isotope analyses of Darai Limestone surface samples refined erosional levels using a locally-derived reference curve. Severe karst precludes the acquisition of coherent surface seismic data, so the primary geophysical tool used was magnetotellurics (MT). A detailed, pre-survey feasibility study defined expected responses from alternative structural models. The MT data demonstrated that the limestone at surface is underlain by thick conductive clastics and not another Darai Limestone sheet. The data also constrained the range of fault cut-off positions significantly. Multiple, three-dimensionally consistent, restorable alternative structural models were created using results from all analyses. These led to a positive assessment of the prospect and an exploratory test is to be drilled in 1996.

  12. Influence of the lift-off effect on the cut-off frequency of the EMAT-generated Rayleigh wave signal.

    PubMed

    Yi, Pengxing; Zhang, Kang; Li, Yahui; Zhang, Xuming

    2014-01-01

    The electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT), a non-contact NDT tool with large lift-off, is becoming an attractive method for detecting the cracks in the metal parts. However, the lift-off of the transducer has a direct effect on the feature that is used to characterize the defects. A detailed investigation on the relationship between the feature and the lift-off of the EMAT is crucial in the detection process. This paper investigates the lift-off effect on the feature, cut-off frequency of EMAT in the Rayleigh wave. The study can be divided into two parts. Firstly, with a multi-field coupling environment, 2-D electromagnetic and wave generation EMAT models are built to simulate the interaction of the Rayleigh wave with the surface crack. Then, the lift-off effect on the cut-off frequency is investigated through simulation and experiment. Compared to the previous studies, it is found that lift-off would cause a negative result when the lift-off varies in the testing process. Besides, the calibration obtained from the tests at a random lift-off value can be used in other tests with any different lift off value provided that the lift-off is kept as a constant during the detection process. PMID:25340446

  13. Clonidine-stimulated growth hormone concentrations (cut-off values) measured by immunochemiluminescent assay (ICMA) in children and adolescents with short stature

    PubMed Central

    de Fátima Borges, Maria; Teixeira, Flávia Carolina Cândida; Feltrin, Aline Karin; Ribeiro, Karina Alvarenga; Nascentes, Gabriel Antonio Nogueira; Resende, Elisabete Aparecida Mantovani Rodrigues; Ferreira, Beatriz Pires; Silva, Adriana Paula; Palhares, Heloísa Marcelina Cunha

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To establish cut-off values for growth hormone concentrations using clonidine as a secretagogue and an immunochemiluminescent assay as the method of measurement and to analyze the response time as well as the influence of gender, nutritional status and pubertal stage. METHODS: A total of 225 tests were performed in 3 patient groups, categorized as group 1 (normal), group 2 (idiopathic short stature) and group 3 (growth hormone deficiency). Among the 199 disease-free individuals, 138 were prepubertal, and 61 were pubertal. Clonidine (0.1 mg/m2) was orally administered, and the growth hormone level was measured by immunochemiluminescent assay. The growth hormone peak and the difference between the growth hormone peak and the baseline level were then analyzed. Statistical analyses were performed using Student's t-test or the Mann-Whitney test and Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn's post hoc test. Cut-off values were determined using a receiver operating characteristic curve. RESULTS: Group 1 and group 2 had no difference in growth hormone peak, gender, body mass index standard deviation score, or pubertal stage. Group 3 exhibited a significantly lower growth hormone peak than the other groups did. The receiver operating characteristic curve demonstrated that growth hormone concentrations ≥ 3.0 ng/mL defined responsiveness to clonidine. In total, 3.02% of individuals in group 1 and group 2 were considered false positive, i.e., these children lacked growth hormone deficiency and had a peak below 3.0 ng/mL. CONCLUSION: Clonidine-stimulated growth hormone concentrations ≥3 ng/mL, as measured by immunochemiluminescent assay, suggest responsiveness to the stimulus regardless of gender, body mass index standard deviation score or pubertal stage. PMID:27166774

  14. Evaluating the Possibility of Defining Cut-Off Points for ΔFA% in Order to Differentiate Four Major Types of Peri-Tumoral White Matter Tract Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Deilami, Tourisa; Hadizadeh Kharrazi, Homayoun; Seddighi, Amir Saied; Tanzifi, Parin; Tayebivaljouzi, Reza; Zamani, Fatemeh; Chavoshzadeh Tafti, Atefeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and its different scalar values such as fractional anisotropy (FA) have recently been used for evaluation of peri-tumoral white matter (WM) involvement to help define safer surgical excision margins. Objectives: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the possibility of defining diagnostic cut-off points for differentiating four major types of peri-tumoral WM involvement using FA. Patients and Methods: DTI was performed in 12 patients with high presumption of having brain tumors, on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. DTI data was processed by MedINRIA software. Two-hundred region of interests (ROI) were evaluated: 100 in the lesion zone and the rest in the normal WM in the contralateral hemisphere. FA value related to each ROI was measured, and the percentage of FA decrement (ΔFAs%) was calculated. Results: Of the 100 ROIs on the lesion side, 74 were related to high-grade lesions, 23 to low-grade ones, and three to “gliosis”. There were 54 “infiltrated”, 22 “displaced”, 15 “disrupted”, and 9 “edematous” tracts. The major type of fiber involvement, both in low-grade and high-grade tumors was “infiltrated, whereas “edematous” fibers comprised the minority. ΔFA% was more than -35 for “displaced” and “edematous” fibers, and less than -35 for the majority of “disrupted” ones, but “infiltrated” fibers had scattered distribution. Mean ΔFA% was the least for “disrupted”, followed by “infiltrated”, “edematous” and “displaced” parts. Conclusion: Introducing definite diagnostic cut-points was not possible, due to overlap. Based on the fact that “disruption” is the most aggressive process, a sensitivity analysis was carried out for “disrupted” fibers for several presumptive cut-off points. PMID:26528388

  15. The optimum cut-off value to differentiate Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto from other species of E. granulosus sensu lato using larval rostellar hook morphometry.

    PubMed

    Soriano, S V; Pierangeli, N B; Pianciola, L A; Mazzeo, M; Lazzarini, L E; Debiaggi, M F; Bergagna, H F J; Basualdo, J A

    2015-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis caused by Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato is one of the most important helminth zoonoses in the world; it affects both humans and livestock. The disease is endemic in Argentina and highly endemic in the province of Neuquén. Considerable genetic and phenotypic variation has been demonstrated in E. granulosus, and ten different genotypes (G1-G10) have been identified using molecular tools. Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato may be considered a species complex, comprised of E. granulosus sensu stricto (G1-G3), E. equinus (G4), E. ortleppi (G5) and E. canadensis (G6-G10). In endemic areas, the characterization of cystic echinococcosis molecular epidemiology is important in order to apply adequate control strategies. A cut-off value for larval large hook total length to distinguish E. granulosus sensu stricto isolates from those produced by other species of the complex was defined for the first time. Overall, 1780 larval hooks of 36 isolates obtained from sheep (n= 11, G1), goats (n= 10, G6), cattle (n= 5, G6) and pigs (n= 10, G7) were analysed. Validation against molecular genotyping as gold standard was carried out using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The optimum cut-off value was defined as 26.5 μm. The proposed method showed high sensitivity (97.8%) and specificity (91.1%). Since in most endemic regions the molecular epidemiology of echinococcosis includes the coexistence of the widely distributed E. granulosus sensu stricto G1 strain and other species of the complex, this technique could be useful as a quick and economical tool for epidemiological and surveillance field studies, when fertile cysts are present.

  16. Cosmic rays, geomagnetic field and climate changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, M.; Smart, D.

    The possibility of a connection between cosmic radiation and climate has intrigued scientists for the past several decades. The recent studies of Friis -Christensen and Svensmark has shown an observed variation of 3-4% of the global cloud cover between 1980 and 1995 that appeared to be directly correlated with the change in galactic cosmic radiation flux over the solar cycle. However, in studies of this type, not only the solar cycle modulation of cosmic radiation must be considered, but also the changes in the cosmic radiation impinging at the top of the atmosphere as a result of the long term evolution of the geomagnetic field. We present preliminary results of an on-going study of geomagnetic cutoff rigidities over a 400-year interval. These results show (1) the change in cutoff rigidity is sufficient large so that the change in cosmic radiation flux impacting the earth is approximately equal to the relative change in flux over a solar cycle, and (2) the changes in cutoff rigidity are non- uniform over the globe with both significant increases and decreases at mid-latitude locations.

  17. Cut-Off Points for Mild, Moderate, and Severe Pain on the Numeric Rating Scale for Pain in Patients with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: Variability and Influence of Sex and Catastrophizing

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Anne M.; Stewart, Roy E.; Köke, Albère J. A.; Oosterwijk, René F. A.; Swaan, Jeannette L.; Schreurs, Karlein M. G.; Schiphorst Preuper, Henrica R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The 0–10 Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) is often used in pain management. The aims of our study were to determine the cut-off points for mild, moderate, and severe pain in terms of pain-related interference with functioning in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain, to measure the variability of the optimal cut-off points, and to determine the influence of patients’ catastrophizing and their sex on these cut-off points. Methods: 2854 patients were included. Pain was assessed by the NRS, functioning by the Pain Disability Index (PDI) and catastrophizing by the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Cut-off point schemes were tested using ANOVAs with and without using the PSC scores or sex as co-variates and with the interaction between CP scheme and PCS score and sex, respectively. The variability of the optimal cut-off point schemes was quantified using bootstrapping procedure. Results and conclusion: The study showed that NRS scores ≤ 5 correspond to mild, scores of 6–7 to moderate and scores ≥8 to severe pain in terms of pain-related interference with functioning. Bootstrapping analysis identified this optimal NRS cut-off point scheme in 90% of the bootstrapping samples. The interpretation of the NRS is independent of sex, but seems to depend on catastrophizing. In patients with high catastrophizing tendency, the optimal cut-off point scheme equals that for the total study sample, but in patients with a low catastrophizing tendency, NRS scores ≤ 3 correspond to mild, scores of 4–6 to moderate and scores ≥7 to severe pain in terms of interference with functioning. In these optimal cut-off schemes, NRS scores of 4 and 5 correspond to moderate interference with functioning for patients with low catastrophizing tendency and to mild interference for patients with high catastrophizing tendency. Theoretically one would therefore expect that among the patients with NRS scores 4 and 5 there would be a higher average PDI score for those with low

  18. Total motile sperm count has a superior predictive value over the WHO 2010 cut-off values for the outcomes of intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles.

    PubMed

    Borges, E; Setti, A S; Braga, D P A F; Figueira, R C S; Iaconelli, A

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare (i) the intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcomes among groups with different total motile sperm count ranges, (ii) the intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcomes between groups with normal and abnormal total motile sperm count, and (iii) the predictive values of WHO 2010 cut-off values and pre-wash total motile sperm count for the intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcomes, in couples with male infertility. This study included data from 518 patients undergoing their first intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycle as a result of male infertility. Couples were divided into five groups according to their total motile sperm count: Group I, total motile sperm count <1 × 10(6) ; group II, total motile sperm count 1-5 × 10(6) ; group III, total motile sperm count 5-10 × 10(6) ; group IV, total motile sperm count 10-20 × 10(6) ; and group V, total motile sperm count >20 × 10(6) (which was considered a normal total motile sperm count value). Then, couples were grouped into an abnormal and normal total motile sperm count group. The groups were compared regarding intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcomes. The predictive values of WHO 2010 cut-off values and total motile sperm count for the intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcomes were also investigated. The fertilization rate was lower in total motile sperm count group I compared to total motile sperm count group V (72.5 ± 17.6 vs. 84.9 ± 14.4, p = 0.011). The normal total motile sperm count group had a higher fertilization rate (84.9 ± 14.4 vs. 81.1 ± 15.8, p = 0.016) and lower miscarriage rate (17.9% vs. 29.5%, p = 0.041) compared to the abnormal total motile sperm count group. The total motile sperm count was the only parameter that demonstrated a predictive value for the formation of high-quality embryos on D2 (OR: 1.18, p = 0.013), formation of high-quality embryos on D3 (OR: 1.12, p = 0.037), formation of blastocysts on D5 (OR: 1.16, p = 0

  19. Calculation of the ELISA’s cut-off based on the change-point analysis method for detection of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Bolivian dogs in the absence of controls

    PubMed Central

    Lardeux, Frédéric; Torrico, Gino; Aliaga, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    In ELISAs, sera of individuals infected by Trypanosoma cruzi show absorbance values above a cut-off value. The cut-off is generally computed by means of formulas that need absorbance readings of negative (and sometimes positive) controls, which are included in the titer plates amongst the unknown samples. When no controls are available, other techniques should be employed such as change-point analysis. The method was applied to Bolivian dog sera processed by ELISA to diagnose T. cruzi infection. In each titer plate, the change-point analysis estimated a step point which correctly discriminated among known positive and known negative sera, unlike some of the six usual cut-off formulas tested. To analyse the ELISAs results, the change-point method was as good as the usual cut-off formula of the form “mean + 3 standard deviation of negative controls”. Change-point analysis is therefore an efficient alternative method to analyse ELISA absorbance values when no controls are available. PMID:27384081

  20. Calculation of the ELISA's cut-off based on the change-point analysis method for detection of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Bolivian dogs in the absence of controls.

    PubMed

    Lardeux, Frédéric; Torrico, Gino; Aliaga, Claudia

    2016-07-01

    In ELISAs, sera of individuals infected by Trypanosoma cruzi show absorbance values above a cut-off value. The cut-off is generally computed by means of formulas that need absorbance readings of negative (and sometimes positive) controls, which are included in the titer plates amongst the unknown samples. When no controls are available, other techniques should be employed such as change-point analysis. The method was applied to Bolivian dog sera processed by ELISA to diagnose T. cruzi infection. In each titer plate, the change-point analysis estimated a step point which correctly discriminated among known positive and known negative sera, unlike some of the six usual cut-off formulas tested. To analyse the ELISAs results, the change-point method was as good as the usual cut-off formula of the form "mean + 3 standard deviation of negative controls". Change-point analysis is therefore an efficient alternative method to analyse ELISA absorbance values when no controls are available. PMID:27384081

  1. Removal of methadone by extended dialysis using a high cut-off dialyzer: implications for the treatment of overdose and for pain management in patients undergoing light chain removal.

    PubMed

    Arelin, Viktor; Schmidt, Julius J; Kayser, Nathalie; Kühn-Velten, W Nikolaus; Suhling, Hendrik; Eden, Gabriele; Kielstein, Jan T

    2016-06-01

    The synthetic opioid methadone hydrochloride has a low molecular weight of 346 D, a high volume of distribution (4 - 7 L/kg), and is lipophilic. It is used as an analgesic and for the maintenance treatment of opiate dependence. In drug addicts, methadone is frequently involved in mixed intoxications that can lead to death. Here we present the case of a drug addict in whom a high cut-off dialysis membrane together with extended dialysis was used in the setting of suspected overdose and acute kidney injury. Although the observed dialyzer plasma clearance (31.5 mL/min) and reduction ratio (38%) were higher than previously reported for standard hemodialysis, the total amount of methadone in the spent dialysate after 1 extended dialysis session was quite low. Hence, even extended dialysis with a high cut-off membrane does not seem to offer a clinically relevant benefit in the setting of overdose for enhanced methadone removal. On the other hand, in patients undergoing high cut-off dialysis for the removal of light chains, methadone could still be used as an analgesic without an additional dose after high cut-off hemodialysis. PMID:27116939

  2. Optimal cut-off of homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome: third national surveillance of risk factors of non-communicable diseases in Iran (SuRFNCD-2007)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Aim We have recently determined the optimal cut-off of the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance for the diagnosis of insulin resistance (IR) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in non-diabetic residents of Tehran, the capital of Iran. The aim of the present study is to establish the optimal cut-off at the national level in the Iranian population with and without diabetes. Methods Data of the third National Surveillance of Risk Factors of Non-Communicable Diseases, available for 3,071 adult Iranian individuals aging 25-64 years were analyzed. MetS was defined according to the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATPIII) and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. HOMA-IR cut-offs from the 50th to the 95th percentile were calculated and sensitivity, specificity, and positive likelihood ratio for MetS diagnosis were determined. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of HOMA-IR for MetS diagnosis were depicted, and the optimal cut-offs were determined by two different methods: Youden index, and the shortest distance from the top left corner of the curve. Results The area under the curve (AUC) (95%CI) was 0.650 (0.631-0.670) for IDF-defined MetS and 0.683 (0.664-0.703) with the ATPIII definition. The optimal HOMA-IR cut-off for the diagnosis of IDF- and ATPIII-defined MetS in non-diabetic individuals was 1.775 (sensitivity: 57.3%, specificity: 65.3%, with ATPIII; sensitivity: 55.9%, specificity: 64.7%, with IDF). The optimal cut-offs in diabetic individuals were 3.875 (sensitivity: 49.7%, specificity: 69.6%) and 4.325 (sensitivity: 45.4%, specificity: 69.0%) for ATPIII- and IDF-defined MetS, respectively. Conclusion We determined the optimal HOMA-IR cut-off points for the diagnosis of MetS in the Iranian population with and without diabetes. PMID:20374655

  3. Geomagnetic Workshop, Canberra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, C. E.; Lilley, F. E. M.; Milligan, P. R.

    On May 14-15, 1985, 63 discerning geomagnetists flocked to Canberra to attend the Geomagnetic Workshop coorganized by the Australian Bureau of Mineral Resources (BMR) and the Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University (ANU). With an aurorally glowing cast that included an International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) president, former president, and division chairman, the Oriental Magneto-Banquet (which was the center of the meeting), was assured of success. As a cunning ploy to mask the true nature of this gastronomic extravagance from the probings of income tax departments, a presentation of scientific papers on Australian geomagnetism in its global setting was arranged.The Australian region, including New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, and a large sector of the Antarctic, covers one eighth of the Earth's surface and historically has played an important role in the study of geomagnetism. The region contains both the south magnetic and geomagnetic poles, and two Australian Antarctic stations (Casey and Davis) are situated in the region of the south polar cusp (see Figure 1).

  4. A cut-off in ocular chemesthesis from vapors of homologous alkylbenzenes and 2-ketones as revealed by concentration-detection functions

    SciTech Connect

    Cometto-Muniz, J. Enrique Abraham, Michael H.

    2008-08-01

    Studies of homologous series of environmental vapors have shown that their chemesthetic (i.e., sensory irritation) potency increases with carbon chain length (that is, their detection thresholds decrease) until they reach a homolog that fails to be detected, even at vapor saturation. All ensuing homologs cannot be detected either. In this investigation, we measured concentration-detection (i.e., psychometric) functions for ocular chemesthesis from homologous alkylbenzenes (pentyl, hexyl, and heptyl benzene) and 2-ketones (undecanone, dodecanone, and tridecanone). Using a three-alternative forced-choice procedure against air blanks, we tested a total of 18 to 24 subjects, about half of them females, average age 31 years, ranging from 18 to 56 years. Stimuli were generated and presented by a computer-controlled, vapor delivery device whose output was quantified by gas chromatography. Exposure time was 6 s and delivery flow 2.5 L/min. Within the context of present and previous findings, the outcome indicated that the functions for heptylbenzene and 2-tridecanone reached a plateau where further increases in concentration did not enhance detection. We conclude that: a) a cut-off point in ocular chemesthetic detection is reached along homologous alkylbenzenes and 2-ketones at the level of heptylbenzene and 2-tridecanone, respectively, and b) the observed effect rests on the homologs exceeding a critical molecular size (or dimension) rather than on them failing to achieve a high enough vapor concentration.

  5. Cut off from supplies - sulfate exhaustion and implications for methane emissions in a brackish rewetted peatland after separation from the coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koebsch, Franziska; Liu, Bo; Schmiedinger, Iris; Spitzy, Alejandro; Köhler, Stefan; Koch, Marian; Jurasinski, Gerald; Gehre, Matthias; Sachs, Torsten; Böttcher, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Coastal ecosystems are at the interface between marine and freshwater and exhibit a special geochemistry. We investigate the S and C geochemistry of a coastal, degraded fen peatland. The site has been cut off from the Baltic Sea since 1995 and was rewetted with freshwater from the surrounding catchment in 2010. Despite of locally high pore water sulfate (SO42-) concentrations, the fen turned into a strong source for methane (CH4) with annual budgets up to 0.26±0.06 kg m-2 (Hahn et al. 2015). To reconcile this apparent contradiction we use concentration patterns and stable isotope signatures of water, SO42-, pyrite, dissolved carbon, and CH4 (δ2H, δ13C, δ18O, δ34S) along a transect with increasing distance to the Baltic coastline (300-1500 m). The current peatland geochemistry is characterized by a combination of relict signals reflecting former brackish water intrusion events and indicators of recent human activities such as internal eutrophication and increasing freshwater contribution. The shallow peat layer (depth mostly ≤ 55 cm) exhibited a pronounced vertical gradient with a freshwater-front lying on top of the brackish water layer. S geochemistry was decoupled from present brackish water distribution as marine SO42- was almost completely biotically reduced and converted to pyrite. The remaining pore water SO42- pool was remarkably 34S-enriched in relation to Baltic Sea SO42- (up to +86.4 and +21‰, respectively) and also δ34S-values of pyrite were comparatively high (+4.8‰), thereby demonstrating a distinct reservoir effect under closed-system conditions. However, one of the profiles situated 1150 m from the Baltic Sea coast line exhibited a contrasting S pattern with pronounced excess of isotopically lighter SO42- at depth (up to 32.8 mM and +22.7‰). We hypothesize, that local groundwater seeps might provide electron acceptors such as NO3- for the contemporary oxidation of pyrite. δ13C in DIC exhibited a pronounced vertical shift from -23.9

  6. Impact of High-Cut-Off Dialysis on Renal Recovery in Dialysis-Dependent Multiple Myeloma Patients: Results from a Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Görlich, Dennis; Thölking, Gerold; Kropff, Martin; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Brand, Marcus; Kümpers, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Background High-cut-off hemodialysis (HCO-HD) can effectively reduce high concentrations of circulating serum free light chains (sFLC) in patients with dialysis-dependent acute kidney injury (AKI) due to multiple myeloma (MM). Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze renal recovery in a retrospective single-center cohort of dialysis-dependent MM patients treated with either conventional HD (conv. HD) or HCO-HD. Methods and Results The final cohort consisted of 59 patients treated with HCO-HD (n = 42) or conv. HD (n = 17). A sustained sFLC response was detected in a significantly higher proportion of HCO-HD patients (83.3%) compared with conv. HD patients (29.4%; p = 0.007). The median duration of sFLC required to reach values <1000 mg/l was 14.5 days in the HCO-HD group and 36 days in the conv. HD group. The corresponding rates of renal recovery were 64.3% and 29.4%, respectively (chi-squared test, p = 0.014). Multivariate regression and decision tree analysis (recursive partitioning) revealed HCO-HD (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 6.1 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5–24.5], p = 0.011) and low initial uric acid values (adjusted OR 1.3 [95%CI 1.0–1.7], p = 0.045) as independent and paramount variables associated with a favorable renal outcome. Conclusions In summary, the results from this retrospective case-control study suggest in addition to novel agent-based chemotherapy a benefit of HCO-HD in sFLC removal and renal outcome in dialysis-dependent AKI secondary to MM. This finding was especially pertinent in patients with low initial uric acid values, resulting in a promising renal recovery rate of 71.9%. Further prospective studies are warranted. PMID:27152520

  7. Burst of reactive oxygen species in pedicel-mediated fruit abscission after carbohydrate supply was cut off in longan (Dimocarpus longan)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ziqin; Zhong, Xiumei; Fan, Yan; Wang, Huicong; Li, Jianguo; Huang, Xuming

    2015-01-01

    Cutting off carbohydrate supply to longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) fruit by girdling and defoliation or by detachment induced 100% abscission within a few days. We used these treatments to study the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in fruit abscission. Girdling plus defoliation decreased sugar concentrations in the fruit and pedicel and depleted starch grains in the chloroplasts in the cells of abscission zone. Prior to the occurrence of intensive fruit abscission, there was a burst in ROS in the pedicel, which peaked at 1 day after treatment (DAT), when H2O2 in the abscission zone was found to be chiefly located along the plasma membrane (PM). H2O2 was found exclusively in the cell walls 2 DAT, almost disappeared 3 DAT, and reappeared in the mitochondria and cell walls 4 DAT. Signs of cell death such as cytoplasm breakdown were apparent from 3 DAT. The burst of ROS coincided with a sharp increase in the activity of PM-bound NADPH oxidase in the pedicel. At the same time, activities of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and peroxidase (POD) were all increased by the treatment and maintained higher than those in the control. Accompanying the reduction in H2O2 abundance, there was a sharp decrease in PM-bound NADPH oxidase activity after 1 DAT in the treated fruit. H2O2 scavenger dimethylthiourea (DMTU, 1 g L–1) significantly inhibited fruit abscission in detached fruit clusters and suppressed the increase in cellulase activity in the abscission zone. These results suggest that fruit abscission induced by carbohydrate stress is mediated by ROS. Roles of ROS in regulating fruit abscission were discussed in relation to its subcellular distribution. PMID:26074931

  8. Cut off values of laser fluorescence for different storage methods at different time intervals in comparison to frozen condition: A 1 year in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Rudra; Kaul, Vibhuti; Farooq, Riyaz; Wazir, Nikhil Dev; Khateeb, Shafayat Ullah; Malik, Altaf H; Masoodi, Ajaz Amin

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the following study is to evaluate the change in laser fluorescence (LF) values for extracted teeth stored in different solutions over 1 year period, to give cut-off values for different storage media at different time intervals to get them at par with the in vivo conditions and to see which medium gives best results with the least change in LF values and while enhancing the validity of DIAGNOdent in research. Materials and Methods: Ninety extracted teeth selected, from a pool of frozen teeth, were divided into nine groups of 10 each. Specimens in Groups 1-8 were stored in 1% chloramine, 10% formalin, 10% buffered formalin, 0.02% thymol, 0.12% chlorhexidine, 3% sodium hypochlorite, a commercially available saliva substitute-Wet Mouth (ICPA Pharmaceuticals) and normal saline respectively at 4°C. The last group was stored under frozen condition at −20°C without contact with any storage solution. DIAGNOdent was used to measure the change the LF values at day 30, 45, 60, 160 and 365. Statistical Analysis Used: The mean change in LF values in different storage mediums at different time intervals were compared using two-way ANOVA. Results: At the end of 1 year, significant decrease in fluorescence (P < 0.05) was observed in Groups 1-8. Maximum drop in LF values occurred between day 1 and 30. Group 9 (frozen specimens) did not significantly change their fluorescence response. Conclusions: An inevitable change in LF takes place due to various storage media commonly used in dental research at different time intervals. The values obtained from our study can remove the bias caused by the storage media and the values of LF thus obtained can hence be conveniently extrapolated to the in vivo condition. PMID:24778506

  9. Anti-mullerian hormone cut-off values for predicting poor ovarian response to exogenous ovarian stimulation in in-vitro fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Satwik, Ruma; Kochhar, Mohinder; Gupta, Shweta M; Majumdar, Abha

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: (a) To establish the cut-off levels for anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) in a population of Indian women that would determine poor response. (b) To determine which among the three ie.,: age, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), or AMH, is the better determinant of ovarian reserve. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: In vitro fertilization (IVF) unit of a tertiary hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The inclusion criterion was all women who presented to the center for in-vitro fertilization/Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI). The exclusion criteria were age >45 years, major medical illnesses precluding IVF or pregnancy, FSH more than 20 IU/L, and failure to obtain consent. The interventions including baseline pelvic scan, day 2/3 FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol estimations, and AMH measurement on any random day of cycle were done. Subjects underwent IVF according to long agonist or antagonist protocol regimen. Oocyte recovery was correlated with studied variables. The primary outcome measure was the number of oocytes aspirated (OCR). Three categories of ovarian response were defined: poor response, OCR ≤ 3; average response, OCR between 4 and 15; hyperresponse, OCR > 15. RESULTS: Of the 198 patients enrolled, poor, average, and hyperresponse were observed in 23%, 63%, and 14% respectively. Correlation coefficient for AMH with ovarian response was r = 0.591. Area under the curve (AUCs) for poor response for AMH, subject's age, and FSH were 0.768, 0.624, and 0.635, respectively. The discriminatory level of AMH for prediction of absolute poor response was 2 pmoL/l, with 98% specificity and 20% sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS: AMH fares better than age and FSH in predicting the overall ovarian response and poor response, though it cannot be the absolute predictor of non-responder status. A level of 2 pmol/l is discriminatory for poor response. PMID:23162361

  10. The impact of cut-off lows on ozone in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere over Changchun from ozonesonde observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yushan; Lü, Daren; Li, Qian; Bian, Jianchun; Wu, Xue; Li, Dan

    2016-02-01

    In situ measurements of the vertical structure of ozone were made in Changchun (43.53°N, 125.13°E), China, by the Institute of Atmosphere Physics, in the summers of 2010-13. Analysis of the 89 validated ozone profiles shows the variation of ozone concentration in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) caused by cut-off lows (COLs) over Changchun. During the COL events, an increase of the ozone concentration and a lower height of the tropopause are observed. Backward simulations with a trajectory model show that the ozone-rich airmass brought by the COL is from Siberia. A case study proves that stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) occurs in the COL. The ozone-rich air mass transported from the stratosphere to the troposphere first becomes unstable, then loses its high ozone concentration. This process usually happens during the decay stage of COLs. In order to understand the influence of COLs on the ozone in the UTLS, statistical analysis of the ozone profiles within COLs, and other profiles, are employed. The results indicate that the ozone concentrations of the in-COL profiles are significantly higher than those of the other profiles between ±4 km around the tropopause. The COLs induce an increase in UTLS column ozone by 32% on average. Meanwhile, the COLs depress the lapse-rate tropopause (LRT)/dynamical tropopause height by 1.4/1.7 km and cause the atmosphere above the tropopause to be less stable. The influence of COLs is durable because the increased ozone concentration lasts at least one day after the COL has passed over Changchun. Furthermore, the relative coefficient between LRT height and lower stratosphere (LS) column ozone is -0.62, which implies a positive correlation between COL strength and LS ozone concentration.

  11. Introduction to Geomagnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinze, William J.

    Coincidentally, as I sat down in late October 2003 to read and review the second edition of Wallace H. Campbell's text, Introduction to Geomagnetic Fields, we received warnings from the news media of a massive solar flare and its possible effect on power supply systems and satellite communications. News programs briefly explained the source of Sun-Earth interactions. If you are interested in learning more about the physics of the connection between sun spots and power supply systems and their impact on orbiting satellites, I urge you to become acquainted with Campbell's book. It presents an interesting and informative explanation of the geomagnetic field and its applications to a wide variety of topics, including oil exploration, climate change, and fraudulent claims of the utility of magnetic fields for alleviating human pain. Geomagnetism, the study of the nature and processes of the Earth's magnetic fields and its application to the investigation of the Earth, its processes, and history, is a mature science with a well-developed theoretical foundation and a vast array of observations. It is discussed in varied detail in Earth physics books and most entry-level geoscience texts. The latter treatments largely are driven by the need to discuss paleomagnetism as an essential tool in studying plate tectonics. A more thorough explanation of geomagnetism is needed by many interested scientists in related fields and by laypersons. This is the objective of Campbell's book. It is particularly germane in view of a broad range of geomagnetic topics that are at the forefront of today's science, including environmental magnetism, so-called ``jerks'' observed in the Earth's magnetic field, the perplexing magnetic field of Mars, improved satellite magnetic field observations, and the increasing availability of high-quality continental magnetic anomaly maps, to name only a few.

  12. A direct correlation between the antioxidant efficiencies of caffeic acid and its alkyl esters and their concentrations in the interfacial region of olive oil emulsions. The pseudophase model interpretation of the "cut-off" effect.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marlene; Losada-Barreiro, Sonia; Paiva-Martins, Fátima; Bravo-Díaz, Carlos; Romsted, Laurence S

    2015-05-15

    Recently published results for a series of homologous antioxidants, AOs, of increasing alkyl chain length show a maximum in AO efficiency followed by a significant decrease for the more hydrophobic AOs, typically called the "cut-off" effect. Here we demonstrate that in olive oil emulsions both antioxidant efficiencies and partition constants for distributions of AOs between the oil and interfacial regions, PO(I), show a maximum at the C8 ester. A reaction between caffeic acid, CA, and its specially synthesised C1-C16 alkyl esters, and a chemical probe is used to estimate partition constants for AO distributions and interfacial rate constants, kI, in intact emulsions based on the pseudophase kinetic model. The model provides a natural interpretation for both the maximum and the "cut-off" effect. More than 70% of the CA esters are in the interfacial region even at low surfactant volume fraction, ΦI=0.005.

  13. Foundations of Geomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Andy

    The study of the magnetic field of the Earth, or geomagnetism, is one of the oldest lines of scientific enquiry. Indeed, it has often been said that William Gilbert's De Magnete, published in 1600 and predating Isaac Newton's Principia by 87 years, can claim to be the first true scientific textbook; his study was essentially the first of academic rather than practical interest.What then, we may ask, has been accomplished in the nearly 400 intervening years up to the publication of Foundations of Geomagnetism? In short, a wealth of observational evidence, considerable physical understanding, and a great deal of mathematical apparatus have accrued, placing the subject on a much surer footing.The latter two categories are described in considerable detail, and with attendant rigor, in this book. The sphericity of the Earth means that a frequent theme in the book is the solution of the partial differential equations of electrodynamics in a spherical geometry.

  14. On regional geomagnetic charts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alldredge, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    When regional geomagnetic charts for areas roughly the size of the US were compiled by hand, some large local anomalies were displayed in the isomagnetic lines. Since the late 1960s, when the compilation of charts using computers and mathematical models was started, most of the details available in the hand drawn regional charts have been lost. One exception to this is the Canadian magnetic declination chart for 1980. This chart was constructed using a 180 degrees spherical harmonic model. -from Author

  15. Geomagnetism. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The latest attempt to summarise the wealth of knowledge now available on geomagnetic phenomena has resulted in this multi-volume treatise, with contributions and reviews from many scientists. The first volume in the series contains a thorough review of all existing information on measuring the Earth's magnetic field, both on land and at sea, and includes a comparative analysis of the techniques available for this purpose.

  16. On extreme geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid, Consuelo; Palacios, Judith; Saiz, Elena; Guerrero, Antonio; Cerrato, Yolanda

    2014-10-01

    Extreme geomagnetic storms are considered as one of the major natural hazards for technology-dependent society. Geomagnetic field disturbances can disrupt the operation of critical infrastructures relying on space-based assets, and can also result in terrestrial effects, such as the Quebec electrical disruption in 1989. Forecasting potential hazards is a matter of high priority, but considering large flares as the only criterion for early-warning systems has demonstrated to release a large amount of false alarms and misses. Moreover, the quantification of the severity of the geomagnetic disturbance at the terrestrial surface using indices as Dst cannot be considered as the best approach to give account of the damage in utilities. High temporal resolution local indices come out as a possible solution to this issue, as disturbances recorded at the terrestrial surface differ largely both in latitude and longitude. The recovery phase of extreme storms presents also some peculiar features which make it different from other less intense storms. This paper goes through all these issues related to extreme storms by analysing a few events, highlighting the March 1989 storm, related to the Quebec blackout, and the October 2003 event, when several transformers burnt out in South Africa.

  17. Spiking the Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constable, C.; Davies, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic field intensities corresponding to virtual axial dipole moments of up to 200 ZAm2, more than twice the modern value, have been inferred from archeomagnetic measurements on artifacts dated at or shortly after 1000 BC. Anomalously high values occur in the Levant and Georgia, but not in Bulgaria. The origin of this spike is believed to lie in Earth's core: however, its spatio-temporal characteristics and the geomagnetic processes responsible for such a feature remain a mystery. We show that a localized spike in the radial magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) must necessarily contribute to the largest scale changes in Earth's surface field, namely the dipole. Even the limiting spike of a delta function at the CMB produces a minimum surface cap size of 60 degrees for a factor of two increase in paleointensity. Combined evidence from modern satellite and millennial scale field modeling suggests that the Levantine Spike is intimately associated with a strong increase in dipole moment prior to 1000 BC and likely the product of north-westward motion of concentrated near equatorial Asian flux patches like those seen in the modern field. New archeomagnetic studies are needed to confirm this interpretation. Minimum estimates of the power dissipated by the spike are comparable to independent estimates of the dissipation associated with the entire steady state geodynamo. This suggests that geomagnetic spikes are either associated with rapid changes in magnetic energy or strong Lorentz forces.

  18. Rigid particulate matter sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Matthew

    2011-02-22

    A sensor to detect particulate matter. The sensor includes a first rigid tube, a second rigid tube, a detection surface electrode, and a bias surface electrode. The second rigid tube is mounted substantially parallel to the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed to face the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed to face the detection surface electrode on the first rigid tube. An air gap exists between the detection surface electrode and the bias surface electrode to allow particulate matter within an exhaust stream to flow between the detection and bias surface electrodes.

  19. The Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome Using Three Different Diagnostic Criteria among Low Earning Nomadic Kazakhs in the Far Northwest of China: New Cut-Off Points of Waist Circumference to Diagnose MetS and Its Implications

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Heng; Liu, Jiaming; Zhang, Jingyu; Ma, Rulin; Ding, Yusong; Zhang, Mei; He, Jia; Xu, Shangzhi; Li, Shugang; Yan, Yizhong; Mu, Lati; Rui, Dongsheng; Niu, Qiang; Guo, Shuxia

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the epidemic of metabolic syndrome (MetS) has aroused wide public concern, most studies on MetS tend to examine urban and high income settings, and few studies cover nomadic areas and low earning populations. This research aims to investigate the prevalence of MetS and explore the cut-off point of waist circumference in a nomadic minority typical of low income populations in the remote northwest region of China. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in a representative sample of 3900 Kazakh adults aged 18–84 years from 2009–2010. Three widely used criteria (ATP III\\IDF\\JIS) were employed to estimate the prevalence of MetS in Kazakhs to compare them with other populations. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to explore the optimal cut-off values of waist circumference. Results The age-adjusted prevalence of MetS was 13.8%, 20.9%, and 24.8% based on the ATP III, IDF, and JIS criteria, respectively. The prevalence of MetS was higher in women and increased with age. Except for reduced HDL-cholesterol, the risk of other components of MetS increased with waist circumference enlargement. The cut-off point of waist circumference in screening at least two other components of MetS was 88 cm in men (Sensitivity = 61.1%, Specificity = 62.1%, ROC Curve Distance = 0.54) and 83 cm in women (Sensitivity = 60.0%, Specificity = 59.6%, ROC Curve Distance = 0.57). Conclusion The prevalence of MetS in Kazakhs is higher than the national level of China and falls in between the Euro-American and Asia levels, as their cut-off points of waist circumference differ from that recommended for Chinese. We suggest a cost-effective strategy to screen for MetS and prevent cardiovascular disease using new cut-off points of waist circumference in low earning nomadic Kazakhs. PMID:26901035

  20. The national geomagnetic initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Earth's magnetic field, through its variability over a spectrum of spatial and temporal scales, contains fundamental information on the solid Earth and geospace environment (the latter comprising the atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere). Integrated studies of the geomagnetic field have the potential to address a wide range of important processes in the deep mantle and core, asthenosphere, lithosphere, oceans, and the solar-terrestrial environment. These studies have direct applications to important societal problems, including resource assessment and exploration, natural hazard mitigation, safe navigation, and the maintenance and survivability of communications and power systems on the ground and in space. Studies of the Earth's magnetic field are supported by a variety of federal and state agencies as well as by private industry. Both basic and applied research is presently supported by several federal agencies, including the National Science Foundation (NSF), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) (through the Navy, Air Force, and Defense Mapping Agency). Although each agency has a unique, well-defined mission in geomagnetic studies, many areas of interest overlap. For example, NASA, the Navy, and USGS collaborate closely in the development of main field reference models. NASA, NSF, and the Air Force collaborate in space physics. These interagency linkages need to be strengthened. Over the past decade, new opportunities for fundamental advances in geomagnetic research have emerged as a result of three factors: well-posed, first-order scientific questions; increased interrelation of research activities dealing with geomagnetic phenomena; and recent developments in technology. These new opportunities can be exploited through a national geomagnetic initiative to define objectives and

  1. Torque Balances on the Taylor Cylinders in the Geomagnetic Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia; Tangborn, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation we report on our continuing effort in geomagnetic data assimilation, aiming at understanding and predicting geomagnetic secular variation on decadal time scales. In particular, we focus on the effect of the torque balances on the cylindrical surfaces in the core co-axial with the Earth's rotation axis (the Taylor cylinders) on the time evolution of assimilated solutions. We use our MoSST core dynamics,model and observed geomagnetic field at the Earth's surface derived via Comprehensive Field Model (CFM) for the geomagnetic data assimilation. In our earlier studies, a model solution is selected randomly from our numerical database. It is then assimilated with the observations such that the poloidal field possesses the same field tomography on the core-mantel boundary (CMB) continued downward from surface observations. This tomography change is assumed to be effective through out the outer core. While this approach allows rapid convergence between model solutions and the observations, it also generates sevee numerical instabilities: the delicate balance between weak fluid inertia and the magnetic torques on the Taylor cylinders are completely altered. Consequently, the assimilated solution diverges quickly (in approximately 10% of the magnetic free-decay time in the core). To improve the assimilation, we propose a partial penetration of the assimilation from the CMB: The full-scale modification at the CMB decreases linearly and vanish at an interior radius r(sub a). We shall examine from our assimilation tests possible relationships between the convergence rate of the model solutions to observations and the cut-off radius r(sub a). A better assimilation shall serve our nudging tests in near future.

  2. Hazards of geomagnetic storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herzog, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    Geomagnetic storms are large and sometimes rapid fluctuations in the Earth's magnetic field that are related to disturbances on the Sun's surface. Although it is not widely recognized, these transient magnetic disturbances can be a significant hazard to people and property. Many of us know that the intensity of the auroral lights increases during magnetic storms, but few people realize that these storms can also cause massive power outages, interrupt radio communications and satellite operations, increase corrosion in oil and gas pipelines, and lead to spuriously high rejection rates in the manufacture of sensitive electronic equipment. 

  3. Optimal Cut-Offs of Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) to Identify Dysglycemia and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A 15-Year Prospective Study in Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C. H.; Shih, A. Z. L.; Woo, Y. C.; Fong, C. H. Y.; Leung, O. Y.; Janus, E.; Cheung, B. M. Y.; Lam, K. S. L.

    2016-01-01

    Background The optimal reference range of homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in normal Chinese population has not been clearly defined. Here we address this issue using the Hong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factor Prevalence Study (CRISPS), a prospective population-based cohort study with long-term follow-up. Material & Methods In this study, normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were defined according to the 1998 World Health Organization criteria. Dysglycemia referred to IFG, IGT or T2DM. This study comprised two parts. Part one was a cross-sectional study involving 2,649 Hong Kong Chinese subjects, aged 25–74 years, at baseline CRISPS-1 (1995–1996). The optimal HOMA-IR cut-offs for dysglycemia and T2DM were determined by the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Part two was a prospective study involving 872 subjects who had persistent NGT at CRISPS-4 (2010–2012) after 15 years of follow-up. Results At baseline, the optimal HOMA-IR cut-offs to identify dysglyceia and T2DM were 1.37 (AUC = 0.735; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.713–0.758; Sensitivity [Se] = 65.6%, Specificity [Sp] = 71.3%] and 1.97 (AUC = 0.807; 95% CI = 0.777–0.886; Se = 65.5%, Sp = 82.9%) respectively. These cut-offs, derived from the cross-sectional study at baseline, corresponded closely to the 75th (1.44) and 90th (2.03) percentiles, respectively, of the HOMA-IR reference range derived from the prospective study of subjects with persistent NGT. Conclusions HOMA-IR cut-offs, of 1.4 and 2.0, which discriminated dysglycemia and T2DM respectively from NGT in Southern Chinese, can be usefully employed as references in clinical research involving the assessment of insulin resistance. PMID:27658115

  4. Bracing for the geomagnetic storms

    SciTech Connect

    Kappenman, J.G. ); Albertson, V.D. )

    1990-03-01

    The authors discuss the impact of geomagnetic storms on utility transmission networks. The effects of a recent storm on the Hydro-Quebec transmission system are described in detail. Research into geomagnetic disturbance prediction is discussed. In coming months, geomagnetic field activity will be high as it builds toward a peak, the 22nd since reliable records of the phenomenon began in the mid-1700s. The peaks come in roughly 11-year cycles, and the next is expected later this year or early in 1991. The solar activity has so far risen at one of the fastest rates ever recorded, and solar forecasters expect cycle 22 to have unusually high activity levels.

  5. Bayesian inference in geomagnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backus, George E.

    1988-01-01

    The inverse problem in empirical geomagnetic modeling is investigated, with critical examination of recently published studies. Particular attention is given to the use of Bayesian inference (BI) to select the damping parameter lambda in the uniqueness portion of the inverse problem. The mathematical bases of BI and stochastic inversion are explored, with consideration of bound-softening problems and resolution in linear Gaussian BI. The problem of estimating the radial magnetic field B(r) at the earth core-mantle boundary from surface and satellite measurements is then analyzed in detail, with specific attention to the selection of lambda in the studies of Gubbins (1983) and Gubbins and Bloxham (1985). It is argued that the selection method is inappropriate and leads to lambda values much larger than those that would result if a reasonable bound on the heat flow at the CMB were assumed.

  6. Effect of Underlay Rigidity on Cutting Characteristic of Aluminum Foil during Wedge Shearing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaijit, Seksan; Nagasawa, Shigeru; Fukuzawa, Yasushi; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Hine, Akira

    This paper reports for the cutting mechanism of a thin worksheet on a flexible underlay by wedge indentation. The effect of underlay's rigidity on the cutting characteristics and separation limit of aluminum foil is studied. Indentation of a 42 degree center bevel blade into a 10μm thickness aluminum foil mounted on several flexible underlays was carried out experimentally and numerically. For discussing the effect of the underlay yield stress and Young's modulus on the deformation behavior of worksheet, an elasto-plastic finite element analysis was carried out. The followings were obtained: (i) the deformation features of the worksheet on a flexible underlay is classified into three patterns: the hard, the mixture, and the floating mode; (ii) there are upper bound rigidities and the lower bound rigidities of the floating phenomenon; (iii) the floating phenomenon is evidenced when the rigidities of underlay are less than the lower bound rigidities; (iv) the mixture mode enables to cut off a worksheet using a bending elongation effect on the outer surface of worksheet.

  7. Rigidity of lattice domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savelyev, V. A.

    1979-01-01

    The means of ensuring total rigidity of lattice domes, using comparison with solid shells of 1-3 layers are discussed. Irregularities of manufacture, processing, and other factors are considered, as they relate to diminution of rigidity. The discussion uses the concepts of upper and lower critical loads on the structure in question.

  8. A clinically based prognostic index for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with a cut-off at 70 years of age significantly improves prognostic stratification: population-based analysis from the Danish Lymphoma Registry.

    PubMed

    Gang, Anne O; Pedersen, Michael; d'Amore, Francesco; Pedersen, Lars M; Jensen, Bo A; Jensen, Paw; Møller, Michael B; Mourits-Andersen, Hans T; Pedersen, Robert S; Klausen, Tobias W; de N Brown, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of rituximab and generally improved health among elderly patients have increased the survival of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The International Prognostic Index (IPI) from 1992 is based on pre-rituximab data from clinical trials including several lymphoma subtypes. We applied IPI factors to a population-based rituximab-treated cohort of 1990 patients diagnosed 2000-2010 and explored new factors and the optimal prognostic age cut-off for DLBCL. Multivariate-analyses (MVA) confirmed the prognostic value of all IPI factors except the presence of > 1 extranodal lesion. The optimal age cut-off was 70 years. In a MVA of albumin, lymphocyte count, sex, immunoglobulin G, bulky disease, hemoglobin and B-symptoms, only albumin was prognostic. We propose: (1) a modified DLBCL prognostic index (DLBCL-PI) including: age (70 years), performance status (PS), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), stage and albumin level, and (2) a separate age-adjusted DLBCL-PI for patients ≤ 70 years including PS, LDH, albumin level and > 1 extranodal lesion, however excluding stage.

  9. Prospective study of prognostic factors in asymptomatic patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like lymphocytosis: the cut-off of 11 × 10(9)/L monoclonal lymphocytes better identifies subgroups with different outcomes.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A C; Fernández de Sevilla, A; Domingo, A; De La Banda, E; Domingo-Domènech, E; Mercadal, S; Ruiz-Xivillé, N; Alonso, E; Encuentra, M; González-Barca, E

    2015-04-01

    The arbitrary threshold of 5 × 10(9)/L chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)-like lymphocytes differentiates monoclonal B lymphocytosis (MBL) from CLL. There are no prospective studies that search for the optimal cut-off of monoclonal lymphocytes able to predict outcome and simultaneously analyze the prognostic value of classic, immunophenotypic, and cytogenetic variables in patients with asymptomatic clonal CLL lymphocytosis (ACL), which includes MBL plus Rai 0 CLL patients. From 2003 to 2010, 231 ACL patients were enrolled in this study. Patients with 11q deletion and atypical lymphocyte morphology at diagnosis had shorter progression-free survival (PFS) (p = 0.007 and p = 0.015, respectively) and treatment-free survival (TFS) (p = 0.009 and p = 0.017, respectively). Elevated beta-2 microglobulin (B2M) also correlated with worse TFS (p = 0.002). The optimal threshold of monoclonal lymphocytes independently correlated with survival was 11 × 10(9)/L (p = 0.000 for PFS and p = 0.016 for TFS). As conclusion, monoclonal lymphocytosis higher than 11 × 10(9)/L better identifies two subgroups of patients with different outcomes than the standard cut-off value of 5 × 10(9)/L. Atypical lymphocyte morphology, 11q deletion and elevated B2M had a negative impact on the survival in ACL patients.

  10. Improved rate capability and cycle stability of Li[Ni0.5Co0.2Mn0.3]O2 with Li2MnO3 coating under high cut-off voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting; Zhao, Shi-Xi; Wang, Ke-Zhen; Gou, Lu-Lu; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2015-11-01

    The structure and electrochemical performance of Li2MnO3-coated Li[Ni0.5Co0.2Mn0.3]O2 cathode were investigated. The results demonstrated that the Li2MnO3-coated Li[Ni0.5Co0.2Mn0.3]O2 sample exhibited an improved electrochemical performance at room and elevated temperatures, especially at a high cut-off voltage range. The capacity retention of the 1.0 mol% Li2MnO3-coated sample after 100 cycles was 78% at 3.0-4.3 V, in comparison with that of 57% for the pristine one at room temperature. Interestingly, after 200 cycles, the 4.0 mol% Li2MnO3-coated cathode showed the best cycle stability with capacity retention as high as 37% when the cut-off voltage was increased to 4.8 V, while it was only 2% for the pristine sample. The cyclability of Li[Ni0.5Co0.2Mn0.3]O2 at high temperature was also slightly improved with Li2MnO3 coating.

  11. Would raising the total cholesterol diagnostic cut-off from 7.5 mmol/L to 9.3 mmol/L improve detection rate of patients with monogenic familial hypercholesterolaemia?

    PubMed

    Futema, M; Kumari, M; Boustred, C; Kivimaki, M; Humphries, S E

    2015-04-01

    A previous report suggested that 88% of individuals in the general population with total cholesterol (TC) > 9.3 mmol/L have familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH). We tested this hypothesis in a cohort of 4896 UK civil servants, mean (SD) age 44 (±6) years, using next generation sequencing to achieve a comprehensive genetic diagnosis. 25 (0.5%) participants (mean age 49.2 years) had baseline TC > 9.3 mmol/L, and overall we found an FH-causing mutation in the LDLR gene in seven (28%) subjects. The detection rate increased to 39% by excluding eight participants with triglyceride levels over 2.3 mmol/L, and reached 75% in those with TC > 10.4 mmol/L. By extrapolation, the detection rate would be ∼25% by including all participants with TC > 8.6 mmol/L (2.5 standard deviations from the mean). Based on the 1/500 FH frequency, 30% of all FH-cases in this cohort would be missed using the 9.3 mmol/L cut-off. Given that an overall detection rate of 25% is considered economically acceptable, these data suggest that a diagnostic TC cut-off of 8.6 mmol/L, rather than 9.3 mmol/L would be clinically useful for FH in the general population. PMID:25682026

  12. Thickness-Independent Ultrasonic Imaging Applied to Abrasive Cut-Off Wheels: An Advanced Aerospace Materials Characterization Method for the Abrasives Industry. A NASA Lewis Research Center Technology Transfer Case History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Farmer, Donald A.

    1998-01-01

    Abrasive cut-off wheels are at times unintentionally manufactured with nonuniformity that is difficult to identify and sufficiently characterize without time-consuming, destructive examination. One particular nonuniformity is a density variation condition occurring around the wheel circumference or along the radius, or both. This density variation, depending on its severity, can cause wheel warpage and wheel vibration resulting in unacceptable performance and perhaps premature failure of the wheel. Conventional nondestructive evaluation methods such as ultrasonic c-scan imaging and film radiography are inaccurate in their attempts at characterizing the density variation because a superimposing thickness variation exists as well in the wheel. In this article, the single transducer thickness-independent ultrasonic imaging method, developed specifically to allow more accurate characterization of aerospace components, is shown to precisely characterize the extent of the density variation in a cut-off wheel having a superimposing thickness variation. The method thereby has potential as an effective quality control tool in the abrasives industry for the wheel manufacturer.

  13. Geomagnetic Reversals during the Phanerozoic.

    PubMed

    McElhinny, M W

    1971-04-01

    An antalysis of worldwide paleomagnetic measurements suggests a periodicity of 350 x 10(6) years in the polarity of the geomagnetic field. During the Mesozoic it is predominantly normal, whereas during the Upper Paleozoic it is predominantly reversed. Although geomagnetic reversals occur at different rates throughout the Phanerozoic, there appeaars to be no clear correlation between biological evolutionary rates and reversal frequency. PMID:17735224

  14. PAMELA's measurements of geomagnetic cutoff variations during the 14 December 2006 storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; De Donato, C.; Nolfo, G. A.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Mergé, M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2016-03-01

    Data from the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) satellite experiment were used to measure the geomagnetic cutoff for high-energy (≳ 80MeV) protons during the 14 December 2006 geomagnetic storm. The variations of the cutoff latitude as a function of rigidity were studied on relatively short timescales, corresponding to spacecraft orbital periods (˜94 min). Estimated cutoff values were compared with those obtained by means of a trajectory-tracing approach based on a dynamical empirical modeling of the Earth's magnetosphere. We found significant variations in the cutoff latitude, with a maximum suppression of ˜7° at lowest rigidities during the main phase of the storm. The observed reduction in the geomagnetic shielding and its temporal evolution were related to the changes in the magnetospheric configuration, investigating the role of interplanetary magnetic field, solar wind, and geomagnetic parameters. PAMELA's results represent the first direct measurement of geomagnetic cutoffs for protons with kinetic energies in the sub-GeV and GeV region.

  15. Validation of Galactic Cosmic Radiation and Geomagnetic Transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.; Troung, A.; ONeill, P.; Bman, B.

    2000-01-01

    The Alpha Magnet Spectrometer (AMS) was flown on Shuttle flight STS-91 in June 1998 near solar minimum. This unique spectrometer has provided very high resolution, calibrated data on the galactic hydrogen and helium rigidity spectra form approx. 100 MeV/n to approx. 200 GeV/n as a function of magnetic latitude. This paper describes a comparison of the AMS data with the Badhwar-O'Neill GCR model and the geomagnetic transmission calculated using the quiescent DGRF 1990 cutoffs. The results have strong bearing on radiation modeling for the International Space Station.

  16. The space-developed dynamic vertical cutoff rigidity model and its applicability to aircraft radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Smart, D F; Shea, M A

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a dynamic geomagnetic vertical cutoff rigidity model that predicts the energetic charged particle transmission through the magnetosphere. Initially developed for space applications, we demonstrate the applicability of this library of cutoff rigidity models for computing aircraft radiation dose. The world grids of vertical cutoff rigidities were obtained by particle trajectory tracing in a magnetospheric model. This reference set of world grids of vertical cutoff rigidities calculated for satellite altitudes covers all magnetic activity levels from super quiet to extremely disturbed (i.e., Kp indices ranging from 0 to 9+) for every three hours in universal time. We utilize the McIlwain "L" parameter as the basis of the interpolation technique to reduce these initial satellite altitude vertical cutoff rigidities to cutoff rigidity values at aircraft altitudes.

  17. a Millennium of Geomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, David P.

    2002-11-01

    The history of geomagnetism began around the year 1000 with the discovery in China of the magnetic compass. Methodical studies of the Earth's field started in 1600 with William Gilbert's De Magnete [Gilbert, 1600] and continued with the work of (among others) Edmond Halley, Charles Augustin de Coulomb, Carl Friedrich Gauss, and Edward Sabine. The discovery of electromagnetism by Hans Christian Oersted and André-Marie Ampére led Michael Faraday to the notion of fluid dynamos, and the observation of sunspot magnetism by George Ellery Hale led Sir Joseph Larmor in 1919 to the idea that such dynamos could sustain themselves naturally in convecting conducting fluids. From that came modern dynamo theory, of both the solar and terrestrial magnetic fields. Paleomagnetic studies revealed that the Earth's dipole had undergone reversals in the distant past, and these became the critical evidence in establishing plate tectonics. Finally, the recent availability of scientific spacecraft has demonstrated the intricacy of the Earth's distant magnetic field, as well as the existence of magnetic fields associated with other planets and with satellites in our solar system.

  18. Measurements of developing teeth, and carpals and epiphyses of the ulna and radius for assessing new cut-offs at the age thresholds of 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 years.

    PubMed

    Cameriere, R; De Luca, S; Cingolani, M; Ferrante, L

    2015-08-01

    The minimum age of criminal responsibility is the youngest age at which children may be held liable for infringements of penal laws. New cut-offs at the age thresholds of 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 years were determined by applying three different methods: measurement of open apices in tooth roots (T); the ratio between the total area of carpal bones and epiphyses of the ulna and radius (HW); and the combined method (THW). The sample consisted of 291 Italian children (152 boys, 139 girls), aged between 5 and 15 years. The sensitivity and specificity were established. As regards THW, specificity reached the maximum of 95% in boys aged 10, and the minimum of 87% in boys aged 11. The best score of the Positive Predictive Value (PPV) was obtained in boys at 10 years with the THW method and the worst in girls of 12 with the HW method.

  19. The limitations of using vertical cutoff rigidities determined from the IGRF magnetic field models for computing aircraft radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Smart, D F; Shea, M A

    2003-01-01

    Vertical cutoff rigidities derived from the International Geomagnetic Reference Fields (IGRF) are normally used to compute the radiation dose at a specific location and to organize the radiation dose measurements acquired at aircraft altitudes. This paper presents some of the usually ignored limits on the accuracy of the vertical cutoff rigidity models and describes some of the computational artifacts present in these models. It is noted that recent aircraft surveys of the radiation dose experienced along specific flight paths is sufficiently precise that the secular variation of the geomagnetic field is observable.

  20. Diagnostic and prognostic value of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) concentrations in very elderly heart disease patients: specific geriatric cut-off and impacts of age, gender, renal dysfunction, and nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Blondé-Cynober, F; Morineau, G; Estrugo, B; Fillie, E; Aussel, C; Vincent, J-P

    2011-01-01

    Confirming the presence of heart failure (HF) in geriatric patients is made difficult by the overlapping symptoms with other diseases and by limited access to investigative techniques such as echography, and the clinical signs are either non-constant or difficult to interpret. In this context, BNP measurement could prove highly useful. We determined a cut-off value of BNP for diagnosing HF in geriatric patients and gauged its predictive power in terms of cardiovascular events, dependence and death within a 6-month timeframe. This clinical and biological study was performed in patients, 44 women and 20 men, age>65 years with suspected HF hospitalized in the geriatric unit at Emile-Roux hospital. Echography was performed at baseline examination. BNP concentrations were determined at baseline examination and at 2 and 6 months later. Renal function was assessed via the Cockroft-Gault formula. Nutritional status was assessed using the geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI). Final reference diagnosis was established by both cardiologist and geriatrician. The diagnostic value of BNP was assessed by area under the ROC curve. The average age of the 64 patients was 84.3±7.4 years. The final diagnosis was HF in 26 patients (41%). A BNP<129pg/ml had a negative predictive value of 90% (accuracy 80%) for excluding the diagnosis of HF. BNP values were predictive of cardiovascular events over a 2-month timeframe in patients with HF and over a 6-month timeframe in the global population. BNP values were not predictive of mortality in patients with or without HF. BNP testing should help to differentiate pulmonary from cardiac etiologies of dyspnea, but a specific cut-off point has to be used in geriatric settings, mainly for patients presenting nutritional and renal dysfunctions.

  1. Solar energetic particle cutoff variations during the 29-31 October 2003 geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, B. T.; Mertens, C. J.; Wiltberger, M.

    2010-05-01

    At low latitudes to midlatitudes the Earth's magnetic field usually shields the upper atmosphere and spacecraft in low Earth orbit from solar energetic particles (SEPs). During severe geomagnetic storms, distortion of the Earth's field suppresses geomagnetic shielding, allowing SEPs access to the midlatitudes. A case study of the 26-31 October 2003 solar-geomagnetic event is used to examine how a severe geomagnetic storm affects SEP access to the Earth. Geomagnetic cutoffs are numerically determined in model geomagnetic fields using code developed by the Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (CISM) at Dartmouth College. The CISM-Dartmouth geomagnetic cutoff model is being used in conjunction with the High Energy and Charge Transport code (HZETRN) at the NASA Langley Research Center to develop a real-time data-driven prediction of radiation exposure at commercial airline altitudes. In this work, cutoff rigidities are computed on global grids and along several high-latitude flight routes before and during the geomagnetic storm. It is found that significant variations in SEP access to the midlatitudes and high latitudes can occur on time scales of an hour or less in response to changes in the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field. The maximum suppression of the cutoff is ˜1 GV occurring in the midlatitudes during the main phase of the storm. The cutoff is also significantly suppressed by the arrival of an interplanetary shock. The maximum suppression of the cutoff due to the shock is approximately one half of the maximum suppression during the main phase of the storm.

  2. Rigidity of melting DNA.

    PubMed

    Pal, Tanmoy; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of DNA flexibility is studied in the presence of stretching and unzipping forces. Two classes of models are considered. In one case the origin of elasticity is entropic due to the polymeric correlations, and in the other the double-stranded DNA is taken to have an intrinsic rigidity for bending. In both cases single strands are completely flexible. The change in the elastic constant for the flexible case due to thermally generated bubbles is obtained exactly. For the case of intrinsic rigidity, the elastic constant is found to be proportional to the square root of the bubble number fluctuation. PMID:27300825

  3. Rigidity of melting DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Tanmoy; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M.

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of DNA flexibility is studied in the presence of stretching and unzipping forces. Two classes of models are considered. In one case the origin of elasticity is entropic due to the polymeric correlations, and in the other the double-stranded DNA is taken to have an intrinsic rigidity for bending. In both cases single strands are completely flexible. The change in the elastic constant for the flexible case due to thermally generated bubbles is obtained exactly. For the case of intrinsic rigidity, the elastic constant is found to be proportional to the square root of the bubble number fluctuation.

  4. Klimovskaya: A new geomagnetic observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, A. A.; Sidorov, R. V.; Krasnoperov, R. I.; Grudnev, A. A.; Khokhlov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    In 2011 Geophysical Center RAS (GC RAS) began to deploy the Klimovskaya geomagnetic observatory in the south of Arkhangelsk region on the territory of the Institute of Physiology of Natural Adaptations, Ural Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences (IPNA UB RAS). The construction works followed the complex of preparatory measures taken in order to confirm that the observatory can be constructed on this territory and to select the optimal configuration of observatory structures. The observatory equipping stages are described in detail, the technological and design solutions are described, and the first results of the registered data quality control are presented. It has been concluded that Klimovskaya observatory can be included in INTERMAGNET network. The observatory can be used to monitor and estimate geomagnetic activity, because it is located at high latitudes and provides data in a timely manner to the scientific community via the web-site of the Russian-Ukrainian Geomagnetic Data Center. The role of ground observatories such as Klimovskaya remains critical for long-term observations of secular variation and for complex monitoring of the geomagnetic field in combination with low-orbiting satellite data.

  5. Mantle superplumes induce geomagnetic superchrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Peter; Amit, Hagay

    2015-07-01

    We use polarity reversal systematics from numerical dynamos to quantify the hypothesis that the modulation of geomagnetic reversal frequency, including geomagnetic superchrons, results from changes in core heat flux related to growth and collapse of lower mantle superplumes. We parameterize the reversal frequency sensitivity from numerical dynamos in terms of average core heat flux normalized by the difference between the present-day core heat flux and the core heat flux at geomagnetic superchron onset. A low-order polynomial fit to the 0-300 Ma Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS) reveals that a decrease in core heat flux relative to present-day of approximately 30% can account for the Cretaceous Normal Polarity and Kiaman Reverse Polarity Superchrons, whereas the hyper-reversing periods in the Jurassic require a core heat flux equal to or higher than present-day. Possible links between GPTS transitions, large igneous provinces (LIPs), and the two lower mantle superplumes are explored. Lower mantle superplume growth and collapse induce GPTS transitions by increasing and decreasing core heat flux, respectively. Age clusters of major LIPs postdate transitions from hyper-reversing to superchron geodynamo states by 30-60 Myr, suggesting that superchron onset may be contemporaneous with LIP-forming instabilities produced during collapses of lower mantle superplumes.

  6. Climate determinism or Geomagnetic determinism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, Y.; Genevey, A.; Le Goff, M.; Fluteau, F.; Courtillot, V.

    2006-12-01

    A number of episodes of sharp geomagnetic field variations (in both intensity and direction), lasting on the order of a century, have been identified in archeomagnetic records from Western Eurasia and have been called "archeomagnetic jerks". These seem to correlate well with multi-decadal cooling episodes detected in the North Atlantic Ocean and Western Europe, suggesting a causal link between both phenomena. A possible mechanism could be a geomagnetic modulation of the cosmic ray flux that would control the nucleation rate of clouds. We wish to underline the remarkable coincidence between archeomagnetic jerks, cooling events in Western Europe and drought periods in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the northern hemisphere. The latter two can be interpreted in terms of global teleconnections among regional climates. It has been suggested that these climatic variations had caused major changes in the history of ancient civilizations, such as in Mesopotamia, which were critically dependent on water supply and particularly vulnerable to lower rainfall amounts. This is one of the foundations of "climate determinism". Our studies, which suggest a geomagnetic origin for at least some of the inferred climatic events, lead us to propose the idea of a "geomagnetic determinism" in the history of humanity.

  7. Electrostatics of Rigid Polyelectrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, G.C.L.

    2009-06-04

    The organization of rigid biological polyelectrolytes by multivalent ions and macroions are important for many fundamental problems in biology and biomedicine, such as cytoskeletal regulation and antimicrobial sequestration in cystic fibrosis. These polyelectrolytes have been used as model systems for understanding electrostatics in complex fluids. Here, we review some recent results in theory, simulations, and experiments.

  8. Effective rigidity of membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peliti, L.

    1986-12-01

    The role of thermal fluctuations of shape (undulations) in reducing the effective rigidity of membranes is reviewed. The consequences of this effect on vesicle size distribution and on the structure of microemulsions, as well as on other physical phenomena, are sketched.

  9. Rigid molecular foams

    SciTech Connect

    Steckle, W.P. Jr.; Mitchell, M.A.; Aspen, P.G.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Organic analogues to inorganic zeolites would be a significant step forward in engineered porous materials and would provide advantages in range, selectivity, tailorability, and processing. Rigid molecular foams or {open_quotes}organic zeolites{close_quotes} would not be crystalline materials and could be tailored over a broader range of pore sizes and volumes. A novel process for preparing hypercrosslinked polymeric foams has been developed via a Friedel-Crafts polycondensation reaction. A series of rigid hypercrosslinked foams have been prepared using simple rigid polyaromatic hydrocarbons including benzene, biphenyl, m-terphenyl, diphenylmethane, and polystyrene, with dichloroxylene (DCX) as the pore size. After drying the foams are robust and rigid. Densities of the resulting foams can range from 0.15 g/cc to 0.75 g/cc. Nitrogen adsorption studies have shown that by judiciously selecting monomers and the crosslinking agent along with the level of crosslinking and the cure time of the resulting gel, the pore size, pore size distribution, and the total surface area of the foam can be tailored. Surface areas range from 160 to 1,200 m{sup 2}/g with pore sizes ranging from 6 {angstrom} to 2,000 {angstrom}.

  10. Determining the strength of the ring and the magnetopause currents during the initial phase of a geomagnetic storm using cosmic-ray data

    SciTech Connect

    Flueckiger, E.O.; Smart, D.F.; Shea, M.A.

    1990-02-01

    During a geomagnetic storm the strength of the magnetospheric current systems is strongly increased. In the initial phase of most events, however, the magnetic field at the Earth's equator (as characterized by the Dst index) shows only a relatively small perturbation due to the opposite magnetic effects caused by the magnetopause currents compared to the ring current. Analysis of Dst and of the cosmic ray cutoff rigidity changes at about 55 deg geomagnetic latitude offers the unique possibility to estimate the intensity of these two current systems separately. The procedure is illustrated for the geomagnetic storm on December 17, 1971.

  11. Obituary--rigid contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Efron, Nathan

    2010-10-01

    Scleral and corneal rigid lenses represented 100 per cent of the contact lens market immediately prior to the invention of soft lenses in the mid-1960s. In the United Kingdom today, rigid lenses comprise 2 per cent of all new lens fits. Low rates of rigid lens fitting are also apparent in 27 other countries which have recently been surveyed. Thus, the 1998 prediction of the author that rigid lenses--also referred to as 'rigid gas permeable' (RGP) lenses or 'gas permeable' (GP) lenses--would be obsolete by the year 2010 has essentially turned out to be correct. In this obituary, the author offers 10 reasons for the demise of rigid lens fitting: initial rigid lens discomfort; intractable rigid lens-induced corneal and lid pathology; extensive soft lens advertising; superior soft lens fitting logistics; lack of rigid lens training opportunities; redundancy of the rigid lens 'problem solver' function; improved soft toric and bifocal/varifocal lenses; limited uptake of orthokeratology; lack of investment in rigid lenses; and the emergence of aberration control soft lenses. Rigid lenses are now being fitted by a minority of practitioners with specialist skills/training. Certainly, rigid lenses can no longer be considered as a mainstream form of contact lens correction. May their dear souls (bulk properties) rest in peace. PMID:20674469

  12. Extreme Geomagnetic Storms - 1868 - 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennerstrom, S.; Lefevre, L.; Dumbović, M.; Crosby, N.; Malandraki, O.; Patsou, I.; Clette, F.; Veronig, A.; Vršnak, B.; Leer, K.; Moretto, T.

    2016-05-01

    We present the first large statistical study of extreme geomagnetic storms based on historical data from the time period 1868 - 2010. This article is the first of two companion papers. Here we describe how the storms were selected and focus on their near-Earth characteristics. The second article presents our investigation of the corresponding solar events and their characteristics. The storms were selected based on their intensity in the aa index, which constitutes the longest existing continuous series of geomagnetic activity. They are analyzed statistically in the context of more well-known geomagnetic indices, such as the Kp and Dcx/Dst index. This reveals that neither Kp nor Dcx/Dst provide a comprehensive geomagnetic measure of the extreme storms. We rank the storms by including long series of single magnetic observatory data. The top storms on the rank list are the New York Railroad storm occurring in May 1921 and the Quebec storm from March 1989. We identify key characteristics of the storms by combining several different available data sources, lists of storm sudden commencements (SSCs) signifying occurrence of interplanetary shocks, solar wind in-situ measurements, neutron monitor data, and associated identifications of Forbush decreases as well as satellite measurements of energetic proton fluxes in the near-Earth space environment. From this we find, among other results, that the extreme storms are very strongly correlated with the occurrence of interplanetary shocks (91 - 100 %), Forbush decreases (100 %), and energetic solar proton events (70 %). A quantitative comparison of these associations relative to less intense storms is also presented. Most notably, we find that most often the extreme storms are characterized by a complexity that is associated with multiple, often interacting, solar wind disturbances and that they frequently occur when the geomagnetic activity is already elevated. We also investigate the semiannual variation in storm occurrence

  13. Worldwide Geomagnetic Data Collection and Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandea, Mioara; Papitashvili, Vladimir

    2009-11-01

    Geomagnetic data provided by different platforms piece together a global picture of Earth's magnetic field and its interaction with geospace. Furthermore, a great diversity of the geomagnetic field changes, from secular (over decades to centuries) to short time variations (down to minutes and seconds), can be detected only through continued observations. An international effort to watch and record geomagnetic changes first began in the 1830s with a network of scientific observers organized by Karl Friedrich Gauss in Germany, and this effort has continued since then. One of the most remarkable achievements in understanding the geomagnetic field morphology and time behavior was made possible by the International Geophysical Year (IGY), an exploration and research effort that lasted for 18 months, starting on 1 July 1957. The IGY encompassed 11 geoscience disciplines, including geomagnetism. The IGY has represented a giant step forward in the quality and quantity of worldwide geomagnetic measurements, as well as in the widespread interest in magnetic measurements. A half century of probing the geomagnetic field spatial and temporal variations has produced a number of outstanding results, and the interested reader can find recent reviews on various geomagnetic field topics (from measurements to modeling) in Encyclopedia of Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism [Gubbins and Herrero-Bervera, 2007] or Treatise on Geophysics: Geomagnetism [Kono, 2007].

  14. Geomagnetic excursions and climate change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampino, M. R.

    1983-01-01

    Rampino argues that although Kent (1982) demonstrated that the intensity of natural remanent magnetism (NRM) in deep-sea sediments is sensitive to changes in sediment type, and hence is not an accurate indicator of the true strength of the geomagnetic field, it does not offer an alternative explanation for the proposed connections between excursions, climate, and orbital parameters. Kent replies by illustrating some of the problems associated with geomagnetic excursions by considering the record of proposed excursions in a single critical core. The large departure from an axial dipole field direction seen in a part of the sample is probably due to a distorted record; the drawing and storage of the sample, which is described, could easily have led to disturbance and distortion of the record.

  15. Teaching Geomagnetism in High School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, D. P.

    2001-05-01

    Many high school curricula include a one-year course in Earth Sciences, often in the 9th grade (essentially pre-algebra). That is a good time to teach about geomagnetism. Not only are dipole reversals and sea-floor magnetization central to this subject, but this is a good opportunity to introduce students to magnetism and its connection to electric currents. The story of Oersted and Faraday give a fascinating insight into the uneven path of scientific discovery, the magnetic compass and William Gilbert provide a view of the beginnings of the scientific revolution, and even basic concepts of dynamo theory and its connection to solar physics can be included. A resource including all the suitable material now exists on the world-wide web at http://www-spof.gsfc.nasa.gov/earthmag/demagint.htm (home page). A 1-month unit on geomagnetism will be outlined.

  16. Ice ages and geomagnetic reversals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    There have been speculations on the relationship between climatic cooling and polarity reversals of the earth's magnetic field during the Pleistocene. Two of the common criticisms on this relationship have been the reality of these short duration geomagnetic events and the accuracy of their dates. Champion et al. (1988) have reviewed recent progress in this area. They identified a total of 10 short-duration polarity events in the last 1 Ma and 6 of these events have been found in volcanic rocks, which also have K-Ar dates. Supposing that the speculated relationship between climatic cooling and geomagnetic reversals actually exist, two mechanisms that assume climatic cooling causes short period magnetic reversals will be investigated. These two methods are core-mantle boundary topography and transfer of the rotational energy to the core.

  17. Heart attacks and geomagnetic activity.

    PubMed

    Knox, E G; Armstrong, E; Lancashire, R; Wall, M; Haynes, R

    1979-10-18

    Malin and Srivastava reported a remarkable correlation between daily variations in the geomagnetic field strength and daily admissions to the cardio-thoracic wards of hospitals in Hyderabad and Secunderabad, for cardiac emergencies, during 1967--72. We have now carried out a similar enquiry in the West Midlands region of the UK for the years 1969--70, but were unable to confirm the Indian results.

  18. Global geomagnetic field mapping - from secular variation to geomagnetic excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panovska, Sanja; Constable, Catherine

    2015-04-01

    The main source of the geomagnetic field is a self-sustaining dynamo produced by fluid motions in Earth's liquid outer core. We study the spatial and temporal changes in the internal magnetic field by mapping the time-varying geomagnetic field over the past 100 thousand years. This is accomplished using a new global data set of paleomagnetic records drawn from high accumulation rate sediments and from volcanic rocks spanning the past 100 thousand years (Late Pleistocene). Sediment data comprises 105 declination, 117 inclination and 150 relative paleointensity (RPI) records, mainly concentrated in northern mid-latitudes, although some are available in the southern hemisphere. Northern Atlantic and Western Pacific are regions with high concentrations of data. The number of available volcanic/archeomagnetic data is comparitively small on the global scale, especially in the Southern hemisphere. Temporal distributions show that the number of data increases toward more recent times with a good coverage for the past 50 ka. Laschamp excursion (41 ka BP) is well represented for both directional and intensity data. The significant increase in data compared to previous compilations results in an improvement over current geomagnetic field models covering these timescales. Robust aspects of individual sediment records are successfully captured by smoothing spline modeling allowing an estimate of random uncertainties present in the records. This reveals a wide range of fidelities across the sediment magnetic records. Median uncertainties are: 17° for declination (range, 1° to 113°), 6° for inclination (1° to 50°) and 0.4 for standardized relative paleointensity (0.02 to 1.4). The median temporal resolution of the records defined by the smoothing time is 400 years (range, 50 years to about 14 kyr). Using these data, a global, time-varying, geomagnetic field model is constructed covering the past 100 thousand years. The modeling directly uses relative forms of sediment

  19. Correlative comparison of geomagnetic storms and auroral substorms using geomagnetic indeces. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cade, W.B.

    1993-06-01

    Partial contents include the following: (1) Geomagnetic storm and substorm processes; (2) Magnetospheric structure; (3) Substorm processes; (4) Data description; (5) Geomagnetic indices; and (6) Data period and data sets.

  20. Self-interfering matter-wave patterns generated by a moving laser obstacle in a two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate inside a power trap cut off by box potential boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Sakhel, Roger R.; Sakhel, Asaad R.; Ghassib, Humam B.

    2011-09-15

    We report the observation of highly energetic self-interfering matter-wave (SIMW) patterns generated by a moving obstacle in a two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) inside a power trap cut off by hard-wall box potential boundaries. The obstacle initially excites circular dispersive waves radiating away from the center of the trap which are reflected from hard-wall box boundaries at the edges of the trap. The resulting interference between outgoing waves from the center of the trap and reflected waves from the box boundaries institutes, to the best of our knowledge, unprecedented SIMW patterns. For this purpose we simulated the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation using the split-step Crank-Nicolson method and the obstacle was modelled by a moving impenetrable Gaussian potential barrier. Various trapping geometries are considered in which the dynamics of the spatial and momentum density, as well as the energy, are considered. The momentum dynamics reveal an oscillatory behavior for the condensate fraction, indicative of excitations out of and de-excitations back into the condensate state. An oscillatory pattern for the energy dynamics reveals the presence of solitons in the system. Some vortex features are also obtained.

  1. Pressurized liquid extraction for the determination of cannabinoids and metabolites in hair: Detection of cut-off values by high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Montesano, Camilla; Simeoni, Maria Chiara; Vannutelli, Gabriele; Gregori, Adolfo; Ripani, Luigi; Sergi, Manuel; Compagnone, Dario; Curini, Roberta

    2015-08-01

    Hair analysis has become a routine procedure in most forensic laboratories since this alternative matrix presents clear advantages over classical matrices; particularly wider time window, non-invasive sampling and good stability of the analytes over time. There are, however, some major challenges for the analysis of cannabinoids in hair, mainly related to the low concentrations of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH), that is the major metabolite. In this study a fast, accurate and sensitive method for the determination of cannabinol, cannabidiol, THC and THC-COOH in hair has been developed. The extraction of analytes from hair (50mg) is based on an automated pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) using water modified with the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate as eluent phase. PLE extract is then cleaned up by SPE using polymeric reversed phase cartridges Strata XL before the injection in the HPLC-HRMS/MS system. Chromatographic conditions obtained with a fused-core column allowed a good separation of the analytes in less than 4min. The whole procedure has been validated according to SWGTOX guidelines. The LLOQs obtained for THC-COOH and the other analytes were respectively 0.1 and 2pg/mg. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first LC-MS/MS based method that allows the detection of THC-COOH in hair at values lower than the cut-off.

  2. Pressurized liquid extraction for the determination of cannabinoids and metabolites in hair: Detection of cut-off values by high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Montesano, Camilla; Simeoni, Maria Chiara; Vannutelli, Gabriele; Gregori, Adolfo; Ripani, Luigi; Sergi, Manuel; Compagnone, Dario; Curini, Roberta

    2015-08-01

    Hair analysis has become a routine procedure in most forensic laboratories since this alternative matrix presents clear advantages over classical matrices; particularly wider time window, non-invasive sampling and good stability of the analytes over time. There are, however, some major challenges for the analysis of cannabinoids in hair, mainly related to the low concentrations of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH), that is the major metabolite. In this study a fast, accurate and sensitive method for the determination of cannabinol, cannabidiol, THC and THC-COOH in hair has been developed. The extraction of analytes from hair (50mg) is based on an automated pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) using water modified with the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate as eluent phase. PLE extract is then cleaned up by SPE using polymeric reversed phase cartridges Strata XL before the injection in the HPLC-HRMS/MS system. Chromatographic conditions obtained with a fused-core column allowed a good separation of the analytes in less than 4min. The whole procedure has been validated according to SWGTOX guidelines. The LLOQs obtained for THC-COOH and the other analytes were respectively 0.1 and 2pg/mg. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first LC-MS/MS based method that allows the detection of THC-COOH in hair at values lower than the cut-off. PMID:26118805

  3. The Geomagnetic Field During a Reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heirtzler, James R.

    2003-01-01

    By modifying the IGRF it is possible to learn what may happen to the geomagnetic field during a geomagnetic reversal. If the entire IGRF reverses then the declination and inclination only reverse when the field strength is zero. If only the dipole component of the IGRF reverses a large geomagnetic field remains when the dipole component is zero and he direction of the field at the end of the reversal is not exactly reversed from the directions at the beginning of the reversal.

  4. The Causes of Geomagnetic Storms During Solar Maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    1998-01-01

    One of the oldest mysteries in geomagnetism is the linkage between solar and geomagnetic activity. The 11-year cycles of both the numbers of sunspots and Earth geomagnetic storms were first noted by Sabine (1852).

  5. Rigid porous filter

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Ta-Kuan; Straub, Douglas L.; Dennis, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention involves a porous rigid filter including a plurality of concentric filtration elements having internal flow passages and forming external flow passages there between. The present invention also involves a pressure vessel containing the filter for the removal of particulates from high pressure particulate containing gases, and further involves a method for using the filter to remove such particulates. The present filter has the advantage of requiring fewer filter elements due to the high surface area-to-volume ratio provided by the filter, requires a reduced pressure vessel size, and exhibits enhanced mechanical design properties, improved cleaning properties, configuration options, modularity and ease of fabrication.

  6. Designing rigid carbon foams.

    PubMed

    Park, Sora; Kittimanapun, Kritsada; Ahn, Jeung Sun; Kwon, Young-Kyun; Tománek, David

    2010-08-25

    We use ab initio density functional calculations to study the stability, elastic properties and electronic structure of sp(2) carbon minimal surfaces with negative Gaussian curvature, called schwarzites. We focus on two systems with cubic unit cells containing 152 and 200 carbon atoms, which are metallic and very rigid. The porous schwarzite structure allows for efficient and reversible doping by electron donors and acceptors, making it a promising candidate for the next generation of alkali ion batteries. We identify schwarzite structures that act as arrays of interconnected spin quantum dots or become magnetic when doped. We introduce two interpenetrating schwarzite structures that may find their use as the ultimate super-capacitor.

  7. Predicted Effect of Geomagnetic Field on CALET Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Brian

    2014-03-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET), comprised of the main calorimeter (CAL) and Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (CGBM) subsystem, is under construction for launch to the ISS. CAL consists of a scintillator Charge Detector (CHD), a 3 radiation length (X0) deep scintillating fiber Imaging Calorimeter (IMC), and a 27 X0 deep PWO Total Absorption Calorimeter (TASC). The primary objectives of CAL are to measure energy spectra of electrons from 1GeV to 20 TeV and nuclei through iron up to 1,000 TeV, and to detect gamma-rays above 10 GeV. Earth's geomagnetic field in the 51.6° inclination ISS orbit will affect the observed fluxes of charged particles. Rigidity cutoffs based on geomagnetic latitude and East-West angle will introduce structure to the charged particle energy spectra. They can also be exploited to facilitate the measurement of distinct positron and electron fluxes between ~3-20 GeV, and the relative abundances of the rare ultra-heavy (UH) nuclei (30 <= Z <= 40) by using the cutoffs to select nuclei near and above the CHD minimum ionization threshold so that they can be identified using the CHD and top IMC layers without requiring energy determination in the TASC. In 5-years CAL would collect ~2 × the UH statistics of TIGER. This research was supported by NASA at Washington University under Grant Number NNX11AE02G.

  8. Observations of ultraheavy cosmic ray particles at 10 GV cutoff rigidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanagimachi, T.; Hisano, K.; Ito, K.; Kobayashi, S.; Doke, T.; Hamasaki, R.; Hayashi, T.; Yakenaka, T.; Nagata, K.

    1985-01-01

    Ultraheavy cosmic ray particles with Z 45 and Fe were observed in two balloon flights at a mean geomagnetic cutoff rigidity of 10 GV. Fluxes of these particles at the top of the atmosphere are presented. A ratio of (Z 45)/(Fe) is compared with other experimental results. The ratio decreases with increasing energy in the energy range from 1 to 10 GeV/amu. A possibility is presented to explain the variation of the ratio with energy.

  9. Snowstorm at the geomagnetic observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čop, R.

    2015-08-01

    The Sinji Vrh Geomagnetic Observatory (hereinafter the Observatory) is situated on Gora above Ajdovščina, a highland karst plateau, in the southwestern part of Slovenia. The Observatory operates in exceptional geological and meteorological conditions due to its location. The very first measurements at the time of initial tests showed that weather fronts induce changes in the local magnetic field. The first measurements intended to determine the value of this influence were carried out at the end of summer 2011. In 2013 the first such measurements were carried out in January. This article presents the results of these measurements, showing how the snowstorm induced changes in Earth's magnetic field.

  10. On the Influence of the Geomagnetic Field Geometry on the Propagation of Charged Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, K.; Kopp, A.; Heber, B.

    2011-12-01

    Studies of the propagation of charged energetic particles in the Earth's magnetic field go back to Carl Størmer, who introduced ''allowed'' and ''forbidden'' regions on the Earth's surface, leading finally to the definition of the cutoff rigidity, i.e. the minimum momentum per charge a particle must have in order to reach a certain geographical point. Employing Monte Carlo Simulations with the PLANETOCOSMICS code we investigate the correlation between the geomagnetic field structure and the (vertical) cutoff rigidity. It turns out that the resulting rigidity maps reflect the geometry of the field, rather than its magnitude, where the field geometry is represented by the difference between the tangential and the radial components. In order to support our findings we also investigate the temporal variation of both quantities over the last century.

  11. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W.; Taylor, E.R. Jr.; Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems` responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  12. Electric Utility Industry Experience with Geomagnetic Disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as a few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems' responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration.

  13. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W. ); Taylor, E.R. Jr. ); Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems' responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  14. Introduction to Geomagnetic Fields: Second Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Wallace H.

    2003-04-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. The Earth's main field; 2. Quiet-time field variations and dynamo currents; 3. Solar-terrestrial activity; 4. Measurement methods; 5. Applications; Appendix A: mathematical topics; Appendix B: geomagnetic organisations, services and bibliography; Appendix C: utility programs for geomagnetic fields; References; Index.

  15. A proteinuria cut-off level of 0.7 g/day after 12 months of treatment best predicts long-term renal outcome in lupus nephritis: data from the MAINTAIN Nephritis Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tamirou, Farah; Lauwerys, Bernard R; Dall'Era, Maria; Mackay, Meggan; Rovin, Brad; Cervera, Ricard; Houssiau, Frédéric A

    2015-01-01

    Background Although an early decrease in proteinuria has been correlated with good long-term renal outcome in lupus nephritis (LN), studies aimed at defining a cut-off proteinuria value are missing, except a recent analysis performed on patients randomised in the Euro-Lupus Nephritis Trial, demonstrating that a target value of 0.8 g/day at month 12 optimised sensitivity and specificity for the prediction of good renal outcome. The objective of the current work is to validate this target in another LN study, namely the MAINTAIN Nephritis Trial (MNT). Methods Long-term (at least 7 years) renal function data were available for 90 patients randomised in the MNT. Receiver operating characteristic curves were built to test the performance of proteinuria measured within the 1st year as short-term predictor of long-term renal outcome. We calculated the positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV). Results After 12 months of treatment, achievement of a proteinuria <0.7 g/day best predicted good renal outcome, with a sensitivity and a specificity of 71% and 75%, respectively. The PPV was high (94%) but the NPV low (29%). Addition of the requirement of urine red blood cells ≤5/hpf as response criteria at month 12 reduced sensitivity from 71% to 41%. Conclusions In this cohort of mainly Caucasian patients suffering from a first episode of LN in most cases, achievement of a proteinuria <0.7 g/day at month 12 best predicts good outcome at 7 years and inclusion of haematuria in the set of criteria at month 12 undermines the sensitivity of early proteinuria decrease for the prediction of good outcome. The robustness of these conclusions stems from the very similar results obtained in two distinct LN cohorts. Trial registration number: NCT00204022. PMID:26629352

  16. Generalized flexibility-rigidity index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc Duy; Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-06-01

    Flexibility-rigidity index (FRI) has been developed as a robust, accurate, and efficient method for macromolecular thermal fluctuation analysis and B-factor prediction. The performance of FRI depends on its formulations of rigidity index and flexibility index. In this work, we introduce alternative rigidity and flexibility formulations. The structure of the classic Gaussian surface is utilized to construct a new type of rigidity index, which leads to a new class of rigidity densities with the classic Gaussian surface as a special case. Additionally, we introduce a new type of flexibility index based on the domain indicator property of normalized rigidity density. These generalized FRI (gFRI) methods have been extensively validated by the B-factor predictions of 364 proteins. Significantly outperforming the classic Gaussian network model, gFRI is a new generation of methodologies for accurate, robust, and efficient analysis of protein flexibility and fluctuation. Finally, gFRI based molecular surface generation and flexibility visualization are demonstrated.

  17. Geomagnetic Disturbances Caused by Internal Atmospheric Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneman, G.

    1984-01-01

    It is commonly believed that geomagnetic disturbances are caused by external influences connected with the solar wind. The 27-day recurrence of perturbations seems to be a strong hint for this interaction. But frequently geomagnetic disturbances occur without any relation to sunspot numbers or radiowave fluxes. This was one of the reasons for introducing hypothetical M-regions on the Sun and their relation to solar wind activities. Only one half of the variance of the geomagnetic AL-index could be related to the solar wind. Therefore it is concluded that internal processes of the magnetosphere were responsible for additional geomagnetic activity. Arguments, which might lead to the suggestion of geomagnetic disturbances as being caused by internal atmospheric dynamics are discussed and a rather preliminary scenario of those processes is proposed.

  18. Geophysical excitation of nutation and geomagnetic jerks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrák, Jan; Ron, Cyril

    2014-05-01

    Recently Zinovy Malkin (2013) proposed that the observed changes of Free Core Nutation parameters (phase, amplitude) might be related to geomagnetic jerks (rapid changes of the secular variations of geomagnetic field). We tested this hypothesis and found that if the numerical integration of Brzezinski broad-band Liouville equations of atmospheric/oceanic excitations is re-initialized at the epochs of geomagnetic jerks, the agreement between the integrated and observed celestial pole offsets is improved significantly. This approach however tacitly assumes that the influence of geomagnetic jerks has a stepwise character, which is physically not acceptable. The present study continues in this effort by introducing a simple continuous excitation function (hypothetically due to geomagnetic jerks). The results of numerical integration of atmospheric/oceanic excitations plus this newly introduced excitation are then compared with the observed celestial pole offsets.

  19. Fractal rigidity in migraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latka, Miroslaw; Glaubic-Latka, Marta; Latka, Dariusz; West, Bruce J.

    2004-04-01

    We study the middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAfv) in humans using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD). Scaling properties of time series of the axial flow velocity averaged over a cardiac beat interval may be characterized by two exponents. The short time scaling exponent (STSE) determines the statistical properties of fluctuations of blood flow velocities in short-time intervals while the Hurst exponent describes the long-term fractal properties. In many migraineurs the value of the STSE is significantly reduced and may approach that of the Hurst exponent. This change in dynamical properties reflects the significant loss of short-term adaptability and the overall hyperexcitability of the underlying cerebral blood flow control system. We call this effect fractal rigidity.

  20. Rigid collapsible dish structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, William B. (Inventor); Giebler, Martin M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A collapsible dish structure composed of a plurality of rows of rigid radial petal assemblies concentric with the axis of the dish. The petal assemblies consist of a center petal and two side petals, the center petal hinged on an axis tangent to a circle concentric with the axis of the dish and the side petals hinged to the center petal at their mating edge. The center petal is foldable inwardly and the side petals rotate about their hinges such that the collapsed dish structure occupies a much smaller volume than the deployed dish. Means of controlling the shape of the dish to compensate for differential expansion of the deployed dish are also provided.

  1. History of the geomagnetic field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doell, Richard R.

    1969-01-01

    Direct measurements of the direction and strength of the earth's magnetic field have provided a knowledge of the field's form and behavior during the last few hundreds of years. For older times, however, it has been necessary to measure the magnetism of certain rocks to learn what the geomagnetic field was like. For example, when a lava flow solidifies (at temperatures near 1000??C) and cools through the Curie point of the magnetic minerals contained in it (around 500??C) it acquires a remanent magnetism that is (1) very weak, (2) very stablel, (3) paralle to the direction of the ambient geomagnetic field, and (4) proportional in intensity to the ambient field. Separating, by various analytical means, this magnetization from other 'unwanted' magnetizations has allowed paleomagnetists to study the historical and prehistorical behavior of the earth's field. It has been learned, for example, that the strength of the field was almost twice its present value 2000 years ago and that it has often completely reversed its polarity. Paleo-magnetists have also confirmed that most oceans are, geologically speaking, relatively new features, and that the continents have markedly changed their positions over the surface of the earth. ?? 1969 The American Institute of Physics.

  2. Improved geomagnetic referencing in the Arctic environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poedjono, B.; Beck, N.; Buchanan, A. C.; Borri, L.; Maus, S.; Finn, Carol; Worthington, Bill; White, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Geomagnetic referencing uses the Earth’s magnetic field to determine accurate wellbore positioning essential for success in today's complex drilling programs, either as an alternative or a complement to north-seeking gyroscopic referencing. However, fluctuations in the geomagnetic field, especially at high latitudes, make the application of geomagnetic referencing in those areas more challenging. Precise crustal mapping and the monitoring of real-time variations by nearby magnetic observatories is crucial to achieving the required geomagnetic referencing accuracy. The Deadhorse Magnetic Observatory (DED), located at Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, has already played a vital role in the success of several commercial ventures in the area, providing essential, accurate, real-time data to the oilfield drilling industry. Geomagnetic referencing is enhanced with real-time data from DED and other observatories, and has been successfully used for accurate wellbore positioning. The availability of real-time geomagnetic measurements leads to significant cost and time savings in wellbore surveying, improving accuracy and alleviating the need for more expensive surveying techniques. The correct implementation of geomagnetic referencing is particularly critical as we approach the increased activity associated with the upcoming maximum of the 11-year solar cycle. The DED observatory further provides an important service to scientific communities engaged in studies of ionospheric, magnetospheric and space weather phenomena.

  3. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOEpatents

    Neet, T.E.; Spieker, D.A.

    1983-12-08

    A rigid, moldable polyurethane foam comprises about 2 to 10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  4. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOEpatents

    Neet, Thomas E.; Spieker, David A.

    1985-03-19

    A rigid, polyurethane foam comprises about 2-10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  5. Geomagnetic activity: Dependence on solar wind parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalgaard, L.

    1977-01-01

    Current ideas about the interaction between the solar wind and the earth's magnetosphere are reviewed. The solar wind dynamic pressure as well as the influx of interplanetary magnetic field lines are both important for the generation of geomagnetic activity. The influence of the geometry of the situation as well as the variability of the interplanetary magnetic field are both found to be important factors. Semi-annual and universal time variations are discussed as well as the 22-year cycle in geomagnetic activity. All three are found to be explainable by the varying geometry of the interaction. Long term changes in geomagnetic activity are examined.

  6. Multiscale Features of Large Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Michelis, P.; Consolini, G.

    2011-12-01

    The present study is focused on the analysis of the multiscale features of four large geomagnetic storms that occurred from 2000 to 2003. In particular, we analyse the fluctuations of these extreme events as recorded along the horizontal component of the geomagnetic field in seven different canadian geomagnetic observatories, by decomposing the signal via the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT). This empirical method, that is alternative to traditional data-analysis methods, consists in an empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and in the Hilbert spectral analysis, and it is designed specifically for analyzing nonlinear and nonstationary data. The features of the intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) are studied as a function of the magnetic latitude.

  7. On the watch for geomagnetic storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, Arthur W.; Brown, William M.

    1997-01-01

    Geomagnetic storms, induced by solar activity, pose significant hazards to satellites, electrical power distribution systems, radio communications, navigation, and geophysical surveys. Strong storms can expose astronauts and crews of high-flying aircraft to dangerous levels of radiation. Economic losses from recent geomagnetic storms have run into hundreds of millions of dollars. With the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as the lead agency, an international network of geomagnetic observatories monitors the onset of solar-induced storms and gives warnings that help diminish losses to military and commercial operations and facilities.

  8. Minimax confidence intervals in geomagnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, Philip B.

    1992-01-01

    The present paper uses theory of Donoho (1989) to find lower bounds on the lengths of optimally short fixed-length confidence intervals (minimax confidence intervals) for Gauss coefficients of the field of degree 1-12 using the heat flow constraint. The bounds on optimal minimax intervals are about 40 percent shorter than Backus' intervals: no procedure for producing fixed-length confidence intervals, linear or nonlinear, can give intervals shorter than about 60 percent the length of Backus' in this problem. While both methods rigorously account for the fact that core field models are infinite-dimensional, the application of the techniques to the geomagnetic problem involves approximations and counterfactual assumptions about the data errors, and so these results are likely to be extremely optimistic estimates of the actual uncertainty in Gauss coefficients.

  9. Frequency of Proterozoic geomagnetic superchrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Peter E.; Evans, David A. D.

    2016-03-01

    Long-term geodynamo evolution is expected to respond to inner core growth and changing patterns of mantle convection. Three geomagnetic superchrons, during which Earth's magnetic field maintained a near-constant polarity state through tens of Myr, are known from the bio/magnetostratigraphic record of Phanerozoic time, perhaps timed according to supercontinental episodicity. Some geodynamo simulations incorporating a much smaller inner core, as would have characterized Proterozoic time, produce field reversals at a much lower rate. Here we compile polarity ratios of site means within a quality-filtered global Proterozoic paleomagnetic database, according to recent plate kinematic models. Various smoothing parameters, optimized to successfully identify the known Phanerozoic superchrons, indicate 3-10 possible Proterozoic superchrons during the 1300 Myr interval studied. Proterozoic geodynamo evolution thus appears to indicate a relatively narrow range of reversal behavior through the last two billion years, implying either remarkable stability of core dynamics over this time or insensitivity of reversal rate to core evolution.

  10. Range indices of geomagnetic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, W.F.; Green, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    The simplest index of geomagnetic activity is the range in nT from maximum to minimum value of the field in a given time interval. The hourly range R was recommended by IAGA for use at observatories at latitudes greater than 65??, but was superceded by AE. The most used geomagnetic index K is based on the range of activity in a 3 h interval corrected for the regular daily variation. In order to take advantage of real time data processing, now available at many observatories, it is proposed to introduce a 1 h range index and also a 3 h range index. Both will be computed hourly, i.e. each will have a series of 24 per day, the 3 h values overlapping. The new data will be available as the range (R) of activity in nT and also as a logarithmic index (I) of the range. The exponent relating index to range in nT is based closely on the scale used for computing K values. The new ranges and range indices are available, from June 1987, to users in real time and can be accessed by telephone connection or computer network. Their first year of production is regarded as a trial period during which their value to the scientific and commercial communities will be assessed, together with their potential as indicators of regional and global disturbances' and in which trials will be conducted into ways of eliminating excessive bias at quiet times due to the rate of change of the daily variation field. ?? 1988.

  11. Deciphering records of geomagnetic reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, Jean-Pierre; Fournier, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    Polarity reversals of the geomagnetic field are a major feature of the Earth's dynamo. Questions remain regarding the dynamical processes that give rise to reversals and the properties of the geomagnetic field during a polarity transition. A large number of paleomagnetic reversal records have been acquired during the past 50 years in order to better constrain the structure and geometry of the transitional field. In addition, over the past two decades, numerical dynamo simulations have also provided insights into the reversal mechanism. Yet despite the large paleomagnetic database, controversial interpretations of records of the transitional field persist; they result from two characteristics inherent to all reversals, both of which are detrimental to an ambiguous analysis. On the one hand, the reversal process is rapid and requires adequate temporal resolution. On the other hand, weak field intensities during a reversal can affect the fidelity of magnetic recording in sedimentary records. This paper is aimed at reviewing critically the main reversal features derived from paleomagnetic records and at analyzing some of these features in light of numerical simulations. We discuss in detail the fidelity of the signal extracted from paleomagnetic records and pay special attention to their resolution with respect to the timing and mechanisms involved in the magnetization process. Records from marine sediments dominate the database. They give rise to transitional field models that often lead to overinterpret the data. Consequently, we attempt to separate robust results (and their subsequent interpretations) from those that do not stand on a strong observational footing. Finally, we discuss new avenues that should favor progress to better characterize and understand transitional field behavior.

  12. Preliminary study of cosmic rays, geomagnetic field changes and possible climate changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, M. A.; Smart, D. F.

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of a connection between cosmic radiation and climate has intrigued scientists for the past several decades. The studies of Friis-Christensen and Svensmark reported a variation of 3-4% in the global cloud cover between 1980 and 1995 that appeared to be directly correlated with the change in galactic cosmic radiation flux over the solar cycle. However, not only the solar cycle modulation of cosmic radiation must be considered, but also the changes in the cosmic radiation impinging at the top of the atmosphere as a result of the long-term evolution of the geomagnetic field. We present preliminary results of an on-going study of geomagnetic cutoff rigidities over a 400-year interval. These results show: (1) the change in cutoff rigidity is sufficiently large over this 400-year period that the change in cosmic radiation flux impacting the earth is approximately equal to the relative change in flux over a solar cycle, and (2) the changes in cutoff rigidity are non-uniform over the globe with both significant increases and decreases at mid-latitude locations.

  13. Solar-Terrestrial Relations and Geomagnetic Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogunade, S. O.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of the solar environment and terrestrial magnetism is presented. The interactions of the solar environment and terrestrial magnetism are then discussed as they result in the creation of the magnetosphere and ionosphere with their corresponding current systems. Geomagnetic variations resulting from these current systems are discussed with regards to the observations made on the Earth's surface. Some useful and disruptive effects of the geomagnetic variations on navigation, shortwave radio communication, space satellite orbits and other technological systems are discussed.

  14. The International Geomagnetic Reference Field, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rukstales, Kenneth S.; Love, Jeffrey J.

    2007-01-01

    This is a set of five world charts showing the declination, inclination, horizontal intensity, vertical component, and total intensity of the Earth's magnetic field at mean sea level at the beginning of 2005. The charts are based on the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) main model for 2005 and secular change model for 2005-2010. The IGRF is referenced to the World Geodetic System 1984 ellipsoid. Additional information about the USGS geomagnetism program is available at: http://geomag.usgs.gov/

  15. How the geomagnetic field vector reverses polarity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prevot, M.; Mankinen, E.A.; Gromme, C.S.; Coe, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    A highly detailed record of both the direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field as it reverses has been obtained from a Miocene volcanic sequence. The transitional field is low in intensity and is typically non-axisymmetric. Geomagnetic impulses corresponding to astonishingly high rates of change of the field sometimes occur, suggesting that liquid velocity within the Earth's core increases during geomagnetic reversals. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  16. Geomagnetic main field modeling using magnetohydrodynamic constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of physical constraints are investigated which may be approximately satisfied by the Earth's liquid core on models of the geomagnetic main field and its secular variation. A previous report describes the methodology used to incorporate nonlinear equations of constraint into the main field model. The application of that methodology to the GSFC 12/83 field model to test the frozen-flux hypothesis and the usefulness of incorporating magnetohydrodynamic constraints for obtaining improved geomagnetic field models is described.

  17. Geomagnetic disturbance effects on power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Albertson, V.D.; Bozoki, B.; Feero, W.E.; Kappenman, J.G.; Larsen, E.V.; Nordell, D.E.; Ponder, J.; Prabhakara, F.S.; Thompson, K.; Walling, R.

    1993-07-01

    In the northern hemisphere, the aurora borealis is visual evidence of simultaneous fluctuations in the earth's magnetic field (geomagnetic field). These geomagnetic disturbances (GMD's), or geomagnetic storms, can affect a number of man-made systems, including electric power systems. The GMD's are caused by the electromagnetic interaction of the solar wind plasma of protons and electrons with the geomagnetic field. These dynamic impulses in the solar wind are due to solar flares, coronal holes, and disappearing filaments, and reach the earth from one to six days after being emitted by a solar event. Instances of geomagnetic storms affecting telegraph systems were noted in England in 1846, and power system disturbances linked to GMD's were first reported in the United States in 1940. This Working Group report is a summary of the state of knowledge and research activity to the present time, and covers the GMD/Geomagnetically-induced currents (GIC) phenomena, transformer effects, the impact on generators, protective relay effects, and communication system effects. It also summarizes modeling and predicting GIC, measuring and monitoring GIC, mitigation methods, system operating guidelines during GMD's, and alerting and forecasting procedures and needs for the power industry.

  18. Cenozoic Eurasia is not a single rigid plate: Paleomagnetic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogné, Jean-Pascal

    2013-11-01

    The widely distributed Cenozoic paleomagnetic inclination anomaly in Asia is usually attributed to either a widespread error of magnetic field recording due to an inclination flattening mechanism in sediments, or to the persistence of an anomalous non-dipolar component of the geomagnetic field throughout the Tertiary. Based on an analysis of the Asian paleomagnetic database for Meso-Cenozoic times, we suggest that instead this puzzling anomaly results from an overlooked global plate tectonics cause where the wide so-called Eurasian plate would have suffered from previously undetected transpressive north-south relative movements between its western and eastern ends since the Cretaceous. These relative movements are most probably accommodated by a component of right-lateral shear movement distributed in the Tornquist-Tesseyre zone, and a localized left-lateral shear movement in the Ural Mountain chain during the Tertiary. Therefore, Eurasia was not the single rigid plate that Cenozoic plate reconstructions have accepted.

  19. Steady flows at the top of the core from geomagnetic field models - The steady motions theorem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, C. V.; Backus, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the steady tangential velocity at the closed surface of a perfect-fluid conductor bounded by a rigid impenetrable exterior can be uniquely determined from knowledge of the normal component of the time-varying magnetic-flux density on the surface. In the context of a simple earth model consisting of an electrically insulating mantle surrounding a perfectly conducting core, the assumption of steady flow provides enough extra information to eliminate the toroidal ambiguity and to allow derivation of a unique global flow at the top of the core from a model of the geomagnetic field.

  20. Geomagnetically trapped energetic helium nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Gregory Guzik, T.; Wefel, J.P.; Roger Pyle, K.; Cooper, J.F.

    1996-07-01

    Geomagnetically trapped helium nuclei, at high energy ({approximately}40{endash}100 MeV/nucleon), have been measured by the ONR-604 instrument during the 1990/1991 CRRES mission. The ONR-604 instrument resolved the isotopes of helium with a mass resolution of 0.1 amu. The energetic helium observed at {ital L}{lt}2.3 have a pitch angle distribution peaking perpendicular to the local magnetic field, which is characteristic of a trapped population. Both the trapped {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He show two peaks at {ital L}=1.2 and 1.9. Each isotope{close_quote}s flux, in each peak, can be characterized by a power law energy spectrum. The energy spectrum of the {sup 3}He is different from that of {sup 4}He, indicating that the {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratio is energy dependent. Over the energy range of 51{endash}86 MeV/nucleon, the {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratio is 8.7{plus_minus}3.1 at {ital L}=1.1{endash}1.5 and is 2.4{plus_minus}0.6 at {ital L}=1.5{endash}2.3. The trapped helium counting rates decrease gradually with time during the CRRES mission, when the anomalous component is excluded from the inner heliosphere, indicating that these high energy ions were not injected by flares during this time period. The decrease in intensity is attributed mainly to the events around {ital L}=1.9. The helium around {ital L}=1.2, dominated by {sup 3}He, does not show a significant temporal evolution, which implies a long-term energetic trapped {sup 3}He population. Two possible origins of the geomagnetically trapped helium isotopes are the interactions of energetic protons with the upper atmosphere and/or the inward diffusion and acceleration of helium ions due to electric-field fluctuations. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Geomagnetic substorm association of plasmoids

    SciTech Connect

    Moldwin, M.B.; Hughes, W.J. )

    1993-01-01

    The relationship of geomagnetic substorms and plasmoids is examined by determining the correlation of the 366 plasmoids identified by Moldwin and Hughes (1992) with ground auroral zone magnetograms and geosynchronous particle data signatures of substorm onsets. Over 84% of the plasmoid events occurred between 5 and 60 min after a substorm onset. We also find near one-to-one correlation between large isolated substorm signatures in the near-Earth region and signatures consistent with a passing plasmoid in the distant tail (i.e., a traveling compression region, or an actual plasmoid observation). However, there does not appear to be an absolute correspondence of every substorm onset to a plasmoid signature in the deep tail especially, for periods of prolonged disturbance that have multiple substorm insets. A correlation of inter-planetary magnetic field B. south with plasmoid observations was also found. The locations of the near- and far-Earth reconnection sites are estimated using the time of flight of the plasmoids from substorm onset to their observation at ISEE 3. The estimates of the near- and far-Earth reconnection sites are highly variable and range from 10 to 140 RE, 32 refs., 4 figs. 2 tabs.

  2. On Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2000-01-01

    A partial description of Earth's broad scale, core-source magnetic field has been developed and tested three ways. The description features an expected, or mean, spatial magnetic power spectrum that is approximately inversely proportional to horizontal wavenumber atop Earth's core. This multipole spectrum describes a magnetic energy range; it is not steep enough for Gubbins' magnetic dissipation range. Temporal variations of core multipole powers about mean values are to be expected and are described statistically, via trial probability distribution functions, instead of deterministically, via trial solution of closed transport equations. The distributions considered here are closed and neither require nor prohibit magnetic isotropy. The description is therefore applicable to, and tested against, both dipole and low degree non-dipole fields. In Part 1, a physical basis for an expectation spectrum is developed and checked. The description is then combined with main field models of twentieth century satellite and surface geomagnetic field measurements to make testable predictions of the radius of Earth's core. The predicted core radius is 0.7% above the 3480 km seismological value. Partial descriptions of other planetary dipole fields are noted.

  3. Geomagnetic Field Modeling with DMSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alken, P.; Redmon, R. J.; Rich, F. J.; Maus, S.; Luhr, H.

    2013-12-01

    The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) launches and maintains a network of satellites to monitor the meteorological, oceanographic, and solar-terrestrial physics environments. In the past decade, geomagnetic field modelers have focused much attention on magnetic measurements from missions such as CHAMP, Oersted and SAC-C. With the completion of the CHAMP mission in 2010, there have been limited satellite-based vector and scalar magnetic field measurements available for main field modeling. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of using the Special Sensor Magnetometer (SSM) instrument onboard DMSP for main field modeling. These vector field measurements are calibrated to compute instrument timing shifts, scale factors, offsets, and non-orthogonalities in the fluxgate magnetometer cores. Euler angles are then computed to determine the orientation of the vector magnetometer with respect to a local coordinate system. We fit a degree 12 main field model to the dataset and compare with similar models such as the World Magnetic Model (WMM) and IGRF. Initial results indicate that the DMSP dataset will be a valuable source for main field modeling for the years between CHAMP and the upcoming Swarm mission.

  4. Coupling Functions for NM-64 and NM Without Lead Derived on the Basis of Calculated Apparent Cutoff Rigidities for CR Latitude Survey from Antarctica to Italy in Minimum of Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L.I.; Danilova, O.A.; Tyasto, M.I.; Ptitsina, N.G.; Villoresi, G.; Iucci, N.; Parisi, M.

    L. I. Dorman (1,2), O. A. Danilova (3), M. I. Tyasto (3), N. G. Ptitsina (3), G. Villoresi (4), N. Iucci (4) and M. Parisi (4) ? (1) Israel Cosmic Ray Center affiliated to Tel Aviv University, Technion and Israel Space Agency, Israel; (2) IZMIRAN, Troitsk, Russia; (3) SPbFIZMIRAN, St. Petersburg, Russia; (4) Dipartimento di Fisica "E. Amaldi", Università "Roma Tre", Rome, Italy In Dorman et al. (2007) it was calculate the apparent cut-off rigidities for the backward route (Antarctica-Italy) of the CR latitude survey performed on a ship during 1996-1997 solar minimum. These computations were done on the basis of results of trajectory calculations for inclined cut-off rigidities for various azimuth and zenith angles (0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°) and azimuth directions changing from 0° to 360° in steps of 45°. The information on integral multiplicities of secondary neutrons detected by neutron monitor in dependence of zenith angle of incoming primary CR particles have been also used. This information is based on the theoretical calculations of meson-nuclear cascades of primary protons with different rigidities arriving to the Earth's atmosphere at zenith angles 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 75°. By using this information and data of CR latitude survey from Antarctica to Italy in minimum of solar activity we determine coupling functions for NM-64 and NM without lead. Reference: L.I. Dorman et al. “Apparent Cutoff Rigidities for Cosmic Ray Latitude Survey from Antarctica to Italy in Minimum of Solar Activity”, Adv. Space Res., 2007 (in press).

  5. Rigid therapies, rigid minds: italian professionals' perspectives on autism interventions.

    PubMed

    Cascio, M Ariel

    2015-06-01

    Many therapies, interventions, and programs seek to improve outcomes and quality of life for people diagnosed with autism spectrum conditions. This paper addresses Italian professionals' perspectives on a variety of such interventions, including TEACCH, ABA, Defeat Autism Now!, and Doman-Delacato. Drawing on participant-observation and interviews collected in 2012-2013 in a northern region of Italy, it highlights the theme of "rigidity" that appears in professionals' discourses about both the characteristics of people with autism and the potential risks of adhering too strictly to any particular treatment protocol. The co-occurrence of the theme of rigidity across different domains demonstrates a way in which diagnostic characteristics become metaphors for medical practice. This paper proposes that such discursive moves may help bridge the gap between people with autism and people who work with them because a key attribute of people with autism-thinking and/or acting rigidly-is also a potential pitfall for people without autism.

  6. Bats Use Geomagnetic Field: Behavior and Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Tian, L.; Zhang, B.; Zhu, R.

    2015-12-01

    It has been known that numerous animals can use the Earth's magnetic field for spatial orientation and long-distance navigation, nevertheless, how animals can respond to the magnetic field remain mostly ambiguous. The intensities of the global geomagnetic field varies between 23 and 66 μT, and the geomagnetic field intensity could drop to 10% during geomagnetic polarity reversals or geomagnetic excursions. Such dramatic changes of the geomagnetic field may pose a significant challenge for the evolution of magnetic compass in animals. For examples, it is vital whether the magnetic compass can still work in such very weak magnetic fields. Our previous experiment has demonstrated that a migratory bat (Nyctalus plancyi) uses a polarity compass for orientation during roosting when exposed to an artificial magnetic field (100 μT). Recently, we experimentally tested whether the N. plancyi can sense very weak magnetic fields that were even lower than those of the present-day geomagnetic field. Results showed: 1) the bats can sense the magnetic north in a field strength of present-day local geomagnetic field (51μT); 2) As the field intensity decreased to only 1/5th of the natural intensity (10 μT), the bats still responded by positioning themselves at the magnetic north. Notably, as the field polarity was artificially reversed, the bats still preferred the new magnetic north, even at the lowest field strength tested (10 μT). Hence, N. plancyi is able to detect the direction of a magnetic field with intensity range from twice to 1/5th of the present-day field strength. This allows them to orient themselves across the entire range of present-day global geomagnetic field strengths and sense very weak magnetic fields. We propose that this high sensitivity might have evolved in bats as the geomagnetic field strength varied and the polarity reversed tens of times over the past fifty million years since the origin of bats. The physiological mechanisms underlying

  7. Principles of major geomagnetic storms forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagnetko, Alexander; Applbaum, David; Dorman, Lev; Pustil'Nik, Lev; Sternlieb, Abraham; Zukerman, Igor

    According to NOAA Space Weather Scales, geomagnetic storms of scales G5 (3-hour index of geomagnetic activity Kp=9), G4 (Kp=8) and G3 (Kp=7) are dangerous for people technology and health (influence on power systems, on spacecraft operations, on HF radio-communications and others). To prevent these serious damages will be very important to forecast dangerous geomagnetic storms. In many papers it was shown that in principle for this forecasting can be used data on CR intensity and CR anisotropy changing before SC of major geomagnetic storms accompanied by sufficient Forbush-decreases (e.g., Dorman et al., 1995, 1999). In this paper we consider all types of observed precursor effects in CR what can be used for forecasting of great geomagnetic storms and possible mechanisms of these precursor effects origin. REFERENCES: Dorman L.I., et al. "Cosmic-ray forecasting features for big Forbush-decreases". Nuclear Physics B, 49A, 136-144 (1995). L.I.Dorman, et al, "Cosmic ray Forbush-decrease as indicators of space dangerous phenomenon and possible use of cosmic ray data for their pre-diction", Proc. of 26-th Intern. Cosmic Ray Conference, Salt Lake City, 6, 476-479 (1999).

  8. The causes of recurrent geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    The causes of recurrent geomagnetic activity were studied by analyzing interplanetary magnetic field and plasma data from earth-orbiting spacecraft in the interval from November 1973 to February 1974. This interval included the start of two long sequences of geomagnetic activity and two corresponding corotating interplanetary streams. In general, the geomagnetic activity was related to an electric field which was due to two factors: (1) the ordered, mesoscale pattern of the stream itself, and (2) random, smaller-scale fluctuations in the southward component of the interplanetary magnetic field Bz. The geomagnetic activity in each recurrent sequence consisted of two successive stages. The first stage was usually the most intense, and it occurred during the passage of the interaction region at the front of a stream. These large amplitudes of Bz were primarily produced in the interplanetary medium by compression of ambient fluctuations as the stream steepened in transit to 1 A.U. The second stage of geomagnetic activity immediately following the first was associated with the highest speeds in the stream.

  9. Ionospheric redistribution during geomagnetic storms

    PubMed Central

    Immel, T J; Mannucci, A J

    2013-01-01

    [1]The abundance of plasma in the daytime ionosphere is often seen to grow greatly during geomagnetic storms. Recent reports suggest that the magnitude of the plasma density enhancement depends on the UT of storm onset. This possibility is investigated over a 7year period using global maps of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) produced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The analysis confirms that the American sector exhibits, on average, larger storm time enhancement in ionospheric plasma content, up to 50% in the afternoon middle-latitude region and 30% in the vicinity of the high-latitude auroral cusp, with largest effect in the Southern Hemisphere. We investigate whether this effect is related to the magnitude of the causative magnetic storms. Using the same advanced Dst index employed to sort the TEC maps into quiet and active (Dst<−100 nT) sets, we find variation in storm strength that corresponds closely to the TEC variation but follows it by 3–6h. For this and other reasons detailed in this report, we conclude that the UT-dependent peak in storm time TEC is likely not related to the magnitude of external storm time forcing but more likely attributable to phenomena such as the low magnetic field in the South American region. The large Dst variation suggests a possible system-level effect of the observed variation in ionospheric storm response on the measured strength of the terrestrial ring current, possibly connected through UT-dependent modulation of ion outflow. PMID:26167429

  10. Atmospheric Entry Studies for Venus Missions: 45 Sphere-Cone Rigid Aeroshells and Ballistic Entries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Spilker, Thomas R.; Allen, Gary A., Jr.; Hwang, Helen H.; Cappuccio, Gelsomina; Moses, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    The present study considers direct ballistic entries into the atmosphere of Venus using a 45deg sphere-cone rigid aeroshell, a legacy shape that has been used successfully in the past in the Pioneer Venus Multiprobe Mission. For a number of entry mass and heatshield diameter combinations (i.e., various ballistic coefficients) and entry velocities, the trajectory space in terms of entry flight path angles between skip out and -30deg is explored with a 3DoF trajectory code, TRAJ. From these trajectories, the viable entry flight path angle space is determined through the use of mechanical and thermal performance limits on the thermal protection material and science payload; the thermal protection material of choice is entry-grade carbon phenolic, for which a material thermal response model is available. For mechanical performance, a 200 g limit is placed on the peak deceleration load experienced by the science instruments, and 10 bar is assumed as the pressure limit for entry-grade carbon-phenolic material. For thermal performance, inflection points in the total heat load distribution are used as cut off criteria. Analysis of the results shows the existence of a range of critical ballistic coefficients beyond which the steepest possible entries are determined by the pressure limit of the material rather than the deceleration load limit.

  11. The latitudinal distribution of the baseline geomagnetic field during the March 17, 2015 geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Tommaso; Piersanti, Mirko; Lepreti, Fabio; Vecchio, Antonio; De Michelis, Paola; Villante, Umberto; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    Geomagnetic storms (GS) are global geomagnetic disturbances that result from the interaction between magnetized plasma that propagates from the Sun and plasma and magnetic fields in the near-Earth space plasma environment. The Dst (Disturbance Storm Time) global Ring Current index is still taken to be the definitive representation for geomagnetic storm and is used widely by researcher. Recent in situ measurements by satellites passing through the ring-current region (i.e. Van Allen probes) and computations with magnetospheric field models showed that there are many other field contributions on the geomagnetic storming time variations at middle and low latitudes. Appling the Empirical Mode Decomposition [Huang et al., 1998] to magnetospheric and ground observations, we detect the different magnetic field contributions during a GS and introduce the concepts of modulated baseline and fluctuations of the geomagnetic field. In this work, we apply this method to study the latitudinal distribution of the baseline geomagnetic field during the St. Patrick's Day Geomagnetic Storm 2015 in order to detect physical informations concerning the differences between high-latitude and equatorial ground measurements.

  12. Magnetospheric mapping with quantitative geomagnetic field models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Mead, G. D.

    1973-01-01

    The Mead-Fairfield geomagnetic field models were used to trace field lines between the outer magnetosphere and the earth's surface. The results are presented in terms of ground latitude and local time contours projected to the equatorial plane and into the geomagnetic tail. With these contours various observations can be mapped along field lines between high and low altitudes. Low altitudes observations of the polar cap boundary, the polar cusp, the energetic electron trapping boundary and the sunward convection region are projected to the equatorial plane and compared with the results of the model and with each other. The results provide quantitative support to the earlier suggestions that the trapping boundary is associated with the last closed field line in the sunward hemisphere, the polar cusp is associated with the region of the last closed field line, and the polar cap projects to the geomagnetic tail and has a low latitude boundary corresponding to the last closed field line.

  13. Scaling laws from geomagnetic time series

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voros, Z.; Kovacs, P.; Juhasz, A.; Kormendi, A.; Green, A.W.

    1998-01-01

    The notion of extended self-similarity (ESS) is applied here for the X - component time series of geomagnetic field fluctuations. Plotting nth order structure functions against the fourth order structure function we show that low-frequency geomagnetic fluctuations up to the order n = 10 follow the same scaling laws as MHD fluctuations in solar wind, however, for higher frequencies (f > l/5[h]) a clear departure from the expected universality is observed for n > 6. ESS does not allow to make an unambiguous statement about the non triviality of scaling laws in "geomagnetic" turbulence. However, we suggest to use higher order moments as promising diagnostic tools for mapping the contributions of various remote magnetospheric sources to local observatory data. Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. An introduction to quiet daily geomagnetic fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    On days that are quiet with respect to solar-terrestrial activity phenomena, the geomagnetic field has variations, tens of gamma in size, with major spectral components at about 24, 12, 8, and 6 hr in period. These quiet daily field variations are primarily due to the dynamo currents flowing in the E region of the earth's ionosphere, are driven by the global thermotidal wind systems, and are dependent upon the local tensor conductivity and main geomagnetic field vector. The highlights of the behavior and interpretation of these quiet field changes, from their discovery in 1634 until the present, are discussed as an introduction to the special journal issue on Quiet Daily Geomagnetic Fields. ?? 1989 Birkha??user Verlag.

  15. International Geomagnetic Reference Field: the third generation.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.

    1982-01-01

    In August 1981 the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy revised the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). It is the second revision since the inception of the IGRF in 1968. The revision extends the earlier series of IGRF models from 1980 to 1985, introduces a new series of definitive models for 1965-1976, and defines a provisional reference field for 1975- 1980. The revision consists of: 1) a model of the main geomagnetic field at 1980.0, not continuous with the earlier series of IGRF models together with a forecast model of the secular variation of the main field during 1980-1985; 2) definitive models of the main field at 1965.0, 1970.0, and 1975.0, with linear interpolation of the model coefficients specified for intervening dates; and 3) a provisional reference field for 1975-1980, defined as the linear interpolation of the 1975 and 1980 main-field models.-from Author

  16. Rigidly foldable origami gadgets and tessellations

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Thomas A.; Lang, Robert J.; Magleby, Spencer P.; Howell, Larry L.

    2015-01-01

    Rigidly foldable origami allows for motion where all deflection occurs at the crease lines and facilitates the application of origami in materials other than paper. In this paper, we use a recently discovered method for determining rigid foldability to identify existing flat-foldable rigidly foldable tessellations, which are also categorized. We introduce rigidly foldable origami gadgets which may be used to modify existing tessellations or to create new tessellations. Several modified and new rigidly foldable tessellations are presented. PMID:26473037

  17. Rigidity generation by nonthermal fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheshka, R.; Recho, P.; Truskinovsky, L.

    2016-05-01

    Active stabilization in systems with zero or negative stiffness is an essential element of a wide variety of biological processes. We study a prototypical example of this phenomenon and show how active rigidity, interpreted as a formation of a pseudowell in the effective energy landscape, can be generated in an overdamped stochastic system. We link the transition from negative to positive rigidity with time correlations in the additive noise, and we show that subtle differences in the out-of-equilibrium driving may compromise the emergence of a pseudowell.

  18. Rigidity generation by nonthermal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Sheshka, R; Recho, P; Truskinovsky, L

    2016-05-01

    Active stabilization in systems with zero or negative stiffness is an essential element of a wide variety of biological processes. We study a prototypical example of this phenomenon and show how active rigidity, interpreted as a formation of a pseudowell in the effective energy landscape, can be generated in an overdamped stochastic system. We link the transition from negative to positive rigidity with time correlations in the additive noise, and we show that subtle differences in the out-of-equilibrium driving may compromise the emergence of a pseudowell.

  19. Large Geomagnetic Storms: Introduction to Special Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.

    2010-01-01

    Solar cycle 23 witnessed the accumulation of rich data sets that reveal various aspects of geomagnetic storms in unprecedented detail both at the Sun where the storm causing disturbances originate and in geospace where the effects of the storms are directly felt. During two recent coordinated data analysis workshops (CDAWs) the large geomagnetic storms (Dst < or = -100 nT) of solar cycle 23 were studied in order to understand their solar, interplanetary, and geospace connections. This special section grew out of these CDAWs with additional contributions relevant to these storms. Here I provide a brief summary of the results presented in the special section.

  20. Tsunami related to solar and geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldi, Gabriele; Cataldi, Daniele; Straser, Valentino

    2016-04-01

    The authors of this study wanted to verify the existence of a correlation between earthquakes of high intensity capable of generating tsunami and variations of solar and Earth's geomagnetic activity. To confirming or not the presence of this kind of correlation, the authors analyzed the conditions of Spaceweather "near Earth" and the characteristics of the Earth's geomagnetic field in the hours that preceded the four earthquakes of high intensity that have generated tsunamis: 1) Japan M9 earthquake occurred on March 11, 2011 at 05:46 UTC; 2) Japan M7.1 earthquake occurred on October 25, 2013 at 17:10 UTC; 3) Chile M8.2 earthquake occurred on April 1, 2014 at 23:46 UTC; 4) Chile M8.3 earthquake occurred on September 16, 2015 at 22:54 UTC. The data relating to the four earthquakes were provided by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The data on ion density used to realize the correlation study are represented by: solar wind ion density variation detected by ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) Satellite, in orbit near the L1 Lagrange point, at 1.5 million of km from Earth, in direction of the Sun. The instrument used to perform the measurement of the solar wind ion density is the Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (EPAM) instrument, equipped on the ACE Satellite. To conduct the study, the authors have taken in consideration the variation of the solar wind protons density of three different energy fractions: differential proton flux 1060-1900 keV (p/cm^2-sec-ster-MeV); differential proton flux 761-1220 keV (p/cm^2-sec-ster-MeV); differential proton flux 310-580 keV (p/cm^2-sec-ster-MeV). Geomagnetic activity data were provided by Tromsø Geomagnetic Observatory (TGO), Norway; by Scoresbysund Geomagnetic Observatory (SCO), Greenland, Denmark and by Space Weather Prediction Center of Pushkov Institute of terrestrial magnetism, ionosphere and radio wave propagation (IZMIRAN), Troitsk, Moscow Region. The results of the study, in agreement with what already

  1. Satellite data for geomagnetic field modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langel, R. A.; Baldwin, R. T.

    1992-06-01

    Satellite measurements of the geomagnetic fields began with the launch of Sputnik 3 in May of 1958 and have continued sporadically. Spacecraft making significant contributions to main field geomagnetism will be reviewed and the characteristics of their data discussed, including coverage, accuracy, resolution and data availability. Of particular interest are Vanguard 3; Cosmos 49, Ogo's -2, -4, and -6; Magsat; DE-2; and POGS. Spacecraft make measurements on a moving platfrom above the ionosphere as opposed to measurements from fixed observatories and surveys, both below the ionosphere. Possible future missions, such as Aristoteles and GOS are reviewed.

  2. Satellite Data for Geomagnetic Field Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Baldwin, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    Satellite measurements of the geomagnetic fields began with the launch of Sputnik 3 in May of 1958 and have continued sporadically. Spacecraft making significant contributions to main field geomagnetism will be reviewed and the characteristics of their data discussed, including coverage, accuracy, resolution and data availability. Of particular interest are Vanguard 3; Cosmos 49, Ogo's -2, -4, and -6; Magsat; DE-2; and POGS. Spacecraft make measurements on a moving platfrom above the ionosphere as opposed to measurements from fixed observatories and surveys, both below the ionosphere. Possible future missions, such as Aristoteles and GOS are reviewed.

  3. Anencephalus, drinking water, geomagnetism and cosmic radiation.

    PubMed

    Archer, V E

    1979-01-01

    The mortality rates from anencephalus from 1950-1969 in Canadian cities are shown to be strongly correlated with city growth rate and with horizontal geomagnetic flux, which is directly related to the intensity of cosmic radiation. They are also shown to have some association with the magnesium content of drinking water. Prior work with these data which showed associations with magnesium in drinking water, mean income, latitude and longitude was found to be inadequate because it dismissed the observed geographic associations as having little biological meaning, and because the important variables of geomagnetism and city growth rate were overlooked. PMID:433919

  4. Rigidity-tuning conductive elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Wanliang; Diller, Stuart; Tutcuoglu, Abbas; Majidi, Carmel

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a conductive propylene-based elastomer (cPBE) that rapidly and reversibly changes its mechanical rigidity when powered with electrical current. The elastomer is rigid in its natural state, with an elastic (Young’s) modulus of 175.5 MPa, and softens when electrically activated. By embedding the cPBE in an electrically insulating sheet of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), we create a cPBE-PDMS composite that can reversibly change its tensile modulus between 37 and 1.5 MPa. The rigidity change takes ˜6 s and is initiated when a 100 V voltage drop is applied across the two ends of the cPBE film. This magnitude of change in elastic rigidity is similar to that observed in natural skeletal muscle and catch connective tissue. We characterize the tunable load-bearing capability of the cPBE-PDMS composite with a motorized tensile test and deadweight experiment. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to control the routing of internal forces by embedding several cPBE-PDMS ‘active tendons’ into a soft robotic pneumatic bending actuator. Selectively activating the artificial tendons controls the neutral axis and direction of bending during inflation.

  5. Geomagnetic activity and north-south asymmetry of cosmic rays circa 1 GV. Final report, 1 March 1977-30 September 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, J.T.; Huang, T.C.

    1986-09-26

    Various features of solar-sector synchronous modulations of the particulate cosmic radiation reaching the earth's atmosphere have been studied using satellite and surface data. The flux in the broad maximum of the galactic cosmic-ray differential spectrum (near 1 GV rigidity) exhibits an intermittent north-south asymmetry in mid and high geomagnetic latitudes. This modulation exhibited a strong association with the geomagnetic disturbance index and interplanetary magnetic field direction during the 1964 and 1965 years of sunspot minimum. Such correlations are consistent with the predictions of a theory that attributes the north south asymmetry to reconnection of the interplanetary and geomagnetic fields. This finding is also consistent with suggestions that the solar-activity influence on atmospheric processes may be mediated by the resulting modulations of upper tropospheric ionization.

  6. Space radiation enhancement linked to geomagnetic disturbances.

    PubMed

    Tomita, F; Den, M; Doke, T; Hayashi, T; Nagaoka, T; Kato, M

    1997-12-01

    Space radiation dosimetry measurements have been made on board the Space Shuttle. A newly developed active detector called "Real-time Radiation Monitoring Device (RRMD)" was used (Doke et al., 1995; Hayashi et al., 1995). The RRMD results indicate that low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) particles steadily penetrate around the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) without clear enhancement of dose equivalent and some daily periodic enhancements of dose equivalent due to high LET particles are seen at the lower geomagnetic cutoff regions (Doke et al., 1996). We also have been analyzing the space weather during the experiment, and found that the anomalous high-energy particle enhancement was linked to geomagnetic disturbance due to the high speed solar wind from a coronal hole. Additional analysis and other experiments are necessary for clarification of these phenomena. If a penetration of high-energy particles into the low altitude occurs by common geomagnetic disturbances, the prediction of geomagnetic activity becomes more important in the next Space Station's era. PMID:11541771

  7. Space radiation enhancement linked to geomagnetic disturbances.

    PubMed

    Tomita, F; Den, M; Doke, T; Hayashi, T; Nagaoka, T; Kato, M

    1998-01-01

    Space radiation dosimetry measurements have been made on board the Space Shuttle. A newly developed active detector called "Real-time Radiation Monitoring Device (RRMD)" was used (Doke et al., 1995; Hayashi et al., 1995). The RRMD results indicate that low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) particles steadily penetrate around the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) without clear enhancement of dose equivalent and some daily periodic enhancements of dose equivalent due to high LET particles are seen at the lower geomagnetic cutoff regions (Doke et al., 1996). We also have been analyzing the space weather during the experiment, and found that the anomalous high-energy particle enhancement was linked to geomagnetic disturbance due to the high speed solar wind from a coronal hole. Additional analysis and other experiments are necessary for clarification of these phenomena. If a penetration of high-energy particles into the low altitude occurs by common geomagnetic disturbances, the prediction of geomagnetic activity becomes more important in the next Space Station's era. PMID:11541929

  8. Indian Institute of Geomagnetism: Progress in research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Progress and aspects is the study of the geomagnetic variations in the Indian region on quiet and disturbed days, equatorial electrojet field, electromagnetic induction in the earth, magnetic pulsations, aeronomy, radio scintillations, magnetosphere and solar wind, and solar-terrestrial relationships were reported.

  9. Helio-geomagnetic influence in cardiological cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsavrias, Ch.; Preka-Papadema, P.; Moussas, X.; Apostolou, Th.; Theodoropoulou, A.; Papadima, Th.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of the energetic phenomena of the Sun, flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on the Earth's ionosphere-magnetosphere, through the solar wind, are the sources of the geomagnetic disturbances and storms collectively known as Space Weather. The research on the influence of Space Weather on biological and physiological systems is open. In this work we study the Space Weather impact on Acute Coronary Syndromes (ACS) distinguishing between ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (STE-ACS) and non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS) cases. We compare detailed patient records from the 2nd Cardiologic Department of the General Hospital of Nicaea (Piraeus, Greece) with characteristics of geomagnetic storms (DST), solar wind speed and statistics of flares and CMEs which cover the entire solar cycle 23 (1997-2007). Our results indicate a relationship of ACS to helio-geomagnetic activity as the maximum of the ACS cases follows closely the maximum of the solar cycle. Furthermore, within very active periods, the ratio NSTE-ACS to STE-ACS, which is almost constant during periods of low to medium activity, changes favouring the NSTE-ACS. Most of the ACS cases exhibit a high degree of association with the recovery phase of the geomagnetic storms; a smaller, yet significant, part was found associated with periods of fast solar wind without a storm.

  10. Geomagnetic referencing in the arctic environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poedjono, B.; Beck, N.; Buchanan, A. C.; Brink, J.; Longo, J.; Finn, C.A.; Worthington, E.W.

    2011-01-01

    Geomagnetic referencing is becoming an increasingly attractive alternative to north-seeking gyroscopic surveys to achieve the precise wellbore positioning essential for success in today's complex drilling programs. However, the greater magnitude of variations in the geomagnetic environment at higher latitudes makes the application of geomagnetic referencing in those areas more challenging. Precise, real-time data on those variations from relatively nearby magnetic observatories can be crucial to achieving the required accuracy, but constructing and operating an observatory in these often harsh environments poses a number of significant challenges. Operational since March 2010, the Deadhorse Magnetic Observatory (DED), located in Deadhorse, Alaska, was created through collaboration between the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and a leading oilfield services supply company. DED was designed to produce real-time geomagnetic data at the required level of accuracy, and to do so reliably under the extreme temperatures and harsh weather conditions often experienced in the area. The observatory will serve a number of key scientific communities as well as the oilfield drilling industry, and has already played a vital role in the success of several commercial ventures in the area, providing essential, accurate data while offering significant cost and time savings, compared with traditional surveying techniques. Copyright 2011, Society of Petroleum Engineers.

  11. Geomagnetic referencing in the arctic environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Podjono, Benny; Beck, Nathan; Buchanan, Andrew; Brink, Jason; Longo, Joseph; Finn, Carol A.; Worthington, E. William

    2011-01-01

    Geomagnetic referencing is becoming an increasingly attractive alternative to north-seeking gyroscopic surveys to achieve the precise wellbore positioning essential for success in today's complex drilling programs. However, the greater magnitude of variations in the geomagnetic environment at higher latitudes makes the application of geomagnetic referencing in those areas more challenging. Precise, real-time data on those variations from relatively nearby magnetic observatories can be crucial to achieving the required accuracy, but constructing and operating an observatory in these often harsh environments poses a number of significant challenges. Operational since March 2010, the Deadhorse Magnetic Observatory (DED), located in Deadhorse, Alaska, was created through collaboration between the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and a leading oilfield services supply company. DED was designed to produce real-time geomagnetic data at the required level of accuracy, and to do so reliably under the extreme temperatures and harsh weather conditions often experienced in the area. The observatory will serve a number of key scientific communities as well as the oilfield drilling industry, and has already played a vital role in the success of several commercial ventures in the area, providing essential, accurate data while offering significant cost and time savings, compared with traditional surveying techniques.

  12. Power lines and the geomagnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Liboff, A.R.; McLeod, B.R.

    1995-09-01

    The metric of prime interest in power line epidemiological studies has been AC magnetic intensity. To consider also possible geomagnetic involvement, the orientation of a long straight power line is examined relative to a uniform geomagnetic field (GMF) with dip angle {alpha}. An expression is derived for the component of the total GMF that is parallel, at an elevation {beta}, to the circular magnetic field that surrounds the line. This component is a function of the angles {alpha} and {beta}, the total geomagnetic intensity B{sub T}, and the angle {theta} between the axis of the power line and magnetic north. Plotting these geomagnetic parameters for known leukemia residences allows one to test for possible ion cyclotron resonance or other GMF interactions. This approach, in principle, is an easy addition to existing or planned studies, because residential access is not required to obtain local values for {alpha}, {beta}, {theta}, and B{sub T}. The authors recommend including these parameters in the design of epidemiological studies examining power line fields and childhood leukemia.

  13. Incorporation of geomagnetic data and services into EPOS infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejda, Pavel; Chambodut, Aude; Curto, Juan-Jose; Flower, Simon; Kozlovskaya, Elena; Kubašta, Petr; Matzka, Jürgen; Tanskanen, Eija; Thomson, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of the geomagnetic field has a long history across Europe that dates back to 1830', and is currently experiencing an increased interest within Earth observation and space weather monitoring. Our goals within EPOS-IP are to consolidate the community, modernise data archival and distribution formats for existing services and create new services for magnetotelluric data and geomagnetic models. Specific objectives are: • Enhance existing services providing geomagnetic data (INTERMAGNET- INTErnational Real-time MAGnetic observatory NETwork; World Data Centre for Geomagnetism; IMAGE- International Monitor for Auroral Geomagnetic Effects) and existing services providing geomagnetic indices (ISGI - International Service of Geomagnetic Indices). • Develop and enhance the geomagnetic community's metadata systems by creating a metadata database, filling it and putting in place processes to ensure that it is kept up to date in the future. • Develop and build access to magnetotelluric (MT) data including transfer functions and time series data from temporary, portable MT-arrays in Europe, as well as to lithospheric conductivity models derived from TM-data. • Develop common web and database access points to global and regional geomagnetic field and conductivity models. • Establish links from the geomagnetic data services, products and models to the Integrated Core Services. The immediate task in the current period is to identify data models of existing services, modify them and integrate into a common model of Geomagnetic Thematic Core Services.

  14. What do we mean by accuracy in geomagnetic measurements?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    High accuracy is what distinguishes measurements made at the world's magnetic observatories from other types of geomagnetic measurements. High accuracy in determining the absolute values of the components of the Earth's magnetic field is essential to studying geomagnetic secular variation and processes at the core mantle boundary, as well as some magnetospheric processes. In some applications of geomagnetic data, precision (or resolution) of measurements may also be important. In addition to accuracy and resolution in the amplitude domain, it is necessary to consider these same quantities in the frequency and space domains. New developments in geomagnetic instruments and communications make real-time, high accuracy, global geomagnetic observatory data sets a real possibility. There is a growing realization in the scientific community of the unique relevance of geomagnetic observatory data to the principal contemporary problems in solid Earth and space physics. Together, these factors provide the promise of a 'renaissance' of the world's geomagnetic observatory system. ?? 1990.

  15. A Study on local geomagnetic activity trend and singularity with geomagnetic data at Cheongyang Magnetic Observatory, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Jeon, Y.; Ryoo, S.

    2011-12-01

    The KMA(Korea Meteorological Administration) has installed and operated the geomagnetic observatory at Cheongyang-gun, Chungcheongnam-do, Korea which started in April, 2009. As Cheongyang geomagnetic observatory, it has been automatically observing total-, X-, Y- and Z-component data at 1-sec interval and storing in real-time. The National Institute of Meteorological Research, which belongs to KMA, proceeded with their work on the production of K-index that is used for geomagnetic activity observation. In addition, we detect the starting and ending of geomagnetic storm as typical thing of global geomagnetic field change and utilize it for showing current status of geomagnetic storm occurrence. It has been reported that geomagnetic storm occurred seven times during from April, 2010 to July, 2011. It was 5 of the maximum K-index value during geomagnetic storm occurrence period and thought mostly to have been caused by coronal hole and CME(Coronal Mass Ejection). Yet the geomagnetic storm has not been had much of an impact locally. At Cheongyang Observatory, a significantly disturbed geomagnetic data was seen as related to the Tohoku, Japan Earthquake, Mw 9.0, on March 11, 2011. Compared to seismic wave data at Seosan seismic observatory 60km away from Cheongyang geomagnetic observatory, we identified the signal involved to the Tohoku, Japan Earthquake. The power spectral density of the disturbed signal has the dominant frequency band of about 0.05 to 0.1 Hz. We should proceed additional study about this in detail.

  16. Rigidity spectrum of Forbush decrease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakakibara, S.; Munakata, K.; Nagashima, K.

    1985-01-01

    Using data from neutron monitors and muon telescopes at surface and underground stations, the average rigidity spectrum of Forbush decreases (Fds) during the period of 1978-1982 were obtained. Thirty eight Ed-events are classified into two groups Hard Fd and Soft Fd according to size of Fd at Sakashita station. It is found that a spectral form of fractional-power type (P to the-gamma sub 1 (P+P sub c) to the -gamma sub2) is more suitable for the present purpose than that of power-exponential type or of power type with an upper limiting rigidity. The best fitted spectrum of fractional-power type is expressed by gamma sub1 = 0.37, gamma sub2 = 0.89 and P subc = 10 GV for Hard Fd and gamma sub1 = 0.77, gamma sub2 = 1.02 and P sub c - 14GV for Soft Fd.

  17. Rotating rigid motion in general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, D.P.; Pooe, C.A.

    1987-11-01

    Kinematic and dynamic expressions are derived for the Lie derivative of vorticity along a particle world line in a rigid motion. It is found that the evolution of vorticity in a rigid motion is governed by the electric part of the Weyl tensor. Necessary and sufficient kinematic and dynamic conditions are established for a rotating rigid motion to be isometric.

  18. Prognostic value of Ki67 and p53 in patients with estrogen receptor-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative breast cancer: Validation of the cut-off value of the Ki67 labeling index as a predictive factor

    PubMed Central

    OHARA, MASAHIRO; MATSUURA, KAZUO; AKIMOTO, ETSUSHI; NOMA, MIDORI; DOI, MIHOKO; NISHIZAKA, TAKASHI; KAGAWA, NAOKI; ITAMOTO, TOSHIYUKI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of the Ki67 labeling index and p53 status as prognostic and predictive indicators of operable estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer. Among 697 consecutive patients with primary breast cancer who underwent curative surgery between 2002 and 2013, 308 patients with ER-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer were assessed. The results of the multivariate Cox analysis demonstrated that a high Ki67 labeling index was significantly associated with a short recurrence-free interval (RFI) (p=0.004) and was marginally associated with a worse overall survival (p=0.074). A positive p53 status was not associated with worse outcomes. To validate the cut-off values of the Ki67 labeling index for identifying patients who may benefit from additional chemotherapy, prognostic factors were investigated in breast cancer patients treated postoperatively with endocrine therapy alone. Analysis of receiver operating characteristic curves demonstrated that a Ki67 labeling index cut-off of 20.0% was optimal for predicting recurrence among patients who did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. The 5-year RFIs for patients with Ki67 <20 and ≥20% were 97.2 and 86.6%, respectively (p=0.0244). A high Ki67 labeling index (≥20%) was significantly associated with large tumors (p<0.01), lymph node metastasis (p=0.0236) and positive p53 status (p<0.001). The univariate analysis demonstrated that Ki67 labeling index ≥20%, lymph node metastasis and progesterone receptor negativity were significant worse prognostic factors for RFI (p=0.0333, 0.0116 and 0.0573, respectively). The Ki67 labeling index was found to be a useful prognostic factor in patients with ER-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer and the cut-off values of the Ki67 labeling index for making a decision regarding adjuvant treatment were validated. PMID:27073684

  19. Steady induction effects in geomagnetism. Part 1A: Steady motional induction of geomagnetic chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1992-01-01

    Geomagnetic effects of magnetic induction by hypothetically steady fluid motion and steady magnetic flux diffusion near the top of Earth's core are investigated using electromagnetic theory, simple magnetic earth models, and numerical experiments with geomagnetic field models. The problem of estimating a steady fluid velocity field near the top of Earth's core which induces the secular variation indicated by broad-scale models of the observed geomagnetic field is examined and solved. In Part 1, the steady surficial core flow estimation problem is solved in the context of the source-free mantle/frozen-flux core model. In the first paper (IA), the theory underlying such estimates is reviewed and some consequences of various kinematic and dynamic flow hypotheses are derived. For a frozen-flux core, fluid downwelling is required to change the mean square normal magnetic flux density averaged over the core-mantle boundary. For surficially geostrophic flow, downwelling implies poleward flow. The solution of the forward steady motional induction problem at the surface of a frozen-flux core is derived and found to be a fine, easily visualized example of deterministic chaos. Geomagnetic effects of statistically steady core surface flow may well dominate secular variation over several decades. Indeed, effects of persistent, if not steady, surficially geostrophic core flow are described which may help explain certain features of the present broad-scale geomagnetic field and perhaps paleomagnetic secular variation.

  20. Geomagnetic Indices Variations And Human Physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, S.

    2007-12-01

    A group of 86 volunteers was examined on each working day in autumn 2001 and in spring 2002. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) were registered. Pulse pressure (PP) was calculated. Data about subjective psycho-physiological complaints (SPPC) were also gathered. Altogether 2799 recordings were obtained. ANOVA was employed to check the significance of influence of daily amplitude of H-component of local geomagnetic field, daily planetary Ap-index and hourly planetary Dst-index on the physiological parameters examined. Post hoc analysis was performed to elicit the significance of differences in the factors levels. Average values of SBP, DBP, PP and SPPC of the group were found to increase statistically significantly and biologically considerably with the increase of geomagnetic indices.

  1. Review of selected geomagnetic activity indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. H.; Feynman, J.

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic activity indexes are reviewed. Classifications of magnetograms from single observatories and the global range of potential associated with the equivalent currents which could have produced the variations monitored at a large array of recording sides are addressed. Principal magnetic activity indexes discussed include: the auroral electrojet index and its associated indexes (AU, AL and AO) useful for auroral zone studies; the Kp, ap, aa and am indexes which are measures of midlatitude geomagnetic activity; and the Dst index of magnetic activity recorded at low latitudes. It is concluded that geomagnetic activity indexes are useful in studies of the interaction between solar activity, the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind, the magnetosphere, ring current, field aligned currents, and ionospheric currents.

  2. Influence of geomagnetic disturbance on atmospheric circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kodera, K.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of geomagnetic disturbance or passage of the solar sector boundary on the atmospheric circulation was reported. Unfortunately little is known about the general morphology of Sun weather relationships. In order to know the general characteristics, pressure height variations on an isobaric surface over the Northern Hemisphere were analyzed. Although it may be suitable to use some index, or some integrated value for statistical purposes, weather prediction data were used to verify whether the obtained tropospheric response is caused externally or not.

  3. MAGSAT for geomagnetic studies over Indian region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastogi, R. G.; Bhargava, B. N.; Singh, B. P.; Rao, D. R. K.; Rangarajan, G. K.; Rajaram, R.; Roy, M.; Arora, B. R.; Seth, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Progress in the preparation of software for converting data tapes produced on an IBM system to data readable on a DEC-10 system, in the creation of awareness of the utility of MAGSAT data among users in India, and in making computer programs supplied by NASA operational on the DEC-10 system is reported. Papers presented to Indian users, at the IAGA fourth scientific assembly, at a symposium on interdisciplinary approaches to geomagnetism, and a paper published in Science Today are included.

  4. Geomagnetic effects on the average surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballatore, P.

    Several results have previously shown as the solar activity can be related to the cloudiness and the surface solar radiation intensity (Svensmark and Friis-Christensen, J. Atmos. Sol. Terr. Phys., 59, 1225, 1997; Veretenenkoand Pudovkin, J. Atmos. Sol. Terr. Phys., 61, 521, 1999). Here, the possible relationships between the averaged surface temperature and the solar wind parameters or geomagnetic activity indices are investigated. The temperature data used are the monthly SST maps (generated at RAL and available from the related ESRIN/ESA database) that represent the averaged surface temperature with a spatial resolution of 0.5°x0.5° and cover the entire globe. The interplanetary data and the geomagnetic data are from the USA National Space Science Data Center. The time interval considered is 1995-2000. Specifically, possible associations and/or correlations of the average temperature with the interplanetary magnetic field Bz component and with the Kp index are considered and differentiated taking into account separate geographic and geomagnetic planetary regions.

  5. Domino model for geomagnetic field reversals.

    PubMed

    Mori, N; Schmitt, D; Wicht, J; Ferriz-Mas, A; Mouri, H; Nakamichi, A; Morikawa, M

    2013-01-01

    We solve the equations of motion of a one-dimensional planar Heisenberg (or Vaks-Larkin) model consisting of a system of interacting macrospins aligned along a ring. Each spin has unit length and is described by its angle with respect to the rotational axis. The orientation of the spins can vary in time due to spin-spin interaction and random forcing. We statistically describe the behavior of the sum of all spins for different parameters. The term "domino model" in the title refers to the interaction among the spins. We compare the model results with geomagnetic field reversals and dynamo simulations and find strikingly similar behavior. The aggregate of all spins keeps the same direction for a long time and, once in a while, begins flipping to change the orientation by almost 180 degrees (mimicking a geomagnetic reversal) or to move back to the original direction (mimicking an excursion). Most of the time the spins are aligned or antialigned and deviate only slightly with respect to the rotational axis (mimicking the secular variation of the geomagnetic pole with respect to the geographic pole). Reversals are fast compared to the times in between and they occur at random times, both in the model and in the case of the Earth's magnetic field. PMID:23410284

  6. Influence of the terrestrial magnetic field geometry on the cutoff rigidity of cosmic ray particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, K.; Kopp, A.; Heber, B.

    2013-10-01

    Studies of the propagation of charged energetic particles in the Earth's magnetic field go back to Carl Størmer. In the end, his investigations finally lead to the definition of the so-called cutoff rigidity RC; that is, the minimum momentum per charge a particle must have in order to reach a certain geographical location. Employing Monte Carlo simulations with the PLANETOCOSMICS code we investigate the correlation between the geomagnetic field structure and the cutoff rigidity. We show that the geometry of the magnetic field has a considerable influence on the resulting cutoff rigidity distribution. Furthermore, we will present a simple geometry-based parameter, δB, which is able to reflect the location-dependent cutoff rigidity. We show that this correlation is also visible in the temporal evolution of the Earth's magnetic field, at least over the last 100 yr. Using latitude scans with neutron monitors, changes of the relative counting rates at different positions are calculated, showing small variations for, e.g., Kiel and Moscow, while large ones occur at Mexico City as well as on the British Virgin Islands.

  7. Implications of two Holocene time-dependent geomagnetic models for cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, Nathaniel

    2016-01-01

    The geomagnetic field is a major influence on in situ cosmogenic nuclide production rates at a given location (in addition to atmospheric pressure and, to a lesser extent, solar modulation effects). A better understanding of how past fluctuations in these influences affected production rates should allow more accurate application of cosmogenic nuclides. As such, this work explores the cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling implications of two recent time-dependent spherical harmonic geomagnetic models spanning the Holocene. Korte and Constable (2011, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter.188, 247-259) and Korte et al. (2011, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 312, 497-505) recently updated earlier spherical harmonic paleomagnetic models with new paleomagnetic data from sediment cores in addition to new archeomagnetic and volcanic data. These updated models offer improved resolution and accuracy over the previous versions, in part due to increased temporal and spatial data coverage. In addition, Pavón-Carrasco et al. (2014, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 388, 98-109) developed another time-dependent spherical harmonic model of the Holocene geomagnetic field, based solely on archeomagnetic and volcanic paleomagnetic data from the same underlying paleomagnetic database as the Korte et al. models, but extending to 14 ka. With the new models as input, trajectory-traced estimates of effective vertical cutoff rigidity (RC - the standard method for ordering cosmic ray data) yield significantly different time-integrated scaling predictions when compared to each other and to results using the earlier models. In addition, predictions of each new model using RC are tested empirically using recently published production rate calibration data for both 10Be and 3He, and compared to predictions using corresponding time-varying geocentric dipolar RC formulations and a static geocentric axial dipole (GAD) model. Results for the few calibration sites from geomagnetically sensitive regions suggest that the

  8. Lubrication of rigid ellipsida solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of geometry on the isothermal hydrodynamic film separating two rigid solids was investigated. The minimum film thickness is derived for fully flooded conjunctions by using the Reynolds boundary conditions. It was found that the minimum film thickness had the same speed, viscosity, and load dependence as Kapitza' classical solution. However, the incorporation of Reynolds boundary conditions resulted in an additional geometry effect. Solutions using the parabolic film approximation are compared by using the exact expression for the film in the analysis. Contour plots are known that indicate in detail the pressure developed between the solids.

  9. Rigid zeolite containing polyurethane foams

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Charles B.

    1985-01-01

    A closed cell rigid polyurethane foam has been prepared which contains up to about 60% by weight of molecular sieves capable of sorbing molecules with effective critical diameters of up to about 10 .ANG.. The molecular sieve component of the foam can be preloaded with catalysts or with reactive compounds that can be released upon activation of the foam to control and complete crosslinking after the foam is formed. The foam can also be loaded with water or other flame-retarding agents, after completion. Up to about 50% of the weight of the isocyanate component of the foam can be replaced by polyimide resin precursors for incorporation into the final polymeric network.

  10. Rigid zeolite containing polyurethane foams

    DOEpatents

    Frost, C.B.

    1984-05-18

    A closed cell rigid polyurethane foam has been prepared which contains up to about 60% by weight of molecular sieves capable of sorbing molecules with effective critical diameters of up to about 10 A. The molecular sieve component of the foam can be preloaded with catalysts or with reactive compounds that can be released upon activation of the foam to control and complete crosslinking after the foam is formed. The foam can also be loaded with water or other flame-retarding agents, after completion. Up to about 50% of the weight of the isocyanate component of the foam can be replaced by polyimide resin precursors for incorporation into the final polymeric network.

  11. Interplanetary magnetic sector polarity inferred from polar geomagnetic field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friis-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    In order to infer the interplanetary sector polarity from polar geomagnetic field diurnal variations, measurements were carried out at Godhavn and Thule (Denmark) Geomagnetic Observatories. The inferred interplanetary sector polarity was compared with the polarity observed at the same time by Explorer 33 and 35 magnetometers. It is shown that the polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field can be reliably inferred from observations of the polar cap geomagnetic fields.

  12. Geomagnetic effects modelling for the PJM interconnection system. Part 2; Geomagnetically induced current study results

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhakara, F.S.; Hannett, L.N.; Ringlee, R.J. ); Ponder, J.Z. )

    1992-05-01

    The development of a computer program for calculation of geomagnetically induced current (GIC) and a GIC power system model for the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland Interconnection is described in this paper. Results of GIC for three different ionospheric source configurations are shown. A new method is presented for estimating GIC in unmetered parts of the system based on a few measurements and precalculated geomagnetic disturbance conditions. The use of an interactive, menu driven GIC program to study mitigation concepts including the effects of line outages, line series capacitors, transformer neutral blocking resistors and transformer neutral blocking capacitors is also presented.

  13. Enhanced rigid-bond restraints

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Andrea; Dittrich, Birger; Sheldrick, George M.

    2012-07-01

    An extension is proposed to the rigid-bond description of atomic thermal motion in crystals. The rigid-bond model [Hirshfeld (1976 ▶). Acta Cryst. A32, 239–244] states that the mean-square displacements of two atoms are equal in the direction of the bond joining them. This criterion is widely used for verification (as intended by Hirshfeld) and also as a restraint in structure refinement as suggested by Rollett [Crystallographic Computing (1970 ▶), edited by F. R. Ahmed et al., pp. 167–181. Copenhagen: Munksgaard]. By reformulating this condition, so that the relative motion of the two atoms is required to be perpendicular to the bond, the number of restraints that can be applied per anisotropic atom is increased from about one to about three. Application of this condition to 1,3-distances in addition to the 1,2-distances means that on average just over six restraints can be applied to the six anisotropic displacement parameters of each atom. This concept is tested against very high resolution data of a small peptide and employed as a restraint for protein refinement at more modest resolution (e.g. 1.7 Å)

  14. Complications of rigid internal fixation.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Chris A; Lin, Kant Y

    2009-03-01

    Over the past 20 years, there have been many advances in the development of bone fixation systems used in the practice of craniomaxillofacial surgery. As surgical practices have evolved, the complications of each technologic advance have changed accordingly. Interfragmentary instability of interosseous wiring has been replaced by the risk of exposure, infection, and palpability of plate and screw fixation systems. The improved rigidity of plate fixation requires anatomic alignment of fracture fragments. Failure to obtain proper alignment has led to the phenomenon known as "open internal fixation" of fracture fragments without proper reduction. The size of the plates has decreased to minimize palpability and exposure. However limitations in their application have been encountered due to the physiologic forces of the muscles of mastication and bone healing. In the pediatric population, the long-standing presence of plates in the cranial vault resulted in reports of transcranial migration and growth restriction. These findings led to the development of resorbable plating systems, which are associated with self-limited plate palpability and soft tissue inflammatory reactions. Any rigid system including these produces growth restriction in varying amounts. In this discussion, we review the reported complication rates of miniplating and microplating systems as well as absorptive plating systems in elective and traumatic craniofacial surgery.

  15. 77 FR 24952 - Staff Technical Conference on Geomagnetic Disturbances to the Bulk-Power System; Technical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Staff Technical Conference on Geomagnetic Disturbances to the Bulk-Power... geomagnetic disturbances. The conference will explore the risks and impacts from geomagnetically...

  16. Effective non-vertical and apparent cutoff rigidities for a cosmic ray latitude survey from Antarctica to Italy in minimum of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L. I.; Danilova, O. A.; Iucci, N.; Parisi, M.; Ptitsyna, N. G.; Tyasto, M. I.; Villoresi, G.

    2008-08-01

    In this paper we will report the results of the computation of cutoff rigidities of vertical and non-vertical incident cosmic ray particles. Non-vertical effective cutoff rigidities have been computed by tracing particle trajectories through the “real” geomagnetic magnetic field comprising the International Geomagnetic Reference Field model (IGRF95, IAGA Division 5 Working Group 8, 1996: Sabaka, T.J., Langel, R.A., Baldwin, R.T., Conrad, J.A. The geomagnetic field, 1900 1995, including the large scale fields from magnetospheric sources and NASA candidate models for the 1995 IGRF revision. J. Geomag. Geoelect. 49, 157 206, 1997.) and the Tsyganenko [Tsyganenko, N.A. A magnetospheric magnetic field model with a warped tail current sheet. Planet. Space Sci. 37, 5 20, 1989.] magnetosphere model. The computation have been done for the backward route (from Antarctica to Italy) of the Italian Antarctic ship survey 1996 1997, for geographic points corresponding to the daily average coordinates of the ship; for zenith angles 15°, 30°, 45° and 60°, and azimuth angles from 0° to 360° in steps of 45°. By means of the obtained non-vertical cutoffs the apparent cutoff rigidities have been calculated. The information on integral multiplicities of secondary neutrons detected by the neutron monitor in dependence of the zenith angle of incoming primary cosmic ray particles have also been used. This information is based on the theoretical calculations of meson-nuclear cascades of primary protons with different rigidities arriving to the Earth’s atmosphere at the zenith angles of 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 75°. The difference between the computed apparent and vertical cutoff rigidities reaches ˜1 GV at rigidities >7 8 GV. At rigidities of 10 16 GV, the difference between the apparent and vertical cutoff rigidities is larger than that obtained earlier by Clem et al. [Clem, J.M., Bieber, J.W., Duldig, M., Evenson, P., Hall, D., Humble, J.E. Contribution of obliquely

  17. Geomagnetically Induced Currents, a space weather hazard. Case study - Europe under intense geomagnetic storms of the solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrica, V.; Demetrescu, Cr.; Stefan, C.; Greculeasa, R.

    2016-05-01

    The interaction of the solar wind and heliospheric magnetic field with the magnetosphere and ionosphere results in variations of the geomagnetic field that induce hazardous electric currents in grounded technological systems (electric power and hydrocarbon transportation networks), the so-called geomagnetically induced currents (GICs). In order to evaluate the hazard induced on the European continent, we present a study of the surface electric field induced by 16 intense (Dst < -150 nT) geomagnetic storms, based on the analysis of the geomagnetic records from the European network of observatories, study that tend to solve the geophysical part of the problem. The evolution during storm development and the sources of the disturbance field are explored in case of the largest geomagnetic storm in the cycle 23 (Dst = -422 nT, November 20-21, 2003), and the geographical distribution of the maximum induced surface geoelectric field over Europe by the 16 storms considered in the study is presented. As source proxies, the Dst geomagnetic index, showing the disturbed field produced by the magnetospheric ring current at the geomagnetic equator, the AL geomagnetic index, showing the disturbed field produced by the ionospheric electrojet at auroral latitude, and the PC geomagnetic index, showing the disturbed field produced by the polar cap current, were examined.

  18. Anesthesia for adult rigid bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Dincq, A S; Gourdin, M; Collard, E; Ocak, S; D'Odémont, J P; Dahlqvist, C; Lacrosse, D; Putz, L

    2014-01-01

    Rigid bronchoscopy under general anesthesia enables performing diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures in the tracheobronchial tree. This technique is characterized by specific technical problems, insofar as the anesthesiologist and the operators share the same space, namely the airway. Several potential complications (hemorrhage inside the airway, threat to ventilation ...) may arise. These challenges render the ability to use the variable available techniques essential, as well as knowledge of the complications they could entail, and the ability to rapidly solve them. General anesthesia is usually total intravenous anesthesia, using short acting agents. Ventilation can be spontaneous, but more often insured using high-frequency jet ventilation. The hospital infrastructure and staff must have the expertise to perform this particular procedure, in order to limit the complication rate. PMID:25508517

  19. Anesthesia for adult rigid bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Dincq, A S; Gourdin, M; Collard, E; Ocak, S; D'Odémont, J P; Dahlqvist, C; Lacrosse, D; Putz, L

    2014-01-01

    Rigid bronchoscopy under general anesthesia enables performing diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures in the tracheobronchial tree. This technique is characterized by specific technical problems, insofar as the anesthesiologist and the operators share the same space, namely the airway. Several potential complications (hemorrhage inside the airway, threat to ventilation ...) may arise. These challenges render the ability to use the variable available techniques essential, as well as knowledge of the complications they could entail, and the ability to rapidly solve them. General anesthesia is usually total intravenous anesthesia, using short acting agents. Ventilation can be spontaneous, but more often insured using high-frequency jet ventilation. The hospital infrastructure and staff must have the expertise to perform this particular procedure, in order to limit the complication rate. PMID:25470890

  20. Focused rigidity casts: an overview.

    PubMed

    Dagg, A R; Chockalingam, N; Branthwaite, H

    2013-02-01

    Focused rigidity casts (FRCs) are a novel treatment made from polymer semi-flexible cast material, used in the management of plantar foot ulceration to offload the site of ulceration. Current anecdotal evidence suggests that use of FRCs helps achieve quicker healing time. While FRCs were first used in the treatment of fractures, previous reports suggest that the FRC may be effective in the treatment of plantar foot ulceration. Although there is a paucity of evidence to support the use of FRCs in the treatment of foot ulceration, current evidence demonstrates a decrease in both wound healing time and plantar pressure. The aim of the paper is to examine the importance of offloading plantar ulcerations and introduce FRCs.

  1. Geomagnetic imprint of the Persani volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besutiu, Lucian; Seghedi, Ioan; Zlagnean, Luminita; Atanasiu, Ligia; Popa, Razvan-Gabriel; Pomeran, Mihai; Visan, Madalina

    2016-04-01

    The Persani small volume volcanism is located in the SE corner of the Transylvanian Depression, at the north-western edge of the intra-mountainous Brasov basin. It represents the south-easternmost segment of the Neogene-Quaternary volcanic chain of the East Carpathians. The alkaline basalt monogenetic volcanic field is partly coeval with the high-K calc-alkaline magmatism south of Harghita Mountains (1-1.6 Ma). Its eruptions post-dated the calc-alkaline volcanism in the Harghita Mountains (5.3-1.6 Ma), but pre-dated the high-K calc-alkaline emissions of Ciomadul volcano (1.0-0.03 Ma). The major volcanic forms have been mapped in previous geological surveys. Still, due to the small size of the volcanoes and large extent of tephra deposits and recent sediments, the location of some vents or other volcanic structures has been incompletely revealed. To overcome this problem, the area was subject to several near-surface geophysical investigations, including paleomagnetic research. However, due to their large-scale features, the previous geophysical surveys proved to be an inappropriate approach to the volcanological issues. Therefore, during the summers of 2014 and 2015, based on the high magnetic contrast between the volcanic rocks and the hosting sedimentary formations, a detailed ground geomagnetic survey has been designed and conducted, within central Persani volcanism area, in order to outline the presence of volcanic structures hidden beneath the overlying deposits. Additionally, information on the rock magnetic properties was also targeted by sampling and analysing several outcrops in the area. Based on the acquired data, a detailed total intensity scalar geomagnetic anomaly map was constructed by using the recent IGRF12 model. The revealed pattern of the geomagnetic field proved to be fully consistent with the direction of magnetisation previously determined on rock samples. In order to enhance the signal/noise ratio, the results were further processed by

  2. Analysis of geomagnetic secular variation during 1980-1985 and 1985- 1990, and geomagnetic models proposed for the 1991 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.

    1992-01-01

    The secular variation of the main geomagnetic field during the periods 1980-1985 and 1985-1990 was analyzed in terms of spherical harmonics up to the eighth degree and order. Data from worldwide magnetic observatories and the Navy's Project MAGNET aerial surveys were used. The resulting pair of secular-variation models was used to update the Definitive Geomagnetic Reference Field (DGRF) model for 1980, resulting in new mainfield models for 1985.0 and 1990.0. These, along with the secular-variation model for 1985-1990, were proposed for the 1991 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). -Author

  3. Mooring and ground handling rigid airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, H., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The problems of mooring and ground handling rigid airships are discussed. A brief history of Mooring and Ground Handling Rigid Airships from July 2, 1900 through September 1, 1939 is included. Also a brief history of ground handling developments with large U. S. Navy nonrigid airships between September 1, 1939 and August 31, 1962 is included wherein developed equipment and techniques appear applicable to future large rigid airships. Finally recommendations are made pertaining to equipment and procedures which appear desirable and feasible for future rigid airship programs.

  4. Rigidity and flexibility of biological networks.

    PubMed

    Gáspár, Merse E; Csermely, Peter

    2012-11-01

    The network approach became a widely used tool to understand the behaviour of complex systems in the last decade. We start from a short description of structural rigidity theory. A detailed account on the combinatorial rigidity analysis of protein structures, as well as local flexibility measures of proteins and their applications in explaining allostery and thermostability is given. We also briefly discuss the network aspects of cytoskeletal tensegrity. Finally, we show the importance of the balance between functional flexibility and rigidity in protein-protein interaction, metabolic, gene regulatory and neuronal networks. Our summary raises the possibility that the concepts of flexibility and rigidity can be generalized to all networks. PMID:23165349

  5. Geomagnetic field effect on cardiovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Gmitrov, Juraj; Gmitrova, Anna

    2004-02-01

    The goal of the present research was try to explain the physiological mechanism for the influence of the geomagnetic field (GMF) disturbance, reflected by the indices of the geomagnetic activity (K, K(p), A(k), and A(p) indices), on cardiovascular regulation. One hundred forty three experimental runs (one daily) comprising 50 min hemodynamic monitoring sequences were carried out in rabbits sedated by pentobarbital infusion (5 mg/kg/h). We examined the arterial baroreflex effects on the short term blood pressure and heart rate (HR) variabilities reflected by the standard deviation (SD) of the average values of the mean femoral arterial blood pressure (MAP) and the HR. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was estimated from blood pressure/HR response to intravenous (i.v.) bolus injections of vasoconstrictor (phenylephrine) and vasodilator (nitroprusside) drugs. We found a significant negative correlation of increasing GMF disturbance (K(p)) with BRS (P = 0.008), HR SD (P =0.022), and MAP SD (P = 0.002) signifying the involvement of the arterial baroreflex mechanism. The abrupt change in geomagnetic disturbance from low (K = 0) to high (K = 4-5) values was associated with a significant increase in MAP (83 +/- 5 vs. 99 +/- 5 mm Hg, P = 0.045) and myocardial oxygen consumption, measured by MAP and HR product (24100 +/- 1800 vs. 31000 +/- 2500 mm Hg. bpm, P = 0.034), comprising an additional cardiovascular risk. Most likely, GMF affects brainstem and higher neural cardiovascular regulatory centers modulating blood pressure and HR variabilities associated with the arterial baroreflex. PMID:14735558

  6. Geomagnetic field modeling by optimal recursive filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Five individual 5 year mini-batch geomagnetic models were generated and two computer programs were developed to process the models. The first program computes statistics (mean sigma, weighted sigma) on the changes in the first derivatives (linear terms) of the spherical harmonic coefficients between mini-batches. The program ran successfully. The statistics are intended for use in computing the state noise matrix required in the information filter. The second program is the information filter. Most subroutines used in the filter were tested, but the coefficient statistics must be analyzed before the filter is run.

  7. Geomagnetically Induced Currents: Progress and Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Alan

    2010-05-01

    Geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) are a hazard to conducting networks such as high-voltage power and pipeline grids. GIC have been known for decades to affect power systems at higher latitudes (e.g. Europe and North America), although more recently GIC have also been found to affect power networks at middle and lower latitudes. Mitigating the effects of GIC remains an issue for the power and pipeline industries and for governments concerned with the societal and economic implications. To understand, e.g. to model and predict, GIC in conducting grids needs expertise drawn from electrical engineering, geophysics and space weather science - a truly multi-disciplinary undertaking. In terms of geophysics and space physics, issues such as Earth structure (e.g. 3D versus 1D mantle and lithospheric conductivity structure), ocean/continent conductivity contrasts, ionospheric current systems and their variability and Sun-Earth magnetic interactions are all relevant. The start of solar cycle 24 provides an opportune time to consider the status of GIC research and to assess what new studies are required in geophysical modelling and in hazard analysis. What do we need to improve on to better specify/predict GIC flowing in power grids, from ‘up-stream' observations of coronal mass ejections through to geomagnetic field measurements made during magnetic storms? In this invited review we will consider aspects of a) Measurement: how do we measure GIC in grids; b) Analysis: how do measured GIC relate to geophysical and space physics data; c) Modelling: what methods exist for modelling GIC, again in relation to other data, and how accurate are models; and d) Prediction: how predictable are GIC and what are the implications for, e.g., the power industry and national governments. We will review the more recent developments in GIC and related geomagnetism and space weather science. We will outline what issues are widely believed to now be understood and what issues remain to be

  8. Advanced Theory of Deep Geomagnetic Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chave, Alan D.

    Advanced Theory of Deep Geomagnetic Sounding is a specialized treatise that covers recent work, mostly from the Soviet Union, on the theory, analysis, and interpretation of natural source electromagnetic induction processes in complex geological structures, with an emphasis on subsurface conductive anomalies. The scope of the book is limited, as suggested by the title, and the authors stress the application of electromagnetic principles to the study of regional geology and deep earth structure rather than surface exploration. The book is clearly aimed at the practicing specialist rather than the graduate student attempting to learn about the broader field of electromagnetic geophysics.

  9. Geomagnetic field behaviour preceding a Superchron: new evidence for a weak Devonian geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, L.; Anwar, T.; Scherbakova, V.; Biggin, A. J.; Kravchinsky, V. A.; Shatsillo, A.; Holt, J.; Pavlov, V.

    2015-12-01

    The ~50 million year transition from the peak in reversal frequency in the Middle Jurassic (~170Ma), associated with a weak geomagnetic field, to the stable and apparently strong field during the Cretaceous Normal Superchron (84-121Ma), represents a dramatic change in time-averaged geomagnetic field behaviour during the Mesozoic Era. New evidence from Siberian samples suggests there is a similar transition in geomagnetic field behaviour during the Palaeozoic, with a weak geomagnetic field in the Upper Devonian preceding the Permo-Carboniferous Superchron (262-318Ma). Both sites, the Viluy Traps and the Zharovsk complex of the Patom Margin, have seemingly reliable, published palaeomagnetic directions and new age constraints, 364.4 ± 1.7Ma (40Ar/39A) 371-377Ma (U-Pb) respectively. The samples were measured using the Thermal Thellier-Coe protocol with partial thermo-remanent magnetisation (pTRM) and tail checks and the Microwave Thellier-IZZI protocol with pTRM checks. Accepted Arai plots show positive pTRM checks, a clear relation between distinct primary directional and palaeointensity components and little to no zig-zagging. Three distinct magneto-mineralogical types were identified from SEM and rock magnetic techniques; low Ti- and intermediate Ti- titanomagnetite and possible maghemite, with mineral type affecting the success rate of samples but resulting in no significant variation in palaeointensity results. The Arai plots also commonly have a distinct two-slope concave-up shape, although non-heating, pseudo-Thellier experiments have supported this resulting from a strong overprint component rather than alteration or multi-domain effects. Results from these experiments give low site mean values between 2.3-29.9μT (Virtual Dipole Moments 4-50.6 ZAm2). The apparently periodic (~180 million years) transitions in geomagnetic field behaviour may indicate the influence of mantle convection changing heat flow across the Core Mantle Boundary.

  10. Search for correlation between geomagnetic disturbances and mortality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, B. J.; Barnes, C. W.; Sturrock, P. A.; Feinleib, M.; Rogot, E.

    1975-01-01

    Statistical evaluation of death rates in the U.S.A. from heart diseases or stroke did not show any correlation with measured geomagnetic pulsations and thus do not support a claimed relationship between geomagnetic activity and mortality rates to low frequency fluctuations of the earth's magnetic field.

  11. [Exacerbation of hypertension and disturbances of the geomagnetic field].

    PubMed

    Vershinina, N I; Petrochenko, N A; Shumilov, I S

    1997-01-01

    The authors consider relationships between emergence of acute episodes of essential hypertension (hospital admittances) and disturbance of the geomagnetic field. The authors report male- and female-specific ranges of the geomagnetic field variations which are threatening for hypertensive subjects. PMID:9229606

  12. Major geomagnetic storm due to solar activity (2006-2013).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Bhupendra Kumar

    Major geomagnetic storm due to solar activity (2006-2013). Bhupendra Kumar Tiwari Department of Physics, A.P.S.University, Rewa(M.P.) Email: - btiwtari70@yahoo.com mobile 09424981974 Abstract- The geospace environment is dominated by disturbances created by the sun, it is observed that coronal mass ejection (CME) and solar flare events are the causal link to solar activity that produces geomagnetic storm (GMS).CMEs are large scale magneto-plasma structures that erupt from the sun and propagate through the interplanetary medium with speeds ranging from only a few km/s to as large as 4000 km/s. When the interplanetary magnetic field associated with CMEs impinges upon the earth’s magnetosphere and reconnect occur geomagnetic storm. Based on the observation from SOHO/LASCO spacecraft for solar activity and WDC for geomagnetism Kyoto for geomagnetic storm events are characterized by the disturbance storm time (Dst) index during the period 2006-2013. We consider here only intense geomagnetic storm Dst <-100nT, are 12 during 2006-2013.Geomagnetic storm with maximum Dst< -155nT occurred on Dec15, 2006 associated with halo CME with Kp-index 8+ and also verify that halo CME is the main cause to produce large geomagnetic storms.

  13. Do Coronal Holes Cause 27 Day Recurring Geomagnetic Storms?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Gonzalez, Walter D.; Gonzalez, Alicia L. C.; Tang, Frances; Park, Dan; Okada, Masaki; Arballo, John

    1994-01-01

    We examine 3 years of interplanetary data and geomagnetic activity indices (1973-1975) to determine the causes of geomagnetic storms and substorms during the descending phase of the solar cycle. In this paper, we specifically studied the year 1974 where two long lasting coronating streams existed.

  14. Jerks as chaotic fluctuations of the geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qamili, Enkelejda; De Santis, Angelo; Isac, Anca; Mandea, Mioara; Duka, Bejo; Simonyan, Anahit

    2013-04-01

    The geomagnetic field is chaotic and can be characterised by a mean exponential time scale < ? > of around 6 years after which it is no longer predictable. It is also ergodic, so time analyses can substitute the more difficult phase space analyses. Taking advantage of these two properties of the geomagnetic field, a scheme of processing global geomagnetic models in time is presented, in order to estimate fluctuations of the time scale. Considering that the capability to predict the geomagnetic field is reduced over periods of geomagnetic jerks, here we propose a method to detect these events over a long time-span. This approach considers that epochs characterised by relative minima of fluctuations in time scale ?, i.e., those periods when the geomagnetic field is less predictable, are possible jerk occurrence dates. We analyse the last 400 years of the geomagnetic field (covered by the Gufm1 model) to detect minima of fluctuations, i.e., epochs characterised by lower values of the time scale. Through this method, most of the well known jerks are confirmed and a few others have been detected. Finally we also identify some short periods when the field is less chaotic (more predictable) than usual, naming these as periods of steady-state geomagnetic regime, to underline their opposite behaviour with respect to jerks.

  15. Empirical analytic transformations between geographic and corrected geomagnetic coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, R. H.

    1970-01-01

    Based upon a mathematical model of contours of constant corrected geomagnetic latitude in a polar projection of geographic coordinates, analytic equations are developed for converting geographic coordinates to corrected geomagnetic coordinates and vice versa. The equations were programmed for use on a small computer. This treatment is restricted to the Northern Hemisphere.

  16. Geomagnetic disturbances imprints in ground and satellite altitude observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahiat, Yasmina; Lamara, Souad; Zaourar, Naima; Hamoudi, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    The temporal evolution of the geomagnetic field and its variations have been repeatedly studied from both ground observatories and near-earth orbiting platforms. With the advent of the space ageand the launches of geomagnetic low altitude orbits satellites, a global coverage has been achieved. Since Magsat mission, more satellites were put into orbit and some of them are still collecting data enhancing the spatial and temporal descriptions of the field. Our study uses new data gathered by the latest SWARM satellite mission launched on November, 22nd 2013. It consists of a constellation of three identical satellites carrying on board high resolution and accuracy scientific equipment. Data from this constellation will allow better understanding the multiscale behavior of the geomagnetic field. Our goal is to analyze and interpret the geomagnetic data collected by this Swarm mission, for a given period and try to separate the external disturbances from internal contributions. We consider in the study the variation of the horizontal component H, for different virtual geomagnetic observatories at the satellite altitude. The analysis of data by Swarm orbital segments shows clearly the external disturbances of the magnetic field like that occurring on 27th of August 2014. This perturbation is shown on geomagnetic indexes and is related to a coronal mass ejection (CME). These results from virtual observatories are confirmed, by the equivalent analysis using ground observatories data for the same geographic positions and same epochs. Key words: Geomagnetic field, external field, geomagnetic index, SWARM mission, virtual observatories.

  17. Science outreach and capacity building in geomagnetism and space sciences—An Indian Institute of Geomagnetism endeavor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawali, Praveen; Bhaskar, Ankush; Dhar, Ajay; Ramesh, Durbha Sai

    2016-05-01

    We present an overview of science outreach and capacity building activities at the Indian Institute of Geomagnetism (IIG) against the backdrop of a long history of geomagnetic studies. We also present the future plans of the institute for strengthening these activities.

  18. Study about geomagnetic variations from data recorded at Surlari Geomagnetic Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimopolos, Laurentiu; Asimopolos, Natalia-Silvia; Sandulescu, Agata Monica; Niculici, Eugen

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents statistical and spectral analysis of data from Surlari Geomagnetic Observatory that contributing to study of geomagnetic variations. Thus were highlighted, for long series of records over several solar cycles, periodicities of 22 years and 11 years. Following the same procedures for medium recording series (multi-annual) have highlighted annual, seasonal and monthly periodicities. For shorter data series, we highlighted diurnal, semidiurnal, 8 hours and even lower periodicities. For very short series with a high sample rate and for few magnetotellurics records, we highlight different types of pulsations (Pc2 - Pc5 and Pi 2). Geomagnetic signals are the convolution product of the atomic stationary signals mono-frequential of different amplitudes associated to phenomena with a very broad band of periodicities and nondeterministic signals associated with geomagnetic disturbances and non-periodic phenomena. Among analysis processes used for discrete series of geomagnetic data with different lengths and sampling rates, can conclude the following: Moving average works as a low pass filter in frequency or high pass in time. By eliminating high frequency components (depending on mobile window size used) can be studied preferential periodicities greater than a given value. Signal linearization (using least squares) provides information on linear trend of the entire series analyzed. Thus, for the very long data series (several decades) we extracted the secular variation slope for each geomagnetic component, separately. The numeric derivative of signal versus time proved to be a very reliable indicator for geomagnetic disturbed periods. Thus, the derivative value may be increased by several orders of magnitude during periods of agitation in comparisons to calm periods. The correlation factor shows significant increases when between two time series a causal relationship exists. Variation of the correlation factor, calculated for a mobile window containing k

  19. Geomagnetic excursions reflect an aborted polarity state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, Jean-Pierre; Plenier, Guillaume; Herrero-Bervera, E.

    2008-10-01

    Geomagnetic excursions represent short episodes of a few thousand years at most during which the field considerably exceeds its normal range of variability during a polarity state. Paleomagnetic records have now been obtained with extremely high temporal resolution which have improved our knowledge of these short events. We have compiled the most detailed records of excursions that had occurred during the Brunhes and Matuyama chrons. We show that virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) of at least one record of each event are able to reach the opposite polarity. In the next step, we have computed different simulations of excursions during which the dipole progressively vanishes before growing back without reversing. This scenario produces very few reversed directions which are only visible at some latitudes. We infer that it is impossible to reach the ratio of reversed to intermediate VGPs present in the paleomagnetic records if the excursions were not associated with a short period of reversed dipole field. Therefore, excursions should be regarded as two successive reversals bracketing an aborted polarity interval. We propose that the same underlying mechanisms prevail in both situations (excursions or reversals) and that below a certain strength the field reaches an unstable position which preludes either the achievement of a reversal or its return to the former polarity.

  20. Solar Wind Charge Exchange During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Ina P.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Sibeck, David G.; Collier, Michael R.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    On March 31st. 2001, a coronal mass ejection pushed the subsolar magnetopause to the vicinity of geosynchronous orbit at 6.6 RE. The NASA/GSFC Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMe) employed a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model to simulate the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction during the peak of this geomagnetic storm. Robertson et aL then modeled the expected 50ft X-ray emission due to solar wind charge exchange with geocoronal neutrals in the dayside cusp and magnetosheath. The locations of the bow shock, magnetopause and cusps were clearly evident in their simulations. Another geomagnetic storm took place on July 14, 2000 (Bastille Day). We again modeled X-ray emission due to solar wind charge exchange, but this time as observed from a moving spacecraft. This paper discusses the impact of spacecraft location on observed X-ray emission and the degree to which the locations of the bow shock and magnetopause can be detected in images.

  1. Weak rigidity in the PPN formalism

    SciTech Connect

    del Olmo, V.; Olivert, J.

    1987-04-01

    The influence of the concept of weakly rigid almost-thermodynamic material schemes on the classical deformations is analyzed. The methods of the PPN approximation are considered. In this formalism, the equations that characterize the weak rigidity are expressed. As a consequence of that, an increase of two orders of magnitude in the strain rate tensor is obtained.

  2. 21 CFR 868.5540 - Rigid laryngoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rigid laryngoscope. 868.5540 Section 868.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5540 Rigid laryngoscope. (a) Identification....

  3. 21 CFR 868.5540 - Rigid laryngoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rigid laryngoscope. 868.5540 Section 868.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5540 Rigid laryngoscope. (a) Identification....

  4. 21 CFR 868.5540 - Rigid laryngoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rigid laryngoscope. 868.5540 Section 868.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5540 Rigid laryngoscope. (a) Identification....

  5. 21 CFR 868.5540 - Rigid laryngoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rigid laryngoscope. 868.5540 Section 868.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5540 Rigid laryngoscope. (a) Identification....

  6. 21 CFR 868.5540 - Rigid laryngoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rigid laryngoscope. 868.5540 Section 868.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5540 Rigid laryngoscope. (a) Identification....

  7. Unbiased rigid registration using transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Dieter A.; Hornegger, Joachim; Bautz, Werner; Kuwert, Torsten; Roemer, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    The evaluation of tumor growth as regression under therapy is an important clinical issue. Rigid registration of sequentially acquired 3D-images has proven its value for this purpose. Existing approaches to rigid image registration use the whole volume for the estimation of the rigid transform. Non-rigid soft tissue deformation, however, will imply a bias to the registration result, because local deformations cannot be modeled by rigid transforms. Anatomical substructures, like bones or teeth, are not affected by these deformations, but follow a rigid transform. This important observation is incorporated in the proposed registration algorithm. The selection of anatomical substructure is done by manual interaction of medical experts adjusting the transfer function of the volume rendering software. The parameters of the transfer function are used to identify the voxels that are considered for registration. A rigid transform is estimated by a quaternion gradient descent algorithm based on the intensity values of the specified tissue classes. Commonly used voxel intensity measures are adjusted to the modified registration algorithm. The contribution describes the mathematical framework of the proposed registration method and its implementation in a commercial software package. The experimental evaluation includes the discussion of different similarity measures, the comparison of the proposed method to established rigid registration techniques and the evaluation of the efficiency of the new method. We conclude with the discussion of potential medical applications of the proposed registration algorithm.

  8. The Rigid Orthogonal Procrustes Rotation Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ten Berge, Jos M. F.

    2006-01-01

    The problem of rotating a matrix orthogonally to a best least squares fit with another matrix of the same order has a closed-form solution based on a singular value decomposition. The optimal rotation matrix is not necessarily rigid, but may also involve a reflection. In some applications, only rigid rotations are permitted. Gower (1976) has…

  9. Geomagnetic jerks as chaotic fluctuations of the Earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qamili, E.; de Santis, A.; Isac, A.; Mandea, M.; Duka, B.; Simonyan, A.

    2013-04-01

    The geomagnetic field is chaotic and can be characterized by a mean exponential time scale < τ > after which it is no longer predictable. It is also ergodic, so time analyses can substitute the more difficult phase space analyses. Taking advantage of these two properties of the Earth's magnetic field, a scheme of processing global geomagnetic models in time is presented, to estimate fluctuations of the time scale τ. Here considering that the capability to predict the geomagnetic field is reduced over periods of geomagnetic jerks, we propose a method to detect these events over a long time span. This approach considers that epochs characterized by relative minima of fluctuations in time scale τ, i.e., those periods when a geomagnetic field is less predictable, are possible jerk occurrence dates. We analyze the last 400 years of the geomagnetic field (covered by the Gufm1 model) to detect minima of fluctuations, i.e., epochs characterized by low values of the time scale. Most of the well known jerks are confirmed through this method and a few others have been suggested. Finally, we also identify some short periods when the field is less chaotic (more predictable) than usual, naming these periods as steady state geomagnetic regime, to underline their opposite behavior with respect to jerks.

  10. Is motivation influenced by geomagnetic activity?

    PubMed

    Starbuck, S; Cornélissen, G; Halberg, F

    2002-01-01

    To eventually build a scientific bridge to religion by examining whether non-photic, non-thermic solar effects may influence (religious) motivation, invaluable yearly world wide data on activities from 1950 to 1999 by Jehovah's Witnesses on behalf of their church were analyzed chronobiologically. The time structure (chronome) of these archives, insofar as it is able to be evaluated in yearly means for up to half a century, was assessed. Least squares spectra in a frequency range from one cycle in 42 to one in 2.1 years of data on the average number of hours per month spent in work for the church, available from 103 different geographic locations, as well as grand totals also including other sites, revealed a large peak at one cycle in about 21 years. The non-linear least squares fit of a model consisting of a linear trend and a cosine curve with a trial period of 21.0 years, numerically approximating that of the Hale cycle, validated the about 21.0-year component in about 70% of the data series, with the non-overlap of zero by the 95% confidence interval of the amplitude estimate. Estimates of MESOR (midline-estimating statistic of rhythm, a rhythm (or chronome) adjusted mean), amplitude and period were further regressed with geomagnetic latitude. The period estimate did not depend on geomagnetic latitude. The about 21.0-year amplitude tends to be larger at low and middle than at higher latitudes and the resolution of the about 21.0-year cycle, gauged by the width of 95% confidence intervals for the period and amplitude, is higher (the 95% confidence intervals are statistically significantly smaller) at higher than at lower latitudes. Near-matches of periods in solar activity and human motivation hint that the former may influence the latter, while the dependence on latitude constitutes evidence that geomagnetic activity may affect certain brain areas involved in motivation, just as it was earlier found that it is associated with effects on the electrocardiogram

  11. Geomagnetic storms: Potential economic impacts on electric utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.R.; Van Dyke, J.W.

    1991-03-20

    Geomagnetic storms associated with sunspot and solar flare activity can disturb communications and disrupt electric power. A very severe geomagnetic storm could cause a major blackout with an economic impact of several billion dollars. The vulnerability of electric power systems in the northeast United States will likely increase during the 1990s because of the trend of transmitting large amounts of power over long distance to meet the electricity demands of this region. A comprehensive research program and a warning satellite to monitor the solar wind are needed to enhance the reliability of electric power systems under the influence of geomagnetic storms. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Solar wind turbulence as a driver of geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikechukwu Ugwu, Ernest Benjamin; Nneka Okeke, Francisca; Ugonabo, Obiageli Josephine

    2016-07-01

    We carried out simultaneous analyses of interplanetary and geomagnetic datasets for the period of (solar Maunder) least (2009) and maximum (2002) solar activity to determine the nature of solar wind turbulence on geomagnetic activity using AE, ASY-D, and ASY-H indices. We determined the role played by Alfvénic fluctuations in the solar wind so as to find out the nature of the turbulence. Our analyses showed that solar wind turbulence play a role in geomagnetic processes at high latitudes during periods of low and high solaractivity but does not have any effect at mid-low latitudes.

  13. Search for correlation between geomagnetic disturbances and mortality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, B. J.; Sturrock, P. A.; Rogot, F.

    1976-01-01

    A search is conducted for a possible correlation between solar activity and myocardial infarction and stroke in the United States. A statistical analysis is performed using data on geomagnetic activity and the daily U.S. mortality due to coronary heart disease and stroke for the years 1962 through 1966. None of the results are found to yield any evidence of a correlation. It is concluded that correlations claimed by Soviet workers between geomagnetic activity and the incidence of various human diseases are probably not statistically significant or probably are not due to a causal relation between geomagnetic activity and disease.

  14. Investigation of Fast and Slow CMEs Effect on Geomagnetic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donmez, Burcin; Kilcik, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Here we investigate the relationship between the fast (v>800 km/s) and slow (v<400 km/s) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and geomagnetic Ap and Dst indices during the last two solar cycles (cycle 23 and 24). In result of our analysis we found following results 1) Fast CMEs show much better relationship with geomagnetic Ap and Dst indices compared to slow ones, 2) Similar to geomagnetic indices, the number of fast CMEs decreased seriously during solar cycle 24th, while the number of slow CMEs are almost the same during the investigated whole time interval (1996 through 2016).

  15. Geomagnetic Effect Caused by 1908 Tunguska Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losseva, T. V.; Kuzmicheva, M. Y.

    2010-12-01

    The analysis of the magnetograms of Irkutsk observatory on the 30th June 1908 showed that the explosion of Tunguska bolide was accompanied by variations of the Earth’s magnetic field, which were being continued for several hours [1]. Irkutsk geophysical observatory is located approximately in 950 km to the southeast from the point of Tunguska explosion and it was nearest point, where the continuous recording of the components of the geomagnetic field was in progress. We suppose that it was caused by magnetic field of the current system, generated in the E-layer of ionosphere by gas dynamical flow after the Tunguska explosion [2]. Plunging through the atmosphere, cosmic body forms a hot rarefied channel behind it; the hydrostatic equilibrium of pressure in the channel becomes broken. The particles of the body vapor and atmospheric air, involved in the motion, lift along this channel upward (so-called plume). In the rarefied layers of the atmosphere they move along the ballistic trajectories in the gravitational field. While falling down gas loses its kinetic energy in dense layers of the atmosphere, which is converted into thermal energy. Then the reflected shock wave is formed. The gas heated in it rises up and all these processes repeat. The effects of heating and ionization of gas at height of 100 km, caused by the oscillations in the atmosphere, can lead to a distortion of the existing current system in ionosphere and generation of new ones. Since the Tunguska body had an oblique trajectory, the plume was ejected in the direction opposite to motion of Tunguska body and provided ionized region at the distance about 700 km from the epicenter at time moment 400 seconds after explosion. Gas dynamical simulation and estimates of the plume parameters have been fulfilled to calculate conductivity profiles and the electric field. Magnetic field of the induced current system has been obtained by the numerical simulation of Maxwell’s equations. Analysis of calculation

  16. Solar activity geomagnetic field and terrestrial weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. W.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    Spectral analysis is used as an independent test of the reported association between interplanetary-magnetic-field structure and terrestrial weather. Spectra of the Ap geomagnetic activity index and the vorticity area index for the years from 1964 to 1970 are examined for common features that may be associated with solar-related phenomena, specifically for peaks in the power spectra of both time series with periods near 27.1 days. The spectra are compared in three ways, and the largest peak with the smallest probability estimate is found to occur at a period of 27.49 days. This result is considered to be statistically significant at the 98% level. It is concluded that the period derived from the Ap spectrum is related to solar rotation and that the analysis provides supporting evidence for a connection between the vorticity area index and solar activity.

  17. Protection against lightning at a geomagnetic observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čop, R.; Milev, G.; Deželjin, D.; Kosmač, J.

    2014-08-01

    The Sinji Vrh Geomagnetic Observatory was built on the brow of Gora, the mountain above Ajdovščina, which is a part of Trnovo plateau, and all over Europe one can hardly find an area which is more often struck by lightning than this southwestern part of Slovenia. When the humid air masses of a storm front hit the edge of Gora, they rise up more than 1000 m in a very short time, and this causes an additional electrical charge of stormy clouds. The reliability of operations performed in every section of the observatory could be increased by understanding the formation of lightning in a thunderstorm cloud and the application of already-proven methods of protection against a stroke of lightning and against its secondary effects. To reach this goal the following groups of experts have to cooperate: experts in the field of protection against lightning, constructors and manufacturers of equipment and observatory managers.

  18. Geomagnetism and paleomagnetism 1979-1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, M.

    My function, in writing these notes, is to bring you up to date in Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism, in as painless a manner as possible—without tears, as the French language texts for tourists used to promise. In writing this account of progress in the past quadrennium, I must first acknowledge that it is a personal and subjective viewpoint;; another reporter would surely emphasize other developments. Yet, there is some virture in writing of things, about which one knows something, so I leave to future reporters the task of redresssing the balance in matters covered.At the outset, one very sad event must be recorded. On April 3, 1981, Sir Edward Bullard died. His published work alone marks him as one of the leaders of geomagnetism in our times. Yet his contribution was much greater; many an American geophysicist, as well as a whole generation of British colleagues, have felt the benefit of his perceptive advice on their research. To those who saw him in the last few months of his life, his courage in the face of his illness was a remarkable example of fortitude. It is by now well known that the definitive paper, which he wrote with Malin, on secular variation at London, was only completed immediately before his death. The transmittal letter had been typed, but death prevented him from signing it. Bullard returned in this final paper to a topic to which he had contributed much. In it, he notes the role of Halley, who first described the phenomenon of westward drift, to which Bullard gave a new numerical precision, two and a half centuries later. I seem to remember Bullard saying in a lecture years ago that, while the Newtons of this world seem other than mortal, Halley was a scientist whose life and acheivements could encourage one's own efforts. Bullard, like Halley, inspires and encourages us.

  19. Forecasting geomagnetic activities from the Boyle Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, R.; Reiff, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    The Boyle Index (BI), Φ =10-4}( {v{2}/{km/sec) + 11.7({(B)/(nT)})sin 3}{(θ /2) kV, has been successful in predicting the geomagnetic activity since its inception in October 2003. It is available in near-real-time from http://space.rice.edu/ISTP/wind.html and provides space weather predictions of geomagnetic indices (Kp, Dst and the AE) in real time through neural network algorithms. In addition, it provides free email alerts to its 700+ subscribers whenever the magnetospheric activity levels exceed certain pre-defined thresholds. We are constantly improving our algorithms, in the interest of either including more data or improving the accuracy and lead-time of forecasts. For example, with the inclusion of two more years of data (2008 and 2009) in the training, we have the advantage of modeling one of the deepest solar minimums, which has been exceptionally low in terms of the activity level. Our algorithms have been successful in capturing the effects of ``preconditioning" and the non-linearity in the solar wind parameters (for example, see figure 1). This paper presents our new attempts to include the effects of solar turbulence by incorporating the standard deviations in the solar wind parameters along with the BI, for greater the turbulence the higher the energy input into the magnetosphere as some of the previous studies have shown. Furthermore, we will also present how 3-hour averaged 1-hour sliding window scheme have improved our predictions with lead times of 3 hours or longer. Our predictions from a recent activity, 03 August 2010.

  20. Historical records of the geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneitz, Patrick; Heilig, Balázs; Vadasz, Gergely; Valach, Fridrich; Dolinský, Peter; Hejda, Pavel; Fabian, Karl; Hammerl, Christa; Leonhardt, Roman

    2014-05-01

    Records of historical direct measurements of the geomagnetic field are invaluable sources to reconstruct temporal variations of the Earth's magnetic field. They provide information about the field evolution back to the late Middle Age. We have investigated such records with focus on Austria and some neighbouring countries. A variety of new sources and source types are examined. These include 19th century land survey and observatory records of the Imperial and Royal "Centralanstalt f. Meteorologie und Erdmagnetismus", which are not included in the existing compilations. Daily measurements at the Imperial and Royal Observatory in Prague have been digitized. The Imperial and Royal Navy carried out observations in the Adriatic Sea during several surveys. Declination values have been collected from famous mining areas in the former Austro-Hungarian Empire. In this connection, a time series for Banska Stiavnica has been compiled. In the meteorological yearbooks of the monastery Kremsmünster regular declination measurements for the first half of the 19th century were registered. Marsigli's observations during military mapping works in 1696 are also included in our collection. Moreover, compass roses on historical maps or declination values marked on compasses, sundials or globes also provide information about ancient field declination. An evaluation of church orientations in Lower Austria and Northern Germany did not support the hypothesis that church naves had been aligned along the East-West direction by means of magnetic compasses. Therefore, this potential source of information must be excluded from our collection. The gathered records are integrated into a database together with corresponding metadata, such as the used measurement instruments and methods. This information allows an assessment of quality and reliability of the historical observations. The combination of compilations of historical measurements with high quality archeo- and paleomagnetic data in a

  1. Homogenization of the historical records of geomagnetic field components and geomagnetic K-index of the Magnetic Observatory of Coimbra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Anna; Ribeiro, Paulo; Pais, M. Alexandra

    2013-04-01

    The Coimbra Magnetic Observatory (COI) (Portugal) has a long history of observation of the geomagnetic field, spanning almost 150 years. Measurements of the geomagnetic field components started in 1866 and include the observations of all components: horizontal (H), downward vertical (Z), northward (X), eastward (Y), total field magnitude (F), inclination (I) and declination (D). These long instrumental geomagnetic records provide very important information about variability of measured parameters, their trends and cycles, and can be used to improve our knowledge on the sources that drive variations of the geomagnetic field: liquid core dynamics (internal) and solar forcing (external). However, during the long life of the Coimbra observatory, some inevitable changes in station location, instrument's park and electromagnetic environment took place. These changes affected the quality of the data causing breaks and jumps in the series. Clearly, these inhomogeneities, typically of shift-like (step-like) or trend-like, have to be corrected or, at least, minimized in order for the data to be used in scientific studies or to be submitted to international databases. The homogenization of the monthly and annual averages of geomagnetic field components has been done using visual and statistical tests (e.g. standard normal homogeneity test), allowing to estimate not only the level of inhomogeneity of the studied series, but also to detect the highly probable homogeneity break points. These have been compared with the metadata, reference series from the nearest geomagnetic stations and geomagnetic field models (e.g. CM4 and CHAOS3) in order to find and to set up the indispensable correction factors. Similar methods have been applied to the homogenization of the local geomagnetic K-index series (from 1952 to 2012). As a result, the homogenized geomagnetic monthly and annual averages of the series measured in COI are considered to be essentially free of artificial shifts and

  2. Interplanetary magnetic sector polarity inferred from polar geomagnetic field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriss-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    With the use of a prediction technique it is shown that the polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field can be reliably inferred from observations of the polar geomagnetic field.

  3. A comprehensive analysis of the geomagnetic storms occurred dur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghamry, Essam; Lethy, Ahmed; Arafa-Hamed, Tareq; Abd Elaal, Esmat

    2016-06-01

    The Geomagnetic storms are considered as one of the major natural hazards. Egyptian geomagnetic observatories observed multiple geomagnetic storms during 18 February to 2 March 2014. During this period, four interplanetary shocks successively hit the Earth's magnetosphere, leading to four geomagnetic storms. The storm onsets occurred on 18, 20, 23 and 27 February. A non-substorm Pi2 pulsation was observed on 26 February. This Pi2 pulsation was detected in Egyptian observatories (Misallat and Abu Simbel), Kakioka station in Japan and Carson City station in US with nearly identical waveforms. Van Allen Probe missions observed non-compressional Pc4 pulsations on the recovery phase of the third storm. This Pc4 event is may be likely attributed to the decay of the ring current in the recovery phase.

  4. Human physiological reaction to geomagnetic disturbances of solar origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, Sv.; Stoilova, I.

    2002-12-01

    During the last two decades publications about the influence of geomagnetic activity on human health increase but there are not still strong evidences for this relationship. We performed measurements and observations of 86 working volunteers during the period of autumn and spring equinox. We examined systolic, diastolic blood pressure and pulse rate. We also collected data for some personal health condition complaints. Four-way analyses of variance (MANOVA method) were employed and the influence of factors geomagnetic activity level, sequence of the days of measurements with respect to the increased geomagnetic activity, medicaments and sex was investigated. We also performed three-way analyses of variance and investigated influence of atmospheric pressure, medicaments and sex on the physiological parameters under consideration. Our investigations indicate that most of the persons examined irrespectively to their health status could be sensitive to the geomagnetic changes, which influence directly self-confidence and working ability.

  5. Spatial and temporal power spectra of the geomagnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, M.G.

    1996-02-10

    This report explores the statistical properties of the geomagnetic field. This research tries to determine the gaussian coefficient covariance from magnetic field measurements of spatial and temporal power spectra and give a theoretical explanation for the nature of these covariances.

  6. A model of geomagnetic secular variation for 1980-1983

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.; Zunde, A.K.

    1987-01-01

    We developed an updated model of the secular variation of the main geomagnetic field during 1980 through 1983 based on annual mean values for that interval from 148 worldwide magnetic observatories. The model consists of a series of 80 spherical harmonics, up to and including those of degree and order 8. We used it to form a proposal for the 1985 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). Comparison of the new model, whose mean epoch is approximately 1982.0, with the Provisional Geomagnetic Reference Field for 1975-1980 (PGRF 1975), indicates that the moment of the centered-dipole part of the geomagnetic field is now decreasing faster than it was 5 years ago. The rate (in field units) indicated by PGRF 1975 was about -25 nT a-1, while for the new model it is -28 nT a-1. ?? 1987.

  7. Geomagnetic Variations of Near-polar Regions and Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchistova, Z. B.; Kutinov, Y. G.

    In polar region geomagnetic variations play active role to non-linear tectonic processes. This analysis is based on spatial-time spectral representation of geomagnetic variation and wave migration transformation. Many perturbations in electromagnetic fields may because by external factors (e.g. magnetic storms, ionosphere anomalies and other phenomena related to solar activity) "trigging" tectonic processes but having no direct relation to the processes of their preparation. Geophysical processes are responsible for perturbations in Earth's rotation and orientation on wide range of time-scale, from less than a day of millions of years. The geological structure of some sites of Earth's crust promotes occurrence of wave guides a number of geophysical fields (acoustic, seismic, electromagnetic), usually of transportation of acoustic, seismic, electromagnetic energy in Earth's crust are coincide spatially. During last 250 mln years Arctic Segment has been developing as an autonomous region with circumpolar zonality of geomagnetic fields, and mass - and-energy transfer in its bowlers as well as shitting of lithospheric plates and expansion of ocean are caused by rotation forces under of expanding planet. The dynamic structure of the geomagnetic variations may be characteriz ed by the variations of the order-chaos state. The order manifest itself in the rhythmic change of the medium state. Analysis of amplitude and phase of geomagnetic variations can be information on ecological state of regions. Geomagnetic variations is intrincically a multiscale process in time and space. One of the most important features of geomagnetic variations is multicyclic character, whish predetermined both extent and character of geomagnetic show, and specific features. Recently, there are collected many facts, show dependence between the processes in the Earth's biosphere, the elements of it, gelio- geo- physical and meteorological factors. The recent experimental data gives us opportunity

  8. Geomagnetic disturbance and the orientation of nocturnally migrating birds.

    PubMed

    Moore, F R

    1977-05-01

    Free-flying passerine migrants respond to natural fluctuations in the earth's magnetic field. The variability in flight directions of nocturnal migrants is significantly correlated with increasing geomagnetic disturbance as measured by both the K index and various components of the earth's magnetic field. The results indicate that such disturbances influence the orientation of free-flying migrants, but the evidence is not sufficient to show that geomagnetism is a cue in their orientation system. PMID:854743

  9. The Geomagnetic Field and Radiation in Near-Earth Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heirtzler, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    This report shows, in detail, how the geomagnetic field interacts with the particle flux of the radiation belts to create a hazard to spacecraft and humans in near-Earth orbit. It illustrates the geometry of the geomagnetic field lines, especially around the area where the field strength is anomalously low in the South Atlantic Ocean. It discusses how the field will probably change in the future and the consequences that may have on hazards in near space.

  10. Rigid shells enhance survival of gekkotan eggs.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Robin M

    2015-11-01

    The majority of lizards and snakes produce permeable parchment-shelled eggs that require high moisture conditions for successful embryonic development. One clade of gekkotan lizards is an exception; females produce relatively impermeable rigid-shelled eggs that normally incubate successfully under low moisture conditions. I tested the hypothesis that the rigid-shell increases egg survival during incubation, but only under low moisture conditions. To test this hypothesis, I incubated rigid-shelled eggs of Chondrodactylus turneri under low and under high moisture conditions. Eggs were incubated with parchment-shelled eggs of Eublepharis macularius to insure that incubation conditions were suitable for parchment-shelled eggs. Chondrodactylus turneri eggs had very high survival (>90%) when they were incubated under low moisture conditions. In contrast, eggs incubated under high moisture conditions had low survival overall, and lower survival than those of the parchment-shelled eggs of E. macularius. Mortality of C. turneri and E. macularius eggs incubated under high moisture conditions was the result of fungal infection, a common source of egg mortality for squamates under laboratory and field conditions. These observations document high survival of rigid-shelled eggs under low moisture conditions because eggs escape from fungal infection. Highly mineralized rigid shells also make egg survival independent of moisture availability and may also provide protection from small invertebrates in nature. Enhanced egg survival could thus compensate for the low reproductive output of gekkotans that produce rigid-shelled eggs.

  11. Characteristics Of Fused Couplers Below Cut-Off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, T. J.; Tekippe, V. J.

    1989-02-01

    A number of different architectures are being explored for the utilization of optical fiber in the subscriber loop. In addition to reliability and maintainability, cost is a prime consideration since full implementation of fiber in the local loop will not occur until it is economically viable. It is becoming increasingly clear that in order to accommodate a number of ISDN applications, including high definition television (HDTV), singlemode fiber with a singlemode laser at the terminal end will be required. The situation at the subscriber end is quite different, however. The data rates are expected to be low on the return path to allow for POTS ( plain old telephone service) and some data transfer. When this requirement is combined with cost and reliability considerations, the inexpensive lasers developed for the CD (compact disk) market become quite attractive. The biggest disadvantage of this source is that the fiber which is optimized for singlemode operation at 1300nm tends to be multimode in the 800nm band where these lasers operate. Previous papers have considered such effects as modal noise and pulse dispersion when using these lasers with fiber that is singlemode in the 1300nm band.[1] Another consideration is the passive components required to implement such an architecture. Figure 1 shows a typical bidirectional design with full duplex operation on a single fiber. The key component is the 800/1300 wavelength division multiplexer/demultiplexer (WDM). Because of the multimode nature of the fiber in the 800nm band, all fiber approaches to fabricating the WDM, such as the fused beconical taper (FBT) approach, raise new issues which are not encountered, for example, with 1300/1500nm WDM's.[2] In this paper we discuss the effects of the multimode behavior of the fiber on the performance of fused couplers and WDM's.

  12. [ANTHROPOMETRIC PARAMETERS' CUT-OFF POINTS FOR DIAGNOSIS OF SARCOPENIA].

    PubMed

    Canda Moreno, Alicia S

    2015-08-01

    Introducción: la sarcopenia es un síndrome caracterizado por baja masa muscular junto con pérdida de fuerza y/o disminución del rendimiento físico. Debido al envejecimiento de nuestra población, se ha producido un aumento de su prevalencia relacionada con la edad, a la que se suman otros factores causados por ciertas enfermedades o la malnutrición. Objetivo: ofrecer una herramienta para el diagnóstico de sarcopenia que determine de forma accesible la pérdida de masa muscular. Material y métodos: se realizó un protocolo antropométrico estandarizado en 883 varones y 506 mujeres, sanos y activos, de edad entre 20 y 39 años. Se calcularon los siguientes índices de desarrollo muscular: perímetros (brazo, antebrazo, muslo y pierna), perímetros corregidos (brazo, muslo y pierna), áreas musculares transversales (CSA de brazo, muslo y pierna) y masa muscular total (kg), en porcentaje (%) y relativa a la talla (kg/m2) mediante la ecuación de Lee. Se fijó como punto de corte el percentil 2,5 (rango inferior del 95% del intervalo de confianza) para las variables estudiadas. Resultados: se encontraron diferencias significativas (p < 0,0001) entre varones y mujeres en todos los indicadores. Los valores del punto de corte de diagnóstico de baja masa muscular fue en varones de 9,1 kg/m2, y en mujeres de 7,3 kg/m2. Y para las CSA (cm2) varón vs. mujer: brazo, 37,7 vs. 24,2; muslo, 154,3 vs. 115,8; y pierna, 78,8 vs. 60,2. Conclusiones: existe dimorfismo sexual que exige criterios diagnósticos diferenciados. La técnica antropométrica puede servir como screening de sarcopenia en el estudio de grandes poblaciones.

  13. Schizophrenia and season of birth: relationship to geomagnetic storms.

    PubMed

    Kay, Ronald W

    2004-01-01

    An excess pattern of winter and spring birth, of those later diagnosed as schizophrenic, has been clearly identified in most Northern Hemisphere samples with none or lesser variation in Equatorial or Southern Hemisphere samples. Pregnancy and birth complications, seasonal variations in light, weather, temperature, nutrition, toxins, body chemistry and gene expression have all been hypothesized as possible causes. In this study, the hypothesis was tested that seasonal variation in the geomagnetic field of the earth primarily as a result of geomagnetic storms (GMS) at crucial periods in intrauterine brain development, during months 2 to 7 of gestation could affect the later rate of development of schizophrenia. The biological plausibility of this hypothesis is also briefly reviewed. A sample of eight representative published studies of schizophrenic monthly birth variation were compared with averaged geomagnetic disturbance using two global indices (AA*) and (aa). Three samples showed a significant negative correlation to both geomagnetic indices, a further three a significant negative correlation to one of the geomagnetic indices, one showed no significant correlation to either index and one showed a significant positive correlation to one index. It is suggested that these findings are all consistent with the hypothesis and that geomagnetic disturbance or factors associated with this disturbance should be further investigated in birth seasonality studies. PMID:14693348

  14. Automated detection of geomagnetic storms with heightened risk of GIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Rachel L.; Leonhardt, Roman

    2016-06-01

    Automated detection of geomagnetic storms is of growing importance to operators of technical infrastructure (e.g., power grids, satellites), which is susceptible to damage caused by the consequences of geomagnetic storms. In this study, we compare three methods for automated geomagnetic storm detection: a method analyzing the first derivative of the geomagnetic variations, another looking at the Akaike information criterion, and a third using multi-resolution analysis of the maximal overlap discrete wavelet transform of the variations. These detection methods are used in combination with an algorithm for the detection of coronal mass ejection shock fronts in ACE solar wind data prior to the storm arrival on Earth as an additional constraint for possible storm detection. The maximal overlap discrete wavelet transform is found to be the most accurate of the detection methods. The final storm detection software, implementing analysis of both satellite solar wind and geomagnetic ground data, detects 14 of 15 more powerful geomagnetic storms over a period of 2 years.

  15. Globally strong geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Hoabin; Yu, Yongjae; Lee, Chan Hee; Kim, Ran Hee; Park, Jingyu; Doh, Seong-Jae; Kim, Wonnyon; Sung, Hyongmi

    2013-12-01

    High-fidelity geomagnetic field intensity determination was carried out using 191 baked fragments collected from 20 kilns or hearths with ages ranging between ∼1200 BC and ∼AD 1725 in South Korea. Geomagnetic field intensity variation displayed three narrow minima at ∼800-700 BC, ∼AD 700, and ∼AD 1600 and two maxima at ∼1200-1100 BC and ∼AD 1000-1100. In most time intervals, virtual axial dipole moment (VADM) variation is confined within 20% of the present VADM. However, geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 yr ago is nearly 40% larger than the present value. Such high VADMs circa 3000 yr ago are in phase with those in other longitudinal bands in northern hemisphere centered at 5E (France), 30E (the Middle East) and 200E (Hawaii). Although strong geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 yr ago is globally synchronous, the highest VADM occurs at slightly different time intervals in different locations. Hence it is possible that the globally strong geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 yr ago reflects the migration of persistent hemispheric flux in northern hemisphere or an episode of geomagnetic field hemispheric asymmetry.

  16. Are migrating raptors guided by a geomagnetic compass?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorup, Kasper; Fuller, Mark R.; Alerstam, T.; Hake, M.; Kjellen, N.; Standberg, R.

    2006-01-01

    We tested whether routes of raptors migrating over areas with homogeneous topography follow constant geomagnetic courses more or less closely than constant geographical courses. We analysed the routes taken over land of 45 individual raptors tracked by satellite-based radiotelemetry: 25 peregrine falcons, Falco peregrinus, on autumn migration between North and South America, and seven honey buzzards, Pernis apivorus, and 13 ospreys, Pandion haliaetus, on autumn migration between Europe and Africa. Overall, migration directions showed a better agreement with constant geographical than constant geomagnetic courses. Tracks deviated significantly from constant geomagnetic courses, but were not significantly different from geographical courses. After we removed movements directed far from the mean direction, which may not be migratory movements, migration directions still showed a better agreement with constant geographical than constant geomagnetic courses, but the directions of honey buzzards and ospreys were not significantly different from constant geomagnetic courses either. That migration routes of raptors followed by satellite telemetry are in closer accordance with constant geographical compass courses than with constant geomagnetic compass courses may indicate that geographical (e.g. based on celestial cues) rather than magnetic compass mechanisms are of dominating importance for the birds' long-distance orientation.

  17. A Quaternary Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    Reversals and excursions of Earth's geomagnetic field create marker horizons that are readily detected in sedimentary and volcanic rocks worldwide. An accurate and precise chronology of these geomagnetic field instabilities is fundamental to understanding several aspects of Quaternary climate, dynamo processes, and surface processes. For example, stratigraphic correlation between marine sediment and polar ice records of climate change across the cryospheres benefits from a highly resolved record of reversals and excursions. The temporal patterns of dynamo behavior may reflect physical interactions between the molten outer core and the solid inner core or lowermost mantle. These interactions may control reversal frequency and shape the weak magnetic fields that arise during successive dynamo instabilities. Moreover, weakening of the axial dipole during reversals and excursions enhances the production of cosmogenic isotopes that are used in sediment and ice core stratigraphy and surface exposure dating. The Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale (GITS) is based on the direct dating of transitional polarity states recorded by lava flows using the 40Ar/39Ar method, in parallel with astrochronologic age models of marine sediments in which O isotope and magnetic records have been obtained. A review of data from Quaternary lava flows and sediments yields a GITS comprising 10 polarity reversals and 27 excursions during the past 2.6 million years. Nine of the ten reversals bounding chrons and subchrons are associated with 40Ar/39Ar ages of transitionally-magnetized lava flows. The tenth, the Guass-Matuyama chron boundary, is tightly bracketed by 40Ar/39Ar dated ash deposits. Of the 27 well-documented excursions, 14 occurred during the Matuyama chron and 13 during the Brunhes chron; 19 have been dated directly using the 40Ar/39Ar method on transitionally-magnetized volcanic rocks and form the backbone of the GITS. Excursions are clearly not the rare phenomena once thought

  18. Metrology of Non-Rigid Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L; Smith, D W; Claudet, A A; Kasper, E P; Patterson, S R

    2002-01-01

    Dimensional characterization of non-rigid parts presents many challenges. For example, when a non-rigid part is mounted in an inspection apparatus the effects of fixturing constraints cause significant deformation of the part. If the part is not used in normal service with the same load conditions as during inspection, the dimensional characteristics in service will deviate from the reported values during inspection. Further, the solution of designing specialized fixturing to duplicate ''as-installed'' conditions does not fully resolve the problem because each inspection requires its own methodology. The goal of this project is to formulate the research problem and propose a method of assessing the dimensional characteristics of non-rigid parts. The measured dimension of a rigid component is traceable at some level of confidence to a single source (NIST in the USA). Hence the measurement of one component of an assembly can be related to the measurement of another component of that assembly. There is no generalized analog to this pedigreed process for dimensionally characterizing non-rigid bodies. For example, a measurement made on a sheet-metal automobile fender is heavily influenced by how it is held during the measurement making it difficult to determine how well that fender will assemble to the rest of the (non-rigid) car body. This problem is often overcome for specific manufacturing problems by constructing rigid fixtures that over-constrain the non-rigid parts to be assembled and then performing the dimensional measurement of the contour of each component to check whether each meets specification. Note that such inspection measurements will yield only an approximation to the assembled shape, which is a function of both the geometry and the compliance of the component parts of the assembly. As a result, non-rigid components are more difficult to specify and inspect and therefore are more difficult to purchase from outside vendors compared to rigid components

  19. Secular variation of the middle and late Miocene geomagnetic field recorded by the Columbia River Basalt Group in Oregon, Idaho and Washington, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Ada R.; Van der Voo, Rob

    2014-06-01

    This study of 118 discrete volcanic flows from the Columbia River Basalt Group is aimed to determine their distribution of geomagnetic field directions and virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) and to compare the inherent secular variation parameters with those from other studies. The magnetic signature of these rocks is uniformly carried by primary titanomagnetite, indicating that magnetic changes are due to variations in the magnetic field. Although most flows are flat lying, those that are tilted pass the Tauxe and Watson tilt test. Sequential flows with statistically similar site means were grouped, and directions that were considered outliers were evaluated and removed using the Vandamme cut-off method. Three normal-polarity (N-polarity) and three reversed-polarity (R-polarity) intervals are revealed by the stratigraphically ordered flows and have mean directions of N polarity (dec/inc = 6.6°/+61.2°, k = 29.3, α95 = 4.2°), and R polarity (dec/inc = 178.2°/-59.2°, k = 16, α95 = 5.5°). Regression analysis indicates that the secular variation analysis has not been affected by regional rotation, and that apparent polar wander is negligible. The VGP distribution is almost perfectly circular and supports the preference of VGP positions for the dispersion analysis. Dispersion parameters with corrections for within-site scatter (Sb) show a range of 14.3°-25.5°, including error limits, and were consistently higher for R-polarity results than for those of N polarity. Published dispersion parameters for extrusives <5 Ma show Sb values slightly lower than ours, yielding values of 16°-19°, although the difference is not statistically significant. In contrast, published dispersion parameters from high quality data from the Cretaceous Normal Superchron are lower than those for the Neogene, which suggests that the noisiness of the magnetic field correlates with the frequency of reversals. Our new results allow us to extend the Plio-Pleistocene palaeosecular variation

  20. Intensity and Variability of Geomagnetic Time Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackel, B. J.; Connors, M. G.; Reiter, K.; Singleton, M.

    2015-12-01

    Time derivatives of the geomagnetic field are studied for more than a decade of observations at more than a dozen sites in northern Canada. In the auroral zone the derivative magnitude observed by 5-second fluxgate magnetometers often has a lognormal distribution. Parameter estimates corresponding to intensity (log-mean) and variability (log-variance) are nearly independent and have very different statistical properties. Variability is essentially a random variable, while intensity autocorrelation times are on the order of tens of minutes. Observed intensities are highly correlated with AE, and increase with solar wind speed and the magnitude of Bz<0. Both variability and intensity have local-time maxima before and after midnight, but with different patterns that combine to produce a larger post-midnight peak. Post-midnight variability is almost completely determined by latitude, with largest values at subauroral sites and smallest values in the polar cap. Intensity depends on latitude, but also has a site-specific element which may be due to local conductivity.

  1. Equatorial airglow and the ionospheric geomagnetic anomaly.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, S.; Reed, E. I.; Troy, B. E., Jr.; Blamont, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Ogo 4 observations of the O I (6300-A) emissions have revealed a global pattern hitherto undetected from the ground-based observations. It is seen that the postsunset emission of O I (6300 A) in October 1967 is very asymmetrical with respect to the geomagnetic equator in certain longitude regions and shows poor correlation with the electron density measured simultaneously from the same spacecraft. This asymmetry is less marked in the UV airglow, O I (1356 A), which appears to vary as the square of the maximum electron density in the F region. The horizon scan data of the 6300-A airglow reveal that the latitudinal asymmetry is associated with asymmetry in the height of the O I (6300-A) emission and hence with the altitude of the F2 peak. From the correlative studies of the airglow and the ionospheric measurements the mechanisms of the UV and the 6300 A emissions are discussed in terms of the processes involving radiative and dissociative recombination. Theoretical expressions are developed which relate the airglow data to the ionospheric parameters.

  2. The Livingston Island Geomagnetic and Ionospheric Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altadill, David; Marsal, Santiago; Blanch, Estefania; Miquel Torta, J.; Quintana-Seguí, Pere; Germán Solé, J.; Cid, Òscar; José Curto, Juan; Ibáñez, Miguel; Segarra, Antoni; Lluís Pijoan, Joan; Juan, Juan Miguel

    2014-05-01

    The Ebre Observatory Institute manages a geophysical observatory installed at the Spanish Antarctic Station (SAS) Juan Carlos I. It was set up in 1995 and it has been updated yearly by our team throughout several projects carried out since then. Nowadays, it hosts a magnetic station providing 1-second data of the 3 components (X, Y, Z) and the total force (F) during the entire year, and an ionospheric station providing vertical and oblique data during austral summer. This observatory has provided long data series of high scientific value from this remote region of the Earth. They have been used to improve the knowledge of the climate and weather behavior of the geomagnetic field and ionosphere in the area, and to model and expand the capacity of data transmission. This contribution aims to present a brief review of the instruments installed at SAS, the research results obtained from their data, and the developing activities under the current project. Finally, future perspectives are outlined with regard to adapting our geophysical observatory to the evolving needs of observatory practice.

  3. Periodic substorm activity in the geomagnetic tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. Y.; Eastman, T. E.; Frank, L. A.; Williams, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    On 19 May 1978 an anusual series of events is observed with the Quadrispherical LEPEDEA on board the ISEE-1 satellite in the Earth's geomagnetic tail. For 13 hours periodic bursts of both ions and electrons are seen in all the particle detectors on the spacecraft. On this day periodic activity is also seen on the ground, where multiple intensifications of the electrojets are observed. At the same time the latitudinal component of the interplanetary magnetic field shows a number of strong southward deflections. It is concluded that an extended period of substorm activity is occurring, which causes repeated thinnings and recoveries of the plasma sheet. These are detected by ISEE, which is situated in the plasma sheet boundary layer, as periodic dropouts and reappearances of the plasma. Comparisons of the observations at ISEE with those at IMP-8, which for a time is engulfed by the plasma sheet, indicate that the activity is relatively localized in spatial extent. For this series of events it is clear that a global approach to magnetospheric dynamics, e.g., reconnection, is inappropriate.

  4. Geomagnetism during solar cycle 23: Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Zerbo, Jean-Louis; Amory-Mazaudier, Christine; Ouattara, Frédéric

    2013-05-01

    On the basis of more than 48 years of morphological analysis of yearly and monthly values of the sunspot number, the aa index, the solar wind speed and interplanetary magnetic field, we point out the particularities of geomagnetic activity during the period 1996-2009. We especially investigate the last cycle 23 and the long minimum which followed it. During this period, the lowest values of the yearly averaged IMF (3 nT) and yearly averaged solar wind speed (364 km/s) are recorded in 1996, and 2009 respectively. The year 2003 shows itself particular by recording the highest value of the averaged solar wind (568 km/s), associated to the highest value of the yearly averaged aa index (37 nT). We also find that observations during the year 2003 seem to be related to several coronal holes which are known to generate high-speed wind stream. From the long time (more than one century) study of solar variability, the present period is similar to the beginning of twentieth century. We especially present the morphological features of solar cycle 23 which is followed by a deep solar minimum. PMID:25685427

  5. Geomagnetic main field modeling with DMSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alken, P.; Maus, S.; Lühr, H.; Redmon, R. J.; Rich, F.; Bowman, B.; O'Malley, S. M.

    2014-05-01

    The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) launches and maintains a network of satellites to monitor the meteorological, oceanographic, and solar-terrestrial physics environments. In the past decade, geomagnetic field modelers have focused much attention on magnetic measurements from missions such as CHAMP, Ørsted, and SAC-C. With the completion of the CHAMP mission in 2010, there has been a multiyear gap in satellite-based vector magnetic field measurements available for main field modeling. In this study, we calibrate the special sensor magnetometer instrument on board DMSP to create a data set suitable for main field modeling. These vector field measurements are calibrated to compute instrument timing shifts, scale factors, offsets, and nonorthogonality angles of the fluxgate magnetometer cores. Euler angles are then computed to determine the orientation of the vector magnetometer with respect to a local coordinate system. We fit a degree 15 main field model to the data set and compare with the World Magnetic Model and Ørsted scalar measurements. We call this model DMSP-MAG-1, and its coefficients and software are available for download at http://geomag.org/models/dmsp.html. Our results indicate that the DMSP data set will be a valuable source for main field modeling for the years between CHAMP and the recently launched Swarm mission.

  6. Geomagnetism during solar cycle 23: Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Zerbo, Jean-Louis; Amory-Mazaudier, Christine; Ouattara, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of more than 48 years of morphological analysis of yearly and monthly values of the sunspot number, the aa index, the solar wind speed and interplanetary magnetic field, we point out the particularities of geomagnetic activity during the period 1996–2009. We especially investigate the last cycle 23 and the long minimum which followed it. During this period, the lowest values of the yearly averaged IMF (3 nT) and yearly averaged solar wind speed (364 km/s) are recorded in 1996, and 2009 respectively. The year 2003 shows itself particular by recording the highest value of the averaged solar wind (568 km/s), associated to the highest value of the yearly averaged aa index (37 nT). We also find that observations during the year 2003 seem to be related to several coronal holes which are known to generate high-speed wind stream. From the long time (more than one century) study of solar variability, the present period is similar to the beginning of twentieth century. We especially present the morphological features of solar cycle 23 which is followed by a deep solar minimum. PMID:25685427

  7. Scratch resistance of rigid contact lens materials.

    PubMed

    Tranoudis, I; Efron, N

    1996-07-01

    Practitioners have long recognised the importance of determining the extent of scratching on the surface of rigid contact lenses when deciding on lens replacement. Despite this, little research has been undertaken to define this problem. The extent of scratching of rigid contact lens materials was evaluated and this property was related to material oxygen permeability and refractive index. One hundred and forty lenses made from 28 different rigid materials were evaluated in a masked and randomised manner. Scratches were created on the front surface of the lenses using an apparatus that was specifically designed and constructed for this experiment. The extent of scratching was quantitatively evaluated using a computer-based scanning and image analysis system. The oxygen permeability of all materials was measured using the polarographic method. An Atago N3000 hand-held refractometer was used to measure the refractive index of these materials. Three significant correlations were revealed: an inverse relationship (r = -0.813, P < 0.0001) between oxygen permeability and refractive index; a positive relationship (r = 0.511, P < 0.008) between oxygen permeability and the extent of scratching; and an inverse relationship (r = -0.539, P < 0.0058) between refractive index and the extent of scratching. The information generated in this study concerning scratch resistance of rigid contact-lens materials may assist the contact lens industry and contact lens practitioners in developing and prescribing rigid lenses with optimal performance characteristics.

  8. History of the Munich-Maisach-Fürstenfeldbruck Geomagnetic Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffel, H. C.

    2015-07-01

    The Munich-Maisach-Fürstenfeldbruck Geomagnetic Observatory is one of the observatories with the longest recordings of the geomagnetic field. It started with hourly measurements on 1 August 1840. The founder of the observatory in Munich was Johann von Lamont (1805-1879), the Director of the Royal Bavarian Astronomical Observatory. He had been stimulated to build his own observatory by the initiative of the Göttingen Magnetic Union founded in 1834 by Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) and Carl Friedrich Gauss (1777-1855). Before 1840 fewer than five observatories existed; the most prominent ones were those in London and Paris. At the beginning Lamont used equipment delivered by Gauss in Göttingen, but soon started to build instruments of his own design. Among them was a nonmagnetic theodolite which allowed precise geomagnetic measurements to be made also in the field. During the 1850s Lamont carried out geomagnetic surveys and produced geomagnetic maps for Germany and many other European countries. At the end of the nineteenth century accurate geomagnetic measurements in Munich became more and more disturbed by the magnetic stray fields from electric tramways and industry. During this period the quality of the data suffered and the measurements had to be interrupted several times. After a provisional solution in Maisach, a village 25 km west of Munich, a final solution could be found in the vicinity of the nearby city of Fürstenfeldbruck. Here the measurements started again on 1 January 1939. Since the 1980s the observatory has been part of INTERMAGNET, an organization providing almost real-time geomagnetic data of the highest quality.

  9. 49 CFR 178.706 - Standards for rigid plastic IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. 178.706 Section... Performance-Oriented Standards § 178.706 Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. (a) The provisions in this section apply to rigid plastic IBCs intended to contain solids or liquids. Rigid plastic IBC types...

  10. 49 CFR 178.706 - Standards for rigid plastic IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. 178.706 Section... Performance-Oriented Standards § 178.706 Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. (a) The provisions in this section apply to rigid plastic IBCs intended to contain solids or liquids. Rigid plastic IBC types...

  11. 49 CFR 178.706 - Standards for rigid plastic IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. 178.706 Section... Performance-Oriented Standards § 178.706 Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. (a) The provisions in this section apply to rigid plastic IBCs intended to contain solids or liquids. Rigid plastic IBC types...

  12. 49 CFR 178.706 - Standards for rigid plastic IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... apply to rigid plastic IBCs intended to contain solids or liquids. Rigid plastic IBC types are... equipment designed to withstand the whole load when IBCs are stacked, for liquids. (6) 31H2 freestanding, for liquids. (b) Rigid plastic IBCs consist of a rigid plastic body, which may have...

  13. 49 CFR 178.706 - Standards for rigid plastic IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... in this section apply to rigid plastic IBCs intended to contain solids or liquids. Rigid plastic IBC... structural equipment designed to withstand the whole load when IBCs are stacked, for liquids. (6) 31H2 freestanding, for liquids. (b) Rigid plastic IBCs consist of a rigid plastic body, which may have...

  14. Quantum mechanics of a generalised rigid body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gripaios, Ben; Sutherland, Dave

    2016-05-01

    We consider the quantum version of Arnold’s generalisation of a rigid body in classical mechanics. Thus, we quantise the motion on an arbitrary Lie group manifold of a particle whose classical trajectories correspond to the geodesics of any one-sided-invariant metric. We show how the derivation of the spectrum of energy eigenstates can be simplified by making use of automorphisms of the Lie algebra and (for groups of type I) by methods of harmonic analysis. We show how the method can be extended to cosets, generalising the linear rigid rotor. As examples, we consider all connected and simply connected Lie groups up to dimension 3. This includes the universal cover of the archetypical rigid body, along with a number of new exactly solvable models. We also discuss a possible application to the topical problem of quantising a perfect fluid.

  15. Generic Rigidity for Circle Diffeomorphisms with Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocić, Saša

    2016-06-01

    We prove that {C^r}-smooth ({r > 2}) circle diffeomorphisms with a break, i.e., circle diffeomorphisms with a single singular point where the derivative has a jump discontinuity, are generically, i.e., for almost all irrational rotation numbers, not {C^{1+\\varepsilon}}-rigid, for any {\\varepsilon > 0}. This result complements our recent proof, joint with Khanin (Geom Funct Anal 24:2002-2028, 2014), that such maps are generically {C^1}-rigid. It stands in remarkable contrast to the result of Yoccoz (Ann Sci Ec Norm Sup 17:333-361, 1984) that {C^r}-smooth circle diffeomorphisms are generically {C^{r-1-κ}}-rigid, for any {κ > 0}.

  16. How substrate rigidity regulates the cellular motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvestani, Alireza

    2011-03-01

    Mechanical stiffness of bio-adhesive substrates has been recognized as a major regulator of cell motility. We present a simple physical model to study the crawling locomotion of a contractile cell on a soft elastic substrate. The mechanism of rigidity sensing is accounted for using Schwarz's two spring model (Schwarz et al. (2006) BioSystems 83, 225-232). The predicted dependency between the speed of motility and substrate stiffness is qualitatively consistent with experimental observations. The model demonstrates that the rigidity dependent motility of cells is rooted in the regulation of actomyosin contractile forces by substrate deformation at each anchorage point. On stiffer substrates, the traction forces required for cell translocation acquire larger magnitude but show weaker asymmetry which leads to slower cell motility. On very soft substrates, the model predicts a biphasic relationship between the substrate rigidity and the speed of locomotion, over a narrow stiffness range, which has been observed experimentally for some cell types.

  17. Refractive index of rigid contact lens materials.

    PubMed

    Tranoudis, I; Efron, N

    1998-01-01

    A simple hand-held refractometer was used to measure the refractive index of 27 rigid gas permeable contact lens materials. As a general rule, lenses with refractive indices lower than 1.458 are made from fluorosilicone acrylates; lenses with refractive indices in the range of 1.458 to 1.469 are made from either fluorosilicone acrylates or silicone acrylates; and lenses with refractive indices greater than 1.469 are made from silicone acrylates. It is demonstrated how refractometry can be used by contact lens practitioners for the identification and verification of rigid contact lenses.

  18. Rigidity analysis of HIV-1 protease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heal, J. W.; Wells, S. A.; Jimenez-Roldan, E.; Freedman, R. F.; Römer, R. A.

    2011-03-01

    We present a rigidity analysis on a large number of X-ray crystal structures of the enzyme HIV-1 protease using the 'pebble game' algorithm of the software FIRST. We find that although the rigidity profile remains similar across a comprehensive set of high resolution structures, the profile changes significantly in the presence of an inhibitor. Our study shows that the action of the inhibitors is to restrict the flexibility of the β-hairpin flaps which allow access to the active site. The results are discussed in the context of full molecular dynamics simulations as well as data from NMR experiments.

  19. Improving geomagnetic observatory data in the South Atlantic Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzka, Jürgen; Morschhauser, Achim; Brando Soares, Gabriel; Pinheiro, Katia

    2016-04-01

    The Swarm mission clearly proofs the benefit of coordinated geomagnetic measurements from a well-tailored constellation in order to recover as good as possible the contributions of the various geomagnetic field sources. A similar truth applies to geomagnetic observatories. Their scientific value can be maximised by properly arranging the position of individual observatories with respect to the geometry of the external current systems in the ionosphere and magnetosphere, with respect to regions of particular interest for secular variation, and with respect to regions of anomalous electric conductivity in the ground. Here, we report on our plans and recent efforts to upgrade geomagnetic observatories and to recover unpublished data from geomagnetic observatories at low latitudes in the South Atlantic Anomaly. In particular, we target the magnetic equator with the equatorial electrojet and low latitudes to characterise the Sq- and ring current. The observatory network that we present allows also to study the longitudinal structure of these external current systems. The South Atlantic Anomaly region is very interesting due to its secular variation. We will show newly recovered data and comparisons with existing data sets. On the technical side, we introduce low-power data loggers. In addition, we use mobile phone data transfer, which is rapidly evolving in the region and allows timely data access and quality control at remote sites that previously were not connected to the internet.

  20. Geomagnetic Activity Forecast based on SW-M-I coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatsuma, T.

    2009-12-01

    The geomagnetic activity shows diurnal and semiannual and solar cycle variations. The cause of these variations consists of two effects. One is the periodical change of the solar wind parameters due to a variation of the geometrical condition between the solar wind and the Earth’s magnetosphere. The other is the periodical change of the SW-M-I coupling efficiency caused by the changing of ionospheric conductivity in the polar cap region. Therefore, operational forecasting model of geomagnetic activity should take into account these variations and dependence. We have developed the empirical model for forecasting geomagnetic activity considering the change of the SW-M-I coupling efficiency. This model can reproduce Equinoctial effect and solar cycle dependence of geomagnetic activity. Further, we have found that the efficiency of SW-M-I coupling tend to be low during the low Alfven Mach number period, from the event analysis of Nov. 2003 storm. Also, we have found that the Alfven Mach number dependence exists independently form the solar wind electric field dependence based on the statistical analysis of PCN index. Since the condition of low Alfven Mach number tend to occur within the ICMEs, we are developing the empirical model with considering the Alfven Mach number dependence. We expect this modification will improve the prediction of severe geomagnetic storm. We also try to examine that our model is valid during the period of recent few years of quiet solar activity.

  1. The Geomagnetic Control Concept of The Ionospheric Long- Term Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, A. V.

    The geomagnetic control concept has been developed to explain long-term trends of the electron concentration in the F2 and E ionospheric regions. Periods with negative and positive foF2, hmF2 and foE trends correspond to the periods of increasing or decreasing geomagnetic activity with the turning points around the end of 1950s, 1960s, and 1980s where trends change their signs. Strong latitudinal and diurnal variations revealed for the foF2 and hmF2 trends can be explained by neutral composition, temperature and thermospheric wind changes. Particle precipitation is important in the auroral zone. The newly proposed concept proceeds from a natural origin of the F2-layer trends rather than an artificial one related to the greenhouse effect. Using the proposed method a very long-term foF2 and foE trends related with general increase of geomagnetic activity in the 20th century has been revealed for the first time. The firstly revealed relationship of the foE trends with geomagnetic activity is due to nitric oxide variations at the E-region heights. This "natural" relationship of the foE trends with geomagnetic activity breaks down around 1970 on many stations presumably due to chemical polution of the upper atmosphere. The increasing rate of rocket and satellite launchings in the late 1960s is considered as a reason.

  2. Geomagnetic activity and polar surface air temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppälä, A.; Randall, C. E.; Clilverd, M. A.; Rozanov, E.; Rodger, C. J.

    2009-10-01

    Here we use the ERA-40 and ECMWF operational surface level air temperature data sets from 1957 to 2006 to examine polar temperature variations during years with different levels of geomagnetic activity, as defined by the A p index. Previous modeling work has suggested that NO x produced at high latitudes by energetic particle precipitation can eventually lead to detectable changes in surface air temperatures (SATs). We find that during winter months, polar SATs in years with high A p index are different than in years with low A p index; the differences are statistically significant at the 2-sigma level and range up to about ±4.5 K, depending on location. The temperature differences are larger when years with wintertime Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs) are excluded. We take into account solar irradiance variations, unlike previous analyses of geomagnetic effects in ERA-40 and operational data. Although we cannot conclusively show that the polar SAT patterns are physically linked by geomagnetic activity, we conclude that geomagnetic activity likely plays a role in modulating wintertime surface air temperatures. We tested our SAT results against variation in the Quasi Biennial Oscillation, the El Niño Southern Oscillation and the Southern Annular Mode. The results suggested that these were not driving the observed polar SAT variability. However, significant uncertainty is introduced by the Northern Annular Mode, and we cannot robustly exclude a chance linkage between sea surface temperature variability and geomagnetic activity.

  3. Secular trends in storm-level geomagnetic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis is made of K-index data from groups of ground-based geomagnetic observatories in Germany, Britain, and Australia, 1868.0-2009.0, solar cycles 11-23. Methods include nonparametric measures of trends and statistical significance used by the hydrological and climatological research communities. Among the three observatory groups, German K data systematically record the highest disturbance levels, followed by the British and, then, the Australian data. Signals consistently seen in K data from all three observatory groups can be reasonably interpreted as physically meaninginful: (1) geomagnetic activity has generally increased over the past 141 years. However, the detailed secular evolution of geomagnetic activity is not well characterized by either a linear trend nor, even, a monotonic trend. Therefore, simple, phenomenological extrapolations of past trends in solar and geomagnetic activity levels are unlikely to be useful for making quantitative predictions of future trends lasting longer than a solar cycle or so. (2) The well-known tendency for magnetic storms to occur during the declining phase of a sunspot-solar cycles is clearly seen for cycles 14-23; it is not, however, clearly seen for cycles 11-13. Therefore, in addition to an increase in geomagnetic activity, the nature of solar-terrestrial interaction has also apparently changed over the past 141 years. ?? Author(s) 2011.

  4. Airport geomagnetic surveys in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berarducci, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the United States military have requirements for design, location, and construction of compass calibration pads (compass roses), these having been developed through collaboration with US Geological Survey (USGS) personnel. These requirements are detailed in the FAA Advisory Circular AC 150/5300-13, Appendix 4, and in various military documents, such as Handbook 1021/1, but the major requirement is that the range of declination measured within 75 meters of the center of a compass rose be less than or equal to 30 minutes of arc. The USGS Geomagnetism Group has developed specific methods for conducting a magnetic survey so that existing compass roses can be judged in terms of the needed standards and also that new sites can be evaluated for their suitability as potentially new compass roses. First, a preliminary survey is performed with a total-field magnetometer, with differences over the site area of less than 75nT being sufficient to warrant additional, more detailed surveying. Next, a number of survey points are established over the compass rose area and nearby, where declination is to be measured with an instrument capable of measuring declination to within 1 minute of arc, such as a Gurley transit magnetometer, DI Flux theodolite magnetometer, or Wild T-0. The data are corrected for diurnal and irregular effects of the magnetic field and declination is determined for each survey point, as well as declination range and average of the entire compass rose site. Altogether, a typical survey takes about four days to complete. ?? 2006 Springer.

  5. Dynamical similarity of geomagnetic field reversals.

    PubMed

    Valet, Jean-Pierre; Fournier, Alexandre; Courtillot, Vincent; Herrero-Bervera, Emilio

    2012-10-01

    No consensus has been reached so far on the properties of the geomagnetic field during reversals or on the main features that might reveal its dynamics. A main characteristic of the reversing field is a large decrease in the axial dipole and the dominant role of non-dipole components. Other features strongly depend on whether they are derived from sedimentary or volcanic records. Only thermal remanent magnetization of lava flows can capture faithful records of a rapidly varying non-dipole field, but, because of episodic volcanic activity, sequences of overlying flows yield incomplete records. Here we show that the ten most detailed volcanic records of reversals can be matched in a very satisfactory way, under the assumption of a common duration, revealing common dynamical characteristics. We infer that the reversal process has remained unchanged, with the same time constants and durations, at least since 180 million years ago. We propose that the reversing field is characterized by three successive phases: a precursory event, a 180° polarity switch and a rebound. The first and third phases reflect the emergence of the non-dipole field with large-amplitude secular variation. They are rarely both recorded at the same site owing to the rapidly changing field geometry and last for less than 2,500 years. The actual transit between the two polarities does not last longer than 1,000 years and might therefore result from mechanisms other than those governing normal secular variation. Such changes are too brief to be accurately recorded by most sediments. PMID:23038471

  6. GEANT4 Simulation for the Zenith Angle Dependence of Cosmic Muon Intensities at Two Different Geomagnetic Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Halil; Bektasoglu, Mehmet

    2013-06-01

    The zenith angle dependence of cosmic muon flux at sea level in the western, eastern, southern and northern azimuths have been investigated separately for Calcutta, India and Melbourne, Australia for muon momenta up to 500 GeV/c using Geant4 simulation package. These two locations were selected due to the fact that they significantly differ in geomagnetic cutoff rigidity. The exponent n, which is defined by the relation I(θ) = I(0°)cosnθ, was obtained for each azimuth in Calcutta and Melbourne. By acquiring an agreement between the simulation results and the experimental ones, the simulation study was extended for different azimuth angles and higher muon momenta. It was shown that the angular dependence of the cosmic muon intensity decreases with the increase of muon momentum at both locations. Moreover, the exponent becomes independent of both geomagnetic location and the azimuth angle for muons with momentum above 10 GeV/c, and it is nearly zero above 50 GeV/c. Therefore, it can be concluded that the cosmic muons with momenta between 50 GeV/c and 500 GeV/c reach the sea level almost isotropically.

  7. Predicted CALET Measurements of Ultra-Heavy Cosmic Ray Abundances and Electron and Positron Fluxes Using the Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Brian

    2012-03-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is an imaging calorimeter under construction for launch to the ISS in 2014 for a planned 5 year mission. CALET consists of a charge detection module (CHD) with two segmented planes of 1 cm thick plastic scintillator, an imaging calorimeter (IMC) with a total of 3 radiation lengths (r.l.) of tungsten plates read out with 8 planes of interleaved scintillating fibers, and a total absorption calorimeter (TASC) with 27 r.l. of lead tungstate (PWO) logs. The primary objectives of the experiment are to measure electron energy spectra from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, to detect gamma-rays above 10 GeV, and to measure the energy spectra of nuclei from protons through iron up to 1,000 TeV. In this paper we discuss the capability of CALET to make additional measurements by exploiting the geomagnetic field it will be exposed to in the ISS 51.6^o inclination orbit. The rare nuclei heavier than nickel (Z=28) can be resolved using the CHD and top IMC layers without requiring particle energy determination in the TASC in field regions where the rigidity cutoffs are above minimum ionization in the scintillator. CALET can also measure the distinct fluxes of cosmic ray positrons and electrons using the earth shadow of the geomagnetic field.

  8. The calculation of corrected geomagnetic coordinates in the high latitude region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alperovich, Leonid; Levitin, Anatoly; Gromova, Lyudmila; Dremukhina, Lyudmila

    Because the real geomagnetic field in Space, especially during geomagnetic perturbations has very complex spatial distribution, we had to use adjusted geomagnetic coordinates. The calculation of these coordinates is connected with the correct calculation of field lines inclusive the internal IGRF (International Geomagnetic Reference Field) and external geomagnetic field. Tables of such coordinates are somewhat incorrect as they do not account for the coordinates' dependency on geomagnetic activity dynamics. We demonstrate how the coordinates vary with geomagnetic activity in high latitude regions. The calculations revealed that during magnetic storms in a major part of the near pole area the field lines are disclosed and for points of this area on the earth's surface the corrected geomagnetic coordinates cannot be calculated.

  9. Solar coronal holes as sources of recurrent geomagnetic disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neupert, W. M.; Pizzo, V.

    1974-01-01

    Observations of the solar corona by Oso 7 have been used in a superposed epoch analysis to study the relationships between classes of coronal features and geomagnetic activity. Both bright coronal regions and regions of less than average brightness were investigated. It was found that for the period from January 1972 through January 1973, a significant enhancement in geomagnetic activity occurred 2-3 days after central meridian passage of large coronal holes that extended to within 5 deg of the solar subearth point when they were on the meridian. Large coronal holes appear to satisfy the requirements for 'M regions' which were hypothesized to be responsible for recurrent geomagnetic disturbances (Bartels, 1934). If solar wind high-speed streams originate preferentially in these regions, their velocity at the base of the corona will be substantially higher than that expected from an axisymmetric solar wind model.

  10. Geomagnetic observations on tristan da cunha, south atlantic ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matzka, J.; Olsen, N.; Maule, C.F.; Pedersen, L.W.; Berarducci, A.M.; Macmillan, S.

    2009-01-01

    Few geomagnetic ground observations exist of the Earth's strongest core field anomaly, the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). The geomagnetic repeat station on the island Tristan da Cunha, located half-way between South Africa and South America at 37?? 05' S, 12?? 18' W, is therefore of crucial importance. We have conducted several sets of repeat station measurements during magnetically quiet conditions (Kp 2o or less) in 2004. The procedures are described and the results are compared to those from earlier campaigns and to the predictions of various global field models. Features of the local crustal bias field and the solar quiet daily variation are discussed. We also evaluate the benefit of continuous magnetic field recordings from Tristan da Cunha, and argue that such a data set is a very valuable addition to geomagnetic satellite data. Recently, funds were set up to establish and operate a magnetometer station on Tristan da Cunha during the Swarm magnetic satellite mission (2011-2014).

  11. Forecasting Geomagnetic Conditions in near-Earth space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abunina, M.; Papaioannou, A.; Gerontidou, M.; Paschalis, P.; Abunin, A.; Gaidash, S.; Tsepakina, I.; Malimbayev, A.; Belov, A.; Mavromichalaki, H.; Kryakunova, O.; Velinov, P.

    2013-02-01

    Geomagnetic conditions in near-Earth space have been a constantly evolving scientific field, especially during the latest years when the dependence of our everyday life on space environment has significantly increased. The scientific community managed to implement centers for the continuous monitoring of the geomagnetic conditions which resulted into short and long term forecasting of the planetary geomagnetic index Ap. In this work, the centers that have been established and are in operational mode in Russia (IZMIRAN), Greece (Athens), Kazakhstan (Almaty) and Bulgaria (Sofia) are presented. The methods that have been used for the forecasting of Ap index are demonstrated and the forecasted results in comparison to the actual Ap measurements are also discussed.

  12. Regional Geomagnetic Field Model for Croatia at 2009.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujić, Eugen; Brkić, Mario; Kovács, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Geomagnetic data of north, east, and vertical components at Croatian repeat stations and ground survey sites, as well as European geomagnetic observatories and repeat stations, were used to obtain a regional geomagnetic model over Croatia at 2009.5 epoch. Different models were derived, depending on input data, and three modelling techniques were used: Taylor Polynomial, Adjusted Spherical Harmonic Analysis, and Spherical Harmonic Analysis. It was derived that the most accurate model over Croatia was the one when only Croatian data were used, and by using the Adjusted Spherical Harmonic Analysis. Based on Croatian repeat stations' data in the interval 2007.5-2010.5, and a global Enhanced Magnetic Model, it was possible to estimate the crustal field at those sites. It was also done by taking into account the empirical adjustment for long-term external field variations. The higher crustal field values were found at those stations which are on or close to the Adriatic anomaly.

  13. Role of centennial geomagnetic changes in local atmospheric ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usoskin, I. G.; Korte, M.; Kovaltsov, G. A.

    2008-03-01

    Many studies of solar-terrestrial relation are based on globally (or hemispherically) averaged quantities, including the average cosmic ray flux. However, regional effects of cosmic ray induced ionization due to geomagnetic changes may be comparable to or even dominate over the solar signal at mid-latitudes on centennial-to-millennial time scales. We show that local changes of the tropospheric ionization due to fast migration of the geomagnetic axis are crucial on centennial time scale, and the use of global averages may smear an important effect. We conclude that changes of the regional tropospheric ionization at mid-latitudes are defined by both geomagnetic changes and solar activity, and none of the two processes can be neglected. This substantiates a necessity for a careful analysis of the regional, not global, indices at mid-latitudes and offers a new possibility to disentangle direct (solar radiation) and indirect (via cosmic rays) effects in the solar-terrestrial relations.

  14. Electron Radiation Belt Dropouts in the Absence of Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, S.; Henderson, M. G.; Steinberg, J. T.; Turner, D. L.; Li, W.

    2015-12-01

    Most observational studies of electron radiation belt dropouts have presented losses occurring during geomagnetic storms. Some statistical analyses of flux dropouts have included non-storm time events, but examples of non-storm time dropouts are still rarities in the literature. A small, but growing, body of work has led to the current understanding that radiation belt dynamics are not always coupled with geomagnetic storms, and that a number of key features are associated with dropouts: solar wind dynamic pressure tends to be high; the interplanetary magnetic field tends to be southward. We present three case studies of dropouts that occurred under quiet geomagnetic conditions and examine the dynamics of the electron phase spece density, and flux, over a wide range of L using Van Allen Probes and other satellites. The solar wind driving each dropout is shown to have a different categorization, and we investigate the role of substorms in non-storm time radiation belt dynamics.

  15. Report of geomagnetic pulsation indices for space weather applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, Z.; Gannon, Jennifer L.; Rigler, Erin J.

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon of ultra-low frequency geomagnetic pulsations was first observed in the ground-based measurements of the 1859 Carrington Event and has been studied for over 100 years. Pulsation frequency is considered to be “ultra” low when it is lower than the natural frequencies of the plasma, such as the ion gyrofrequency. Ultra-low frequency pulsations are considered a source of noise in some geophysical analysis techniques, such as aeromagnetic surveys and transient electromagnetics, so it is critical to develop near real-time space weather products to monitor these geomagnetic pulsations. The proper spectral analysis of magnetometer data, such as using wavelet analysis techniques, can also be important to Geomagnetically Induced Current risk assessment.

  16. Extreme geomagnetic disturbances due to shocks within CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugaz, N.; Farrugia, C. J.; Huang, C.-L.; Spence, H. E.

    2015-06-01

    We report on features of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling elicited by shocks propagating through coronal mass ejections (CMEs) by analyzing the intense geomagnetic storm of 6 August 1998. During this event, the dynamic pressure enhancement at the shock combined with a simultaneous increase in the southward component of the magnetic field resulted in a large earthward retreat of Earth's magnetopause, which remained close to geosynchronous orbit for more than 4 h. This occurred despite the fact that both shock and CME were weak and relatively slow. Another similar example of a weak shock inside a slow CME resulting in an intense geomagnetic storm is the 30 September 2012 event, which strongly depleted the outer radiation belt. We discuss the potential of shocks inside CMEs to cause large geomagnetic effects at Earth, including magnetopause shadowing.

  17. Rigid polyurethane and kenaf core composite foams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rigid polyurethane foams are valuable in many construction applications. Kenaf is a bast fiber plant where the surface stem skin provides bast fibers whose strength-to-weight ratio competes with glass fiber. The higher volume product of the kenaf core is an under-investigated area in composite appli...

  18. Rigid body dynamics on the Poisson torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Peter H.

    2008-11-01

    The theory of rigid body motion with emphasis on the modifications introduced by a Cardan suspension is outlined. The configuration space is no longer SO(3) but a 3-torus; the equivalent of the Poisson sphere, after separation of an angular variable, is a Poisson torus. Iso-energy surfaces and their bifurcations are discussed. A universal Poincaré section method is proposed.

  19. Anaesthetic implications of rigid spine syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, B G; Laub, M; Knudsen, R H

    1999-01-01

    The perioperative management of a 14-year-old girl, suffering from the muscular disorder rigid spine syndrome, is presented. The anaesthetic implications with regard to possible difficult intubation, cardiac involvement, malignant hyperthermia, neuromuscular blocking agents, and postoperative recovery are discussed. PMID:10411775

  20. Phosphorescence and Energy Transfer in Rigid Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enciso, E.; Cabello, A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an experiment which illustrates the general aspects of intermolecular energy transfer between triplet states in rigid solutions of organic compounds solved in an ethanol-ether mixture. Measurements of quenching and energy transfer processes are made using the chemicals of benzophenone and naphthalene. (CS)

  1. Bending rigidity of composite resin coating clasps.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, K; Kibi, M; Ono, T; Nokubi, T

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the bending profiles of composite resin coating cast clasps. The cobalt-chromium alloy cast clasps were made using tapered wax pattern. Silane coupling method (Silicoater MD, Kulzer Co.) was used to attach composite resin to metal surface. The breakage and the bending rigidity of composite resin coating clasps were evaluated. Results were as follows: 1) After the repeated bending test to the tips of clasp arm at 10,000 times in 0.25 mm deflection, neither crack on composite resin surface nor separation at resin/metal interface was observed in any specimen. 2) There was no significant difference in the bending rigidity of clasp arms between before and after composite resin coating. From these results, it was demonstrated that the composite resin coating cast clasp was available in clinical cases and coating with composite resin had little influence on the bending rigidity of clasp arms. Therefore, it was suggested that our clasp designing and fabricating system to control the bending rigidity of clasp arms could be applied to composite resin coating clasps. PMID:8935086

  2. An experimental study of the biological effects of geomagnetic disturbances: The impact of a typical geomagnetic storm and its constituents on plants and animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylov, Viacheslav V.; Zotov, Oleg D.; Klain, Boris I.; Ushakova, Natalia V.; Kantserova, Nadezhda P.; Znobisheva, Anna V.; Izyumov, Yuri G.; Kuz'mina, Victoria V.; Morozov, Alexey A.; Lysenko, Liudmila A.; Nemova, Nina N.; Osipova, Elena A.

    2014-04-01

    Naturally occurring geomagnetic storms have been shown to correlate with changes in organisms' biological processes. Changes in the geomagnetic field during a geomagnetic storm are complex and contain both slow changes of the geomagnetic field with frequencies of up to 0.001 Hz, and various geomagnetic pulsations observed in general to be within the range of 0.001-5 Hz. Little is known about what frequency constituent of geomagnetic storms has the strongest effect on living organisms. This paper uses an experimental approach to demonstrate that organisms from different taxa principally respond to slow changes of the geomagnetic field corresponding with the main phase and the initial period of the recovery phase of a geomagnetic storm. Pc1 type pulsations, which are commonly regarded as biologically effective elements of geomagnetic disturbances, did not affect controlled parameters in our experiments. This paper may serve as a starting point for a thorough inquiry into the influence of slow fluctuations of the geomagnetic field on organisms.

  3. Rigid spinal muscular dystrophy and rigid spine syndrome: report of 7 children.

    PubMed

    Koul, Roshan; Al-Yarubi, Saif; Al-Kindy, Hussein; Al-Futaisi, Amna; Al-Thihli, Khalid; Chacko, Poovathoor Alexander; Sankhla, Dilip

    2014-11-01

    Seven children (5 male, 2 female) were seen over the last 16 years with rigid spine syndrome. Six children had rigid spinal muscular dystrophy (selenoprotein N1-related myopathy [SEPN1RM]) and 1 had myopathy associated with rigid spine. The main presenting complaint in all was difficulty in bending the spine. The diagnosis was made on clinical features and imaging of the paraspinal muscles. Muscle histopathology revealed minimal myopathic changes to severe muscle degeneration. Genetic testing, which was only available for the last case, for selenoprotein was negative.

  4. Geomagnetic, cosmogenic and climatic changes across the last geomagnetic reversal from Equatorial Indian Ocean sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, Jean-Pierre; Bassinot, Franck; Bouilloux, Alexandra; Bourlès, Didier; Nomade, Sébastien; Guillou, Valéry; Lopes, Fernand; Thouveny, Nicolas; Dewilde, Fabien

    2014-07-01

    distribution of tektite abundance was used to deconvolve the 10Be/9Be signal. The results confirm that the beryllium changes are concentrated during the transitional period, thus likely in presence of a multipolar geomagnetic field (or in the vicinity of a geomagnetic pole) that favored the penetration of cosmic rays and consequently increased the 10Be production. The absence of 10Be during the precursor indicates that the present site and the Indonesian ones were far away from a geomagnetic pole and that interlatitudinal atmospheric mixing was limited. The geomagnetic pole positions above the Indonesian sites during the precursor would thus be incompatible with the corresponding inclined dipolar field during this period, and suggest the dominance of low-degree harmonics.

  5. [Parkinsonian rigidity: clinical and physiopathologic aspects].

    PubMed

    Delwaide, P J; Pepin, J L; Maertens de Noordhout, A

    1990-01-01

    Neurophysiologic mechanisms responsible for parkinsonian rigidity are poorly understood. In any case, they have to fit all the clinical data which are first reviewed before discussing 2 theories which are proposed to interpret rigidity. The first theory postulates that increased resistance to mobilization is due to hyperactivity in a long loop reflex pathway which originates at the neuromuscular spindles and relays in the motor cortex. This theory is based on the largely accepted finding that, in parkinsonian patients, M2 response is increased when a voluntary movement is abruptly stopped. Although popular this hypothesis is far from explaining all the clinical facts, namely that rigidity is equal in extensor and flexor, proximal and distal muscles. Based on a reflex set by primary afferent discharges, it is incompatible with the lack of rigidity reinforcement after faster passive mobilization. The second theory rests on data obtained from electrophysiological studies of some spinal interneurones. Both IA and IB inhibitory interneurones are functionally modified but not in the same direction. While the IA inhibitory interneurone is facilitated, the IB inhibitory interneurone is less active. Disappearance of autogenic inhibition can explain rigidity at rest and the tonic stretch reflex. In addition, interneurones intervening in the flexor reflex disclose a modified excitability. It is possible to interpret these facts by postulating an abnormal influence transmitted through descending reticulospinal pathways. This abnormal influence would result from modified activation of reticular nuclei by afferents projecting from the basal ganglia. Such a hypothesis is open to experimental testing through the startle reaction. The latter facilitates the H reflex by the reticulospinal pathways, the influence of cortex--if any--being negligible.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. 77 FR 22312 - Geomagnetic Disturbances to the Bulk-Power System; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Geomagnetic Disturbances to the Bulk-Power System; Notice of Technical... Conference on Geomagnetic Disturbances to the Bulk-Power System on Monday, April 30, 2012, from 11 a.m. to 4... issues related to reliability of the Bulk-Power System as affected by geomagnetic disturbances....

  7. Testing for Links Between Geomagnetic Field Variability and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetter, L.; Acton, G.; Hill, T.

    2006-12-01

    Although orbital forcing controls much of long-term climate change and increases in greenhouse gases are thought to be driving recent global warming, other factors may also play a significant role. Recent studies have hypothesized various forms of links between climate change and solar irradiance, solar activity, and cosmic ray flux. Because changes in geomagnetic field strength affect the cosmic ray flux, it is possible that changes in the geomagnetic field contribute to long- and short-term climate change. Alternatively, it has been hypothesized that geomagnetic field variability is influenced by climate change or solar activity. We test such claims through a paleomagnetic and stable isotope study of Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) sediment cores from the Blake Outer Ridge (BOR), western North Atlantic Ocean. The goal of the study is to create a continuous, high-resolution record of geomagnetic field variability with an accurate, astronomically tuned chronology. Sediment cored on the BOR in four holes at Site 1061 during ODP Leg 172 is being used for this investigation. The high sedimentation rate, averaging 22 cm/k.y. over the Brunhes, and the exceptional paleomagnetic properties of the area make Site 1061 an excellent candidate to test for links between short- term geomagnetic events and climate. The paleomagnetic record, originally constructed mainly from continuous split-core measurements, is being refined and rock magnetic analyses are being conducted on U- channel samples that span the Brunhes. We have also refined the between-hole correlation and constructed a more detailed composite stratigraphic section for Site 1061 in order to improve the continuity and relative chronology of the record and to confirm the existence of distinct geomagnetic excursions and other short-term events in multiple drill holes. Additionally, planktonic forams are being measured for δ18 O variations across, and extending to one meter beyond each observed excursion, allowing for

  8. IMF sector behavior estimated from geomagnetic data at South Pole

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, S.; Xu, W.h.

    1981-05-01

    IMF sector behavior which has previously been estimated from the geomagnetic data at Godhavn is confirmed by study of the data at South Pole for 1959--1970 with the same estimation technique, taking the difference between northern and southern hemispheres into consideration. A method to improve (about 18%) the agreement between assigned and actual sector structures by study of the data at the two stations is suggested. Geomagnetic disturbance effects on sector estimation are discussed, and reversed sector effects in winter are given special emphasis.

  9. Very large geomagnetic disturbance during sunspot cycle 21: A prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, H. H., III

    1979-01-01

    Evidence is presented which suggests that very large geomagnetic disturbances (350 gammas or greater at an invariant magnetic latitude of 50 degrees) occur once or twice per sunspot cycle, on the average. There is also some tendency for these disturbances to group in large odd numbered sunspot cycles similar to the current cycle, cycle 21. No such disturbance was noted during the past cycle although a series of major solar flares was observed in August 1972. At least one very large geomagnetic disturbance is expected during the current cycle; a prediction with perhaps serious consequences for electric power companies.

  10. GEOMAGNETIC REVERSALS DRIVEN BY ABRUPT SEA LEVEL CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, R.A.; Morris, D.E.

    1986-10-01

    Changes in the moment of inertia of the earth, brought about by the redistribution of ocean water from the tropics to ice at high latitudes, couple energy from the spin of the earth into convection in the liquid core. This mechanism may help provide the driving energy for the earth's dynamo. Sufficiently rapid ocean level changes can disrupt the dynamo, resulting (in half of the cases) in a geomagnetic field reversal. The model can account for the previously mysterious correlation reported between geomagnetic reversals and mass extinctions.

  11. The Lewis Research Center geomagnetic substorm simulation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkopec, F. D.; Stevens, N. J.; Sturman, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A simulation facility was established to determine the response of typical spacecraft materials to the geomagnetic substorm environment and to evaluate instrumentation that will be used to monitor spacecraft system response to this environment. Space environment conditions simulated include the thermal-vacuum conditions of space, solar simulation, geomagnetic substorm electron fluxes and energies, and the low energy plasma environment. Measurements for spacecraft material tests include sample currents, sample surface potentials, and the cumulative number of discharges. Discharge transients are measured by means of current probes and oscilloscopes and are verified by a photomultiplier. Details of this facility and typical operating procedures are presented.

  12. Rigid Body Modes Influence On Microvibration Analysis-Application To Swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laduree, G.; Fransen, S.; Baldesi, G.; Pflieger, I.

    2012-07-01

    Microvibrations are defined as low level mechanical disturbances affecting payload performance, generated by mobile parts or mechanism operating on-board the spacecraft, like momentum or reaction wheels, pointing mechanism, cryo-coolers or thrusters. The disturbances caused by these sources are transmitted through the spacecraft structure and excite modes of that structure or elements of the payload impacting its performance (e.g. Line of sight rotations inducing some image quality degradation). The dynamic interaction between these three elements (noise source, spacecraft structure and sensitive receiver) makes the microvibration prediction a delicate problem. Microvibration sources are generally of concern in the frequency range from a few Hz to 1000 Hz. However, in some specific cases, high stability at lower frequencies might be requested. This is the case of the SWARM mission, whose objectives are to provide the best ever survey of the geomagnetic field and its temporal evolution as well as supplementary information for studying the interaction of the magnetic field with other physical quantities describing the Earth system (e.g. ocean circulation). Among its instruments, SWARM is embarking a very sensitive 6-axis accelerometer in the low frequency range (10-8 m/s2 or rad/s2 between 10-4 and 0.1 Hz) located at its Centre of Gravity and an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer located at the tip of a boom far from the spacecraft body. The ASM performs its measurements by rotating an alternative magnetic field around its main axis thanks to a piezo-electric motor. This repeated disturbance might generate some pollution of the accelerometer science data. The objective of this work is to focus on the interaction of the rigid body mode calculation method with the elastic contribution of the normal modes excited by the noise source frequency content. It has indeed been reported in the past that NASTRAN Lanczos rigid body modes may lead to inaccurate rigid-body accelerations

  13. Sediments fail to record geomagnetic transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, Jean-Pierre; Meynadier, Laure; Bassinot, Franck; Simon, Quentin; Thouveny, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    consequence the VGPs follow a simple longitudinal trajectory like expected for a rotation of the dipole. This unrealistic scenario likely results from heavy post-depositional processes that integrated various amounts of pre- and post-transitional magnetic directions within each sample. These results confirm that sediments are mostly inappropriate to extract suitable information about geomagnetic reversals.

  14. Rigid Cluster Decomposition Reveals Criticality in Frictional Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkes, Silke; Quint, David A.; Fily, Yaouen; Schwarz, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    We study the nature of the frictional jamming transition within the framework of rigidity percolation theory. Slowly sheared frictional packings are decomposed into rigid clusters and floppy regions with a generalization of the pebble game including frictional contacts. Our method suggests a second-order transition controlled by the emergence of a system-spanning rigid cluster accompanied by a critical cluster size distribution. Rigid clusters also correlate with common measures of rigidity. We contrast this result with frictionless jamming, where the rigid cluster size distribution is noncritical.

  15. Rigid Cluster Decomposition Reveals Criticality in Frictional Jamming.

    PubMed

    Henkes, Silke; Quint, David A; Fily, Yaouen; Schwarz, J M

    2016-01-15

    We study the nature of the frictional jamming transition within the framework of rigidity percolation theory. Slowly sheared frictional packings are decomposed into rigid clusters and floppy regions with a generalization of the pebble game including frictional contacts. Our method suggests a second-order transition controlled by the emergence of a system-spanning rigid cluster accompanied by a critical cluster size distribution. Rigid clusters also correlate with common measures of rigidity. We contrast this result with frictionless jamming, where the rigid cluster size distribution is noncritical. PMID:26824572

  16. Quasiclassical trajectory studies of rigid rotor--rigid surface scattering. II. Corrugated surface

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.C.; Bowman, J.M.

    1984-03-01

    The quasiclassical trajectory method, previously applied to rigid rotor--rigid flat surface scattering (J. M. Bowman and S. C. Park, J. Chem. Phys. 77, 5441 (1982)) is applied to a rigid rotor--rigid corrugated surface, i.e., a N/sub 2/--LiF(001), system. The mechanisms for rotational excitation at low and high collision energies are studied as well as their dependence on initial beam orientation and corrugation strength. A significant correlation between long-lived trajectories and high rotational excitation is found for low energy collisions and rotational rainbows are clearly observed in the high energy regime, although these features are broadened relative to the flat surface reported previously.

  17. A method of predictions geomagnetic activity based on a coronal model of relations between solar and geomagnetic activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halenka, J.

    1979-01-01

    A method developed to predict both disturbed and quiet geomagnetic periods is described. The method uses solar situations along the CM with the key role of filaments, giving indirect evidence of types of directly unobservable coronal structures above them. The time lag, not to be interpreted in terms of propagation speed, between the CM activity and the commencement of the geomagnetic response is about one to two days. Solar phenomena serve as indicators within approximately 10 deg of the CM and up to the zone of high latitude filaments.

  18. Origin of rigidity in athermal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sumantra

    Solids are distinguished from fluids by their ability to resist shear. In traditional solids, the resistance to shear is associated with the emergence of broken translational symmetry as exhibited by a non-uniform density pattern, which results from either minimizing the energy cost or maximizing the entropy or both. In this thesis, we focus on a special class of materials where this paradigm is challenged. We argue that the observation of rigidity in dry granular materials, a representative system, is a collective process controlled solely by few constraints, e.g., the boundary stresses, the constraint of force and torque balance, and the positivity of contact forces. We have shown that these constraints lead to a broken translational symmetry in a dual space of heights (loop forces) which leads to the observed rigidity (jamming) in such a system. We investigate the structure and behavior of the dual space through a geometrical construction as the system evolves towards the rigidity transition, commonly known as jamming. In that context, we explore the role of friction in jamming and establish the equivalence of real space and stress space description. We conclude that the role of real space geometry is negligible, and a stress only description is sufficient to understand the phenomenology of jamming. In the second half of the thesis, we develop a phenomenological model of the shear induced rigidity in athermal materials. Recent studies of athermal systems such as dry grains and dense, non-Brownian suspensions have shown that shear can lead to solidification through the process of shear jamming in grains and discontinuous shear thickening in suspensions. The similarities observed between these two distinct phenomena suggest that the physical processes leading to shear-induced rigidity in athermal materials are universal. We present a non-equilibrium statistical mechanics model, which exhibits the phenomenology of these shear-driven transitions: shear jamming and

  19. New insights on geomagnetic storms from observations and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jordanova, Vania K

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the response at Earth of the Sun's varying energy output and forecasting geomagnetic activity is of central interest to space science, since intense geomagnetic storms may cause severe damages on technological systems and affect communications. Episodes of southward (Bzgeomagnetic conditions are associated either with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and possess long and continuous negative IMF Bz excursions, or with high speed solar wind streams (HSS) whose geoeffectiveness is due to IMF Bz profiles fluctuating about zero with various amplitudes and duration. We show examples of ring current simulations during two geomagnetic storms representative of each interplanetary condition with our kinetic ring current atmosphere interactions model (RAM), and investigate the mechanisms responsible for trapping particles and for causing their loss. We find that periods of increased magnetospheric convection coinciding with enhancements of plasma sheet density are needed for strong ring current buildup. During the HSS-driven storm the convection potential is highly variable and causes small sporadic injections into the ring current. The long period of enhanced convection during the CME-driven storm causes a continuous ring current injection penetrating to lower L shells and stronger ring current buildup.

  20. The risk characteristics of solar and geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolska, Katerina

    2016-04-01

    The main aim of this contribution is a deeper analysis of the influence of solar activity which is expected to have an impact on human health, and therefore on mortality, in particular civilization and degenerative diseases. We have constructed the characteristics that represent the risk of solar and geomagnetic activity on human health on the basis of our previous analysis of association between the daily numbers of death on diseases of the nervous system and diseases of the circulatory system and solar and geomagnetic activity in the Czech Republic during the years 1994 - 2013. We used long period daily time series of numbers of deaths by cause, long period time series of solar activity indices (namely R and F10.7), geomagnetic indicies (Kp planetary index, Dst) and ionospheric parameters (foF2 and TEC). The ionospheric parameters were related to the geographic location of the Czech Republic and adjusted for middle geographic latitudes. The risk characteristics were composed by cluster analysis in time series according to the phases of the solar cycle resp. the seasonal insolation at mid-latitudes or the daily period according to the impact of solar and geomagnetic activity on mortality by cause of death from medical cause groups of death VI. Diseases of the nervous system and IX. Diseases of the circulatory system mortality by 10th Revision of International Classification of Diseases WHO (ICD-10).

  1. An empirical model of the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yamazaki, Y.; Yumoto, K.; Cardinal, M.G.; Fraser, B.J.; Hattori, P.; Kakinami, Y.; Liu, J.Y.; Lynn, K.J.W.; Marshall, R.; McNamara, D.; Nagatsuma, T.; Nikiforov, V.M.; Otadoy, R.E.; Ruhimat, M.; Shevtsov, B.M.; Shiokawa, K.; Abe, S.; Uozumi, T.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2011-01-01

    An empirical model of the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation has been constructed based on geomagnetic data obtained from 21 stations along the 210 Magnetic Meridian of the Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network (CPMN) from 1996 to 2007. Using the least squares fitting method for geomagnetically quiet days (Kp ??? 2+), the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation at each station was described as a function of solar activity SA, day of year DOY, lunar age LA, and local time LT. After interpolation in latitude, the model can describe solar-activity dependence and seasonal dependence of solar quiet daily variations (S) and lunar quiet daily variations (L). We performed a spherical harmonic analysis (SHA) on these S and L variations to examine average characteristics of the equivalent external current systems. We found three particularly noteworthy results. First, the total current intensity of the S current system is largely controlled by solar activity while its focus position is not significantly affected by solar activity. Second, we found that seasonal variations of the S current intensity exhibit north-south asymmetry; the current intensity of the northern vortex shows a prominent annual variation while the southern vortex shows a clear semi-annual variation as well as annual variation. Thirdly, we found that the total intensity of the L current system changes depending on solar activity and season; seasonal variations of the L current intensity show an enhancement during the December solstice, independent of the level of solar activity. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Particle acceleration from reconnection in the geomagnetic tail

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J.; Borovsky, J.E.; Thomsen, M.F.; McComas, D.J.; Reeves, G.D.; Belian, R.D.; Hesse, M.; Schindler, K.

    1997-08-01

    Acceleration of charged particles in the near geomagnetic tail, associated with a dynamic magnetic reconnection process, was investigated by a combined effort of data analysis, using Los Alamos data from geosynchronous orbit, MHD modeling of the dynamic evolution of the magnetotail, and test particle tracing in the electric and magnetic fields obtained from the MHD simulation.

  3. First results from the first Croatian geomagnetic observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandic, Igor; Herak, Davorka; Heilig, Balazs

    2013-04-01

    The first Croatian geomagnetic observatory was established in the area of the Nature Park Lonjsko Polje, after a century of sporadic efforts originating from the proposals of Andrija Mohorovicic. The location was chosen after exhaustive surveys of possible sites. It is located far enough from sources of civilization noise, and was found to be an area without magnetic anomalies and with a low field gradient. The construction of the observatory buildings was completed in the autumn of 2011. The furnishing and installation of instruments and test measurements were completed by the beginning of summer 2012, ever since we have continuous recordings of the geomagnetic elements. In the beginning of December 2012 the fluxgate magnetometer LEMI-035 (H,D,Z orientation) has been installed under the framework of the PLASMON project in cooperation with the Tihany Observatory (Hungary). Permanent data of high quality from our observatory will contribute to the monitoring of the Earth's magnetic field on the regional and global levels, thus enabling further development of geomagnetism in Croatia through collaboration with scientists from the other countries, participation in the international projects, eventual membership in the International Real-time Magnetic Observatory Network (INTERMAGNET), etc. The field elements for the epoch 2012,75 and the baselines are presented together with highlights of some recorded geomagnetic events so far. Furthermore, the comparison between the variation data recorded by the dIdD and the fluxgate LEMI-035 magnetometer is presented.

  4. Surface electric fields for North America during historical geomagnetic storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wei, Lisa H.; Homeier, Nichole; Gannon, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the impact of geomagnetic disturbances on the electric grid, we recreate surface electric fields from two historical geomagnetic storms—the 1989 “Quebec” storm and the 2003 “Halloween” storms. Using the Spherical Elementary Current Systems method, we interpolate sparsely distributed magnetometer data across North America. We find good agreement between the measured and interpolated data, with larger RMS deviations at higher latitudes corresponding to larger magnetic field variations. The interpolated magnetic field data are combined with surface impedances for 25 unique physiographic regions from the United States Geological Survey and literature to estimate the horizontal, orthogonal surface electric fields in 1 min time steps. The induced horizontal electric field strongly depends on the local surface impedance, resulting in surprisingly strong electric field amplitudes along the Atlantic and Gulf Coast. The relative peak electric field amplitude of each physiographic region, normalized to the value in the Interior Plains region, varies by a factor of 2 for different input magnetic field time series. The order of peak electric field amplitudes (largest to smallest), however, does not depend much on the input. These results suggest that regions at lower magnetic latitudes with high ground resistivities are also at risk from the effect of geomagnetically induced currents. The historical electric field time series are useful for estimating the flow of the induced currents through long transmission lines to study power flow and grid stability during geomagnetic disturbances.

  5. Investigating dynamical complexity of geomagnetic jerks using various entropy measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasis, Georgios; Potirakis, Stelios; Mandea, Mioara

    2016-06-01

    Recently, many novel concepts originated in dynamical systems or information theory have been developed, partly motivated by specific research questions linked to geosciences, and found a variety of different applications. This continuously extending toolbox of nonlinear time series analysis highlights the importance of the dynamical complexity to understand the behavior of the complex Earth's system and its components. Here, we propose to apply such new approaches, mainly a series of entropy methods to the time series of the geomagnetic field. Two datasets provided by Chambon la Foret (France) and Niemegk (Germany) observatories are considered for analysis to detect dynamical complexity changes associated with geomagnetic jerks, the abrupt changes in the second temporal derivative of the Earth's magnetic field. The results clearly demonstrate the ability of Shannon and Tsallis entropies as well as Fisher information to detect events in a regional manner having identified complexities lower than the background in time intervals when geomagnetic jerks have already been reported in the literature. Additionally, these information measures are directly applicable to the original data without having to derive the secular variation or acceleration from the observatory monthly means. The strength of the proposed analysis to reveal dynamical complexity features associated with geomagnetic jerks can be utilized for analyzing not only ground measurements, but also satellite data, as those provided by the current magnetic field mission of Swarm.

  6. (abstract) A Geomagnetic Contribution to Climate Change in this Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, J.; Ruzmaikin, A.; Lawrence, J.

    1996-01-01

    There is a myth that all solar effects can be parameterized by the sun spot number. This is not true. For example, the level of geomagnetic activity during this century was not proportional to the sunspot number. Instead there is a large systematic increase in geomagnetic activity, not reflected in the sunspot number. This increase occurred gradually over at least 60 years. The 11 year solar cycle variation was superimposed on this systematic increase. Here we show that this systematic increase in activity is well correlated to the simultaneous increase in terrestrial temperature that occurred during the first half of this century. We discuss these findings in terms of mechanisms by which geomagnetics can be coupled to climate. These mechanisms include possible changes in weather patterns and cloud cover due to increased cosmic ray fluxes, or to increased fluxes of high energy electrons. We suggest that this systematic increase in geomagnetic activity contributed (along with anthropogenic effects and possible changes in solar irradiance) to the changes in climate recorded during this period.

  7. The Use of Dispersion Relations For The Geomagnetic Transfer Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcuello, A.; Queralt, P.; Ledo, J. J.

    The magnetotelluric responses are complex magnitudes, where real and imaginary parts contain the same information on the geoelectrical structure. It seems possible, from very general hypotheses on the geoelectrical models (causality, stability and passivity), to apply the Kramers-Krönig dispersion relations to the magnetotelluric responses (impedance, geomagnetic transfer functions,...). In particular, the applica- bility of these relations to the impedance is a current point of discussion, but there are not many examples of their application to the geomagnetic transfer functions (tipper). The aim of this paper is to study how the relations of dispersion are applied to the real and imaginary part of the geomagnetic transfer functions, and to check its validity. For this reason, we have considered data (or responses) from two- and three-dimensional structures, and for these data, we have taken two situations: 1.- Responses that have been synthetically generated from numerical modelling, that allows us to control the quality of the data. 2.- Responses obtained from fieldwork, that are affected by exper- imental error. Additionally, we have also explored the use of these relations to extrap- olate the geomagnetic transfer functions outside the interval of measured frequencies, in order to obtain constrains on the values of these extrapolated data. The results have shown that the dispersion relations are accomplished for the geomag- netic transfer functions, and they can offer information about how these responses are behaved outside (but near) the range of measured frequencies.

  8. Permutation Entropy Analysis of Geomagnetic Indices Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Michelis, Paola; Consolini, Giuseppe

    2013-04-01

    The Earth's magnetospheric dynamics displays a very complex nature in response to solar wind changes as widely documented in the scientific literature. This complex dynamics manifests in various physical processes occurring in different regions of the Earth's magnetosphere as clearly revealed by previous analyses on geomagnetic indices (AE-indices, Dst, Sym-H, ....., etc.). One of the most interesting features of the geomagnetic indices as proxies of the Earth's magnetospheric dynamics is the multifractional nature of the time series of such indices. This aspect has been interpreted as the occurrence of intermittence and dynamical phase transition in the Earth's magnetosphere. Here, we investigate the Markovian nature of different geomagnetic indices (AE-indices, Sym-H, Asy-H) and their fluctuations by means of Permutation Entropy Analysis. The results clearly show the non-Markovian and different nature of the distinct sets of geomagnetic indices, pointing towards diverse underlying physical processes. A discussion in connection with the nature of the physical processes responsible of each set of indices and their multifractional character is attempted.

  9. Solar Activity, Different Geomagnetic Activity Levels and Acute Myocardial Infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, Svetla; Jordanova, Malina; Stoilova, Irina; Taseva, Tatiana; Maslarov, Dimitar

    Results on revealing a possible relationship between solar activity (SA) and geomagnetic activity (GMA) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) morbidity are presented. Studies were based on medical data covering the period from 1.12.1995 to 31.12.2004 and concerned daily distribution of patients with AMI diagnose (in total 1192 cases) from Sofia region on the day of admission at the hospital. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to check the significance of GMA intensity effect and the type of geomagnetic storms, those caused by Magnetic Clouds (MC) and by High Speed Solar Wind Streams (HSSWS), on AMI morbidity. Relevant correlation coefficients were calculated. Results revealed statistically significant positive correlation between considered GMA indices and AMI. ANOVA revealed that AMI number was signifi- cantly increased from the day before (-1st) till the day after (+1st) geomagnetic storms with different intensities. Geomagnetic storms caused by MC were related to significant increase of AMI number in comparison with the storms caused by HSSWS. There was a trend for such different effects even on -1st and +1st day.

  10. Surface electric fields for North America during historical geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lisa H.; Homeier, Nicole; Gannon, Jennifer L.

    2013-08-01

    To better understand the impact of geomagnetic disturbances on the electric grid, we recreate surface electric fields from two historical geomagnetic storms—the 1989 "Quebec" storm and the 2003 "Halloween" storms. Using the Spherical Elementary Current Systems method, we interpolate sparsely distributed magnetometer data across North America. We find good agreement between the measured and interpolated data, with larger RMS deviations at higher latitudes corresponding to larger magnetic field variations. The interpolated magnetic field data are combined with surface impedances for 25 unique physiographic regions from the United States Geological Survey and literature to estimate the horizontal, orthogonal surface electric fields in 1 min time steps. The induced horizontal electric field strongly depends on the local surface impedance, resulting in surprisingly strong electric field amplitudes along the Atlantic and Gulf Coast. The relative peak electric field amplitude of each physiographic region, normalized to the value in the Interior Plains region, varies by a factor of 2 for different input magnetic field time series. The order of peak electric field amplitudes (largest to smallest), however, does not depend much on the input. These results suggest that regions at lower magnetic latitudes with high ground resistivities are also at risk from the effect of geomagnetically induced currents. The historical electric field time series are useful for estimating the flow of the induced currents through long transmission lines to study power flow and grid stability during geomagnetic disturbances.

  11. Cosmic rays flux and geomagnetic field variations at midlatitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Anna; Ribeiro, Paulo; Tragaldabas Collaboration Team

    2014-05-01

    It is well known that the cosmic rays flux is modulated by the solar wind and the Earth's magnetic field. The Earth's magnetic field deflects charged particles in accordance with their momentum and the local field strength and direction. The geomagnetic cutoffs depend both on the internal and the external components of the geomagnetic field, therefore reflecting the geodynamo and the solar activity variations. A new generation, high performance, cosmic ray detector Tragaldabas was recently installed at the University of Santiago de Compostela (Spain). The detector has been acquiring test data since September 2013 with a rate of about 80 events/s over a solid angle of ~5 srad. around the vertical direction. To take full advantage of this new facility for the study of cosmic rays arriving to the Earth, an international collaboration has been organized, of about 20 researchers from 10 laboratories of 5 European countries. The Magnetic Observatory of Coimbra (Portugal) has been measuring the geomagnetic field components for almost 150 years since the first measurements in 1866. It is presently equipped with up-to-date instruments. Here we present a preliminary analysis of the global cosmic ray fluxes acquired by the new Tragaldabas detector in relation to the geomagnetic field variations measured by the Coimbra observatory. We also compare the data from the new cosmic rays detector with results obtained by the Castilla-La Mancha Neutron Monitor (CaLMa, Gadalajara, Spain) that is in operation since October 2011.

  12. Does a rigid body limit maneuverability?

    PubMed

    Walker, J A

    2000-11-01

    Whether a rigid body limits maneuverability depends on how maneuverability is defined. By the current definition, the minimum radius of the turn, a rigid-bodied, spotted boxfish Ostracion meleagris approaches maximum maneuverability, i.e. it can spin around with minimum turning radii near zero. The radius of the minimum space required to turn is an alternative measure of maneuverability. By this definition, O. meleagris is not very maneuverable. The observed space required by O. meleagris to turn is slightly greater than its theoretical minimum but much greater than that of highly flexible fish. Agility, the rate of turning, is related to maneuverability. The median- and pectoral-fin-powered turns of O. meleagris are slow relative to the body- and caudal-fin-powered turns of more flexible fish.

  13. TLP rigid riser; A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Rooney, P.P.; Engebretsen, K.B. ); Pettersen, D.J. )

    1992-03-01

    This paper summarizes tension-leg platform (TLP) rigid riser design considerations and presents results of TLP riser analysis for a production/injection riser in the North Sea. Analysis methods, design criteria, and design optimization are addressed. The riser is designed for 300-m water depth in compliance with Norwegian regulations. Emphasis is placed on application of the regulations and quantitative comparison of alternative methods for analysis of fatigue and extremes.

  14. Amiodarone keratopathy and rigid contact lens wear.

    PubMed

    Astin, C L

    2001-01-01

    Two cases are presented of patients wearing rigid gas permeable contact lenses who exhibited the typical fan-shaped patterns of corneal pigment deposition related to long-term medication containing amiodarone. The vortex corneal epitheliopathy and contact lens tolerance were monitored over several years. In both cases, the lens material was replaced with one incorporating an ultra-violet light inhibitor in view of the possibility of medically induced photosensitivity.

  15. Rigid plastic collars for marking geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ballou, R.M.; Martin, F.W.

    1964-01-01

    Rigid plastic collars of one to three colors proved useful for recognition of individual Canada geese (Branta canadensis). The collars did not seem to affect the behavior of the geese, and there was little mortality caused by their use. In good light, bright colors are visible through a 20-power spotting scope for more than 1 mile. Retention of collars was about 90 percent for 1 year and more than 80 percent for 2 years.

  16. Rapid determination of RMSDs corresponding to macromolecular rigid body motions.

    PubMed

    Popov, Petr; Grudinin, Sergei

    2014-05-01

    Finding the root mean sum of squared deviations (RMSDs) between two coordinate vectors that correspond to the rigid body motion of a macromolecule is an important problem in structural bioinformatics, computational chemistry, and molecular modeling. Standard algorithms compute the RMSD with time proportional to the number of atoms in the molecule. Here, we present RigidRMSD, a new algorithm that determines a set of RMSDs corresponding to a set of rigid body motions of a macromolecule in constant time with respect to the number of atoms in the molecule. Our algorithm is particularly useful for rigid body modeling applications, such as rigid body docking, and also for high-throughput analysis of rigid body modeling and simulation results. We also introduce a constant-time rotation RMSD as a similarity measure for rigid molecules. A C++ implementation of our algorithm is available at http://nano-d.inrialpes.fr/software/RigidRMSD. PMID:24615729

  17. Assessment of extreme values in geomagnetic and geoelectric field variations for Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitina, L.; Trichtchenko, L.; Boteler, D. H.

    2016-07-01

    Disturbances of the geomagnetic field produced by space weather events can have an impact on power systems and other critical infrastructure. To mitigate these risks it is important to determine the extreme values of geomagnetic activity that can occur. More than 40 years of 1 min magnetic data recorded at 13 Canadian geomagnetic observatories have been analyzed to evaluate extreme levels in geomagnetic and geoelectric activities in different locations of Canada. The hourly ranges of geomagnetic field variations and hourly maximum in rate of change of the magnetic variations have been used as measures of geomagnetic activity. Geoelectric activity is estimated by the hourly peak amplitude of the geoelectric fields calculated with the use of Earth resistivity models specified for different locations in Canada. A generalized extreme value distribution was applied to geomagnetic and geoelectric indices to evaluate extreme geomagnetic and geoelectric disturbances, which could happen once per 50 and once per 100 years with 99% confidence interval. Influence of geomagnetic latitude and Earth resistivity models on the results for the extreme geomagnetic and geoelectric activity is discussed. The extreme values provide criteria for assessing the vulnerability of power systems and other technology to geomagnetic activity for design or mitigation purposes.

  18. Geometric simulation of structures containing rigid units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Stephen

    2005-03-01

    Much insight into the behaviour of the framework silicates can be obtained from the Rigid Unit model. I review results from geometric analyses [1] of framework structures, quantifying the significance of rigid unit motion in thermal disorder and in defect accomodation, and from a method of simulation [2,3] based on a whole-body `geometric potential' rather than on interatomic potentials. I show the application of the geometric potential to the symmetry-constrained generation of hypothetical zeolite frameworks [4], and to the rapid generation of protein conformations using insights from rigid cluster decomposition [5]. 1. Wells, Dove and Tucker, Journal of Applied Crystallography, 37:536--544 (2004). 2. G.D. Gatta and S.A. Wells, Phys. Chem. Min. 31:1--10 (2004). 3. A. Sartbaeva, S. A. Wells, S. A. T. Redfern, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 16, 8173 (2004) 4. M. M. J. Treacy, I. Rivin, E. Balkovsky, K. H. Randall and M. D. Foster, Micropor. Mesopor. Mater. 74, 121-132 (2004). 5. M.F. Thorpe, Ming Lei, A.J. Rader, Donald J. Jacobs, and Leslie A. Kuhn, Journal of Molecular Graphics and Modelling 19, 1:60 - 69, (2001).

  19. Modeling the Flexural Rigidity of Rod Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Haeri, Mohammad; Knox, Barry E.; Ahmadi, Aphrodite

    2013-01-01

    In vertebrate eyes, the rod photoreceptor has a modified cilium with an extended cylindrical structure specialized for phototransduction called the outer segment (OS). The OS has numerous stacked membrane disks and can bend or break when subjected to mechanical forces. The OS exhibits axial structural variation, with extended bands composed of a few hundred membrane disks whose thickness is diurnally modulated. Using high-resolution confocal microscopy, we have observed OS flexing and disruption in live transgenic Xenopus rods. Based on the experimental observations, we introduce a coarse-grained model of OS mechanical rigidity using elasticity theory, representing the axial OS banding explicitly via a spring-bead model. We calculate a bending stiffness of ∼105 nN⋅μm2, which is seven orders-of-magnitude larger than that of typical cilia and flagella. This bending stiffness has a quadratic relation to OS radius, so that thinner OS have lower fragility. Furthermore, we find that increasing the spatial frequency of axial OS banding decreases OS rigidity, reducing its fragility. Moreover, the model predicts a tendency for OS to break in bands with higher spring number density, analogous to the experimental observation that transgenic rods tended to break preferentially in bands of high fluorescence. We discuss how pathological alterations of disk membrane properties by mutant proteins may lead to increased OS rigidity and thus increased breakage, ultimately contributing to retinal degeneration. PMID:23442852

  20. Origin of rigidity in dry granular solids.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumantra; Bi, Dapeng; Zhang, Jie; Behringer, R P; Chakraborty, Bulbul

    2013-08-01

    Solids are distinguished from fluids by their ability to resist shear. In traditional solids, the resistance to shear is associated with the emergence of broken translational symmetry as exhibited by a nonuniform density pattern. In this work, we focus on the emergence of shear rigidity in a class of solids where this paradigm is challenged. Dry granular materials have no energetically or entropically preferred density modulations. We show that, in contrast to traditional solids, the emergence of shear rigidity in these granular solids is a collective process, which is controlled solely by boundary forces, the constraints of force and torque balance, and the positivity of the contact forces. We develop a theoretical framework based on these constraints, which connects rigidity to broken translational symmetry in the space of forces, not positions of grains. We apply our theory to experimentally generated shear-jammed states and show that these states are indeed characterized by a persistent, non-uniform density modulation in force space, which emerges at the shear-jamming transition.