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Sample records for geometric deformable models

  1. A geometric deformable model for echocardiographic image segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hang, X.; Greenberg, N. L.; Thomas, J. D.

    2002-01-01

    Gradient vector flow (GVF), an elegant external force for parametric deformable models, can capture object boundaries from both sides. A new geometric deformable model is proposed that combines GVF and the geodesic active contour model. The level set method is used as the numerical method of this model. The model is applied for echocardiographic image segmentation.

  2. Biomedical image segmentation using geometric deformable models and metaheuristics.

    PubMed

    Mesejo, Pablo; Valsecchi, Andrea; Marrakchi-Kacem, Linda; Cagnoni, Stefano; Damas, Sergio

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes a hybrid level set approach for medical image segmentation. This new geometric deformable model combines region- and edge-based information with the prior shape knowledge introduced using deformable registration. Our proposal consists of two phases: training and test. The former implies the learning of the level set parameters by means of a Genetic Algorithm, while the latter is the proper segmentation, where another metaheuristic, in this case Scatter Search, derives the shape prior. In an experimental comparison, this approach has shown a better performance than a number of state-of-the-art methods when segmenting anatomical structures from different biomedical image modalities.

  3. Brst-Invariant Deformations of Geometric Structures in Sigma Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytsenko, A. A.

    The closed string correlators can be constructed from the open ones using topological string theories as a model. The space of physical closed string states is isomorphic to the Hochschild cohomology of (A,Q) (operator Q of ghost number one), - this statement has been verified by means of computation of the Hochschild cohomology of the category of D-branes. We study a Lie algebra of formal vector fields Wn with its application to the perturbative deformed holomorphic symplectic structure in the A-model, and a Calabi-Yau manifold with boundaries in the B-model. We show that equivalent classes of deformations are describing by a Hochschild cohomology theory of the DG-algebra, {A} = (A, Q), Q = bar ∂ + {∂ {deform}}, which is defined to be the cohomology of (-1)nQ+dHoch. Here bar ∂ is the initial non-deformed BRST operator while ∂deform is the deformed part whose algebra is a Lie algebra of linear vector fields gln. We assume that if in the theory exists a single D-brane then all the information associated with deformations is encoded in an associative algebra A equipped with a differential Q = bar ∂ + {∂ {deform}}. In addition equivalence classes of deformations of these data are described by a Hochschild cohomology of (A,Q), an important geometric invariant of the (anti)holomorphic structure on X. We also discuss the identification of the harmonic structure (HT•(X) HΩ•(X)) of affine space X and the group {Ext}Xn ({ {O}_Δ }, { {O}Δ }) (the HKR isomorphism), and bulk-boundary deformation pairing.

  4. Brst-Invariant Deformations of Geometric Structures in Sigma Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytsenko, A. A.

    2011-06-01

    The closed string correlators can be constructed from the open ones using topological string theories as a model. The space of physical closed string states is isomorphic to the Hochschild cohomology of (A, Q) (operator Q of ghost number one), - this statement has been verified by means of computation of the Hochschild cohomology of the category of D-branes. We study a Lie algebra of formal vector fields Wn with its application to the perturbative deformed holomorphic symplectic structure in the A-model, and a Calabi-Yau manifold with boundaries in the B-model. We show that equivalent classes of deformations are describing by a Hochschild cohomology theory of the DG-algebra {A} = (A, Q), Q = /line{\\part} + \\part { deform}, which is defined to be the cohomology of (-1)n Q + dHoch. Here /line{\\part} is the initial non-deformed BRST operator while \\partdeform is the deformed part whose algebra is a Lie algebra of linear vector fields gln. We assume that if in the theory exists a single D-brane then all the information associated with deformations is encoded in an associative algebra A equipped with a differential Q = /line{\\part}+\\part { deform}. In addition equivalence classes of deformations of these data are described by a Hochschild cohomology of (A, Q), an important geometric invariant of the (anti)holomorphic structure on X. We also discuss the identification of the harmonic structure (HT•(X); HΩ•(X)) of affine space X and the group ExtXn({O}\\triangle , {O}\\triangle ) (the HKR isomorphism), and bulk-boundary deformation pairing.

  5. Deformations of Geometric Structures in Topological Sigma Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytsenko, A. A.

    2010-11-01

    We study a Lie algebra of formal vector fields Wn with it application to the perturbative deformed holomorphic symplectic structure in the A-model, and a Calabi-Yau manifold with boundaries in the B-model. We show that equivalent classes of deformations are described by a Hochschild cohomology of the DG-algebra A = (A,Q), Q = ∂¯+∂deform, which is defined to be the cohomology of (-1)nQ+dHoch. Here ∂¯ is the initial non-deformed BRST operator while ∂deform is the deformed part whose algebra is a Lie algebra of linear vector fields gln.

  6. A Multiple Object Geometric Deformable Model for Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bogovic, John A.; Prince, Jerry L.; Bazin, Pierre-Louis

    2012-01-01

    Deformable models are widely used for image segmentation, most commonly to find single objects within an image. Although several methods have been proposed to segment multiple objects using deformable models, substantial limitations in their utility remain. This paper presents a multiple object segmentation method using a novel and efficient object representation for both two and three dimensions. The new framework guarantees object relationships and topology, prevents overlaps and gaps, enables boundary-specific speeds, and has a computationally efficient evolution scheme that is largely independent of the number of objects. Maintaining object relationships and straightforward use of object-specific and boundary-specific smoothing and advection forces enables the segmentation of objects with multiple compartments, a critical capability in the parcellation of organs in medical imaging. Comparing the new framework with previous approaches shows its superior performance and scalability. PMID:23316110

  7. 3D geometrical modelling of post-foliation deformations in metamorphic terrains (Syros, Cyclades, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippon, Mélody; Le Carlier de Veslud, Christian; Gueydan, Frédéric; Brun, Jean-Pierre; Caumon, Guillaume

    2015-09-01

    Superposed to ductile syn-metamorphic deformations, post-foliation deformations affect metamorphic units during their exhumation. Understanding the role of such deformations in the structuration of metamorphic units is key for understanding the tectonic evolution of convergence zones. We characterize post-foliations deformations using 3D modelling which is a first-order tool to describe complex geological structures, but a challenging task where based only on surface data. We propose a modelling procedure that combines fast draft models (interpolation of orientation data), with more complex ones where the structural context is better understood (implicit modelling), allowing us to build a 3D geometrical model of Syros Island blueschists (Cyclades), based on field data. With our approach, the 3D model is able to capture the complex present-day geometry of the island, mainly controlled by the superposition of three types of post-metamorphic deformations affecting the original metamorphic pile: i) a top-to-South ramp-flat extensional system that dominates the overall island structure, ii) large-scale folding of the metamorphic units associated with ramp-flat extensional system, and iii) steeply-dipping normal faults trending dominantly NNW-SSE and EW. The 3D surfaces produced by this method match outcrop data, are geologically consistent, and provide reasonable estimates of geological structures in poorly constrained areas.

  8. Geometric deformable model driven by CoCRFs: application to optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Tsechpenakis, Gabriel; Lujan, Brandon; Martinez, Oscar; Gregori, Giovanni; Rosenfeld, Philip J

    2008-01-01

    We present a geometric deformable model driven by dynamically updated probability fields. The shape is defined with the signed distance function, and the internal (smoothness) energy consists of a C1 continuity constraint, a shape prior, and a term that forces the zero-level of the shape distance function towards a connected form. The image probability fields are estimated by our collaborative Conditional Random Field (CoCRF), which is updated during the evolution in an active learning manner: it infers class posteriors in pixels or regions with feature ambiguities by assessing the joint appearance of neighboring sites and using the classification confidence. We apply our method to Optical Coherence Tomography fundus images for the segmentation of geographic atrophies in dry age-related macular degeneration of the human eye.

  9. Deformation Prediction and Geometrical Modeling of Head and Neck Cancer Tumor: A Data Mining Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi, Maryam

    Radiation therapy has been used in the treatment of cancer tumors for several years and many cancer patients receive radiotherapy. It may be used as primary therapy or with a combination of surgery or other kinds of therapy such as chemotherapy, hormone therapy or some mixture of the three. The treatment objective is to destroy cancer cells or shrink the tumor by planning an adequate radiation dose to the desired target without damaging the normal tissues. By using the pre-treatment Computer Tomography (CT) images, most of the radiotherapy planning systems design the target and assume that the size of the tumor will not change throughout the treatment course, which takes 5 to 7 weeks. Based on this assumption, the total amount of radiation is planned and fractionated for the daily dose required to be delivered to the patient's body. However, this assumption is flawed because the patients receiving radiotherapy have marked changes in tumor geometry during the treatment period. Therefore, there is a critical need to understand the changes of the tumor shape and size over time during the course of radiotherapy in order to prevent significant effects of inaccuracy in the planning. In this research, a methodology is proposed in order to monitor and predict daily (fraction day) tumor volume and surface changes of head and neck cancer tumors during the entire treatment period. In the proposed method, geometrical modeling and data mining techniques will be used rather than repetitive CT scans data to predict the tumor deformation for radiation planning. Clinical patient data were obtained from the University of Texas-MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC). In the first step, by using CT scan data, the tumor's progressive geometric changes during the treatment period are quantified. The next step relates to using regression analysis in order to develop predictive models for tumor geometry based on the geometric analysis results and the patients' selected attributes (age, weight

  10. Integrability conditions between the first and second Cosserat deformation tensor in geometrically nonlinear micropolar models and existence of minimizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lankeit, Johannes; Neff, Patrizio; Osterbrink, Frank

    2017-02-01

    In this note, we extend integrability conditions for the symmetric stretch tensor U in the polar decomposition of the deformation gradient nabla φ =F=R U to the nonsymmetric case. In doing so, we recover integrability conditions for the first Cosserat deformation tensor. Let F=overline{R} overline{U} with overline{R}:Ω subset R^3longrightarrow {{SO}}(3) and overline{U}:Ω subset R^3longrightarrow GL(3). Then, K:=overline{R}^T{Grad} overline{R}={{Anti}}( Big [overline{U}({{Curl}}overline{U})^T-{1/2{{tr}}(overline{U}({{Curl}}overline{U})^T)/{1}Big ]overline{U}}{det overline{U}}), giving a connection between the first Cosserat deformation tensor overline{U} and the second Cosserat tensor K. (Here, {{Anti}} denotes an isomorphism between R^{3× 3} and So(3):= Ain R^{3× 3× 3} | A.uin so(3)forall uin R^3}). The formula shows that it is not possible to prescribe overline{U} and K independent from each other. We also propose a new energy formulation of geometrically nonlinear Cosserat models which completely separate the effects of nonsymmetric straining and curvature. For very weak constitutive assumptions (no direct boundary condition on rotations, zero Cosserat couple modulus, quadratic curvature energy), we show existence of minimizers in Sobolev spaces.

  11. A semi-automatic framework for highway extraction and vehicle detection based on a geometric deformable model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xutong

    Road extraction and vehicle detection are two of the most important steps of traffic flow analysis from multi-frame aerial photographs. The traditional way of deriving traffic flow trajectories relies on manual vehicle counting from a sequence of aerial photographs. It is tedious and time-consuming work. To improve this process, this research presents a new semi-automatic framework for highway extraction and vehicle detection from aerial photographs. The basis of the new framework is a geometric deformable model. This model refers to the minimization of an objective function that connects the optimization problem with the propagation of regular curves. Utilizing implicit representation of two-dimensional curve, the implementation of this model is capable of dealing with topological changes during curve deformation process and the output is independent of the position of the initial curves. A seed point propagation framework is designed and implemented. This framework incorporates highway extraction, tracking, and linking into one procedure. Manually selected seed points can be automatically propagated throughout a whole highway network. During the process, road center points are also extracted, which introduces a search direction for solving possible blocking problems. This new framework has been successfully applied to highway network extraction and vehicle detection from a large orthophoto mosaic. In this research, vehicles on the extracted highway network were detected with an 83% success rate.

  12. A Geometric Classification of Jaw Deformities

    PubMed Central

    Gateno, Jaime; Alfi, David; Xia, James J.; Teichgraeber, John F.

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, the most widely used classification system for jaw deformities is the one provided by the International Classification of Diseases, Clinical Modification (ICD-CM), a taxonomy scheme that is based on the World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases (ICD). The last iteration of ICD-CM, version 10, sorts jaw deformities according to geometry, into 3 groups: anomalies of jaw size, anomalies of jaw-cranial base relationship, or unspecified. Yet these deformities can affect 6 different geometric attributes: size, position, orientation, shape, symmetry, and completeness. In clinical practice and in teaching we have found the ICD-CM classification to be incomplete and disjointed. With this in mind, we have developed a better classification system. The purpose of this paper is to present it. PMID:26608152

  13. Chiral models: Geometrical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelomov, A. M.

    1987-02-01

    Two-dimensional classical chiral models of field theory are considered, the main attention being paid on geometrical aspects of such theories. A characteristic feature of these models is that the interaction is inserted not by adding the interaction Lagrangian to the free field Lagrangian, but has a purely geometrical origin and is related to the inner curvature of the manifold. These models are in many respects analogous to non-Abelian gauge theories and as became clear recently, they are also important for the superstring theory which nowadays is the most probable candidate for a truly unified theory of all interactions including gravitation.

  14. Pragmatic geometric model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamer, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of subsurface model reliability is mathematically and technically demanding as there are many different sources of uncertainty and some of the factors can be assessed merely in a subjective way. For many practical applications in industry or risk assessment (e. g. geothermal drilling) a quantitative estimation of possible geometric variations in depth unit is preferred over relative numbers because of cost calculations for different scenarios. The talk gives an overview of several factors that affect the geometry of structural subsurface models that are based upon typical geological survey organization (GSO) data like geological maps, borehole data and conceptually driven construction of subsurface elements (e. g. fault network). Within the context of the trans-European project "GeoMol" uncertainty analysis has to be very pragmatic also because of different data rights, data policies and modelling software between the project partners. In a case study a two-step evaluation methodology for geometric subsurface model uncertainty is being developed. In a first step several models of the same volume of interest have been calculated by omitting successively more and more input data types (seismic constraints, fault network, outcrop data). The positions of the various horizon surfaces are then compared. The procedure is equivalent to comparing data of various levels of detail and therefore structural complexity. This gives a measure of the structural significance of each data set in space and as a consequence areas of geometric complexity are identified. These areas are usually very data sensitive hence geometric variability in between individual data points in these areas is higher than in areas of low structural complexity. Instead of calculating a multitude of different models by varying some input data or parameters as it is done by Monte-Carlo-simulations, the aim of the second step of the evaluation procedure (which is part of the ongoing work) is to

  15. 3D printed, bio-inspired prototypes and analytical models for structured suture interfaces with geometrically-tuned deformation and failure behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Erica; Li, Yaning; Ortiz, Christine; Boyce, Mary C.

    2014-12-01

    Geometrically structured interfaces in nature possess enhanced, and often surprising, mechanical properties, and provide inspiration for materials design. This paper investigates the mechanics of deformation and failure mechanisms of suture interface designs through analytical models and experiments on 3D printed polymer physical prototypes. Suture waveforms with generalized trapezoidal geometries (trapezoidal, rectangular, anti-trapezoidal, and triangular) are studied and characterized by several important geometric parameters: the presence or absence of a bonded tip region, the tip angle, and the geometry. It is shown that a wide range (in some cases as great as an order of magnitude) in stiffness, strength, and toughness is achievable dependent on tip bonding, tip angle, and geometry. Suture interfaces with a bonded tip region exhibit a higher initial stiffness due to the greater load bearing by the skeletal teeth, a double peak in the stress-strain curve corresponding to the failure of the bonded tip and the failure of the slanted interface region or tooth, respectively, and an additional failure and toughening mechanism due to the failure of the bonded tip. Anti-trapezoidal geometries promote the greatest amplification of properties for suture interfaces with a bonded tip due the large tip interface area. The tip angle and geometry govern the stress distributions in the teeth and the ratio of normal to shear stresses in the interfacial layers, which together determine the failure mechanism of the interface and/or the teeth. Rectangular suture interfaces fail by simple shearing of the interfaces. Trapezoidal and triangular suture interfaces fail by a combination of shear and tensile normal stresses in the interface, leading to plastic deformation, cavitation events, and subsequent stretching of interface ligaments with mostly elastic deformation in the teeth. Anti-trapezoidal suture interfaces with small tip angles have high stress concentrations in the teeth

  16. Iris-based medical analysis by geometric deformation features.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin; Zhang, D; Li, Naimin; Cai, Yan; Zuo, Wangmeng; Wang, Kuanguan

    2013-01-01

    Iris analysis studies the relationship between human health and changes in the anatomy of the iris. Apart from the fact that iris recognition focuses on modeling the overall structure of the iris, iris diagnosis emphasizes the detecting and analyzing of local variations in the characteristics of irises. This paper focuses on studying the geometrical structure changes in irises that are caused by gastrointestinal diseases, and on measuring the observable deformations in the geometrical structures of irises that are related to roundness, diameter and other geometric forms of the pupil and the collarette. Pupil and collarette based features are defined and extracted. A series of experiments are implemented on our experimental pathological iris database, including manual clustering of both normal and pathological iris images, manual classification by non-specialists, manual classification by individuals with a medical background, classification ability verification for the proposed features, and disease recognition by applying the proposed features. The results prove the effectiveness and clinical diagnostic significance of the proposed features and a reliable recognition performance for automatic disease diagnosis. Our research results offer a novel systematic perspective for iridology studies and promote the progress of both theoretical and practical work in iris diagnosis.

  17. Segmentation of the Cerebellar Peduncles Using a Random Forest Classifier and a Multi-object Geometric Deformable Model: Application to Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chuyang; Yang, Zhen; Ying, Sarah H; Prince, Jerry L

    2015-07-01

    The cerebellar peduncles, comprising the superior cerebellar peduncles (SCPs), the middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP), and the inferior cerebellar peduncles (ICPs), are white matter tracts that connect the cerebellum to other parts of the central nervous system. Methods for automatic segmentation and quantification of the cerebellar peduncles are needed for objectively and efficiently studying their structure and function. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides key information to support this goal, but it remains challenging because the tensors change dramatically in the decussation of the SCPs (dSCP), the region where the SCPs cross. This paper presents an automatic method for segmenting the cerebellar peduncles, including the dSCP. The method uses volumetric segmentation concepts based on extracted DTI features. The dSCP and noncrossing portions of the peduncles are modeled as separate objects, and are initially classified using a random forest classifier together with the DTI features. To obtain geometrically correct results, a multi-object geometric deformable model is used to refine the random forest classification. The method was evaluated using a leave-one-out cross-validation on five control subjects and four patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). It was then used to evaluate group differences in the peduncles in a population of 32 controls and 11 SCA6 patients. In the SCA6 group, we have observed significant decreases in the volumes of the dSCP and the ICPs and significant increases in the mean diffusivity in the noncrossing SCPs, the MCP, and the ICPs. These results are consistent with a degeneration of the cerebellar peduncles in SCA6 patients.

  18. Geometric modeling of pelvic organs with thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bay, T.; Chen, Z.-W.; Raffin, R.; Daniel, M.; Joli, P.; Feng, Z.-Q.; Bellemare, M.-E.

    2012-03-01

    Physiological changes in the spatial configuration of the internal organs in the abdomen can induce different disorders that need surgery. Following the complexity of the surgical procedure, mechanical simulations are necessary but the in vivo factor makes complicate the study of pelvic organs. In order to determine a realistic behavior of these organs, an accurate geometric model associated with a physical modeling is therefore required. Our approach is integrated in the partnership between a geometric and physical module. The Geometric Modeling seeks to build a continuous geometric model: from a dataset of 3D points provided by a Segmentation step, surfaces are created through a B-spline fitting process. An energy function is built to measure the bidirectional distance between surface and data. This energy is minimized with an alternate iterative Hoschek-like method. A thickness is added with an offset formulation, and the geometric model is finally exported in a hexahedral mesh. Afterward, the Physical Modeling tries to calculate the properties of the soft tissues to simulate the organs displacements. The physical parameters attached to the data are determined with a feedback loop between finite-elements deformations and ground-truth acquisition (dynamic MRI).

  19. Material and Geometric Analysis of Structures Subjected to Large Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferranto, Justin

    The two major focuses of this dissertation are: (1) Studying the structural behaviors of hyper-elastic membranes subjected to extremely large deformation. These membranes are used in a reconfigurable tooling system (RTS) which was under development during the course of this study. (2) Establishing a continuum constitutive model for fabric materials under in-plane large deformation through theoretical and numerical analyses. This model may also be applied to study a class of materials which involve significant internal structure reconfiguration during deformation. The RTS allows quick onsite fabrication of high temperature composite parts. RTS applications include rapid onsite repair of aircraft components. The RTS uses a hyperelastic membrane as an interface between the state-change material and model. This membrane may be subjected to 800% engineering strain during operation. In this part of the study, material properties of the membranes have been characterized through three tests: simple tension, equal biaxial tension and planar tension. Nine-term Money-Rivlin constants are obtained through data regression. Finite element simulations have been conducted to simulate the deformed shapes of a membrane around several representative geometries under various vacuum pressure and constraint conditions. Experimental results have been compared with predictions from finite element simulations. This study contributes to understanding the behavior of membrane structures under large deformations in general; the results are used to generate design guidelines for RTS applicability. Fabric materials are widely used in industry for numerous applications. They exhibit a meso-scale complexity and involve significant internal structure reconfiguration during large deformation, which prohibits the direct application of the theory of continuum mechanics when studying these materials. In the second part of this work, a unique meso-scale FEA model, utilizing new modeling techniques and

  20. Supersymmetric chiral models: Geometrical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelomov, A. M.

    1989-03-01

    We consider classical supersymmetric chiral models of field theory and focus our attention on the geometrical aspects of such theories. A characteristic feature of such models is that the interaction is not introduced by adding the interaction Lagrangian to the free field Lagrangian, but has a purely geometrical origin and is related to the inner curvature of the target manifold. In many aspects these models are analogous to gauge theories and, as became clear recently, they are also important for superstring theory, which nowadays is the most probable candidate for a truly unified theory of all interactions including gravitation.

  1. Geometrical modelling of textile reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastore, Christopher M.; Birger, Alexander B.; Clyburn, Eugene

    1995-01-01

    The mechanical properties of textile composites are dictated by the arrangement of yarns contained with the material. Thus to develop a comprehensive understanding of the performance of these materials, it is necessary to develop a geometrical model of the fabric structure. This task is quite complex, as the fabric is made form highly flexible yarn systems which experience a certain degree of compressability. Furthermore there are tremendous forces acting on the fabric during densification typically resulting in yarn displacement and misorientation. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology for characterizing the geometry of yarns within a fabric structure including experimental techniques for evaluating these models. Furthermore, some applications of these geometric results to mechanical prediction models are demonstrated. Although more costly than its predecessors, the present analysis is based on the detailed architecture developed by one of the authors and his colleagues and accounts for many of the geometric complexities that other analyses ignore.

  2. Geometric Electron Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nika, G. Gerald; Parameswaran, R.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a visual approach for explaining the filling of electrons in the shells, subshells, and orbitals of the chemical elements. Enables students to apply the principles of atomic electron configuration while using manipulatives to model the building up of electron configurations as the atomic numbers of elements increase on the periodic…

  3. Geometrical modelling of textile reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastore, Christopher M.; Birger, Alexander B.; Clyburn, Eugene

    1995-01-01

    The mechanical properties of textile composites are dictated by the arrangement of yarns contained within the material. Thus, to develop a comprehensive understanding of the performance of these materials, it is necessary to develop a geometrical model of the fabric structure. This task is quite complex, as the fabric is made from highly flexible yarn systems which experience a certain degree of compressibility. Furthermore there are tremendous forces acting on the fabric during densification typically resulting in yarn displacement and misorientation. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology for characterizing the geometry of yarns within a fabric structure including experimental techniques for evaluating these models. Furthermore, some applications of these geometric results to mechanical property predictions models are demonstrated.

  4. Geometric Modelling of Octagonal Lamp Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, T. O.; Lichti, D. D.

    2014-06-01

    Lamp poles are one of the most abundant highway and community components in modern cities. Their supporting parts are primarily tapered octagonal cones specifically designed for wind resistance. The geometry and the positions of the lamp poles are important information for various applications. For example, they are important to monitoring deformation of aged lamp poles, maintaining an efficient highway GIS system, and also facilitating possible feature-based calibration of mobile LiDAR systems. In this paper, we present a novel geometric model for octagonal lamp poles. The model consists of seven parameters in which a rotation about the z-axis is included, and points are constrained by the trigonometric property of 2D octagons after applying the rotations. For the geometric fitting of the lamp pole point cloud captured by a terrestrial LiDAR, accurate initial parameter values are essential. They can be estimated by first fitting the points to a circular cone model and this is followed by some basic point cloud processing techniques. The model was verified by fitting both simulated and real data. The real data includes several lamp pole point clouds captured by: (1) Faro Focus 3D and (2) Velodyne HDL-32E. The fitting results using the proposed model are promising, and up to 2.9 mm improvement in fitting accuracy was realized for the real lamp pole point clouds compared to using the conventional circular cone model. The overall result suggests that the proposed model is appropriate and rigorous.

  5. 4-D facial expression recognition by learning geometric deformations.

    PubMed

    Ben Amor, Boulbaba; Drira, Hassen; Berretti, Stefano; Daoudi, Mohamed; Srivastava, Anuj

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic approach for facial expression recognition from 3-D video sequences. In the proposed solution, the 3-D faces are represented by collections of radial curves and a Riemannian shape analysis is applied to effectively quantify the deformations induced by the facial expressions in a given subsequence of 3-D frames. This is obtained from the dense scalar field, which denotes the shooting directions of the geodesic paths constructed between pairs of corresponding radial curves of two faces. As the resulting dense scalar fields show a high dimensionality, Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) transformation is applied to the dense feature space. Two methods are then used for classification: 1) 3-D motion extraction with temporal Hidden Markov model (HMM) and 2) mean deformation capturing with random forest. While a dynamic HMM on the features is trained in the first approach, the second one computes mean deformations under a window and applies multiclass random forest. Both of the proposed classification schemes on the scalar fields showed comparable results and outperformed earlier studies on facial expression recognition from 3-D video sequences.

  6. Postbuckling analysis of shear deformable composite flat panels taking into account geometrical imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Librescu, L.; Stein, M.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of initial geometrical imperfections on the postbuckling response of flat laminated composite panels to uniaxial and biaxial compressive loading are investigated analytically. The derivation of the mathematical model on the basis of first-order transverse shear deformation theory is outlined, and numerical results for perfect and imperfect, single-layer and three-layer square plates with free-free, clamped-clamped, or free-clamped edges are presented in graphs and briefly characterized. The present approach is shown to be more accurate than analyses based on the classical Kirchhoff plate model.

  7. Tensor3D: A computer graphics program to simulate 3D real-time deformation and visualization of geometric bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallozzi Lavorante, Luca; Dirk Ebert, Hans

    2008-07-01

    Tensor3D is a geometric modeling program with the capacity to simulate and visualize in real-time the deformation, specified through a tensor matrix and applied to triangulated models representing geological bodies. 3D visualization allows the study of deformational processes that are traditionally conducted in 2D, such as simple and pure shears. Besides geometric objects that are immediately available in the program window, the program can read other models from disk, thus being able to import objects created with different open-source or proprietary programs. A strain ellipsoid and a bounding box are simultaneously shown and instantly deformed with the main object. The principal axes of strain are visualized as well to provide graphical information about the orientation of the tensor's normal components. The deformed models can also be saved, retrieved later and deformed again, in order to study different steps of progressive strain, or to make this data available to other programs. The shape of stress ellipsoids and the corresponding Mohr circles defined by any stress tensor can also be represented. The application was written using the Visualization ToolKit, a powerful scientific visualization library in the public domain. This development choice, allied to the use of the Tcl/Tk programming language, which is independent on the host computational platform, makes the program a useful tool for the study of geometric deformations directly in three dimensions in teaching as well as research activities.

  8. Compensation of geometrical deformations for watermark extraction in digital cinema application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delannay, Damien; Delaigle, Jean-Francois; Macq, Benoit M. M.; Barlaud, Michel

    2001-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the restoration of geometrically altered digital images with the aim of recovering an embedded watermark information. More precisely, we focus on the distorsion taking place by the camera acquisition of an image. Indeed, in the cinema industry, a large part of early movie piracy comes from copies made in the theater itself with a camera. The evolution towards digital cinema broadcast enables watermark based fingerprinting protection systems. The first step for fingerprint extraction of a counterfeit material is the compensation of the geometrical deformation inherent to the acquisition process. In order to compensate the deformations, we use a modified 12-parameters bilinear transformation model which closely matches the deformations taking place by an analog acquisition process. The estimation of the parameters can either be global, either vary across regions within the image. Our approach consist in the estimation of the displacement of a number of of pixels via a modified block-matching technique followed by a minimum mean square error optimization of the parameters on basis of those estimated displacement-vectors. The estimated transformation is applied to the candidate image to get a reconstruction as close as possible to the original image. Classical watermark extraction procedure can follow.

  9. Geometric effects in the electronic transport of deformed nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Fernando; Fumeron, Sébastien; Berche, Bertrand; Moraes, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Quasi-two-dimensional systems may exibit curvature, which adds three-dimensional influence to their internal properties. As shown by da Costa (1981 Phys. Rev. A 23 1982-7), charged particles moving on a curved surface experience a curvature-dependent potential which greatly influence their dynamics. In this paper, we study the electronic ballistic transport in deformed nanotubes. The one-electron Schrödinger equation with open boundary conditions is solved numerically with a flexible MAPLE code made available as supplementary data. We find that the curvature of the deformations indeed has strong effects on the electron dynamics, suggesting its use in the design of nanotube-based electronic devices.

  10. A geometric exploration of stress in deformed liquid foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Myfanwy E.; Schröder-Turk, Gerd E.; Kraynik, Andrew M.

    2017-03-01

    We explore an alternate way of looking at the rheological response of a yield stress fluid: using discrete geometry to probe the heterogeneous distribution of stress in soap froth. We present quasi-static, uniaxial, isochoric compression and extension of three-dimensional random monodisperse soap froth in periodic boundary conditions and examine the stress and geometry that result. The stress and shape anisotropy of individual cells is quantified by Q, a scalar measure derived from the interface tensor that gauges each cell’s contribution to the global stress. Cumulatively, the spatial distribution of highly deformed cells allows us to examine how stress is internally distributed. The topology of highly deformed cells, how they arrange relative to one another in space, gives insight into the heterogeneous distribution of stress.

  11. a Visualization Model of Flower Based on Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ling; Wang, Lei; Yang, Xuedong

    We present a simple and effective modeling method for flowers. It starts with an initial geometric shape, such as ellipsoid, cylinder, or plane surface et al., and then simulates flower components (such as pedicel, receptacle, pistils, stamens, petals and sepals) by addition deformation to the basic geometric shape. The detailed geometry of flower component is defined by basic equation for the basic shape along with a deformation function. A variety of flower can be produced by varying the deformation parameters. A number of examples are given in the paper to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed model.

  12. A novel scheme for automatic nonrigid image registration using deformation invariant feature and geometric constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhipeng; Lei, Lin; Zhou, Shilin

    2015-10-01

    Automatic image registration is a vital yet challenging task, particularly for non-rigid deformation images which are more complicated and common in remote sensing images, such as distorted UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) images or scanning imaging images caused by flutter. Traditional non-rigid image registration methods are based on the correctly matched corresponding landmarks, which usually needs artificial markers. It is a rather challenging task to locate the accurate position of the points and get accurate homonymy point sets. In this paper, we proposed an automatic non-rigid image registration algorithm which mainly consists of three steps: To begin with, we introduce an automatic feature point extraction method based on non-linear scale space and uniform distribution strategy to extract the points which are uniform distributed along the edge of the image. Next, we propose a hybrid point matching algorithm using DaLI (Deformation and Light Invariant) descriptor and local affine invariant geometric constraint based on triangulation which is constructed by K-nearest neighbor algorithm. Based on the accurate homonymy point sets, the two images are registrated by the model of TPS (Thin Plate Spline). Our method is demonstrated by three deliberately designed experiments. The first two experiments are designed to evaluate the distribution of point set and the correctly matching rate on synthetic data and real data respectively. The last experiment is designed on the non-rigid deformation remote sensing images and the three experimental results demonstrate the accuracy, robustness, and efficiency of the proposed algorithm compared with other traditional methods.

  13. Geometric Modeling Application Interface Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    Manual IDEF-Extended ( IDEFIX ) Integrated Information Support System (IISS), ICAM Project 6201, Contract F33615-80-C-5155, December 1985. Interim...Differential Geometry of Curves and Surfaces, M. P. de Carmo, Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1976. IDEFIX Readers Reference, D. Appleton Company, December 1985...Modeling. IDEFI -- IDEF Information Modeling. IDEFIX -- IDEF Extended Information Modeling. IDEF2 -- IDEF Dynamics Modeling. IDSS -- Integrated Decision

  14. Curved Displacement Transfer Functions for Geometric Nonlinear Large Deformation Structure Shape Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran; Lung, Shun-Fat

    2017-01-01

    For shape predictions of structures under large geometrically nonlinear deformations, Curved Displacement Transfer Functions were formulated based on a curved displacement, traced by a material point from the undeformed position to deformed position. The embedded beam (depth-wise cross section of a structure along a surface strain-sensing line) was discretized into multiple small domains, with domain junctures matching the strain-sensing stations. Thus, the surface strain distribution could be described with a piecewise linear or a piecewise nonlinear function. The discretization approach enabled piecewise integrations of the embedded-beam curvature equations to yield the Curved Displacement Transfer Functions, expressed in terms of embedded beam geometrical parameters and surface strains. By entering the surface strain data into the Displacement Transfer Functions, deflections along each embedded beam can be calculated at multiple points for mapping the overall structural deformed shapes. Finite-element linear and nonlinear analyses of a tapered cantilever tubular beam were performed to generate linear and nonlinear surface strains and the associated deflections to be used for validation. The shape prediction accuracies were then determined by comparing the theoretical deflections with the finiteelement- generated deflections. The results show that the newly developed Curved Displacement Transfer Functions are very accurate for shape predictions of structures under large geometrically nonlinear deformations.

  15. Geometric Models for Collaborative Search and Filtering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitton, Ephrat

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation explores the use of geometric and graphical models for a variety of information search and filtering applications. These models serve to provide an intuitive understanding of the problem domains and as well as computational efficiencies to our solution approaches. We begin by considering a search and rescue scenario where both…

  16. Yang-Mills generalization of the geometrical collective model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosensteel, George; Sparks, Nick

    2015-04-01

    The geometrical or Bohr-Mottelson model is generalized and recast as a Yang-Mills theory. The gauge symmetry determines conservation of Kelvin circulation. The circulation commutes with the Hamiltonian when it is the sum of the kinetic energy and a potential that depends only on deformation. The conventional Bohr-Mottelson model is the special case of circulation zero, and wave functions are complex-valued. In the generalization, any quantized value of the circulation is allowed, and the wave functions are vector-valued. The Yang-Mills formulation introduces a new coupling between the geometrical and intrinsic degrees of freedom. The coupling appears in the covariant derivative term of the collective kinetic energy. This kind of coupling is sometimes called ``magnetic'' because of the analogy with electrodynamics.

  17. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Liu, Tian-Shu

    2001-01-01

    The theory, methods, and applications of the videogrammetric model deformation (VMD) measurement technique used at NASA for wind tunnel testing are presented. The VMD technique, based on non-topographic photogrammetry, can determine static and dynamic aeroelastic deformation and attitude of a wind-tunnel model. Hardware of the system includes a video-rate CCD camera, a computer with an image acquisition frame grabber board, illumination lights, and retroreflective or painted targets on a wind tunnel model. Custom software includes routines for image acquisition, target-tracking/identification, target centroid calculation, camera calibration, and deformation calculations. Applications of the VMD technique at five large NASA wind tunnels are discussed.

  18. Symmetries and deformations in the spherical shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Isacker, P.; Pittel, S.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss symmetries of the spherical shell model that make contact with the geometric collective model of Bohr and Mottelson. The most celebrated symmetry of this kind is SU(3), which is the basis of Elliott’s model of rotation. It corresponds to a deformed mean field induced by a quadrupole interaction in a single major oscillator shell N and can be generalized to include several major shells. As such, Elliott’s SU(3) model establishes the link between the spherical shell model and the (quadrupole component of the) geometric collective model. We introduce the analogue symmetry induced by an octupole interaction in two major oscillator shells N-1 and N, leading to an octupole-deformed solution of the spherical shell model. We show that in the limit of large oscillator shells, N\\to ∞ , the algebraic octupole interaction tends to that of the geometric collective model.

  19. Model-based vision using geometric hashing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerman, Alexander, III; Patton, Ronald

    1991-04-01

    The Geometric Hashing technique developed by the NYU Courant Institute has been applied to various automatic target recognition applications. In particular, I-MATH has extended the hashing algorithm to perform automatic target recognition ofsynthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery. For this application, the hashing is performed upon the geometric locations of dominant scatterers. In addition to being a robust model-based matching algorithm -- invariant under translation, scale, and 3D rotations of the target -- hashing is of particular utility because it can still perform effective matching when the target is partially obscured. Moreover, hashing is very amenable to a SIMD parallel processing architecture, and thus potentially realtime implementable.

  20. Geometrical study of the deformations of a thin spherical shell inspired by pollen grains.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couturier, Etienne; Katifori, Eleni; Dumais, Jacques; Cerda, Enrique

    2013-03-01

    Various monocotyledon pollen grains have a geometric design. They are constituted by a stiff thin shell with an n-fold rotationally symmetric softer sector. The mechanic response of these inhomogeneous shells can be approximated as an open shell. Isometric modes are known to be energetically favorable for thin shells when they are possible. Although the literature for the complete sphere, for which these modes are impossible, is extensive, analyses of the deformation of open shells whose isometric deformations are not inhibited, are much more scarce. We focus on the isometric deformation of spheres with n-fold rotationally symmetric openings. The isometric deformation means that the surface remains a constant gaussian curvature surface. Using differential geometry, we obtained an integrable family of surfaces whose gaussian curvature remains approximatively constant. We performed both simulations by tethered mesh methods and experiments with cut ping-pong balls. We observe that first the shell surface deforms without any stretching and is very well described as a part of an approximative constant gaussian curvature surface whose singularities remain outside the shell surface and get closer to the shell surface as the load increases.

  1. a Modular Geometric Model for Underwater Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, H.-G.

    2015-04-01

    Underwater applications of photogrammetric measurement techniques usually need to deal with multimedia photogrammetry aspects, which are characterized by the necessity of handling optical rays that are broken at interfaces between optical media with different refrative indices according to Snell's Law. This so-called multimedia geometry has to be incorporated into geometric models in order to achieve correct measurement results. The paper shows a flexible yet strict geometric model for the handling of refraction effects on the optical path, which can be implemented as a module into photogrammetric standard tools such as spatial resection, spatial intersection, bundle adjustment or epipolar line computation. The module is especially well suited for applications, where an object in water is observed by cameras in air through one or more plane parallel glass interfaces, as it allows for some simplifications here.

  2. Geometric modeling for computer aided design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwing, James L.

    1993-01-01

    Over the past several years, it has been the primary goal of this grant to design and implement software to be used in the conceptual design of aerospace vehicles. The work carried out under this grant was performed jointly with members of the Vehicle Analysis Branch (VAB) of NASA LaRC, Computer Sciences Corp., and Vigyan Corp. This has resulted in the development of several packages and design studies. Primary among these are the interactive geometric modeling tool, the Solid Modeling Aerospace Research Tool (smart), and the integration and execution tools provided by the Environment for Application Software Integration and Execution (EASIE). In addition, it is the purpose of the personnel of this grant to provide consultation in the areas of structural design, algorithm development, and software development and implementation, particularly in the areas of computer aided design, geometric surface representation, and parallel algorithms.

  3. Non-geometric fluxes, quasi-Hopf twist deformations, and nonassociative quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Mylonas, Dionysios Szabo, Richard J.; Schupp, Peter

    2014-12-15

    We analyse the symmetries underlying nonassociative deformations of geometry in non-geometric R-flux compactifications which arise via T-duality from closed strings with constant geometric fluxes. Starting from the non-abelian Lie algebra of translations and Bopp shifts in phase space, together with a suitable cochain twist, we construct the quasi-Hopf algebra of symmetries that deforms the algebra of functions and the exterior differential calculus in the phase space description of nonassociative R-space. In this setting, nonassociativity is characterised by the associator 3-cocycle which controls non-coassociativity of the quasi-Hopf algebra. We use abelian 2-cocycle twists to construct maps between the dynamical nonassociative star product and a family of associative star products parametrized by constant momentum surfaces in phase space. We define a suitable integration on these nonassociative spaces and find that the usual cyclicity of associative noncommutative deformations is replaced by weaker notions of 2-cyclicity and 3-cyclicity. Using this star product quantization on phase space together with 3-cyclicity, we formulate a consistent version of nonassociative quantum mechanics, in which we calculate the expectation values of area and volume operators, and find coarse-graining of the string background due to the R-flux.

  4. Overview of geometrical room acoustic modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Savioja, Lauri; Svensson, U Peter

    2015-08-01

    Computerized room acoustics modeling has been practiced for almost 50 years up to date. These modeling techniques play an important role in room acoustic design nowadays, often including auralization, but can also help in the construction of virtual environments for such applications as computer games, cognitive research, and training. This overview describes the main principles, landmarks in the development, and state-of-the-art for techniques that are based on geometrical acoustics principles. A focus is given to their capabilities to model the different aspects of sound propagation: specular vs diffuse reflections, and diffraction.

  5. A deformation theory of strain gradient crystal plasticity that accounts for geometrically necessary dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardella, Lorenzo

    2006-01-01

    We propose a deformation theory of strain gradient crystal plasticity that accounts for the density of geometrically necessary dislocations by including, as an independent kinematic variable, Nye's dislocation density tensor [1953. Acta Metallurgica 1, 153-162]. This is accomplished in the same fashion as proposed by Gurtin and co-workers (see, for instance, Gurtin and Needleman [2005. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 53, 1-31]) in the context of a flow theory of crystal plasticity, by introducing the so-called defect energy. Moreover, in order to better describe the strengthening accompanied by diminishing size, we propose that the classical part of the plastic potential may be dependent on both the plastic slip vector and its gradient; for single crystals, this also makes it easier to deal with the "higher-order" boundary conditions. We develop both the kinematic formulation and its static dual and apply the theory to the simple shear of a constrained strip (example already exploited in Shu et al. [2001. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 49, 1361-1395], Bittencourt et al. [2003. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 51, 281-310], Niordson and Hutchinson [2003. Euro J. Mech. Phys. Solids 22, 771-778], Evers et al. [2004. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 52, 2379-2401], and Anand et al. [2005. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 53, 1789-1826]) to investigate what sort of behaviour the new model predicts. The availability of the total potential energy functional and its static dual allows us to easily solve this simple boundary value problem by resorting to the Ritz method.

  6. Deformed Richardson-Gaudin model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulish, P.; Stolin, A.; Johannesson, L. H.

    2014-09-01

    The Richardson-Gaudin model describes strong pairing correlations of fermions confined to a finite chain. The integrability of the Hamiltonian allows the algebraic construction of its eigenstates. In this work we show that the quantum group theory provides a possibility to deform the Hamiltonian preserving integrability. More precisely, we use the so-called Jordanian r-matrix to deform the Hamiltonian of the Richardson-Gaudin model. In order to preserve its integrability, we need to insert a special nilpotent term into the auxiliary L-operator which generates integrals of motion of the system. Moreover, the quantum inverse scattering method enables us to construct the exact eigenstates of the deformed Hamiltonian. These states have a highly complex entanglement structure which require further investigation.

  7. Advances in Geometric Acoustic Propagation Modeling Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, P. S.; Arrowsmith, S.

    2013-12-01

    Geometric acoustics provides an efficient numerical method to model propagation effects. At leading order, one can identify ensonified regions and calculate celerities of the predicted arrivals. Beyond leading order, the solution of the transport equation provides a means to estimate the amplitude of individual acoustic phases. The auxiliary parameters introduced in solving the transport equation have been found to provide a means of identifying ray paths connecting source and receiver, or eigenrays, for non-planar propagation. A detailed explanation of the eigenray method will be presented as well as an application to predicting azimuth deviations for infrasonic data recorded during the Humming Roadrunner experiment of 2012.

  8. Brst-Invariant Deformations of Geometric Structures in Topological Field Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytsenko, A. A.; Chaichian, M.; Tureanu, A.; Williams, F. L.

    2013-06-01

    We study a Lie algebra of formal vector fields Wn with its application to the perturbative deformed holomorphic symplectic structure in the A-model, and a Calabi-Yau manifold with boundaries in the B-model. A relevant concept in the vertex operator algebra and the BRST cohomology is that of the elliptic genera (the one-loop string partition function). We show that the elliptic genera can be written in terms of spectral functions of the hyperbolic three-geometry (which inherits the cohomology structure of BRST-like operator). We show that equivalence classes of deformations are described by a Hochschild cohomology theory of the DG-algebra {A} = (A, Q), Q = \\bar {∂ } + ∂ deform, which is defined to be the cohomology of (-1)n Q + dHoch. Here, \\bar {∂ } is the initial nondeformed BRST operator while ∂deform is the deformed part whose algebra is a Lie algebra of linear vector fields gln. We discuss the identification of the harmonic structure (HT•(X);HΩ•(X)) of affine space X and the group {Ext}Xn({{O}}\\triangle, {{O}}\\triangle ) (the HKR isomorphism), and bulk-boundary deformation pairing.

  9. Young Children's Understanding of Geometric Shapes: The Role of Geometric Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elia, Iliada; Gagatsis, Athanasios; Kyriakides, Leonidas

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the role of polygonal shapes as geometrical models in teaching mathematics, so as to elicit and interpret children's geometric conceptions and understanding about shapes. Primary pupils were asked to draw a stairway of figures (triangles, squares and rectangles) each one bigger than the preceding one. Pupils use two…

  10. Geometric Model of a Coronal Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Gibson, S. E.; Ratawicki, D.; Dove, J.; deToma, G.; Hao, J.; Hudson, H. S.; Marque, C.; McIntosh, P. S.; Reeves, K. K.; Schmidt, D. J.; Sterling, A. C.; Tripathi, D. K.; Williams, D. R.; Zhang, M.

    2010-01-01

    We observed a coronal cavity from August 8-18 2007 during a multi-instrument observing campaign organized under the auspices of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY). Here we present initial efforts to model the cavity with a geometrical streamer-cavity model. The model is based the white-light streamer mode] of Gibson et a]. (2003 ), which has been enhanced by the addition of a cavity and the capability to model EUV and X-ray emission. The cavity is modeled with an elliptical cross-section and Gaussian fall-off in length and width inside the streamer. Density and temperature can be varied in the streamer and cavity and constrained via comparison with data. Although this model is purely morphological, it allows for three-dimensional, multi-temperature analysis and characterization of the data, which can then provide constraints for future physical modeling. Initial comparisons to STEREO/EUVI images of the cavity and streamer show that the model can provide a good fit to the data. This work is part of the effort of the International Space Science Institute International Team on Prominence Cavities

  11. Experimental study of the geometrical effects in the localization of deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, C.; Ammi, M.; Bideau, D.; Troadec, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the localization of deformation in a 2D packing model. The samples consist of regular packings of equal parallel cylinders (drinking straws). The local stress-strain characteristics, at the contact between two straws, shows a softening part, responsible for the localization of the deformation. We have analyzed the roughness of localization band, i.e., the width W of the localized zone versus its length L. Our results demonstrate the self-affine character of the localized zone: We find a power law, W~Lζ with ζ=0.73+/-0.07, which is consistent with recent work on the ``weak'' disorder model.

  12. Transformation of a Foucault shadowgram into the geometrical model of a shear interferogram by means of isophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhevlakov, A. P.; Zatsepina, M. E.; Kirillovskii, V. K.

    2014-06-01

    The principles of transformation of a Foucault shadowgram into a quantitative map of wave-front deformation based on creation of a system of isophotes are unveiled. The presented studies and their results prove that there is a high degree of correspondence between a Foucault shadowgram and the geometrical model of a shear interferogram with respect to displaying wave-front deformations.

  13. Geometric investigations of a vorticity model equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Martin; Kolev, Boris; Preston, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    This article consists of a detailed geometric study of the one-dimensional vorticity model equation which is a particular case of the generalized Constantin-Lax-Majda equation. Wunsch showed that this equation is the Euler-Arnold equation on Diff (S1) when the latter is endowed with the right-invariant homogeneous H ˙ 1 / 2-metric. In this article we prove that the exponential map of this Riemannian metric is not Fredholm and that the sectional curvature is locally unbounded. Furthermore, we prove a Beale-Kato-Majda-type blow-up criterion, which we then use to demonstrate a link to our non-Fredholmness result. Finally, we extend a blow-up result of Castro-Córdoba to the periodic case and to a much wider class of initial conditions, using a new generalization of an inequality for Hilbert transforms due to Córdoba-Córdoba.

  14. Counteracting geometrical attacks on robust image watermarking by constructing a deformable pyramid transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuntao; Ni, Jiangqun; Zhang, Dong

    2013-12-01

    Counteracting geometrical attacks remains one of the most challenging problems in robust watermarking. In this paper, we resist rotation, scaling, and translation (RST) by constructing a kind of deformable pyramid transform (DPT) that is shift-invariant, steerable, and scalable. The DPT is extended from a closed-form polar-separable steerable pyramid transform (SPT). The radial component of the SPT's basis filters is taken as the kernel of the scalable basis filters, and the angular component is used for the steerable basis filters. The shift-invariance is inherited from the SPT by retaining undecimated high-pass and band-pass subbands. Based on the designed DPT, we theoretically derive interpolation functions for steerability and scalability and synchronization mechanisms for translation, rotation, and scaling. By exploiting the preferable characteristics of DPT, we develop a new template-based robust image watermarking scheme that is resilient to RST. Translation invariance is achieved by taking the Fourier magnitude of the cover image as the DPT's input. The resilience to rotation and scaling is obtained using the synchronization mechanisms for rotation and scaling, for which an efficient template-matching algorithm has been devised. Extensive simulations show that the proposed scheme is highly robust to geometrical attacks, such as RST, cropping, and row/column line removal, as well as common signal processing attacks such as JPEG compression, additive white Gaussian noise, and median filtering.

  15. Geometrically engineering the standard model: Locally unfolding three families out of E{sub 8}

    SciTech Connect

    Bourjaily, Jacob L.

    2007-08-15

    This paper extends and builds upon the results of [J. L. Bourjaily, arXiv:0704.0444.], in which we described how to use the tools of geometrical engineering to deform geometrically engineered grand unified models into ones with lower symmetry. This top-down unfolding has the advantage that the relative positions of singularities giving rise to the many 'low-energy' matter fields are related by only a few parameters which deform the geometry of the unified model. And because the relative positions of singularities are necessary to compute the superpotential, for example, this is a framework in which the arbitrariness of geometrically engineered models can be greatly reduced. In [J. L. Bourjaily, arXiv:0704.0444.], this picture was made concrete for the case of deforming the representations of an SU{sub 5} model into their standard model content. In this paper we continue that discussion to show how a geometrically engineered 16 of SO{sub 10} can be unfolded into the standard model, and how the three families of the standard model uniquely emerge from the unfolding of a single, isolated E{sub 8} singularity.

  16. Geometric Modeling of Inclusions as Ellipsoids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Nonmetallic inclusions in gas turbine disk alloys can have a significant detrimental impact on fatigue life. Because large inclusions that lead to anomalously low lives occur infrequently, probabilistic approaches can be utilized to avoid the excessively conservative assumption of lifing to a large inclusion in a high stress location. A prerequisite to modeling the impact of inclusions on the fatigue life distribution is a characterization of the inclusion occurrence rate and size distribution. To help facilitate this process, a geometric simulation of the inclusions was devised. To make the simulation problem tractable, the irregularly sized and shaped inclusions were modeled as arbitrarily oriented, three independent dimensioned, ellipsoids. Random orientation of the ellipsoid is accomplished through a series of three orthogonal rotations of axes. In this report, a set of mathematical models for the following parameters are described: the intercepted area of a randomly sectioned ellipsoid, the dimensions and orientation of the intercepted ellipse, the area of a randomly oriented sectioned ellipse, the depth and width of a randomly oriented sectioned ellipse, and the projected area of a randomly oriented ellipsoid. These parameters are necessary to determine an inclusion s potential to develop a propagating fatigue crack. Without these mathematical models, computationally expensive search algorithms would be required to compute these parameters.

  17. Geometric Exponents of Dilute Loop Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provencher, Guillaume; Saint-Aubin, Yvan; Pearce, Paul A.; Rasmussen, Jørgen

    2012-04-01

    The fractal dimensions of the hull, the external perimeter and of the red bonds are measured through Monte Carlo simulations for dilute minimal models, and compared with predictions from conformal field theory and SLE methods. The dilute models used are those first introduced by Nienhuis. Their loop fugacity is β=-2 \\cos(π/bar{kappa}) where the parameter bar{kappa} is linked to their description through conformal loop ensembles. It is also linked to conformal field theories through their central charges c(bar{kappa})=13-6(bar{kappa}+bar{kappa}^{-1}) and, for the minimal models of interest here, bar{kappa}=p/p' where p and p' are two coprime integers. The geometric exponents of the hull and external perimeter are studied for the pairs ( p, p')=(1,1),(2,3),(3,4),(4,5),(5,6),(5,7), and that of the red bonds for ( p, p')=(3,4). Monte Carlo upgrades are proposed for these models as well as several techniques to improve their speeds. The measured fractal dimensions are obtained by extrapolation on the lattice size H, V→∞. The extrapolating curves have large slopes; despite these, the measured dimensions coincide with theoretical predictions up to three or four digits. In some cases, the theoretical values lie slightly outside the confidence intervals; explanations of these small discrepancies are proposed.

  18. Integrable Deformations of T -Dual σ Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsato, Riccardo; Wulff, Linus

    2016-12-01

    We present a method to deform (generically non-Abelian) T duals of two-dimensional σ models, which preserves classical integrability. The deformed models are identified by a linear operator ω on the dualized subalgebra, which satisfies the 2-cocycle condition. We prove that the so-called homogeneous Yang-Baxter deformations are equivalent, via a field redefinition, to our deformed models when ω is invertible. We explain the details for deformations of T duals of principal chiral models, and present the corresponding generalization to the case of supercoset models.

  19. Surface effects on the free vibration behavior of postbuckled circular higher-order shear deformable nanoplates including geometrical nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahmani, S.; Bahrami, M.; Ansari, R.

    2014-12-01

    This investigation deals with the free vibration characteristics of circular higher-order shear deformable nanoplates around the postbuckling configuration incorporating surface effects. Using the Gurtin-Murdoch elasticity theory, a size-dependent higher-order shear deformable plate model is developed which takes account all surface effects including surface elasticity, surface stress and surface density. Geometrical nonlinearity is considered based on the von Karman type nonlinear strain-displacement relationships. Also, in order to satisfy the balance conditions between bulk and surfaces of nanoplate, it is assumed that the normal stress is distributed cubically through the thickness of nanoplate. Hamilton's principle is utilized to derive non-classical governing differential equations of motion and related boundary conditions. Afterwards, an efficient numerical methodology based on a generalized differential quadrature (GDQ) method is employed to solve numerically the problem so as to discretize the governing partial differential equations along various edge supports using Chebyshev-Gauss-Lobatto grid points and pseudo arc-length continuation technique. A comparison between the results of present non-classical model and those of the classical plate theory is conducted. It is demonstrated that in contrast to the prebuckling domain, for a specified value of axial load in the postbuckling domain, increasing the plate thickness leads to higher frequencies.

  20. Deformable human body model development

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, W.O.; Aida, T.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A Deformable Human Body Model (DHBM) capable of simulating a wide variety of deformation interactions between man and his environment has been developed. The model was intended to have applications in automobile safety analysis, soldier survivability studies and assistive technology development for the disabled. To date, we have demonstrated the utility of the DHBM in automobile safety analysis and are currently engaged in discussions with the U.S. military involving two additional applications. More specifically, the DHBM has been incorporated into a Virtual Safety Lab (VSL) for automobile design under contract to General Motors Corporation. Furthermore, we have won $1.8M in funding from the U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command for development of a noninvasive intracranial pressure measurement system. The proposed research makes use of the detailed head model that is a component of the DHBM; the project duration is three years. In addition, we have been contacted by the Air Force Armstrong Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory concerning possible use of the DHBM in analyzing the loads and injury potential to pilots upon ejection from military aircraft. Current discussions with Armstrong involve possible LANL participation in a comparison between DHBM and the Air Force Articulated Total Body (ATB) model that is the current military standard.

  1. Yang-Mills equation for the nuclear geometrical collective model connexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, N.; Rosensteel, G.

    2017-01-01

    The Bohr-Mottelson collective model of rotations and quadrupole vibrations is a foundational model in nuclear structure physics. A modern formulation using differential geometry of bundles builds on this legacy collective model to allow a deformation-dependent interaction between rotational and vortical degrees of freedom. The interaction is described by the bundle connexion. This article reports the Yang-Mills equation for the connexion. For a class of solutions to the Yang-Mills equation, the differential geometric collective model attains agreement between experiment and theory for the moments of inertia of deformed isotopes. More generally, the differential geometric framework applies to models of emergent phenomena in which two interacting sets of degrees of freedom must be unified.

  2. On the geometric relationship between deformation microstructures in zircon and the kinematic framework of the shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, Elizaveta; Klötzli, Urs; Habler, Gerlinde

    2016-10-01

    We present novel microstructural analyses of zircon from a variety of strained rocks. For the first time, multiple plastically deformed zircon crystals were analyzed in a kinematic context of the respective host shear zones. Our aim was to derive how the orientation of zircon grains in a shear zone affects their deformation, based on careful in situ observations. For sampling, we selected zircon-bearing rocks that were deformed by simple shear. Samples covered a range of P-T conditions and lithologies, including various meta-igneous and meta-sedimentary gneisses. Microstructural analyses of zircon crystals in situ with scanning electron backscatter diffraction mapping show strong geometrical relationships between orientations of: (i) the long axes of plastically deformed zircon crystals, (ii) the crystallographic orientation of misorientation axes in plastically deformed zircon crystals and (iii) the foliation and lineation directions of the respective samples. We assume that zircon crystals did not experience post-deformation rigid body rotation, and thus the true geometric link can be observed. The relationships are the following: (a) plastically deformed zircon crystals usually have long axes parallel to the mylonitic foliation plane; (b) crystals with < c > axes oriented at an angle > 15° to the foliation plane are undeformed or fractured. Zircon crystals that have < c > axes aligned parallel or normal to the stretching lineation within the foliation plane develop misorientation and rotation axes parallel to the [001] crystallographic direction. Zircon grains with the < c > axis aligned at 30-60° to the lineation within the foliation plane often develop either two low Miller indices misorientation axes or one high Miller indices misorientation axis. Host phases have a significant influence on deformation mechanisms. In a relatively soft matrix, zircon is more likely to develop low Miller indices misorientation axes than in a relatively strong matrix. These

  3. Geometric modeling for computer aided design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwing, James L.; Olariu, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    The primary goal of this grant has been the design and implementation of software to be used in the conceptual design of aerospace vehicles particularly focused on the elements of geometric design, graphical user interfaces, and the interaction of the multitude of software typically used in this engineering environment. This has resulted in the development of several analysis packages and design studies. These include two major software systems currently used in the conceptual level design of aerospace vehicles. These tools are SMART, the Solid Modeling Aerospace Research Tool, and EASIE, the Environment for Software Integration and Execution. Additional software tools were designed and implemented to address the needs of the engineer working in the conceptual design environment. SMART provides conceptual designers with a rapid prototyping capability and several engineering analysis capabilities. In addition, SMART has a carefully engineered user interface that makes it easy to learn and use. Finally, a number of specialty characteristics have been built into SMART which allow it to be used efficiently as a front end geometry processor for other analysis packages. EASIE provides a set of interactive utilities that simplify the task of building and executing computer aided design systems consisting of diverse, stand-alone, analysis codes. Resulting in a streamlining of the exchange of data between programs reducing errors and improving the efficiency. EASIE provides both a methodology and a collection of software tools to ease the task of coordinating engineering design and analysis codes.

  4. Geometrical modeling of fibrous materials under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maze, Benoit; Vahedi Tafreshi, Hooman; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam

    2007-10-01

    Many fibrous materials such as nonwovens are consolidated via compaction rolls in a so-called calendering process. Hot rolls compress the fiber assembly and cause fiber-to-fiber bonding resulting in a strong yet porous structure. In this paper, we describe an algorithm for generating three dimensional virtual fiberwebs and simulating the geometrical changes that happen to the structure during the calendering process. Fibers are assumed to be continuous filaments with square cross sections lying randomly in the x or y direction. The fibers are assumed to be flexible to allow bending over one another during the compression process. Lateral displacement is not allowed during the compaction process. The algorithm also does not allow the fibers to interpenetrate or elongate and so the mass of the fibers is conserved. Bending of the fibers is modeled either by considering a constant "slope of bending" or constant "span of bending." The influence of the bending parameters on the propagation of compression through the material's thickness is discussed. In agreement with our experimental observations, it was found that the average solid volume fraction profile across the thickness becomes U shaped after the calendering. The application of these virtual structures in studying transport phenomena in fibrous materials is also demonstrated.

  5. Deformable image registration for geometrical evaluation of DIBH radiotherapy treatment of lung cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottosson, W.; Lykkegaard Andersen, J. A.; Borrisova, S.; Mellemgaard, A.; Behrens, C. F.

    2014-03-01

    Respiration and anatomical variation during radiotherapy (RT) of lung cancer yield dosimetric uncertainties of the delivered dose, possibly affecting the clinical outcome if not corrected for. Adaptive radiotherapy (ART), based on deformable image registration (DIR) and Deep-Inspiration-Breath-Hold (DIBH) gating can potentially improve the accuracy of RT. Purpose: The objective was to investigate the performance of contour propagation on repeated CT and Cone Beam CT (CBCT) images in DIBH compared to images acquired in free breathing (FB), using a recently released DIR software. Method: Three locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients were included, each with a planning-, midterm- and final CT (pCT, mCT, fCT) and 7 CBCTs acquired weekly and on the same day as the mCT and fCT. All imaging were performed in both FB and DIBH, using Varian RPM system for respiratory tracking. Delineations of anatomical structures were performed on each image set. The CT images were retrospective rigidly and deformable registered to all obtained images using the Varian Smart Adapt v. 11.0. The registered images were analysed for volume change and Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). Result: Geometrical similarities were found between propagated and manually delineated structures, with a slightly favour of FB imaging. Special notice should be taken to registrations where image artefacts or low tissue contrast are present. Conclusion: This study does not support the hypothesis that DIBH images perform better image registration than FB images. However DIR is a feasible tool for ART of lung cancer.

  6. Geometric deviation modeling by kinematic matrix based on Lagrangian coordinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weidong; Hu, Yueming; Liu, Yu; Dai, Wanyi

    2015-09-01

    Typical representation of dimension and geometric accuracy is limited to the self-representation of dimension and geometric deviation based on geometry variation thinking, yet the interactivity affection of geometric variation and gesture variation of multi-rigid body is not included. In this paper, a kinematic matrix model based on Lagrangian coordinate is introduced, with the purpose of unified model for geometric variation and gesture variation and their interactive and integrated analysis. Kinematic model with joint, local base and movable base is built. The ideal feature of functional geometry is treated as the base body; the fitting feature of functional geometry is treated as the adjacent movable body; the local base of the kinematic model is fixed onto the ideal geometry, and the movable base of the kinematic model is fixed onto the fitting geometry. Furthermore, the geometric deviation is treated as relative location or rotation variation between the movable base and the local base, and it's expressed by the Lagrangian coordinate. Moreover, kinematic matrix based on Lagrangian coordinate for different types of geometry tolerance zones is constructed, and total freedom for each kinematic model is discussed. Finally, the Lagrangian coordinate library, kinematic matrix library for geometric deviation modeling is illustrated, and an example of block and piston fits is introduced. Dimension and geometric tolerances of the shaft and hole fitting feature are constructed by kinematic matrix and Lagrangian coordinate, and the results indicate that the proposed kinematic matrix is capable and robust in dimension and geometric tolerances modeling.

  7. Geometrizing the Quantum - A Toy Model

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Benjamin

    2009-12-15

    It is shown that the equations of relativistic Bohmian mechanics for multiple bosonic particles have a dual description in terms of a classical theory of conformally 'curved' space-time. This shows that it is possible to formulate quantum mechanics as a purely classical geometrical theory. The results are further generalized to interactions with an external electromagnetic field.

  8. Geometric aspects of shear jamming induced by deformation of frictionless sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinutha, H. A.; Sastry, Srikanth

    2016-09-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that shear deformation of frictionless sphere packings leads to structures that will undergo jamming in the presence of friction, at densities well below the isotropic jamming point {φj}≈ 0.64 , and at high enough strains. Here, we show that the geometric features induced by strain are robust with respect to finite size effects, and include the feature of hyperuniformity, previously studied in the context of jamming, and more recently in driven systems. We study the approach to jamming as strain is increased, by evolving frictionless sheared configurations through frictional dynamics, and thereby identify a critical, or jamming, strain for each density, for a chosen value of the coefficient of friction. In the presence of friction above a certain strain value the sheared frictionless packings begin to develop finite stresses, which marks the onset of shear jamming. At a higher strain value, the shear stress reaches a saturation value after rising rapidly above the onset of shear jamming, which permits identification of the shear jamming transition. The onset of shear jamming and shear jamming are found to occur when the coordination number Z reaches values of Z  =  3 and Z  =  4 respectively. By considering percolation probabilities for the contact network, clusters of four coordinated and six coordinated spheres, we show that the percolation of four coordinated spheres corresponds to the onset of shear jamming behaviour, whereas the percolation of six coordinated spheres corresponds to shear jamming, for the chosen friction coefficients. At the onset of shear jamming, the force distribution begins to develop a peak at finite value and the force network is anisotropic and heterogeneous. And at the shear jamming transition, the force distribution has a well defined peak close to < f> and the force network is less anisotropic and homogeneous. We briefly discuss mechanical aspects of the jamming behaviour by

  9. Modal Substructuring of Geometrically Nonlinear Finite-Element Models

    SciTech Connect

    Kuether, Robert J.; Allen, Matthew S.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.

    2015-12-21

    The efficiency of a modal substructuring method depends on the component modes used to reduce each subcomponent model. Methods such as Craig–Bampton have been used extensively to reduce linear finite-element models with thousands or even millions of degrees of freedom down orders of magnitude while maintaining acceptable accuracy. A novel reduction method is proposed here for geometrically nonlinear finite-element models using the fixed-interface and constraint modes of the linearized system to reduce each subcomponent model. The geometric nonlinearity requires an additional cubic and quadratic polynomial function in the modal equations, and the nonlinear stiffness coefficients are determined by applying a series of static loads and using the finite-element code to compute the response. The geometrically nonlinear, reduced modal equations for each subcomponent are then coupled by satisfying compatibility and force equilibrium. This modal substructuring approach is an extension of the Craig–Bampton method and is readily applied to geometrically nonlinear models built directly within commercial finite-element packages. The efficiency of this new approach is demonstrated on two example problems: one that couples two geometrically nonlinear beams at a shared rotational degree of freedom, and another that couples an axial spring element to the axial degree of freedom of a geometrically nonlinear beam. The nonlinear normal modes of the assembled models are compared with those of a truth model to assess the accuracy of the novel modal substructuring approach.

  10. Modal Substructuring of Geometrically Nonlinear Finite-Element Models

    DOE PAGES

    Kuether, Robert J.; Allen, Matthew S.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.

    2015-12-21

    The efficiency of a modal substructuring method depends on the component modes used to reduce each subcomponent model. Methods such as Craig–Bampton have been used extensively to reduce linear finite-element models with thousands or even millions of degrees of freedom down orders of magnitude while maintaining acceptable accuracy. A novel reduction method is proposed here for geometrically nonlinear finite-element models using the fixed-interface and constraint modes of the linearized system to reduce each subcomponent model. The geometric nonlinearity requires an additional cubic and quadratic polynomial function in the modal equations, and the nonlinear stiffness coefficients are determined by applying amore » series of static loads and using the finite-element code to compute the response. The geometrically nonlinear, reduced modal equations for each subcomponent are then coupled by satisfying compatibility and force equilibrium. This modal substructuring approach is an extension of the Craig–Bampton method and is readily applied to geometrically nonlinear models built directly within commercial finite-element packages. The efficiency of this new approach is demonstrated on two example problems: one that couples two geometrically nonlinear beams at a shared rotational degree of freedom, and another that couples an axial spring element to the axial degree of freedom of a geometrically nonlinear beam. The nonlinear normal modes of the assembled models are compared with those of a truth model to assess the accuracy of the novel modal substructuring approach.« less

  11. Analytical volcano deformation source models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lisowski, Michael; Dzurisin, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Primary volcanic landforms are created by the ascent and eruption of magma. The ascending magma displaces and interacts with surrounding rock and fluids as it creates new pathways, flows through cracks or conduits, vesiculates, and accumulates in underground reservoirs. The formation of new pathways and pressure changes within existing conduits and reservoirs stress and deform the surrounding rock. Eruption products load the crust. The pattern and rate of surface deformation around volcanoes reflect the tectonic and volcanic processes transmitted to the surface through the mechanical properties of the crust.

  12. Multiscale geometric modeling of macromolecules II: Lagrangian representation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xin; Xia, Kelin; Chen, Zhan; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Geometric modeling of biomolecules plays an essential role in the conceptualization of biolmolecular structure, function, dynamics and transport. Qualitatively, geometric modeling offers a basis for molecular visualization, which is crucial for the understanding of molecular structure and interactions. Quantitatively, geometric modeling bridges the gap between molecular information, such as that from X-ray, NMR and cryo-EM, and theoretical/mathematical models, such as molecular dynamics, the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and the Nernst-Planck equation. In this work, we present a family of variational multiscale geometric models for macromolecular systems. Our models are able to combine multiresolution geometric modeling with multiscale electrostatic modeling in a unified variational framework. We discuss a suite of techniques for molecular surface generation, molecular surface meshing, molecular volumetric meshing, and the estimation of Hadwiger’s functionals. Emphasis is given to the multiresolution representations of biomolecules and the associated multiscale electrostatic analyses as well as multiresolution curvature characterizations. The resulting fine resolution representations of a biomolecular system enable the detailed analysis of solvent-solute interaction, and ion channel dynamics, while our coarse resolution representations highlight the compatibility of protein-ligand bindings and possibility of protein-protein interactions. PMID:23813599

  13. Geometrical model for non-zero θ13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun-Mou; Wang, Bin; Li, Xue-Qian

    2011-10-01

    Based on Friedberg and Lee’s geometric picture by which the tribimaximal Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakawaga-Sakata leptonic mixing matrix is constructed, namely, corresponding mixing angles correspond to the geometric angles among the sides of a cube. We suggest that the three realistic mixing angles, which slightly deviate from the values determined for the cube, are due to a viable deformation from the perfectly cubic shape. Taking the best-fitted results of θ12 and θ23 as inputs, we determine the central value of sin⁡22θ13 should be 0.0238, with a relatively large error tolerance; this value lies in the range of measurement precision of the Daya Bay experiment and is consistent with recent results from the T2K Collaboration.

  14. MOEMS Modeling Using the Geometrical Matrix Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2005-01-01

    New technologies such as MicroOptoElectro-Mechanical Systems (MOEMS) require new modeling tools. These tools must simultaneously model the optical, electrical, and mechanical domains and the interactions between these domains. To facilitate rapid prototyping of these new technologies an optical toolbox has been developed for modeling MOEMS devices. The toolbox models are constructed using MATLAB's dynamical simulator, Simulink. Modeling toolboxes will allow users to focus their efforts on system design and analysis as opposed to developing component models. This toolbox was developed to facilitate rapid modeling and design of a MOEMS based laser ultrasonic receiver system.

  15. Geometric modeling of subcellular structures, organelles, and multiprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin; Xia, Kelin; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2012-12-01

    Recently, the structure, function, stability, and dynamics of subcellular structures, organelles, and multiprotein complexes have emerged as a leading interest in structural biology. Geometric modeling not only provides visualizations of shapes for large biomolecular complexes but also fills the gap between structural information and theoretical modeling, and enables the understanding of function, stability, and dynamics. This paper introduces a suite of computational tools for volumetric data processing, information extraction, surface mesh rendering, geometric measurement, and curvature estimation of biomolecular complexes. Particular emphasis is given to the modeling of cryo-electron microscopy data. Lagrangian-triangle meshes are employed for the surface presentation. On the basis of this representation, algorithms are developed for surface area and surface-enclosed volume calculation, and curvature estimation. Methods for volumetric meshing have also been presented. Because the technological development in computer science and mathematics has led to multiple choices at each stage of the geometric modeling, we discuss the rationales in the design and selection of various algorithms. Analytical models are designed to test the computational accuracy and convergence of proposed algorithms. Finally, we select a set of six cryo-electron microscopy data representing typical subcellular complexes to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed algorithms in handling biomolecular surfaces and explore their capability of geometric characterization of binding targets. This paper offers a comprehensive protocol for the geometric modeling of subcellular structures, organelles, and multiprotein complexes.

  16. Geometric curvature and phase of the Rabi model

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Lijun; Huai, Sainan; Guo, Liping; Zhang, Yunbo

    2015-11-15

    We study the geometric curvature and phase of the Rabi model. Under the rotating-wave approximation (RWA), we apply the gauge independent Berry curvature over a surface integral to calculate the Berry phase of the eigenstates for both single and two-qubit systems, which is found to be identical with the system of spin-1/2 particle in a magnetic field. We extend the idea to define a vacuum-induced geometric curvature when the system starts from an initial state with pure vacuum bosonic field. The induced geometric phase is related to the average photon number in a period which is possible to measure in the qubit–cavity system. We also calculate the geometric phase beyond the RWA and find an anomalous sudden change, which implies the breakdown of the adiabatic theorem and the Berry phases in an adiabatic cyclic evolution are ill-defined near the anti-crossing point in the spectrum.

  17. Post-buckling of geometrically imperfect shear-deformable flat panels under combined thermal and compressive edge loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Librescu, L.; Souza, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    The static post-buckling of simply-supported flat panels exposed to a stationary nonuniform temperature field and subjected to a system of subcritical in-plane compressive edge loads is investigated. The study is performed within a refined theory of composite laminated plates incorporating the effect of transverse shear and the geometric nonlinearities. The influence played by a number of effects, among them transverse shear deformation, initial geometric imperfections, the character of the in-plane boundary conditions and thickness ratio are studied and a series of conclusions are outlined. The influence played by the complete temperature field (i.e., the uniform through thickness and thickness-wise gradient) as compared to the one induced by only the uniform one, is discussed and the peculiarities of the resulting post-buckling behaviors are enlightened.

  18. Leukocyte deformability: finite element modeling of large viscoelastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Dong, C; Skalak, R

    1992-09-21

    An axisymmetric deformation of a viscoelastic sphere bounded by a prestressed elastic thin shell in response to external pressure is studied by a finite element method. The research is motivated by the need for understanding the passive behavior of human leukocytes (white blood cells) and interpreting extensive experimental data in terms of the mechanical properties. The cell at rest is modeled as a sphere consisting of a cortical prestressed shell with incompressible Maxwell fluid interior. A large-strain deformation theory is developed based on the proposed model. General non-linear, large strain constitutive relations for the cortical shell are derived by neglecting the bending stiffness. A representation of the constitutive equations in the form of an integral of strain history for the incompressible Maxwell interior is used in the formulation of numerical scheme. A finite element program is developed, in which a sliding boundary condition is imposed on all contact surfaces. The mathematical model developed is applied to evaluate experimental data of pipette tests and observations of blood flow.

  19. 3-D Geometric Modeling for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ault, Holly K.

    1999-01-01

    Describes new geometric computer models used in contemporary computer-aided design (CAD) software including wire frame, surface, solid, and parametric models. Reviews their use in engineering design and discusses the impact of these new technologies on the engineering design graphics curriculum. (Author/CCM)

  20. Geometric and electrostatic modeling using molecular rigidity functions

    DOE PAGES

    Mu, Lin; Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guowei

    2017-03-01

    Geometric and electrostatic modeling is an essential component in computational biophysics and molecular biology. Commonly used geometric representations admit geometric singularities such as cusps, tips and self-intersecting facets that lead to computational instabilities in the molecular modeling. Our present work explores the use of flexibility and rigidity index (FRI), which has a proved superiority in protein B-factor prediction, for biomolecular geometric representation and associated electrostatic analysis. FRI rigidity surfaces are free of geometric singularities. We propose a rigidity based Poisson–Boltzmann equation for biomolecular electrostatic analysis. These approaches to surface and electrostatic modeling are validated by a set of 21 proteins.more » Our results are compared with those of established methods. Finally, being smooth and analytically differentiable, FRI rigidity functions offer excellent curvature analysis, which characterizes concave and convex regions on protein surfaces. Polarized curvatures constructed by using the product of minimum curvature and electrostatic potential is shown to predict potential protein–ligand binding sites.« less

  1. Decoherence of spin-deformed bosonic model

    SciTech Connect

    Dehdashti, Sh.; Mahdifar, A.; Bagheri Harouni, M.; Roknizadeh, R.

    2013-07-15

    The decoherence rate and some parameters affecting it are investigated for the generalized spin-boson model. We consider the spin-bosonic model when the bosonic environment is modeled by the deformed harmonic oscillators. We show that the state of the environment approaches a non-linear coherent state. Then, we obtain the decoherence rate of a two-level system which is in contact with a deformed bosonic environment which is either in thermal equilibrium or in the ground state. By using some recent realization of f-deformed oscillators, we show that some physical parameters strongly affect the decoherence rate of a two-level system. -- Highlights: •Decoherence of the generalized spin-boson model is considered. •In this model the environment consists of f-oscillators. •Via the interaction, the state of the environment approaches non-linear coherent states. •Effective parameters on decoherence are considered.

  2. Icosahedral quasicrystal decoration models. I. Geometrical principles

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalkovic, M. |; Zhu, W.; Henley, C.L.; Oxborrow, M. |

    1996-04-01

    It is proposed that quasicrystal structure determination should include the calculation of cohesive energies using realistic potentials. A class of atomic decoration models for {ital i}-AlMn is then presented, adopting the {open_quote}{open_quote}canonical-cell{close_quote}{close_quote} tiling geometry, with {open_quote}{open_quote}Mackay icosahedron{close_quote}{close_quote} clusters placed on all its nodes. The remaining atomic positions are based, as far as possible, on the known structure of {alpha}-AlMnSi. These models guarantee good local packing of the atoms, whose displacements away from {open_quote}{open_quote}ideal{close_quote}{close_quote} positions are specified by only a moderate number of parameters. Certain atomic sites are uncertain as regards their occupancy and/or chemistry; variations of the decoration rules on these sites must be compared, in order to discover the correct one. Our models are well adapted to be relaxed under an effective Hamiltonian to optimize the cohesive energy; we show how the energies found in such relaxations can be used to extract an effective tile-tile Hamiltonian, as would be needed for future studies of phason elasticity and the development of long-range order. In addition, we clarify concepts needed for decoration models in general (in particular, the ways in which elaborate, more realistic decorations may be evolved from simpler ones). We also show that these decoration models are closely related, but not identical, to quasiperiodic structures defined using six-dimensional formalism. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. Geometric modeling for computer aided design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwing, James L.

    1992-01-01

    The goal was the design and implementation of software to be used in the conceptual design of aerospace vehicles. Several packages and design studies were completed, including two software tools currently used in the conceptual level design of aerospace vehicles. These tools are the Solid Modeling Aerospace Research Tool (SMART) and the Environment for Software Integration and Execution (EASIE). SMART provides conceptual designers with a rapid prototyping capability and additionally provides initial mass property analysis. EASIE provides a set of interactive utilities that simplify the task of building and executing computer aided design systems consisting of diverse, stand alone analysis codes that result in the streamlining of the exchange of data between programs, reducing errors and improving efficiency.

  4. Multiscale geometric modeling of macromolecules I: Cartesian representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Kelin; Feng, Xin; Chen, Zhan; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the geometric modeling and computational algorithm development of biomolecular structures from two data sources: Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) in the Eulerian (or Cartesian) representation. Molecular surface (MS) contains non-smooth geometric singularities, such as cusps, tips and self-intersecting facets, which often lead to computational instabilities in molecular simulations, and violate the physical principle of surface free energy minimization. Variational multiscale surface definitions are proposed based on geometric flows and solvation analysis of biomolecular systems. Our approach leads to geometric and potential driven Laplace-Beltrami flows for biomolecular surface evolution and formation. The resulting surfaces are free of geometric singularities and minimize the total free energy of the biomolecular system. High order partial differential equation (PDE)-based nonlinear filters are employed for EMDB data processing. We show the efficacy of this approach in feature-preserving noise reduction. After the construction of protein multiresolution surfaces, we explore the analysis and characterization of surface morphology by using a variety of curvature definitions. Apart from the classical Gaussian curvature and mean curvature, maximum curvature, minimum curvature, shape index, and curvedness are also applied to macromolecular surface analysis for the first time. Our curvature analysis is uniquely coupled to the analysis of electrostatic surface potential, which is a by-product of our variational multiscale solvation models. As an expository investigation, we particularly emphasize the numerical algorithms and computational protocols for practical applications of the above multiscale geometric models. Such information may otherwise be scattered over the vast literature on this topic. Based on the curvature and electrostatic analysis from our multiresolution surfaces, we introduce a new concept, the

  5. Multiscale geometric modeling of macromolecules I: Cartesian representation

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kelin; Feng, Xin; Chen, Zhan; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo Wei

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the geometric modeling and computational algorithm development of biomolecular structures from two data sources: Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) in the Eulerian (or Cartesian) representation. Molecular surface (MS) contains non-smooth geometric singularities, such as cusps, tips and self-intersecting facets, which often lead to computational instabilities in molecular simulations, and violate the physical principle of surface free energy minimization. Variational multiscale surface definitions are proposed based on geometric flows and solvation analysis of biomolecular systems. Our approach leads to geometric and potential driven Laplace-Beltrami flows for biomolecular surface evolution and formation. The resulting surfaces are free of geometric singularities and minimize the total free energy of the biomolecular system. High order partial differential equation (PDE)-based nonlinear filters are employed for EMDB data processing. We show the efficacy of this approach in feature-preserving noise reduction. After the construction of protein multiresolution surfaces, we explore the analysis and characterization of surface morphology by using a variety of curvature definitions. Apart from the classical Gaussian curvature and mean curvature, maximum curvature, minimum curvature, shape index, and curvedness are also applied to macromolecular surface analysis for the first time. Our curvature analysis is uniquely coupled to the analysis of electrostatic surface potential, which is a by-product of our variational multiscale solvation models. As an expository investigation, we particularly emphasize the numerical algorithms and computational protocols for practical applications of the above multiscale geometric models. Such information may otherwise be scattered over the vast literature on this topic. Based on the curvature and electrostatic analysis from our multiresolution surfaces, we introduce a new concept, the

  6. Geometric Aspects of Force Controllability for a Swimming Model

    SciTech Connect

    Khapalov, A. Y.

    2008-02-15

    We study controllability properties (swimming capabilities) of a mathematical model of an abstract object which 'swims' in the 2-D Stokes fluid. Our goal is to investigate how the geometric shape of this object affects the forces acting upon it. Such problems are of interest in biology and engineering applications dealing with propulsion systems in fluids.

  7. Geometric model from microscopic theory for nuclear absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    John, Sarah; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.; Tripathi, Ram K.

    1993-01-01

    A parameter-free geometric model for nuclear absorption is derived herein from microscopic theory. The expression for the absorption cross section in the eikonal approximation, taken in integral form, is separated into a geometric contribution that is described by an energy-dependent effective radius and two surface terms that cancel in an asymptotic series expansion. For collisions of light nuclei, an expression for the effective radius is derived from harmonic oscillator nuclear density functions. A direct extension to heavy nuclei with Woods-Saxon densities is made by identifying the equivalent half-density radius for the harmonic oscillator functions. Coulomb corrections are incorporated, and a simplified geometric form of the Bradt-Peters type is obtained. Results spanning the energy range from 1 MeV/nucleon to 1 GeV/nucleon are presented. Good agreement with experimental results is obtained.

  8. Modelling deformation and fracture in confectionery wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Idris K.; Charalambides, Maria N.; Williams, J. Gordon; Rasburn, John

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to model the deformation and fracture behaviour of brittle wafers often used in chocolate confectionary products. Three point bending and compression experiments were performed on beam and circular disc samples respectively to determine the 'apparent' stress-strain curves in bending and compression. The deformation of the wafer for both these testing types was observed in-situ within an SEM. The wafer is modeled analytically and numerically as a composite material with a core which is more porous than the skins. X-ray tomography was used to generate a three dimensional volume of the wafer microstructure which was then meshed and used for quantitative analysis. A linear elastic material model, with a damage function and element deletion, was used and the XMT generated architecture was loaded in compression. The output from the FE simulations correlates closely to the load-deflection deformation observed experimentally.

  9. Comparison and Analysis of Geometric Correction Models of Spaceborne SAR

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weihao; Yu, Anxi; Dong, Zhen; Wang, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    Following the development of synthetic aperture radar (SAR), SAR images have become increasingly common. Many researchers have conducted large studies on geolocation models, but little work has been conducted on the available models for the geometric correction of SAR images of different terrain. To address the terrain issue, four different models were compared and are described in this paper: a rigorous range-doppler (RD) model, a rational polynomial coefficients (RPC) model, a revised polynomial (PM) model and an elevation derivation (EDM) model. The results of comparisons of the geolocation capabilities of the models show that a proper model for a SAR image of a specific terrain can be determined. A solution table was obtained to recommend a suitable model for users. Three TerraSAR-X images, two ALOS-PALSAR images and one Envisat-ASAR image were used for the experiment, including flat terrain and mountain terrain SAR images as well as two large area images. Geolocation accuracies of the models for different terrain SAR images were computed and analyzed. The comparisons of the models show that the RD model was accurate but was the least efficient; therefore, it is not the ideal model for real-time implementations. The RPC model is sufficiently accurate and efficient for the geometric correction of SAR images of flat terrain, whose precision is below 0.001 pixels. The EDM model is suitable for the geolocation of SAR images of mountainous terrain, and its precision can reach 0.007 pixels. Although the PM model does not produce results as precise as the other models, its efficiency is excellent and its potential should not be underestimated. With respect to the geometric correction of SAR images over large areas, the EDM model has higher accuracy under one pixel, whereas the RPC model consumes one third of the time of the EDM model. PMID:27347973

  10. A Geometric Crescent Model for Black Hole Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamruddin, Ayman Bin; Dexter, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a global very long baseline interferometry array operating at millimeter wavelengths, is spatially resolving the immediate environment of black holes for the first time. The current observations of the Galactic center black hole, Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), have been interpreted in terms of unmotivated geometric models (e.g., a symmetric Gaussian) or detailed calculations involving accretion onto a black hole. The latter are subject to large systematic uncertainties. Motivated by relativistic effects around black holes, we propose a geometric crescent model for black hole images. We show that this simple model provides an excellent statistical description of the existing EHT data of Sgr A*, superior to the Gaussian. It also closely matches physically predicted models, bridging accretion theory and observation. Based on our results, we make predictions for future observations for the accessibility of the black hole shadow, direct evidence for a black hole event horizon.

  11. Mathematical modeling of deformation during hot rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, D.; Stachowiak, R.G.; Samarasekera, I.V.; Brimacombe, J.K.

    1994-12-31

    The deformation that occurs in the roll bite during the hot rolling of steel, particularly the strain-rate and strain distribution, has been mathematically modeled using finite-element analysis. In this paper three different finite-element models are compared with one another and with industrial measurements. The first model is an Eulerian analysis based on the flow formulation method, while the second utilizes an Updated Lagrangian approach. The third model is based on a commercially available program DEFORM which also utilizes a Lagrangian reference frame. Model predictions of strain and strain-rate distribution, particularly near the surface of the slab, are strongly influenced by the treatment of friction at the boundary and the magnitude of the friction coefficient or shear factor. Roll forces predicted by the model have been compared with industrial rolling loads from a seven-stand hot-strip mill.

  12. Geometric-optical Modeling of a Conifer Forest Canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahler, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research is to explore how the geometry of trees in forest stands influences the reflectance of the forest as imaged from space. Most plant canopy modeling has viewed the canopy as an assemblage of plane-parallel layers on top of a soil surface. For these models, leaf angle distribution, leaf area index, and the angular transmittance and reflectance of leaves are the primary optical and geometric parameters. Such models are now sufficiently well developed to explain most of the variance in angular reflectance measurements observed from homogeneous plant canopies. However, forest canopies as imaged by airborne and spaceborne scanners exhibit considerable variance at quite a different scale. Brightness values vary strongly from one pixel to the next primarily as a function of the number of trees they contain. At this scale, the forest canopy is nonuniform and discontinuous. This research focuses on a discrete-element, geometric-optical view of the forest canopy.

  13. A geometric crescent model for black hole images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamruddin, Ayman Bin; Dexter, Jason

    2013-09-01

    The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a global very long baseline interferometry array operating at millimetre wavelengths, is spatially resolving the immediate environments of black holes for the first time. The current observations of the Galactic centre black hole, Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), and M87 have been interpreted in terms of either geometric models (e.g. a symmetric Gaussian) or detailed calculations of the appearance of black hole accretion flows. The former are not physically motivated, while the latter are subject to large systematic uncertainties. Motivated by the dominant relativistic effects of Doppler beaming and gravitational lensing in many calculations, we propose a geometric crescent model for black hole images. We show that this simple model provides an excellent statistical description of the existing EHT data of Sgr A* and M87, superior to other geometric models for Sgr A*. It also qualitatively matches physically predicted models, bridging accretion theory and observation. Based on our results, we make predictions for the detectability of the black hole shadow, a signature of strong gravity, in future observations.

  14. Workshop on the Integration of Finite Element Modeling with Geometric Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wozny, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    The workshop on the Integration of Finite Element Modeling with Geometric Modeling was held on 12 May 1987. It was held to discuss the geometric modeling requirements of the finite element modeling process and to better understand the technical aspects of the integration of these two areas. The 11 papers are presented except for one for which only the abstract is given.

  15. Cosmic constraint to DGP brane model: Geometrical and dynamical perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Lixin; Wang Yuting

    2010-08-15

    In this paper, the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (DGP) brane model is confronted by current cosmic observational data sets from geometrical and dynamical perspectives. On the geometrical side, the recently released Union2 557 of type Ia supernovae (SN Ia), the baryon acoustic oscillation from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Two Degree Galaxy Redshift Survey (transverse and radial to line-of-sight data points), the cosmic microwave background measurement given by the seven-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe observations [shift parameters R, l{sub a}(z{sub *}) and redshift at the last scatter surface z{sub *}], ages of high redshifts galaxies, i.e., the lookback time and the high redshift gamma ray bursts are used. On the dynamical side, data points about the growth function of matter linear perturbations are used. Using the same data set combination, we also constrain the flat {Lambda}CDM model as a comparison. The results show that current geometrical and dynamical observational data sets much favor the flat {Lambda}CDM model and the departure from it is above 4{sigma}(6{sigma}) for the spatially flat DGP model with (without) SN systematic errors. The consistence of growth function data points is checked in terms of a relative departure of redshift-distance relation.

  16. Geometric-optical modeling of a conifer forest canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, X.; Strahler, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    A geometric-optical model of a conifer forest canopy was constructed to describe the variance of a remotely-sensed image of a forest stand. The model is driven by interpixel variance generated from three sources: (1) the number of crowns in the pixel; (2) the size of the individual crowns; and (3) the overlapping of crowns and shadows. The illumination of a tree and its shadow is described as a cone using parallel-ray geometry. The model can also be inverted to provide estimates of the size, shape and spacing of the trees using remotely-sensed imagery and a minimum of ground measurements. The results of field tests using 10-meter and 80-meter multispectral imagery of two test conifer stands in northeastern California are presented. It is shown that the model produces reasonable estimates for the geometric parameters of the stand and appears to be sufficiently robust for application to other geometric shapes corresponding to different types of vegetation.

  17. Measurement of ship deformation based on ARX model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xianglu; Qin, Shiqiao; Wang, Xingshu; Hu, Feng; Wu, Wei; Zheng, JiaXing

    2016-01-01

    Ship deformation is the main error source of partial reference. Such deformation can be estimated by laser gyro units and Kalman filter technology. For Kalman filter, deformation was divide into two parts, dynamic deformation, and static deformation. Traditionally, dynamic deformation is treated as AR2 model .In this paper, dynamic deformation is taken as a kind of ARX model. Based on actual data measured by Yuanwang-3 Space Survey Ship, simulation experiments are studied. Results show that the novel model can improve the measurement precision.

  18. Single High Fidelity Geometric Data Sets for LCM - Model Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    Defence R&D Canada – Atlantic DEFENCE DÉFENSE & Single High Fidelity Geometric Data Sets for LCM – Model Requirements D. Brennan T. Koko K. Mackay M...Brennan T. Koko K. Mackay M. Norwood S. Tobin E. Teng J. Wallace Martec Limited Martec Limited 1888 Brunswick Street, Suite 400 Halifax...result in SPMs for use in LCM analysis of existing and future classes of Canadian naval vessels. D. Brennan, T. Koko , K. Mackay, M. Norwood, S. Tobin, E

  19. Geometrical measurement of cardiac wavelength in reaction-diffusion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupraz, Marie; Jacquemet, Vincent

    2014-09-01

    The dynamics of reentrant arrhythmias often consists in multiple wavelets propagating throughout an excitable medium. An arrhythmia can be sustained only if these reentrant waves have a sufficiently short wavelength defined as the distance traveled by the excitation wave during its refractory period. In a uniform medium, wavelength may be estimated as the product of propagation velocity and refractory period (electrophysiological wavelength). In order to accurately measure wavelength in more general substrates relevant to atrial arrhythmias (heterogeneous and anisotropic), we developed a mathematical framework to define geometrical wavelength at each time instant based on the length of streamlines following the propagation velocity field within refractory regions. Two computational methods were implemented: a Lagrangian approach in which a set of streamlines were integrated, and an Eulerian approach in which wavelength was the solution of a partial differential equation. These methods were compared in 1D/2D tissues and in a model of the left atrium. An advantage of geometrical definition of wavelength is that the wavelength of a wavelet can be tracked over time with high temporal resolution and smaller temporal variability in an anisotropic and heterogeneous medium. The results showed that the average electrophysiological wavelength was consistent with geometrical measurements of wavelength. Wavelets were however often shorter than the electrophysiological wavelength due to interactions with boundaries and other wavelets. These tools may help to assess more accurately the relation between substrate properties and wavelet dynamics in computer models.

  20. Unified Model Deformation and Flow Transition Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, Alpheus W.; Liu, Tianshu; Garg, Sanjay; Bell, James H.; Morgan, Daniel G.

    1999-01-01

    The number of optical techniques that may potentially be used during a given wind tunnel test is continually growing. These include parameter sensitive paints that are sensitive to temperature or pressure, several different types of off-body and on-body flow visualization techniques, optical angle-of-attack (AoA), optical measurement of model deformation, optical techniques for determining density or velocity, and spectroscopic techniques for determining various flow field parameters. Often in the past the various optical techniques were developed independently of each other, with little or no consideration for other techniques that might also be used during a given test. Recently two optical techniques have been increasingly requested for production measurements in NASA wind tunnels. These are the video photogrammetric (or videogrammetric) technique for measuring model deformation known as the video model deformation (VMD) technique, and the parameter sensitive paints for making global pressure and temperature measurements. Considerations for, and initial attempts at, simultaneous measurements with the pressure sensitive paint (PSP) and the videogrammetric techniques have been implemented. Temperature sensitive paint (TSP) has been found to be useful for boundary-layer transition detection since turbulent boundary layers convect heat at higher rates than laminar boundary layers of comparable thickness. Transition is marked by a characteristic surface temperature change wherever there is a difference between model and flow temperatures. Recently, additional capabilities have been implemented in the target-tracking videogrammetric measurement system. These capabilities have permitted practical simultaneous measurements using parameter sensitive paint and video model deformation measurements that led to the first successful unified test with TSP for transition detection in a large production wind tunnel.

  1. Multiple representation approach to geometric model construction from range data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivunen, Visa; Vezien, Jean-Marc; Bajcsy, Ruzena

    1995-04-01

    A method is presented for constructing geometric design data from noisy 3-D sensor measurements of physical parts. In early processing phase, RLTS regression filters stemming from robust estimation theory are used for separating the desired part of the signal in contaminated sensor data from undesired part. Strategies for producing a complete 3-D data set from partial views are studied. Surface triangulation, NURBS, and superellipsoids are employed in model construction to be able to represent efficiently polygonal shapes, free form surfaces and standard primitive solids. Multiple representations are used because there is no single representation that would be most appropriate in all situations. The size of the required control point mesh for spline description is estimated using a surface characterization process. Surfaces of arbitrary topology are modeled using triangulation and trimmed NURBS. A user given tolerance value is driving refinement of the obtained surface model. The resulting model description is a procedural CAD model which can convey structural information in addition to low level geometric primitives. The model is translated to IGES standard product data exchange format to enable data sharing with other processes in concurrent engineering environment. Preliminary results on view registration and integration using simulated data are shown. Examples of model construction using both real and simulated data are also given.

  2. Scale Problems in Geometric-Kinematic Modelling of Geological Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siehl, Agemar; Thomsen, Andreas

    To reveal, to render and to handle complex geological objects and their history of structural development, appropriate geometric models have to be designed. Geological maps, sections, sketches of strain and stress patterns are such well-known analogous two-dimensional models. Normally, the set of observations and measurements supporting them is small in relation to the complexity of the real objects they derive from. Therefore, modelling needs guidance by additional expert knowledge to bridge empty spaces which are not supported by data. Generating digital models of geological objects has some substantial advantages compared to conventional methods, especially if they are supported by an efficient database management system. Consistent 3D models of some complexity can be created, and experiments with time-dependent geological geometries may help to restore coherent sequences of paleogeological states. In order to cope with the problems arising from the combined usage of 3D-geometry models of different scale and resolution within an information system on subsurface geology, geometrical objects need to be annotated with information on the context, within which the geometry model has been established and within which it is valid, and methods supporting storage and retrieval as well as manipulation of geometry at different scales must also take into account and handle such context information to achieve meaningful results. An example is given of a detailed structural study of an open pit lignite mine in the Lower Rhine Basin.

  3. A Digital Video Model Deformation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Snow, W. L.; Goad, W. K.; Childers, B. A.

    1986-01-01

    The use of slid-state array cameras and a PC controlled image acquisition system to measure model deformation in a wind tunnel is discussed. This digital system is an improvement to an earlier video model deformation system used at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) which employed high-resolution tube cameras and required the manual measurement of targets on video hardcopy images. The new system eliminates both the vibration-induced distortion associated with tube cameras and the manual readup of video images necessary in the earlier version. Camera calibration and data reduction procedures necessary to convert pixel image plane data from two cameras into wing deflections are presented. Laboratory tests to establish the uncertainty of the new system with the geometry to be used at the NTF are described.

  4. A digital video model deformation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burner, A. W.; Snow, W. L.; Goad, W. K.; Childers, B. A.

    The use of solid-state array cameras and a PC-controlled image acquisition system to measure model deformation in a wind tunnel is discussed. This digital system improves an earlier video model deformation system that used high-resolution tube cameras and required the manual measurement of targets on video hardcopy images. The new system eliminates both the vibration-induced distortion associated with tube cameras and the manual readup of video images necessary in the earlier version. Camera calibration and data reduction procedures necessary to convert pixel image plane data from two cameras into wing deflections are presented. Laboratory tests to establish the uncertainty of the system with the geometry to be used are described.

  5. Acoustoelasticity model of inhomogeneously deformed bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchishin, O. Z.; Chekurin, V. F.

    2009-10-01

    We consider a mathematical model of dynamics of small elastic perturbations in an inhomogeneously deformed rigid body, where for the determining parameters of a local state we take the tensor characteristics of a given actual (strained) configuration (the Cauchy stress tensor and the Hencky or Almansi or Figner strain measure). An iteration algorithm is developed to solve the Cauchy problem stated in the framework of this model for a system of hyperbolic equations with variable coefficients that describes the propagation of elastic pulses in an inhomogeneous deformed continuum. In the case of two-dimensional stress fields, we obtain acoustoelasticity integral relations between the probing pulse parameters and the initial strain (stress) distribution in the direction of pulse propagation in the strained body. We also consider an example of application of the obtained integral relations in the inverse acoustic tomography problem for residual strains in a strip.

  6. Geometric Aspects of Ground Augmentation of Satellite Networks for the Needs of Deformation Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protaziuk, Elżbieta

    2016-06-01

    Satellite measurements become competitive in many tasks of engineering surveys, however, in many requiring applications possibilities to apply such solutions are still limited. The possibility to widely apply satellite technologies for displacements measurements is related with new challenges; the most important of them relate to increasing requirements concerning the accuracy, reliability and continuity of results of position determination. One of the solutions is a ground augmentation of satellite network, which intention is to improve precision of positioning, ensure comparable accuracy of coordinates and reduce precision fluctuations over time. The need for augmentation of GNSS is particularly significant in situations: where the visibility of satellites is poor because of terrain obstacles, when the determined position is not precise enough or a satellites constellation does not allow for reliable positioning. Ground based source/sources of satellite signal placed at a ground, called pseudosatellites, or pseudolites were intensively investigated during the last two decades and finally were developed into groundbased, time-synchronized transceivers, that can transmit and receive a proprietary positioning signal. The paper presents geometric aspects of the ground based augmentation of the satellite networks using various quality measures of positioning geometry, which depends on access to the constellation of satellites and the conditions of the observation environment. The issue of minimizing these measures is the key problem that allows to obtain the position with high accuracy. For this purpose, the use of an error ellipsoid is proposed and compared with an error ellipse. The paper also describes the results of preliminary accuracy analysis obtained at test area and a comparison of various measures of the quality of positioning geometry.

  7. Subjective surfaces: a geometric model for boundary completion

    SciTech Connect

    Sarti, Alessandro; Malladi, Ravi; Sethian, J.A.

    2000-06-01

    We present a geometric model and a computational method for segmentation of images with missing boundaries. In many situations, the human visual system fills in missing gaps in edges and boundaries, building and completing information that is not present. Boundary completion presents a considerable challenge in computer vision, since most algorithms attempt to exploit existing data. A large body of work concerns completion models, which postulate how to construct missing data; these models are often trained and specific to particular images. In this paper, we take the following, alternative perspective: we consider a reference point within an image as given, and then develop an algorithm which tries to build missing information on the basis of the given point of view and the available information as boundary data to the algorithm. Starting from this point of view, a surface is constructed. It is then evolved with the mean curvature flow in the metric induced by the image until a piecewise constant solution is reached. We test the computational model on modal completion, amodal completion, texture, photo and medical images. We extend the geometric model and the algorithm to 3D in order to extract shapes from low signal/noise ratio medical volumes. Results in 3D echocardiography and 3D fetal echography are presented.

  8. Modeling plasticity by non-continuous deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Shmuel, Yaron; Altus, Eli

    2016-10-01

    Plasticity and failure theories are still subjects of intense research. Engineering constitutive models on the macroscale which are based on micro characteristics are very much in need. This study is motivated by the observation that continuum assumptions in plasticity in which neighbour material elements are inseparable at all-time are physically impossible, since local detachments, slips and neighbour switching must operate, i.e. non-continuous deformation. Material microstructure is modelled herein by a set of point elements (particles) interacting with their neighbours. Each particle can detach from and/or attach with its neighbours during deformation. Simulations on two- dimensional configurations subjected to uniaxial compression cycle are conducted. Stochastic heterogeneity is controlled by a single "disorder" parameter. It was found that (a) macro response resembles typical elasto-plastic behaviour; (b) plastic energy is proportional to the number of detachments; (c) residual plastic strain is proportional to the number of attachments, and (d) volume is preserved, which is consistent with macro plastic deformation. Rigid body displacements of local groups of elements are also observed. Higher disorder decreases the macro elastic moduli and increases plastic energy. Evolution of anisotropic effects is obtained with no additional parameters.

  9. Fetal akinesia deformation sequence: an animal model.

    PubMed

    Moessinger, A C

    1983-12-01

    Rat fetuses were paralyzed by daily transuterine injections of curare from day 18 of gestation until term (day 21). The following anomalies were noted at the time of delivery: multiple joint contractures, pulmonary hypoplasia, micrognathia, fetal growth retardation, short umbilical cords, and polyhydramnios. Neither sham-operated nor untouched littermate control fetuses had any of these anomalies. The group of anomalies (or deformation sequence) obtained with this animal model is presumed to result from the paralytic effect of curare. This phenotype bears a striking resemblance to the syndrome of ankyloses, facial anomalies, and pulmonary hypoplasia (also known as Pena and Shokeir I), presumably inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. It is suggested that this phenotype is not specific but, rather, represents a deformation sequence which results from fetal immobilization or akinesia. Diagnostic evaluation of patients with this group of anomalies should include the identification of the underlying pathologic process (etiology of the akinesia) to allow for proper classification and genetic counseling.

  10. Explicit Seesaw Model and Deformed Fermion Universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krolikowski, Wojciech

    2003-01-01

    In the simple model of neutrino texture presented in this paper, the Majorana lefthanded mass matrix is zero, the Majorana righthanded mass matrix --- diagonal and degenerate, and the Dirac mass matrix has a hierarchical structure, deformed unitarily by nearly bimaximal mixing. In the case, when the Majorana righthanded term dominates over the Dirac term, the familiar seesaw mechanism leads effectively to the nearly bimaximal oscillations of active neutrinos, consistent with solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments. If the Dirac term, before its unitary deformation, is similar in shape to the known charged-lepton mass matrix, then parameters for solar ν e's and atmospheric ν μ 's become related to each other, predicting from the SuperKamiokande value of Δ m322 a tiny Δ m212 typical for MSW LOW solar solution rather than for MSW Large Mixing Angle solution. The predicted mass spectrum is then hierarchical. In Appendix a suggestive form of nearly bimaximal effective mass matrix is derived.

  11. Numerical treatment of a geometrically nonlinear planar Cosserat shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, Oliver; Neff, Patrizio; Bîrsan, Mircea

    2016-05-01

    We present a new way to discretize a geometrically nonlinear elastic planar Cosserat shell. The kinematical model is similar to the general six-parameter resultant shell model with drilling rotations. The discretization uses geodesic finite elements (GFEs), which leads to an objective discrete model which naturally allows arbitrarily large rotations. GFEs of any approximation order can be constructed. The resulting algebraic problem is a minimization problem posed on a nonlinear finite-dimensional Riemannian manifold. We solve this problem using a Riemannian trust-region method, which is a generalization of Newton's method that converges globally without intermediate loading steps. We present the continuous model and the discretization, discuss the properties of the discrete model, and show several numerical examples, including wrinkling of thin elastic sheets in shear.

  12. Tracking of object deformations in color and depth video: deformation models and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordt, Andreas; Reinhold, Stefan; Koch, Reinhard

    2015-05-01

    The research on deformation tracking based on color image data has continuously gained a wide interest in the last 15 years. In addition, using depth sensors such as the Microsoft Kinect, allows to mitigate the ambiguity problems that arise when trying to solve the deformation tracking tasks on color images only, by adding depth information. However, the fusion of color and depth data is not straight forward, and the deformation tracking task is still ill-posed due to the lack of a general deformation model. The problem is usually circumvented by providing special deformation functions for the task at hand, e.g., skeleton-based for reconstructing people or triangle-based for tracking planar surfaces. In this article we summarize the Analysis by Synthesis (AbS) approach for deformation tracking in depth and color video and show some successful applications of specialized deformation functions. To overcome the issues with NURBS based deformation tracking we propose a new geodesic RBF-based deformation model, which can adapt to any surface topology and shape, while keeping the number of deformation parameters low. Example deformations for objects of different topologies are given, showing the versatility and efficiency of the proposed model.

  13. Modelling highly deformable metal extrusion using SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Mahesh; Cleary, Paul W.

    2015-05-01

    Computational modelling is often used to reduce trial extrusions through accurate defect prediction. Traditionally, metal extrusion is modelled using mesh based finite element methods. However, large plastic deformations can lead to heavy re-meshing and numerical diffusion. Here we use the mesh-less smoothed particle hydrodynamics method since it allows simulation of large deformations without re-meshing and the tracking of history dependent properties such as plastic strain making it suitable for defect prediction. The variation in plastic strain and deformation for aluminium alloy in a cylindrical 3D geometry with extrusion ratio and die angle is evaluated. The extrusion process is found to have three distinct phases consisting of an initial sharp rise in extrusion force, a steady phase requiring constant force and terminating in a sharp decline in force as metal is completely extruded. Deformation and plastic strain increased significantly with extrusion ratio but only moderately with die angle. Extrusion force increased by 150 % as the extrusion ratio increased from 2:1 to 4:1 but had only a marginal change with die angle. A low strain zone in the centre of the extruded product was found to be a function of extrusion ratio but was persistent and did not vary with die angle. Simulation of a complex 3D building industry component showed large variations in plastic strain along the length of the product at two scales. These were due to change in metal behaviour as extrusion progressed from phase 1 to phase 2. A stagnation zone at the back of the die was predicted that could lead to the "funnel" or "pipe" defect.

  14. High-fidelity geometric modeling for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zeyun; Holst, Michael J.; Andrew McCammon, J.

    2008-05-19

    In this paper, we describe a combination of algorithms for high-fidelity geometric modeling and mesh generation. Although our methods and implementations are application-neutral, our primary target application is multiscale biomedical models that range in scales across the molecular, cellular, and organ levels. Our software toolchain implementing these algorithms is general in the sense that it can take as input a molecule in PDB/PQR forms, a 3D scalar volume, or a user-defined triangular surface mesh that may have very low quality. The main goal of our work presented is to generate high quality and smooth surface triangulations from the aforementioned inputs, and to reduce the mesh sizes by mesh coarsening. Tetrahedral meshes are also generated for finite element analysis in biomedical applications. Experiments on a number of bio-structures are demonstrated, showing that our approach possesses several desirable properties: feature-preservation, local adaptivity, high quality, and smoothness (for surface meshes). Finally, the availability of this software toolchain will give researchers in computational biomedicine and other modeling areas access to higher-fidelity geometric models.

  15. Geometric modeling of inflatable structures for lunar base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, Paul S.; Sadeh, Willy Z.; Morroni, Loretta A.

    1992-01-01

    A modular inflatable structure consisting of thin, composite membranes is presented for use in a lunar base. Results from a linear elastic analysis of the structure indicate that it is feasible in the lunar environment. Further analysis requires solving nonlinear equations and accurately specifying the geometries of the structural members. A computerized geometric modeling technique, using bicubic Bezier surfaces to generate the geometries of the inflatable structure, was conducted. Simulated results are used to create three-dimensional wire frames and solid renderings of the individual components of the inflatable structure. The component geometries are connected into modules, which are then assembled based upon the desired architecture of the structure.

  16. Geometric modeling of inflatable structures for lunar base.

    PubMed

    Nowak, P S; Sadeh, W Z; Morroni, L A

    1992-07-01

    A modular inflatable structure consisting of thin, composite membranes is presented for use in a lunar base. Results from a linear elastic analysis of the structure indicate that it is feasible in the lunar environment. Further analysis requires solving nonlinear equations and accurately specifying the geometries of the structural members. A computerized geometric modeling technique, using bicubic Bezier surfaces to generate the geometries of the inflatable structure, was conducted. Simulated results are used to create three-dimensional wire frames and solid renderings of the individual components of the inflatable structure. The component geometries are connected into modules, which are then assembled based upon the desired architecture of the structure.

  17. Geometric and Textural Blending for 3D Model Stylization.

    PubMed

    Huang, YiJheng; Lin, Wen-Chieh; Yeh, I-Cheng; Lee, Tong-Yee

    2017-01-25

    Stylizing a 3D model with characteristic shapes or appearances is common in product design, particularly in the design of 3D model merchandise, such as souvenirs, toys, furniture, and stylized items. A model stylization approach is proposed in this study. The approach combines base and style models while preserving user-specified shape features of the base model and the attractive features of the style model with limited assistance from a user. The two models are first combined at the topological level. A tree-growing technique is utilized to search for all possible combinations of the two models. Second, the models are combined at textural and geometric levels by employing a morphing technique. Results show that the proposed approach generates various appealing models and allows users to control the diversity of the output models and adjust the blending degree between the base and style models. The results of this work are also experimentally compared with those of a recent work through a user study. The comparison indicates that our results are more appealing, feature-preserving, and reasonable than those of the compared previous study. The proposed system allows product designers to easily explore design possibilities and assists novice users in creating their own stylized models.

  18. Geometrical modeling of optical phase difference for analyzing atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuksel, Demet; Yuksel, Heba

    2013-09-01

    Ways of calculating phase shifts between laser beams propagating through atmospheric turbulence can give us insight towards the understanding of spatial diversity in Free-Space Optical (FSO) links. We propose a new geometrical model to estimate phase shifts between rays as the laser beam propagates through a simulated turbulent media. Turbulence is simulated by filling the propagation path with spherical bubbles of varying sizes and refractive index discontinuities statistically distributed according to various models. The level of turbulence is increased by elongating the range and/or increasing the number of bubbles that the rays interact with along their path. For each statistical representation of the atmosphere, the trajectories of two parallel rays separated by a particular distance are analyzed and computed simultaneously using geometrical optics. The three-dimensional geometry of the spheres is taken into account in the propagation of the rays. The bubble model is used to calculate the correlation between the two rays as their separation distance changes. The total distance traveled by each ray as both rays travel to the target is computed. The difference in the path length traveled will yield the phase difference between the rays. The mean square phase difference is taken to be the phase structure function which in the literature, for a pair of collimated parallel pencil thin rays, obeys a five-third law assuming weak turbulence. All simulation results will be compared with the predictions of wave theory.

  19. Hopping electron model with geometrical frustration: kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terao, Takamichi

    2016-09-01

    The hopping electron model on the Kagome lattice was investigated by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, and the non-equilibrium nature of the system was studied. We have numerically confirmed that aging phenomena are present in the autocorrelation function C ({t,tW )} of the electron system on the Kagome lattice, which is a geometrically frustrated lattice without any disorder. The waiting-time distributions p(τ ) of hopping electrons of the system on Kagome lattice has been also studied. It is confirmed that the profile of p (τ ) obtained at lower temperatures obeys the power-law behavior, which is a characteristic feature of continuous time random walk of electrons. These features were also compared with the characteristics of the Coulomb glass model, used as a model of disordered thin films and doped semiconductors. This work represents an advance in the understanding of the dynamics of geometrically frustrated systems and will serve as a basis for further studies of these physical systems.

  20. SU-E-J-94: Geometric and Dosimetric Evaluation of Deformation Image Registration Algorithms Using Virtual Phantoms Generated From Patients with Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z; Greskovich, J; Xia, P; Bzdusek, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To generate virtual phantoms with clinically relevant deformation and use them to objectively evaluate geometric and dosimetric uncertainties of deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms. Methods: Ten lung cancer patients undergoing adaptive 3DCRT planning were selected. For each patient, a pair of planning CT (pCT) and replanning CT (rCT) were used as the basis for virtual phantom generation. Manually adjusted meshes were created for selected ROIs (e.g. PTV, lungs, spinal cord, esophagus, and heart) on pCT and rCT. The mesh vertices were input into a thin-plate spline algorithm to generate a reference displacement vector field (DVF). The reference DVF was used to deform pCT to generate a simulated replanning CT (srCT) that was closely matched to rCT. Three DIR algorithms (Demons, B-Spline, and intensity-based) were applied to these ten virtual phantoms. The images, ROIs, and doses were mapped from pCT to srCT using the DVFs computed by these three DIRs and compared to those mapped using the reference DVF. Results: The average Dice coefficients for selected ROIs were from 0.85 to 0.96 for Demons, from 0.86 to 0.97 for intensity-based, and from 0.76 to 0.95 for B-Spline. The average Hausdorff distances for selected ROIs were from 2.2 to 5.4 mm for Demons, from 2.3 to 6.8 mm for intensity-based, and from 2.4 to 11.4 mm for B-Spline. The average absolute dose errors for selected ROIs were from 0.2 to 0.6 Gy for Demons, from 0.1 to 0.5 Gy for intensity-based, and from 0.5 to 1.5 Gy for B-Spline. Conclusion: Virtual phantoms were modeled after patients with lung cancer and were clinically relevant for adaptive radiotherapy treatment replanning. Virtual phantoms with known DVFs serve as references and can provide a fair comparison when evaluating different DIRs. Demons and intensity-based DIRs were shown to have smaller geometric and dosimetric uncertainties than B-Spline. Z Shen: None; K Bzdusek: an employee of Philips Healthcare; J Greskovich: None; P Xia

  1. Modeling plastic deformation effect on magnetization in ferromagnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianwei; Xu, Minqiang; Leng, Jiancheng; Xu, Mingxiu

    2012-03-01

    Based on the Sablik-Landgraf model, an integrated model has been developed which provides a description of the effect of plastic deformation on magnetization. The modeling approach is to incorporate the effect of plastic deformation on the effective field and that on the model parameters. The effective field incorporates the contributions of residual stress, stress demagnetization term, and the plastic deformation. We also consider the effect of plastic deformation on the model parameters: pinning coefficient, the scaling constant and the interdomain coupling coefficient. The computed magnetization exhibits sharp change in the preliminary stage of plastic deformation, and then decreases slowly with the increase of plastic strain, in agreement with experimental results.

  2. Geometrically nonlinear free vibration of shear deformable piezoelectric carbon nanotube/fiber/polymer multiscale laminated composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, M.; Liu, X. F.; He, X. Q.; Kitipornchai, S.

    2014-07-01

    The nonlinear free vibration of carbon nanotubes/fiber/polymer composite (CNTFPC) multi-scale plates with surface-bonded piezoelectric actuators is studied in this paper. The governing equations of the piezoelectric nanotubes/fiber/polymer multiscale laminated composite plates are derived based on first-order shear deformation plate theory (FSDT) and von Kármán geometrical nonlinearity. Halpin-Tsai equations and fiber micromechanics are used in hierarchy to predict the bulk material properties of the multiscale composite. The carbon nanotubes are assumed to be uniformly distributed and randomly oriented through the epoxy resin matrix. A perturbation scheme of multiple time scales is employed to determine the nonlinear vibration response and the nonlinear natural frequencies of the plates with immovable simply supported boundary conditions. The effects of the applied constant voltage, plate geometry, volume fraction of fibers and weight percentage of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the linear and nonlinear natural frequencies of the piezoelectric nanotubes/fiber/polymer multiscale composite plate are investigated through a detailed parametric study.

  3. A Geometrically Exact Model for Externally Loaded Concentric-Tube Continuum Robots

    PubMed Central

    Rucker, D. Caleb; Jones, Bryan A.; Webster, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Continuum robots, which are composed of multiple concentric, precurved elastic tubes, can provide dexterity at diameters equivalent to standard surgical needles. Recent mechanics-based models of these “active cannulas” are able to accurately describe the curve of the robot in free space, given the preformed tube curves and the linear and angular positions of the tube bases. However, in practical applications, where the active cannula must interact with its environment or apply controlled forces, a model that accounts for deformation under external loading is required. In this paper, we apply geometrically exact rod theory to produce a forward kinematic model that accurately describes large deflections due to a general collection of externally applied point and/or distributed wrench loads. This model accommodates arbitrarily many tubes, with each having a general preshaped curve. It also describes the independent torsional deformation of the individual tubes. Experimental results are provided for both point and distributed loads. Average tip error under load was 2.91 mm (1.5%–3% of total robot length), which is similar to the accuracy of existing free-space models. PMID:21566688

  4. A Geometrically Exact Model for Externally Loaded Concentric-Tube Continuum Robots.

    PubMed

    Rucker, D Caleb; Jones, Bryan A; Webster, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Continuum robots, which are composed of multiple concentric, precurved elastic tubes, can provide dexterity at diameters equivalent to standard surgical needles. Recent mechanics-based models of these "active cannulas" are able to accurately describe the curve of the robot in free space, given the preformed tube curves and the linear and angular positions of the tube bases. However, in practical applications, where the active cannula must interact with its environment or apply controlled forces, a model that accounts for deformation under external loading is required. In this paper, we apply geometrically exact rod theory to produce a forward kinematic model that accurately describes large deflections due to a general collection of externally applied point and/or distributed wrench loads. This model accommodates arbitrarily many tubes, with each having a general preshaped curve. It also describes the independent torsional deformation of the individual tubes. Experimental results are provided for both point and distributed loads. Average tip error under load was 2.91 mm (1.5%-3% of total robot length), which is similar to the accuracy of existing free-space models.

  5. A tumor growth model with deformable ECM.

    PubMed

    Sciumè, G; Santagiuliana, R; Ferrari, M; Decuzzi, P; Schrefler, B A

    2014-11-26

    Existing tumor growth models based on fluid analogy for the cells do not generally include the extracellular matrix (ECM), or if present, take it as rigid. The three-fluid model originally proposed by the authors and comprising tumor cells (TC), host cells (HC), interstitial fluid (IF) and an ECM, considered up to now only a rigid ECM in the applications. This limitation is here relaxed and the deformability of the ECM is investigated in detail. The ECM is modeled as a porous solid matrix with Green-elastic and elasto-visco-plastic material behavior within a large strain approach. Jauman and Truesdell objective stress measures are adopted together with the deformation rate tensor. Numerical results are first compared with those of a reference experiment of a multicellular tumor spheroid (MTS) growing in vitro, then three different tumor cases are studied: growth of an MTS in a decellularized ECM, growth of a spheroid in the presence of host cells and growth of a melanoma. The influence of the stiffness of the ECM is evidenced and comparison with the case of a rigid ECM is made. The processes in a deformable ECM are more rapid than in a rigid ECM and the obtained growth pattern differs. The reasons for this are due to the changes in porosity induced by the tumor growth. These changes are inhibited in a rigid ECM. This enhanced computational model emphasizes the importance of properly characterizing the biomechanical behavior of the malignant mass in all its components to correctly predict its temporal and spatial pattern evolution.

  6. A tumor growth model with deformable ECM

    PubMed Central

    Sciumè, G; Santagiuliana, R; Ferrari, M; Decuzzi, P; Schrefler, B A

    2015-01-01

    Existing tumor growth models based on fluid analogy for the cells do not generally include the extracellular matrix (ECM), or if present, take it as rigid. The three-fluid model originally proposed by the authors and comprising tumor cells (TC), host cells (HC), interstitial fluid (IF) and an ECM, considered up to now only a rigid ECM in the applications. This limitation is here relaxed and the deformability of the ECM is investigated in detail. The ECM is modeled as a porous solid matrix with Green-elastic and elasto-visco-plastic material behavior within a large strain approach. Jauman and Truesdell objective stress measures are adopted together with the deformation rate tensor. Numerical results are first compared with those of a reference experiment of a multicellular tumor spheroid (MTS) growing in vitro, then three different tumor cases are studied: growth of an MTS in a decellularized ECM, growth of a spheroid in the presence of host cells and growth of a melanoma. The influence of the stiffness of the ECM is evidenced and comparison with the case of a rigid ECM is made. The processes in a deformable ECM are more rapid than in a rigid ECM and the obtained growth pattern differs. The reasons for this are due to the changes in porosity induced by the tumor growth. These changes are inhibited in a rigid ECM. This enhanced computational model emphasizes the importance of properly characterizing the biomechanical behavior of the malignant mass in all its components to correctly predict its temporal and spatial pattern evolution. PMID:25427284

  7. Implicit modeling of folds and overprinting deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Gautier; Ailleres, Laurent; Grose, Lachlan; Caumon, Guillaume; Jessell, Mark; Armit, Robin

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional structural modeling is gaining importance for a broad range of quantitative geoscientific applications. However, existing approaches are still limited by the type of structural data they are able to use and by their lack of structural meaning. Most techniques heavily rely on spatial data for modeling folded layers, but are unable to completely use cleavage and lineation information for constraining the shape of modeled folds. This lack of structural control is generally compensated by expert knowledge introduced in the form of additional interpretive data such as cross-sections and maps. With this approach, folds are explicitly designed by the user instead of being derived from data. This makes the resulting structures subjective and deterministic. This paper introduces a numerical framework for modeling folds and associated foliations from typical field data. In this framework, a parametric description of fold geometry is incorporated into the interpolation algorithm. This way the folded geometry is implicitly derived from observed data, while being controlled through structural parameters such as fold wavelength, amplitude and tightness. A fold coordinate system is used to support the numerical description of fold geometry and to modify the behavior of classical structural interpolators. This fold frame is constructed from fold-related structural elements such as axial foliations, intersection lineations, and vergence. Poly-deformed terranes are progressively modeled by successively modeling each folding event going backward through time. The proposed framework introduces a new modeling paradigm, which enables the building of three-dimensional geological models of complex poly-deformed terranes. It follows a process based on the structural geologist approach and is able to produce geomodels that honor both structural data and geological knowledge.

  8. Finite element modelling of squirrel, guinea pig and rat skulls: using geometric morphometrics to assess sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Cox, P G; Fagan, M J; Rayfield, E J; Jeffery, N

    2011-12-01

    Rodents are defined by a uniquely specialized dentition and a highly complex arrangement of jaw-closing muscles. Finite element analysis (FEA) is an ideal technique to investigate the biomechanical implications of these specializations, but it is essential to understand fully the degree of influence of the different input parameters of the FE model to have confidence in the model's predictions. This study evaluates the sensitivity of FE models of rodent crania to elastic properties of the materials, loading direction, and the location and orientation of the models' constraints. Three FE models were constructed of squirrel, guinea pig and rat skulls. Each was loaded to simulate biting on the incisors, and the first and the third molars, with the angle of the incisal bite varied over a range of 45°. The Young's moduli of the bone and teeth components were varied between limits defined by findings from our own and previously published tests of material properties. Geometric morphometrics (GMM) was used to analyse the resulting skull deformations. Bone stiffness was found to have the strongest influence on the results in all three rodents, followed by bite position, and then bite angle and muscle orientation. Tooth material properties were shown to have little effect on the deformation of the skull. The effect of bite position varied between species, with the mesiodistal position of the biting tooth being most important in squirrels and guinea pigs, whereas bilateral vs. unilateral biting had the greatest influence in rats. A GMM analysis of isolated incisor deformations showed that, for all rodents, bite angle is the most important parameter, followed by elastic properties of the tooth. The results here elucidate which input parameters are most important when defining the FE models, but also provide interesting glimpses of the biomechanical differences between the three skulls, which will be fully explored in future publications.

  9. Geometrical optical modeling considerations for LCD projector display systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweyen, John C.; Garcia, Kevin J.; Gleckman, Philip L.

    1997-05-01

    End-to-end modeling of the photometric performance of LCD projection system using Monte Carlo geometrical ray tracing methods is an accurate and precise tool for predicting and improving the performance of these deices before, during and after product development. However, an accurate simulation first requires considering which physical properties contribute most to the system's photometric performance. Second, these properties must be characterized by physical measurements and translated into the tangible modeling parameters of a ray tracing program. Third, the implications of using a Monte Carlo ray tracing algorithm, and in general any other optical transformation algorithm, on radiometric accuracy must be well understood. These considerations as well as a generalized approach to the characterization and simulation of an LCD projector are described. A commercially available ray tracing program, the Advanced Systems Analysis Program, is used to demonstrate this approach. The irradiance uniformity, CIE color performance and screen brightness of an arc source LCD projector system are computed as an example.

  10. Finite element modelling of squirrel, guinea pig and rat skulls: using geometric morphometrics to assess sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Cox, P G; Fagan, M J; Rayfield, E J; Jeffery, N

    2011-01-01

    Rodents are defined by a uniquely specialized dentition and a highly complex arrangement of jaw-closing muscles. Finite element analysis (FEA) is an ideal technique to investigate the biomechanical implications of these specializations, but it is essential to understand fully the degree of influence of the different input parameters of the FE model to have confidence in the model's predictions. This study evaluates the sensitivity of FE models of rodent crania to elastic properties of the materials, loading direction, and the location and orientation of the models’ constraints. Three FE models were constructed of squirrel, guinea pig and rat skulls. Each was loaded to simulate biting on the incisors, and the first and the third molars, with the angle of the incisal bite varied over a range of 45°. The Young's moduli of the bone and teeth components were varied between limits defined by findings from our own and previously published tests of material properties. Geometric morphometrics (GMM) was used to analyse the resulting skull deformations. Bone stiffness was found to have the strongest influence on the results in all three rodents, followed by bite position, and then bite angle and muscle orientation. Tooth material properties were shown to have little effect on the deformation of the skull. The effect of bite position varied between species, with the mesiodistal position of the biting tooth being most important in squirrels and guinea pigs, whereas bilateral vs. unilateral biting had the greatest influence in rats. A GMM analysis of isolated incisor deformations showed that, for all rodents, bite angle is the most important parameter, followed by elastic properties of the tooth. The results here elucidate which input parameters are most important when defining the FE models, but also provide interesting glimpses of the biomechanical differences between the three skulls, which will be fully explored in future publications. PMID:21974720

  11. Modelling Polymer Deformation during 3D Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlroy, Claire; Olmsted, Peter

    Three-dimensional printing has the potential to transform manufacturing processes, yet improving the strength of printed parts, to equal that of traditionally-manufactured parts, remains an underlying issue. The fused deposition modelling technique involves melting a thermoplastic, followed by layer-by-layer extrusion to fabricate an object. The key to ensuring strength at the weld between layers is successful inter-diffusion. However, prior to welding, both the extrusion process and the cooling temperature profile can significantly deform the polymer micro-structure and, consequently, how well the polymers are able to ``re-entangle'' across the weld. In particular, polymer alignment in the flow can cause de-bonding of the layers and create defects. We have developed a simple model of the non-isothermal extrusion process to explore the effects that typical printing conditions and material rheology have on the conformation of a polymer melt. In particular, we incorporate both stretch and orientation using the Rolie-Poly constitutive equation to examine the melt structure as it flows through the nozzle, the subsequent alignment with the build plate and the resulting deformation due to the fixed nozzle height, which is typically less than the nozzle radius.

  12. Methods for Geometric Data Validation of 3d City Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, D.; Alam, N.; Wewetzer, M.; Pries, M.; Coors, V.

    2015-12-01

    Geometric quality of 3D city models is crucial for data analysis and simulation tasks, which are part of modern applications of the data (e.g. potential heating energy consumption of city quarters, solar potential, etc.). Geometric quality in these contexts is however a different concept as it is for 2D maps. In the latter case, aspects such as positional or temporal accuracy and correctness represent typical quality metrics of the data. They are defined in ISO 19157 and should be mentioned as part of the metadata. 3D data has a far wider range of aspects which influence their quality, plus the idea of quality itself is application dependent. Thus, concepts for definition of quality are needed, including methods to validate these definitions. Quality on this sense means internal validation and detection of inconsistent or wrong geometry according to a predefined set of rules. A useful starting point would be to have correct geometry in accordance with ISO 19107. A valid solid should consist of planar faces which touch their neighbours exclusively in defined corner points and edges. No gaps between them are allowed, and the whole feature must be 2-manifold. In this paper, we present methods to validate common geometric requirements for building geometry. Different checks based on several algorithms have been implemented to validate a set of rules derived from the solid definition mentioned above (e.g. water tightness of the solid or planarity of its polygons), as they were developed for the software tool CityDoctor. The method of each check is specified, with a special focus on the discussion of tolerance values where they are necessary. The checks include polygon level checks to validate the correctness of each polygon, i.e. closeness of the bounding linear ring and planarity. On the solid level, which is only validated if the polygons have passed validation, correct polygon orientation is checked, after self-intersections outside of defined corner points and edges

  13. Geometrical model for DBMS: an experimental DBMS using IBM solid modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, D.E.D.L.

    1985-01-01

    This research presents a new model for data base management systems (DBMS). The new model, Geometrical DBMS, is based on using solid modelling technology in designing and implementing DBMS. The Geometrical DBMS is implemented using the IBM solid modelling Geometric Design Processor (GDP). Built basically on computer-graphics concepts, Geometrical DBMS is indeed a unique model. Traditionally, researchers start with one of the existent DBMS models and then put a graphical front end on it. In Geometrical DBMS, the graphical aspect of the model is not an alien concept tailored to the model but is, as a matter of fact, the atom around which the model is designed. The main idea in Geometrical DBMS is to allow the user and the system to refer to and manipulate data items as a solid object in 3D space, and representing a record as a group of logically related solid objects. In Geometical DBMS, hierarchical structure is used to present the data relations and the user sees the data as a group of arrays; yet, for the user and the system together, the data structure is a multidimensional tree.

  14. Geometric modelling of viscosity of copper-containing liquid alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Ali; Arslan, Hüseyin

    2016-02-01

    In this work, viscosities of ternary Au-Ag-Cu and Al-Cu-Si liquid alloys have been calculated as a function of gold, aluminium and copper compositions for the sections Au-Ag-Cu (xAg/xCu = 0.543 at 1373 K), Alx(Cu50-Si50)(1-x) and Cux(Al50-Si50)(1-x) at 1375 K using Chou's general solution model, Muggianu, Kohler, Toop, Hillert, Budai et al., Kozlov et al., Schick et al. and Kaptay et al. models. The present study finds that a comparison of the predicted values of viscosities associated with the geometric and physical models indicate good mutual agreement. The Muggianu model indicates the best agreement with the results obtained for Au-Ag-Cu and Alx-Cu50-Si50 alloy systems and the Kaptay et al. model, which is a physical model, indicates the best agreement with the results obtained for Al50-Cux-Si50.

  15. Geometric and Colour Data Fusion for Outdoor 3D Models

    PubMed Central

    Merchán, Pilar; Adán, Antonio; Salamanca, Santiago; Domínguez, Vicente; Chacón, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the generation of accurate, dense and coloured 3D models of outdoor scenarios from scanners. This is a challenging research field in which several problems still remain unsolved. In particular, the process of 3D model creation in outdoor scenes may be inefficient if the scene is digitalized under unsuitable technical (specific scanner on-board camera) and environmental (rain, dampness, changing illumination) conditions. We address our research towards the integration of images and range data to produce photorealistic models. Our proposal is based on decoupling the colour integration and geometry reconstruction stages, making them independent and controlled processes. This issue is approached from two different viewpoints. On the one hand, given a complete model (geometry plus texture), we propose a method to modify the original texture provided by the scanner on-board camera with the colour information extracted from external images taken at given moments and under specific environmental conditions. On the other hand, we propose an algorithm to directly assign external images onto the complete geometric model, thus avoiding tedious on-line calibration processes. We present the work conducted on two large Roman archaeological sites dating from the first century A.D., namely, the Theatre of Segobriga and the Fori Porticus of Emerita Augusta, both in Spain. The results obtained demonstrate that our approach could be useful in the digitalization and 3D modelling fields. PMID:22969327

  16. Geometric and colour data fusion for outdoor 3D models.

    PubMed

    Merchán, Pilar; Adán, Antonio; Salamanca, Santiago; Domínguez, Vicente; Chacón, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the generation of accurate, dense and coloured 3D models of outdoor scenarios from scanners. This is a challenging research field in which several problems still remain unsolved. In particular, the process of 3D model creation in outdoor scenes may be inefficient if the scene is digitalized under unsuitable technical (specific scanner on-board camera) and environmental (rain, dampness, changing illumination) conditions. We address our research towards the integration of images and range data to produce photorealistic models. Our proposal is based on decoupling the colour integration and geometry reconstruction stages, making them independent and controlled processes. This issue is approached from two different viewpoints. On the one hand, given a complete model (geometry plus texture), we propose a method to modify the original texture provided by the scanner on-board camera with the colour information extracted from external images taken at given moments and under specific environmental conditions. On the other hand, we propose an algorithm to directly assign external images onto the complete geometric model, thus avoiding tedious on-line calibration processes. We present the work conducted on two large Roman archaeological sites dating from the first century A.D., namely, the Theatre of Segobriga and the Fori Porticus of Emerita Augusta, both in Spain. The results obtained demonstrate that our approach could be useful in the digitalization and 3D modelling fields.

  17. Dosimetric treatment course simulation based on a statistical model of deformable organ motion.

    PubMed

    Söhn, M; Sobotta, B; Alber, M

    2012-06-21

    We present a method of modeling dosimetric consequences of organ deformation and correlated motion of adjacent organ structures in radiotherapy. Based on a few organ geometry samples and the respective deformation fields as determined by deformable registration, principal component analysis (PCA) is used to create a low-dimensional parametric statistical organ deformation model (Söhn et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 5893-908). PCA determines the most important geometric variability in terms of eigenmodes, which represent 3D vector fields of correlated organ deformations around the mean geometry. Weighted sums of a few dominating eigenmodes can be used to simulate synthetic geometries, which are statistically meaningful inter- and extrapolations of the input geometries, and predict their probability of occurrence. We present the use of PCA as a versatile treatment simulation tool, which allows comprehensive dosimetric assessment of the detrimental effects that deformable geometric uncertainties can have on a planned dose distribution. For this, a set of random synthetic geometries is generated by a PCA model for each simulated treatment course, and the dose of a given treatment plan is accumulated in the moving tissue elements via dose warping. This enables the calculation of average voxel doses, local dose variability, dose-volume histogram uncertainties, marginal as well as joint probability distributions of organ equivalent uniform doses and thus of TCP and NTCP, and other dosimetric and biologic endpoints. The method is applied to the example of deformable motion of prostate/bladder/rectum in prostate IMRT. Applications include dosimetric assessment of the adequacy of margin recipes, adaptation schemes, etc, as well as prospective 'virtual' evaluation of the possible benefits of new radiotherapy schemes.

  18. Vacuum Stability in Kaluza-Klein Geometric Sigma Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilić, M.

    2002-09-01

    In Kaluza-Klein geometric sigma models, the scalar fields coupled to higher-dimensional gravity are pure gauge. The gauge fixed theory contains no matter fields, and can consistently be reduced to 4 dimensions, provided the internal space is chosen in the form of a group manifold. The effective 4-dimensional theory includes standard Einstein and Yang-Mills sectors, and is free of the classical cosmological constant problem. In this paper, the stability of the internal excitations is analyzed. It is shown that the initial Lagrangian can be modified to lead to a classically stable effective 4-dimensional theory, independently of the particular group used, and retaining all the basic features of the unmodified theory.

  19. A responsive finite element method to aid interactive geometric modeling.

    PubMed

    Umetani, N; Takayama, K; Mitani, J; Igarashi, T

    2011-01-01

    Current computer-aided engineering systems use numerical-simulation methods mainly as offline verification tools to reject designs that don't satisfy the required constraints, rather than as tools to guide users toward better designs. However, integrating real-time finite element method (FEM) into interactive geometric modeling can provide user guidance. During interactive editing, real-time feedback from numerical simulation guides users toward an improved design without tedious trial-and-error iterations. Careful reuse of previous computation results, such as meshes and matrices, on the basis of speed and accuracy trade-offs, have helped produce fast FEM analysis during interactive editing. Several 2D example applications and informal user studies show this approach's effectiveness. Such tools could help nonexpert users design objects that satisfy physical constraints and help those users understand the underlying physical properties.

  20. Geometrical Model of the Tetragonal BPX Blue Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pansu, B.

    1995-04-01

    Crystals of BP1 and BP2 blue phases exhibit different crystalline structures under sufficiently high electric field. When the dielectric anisotropy is positive, the same tetragonal phase, called BPX, has been observed when the field is applied, either along a two-fold axis of the BP1 phase, or along a four-fold axis of the BP2 phase. With the help of the geometrical models of cubic blue phases deduced from the analogy with the cubic lyotropic phases, we propose in this paper a geometrical model of the BPX phase and a mechanism for the transformations of BP1 and BP2 into BPX. L'application d'un champ électrique suffisamment intense sur des monocristaux de phases bleues BP1 et BP2 provoque l'apparition de nouvelles structures cristallines. Notamment, une même phase BPX à symétrie tétragonale a été observée quand le champ est dirigé suivant un axe d'ordre 2 de la BP1 ou un axe d'ordre 4 de la BP2, ceci quand l'anisotropie diélectrique est positive. A partir de modèles géométriques des phases bleues basés sur l'analogie avec les phases cubiques lyotropes, nous proposons un modèle géométrique de la phase BPX et un mécanisme de transformation des phases bleues BP1 et BP2 en BPX.

  1. Approach to analyze a deformable moving target by using the shape deformation model and morphological operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Weiguo; Asai, Take; Akatsuka, Takao

    1995-10-01

    The measurement of the characteristic parameters for a moving object with deformation is often an important problem. Here, an approach to analyze the shape change of a ball, when it is kicked in soccer, is proposed by using a simple shape deformation model to evaluate the shape change from the image sequence. Moreover, to determine the parameters of the model which apply to actual ball deformation, the detection of ball is necessary, and the pattern spectrum based on morphological operators is considered. Here, we assume that the deformation surface of the ball is a circular arc, when it is kicked by foot, and the arc is always convex when it is observed from the kicking side. To obtain the parameters of the arc, the preprocessing of the ball image such as local binarization, the region filling and noisy smoothing with morphological operators, is performed from actual image sequence. In order to detect the ball, the pattern spectrum with morphological operators is measured, and then circumscribed circle of the ball is extracted. So, the center and radius of the ball from circumscribed circle and the arc of the deformation surface of the model are obtained. Finally, the characteristic parameters of a moving ball such as the deformation are measured by using the shape deformation model. To demonstrate the effect of this method, we show an application to extract the deformation of the ball in football for the actual sports skill training.

  2. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of the use of deformable image registration in adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eiland, R.B.; Maare, C.; Sjöström, D.; Samsøe, E.; Behrens, C.F.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out geometric and dosimetric evaluation of the usefulness of a deformable image registration algorithm utilized for adaptive head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Data consisted of seven patients, each with a planning CT (pCT), a rescanning CT (ReCT) and a cone beam CT (CBCT). The CBCT was acquired on the same day (±1 d) as the ReCT (i.e. at Fraction 17, 18, 23, 24 or 29). The ReCT served as ground truth. A deformed CT (dCT) with structures was created by deforming the pCT to the CBCT. The geometrical comparison was based on the volumes of the deformed, and the manually delineated structures on the ReCT. Likewise, the center of mass shift (CMS) and the Dice similarity coefficient were determined. The dosimetric comparison was performed by recalculating the initial treatment plan on the dCT and the ReCT. Dose–volume histogram (DVH) points and a range of conformity measures were used for the evaluation. We found a significant difference in the median volume of the dCT relative to that of the ReCT. Median CMS values were ∼2–5 mm, except for the spinal cord, where the median CMS was 8 mm. Dosimetric evaluation of target structures revealed small differences, while larger differences were observed for organs at risk. The deformed structures cannot fully replace manually delineated structures. Based on both geometrical and dosimetrical measures, there is a tendency for the dCT to overestimate the need for replanning, compared with the ReCT. PMID:24907340

  3. Rapid world modeling: Fitting range data to geometric primitives

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, J.; Little, C.

    1996-12-31

    For the past seven years, Sandia National Laboratories has been active in the development of robotic systems to help remediate DOE`s waste sites and decommissioned facilities. Some of these facilities have high levels of radioactivity which prevent manual clean-up. Tele-operated and autonomous robotic systems have been envisioned as the only suitable means of removing the radioactive elements. World modeling is defined as the process of creating a numerical geometric model of a real world environment or workspace. This model is often used in robotics to plan robot motions which perform a task while avoiding obstacles. In many applications where the world model does not exist ahead of time, structured lighting, laser range finders, and even acoustical sensors have been used to create three dimensional maps of the environment. These maps consist of thousands of range points which are difficult to handle and interpret. This paper presents a least squares technique for fitting range data to planar and quadric surfaces, including cylinders and ellipsoids. Once fit to these primitive surfaces, the amount of data associated with a surface is greatly reduced up to three orders of magnitude, thus allowing for more rapid handling and analysis of world data.

  4. Aeroelastic simulation of multi-MW wind turbines using a free vortex model coupled to a geometrically exact beam model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saverin, Joseph; Peukert, Juliane; Marten, David; Pechlivanoglou, George; Paschereit, Christian Oliver; Greenblatt, David

    2016-09-01

    The current paper investigates the aeroelastic modelling of large, flexible multi- MW wind turbine blades. Most current performance prediction tools make use of the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) model, based upon a number of simplifying assumptions that hold only under steady conditions. This is why a lifting line free vortex wake (LLFVW) algorithm is used here to accurately resolve unsteady wind turbine aerodynamics. A coupling to the structural analysis tool BeamDyn, based on geometrically exact beam theory, allows for time-resolved aeroelastic simulations with highly deflected blades including bend-twist, coupling. Predictions of blade loading and deformation for rigid and flexible blades are analysed with reference to different aerodynamic and structural approaches. The emergency shutdown procedure is chosen as an examplary design load case causing large deflections to place emphasis on the influence of structural coupling and demonstrate the necessity of high fidelity structural models.

  5. Unified optical distortion correction method for imaging systems using a concise geometrical transformation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shengqian; Liu, Siqi; Yuan, Fei; Zheng, Zhenrong

    2017-01-01

    Since optical distortion has been a big trouble for various kinds of imaging systems, finding a simple correction method with wide applications is of significant importance. In this paper, we propose a unified and simple correction method, performing well for both photographic and projective imaging systems. The basic idea is regarding the optical distortion as geometrical deformation between the object and image, without considering the specific features of an optical system. First of all, a calibration template is employed to establish the geometrical transformation model (GTM) for the distortion of a built optical system. Two alternative algorithms are given to estimate the GTM in algebraic form. The computation is very simple because no intrinsic parameters of the optical system are needed to establish the GTM. Besides, the errors introduced by the fabricating and assembling process can be eliminated. Then, the corrected image of the photographic system or the pre-distorted image of the projective systems can be obtained accordingly utilizing the GTM. Experiments are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of our method with wide applications.

  6. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement System User's Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dismond, Harriett R.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide the user of the NASA VMD system, running the MDef software, Version 1.10, all information required to operate the system. The NASA Videogrammetric Model Deformation system consists of an automated videogrammetric technique used to measure the change in wing twist and bending under aerodynamic load in a wind tunnel. The basic instrumentation consists of a single CCD video camera and a frame grabber interfaced to a computer. The technique is based upon a single view photogrammetric determination of two-dimensional coordinates of wing targets with fixed (and known) third dimensional coordinate, namely the span-wise location. The major consideration in the development of the measurement system was that productivity must not be appreciably reduced.

  7. Phenomenological modeling of nonlinear holograms based on metallic geometric metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Ye, Weimin; Li, Xin; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Shuang

    2016-10-31

    Benefiting from efficient local phase and amplitude control at the subwavelength scale, metasurfaces offer a new platform for computer generated holography with high spatial resolution. Three-dimensional and high efficient holograms have been realized by metasurfaces constituted by subwavelength meta-atoms with spatially varying geometries or orientations. Metasurfaces have been recently extended to the nonlinear optical regime to generate holographic images in harmonic generation waves. Thus far, there has been no vector field simulation of nonlinear metasurface holograms because of the tremendous computational challenge in numerically calculating the collective nonlinear responses of the large number of different subwavelength meta-atoms in a hologram. Here, we propose a general phenomenological method to model nonlinear metasurface holograms based on the assumption that every meta-atom could be described by a localized nonlinear polarizability tensor. Applied to geometric nonlinear metasurfaces, we numerically model the holographic images formed by the second-harmonic waves of different spins. We show that, in contrast to the metasurface holograms operating in the linear optical regime, the wavelength of incident fundamental light should be slightly detuned from the fundamental resonant wavelength to optimize the efficiency and quality of nonlinear holographic images. The proposed modeling provides a general method to simulate nonlinear optical devices based on metallic metasurfaces.

  8. Uncertainties in modeling, prediction, and actions in response to variations in patient geometric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani, Rojano

    External beam radiation therapy is an effective method for treating cancer in many body sites. Highly conformal plans can be created to provide good target coverage while sparing the surrounding normal tissue. A fundamental problem in delivering these conformal plans is the inter- and intra-fractional variations in patient geometry, which result in deviation of the delivered dose from the planned dose, thus reducing the probability of tumor control or increasing the risk of normal tissue toxicity. To address this problem, various motion management strategies have been implemented in the clinic, and several others are under investigation. While the technique employed for management of geometric variation can change depending on the type and source of the variation (set up error, respiratory-induced motion and deformation, or tumor shrinkage or tissue loss in response to treatment) as well as other clinical factors, all these techniques have one thing in common and that is the fact that they are not perfect. This work investigates the uncertainties associated with the measurement and management of motion and deformation, and evaluates the impact of these uncertainties on the accuracy of geometry and dose tracking for treatment adaptation. This research quantified the magnitude and distribution of error in deformable image registration for aligning image volumes acquired at different breathing states. It further explored the potential of reducing the registration error in deforming lung geometry, by applying a method from multivariate statistics (principal component analysis) to identify the significant modes of variation in this geometry. It also demonstrated the potential for tracking respiratory induced deformation in various regions in the lung, using a few surrogates such as implanted markers. In addition to the evaluation of registration error for thoracic geometry affected by respiratory motion, this work also investigates the accuracy of deformable image

  9. On the sigma-model of deformed special geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes Cardoso, Gabriel; Véliz-Osorio, Alvaro

    2013-07-01

    We discuss the deformed sigma-model that arises when considering four-dimensional N=2 abelian vector multiplets in the presence of an arbitrary chiral background field. In addition, we allow for a class of deformations of special geometry by non-holomorphic terms. We analyze the geometry of the sigma-model in terms of intrinsic torsion classes. We show that, generically, the deformed geometry is non-Kähler. We illustrate our findings with an example. We also express the deformed sigma-model in terms of the Hesse potential that underlies the real formulation of special geometry.

  10. The Numba ductile deformation zone (northwest Cameroon): A geometric analysis of folds based on the Fold Profiler method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njanko, T.; Chatué, C. Njiki; Kwékam, M.; Nké, B. E. Bella; Sandjo, A. F. Yakeu; Fozing, E. M.

    2017-03-01

    The Numba ductile deformation zone (NDDZ) is characterised by folds recorded during the three deformation phases that affected the banded amphibole gneiss. Fold-shape analyses using the program Fold Profiler with the aim to show the importance of folding events in the structural analysis of the NDDZ and its contribution to the Pan-African orogeny in central Africa have been made. Classical field method, conic sections method and Ramsay's fold classification method were applied to (i) have the general orientation of folds, (ii) analyze the fold shapes and (iii) classify the geometry of the folded bands. Fold axes in banded amphibole gneiss plunge moderately (<15°) towards the NNE or SSW. The morphology of F1, F2 and F3 folds in the study area clearly points to (i) Z-shape folds with SE vergence and (ii) a dextral sense of shear motion. Conic section method reveals two dominant families: F1 and F3 folds belong to parabolic shape folds, while F2 folds belong to parabolic shape and hyperbolic shape folds. Ramsay's scheme emphasizes class 1C (for F1, F2 and F3 folds) and class 3 (for F2 folds) as main fold classes. The co-existence of the various fold shapes can be explained by (i) the structuration of the banded gneiss, (ii) the folding mechanisms that associate shear with a non-least compressive or flattening component in a ductile shear zone and (iii) the change in rheological properties of the band during the period of fold formation. These data allow us to conclude that the Numba region underwent ductile dextral shear and can be integrated (i) in a correlation model with the Central Cameroon Shear Zone (CCSZ) and associated syn-kinematic intrusions and (ii) into the tectonic model of Pan-African belt of central Africa in Cameroon.

  11. Deformation methods in modelling of the inner magnetospheric electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toivanen, P. K.

    2007-12-01

    Various deformation methods have been widely used in animation image processing. In common terms, they are mathematical presentations of deformations of an image drawn on an elastic material under stretching or compression of the material. Such a method has also been used in modelling of the magnetospheric magnetic fields, and recently been generalized to include also the electric fields. In this presentations, the theory of the deformation method and an application in a form of a new global magnetospheric electromagnetic field model are previewed. The main focus of the presentation is on the inner magnetospheric current systems and associated electromagnetic fields during quiet and disturbed periods. Finally, a short look at the modern deformation methods in image processing is taken. These methods include the Free Form Deformations and Moving Least Squares Deformations, and their future applications in magnetospheric field modelling are discussed.

  12. The Effects of Nonlinear Damping on Post-flutter Behavior Using Geometrically Nonlinear Reduced Order Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Pengchao

    Recent studies of the occurrence of post-flutter limit cycle oscillations (LCO) of the F-16 have provided good support to the long-standing hypothesis that this phenomenon involves a nonlinear structural damping. A potential mechanism for the appearance of nonlinearity in the damping are the nonlinear geometric effects that arise when the deformations become large enough to exceed the linear regime. In this light, the focus of this investigation is first on extending nonlinear reduced order modeling (ROM) methods to include viscoelasticity which is introduced here through a linear Kelvin-Voigt model in the undeformed configuration. Proceeding with a Galerkin approach, the ROM governing equations of motion are obtained and are found to be of a generalized van der Pol-Duffing form with parameters depending on the structure and the chosen basis functions. An identification approach of the nonlinear damping parameters is next proposed which is applicable to structures modeled within commercial finite element software. The effects of this nonlinear damping mechanism on the post-flutter response is next analyzed on the Goland wing through time-marching of the aeroelastic equations comprising a rational fraction approximation of the linear aerodynamic forces. It is indeed found that the nonlinearity in the damping can stabilize the unstable aerodynamics and lead to finite amplitude limit cycle oscillations even when the stiffness related nonlinear geometric effects are neglected. The incorporation of these latter effects in the model is found to further decrease the amplitude of LCO even though the dominant bending motions do not seem to stiffen as the level of displacements is increased in static analyses.

  13. Content-Based Search on a Database of Geometric Models: Identifying Objects of Similar Shape

    SciTech Connect

    XAVIER, PATRICK G.; HENRY, TYSON R.; LAFARGE, ROBERT A.; MEIRANS, LILITA; RAY, LAWRENCE P.

    2001-11-01

    The Geometric Search Engine is a software system for storing and searching a database of geometric models. The database maybe searched for modeled objects similar in shape to a target model supplied by the user. The database models are generally from CAD models while the target model may be either a CAD model or a model generated from range data collected from a physical object. This document describes key generation, database layout, and search of the database.

  14. Propagation of finite amplitude sound through turbulence: modeling with geometrical acoustics and the parabolic approximation.

    PubMed

    Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Lipkens, Bart; Dallois, Laurent; Hamilton, Mark F; Blackstock, David T

    2002-01-01

    Sonic boom propagation can be affected by atmospheric turbulence. It has been shown that turbulence affects the perceived loudness of sonic booms, mainly by changing its peak pressure and rise time. The models reported here describe the nonlinear propagation of sound through turbulence. Turbulence is modeled as a set of individual realizations of a random temperature or velocity field. In the first model, linear geometrical acoustics is used to trace rays through each realization of the turbulent field. A nonlinear transport equation is then derived along each eigenray connecting the source and receiver. The transport equation is solved by a Pestorius algorithm. In the second model, the KZK equation is modified to account for the effect of a random temperature field and it is then solved numerically. Results from numerical experiments that simulate the propagation of spark-produced N waves through turbulence are presented. It is observed that turbulence decreases, on average, the peak pressure of the N waves and increases the rise time. Nonlinear distortion is less when turbulence is present than without it. The effects of random vector fields are stronger than those of random temperature fields. The location of the caustics and the deformation of the wave front are also presented. These observations confirm the results from the model experiment in which spark-produced N waves are used to simulate sonic boom propagation through a turbulent atmosphere.

  15. Single-View Food Portion Estimation Based on Geometric Models

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Shaobo; Liu, Chang; Zhu, Fengqing; Delp, Edward J.; Boushey, Carol J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a food portion estimation technique based on a single-view food image used for the estimation of the amount of energy (in kilocalories) consumed at a meal. Unlike previous methods we have developed, the new technique is capable of estimating food portion without manual tuning of parameters. Although single-view 3D scene reconstruction is in general an ill-posed problem, the use of geometric models such as the shape of a container can help to partially recover 3D parameters of food items in the scene. Based on the estimated 3D parameters of each food item and a reference object in the scene, the volume of each food item in the image can be determined. The weight of each food can then be estimated using the density of the food item. We were able to achieve an error of less than 6% for energy estimation of an image of a meal assuming accurate segmentation and food classification. PMID:27672682

  16. Beta Functions in Chirally Deformed Supersymmetric Sigma Models in Two Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, Arkady

    We study two-dimensional sigma models where the chiral deformation diminished the original 𝒩 =(2, 2) supersymmetry to the chiral one, 𝒩 =(0, 2). Such heterotic models were discovered previously on the world sheet of non-Abelian stringy solitons supported by certain four-dimensional 𝒩 = 1 theories. We study geometric aspects and holomorphic properties of these models, and derive a number of exact expressions for the β functions in terms of the anomalous dimensions analogous to the NSVZ β function in four-dimensional Yang-Mills. Instanton calculus provides a straightforward method for the derivation.

  17. Beta functions in Chirally deformed supersymmetric sigma models in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, Arkady

    2016-10-01

    We study two-dimensional sigma models where the chiral deformation diminished the original 𝒩 = (2, 2) supersymmetry to the chiral one, 𝒩 = (0, 2). Such heterotic models were discovered previously on the world sheet of non-Abelian stringy solitons supported by certain four-dimensional 𝒩 = 1 theories. We study geometric aspects and holomorphic properties of these models, and derive a number of exact expressions for the β functions in terms of the anomalous dimensions analogous to the NSVZ β function in four-dimensional Yang-Mills. Instanton calculus provides a straightforward method for the derivation.

  18. dMODELS: A software package for modeling volcanic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, M.

    2013-12-01

    dMODELS is software package including the most common source models used to interpret deformation measurements near active volcanic centers. The emphasis is on estimating the parameters of analytical models of deformation by inverting data from the Global Positioning System (GPS), InSAR, tiltmeters and strainmeters. Source models include: (a) pressurized spherical, ellipsoidal and sill-like magma chambers in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space; and (b) pressurized spherical magma chamber with correction for the effect of topography (i.e., Williams and Wadge, 1998). All the expressions have been extended to include deformation and strain within the Earth's crust (as opposed to only the Earth's surface) and verified against finite element models. The software has been developed using Matlab but compiled versions that can be run using the free Matlab Compiler Runtime (MCR) are available for Linux, and Windows 7 (32bit and 64bit). The MATLAB scripts and compiled files are open source and intended for teaching and research. The software can be downloaded from the USGS web site pubs.usgs.gov/tm/13/b1/. Please e-mail the author at mbattaglia@usgs.gov if you would like to be included in the dMODELS mail list to get information about the release of software updates.

  19. Meshless Modeling of Deformable Shapes and their Motion

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Bart; Ovsjanikov, Maks; Wand, Michael; Seidel, Hans-Peter; Guibas, Leonidas J.

    2010-01-01

    We present a new framework for interactive shape deformation modeling and key frame interpolation based on a meshless finite element formulation. Starting from a coarse nodal sampling of an object’s volume, we formulate rigidity and volume preservation constraints that are enforced to yield realistic shape deformations at interactive frame rates. Additionally, by specifying key frame poses of the deforming shape and optimizing the nodal displacements while targeting smooth interpolated motion, our algorithm extends to a motion planning framework for deformable objects. This allows reconstructing smooth and plausible deformable shape trajectories in the presence of possibly moving obstacles. The presented results illustrate that our framework can handle complex shapes at interactive rates and hence is a valuable tool for animators to realistically and efficiently model and interpolate deforming 3D shapes. PMID:24839614

  20. Modeling bidirectional reflectance of forests and woodlands using Boolean models and geometric optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahler, Alan H.; Jupp, David L. B.

    1990-01-01

    Geometric-optical discrete-element mathematical models for forest canopies have been developed using the Boolean logic and models of Serra. The geometric-optical approach is considered to be particularly well suited to describing the bidirectional reflectance of forest woodland canopies, where the concentration of leaf material within crowns and the resulting between-tree gaps make plane-parallel, radiative-transfer models inappropriate. The approach leads to invertible formulations, in which the spatial and directional variance provides the means for remote estimation of tree crown size, shape, and total cover from remotedly sensed imagery.

  1. Jordanian deformation of the open sℓ(2) Gaudin model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    António, N. Cirilo; Manojlović, N.; Nagy, Z.

    2014-04-01

    We derive a deformed sℓ( 2) Gaudin model with integrable boundaries. Starting from the Jordanian deformation of the SL( 2)-invariant Yang R-matrix and generic solutions of the associated reflection equation and the dual reflection equation, we obtain the corresponding inhomogeneous spin- 1/2 XXX chain. The semiclassical expansion of the transfer matrix yields the deformed sℓ( 2) Gaudin Hamiltonians with boundary terms.

  2. Deformation modeling and constitutive modeling for anisotropic superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, Walter W.; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1989-01-01

    A study of deformation mechanisms in the single crystal superalloy PWA 1480 was conducted. Monotonic and cyclic tests were conducted from 20 to 1093 C. Both (001) and near-(123) crystals were tested, at strain rates of 0.5 and 50 percent/minute. The deformation behavior could be grouped into two temperature regimes: low temperatures, below 760 C; and high temperatures, above 820 to 950 C depending on the strain rate. At low temperatures, the mechanical behavior was very anisotropic. An orientation dependent CRSS, a tension-compression asymmetry, and anisotropic strain hardening were all observed. The material was deformed by planar octahedral slip. The anisotropic properties were correlated with the ease of cube cross-slip, as well as the number of active slip systems. At high temperatures, the material was isotropic, and deformed by homogeneous gamma by-pass. It was found that the temperature dependence of the formation of superlattice-intrinsic stacking faults was responsible for the local minimum in the CRSS of this alloy at 400 C. It was proposed that the cube cross-slip process must be reversible. This was used to explain the reversible tension-compression asymmetry, and was used to study models of cross-slip. As a result, the cross-slip model proposed by Paidar, Pope and Vitek was found to be consistent with the proposed slip reversibility. The results were related to anisotropic viscoplastic constitutive models. The model proposed by Walter and Jordan was found to be capable of modeling all aspects of the material anisotropy. Temperature and strain rate boundaries for the model were proposed, and guidelines for numerical experiments were proposed.

  3. HSR Model Deformation Measurements from Subsonic to Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Erickson, G. E.; Goodman, W. L.; Fleming, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the video model deformation technique (VMD) used at five NASA facilities and the projection moire interferometry (PMI) technique used at two NASA facilities. Comparisons between the two techniques for model deformation measurements are provided. Facilities at NASA-Ames and NASA-Langley where deformation measurements have been made are presented. Examples of HSR model deformation measurements from the Langley Unitary Wind Tunnel, Langley 16-foot Transonic Wind Tunnel, and the Ames 12-foot Pressure Tunnel are presented. A study to improve and develop new targeting schemes at the National Transonic Facility is also described. The consideration of milled targets for future HSR models is recommended when deformation measurements are expected to be required. Finally, future development work for VMD and PMI is addressed.

  4. Micromechanical Model for Deformation in Solids with Universal Predictions for Stress-Strain Curves and Slip Avalanches

    SciTech Connect

    Dahmen, Karin A.; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Uhl, Jonathan T.

    2009-05-01

    A basic micromechanical model for deformation of solids with only one tuning parameter (weakening {epsilon}) is introduced. The model can reproduce observed stress-strain curves, acoustic emissions and related power spectra, event statistics, and geometrical properties of slip, with a continuous phase transition from brittle to ductile behavior. Exact universal predictions are extracted using mean field theory and renormalization group tools. The results agree with recent experimental observations and simulations of related models for dislocation dynamics, material damage, and earthquake statistics.

  5. Interplay of Aging and Hypertension in Cardiac Remodeling: A Mathematical Geometric Model

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Meng-Hang; Tsai, Wei-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Hypertensive disorder can cause cardiac deformities. Elastic characteristic parameters, like Young’s modulus of elasticity (E) derived from a traditional cylindrical model, increase significantly with aging. However, the geometric and component changes of aging hearts because of chronic hypertension remain unknown. To better describe the effects, we propose an elliptical elastic and mathematical model to evaluate myocardial stiffness. Ninety-six hypertensive patients (HTNPos) (men: 59.3%; age ≥ 65 years: 20.8%) were enrolled and compared with normotensive controls (HTNNeg) (n = 47, 48.9%). HTNPos patients had a thicker interventricular septum in diastole (IVSd) (HTNPos: 0.96 ± 0.21 cm vs. HTNNeg: 0.77 ± 0.15; p = 0.005) and higher intracardiac pressure (e/e′: 9.06 ± 4.85 cm vs. 7.76 ± 3.41; p = 0.01), especially the elderly (> 65 years) (IVSd: 1.03 ± 0.19 cm, e/e′: 11.39 ± 1.99; p = 0.006 and 0.01, respectively). Nevertheless, the internal dimension decreased more significantly in the HTNPos rather than in the HTNNeg elderly (5.23 ± 0.46 vs. 4.74 ± 0.69 cm; p = 0.02). We found different directions of cardiac remodeling with normotensive and hypertensive loads. Different from the longitudinal and circumferential strain, E and Poisson’s ratio (υ) are values that directly present the rigidity of myocardium. E was significantly higher in the elderly (8011.92 ± 2431.85 vs. 6052.43 ± 3121.50; p = 0.02), whereas υ was significantly higher in all HTNPos patients (0.73 ± 0.12 vs. 0.61 ± 0.07; p < 0.001). Because E and υ reflected the material changes of myocardium in the HTNPos elderly, the proposed elliptical mathematical heart model better describes the geometric deformity induced by aging and hypertension. PMID:27977729

  6. Emergent lattices with geometrical frustration in doped extended Hubbard models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Ryui; Tocchio, Luca F.; Valentí, Roser; Gros, Claudius

    2016-11-01

    Spontaneous charge ordering occurring in correlated systems may be considered as a possible route to generate effective lattice structures with unconventional couplings. For this purpose we investigate the phase diagram of doped extended Hubbard models on two lattices: (i) the honeycomb lattice with on-site U and nearest-neighbor V Coulomb interactions at 3 /4 filling (n =3 /2 ) and (ii) the triangular lattice with on-site U , nearest-neighbor V , and next-nearest-neighbor V' Coulomb interactions at 3 /8 filling (n =3 /4 ). We consider various approaches including mean-field approximations, perturbation theory, and variational Monte Carlo. For the honeycomb case (i), charge order induces an effective triangular lattice at large values of U /t and V /t , where t is the nearest-neighbor hopping integral. The nearest-neighbor spin exchange interactions on this effective triangular lattice are antiferromagnetic in most of the phase diagram, while they become ferromagnetic when U is much larger than V . At U /t ˜(V/t ) 3 , ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange interactions nearly cancel out, leading to a system with four-spin ring-exchange interactions. On the other hand, for the triangular case (ii) at large U and finite V', we find no charge order for small V , an effective kagome lattice for intermediate V , and one-dimensional charge order for large V . These results indicate that Coulomb interactions induce [case (i)] or enhance [case(ii)] emergent geometrical frustration of the spin degrees of freedom in the system, by forming charge order.

  7. Preliminary deformation model for National Seismic Hazard map of Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Meilano, Irwan; Gunawan, Endra; Sarsito, Dina; Prijatna, Kosasih; Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.; Susilo,; Efendi, Joni

    2015-04-24

    Preliminary deformation model for the Indonesia’s National Seismic Hazard (NSH) map is constructed as the block rotation and strain accumulation function at the elastic half-space. Deformation due to rigid body motion is estimated by rotating six tectonic blocks in Indonesia. The interseismic deformation due to subduction is estimated by assuming coupling on subduction interface while deformation at active fault is calculated by assuming each of the fault‘s segment slips beneath a locking depth or in combination with creeping in a shallower part. This research shows that rigid body motion dominates the deformation pattern with magnitude more than 15 mm/year, except in the narrow area near subduction zones and active faults where significant deformation reach to 25 mm/year.

  8. Geometric modeling and analysis of large latticed surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Hefzy, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    The application of geometrical schemes, similar to geodesic domes, to large spherical antenna reflectors was investigated. The shape and size of flat segmented latticed surfaces which approximate general shells of revolution, and in particular spherical and paraboloidal reflective surfaces, were determined. The extensive mathematical and computational geometric analyses of the reflector resulted in the development of a general purpose computer program capable of generating the complete design parameters of the dish. The program also includes a graphical self contained subroutine for graphic display of the required design.

  9. Modeling the effects of particle deformation in chemical mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaochun; Zhao, Yongwu; Wang, Yongguang

    2012-09-01

    In a chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process, an active abrasive particle participating in the wear process will contact the pad and the wafer at the same time. The applied polishing load causes the deformation of the pad in the contact interface of the particle and the pad, and the deformation of the wafer in the contact interface of the particle and the wafer. Besides, this force causes the deformation of the abrasive particle. Based on the elastic-plastic micro-contact mechanics and abrasive wear theory, a novel model for material removal rate (MRR) with consideration of the abrasive particle deformation is presented in this paper. The deformation of the abrasive particle, affecting the indentation depth of the particle into the wafer, is quantitatively incorporated into the model. The results and analyses show that the present model is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  10. Localised vs distributed deformation: 3D modelling of the Dead Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devès, M. H.; King, G. C.; Klinger, Y.; Agnon, A.

    2012-12-01

    The lithosphere behaves as strain softening elasto-plastic materials. In the laboratory, such materials are known to deform in a brittle or a ductile manner depending on the applied geometric boundary conditions. In the lithosphere however, the importance of boundary conditions in controlling the deformation style has been largely ignored. Under general boundary conditions, both laboratory and field observations show that only part of the deformation can localise on through going faults while the rest must remain distributed in process zones where spatially varying shear directions inhibit localisation. Conventional modelling methods use rheologies deduced from laboratory experiments that are not constrained as a function of the geometry of the applied boundary conditions. We propose an alternative modelling method based on the use of an appropriate distribution of dislocation sources to create the deformation field. This approach, because it does not rely on integrating differential equations from more or less well-constrained boundary conditions, does not require making assumptions on the parameters controlling the level and distribution of stresses within the lithosphere. It only supposes that strain accumulates linearly away from the dislocation singularities satisfying the compatibility equations. We verify that this model explains important and hitherto unexplained features of the topography of the Dead Sea region. Following the idea that strain can only localise under specific conditions as inferred from laboratory and field scale observations, we use our model of deformation to predict where deformation can localise and where it has to remain distributed. We find that 65% of the deformation in the Dead Sea region can localise on kinematically stable through-going strike-slip faults while the remaining 35% must remain distributed. Observations suggest that distributed deformation occurs at stress levels that can be ten times greater than that associated with

  11. Modeling Steady Acoustic Fields Bounded in Cavities with Geometrical Imperfections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albo, P. A. Giuliano; Gavioso, R. M.; Benedetto, G.

    2010-07-01

    A mathematical method is derived within the framework of classical Lagrangian field theory, which is suitable for the determination of the eigenstates of acoustic resonators of nearly spherical shape. The method is based on the expansion of the Helmholtz differential operator and the boundary condition in a power series of a small geometrical perturbation parameter {ɛ} . The method extends to orders higher than {ɛ^2} the calculation of the perturbed acoustic eigenvalues, which was previously limited by the use of variational formalism and the methods of Morse and Ingard. A specific example is worked out for radial modes of a prolate spheroid, with the frequency perturbation calculated to order {ɛ^3} . A possible strategy to tackle the problem of calculating the acoustic eigenvalues for cavities presenting non-smooth geometrical imperfections is also described.

  12. Localised and distributed deformation in the lithosphere: Modelling the Dead Sea region in 3 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devès, Maud; King, Geoffrey C. P.; Klinger, Yann; Agnon, Amotz

    2011-08-01

    The Earth's lithosphere behaves as a strain softening elasto-plastic material. In the laboratory, such materials are known to deform in a brittle or a ductile manner depending on the applied geometric boundary conditions. In the lithosphere however, the importance of boundary conditions in controlling the deformation style has been largely ignored. Under general boundary conditions, both laboratory and field scale observations show that only part of the deformation can localise on through going faults while the rest must remain distributed in 'process zones' where spatially varying shear directions inhibit localisation. Conventional modelling methods (finite difference, finite or discrete elements) use rheologies deduced from laboratory experiments that are not constrained as a function of the geometry of the applied boundary conditions. In this paper, we propose an alternative modelling method that is based on the use of an appropriate distribution of dislocation sources to create the deformation field. This approach, because it does not rely on integrating differential equations from more or less well-constrained boundary conditions, does not require making assumptions on the parameters controlling the level and distribution of stresses within the lithosphere. It only supposes that strain accumulates linearly away from the dislocation singularities satisfying the compatibility equations. We verify that this model explains important and hitherto unexplained features of the topography of the Dead Sea region. Following the idea that strain can only localise under specific conditions as inferred from laboratory and field scale observations, we use our model of deformation to predict where deformation can localise and where it has to remain distributed. We find that ~ 65% of the deformation in the Dead Sea region can localise on kinematically stable through-going strike-slip faults while the remaining ~ 35% has to remain distributed. Observations suggest that

  13. Treatment of geometric singularities in implicit solvent models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sining; Geng, Weihua; Wei, G. W.

    2007-06-01

    Geometric singularities, such as cusps and self-intersecting surfaces, are major obstacles to the accuracy, convergence, and stability of the numerical solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation. In earlier work, an interface technique based PB solver was developed using the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method, which explicitly enforces the flux jump condition at the solvent-solute interfaces and leads to highly accurate biomolecular electrostatics in continuum electric environments. However, such a PB solver, denoted as MIBPB-I, cannot maintain the designed second order convergence whenever there are geometric singularities, such as cusps and self-intersecting surfaces. Moreover, the matrix of the MIBPB-I is not optimally symmetrical, resulting in the convergence difficulty. The present work presents a new interface method based PB solver, denoted as MIBPB-II, to address the aforementioned problems. The present MIBPB-II solver is systematical and robust in treating geometric singularities and delivers second order convergence for arbitrarily complex molecular surfaces of proteins. A new procedure is introduced to make the MIBPB-II matrix optimally symmetrical and diagonally dominant. The MIBPB-II solver is extensively validated by the molecular surfaces of few-atom systems and a set of 24 proteins. Converged electrostatic potentials and solvation free energies are obtained at a coarse grid spacing of 0.5Å and are considerably more accurate than those obtained by the PBEQ and the APBS at finer grid spacings.

  14. Localised and distributed deformation in the lithosphere: Modelling the Dead Sea region in 3 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devès, M.; King, G. C. P.; Klinger, Y.; Agnon, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Earth's lithosphere behaves as a strain softening elasto-plastic material. In the laboratory, such materials are known to deform in a brittle or a ductile manner depending on the applied geometric boundary conditions. In the lithosphere however, the importance of boundary conditions in controlling the deformation style has been largely ignored. Under general boundary conditions, both laboratory and field scale observations show that only part of the deformation can localise on through going faults while the rest must remain distributed in 'process zones' where spatially varying shear directions inhibit localisation. Conventional modelling methods (finite difference, finite or discrete elements) use rheologies deduced from laboratory experiments that are not constrained as a function of the geometry of the applied boundary conditions. In this paper, we propose an alternative modelling method that is based on the use of an appropriate distribution of dislocation sources to create the deformation field. This approach, because it does not rely on integrating differential equations from more or less well-constrained boundary conditions, does not require making assumptions on the parameters controlling the level and distribution of stresses within the lithosphere. It only supposes that strain accumulates linearly away from the dislocation singularities satisfying the compatibility equations. We verify that thismodel explains important and hitherto unexplained features of the topography of the Dead Sea region. Following the idea that strain can only localise under specific conditions as inferred from laboratory and field scale observations, we use our model of deformation to predict where deformation can localise and where it has to remain distributed. We find that ~65% of the deformation in the Dead Sea region can localise on kinematically stable through-going strike-slip faults while the remaining ~35% has to remain distributed. Observations suggest that distributed

  15. Droplet Deformation Prediction With the Droplet Deformation and Breakup Model (DDB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The Droplet Deformation and Breakup Model was used to predict deformation of droplets approaching the leading edge stagnation line of an airfoil. The quasi-steady model was solved for each position along the droplet path. A program was developed to solve the non-linear, second order, ordinary differential equation that governs the model. A fourth order Runge-Kutta method was used to solve the equation. Experimental slip velocities from droplet breakup studies were used as input to the model which required slip velocity along the particle path. The center of mass displacement predictions were compared to the experimental measurements from the droplet breakup studies for droplets with radii in the range of 200 to 700 mm approaching the airfoil at 50 and 90 m/sec. The model predictions were good for the displacement of the center of mass for small and medium sized droplets. For larger droplets the model predictions did not agree with the experimental results.

  16. Inelastic deformation and phenomenological modeling of aluminum including transient effect

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    A review was made of several phenomenological theories which have recently been proposed to describe the inelastic deformation of crystalline solids. Hart's deformation theory has many advantages, but there are disagreements with experimental deformation at stress levels below yield. A new inelastic deformation theory was proposed, introducing the concept of microplasticity. The new model consists of five deformation elements: a friction element representing a deformation element controlled by dislocation glide, a nonrecoverable plastic element representing the dislocation leakage rate over the strong dislocation barriers, a microplastic element representing the dislocation leakage rate over the weak barriers, a short range anelastic spring element representing the recoverable anelastic strain stored by piled-up dislocations against the weak barriers, and a long range anelastic spring element representing the recoverable strain stored by piled-up dislocations against the strong barriers. Load relaxation and tensile testing in the plastic range were used to determine the material parameters for the plastic friction elements. The short range and long range anelastic moduli and the material parameters for the kinetics of microplasticity were determined by the measurement of anelastic loops and by performing load relaxation tests in the microplastic region. Experimental results were compared with a computer simulation of the transient deformation behavior of commercial purity aluminum. An attempt was made to correlate the material parameters and the microstructure from TEM. Stability of material parameters during inelastic deformation was discussed and effect of metallurgical variables was examined experimentally. 71 figures, 5 tables.

  17. A geometric level set model for ultrasounds analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sarti, A.; Malladi, R.

    1999-10-01

    We propose a partial differential equation (PDE) for filtering and segmentation of echocardiographic images based on a geometric-driven scheme. The method allows edge-preserving image smoothing and a semi-automatic segmentation of the heart chambers, that regularizes the shapes and improves edge fidelity especially in presence of distinct gaps in the edge map as is common in ultrasound imagery. A numerical scheme for solving the proposed PDE is borrowed from level set methods. Results on human in vivo acquired 2D, 2D+time,3D, 3D+time echocardiographic images are shown.

  18. Distortion of DNA cholesteric liquid crystal quenched at low temperature : geometrical analysis and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leforestier, A.; Livolant, F.

    1992-10-01

    Freeze-fracture electron microscopy allows an ultrastructural analysis of deformations of a DNA cholesteric liquid crystalline sample subjected to a compressive stress applied parallel to the layers, when quickly frozen by projection onto a copper block cooled down to about 10K. A geometrical model of these deformations is proposed. After a brief recall of the usual representation of the cholesteric structure as a succession of equidistant pseudoplanes, we show that these planes are distorted into sinusoidal surfaces whose wavelength is much smaller than the cholesteric pitch and its amplitude modulated with the average molecular orientation relative to the compressive force. The consequences of these deformations regarding double twist occurrence within the structure are analysed. When the DNA concentration in the cholesteric mesophase is low, a complex helicoidal structure is observed. A relationship between these two phenomena is considered and discussed. La microscopie électronique associée à la technique de cryofracture permet une analyse ultrastructurale des déformations de l'organisation cristalline liquide cholestérique d'un échantillon d'ADN en solution : lors de la congélation par projection contre un bloc de cuivre refroidi à environ 10K par de l'hélium liquide, l'échantillon est soumis à des forces de compression parallèles à la stratification cholostérique. Nous présentons une modélisation géométrique de ces déformations. Après un bref rappel de la représentation schématique de la structure cholestérique par une série de plans fictifs, nous montrons que ces plans sont alors transformés en surfaces sinusoïdales dont la période est très inférieure au pas cholostérique et l'amplitude modulée en fonction de l'orientation relative des molécules et de la force de compression. Les conséquences de telles déformations sur l'émergence de double twist dans la structure sont examinées. Pour les plus faibles valeurs de

  19. Modeling crustal deformation near active faults and volcanic centers: a catalog of deformation models and modeling approaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglia, Maurizio; ,; Peter, F.; Murray, Jessica R.

    2013-01-01

    This manual provides the physical and mathematical concepts for selected models used to interpret deformation measurements near active faults and volcanic centers. The emphasis is on analytical models of deformation that can be compared with data from the Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), leveling surveys, tiltmeters and strainmeters. Source models include pressurized spherical, ellipsoidal, and horizontal penny-shaped geometries in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. Vertical dikes and faults are described following the mathematical notation for rectangular dislocations in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. All the analytical expressions were verified against numerical models developed by use of COMSOL Multyphics, a Finite Element Analysis software (http://www.comsol.com). In this way, typographical errors present were identified and corrected. Matlab scripts are also provided to facilitate the application of these models.

  20. Dual geometric worm algorithm for two-dimensional discrete classical lattice models.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, Peter; Sørensen, Erik S; Alet, Fabien

    2004-01-01

    We present a dual geometrical worm algorithm for two-dimensional Ising models. The existence of such dual algorithms was first pointed out by Prokof'ev and Svistunov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 160601 (2001)

  1. An improved measurement model of binocular vision using geometrical approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiyue; Wang, Zhongyu; Yao, Zhenjian; Forrest, Jeffrey; Zhou, Weihu

    2016-12-01

    In order to improve the precision of a binocular vision measurement system, an effective binocular vision measurement method, named geometrical approximation, is proposed. This method can optimize the measurement results by geometrical approximation operation based on the principles of optimization theory and spatial geometry. To evaluate the properties of the proposed method, both simulative and practical experiments are carried out. The influence of image noise and focal length error on measurement results is discussed. The results show that measurement performance of the proposed method is manifested well. Besides, the proposed method is also compared with Bundle adjustment and least squares method in a practical experiment. The experiment results indicate that the average error, calculated by using the proposed method, is 0.076 mm less than Bundle adjustment’s 0.085 mm, and only half of the least squares method’s 0.146 mm. At the meantime, the proposed method enjoys a high level of computational efficiency when compared to Bundle adjustment. Since no nonlinear iteration optimization is involved, this method can be applied readily to real time on-line measurements.

  2. Integrability of the η-deformed Neumann-Rosochatius model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunov, Gleb; Heinze, Martin; Medina-Rincon, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    An integrable deformation of the well-known Neumann-Rosochatius system is studied by considering generalised bosonic spinning solutions on the η-deformed \\text{Ad}{{\\text{S}}5}× {{\\text{S}}5} background. For this integrable model we construct a 4× 4 Lax representation and a set of integrals of motion that ensures its Liouville integrability. These integrals of motion correspond to the deformed analogues of the Neumann-Rosochatius integrals and generalise the previously found integrals for the η-deformed Neumann and {{≤ft(\\text{Ad}{{\\text{S}}5}× {{\\text{S}}5}\\right)}η} geodesic systems. Finally, we briefly comment on consistent truncations of this model.

  3. Fluctuating Nonlinear Spring Model of Mechanical Deformation of Biological Particles

    PubMed Central

    Kononova, Olga; Snijder, Joost; Kholodov, Yaroslav; Marx, Kenneth A.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.; Roos, Wouter H.; Barsegov, Valeri

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of virus capsids correlate with local conformational dynamics in the capsid structure. They also reflect the required stability needed to withstand high internal pressures generated upon genome loading and contribute to the success of important events in viral infectivity, such as capsid maturation, genome uncoating and receptor binding. The mechanical properties of biological nanoparticles are often determined from monitoring their dynamic deformations in Atomic Force Microscopy nanoindentation experiments; but a comprehensive theory describing the full range of observed deformation behaviors has not previously been described. We present a new theory for modeling dynamic deformations of biological nanoparticles, which considers the non-linear Hertzian deformation, resulting from an indenter-particle physical contact, and the bending of curved elements (beams) modeling the particle structure. The beams’ deformation beyond the critical point triggers a dynamic transition of the particle to the collapsed state. This extreme event is accompanied by a catastrophic force drop as observed in the experimental or simulated force (F)-deformation (X) spectra. The theory interprets fine features of the spectra, including the nonlinear components of the FX-curves, in terms of the Young’s moduli for Hertzian and bending deformations, and the structural damage dependent beams’ survival probability, in terms of the maximum strength and the cooperativity parameter. The theory is exemplified by successfully describing the deformation dynamics of natural nanoparticles through comparing theoretical curves with experimental force-deformation spectra for several virus particles. This approach provides a comprehensive description of the dynamic structural transitions in biological and artificial nanoparticles, which is essential for their optimal use in nanotechnology and nanomedicine applications. PMID:26821264

  4. Effect of Shear Deformation and Continuity on Delamination Modelling with Plate Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, E. H.; Riddell, W. T.; Raju, I. S.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of several critical assumptions and parameters on the computation of strain energy release rates for delamination and debond configurations modeled with plate elements have been quantified. The method of calculation is based on the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT), and models that model the upper and lower surface of the delamination or debond with two-dimensional (2D) plate elements rather than three-dimensional (3D) solid elements. The major advantages of the plate element modeling technique are a smaller model size and simpler geometric modeling. Specific issues that are discussed include: constraint of translational degrees of freedom, rotational degrees of freedom or both in the neighborhood of the crack tip; element order and assumed shear deformation; and continuity of material properties and section stiffness in the vicinity of the debond front, Where appropriate, the plate element analyses are compared with corresponding two-dimensional plane strain analyses.

  5. Performance Analysis of Tandem-L Mission for Modeling Volcanic and Seismic Deformation Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Homa; Goel, Kanika; Parizzi, Alessandro; Sudhaus, Henriette; Adam, Nico; Eineder, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Although a great number of publications have focused on the application of InSAR in deformation source modeling as well as the development of different algorithms in this regard, little investigation has been dedicated to the sensitivity analysis of the InSAR in deformation source modeling. Our purpose is to address this issue by analyzing the reliability of InSAR in modeling the deformation sources due to landslides, seismic and volcanic activities, with special focus on the L band SAR measurements. The sensitivity analysis is considered for three commonly used geophysical models in case of subsidence, seismic and volcanic activities; namely, the Gaussian subsidence bowl, Okada and Mogi point source, respectively. In each of the cases, the InSAR sensitivity is analytically formulated and its performance is investigated using simulated SAR data. The investigations are carried out using stochastic error propagation approaches to infer the precision of the models' parameters as well as their mutual covariance. The limiting factors in SAR interferometry are categorized in two groups and investigated separately in sensitivity analysis; with the first dealing with the geometrical limits imposed by the side looking geometry of the SAR measurements and the second focusing on the InSAR stochastic characteristics in the L band.

  6. SU-C-BRF-05: Design and Geometric Validation of An Externally and Internally Deformable, Programmable Lung Motion Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Y; Sawant, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Most clinically-deployed strategies for respiratory motion management in lung radiotherapy (e.g., gating, tracking) use external markers that serve as surrogates for tumor motion. However, typical lung phantoms used to validate these strategies are rigid-exterior+rigid-interior or rigid-exterior+deformable-interior. Neither class adequately represents the human anatomy, which is deformable internally as well as externally. We describe the construction and experimental validation of a more realistic, externally- and internally-deformable, programmable lung phantom. Methods: The outer shell of a commercially-available lung phantom (RS- 1500, RSD Inc.) was used. The shell consists of a chest cavity with a flexible anterior surface, and embedded vertebrae, rib-cage and sternum. A 3-axis platform was programmed with sinusoidal and six patient-recorded lung tumor trajectories. The platform was used to drive a rigid foam ‘diaphragm’ that compressed/decompressed the phantom interior. Experimental characterization comprised of mapping the superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) trajectories of external and internal radioopaque markers with kV x-ray fluoroscopy and correlating these with optical surface monitoring using the in-room VisionRT system. Results: The phantom correctly reproduced the programmed motion as well as realistic effects such as hysteresis. The reproducibility of marker trajectories over multiple runs for sinusoidal as well as patient traces, as characterized by fluoroscopy, was within 0.4 mm RMS error for internal as well as external markers. The motion trajectories of internal and external markers as measured by fluoroscopy were found to be highly correlated (R=0.97). Furthermore, motion trajectories of arbitrary points on the deforming phantom surface, as recorded by the VisionRT system also showed a high correlation with respect to the fluoroscopically-measured trajectories of internal markers (R=0.92). Conclusion: We have

  7. Deformed Calogero-Sutherland model and fractional quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atai, Farrokh; Langmann, Edwin

    2017-01-01

    The deformed Calogero-Sutherland (CS) model is a quantum integrable system with arbitrary numbers of two types of particles and reducing to the standard CS model in special cases. We show that a known collective field description of the CS model, which is based on conformal field theory (CFT), is actually a collective field description of the deformed CS model. This provides a natural application of the deformed CS model in Wen's effective field theory of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE), with the two kinds of particles corresponding to electrons and quasi-hole excitations. In particular, we use known mathematical results about super-Jack polynomials to obtain simple explicit formulas for the orthonormal CFT basis proposed by van Elburg and Schoutens in the context of the FQHE.

  8. Static deformation modeling and analysis of flexure hinges made of a shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhijiang; Yang, Miao; Dong, Wei; Zhang, Dan

    2016-11-01

    The flexure hinge is a key element in compliant mechanisms to achieve continuous motion; however the motion range of a flexure hinge is severely restricted by the material’s allowable strain. Due to the superelasticity effect, shape memory alloys (SMAs) can undergo much larger strain than other metals; this means that they are excellent candidates for the fabrication of flexure hinges with a large motion range. In this paper, a simple static deformation modeling approach is proposed for a flexure hinge made of a SMA. The superelastic behavior of the SMA is described by Brinson’s constitutive model. The flexure hinge is considered as a non-prismatic cantilever beam associated with geometrical and material nonlinearities. Govern equations of the flexure hinge are derived and solved numerically by applying the nonlinear bending theory of the Euler-Bernoulli beam. Experimental tests show that the proposed modeling approach can predict the deformation of the flexure hinge precisely; the maximum relative error is less than 6.5%. Based on the static deformation model, the motion capacity, the stiffness characteristic and the rotational error of the flexure hinge are also investigated. The results reveal that the flexure hinge made of a SMA has great potential to construct compliant mechanisms with a large motion range.

  9. Image-based Modeling of PSF Deformation with Application to Limited Angle PET Data.

    PubMed

    Matej, Samuel; Li, Yusheng; Panetta, Joseph; Karp, Joel S; Surti, Suleman

    2016-10-01

    The point-spread-functions (PSFs) of reconstructed images can be deformed due to detector effects such as resolution blurring and parallax error, data acquisition geometry such as insufficient sampling or limited angular coverage in dual-panel PET systems, or reconstruction imperfections/simplifications. PSF deformation decreases quantitative accuracy and its spatial variation lowers consistency of lesion uptake measurement across the imaging field-of-view (FOV). This can be a significant problem with dual panel PET systems even when using TOF data and image reconstruction models of the detector and data acquisition process. To correct for the spatially variant reconstructed PSF distortions we propose to use an image-based resolution model (IRM) that includes such image PSF deformation effects. Originally the IRM was mostly used for approximating data resolution effects of standard PET systems with full angular coverage in a computationally efficient way, but recently it was also used to mitigate effects of simplified geometric projectors. Our work goes beyond this by including into the IRM reconstruction imperfections caused by combination of the limited angle, parallax errors, and any other (residual) deformation effects and testing it for challenging dual panel data with strongly asymmetric and variable PSF deformations. We applied and tested these concepts using simulated data based on our design for a dedicated breast imaging geometry (B-PET) consisting of dual-panel, time-of-flight (TOF) detectors. We compared two image-based resolution models; i) a simple spatially invariant approximation to PSF deformation, which captures only the general PSF shape through an elongated 3D Gaussian function, and ii) a spatially variant model using a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to more accurately capture the asymmetric PSF shape in images reconstructed from data acquired with the B-PET scanner geometry. Results demonstrate that while both IRMs decrease the overall uptake

  10. Symmetry Based No Core Shell Model in a Deformed Basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekejian, David; Draayer, Jerry; Launey, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    To address current limitations of shell-model descriptions of large spatial deformation and cluster structures, we adopt a no-core shell model with a deformed harmonic oscillator basis and implement an angular momentum projection in a symmetry-adapted scheme. This approach allows us to reach larger model spaces as a result of computational memory savings for calculations of highly deformed states, such as the Hoyle state in C-12. The method is first tested with schematic interactions, but the ultimate goal is to carry forward calculations with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions in future work. Supported by the U.S. NSF (OCI-0904874, ACI-1516338) and the U.S. DOE (DE-SC0005248), and benefitted from computing resources provided by Blue Waters and LSU's Center for Computation & Technology.

  11. Tidal deformation of planets: experience in experimental modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobryakov, A. P.; Revuzhenko, A. F.; Shemyakin, E. I.

    1992-06-01

    Two types of apparatus are described for laboratory modeling of tidal deformation. Plane deformation occurs in the first, and the model of the body has the shape of an elliptical cylinder; in the second three-dimensional deformation occurs, and the model is spheroidal in shape. In both cases displacements simulating motion of the tidal wave are assigned on the boundary. A global mechanism of directed mass transfer has been discovered. It is connected with transformation of vertical displacements to horizontal ones. The internal particles describe almost closed trajectories in one complete rotation of the tidal wave, but do not return to their original position. Residual displacements accumulate with increasing number of cycles and lead to differential rotation of internal masses. Questions surrounding experimental measurement of energy dissipation and the role of an internal rigid core are investigated. The effect of directed transfer on the physical fields of planets is discussed.

  12. Role of anelastic rheology in volcanic deformation modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trasatti, E.; Giunchi, C.; Bonafede, M.

    2003-04-01

    Analogical models of ground deformation in volcanic areas often show better agreement with observations than mathematical models assuming a perfectly elastic behaviour of the medium. In particular, extensive sand-box experiments show that, following an inflation episode at depth, strain localization takes place above the source, along fault-like structures, which play a fundamental role in governing the cumulative long term deformation of the medium. Owing to the low lithostatic pressure, to the widespread presence of fluids and to the low cohesion of volcanic material, shallow layers in a volcanic region are better described in terms of the modified Mohr-Coulomb constitutive relation. Deep layers, on the other side, are better described in terms of viscoelastic constitutive relations, owing to the high temperatures close to magma reservoirs. Taking into account the inelastic properties of the medium, it is possible to lower considerably the overpressure estimates inferred from elastic models and to reconcile inferred overpressure values with petrologic constraints. In this study, we develop finite element models of ground deformation in volcanic areas, employing elastic and inelastic constitutive laws. The aim of the analysis is to elucidate how a heterogeneous structure of the medium (variations in rheologic parameters and pore pressure) affect the stress and strain distribution. The huge ground deformation (more than 1.5 m) observed at Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy) during 1982-84 is modelled in terms of an inelastic behaviour of the medium. The caldera is characterized by different mechanical (elastic and inelastic) properties with respect to the host rocks, due to the different formation and evolution. Axi-symmetric finite element models are developed, involving an overpressure source located at depth greater than the deepest limit of hypocenter distribution. Models take into account gravity and the initial isotropic (lithostatic) stress state is perturbed by

  13. Forward and inverse modelling of post-seismic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Ophelia; Al-Attar, David; Tromp, Jeroen; Mitrovica, Jerry X.

    2016-11-01

    We consider a new approach to both the forward and inverse problems in post-seismic deformation. We present a method for forward modelling post-seismic deformation in a self-gravitating, heterogeneous and compressible earth with a variety of linear and non-linear rheologies. We further demonstrate how the adjoint method can be applied to the inverse problem both to invert for rheological structure and to calculate the sensitivity of a given surface measurement to changes in rheology or time-dependence of the source. Both the forward and inverse aspects are illustrated with several numerical examples implemented in a spherically symmetric earth model.

  14. Forward and inverse modelling of post-seismic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Ophelia; Al-Attar, David; Tromp, Jeroen; Mitrovica, Jerry X.

    2017-02-01

    We consider a new approach to both the forward and inverse problems in post-seismic deformation. We present a method for forward modelling post-seismic deformation in a self-gravitating, heterogeneous and compressible earth with a variety of linear and nonlinear rheologies. We further demonstrate how the adjoint method can be applied to the inverse problem both to invert for rheological structure and to calculate the sensitivity of a given surface measurement to changes in rheology or time-dependence of the source. Both the forward and inverse aspects are illustrated with several numerical examples implemented in a spherically symmetric earth model.

  15. Data driven modeling of plastic deformation

    DOE PAGES

    Versino, Daniele; Tonda, Alberto; Bronkhorst, Curt A.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper the application of machine learning techniques for the development of constitutive material models is being investigated. A flow stress model, for strain rates ranging from 10–4 to 1012 (quasi-static to highly dynamic), and temperatures ranging from room temperature to over 1000 K, is obtained by beginning directly with experimental stress-strain data for Copper. An incrementally objective and fully implicit time integration scheme is employed to integrate the hypo-elastic constitutive model, which is then implemented into a finite element code for evaluation. Accuracy and performance of the flow stress models derived from symbolic regression are assessed by comparisonmore » to Taylor anvil impact data. The results obtained with the free-form constitutive material model are compared to well-established strength models such as the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) model and the Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) model. Here, preliminary results show candidate free-form models comparing well with data in regions of stress-strain space with sufficient experimental data, pointing to a potential means for both rapid prototyping in future model development, as well as the use of machine learning in capturing more data as a guide for more advanced model development.« less

  16. Geometric approach to nonlinear coherent states using the Higgs model for harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdifar, A.; Roknizadeh, R.; Naderi, M. H.

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the relation between the curvature of the physical space and the deformation function of the deformed oscillator algebra using the nonlinear coherent states approach. For this purpose, we study two-dimensional harmonic oscillators on the flat surface and on a sphere by applying the Higgs model. With the use of their algebras, we show that the two-dimensional oscillator algebra on a surface can be considered as a deformed one-dimensional oscillator algebra where the effect of the curvature of the surface appears as a deformation function. We also show that the curvature of the physical space plays the role of deformation parameter. Then we construct the associated coherent states on the flat surface and on a sphere and compare their quantum statistical properties, including quadrature squeezing and antibunching effect.

  17. Mathematical models of carbon-carbon composite deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, N. N.; Kuvyrkin, G. N.

    2016-09-01

    Mathematical models of carbon-carbon composites (CCC) intended for describing the processes of deformation of structures produced by using CCC under high-temperature loading are considered. A phenomenological theory of CCC inelastic deformation is proposed, where such materials are considered as homogeneous ones with effective characteristics and where their high anisotropy of mechanical characteristics and different ways of resistance to extension and compression are taken into account. Micromechanical models are proposed for spatially reinforced CCC, where the difference between mechanical characteristics of components and the reinforcement scheme are taken into account. Themodel parameters are determined from the results of experiments of composite macrospecimens in the directions typical of the material. A version of endochronictype theory with several internal times "launched" for each composite component and related to some damage accumulation mechanisms is proposed for describing the inelastic deformation. Some practical examples are considered.

  18. Modeling Large-Strain, High-Rate Deformation in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D R; Kay, G J; LeBlanc, M M

    2001-07-20

    The large strain deformation response of 6061-T6 and Ti-6Al-4V has been evaluated over a range in strain rates from 10{sup -4} s{sup -1} to over 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}. The results have been used to critically evaluate the strength and damage components of the Johnson-Cook (JC) material model. A new model that addresses the shortcomings of the JC model was then developed and evaluated. The model is derived from the rate equations that represent deformation mechanisms active during moderate and high rate loading. Another model that accounts for the influence of void formation on yield and flow behavior of a ductile metal (the Gurson model) was also evaluated. The characteristics and predictive capabilities of these models are reviewed.

  19. Experimental characterization and crystal plasticity modeling of heterogeneous deformation in polycrystalline -Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Leyun; Barabash, Rozaliya; Yang, Y; Bieler, Prof T R; Crimp, Prof M A; Eisenlohr, P; Liu, W.; Ice, Gene E

    2011-01-01

    Grain-level heterogeneous deformation was studied in a polycrystalline {alpha}-Ti specimen deformed by four-point bending. Dislocation slip activity in the microstructure was investigated by surface slip trace analysis. Three-dimensional-X-ray diffraction (3D-XRD) was used to investigate subsurface lattice rotations and to identify geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs). The slip systems of local GNDs were analyzed by studying the streaking directions of reflections in corresponding Laue patterns. The analysis performed in one grain indicated that the subsurface GNDs were from the same slip system identified using slip trace analysis in backscattered electron images. A crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) model was used to simulate deformation of the same microstructural region. The predictions of dislocation slip activity match the general aspects of the experimental observations, including the ability to simulate the activation of different slip systems in grains where multiple slip systems were activated. Prediction of local crystal rotations, however, was the least accurate aspect of the CPFE model.

  20. Experimental characterization and crystal plasticity modeling of heterogeneous deformation in polycrystalline {alpha}-Ti.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Barabash, R. I.; Yang, Y.; Bieler, T. R.; Crimp, M. A.; Eisenlohr, P.; Liu, W.; Ice, G. E.

    2011-03-01

    Grain-level heterogeneous deformation was studied in a polycrystalline {alpha}-Ti specimen deformed by four-point bending. Dislocation slip activity in the microstructure was investigated by surface slip trace analysis. Three-dimensional-X-ray diffraction (3D-XRD) was used to investigate subsurface lattice rotations and to identify geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs). The slip systems of local GNDs were analyzed by studying the streaking directions of reflections in corresponding Laue patterns. The analysis performed in one grain indicated that the subsurface GNDs were from the same slip system identified using slip trace analysis in backscattered electron images. A crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) model was used to simulate deformation of the same microstructural region. The predictions of dislocation slip activity match the general aspects of the experimental observations, including the ability to simulate the activation of different slip systems in grains where multiple slip systems were activated. Prediction of local crystal rotations, however, was the least accurate aspect of the CPFE model.

  1. An immersed-boundary method for modeling flow of deformable blood cells in complex geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-11-01

    We present a computational methodology for simulating blood flow at the cellular scale in highly complex geometries, such as microvascular networks. Immersed boundary methods provide the foundation for our approach, as they allow modeling flows in arbitrary geometries, in addition to resolving the large deformation and dynamics of individual blood cell with high fidelity. Different simulation components are seamlessly integrated into the present methodology that can simultaneously model stationary rigid boundaries of arbitrary and complex shape, moving rigid bodies, and highly deformable interfaces of blood cells that are governed by non-linear elasticity. This permits physiologically realistic simulations of blood cells flowing in complex microvascular networks characterized by multiple bifurcating and merging vessels. The methodology is validated against analytical theory, experimental data, and previous numerical results. We then demonstrate the capabilities of the methodology by simulating deformable blood cells and heterogeneous cell suspensions flowing in both physiologically realistic microvascular networks and geometrically intricate microfluidic devices. The methodology offers the potential of scaling up to large microvascular networks at organ levels. Funded by NSF CBET 1604308.

  2. Numerical Modeling of Exploitation Relics and Faults Influence on Rock Mass Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesołowski, Marek

    2016-12-01

    This article presents numerical modeling results of fault planes and exploitation relics influenced by the size and distribution of rock mass and surface area deformations. Numerical calculations were performed using the finite difference program FLAC. To assess the changes taking place in a rock mass, an anisotropic elasto-plastic ubiquitous joint model was used, into which the Coulomb-Mohr strength (plasticity) condition was implemented. The article takes as an example the actual exploitation of the longwall 225 area in the seam 502wg of the "Pokój" coal mine. Computer simulations have shown that it is possible to determine the influence of fault planes and exploitation relics on the size and distribution of rock mass and its surface deformation. The main factor causing additional deformations of the area surface are the abandoned workings in the seam 502wd. These abandoned workings are the activation factor that caused additional subsidences and also, due to the significant dip, they are a layer on which the rock mass slides down in the direction of the extracted space. These factors are not taken into account by the geometrical and integral theories.

  3. Matrix model description of baryonic deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Bena, Iosif; Murayama, Hitoshi; Roiban, Radu; Tatar, Radu

    2003-03-13

    We investigate supersymmetric QCD with N{sub c} + 1 flavors using an extension of the recently proposed relation between gauge theories and matrix models.The impressive agreement between the two sides provides a beautiful confirmation of the extension of the gauge theory-matrix model relation to this case.

  4. Geometric critical exponent inequalities for general random cluster models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaki, Hal

    1987-11-01

    A set of new critical exponent inequalities, d(1 -1 / δ)≥2 - η, dv(1 - 1/ δ)≥ γ, and dμ> 1, is proved for a general class of random cluster models, which includes (independent or dependent) percolations, lattice animals (with any interactions), and various stochastic cluster growth models. The inequalities imply that the critical phenomena in the models are inevitably not mean-field-like in the dimensions one, two, and three.

  5. Storm Tracks and Barotropic Deformation in Climate Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Robert X.; Dole, Randall M.

    2000-08-01

    The relationship between the time-mean planetary-scale deformation field and the structure of midlatitude storm tracks is studied in wintertime simulations of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Earth Observing System model. Model biases are determined by contrasting model simulations (forced by observed SSTs) with parallel analyses of NCEP-NCAR reanalyses. Barotropic diagnostics are employed to identify potential dynamical linkages between regional biases in the midlatitude storm tracks and the horizontal deformation field. Initial observational analyses confirm that synoptic eddies are optimally configured to transfer kinetic energy to the mean flow in the jet exit regions, where strong stretching deformation exists. In these regions, the major axes of the synoptic eddies are aligned along the dilatation axes of the mean flow. Consequently, mean flow advection stretches synoptic eddies along their major axes, thereby increasing their anisotropy and weakening their kinetic energy.A strong link is identified between model biases in the horizontal structure of the midlatitude storm tracks and the representation of upper-tropospheric barotropic deformation. In particular, model-simulated storm tracks extend too far downstream in regions where the zonal stretching deformation (associated with horizontal diffluence in jet exit regions) is either too weak in magnitude or displaced westward in comparison with observations. These biases are associated with anomalously weak or westward-displaced patterns of negative barotropic energy conversions, which normally act as a sink of synoptic eddy activity in the jet exit. The anomalous energy conversion patterns are primarily due to model biases in the winter-mean flow rather than the simulated horizontal eddy structures, which closely resemble observations.The results indicate that the horizontal structure of

  6. Littelmann path model for geometric crystals, Whittaker functions on Lie groups and Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhaibi, Reda

    2013-02-01

    Generally speaking, this thesis focuses on the interplay between the representations of Lie groups and probability theory. It subdivides into essentially three parts. In a first rather algebraic part, we construct a path model for geometric crystals in the sense of Berenstein and Kazhdan, for complex semi-simple Lie groups. We will mainly describe the algebraic structure, its natural morphisms and parameterizations. The theory of total positivity will play a particularly important role. Then, we anticipate on the probabilistic part by exhibiting a canonical measure on geometric crystals. It uses as ingredients the superpotential for the flag manifold and a measure invariant under the crystal actions. The image measure under the weight map plays the role of Duistermaat-Heckman measure. Its Laplace transform defines Whittaker functions, providing an interesting formula for all Lie groups. Then it appears clearly that Whittaker functions are to geometric crystals, what characters are to combinatorial crystals. The Littlewood-Richardson rule is also exposed. Finally we present the probabilistic approach that allows to find the canonical measure. It is based on the fundamental idea that the Wiener measure will induce the adequate measure on the algebraic structures through the path model. In the last chapter, we show how our geometric model degenerates to the continuous classical Littelmann path model and thus recover known results. For example, the canonical measure on a geometric crystal of highest weight degenerates into a uniform measure on a polytope, and recovers the parameterizations of continuous crystals.

  7. Target Recognition Using Neural Networks for Model Deformation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Richard W.; Hibler, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Optical measurements provide a non-invasive method for measuring deformation of wind tunnel models. Model deformation systems use targets mounted or painted on the surface of the model to identify known positions, and photogrammetric methods are used to calculate 3-D positions of the targets on the model from digital 2-D images. Under ideal conditions, the reflective targets are placed against a dark background and provide high-contrast images, aiding in target recognition. However, glints of light reflecting from the model surface, or reduced contrast caused by light source or model smoothness constraints, can compromise accurate target determination using current algorithmic methods. This paper describes a technique using a neural network and image processing technologies which increases the reliability of target recognition systems. Unlike algorithmic methods, the neural network can be trained to identify the characteristic patterns that distinguish targets from other objects of similar size and appearance and can adapt to changes in lighting and environmental conditions.

  8. Human supervisory approach to modeling industrial scenes using geometric primitives

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, J.P.; Little, C.Q.; Roberts, R.S.

    1997-11-19

    A three-dimensional world model is crucial for many robotic tasks. Modeling techniques tend to be either fully manual or autonomous. Manual methods are extremely time consuming but also highly accurate and flexible. Autonomous techniques are fast but inflexible and, with real-world data, often inaccurate. The method presented in this paper combines the two, yielding a highly efficient, flexible, and accurate mapping tool. The segmentation and modeling algorithms that compose the method are specifically designed for industrial environments, and are described in detail. A mapping system based on these algorithms has been designed. It enables a human supervisor to quickly construct a fully defined world model from unfiltered and unsegmented real-world range imagery. Examples of how industrial scenes are modeled with the mapping system are provided.

  9. Modeling Finite Deformations in Trigonal Ceramic Crystals with Lattice Defects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-08

    International Journal of Plasticity 26 (2010) 1357–1386 1385Farber, Y.A., Yoon, S.Y., Lagerlof, K.P.D., Heuer, A.H., 1993. Microplasticity during high... microplasticity -induced deformation in uniaxially strained ceramics by 3-D Voronoi polycrystal modeling. Int. J. Plast. 21, 801–834. Zhang, C., Kalia, R.K

  10. Models for determining the geometrical properties of halo coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.; Liu, Y.

    2005-12-01

    To this day, the prediction of space weather effects near the Earth suffer from a fundamental problem: the necessary condition for determining whether or not and when a part of the huge interplanetary counterpart (ICME) of frontside halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is able to hit the Earth and generate goemagnetic storms, i.e., the real angular width, the propagation direction and speed of the CMEs, cannot be measured directly because of the unfavorable geometry. To inverse these geometrical and kinematical properties we have recently developed a few geometrical models, such as the cone model, the ice cream cone model, and the spherical cone model. The inversing solution of the cone model for the 12 may 1997 halo CME has been used as an input to the ENLIL model (a 3D MHD solar wind code) and successfully predicted the ICME near the Earth (Zhao, Plukett & Liu, 2002; Odstrcil, Riley & Zhao, 2004). After briefly describing the geometrical models this presentation will discuss: 1. What kind of halo CMEs can be inversed? 2. How to select the geometrical models given a specific halo CME? 3. Whether or not the inversing solution is unique?

  11. Gauged spinning models with deformed supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedoruk, Sergey; Ivanov, Evgeny

    2016-11-01

    New models of the SU(2|1) supersymmetric mechanics based on gauging the systems with dynamical ( 1, 4, 3) and semi-dynamical ( 4, 4, 0) supermultiplets are presented. We propose a new version of SU(2|1) harmonic superspace approach which makes it possible to construct the Wess-Zumino term for interacting ( 4, 4, 0) multiplets. A new {N}=4 extension of d = 1 Calogero-Moser multiparticle system is obtained by gauging the U( n) isometry of matrix SU(2|1) harmonic superfield model.

  12. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Technique for Wind Tunnel Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, Danny A.

    2006-01-01

    Videogrammetric measurement technique developments at NASA Langley were driven largely by the need to quantify model deformation at the National Transonic Facility (NTF). This paper summarizes recent wind tunnel applications and issues at the NTF and other NASA Langley facilities including the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel, 8-Ft high Temperature Tunnel, and the 20-Ft Vertical Spin Tunnel. In addition, several adaptations of wind tunnel techniques to non-wind tunnel applications are summarized. These applications include wing deformation measurements on vehicles in flight, determining aerodynamic loads based on optical elastic deformation measurements, measurements on ultra-lightweight and inflatable space structures, and the use of an object-to-image plane scaling technique to support NASA s Space Exploration program.

  13. Sensitivity analysis of geometric errors in additive manufacturing medical models.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Jose Miguel; Arrieta, Cristobal; Andia, Marcelo E; Uribe, Sergio; Ramos-Grez, Jorge; Vargas, Alex; Irarrazaval, Pablo; Tejos, Cristian

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) models are used in medical applications for surgical planning, prosthesis design and teaching. For these applications, the accuracy of the AM models is essential. Unfortunately, this accuracy is compromised due to errors introduced by each of the building steps: image acquisition, segmentation, triangulation, printing and infiltration. However, the contribution of each step to the final error remains unclear. We performed a sensitivity analysis comparing errors obtained from a reference with those obtained modifying parameters of each building step. Our analysis considered global indexes to evaluate the overall error, and local indexes to show how this error is distributed along the surface of the AM models. Our results show that the standard building process tends to overestimate the AM models, i.e. models are larger than the original structures. They also show that the triangulation resolution and the segmentation threshold are critical factors, and that the errors are concentrated at regions with high curvatures. Errors could be reduced choosing better triangulation and printing resolutions, but there is an important need for modifying some of the standard building processes, particularly the segmentation algorithms.

  14. A New Model for Episodic Caldera Deformation at Yellowstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervelli, P. F.; Gervais, S. M.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Wicks, C. W.

    2012-12-01

    For nearly 90 years, geodetic measurements at Yellowstone have shown recurring episodes of uplift and subsidence confined mostly to the caldera but also extending into the Norris Geyser Basin. The most recent such episode began in late 2004 with the onset of caldera-wide uplift that continued for about 5 years before switching to subsidence in late 2009. The physical mechanism driving the deformation is unknown, though several researchers have proposed kinematic models that can reproduce the observed data. The "Lake" earthquake swarm, which occurred in the northern part of Yellowstone Lake from December 2008 through January 2009, provides a new constraint on caldera deformation models. The timing of the swarm correlates with an abrupt change in local deformation, which preceded the gradual transition from uplift to subsidence in late 2009. Thus, caldera deformation, at least in the vicinity of Yellowstone Lake, consists of two (or more) distinct parts, implying the existence of two (or more) distinct deformation sources. This fresh information leads us to propose a new kinematic model for deformation at Yellowstone, which we develop from the last 15 years of continuous GPS and InSAR data. Our new model consists of three deformation sources: (1) a cauldron block source that is subject to a constant displacement at its base while its surrounding ring fault remains locked; (2) a pressurizing (or depressurizing) spherical cavity near the Norris Geyser Basin, which is known to deform separately from the caldera; and (3) a pressurizing (or depressurizing) spherical cavity at the Sour Creek Dome, which we infer from the abrupt change in deformation rate after the Lake Swarm. We use the GPS and InSAR data from the period of strongest signal, summer 2005 through summer 2007, to optimize the geometry of the three sources: the locations and depths of the spherical cavity, and the perimeter of the cauldron block. We then, while holding their geometry fixed, estimate the

  15. Optimization of absorption placement using geometrical acoustic models and least squares.

    PubMed

    Saksela, Kai; Botts, Jonathan; Savioja, Lauri

    2015-04-01

    Given a geometrical model of a space, the problem of optimally placing absorption in a space to match a desired impulse response is in general nonlinear. This has led some to use costly optimization procedures. This letter reformulates absorption assignment as a constrained linear least-squares problem. Regularized solutions result in direct distribution of absorption in the room and can accommodate multiple frequency bands, multiple sources and receivers, and constraints on geometrical placement of absorption. The method is demonstrated using a beam tracing model, resulting in the optimal absorption placement on the walls and ceiling of a classroom.

  16. Evolution of Geometric Sensitivity Derivatives from Computer Aided Design Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William T.; Lazzara, David; Haimes, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The generation of design parameter sensitivity derivatives is required for gradient-based optimization. Such sensitivity derivatives are elusive at best when working with geometry defined within the solid modeling context of Computer-Aided Design (CAD) systems. Solid modeling CAD systems are often proprietary and always complex, thereby necessitating ad hoc procedures to infer parameter sensitivity. A new perspective is presented that makes direct use of the hierarchical associativity of CAD features to trace their evolution and thereby track design parameter sensitivity. In contrast to ad hoc methods, this method provides a more concise procedure following the model design intent and determining the sensitivity of CAD geometry directly to its respective defining parameters.

  17. A geometric view of adaptive optics control: boiling atmosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiberg, Donald M.; Max, Claire E.; Gavel, Donald T.

    2004-10-01

    The separation principle of optimal adaptive optics control is derived, and definitions of controllability and observability are introduced. An exact finite dimensional state space representation of the control system dynamics is obtained without the need for truncation in modes such as Zernikes. The uncertainty of sensing uncontrollable modes confuses present adaptive optics controllers. This uncertainty can be modeled by a Kalman filter. Reducing this uncertainty permits increased gain, increasing the Strehl, which is done by an optimal control law derived here. A general model of the atmosphere is considered, including boiling.

  18. Building accurate geometric models from abundant range imaging information

    SciTech Connect

    Diegert, C.; Sackos, J.; Nellums, R.

    1997-05-01

    The authors define two simple metrics for accuracy of models built from range imaging information. They apply the metric to a model built from a recent range image taken at the Laser Radar Development and Evaluation Facility (LDERF), Eglin AFB, using a Scannerless Range Imager (SRI) from Sandia National Laboratories. They also present graphical displays of the residual information produced as a byproduct of this measurement, and discuss mechanisms that these data suggest for further improvement in the performance of this already impressive SRI.

  19. Meso-Scale Modeling of Polycrystal Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hojun

    Computational material modeling of material is essential to accelerate material/process design and reduce costs in wide variety of applications. In particular, multi-scale models are gaining momentum in many fields as computers become faster, and finer structures become accessible experimentally. An effective (i.e. sufficiently accurate and fast to have practical impact) multi-scale model of dislocation-based metal plasticity may have many important applications such as metal forming. A two-scale method to predict quantitatively the Hall-Petch effect, as well as dislocation densities and lattice curvatures throughout a polycrystal, has been developed and implemented. Based on a finite element formulation, the first scale is called a Grain-Scale Simulation (GSS) that is standard except for using novel single-crystal constitutive equations that were proposed and tested as part of this work (and which are informed from the second model scale). The GSS allows the determination of local stresses, strains, and slip magnitudes while enforcing compatibility and equilibrium throughout a polycrystal in a finite element sense. The second scale is called here a Meso-Scale Simulation (MSS) which is novel in concept and application. It redistributes the mobile part of the dislocation density within grains consistent with the plastic strain distribution, and enforces slip transmission criteria at grain boundaries that depend on local grain and boundary properties. Stepwise simulation at the two scales proceeds sequentially in order to predict the spatial distribution of dislocation density and the flow stress for each slip system within each grain, and each simulation point. The MSS was formulated with the minimum number of undermined or arbitrary parameters, three. Two of these are related to the shape of the strain hardening curve and the other represents the initial yield. These parameters do not invoke additional length scales. The new model made possible the following

  20. Thickness Reconstruction of Layers by 3D Geometrical Model to Characterize Caledonian Tectonic Complex and Data in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukass, J.; Saks, T.; Popovs, K.

    2012-04-01

    In present study we attempt to verify the 3D geological model, which has been built on a variety of heterogeneous data sources for the Baltic Basin (BB). Data describing the displacement along the faults and associated thickness changes of the syntectonic strata is sparse and reflects only regional relevance (Brangulis & Konsins 2002). Borehole logs provide most reliable and comprehensive data source for reconstructing the structural geology of the Latvia sedimentary cover as sufficient quality seismic data is available only for the local scale structures. Based on the thickness analysis of the boreholes rough resolution 3D geological tectonic block model was developed to deconstruct the geological structure of the Latvia Caledonian sedimentary sequence. MOSYS modeling system was used for the geological structure modeling, developed within the PUMA project (Sennikovs et al, 2011). Algorithmic genetic approach was applied to interpolate data of well logs as strata volume and sequentially to reconstruct the post-deformation situation. This approach allows modifying model construction in any step and all processes are fully documented and are repeatable. Geometrical model consists of 33 tectonic blocks bordered by the faults which were distributed by interpreting displacement amount of the blocks along the faults providing an opportunity to characterize common tectonic evolution. The study results indicate insignificant thickness change of the Ordovician and Silurian strata along the faults suggesting that major slip event along the faults occurred during the late Silurian and early Devonian, and some secondary fault reactivation during the middle Devonian Narva time. Uplift of the territory during this time is confirmed by the presence of the regional unconformity. Constructed rough resolution 3D geometrical model suggests shortening along the horizontal axis approximately 10 - 20% but most of the shortening has occurred in the central-west part of Latvia where it

  1. A geometric modeler based on a dual-geometry representation polyhedra and rational b-splines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klosterman, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    For speed and data base reasons, solid geometric modeling of large complex practical systems is usually approximated by a polyhedra representation. Precise parametric surface and implicit algebraic modelers are available but it is not yet practical to model the same level of system complexity with these precise modelers. In response to this contrast the GEOMOD geometric modeling system was built so that a polyhedra abstraction of the geometry would be available for interactive modeling without losing the precise definition of the geometry. Part of the reason that polyhedra modelers are effective is that all bounded surfaces can be represented in a single canonical format (i.e., sets of planar polygons). This permits a very simple and compact data structure. Nonuniform rational B-splines are currently the best representation to describe a very large class of geometry precisely with one canonical format. The specific capabilities of the modeler are described.

  2. Volumetric Intraoperative Brain Deformation Compensation: Model Development and Phantom Validation

    PubMed Central

    DeLorenzo, Christine; Papademetris, Xenophon; Staib, Lawrence H.; Vives, Kenneth P.; Spencer, Dennis D.; Duncan, James S.

    2012-01-01

    During neurosurgery, nonrigid brain deformation may affect the reliability of tissue localization based on preoperative images. To provide accurate surgical guidance in these cases, preoperative images must be updated to reflect the intraoperative brain. This can be accomplished by warping these preoperative images using a biomechanical model. Due to the possible complexity of this deformation, intraoperative information is often required to guide the model solution. In this paper, a linear elastic model of the brain is developed to infer volumetric brain deformation associated with measured intraoperative cortical surface displacement. The developed model relies on known material properties of brain tissue, and does not require further knowledge about intraoperative conditions. To provide an initial estimation of volumetric model accuracy, as well as determine the model’s sensitivity to the specified material parameters and surface displacements, a realistic brain phantom was developed. Phantom results indicate that the linear elastic model significantly reduced localization error due to brain shift, from >16 mm to under 5 mm, on average. In addition, though in vivo quantitative validation is necessary, preliminary application of this approach to images acquired during neocortical epilepsy cases confirms the feasibility of applying the developed model to in vivo data. PMID:22562728

  3. Three-Dimensional Geometric Modeling for Anatomical Structures

    PubMed Central

    Shani, Uri

    1981-01-01

    Computer analysis of images of anatomical structures can benefit from the use of a priori knowledge about the inspected domain. Even though the anatomy structure of humans is variable, it is far more organized than other domains which are commonly used for image understanding (e.g., outdoor scenes or even images of a boxes-and-cylinders world). This paper discusses an organization scheme for modeling the 3-D structure of the abdominal anatomy and its use for analyzing 3-D CAT (Computed Axial Tomography) scans of the abdomen. The discussion is divided into two major portions of the knowledge organization: a relational database for gross anatomy and a 3-D shape model for individual organs using generalized cylinders. The paper also includes an example of 3-D image analysis for the detection of the kidneys' 3-D shape from abdominal CAT scans.

  4. Reappraisal of a model for deformed special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubitosi, Giulia; Magueijo, João

    2016-06-01

    We revisit one of the earliest proposals for deformed dispersion relations in the light of recent results on dynamical dimensional reduction and production of cosmological fluctuations. Depending on the specification of the measure of integration and the addition rule in momentum space the model may be completed so as to merely deform Lorentz invariance, or so as to introduce a preferred frame. Models which violate Lorentz invariance have a negative UV asymptotic dimension and a very red spectrum of quantum vacuum fluctuations. Instead, models which preserve frame independence can exhibit running to a UV dimension of two, and a scale-invariant spectrum of fluctuations. The bispectrum of the fluctuations is another point of divergence between the two casings proposed here for the original model.

  5. Efficient High-Fidelity, Geometrically Exact, Multiphysics Structural Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-14

    through-thickness analysis is implemented using a 1D finite element discretization in the computer program VAPAS, which has direct connection with the...potential and feasibility of these new concepts, the designers must be equipped with a versatile computational design framework to accurately analyze...systematically obtain an effective plate model unifying a homogenization process and a dimensional reduction process. This approach is implemented in the computer

  6. Geometrical model for the energy of semicoherent interphase interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ecob, Roger C.; Ralph, Brian

    1980-01-01

    The basis for the considerations given in this paper is the O-lattice description of crystalline interfaces of Bollmann. In the development of his approach presented here, all possible interfacial planes between two crystal phases having a defined orientation relationship are considered. The energies of these interfaces are then computed in terms of the energies of the primary intrinsic dislocations. A number of modeling interactions are incorporated into this approach, and a better agreement with experimental data is thus obtained. PMID:16592796

  7. Segmentation of pelvic structures for planning CT using a geometrical shape model tuned by a multi-scale edge detector

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Fabio; Romero, Eduardo; Dréan, Gaël; Simon, Antoine; Haigron, Pascal; De Crevoisier, Renaud; Acosta, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Accurate segmentation of the prostate and organs at risk in computed tomography (CT) images is a crucial step for radiotherapy (RT) planning. Manual segmentation, as performed nowadays, is a time consuming process and prone to errors due to the a high intra- and inter-expert variability. This paper introduces a new automatic method for prostate, rectum and bladder segmentation in planning CT using a geometrical shape model under a Bayesian framework. A set of prior organ shapes are first built by applying Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to a population of manually delineated CT images. Then, for a given individual, the most similar shape is obtained by mapping a set of multi-scale edge observations to the space of organs with a customized likelihood function. Finally, the selected shape is locally deformed to adjust the edges of each organ. Experiments were performed with real data from a population of 116 patients treated for prostate cancer. The data set was split in training and test groups, with 30 and 86 patients, respectively. Results show that the method produces competitive segmentations w.r.t standard methods (Averaged Dice = 0.91 for prostate, 0.94 for bladder, 0.89 for Rectum) and outperforms the majority-vote multi-atlas approaches (using rigid registration, free-form deformation (FFD) and the demons algorithm) PMID:24594798

  8. Segmentation of pelvic structures for planning CT using a geometrical shape model tuned by a multi-scale edge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Fabio; Romero, Eduardo; Dréan, Gaël; Simon, Antoine; Haigron, Pascal; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Acosta, Oscar

    2014-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of the prostate and organs at risk in computed tomography (CT) images is a crucial step for radiotherapy planning. Manual segmentation, as performed nowadays, is a time consuming process and prone to errors due to the a high intra- and inter-expert variability. This paper introduces a new automatic method for prostate, rectum and bladder segmentation in planning CT using a geometrical shape model under a Bayesian framework. A set of prior organ shapes are first built by applying principal component analysis to a population of manually delineated CT images. Then, for a given individual, the most similar shape is obtained by mapping a set of multi-scale edge observations to the space of organs with a customized likelihood function. Finally, the selected shape is locally deformed to adjust the edges of each organ. Experiments were performed with real data from a population of 116 patients treated for prostate cancer. The data set was split in training and test groups, with 30 and 86 patients, respectively. Results show that the method produces competitive segmentations w.r.t standard methods (averaged dice = 0.91 for prostate, 0.94 for bladder, 0.89 for rectum) and outperforms the majority-vote multi-atlas approaches (using rigid registration, free-form deformation and the demons algorithm).

  9. Physical modeling of geometrically confined disordered protein assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, David

    2015-08-01

    The transport of cargo across the nuclear membrane is highly selective and accomplished by a poorly understood mechanism involving hundreds of nucleoporins lining the inside of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Currently, there is no clear picture of the overall structure formed by this collection of proteins within the pore, primarily due to their disordered nature and uncertainty regarding the properties of individual nucleoporins. We first study the defining characteristics of the amino acid sequences of nucleoporins through bioinformatics techniques, although bioinformatics of disordered proteins is especially challenging given high mutation rates for homologous proteins and that functionality may not be strongly related to sequence. Here we have performed a novel bioinformatic analysis, based on the spatial clustering of physically relevant features such as binding motifs and charges within disordered proteins, on thousands of FG motif containing nucleoporins (FG nups). The biophysical mechanism by which the critical FG nups regulate nucleocytoplasmic transport has remained elusive, yet our analysis revealed a set of highly conserved spatial features in the sequence structure of individual FG nups, such as the separation, localization, and ordering of FG motifs and charged residues along the protein chain. These sequence features are likely conserved due to a common functionality between species regarding how FG nups functionally regulate traffic, therefore these results constrain current models and eliminate proposed biophysical mechanisms responsible for regulation of nucleocytoplasmic traffic in the NPC which would not result in such a conserved amino acid sequence structure. Additionally, this method allows us to identify potentially functionally analogous disordered proteins across distantly related species. To understand the physical implications of the sequence features on structure and dynamics of the nucleoporins, we performed coarse-grained simulations

  10. Quantitative comparisons of numerical models of brittle deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, S.

    2009-04-01

    Numerical modelling of brittle deformation in the uppermost crust can be challenging owing to the requirement of an accurate pressure calculation, the ability to achieve post-yield deformation and localisation, and the choice of rheology (plasticity law). One way to approach these issues is to conduct model comparisons that can evaluate the effects of different implementations of brittle behaviour in crustal deformation models. We present a comparison of three brittle shortening experiments for fourteen different numerical codes, which use finite element, finite difference, boundary element and distinct element techniques. Our aim is to constrain and quantify the variability among models in order to improve our understanding of causes leading to differences between model results. Our first experiment of translation of a stable sand-like wedge serves as a reference that allows for testing against analytical solutions (e.g., taper angle, root-mean-square velocity and gravitational rate of work). The next two experiments investigate an unstable wedge in a sandbox-like setup which deforms by inward translation of a mobile wall. All models accommodate shortening by in-sequence formation of forward shear zones. We analyse the location, dip angle and spacing of thrusts in detail as previous comparisons have shown that these can be highly variable in numerical and analogue models of crustal shortening and extension. We find that an accurate implementation of boundary friction is important for our models. Our results are encouraging in the overall agreement in their dynamic evolution, but show at the same time the effort that is needed to understand shear zone evolution. GeoMod2008 Team: Markus Albertz, Michele Cooke, Susan Ellis, Taras Gerya, Luke Hodkinson, Kristin Hughes, Katrin Huhn, Boris Kaus, Walter Landry, Bertrand Maillot, Christophe Pascal, Anton Popov, Guido Schreurs, Christopher Beaumont, Tony Crook, Mario Del Castello and Yves Leroy

  11. Metallic clusters on a model surface: Quantum versus geometric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, S. A.; Haldar, Soumyajyoti; Kanhere, D. G.

    2011-08-01

    We determine the structure and melting behavior of supported metallic clusters using an ab initio density-functional-based treatment of intracluster interactions and an approximate treatment of the surface as an idealized smooth plane yielding an effective Lennard-Jones interaction with the ions of the cluster. We apply this model to determine the structure of sodium clusters containing from 4 to 22 atoms, treating the cluster-surface interaction strength as a variable parameter. For a strong cluster-surface interaction, the clusters form two-dimensional (2D) monolayer structures; comparisons with calculations of structure and dissociation energy performed with a classical Gupta interatomic potential show clearly the role of quantum shell effects in the metallic binding in this case, and evidence is presented that these shell effects correspond to those for a confined 2D electron gas. The thermodynamics and melting behavior of a supported Na20 cluster is considered in detail using the model for several cluster-surface interaction strengths. We find quantitative differences in the melting temperatures and caloric curve from density-functional and Gupta treatments of the valence electrons. A clear dimensional effect on the melting behavior is also demonstrated, with 2D structures showing melting temperatures above those of the bulk or (at very strong cluster-surface interactions) no clear meltinglike transition.

  12. Analysis of a hyperbolic geometric model for visual texture perception

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We study the neural field equations introduced by Chossat and Faugeras to model the representation and the processing of image edges and textures in the hypercolumns of the cortical area V1. The key entity, the structure tensor, intrinsically lives in a non-Euclidean, in effect hyperbolic, space. Its spatio-temporal behaviour is governed by nonlinear integro-differential equations defined on the Poincaré disc model of the two-dimensional hyperbolic space. Using methods from the theory of functional analysis we show the existence and uniqueness of a solution of these equations. In the case of stationary, i.e. time independent, solutions we perform a stability analysis which yields important results on their behavior. We also present an original study, based on non-Euclidean, hyperbolic, analysis, of a spatially localised bump solution in a limiting case. We illustrate our theoretical results with numerical simulations. AMS subject classifications: 30F45, 33C05, 34A12, 34D20, 34D23, 34G20, 37M05, 43A85, 44A35, 45G10, 51M10, 92B20, 92C20. PMID:22656402

  13. Semiautomated four-dimensional computed tomography segmentation using deformable models

    SciTech Connect

    Ragan, Dustin; Starkschall, George; McNutt, Todd; Kaus, Michael; Guerrero, Thomas; Stevens, Craig W.

    2005-07-15

    The purpose of this work is to demonstrate a proof of feasibility of the application of a commercial prototype deformable model algorithm to the problem of delineation of anatomic structures on four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) image data sets. We acquired a 4D CT image data set of a patient's thorax that consisted of three-dimensional (3D) image data sets from eight phases in the respiratory cycle. The contours of the right and left lungs, cord, heart, and esophagus were manually delineated on the end inspiration data set. An interactive deformable model algorithm, originally intended for deforming an atlas-based model surface to a 3D CT image data set, was applied in an automated fashion. Triangulations based on the contours generated on each phase were deformed to the CT data set on the succeeding phase to generate the contours on that phase. Deformation was propagated through the eight phases, and the contours obtained on the end inspiration data set were compared with the original manually delineated contours. Structures defined by high-density gradients, such as lungs, cord, and heart, were accurately reproduced, except in regions where other gradient boundaries may have confused the algorithm, such as near bronchi. The algorithm failed to accurately contour the esophagus, a soft-tissue structure completely surrounded by tissue of similar density, without manual interaction. This technique has the potential to facilitate contour delineation in 4D CT image data sets; and future evolution of the software is expected to improve the process.

  14. Modelling of orbital deformation using finite-element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sukhun, Jehad; Lindqvist, Christian; Kontio, Risto

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a three-dimensional finite-element model (FEM) of the human orbit, containing the globe, to predict orbital deformation in subjects following a blunt injury. This study investigated the hypothesis that such deformation could be modelled using finite-element techniques. One patient who had CT-scan examination to the maxillofacial skeleton including the orbits, as part of her treatment, was selected for this study. A FEM of one of the orbits containing the globe was constructed, based on CT-scan images. Simulations were performed with a computer using the finite-element software NISA (EMRC, Troy, USA). The orbit was subjected to a blunt injury of a 0.5 kg missile with 30 m s−1 velocity. The FEM was then used to predict principal and shear stresses or strains at each node position. Two types of orbital deformation were predicted during different impact simulations: (i) horizontal distortion and (ii) rotational distortion. Stress values ranged from 213.4 to 363.3 MPa for the maximum principal stress, from −327.8 to −653.1 MPa for the minimum principal stress, and from 212.3 to 444.3 MPa for the maximum shear stress. This is the first finite-element study, which demonstrates different and concurrent patterns of orbital deformation in a subject following a blunt injury. Finite element modelling is a powerful and invaluable tool to study the multifaceted phenomenon of orbital deformation. PMID:16849235

  15. Algebraic geometrization of the Kuramoto model: Equilibria and stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Dhagash; Daleo, Noah S.; Dörfler, Florian; Hauenstein, Jonathan D.

    2015-05-01

    Finding equilibria of the finite size Kuramoto model amounts to solving a nonlinear system of equations, which is an important yet challenging problem. We translate this into an algebraic geometry problem and use numerical methods to find all of the equilibria for various choices of coupling constants K, natural frequencies, and on different graphs. We note that for even modest sizes (N ˜ 10-20), the number of equilibria is already more than 100 000. We analyze the stability of each computed equilibrium as well as the configuration of angles. Our exploration of the equilibrium landscape leads to unexpected and possibly surprising results including non-monotonicity in the number of equilibria, a predictable pattern in the indices of equilibria, counter-examples to conjectures, multi-stable equilibrium landscapes, scenarios with only unstable equilibria, and multiple distinct extrema in the stable equilibrium distribution as a function of the number of cycles in the graph.

  16. Polarity-Driven Geometrical Cluster Growth Model of Budding Yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Reniel B.; Lim, May T.

    We present a polarity-driven activator-inhibitor model of budding yeast in a two-dimensional medium wherein impeding metabolites secretion (or growth inhibitors) and growth directionality are determined by the local nutrient level. We found that colony size and morphological features varied with nutrient concentration. A branched-type morphology is associated with high impeding metabolite concentration together with a high fraction of distal budding, while opposite conditions (low impeding metabolite concentration, high fraction of proximal budding) promote Eden-type patterns. Increasing the anisotropy factor (or polarity) produced other spatial patterns akin to the electrical breakdown under varying electric field. Rapid changes in the colony morphology, which we conjecture to be equivalent to a transition from an inactive quiescent state to an active budding state, appeared when nutrients were limited.

  17. Geometric Mixing, Peristalsis, and the Geometric Phase of the Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Arrieta, Jorge; Cartwright, Julyan H. E.; Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Piro, Nicolas; Piro, Oreste; Tuval, Idan

    2015-01-01

    Mixing fluid in a container at low Reynolds number— in an inertialess environment—is not a trivial task. Reciprocating motions merely lead to cycles of mixing and unmixing, so continuous rotation, as used in many technological applications, would appear to be necessary. However, there is another solution: movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion to introduce a geometric phase. We show using journal-bearing flow as a model that such geometric mixing is a general tool for using deformable boundaries that return to the same position to mix fluid at low Reynolds number. We then simulate a biological example: we show that mixing in the stomach functions because of the “belly phase,” peristaltic movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion introduces a geometric phase that avoids unmixing. PMID:26154384

  18. Geometric Mixing, Peristalsis, and the Geometric Phase of the Stomach.

    PubMed

    Arrieta, Jorge; Cartwright, Julyan H E; Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Piro, Nicolas; Piro, Oreste; Tuval, Idan

    2015-01-01

    Mixing fluid in a container at low Reynolds number--in an inertialess environment--is not a trivial task. Reciprocating motions merely lead to cycles of mixing and unmixing, so continuous rotation, as used in many technological applications, would appear to be necessary. However, there is another solution: movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion to introduce a geometric phase. We show using journal-bearing flow as a model that such geometric mixing is a general tool for using deformable boundaries that return to the same position to mix fluid at low Reynolds number. We then simulate a biological example: we show that mixing in the stomach functions because of the "belly phase," peristaltic movement of the walls in a cyclical fashion introduces a geometric phase that avoids unmixing.

  19. Dynamic deformable models for 3D MRI heart segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, Leonid; Bao, Zhaosheng; Gusikov, Igor; Wood, John; Breen, David E.

    2002-05-01

    Automated or semiautomated segmentation of medical images decreases interstudy variation, observer bias, and postprocessing time as well as providing clincally-relevant quantitative data. In this paper we present a new dynamic deformable modeling approach to 3D segmentation. It utilizes recently developed dynamic remeshing techniques and curvature estimation methods to produce high-quality meshes. The approach has been implemented in an interactive environment that allows a user to specify an initial model and identify key features in the data. These features act as hard constraints that the model must not pass through as it deforms. We have employed the method to perform semi-automatic segmentation of heart structures from cine MRI data.

  20. Phenomenological model for transient deformation based on state variables

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M S; Cho, C W; Alexopoulos, P; Mughrabi, H; Li, C Y

    1980-01-01

    The state variable theory of Hart, while providing a unified description of plasticity-dominated deformation, exhibits deficiencies when it is applied to transient deformation phenomena at stresses below yield. It appears that the description of stored anelastic strain is oversimplified. Consideration of a simple physical picture based on continuum dislocation pileups suggests that the neglect of weak barriers to dislocation motion is the source of these inadequacies. An appropriately modified description incorporating such barriers then allows the construction of a macroscopic model including transient effects. Although the flow relations for the microplastic element required in the new theory are not known, tentative assignments may be made for such functions. The model then exhibits qualitatively correct behavior when tensile, loading-unloading, reverse loading, and load relaxation tests are simulated. Experimental procedures are described for determining the unknown parameters and functions in the new model.

  1. Nonlinear geometric effects in mechanical bistable morphing structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zi; Guo, Qiaohang; Majidi, Carmel; Chen, Wenzhe; Srolovitz, David J; Haataja, Mikko P

    2012-09-14

    Bistable structures associated with nonlinear deformation behavior, exemplified by the Venus flytrap and slap bracelet, can switch between different functional shapes upon actuation. Despite numerous efforts in modeling such large deformation behavior of shells, the roles of mechanical and nonlinear geometric effects on bistability remain elusive. We demonstrate, through both theoretical analysis and tabletop experiments, that two dimensionless parameters control bistability. Our work classifies the conditions for bistability, and extends the large deformation theory of plates and shells.

  2. Simulation of mechanisms modeled by geometrically-exact beams using Rodrigues rotation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay Neto, Alfredo

    2017-03-01

    We present mathematical models for joints, springs, dashpots and follower loads, to be used together with geometrically-exact beam finite elements to simulate mechanisms. The rotations are described using Rodrigues parameters. An updated-Lagrangian approach is employed, leading to the possibility of finite rotations involving many turns, overcoming possible singularities in the rotation tensor. We present formulations for spherical, hinge and universal (Cardan) joints, which are enforced by Lagrange multipliers. For the hinge joint, a torsional spring with a nonlinear damper model is presented. A geometric-nonlinear translational spring/dashpot model is proposed, such as follower loads. All formulations are presented detailing their contribution to the model weak form and tangent operator. These are employed together with implicit time-integration schemes. Numerical examples are performed, showing that the proposed formulations are able to model complex spatial mechanisms. Usage of the models together with contact interaction between beams is explored by a cam/follower mechanism example.

  3. Geometric mechanics for modelling bioinspired robots locomotion: from rigid to continuous (soft) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Frederic; Porez, Mathieu; Renda, Federico

    This talk presents recent geometric tools developed to model the locomotion dynamics of bio-inspired robots. Starting from the model of discrete rigid multibody systems we will rapidly shift to the case of continuous systems inspired from snakes and fish. To that end, we will build on the model of Cosserat media. This extended picture of geometric locomotion dynamics (inspired from fields' theory) will allow us to introduce models of swimming recently used in biorobotics. We will show how modeling a fish as a one-dimensional Cosserat medium allows to recover and extend the Large Amplitude Elongated Body theory of J. Lighthill and to apply it to an eel-like robot. In the same vein, modeling the mantle of cephalopods as a two dimensional Cosserat medium will build a basis for studying the jet propelling of a soft octopus like robot.

  4. Compound dislocation models (CDMs) for volcano deformation analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkhoo, Mehdi; Walter, Thomas R.; Lundgren, Paul R.; Prats-Iraola, Pau

    2017-02-01

    Volcanic crises are often preceded and accompanied by volcano deformation caused by magmatic and hydrothermal processes. Fast and efficient model identification and parameter estimation techniques for various sources of deformation are crucial for process understanding, volcano hazard assessment and early warning purposes. As a simple model that can be a basis for rapid inversion techniques, we present a compound dislocation model (CDM) that is composed of three mutually orthogonal rectangular dislocations (RDs). We present new RD solutions, which are free of artefact singularities and that also possess full rotational degrees of freedom. The CDM can represent both planar intrusions in the near field and volumetric sources of inflation and deflation in the far field. Therefore, this source model can be applied to shallow dikes and sills, as well as to deep planar and equidimensional sources of any geometry, including oblate, prolate and other triaxial ellipsoidal shapes. In either case the sources may possess any arbitrary orientation in space. After systematically evaluating the CDM, we apply it to the co-eruptive displacements of the 2015 Calbuco eruption observed by the Sentinel-1A satellite in both ascending and descending orbits. The results show that the deformation source is a deflating vertical lens-shaped source at an approximate depth of 8 km centred beneath Calbuco volcano. The parameters of the optimal source model clearly show that it is significantly different from an isotropic point source or a single dislocation model. The Calbuco example reflects the convenience of using the CDM for a rapid interpretation of deformation data.

  5. Is there a geometric module for spatial orientation? Insights from a rodent navigation model.

    PubMed

    Sheynikhovich, Denis; Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Strösslin, Thomas; Arleo, Angelo; Gerstner, Wulfram

    2009-07-01

    Modern psychological theories of spatial cognition postulate the existence of a geometric module for reorientation. This concept is derived from experimental data showing that in rectangular arenas with distinct landmarks in the corners, disoriented rats often make diagonal errors, suggesting their preference for the geometric (arena shape) over the nongeometric (landmarks) cues. Moreover, sensitivity of hippocampal cell firing to changes in the environment layout was taken in support of the geometric module hypothesis. Using a computational model of rat navigation, the authors proposed and tested the alternative hypothesis that the influence of spatial geometry on both behavioral and neuronal levels can be explained by the properties of visual features that constitute local views of the environment. Their modeling results suggest that the pattern of diagonal errors observed in reorientation tasks can be understood by the analysis of sensory information processing that underlies the navigation strategy employed to solve the task. In particular, 2 navigation strategies were considered: (a) a place-based locale strategy that relies on a model of grid and place cells and (b) a stimulus-response taxon strategy that involves direct association of local views with action choices. The authors showed that the application of the 2 strategies in the reorientation tasks results in different patterns of diagonal errors, consistent with behavioral data. These results argue against the geometric module hypothesis by providing a simpler and biologically more plausible explanation for the related experimental data. Moreover, the same model also describes behavioral results in different types of water-maze tasks.

  6. Modeling of friction-induced deformation and microstructures.

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Joseph Richard; Prasad, Somuri V.; Jungk, John Michael; Cordill, Megan J.; Bammann, Douglas J.; Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moody, Neville Reid; Majumdar, Bhaskar Sinha (New Mexico Institure of Mining and Technology)

    2006-12-01

    Frictional contact results in surface and subsurface damage that could influence the performance, aging, and reliability of moving mechanical assemblies. Changes in surface roughness, hardness, grain size and texture often occur during the initial run-in period, resulting in the evolution of subsurface layers with characteristic microstructural features that are different from those of the bulk. The objective of this LDRD funded research was to model friction-induced microstructures. In order to accomplish this objective, novel experimental techniques were developed to make friction measurements on single crystal surfaces along specific crystallographic surfaces. Focused ion beam techniques were used to prepare cross-sections of wear scars, and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and TEM to understand the deformation, orientation changes, and recrystallization that are associated with sliding wear. The extent of subsurface deformation and the coefficient of friction were strongly dependent on the crystal orientation. These experimental observations and insights were used to develop and validate phenomenological models. A phenomenological model was developed to elucidate the relationships between deformation, microstructure formation, and friction during wear. The contact mechanics problem was described by well-known mathematical solutions for the stresses during sliding friction. Crystal plasticity theory was used to describe the evolution of dislocation content in the worn material, which in turn provided an estimate of the characteristic microstructural feature size as a function of the imposed strain. An analysis of grain boundary sliding in ultra-fine-grained material provided a mechanism for lubrication, and model predictions of the contribution of grain boundary sliding (relative to plastic deformation) to lubrication were in good qualitative agreement with experimental evidence. A nanomechanics-based approach has been developed for characterizing the

  7. Statistical modeling of interfractional tissue deformation and its application in radiation therapy planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vile, Douglas J.

    In radiation therapy, interfraction organ motion introduces a level of geometric uncertainty into the planning process. Plans, which are typically based upon a single instance of anatomy, must be robust against daily anatomical variations. For this problem, a model of the magnitude, direction, and likelihood of deformation is useful. In this thesis, principal component analysis (PCA) is used to statistically model the 3D organ motion for 19 prostate cancer patients, each with 8-13 fractional computed tomography (CT) images. Deformable image registration and the resultant displacement vector fields (DVFs) are used to quantify the interfraction systematic and random motion. By applying the PCA technique to the random DVFs, principal modes of random tissue deformation were determined for each patient, and a method for sampling synthetic random DVFs was developed. The PCA model was then extended to describe the principal modes of systematic and random organ motion for the population of patients. A leave-one-out study tested both the systematic and random motion model's ability to represent PCA training set DVFs. The random and systematic DVF PCA models allowed the reconstruction of these data with absolute mean errors between 0.5-0.9 mm and 1-2 mm, respectively. To the best of the author's knowledge, this study is the first successful effort to build a fully 3D statistical PCA model of systematic tissue deformation in a population of patients. By sampling synthetic systematic and random errors, organ occupancy maps were created for bony and prostate-centroid patient setup processes. By thresholding these maps, PCA-based planning target volume (PTV) was created and tested against conventional margin recipes (van Herk for bony alignment and 5 mm fixed [3 mm posterior] margin for centroid alignment) in a virtual clinical trial for low-risk prostate cancer. Deformably accumulated delivered dose served as a surrogate for clinical outcome. For the bony landmark setup

  8. Modeling photosynthesis of discontinuous plant canopies by linking Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer model with biochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Q.; Gong, P.; Li, W.

    2015-02-01

    Modeling vegetation photosynthesis is essential for understanding carbon exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The radiative transfer process within plant canopies is one of the key drivers that regulate canopy photosynthesis. Most vegetation cover consists of discrete plant crowns, of which the physical observation departs from the underlying assumption of a homogenous and uniform medium in classic radiative transfer theory. Here we advance the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer (GORT) model to simulate photosynthesis activities for discontinuous plant canopies. We separate radiation absorption into two components that are absorbed by sunlit and shaded leaves, and derive analytical solutions by integrating over the canopy layer. To model leaf-level and canopy-level photosynthesis, leaf light absorption is then linked to the biochemical process of gas diffusion through leaf stomata. The canopy gap probability derived from GORT differs from classic radiative transfer theory, especially when the leaf area index is high, due to leaf clumping effects. Tree characteristics such as tree density, crown shape, and canopy length affect leaf clumping and regulate radiation interception. Modeled gross primary production (GPP) for two deciduous forest stands could explain more than 80% of the variance of flux tower measurements at both near hourly and daily time scales. We also demonstrate that the ambient CO2 concentration influences daytime vegetation photosynthesis, which needs to be considered in state-of-the-art biogeochemical models. The proposed model is complementary to classic radiative transfer theory and shows promise in modeling the radiative transfer process and photosynthetic activities over discontinuous forest canopies.

  9. Extension of non-linear beam models with deformable cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, I.; Krylov, S.; Harari, I.

    2015-12-01

    Geometrically exact beam theory is extended to allow distortion of the cross section. We present an appropriate set of cross-section basis functions and provide physical insight to the cross-sectional distortion from linear elastostatics. The beam formulation in terms of material (back-rotated) beam internal force resultants and work-conjugate kinematic quantities emerges naturally from the material description of virtual work of constrained finite elasticity. The inclusion of cross-sectional deformation allows straightforward application of three-dimensional constitutive laws in the beam formulation. Beam counterparts of applied loads are expressed in terms of the original three-dimensional data. Special attention is paid to the treatment of the applied stress, keeping in mind applications such as hydrogel actuators under environmental stimuli or devices made of electroactive polymers. Numerical comparisons show the ability of the beam model to reproduce finite elasticity results with good efficiency.

  10. A large deformation viscoelastic model for double-network hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yunwei; Lin, Shaoting; Zhao, Xuanhe; Anand, Lallit

    2017-03-01

    We present a large deformation viscoelasticity model for recently synthesized double network hydrogels which consist of a covalently-crosslinked polyacrylamide network with long chains, and an ionically-crosslinked alginate network with short chains. Such double-network gels are highly stretchable and at the same time tough, because when stretched the crosslinks in the ionically-crosslinked alginate network rupture which results in distributed internal microdamage which dissipates a substantial amount of energy, while the configurational entropy of the covalently-crosslinked polyacrylamide network allows the gel to return to its original configuration after deformation. In addition to the large hysteresis during loading and unloading, these double network hydrogels also exhibit a substantial rate-sensitive response during loading, but exhibit almost no rate-sensitivity during unloading. These features of large hysteresis and asymmetric rate-sensitivity are quite different from the response of conventional hydrogels. We limit our attention to modeling the complex viscoelastic response of such hydrogels under isothermal conditions. Our model is restricted in the sense that we have limited our attention to conditions under which one might neglect any diffusion of the water in the hydrogel - as might occur when the gel has a uniform initial value of the concentration of water, and the mobility of the water molecules in the gel is low relative to the time scale of the mechanical deformation. We also do not attempt to model the final fracture of such double-network hydrogels.

  11. Dislocation models of interseismic deformation in the western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.; McCrory, P.; Svarc, J.; Murray, J.

    2008-01-01

    The GPS-derived crustal velocity field of the western United States is used to construct dislocation models in a viscoelastic medium of interseismic crustal deformation. The interseismic velocity field is constrained by 1052 GPS velocity vectors spanning the ???2500-km-long plate boundary zone adjacent to the San Andreas fault and Cascadia subduction zone and extending ???1000 km into the plate interior. The GPS data set is compiled from U.S. Geological Survey campaign data, Plate Boundary Observatory data, and the Western U.S. Cordillera velocity field of Bennett et al. (1999). In the context of viscoelastic cycle models of postearthquake deformation, the interseismic velocity field is modeled with a combination of earthquake sources on ???100 known faults plus broadly distributed sources. Models that best explain the observed interseismic velocity field include the contributions of viscoelastic relaxation from faulting near the major plate margins, viscoelastic relaxation from distributed faulting in the plate interior, as well as lateral variations in depth-averaged rigidity in the elastic lithosphere. Resulting rigidity variations are consistent with reduced effective elastic plate thickness in a zone a few tens of kilometers wide surrounding the San Andreas fault (SAF) system. Primary deformation characteristics are captured along the entire SAF system, Eastern California Shear Zone, Walker Lane, the Mendocino triple junction, the Cascadia margin, and the plate interior up to ???1000 km from the major plate boundaries.

  12. A skeleton family generator via physics-based deformable models.

    PubMed

    Krinidis, Stelios; Chatzis, Vassilios

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for object skeleton family extraction. The introduced technique utilizes a 2-D physics-based deformable model that parameterizes the objects shape. Deformation equations are solved exploiting modal analysis, and proportional to model physical characteristics, a different skeleton is produced every time, generating, in this way, a family of skeletons. The theoretical properties and the experiments presented demonstrate that obtained skeletons match to hand-labeled skeletons provided by human subjects, even in the presence of significant noise and shape variations, cuts and tears, and have the same topology as the original skeletons. In particular, the proposed approach produces no spurious branches without the need of any known skeleton pruning method.

  13. Modeling and analysis methodology for aeroelastically tailored chordwise deformable wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehfield, Lawrence W.; Chang, Stephen; Zischka, Peter J.

    1992-01-01

    Structural concepts have been created which produce chordwise camber deformation that results in enhanced lift. A wing box can be tailored to utilize each of these with composites. In attempting to optimize the aerodynamic benefits, we have found there are two optimal designs that are of interest. There is a weight optimum which corresponds to the maximum lift per unit structural weight. There is also a lift optimum that corresponds to maximum absolute lift. New structural models, the basic deformation mechanisms that are utilized and typical analytical results are presented. It appears that lift enhancements of sufficient magnitude can be produced to render this type of wing tailoring of practical interest. Experiments and finite element correlations are performed which confirm the validity of the theoretical models utilized.

  14. A geometric graph model for citation networks of exponentially growing scientific papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zheng; Ouyang, Zhenzheng; Liu, Qi; Li, Jianping

    2016-08-01

    In citation networks, the content relativity of papers is a precondition of engendering citations, which is hard to model by a topological graph. A geometric graph is proposed to predict some features of the citation networks with exponentially growing papers, which addresses the precondition by using coordinates of nodes to model the research contents of papers, and geometric distances between nodes to diversities of research contents between papers. Citations between modeled papers are drawn according to a geometric rule, which addresses the precondition as well as some other factors engendering citations, namely academic influences of papers, aging of those influences, and incomplete copying of references. Instead of cumulative advantage of degree, the model illustrates that the scale-free property of modeled networks arises from the inhomogeneous academic influences of modeled papers. The model can also reproduce some other statistical features of citation networks, e.g. in- and out-assortativities, which show the model provides a suitable tool to understand some aspects of citation networks by geometry.

  15. Model Deformation Measurements at a Cryogenic Wind Tunnel Using Photogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Snow, W. L.; Goad, W. K.

    1982-01-01

    A photogrammetric closed circuit television system to measure model deformation at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) is described. The photogrammetric approach was chosen because of its inherent rapid data recording of the entire object field. Video cameras are used to acquire data instead of film cameras due to the inaccessibility of cameras which must be housed within the cryogenic, high pressure plenum of this facility. Data reduction procedures and the results of tunnel tests at the NTF are presented.

  16. Model Deformation Measurements at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.

    1998-01-01

    Only recently have large amounts of model deformation data been acquired in NASA wind tunnels. This acquisition of model deformation data was made possible by the development of an automated video photogrammetric system to measure the changes in wing twist and bending under aerodynamic load. The measurement technique is based upon a single view photogrammetric determination of two dimensional coordinates of wing targets with a fixed third dimensional coordinate, namely the spanwise location. A major consideration in the development of the measurement system was that use of the technique must not appreciably reduce wind tunnel productivity. The measurement technique has been used successfully for a number of tests at four large production wind tunnels at NASA and a dedicated system is nearing completion for a fifth facility. These facilities are the National Transonic Facility, the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, and the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at NASA Langley, and the 12-FT Pressure Tunnel at NASA Ames. A dedicated system for the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel is scheduled to be used for the first time for a test in September. The advantages, limitations, and strategy of the technique as currently used in NASA wind tunnels are presented. Model deformation data are presented which illustrate the value of these measurements. Plans for further enhancements to the technique are presented.

  17. Heavy quark potential from deformed AdS5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zi-qiang; Hou, De-fu; Chen, Gang

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the heavy quark potential in some holographic QCD models. The calculation relies on a modified renormalization scheme mentioned in a previous work of Albacete et al. After studying the heavy quark potential in Pirner-Galow model and Andreev-Zakharov model, we extend the discussion to a general deformed AdS5 case. It is shown that the obtained potential is negative definite for all quark-antiquark separations, differs from that using the usual renormalization scheme.

  18. Modeling Permanent Deformations of Superelastic and Shape Memory Materials.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Marco Fabrizio; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2015-06-11

    In this paper we propose a modification of the polycrystalline shape memory alloy constitutive model originally proposed by Souza. By introducing a transformation strain energy with two different hardening coefficients, we are able to take into account the effect of the martensitic transformation of unfavorably oriented grains occurring after the main plateau. By choosing a proper second hardening coefficient, it is possible to reproduce the correct stress strain behavior of the material after the plateau without the need of introducing a much smaller Young modulus for martensite. The proposed modification is introduced in the model comprising permanent deformation effects. Model results for uniaxial stress tests are compared to experimental results showing good agreement.

  19. Modeling deformation associated with the 2004-2008 dome-building eruption of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisowski, M.; Battaglia, M.

    2011-12-01

    We estimate deformation sources active during and after the 2004-2008 dome-building eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH) by inverting campaign and continuous GPS (CGPS) measured deformation between 2000 and 2011. All data are corrected for background deformation using a tectonic model that includes block rotation and uniform strain accumulation. The campaign GPS surveys characterize the deformation over a large area, and the CGPS data allow estimates of time-dependent changes in the rate of deformation. Only one CGPS station, JRO1, was operating near MSH prior to the start of unrest on September 23, 2004. Most other CGPS stations, installed by the Plate Boundary Observatory and Cascade Volcano Observatory, were operating by mid-October, 2004. The inward displacement of JRO1 started with the seismic unrest on September 23, 2004, and continued at a rate of 0.5 mm/day until the last phreatic explosion on October 5, 2004 (note there was another explosion in March 2005). The deformation then decayed exponentially until activity ceased in January, 2008. The rate of decay was estimated using a number of clean CGPS time series, and then it was fixed to estimate amplitudes for all CGPS station displacements. The inward and downward movements (deflation) observed at all stations during the eruption (2004-2008) were best-fit by a prolate spheroid with geometric aspect ratio 0.19 ± 0.6, a depth of 7.4 ± 1.7 km, and a cavity volume decrease of 0.028 ± 0.005 cubic km. This source is practically vertical (dip angle: 84 ± 5; strike angle 298 ± 84) and is located beneath the dome. All errors are 95% bounds and have been estimated using jackknife. The post-eruption deformation (2008 - present) is characterized by deflation in the near field (within 2 km from the dome) and inflation in the far field. The near-field deflation signal is best fit by a very shallow sill-like source (~0.18 ± 0.05 km below the crater floor) with a radius of 0.5 ± 0.3 km and a cavity volume decrease of

  20. Geometrical measures of non-Gaussianity generated from single field inflationary models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junaid, M.; Pogosyan, D.

    2015-08-01

    We calculate the third-order moments of scalar curvature perturbations in configuration space for different inflationary models. We develop a robust numerical technique to compute the bispectrum for different models that have some features in the inflationary potential. From the bispectrum we evaluate moments analytically in the slow-roll regime while we devise a numerical mechanism to calculate these moments for non-slow-roll single-field inflationary models with a standard kinetic term that are minimally coupled to gravity. With the help of these third-order moments one can directly predict many non-Gaussian and geometrical measures of cosmic microwave background distributions in the configuration space. Thus, we devise a framework to calculate different third-order moments and geometrical measures, e.g. Minkowski functionals or the skeleton statistic, generated by different single-field models of inflation.

  1. Heterogeneous Deformable Modeling of Bio-Tissues and Haptic Force Rendering for Bio-Object Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shiyong; Lee, Yuan-Shin; Narayan, Roger J.

    This paper presents a novel technique for modeling soft biological tissues as well as the development of an innovative interface for bio-manufacturing and medical applications. Heterogeneous deformable models may be used to represent the actual internal structures of deformable biological objects, which possess multiple components and nonuniform material properties. Both heterogeneous deformable object modeling and accurate haptic rendering can greatly enhance the realism and fidelity of virtual reality environments. In this paper, a tri-ray node snapping algorithm is proposed to generate a volumetric heterogeneous deformable model from a set of object interface surfaces between different materials. A constrained local static integration method is presented for simulating deformation and accurate force feedback based on the material properties of a heterogeneous structure. Biological soft tissue modeling is used as an example to demonstrate the proposed techniques. By integrating the heterogeneous deformable model into a virtual environment, users can both observe different materials inside a deformable object as well as interact with it by touching the deformable object using a haptic device. The presented techniques can be used for surgical simulation, bio-product design, bio-manufacturing, and medical applications.

  2. Modelling of deformation and recrystallisation microstructures in rocks and ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bons, Paul D.; Evans, Lynn A.; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Griera, Albert; Jessell, Mark W.; Lebensohn, Ricardo; Llorens, Maria-Gema; Peternell, Mark; Piazolo, Sandra; Weikusat, Ilka; Wilson, Chris J. L.

    2015-04-01

    Microstructures both record the deformation history of a rock and strongly control its mechanical properties. As microstructures in natural rocks only show the final "post-mortem" state, geologists have attempted to simulate the development of microstructures with experiments and later numerical models. Especially in-situ experiments have given enormous insight, as time-lapse movies could reveal the full history of a microstructure. Numerical modelling is an alternative approach to simulate and follow the change in microstructure with time, unconstrained by experimental limitations. Numerical models have been applied to a range of microstructural processes, such as grain growth, dynamic recrystallisation, porphyroblast rotation, vein growth, formation of mylonitic fabrics, etc. The numerical platform "Elle" (www.elle.ws) in particular has brought progress in the simulation of microstructural development as it is specifically designed to include the competition between simultaneously operating processes. Three developments significantly improve our capability to simulate microstructural evolution: (1) model input from the mapping of crystallographic orientation with EBSD or the automatic fabric analyser, (2) measurement of grain size and crystallographic preferred orientation evolution using neutron diffraction experiments and (3) the implementation of the full-field Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) solver for modelling anisotropic crystal-plastic deformation. The latter enables the detailed modelling of stress and strain as a function of local crystallographic orientation, which has a strong effect on strain localisation such as, for example, the formation of shear bands. These models can now be compared with the temporal evolution of crystallographic orientation distributions in in-situ experiments. In the last decade, the possibility to combine experiments with numerical simulations has allowed not only verification and refinement of the numerical simulation

  3. SU-E-J-119: Head-And-Neck Digital Phantoms for Geometric and Dosimetric Uncertainty Evaluation of CT-CBCT Deformable Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z; Koyfman, S; Xia, P; Bzdusek, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate geometric and dosimetric uncertainties of CT-CBCT deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms using digital phantoms generated from real patients. Methods: We selected ten H&N cancer patients with adaptive IMRT. For each patient, a planning CT (CT1), a replanning CT (CT2), and a pretreatment CBCT (CBCT1) were used as the basis for digital phantom creation. Manually adjusted meshes were created for selected ROIs (e.g. PTVs, brainstem, spinal cord, mandible, and parotids) on CT1 and CT2. The mesh vertices were input into a thin-plate spline algorithm to generate a reference displacement vector field (DVF). The reference DVF was applied to CBCT1 to create a simulated mid-treatment CBCT (CBCT2). The CT-CBCT digital phantom consisted of CT1 and CBCT2, which were linked by the reference DVF. Three DIR algorithms (Demons, B-Spline, and intensity-based) were applied to these ten digital phantoms. The images, ROIs, and volumetric doses were mapped from CT1 to CBCT2 using the DVFs computed by these three DIRs and compared to those mapped using the reference DVF. Results: The average Dice coefficients for selected ROIs were from 0.83 to 0.94 for Demons, from 0.82 to 0.95 for B-Spline, and from 0.67 to 0.89 for intensity-based DIR. The average Hausdorff distances for selected ROIs were from 2.4 to 6.2 mm for Demons, from 1.8 to 5.9 mm for B-Spline, and from 2.8 to 11.2 mm for intensity-based DIR. The average absolute dose errors for selected ROIs were from 0.7 to 2.1 Gy for Demons, from 0.7 to 2.9 Gy for B- Spline, and from 1.3 to 4.5 Gy for intensity-based DIR. Conclusion: Using clinically realistic CT-CBCT digital phantoms, Demons and B-Spline were shown to have similar geometric and dosimetric uncertainties while intensity-based DIR had the worst uncertainties. CT-CBCT DIR has the potential to provide accurate CBCT-based dose verification for H&N adaptive radiotherapy. Z Shen: None; K Bzdusek: an employee of Philips Healthcare; S Koyfman: None; P Xia

  4. Visualization of cardiac dynamics using physics-based deformable model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-te; Robb, Richard A.

    2000-04-01

    Modeling of moving anatomic structures is complicated by the complexity of motion intrinsic and extrinsic to the structures. However when motion is cyclical, such as in heart, effective dynamic modeling can be approached using modern fast imaging techniques, which provide 3D structural data. Data may be acquired as a sequence of 3D volume images throughout the cardiac cycle. To model the intricate non- linear motion of the heart, we created a physics-based surface model which can realistically deform between successive time points in the cardiac cycle, yielding a dynamic 4D model of cardiac motion. Sequences of fifteen 3D volume images of intact canine beating hearts were acquired during compete cardiac cycles using the Dynamic Spatial Reconstructor and the Electron Beam CT. The chambers of the heart were segmented at successive time points, typically at 1/15-second intervals. The left ventricle of the first item point was reconstructed as an initial triangular mesh. A mass-spring physics-based deformable model, which can expand and shrink with local contraction and stretching forces distributed in an anatomically accurate simulation of cardiac motion, was applied to the initial mesh and allowed the initial mesh to deform to fit the left ventricle in successive time increments of the sequence. The resultant 4D model can be interactively transformed and displayed with associated regional electrical activity mapped onto the anatomic surfaces, producing a 5D mode, which faithfully exhibits regional cardiac contraction and relaxation patterns over the entire heart. For acquisition systems that may provide only limited 4D data, the model can provide interpolated anatomic shape between time points. This physics-based deformable model accurately represents dynamic cardiac structural changes throughout the cardiac cycle. Such models provides the framework for minimizing the number of time points required to usefully depict regional motion of myocardium and allowing

  5. Surrogate modeling of deformable joint contact using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Eskinazi, Ilan; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2015-09-01

    Deformable joint contact models can be used to estimate loading conditions for cartilage-cartilage, implant-implant, human-orthotic, and foot-ground interactions. However, contact evaluations are often so expensive computationally that they can be prohibitive for simulations or optimizations requiring thousands or even millions of contact evaluations. To overcome this limitation, we developed a novel surrogate contact modeling method based on artificial neural networks (ANNs). The method uses special sampling techniques to gather input-output data points from an original (slow) contact model in multiple domains of input space, where each domain represents a different physical situation likely to be encountered. For each contact force and torque output by the original contact model, a multi-layer feed-forward ANN is defined, trained, and incorporated into a surrogate contact model. As an evaluation problem, we created an ANN-based surrogate contact model of an artificial tibiofemoral joint using over 75,000 evaluations of a fine-grid elastic foundation (EF) contact model. The surrogate contact model computed contact forces and torques about 1000 times faster than a less accurate coarse grid EF contact model. Furthermore, the surrogate contact model was seven times more accurate than the coarse grid EF contact model within the input domain of a walking motion. For larger input domains, the surrogate contact model showed the expected trend of increasing error with increasing domain size. In addition, the surrogate contact model was able to identify out-of-contact situations with high accuracy. Computational contact models created using our proposed ANN approach may remove an important computational bottleneck from musculoskeletal simulations or optimizations incorporating deformable joint contact models.

  6. Surrogate Modeling of Deformable Joint Contact using Artificial Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Eskinazi, Ilan; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Deformable joint contact models can be used to estimate loading conditions for cartilage-cartilage, implant-implant, human-orthotic, and foot-ground interactions. However, contact evaluations are often so expensive computationally that they can be prohibitive for simulations or optimizations requiring thousands or even millions of contact evaluations. To overcome this limitation, we developed a novel surrogate contact modeling method based on artificial neural networks (ANNs). The method uses special sampling techniques to gather input-output data points from an original (slow) contact model in multiple domains of input space, where each domain represents a different physical situation likely to be encountered. For each contact force and torque output by the original contact model, a multi-layer feed-forward ANN is defined, trained, and incorporated into a surrogate contact model. As an evaluation problem, we created an ANN-based surrogate contact model of an artificial tibiofemoral joint using over 75,000 evaluations of a fine-grid elastic foundation (EF) contact model. The surrogate contact model computed contact forces and torques about 1000 times faster than a less accurate coarse grid EF contact model. Furthermore, the surrogate contact model was seven times more accurate than the coarse grid EF contact model within the input domain of a walking motion. For larger input domains, the surrogate contact model showed the expected trend of increasing error with increasing domain size. In addition, the surrogate contact model was able to identify out-of-contact situations with high accuracy. Computational contact models created using our proposed ANN approach may remove an important computational bottleneck from musculoskeletal simulations or optimizations incorporating deformable joint contact models. PMID:26220591

  7. Accuracy of femur reconstruction from sparse geometric data using a statistical shape model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ju; Besier, Thor F

    2017-04-01

    Sparse geometric information from limited field-of-view medical images is often used to reconstruct the femur in biomechanical models of the hip and knee. However, the full femur geometry is needed to establish boundary conditions such as muscle attachment sites and joint axes which define the orientation of joint loads. Statistical shape models have been used to estimate the geometry of the full femur from varying amounts of sparse geometric information. However, the effect that different amounts of sparse data have on reconstruction accuracy has not been systematically assessed. In this study, we compared shape model and linear scaling reconstruction of the full femur surface from varying proportions of proximal and distal partial femur geometry in combination with morphometric and landmark data. We quantified reconstruction error in terms of surface-to-surface error as well as deviations in the reconstructed femur's anatomical coordinate system which is important for biomechanical models. Using a partial proximal femur surface, mean shape model-based reconstruction surface error was 1.8 mm with 0.15° or less anatomic axis error, compared to 19.1 mm and 2.7-5.6° for linear scaling. Similar results were found when using a partial distal surface. However, varying amounts of proximal or distal partial surface data had a negligible effect on reconstruction accuracy. Our results show that given an appropriate set of sparse geometric data, a shape model can reconstruct full femur geometry with far greater accuracy than simple scaling.

  8. Frame junction vibration transmission with a modified frame deformation model.

    PubMed

    Moore, J A

    1990-12-01

    A previous paper dealt with vibration transmission through junctions of connected frame members where the allowed frame deformations included bending, torsion, and longitudinal motions [J.A. Moore, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 88, 2766-2776 (1990)]. In helicopter and aircraft structures the skin panels can constitute a high impedance connection along the length of the frames that effectively prohibits in-plane motion at the elevation of the skin panels. This has the effect of coupling in-plane bending and torsional motions within the frame. This paper discusses the transmission behavior through frame junctions that accounts for the in-plane constraint in idealized form by assuming that the attached skin panels completely prohibit inplane motion in the frames. Also, transverse shear deformation is accounted for in describing the relatively deep web frame constructions common in aircraft structures. Longitudinal motion in the frames is not included in the model. Transmission coefficient predictions again show the importance of out-of-plane bending deformation to the transmission of vibratory energy in an aircraft structure. Comparisons are shown with measured vibration transmission data along the framing in the overhead of a helicopter airframe, with good agreement. The frame junction description has been implemented within a general purpose statistical energy analysis (SEA) computer code in modeling the entire airframe structure including skin panels.

  9. Oscillatory athermal quasistatic deformation of a model glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiocco, Davide; Foffi, Giuseppe; Sastry, Srikanth

    2013-08-01

    We report computer simulations of oscillatory athermal quasistatic shear deformation of dense amorphous samples of a three-dimensional model glass former. A dynamical transition is observed as the amplitude of the deformation is varied: For large values of the amplitude the system exhibits diffusive behavior and loss of memory of the initial conditions, whereas localization is observed for small amplitudes. Our results suggest that the same kind of transition found in driven colloidal systems is present in the case of amorphous solids (e.g., metallic glasses). The onset of the transition is shown to be related to the onset of energy dissipation. Shear banding is observed for large system sizes, without, however, affecting qualitative aspects of the transition.

  10. Improved techniques for thermomechanical testing in support of deformation modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castelli, Michael G.; Ellis, John R.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of generating precise thermomechanical deformation data to support constitutive model development was investigated. Here, the requirement is for experimental data that is free from anomalies caused by less than ideal equipment and procedures. A series of exploratory tests conducted on Hastelloy X showed that generally accepted techniques for strain controlled tests were lacking in at least three areas. Specifically, problems were encountered with specimen stability, thermal strain compensation, and temperature/mechanical strain phasing. The source of these difficulties was identified and improved thermomechanical testing techniques to correct them were developed. These goals were achieved by developing improved procedures for measuring and controlling thermal gradients and by designing a specimen specifically for thermomechanical testing. In addition, innovative control strategies were developed to correctly proportion and phase the thermal and mechanical components of strain. Subsequently, the improved techniques were used to generate deformation data for Hastelloy X over the temperature range, 200 to 1000 C.

  11. Finite element modeling of the deformation of magnetoelastic film

    SciTech Connect

    Barham, Matthew I.; White, Daniel A.; Steigmann, David J.

    2010-09-01

    Recently a new class of biocompatible elastic polymers loaded with small ferrous particles, a magnetoelastic polymer, has been developed. This engineered material is formed into a thin film using spin casting. An applied magnetic field will deform the film. The magnetic deformation of this film has many possible applications, particularly in microfluidic pumps and pressure regulators. In this paper a finite element method suitable for the transient simulation of arbitrarily shaped three-dimensional magnetoelastic polymers subjected to time-varying magnetic fields is developed. The approach is similar to that employed in finite elment magnetohydrodynamic simulations, the key difference is a more complex hyperelastic material model. In order to confirm the validity of the approach, finite element solutions for an axially symmetric thin film are compared to an analytical solution based on the membrane (infinitely thin) approximation. For this particular problem the two approaches give qualitatively similar results and converge as the film thickness approaches zero.

  12. Elastic properties of compressed cryocrystals in a deformed atom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbenko, Ie. Ie.; Zhikharev, I. V.; Troitskaya, E. P.; Chabanenko, Val. V.; Pilipenko, E. A.

    2013-06-01

    A model with deformed atom shells was built to investigate the elastic properties of rare-gas Ne and Kr crystals under high pressure. It is shown that the observed deviation from the Cauchy relation δ cannot be adequately reproduced when taking into account only the many-body interaction. The individual pressure dependence of δ is the result of competition of the many-body interaction and the quadrupole interaction associated with the quadrupole-type deformation of electron shells of the atoms during the displacement of the nuclei. Each kind of interaction makes a strongly pressure dependent contribution to δ. In the case of Ne and Kr, contributions of these interactions are compensated to a good precision, providing δ being almost constant against pressure.

  13. Geant4.10 simulation of geometric model for metaphase chromosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafat-Motavalli, L.; Miri-Hakimabad, H.; Bakhtiyari, E.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a geometric model of metaphase chromosome is explained. The model is constructed according to the packing ratio and dimension of the structure from nucleosome up to chromosome. A B-DNA base pair is used to construct 200 base pairs of nucleosomes. Each chromatin fiber loop, which is the unit of repeat, has 49,200 bp. This geometry is entered in Geant4.10 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit and can be extended to the whole metaphase chromosomes and any application in which a DNA geometrical model is needed. The chromosome base pairs, chromosome length, and relative length of chromosomes are calculated. The calculated relative length is compared to the relative length of human chromosomes.

  14. An independent-atom-model description of ion-molecule collisions including geometric screening corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüdde, Hans Jürgen; Achenbach, Alexander; Kalkbrenner, Thilo; Jankowiak, Hans-Christian; Kirchner, Tom

    2016-04-01

    A new model to account for geometric screening corrections in an independent-atom-model description of ion-molecule collisions is introduced. The ion-molecule cross sections for net capture and net ionization are represented as weighted sums of atomic cross sections with weight factors that are determined from a geometric model of overlapping cross section areas. Results are presented for proton collisions with targets ranging from diatomic to complex polyatomic molecules. Significant improvement compared to simple additivity rule results and in general good agreement with experimental data are found. The flexibility of the approach opens up the possibility to study more detailed observables such as orientation-dependent and charge-state-correlated cross sections for a large class of complex targets ranging from biomolecules to atomic clusters.

  15. Region-based geometric modelling of human airways and arterial vessels.

    PubMed

    Ding, Songlin; Ye, Yong; Tu, Jiyuan; Subic, Aleksandar

    2010-03-01

    Anatomically precise geometric models of human airways and arterial vessels play a critical role in the analysis of air and blood flows in human bodies. The established geometric modelling methods become invalid when the model consists of bronchioles or small vessels. This paper presents a new method for reconstructing the entire airway tree and carotid vessels from point clouds obtained from CT or MR images. A novel layer-by-layer searching algorithm has been developed to recognize branches of the airway tree and arterial vessels from the point clouds. Instead of applying uniform accuracy to all branches regardless of the number of available points, the surface patches on each branch are constructed adaptively based on the number of available elemental points, which leads to the elimination of distortions occurring at small bronchi and vessels.

  16. Quasiequilibrium models for triaxially deformed rotating compact stars

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Xing; Markakis, Charalampos; Sugiyama, Noriyuki; Uryu, Koji

    2008-12-15

    Quasiequilibrium models of rapidly rotating triaxially deformed stars are computed in general relativistic gravity, assuming a conformally flat spatial geometry (Isenberg-Wilson-Mathews formulation) and a polytropic equation of state. Highly deformed solutions are calculated on the initial slice covered by spherical coordinate grids, centered at the source, in all angular directions up to a large truncation radius. Constant rest mass sequences are calculated from nearly axisymmetric to maximally deformed triaxial configurations. Selected parameters are to model (proto-) neutron stars; the compactness is M/R=0.001, 0.1, 0.14, and 0.2 for polytropic index n=0.3 and M/R=0.001, 0.1, 0.12, and 0.14 for n=0.5, where M/R refers to that of a nonrotating spherical star having the same rest mass. We confirmed that the triaxial solutions exist for these parameters as in the case of Newtonian polytropes. However, it is also found that the triaxial sequences become shorter for higher compactness, and those disappear at a certain large compactness for the n=0.5 case. In the scenario of the contraction of proto-neutron stars being subject to strong viscosity and rapid cooling, it is plausible that, once the viscosity driven secular instability sets in during the contraction, the proto-neutron stars are always maximally deformed triaxial configurations, as long as the compactness and the equation of state parameters allow such triaxial sequences. Detection of gravitational waves from such sources may be used as another probe for the nuclear equation of state.

  17. A nonaffine network model for elastomers undergoing finite deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Jacob D.; Goulbourne, N. C.

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we construct a new physics-based model of rubber elasticity to capture the strain softening, strain hardening, and deformation-state dependent response of rubber materials undergoing finite deformations. This model is unique in its ability to capture large-stretch mechanical behavior with parameters that are connected to the polymer chemistry and can also be easily identified with the important characteristics of the macroscopic stress-stretch response. The microscopic picture consists of two components: a crosslinked network of Langevin chains and an entangled network with chains confined to a nonaffine tube. These represent, respectively, changes in entropy due to thermally averaged chain conformations and changes in entropy due to the magnitude of these conformational fluctuations. A simple analytical form for the strain energy density is obtained using Rubinstein and Panyukov's single-chain description of network behavior. The model only depends on three parameters that together define the initial modulus, extent of strain softening, and the onset of strain hardening. Fits to large stretch data for natural rubber, silicone rubber, VHB 4905 (polyacrylate rubber), and b186 rubber (a carbon black-filled rubber) are presented, and a comparison is made with other similar constitutive models of large-stretch rubber elasticity. We demonstrate that the proposed model provides a complete description of elastomers undergoing large deformations for different applied loading configurations. Moreover, since the strain energy is obtained using a clear set of physical assumptions, this model may be tested and used to interpret the results of computer simulation and experiments on polymers of known microscopic structure.

  18. Modelling the transport of geometrically necessary dislocations on slip systems: application to single- and multi-crystals of ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richeton, T.; Le, LT; Chauve, T.; Bernacki, M.; Berbenni, S.; Montagnat, M.

    2017-02-01

    A model based on the elastic theory of continuously distributed dislocations, accounting for the transport of geometrically necessary dislocations (GND) on slip systems is developed. It allows keeping the crystallographic nature of glide by allocating velocities specific to slip systems to GND. At grain boundaries, the dislocation transport equation is resolved between a specific system in a grain and a specific system in the adjacent grain. It is used to simulate a compression creep test followed by unloading of a multiple slip deforming multi-crystal of ice during which kink band formation, grain boundary migration and localized grain nucleation are observed. The model predictions are compared to 2D strain fields obtained by digital image correlation and show a good agreement. Besides, the kink band position corresponds very well with an area of strong lattice misorientation predicted by the model and is also bounded by opposite densities of edge dislocations, in agreement with kink banding theory and characterization. Furthermore, the grain boundary migration is observed to happen from predicted low dislocation density area towards high dislocation ones—also in agreement with the theory. Lastly, the triple junctions where nucleation is observed are also characterized by high GND density and especially strong gradient of elastic energy density. These different features show the relevance of using a continuum theory of polarized dislocations per slip system to study the onset of relaxation mechanisms like kink banding, grain boundary migration and grain nucleation and possibly to propose nucleation and migration criteria.

  19. Evaluation of Geometrically Nonlinear Reduced Order Models with Nonlinear Normal Modes

    DOE PAGES

    Kuether, Robert J.; Deaner, Brandon J.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.; ...

    2015-09-15

    Several reduced-order modeling strategies have been developed to create low-order models of geometrically nonlinear structures from detailed finite element models, allowing one to compute the dynamic response of the structure at a dramatically reduced cost. But, the parameters of these reduced-order models are estimated by applying a series of static loads to the finite element model, and the quality of the reduced-order model can be highly sensitive to the amplitudes of the static load cases used and to the type/number of modes used in the basis. Our paper proposes to combine reduced-order modeling and numerical continuation to estimate the nonlinearmore » normal modes of geometrically nonlinear finite element models. Not only does this make it possible to compute the nonlinear normal modes far more quickly than existing approaches, but the nonlinear normal modes are also shown to be an excellent metric by which the quality of the reduced-order model can be assessed. Hence, the second contribution of this work is to demonstrate how nonlinear normal modes can be used as a metric by which nonlinear reduced-order models can be compared. Moreover, various reduced-order models with hardening nonlinearities are compared for two different structures to demonstrate these concepts: a clamped–clamped beam model, and a more complicated finite element model of an exhaust panel cover.« less

  20. Evaluation of Geometrically Nonlinear Reduced Order Models with Nonlinear Normal Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Kuether, Robert J.; Deaner, Brandon J.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.; Allen, Matthew S.

    2015-09-15

    Several reduced-order modeling strategies have been developed to create low-order models of geometrically nonlinear structures from detailed finite element models, allowing one to compute the dynamic response of the structure at a dramatically reduced cost. But, the parameters of these reduced-order models are estimated by applying a series of static loads to the finite element model, and the quality of the reduced-order model can be highly sensitive to the amplitudes of the static load cases used and to the type/number of modes used in the basis. Our paper proposes to combine reduced-order modeling and numerical continuation to estimate the nonlinear normal modes of geometrically nonlinear finite element models. Not only does this make it possible to compute the nonlinear normal modes far more quickly than existing approaches, but the nonlinear normal modes are also shown to be an excellent metric by which the quality of the reduced-order model can be assessed. Hence, the second contribution of this work is to demonstrate how nonlinear normal modes can be used as a metric by which nonlinear reduced-order models can be compared. Moreover, various reduced-order models with hardening nonlinearities are compared for two different structures to demonstrate these concepts: a clamped–clamped beam model, and a more complicated finite element model of an exhaust panel cover.

  1. Active deformable sheets: prototype implementation, modeling, and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Robert J.; Johnson, Norbert; Doumanidis, Charalabos C.

    2000-06-01

    Active deformable sheets are integrated smart planar sheet structures performing off-plane deformations under computer actuation and control, to take up a desired dynamic morphology specified in CAD software or obtained by 3-D scanning of a solid surface. The sheet prototypes are implemented in the laboratory by elastic neoprene foil layers with embedded asymmetric grids of SMA wires (Nitinol), which upon electrical contraction bend the sheet to the necessary local curvature distribution. An analytical model of such prototypes, consisting of an electrical, a thermal, a material and a mechanical module, as well as a more complex finite element thermomechanical simulation of the sheet structure have been developed and validated experimentally. Besides open-loop control of the sheet curvatures by modulation of the SMA wire actuation current, a closed-loop control system has been implemented, using feedback of the wire electrical resistance measurements in real time, correlating to the material transformation state. The active deformable sheets are intended for applications such as reconfigurable airfoils and aerospace structures, variable focal length optics and electromagnetic reflectors, flexible and rapid tooling and microrobotics.

  2. Geometric Moments Based Ellipsoid Model for Defining Spatio-Temporal Characteristics of Extreme Rainfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, H.

    2011-12-01

    The impact of climate variation on monsoon seasonal rainfall has been generally well documented in the climate literature. However, rather limited efforts have been done to understand moisture transport and their impact on extreme rainfall in the hydrology field. This study developed a new model for extracting moisture tracks associated with extreme events as a way to characterize large scale climate system. Main interests are to derive location, size and direction of the rainfall field and this study developed an algorithm to extract the above characteristics from global climate data set. In order to facilitate characterization of synoptic patterns, geometric moment based ellipsoid models are introduced. Local weather station data in Korea and NCEP reanalysis data are mainly utilized to identify synoptic patterns. The proposed geometric moments based ellipsoid model works equally well with regularly and irregularly distributed synthetic grid data. Finally, the proposed model was applied to space-time real moisture transport. We extracted daily wind patterns and specific humidity on top 20 extreme rainfall events and apply a 90% threshold to isolate high magnitude of moisture transport associated with extreme rainfall in South Korea. It was found that location, size and direction of the rainfall field was successfully extracted. Our analyses of daily synoptic moisture transport patterns defined by geometric moments suggest can be possibly clustered given their intensity, direction and position properties. Acknowledgement : This work was supported by National Research Foundation of Korea Grant funded by the Korean Government (NRF-2010-220-D00083)

  3. A human supervisory approach to rapid world modeling through the use of geometric primitives

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, J.; Roberts, R.

    1997-08-11

    A three-dimensional world model is crucial for many robot-oriented tasks. The most efficient mapping configuration use geometric primitives to model environments, and are easy to store and process. In the past, modeling techniques have been either fully manual or autonomous. Manual methods are extremely time consuming but also highly accurate and flexible. On the other hand autonomous techniques are fast but inflexible and often inaccurate. The method presented in this paper combines the two thereby yielding a highly efficient, flexible, and accurate tool. Our methods enable a human supervisor to quickly construct a fully defined world model from unfiltered and unsegmented real-world range data.

  4. Hubble space telescope observations and geometric models of compact multipolar planetary nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, Chih-Hao; Chau, Wayne; Zhang, Yong; Kwok, Sun E-mail: wwlljj1314@gmail.com E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk

    2014-05-20

    We report high angular resolution Hubble Space Telescope observations of 10 compact planetary nebulae (PNs). Many interesting internal structures, including multipolar lobes, arcs, two-dimensional rings, tori, and halos, are revealed for the first time. These results suggest that multipolar structures are common among PNs, and these structures develop early in their evolution. From three-dimensional geometric models, we have determined the intrinsic dimensions of the lobes. Assuming the lobes are the result of interactions between later-developed fast winds and previously ejected asymptotic giant branch winds, the geometric structures of these PNs suggest that there are multiple phases of fast winds separated by temporal variations and/or directional changes. A scenario of evolution from lobe-dominated to cavity-dominated stages is presented. The results reported here will provide serious constraints on any dynamical models of PNs.

  5. Partial SUSY breaking for asymmetric Gepner models and non-geometric flux vacua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenhagen, Ralph; Fuchs, Michael; Plauschinn, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Using the method of simple current extensions, asymmetric Gepner models of Type IIB with N = 1 space-time supersymmetry are constructed. The combinatorics of the massless vector fields suggests that these classical Minkowski string vacua provide fully backreacted solutions corresponding to N = 1 minima of N = 2 gauged supergravity. The latter contain abelian gaugings along the axionic isometries in the hypermultiplet moduli space, and can be considered as Type IIB flux compactifications on Calabi-Yau manifolds equipped with (non-)geometric fluxes. For a particular class of asymmetric Gepner models, we are able to explicitly specify the underlying CICYs and to check necessary conditions for a GSUGRA interpretation. If this conjecture is correct, there exists a large class of exactly solvable non-geometric flux compactifications on CY threefolds.

  6. Multiscale Combination of Physically-Based Registration and Deformation Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Tsap, L.; Goldgof, D.B.; Sarkar, S.

    1999-11-08

    In this paper the authors present a novel multiscale approach to recovery of nonrigid motion from sequences of registered intensity and range images. The main idea of the approach is that a finite element (FEM) model can naturally handle both registration and deformation modeling using a single model-driving strategy. The method includes a multiscale iterative algorithm based on analysis of the undirected Hausdorff distance to recover correspondences. The method is evaluated with respect to speed, accuracy, and noise sensitivity. Advantages of the proposed approach are demonstrated using man-made elastic materials and human skin motion. Experiments with regular grid features are used for performance comparison with a conventional approach (separate snakes and FEM models). It is shown that the new method does not require a grid and can adapt the model to available object features.

  7. Simplified versus geometrically accurate models of forefoot anatomy to predict plantar pressures: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Telfer, Scott; Erdemir, Ahmet; Woodburn, James; Cavanagh, Peter R

    2016-01-25

    Integration of patient-specific biomechanical measurements into the design of therapeutic footwear has been shown to improve clinical outcomes in patients with diabetic foot disease. The addition of numerical simulations intended to optimise intervention design may help to build on these advances, however at present the time and labour required to generate and run personalised models of foot anatomy restrict their routine clinical utility. In this study we developed second-generation personalised simple finite element (FE) models of the forefoot with varying geometric fidelities. Plantar pressure predictions from barefoot, shod, and shod with insole simulations using simplified models were compared to those obtained from CT-based FE models incorporating more detailed representations of bone and tissue geometry. A simplified model including representations of metatarsals based on simple geometric shapes, embedded within a contoured soft tissue block with outer geometry acquired from a 3D surface scan was found to provide pressure predictions closest to the more complex model, with mean differences of 13.3kPa (SD 13.4), 12.52kPa (SD 11.9) and 9.6kPa (SD 9.3) for barefoot, shod, and insole conditions respectively. The simplified model design could be produced in <1h compared to >3h in the case of the more detailed model, and solved on average 24% faster. FE models of the forefoot based on simplified geometric representations of the metatarsal bones and soft tissue surface geometry from 3D surface scans may potentially provide a simulation approach with improved clinical utility, however further validity testing around a range of therapeutic footwear types is required.

  8. Geometric and Hydrodynamic Characteristics of Three-dimensional Saturated Prefractal Porous Media Determined with Lattice Boltzmann Modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fractal and prefractal geometric models have substantial potential of contributing to the analysis of flow and transport in porous media such as soils and reservoir rocks. In this study, geometric and hydrodynamic parameters of saturated 3D mass and pore-solid prefractal porous media were characteri...

  9. Neural Network method for Inverse Modeling of Material Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.D., Jr.; Ivezic, N.D.; Zacharia, T.

    1999-07-10

    A method is described for inverse modeling of material deformation in applications of importance to the sheet metal forming industry. The method was developed in order to assess the feasibility of utilizing empirical data in the early stages of the design process as an alternative to conventional prototyping methods. Because properly prepared and employed artificial neural networks (ANN) were known to be capable of codifying and generalizing large bodies of empirical data, they were the natural choice for the application. The product of the work described here is a desktop ANN system that can produce in one pass an accurate die design for a user-specified part shape.

  10. Comparison of Three Optical Methods for Measuring Model Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Fleming, G. A.; Hoppe, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare the current state-of-the-art of the following three optical techniques under study by NASA for measuring model deformation in wind tunnels: (1) video photogrammetry, (2) projection moire interferometry, and (3) the commercially available Optotrak system. An objective comparison of these three techniques should enable the selection of the best technique for a particular test undertaken at various NASA facilities. As might be expected, no one technique is best for all applications. The techniques are also not necessarily mutually exclusive and in some cases can be complementary to one another.

  11. Finite Element Model and Validation of Nasal Tip Deformation.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Cyrus T; Harb, Rani; Badran, Alan; Ho, David; Wong, Brian J F

    2017-03-01

    Nasal tip mechanical stability is important for functional and cosmetic nasal airway surgery. Palpation of the nasal tip provides information on tip strength to the surgeon, though it is a purely subjective assessment. Providing a means to simulate nasal tip deformation with a validated model can offer a more objective approach in understanding the mechanics and nuances of the nasal tip support and eventual nasal mechanics as a whole. Herein we present validation of a finite element (FE) model of the nose using physical measurements recorded using an ABS plastic-silicone nasal phantom. Three-dimensional photogrammetry was used to capture the geometry of the phantom at rest and while under steady state load. The silicone used to make the phantom was mechanically tested and characterized using a linear elastic constitutive model. Surface point clouds of the silicone and FE model were compared for both the loaded and unloaded state. The average Hausdorff distance between actual measurements and FE simulations across the nose were 0.39 ± 1.04 mm and deviated up to 2 mm at the outermost boundaries of the model. FE simulation and measurements were in near complete agreement in the immediate vicinity of the nasal tip with millimeter accuracy. We have demonstrated validation of a two-component nasal FE model, which could be used to model more complex modes of deformation where direct measurement may be challenging. This is the first step in developing a nasal model to simulate nasal mechanics and ultimately the interaction between geometry and airflow.

  12. Monte Carlo based geometrical model for efficiency calculation of an n-type HPGe detector.

    PubMed

    Cabal, Fatima Padilla; Lopez-Pino, Neivy; Bernal-Castillo, Jose Luis; Martinez-Palenzuela, Yisel; Aguilar-Mena, Jimmy; D'Alessandro, Katia; Arbelo, Yuniesky; Corrales, Yasser; Diaz, Oscar

    2010-12-01

    A procedure to optimize the geometrical model of an n-type detector is described. Sixteen lines from seven point sources ((241)Am, (133)Ba, (22)Na, (60)Co, (57)Co, (137)Cs and (152)Eu) placed at three different source-to-detector distances (10, 20 and 30 cm) were used to calibrate a low-background gamma spectrometer between 26 and 1408 keV. Direct Monte Carlo techniques using the MCNPX 2.6 and GEANT 4 9.2 codes, and a semi-empirical procedure were performed to obtain theoretical efficiency curves. Since discrepancies were found between experimental and calculated data using the manufacturer parameters of the detector, a detail study of the crystal dimensions and the geometrical configuration is carried out. The relative deviation with experimental data decreases from a mean value of 18-4%, after the parameters were optimized.

  13. Multiple unfoldings of orbifold singularities: Engineering geometric analogies to unification

    SciTech Connect

    Bourjaily, Jacob L.

    2009-02-15

    Katz and Vafa [Nucl. Phys. B497, 146 (1997)] showed how charged matter can arise geometrically by the deformation of ADE-type orbifold singularities in type IIa, M-theory, and F-theory compactifications. In this paper we use those same basic ingredients, used there to geometrically engineer specific matter representations, here to deform the compactification manifold itself in a way which naturally compliments many features of unified model building. We realize this idea explicitly by deforming a manifold engineered to give rise to an SU{sub 5} grand unified model into a one giving rise to the standard model. In this framework, the relative local positions of the singularities giving rise to standard model fields are specified in terms of the values of a small number of complex structure moduli which deform the original manifold, greatly reducing the arbitrariness of their relative positions.

  14. Complex transformation field created by geometrical gradient design of NiTi shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtiari, Reza; Shariat, Bashir S.; Motazedian, Fakhrodin; Wu, Zhigang; Zhang, Junsong; Yang, Hong; Liu, Yinong

    Owing to geometrical non-uniformity, geometrically graded shape memory alloy (SMA) structures by design have the ability to exhibit different and novel thermal and mechanical behaviors compared to geometrically uniform conventional SMAs. This paper reports a study of the pseudoelastic behavior of geometrically graded NiTi plates. This geometrical gradient creates partial stress gradient over stress-induced martensitic transformation, providing enlarged stress controlling interval for shape memory actuation. Finite element modeling framework has been established to predict the deformation behavior of such structures in tensile loading cycles, which was validated by experiments. The modeling results show that the transformation mostly propagates along the gradient direction as the loading level increases.

  15. Statistical Modeling of CTV Motion and Deformation for IMRT of Early-Stage Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bondar, Luiza; Intven, Martijn; Burbach, J.P. Maarten; Budiarto, Eka; Kleijnen, Jean-Paul; Philippens, Marielle; Asselen, Bram van; Seravalli, Enrica; Reerink, Onne; Raaymakers, Bas

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To derive and validate a statistical model of motion and deformation for the clinical target volume (CTV) of early-stage rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: For 16 patients, 4 to 5 magnetic resonance images (MRI) were acquired before each fraction was administered. The CTV was delineated on each MRI. Using a leave-one-out methodology, we constructed a population-based principal component analysis (PCA) model of the CTV motion and deformation of 15 patients, and we tested the model on the left-out patient. The modeling error was calculated as the amount of the CTV motion-deformation of the left-out-patient that could not be explained by the PCA model. Next, the PCA model was used to construct a PCA target volume (PCA-TV) by accumulating motion-deformations simulated by the model. A PCA planning target volume (PTV) was generated by expanding the PCA-TV by uniform margins. The PCA-PTV was compared with uniform and nonuniform CTV-to-PTV margins. To allow comparison, geometric margins were determined to ensure adequate coverage, and the volume difference between the PTV and the daily CTV (CTV-to-PTV volume) was calculated. Results: The modeling error ranged from 0.9 ± 0.5 to 2.9 ± 2.1 mm, corresponding to a reduction of the CTV motion-deformation between 6% and 60% (average, 23% ± 11%). The reduction correlated with the magnitude of the CTV motion-deformation (P<.001, R=0.66). The PCA-TV and the CTV required 2-mm and 7-mm uniform margins, respectively. The nonuniform CTV-to-PTV margins were 4 mm in the left, right, inferior, superior, and posterior directions and 8 mm in the anterior direction. Compared to uniform and nonuniform CTV-to-PTV margins, the PCA-based PTV significantly decreased (P<.001) the average CTV-to-PTV volume by 128 ± 20 mL (49% ± 4%) and by 35 ± 6 mL (20% ± 3.5%), respectively. Conclusions: The CTV motion-deformation of a new patient can be explained by a population-based PCA model. A PCA model

  16. A dislocation-based, strain–gradient–plasticity strengthening model for deformation processed metal-metal composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Liang; Russell, Alan; Anderson, Iver

    2014-01-03

    Deformation processed metal–metal composites (DMMCs) are high-strength, high-electrical conductivity composites developed by severe plastic deformation of two ductile metal phases. The extraordinarily high strength of DMMCs is underestimated using the rule of mixture (or volumetric weighted average) of conventionally work-hardened metals. In this article, a dislocation-density-based, strain–gradient–plasticity model is proposed to relate the strain-gradient effect with the geometrically necessary dislocations emanating from the interface to better predict the strength of DMMCs. The model prediction was compared with the experimental findings of Cu–Nb, Cu–Ta, and Al–Ti DMMC systems to verify the applicability of the new model. The results show that this model predicts the strength of DMMCs better than the rule-of-mixture model. The strain-gradient effect, responsible for the exceptionally high strength of heavily cold worked DMMCs, is dominant at large deformation strain since its characteristic microstructure length is comparable with the intrinsic material length.

  17. A dislocation-based, strain–gradient–plasticity strengthening model for deformation processed metal–metal composites

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Liang; Russell, Alan; Anderson, Iver

    2014-01-03

    Deformation processed metal–metal composites (DMMCs) are high-strength, high-electrical conductivity composites developed by severe plastic deformation of two ductile metal phases. The extraordinarily high strength of DMMCs is underestimated using the rule of mixture (or volumetric weighted average) of conventionally work-hardened metals. A dislocation-density-based, strain–gradient–plasticity model is proposed to relate the strain-gradient effect with the geometrically necessary dislocations emanating from the interface to better predict the strength of DMMCs. The model prediction was compared with our experimental findings of Cu–Nb, Cu–Ta, and Al–Ti DMMC systems to verify the applicability of the new model. The results show that this model predicts themore » strength of DMMCs better than the rule-of-mixture model. The strain-gradient effect, responsible for the exceptionally high strength of heavily cold worked DMMCs, is dominant at large deformation strain since its characteristic microstructure length is comparable with the intrinsic material length.« less

  18. A dislocation-based, strain–gradient–plasticity strengthening model for deformation processed metal–metal composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Liang; Russell, Alan; Anderson, Iver

    2014-01-03

    Deformation processed metal–metal composites (DMMCs) are high-strength, high-electrical conductivity composites developed by severe plastic deformation of two ductile metal phases. The extraordinarily high strength of DMMCs is underestimated using the rule of mixture (or volumetric weighted average) of conventionally work-hardened metals. A dislocation-density-based, strain–gradient–plasticity model is proposed to relate the strain-gradient effect with the geometrically necessary dislocations emanating from the interface to better predict the strength of DMMCs. The model prediction was compared with our experimental findings of Cu–Nb, Cu–Ta, and Al–Ti DMMC systems to verify the applicability of the new model. The results show that this model predicts the strength of DMMCs better than the rule-of-mixture model. The strain-gradient effect, responsible for the exceptionally high strength of heavily cold worked DMMCs, is dominant at large deformation strain since its characteristic microstructure length is comparable with the intrinsic material length.

  19. Multi-view and 3D deformable part models.

    PubMed

    Pepik, Bojan; Stark, Michael; Gehler, Peter; Schiele, Bernt

    2015-11-01

    As objects are inherently 3D, they have been modeled in 3D in the early days of computer vision. Due to the ambiguities arising from mapping 2D features to 3D models, 3D object representations have been neglected and 2D feature-based models are the predominant paradigm in object detection nowadays. While such models have achieved outstanding bounding box detection performance, they come with limited expressiveness, as they are clearly limited in their capability of reasoning about 3D shape or viewpoints. In this work, we bring the worlds of 3D and 2D object representations closer, by building an object detector which leverages the expressive power of 3D object representations while at the same time can be robustly matched to image evidence. To that end, we gradually extend the successful deformable part model [1] to include viewpoint information and part-level 3D geometry information, resulting in several different models with different level of expressiveness. We end up with a 3D object model, consisting of multiple object parts represented in 3D and a continuous appearance model. We experimentally verify that our models, while providing richer object hypotheses than the 2D object models, provide consistently better joint object localization and viewpoint estimation than the state-of-the-art multi-view and 3D object detectors on various benchmarks (KITTI [2] , 3D object classes [3] , Pascal3D+ [4] , Pascal VOC 2007 [5] , EPFL multi-view cars[6] ).

  20. Modeling Permanent Deformations of Superelastic and Shape Memory Materials

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Marco Fabrizio; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we propose a modification of the polycrystalline shape memory alloy constitutive model originally proposed by Souza. By introducing a transformation strain energy with two different hardening coefficients, we are able to take into account the effect of the martensitic transformation of unfavorably oriented grains occurring after the main plateau. By choosing a proper second hardening coefficient, it is possible to reproduce the correct stress strain behavior of the material after the plateau without the need of introducing a much smaller Young modulus for martensite. The proposed modification is introduced in the model comprising permanent deformation effects. Model results for uniaxial stress tests are compared to experimental results showing good agreement. PMID:26110494

  1. Automated 3D motion tracking using Gabor filter bank, robust point matching, and deformable models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Wang, Xiaoxu; Chung, Sohae; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2010-01-01

    Tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tagged MRI or tMRI) provides a means of directly and noninvasively displaying the internal motion of the myocardium. Reconstruction of the motion field is needed to quantify important clinical information, e.g., the myocardial strain, and detect regional heart functional loss. In this paper, we present a three-step method for this task. First, we use a Gabor filter bank to detect and locate tag intersections in the image frames, based on local phase analysis. Next, we use an improved version of the robust point matching (RPM) method to sparsely track the motion of the myocardium, by establishing a transformation function and a one-to-one correspondence between grid tag intersections in different image frames. In particular, the RPM helps to minimize the impact on the motion tracking result of 1) through-plane motion and 2) relatively large deformation and/or relatively small tag spacing. In the final step, a meshless deformable model is initialized using the transformation function computed by RPM. The model refines the motion tracking and generates a dense displacement map, by deforming under the influence of image information, and is constrained by the displacement magnitude to retain its geometric structure. The 2D displacement maps in short and long axis image planes can be combined to drive a 3D deformable model, using the moving least square method, constrained by the minimization of the residual error at tag intersections. The method has been tested on a numerical phantom, as well as on in vivo heart data from normal volunteers and heart disease patients. The experimental results show that the new method has a good performance on both synthetic and real data. Furthermore, the method has been used in an initial clinical study to assess the differences in myocardial strain distributions between heart disease (left ventricular hypertrophy) patients and the normal control group. The final results show that the proposed method

  2. Modelling Polymer Deformation and Welding Behaviour during 3D Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlroy, Claire; Olmsted, Peter

    2016-11-01

    3D printing has the potential to transform manufacturing processes, yet improving the strength of printed parts, to equal that of traditionally-manufactured parts, remains an underlying issue. The most common method, fused deposition modelling, involves melting a thermoplastic, followed by layer-by-layer extrusion of the material to fabricate a three-dimensional object. The key to the ensuring strength at the weld between these layers is successful inter-diffusion. However, as the printed layer cools towards the glass transition temperature, the time available for diffusion is limited. In addition, the extrusion process significantly deforms the polymer micro-structure prior to welding and consequently affects how the polymers "re-entangle" across the weld. We have developed a simple model of the non-isothermal printing process to explore the effects that typical printing conditions and amorphous polymer rheology have on the ultimate weld structure. In particular, we incorporate both the stretch and orientation of the polymer using the Rolie-Poly constitutive equation to examine how the melt flows through the nozzle and is deposited onto the build plate. We then address how this deformation relaxes and contributes to the thickness and structure of the weld. National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) and Georgetown University.

  3. Analysis of deformable image registration accuracy using computational modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Hualiang; Kim, Jinkoo; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2010-03-15

    Computer aided modeling of anatomic deformation, allowing various techniques and protocols in radiation therapy to be systematically verified and studied, has become increasingly attractive. In this study the potential issues in deformable image registration (DIR) were analyzed based on two numerical phantoms: One, a synthesized, low intensity gradient prostate image, and the other a lung patient's CT image data set. Each phantom was modeled with region-specific material parameters with its deformation solved using a finite element method. The resultant displacements were used to construct a benchmark to quantify the displacement errors of the Demons and B-Spline-based registrations. The results show that the accuracy of these registration algorithms depends on the chosen parameters, the selection of which is closely associated with the intensity gradients of the underlying images. For the Demons algorithm, both single resolution (SR) and multiresolution (MR) registrations required approximately 300 iterations to reach an accuracy of 1.4 mm mean error in the lung patient's CT image (and 0.7 mm mean error averaged in the lung only). For the low gradient prostate phantom, these algorithms (both SR and MR) required at least 1600 iterations to reduce their mean errors to 2 mm. For the B-Spline algorithms, best performance (mean errors of 1.9 mm for SR and 1.6 mm for MR, respectively) on the low gradient prostate was achieved using five grid nodes in each direction. Adding more grid nodes resulted in larger errors. For the lung patient's CT data set, the B-Spline registrations required ten grid nodes in each direction for highest accuracy (1.4 mm for SR and 1.5 mm for MR). The numbers of iterations or grid nodes required for optimal registrations depended on the intensity gradients of the underlying images. In summary, the performance of the Demons and B-Spline registrations have been quantitatively evaluated using numerical phantoms. The results show that parameter

  4. Continuum modeling of deformation and aggregation of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Daegeun; You, Donghyun

    2016-07-26

    In order to gain better understanding for rheology of an isolated red blood cell (RBC) and a group of multiple RBCs, new continuum models for describing mechanical properties of cellular structures of an RBC and inter-cellular interactions among multiple RBCs are developed. The viscous property of an RBC membrane, which characterizes dynamic behaviors of an RBC under stress loading and unloading processes, is determined using a generalized Maxwell model. The present model is capable of predicting stress relaxation and stress-strain hysteresis, of which prediction is not possible using the commonly used Kelvin-Voigt model. Nonlinear elasticity of an RBC is determined using the Yeoh hyperelastic material model in a framework of continuum mechanics using finite-element approximation. A novel method to model inter-cellular interactions among multiple adjacent RBCs is also developed. Unlike the previous modeling approaches for aggregation of RBCs, where interaction energy for aggregation is curve-fitted using a Morse-type potential function, the interaction energy is analytically determined. The present aggregation model, therefore, allows us to predict various effects of physical parameters such as the osmotic pressure, the thickness of a glycocalyx layer, the penetration depth, and the permittivity, on the depletion and electrostatic energy among RBCs. Simulations for elongation and recovery deformation of an RBC and for aggregation of multiple RBCs are conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the present continuum modeling methods.

  5. A fully consistent linearized model for vibration analysis of rotating beams in the framework of geometrically exact theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Invernizzi, Davide; Dozio, Lorenzo

    2016-05-01

    The equations of motions governing the free vibrations of prismatic slender beams rotating in a plane at constant angular velocity are derived according to a geometrically exact approach. Compared to other modeling methods, additional stiffening terms induced by pre-stress are found in the dynamic equations after fully consistent linearization about the deformed equilibrium configuration. These terms include axial, bending and torsional stiffening effects which arise when second-order generalized strains are retained. It is shown that their contribution becomes relevant at moderate to high angular speeds, where high means that the equilibrium state is subject to strains close to the limit where a physically linear constitutive law still applies. In particular, the importance of the axial stiffening is specifically investigated. The natural frequencies as a function of the angular velocity and other system parameters are computed and compared with benchmark cases available in the literature. Finally, the error on the modal characteristics of the rotating beam is evaluated when the linearization is carried out about the undeformed configuration.

  6. Geometric-optical bidirectional reflectance modeling of a conifer forest canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, X.; Strahler, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    A geometric-optical forest canopy model that treats conifers as cones casting shadows on a contrasting background explains the major anisotropies in bidirectional reflectance measurements of a conifer forest canopy. The model uses parallel-ray geometry to describe the illumination and viewing of conifers as three-dimensional cones. Both computer simulation and analytical closed-form expressions are implemented. The results show a good qualitative agreement with the directional reflectance measurements of the conifer stand, indicating that the three-dimensional nature of the canopy is a key factor in determining its directional reflectance.

  7. Modelling couplings between reaction, fluid flow and deformation: Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Podladchikov, Yury Y.; Connolly, James A. D.

    2016-04-01

    Mineral assemblages out of equilibrium are commonly found in metamorphic rocks testifying of the critical role of kinetics for metamorphic reactions. As experimentally determined reaction rates in fluid-saturated systems generally indicate complete reaction in less than several years, i.e. several orders of magnitude faster than field-based estimates, metamorphic reaction kinetics are generally thought to be controlled by transport rather than by processes at the mineral surface. However, some geological processes like earthquakes or slow-slip events have shorter characteristic timescales, and transport processes can be intimately related to mineral surface processes. Therefore, it is important to take into account the kinetics of mineral surface processes for modelling fluid/rock interactions. Here, a model coupling reaction, fluid flow and deformation was improved by introducing a delay in the achievement of equilibrium. The classical formalism for dissolution/precipitation reactions was used to consider the influence of the distance from equilibrium and of temperature on the reaction rate, and a dependence on porosity was introduced to model evolution of reacting surface area during reaction. The fitting of experimental data for three reactions typically occurring in metamorphic systems (serpentine dehydration, muscovite dehydration and calcite decarbonation) indicates a systematic faster kinetics close from equilibrium on the dehydration side than on the hydration side. This effect is amplified through the porosity term in the reaction rate since porosity is formed during dehydration. Numerical modelling indicates that this difference in reaction rate close from equilibrium plays a key role in microtextures formation. The developed model can be used in a wide variety of geological systems where couplings between reaction, deformation and fluid flow have to be considered.

  8. Development of a 10-year-old full body geometric dataset for computational modeling.

    PubMed

    Mao, Haojie; Holcombe, Sven; Shen, Ming; Jin, Xin; Wagner, Christina D; Wang, Stewart C; Yang, King H; King, Albert I

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to create a computer-aided design (CAD) geometric dataset of a 10-year-old (10 YO) child. The study includes two phases of efforts. At Phase One, the 10 YO whole body CAD was developed from component computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of 12 pediatric subjects. Geometrical scaling methods were used to convert all component parts to the average size for a 10 YO child, based on available anthropometric data. Then the component surfaces were compiled and integrated into a complete body. The bony structures and flesh were adjusted as symmetrical to minimize the bias from a single subject while maintaining anthropometrical measurements. Internal organs including the liver, spleen, and kidney were further verified by literature data. At Phase Two, internal characteristics for the cervical spine disc, wrist, hand, pelvis, femur, and tibia were verified with data measured from additional 94 10 YO children. The CAD dataset developed through these processes was mostly within the corridor of one standard deviation (SD) of the mean. In conclusion, a geometric dataset for an average size 10 YO child was created. The dataset serves as a foundation to develop computational 10 YO whole body models for enhanced pediatric injury prevention.

  9. The geometric signature: Quantifying landslide-terrain types from digital elevation models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pike, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Topography of various types and scales can be fingerprinted by computer analysis of altitude matrices (digital elevation models, or DEMs). The critical analytic tool is the geometric signature, a set of measures that describes topographic form well enough to distinguish among geomorphically disparate landscapes. Different surficial processes create topography with diagnostic forms that are recognizable in the field. The geometric signature abstracts those forms from contour maps or their DEMs and expresses them numerically. This multivariate characterization enables once-in-tractable problems to be addressed. The measures that constitute a geometric signature express different but complementary attributes of topographic form. Most parameters used here are statistical estimates of central tendency and dispersion for five major categories of terrain geometry; altitude, altitude variance spectrum, slope between slope reversals, and slope and its curvature at fixed slope lengths. As an experimental application of geometric signatures, two mapped terrain types associated with different processes of shallow landsliding in Marin County, California, were distinguished consistently by a 17-variable description of topography from 21??21 DEMs (30-m grid spacing). The small matrix is a statistical window that can be used to scan large DEMs by computer, thus potentially automating the mapping of contrasting terrain types. The two types in Marin County host either (1) slow slides: earth flows and slump-earth flows, or (2) rapid flows: debris avalanches and debris flows. The signature approach should adapt to terrain taxonomy and mapping in other areas, where conditions differ from those in Central California. ?? 1988 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  10. Variable-intercept panel model for deformation zoning of a super-high arch dam.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhongwen; Gu, Chongshi; Qin, Dong

    2016-01-01

    This study determines dam deformation similarity indexes based on an analysis of deformation zoning features and panel data clustering theory, with comprehensive consideration to the actual deformation law of super-high arch dams and the spatial-temporal features of dam deformation. Measurement methods of these indexes are studied. Based on the established deformation similarity criteria, the principle used to determine the number of dam deformation zones is constructed through entropy weight method. This study proposes the deformation zoning method for super-high arch dams and the implementation steps, analyzes the effect of special influencing factors of different dam zones on the deformation, introduces dummy variables that represent the special effect of dam deformation, and establishes a variable-intercept panel model for deformation zoning of super-high arch dams. Based on different patterns of the special effect in the variable-intercept panel model, two panel analysis models were established to monitor fixed and random effects of dam deformation. Hausman test method of model selection and model effectiveness assessment method are discussed. Finally, the effectiveness of established models is verified through a case study.

  11. A geometric model for excavation and modification at terrestrial simple impact craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grieve, R. A. F.; Garvin, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    A geometric model for the excavation and modification stages of simple crater development is presented. Cavity modification is modelled from an analytical derivation of the dimensions of the so-called transient cavity (Dence, 1973; Dence et al., 1977). The final cavity as it appears in terrestrial craters and the primary elements of excavation are approximated by a variation of the so-called Z model. The applicability of the model is tested with data from the Meteor and Brent craters. In the case of Meteor, the modelled final crater diameter at the original ground plane is within 26 m of the observed value and the modelled breccia lens and the rim crest volumes of the final true crater are within 9.5 percent and 2.5 percent, respectively, of the observed values. The correspondence for the more degraded Brent crater is less precise.

  12. Crystal chemistry of natural and synthetic trioctahedral micas: Exploring the limits of geometric crystal chemical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Patrick H. J.

    Seventy-five synthetic powder trioctahedral mica samples (between Mg, Co, Ni, and Fe end members, with different degrees of oxidation, vacancy and Al/Si contents, and including an OH/F substitution series) were studied by room-temperature powder X-ray diffraction. The iron-bearing samples were studied by 57Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy. Subsets of the samples were also characterized by scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, and gas chromatography. Lattice parameters (refined under the 1M stacking polytype, space group C2/m) were determined for all powder samples and iron site populations ([4]Fe 3+, [6]Fe2+, and [6]Fe 2+) were obtained from Mossbauer spectroscopy. The relation (c/a)cosbeta* = 113 was found to hold exactly (within experimental error) for all synthetic powders whereas it does not hold in general for synthetic and natural 1M single-crystals. The above relation is predicted to hold for geometric home-octahedral sheets (having equal M1 and M2 site bond lengths) and not to hold for geometric meso-octahedral sheets (having unequal M1 and M2 site bond lengths). The counter-rotation of the M2 site of 1M single-crystals exactly (within experimental error) follows the geometric meso-octahedral sheet model, which, assuming a uniform octahedral sheet height and site-specific M1 and M2 bond lengths, predicts site-specific flattening angles and a counter-rotation angle for the M2 site which is uniquely determined by the bond length difference between the M1 and M2 sites. A geometric meso-octahedral 2:1 layer silicate was shown to require corrugated tetrahedral sheets composed of bond-distorted tetrahedra. Key geometric meso-octahedral distortions in 1M single-crystals were identified and elucidated: (i) intra-layer top-bottom displacements within a TOT layer; and (ii) a tetrahedral bending angle between the apical bond and the pyramidal base formed by the three basal bonds. Plots

  13. Modeling level structures of odd-odd deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.W.; Kern, J.; Piepenbring, R.; Boisson, J.P.

    1985-01-15

    A technique for modeling quasiparticle excitation energies and rotational parameters in odd-odd deformed nuclei has been applied to actinide species where new experimental data have been obtained by use of neutron-capture gamma-ray spectroscopy. The input parameters required for the calculation were derived from empirical data on single-particle excitations in neighboring odd-mass nuclei. Calculated configuration-specific values for the Gallagher-Moszkowski splittings were used. Calculated and experimental level structures for /sup 238/Np, /sup 244/Am, and /sup 250/Bk are compared, as well as those for several nuclei in the rare-earch region. The agreement for the actinide species is excellent, with bandhead energies deviating 22 keV and rotational parameters 5%, on the average. Corresponding average deviations for five rare-earth nuclei are 47 keV and 7%. Several applications of this modeling technique are discussed.

  14. Modeling level structures of odd-odd deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.W.; Kern, J.; Piepenbring, R.; Boisson, J.P.

    1984-09-07

    A technique for modeling quasiparticle excitation energies and rotational parameters in odd-odd deformed nuclei has been applied to actinide species where new experimental data have been obtained by use of neutron-capture gamma-ray spectroscopy. The input parameters required for the calculation were derived from empirical data on single-particle excitations in neighboring odd-mass nuclei. Calculated configuration-specific values for the Gallagher-Moszkowski splittings were used. Calculated and experimental level structures for /sup 238/Np, /sup 244/Am, and /sup 250/Bk are compared, as well as those for several nuclei in the rare-earth region. The agreement for the actinide species is excellent, with bandhead energies deviating 22 keV and rotational parameters 5%, on the average. Corresponding average deviations for five rare-earth nuclei are 47 keV and 7%. Several applications of this modeling technique are discussed. 18 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Modeling cellular deformations using the level set formalism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Effler, Janet C; Kutscher, Brett L; Sullivan, Sarah E; Robinson, Douglas N; Iglesias, Pablo A

    2008-01-01

    Background Many cellular processes involve substantial shape changes. Traditional simulations of these cell shape changes require that grids and boundaries be moved as the cell's shape evolves. Here we demonstrate that accurate cell shape changes can be recreated using level set methods (LSM), in which the cellular shape is defined implicitly, thereby eschewing the need for updating boundaries. Results We obtain a viscoelastic model of Dictyostelium cells using micropipette aspiration and show how this viscoelastic model can be incorporated into LSM simulations to recreate the observed protrusion of cells into the micropipette faithfully. We also demonstrate the use of our techniques by simulating the cell shape changes elicited by the chemotactic response to an external chemoattractant gradient. Conclusion Our results provide a simple but effective means of incorporating cellular deformations into mathematical simulations of cell signaling. Such methods will be useful for simulating important cellular events such as chemotaxis and cytokinesis. PMID:18652669

  16. On the Modeling of Plastic Deformation of Magnesium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ertuerk, S.; Steglich, D.; Bohlen, J.; Letzig, D.; Brocks, W.

    2007-05-17

    Magnesium alloys are promising materials due to their low density and therefore high specific strength. However, the industrial application is not well established so far, especially for wrought products such as sheets or profiles. Due to its hexagonal crystallographic structure, deformation mechanisms observed in magnesium alloys are rather different from those in face centered cubic metals such as aluminum alloys. This leads not only to a mechanical anisotropy, but also to a tension-compression asymmetry, i.e. unequal compressive and tensile yield strength. The resulting complexity in the yielding behavior of such materials cannot be captured by conventional models of J2 plasticity. Cazacu and Barlat, therefore, proposed a phenomenological yield potential which accounts for the respective phenomena by introducing the third invariant of the stress tensor. Simulations based on this model are performed with ABAQUS/Explicit and a user defined routine VUMAT for validating the respective implementation. The application aims at simulating the extrusion process of magnesium alloys.

  17. On the Modeling of Plastic Deformation of Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertürk, S.; Steglich, D.; Bohlen, J.; Letzig, D.; Brocks, W.

    2007-05-01

    Magnesium alloys are promising materials due to their low density and therefore high specific strength. However, the industrial application is not well established so far, especially for wrought products such as sheets or profiles. Due to its hexagonal crystallographic structure, deformation mechanisms observed in magnesium alloys are rather different from those in face centered cubic metals such as aluminum alloys. This leads not only to a mechanical anisotropy, but also to a tension-compression asymmetry, i.e. unequal compressive and tensile yield strength. The resulting complexity in the yielding behavior of such materials cannot be captured by conventional models of J2 plasticity. Cazacu and Barlat, therefore, proposed a phenomenological yield potential which accounts for the respective phenomena by introducing the third invariant of the stress tensor. Simulations based on this model are performed with ABAQUS/Explicit and a user defined routine VUMAT for validating the respective implementation. The application aims at simulating the extrusion process of magnesium alloys.

  18. A reinforcement learning approach to model interactions between landmarks and geometric cues during spatial learning.

    PubMed

    Sheynikhovich, Denis; Arleo, Angelo

    2010-12-13

    In contrast to predictions derived from the associative learning theory, a number of behavioral studies suggested the absence of competition between geometric cues and landmarks in some experimental paradigms. In parallel to these studies, neurobiological experiments suggested the existence of separate independent memory systems which may not always interact according to classic associative principles. In this paper we attempt to combine these two lines of research by proposing a model of spatial learning that is based on the theory of multiple memory systems. In our model, a place-based locale strategy uses activities of modeled hippocampal place cells to drive navigation to a hidden goal, while a stimulus-response taxon strategy, presumably mediated by the dorso-lateral striatum, learns landmark-approaching behavior. A strategy selection network, proposed to reside in the prefrontal cortex, implements a simple reinforcement learning rule to switch behavioral strategies. The model is used to reproduce the results of a behavioral experiment in which an interaction between a landmark and geometric cues was studied. We show that this model, built on the basis of neurobiological data, can explain the lack of competition between the landmark and geometry, potentiation of geometry learning by the landmark, and blocking. Namely, we propose that the geometry potentiation is a consequence of cooperation between memory systems during learning, while blocking is due to competition between the memory systems during action selection.

  19. Midpoint attractors and species richness: Modelling the interaction between environmental drivers and geometric constraints.

    PubMed

    Colwell, Robert K; Gotelli, Nicholas J; Ashton, Louise A; Beck, Jan; Brehm, Gunnar; Fayle, Tom M; Fiedler, Konrad; Forister, Matthew L; Kessler, Michael; Kitching, Roger L; Klimes, Petr; Kluge, Jürgen; Longino, John T; Maunsell, Sarah C; McCain, Christy M; Moses, Jimmy; Noben, Sarah; Sam, Katerina; Sam, Legi; Shapiro, Arthur M; Wang, Xiangping; Novotny, Vojtech

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a novel framework for conceptualising, quantifying and unifying discordant patterns of species richness along geographical gradients. While not itself explicitly mechanistic, this approach offers a path towards understanding mechanisms. In this study, we focused on the diverse patterns of species richness on mountainsides. We conjectured that elevational range midpoints of species may be drawn towards a single midpoint attractor - a unimodal gradient of environmental favourability. The midpoint attractor interacts with geometric constraints imposed by sea level and the mountaintop to produce taxon-specific patterns of species richness. We developed a Bayesian simulation model to estimate the location and strength of the midpoint attractor from species occurrence data sampled along mountainsides. We also constructed midpoint predictor models to test whether environmental variables could directly account for the observed patterns of species range midpoints. We challenged these models with 16 elevational data sets, comprising 4500 species of insects, vertebrates and plants. The midpoint predictor models generally failed to predict the pattern of species midpoints. In contrast, the midpoint attractor model closely reproduced empirical spatial patterns of species richness and range midpoints. Gradients of environmental favourability, subject to geometric constraints, may parsimoniously account for elevational and other patterns of species richness.

  20. Patient-specific Deformation Modelling via Elastography: Application to Image-guided Prostate Interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Ni, Dong; Qin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2016-06-01

    Image-guided prostate interventions often require the registration of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images to provide high-quality guidance. One of the main challenges for registering MR images to TRUS images is how to estimate the TRUS-probe-induced prostate deformation that occurs during TRUS imaging. The combined statistical and biomechanical modeling approach shows promise for the adequate estimation of prostate deformation. However, the right setting of the biomechanical parameters is very crucial for realistic deformation modeling. We propose a patient-specific deformation model equipped with personalized biomechanical parameters obtained from shear wave elastography to reliably predict the prostate deformation during image-guided interventions. Using data acquired from a prostate phantom and twelve patients with suspected prostate cancer, we compared the prostate deformation model with and without patient-specific biomechanical parameters in terms of deformation estimation accuracy. The results show that the patient-specific deformation model possesses favorable model ability, and outperforms the model without patient-specific biomechanical parameters. The employment of the patient-specific biomechanical parameters obtained from elastography for deformation modeling shows promise for providing more precise deformation estimation in applications that use computer-assisted image-guided intervention systems.

  1. Patient-specific Deformation Modelling via Elastography: Application to Image-guided Prostate Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Ni, Dong; Qin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided prostate interventions often require the registration of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images to provide high-quality guidance. One of the main challenges for registering MR images to TRUS images is how to estimate the TRUS-probe-induced prostate deformation that occurs during TRUS imaging. The combined statistical and biomechanical modeling approach shows promise for the adequate estimation of prostate deformation. However, the right setting of the biomechanical parameters is very crucial for realistic deformation modeling. We propose a patient-specific deformation model equipped with personalized biomechanical parameters obtained from shear wave elastography to reliably predict the prostate deformation during image-guided interventions. Using data acquired from a prostate phantom and twelve patients with suspected prostate cancer, we compared the prostate deformation model with and without patient-specific biomechanical parameters in terms of deformation estimation accuracy. The results show that the patient-specific deformation model possesses favorable model ability, and outperforms the model without patient-specific biomechanical parameters. The employment of the patient-specific biomechanical parameters obtained from elastography for deformation modeling shows promise for providing more precise deformation estimation in applications that use computer-assisted image-guided intervention systems. PMID:27272239

  2. A point cloud modeling method based on geometric constraints mixing the robust least squares method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, JIanping; Pan, Yi; Yue, Shun; Liu, Dapeng; Liu, Bin; Huang, Nan

    2016-10-01

    The appearance of 3D laser scanning technology has provided a new method for the acquisition of spatial 3D information. It has been widely used in the field of Surveying and Mapping Engineering with the characteristics of automatic and high precision. 3D laser scanning data processing process mainly includes the external laser data acquisition, the internal industry laser data splicing, the late 3D modeling and data integration system. For the point cloud modeling, domestic and foreign researchers have done a lot of research. Surface reconstruction technology mainly include the point shape, the triangle model, the triangle Bezier surface model, the rectangular surface model and so on, and the neural network and the Alfa shape are also used in the curved surface reconstruction. But in these methods, it is often focused on single surface fitting, automatic or manual block fitting, which ignores the model's integrity. It leads to a serious problems in the model after stitching, that is, the surfaces fitting separately is often not satisfied with the well-known geometric constraints, such as parallel, vertical, a fixed angle, or a fixed distance. However, the research on the special modeling theory such as the dimension constraint and the position constraint is not used widely. One of the traditional modeling methods adding geometric constraints is a method combing the penalty function method and the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (L-M algorithm), whose stability is pretty good. But in the research process, it is found that the method is greatly influenced by the initial value. In this paper, we propose an improved method of point cloud model taking into account the geometric constraint. We first apply robust least-squares to enhance the initial value's accuracy, and then use penalty function method to transform constrained optimization problems into unconstrained optimization problems, and finally solve the problems using the L-M algorithm. The experimental results

  3. A solution to the surface intersection problem. [Boolean functions in geometric modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timer, H. G.

    1977-01-01

    An application-independent geometric model within a data base framework should support the use of Boolean operators which allow the user to construct a complex model by appropriately combining a series of simple models. The use of these operators leads to the concept of implicitly and explicitly defined surfaces. With an explicitly defined model, the surface area may be computed by simply summing the surface areas of the bounding surfaces. For an implicitly defined model, the surface area computation must deal with active and inactive regions. Because the surface intersection problem involves four unknowns and its solution is a space curve, the parametric coordinates of each surface must be determined as a function of the arc length. Various subproblems involved in the general intersection problem are discussed, and the mathematical basis for their solution is presented along with a program written in FORTRAN IV for implementation on the IBM 370 TSO system.

  4. Calculating the bidirectional reflectance of natural vegetation covers using Boolean models and geometric optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahler, Alan H.; Li, Xiao-Wen; Jupp, David L. B.

    1991-01-01

    The bidirectional radiance or reflectance of a forest or woodland can be modeled using principles of geometric optics and Boolean models for random sets in a three dimensional space. This model may be defined at two levels, the scene includes four components; sunlight and shadowed canopy, and sunlit and shadowed background. The reflectance of the scene is modeled as the sum of the reflectances of the individual components as weighted by their areal proportions in the field of view. At the leaf level, the canopy envelope is an assemblage of leaves, and thus the reflectance is a function of the areal proportions of sunlit and shadowed leaf, and sunlit and shadowed background. Because the proportions of scene components are dependent upon the directions of irradiance and exitance, the model accounts for the hotspot that is well known in leaf and tree canopies.

  5. Model Deformation Measurements of Sonic Boom Models in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schairer, Edward T.; Kushner, Laura K.; Garbeff, Theodore J.; Heineck, James T.

    2015-01-01

    The deformations of two sonic-boom models were measured by stereo photogrammetry during tests in the 9- by 7-Ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The models were geometrically similar but one was 2.75 times as large as the other. Deformation measurements were made by simultaneously imaging the upper surfaces of the models from two directions by calibrated cameras that were mounted behind windows of the test section. Bending and twist were measured at discrete points using conventional circular targets that had been marked along the leading and trailing edges of the wings and tails. In addition, continuous distributions of bending and twist were measured from ink speckles that had been applied to the upper surfaces of the model. Measurements were made at wind-on (M = 1.6) and wind-off conditions over a range of angles of attack between 2.5 deg. and 5.0 deg. At each condition, model deformation was determined by comparing the wind-off and wind-on coordinates of each measurement point after transforming the coordinates to reference coordinates tied to the model. The necessary transformations were determined by measuring the positions of a set of targets on the rigid center-body of the models whose model-axes coordinates were known. Smoothly varying bending and twist measurements were obtained at all conditions. Bending displacements increased in proportion to the square of the distance to the centerline. Maximum deflection of the wingtip of the larger model was about 5 mm (2% of the semispan) and that of the smaller model was 0.9 mm (1% of the semispan). The change in wing twist due to bending increased in direct proportion to distance from the centerline and reached a (absolute) maximum of about -1? at the highest angle of attack for both models. The measurements easily resolved bending displacements as small as 0.05 mm and bending-induced changes in twist as small as 0.05 deg.

  6. Poroelastic model for adsorption-induced deformation of biopolymers obtained from molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulasinski, Karol; Guyer, Robert; Derome, Dominique; Carmeliet, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Molecular simulation of adsorption of water molecules in nanoporous amorphous biopolymers, e.g., cellulose, reveals nonlinear swelling and nonlinear mechanical response with the increase in fluid content. These nonlinearities result from hydrogen bond breakage by water molecules. Classical poroelastic models, employing porosity and pore pressure as basic variables for describing the "pore fluid," are not adequate for the description of these systems. There is neither a static geometric structure to which porosity can sensibly be assigned nor arrangements of water molecules that are adequately described by giving them a pressure. We employ molar concentration of water and chemical potential to describe the state of the "pore fluid" and stress-strain as mechanical variables. A thermodynamic description is developed using a model energy function having mechanical, fluid, and fluid-mechanical coupling contributions. The parameters in this model energy are fixed by the output of the initial simulation and validated with the results of further simulation. The poroelastic properties, e.g., swelling and mechanical response, are found to be functions both of the molar concentration of water and the stress. The basic fluid-mechanical coupling coefficient, the swelling coefficient, depends on the molar concentration of water and stress and is interpreted in terms of porosity change and solid matrix deformation. The difference between drained and undrained bulk stiffness is explained as is the dependence of these moduli on concentration and stress.

  7. Poroelastic model for adsorption-induced deformation of biopolymers obtained from molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Kulasinski, Karol; Guyer, Robert; Derome, Dominique; Carmeliet, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Molecular simulation of adsorption of water molecules in nanoporous amorphous biopolymers, e.g., cellulose, reveals nonlinear swelling and nonlinear mechanical response with the increase in fluid content. These nonlinearities result from hydrogen bond breakage by water molecules. Classical poroelastic models, employing porosity and pore pressure as basic variables for describing the "pore fluid," are not adequate for the description of these systems. There is neither a static geometric structure to which porosity can sensibly be assigned nor arrangements of water molecules that are adequately described by giving them a pressure. We employ molar concentration of water and chemical potential to describe the state of the "pore fluid" and stress-strain as mechanical variables. A thermodynamic description is developed using a model energy function having mechanical, fluid, and fluid-mechanical coupling contributions. The parameters in this model energy are fixed by the output of the initial simulation and validated with the results of further simulation. The poroelastic properties, e.g., swelling and mechanical response, are found to be functions both of the molar concentration of water and the stress. The basic fluid-mechanical coupling coefficient, the swelling coefficient, depends on the molar concentration of water and stress and is interpreted in terms of porosity change and solid matrix deformation. The difference between drained and undrained bulk stiffness is explained as is the dependence of these moduli on concentration and stress.

  8. Morphing of geometric composites via residual swelling.

    PubMed

    Pezzulla, Matteo; Shillig, Steven A; Nardinocchi, Paola; Holmes, Douglas P

    2015-08-07

    Understanding and controlling the shape of thin, soft objects has been the focus of significant research efforts among physicists, biologists, and engineers in the last decade. These studies aim to utilize advanced materials in novel, adaptive ways such as fabricating smart actuators or mimicking living tissues. Here, we present the controlled growth-like morphing of 2D sheets into 3D shapes by preparing geometric composite structures that deform by residual swelling. The morphing of these geometric composites is dictated by both swelling and geometry, with diffusion controlling the swelling-induced actuation, and geometric confinement dictating the structure's deformed shape. Building on a simple mechanical analog, we present an analytical model that quantitatively describes how the Gaussian and mean curvatures of a thin disk are affected by the interplay among geometry, mechanics, and swelling. This model is in excellent agreement with our experiments and numerics. We show that the dynamics of residual swelling is dictated by a competition between two characteristic diffusive length scales governed by geometry. Our results provide the first 2D analog of Timoshenko's classical formula for the thermal bending of bimetallic beams - our generalization explains how the Gaussian curvature of a 2D geometric composite is affected by geometry and elasticity. The understanding conferred by these results suggests that the controlled shaping of geometric composites may provide a simple complement to traditional manufacturing techniques.

  9. A Geometric Model for Specularity Prediction on Planar Surfaces with Multiple Light Sources.

    PubMed

    Morgand, Alexandre; Tamaazousti, Mohamed; Bartoli, Adrien

    2017-03-02

    Specularities are often problematic in computer vision since they impact the dynamic range of the image intensity. A natural approach would be to predict and discard them using computer graphics models. However, these models depend on parameters which are difficult to estimate (light sources, objects' material properties and camera). We present a geometric model called JOLIMAS: JOint LIght-MAterial Specularity, which predicts the shape of specularities. JOLIMAS is reconstructed from images of specularities observed on a planar surface. It implicitly includes light and material properties, which are intrinsic to specularities. This model was motivated by the observation that specularities have a conic shape on planar surfaces. The conic shape is obtained by projecting a fixed quadric on the planar surface. JOLIMAS thus predicts the specularity using a simple geometric approach with static parameters (object material and light source shape). It is adapted to indoor light sources such as light bulbs and fluorescent lamps. The prediction has been tested on synthetic and real sequences. It works in a multi-light context by reconstructing a quadric for each light source with special cases such as lights being switched on or off. We also used specularity prediction for dynamic retexturing and obtained convincing rendering results. Further results are presented as supplementary video material.

  10. BoneCreo: a novel approach for generating a geometric model of the bone structure.

    PubMed

    Wrona, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Bones, the fundamental part of the skeleton, are constantly subjected to many biological processes including growth, feeding and remodelling. Remodelling causes changes in bone structure that may be difficult to notice on a day-to-day basis but become significant over the longer time span. It acts on the cancellous and cortical bone tissue, causing alterations in thickness and spatial arrangement in the first and alternations in pore size in the second. In healthy individuals such changes are a part of the natural bone remodelling process explained by Wolff's law. However, the direction of such changes is difficult to predict in patients in various pathological states in which bone health is affected. Here, we present a method to generate a computer based geometric model of the bone structure based on the cancellous tissue structure images. As a result we obtained a geometric model of the structure corresponding to the physical model of the cancellous bone. Such a model can be used in computer simulation to predict the remodelling changes in the healthy and pathological bone structures.

  11. 3D Face modeling using the multi-deformable method.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jinkyu; Yu, Sunjin; Kim, Joongrock; Lee, Sangyoun

    2012-09-25

    In this paper, we focus on the problem of the accuracy performance of 3D face modeling techniques using corresponding features in multiple views, which is quite sensitive to feature extraction errors. To solve the problem, we adopt a statistical model-based 3D face modeling approach in a mirror system consisting of two mirrors and a camera. The overall procedure of our 3D facial modeling method has two primary steps: 3D facial shape estimation using a multiple 3D face deformable model and texture mapping using seamless cloning that is a type of gradient-domain blending. To evaluate our method's performance, we generate 3D faces of 30 individuals and then carry out two tests: accuracy test and robustness test. Our method shows not only highly accurate 3D face shape results when compared with the ground truth, but also robustness to feature extraction errors. Moreover, 3D face rendering results intuitively show that our method is more robust to feature extraction errors than other 3D face modeling methods. An additional contribution of our method is that a wide range of face textures can be acquired by the mirror system. By using this texture map, we generate realistic 3D face for individuals at the end of the paper.

  12. Unified constitutive model for single crystal deformation behavior with applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, K. P.; Meyer, T. G.; Jordan, E. H.

    1988-01-01

    Single crystal materials are being used in gas turbine airfoils and are candidates for other hot section components because of their increased temperature capabilities and resistance to thermal fatigue. Development of a constitutive model which assesses the inelastic behavior of these materials has been studied in 2 NASA programs: Life Prediction and Constitutive Models for Engine Hot Section Anisotropic Materials and Biaxial Constitutive Equation Development for Single Crystals. The model has been fit to a large body of constitutive data for single crystal PWA 1480 material. The model uses a unified approach for computing total inelastic strains (creep plus plasticity) on crystallographic slip systems reproducing observed directional and strain rate effects as a natural consequence of the summed slip system quantities. The model includes several of the effects that have been reported to influence deformation in single crystal materials, such as shear stress, latent hardening, and cross slip. The model is operational in a commercial Finite Element code and is being installed in a Boundary Element Method code.

  13. Segmentation of Pathological Structures by Landmark-Assisted Deformable Models.

    PubMed

    Ibragimov, Bulat; Korez, Robert; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo; Xing, Lei; Vrtovec, Tomaz

    2017-02-13

    Computerized segmentation of pathological structures in medical images is challenging, as, in addition to unclear image boundaries, image artifacts and traces of surgical activities, the shape of pathological structures may be very different from the shape of normal structures. Even if a sufficient number of pathological training samples are collected, statistical shape modeling cannot always capture shape features of pathological samples as they may be suppressed by shape features of a considerably larger number of healthy samples. At the same time, landmarking can be efficient in analyzing pathological structures but often lacks robustness. In this paper, we combine the advantages of landmark detection and deformable models into a novel supervised multi-energy segmentation framework that can efficiently segment structures with pathological shape. The framework adopts the theory of Laplacian shape editing that was introduced in the field of computer graphics, so that the limitations of statistical shape modeling are avoided. The performance of the proposed framework was validated by segmenting fractured lumbar vertebrae from three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) images, atrophic corpora callosa from two-dimensional (2D) magnetic resonance (MR) crosssections and cancerous prostates from 3D MR images, resulting respectively in a Dice coefficient of 84.7 ± 5.0%, 85.3 ± 4.8% and 78.3 ± 5.1%, and boundary distance of 1.14 ± 0.49 mm, 1.42 ± 0.45mm and 2.27 ± 0.52 mm. The obtained results were shown to be superior in comparison to existing deformable modelbased segmentation algorithms.

  14. Geometric Context and Orientation Map Combination for Indoor Corridor Modeling Using a Single Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baligh Jahromi, Ali; Sohn, Gunho

    2016-06-01

    Since people spend most of their time indoors, their indoor activities and related issues in health, security and energy consumption have to be understood. Hence, gathering and representing spatial information of indoor spaces in form of 3D models become very important. Considering the available data gathering techniques with respect to the sensors cost and data processing time, single images proved to be one of the reliable sources. Many of the current single image based indoor space modeling methods are defining the scene as a single box primitive. This domain-specific knowledge is usually not applicable in various cases where multiple corridors are joined at one scene. Here, we addressed this issue by hypothesizing-verifying multiple box primitives which represents the indoor corridor layout. Middle-level perceptual organization is the foundation of the proposed method, which relies on finding corridor layout boundaries using both detected line segments and virtual rays created by orthogonal vanishing points. Due to the presence of objects, shadows and occlusions, a comprehensive interpretation of the edge relations is often concealed. This necessitates the utilization of virtual rays to create a physically valid layout hypothesis. Many of the former methods used Orientation Map or Geometric Context to evaluate their proposed layout hypotheses. Orientation map is a map that reveals the local belief of region orientations computed from line segments, and in a segmented image geometric context uses color, texture, edge, and vanishing point cues to estimate the likelihood of each possible label for all super-pixels. Here, the created layout hypotheses are evaluated by an objective function which considers the fusion of orientation map and geometric context with respect to the horizontal viewing angle at each image pixel. Finally, the best indoor corridor layout hypothesis which gets the highest score from the scoring function will be selected and converted to a 3D

  15. 3D Finite Element Modelling for the investigation of the cavity effect in extensometric rock-deformation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kis, M.; Detzky, G.; Koppán, A.

    2012-04-01

    phenomenon in general. Authors calculated the deformations of a simple-geometry 3D cavity, which is caused by variable gravity loads. Dependence of the cavity effect on changing of distinct elastic properties in categorized models has been investigated. Authors introduced qualifying parameter fields calculated using the results of the FE modelling (nodal displacements as a model answer for the gravity load), in order to characterize the effect. Modelling results can be used as an estimation not only for the absolute cavity effect rate of the intended arrangement, furthermore the sensitivity of the given system against a particular geometric property. As an application example finite element modelling were carried out in order to estimate the influence of the complicated cavity system surrounding the "Budapest-Matyashegy" Gravity and Geodynamical Observatory of the Eotvos Lorand Geophysical Institute of Hungary.

  16. Physics-based deformable organisms for medical image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamarneh, Ghassan; McIntosh, Chris

    2005-04-01

    Previously, "Deformable organisms" were introduced as a novel paradigm for medical image analysis that uses artificial life modelling concepts. Deformable organisms were designed to complement the classical bottom-up deformable models methodologies (geometrical and physical layers), with top-down intelligent deformation control mechanisms (behavioral and cognitive layers). However, a true physical layer was absent and in order to complete medical image segmentation tasks, deformable organisms relied on pure geometry-based shape deformations guided by sensory data, prior structural knowledge, and expert-generated schedules of behaviors. In this paper we introduce the use of physics-based shape deformations within the deformable organisms framework yielding additional robustness by allowing intuitive real-time user guidance and interaction when necessary. We present the results of applying our physics-based deformable organisms, with an underlying dynamic spring-mass mesh model, to segmenting and labelling the corpus callosum in 2D midsagittal magnetic resonance images.

  17. Geometrical order-of-magnitude estimates for spatial curvature in realistic models of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchert, Thomas; Ellis, George F. R.; van Elst, Henk

    2009-09-01

    The thoughts expressed in this article are based on remarks made by Jürgen Ehlers at the Albert-Einstein-Institut, Golm, Germany in July 2007. The main objective of this article is to demonstrate, in terms of plausible order-of-magnitude estimates for geometrical scalars, the relevance of spatial curvature in realistic models of the Universe that describe the dynamics of structure formation since the epoch of matter-radiation decoupling. We introduce these estimates with a commentary on the use of a quasi-Newtonian metric form in this context.

  18. Matching Aerial Images to 3D Building Models Using Context-Based Geometric Hashing.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaewook; Sohn, Gunho; Bang, Kiin; Wichmann, Andreas; Armenakis, Costas; Kada, Martin

    2016-06-22

    A city is a dynamic entity, which environment is continuously changing over time. Accordingly, its virtual city models also need to be regularly updated to support accurate model-based decisions for various applications, including urban planning, emergency response and autonomous navigation. A concept of continuous city modeling is to progressively reconstruct city models by accommodating their changes recognized in spatio-temporal domain, while preserving unchanged structures. A first critical step for continuous city modeling is to coherently register remotely sensed data taken at different epochs with existing building models. This paper presents a new model-to-image registration method using a context-based geometric hashing (CGH) method to align a single image with existing 3D building models. This model-to-image registration process consists of three steps: (1) feature extraction; (2) similarity measure; and matching, and (3) estimating exterior orientation parameters (EOPs) of a single image. For feature extraction, we propose two types of matching cues: edged corner features representing the saliency of building corner points with associated edges, and contextual relations among the edged corner features within an individual roof. A set of matched corners are found with given proximity measure through geometric hashing, and optimal matches are then finally determined by maximizing the matching cost encoding contextual similarity between matching candidates. Final matched corners are used for adjusting EOPs of the single airborne image by the least square method based on collinearity equations. The result shows that acceptable accuracy of EOPs of a single image can be achievable using the proposed registration approach as an alternative to a labor-intensive manual registration process.

  19. Matching Aerial Images to 3D Building Models Using Context-Based Geometric Hashing

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaewook; Sohn, Gunho; Bang, Kiin; Wichmann, Andreas; Armenakis, Costas; Kada, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A city is a dynamic entity, which environment is continuously changing over time. Accordingly, its virtual city models also need to be regularly updated to support accurate model-based decisions for various applications, including urban planning, emergency response and autonomous navigation. A concept of continuous city modeling is to progressively reconstruct city models by accommodating their changes recognized in spatio-temporal domain, while preserving unchanged structures. A first critical step for continuous city modeling is to coherently register remotely sensed data taken at different epochs with existing building models. This paper presents a new model-to-image registration method using a context-based geometric hashing (CGH) method to align a single image with existing 3D building models. This model-to-image registration process consists of three steps: (1) feature extraction; (2) similarity measure; and matching, and (3) estimating exterior orientation parameters (EOPs) of a single image. For feature extraction, we propose two types of matching cues: edged corner features representing the saliency of building corner points with associated edges, and contextual relations among the edged corner features within an individual roof. A set of matched corners are found with given proximity measure through geometric hashing, and optimal matches are then finally determined by maximizing the matching cost encoding contextual similarity between matching candidates. Final matched corners are used for adjusting EOPs of the single airborne image by the least square method based on collinearity equations. The result shows that acceptable accuracy of EOPs of a single image can be achievable using the proposed registration approach as an alternative to a labor-intensive manual registration process. PMID:27338410

  20. An atomistic geometrical model of the B-DNA configuration for DNA-radiation interaction simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, M. A.; Sikansi, D.; Cavalcante, F.; Incerti, S.; Champion, C.; Ivanchenko, V.; Francis, Z.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, an atomistic geometrical model for the B-DNA configuration is explained. This model accounts for five organization levels of the DNA, up to the 30 nm chromatin fiber. However, fragments of this fiber can be used to construct the whole genome. The algorithm developed in this work is capable to determine which is the closest atom with respect to an arbitrary point in space. It can be used in any application in which a DNA geometrical model is needed, for instance, in investigations related to the effects of ionizing radiations on the human genetic material. Successful consistency checks were carried out to test the proposed model. Catalogue identifier: AEPZ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEPZ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1245 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6574 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN. Computer: Any. Operating system: Multi-platform. RAM: 2 Gb Classification: 3. Nature of problem: The Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the interaction of ionizing radiation with the human genetic material in order to determine DNA damage yields per unit absorbed dose. To accomplish this task, an algorithm to determine if a given energy deposition lies within a given target is needed. This target can be an atom or any other structure of the genetic material. Solution method: This is a stand-alone subroutine describing an atomic-resolution geometrical model of the B-DNA configuration. It is able to determine the closest atom to an arbitrary point in space. This model accounts for five organization levels of the human genetic material, from the nucleotide pair up to the 30 nm chromatin fiber. This subroutine carries out a series of coordinate transformations

  1. A discrete model for geometrically nonlinear transverse free constrained vibrations of beams with various end conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmouni, A.; Beidouri, Z.; Benamar, R.

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of the present paper was the development of a physically discrete model for geometrically nonlinear free transverse constrained vibrations of beams, which may replace, if sufficient degrees of freedom are used, the previously developed continuous nonlinear beam constrained vibration models. The discrete model proposed is an N-Degrees of Freedom (N-dof) system made of N masses placed at the ends of solid bars connected by torsional springs, presenting the beam flexural rigidity. The large transverse displacements of the bar ends induce a variation in their lengths giving rise to axial forces modelled by longitudinal springs. The calculations made allowed application of the semi-analytical model developed previously for nonlinear structural vibration involving three tensors, namely the mass tensor mij, the linear rigidity tensor kij and the nonlinearity tensor bijkl. By application of Hamilton's principle and spectral analysis, the nonlinear vibration problem is reduced to a nonlinear algebraic system, examined for increasing numbers of dof. The results obtained by the physically discrete model showed a good agreement and a quick convergence to the equivalent continuous beam model, for various fixed boundary conditions, for both the linear frequencies and the nonlinear backbone curves, and also for the corresponding mode shapes. The model, validated here for the simply supported and clamped ends, may be used in further works to present the flexural linear and nonlinear constrained vibrations of beams with various types of discontinuities in the mass or in the elasticity distributions. The development of an adequate discrete model including the effect of the axial strains induced by large displacement amplitudes, which is predominant in geometrically nonlinear transverse constrained vibrations of beams [1]. The investigation of the results such a discrete model may lead to in the case of nonlinear free vibrations. The development of the analogy between the

  2. A simple geometrical model describing shapes of soap films suspended on two rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Felix J.; Kilvington, Charles D.; Wildenberg, Rebekah L.; Camacho, Franco E.; Walecki, Wojciech J.; Walecki, Peter S.; Walecki, Eve S.

    2016-09-01

    We measured and analysed the stability of two types of soap films suspended on two rings using the simple conical frusta-based model, where we use common definition of conical frustum as a portion of a cone that lies between two parallel planes cutting it. Using frusta-based we reproduced very well-known results for catenoid surfaces with and without a central disk. We present for the first time a simple conical frusta based spreadsheet model of the soap surface. This very simple, elementary, geometrical model produces results surprisingly well matching the experimental data and known exact analytical solutions. The experiment and the spreadsheet model can be used as a powerful teaching tool for pre-calculus and geometry students.

  3. Video model deformation system for the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burner, A. W.; Snow, W. L.; Goad, W. K.

    1983-08-01

    A photogrammetric closed circuit television system to measure model deformation at the National Transonic Facility is described. The photogrammetric approach was chosen because of its inherent rapid data recording of the entire object field. Video cameras are used to acquire data instead of film cameras due to the inaccessibility of cameras which must be housed within the cryogenic, high pressure plenum of this facility. A rudimentary theory section is followed by a description of the video-based system and control measures required to protect cameras from the hostile environment. Preliminary results obtained with the same camera placement as planned for NTF are presented and plans for facility testing with a specially designed test wing are discussed.

  4. Video model deformation system for the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Snow, W. L.; Goad, W. K.

    1983-01-01

    A photogrammetric closed circuit television system to measure model deformation at the National Transonic Facility is described. The photogrammetric approach was chosen because of its inherent rapid data recording of the entire object field. Video cameras are used to acquire data instead of film cameras due to the inaccessibility of cameras which must be housed within the cryogenic, high pressure plenum of this facility. A rudimentary theory section is followed by a description of the video-based system and control measures required to protect cameras from the hostile environment. Preliminary results obtained with the same camera placement as planned for NTF are presented and plans for facility testing with a specially designed test wing are discussed.

  5. A material sensitivity study on the accuracy of deformable organ registration using linear biomechanical models.

    PubMed

    Chi, Y; Liang, J; Yan, D

    2006-02-01

    Model-based deformable organ registration techniques using the finite element method (FEM) have recently been investigated intensively and applied to image-guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART). These techniques assume that human organs are linearly elastic material, and their mechanical properties are predetermined. Unfortunately, the accurate measurement of the tissue material properties is challenging and the properties usually vary between patients. A common issue is therefore the achievable accuracy of the calculation due to the limited access to tissue elastic material constants. In this study, we performed a systematic investigation on this subject based on tissue biomechanics and computer simulations to establish the relationships between achievable registration accuracy and tissue mechanical and organ geometrical properties. Primarily we focused on image registration for three organs: rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate. The tissue anisotropy due to orientation preference in tissue fiber alignment is captured by using an orthotropic or a transversely isotropic elastic model. First we developed biomechanical models for the rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate using simplified geometries and investigated the effect of varying material parameters on the resulting organ deformation. Then computer models based on patient image data were constructed, and image registrations were performed. The sensitivity of registration errors was studied by perturbating the tissue material properties from their mean values while fixing the boundary conditions. The simulation results demonstrated that registration error for a subvolume increases as its distance from the boundary increases. Also, a variable associated with material stability was found to be a dominant factor in registration accuracy in the context of material uncertainty. For hollow thin organs such as rectal walls and bladder walls, the registration errors are limited. Given 30% in material uncertainty

  6. A material sensitivity study on the accuracy of deformable organ registration using linear biomechanical models

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Y.; Liang, J.; Yan, D.

    2006-02-15

    Model-based deformable organ registration techniques using the finite element method (FEM) have recently been investigated intensively and applied to image-guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART). These techniques assume that human organs are linearly elastic material, and their mechanical properties are predetermined. Unfortunately, the accurate measurement of the tissue material properties is challenging and the properties usually vary between patients. A common issue is therefore the achievable accuracy of the calculation due to the limited access to tissue elastic material constants. In this study, we performed a systematic investigation on this subject based on tissue biomechanics and computer simulations to establish the relationships between achievable registration accuracy and tissue mechanical and organ geometrical properties. Primarily we focused on image registration for three organs: rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate. The tissue anisotropy due to orientation preference in tissue fiber alignment is captured by using an orthotropic or a transversely isotropic elastic model. First we developed biomechanical models for the rectal wall, bladder wall, and prostate using simplified geometries and investigated the effect of varying material parameters on the resulting organ deformation. Then computer models based on patient image data were constructed, and image registrations were performed. The sensitivity of registration errors was studied by perturbating the tissue material properties from their mean values while fixing the boundary conditions. The simulation results demonstrated that registration error for a subvolume increases as its distance from the boundary increases. Also, a variable associated with material stability was found to be a dominant factor in registration accuracy in the context of material uncertainty. For hollow thin organs such as rectal walls and bladder walls, the registration errors are limited. Given 30% in material uncertainty

  7. Geometric-model-free tracking of extended targets using 3D lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinemann, Philipp; Klappstein, Jens; Dickmann, Juergen; von Hundelshausen, Felix; Wünsche, Hans-Joachim

    2012-06-01

    Tracking of extended targets in high definition, 360-degree 3D-LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) measurements is a challenging task and a current research topic. It is a key component in robotic applications, and is relevant to path planning and collision avoidance. This paper proposes a new method without a geometric model to simultaneously track and accumulate 3D-LIDAR measurements of an object. The method itself is based on a particle filter and uses an object-related local 3D grid for each object. No geometric object hypothesis is needed. Accumulation allows coping with occlusions. The prediction step of the particle filter is governed by a motion model consisting of a deterministic and a probabilistic part. Since this paper is focused on tracking ground vehicles, a bicycle model is used for the deterministic part. The probabilistic part depends on the current state of each particle. A function for calculating the current probability density function for state transition is developed. It is derived in detail and based on a database consisting of vehicle dynamics measurements over several hundreds of kilometers. The adaptive probability density function narrows down the gating area for measurement data association. The second part of the proposed method addresses weighting the particles with a cost function. Different 3D-griddependent cost functions are presented and evaluated. Evaluations with real 3D-LIDAR measurements show the performance of the proposed method. The results are also compared to ground truth data.

  8. Matching Aerial Images to 3d Building Models Based on Context-Based Geometric Hashing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Bang, K.; Sohn, G.; Armenakis, C.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new model-to-image framework to automatically align a single airborne image with existing 3D building models using geometric hashing is proposed. As a prerequisite process for various applications such as data fusion, object tracking, change detection and texture mapping, the proposed registration method is used for determining accurate exterior orientation parameters (EOPs) of a single image. This model-to-image matching process consists of three steps: 1) feature extraction, 2) similarity measure and matching, and 3) adjustment of EOPs of a single image. For feature extraction, we proposed two types of matching cues, edged corner points representing the saliency of building corner points with associated edges and contextual relations among the edged corner points within an individual roof. These matching features are extracted from both 3D building and a single airborne image. A set of matched corners are found with given proximity measure through geometric hashing and optimal matches are then finally determined by maximizing the matching cost encoding contextual similarity between matching candidates. Final matched corners are used for adjusting EOPs of the single airborne image by the least square method based on co-linearity equations. The result shows that acceptable accuracy of single image's EOP can be achievable by the proposed registration approach as an alternative to labour-intensive manual registration process.

  9. Geometric dimension model of virtual astronaut body for ergonomic analysis of man-machine space system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qianxiang, Zhou

    2012-07-01

    It is very important to clarify the geometric characteristic of human body segment and constitute analysis model for ergonomic design and the application of ergonomic virtual human. The typical anthropometric data of 1122 Chinese men aged 20-35 years were collected using three-dimensional laser scanner for human body. According to the correlation between different parameters, curve fitting were made between seven trunk parameters and ten body parameters with the SPSS 16.0 software. It can be concluded that hip circumference and shoulder breadth are the most important parameters in the models and the two parameters have high correlation with the others parameters of human body. By comparison with the conventional regressive curves, the present regression equation with the seven trunk parameters is more accurate to forecast the geometric dimensions of head, neck, height and the four limbs with high precision. Therefore, it is greatly valuable for ergonomic design and analysis of man-machine system.This result will be very useful to astronaut body model analysis and application.

  10. Automated contouring error detection based on supervised geometric attribute distribution models for radiation therapy: A general strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Tan, Jun; Dolly, Steven; Kavanaugh, James; Harold Li, H.; Altman, Michael; Gay, Hiram; Thorstad, Wade L.; Mutic, Sasa; Li, Hua; Anastasio, Mark A.; Low, Daniel A.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: One of the most critical steps in radiation therapy treatment is accurate tumor and critical organ-at-risk (OAR) contouring. Both manual and automated contouring processes are prone to errors and to a large degree of inter- and intraobserver variability. These are often due to the limitations of imaging techniques in visualizing human anatomy as well as to inherent anatomical variability among individuals. Physicians/physicists have to reverify all the radiation therapy contours of every patient before using them for treatment planning, which is tedious, laborious, and still not an error-free process. In this study, the authors developed a general strategy based on novel geometric attribute distribution (GAD) models to automatically detect radiation therapy OAR contouring errors and facilitate the current clinical workflow. Methods: Considering the radiation therapy structures’ geometric attributes (centroid, volume, and shape), the spatial relationship of neighboring structures, as well as anatomical similarity of individual contours among patients, the authors established GAD models to characterize the interstructural centroid and volume variations, and the intrastructural shape variations of each individual structure. The GAD models are scalable and deformable, and constrained by their respective principal attribute variations calculated from training sets with verified OAR contours. A new iterative weighted GAD model-fitting algorithm was developed for contouring error detection. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was employed in a unique way to optimize the model parameters to satisfy clinical requirements. A total of forty-four head-and-neck patient cases, each of which includes nine critical OAR contours, were utilized to demonstrate the proposed strategy. Twenty-nine out of these forty-four patient cases were utilized to train the inter- and intrastructural GAD models. These training data and the remaining fifteen testing data sets

  11. Modeling of ductile deformation in anisotropic rocks with slip surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Marcin

    2013-04-01

    Flanking structures and sheath folds can develop in layered rocks due to flow perturbation around slip surfaces in shear zones (Exner and Dabrowski, 2010; Reber et al., submitted). Mechanical anisotropy of the host rock has been shown to play a major role in determining the slip rate and the flow pattern around it (Kocher and Mancktelow, 2006; Fletcher, 2011). In addition, anisotropic fluids such as ductile foliated rocks have a 'memory' of deformation due to evolving microstructure. For example, the rotation of a rigid circular inclusion embedded in a layered host in layer-parallel shear results in the structural reorganization around it, which leads to the modification of the flow pattern in the host and in consequence to a massive reduction of the inclusion rotation rate (Dabrowski and Schmid, 2011). Willis (1964) derived an analytical elastic solution for an elliptical inclusion in a homogeneous anisotropic matrix subject to a uniform load in the far field. The solution can be reduced to the case of an incompressible viscous medium. The case of an arbitrarily oriented inviscid slit under shear parallel to the principal axis of anisotropy can be obtained by reducing it even further. Although derived for the initial state of homogeneous planar anisotropy, the solution provides useful insights into the large deformation behavior of the system. In this study, I will use different models and numerical modeling techniques to assess the impact of mechanical anisotropy and structural development on the perturbing flow around an inviscid slit (slip surface) embedded in a host comprising discrete isotropic layers in layer-parallel simple shear. In the limit of thin layers (the number of layers intercepting the slit tends to infinity), the host is modeled as an anisotropic fluid. The anisotropic viscosity is determined by the bulk anisotropic viscosity of the layered system. The layering is initially planar or equivalently the anisotropy is initially homogeneous. Both non

  12. Modeling Step-Strain Relaxation and Cyclic Deformations of Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, A.R.; Mead, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    Data for step-strain relaxation and cyclic compressive deformations of highly viscous short elastomer cylinders are modeled using a large strain rubber viscoelastic constitutive theory with a rate-independent friction stress term added. In the tests, both small and large amplitude cyclic compressive strains, in the range of 1% to 10%, were superimposed on steady state compressed strains, in the range of 5% to 20%, for frequencies of 1 and 10 Hz. The elastomer cylinders were conditioned prior to each test to soften them. The constants in the viscoclastic-friction constitutive theory are determined by employing a nonlinear least-squares method to fit the analytical stresses for a Maxwell model, which includes friction, to measured relaxation stresses obtained from a 20% step-strain compression test. The simulation of the relaxation data with the nonlinear model is successful at compressive strains of 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20%. Simulations of hysteresis stresses for enforced cyclic compressive strains of 20% +/- 5% are made with the model calibrated by the relaxation data. The predicted hysteresis stresses are lower than the measured stresses.

  13. Brain-skull boundary conditions in a computational deformation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Songbai; Liu, Fenghong; Roberts, David; Hartov, Alex; Paulsen, Keith

    2007-03-01

    Brain shift poses a significant challenge to accurate image-guided neurosurgery. To this end, finite element (FE) brain models have been developed to estimate brain motion during these procedures. The significance of the brain-skull boundary conditions (BCs) for accurate predictions in these models has been explored in dynamic impact and inertial rotation injury computational simulations where the results have shown that the brain mechanical response is sensitive to the type of BCs applied. We extend the study of brain-skull BCs to quasi-static brain motion simulations which prevail in neurosurgery. Specifically, a frictionless brain-skull BC using a contact penalty method master-slave paradigm is incorporated into our existing deformation forward model (forced displacement method). The initial brain-skull gap (CSF thickness) is assumed to be 2mm for demonstration purposes. The brain surface nodes are assigned as either fixed (at bottom along the gravity direction), free (at brainstem), with prescribed displacement (at craniotomy) or as slave nodes potentially in contact with the skull (all the remaining). Each slave node is assigned a penalty parameter (β=5) such that when the node penetrates the rigid body skull inner-surface (master surface), a contact force is introduced proportionally to the penetration. Effectively, brain surface nodes are allowed to move towards or away from the cranium wall, but are ultimately restricted from penetrating the skull. We show that this scheme improves the model's ability to represent the brain-skull interface.

  14. Modeling Airflow Using Subject-Specific 4DCT-Based Deformable Volumetric Lung Models

    PubMed Central

    Ilegbusi, Olusegun J.; Li, Zhiliang; Seyfi, Behnaz; Min, Yugang; Meeks, Sanford; Kupelian, Patrick; Santhanam, Anand P.

    2012-01-01

    Lung radiotherapy is greatly benefitted when the tumor motion caused by breathing can be modeled. The aim of this paper is to present the importance of using anisotropic and subject-specific tissue elasticity for simulating the airflow inside the lungs. A computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) based approach is presented to simulate airflow inside a subject-specific deformable lung for modeling lung tumor motion and the motion of the surrounding tissues during radiotherapy. A flow-structure interaction technique is employed that simultaneously models airflow and lung deformation. The lung is modeled as a poroelastic medium with subject-specific anisotropic poroelastic properties on a geometry, which was reconstructed from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scan datasets of humans with lung cancer. The results include the 3D anisotropic lung deformation for known airflow pattern inside the lungs. The effects of anisotropy are also presented on both the spatiotemporal volumetric lung displacement and the regional lung hysteresis. PMID:23365554

  15. STATISTICAL MECHANICS MODELING OF MESOSCALE DEFORMATION IN METALS

    SciTech Connect

    Anter El-Azab

    2013-04-08

    The research under this project focused on a theoretical and computational modeling of dislocation dynamics of mesoscale deformation of metal single crystals. Specifically, the work aimed to implement a continuum statistical theory of dislocations to understand strain hardening and cell structure formation under monotonic loading. These aspects of crystal deformation are manifestations of the evolution of the underlying dislocation system under mechanical loading. The project had three research tasks: 1) Investigating the statistical characteristics of dislocation systems in deformed crystals. 2) Formulating kinetic equations of dislocations and coupling these kinetics equations and crystal mechanics. 3) Computational solution of coupled crystal mechanics and dislocation kinetics. Comparison of dislocation dynamics predictions with experimental results in the area of statistical properties of dislocations and their field was also a part of the proposed effort. In the first research task, the dislocation dynamics simulation method was used to investigate the spatial, orientation, velocity, and temporal statistics of dynamical dislocation systems, and on the use of the results from this investigation to complete the kinetic description of dislocations. The second task focused on completing the formulation of a kinetic theory of dislocations that respects the discrete nature of crystallographic slip and the physics of dislocation motion and dislocation interaction in the crystal. Part of this effort also targeted the theoretical basis for establishing the connection between discrete and continuum representation of dislocations and the analysis of discrete dislocation simulation results within the continuum framework. This part of the research enables the enrichment of the kinetic description with information representing the discrete dislocation systems behavior. The third task focused on the development of physics-inspired numerical methods of solution of the coupled

  16. Simple models for intermittent deformation and slip avalanches: from crystals to granular materials and earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, K.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Uhl, J.

    2011-12-01

    Slowly sheared solid or densely packed granular materials often deform in an intermittent way with slip avalanches. The distribution of sizes follows often a power law over a broad range of sizes. In these cases, universal (i.e. detail-independent) scaling behavior governs the statistics of the slip-avalanches. Under some conditions, there are also "characteristic" statistics associated with enhanced occurrence of system-size events, and long-term mode switching between power law and characteristic behavior. These dynamic regimes can be understood with basic micromechanical model for deformation of solids with only two tuning parameter: weakening and dissipation of elastic stress transfer. For granular materials the packing fraction plays the role of the dissipation parameter and it sets the size of the largest slip avalanche. The model can reproduce observed stress-strain curves, power spectra of acoustic emissions, statistics of slip avalanches, and geometrical properties of slip, with a continuous phase transition from brittle to ductile behavior. Exact universal predictions for the power law exponents of the avalanche size distributions, durations, power spectra of acoustic emissions, and scaling functions are extracted using an analytical mean field theory and renormalization group tools. For granular materials a dynamic phase diagram with solid-like behavior and large slip avalanches at large packing fractions, and fluid-like behavior at lower packing fractions is obtained. The results agree with recent experimental observations and simulations of the statistics of dislocation dynamics in sheared crystals such as ice [1], slip avalanches in sheared granular materials [2], and avalanches in magnetic and fault systems [3,4]. [1] K. A. Dahmen, Y. Ben-Zion, and J.T. Uhl, "A micromechanical model for deformation in solids with universal predictions for stress strain curves and slip avalanches", Physical Review Letters 102, 175501/1-4 (2009). [2] K. A. Dahmen, Y

  17. A theoretical and computational setting for a geometrically nonlinear gradient damage modelling framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedjar, B.

    The present work deals with the extension to the geometrically nonlinear case of recently proposed ideas on elastic- and elastoplastic-damage modelling frameworks within the infinitesimal theory. The particularity of these models is that the damage part of the modelling involves the gradient of damage quantity which, together with the equations of motion, are ensuing from a new formulation of the principle of virtual power. It is shown how the thermodynamics of irreversible processes is crucial in the characterization of the dissipative phenomena and in setting the convenient forms for the constitutive relations. On the numerical side, we discuss the problem of numerically integrating these equations and the implementation within the context of the finite element method is described in detail. And finally, we present a set of representative numerical simulations to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework.

  18. Geometrical properties of avalanches in self-organized critical models of solar flares.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Scott W; Charbonneau, Paul; Bogdan, Thomas J; Liu, Han-Li; Norman, James P

    2002-04-01

    We investigate the geometrical properties of avalanches in self-organized critical models of solar flares. Traditionally, such models differ from the classical sandpile model in their formulation of stability criteria in terms of the curvature of the nodal field, and belong to a distinct universality class. With a view toward comparing these properties to those inferred from spatially and temporally resolved flare observations, we consider the properties of avalanche peak snapshots, time-integrated avalanches in two and three dimensions, and the two-dimensional projections of the latter. The nature of the relationship between the avalanching volume and its projected area is an issue of particular interest in the solar flare context. Using our simulation results we investigate this relationship, and demonstrate that proper accounting of the fractal nature of avalanches can bring into agreement hitherto discrepant results of observational analyses based on simple, nonfractal geometries for the flaring volume.

  19. A model for massless higher spin field interacting with a geometrical background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandelloni, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    We study a very general four-dimensional field theory model describing the dynamics of a massless higher spin N symmetric tensor field particle interacting with a geometrical background. This model is invariant under the action of an extended linear diffeomorphism. We investigate the consistency of the equations of motion, and the highest spin degrees of freedom are extracted by means of a set of covariant constraints. Moreover, the highest spin equations of motions (and in general all the highest spin field 1-PI irreducible Green functions) are invariant under a chain of transformations induced by a set of N - 2 Ward operators, while the auxiliary fields equations of motion spoil this symmetry. The first steps to a quantum extension of the model are discussed on the basis of the algebraic field theory. Technical aspects are reported in Appendices, in particular, one of them is devoted to illustrate the spin-2 case.

  20. Artefact-reduced kinematics measurement using a geometric finger model with mixture-prior particle filtering.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheung-Wen; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Jou, I-Ming; Su, Fong-Chin; Sun, Yung-Nien

    2013-01-01

    It is challenging to measure the finger's kinematics of underlying bones in vivo. This paper presents a new method of finger kinematics measurement, using a geometric finger model and several markers deliberately stuck on skin surface. Using a multiple-view camera system, the optimal motion parameters of finger model were estimated using the proposed mixture-prior particle filtering. This prior, consisting of model and marker information, avoids generating improper particles for achieving near real-time performance. This method was validated using a planar fluoroscopy system that worked simultaneously with photographic system. Ten male subjects with asymptomatic hands were investigated in experiments. The results showed that the kinematic parameters could be estimated more accurately by the proposed method than by using only markers. There was 20-40% reduction in skin artefacts achieved for finger flexion/extension. Thus, this profile system can be developed as a tool of reliable kinematics measurement with good applicability for hand rehabilitation.

  1. A Simple Geometrical Model for Calculation of the Effective Emissivity in Blackbody Cylindrical Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucas, Javier

    2015-03-01

    A simple geometrical model for calculating the effective emissivity in blackbody cylindrical cavities has been developed. The back ray tracing technique and the Monte Carlo method have been employed, making use of a suitable set of coordinates and auxiliary planes. In these planes, the trajectories of individual photons in the successive reflections between the cavity points are followed in detail. The theoretical model is implemented by using simple numerical tools, programmed in Microsoft Visual Basic for Application and Excel. The algorithm is applied to isothermal and non-isothermal diffuse cylindrical cavities with a lid; however, the basic geometrical structure can be generalized to a cylindro-conical shape and specular reflection. Additionally, the numerical algorithm and the program source code can be used, with minor changes, for determining the distribution of the cavity points, where photon absorption takes place. This distribution could be applied to the study of the influence of thermal gradients on the effective emissivity profiles, for example. Validation is performed by analyzing the convergence of the Monte Carlo method as a function of the number of trials and by comparison with published results of different authors.

  2. Capturing spiral radial growth of conifers using the superellipse to model tree-ring geometric shape.

    PubMed

    Shi, Pei-Jian; Huang, Jian-Guo; Hui, Cang; Grissino-Mayer, Henri D; Tardif, Jacques C; Zhai, Li-Hong; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Li, Bai-Lian

    2015-01-01

    Tree-rings are often assumed to approximate a circular shape when estimating forest productivity and carbon dynamics. However, tree rings are rarely, if ever, circular, thereby possibly resulting in under- or over-estimation in forest productivity and carbon sequestration. Given the crucial role played by tree ring data in assessing forest productivity and carbon storage within a context of global change, it is particularly important that mathematical models adequately render cross-sectional area increment derived from tree rings. We modeled the geometric shape of tree rings using the superellipse equation and checked its validation based on the theoretical simulation and six actual cross sections collected from three conifers. We found that the superellipse better describes the geometric shape of tree rings than the circle commonly used. We showed that a spiral growth trend exists on the radial section over time, which might be closely related to spiral grain along the longitudinal axis. The superellipse generally had higher accuracy than the circle in predicting the basal area increment, resulting in an improved estimate for the basal area. The superellipse may allow better assessing forest productivity and carbon storage in terrestrial forest ecosystems.

  3. Capturing spiral radial growth of conifers using the superellipse to model tree-ring geometric shape

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Pei-Jian; Huang, Jian-Guo; Hui, Cang; Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.; Tardif, Jacques C.; Zhai, Li-Hong; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Li, Bai-Lian

    2015-01-01

    Tree-rings are often assumed to approximate a circular shape when estimating forest productivity and carbon dynamics. However, tree rings are rarely, if ever, circular, thereby possibly resulting in under- or over-estimation in forest productivity and carbon sequestration. Given the crucial role played by tree ring data in assessing forest productivity and carbon storage within a context of global change, it is particularly important that mathematical models adequately render cross-sectional area increment derived from tree rings. We modeled the geometric shape of tree rings using the superellipse equation and checked its validation based on the theoretical simulation and six actual cross sections collected from three conifers. We found that the superellipse better describes the geometric shape of tree rings than the circle commonly used. We showed that a spiral growth trend exists on the radial section over time, which might be closely related to spiral grain along the longitudinal axis. The superellipse generally had higher accuracy than the circle in predicting the basal area increment, resulting in an improved estimate for the basal area. The superellipse may allow better assessing forest productivity and carbon storage in terrestrial forest ecosystems. PMID:26528316

  4. Dual geometric worm algorithm for two-dimensional discrete classical lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchcock, Peter; Sørensen, Erik S.; Alet, Fabien

    2004-07-01

    We present a dual geometrical worm algorithm for two-dimensional Ising models. The existence of such dual algorithms was first pointed out by Prokof’ev and Svistunov [

    N. Prokof’ev and B. Svistunov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 160601 (2001)
    ]. The algorithm is defined on the dual lattice and is formulated in terms of bond variables and can therefore be generalized to other two-dimensional models that can be formulated in terms of bond variables. We also discuss two related algorithms formulated on the direct lattice, applicable in any dimension. These latter algorithms turn out to be less efficient but of considerable intrinsic interest. We show how such algorithms quite generally can be “directed” by minimizing the probability for the worms to erase themselves. Explicit proofs of detailed balance are given for all the algorithms. In terms of computational efficiency the dual geometrical worm algorithm is comparable to well known cluster algorithms such as the Swendsen-Wang and Wolff algorithms, however, it is quite different in structure and allows for a very simple and efficient implementation. The dual algorithm also allows for a very elegant way of calculating the domain wall free energy.

  5. Effect of geometrical stress concentrators on the current-induced suppression of the serrated deformation in an aluminum-magnesium AlMg5 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibkov, A. A.; Zolotov, A. E.; Zheltov, M. A.; Denisov, A. A.; Gasanov, M. F.; Kochegarov, S. S.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of an electric current on the band formation and the serrated deformation of planar specimens made of an aluminum-magnesium AlMg5 alloy and weakened by holes is experimentally studied. It is found that the concentration of elastic stress fields and the self-localized unstable plastic deformation field near a hole decreases the critical strain of appearance of the first stress drop and hinders the currentinduced suppression of band formation and the serrated Portevin-Le Chatelier deformation. These results are shown not to be related to the concentration of Joule heat near a hole.

  6. A multi-organ biomechanical model to analyze prostate deformation due to large deformation of the rectum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Kristy K.; Ménard, Cynthia; Hensel, Jennifer; Jaffray, David A.

    2006-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with an endorectal receiver coil (ERC) provides superior visualization of the prostate gland and its surrounding anatomy at the expense of large anatomical deformation. The ability to correct for this deformation is critical to integrate the MR images into the CT-based treatment planning for radiotherapy. The ability to quantify and understand the physiological motion due to large changes in rectal filling can also improve the precision of image-guided procedures. The purpose of this study was to understand the biomechanical relationship between the prostate, rectum, and bladder using a finite element-based multi-organ deformable image registration method, 'Morfeus' developed at our institution. Patients diagnosed with prostate cancer were enrolled in the study. Gold seed markers were implanted in the prostate and MR scans performed with the ERC in place and its surrounding balloon inflated to varying volumes (0-100cc). The prostate, bladder, and rectum were then delineated, converted into finite element models, and assigned appropriate material properties. Morfeus was used to assign surface interfaces between the adjacent organs and deform the bladder and rectum from one position to another, obtaining the position of the prostate through finite element analysis. This approach achieves sub-voxel accuracy of image co-registration in the context of a large ERC deformation, while providing a biomechanical understanding of the multi-organ physiological relationship between the prostate, bladder, and rectum. The development of a deformable registration strategy is essential to integrate the superior information offered in MR images into the treatment planning process.

  7. Model Deformation Measurement Technique NASA Langley HSR Experiences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Wahls, R. A.; Owens, L. R.; Goad, W. K.

    1999-01-01

    Model deformation measurement techniques have been investigated and developed at NASA's Langley Research Center. The current technique is based upon a single video camera photogrammetric determination of two dimensional coordinates of wing targets with a fixed (and known) third dimensional coordinate, namely the spanwise location. Variations of this technique have been used to measure wing twist and bending at a few selected spanwise locations near the wing tip on HSR models at the National Transonic Facility, the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, and the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. Automated measurements have been made at both the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel and at Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel during the past year. Automated measurements were made for the first time at the NTF during the recently completed HSR Reference H Test 78 in early 1996. A major problem in automation for the NTF has been the need for high contrast targets which do not exceed the stringent surface finish requirements. The advantages and limitations (including targeting) of the technique as well as the rationale for selection of this particular technique are discussed. Wing twist examples from the HSR Reference H model are presented to illustrate the run-to-run and test-to-test repeatability of the technique in air mode at the NTF. Examples of wing twist in cryogenic nitrogen mode at the NTF are also presented.

  8. Fluid-Structure interaction modeling in deformable porous arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakerzadeh, Rana; Zunino, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    A computational framework is developed to study the coupling of blood flow in arteries interacting with a poroelastic arterial wall featuring possibly large deformations. Blood is modeled as an incompressible, viscous, Newtonian fluid using the Navier-Stokes equations and the arterial wall consists of a thick material which is modeled as a Biot system that describes the mechanical behavior of a homogeneous and isotropic elastic skeleton, and connecting pores filled with fluid. Discretization via finite element method leads to the system of nonlinear equations and a Newton-Raphson scheme is adopted to solve the resulting nonlinear system through consistent linearization. Moreover, interface conditions are imposed on the discrete level via mortar finite elements or Nitsche's coupling. The discrete linearized coupled FSI system is solved by means of a splitting strategy, which allows solving the Navier-Stokes and Biot equations separately. The numerical results investigate the effects of proroelastic parameters on the pressure wave propagation in arteries, filtration of incompressible fluids through the porous media, and the structure displacement. The fellowship support from the Computational Modeling & Simulation PhD program at University of Pittsburgh for Rana Zakerzadeh is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Modeling Interseismic and Transient Deformation in Southcentral Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, A. M.; Ali, T.

    2009-12-01

    The convergent margin of Southern Alaska marks the active tectonic boundary between the North American and Pacific plates. Here we numerically model the response of the Alaskan lithosphere to interseismic, coseismic and postseismic loading in order to interpret the contemporary velocity field from GPS observations. Results suggest that, to first order, the surface velocities can be explained by the combination of interseismic deformation associated with a locked megathrust and postseismic viscous relaxation following large earthquakes, particularly the 1964 M9.2 Great Alaska earthquake. The best fitting model requires a weak mantle wedge sandwiched between a strong crust and the subducting slab. Most of the trenchward directed velocities observed in the GPS data, near the Kenai Peninsula and Kodiak Island as well in interior Alaska north of the Denali Fault, are a viscous relaxation response to the 1964 earthquake. In a few decades we should begin to see these velocities decay and subsequently point northwestwards. Postseismic viscous relaxation associated with large strike slip earthquakes since 1949 on the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather faults only provide a small contribution (~5mm/yr) to the present day GPS velocity field in that region. Our models demonstrate how subduction of the Pacific plate tends to load all the major faults at the margin including the central and eastern segments of the Denali fault and show how the 1964 earthquake and associated postseismic relaxation combined to increase Coulomb stress at the fault segment that ruptured during the 2002 M7.9 Denali earthquake.

  10. A model of pulsatile flow in a uniform deformable vessel.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G A; Borovetz, H S; Anderson, J L

    1992-01-01

    Simulations of blood flow in natural and artificial conduits usually require large computers for numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. Often, physical insight into the fluid dynamics is lost when the solution is purely numerical. An alternative to solving the most general form of the Navier-Stokes equations is described here, wherein a functional form of the solution is assumed in order to simplify the required computations. The assumed forms for the axial pressure gradient and velocity profile are chosen such that conservation of mass is satisfied for fully established pulsatile flow in a straight, deformable vessel. The resulting equations are cast in finite-difference form and solved explicitly. Results for the limiting cases of rigid wall and zero applied pressure are found to be in good agreement with analytical solutions. Comparison with the experimental results of Klanchar et al. [Circ. Res. 66, 1624-1635 (1990]) also shows good agreement. Application of the model to realistic physiological parameter values provides insight as to the influence of the pulsatile nature of the flow field on wall shear development in the presence of a moving wall boundary. Specifically, the model illustrates the dependence of flow rate and shear rate on the amplitude of the vessel wall motion and the phase difference between the applied pressure difference and the oscillations of the vessel radius. The present model can serve as a useful tool for experimentalists interested in quantifying the magnitude and character of velocity profiles and shearing forces in natural and artificial biologic conduits.

  11. Geometric continuum regularization of quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.B. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-11-08

    An overview of the continuum regularization program is given. The program is traced from its roots in stochastic quantization, with emphasis on the examples of regularized gauge theory, the regularized general nonlinear sigma model and regularized quantum gravity. In its coordinate-invariant form, the regularization is seen as entirely geometric: only the supermetric on field deformations is regularized, and the prescription provides universal nonperturbative invariant continuum regularization across all quantum field theory. 54 refs.

  12. Accurate 3D Modeling of Breast Deformation for Temporal Mammogram Registration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT In this research project, we have developed mathematical model of breast deformation to simulate breast compression during...proposed to simulate and analyze breast deformation that can significantly improve the accuracy of matching in temporal mammograms and thus, the...performance of diagnosis and treatment. In this research project, we have developed a mathematical model of breast deformation to simulate breast

  13. New geometric design consistency model based on operating speed profiles for road safety evaluation.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Torregrosa, Francisco J; Pérez-Zuriaga, Ana M; Campoy-Ungría, J Manuel; García-García, Alfredo

    2013-12-01

    To assist in the on-going effort to reduce road fatalities as much as possible, this paper presents a new methodology to evaluate road safety in both the design and redesign stages of two-lane rural highways. This methodology is based on the analysis of road geometric design consistency, a value which will be a surrogate measure of the safety level of the two-lane rural road segment. The consistency model presented in this paper is based on the consideration of continuous operating speed profiles. The models used for their construction were obtained by using an innovative GPS-data collection method that is based on continuous operating speed profiles recorded from individual drivers. This new methodology allowed the researchers to observe the actual behavior of drivers and to develop more accurate operating speed models than was previously possible with spot-speed data collection, thereby enabling a more accurate approximation to the real phenomenon and thus a better consistency measurement. Operating speed profiles were built for 33 Spanish two-lane rural road segments, and several consistency measurements based on the global and local operating speed were checked. The final consistency model takes into account not only the global dispersion of the operating speed, but also some indexes that consider both local speed decelerations and speeds over posted speeds as well. For the development of the consistency model, the crash frequency for each study site was considered, which allowed estimating the number of crashes on a road segment by means of the calculation of its geometric design consistency. Consequently, the presented consistency evaluation method is a promising innovative tool that can be used as a surrogate measure to estimate the safety of a road segment.

  14. Model Attitude and Deformation Measurements at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is currently participating in an American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) sponsored Model Attitude and Deformation Working Group. This working group is chartered to develop a best practices document dealing with the measurement of two primary areas of wind tunnel measurements, 1) model attitude including alpha, beta and roll angle, and 2) model deformation. Model attitude is a principle variable in making aerodynamic and force measurements in a wind tunnel. Model deformation affects measured forces, moments and other measured aerodynamic parameters. The working group comprises of membership from industry, academia, and the Department of Defense (DoD). Each member of the working group gave a presentation on the methods and techniques that they are using to make model attitude and deformation measurements. This presentation covers the NASA Glenn Research Center s approach in making model attitude and deformation measurements.

  15. Mean-field dynamic criticality and geometric transition in the Gaussian core model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coslovich, Daniele; Ikeda, Atsushi; Miyazaki, Kunimasa

    2016-04-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate dynamic heterogeneities and the potential energy landscape of the Gaussian core model (GCM). Despite the nearly Gaussian statistics of particles' displacements, the GCM exhibits giant dynamic heterogeneities close to the dynamic transition temperature. The divergence of the four-point susceptibility is quantitatively well described by the inhomogeneous version of the mode-coupling theory. Furthermore, the potential energy landscape of the GCM is characterized by large energy barriers, as expected from the lack of activated, hopping dynamics, and display features compatible with a geometric transition. These observations demonstrate that all major features of mean-field dynamic criticality can be observed in a physically sound, three-dimensional model.

  16. [Theory of phyllotaxis. I. A geometric model for helical forms of consecutive phyllotaxis].

    PubMed

    Malygin, A G

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a geometric model for helical forms of consecutive phyllotaxis on the basis of an axiomatic approach. It follows from the model that rudiment growth and the movement of the cylindrical rudiment surface in the absence of a displacement in the direction along the rudiment axis leads to a repeating transition of tetragonal packaging of the rudiment into hexagonal packaging and vice versa. Under these conditions, sequences of rudiments produce left-handed and right-handed helices, the number of which at the circumference of the cylinder corresponds to adjacent numbers of the Fibonacci series. We demonstrate that the left-handed and right-handed isomers of helical forms of the consecutive phyllotaxis appear as a result of the transition of an unstable symmetric structure of the embryo at early developmental stages into stable left-handed or right-handed structures.

  17. Modeling and measurement of geometrically nonlinear damping in a microcantilever-nanotube system.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Bongwon; Cho, Hanna; Yu, Min-Feng; Vakakis, Alexander F; McFarland, Donald Michael; Bergman, Lawrence A

    2013-10-22

    Nonlinear mechanical systems promise broadband resonance and instantaneous hysteretic switching that can be used for high sensitivity sensing. However, to introduce nonlinear resonances in widely used microcantilever systems, such as AFM probes, requires driving the cantilever to an amplitude that is too large for any practical applications. We introduce a novel design for a microcantilever with a strong nonlinearity at small cantilever oscillation amplitude arising from the geometrical integration of a single BN nanotube. The dynamics of the system was modeled theoretically and confirmed experimentally. The system, besides providing a practical design of a nonlinear microcantilever-based probe, demonstrates also an effective method of studying the nonlinear damping properties of the attached nanotube. Beyond the typical linear mechanical damping, the nonlinear damping contribution from the attached nanotube was found to be essential for understanding the dynamical behavior of the designed system. Experimental results obtained through laser microvibrometry validated the developed model incorporating the nonlinear damping contribution.

  18. Ion-biomolecule collisions studied within the independent atom model including geometric screening corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüdde, H. J.; Achenbach, A.; Kalkbrenner, T.; Jankowiak, H. C.; Kirchner, T.

    2016-05-01

    A recently introduced model to account for geometric screening corrections in an independent-atom-model description of ion-molecule collisions is applied to proton collisions from amino acids and DNA and RNA nucleobases. The correction coefficients are obtained from using a pixel counting method (PCM) for the exact calculation of the effective cross sectional area that emerges when the molecular cross section is pictured as a structure of (overlapping) atomic cross sections. This structure varies with the relative orientation of the molecule with respect to the projectile beam direction and, accordingly, orientation-independent total cross sections are obtained from averaging the pixel count over many orientations. We present net capture and net ionization cross sections over wide ranges of impact energy and analyze the strength of the screening effect by comparing the PCM results with Bragg additivity rule cross sections and with experimental data where available. Work supported by NSERC, Canada.

  19. Modeling Geometric-Temporal Context With Directional Pyramid Co-Occurrence for Action Recognition.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chunfeng; Li, Xi; Hu, Weiming; Ling, Haibin; Maybank, Stephen J

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we present a new geometric-temporal representation for visual action recognition based on local spatio-temporal features. First, we propose a modified covariance descriptor under the log-Euclidean Riemannian metric to represent the spatio-temporal cuboids detected in the video sequences. Compared with previously proposed covariance descriptors, our descriptor can be measured and clustered in Euclidian space. Second, to capture the geometric-temporal contextual information, we construct a directional pyramid co-occurrence matrix (DPCM) to describe the spatio-temporal distribution of the vector-quantized local feature descriptors extracted from a video. DPCM characterizes the co-occurrence statistics of local features as well as the spatio-temporal positional relationships among the concurrent features. These statistics provide strong descriptive power for action recognition. To use DPCM for action recognition, we propose a directional pyramid co-occurrence matching kernel to measure the similarity of videos. The proposed method achieves the state-of-the-art performance and improves on the recognition performance of the bag-of-visual-words (BOVWs) models by a large margin on six public data sets. For example, on the KTH data set, it achieves 98.78% accuracy while the BOVW approach only achieves 88.06%. On both Weizmann and UCF CIL data sets, the highest possible accuracy of 100% is achieved.

  20. A geometric photography model for determining cloud top heights using MISR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yongjian; Qiu, Xinfa; Sun, Zhian; Li, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    Cloud top height (CTH) is an important factor in weather forecasting and monitoring. An accurate CTH has scientific significance for improving the quality of both weather analyses and numerical weather prediction. The three-dimensional geometric method has been widely recognized as a CTH calculation method that provides relatively high accuracy. In this paper, we used the theory of digital photogrammetry and remote sensing technology to establish a geometric photography model (GPM) that can simultaneously determine CTHs and cloud movement speed (CMS) by introducing the CMS into the collinearity equation of photogrammetry. The CTH is derived by constructing three-dimensional image pairs of multitemporal Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) red spectral band images from three angles. Compared with CTHs observed by ground-based lidar at the United States Southern Great Plains, the difference of CTHs using the GPM relative to the reference value was less than 300 m. By analyzing the ground control points, the GPM error is estimated to be approximately 300 m. Compared with MISR CTH data, the CTHs calculated in this study were similar to that of MISR without wind.

  1. A Method for Lung Boundary Correction Using Split Bregman Method and Geometric Active Contour Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianxun; Liang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    In order to get the extracted lung region from CT images more accurately, a model that contains lung region extraction and edge boundary correction is proposed. Firstly, a new edge detection function is presented with the help of the classic structure tensor theory. Secondly, the initial lung mask is automatically extracted by an improved active contour model which combines the global intensity information, local intensity information, the new edge information, and an adaptive weight. It is worth noting that the objective function of the improved model is converted to a convex model, which makes the proposed model get the global minimum. Then, the central airway was excluded according to the spatial context messages and the position relationship between every segmented region and the rib. Thirdly, a mesh and the fractal theory are used to detect the boundary that surrounds the juxtapleural nodule. Finally, the geometric active contour model is employed to correct the detected boundary and reinclude juxtapleural nodules. We also evaluated the performance of the proposed segmentation and correction model by comparing with their popular counterparts. Efficient computing capability and robustness property prove that our model can correct the lung boundary reliably and reproducibly. PMID:26089976

  2. Efficiencies of power plants, quasi-static models and the geometric-mean temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johal, Ramandeep S.

    2017-02-01

    Observed efficiencies of industrial power plants are often approximated by the square-root formula: 1 - √T-/T+, where T+(T-) is the highest (lowest) temperature achieved in the plant. This expression can be derived within finite-time thermodynamics, or, by entropy generation minimization, based on finite rates for the processes. In these analyses, a closely related quantity is the optimal value of the intermediate temperature for the hot stream, given by the geometric-mean value: √T+/T-. In this paper, instead of finite-time models, we propose to model the operation of plants by quasi-static work extraction models, with one reservoir (source/sink) as finite, while the other as practically infinite. No simplifying assumption is made on the nature of the finite system. This description is consistent with two model hypotheses, each yielding a specific value of the intermediate temperature, say T1 and T2. The lack of additional information on validity of the hypothesis that may be actually realized, motivates to approach the problem as an exercise in inductive inference. Thus we define an expected value of the intermediate temperature as the equally weighted mean: (T1 + T2)/2. It is shown that the expected value is very closely given by the geometric-mean value for almost all of the observed power plants.

  3. Distributed control in adaptive optics: deformable mirror and turbulence modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellenbroek, Rogier; Verhaegen, Michel; Doelman, Niek; Hamelinck, Roger; Rosielle, Nick; Steinbuch, Maarten

    2006-06-01

    Future large optical telescopes require adaptive optics (AO) systems whose deformable mirrors (DM) have ever more degrees of freedom. This paper describes advances that are made in a project aimed to design a new AO system that is extendible to meet tomorrow's specifications. Advances on the mechanical design are reported in a companion paper [6272-75], whereas this paper discusses the controller design aspects. The numerical complexity of controller designs often used for AO scales with the fourth power in the diameter of the telescope's primary mirror. For future large telescopes this will undoubtedly become a critical aspect. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of solving this issue with a distributed controller design. A distributed framework will be introduced in which each actuator has a separate processor that can communicate with a few direct neighbors. First, the DM will be modeled and shown to be compatible with the framework. Then, adaptive turbulence models that fit the framework will be shown to adequately capture the spatio-temporal behavior of the atmospheric disturbance, constituting a first step towards a distributed optimal control. Finally, the wavefront reconstruction step is fitted into the distributed framework such that the computational complexity for each processor increases only linearly with the telescope diameter.

  4. 3-D deformable image registration: a topology preservation scheme based on hierarchical deformation models and interval analysis optimization.

    PubMed

    Noblet, Vincent; Heinrich, Christian; Heitz, Fabrice; Armspach, Jean-Paul

    2005-05-01

    This paper deals with topology preservation in three-dimensional (3-D) deformable image registration. This work is a nontrivial extension of, which addresses the case of two-dimensional (2-D) topology preserving mappings. In both cases, the deformation map is modeled as a hierarchical displacement field, decomposed on a multiresolution B-spline basis. Topology preservation is enforced by controlling the Jacobian of the transformation. Finding the optimal displacement parameters amounts to solving a constrained optimization problem: The residual energy between the target image and the deformed source image is minimized under constraints on the Jacobian. Unlike the 2-D case, in which simple linear constraints are derived, the 3-D B-spline-based deformable mapping yields a difficult (until now, unsolved) optimization problem. In this paper, we tackle the problem by resorting to interval analysis optimization techniques. Care is taken to keep the computational burden as low as possible. Results on multipatient 3-D MRI registration illustrate the ability of the method to preserve topology on the continuous image domain.

  5. Geometric entanglement and quantum phase transitions in two-dimensional quantum lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Qian-Qian; Wang, Hong-Lei; Li, Sheng-Hao; Cho, Sam Young; Batchelor, Murray T.; Zhou, Huan-Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Geometric entanglement (GE), as a measure of multipartite entanglement, has been investigated as a universal tool to detect phase transitions in quantum many-body lattice models. In this paper we outline a systematic method to compute GE for two-dimensional (2D) quantum many-body lattice models based on the translational invariant structure of infinite projected entangled pair state (iPEPS) representations. By employing this method, the q -state quantum Potts model on the square lattice with q ∈{2 ,3 ,4 ,5 } is investigated as a prototypical example. Further, we have explored three 2D Heisenberg models: the antiferromagnetic spin-1/2 X X X and anisotropic X Y X models in an external magnetic field, and the antiferromagnetic spin-1 X X Z model. We find that continuous GE does not guarantee a continuous phase transition across a phase transition point. We observe and thus classify three different types of continuous GE across a phase transition point: (i) GE is continuous with maximum value at the transition point and the phase transition is continuous, (ii) GE is continuous with maximum value at the transition point but the phase transition is discontinuous, and (iii) GE is continuous with nonmaximum value at the transition point and the phase transition is continuous. For the models under consideration, we find that the second and the third types are related to a point of dual symmetry and a fully polarized phase, respectively.

  6. Modeling of deformation behavior and texture evolution in magnesium alloy using the intermediate $\\phi$-model

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dongsheng; Ahzi, Said; M'Guil, S. M.; Wen, Wei; Lavender, Curt A.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2014-01-06

    The viscoplastic intermediate phi-model was applied in this work to predict the deformation behavior and texture evolution in a magnesium alloy, an HCP material. We simulated the deformation behavior with different intergranular interaction strengths and compared the predicted results with available experimental results. In this approach, elasticity is neglected and the plastic deformation mechanisms are assumed as a combination of crystallographic slip and twinning systems. Tests are performed for rolling (plane strain compression) of random textured Mg polycrystal as well as for tensile and compressive tests on rolled Mg sheets. Simulated texture evolutions agree well with experimental data. Activities of twinning and slip, predicted by the intermediate $\\phi$-model, reveal the strong anisotropic behavior during tension and compression of rolled sheets.

  7. High Strain Rate Deformation Modeling of a Polymer Matrix Composite. Part 2; Composite Micromechanical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Recently applications have exposed polymer matrix composite materials to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under these extreme conditions. In this second paper of a two part report, a three-dimensional composite micromechanical model is described which allows for the analysis of the rate dependent, nonlinear deformation response of a polymer matrix composite. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations utilized to model the deformation response of a polymer are implemented within the micromechanics method. The deformation response of two representative laminated carbon fiber reinforced composite materials with varying fiber orientation has been predicted using the described technique. The predicted results compare favorably to both experimental values and the response predicted by the Generalized Method of Cells, a well-established micromechanics analysis method.

  8. Deformation-induced damage and recovery in model hydrogels - A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zidek, Jan; Milchev, Andrey; Jancar, Josef; Vilgis, Thomas A.

    2016-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulation of a model hybrid cross-link hydrogel, we investigate the network damage evolution and the related structure transformations. We model the hydrogel structure as a network-connected assembly of crosslinked clusters whereby deformation-induced damage is considered along with network recovery. The two principal mechanisms involved in hydrogel recovery from deformation include segment hops of the building structure units (segments) between clusters and cluster shape modification. These mechanisms act either instantaneously, or with a certain time delay after the onset of deformation. By elucidating the conditions under which one of the mechanisms prevails, one may design hydrogel materials with a desired response to deformation.

  9. Rat airway morphometry measured from in situ MRI-based geometric models

    PubMed Central

    Oakes, Jessica M.; Scadeng, Miriam; Breen, Ellen C.; Marsden, Alison L.

    2012-01-01

    Rodents have been widely used to study the environmental or therapeutic impact of inhaled particles. Knowledge of airway morphometry is essential in assessing geometric influence on aerosol deposition and in developing accurate lung models of aerosol transport. Previous morphometric studies of the rat lung performed ex situ provided high-resolution measurements (50–125 μm). However, it is unclear how the overall geometry of these casts might have differed from the natural in situ appearance. In this study, four male Wistar rat (268 ± 14 g) lungs were filled sequentially with perfluorocarbon and phosphate-buffered saline before being imaged in situ in a 7-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner at a resolution of 0.2 × 0.2 × 0.27 mm. Airway length, diameter, gravitational, bifurcation, and rotational angles were measured for the first four airway generations from 3D geometric models built from the MR images. Minor interanimal variability [expressed by the relative standard deviation RSD (=SD/mean)] was found for length (0.18 ± 0.07), diameter (0.15 ± 0.15), and gravitational angle (0.12 ± 0.06). One rat model was extended to 16 airway generations. Organization of the airways using a diameter-defined Strahler ordering method resulted in lower interorder variability than conventional generation-based grouping for both diameter (RSD = 0.12 vs. 0.42) and length (0.16 vs. 0.67). Gravitational and rotational angles averaged 82.9 ± 37.9° and 53.6 ± 24.1°, respectively. Finally, the major daughter branch bifurcated at a smaller angle (19.3 ± 14.6°) than the minor branch (60.5 ± 19.4°). These data represent the most comprehensive set of rodent in situ measurements to date and can be used readily in computational studies of lung function and aerosol exposure. PMID:22461437

  10. Proximity potential for heavy ion reactions on deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, A. J.; Bayman, B. F.

    1982-01-01

    The usual treatment of the deformed optical model for analysis of heavy ion induced inelastic scattering data involves a deformed (target) radius, a spherical (projectile) radius and a potential strength dependent on the surface separation along the line between the two centers. Several authors using various approaches have shown that this center line potential is geometrically inadequate especially for description of higher L deformation parameters probed in heavy ion induced inelastic scattering experiments. A quantitatively adequate form of the deformed proximity potential suitable for use with a coupled channels reaction code in the analysis of inelastic scattering data above the Coulomb barrier is described. A major objective is to be able to extract reliably higher deformed multipole moments from such data. The deformed potential calculated in the folding model will serve as a geometrically exact benchmark to evaluate the accuracy of the proximity potential prescriptions. (WHK)

  11. HERMES: A Model to Describe Deformation, Burning, Explosion, and Detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Reaugh, J E

    2011-11-22

    performance, whether as a result of accident, hazard, or a fault in the detonation train. These models describe the build-up of detonation from a shock stimulus. They are generally consistent with the mesoscale picture of ignition at many small defects in the plane of the shock front and the growth of the resulting hot-spots, leading to detonation in heterogeneous explosives such as plastic-bonded explosives (PBX). The models included terms for ignition, and also for the growth of reaction as tracked by the local mass fraction of product gas, {lambda}. The growth of reaction in such models incorporates a form factor that describes the change of surface area per unit volume (specific surface area) as the reaction progresses. For unimolecular crystalline-based explosives, the form factor is consistent with the mesoscale picture of a galaxy of hot spots burning outward and eventually interacting with each other. For composite explosives and propellants, where the fuel and oxidizer are segregated, the diffusion flame at the fuel-oxidizer interface can be interpreted with a different form factor that corresponds to grains burning inward from their surfaces. The form factor influences the energy release rate, and the amount of energy released in the reaction zone. Since the 19th century, gun and cannon propellants have used perforated geometric shapes that produce an increasing surface area as the propellant burns. This helps maintain the pressure as burning continues while the projectile travels down the barrel, which thereby increases the volume of the hot gas. Interior ballistics calculations use a geometric form factor to describe the changing surface area precisely. As a result, with a suitably modified form factor, detonation models can represent burning and explosion in damaged and broken reactant. The disadvantage of such models in application to accidents is that the ignition term does not distinguish between a value of pressure that results from a shock, and the same

  12. A geometrical model for the Monte Carlo simulation of the TrueBeam linac.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, M; Sempau, J; Fogliata, A; Cozzi, L; Sauerwein, W; Brualla, L

    2015-06-07

    Monte Carlo simulation of linear accelerators (linacs) depends on the accurate geometrical description of the linac head. The geometry of the Varian TrueBeam linac is not available to researchers. Instead, the company distributes phase-space files of the flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams tallied at a plane located just upstream of the jaws. Yet, Monte Carlo simulations based on third-party tallied phase spaces are subject to limitations. In this work, an experimentally based geometry developed for the simulation of the FFF beams of the Varian TrueBeam linac is presented. The Monte Carlo geometrical model of the TrueBeam linac uses information provided by Varian that reveals large similarities between the TrueBeam machine and the Clinac 2100 downstream of the jaws. Thus, the upper part of the TrueBeam linac was modeled by introducing modifications to the Varian Clinac 2100 linac geometry. The most important of these modifications is the replacement of the standard flattening filters by ad hoc thin filters. These filters were modeled by comparing dose measurements and simulations. The experimental dose profiles for the 6 MV and 10 MV FFF beams were obtained from the Varian Golden Data Set and from in-house measurements performed with a diode detector for radiation fields ranging from 3  ×  3 to 40  ×  40 cm(2) at depths of maximum dose of 5 and 10 cm. Indicators of agreement between the experimental data and the simulation results obtained with the proposed geometrical model were the dose differences, the root-mean-square error and the gamma index. The same comparisons were performed for dose profiles obtained from Monte Carlo simulations using the phase-space files distributed by Varian for the TrueBeam linac as the sources of particles. Results of comparisons show a good agreement of the dose for the ansatz geometry similar to that obtained for the simulations with the TrueBeam phase-space files for all fields and depths considered, except for

  13. Effects of geometric head model perturbations on the EEG forward and inverse problems.

    PubMed

    von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Muravchik, Carlos H; Nehorai, Arye

    2006-03-01

    We study the effect of geometric head model perturbations on the electroencephalography (EEG) forward and inverse problems. Small magnitude perturbations of the shape of the head could represent uncertainties in the head model due to errors on images or techniques used to construct the model. They could also represent small scale details of the shape of the surfaces not described in a deterministic model, such as the sulci and fissures of the cortical layer. We perform a first-order perturbation analysis, using a meshless method for computing the sensitivity of the solution of the forward problem to the geometry of the head model. The effect on the forward problem solution is treated as noise in the EEG measurements and the Cramér-Rao bound is computed to quantify the effect on the inverse problem performance. Our results show that, for a dipolar source, the effect of the perturbations on the inverse problem performance is under the level of the uncertainties due to the spontaneous brain activity. Thus, the results suggest that an extremely detailed model of the head may be unnecessary when solving the EEG inverse problem.

  14. Enhancement of Generic Building Models by Recognition and Enforcement of Geometric Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidow, J.; Hammer, H.; Pohl, M.; Bulatov, D.

    2016-06-01

    Many buildings in 3D city models can be represented by generic models, e.g. boundary representations or polyhedrons, without expressing building-specific knowledge explicitly. Without additional constraints, the bounding faces of these building reconstructions do not feature expected structures such as orthogonality or parallelism. The recognition and enforcement of man-made structures within model instances is one way to enhance 3D city models. Since the reconstructions are derived from uncertain and imprecise data, crisp relations such as orthogonality or parallelism are rarely satisfied exactly. Furthermore, the uncertainty of geometric entities is usually not specified in 3D city models. Therefore, we propose a point sampling which simulates the initial point cloud acquisition by airborne laser scanning and provides estimates for the uncertainties. We present a complete workflow for recognition and enforcement of man-made structures in a given boundary representation. The recognition is performed by hypothesis testing and the enforcement of the detected constraints by a global adjustment of all bounding faces. Since the adjustment changes not only the geometry but also the topology of faces, we obtain improved building models which feature regular structures and a potentially reduced complexity. The feasibility and the usability of the approach are demonstrated with a real data set.

  15. Parametric geometric model and shape optimization of an underwater glider with blended-wing-body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chunya; Song, Baowei; Wang, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Underwater glider, as a new kind of autonomous underwater vehicles, has many merits such as long-range, extended-duration and low costs. The shape of underwater glider is an important factor in determining the hydrodynamic efficiency. In this paper, a high lift to drag ratio configuration, the Blended-Wing-Body (BWB), is used to design a small civilian under water glider. In the parametric geometric model of the BWB underwater glider, the planform is defined with Bezier curve and linear line, and the section is defined with symmetrical airfoil NACA 0012. Computational investigations are carried out to study the hydrodynamic performance of the glider using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code Fluent. The Kriging-based genetic algorithm, called Efficient Global Optimization (EGO), is applied to hydrodynamic design optimization. The result demonstrates that the BWB underwater glider has excellent hydrodynamic performance, and the lift to drag ratio of initial design is increased by 7% in the EGO process.

  16. Computer-aided geometric modeling of the human eye and orbit.

    PubMed

    Parshall, R F

    1991-01-01

    The author advocates, as a long-term development agenda for the profession, a shift in the working methods of medical illustrators from a two-dimensional image processing mode to a computer-aided design and drafting (CADD) mode. Existing CADD technology, which can make short work of the complex graphic construction problems of anatomical visualization, performs virtually all of its manipulations through systematic exercise of graphic geometry which illustrators tend to reduce to an intuitive, almost vestigial supplement to 2D image processing methods. The primary barrier to the immediate use of CADD is a lack of geometric database materials on anatomical component systems of the body. An on-going experimental project in modeling the human eye and orbit, utilizing a Silicon Graphics Iris workstation and Control Data Corporation's Integrated Computerized Engineering and Manufacturing (ICEM) software, exemplifies the preparatory work needed to create such database materials.

  17. Geometrical optics approximation modeling of laser measurements of an operating Bessemer-converter casing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalev, Mihail; Parvanov, Orlin; Pirgov, Peter S.

    1996-12-01

    We report the use of computer techniques for modeling and visualization of the laser monitoring of the inner surface of an operating Bessemer converter. The purpose of the study was to estimate the accuracy of the laser measurement technique, to determine the geometrical parameters necessary, and to establish the requirements to the accuracy of the scanning part of a laser meter when the pulse duration, beam divergence and defects size are pre-set. The following basic conclusions can be drawn: firstly, it is possible to use a laser meter as a device for monitoring the casing thickness based on the use of a pulsed solid-state laser; secondly, the process of non-uniform wear can be handled by means of additional measurements with off-axis sounding geometry; thirdly, the numerical experiment demonstrates that, based on the accuracy achieved of determining the casing thickness, the operating life-time of the converter can be extended.

  18. A New Family of Interpolatory Non-Stationary Subdivision Schemes for Curve Design in Geometric Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Costanza; Romani, Lucia

    2010-09-01

    Univariate subdivision schemes are efficient iterative methods to generate smooth limit curves starting from a sequence of arbitrary points. Aim of this paper is to present and investigate a new family of 6-point interpolatory non-stationary subdivision schemes capable of reproducing important curves of great interest in geometric modeling and engineering applications, if starting from uniformly spaced initial samples. This new family can reproduce conic sections since it is obtained by a parameter depending affine combination of the cubic exponential B-spline symbol generating functions in the space V4,γ = {1,x,etx,e-tx} with t∈{0,s,is|s>0}. Moreover, the free parameter can be chosen to reproduce also other interesting analytic curves by imposing the algebraic conditions for the reproduction of an additional pair of exponential polynomials giving rise to different extensions of the space V4,γ.

  19. An Approach for Measuring and Modeling of Plastic Deformation of Metallic Plates during High Velocity Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    O'Toole, Brendan J.; Trabia, Mohamed B.; Roy, Shawoon K.; Somasundarum, Deepak; Jennings, Richard; Matthes, Melissa; Hixson, Robert S.; Becker, Steven; Daykin, Edward P.; Pena, Michael T.; Machorro, Eric A.

    2014-05-29

    During high velocity impact experiments, projectile impact creates extreme pressure waves that results in a significant localized deformation within a short period of time. Experiments under these conditions require sophisticated data acquisition technique to better understand the materials deformation mechanisms. Since these experiments are expensive, it is also beneficial to develop accurate computational models that can predict this kind of deformation in high velocity impact events.

  20. Molecular modelling of structure and deformation mechanisms of auxetic behaviour in the α-quartz structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yong Tao; Alderson, Andrew; Alderson, Kim Lesley

    2011-11-01

    Force field based simulation has been employed to predict the deformation mechanisms of auxetic nano-materials having tetrahedral framework. The structure of α-quartz was studied in detail for subjecting to uniaxial loading along the Z direction. The cooperative dilation and rotation of tetrahedra acting concurrently were demonstrated to be the main deformation mechanism of α-quartz, confirming previous analytical model. Slight tetrahedral distortion also existed for undeformed and deformed structure.

  1. Molecular modelling of structure and deformation mechanisms of auxetic behaviour in the α-quartz structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yong Tao; Alderson, Andrew; Alderson, Kim Lesley

    2012-04-01

    Force field based simulation has been employed to predict the deformation mechanisms of auxetic nano-materials having tetrahedral framework. The structure of α-quartz was studied in detail for subjecting to uniaxial loading along the Z direction. The cooperative dilation and rotation of tetrahedra acting concurrently were demonstrated to be the main deformation mechanism of α-quartz, confirming previous analytical model. Slight tetrahedral distortion also existed for undeformed and deformed structure.

  2. Probing surface plasmons by bare V-shaped tips: modeling by geometrical optics and rigorous diffraction theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Gaurav; Hyvärinen, Heikki J.; Tervo, Jani; Turunen, Jari

    2017-02-01

    We consider probing inhomogeneous waves in the near fields of metallic nanostructures with the aid of a dielectric V-shaped wedge connected to a waveguide. A geometrical model based on the local plane interface approach is proposed to describe the interaction of the wedge with the inhomogeneous field. The fundamental ideas behind the geometrical model are validated by comparison with the results given by rigorous diffraction analysis, and applied to probing plasmonic interference patterns generated by metallic gratings with very narrow slits. The model explains intuitively why a bare wedge with a large apex angle is capable of subwavelength resolution in the spirit of scanning near-field microscopy.

  3. An asperity-deformation model for effective pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangi, Anthony F.; Carlson, Richard L.

    1996-05-01

    Variations of the mechanical and transport properties of cracked and/or porous rocks under isotropic stress depend on both the confining pressure ( Pc) and the pore-fluid pressure ( Pp). To a first approximation, these rock properties are functions of the differential pressure, Pd = Pc - Pp; at least for low differential pressures. However, at higher differential pressures, the properties depend in a more complicated way upon the two pressures. The concept of effective pressure, Pe, is used to denote this variation and it is defined as Pe( Pc, Pp) = Pc - n( Pc, Pp) Pp. If n = 1 (and therefore, is independent of Pc and Pp), the effective pressure is just the differential pressure. We have used an asperity-deformation model and a force-balance equation to derive expressions for the effective pressure. We equate the total external force (in one direction), Fc, to the total force on the asperities, Fa, and the force of the fluid, Fp, acting in that same direction. The fluid force, Fp, acts only on the parts of the crack (or pore-volume) faces which are not in contact. Then, the asperity pressure, Pa, is the average force per unit area acting on the crack (or grain) contacts P a = {F a}/{A} = {F c}/{A} - {F p}/{A} = P c - (1 - {A c}/{A})P p, where A is the total area over which Fc acts and Ac is the area of contact of the crack asperities or the grains. Thus, the asperity pressure, Pa, is greater than the differential pressure, Pd, because Pp acts on a smaller area, A- Ac, than the total area, A. For elastic asperities, the area of contact Ac and the strain (e.g., crack and pore openings) remain the same, to a high degree of approximation, at constant asperity pressure. Therefore, transport properties such as permeability, resistivity, thermal conductivity, etc. are constant, to the same degree of approximation, at constant asperity pressure. For these properties, the asperity pressure is, very accurately, the effective pressure, Pc. Using this model, we find that the

  4. Surrogate-driven deformable motion model for organ motion tracking in particle radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassi, Aurora; Seregni, Matteo; Riboldi, Marco; Cerveri, Pietro; Sarrut, David; Battista Ivaldi, Giovanni; Tabarelli de Fatis, Paola; Liotta, Marco; Baroni, Guido

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is the development and experimental testing of a tumor tracking method for particle radiation therapy, providing the daily respiratory dynamics of the patient’s thoraco-abdominal anatomy as a function of an external surface surrogate combined with an a priori motion model. The proposed tracking approach is based on a patient-specific breathing motion model, estimated from the four-dimensional (4D) planning computed tomography (CT) through deformable image registration. The model is adapted to the interfraction baseline variations in the patient’s anatomical configuration. The driving amplitude and phase parameters are obtained intrafractionally from a respiratory surrogate signal derived from the external surface displacement. The developed technique was assessed on a dataset of seven lung cancer patients, who underwent two repeated 4D CT scans. The first 4D CT was used to build the respiratory motion model, which was tested on the second scan. The geometric accuracy in localizing lung lesions, mediated over all breathing phases, ranged between 0.6 and 1.7 mm across all patients. Errors in tracking the surrounding organs at risk, such as lungs, trachea and esophagus, were lower than 1.3 mm on average. The median absolute variation in water equivalent path length (WEL) within the target volume did not exceed 1.9 mm-WEL for simulated particle beams. A significant improvement was achieved compared with error compensation based on standard rigid alignment. The present work can be regarded as a feasibility study for the potential extension of tumor tracking techniques in particle treatments. Differently from current tracking methods applied in conventional radiotherapy, the proposed approach allows for the dynamic localization of all anatomical structures scanned in the planning CT, thus providing complete information on density and WEL variations required for particle beam range adaptation.

  5. Probabilistic multiobject deformable model for MR/SPECT brain image registration and segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikou, Christophoros; Heitz, Fabrice; Armspach, Jean-Paul

    1999-05-01

    A probabilistic deformable model for the representation of brain structures is described. The statistically learned deformable model represents the relative location of head (skull and scalp) and brain surfaces in MR/SPECT images pairs and accommodates the significant variability of these anatomical structures across different individuals. To provide a training set, a representative collection of 3D MRI volumes of different patients have first been registered to a reference image. The head and brain surfaces of each volume are parameterized by the amplitudes of the vibration modes of a deformable spherical mesh. For a given MR image in the training set, a vector containing the largest vibration modes describing the head and the brain is created. This random vector is statistically constrained by retaining the most significant variations modes of its Karhunen-Loeve expansion on the training population. By these means, both head and brain surfaces are deformed according to the anatomical variability observed in the training set. Two applications of the probabilistic deformable model are presented: the deformable model-based registration of 3D multimodal (MR/SPECT) brain images and the segmentation of the brain from MRI using the probabilistic constraints embedded in the deformable model. The multi-object deformable model may be considered as a first step towards the development of a general purpose probabilistic anatomical atlas of the brain.

  6. t-LSE: a novel robust geometric approach for modeling protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; You, Zhu-Hong; Huang, De-Shuang; Wang, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks provide insights into understanding of biological processes, function and the underlying complex evolutionary mechanisms of the cell. Modeling PPI network is an important and fundamental problem in system biology, where it is still of major concern to find a better fitting model that requires less structural assumptions and is more robust against the large fraction of noisy PPIs. In this paper, we propose a new approach called t-logistic semantic embedding (t-LSE) to model PPI networks. t-LSE tries to adaptively learn a metric embedding under the simple geometric assumption of PPI networks, and a non-convex cost function was adopted to deal with the noise in PPI networks. The experimental results show the superiority of the fit of t-LSE over other network models to PPI data. Furthermore, the robust loss function adopted here leads to big improvements for dealing with the noise in PPI network. The proposed model could thus facilitate further graph-based studies of PPIs and may help infer the hidden underlying biological knowledge. The Matlab code implementing the proposed method is freely available from the web site: http://home.ustc.edu.cn/~yzh33108/PPIModel.htm.

  7. A novel model of the geometric and detector response for limited angular sampling pinhole SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wietholt, Christian; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung; Clough, Anne V.; Chen, Chin-Tu

    2006-03-01

    Reconstruction methodologies for data sets with reduced angular sampling (RAS) are essential for efficient dynamic or static preclinical animal imaging research using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Modern iterative reconstruction methods can obtain 3D radiotracer distributions of the highest possible quality and resolution. Essential to these algorithms is an accurate model of the physical imaging process. We developed a new point-spread function (PSF) model for the pinhole geometry and compared it to a Gaussian model in a RAS setting. The new model incorporates the geometric response of the pinhole and the detector response of the camera by simulating the system PSF using the error function. Reconstruction of simulated data was done with OS-EM and COS-EM: a new convergent OS-EM based algorithm. The reconstruction of projection data of a simulated point source using the novel method showed improved FWHM values compared to a standard Gaussian method. COS-EM delivers improved results for RAS data, although it converges slower than OS-EM. The reconstruction of Monte Carlo simulated projection data from a resolution phantom shows that as few as 40 projections are sufficient to reconstruct an image with a resolution of approximately 4 mm. The new pinhole model applied to iterative reconstruction methods can reduce imaging time in small animal experiments by a factor of three or reduce the number of cameras needed to perform dynamic SPECT.

  8. Deformed proximity potential for heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, A.J.

    1989-09-01

    The proximity potential is discussed for the inelastic scattering of a spherical nucleus on a deformed nucleus or the mutual interaction of two deformed nuclei. It is shown that the proximity potential is, in general, geometrically more correct than the usual centerline prescription used in inelastic scattering analyses. For the cases where the proximity potential is inadequate a folding model approach is advocated. Techniques to facilitate the coupled channels analysis are presented. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Particle-Based Geometric and Mechanical Modelling of Woven Technical Textiles and Reinforcements for Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadi, Reza

    Technical textiles are increasingly being engineered and used in challenging applications, in areas such as safety, biomedical devices, architecture and others, where they must meet stringent demands including excellent and predictable load bearing capabilities. They also form the bases for one of the most widespread group of composite materials, fibre reinforced polymer-matrix composites (PMCs), which comprise materials made of stiff and strong fibres generally available in textile form and selected for their structural potential, combined with a polymer matrix that gives parts their shape. Manufacturing processes for PMCs and technical textiles, as well as parts and advanced textile structures must be engineered, ideally through simulation, and therefore diverse properties of the textiles, textile reinforcements and PMC materials must be available for predictive simulation. Knowing the detailed geometry of technical textiles is essential to predicting accurately the processing and performance properties of textiles and PMC parts. In turn, the geometry taken by a textile or a reinforcement textile is linked in an intricate manner to its constitutive behaviour. This thesis proposes, investigates and validates a general numerical tool for the integrated and comprehensive analysis of textile geometry and constitutive behaviour as required toward engineering applications featuring technical textiles and textile reinforcements. The tool shall be general with regards to the textiles modelled and the loading cases applied. Specifically, the work aims at fulfilling the following objectives: 1) developing and implementing dedicated simulation software for modelling textiles subjected to various load cases; 2) providing, through simulation, geometric descriptions for different textiles subjected to different load cases namely compaction, relaxation and shear; 3) predicting the constitutive behaviour of the textiles undergoing said load cases; 4) identifying parameters

  10. Effect of material property heterogeneity on biomechanical modeling of prostate under deformation.

    PubMed

    Samavati, Navid; McGrath, Deirdre M; Jewett, Michael A S; van der Kwast, Theo; Ménard, Cynthia; Brock, Kristy K

    2015-01-07

    Biomechanical model based deformable image registration has been widely used to account for prostate deformation in various medical imaging procedures. Biomechanical material properties are important components of a biomechanical model. In this study, the effect of incorporating tumor-specific material properties in the prostate biomechanical model was investigated to provide insight into the potential impact of material heterogeneity on the prostate deformation calculations. First, a simple spherical prostate and tumor model was used to analytically describe the deformations and demonstrate the fundamental effect of changes in the tumor volume and stiffness in the modeled deformation. Next, using a clinical prostate model, a parametric approach was used to describe the variations in the heterogeneous prostate model by changing tumor volume, stiffness, and location, to show the differences in the modeled deformation between heterogeneous and homogeneous prostate models. Finally, five clinical prostatectomy examples were used in separately performed homogeneous and heterogeneous biomechanical model based registrations to describe the deformations between 3D reconstructed histopathology images and ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging, and examine the potential clinical impact of modeling biomechanical heterogeneity of the prostate. The analytical formulation showed that increasing the tumor volume and stiffness could significantly increase the impact of the heterogeneous prostate model in the calculated displacement differences compared to the homogeneous model. The parametric approach using a single prostate model indicated up to 4.8 mm of displacement difference at the tumor boundary compared to a homogeneous model. Such differences in the deformation of the prostate could be potentially clinically significant given the voxel size of the ex vivo MR images (0.3  ×  0.3  ×  0.3 mm). However, no significant changes in the registration accuracy were

  11. Detection and registration of ribs in MRI using geometric and appearance models.

    PubMed

    Samei, Golnoosh; Székely, Gábor; Tanner, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) is a new type of minimally invasive therapy for treating malignant liver tissues. Since the ribs on the beam path can compromise an effective therapy, detecting them and tracking their motion on MR images is of great importance. However, due to poor magnetic signal emission of bones, ribs cannot be entirely observed in MR. In the proposed method, we take advantage of the accuracy of CT in imaging the ribs to build a geometric ribcage model and combine it with an appearance model of the neighbouring structures of ribs in MR to reconstruct realistic centerlines in MRIs. We have improved our previous method by using a more sophisticated appearance model, a more flexible ribcage model, and a more effective optimization strategy. We decreased the mean error to 2.5 mm, making the method suitable for clinical application. Finally, we propose a rib registration method which conserves the shape and length of ribs, and imposes realistic constraints on their motions, achieving 2.7mm mean accuracy.

  12. Competition and fixation of cohorts of adaptive mutations under Fisher geometrical model

    PubMed Central

    Alpedrinha, João; Campos, Paulo R.A.; Gordo, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    One of the simplest models of adaptation to a new environment is Fisher’s Geometric Model (FGM), in which populations move on a multidimensional landscape defined by the traits under selection. The predictions of this model have been found to be consistent with current observations of patterns of fitness increase in experimentally evolved populations. Recent studies investigated the dynamics of allele frequency change along adaptation of microbes to simple laboratory conditions and unveiled a dramatic pattern of competition between cohorts of mutations, i.e., multiple mutations simultaneously segregating and ultimately reaching fixation. Here, using simulations, we study the dynamics of phenotypic and genetic change as asexual populations under clonal interference climb a Fisherian landscape, and ask about the conditions under which FGM can display the simultaneous increase and fixation of multiple mutations—mutation cohorts—along the adaptive walk. We find that FGM under clonal interference, and with varying levels of pleiotropy, can reproduce the experimentally observed competition between different cohorts of mutations, some of which have a high probability of fixation along the adaptive walk. Overall, our results show that the surprising dynamics of mutation cohorts recently observed during experimental adaptation of microbial populations can be expected under one of the oldest and simplest theoretical models of adaptation—FGM. PMID:27547562

  13. Investigation of the pore geometrical structure of nanofibrous membranes using statistical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanmohammadi Khoshui, Sedigheh; Hosseini Ravandi, Seyed Abdolkarim; Bagherzadeh, Roohollah; Saberi, Zahra; Karimi, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    The pore size and its distribution are the two main geometrical properties of nanofibrous membranes in various applications such as filtration and tissue engineering. In the current paper, a modified approach (model) is suggested to predict pore size and its distribution in nanofibrous membranes. In the present work, inter-fibre pores are considered as polygons arising from the fibre contacts. For the first time, these polygons are assumed to be three-, four- and five-gons, and the hydraulic radius of the pores was obtained instead of the equal radius. The pore size of multilayer mats was provided with a different insight. The pore mean size and its distribution were obtained by statistical methods. In order to validate the model, polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibrous mats were electrospun, and the mean pore size and its distribution were measured using porosimetry. It was found that the probability distribution function of the pore size in both single and multi nanofibrous layers was the Gamma function with two parameters. The effect of the fibre width and porosity raise was increasing of mean pore diameter of multilayer networks. A comparison between the modified model and previous models revealed that the modified approach was more realistic.

  14. Towards geometric D6-brane model building on non-factorisable toroidal ℤ 4-orbifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berasaluce-González, Mikel; Honecker, Gabriele; Seifert, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    We present a geometric approach to D-brane model building on the non-factorisable torus backgrounds of T 6/ ℤ 4, which are A 3 × A 3 and A 3 × A 1 × B 2. Based on the counting of `short' supersymmetric three-cycles per complex structure vev, the number of physically inequivalent lattice orientations with respect to the anti-holomorphic involution ℛ of the Type IIA/Ωℛ orientifold can be reduced to three for the A 3 × A 3 lattice and four for the A 3 × A 1 × B 2 lattice. While four independent three-cycles on A 3 × A 3 cannot accommodate phenomenologically interesting global models with a chiral spectrum, the eight-dimensional space of three-cycles on A 3 × A 1 × B 2 is rich enough to provide for particle physics models, with several globally consistent two- and four-generation Pati-Salam models presented here.

  15. Modelling of the cellular automata space deformation within the RCAFE framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitko, Mateusz; Madej, Łukasz

    2016-10-01

    Development of the innovative approach to micro scale cellular automata (CA) space deformation during dynamic recrystallization process (DRX) is the main goal of the present paper. Major assumptions of the developed CA DRX model as well as novel space deformation algorithm, which is based on the random cellular automata concept and FE method, are described. Algorithms and methods to transfer input/output data between FE and CA are presented in detail. Visualization tool to analyze progress of deformation in the irregular CA space is also highlighted. Finally, initial results in the form of deformed and recrystallized microstructures are presented and discussed.

  16. Watermarked cardiac CT image segmentation using deformable models and the Hermite transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Coronel, Sandra L.; Moya-Albor, Ernesto; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris; Brieva, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Medical image watermarking is an open area for research and is a solution for the protection of copyright and intellectual property. One of the main challenges of this problem is that the marked images should not differ perceptually from the original images allowing a correct diagnosis and authentication. Furthermore, we also aim at obtaining watermarked images with very little numerical distortion so that computer vision tasks such as segmentation of important anatomical structures do not be impaired or affected. We propose a preliminary watermarking application in cardiac CT images based on a perceptive approach that includes a brightness model to generate a perceptive mask and identify the image regions where the watermark detection becomes a difficult task for the human eye. We propose a normalization scheme of the image in order to improve robustness against geometric attacks. We follow a spread spectrum technique to insert an alphanumeric code, such as patient's information, within the watermark. The watermark scheme is based on the Hermite transform as a bio-inspired image representation model. In order to evaluate the numerical integrity of the image data after watermarking, we perform a segmentation task based on deformable models. The segmentation technique is based on a vector-value level sets method such that, given a curve in a specific image, and subject to some constraints, the curve can evolve in order to detect objects. In order to stimulate the curve evolution we introduce simultaneously some image features like the gray level and the steered Hermite coefficients as texture descriptors. Segmentation performance was assessed by means of the Dice index and the Hausdorff distance. We tested different mark sizes and different insertion schemes on images that were later segmented either automatic or manual by physicians.

  17. The periodic table of real geometric algebras, bits of space-time, and the Standard Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Dennis

    2007-04-01

    Real geometric algebras Rn;s in n dimensions with signature s are isomorphic to algebras of real, complex, or quaternionic matrices R(2^n 2), C(2^n-1 2), or H(2^n-2 2), or of block diagonal matrices ^2R(2^n-1 2) or ^2H(2^n-3 2), for | ( s+3 )8-4 | = 1, 2, 3, 0, or 4, respectively. Only for n = 2 or 4 and s = 0 or 2 is Rn;s isomorphic to real nxn matrices R(n). R2;2 and R2;0 describe the Euclidean plane and the Minkowskian plane. Their direct product, R4;2 = R2;0 R2;2, describes 4-d space-time with signature + + + -- and with dynamical elements (position, spin, momentum, and action) that satisfy the Heisenberg commutation relations. Quantum mechanics emerges naturally. Electromagnetism, described by U(1) C R1;-1, has one time-like coordinate; the weak force, described by SU(2) SO(3) R3;3, has three space-like coordinates. Thus the real algebra of the symmetry group of the electro-weak force is isomorphic to the real algebra of space-time. Finally, R8;2 = R4;0 R4;2 is isomorphic to R(16), into which can be fit three generations of weakly interacting Fermi doublets and three generations of three colors of quarks. Every 8 dimensions thereafter, geometric algebras factor into direct products of R(16), interpreted as a 4-d hexadecimal space-time lattice with four additional internal coordinates for the Standard Model.

  18. Is There a Geometric Module for Spatial Orientation? Insights from a Rodent Navigation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheynikhovich, Denis; Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Strosslin, Thomas; Arleo, Angelo; Gerstner, Wulfram

    2009-01-01

    Modern psychological theories of spatial cognition postulate the existence of a geometric module for reorientation. This concept is derived from experimental data showing that in rectangular arenas with distinct landmarks in the corners, disoriented rats often make diagonal errors, suggesting their preference for the geometric (arena shape) over…

  19. Improved Porosity and Permeability Models with Coal Matrix Block Deformation Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yinbo; Li, Zenghua; Yang, Yongliang; Zhang, Lanjun; Qi, Qiangqiang; Si, Leilei; Li, Jinhu

    2016-09-01

    Coal permeability is an important parameter in coalbed methane (CBM) exploration and greenhouse gas storage. A reasonable theoretical permeability model is helpful for analysing the influential factors of gas flowing in a coalbed. As an unconventional reservoir, the unique feature of a coal structure deformation determines the state of gas seepage. The matrix block and fracture change at the same time due to changes in the effective stress and adsorption; the porosity and permeability also change. Thus, the matrix block deformation must be ignored in the theoretical model. Based on the cubic model, we analysed the characteristics of matrix block deformation and fracture deformation. The new models were developed with the change in matrix block width a. We compared the new models with other models, such as the Palmer-Manson (P-M) model and the Shi-Durucan (S-D) model, and used a constant confining stress. By matching the experimental data, our model matches quite well and accurately predicts the evolution of permeability. The sorption-induced strain coefficient f differs between the strongly adsorbing gases and weakly adsorbing gases because the matrix block deformation is more sensitive for the weakly adsorbing gases and the coefficient f is larger. The cubic relationship between porosity and permeability overlooks the importance of the matrix block deformation. In our model, the matrix block deformation suppresses the permeability ratio growth. With a constant confining stress, the weight of the matrix block deformation for the strongly adsorbing gases is larger than that for weakly adsorbing gases. The weight values increase as the pore pressure increases. It can be concluded that the matrix block deformation is an important phenomenon for researching coal permeability and can be crucial for the prediction of CBM production due to the change in permeability.

  20. A geometric analysis of fast-slow models for stochastic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Popović, Nikola; Marr, Carsten; Swain, Peter S

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic models for gene expression frequently exhibit dynamics on several different scales. One potential time-scale separation is caused by significant differences in the lifetimes of mRNA and protein; the ratio of the two degradation rates gives a natural small parameter in the resulting chemical master equation, allowing for the application of perturbation techniques. Here, we develop a framework for the analysis of a family of 'fast-slow' models for gene expression that is based on geometric singular perturbation theory. We illustrate our approach by giving a complete characterisation of a standard two-stage model which assumes transcription, translation, and degradation to be first-order reactions. In particular, we present a systematic expansion procedure for the probability-generating function that can in principle be taken to any order in the perturbation parameter, allowing for an approximation of the corresponding propagator probabilities to that same order. For illustrative purposes, we perform this expansion explicitly to first order, both on the fast and the slow time-scales; then, we combine the resulting asymptotics into a composite fast-slow expansion that is uniformly valid in time. In the process, we extend, and prove rigorously, results previously obtained by Shahrezaei and Swain (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 105(45):17256-17261, 2008) and Bokes et al. (J Math Biol 64(5):829-854, 2012; J Math Biol 65(3):493-520, 2012). We verify our asymptotics by numerical simulation, and we explore its practical applicability and the effects of a variation in the system parameters and the time-scale separation. Focussing on biologically relevant parameter regimes that induce translational bursting, as well as those in which mRNA is frequently transcribed, we find that the first-order correction can significantly improve the steady-state probability distribution. Similarly, in the time-dependent scenario, inclusion of the first-order fast asymptotics results in a

  1. Automatic brain segmentation and validation: image-based versus atlas-based deformable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboutanos, Georges B.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    1997-04-01

    Due to the complexity of the brain surface, there is at present no segmentation method that proves to work automatically and consistently on any 3-D magnetic resonance (MR) images of the head. There is a definite lack of validation studies related to automatic brain extraction. In this work we present an image-base automatic method for brain segmentation and use its results as an input to a deformable model method which we call image-based deformable model. Combining image-based methods with a deformable model can lead to a robust segmentation method without requiring registration of the image volumes into a standardized space, the automation of which remains challenging for pathological cases. We validate our segmentation results on 3-D MP-RAGE (magnetization-prepared rapid gradient-echo) volumes for the image model prior- and post-deformation and compare it to an atlas model prior- and post-deformation. Our validation is based on volume measurement comparison to manually segmented data. Our analysis shows that the improvement afforded by the deformable model methods are statistically significant, however there are no significant differences between the image-based and atlas-based deformable model methods.

  2. Diagnostics of circumstellar grains in geometric models I: structure and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawes, J. H. P.; Greaves, J. S.

    2017-01-01

    The spectral energy distribution (SED) of circumstellar dust has been extensively used to diagnose the sizes and compositions of dust grains. We show that variations of SED slope in the long wavelength (submillimetre to radio) regime can be used to diagnose the gross physical nature (and hence origins) of the dust, using simple geometric models that complement the use of detailed simulations. We consider two dust grain types: (i) clustered aggregates of smaller particles (monomers), and (ii) composite grains comprising ferrous inclusions within a silicate matrix. These types are intended to be analogous to fluffy cometary particles and fragments of compacted asteroids, respectively. Our results indicate that clusters of silicate grains produce a smooth SED, while composite grains with FeS inclusions produce an SED that has a pronounced drop at a wavelength an order of magnitude larger than the grain size, and is flatter at long wavelengths. As a test case, we compare the model predictions to flux measurements of the TW Hydrae disc. This SED shows a drop that only occurs in our models of compacted grains with inclusions. Since the TW Hya discs spans approximately 10-40 AU in radius, fluffy particles from comets were perhaps expected, as in the Sun's Kuiper belt.

  3. Automated Geometric Model Builder Using Range Image Sensor Data: Final Acquistion

    SciTech Connect

    Diegert, C.; Sackos, J.

    1999-02-01

    This report documents a data collection where we recorded redundant range image data from multiple views of a simple scene, and recorded accurate survey measurements of the same scene. Collecting these data was a focus of the research project Automated Geometric Model Builder Using Range Image Sensor Data (96-0384), supported by Sandia's Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program during fiscal years 1996, 1997, and 1998. The data described here are available from the authors on CDROM, or electronically over the Internet. Included in this data distribution are Computer-Aided Design (CAD) models we constructed from the survey measurements. The CAD models are compatible with the SolidWorks 98 Plus system, the modern Computer-Aided Design software system that is central to Sandia's DeskTop Engineering Project (DTEP). Integration of our measurements (as built) with the constructive geometry process of the CAD system (as designed) delivers on a vision of the research project. This report on our final data collection will also serve as a final report on the project.

  4. Advanced Spacecraft EM Modelling Based on Geometric Simplification Process and Multi-Methods Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leman, Samuel; Hoeppe, Frederic

    2016-05-01

    This paper is about the first results of a new generation of ElectroMagnetic (EM) methodology applied to spacecraft systems modelling in the low frequency range (system's dimensions are of the same order of magnitude as the wavelength).This innovative approach aims at implementing appropriate simplifications of the real system based on the identification of the dominant electrical and geometrical parameters driving the global EM behaviour. One rigorous but expensive simulation is performed to quantify the error generated by the use of simpler multi-models. If both the speed up of the simulation time and the quality of the EM response are satisfied, uncertainty simulation could be performed based on the simple models library implementing in a flexible and robust Kron's network formalism.This methodology is expected to open up new perspectives concerning fast parametric analysis, and deep understanding of systems behaviour. It will ensure the identification of main radiated and conducted coupling paths and the sensitive EM parameters in order to optimize the protections and to control the disturbance sources in spacecraft design phases.

  5. Identification of femoral head center of bipolar hemiarthroplasy in radiostereometric analysis with elementary geometrical shape models.

    PubMed

    Tsukanaka, Masako; Röhrl, Stephan M; von Schewelov, Thord; Nordsletten, Lars

    2016-02-08

    Elementary geometrical shape (EGS) models are useful in radiostereometric analysis (RSA) on hip stems because tantalum markers attached to the stems can be omitted. In order to create an EGS model of a femoral stem, the center of the femoral head has to be identified. The contour of the femoral head is recommended to be used. However, the contour of the femoral head cannot be detected exclusively by computer if it is combined with a bipolar head or a metal cup. We therefore hypothesized that the contour of the outer head of bipolar hemiarthroplasty can be included in the EGS model as well as the femoral head contour. We calculated the time required for the detection of the contour, the precision of analysis and the stem micromotion at 2 years using the two different methods in the same picture set and compared the results. The detection of the bipolar head contour was 10 times faster than that of the femoral head contour. The precision for subsidence was 0.16 mm in EGS RSA with the femoral head contour, and 0.15 mm with the bipolar head contour (p=0.68). The precisions were comparable and clinically acceptable. There was no significant difference between the results of the 2-year micromotion with the two different methods. We conclude that this new method is applicable to measure stem micromotion of hemi-arthroplasty with EGS RSA and the method facilitates the Radiostereometric analysis.

  6. Geometrical model for martensitic phase transitions: Understanding criticality and weak universality during microstructure growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrents, Genís; Illa, Xavier; Vives, Eduard; Planes, Antoni

    2017-01-01

    A simple model for the growth of elongated domains (needle-like) during a martensitic phase transition is presented. The model is purely geometric and the only interactions are due to the sequentiality of the kinetic problem and to the excluded volume, since domains cannot retransform back to the original phase. Despite this very simple interaction, numerical simulations show that the final observed microstructure can be described as being a consequence of dipolar-like interactions. The model is analytically solved in 2D for the case in which two symmetry related domains can grow in the horizontal and vertical directions. It is remarkable that the solution is analytic both for a finite system of size L ×L and in the thermodynamic limit L →∞ , where the elongated domains become lines. Results prove the existence of criticality, i.e., that the domain sizes observed in the final microstructure show a power-law distribution characterized by a critical exponent. The exponent, nevertheless, depends on the relative probabilities of the different equivalent variants. The results provide a plausible explanation of the weak universality of the critical exponents measured during martensitic transformations in metallic alloys. Experimental exponents show a monotonous dependence with the number of equivalent variants that grow during the transition.

  7. Results of including geometric nonlinearities in an aeroelastic model of an F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buttrill, Carey S.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated, nonlinear simulation model suitable for aeroelastic modeling of fixed-wing aircraft has been developed. While the author realizes that the subject of modeling rotating, elastic structures is not closed, it is believed that the equations of motion developed and applied herein are correct to second order and are suitable for use with typical aircraft structures. The equations are not suitable for large elastic deformation. In addition, the modeling framework generalizes both the methods and terminology of non-linear rigid-body airplane simulation and traditional linear aeroelastic modeling. Concerning the importance of angular/elastic inertial coupling in the dynamic analysis of fixed-wing aircraft, the following may be said. The rigorous inclusion of said coupling is not without peril and must be approached with care. In keeping with the same engineering judgment that guided the development of the traditional aeroelastic equations, the effect of non-linear inertial effects for most airplane applications is expected to be small. A parameter does not tell the whole story, however, and modes flagged by the parameter as significant also need to be checked to see if the coupling is not a one-way path, i.e., the inertially affected modes can influence other modes.

  8. A Deformable Generic 3D Model of Haptoral Anchor of Monogenean

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Bee Guan; Dhillon, Sarinder Kaur; Lim, Lee Hong Susan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a digital 3D model which allows for visualisation in three dimensions and interactive manipulation is explored as a tool to help us understand the structural morphology and elucidate the functions of morphological structures of fragile microorganisms which defy live studies. We developed a deformable generic 3D model of haptoral anchor of dactylogyridean monogeneans that can subsequently be deformed into different desired anchor shapes by using direct manipulation deformation technique. We used point primitives to construct the rectangular building blocks to develop our deformable 3D model. Point primitives are manually marked on a 2D illustration of an anchor on a Cartesian graph paper and a set of Cartesian coordinates for each point primitive is manually extracted from the graph paper. A Python script is then written in Blender to construct 3D rectangular building blocks based on the Cartesian coordinates. The rectangular building blocks are stacked on top or by the side of each other following their respective Cartesian coordinates of point primitive. More point primitives are added at the sites in the 3D model where more structural variations are likely to occur, in order to generate complex anchor structures. We used Catmull-Clark subdivision surface modifier to smoothen the surface and edge of the generic 3D model to obtain a smoother and more natural 3D shape and antialiasing option to reduce the jagged edges of the 3D model. This deformable generic 3D model can be deformed into different desired 3D anchor shapes through direct manipulation deformation technique by aligning the vertices (pilot points) of the newly developed deformable generic 3D model onto the 2D illustrations of the desired shapes and moving the vertices until the desire 3D shapes are formed. In this generic 3D model all the vertices present are deployed for displacement during deformation. PMID:24204903

  9. A deformable generic 3D model of haptoral anchor of Monogenean.

    PubMed

    Teo, Bee Guan; Dhillon, Sarinder Kaur; Lim, Lee Hong Susan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a digital 3D model which allows for visualisation in three dimensions and interactive manipulation is explored as a tool to help us understand the structural morphology and elucidate the functions of morphological structures of fragile microorganisms which defy live studies. We developed a deformable generic 3D model of haptoral anchor of dactylogyridean monogeneans that can subsequently be deformed into different desired anchor shapes by using direct manipulation deformation technique. We used point primitives to construct the rectangular building blocks to develop our deformable 3D model. Point primitives are manually marked on a 2D illustration of an anchor on a Cartesian graph paper and a set of Cartesian coordinates for each point primitive is manually extracted from the graph paper. A Python script is then written in Blender to construct 3D rectangular building blocks based on the Cartesian coordinates. The rectangular building blocks are stacked on top or by the side of each other following their respective Cartesian coordinates of point primitive. More point primitives are added at the sites in the 3D model where more structural variations are likely to occur, in order to generate complex anchor structures. We used Catmull-Clark subdivision surface modifier to smoothen the surface and edge of the generic 3D model to obtain a smoother and more natural 3D shape and antialiasing option to reduce the jagged edges of the 3D model. This deformable generic 3D model can be deformed into different desired 3D anchor shapes through direct manipulation deformation technique by aligning the vertices (pilot points) of the newly developed deformable generic 3D model onto the 2D illustrations of the desired shapes and moving the vertices until the desire 3D shapes are formed. In this generic 3D model all the vertices present are deployed for displacement during deformation.

  10. Construction of a deformable spatiotemporal MRI atlas of the fetal brain: evaluation of similarity metrics and deformation models.

    PubMed

    Gholipour, Ali; Limperopoulos, Catherine; Clancy, Sean; Clouchoux, Cedric; Akhondi-Asl, Alireza; Estroff, Judy A; Warfield, Simon K

    2014-01-01

    The development and identification of best methods in fetal brain MRI analysis is crucial as we expect an outburst of studies on groupwise and longitudinal analysis of early brain development in the upcoming years. To address this critical need, in this paper, we have developed a mathematical framework for the construction of an unbiased deformable spatiotemporal atlas of the fetal brain MRI and compared it to alternative configurations in terms of similarity metrics and deformation models. Our contributions are twofold: first we suggest a novel approach to fetal brain spatiotemporal atlas construction that shows high capability in capturing anatomic variation between subjects; and second, within our atlas construction framework we evaluate and compare a set of plausible configurations for inter-subject fetal brain MRI registration and identify the most accurate approach that can potentially lead to most accurate results in population atlas construction, atlas-based segmentation, and group analysis. Our evaluation results indicate that symmetric diffeomorphic deformable registration with cross correlation similarity metric outperforms other configurations in this application and results in sharp unbiased atlases that can be used in fetal brain MRI analysis.

  11. Experimental Investigation of Aeroelastic Deformation of Slender Wings at Supersonic Speeds Using a Video Model Deformation Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    A video-based photogrammetric model deformation system was established as a dedicated optical measurement technique at supersonic speeds in the NASA Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. This system was used to measure the wing twist due to aerodynamic loads of two supersonic commercial transport airplane models with identical outer mold lines but different aeroelastic properties. One model featured wings with deflectable leading- and trailing-edge flaps and internal channels to accommodate static pressure tube instrumentation. The wings of the second model were of single-piece construction without flaps or internal channels. The testing was performed at Mach numbers from 1.6 to 2.7, unit Reynolds numbers of 1.0 million to 5.0 million, and angles of attack from -4 degrees to +10 degrees. The video model deformation system quantified the wing aeroelastic response to changes in the Mach number, Reynolds number concurrent with dynamic pressure, and angle of attack and effectively captured the differences in the wing twist characteristics between the two test articles.

  12. Modelling MEMS deformable mirrors for astronomical adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Celia

    As of July 2012, 777 exoplanets have been discovered utilizing mainly indirect detection techniques. The direct imaging of exoplanets is the next goal for astronomers, because it will reveal the diversity of planets and planetary systems, and will give access to the exoplanet's chemical composition via spectroscopy. With this spectroscopic knowledge, astronomers will be able to know, if a planet is terrestrial and, possibly, even find evidence of life. With so much potential, this branch of astronomy has also captivated the general public attention. The direct imaging of exoplanets remains a challenging task, due to (i) the extremely high contrast between the parent star and the orbiting exoplanet and (ii) their small angular separation. For ground-based observatories, this task is made even more difficult, due to the presence of atmospheric turbulence. High Contrast Imaging (HCI) instruments have been designed to meet this challenge. HCI instruments are usually composed of a coronagraph coupled with the full onaxis corrective capability of an Extreme Adaptive Optics (ExAO) system. An efficient coronagraph separates the faint planet's light from the much brighter starlight, but the dynamic boiling speckles, created by the stellar image, make exoplanet detection impossible without the help of a wavefront correction device. The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) system is a high performance HCI instrument developed at Subaru Telescope. The wavefront control system of SCExAO consists of three wavefront sensors (WFS) coupled with a 1024- actuator Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM). MEMS DMs offer a large actuator density, allowing high count DMs to be deployed in small size beams. Therefore, MEMS DMs are an attractive technology for Adaptive Optics (AO) systems and are particularly well suited for HCI instruments employing ExAO technologies. SCExAO uses coherent light modulation in the focal plane introduced by the DM, for

  13. Twisted supersymmetry in a deformed Wess-Zumino model in (2 + 1) dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palechor, C.; Ferrari, A. F.; Quinto, A. G.

    2017-01-01

    Non-anticommutative deformations have been studied in the context of super-symmetry (SUSY) in three and four space-time dimensions, and the general picture is that highly nontrivial to deform supersymmetry in a way that still preserves some of its important properties, both at the formal algebraic level (e.g., preserving the associativity of the deformed theory) as well as at the physical level (e.g., maintaining renormalizability). The Hopf algebra formalism allows the definition of algebraically consistent deformations of SUSY, but this algebraic consistency does not guarantee that physical models build upon these structures will be consistent from the physical point of view. We will investigate a deformation induced by a Drinfel'd twist of the N = 1 SUSY algebra in three space-time dimensions. The use of the Hopf algebra formalism allows the construction of deformed N = 1 SUSY algebras that should still preserve a deformed version of supersymmetry. We will construct the simplest deformed version of the Wess-Zumino model in this context, but we will show that despite the consistent algebraic structure, the model in question is not invariant under SUSY transformation and is not renormalizable. We will comment on the relation of these results with previous ones discussed in the literature regarding similar four-dimensional constructions.

  14. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnels. Part 4: Model deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George

    1992-01-01

    A survey of systems capable of model deformation measurements was conducted. The survey included stereo-cameras, scanners, and digitizers. Moire, holographic, and heterodyne interferometry techniques were also looked at. Stereo-cameras with passive or active targets are currently being deployed for model deformation measurements at NASA Ames and LaRC, Boeing, and ONERA. Scanners and digitizers are widely used in robotics, motion analysis, medicine, etc., and some of the scanner and digitizers can meet the model deformation requirements. Commercial stereo-cameras, scanners, and digitizers are being improved in accuracy, reliability, and ease of operation. A number of new systems are coming onto the market.

  15. [Research progress on real-time deformable models of soft tissues for surgery simulation].

    PubMed

    Xu, Shaoping; Liu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Hua; Luo, Jie

    2010-04-01

    Biological tissues generally exhibit nonlinearity, anisotropy, quasi-incompressibility and viscoelasticity about material properties. Simulating the behaviour of elastic objects in real time is one of the current objectives of virtual surgery simulation which is still a challenge for researchers to accurately depict the behaviour of human tissues. In this paper, we present a classification of the different deformable models that have been developed. We present the advantages and disadvantages of each one. Finally, we make a comparison of deformable models and perform an evaluation of the state of the art and the future of deformable models.

  16. Modeling of sharp change in magnetic hysteresis behavior of electrical steel at small plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Sablik, M.J.; Rios, S.; Landgraf, F.J.G.; Yonamine, T.; Campos, M.F. de

    2005-05-15

    In 2.2% Si electrical steel, the magnetic hysteresis behavior is sharply sheared by a rather small plastic deformation (0.5%). A modification to the Jiles-Atherton hysteresis model makes it possible to model magnetic effects of plastic deformation. In this paper, with this model, it is shown how a narrow hysteresis with an almost steplike hysteresis curve for an undeformed specimen is sharply sheared by plastic deformation. Computed coercivity and hysteresis loss show a sharp step to higher values at small strain due to an n=1/2 power law dependence on residual strain. The step is seen experimentally.

  17. A stochastic-geometric model of soil variation in Pleistocene patterned ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lark, Murray; Meerschman, Eef; Van Meirvenne, Marc

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we examine the spatial variability of soil in parent material with complex spatial structure which arises from complex non-linear geomorphic processes. We show that this variability can be better-modelled by a stochastic-geometric model than by a standard Gaussian random field. The benefits of the new model are seen in the reproduction of features of the target variable which influence processes like water movement and pollutant dispersal. Complex non-linear processes in the soil give rise to properties with non-Gaussian distributions. Even under a transformation to approximate marginal normality, such variables may have a more complex spatial structure than the Gaussian random field model of geostatistics can accommodate. In particular the extent to which extreme values of the variable are connected in spatially coherent regions may be misrepresented. As a result, for example, geostatistical simulation generally fails to reproduce the pathways for preferential flow in an environment where coarse infill of former fluvial channels or coarse alluvium of braided streams creates pathways for rapid movement of water. Multiple point geostatistics has been developed to deal with this problem. Multiple point methods proceed by sampling from a set of training images which can be assumed to reproduce the non-Gaussian behaviour of the target variable. The challenge is to identify appropriate sources of such images. In this paper we consider a mode of soil variation in which the soil varies continuously, exhibiting short-range lateral trends induced by local effects of the factors of soil formation which vary across the region of interest in an unpredictable way. The trends in soil variation are therefore only apparent locally, and the soil variation at regional scale appears random. We propose a stochastic-geometric model for this mode of soil variation called the Continuous Local Trend (CLT) model. We consider a case study of soil formed in relict patterned

  18. Thermal debinding modeling of mass transport and deformation in powder-injection molding compact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shengjie, Ying; Lam, Y. C.; Yu, S. C. M.; Tam, K. C.

    2002-06-01

    A two-dimensional model of mass transport and deformation in thermal debinding for the powder-injection molding (PIM) compact, based on mass and heat transfer in deformable porous media and elasticity theory, is proposed. The primary mechanisms of mass transport, i.e., liquid flow, gas flow, vapor diffusion, and convection, as well as heat transfer, polymer pyrolysis, powder-particle packing, compact deformation, and their interactions are simultaneously included in the model. A computer code, in which integrated control-volume finite-difference and finite-element methods are employed, is developed to simulate the process. The simulated results revealed that the nonuniform distribution of polymer residue, which results from the nonuniform flow of the polymer, causes the nonuniform deformation in the compact. Severe nonuniform deformation in the compact might lead to cracking, distortion, and failure of the compact during the polymer-removal process.

  19. Geometric structure and geodesic in a solvable model of nonequilibrium process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun-jin; Lee, UnJin; Heseltine, James; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the geometric structure of a nonequilibrium process and its geodesic solutions. By employing an exactly solvable model of a driven dissipative system (generalized nonautonomous Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process), we compute the time-dependent probability density functions (PDFs) and investigate the evolution of this system in a statistical metric space where the distance between two points (the so-called information length) quantifies the change in information along a trajectory of the PDFs. In this metric space, we find a geodesic for which the information propagates at constant speed, and demonstrate its utility as an optimal path to reduce the total time and total dissipated energy. In particular, through examples of physical realizations of such geodesic solutions satisfying boundary conditions, we present a resonance phenomenon in the geodesic solution and the discretization into cyclic geodesic solutions. Implications for controlling population growth are further discussed in a stochastic logistic model, where a periodic modulation of the diffusion coefficient and the deterministic force by a small amount is shown to have a significant controlling effect.

  20. Properties of selected mutations and genotypic landscapes under Fisher’s Geometric Model

    PubMed Central

    Blanquart, François; Achaz, Guillaume; Bataillon, Thomas; Tenaillon, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The fitness landscape – the mapping between genotypes and fitness – determines properties of the process of adaptation. Several small genotypic fitness landscapes have recently been built by selecting a handful of beneficial mutations and measuring fitness of all combinations of these mutations. Here we generate several testable predictions for the properties of these small genotypic landscapes under Fisher’s geometric model of adaptation. When the ancestral strain is far from the fitness optimum, we analytically compute the fitness effect of selected mutations and their epistatic interactions. Epistasis may be negative or positive on average depending on the distance of the ancestral genotype to the optimum and whether mutations were independently selected, or co-selected in an adaptive walk. Simulations show that genotypic landscapes built from Fisher’s model are very close to an additive landscape when the ancestral strain is far from the optimum. However, when it is close to the optimum, a large diversity of landscape with substantial roughness and sign epistasis emerged. Strikingly, small genotypic landscapes built from several replicate adaptive walks on the same underlying landscape were highly variable, suggesting that several realizations of small genotypic landscapes are needed to gain information about the underlying architecture of the fitness landscape. PMID:25311558

  1. Evolving Nutritional Strategies in the Presence of Competition: A Geometric Agent-Based Model

    PubMed Central

    Senior, Alistair M.; Charleston, Michael A.; Lihoreau, Mathieu; Buhl, Jerome; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Access to nutrients is a key factor governing development, reproduction and ultimately fitness. Within social groups, contest-competition can fundamentally affect nutrient access, potentially leading to reproductive asymmetry among individuals. Previously, agent-based models have been combined with the Geometric Framework of nutrition to provide insight into how nutrition and social interactions affect one another. Here, we expand this modelling approach by incorporating evolutionary algorithms to explore how contest-competition over nutrient acquisition might affect the evolution of animal nutritional strategies. Specifically, we model tolerance of nutrient excesses and deficits when ingesting nutritionally imbalanced foods, which we term ‘nutritional latitude’; a higher degree of nutritional latitude constitutes a higher tolerance of nutritional excess and deficit. Our results indicate that a transition between two alternative strategies occurs at moderate to high levels of competition. When competition is low, individuals display a low level of nutritional latitude and regularly switch foods in search of an optimum. When food is scarce and contest-competition is intense, high nutritional latitude appears optimal, and individuals continue to consume an imbalanced food for longer periods before attempting to switch to an alternative. However, the relative balance of nutrients within available foods also strongly influences at what levels of competition, if any, transitions between these two strategies occur. Our models imply that competition combined with reproductive skew in social groups can play a role in the evolution of diet breadth. We discuss how the integration of agent-based, nutritional and evolutionary modelling may be applied in future studies to further understand the evolution of nutritional strategies across social and ecological contexts. PMID:25815976

  2. Skuller: A volumetric shape registration algorithm for modeling skull deformities.

    PubMed

    Sahillioğlu, Yusuf; Kavan, Ladislav

    2015-07-01

    We present an algorithm for volumetric registration of 3D solid shapes. In comparison to previous work on image based registration, our technique achieves higher efficiency by leveraging a template tetrahedral mesh. In contrast to point- and surface-based registration techniques, our method better captures volumetric nature of the data, such as bone thickness. We apply our algorithm to study pathological skull deformities caused by a particular condition, i.e., craniosynostosis. The input to our system is a pair of volumetric 3D shapes: a tetrahedral mesh and a voxelized object represented by a set of voxel cells segmented from computed tomography (CT) scans. Our general framework first performs a global registration and then launches a novel elastic registration process that uses as much volumetric information as possible while deforming the generic template tetrahedral mesh of a healthy human skull towards the underlying geometry of the voxel cells. Both data are high-resolution and differ by large non-rigid deformations. Our fully-automatic solution is fast and accurate, as compared with the state of the arts from the reconstruction and medical image registration fields. We use the resulting registration to match the ground-truth surfaces extracted from the medical data as well as to quantify the severity of the anatomical deformity.

  3. Models for rupture mechanics of plate boundaries and crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur, A.

    1983-02-01

    The role of pull aparts and pushups in transcurrent systems, the rotation of faults and blocks within transcurrent fault systems, the role of accretion tectonics in plate boundary deformation, and power law creep behavior and the yielding at plate boundaries were investigated.

  4. Models for rupture mechanics of plate boundaries and crustal deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nur, A.

    1983-01-01

    The role of pull aparts and pushups in transcurrent systems, the rotation of faults and blocks within transcurrent fault systems, the role of accretion tectonics in plate boundary deformation, and power law creep behavior and the yielding at plate boundaries were investigated.

  5. Experimental Deformation of Dehydrating Antigorite: Challenging Models of Dehydration Embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirth, Greg; Chernak, Linda

    2010-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that intermediate depth earthquakes in subduction zones are caused by the dehydration of hydrous phases, we conducted temperature-ramping experiments on antigorite serpentinite. Cold-pressed powdered samples of antigorite were deformed to a high differential stress at 400°C and 1.0 GPa, within the antigorite stability field, where we have shown that deformation localizes. Temperature was then increased at different rates, 1800°C/hr and 180°C/hr, to cross the reaction boundary while the sample continued to deform; samples were deformed at strain rates of 10-4 s-1, 10-5 s-1 and 10-6 s-1. Two additional experiments were conducted in a similar manner at 300°C, 1.5 GPa and 10-5 s-1 but samples remained 'statically' at high stress during the temperature increase. Our results show that although the decrease in stress during temperature ramping is large, stress relaxes stably, even after dehydration. We find that the slopes of the unloading curves are approximately the same for constant values of the ratio (strain rate/ramp rate) and that the unloading slope is greater for higher values of this ratio. In addition, we find that the unloading curves with the greatest slopes are similar to the apparatus compliance, suggesting that we are generating 'slow earthquakes' in our experiments over the course 5 to 10s of minutes. A strain rate stepping experiment indicates that antigorite has velocity strengthening behavior at 700°C and 1.5 GPa suggesting that as soon as an instability develops in the antigorite, the material strengthens sufficiently to not go unstable. Our results thus suggest that antigorite dehydration does not result in 'dehydration embrittlement' but that it may promote slow earthquakes. We have also conducted a preliminary experiment to study the role of effective pressure on deformation behavior after dehydration. A cold-pressed powdered sample of antigorite with a small core of coarse-grained olivine at one end was deformed at 700

  6. Geometric modelling of the volume of investigation of well logs for thin-bed characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudi, Pedram; Memarian, Hossein; Aïfa, Tahar; Tokhmechi, Behzad

    2017-03-01

    The fuzzy membership function is used to model the volume of investigation of well logs geometrically. We discuss the fact that the spacing of a transmitter–receiver is not a precise parameter for addressing the vertical resolution of well logs. Instead, the vertical resolution of membership function (VRmf) is developed and estimated by variography analysis. In the five studied wells, the vertical resolution of gamma ray (GR), bulk density (RHOB), neutron porosity (NPHI) and sonic (DT) logs are estimated to be 61, 76, 76 and 61 cm, respectively. The simplest membership function for describing the volume of investigation of the GR, RHOB and NPHI is the triangle. For DT it is a complex shape. Being compatible with volumetric records in the well logs, the volumetric Nyquist frequency is introduced while considering the VRmf. Based on triangular membership functions, a thin-bed geometric simulator is designed. Regression models, i.e. deconvolution relations, are developed between the real thickness and the real petrophysical variation of a thin bed as outputs, and the same log-derived parameters are used as inputs. The shoulder-bed effect in GR, RHOB and NPHI is reduced by two to three times due to the mean squared error (MSE). To check the applicability of the deconvolution relations for the real data, ten thin beds are chosen within a well at the interval of the Sarvak Formation. In all the observations, the shoulder-bed effect is reduced after deconvolution. The thickness of the thin beds is estimated with a standard deviation of 4.4 cm, which is a precise value. The method is applied to the cored interval of the Sarvak Formation in a nearby well to characterize a porous carbonate thin bed sandwiched between dense carbonates. The estimated thin-bed thickness (13 ± 7.5 cm) is close to the in situ thin-bed thickness (<25 cm). Furthermore, the NPHI (total porosity) of the thin bed is estimated to be 11.7%, which is compatible with the core porosity (effective

  7. Can We Improve Estimates of Seismological Q Using a New ``Geometrical Spreading'' Model?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jiakang

    2010-10-01

    Precise measurements of seismological Q are difficult because we lack detailed knowledge on how the Earth’s fine velocity structure affects the amplitude data. In a number of recent papers, Morozov (Geophys J Int 175:239-252, 2008; Seism Res Lett 80:5-7, 2009; Pure Appl Geophys, this volume, 2010) proposes a new procedure intended to improve Q determinations. The procedure relies on quantifying the structural effects using a new form of geometrical spreading (GS) model that has an exponentially decaying component with time, e -γt·γ is a free parameter and is measured together with Q. Morozov has refit many previously published sets of amplitude attenuation data. In general, the new Q estimates are much higher than previous estimates, and all of the previously estimated frequency-dependence values for Q disappear in the new estimates. In this paper I show that (1) the traditional modeling of seismic amplitudes is physically based, whereas the new model lacks a physical basis; (2) the method of measuring Q using the new model is effectively just a curve fitting procedure using a first-order Taylor series expansion; (3) previous high-frequency data that were fit by a power-law frequency dependence for Q are expected to be also fit by the first-order expansion in the limited frequency bands involved, because of the long tails of power-law functions; (4) recent laboratory measurements of intrinsic Q of mantle materials at seismic frequencies provide independent evidence that intrinsic Q is often frequency-dependent, which should lead to frequency-dependent total Q; (5) published long-period surface wave data that were used to derive several recent Q models inherently contradict the new GS model; and (6) previous modeling has already included a special case that is mathematically identical to the new GS model, but with physical assumptions and measured Q values that differ from those with the new GS model. Therefore, while individually the previous Q measurements

  8. Small Shield Volcanoes on Mars: Global Geometric Properties and Model Implications for Regional Variations in Eruptive Styles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Mitchell, D.; Riedel, S. J.; Taylor, K.

    2002-01-01

    Small martian volcanic shields geometric parameters show a global latitude dependence. Modeling results and observations are best explained by a sensitivity to an increasing availability of subsurface volatiles towards the polar regions. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. The geometrical precision of virtual bone models derived from clinical computed tomography data for forensic anthropology.

    PubMed

    Colman, Kerri L; Dobbe, Johannes G G; Stull, Kyra E; Ruijter, Jan M; Oostra, Roelof-Jan; van Rijn, Rick R; van der Merwe, Alie E; de Boer, Hans H; Streekstra, Geert J

    2017-02-10

    Almost all European countries lack contemporary skeletal collections for the development and validation of forensic anthropological methods. Furthermore, legal, ethical and practical considerations hinder the development of skeletal collections. A virtual skeletal database derived from clinical computed tomography (CT) scans provides a potential solution. However, clinical CT scans are typically generated with varying settings. This study investigates the effects of image segmentation and varying imaging conditions on the precision of virtual modelled pelves. An adult human cadaver was scanned using varying imaging conditions, such as scanner type and standard patient scanning protocol, slice thickness and exposure level. The pelvis was segmented from the various CT images resulting in virtually modelled pelves. The precision of the virtual modelling was determined per polygon mesh point. The fraction of mesh points resulting in point-to-point distance variations of 2 mm or less (95% confidence interval (CI)) was reported. Colour mapping was used to visualise modelling variability. At almost all (>97%) locations across the pelvis, the point-to-point distance variation is less than 2 mm (CI = 95%). In >91% of the locations, the point-to-point distance variation was less than 1 mm (CI = 95%). This indicates that the geometric variability of the virtual pelvis as a result of segmentation and imaging conditions rarely exceeds the generally accepted linear error of 2 mm. Colour mapping shows that areas with large variability are predominantly joint surfaces. Therefore, results indicate that segmented bone elements from patient-derived CT scans are a sufficiently precise source for creating a virtual skeletal database.

  10. The Definition and Computation of a Metric on Plane Curves. The Meaning of a Face on a Geometric Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Two topics in topology, the comparison of plane curves and faces on geometric models, are discussed. With regard to the first problem, a curve is defined to be a locus of points without any underlying parameterization. A metric on a class of plane curves is defined, a finite computation of this metric is given for the case of piecewise linear curves, and it is shown how to approximate curves that have bounded curvature by piecewise linear curves. In this way a bound on the distance between two curves can be computed. With regard to the second problem, the questions to be discussed are under what circumstances do geometrical faces make sense; how can they be explicity defined; and when are these geometrical faces homeomorphic to the realization of the abstract (topological) face.

  11. High Strain Rate Deformation Modeling of a Polymer Matrix Composite. Part 1; Matrix Constitutive Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Recently applications have exposed polymer matrix composite materials to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under these extreme conditions. In this first paper of a two part report, background information is presented, along with the constitutive equations which will be used to model the rate dependent nonlinear deformation response of the polymer matrix. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive models which were originally developed to model the viscoplastic deformation of metals have been adapted to model the nonlinear viscoelastic deformation of polymers. The modified equations were correlated by analyzing the tensile/ compressive response of both 977-2 toughened epoxy matrix and PEEK thermoplastic matrix over a variety of strain rates. For the cases examined, the modified constitutive equations appear to do an adequate job of modeling the polymer deformation response. A second follow-up paper will describe the implementation of the polymer deformation model into a composite micromechanical model, to allow for the modeling of the nonlinear, rate dependent deformation response of polymer matrix composites.

  12. A discrete curvature-based deformable surface model with application to segmentation of volumetric images.

    PubMed

    Ghanei, Amir; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2002-12-01

    In this paper, we present a new curvature-based three-dimensional (3-D) deformable surface model. The model deforms under defined force terms. Internal forces are calculated from local model curvature, using a robust method by a least-squares error (LSE) approximation to the Dupin indicatrix. External forces are calculated by applying a step expansion and restoration filter (SEF) to the image data. A solution for one of the most common problems associated with deformable models, self-cutting, has been proposed in this work. We use a principal axis analysis and reslicing of the deformable model, followed by triangulation of the slices, to remedy self-cutting. We use vertex resampling, multiresolution deformation, and refinement of the mesh grid to improve the quality of the model deformation, which leads to better results. Examples of the model application to different cases (simulation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computerized tomography (CT), and ultrasound images) are presented, showing diversity and flexibility of the model.

  13. Geometric phase and topology of elastic oscillations and vibrations in model systems: Harmonic oscillator and superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deymier, P. A.; Runge, K.; Vasseur, J. O.

    2016-12-01

    We illustrate the concept of geometric phase in the case of two prototypical elastic systems, namely the one-dimensional harmonic oscillator and a one-dimensional binary superlattice. We demonstrate formally the relationship between the variation of the geometric phase in the spectral and wave number domains and the parallel transport of a vector field along paths on curved manifolds possessing helicoidal twists which exhibit non-conventional topology.

  14. Erythrocyte: A systems model of the control of aggregation and deformability.

    PubMed

    Bazanovas, Antonina N; Evstifeev, Aleksandr I; Khaiboullina, Svetlana F; Sadreev, Ildar I; Skorinkin, Andrey I; Kotov, Nikolay V

    2015-05-01

    Human erythrocytes are highly specialized enucleate cells that are involved in providing efficient gas transport. Erythrocytes have been extensively studied both experimentally and by mathematical modeling in recent years. However, understanding of how aggregation and deformability are regulated is limited. These properties of the erythrocyte are essential for the physiological functioning of the cell. In this work, we propose a novel mathematical model of the molecular system that controls the aggregation and deformability of the erythrocyte. This model is based on the experimental results of previously published studies. Our model suggests fundamentally new mechanisms that regulate aggregation and deformability in a latch-like manner. The results of this work could be used as a general explanation of how the erythrocytes regulate their aggregation and deformability, and are essential in understanding erythrocyte disorders and aging.

  15. Using GPS loading deformation to distinguish different hydrological measurements and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Y.; van Dam, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    The earth's lithosphere is deformed elastically by seasonal and inter-annual surface mass variations. The Global Positioning System (GPS) accurately measures 3D crustal deformation caused by surface hydrological mass movements. In this study, we calculate the loading deformation using different hydrological models and in-situ hydrological measurements, and compare those modeled results with actual deformation measurements of the dense GPS network in United States and Europe. Therefore, GPS can be used as an independent tool to evaluate the differences between hydrological measurements and models. We are particularly interested in comparing the snow volume differences between in-situ snow measurement (such as SNOTEL) and the snow components of simulated models (such as GLDAS or NLDAS). We, therefore, demonstrate that GPS as a geodetic observation can provide valuable information for hydrological studies.

  16. Balancing Selection in Species with Separate Sexes: Insights from Fisher’s Geometric Model

    PubMed Central

    Connallon, Tim; Clark, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    How common is balancing selection, and what fraction of phenotypic variance is attributable to balanced polymorphisms? Despite decades of research, answers to these questions remain elusive. Moreover, there is no clear theoretical prediction about the frequency with which balancing selection is expected to arise within a population. Here, we use an extension of Fisher’s geometric model of adaptation to predict the probability of balancing selection in a population with separate sexes, wherein polymorphism is potentially maintained by two forms of balancing selection: (1) heterozygote advantage, where heterozygous individuals at a locus have higher fitness than homozygous individuals, and (2) sexually antagonistic selection (a.k.a. intralocus sexual conflict), where the fitness of each sex is maximized by different genotypes at a locus. We show that balancing selection is common under biologically plausible conditions and that sex differences in selection or sex-by-genotype effects of mutations can each increase opportunities for balancing selection. Although heterozygote advantage and sexual antagonism represent alternative mechanisms for maintaining polymorphism, they mutually exist along a balancing selection continuum that depends on population and sex-specific parameters of selection and mutation. Sexual antagonism is the dominant mode of balancing selection across most of this continuum. PMID:24812306

  17. Differential-geometric aspects of a nonholonomic Dirac mechanics: Lessons of a model quadratic in velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, V. P.

    2014-03-01

    Faddeev and Vershik proposed the Hamiltonian and Lagrangian formulations of constrained mechanical systems that are invariant from the differential geometry standpoint. In both formulations, the description is based on a nondegenerate symplectic 2-form defined on a cotangent bundle T*Q (in the Hamiltonian formulation) or on a tangent bundle TQ (in the Lagrangian formulation), and constraints are sets of functions in involution on these manifolds. We demonstrate that this technique does not allow "invariantization" of the Dirac procedure of constraint "proliferation." We show this in an example of a typical quantum field model in which the original Lagrange function is a quadratic form in velocities with a degenerate coefficient matrix. We postulate that the initial phase space is a manifold where all arguments of the action functional including the Lagrange multipliers are defined. The Lagrange multipliers can then be naturally interpreted physically as velocities (in the Hamiltonian formulation) or momenta (in the Lagrangian formulation) related to "nonphysical" degrees of freedom. A quasisymplectic 2-form invariantly defined on such a manifold is degenerate. We propose new differential-geometric structures that allow formulating the Dirac procedure invariantly.

  18. Development of Camera Model and Geometric Calibration/validation of Xsat IRIS Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwoh, L. K.; Huang, X.; Tan, W. J.

    2012-07-01

    XSAT, launched on 20 April 2011, is the first micro-satellite designed and built in Singapore. It orbits the Earth at altitude of 822 km in a sun synchronous orbit. The satellite carries a multispectral camera IRIS with three spectral bands - 0.52~0.60 mm for Green, 0.63~0.69 mm for Red and 0.76~0.89 mm for NIR at 12 m resolution. In the design of IRIS camera, the three bands were acquired by three lines of CCDs (NIR, Red and Green). These CCDs were physically separated in the focal plane and their first pixels not absolutely aligned. The micro-satellite platform was also not stable enough to allow for co-registration of the 3 bands with simple linear transformation. In the camera model developed, this platform stability was compensated with 3rd to 4th order polynomials for the satellite's roll, pitch and yaw attitude angles. With the camera model, the camera parameters such as the band to band separations, the alignment of the CCDs relative to each other, as well as the focal length of the camera can be validated or calibrated. The results of calibration with more than 20 images showed that the band to band along-track separation agreed well with the pre-flight values provided by the vendor (0.093° and 0.046° for the NIR vs red and for green vs red CCDs respectively). The cross-track alignments were 0.05 pixel and 5.9 pixel for the NIR vs red and green vs red CCDs respectively. The focal length was found to be shorter by about 0.8%. This was attributed to the lower operating temperature which XSAT is currently operating. With the calibrated parameters and the camera model, a geometric level 1 multispectral image with RPCs can be generated and if required, orthorectified imagery can also be produced.

  19. Modeling for deformable mirrors and the adaptive optics optimization program

    SciTech Connect

    Henesian, M.A.; Haney, S.W.; Trenholme, J.B.; Thomas, M.

    1997-03-18

    We discuss aspects of adaptive optics optimization for large fusion laser systems such as the 192-arm National Ignition Facility (NIF) at LLNL. By way of example, we considered the discrete actuator deformable mirror and Hartmann sensor system used on the Beamlet laser. Beamlet is a single-aperture prototype of the 11-0-5 slab amplifier design for NIF, and so we expect similar optical distortion levels and deformable mirror correction requirements. We are now in the process of developing a numerically efficient object oriented C++ language implementation of our adaptive optics and wavefront sensor code, but this code is not yet operational. Results are based instead on the prototype algorithms, coded-up in an interpreted array processing computer language.

  20. Demonstration of finite element simulations in MOOSE using crystallographic models of irradiation hardening and plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, Anirban; Wen, Wei; Martinez Saez, Enrique; Tome, Carlos

    2016-05-31

    This report describes the implementation of a crystal plasticity framework (VPSC) for irradiation hardening and plastic deformation in the finite element code, MOOSE. Constitutive models for irradiation hardening and the crystal plasticity framework are described in a previous report [1]. Here we describe these models briefly and then describe an algorithm for interfacing VPSC with finite elements. Example applications of tensile deformation of a dog bone specimen and a 3D pre-irradiated bar specimen performed using MOOSE are demonstrated.

  1. A Model for Estimating Nonlinear Deformation and Damage in Ceramic Matrix Composites (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2011-4232 A MODEL FOR ESTIMATING NONLINEAR DEFORMATION AND DAMAGE IN CERAMIC MATRIX COMPOSITES (PREPRINT) Unni Santhosh and...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Unni Santhosh and Jalees Ahmad 5d. PROJECT...Composite Materials, 2010 A Model for Estimating Nonlinear Deformation and Damage in Ceramic Matrix Composites Unni Santhosh and Jalees Ahmad Research

  2. Three-dimensional analysis of time varying tuft behavior by its successive geometric shape modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, Junta; Miyake, Tetsuo

    A tuft in the air flow was observed by three CCD video cameras which were installed in the directions nearly perpendicular to each other. In this procedure, a tufted woolen yarn of the diameter of about 1 mm and of the length of 35 mm was attached on the top of a thin post pin. The principle of this shape modeling is based on the intersection of multiple viewing cones. This intersected zone results in a polyhedron when the digital image is used. It becomes a good approximation of the original shape when it is convex. This polyhedron is described with spatially fixed coordinates, so that not only its spatial shape, but also the position, direction, deformation, or fluttering at the every moment can be estimated. From this modeling, the effect of rigidity due to adhesives near the fixed end and a few millimeters of three-dimensional displacement at the free end are observed. This method is capable to serve for measurement and analysis of a single tuft characteristics, depending on its material, kind of fluid, or flow range, and has the possibility of quantitative analysis of three-dimensional unsteady flow visualization.

  3. Computer Modelling of Cyclic Deformation of High-Temperature Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-14

    precision. In this case the aim will be at least to eliminate functional empiricism. Restriction of empiricism to the choice of parameters to be input...deformation of dispersion-hardened materials. In the general case this will be done by a literature search. For specific materials, the micromechanisms...cross-slip and/or climb without the generation of appreciable back-stress. Task 112. Anisotropic dispersoids This task covers the case of dispersoids

  4. Numerical modeling of a large deformation thermoforming process

    SciTech Connect

    Schrank, M.G.

    1988-04-01

    A numerical solution, using finite element methods, is presented for the simulation of a blow-molding process used to form a thermoplastic polymer (polyethylene terephthalate). The constitutive relationship employed in the analysis is a modification of the creep power law, allowing both strain hardening and strain rate hardening of the material. Analytical results compare well with experimental data for both rate of deformation during the forming process and strain distribution in the final formed configuration. 15 figs.

  5. Highway extraction from high resolution aerial photography using a geometric active contour model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xutong

    Highway extraction and vehicle detection are two of the most important steps in traffic-flow analysis from multi-frame aerial photographs. The traditional method of deriving traffic flow trajectories relies on manual vehicle counting from a sequence of aerial photographs, which is tedious and time-consuming. This research presents a new framework for semi-automatic highway extraction. The basis of the new framework is an improved geometric active contour (GAC) model. This novel model seeks to minimize an objective function that transforms a problem of propagation of regular curves into an optimization problem. The implementation of curve propagation is based on level set theory. By using an implicit representation of a two-dimensional curve, a level set approach can be used to deal with topological changes naturally, and the output is unaffected by different initial positions of the curve. However, the original GAC model, on which the new model is based, only incorporates boundary information into the curve propagation process. An error-producing phenomenon called leakage is inevitable wherever there is an uncertain weak edge. In this research, region-based information is added as a constraint into the original GAC model, thereby, giving this proposed method the ability of integrating both boundary and region-based information during the curve propagation. Adding the region-based constraint eliminates the leakage problem. This dissertation applies the proposed augmented GAC model to the problem of highway extraction from high-resolution aerial photography. First, an optimized stopping criterion is designed and used in the implementation of the GAC model. It effectively saves processing time and computations. Second, a seed point propagation framework is designed and implemented. This framework incorporates highway extraction, tracking, and linking into one procedure. A seed point is usually placed at an end node of highway segments close to the boundary of the

  6. Computational implementation of the multi-mechanism deformation coupled fracture model for salt

    SciTech Connect

    Koteras, J.R.; Munson, D.E.

    1996-05-01

    The Multi-Mechanism Deformation (M-D) model for creep in rock salt has been used in three-dimensional computations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a potential waste, repository. These computational studies are relied upon to make key predictions about long-term behavior of the repository. Recently, the M-D model was extended to include creep-induced damage. The extended model, the Multi-Mechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, is considerably more complicated than the M-D model and required a different technology from that of the M-D model for a computational implementation.

  7. S-matrices and quantum group symmetry of k-deformed sigma models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollowood, Timothy J.; Miramontes, J. Luis; Schmidtt, David M.

    2016-11-01

    Recently, two kinds of integrable deformations of the string world sheet theory in the gauge/gravity correspondence have been constructed (Delduc et al 2014 Phys. Rev. Lett. 112 051601; Hollowood et al 2014 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 47 495402). One class of these, the k deformations associated to the more general q deformations but with q={{{e}}}{{i}π /k} a root of unity, has been shown to be related to a particular discrete deformation of the principal chiral models and (semi-)symmetric space sigma models involving a gauged WZW model. We conjecture a form for the exact S-matrices of the bosonic integrable field theories of this type. The S-matrices imply that the theories have a hidden infinite dimensional affine quantum group symmetry. We provide some evidence, via quantum inverse scattering techniques, that the theories do indeed possess the finite-dimensional part of this quantum group symmetry.

  8. Extension of continental lithosphere - A model for two scales of basin and range deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuber, M. T.; Parmentier, E. M.; Fletcher, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a model for deformation in an extending continental lithosphere that is stratified in density and strength is described. The lithosphere model demonstrates that the necking instabilities at two wavelengths originate due to a strong upper crust, a mantle layer, and a weak lower crust. It is observed that the dominant wavelengths of necking are controlled by layer thickness and the strength of the layers control the amplitude of the instabilities. The model is applied to the Basin and Range Province of the western U.S. where deformations in ranges and tile domains are detected. The relation between the Bouguer gravity anomaly and the deformations is studied. The data reveal that the horizontal scale of short wavelength necking correlates with the spacings of individual basins and ranges, and the longer wavelength corresponds to the width of tilt domains. The control of the Basin and Range deformation by two scales of extensional instability is proposed.

  9. Modeling photosynthesis of discontinuous plant canopies by linking the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer model with biochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Q.; Gong, P.; Li, W.

    2015-06-01

    Modeling vegetation photosynthesis is essential for understanding carbon exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The radiative transfer process within plant canopies is one of the key drivers that regulate canopy photosynthesis. Most vegetation cover consists of discrete plant crowns, of which the physical observation departs from the underlying assumption of a homogenous and uniform medium in classic radiative transfer theory. Here we advance the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer (GORT) model to simulate photosynthesis activities for discontinuous plant canopies. We separate radiation absorption into two components that are absorbed by sunlit and shaded leaves, and derive analytical solutions by integrating over the canopy layer. To model leaf-level and canopy-level photosynthesis, leaf light absorption is then linked to the biochemical process of gas diffusion through leaf stomata. The canopy gap probability derived from GORT differs from classic radiative transfer theory, especially when the leaf area index is high, due to leaf clumping effects. Tree characteristics such as tree density, crown shape, and canopy length affect leaf clumping and regulate radiation interception. Modeled gross primary production (GPP) for two deciduous forest stands could explain more than 80% of the variance of flux tower measurements at both near hourly and daily timescales. We demonstrate that ambient CO2 concentrations influence daytime vegetation photosynthesis, which needs to be considered in biogeochemical models. The proposed model is complementary to classic radiative transfer theory and shows promise in modeling the radiative transfer process and photosynthetic activities over discontinuous forest canopies.

  10. Application of a Multiscale Model of Tantalum Deformation at Megabar Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallo, R M; Park, H; Barton, N R; Remignton, B A; Pollaine, S M; Prisbrey, S T; Bernier, J V; May, M J; Maddox, B R; Swift, D W; Becker, R C; Olson, R T

    2010-05-13

    A new multiscale simulation tool has been developed to model the strength of tantalum under high-pressure dynamic compression. This new model combines simulations at multiple length scales to explain macroscopic properties of materials. Previously known continuum models of material response under load have built upon a mixture of theoretical physics and experimental phenomenology. Experimental data, typically measured at static pressures, are used as a means of calibration to construct models that parameterize the material properties; e.g., yield stress, work hardening, strain-rate dependence, etc. The pressure dependence for most models enters through the shear modulus, which is used to scale the flow stress. When these models are applied to data taken far outside the calibrated regions of phase space (e.g., strain rate or pressure) they often diverge in their predicted behavior of material deformation. The new multiscale model, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, starts with interatomic quantum mechanical potential and is based on the motion and multiplication of dislocations. The basis for the macroscale model is plastic deformation by phonon drag and thermally activated dislocation motion and strain hardening resulting from elastic interactions among dislocations. The dislocation density, {rho}, and dislocation velocity, {nu}, are connected to the plastic strain rate {var_epsilon}{sup p}, via Orowan's equation: {var_epsilon}{sup p} = {rho}b{nu}/M, where b is the Burger's vector, the shear magnitude associated with a dislocation, and M is the Taylor factor, which accounts for geometric effects in how slip systems accommodate the deformation. The evolution of the dislocation density and velocity is carried out in the continuum model by parameterized fits to smaller scale simulations, each informed by calculations on smaller length scales down to atomistic dimensions. We apply this new model for tantalum to two sets of experiments and compare the

  11. Geometric-optical bidirectional reflectance modeling of the discrete crown vegetation canopy - Effect of crown shape and mutual shadowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiaowen; Strahler, Alan H.

    1992-01-01

    Many natural vegetation covers can be regarded as assemblages of plant crowns, on a background, which interact with light as discrete objects. On this basis, geometric optics furnish an approach to the modeling of vegetation canopies that captures the most important features of such growths' bidirectional measurements. Attention is presently given to models which approximate these phenomena and relate the size, shape, and count density of plant crowns to viewing and illumination positions and to crown-background reflectance contrasts.

  12. Modelling heat and mass transfer in bread baking with mechanical deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, V.; Salagnac, P.; Glouannec, P.; Ploteau, J.-P.; Jury, V.; Boillereaux, L.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, the thermo-hydric behaviour of bread during baking is studied. A numerical model has been developed with Comsol Multiphysics© software. The model takes into account the heat and mass transfers in the bread and the phenomenon of swelling. This model predicts the evolution of temperature, moisture, gas pressure and deformation in French "baguette" during baking. Local deformation is included in equations using solid phase conservation and, global deformation is calculated using a viscous mechanic model. Boundary conditions are specified with the sole temperature model and vapour pressure estimation of the oven during baking. The model results are compared with experimental data for a classic baking. Then, the model is analysed according to physical properties of bread and solicitations for a better understanding of the interactions between different mechanisms within the porous matrix.

  13. Tissue deformation and shape models in image-guided interventions: a discussion paper.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, D J; Barratt, D; Blackall, J M; Chan, C; Edwards, P J; Rhode, K; Penney, G P; McClelland, J; Hill, D L G

    2005-04-01

    This paper promotes the concept of active models in image-guided interventions. We outline the limitations of the rigid body assumption in image-guided interventions and describe how intraoperative imaging provides a rich source of information on spatial location of anatomical structures and therapy devices, allowing a preoperative plan to be updated during an intervention. Soft tissue deformation and variation from an atlas to a particular individual can both be determined using non-rigid registration. Established methods using free-form deformations have a very large number of degrees of freedom. Three examples of deformable models--motion models, biomechanical models and statistical shape models--are used to illustrate how prior information can be used to restrict the number of degrees of freedom of the registration algorithm and thus provide active models for image-guided interventions. We provide preliminary results from applications for each type of model.

  14. Internal phase transition induced by external forces in Finsler geometric model for membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koibuchi, Hiroshi; Shobukhov, Andrey

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we numerically study an anisotropic shape transformation of membranes under external forces for two-dimensional triangulated surfaces on the basis of Finsler geometry. The Finsler metric is defined by using a vector field, which is the tangential component of a three-dimensional unit vector σ corresponding to the tilt or some external macromolecules on the surface of disk topology. The sigma model Hamiltonian is assumed for the tangential component of σ with the interaction coefficient λ. For large (small) λ, the surface becomes oblong (collapsed) at relatively small bending rigidity. For the intermediate λ, the surface becomes planar. Conversely, fixing the surface with the boundary of area A or with the two-point boundaries of distance L, we find that the variable σ changes from random to aligned state with increasing of A or L for the intermediate region of λ. This implies that an internal phase transition for σ is triggered not only by the thermal fluctuations, but also by external mechanical forces. We also find that the frame (string) tension shows the expected scaling behavior with respect to A/N (L/N) at the intermediate region of A (L) where the σ configuration changes between the disordered and ordered phases. Moreover, we find that the string tension γ at sufficiently large λ is considerably smaller than that at small λ. This phenomenon resembles the so-called soft-elasticity in the liquid crystal elastomer, which is deformed by small external tensile forces.

  15. Modeling of porous scaffold deformation induced by medium perfusion.

    PubMed

    Podichetty, Jagdeep T; Madihally, Sundararajan V

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we tested the possibility of calculating permeability of porous scaffolds utilized in soft tissue engineering using pore size and shape. We validated the results using experimental measured pressure drop and simulations with the inclusion of structural deformation. We prepared Polycaprolactone (PCL) and Chitosan-Gelatin (CG) scaffolds by salt leaching and freeze drying technique, respectively. Micrographs were assessed for pore characteristics and mechanical properties. Porosity for both scaffolds was nearly same but the permeability varied 10-fold. Elastic moduli were 600 and 9 kPa for PCL and CG scaffolds, respectively, while Poisson's ratio was 0.3 for PCL scaffolds and ∼1.0 for CG scaffolds. A flow-through bioreactor accommodating a 10 cm diameter and 0.2 cm thick scaffold was used to determine the pressure-drop at various flow rates. Additionally, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations were performed by coupling fluid flow, described by Brinkman equation, with structural mechanics using a dynamic mesh. The experimentally obtained pressure drop matched the simulation results of PCL scaffolds. Simulations were extended to a broad range of permeabilities (10(-10) m(2) to 10(-14) m(2) ), elastic moduli (10-100,000 kPa) and Poisson's ratio (0.1-0.49). The results showed significant deviation in pressure drop due to scaffold deformation compared to rigid scaffold at permeabilities near healthy tissues. Also, considering the scaffold as a nonrigid structure altered the shear stress profile. In summary, scaffold permeability can be calculated using scaffold pore characteristics and deformation could be predicted using CFD simulation. These relationships could potentially be used in monitoring tissue regeneration noninvasively via pressure drop.

  16. Taking latitude with Ptolemy: Jamshid al-Kashi's novel geometric model of the motions of the inferior planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Brummelen, Glen

    2006-07-01

    In terms of complexity, planetary latitudes are the culmination of Ptolemy's mathematical astronomy. Al-Kashi's remarkable system removes its mathematical flaws, and demonstrates that Muslim astronomers not only mastered this apex of Ptolemaic astronomy, but also perfected its mathematics. The remainder of this paper is devoted first to a brief description of the mathematics of Ptolemy's latitude model, and then to a technical account of the part of the Khaqani Zij devoted to al-Kashi's spherical approach. Al-Kashi's text falls roughly into three sections: a geometrical description of the spherical model, a mathematical discussion of how one might generate planetary positions from it, and a sample calculation for Venus. A translation by Sergei Tourkin of the passage in which al-Kashi describes the geometric structure of his model may be found in an appendix.

  17. A Mechanism-based Model for Deformation Twinning in Polycrystalline FCC Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuan; Sun, Xin; Wang, Y. D.; Hu, Xiaohua; Zbib, Hussein M.

    2014-06-01

    Deformation twinning, a common and important plastic deformation mechanism, is the key contributor to the excellent combination of strength and ductility in twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel. In the open literature, a significant amount of research has been reported on the microstructural characteristics of deformation twinning and its influence on the overall deformation behavior of TWIP steel. In this study, we examine the feasibility of a mechanism-based crystal plasticity model in simulating the microstructural level deformation characteristics of TWIP steel. To this end, a model considering both double-slip and double-twin is developed to investigate the stress-strain behavior and local microstructural features related to the formation and growth of micro-twins in low stacking fault energy (SFE) TWIP steel. The twin systems are described as pseudo-slips that can be activated when their resolved shear stress reaches the corresponding critical value. A hardening law that accounts for the interaction among the slip and twin systems is also developed. Numerical simulations for dDifferent mesh sizes and single crystal patch tests under different loading modes are carried out to verify the modeling procedure. Our simulation results reveal that, despite its simple nature, the double-slip/double-twin model can capture the key deformation features of TWIP steel, including twin volume fraction evolution, continuous strain hardening, and the final fracture in the form of strain localization.

  18. Use of multiscale zirconium alloy deformation models in nuclear fuel behavior analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, Robert; Tomé, Carlos; Liu, Wenfeng; Alankar, Alankar; Subramanian, Gopinath; Stanek, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Accurate prediction of cladding mechanical behavior is a key aspect of modeling nuclear fuel behavior, especially for conditions of pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA), and loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). Current approaches to fuel performance modeling rely on empirical models for cladding creep, growth and plastic deformation, which are limited to the materials and conditions for which the models were developed. CASL has endeavored to improve upon this approach by incorporating a microstructurally-based, atomistically-informed, zirconium alloy mechanical deformation analysis capability into the BISON-CASL engineering scale fuel performance code. Specifically, the viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) polycrystal plasticity modeling approach, developed by Lebensohn and Tome´ [2], has been coupled with BISON-CASL to represent the mechanistic material processes controlling the deformation behavior of the cladding. A critical component of VPSC is the representation of the crystallographic orientation of the grains within the matrix material and the ability to account for the role of texture on deformation. The multiscale modeling of cladding deformation mechanisms allowed by VPSC far exceed the functionality of typical semi-empirical constitutive models employed in nuclear fuel behavior codes to model irradiation growth and creep, thermal creep, or plasticity. This paper describes the implementation of an interface between VPSC and BISON-CASL and provides initial results utilizing the coupled functionality.

  19. High level implementation of geometric multigrid solvers for finite element problems: Applications in atmospheric modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Lawrence; Müller, Eike Hermann

    2016-12-01

    The implementation of efficient multigrid preconditioners for elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs) is a challenge due to the complexity of the resulting algorithms and corresponding computer code. For sophisticated (mixed) finite element discretisations on unstructured grids an efficient implementation can be very time consuming and requires the programmer to have in-depth knowledge of the mathematical theory, parallel computing and optimisation techniques on manycore CPUs. In this paper we show how the development of bespoke multigrid preconditioners can be simplified significantly by using a framework which allows the expression of the each component of the algorithm at the correct abstraction level. Our approach (1) allows the expression of the finite element problem in a language which is close to the mathematical formulation of the problem, (2) guarantees the automatic generation and efficient execution of parallel optimised low-level computer code and (3) is flexible enough to support different abstraction levels and give the programmer control over details of the preconditioner. We use the composable abstractions of the Firedrake/PyOP2 package to demonstrate the efficiency of this approach for the solution of strongly anisotropic PDEs in atmospheric modelling. The weak formulation of the PDE is expressed in Unified Form Language (UFL) and the lower PyOP2 abstraction layer allows the manual design of computational kernels for a bespoke geometric multigrid preconditioner. We compare the performance of this preconditioner to a single-level method and hypre's BoomerAMG algorithm. The Firedrake/PyOP2 code is inherently parallel and we present a detailed performance analysis for a single node (24 cores) on the ARCHER supercomputer. Our implementation utilises a significant fraction of the available memory bandwidth and shows very good weak scaling on up to 6,144 compute cores.

  20. Discrete element modeling of rock deformation, fracture network development and permeability evolution under hydraulic stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shouchun Deng; Robert Podgorney; Hai Huang

    2011-02-01

    Key challenges associated with the EGS reservoir development include the ability to reliably predict hydraulic fracturing and the deformation of natural fractures as well as estimating permeability evolution of the fracture network with time. We have developed a physics-based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by coupling a discrete element model (DEM) for fracturing with a network flow model. In DEM model, solid rock is represented by a network of discrete elements (often referred as particles) connected by various types of mechanical bonds such as springs, elastic beams or bonds that have more complex properties (such as stress-dependent elastic constants). Fracturing is represented explicitly as broken bonds (microcracks), which form and coalesce into macroscopic fractures when external and internal load is applied. The natural fractures are represented by a series of connected line segments. Mechanical bonds that intersect with such line segments are removed from the DEM model. A network flow model using conjugate lattice to the DEM network is developed and coupled with the DEM. The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which therefore deforms the mechanical bonds and breaks them if the deformation reaches a prescribed threshold value. Such deformation/fracturing in turn changes the permeability of the flow network, which again changes the evolution of fluid pressure, intimately coupling the two processes. The intimate coupling between fracturing/deformation of fracture networks and fluid flow makes the meso-scale DEM- network flow simulations necessary in order to accurately evaluate the permeability evolution, as these methods have substantial advantages over conventional continuum mechanical models of elastic rock deformation. The challenges that must be overcome to simulate EGS reservoir stimulation, preliminary results, progress to date and near future research directions and opportunities will be

  1. Geometric optics for a coupling model of electromagnetic and gravitational fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, Jiliang Chen, Songbai; Pan, Qiyuan

    2016-04-15

    The coupling between the electromagnetic and gravitational fields results in “faster than light” photons, and then the first and third laws of geometric optics are invalid in usual spacetime. By introducing an effective spacetime, we find that the wave vector can be casted into null and then it obeys the geodesic equation, the polarization vector is perpendicular to the rays, and the number of photons is conserved. That is to say, the laws of geometric optics are valid for the modified theory in the effective spacetime. We also show that the focusing theorem of light rays for the modified theory in the effective spacetime can be cast into the usual form.

  2. Augmenting forest inventory attributes with geometric optical modelling in support of regional susceptibility assessments to bark beetle infestations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coggins, Sam B.; Coops, Nicholas C.; Hilker, Thomas; Wulder, Michael A.

    2013-04-01

    Assessment of the susceptibility of forests to mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) infestation is based upon an understanding of the characteristics that predispose the stands to attack. These assessments are typically derived from conventional forest inventory data; however, this information often represents only managed forest areas. It does not cover areas such as forest parks or conservation regions and is often not regularly updated resulting in an inability to assess forest susceptibility. To address these shortcomings, we demonstrate how a geometric optical model (GOM) can be applied to Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery (30 m spatial resolution) to estimate stand-level susceptibility to mountain pine beetle attack. Spectral mixture analysis was used to determine the proportion of sunlit canopy and background, and shadow of each Landsat pixel enabling per pixel estimates of attributes required for model inversion. Stand structural attributes were then derived from inversion of the geometric optical model and used as basis for susceptibility mapping. Mean stand density estimated by the geometric optical model was 2753 (standard deviation ± 308) stems per hectare and mean horizontal crown radius was 2.09 (standard deviation ± 0.11) metres. When compared to equivalent forest inventory attributes, model predictions of stems per hectare and crown radius were shown to be reasonably estimated using a Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA (p < 0.001). These predictions were then used to create a large area map that provided an assessment of the forest area susceptible to mountain pine beetle damage.

  3. Understanding complex structures in fold-and-thrust belts. Integration of geometric and growth strata analyses, paleomagnetism, AMS and analogue models in the Western termination of the Southern Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo, Emilio L.; Sánchez, Elisa; Oliva-Urcia, Belén; José Ramón, Ma

    2014-05-01

    Classic 2D approaches have helped the understanding of the geometry and kinematics of fold-and-thrust belts belts (FAT belts) but are insufficient to unravel many natural cases. This is because deformation is 3D from the geometric point of view and, thus, cylindrical features may be considered as a simplification. On the other hand, deformation kinematics is usually complex, diachronic and poliphasic in real cases. Therefore, FAT belts have to be always considered in 4D. In this sense, the Southern Pyrenees is a perfect location to study the evolution of FAT belts because of the exceptional outcropping conditions of growth strata, the proven diachronic kinematics and the non-coaxial interference of deformation events. Within the vast catalogue of complex structures that includes superposed folding, conical and plunging folds, oblique thrust ramps, etc here, we have selected the westernmost termination of the South Pyrenean sole thrust to illustrate how the integration of geometric and kinematic analysis can help unraveling complex structures in FAT belts. The San Marzal pericline (4 km2 surface extension) is the lateral termination of the Sto. Domingo deca-kilometric fold. San Marzal looks like a large 70° plunging cylindrical structure. However the large magnitude (≡ 60-70°) of vertical axis rotations accommodated between its flanks cannot be explained without a conical geometry. In this work we will show how the structural analysis performed on this structure has disentangled its complex geometry. This analyses comprises several hundreds of bedding data, joints and veins and more than 150 standard paleomagnetic and AMS sites. Besides, we will show how the kinematic information derived from magnetostratigraphic sections (more than 8 km of sampled profiles) has helped to constraint the folding and rotation ages and velocities. Finally, all these complex geometric and kinematic features have inspired us to build an analogue model where we can explore the 3D

  4. Differences between the deformed-potential and folding-model descriptions of inelastic nuclear scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hnizdo, V. )

    1994-08-01

    The differences between the deformed-potential and folding-model descriptions of inelastic nuclear scattering, attention to which has been called recently by Beene, Horen, and Satchler [Phys. Rev. C 48, 3128 (1993)], were pointed out already some time ago by contrasting the rules of equal deformation lengths and equal normalized multipole moments for the optical potential and the underlying nucleon distribution of the excited nucleus.

  5. Kinematic evolution of thrusts wedge and erratic line length balancing: insights from deformed sandbox models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Mohammad Irfan; Dubey, A. K.; Toscani, Giovanni; Bonini, Lorenzo;