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Sample records for geomagnetic secular variations

  1. Geomagnetic secular variation in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heirtzler, J. R.; Nazarova, K.

    2003-02-01

    Annual repeat stations in Australia and in South Africa show that secular variation may change rapidly and over short geographical distances in the Indian Ocean area. Satellite models show large secular variations in the center of the Indian Ocean where there are few island geomagnetic observatories. This paper investigates marine geomagnetic measurements to see if they give more information about secular variations in this area. Between 1960 and 1988 there were more than 70 port-to-port cruises with ships towing proton precession magnetometers in the Indian Ocean. Change in field intensity from one cruise to another provides new information about the secular variation in this part of the world. Several methods were investigated to determine this change from the ship's data. Observing the change on closely parallel or crossing tracks provides an estimate of this change. These results indicate that there are short time and distance scales of secular variation in the Indian Ocean which have not been accounted for in geomagnetic field models.

  2. Geomagnetic field models incorporating physical constraints on the secular variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constable, Catherine; Parker, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    This proposal has been concerned with methods for constructing geomagnetic field models that incorporate physical constraints on the secular variation. The principle goal that has been accomplished is the development of flexible algorithms designed to test whether the frozen flux approximation is adequate to describe the available geomagnetic data and their secular variation throughout this century. These have been applied to geomagnetic data from both the early and middle part of this century and convincingly demonstrate that there is no need to invoke violations of the frozen flux hypothesis in order to satisfy the available geomagnetic data.

  3. The geomagnetic secular variation S parameter: A mathematical artifact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, J. M.; Gilder, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    Secular variation, the change in the Earth's magnetic field through time, reflects the energy state of the geodynamo. Secular variation is commonly quantified by the standard deviation of the angular distances of the virtual geomagnetic poles to their mean pole, known as the S value. The S value has long been thought to exhibit latitude dependence [S(λ)] whose origin is widely attributed to a combination of time-varying dipole and non-dipole components. The slope, magnitude and uncertainty of S(λ) are taken as a basis to model the geomagnetic field and understand its evolution. Here we show that variations in S stem from a mathematical aberration of the conversion from directions to poles. A new method to quantify secular variation is proposed.

  4. Secular Variations of the Geomagnetic Field in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sas-Uhrynowski, A.; Welker, E.

    2009-09-01

    The international project MagNetE (Magnetic Net For Europe) was undertaken in 2003. The project has been accepted by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy of the IUGG. The common research on the geomagnetic field space and time distribution in Europe, as well as collecting data and its analysis, constitutes the grounds for theoretical works on geomagnetic field models and their parameters. It is also the basis for studying the genesis of the geomagnetic field secular variations and its mechanism. The results of the project enable to increase the accuracy of models on the global, regional, and also on local scale. It has a vital meaning for the regions where the geomagnetic data are not available or, where the existing data, because of their low accuracy, cannot be used. Information about the secular variations of the geomagnetic field makes it possible to update the magnetic data, which is needed in navigation, topography, telecommunication, geology and geophysics and other domains. The enclosed maps of isopors presented have been compiled using the results of measuring campaigns in the years 2004-2006 together with the archive data. They show the secular variations of the magnetic declination D, the length H of the horizontal intensity vector and the lenght F of the total intensity vector of the geomagnetic field, in the intervals 1995-2000 and 2000-2005. The maps of isopors for Europe have been worked out using data from not only the magnetic observatories, but also from some hundred magnetic secular variation stations (repeated stations), located in 23 European countries. The secular variation differences between data obtained from terrestrial surveys and data from the IGRF model (International Geomagnetic Reference Field) have been presented in the form of maps and histograms. In several regions of Europe the unexpectedly large secular variation anomalies are visible. Anomalies of so high frequency and large amplitude cannot exist. They are

  5. Localized sudden changes in the geomagnetic secular variation.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alldredge, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    There is much debate as to whether there was a worldwide geomagnetic jerk in 1969 or 1970. It is agreed that there was an unusual sharp change in the secular variation in the east component, Y, in Europe at that time. This note points out how a localized sudden change in the secular variation pattern of one component in Europe can occur without having any large worldwide effects in any of the components. The accompanying changes in the spherical harmonic coefficients for such a localized change are also discussed. -after Author

  6. A model of geomagnetic secular variation for 1980-1983

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.; Zunde, A.K.

    1987-01-01

    We developed an updated model of the secular variation of the main geomagnetic field during 1980 through 1983 based on annual mean values for that interval from 148 worldwide magnetic observatories. The model consists of a series of 80 spherical harmonics, up to and including those of degree and order 8. We used it to form a proposal for the 1985 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). Comparison of the new model, whose mean epoch is approximately 1982.0, with the Provisional Geomagnetic Reference Field for 1975-1980 (PGRF 1975), indicates that the moment of the centered-dipole part of the geomagnetic field is now decreasing faster than it was 5 years ago. The rate (in field units) indicated by PGRF 1975 was about -25 nT a-1, while for the new model it is -28 nT a-1. ?? 1987.

  7. Geomagnetic Secular Variation Prediction with Thermal Heterogeneous Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia; Tangborn, Andrew; Jiang, Weiyuan

    2011-01-01

    It has long been conjectured that thermal heterogeneity at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) affects the geodynamo substantially. The observed two pairs of steady and strong magnetic flux lobes near the Polar Regions and the low secular variation in the Pacific over the past 400 years (and perhaps longer) are likely the consequences of this CMB thermal heterogeneity. There are several studies on the impact of the thermal heterogeneity with numerical geodynamo simulations. However, direct correlation between the numerical results and the observations is found very difficult, except qualitative comparisons of certain features in the radial component of the magnetic field at the CMB. This makes it difficult to assess accurately the impact of thermal heterogeneity on the geodynamo and the geomagnetic secular variation. We revisit this problem with our MoSST_DAS system in which geomagnetic data are assimilated with our geodynamo model to predict geomagnetic secular variations. In this study, we implement a heterogeneous heat flux across the CMB that is chosen based on the seismic tomography of the lowermost mantle. The amplitude of the heat flux (relative to the mean heat flux across the CMB) varies in the simulation. With these assimilation studies, we will examine the influences of the heterogeneity on the forecast accuracies, e.g. the accuracies as functions of the heterogeneity amplitude. With these, we could be able to assess the model errors to the true core state, and thus the thermal heterogeneity in geodynamo modeling.

  8. Gravitational dynamos and the low-frequency geomagnetic secular variation

    PubMed Central

    Olson, P.

    2007-01-01

    Self-sustaining numerical dynamos are used to infer the sources of low-frequency secular variation of the geomagnetic field. Gravitational dynamo models powered by compositional convection in an electrically conducting, rotating fluid shell exhibit several regimes of magnetic field behavior with an increasing Rayleigh number of the convection, including nearly steady dipoles, chaotic nonreversing dipoles, and chaotic reversing dipoles. The time average dipole strength and dipolarity of the magnetic field decrease, whereas the dipole variability, average dipole tilt angle, and frequency of polarity reversals increase with Rayleigh number. Chaotic gravitational dynamos have large-amplitude dipole secular variation with maximum power at frequencies corresponding to a few cycles per million years on Earth. Their external magnetic field structure, dipole statistics, low-frequency power spectra, and polarity reversal frequency are comparable to the geomagnetic field. The magnetic variability is driven by the Lorentz force and is characterized by an inverse correlation between dynamo magnetic and kinetic energy fluctuations. A constant energy dissipation theory accounts for this inverse energy correlation, which is shown to produce conditions favorable for dipole drift, polarity reversals, and excursions. PMID:18048345

  9. Gravitational dynamos and the low-frequency geomagnetic secular variation.

    PubMed

    Olson, P

    2007-12-18

    Self-sustaining numerical dynamos are used to infer the sources of low-frequency secular variation of the geomagnetic field. Gravitational dynamo models powered by compositional convection in an electrically conducting, rotating fluid shell exhibit several regimes of magnetic field behavior with an increasing Rayleigh number of the convection, including nearly steady dipoles, chaotic nonreversing dipoles, and chaotic reversing dipoles. The time average dipole strength and dipolarity of the magnetic field decrease, whereas the dipole variability, average dipole tilt angle, and frequency of polarity reversals increase with Rayleigh number. Chaotic gravitational dynamos have large-amplitude dipole secular variation with maximum power at frequencies corresponding to a few cycles per million years on Earth. Their external magnetic field structure, dipole statistics, low-frequency power spectra, and polarity reversal frequency are comparable to the geomagnetic field. The magnetic variability is driven by the Lorentz force and is characterized by an inverse correlation between dynamo magnetic and kinetic energy fluctuations. A constant energy dissipation theory accounts for this inverse energy correlation, which is shown to produce conditions favorable for dipole drift, polarity reversals, and excursions.

  10. Geomagnetic secular variation timescales under rapid rotation constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutelier, Maélie; Amit, Hagay; Christensen, Uli

    2016-04-01

    Based on geomagnetic observations, numerical dynamo simulations and frozen-flux theory it has been argued that the secular variation (SV) timescale of the magnetic field varies as 1l (where l is the spherical harmonic degree), except for the dipole. The equatorial symmetry of the core flow, which is expected due to rapid rotation effects, allows SV timescale decomposition into symmetric and asymmetric parts. We show in geomagnetic field models and in numerical dynamo simulations that the 1/l scaling law applies for the symmetric and asymmetric timescales as well separately. In both observed and simulated data the symmetric/asymmetric SV timescales are smaller/larger respectively, than in that of the full dataset. The symmetric dipole time scale is well fitted by the 1/l law in the geomagnetic field models, but not in the dynamo models. The opposite holds for the symmetric quadrupole time scales. Assuming that the dynamo models are more representative of the long-term behavior than the geomagnetic field models due to the much longer averaging time of the former, this may suggest that during the historical era the symmetric dipole SV timescale was exceptionally large and the symmetric quadrupole SV timescale was exceptionally small. Since present-day symmetric dipole SV timescale is below the 1/l fit, this may further suggest that the nearly constant dipole tilt between 1840-1960 was anomalous. Failure to explain the dipole SV timescales (both axial and equatorial) by the scaling law may suggest strong diffusion effects for the lowest degrees. Overall, our analytical fits for the symmetric and asymmetric SV timescales provide new insight into the re-organization times of different length scales in Earth's outer core.

  11. The 1995 revision of the joint US/UK geomagnetic field models - I. Secular variation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macmillan, S.; Barraclough, D.R.; Quinn, J.M.; Coleman, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    We present the methods used to derive mathematical models of global secular variation of the main geomagnetic field for the period 1985 to 2000. These secular-variation models are used in the construction of the candidate US/UK models for the Definitive Geomagnetic Reference Field at 1990, the International Geomagnetic Reference Field for 1995 to 2000, and the World Magnetic Model for 1995 to 2000 (see paper II, Quinn et al., 1997). The main sources of data for the secular-variation models are geomagnetic observatories and repeat stations. Over the areas devoid of these data secular-variation information is extracted from aeromagnetic and satellite data. We describe how secular variation is predicted up to the year 2000 at the observatories and repeat stations, how the aeromagnetic and satellite data are used, and how all the data are combined to produce the required models.

  12. Geomagnetic secular variations at the Permo-Triassic boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Vladimir; Veselovskiy, Roman; Fetisova, Anna; Latyshev, Anton; Fluteau, Frederic

    2014-05-01

    Study of changes in geomagnetic secular variations through geological time is essential to document the Earth's magnetic field evolution and provides an important constraint for geodynamo modeling. Moreover, knowledge of the secular variations value for any specific geological epoch (paleosecular variations - PSV) may give an additional tool to constrain the duration of emplacement and cooling of various magmatic bodies including flows, dykes and sills. In this report we present the result of study of the PSV at the Permo-Triassic boundary (~252 Ma), based on the paleomagnetic data, obtained from numerous (N>100) volcanic flows of the Siberian traps exposed in series of sections located in Norilsk and Maymecha-Kotuy regions in the North-West and North of the Siberian platform. Our data, taken together with similar data from other regions (Sementau, East Kazakhstan; Emeichan, China) indicates that the amplitude of PSV at the Permo-Triassic boundary was about the same or a little lower than in Late Cenozoic during last 5 milllions years. The low (comparing with expected one) value of PSV recorded in several large sills from Angara-Bratsk region (southern Siberian platform) indicates that these sills was formed very fast during the time interval less than, at least, several thousand years. Especially this conclusion is interesting for so called Tolstomyss sill, which, in fact, represents a huge field of associated tuffs, sills, dykes and volcanics, extended over the distance more than 200 km. This result can be considered as a further indication of very fast emplacement of the Siberian traps and their link with the Permo-Triassic catastrophe.

  13. Analysis of geomagnetic secular variation during 1980-1985 and 1985- 1990, and geomagnetic models proposed for the 1991 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.

    1992-01-01

    The secular variation of the main geomagnetic field during the periods 1980-1985 and 1985-1990 was analyzed in terms of spherical harmonics up to the eighth degree and order. Data from worldwide magnetic observatories and the Navy's Project MAGNET aerial surveys were used. The resulting pair of secular-variation models was used to update the Definitive Geomagnetic Reference Field (DGRF) model for 1980, resulting in new mainfield models for 1985.0 and 1990.0. These, along with the secular-variation model for 1985-1990, were proposed for the 1991 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). -Author

  14. On the Possibilities of Predicting Geomagnetic Secular Variation with Geodynamo Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Tangborn, Andrew; Sabaka, Terrance

    2004-01-01

    We use our MoSST core dynamics model and geomagnetic field at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) continued downward from surface observations to investigate possibilities of geomagnetic data assimilation, so that model results and current geomagnetic observations can be used to predict geomagnetic secular variation in future. As the first attempt, we apply data insertion technique to examine evolution of the model solution that is modified by geomagnetic input. Our study demonstrate that, with a single data insertion, large-scale poloidal magnetic field obtained from subsequent numerical simulation evolves similarly to the observed geomagnetic variation, regardless of the initial choice of the model solution (so long it is a well developed numerical solution). The model solution diverges on the time scales on the order of 60 years, similar to the time scales of the torsional oscillations in the Earth's core. Our numerical test shows that geomagnetic data assimilation is promising with our MoSST model.

  15. RESEARCH NOTE: A Late Holocene geomagnetic secular variation record from Erhai Lake, southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyodo, Masayuki; Yoshihara, Arata; Kashiwaya, Kenji; Okimura, Takashi; Masuzawa, Toshiyuki; Nomura, Ryotaro; Tanaka, Shingo; Xing, Tang Bang; Qing, Liu Su; Jian, Liu Shi

    1999-03-01

    A secular variation record of the geomagnetic field direction for the last 6.5 kyr has been obtained from the magnetization of sediment cores from Erhai Lake, southwest China. In order to make a comparison with this record, secular variation in east-central China was investigated by combining available magnetic field data from historical records and archaeomagnetic measurements since about 350 bc. The secular variation in Erhai Lake shows features consistent with the combined record, except for the oldest three observed declination swings in Sian from 720 to 900 ad. Many features of declination and inclination in China also occur in Japan. From 500 to 1000 ad, declination was westerly ranging from about -20° to -5° in Erhai Lake, east-central China, and Japan.

  16. Bottom-up control of geomagnetic secular variation by the Earth's inner core.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Julien; Finlay, Christopher C; Fournier, Alexandre

    2013-10-10

    Temporal changes in the Earth's magnetic field, known as geomagnetic secular variation, occur most prominently at low latitudes in the Atlantic hemisphere (that is, from -90 degrees east to 90 degrees east), whereas in the Pacific hemisphere there is comparatively little activity. This is a consequence of the geographical localization of intense, westward drifting, equatorial magnetic flux patches at the core surface. Despite successes in explaining the morphology of the geomagnetic field, numerical models of the geodynamo have so far failed to account systematically for this striking pattern of geomagnetic secular variation. Here we show that it can be reproduced provided that two mechanisms relying on the inner core are jointly considered. First, gravitational coupling aligns the inner core with the mantle, forcing the flow of liquid metal in the outer core into a giant, westward drifting, sheet-like gyre. The resulting shear concentrates azimuthal magnetic flux at low latitudes close to the core-mantle boundary, where it is expelled by core convection and subsequently transported westward. Second, differential inner-core growth, fastest below Indonesia, causes an asymmetric buoyancy release in the outer core which in turn distorts the gyre, forcing it to become eccentric, in agreement with recent core flow inversions. This bottom-up heterogeneous driving of core convection dominates top-down driving from mantle thermal heterogeneities, and localizes magnetic variations in a longitudinal sector centred beneath the Atlantic, where the eccentric gyre reaches the core surface. To match the observed pattern of geomagnetic secular variation, the solid material forming the inner core must now be in a state of differential growth rather than one of growth and melting induced by convective translation.

  17. Simultaneous stochastic inversion for geomagnetic main field and secular variation. II - 1820-1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Jackson, Andrew

    1989-01-01

    With the aim of producing readable time-dependent maps of the geomagnetic field at the core-mantle boundary, the method of simultaneous stochastic inversion for the geomagnetic main field and secular variation, described by Bloxham (1987), was applied to survey data from the period 1820-1980 to yield two time-dependent geomagnetic-field models, one for the period 1900-1980 and the other for 1820-1900. Particular consideration was given to the effect of crustal fields on observations. It was found that the existing methods of accounting for these fields as sources of random noise are inadequate in two circumstances: (1) when sequences of measurements are made at one particular site, and (2) for measurements made at satellite altitude. The present model shows many of the features in the earth's magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary described by Bloxham and Gubbins (1985) and supports many of their earlier conclusions.

  18. Dynamic Responses of the Earth's Outer Core to Assimilation of Observed Geomagnetic Secular Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia; Tangborn, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Assimilation of surface geomagnetic observations and geodynamo models has advanced very quickly in recent years. However, compared to advanced data assimilation systems in meteorology, geomagnetic data assimilation (GDAS) is still in an early stage. Among many challenges ranging from data to models is the disparity between the short observation records and the long time scales of the core dynamics. To better utilize available observational information, we have made an effort in this study to directly assimilate the Gauss coefficients of both the core field and its secular variation (SV) obtained via global geomagnetic field modeling, aiming at understanding the dynamical responses of the core fluid to these additional observational constraints. Our studies show that the SV assimilation helps significantly to shorten the dynamo model spin-up process. The flow beneath the core-mantle boundary (CMB) responds significantly to the observed field and its SV. The strongest responses occur in the relatively small scale flow (of the degrees L is approx. 30 in spherical harmonic expansions). This part of the flow includes the axisymmetric toroidal flow (of order m = 0) and non-axisymmetric poloidal flow with m (is) greater than 5. These responses can be used to better understand the core flow and, in particular, to improve accuracies of predicting geomagnetic variability in future.

  19. Statistics of the geomagnetic secular variation for the past 5Ma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constable, C. G.; Parker, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    A new statistical model is proposed for the geomagnetic secular variation over the past 5Ma. Unlike previous models, the model makes use of statistical characteristics of the present day geomagnetic field. The spatial power spectrum of the non-dipole field is consistent with a white source near the core-mantle boundary with Gaussian distribution. After a suitable scaling, the spherical harmonic coefficients may be regarded as statistical samples from a single giant Gaussian process; this is the model of the non-dipole field. The model can be combined with an arbitrary statistical description of the dipole and probability density functions and cumulative distribution functions can be computed for declination and inclination that would be observed at any site on Earth's surface. Global paleomagnetic data spanning the past 5Ma are used to constrain the statistics of the dipole part of the field. A simple model is found to be consistent with the available data. An advantage of specifying the model in terms of the spherical harmonic coefficients is that it is a complete statistical description of the geomagnetic field, enabling us to test specific properties for a general description. Both intensity and directional data distributions may be tested to see if they satisfy the expected model distributions.

  20. Constraints on geomagnetic secular variation modeling from electromagnetism and fluid dynamics of the Earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    A spherical harmonic representation of the geomagnetic field and its secular variation for epoch 1980, designated GSFC(9/84), is derived and evaluated. At three epochs (1977.5, 1980.0, 1982.5) this model incorporates conservation of magnetic flux through five selected patches of area on the core/mantle boundary bounded by the zero contours of vertical magnetic field. These fifteen nonlinear constraints are included like data in an iterative least squares parameter estimation procedure that starts with the recently derived unconstrained field model GSFC (12/83). Convergence is approached within three iterations. The constrained model is evaluated by comparing its predictive capability outside the time span of its data, in terms of residuals at magnetic observatories, with that for the unconstrained model.

  1. A new Holocene record of geomagnetic secular variation from Windermere, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, Rachael S.; Xuan, Chuang; Kemp, Alan E. S.; Bull, Jonathan M.; Cotterill, Carol J.; Fielding, J. James; Pearce, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Palaeomagnetic secular variation (PSV) records serve as valuable independent stratigraphic correlation and dating tools for marine and terrestrial sediment sequences. The master Holocene UK PSV record, used to date regional Holocene sediment sequences, was established over three decades ago using older radiocarbon techniques and discrete sediment samples from Windermere and two other lakes (Turner and Thompson, 1981). We present a new radiocarbon-dated record of Holocene geomagnetic secular variation from Windermere, with a view to updating the UK master PSV curve. Our analyses used u-channel samples taken from the centre of four sediment cores retrieved from Windermere in 2012.The natural remnant magnetisation (NRM) of each U-channel was measured before and after stepwise alternating field demagnetisation on a 2G Enterprises superconducting rock magnetometer at 0.5 cm resolution for the first core, and 1 cm resolution for the remaining cores. The NRM data reveal a stable and well-defined primary magnetization. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) directions of the four Windermere cores, especially the inclination records, appear to correlate well on their independent radiocarbon age models. The new Windermere PSV records compare well with the existing UK master curve on millennial timescales, as well as with records from other European lakes and northern North Atlantic marine records. These observations suggest that millennial scale secular variations of the Earth's magnetic field in the Europe- North Atlantic region shared common driving mechanisms during the Holocene. The new Windermere PSV record may thus be used in a regional context for correlating and dating sediment sequences through the Holocene.

  2. Late Glacial and Holocene Geomagnetic secular variation in Western Lake Geneva (Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baster, I.; Heller, F.; Egli, R.; Rachoud-Schneider, A. M.; Wildi, W.

    2003-04-01

    secular variation curves extending back to 13'400 years B. P. recorded by sediments deposited in Lac du Joux, Switzerland, J. Geophys., 48, 139-147. Turner, G.M. &Thompson, R. (1981) Lake sediment record of the geomagnetic secular variation in Britain during Holocene times, Geophys. J. Roy. astr. Soc., 65, 703-725.

  3. Retrieving geomagnetic secular variations from lava flows: evidence from Mounts Arso, Etna and Vesuvius (southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Incoronato, Alberto; Angelino, Antimo; Romano, Romolo; Ferrante, Agostino; Sauna, Renata; Vanacore, Gianpio; Vecchione, Claudio

    2002-06-01

    Mean directions of magnetization from Mounts Arso (Ischia Island, Gulf of Naples), Etna and Vesuvius lava flows have been determined based on very stringent linearity criteria. These indicate that, regardless of the source volcano, the lava flow mean directions of magnetization form a common path, the SISVC (Southern Italy Secular Variation Curve). This curve enables a reassessment of the age of eruption of several lavas. A date of AD 1169 is demonstrated to be the only possible time of emplacement for one Etna lava flow previously assigned an age of AD 812/1169. It is also demonstrated that two Etna lava flows, which, according to the literature, were emplaced in AD 1536 and 1595 respectively, were actually both emplaced around AD 1037. Three other Etna lava flows, one ascribed to AD 1566 and two to AD 1595, were actually emplaced between AD 1169 and 1284/85. The same time window also holds for a Vesuvius lava flow for which only an upper time threshold was previously available. Only one of the studied flows needs further sampling and analysis to verify whether this flow has been affected by a complete remagnetization or has an erroneous historical dating. The applied procedure seems to be the most appropriate one in carrying out palaeomagnetic surveys of lava flows, as also suggested by the broad agreement with some 17th and 19th century measurements of the geomagnetic field in Rome, relocated to Etna, and is likely to improve knowledge of past history of a volcano significantly.

  4. Using geomagnetic secular variation to separate remanent and induced sources of the crustal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesur, Vincent; Gubbins, David

    2000-09-01

    Magnetic fields originating from magnetized crustal rocks dominate the geomagnetic spectrum at wavelengths of 0.1-100km. It is not known whether the magnetization is predominantly induced or remanent, and static surveys cannot discriminate between the two. Long-running magnetic observatories offer a chance, in principle, of separating the two sources because secular variation leads to a change in the main inducing field, which in turn causes a change in the induced part of the short-wavelength crustal field. We first argue that the induced crustal field, bI(t), is linearly related to the local core field, B(t), through a symmetric, trace-free matrix A: bI(t)=AB(t). We then subtract a core field model from the observatory annual means and invert the residuals for three components of the remanent field, bR(t), and the five independent elements of A. Applying the method to 20 European observatories, all of which have recorded for more than 50 years, shows that the most difficult task is to distinguish bR from the steady part of bI. However, for nine observatories a time-dependent induced field fits the data better than a steady remanent field at the 99 per cent confidence level, suggesting the presence of a significant induced component to the magnetization.

  5. Archaeomagnetic results from southern Italy and their bearing on geomagnetic secular variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, M. E.; Hoye, G. S.

    2005-07-01

    Archaeodirectional results from kilns and other baked structures in southern Italy are presented. They are generally compatible with the much larger data sets from France and Bulgaria. In particular, a summary of all the results associated with the well-known eruption of Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii ( n = 9, D = 355°, I = 58°, α95 = 1.5°) provides a reliable archaeomagnetic anchor point supporting the French and Bulgarian master curves. It is extremely well-constrained in time and it comprises independent studies carried out in four different countries. Furthermore, it is derived from a diverse set of features agreement amongst which argues strongly against significant perturbations due to magnetic refraction, structural disturbance, or depositional shallowing. In terms of geomagnetic secular variation, we interpret the western European archaeomagnetic data summarized here in terms of an open loop caused by westward drift, followed by an inclination low spanning the first few centuries CE representing the signal of a static flux pulse that reaches a maximum magnetic moment of a few percent of the earth's main central dipole.

  6. Improving total field geomagnetic secular variation modeling from a new set of cross-over marine data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavón-Carrasco, F. Javier; Torta, J. Miquel; Catalán, Manuel; Talarn, Àngela; Ishihara, Takemi

    2013-03-01

    A new set of cross-over marine data has been used to generate a regional model for the secular variation of the total geomagnetic field, showing the potential of the suggested approach for gaining a better knowledge of the field over oceanic regions. The model, which is valid for the Northern Atlantic region during the temporal interval 1960-2000, was obtained using spherical cap harmonic analysis (SCHA) in space and penalized splines in time. The maximum spatial expansion is equivalent to degree 9 in ordinary spherical harmonic analysis. Annual mean intensity data from different geomagnetic observatories have been used to improve the spatial and temporal resolution of the original dataset. Results indicate that the regional model improves, in terms of the root mean square error, the prediction given by the 11th generation of IGRF and CM4 global models, especially for the geomagnetic observatories considered. We also provide the uncertainty of the model coefficients and the secular variation prediction given by a bootstrap algorithm. The model is available in the EarthRef. org Digital Archive at http://earthref.org/ERDA/1728/.

  7. Geomagnetic Secular Variation in Texas over the Last 17,000 Years: High-Intensity Geomagnetic Field 'Spike' Observed at ca. 3000 cal BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, M. D.; Feinberg, J. M.; Waters, M. R.; Stafford, T. W., Jr.; Forman, S. L.; Lundelius, E. L.

    2015-12-01

    By observing the fluctuations in direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field through time, we increase our understanding of the fluid motions in the Earth's outer core that sustain the geomagnetic field, the geodynamo. Recent archaeomagnetic studies in the Near East have proposed extremely rapid increases - 'spikes' - in geomagnetic field intensity ca. 3000 years ago that have proved problematic for our current understanding of core-flow. However, until now, these geomagnetic spikes had not been observed outside of the Near East, where they have been found in metallurgical slag and mud brick walls. We present a new fully-oriented, geomagnetic secular variation and relative palaeointensity (RPI) record for the last 17,000 years from Hall's Cave, Texas. Sediment washed into the cave has formed a continuous stratigraphic sequence that is at least 3.5 m thick. Within the stable, cool climate of the cave, pedogenic and bioturbation processes are almost non-existent, thereby limiting post-depositional physical and geochemical alteration of the magnetic record. The sub-aerial and subterranean setting of the sedimentary sequence in Hall's Cave enabled us to collect oriented palaeomagnetic cubes from an excavated section through the sequence. The palaeomagnetic samples yielded high-quality vectors. An age model for the sequence, determined using 57 AMS 14C-dates on individual bones from microvertebrate, was combined with the palaeomagnetic data to construct a secular variation record. The record is in broad agreement with predictions by Holocene field models for the site's location. However, at ca. 3000 years ago, the RPI data indicate an almost four-fold increase in geomagnetic field intensity lasting several hundred years and contemporaneous with the more short-lived, decadal-scale spikes reported from the Near East. Evidence for this extreme intensity event outside of the Near East has major implications for our current understanding of core-dynamics.

  8. An Online Observatory and Satellite-Based Model for the Geomagnetic Field in Antarctica and its Secular Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Santis, A.; Gaya-Pique', L.; Torta, M. J.; Caprara, F.; De Santis, A.

    2002-05-01

    The recently proposed Antarctic geomagnetic Reference Model (ARM) is now available online. The model, developed applying Spherical Cap Harmonic Analysis, is capable of synthesizing the main field and its secular variation over Antarctica, and was based on the annual means of X, Y, and Z components recorded by Antarctic Observatories during the last forty years as well as on a selected subset of Oersted satellite total field values measured in periods characterized by very low magnetic activity between December 1999 and January 2000. ARM presents a clear improvement with respect to the IGRF2000 model when representing the field and, especially, its secular variation, so it would be recommended the use of ARM when magnetic surveys in Antarctica, carried out at different times, are reduced to the same epoch. To facilitate the work to the scientific community involved on the study of Antarctic magnetic features like the anomaly field, ARM is accessible through the homepage of the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (www.ingv.it), allowing the user to compute the values of the geomagnetic field over Antarctica for a 3-D position (latitude, longitude, altitude) from 1960 to 2000, being also useful to predict the field ahead, although the errors are expected to increase with time. To further improving the model we intend to add the sampling of data corresponding to the quiet-day selection from Oersted, CHAMP and the Oersted-2 experiment onboard SAC-C, made available for this Session.

  9. Geomagnetic secular variation in Sicily and revised ages of historic lavas from Mount Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanguy, J. C.; Bucur, I.; Thompson, J. F. C.

    1985-12-01

    The variation of geomagnetic field direction in Sicily during the past 700 yr has tentatively been determined using lavas of known date from Mount Etna1. Additional palaeomagnetic studies on several hundred volcanic samples, combined with archaeomagnetic investigations carried out on Norman buildings, have improved the previous results and permit a reconstruction of the geomagnetic variation curve to about AD 1000. This curve agrees well with those obtained for other European countries2-6 and may be used as a reference for checking the ages attributed to archaeological structures as well as volcanic products in southern Italy during the past 1,000 yr. The present results cast serious doubts on the true ages of numerous historically dated lavas from Mount Etna, most of which are at least several centuries older than previously believed. The conclusions have implications for the succession of eruptions, effusion rates, magmatic evolution, and so on, and demonstrate the inconsistency of eruptive models based on historical records alone.

  10. Multi-decadal ingredients of the secular variation of the geomagnetic field. Insights from long time series of observatory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demetrescu, Crisan; Dobrica, Venera

    2014-06-01

    The temporal evolution of the geomagnetic field is shown, on data from 24 observatories with 100-150 years long time series of annual means, to be composed of several ingredients, which we call the steady, the ∼80-year, the 22-year, and the 11-year variations. The latter is the result of incomplete averaging out in the annual mean of external effects and shows a characteristic 11-year solar-cycle-related evolution with an amplitude of 10-40 nT in H and Z and within ±0.05° in D. The other three characterize the main field. While the steady variation carries the largest part of the main field and is smoothly increasing or decreasing in time, the ∼80-year variation shows changes with amplitudes amounting to several hundred nT in the intensity components H and Z, and of 0.2-0.7° in declination; the 22-year variation changes with much smaller amplitudes, of 20-60 nT in H and somewhat larger in Z (20-100 nT), and of about 0.05-0.15° in D. The analysis of the first time derivative of declination for the 24 study observatories showed that the ∼80-year variation dominated the secular variation in the last 100 years and that the 22-year variation has gotten its importance in defining the time evolution of the first time derivative of declination, jerks included, since 1960. The external contribution is decisive though in establishing the very short time scale characterizing jerks and, to some extent, also the amplitude and timing of the jerk. The analysis of 400 years-long declination time-series from three European locations (London, Munich, Rome) resulted in tracing back of the ∼80-year variation to the 15th century and showed that what we called 'steady variation', based on 150 years of observatory data, proves to be only a part of a larger timescale variation, when 400 years of data are available. According to our results, the term 'jerk' loses its presently accepted meaning of sudden change in the temporal evolution of secular variation. A more complex

  11. Importance of selecting archaeomagnetic data for geomagnetic modelling: example of the new Western Europe directional and intensity secular variation curves from 1500 BC to 200 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herve, Gwenael; Chauvin, Annick; Lanos, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    At the regional scale, the dispersion between archaeomagnetic data and especially archaeointensities suggests that some of them may be biased. As a consequence, it appears necessary to perform a selection of available data before to compute mean regional secular variation curves or geomagnetic models. However the definition of suitable selection criteria is not obvious and we need to know how to manage "old" data acquired during the 60-70s. The Western Europe directional and intensity data set from 1500 BC to 200 AD allows to discuss these issues. It has recently been enhanced by 39 new archaeodirections and 23 new archaeointensities (Hervé et al., 2013a and 2013b data sets and 5 unpublished data). First, the whole Western Europe data set was selected but the strong dispersion restricted the accuracy and the reliability of the new Western Europe secular variation curves at Paris. The causes of the dispersion appear different between archaeodirections and archaeointensities. In the directional data set, the main problem comes from some age errors in the oldest published data. Since their publication their archaeological dating may have changed of 50 years or more. For intensity data that were acquired much more recently, the dispersion mainly results from the use of unreliable archaeointensity protocols. We propose a weighting approach based on the number of specimens and the use of pTRM-checks, anisotropy and cooling rate corrections. Only 63% of available archaeodirections and 32% of archaeointensities were used to build the new Western Europe secular variation curves from 1500 BC to 200 AD. These curves reveal that selecting the reference data avoids wrong estimations of the shape of the secular variation curves, the secular variation rate, the dating of archaeomagnetic jerks... Finally, it is worth pointing out that current geomagnetic global models take into account almost all the data that we decided to reject. It could partly explain why their predictions at

  12. Holocene geomagnetic secular variation recorded by volcanic deposits at Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagstrum, J.T.; Hoblitt, R.P.; Gardner, C.A.; Gray, T.E.

    2002-01-01

    A compilation of paleomagnetic data from volcanic deposits of Mount St. Helens is presented in this report. The database is used to determine signature paleomagnetic directions of products from its Holocene eruptive events, to assign sampled units to their proper eruptive period, and to begin the assembly of a much larger database of paleomagnetic directions from Holocene volcanic rocks in western North America. The paleomagnetic results from Mount St. Helens are mostly of high quality, and generally agree with the division of its volcanic deposits into eruptive episodes based on previous geologic mapping and radiocarbon dates. The Muddy River andesite's paleomagnetic direction, however, indicates that it is more likely part of the Pine Creek eruptive period rather than the Castle Creek period. In addition, the Two-Fingers andesite flow is more likely part of the Middle Kalama eruptive period and not part of the Goat Rocks period. The paleomagnetic data from Mount St. Helens and Mount Hood document variation in the geomagnetic field's pole position over the last ~2,500 years. A distinct feature of the new paleosecular variation (PSV) record, similar to the Fish Lake record (Oregon), indicates a sudden change from rapid clockwise movement of the pole about the Earth's spin axis to relatively slow counterclockwise movement at ???800 to 900 years B.P.

  13. A directional Secular Variation Curve for Greece for the last 4500 years: Comparison with regional and global geomagnetic field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Marco, E.; Tema, E.; Lanos, P.; Kondopoulou, D.

    2009-12-01

    A total of 64 Greek archaeomagnetic directional data have been used for the establishment of the variation of the Earth’s magnetic field in Greece over the past 4500 years. Most of the data come from archaeological material but some data from Santorini lava flows are also included. The data ages range from Minoan times (~2500 BC) up to the last century with a gap around 10th to 6th century BC. All data have been relocated to Athens (37.97° N, 23.72° E) using the virtual geomagnetic pole method. Data coming from direct measurements available in Greece for the last four centuries have been also added. The secular variation (SV) curves for declination and inclination have been obtained using hierarchical Bayesian modelling. For comparison, the dataset has been also analysed using the bi-variate moving average window technique with 150 years time window shifted by 75 years. The obtained smoothed curves accompanied by a 95 % confidence envelope are compared with archaeomagnetic data from Mediterranean area and with SV curves from nearby countries. The Greek curves have also been compared with the predictions of the SCHA.DIF.3K regional and the CALS7K and ARCH3K global geomagnetic field models. Despite the differences recognised between these models, the Greek archaeomagnetic SV curve is in reasonably good agreement with their basic trends. The proposed directional SV curve can contribute, together with the intensity SV curve previously published for Greece, to the reliable archaeomagnetic dating of Greek artefacts based on the full description of the Earth’s magnetic field (declination, inclination, intensity). It is clear that the continuous update of the dataset with new results from well-dated archaeological material will increase the precision of the SV curve, especially for the time periods poorly covered by data.

  14. Paleomagnetic directions and thermoluminescence dating from a bread oven-floor sequence in Lübeck (Germany): A record of 450 years of geomagnetic secular variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepp, Elisabeth; Pucher, Rudolf; Goedicke, Christian; Manzano, Ana; Müller, Uwe; Lanos, Philippe

    2003-02-01

    A record of about 450 years of geomagnetic secular variation is presented from a single archaeological site in Lübeck (Germany) where a sequence of 25 bread oven floors has been preserved in a bakery from medieval times until today. The age dating of the oven-floor sequence is based on historical documents, 14C-dating and thermoluminescence dating. It confines the time interval from about 1300 to 1800 A.D. Paleomagnetic directions have been determined from each oven floor by means of 198 oriented hand samples. After alternating field as well as thermal demagnetization experiments, the characteristic remanent magnetization direction was obtained using principal component analysis. The mean directions of 24 oven floors are characterized by high Fisherian precision parameters (>146) and small α95 confidence limits (1.2°-4.6°). For obtaining a smooth curve of geomagnetic secular variation for Lübeck, a spherical spline function was fitted to the data using a Bayesian approach, which considers not only the obtained ages, but also stratigraphic order. Correlation with historical magnetic records suggests that the age estimation for the upper 10 layers was too young and must date from the end of the sixteenth to the mid of the eighteenth century. For the lowermost 14 layers, dating is reliable and provides a secular variation curve for Germany. The inclination shows a minimum in the fourteenth century and then increases by more than 10°. Declination shows a local minimum around 1400 A.D. followed by a maximum in the seventeenth century. This is followed by the movement of declination about 30° to western directions.

  15. Secular variation of the middle and late Miocene geomagnetic field recorded by the Columbia River Basalt Group in Oregon, Idaho and Washington, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Ada R.; Van der Voo, Rob

    2014-06-01

    This study of 118 discrete volcanic flows from the Columbia River Basalt Group is aimed to determine their distribution of geomagnetic field directions and virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) and to compare the inherent secular variation parameters with those from other studies. The magnetic signature of these rocks is uniformly carried by primary titanomagnetite, indicating that magnetic changes are due to variations in the magnetic field. Although most flows are flat lying, those that are tilted pass the Tauxe and Watson tilt test. Sequential flows with statistically similar site means were grouped, and directions that were considered outliers were evaluated and removed using the Vandamme cut-off method. Three normal-polarity (N-polarity) and three reversed-polarity (R-polarity) intervals are revealed by the stratigraphically ordered flows and have mean directions of N polarity (dec/inc = 6.6°/+61.2°, k = 29.3, α95 = 4.2°), and R polarity (dec/inc = 178.2°/-59.2°, k = 16, α95 = 5.5°). Regression analysis indicates that the secular variation analysis has not been affected by regional rotation, and that apparent polar wander is negligible. The VGP distribution is almost perfectly circular and supports the preference of VGP positions for the dispersion analysis. Dispersion parameters with corrections for within-site scatter (Sb) show a range of 14.3°-25.5°, including error limits, and were consistently higher for R-polarity results than for those of N polarity. Published dispersion parameters for extrusives <5 Ma show Sb values slightly lower than ours, yielding values of 16°-19°, although the difference is not statistically significant. In contrast, published dispersion parameters from high quality data from the Cretaceous Normal Superchron are lower than those for the Neogene, which suggests that the noisiness of the magnetic field correlates with the frequency of reversals. Our new results allow us to extend the Plio-Pleistocene palaeosecular variation

  16. Evaluation of using R-SCHA to simultaneously model main field and secular variation multilevel geomagnetic data for the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talarn, Àngela; Pavón-Carrasco, F. Javier; Torta, J. Miquel; Catalán, Manuel

    2017-02-01

    One efficient approach to modelling the Earth's core magnetic field involves the inclusion of crossover marine data which cover areas lacking in observatory and repeat station data for epochs when precise three-component satellite magnetic field measurements were not common. In this study, we show how the Revised Spherical Cap Harmonic Analysis (R-SCHA) can appropriately provide a continuous-time field model for the North Atlantic region by using multilevel sets of geomagnetic data such as marine, repeat station, observatory, and satellite data. Taking advantage of the properties of the R-SCHA basis functions we can model the radial and horizontal variations of the main field and its secular variation with the most suitable spatial and temporal wavelengths. To assess the best compromise between the data fit and the model roughness, temporal and spatial regularization matrices were implemented in the modelling approach. Two additional strategies were also used to obtain a satisfactory regional model: the opportunity to fit the anomaly bias at each observatory location, and constraining the regional model to the CHAOS-6 model at the end of its period of validity, i.e. 1999-2000, allowing a smooth transition with the predictions of this recent model. In terms of the root mean square error, the degree of success was limited partly because of the high uncertainties associated with some of the datasets (especially the marine ones), but we have produced a model that performs comparably to the global models for the period 1960-2000, thus showing the benefits of using this regional technique.

  17. Palaeomagnetic investigations on lake sediments from NE China: a new record of geomagnetic secular variations for the last 37 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Ute

    2007-04-01

    Detailed palaeomagnetic investigations were carried out on two 23 m long sediment cores from Erlongwan maar lake, NE China. The sediment composition of both cores is nearly identical. Based on a macroscopical inspection of the cores 410 graded layers intercalated into the laminated sediments were identified. Measurements of the anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility revealed that these layers have not disturbed the sediment structure in general, but only in intervals where their thicknesses exceeds 50 cm. The age model for Erlongwan is based on 15 AMS 14C-datings on bulk sediment, showing that the sediment profile spans the last 37 ka cal BP. Although one of the sediment cores has been slightly deformed during core recovery, similar inclination and declination records could be obtained by standard palaeomagnetic methods. The stacked inclination and declination records show both variations similar to those known from palaeosecular variation records from Eastern China and Japan. Therefore, the presented study is a contribution to the ongoing process of compiling a PSV mastercurve for East Asia.

  18. Main field and recent secular variation.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alldredge, L.R.

    1983-01-01

    As Cain (1979) indicated might happen in the last IUGG quadrennial report, added resources were made available during the past few years and a real impulse was added to the geomagnetic work in the US by the launching of the MAGSAT Satellite. This new effort paid off in terms of new charts, additional long wavelength studies, and external source studies. As before, however, the future funding for new starts in geomagnetism does not look bright at the present time. A single MAGSAT in orbit a little more than seven months did wonders for main field (M.F.) charting, but did little or nothing for secular variation (S.V.) charting. It would take a number of repeated MAGSATS to help the S.V. picture. Meanwhile, the world magnetic observatory net and surface repeat stations remain as the main source of S.V. data. -from Author

  19. Paleomagnetic secular variation study of Ar-Ar dated lavas flows from Tacambaro area (Central Mexico): Possible evidence of Intra-Jaramillo geomagnetic excursion in volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, Rafael Maciel; Goguitchaichvili, Avto; Guilbaud, Marie-Noëlle; Martínez, Vicente Carlos Ruiz; Rathert, Manuel Calvo; Siebe, Claus; Reyes, Bertha Aguilar; Morales, Juan

    2014-04-01

    More than 350 oriented paleomagnetic cores were obtained for rock-magnetic and paleomagnetic analysis from radiometrically dated (40Ar-39Ar) magmatic rocks occurring in the southern segment (Jorullo and Tacámbaro areas) of the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Most of the lavas (37) stem from monogenetic volcanoes dated at less than 4 Ma. Two additional sites were sampled from the plutonic basement dated at 33-30 Ma. Primary remanences carried by low-Ti titanomagnetites allowed to determining 34 reliable site-mean directions of mostly normal (27) but also reversed (7) polarities. The mean directions of these two populations are antipodal, and suggest neither major vertical-axis rotations with respect to the North America craton nor tilting in the region for the last 4 Ma (rotation and flattening of the inclination parameters being less than -5.9 ± 3.8 and 0.1 ± 3.9, respectively). The corresponding paleomagnetic pole obtained for Pliocene-Pleistocene times is PLAT = 83.4°, PLON = 2.4° (N = 32, A95 = 2.7°). Virtual geomagnetic poles also contribute to the time averaged field global database and to the paleosecular variation (PSV) investigations at low latitudes from lavas for the last 5 Ma, showing a geomagnetic dispersion value that is in agreement with available PSV models. When comparing the magnetic polarities and corresponding radiometric ages of the studied sites with the Cenozoic geomagnetic polarity time scale (GPTS), a good correlation is observable. This finding underscores the suitability of data obtained on lavas in Central Mexico for contributing to the GPTS. Furthermore, the detection of short-lived geomagnetic features seems possible, since the possible evidence of Intra-Jaramillo geomagnetic excursion could be documented for the first time in these volcanic rocks.

  20. Secular variations of tropospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrgian, A. Kh.

    1988-02-01

    The dependence of secular variations of tropospheric ozone on decreases of temperature and cloud growth in Central Europe is assessed on the basis of Vienna, Paris, and Athens data for 1853-1920. Decreases in ozone content occurring with a certain time lag after major volcanic eruptions (e.g., Krakatoa) are examined. The effect of the Tungusk-meteorite fall on ozone content is also discussed.

  1. Secular trends in storm-level geomagnetic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis is made of K-index data from groups of ground-based geomagnetic observatories in Germany, Britain, and Australia, 1868.0-2009.0, solar cycles 11-23. Methods include nonparametric measures of trends and statistical significance used by the hydrological and climatological research communities. Among the three observatory groups, German K data systematically record the highest disturbance levels, followed by the British and, then, the Australian data. Signals consistently seen in K data from all three observatory groups can be reasonably interpreted as physically meaninginful: (1) geomagnetic activity has generally increased over the past 141 years. However, the detailed secular evolution of geomagnetic activity is not well characterized by either a linear trend nor, even, a monotonic trend. Therefore, simple, phenomenological extrapolations of past trends in solar and geomagnetic activity levels are unlikely to be useful for making quantitative predictions of future trends lasting longer than a solar cycle or so. (2) The well-known tendency for magnetic storms to occur during the declining phase of a sunspot-solar cycles is clearly seen for cycles 14-23; it is not, however, clearly seen for cycles 11-13. Therefore, in addition to an increase in geomagnetic activity, the nature of solar-terrestrial interaction has also apparently changed over the past 141 years. ?? Author(s) 2011.

  2. Historic and paleomagnetic secular variation and the earth's core dynamo process.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, S. P.; Olson, P.

    1987-06-01

    This paper attempts to summarize briefly the recent and ongoing efforts of the geomagnetism and paleomagnetism community to understand both the earth's magnetic-field secular variation, and its implications for the core dynamo process.

  3. Secular obliquity variations for Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bills, Bruce; Scott, Bryan R.; Nimmo, Francis

    2016-10-01

    We have constructed secular variation models for the orbit and spin poles of the asteroid (1) Ceres, and used them to examine how the obliquity, or angular separation between spin and orbit poles, varies over a time span of several million years. The current obliquity is 4.3 degrees, which means that there are some regions near the poles which do not receive any direct Sunlight. The Dawn mission has provided an improved estimate of the spin pole orientation, and of the low degree gravity field. That allows us to estimate the rate at which the spin pole precesses about the instantaneous orbit pole.The orbit of Ceres is secularly perturbed by the planets, with Jupiter's influence dominating. The current inclination of the orbit plane, relative to the ecliptic, is 10.6 degrees. However, it varies between 7.27 and 11.78 degrees, with dominant periods of 22.1 and 39.6 kyr. The spin pole precession rate parameter has a period of 205 kyr, with current uncertainty of 3%, dominated by uncertainty in the mean moment of inertia of Ceres.The obliquity varies, with a dominant period of 24.5 kyr, with maximum values near 26 degrees, and minimum values somewhat less than the present value. Ceres is currently near to a minimum of its secular obliquity variations.The near-surface thermal environment thus has at least 3 important time scales: diurnal (9.07 hours), annual (4.60 years), and obliquity cycle (24.5 kyr). The annual thermal wave likely only penetrates a few meters, but the much long thermal wave associated with the obliquity cycle has a skin depth larger by a factor of 70 or so, depending upon thermal properties in the subsurface.

  4. Magnetic Navigation in Sea Turtles: Insights from Secular Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putman, N. F.; Lohmann, K.

    2011-12-01

    Sea turtles are iconic migrants that posses a sensitive magnetic-sense that guides their long-distance movements in a variety of contexts. In the first few hours after hatching turtles use the magnetic field to maintain an offshore compass heading to reach deeper water, out of the reach of nearshore predators. Young turtles engage in directed swimming in response to regional magnetic fields that exist along their transoceanic migratory path. Older turtles also use magnetic information to relocate foraging sites and islands used for nesting after displacement. Numerous hypotheses have been put forth to explain how magnetic information functions in these movements, however, there is little consensus among animal navigation researchers. A particular vexing issue is how magnetic navigation can function under the constraints of the constant, gradual shifting of the earth's magnetic field (secular variation). Here, I present a framework based on models of recent geomagnetic secular variation to explore several navigational mechanisms proposed for sea turtles. I show that while examination of secular variation likely falsifies some hypothetical navigational strategies, it provides key insights into the selective pressures that could maintain other navigational mechanisms. Moreover, examination of secular variation's influence on the navigational precision in reproductive migrations of sea turtles offers compelling explanations for the population structure along sea turtle nesting beaches as well as spatiotemporal variation in nesting turtle abundance.

  5. Mineral magnetism and geomagnetic secular variation of marine and lacustrine sediments from central Italy: timing and nature of local and regional Holocene environmental change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolph, Timothy C.; Vigliotti, Luigi; Oldfield, Frank

    2004-07-01

    Sediment core palaeomagnetic and mineral magnetic records from two crater lakes in central Italy and from the western margin of the Adriatic Sea have been used to evaluate local and regional responses to Holocene environmental change. In all cores, sediment magnetism reflects the interplay between catchment material and the in situ production of bacterial magnetite (magnetotactic bacteria). In the lakes, the earliest Holocene sediments record a waning catchment input that we attribute to rising lake levels and increased tree cover in the catchment. From ˜9000 to 5000 yr BP, both lakes become anoxic, a consequence of water-mass stratification driven by high lake levels. Bottom-water anoxia also developed in the Adriatic, with sapropel S1 produced between ˜9000 and 7000 yr BP. Subsequently, the lake and Adriatic mineral magnetic records show evidence for increased catchment delivery, consistent with pollen evidence for Bronze Age deforestation. In the lakes, this evidence is first recorded at ˜4300 yr BP and a number of distinct clearance events are recorded. In comparison, at Adriatic site RF93-30, lithogenic input increases abruptly at ˜3500 yr BP and is followed by a slowly changing record of waxing and waning sediment delivery. Inter-site comparisons of palaeomagnetic data point to a possible link between the magnitude of the bacterial magnetite component and the recorded magnetic inclination. The sites are at near identical latitudes and have similar sediment accumulation rates but the Adriatic sites have a core-average magnetic inclination that is some 10° steeper than the lake average values. We suggest that the large dipole moment of the magnetosome chains, which in life produce the passive alignment of the bacterium along the local geomagnetic field line, produce a more faithful (albeit smoothed) record of the geomagnetic field.

  6. Improving late Holocene radiocarbon-based chronologies by matching paleomagnetic secular variations to geomagnetic field models - Examples from Nam Co (Tibet) and Lake Kalimpaa (Sulawesi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberzettl, T.; Kasper, T.; St-Onge, G.; Behling, H.; Daut, G.; Doberschütz, S.; Kirleis, W.; Mäusbacher, R.; Nowaczyk, N.

    2010-12-01

    Precise age control is a prerequisite for reliable paleoenvironmental reconstruction. Almost all Holocene chronologies of lacustrine sequences are based on radiocarbon dating. Most reliable ages are obtained from fragile terrestrial vegetation remnants (e.g., leaves) as these neither yield a reservoir or hard water effect nor are reworked as they would be destroyed during this process. However, in many records no terrestrial plant remains or macro remains in general are found in the sediments. In this case the only option to establish a radiocarbon based chronology is to date bulk sediment. This sediment sometimes contains reworked material or, in hard water lakes, aquatic organic remains which contain old carbon - both resulting in older ages. Here we present two records dated by bulk material showing these inconveniences. Nam Co is a hard water lake on the Tibetan Plateau (30.5°N, 91°E). Previous studies from various sites in this lake revealed different hard water effects. A radiocarbon date of bulk sediment from the top of a gravity core yielded an age of 1420 ±40 BP for the sediment/water interface. In order to test if this value can be constantly extrapolated back in time we established a reservoir corrected chronology with this value. Subsequently, we compared inclination and declination data to the CALS3k.3 and the CALS7k geomagnetic field models which currently provide the best representation of the late Holocene geomagnetic field. This showed excellent accordance for the period covered by the gravity core, i.e., ~4000 cal BP. Lake Kalimpaa (1.3°S, 120.3°E) is located on the island of Sulawesi, Indonesia. Radiocarbon-dated bulk samples also showed inconsistencies. Most likely not only the autochthonous carbon fraction was dated but also some allochthonous organic matter was incorporated into the samples. If this is the case, all ages are tentatively too old. Following a conservative approach, in order to minimize this error, only the youngest dates

  7. Are secular correlations between sunspots, geomagnetic activity, and global temperature significant?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, J.J.; Mursula, K.; Tsai, V.C.; Perkins, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have led to speculation that solar-terrestrial interaction, measured by sunspot number and geomagnetic activity, has played an important role in global temperature change over the past century or so. We treat this possibility as an hypothesis for testing. We examine the statistical significance of cross-correlations between sunspot number, geomagnetic activity, and global surface temperature for the years 1868-2008, solar cycles 11-23. The data contain substantial autocorrelation and nonstationarity, properties that are incompatible with standard measures of cross-correlational significance, but which can be largely removed by averaging over solar cycles and first-difference detrending. Treated data show an expected statistically- significant correlation between sunspot number and geomagnetic activity, Pearson p < 10-4, but correlations between global temperature and sunspot number (geomagnetic activity) are not significant, p = 0.9954, (p = 0.8171). In other words, straightforward analysis does not support widely-cited suggestions that these data record a prominent role for solar-terrestrial interaction in global climate change. With respect to the sunspot-number, geomagnetic-activity, and global-temperature data, three alternative hypotheses remain difficult to reject: (1) the role of solar-terrestrial interaction in recent climate change is contained wholly in long-term trends and not in any shorter-term secular variation, or, (2) an anthropogenic signal is hiding correlation between solar-terrestrial variables and global temperature, or, (3) the null hypothesis, recent climate change has not been influenced by solar-terrestrial interaction. ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Historical variation of the geomagnetic axial dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, Christopher C.

    2008-09-01

    The geomagnetic axial dipole (hereinafter denoted g10) is the largest component of our planet's magnetic field. Its magnitude determines the morphology of solar-terrestrial electrical current systems and it is the most fundamental diagnostic property of the core-generated geodynamo. Elucidating past and future variations of g10(t) is consequently of central importance in geomagnetism. Previous historical geomagnetic field models, such as gufm1 of Jackson et al. [Jackson, A., Jonkers, A.R.T., Walker, M.R., 2000. Four centuries of geomagnetic secular variation from historical records. Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. A 358, 957-990], used direct observations to constrain g10(t) only after 1840 A.D.; before this time a crude linear extrapolation of the post-1840 A.D. rate of change (15 nT/year) was employed. In this contribution I construct historical field models with g10(t) instead constrained from 1590 A.D. to 1840 A.D. by an archaeointensity dataset compiled by Korte et al. [Korte, M., Genevey, A., Constable, C.G., Frank, U., Schnepp, E., 2005. Continuous geomagnetic field models for the past 7 millennia. 1. A new global data compilation. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 6, doi:10.1029/2004GC000800]. A range of possible linear models of the form g10(t)=g10(1840)+β(t-1840) are first explored; β=2.74±42.32 nT/year is found to explain the archaeointensity dataset with maximum likelihood, consistent with the recent findings of Gubbins et al. [Gubbins, D., Jones, A.L., Finlay, C.C., 2006. Fall in Earth's magnetic field is erratic. Science 312, 900-902]. Relaxing the linear constraint in an effort to find more physically plausible models, I find it is necessary to artificially increase the weight given to the archaeointensity data in order to obtain acceptable models. Despite satisfactorily explaining both the historical and archaeointensity data, and possessing reasonable spatial and temporal complexity, such free evolution models perform worse than the simpler linearly

  9. Secular variations around 2000 obtained from satellite and observatory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar, T.; Golovkov, V.; Yakovleva, S.

    2003-04-01

    SECULAR VARIATIONS AROUND 2000 OBTAINED FROM SATELLITE AND OBSERVATORY DATA T. Bondar, V. Golovkov and S. Yakovleva Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation RAS IZMIRAN, Troitsk, Moscow Reg., 142190, Russia golovkov@izmiran.rssi.ru/FAX: +7-095-3340124 Using coefficients of models, developed on base of the satellite measurements of the geomagnetic vector (missions Magsat and Oersted), as well as SV coefficients in model by Olsen (2002) a space-time model of the geomagnetic field changes on the time interval of 20 yrs duration was developed. Coefficients of this ST model were obtained as the Taylor series up to second derivative. Obtained parabolic space-time model was compared with data series from magnetic observatories. It is shown that deviation of this completely satellite based model relative observatory time series is rather big due to the geomagnetic jerk about 1990. Space-time model derived from data from observatories describes variations better but only for area covered enough with observatories. False foci over SE Pacific reach hundreds nT. A new approach of joint use of satellite and observatory data is proposed. This technique of space-time analysis permits decreasing averaged errors to a few tens nT on whole time interval and whole Earth’s surface including large ocean areas.

  10. Independently dated paleomagnetic secular variation records from the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberzettl, T.; Henkel, K.; Kasper, T.; Ahlborn, M.; Su, Y.; Appel, E.; St-Onge, G.; Stoner, J. S.; Daut, G.; Wang, J.; Zhu, L.; Maeusbacher, R.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetostratigraphy has been serving as a valuable tool for dating and confirming chronologies of lacustrine sediments in many parts of the world. However, suitable paleomagnetic records on the Tibetan Plateau (TP) and adjacent areas are extremely scarce. Here, independently radiocarbon dated sediments of two lakes on the southern central TP, Tangra Yumco and Taro Co some 250 km further west, were investigated for their potential to record paleomagnetic secular variations. Multiple sediment cores resemble a very similar inclination pattern for the past 4000 years. This demonstrates the high potential of inclination to compare records over the Tibetan Plateau and eventually date other Tibetan records stratigraphically. Comparisons to an existing record from Nam Co, a lake 350 km west of Tangra Yumco, a varve dated record from the Makran Accretionary Wedge, and a stack record from East Asia reveal many similarities. However, model output data of geomagnetic field models for the coordinates of Tangra Yumco do not agree with our findings.

  11. Evaluation of the 1985-1990 IGRF secular variation candidates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cain, J.C.; Kluth, C.

    1987-01-01

    The IGRF secular variation model for 1985-1990 was adopted by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy at its Prague meeting in August 1985 as an average of the three candidate models submitted to the committee. We compared the three models at epoch 1985.0 against each other and against a new model based on observatory data available as of July 1, 1985. These comparisons showed that one of the three candidate models disagreed more with the other two and our model, especially in the eastern Pacific. None of the candidate models was seen to respond to a change in the secular variation of the vertical component that appears to have taken place most strongly in the western Pacific area since 1982. The lack of satellite data was seen to be a significant handicap towards prediction of the field change over most of the Earth's surface, especially the southern oceans. Maximum errors of any model are estimated to be of the order of 80 nT a-1. ?? 1987.

  12. Two-scale model of a geomagnetic field variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braginsky, S. I.; Le Mouel, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of the vertical scale is investigated by considering a simple kinematic two-scale model of fluid flow inducing a variable magnetic field. Depending on the time constant, the induced magnetic field displays a variety of behaviors and geometries. In the high-frequency case, for example, a strong magnetic field tangential to the core mantle boundary, and hidden in the Delta layer, can be generated. A detailed computation and description of this magnetic field are presented. Some possible features of the secular variation of the actual geomagnetic field are discussed in the light of the model proposed here.

  13. Secular obliquity variations of Ceres and Pallas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bills, Bruce G.; Scott, Bryan R.

    2017-03-01

    We examine variations in the orientations of the orbit poles and spin poles of Ceres and Pallas, on time scales of a few million years. We consider these two bodies together because they have similar orbits, but very different present states of knowledge concerning internal mass distribution and spin pole orientation. For Ceres, the Dawn mission has recently provided accurate estimates of the current spin pole orientation, and the degree 2 spherical harmonics of the gravitational potential. The polar moment of inertia is not as well constrained, but plausible bounds are known. For Pallas, we have estimates of the shape of the body, and spin pole orientation and angular rate, all derived from optical light curves. Using those input parameters, and the readily computed secular variations in the orbit pole, we can compute long term variations in the spin pole orientation. This provides information concerning long term variations in insolation, which controls stability of surface volatiles.

  14. RESEARCH PAPERS : Secular variation of the poloidal magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Archana

    1998-01-01

    A region of enhanced conductivity at the base of the mantle is modelled by an infinitesimally thin sheet of uniform effective conductance adjacent to the core-mantle boundary. Currents induced in this sheet by the temporally varying magnetic field produced by the geodynamo give rise to a discontinuity in the horizontal components of the poloidal magnetic field on crossing the sheet, while the radial component is continuous across the sheet. Treating the rest of the mantle as an insulator, the horizontal components of the poloidal magnetic field and their secular variation at the top of the core are determined from geomagnetic field, secular variation and secular acceleration models. It is seen that for an assumed effective conductance of the sheet of 108 S, which may be not unrealistic, the changes produced in the horizontal components of the poloidal field at the top of the core are usually <=10 per cent, but corrections to the secular variation in these components at the top of the core are typically 40 per cent, which is greater than the differences that exist between different secular variation models for the same epoch. Given the assumption that all the conductivity of the mantle is concentrated into a thin shell, the present method is not restricted to a weakly conducting mantle. Results obtained are compared with perturbation solutions.

  15. Evaluation of a new paleosecular variation activity index as a diagnostic tool for geomagnetic field variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panovska, Sanja; Constable, Catherine

    2015-04-01

    Geomagnetic indices like Dst, K and A, have been used since the early twentieth century to characterize activity in the external part of the modern geomagnetic field and as a diagnostic for space weather. These indices reflect regional and global activity and serve as a proxy for associated physical processes. However, no such tools are yet available for the internal geomagnetic field driven by the geodynamo in Earth's liquid outer core. To some extent this reflects limited spatial and temporal sampling for longer timescales associated with paleomagnetic secular variation, but recent efforts in both paleomagnetic data gathering and modeling activity suggest that longer term characterization of the internal geomagnetic weather/climate and its variability would be useful. Specifically, we propose an index for activity in paleosecular variation, useful as both a local and global measure of field stability during so-called normal secular variation and as a means of identifying more extreme behavior associated with geomagnetic excursions and reversals. To date, geomagnetic excursions have been identified by virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) deviating more than some conventional limit from the geographic pole (often 45 degrees), and/or by periods of significant intensity drops below some critical value, for example 50% of the present-day field. We seek to establish a quantitative definition of excursions in paleomagnetic records by searching for synchronous directional deviations and lows in relative paleointensity. We combine paleointensity variations with deviations from the expected geocentric axial dipole (GAD) inclination in a single parameter, which we call the paleosecular variation (PSV) activity index. This new diagnostic can be used on any geomagnetic time series (individual data records, model predictions, spherical harmonic coefficients, etc.) to characterize the level of paleosecular variation activity, find excursions, or even study incipient reversals

  16. Fluctuations in tides and geomagnetic variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohsiek, A.; Kiefer, M.; Meek, C. E.; Manson, A. H.

    Middle atmosphere tidal winds and the daily geomagnetic Sq-variation show a day-to-day variability, both with a local behaviour. Due to the main cause of the Sq-variation, the ionospheric dynamo effect, day-to-day fluctuation of Sq could be raised by fluctuations in tides. This coupling of fluctuations is investigated with radar wind data measured at Saskatoon at around 100 km height and with magnetic data from four observatories in the vicinity of the radar. We show that our definition of fluctuations exhibits properties of atmospheric tides in the winds and that the magnetic data can be assumed to represent a local behaviour. We find that there are some significant correlations between fluctuations in winds and magnetic variations. Apparently the local fluctuation of geomagnetic variations is weakly coupled not only to the fluctuations of the semidiurnal tides but also to those of the mean winds.

  17. Secular variation and core-flow modelling with stable strafication at the top of the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Richard; Buffett, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Observed geomagnetic secular variation has been used for many years to provide an observational constraint on the dynamics of the core through the modelling of its surface flow. Recent results in both seismology and mineral physics provide strong evidence of a stably stratified layer at the top of the core, which has substantial implications for the calculation of such flows. It has been assumed for many years that the dynamic state at the core surface is close to tangentially geostrophic, and pure stable stratification also requires a flow to be toroidal. Combining these two conditions requires variations in flow that are completely zonal toroidal, which are known not to provide an adequate explanation of the observed secular variation. However, a stably stratified layer can support flow instabilities of a more general character. Buffett (2014) has recently provided a model in which zonal toroidal motions are associated with the excitation of a zonal poloidal instability. This model is able to explain the broad variation of the axial dipole over the past 100 years, and also to explain feature of geomagnetic jerks that cannot be explained by purely torsional motions. This model has inspired a new generation of core-flow models, with a substantial time-varying zonal poloidal component, something that is absent from most models of core surface flow. Here, we present these new models, and consider to what extent this flow structure can explain the details of secular variation. We also consider the implications for the connection between core-surface flow and length-of-day variation - a stably stratified layer has implications for the interpretation of core flow and the Earth's angular momentum budget. Finally, we consider the ability of core-surface flow models to probe the structure of the stably- stratified layer. Buffett (2014). Geomagnetic fluctuations reveal stable stratification at the top of the Earth's core, Nature 507, 484-487, doi:10.1038/nature13122

  18. Holocene paleomagnetic secular variation records from the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Zheng, H.; Kissel, C.; Laj, C. E.; Deng, C.

    2011-12-01

    Paleomagnetic study on marine sediments can provide continuous, high-resolution records of short-term fluctuations of the Earth's magnetic field, which can be used for inter-core correlations at regional scale. However, Holocene paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) records from marine sediment are still rare. Detailed paleomagnetic and rock magnetic studies were conducted on u-channel samples from rapidly deposited sediment core MD06-3040 (27.72°N, 121.78°E; 46 m water depth), on the East China Sea (ECS) inner continental shelf Holocene marine sequence, during IMAGES XIV Marco Polo 2 cruise on the R. V. Marion Dufresne (IPEV). The 19.22 m long core spans the entire Holocene, with theoretical high-resolution of about 20-year for paleomagnetic studies, and paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) for the last 7500 years was retrieved from the uppermost 15.8 m fine-grained sediments. The dominant carrier of the remanent magnetization is magnetite, with some contributions from iron sulfide, such as greigite below 3.5 m, due to post-depositional diagenesis. The Characteristic Remanent magnetization (ChRM) is well defined by a single magnetization component and Maximum Angular Deviations (MAD) lower than 5°. Therefore, the information of paleomagnetic directions is still preserved after diagenetic alteration. Inclination of core MD06-3040 presents seven relatively high peaks, and declination presents four obvious eastern ward drifts during the last 7500 years. These variations can be well compared to that obtained from lakes in Japan, and some features are also comparable to the records from Europe with temporal offset. The power spectrum analysis shows that the inclination has significant power at the period of ~660 years, and declination at the period of ~3500 years and 1300 years. These periods are similar to that from Japan and North America, in which the period of ~1300 years for declination has been reported in many areas around the world. The observed PSV from

  19. Solar generated quasi-biennial geomagnetic variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiura, M.; Poros, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    The existence of highly correlated quasi-biennial variations in the geomagnetic field and in solar activity is demonstrated. The analysis uses a numerical filter technique applied to monthly averages of the geomagnetic horizontal component and of the Zurich relative sunspot number. Striking correlations are found between the quasi-biennial geomagnetic variations determined from several magnetic observatories located at widely different longitudes, indicating a worldwide nature of the obtained variation. The correlation coefficient between the filtered Dst index and the filtered relative sunspot number is found to be -0.79 at confidence level greater than 99% with a time-lag of 4 months, with solar activity preceding the Dst variation. The correlation between the unfiltered data of Dst and of the sunspot number is also high with a similar time-lag. Such a timelag has not been discussed in the literature, and a further study is required to establish the mode of sun-earth relationship that gives this time delay.

  20. Variations in the geomagnetic dipole moment during the Holocene and the past 50 kyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; Riisager, Peter; Donadini, Fabio; Snowball, Ian; Muscheler, Raimund; Korhonen, Kimmo; Pesonen, Lauri J.

    2008-07-01

    All absolute paleointensity data published in peer-reviewed journals were recently compiled in the GEOMAGIA50 database. Based on the information in GEOMAGIA50, we reconstruct variations in the geomagnetic dipole moment over the past 50 kyr, with a focus on the Holocene period. A running-window approach is used to determine the axial dipole moment that provides the optimal least-squares fit to the paleointensity data, whereas associated error estimates are constrained using a bootstrap procedure. We subsequently compare the reconstruction from this study with previous reconstructions of the geomagnetic dipole moment, including those based on cosmogenic radionuclides ( 10Be and 14C). This comparison generally lends support to the axial dipole moments obtained in this study. Our reconstruction shows that the evolution of the dipole moment was highly dynamic, and the recently observed rates of change (5% per century) do not appear unique. We observe no apparent link between the occurrence of archeomagnetic jerks and changes in the geomagnetic dipole moment, suggesting that archeomagnetic jerks most likely represent drastic changes in the orientation of the geomagnetic dipole axis or periods characterized by large secular variation of the non-dipole field. This study also shows that the Holocene geomagnetic dipole moment was high compared to that of the preceding ˜ 40 kyr, and that ˜ 4 · 10 22 Am 2 appears to represent a critical threshold below which geomagnetic excursions and reversals occur.

  1. Secular Variation Across the Oceans: a Retrospective Study from 35 Years of Shipboard Total Field Measurements in the NE Atlantic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, C. A.; Verhoef, J.; Macnab, R.

    1992-01-01

    This is a pilot study to determine whether secular variation information can be retrieved from underway shipboard total field measurements with sufficient accuracy to complement geomagnetic data from land-based observatories. Applying the various new techniques described in this report, we extracted values of the total field at 42,677 crossovers or ship track intersection points contained in data sets collected between 18 degrees N and 50 degress N in the NE Atlantic, and extending temporally from 1955 to 1990. We used an edited subset of these total field values to derive the secular variation at 30,140 different locations in the study area, and compared the results with DGRF secular variation over the study area, calculated at 5 year intervals. The derived and DGRF values agree well, showing that indeed marine data can be a source for secular variations. However the analysis demonstrated that due to inherent noise in the marine data, only minor improvements on the DGRF values for the secular variation can be achieved.

  2. Secular variation study from non-welded pyroclastic deposits from Montagne Pelée volcano, Martinique (West Indies)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genevey, A.; Gallet, Y.; Boudon, G.

    2002-07-01

    We present palaeomagnetic data obtained from large clasts collected in non-welded pyroclastic deposits from Montagne Pelée volcano (Martinique Island, West Indies). These deposits, dated by the 14C method from 5000 yr BP to the present, comprise block- and ash-flows, ash- and pumice-flows and pumice fallouts. Alternating fields treatment was as a routine chosen to demagnetise large samples for which the magnetisation was measured with a specially designed inductometer. The mean directions obtained from block- and ash-flow deposits of the 1902 and 1929 eruptions are in good agreement with the expected geomagnetic directions at these times in Martinique. The so-called P1 eruption (˜1345 AD), which is characterised by a rarely observed transition from a Peléean to a Plinian eruptive style, allows a direct comparison of the palaeomagnetic directions obtained from the three types of pyroclastic deposits. All deposits provide identical mean directions, which further demonstrates the suitability of the non-welded pyroclastic deposits for geomagnetic secular variation study with a very good accuracy and precision. The possibility of using pyroclastic deposits is promising for obtaining a wider distribution of sampling sites, which may better allow us to constrain our knowledge on the geomagnetic secular variation. We find that large geomagnetic changes occurred in Martinique during the last millennium, while the variations appear more limited prior to this period.

  3. Long Term Geomagnetic Variations and Whole-Mantle Convection Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggin, A. J.; Steinberger, B. M.; Aubert, J.; Suttie, N.; Holme, R.; Torsvik, T. H.; van der Meer, D.; Van Hinsbergen, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    It has long been suspected that palaeomagnetically-observed variations in geomagnetic behaviour occurring over tens to hundreds of millions of years result from changes in core-mantle boundary (CMB) heat flow, itself controlled by lower mantle dynamics. Furthermore, the last few decades have seen numerous claims of causal relations between the palaeomagnetic record and surface events inferred from the geological record that invoke whole-mantle convection processes (sinking slabs, rising plumes, and true polar wander). Recent findings in seismology, geodynamics, and the numerical simulation of both mantle convection and the geodynamo do provide qualitative support for such ideas. CMB heat flow is probably highly heterogeneous and susceptible to substantial changes through variations in locations and rates of subduction, plume flux, or simply by rotations of the entire pattern with respect to the geodynamo via true polar wander (TPW). Numerical geodynamo modelling suggests that long term geomagnetic behaviour is sensitive to changes in total heat flow and its spatial pattern but cannot yet quantitatively confirm that the variations we expect to see in CMB heat flow over tens to hundreds of Myr (up to several tens of percent) are sufficient to modify the behaviour as observed. The most dramatic change in long-term geomagnetic behaviour observed in the last 200 Myr was between the mid-Jurassic (~ 170 Myr ago) and the mid-Cretaceous (~ 120 Myr ago) when average reversal frequency decreased from > 8 Myr-1 to < 0.1 Myr-1, mean field intensity appeared to increase by a factor of ~ 2, and the pattern of secular variation became much more stable. This transition was coincident with a major TPW event that probably moved patches of high CMB heat flux towards higher latitudes, a process which geodynamo models suggest would cause changes to geomagnetic behaviour similar to those observed. Consequently, we suspect that TPW played a role in causing this transition. TPW may not be

  4. Secular variation of a metallic asteroid dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, J. F. J.; Harrison, R. J.; Neufeld, J. A.; Nimmo, F.; Herrero-Albillos, J.; Kronast, F.; Weiss, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms by which inward core solidification may drive dynamo activity, and the properties of any fields that may result from this process, are highly uncertain. The fast cooling rates of the IVA iron meteorites suggest that their parent core had its silicate mantle removed by planetary collisions during the early solar system. Due to the resulting rapid radiative surface cooling, the IVA parent core solidified from the top-down, permitting a cold metallic crust that feasibly experienced fields generated by the hot interior liquid as it inwardly solidified. The IVA meteorites therefore potentially contain unique paleomagnetic information regarding top-down solidification. Through x-ray microscopy of the cloudy zone in the Steinbach and Chinautla meteorites and traditional paleomagnetic measurements on silicates extracted from the Steinbach, Bishop Canyon and São João Nepomuceno meteorites, we argue that the IVA parent core generated an intense (>100 μT) and secularly varying (time-scale <100 kyr) field during top-down solidification. These results show that certain iron meteorites are capable of having experienced dynamo fields, and that asteroids can generate directionally varying magnetic activity, strengthening claims that the fundamentals of dynamo activity are consistent across small and large bodies. Models of the thermochemical evolution and solidification of an unmantled core suggest that this field resulted from liquid motion induced by the repeated delamination and sinking of material from the base of the inwardly solidifying crust. This efficient dynamo generation mechanism was likely capable of readily creating magnetic activity at the slow cooling rates expected within mantled, inwardly solidifying cores (e.g., Mercury, Ganymede, many asteroids). Combining this observation with that of efficient solidification-driven dynamos during bottom-up asteroid core solidification, it is likely that magnetic activity was widespread in the early solar

  5. Geomagnetic Field Variations as Determined from Bulgarian Archaeomagnetic Data. Part II: The Last 8000 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacheva, Mary; Jordanova, Neli; Karloukovski, Vassil

    The knowledge about past secular variations of the geomagnetic field is achieved on the basis of archaeomagnetic researches of which the Bulgarian studies form an extended data set. In Part I (Kovacheva and Toshkov, 1994), the methodology used in the Sofia palaeomagnetic laboratory was described and the secular variation curves for the last 2000 years were shown. In Part II (this paper), the basic characteristics of the prehistoric materials used in the archaeomagnetic studies are emphasised, particularly in the context of the rock magnetic studies used in connection with palaeointensity determinations. The results of magnetic anisotropy studies of the prehistoric ovens and other fired structures are summarised, including the anisotropy correction of the palaeointensity results for prehistoric materials, different from bricks and pottery. Curves of the direction and intensity of the geomagnetic field during the last 8000 years in Bulgaria are given. The available directional and intensity values have been used to calculate the variation curve of the virtual dipole moment (VDM) for the last 8000 years based on different time interval averages. The path of virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) positions is discussed.

  6. Secular trends and geographical variations in sex ratio at birth.

    PubMed

    Pavic, Dario

    2015-12-01

    Numerous studies have established the presence of secular trends and geographical variations in sex ratio at birth, albeit with mixed and often contradictory results. In addition, a multitude of environmental, social, economic, demographic and other factors has been proposed to influence the sex ratio at birth, thus complicating the interpretation of both secular trends and geographical variations. In this paper, the current state of knowledge on these issues is presented and critically assessed. Analyzing longer time series of sex ratio at birth with possible cycles and random components is given priority over establishing simple linear trends in the data. In analyzing the geographical variation in the sex ratio at birth, two different levels of analysis are distinguished (global and local), and two different sets of factors affecting the sex ratio at birth are proposed accordingly. Some key guidelines and future research directions are also proposed.

  7. The quasi-biennial variation in the geomagnetic field: a global characteristics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Jiaming; Du, Aimin

    2016-04-01

    The periodicity of 1.5-3 years, namely the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), has been identified in the solar, geophysical, and atmospheric variability. Sugiura (1976) investigated the observatory annual means over 1900-1970 and confirmed the QBO in the geomagnetic field. At present, studying the quasi-biennial oscillation becomes substantial for separating the internal/external parts in the geomagnetic observations. For the internal field, two typical periodicities, namely the 6-year oscillation in the geomagnetic secular acceleration (SA) and the geomagnetic jerk (occurs in 1-2 years), have close period to the QBO. Recently, a global quasi-biennial fluctuation was identified in the geomagnetic core field model (Silva et al., 2012). Silva et al. speculated this 2.5 years signal to either external source remaining in the core field model or consequence of the methods used to construct the model. As more high-quality data from global observatories are available, it is a good opportunity to characterize the geomagnetic QBO in the global range. In this paper, we investigate the QBO in the observatory monthly geomagnetic field X, Y, and Z components spanning 1985-2010. We employ the observatory hourly means database from the World Data Center for Geomagnetism (WDC) for the investigation. Wavelet analysis is used to detect and identify the QBO, while Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis to obtain the statistics of the QBO. We apply the spherical harmonic analysis on QBO's amplitude, in order to quantify and separate internal and external sources. Three salient periods respectively at 2.9, 2.2, and 1.7 years, are identified in the amplitude spectrum over 1988-2008. The oscillation with the period of ~2.2 years is most prominent in all field components and further studied. In the X component the QBO is attenuated towards the polar regions, while in the Z component the amplitude of QBO increases with increasing of the geomagnetic latitude. At the high latitudes, the QBO

  8. Long-term variation in the upper atmosphere as seen in the geomagnetic solar quiet daily variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, Atsuki; Koyama, Yukinobu; Nose, Masahito; Hori, Tomoaki; Otsuka, Yuichi; Yatagai, Akiyo

    2014-12-01

    Characteristics of long-term variation in the amplitude of solar quiet (Sq) geomagnetic field daily variation have been investigated using 1-h geomagnetic field data obtained from 69 geomagnetic observation stations within the period of 1947 to 2013. The Sq amplitude observed at these geomagnetic stations showed a clear dependence on the 10- to 12-year solar activity cycle and tended to be enhanced during each solar maximum phase. The Sq amplitude was the smallest around the minimum of solar cycle 23/24 in 2008 to 2009. The relationship between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude was approximately linear but about 53% of geomagnetic stations showed a weak nonlinear relation to the solar F10.7 index. In order to remove the effect of solar activity seen in the long-term variation of the Sq amplitude, we calculated a linear or second-order fitting curve between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude during 1947 to 2013 and examined the residual Sq amplitude, which is defined as the deviation from the fitting curve. As a result, the majority of trends in the residual Sq amplitude that passed through a trend test showed negative values over a wide region. This tendency was relatively strong in Europe, India, the eastern part of Canada, and New Zealand. The relationship between the magnetic field intensity at 100-km altitude and residual Sq amplitude showed an anti-correlation for about 71% of the geomagnetic stations. Furthermore, the residual Sq amplitude at the equatorial station (Addis Ababa) was anti-correlated with the absolute value of the magnetic field inclination. This implies movement of the equatorial electrojet due to the secular variation of the ambient magnetic field.

  9. Geomagnetic Variations of Near-polar Regions and Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchistova, Z. B.; Kutinov, Y. G.

    In polar region geomagnetic variations play active role to non-linear tectonic processes. This analysis is based on spatial-time spectral representation of geomagnetic variation and wave migration transformation. Many perturbations in electromagnetic fields may because by external factors (e.g. magnetic storms, ionosphere anomalies and other phenomena related to solar activity) "trigging" tectonic processes but having no direct relation to the processes of their preparation. Geophysical processes are responsible for perturbations in Earth's rotation and orientation on wide range of time-scale, from less than a day of millions of years. The geological structure of some sites of Earth's crust promotes occurrence of wave guides a number of geophysical fields (acoustic, seismic, electromagnetic), usually of transportation of acoustic, seismic, electromagnetic energy in Earth's crust are coincide spatially. During last 250 mln years Arctic Segment has been developing as an autonomous region with circumpolar zonality of geomagnetic fields, and mass - and-energy transfer in its bowlers as well as shitting of lithospheric plates and expansion of ocean are caused by rotation forces under of expanding planet. The dynamic structure of the geomagnetic variations may be characteriz ed by the variations of the order-chaos state. The order manifest itself in the rhythmic change of the medium state. Analysis of amplitude and phase of geomagnetic variations can be information on ecological state of regions. Geomagnetic variations is intrincically a multiscale process in time and space. One of the most important features of geomagnetic variations is multicyclic character, whish predetermined both extent and character of geomagnetic show, and specific features. Recently, there are collected many facts, show dependence between the processes in the Earth's biosphere, the elements of it, gelio- geo- physical and meteorological factors. The recent experimental data gives us opportunity

  10. A Secular Variation Model for Igrf-12 Based on Swarm Data and Inverse Geodynamo Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, A.; Aubert, J.; Erwan, T.

    2014-12-01

    We are proposing a secular variation candidate model for the 12th generation of the international geomagnetic reference field, spanning the years 2015-2020. The novelty of our approach stands in the initialization of a 5-yr long integration of a numerical model of Earth's dynamo by means of inverse geodynamo modelling, as introduced by Aubert (GJI, 2014). This inverse technique combines the information coming from the observations (in the form of an instantaneous estimate of the Gauss coefficients for the magnetic field and its secular variation) with that coming from the multivariate statistics of a free run of a numerical model of the geodynamo. The Gauss coefficients and their error covariance properties are determined from Swarm data along the lines detailed by Thébault et al. (EPS, 2010). The numerical model of the geodynamo is the so-called Coupled Earth Dynamo model (Aubert et al., Nature, 2013), whose variability possesses a strong level of similarity with that of the geomagnetic field. We illustrate and assess the potential of this methodology by applying it to recent time intervals, with an initialization based on CHAMP data, and conclude by presenting our SV candidate, whose initialization is based on the 1st year of Swarm data This work is supported by the French "Agence Nationale de la Recherche" under the grant ANR-11-BS56-011 (http://avsgeomag.ipgp.fr) and by the CNES. References: Aubert, J., Geophys. J. Int. 197, 1321-1334, 2014, doi: 10.1093/gji/ggu064 Aubert, J., Finlay, C., Fournier, F. Nature 502, 219-223, 2013, doi: 10.1038/nature12574 Thébault E. , A. Chulliat, S. Maus, G. Hulot, B. Langais, A. Chambodut and M. Menvielle, Earth Planets Space, Vol. 62 (No. 10), pp. 753-763, 2010.

  11. An empirical model of the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yamazaki, Y.; Yumoto, K.; Cardinal, M.G.; Fraser, B.J.; Hattori, P.; Kakinami, Y.; Liu, J.Y.; Lynn, K.J.W.; Marshall, R.; McNamara, D.; Nagatsuma, T.; Nikiforov, V.M.; Otadoy, R.E.; Ruhimat, M.; Shevtsov, B.M.; Shiokawa, K.; Abe, S.; Uozumi, T.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2011-01-01

    An empirical model of the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation has been constructed based on geomagnetic data obtained from 21 stations along the 210 Magnetic Meridian of the Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network (CPMN) from 1996 to 2007. Using the least squares fitting method for geomagnetically quiet days (Kp ??? 2+), the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation at each station was described as a function of solar activity SA, day of year DOY, lunar age LA, and local time LT. After interpolation in latitude, the model can describe solar-activity dependence and seasonal dependence of solar quiet daily variations (S) and lunar quiet daily variations (L). We performed a spherical harmonic analysis (SHA) on these S and L variations to examine average characteristics of the equivalent external current systems. We found three particularly noteworthy results. First, the total current intensity of the S current system is largely controlled by solar activity while its focus position is not significantly affected by solar activity. Second, we found that seasonal variations of the S current intensity exhibit north-south asymmetry; the current intensity of the northern vortex shows a prominent annual variation while the southern vortex shows a clear semi-annual variation as well as annual variation. Thirdly, we found that the total intensity of the L current system changes depending on solar activity and season; seasonal variations of the L current intensity show an enhancement during the December solstice, independent of the level of solar activity. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. A first secular variation curve for the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, J. I.; Osete, M. L.; Ruiz-Martínez, V. C.; Fabien, A.; Tarling, D. H.

    2003-04-01

    A palaeomagnetic study has been carried out at 22 archaeological sites in the Iberian Peninsula. These new results together with data from 4 sites previously studied in Iberia and data from neighbouring countries (southern of France and northern Morocco) have been compiled in order to obtain a first Secular Variation Curve for the Iberian Peninsula. Data from France and Morocco were selected from the Archaeomagnetic Database compiled by the Dept. of Geological Sciences, University of Plymouth, UK (D. Tarling). The selection criteria adopted was the following: Dating errors <50 years, number of samples > 5 and α95 < 3^o. A total amount of 54 data points with ages ranging from 200 BC up to 1500 AD have been used to construct the Madrid Preliminary Secular Variation Curve for the Iberian Peninsula, albeit with a gap between the 7th and 10th centuries. Palaeomagnetic directions were corrected to Madrid, using the Via-Pole Conversion method (Noel and Batt, 1990, Geoph. J. Inter, 70, 201--204). A 100 year something window moving in 50 years increments was applied to the data.

  13. Holocene Full-Vector Secular Variation from African Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, S.; Platzman, E. S.; Johnson, T. C.; Scholz, C. A.; Cohen, A. S.; Russell, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    We are developing a regional pattern of Holocene paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) from four lakes in East Africa - Lake Turkana (3°N), Lake Victoria (1°S), Lake Tanganyika (5°S), and Lake Malawi (10°S). Detailed paleomagnetic and rock magnetic measurements have been made on two cores from Lake Malawi (9m meters in depth, last ~10,000 years), two cores from Lake Victoria (8 m, last ~8,000 years), 11 cores from Lake Turkana (2-9 m, last ~10,000 years), and one core from Lake Tanganyika (5 m, last ~5,000 years). Our rock magnetic studies identify significant intervals of magnetic mineral dissolution in Lakes Victoria and Tanganyika making parts of these cores unsuitable for relative paleointensity studies. On the other hand, rock magnetic variability in the Lake Malawi and Lake Turkana cores are stable and correlatable among cores. We have recovered directional secular variation records from Lakes Malawi, Victoria, and Turkana. Millennial-scale inclination and declination features can be correlated among cores at each lake and between lakes. We have also recovered relative paleointensity records from Lakes Malawi and Turkana. More than 20 radiocarbon dates and detailed seismic stratigraphy (Turkana) provide critical added information for correlating and dating the paleomagnetic records.

  14. Estimating the change in asymptotic direction due to secular changes in the geomagnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flueckiger, E. O.; Smart, D. F.; Shea, M. A.; Gentile, L. C.; Bathurat, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of geomagnetic optics, as described by the asymptotic directions of approach, is extremely useful in the analysis of cosmic radiation data. However, when changes in cutoff occur as a result of evolution in the geomagnetic field, there are corresponding changes in the asymptotic cones of acceptance. A method is introduced of estimating the change in the asymptotic direction of approach for vertically incident cosmic ray particles from a reference set of directions at a specific epoch by considering the change in the geomagnetic cutoff.

  15. Comments on 'Remarks on the secular change in the energy density spectrum of the geomagnetic field' by Joachim Meyer.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alldredge, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    Meyer has discussed only the Rn aspect of the Alldredge (1984) paper he is criticising. He has ignored the pictorial demonstration of the need for higher harmonics to properly describe the secular variation field than the main field as demonstrated. This more or less independent demonstration supports the general conclusion of that paper. -from Author

  16. Interplanetary magnetic field and geomagnetic Dst variations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, V. L.; Desai, U. D.

    1973-01-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field has been shown to influence the ring current field represented by Dst. Explorer 28 hourly magnetic field observations have been used with the hourly Dst values. The moderate geomagnetic storms of 60 gammas and quiet-time fluctuations of 10 to 30 gammas are correlated with the north to south change of the interplanetary field component perpendicular to the ecliptic. This change in the interplanetary field occurs one to three hours earlier than the corresponding change in the Dst field.

  17. Archeointensities in Greece during the Neolithic period: New insights into material selection and secular variation curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjat, G.; Aidona, E.; Kondopoulou, D.; Camps, P.; Rathossi, C.; Poidras, T.

    2013-02-01

    Numerous archeomagnetic studies have provided high quality data for both the direction and the intensity of the geomagnetic field, essentially in Europe for the last 10 millennia. In particular, Greece supplies a lot of archeological materials due to its impressive cultural heritage and volcanic activity, so that numerous data have been obtained from burnt clays or historical lava flows. The most recent Greek secular variation curves are available for the last 8 millennia for the intensity and the last 6 millennia for the direction. Nevertheless, the coverage still presents several gaps for periods older than 2500 BC. In an effort to complete the Greek curve and extend it to older times, we present the archeointensity results from three Neolithic settlements in Northern Greece. The samples are of two different natures: burnt structures from Avgi (5250 ± 150 BC) and Vasili (4800 ± 200 BC), as well as ceramics from Dikili Tash (4830 ± 80 BC) and Vasili (4750 ± 250 BC). The samples have been subjected to standard rock magnetic analyses in order to estimate the thermal stability and the domain state of the magnetic carriers before archeointensity measurements. Surprisingly, very few ceramic samples provided reliable archeointensities whereas samples from burnt structures presented a very good success rate. Complementary studies showed that a detailed examination of the matrix color, following archeological information and classification standards can be a decisive test for pre-selection of sherds. In spite of these unsuccessful measurements from ceramics, we obtained an intensity value of 73.5 ± 1.1 μT for Dikili Tash, a higher value than the other data obtained in the same area, during the same period. However we do not have evidences for a technical artefact during the experiment. The burnt structures yielded two reliable archeointensities of 36.1 ± 1.8 μT and 46.6 ± 3.4 μT for Avgi and Vasili, respectively. Finally, we achieved a new archeomagnetic dating

  18. Secular variation of the Earth's magnetic field in the Balkan region during the last eight millennia based on archaeomagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tema, E.; Kondopoulou, D.

    2011-08-01

    The first archaeomagnetic secular variation (SV) curves for the whole Southern Balkan Peninsula are presented. These are based on all data within a 700 km circle centred at Thessaloniki (40.60oN, 23.00oE). This data set consists of 325 directional and 625 intensity data mainly from Greece, Bulgaria, Serbia and southern Hungary. Some data from southern Italy are also included. The sliding moving window technique, was used to calculate a continuous SV curve for intensity while the directional SV curves were calculated using the bivariate extension of the Fisher statistics. These curves are well constrained and clearly show the main features of the geomagnetic field variation in this region during the last eight millennia. Comparisons with the predictions of the SCHA.DIF.3K and SCHA.DIF.8K regional and the CALS7K.2 and ARCH3K.1 global geomagnetic field models show a good agreement for the last 3000 years but differences for older times. The Balkan SV curves identify several rapid changes of the geomagnetic field in eastern Europe and can be used as reference curves for archaeomagnetic dating in the Balkan Peninsula.

  19. Long-term variation in the upper atmosphere as seen in the geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) daily variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, A.; Koyama, Y.; Yatagai, A. I.; Nose, M.; Hori, T.; Otsuka, Y.

    2012-12-01

    It has been well-known that geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) daily variation is produced by the global ionospheric currents flowing in the E-region, which are generated by dynamo process via interaction between the neutral wind and ionospheric plasma in a region of the lower thermosphere and ionosphere. Then, to investigate the Sq amplitude is essential for understanding the long-term variations in the ionospheric conductivity and neutral wind of the lower thermosphere and ionosphere. Recently, Elias et al. [2010] reported that the Sq amplitude tends to increase by 5.4-9.9 % in the middle latitudes in a period of 1961-2001. They mentioned that the long-term variation of ionospheric conductivity associated with geomagnetic secular variation mainly determines the Sq trend, but that the rest component is due to ionospheric conductivity enhancement associated with cooling effect in the thermosphere due to increasing greenhouse gas. In the present study, we clarify the characteristics of the long-term variation in the Sq amplitude using the long-term observation data of geomagnetic field and neutral wind. In the present analysis, we used the F10.7 solar flux as a good indicator of the variation in the solar irradiance in the EUV and UV range as well as geomagnetic field data with time resolution of 1 hour observed at 184 geomagnetic stations. The definition of the Sq amplitude is the difference of the H-component between the maximum and minimum every day when the Kp index is less than 4. As a result, the long-term variation in the Sq amplitude at all the geomagnetic stations shows a strong correlation with the solar F10.7 flux which depends on 11-year solar activity. The relationship between the Sq amplitude and F10.7 flux was not linear but nonlinear. This nonlinearity could be interpreted as the decrease of production rate of electrons and ions in the ionosphere for the strong EUV and UV fluxes as already reported by Balan et al. [1993]. In order to minimize the solar

  20. The visible spectrum of Pluto: secular and longitudinal variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzi, Vania; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemí; Emery, Joshua P.; Licandro, Javier; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Grundy, Will; Binzel, Richard P.

    2015-11-01

    Continuous near-infrared spectroscopic observations during the last 30 years enabled the characterization of the Pluto's surface and the study of its variability. Nevertheless, only few data are available in the visible range, where the nature of the complex-organics can be studied.For this reason, we started an observational campaign to obtain the Pluto's relative reflectance in the visible range, with the aim of characterizing the different components of its surface, and providing ground based observations in support of the New Horizons mission. We observed Pluto on six nights in 2014, with the imager/spectrograph ACAM@WHT (La Palma, Spain). We obtained six spectra in the 0.40 - 0.93 µm range, that covered a whole Pluto's rotational period (6.4 days).To study longitudinal variations, we computed for all the spectra the spectral slope, and the position and the depth of the methane ice absorption bands. Also, to search for secular or seasonal variations we compared our data with previously published results.All the spectra present a red slope, indicating the presence of complex organics on Pluto's surface, and show the methane ice absorption bands between 0.73 and 0.90 μm. We also report the detection of the CH4 absorption band at 0.62 μm, already detected in the spectra of Makemake and Eris. The measurement of the band depth at 0.62 μm in the new spectra of Pluto, and in the spectra of Makemake and Eris, permits us to estimate the Lambert coefficient, not measured yet at this wavelength, at a temperature of 30 K and 40 K.We find that all the CH4 bands present a blue shift. This shift is minimum at the Charon-facing hemisphere, where the CH4 is also more abundant, indicating a higher degree of saturation of CH4 in the CH4:N2 dilution at this hemisphere.Comparing with data in the literature, we found that the longitudinal and secular variations of the parameters measured in our spectra are in accordance with previous results and with the distribution of the dark

  1. De-noising Diurnal Variation Data in Geomagnetic Field Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onovughe, E.

    2017-01-01

    Ground based geomagnetic observatory series have been used to investigate and describe the residuals between a continuous geomagnetic field model and observed diurnal variation for noise-removal of signal due to external field of magnetospheric ring current sources. In all the observatories studied, the residuals in the X-direction consistently show the noisiest signal. Results show that the residuals in the X-direction correlates closely with the RC-index, suggesting an origin from unmodelled external field variation. Notable cross-correlation is also seen between the residuals and the RC-index at zero-lag. Removal/reduction of this unmodelled signal enhances resolution of fine-scale detail in diurnal variation studies.

  2. The Dst index underestimates the solar cycle variation of geomagnetic activity.

    PubMed

    Temerin, Michael; Li, Xinlin

    2015-07-01

    It is known that the correction of the Kyoto Dst index for the secular variation of the Earth's internal field produces a discontinuity in the Kyoto Dst index at the end of each year. We show that this secular correction also introduces a significant baseline error to the Kyoto Dst index that leads to an underestimate of the solar cycle variation of geomagnetic activity and of the strength of the ring current as measured by the Kyoto Dst index. Thus, the average value of the Kyoto Dst index would be approximately 13 nT more negative for the active year 2003 compared to quiet years 2006 and 2009 if the Kyoto Dst index properly measured the effects of the ring current and other currents that influence the Dst observatories. Discontinuities in the Kyoto Dst index at the end of each year have an average value of about 5 nT, but the discontinuity at the end of year 2002 was approximately 12 nT, and the discontinuity at the end of year 1982 may have been as large as 20 nT.

  3. Character of Holocene paleomagnetic secular variation in the tangent cylinder: Evidence from the Chukchi Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Steve; Keigwin, Lloyd; Darby, Dennis

    2016-07-01

    We have carried out a paleomagnetic study on three deep-sea cores from the Chukchi Sea (72°N) in order to characterize the Holocene paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) in this high-latitude region. The Chukchi Sea lies within the geomagnetic-field tangent cylinder and PSV variability in this region might be expected to have a different pattern than PSV at sites located outside the tangent cylinder at lower latitudes. We have recovered correlatable directional PSV records and relative paleointensity records from all three cores. 15 radiocarbon dates were used to develop a chronostratigraphy for the PSV records. These records constitute the highest-resolution full-vector PSV records ever recovered from such high latitudes. We have compared our results with other previous studies from the region and find that our overall PSV is consistent with these other studies, although there are sometimes age differences up to 1000 years between correlatable PSV features. Our statistical PSV characteristics indicate that field variability (VGP angular dispersion) is lower than in regions just south of the Chukchi Sea and outside the tangent cylinder, but our records are probably not long enough to completely characterize PSV. However, our results are consistent with the only other published VGP angular dispersion results from inside the tangent cylinder (Antarctica, 79°S).

  4. Secular variation from Mexican stalagmites: their potential and problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, A. G.; Ford, D. C.; Schwarcz, H. P.; Birchall, T.

    1989-07-01

    As part of a feasibility study to see whether stalagmites could provide useful records of secular variation, nine oriented stalagmites were collected from the states of Chiapas and San Luis Potosí, Mexico. Of these, six have yielded measurable natural remanent magnetizations (NRMs) throughout their length. The cleaned magnetizations of one of these samples were shown unequivocally to have recorded the ambient field, and there is no reason to believe that this is not true of the primary magnetizations of other samples. The sequences of palaeofield directions, up the samples' length, have varying degrees of resolution and serial correlation, depending on the rate of field change as averaged by the stalagmite growth rate and the thickness of the measured specimens. Ages and growth rates were estimated by the U-Th method. The main problem in stalagmite palaeomagnetic analysis is a weak NRM, although this may be avoided by judicious choice of the sample. Samples which possess significant viscous components may be cleaned by alternating field or thermally if there is sufficient magnetic material. Unlike many sediments, stalagmites do not appear to suffer from depositional error problems. Dating problems may include low initial U-content, yielding ages with large errors, and the presence of allogenic 230Th in detritus, which causes older apparent ages. The dating limit is ˜ 350 ka. It is usually not possible to obtain long records comparable with those of most lake sediments, and there are aesthetic reasons for not spoiling caves adorned with stalagmites. The method is seen to be complementary to the use of sedimentary sequences to study palaeosecular variation. Studies of the rock magnetism of stalagmites are presented to suggest the mineral carriers of the magnetization and the origins of the natural remanence.

  5. A study of geomagnetic field variations along the 80° S geomagnetic parallel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepidi, Stefania; Cafarella, Lili; Francia, Patrizia; Piancatelli, Andrea; Pietrolungo, Manuela; Santarelli, Lucia; Urbini, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    The availability of measurements of the geomagnetic field variations in Antarctica at three sites along the 80° S geomagnetic parallel, separated by approximately 1 h in magnetic local time, allows us to study the longitudinal dependence of the observed variations. In particular, using 1 min data from Mario Zucchelli Station, Scott Base and Talos Dome, a temporary installation during 2007-2008 Antarctic campaign, we investigated the diurnal variation and the low-frequency fluctuations (approximately in the Pc5 range, ˜ 1-7 mHz). We found that the daily variation is clearly ordered by local time, suggesting a predominant effect of the polar extension of midlatitude ionospheric currents. On the other hand, the pulsation power is dependent on magnetic local time maximizing around magnetic local noon, when the stations are closer to the polar cusp, while the highest coherence between pairs of stations is observed in the magnetic local nighttime sector. The wave propagation direction observed during selected events, one around local magnetic noon and the other around local magnetic midnight, is consistent with a solar-wind-driven source in the daytime and with substorm-associated processes in the nighttime.

  6. Spatial and Temporal Variations in the Geomagnetic Field Determined From the Paleomagnetism of Sediment Cores From Scientific Ocean Drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acton, G.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying the spatial and temporal variations of the main geomagnetic field at Earth's surface is important for understanding underlying geodynamo processes and conditions near the core-mantle boundary. Much of the geomagnetic variability, known as secular variation, occurs on timescales of tens of years to many thousands of years, requiring the use of paleomagnetic observations to derive continuous records of the ancient field, referred to as paleosecular variation (PSV) records. Marine depositional systems where thick sedimentary sections accumulate at high sedimentation rates provide some of the best locations for obtaining long continuous PSV records that can reveal both the short- and long-term changes in the field. Scientific ocean drilling has been successful at recovering many such sections and the paleomagnetic records from these reveal how the amplitude of PSV differs between sites and through time. In this study, several such records cored during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), and other cruises from high, mid, and low latitudes will be used to quantify time intervals of low and high PSV, to examine time-average properties of the field, to map spatial variations in the angular dispersion of the virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP), and to assess whether the spatial variation in angular dispersion changes with time.

  7. Solar daily variation at geomagnetic observatories in Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahim, Zain; Kumbher, Abdul Salam

    2016-03-01

    A study of solar daily variation is performed using the famous Chapman-Miller method for solar cycles 22 & 23 (1986-2007). The objective is to study the characteristics of Sq variation at Pakistani geomagnetic observatories using solar harmonics and a more traditional five quietest day's method. The data recorded at the Karachi geomagnetic observatory for SC 22 and 23 and data sets from other Pakistani geomagnetic observatories; Sonmiani, Quetta and Islamabad are analyzed for H, D and Z components of the geomagnetic field. Except for the D and Z components at Karachi and Sonmiani and H component at Islamabad, the two solar daily variations correlated well with each other. Also, the synthesized daily variation from the solar harmonics of H, D and Z components explained the equivalent Sq current system reasonably well for all seasons. For H component, the first solar harmonic (s1) obtained from spherical harmonic analysis of the data, appeared as the largest harmonic with no significant changes for the seasonal division of data. However, for D and Z components, amplitudes are comparable, but undergo distinct variations. s1 for H and D components increases with magnetic activity while for Z component it is the largest for the medium phase of magnetic activity. With the sunspot number division of data, the weighted mean of the Wolf ratio of all three components is in good agreement with the previous studies. The synthesized solar daily variation for D component, S(D), at Karachi, Sonmiani, Quetta and Islamabad did not show any signs of winter anomaly for the period studied. However, S(D) variation at Karachi during winter season showed morning minimum followed by a maximum at local noon and another minimum in the afternoon. We suggest this could be the effects of Equatorial Ionospheric Anomaly (EIA) observable at the Karachi observatory only during the winter season. Similarly, much disturbed in equinoctial and summer months, S(Z) illustrated an unwavering daily

  8. Reconstruction of secular variation in seawater sulfate concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algeo, T. J.; Luo, G. M.; Song, H. Y.; Lyons, T. W.; Canfield, D. E.

    2015-04-01

    Long-term secular variation in seawater sulfate concentrations ([SO42-]SW) is of interest owing to its relationship to the oxygenation history of Earth's surface environment. In this study, we develop two complementary approaches for quantification of sulfate concentrations in ancient seawater and test their application to late Neoproterozoic (635 Ma) to Recent marine units. The "rate method" is based on two measurable parameters of paleomarine systems: (1) the S-isotope fractionation associated with microbial sulfate reduction (MSR), as proxied by Δ34SCAS-PY, and (2) the maximum rate of change in seawater sulfate, as proxied by &partial; δ 34SCAS/∂ t(max). The "MSR-trend method" is based on the empirical relationship of Δ34SCAS-PY to aqueous sulfate concentrations in 81 modern depositional systems. For a given paleomarine system, the rate method yields an estimate of maximum possible [SO42-]SW (although results are dependent on assumptions regarding the pyrite burial flux, FPY), and the MSR-trend method yields an estimate of mean [SO42-]SW. An analysis of seawater sulfate concentrations since 635 Ma suggests that [SO42-]SW was low during the late Neoproterozoic (<5 mM), rose sharply across the Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary (~5-10 mM), and rose again during the Permian (~10-30 mM) to levels that have varied only slightly since 250 Ma. However, Phanerozoic seawater sulfate concentrations may have been drawn down to much lower levels (~1-4 mM) during short (<~2 Myr) intervals of the Cambrian, Early Triassic, Early Jurassic, and Cretaceous as a consequence of widespread ocean anoxia, intense MSR, and pyrite burial. The procedures developed in this study offer potential for future high-resolution quantitative analyses of paleo-seawater sulfate concentrations.

  9. Duration of eruption at the Giant Crater lava field, Medicine Lake volcano, California, based on paleomagnetic secular variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, Duane E.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.

    1994-08-01

    Nearly 500 cores were collected from the postglacial Giant Crater lava field on the south flank of Medicine Lake volcano. The basaltic lavas form a continuous set of lava flows which display strong chemical zonation from initially erupted calc-alkaline basaltic andesite to final primitive basalt of tholeiitic affinity. Six chemical-stratigraphic groups have been recognized and mapped. The eruptive sequence was sampled at numerous sites both to determine the characteristic paleomagnetic direction of each chemical group and to estimate the duration of the eruption inferred from secular variation of the geomagnetic field. Well-grouped mean directions of magnetization were obtained for 41 sites in the Giant Crater lava field. Mean directions of magnetization determined for the lava field are nearly identical. The likelihood of any extended time interval for the eruption of the different lava types is extremely small, and the data suggest an eruptive event of less than 30 years duration, analogous to historic Hawaiian eruptions. However, the average of groups 1-4, which cannot be distinguished paleomagnetically from each other, is slightly different statistically from that of the average of groups 5 and 6, which have similar directions. A time gap of 10 +/- 5 years is inferred between eruption of group 4 and 5 lavas based on analysis of the probability of the observed angular difference of 1.27 deg +/- 0.84 deg between their mean directions and by comparison of this angular difference to calculated filed directions with similar declination and inclination determined from spherical harmonic models of the geomagnetic field for the time period 1945-1990. About 200 oriented cores were also collected from predecessor and successor basaltic lava flows on the upper flanks of the volcano. Together with remanent directions from lavas of the Snake River Plain the data define a clockwise loop of secular variation.

  10. AN UPDATE OF ITALIAN ARCHEAOINTENSITY DATA AND GEOMAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH VARIATION DURING THE LAST THREE MILLENNIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tema, E.; Goguitchaichrili, A.

    2009-12-01

    Beside of the impressive cultural heritage and the abundant archaeological sites, Italian archaeointensity data are still sparse. We present here a new compilation and analysis of existing absolute intensity data in order to estimate the variation of the Earth’s magnetic field over the past three millennia. The current dataset consists of 140 intensity data mainly belonging to southern Italy. Vesuvius and Etna contribute 83 per cent of total while only 17 per cent comes from archaeological material. The time distribution is also irregular with the majority of determinations concentrated at the last four centuries. Still, older periods are very poorly covered. All data have been reduced at the latitude of Viterbo (42.45° N, 12.03° E) and plotted versus time. Data coming from historical volcanic eruptions show important discrepancies while those coming from archaeological material are still not sufficiently numerous to reliably describe the fine characteristics of geomagnetic field intensity variations. In order to increase the representativity of the data, archaeointensity results from nearby regions (approximately 700 km and 900 km radius from Viterbo) have been considered. The 700 km circle dataset still remains poor with only 20 additional data added. In contrast, the 900 km dataset includes 122 more archaeointensity data mainly coming from France, Switzerland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Greece and Bulgaria that partially fill the gap between 4-7th centuries BC and 3-4th and 9-11th AD for which no Italian data are available. A preliminary Italian intensity secular variation curve has been calculated by using sliding windows of 100 years shifted by 50 years. The results have been compared with regional and global models predictions. Clearly more Italian archaeointensity data are still needed in order to draw a robust Italian intensity secular variation curve that could be used for archaeomagnetic dating in combination with directional data.

  11. Marine Magnetic Anomalies, Oceanic Crust Magnetization, and Geomagnetic Time Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyment, J.; Arkani-Hamed, J.

    2005-12-01

    Since the classic paper of Vine and Matthews (Nature, 1963), marine magnetic anomalies are commonly used to date the ocean floor through comparison with the geomagnetic polarity time scale and proper identification of reversal sequences. As a consequence, the classical model of rectangular prisms bearing a normal / reversed magnetization has been dominant in the literature for more than 40 years. Although the model explains major characteristics of the sea-surface magnetic anomalies, it is contradicted by (1) recent advances on the geophysical and petrologic structure of the slow-spreading oceanic crust, and (2) the observation of short-term geomagnetic time variations, both of which are more complex than assumed in the classical model. Marine magnetic anomalies may also provide information on the magnetization of the oceanic crust as well as short-term temporal fluctuations of the geomagnetic field. The "anomalous skewness", a residual phase once the anomalies have been reduced to the pole, has been interpreted either in terms of geomagnetic field variations or crustal structure. The spreading-rate dependence of anomalous skewness rules out the geomagnetic hypothesis and supports a spreading-rate dependent magnetic structure of the oceanic crust, with a basaltic layer accounting for most of the anomalies at fast spreading rates and an increasing contribution of the deeper layers with decreasing spreading rate. The slow cooling of the lower crust and uppermost mantle and serpentinization, a low temperature alteration process which produces magnetite, are the likely cause of this contribution, also required to account for satellite magnetic anomalies over oceanic areas. Moreover, the "hook shape" of some sea-surface anomalies favors a time lag in the magnetization acquisition processes between upper and lower magnetic layers: extrusive basalt acquires a thermoremanent magnetization as soon as emplaced, whereas the underlying peridotite and olivine gabbro cool slowly

  12. The Study of the Geomagnetic Variation for Sq current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.; Du, A.

    2012-04-01

    The solar quiet variation (Sq) with a period of 24 hrs is a typical one of the quiet variations. Sq is generally caused by atmospheric tide-dynamo in ionosphere and it is controlled by the electric field, electric conductivity in ionosphere and neutral wind in middle-high altitude atmosphere. In our work, the geomagnetic field data observed by 90 ground-based observatories is used to analyze the local time variation of Sq. Sq is derived from five quiet-day geomagnetic data in every month by the FFT method. According to the pattern of geomagnetic X component in Sq, there is a prenoon-postnoon (before noon and after noon) asymmetry. This asymmetry is obvious in spring, summer and winter. The X component at 12:00-13:00 LT is about 5 nT larger than it at 11:00-12:00 LT. The ratio between the X component of daily variable amplitude and Y component of daily variable amplitude in middle and low (high) latitude regions in summer is greater (smaller) than that in winter. Used the sphere harmonic analysis method, the Sq equivalent current system is obtained. From the pattern of Sq current system, the prenoon-postnoon asymmetry may be caused by the electric field in the high latitude region. This electric field has two effects: the one is that the electric field from high latitude maps to the low latitude region; the other is this electric field penetrate to the middle latitude region directly. The combined action of these two effects makes the prenoon-postnoon asymmetry of Sq. The asymmetry also has an obvious seasonal effect. It may relate to the polar Sq and DP2 in the high latitude region.

  13. New archaeointensity results from archaeological sites and variation of the geomagnetic field intensity for the last 7 millennia in Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, E.; Spatharas, V.; Gómez-Paccard, M.; Chauvin, A.; Kondopoulou, D.

    In this study six new intensity determinations are presented, obtained from five well dated archaeological sites, located in northern Greece and in Paros, Cyclades Islands. The fired structures consisted of ceramic and pottery kilns belonging to the Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods. Between 8 and 21 samples of highly fired baked clays, tiles and bricks were taken, homogeneously distributed over the structures. The samples were analysed using the classical Thellier method, providing the past intensities and directions of the geomagnetic field recorded at each site. The intensity values have been corrected for anisotropy of thermal remanent magnetisation and cooling rate effects. Differences in the mean archaeointensities per site ranging from 1% to 11%, before and after TRM anisotropy and cooling rate corrections, were obtained. The new results indicate a decrease of 20% of the geomagnetic field strength in Greece, during the last four centuries BC. In order to compare our results with previously published data, a catalogue of archaeo- and palaeointensity results for the Aegean area has been established, covering the last 7 millennia. It consists of 336 data from Greece, western Turkey and Former Yugoslavia, collected from various authors. Weighting factors have been applied to these data, that then have been treated with a hierarchical Bayesian modelling, and a geomagnetic field intensity variation curve for Greece was constructed. A good agreement is observed when comparing the curve for Greece with the Bulgarian secular variation curve (SVC) for intensity. Satisfactory coincidence is also found with the archaeointensity data from Mesopotamia. Despite the presence of some time gaps, a more precise secular variation intensity curve has been constructed for Greece which, combined with a forthcoming directional SVC, will help for dating purposes.

  14. Active experiments in the ionosphere and geomagnetic field variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivokon, V. P.; Cherneva, N. V.; Khomutov, S. Y.; Serovetnikov, A. S.

    2014-11-01

    Variations of ionospheric-magnetospheric relation energy, as one of the possible outer climatology factors, may be traced on the basis of analysis of natural geophysical phenomena such as ionosphere artificial radio radiation and magnetic storms. Experiments on active impact on the ionosphere have been carried out for quite a long time in Russia as well. The most modern heating stand is located in Alaska; it has been used within the HAARP Program. The possibility of this stand to affect geophysical fields, in particular, the geomagnetic field is of interest.

  15. Empirical evidence for latitude dependence and asymmetry of geomagnetic spatial variation in mainland China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shikun; Zhang, Hao; Li, Xihai; Liu, Daizhi; Wang, Xiqin

    2016-05-01

    Spatiotemporal geomagnetic variation is a significant research topic of geomagnetism and space physics. Generated by convection and flows within the fluid outer core, latitude dependence and asymmetry, as the inherent spatiotemporal properties of geomagnetic field, have been extensively studied. We apply and modify an extension of existing method, Hidden Markov Model (HMM), which is an efficient tool for modeling the statistical properties of time series. Based on ground magnetic measurement data set in mainland China, first, we find the parameters of HMM can be used as the geomagnetic statistical signature to represent the spatiotemporal geomagnetic variations for each site. The results also support the existence of the geomagnetic latitude dependence more apparently. Furthermore, we provide solid empirical evidence for geomagnetic asymmetry relying on such ground magnetic measurement data set.

  16. Correlation of the earth's rotation rate and the secular change of the geomagnetic field. [power spectra/harmonic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    Power spectral density analysis using Burg's maximum entropy method was applied to the geomagnetic dipole field and its rate of change for the years 1901 to 1969. Both spectra indicate relative maxima at 0.015 cycles/year and its harmonics. These maxima correspond approximately to 66, 33, 22, 17, 13, 11, and 9-year spectral lines. The application of the same analysis techniques to the length-of-day (l.o.d) fluctuations for the period 1865 to 1961 reveal similar spectral characteristics. Although peaks were observed at higher harmonics of the fundamental frequency, the 22-year and 11-year lines are not attributed unambiguously to the solar magnetic cycle and the solar cycle. It is suggested that the similarity in the l.o.d fluctuations and the dipole field variations is related to the motion within the earth's fluid core during the past one hundred years.

  17. The use of geomagnetic field models in magnetic surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, R. D.; Gain, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    The importance of global geomagnetic field models for the reduction of magnetic surveys is discussed. It is demonstrated that a numerical model with adequate secular variation correction, provides a suitable representation of the regional field. The limitations of the presently available models are reported, with emphasis on the International Geomagnetic Reference Field.

  18. Assessment of extreme values in geomagnetic and geoelectric field variations for Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitina, L.; Trichtchenko, L.; Boteler, D. H.

    2016-07-01

    Disturbances of the geomagnetic field produced by space weather events can have an impact on power systems and other critical infrastructure. To mitigate these risks it is important to determine the extreme values of geomagnetic activity that can occur. More than 40 years of 1 min magnetic data recorded at 13 Canadian geomagnetic observatories have been analyzed to evaluate extreme levels in geomagnetic and geoelectric activities in different locations of Canada. The hourly ranges of geomagnetic field variations and hourly maximum in rate of change of the magnetic variations have been used as measures of geomagnetic activity. Geoelectric activity is estimated by the hourly peak amplitude of the geoelectric fields calculated with the use of Earth resistivity models specified for different locations in Canada. A generalized extreme value distribution was applied to geomagnetic and geoelectric indices to evaluate extreme geomagnetic and geoelectric disturbances, which could happen once per 50 and once per 100 years with 99% confidence interval. Influence of geomagnetic latitude and Earth resistivity models on the results for the extreme geomagnetic and geoelectric activity is discussed. The extreme values provide criteria for assessing the vulnerability of power systems and other technology to geomagnetic activity for design or mitigation purposes.

  19. Paleosecular variation record of geomagnetic full vector during late Miocene, from the Nayarit area, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goguitchaichvili, Avto; Alva Valdivia, Luis M.; Elguera, Jose Rosas; Fucugauchi, Jaime Urrutia; Cervantes, Miguel Angel; Morales, Juan

    2002-11-01

    results support the theoretical suggestion about an inverse relationship between secular variation and local field strength as result of electromagnetic coupling between the solid inner core and liquid outer core, with the inner core tending to stabilise core convection, and hence the field, when intensity is high. Some fluctuation of absolute intensity was detected within the same directional group (DG) indicating that the intensity of the geomagnetic field varies faster than its direction.

  20. Long-term variation in the upper atmosphere as seen in the amplitude of the geomagnetic solar quiet daily variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, A.; Koyama, Y.; Hayashi, H.; Nose, M.; Hori, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Tsuda, T.

    2011-12-01

    It has been well-known that geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) daily variation is produced by global ionospheric currents flowing in the E-region from middle latitudes to the magnetic equator. These currents are generated by a dynamo process via interaction between the neutral wind and ionospheric plasma in a region of the thermosphere and ionosphere. From the Ohm's equation, the ionospheric currents strongly depend on the ionospheric conductivity, polarization electric field and neutral wind. Then, to investigate the Sq amplitude is essential for understanding the long-term variations in the ionospheric conductivity and neutral wind of the thermosphere and ionosphere. Elias et al. [2010] found that the Sq amplitude tends to increase by 5.4-9.9 % in the middle latitudes from 1961 to 2001. They mentioned that the long-term variation of ionospheric conductivity associated with geomagnetic secular variation mainly determines the Sq trend, but that the rest component is ionospheric conductivity enhancement associated with cooling effects in the thermosphere due to increasing the greenhouse gases. In this talk, we clarify the characteristics of the long-term variation in the Sq amplitude using the long-term observation data of geomagnetic field and neutral wind. These observation data have been provided by the IUGONET (Inter-university Upper atmosphere Global Observation NETwork) project. In the present analysis, we used the F10.7 flux as an indicator of the variation in the solar irradiance in the EUV and UV range, geomagnetic field data with time resolution of 1 hour. The definition of the Sq amplitude is the difference of the H-component between the maximum and minimum per day when the Kp index is less than 4. As a result, the Sq amplitude at all the stations strongly depends on 11-year solar activity, and tends to enhance more during the high activities (19- and 22- solar cycles) than during the low activity (20-solar cycle). The Fourier spectra of the F10.7 flux and Sq

  1. Johann von Lamont: A Pioneer in Geomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffel, Heinrich

    2006-06-01

    The 200th birthday of John Lamont (1805-1879, Figure 1), a pioneer in the study of geomagnetism, was marked on 13 December 2005. Lamont founded the Munich Geomagnetic Observatory in 1840 and was a member of the group of scientists including Carl Friedrich Gauss, Alexander von Humboldt, Eduard Sabine, Jonas Angstrøm, Humphret Lloyd, Adolf Kupffer, Karl Kreil, and Adolphe Quetelet who composed the Göttingen Magnetic Union. They organized an international network of geomagnetic observatories [Barraclough et al., 1992]. The present knowledge of the geomagnetic field and its secular variation is largely based on the data collected by the global network of geomagnetic observatories during the last 170 years. Lamont's talents and his dedication and enthusiasm for discovery are reflected in the depth and scope of his contributions to a broad variety of natural sciences such as astronomy, meteorology, geomagnetism, and geodesy. However, this article just touches on his merits in geomagnetism.

  2. Latitudinal variation of the polar cusp during a geomagnetic storm

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, C.

    1982-01-01

    Large amplitude latitudinal variation of the polar cusp position was observed during the intense geomagnetic storm of 15--16 February 1980. The observation of the polar cusp, identified as the region of intense but extremely soft electron precipitation, was made by two nearly noon-midnight orbit DMSP satellites over both northern and southern hemispheres. The latitudinal shift of the polar cusp is observed to be related to the intensity variation of the ring current indicated by the hourly Dst values. The polar cusp region moved from its normal location at approx.76/sup 0/ gm lat down to approx.62/sup 0/ gm lat at the peak of this storm. This movement took about 5 hours and was detected over both hemispheres. A drastic variation in the width of the cusp region was also observed; it is very narrow (approx.1/sup 0/) during the equatorial shift and expands to > or approx. =5/sup 0/ during the poleward recovery. Variation of the polar cusp latitude with that of the Dst index was also seen during the period before the intense storm.

  3. Paleosecular variations of the geomagnetic field during the Holocene from Eastern Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoqiang; Liu, Qingsong; Yu, Kefu; Huang, Wenya; Zhu, Liyan; Zhang, Huodai; Liu, Jian; Li, JinHua

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) records bear great information of dynamics processes of the Earth's geomagnetic field, and can be further used for inter-profile correlation and for dating sediments. However, effects of changes in the depositional environment on PSV records have not been fully determined. This study constructed Holocene PSV records for the gravity piston core (ZSQD34) obtained from the northern South China Sea. Rock magnetic and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) results indicate that single (SD) and PSD domain magnetites are the main carrier of the natural remanent magnetization. Comparable to the records derived from the freshwater lakes and the modeling results, we observed that direction curves from these two environments of contrasting salinity content are rather consistent. The direction curves are independent of the constructed salinity. However, the gradual increasing trend of relative intensity since about 5 kyr might be related to the decreasing sea surface salinity. Furthermore, on the centennial and millennial time scale, the relative intensity and salinity show some positive relation, suggesting a potential contribution of salinity to the paleomagnetic relative intensity recording processes.

  4. Two populations of sunspots and secular variations of their characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagovitsyn, Yu. A.; Pevtsov, A. A.; Osipova, A. A.; Tlatov, A. G.; Miletskii, E. V.; Nagovitsyna, E. Yu.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the magnetic fields and total areas of mid- and low-latitude sunspots based on observations at the Greenwich and Kislovodsk (sunspot areas) and Mount Wilson, Crimean, Pulkovo, Ural, IMIS, Ussuriysk, IZMIRAN, and Shemakha (magnetic fields) observatories. We show that the coefficients in the linear form of the dependence of the logarithm of the total sunspot area S on its maximum magnetic field H change with time. Two distinct populations of sunspots are identified using the twodimensional H-log S occurrence histogram: small and large, separated by the boundaries log S = 1.6 ( S = 40 MSH) and H = 2050 G. Analysis of the sunspot magnetic flux also reveals the existence of two lognormally distributed populations with the mean boundary between them Φ = 1021 Mx. At the same time, the positions of the flux occurrence maxima for the populations change on a secular time scale: by factors of 4.5 and 1.15 for small and large sunspots, respectively. We have confirmed that the sunspots form two physically distinct populations and show that the properties of these populations change noticeably with time. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis about the existence of two magnetic field generation zones on the Sun within the framework of a spatially distributed dynamo.

  5. New Sediment Data to Constrain Southern Atlantic Holocene Secular Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korte, M. C.; Frank, U.; Nowaczyk, N. R.; Frederichs, T.; Brown, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The present day geomagnetic field shows a notable weak zone stretching from South America to southern Africa. This is known as the South Atlantic Anomaly caused by a growing patch of reversed magnetic flux at the core-mantle boundary. The investigation of existence and evolution of similar features over the past millennia using global spherical harmonic models is hampered by the fact that at present only very few paleomagnetic data from equatorial and many southern hemisphere regions are available to constrain models well in these regions. Here, we present the results of paleomagnetic investigations of sediment cores from four locations at low latitudes. OPD 1078 and 1079 lie off the coast of Angola, GeoB6517-2 and ODP 1076D are located in the Congo Fan and M35003-4 is situated southeast of Grenada in the Tobago Basin. In addition to the paleomagnetic work all cores were subjected to a comprehensive set of rock magnetic measurements. Detailed age models based on radiocarbon dating are available for all locations, since the sites were already subjects of different aspects of climatic studies. We include these new records and previously presented data from two Ethiopian locations in millennial scale global models of the CALSxk type. Agreement of the new data to previous models and modifications of models due to the additional data are discussed, focussing in particular on magnetic field structures resembling the present-day South Atlantic Anomaly.

  6. Archeointensities during the Neolithic period in Greece: new data to constraint the secular variation curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjat, G.; Aidona, E.; Camps, P.; Poidras, T.; Kondopoulou, D.

    2011-12-01

    Archaeomagnetism has been continuously developed over the last three decades. Backed archaeological features such as pottery, kilns or burnt structures, provide reliable data as they usually carry a strong and stable thermo-remanent magnetization acquired during the last firing. Numerous studies have provided high quality data for both the direction and intensity of the geomagnetic field essentially in Europe (e. g. compilations Genevey et al 2008, G3, Kovacheva et al, 2009, G3). In particular, Greece provides a lot of archaeological materials and numerous data are available (e. g. Aitken et al 1984, PEPI, Aitken et al 1989, PEPI, De Marco et al, 2008, Phys. Chem. Earth) from archaeomagnetic features or historical lava flows (Spassov et al, 2010, G3). The Greek secular variation curves (SVCs) are available for the last 8 millennia for the intensity and the last 6 millenia for the direction. Nevertheless, the coverage of the archaeological periods remains with several gaps for periods older than 2500 BC (Genevey et al, 2008, G3 and Kovacheva et al, 2009, G3). In this study, we present paleointensity results from Neolithic settlements in Northern Greece. Samples have been collected from four different archaeological sites: burnt structures and ceramics in Avgi (Kastoria, 5400-5100 B.C.) and Vasili (Farsala, 6000 B.C.), one kiln with the associated ceramics from Sossandra (Aridaia, 5000-4600 B.C.) and one ceramic collection from Dikili Tash (Kavala, 4800 B.C.). The samples have been subjected to a standard magnetic analysis in order to define the stability of the magnetic carriers and fulfil all the required criteria for the estimation of the palaeointensity. We obtained two reliable palaeointensities for the Avgi and Vasili sites of 38 and 48 μT respectively and a high mean paleointensity value arround 85 μT for the Dikili Tash site. These results are compared with the SVCs from neighbouring countries as well as with recent compilations and global models. We

  7. The relationship of air temperature variations over the northern hemisphere during the secular and 11-year solar cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryzhakov, L. Y.; Tomskaya, A. S.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison was made of air temperature anomaly maps for the months of January and July against a background of high and low secular solar activity, with and without regard for the 11 year cycle. By comparing temperature variations during the 11 year and secular cycles, it is found that the 11 year cycle influences thermal conditions more strongly than the secular cycle, and that temperature differences between extreme phases of the solar cycles are greater in January than in July.

  8. Equatorial E region electric fields at the dip equator: 2. Seasonal variabilities and effects over Brazil due to the secular variation of the magnetic equator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, J.; Denardini, C. M.; Resende, L. C. A.; Chen, S. S.; Schuch, N. J.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the seasonal dependency of the E region electric field (EEF) at the dip equator is examined. The eastward zonal (Ey) and the daytime vertical (Ez) electric fields are responsible for the overall phenomenology of the equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere, including the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) and its plasma instability. The electric field components are studied based on long-term backscatter radars soundings (348 days for both systems) collected during geomagnetic quiet days (Kp ≤ 3+), from 2001 to 2010, at the São Luís Space Observatory (SLZ), Brazil (2.33°S, 44.20°W), and at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory (JRO), Peru (11.95°S, 76.87°W). Among the results, we observe, for the first time, a seasonal difference between the EEF in these two sectors in South America based on coherent radar measurements. The EEF is more intense in summer at SLZ, in equinox at JRO, and has been highly variable with season in the Brazilian sector compared to the Peruvian sector. In addition, the secular variation on the geomagnetic field and its effect on the EEJ over Brazil resulted that as much farther away is the magnetic equator from SLZ, later more the EEJ is observed (10 h LT) and sooner it ends (16 h LT). Moreover, the time interval of type II occurrence decreased significantly after the year 2004, which is a clear indication that SLZ is no longer an equatorial station due to the secular variation of the geomagnetic field.

  9. Geomagnetic main field modeling using magnetohydrodynamic constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of physical constraints are investigated which may be approximately satisfied by the Earth's liquid core on models of the geomagnetic main field and its secular variation. A previous report describes the methodology used to incorporate nonlinear equations of constraint into the main field model. The application of that methodology to the GSFC 12/83 field model to test the frozen-flux hypothesis and the usefulness of incorporating magnetohydrodynamic constraints for obtaining improved geomagnetic field models is described.

  10. Variations of angular elements of the geomagnetic field in Europe during the last 24 centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burakov, K. S.; Nachasova, I. E.

    2011-05-01

    The analysis of variations in angular elements of the geomagnetic field during the period since 350 B.C. to the present day according to the findings from the study of thermal magnetization of baked archaeological samples from England, France, and East Europe showed that the key feature in the behavior of the geomagnetic inclination in all three regions is a millennial variation. The trend in the behavior of the inclination of the geomagnetic field can be regarded as a manifestation of a variation with a characteristic time scale of several thousand years. Despite the general likeness of variations in inclination and declination of the ancient geomagnetic field, they also exhibit a noticeable dissimilarity. The paths of the virtual geomagnetic pole reconstructed from the variations of angular elements of the geomagnetic field in East Europe indicate that the geomagnetic polar motion is quasi-cyclic. The duration of the first cycle was about 1000 years, while the second cycle has not been completed due to the change of the motion to the opposite direction in the middle of the XVII century.

  11. Statistical analysis of extreme values for geomagnetic and geoelectric field variations for Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitina, Lidia; Trichtchenko, Larisa; Boteler, David

    2016-04-01

    Disturbances of the geomagnetic field produced by space weather events cause variable geoelectric fields at Earth's surface which drive electric currents in power systems, resulting in hazardous impacts on electric power transmission. In extreme cases, as during the magnetic storm in March 13, 1989, this can result in burnt-out transformers and power blackouts. To make assessment of geomagnetic and geoelectric activity in Canada during extreme space weather events, extreme value statistical analysis has been applied to more than 40 years of magnetic data from the Canadian geomagnetic observatories network. This network has archived digital data recordings for observatories located in sub-auroral, auroral, and polar zones. Extreme value analysis was applied to hourly ranges of geomagnetic variations as an index of geomagnetic activity and to hourly maximum of rate-of-change of geomagnetic field. To estimate extreme geoelectric fields, the minute geomagnetic data were used together with Earth conductivity models for different Canadian locations to calculate geoelectric fields. The extreme value statistical analysis was applied to hourly maximum values of the horizontal geoelectric field. This assessment provided extreme values of geomagnetic and geoelectric activity which are expected to happen once per 50 years and once per 100 years. The results of this analysis are designed to be used to assess the geomagnetic hazard to power systems and help the power industry mitigate risks from extreme space weather events.

  12. The effect of cosmic ray intensity variations and geomagnetic disturbances on the physiological state of aviators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papailiou, M.; Mavromichalaki, H.; Kudela, K.; Stetiarova, J.; Dimitrova, S.; Giannaropoulou, E.

    2011-09-01

    Over the last few years various researches have reached the conclusion that cosmic ray variations and geomagnetic disturbances are related to the condition of the human physiological state. In this study medical data regarding 4018 Slovak aviators were analyzed in relation to daily variations of cosmic ray and geomagnetic activity. Specifically daily data concerning mean values of heart rate which were registered during the medical examinations of the Slovak aviators, were related to daily variations of cosmic ray intensity, as measured by the Neutron Monitor Station on Lomnicky Stit (http://neutronmonitor.ta3.sk/realtime.php3) and the high resolution neutron monitor database (http://www.nmdb.eu) and daily variations of Dst and Ap geomagnetic indices. All subjects were men in good health of age 18-60 yrs. This particular study refers to the time period from 1 January 1994 till 31 December 2002. Statistical methods were applied to establish a statistical significance of the effect of geomagnetic activity levels and cosmic ray intensity variations on the aforementioned physiological parameters for the whole group. The Pearson r-coefficients were calculated and the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) method was applied to establish the statistical significance levels (p-values) of the effect of geomagnetic activity and cosmic ray intensity variations on heart rate up to three days before and three days after the respective events. Results show that there is an underlying effect of geomagnetic activity and cosmic ray intensity variations on the cardiovascular functionality.

  13. Effect of March 9, 2016 Total Solar Eclipse on geomagnetic field variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhimat, Mamat; Winarko, Anton; Nuraeni, Fitri; Bangkit, Harry; Aris, M. Andi; Suwardi; Sulimin

    2016-11-01

    During solar eclipse, solar radiation to the Earth is blocked by the Moon. Thus, the ionization process in the ionosphere is disrupted, as well as the variation of geomagnetic field. The disturbance of geomagnetic field is caused by electric current in the E layer of the ionosphere. At low latitude, the current which is dominant in quiet day is the Sq currents. The blocking of solar radiation cause decrement in electron density in the blocked region. The aim of the research is to find the effect of total solar eclipse to the geomagnetic field. The measurement of the geomagnetic field variation during total solar eclipse on March 9, 2016 was carried out at the Meteorological station of BMKG in Ternate (0° 49' 45.20 "N; 127° 22' 54.00" E). By eliminating the geomagnetic disturbance that occurred in a daily geomagnetic field variation, the pattern of quiet day which is usually in a shape of smooth curve became affected. During the total solar eclipse on March 9, 2016 from 00:30 until 02:00 UT, we found that the geomagnetic field variation of the quiet day decreased by -5 nT.

  14. Dynamo currents representing geomagnetic L variation demonstrated by a multi-layer ionospheric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.-Y.; Tschu, K.-K.; Matsushita, S.

    1984-05-01

    A multi-layer ionospheric model and lunar (2,2) tidal mode have been used to calculate dynamo current systems representing lunar geomagnetic semidiurnal variations. Since both the height variation of the ionospheric conductivities and latitudinal dependence of the height of the conductivity peaks have been taken into account, the dynamo current systems agree with equivalent ones (estimated from geomagnetic data) better than those for a thin shell model of the ionospheric conductivity, especially in the polar region.

  15. Present-day secular variations in the zonal harmonics of earth's geopotential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitrovica, J. X.; Peltier, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    The mathematical formulation required for predicting secular variation in the geopotential is developed for the case of a spherically symmetric, self-gravitating, viscoelastic earth model and an arbitrary surface load which can include a gravitational self-consistent ocean loading component. The theory is specifically applied to predict the present-day secular variation in the zonal harmonics of the geopotenial arising from the surface mass loading associated with the late Pleistocene glacial cycles. A procedure is outlined in which predictions of the present-day geopotential signal due to the late Pleistocene glacial cycles may be used to derive bounds on the net present-day mass flux from the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets to the local oceans.

  16. Solar neutrino production of long-lived isotopes and secular variations in the sun

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.; Cowan, G.A.

    1980-11-21

    Long-lived isotopes produced in the earth's crust by solar neutrinos may provide a method of probing secular variations in the rate of energy production in the sun's core. Only one isotope, calcium-41, appears to be suitable from the dual standpoints of reliable nuclear physics and manageable backgrounds. The proposed measurement also may be interesting in view of recent evidence for neutrino oscillations.

  17. Exploring the use of paleomagnetic secular variations to date young sediments from the hardwater lake Tangra Yumco (Tibet)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberzettl, T.; Kasper, T.; Long, H.; Su, Y.; Ahlborn, M.; Appel, E.; Daut, G.; Henkel, K.; St-Onge, G.; Wang, J.; Zhu, L.; Maeusbacher, R.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetostratigraphy has been serving as a valuable tool for dating and confirming chronologies of lacustrine sediments. Although the coverage of suitable paleomagnetic records on the Tibetan Plateau (TP) and around has been extremely scarce, recently emerging records enable a validation of existing age-depth models using magnetostratigraphy. This is very important, since almost all radiocarbon ages obtained from lacustrine sediments on the TP are affected by a reservoir effect. For example at Nam Co (co = lake) on the eastern TP the chronology for the past 4 ka cal BP was supported by the comparison of paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) and results from spherical harmonic geomagnetic field models. In addition, this approach was confirmed by comparison of the directional data of Nam Co to a varved record from the Makran accretionary wedge which is much further to the south-west but shows remarkable similarities. Here we present PSV data from multiple sediment cores from lake Tangra Yumco, located ~400 km west of Nam Co. Inclination and declination data from the different sediment cores are very similar, but only one core has been sufficiently dated yet. Unfortunately, validation of the reservoir corrected radiocarbon based age scale from this core is very poor although it contains one age from a part of wood (which because of its terrestrial nature was not reservoir corrected). On this chronology, the Tangra Yumco PSV data shows neither similarities with the Nam Co record, nor with geomagnetic field model outputs. Interestingly, if the chronology from Tangra Yumco is tuned to the chronology of the validated Nam Co record using inclination data, the minerogenic input proxies become almost identical. The minerogenic input is indicative of runoff and hence hydrological variations due to changes in the monsoon strength. Very similar hydrological variations can also be observed in the independently-dated Hongyuan peat bog (further to the north-east) which suggests

  18. First archeointensity determinations on Maya incense burners from Palenque temples, Mexico: New data to constrain the Mesoamerica secular variation curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjat, G.; Camps, P.; Alva Valdivia, L. M.; Sougrati, M. T.; Cuevas-Garcia, M.; Perrin, M.

    2013-02-01

    We present archeointensity data carried out on pieces of incense burners from the ancient Maya city of Palenque, Chiapas, Mexico, covering much of the Mesoamerican Classic period, from A.D. 400 to A.D. 850. We worked on pieces from 24 incense burners encompassing the five Classic ceramic phases of Palenque: Motiepa (A.D. 400-500), Cascadas (A.D. 500-600), Otulum (A.D. 600-700), Murcielagos (A.D. 700-770), and Balunté (A.D. 770-850). All the samples come from highly elaborate, flanged pedestal of incense burners that are undoubtedly assigned to a ceramic phase by means of their iconographic, morphological and stylistic analyses. Archeointensity measurements were performed with the Thellier-Thellier's method on pre-selected samples by means of their magnetic properties. We obtained archeointensities of very good technical quality from 19 of 24 pieces, allowing the determination of a precise mean value for each ceramic phase, between 29.1±0.9 μT and 32.5±1.2 μT. The firing temperatures of ceramics were estimated with Mössbauer spectroscopy between 700 °C and 1000 °C. These values ensure that a full thermo-remanent magnetization was acquired during the original heating. Our results suggest a relative stability of the field intensity during more than 400 years in this area. The abundance of archeological material in Mesoamerica contrasts with the small amount of archeomagnetic data available that are, in addition, of uneven quality. Thus, it is not possible to establish a trend of intensity variations in Mesoamerica, even using the global databases and secular variation predictions from global models. In this context, our high technical quality data represent a strong constraint for the Mesoamerican secular variation curve during the first millennium AD. The corresponding Virtual Axial Dipole Moments (VADM) are substantially smaller than the ones predicted by the last global geomagnetic models CALS3k.4, suggesting the need for additional data to develop a

  19. Decadal to millennial scale geomagnetic field variations in the Levantine archaeointensity curve (LAC): methodology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaar, Ron; Tauxe, Lisa; Ron, Hagai; Agnon, Amotz; Ben-Yosef, Erez; Finkelstein, Israel; Zuckerman, Sharon; Levy, Thomas E.

    2014-05-01

    ) according to the dating method employed (archaeological, historical, radiocarbon). In addition, we cross check results from multiple archaeological sites using different source materials dated using different methodologies. The results of this effort are summarized in a regional compilation namely Levantine Archaeomagnetic Curve - LAC. The initial version of the LAC includes recently published data from ancient copper production sites, and new data from two important biblical archaeological mounds in Israel - Tel Megiddo ("Armageddon") and Tel Hazor. In this talk we review our working methodologies, report the current status of the LAC, and discuss its implications on our understanding of geomagnetic secular variations.

  20. The Effect of a Heterogeneous Thin Electrically Conducting Lower Mantle Layer on Secular Variation in the Geodynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilim, R.; Dumberry, M.; Stanley, S.

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that the rate of secular variation is not constant over the Earth. Particularly, the Pacific Ocean is remarkably devoid of any quickly time varying magnetic field components. While this could be due to factors intrinsic to the dynamo, the Earth's lowest mantle displays a remarkable heterogeneity that could also help explain the pattern of secular variation if this deep mantle heterogeneity can couple to the dynamo. There have been several recent studies that discuss the possibility of an electrically conducting lower mantle, either because of the metallization of FeO, or from the deep penetration of iron into the mantle due to morphological instabilities. If a thin lower mantle layer is heterogeneous in electrical conductivity it could couple to the flow via the Lorenz force and brake the eddies which contribute to secular variation, lowering both the field amplitude and the rate of secular variation. A conducting mantle layer will also preferentially damp the quickly time varying components of the magnetic field via the electromagnetic screening effect, reducing the secular variation we observe at the surface of the Earth. While other studies have investigated the thermal effects of a heterogeneous lower mantle on the dynamo, we investigate the effects of a thin electrically conducting lower mantle layer. We use a numerical geodynamo model to determine whether this layer can cause the spatial pattern of secular variation rates observed for the Earth.

  1. ong-term trends of foE and geomagnetic activity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, A. V.; de La Morena, B. A.

    2003-03-01

    A relationship between foE trends and geomagnetic activity long-term variations has been revealed for the first time. By analogy with earlier obtained results on the foF2 trends it is possible to speak about the geomagnetic control of the foE long-term trends as well. Periods of increasing geomagnetic activity correspond to negative foE trends, while these trends are positive for the decreasing phase of geomagnetic activity. This natural relationship breaks down around 1970 (on some stations later) when pronounced positive foE trends have appeared on most of the stations considered. The dependence of foE trends on geomagnetic activity can be related with nitric oxide variations at the E-layer heights. The positive foE trends that appeared after the break down effect may also be explained by the [NO] decrease which is not related to geomagnetic activity variations. But negative trends or irregular foE variations on some stations for the same time period require some different mechanism. Chemical pollution of the lower thermosphere due to the anthropogenic activity may be responsible for such abnormal foE behavior after the end of the 1960s.

  2. Geophysical variables and behavior: XXI. Geomagnetic variation as possible enhancement stimuli for UFO reports preceding earthtremors.

    PubMed

    Persinger, M A

    1985-02-01

    The contribution of geomagnetic variation to the occurrence of UFORs (reports of UFOs) within the New Madrid States during the 6-mo. increments before increases in the numbers of IV-V or less intensity earthquakes within the central USA was determined. Although statistically significant zero-order correlations existed between measures of earthquakes, UFORs and geomagnetic variability, the association between the latter two deteriorated markedly when their shared variance with earthquakes was held constant. These outcomes are compatible with the hypothesis that geomagnetic variability (or phenomena associated with it) may enhance UFORs but only if tectonic stress and strain are increasing within the region.

  3. Temporal correlation of U. S. Great Basin lake sediments below the Mono Lake Excursion using paleomagnetic secular variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddicoat, J. C.; Coe, R. S.; Negrini, R. M.; Knott, J. R.; Lund, S.; Benson, L. V.

    2015-12-01

    Beginning nearly 50 years ago with a paleomagnetic study of exposed lacustrine sediments in the Mono Basin, CA (Denham and Cox, 1971), there have been subsequent studies to document paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) in the basin and to establish a chronology for that record (Vazquez and Lidzbarski, 2012). We report a paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) investigation of lacustrine sediments in the Mono Basin, CA, that extends the base of the PSV record of Lund et al. (1988) by about 20 percent. We did our investigation at two localities separated by about 4 km on the southeastern and eastern sides of Mono Lake: South Shore Cliffs (SSC) and Warm Springs (WS). The sampled interval at SSC is from 0.1 m above to 2.2 m below Wilson Creek Ash 19 in the tephrostratigraphy of Lajoie (1968), ending in loose sand. At WS, we sampled from Ash 17 to 1.0 m below Ash 19, a total of 2 m. At SSC using back-to-back horizons 2-cm thick containing one to three samples each that were a.f. or thermally demagnetized, we found rapidly fluctuating PSV in the interval from ~ 0.3 to 1.0 m below Ash 19. The fluctuating PSV contains a change in declination of ~ 80˚ from 308˚ (n = 3, α-95: 6.1˚) to 29˚ (n = 3, α-95: 11.5˚) within a single hand sample that spans 14 cm. Inclination during that change in declination gradually rose from 56˚ to 63˚ and increased to 70˚ before reducing to a minimum of 29.9˚. The path of the Virtual Geomagnetic Poles when the declination is most westerly forms a narrow loop that reaches 49.7˚ N latitude near 170˚ E longitude. At WS the westerly swing in declination is absent, but the easterly declination and relatively steep inclination described above are recorded. A study of the relative paleomagnetic intensity (RPI) shows that the maximum RPI is ~1.5 m below Ash 19 and decreases to a minimum ~6 cm above the ash. Distinct PSV and RPI features below the Mono Lake excursion correlate well between records from the periphery of Mono Lake and those from

  4. Paleosecular variations of geomagnetic field from the Last Glacial Maximum to the Holocene in the north of South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Huang, W.; Liu, Q.

    2012-12-01

    The high-resolution geomagnetic field records from the Last Glacial Maximum to the Holocene, which possessed of a notable climate change, were scarce in the global area. In this abstract, two gravity piston cores ZSQD2 (114.16oE, 19.58oN, ~190 cm in length, water depth 681m) and ZSQD34 (114.74oE, 19.05oN, ~184 cm in length, water depth 1820 m), situated in the north of South China Sea, were selected to study the secular variations of geomagnetic field in this area. Radiocarbon ages of G.sacculifer suggest that the deposition rate varied with 56.1 cm/kyr and 3.7 cm/kyr during the Last Glacial and the Holocene, respectively. Rock magnetic results indicate that the pseudo-single domain magnetite with low coercivity dominate the properties of sediments. The characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) values are evaluated using the 5-8 AF steps when MAD values are generally <5. Constrained by the radiocarbon chronology, the secular variation curves since ~18 cal. kyr can be constructed using the ChRM directions and NRM/ARM ratios (as a proxy of relative intensity). Comparing the Holocene SV with that from terrestrial lakes in Southern China, similar shape corroborates the reliability of records and uniform pattern of non-dipole magnetic field. Two significant features on SV curves present the geomagnetic field characteristics from ~17 cal. kyr to the early Holocene. One is that the direction variations lag behind the relative intensity on the millennium time scale. Such as a major direction shift occurred around 13 cal. kyr while the relative intensity low was about 14 cal. kyr. Another feature is the fast and frequent wiggles both in direction and intensity between ~17 to ~14.5 cal. kyr. During this period, two significant negative inclination anomalies occurred at ~16.4 and ~15.4 cal. kyr associated with low intensity, respectively. Nevertheless, the corresponding declinations did not show the reversed features although they had also some slight fluctuations. The

  5. Variations in geomagnetic field and temperature in Spain during the past millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachasova, I. E.; Burakov, K. S.; Pilipenko, O. V.; Markov, G. P.

    2015-07-01

    The archaeomagnetic studies are conducted for the collection of coated ceramic samples from the Albarracin archaeological monument in Spain dated to the 10-20th centuries A.D. The pattern of variations in geomagnetic field intensity during this time interval is identified. The behavior of geomagnetic intensity is dominated by a decreasing trend (from ˜80 to 40 μT). The variation with a characteristic time of a few hundred years is the most striking one. Investigation of the material from this collection by the method of rehydroxylation provided the temperature estimates for this region of Spain for the time interval of pottery production. The temperature variations generally tend to increase, while the main trend in the variations of geomagnetic intensity is decreasing. The time series of temperature and intensity of the main magnetic field contain variations with close characteristic times shifted in time so that the changes in temperature go somewhat ahead of the changes in the geomagnetic field. It was previously suggested to improve the accuracy and resolution of the obtained variations in the past magnetic field using the method of archaeomagnetic dating of the material from archaeological monuments. The method was tested by dating the pottery kiln material from the El Molon monument, Spain, with the use of the virtual geomagnetic pole curve based on the past magnetic field in the East Europe. The method proved to be quite efficient and promising for dating the archaeological material from all over Europe.

  6. Analysis of the Solar Diameter Variations at July, 1986 and the Geomagnetic Storm of March, 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humberto Andrei, Alexandre; Garcia, Marcos A.; Papa, Andres R. R.; Calderari Boscardin, Sergio; Lousada Penna, Jucira; Sigismondi, Costantino

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we have a well-known event in scientific literature used to illustrate our investigation on the viability of the solar diameter variation be a precursor for the occurrence of sets of coronal mass ejections, and thus, for geomagnetic storms, as noted in previous works of our group, but now, in a time scale of a few days. The selected event was that of March 13, 1989, a strong geomagnetic storm that made the Hydro-Quebec power grid fall down by 9 hours, damaging the local economy in millions of dollars. At the same time we have investigated a time interval belonging to a solar minimum period, on July 1986, prior to the rising phase and solar maximum of Solar Cycle 22, to compare with the geomagnetic pattern, as well as with the solar diameter behavior along these periods of low solar and geomagnetic activity. We used the time series of the CERGA’s astrolabe (because its dataset is long enough as to comprise both time periods of the analysis), the geomagnetic index AP and the H geomagnetic component from the Tatuoca Magnetic Observatory (because it is near to the geomagnetic equator and with the extra aim of checking the sensitivity of its magnetometers to global events).

  7. What do we mean by accuracy in geomagnetic measurements?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    High accuracy is what distinguishes measurements made at the world's magnetic observatories from other types of geomagnetic measurements. High accuracy in determining the absolute values of the components of the Earth's magnetic field is essential to studying geomagnetic secular variation and processes at the core mantle boundary, as well as some magnetospheric processes. In some applications of geomagnetic data, precision (or resolution) of measurements may also be important. In addition to accuracy and resolution in the amplitude domain, it is necessary to consider these same quantities in the frequency and space domains. New developments in geomagnetic instruments and communications make real-time, high accuracy, global geomagnetic observatory data sets a real possibility. There is a growing realization in the scientific community of the unique relevance of geomagnetic observatory data to the principal contemporary problems in solid Earth and space physics. Together, these factors provide the promise of a 'renaissance' of the world's geomagnetic observatory system. ?? 1990.

  8. Analysis of Geomagnetic Disturbances and Cosmic Ray Intensity Variations in Relation to Medical Data from Rome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannaropoulou, E.; Papailiou, M.; Mavromichalaki, H.; Tsipis, A.

    2010-07-01

    Over the last few years many studies have been conducted concerning the possible influence of geomagnetic and solar activity and cosmic ray activity on human physiological state and in particular on human cardio - health state. As it is shown the human organism is sensitive to environmental changes and reacts to them through a series of variations of its physiological parameters such as heart rate, arterial systolic and diastolic blood pressure, etc. In this paper daily mean values of heart rate, as they were registered for a group of 2.028 volunteers during medical examinations in the Polyclinico Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy are analyzed in relation to daily cosmic ray intensity variations, as measured by the Neutron Monitor of the University of Athens and daily variations of the geomagnetic indices Dst, Ap and Kp. The results from this study show that geomagnetic activity changes and cosmic rays intensity variations may regulate the human homeostasis.

  9. Secular variation in carbon isotope ratios from Upper Proterozoic successions of Svalbard and East Greenland.

    PubMed

    Knoll, A H; Hayes, J M; Kaufman, A J; Swett, K; Lambert, I B

    1986-06-26

    Analyses of stratigraphically continuous suites of samples from Upper Proterozoic sedimentary successions of East Greenland, Spitsbergen and Nordaustlandet (Svalbard) provide an approximation to the secular variation in carbon isotope ratios during a geologically and biologically important period of change from around 900 million years ago to the beginning of the Cambrian period. Late Riphean carbonates and organic material show a stratigraphically useful pattern of enrichment in 13C relative to Phanerozoic or earlier Proterozoic samples. Isotopic compositions of isolated samples from other localities are consistent with a worldwide extended interval of enhanced organic burial and consequent net survival of oxidized material, probably O2, just before the initial radiation of metazoans.

  10. Global Secular Variation and Excursions Within the Brunhes - is it Real?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barckhausen, U.; Weske, M.

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed 64 high quality magnetic profiles crossing the Central Indian Ridge and the Southeast Indian Ridge between 21°S and 28°S. All profiles cover the entire Anomaly 1 and they do not cross discontinuities, major faults, or significant isolated bathymetric features. When stacked over single ridge segments, correlated variations in the magnetic field become apparent. However, these variations change from one ridge segment to the next and when stacked over the entire ridge, all correlated variations are lost. Therefore we conclude that the correlated variations represent local effects, in this case mainly caused by bathymetry and irregularities of the spreading process which are typically limited to one ridge segment. Since we do not see any anomalies associated to geomagnetic excursions, we carried out forward modelling which shows that any excursion lasting for longer than 10.000 years should become visible in our data, thus putting an upper limit of 10.000 years to the maximum duration of geomagnetic excursions during the Brunhes.

  11. Characteristics of long-term variation in the amlitude of the geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) daily variation using the Inter-university Upper atmosphere Gobal Observation NETwork (IUGONET) data analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, A.; Koyama, Y.; Nose, M.; Hori, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Yatagai, A. I.

    2014-12-01

    Characteristics of long-term variation in the amplitude of solar quiet geomagnetic field daily variation (Sq) have been investigated using 1-hour geomagnetic field data obtained from 69 geomagnetic stations in a period of 1947-2013. In the present data analysis, we took advantage of the IUGONET data analysis system. The Sq amplitude clearly showed a 10-12 year solar activity dependence and it tended to enhance during each solar maximum. During the minimum of solar cycle 23/24 in 2008-2009, the Sq amplitude became the smallest in the investigated period. The relationship between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude is approximately linear but 64 percent of geomagnetic stations show a weak nonlinear dependence on the solar F10.7 index. In order to remove the effect of solar activity seen in the long-term variation of the Sq amplitude, we calculated a linear or second order fitting curve between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude during 1947-2013, and examined the residual Sq amplitude, which is defined as the deviation from the fitting curve. As a result, a majority of the trends in the residual Sq amplitude that passed through a trend test showed a negative value in a wide region. This tendency was relatively strong in Europe, India, the eastern part of Canada, and New Zealand. The relationship between the magnetic field intensity and residual Sq amplitude showed an anti-correlation for about 71 percent of geomagnetic stations. On the other hand, the residual Sq amplitude in the equatorial station (Addis Ababa) was anti-correlated with the absolute value of the magnetic field inclination. This implies the movement of the equatorial electrojet due to the secular variation of the ambient magnetic field.

  12. Steady induction effects in geomagnetism. Part 1A: Steady motional induction of geomagnetic chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1992-01-01

    Geomagnetic effects of magnetic induction by hypothetically steady fluid motion and steady magnetic flux diffusion near the top of Earth's core are investigated using electromagnetic theory, simple magnetic earth models, and numerical experiments with geomagnetic field models. The problem of estimating a steady fluid velocity field near the top of Earth's core which induces the secular variation indicated by broad-scale models of the observed geomagnetic field is examined and solved. In Part 1, the steady surficial core flow estimation problem is solved in the context of the source-free mantle/frozen-flux core model. In the first paper (IA), the theory underlying such estimates is reviewed and some consequences of various kinematic and dynamic flow hypotheses are derived. For a frozen-flux core, fluid downwelling is required to change the mean square normal magnetic flux density averaged over the core-mantle boundary. For surficially geostrophic flow, downwelling implies poleward flow. The solution of the forward steady motional induction problem at the surface of a frozen-flux core is derived and found to be a fine, easily visualized example of deterministic chaos. Geomagnetic effects of statistically steady core surface flow may well dominate secular variation over several decades. Indeed, effects of persistent, if not steady, surficially geostrophic core flow are described which may help explain certain features of the present broad-scale geomagnetic field and perhaps paleomagnetic secular variation.

  13. The steady part of the secular variation of the Earth's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloxham, Jeremy

    1992-01-01

    The secular variation of the Earth's magnetic field results from the effects of magnetic induction in the fluid outer core and from the effects of magnetic diffusion in the core and the mantle. Adequate observations to map the magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary extend back over three centuries, providing a model of the secular variation at the core-mantle boundary. Here we consider how best to analyze this time-dependent part of the field. To calculate steady core flow over long time periods, we introduce an adaptation of our earlier method of calculating the flow in order to achieve greater numerical stability. We perform this procedure for the periods 1840-1990 and 1690-1840 and find that well over 90 percent of the variance of the time-dependent field can be explained by simple steady core flow. The core flows obtained for the two intervals are broadly similar to each other and to flows determined over much shorter recent intervals.

  14. Geomagnetic imprinting predicts spatio-temporal variation in homing migration of pink and sockeye salmon

    PubMed Central

    Putman, Nathan F.; Jenkins, Erica S.; Michielsens, Catherine G. J.; Noakes, David L. G.

    2014-01-01

    Animals navigate using a variety of sensory cues, but how each is weighted during different phases of movement (e.g. dispersal, foraging, homing) is controversial. Here, we examine the geomagnetic and olfactory imprinting hypotheses of natal homing with datasets that recorded variation in the migratory routes of sockeye (Oncorhynchus nerka) and pink (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) salmon returning from the Pacific Ocean to the Fraser River, British Columbia. Drift of the magnetic field (i.e. geomagnetic imprinting) uniquely accounted for 23.2% and 44.0% of the variation in migration routes for sockeye and pink salmon, respectively. Ocean circulation (i.e. olfactory imprinting) predicted 6.1% and 0.1% of the variation in sockeye and pink migration routes, respectively. Sea surface temperature (a variable influencing salmon distribution but not navigation, directly) accounted for 13.0% of the variation in sockeye migration but was unrelated to pink migration. These findings suggest that geomagnetic navigation plays an important role in long-distance homing in salmon and that consideration of navigation mechanisms can aid in the management of migratory fishes by better predicting movement patterns. Finally, given the diversity of animals that use the Earth's magnetic field for navigation, geomagnetic drift may provide a unifying explanation for spatio-temporal variation in the movement patterns of many species. PMID:25056214

  15. Geomagnetic imprinting predicts spatio-temporal variation in homing migration of pink and sockeye salmon.

    PubMed

    Putman, Nathan F; Jenkins, Erica S; Michielsens, Catherine G J; Noakes, David L G

    2014-10-06

    Animals navigate using a variety of sensory cues, but how each is weighted during different phases of movement (e.g. dispersal, foraging, homing) is controversial. Here, we examine the geomagnetic and olfactory imprinting hypotheses of natal homing with datasets that recorded variation in the migratory routes of sockeye (Oncorhynchus nerka) and pink (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) salmon returning from the Pacific Ocean to the Fraser River, British Columbia. Drift of the magnetic field (i.e. geomagnetic imprinting) uniquely accounted for 23.2% and 44.0% of the variation in migration routes for sockeye and pink salmon, respectively. Ocean circulation (i.e. olfactory imprinting) predicted 6.1% and 0.1% of the variation in sockeye and pink migration routes, respectively. Sea surface temperature (a variable influencing salmon distribution but not navigation, directly) accounted for 13.0% of the variation in sockeye migration but was unrelated to pink migration. These findings suggest that geomagnetic navigation plays an important role in long-distance homing in salmon and that consideration of navigation mechanisms can aid in the management of migratory fishes by better predicting movement patterns. Finally, given the diversity of animals that use the Earth's magnetic field for navigation, geomagnetic drift may provide a unifying explanation for spatio-temporal variation in the movement patterns of many species.

  16. PAMELA's measurements of geomagnetic cutoff variations during the 14 December 2006 storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; De Donato, C.; Nolfo, G. A.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Mergé, M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2016-03-01

    Data from the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) satellite experiment were used to measure the geomagnetic cutoff for high-energy (≳ 80MeV) protons during the 14 December 2006 geomagnetic storm. The variations of the cutoff latitude as a function of rigidity were studied on relatively short timescales, corresponding to spacecraft orbital periods (˜94 min). Estimated cutoff values were compared with those obtained by means of a trajectory-tracing approach based on a dynamical empirical modeling of the Earth's magnetosphere. We found significant variations in the cutoff latitude, with a maximum suppression of ˜7° at lowest rigidities during the main phase of the storm. The observed reduction in the geomagnetic shielding and its temporal evolution were related to the changes in the magnetospheric configuration, investigating the role of interplanetary magnetic field, solar wind, and geomagnetic parameters. PAMELA's results represent the first direct measurement of geomagnetic cutoffs for protons with kinetic energies in the sub-GeV and GeV region.

  17. Geomagnetic secular variation as a window on the dynamics of Earth's core (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, A.

    2010-12-01

    One of the forefront questions of planetary geophysics is to understand how magnetic fields can be spontaneously created by so-called dynamo action. Giant strides have been taken in recent years in understanding the theory of convectively driven dynamos; yet equally important is the marriage between theory and observation. I will argue that we are on the cusp of a new level of understanding brought about by new methods for incorporating observations and theory. In 1950 Sir Edward Bullard wrote an influential paper entitled "The westward drift of the Earth's magnetic field", with coauthors C Freedman, H Gellman and J Nixon. A comprehensive study of observations was tied together with the then nascent dynamo theory to infer properties of the dynamics of the core. Sixty years on, we have a much enriched understanding of the theory of convectively driven dynamos, and an even more comprehensive database of observations stretching back several centuries. Equally important are the new satellite observations that provide global coverage with unprecedented accuracy over the last decade. In this talk I will try to show how the interplay between theory and observation can lead to understanding of force balances in the core, and interactions between the core and the overlying mantle.

  18. The geomagnetic field intensity variations in the Iberian Peninsula during the last millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachasova, I. E.; Akimova, S. V.

    2015-09-01

    The pattern of variations in the intensity of the geomagnetic field starting from the middle of the sixth millennium B.C. is reconstructed from the data about the intensity of the ancient geomagnetic field in the region of the Iberian Peninsula provided by the archaeomagnetic studies of ceramics from archaeological monuments. In this time interval, the intensity of the field widely varies from ~30 to ~90 µT. The smooth variation of the field is superimposed by the variations with characteristic times from thousands to hundreds of years. The intensity variations can be subdivided into two groups: rather sharp variations with a characteristic duration of about 200 years and smooth quasi-harmonic fluctuations with a duration of a few hundred years.

  19. [Biotropic effects of geomagnetic storms and their seasonal variations].

    PubMed

    Kuleshova, V P; Pulinets, S A; Sazanova, E A; Kharchenko, A M

    2001-01-01

    A substantial effect of geomagnetic storms on human health with a confidential probability P = 0.95 was revealed. The quantitative estimates of the biotropic effect are presented. For example, the frequency of occurrence of bursts exceeding the average number of hospitalized patients with mental and cardiovascular diseases during magnetic storms increases approximately 2 times compared with quiet periods (based on the data on 1983-84). The frequency of occurrence of myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, violation of cardial rhythm, acute violation of brain blood circulation during storms increases 2.1; 1.6; 1.6; 1.5 times, respectively compared with magnetically quiet periods (based on the data of 1992-96). A similarity of the seasonal distribution of the magnitude of the biotropic effect is revealed in the case of myocardial infarction and the number of magnetic storms: a maximum in the equinox and a minimum in summer.

  20. Interhourly Variability Index of Geomagnetic Activity and Its Use in Deriving the Long-Term Variation of Solar Wind Speed

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-31

    CONTRACT NUMBER Interhourly variability index of geomagnetic activity and its use in deriving the long-term variation of solar wind speed 5b...detailed derivation of the interhourly variability (IHP) index of geomagnetic activity. The LHV index for a given geomagnetic element is mechanically... index is derived separately for stations in both hemispheres within six longitude sectors spanning the Earth using only local night hours. It is

  1. A new 200 Ma paleomagnetic pole for Africa, and paleo-secular variation scatter from Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) intrusives in Morocco (Ighrem and Foum Zguid dykes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palencia-Ortas, A.; Ruiz-Martínez, V. C.; Villalaín, J. J.; Osete, M. L.; Vegas, R.; Touil, A.; Hafid, A.; McIntosh, G.; van Hinsbergen, D. J. J.; Torsvik, T. H.

    2011-06-01

    Available apparent polar wander (APW) paths for the 200 Ma configuration of Pangea, just prior to the opening of the Central Atlantic Ocean, differ as much as 10o in arc length. Here, we add new data from northwest Africa for this time, obtained from the northeast-trending Foum-Zguid and Ighrem dykes (ca. 200 Ma). These dykes form part of the northern domain of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), and crosscut the Anti-Atlas Ranges in Morocco, and compositionally correspond to quartz-normative tholeiites intruded in continental lithosphere shortly before the opening of the Central Atlantic Ocean. The Foum-Zguid dyke has been intensively studied, whereas the Ighrem dyke has received less scientific focus. We sampled both dykes for paleomagnetic investigation along 100 km of each dyke (12 sites for Foum-Zguid and 11 for Ighrem, 188 samples included in the final analyses). Rock magnetic experiments indicate a mixture of multidomain and single-domain magnetite and/or low-Ti titanomagnetite particles as the principal remanence carriers. In both dykes, the primary nature of the characteristic remanent magnetization is supported by positive contact tests, related to Fe-metasomatism or baked overprints of the corresponding sedimentary country rocks. The directions of the characteristic magnetization exhibit exclusively normal polarity. Site-mean virtual geomagnetic poles are differently grouped in each dyke, suggesting distinct geomagnetic secular variation records. The Foum-Zguid paleomagnetic pole (N= 12, PLat= 67.9°N, PLon= 247.9°E, κ= 125, A95= 3.9°) plots close to that of Ighrem (N= 11, PLat= 78.4°N, PLon= 238.2°E, κ= 47, A95= 6.7°), confirming those mineralogical and geochemical evidences supporting that they represent dissimilar magmatic stages. Virtual geomagnetic poles dispersion from both dykes (S= 10.5°13.0°8.1°) is in line with those obtained from recent studies of a CAMP-related dyke in Iberia and results from CAMP lavas in the Argana

  2. Variations in the intensity of the geomagnetic field in Siberia during the last 13000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachasova, I. E.; Burakov, K. S.; Pilipenko, O. V.

    2015-01-01

    The thermal magnetization of the samples from the archaeological sites in Siberia is studied. The magnetization of the collected samples was studied using the authors' modification of the Thellier method amended by the magnetic anisotropy and chemical alterations. Resulting from the study of the burned material from the Kazachka site, the time series of the geomagnetic field intensity in Siberia spanning the time interval from 10000 to 1000 B.C. is obtained. These data are unique in terms of the duration and representativeness. For the first time, the main variation in the intensity of the geomagnetic field is traced by studying the magnetization of the samples from a single archeological site. The pattern of the variations in the intensity of the geomagnetic field in Siberia from 11000 B.C. to 2000 A.D., which is reconstructed from the data of the Kazachka, Ust-Karenga, and some other sites of Cis-Baikalia, indicates that the characteristics time of the long-period oscillation in the intensity of the geomagnetic field is about 8000 years. It also suggests the existence of rapid variations superimposed on the main oscillation.

  3. Annual and semiannual variations of the geomagnetic field at equatorial locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, W. H.

    1981-06-01

    The annual and semiannual variations of the quiet-sun year (1965) geomagnetic field are examined using geomagnetic records obtained from observatories located between about 0 and 30 deg N geomagnetic latitude. Three separate contributions are analyzed: (1) the quiet-day midnight level (MDT), (2) the solar-quiet daily variation (Sq), and (3) the quiet-time lunar semidiurnal tidal variation (L). Methods of three recent studies (Campbell, 1980a, 1980b) are used to emphasize the equatorial features, and the differences in the seasonal amplitude and phase changes, obtained from a Fourier analysis of annual and semiannual components in the three orthogonal magnetic-field directions, are illustrated. Conclusions are presented, including: (1) the equatorial MDT variations of the northward and vertical components at quiet periods seem to represent the expected seasonal nighttime magnetospheric distortions, (2) the seasonal equatorial region Sq follows closely the annual and semiannual patterns expected to be caused by ionospheric conductivity and heating variations that give rise to a dynamo current at E-region heights, and (3) the lunar seasonal variations show characteristics of dayside ionospheric electrojet origin.

  4. Relationship Between Human Physiological Parameters And Geomagnetic Variations Of Solar Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, S.

    variations of solar origin. The examinations and analyses performed show that space weather prediction may be utilized for the purpose of pharmacological and regime measures to limit the adverse physiological reactions to geomagnetic storms.

  5. Induction effects of geomagnetic disturbances in the geo-electric field variations at low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doumbia, Vafi; Boka, Kouadio; Kouassi, Nguessan; Didier Franck Grodji, Oswald; Amory-Mazaudier, Christine; Menvielle, Michel

    2017-01-01

    In this study we examined the influences of geomagnetic activity on the Earth surface electric field variations at low latitudes. During the International Equatorial Electrojet Year (IEEY) various experiments were performed along 5° W in West Africa from 1992 to 1995. Among other instruments, 10 stations equipped with magnetometers and telluric electric field lines operated along a meridian chain across the geomagnetic dip equator from November 1992 to December 1994. In the present work, the induced effects of space-weather-related geomagnetic disturbances in the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) influence area in West Africa were examined. For that purpose, variations in the north-south (Ex) and east-west (Ey) components of telluric electric field were analyzed, along with that of the three components (H, D and Z) of the geomagnetic field during the geomagnetic storm of 17 February 1993 and the solar flare observed on 4 April 1993. The most important induction effects during these events are associated with brisk impulses like storm sudden commencement (ssc) and solar flare effect (sfe) in the geomagnetic field variations. For the moderate geomagnetic storm that occurred on 17 February 1993, with a minimum Dst index of -110 nT, the geo-electric field responses to the impulse around 11:00 LT at LAM are Ex = 520 mV km-1 and Ey = 400 mV km-1. The geo-electric field responses to the sfe that occurred around 14:30 LT on 4 April 1993 are clearly observed at different stations as well. At LAM the crest-to-crest amplitude of the geo-electric field components associated with the sfe are Ex = 550 mV km-1 and Ey = 340 mV km-1. Note that the sfe impact on the geo-electric field variations decreases with the increasing distance of the stations from the subsolar point, which is located at about 5.13° N on 4 April. This trend does not reflect the sfe increasing amplitude near the dip equator due the high Cowling conductivity in the EEJ belt.

  6. Geomagnetic superchrons and time variations in the cooling rate of the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, P.

    2015-12-01

    Polarity reversal systematics from numerical dynamos are used to explore the relationship between geomagnetic reversal frequency, including geomagnetic superchrons, and time variations in the rate of the cooling of the core. We develop a parameterization of the average reversal frequency from numerical dynamos in terms of the core heat flux normalized by the difference between the present-day core heat flux and the core heat flux at geomagnetic superchron onset. A low-order polynomial fit of this parameterization to the 0-300 Ma Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS) reveals that a decrease in core heat flux relative to present-day of approximately 30% can account for the Cretaceous Normal Polarity and Kiaman Reversed Polarity Superchrons, whereas the hyper-reversing periods in the Jurassic GPTS imply a core heat flux approximately 20% higher than at present-day. Low heat flux and slow cooling of the core inferred during the Kiaman Reversed Polarity Superchron is qualitatively consistent with predictions from mantle global circulation models (mantle GCMs) that show a reduction in mantle convective activity during the time of Pangea, whereas these same mantle GCMs and most plate motion reconstructions predict fast core cooling during the Cretaceous Normal Polarity Superchron, suggesting that the cooling rate of the core is not generally in phase with variations in plate motions.

  7. Spectral characteristics of geomagnetic field variations at low and equatorial latitudes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    Geomagnetic field spectra from eight standard observations at geomagnetic latitudes below 30?? were studied to determine the field characteristics unique to the equatorial region. Emphasis was placed upon those variations having periods between 5 min and 4 hr for a selection of magnetically quiet, average, and active days in 1965. The power spectral density at the equator was about ten times that the near 30?? latitude. The initial manifestation of the equatorial electrojet as evidenced by the east-west alignment of the horizontal field or the change in vertical amplitudes occurred below about 20?? latitude. Induced current effects upon the vertical component from which the Earth conductivity might be inferred could best be obtained at times and latitudes unaffected by the electrojet current. Values of about 1.6 ?? 103 mhos/m for an effective skin depth of 500-600 km were determined. The spectral amplitudes increased linearly with geomagnetic activity index, Ap. The spectral slope had a similar behavior at all latitudes. The slope changed systematically with Ap-index and showed a diurnal variation, centered on local noon, that changed form with geomagnetic activity.

  8. Multiday thermospheric density oscillations associated with variations in solar radiation and geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiyao; Wang, Wenbin; Zhang, Shunrong; Liu, Xiao; Yuan, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Thermospheric densities observed by Challenging Minisatellite Payload and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment satellites during 2002-2010 and the globally averaged thermospheric densities from 1967 to 2007 have been used to investigate latitudinal, longitudinal, and height dependences of the multiday oscillations of thermospheric densities. The data show that the main multiday oscillations in thermospheric densities are 27, 13.5, 9, and 7 day oscillations. The high-correlation coefficients between the density oscillations and the F10.7 or Ap index indicate that these oscillations are externally driven. The 27 day density oscillation, being the strongest, is induced by variations in solar radiation, as well as recurrent geomagnetic activity that is the result of corotating interaction regions (CIRs) and high-speed solar wind streams of coronal hole origin. Density oscillations at periods of 13.5, 9, and 7 days at solar minimum and during the declining phase are stronger than those at solar maximum. These oscillations are mainly associated with recurrent geomagnetic activity due to coronal hole high-speed streams and CIRs. The multiday, periodic oscillations of thermospheric density exhibit strong latitudinal and longitudinal variations in the geomagnetic coordinate and oscillate synchronously at different heights. Oscillations with zonal wave number 0 oscillate globally, whereas those with nonzero wave numbers are strong at high geomagnetic latitudes, and hemispherically asymmetric. They are stronger in the Southern Hemisphere. The spectral distributions of thermospheric densities at different heights have almost the same latitude and longitude structures, but the spectral magnitudes increase with height.

  9. Variations in geomagnetic intensity and temperature in the second Millennium B.C. in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachasova, I. E.; Burakov, K. S.

    2012-05-01

    The Bronze ceramics of the Baeza archeological monument in Spain is studied by archaeomagnetic methods. In the 19th and 18th centuries B.C, the intensity of the geomagnetic field varied from 40 to 60 mkT. The variations are smooth; they attained their maximum in the 16th to 15th centuries B.C. The obtained data on the variations in the geomagnetic intensity perfectly agree with the results of previous investigations for the ceramics from the Bronze Age multilayered archeological monuments Azuer and Ubeda. The temperature in the region of the Baeza monument is estimated in the interval from the 18th to the 13th centuries B.C. It experiences wave-like variation, ranging from ˜15 to 23°C and attains its maximum in the 16th century B.C.

  10. Natural variations in the geomagnetically trapped electron population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vampola, A. L.

    1972-01-01

    Temporal variations in the trapped natural electron flux intensities and energy spectra are discussed and demonstrated using recent satellite data. These data are intended to acquaint the space systems engineer with the types of natural variations that may be encountered during a mission and to augment the models of the electron environment currently being used in space system design and orbit selection. An understanding of the temporal variations which may be encountered should prove helpful. Some of the variations demonstrated here which are not widely known include: (1) addition of very energetic electrons to the outer zone during moderate magnetic storms: (2) addition of energetic electrons to the inner zone during major magnetic storms; (3) inversions in the outer zone electron energy spectrum during the decay phase of a storm injection event and (4) occasional formation of multiple maxima in the flux vs altitude profile of moderately energetic electrons.

  11. Study on the Geomagnetic Short Period Variations of the Northwestern Yunnan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Y.; Li, Q.; Cai, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Northwestern Yunnan is located in the interaction area between the Eurasian plate and the India plate. This area has been the ideal place for the research of continental dynamics and the prediction for risk region of strong earthquake for its complex tectonic environment and frequent seismic activity. Therefore the study on the geomagnetic short period variations is of great significance in the exploration of deep electrical structure, analysis of the seismic origin and deep geodynamics in the Northwestern Yunnan of China . This paper is based on the geomagnetic data from the magnetometer array with 8 sites built in the northwestern Yunnan to explore the deep electrical structure by the method of geomagnetic depth sounding. Firstly, we selected a total of 183 geomagnetic short period events at the range of 6min to 120min period. And we found a north northwest dividing line, of which two sides has the opposite value in the vertical component variation amplitude, which indicates the obvious conductivity anomaly underground. Secondly, the contour maps of the ratio of vertical component and horizontal component variation amplitude ΔZ/ΔH in different periods reflects the changes of a high conductivity belt's direction and position. In addition, the induction arrows maps within the period of 2 - 256min also shows that on the two sides of the dividing line the induction vectors deviate from each other, and the amplitude and direction of vectors varies with periods regularly. In the light of this, we infer that a high conductivity belt probably exists, which stretches from the deep crust to uppermost mantle and changes with depth constantly with the reference of magnetotelluric sounding. In the end of this paper, the staggered grid finite difference method is used to model the simplified three-dimensional high conductivity anomaly, and the result shows magnetic field distributions are consistent with the observed geomagnetic short period variations characteristics in

  12. Spring-fall asymmetry of substorm strength, geomagnetic activity and solar wind: Implications for semiannual variation and solar hemispheric asymmetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mursula, K.; Tanskanen, E.; Love, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    We study the seasonal variation of substorms, geomagnetic activity and their solar wind drivers in 1993-2008. The number of substorms and substorm mean duration depict an annual variation with maxima in Winter and Summer, respectively, reflecting the annual change of the local ionosphere. In contradiction, substorm mean amplitude, substorm total efficiency and global geomagnetic activity show a dominant annual variation, with equinoctial maxima alternating between Spring in solar cycle 22 and Fall in cycle 23. The largest annual variations were found in 1994 and 2003, in the declining phase of the two cycles when high-speed streams dominate the solar wind. A similar, large annual variation is found in the solar wind driver of substorms and geomagnetic activity, which implies that the annual variation of substorm strength, substorm efficiency and geomagnetic activity is not due to ionospheric conditions but to a hemispherically asymmetric distribution of solar wind which varies from one cycle to another. Our results imply that the overall semiannual variation in global geomagnetic activity has been seriously overestimated, and is largely an artifact of the dominant annual variation with maxima alternating between Spring and Fall. The results also suggest an intimate connection between the asymmetry of solar magnetic fields and some of the largest geomagnetic disturbances, offering interesting new pathways for forecasting disturbances with a longer lead time to the future. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Spring-fall asymmetry of substorm strength, geomagnetic activity and solar wind: Implications for semiannual variation and solar hemispheric asymmetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marsula, K.; Tanskanen, E.; Love, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    We study the seasonal variation of substorms, geomagnetic activity and their solar wind drivers in 1993–2008. The number of substorms and substorm mean duration depict an annual variation with maxima in Winter and Summer, respectively, reflecting the annual change of the local ionosphere. In contradiction, substorm mean amplitude, substorm total efficiency and global geomagnetic activity show a dominant annual variation, with equinoctial maxima alternating between Spring in solar cycle 22 and Fall in cycle 23. The largest annual variations were found in 1994 and 2003, in the declining phase of the two cycles when high-speed streams dominate the solar wind. A similar, large annual variation is found in the solar wind driver of substorms and geomagnetic activity, which implies that the annual variation of substorm strength, substorm efficiency and geomagnetic activity is not due to ionospheric conditions but to a hemispherically asymmetric distribution of solar wind which varies from one cycle to another. Our results imply that the overall semiannual variation in global geomagnetic activity has been seriously overestimated, and is largely an artifact of the dominant annual variation with maxima alternating between Spring and Fall. The results also suggest an intimate connection between the asymmetry of solar magnetic fields and some of the largest geomagnetic disturbances, offering interesting new pathways for forecasting disturbances with a longer lead time to the future.

  14. Paleomagnetic secular variation at the Azores during the last 3 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Chiara, A.; Speranza, F.; Porreca, M.

    2012-12-01

    We report on 33 new paleomagnetic directions obtained from 16 lava flows emplaced in the last 3 ka on São Miguel, the largest island of the Azores. The data provide 27 directions from historical or 14C dated flows which, together with 6 directions previously gathered from the same flows by Johyson et al., (1998), yield the first paleomagnetic record of the last 3 ka from the Atlantic Ocean. Within-flow directions are consistent, suggesting that inclination swings from 60° to 25° and declination changes between -10° to 20° reflect variations in the geomagnetic field over the last 3 ka. To a first approximation, the declination record is consistent with predictions from CALS3k.4 and gufm1 global field models. Conversely, inclination values are lower than model predictions at two different ages: 1) four different sites from the 1652 AD flow yield I=48° instead of I=63° predicted by gufm1; 2) data from several flows nicely mimic the inclination minimum of 800-1400 AD, but inclination values are lower by ca. 10° than CALS3k.4 model predictions. By interpolating a cubic spline fit on declination / inclination versus age data, we tentatively infer the directional evolution of the geomagnetic field at the Azores from 1000 BC to 1600 AD.The obtained curve shows three tracks in virtual overlap during the 1000-800 BC, 800-500 BC, and 400-700 AD time spans; Cubic spline interpolation of flow mean declinations (a) and inclinations (b) versus respective calendar ages; c) directions derived every 100 years from cubic spline interpolation, superimposed on paleomagnetic directions (and relative confidence cones) from three loosely-dated flows (Fig. 1). For ages older than 750 AD the fit line is dashed, as it is constrained by a limited number of data. Vertical error bars for declination and inclination data are α95 /cos(I) and α95 values, respectively

  15. Statistical analysis of geomagnetic field variations during the partial solar eclipse on 2011 January 4 in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ateş, Abdullah; Ekinci, Yunus Levent; Buyuksarac, Aydin; Aydemir, Attila; Demirci, Alper

    2015-05-01

    Some geophysical parameters, such as those related to gravitation and the geomagnetic field, could change during solar eclipses. In order to observe geomagnetic fluctuations, geomagnetic measurements were carried out in a limited time frame during the partial solar eclipse that occurred on 2011 January 4 and was observed in Canakkale and Ankara, Turkey. Additionally, records of the geomagnetic field spanning 24 hours, obtained from another observatory (in Iznik, Turkey), were also analyzed to check for any peculiar variations. In the data processing stage, a polynomial fit, following the application of a running average routine, was applied to the geomagnetic field data sets. Geomagnetic field data sets indicated there was a characteristic decrease at the beginning of the solar eclipse and this decrease can be well-correlated with previous geomagnetic field measurements that were taken during the total solar eclipse that was observed in Turkey on 2006 March 29. The behavior of the geomagnetic field is also consistent with previous observations in the literature. As a result of these analyses, it can be suggested that eclipses can cause a shielding effect on the geomagnetic field of the Earth.

  16. On the secular variations in the composition of Phanerozoic marine potash evaporites

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, H.D.; Horita, J.; Seyfried, W.E. Jr.

    1996-11-01

    In a recent paper, L.A. Hardie proposed that the secular changes in the mineralogy of marine nonskeletal limestones and in the mineralogy of marine potash evaporites during the Phanerozoic are the result of changes in the composition of seawater caused primarily by fluctuations in the flux of seawater through mid-ocean ridges. He suggested that even quite small variations (25%) in this flux have a profound effect on the composition of seawater. We show that the effects of changes in the hydrothermal flux are much smaller than he proposed. Nevertheless, a doubling of the hydrothermal flux could probably alter the composition of seawater sufficiently to affect the mineralogy of marine potash evaporites. An alternative explanation for the variations in the mineralogy of these deposits invokes differences in the degree of dolomitization during the evaporation of seawater. The apparent near constancy of the K{sup +} content of seawater during the Phanerozoic supports this hypothesis. It seems likely that during periods of rapid seafloor spreading the rate of seawater cycling is greater than today, that sea level is higher, that very large carbonate platforms are more abundant, and that changes in seawater chemistry together with increases in dolomitization during the evaporation of seawater lead to MgSO{sub 4}-free potash deposits. The relative importance of these several effects can probably be determined with certainty only when we have analyses of relatively unaltered seawater from the several Phanerozoic periods. 27 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Annual and semiannual variations of the geomagnetic field at equatorial locations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    For a year of quiet solar-activity level, geomagnetic records from American hemisphere observatories located between about 0?? and 30?? north geomagnetic latitude were used to compare the annual and semiannual variations of the geomagnetic field associated with three separate contributions: (a) the quiet-day midnight level, MDT; (b) the solar-quiet daily variation, Sq; (c) the quiet-time lunar semidiurnal tidal variation, L(12). Four Fourier spectral constituents (24, 12, 8, 6 h periods) of Sq were individually treated. All three orthogonal elements (H, D and Z) were included in the study. The MDT changes show a dominant semiannual variation having a range of about 7 gammas in H and a dominant annual variation in Z having a range of over 8 gammas. These changes seem to be a seasonal response to the nightside distortions by magnetospheric currents. There is a slow decrease in MDT amplitudes with increasing latitude. The Sq changes follow the patterns expected from an equatorial ionospheric dynamo electrojet current system. The dominant seasonal variations occur in H having a range of over 21 gammas for the 24 h period and over 12 gammas for the 12 h period spectral components. The higher-order components are relatively smaller in size. The Sq(H) amplitudes decrease rapidly with increasing latitude. Magnetospheric contributions to the equatorial Sq must be less than a few per cent of the observed magnitude. The L(12) variation shows the ionospheric electrojet features by the dominance of H and the rapid decrease in amplitude with latitude away from the equator. However, the seasonal variation range of over 7 gammas has a maximum in early February and minimum in late June that is not presently explainable by the known ionospheric conductivity and tidal behavior. ?? 1981.

  18. Constraints on the secular variation of Mercury's magnetic field from the combined analysis of MESSENGER and Mariner 10 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philpott, Lydia C.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Winslow, Reka M.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Purucker, Michael E.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2014-10-01

    Observations of Mercury's internal magnetic field from the Magnetometer on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft have revealed a dipole moment of 190 nT RM3 offset about 480 km northward from the planetary equator, where RM is Mercury's radius. We have reanalyzed magnetic field observations acquired by the Mariner 10 spacecraft during its third flyby of Mercury (M10-III) in 1975 to constrain the secular variation in the internal field over the past 40 years. With the application of techniques developed in the analysis of MESSENGER data, we find that the dipole moment that best fits the M10-III data is 188 nT RM3 offset 475 km northward from the equator. Our results are consistent with no secular variation, although variations of up to 10%, 16%, and 35%, respectively, are permitted in the zonal coefficients g10, g20, and g30 in a spherical harmonic expansion of the internal field.

  19. Long-term variation in the ionosphere and lower thermosphere as seen in the geomagnetic solar quiet daily variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, A.; Koyama, Y.; Hori, T.; Nose, M.; Otsuka, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In order to investigate characteristics of the long-term variation in the ionosphere and lower thermosphere, we analyzed the amplitude of geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) field daily variation using 1-h geomagnetic field data obtained from 69 geomagnetic stations within the period of 1947-2013. In the present data analysis, we took advantage of the Inter-university Upper atmosphere Global Observation NETwork (IUGONET) products (metadata database and analysis software) for finding and handling the long-term observation data obtained at many observatories. The Sq amplitude observed at these geomagnetic stations showed a clear solar activity dependence and tended to be enhanced during each solar maximum phase. The Sq amplitude was the smallest around the minimum of solar cycle 23/24 in 2008-2009. This significant depression implies that the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation responsible for ionization of the upper atmosphere decreased during this solar cycle minimum. In order to examine a global distribution of the long-term trend in the Sq amplitude, we derived the residual Sq amplitude from the deviation from the fitting curve between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude. As a result, a majority of the trends in the residual Sq amplitude showed negative values over a wide region. This tendency was relatively strong in Europe, India, the eastern part of Canada, and New Zealand. Moreover, we estimate the neutral wind in the lower thermosphere from the Sq amplitude and height-integrated ionospheric conductivity in order to know the physical mechanism of the long-term trend in the residual Sq amplitude. As a result, the estimated thermospheric zonal and meridional winds showed a seasonal variation with a period of one year or less, but the solar activity dependence was unclear. This result suggests that the solar cycle dependence of the Sq amplitude may be mainly attributed to the variation of the ionospheric conductivity.

  20. The Identification of Seismo and Volcanomagnetic Events Using Non-stationary Analysis of Geomagnetic Field Variations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedi, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Johnston, M.; La Manna, M.

    Many studies have shown a clear correlation between volcanic and/or seismic activ- ity and time variations of local geomagnetic fields, called seismomagnetic (SM) and /or volcanomagnetic (VM) effects. SM and VM can be generated from various phys- ical process, such as piezomagnetism, tectonomagnetism and electrokinetism. Rele- vant parameters are the event duration, the event magnitude and the magnetometer sample rate. Here, we present some results obtained from a non-stationary analysis of geomagnetic time series that focuses on automatic detection of possible SM and VM events. Several approaches are considered. The first one, based on the continuous wavelet transform, provides us with a multiresolution lecture of the signal, expanded in time-scale space. The second uses a time-variant adaptive algorithm (RLS) that al- lows the detection of some time intervals where important statistical variations of the signal occur. Finally, we investigate a third technique relying on multifractal analy- sis. This latter allows estimation of local regularity of a time series path, in order to detect unusual singularities. Different multifractal models were used for testing the methodology, such as multifractional Brownian Motions (mbmSs), before applying it to synthetic simulations of geomagnetic signals. In our simulations, we took into account theoretical SM and/or VM effects deriving from fault rupture and overpres- sured magma chambers. We applied these methodologies to two different real world data sets, recorded on Mt Etna (volcanic area) during the volcanic activity occurred in 1981, and in North Palm Springs (seismic area) during the seism of July 8th 1986, respectively. In both cases, all techniques were effective in automatically identifying the geomagnetic time-variations likely inferred by volcanic and/or seismic activity and the results are in good agreement with the indices provided by real volcanic and seismic measurements.

  1. The Identification of Seismo and Volcanomagnetic Events Using Non-stationary Analysis of Geomagnetic Field Variations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedi, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Johnston, M.; La Manna, M.

    Many studies have shown a clear correlation between volcanic and/or seismic activ- ity and time variations of local geomagnetic fields, called seismomagnetic (SM) and /or volcanomagnetic (VM) effects. SM and VM can be generated from various phys- ical process, such as piezomagnetism, tectonomagnetism and electrokinetism. Rele- vant parameters are the event duration, the event magnitude and the magnetometer sample rate. Here, we present some results obtained from a non-stationary analysis of geomagnetic time series that focuses on automatic detection of possible SM and VM events. Several approaches are considered. The first one, based on the continuous wavelet transform, provides us with a multiresolution lecture of the signal, expanded in time-scale space. The second uses a time-variant adaptive algorithm (RLS) that al- lows the detection of some time intervals where important statistical variations of the signal occur. Finally, we investigate a third technique relying on multifractal analy- sis. This latter allows estimation of local regularity of a time series path, in order to detect unusual singularities. Different multifractal models were used for testing the methodology, such as multifractional Brownian Motions (mbm 's), before applying it to synthetic simulations of geomagnetic signals. In our simulations, we took into account theoretical SM and/or VM effects deriving from fault rupture and overpres- sured magma chambers. We applied these methodologies to two different real world data sets, recorded on Mt Etna (volcanic area) during the volcanic activity occurred in 1981, and in North Palm Springs (seismic area) during the seism of July 8th 1986, respectively. In both cases, all techniques were effective in automatically identifying the geomagnetic time-variations likely inferred by volcanic and/or seismic activity in fact we obtained results in good agreement with the indices provided by real volcanic and seismic measurements.

  2. Analysis of geomagnetic data and cosmic ray variations in periods of magnetic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandrikova, Oksana; Zalyaev, Timur; Solovev, Igor; Shevtsov, Boris

    indent=0.63cm In the present paper we have suggested a model of the geomagnetic field variation, which allows us to present the characteristic variation of the field and local perturbations formed in periods of increased geomagnetic activity. The model is based on wavelets and has the following form: [ f(t)= sum_n c_{j,n} phi_{j,n} + sum_{(j_{dist},n)in I_1} d_{j_{dist},n}Psi_{j_{dist},n}(t) + sum_{(j_{dist},n)in I_2} d_{j_{dist},n}Psi_{j_{dist},n}(t) + e(t) ] where component sum_n c_{j,n} phi_{j,n} presents the characteristic variation; component \\sum_{(j_{dist},n)in I_1} d_{j_{dist},n}Psi_{j_{dist},n}(t) presents weak geomagnetic perturbations; component \\sum_{(j_{dist},n)in I_2} d_{j_{dist},n}Psi_{j_{dist},n}(t) presents strong geomagnetic perturbations; j is the scale; I_1, I_2 are the sets of indices; e(t) is the noise; Psi_j = \\{Psi_{j,n}\\}_{n in Z} is the wavelet basis; phi_j = \\{phi_{j,n}\\}_{n in Z} is the scaling function; c_{j,n}=< f, phi_{j,n} > ,d_{j,n}=< f, Psi_{j,n} >. Using the proposed model we have developed a technique of identifying the characteristic variation of the geomagnetic field (in periods of quiet magnetosphere) and components presenting different conditions of the field in periods of perturbations. The technique can be used for various data registration stations and is useful for studying the dynamics of electric current systems in the magnetosphere, the interaction between such systems, and their spatial and temporal distribution. We have also created special rules for estimating the storminess degree of the geomagnetic field. The suggested theoretical tools allow us to determine time points when geomagnetic perturbations arise and to obtain quantitative estimates of the storminess degree. Furthermore, it is also possible to implement these rules in the automatic mode. The theoretical tools mentioned above are also aimed at developing and improving mathematical tools for estimating and monitoring the condition of the geomagnetic

  3. Improved Land-Sea Correlations in Iceland Based on Paleomagnetic Secular Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ölafsdóttir, S.; Geirsdóttir, Á.; Miller, G. H.; Stoner, J. S.

    2012-04-01

    High-resolution paleoclimatic reconstructions from both terrestrial and nearby marine archives are available from Iceland. Independently dated tephras and radiocarbon dates could theoretically synchronize these records, thereby allowing evaluation of leads and lags in the climate record. However, direct comparisons between records are limited by the difficulties in deriving precise age control. Here, Paleomagnetic Secular Variation (PSV) records reconstructed through alternating field demagnetization of u-channel samples from two lacustrine archives (HAK-1B & HVT-1A) are compared to the PSV records from a well-dated marine record (MD99-2269) taken from North Iceland shelf. Over the past 10 ka of the sediment records 40 to 60 tie points are utilized, based on diagnostic tephra layers and unique features in the PSV records, to synchronize the three sediment cores within a lock-in depth uncertainty. The uncertainties are likely to be on the order of decades due to the high accumulation rate, allowing all records to be placed on a common time scale. Using the well-dated marine core as a chronological template demonstrates the difference between linearly-interpreted tephra-based age model and the more time-variable PSV age model. The high frequency of tie points allows the reconstruction of sediment accumulation rate changes in the lacustrine records that were not apparent from the tephrochonological controls. The resulting PSV synchronized paleoclimate records from land and sea add valuable information about forcing and responses of the Holocene climate system.

  4. Paleomagnetic secular variation and environmental magnetism of Holocene-age sediments from Tulare Lake, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roza, Janine; Jackson, Brandon; Heaton, Eric; Negrini, Rob

    2016-05-01

    The lake-level record from Tulare Lake, CA has been shown to provide valuable constraints on late Pleistocene and Holocene runoff from the Sierra Nevada mountain range into the San Joaquin Valley of California, one of the world's most prolific agricultural centers. This project uses the magnetic properties of the Tulare Lake sediments in order to date the sediments and to constrain the relative lake level at the time of deposition. Shallowing lake conditions were identified leading up to a prominent unconformity; magnetic mineralogy and grain size indicators, primarily decreasing ARM/IRM and S-Ratio values suggest coarser grain sizes and more oxidizing conditions. Approximately half of the samples possessed well-behaved paleomagnetic directions suitable for paleomagnetic secular variation dating. The results indicate that the sediments below the unconformity were deposited approximately 7600-8500 cal yr BP, and the sediments above the unconformity were deposited approximately 2500-800 cal yr BP. The ages of the corresponding sediments are consistent with the time intervals during which previous studies indicate that lake level was above the elevation of this site, before and after a mid Holocene regression.

  5. Paleomagnetic Secular Variation and Environmental Magnetism of Holocene-aged Sediments from Tulare Lake, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roza, J.; Jackson, B.; Heaton, E.; Negrini, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    The lake-level record from Tulare Lake, CA has been shown to provide valuable constraints on late Pleistocene and Holocene channelized runoff from the Sierra Nevada mountain range into the San Joaquin Valley of California, one of the world's most prolific agricultural centers. This project focuses on the use of magnetic properties of the Tulare Lake sediments in order to test previous results by dating the sediments and determining the relative lake level at the time of deposition. Shallowing lake conditions were identified leading up to a prominent unconformity from magnetic mineralogy and grain size indicators, primarily decreasing ARM/IRM and S-Ratio values suggesting coarser grain sizes and more oxidizing conditions. Approximately half of the samples possessed well-behaved paleomagnetic directions suitable for paleomagnetic secular variation dating. The results indicate that the sediments below the unconformity were deposited approximately 7600-6700 14C years ago (~7600 to 8500 cal yr B.P.), and the sediments above the unconformity were deposited approximately 2200-500 14C years ago. The ages of the corresponding sediments are consistent with the time intervals during which lake level was predicted to be above the elevation of the Poso Canal site before and after a mid-Holocene regression.

  6. Rotationally Resolved Study Of The Surface Of Pluto: seasonal/secular variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Bauer, James; Buratti, Bonnie; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Grundy, Will M.; Emery, Joshua P.; Fernandez, Yan; Lisse, Casey M.; Stansberry, John

    2015-10-01

    We propose Warm Spitzer/IRAC GO observations of the Pluto system, to monitorize the secular and/or seasonal changes on Pluto's surface composition. The aim of this proposal is to characterize the surface heterogeneity of Pluto through photometric observations at the 3.6 and 4.5 µm IRAC channels after the New Horizons encounter on July 2014. We ask for observations at 18 longitudes (~ every 20o). The surface of Pluto, formed by patches of CH4, N2 and CO, is a dynamic and variable system, with a timescale on the order of months to years. Spitzer holds a unique place in the solar system to observe Pluto, above the Earth's atmosphere in a stable Earth-trailing environment. Relative differences in the albedo of Pluto in ch1 and ch2 is an effective tool to study the different mixing ratios of the ices on the surface. This is also promising for the search of other candidate materials that have not yet been identified in the vis/NIR, e.g CO2 that has its fundamental absorption band in the wavelength range of ch2. In 2004, under a Spitzer program during the cryogenic mission (PI. Cruikshank), low-resolution light curves were obtained at 8 different longitudes. In 2014, under a Cycle 10 program (PI. Pinilla-Alonso) we obtained data at ch1 and ch2 at 18 longitudes. The analysis of these data shows clear indications not only of surface heterogeneity, but also on possible secular variations. These data are under analysis and show a great potential for the mapping of volatiles ices all over the surface of Pluto. Two parallel observational programs are in progress involving people in this group, one of near-infrared spectroscopy (~0.9-2.5 µm) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (PI. Grundy) and one of visible spectroscopy (0.4-0.95 µm) at WHT, La Palma (PI. Pinilla-Alonso). The combination of these datasets, covering different wavelength regions, provide unique and complementary information, and is very important in deriving full benefit of data from the NASA New Horizons

  7. Semiannual variations of great geomagnetic storms: Solar sources of great storms. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Cliver, E.W.; Crooker, N.U.; Cane, H.V.

    1992-01-01

    The authors report preliminary results of an investigation of the solar sources of 25 great geomagnetic storms with D sub st < or = {minus}250 nT occurring from 1957-1990. These storms exhibit a clear semiannual variation with 14 events occurring within {+-} 30 days of the equinoxes vs. 5 storms within {+-} 30 days of the solstices. This seasonal variation appears to result from a variable threshold for the size of a solar event required to produce a great geomagnetic storm, in the sense that weaker solar events, such as disappearing solar filaments, are more likely to produce great storms at the equinoxes than near the solstices. The great problem storms of the last four solar cycles, i.e., those storms lacking commensurate preceding solar activity, are all found to occur relatively near the equinoxes. Conversely, four of the five great storms that occurred near the solstices were preceded by truly outstanding solar flares. About half (11/25) of the great storms had obvious precursor geomagnetic activity, i.e., periods of approximately > 1 day with D sub st approximately < {minus}30 nT. The precursors can enable some weaker solar events to be more geoeffective than would otherwise be the case in two ways: (1) compression and amplification of pre-existing southward (precursor) fields by the transient shock, and (2) establishment of a lower D sub st baseline , making it easier for transient events to drive D sub st to values < or = {minus}250 nT.

  8. Geomagnetic intensity variations over the past 780 kyr obtained from near-seafloor magnetic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Gee, J S; Cande, S C; Hildebrand, J A; Donnelly, K; Parker, R L

    2000-12-14

    Knowledge of past variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field provides an important constraint on models of the geodynamo. A record of absolute palaeointensity for the past 50 kyr has been compiled from archaeomagnetic and volcanic materials, and relative palaeointensities over the past 800 kyr have been obtained from sedimentary sequences. But a long-term record of geomagnetic intensity should also be carried by the thermoremanence of the oceanic crust Here we show that near-seafloor magnetic anomalies recorded over the southern East Pacific Rise are well correlated with independent estimates of geomagnetic intensity during the past 780 kyr. Moreover, the pattern of absolute palaeointensity of seafloor glass samples from the same area agrees with the well-documented dipole intensity pattern for the past 50 kyr. A comparison of palaeointensities derived from seafloor glass samples with global intensity variations thus allows us to estimate the ages of surficial lava flows in this region. The record of geomagnetic intensity preserved in the oceanic crust should provide a higher-time-resolution record of crustal accretion processes at mid-ocean ridges than has previously been obtainable.

  9. Daily variations of geomagnetic H D and Z-field at equatorial latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okeke, F. N.; Hamano, Y.

    2000-04-01

    With the establishment of the new geomagnetic field observations in the Ocean Hemisphere Network Project (OHP) in Japan, minutes values of geomagnetic components, H D and Zhave been recorded. The hourly mean values were used to study the variations in these three components at these new equatorial electrojet regions. The results of the analysis carried out revealed that the amplitude of dHhas diurnal variation which peaks during the day at about local noon in all the three equatorial electrojet regions. This diurnal variation in Hwith Sq(H) enhancement in all the three regions are attributed to the enhanced dynamo action at these regions. Diurnal variation as observed in Dindicates that the equatorial electrojet current system has both east-west and north-south components. The pronounced magnitude of Zvariation as observed in Kiritimati is attributed mainly to sea induction. Also some abnormal features were observed on 23rd of January at Huancayo, in the components. Seasonal variations with more pronounced equinoctial maximum were observed in Hthan in Z. Dcomponent showed no consistent seasonal variation in all the regions. The equinoctial maximum is due to enhanced equatorial electron density at equinox. More research work, if carried out in these new regions will be useful in making more new contributions to the field of the dynamics of the equatorial electrojet region.

  10. Solar Flares and Variation of Local Geomagnetic Field: Measurements by the Huancayo Observatory over 2001-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlos Reyes, Rafael E.; Gárate Ayesta, Gabriel A.; Reyes Navarro, Felipe A.

    2017-02-01

    We study the local variation of the geomagnetic field measured by the Huancayo Geomagnetic Observatory, Peru, during 2001-2010. Initially, we sought to relate the SFI values, stored daily in the NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center, with the corresponding geomagnetic index; however, no relation was observed. Nonetheless, subsequently, a comparison between the monthly geomagnetic-activity index and the monthly SFI average allowed observing a temporal correlation between these average indices. This correlation shows that the effect of the solar flares does not simultaneously appear on the corresponding magnetic indices. To investigate this, we selected the most intense X-class flares; then, we checked the magnetic field disturbances observed in the Huancayo Geomagnetic Observatory magnetograms. We found some disturbances of the local geomagnetic field in the second and third day after the corresponding solar flare; however, the disturbance strength of the local geomagnetic field is not correlated with the X-class of the solar flare. Finally, there are some disturbances of the local geomagnetic field that are simultaneous with the X-class solar flares and they show a correlation with the total flux of the solar flare.

  11. Evidence for Solar-Cycle Forcing and Secular Variation in the Armagh Observatory Temperature Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1998-01-01

    A prominent feature of previous long-term temperature studies has been the appearance of warming since the 1880s, this often being taken as evidence for anthropogenic-induced global warming. In this investigation, the long-term, annual, mean temperature record (1844-1992) of the Armagh Observatory (Armagh, North Ireland), a set of temperature data based on maximum and minimum thermometers that predates the 1880s and correlates well with northern hemispheric and global standards, is examined for evidence of systematic variation, in particular, as related to solar-cycle forcing and secular variation. Indeed, both appear to be embedded within the Armagh data. Removal of these effects, each contributing about 8% to the overall reduction in variance, yields residuals that are randomly distributed. Application of the 10-year moving average to the residuals, furthermore, strongly suggests that the behavior of the residuals is episodic, inferring that (for extended periods of time) temperatures at Armagh sometimes were warmer or cooler (than expected), while at other times they were stable. Comparison of cyclic averages of annual mean temperatures against the lengths of the associated Hale cycles (i.e., the length of two, sequentially numbered, even-odd sunspot cycle pairs) strongly suggests that the temperatures correlate inversely (r = -0.886 at less than 2% level of significance) against the length of the associated Hale cycle. Because sunspot cycle 22 ended in 1996, the present Hale cycle probably will be shorter than average, implying that temperatures at Armagh over this Hale cycle will be warmer (about 9.31 q 0.23 C at the 90% confidence level) than average (= 9.00 C).

  12. Cosmological variation of the MOND constant: Secular effects on galactic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2015-02-01

    The proximity of the MOND acceleration constant with cosmological accelerations—for example, a0≈c H0/2 π —points to its possibly decreasing with cosmic time. I begin to consider the secular changes induced in galactic systems by such presumed variations, which are assumed to be adiabatic. It is important to understand these effects, in isolation from other evolutionary influences, in order to identify or constrain a0 variations by detection of induced effects, or lack thereof. I find that as long as the system is fully in the deep-MOND regime—as applies to many galactic systems—the adiabatic response of the system obeys simple scaling laws. For example, in a system that would be stationary for fixed a0, the system expands homologously as a0-1 /4, while internal velocities decrease uniformly as a01 /4. If a0∝c H at all relevant times, this change amounts to a factor of ˜2.5 since redshift 10. For rotating systems, the angular frequency Ω ∝a01 /2. The accelerations increase relative to a0 as a0-1 /4, pushing the system towards the Newtonian regime. All this follows from the appearance of a0 in MOND and the scale invariance of the deep-MOND limit—two basic tenets of MOND. More complicated evolution ensues when parts of the system become Newtonian, or are so from inception. For example, these parts may become unstable since they are not protected by MOND's stabilizing effects. The existence of such regions also modifies the MONDian regime since they affect the potential everywhere, and constituents might migrate between the Newtonian and MONDian regimes. Studying these last effects would require detailed numerical calculations.

  13. Secular Variation and Paleomagnetic Studies of Southern Patagonian Plateau Lavas, 46S to 52S, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L.; Gorring, M.; Mason, D.; Condit, C.; Lillydahl-Schroeder, H.

    2007-12-01

    Regional studies of paleosecular variation of the Earth's magnetic field can provide us with information beyond that available from one location. Southern Patagonia, Argentina (46S to 52S latitude and 68W to 72W longitude) is a place where numerous Plio-Pleistocene lava flows are available for such a study. Volcanic activity in this area is related to back arc volcanism due to slab window activity as the South Chile Ridge is subducted beneath western South America, producing Neogene volcanic centers capping Mesozoic basement extending far to the east of the active plate boundary. Published studies on young lavas from both the northern (Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires, Brown et al, 2004) and southern (Pali Aike Volcanic Field, Mejia et al, 2004) portions provide stable paleomagnetic data on nearly 70 lava flows. Paleosecular variation values for the two studies differ, with 17.1 degrees obtained from the Pali Aike field and 20.0 degrees from the Lago Buenos Aires field. Recent fieldwork in the plateau lavas between these two locations has provided some 80 new sites allowing us to better investigate secular variation and the time-averaged field over this entire region during the past 5 myr. Rock magnetic studies on selected new samples (isothermal remanent magnetization and hysteresis measurements) as well as optical observations indicate low titanium magnetite as the primary carrier of remanence. Hysteresis properties range from 0.1 to 0.4 for Mr/Ms and 1.4 to 3.0 for Hcr/Hc indicating psuedo-single domain behavior. Mean destructive fields for AF demagnetization average 40 to 60 mT. Thirty-three new sites, mostly from Gran Meseta Central (48°S), yield a mean direction of inclination -61.8, declination of 356.6 with an alpha-95 of 5.7 degrees. These directions, with additional sites recently collected from Meseta de la Muerte south to Rio Santa Cruz, will allow us to further investigate paleosecular variation over this wide region.

  14. The geomagnetic elements in Denmark 1928-1980

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, H. A.

    Geomagnetic surveys in Denmark from 1928 till 1980 are reported. The Danish Meteorological Institute initiated a new, geomagnetic survey of Denmark in 1928 by the establishment of 10 repeat statins for observation of the geomagnetic, secular variation. The stations were visited again in 1930 and since then every fifth year. The general survey was started in 1939 and continued during the years 1946 to 1957 with the mapping of Northern Jutland. In 1967 the survey taken with a coarser spacing of the measured points during the following years succeeded in completing the mapping of the country with primary consideration to the declination. The observations on the repeat stations during the time 1928-1980 allowed development of mathematical formulas for the secular change of the magnetic elements D, H and Z at any arbitrary point in the country.

  15. Cosmic rays, conditions in interplanetary space and geomagnetic variations during solar cycles 19-24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biktash, Lilia

    2016-07-01

    We have studied conditions in interplanetary space, which can have an influence on galactic and solar cosmic rays (CRs). In this connection the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field parameters and CRs variations have been compared with geomagnetic activity represented by the equatorial Dst and Kp indices beginning from 1955 to the end 2015. The indices are in common practice in the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction studies and they are the final product of this interaction. The important drivers in interplanetary medium which have effect on cosmic rays as CMEs (coronal mass ejections) and CIRs (corotating interaction regions) undergo very strong changes during their propagation to the Earth. Correlation of sunspot numbers and long-term variations of cosmic rays do not adequately reflect peculiarities concerned with the solar wind arrival to 1 AU also. Moreover records of in situ space measurements of the IMF and most other indicators of solar activity cover only a few decades and have a lot of gaps for calculations of long-term variations. Because of this, in such investigations, the geomagnetic indices have some inestimable advantage as continuous series other the solar wind measurements. We have compared the yearly average variations of the indices and of the solar wind parameters with cosmic ray data from Moscow, Climax, Halekala and Oulu neutron monitors during the 20-24 solar cycles. During the descending phases of the solar cycles the long-lasting solar wind high speed streams occurred frequently and were the primary contributors to the recurrent Dst variations and had effects on cosmic rays variations. We show that long-term Dst and Kp variations in these solar cycles were correlated with cosmic ray count rates and can be used for prediction of CR variations. Climate change in connection with evolution of CRs variations is discussed.

  16. A global analysis of the 1991 geomagnetic jerk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Michelis, Paola; Cafarella, Lili; Meloni, Antonio

    2000-12-01

    A recent examination of the geomagnetic annual mean values for the European magnetic observatories has shown the existence of a sudden change in the secular acceleration in about 1991 (Cafarella & Meloni 1995; Macmillan 1996). Using first differences of the Y (east geomagnetic field component) mean values from 74 observatories, the worldwide character of the 1991 impulse has been determined (De Michelis et al. 1998). Using data from 109 observatories widely distributed all over the world, the structure of the secular variation for the X (north) and Z (vertical) magnetic field intensities around 1990 was investigated, and evidence of this most recent jerk was found. External effects were removed from the annual mean data by comparing the long-term variations of the geomagnetic field components at individual observatories with the long-term variations of two geomagnetic indices, aa and Dst, and of a solar index, the Wolf number R. A careful analysis has been carried out on the amplitude of the external disturbance, on its dependence on latitude, and on the weights of the geomagnetic indices in the evaluation of the resulting external field. The secular variation has been evaluated from the corrected annual means. Around 1990, the secular variation can be fitted at many observatories by two straight lines with a sudden and marked change in slope. In this manner the jerk occurrence time and the intensity of the step in the second time derivative (ΔX'', ΔY'' and ΔZ'') were computed. Maps of ΔX'', ΔY'' and ΔZ'' provide information on the worldwide intensity distribution of the examined event. Maps of the jerk occurrence-time distributions are also given. The mean jerk occurrence time is 1990.1+/-0.6. Finally, a spherical harmonic analysis was used to complete the quantitative description of this phenomenon in order to study the trend of the energy density spectrum as a function of the harmonic degree n.

  17. Geomagnetic variations possibly associated with the Pisco earthquake on 15 August 2007, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takla, E. M.; Yumoto, K.; Ishitsuka, J.; Rosales, D.; Dutra, S.; Uozumi, T.; Abe, S.

    2012-02-01

    On 15 August 2007, Pisco earthquake (magnitude 8.0) hit the central coast of Peru near the MAGDAS Ancon (ANC) station. Geomagnetic data from ANC and other reference stations have been analyzed to detect any signature related to this great earthquake. Results indicate the presence of annual geomagnetic variations in the vertical component at ANC and Huancayo (HUA) stations (in the vicinity of the epicenter of Pisco earthquake). These variations have a quasi-sinusoidal waveform with amplitudes of about 10 and 5 nT for ANC and HUA stations respectively. They appeared clearly during the period preceding the onset of the Pisco earthquake especially at ANC station. By using HUA, Eusebio (EUS) and Kourou (KOU) as reference stations in the vicinity and away from the epicenter of Pisco earthquake, a clear disappearance of the diurnal variation of the vertical component was observed at ANC station during the day of earthquake. Moreover, the Pisco earthquake and another earthquake (on 29 March 2008) near ANC station were found to occur concurrently with the depressions in the polarization ratio (Z/H) of Pc 3 (10-45 s) amplitude. Such anomalous variations appear to be a result of changes in the crustal stress field and the lithospheric conductivity in the studied region.

  18. Effect of secular variation in oceanic Mg/Ca on calcareous biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, J. B.; Stanley, S. M.

    2006-12-01

    The polymorph mineralogy of simple, hypercalcifying marine organisms has generally varied in synchroneity with the polymorph mineralogy of abiotic CaCO3 precipitates (ooids, marine cements) throughout the Phanerozoic Eon. This synchroneity is caused by secular variation in the Mg/Ca ratio of seawater (SW; mMg/Ca > 2 = aragonite + high-Mg calcite; mMg/Ca < 2 = calcite), determined primarily by the mixing rate of mid-ocean-ridge/large-igneous-province hydrothermal brines and river water, driven by the global rate of ocean crust production. Here, we present experiments evaluating the effect of seawater Mg/Ca on the biomineralization and growth of extant representatives of hypercalcifying taxa that have been subjected to fluctuations in oceanic Mg/Ca in the past. Codiacean algae (arag), scleractinian corals (arag), coccolithophores (low-high Mg-calc), coralline algae (high Mg-calc), various reef-dwelling animals (echinoids, crabs, shrimp, calcareous serpulid worms; high Mg- calc), and calcifying microbial mats (arag + high-Mg calc) were grown in artificial SW formulated over the range of mMg/Ca (1.0 to 5.2) that occurred throughout each taxon's history. Codiacean algae and scleractinian corals exhibited higher rates of calcification and growth in artificial SW favoring their aragonite mineralogy and, significantly, produced a portion of their CaCO3 as calcite in the artificial calcite SW. Coccolithophores (low-high Mg calc.) showed higher calcification and growth rates and produced low-Mg calcite in the calcite SW. Likewise, coralline algae and the reef-dwelling animals (high-Mg calc) varied skeletal Mg/Ca with seawater Mg/Ca. The calcifying microbial mats grew equally well in the calcite and aragonite SW and varied their mineral polymorph commensurate with the SW (mMg/Ca<2 = low- Mg calc; mMg/Ca>2 = arag + high-Mg calc), suggesting a nearly abiotic mode of calcification. The precipitation of low-Mg calcite + aragonite by codiacean algae and scleractinian corals (arag

  19. A proposed International Geomagnetic Reference Field for 1965- 1985.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.; Fabiano, E.B.

    1982-01-01

    A set of spherical harmonic models describing the Earth's main magnetic field from 1965 to 1985 has been developed and is proposed as the next revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). A tenth degree and order spherical harmonic model of the main field was derived from Magsat data. A series of eighth degree and order spherical harmonic models of the secular variation of the main field was derived from magnetic observatory annual mean values. Models of the main field at 1965, 1970, 1975, and 1980 were obtained by extrapolating the main-field model using the secular variation models.-Authors spherical harmonic models Earth main magnetic field Magsat data

  20. A correlation between measured E-region current and geomagnetic daily variation at equatorial latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duhau, S.; Osella, A. M.

    The usual methods of separation of the geomagnetic daily variations into parts of external and internal origin at equatorial latitudes have been revised to remove any previous assumption about the internal current, so that the separation may be performed in a zone of anomalous earth conductivity. The resulting procedure has been applied to obtain the distribution of the ionospheric current from the external field, at the South American dip equator and the result has been compared with previous measurements of the E-region current.

  1. Do Geomagnetic Variations Affect the Foliar Spiral Direction of Coconut Palms?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minorsky, P. V.; Bronstein, N. B.

    2005-12-01

    In coconut palms, leaves are attached to the stem in either an ascending clockwise (left-handed or L) or counter-clockwise (right-handed or R) spiral (1). Foliar spiral direction (FSD) is a classic case of morphological antisymmetry, in which dextral and sinistral forms are not inherited and are equally common within a species (2). FSD would seem a simple stochastic process unworthy of further study if not for the observation, based on data collected from 71,640 coconut palms in 42 locations around the world, that the FSD of coconut palms varies with latitude: R-trees predominate in the N Hemisphere and L-trees predominate in the S Hemisphere (3). Hemispheric asymmetries in FSD are significantly better correlated with magnetic latitude than with geographic or geomagnetic latitude, suggesting that latitudinal asymmetries in FSD might be associated with the temporally varying component of Earth's magnetic field (4). Here, we present two new lines of evidence that geomagnetic variations may underlie asymmetries in palm FSD. First, we show that asymmetries occur in the FSD of palm populations on opposite sides of islands, and second, that asymmetries in FSD vary with the 11-year solar cycle. The prediction that asymmetries in coconut palm FSD should exist on opposite sides of islands arises from the fact that because seawater is more electrically conductive than land, induced earth currents divide and stream past an island more strongly in one particular direction. The "geomagnetic island effect" is characterized by a complete reversal of the vertical Z component of short-period geomagnetic field anomalies at observation points on opposite sides of islands (5). To examine whether FSD varied around the circumferences of islands, we collected data on 6 islands (Puerto Rico, n = 4311; Antigua, n = 2038; Hawaii, n = 3552; Maui, n = 2175; Tahiti, n = 1582; Moorea, n = 2116). For each population, the degree of asymmetry was determined by calculating an "asymmetry quotient

  2. Synchronous Variations of the Free Aquifer Groundwater Level and Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabova, Svetlana A.; Spivak, Alexander A.

    2015-04-01

    We consider long period variations of the magnetic field at the Earth's crust surface and its relation to seasonal change of the groundwater regime at the middle latitude geophysical observatory "Mikhnevo", situated at 85 km south of Moscow. Observatory is located away from large industrial projects allowing one to realize correct recording of geophysical fields. Results of synchronous observations of geomagnetic variations and groundwater regime were used as basic data. Measurements of the local variations of the magnetic field were carried out in special geomagnetic pavilion using flux-gate magnetometer LEMI-018 (measurement range ±68 000 nT, resolution capacity 10 pT). Received digital data rows with discretization 1 s resulted in sequence of values in 1 min. Measurements of the groundwater variations in water-table aquifer were carried out in the well of 30 m depth using sensitive sensor of water level LMP308i (resolving capacity 0.1 mm). Magnetic tipper, which is very sensitive to changes of the Earth's crust properties, was considered as characteristics of the magnetic variations, and in the same time as an indicator of the change of the electric properties of the medium. Results of calculations demonstrate clear marked annual variation of both real and imaginary composites of magnetic tipper describing relation between vertical component of magnetizing force and its horizontal components. Increase of thickness of the layer of watered rock resulting from rise of underground water level in water-table aquifer causes an increase of electrical conductivity of subsurface Earth's crust plot. It results in synchronous magnetic tipper variations.

  3. Sq and EEJ—A Review on the Daily Variation of the Geomagnetic Field Caused by Ionospheric Dynamo Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Y.; Maute, A.

    2016-09-01

    A record of the geomagnetic field on the ground sometimes shows smooth daily variations on the order of a few tens of nano teslas. These daily variations, commonly known as Sq, are caused by electric currents of several μA/m2 flowing on the sunlit side of the E-region ionosphere at about 90-150 km heights. We review advances in our understanding of the geomagnetic daily variation and its source ionospheric currents during the past 75 years. Observations and existing theories are first outlined as background knowledge for the non-specialist. Data analysis methods, such as spherical harmonic analysis, are then described in detail. Various aspects of the geomagnetic daily variation are discussed and interpreted using these results. Finally, remaining issues are highlighted to provide possible directions for future work.

  4. Sq and EEJ—A Review on the Daily Variation of the Geomagnetic Field Caused by Ionospheric Dynamo Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Y.; Maute, A.

    2017-03-01

    A record of the geomagnetic field on the ground sometimes shows smooth daily variations on the order of a few tens of nano teslas. These daily variations, commonly known as Sq, are caused by electric currents of several μ A/m2 flowing on the sunlit side of the E-region ionosphere at about 90-150 km heights. We review advances in our understanding of the geomagnetic daily variation and its source ionospheric currents during the past 75 years. Observations and existing theories are first outlined as background knowledge for the non-specialist. Data analysis methods, such as spherical harmonic analysis, are then described in detail. Various aspects of the geomagnetic daily variation are discussed and interpreted using these results. Finally, remaining issues are highlighted to provide possible directions for future work.

  5. Fossil corals as an archive of secular variations in seawater chemistry since the Mesozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gothmann, Anne M.; Stolarski, Jarosław; Adkins, Jess F.; Schoene, Blair; Dennis, Kate J.; Schrag, Daniel P.; Mazur, Maciej; Bender, Michael L.

    2015-07-01

    Numerous archives suggest that the major ion and isotopic composition of seawater have changed in parallel with large variations in geologic processes and Earth's climate. However, our understanding of the mechanisms driving secular changes in seawater chemistry on geologic timescales is limited by the resolution of data in time, large uncertainties in seawater chemistry reconstructions, and ambiguities introduced by sample diagenesis. We validated the preservation of a suite of ∼60 unrecrystallized aragonitic fossil scleractinian corals, ranging in age from Triassic through Recent, for use as new archives of past seawater chemistry. Optical and secondary electron microscopy (SEM) studies reveal that fossil coral crystal fabrics are similar to those of modern coralline aragonite. X-ray diffractometry (XRD), cathodoluminescence microscopy (CL), and Raman studies confirm that these specimens contain little to no secondary calcite. In order to screen for geochemical changes indicative of alteration, we measured 87Sr/86Sr ratios, clumped isotopes, and trace element ratios sensitive to diagenesis (e.g., Mn/Ca). We retain samples when these tests either fail to identify any diagenetic modifications, or identify specific domains free of detectable alteration. Using the validated fossil coral archive we reconstruct seawater Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios, measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), back to ∼230 Ma. The effects of temperature on coral trace element incorporation cannot explain the trends observed in our fossil coral Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca data. In agreement with independent records, seawater Mg/Ca molar ratios inferred from corals are low (Mg/Ca ∼1) during the Cretaceous and Jurassic, and increase between the Early Cenozoic and present (Mg/Ca = 5.2). Seawater Sr/Ca ratios from corals vary systematically between ∼8 and 13 mmol/mol since 230 Ma, with maximum values in the Cretaceous and Paleogene. The coral Sr/Ca record disagrees with records from

  6. New Insights on Long Term Geomagnetic Moment Variation from Cosmogenic Nuclide and Paleointensity Signatures along Ocean Sediment Cores.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouveny, N.; Bourles, D. L.; Valet, J. P.; Bassinot, F. C.; Ménabréaz, L.; Simon, Q.; Demory, F.; Valery, G.; Vidal, L.; Beaufort, L.; de Garidel-Thoron, T.

    2015-12-01

    Some numerical and experimental simulations suggest that precession might supply enough power to influence planetary dynamos. The demonstration of a causal relationship between the Earth's orbital motion and variations of the geomagnetic field intensity, would open interesting perspective for modelling the past and future geomagnetic field behaviour and its eventual relationships to past and future orbitally constrained, climatic changes. Although pristine geomagnetic signals can be extracted by filtering and stacking multiple normalized intensity records, the reconstruction of high resolution geomagnetic field variations still raises questions. Namely, significant variance at orbital frequencies in relative paleointensity (RPI) records are generally considered as clues of residual contamination by paleoclimatically induced variations of magnetic carriers size ranges or mineralogy. Such questions can be adressed using other indicators of the geomagnetic dipole moment variation, such as the cosmogenic production modulated by the magnetospheric shielding. During the MAGORB project (ANR-09-BLAN-053-001) cosmogenic nuclide geochemistry, d18O, and paleomagnetic records were constructed along thick clayey-carbonate sequences deposited in the equatorial pacific and indian oceans over the last million of years. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio and RPI variations generally exhibit similar ranges of oscillations. However significant offsets appear between some RPI lows and their corresponding 10Be/9Be peaks, suggesting delayed lock-in of the remanent magnetization. After transfer on time scales the new geomagnetic moment series can be compared with the PISO-1500 and SINT-2000 stacks, and with the 10Be ice core record of EPICA Dome C. These new authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio records provide new opportunities to: 1) assess the validity of high resolution RPI records, 2) evaluate address the question of the presence of orbital periods in the paleo-field geomagnetic spectrum, and 3) to

  7. Reconstruction of the long term variations of the total solar irradiance from geomagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, K.; Nagovitsyn, Yu.; Kirov, B.

    2015-12-01

    The total solar irradiance (TSI) is considered one of the main factors determining the terrestrial climate, and its variations are included in many numerical models evaluating the effects of natural as compared to anthropogenic factors of climate change. For the purposes of climate change, it is important to estimate both past and future TSI variations, which are caused by variations of the solar magnetic fields. Various proxies are used for reconstructing the long term evolution of TSI, which have some inevitable limitations leading to big uncertainties. We suggest an independent proxy-geomagnetic activity records, and present a reconstruction of TSI which supports higher long term TSI variability than generally accepted, and a prediction for a decrease in TSI in the following cycles, which can be taken into account in models of the expected future climate variability.

  8. International Geomagnetic Reference Field: the third generation.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.

    1982-01-01

    In August 1981 the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy revised the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). It is the second revision since the inception of the IGRF in 1968. The revision extends the earlier series of IGRF models from 1980 to 1985, introduces a new series of definitive models for 1965-1976, and defines a provisional reference field for 1975- 1980. The revision consists of: 1) a model of the main geomagnetic field at 1980.0, not continuous with the earlier series of IGRF models together with a forecast model of the secular variation of the main field during 1980-1985; 2) definitive models of the main field at 1965.0, 1970.0, and 1975.0, with linear interpolation of the model coefficients specified for intervening dates; and 3) a provisional reference field for 1975-1980, defined as the linear interpolation of the 1975 and 1980 main-field models.-from Author

  9. Variation of surface electric field during geomagnetic disturbed period at Maitri, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victor, N. Jeni; Panneerselvam, C.; Anil Kumar, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The paper discusses on the variations of the atmospheric vertical electric field measured at sub-auroral station Maitri (70∘75'S, 11∘75'E), and polar station Vostok (78.5∘S, 107∘E) during the geomagnetic disturbances on 25-26 January 2006. Diurnal variation of surface electric field measured at Maitri shows a similar variation with worldwide thunderstorm activity, whereas the departure of the field is observed during disturbed periods. This part of the field corresponds to the magnetospheric/ionospheric (an additional generator in the polar regions) voltage generators. Solar wind parameters and planetary indices represent the temporal variation of the disturbances, and digital fluxgate magnetometer variation continuously monitored to trace the auroral movement at Maitri. We have observed that the electrojet movement leaves its signature on vertical and horizontal components of the DFM in addition; the study infers the position of auroral current wedge with respect to Maitri. To exhibit the auroral oval, OVATION model is obtained with the aid of DMSP satellite and UV measurements. It is noted that the Maitri is almost within the auroral oval during the periods of disturbances. To examine the simultaneous changes in the vertical electric field associated with this magnetic disturbance, the dawn-dusk potential is studied for every UT hours; the potential was obtained from Weimer model and SuperDARN radar. The comparison reveals the plausible situation for the superposition of dawn-dusk potential on surface electric field over Maitri. This observation also shows that the superposition may not be consistent with the phase of the electrojet. Comparison of surface electric field at Maitri and Vostok shows that the parallel variation exhibits with each other, but during the period of geomagnetic disturbances, the influence is not much discerned at Vostok.

  10. Long-term variations in the flux of cosmogenic isotope 10Be over the last 10000 years: Variations in the geomagnetic field and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, S. S.; Dergachev, V. A.; Raspopov, O. M.; Jungner, H.

    2012-02-01

    A spectral analysis of data on the flux of cosmogenic 10Be in ice core samples from the Central Greenland (project GRIP) over the last 10 thousand years have been carried out. It has been shown that the 10Be flux varies cyclically; the most significant cycle is of about 2300 years. Variations in the position of the virtual geomagnetic pole over 8000 years have been analyzed. Significant components, pointing to the cyclic variation in the position of the geomagnetic pole with a period of about 2300 years, have been revealed in a periodogram of the virtual geomagnetic pole longitude. In addition to the nearly 2300-year-long cycle, some lines are observable in the 10Be flux periodogram, which can be considered as a manifestation of the 1000-year-long cycle of the 10Be deposition rate on the ice surface. The relationship between the cyclicity of the geomagnetic pole position and the 10Be flux is discussed.

  11. Marine sediments and Beryllium-10 record of the geomagnetic moment variations during the Brunhes period.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ménabréaz, Lucie; Thouveny, Nicolas; Bourlès, Didier; Demory, François

    2010-05-01

    Over millennial time scales, the atmospheric production of the cosmonuclid 10Be (half-life 1.387 ± 0.012 Ma [Shmeleff et al., 2009; Korschinek et al., 2009]) is modulated by the geomagnetic field strength, following a negative power law (e.g. Lal, 1988; Masarik and Beer, 2009). With respect to paleomagnetic reconstructions, 10Be-derived paleointensity records can therefore constitute an alternative, global and independent reading of the dipole moment variations. During the last years, efforts have been made to extract a geomagnetic signal from single and stacked 10Be records in natural archives such as ice and marine sediments (e.g. Carcaillet et al., 2004; Christl et al., 2007; Muscheler et al., 2005). In marine sediments, the 10Be concentration results from complex interplay of several processes: cosmogenic production, adsorption on sediment particles, redistribution by fluviatile and oceanic transport, and deposition. Therefore, a correction procedure is required to consider both sediment redistribution and enhanced scavenging, which can alter the primary signatures. To reconstruct the succession of field intensity lows accompanying excursions during the Brunhes chron, we investigated authigenic 10Be/9Be record of marine sequences also studied for paleomagnetism and oxygen isotopes. Mid and low latitude sites were preferred in order to benefit from the most efficient modulation by the magnetospheric shielding. We present a high resolution authigenic 10Be/9Be record of the last 50 ka recovered from the Portuguese Margin, that deciphers the cosmonuclide 10Be overproduction created by the geomagnetic dipole low associated with the Laschamp excursion. This record is compared to other proxy records of the geomagnetic field variations for the same time interval: (1) the relative paleointensity (RPI) reconstructed from the same sediments and the GLOPIS-75 record (Laj et al., 2004), (2) the absolute VDM record based on absolute paleointensities measured on lava flows

  12. Analysis of Changes of Cardiological Parameters at Middle Latitude Region in Relation to Geomagnetic Disturbances and Cosmic Ray Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papailiou, M.; Dimitrova, S.; Babayev, E. S.; Mavromichalaki, H.

    2010-01-01

    Collaborating scientific groups from Athens (Greece), Baku (Azerbaijan) and Sofia (Bulgaria) have conducted a research work on the possible effects of geomagnetic field disturbances (GMF) and cosmic ray intensity (CRI) variations on human homeostasis, particularly, the cardio-health state. Electrocardiograms (ECGs) of seven functionally healthy persons were digitally registered at the joint Laboratory of Heliobiology located in the Medical Centre INAM, Baku, on working days and Saturdays. Heart rate values, estimated from ECGs, were analysed in relation to daily values of CRI, as measured by the Neutron Monitor of the University of Athens and daily variations of Dst and Ap geomagnetic indices and some significant results had been revealed in previous studies. Researches were continued by study of additional cardiologic parameters estimated from the same ECG data. In this study digital data of RR interval (the time elapsing between two consecutive R waves in the ECG), namely RRminimum, RRmaximum and RRaverage were analyzed taking into consideration different levels of GMF disturbances (estimated through variations of Dst and Ap indices) and cosmic ray activity (through CRI variations). The data refer to the time period 15 July 2006-31 March 2008. Variations of RR intervals show connection to GMF disturbances and CRI variations. The revealed effects are more pronounced for high levels of geomagnetic activity (when geomagnetic storms occur) and large CRI decreases as well as on the days before and after these variations.

  13. Klimovskaya: A new geomagnetic observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, A. A.; Sidorov, R. V.; Krasnoperov, R. I.; Grudnev, A. A.; Khokhlov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    In 2011 Geophysical Center RAS (GC RAS) began to deploy the Klimovskaya geomagnetic observatory in the south of Arkhangelsk region on the territory of the Institute of Physiology of Natural Adaptations, Ural Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences (IPNA UB RAS). The construction works followed the complex of preparatory measures taken in order to confirm that the observatory can be constructed on this territory and to select the optimal configuration of observatory structures. The observatory equipping stages are described in detail, the technological and design solutions are described, and the first results of the registered data quality control are presented. It has been concluded that Klimovskaya observatory can be included in INTERMAGNET network. The observatory can be used to monitor and estimate geomagnetic activity, because it is located at high latitudes and provides data in a timely manner to the scientific community via the web-site of the Russian-Ukrainian Geomagnetic Data Center. The role of ground observatories such as Klimovskaya remains critical for long-term observations of secular variation and for complex monitoring of the geomagnetic field in combination with low-orbiting satellite data.

  14. Paleomagnetic secular variation at Vulcano (Aeolian Islands) during the last 135 kyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, Roberto; Zanella, Elena

    2003-08-01

    Paleosecular variation (PSV) of the Earth’s magnetic field during the last 135 kyr has been investigated in lavas, scoriae and pyroclastic rocks of Vulcano (Aeolian Islands). About 1000 samples have been collected at 77 sites from 25 distinct volcanic units, whose age is either known from published isotopical data or constrained on the grounds of statigraphical relationships. Magnetic mineralogy investigation shows that Ti-magnetite is the main ferromagnetic mineral. At most sites, secondary magnetization components are either absent or easily removed by stepwise thermal or alternating field demagnetization. The mean site direction of the characteristic remanent magnetization is usually well-defined, since the semi-angle of confidence is greater than 5° at only four sites. The mean paleomagnetic direction over the last 135 kyr (D=9.4°, I=53.2°, α95=3.5°) differs from the geocentric axial dipole (GAD) at Vulcano (D=0°, I=57.8°) and might be interpreted as the effect of a long-term, non-axial-dipolar component. The PSV record from Vulcano agrees well with those from the lacustrine sediments of Lago Grande di Monticchio (100 kyr BP) and Lago di Mezzano (30 kyr BP), located in the Italian peninsula [Brandt et al., Quat. Sci. Rev. 18 (1999) 961-976]. The inclination anomaly ΔI found at Vulcano corresponds to about half of the shallowing observed in the sediments of the two lakes and the declination anomaly ΔD may be used to tie the declination values, derived from azimuthally unoriented cores, to the geographical reference system. In order to find the optimum site to be used as reference for PSV studies in Italy, the angular values of the Earth’s magnetic field measured at the 113 repeat stations of the Italian Geomagnetic Network [Coticchia et al., Boll. Geod. Sci. Aff. 40 (2001) 277-291] have been analyzed with the relocation via pole method [Noel and Batt, Geophys. J. Int. 102 (1990) 753-756]. The Viterbo station (lat. 42°27‧N, long. 12°02

  15. The cosmic ray differential diurnal variation dependences on the zenith angle and the geomagnetic disturbance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavlakov, S.; Georgiev, L.

    1985-01-01

    Simultaneous and continuous muon measurements in two opposite azimuthal directions under equal zenith angles demonstrated the importance of this method for cosmic ray diurnal variation investigations. Lately these measurements were extended by means of improved telescopes. The obtained cosmic ray diurnal variations were presented as intensity differential curves. Theoretical investigations connected the properties of these curves with some interplanetary spece parameters. The harmonics of these curves were interpreted physically. Some order difference curves were introduced. In earlier works some dependences between the parameters characterizing the first and the second harmonics of the differential intensity curves and the geomagnetic activity were found. Then all measurements were carried out under only one zenith angle. The results of investigations of similar dependences using data of simultaneous measurements under three different zenith angles are presented.

  16. Palaeomagnetism of the Upper Miocene- Lower Pliocene lavas from the East Carpathians: contribution to the paleosecular variation of geomagnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Vişan, Mădălina; Panaiotu, Cristian G.; Necula, Cristian; Dumitru, Anca

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of the paleosecular variation of the geomagnetic field on geological timescales depend on globally distributed data sets from lava flows. We report new paleomagnetic results from lava flows of the East Carpathian Mountains (23.6°E, 46.4°N) erupted between 4 and 6 Ma. The average virtual geomagnetic pole position (76 sites) includes the North Geographic Pole and the dispersion of virtual geomagnetic poles is in general agreement with the data of the Time Averaged geomagnetic Field Initiative. Based on this study and previous results from the East Carpathians obtained from 0.04–4 Ma old lava flows, we show that high value of dispersion are characteristic only for 1.5–2.8 Ma old lava flows. High values of dispersion during the Matuyama chron are also reported around 50°N, in the global paleosecular variation data set. More data are needed at a global level to determine if these high dispersions reflect the behaviour of the geomagnetic field or an artefact of inadequate number of sites. This study of the East Carpathians volcanic rocks brings new data from southeastern Europe and which can contribute to the databases for time averaged field and paleosecular variation from lavas in the last 6 Ma. PMID:26997549

  17. Palaeomagnetism of the Upper Miocene- Lower Pliocene lavas from the East Carpathians: contribution to the paleosecular variation of geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vişan, Mădălina; Panaiotu, Cristian G.; Necula, Cristian; Dumitru, Anca

    2016-03-01

    Investigations of the paleosecular variation of the geomagnetic field on geological timescales depend on globally distributed data sets from lava flows. We report new paleomagnetic results from lava flows of the East Carpathian Mountains (23.6°E, 46.4°N) erupted between 4 and 6 Ma. The average virtual geomagnetic pole position (76 sites) includes the North Geographic Pole and the dispersion of virtual geomagnetic poles is in general agreement with the data of the Time Averaged geomagnetic Field Initiative. Based on this study and previous results from the East Carpathians obtained from 0.04–4 Ma old lava flows, we show that high value of dispersion are characteristic only for 1.5–2.8 Ma old lava flows. High values of dispersion during the Matuyama chron are also reported around 50°N, in the global paleosecular variation data set. More data are needed at a global level to determine if these high dispersions reflect the behaviour of the geomagnetic field or an artefact of inadequate number of sites. This study of the East Carpathians volcanic rocks brings new data from southeastern Europe and which can contribute to the databases for time averaged field and paleosecular variation from lavas in the last 6 Ma.

  18. Palaeomagnetism of the Upper Miocene- Lower Pliocene lavas from the East Carpathians: contribution to the paleosecular variation of geomagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Vişan, Mădălina; Panaiotu, Cristian G; Necula, Cristian; Dumitru, Anca

    2016-03-21

    Investigations of the paleosecular variation of the geomagnetic field on geological timescales depend on globally distributed data sets from lava flows. We report new paleomagnetic results from lava flows of the East Carpathian Mountains (23.6°E, 46.4°N) erupted between 4 and 6 Ma. The average virtual geomagnetic pole position (76 sites) includes the North Geographic Pole and the dispersion of virtual geomagnetic poles is in general agreement with the data of the Time Averaged geomagnetic Field Initiative. Based on this study and previous results from the East Carpathians obtained from 0.04-4 Ma old lava flows, we show that high value of dispersion are characteristic only for 1.5-2.8 Ma old lava flows. High values of dispersion during the Matuyama chron are also reported around 50°N, in the global paleosecular variation data set. More data are needed at a global level to determine if these high dispersions reflect the behaviour of the geomagnetic field or an artefact of inadequate number of sites. This study of the East Carpathians volcanic rocks brings new data from southeastern Europe and which can contribute to the databases for time averaged field and paleosecular variation from lavas in the last 6 Ma.

  19. MoSST DAS: The First Working Geomagnetic Data Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia; Wei, Zigang; Tangborn, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The Earth possesses an internal magnetic field (geomagnetic field) generated by convection in the outer core (geodynamo). Previous efforts have been focused along two distinct paths: (1) numerical geodynamo modeling to understand the origin of the geomagnetic field, and the mechanisms of geomagnetic secular variations (SV); and (2) geomagnetic field modeling to map the spatial/temporal variations of the field from geomagnetic data, and to derive core properties, e.g. inversion of core flow near the core-mantle boundary (CMB). Geomagnetic data assimilation is a new approach emerged over the past 5 years: surface observations are assimilated with geodynamo models for better understanding of the core dynamical state, and accurately prediction of SV. In collaboration with several geomagnetic research groups, we have developed the first working geomagnetic data assimilation system, Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent, and Three-dimensional (MoSST) DAS, that includes the MoSST numerical dynamo model; 7000 years of geomagnetic field maps from several field models utilizing satellite and ground observatory data, historical magnetic records and archeo/paleo magnetic data; and an ensemble based optimal interpolation (01) assimilation algorithm. With this system, we have demonstrated clearly that the assimilated core dynamical state is substantially different from those of pure geodynamo simulations. Ensemble assimilation runs also show the convergence of the assimilated solutions inside the core, suggesting that the simulation state is pulled closer to the truth via data assimilation. The forecasts from this system are also very accurate: the 5-year forecast of the geomagnetic field agrees very well with the observations; and the 5-year secular variation forecast is more accurate than the IGRF SV forecast models in the past. Using geomagnetic records up to 2009, we have made an SV forecast for the period from 2010-2015, and is a candidate SV model for IGRF-11.

  20. New archeointensity data from French Early Medieval pottery production (6th-10th century AD). Tracing 1500 years of geomagnetic field intensity variations in Western Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genevey, Agnès; Gallet, Yves; Jesset, Sébastien; Thébault, Erwan; Bouillon, Jérôme; Lefèvre, Annie; Le Goff, Maxime

    2016-08-01

    Nineteen new archeointensity results were obtained from the analysis of groups of French pottery fragments dated to the Early Middle Ages (6th to 10th centuries AD). They are from several medieval ceramic production sites, excavated mainly in Saran (Central France), and their precise dating was established based on typo-chronological characteristics. Intensity measurements were performed using the Triaxe protocol, which takes into account the effects on the intensity determinations of both thermoremanent magnetization anisotropy and cooling rate. Intensity analyses were also carried out on modern pottery produced at Saran during an experimental firing. The results show very good agreement with the geomagnetic field intensity directly measured inside and around the kiln, thus reasserting the reliability of the Triaxe protocol and the relevance of the quality criteria used. They further demonstrate the potential of the Saran pottery production for archeomagnetism. The new archeointensity results allow a precise and coherent description of the geomagnetic field intensity variations in Western Europe during the Early Medieval period, which was until now poorly documented. They show a significant increase in intensity during the 6th century AD, high intensity values from the 7th to the 9th century, with a minimum of small amplitude at the transition between the 7th and the 8th centuries and finally an important decrease until the beginning of the 11th century. Together with published intensity results available within a radius of 700 km around Paris, the new data were used to compute a master curve of the Western European geomagnetic intensity variations over the past 1500 years. This curve clearly exhibits five intensity maxima: at the transition between the 6th and 7th century AD, at the middle of the 9th century, during the 12th century, in the second part of the 14th century and at the very beginning of the 17th century AD. Some of these peaks are smoothed, or

  1. Monitoring the ionospheric total electron content variations over the Korean Peninsula using a GPS network during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byung-Kyu; Lee, Sang-Jeong; Park, Jong-Uk

    2011-06-01

    We have established a regional ionospheric model (RIM) for investigating changes in the total electron content (TEC) over South Korea using 38 Korean GPS reference stations. The inverse distance weighted (IDW) interpolation method was applied to create a two-dimensional ionospheric map of vertical TEC units (TECU) based on a grid. To examine the diurnal patterns of ionospheric TEC over South Korea, we first processed the GPS data from a geomagnetically quiet period of 10 days. In a second step, we compared the estimated GPS-TEC variations with the changes in geomagnetic activity indices (the K p and D st indices) and the auroral electrojet index (AE) as a function of universal time (UT) on 4 and 20 November, 2003. The GPS-TEC responses for those storm events were proportional to the geomagnetic activity at this mid-latitude location. The sudden increases in ionospheric TEC (SITEC) caused by the geomagnetic storms were detected. The variations in GPS-TEC may help reveal the processes of ionospheric disturbances caused by geomagnetic storms.

  2. Improving geomagnetic observatory data in the South Atlantic Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzka, Jürgen; Morschhauser, Achim; Brando Soares, Gabriel; Pinheiro, Katia

    2016-04-01

    The Swarm mission clearly proofs the benefit of coordinated geomagnetic measurements from a well-tailored constellation in order to recover as good as possible the contributions of the various geomagnetic field sources. A similar truth applies to geomagnetic observatories. Their scientific value can be maximised by properly arranging the position of individual observatories with respect to the geometry of the external current systems in the ionosphere and magnetosphere, with respect to regions of particular interest for secular variation, and with respect to regions of anomalous electric conductivity in the ground. Here, we report on our plans and recent efforts to upgrade geomagnetic observatories and to recover unpublished data from geomagnetic observatories at low latitudes in the South Atlantic Anomaly. In particular, we target the magnetic equator with the equatorial electrojet and low latitudes to characterise the Sq- and ring current. The observatory network that we present allows also to study the longitudinal structure of these external current systems. The South Atlantic Anomaly region is very interesting due to its secular variation. We will show newly recovered data and comparisons with existing data sets. On the technical side, we introduce low-power data loggers. In addition, we use mobile phone data transfer, which is rapidly evolving in the region and allows timely data access and quality control at remote sites that previously were not connected to the internet.

  3. Physical Meaning of the Equinoctial Effect for Seasonal Variation of Geomagnetic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, A.

    2008-12-01

    The general tendency for magnetic disturbances to be more stormy at equinoxes than at solstices has been recognised for more than 150 years. To explain the seasonal variation three principal hypotheses have been proposed; the axial hypothesis (Cortie, 1912), the equinoctial hypothesis (Bartels, 1932; McIntosh, 1959), and the Russell and McPherron (RM) hypothesis (Russell and McPherron, 1973). The RM hypothesis, which is based on the recognition that the magnetic field in the solar equatorial plane tends to have the largest southward component in geocentric solar magnetospheric (GSM) coordinates in early April and October, has been largely accepted for many years. However, recent studies have confirmed that the RM effect accounts for only a subordinate proportion of the seasonal variation of geomagnetic activity, and that the larger part of the phenomenon is attributable to the equinoctial effect in which the angle between the solar wind flow and the dipole axis of the Earth plays an essential role (Cliver, Kamide and Ling, 2000; Cliver, Kamide, Ling and Yokoyama, 2001; O'Brien and McPherron, 2002). In this paper physical meaning of the equinoctial effect is investigated based on the data of three-hourly am index and solar wind parameters acquired by the ACE satellite. The am indices are well correlated with BsVxVx, where Bs is the southward component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and Vx is the solar wind velocity in the sun-earth direction. It is found, however, that the am - BsVxVx relation depends on the range of VxVx: The am in higher ranges of VxVx tends to be larger than am in lower ranges of VxVx for both equinoctial and solstitial epochs for the same value of BsVxVx. Using the data sets of the same VxVx range, it is shown that distribution of points in the am - BsVxVx diagram at the solstitial epochs overlaps with that at the equinoctial epochs and the average am values in each BsVxVx bin in solstitial epochs are almost equal to those in

  4. Crustal structure of Precambrian terranes in the southern African subcontinent with implications for secular variation in crustal genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachingwe, Marsella; Nyblade, Andrew; Julià, Jordi

    2015-07-01

    New estimates of crustal thickness, Poisson's ratio and crustal shear wave velocity have been obtained for 39 stations in Angola, Botswana, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, Tanzania and Zambia by modelling P-wave receiver functions using the H-κ stacking method and jointly inverting the receiver functions with Rayleigh-wave phase and group velocities. These estimates, combined with similar results from previous studies, have been examined for secular trends in Precambrian crustal structure within the southern African subcontinent. In both Archean and Proterozoic terranes we find similar Moho depths [38-39 ± 3 km SD (standard deviation)], crustal Poisson's ratio (0.26 ± 0.01 SD), mean crustal shear wave velocity (3.7 ± 0.1 km s-1 SD), and amounts of heterogeneity in the thickness of the mafic lower crust, as defined by shear wave velocities ≥4.0 km s-1. In addition, the amount of variability in these crustal parameters is similar within each individual age grouping as between age groupings. Thus, the results provide little evidence for secular variation in Precambrian crustal structure, including between Meso- and Neoarchean crust. This finding suggests that (1) continental crustal has been generated by similar processes since the Mesoarchean or (2) plate tectonic processes have reworked and modified the crust through time, erasing variations in structure resulting from crustal genesis.

  5. Temporal Variation of Different Categories Sunspot Groups since 1996: Their Relation with Geomagnetic Ap and Dst Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcik, Ali; Ozguc, Atila; Rozelot, Jean Pierre; Donmez, Burcin; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    2016-07-01

    We studied the temporal variation of the number of sunspot groups and sunspot counts in these groups in four categories as small (A, B), medium (C), large (D, E, F) and final (H modified Zurich classes) since 1996. Then we compared these data sets with geomagnetic Ap and Dst indices. In results of our analysis we found followings: 1) different categories sunspot groups and sunspot counts in these groups behave differently during a solar cycle. ii) Response of geomagnetic indices to these data sets are also different.

  6. An Introduction to Data Assimilation and Predictability in Geomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Alexandre; Hulot, Gauthier; Jault, Dominique; Kuang, Weijia; Tangborn, Andrew; Gillet, Nicolas; Canet, Elisabeth; Aubert, Julien; Lhuillier, Florian

    2010-08-01

    Data assimilation in geomagnetism designates the set of inverse methods for geomagnetic data analysis which rely on an underlying prognostic numerical model of core dynamics. Within that framework, the time-dependency of the magnetohydrodynamic state of the core need no longer be parameterized: The model trajectory (and the secular variation it generates at the surface of the Earth) is controlled by the initial condition, and possibly some other static control parameters. The primary goal of geomagnetic data assimilation is then to combine in an optimal fashion the information contained in the database of geomagnetic observations and in the dynamical model, by adjusting the model trajectory in order to provide an adequate fit to the data. The recent developments in that emerging field of research are motivated mostly by the increase in data quality and quantity during the last decade, owing to the ongoing era of magnetic observation of the Earth from space, and by the concurrent progress in the numerical description of core dynamics. In this article we review briefly the current status of our knowledge of core dynamics, and elaborate on the reasons which motivate geomagnetic data assimilation studies, most notably (a) the prospect to propagate the current quality of data backward in time to construct dynamically consistent historical core field and flow models, (b) the possibility to improve the forecast of the secular variation, and (c) on a more fundamental level, the will to identify unambiguously the physical mechanisms governing the secular variation. We then present the fundamentals of data assimilation (in its sequential and variational forms) and summarize the observations at hand for data assimilation practice. We present next two approaches to geomagnetic data assimilation: The first relies on a three-dimensional model of the geodynamo, and the second on a quasi-geostrophic approximation. We also provide an estimate of the limit of the predictability of

  7. Geomagnetic Excursions: A Critical Assessment of the Evidence as Recorded in Sediments of the Brunhes Epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verosub, K. L.

    1982-08-01

    Geomagnetic excursions have tantalized geophysicists since the earliest suggestion of their occurrence over 15 years ago. Either as large-scale geomagnetic secular variation, geomagnetic reversals of short duration or aborted reversals, they held great promise of providing new insights into the nature of the origin of the geomagnetic field. Unfortunately the evidence for geomagnetic excursions from the palaeomagnetic record of Brunhes age sediments is not as compelling as the theoretical arguments. A critical assessment of the available data indicates that the Gothenburg excursion is unlikely to have occurred and the Erieau excursion is very unlikely. The Mono Lake excursion probably occurred, but its absence in nearby contemporaneous sites creates profound problems. The Blake Event appears to be an actual short reversal of complex character, but confirmation of its global nature may be quite difficult.

  8. Altitude variations in the thermosphere mass density response to geomagnetic activity during the recent solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Thayer, J. P.; Burns, A.; Wang, W.; Sutton, E.

    2014-03-01

    Accelerometer data from coplanar orbits of Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites were used to study the complex altitude and latitude variations of the thermosphere mass density response to geomagnetic activity during 1-10 December 2008 near 09 LT. Helium number densities near 500 km altitude were extracted from the CHAMP and GRACE measurements and clearly show the presence of a winter hemisphere helium bulge. This recent extreme solar minimum indicates that wintertime helium concentrations exceed NRLMSISE-00 model estimates by 30%-70% during quiet geomagnetic activity after adjusting F10.7 input into MSIS. The perturbation in mass density from quiet to active conditions is found to be less enhanced in the winter hemisphere at the higher GRACE altitudes (25%) than at the lower CHAMP altitudes (60%) and is attributed to dynamic behavior in the helium/oxygen transition. The investigation revealed the maximum storm time density perturbation to occur near the He/O transition region with a much weaker maximum near the O/N2 transition region. The altitude of maximum density perturbation occurs where the perturbation in the weighted pressure scale height is equal and opposite to the perturbation in the weighted mean molecular weight scale height. The altitude structure of density scale height perturbation is significantly influenced by the changes in the molecular weight scale height and can account for 50% of the change in mass density scale height in a region correspondingly close to the He/O transition during the 2008 solar minimum period.

  9. Secular variation between 5 and 10c CE in Japan: remeasurements of 2000 samples collected between 1960-70's from Sueki earthenware kilns in Osaka.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibuya, H.; Mochizuki, N.; Hatakeyama, T.

    2015-12-01

    In Japan, archeomagnetic measurements are vigorously developed for years, though it is not well known to paleomagnetism community in english. One of the works is massive archeomagnetic study of Suemura kiln group carried out in Osaka University in 1960's to early 70's. More than 500 kilns were excavated in Sakai city and vicinities, Osaka Prefecture, Japan. The kiln group is called as Suemura Kilns, and are for Sueki earthenware of 5c to 10c CE. About 300 kilns were sampled and most of the samples were measured at the time, and the results are reported in e.g. Hirooka (1971) and Shibuya (1980). However, the results have significant scatter in direction, which may be due to the limitation of old astatic magnetometer measurements and handwriting graphic determination of magnetic direction, and/or the lack of demagnetization. We recently inherited many of those samples and remeasured them with spinner magnetometer applying alternation field demagnetization (afd). The magnetizations are generally very stable, as usual as other archeomagnetic samples, and afd does not change the magnetic direction mostly. However, significant number of sites show large scatter in magnetic directions, which might be due to the wrong identification of kiln floor or disturbance at the time of collapsing or excavation. Taking kilns of α95<4o, we recovered 131 paleomagnetic directions. Although third of them are dated by pottery shape chronology, the range of each pottery style is not precisely known and the relation of the baked floor and the potteries excavated around kilns are not always clear. The carbon dating of those kilns are very scares. Thus we first try to draw secular variation curve in declination-inclination plot. With the rough ages of those kilns, it is pretty easy to draw the SVC. It is also numerically determined taking the distance of each direction from nearest point in SVC and the velocity change of the SVC as penalty function, within a couple of degrees in the error

  10. Studies of ionospheric variations during geomagnetic activities at the low-latitude station, Ile-Ife, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmanuel, Ariyibi

    The dual frequency SCINDA NovAtel GSV 4004B GPS receiver installed at the Ile-Ife (low-latitude station) has been in operation since December 2009. Data records for the year 2010 were processed to obtain Total Electron Content (TEC) and S 4 index. These were interpreted to analyze the ionospheric condition during low geomagnetic activity period (when Dst is from -40 to 0 nT) and during geomagnetic storm events (with Dst about -100 nT). Seasonal variations of the TEC and S 4 index were also investigated. The occurrence of scintillations is closely linked to the peak value of TEC during the daytime; this is very evident during the equinox months when TEC ≥ 30 TECu. When the maximum TEC value is below 30 TECu, as shown by most of the days in the summer months, the scintillation phenomenon does not occur. During geomagnetic storms, the daytime segment of the TEC plot experiences fluctuations (even bifurcations) in values with the peak TEC value of about 40 TECu. From the interpreted data, the occurrence of geomagnetic storm does not necessarily suggest an increase in the level of scintillations at a low-latitude region. Also, there is a remarkable difference between the IRI 2007 model and the observed TEC values, as the daytime TEC peak differs in magnitude and time of occurrence from the observed TEC.

  11. Studies of ionospheric variations during geomagnetic activities at the low-latitude station, Ile-Ife, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyibi, Emmanuel; Joshua, Emanuel; Rabiu, Babatunde

    2013-02-01

    The dual frequency SCINDA NovAtel GSV 4004B GPS receiver installed at the Ile-Ife (low-latitude station) has been in operation since December 2009. Data records for the year 2010 were processed to obtain Total Electron Content (TEC) and S 4 index. These were interpreted to analyze the ionospheric condition during low geomagnetic activity period (when Dst is from -40 to 0 nT) and during geomagnetic storm events (with Dst about -100 nT). Seasonal variations of the TEC and S 4 index were also investigated. The occurrence of scintillations is closely linked to the peak value of TEC during the daytime; this is very evident during the equinox months when TEC ≥ 30 TECu. When the maximum TEC value is below 30 TECu, as shown by most of the days in the summer months, the scintillation phenomenon does not occur. During geomagnetic storms, the daytime segment of the TEC plot experiences fluctuations (even bifurcations) in values with the peak TEC value of about 40 TECu. From the interpreted data, the occurrence of geomagnetic storm does not necessarily suggest an increase in the level of scintillations at a low-latitude region. Also, there is a remarkable difference between the IRI 2007 model and the observed TEC values, as the daytime TEC peak differs in magnitude and time of occurrence from the observed TEC.

  12. Geomagnetic modeling by optimal recursive filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, B. P.; Estes, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a preliminary study to determine the feasibility of using Kalman filter techniques for geomagnetic field modeling are given. Specifically, five separate field models were computed using observatory annual means, satellite, survey and airborne data for the years 1950 to 1976. Each of the individual field models used approximately five years of data. These five models were combined using a recursive information filter (a Kalman filter written in terms of information matrices rather than covariance matrices.) The resulting estimate of the geomagnetic field and its secular variation was propogated four years past the data to the time of the MAGSAT data. The accuracy with which this field model matched the MAGSAT data was evaluated by comparisons with predictions from other pre-MAGSAT field models. The field estimate obtained by recursive estimation was found to be superior to all other models.

  13. Geomagnetic intensity variations for the past 8 kyr: New archaeointensity results from Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Shuhui; Tauxe, Lisa; Deng, Chenglong; Pan, Yongxin; Jin, Guiyun; Zheng, Jianming; Xie, Fei; Qin, Huafeng; Zhu, Rixiang

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we have carried out paleointensity experiments on 918 specimens spanning the last ∼7 kyr, including pottery fragments, baked clay and slag, collected from Shandong, Liaoning, Zhejiang and Hebei Provinces in China. Approximately half of the specimens yielded results that passed strict data selection criteria and give high-fidelity paleointensities. The virtual axial dipole moments (VADMs) of our sites range from ∼2×1022 to ∼13×1022 Am. At ∼2250 BCE our results suggest a paleointensity low of ∼2×1022 Am, which increases to a high of ∼13×1022 Am by ∼1300 BCE. This rapid (less than 1000 yrs) six-fold change in the paleointensity may have important implications for the dynamics of core flow at this time. Our data from the last ∼3 kyr are generally in good agreement with the ARCH3k.1 model, but deviate significantly at certain time periods from the CALS3k.4 and CALS10k.1b model, which is likely due to differences in the data used to constrain these models. At ages older than ∼3 ka, where only the CALS10k.1b model is available for comparison, our data deviate significantly from the model. Combining our new results with the published data from China and Japan, we provide greatly improved constraints for the regional model of Eastern Asia. When comparing the variations of geomagnetic field in three global representative areas of Eastern Asia, the Middle East and Southern Europe, a common general trend of sinusoidal variations since ∼8 ka is shown, likely dominated by the dipole component. However, significant disparities are revealed as well, which we attribute to non-dipolar components caused by movement of magnetic flux patches at the core-mantle boundary.

  14. Holocene geomagnetic field intensity variations: Contribution from the low latitude Canary Islands site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissel, C.; Laj, C.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Perez-Torrado, F.; Carracedo, J. C.; Wandres, C.

    2015-11-01

    New absolute paleomagnetic intensity (PI) are investigated from 37 lava flows located at Tenerife and Gran Canaria (Canary Islands). They complete previously published directional results from the same flows and therefore allow to examine the time variations of the full geomagnetic vector. Twenty-eight flows are radiocarbon dated between 1706 AD and about 13 200 BC and one is historical. Eight other flows are not dated but they have stratigraphic links with the dated flows and archeomagnetic ages had been attributed to them based on their paleomagnetic directions. Various mineralogical analyses were conducted, giving access to the nature of the magnetic minerals and to their grain size. We performed the original Thellier and Thellier paleointensity (PI) experiments with a success rate of about 65% coupling this experiment with the strict set of selection criteria PICRIT-03. The mean PIs at the flow level are based on 3 to 12 independent PI determinations except for one site in which only one reliable determination could be obtained. The data indicate some variability in the local field intensity with a prominent PI peak centered around 600 BC and reaching 80 μT (VADM 16 ×1022 Am2), documented for the first time in this region. Combined with the published data obtained from western Africa, Spain, Portugal, Morocco and the Azores within a 2000 km-radius around the Canary Islands, our data allow to construct a curve illustrating the Earth magnetic field intensity fluctuations for Southwestern Europe/Western Africa. This curve, compared to the one produced for the Middle East and one calculated for Central Asia shows that maximum intensity patches have a very large geographical extent. They do not yet appear clearly in the models of variations of the dipolar field intensity.

  15. Geomagnetic Paleointensity Variations as a Cheap, High-Resolution Geochronometer for Recent Mid-Ocean Ridge Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DYMENT, J.; HEMOND, C.

    2001-12-01

    The sequence of geomagnetic field reversals is widely used to date events younger than 160 Ma, with a resolution of a million years. In oceanic domains, Vine and Matthews (1963) magnetic anomalies have been successfully used for more than 35 years. The major limitation of this chronometer is its low temporal resolution, especially for the recent times: the youngest polarity reversal, between Brunhes normal and Matuyama reversed periods, is dated ~800 ka. Studies of pelagic sedimentary cores have shown the existence of consistent variations of the geomagnetic field intensity within this period. If accurately dated, these variations may refine the magnetic geochronometer to a much higher resolution of 10-100 ka. Recent studies have demonstrated that the "tiny wiggles" of lower amplitude and shorter wavelength superimposed to the Vine and Matthews anomalies are of geomagnetic origin and correspond to the paleointensity variations identified on sediment cores. Using a large set of magnetic data acquired in 1996 on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 21° N (surface and submersible magnetic anomalies, natural remanent magnetization and absolute paleointensities measured on samples), we have shown that the oceanic crust confidently records the geomagnetic intensity variations. It was unfortunately impossible to date the samples, made of basalt too depleted in K2O and in trace elements required by the various methods of radiochronology. In 2000 we have collected a similar data set at the Central Indian Ridge axis at 19° S (surface, deep-tow, and submersible magnetic anomalies, natural remanent magnetization and absolute paleointensities measured on samples). This area offers the advantages of 1) a faster spreading rate, and therefore a higher temporal resolution of the geomagnetic signal, and 2) the presence of moderately enriched basalt as a consequence of the interaction of the ridge with the nearby Reunion hotspot, making possible radiochronologic dating. Our first evaluation

  16. The variations of geomagnetic field in the region of the Sulaksky cascade of hydro-electric power station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniyalov, M. G.; Suleymanov, A. I.

    2012-04-01

    Technogenic intervention in nature while creation of large water basins disturbs developed dynamic balance in rock mass and activates seismic processes, i.e. causes the so-called exited earthquakes which are connected with water basin operation. Local changes of a magnetic field of the Earth can be the result of various physical processes, but the most probable - electromagnetic and piezomagnetic processes. In our case the rock piezomagnetism is considered to be the principal cause of local geomagnetic variations - change of their magnetization under the influence of mechanical pressure. The measurements were made 2 times a day at the same time to reveal the connection of geomagnetic field components variations with water basin level fluctuations. According to geomagnetic measurements of 1983-1989 it is determined, that relative changes of a vertical component δΖ much more exceed respective alterations of the module of a full vector δT that is indirect acknowledgement of magnetoelastic effect under natural conditions. We determined that in the period of intensive rising of water level and weight the sharp reduction of a vertical component in water basin is observed which depends not only on loading value, but also on filling speed. At stable level of a water basin slight increase of δΖ is observed which is explained by internal pressure relaxation process in the water basin basis. The empirical formula for calculation of changes of a vertical component of a field ΔΖ under the influence of loading during the water basin filling is observed. The numerical value of coefficient k,, calculated by the least square method as the interconnection coefficient between vertical component changes and changes of level of the Chirkeysky water basin according to measurements of 1983-1989 is: 5, 66 10-4 nano-tesla / Pa. Ju. Skovorodkin obtained the numerical value of k coefficient: 6, 3 10-6 nano-tesla / Pa during the variations measurements of full vector module of

  17. Geomagnetic field variations induced by internal and surface waves in the four-layer model of the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smagin, V. P.; Semkin, S. V.; Savchenko, V. N.

    2014-09-01

    The layered model of the marine environment, including the atmosphere, two seawater layers with different conductivity and density, and the bottom rock layer, has been considered. The geomagnetic field variations, generated by internal and surface waves with different frequency and propagation direction, have been found in the scope of this model. The effect of magnetic permeability and electric conductivity of bottom rocks on induced magnetic field has been taken into account. The transfer functions and spectral densities of these variations have been analytically determined and numerically estimated.

  18. Local geomagnetic indices and their role in space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Antonio; Cid, Consuelo; Saiz, Elena; Palacios, Judith; Cerrato, Yolanda

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of local geomagnetic disturbances (specific longitude and latitude) have recently proved to play an important role in space weather research. Localized strong (high intensity) and impulsive (fast developed and fast recovered) geomagnetic disturbances are typically recorded at high latitudes and commonly related to field-aligned currents. These type of disturbances are also recorded, less frequently, at mid and low latitudes, representing an important hazard for technology. In order to obtain geomagnetic disturbances (geomagnetic index) from the records at a certain observatory, a baseline has to be removed. The baseline is usually determined taking into account geomagnetic secular variation and solar quiet time. At mid-latitudes the shape of the daily solar quiet component presents a strong day-to-day variability difficult to predict. In this work we present a new technique capable to determine the baseline at mid-latitudes which allows us to obtain a high resolution local geomagnetic index with the highest accuracy ever obtained at mid-latitudes.

  19. Mapping Geomagnetic Field Variations in the Cretaceous Quiet Zone with Unmanned Airborne Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, J. S.; Cande, S. C.; Kent, D. V.

    2007-12-01

    About one quarter of the present seafloor was generated during the constant normal polarity interval from 121 to 83 Ma (Cretaceous Quiet Zone or KQZ), and the lack of temporal markers limits tectonic reconstructions in these areas. Although magnetostratigraphic studies provide strong evidence that the KQZ formed during predominantly normal polarity, there are nonetheless relatively large amplitude variations in many sea surface magnetic anomaly profiles crossing KQZ crust. To evaluate the relative importance of geomagnetic and crustal variables (thickness, geochemistry) in generating these anomalies, we collected multibeam bathymetry and magnetic data on 19 profiles crossing anomaly 34 and extending 500 km into the KQZ in the southwest Pacific. The relatively fast spreading (60 km/m.y. half rate), minimal sediment cover and high paleolatitude of formation make this area ideal for evaluating the magnetic anomaly pattern. An additional 10,000 km of magnetic anomaly data were acquired using an autonomous unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV). Although land-launched UAVs have been used in a variety of research applications, the nine successful flights during our cruise represent the first deployment from a UNOLS research vessel. The UAV (operated by Fugro Airborne) was launched from a pneumatic catapult and captured by a wingtip clip that attaches to a rope suspended from a retractable boom on the fantail. The Cs-vapor magnetometer data from the UAV compare favorably with results from the surface-towed magnetometer, with minor differences related primarily to the higher elevation (120m above sea level) of the UAV. The resulting magnetic coverage indicates that, as with younger seafloor, quasi-linear short wavelength anomalies are present within the KQZ. These anomalies can vary on spatial scales smaller than the multibeam swath width, highlighting the utility of obtaining additional coverage with the UAVs.

  20. Predicting the Size of Sunspot Cycle 24 on the Basis of Single- and Bi-Variate Geomagnetic Precursor Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Examined are single- and bi-variate geomagnetic precursors for predicting the maximum amplitude (RM) of a sunspot cycle several years in advance. The best single-variate fit is one based on the average of the ap index 36 mo prior to cycle minimum occurrence (E(Rm)), having a coefficient of correlation (r) equal to 0.97 and a standard error of estimate (se) equal to 9.3. Presuming cycle 24 not to be a statistical outlier and its minimum in March 2008, the fit suggests cycle 24 s RM to be about 69 +/- 20 (the 90% prediction interval). The weighted mean prediction of 11 statistically important single-variate fits is 116 +/- 34. The best bi-variate fit is one based on the maximum and minimum values of the 12-mma of the ap index; i.e., APM# and APm*, where # means the value post-E(RM) for the preceding cycle and * means the value in the vicinity of cycle minimum, having r = 0.98 and se = 8.2. It predicts cycle 24 s RM to be about 92 +/- 27. The weighted mean prediction of 22 statistically important bi-variate fits is 112 32. Thus, cycle 24's RM is expected to lie somewhere within the range of about 82 to 144. Also examined are the late-cycle 23 behaviors of geomagnetic indices and solar wind velocity in comparison to the mean behaviors of cycles 2023 and the geomagnetic indices of cycle 14 (RM = 64.2), the weakest sunspot cycle of the modern era.

  1. Variations of terrestrial geomagnetic activity correlated to M6+ global seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldi, Gabriele; Cataldi, Daniele; Straser, Valentino

    2013-04-01

    From the surface of the Sun, as a result of a solar flare, are expelled a coronal mass (CME or Coronal Mass Ejection) that can be observed from the Earth through a coronagraph in white light. This ejected material can be compared to an electrically charged cloud (plasma) mainly composed of electrons, protons and other small quantities of heavier elements such as helium, oxygen and iron that run radially from the Sun along the lines of the solar magnetic field and pushing into interplanetary space. Sometimes the CME able to reach the Earth causing major disruptions of its magnetosphere: mashed in the region illuminated by the Sun and expanding in the region not illuminated. This interaction creates extensive disruption of the Earth's geomagnetic field that can be detected by a radio receiver tuned to the ELF band (Extreme Low Frequency 0-30 Hz). The Radio Emissions Project (scientific research project founded in February 2009 by Gabriele Cataldi and Daniele Cataldi), analyzing the change in the Earth's geomagnetic field through an induction magnetometer tuned between 0.001 and 5 Hz (bandwidth in which possible to observe the geomagnetic pulsations) was able to detect the existence of a close relationship between this geomagnetic perturbations and the global seismic activity M6+. During the arrival of the CME on Earth, in the Earth's geomagnetic field are generated sudden and intensive emissions that have a bandwidth including between 0 and 15 Hz, an average duration of 2-8 hours, that preceding of 0-12 hours M6+ earthquakes. Between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2012, all M6+ earthquakes recorded on a global scale were preceded by this type of signals which, due to their characteristics, have been called "Seismic Geomagnetic Precursors" (S.G.P.). The main feature of Seismic Geomagnetic Precursors is represented by the close relationship that they have with the solar activity. In fact, because the S.G.P. are geomagnetic emissions, their temporal modulation depends

  2. Geomagnetic and Archeomagnetic Jerks: Where Do We Stand?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandea, Mioara; Olsen, Nils

    2009-06-01

    The Earth's magnetic field is generated mainly by a self-sustaining dynamo in the fluid outer core. Known as the core or main field, the dynamo's magnetic field is not constant but changes with time, a phenomenon denoted as secular variation. Unfortunately, no common agreement exists about the definition of secular variation: While some use this term for the temporal changes of the core field in general, others use the term only for its linear part (first time derivative). Two more terms are linked to core field temporal variations: geomagnetic jerks and archeomagnetic jerks. They are used to describe specific magnetic field signatures in the observations, implying a phenomenological classification. We suggest that a characterization of magnetic field changes based on the physics of the underlying core process may be more useful. Such a classification is proposed here to help avoid further misunderstanding through terminology.

  3. Refining the Late Quaternary Paleomagnetic Secular Variation record in the Mediterranean Region as a Chronologic Tool for Marine Geology Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, M.; Liddicoat, J. C.; Budillon, F.; Incoronato, A.; Coe, R.; Insinga, D.; Lubritto, C.; Cassata, W. S.; Tiano, P.; Petruccione, E.

    2011-12-01

    Together, piston cores C1067, C1201 and C1202 from the continental shelf and slope in the Salerno Gulf and Cilento offshore in the Eastern Tyrrhenian Sea record long-term change (Paleomagnetic Secular Variation - PSV) of Earth's magnetic field during the last approximately 115,000 years. Each core contains the last 24,000 years except for the interval from about 20,000 to 11,000 years that is absent in C1067 and C1202 because of erosion on the continental slope. The PSV for the Eastern Tyrrhenian Sea is correlated to curves of global relative paleomagnetic field intensity in other marine cores (Stoner et al., 2002) and dated lacustrine records of PSV for western Europe (Thouveny et al., 1990) and Great Britain (Turner and Thompson, 1981). Tephrochronolgy and radiometric dates (C14 and Ar/Ar) also are used for assigning an age to the record. Along with an improved record of PSV for the Mediterranean region, the PSV in the Salerno Gulf and Cilento offshore piston cores has application for placing time constraints on the marine geology and stratigraphy on the continental shelf and slope. The result is that catastrophic events such as large-scale submarine slumps, volcanic eruptions, turbidite deposition, and abrupt changes in sedimentation rate are dated. The changes in sedimentation rate seem to be linked to global rapid sea-level pulses and climate events that induced concurrent reduction and/or abundance in the sediment supply from the adjacent coastal margin.

  4. Geomagnetic Jerks in the Swarm Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, William; Beggan, Ciaran; Macmillan, Susan

    2016-08-01

    The timely provision of geomagnetic observations as part of the European Space Agency (ESA) Swarm mission means up-to-date analysis and modelling of the Earth's magnetic field can be conducted rapidly in a manner not possible before. Observations from each of the three Swarm constellation satellites are available within 4 days and a database of close-to-definitive ground observatory measurements is updated every 3 months. This makes it possible to study very recent variations of the core magnetic field. Here we investigate rapid, unpredictable internal field variations known as geomagnetic jerks. Given that jerks represent (currently) unpredictable changes in the core field and have been identified to have happened in 2014 since Swarm was launched, we ask what impact this might have on the future accuracy of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). We assess the performance of each of the IGRF-12 secular variation model candidates in light of recent jerks, given that four of the nine candidates are novel physics-based predictive models.

  5. Relationship between human physiological parameters and geomagnetic variations of solar origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, S.

    Results presented concern influence of increased geomagnetic activity on some human physiological parameters. The blood pressure and heart rate of 86 volunteers were measured on working days in autumn 2001 (01/10 09/11) and in spring 2002 (08/04 28/05). These periods were chosen because of maximal expected geomagnetic activity. Altogether 2799 recordings were obtained and analysed. Questionnaire information about subjective psycho-physiological complaints was also gathered. MANOVA was employed to check the significance of the influence of three factors on the physiological parameters under consideration. The factors were the following: (1) planetary geomagnetic activity level estimated by Ap-index and divided into five levels; (2) gender males and females; (3) blood pressure degree persons in the group examined were divided into hypotensive, normotensive and hypertensive. Post hoc analysis was performed to elicit the significance of differences in the factors’ levels. The average arterial blood pressure of the group was found to increase significantly with the increase of geomagnetic activity level. The average increment of systolic and diastolic blood pressure of the group examined reached 9%. This effect was present irrespectively of gender. Results obtained suppose that hypertensive persons have the highest sensitivity and the hypotensive persons have the lowest sensitivity of the arterial blood pressure to increase of geomagnetic activity. The results did not show significant changes in the heart rate. The percentage of the persons who reported subjective psycho-physiological complaints was also found to increase significantly with the geomagnetic activity increase and the highest sensitivity was revealed for the hypertensive females.

  6. Secular variation of activity in comets 2P/Encke and 9P/Tempel 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haken, Michael; AHearn, Michael F.; Feldman, Paul D.; Budzien, Scott A.

    1995-01-01

    We compare production rates of H20 derived from International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra from multiple apparitions of 2 comets, 2P/Encke and 9P/Tempel 1, whose orbits are in near-resonance with that of the Earth. Since model-induced errors are primarily a function of observing geometry, the close geometrical matches afforded by the resonance condition results in the cancellation of such errors when taking ratios of production rates. Giving careful attention to the variation of model parameters with solar activity, we find marginal evidence of change in 2P/Encke: a 1-sigma pre-perihelion decrease averaging 4%/revolution over 4 apparitions from 1980-1994, and a 1-sigma post-perihelion increase of 16%/revolution for 2 successive apparitions in 1984 and 1987. We find for 9P/Tempel 1, however, a 7-sigma decrease of 29%/revolution over 3 apparitions from 1983-1994, even after correcting for a tracking problem which made the fluxes systematically low. We speculate on a possible association of the character of long-term brightness variations with physical properties of the nucleus, and discuss implications for future research.

  7. Long-term observations of the solar wind speed from the high latitude geomagnetic observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukianova, Renata; Kozlovsky, Alexander

    Solar wind speed is an important driver of the magnetospheric dynamics. The solar wind high speed streams (HSSs) affects the ionosphere and even the neutral atmosphere. Analysis of the geomagnetic secular variation at polar and auroral latitudes reveals a signal of the HSS as a significant deflection of the observatory annual means in the corresponding secular variation. A major reduction of the horizontal geomagnetic component at auroral latitudes and to a notable strengthening of the vertical component in both polar caps indicates an extreme intensity in the westward substorm auroral electrojet (WEJ) current detected in the strongest HSS years during the declining phase of each solar cycle. The near polar cap boundary observatories in Antarctic show the largest effect. The longest available time series from Godhavn and Sodankyla observatories allows monitoring the WEJ intensity during the last 100 years and makes it possible to associate the WEJ intensity with the extreme HSS.

  8. Variations of total electron content during geomagnetic disturbances: A model/observation comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roble, G. Lu X. Pi A. D. Richmond R. G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper studies the ionospheric response to major geomagnetic storm of October 18-19, 1995, using the thermosphere-ionosphere electrodynamic general circulation model (TIE-GCM) simulations and the global ionospheric maps (GIM) of total electron content (TEC) observations from the Global Positioning System (GPS) worldwide network.

  9. Arabidopsis thaliana root elongation growth is sensitive to lunisolar tidal acceleration and may also be weakly correlated with geomagnetic variations

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Peter W.; Fisahn, Joachim; Yazdanbakhsh, Nima; Moraes, Thiago A.; Khabarova, Olga V.; Gallep, Cristiano M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Correlative evidence suggests a relationship between the lunisolar tidal acceleration and the elongation rate of arabidopsis roots grown under free-running conditions of constant low light. Methods Seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana were grown in a controlled-climate chamber maintained at a constant temperature and subjected to continuous low-level illumination from fluorescent tubes, conditions that approximate to a ‘free-running’ state in which most of the abiotic factors that entrain root growth rates are excluded. Elongation of evenly spaced, vertical primary roots was recorded continuously over periods of up to 14 d using high temporal- and spatial-resolution video imaging and were analysed in conjunction with geophysical variables. Key Results and Conclusions The results confirm the lunisolar tidal/root elongation relationship. Also presented are relationships between the hourly elongation rates and the contemporaneous variations in geomagnetic activity, as evaluated from the disturbance storm time and ap indices. On the basis of time series of root elongation rates that extend over ≥4 d and recorded at different seasons of the year, a provisional conclusion is that root elongation responds to variation in the lunisolar force and also appears to adjust in accordance with variations in the geomagnetic field. Thus, both lunisolar tidal acceleration and the geomagnetic field should be considered as modulators of root growth rate, alongside other, stronger and more well-known abiotic environmental regulators, and perhaps unexplored factors such as air ions. Major changes in atmospheric pressure are not considered to be a factor contributing to oscillations of root elongation rate. PMID:23532042

  10. Variations of solar, interplanetary, and geomagnetic parameters with solar magnetic multipole fields during Solar Cycles 21-24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bogyeong; Lee, Jeongwoo; Yi, Yu; Oh, Suyeon

    2015-01-01

    In this study we compare the temporal variations of the solar, interplanetary, and geomagnetic (SIG) parameters with that of open solar magnetic flux from 1976 to 2012 (from Solar Cycle 21 to the early phase of Cycle 24) for a purpose of identifying their possible relationships. By the open flux, we mean the average magnetic field over the source surface (2.5 solar radii) times the source area as defined by the potential field source surface (PFSS) model of the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO). In our result, most SIG parameters except the solar wind dynamic pressure show rather poor correlations with the open solar magnetic field. Good correlations are recovered when the contributions from individual multipole components are counted separately. As expected, solar activity indices such as sunspot number, total solar irradiance, 10.7 cm radio flux, and solar flare occurrence are highly correlated with the flux of magnetic quadrupole component. The dynamic pressure of solar wind is strongly correlated with the dipole flux, which is in anti-phase with Solar Cycle (SC). The geomagnetic activity represented by the Ap index is correlated with higher order multipole components, which show relatively a slow time variation with SC. We also found that the unusually low geomagnetic activity during SC 23 is accompanied by the weak open solar fields compared with those in other SCs. It is argued that such dependences of the SIG parameters on the individual multipole components of the open solar magnetic flux may clarify why some SIG parameters vary in phase with SC and others show seemingly delayed responses to SC variation.

  11. The 2014 geomagnetic jerk as observed by southern African magnetic observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotzé, P. B.

    2017-01-01

    Rapid secular variation pulses in the Earth's geomagnetic field have been identified during the last decade. In particular, the 2014 jerk is the latest in a series of localised rapid secular variation events observed at the Earth's surface which are thought to be the result of rapid oscillations at the core surface approximately at a depth of 3000 km. In Southern Africa, the 2014 jerk has been analysed using data from four observatories located at Hermanus, Hartebeesthoek, Keetmanshoop and Tsumeb and found that this event occurred with varying strengths in the different components at a particular observatory, while different observatories in the region showed strong individual characteristics. The changes in the secular variation patterns at individual magnetic observatories in this study took place in an area characterised by rapid changes in the geomagnetic field with time. Of particular interest is that global field models like CHAOS-6 and POMME 10 derived from various combinations of ground and satellite data do not always indicate similar short-period patterns in X, Y and Z as revealed by observatory measurements. This has been confirmed by comparing the secular variation pattern at the Kourou magnetic observatory located in French Guiana, a station close to the current centre of the South Atlantic Anomaly.

  12. Secular variations in composition of the solar wind - Evidence and causes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerridge, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    Variations in the composition of the regolith due to irradiation by the solar wind are examined by categorizing the exposure history recorded in each sample. The history can be defined by two parameters: the duration of solar wind exposure (maturity) and a measure of how long the exposure took place (antiquity). Three partially successful methods for determining antiquity are described: the regolith contains small amounts of unsupported, trapped radiogenic noble gases, the most common being Ar-40. Assuming relatively prompt outgassing of the lunar interior, the amount of Ar-40 implanted per unit time should be proportional to the lunar content of K-40, and thus should have decayed exponentially over the lifetime of the moon. Normalization to constant exposure duration is achieved by taking the ratio Ar-40/Ar-36 in trapped gas, Ar-36 being an efficiently trapped solar wind species. The second method involves the interaction between galactic cosmic rays and lunar material producing certain spallogenic nuclides which may be analyzed in terms of a cosmic ray exposure age. The third method deals with the fact that there is a general tendency for depth within a core to be related to time deposition; two variants of this method are presented.

  13. International geomagnetic reference field 1980: a report by IAGA Division I working group.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the recommendations of the working group, which suggested additions to IGRF because of the cumulative effect of the inevitable uncertainties in the secular variation models which had led to unacceptable inaccuracies in the IGRF by the late 1970's. The recommendations were accepted by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy on August 15, 1981 at the 4th Scientific Assembly, Edinburgh. An extended table sets out spherical harmonic coefficients of the IGRF 1980.-R.House

  14. New archaeomagnetic direction results from China and their constraints on palaeosecular variation of the geomagnetic field in Eastern Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Shuhui; Tauxe, Lisa; Deng, Chenglong; Qin, Huafeng; Pan, Yongxin; Jin, Guiyun; Chen, Xuexiang; Chen, Wei; Xie, Fei; Zhu, Rixiang

    2016-11-01

    We carried out an archaeomagnetic directional study on 38 oriented samples (bricks and baked clays) collected from four archaeological locations at three provinces in China. The ages of our samples, spanning from ˜3000 BCE to ˜1300 CE, were constrained using a combination of archaeological context, radiocarbon dating and stratigraphic information. Rock magnetic results demonstrate that the main magnetic minerals of the studied samples are magnetite and/or hematite in single domain and superparamagnetic states. A total of 20 new reliable archaeodirectional data from 12 independent sites are obtained after thermal demagnetization experiments. These are the first set of archaeodirectional data in China produced since the 1990s. The published data are largely from the past 2 kyr and data from older time periods are rare. Our new data, especially those from period older than 3 ka, fill many gaps of the presently published dataset and will provide strong constraints on palaeosecular variation of the geomagnetic field in Eastern Asia and on the improvement of global models. Quite a few inflection points in the direction of the geomagnetic field are recorded in Eastern Asia over the past 10 kyr and some of them synchronize with the maximums or minimums of the palaeointensity. The palaeosecular variation rates are very low (based on present data distribution) before 2000 BCE and then start to increase and fluctuate afterward, which is generally consistent with the pattern of palaeointensity variations in this area.

  15. Review: the effects of secular variation in seawater Mg/Ca on marine biocalcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, J. B.

    2009-07-01

    Synchronized transitions in the polymorph mineralogy of the major reef-building and sediment-producing calcareous marine organisms and abiotic CaCO3 precipitates (ooids, marine cements) throughout Phanerozoic time is believed to have been caused by tectonically-induced variations in seawater molar Mg/Ca (>2="aragonite seas"; <2="calcite seas"). Here, I review a series of experiments in which extant calcifying taxa were reared in experimental seawater formulated over the range of mMg/Ca ratios (1.0 to 5.2) that occurred throughout their geologic history. Aragonite-secreting bryopsidalean algae and scleractinian corals and calcite-secreting coccolithophores exhibited higher rates of calcification and growth in the experimental seawaters that favored their skeletal mineral. These results support the assertion that seawater Mg/Ca played an important role in determining which hypercalcifying marine organisms were the major reef-builders and sediment-producers throughout Earth history. The observation that primary production increased along with calcification in mineralogically-favorable seawater is consistent with the hypothesis that calcification promotes photosynthesis within autotrophs through the liberation of CO2. The Mg/Ca ratio of calcite secreted by the coccolithophores, coralline algae and reef-dwelling animals (crustacea, urchins, calcareous tube worms) declined with reductions in seawater Mg/Ca. Calcifying microbial biofilms varied their mineral polymorph with seawater Mg/Ca (mMg/Ca<2=low Mg calc; mMg/Ca>2=arag+high Mg calc), suggesting a nearly abiotic mode of calcification. These results indicate that biomineralogical control can be partially overridden by ambient seawater Mg/Ca and suggests that modern high Mg calcite organisms probably secreted low Mg calcite in calcite seas of the past. Notably, Mg fractionation in autotrophic organisms was more strongly influenced by changes in seawater Mg/Ca, a probable consequence of them inducing a less controlled

  16. Periodic variation in the geomagnetic activity - A study based on the Ap index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Gonzalez, Alicia L. C.; Gonzalez, Walter D.; Dutra, Severino L. G.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1993-01-01

    The monthly and daily samples of the Ap index for the interval from 1932 through 1982 were studied using the power spectrum technique. Results obtained for Bartel's period (about 27 days), the semiannual period, the dual-peak solar cycle distribution of geomagnetic storms, and certain other medium-scale periodicities are examined in detail. In addition, results on the cumulative occurrence number of storms per decade as a function of the Ap and Dst indices for the storm are presented.

  17. Latitudinal variation of 732.0 nm dayglow emission under geomagnetic storm conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vir; Dharwan, Maneesha

    2016-07-01

    A comprehensive model is developed to study 732.0 nm dayglow emission. The Solar2000 EUV (extreme ultraviolet) flux model, neutral atmosphere model (NRLMSISE-00), latest transition probabilities and updated reaction rate coefficients are incorporated in the present model. The modeled volume emission rates (VER) are compared with the measurements as provided by Atmosphere Explorer-C satellite, Dynamics Explorer-2 spacecraft and WINDII measurements. The model is found in very good agreement with the measurements. This model is used to study the effects of geomagnetic storm on the 732.0 nm dayglow emission at various latitudes in northern hemisphere. It is found that the VER decreases as the latitude increases. The decrease in VER from low to mid latitudes is due to the decrease in atomic oxygen number density with latitude. The zenith intensity at the maximum geomagnetic activity is about 15% higher than the zenith intensity before the start of the geomagnetic storm in equatorial region. However, no appreciable change in the zenith intensity is found at higher latitudes (above 50° N). Further a negative correlation is found between the volume emission rate and DST index at all latitudes.

  18. Correction of in situ cosmogenic nuclide production rates for geomagnetic field intensity variations during the past 800,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masarik, Jozef; Frank, Martin; Schäfer, Jörg M.; Wieler, Rainer

    2001-09-01

    We present integrated relative production rates for cosmogenic nuclides in rock surfaces, which take into account reported variations of the geomagnetic field intensity during the past 800,000 yr. The calculations are based on the model simulating cosmic ray particle interactions with the Earth's atmosphere given by Masarik and Beer ["Simulation of particle fluxes and cosmogenic nuclide production in the Earth's atmosphere," J. Geophys. Res. 104(D10), 12099-12111, 1999]. Corrections are nearly independent on altitude between sea level and at least 5000 m. The correction factors are essentially identical for all stable and radioactive cosmogenic nuclides with half-lives longer than a few hundred thousand years. At the equator, integrated production rates for exposure ages between ˜40,000 to 800,000 yr are 10 to 12% higher than the present-day values, whereas at latitudes >40°, geomagnetic field intensity variations have hardly influenced in situ cosmogenic nuclide production. Correction factors for in situ 14C production rates differ from those of longer-lived nuclides. They are always smaller than ˜2% because the magnetic field intensity remained rather constant during the past ˜10 kyr, when the major fraction of the 14C extant today was produced.

  19. Geomagnetic control of the midlatitude daytime foF1 and foF2 long-term variations: Physical interpretation using European observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, A. V.; Perrone, L.

    2016-07-01

    Morphological analysis of Slough/Chilton and Juliusruh foF2 and foF1 long-term variations for the period including recent observations made in the previous paper (PM) has shown that the geomagnetic control is valid in the 21st century, moreover, the dependence on geomagnetic activity has become more pronounced and explicit after 1990. A new method to retrieve thermospheric neutral composition (O, O2, and N2), exospheric temperature Tex, and the total solar EUV flux with λ < 1050 Å from routine foF1 ionosonde observations has been developed to understand the mechanism of this geomagnetic control. The method was tested using CHAMP/STAR neutral gas density measurements. The retrieved for the first time thermospheric parameters at Slough/Chilton and Juliusruh over the period of ~ 5 solar cycles were used to analyze the mechanism of foF1 and foF2 long-term variations in the light of the geomagnetic control concept. It was shown that the control was provided via two channels: [O] and [O]/[N2] variations. Geomagnetic activity presented by 11 year running mean weighted index Ap11y controls the (O/N2)11y ratio variations, while solar activity presented by (F10.7)11y controls atomic oxygen [O]11y variations. Atomic oxygen, the main aeronomic parameter controlling daytime foF1 and foF2 variations, manifests solar cycle and long-term (for some solar cycles) variations with the rising phase in 1965-1985 and the falling phase in 1985-2008. These long-term [O] variations are reflected in foF2 and foF1 long-term variations. The origin of these long-term variations is in the Sun. The empirical thermospheric model Mass Spectrometer Incoherent Scatter-86 driven by Ap and F10.7 indices manifests [O]11y and (O/N2 )11y variations similar to the retrieved ones including the period of deep solar minimum with a very low atomic oxygen concentration in 2008. This confirms the basic idea of the geomagnetic control concept that ionospheric long-term variations have a natural (not

  20. Improving our knowledge of the rapid geomagnetic field intensity variation observed in Europe around 800 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Paccard, M.; Chauvin, A.; Lanos, P.; Dufresne, P.; Kovacheva, M.; Hill, M. J.; Beamud, E.; Gutiérrez-Lloret, S.; Cañavate, V.; Blain, S.; Bouvier, A.; Oberlin, C.; Guibert, P.; Sapin, C.; Pringent, D.

    2011-12-01

    Available European data indicate that during the past 2500 years there have been periods of rapid intensity geomagnetic fluctuations interspersed with periods of little change. The challenge now is to precisely describe these rapid changes. The aim of this study is to obtain an improved description of the sharp geomagnetic intensity change that took place in Western Europe around 800 yrs AD as well as to investigate if this peak is observed at a continental scale. For this purpose 13 precisely dated early medieval Spanish pottery fragments, 4 archeological French kilns and a 3 collections of bricks used for the construction of different historical buildings from France and with ages ranging between 330 to 1290 AD have been studied. The material collected has been dated by archeological/historical constraints together with radiocarbon,thermoluminiscence (TL) and archeomagentic analysis. From classical Thellier experiments including TRM anisotropy and cooling rate corrections upon archeointensity estimates and conducted on 164 specimens (119 of them giving reliable results) ten new high-quality mean intensities have been obtained. The new intensity data together with a selection of the most reliable data from Western Europe have been relocated to the latitude of Paris and confirm the existence of an intensity maxima of ~85 μT centred at ~850 AD and related to intensity changes up to 20 μT per century. The results also indicate that a previous abrupt intensity change (reaching a maximum value of ~ 90 μT) took place in Western Europe around 650 AD. A selection of high-quality intensity data from Bulgaria, Italy and Greece indicate a very similar intensity trend for Eastern Europe. Although available data indicate that the duration of such periods of high intensities may be of less than one century more data are needed to infer the exact duration of these maximums. A comparison between the selected data and regional and global geomagnetic field models indicates that

  1. Holocene geomagnetic field variations from low latitude site: contribution from the Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissel, Catherine; Laj, Carlo; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Perez-Torrado, Francisco; Carrracedo, Juan-Carlos; Wandres, Camille

    2016-04-01

    Full geomagnetic vector information was retrieved from 37 lava flows (corresponding to 38 sites because one flow was sampled at two different localities) located in Tenerife and Gran Canaria (Canary Islands). Twenty-eight flows are dated between 1706 AD and about 13200 BC and one is historical. Eight other non-dated flows have stratigraphic links with the dated flows and at the end, our study allowed us to attribute to them archeomagnetic ages based on their paleomagnetic characteristics. Various mineralogical analyses were conducted, giving access to the nature and grain size of the magnetic minerals. Full stepwise (about 13 steps) thermal and AF demagnetizations were conducted on more than 400 samples to determine the paleomagnetic directions. The individual MAD values are on the average about 2° and the mean precision parameter at the flow scale (alpha95) is 4.2°. For paleointensities (PI), we performed the original Thellier and Thellier experiments with a success rate of about 65%, coupling it with the strict set of selection criteria PICRIT-03. The mean PIs at the flow level are based on 3 to 12 independent PI determinations except for one site in which only one reliable determination could be obtained. The obtained data are unique in this area over the 1000-14000 BC period and they are complementary to the dataset obtained in the Canary Islands for the last 500 years. Over the last 3 kyr, they indicate some variability in the local field intensity with a prominent PI peak centered around 600 BC and reaching 80 μT (VADM 16 x 10 ^22 Am ^2), documented by four different flows and associated to significantly easterly deviated declinations. The directional data are rather consistent with the most recent models proposed for that area but the obtained PI indicate that models largely underestimate the paleointensities. Combined with published data obtained from western Africa, Spain, Portugal, Morocco and the Azores within a 2000 km-radius around the Canary

  2. The semiannual variation of great geomagnetic storms and the postshock Russell-Mcpherron effect preceding coronal mass ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, N. U.; Cliver, E. W.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1992-01-01

    Recent results indicate that the intense southward interplanetary magnetic fields (IMFs) responsible for great storms can reside in the postshock plasma preceding the driver gas of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) as well as in the driver gas itself. It is proposed here that strong southward fields in the postshock flow result from a major increase in the Russell-McPherron polarity effect through a systematic pattern of compression and draping within the ecliptic plane. Differential compression at the shock increases the Parker spiral angle and, consequently, the azimuthal field component that projects as a southward component onto earth's dipole axis. The resulting prediction is that southward fields in the postshock plasma maximize at the spring (fall) equinox in CMEs emerging from toward (away) sectors. This pattern produces a strong semiannual variation in postshock IMF orientation and may account at least in part for the observed semiannual variation of the occurrence of great geomagnetic storms.

  3. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio signatures of the cosmogenic nuclide production linked to geomagnetic dipole moment variation since the Brunhes/Matuyama boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Quentin; Thouveny, Nicolas; Bourlès, Didier L.; Valet, Jean-Pierre; Bassinot, Franck; Ménabréaz, Lucie; Guillou, Valéry; Choy, Sandrine; Beaufort, Luc

    2016-11-01

    Geomagnetic dipole moment variations associated with polarity reversals and excursions are expressed by large changes of the cosmogenic nuclide beryllium-10 (10Be) production rates. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios (proxy of atmospheric 10Be production) from oceanic cores therefore complete the classical information derived from relative paleointensity (RPI) records. This study presents new authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio results obtained from cores MD05-2920 and MD05-2930 collected in the west equatorial Pacific Ocean. Be ratios from cores MD05-2920, MD05-2930 and MD90-0961 have been stacked and averaged. Variations of the authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio are analyzed and compared with the geomagnetic dipole low series reported from global RPI stacks. The largest 10Be overproduction episodes are related to dipole field collapses (below a threshold of 2 × 1022 Am2) associated with the Brunhes/Matuyama reversal, the Laschamp (41 ka) excursion, and the Iceland Basin event (190 ka). Other significant 10Be production peaks are correlated to geomagnetic excursions reported in literature. The record was then calibrated by using absolute dipole moment values drawn from the Geomagia and Pint paleointensity value databases. The 10Be-derived geomagnetic dipole moment record, independent from sedimentary paleomagnetic data, covers the Brunhes-Matuyama transition and the whole Brunhes Chron. It provides new and complementary data on the amplitude and timing of millennial-scale geomagnetic dipole moment variations and particularly on dipole moment collapses triggering polarity instabilities.

  4. Spatial variation in the plasma sheet composition: Dependence on geomagnetic and solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggiolo, R.; Kistler, L. M.

    2014-04-01

    We study the spatial distribution of plasma sheet O+ and H+ ions using data from the COmposition and DIstribution Function (CODIF) instrument on board the Cluster spacecraft from 2001 to 2005. The densities are mapped along magnetic field lines to produce bidimensional density maps at the magnetospheric equatorial plane for various geomagnetic and solar activity levels (represented by the Kp and F10.7 indexes). We analyze the correlation of the O+ and H+ density with Kp and F10.7 in the midtail region at geocentric distances between 15 and 20 RE and in the near-Earth regions at radial distances between 7 and 8 RE. Near Earth the H+ density slightly increases with Kp and F10.7 while in the midtail region it is not correlated with Kp and F10.7. On the contrary, the amount of O+ ions significantly increases with Kp and F10.7 independently of the region. In the near-Earth region, the effects of solar EUV and geomagnetic activity on the O+ density are comparable. In the midtail region, the O+ density increases at a lower rate with solar EUV flux but strongly increases with geomagnetic activity although the effect is modulated by the solar EUV flux level. We also evidence a strong increase of the proportion of O+ ions with decreasing geocentric distance below ~10 RE. These results confirm the direct entry of O+ ions into the near-Earth plasma sheet and suggest that both energetic outflows from the auroral zone and cold outflow from the high-latitude ionosphere may contribute to feed the near-Earth plasma sheet with ionospheric ions.

  5. Late Quaternary paleomagnetic secular variation, relative paleointensity, and environmental magnetism from Cascade Lake, Brooks Range, Arctic Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen, D. P.; Kaufman, D. S.; Stoner, J. S.; Reilly, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Two sediment cores from Cascade Lake (68.38°N, 154.60°W), Arctic Alaska were selected for paleomagnetic analysis to compare 14C age control with paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) and relative paleointensity (RPI) age control derived from field models and other local sedimentary records. Rock magnetic experiments were performed to quantify variability in magnetic properties and to infer sediment sourcing during the late Quaternary. U-channels were studied through AF demagnetization of the natural remanent magnetization, and laboratory-induced magnetizations including anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM) acquisition, ARM demagnetization, and isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM). Maximum angular deviation values average <2°, indicating a strong, well-defined characteristic remanent magnetization dominated by a low-coercivity component that increases up core. Average inclinations are within 4° of the expected geocentric axial dipole, and major inclination features can be correlated across the two cores. Correlation of inclination changes with the Burial Lake record, 200 km to the west (Dorfman, 2013, unpub. thesis), indicates that the Cascade Lake sedimentary sequence overlying the basal diamicton likely spans at least 16 ka. Cascade Lake sediments may be suitable for RPI estimation using the ARM or IRM as a normalizer, following a more detailed examination of magnetic properties. A systematic offset between the Cascade Lake 14C chronology and PSV and RPI chronologies wiggle-matched to field models suggests a hard-water effect of ~1000 yr, although we cannot rule out the possibility that at least some of the age offset represents a post-depositional remanent magnetization lock-in effect at Cascade Lake. S-ratios (IRM0.3T/SIRM) and ARM-ratios (ARM/SIRM) show a sharp decrease in low-coercivity material across the transition from clastic sediments to organic-rich sediments, followed by an increase in the concentration of fine-grained magnetic material and

  6. Domino model for geomagnetic field reversals.

    PubMed

    Mori, N; Schmitt, D; Wicht, J; Ferriz-Mas, A; Mouri, H; Nakamichi, A; Morikawa, M

    2013-01-01

    We solve the equations of motion of a one-dimensional planar Heisenberg (or Vaks-Larkin) model consisting of a system of interacting macrospins aligned along a ring. Each spin has unit length and is described by its angle with respect to the rotational axis. The orientation of the spins can vary in time due to spin-spin interaction and random forcing. We statistically describe the behavior of the sum of all spins for different parameters. The term "domino model" in the title refers to the interaction among the spins. We compare the model results with geomagnetic field reversals and dynamo simulations and find strikingly similar behavior. The aggregate of all spins keeps the same direction for a long time and, once in a while, begins flipping to change the orientation by almost 180 degrees (mimicking a geomagnetic reversal) or to move back to the original direction (mimicking an excursion). Most of the time the spins are aligned or antialigned and deviate only slightly with respect to the rotational axis (mimicking the secular variation of the geomagnetic pole with respect to the geographic pole). Reversals are fast compared to the times in between and they occur at random times, both in the model and in the case of the Earth's magnetic field.

  7. New constraints on the variation of the geomagnetic field during the late Neolithic period: Archaeointensity results from Sichuan, southwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Wei; Tauxe, Lisa; Deng, Chenglong; Qin, Huafeng; Pan, Yongxin; Yi, Liang; Zhu, Rixiang

    2015-04-01

    We have carried out an archaeomagnetic study on a late Neolithic locality (Liujiazhai) in Sichuan, southwestern China. We pull together various dating techniques, including radiocarbon analysis, optically stimulated luminescence dating, stratigraphic information as well as archaeological and archaeomagnetic estimations, to constrain the age of the studied samples. Rock magnetic results indicate thermally stable fine-grained magnetite or titanomagnetite as the dominant magnetic carriers. More than half of the specimens (141/246) in the paleointensity experiment pass the selection criteria and are considered to record robust intensity values. The virtual axial dipole moments range from approximately (2.8 to 7.8) × 1022 Am2 with an average of 5.9 × 1022 Am2, indicating that the geomagnetic intensity around 3000 before the Common Era (B.C.E.) is overall lower than the present field intensity (9.8 × 1022 Am2) of this area. The new results from Liujiazhai are generally consistent with the published data of similar age but deviate from the only available model of CALS10k.1b at certain time periods, making them important for future improvements of the model. Those data are significant for constraining the variation of geomagnetic field intensity between ~3100 and 2600 B.C.E. and improving the regional model of eastern Asia.

  8. Marine sediments and Beryllium-10 record of the geomagnetic moment variations of the 20-50ka interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ménabréaz, L.; Thouveny, N.; Bourles, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    To better constrain the Earth's dipole moment changes at the time of the Laschamp and Mono Lake excursions, we reconstructed the cosmogenic nuclide 10Be production variations in the atmosphere using authigenic 10Be/9Be records measured along two marine sediment sequences from the north-east Atlantic (Portuguese margin) and west-equatorial Pacific (Papua-New Guinea margin) oceans. These two records evidence an almost doubling of the 10Be production at ~41 ka, thus assignable to the geomagnetic dipole low associated to the Laschamp excursion. The compilation of authigenic 10Be/9Be marine records provides a stack which indicates that the global 10Be production rates at 41 ka were enhanced by a ~1.5 factor compared to the average over the 20-50 ka interval. The comparison of this authigenic 10Be/9Be marine stack with the Greenland 10Be flux record (smoothed by 1000-year averaging) evidences a good coherency of the timing and amplitude of 10Be production recorded at high, mid and low latitudes. This confirms that the 10Be overproduction signal has a global significance, as expected from a geomagnetic dipole moment loss. The calibration of the 10Be/9Be stack using absolute virtual dipole moment values provides an independent tool to reconstruct geomagnetic dipole moment variations. This allows computing the loss rate leading to the Laschamp dipole minimum (~ -1.5 x 1022 A.m2.ka-1), which constitutes an interesting criterion to assess the loss rate of the historical field. In constrast with relative paleointensity records and absolute paleointensity data sets, the absence of significant cosmogenic enhancement at the age of 34 ka suggests that the Mono Lake dipole low was not sufficient to trigger a significant cosmogenic overproduction. This demonstrates that if the Mono lake excursion really occurred at that time, the duration and amplitude of the dipole weakening were very limited compared to that of the Laschamp. The 10Be overproduction quantified in this study

  9. The 2000 revision of the joint UK/US geomagnetic field models and an IGRF 2000 candidate model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macmillan, S.; Quinn, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The method of derivation of the joint UK/US spherical harmonic geomagnetic main-field and secular-variation models is presented. Early versions of these models, with the main field truncated at degree 10, are the UK/US candidates for the IGRF 2000 model. The main-field model describes the Earth's magnetic field at the 2000.0 epoch, while the secular-variation model predicts the evolution of this field between 2000.0 and 2005.0. A revised 1995.0 main-field model was also generated. Regional models for the continental US, Alaska and Hawaii were also produced as a by-product of the UK/US global modelling effort. Copy right?? The Society of Geomagnetism and Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences (SGEPSS); The Seismological Society of Japan; The Volcanological Society of Japan; The Geodetic Society of Japan; The Japanese Society for Planetary Sciences.

  10. Persistent high paleosecular variation activity in southern hemisphere for at least 10 000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constable, Catherine; Korte, Monika; Panovska, Sanja

    2016-11-01

    Direct observations of the geomagnetic field show that secular variation is strong in the Atlantic hemisphere, and comparatively reduced in the Pacific region. The dipole has been decaying since at least 1840 AD, driven by growth and migration of reverse flux patches in the southern hemisphere. We investigate whether anything like this modern pattern of geomagnetic secular variation persists and can be detected in global paleomagnetic field models. Synthesis of results from two new time-varying spherical harmonic models shows that geographically distinct geomagnetic secular variation extends to at least 10 000 BP. The models use the same database but differ in methodology, leading to some regional differences in results. Consistent large-scale surface features include strong average fields in the northern hemisphere and weaker fields with greater overall variability in the south. Longitudinal structure is present, with weaker average fields in the western Pacific than in the east, and prominent negative inclination anomalies extending beneath Indonesia, across Africa and to Brazil, but weaker anomalies in the central Pacific. Marginally positive inclination anomalies occur west of the Americas. Paleosecular variation activity peaks at high southern latitudes, and there is a pattern of reduced activity at equatorial and mid-latitudes beneath the Pacific. Although the dipole has exhibited both growth and decay over the interval 0-10 000 BP, our results show that geomagnetic paleosecular variation is preferentially focused in similar geographic regions to secular variation seen in the modern field.

  11. Growth variation, final height and secular trend. Proceedings of the 17th Aschauer Soiree, 7th November 2009.

    PubMed

    Hermanussen, M; Godina, E; Rühli, F J; Blaha, P; Boldsen, J L; van Buuren, S; MacIntyre, M; Assmann, C; Ghosh, A; de Stefano, G F; Sonkin, V D; Tresguerres, J A F; Meigen, C; Scheffler, C; Geiger, C; Lieberman, L S

    2010-08-01

    Growth and body height have always been topics interesting to the public. In particular, the stupendous increase of some 15-19cm in final adult height during the last 150 years in most European countries (the "secular trend"), the concomitant changes in body and head proportions, the tendency towards early onset of sexual maturation, the changes in the age when final height is being reached, and the very recent trend in body mass index, have generated much scientific literature. The marked plasticity of growth in height and weight over time causes problems. Child growth references differ between nations, they tend to quickly become out of date, and raise a number of questions regarding fitting methods, effects caused by selective drop-out, etc. New findings contradict common beliefs about the primary importance of nutritional and health related factors for secular changes in growth. There appears to be a broad age span from mid-childhood to early adolescence that is characterised by a peculiar insusceptibility. Environmental factors that are known to influence growth during this age span appear to have only little or no impact on final height. Major re-arrangements in height occur at an age when puberty has almost been completed and final height has almost been reached, implying that factors, which drive the secular trend in height, are limited to early childhood and late adolescence.

  12. Earth orientation parameters: excitation by atmosphere, oceans and geomagnetic jerks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrak, Jan; Ron, Cyril

    2015-08-01

    It is well known that geophysical fluids (atmosphere, oceans) excite Earth orientation. The influence is known to be dominant for polar motion, partly responsible for length-of-day changes, and very small effects are now observable also in nutation. Very recently several authors (Holme and de Viron 2005, Gibert and le Mouel 2008, Malkin 2013) noted that sudden changes of Earth's speed of rotation and phase/amplitude of the free motions of its spin axis (Chandler wobble, Free core nutation) occur near the epochs of geomagnetic jerks (GMJ - rapid changes of the secular variations of geomagnetic field). By using the numerical integration of broad-band Liouville equations (Brzezinski 1994) we demonstrate that if non-periodical bell-like excitations of limited length (app. 1 year) around the epochs of GMJ are added to atmospheric and oceanic excitations, the agreement between observed and calculated Earth orientation parameters is improved significantly.

  13. International Geomagnetic Reference Field: the 12th generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thébault, Erwan; Finlay, Christopher C.; Beggan, Ciarán D.; Alken, Patrick; Aubert, Julien; Barrois, Olivier; Bertrand, Francois; Bondar, Tatiana; Boness, Axel; Brocco, Laura; Canet, Elisabeth; Chambodut, Aude; Chulliat, Arnaud; Coïsson, Pierdavide; Civet, François; Du, Aimin; Fournier, Alexandre; Fratter, Isabelle; Gillet, Nicolas; Hamilton, Brian; Hamoudi, Mohamed; Hulot, Gauthier; Jager, Thomas; Korte, Monika; Kuang, Weijia; Lalanne, Xavier; Langlais, Benoit; Léger, Jean-Michel; Lesur, Vincent; Lowes, Frank J.; Macmillan, Susan; Mandea, Mioara; Manoj, Chandrasekharan; Maus, Stefan; Olsen, Nils; Petrov, Valeriy; Ridley, Victoria; Rother, Martin; Sabaka, Terence J.; Saturnino, Diana; Schachtschneider, Reyko; Sirol, Olivier; Tangborn, Andrew; Thomson, Alan; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars; Vigneron, Pierre; Wardinski, Ingo; Zvereva, Tatiana

    2015-05-01

    The 12th generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was adopted in December 2014 by the Working Group V-MOD appointed by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA). It updates the previous IGRF generation with a definitive main field model for epoch 2010.0, a main field model for epoch 2015.0, and a linear annual predictive secular variation model for 2015.0-2020.0. Here, we present the equations defining the IGRF model, provide the spherical harmonic coefficients, and provide maps of the magnetic declination, inclination, and total intensity for epoch 2015.0 and their predicted rates of change for 2015.0-2020.0. We also update the magnetic pole positions and discuss briefly the latest changes and possible future trends of the Earth's magnetic field.

  14. Geomagnetic inverse problem and data assimilation: a progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, Julien; Fournier, Alexandre

    2013-04-01

    In this presentation I will present two studies recently undertaken by our group in an effort to bring the benefits of data assimilation to the study of Earth's magnetic field and the dynamics of its liquid iron core, where the geodynamo operates. In a first part I will focus on the geomagnetic inverse problem, which attempts to recover the fluid flow in the core from the temporal variation of the magnetic field (known as the secular variation). Geomagnetic data can be downward continued from the surface of the Earth down to the core-mantle boundary, but not further below, since the core is an electrical conductor. Historically, solutions to the geomagnetic inverse problem in such a sparsely observed system were thus found only for flow immediately below the core mantle boundary. We have recently shown that combining a numerical model of the geodynamo together with magnetic observations, through the use of Kalman filtering, now allows to present solutions for flow throughout the core. In a second part, I will present synthetic tests of sequential geomagnetic data assimilation aiming at evaluating the range at which the future of the geodynamo can be predicted, and our corresponding prospects to refine the current geomagnetic predictions. Fournier, Aubert, Thébault: Inference on core surface flow from observations and 3-D dynamo modelling, Geophys. J. Int. 186, 118-136, 2011, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2011.05037.x Aubert, Fournier: Inferring internal properties of Earth's core dynamics and their evolution from surface observations and a numerical geodynamo model, Nonlinear Proc. Geoph. 18, 657-674, 2011, doi:10.5194/npg-18-657-2011 Aubert: Flow throughout the Earth's core inverted from geomagnetic observations and numerical dynamo models, Geophys. J. Int., 2012, doi: 10.1093/gji/ggs051

  15. The 2003 geomagnetic jerk and its relation to the core surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardinski, I.; Holme, R.; Asari, S.; Mandea, M.

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we examine the core surface flow obtained by an inversion of a continuous model of the geomagnetic field and its temporal variation using the diffusion-less induction equation. The continuous CHAOS model is derived from satellite data up to spherical harmonic degree 14 and covers the period 1999 to 2006. The CHAOS secular variation, when downward continued to the core surface, shows stripe-like features, which can be attributed to spherical harmonic degree 12 and higher. These contributions are removed by applying a tapering method, and the resulting tapered model is then inverted for the core surface flow. Satellite-based field models have a high spatial resolution; however, their temporal resolution is limited. In order to enhance the temporal resolution of the flow, we additionally constrain the flow to fit the secular variation from ground-based observatory data. A range of solutions, subject to different constraints, are computed, two flow hypotheses being considered: purely toroidal flow and tangentially geostrophic flow. We show that both flow types provide similar results; however, the purely toroidal flow provides a better fit to the secular variation in the equatorial region than the tangentially geostrophic flow. We then analyze the residuals between observed secular variation and its predictions from the flow. We note larger residuals for the tangentially geostrophic flow, where strong radial secular variation and a weak radial field are observed. Although diffusive effects cannot be ruled out as a potential source of the mismatch, we attribute the larger residuals to be caused by a flawed estimation of the poloidal flow. We also seek to relate temporal changes in the fluid flow to the geomagnetic jerk which occurred at the beginning of 2003. It is found that this geomagnetic jerk coincides with variations in the zonal flow components of both flow types, suggesting a possible link to torsional oscillations. However, we argue that other

  16. Magnetic and Electromagnetic Induction Effects in the Annual Means of Geomagnetic Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demetrescu, Crisan; Andreescu, Maria

    1992-01-01

    The solar-cycle related (SC) variation in the annual means of the horizontal and vertical components of the geomagnetic field at European observatories is used to infer information on the magnetic and electric properties of the interior, characteristic of the observatory location, by identifying and analyzing the magnetic induction component and respectively the electromagnetic induction component of the SC variation. The obtained results and the method can be used to better constrain the anomaly bias in main field modelling and to improve the reliability of secular variation models beyond the time interval covered by data.

  17. An electromagnetic sounding experiment in Germany using the vertical gradient of geomagnetic variations observed in a deep borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmucker, Ulrich; Spitzer, Klaus; Steveling, Erich

    2009-09-01

    We have recorded for 13 d, geomagnetic variations simultaneously on the Earth's surface and in a borehole at 832 m depth straight below, with a sampling rate of 1 Hz. In addition, geoelectric variations were observed at the same site near Bad Königshofen in Frankonia, Germany. The penetrated moderately conductive Triassic sediments lie above highly resistive Permian deposits. A presumably crystalline basement begins at 1500-1900 m depth. The purpose of the experiment is to determine the skin effect of geomagnetic variations and to derive from it the equivalent to the magnetotelluric (MT) surface impedance, using the vertical gradient (VG) method of electromagnetic (EM) sounding. In this way, we were able to reproduce all four elements of the MT impedance tensor, except for an unexplained but consistent downward shift of VG phases against MT phases by roughly 15° for the two off-diagonal elements. Hence, our tensor evaluation goes beyond the common practice, to express the skin effect by a single VG transfer function in response to a layered structure. The otherwise good agreement of VG and MT results implies that at our test site, the MT impedance tensor is largely distortion-free and that, for example, its pronounced anisotropy should be regarded as a genuine characteristic of the EM response for a laterally non-uniform or possibly anisotropic deep structure. The drilling site lies within the range of a widespread induction anomaly. We have observed the resulting variations of the vertical magnetic component at the surface and in the borehole and found them to be identical. The thus established absence of a skin effect for the vertical component allows us to treat the sedimentary layer down to the depth of the borehole instrument as a thin sheet, and the pertinent thin-sheet approximation for EM induction forms the basis of our analysis. We have derived the required estimate of conductance from the skin effect of horizontal components, noting that this estimate

  18. Structure in the secular variation of seawater sup 87 Sr/ sup 86 Sr for the Ivorian/Chadian (Osagean, Lower Carboniferous)

    SciTech Connect

    Douthit, T.L.; Hanson, G.N.; Meyers, W.J. )

    1990-05-01

    The secular variations of {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr in seawater for the Ivorian/Chadian, (equivalent to the Osagean, Lower Carboniferous) were determined through detailed analysis of well-preserved marine cements from the Waulsortian facies of Ireland. The results indicate that marine cements have utility in characterizing marine paleochemistries. Marine cements were judged pristine on the basis of nonluminescent character and stable isotopic composition comparable to previous estimates of Mississippian marine calcite. Analysis of the marine cements yielded {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios lower than previously reported values for the Ivorian/Chadian. Error resulting from chronostratigraphic correlation between different geographic areas was avoided by restricting the sample set to a single 1,406-ft-long core (core P-1). The P-1 core is estimated to represent a minimum of 8.7 m.y. of continuous Waulsortian Limestone deposition. The {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios of 11 nonluminescent cements document a non-monotonic variation in seawater {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr along the length of the core. {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ranges from a high of 0.707908 in the early Ivorian to a low of about 0.707650 in the late Ivorian and middle Chadian with an early Chadian maximum at 0.707800 (all data are adjusted to a value of 0.710140 for SRM 987). The indicated maximum rate of change in seawater {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr is {minus}0.00011/Ma, comparable in magnitude to Tertiary values. The secular variation curve of seawater {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr for the Ivorian/Chadian has previously been thought to decrease monotonically with decreasing age. These data suggest that the seawater {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr variation over this interval may be sinusoidal in nature and emphasize the importance of well-characterized intraformational isotopic base lines.

  19. High-resolution paleomagnetic secular variations and relative paleointensity since the Late Pleistocene in southern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lise-Pronovost, A.; St-Onge, G.; Gogorza, C. G.; Haberzettl, T.; Kliem, P.; Francus, P.; Zolitschka, B.

    2012-12-01

    High-resolution paleomagnetic records from the Southern Hemisphere are largely under-represented relative to the Northern Hemisphere. Here we present a high-resolution u-channel-based full vector (inclination, declination and relative paleointensity) paleomagnetic reconstruction since 51.2 ka cal BP from the maar lake Laguna Potrok Aike in Southern Patagonia (52°S, 70°W) in order to 1) document the variability of the geomagnetic field in an area of the world where observations are scarce and 2) compare this new record with other high-resolution records and stacks from around the globe in order to assess the geomagnetic field behavior in the Southern Hemisphere. The long sedimentary sequence was recovered in 2008 in the framework of the International Continental scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) Potrok Aike maar lake Sediment Archive Drilling prOject (PASADO) and the radiocarbon-based chronology indicates an average sedimentation rate of 89 cm/ka for the last 51.2 ka. Detailed rock-magnetic analyses reveal that the magnetic assemblage is dominated by pseudo single domain magnetite, which is optimal for paleomagnetic reconstructions, and that the sediment fulfills the common criteria for high-quality paleomagnetic archives. The new high-resolution record from Laguna Potrok Aike is compared with the available records from the mid- to high-latitude of the Southern Hemisphere, as well as with reference records and stacks from the Northern Hemisphere, revealing consistent millennial-scale variability, the Laschamp and possibly the Mono Lake geomagnetic excursions. Interestingly, the regional and global comparisons reveal a directional swing and sharp minimum in intensity at 46 ka cal BP which appears to be mainly observed in the Southern Hemisphere and could likely be used as a new chronostratigraphic marker. In addition, a direction swing at 20 ka cal BP could be associated with the Hilina Pali excursion, recorded with details in Hawaiian lava flows. Finally, these

  20. Seasonal and secular variation of wind streaks on Mars - An analysis of Mariner 9 and Viking data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.

    1979-01-01

    Viking orbiter observations extending over 1 Martian year have been used in conjunction with Mariner 9 data obtained in 1971-1972 to study the seasonal and secular behavior of several kinds of wind streaks. Most bright streaks, inferred to consist of dust storm fallout in the lees of obstacles, have changed very little in form or orientation over a period of 3 Martian years. Some are extremely stable and have experienced no effective eolian action over the 3 years. A few bright streaks changed rapidly during global dust storms; these streaks are located in areas subject to both global and topographic winds. Viking images have shown for the first time that dark, erosional streaks are stable from the time of their formation after major dust storms until the onset of the next episode of major storm activity. Available evidence shows that the large, dark streaks in Oxia Palus consist of material deflated from dune fields within the associated craters. These streaks lengthened secularly since 1972; changes appear to occur episodically during southern summer. The great majority of all streaks reflect winds during the period from late southern spring to early southern fall, although some changes occur throughout the year. The global pattern of wind streaks and the variability of the streaks thus depend strongly upon the current south-north asymmetry of seasons on Mars.

  1. Investigating dynamical complexity of geomagnetic jerks using various entropy measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasis, Georgios; Potirakis, Stelios; Mandea, Mioara

    2016-06-01

    Recently, many novel concepts originated in dynamical systems or information theory have been developed, partly motivated by specific research questions linked to geosciences, and found a variety of different applications. This continuously extending toolbox of nonlinear time series analysis highlights the importance of the dynamical complexity to understand the behavior of the complex Earth's system and its components. Here, we propose to apply such new approaches, mainly a series of entropy methods to the time series of the geomagnetic field. Two datasets provided by Chambon la Foret (France) and Niemegk (Germany) observatories are considered for analysis to detect dynamical complexity changes associated with geomagnetic jerks, the abrupt changes in the second temporal derivative of the Earth's magnetic field. The results clearly demonstrate the ability of Shannon and Tsallis entropies as well as Fisher information to detect events in a regional manner having identified complexities lower than the background in time intervals when geomagnetic jerks have already been reported in the literature. Additionally, these information measures are directly applicable to the original data without having to derive the secular variation or acceleration from the observatory monthly means. The strength of the proposed analysis to reveal dynamical complexity features associated with geomagnetic jerks can be utilized for analyzing not only ground measurements, but also satellite data, as those provided by the current magnetic field mission of Swarm.

  2. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio signatures of the cosmogenic nuclide production linked to geomagnetic dipole moment variation since the Brunhes/Matuyama boundary

    PubMed Central

    Thouveny, Nicolas; Bourlès, Didier L.; Valet, Jean‐Pierre; Bassinot, Franck; Ménabréaz, Lucie; Guillou, Valéry; Choy, Sandrine; Beaufort, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Geomagnetic dipole moment variations associated with polarity reversals and excursions are expressed by large changes of the cosmogenic nuclide beryllium‐10 (10Be) production rates. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios (proxy of atmospheric 10Be production) from oceanic cores therefore complete the classical information derived from relative paleointensity (RPI) records. This study presents new authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio results obtained from cores MD05‐2920 and MD05‐2930 collected in the west equatorial Pacific Ocean. Be ratios from cores MD05‐2920, MD05‐2930 and MD90‐0961 have been stacked and averaged. Variations of the authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio are analyzed and compared with the geomagnetic dipole low series reported from global RPI stacks. The largest 10Be overproduction episodes are related to dipole field collapses (below a threshold of 2 × 1022 Am2) associated with the Brunhes/Matuyama reversal, the Laschamp (41 ka) excursion, and the Iceland Basin event (190 ka). Other significant 10Be production peaks are correlated to geomagnetic excursions reported in literature. The record was then calibrated by using absolute dipole moment values drawn from the Geomagia and Pint paleointensity value databases. The 10Be‐derived geomagnetic dipole moment record, independent from sedimentary paleomagnetic data, covers the Brunhes‐Matuyama transition and the whole Brunhes Chron. It provides new and complementary data on the amplitude and timing of millennial‐scale geomagnetic dipole moment variations and particularly on dipole moment collapses triggering polarity instabilities. PMID:28163989

  3. Authigenic (10)Be/(9)Be ratio signatures of the cosmogenic nuclide production linked to geomagnetic dipole moment variation since the Brunhes/Matuyama boundary.

    PubMed

    Simon, Quentin; Thouveny, Nicolas; Bourlès, Didier L; Valet, Jean-Pierre; Bassinot, Franck; Ménabréaz, Lucie; Guillou, Valéry; Choy, Sandrine; Beaufort, Luc

    2016-11-01

    Geomagnetic dipole moment variations associated with polarity reversals and excursions are expressed by large changes of the cosmogenic nuclide beryllium-10 ((10)Be) production rates. Authigenic (10)Be/(9)Be ratios (proxy of atmospheric (10)Be production) from oceanic cores therefore complete the classical information derived from relative paleointensity (RPI) records. This study presents new authigenic (10)Be/(9)Be ratio results obtained from cores MD05-2920 and MD05-2930 collected in the west equatorial Pacific Ocean. Be ratios from cores MD05-2920, MD05-2930 and MD90-0961 have been stacked and averaged. Variations of the authigenic (10)Be/(9)Be ratio are analyzed and compared with the geomagnetic dipole low series reported from global RPI stacks. The largest (10)Be overproduction episodes are related to dipole field collapses (below a threshold of 2 × 10(22) Am(2)) associated with the Brunhes/Matuyama reversal, the Laschamp (41 ka) excursion, and the Iceland Basin event (190 ka). Other significant (10)Be production peaks are correlated to geomagnetic excursions reported in literature. The record was then calibrated by using absolute dipole moment values drawn from the Geomagia and Pint paleointensity value databases. The (10)Be-derived geomagnetic dipole moment record, independent from sedimentary paleomagnetic data, covers the Brunhes-Matuyama transition and the whole Brunhes Chron. It provides new and complementary data on the amplitude and timing of millennial-scale geomagnetic dipole moment variations and particularly on dipole moment collapses triggering polarity instabilities.

  4. High-resolution paleomagnetic secular variations and relative paleointensity since the Late Pleistocene in southern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PASADO Science Team Lisé-Pronovost, Agathe; St-Onge, Guillaume; Gogorza, Claudia; Haberzettl, Torsten; Preda, Michel; Kliem, Pierre; Francus, Pierre; Zolitschka, Bernd

    2013-07-01

    Paleomagnetic inclination, declination and relative paleointensity were reconstructed from the sediments of Laguna Potrok Aike in the framework of the International Continental scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) Potrok Aike maar lake Sediment Archive Drilling prOject (PASADO). Here we present the u-channel-based full vector paleomagnetic field reconstruction since 51.2 ka cal BP. The relative paleointensity proxy (RPI) was built by normalising the natural remanent magnetisation with the anhysteretic remanent magnetisation using the average ratio at 4 demagnetisation steps part of the ChRM interval (NRM/ARM10-40 mT). A grain size influence on the RPI was removed using a correction based on the linear relationship between the RPI and the median destructive field of the natural remanent magnetisation (MDFNRM). The new record is compared with other lacustrine and marine records and stacks from the mid- to high-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere, revealing consistent millennial-scale variability, the identification of the Laschamp and possibly the Mono Lake geomagnetic excursions, and a direction swing possibly associated to the Hilina Pali excursion at 20 ka cal BP. Nonetheless, a global-scale comparison with other high-resolution records located on the opposite side of the Earth and with various dipole field references hint at a different behaviour of the geomagnetic field around southern South America at 46 ka cal BP.

  5. Restoration project of geomagnetic survey in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlakovs, J.; Lembere, I.

    2003-04-01

    THE RESTORATION PROJECT OF GEOMAGNETIC SURVEY IN LATVIA J. Burlakovs, I. Lembere State Land Service of Latvia, Geodesy Board juris.burlakovs@gp.vzd.gov.lv / Fax: +371-7612736 The aim of geomagnetic survey measurements is to study the geomagnetic field at global, regional as well as local scales. To determine secular changes of the geomagnetic field it is very important to do a lot of regular field work. Recalculation and comparison of measured data for corrections must be made using the observatory or magnetic station data collected nearby the investigated area in the real-time. Field geomagnetic survey measurements in Latvia have not been made since 1991. The State Land Service of Latvia, the Geodesy Board plans to restart such kind of measurements in Latvia. The repeat station network must be renewed, regular magnetic declination, inclination and total field intensity data must be gathered, compared with the observatory data and secular changes of the geomagnetic field discovered. It is also possible to do regional correlations for data to determine future trends of the geomagnetic field changes. The detection of geomagnetic anomalies and the reason of the existence of those at particular territories could be made. Such kind of measurements demands the highest accuracy and therefore is necessary to cooperate with geomagnetic research network groups in neighbouring areas - Estonia, Finland and Poland, where permanent magnetic stations are situated. One permanent magnetic station also could be established in Latvia to do permanent recordings of geomagnetic field components, which give the possibility to do regional corrections for separate measurement recordings in the field. Geomagnetic field studies are important for cartography, navigational and military needs, also it is possible to use this information together with geological and geophysical data to create and specify the geological model for the territory. In future Latvia must participate within the

  6. Geomagnetic control of the midlatitude foF1 and foF2 long-term variations: Recent observations in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, L.; Mikhailov, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    A new very simple method, allowing an easy control, has been applied to extract long-term (11 year) δfoF2 11y and δfoF1 11y variations from June foF2 and foF1 monthly median observations at European Slough/Chilton and Juliusruh stations, including recent data until 2015. The aim of the analysis was to check the validity of the geomagnetic control of foF2 and foF1 long-term variations in the 21st century with the main accent on the period including the last deep solar minimum in 2008-2009. The geomagnetic control was shown to be valid. Moreover, the dependence on geomagnetic activity has become more pronounced and explicit after 1990. A simultaneous analysis of foF2 and foF1 long-term variations improves the reliability of the obtained conclusions and helps understand the physical mechanism of these variations. Due to common neutral composition and the similarity of photochemical processes noontime foF2 and foF1 demonstrate similar long-term variations: the correlation coefficient between δfoF2 11y and δfoF1 11y is 0.834 at Slough/Chilton and 0.884 at Juliusruh with the 99% confidence level according to Fisher's F criterion. Midnight long-term δfoF2 11y variations also manifest a pronounced dependence on Ap11y which may be interpreted in the framework of the geomagnetic control concept.

  7. The International Geomagnetic Reference Field, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rukstales, Kenneth S.; Love, Jeffrey J.

    2007-01-01

    This is a set of five world charts showing the declination, inclination, horizontal intensity, vertical component, and total intensity of the Earth's magnetic field at mean sea level at the beginning of 2005. The charts are based on the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) main model for 2005 and secular change model for 2005-2010. The IGRF is referenced to the World Geodetic System 1984 ellipsoid. Additional information about the USGS geomagnetism program is available at: http://geomag.usgs.gov/

  8. Geomagnetic field variations during the last 400 kyr in the western equatorial Pacific: Paleointensity-inclination correlation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, T.; Kanamatsu, T.; Mizuno, S.; Hokanishi, N.; Gaffar, E. Z.

    2008-12-01

    A paleomagnetic study was conducted on four piston cores newly obtained from the West Caroline Basin in the western equatorial Pacific in order to investigate variations in paleointensity and inclination during the last 400 kyr. An inclination-intensity correlation was previously reported in this region using giant piston cores, but the quality of the paleomagnetic data of the younger end, the last ca. 300 kyr, was needed to be checked because the upper part of the giant piston cores could suffer from perturbation by oversampling. Age control is based on the oxygen-isotope ratios for one core and inter-core correlation using relative paleointensity for other cores. The mean inclinations of the four cores show negative inclination anomalies ranging from -5.2 to -11.2 degree. The western equatorial Pacific is documented as a region of a large negative inclination anomalies, and the observed values are comparable to those expected from the time-averaged field (TAF) models [Johnson and Constable, 1997; Hatakeyama and Kono, 2002]. Stacked curves of paleointensity and inclination were constructed from the four cores. It was confirmed that geomagnetic variations on the order of 10 to 100 kyrs occur in inclination as well as paleointensity. A cross-correlation analysis showed that significant in-phase correlation occurs between intensity and inclination for periods longer than about 25 kyr, and power spectra of both paleointensity and inclination variations have peaks at ~100 kyr periods. The regional paleointensity stack with higher resolution than the Sint-800 stack [Guyodo and Valet, 1999] should be useful for paleointensity-assisted chronostratigraphy.

  9. Variations in the geomagnetic field strength in the 5th 3rd centuries BC in the eastern Mediterranean (according to narrowly dated ceramics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachasova, I. E.; Burakov, K. S.; Il'Ina, T. A.

    2008-06-01

    The magnetization of ceramics from the eastern Mediterranean dated within a short period (mostly shorter than ±20 years) has been studied, which made it possible to specify the geomagnetic field variations on the time interval 5th 3rd centuries BC. The 11-year time series of the geomagnetic field strength values has been constructed. The field strength changes have been considered, which indicated that the centennial variation with a characteristic time of ˜130 years (according to the obtained data) is observed on this time interval as well as during the last two millennia. The ceramic material from the Mayskaya Gora archeological site (Taman), the preparation succession of which was established based on the shape of pottery but the problem of absolute dating was not solved, has been dated.

  10. The variations of ionosphere critical frequency of E layer over the equatorial geomagnetic region in Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenpankho, Prasert; Ishii, Mamoru; Supnithi, Pornchai

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the values of the critical frequency of the ionospheric E layer, foE, obtained at Chumphon ionospheric observatory station, Thailand. For a declining phase of the solar cycle 23 during the year 2005-2008 and an inclining phase of the solar cycle 24 during the year 2009-2013, the foE data have been used to investigate the foE variations over the equatorial geomagnetic region in Southeast Asia. A comparison between the observation data and International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) 2012 model has also been investigated and studied. The results show that the foE obtained from IRI 2012 model underestimates foE from Chumphon station especially during the period of 7-11 am and after 6 pm for each day and all seasons. As the results combining with the previous investigations, we suggest that the underestimation of ionospheric foE by IRI 2012 model is helpful for the correction and improvement of IRI model in an equatorial Asia region.

  11. Time scale of FAC variations estimated by SWARM and a comparison with ground based geomagnetic and micro-barometric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyemori, T.; Nakanishi, K.; Aoyama, T.; Luhr, H.; Odagi, Y.; Yokoyama, Y.; Iguchi, M.; Sugitani, S.; Hashiguchi, H.; Utsugi, M.; Ono, T.; Sanoo, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The low altitude magnetic satellites such as Oersted, CHAMP or SWARM observed small scale magnetic fluctuations having period about 10 to 30 sec along their orbits in middle or low latitudes. The amplitude is usually less than a few nT and they were observed almost always on the dayside. Most of them are interpreted as the spatial structure of small scale FACs probably generated by atmospheric gravity waves (Nakanishi et al., 2014). From a statistical analysis of correlation coefficients between a pair of the SWARM satellites, Iyemori et al. (2015) estimated the temporal scale of FAC variation to be roughly about 200 secs for meridional magnetic components and about 340 secs for longitudinal, i.e., east-west component. Based on a spectral analysis of ground geomagnetic and micro-barometric observations, we found that the spectral peaks with similar periods, i.e., 200sec or 320-350sec tend to appear statistically. This tendency supports the idea that the source of the FACs is mainly the acoustic mode of gravity waves. We discuss the characteristics of the power spectra, in particular, those of micro-barometric observations.

  12. Evidence for rapid geomagnetic field intensity variations in Western Europe over the past 800 years from new French archeointensity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genevey, Agnès; Gallet, Yves; Rosen, Jean; Le Goff, Maxime

    2009-06-01

    The number of reliable archeointensity determinations obtained from Western Europe for the past millennium remains limited. Moreover, the large scatter between different datasets available is puzzling. The present study analyzed 31 new groups of baked clay (ceramic or brick) fragments sampled in France (29 groups) and in Belgium (2 groups). These groups contain several fragments collected from different artefacts and are precisely dated principally from historical constraints between the XIIIth and the XIXth centuries. Additionally, we re-evaluated 14 intensity values that we previously obtained from the same time period. The fragments were analyzed using two different thermal methods: (1) the "in field-zero field" (IZ) or the IZZI version of the classical Thellier and Thellier method and (2) the Triaxe protocol that involves high-temperature magnetization measurements. Data were corrected for the anisotropy of thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) and the dependence of TRM acquisition on the cooling rate was taken into account in the different protocols. Archeointensity data obtained on twin specimens sampled from the same fragment and using both experimental techniques generally show a good agreement (i.e. within 5%) at the fragment and at the site level. All retained site-level averaged intensity results (43 of 45 groups) have standard deviations of less than 5 µT. Furthermore, groups of approximately the same age have very consistent archeointensity. Altogether, the data presented herein recover a detailed and smoothed geomagnetic field intensity variation curve characterized by two peaks in intensity, the first during the second half of the XIVth century and the second around AD 1600, followed by a significant decreasing trend in intensity during most the XVIIth and XVIIIth centuries. This evolution does not satisfactorily fit with the expected intensity values for France derived from geomagnetic field models relying on a different evolution of the axial dipole

  13. Holocene Geomagnetic Change in the Northern North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoner, J. S.; Channell, J. E.; Mazaud, A.; Xuan, C.; Strano, S. E.; Olafsdottir, S.; Jennings, A. E.

    2012-12-01

    High-resolution and well-dated paleomagnetic records constrain the geomagnetism of the Holocene North Atlantic. These records comprise ultra-high resolution sediment records from lakes (Haukadalsvatn, Iceland) and from continental margins (MD99-2269, N Iceland shelf; MD99-2322, E. Greenland), and from high accumulating (>50 cm/kyr) deep-sea sediments from the Eirik Drift, Labrador Sea (IODP Site U1305). Similarities among these directional paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) records from very different environments imply that the records provide robust reconstructions of the paleo-geomagnetic field. Assuming that the age of magnetization is best defined by PSV in the highest sedimentation rate (>200 cm /kyr) records, allows us to place northern North Atlantic PSV and relative paleointensity (RPI) into a regional context. Northern North Atlantic PSV and RPI are more consistent with European than North American records, and the evolution of virtual geomagnetic poles (VGP) are temporally and longitudinally similar too global reconstructions, though with much larger latitudinal variations. The largest deviation from a geocentric axial dipole, in contrast to the usual assumption, is observed during times of highest field intensities in the North Atlantic and globally, while the highest rates of VGP change are associated with North Atlantic field intensity lows. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that PSV results from temporal oscillations of flux concentrations (lobes) at a few recurrent locations.

  14. Evaluation of models proposed for the 1991 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.

    1992-01-01

    The 1991 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) comprises a definitive main-field model for 1985.0, a main-field model for 1990.0, and a forecast secular-variation model for the period 1990-1995. The five 1985.0 main-field models and five 1990.0 main-field models that were proposed have been evaluated by comparing them with one another, with magnetic observatory data, and with Project MAGNET aerial survey data. The comparisons indicate that the main-field models proposed by IZMIRAN, and the secular-variation model proposed jointly by the British Geological Survey and the US Naval Oceanographic Office, should be assigned relatively lower weight in the derivation of the new IGRF models. -Author

  15. Effects of geomagnetic activity variations on the physiological and psychological state of functionally healthy humans: Some results of Azerbaijani studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayev, Elchin S.; Allahverdiyeva, Aysel A.

    There are collaborative and cross-disciplinary space weather studies in the Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences conducted with purposes of revealing possible effects of solar, geomagnetic and cosmic ray variability on certain technological, biological and ecological systems. This paper describes some results of the experimental studies of influence of the periodical and aperiodical changes of geomagnetic activity upon human brain, human health and psycho-emotional state. It also covers the conclusions of studies on influence of violent solar events and severe geomagnetic storms of the solar cycle 23 on the mentioned systems in middle-latitude location. It is experimentally established that weak and moderate geomagnetic storms do not cause significant changes in the brain's bioelectrical activity and exert only stimulating influence while severe disturbances of geomagnetic conditions cause negative influence, seriously disintegrate brain's functionality, activate braking processes and amplify the negative emotional background of an individual. It is concluded that geomagnetic disturbances affect mainly emotional and vegetative spheres of human beings while characteristics reflecting personality properties do not undergo significant changes.

  16. Intensity variation of the geomagnetic field in Mesoamerica during the last 3500 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, J.; Gogichaisvili, A.

    2009-05-01

    After Nagata's and Bucha's pioneering works in Mesoamerica in the 60th's and 70th's a gap in archeointensity studies in the region seems to be opened, in spite of the abundant well known archeological vestiges available in Mexico. Aimed to improve the insipient reference curve for Mesoamerica, and to contribute to the global intensity database, we present latest archeointensity determinations obtained from oldest Western Mesoamerican archaeological deposits, as well as from pre-Columbian Central and Eastern Mexican archaeological sites. Although still not enough in number to define a variation curve for the region, they outline a tendency that differs to that of model predictions based on previous data.

  17. Review: geological and experimental evidence for secular variation in seawater Mg/Ca (calcite-aragonite seas) and its effects on marine biological calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, J. B.

    2010-09-01

    Synchronized transitions in the polymorph mineralogy of the major reef-building and sediment-producing calcareous marine organisms and abiotic CaCO3 precipitates (ooids, marine cements) throughout Phanerozoic time are believed to have been caused by tectonically induced variations in the Mg/Ca ratio of seawater (molar Mg/Ca>2="aragonite seas", <2="calcite seas"). Here, I assess the geological evidence in support of secular variation in seawater Mg/Ca and its effects on marine calcifiers, and review a series of recent experiments that investigate the effects of seawater Mg/Ca (1.0-5.2) on extant representatives of calcifying taxa that have experienced variations in this ionic ratio of seawater throughout the geologic past. Secular variation in seawater Mg/Ca is supported by synchronized secular variations in (1) the ionic composition of fluid inclusions in primary marine halite, (2) the mineralogies of late stage marine evaporites, abiogenic carbonates, and reef- and sediment-forming marine calcifiers, (3) the Mg/Ca ratios of fossil echinoderms, molluscs, rugose corals, and abiogenic carbonates, (4) global rates of tectonism that drive the exchange of Mg2+ and Ca2+ along zones of ocean crust production, and (5) additional proxies of seawater Mg/Ca including Sr/Mg ratios of abiogenic carbonates, Sr/Ca ratios of biogenic carbonates, and Br concentrations in marine halite. Laboratory experiments have revealed that aragonite-secreting bryopsidalean algae and scleractinian corals and calcite-secreting coccolithophores exhibit higher rates of calcification and growth in experimental seawaters formulated with seawater Mg/Ca ratios that favor their skeletal mineral. These results support the assertion that seawater Mg/Ca played an important role in determining which hypercalcifying marine organisms were the major reef-builders and sediment-producers throughout Earth history. The observation that primary production increased along with calcification within the bryopsidalean

  18. Storm-time variation of the horizontal and vertical components of the geomagnetic fields and rate of induction at different latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falayi, E. O.; Oyebanjo, O. A.; Omotosho, T. V.; Okusanya, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents the hourly mean variation of horizontal (H) and vertical (Z) components of the geomagnetic field and the rate of induction ΔH/ΔZ at different latitudes during magnetic storm of 20 March 2001 and 1 October 2001. The results of the analysis revealed that at high latitude stations greater than 60°, the reduction in ΔH component was noticed after the noon time while other stations less than 60° experienced reduction of H in the morning time during the geomagnetic storm. Large amplitude of ΔH and ΔZ were exhibited during the daytime over the equatorial zone, the amplitude decreases from mid latitudes to the dip equator during the nighttime. The daytime enhancement of ΔH at AAE, BAN and MBO suggest the presence of a strong eastward directed current which comes under the influence of electrojet. There were strong positive and negative correlations between ring current (DR) and horizontal component of the magnetic field ΔH. The effect of rate of induction is more significant at high latitudes than lower latitudes, during the geomagnetic storm. More enhancement in rate of induction occurred at nighttime than daytime. This result may be from other sources other than the ionosphere that is magnetospheric process significantly contributes toward the variation of induction.

  19. Paleomagnetism and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of the Plio-Pleistocene Boring Volcanic Field: Implications for the geomagnetic polarity time scale and paleosecular variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagstrum, Jonathan T.; Fleck, Robert J.; Evarts, Russell C.; Calvert, Andrew T.

    2017-01-01

    Paleomagnetic directions and 40Ar/39Ar ages have been determined for samples of lava flows from the same outcrops, where possible, for 84 eruptive units ranging in age from 3200 ka to 60 ka within the Boring Volcanic Field (BVF) of the Pacific Northwest, USA. This study expands upon our previous results for the BVF, and compares the combined results with the current geomagnetic polarity time scale (GPTS). Lava flows with transitional directions were found within the BVF at the Matuyama-Brunhes and Jaramillo-Matuyama polarity boundaries, and replicate ages corresponding to these and other boundaries have been newly ascertained. Although the BVF data generally agree with GPTS chronozone boundaries, they indicate that onset of the Gauss-Matuyama transition and Olduvai subchron occurred significantly earlier than given in the current time scale calibration. Additional comparisons show that the BVF results are consistent with recent statistical models of geomagnetic paleosecular variation.

  20. Narrow Scale Flow and a Weak Field by the Top of Earth's Core: Evidence from Orsted, Magsat and Secular Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2004-01-01

    As Earth's main magnetic field weakens, our magnetic shield against the onslaught of the solar wind thins. And the field strength needed to fend off battering by solar coronal mass ejections is decreasing, just when the delicate complexity of modem, vulnerable, electro-technological systems is increasing at an unprecedented rate. Recently, a working group of distinguished scientist from across the nation has asked NASA's Solid Earth and Natural Hazards program a key question: What are the dynamics of Earth s magnetic field and its interactions with the Earth system? Paleomagnetic studies of crustal rocks magnetized in the geologic past reveal that polarity reversals have occurred many times during Earth s history. Networked super-computer simulations of core field and flow, including effects of gravitational, pressure, rotational Coriolis, magnetic and viscous forces, suggest how this might happen in detail. And space-based measurements of the real, time-varying magnetic field help constrain estimates of the speed and direction of fluid iron flowing near the top of the core and enable tests of some hypotheses about such flow. Now scientists at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center have developed and applied methods to test the hypotheses of narrow scale flow and of a dynamically weak magnetic field near the top of Earth s core. Using two completely different methods, C. V. Voorhies has shown these hypotheses lead to specific theoretical forms for the "spectrum" of Earth s main magnetic field and the spectrum of its rate of change. Much as solar physicists use a prism to separate sunlight into its spectrum, from long wavelength red to short wavelength blue light, geophysicists use a digital prism, spherical harmonic analysis, to separate the measured geomagnetic field into its spectrum, from long to short wavelength fields. They do this for the rate of change of the field as well.

  1. Combined palaeomagnetic secular variation and petrophysical records to time-constrain geological and hazardous events: An example from the eastern Tyrrhenian Sea over the last 120 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, Marina; Liddicoat, Joseph; Budillon, Francesca; Incoronato, Alberto; Coe, Robert S.; Insinga, Donatella D.; Cassata, William S.; Lubritto, Carmine; Angelino, Antimo; Tamburrino, Stella

    2014-02-01

    Long-term change of Earth's magnetic field (palaeomagnetic secular variation, PSV) during much of the last approximately 120 ka was recorded in cored sediment from the slope margin of the eastern Tyrrhenian Sea. The PSV record has been correlated to master curves of global palaeomagnetic field intensity and PSV records for western Europe. Tephrochronology and radiometric dating (14C and 40Ar/39Ar) have also been used to constrain the age of the PSV record. The combination of the new data with prior PSV and petrophysical data from the area provides a chronological framework for geological events such as large-scale submarine slumps, stratigraphic gaps and short-term changes in deposition rate on the continental margin. These latter changes are linked to the combined action of relative sea-level oscillations, climate events, and consequent variations in land exposure through time. Moreover, new data concerning the thickness and dispersal of Campanian Plain pyroclastic deposits in the marine setting enable volcanic-hazard evaluation. Finally, a pyroclastic deposit (tephra X-6) found offshore in the Southern Campanian marine environment was 40Ar/39Ar dated for the first time at 108.9 ± 1.8 ka BP.

  2. Long periods (1 -10 mHz) geomagnetic pulsations variation with solar cycle in South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigon Silva, Willian; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Guimarães Dutra, Severino Luiz; Babulal Trivedi, Nalin; Claudir da Silva, Andirlei; Souza Savian, Fernando; Ronan Coelho Stekel, Tardelli; de Siqueira, Josemar; Espindola Antunes, Cassio

    The occurrence and intensity of the geomagnetic pulsations Pc-5 (2-7 mHz) and its relationship with the solar cycle in the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly -SAMA is presented. The study of geomagnetic pulsations is important to help the understanding of the physical processes that occurs in the magnetosphere region and help to predict geomagnetic storms. The fluxgate mag-netometers H, D and Z, three axis geomagnetic field data from the Southern Space Observatory -SSO/CRS/INPE -MCT, São Martinho da Serra (29.42° S, 53.87° W, 480m a.s.l.), RS, Brasil, a were analyzed and correlated with the solar wind parameters (speed, density and temperature) from the ACE and SOHO satellites. A digital filtering to enhance the 2-7 mHz geomagnetic pulsations was used. Five quiet days and five perturbed days in the solar minimum and in the solar maximum were selected for this analysis. The days were chosen based on the IAGA definition and on the Bartels Musical Diagrams (Kp index) for 2001 (solar maximum) and 2008 (solar minimum). The biggest Pc-5 amplitude averages differences between the H-component is 78,35 nT for the perturbed days and 1,60nT for the quiet days during the solar maximum. For perturbed days the average amplitude during the solar minimum is 8,32 nT, confirming a direct solar cycle influence in the geomagnetic pulsations intensity for long periods.

  3. Material circulation model including chemical differentiation within the mantle and secular variation of temperature and composition of the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiya, Tsuyoshi

    2004-08-01

    indicates that the upper mantle had higher FeO content (10 wt.%), and that the FeO content was constant until early Proterozoic, and then decreased. Segregation of iron grains from subducted oceanic crust during slab penetration into the lower mantle is plausible to decrease the FeO content in the mantle. If the produced metallic iron sinks and accumulates on the core, the metallic iron layer would be about 57 km thick. The potential mantle temperature of the upper mantle was about 1480 °C in the Archean and was hotter by ca. 150-200 °C than the modern mantle. The temperature decreased not monotonously but episodically. In addition, recent ultra-high pressure experiments presumed chemical differentiation within the mantle, dehydration or slab melting of subducted oceanic crust beneath a subduction zone, segregation of iron grains from slab materials during slab penetration [Science 273 (1996) 1522], and partial melting of subducted oceanic crust on the core-mantle boundary [Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. (2002)]. This work proposes a global material circulation model, which includes three chemical differentiations within the mantle and the secular change of temperature and composition of the mantle.

  4. Measurements of the vertical profile, diurnal variation, and secular change of ClO in the stratosphere over Thule, Greenland, February-March, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezafra, Robert L.; Emmons, Louisa K.; Reeves, John M.; Shindell, Drew T.

    1994-01-01

    We report observations of stratospheric chlorine monoxide over the altitude range approx. 16 to 50 km at Thule, Greenland from Feb. 8 to Mar. 24, 1992. A new, more sensitive ground-based mm-wave spectrometer was employed for these measurements, similar in principle to that used earlier for the discovery of low altitude ClO in the Antarctic springtime. In this report, we discuss different aspects of vertical distribution, secular trends, and diurnal variation of ClO in the Arctic stratosphere, based on a preliminary analysis of our Thule data. We see no evidence for large (approx. 1.2-1.5 ppb) amounts of ClO in the lower stratosphere at any time during February or March, in agreement with UARS-MLS findings for this period, and in marked contrast to findings reported for the Arctic in January. We have some evidence for small enhancements (approx. 0.2-0.5 ppb) in the 18-30 km range in late February-early March, which might be associated with volcanic aerosol, rather than PSC, processing.

  5. Dynamics of the properties of steppe paleosols of the Sarmatian time (2nd century BC-4th century AD) in relation to secular variations in climatic humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkin, V. A.; Zolotareva, B. N.; Demkina, T. S.; Khomutova, T. E.; Kashirskaya, N. N.; El'Tsov, M. V.; Udal'Tsov, S. N.

    2012-02-01

    Paleosols buried under kurgans of the Early (2nd-1st centuries BC), Middle (1st-2nd centuries AD) and Late (2nd-IV centuries AD) Sarmatian epochs were studied in dry steppes and desert steppes of the Lower Volga region (the Privolzhskaya and Ergeni Uplands and the Caspian Lowland). It was found that temporal variations in the morphological, chemical, microbiological, and magnetic properties of the paleosols in the interval of 2200-1600 BP were characterized by the cyclic pattern related to secular dynamics of climatic humidity with changes in the mean annual precipitation of ±30-50 mm. These climate changes did not transform chestnut paleosols and paleosolonetzes at the type or subtype taxonomic levels. However, they led to certain changes in the humus, carbonate, and salt profiles of the soils; in the character of solonetzic horizon B1; and in the state of microbial communities. According to these data, the Sarmatian time was characterized by alternation of micropluvial and microarid stages lasting fro about 100-200 years. In particular, the stages of humidization were observed in the 1st century BC-1st century AD and in the 4th century AD; the most arid conditions were observed in the second half of the 2nd and the first half of the 3rd century AD.

  6. Dynamic techniques for studies of secular variations in position from ranging to satellites. [using laser range measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Kolenkiewicz, R.; Agreen, R. W.; Dunn, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Satellite laser range measurements were applied to the study of latitude variation arising from polar motion, and the solid-earth and ocean tidal distortion of the earth's gravity field. Experiments involving two laser tracking stations were conducted. The relative location of one station with respect to the other was determined by performing simultaneous range measurements to a satellite from two stations several hundred kilometers apart. The application of this technique to the San Andreas Fault Experiment in California is discussed. Future capabilities of spacecraft equipped with laser retroreflectors include: (1) determination of the product of the earth's mass and gravitational constant; (2) measurement of crustal and tectonic motions; (3) determination of the elastic response of the solid-earth tidal forces; (4) measurement of the amplitudes and phase of certain components of the ocean tides; and (5) self-monitoring of the latitude and height variations of the tracking station.

  7. Geomagnetism applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, Wallace H.

    1995-01-01

    The social uses of geomagnetism include the physics of the space environment, satellite damage, pipeline corrosion, electric power-grid failure, communication interference, global positioning disruption, mineral-resource detection, interpretation of the Earth's formation and structure, navigation, weather, and magnetoreception in organisms. The need for continuing observations of the geomagnetic field, together with careful archiving of these records and mechanisms for dissemination of these data, is emphasized.

  8. Assessment of models proposed for the 1985 revision of the international geomagnetic reference field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.; Zunde, A.K.

    1987-01-01

    Geomagnetic measurements from land, marine and aerial surveys conducted in the years 1945-1964 were used to test the 14 models proposed as additions, for that period, to the series of definitive geomagnetic reference field (DGRF) models. Overall, NASA's 'SFAS' models and the BGS (British Geological Survey) models agree best with these data. Comparisons of the two proposed definitive main-field models for 1980.0, with each other and with the existing IGRF 1980 main-field model, show mostly close agreement, with the greatest absolute differences (several tens of nanotesla) occurring in the region of Antarctica. Comparison of the the three proposed forecast secular-variation models for 1985-1990 with estimates of recent rates of change at 148 magnetic observatories shows that the IZMIRAN (U.S.S.R.) and USGS models are in closest agreement with these data. ?? 1987.

  9. Spatiotemporal characteristics of the geomagnetic diurnal variation anomalies prior to the 2011 Tohoku earthquake (Mw 9.0) and the possible coupling of multiple pre-earthquake phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Peng; Hattori, Katsumi; Huang, Qinghua; Hirooka, Shinji; Yoshino, Chie

    2016-11-01

    Xu et al. (2013) and Han et al. (2015) have reported unusual behaviors of geomagnetic diurnal variation (GDV) in the vertical component prior to the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku earthquake (Mw 9.0). To make a better understanding of this phenomenon, temporal-spatial analyses of GDV have been applied in this study. Geomagnetic data of long-term observations at 17 stations in Japan have been analyzed using the same method in Han et al. (2015). Ratios of diurnal variation range between the reference station KAK and the target stations have been computed. After removing seasonal variations, the 15-day backward running mean values of the ratios in the vertical component shows a clear anomaly exceeding the statistical threshold about 2 months before the mega event at both ESA and MIZ stations in the Tohoku Region. Locations of anomalies in spatial distribution show a good correlation with the epicenter of the Mw 9.0 earthquake. These spatiotemporal results are consistent with those obtained from other independent observations such as groundwater level and GPS displacements. The coupling of multiple pre-earthquake phenomena may help to understand the preparation process of a mega earthquake in the subduction zone.

  10. Evidence for a secular variation in the C-13/C-12 ratio of carbon implanted in lunar soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    A curve of delta(C-13) vs delta(N-15) for lunar soils and breccias shows that the previously recorded 30% change in delta(N-15) is associated with a change in delta(C-13). The correlation represents concurrent changes in the isotope ratios of both elements at their source, and does not result from maturation effects or nonselective sample contamination. A computation of the relative production rates of C-13 and N-15 shows that spallation reactions in the sun could produce the observed ratio of the delta(C-13) to delta (N-15) variations.

  11. Stochastic forecasting of the geomagnetic field from the COV-OBS.x1 geomagnetic field model, and candidate models for IGRF-12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillet, Nicolas; Barrois, Olivier; Finlay, Christopher C.

    2015-05-01

    We present the geomagnetic field model COV-OBS.x1, covering 1840 to 2020, from which have been derived candidate models for the IGRF-12. Towards the most recent epochs, it is primarily constrained by first differences of observatory annual means and measurements from the Oersted, Champ, and Swarm satellite missions. Stochastic information derived from the temporal spectra of geomagnetic series is used to construct the a priori model covariance matrix that complements the constraint brought by the data. This approach makes it possible the use of a posteriori model errors, for instance, to measure the `observations' uncertainties in data assimilation schemes for the study of the outer core dynamics. We also present and illustrate a stochastic algorithm designed to forecast the geomagnetic field. The radial field at the outer core surface is advected by core motions governed by an auto-regressive process of order 1. This particular choice is motivated by the slope observed for the power spectral density of geomagnetic series. Accounting for time-correlated model errors (subgrid processes associated with the unresolved magnetic field) is made possible thanks to the use of an augmented state ensemble Kalman filter algorithm. We show that the envelope of forecasts includes the observed secular variation of the geomagnetic field over 5-year intervals, even in the case of rapid changes. In a purpose of testing hypotheses about the core dynamics, this prototype method could be implemented to build the `state zero' of the ability to forecast the geomagnetic field, by measuring what can be predicted when no deterministic physics is incorporated into the dynamical model.

  12. Plio-Pleistocene paleomagnetic secular variation and time-averaged field: Ruiz-Tolima volcanic chain, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Duque, A.; Mejia, V.; Opdyke, N. D.; Huang, K.; Rosales-Rivera, A.

    2016-02-01

    Paleomagnetic results obtained from 47 Plio-Pleistocene volcanic flows from the Ruiz-Tolima Volcanic Chain (Colombia) are presented. The mean direction of magnetization among these flows, which comprise normal (n = 43) and reversed (n = 4) polarities, is Dec = 1.8°, Inc = 3.2°, α95 = 5.0°, and κ = 18.4. This direction of magnetization coincides with GAD plus a small persistent axial quadrupolar component (around 5%) at the site-average latitude (4.93°). This agreement is robust after applying several selection criteria (α95 < 10º α95 < 5.5º polarities: normal, reversed, and tentatively transitional). The data are in agreement with Model G proposed by McElhinny and McFadden (1997) and the fit is improved when sites tentatively identified as transitional (two that otherwise have normal polarity) are excluded from the calculations. Compliance observed with the above mentioned time-averaged field and paleosecular variation models, is also observed for many recent similar studies from low latitudes, with the exception of results from Galapagos Islands that coincide with GAD and tend to be near sided.

  13. The geomagnetic jerk of 1969 and the DGRFs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, D.; Cain, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Cubic spline fits to the DGRF/IGRF series indicate agreement with other analyses showing the 1969-1970 magnetic jerk in the h ??12 and g ??02 secular change coefficients, and agreement that the h ??11 term showed no sharp change. The variation of the g ??01 term is out of phase with other analyses indicating a likely error in its representation in the 1965-1975 interval. We recommend that future derivations of the 'definitive' geomagnetic reference models take into consideration the times of impulses or jerks so as to not be bound to a standard 5 year interval, and otherwise to make more considered analyses before adopting sets of coefficients. ?? 1987.

  14. Variations in the geomagnetic and gravitational background associated with two strong earthquakes of the May 2012 sequence in the Po Valley Plain (Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straser, Valentino

    2013-04-01

    Reawakening of seismic activity in the Emilian Po Valley Plain (Italy) resulted in 2,492 earthquakes over five and a half months: 2,270 with M<3, 189 with a magnitude from 3.0<= M <4.0, 27 con 4.0<= M <5.0, and 7 M>= 7. The mainshock was recorded during the night of 20 May 2012, at 04:03:52 Italian time (02:03:52 UTC) with epicentre in Finale Emilia, at a depth of 6.3km, by the Italian National Institute of Geophysics and Vulcanology (INGV). A long sequence of telluric shocks occurred in the same seismic district in the areas between the provinces of Modena, Ferrara, Mantua, Reggio Emilia, Bologna and Rovigo. In addition to the general devastation plus damage to civil and industrial buildings and the historical heritage, the earthquakes resulted in a total of 27 victims. Concomitant with the two strongest quakes, recorded on 20 and 29 May 2012, respectively, as in the case of others, variations were noted in the geomagnetic background by the LTPA monitoring station in Rome (Italy). The geomagnetic background variations were associated with the appearance of radio-anomalies in a frequency range from 0.1 to 3.0Hz, as well as gravimetric variations found around 60km from the epicentre. The peak accelerations, detected in correspondence with the strongest shocks on 20 and 29 May 2012, were respectively 0.31g and 0.29g. The appearance of the radio-anomalies coincided, from a temporal point of view, with average gravimetric variations of approximately 30µGal around the epicentre areas, concurrent with the mainshock. In this study, both the appearance of radio-anomalies and the gravitational variations recorded before strong earthquakes were related to the dynamics of the fault and a progressive reduction in granulometry in the core of the fracture, until the point of dislocation was reached. The intense friction in the fault and the damping factors produced before the shock are hypothesized as being proportional to the number of radio-anomalies measured. The radio

  15. Secular Evolution of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Knapen, Johan H.

    2013-10-01

    Preface; 1. Secular evolution in disk galaxies John Kormendy; 2. Galaxy morphology Ronald J. Buta; 3. Dynamics of secular evolution James Binney; 4. Bars and secular evolution in disk galaxies: theoretical input E. Athanassoula; 5. Stellar populations Reynier F. Peletier; 6. Star formation rate indicators Daniela Calzetti; 7. The evolving interstellar medium Jacqueline van Gorkom; 8. Evolution of star formation and gas Nick Z. Scoville; 9. Cosmological evolution of galaxies Isaac Shlosman.

  16. Effect of Cross-Correlation on Geomagnetic Forecast Accuracies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia; Wei, Zigang; Tangborn, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Surface geomagnetic observation can determine up to degree L = 14 time-varying spherical harmonic coefficients of the poloidal magnetic field. Assimilation of these coefficients to numerical dynamo simulation could help us understand better the dynamical processes in the Earth's outer core, and to provide more accurate forecast of geomagnetic secular variations (SV). In our previous assimilation studies, only the poloidal magnetic field in the core is corrected by the observations in the analysis. Unobservable core state variables (the toroidal magnetic field and the core velocity field) are corrected via the dynamical equations of the geodynamo. Our assimilation experiments show that the assimilated core state converges near the CMB, implying that the dynamo state is strongly constrained by surface geomagnetic observations, and is pulled closer to the truth by the data. We are now carrying out an ensemble of assimilation runs with 1000 years of geomagnetic and archeo/paleo magnetic record. In these runs the cross correlation between the toroidal and the poloidal magnetic fields is incorporated into the analysis. This correlation is derived from the physical boundary conditions of the toroidal field at the core-mantle boundary (CMB). The assimilation results are then compared with those of the ensemble runs without the cross-correlation, aiming at understanding two fundamental issues: the effect of the crosscorrelation on (1) the convergence of the core state, and (2) the SV prediction accuracies. The constrained dynamo solutions will provide valuable insights on interpreting the observed SV, e.g. the near-equator magnetic flux patches, the core-mantle interactions, and possibly other geodynamic observables.

  17. A full-vector paleomagnetic secular variation record (PSV) from Pyramid Lake (Nevada) from 47-17 ka: Evidence for the successive Mono Lake and Laschamp Excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, S.; Benson, L.; Negrini, R.; Liddicoat, J.; Mensing, S.

    2017-01-01

    We have carried out a paleomagnetic study of late-Pleistocene Pyramid Lake core PLC08-1 (1680 cm). Our goals were to develop a full-vector paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) record for the core, establish a paleomagnetic chronostratigraphy for the lake based on correlation of the PSV record to other dated PSV records in the region, compare that chronostratigraphy with previously developed radiocarbon and ash chronologies, and search for evidence of the Mono Lake Excursion and Laschamp Excursion. We have recovered a full-vector PSV record (inclination, declination, relative paleointensity) for the interval 47 ka to 17 ka. Twenty radiocarbon dates and four dated ashes provided a chronostratigraphic framework for this record. We have also used the link between our PSV and other dated PSV records to develop an independent PSV chronostratigraphy for the core. The PSV chronostratigraphy is not significantly different from that estimated by the radiocarbon and ash chronologies. We note the existence of two intervals of anomalous paleomagnetic directions. The younger interval, centered at 34.1 ± 0.4 ka, has the characteristic vector component features of the Mono Lake Excursion. The older interval, centered at 40.9 ± 0.5 ka, has the characteristic paleomagnetic signature of the Laschamp Excursion. This is the first time both intervals of excursional behavior have been found in the same sediment record from the western USA. Our new PSV record also corroborates previous estimates of the Mono Lake Excursion directional field behavior (Liddicoat and Coe, 1979) and age (Benson et al., 2003).

  18. Geodynamo simulations: tools to understand and forecast the geomagnetic field evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, Julien

    2016-04-01

    The past two decades have seen an extensive development of numerical geodynamo simulations as tools to understand the mechanisms through which the magnetic field of internal origin of our planet is generated. Though these are still run at parameter regimes far from that of the Earth's core, the similarity of their output with the various observables of the field, secular variation, and underlying core flows has strengthened the prospect to use these simulations as analysis and forecasting tools for the geomagnetic field evolution. In this presentation, I will report on recent progress in geomagnetic data assimilation, an emerging discipline which blends together the high-quality satellite data such as these obtained by the Swarm mission, and state-of-the art numerical geodynamo simulation with an Earth-like output. The outcome of data assimilation is an estimate of the internal geodynamo structure, which sheds light into the mechanisms currently responsible for the geomagnetic dipole decay and the extension of the South Atlantic geomagnetic anomaly. Starting from such estimates obtained at present, ensemble-based techniques akin to those used in meteorology can help to estimate how the present field will evolve in the future. For the next century, our operational forecasts predict a further dipole decay of about 1 microtesla at Earth's surface, together with a similar deepening and a westward motion of the South Atlantic anomaly.

  19. Authigenic 10Be/9Be Ratio Signatures of the Cosmogenic Nuclide Production Linked to Geomagnetic Dipole Moment Variation During and Since the Brunhes/Matuyama Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Q.; Thouveny, N.; Bourles, D. L.; Ménabréaz, L.; Valet, J. P.; Valery, G.; Choy, S.

    2015-12-01

    The atmospheric production rate of cosmogenic nuclides is linked to the geomagnetic dipole moment (GDM) by a non-linear inverse relationship. Large amplitude GDM variations associated with reversals and excursions can potentially be reconstructed using time variation of the cosmogenic beryllium-10 (10Be) production recorded in ocean sediments. Downcore profiles of authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios (proxy of atmospheric 10Be production) in oceanic cores provide independent and additional records of the evolution of the geomagnetic intensity and complete previous information derived from relative paleointensity (RPI). Here are presented new authigenic 10Be/9Be results obtained from cores MD05-2920 and from the top of core MD05-2930 collected in the West Equatorial Pacific Ocean. Completing data of Ménabréaz et al. (2012, 2014), these results provide the first continuous 10Be production rate sedimentary record covering the last 800 ka. Along these cores, authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio peaks are recorded - within methodological errors - at the stratigraphic level of RPI lows. High-resolution chronologies (δ18O-derived) lead to interpret these peaks as successive global 10Be overproduction events triggered by geomagnetic dipole lows present in the PISO-1500 and Sint-2000 stacks. The largest amplitude 10Be production enhancement is synchronous to the very large decrease of the dipole field associated with the last polarity reversal (772 ka). It is consistent in shape and duration with the peak recorded in core MD90-0961 from the Maldive area (Indian Ocean) (Valet et al. 2014). Two significant 10Be production enhancements are coeval with the Laschamp (41 ka) and Icelandic basin (190 ka) excursions, while 10Be production peaks of lower amplitude correlate to other recognized excursions such as the Blake (120 ka), Pringle-Falls (215 ka), Portuguese Margin (290 ka), Big Lost (540 ka) among others. This study provides new data on the amplitude and timing of dipole field variations

  20. The influence of El-Niño Southern Oscillation and Pacific Decadal Oscillation on secular rainfall variations in Hawai'i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, A. G.; Elison Timm, O.; Giambelluca, T. W.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale teleconnections, particularly the El-Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), have a strong influence on rainfall patterns in Hawai'i. Over the last century, we have observed statistically significant declines in rainfall across the state, and it is unknown whether these declines are due to changes in these natural large-scale variations in climate, or whether these downward trends can be explained by anthropogenic effects. To better aid managers and decision-makers, it is important to understand what is driving current trends. Here we use an empirical approach to study long-term trends in a geographically complex region and diverse climate. Using a time series of month-year rainfall maps for Hawai'i starting in January 1920 at 250 m resolution, an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis was performed to study the spatiotemporal variations and trend patterns. We further correlate the leading spatial and temporal components with ENSO and PDO indices, linear trends, and secular trends. More of the variability is contained in the first component in the winter (December-January-February) than in the summer (June-July-August), especially in the northern islands (Kaua'i and O'ahu) suggesting that natural climate variability has a stronger effect on the spatiotemporal rainfall patterns during the winter season than the summer season. Currently, independent efforts to downscale future climate projections for Hawai'i have produced different future outlooks for rainfall. In the absence of adequately designed control experiments with regional climate models, we propose evaluating differences between observed and projected trend patterns as an alternative criterion for measuring the significance and plausibility of future climate change projections. Our results show the difficulties of separating anthropogenic and natural rainfall trends, e.g., identifying spatial (and seasonal) patterns of the trends that are different from

  1. Geomagnetism and paleomagnetism 1979-1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, M.

    My function, in writing these notes, is to bring you up to date in Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism, in as painless a manner as possible—without tears, as the French language texts for tourists used to promise. In writing this account of progress in the past quadrennium, I must first acknowledge that it is a personal and subjective viewpoint;; another reporter would surely emphasize other developments. Yet, there is some virture in writing of things, about which one knows something, so I leave to future reporters the task of redresssing the balance in matters covered.At the outset, one very sad event must be recorded. On April 3, 1981, Sir Edward Bullard died. His published work alone marks him as one of the leaders of geomagnetism in our times. Yet his contribution was much greater; many an American geophysicist, as well as a whole generation of British colleagues, have felt the benefit of his perceptive advice on their research. To those who saw him in the last few months of his life, his courage in the face of his illness was a remarkable example of fortitude. It is by now well known that the definitive paper, which he wrote with Malin, on secular variation at London, was only completed immediately before his death. The transmittal letter had been typed, but death prevented him from signing it. Bullard returned in this final paper to a topic to which he had contributed much. In it, he notes the role of Halley, who first described the phenomenon of westward drift, to which Bullard gave a new numerical precision, two and a half centuries later. I seem to remember Bullard saying in a lecture years ago that, while the Newtons of this world seem other than mortal, Halley was a scientist whose life and acheivements could encourage one's own efforts. Bullard, like Halley, inspires and encourages us.

  2. Temporal variation of the arterial pressure in healthy young people and its relation to geomagnetic activity in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azcárate, T.; Mendoza, B.; Sánchez de la Peña, S.; Martínez, J. L.

    2012-11-01

    We present a study of the temporal behavior of the systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure for a sample of 51 normotensive, healthy volunteers, 18 men and 33 women with an average age of 19 years old in Mexico City, Mexico, during April and May, 2008. We divided the data by sex along the circadian rhythm. Three geomagnetic storms occurred during the studied time-span. The strongest one, a moderate storm, is attributed to a coronal hole border that reached the Earth. The ANOVA test applied to the strongest storm showed that even though we are dealing with a moderate geomagnetic storm, there are statistically significant responses of the blood pressure. The superposed epoch analysis during a three-day window around the strongest storm shows that on average the largest changes occurred for the SBP. Moreover, the SBP largest increases occurred two days before and one day after this storm, and women are the most sensitive group as they present larger SBP and DBP average changes than men. Finally, given the small size of the sample, we cannot generalize our results.

  3. Geomagnetic effects caused by rocket exhaust jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipko, Yuriy; Pashinin, Aleksandr; Khakhinov, Vitaliy; Rahmatulin, Ravil

    2016-09-01

    In the space experiment Radar-Progress, we have made 33 series of measurements of geomagnetic variations during ignitions of engines of Progress cargo spacecraft in low Earth orbit. We used magneto-measuring complexes, installed at observatories of the Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics of Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and magnetotelluric equipment of a mobile complex. We assumed that engine running can cause geomagnetic disturbances in flux tubes crossed by the spacecraft. When analyzing experimental data, we took into account space weather factors: solar wind parameters, total daily mid-latitude geomagnetic activity index Kp, geomagnetic auroral electrojet index AE, global geomagnetic activity. The empirical data we obtained indicate that 18 of the 33 series showed geomagnetic variations in various time ranges.

  4. Survey of Geomagnetic Observations Made in the Northern Sector of Russia and New Methods for Analysing Them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvishiani, Alexei; Lukianova, Renata; Soloviev, Anatoly; Khokhlov, Andrei

    2014-09-01

    An overview of the geomagnetic observations made in the northern part of Russia is presented from a historical perspective. Several stations were deployed on the territory of the former Soviet Union during the International Geophysical Year, 1957-1958, with the active participation and guidance of the Interagency Geophysical Committee which is inherited by the Geophysical Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences (GC RAS). In the 1990s, the majority of these stations, especially those in the remoter regions, were closed. Nowadays, the geomagnetic network, including the observatories of the INTERMAGNET program, has been restored. Examples of high-latitude geomagnetic variations in the Russian longitudinal sector are shown, and maps and trends of the secular variation over the territory of Russia presented. Particular attention is paid to the automated processing of data and to the analysis methods used. To process the growing amount of high-resolution geomagnetic data, sophisticated mathematical methods based on the fuzzy logic approach and new discrete mathematical analysis algorithms have been developed. The formal methods and algorithms for recognizing both artificial and natural disturbances in the magnetograms are described.

  5. Using an independent geochronology based on palaeomagnetic secular variation (PSV) and atmospheric Pb deposition to date Baltic Sea sediments and infer 14C reservoir age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lougheed, Bryan C.; Snowball, Ian; Moros, Matthias; Kabel, Karoline; Muscheler, Raimund; Virtasalo, Joonas J.; Wacker, Lukas

    2012-05-01

    Dating of sediment cores from the Baltic Sea has proven to be difficult due to uncertainties surrounding the 14C reservoir age and a scarcity of macrofossils suitable for dating. Here we present the results of multiple dating methods carried out on cores in the Gotland Deep area of the Baltic Sea. Particular emphasis is placed on the Littorina stage (8 ka ago to the present) of the Baltic Sea and possible changes in the 14C reservoir age of our dated samples. Three geochronological methods are used. Firstly, palaeomagnetic secular variations (PSV) are reconstructed, whereby ages are transferred to PSV features through comparison with varved lake sediment based PSV records. Secondly, lead (Pb) content and stable isotope analysis are used to identify past peaks in anthropogenic atmospheric Pb pollution. Lastly, 14C determinations were carried out on benthic foraminifera (Elphidium spec.) samples from the brackish Littorina stage of the Baltic Sea. Determinations carried out on smaller samples (as low as 4 μg C) employed an experimental, state-of-the-art method involving the direct measurement of CO2 from samples by a gas ion source without the need for a graphitisation step - the first time this method has been performed on foraminifera in an applied study. The PSV chronology, based on the uppermost Littorina stage sediments, produced ten age constraints between 6.29 and 1.29 cal ka BP, and the Pb depositional analysis produced two age constraints associated with the Medieval pollution peak. Analysis of PSV data shows that adequate directional data can be derived from both the present Littorina saline phase muds and Baltic Ice Lake stage varved glacial sediments. Ferrimagnetic iron sulphides, most likely authigenic greigite (Fe3S4), present in the intermediate Ancylus Lake freshwater stage sediments acquire a gyroremanent magnetisation during static alternating field (AF) demagnetisation, preventing the identification of a primary natural remanent magnetisation for

  6. Full-vector paleomagnetic secular variation records from latest quaternary sediments of Lake Malawi (10.0°S, 34.3°E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Steve; Platzman, Ellen; Johnson, Tom

    2016-07-01

    We have conducted a paleomagnetic study of Late Quaternary sediments from Lake Malawi, East Africa, in order to develop a high-resolution record of paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV). This study has recovered PSV records from two cores (3P, 6P) in northern Lake Malawi (10.0°S, 34.3°E). The PSV appears to be recorded in fine-grained detrital magnetite/titanomagnetite grains. Detailed af demagnetization of the natural remanence (NRM) shows that a distinctive characteristic remanence (ChRM) is demagnetized from ∼20 to 80 mT, which decreases simply toward the origin. The resulting directional PSV records for 3P and 6P are easily correlatable with 29 distinct inclination features and 29 declination features. The statistical character of the PSV in both cores is consistent with Holocene PSV noted at other Holocene equatorial sites. Radiocarbon dating of the cores is based on 18 independent radiocarbon dates and four dated stratigraphic horizons that can be correlated into each core. The final directional PSV time series cover the last 24,000 years with an average sediment accumulation rate of ∼30 cm/kyr. We have also developed a relative paleointensity estimate for these PSV records based on normalizing the NRM (after 20 mT af demagnetization) by the SIRM (after 20 mT af demagnetization). Changing sedimentation patterns complicate any attempt to develop a single paleointensity record for the entire core lengths. We have developed a relative paleointensity record for the last 6000 years that has 14 correlatable features including 5 notable peaks in intensity. Three of these peaks are synchronous with paleointensity highs farther north in SE Europe/SW Asia/Egypt but two of the peaks are at times of low paleointensity farther north. We interpret this to indicate that Lake Malawi (10°S) is at least partly under the influence of a different flux-regeneration region of the outer-core dynamo. A relative paleointensity record was also developed for ∼11,000-24,000 YBP

  7. Northern hemisphere mid-latitude geomagnetic anomaly revealed from Levantine Archaeomagnetic Compilation (LAC).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaar, R.; Tauxe, L.; Agnon, A.; Ben-Yosef, E.; Hassul, E.

    2015-12-01

    The rich archaeological heritage of Israel and nearby Levantine countries provides a unique opportunity for archaeomagnetic investigation in high resolution. Here we present a summary of our ongoing effort to reconstruct geomagnetic variations of the past several millennia in the Levant at decadal to millennial resolution. This effort at the Southern Levant, namely the "Levantine Archaeomagnetic Compilation" (LAC), presently consists of data from over 650 well-dated archaeological objects including pottery, slag, ovens, and furnaces. In this talk we review the methodological challenges in achieving a robust master secular variation curve with realistic error estimations from a large number of different datasets. We present the current status of the compilation, including the southern and western Levant LAC data (Israel, Cyprus, and Jordan) and other published north-eastern Levant data (Syria and southern Turkey), and outline the main findings emerging from these data. The main feature apparent from the new compilation is an extraordinary intensity high that developed over the Levant region during the first two millennia BCE. The climax of this event is a double peak intensity maximum starting at ca. 1000 BCE and ending at ca. 735 BCE, accompanied with at least two events of geomagnetic spikes. Paleomagnetic directions from this period demonstrate anomalies of up to 20 degrees far from the averaged GAD field. This leads us to postulate that the maximum in the intensity is a manifestation of an intense mid-latitude local positive geomagnetic anomaly that persisted for over two centuries.

  8. Geochemistry of Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle limestone, Oklahoma: Implications for diagenetic. delta. sup 18 O alteration and secular. delta. sup 13 C and sup 87 Sr/ sup 86 Sr variation

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Guoqiu; Land, L.S. )

    1991-10-01

    Isotopic analyses of 227 limestone samples from the Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle Group, Oklahoma, document slow secular changes in the chemistry of the limestones. From late Cambrian to early Ordovician, the {delta}{sup 18}O values of the limestones increase from {minus}10{per thousand} to {minus}7{per thousand} (PDB); {delta}{sup 13}C values decrease from 0{per thousand} to {minus}2{per thousand} (PDB); and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios decrease from 0.7091 to 0.7088. The light {delta}{sup 18}O values suggest that all Arbuckle limestones underwent diagenetic alteration, probably caused by meteoric water recharged during the development of the overlying, pre-middle Ordovician unconformity. The gradual {delta}{sup 18}O increase from late Cambrian to early Ordovician reflects reduced {sup 18}O depletion with decreasing burial temperature during alteration, although the presence of additional primary secular {delta}{sup 18}O variation cannot be ruled out. The {delta}{sup 13}C and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr variations, in accord with {delta}{sup 13}C and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr variations in the literature, represent primary secular variations. The variations indicate that the {delta}{sup 13}C value and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio of early Paleozoic surface seawater decreased from late Cambrian to early Ordovician. The {delta}{sup 13}C variation during this time period seems to correlate with sea-level variation. Specifically, during sea-level fall, an increase in the rate of oxidation of organic matter caused {sup 13}C depletion of inorganic bicarbonate in seawater. As a result, early Ordovician carbonates, probably deposited during the regression stage of the latest Precambrian to latest early Ordovician cycle, became {sup 13}C depleted, relative to late Cambrian carbonates. The decrease of seawater {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio from late Cambrian to early Ordovician may have resulted from decreased riverine Sr input caused by decreased rate of continental weathering.

  9. New Archaeointensity Result from Middle-Eastern China and Its Constraints on the Variation of the Geomagnetic Field during the last 6 kyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, S.; Jin, G.; Deng, C.; Tauxe, L.; Qin, H.; Pan, Y.; Zhu, R.

    2015-12-01

    Archaeomagnetic study is an effective way to understand the variation of the geomagnetic field over periods of hundreds to thousands of years. We have carried out archaeointensity studies on archaeological artifacts, including pottery fragments, bricks and baked clay, collected from several sites covering the middle to eastern part of China spanning the past ~6 kyr. We designed detailed rock magnetic and archaeointensity experiments in this study. Rock magnetic results indicate that the main magnetic carriers of these samples are stable magnetite or titanomagnetite with mainly fine particles of SD and SP. About 40% of the specimens in the paleointensity experiment pass the strict selection criteria and are considered to record robust intensity values. The virtual axial dipole moments (VADMs) of our sites range from ~2.5×1022 to ~15.8×1022 Am2. We record three low intensity values with VADMs of less than 3×1022 Am2, two of them comparable to the one reported by Cai et al. (2015) at ~3000 BCE while the other one comparable to those reported by Cai et al. (2014) at ~2200 BCE, which supply further evidence for the existence of 'DIPs' (decreases in paleoinetnsity) in China during the period of ~3000-2000 BCE. A high intensity value of ~16×1022 Am2 is recorded by our new data at ~1300 BCE, which may represent a new spike at this time period. The low and high values recorded by our new data update the six-fold variation between ~2200 BCE and ~1300 BCE discussed in Cai et al. (2014) to eight-fold, which may indicate a stronger geodynamic process during this period. Our new data are generally in good agreement with the published data in China, Japan and Korea at similar time periods, except the extreme low and high values discussed above, which will improve the Eastern Asian model greatly. The new data together with the published data suggest severe fluctuation of the geomagnetic field in Eastern Asia during the last 6 kyr. Vast quantities of reliable data are needed to

  10. Wavelet analysis of paleomagnetic data: 1. Characteristic average times (5 10 kyr) of variations in the geomagnetic field during and immediately before and after the Early Jaramillo reversal (Western Turkmenistan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurarii, G. Z.; Aleksyutin, M. V.; Ataev, N.

    2007-10-01

    Joint wavelet analysis of complete and downsampled series of paleomagnetic and petromagnetic characteristics of rocks in the Matuyama-Jaramillo transitional zone in the Adzhidere section is used to extract paleomagnetic data whose variations are associated with the geomagnetic field alone and data correlating with variations in petromagnetic parameters. It supposed that this correlation can be caused by an external factor affecting weak variations in the magnetic field and climatic changes reflected in the composition and amount of the ferromagnetic fraction in rocks. Preliminary data are obtained for the characteristic times of field variations at the time of accumulation of rocks in the transitional zone.

  11. Geomagnetic response to solar activity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mead, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    The relationship between solar activity and geomagnetic variations is discussed in the light of spacecraft data obtained during the last decade. The effects of centers of solar activity responsible for producing geomagnetic activity on earth are believed to be transmitted through the solar wind, and there is usually a delay of two or three days before the onset of magnetic activity. Attempts to make a one-to-one correspondence between specific solar events and specific magnetic storms, however, are usually unsuccessful, because of the complex and indirect processes linking the two phenomena. Normally, only statistical tendencies can be shown.

  12. Wavelet analysis of paleomagnetic data: 5. Early Jaramillo reversal and main characteristic times in the interval from 3 to 70 ka in the variations of the elements of geomagnetic field (Western Turkmenia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurarii, G. Z.

    2013-01-01

    The data on the variations in the elements of the geomagnetic field with the characteristic times of 3-70 ka during the 180-ka interval that includes the final stage of the Matuyama chron, the Jaramillo subchron, and the Early Jaramillo reversal are presented. A series of particular features are revealed in the variations. It is shown that such detailed characteristics of the variations, which might be critical for identifying the causes of the reversals, can only be derived by thorough investigation of the sedimentary rocks that were accumulated during very long time intervals (many hundreds of years) and slowly cooling intrusions.

  13. Variation of Plasmaspheric (90-4000 km) Field-aligned Electron Density and Ion Composition as a Function of Geomagnetic Storm Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, A.; Sonwalkar, V. S.

    2015-12-01

    Whistler mode (WM) radio sounding from IMAGE has led to the first measurements of plasmaspheric field-aligned electron density and ion composition as a function of geomagnetic storm activity during Aug-Sep 2005, a period that included several successive geomagnetic storms of varying strength. The plasmapause was located at L~2.4 during the onset and main phases of the storms. On the dayside, as a function of storm activity we found in general the following results: (1) The electron density, relative ion concentrations, and O+/H+ transition height had different temporal behavior. (2) Electron density in the first 1-2 days of the storm increased followed by a decrease in the recovery phase. (3) αH+ decreased during the onset, main and early recovery phase, and then it increased; αO+ increased in the early recovery phase, and then it decreased; αHe+ in general increased in the onset or main phase and decreased in the recovery phase. (4) O+/H+ transition height increased by ~200-300 km during the onset, main and early recovery phase. (5) When successive storms occurred in less than a day's span, the latter storms had little or no effect on the electron density and ion composition. On the nightside, WM sounding data was sparse. In the case of one moderate storm, we found that 3 days after the storm, electron density at F2 peak and relative ion concentrations (at all altitudes) were comparable to those before the storm, whereas electron density above O+/H+ transition height decreased. WM sounding results for the dayside and nightside were in agreement with measurements from CHAMP (350 km) and DMSP (850 km). WM sounding measurements coupled with physics-based models (e.g. SAMI2) will allow: (a) investigation of the role of thermospheric winds, dynamo and storm time electric fields in causing the variations in electron and ion densities, and (b) testing of current theories and validating physics-based models of the thermosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling.

  14. Persistently anomalous Pacific geomagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Catherine L.; Constable, Catherine G.

    A new average geomagnetic field model for the past 3kyr (ALS3K) helps bridge a large temporal sampling gap between historical models and more traditional paleomagnetic studies spanning the last 5 Myr. A quasi-static feature seen historically in the central Pacific has the opposite sign in ALS3K; its structure is similar to, but of larger amplitude than, that in the time-averaged geomagnetic field for the last 5 Myr. Anomalous geomagnetic fields exist beneath the Pacific over timescales ranging from 10²-106 years. It is unlikely that bias over such long time scales arises from electromagnetic screening, but conceivable that the Lorentz force is influenced by long wavelength thermal variations and/or localized regions of increased electrical conductivity (associated with compositional anomalies and possibly partial melt). This is consistent with recent seismic observations of the lower mantle.

  15. Simulation of ionospheric electric fields and geomagnetic field variation by the ionospheric dynamo for different solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Masahico; Yamada, Yuji

    1987-12-01

    Variations in the ionospheric Sq electric currents and fields caused by the changes in electric conductivity due to the solar activity variations are studied using the IRI model. Calculation is made for R = 35 and 200 on the assumption of constant (1, -2), (2, 2) and (2, 4) mode tidal winds. It is shown that the effect of semidiurnal tidal winds becomes strong and generates about one half of the total Sq currents in the ionosphere when solar activity is low. On the other hand, when solar activity is high, diurnal tidal winds become the main contributor to the Sq currents, although the inclusion of semidiurnal tidal winds creates a clockwise current vortex in the duskside low latitude region.

  16. Geomagnetic field variations during the last 400 kyr in the western equatorial Pacific: Paleointensity-inclination correlation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Toshitsugu; Kanamatsu, Toshiya; Mizuno, Sakiko; Hokanishi, Natsumi; Gaffar, Eddy Z.

    2008-10-01

    A paleomagnetic study was conducted on four piston cores newly obtained from the West Caroline Basin in the western equatorial Pacific in order to investigate variations in paleointensity and inclination during the last 400 kyr. An inclination-intensity correlation was previously reported in this region using giant piston cores, but the quality of the paleomagnetic data of the younger end, the last ca. 300 kyr, was needed to be checked because the upper part of the giant piston cores could suffer from perturbation by oversampling. Age control is based on the oxygen-isotope ratios for one core and inter-core correlation using relative paleointensity for other cores. Stacked curves of paleointensity and inclination were constructed from the four cores. It was confirmed that variations on the order of 104 to 105 years occur in inclination as well as paleointensity. A cross-correlation analysis showed that significant in-phase correlation occurs between intensity and inclination for periods longer than about 25 kyr, and power spectra of both paleointensity and inclination variations have peaks at ~100 kyr periods. The regional paleointensity stack with higher resolution than the Sint-800 stack (Guyodo and Valet, 1999) should be useful for paleointensity-assisted chronostratigraphy.

  17. A northern hemisphere geomagnetic field model for the last 14ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavon-Carrasco, Fco Javier; Osete, Maria Luisa; Miquel Torta, Joan; de Santis, Angelo

    2013-04-01

    In this work, we propose a first regional geomagnetic field model for the Northern Hemisphere based on archaeomagnetic and lava flow data. The regional model, called scha.dif.14k, allows us to analyse the low degree of the geomagnetic field secular variation for the last 14000 years: from 12000 BC to 1900 AD. The inversion process of the declination, inclination and intensity palaeomagnetic data was carried out iteratively, using the spherical cap harmonic analysis (SCHA) up to degree K = 4 in space and penalized cubic B-spline in time with a knot point of 100 years for the whole time interval. Three starting models have been tested: a) A constant axial dipole field, b) a time-dependent axial dipole field and c) a time-dependent inclined dipole field. The last two starting models were estimated by using directly the archaeomagnetic data. These starting models have been perturbed in order to obtain a regional model with a higher spatial and temporal variability. We have compared the model with the recent published palaeosecular variation curves and with the global model for the Holocene: CALS10K.1b. Our model fits reasonably well the different palaeosecular variation curves and improves the prediction of the CALS10K.1b global model.

  18. Space-time structure of the 2003 geomagnetic jerk at Mid-Eastern Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Jiaming; Du, Aimin; Xu, Wenyao; Yang, Dongmei

    2015-04-01

    The 2003 jerk has an abrupt change in the geomagnetic secular variation (SV), and was recognized as a local phenomenon of internal origin from the satellite observations (Olsen and Mandea, 2007). Notable strength of the 2003 jerk is located at Mid-Eastern Asia. The temporal and spatial features at this area are important to resolve the Earth's core fluid flow dynamics at local scale (e.g. Wardinski et al., 2008). We investigate the temporal-spatial development of the 2003 jerk in more detail at Mid-Eastern Asia with the ground-based observations and CHAOS-3 core field model. We select the data in the international geomagnetic quiet days to calculate the monthly means. In order to reduce the influence of the external field, we adopt a function comprising the terms associated with the indices of the geomagnetic activity, and the terms of the periodic signals on the observatory monthly means data (Stewart and Whaler, 1992). We then use an empirical AR-2 model to represent the internal field signals in the observatory data. The extreme detection is applied to identify the jerk in the SV time series. The onset time and the strength of the 2003 jerk are obtained through the detection for geomagnetic field component, X, Y and Z. The maximum of the strength of the 2003 jerk is located under the Indian mainland. The onset time of this jerk propagates approximately southeastward. Two jerks in 2001 and 2003 for the Z component are further compared and they are confirmed as independent processes. We suggest the jerk in 2001 identical to the well known 1999 jerk in Europe (Mandea et al., 2000). Our results reveal the fine structures of the 2003 jerk that corroborate the conclusions in previous studies. The larger scale time-spatial structure given by the AR-2 model constructed from ground observatory data (monthly values) is consistent with the results from the CHAOS-3 model. This structure can be applied for further inversion of the local core surface fluid flow motions

  19. Fine structure of the 2003 geomagnetic jerk near China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, J.; Du, A.

    2015-12-01

    The 2003 jerk has an abrupt change in the geomagnetic secular variation (SV), and was recognized as a local phenomenon of internal origin from the satellite observations (Olsen and Mandea, 2007). Notable strength of the 2003 jerk is located near China. The temporal and spatial features at this area are important to resolve the Earth's core fluid flow dynamics at local scale (e.g. Wardinski et al., 2008). We investigate the temporal-spatial development of the 2003 jerk in more detail near China with the ground-based observations and CHAOS-3 core field model. We select the data in the international geomagnetic quiet days to calculate the monthly means. In order to reduce the influence of the external field, we adopt a function comprising the terms associated with the indices of the geomagnetic activity, and the terms of the periodic signals on the observatory monthly means data (Stewart and Whaler, 1992). We then use an empirical AR-2 model to represent the internal field signals in the observatory data. The extreme detection is applied to identify the jerk in the SV time series. The onset time and the strength of the 2003 jerk are obtained through the detection for geomagnetic field component, X, Y and Z. The maximum of the strength of the 2003 jerk is located under the Indian mainland. The onset time of this jerk propagates approximately southeastward. Two jerks in 2001 and 2003 for the Z component are further compared and they are confirmed as independent processes. We suggest the jerk in 2001 identical to the well known 1999 jerk in Europe (Mandea et al., 2000). Our results reveal the fine structures of the 2003 jerk that corroborate the conclusions in previous studies. The larger scale time-spatial structure given by the AR-2 model constructed from ground observatory data (monthly values) is consistent with the results from the CHAOS-3 model. This structure can be applied for further inversion of the local core surface fluid flow motions.

  20. The 1995 revision of the joint US/UK geomagnetic field models. II: Main field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinn, J.M.; Coleman, R.J.; Macmillan, S.; Barraclough, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the 1995 main-field revision of the World Magnetic Model (WMM-95). It is based on Project MAGNET high-level (??? 15,000 ft.) vector aeromagnetic survey data collected between 1988 and 1994 and on scalar total intensity data collected by the Polar Orbiting Geomagnetic Survey (POGS) satellite during the period 1991 through 1993. The spherical harmonic model produced from these data describes that portion of the Earth's magnetic field generated internal to the Earth's surface at the 1995.0 Epoch. When combined with the spherical harmonic model of the Earth's secular variation described in paper I, the Earth's main magnetic field is fully characterized between the years 1995 and 2000. Regional magnetic field models for the conterminous United States, Alaska and, Hawaii were generated as by-products of the global modeling process.

  1. Anomalous night-time peaks in diurnal variations of NmF2 close to the geomagnetic equator: A statistical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. V.; Pavlova, N. M.

    2007-11-01

    We present a study of anomalous night-time NmF2 peaks, ANNPs, observed by the La Paz, Natal, Djibouti, Kodaikanal, Madras, Manila, Talara, and Huancayo Jicamarca ionosonde stations close to the geomagnetic equator. It is shown for the first time that the probabilities of occurrence of the first and second ANNPs depend on the geomagnetic longitude, and there is a longitude sector close to 110° geomagnetic longitude where the first and second ANNPs occur less frequently in comparison with the longitude regions located close to and below about 34° geomagnetic longitude and close to and above about 144° geomagnetic longitude. The found frequencies of occurrence of the ANNPs increase with increasing solar activity, except of the Djibouti and Kodaikanal ionosonde stations, where the probability of the first ANNP occurrence is found to decrease with increasing solar activity from low to moderate solar activity, and except of the Natal ionosonde station, where the frequencies of occurrence of the first and second ANNPs decrease with increasing solar activity from moderate to high solar activity. We found that the occurrence probabilities of ANNPs during geomagnetically disturbed conditions are greater than those during geomagnetically quiet conditions. The ANNP probabilities are largest in summer and are lowest in winter for the La-Paz, Talara, and Huancayo Jicamarca sounders. These probabilities are lowest in summer for the Djibouti, Madras, and Manila ionosonde stations, and in spring for the Kodaikanal sounder. The maximums in the probabilities are found to be in autumn for the Djibouti, Madras, and Manila ionosonde stations, and in winter for the Kodaikanal sounder.

  2. Torque Balances on the Taylor Cylinders in the Geomagnetic Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia; Tangborn, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation we report on our continuing effort in geomagnetic data assimilation, aiming at understanding and predicting geomagnetic secular variation on decadal time scales. In particular, we focus on the effect of the torque balances on the cylindrical surfaces in the core co-axial with the Earth's rotation axis (the Taylor cylinders) on the time evolution of assimilated solutions. We use our MoSST core dynamics,model and observed geomagnetic field at the Earth's surface derived via Comprehensive Field Model (CFM) for the geomagnetic data assimilation. In our earlier studies, a model solution is selected randomly from our numerical database. It is then assimilated with the observations such that the poloidal field possesses the same field tomography on the core-mantel boundary (CMB) continued downward from surface observations. This tomography change is assumed to be effective through out the outer core. While this approach allows rapid convergence between model solutions and the observations, it also generates sevee numerical instabilities: the delicate balance between weak fluid inertia and the magnetic torques on the Taylor cylinders are completely altered. Consequently, the assimilated solution diverges quickly (in approximately 10% of the magnetic free-decay time in the core). To improve the assimilation, we propose a partial penetration of the assimilation from the CMB: The full-scale modification at the CMB decreases linearly and vanish at an interior radius r(sub a). We shall examine from our assimilation tests possible relationships between the convergence rate of the model solutions to observations and the cut-off radius r(sub a). A better assimilation shall serve our nudging tests in near future.

  3. Quickly erupted volcanic sections of the Steens Basalt, Columbia River Basalt Group: Secular variation, tectonic rotation, and the Steens Mountain reversal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarboe, N.A.; Coe, R.S.; Renne, P.R.; Glen, J.M.G.; Mankinen, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    The Steens Basalt, now considered part of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG), contains the earliest eruptions of this magmatic episode. Lava flows of the Steens Basalt cover about 50,000 km2 of the Oregon Plateau in sections up to 1000 m thick. The large number of continuously exposed, quickly erupted lava flows (some sections contain over 200 flows) allows for small loops in the magnetic field direction paths to be detected. For volcanic rocks, this detail and fidelity are rarely found outside of the Holocene and yield estimates of eruption durations at our four sections of ??2.5 ka for 260 m at Pueblo Mountains, 0.5 to 1.5 ka for 190 m at Summit Springs, 1-3 ka for 170 m at North Mickey, and ??3 ka for 160 m at Guano Rim. That only one reversal of the geomagnetic field occurred during the eruption of the Steens Basalt (the Steens reversal at approximately 16.6 Ma) is supported by comparing 40Ar/39Ar ages and magnetic polarities to the geomagnetic polarity timescale. At Summit Springs two 40Ar/39Ar ages from normal polarity flows (16.72 ?? ?? 0.29 Ma (16.61) and 16.92 ?? ?? 0.52 Ma (16.82); ?? ?? equals 2s error) place their eruptions after the Steens reversal, while at Pueblo Mountains an 40Ar/39Ar age of 16.72 ?? ?? 0.21 Ma (16.61) from a reverse polarity flow places its eruption before the Steens reversal. Paleomagnetic field directions yielded 50 nontransitional directional-group poles which, combined with 26 from Steens Mountain, provide a paleomagnetic pole for the Oregon Plateau of 85.7??N, 318.4??E, K = 15.1, A95 = 4.3. Comparison of this new pole with a reference pole derived from CRBG flows from eastern Washington and a synthetic reference pole for North America derived from global data implies relative clockwise rotation of the Oregon Plateau of 7.4 ?? 5.0?? or 14.5 ?? 5.4??, respectively, probably due to northward decreasing extension of the basin and range. ?? 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Geomagnetism of earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    Instrumentation, analytical methods, and research goals for understanding the behavior and source of geophysical magnetism are reviewed. Magsat, launched in 1979, collected global magnetometer data and identified the main terrestrial magnetic fields. The data has been treated by representing the curl-free field in terms of a scalar potential which is decomposed into a truncated series of spherical harmonics. Solutions to the Laplace equation then extend the field upward or downward from the measurement level through intervening spaces with no source. Further research is necessary on the interaction between harmonics of various spatial scales. Attempts are also being made to analytically model the main field and its secular variation at the core-mantle boundary. Work is also being done on characterizing the core structure, composition, thermodynamics, energetics, and formation, as well as designing a new Magsat or a tethered satellite to be flown on the Shuttle.

  5. Steady induction effects in geomagnetism. Part 1B: Geomagnetic estimation of steady surficial core motions: A non-linear inverse problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1993-01-01

    The problem of estimating a steady fluid velocity field near the top of Earth's core which induces the secular variation (SV) indicated by models of the observed geomagnetic field is examined in the source-free mantle/frozen-flux core (SFI/VFFC) approximation. This inverse problem is non-linear because solutions of the forward problem are deterministically chaotic. The SFM/FFC approximation is inexact, and neither the models nor the observations they represent are either complete or perfect. A method is developed for solving the non-linear inverse motional induction problem posed by the hypothesis of (piecewise, statistically) steady core surface flow and the supposition of a complete initial geomagnetic condition. The method features iterative solution of the weighted, linearized least-squares problem and admits optional biases favoring surficially geostrophic flow and/or spatially simple flow. Two types of weights are advanced radial field weights for fitting the evolution of the broad-scale portion of the radial field component near Earth's surface implied by the models, and generalized weights for fitting the evolution of the broad-scale portion of the scalar potential specified by the models.

  6. Improved geomagnetic referencing in the Arctic environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poedjono, B.; Beck, N.; Buchanan, A. C.; Borri, L.; Maus, S.; Finn, Carol; Worthington, Bill; White, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Geomagnetic referencing uses the Earth’s magnetic field to determine accurate wellbore positioning essential for success in today's complex drilling programs, either as an alternative or a complement to north-seeking gyroscopic referencing. However, fluctuations in the geomagnetic field, especially at high latitudes, make the application of geomagnetic referencing in those areas more challenging. Precise crustal mapping and the monitoring of real-time variations by nearby magnetic observatories is crucial to achieving the required geomagnetic referencing accuracy. The Deadhorse Magnetic Observatory (DED), located at Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, has already played a vital role in the success of several commercial ventures in the area, providing essential, accurate, real-time data to the oilfield drilling industry. Geomagnetic referencing is enhanced with real-time data from DED and other observatories, and has been successfully used for accurate wellbore positioning. The availability of real-time geomagnetic measurements leads to significant cost and time savings in wellbore surveying, improving accuracy and alleviating the need for more expensive surveying techniques. The correct implementation of geomagnetic referencing is particularly critical as we approach the increased activity associated with the upcoming maximum of the 11-year solar cycle. The DED observatory further provides an important service to scientific communities engaged in studies of ionospheric, magnetospheric and space weather phenomena.

  7. The influence of the great inequality on the secular disturbing function of the planetary system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musen, P.

    1971-01-01

    This paper derives the contribution by the great inequality to the secular disturbing function of the principal planets. Andoyer's expansion of the planetary disturbing function and von Zeipel's method of eliminating the periodic terms is employed; thereby, the corrected secular disturbing function for the planetary system is derived. The conclusion is drawn that the canonicity of the equations for the secular variation of the heliocentric elements can be preserved if there be retained, in the secular disturbing function, terms only of the second and fourth order relative to the eccentricity and inclinations. The Krylov-Bogoliubov method is suggested for eliminating periodic terms, if it is desired to include the secular perturbations of the fifth and higher order in the heliocentric elements. The additional part of the secular disturbing function derived in this paper can be included in existing theories of the secular effects of principal planets.

  8. Geomagnetic Field Response at Southern and Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandel, Babita

    Geomagnetic Field Response at Southern and Northern Hemisphere Babita Chandel, Shailendra Saini, Sneha Yadav,S.K.Vijay and A.K.Gwal Space Science Laboratory, Department of Physics, Barkatullah University, Bhopal-462026, India ABSTRACT: This paper represents the geomagnetic field response at Southern Hemisphere (MAITRI) and Northern Hemisphere (TROMSO). The Indian Antarctic Station MAITRI is located at geomagnetic Long. (66.030, 53.210) where as TROMSO is at geomagnetic Long. (66.030, 53.210). We studied the behaviour of geomagnetic field with respect to geomagnetic storms at both the stations TROMSO and MAITRI. It was observed that at Southern Hemisphere there is more variation in winter as compared to the summer season, where as in Northern Hemisphere the variations are more in summer as compared to winter. As in the Northern hemisphere the magnetospheric plasma is strongly turbulized in summer and in Southern hemisphere the magentospheric plasma is strongly turbulized in winter.

  9. Changing environmental conditions during a geomagnetic reversal: Evidence from trace element and isotope variations on Pleistocene flowstone sequences from Cueva Victoria (SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertz-Kraus, R.; Kocot, Y.; Gibert, L.; Scott, G. R.; Jochum, K. P.

    2011-12-01

    The weakening or non-existence of the Earth's magnetic field during a polarity transition is supposed to influence climatic conditions causing variations in, e.g., rainfall, weathering, or the amount of meteoric water infiltrating soils and rocks. Such variations can be monitored by the proxy record (stable and radiogenic isotope or elemental variations) of laminated carbonate sequences precipitated in caves (flowstones). In this study, a multiproxy approach is applied to flowstone samples from Cueva Victoria (SE Spain) recording the Brunhes-Matuyama reversal at 0.78 Ma (Marine Isotope Stage MIS 19) or less likely the lower Jaramillo polarity transition at 1.075 Ma (MIS 31). Cueva Victoria is paleontologically important because of the large number of fossilized fauna found (55 species). The flowstone forms a characteristic layer in the cave system allowing multiple sampling at different locations within the system to test the reproducablity of the analytically derived proxies. Element concentrations were determined on two flowstone samples, using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) along transects covering the geomagnetic change from reverse to normal. Most of the monitored elements show distinctive variations with the highest concentrations in the interval related to the polarity transition: U concentrations are up to factor of 5 higher in the interval of the transition. Increased U concentrations can be explained by (UO2)2+-enriched percolating waters enhancing the weathering during wetter conditions. About four times higher P concentrations indicate changes in vegetation and soil productivity influencing the supply of P to the cave system. Similar concentration maxima are found for the rare earth elements, but also for other elements such as Fe, Na, Al, and Si. Most of these elements are transported bound on colloids and particles. Higher particle supply to the cave environment points to higher infiltration rates caused by

  10. Anomalous night-time peaks in diurnal variations of NmF2 close to the geomagnetic equator: a statistical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Anatoli

    We present a study of anomalous night-time NmF2 peaks, ANNPs, observed by the La Paz, Natal, Djibouti, Kodaikanal, Madras, Manila, Talara, and Huancayo-Jicamarca ionosonde stations close to the geomagnetic equator. It is shown that the probabilities of occurrence of the first and second ANNPs depend on the geomagnetic longitude, and there is a longitude sector close to 110° geomagnetic longitude where the first and second ANNPs occur less frequently in comparisons with the longitude regions located close to and below about 34° geomagnetic longitude and close to and above about 144° geomagnetic longitude. The found frequencies of occurrence of the ANNPs increase with increasing solar activity, except of the Djibouti and Kodaikanal ionosonde stations, where the probability of the first ANNP occurrence is found to decrease with increasing solar activity from low (F10.7<100) to moderate (100≤F10.7≤170) solar activity, and except of the Natal ionosonde station, where the frequencies of occurrence of the first and second ANNPs decrease with increasing solar activity from moderate to high (F10.7>170) solar activity. We found that the occurrence probabilities of ANNPs during geomagnetically disturbed conditions are greater than those during geomagnetically quiet conditions. The calculated values of these probabilities have pronounced maximums in June (La-Paz and Talara) and in July (Huancayo-Jicamarca) at the ionosonde stations located in the southern geographic hemisphere. The first ANNP is least frequently observed in January (La-Paz, Talara, and Huancayo-Jicamarca), and the second ANNP is least frequently measured in January (La-Paz and Huancayo-Jicamarca) and in December (Talara). In the northern geographic hemisphere, the studied probabilities are lowest in June (Djibouti and Madras), in July (Manila), and in April (Kodaikanal). The maximums in the probabilities of occurrence of the first and second ANNPs are found to be in September (Djibouti), in October

  11. Anomalous paleointensity variation in the Late Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, B.; Doh, S.; Yu, Y.; Kim, W.

    2010-12-01

    A successive paleointensity variation of the Late Cretaceous (~73.1 Ma) was obtained from the six consecutive lava flows at Jeon-gok Volcanic Complex (JVC) in Korea. A total of 283 samples were collected vertically from the bottom of the flow exposures. For the paleointensity determination, over 200 samples were subjected to the Thellier-type IZZI method with systematic alteration checks. Seventy-nine samples passed conventional reliable criteria, yielding a success rate of 38.7%. The paleofield carrier was found as a magnetite, based on the thermomagnetic analysis. Additional rock magnetic experiments revealed a predominance of single-domain magnetite with partial contribution from superparamagnetic grains. Temporally, the estimated paleointensities (2.7-51.1 μT) displayed distinctive half-sinusoidal fluctuation. The corresponding virtual axial dipole moments range from 4.7 to 90.1 ZAm2 (Z = 1021). Such enormous paleointensity variation with extremely low to high intensity might indicate the period of the geomagnetic field transition or excursion in the Late Cretaceous. Perhaps this ancient geomagnetic field intensity fluctuation reflects the geomagnetic secular variation in late Cretaceous.

  12. Three-dimensional electrical conductivity structure beneath Australia from inversion of geomagnetic observatory data: evidence for lateral variations in transition-zone temperature, water content and melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Takao; Khan, Amir; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we report the 3-D electrical conductivity distribution beneath the Australian continent in the depth range 410-1600 km, which we have imaged by inverting C-response estimates from a regional network of geomagnetic observatories. The inversion scheme is based on a quasi-Newton optimization method while the forward algorithm relies on an integral-equation approach. To properly account for the ocean effect in responses at coastal observatories we included a high-resolution (1° × 1°) fixed thin laterally varying surface conductance layer. As starting model in the inversion we considered a laboratory-based 3-D conductivity model of the region obtained from seismic surface wave data and thermodynamic modelling. This model provides a good fit to observed C-response estimates supporting its choice as initial model. The most striking feature of the obtained 3-D model is a high-conductivity anomaly in the lower part of the mantle transition zone (MTZ; 520-660 km depth) beneath southeastern Australia implying considerable lateral as radial heterogeneity in the conductivity structure. The high-conductivity region appears to be 0.5-1 log units more conductive than previous global and other regionalized 1-D models. Further analysis using laboratory-based conductivity models combined with thermochemical phase equilibrium computations shows that the strong conductivity anomaly implies water contents of around 0.1 wt per cent in the upper part and >0.4 wt per cent in the lower part of the MTZ. This implies a large MTZ water reservoir that likely totals one to three times that which currently resides in the oceans. The amount of water in the lower MTZ appears to exceed the experimentally determined water storage capacity of the main lower MTZ mineral ringwoodite, which, as a result, undergoes dehydration-induced partial melting. Including contributions to conductivity from a thin melt layer (20 km thick) located in the mid-MTZ increases conductivity locally in the

  13. Interplanetary magnetic sector polarity inferred from polar geomagnetic field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friis-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    In order to infer the interplanetary sector polarity from polar geomagnetic field diurnal variations, measurements were carried out at Godhavn and Thule (Denmark) Geomagnetic Observatories. The inferred interplanetary sector polarity was compared with the polarity observed at the same time by Explorer 33 and 35 magnetometers. It is shown that the polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field can be reliably inferred from observations of the polar cap geomagnetic fields.

  14. Extreme Geomagnetic Storms - 1868 - 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennerstrom, S.; Lefevre, L.; Dumbović, M.; Crosby, N.; Malandraki, O.; Patsou, I.; Clette, F.; Veronig, A.; Vršnak, B.; Leer, K.; Moretto, T.

    2016-05-01

    We present the first large statistical study of extreme geomagnetic storms based on historical data from the time period 1868 - 2010. This article is the first of two companion papers. Here we describe how the storms were selected and focus on their near-Earth characteristics. The second article presents our investigation of the corresponding solar events and their characteristics. The storms were selected based on their intensity in the aa index, which constitutes the longest existing continuous series of geomagnetic activity. They are analyzed statistically in the context of more well-known geomagnetic indices, such as the Kp and Dcx/Dst index. This reveals that neither Kp nor Dcx/Dst provide a comprehensive geomagnetic measure of the extreme storms. We rank the storms by including long series of single magnetic observatory data. The top storms on the rank list are the New York Railroad storm occurring in May 1921 and the Quebec storm from March 1989. We identify key characteristics of the storms by combining several different available data sources, lists of storm sudden commencements (SSCs) signifying occurrence of interplanetary shocks, solar wind in-situ measurements, neutron monitor data, and associated identifications of Forbush decreases as well as satellite measurements of energetic proton fluxes in the near-Earth space environment. From this we find, among other results, that the extreme storms are very strongly correlated with the occurrence of interplanetary shocks (91 - 100 %), Forbush decreases (100 %), and energetic solar proton events (70 %). A quantitative comparison of these associations relative to less intense storms is also presented. Most notably, we find that most often the extreme storms are characterized by a complexity that is associated with multiple, often interacting, solar wind disturbances and that they frequently occur when the geomagnetic activity is already elevated. We also investigate the semiannual variation in storm occurrence

  15. High-resolution palaeomagnetic records of the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion from ODP Sites 1061 and 1062

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, M. D.; Henderson, G. M.; Thomas, A. L.; Mac Niocaill, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Laschamp geomagnetic excursion (~41 ka) was a brief global deviation in geomagnetic field behaviour from that expected during normal secular variation. Previously published records suggest rapid changes in field direction and a concurrent substantial decrease in field intensity. We present here high-resolution palaeomagnetic records of the Laschamp excursion obtained from two Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 1061 and 1062 on the Blake-Bahama Outer Ridge (ODP Leg 172) and compare this record with previously published records of the Blake and Iceland Basin Excursions. Relatively high sedimentation rates (>10 cm kyr-1) at these locations allow the determination of transitional field behaviour during the excursion. Rather than assuming a constant sedimentation rate between assigned age tie-points, we employ measurements of 230Thxs concentration in the sediment to assess variations in the sedimentation rates through the core sections of interest. This allows us to better determine the temporal behaviour of the Laschamp excursion with greater accuracy and known uncertainty. The Laschamp excursion at this location appears to be much shorter in duration than the Blake and Iceland Basin excursions. Palaeomagnetic measurements of discrete samples from four cores reveal a single excursional feature, across an interval of 30 cm, associated with a broader palaeointensity low. The excursion is characterised by rapid transitions (less than 500 years) between a stable normal polarity and a partially-reversed, polarity. Peaks in inclination either side of the directional excursion indicate periods of time when the local field is dominated by vertical flux patches. Similar behaviour has been observed in records of the Iceland Basin Excursion from the same region. The palaeointensity record is in good agreement between the two sites. The palaeointensity record shows two minima, where the second dip in intensity is associated with a more limited directional deviation. Similar

  16. Craniofacial Secular Change in Recent Mexican Migrants.

    PubMed

    Spradley, Katherine; Stull, Kyra E; Hefner, Joseph T

    2016-01-01

    Research by economists suggests that recent Mexican migrants are better educated and have higher socioeconomic status (SES) than previous migrants. Because factors associated with higher SES and improved education can lead to positive secular changes in overall body form, secular changes in the craniofacial complex were analyzed within a recent migrant group from Mexico. The Mexican group represents individuals in the act of migration, not yet influenced by the American environment, and thus can serve as a starting point for future studies of secular change in this population group. The excavation of a historic Hispanic cemetery in Tucson, Arizona, also allows for a comparison between historic Hispanics and recent migrants to explore craniofacial trends over a broad time period, as both groups originate from Mexico. The present research addresses two main questions: (1) Are cranial secular changes evident in recent Mexican migrants? (2) Are historic Hispanics and recent Mexican migrants similar? By studying secular changes within a migrant population group, secular trends may be detected, which will be important for understanding the biological variation of the migrants themselves and will serve as a preliminary investigation of secular change within Mexican migrants. The comparison of a sample of recent Mexican migrants with a historic Hispanic sample, predominantly of Mexican origin, allows us to explore morphological similarities and differences between early and recent Mexicans within the United States. Vault and face size and a total of 82 craniofacial interlandmark distances were used to explore secular changes within the recent Mexican migrants (females, n = 38; males, n = 178) and to explore the morphological similarities between historic Hispanics (females, n = 54; males, n = 58) and recent migrants. Sexes were separated, and multivariate adaptive regression splines and basis splines (quadratic with one knot) were used to assess the direction and magnitude

  17. Geomagnetic and atmospheric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoker, P. H.

    1983-08-01

    Geomagnetic and atmospheric processes affecting cosmic-ray earthbound spectrometry are analyzed. The topics discussed include: cutoff rigidities and asymptotic directions; cosmic ray secondaries in the atmosphere and magnetosphere; neutron counters without lead and neutron monitors; and coupling coefficients/yield functions and response functions of cosmic ray detectors. Theoretical simulations of the atmosphere and geomagnetism are presented, taking into account such factors as geomagnetic ring currents and meteorological effects. Diagrams and cutoff rigidity contours are included.

  18. Inner Core Rotation from Geomagnetic Westward Drift and a Stationary Spherical Vortex in Earth's Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, C. V.

    1999-01-01

    The idea that geomagnetic westward drift indicates convective leveling of the planetary momentum gradient within Earth's core is pursued in search of a differentially rotating mean state, upon which various oscillations and secular effects might be superimposed. The desired state conforms to roughly spherical boundary conditions, minimizes dissipative interference with convective cooling in the bulk of the core, yet may aide core cooling by depositing heat in the uppermost core and lower mantle. The variational calculus of stationary dissipation applied to a spherical vortex within the core yields an interesting differential rotation profile akin to spherical Couette flow bounded by thin Hartmann layers. Four boundary conditions are required. To concentrate shear induced dissipation near the core-mantle boundary, these are taken to be: (i) no-slip at the core-mantle interface; (ii) geomagnetically estimated bulk westward flow at the base of the core-mantle boundary layer; (iii) no-slip at the inner-outer core interface; and, to describe magnetic locking of the inner core to the deep outer core, (iv) hydrodynamically stress-free at the inner-outer core boundary. By boldly assuming the axial core angular momentum anomaly to be zero, the super-rotation of the inner core is calculated to be at most 1.5 degrees per year.

  19. Inner Core Rotation from Geomagnetic Westward Drift and a Stationary Spherical Vortex in Earth's Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1998-01-01

    The idea that geomagnetic westward drift indicates convective leveling of the planetary momentum gradient within Earth's core is pursued in search of a differentially rotating mean state, upon which various oscillations and secular effects might be superimposed. The desired state conforms to roughly spherical boundary conditions, minimizes dissipative interference with convective cooling in the bulk of the core, yet may aid core cooling by depositing heat in the uppermost core and lower mantle. The variational calculus of stationary dissipation applied to a spherical vortex within the core yields an interesting differential rotation profile, akin to spherical Couette flow bounded by thin Hartmann layers. Four boundary conditions are required. To concentrate shear induced dissipation near the core-mantle boundary, these are taken to be: (i) no-slip at the core-mantle interface; (ii) geomagnetically estimated bulk westward flow at the base of the core-mantle boundary layer; (iii) no-slip at the inner-outer core interface; and, to describe magnetic locking of the inner core to the deep outer core; (iv) hydrodynamically stress-free at the inner-outer core boundary. By boldly assuming the axial core angular momentum anomaly to be zero, the super-rotation of the inner core relative to the mantle is calculated to be at most 1.5 deg./yr.

  20. Steady induction effects in geomagnetism. Part 1C: Geomagnetic estimation of steady surficial core motions: Application to the definitive geomagnetic reference field models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1993-01-01

    In the source-free mantle/frozen-flux core magnetic earth model, the non-linear inverse steady motional induction problem was solved using the method presented in Part 1B. How that method was applied to estimate steady, broad-scale fluid velocity fields near the top of Earth's core that induce the secular change indicated by the Definitive Geomagnetic Reference Field (DGRF) models from 1945 to 1980 are described. Special attention is given to the derivation of weight matrices for the DGRF models because the weights determine the apparent significance of the residual secular change. The derived weight matrices also enable estimation of the secular change signal-to-noise ratio characterizing the DGRF models. Two types of weights were derived in 1987-88: radial field weights for fitting the evolution of the broad-scale portion of the radial geomagnetic field component at Earth's surface implied by the DGRF's, and general weights for fitting the evolution of the broad-scale portion of the scalar potential specified by these models. The difference is non-trivial because not all the geomagnetic data represented by the DGRF's constrain the radial field component. For radial field weights (or general weights), a quantitatively acceptable explication of broad-scale secular change relative to the 1980 Magsat epoch must account for 99.94271 percent (or 99.98784 percent) of the total weighted variance accumulated therein. Tolerable normalized root-mean-square weighted residuals of 2.394 percent (or 1.103 percent) are less than the 7 percent errors expected in the source-free mantle/frozen-flux core approximation.

  1. Geomagnetic disturbances and pulsations as a high-latitude response to considerable alternating IMF Variations during the magnetic storm recovery phase (Case study: May 30, 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitin, A. E.; Kleimenova, N. G.; Gromova, L. I.; Antonova, E. E.; Dremukhina, L. A.; Zelinsky, N. R.; Gromov, S. V.; Malysheva, L. M.

    2015-11-01

    Features of high-latitude geomagnetic disturbances during the magnetic storm ( Dst min =-144 nT) recovery phase were studied based on the observations on the Scandinavian profile of magnetometers (IMAGE). Certain non-typical effects that occur under the conditions of large positive IMF Bz values (about +20-25 nT) and large negative IMF By values (to-20 nT) were revealed. Thus, an intense (about 400 nT) negative bay in the X component of the magnetic field (the polar electrojet, PE) was observed in the dayside sector at geomagnetic latitudes higher than 70°. As the IMF B y reverses its sign from negative to positive, the bay in the X component was replaced by the bay in the Y component. The possible distribution of the fieldaligned currents of the NBZ system was analyzed based on the CHAMP satellite data. The results were compared with the position of the auroral oval (the OVATION model) and the ion and electron flux observations on the DMSP satellite. Analysis of the particle spectra indicated that these spectra correspond to the auroral oval dayside sector crossings by the satellite, i.e., to the dayside projection of the plasma ring surrounding the Earth. Arguments are presented for the assumption that the discussed dayside electrojet ( PE) is localized near the polar edge of the dayside auroral oval in a the closed magnetosphere. The features of the spectral and spatial dynamics of intense Pc5 geomagnetic pulsations were studied in this time interval. It was established that the spectrum of high-latitude (higher than ~70°) pulsations does not coincide with the spectrum of fluctuations in the solar wind and IMF. It was shown that Pc5 geomagnetic pulsations can be considered as resonance oscillations at latitudes lower than 70° and apparently reflect fluctuations in turbulent sheets adjacent to the magnetopause (the low-latitude boundary layer, a cusp throat) or in a turbulent magnetosheath at higher latitudes.

  2. Comment on 'The semiannual variation of great geomagnetic storms and the postshock Russell-McPherron effect preceding coronal mass ejecta' by N. U. Crooker, E. W. Cliver and B. T. Tsurutani

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, W. D.; Clua De Gonzalez, A. L.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    It is proposed by Crooker et al. (1992) that for a subgroup of great geomagnetic storms, for which the associated strong southward IMF (B(S)) fields reside in the postshock plasma, preceding the driver gas of coronal mass ejections, such strong B(S) fields result from a 'major increase in the Russell-McPherron polarity effect, through a systematic pattern of compression and draping' of the Archimedean field in the x-y plane. The critics test the scenario proposed by Crooker et al., namely, that the Russell-McPherron polarity effect is a major contribution to the semiannual variable of intense geomagnetic storms. It is found by the critics that in the cases studied there is little difference between the B(S) values as measured in geocentric solar ecliptic and geocentric solar magnetospheric coordinates, and it is concluded that the Russell-McPherron mechanism cannot explain by itself the seasonal dependence of intense storms, for which the variation is the largest. Crooker et al. present arguments to show that the combined preshock and postshock Russell-McPherron effect remains the sole cause of the semiannual variation of great storm occurrence.

  3. Large geomagnetic field anomalies revealed in Bronze to Iron Age archeomagnetic data from Tel Megiddo and Tel Hazor, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaar, Ron; Tauxe, Lisa; Ron, Hagai; Ebert, Yael; Zuckerman, Sharon; Finkelstein, Israel; Agnon, Amotz

    2016-05-01

    Geomagnetic field measurements from the past few centuries show heightened secular variation activity in the southern hemisphere associated with the south Atlantic anomaly (SAA). It is uncertain whether geomagnetic anomalies at a similar scale have existed in the past owing to limited coverage and uncertainties in the paleomagnetic database. Here we provide new evidence from archaeological sources in the Levant suggesting a large positive northern hemisphere anomaly, similar in magnitude to the SAA during the 9th-8th centuries BCE, called ;Levantine Iron Age anomaly;. We also report an additional geomagnetic spike in the 8th century. The new dataset comprises 73 high precision paleointensity estimates from ca. 3000 BCE to 732 BCE, and five directional measurements between the 14th and the 9th centuries BCE. Well-dated pottery and cooking ovens were collected from twenty archaeological strata in two large contemporaneous stratigraphical mounds (tells) in Israel: Tel Megiddo and Tel Hazor. The new data are combined with previously published data and interpreted automatically using the PmagPy Thellier GUI program. The Tel Megiddo and Tel Hazor data sets demonstrate excellent internal consistency and remarkable agreement with published data from Mesopotamia (Syria). The data illustrate the evolution of an extreme geomagnetic high that culminated in at least two spikes between the 11th and the 8th centuries BCE (Iron Age in the Levant). The paleomagnetic directional data of the 9th century BCE show positive inclination anomalies, and deviations of up to 22° from the averaged geocentric axial dipole (GAD) direction. From comparison of the Levantine archaeomagnetic data with IGRF model for 2015 we infer the ;Levantine Iron Age anomaly; between the 10th and the 8th centuries BCE is a local positive anomaly. The eastward extent of the anomaly is currently unknown.

  4. Secular Variation in the Storage and Dissipation of Elastic Strain Energy Along the Central Altyn Tagh Fault (86-88.5°E), NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowgill, E.; Gold, R. D.; Arrowsmith, R.; Friedrich, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    In elastic rebound theory, hazard increases as interseismic strain rebuilds after rupture. This model is challenged by the temporal variation in the pacing of major earthquakes that is both predicted by mechanical models and suggested by some long paleoseismic records (e.g., 1-3). However, the extent of such behavior remains unclear due to a lack of long (5-25 ky) records of fault slip. Using Monte Carlo analysis of 11 offset landforms, we determined a 16-ky record of fault slip for the active, left-lateral Altyn Tagh fault, which bounds the NW margin of the Tibetan Plateau. This history reveals a pulse of accelerated slip between 6.4 and 6.0 ka, during which the fault slipped 9 +14/-2 m at a rate of 23 +35/-5 mm/y, or ~3x the 16 ky average of 8.1 +1.2/-0.9mm/y. These two modes of earthquake behavior suggest temporal variation in the rates of stress storage and release. The simplest explanation for the pulse is a cluster of 2-8 Mw > 7.5 earthquakes. Such supercyclicity has been reported for the Sunda (4) and Cascadia (3) megathrusts, but contrasts with steady slip along the strike-slip Alpine fault (5), for example. A second possibility is that the pulse reflects a single, unusually large rupture. However, this Black Swan event is unlikely: empirical scaling relationships require a Mw 8.2 rupture of the entire 1200-km-long ATF to produce 7 m of average slip. Likewise, Coulomb stress change from rupture on the adjacent North Altyn fault is of modest magnitude and overlap with the ATF. Poor temporal correlation between precipitation and the slip pulse argues against climatically modulated changes in surface loading (lakes/ice) or pore-fluid pressure. "Paleoslip" studies such as this sacrifice the single-event resolution of paleoseismology in exchange for long records that quantify both the timing and magnitude of fault slip averaged over multiple ruptures, and are essential for documenting temporal variations in fault slip as we begin to use calibrated physical

  5. Resonant and secular orbital interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke

    In stable solar systems, planets remain in nearly elliptical orbits around their stars. Over longer timescales, however, their orbital shapes and sizes change due to mutual gravitational perturbations. Orbits of satellites around a planet vary for the same reason. Because of their interactions, the orbits of planets and satellites today are different from what they were earlier. In order to determine their original orbits, which are critical constraints on formation theories, it is crucial to understand how orbits evolve over the age of the Solar System. Depending on their timescale, we classify orbital interactions as either short-term (orbital resonances) or long-term (secular evolution). My work involves examples of both interaction types. Resonant history of the small Neptunian satellites. In satellite systems, tidal migration brings satellite orbits in and out of resonances. During a resonance passage, satellite orbits change dramatically in a very short period of time. We investigate the resonant history of the six small Neptunian moons. In this unique system, the exotic orbit of the large captured Triton (with a circular, retrograde, and highly tilted orbit) influences the resonances among the small satellites very strongly. We derive an analytical framework which can be applied to Neptune's satellites and to similar systems. Our numerical simulations explain the current orbital tilts of the small satellites as well as constrain key physical parameters of both Neptune and its moons. Secular orbital interactions during eccentricity damping. Long-term periodic changes of orbital shape and orientation occur when two or more planets orbit the same star. The variations of orbital elements are superpositions of the same number of fundamental modes as the number of planets in the system. We investigate how this effect interacts with other perturbations imposed by external disturbances, such as the tides and relativistic effects. Through analytical studies of a

  6. An introduction to quiet daily geomagnetic fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    On days that are quiet with respect to solar-terrestrial activity phenomena, the geomagnetic field has variations, tens of gamma in size, with major spectral components at about 24, 12, 8, and 6 hr in period. These quiet daily field variations are primarily due to the dynamo currents flowing in the E region of the earth's ionosphere, are driven by the global thermotidal wind systems, and are dependent upon the local tensor conductivity and main geomagnetic field vector. The highlights of the behavior and interpretation of these quiet field changes, from their discovery in 1634 until the present, are discussed as an introduction to the special journal issue on Quiet Daily Geomagnetic Fields. ?? 1989 Birkha??user Verlag.

  7. Secular trends and geographical variations in the dietary intake of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) using archived samples from the early 1980s and mid 1990s in Japan.

    PubMed

    Wada, Yasuhiko; Koizumi, Akio; Yoshinaga, Takeo; Harada, Kouji; Inoue, Kayoko; Morikawa, Akiko; Muroi, Junko; Inoue, Sumiko; Eslami, Bita; Hirosawa, Iwao; Hirosawa, Akitsu; Fujii, Shigeo; Fujimine, Yoshinori; Hachiya, Noriyuki; Koda, Shigeki; Kusaka, Yukinori; Murata, Katsuyuki; Nakatsuka, Haruo; Omae, Kazuyuki; Saito, Norimitsu; Shimbo, Shinichiro; Takenaka, Katsunobu; Takeshita, Tatsuya; Todoriki, Hidemi; Watanabe, Takao; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2005-05-01

    A retrospective exposure assessment among the general population for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) was conducted using dietary surveys. We analyzed samples of food duplicate portions collected in the early 1980s (1980 survey: N=40) and the mid 1990s (1995 survey: N=39) from female subjects (5 participants from each of 8 sites per survey except for one site) living throughout Japan, from the north (Hokkaido) to the south (Okinawa). The study populations in the 1980 and 1995 surveys were different, but lived in the same communities. We measured four PBDE congeners [2,2',4,4'-tetrabrominated diphenyl ether (tetraBDE): #47; 2,2',4,4',5-pentaBDE: #99; 2,2',4,4',6-pentaBDE: #100; and 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexaBDE: #153] in the diet. #99 was the most abundant congener in the diet (49% of the total PBDEs), followed by #47 (33%), #100 (12%) and #153 (6%). Regional variations found in the 1980 survey decreased in the 1995 survey. The total daily intake of PBDEs (ng/d) [GM (GSD)] in the 1980 survey [91.4 (4.1)] was not significantly different from that in the 1995 survey [93.8 (3.4)] for the total population, nor did it differ among the sites including Shimane, in which a 20-fold increase in serum concentrations was observed in the same population1). In consideration of the significant increases in the serum concentration, inhalation may be more important than food ingestion as the route of human exposure to PBDEs.

  8. Geomagnetism-Paleomagnetism Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Subir K.

    I n response to strong member concerns about the future of geomagnetism, Neil D. Opdyke, President of the Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism Section, has appointed an ad hoc Committee for the Future of Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism consisting of Subir K. Banerjee (chair; University of Minnesota, Minneapolis), Joseph Cain (U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colo.) and Rob Van der Voo (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor). The committee seeks, from the membership at large, perceptions of future directions of research, help in identifying a few expanding research areas that show a promise of delivering significant results in the next 5 to 10 years, and guidance in generating a strategy to bring these about.

  9. Dynamics of secular evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binney, James

    2013-10-01

    The material in this article was presented in five hours of lectures to the 2011 Canary Islands Winter School. The School’s theme was ‘Secular Evolution of Galaxies’ and my task was to present the underlying stellar-dynamical theory. Other lecturers were speaking on the role of bars and chemical evolution, so these topics are avoided here. The material starts with an account of the connections between isolating integrals, quasiperiodicity and angle-action variables - these variables played a prominent and unifying role throughout the lectures. This leads on to the phenomenon of resonant trap- ping and how this can lead to chaos in cuspy potentials and phase-space mixing in slowly evolving potentials. Surfaces of section and frequency analysis are introduced as diagnostics of phase-space structure. Real galactic potentials include a fluctuating part that drives the system towards unattainable thermal equilibrium. Two-body encounters are only one source of fluctuations, and all fluctuations will drive similar evolution. The orbit-averaged Fokker-Planck equation is derived, as are relations that hold between the second-order diffusion coefficients and both the power spectrum of the fluctuations and the first-order diffusion coefficients. From the observed heating of the solar neighbourhood we show that the second-order diffusion coefficients must scale as ˜ J1/2. We show that periodic spiral structure shifts angular momentum outwards, heating at the Lindblad resonances and mixing at corotation. The equation that would yield the normal modes of a stellar disk is first derived and then used to discuss the propagation of tightly wound spiral waves. The winding up of such waves is described and explains why cool stellar disks are responsive systems that amplify ambient noise. An explanation is offered of why the Lin-Shu-Kalnajs dispersion relation and even global normal-mode calculations provide a very incomplete understanding of the dynamics of stellar disks.

  10. Geomagnetically Induced Currents, a space weather hazard. Case study - Europe under intense geomagnetic storms of the solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrica, V.; Demetrescu, Cr.; Stefan, C.; Greculeasa, R.

    2016-05-01

    The interaction of the solar wind and heliospheric magnetic field with the magnetosphere and ionosphere results in variations of the geomagnetic field that induce hazardous electric currents in grounded technological systems (electric power and hydrocarbon transportation networks), the so-called geomagnetically induced currents (GICs). In order to evaluate the hazard induced on the European continent, we present a study of the surface electric field induced by 16 intense (Dst < -150 nT) geomagnetic storms, based on the analysis of the geomagnetic records from the European network of observatories, study that tend to solve the geophysical part of the problem. The evolution during storm development and the sources of the disturbance field are explored in case of the largest geomagnetic storm in the cycle 23 (Dst = -422 nT, November 20-21, 2003), and the geographical distribution of the maximum induced surface geoelectric field over Europe by the 16 storms considered in the study is presented. As source proxies, the Dst geomagnetic index, showing the disturbed field produced by the magnetospheric ring current at the geomagnetic equator, the AL geomagnetic index, showing the disturbed field produced by the ionospheric electrojet at auroral latitude, and the PC geomagnetic index, showing the disturbed field produced by the polar cap current, were examined.

  11. Geomagnetic disturbances imprints in ground and satellite altitude observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahiat, Yasmina; Lamara, Souad; Zaourar, Naima; Hamoudi, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    The temporal evolution of the geomagnetic field and its variations have been repeatedly studied from both ground observatories and near-earth orbiting platforms. With the advent of the space ageand the launches of geomagnetic low altitude orbits satellites, a global coverage has been achieved. Since Magsat mission, more satellites were put into orbit and some of them are still collecting data enhancing the spatial and temporal descriptions of the field. Our study uses new data gathered by the latest SWARM satellite mission launched on November, 22nd 2013. It consists of a constellation of three identical satellites carrying on board high resolution and accuracy scientific equipment. Data from this constellation will allow better understanding the multiscale behavior of the geomagnetic field. Our goal is to analyze and interpret the geomagnetic data collected by this Swarm mission, for a given period and try to separate the external disturbances from internal contributions. We consider in the study the variation of the horizontal component H, for different virtual geomagnetic observatories at the satellite altitude. The analysis of data by Swarm orbital segments shows clearly the external disturbances of the magnetic field like that occurring on 27th of August 2014. This perturbation is shown on geomagnetic indexes and is related to a coronal mass ejection (CME). These results from virtual observatories are confirmed, by the equivalent analysis using ground observatories data for the same geographic positions and same epochs. Key words: Geomagnetic field, external field, geomagnetic index, SWARM mission, virtual observatories.

  12. Geomagnetic excitation of nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, C.; Vondrák, J.

    2015-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis of Malkin (2013), who demonstrated that the observed changes of Free Core Nutation parameters (phase, amplitude) occur near the epochs of geomagnetic jerks. We found that if the numerical integration of Brzeziński broad-band Liouville equations of atmospheric/oceanic excitations is re-initialized at the epochs of geomagnetic jerks, the agreement between the integrated and observed celestial pole offsets is improved (Vondrák & Ron, 2014). Nevertheless, this approach assumes that the influence of geomagnetic jerks leads to a stepwise change in the position of celestial pole, which is physically not acceptable. Therefore we introduce a simple continuous excitation function that hypothetically describes the influence of geomagnetic jerks, and leads to rapid but continuous changes of pole position. The results of numerical integration of atmospheric/oceanic excitations and this newly introduced excitation are then compared with the observed celestial pole offsets, and prove that the agreement is improved significantly.

  13. Recurring features of mid-Miocene transitional geomagnetic field behavior: Observations from NE Nevada and SE Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogue, S. W.; Glen, J. M. G.

    2014-12-01

    Paleomagnetic results from a 150m thick stack of 15.2 my old lava flows in the Sheep Creek Range (north central Nevada; 40.7N, 243.2E) show that distinctive aspects of the reversing geomagnetic field can recur after 1.5 million years. The Sheep Creek lavas preserve a partial record of what is likely the C5Br-C5Bn geomagnetic reversal. That event occurred 1.5 million years and five polarity switches after reversal (C5Cr-C5Cn) recorded in great detail at Steens Mountain in SE Oregon. During both transitions, the VGP made repeat visits to low latitude positions in South America and near Africa although in different order. This behavior implies a control that varies over a timescale much longer that associated with flow in the outer core (~60 yrs), presumably lateral variations in lower mantle temperature or topography on the core-mantle boundary. Furthermore, the field in both reversals moved from clearly transitional to normal-polarity-like (i.e., down and north) directions before "rebounding" to intermediate directions. It has been suggested recently (Valet et al., Nature 2012) that this kind of behavior (i.e., directional change in the form of precursor- main polarity switch-rebound) may be a systematic aspect of transitional field behavior, a suggestion reinforced by these new observations. The distinctive, two component magnetization of a particular lava flow in the Sheep Creek section has been interpreted by Bogue and Glen (GRL, 2010) as evidence of directional change (~1 deg/week) orders of magnitude faster than normal secular variation. If the field was strong at the end of the directional change, then a large change in the local geomagnetic field vector is implied by the directional data for any initial field strength. Preliminary paleointensity experiments aimed at resolving this aspect of the record are in progress.

  14. [The influence of circadian rhythms of geomagnetic field variations and the background cosmic radiation on nitric oxide production in human organism].

    PubMed

    Iamshanov, V A; Koshelevskiĭ, V K

    2012-01-01

    The circadian rhythms of background gamma-radiation and Ki-indexes of geomagnetic activity (GMF) during August-September 2008, January-February 2010 and March 2011 were studied. The authors show that in summer period the maximum of Ki-indexes and gamma-radiation were at 3 p.m. of local time. In winter these maximums were shifted at more last time. It was suggested that an organism produces the own free radicals as nitric oxide to neutralize radicals from background radiation. They are formed during decay of neutrophiles when GMF-activity falls. On the other side, the production of NO is regulated by melatonin synthesis which has a circadian rhythm.

  15. More on the alleged 1970 geomagnetic jerk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alldredge, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    French and United Kingdom workers have published reports describing a sudden change in the secular acceleration, called an impulse or a jerk, which took place around 1970. They claim that this change took place in a period of a year or two and that the sources of the alleged jerk are internal. An earlier paper by this author questioned their method of analysis pointing out that their method of piecemeal fitting of parabolas to the data will always create a discontinuity in the secular acceleration where the parabolas join and that the place where the parabolas join is an a priori assumption and not a result of the analysis. This paper gives a very brief summary of this first paper and then adds additional reasons for questioning the allegation that there was a worldwide sudden jerk in the magnetic field of internal origin around 1970. These new reasons are based largely on new field models which give cubic approximations of the field right through the 1970 timeframe and therefore have no discontinuities in the second derivative (jerk) around 1970. Some recent Japanese work shows several sudden changes in the secular variation pattern which cover limited areas and do not seem to be closely related to each other or to the irregularity noted in the European area near 1970. The secular variation picture which seems to be emerging is one with many local or limited-regional secular variation changes which appear to be almost unrelated to each other in time or space. A worldwide spherical harmonic model including coefficients up to degree 13 could never properly depict such a situation. ?? 1985.

  16. Secular humanism and "scientific psychiatry"

    PubMed Central

    Szasz, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The Council for Secular Humanism identifies Secular Humanism as a "way of thinking and living" committed to rejecting authoritarian beliefs and embracing "individual freedom and responsibility ... and cooperation." The paradigmatic practices of psychiatry are civil commitment and insanity defense, that is, depriving innocent persons of liberty and excusing guilty persons of their crimes: the consequences of both are confinement in institutions ostensibly devoted to the treatment of mental diseases. Black's Law Dictionary states: "Every confinement of the person is an 'imprisonment,' whether it be in a common prison, or in private house, or in the stocks, or even by forcibly detaining one in the public streets." Accordingly, I maintain that Secular Humanism is incompatible with the principles and practices of psychiatry. PMID:16759353

  17. Secular humanism and "scientific psychiatry".

    PubMed

    Szasz, Thomas

    2006-04-25

    The Council for Secular Humanism identifies Secular Humanism as a "way of thinking and living" committed to rejecting authoritarian beliefs and embracing "individual freedom and responsibility ... and cooperation." The paradigmatic practices of psychiatry are civil commitment and insanity defense, that is, depriving innocent persons of liberty and excusing guilty persons of their crimes: the consequences of both are confinement in institutions ostensibly devoted to the treatment of mental diseases. Black's Law Dictionary states: "Every confinement of the person is an 'imprisonment,' whether it be in a common prison, or in private house, or in the stocks, or even by forcibly detaining one in the public streets." Accordingly, I maintain that Secular Humanism is incompatible with the principles and practices of psychiatry.

  18. Tsunami related to solar and geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldi, Gabriele; Cataldi, Daniele; Straser, Valentino

    2016-04-01

    The authors of this study wanted to verify the existence of a correlation between earthquakes of high intensity capable of generating tsunami and variations of solar and Earth's geomagnetic activity. To confirming or not the presence of this kind of correlation, the authors analyzed the conditions of Spaceweather "near Earth" and the characteristics of the Earth's geomagnetic field in the hours that preceded the four earthquakes of high intensity that have generated tsunamis: 1) Japan M9 earthquake occurred on March 11, 2011 at 05:46 UTC; 2) Japan M7.1 earthquake occurred on October 25, 2013 at 17:10 UTC; 3) Chile M8.2 earthquake occurred on April 1, 2014 at 23:46 UTC; 4) Chile M8.3 earthquake occurred on September 16, 2015 at 22:54 UTC. The data relating to the four earthquakes were provided by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The data on ion density used to realize the correlation study are represented by: solar wind ion density variation detected by ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) Satellite, in orbit near the L1 Lagrange point, at 1.5 million of km from Earth, in direction of the Sun. The instrument used to perform the measurement of the solar wind ion density is the Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (EPAM) instrument, equipped on the ACE Satellite. To conduct the study, the authors have taken in consideration the variation of the solar wind protons density of three different energy fractions: differential proton flux 1060-1900 keV (p/cm^2-sec-ster-MeV); differential proton flux 761-1220 keV (p/cm^2-sec-ster-MeV); differential proton flux 310-580 keV (p/cm^2-sec-ster-MeV). Geomagnetic activity data were provided by Tromsø Geomagnetic Observatory (TGO), Norway; by Scoresbysund Geomagnetic Observatory (SCO), Greenland, Denmark and by Space Weather Prediction Center of Pushkov Institute of terrestrial magnetism, ionosphere and radio wave propagation (IZMIRAN), Troitsk, Moscow Region. The results of the study, in agreement with what already

  19. First European directional paleosecular variation curve for the Neolithic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrancho, A.; Villalain, J.; Pavon-Carrasco, F.; Osete, M. L.; Straus, L. G.; Vergès, J.; Carretero, J.; Angelucci, D. E.; González Morales, M.; Arsuaga, J.; Bermúdez de Castro, J.; Carbonell, E.

    2013-05-01

    Extending back in time paleosecular variation (PSV) records worldwide is necessary to improve geomagnetic field models whose applications range from the reconstruction of geomagnetic field behavior to archeomagnetic dating. To that aim, independently well-dated and high-quality geomagnetic field recorders are required in order to avoid the smoothing effect produced by the inclusion of sedimentary records in global and regional models. This is the case of lava flows and archeomagnetic materials which usually carry a stable thermoremament magnetization (TRM). Although the archeomagnetic European database is the most complete of the world, there is a significant lack of archeomagnetic data in Western Europe before the third millennium B.C., because older, well-dated, in situ materials carrying a TRM are scarce. Here we show anthropogenic cave sediments as new geomagnetic field recorders, reporting 26 new archeomagnetic directions obtained from three caves in Northern Spain ranging between ~5,500 and 2,000 yr. cal. B.C. These data represent the oldest archeomagnetic directions currently existing in all Western Europe. The combination of data presented here and the recent updated Bulgarian database allows us to propose the first European secular variation curve for the Neolithic which can be used for dating purposes. For certain periods the proposed European directional PSV curve may reach similar precision as radiocarbon. Taking into account the good preservation, age-control and widespread occurrence of these materials across southern Europe, these materials represent a new source of data for archeomagnetic dating, as well as geomagnetic field modeling.

  20. Extreme geomagnetically induced currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Ryuho; Ngwira, Chigomezyo

    2016-12-01

    We propose an emergency alert framework for geomagnetically induced currents (GICs), based on the empirically extreme values and theoretical upper limits of the solar wind parameters and of d B/d t, the time derivative of magnetic field variations at ground. We expect this framework to be useful for preparing against extreme events. Our analysis is based on a review of various papers, including those presented during Extreme Space Weather Workshops held in Japan in 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014. Large-amplitude d B/d t values are the major cause of hazards associated with three different types of GICs: (1) slow d B/d t with ring current evolution (RC-type), (2) fast d B/d t associated with auroral electrojet activity (AE-type), and (3) transient d B/d t of sudden commencements (SC-type). We set "caution," "warning," and "emergency" alert levels during the main phase of superstorms with the peak Dst index of less than -300 nT (once per 10 years), -600 nT (once per 60 years), or -900 nT (once per 100 years), respectively. The extreme d B/d t values of the AE-type GICs are 2000, 4000, and 6000 nT/min at caution, warning, and emergency levels, respectively. For the SC-type GICs, a "transient alert" is also proposed for d B/d t values of 40 nT/s at low latitudes and 110 nT/s at high latitudes, especially when the solar energetic particle flux is unusually high.

  1. Atmospheric helium and geomagnetic field reversals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, W. R.; Kern, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of the earth's helium budget is examined in the light of recent work on the interaction of the solar wind with nonmagnetic planets. It is proposed that the dominant mode of helium (He4) loss is ion pumping by the solar wind during geomagnetic field reversals, when the earth's magnetic field is very small. The interaction of the solar wind with the earth's upper atmosphere during such a period is found to involve the formation of a bow shock. The penetration altitude of the shock-heated solar plasma is calculated to be about 700 km, and ionization rates above this level are estimated for a cascade ionization (electron avalanche) process to average 10 to the 9th power ions/sq cm/sec. The calculated ionization rates and the capacity of the solar wind to remove ionized helium (He4) from the upper atmosphere during geomagnetic dipole reversals are sufficient to yield a secular equilibrium over geologic time scales. The upward transport of helium from the lower atmosphere under these conditions is found to be adequate to sustain the proposed loss rate.

  2. Geomagnetic referencing in the arctic environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Podjono, Benny; Beck, Nathan; Buchanan, Andrew; Brink, Jason; Longo, Joseph; Finn, Carol A.; Worthington, E. William

    2011-01-01

    Geomagnetic referencing is becoming an increasingly attractive alternative to north-seeking gyroscopic surveys to achieve the precise wellbore positioning essential for success in today's complex drilling programs. However, the greater magnitude of variations in the geomagnetic environment at higher latitudes makes the application of geomagnetic referencing in those areas more challenging. Precise, real-time data on those variations from relatively nearby magnetic observatories can be crucial to achieving the required accuracy, but constructing and operating an observatory in these often harsh environments poses a number of significant challenges. Operational since March 2010, the Deadhorse Magnetic Observatory (DED), located in Deadhorse, Alaska, was created through collaboration between the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and a leading oilfield services supply company. DED was designed to produce real-time geomagnetic data at the required level of accuracy, and to do so reliably under the extreme temperatures and harsh weather conditions often experienced in the area. The observatory will serve a number of key scientific communities as well as the oilfield drilling industry, and has already played a vital role in the success of several commercial ventures in the area, providing essential, accurate data while offering significant cost and time savings, compared with traditional surveying techniques.

  3. Geomagnetic referencing in the arctic environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poedjono, B.; Beck, N.; Buchanan, A. C.; Brink, J.; Longo, J.; Finn, C.A.; Worthington, E.W.

    2011-01-01

    Geomagnetic referencing is becoming an increasingly attractive alternative to north-seeking gyroscopic surveys to achieve the precise wellbore positioning essential for success in today's complex drilling programs. However, the greater magnitude of variations in the geomagnetic environment at higher latitudes makes the application of geomagnetic referencing in those areas more challenging. Precise, real-time data on those variations from relatively nearby magnetic observatories can be crucial to achieving the required accuracy, but constructing and operating an observatory in these often harsh environments poses a number of significant challenges. Operational since March 2010, the Deadhorse Magnetic Observatory (DED), located in Deadhorse, Alaska, was created through collaboration between the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and a leading oilfield services supply company. DED was designed to produce real-time geomagnetic data at the required level of accuracy, and to do so reliably under the extreme temperatures and harsh weather conditions often experienced in the area. The observatory will serve a number of key scientific communities as well as the oilfield drilling industry, and has already played a vital role in the success of several commercial ventures in the area, providing essential, accurate data while offering significant cost and time savings, compared with traditional surveying techniques. Copyright 2011, Society of Petroleum Engineers.

  4. Studies on the Geomagnetic Induction Vectors of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiao; Zhang, Huiqian; Huang, Qinghua

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the geomagnetic data of 16 stations, near 6 years for most, provided by the National Geomagnetic Center of China, were used to study on the geomagnetic induction vectors. The stations cover the whole North China and part of southwestern China, both of which has a complicate geological and tectonic background. This study will not only advance the understanding of regional tectonic variations, but also provide some suggestions on the construction for geomagnetic observation network of earthquake monitoring. The time series of geomagnetic induction vectors were obtained by the robust estimation method, which has been verified and compared with the ordinary least square and the weighted square method. A principle of selecting a specified period's results from the robust estimation method was defined. Then, the results with the period of 640s for all stations were selected by this principle. The long-term trends (more than six months at least) within the time series were extracted by the Fourier harmonic analysis. Consistent phase variations exist for most stations within a similar tectonic background. About one-month period variations in the most stations' results after removing the long-term trends were found. Spectrum analysis for the results and geomagnetic activity index showed that those phenomena may relate to the period of the global geomagnetic activity. A preference azimuth of the geomagnetic induction vectors was found in each station by statistical analysis on the time series. It pointed out the possible relatively high conductivity structures. Exactly, geomagnetic vectors of BJI, JIH, LYH and TAY station, which surround the basin of North China, suggested a relatively higher conductivity layer; that of stations around the Erdos block suggested a complicated structure. Three-dimension inversion by ModEM verifies our results.

  5. On predicting changes in the geomagnetic field.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alldredge, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    The present method of using constant secular variation rates to forecast magnetic components at a given site or to forecast spherical harmonic coefficients is known to be inaccurate. A new predictive method using trend and trigonometric functions fitted to known past values is used to extrapolate for a few years into the future. This provides an improvement over the usual linear extrapolation method. -from Author

  6. Effects of magnetic fields produced by simulated and real geomagnetic storms on rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Bretón, J. L.; Mendoza, B.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we report experiments of arterial pressure (AP) measurements of ten Wistar rats subjected to geomagnetic field changes and to artificially stimulated magnetic field variations. Environmental electromagnetic effects were screened using a semianechoic chamber, which allowed us to discern the effects associated with geomagnetic storms. We stimulated the subjects with a linear magnetic profile constructed from the average changes of sudden storm commencement (SSC) and principal phases of geomagnetic storms measured between 1996 and 2008 with Dst ⩽ -100 nT. Although we found no statistically significant AP variations, statistically significant AP changes were found when a geomagnetic storm occurred during the experimental period. Using the observed geomagnetic storm variations to construct a geomagnetic profile to stimulate the rats, we found that the geomagnetic field variations associated to the SSC day were capable of increasing the subjects AP between 7% and 9% from the reference value. Under this magnetic variation, the subjects presented a notably restless behavior not seen under other conditions. We conclude that even very small changes in the geomagnetic field associated with a geomagnetic storm can produce a measurable and reproducible physiological response.

  7. Comparative morphological analysis of the diurnal rhythms in geomagnetic and seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desherevskii, A. V.; Sidorin, A. Ya.

    2016-12-01

    To verify the hypothesis of the possible influence of geomagnetic variations on seismicity, the structures of the diurnal rhythms of seismicity in Garm research area, Tajikistan, and geomagnetic activity are investigated in detail using the regional index of geomagnetic activity at the Tashkent Astronomical Observatory. We compare (1) the average shape of the diurnal variations and its seasonal changes; (2) temporal changes in special coefficients of the amplitude variations and the diurnal variation stability. It is revealed that the dynamics of the mentioned parameters differ considerably between the geomagnetic and seismic activities. We conclude that the results obtained on the basis of the used data and processing techniques do not confirm the hypothesis of possible influence of weak geomagnetic variations on background seismicity in the Garm region, Tajikistan.

  8. High-resolution record of the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion at the Blake-Bahama Outer Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, Mark D.; Mac Niocaill, Conall; Thomas, Alex L.; Henderson, Gideon M.

    2013-12-01

    Geomagnetic excursions are brief deviations of the geomagnetic field from behaviour expected during `normal secular' variation. The Laschamp excursion at ˜41 ka was one such deviation. Previously published records suggest rapid changes in field direction and a concurrent substantial decrease in field intensity associated with this excursion. Accurate dating of excursions, and determination of their durations from multiple locations, is vital to our understanding of global field behaviour during these deviations. We present here high-resolution palaeomagnetic records of the Laschamp excursion obtained from two Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites, 1061 and 1062 on the Blake-Bahama Outer Ridge (ODP Leg 172). High sedimentation rates (˜30-40 cm kyr-1) at these locations allow determination of transitional field behaviour during the excursion. Palaeomagnetic measurements of discrete samples from four cores reveal a single excursional feature, across an interval of 30 cm, associated with a broader palaeointensity low. We determine the age and duration of the Laschamp excursion using a stratigraphy linked to the δ18O record from the Greenland ice cores. This chronology dates the Laschamp excursion at the Blake Ridge to 41.3 ka. The excursion is characterized by rapid transitions (less than 200 yr) between stable normal polarity and a partially reversed polarity state. The palaeointensity record is in good agreement between the two sites, revealing two prominent minima. The first minimum is associated with the Laschamp excursion at 41 ka and the second corresponds to the Mono Lake excursion at ˜35.5 ka. We determine that the directional excursion during the Laschamp at this location was no longer than ˜400 yr, occurring within a palaeointensity minimum that lasted 2000 yr. The Laschamp excursion at this location is much shorter in duration than the Blake and Iceland Basin excursions.

  9. On Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1998-01-01

    A statistical description of Earth's broad scale, core-source magnetic field has been developed and tested. The description features an expected, or mean, spatial magnetic power spectrum that is neither "flat" nor "while" at any depth, but is akin to spectra advanced by Stevenson and McLeod. This multipole spectrum describes the magnetic energy range; it is not steep enough for Gubbins' magnetic dissipation range. Natural variations of core multipole powers about their mean values are to be expected over geologic time and are described via trial probability distribution functions that neither require nor prohibit magnetic isotropy. The description is thus applicable to core-source dipole and low degree non-dipole fields despite axial dipole anisotropy. The description is combined with main field models of modem satellite and surface geomagnetic measurements to make testable predictions of: (1) the radius of Earth's core, (2) mean paleomagnetic field intensity, and (3) the mean rates and durations of both dipole power excursions and durable axial dipole reversals. The predicted core radius is 0.7% above the 3480 km seismologic value. The predicted root mean square paleointensity (35.6 mu T) and mean Virtual Axial Dipole Moment (about 6.2 lx 1022 Am(exp 2)) are within the range of various mean paleointensity estimates. The predicted mean rate of dipole power excursions, as defined by an absolute dipole moment <20% of the 1980 value, is 9.04/Myr and 14% less than obtained by analysis of a 4 Myr paleointensity record. The predicted mean rate of durable axial dipole reversals (2.26/Myr) is 2.3% more than established by the polarity time-scale for the past 84 Myr. The predicted mean duration of axial dipole reversals (5533 yr) is indistinguishable from an observational value. The accuracy of these predictions demonstrates the power and utility of the description, which is thought to merit further development and testing. It is suggested that strong stable stratification

  10. Introduction to Geomagnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinze, William J.

    Coincidentally, as I sat down in late October 2003 to read and review the second edition of Wallace H. Campbell's text, Introduction to Geomagnetic Fields, we received warnings from the news media of a massive solar flare and its possible effect on power supply systems and satellite communications. News programs briefly explained the source of Sun-Earth interactions. If you are interested in learning more about the physics of the connection between sun spots and power supply systems and their impact on orbiting satellites, I urge you to become acquainted with Campbell's book. It presents an interesting and informative explanation of the geomagnetic field and its applications to a wide variety of topics, including oil exploration, climate change, and fraudulent claims of the utility of magnetic fields for alleviating human pain. Geomagnetism, the study of the nature and processes of the Earth's magnetic fields and its application to the investigation of the Earth, its processes, and history, is a mature science with a well-developed theoretical foundation and a vast array of observations. It is discussed in varied detail in Earth physics books and most entry-level geoscience texts. The latter treatments largely are driven by the need to discuss paleomagnetism as an essential tool in studying plate tectonics. A more thorough explanation of geomagnetism is needed by many interested scientists in related fields and by laypersons. This is the objective of Campbell's book. It is particularly germane in view of a broad range of geomagnetic topics that are at the forefront of today's science, including environmental magnetism, so-called ``jerks'' observed in the Earth's magnetic field, the perplexing magnetic field of Mars, improved satellite magnetic field observations, and the increasing availability of high-quality continental magnetic anomaly maps, to name only a few.

  11. Secular evolution in disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapen, J. H.

    2013-05-01

    The detailed study of the different structural components of nearby galaxies can supply vital information about the secular, or internal, evolution of these galaxies which they may have undergone since their formation. We highlight a series of new studies based on the analysis of mid-infrared images of over 2000 local galaxies which we are collecting within the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S^4G). In particular, we discuss new results on the thick and thin disk components of galaxies, which turn out to be roughly equally massive, and whose properties indicate that the thick disks mostly formed in situ, and to a lesser degree as a result of galaxy-galaxy interactions and secular evolution. We then briefly review recent research into rings in galaxies, which are common and closely linked to secular evolution of galaxies. Finally, we report on the research into local galaxy morphology, kinematics and stellar populations that we will perform over the coming four years within the EU-funded initial training network DAGAL (Detailed Anatomy of GALaxies).

  12. Range indices of geomagnetic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, W.F.; Green, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    The simplest index of geomagnetic activity is the range in nT from maximum to minimum value of the field in a given time interval. The hourly range R was recommended by IAGA for use at observatories at latitudes greater than 65??, but was superceded by AE. The most used geomagnetic index K is based on the range of activity in a 3 h interval corrected for the regular daily variation. In order to take advantage of real time data processing, now available at many observatories, it is proposed to introduce a 1 h range index and also a 3 h range index. Both will be computed hourly, i.e. each will have a series of 24 per day, the 3 h values overlapping. The new data will be available as the range (R) of activity in nT and also as a logarithmic index (I) of the range. The exponent relating index to range in nT is based closely on the scale used for computing K values. The new ranges and range indices are available, from June 1987, to users in real time and can be accessed by telephone connection or computer network. Their first year of production is regarded as a trial period during which their value to the scientific and commercial communities will be assessed, together with their potential as indicators of regional and global disturbances' and in which trials will be conducted into ways of eliminating excessive bias at quiet times due to the rate of change of the daily variation field. ?? 1988.

  13. Ionospheric redistribution during geomagnetic storms.

    PubMed

    Immel, T J; Mannucci, A J

    2013-12-01

    [1]The abundance of plasma in the daytime ionosphere is often seen to grow greatly during geomagnetic storms. Recent reports suggest that the magnitude of the plasma density enhancement depends on the UT of storm onset. This possibility is investigated over a 7year period using global maps of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) produced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The analysis confirms that the American sector exhibits, on average, larger storm time enhancement in ionospheric plasma content, up to 50% in the afternoon middle-latitude region and 30% in the vicinity of the high-latitude auroral cusp, with largest effect in the Southern Hemisphere. We investigate whether this effect is related to the magnitude of the causative magnetic storms. Using the same advanced Dst index employed to sort the TEC maps into quiet and active (Dst<-100 nT) sets, we find variation in storm strength that corresponds closely to the TEC variation but follows it by 3-6h. For this and other reasons detailed in this report, we conclude that the UT-dependent peak in storm time TEC is likely not related to the magnitude of external storm time forcing but more likely attributable to phenomena such as the low magnetic field in the South American region. The large Dst variation suggests a possible system-level effect of the observed variation in ionospheric storm response on the measured strength of the terrestrial ring current, possibly connected through UT-dependent modulation of ion outflow.

  14. Beryllium isotopes as tracers of Lake Lisan (last Glacial Dead Sea) hydrology and the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmaker, Reuven; Stein, Mordechai; Beer, Jürg; Christl, Marcus; Fink, David; Lazar, Boaz

    2014-08-01

    The content of the cosmogenic isotope 10Be (t1/2=1.39 Ma) in lacustrine sediments that deposit in lakes with a large watershed is susceptible to both climate and cosmogenic production rate variations. In order to distinguish between these two controls, we measured 10Be and major elements in several sections of the annually laminated sediments of the Lake Lisan (the last Glacial precursor of the Dead Sea) that are composed of detrital sediments and primary (evaporitic) aragonites. The sections were selected to represent regional hydrology and climate as reflected by different lake configurations (level rise, drop and high-stands) and rapid change in the 10Be production rate during the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion. Since the short-lived cosmogenic “sister” of 10Be, 7Be (t1/2=53.3 d) has virtually no recycled component, the recycled 10Be in Lake Lisan detrital sediments was evaluated by measuring 7Be in their modern equivalents: modern flood suspended matter, dust and mud cracks. Our results demonstrate that although the recycled 10Be component is significant, secular variations in the 10Be concentration in Lake Lisan sediments correlate with hydrological variations and geomagnetic excursions. During periods of moderate variations in 10Be production rate, the 10Be concentration in the Lisan detrital sediments positively correlates with lake level, Al + Fe content and the (Al + Fe)/(Ca + Mg) ratio. These correlations suggest that the 10Be is adsorbed on the fine silicate component (probably clays) of the detrital laminae. The fine silicates together with carbonates were transported to Dead Sea drainage basin mainly as airborne dust that after a short residence time was washed into Lake Lisan as flood suspended matter. We suggest that preferential dissolution of carbonates in the flood suspended matter concentrated the residual fine component leading to the positive correlation between 10Be and the (Al + Fe)/(Ca + Mg) ratio. During periods of increased water

  15. Secular resonances with Ceres and Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsirvoulis, Georgios; Novaković, Bojan

    2016-12-01

    In this work we explore dynamical perturbations induced by the massive asteroids Ceres and Vesta on main-belt asteroids through secular resonances. First we determine the location of the linear secular resonances with Ceres and Vesta in the main belt, using a purely numerical technique. Then we use a set of numerical simulations of fictitious asteroids to investigate the importance of these secular resonances in the orbital evolution of main-belt asteroids. We found, evaluating the magnitude of the perturbations in the proper elements of the test particles, that in some cases the strength of these secular resonances is comparable to that of known non-linear secular resonances with the giant planets. Finally we explore the asteroid families that are crossed by the secular resonances we studied, and identified several cases where the latter seem to play an important role in their post-impact evolution.

  16. Secular Trends in the Mean Longitudes of Planets Derived from Optical Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnik, Yuri B.; Masreliez, C. Johan

    2004-08-01

    About 240,000 worldwide optical observations of the Sun, Mercury, and Venus, accumulated during the entire era of classical astrometry from James Bradley up to the present, are used to analyze the secular longitude variations of the innermost planets. A reduction method relating historical planetary observations to the Hipparcos reference frame is presented. Secular trends in the longitudes of the Sun, Mercury, and Venus with respect to the ephemeris DE405 are estimated for the time span 1750-2000.

  17. Globally strong geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Hoabin; Yu, Yongjae; Lee, Chan Hee; Kim, Ran Hee; Park, Jingyu; Doh, Seong-Jae; Kim, Wonnyon; Sung, Hyongmi

    2013-12-01

    High-fidelity geomagnetic field intensity determination was carried out using 191 baked fragments collected from 20 kilns or hearths with ages ranging between ∼1200 BC and ∼AD 1725 in South Korea. Geomagnetic field intensity variation displayed three narrow minima at ∼800-700 BC, ∼AD 700, and ∼AD 1600 and two maxima at ∼1200-1100 BC and ∼AD 1000-1100. In most time intervals, virtual axial dipole moment (VADM) variation is confined within 20% of the present VADM. However, geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 yr ago is nearly 40% larger than the present value. Such high VADMs circa 3000 yr ago are in phase with those in other longitudinal bands in northern hemisphere centered at 5E (France), 30E (the Middle East) and 200E (Hawaii). Although strong geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 yr ago is globally synchronous, the highest VADM occurs at slightly different time intervals in different locations. Hence it is possible that the globally strong geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 yr ago reflects the migration of persistent hemispheric flux in northern hemisphere or an episode of geomagnetic field hemispheric asymmetry.

  18. Foundations of Geomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Andy

    The study of the magnetic field of the Earth, or geomagnetism, is one of the oldest lines of scientific enquiry. Indeed, it has often been said that William Gilbert's De Magnete, published in 1600 and predating Isaac Newton's Principia by 87 years, can claim to be the first true scientific textbook; his study was essentially the first of academic rather than practical interest.What then, we may ask, has been accomplished in the nearly 400 intervening years up to the publication of Foundations of Geomagnetism? In short, a wealth of observational evidence, considerable physical understanding, and a great deal of mathematical apparatus have accrued, placing the subject on a much surer footing.The latter two categories are described in considerable detail, and with attendant rigor, in this book. The sphericity of the Earth means that a frequent theme in the book is the solution of the partial differential equations of electrodynamics in a spherical geometry.

  19. Geomagnetic Field Variability in the Western Canadian Arctic Since the Last Deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Onge, G.; Lise-Pronovost, A.; Barletta, F.; Channell, J. E.; Brachfeld, S. A.; Polyak, L. V.; Darby, D. A.; Rochon, A.; Scott, D. B.

    2009-12-01

    Several piston cores (HLY0501-05JPC, -06JPC, -08JPC and 2004-804-803, -124, -250, -650, -750) were recently collected in the western Canadian Arctic and Arctic Alaskan margin as part of major international scientific programs such as CASES (Canadian Arctic Shelf Exchange Study), ArcticNet and HOTRAX (Healy-Oden Trans Arctic Expedition). Due to the seafloor imaging and subbottom profiling capabilities of the deployed ice-breakers (CCGS Amundsen and USCCG Healy), the coring sites were carefully selected for high sediment accumulation areas not affected by mass wasting events nor by ice scouring. The sedimentological, physical and magnetic properties of these piston cores in conjunction with AMS-14C dating reveal that these cores span the last deglaciation to the present with sedimentation rates as high as 350 cm/ka. Here we highlight key paleomagnetic secular variations and relative paleointensity findings from selected cores collected off the Arctic Alaskan margin, the Mackenzie delta and in the Amundsen Gulf in order to synthesize geomagnetic field variability in the western Canadian Arctic since the last deglaciation.

  20. Geomagnetic imprinting: A unifying hypothesis of long-distance natal homing in salmon and sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Kenneth J; Putman, Nathan F; Lohmann, Catherine M F

    2008-12-09

    Several marine animals, including salmon and sea turtles, disperse across vast expanses of ocean before returning as adults to their natal areas to reproduce. How animals accomplish such feats of natal homing has remained an enduring mystery. Salmon are known to use chemical cues to identify their home rivers at the end of spawning migrations. Such cues, however, do not extend far enough into the ocean to guide migratory movements that begin in open-sea locations hundreds or thousands of kilometers away. Similarly, how sea turtles reach their nesting areas from distant sites is unknown. However, both salmon and sea turtles detect the magnetic field of the Earth and use it as a directional cue. In addition, sea turtles derive positional information from two magnetic elements (inclination angle and intensity) that vary predictably across the globe and endow different geographic areas with unique magnetic signatures. Here we propose that salmon and sea turtles imprint on the magnetic field of their natal areas and later use this information to direct natal homing. This novel hypothesis provides the first plausible explanation for how marine animals can navigate to natal areas from distant oceanic locations. The hypothesis appears to be compatible with present and recent rates of field change (secular variation); one implication, however, is that unusually rapid changes in the Earth's field, as occasionally occur during geomagnetic polarity reversals, may affect ecological processes by disrupting natal homing, resulting in widespread colonization events and changes in population structure.

  1. On regional geomagnetic charts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alldredge, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    When regional geomagnetic charts for areas roughly the size of the US were compiled by hand, some large local anomalies were displayed in the isomagnetic lines. Since the late 1960s, when the compilation of charts using computers and mathematical models was started, most of the details available in the hand drawn regional charts have been lost. One exception to this is the Canadian magnetic declination chart for 1980. This chart was constructed using a 180 degrees spherical harmonic model. -from Author

  2. On extreme geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid, Consuelo; Palacios, Judith; Saiz, Elena; Guerrero, Antonio; Cerrato, Yolanda

    2014-10-01

    Extreme geomagnetic storms are considered as one of the major natural hazards for technology-dependent society. Geomagnetic field disturbances can disrupt the operation of critical infrastructures relying on space-based assets, and can also result in terrestrial effects, such as the Quebec electrical disruption in 1989. Forecasting potential hazards is a matter of high priority, but considering large flares as the only criterion for early-warning systems has demonstrated to release a large amount of false alarms and misses. Moreover, the quantification of the severity of the geomagnetic disturbance at the terrestrial surface using indices as Dst cannot be considered as the best approach to give account of the damage in utilities. High temporal resolution local indices come out as a possible solution to this issue, as disturbances recorded at the terrestrial surface differ largely both in latitude and longitude. The recovery phase of extreme storms presents also some peculiar features which make it different from other less intense storms. This paper goes through all these issues related to extreme storms by analysing a few events, highlighting the March 1989 storm, related to the Quebec blackout, and the October 2003 event, when several transformers burnt out in South Africa.

  3. The national geomagnetic initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Earth's magnetic field, through its variability over a spectrum of spatial and temporal scales, contains fundamental information on the solid Earth and geospace environment (the latter comprising the atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere). Integrated studies of the geomagnetic field have the potential to address a wide range of important processes in the deep mantle and core, asthenosphere, lithosphere, oceans, and the solar-terrestrial environment. These studies have direct applications to important societal problems, including resource assessment and exploration, natural hazard mitigation, safe navigation, and the maintenance and survivability of communications and power systems on the ground and in space. Studies of the Earth's magnetic field are supported by a variety of federal and state agencies as well as by private industry. Both basic and applied research is presently supported by several federal agencies, including the National Science Foundation (NSF), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) (through the Navy, Air Force, and Defense Mapping Agency). Although each agency has a unique, well-defined mission in geomagnetic studies, many areas of interest overlap. For example, NASA, the Navy, and USGS collaborate closely in the development of main field reference models. NASA, NSF, and the Air Force collaborate in space physics. These interagency linkages need to be strengthened. Over the past decade, new opportunities for fundamental advances in geomagnetic research have emerged as a result of three factors: well-posed, first-order scientific questions; increased interrelation of research activities dealing with geomagnetic phenomena; and recent developments in technology. These new opportunities can be exploited through a national geomagnetic initiative to define objectives and

  4. Asteroid Secular Resonant Proper Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidelli, Alessandro

    1993-09-01

    A practical algorithm for the computation of the dynamic evolution of asteroids which are inside or close to a secular resonance has been developed. The results are checked with many numerical simulations of both real and fictitious objects. These tests prove that the algorithm is able to identify the dynamic nature of resonant objects and distinguish between future planet crossers and regular bodies. The short CPU time necessary for its execution makes it a useful tool for studying the mechanisms of meteorite transport to the inner Solar System. For this purpose, the sets of initial conditions which lead to large eccentricity in the v6 secular resonance are identified. Finally, the dynamic behavior of 44 numbered asteroids very close to the v6 resonance is analyzed. Only 4 of these asteroids are found in regions dangerous for their stability. A few others become temporary Mars crossers. The rest of them, as 6 Hebe, have a moderate eccentricity during all their quasi-periodic dynamic evolution.

  5. Holocene records of geomagnetic field behavior from a north-south transect along the western Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brachfeld, S. A.; Shah, D. P.; St-Onge, M.; St-Onge, G.

    2013-12-01

    Geochronology is inherently difficult when working with Antarctic margin sediments. Radiocarbon dating and oxygen isotope stratigraphy are challenging or impossible in sites with poor preservation of biogenic calcite. Radiocarbon dating of the acid insoluble organic matter (AIOM) is further complicated by organically lean sediment and the presence of reworked organic carbon or detrital carbon from sedimentary rocks. These complications limit the ability to interpret a paleoclimate record. Geomagnetic paleointensity dating is a proven 'tuning' technique that has been successfully applied in several studies around the Antarctic margin. However, the reference curves to which these sites were tuned were constructed primarily from Northern Hemisphere data. Here we present paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) and relative paleointensity (RPI) data from three Antarctic Peninsula sites that possess independent chronologies and which have moderate to ultra-high sedimentation rates (40 - 700 cm/ka). Maxwell Bay, located in the volcanic South Shetland Islands, is an ultra-high-resolution site with strongly magnetic sediments from which the Shallow Drilling (SHALDRIL) program recovered a 108-m record spanning the last 14 ka. Outer Barilari Bay and Hugo Island Trough, which lie to the South along the western Antarctic Peninsula, are moderate resolution sites with a high proportion of biogenic silica. Maxwell Bay and Bariliari Bay are unique in that they possess homogenous sediment and uniform magnetic mineral assemblages, while also preserving biogenic calcite, a rare combination on the Antarctic margin. All three sites preserve strong, stable remanent magnetizations with an easily isolated characteristic component and MAD values generally < 2°, with the exception of turbidites, intervals with abundant dropstones, and biosiliceous ooze intervals. Inclination values fluctuate between the present-day value at the cores sites (-58°) and the geomagnetic axial dipole inclination

  6. The Secular University and Its Critics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobani, Yuval

    2016-01-01

    Universities in the USA have become bastions of secularity in a distinctly religious society. As such, they are subjected to a variety of robust and rigorous religious critiques. In this paper I do not seek to engage in the debate between the supporters of the secular university and its opponents. Furthermore, I do not claim to summarize the…

  7. [Nursing care at home and secularism].

    PubMed

    Lecointre, Brigitte

    2015-12-01

    The question of secularism, long-time confined to schools and the relationships between the Church and State, is today being raised in the field of public health. Nurses are directly affected and are integrating this dimension of secularism into their care practices. A private practice nurse describes the effect these changes are having on her practice in patients' homes.

  8. Toward a Definition of Secular Humanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1987-01-01

    This article describes secular humanism and refutes arguments that secular humanism is a religion and, as such, is practiced by most educators. It concludes that knowledge is the most important tool for combatting evangelical right-wing or extreme left-wing movements. (MT)

  9. Unsafe Gods: Security, Secularism and Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    This book makes the compelling argument that religion can be complicit in conflict and that a new secularism is vital to foster security. Using insights from complexity science, it shows how dynamic secularism can be used to accommodate diverse faiths and beliefs within worldly politics. Exploration of the interplay of religion and education in…

  10. Textbook Censorship and Secular Humanism in Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Franklin

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the activities of the New Christian Right (NCR) related to teaching evolution in the public schools. Describes the effects of legislation and court litigation on the NCR's efforts to eliminate secular humanism from textbooks. Provides an NCR definition of secular humanism. (LS)

  11. Multifractal analysis of low-latitude geomagnetic fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolzan, M. J. A.; Rosa, R. R.; Sahai, Y.

    2009-02-01

    The technique of large deviation multifractal spectrum has shown that the high-latitude (77.5° N, 69.2° W) geomagnetic fluctuations can be described from direct dissipation process or loading-unloading regimes of the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling. In this paper, we analyze the H-component of low-latitude (22.4° S, 43.6° W) geomagnetic field variability observed during the month of July 2000 at the Geomagnetic Observatory, Vassouras, RJ, Brazil. The variability pattern during this period is a mixture of quiet and disturbed days including the Bastille Day intense geomagnetic storm on 15 July. Due to the complexity of this data, we pursue a detailed analysis of the geomagnetic fluctuations in different time scales including a multifractal approach using the singular power spectrum deviations obtained from the wavelet transform modulus maxima (WTMM). The results suggest, as observed from high-latitude data, the occurrence of low-latitude multifractal processes driving the intermittent coupling between the solar wind-magnetosphere and geomagnetic field variations. On finer scales possible physical mechanisms in the context of nonlinear magnetosphere response are discussed.

  12. Operational Geomagnetic Forecast Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeniv, O.; Polonska, A.; Parnowski, A.

    2014-12-01

    The operational forecasting service for real-time geomagnetic indices Dst and Kp was described. The warning time for the Earth to the intersection of the Dst index is 1-4 hours, for the Kp index - 3 hours. The skillscore parameter, which is defined as a decrease of the relative mean square error with respect to the trivial model, was approximately 40% for Dst and 15% for Kp. The service works on-line freely available through STAFF http://www.staff.oma.be/ browser.

  13. Hazards of geomagnetic storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herzog, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    Geomagnetic storms are large and sometimes rapid fluctuations in the Earth's magnetic field that are related to disturbances on the Sun's surface. Although it is not widely recognized, these transient magnetic disturbances can be a significant hazard to people and property. Many of us know that the intensity of the auroral lights increases during magnetic storms, but few people realize that these storms can also cause massive power outages, interrupt radio communications and satellite operations, increase corrosion in oil and gas pipelines, and lead to spuriously high rejection rates in the manufacture of sensitive electronic equipment. 

  14. Ionospheric redistribution during geomagnetic storms

    PubMed Central

    Immel, T J; Mannucci, A J

    2013-01-01

    [1]The abundance of plasma in the daytime ionosphere is often seen to grow greatly during geomagnetic storms. Recent reports suggest that the magnitude of the plasma density enhancement depends on the UT of storm onset. This possibility is investigated over a 7year period using global maps of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) produced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The analysis confirms that the American sector exhibits, on average, larger storm time enhancement in ionospheric plasma content, up to 50% in the afternoon middle-latitude region and 30% in the vicinity of the high-latitude auroral cusp, with largest effect in the Southern Hemisphere. We investigate whether this effect is related to the magnitude of the causative magnetic storms. Using the same advanced Dst index employed to sort the TEC maps into quiet and active (Dst<−100 nT) sets, we find variation in storm strength that corresponds closely to the TEC variation but follows it by 3–6h. For this and other reasons detailed in this report, we conclude that the UT-dependent peak in storm time TEC is likely not related to the magnitude of external storm time forcing but more likely attributable to phenomena such as the low magnetic field in the South American region. The large Dst variation suggests a possible system-level effect of the observed variation in ionospheric storm response on the measured strength of the terrestrial ring current, possibly connected through UT-dependent modulation of ion outflow. PMID:26167429

  15. High-resolution palaeomagnetic records of the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion from the Blake Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Niocaill, C.; Bourne, M. D.; Thomas, A. L.; Henderson, G. M.

    2013-05-01

    Geomagnetic excursions are brief (1000s of years) deviations in geomagnetic field behaviour from that expected during 'normal secular' variation. The Laschamp excursion (~41 ka) was a global deviation in geomagnetic field behaviour. Previously published records suggest rapid changes in field direction and a concurrent substantial decrease in field intensity. Accurate dating of excursions and determinations of their durations from multiple locations is vital to our understanding to global field behaviour during these deviations. We present here high-resolution palaeomagnetic records of the Laschamp excursion obtained from two Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 1061 and 1062 on the Blake-Bahama Outer Ridge (ODP Leg 172) Relatively high sedimentation rates (~30-40 cm kyr-1) at these locations allow the determination of transitional field behaviour during the excursion. Despite their advantages, sedimentary records can be limited by the potential for unrecognized variations in sedimentation rates between widely spaced age-constrained boundaries. Rather than assuming a constant sedimentation rate between assigned age tie-points, we employ measurements of the concentration of 230Thxs in the sediment. 230Thxs is a constant flux proxy and may be used to assess variations in the sedimentation rates through the core sections of interest. Following this approach, we present a new age model for Site 1061 that allows us to better determine the temporal behaviour of the Laschamp excursion with greater accuracy and known uncertainty. Palaeomagnetic measurements of discrete samples from four cores reveal a single excursional feature, across an interval of 30 cm, associated with a broader palaeointensity low. The excursion is characterised by rapid transitions (less than 200 years) between a stable normal polarity and a partially-reversed, polarity. Peaks in inclination either side of the directional excursion indicate periods of time when the local field is dominated by vertical

  16. Secular Evolution in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormendy, John

    2013-10-01

    Self-gravitating systems evolve toward the most tightly bound configuration that is reachable via the evolution processes that are available to them. They do this by spreading -- the inner parts shrink while the outer parts expand -- provided that some physical process efficiently transports energy or angular momentum outward. The reason is that self-gravitating systems have negative specific heats. As a result, the evolution of stars, star clusters, protostellar and protoplanetary disks, black hole accretion disks and galaxy disks are fundamentally similar. How evolution proceeds then depends on the evolution processes that are available to each kind of self-gravitating system. These processes and their consequences for galaxy disks are the subjects of my lectures and of this Canary Islands Winter School. I begin with a review of the formation, growth and death of bars. Then I review the slow (`secular') rearrangement of energy, angular momentum, and mass that results from interactions between stars or gas clouds and collective phenomena such as bars, oval disks, spiral structure and triaxial dark haloes. The `existence-proof' phase of this work is largely over: we have a good heuristic understanding of how nonaxisymmetric structures rearrange disk gas into outer rings, inner rings and stuff dumped onto the centre. The results of simulations correspond closely to the morphology of barred and oval galaxies. Gas that is transported to small radii reaches high densities. Observations confirm that many barred and oval galaxies have dense central concentrations of gas and star formation. The result is to grow, on timescales of a few Gyr, dense central components that are frequently mistaken for classical (elliptical-galaxy-like) bulges but that were grown slowly out of the disk (not made rapidly by major mergers). The resulting picture of secular galaxy evolution accounts for the richness observed in galaxy structure. We can distinguish between classical and pseudo

  17. Lagged association between geomagnetic activity and diminished nocturnal pain thresholds in mice.

    PubMed

    Galic, M A; Persinger, M A

    2007-10-01

    A wide variety of behaviors in several species has been statistically associated with the natural variations in geomagnetism. To examine whether changes in geomagnetic activity are associated with pain thresholds, adult mice were exposed to a hotplate paradigm once weekly for 52 weeks during the dark cycle. Planetary A index values from the previous 6 days of a given hotplate session were correlated with the mean response latency for subjects to the thermal stimulus. We found that hotplate latency was significantly (P < 0.05) and inversely correlated (rho = -0.25) with the daily geomagnetic intensity 3 days prior to testing. Therefore, if the geomagnetic activity was greater 3 days before a given hotplate trial, subjects tended to exhibit shorter response latencies, suggesting lower pain thresholds or less analgesia. These results are supported by related experimental findings and suggest that natural variations in geomagnetic intensity may influence nociceptive behaviors in mice.

  18. Geomagnetic field behaviour preceding a Superchron: new evidence for a weak Devonian geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, L.; Anwar, T.; Scherbakova, V.; Biggin, A. J.; Kravchinsky, V. A.; Shatsillo, A.; Holt, J.; Pavlov, V.

    2015-12-01

    The ~50 million year transition from the peak in reversal frequency in the Middle Jurassic (~170Ma), associated with a weak geomagnetic field, to the stable and apparently strong field during the Cretaceous Normal Superchron (84-121Ma), represents a dramatic change in time-averaged geomagnetic field behaviour during the Mesozoic Era. New evidence from Siberian samples suggests there is a similar transition in geomagnetic field behaviour during the Palaeozoic, with a weak geomagnetic field in the Upper Devonian preceding the Permo-Carboniferous Superchron (262-318Ma). Both sites, the Viluy Traps and the Zharovsk complex of the Patom Margin, have seemingly reliable, published palaeomagnetic directions and new age constraints, 364.4 ± 1.7Ma (40Ar/39A) 371-377Ma (U-Pb) respectively. The samples were measured using the Thermal Thellier-Coe protocol with partial thermo-remanent magnetisation (pTRM) and tail checks and the Microwave Thellier-IZZI protocol with pTRM checks. Accepted Arai plots show positive pTRM checks, a clear relation between distinct primary directional and palaeointensity components and little to no zig-zagging. Three distinct magneto-mineralogical types were identified from SEM and rock magnetic techniques; low Ti- and intermediate Ti- titanomagnetite and possible maghemite, with mineral type affecting the success rate of samples but resulting in no significant variation in palaeointensity results. The Arai plots also commonly have a distinct two-slope concave-up shape, although non-heating, pseudo-Thellier experiments have supported this resulting from a strong overprint component rather than alteration or multi-domain effects. Results from these experiments give low site mean values between 2.3-29.9μT (Virtual Dipole Moments 4-50.6 ZAm2). The apparently periodic (~180 million years) transitions in geomagnetic field behaviour may indicate the influence of mantle convection changing heat flow across the Core Mantle Boundary.

  19. Full vector spherical harmonic analysis of the Holocene geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Marcia

    High-quality time-series paleomagnetic measurements have been used to derive spherical harmonic models of Earth's magnetic field for the past 2,000 years. A newly-developed data compilation, PSVMOD2.0 consists of time-series directional and intensity records that significantly improve the data quality and global distribution used to develop previous spherical harmonic models. PSVMOD2.0 consists of 185 paleomagnetic time series records from 85 global sites, including 30 full-vector records (inclination, declination and intensity). It includes data from additional sites in the Southern Hemisphere and Arctic and includes globally distributed sediment relative paleointensity records, significantly improving global coverage over previous models. PSVMOD2.0 records have been assessed in a series of 7 regional intercomparison studies, four in the Northern Hemisphere and 3 in the southern hemisphere. Comparisons on a regional basis have improved the quality and chronology of the data and allowed investigation of spatial coherence and the scale length associated with paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) features. We have developed a modeling methodology based on nonlinear inversion of the PSVMOD2.0 directional and intensity records. Models of the geomagnetic field in 100-year snapshots have been derived for the past 2,000 with the ultimate goal of developing models spanning the past 8,000 years. We validate the models and the methodology by comparing with the GUFM1 historical models during the 400-year period of overlap. We find that the spatial distribution of sites and quality of data are sufficient to derive models that agree with GUFM1 in the large-scale characteristics of the field. We use the the models derived in this study to downward continue the field to the core-mantle boundary and examine characteristics of the large-scale structure of the magnetic field at the source region. The derived models are temporally consistent from one epoch to the next and exhibit

  20. Comparison Of The Global Analytic Models Of The Main Geomagnetic Field With The Stratospheric Balloon Magnetic Data 335

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Yu.; Filippov, S.; Frunze, A.

    2013-12-01

    Three global analytical models of a main geomagnetic field constructed by satellite data are used: model IGRF, Daily Mean Spherical Harmonic Models (DMSHM), and model EMM/2010, and also scalar data of geomagnetic field and its gradients, received in stratospheric balloon gradient magnetic surveys at altitudes of ~30 km. At these altitudes the regional magnetic field is formed from all sources of the Earth's crust. It enables to receive along lengthy routes of surveys the fullest data on regional and longwave-lenght magnetic anomalies. Model DMSHM is used at extracting of magnetic anomalies for elimination of a secular variation up to significant value 0,2 nT. The model can be constructed within the limits of ± 1 months from the moment stratospheric balloon surveys with beneficial day terms with magnetic activity up to Kp <20, that leads to an error of representation of main MFE equal ±5 нТл. It is possible at presence acting for the period of stratospheric balloon magnetic survey of the satellite, for example, Swarm. On stratospheric balloon data it is shown, that model EMM/2010 unsatisfactorily displays MFE at altitude of 30 km. Hence, the qualitative model of the constant (main and anomaly) magnetic field cannot be constructed only with use of satellite and ground data. The improved model constant MFE, constructed according to satellite and stratospheric balloon magnetic surveys, developed up to a degree and the order m=n=720, will have a reliable data about regional crust magnetic field, hence, and about deep magnetic structure of the Earth's crust. The use gradient magnetic surveys aboard stratospheric balloons allows to find the places alternating approximately through 3000 km in which there are no magnetic anomalies. In these places probably to supervise satellite magnetic models for a range of altitude of 20-40 km, timed to stratospheric balloon magnetic surveys.

  1. On Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2000-01-01

    A partial description of Earth's broad scale, core-source magnetic field has been developed and tested three ways. The description features an expected, or mean, spatial magnetic power spectrum that is approximately inversely proportional to horizontal wavenumber atop Earth's core. This multipole spectrum describes a magnetic energy range; it is not steep enough for Gubbins' magnetic dissipation range. Temporal variations of core multipole powers about mean values are to be expected and are described statistically, via trial probability distribution functions, instead of deterministically, via trial solution of closed transport equations. The distributions considered here are closed and neither require nor prohibit magnetic isotropy. The description is therefore applicable to, and tested against, both dipole and low degree non-dipole fields. In Part 1, a physical basis for an expectation spectrum is developed and checked. The description is then combined with main field models of twentieth century satellite and surface geomagnetic field measurements to make testable predictions of the radius of Earth's core. The predicted core radius is 0.7% above the 3480 km seismological value. Partial descriptions of other planetary dipole fields are noted.

  2. Geomagnetically trapped anomalous cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Selesnick, R.S.; Cummings, A.C.; Cummings, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    Since its launch in July 1992, the polar-orbiting satellite SAMPEX has been collecting data on geomagnetically trapped heavy ions, predominantly O, N, and Ne, at energies {ge}15 MeV/nucleon and in a narrow L shell range L = 2. Their location, elemental composition, energy spectra, pitch angle distribution, and time variations all support the theory that these particles originated as singly ionized interplanetary anomalous cosmic rays that were stripped of electrons in the Earth`s upper atmosphere and subsequently trapped. The O are observed primarily at pitch angles outside the atmospheric loss cones, consistent with a trapped population, and their distribution there is nearly isotropic. The abundances relative to O of the N, possible Ne, and especially C are lower than the corresponding interplanetary values, which may be indicative of the trapping efficiencies. The distributions of trapped N, O, and Ne in energy and L shell suggest that most of the ions observed at the SAMPEX altitude of {approximately}600 km are not fully stripped when initially trapped. A comparison of the trapped intensity with the much lower interplanetary intensity of anomalous cosmic rays provides model-dependent estimates of the product of the trapping probability and the average trapped particle lifetime against ionization losses in the residual atmosphere for particles that mirror near the SAMPEX altitude. 36 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Bayesian inference in geomagnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backus, George E.

    1988-01-01

    The inverse problem in empirical geomagnetic modeling is investigated, with critical examination of recently published studies. Particular attention is given to the use of Bayesian inference (BI) to select the damping parameter lambda in the uniqueness portion of the inverse problem. The mathematical bases of BI and stochastic inversion are explored, with consideration of bound-softening problems and resolution in linear Gaussian BI. The problem of estimating the radial magnetic field B(r) at the earth core-mantle boundary from surface and satellite measurements is then analyzed in detail, with specific attention to the selection of lambda in the studies of Gubbins (1983) and Gubbins and Bloxham (1985). It is argued that the selection method is inappropriate and leads to lambda values much larger than those that would result if a reasonable bound on the heat flow at the CMB were assumed.

  4. THEORY OF SECULAR CHAOS AND MERCURY'S ORBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Lithwick, Yoram; Wu Yanqin

    2011-09-20

    We study the chaotic orbital evolution of planetary systems, focusing on secular (i.e., orbit-averaged) interactions, which dominate on long timescales. We first focus on the evolution of a test particle that is forced by multiple planets. To linear order in eccentricity and inclination, its orbit precesses with constant frequencies. But nonlinearities modify the frequencies, and can shift them into and out of resonance with either the planets' eigenfrequencies (forming eccentricity or inclination secular resonances), or with linear combinations of those frequencies (forming mixed high-order secular resonances). The overlap of these nonlinear secular resonances drives secular chaos. We calculate the locations and widths of nonlinear secular resonances, display them together on a newly developed map (the 'map of the mean momenta'), and find good agreement between analytical and numerical results. This map also graphically demonstrates how chaos emerges from overlapping secular resonances. We then apply this newfound understanding to Mercury to elucidate the origin of its orbital chaos. We find that since Mercury's two free precession frequencies (in eccentricity and inclination) lie within {approx}25% of two other eigenfrequencies in the solar system (those of the Jupiter-dominated eccentricity mode and the Venus-dominated inclination mode), secular resonances involving these four modes overlap and cause Mercury's chaos. We confirm this with N-body integrations by showing that a slew of these resonant angles alternately librate and circulate. Our new analytical understanding allows us to calculate the criterion for Mercury to become chaotic: Jupiter and Venus must have eccentricity and inclination of a few percent. The timescale for Mercury's chaotic diffusion depends sensitively on the forcing. As it is, Mercury appears to be perched on the threshold for chaos, with an instability timescale comparable to the lifetime of the solar system.

  5. The Incidence and Management of Conflicts in Secular and Non-Secular Tertiary Institutions in South West Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayodele, Joseph Babatola; Adewumi, Joseph Olukayode

    2007-01-01

    This paper compared the incidence and management of conflicts in secular and non-secular tertiary institutions in Nigeria. The sample of this study was made of sixty staff, and two hundred and forty students randomly selected each from two secular and two non-secular tertiary institutions in south western Nigeria. A validated questionnaire was…

  6. Day-to-Day Variability of H Component of Geomagnetic Field in Central African Sector Provided by YACM (Yaoundé-Cameroon) Amber Magnetometer Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etoundi Messanga, Honoré

    2015-04-01

    The geomagnetic data obtained from Amber Network station in Cameroon has been used for this study. The variability of H component of geomagnetic field has been examined by using geomagnetic field data of X and Y components recorded at AMBER magnetometer station hosted by the Department of Physics of University of Yaoundé (3.87°N, 11.52°E). The day-to-day variability of the horizontal intensity of the geomagnetic field has been examined and shows that the scattering of H component of magnetic field variation is more on disturbed than on quiet days. The signatures H of geomagnetic Sq and Sd variations in intensities in the geomagnetic element, has been studied. This paper shows that the daytime variations in intensities of geomagnetic elements H, Sq(H) and Sd(H) respectively are generally greater at diurnal-times than at night-times. This study mainly interests to answer to two questions: 1) how can geomagnetic variations be used to study the equatorial ionosphere electrodynamics and electrojet equatorial over Africa in general and Cameroon in particular? 2) How can geomagnetic variations be used to monitor and predict Space weather events in Cameroon? This study presents and interprets the results of H component of geomagnetic field variations during magnetic storms and on quiet days.

  7. H-alpha response to geomagnetic disturbed activity at Arecibo.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Pedrina; Kerr, R.; Noto, J.; Brum, Christiano; Gonzalez, Sixto

    Configured with a spectral resolution of 0.0086 nm at 6563A, the low resolution Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) installed at Arecibo Observatory sampled the geocoronal Balmer-alpha emission for sixty nights during new moon periods from September 2006 to September 2007. In this work two of these periods are analyzed according to the variability with the geomagnetic activity. With this purpose, the effect of the shadow height, local time and solar flux depen-dencies were found and isolated and only the possible variations due the geomagnetic activity were evaluated. The residuos of the relative H-alpha intensity and temperature are analyzed.

  8. Ar/Ar ages from transitionally magnetized lavas on La Palma, Canary Islands, and the geomagnetic instability timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, B. S.; Relle, M. K.; Hoffman, K. A.; Battle, A.; Laj, C.; Guillou, H.; Carracedo, J. C.

    2002-11-01

    A detailed study of 43 lava flows comprising two stratigraphic sequences exposed along the north and south walls of Barranco de los Tilos on the island of La Palma, Canary Islands, reveals a complex, temporally segmented record of geodynamo behavior that contains no less than three distinct geomagnetic events. The Matuyama-Brunhes (M-B) reversal is recorded in five transitionally magnetized lava flows from the north (TN) section. The isochrons obtained from three of the lower four M-B lavas are defined by 14 incremental heating experiments that, together with a previous age determination, yielded a weighted mean of 798.4 ± 6.2 ka (all uncertainties ±2σ). In addition, a 780.3 ± 10.3 ka isochron was determined for the overlying transitionally magnetized flow, indicating that it was erupted during a distinctly younger portion of the transition. Near the base of the south (TS) section one finds a sequence of weakly magnetized flows associated with virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) positions in the southwest Indian Ocean between latitudes 56°S and 65°S, suggesting instability of the geomagnetic field beyond that of typical secular variation. 40Ar/39Ar isochrons from three of these flows, defined by 11 separate incremental heating experiments, gave a weighted mean of 822.2 ± 8.7 ka. This anomalous field behavior recorded 24 ± 11 kyr prior to the M-B reversal may coincide with an event featured in several marine sediment records. Directly above two normal polarity flows (40Ar/39Ar isochrons of 751.9 ± 18.1 ka and 675.0 ± 15.7 ka) are nine transitionally magnetized lavas having magnetization directions associated with low to midlatitude VGPs spanning 23°-60°N. These flows are then capped by a single flow possessing normal polarity. Based on 12 incremental heating experiments, 40Ar/39Ar isochrons of five of these nine lavas, along with the uppermost flow, gave a weighted mean age of 580.2 ± 7.8 ka for this period of transitional to normal field behavior. From

  9. Correlation Based Geomagnetic Field Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holschneider, M.; Mauerberger, S.; Lesur, V.; Baerenzung, J.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new method for determining geomagnetic field models. It is based on the construction of an a priori correlation structure derived from our knowledge about characteristic length scales and sources of the geomagnetic field. The magnetic field measurements are then seen as correlated random variables too and the inversion process amounts to compute the a posteriori correlation structure using Bayes theorem. We show how this technique allows the statistical separation of the various field contributions and the assessment of their uncertainties.

  10. Intensity of the geomagnetic field in Europe for the last 3 ka: Influence of data quality on geomagnetic field modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavón-Carrasco, Francisco Javier; Gómez-Paccard, Miriam; Hervé, Gwenaël.; Osete, María. Luisa; Chauvin, Annick

    2014-06-01

    of the main challenges of paleomagnetic research is to obtain high-resolution geomagnetic field intensity reconstructions. For the last millennia, these reconstructions are mostly based on archeomagnetic data. However, the quality of the intensity data available in the databases is very variable, and the high scatter observed in the records clearly suggests that some of them might not be reliable. In this work we investigate how the geomagnetic field intensity reconstructions and, hence, our present knowledge of the geomagnetic field in the past, are affected by the quality of the data selected for modeling the Earth's magnetic field. For this purpose we rank the European archeointensity data in four quality categories following widely accepted paleomagnetic criteria based on the methodology used during the laboratory treatment of the samples and on the number of specimens retained to calculate the mean intensities. Four geomagnetic field regional models have been implemented by applying the revised spherical cap harmonic analysis to these four groups of input data. Geomagnetic field models strongly depend on the used data set. The model built using all the available data (without any preselection) appears to be the less accurate, indicating some internal inconsistencies of the data set. In addition, some features of this model are clearly dominated by the less reliable archeointensity data, suggesting that such features might not reflect real variations of the past geomagnetic field. On the contrary, the regional model built on selected high-quality intensity data shows a very consistent intensity pattern at the European scale, confirming that the main intensity changes observed in Europe in the recent history of the geomagnetic field occurred at the continental scale.

  11. Midlatitude cooling caused by geomagnetic field minimum during polarity reversal.

    PubMed

    Kitaba, Ikuko; Hyodo, Masayuki; Katoh, Shigehiro; Dettman, David L; Sato, Hiroshi

    2013-01-22

    The climatic effects of cloud formation induced by galactic cosmic rays (CRs) has recently become a topic of much discussion. The CR-cloud connection suggests that variations in geomagnetic field intensity could change climate through modulation of CR flux. This hypothesis, however, is not well-tested using robust geological evidence. Here we present paleoclimate and paleoenvironment records of five interglacial periods that include two geomagnetic polarity reversals. Marine oxygen isotope stages 19 and 31 contain both anomalous cooling intervals during the sea-level highstands and the Matuyama-Brunhes and Lower Jaramillo reversals, respectively. This contrasts strongly with the typical interglacial climate that has the temperature maximum at the sea-level peak. The cooling occurred when the field intensity dropped to <40% of its present value, for which we estimate >40% increase in CR flux. The climate warmed rapidly when field intensity recovered. We suggest that geomagnetic field intensity can influence global climate through the modulation of CR flux.

  12. Geomagnetic observations on tristan da cunha, south atlantic ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matzka, J.; Olsen, N.; Maule, C.F.; Pedersen, L.W.; Berarducci, A.M.; Macmillan, S.

    2009-01-01

    Few geomagnetic ground observations exist of the Earth's strongest core field anomaly, the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). The geomagnetic repeat station on the island Tristan da Cunha, located half-way between South Africa and South America at 37?? 05' S, 12?? 18' W, is therefore of crucial importance. We have conducted several sets of repeat station measurements during magnetically quiet conditions (Kp 2o or less) in 2004. The procedures are described and the results are compared to those from earlier campaigns and to the predictions of various global field models. Features of the local crustal bias field and the solar quiet daily variation are discussed. We also evaluate the benefit of continuous magnetic field recordings from Tristan da Cunha, and argue that such a data set is a very valuable addition to geomagnetic satellite data. Recently, funds were set up to establish and operate a magnetometer station on Tristan da Cunha during the Swarm magnetic satellite mission (2011-2014).

  13. Regional Geomagnetic Field Model for Croatia at 2009.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujić, Eugen; Brkić, Mario; Kovács, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Geomagnetic data of north, east, and vertical components at Croatian repeat stations and ground survey sites, as well as European geomagnetic observatories and repeat stations, were used to obtain a regional geomagnetic model over Croatia at 2009.5 epoch. Different models were derived, depending on input data, and three modelling techniques were used: Taylor Polynomial, Adjusted Spherical Harmonic Analysis, and Spherical Harmonic Analysis. It was derived that the most accurate model over Croatia was the one when only Croatian data were used, and by using the Adjusted Spherical Harmonic Analysis. Based on Croatian repeat stations' data in the interval 2007.5-2010.5, and a global Enhanced Magnetic Model, it was possible to estimate the crustal field at those sites. It was also done by taking into account the empirical adjustment for long-term external field variations. The higher crustal field values were found at those stations which are on or close to the Adriatic anomaly.

  14. Wavelet-based multiscale analysis of geomagnetic disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaourar, N.; Hamoudi, M.; Mandea, M.; Balasis, G.; Holschneider, M.

    2013-12-01

    The dynamics of external contributions to the geomagnetic field is investigated by applying time-frequency methods to magnetic observatory data. Fractal models and multiscale analysis enable obtaining maximum quantitative information related to the short-term dynamics of the geomagnetic field activity. The stochastic properties of the horizontal component of the transient external field are determined by searching for scaling laws in the power spectra. The spectrum fits a power law with a scaling exponent β, a typical characteristic of self-affine time-series. Local variations in the power-law exponent are investigated by applying wavelet analysis to the same time-series. These analyses highlight the self-affine properties of geomagnetic perturbations and their persistence. Moreover, they show that the main phases of sudden storm disturbances are uniquely characterized by a scaling exponent varying between 1 and 3, possibly related to the energy contained in the external field. These new findings suggest the existence of a long-range dependence, the scaling exponent being an efficient indicator of geomagnetic activity and singularity detection. These results show that by using magnetogram regularity to reflect the magnetosphere activity, a theoretical analysis of the external geomagnetic field based on local power-law exponents is possible.

  15. Nonstationary analysis of geomagnetic time sequences from Mount Etna and North Palm Springs earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedi, M.; La Manna, M.; Palmieri, F.

    2003-10-01

    Volcanomagnetic and/or seismomagnetic effects are geomagnetic variations generated before eruptions and/or seismic events. Our aim is to analyze geomagnetic time series to detect the volcanomagnetic and/or seismomagnetic effects among a number of other variations. Two advanced signal-processing techniques are proposed to analyze the geomagnetic time series. The first technique, called Continuous Wavelet Transform Singularity Analysis (CWTSA), is based on the Continuous Wavelet Transform; the second, called Time-Variant Statistical Analysis of Nonstationary Signals (TVANS), is based on a time-varying adaptive algorithm (Recursive Least Squares). Both techniques are very effective in detecting the geomagnetic variations at the time instants likely linked to volcanic and/or seismic activity. The application of these methodologies to geomagnetic time sequences, respectively, recorded on Mount Etna during the volcanic activity of 1981 and in North Palm Springs during the seismic events of 8 July 1986 yields a good correspondence between events detected by both techniques and volcanic end seismic events. The statistical significance of geomagnetic time series was also assessed to verify the obtained results from CWTSA and TVANS. It was defined at significance level of 95% in the wavelet power spectrum for the difference of the geomagnetic time series aiming at distinguishing the most "significant" events when they are upon this one.

  16. Effect of geomagnetic disturbances on physiological parameters: An investigation on aviators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papailiou, M.; Mavromichalaki, H.; Kudela, K.; Stetiarova, J.; Dimitrova, S.

    2011-11-01

    Over the last years the potential effect that the geomagnetic activity may have on human physiological parameters (such as heart rate, arterial diastolic and systolic pressure) is being widely investigated with irrefutable results. As it is suggested, human health can be affected by solar activity and related geophysical changes. In this study a group of 4018 Slovak aviators was examined from January 1, 1994 to December 31, 2002, covering periods with high solar and geomagnetic activity. Specifically, medical data of mean values of arterial diastolic and systolic blood pressure, which were registered during the medical examinations of the Slovak aviators, were related to daily variations of Dst and Ap geomagnetic indices. All subjects were men (from 18 to 60 years old) in good health. Statistical significance levels (p-values) of the effect of geomagnetic activity on the aforementioned parameters up to three days before and three days after the geomagnetic event were established using the statistical method ANalysis Of VAriance (ANOVA). Statistical analysis of the arterial blood pressure variations for different levels of geomagnetic activity revealed that geomagnetic changes are connected to variations of the human physiological parameters.

  17. Secular evolution in young galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2015-03-01

    Young galaxies viewed at high redshift have high turbulent velocities, high star formation rates, high gas fractions, and chaotic structures, suggesting wild instabilities during which giant gas clumps form and make stars in their dense regions, stir other disk stars and gas, and transport angular momentum outward with a resulting net mass flow inward (e.g., Ceverino et al. 2010). At z=1.5, 40% of star-forming galaxies have significant clumps (Elmegreen et al. 2007; Wuyts et al. 2012), and in these, 10%-20% of the stellar mass is in clumps that last ~150 Myr (Elmegreen et al. 2009; Wuyts et al. 2012). The thick disk and bulge in modern galaxies could form in this phase. The similarity in the α/Fe ratio (Meléndez et al. 2008), K-giant abundances (Bensby et al. 2010) and ages for the Milky Way bulge and thick disk suggest they formed at the same time. High dispersion gas at z ~ 1.5 can do this because it makes the young disk thick and the SF clumps big enough to drive fast secular evolution (Elmegreen et al. 2006; Genzel et al. 2008; Bournaud et al. 2009). Local analogues might be present in dynamically young galaxies like BCDs (Elmegreen et al. 2012). The high fraction of z ~ 1.5 galaxies with massive clumps suggests clump formation is a long-lived phase and that clump torques should last ~ 1 Gyr or more even if individual clumps come and go on shorter timescales. Clump formation may cease when stars finally dominate the disk mass (Cacciato et al. 2012).

  18. a Millennium of Geomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, David P.

    2002-11-01

    The history of geomagnetism began around the year 1000 with the discovery in China of the magnetic compass. Methodical studies of the Earth's field started in 1600 with William Gilbert's De Magnete [Gilbert, 1600] and continued with the work of (among others) Edmond Halley, Charles Augustin de Coulomb, Carl Friedrich Gauss, and Edward Sabine. The discovery of electromagnetism by Hans Christian Oersted and André-Marie Ampére led Michael Faraday to the notion of fluid dynamos, and the observation of sunspot magnetism by George Ellery Hale led Sir Joseph Larmor in 1919 to the idea that such dynamos could sustain themselves naturally in convecting conducting fluids. From that came modern dynamo theory, of both the solar and terrestrial magnetic fields. Paleomagnetic studies revealed that the Earth's dipole had undergone reversals in the distant past, and these became the critical evidence in establishing plate tectonics. Finally, the recent availability of scientific spacecraft has demonstrated the intricacy of the Earth's distant magnetic field, as well as the existence of magnetic fields associated with other planets and with satellites in our solar system.

  19. Wavelet analysis of paleomagnetic data: 4. Characteristic short times (0.4-4.5 ky) of variations in the elements of the geomagnetic field during the early Jaramillo reversal and in the stationary field during the Matuyama and Jaramillo chrons (Western Turkmenia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurarii, G. Z.; Aleksyutin, M. V.; Ataev, N. M.

    2012-04-01

    The geomagnetic variations with characteristic times ranging from 0.4 to 15 ka are shown to be largely stochastic. Variations with different characteristic times appear during different time intervals and reflect accelerating and decelerating processes. The variations do not exhibit any predominant times. At the same time, almost periodic variations in the lithological characteristics are clearly seen in the wavelet diagrams of the parameters that reflect the changes in the composition (quantitative and qualitative) of ferrimagnetic material; i.e., the changes in the conditions of sedimentation related to climate variations. The variations with periods of 5, 8.5, and 13 ka are concurrent with the similar variations in the paleomagnetic data, while the variations with a period of 3.5 ka are only observed in the magnetic parameters. We suggest that the first mentioned oscillations reflect the changes of the external (relative to the Earth) origin, whereas the changes with a period of 3.5 ka are caused by some terrestrial factors.

  20. On the slow time geomagnetic field modulation of galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okpala, Kingsley

    2016-07-01

    Cosmic rays of galactic origin are modulated by both heliospheric and geomagnetic conditions. The mutual (and mutually exclusive) contribution of both heliospheric and geomagnetic conditions to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) modulation is still an open question. While the rapid-time association of the galactic cosmic ray variation with different heliophysical and geophysical phenomena has been well studied, not so much attention has been paid to slow-time variations especially with regards to local effects. In this work, we employed monthly means of cosmic ray count rates from two mid latitude (Hermanus and Rome), and two higher latitude (Inuvik and Oulu) neutron monitors (NM), and compared their variability with geomagnetic stations that are in close proximity to the NMs. The data spans 1966 to 2008 and covers four (4) solar cycles. The difference (DeltaCR)between the mean count rate of all days and the mean of the five quietest days for each month was compared with the Dst-related disturbance (DeltaH) derived from the nearby geomagnetic stations. Zeroth- and First- correlation between the cosmic ray parameters and geomagnetic parameters was performed to ascertain statistical association and test for spurious association. Our results show that solar activity is generally strongly correlated (>0.75) with mean strength of GCR count rate and geomagnetic field during individual solar cycles. The correlation between mean strength of cosmic ray intensity and Geomagnetic field strength is spurious and is basically moderated by the solar activity. The signature of convection driven disturbances at high latitude geomagnetic stations was evident during the declining phase of the solar cycles close to the solar minimum. The absence of this feature in the slow-time varying cosmic ray count rates in all stations, and especially in the mid latitude geomagnetic stations suggest that the local geomagnetic disturbance contributes much less in modulating the cosmic ray flux.

  1. Stochastic resonance in geomagnetic polarity reversals.

    PubMed

    Consolini, Giuseppe; De Michelis, Paola

    2003-02-07

    Among noise-induced cooperative phenomena a peculiar relevance is played by stochastic resonance. In this paper we offer evidence that geomagnetic polarity reversals may be due to a stochastic resonance process. In detail, analyzing the distribution function P(tau) of polarity residence times (chrons), we found the evidence of a stochastic synchronization process, i.e., a series of peaks in the P(tau) at T(n) approximately (2n+1)T(Omega)/2 with n=0,1,...,j and T(omega) approximately 0.1 Myr. This result is discussed in connection with both the typical time scale of Earth's orbit eccentricity variation and the recent results on the typical time scale of climatic long-term variation.

  2. Mid-latitude Geomagnetic Field Analysis Using BOH Magnetometer: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jun-Ga; Choi, Kyu-Cheol; Lee, Jae-Jin; Park, Young-Deuk; Ha, Dong-Hun

    2011-09-01

    Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute researchers have installed and operated magnetometers at Mt. Bohyun Observatory to measure the Earth's magnetic field variations in South Korea. We, in 2007, installed a fluxgate magnetometer (RFP-523C) to measure H, D, and Z components of the geomagnetic field. In addition, in 2009, we installed a Overhauser proton sensor to measure the absolute total magnetic field F and a three-axis magneto-impedance sensor for spectrum analysis. Currently three types of magnetometer data have been accumulated. In this paper, we provide the preliminary and the first statistical analysis using the BOH magnetometer installed at Mt. Bohyun Observatory. By superposed analysis, we find that daily variations of H, D, and Z shows similar tendency, that is, about 30 minutes before the meridian (11:28) a minimum appears and the time after about 3 hours and 30 minutes (15:28) a maximum appears. Also, a quiet interval start time (19:06) is near the sunset time, and a quiet interval end time (06:40) is near the sunrise time. From the sunset to the sunrise, the value of H has a nearly constant interval, that is, the sun affects the changes in H values. Seasonal variations show similar dependences to the sun. Local time variations show that noon region has the biggest variations and midnight region has the smallest variations. We compare the correlations between geomagnetic variations and activity indices as we expect the geomagnetic variation would contain the effects of geomagnetic activity variations. As a result, the correlation coefficient between H and Dst is the highest (r = 0.947), and other AL, AE, AU index and showed a high correlation. Therefore, the effects of geomagnetic storms and geomagnetic substorms might contribute to the geomagnetic changes significantly.

  3. Mechanism of secular increasing of mean gravity in Northern hemisphere and secular decreasing of mean gravity in Southern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yu. V.; Ferrandiz, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    phenomena as cyclicity and synchronism of planetary natural processes, inversion of activity of natural processes in opposite hemispheres. Numerous confirmations give the extensive data of every possible geophysical observations. The phenomenon of synchronism in annual variations of activity of various natural processes is rather brightly expressed - their phases are precisely synchronized, and the periods of extreme activity (or passivity) fall to February - March or August - September. In daily variations of natural processes similar laws are observed. Here we speak about modern processes, but similar laws take place in various time scales, including geological. In the given report we shall concentrate on the analysis of possible secular variations of a gravity at displacement of an external core (of its centre of mass) relatively to the elastic mantle. The analysis has shown, that gravitational influence of displaced superfluous mass of the core are a major factor of secular variations of a gravity. However the displaced core causes directed redistribution of atmospheric masses from a southern hemisphere in northern, and also complex slow redistribution of oceanic masses. Increase of loading of atmospheric and oceanic masses on an elastic crust of northern hemisphere results in its slow lowering. Return processes should observed in a southern hemisphere. All listed factors, certainly, directly influence variations of a gravity. In a more comprehensive sense redistribution of all fluid masses, including climatic character also result in changes of a gravity. Hemispheres mean secular trends of gravity. For an estimation of a role of factors of redistribution of air and fluid masses in variations of a gravity the point model of redistribution of masses of the Earth (Barkin, 2001), obtained very effective applications at studying of fundamental problems of geodynamics, has been used. Let's emphasize, that the Earth is active dynamic object at which activity in the certain

  4. 10 Ma of Igneous Activity in the Transmexican Volcanic Belt: Tectonic and Geomagnetic Implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Martinez, V. C.; Osete, M. L.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2007-05-01

    A total of 51 sites with geochronological control were sampled in the central and western segments of the Transmexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB). Together with other previously published 69 sites from the eastern segment, they span the spatial and temporal activity of the TMVB. Using now the same reference directions and methodologies, they are analyzed in order (i) to determine the possible occurrence and significance (spatially and temporally) of vertical axis crustal block rotations that have been reported in this region; and (ii) to study the geomagnetic Paleo Secular Variation during the last 10 Ma; to check the previously suggested existence of a "Pacific Dipole Window" extending to Mexico. Paleomagnetic results, backed by statistical tests performed according to their geographical distribution (3 structural segments) or according to their ages (Late Miocene, Pliocene or Quaternary), do not support the notion that large vertical axis block rotations (paleomagnetically detectable) occurred in this arc after Late Miocene times. They suggest that the TMVB could be considered paleomagnetically as an unique tectonic domain under a transtensional regime, where its extension component prevails over its left-lateral component. The mean paleomagnetic directions, obtained in the age ranges 10-5 Ma and 5-0 Ma, do not differ from their respective reference directions. In both datasets, VGPs have been selected using quality Fisher's precision parameters and optimum cutoff angles. This results in a circularly symmetrical data distribution with statistically indistinguishable antipodal normal and reverse polarities. VGP dispersions are consistent with those from globally distributed observations at Mexican latitudes for the Miocene and the Plio- Quaternary. An analysis of all the published paleomagnetic data from the TMVB, when combined all together and selected in the same terms, do not support neither the existence of large crustal block rotations nor the persistence of a

  5. Dominant modes of relationship between U.S. temperature and geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prohaska, J. T.; Willett, H. C.

    1983-01-01

    Eigen-analysis is applied to a matrix of cross-correlation coefficients between the geomagnetic aa-index for 0 to 23-yr lag and the monthly mean temperature at 32 United States stations. About 75 percent of the relationship between the two fields is contained in three dominant modes. A secular trend (about 90 yr) and two 11-yr cycles dominate the mode time series. The month-to-month changes in the temperature anomaly patterns indicate a slow eddy-like motion to the east of the Continental Divide for all three dominant modes.

  6. Geomagnetic activity influences the melatonin secretion at latitude 70 degrees N.

    PubMed

    Weydahl, A; Sothern, R B; Cornélissen, G; Wetterberg, L

    2001-01-01

    Factors other than light may affect variations in melatonin, including disturbances in the geomagnetic field. Such a possibility was tested in Alta, Norway, located at latitude 70 degrees N, where the aurora borealis is a result of large changes in the horizontal component (H) of the geomagnetic field. Geomagnetic disturbances are felt more strongly closer to the pole than at lower latitudes. Also noteworthy in Alta is the fact that the sun does not rise above the horizon for several weeks during the winter. To examine whether changes in geomagnetic activity influence the secretion of melatonin, saliva was collected from 25 healthy subjects in Alta several times during the day-night and at different times of the year. Single cosinor analyses yielded individual estimates of.the circadian amplitude and MESOR of melatonin. A 3-hour mean value for the local geomagnetic activity index, K, was used for approximately the same 24-hour span. A circadian rhythm was found to characterize both melatonin and K, the peak in K (23:24) preceding that of melatonin (06:08). During the span of investigation, a circannual variation also characterized both variables. Correlation analyses suggest that changes in geomagnetic activity had to be of a certain magnitude to affect the circadian amplitude of melatonin. If large enough (> 80 nT/3 h), changes in geomagnetic activity also significantly decreased salivary melatonin concentration.

  7. Asteroid proper elements and secular resonances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knezevic, Zoran; Milani, Andrea

    1992-01-01

    In a series of papers (e.g., Knezevic, 1991; Milani and Knezevic, 1990; 1991) we reported on the progress we were making in computing asteroid proper elements, both as regards their accuracy and long-term stability. Additionally, we reported on the efficiency and 'intelligence' of our software. At the same time, we studied the associated problems of resonance effects, and we introduced the new class of 'nonlinear' secular resonances; we determined the locations of these secular resonances in proper-element phase space and analyzed their impact on the asteroid family classification. Here we would like to summarize the current status of our work and possible further developments.

  8. Solar Influences on Geomagnetic and Related Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vestine, E. H.

    1961-01-01

    A discussion of the geomagnetic effects of streams of electromagnetic and particular radiation from the sun. The interplay of forces between the geomagnetic field and solar streams is outlined; and the theoretical relationship between these, the solar storms, the trapped Van Allen radiations, the polar aurora, and geomagnetic field distortion are presented.

  9. Prediction of secular acceleration of axial rotation of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yu. V.

    2009-04-01

    Secular motion of the Earth pole and non-tidal acceleration of its diurnal rotation have obtained rather precise explanation with the help of simple one-point model of the directed transport of fluid masses from a southern hemisphere in northern hemisphere with the general direction, given by geocentric axis OP directed to pole P with coordinates 700N, 10403 E[1]. The another generalized model represents a system of two material points with masses m2 and m1, located on surface of the Earth at poles of geocentric axis OP. Masses are linearly changed in the time with velocities [2]: ṁ2 = 0.179 × 1015kg/yrand ṁ1 = 0.043 × 1015kg/yr. A reduction of fluid masses of the appropriate thin spherical layer of the Earth correspond to secular increasing of masses of model points. The specified model has allowed to explain values of fundamental geodynamic parameters observably and determined during decades: a direction and velocity of drift of a pole of the Earth; value of non-tidal acceleration of axial rotation; to explain a secular variations of coefficients of the second, third, fourth, sixth and eighth zonal harmonics of a geopotential; coefficients of secular changes of a surface of ocean for the last approximately 150 years; a direction of secular drift of a geocenter and other planetary phenomena [3]. The role of the angular momentum of redistributed masses of the Earth in rotation of the Earth appeared not essential at the given stage of researches. On the essence the offered model has semi-empirical character as it bases on values of velocities of change of masses of points and the given position of axis OP. For their determination and estimations the part of the observant data was used, and other parameters were designed under analytical formulas. The obtained results have precisely confirmed competency and affectivity of geodynamic model [4] about existence of secular drift of a liquid core along radial direction OP with velocity about 2.6 cm/yr in the

  10. Geomagnetic Navigation in Sea Turtles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, K.; Putman, N.; Lohmann, C.

    2011-12-01

    Young loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) from eastern Florida undertake a transoceanic migration in which they gradually circle the north Atlantic Ocean before returning to the North American coast. Newly hatched turtles (hatchlings) begin the migration with a 'magnetic map' in which regional magnetic fields function as navigational markers and elicit changes in swimming direction at crucial geographic boundaries. In laboratory experiments, young turtles that had never before been in the ocean were exposed to fields like those that exist at various, widely separated locations along their transoceanic migratory route. Turtles responded by swimming in directions that would, in each case, help them remain within the North Atlantic gyre currents and advance along the migratory pathway. The results demonstrate that turtles can derive both longitudinal and latitudinal information from the Earth's field, and provide strong evidence that hatchling loggerheads inherit a remarkably elaborate set of responses that function in guiding them along their open-sea migratory route. For young sea turtles, couplings of oriented swimming to regional magnetic fields appear to provide the fundamental building blocks from which natural selection can sculpt a sequence of responses capable of guiding first-time ocean migrants along complex migratory routes. The results imply that hatchlings from different populations in different parts of the world are likely to have magnetic navigational responses uniquely suited for the migratory routes that each group follows. Thus, from a conservation perspective, turtles from different populations are not interchangeable. From an evolutionary perspective, the responses are not incompatible with either secular variation or magnetic polarity reversals. As Earth's field gradually changes, strong selective pressure presumably acts to maintain an approximate match between the responses of hatchlings and the fields that exist at critical points along

  11. Secularization and Religious Change among Elite Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ecklund, Elaine Howard; Park, Jerry Z.; Veliz, Phil Todd

    2008-01-01

    Sociologists of religion have often connected secularization to science, but have rarely examined the role of religion in the lives of scientists or how the sciences have changed religiously over time. Here we address this shortcoming by comparing religiosity between two samples of elite academic natural and social scientists, one in 1969 and one…

  12. Religion, Education, and Secularism in International Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambach, Amy; Marshall, Katherine; Nelson, Matthew J.; Andreescu, Liviu; Kwayu, Aikande C.; Wexler, Philip; Hotam, Yotam; Fischer, Shlomo; El Bilawi, Hassan

    2011-01-01

    During the interwar years of the early twentieth century, and through at least the 1980s, education was seen by scholars, state leaders, and international agency representatives alike as a way to modernize and secularize underdeveloped communities. Arguments about the modernizing power of education did not erase or discount the presence of…

  13. Human Values in a Secular World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apostol, Robert Z.

    The lectures of five contemporary philosophers, charged with addressing themselves to important moral issues of contemporary society with an eye to highlighting those values that are at the base of human life today, are presented in this volume. Louis Dupre is concerned with the issue of making religion intelligible in Religion in a Secular World.…

  14. Geodetic secular velocity errors due to interannual surface loading deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaría-Gómez, Alvaro; Mémin, Anthony

    2015-08-01

    Geodetic vertical velocities derived from data as short as 3 yr are often assumed to be representative of linear deformation over past decades to millennia. We use two decades of surface loading deformation predictions due to variations of atmospheric, oceanic and continental water mass to assess the effect on secular velocities estimated from short time-series. The interannual deformation is time-correlated at most locations over the globe, with the level of correlation depending mostly on the chosen continental water model. Using the most conservative loading model and 5-yr-long time-series, we found median vertical velocity errors of 0.5 mm yr-1 over the continents (0.3 mm yr-1 globally), exceeding 1 mm yr-1 in regions around the southern Tropic. Horizontal velocity errors were seven times smaller. Unless an accurate loading model is available, a decade of continuous data is required in these regions to mitigate the impact of the interannual loading deformation on secular velocities.

  15. Surface electric fields for North America during historical geomagnetic storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wei, Lisa H.; Homeier, Nichole; Gannon, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the impact of geomagnetic disturbances on the electric grid, we recreate surface electric fields from two historical geomagnetic storms—the 1989 “Quebec” storm and the 2003 “Halloween” storms. Using the Spherical Elementary Current Systems method, we interpolate sparsely distributed magnetometer data across North America. We find good agreement between the measured and interpolated data, with larger RMS deviations at higher latitudes corresponding to larger magnetic field variations. The interpolated magnetic field data are combined with surface impedances for 25 unique physiographic regions from the United States Geological Survey and literature to estimate the horizontal, orthogonal surface electric fields in 1 min time steps. The induced horizontal electric field strongly depends on the local surface impedance, resulting in surprisingly strong electric field amplitudes along the Atlantic and Gulf Coast. The relative peak electric field amplitude of each physiographic region, normalized to the value in the Interior Plains region, varies by a factor of 2 for different input magnetic field time series. The order of peak electric field amplitudes (largest to smallest), however, does not depend much on the input. These results suggest that regions at lower magnetic latitudes with high ground resistivities are also at risk from the effect of geomagnetically induced currents. The historical electric field time series are useful for estimating the flow of the induced currents through long transmission lines to study power flow and grid stability during geomagnetic disturbances.

  16. Surface electric fields for North America during historical geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lisa H.; Homeier, Nicole; Gannon, Jennifer L.

    2013-08-01

    To better understand the impact of geomagnetic disturbances on the electric grid, we recreate surface electric fields from two historical geomagnetic storms—the 1989 "Quebec" storm and the 2003 "Halloween" storms. Using the Spherical Elementary Current Systems method, we interpolate sparsely distributed magnetometer data across North America. We find good agreement between the measured and interpolated data, with larger RMS deviations at higher latitudes corresponding to larger magnetic field variations. The interpolated magnetic field data are combined with surface impedances for 25 unique physiographic regions from the United States Geological Survey and literature to estimate the horizontal, orthogonal surface electric fields in 1 min time steps. The induced horizontal electric field strongly depends on the local surface impedance, resulting in surprisingly strong electric field amplitudes along the Atlantic and Gulf Coast. The relative peak electric field amplitude of each physiographic region, normalized to the value in the Interior Plains region, varies by a factor of 2 for different input magnetic field time series. The order of peak electric field amplitudes (largest to smallest), however, does not depend much on the input. These results suggest that regions at lower magnetic latitudes with high ground resistivities are also at risk from the effect of geomagnetically induced currents. The historical electric field time series are useful for estimating the flow of the induced currents through long transmission lines to study power flow and grid stability during geomagnetic disturbances.

  17. ISS Plasma Contactor Units Operations During Strong Geomagnetic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alred, J.; Mikatarian, R.; Barsamian, H.; Minow, J.; Koontz, S.

    2003-12-01

    The large structure and high voltage arrays of the ISS represent a complex system that interacts with the Earth's ionosphere. To mitigate spacecraft charging problems on the ISS, two Plasma Contactor Units discharge ionized xenon gas to "clamp" the potential of the ISS with respect to the low Earth orbit plasma. The Plasma Interaction Model, a model of ISS plasma interaction developed from the basic physics of the interaction phenomena, includes magnetic induction effects, plasma temperature and density effects, interaction of the high voltage solar arrays with ionospheric plasma, and accounts for other conductive areas on the ISS. To augment this model, the PCU discharge current has been monitored for the ISS in a variety of flight attitudes as well as during the annual seasons. A review of the PCU discharge currents shows a correlation to the geomagnetic activity. The variation in the PCU discharge current during strong geomagnetic activity will be presented. Also, the PCU discharge currents during periods of low geomagnetic activity will be discussed. The presentation will conclude with a comparison of satellite plasma measurements during different stages of geomagnetic activity.

  18. (abstract) A Geomagnetic Contribution to Climate Change in this Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, J.; Ruzmaikin, A.; Lawrence, J.

    1996-01-01

    There is a myth that all solar effects can be parameterized by the sun spot number. This is not true. For example, the level of geomagnetic activity during this century was not proportional to the sunspot number. Instead there is a large systematic increase in geomagnetic activity, not reflected in the sunspot number. This increase occurred gradually over at least 60 years. The 11 year solar cycle variation was superimposed on this systematic increase. Here we show that this systematic increase in activity is well correlated to the simultaneous increase in terrestrial temperature that occurred during the first half of this century. We discuss these findings in terms of mechanisms by which geomagnetics can be coupled to climate. These mechanisms include possible changes in weather patterns and cloud cover due to increased cosmic ray fluxes, or to increased fluxes of high energy electrons. We suggest that this systematic increase in geomagnetic activity contributed (along with anthropogenic effects and possible changes in solar irradiance) to the changes in climate recorded during this period.

  19. Information Theory Approach to Evaluate the Geomagnetic and Ionospheric Response to Solar Wind Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seemala, G. K.; R, S.; Bhaskara, V.; Ramesh, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of space weather and understanding onset o geomagnetic storms is increasing day by day as the space missions increase. It is known from the ground-based and space-borne observations that a geomagnetic storm is a temporary disturbance of earth's magnetosphere caused by a solar wind and/or solar eruptions. Geomagnetic storms are more disruptive now than in the past because of our greater dependence on technical systems that can be affected by electric currents and energetic particles high in the Earth's magnetosphere. It is known that number of phenomena occurs during the space weather events; and there are many un-solved questions like solar wind coupling with magnetosphere and ionosphere, relationship between geomagnetic storms & sub-storms etc. To evaluate contribution of various interplanetary parameters that have major role in the geomagnetic storm/geomagnetic variations, the information theory approach is used. In information theory, the measure of uncertainty or randomness of a signal can be quantified by using Shannon entropy or entropy for short. And Transfer entropy is capable of quantifying the directional flow of information between two signals. Thus the Transfer entropy is capable of distinguishing effectively driving and responding signals. In this study, we use Transfer entropy function on Solar wind parameters and ground magnetic data to derive the drivers and relations between them, and also study their contributed effect on ionospheric TEC. In this presentation, we will evaluate and present the results obtained, and discuss about the driving forces on the geomagnetic field disturbances.

  20. Geomagnetic Effect Caused by 1908 Tunguska Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losseva, T. V.; Kuzmicheva, M. Y.

    2010-12-01

    The analysis of the magnetograms of Irkutsk observatory on the 30th June 1908 showed that the explosion of Tunguska bolide was accompanied by variations of the Earth’s magnetic field, which were being continued for several hours [1]. Irkutsk geophysical observatory is located approximately in 950 km to the southeast from the point of Tunguska explosion and it was nearest point, where the continuous recording of the components of the geomagnetic field was in progress. We suppose that it was caused by magnetic field of the current system, generated in the E-layer of ionosphere by gas dynamical flow after the Tunguska explosion [2]. Plunging through the atmosphere, cosmic body forms a hot rarefied channel behind it; the hydrostatic equilibrium of pressure in the channel becomes broken. The particles of the body vapor and atmospheric air, involved in the motion, lift along this channel upward (so-called plume). In the rarefied layers of the atmosphere they move along the ballistic trajectories in the gravitational field. While falling down gas loses its kinetic energy in dense layers of the atmosphere, which is converted into thermal energy. Then the reflected shock wave is formed. The gas heated in it rises up and all these processes repeat. The effects of heating and ionization of gas at height of 100 km, caused by the oscillations in the atmosphere, can lead to a distortion of the existing current system in ionosphere and generation of new ones. Since the Tunguska body had an oblique trajectory, the plume was ejected in the direction opposite to motion of Tunguska body and provided ionized region at the distance about 700 km from the epicenter at time moment 400 seconds after explosion. Gas dynamical simulation and estimates of the plume parameters have been fulfilled to calculate conductivity profiles and the electric field. Magnetic field of the induced current system has been obtained by the numerical simulation of Maxwell’s equations. Analysis of calculation

  1. Variation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton City Board of Education (Ontario).

    Suggestions for studying the topic of variation of individuals and objects (balls) to help develop elementary school students' measurement, comparison, classification, evaluation, and data collection and recording skills are made. General suggestions of variables that can be investigated are made for the study of human variation. Twelve specific…

  2. A mechanism for inducing climatic variations through ozone destruction: Screening of galactic cosmic rays by solar and terrestrial magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    A perturbation analysis, allowing for temperature and opacity feedbacks, is developed to calculate depletions in the O3 abundance and reductions of stratospheric solar heating that result from increases in NOx concentration. A pair of perturbation coefficients give the reduction in O3 and temperature through the stratosphere for a specified NOx increase. This type of analysis illustrates the tendency for various levels to self-heal when a perturbation occurs. Physical arguments indicate that the expected sign of the climatic effect is correct, with colder surface temperatures produced by reduced magnetic shielding. In addition, four qualitative reasons are suggested for thinking that significant ozone reductions by cosmic ray influxes will lead to an increased terrestrial albedo from stratospheric condensation. In this view, long-term (approximately 10,000 years) climatic changes have resulted from secular geomagnetic variations while shorter (approximately 100 years) excursions are related to changes in solar activity.

  3. Lunisolar tidal waves, geomagnetic activity and epilepsy in the light of multivariate coherence.

    PubMed

    Mikulecky, M; Moravcikova, C; Czanner, S

    1996-08-01

    The computed daily values of lunisolar tidal waves, the observed daily values of Ap index, a measure of the planetary geomagnetic activity, and the daily numbers of patients with epileptic attacks for a group of 28 neurology patients between 1987 and 1992 were analyzed by common, multiple and partial cross-spectral analysis to search for relationships between periodicities in these time series. Significant common and multiple coherence between them was found for rhythms with a period length over 3-4 months, in agreement with seasonal variations of all three variables. If, however, the coherence between tides and epilepsy was studied excluding the influence of geomagnetism, two joint infradian periodicities with period lengths of 8.5 and 10.7 days became significant. On the other hand, there were no joint rhythms for geomagnetism and epilepsy when the influence of tidal waves was excluded. The result suggests a more primary role of gravitation, compared with geomagnetism, in the multivariate process studied.

  4. Disruption in climatic rhythm and anomalous cooling during large decreases in geomagnetic field intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaba, I.; Hyodo, M.; Katoh, S.; Sato, H.; Matsushita, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Earth's climate is regulated by many factors. Especially, the orbital elements have a large influence on climate. Are there any factors which impact this strong regulation force? The galactic cosmic ray (CR) can be a candidate for such factors. The correlation between CR flux and global cloud cover suggests that the geomagnetic field affects the Earth's climate. CR is strongly modulated by the geomagnetic field. During the geomagnetic polarity reversal, the decrease in field intensity causes an increase in CR flux which would raise cloud cover. In order to examine this effect in the geological past, we examined climate and sea-level changes focusing on marine oxygen isotope stages (MIS) 31 to 17. The climate changes well accord with eustatic sea-level variations dominated by the Earth's orbital elements. However, in MIS 31 and 19, the thermal maximum was clearly lagged behind the sea-level highstand, and instead anomalous cooling occurred. These interglacial periods have the Lower Jaramillo and Matuyama-Brunhes geomagnetic polarity reversals, respectively. Comparing the climate and relative paleointensity variations for the interglacials, the cooling event coincides with the paleointensity minimum associated with the geomagnetic reversal. The coincidence suggests that the geomagnetic field decrease may have caused the disruption of the orbitally forced Earth's climate rhythm.

  5. Teaching Geomagnetism in High School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, D. P.

    2001-05-01

    Many high school curricula include a one-year course in Earth Sciences, often in the 9th grade (essentially pre-algebra). That is a good time to teach about geomagnetism. Not only are dipole reversals and sea-floor magnetization central to this subject, but this is a good opportunity to introduce students to magnetism and its connection to electric currents. The story of Oersted and Faraday give a fascinating insight into the uneven path of scientific discovery, the magnetic compass and William Gilbert provide a view of the beginnings of the scientific revolution, and even basic concepts of dynamo theory and its connection to solar physics can be included. A resource including all the suitable material now exists on the world-wide web at http://www-spof.gsfc.nasa.gov/earthmag/demagint.htm (home page). A 1-month unit on geomagnetism will be outlined.

  6. Ice ages and geomagnetic reversals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    There have been speculations on the relationship between climatic cooling and polarity reversals of the earth's magnetic field during the Pleistocene. Two of the common criticisms on this relationship have been the reality of these short duration geomagnetic events and the accuracy of their dates. Champion et al. (1988) have reviewed recent progress in this area. They identified a total of 10 short-duration polarity events in the last 1 Ma and 6 of these events have been found in volcanic rocks, which also have K-Ar dates. Supposing that the speculated relationship between climatic cooling and geomagnetic reversals actually exist, two mechanisms that assume climatic cooling causes short period magnetic reversals will be investigated. These two methods are core-mantle boundary topography and transfer of the rotational energy to the core.

  7. Science education in a secular age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, David E.

    2013-03-01

    A college science education instructor tells his students he rejects evolution. What should we think? The scene unfolds in one of the largest urban centers in the world. If we are surprised, why? Expanding on Federica Raia's (2012) first-hand experience with this scenario, I broaden her discussion by considering the complexity of science education in a secular age. Enjoining Raia within the framework of Charles Taylor's A Secular Age, I task the science education community to consider the broad strokes of science, religious faith, and the complexity of modernity in its evolving, hybridized forms. Building upon anthropological approaches to science education research, I articulate a framework to more fully account for who, globally, is a Creationist, and what this means for our views of ethically responsive science education.

  8. On the suitability of refractory bricks from a mediaeval brass melting and working site near Dinant (Belgium) as geomagnetic field recorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hus, J.; Geeraerts, R.; Plumier, J.

    2004-11-01

    Directional field archaeomagnetic data from two oval shaped kilns, of which still one was lined with refractory bricks, unearthed in a brass melting and working site in Bouvignes-sur-Meuse in Belgium, confirm the archaeologic dating as 14-15th century A.D. for the main site activities. The archaeomagnetic dates, obtained using reference secular variation curves of the geomagnetic field direction for France and Great Britain, lead to better time constraints for the cessation of kiln operations. Refractory bricks (firebricks) that are used for their chemical and thermal properties, and in particular for their resistance to high temperatures and temperature changes, are not unusual in metal melting and working sites. The firebricks from the examined site are coarse-grained and very porous inside but possess a very stable remanent magnetisation and revealed to be suitable magnetic field recorders. Although the firebricks have a single-component remanent magnetization, non-random deviations in remanence direction in function of the relative azimuth from the centre of the kiln or with the position of the bricks in the kiln wall, were observed. Several hypotheses for the origin of the deviations were considered: anisotropy, refraction, magnetic interaction, magnetic field distortion and the presence of a local disturbing magnetic source.

  9. Correlative comparison of geomagnetic storms and auroral substorms using geomagnetic indeces. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cade, W.B.

    1993-06-01

    Partial contents include the following: (1) Geomagnetic storm and substorm processes; (2) Magnetospheric structure; (3) Substorm processes; (4) Data description; (5) Geomagnetic indices; and (6) Data period and data sets.

  10. The Mono Lake geomagnetic excursion recorded in loess: Its application as time marker and implications for its geomagnetic nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambach, U.; Hark, M.; Zeeden, C.; Reddersen, B.; Zöller, L.; Fuchs, M.

    2009-04-01

    . The directional palaeomagnetic record is of high quality and shows variations in the bandwidth of secular variation in the upper and in the lower part of the section, whereas in the central part shallow (? 30˚ ) and oversteep inclinations reveal the record of a geomagnetic excursion just above the find horizon. The shallow inclinations are preceded by and go along with westerly declinations, whereas the steep inclinations are preceded by easterly declinations. This directional pattern is similar to what was found at the Mono Lake in California (e.g. Liddicoat and Coe, 1979; Lund et al., 1988). A relative palaeointensity (RPI) record was constructed by using MS and ARM as normalisers. This record corresponds quite well to the GLOPIS (Laj et al., 2004) and thus provides additional dating. The peak of the directional excursion coincides with a relative minimum of RPI. The average RPI during the excursional interval, however, is significantly higher than during normal periods, contrary to what is usually reported. Furthermore, just before and after the directional excursion the highest values of RPI occur. The largest amplitude of the directional excursion does not correspond to the well defined minimum in RPI preceding this interval which is usually taken for the MLE in the marine RPI records. This offset between the RPI and the directional record may indicate the presence of strong non-dipole components and may also explain the blur in dating of the MLE. The calculated VGPs of the directional excursion lie over North America but do not correspond to the looping behaviour as reported from the Mono Lake VGPs itself (Liddicoat and Coe, 1979). The cultural layer at the Krems-Wachtberg site is located in the centre of the RPI minimum which is slightly older than the peak of the directional excursion. The radiocarbon ages from the cultural layer (~27 ka 14C age BP = ~32 ka calendric age calBP) fit well to the age estimates of the MLE at the Mono Lake based on radiocarbon

  11. The Geomagnetic Field During a Reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heirtzler, James R.

    2003-01-01

    By modifying the IGRF it is possible to learn what may happen to the geomagnetic field during a geomagnetic reversal. If the entire IGRF reverses then the declination and inclination only reverse when the field strength is zero. If only the dipole component of the IGRF reverses a large geomagnetic field remains when the dipole component is zero and he direction of the field at the end of the reversal is not exactly reversed from the directions at the beginning of the reversal.

  12. New book discusses normal geomagnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Pochtarev, V.I.

    1984-07-01

    Material on the normal geomagnetic field and its gradients over the Earth's surface at different elevations is presented. Methods are developed for plotting the normal geomagnetic field and mathematical approximations of the geomagnetic field are presented. The nature of the Earth's normal magnetic field is investigated on the basis of an analysis of geophysical, geological and geochemical data and data on the internal structure of the Earth.

  13. Towards an effective record of dipole moment variations since the Precambrian using new reliability criteria and outputs from numerical dynamo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggin, A. J.; Suttie, N.; Paterson, G. A.; Aubert, J.; Hurst, E.; Clarke, A.

    2013-12-01

    address challenge 2, we take an approach using the outputs of numerical dynamo simulations. This involves subsampling synthetic global time series of full-vector magnetic field data, converting these datasets into virtual (axial) dipole moments, and comparing these to the entire distribution to ascertain how well secular variation is averaged and characterised. Finally, the two approaches will be combined. Datasets of real dipole moment estimates, filtered by QPI, will be compared to the synthetic distributions in order to present more robust characterisations of geomagnetic behaviour in different time intervals than has previously been possible.

  14. The geocoronal responses to the geomagnetic disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwabara, M.; Yoshioka, K.; Murakami, G.; Tsuchiya, F.; Kimura, T.; Yamazaki, A.; Yoshikawa, I.

    2017-01-01

    Atomic hydrogen atoms in the terrestrial exosphere resonantly scatter solar Lyman alpha (121.6 nm) radiation, observed as the hydrogen geocorona. Measurements of scattered solar photons allow us to probe time-varying distributions of exospheric hydrogen atoms. The Hisaki satellite with the extreme ultraviolet spectrometer (EXtreme ultraviolet spectrosCope for ExosphEric Dynamics: EXCEED) was launched in September 2013. EXCEED acquires spectral images (52-148 nm) of the atmospheres/magnetospheres of planets from Earth orbit. Due to its low orbital altitude ( 1000 km), the images taken by the instrument also contain the geocoronal emissions. In this context, EXCEED has provided quasi-continuous remote sensing observations of the geocorona with high temporal resolution ( 1 min) since 2013. These observations provide a unique database to determine the long-term behavior of the exospheric density structure. In this paper, we report exospheric structural responses observed by EXCEED to geomagnetic disturbances. Several geomagnetic storms with decreases of Dst index occurred in February 2014 and the Lyman alpha column brightness on the night side of the Earth increased abruptly and temporarily by approximately 10%. Hisaki reveal that the time lag between the peaks of the magnetic activity and the changes in the Lyman alpha column brightness is found to be about 2 to 6 h during storms. In order to interpret the observational results, we evaluate quantitatively the factors causing the increase. On the basis of these results, a coupling effect via charge exchange between the exosphere and plasmasphere causes variations of the exospheric density structure.

  15. The Causes of Geomagnetic Storms During Solar Maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    1998-01-01

    One of the oldest mysteries in geomagnetism is the linkage between solar and geomagnetic activity. The 11-year cycles of both the numbers of sunspots and Earth geomagnetic storms were first noted by Sabine (1852).

  16. Secular dynamics in hierarchical three-body systems with mass loss and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michaely, Erez; Perets, Hagai B.

    2014-10-20

    Recent studies have shown that secular evolution of triple systems can play a major role in the evolution and interaction of their inner binaries. Very few studies explored the stellar evolution of triple systems, and in particular the mass-loss phase of the evolving stellar components. Here we study the dynamical secular evolution of hierarchical triple systems undergoing mass loss. We use the secular evolution equations and include the effects of mass loss and mass transfer, as well as general relativistic effects. We present various evolutionary channels taking place in such evolving triples, and discuss both the effects of mass loss and mass transfer in the inner binary system, as well as the effects of mass loss/transfer from an outer third companion. We discuss several distinct types/regimes of triple secular evolution, where the specific behavior of a triple system can sensitively depend on its hierarchy and the relative importance of classical and general relativistic effects. We show that the orbital changes due to mass-loss and/or mass-transfer processes can effectively transfer a triple system from one dynamical regime to another. In particular, mass loss/transfer can both induce and quench high-amplitude (Lidov-Kozai) variations in the eccentricity and inclination of the inner binaries of evolving triples. They can also change the system dynamics from an orderly periodic behavior to a chaotic one, and vice versa.

  17. Research on meaning-making and health in secular society: secular, spiritual and religious existential orientations.

    PubMed

    la Cour, Peter; Hvidt, Niels C

    2010-10-01

    This article proposes a framework of concepts for the field of existential meaning-making in secular cultures such as those of Northern Europe. Seeking an operational approach, we have narrowed the field's components down to a number of basic domains and dimensions that provide a more authentic cultural basis for research in secular society. Reviewing the literature, three main domains of existential meaning-making emerge: Secular, spiritual, and religious. In reconfirming these three domains, we propose to couple them with the three dimensions of cognition (knowing), practice (doing), and importance (being), resulting in a conceptual framework that can serve as a fundamental heuristic and methodological research tool for mapping the field of existential meaning-making and health. The proposed grid might contribute to clearer understanding of the multidimensional nature of existential meaning-making and as a guide for posing adequate research and clinical questions in the field.

  18. The paleomagnetism of single silicate crystals: Recording geomagnetic field strength during mixed polarity intervals, superchrons, and inner core growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarduno, J. A.; Cottrell, R. D.; Smirnov, A. V.

    2006-03-01

    during times of moderate (<1 reversal/million years) and very rapid (>10 reversals/million years) reversal occurrence suggest a weaker and more variable field. These paleointensity data, together with a consideration of paleomagnetic directions, suggest that geomagnetic reversals, field morphology, secular variation, and intensity are related. The linkages over tens of millions of years imply a lower mantle control on the geodynamo. On even longer timescales the magnetization held by plagioclase and other silicate crystals can be used to investigate the Proterozoic and Archean geomagnetic field during the onset of growth of the solid inner core. Data from plagioclase crystals separated from mafic dikes, together with directional data from whole rocks, indicate a dipole-dominated field similar to that of the modern, 2.5-2.7 billion years ago. Older Archean rocks are of great interest for paleomagnetic and paleointensity investigations because they may record a time when the compositionally driven convection of the modern dynamo may not have been operating and a solid inner core did not play its current role in controlling the geometry of outer core flow. Most rocks of this age have been affected by low-grade metamorphism; investigations using single silicate grains provide arguably our best hope of seeing through secondary geologic events and reading the early history of the geodynamo. Absolute paleointensity measurements of the oldest rocks on the planet will require the further development of methods to investigate silicate crystals with exsolved magnetic minerals that address the uncertainties posed by thermocrystallization remanent magnetization, anisotropy, and slow cooling. Fortunately, prior work in rock magnetism, together with advances in analytical equipment and techniques, provides a solid foundation from which these frontier issues can be approached.

  19. Plasmasphere Refilling After Geomagnetic Storms Observed by EMMA Magnetometer Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Corpo, A.; Vellante, M.; Heilig, B.; Lichtenberger, J.; Reda, J.; Pietropaolo, E.; Chi, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of a study of plasmasphere dynamics during a few geomagnetic storms through examination of radial profiles of the equatorial plasma mass density. The plasma mass density is derived from field line resonance (FLR) frequencies observations across EMMA, a meridional network of 25 magnetometer stations extending from Central Italy to North Finland (1.5 < L < 6.5). The study focuses on plasmaspheric refilling following depletion due to geomagnetic activity. From the time variation of the equatorial plasma mass den