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Sample records for geopressured-geothermal development texas

  1. Geopressured geothermal resource of the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast: a technology characterization and environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Usibelli, A.; Deibler, P.; Sathaye, J.

    1980-12-01

    Two aspects of the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast geopressured geothermal resource: (1) the technological requirements for well drilling, completion, and energy conversion, and, (2) the environmental impacts of resource exploitation are examined. The information comes from the literature on geopressured geothermal research and from interviews and discussions with experts. The technology characterization section emphasizes those areas in which uncertainty exists and in which further research and development is needed. The environmental assessment section discusses all anticipated environmental impacts and focuses on the two largest potential problems: (a) subsidence and (b) brine disposal.

  2. Research and Development Program Plan for Geopressure-Geothermal Resources

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-01

    The objective of the Geopressure-Geothermal Program of the Division of Geothermal Energy, U.S. Department of Energy, is to determine by the end of FY86 the magnitude and economic potential of the geopressure-geothermal resources. This Program Plan describes how the Department of Energy proposes to achieve this objective. The main purposes of the current program are to narrow the range of uncertainty on the potential recovery of energy from the geopressure-geothermal resources and to ensure the timely development of these resources as the potential is demonstrated. For these purposes, the Division of Geothermal Energy has established the following objectives: (1) Define the magnitude, potential, and economics of the resources. (2) Conduct supporting research on reservoir and fluid characteristics. (3) Adapt or develop downhole, surface, and disposal technology. (4) Identify and mitigate adverse environmental, legal, and institutional issues in order to promote commercialization.

  3. Geopressured geothermal resource in Texas and Louisiana: geological constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Bebout, D.G.; Gutierrez, D.R.; Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of the DOE-funded geopressured geothermal project is to assess the viability of producing energy from the deep subsurface aquifers of the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast. These aquifers must comprise thick extensive sandstone units with high temperature, high porosity and permeability, and low salinity. Regional studies indicate that these ideal aquifers are not common; in fact, none have yet been found. Geological studies have demonstrated that sandstones decrease in abundance and thickness with depth; however, exceptions do occur and some are now being drilled and tested. Porosity and permeability also decrease with depth, but differences in original composition, burial history, and diagenesis result in variations in preserved porosity. Salinity within the geopressured zone is highly variable and probably related to aquifer porosity and permeability, thickness and lateral extent, and to the nature of the bounding growth faults.

  4. Comparison of estimated and background subsidence rates in Texas-Louisiana geopressured geothermal areas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, L.M.; Clayton, M.; Everingham, J.; Harding, R.C.; Massa, A.

    1982-06-01

    A comparison of background and potential geopressured geothermal development-related subsidence rates is given. Estimated potential geopressured-related rates at six prospects are presented. The effect of subsidence on the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast is examined including the various associated ground movements and the possible effects of these ground movements on surficial processes. The relationships between ecosystems and subsidence, including the capability of geologic and biologic systems to adapt to subsidence, are analyzed. The actual potential for environmental impact caused by potential geopressured-related subsidence at each of four prospects is addressed. (MHR)

  5. Recoverable Resource Estimate of Identified Onshore Geopressured Geothermal Energy in Texas and Louisiana (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, A.; Augustine, C.

    2012-04-01

    Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are characterized by high temperatures and high pressures with correspondingly large quantities of dissolved methane. Due to these characteristics, the reservoirs provide two sources of energy: chemical energy from the recovered methane, and thermal energy from the recovered fluid at temperatures high enough to operate a binary power plant for electricity production. Formations with the greatest potential for recoverable energy are located in the gulf coastal region of Texas and Louisiana where significantly overpressured and hot formations are abundant. This study estimates the total recoverable onshore geopressured geothermal resource for identified sites in Texas and Louisiana. In this study a geopressured geothermal resource is defined as a brine reservoir with fluid temperature greater than 212 degrees F and a pressure gradient greater than 0.7 psi/ft.

  6. Environmental analysis of geopressured-geothermal prospect areas, De Witt and Colorado counties, Texas. Final report, March 1 - August 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavson, T.C.; Reeder, F.S.; Badger, E.A.

    1980-02-01

    Information collected and analyzed for a preliminary environmental analysis of geopressured geothermal prospect areas in Colorado and DeWitt Counties, Texas is presented. Specific environmental concerns for each geopressured geothermal prospect area are identified and discussed. Approximately 218 km/sup 2/(85 mi/sup 2/) were studied in the vicinity of each prospect area to: (1) conduct an environmental analysis to identify more and less suited areas for geopressured test wells; and (2) provide an environmental data base for future development of geopressured geothermal energy resources. A series of maps and tables are included to illustrate environmental characteristics including: geology, water resources, soils, current land use, vegetation, wildlife, and meteorological characteristics, and additional relevant information on cultural resources, power- and pipelines, and regulatory agencies. A series of transparent overlays at the scale of the original mapping has also been produced for the purposes of identifying and ranking areas of potential conflict between geopressured geothermal development and environmental characteristics. The methodology for ranking suitability of areas within the two prospect areas is discussed in the appendix. (MHR)

  7. Consolidation of geologic studies of geopressured geothermal resources in Texas. 1982 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.; Kaiser, W.R.; Finley, R.J.

    1983-03-01

    Detailed structural mapping at several horizons in selected study areas within the Frio growth-fault trend demonstrates a pronounced variability in structural style. At Sarita in South Texas, shale mobilization produced one or more shale ridges, one of which localized a low-angle growth fault trapping a wedge of deltaic sediments. At Corpus Christi, shale mobilization produced a series of large growth faults, shale-cored domed anticlines, and shale-withdrawal basins, which become progressively younger basinward. At Blessing, major growth faults trapped sands of the Greta/Carancahua barrier system with little progradation. At Pleasant Bayou, a major early growth-fault pattern was overprinted by later salt tectonics - the intrusion of Danbury Dome and the development of a salt-withdrawal basin. At Port Arthur, low-displacement, long-lived faults formed on a sand-poor shelf margin contemporaneously with broad salt uplifts and basins. Variability in styles is related to the nature and extent of Frio sedimentation and shelf-margin progradation and to the presence or absence of salt. Structural styles that are conducive to the development of large geothermal reservoirs include blocks between widely spaced growth faults having dip reversal, salt-withdrawal basins, and shale-withdrawal basins. These styles are widespread on the Texas Gulf Coast. However, actually finding a large reservoir depends on demonstrating the existence of sufficient sandstone with adequate quality to support geopressured geothermal energy production.

  8. Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    John, C.J.

    1992-10-01

    Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing.

  9. Problem definition study of subsidence caused by geopressured geothermal resource development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    The environmental and socio-economic settings of four environmentally representative Gulf Coast geopressured geothermal fairways were inventoried. Subsidence predictions were prepared using feasible development scenarios for the four representative subsidence sites. Based on the results of the subsidence estimates, an assessment of the associated potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts was prepared. An inventory of mitigation measures was also compiled. Results of the subsidence estimates and impact assessments are presented, as well as conclusions as to what are the major uncertainties, problems, and issues concerning the future study of geopressured geothermal subsidence.

  10. Consolidation of geologic studies of geopressured-geothermal resources in Texas. 1990 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Raney, J.A.; Seni, S.J.; DuBar, J.R.; Walter, T.G.

    1991-03-01

    In a five-county area of South Texas, geopressured-geothermal reservoirs in the upper Wilcox Group colocated with heavy-oil reservoirs in the overlying Jackson Group. In 1990, research at the Bureau of Economic Geology concentrated on evaluating the potential of using geopressured-geothermal water for hot-water flooding of heavy-oil reservoirs. Favorable geothermal reservoirs are defined by thick deltaic sandstones and growth-fault-bounded compartments. Potential geothermal reservoirs are present at a depth of 11,000 ft (3,350 m) to 15,000 ft (4,570 m) and contain water at temperatures of 350 F (177 C) to 383 F (195 C) in Fandango field, Zapata County. One potential geothermal reservoir sandstone in the upper Wilcox (R sandstone) is composed of a continuous sand body 100 ft (30 m) to greater than 200 ft (>61 m) thick. Fault blocks average 2 to 4 mi{sup 2} (5.2 to 10.4 km{sup 2}) in area.

  11. Depositional setting, structural style, and sandstone distribution in three geopressured geothermal areas, Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Winker, C.D.; Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.; Garcia, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    Three areas in the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain were studied using electric logs and seismic-reflection data to interpret their depositional and structural history and to compare their potential as geopressured-geothermal reservoirs. The Cuero study area, on the lower Wilcox (upper Paleocene) growth-fault trend, is characterized by closely and evenly spaced, subparallel, down-to-the-basin growth faults, relatively small expansion ratios, and minor block rotation. Distributary-channel sandstones in the geopressured lower Wilcox Group of the South Cook fault block appear to be the best geothermal aquifers in the Cuero area. The Blessing study area, on the lower Frio (Oligocene) growth-fault trend, shows wider and more variable fault spacing and much greater expansion ratios and block rotation, particularly during early Frio time. Thick geopressured sandstone aquifers are laterally more extensive in the Blessing area than in the Cuero area. The Pleasant Bayou study area, like the Blessing area, is on the Frio growth-fault trand, and its early structural development was similar rapid movement of widely spaced faults resulted in large expansion ratios and major block rotation. However, a late-stage pattern of salt uplift and withdrawal complicated the structural style. Thick geopressured lower Frio sandstone aquifers are highly permeable and laterally extensive, as in the Blessing area. In all three areas, geopressured aquifers were created where early, rapid movement along down-to-the-basin growth faults juxtaposed shallow-water sands against older shales, probably deposited in slope environments. Major transgressions followed the deposition of reservoir sands and probably also influenced the hydraulic isolation that allowed the build up of abnormal pressures. 26 refs., 49 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. The Geopressured-Geothermal Resource, research and use

    SciTech Connect

    Negus-de Wys, J.

    1990-01-01

    The Geopressured-Geothermal Resource has an estimated accessible resource base of 5700 quads of gas and 11,000 quads of thermal energy in the onshore Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast area alone. After 15 years the program is now beginning a transition to commercialization. The program presently has three geopressured- geothermal wells in Texas and Louisiana. Supporting research in the Geopressured Program includes research on rock mechanics, logging, geologic studies, reservoir modeling, and co-location of brine and heavy oil, environmental monitoring, geologic studies, hydrocarbons associated with the geopressured brines and development of a pH monitor for harsh environments, research support in prediction of reservoir behavior, thermal enhanced oil recovery, direct use, hydraulic and thermal conversion, and use of supercritical processes and pyrolysis in detoxification. The on-going research and well operations are preparing the way to commercialization of the Geopressured-Geothermal Resource is covered in this report. 12 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Geopressured geothermal bibliography (Geopressure Thesaurus)

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, T.R.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1981-08-01

    This thesaurus of terminology associated with the geopressured geothermal energy field has been developed as a part of the Geopressured Geothermal Information System data base. A thesaurus is a compilation of terms displaying synonymous, hierarchical, and other relationships between terms. These terms, which are called descriptors, constitute the special language of the information retrieval system, the system vocabulary. The Thesaurus' role in the Geopressured Geothermal Information System is to provide a controlled vocabulary of sufficient specificity for subject indexing and retrieval of documents in the geopressured geothermal energy field. The thesauri most closely related to the Geopressure Thesaurus in coverage are the DOE Energy Information Data Base Subject Thesaurus and the Geothermal Thesaurus being developed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The Geopressure Thesaurus differs from these thesauri in two respects: (1) specificity of the vocabulary or subject scope and (2) display format.

  14. Session: Geopressured-Geothermal

    SciTech Connect

    Jelacic, Allan J.; Eaton, Ben A.; Shook, G. Michael; Birkinshaw, Kelly; Negus-de Wys, Jane

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Overview of Geopressured-Geothermal'' by Allan J. Jelacic; ''Geothermal Well Operations and Automation in a Competitive Market'' by Ben A. Eaton; ''Reservoir Modeling and Prediction at Pleasant Bayou Geopressured-Geothermal Reservoir'' by G. Michael Shook; ''Survey of California Geopressured-Geothermal'' by Kelly Birkinshaw; and ''Technology Transfer, Reaching the Market for Geopressured-Geothermal Resources'' by Jane Negus-de Wys.

  15. Geopressured Geothermal Resource and Recoverable Energy Estimate for the Wilcox and Frio Formations, Texas (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, A.; Augustine, C.

    2011-10-01

    An estimate of the total and recoverable geopressured geothermal resource of the fairways in the Wilcox and Frio formations is made using the current data available. The flow rate of water and methane for wells located in the geopressured geothermal fairways is simulated over a 20-year period utilizing the TOUGH2 Reservoir Simulator and research data. The model incorporates relative permeability, capillary pressure, rock compressibility, and leakage from the bounding shale layers. The simulations show that permeability, porosity, pressure, sandstone thickness, well spacing, and gas saturation in the sandstone have a significant impact on the percent of energy recovered. The results also predict lower average well production flow rates and a significantly higher production of natural gas relative to water than in previous studies done from 1975 to 1980. Previous studies underestimate the amount of methane produced with hot brine. Based on the work completed in this study, multiphase flow processes and reservoir boundary conditions greatly influence the total quantity of the fluid produced as well as the ratio of gas and water in the produced fluid.

  16. Pleasant Bayou geopressured/geothermal testing project, Brazoria County, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ortego, P.K.

    1985-07-01

    Phase II-B production testing of the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well began September 22, 1982. The test plan was designed to evaluate the capabilities of the geopressured-geothermal reservoir during an extended flow period. Tests were conducted to determine reservoir areal extent; aquifer fluid properties; fluid property change with production; information on reservoir production drive mechanism; long-term scale and corrosion control methods; and disposal well operations. Operatinal aspects of geopressured-geothermal production were also evaluated. The test was discontinued prematurely in May 1983 because of a production tubing failure. Most of the production tubing was recovered from the well and cause of the failure was determined. Plans for recompletion of the well were prepared. However, the well was not recompleted because of funding constraints and/or program rescheduling. In March 1984, the Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) directed that the site be placed in a standby-secured condition. In August 1984, the site was secured. Routine site maintenance and security was provided during the secured period.

  17. Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana. Annual report, 1 January 1991--31 December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    John, C.J.

    1992-10-01

    Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing.

  18. Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    Continuous recording microearthquake monitoring networks have been established around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal design wells in southwestern Louisiana and southeastern Texas since summer 1980 to assess the effects well development may have had on subsidence and growth-fault activation. This monitoring has shown several unusual characteristics of Gulf Coast seismic activity. The observed activity is classified into two dominant types, one with identifiable body phases (type 1) and the other with only surface-wave signatures (type 2). During this reporting period no type 1 or body-wave events were reported. A total of 230 type 2 or surface-wave events were recorded. Origins of the type 2 events are still not positively understood; however, little or no evidence is available to connect them with geopressured-geothermal well activity. We continue to suspect sonic booms from military aircraft or some other human-induced source. 37 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. United States Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program. Annual report, 1 November 1980-31 October 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfman, M.H.; Morton, R.A.; Dunlap, H.F.; Frederick, D.O.; Gray, K.E.; Peters, E.J.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Thompson, T.W.

    1982-07-01

    The following are included: objectives, overview, coordination assistance, compaction measurements on Texas Gulf Coast Sandstones and Shales; US Gulf Coast Geopressured-Geothermal Aquifer simulation, Preliminary Review of Subsidence Insurance Issues, Geopressured-Geothermal Information System, and Study of Log Derived Water Resistivity Values in Geopressured Geothermal Formations. (MHR)

  20. Wilcox sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast: their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy. Report of Investigations No. 117

    SciTech Connect

    Debout, D.G.; Weise, B.R.; Gregory, A.R.; Edwards, M.B.

    1982-01-01

    Regional studies of the lower Eocene Wilcox Group in Texas were conducted to assess the potential for producing heat energy and solution methane from geopressured fluids in the deep-subsurface growth-faulted zone. However, in addition to assembling the necessary data for the geopressured geothermal project, this study has provided regional information of significance to exploration for other resources such as lignite, uranium, oil, and gas. Because the focus of this study was on the geopressured section, emphasis was placed on correlating and mapping those sandstones and shales occurring deeper than about 10,000 ft. The Wilcox and Midway Groups comprise the oldest thick sandstone/shale sequence of the Tertiary of the Gulf Coast. The Wilcox crops out in a band 10 to 20 mi wide located 100 to 200 mi inland from the present-day coastline. The Wilcox sandstones and shales in the outcrop and updip shallow subsurface were deposited primarily in fluvial environments; downdip in the deep subsurface, on the other hand, the Wilcox sediments were deposited in large deltaic systems, some of which were reworked into barrier-bar and strandplain systems. Growth faults developed within the deltaic systems, where they prograded basinward beyond the older, stable Lower Cretaceous shelf margin onto the less stable basinal muds. Continued displacement along these faults during burial resulted in: (1) entrapment of pore fluids within isolated sandstone and shale sequences, and (2) buildup of pore pressure greater than hydrostatic pressure and development of geopressure.

  1. Geopressured geothermal bibliography. Volume 1 (citation extracts)

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, T.R.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1981-08-01

    This bibliography was compiled by the Center for Energy Studies at The University of Texas at Austin to serve as a tool for researchers in the field of geopressured geothermal energy resources. The bibliography represents citations of papers on geopressured geothermal energy resources over the past eighteen years. Topics covered in the bibliography range from the technical aspects of geopressured geothermal reservoirs to social, environmental, and legal aspects of tapping those reservoirs for their energy resources. The bibliography currently contains more than 750 entries. For quick reference to a given topic, the citations are indexed into five divisions: author, category, conference title, descriptor, and sponsor. These indexes are arranged alphabetically and cross-referenced by page number.

  2. Economic review of the geopressured-geothermal resource with recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.M.; Negus-de Wys, J.; Faulder, D.D.; Lunis, B.C.

    1989-11-01

    This report presents the results of an economic study conducted by the INEL under DOE Contract No. AC07-76ID01570 to evaluate the breakeven price to market energy from a geopressured-geothermal resource. A breakeven price is a minimum, per unit charge required for the developer to recover all direct and indirect costs and a rate of return sufficient to compensate the developer for depreciation, the time value of money, and the risk of failure. The DOE Geopressured-Geothermal Research Program and the DOE well testing and operations at three locations in the Gulf Coast region provide the bulk of resource and economic characteristics for this study. A menu-driven model was developed in LOTUS-123 to calculate the breakeven price to market gas and electricity from a geopressured-geothermal resource. This model was developed using the present value methodology and conservative assumptions. Assuming present well constraints and current off-the-shelf conversion technology, the breakeven price for electricity is about $0.26/kWh using only the thermal energy from a Hulin-type resource. Assuming identical resource and technology constraints, the breakeven price is reduced to about $0.15/kWh when using all available energy forms (methane, hydraulic, and thermal). Assuming the use of available advanced technologies, the breakeven price is reduced to about $0.10/kWh. Assuming the higher quality resource (with higher temperature and gas content) in the South Texas cases, the breakeven cost is about $0.095/kWh. Using advanced technology, this cost is further reduced to about $0.05/kWh. Both costs are within program goals. The results of this study suggest that the future direction of the Geopressured-Geothermal Program emphasize (a) selection of higher quality resource, (b) advanced energy conversion technology, and (c) total energy utilization.

  3. Microseismic monitoring of Chocolate Bayou, Texas: the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 geopressured/geothermal energy test well program

    SciTech Connect

    Mauk, F.J.; Kimball, B.; Davis, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Brazoria seismic network, instrumentation, design, and specifications are described. The data analysis procedures are presented. Seismicity is described in relation to the Pleasant Bayou production history. Seismicity originating near the chemical plant east of the geopressured/geothermal well is discussed. (MHR)

  4. Depositional setting, structural style, and sandstone distribution in three geopressured geothermal areas, Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Winker, C.D.; Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.; Garcia, D.D.

    1981-10-01

    Three areas in the Texas Gulf Coast region with different depositional settings, structural styles, and sandstone distribution were studied with well log and seismic data to evaluate some of the controls on subsurface conditions in geopressured aquifers. Structural and stratigraphic interpretations were made primarily on the basis of well log correlations. Seismic data confirm the log interpretations but also are useful in structure mapping at depths below well control.

  5. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Saldana well No. 2, Zapata County, Texas. Volume I. Completion and testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-07

    The Saldana Well No. 2, approximately 35 miles Southeast of the city of Laredo, Texas, was the sixth successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the DOE Wells of Opportunity Program. The well was tested through the annulus between 7-inch casing and 2-3/8 inch tubing. The interval tested was from 9745 to 9820 feet. The geological section was the 1st Hinnant Sand, an upper member of the Wilcox Group. Produced water was injected into the Saldana Well No. 1, which was also acquired from Riddle Oil Company and converted to a disposal well. A Miocene salt water sand was perforated from 3005 to 3100 feet for disposal. One pressure drawdown flow test and one pressure buildup test were conducted during a 10-day period. A total of 9328 barrels of water was produced. The highest sustained flow rate was 1950 BWPD.

  6. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 4: Bibliography (annotated only for all major reports)

    SciTech Connect

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    This bibliography contains US Department of Energy sponsored Geopressured-Geothermal reports published after 1984. Reports published prior to 1984 are documented in the Geopressured Geothermal bibliography Volumes 1, 2, and 3 that the Center for Energy Studies at the University of Texas at Austin compiled in May 1985. It represents reports, papers and articles covering topics from the scientific and technical aspects of geopressured geothermal reservoirs to the social, environmental, and legal considerations of exploiting those reservoirs for their energy resources.

  7. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT, U.S. Department of Energy: Award No. DE-EE0002855 "Demonstrating the Commercial Feasibility of Geopressured-Geothermal Power Development at Sweet Lake Field - Cameron Parish, Louisiana"

    SciTech Connect

    Gayle, Phillip A., Jr.

    2012-01-13

    The goal of the project was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of geopressured-geothermal power development by exploiting the extraordinarily high pressured hot brines know to exist at depth near the Sweet Lake oil and gas field in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. The existence of a geopressured-geothermal system at Sweet Lake was confirmed in the 1970's and 1980's as part of DOE's Geopressured-Geothermal Program. That program showed that the energy prices at the time could not support commercial production of the resource. Increased electricity prices and technological advancements over the last two decades, combined with the current national support for developing clean, renewable energy and the job creation it would entail, provided the justification necessary to reevaluate the commercial feasibility of power generation from this vast resource.

  8. Gulf Coast Geopressured-Geothermal Program Summary Report Compilation. Volume I, Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Chacko, J. John; Maciasz, Gina; Harder, Brian J.

    1998-06-01

    The significant accomplishments of this program included (1) identification of the geopressured-geothermal onshore fairways in Louisiana and Texas, (2) determination that high brine flow rates of 20,000--40,000 barrels a day can be obtained for long periods of time, (3) brine, after gas extraction can be successfully reinjected into shallow aquifers without affecting the surface waters or the fresh water aquifers, (4) no observable subsidence or microseismic activity was induced due to the subsurface injection of brine, and no detrimental environmental effects attributable to geopressured--geothermal well testing were noticed, (5) sanding can be controlled by reducing flow rates, (6) corrosion controlled with inhibitors, (7) scaling controlled by phosphonate scale inhibitors, (8) demonstrated that production of gas from saturated brine under pressure was viable and (9) a hybrid power system can be successfully used for conversion of the thermal and chemical energy contained in the geopressured-geothermal resource for generation of electricity. The U. S. Department of Energy's geopressured-geothermal research program in the Gulf Coast achieved many significant findings and disproved and clarified many historical perceptions that had previously limited industry's interest in developing this resource. Though in today's economic market it may not be commercially profitable to exploit this resource, the rapid advance of technology in all its different aspects could potentially make this resource attractive in the not too distant future. The ideal situation would involve the development of a total energy system in which all three associated forms of energy--chemical, thermal and mechanical are utilized. The extraction of gas from brine combined with the large number of potential direct and indirect uses of this resource will add to its economic profitability. This U.S. DOE's visionary research program has essentially laid the foundations for characterization of this

  9. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 3: Applied and direct uses, resource feasibility, economics

    SciTech Connect

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal hybrid cycle power plant: design, testing, and operation summary; Feasibility of hydraulic energy recovery from geopressured-geothermal resources: economic analysis of the Pelton turbine; Brine production as an exploration tool for water drive gas reservoirs; Study of supercritical Rankine cycles; Application of the geopressured-geothermal resource to pyrolytic conversion or decomposition/detoxification processes; Conclusions on wet air oxidation, pyrolytic conversion, decomposition/detoxification process; Co-location of medium to heavy oil reservoirs with geopressured-geothermal resources and the feasibility of oil recovery using geopressured-geothermal fluids; Economic analysis; Application of geopressured-geothermal resources to direct uses; Industrial consortium for the utilization of the geopressured-geothermal resource; Power generation; Industrial desalination, gas use and sales, pollutant removal, thermal EOR, sulfur frasching, oil and natural gas pipelining, coal desulfurization and preparation, lumber and concrete products kilning; Agriculture and aquaculture applications; Paper and cane sugar industries; Chemical processing; Environmental considerations for geopressured-geothermal development. 27 figs., 25 tabs.

  10. Geopressured geothermal bibliography. Volume III. (Geopressure thesaurus). Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Sepehrnoori, K.; Carter, F.; Schneider, R.; Street, S.; McGill, K.

    1985-05-01

    This thesaurus of terminology associated with the geopressured geothermal energy field has been developed as a part of the Geopressured Geothermal Information System data base. The subject scope includes: (1) geopressure resource assessment; (2) geology, hydrology, and geochemistry of geopressured systems; (3) geopressure exploration and exploration technology; (4) geopressured reservoir engineering and drilling technology; (5) economic aspects; (6) environmental aspects; (7) legal, institutional, and sociological aspects; (8) electrical and nonelectrical utilization; and (9) other energy sources, especially methane and other fossil fuel reserves, associated with geopressured reservoirs.

  11. Fiscal Year 1992 Annual Operating Plan for the Geopressured-Geothermal Research Program ($4.3 Million Budget)

    SciTech Connect

    1991-08-01

    This plan describes the Geopressured-Geothermal Research Program. A Geopressured well in Texas (Pleasant Bayou) will undergo a slow test and a pressure buildup test. A geopressured well in Louisiana (Gladys McCall) will be flow tested for a short period, logged, plugged and abandoned or turned over to industry early in FY 92. A second deep geopressured well in Louisiana, the Hulin Well, is being kept on standby. Related university research in geology, numerical reservoir modeling, subsidence, microseismicity, and water quality will continue, with program data reviews initiated in appropriate areas. Increased emphasis on integrated reservoir engineering will be implemented. The well activities coupled with the related university research are designed to improve the ability to forecast reservoir productive capacity, to verify the reliability of the resource as a long-term energy resource, and to determine the environmental effects of long-term production. By these means, the Geopressured-Geothermal Research Program is developing a solid technology base that private industry can use to evaluate the geopressured-geothermal resource. The Industrial Consortium for utilization of the resource will be continued. Use projects in Louisiana and Texas will be evaluated. A geopressured reservoir review will be managed by INEL. The DOE Field Office, Idaho will make preparations to complete the program. [DJE-2005

  12. The Geopressured-Geothermal Program: Energy conversion status and future possibilities

    SciTech Connect

    Negus-de Wys, J.; Lawford, T.W.; Faulder, D.D. )

    1989-01-01

    The Geopressured-Geothermal Program, sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) began in 1976 with the Wells of Opportunity. This early research concentrated on resource characterization at several locations in Texas and Louisiana. More recently, the program has included well operations and supporting university research in geoscience and engineering. Long term flow testing, reinjection of brine, and scale prevention were accomplished at the Gladys McCall Well. The Pleasant Bayou Well provided additional data for modeling and predicting geopressured reservoir behavior. This year a hybrid power system (HPS) was constructed at Pleasant Bayou in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). This is the first conversion of the geopressured-geothermal resource to electricity. An economic review of geopressured-geothermal resource development concludes that using off-the-shelf technology, electricity can be produced for $0.125/kWh from a Gladys McCall type resource (40,000 bpd brine production, 27 scf methane/bbl, 288{degree}F brine, and 10-year resource life). The Pleasant Bayou type resource can produce electricity for $0.32/kWh. Advanced technology could reduce the cost to $0.16/kWh. A review and status of the HPS is presented with future possibilities for the program, including (1) recovery of medium and heavy oil with hot geopressured brine, (2) direct use, especially aquaculture, and (3) development and use of advanced technology for conversion at the Hulin Well, the deepest, hottest well in the program. The estimated improvement in efficiencies with advanced conversion technology range from 100 to 160%. This would greatly reduce the cost to produce electricity. 6 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. The geopressured-geothermal resource: Transition to commercialization

    SciTech Connect

    Negus-de Wys, J. ); Dorfman, M. . Dept. of Petroleum Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    The Geopressured-Geothermal resource has an estimated 5700 recoverable quad of gas and 11,000 recoverable quad of thermal energy in the onshore Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast area alone. After 15 years the program is now beginning a transition to commercialization. The program presently has three geopressured-geothermal wells in Texas and Louisiana. The Pleasant Bayou Well has a 1 MWe hybrid power system converting some gas and the thermal energy to electricity. The Gladys McCall Well produced over 23 MM bbls brine with 23 scf per bbl over 4 1/2 years. It is now shut-in building up pressure. The deep Hulin Well has been cleaned out and short term flow tested. It is on standby awaiting funds for long-term flow testing. In January 1990 an Industrial Consortium for the Utilization of the Geopressured-Geothermal Resource was convened at Rice University, Houston, TX. Sixty-five participants heard industry cost-shared proposals for using the hot geopressured brine. Proposals ranged from thermal enhanced oil recovery to aquaculture, conversion, and environmental clean up processes. By the September meeting at UTA-Balcones Research Center, industry approved charters will have been received, an Advisory Board will be appointed, and election of officers from industry will be held. 11 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Parcperdue Geopressure -- Geothermal Project: Appendix E

    SciTech Connect

    Sweezy, L.R.

    1981-10-05

    The mechanical and transport properties and characteristics of rock samples obtained from DOW-DOE L.R. SWEEZY NO. 1 TEST WELL at the Parcperdue Geopressure/Geothermal Site have been investigated in the laboratory. Elastic moduli, compressibility, uniaxial compaction coefficient, strength, creep parameters, permeability, acoustic velocities (all at reservoir conditions) and changes in these quantities induced by simulated reservoir production have been obtained from tests on several sandstone and shale samples from different depths. Most important results are that the compaction coefficients are approximately an order of magnitude lower than those generally accepted for the reservoir sand in the Gulf Coast area and that the creep behavior is significant. Geologic characterization includes lithological description, SEM micrographs and mercury intrusion tests to obtain pore distributions. Petrographic analysis shows that approximately half of the total sand interval has excellent reservoir potential and that most of the effective porosity in the Cib Jeff Sand is formed by secondary porosity development.

  15. Geopressured geothermal bibliography. Volume II (geopressure thesaurus). Second Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Sepehrnoori, K.; Carter, F.; Schneider, R.; Street, S.; McGill, K.

    1983-05-01

    This thesaurus of terminology associated with the geopressured geothermal energy field has been developed as a part of the Geopressured Geothermal Information System data base. It is a compilation of terms displaying synomymous, hierarchical, and other relationships between terms. These terms, which are called descriptors, constitute the special language of the information retrieval system - the system vocabulary. The function of this thesaurus is to provide a standardized vocabulary for the information storage and retrieval system to facilitate both the indexing and subject-searching processes. In indexing, a thesaurus is used to translate the natural language of the document to be indexed into the standardized system vocabulary and to place the document at the appropriate level of generality or specificity in relation to the other documents in the data base. In subject retrieval, the thesaurus is used to match the natural language used in search requests with the system vocabulary and to find the most appropriate term to represent a concept.

  16. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 1: Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The significant accomplishments of this program included (1) identification of the geopressured-geothermal onshore fairways in Louisiana and Texas, (2) determination that high brine flow rates of 20,000--40,000 barrels a day can be obtained for long periods of time, (3) brine, after gas extraction can be successfully reinjected into shallow aquifers without affecting the surface waters or the fresh water aquifers, (4) no observable subsidence or microseismic activity was induced due to the subsurface injection of brine, and no detrimental environmental effects attributable to geopressured-geothermal well testing were noticed, (5) sanding can be controlled by reducing flow rates, (6) corrosion controlled with inhibitors, (7) scaling controlled by phosphonate scale inhibitors, (8) demonstrated that production of gas from saturated brine under pressure was viable and (9) a hybrid power system can be successfully used for conversion of the thermal and chemical energy contained in the geopressured-geothermal resource for generation of electricity.

  17. Technology Transfer, Reaching the Market for Geopressured-Geothermal Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Wys, J. Negus-de

    1992-03-24

    Technology transfer to the industrial sector for geopressured-geothermal technology has included diverse strategies, with successes and obstacles or roadblocks. Numerical data are tabulated in terms of response to the various strategies. Strategy categories include the following: feasibility studies and reports, consortium activities and proceedings, the Geothermal Resource Council, national and international meetings of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, other societal and organizational meetings, and conferences, Department of Energy solicitation of interest in the Commerce Business Daily, industry peer review panels, and the Secretary's Technology Initiative. Additionally, the potential of a 12-page color brochure on the geopressured-geothermal resource, workshops, and cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) is discussed. In conclusion, what is the best way to reach the market and what is the winning combination? All of the above strategies contribute to technology transfer and are needed in some combination for the desired success. The most successful strategy activities for bringing in the interest of the largest number of industries and the independents are the consortium meetings, one-on-one telephone calling, and consortium proceedings with information service followup. the most successful strategy activities for bringing in the interest and participation of ''majors'' are national and international peer reviewed papers at internationally recognized industry-related society meetings, and on-call presentations to specific companies. Why? Because quality is insured, major filtering has already taken place, and the integrity of the showcase is established. Thus, the focused strategy is reduced to a target of numbers (general public/minors/independents) versus quality (majors). The numerical results of the activities reflecting four years of technology transfer following the 15 year lead in the early phases of geopressured-geothermal

  18. Pleasant Bayou Geopressured-Geothermal Reservoir Analysis - January 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Riney, T.D.

    1991-01-01

    Many sedimentary basins contain formations with pore fluids at pressures higher than hydrostatic value; these formations are called geopressured. The pore pressure is generally well in excess of hydrostatic and the fluids vary in scalinity, temperature, and dissolved methane. As part of its program to define the magnitude and recoverability of the geopressured-geothermal energy resource, the US Department of Energy has drilled and tested deep wells in geopressured formations in the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast region. Geological information for the Pleasant Bayou geopressured geothermal resource is most extensive among the reservoirs tested. Earlier testing of the DOE well (Pleasant Bayou Well No.2) was conducted in several phases during 1979-1983. Long-term testing was resumed in May 1988 and is currently in progress. This report summarizes the pertinent field and laboratory test data available through December 31, 1990. A numerical reservoir simulator is employed as a tool for synthesizing and integrating the reservoir information, formation rock and fluid properties data from laboratory tests, well data from the earlier testing (1979-1983), and the ongoing long-term production testing (1988-1990) of Pleasant Bayou Well No.2. A reservoir simulation model has been constructed which provides a detailed match to the well test history to date. This model is constructed within a geologic framework described by the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology and relies heavily on the pressure transient data from the 1980 Reservoir Limits Test in conjunction with the 1988-1990 production testing.

  19. Future for geopressured-geothermal resources

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsthaler, J.; Plum, M.

    1988-01-01

    The geopressured-geothermal production technologies for recompleting the Hulin Well and design and operation of surface facilities appear to be well in hand. A preliminary capital cost estimate indicates $4.45 million is required to recomplete and prepare the Hulin Well for production testing. The planned recompletion of the production well, surface facilities, and disposal well will have the capability to handle 24,000 barrels per day (bpd) of brine. If the reservoir can produce this design flow of brine saturated with gas, and the gas can be sold for $1.30/thousand cubic feet (mcf), DOE should have a positive cash flow about $530 per day for the first year. If gas zones are located above the brine as indicated by logs, the positive cash flow could reach $4130 per day or higher. The principal uncertainties are the gas content of the brine and the reservoir performance, both initially and long term. A private developer would need a market price for natural gas of from $1.38 to $4.60 per mcf for a reasonable return on investment depending on the reservoir performance and whether or not zones of excess gas are actually encountered. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Evaluation of potential geopressure geothermal test sites in southern Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Bassiouni, Z.

    1980-04-01

    Six geopressured-geothermal prospects in southern Louisiana were studied in detail to assess their potential use as test sites for the production of geopressure-geothermal energy. Each of the six sites contains substantial quantities of energy. Three of these prospects, Grand Lake, Lake Theriot, and Bayou Hebert, appear to be suitable for a test site. A summary of the findings is presented.

  1. Thermal Enhanced Oil Recovery Using Geopressured-Geothermal Brine

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-01

    , feasibility and economic studies, and hot water flooding design would be made for the proposed project, and geopressured production well and leases will be investigated. Phase 2--If the results of the feasibility studies warrant proceeding, geopressured production well and leases will be obtained. Phase 3--Operation of project, collection of injection and production data, reservoir and environmental monitoring and evaluation will be completed. This would be concluded by a final report including an evaluation of methodology for regional application in the Texas Gulf Coast. The project will be turned over to the operator for operation to depletion. The final report will also address the feasibility of geopressured-geothermal enhanced recovery of oil in other locations. There is a regional trend of similar reservoirs along the Texas Gulf Coast, where this technology could be immediately applied, as well as other areas, such as the San Joaquin Basin, where the country's largest heavy oil reserves are located. If this process is proven successful, many millions of barrels of oil could be added to this country's recoverable reserves. Further, hundreds of marginally economic fields may not require immediate plugging. The total estimated cost for this five-year program is approximately $16 million. Cost-sharing by the small business will reduce the DOE funds required over five years to $13 million less cost-shared oil produced. To initiate this program would require a first year funding level of approximately $1 million. This is not a formal proposal and is not a commitment by EG&G Idaho, Inc. A formal breakdown of financial information will be provided with a formal request for proposal.

  2. Industrial Consortium for the Utilization of the Geopressured-Geothermal Resource. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Negus-deWys, J.

    1990-03-01

    The Geopressured-Geothermal Program, now in its fifteenth year, is entering the transition period to commercial use. The industry cost-shared proposals to the consortium, represented in the presentations included in these proceedings, attest to the interest developing in the industrial community in utilizing the geopressured-geothermal resource. Sixty-five participants attended these sessions, two-thirds of whom represented industry. The areas represented by cost-shared proposals include (1) thermal enhanced oil recovery, (2) direct process use of thermal energy, e.g., aquaculture and agriculture, (3) conversion of thermal energy to electricity, (4) environment related technologies, e.g., use of supercritical processes, and (5) operational proposals, e.g., a field manual for scale inhibitors. It is hoped that from this array of potential use projects, some will persist and be successful in proving the viability of using the geopressured-geothermal resource. Such industrial use of an alternative and relatively clean energy resource will benefit our nation and its people.

  3. Industrial Consortium for the Utilization of the Geopressured-Geothermal Resource. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Negus-deWys, J.

    1990-03-01

    The Geopressured-Geothermal Program, now in its fifteenth year, is entering the transition period to commercial use. The industry cost-shared proposals to the consortium, represented in the presentations included in these proceedings, attest to the interest developing in the industrial community in utilizing the geopressured-geothermal resource. Sixty-five participants attended these sessions, two-thirds of whom represented industry. The areas represented by cost-shared proposals include (1) thermal enhanced oil recovery, (2) direct process use of thermal energy, e.g., aquaculture and agriculture, (3) conversion of thermal energy to electricity, (4) environment related technologies, e.g., use of supercritical processes, and (5) operational proposals, e.g., a field manual for scale inhibitors. It is hoped that from this array of potential use projects, some will persist and be successful in proving the viability of using the geopressured-geothermal resource. Such industrial use of an alternative and relatively clean energy resource will benefit our nation and its people.

  4. Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana. Final report, September 27, 1978-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Wrighton, F.M.; Bebout, D.; Carver, D.R.; Groat, C.C.; Johnson, A.E. Jr.

    1981-08-31

    The data analysis is based on the Brazoria Texas well and the balance of the modeling work is theoretical. Progress in the regional assessment of the geopressured-geothermal resource in Louisiana is reported. Environmental monitoring effort established monitoring systems and baseline environmental measurements. Efforts to improve the technoeconomic model, improve the estimates of methane in solution, and to evaluate newly identified sites are described. (MHR)

  5. The feasibility of recovering medium to heavy oil using geopressured- geothermal fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Negus-de Wys, J.; Kimmell, C.E.; Hart, G.F.; Plum, M.M.

    1991-09-01

    The feasibility, economics and environmental concerns of producing more domestic oil using thermal enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) are reviewed and the unique nature of geopressured-geothermal (GPGT) fluids for thermal recovery are outlined. Current methods of TEOR are briefly discussed and it is noted that these methods are presently under scrutiny by both federal and state air quality agencies; and moreover, they often involve costly operational and mechanical problems associated with heating water on the surface for injection into the target reservoir. The characteristics of the GPGT resources as seen through previous Department of Energy (DOE) studies from sites in Louisiana and Texas are discussed. These studies indicate sufficient quantities of GPGT fluids can be produced to sustain a TEOR project. The Alworth Field in the south Texas Mirando Trend is proposed as a TEOR pilot site. The target reservoirs for injection of the GPGT fluids are the Jackson and Yegua sandstones of the upper Eocene Epoch. The reservoirs contain an estimated 4 MMbbls of heavy oil in place (OIP) (18.6{degree}API) of which it is estimated that at least 1 MMbbls could be recovered by TEOR. The problems associated with using the GPGT fluids for TEOR include those normally associated with hot water flooding but in addition the reaction of the brine from the geopressured-geothermal reservoir with the target reservoir is uncertain. Under the elevated temperatures associated with GPGT TEOR, actual increased porosity and permeability are possible. 120 refs., 40 figs., 13 tabs.

  6. Geopressured geothermal bibliography. Volume I. Citation extracts. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Sepehrnoori, K.; Carter, F.; Schneider, R.; Street, S.; McGill, K.

    1983-05-01

    This annoted bibliography contains 1131 citations. It represents reports, papers, and articles appearing over the past eighteen years covering topics from the scientific and technical aspects of geopressured geothermal reservoirs to the social, environmental, and legal considerations of exploiting those reservoirs for their energy resources. Six indexes include: author, conference title, descriptor, journal title, report number, and sponsor. (MHR)

  7. Reservoir engineering studies of the Gladys McCall geopressured-geothermal resource; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen-Min; Less, K.; Miller, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    Transient pressure analysis techniques have been used to evaluate the performance of the Gladys McCall geopressured-geothermal reservoir. A fault-controlled aquifer influx model has also been developed to account for pressure support observed during both reservoir depletion and recovery phases. The Gladys McCall No. 1 well was drilled and completed in the lower Miocene geopressured sandstones under the US Department of Energy geopressured-geothermal research program. The well was shut in October 1987 after producing over 27 MMstb of brine and 676 MMscf gas since October 1983. Eight pressure transient tests were conducted in the well. Analysis of transient pressure data provided a quantitative evaluation of reservoir characteristics, including: (a) formation transmissibility and skin, (b) the size and possible shape of the main producing reservoir, and (c) characteristics of the pressure support mechanism. The pressure behavior of 1983 Reservoir Limits Test (RLT) suggested that the Gladys McCall reservoir might have a long narrow shape with the well located off-center. An elongated numerical model developed accordingly was able to reproduce the pressure characteristics shown in the test. During both the reservoir production and shut-in periods, pressure buildup tests indicated some degree of external pressure support. Aquifer recharging was believed to be the main source. Based on reservoir material-balance calculations, an aquifer influx model was derived from a conceptual model of water leakage through a partially sealing fault into the reservoir under steady-state conditions. Moreover, a match of the pressure history required that the conductivity of the fault be a function of the pressure difference between the supporting aquifer and the reservoir.

  8. Reservoir engineering studies of the Gladys McCall geopressured-geothermal resource. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, C.M.; Lee, K.; Miller, M.A.

    1993-09-01

    Transient pressure analysis techniques have been used to evaluate the performance of the Gladys McCall geopressured-geothermal reservoir. A fault-controlled aquifer influx model has also been developed to account for pressure support observed during both reservoir depletion and recovery phases. The Gladys McCall No. 1 well was drilled and completed in the lower Miocene geopressured sandstones under the US Department of energy geopressured-geothermal research program. The well was shut in october 1987 after producing over 27 MMstb of brine and 676 MMscf gas since October 1983. Eight pressure transient tests were conducted in the well. Analysis of transient pressure data provided a quantitative evaluation of reservoir characteristics, including: (a) formation transmissibility and skin, (b) the size and possible shape of the main producing reservoir, (c) characteristics of the pressure support mechanism. The pressure behavior of 1983 Reservoir Limits Test (RLT) suggested that the Gladys McCall reservoir might have a long narrow shape with the well located off-center. An elongated numerical model developed accordingly was able to reproduce the pressure characteristics show in the test. During both the reservoir production and shut-in periods, pressure buildup tests indicated some degree of external pressure support. Aquifer recharging was believed to be the main source. Based on reservoir material-balance calculations, an aquifer influx model was derived from a conceptual model of water leakage through a partially sealing fault into the reservoir under steady-state conditions. Moreover, a match of the pressure history required that the conductivity of the fault be a function of the pressure difference between the supporting aquifer and the reservoir.

  9. Operations research and systems analysis of geopressured-geothermal energy in Louisiana. Final report for the period June 1, 1978-August 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.E. Jr.

    1980-11-01

    The primary purpose was to provide a projection of the probable future contribution of the geopressured-geothermal energy resource in Louisiana to the overall energy requirements of the nation. A number of associated objectives were emphasized: namely, development of the tools and methodology for performing economic analyses, application of these tools to specific prospects about which adequate resource assessments have been made, identification of the impediments to resource development, and socio-economic analysis of the impact of development of the resource on these specific prospects. An overview of the geopressured-geothermal resource activities in Louisiana is provided first, followed by a detailed discussion and review of the achievements of this project. Finally the major conclusions and findings of this project with respect to commercial viability, impediments, and social and economic impact are presented, and recommendations are made for future systems analysis work.

  10. Water Resource Assessment of Geothermal Resources and Water Use in Geopressured Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C. E.; Harto, C. B.; Troppe, W. A.

    2011-09-01

    This technical report from Argonne National Laboratory presents an assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation and an analysis of fresh water use in low-temperature geopressured geothermal power generation systems.

  11. Factors controlling reservoir quality in tertiary sandstones and their significance to geopressured geothermal production

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, R.G.; Richmann, D.L.; Milliken, K.L.

    1981-01-01

    Variable intensity of diagenesis is the factor primarily responsible for contrasting regional reservoir quality of Tertiary sandstones from the upper and lower Texas coast. Detailed comparison of Frio sandstone from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury Dome area, Brazoria County, and Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area, Hidalgo County, reveals that extent of diagenetic modification is most strongly influenced by (1) detrital mineralogy and (2) regional geothermal gradients. The regional reservoir quality of Frio sandstones from Brazoria County is far better than that characterizing Vicksburg sandstones from Hidalgo County, especially at depths suitable for geopressured geothermal energy production. However, in predicting reservoir quality on a site-specific basis, locally variable factors such as relative proportions for porosity types, pore geometry as related to permeability, and local depositional environment must also be considered. Even in an area of regionally favorable reservoir quality, such local factors can significantly affect reservoir quality and, hence, the geothermal production potential of a specific sandstone unit.

  12. Pleasant Bayou area, Brazoria County, Texas, brine injection experience

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, C.F.; Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal brine disposal is one of the facets relating to the geopressured-geothermal energy problem. Subsurface brine disposal is a viable option and a good deal of information is available on brine disposal in the general Gulf Coast area. The specific information presented was developed in a DOE study of salt water disposal experience in Louisiana and Texas (Knutson and Boardman, 1977), an EPA study of large volume brine injection in Brazoria County, Texas (Knutson, 1980) and industrial brine injection experience, especially in Tertiary clastic sediments.

  13. Design and operation of a geopressurized-geothermal hybrid cycle power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.G.; Hattar, M.M.

    1991-02-01

    Geopressured-geothermal resources can contribute significantly to the national electricity supply once technical and economic obstacles are overcome. Power plant performance under the harsh conditions of a geopressured resource was unproven, so a demonstration power plant was built and operated on the Pleasant Bayou geopressured resource in Texas. This one megawatt facility provided valuable data over a range of operating conditions. This power plant was a first-of-a-kind demonstration of the hybrid cycle concept. A hybrid cycle was used to take advantage of the fact that geopressured resources contain energy in more than one form -- hot water and natural gas. Studies have shown that hybrid cycles can yield thirty percent more power than stand-alone geothermal and fossil fuel power plants operating on the same resource. In the hybrid cycle at Pleasant Bayou, gas was burned in engines to generate electricity directly. Exhaust heat from the engines was then combined with heat from the brine to generate additional electricity in a binary cycle. Heat from the gas engine was available at high temperature, thus improving the efficiency of the binary portion of the hybrid cycle. Design power output was achieved, and 3445 MWh of power were sold to the local utility over the course of the test. Plant availability was 97.5% and the capacity factor was over 80% for the extended run at maximum power production. The hybrid cycle power plant demonstrated that there are no technical obstacles to electricity generation at Pleasant Bayou. 14 refs., 38 figs., 16 tabs.

  14. A geopressured-geothermal, solar conversion system to produce potable water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitschke, George Samuel

    A design is presented for recovering Geopressured-Geothermal (GPGT) reservoir brines for conversion into solar ponds to renewably power coastal seawater desalination. The hot, gas-cut, high-pressure GPGT brine is flowed through a well-bore to surface systems which concentrate the brine in multi-effect evaporators and recover the gas. The gas and distilled water are used for thermal enhanced oil recovery, and the concentrated brine is used to construct solar ponds. The thermal energy from the solar ponds is used to produce electricity, which is then used to renewably power coastal desalination plants for large-scale potable water production from the sea. The design is proposed for deployment in California and Texas, where the two largest U.S. GPGT basins exist. Projections show that the design fully deployed in California could provide 5 MAF/y (million acre-ft per year) while yielding a 45% Rate of Return (combined oil and water revenues); the California municipal water load is 10 MAF/y. The dissertation contains a feasibility study of the design approach, supported by engineering analyses and simulation models, included in the appendices. A range of systems configurations and GPGT flow conditions are modeled to illustrate how the approach lends itself to modular implementation, i.e., incrementally installing a single system, tens of systems, up to 1000 systems, which corresponds to full deployment in California for the scenario analyzed. The dissertation includes a method for launching and piloting the approach, starting from a single system installation.

  15. Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana. Annual report, 1 November 1982-31 October 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-31

    This annual report describes environmental monitoring of microseismic activity, land-surface elevations, and surface and ground-water quality at three designed geopressured-geothermal test well sites in Louisiana.

  16. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Detailed completion prognosis for geopressured-geothermal well of opportunity, prospect #2

    SciTech Connect

    1981-03-01

    A geopressured-geothermal test of Martin Exploration Company's Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2 will be conducted in the Tuscaloosa Trend. The Crown Zellerbach Well No. 1 will be converted to a saltwater disposal well for disposal of produced brine. The well is located in the Satsuma Area, Livingston parish, Louisiana. Eaton proposes to test the Tuscaloosa by perforating the 7 inch casing from 16,718 feet to 16,754 feet. The reservoir pressure at an intermediate formation depth of 16,736 feet is anticipated to be 12,010 psi and the temperature is anticipated to be 297 F. Calculated water salinity is 16,000 ppm. The well is expected to produce a maximum of 16,000 barrels of water a day with a gas content of 51 SCF/bbl. Eaton will re-enter the test well, clean out to 17,000 feet, run production casing and complete the well. The disposal well will be re-entered and completed in the 9-5/8 inch casing for disposal of produced brine. Testing will be conducted similar to previous Eaton annular flow WOO tests. An optional test from 16,462 feet to 16,490 feet may be performed after the original test and will require a workover with a rig on location to perform the plugback. The surface production equipment utilized on previous tests will be utilized on this test. The equipment has worked satisfactorily and all parties involved in the testing are familiar with its operation. Weatherly Engineering will operate the test equipment. The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) and Mr. Don Clark will handle sampling, testing and reservoir engineering evaluation, respectively. wireline work required will be awarded on basis of bid evaluation. At the conclusion of the test period, the D.O.E. owned test equipment will be removed from the test site, the test and disposal wells plugged and abandoned and the sites restored to the satisfaction of all parties.

  17. Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana: Annual report for the period 1 November 1984 to 31 December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Groat, C.G.

    1987-09-01

    This report describes environmental monitoring activities carried out by Louisiana State University (LSU) under US Department of Energy Contract FC07-85NV10425 for the period 1 November 1984 through 31 December 1986. Other aspects of the LSU technical support program completed under prior contracts were covered in final form in reports preceding this one. During the contract period, the Louisiana Geological Survey, aided by subcontractors, monitored microseismic activity, land-surface subsidence, and surface and ground-water quality at three designed geopressured-geothermal test well sites in Louisiana and Texas. Don Stevenson supervised microseismic monitoring activities, and Drukell Trahan coordinated water quality and land-surface subsidence studies. This is a progress report in the sense that it discusses program components, provides raw data, and presents preliminary interpretations. The environmental monitoring program continues and will be the subject of subsequent annual reports.

  18. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-B: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    SciTech Connect

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Design well program; LaFourche Crossing; MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 (Sweet Lake); Environmental monitoring at Sweet Lake; Air quality; Water quality; Microseismic monitoring; Subsidence; Dow/DOE L.R. Sweezy No. 1 well; Reservoir testing; Environmental monitoring at Parcperdue; Air monitoring; Water runoff; Groundwater; Microseismic events; Subsidence; Environmental consideration at site; Gladys McCall No. 1 well; Test results of Gladys McCall; Hydrocarbons in production gas and brine; Environmental monitoring at the Gladys McCall site; Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well; Pleasant Bayou hybrid power system; Environmental monitoring at Pleasant Bayou; and Plug abandonment and well site restoration of three geopressured-geothermal test sites. 197 figs., 64 tabs.

  19. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-A: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    SciTech Connect

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal resource description; Resource origin and sediment type; Gulf Coast resource extent; Resource estimates; Project history; Authorizing legislation; Program objectives; Perceived constraints; Program activities and structure; Well testing; Program management; Program cost summary; Funding history; Resource characterization; Wells of opportunity; Edna Delcambre No. 1 well; Edna Delcambre well recompletion; Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well; Beulah Simon No. 2 well; P.E. Girouard No. 1 well; Prairie Canal No. 1 well; Crown Zellerbach No. 2 well; Alice C. Plantation No. 2 well; Tenneco Fee N No. 1 well; Pauline Kraft No. 1 well; Saldana well No. 2; G.M. Koelemay well No. 1; Willis Hulin No. 1 well; Investigations of other wells of opportunity; Clovis A. Kennedy No. 1 well; Watkins-Miller No. 1 well; Lucien J. Richard et al No. 1 well; and the C and K-Frank A. Godchaux, III, well No. 1.

  20. Geologic, geophysical, and geochemical aspects of site-specific studies of the geopressured-geothermal energy resource of southern Louisiana. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pilger, R.H. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The report consists of four sections dealing with progress in evaluating geologic, geochemical, and geophysical aspects of geopressured-geothermal energy resources in Louisiana. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual sections. (ACR)

  1. Contractor for geopressured-geothermal sites: Final contract report, Volume 1, fiscal years 1986--1990 (5 years), testing of wells through October 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Field tests and studies were conducted to determine the production behavior of geopressured-geothermal reservoirs and their potential as future energy sources. Results are presented for Gladys McCall Site, Pleasant Bayou Site, and Hulin Site.

  2. Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells. Summary of Gruy Federal's Well-of-Opportunity Program to January 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    Scouting and monitoring techniques peculiar to geopressured-geothermal wells and legal problems are presented. The following are tabulated: priority wells actively monitored, industry contacts, and the summary of industry responses to well-or-opportunity solicitation. (MHR)

  3. Laboratory determination of mechanical properties of rocks from the Parcperdue geopressured/geothermal site

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, K.P.; Borschel, T.F.; Holland, M.T.; Schatz, J.F.; Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    The deformational behavior and fluid flow characteristics of rock samples obtained from DOW/DOE L.R. Sweezy No. 1 Test Well at the Parcperdue Geopressured/Geothermal Site have been investigated in the laboratory. Elastic moduli, compressibility, uniaxial compaction coefficient, strength, creep parameters, permeability, acoustic velocites (all at reservoir conditions) and changes in these quantities induced by simulated reservoir production have been obtained from tests on several sandstone and shale samples from different depths. Tests consisting of several hydrostatic and triaxial loading phases and pore pressure reduction were designed to provide measurements to be used for calculating several of the above mentioned parameters in a single test. Pore volume changes were measured during some phases of the tests.

  4. T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. Geopressured-geothermal well report, Volume II. Well workover and production testing, February 1982-October 1985. Final report. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well was the fourth in a series of wells in the DOE Design Wells Program that were drilled into deep, large geopressured-geothermal brine aquifers in order to provide basic data with which to determine the technological and economic viability of producing energy from these unconventional resources. This brine production well was spudded on May 27, 1981 and drilling operations were completed on November 2, 1981 after using 160 days of rig time. The well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet. The target sands lie at a depth of 14,412 to 15,860 feet in the Fleming Formation of the lower Miocene. This report covers well production testing operations and necessary well workover operations during the February 1982 to October 1985 period. The primary goals of the well testing program were: (1) to determine reservoir size, shape, volume, drive mechanisms, and other reservoir parameters, (2) to determine and demonstrate the technological and economic viability of producing energy from a geopressured-geothermal brine aquifer through long-term production testing, and (3) to determine problem areas associated with such long-term production, and to develop solutions therefor.

  5. The variable pressure supercritical Rankine cycle for integrated natural gas and power production from the geopressured geothermal resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsberry, F. L.

    1982-03-01

    A small-scale power plant cycle that utilizes both a variable pressure vaporizer (heater) and a floating pressure (and temperature) air-cooled condenser is described. Further, it defends this choice on the basis of classical thermodynamics and minimum capital cost by supporting these conclusions with actual comparative examples. The application suggested is for the geopressured geothermal resource. The arguments cited in this application apply to any process (petrochemical, nuclear, etc.) involving waste heat recovery.

  6. Subsurface geology and geopressured/geothermal resource evaluation of the Lirette-Chauvin-Lake Boudreaux area, Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, W.S.

    1982-12-01

    The geology of a 125 square mile area located about 85 miles southeast of Baton Rouge and about 12 miles southeast of Houma, Louisiana, has been studied to evaluate its potential for geopressured/geothermal energy resources. Structure, stratigraphy, and sedimentation were studied in conjunction with pressure and temperature distributions over a broad area to locate and identify reservoirs that may be prospective. Recommendations concerning future site specific studies within the current area are proposed based on these findings.

  7. Variable pressure supercritical Rankine cycle for integrated natural gas and power production from the geopressured geothermal resource

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsberry, F.L.

    1982-03-01

    A small-scale power plant cycle that utilizes both a variable pressure vaporizer (heater) and a floating pressure (and temperature) air-cooled condenser is described. Further, it defends this choice on the basis of classical thermodynamics and minimum capital cost by supporting these conclusions with actual comparative examples. The application suggested is for the geopressured geothermal resource. The arguments cited in this application apply to any process (petrochemical, nuclear, etc.) involving waste heat recovery.

  8. Factors controlling reservoir quality in tertiary sandstones and their significance to geopressured geothermal production. Annual report, May 1, 1979-May 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, R.G.; Richmann, D.L.; Milliken, K.L.

    1980-07-01

    Differing extents of diagenetic modification is the factor primarily responsible for contrasting regional reservoir quality of Tertiary sandstones from the Upper and Lower Texas Gulf Coast. Detailed comparison of Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury Dome area, Brazoria County, and Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area, Hidalgo County, reveals that extent of diagenetic modification is most strongly influenced by (1) detrital mineralogy and (2) regional geothermal gradients. Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area are less stable, chemically and mechanically, than Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury dome area. Vicksburg sandstones are mineralogically immature and contain greater proportions of feldspars and rock fragments than do Frio sandstones. Thr reactive detrital assemblage of Vicksubrg sandstones is highly susceptible to diagenetic modification. Susceptibility is enhanced by higher than normal geothermal gradients in the McAllen Ranch Field area. Thus, consolidation of Vicksburg sandstones began at shallower depth of burial and precipitation of authigenic phases (especially calcite) was more pervasive than in Frio sandstones. Moreover, the late-stage episode of ferroan calcite precipitation that occluded most secondary porosity in Vicksburg sandstones did not occur significantly in Frio sandstones. Therefore, regional reservoir quality of Frio sandstones from Brazoria County is far better than that characterizing Vicksburg sandstones from Hidalgo County, especially at depths suitable for geopressured geothermal energy production.

  9. Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Hartsock, J.H.; Rodgers, J.A.

    1980-09-01

    Over the life of the project, 1143 wildcat wells were screened for possible use. Although many did not meet the program's requirement for sand development, a surprisingly large number were abandoned because of downhole mechanical problems. Only 94 of these wells were completed as commercial hydrocarbon producers. Five wells of opportunity were funded for testing. Of these, two were evaluated for their hydraulic energy, thermal energy, and recoverable methane, and three were abandoned because of mechanical problems. (MHR)

  10. Subsurface geology and potential for geopressured-geothermal energy in the Turtle Bayou field-Kent Bayou field area, Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.R.

    1982-09-01

    A 216 square mile area approximately 65 miles southwest of New Orleans, Louisiana, has been geologically evaluated to determine its potential for geopressured-geothermal energy production. The structural and stratigraphic analyses were made with emphasis upon the Early and Middle Miocene age sediments which lie close to and within the geopressured section. Three geopressured sands, the Robulus (43) sand, Cibicides opima sand, and Cristellaria (I) sand, are evaluated for their potential of producing geothermal energy. Two of these sands, the Robulus (43) sand and the Cibicides opima sand, meet several of the United States Department of Energy's suggested minimum requirements for a prospective geopressured-geothermal energy reservoir.

  11. Methods for collection and analysis of geopressured geothermal and oil field waters

    SciTech Connect

    Lico, M.S.; Kharaka, Y.K.; Carothers, W.W.; Wright, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    Present methods are described for the collection, preservation, and chemical analysis of waters produced from geopressured geothermal and petroleum wells. Detailed procedures for collection include precautions and equipment necessary to ensure that the sample is representative of the water produced. Procedures for sample preservation include filtration, acidification, dilution for silica, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) extraction of aluminum, addition of potassium permanganate to preserve mercury, and precipitation of carbonate species as strontium carbonate for stable carbon isotopes and total dissolved carbonate analysis. Characteristics determined at the well site are sulfide, pH, ammonia, and conductivity. Laboratory procedures are given for the analysis of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, iron, manganese, zinc, lead, aluminum, and mercury by atomic absorption and flame emission spectroscopy. Chloride is determined by silver nitrate titration and fluoride by ion-specific electrode. Bromide and iodide concentrations are determined by the hypochlorite oxidation method. Sulfate is analyzed by titration using barium chloride with thorin indicator after pretreatment with alumina. Boron and silica are determined colorimetrically by the carmine and molybdate-blue methods, respectively. Aliphatic acid anions (C/sub 2/ through C/sub 5/) are determined by gas chromatography after separation and concentration in a chloroform-butanol mixture.

  12. Methods for collection and analysis of geopressured geothermal and oil field waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lico, Michael S.; Kharaka, Yousif K.; Carothers, William W.; Wright, Victoria A.

    1982-01-01

    Present methods are described for the collection, preservation, and chemical analysis of waters produced from geopressured geothermal and petroleum wells. Detailed procedures for collection include precautions and equipment necessary to ensure that the sample is representative of the water produced. Procedures for sample preservation include filtration, acidification, dilution for silica, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) extraction of aluminum, addition of potassium permanganate to preserve mercury, and precipitation of carbonate species as strontium carbonate for stable carbon isotopes and total dissolved carbonate analysis. Characteristics determined at the well site are sulfide, pH, ammonia, and conductivity. Laboratory procedures are given for the analysis of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, iron, manganese, zinc, lead, aluminum, .and mercury by atomic absorption and flame emission spectroscopy. Chloride is determined by silver nitrate titration and fluoride by ion-specific electrode. Bromide and iodide concentrations are determined by the hypochlorite oxidation method. Sulfate is analyzed by titration using barium chloride with thorin indicator after pretreatment with alumina. Boron and silica are determined colorimetrically by the carmine and molybdate-blue methods, respectively. Aliphatic acid anions (C2 through C5) are determined by gas chromatography after separation and concentration in a chloroform-butanol mixture.

  13. Geopressured-Geothermal Drilling and Testing Plan, Volume II, Testing Plan; Dow Chemical Co. - Dept. of Energy Dow-DOE Sweezy No. 1 Well, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    1982-02-01

    The Dow/D.O.E. L. R. Sweezy No. 1 geopressured geothermal production well was completed in August of 1981. The well was perforated and gravel packed in approximately 50 feet of sand from 13,344 feet to 13,395 feet. Permeabilities of 6 to 914 millidarcies were measured with porosity of 25 to 36%. Static surface pressure after well clean-up was 5000 psi. At 1000 B/D flow rate the drawdown was 50 psi. The water produced in clean-up contained 100,000 ppm TDS. This report details the plan for testing this well with the goal of obtaining sufficient data to define the total production curve of the small, 939 acre, reservoir. A production time of six to nine months is anticipated. The salt water disposal well is expected to be completed and surface equipment installed such that production testing will begin by April 1, 1982. The program should be finished and reports written by February 28, 1983. The brine will be produced from the No.1 well, passed through a separator where the gas is removed, then reinjected into the No.2 (SWD) well under separator pressure. Flow rates of up to 25,000 B/D are expected. The tests are divided into a two-week short-term test and six to nine-month long-term tests with periodic downhole measurement of drawdown and buildup rates. Data obtained in the testing will be relayed by phoneline computer hookup to Otis Engineering in Dallas, Texas, where the reservoir calculations and modeling will be done. At the point where sufficient data has been obtained to reach the objectives of the program, production will be ended, the wells plugged and abandoned, and a final report will be issued.

  14. United States Gulf Coast geopressured geothermal program. Special projects research and coordination assistance. Final report, 1 December 1978-30 October 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfman, M.H.; Morton, R.A.

    1981-06-01

    Work for the period, December 1, 1978 through October 31, 1980, is documented. The following activities are covered: project technical coordination assistance and liaison; technical assistance for review and evaluation of proposals and contract results; technical assistance for geopressured-geothermal test wells; technical assistance, coordination, and planning of surface utilization program; legal research; and special projects. (MHR)

  15. Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana; Final report, 1 January 1992--31 December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    John, C.J.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has operated continuous-recording, microearthquake monitoring networks at geopressured-geothermal test well sites since 1980. These microseismic networks were designed to detect microearthquakes indicative of fault activation and/or subsidence that can potentially result from the deep subsurface withdrawal and underground disposal of large volumes of brine during well testing. Seismic networks were established before the beginning of testing to obtain background levels of seismicity. Monitoring continued during testing and for some time after cessation of flow testing to assess any delayed microseismicity caused by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. No flow testing has been done at the Hulin well since January 1990, and the Pleasant Bayou well has been shut down since September 1992. Microseismic monitoring continued at the Hulin and Pleasant Bayou sites until 31 December 1992, at which time both operations were shut down and field sites dismantled. During 1992, the networks recorded seismic signals from earthquakes, sonic booms, geophysical blasting, thunderstorms, etc. However, as in previous years, no local microseismic activity attributable to geopressured-geothermal well testing was recorded.

  16. Consolidation of geologic studies of geopressured geothermal resources in Texas. 1984 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, T.E.; Light, M.P.R.; Tyler, N.; Morton, R.A.

    1986-03-01

    The report contains two sections, the first on a regional statistical survey of fault compartments, and the second on a revised theory of fluid migration and temperature history in the Frio formation. Separate abstracts were prepared for each section. (ACR)

  17. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Wells of Opportunity Program final contract report, 1980-1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The geopressured-geothermal candidates for the Wells of Opportunity program were located by the screening of published information on oil industry activity and through direct contact with the oil and gas operators. This process resulted in the recommendation to the DOE of 33 candidate wells for the program. Seven of the 33 recommended wells were accepted for testing. Of these seven wells, six were actually tested. The first well, the No. 1 Kennedy, was acquired but not tested. The seventh well, the No. 1 Godchaux, was abandoned due to mechanical problems during re-entry. The well search activities, which culminated in the acceptance by the DOE of 7 recommended wells, were substantial. A total of 90,270 well reports were reviewed, leading to 1990 wells selected for thorough geological analysis. All of the reservoirs tested in this program have been restricted by one or more faults or permeability barriers. A comprehensive discussion of test results is presented.

  18. Environmental impact of geopressure - geothermal cogeneration facility on wetland resources and socioeconomic characteristics in Louisiana Gulf Coast region. Final report, October 10, 1983-September 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Smalley, A.M.; Saleh, F.M.S.; Fontenot, M.

    1984-08-01

    Baseline data relevant to air quality are presented. The following are also included: geology and resource assessment, design well prospects in southwestern Louisiana, water quality monitoring, chemical analysis subsidence, microseismicity, geopressure-geothermal subsidence modeling, models of compaction and subsidence, sampling handling and preparation, brine chemistry, wetland resources, socioeconomic characteristics, impacts on wetlands, salinity, toxic metals, non-metal toxicants, temperature, subsidence, and socioeconomic impacts. (MHR)

  19. Feasibility study: Application of the geopressured-geothermal resource to pyrolytic conversion or decomposition/detoxification processes

    SciTech Connect

    Propp, W.A.; Grey, A.E.; Negus-de Wys, J.; Plum, M.M.; Haefner, D.R.

    1991-09-01

    This study presents a preliminary evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of selected conceptual processes for pyrolytic conversion of organic feedstocks or the decomposition/detoxification of hazardous wastes by coupling the process to the geopressured-geothermal resource. The report presents a detailed discussion of the resource and of each process selected for evaluation including the technical evaluation of each. A separate section presents the economic methodology used and the evaluation of the technically viable process. A final section presents conclusions and recommendations. Three separate processes were selected for evaluation. These are pyrolytic conversion of biomass to petroleum like fluids, wet air oxidation (WAO) at subcritical conditions for destruction of hazardous waste, and supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) also for the destruction of hazardous waste. The scientific feasibility of all three processes has been previously established by various bench-scale and pilot-scale studies. For a variety of reasons detailed in the report the SCWO process is the only one deemed to be technically feasible, although the effects of the high solids content of the geothermal brine need further study. This technology shows tremendous promise for contributing to solving the nation's energy and hazardous waste problems. However, the current economic analysis suggests that it is uneconomical at this time. 50 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. An integrated approach to reservoir engineering at Pleasant Bayou Geopressured-Geothermal reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Shook, G.M.

    1992-12-01

    A numerical model has been developed for the Pleasant Bayou Geothermal-Geopressured reservoir. This reservoir description is the result of integration of a variety of data, including geological and geophysical interpretations, pressure transient test analyses, and well operations. Transient test analyses suggested several enhancements to the geologic description provided by University of Texas Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG), including the presence of an internal fault not previously identified. The transient tests also suggested water influx from an adjacent aquifer during the long-term testing of Pleasant Bayou; comparisons between transient test analyses and the reservoir description from BEG suggests that this fault exhibits pressure-dependent behavior. Below some pressure difference across the fault, it remains a no-flow barrier; above this threshold pressure drop the barrier fails, and fluid moves across the fault. A history match exercise is presented, using the hypothesized {open_quotes}leaky fault.{close_quotes} Successful match of 4 years of production rates and estimates of average reservoir pressure supports the reservoir description developed herein. Sensitivity studies indicate that the degree of communication between the perforated interval and the upper and lower sands in the reservoir (termed {open_quotes}distal volume{close_quotes} by BEG) impact simulation results very little, whereas results are quite sensitive to storage and transport properties of this distal volume. The prediction phase of the study indicates that Pleasant Bayou is capable of producing 20,000 STB/d through 1997, with the final bottomhole pressure approximately 1600 psi above abandonment pressure.

  1. Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells. Final report: Beulah Simon No. 2 Well, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana. Volume I. Completion and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, R.J.; Hartsock, J.H.; McCoy, R.L.; Rodgers, J.A.

    1980-07-01

    Geopressured-geothermal (Geo{sup 2}) test operations were conducted at the Beulah Simon No. 2 well site during the period from September through December 1979. The well provided the second geopressured-geothermal test to be completed under the DOE-Gruy Well of Opportunity program. The completion in a geopressured aquifer of Oligocene age at approximately 14,700 feet and the testing of hot salt water from this zone were accomplished without significant difficulty. Some problems were encountered with the wireline and wireline high-pressure lubricator associated with the running of bottomhole instruments. The objectives of the project were all accomplished, and good test data were obtained on the flow rates of gas and water. The gas content was 24 standard cubic feet per stock tank barrel of water. The disposal well accepted the full wellhead stream at temperatures as high as 255{sup 0}F (124{sup 0}C). Over the 10-day flow period the hot brine did not appear to adversely affect the clay minerals in the disposal aquifer. A conclusion from this operation is that presently available wirelines and pressure lubricators are not adaptable for use with uninhibited well fluids under flowing conditions. In addition, this test demonstrated that injection of scale inhibitor down the annulus eliminated scale buildup within the flow string and surface facilities. (MHR)

  2. Environmental baseline monitoring in the area of general crude oil - Department of Energy Pleasant Bayou Number 2: a geopressured geothermal test well, 1979. Annual report, Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavson, T.C.; Howard, R.C.; McGookey, D.

    1980-01-01

    A program to monitor baseline air and water quality, subsidence, microseismic activity, and noise in the vicinity of Brazoria County geopressured geothermal test wells, Pleasant Bayou No. 1 and No. 2, has been underway since March 1978. The initial report on environmental baseline monitoring at the test well contained descriptions of baseline air and water quality, a noise survey, an inventory of microseismic activity, and a discussion of the installation of a liquid tilt meter (Gustavson, 1979). The following report continues the description of baseline air and water quality of the test well site, includes an inventory of microseismic activity during 1979 with interpretations of the origin of the events, and discusses the installation and monitoring of a liquid tilt meter at the test well site. In addition, a brief description of flooding at the test site is presented.

  3. Frio sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast: their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy

    SciTech Connect

    Bebout, D.G.; Loucks, R.G.; Gregory, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed geological, geophysical, and engineering studies conducted on the Frio Formation have delineated a geothermal test well site in the Austin Bayou Prospect which extends over an area of 60 square miles. A total of 800 to 900 feet of sandstone will occur between the depths of 13,500 and 16,500 feet. At leat 30 percent of the sand will have core permeabilities of 20 to 60 millidarcys. Temperature at the top of the sandstone section will be 300/sup 0/F. Water, produced at a rate of 20,000 to 40,000 barrels per day, will probably have to be disposed of by injection into shallower sandstone reservoirs. More than 10 billion barrels of water are in place in these sandstone reservoirs of the Austin Bayou Prospect; there should be approximately 400 billion cubic feet of methane in solution in this water. Only 10 percent of the water and methane (1 billion barrels of water and 40 billion cubic feet of methane) will be produced without reinjection of the waste water into the producing formation. Reservoir simulation studies indicate that 90 percent of the methane can be produced with reinjection. 106 figures.

  4. The industrial consortium for the utilization of the geopressured-geothermal resource

    SciTech Connect

    Negus-de Wys, J.

    1991-02-15

    Four feasibility studies have been developed by the INEL on thermal enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) Use of Supercritical Fluid processes for Detoxification of Pollutants, and Hydraulic Conversion to Electricity, and Direct Use. The studies provide information bases for potential industrial partners in the resource utilization. A joint proposal from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and INEL on supercritical fluid processes in going forward. Western Resources Technology has begun development of a dozen geopressured well projects. An hydraulic turbine test will be conducted at Pleasant Bayou in Summer of 1991. Dr. Wayne Steele of Anglewood, TX, a retired medical doctor, is proposing to raise fresh water Australian lobsters in the Pleasant Bayou Well fire water pond. Additional projects such as catfish farming, crayfish, desalintion plant and agricultural greenhouse use of the resource heat are waiting in the wings'' for the DOE wells to become available for pilot use projects. 2 figs.

  5. The feasibility of applying geopressured-geothermal resources to direct uses

    SciTech Connect

    Lunis, B.C.; Negus-de Wys, J.; Plum, M.M. ); Lienau, P.J. . Geo-Heat Center); Spencer, F.J. ); Nitschke, G.F. )

    1991-09-01

    This study concludes that direct use technologies, especially desalinated water production, can contribute significantly to the value added process and the overall economic viability in developing a geopressured resource. Although agriculture and aquaculture applications are marginal projects when they are the only use of a geopressured well, the small margin of profitability can contribute to improving the overall economics of the direct use development. The added complexity from a technical and management aspect may add to the overall risk and unpredictability of the project. Six combination of direct uses received economic evaluation that resulted in 15% discounted payback periods ranging from 4 to over 10 years. Many other combinations are possible depending on the resource and market variables. Selection of appropriate technologies and sizes of applications will be established by the developer that engages in geopressured resource utilization. Currently, many areas of the country where geopressured resources are located also have surplus electrical capacity and generation, thus power utilities have been selling power for less than 2 cents per kWH, well below a reasonable breakeven value for geopressured produced electricity. However, when the energy demand of the integrated geopressured facility is large enough to install power generation equipment, operating expenses can be reduced by not paying the 10 to 12 cents per kWH utility rate. The study includes an analysis of a geothermal turbine unit installed with a desalination and an agriculture/aquaculture facility, taking advantage of the cascading energy values. Results suggest that this scenario becomes profitable only where the market price for electricity exceeds five cents per kWH.

  6. The feasibility of applying geopressured-geothermal resources to direct uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunis, Ben C.; Dewys, Jane Negus; Plum, Martin M.; Lienau, Paul J.; Spencer, F. J.; Nitschke, George F.

    1991-09-01

    This study concludes that direct use technologies, especially desalinated water production, can contribute significantly to the value added process and the overall economic viability in developing a geopressured resource. Although agriculture and aquaculture applications are marginal projects when they are the only use of a geopressured well, the small margin of profitability can contribute to improving the overall economics of the direct use development. The added complexity from a technical and management aspect may add to the overall risk and unpredictability of the project. Six combinations of direct uses received economic evaluation that resulted in 15 percent discounted payback periods ranging from 4 to over 10 years. Many other combinations are possible depending on the resource and market variables. Selection of appropriate technologies and sizes of applications will be established by the developer that engages in geopressured resource utilization. Currently, many areas of the country where geopressured resources are located also have surplus electrical capacity and generation; thus power utilities have been selling power for less than two cents per kWH, well below a reasonable breakeven value for geopressured produced electricity. However, when the energy demand of the integrated geopressured facility is large enough to install power generation equipment, operating expenses can be reduced by not paying the 10 to 12 cents per kWH utility rate. The study includes an analysis of a geothermal turbine unit installed with a desalination and an agriculture/aquaculture facility, taking advantage of the cascading energy values. Results suggest that this scenario becomes profitable only where the market price for electricity exceeds five cents per kWH.

  7. High-resolution, three-dimensional, seismic survey over the geopressured-geothermal reservoir at Parcperdue, Louisiana. Final report, January 1, 1981-July 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsland, G.L.

    1985-07-01

    A high resolution three-dimensional seismic survey was performed over the reservoir of the geopressured-geothermal production experiment at Parcperdue, Louisiana and high quality results have been obtained. The reservoir is now mapped with more control and assurance than was possible with the previously existing data. Three differences between the map of this project and those available before are significant in the interpretation of the depletion experiment: (1) the western bounding fault is further west leading to a larger reservoir volume; (2) a down to the north (relief) fault through the reservoir has been found; and (3) there are structural highs in which small petroleum accumulations may exist within the reservoir. An original goal of testing the before and after seismic experiment idea as a production monitor has not been realized. However, the quality of the data at the stages of processing presently available is high enough that, had the well not failed, it would have been prudent to have proceeded with the project toward the second experiment. 3 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report P. R. Girouard Well No. 1, Lafayette Parish, Louisiana. Volume I. Completion and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The P.R. Girouard No. 1 Well, located approximately 10 miles southeast of Lafayette, Louisiana, was the fourth successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the Wells of Opportunity program. The well was tested through 3-1/2 inch tubing set on a packer at 14,570 feet without major problems. The geological section tested was the Oligocene Marginulina Texana No. 1 sand of upper Frio age. The interval tested was from 14,744 to 14,819 feet. Produced water was piped down a disposal well perforated from 2870 to 3000 feet in a Miocene saltwater sand. Four flow tests were conducted for sustained production rates of approximately 4000 BWPD to approximately 15,000 BWPD. The highest achieved, during a fifth short test, was 18,460 BWPD. The test equipment was capable of handling higher rates. The gas-to-water ratio was relatively uniform at approximately 40 SCF/bbl. The heating value of the gas is 970 Btu/SCF. The reservoir tests show that is is doubtful that this well would sustain production rates over 10,000 BWPD for any lengthy period from the sand zone in which it was completed. This limited flow capacity is due to the well's poor location in the reservoir and is not a result of any production deficiencies of the Marginulina Texana sand.

  9. Proceedings of the conference on alternative energy sources for Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, I.N.

    1981-01-01

    Four primary areas of study for alternative energy sources for Texas are considered. These are: energy demand supply and economics; prospects for energy resources (oil, lignite, coal, nuclear, goethermal and solar) and conservation; financial and technical constraints; and future planning. The following papers are presented: US energy outlook to 1990; energy supply and demand projections; comparative economics of solar energy in the generation of big power; gas present and future prospects; prospects for enhanced recovery of oil in Texas; the outlook for coal in USA; implementation of nuclear power in Texas; future outlook - geopressured-geothermal energy for Texas; future prospects for conservation and solar energy; financing and money supply constraints; technical constraints to energy supply increase; planning for the future - the crisis that drones on. Two papers have been abstracted separately.

  10. U.S. DOE Geopressured/Geothermal Program: Final report on well plug and abandonment operations and well site restoration, Louisiana and Texas wells

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-30

    Some of the critical operations conducted during the plugging and abandonment of the three producing wells of the U.S. DOE GEOPRESSURED/GEOTHERL PROGRAM were witnessed by D-O-R Engineering personnel. All operations witnessed by D-O-R personnel were in compliance with the respective state regulations and were conducted as per D-O-R's recommendations to the Department of Energy and their prime contractor, EG&G Idaho. It is our belief that competent cement plugs were left in all three wells. The following describes the work actually witnessed by D-O-R personnel.

  11. Study effects of geopressured-geothermal subsurface environment on elastic properties of Texas Gulf Coast sandstones and shales using well logs, core data, and velocity surveys. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, A.R.

    1980-05-01

    Relations between porosity and permeability for the Pleasant Bayou wells were determined from conventional core data. Porosities from the time average equations required compaction correction factors of 1.9 in hydropressured sandstones and 1.0 in geopressured sandstones. Best average prmeabilities in the geopressured zone were found in the primary production interval 14,687 to 14,716 ft (4477 to 4485 m). Average density gradients were 2.106 x 10/sup -3/ and 2.688 x 10/sup -3/ (gm/cm/sup 3/)/100 ft in sandstones and shales respectively. Compressional (P-wave) and shear (S-wave) velocities from the long-spaced sonic log and bulk densities from the formation density log were used to compute in-situ elastic moduli, Poisson's ratio, V/sub p//V/sub s/, and bulk compressibility in two intervals of deep geopressured sandstone and shale in No. 2 Pleasant Bayou. Most computed values of these parameters seem reasonable. Improved accuracy of travel times from the long-spaced sonic log should permit more accurate depth-to-time correlation with seismic data.

  12. Microseismic monitoring of Chocolate Bayou, Texas. The Pleasant Bayou No. 2 geopressured/geothermal energy test-well program. 1982 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mauk, F.J.; Davis, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    To investigate the seismic risks associated with geopressured fluid production from the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 design well a seismic monitoring program was conducted in the vicinity of the Brazoria County design wells since 1979. The monitoring program was designed first to establish the nature of the local ambient seismicity prior to production, and second to provide continued surveillance of the area during the well tests to determine if production altered ambient seismic conditions significantly. The operation, data analyses, results and conclusions of the Brazoria seismic network during the operational period from 1 January through 31 December 1982 are described.

  13. Microseismic monitoring of Chocolate Bayou Texas: the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 geopressured/geothermal energy test-well program. 1981 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mauk, F.J.

    1982-01-01

    To investigate normal ambient seismicity as well as potentially enhanced seismic activity induced by brine production, a seismic monitoring program has been conducted in the vicinity of the Chocolate Bayou geopressured test well (the Pleasant Bayou No. 2) since September 1978. The Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well has been completed and perforated at depths of 14,467-14,707 feet (4464.4-4482.7m). The brines produced from the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well are reinjected at a depth of 6226-6538 feet (1897.7-1992.8m) in the Pleasant Bayou No. 1 well. The seismic monitoring network and results obtained from January through November 1981 are described.

  14. G. M. Koelemay well No. 1, Jefferson County, Texas. Volume II. Well test data: testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The following are included in the appendices: field test data, combined and edited raw data, time/pressure data, sample log, reservoir fluid study, gas data, sample collection and analysis procedure, scale monitoring and water analysis, sand detector and strip charts, and Horner-type plot data. (MHR)

  15. Geothermal Well Operations and Automation in a Competitive Market

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, B.A.; Featherston, C.R.; Meahl, T.E.; Randolph, P.L.

    1992-03-24

    America's increasing dependence on foreign energy sources, and the national environmental initiatives, based on the increasing awareness of the need for protection of the environment, have led to the development of the Department of Energy's (DOE) domestic US alternative energy programs. One of these programs is the current US Gulf Coast Geopressured-Geothermal Program, conducted at three sites in Louisiana and Texas. Excellent results have been obtained in reaching the objectives for this production operation and energy conversion project, which are: (1) to determine the size of geopressured-geothermal reservoirs and the drive mechanisms by long-term, high volume, flow testing; (2) prove long-term injectability of large volumes of spent brine; (3) develop modified scale inhibitor treatment procedures; (4) develop methods for reduction of erosion/corrosion; (5) develop technology for automated operation of geopressured-geothermal production system; and (6) develop technology to produce power economically from the geopressured-geothermal resources. The long-term flow test at the Gladys McCall site has shown the producing reservoir is many times it original, projected size. Flow tests are being conducted at the Pleasant Bayou site in Texas. Another reservoir, at the Hulin site in Louisiana, remains for initiation of testing, at a time to be determined. Gas sales and electrical power generation from the geopressured-geothermal resources have proven that these are reliable alternative power sources. Continuing work is being done for field automation to improve the economics of these operations.

  16. Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    In 1997, the Texas Legislature passed a comprehensive revision to the Texas Water Code. This legislation (Senate Bill 1) changed water planning in Texas from a statewide to a regional activity. By September 2001, the 16 regions created by Senate Bill 1 must produce water plans to address their water needs during drought-of-record conditions, and must identify water-management strategies for periods when streamflows, reservoir storage, and groundwater levels are 50 and 75 percent of normal.

  17. Texas Skills Development Program. Report to the Governor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Dept. of Commerce, Austin.

    The Texas Skills Development Program (TSDP) is a key long-term strategy of the Smart Jobs initiative that will assist Texas business, industry, and labor in conveying job skill requirements to the public education and training system. Employers feel that job applicants do not have the basic reading, writing, and computation skills they need. TSDP…

  18. Development of Texas intense positron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köymen, A. R.; Ünlü, K.; Jacobsen, F. M.; Göktepeli, S.; Wehring, B. W.

    1999-02-01

    The Texas Intense Positron Source (TIPS) is a reactor-based low-energy positron beam facility utilizing some novel techniques in positron beam production. This facility will be located at the University of Texas (UT) at Austin Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) and is being developed by UT Austin and UT Arlington researchers. TIPS will use a large area (total area of 900-1800 cm 2) 64Cu source to supply fast β + particles for subsequent moderation to form an intense monoenergetic positron beam in the energy range of 0-50 keV with an expected intensity of 10 8 e +/s. Natural copper will be neutron activated near the core of the NETL 1 MW TRIGA Mark II research reactor to produce the 64Cu isotope. The activated source will be transported to the moderator/remoderator assembly, outside the biological shield of the reactor. This assembly combines the primary moderation and posterior remoderation of the fast β + particles into one stage using solid Kr to produce a low-energy positron source of a few eV with a diameter of 8 mm. The low-energy positron beam is then extracted by an electrostatic modified SOA gun and after further acceleration to 5 keV, the beam is focused onto the object slit of a 90° bending magnet. After further focusing and another 90° bend, the beam enters the main accelerator/decelerator that transports the beam onto the target for experimentation. The components of TIPS have been manufactured and are currently being optimized. In this communication we present some of the details of the TIPS facility and furthermore briefly discuss its intended applications.

  19. Perceptions of Texas 4-H Livestock Ambassadors on Career Development, Higher Education, and Leadership Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanolini, William F.; Rayfield, John; Ripley, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Selected 4-H youth participated in the Texas 4-H Livestock Ambassador program. Forty-five youth participated in the 3-day program delivered by university professors and staff, Texas AgriLife Extension faculty and industry representatives. An instrument was developed and administered to the Texas 4-H Livestock Ambassadors at the end of their first…

  20. Texas LPG fuel cell development and demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2004-07-26

    The State Energy Conservation Office has executed its first Fuel Cell Project which was awarded under a Department of Energy competitive grant process. The Texas LPG Fuel Processor Development and Fuel Cell Demonstration Program is a broad-based public/private partnership led by the Texas State Energy Conservation Office (SECO). Partners include the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division (AFRED) of the Railroad Commission of Texas; Plug Power, Inc., Latham, NY, UOP/HyRadix, Des Plaines, IL; Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), San Antonio, TX; the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC), and the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT). The team proposes to mount a development and demonstration program to field-test and evaluate markets for HyRadix's LPG fuel processor system integrated into Plug Power's residential-scale GenSys(TM) 5C (5 kW) PEM fuel cell system in a variety of building types and conditions of service. The program's primary goal is to develop, test, and install a prototype propane-fueled residential fuel cell power system supplied by Plug Power and HyRadix in Texas. The propane industry is currently funding development of an optimized propane fuel processor by project partner UOP/HyRadix through its national checkoff program, the Propane Education and Research Council (PERC). Following integration and independent verification of performance by Southwest Research Institute, Plug Power and HyRadix will produce a production-ready prototype unit for use in a field demonstration. The demonstration unit produced during this task will be delivered and installed at the Texas Department of Transportation's TransGuide headquarters in San Antonio, Texas. Simultaneously, the team will undertake a market study aimed at identifying and quantifying early-entry customers, technical and regulatory requirements, and other challenges and opportunities that need to be addressed in planning commercialization of the units. For further

  1. Final report for the geothermal well site restoration and plug and abandonment of wells: DOE Pleasant Bayou test site, Brazoria County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, Ben N.; Seigel, Ben H.

    1994-03-13

    For a variety of reasons, thousands of oil and gas wells have been abandoned in the Gulf Coast Region of the United States. Many of these wells penetrated geopressured zones whose resource potential for power generation was undervalued or ignored. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geopressured-Geothermal Research Program was chartered to improve geothermal technology to the point where electricity could be commercially produced from a substantial number of geopressured resource sites. This research program focused on relatively narrow technical issues that are unique to geopressured resources such as the ability to predict reservoir production capacity based on preliminary flow tests. Three well sites were selected for the research program. These are the Willis Hulin and Gladys McCall sites in Louisiana, and the Pleasant Bayou site in Texas. The final phase of this research project consists of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and site restoration.

  2. Parcperdue Geopressure--Geothermal Project: Appendix B

    SciTech Connect

    Sweezy, L.R.

    1981-10-05

    The reservoir models used to perform the drawdown and buildup pressure analyses consist of analytic forms in lieu of the finite difference or numeric simulator types. Analytic models are derived from solutions of the diffusion equation which relate a pressure response with time and distance in the reservoir for a specified flow system. Solutions of the diffusion equation are obtained through mathematical methods such as Laplace transforms, Fourier transforms, Neuman's product techniques and Green's functions. Before an analytic solution is derived, the diffusivity equation is expressed in terms of dimensionless potential (m{sub D}), dimensionless distance (r{sub D}) and dimensionless time (t{sub D}). For the cylindrical coordinate case, the diffusivity equation in dimensionless form for a geopressured system is given.

  3. Workforce Development Evaluation in Texas: An Assessment. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Christopher T.; McPherson, Robert E.; Norris, Dave N.; Betsinger, Alicia

    This paper offers an initial assessment of Texas' work force development evaluation and performance management efforts. Following an overview, section 2 clarifies distinctions between performance management and evaluation responsibilities such as purpose, definition, information produced, general question asked, and key questions addressed.…

  4. The Applied and Workforce Baccalaureate at South Texas College: Specialized Workforce Development Addressing Economic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mejia, Juan E.

    2012-01-01

    South Texas College (STC), created in 1993 as South Texas Community College (STCC), has developed from a concept by visionary leaders in the region to currently offering more than one hundred degree and certificate options for students from the counties of Hidalgo and Starr, including two bachelor of applied technology (B.A.T.) degrees. These…

  5. Geothermal and heavy-oil resources in Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Seni, S.J.; Walter, T.G.

    1994-01-01

    In a five-county area of South Texas, geopressured-geothermal reservoirs in the Paleocene-Eocene Wilcox Group lie below medium- to heavy-oil reservoirs in the Eocene Jackson Group. This fortuitous association suggests the use of geothermal fluids for thermally enhanced oil recovery (TEOR). Geothermal fairways are formed where thick deltaic sandstones are compartmentalized by growth faults. Wilcox geothermal reservoirs in South Texas are present at depths of 11,000 to 15,000 ft (3,350 to 4,570 m) in laterally continuous sandstones 100 to 200 ft (30 to 60 m) thick. Permeability is generally low (typically 1 md), porosity ranges from 12 to 24 percent, and temperature exceeds 250{degrees}F (121{degrees}C). Reservoirs containing medium (20{degrees} to 25{degrees} API gravity) to heavy (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) oil are concentrated along the Texas Coastal Plain in the Jackson-Yegua Barrier/Strandplain (Mirando Trend), Cap Rock, and Piercement Salt Dome plays and in the East Texas Basin in Woodbine Fluvial/Deltaic Strandplain and Paluxy Fault Line plays. Injection of hot, moderately fresh to saline brines will improve oil recovery by lowering viscosity and decreasing residual oil saturation. Smectite clay matrix could swell and clog pore throats if injected waters have low salinity. The high temperature of injected fluids will collapse some of the interlayer clays, thus increasing porosity and permeability. Reservoir heterogeneity resulting from facies variation and diagenesis must be considered when siting production and injection wells within the heavy-oil reservoir. The ability of abandoned gas wells to produce sufficient volumes of hot water over the long term will also affect the economics of TEOR.

  6. The Texas concurrent characterization, licensing, and development process

    SciTech Connect

    Avant, R.V. Jr.

    1993-03-01

    The 72nd Texas Legislature specifically delineated a 400-square-mile area in southeast Hudspeth County where siting activities would be limited. The Authority was given unprecedented powers of property access and eminent domain and expanded budget authority to conduct site selection, characterization, and licensing. In the summer of 1991, the Authority identified five general siting areas in the prescribed region, and in the fall of 1991, the Authority narrowed the siting area to one large ranch composed of about 16,000 acres--called the Faskin Ranch. Site characterization began in 1991 and will be complete by September 1993. In September 1991, Authority staff began preparing the license application and included all available information on the Faskin Ranch. At its February meeting, the Authority`s board directed staff to submit the license application to the Texas Water Commission (the new Texas radiation control agency). The license application was submitted on March 2, 1992, and on April 15, 1992, the Commission determined that the application was sufficiently complete to begin review. Discrete technical packages such as groundwater hydrology, surface water hydrology, design, etc., will be submitted to the agency for review on the completion of each package. A schedule has been developed to allow the regulators the maximum time possible to review critical technical areas while minimizing the total review period.

  7. Developing new emission factors for the Texas cotton ginning industry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) is the regulatory authority that issues air quality permits in Texas. All cotton gins operating in Texas are required to obtain a permit from the TCEQ. The TCEQ is very experienced at permitting cotton gins, having rules in place requiring these p...

  8. Oil and gas developments in South Texas in 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Raring, A.M.

    1983-10-01

    In 1982, reported completions totaled 1,436 exploratory and 3,668 development wells in south Texas Railroad Commission Districts 1, 2, and 4. For the adjacent offshore, completions totaled 46 exploratory and 19 development wells. Average depths for these wells were: District 1, 3,246 ft; District 2, 6,926 ft; District 4, 7,711 ft; and offshore, 9,802 ft. Of 63 onshore Miocene exploratory tests drilled in 1982, 40 (63%) were successful, but only 2 opened new fields. The Oligocene Frio and Vicksburg trends received 474 and 119 onshore exploratory tests. There were 33 newfield discoveries among the successful 56% of Frio wells drilled. Vicksburg drilling had a 58% success rate and found 7 new fields. Exploratory drilling for Eocene objectives totaled 455 wells. Five new-field discoveries in Jackson Group sands and 9 in Yegua and Queen City (Claiborne Group) sands came from totals of 46 and 106 wells drilled; 54% and 44% of these efforts were successful. South Texas' biggest reserves additions were contributed by gas reservoirs found along the deep Wilcox flexure trend.

  9. Developing and Planning a Texas Based Homeschool Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Bobby K.

    2011-01-01

    Texas has some of the lowest SAT scores in the nation. They are ranked 36th nationwide in graduation rates and teacher salaries rank at number 33. The public school system in Texas has problems with overcrowding, violence, and poor performance on standardized testing. Currently 300,000 families have opted out of the public school system in order…

  10. Evaluation Action Plan for the Texas Workforce Development System. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Christopher T.; McPherson, Robert E.

    Texas is shifting to an integrated, systems-oriented approach to providing work force services for its residents and employers in which all services are guided by a single mission and vision. Implementation strategies are clearly focused on achieving common results. Accountability means being able to ensure taxpayers, residents, employers, and…

  11. A statewide strategy for nursing workforce development through partnerships in Texas.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Aileen; Green, Alexia

    2008-08-01

    Statewide efforts and partnerships were used for nursing workforce development to address the nursing shortage in Texas. A statewide strategic action plan was developed where partnerships and collaboration were the key components. One of the most important outcomes of these statewide partnerships was the passage of the Nursing Shortage Reduction Act 2001. Through this legislation, the Texas Center for Nursing Workforce Studies and its advisory committee were established. This article describes how a statewide infrastructure for nursing workforce policy and legislative and regulatory processes were further developed. An overview is provided on the contributions made by the organizations involved with these strategic partnerships. The ingredients for establishing successful, strategic partnerships are also identified. It is hoped that nursing and health care leaders striving to address the nursing shortage could consider statewide efforts such as those used in Texas to develop nursing workforce policy and legislation.

  12. Academy of Human Resource Development Conference Proceedings (San Antonio, Texas, March 3-6, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Annie, Ed.; Watkins, Karen, Ed.

    This document contains the following 26 papers presented at the first Academy of Human Resource Development (HRD) Conference: "Management as a Service to Internal Customers" (Antonioni); "Developing Texas State Agency Executives for the Learning Organizations" (Bales); "How Executive Businesswomen Develop and Function in Male-Dominated…

  13. Economic Development Impact of 1,000 MW of Wind Energy in Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Reategui, S.; Hendrickson, S.

    2011-08-01

    Texas has approximately 9,727 MW of wind energy capacity installed, making it a global leader in installed wind energy. As a result of the significant investment the wind industry has brought to Texas, it is important to better understand the economic development impacts of wind energy in Texas. This report analyzes the jobs and economic impacts of 1,000 MW of wind power generation in the state. The impacts highlighted in this report can be used in policy and planning decisions and can be scaled to get a sense of the economic development opportunities associated with other wind scenarios. This report can also inform stakeholders in other states about the potential economic impacts associated with the development of 1,000 MW of new wind power generation and the relationships of different elements in the state economy.

  14. Ozone Air Quality Impacts of Shale Gas Development in South Texas Urban Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Liao, K.

    2013-12-01

    Recent technological advances, mainly horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, and continued drilling in shale, have increased domestic production of oil and gas in the United State (U.S.). However, shale gas developments could also affect the environment and human health, particularly in areas where oil and gas developments are new activities. This study is focused on the impacts of shale gas developing activities on summertime ozone air quality in South Texas urban areas since many of them are already ozone nonattainment areas. We use an integrated approach to investigate the ozone air quality impact of the shale gas development in South Texas urban areas. They are: (1) satellite measurement of precursors, (2) observations of ground-level ozone concentrations, and (3) air mass trajectory modeling. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an important precursor to ozone formation, and summertime average tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) column densities measured by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Ozone Monitoring Instrument increased in the South Texas shale area (i.e., the Eagle Ford Shale area) in 2011 and 2012 as compared to 2008-2010. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's ground-level observations showed summertime average and peak ozone (i.e., the 4th highest daily maximum 8-hour average ozone) concentrations slightly increased from 2010 to 2012 in Austin and San Antonio. However, the frequencies of peak ozone concentrations above the 75ppb ozone standard have been significantly increasing since 2011 in Austin and San Antonio. It is expected to increase the possibilities of violating the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for South Texas urban areas in the future. The results of trajectory modeling showed air masses transported from the southeastern Texas could reach Austin and San Antonio and confirmed that emissions from the Eagle Ford Shale area could affect ozone air quality in South Texas urban areas in 2011 and 2012

  15. A glimpse into Texas Scottish Rite Hospital's educational, clinical care, and research development.

    PubMed

    Herring, J Anthony; Birch, John G; Johnston, Charles E; Richards, B Stephens

    2015-03-01

    This article describes four areas of pediatric orthopaedic education, research, and clinical care undertaken at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital (TSRH) over the past 25 years. These areas include the weekly preoperative conferences, the evolution of the limb lengthening and deformity correction program, the development of the TSRH instrumentation system, and the evolution of the clubfoot treatment program.

  16. Parcperdue Geopressure -- Geothermal Project: Appendices (C--M)

    SciTech Connect

    Sweezy, L.R.

    1981-10-05

    Twelve flow tests were made on the L. R. Sweezy No. 1 well. Short-term tests, Flow Test No.1 through Flow Test No.4 were designed to estimate formation properties and were conducted for drawdown periods measured in hours. Intermediate-term tests, Flow Test No.5 through Flow Test No.8, were for a few days and were designed to test for reservoir boundaries. Long-term tests, Flow Test No.9 through Flow Test No.12, were designed for drawdown periods of about 60 days in order to examine the depletion behavior of the reservoir.

  17. Geopressured-geothermal well report. Volume I. Drilling and completion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Gladys McCall site activities are covered through the completion of the test well and salt water disposal well. The test well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet, then plugged back to 15,831 feet. Three 4'' diameter diamond cores were taken for analysis. An existing well on site, the Getty-Butts Gladys McCall No. 1, was reentered and completed to a depth of 3514 feet as a salt water disposal well. The geologic interpretation of the Gladys McCall site indicated target sands for testing at 15,080 feet through 15, 831 feet. Reservoir fluid temperature at this depth is estimated to be approximately 313/sup 0/F and pressure is estimated to be +-12,800 psi. The preliminary reservoir volume estimate is 3.6 billion barrels of brine. The design wells program includes environmental monitoring of the Gladys McCall site by Louisiana State University. Field stations are set up to monitor surface and ground water quality, subsidence, land loss and shoreline erosion, and seismicity. As of December 31, 1981 the study shows no significant impact on the environment by site operations.

  18. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This contract called for the acquisition and testing of Wells of Opportunity. Wells of Opportunity are located by screening published information on oil industry activity and through personal contacts with oil operators. This process resulted in recommendation of 21 candidate wells to the DOE for the WOO program. Of the 21 wells recommended, 7 were accepted. Six of these 7 were acquired for testing. Three wells have been tested, and the fourth and fifth will be tested early in 1981. Preliminary test results are briefly described and are shown in a table. The actual testing schedule and the originally proposed schedule matched very closely. Cumulative costs through November 1980 were approximately $6.5 million and compare to an estimate of $8.5 million for the same period. A graphical comparison of actual versus estimated costs is given.

  19. Review of Geopressured-Geothermal and Co-Production Research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-16

    This report is the minutes of the DOE/GRI/Industry meeting. They include a transcript of the questions and answers following each presentation and copies of slides and/or summaries prepared by each of the speakers.

  20. Hulin Geopressure-geothermal test well: First order levels

    SciTech Connect

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of this survey was to level through and establish elevations for existing benchmarks along LA Highway No. 685 from Erath, Louisiana south to the well site. The leveling was performed in April 1991, and was accomplished using procedures and equipment identical to that used by the National Geodetic Survey for First Order Class I Leveling. The leveling began on benchmark NGS T-361 located in Erath, Louisiana and the published elevation of 5.271 feet was used for this survey. On this survey a new benchmark, HU-18 was set on a concrete slab in the well site to observe the subsidence of the ground surface. Also, benchmark No.8 could not be found. A two hour search was made with no results. At this leveling it was noted that an error was made. A metric D.E. was used for the well head elevation instead of feet. This error has been corrected in this report.

  1. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Detailed completion prognosis for geopressured-geothermal well of opportunity, prospect #7

    SciTech Connect

    Godchaux, Frank A.

    1981-06-01

    This book is a detailed prognosis covering the acquisition, completion, drilling, testing and abandonment of the Frank A. Godchaux, III, Well No. 1 under the Wells of Opportunity Program. The well is located approximately 12 miles southeast of the city of Abbeville, Louisiana. Eaton Operating Company proposes to test a section of the Planulina sand at a depth ranging from 15,584 to 15,692 feet. The reservoir pressure is estimated to be 14,480 psi and the temperature of the formation water is expected to be 298 F. The water salinity is calculated to be 75,000 ppm. The well is expected to produce 20,000 barrels of water per day with a gas content of 44 standard cubic feet pre barrel. The well was acquired from C and K Petroleu, Inc. on March 20, 1981. C and K abandoned the well at a total depth of 16,000 feet. The well has a 7-5/8 inches liner set at 13,387 feet. Eaton proposes to set 5-1/2 inch casing at 16,000 feet and produce the well through the casing using a 2-3/8 inch tubing string for wireline protection and for pressure control. A 4,600 foot saltwater disposal well will be drilled on the site and testing will be conducted similar to previous Eaton tests. The total estimated cost to perform the work is $2,959,000. An optional test from 14,905 to 15,006 feet may be performed after the original test and will require a workover with a rig on location to perform the plugback. The surface production equipment utilized on previous Eaton WOO tests will be utilized on this test. This equipment has worked satisfactorily and all parties involved in the testing are familiar with its operation. The Institute of Gas Technology and Mr. Don Clark will handle the sampling and testing and reservoir evaluation, respectively, as on the previous Eaton tests.

  2. Structural development of McKelligon Canyon, Franklin Mountains, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Stacy, J.K.; Julian, F.E. )

    1992-04-01

    McKelligon Canyon is located in the south-central Franklin Mountains of west Texas. The Franklin Mountains are a north-south-trending, tilted fault block mountain range. Most workers who have studied the Franklins agree that range uplift occurred after the Cenomanian. Rio Grande rift extension and Laramide age compression are the most commonly cited mechanisms for range uplift. Recently, McKelligon Canyon was suggested to contain Laramide thrust faults at several locations. This study, however, shows that the canyon's structural pattern is characterized by much extensional faulting. No evidence of thrust faults or other compressional features were found. Steep, northeast-dipping (55-80{degree}) normal faults, which strike N60W and N10W, are the primary structures within the canyon. These faults are oblique to the general north-south trend of the range and have a maximum vertical offset, as measured by stratigraphic separation, of approximately 650 m. Strain values obtained from oriented limestone samples collected from the field suggest an early Rio Grande rift origin of the sturctures found in this area. Additionally, paleokarst collapse breccias occur in abundance throughout the study area and are confined to the McKelligon Canyon Formation and the lower 2-3 m of the Scenic Drive Formation. The presence of karsting in the upper part of the Scenic Drive Formation and the overlying Florida Mountains Formation could not be verified in the field. These karst features appear to be randomly distributed as seen on the surface, however, this may be due to preferred differential erosion.

  3. Development of Cotton Valley gas in Carthage Field--price was the key. [Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, F.E.; Asseff, G.

    1982-09-01

    Development of the Cotton Valley formation in East Texas has been stimulated by the economics of higher gas prices. The combined actions of the industry, Congress, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and the Texas Railroad Commission (RRC) have added to the market gas reserves that were discovered in 1937, but were not economical to produce until the 1970's. The Cotton Valley formation in Carthage Field, Panola County, Texas, was first penetrated in 1937, and cores from that well indicated the presence of gas. Drill stem tests in 1944 confirmed the presence of gas in these deep, low permeability sands. The gas price then was $0.03 per MCF. The first gas production was recorded in 1968, from one well, and by 1975, seven wells were producing. Gas prices had now increased to $0.62 per MCF. When the price of gas reached $2.49 per MCF in 1979, development increased rapidly with 117 new wells being drilled and completed that year, 86 wells in 1980 and 53 wells in 1981. The drilling of these wells was a result of higher gas prices under the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978 (NGPA), the ''tight'' gas classification by FERC on October 24, 1980, and Railroad Commission approval of 320-acre spacing on February 9, 1981, to permit additional drainage wells on the 640 acre units. The price of gas is now over $6.00 per MCF, and more than 400 wells are producing from the Cotton Valley as development continues.

  4. Laser Safety Program Development at Texas A&M University--Issues and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Latha; Menchaca, Daniel I; Tutt, James

    2015-09-01

    Implementing a laser safety program within a University setting encompassing a wide variety of Class 3b and Class 4 lasers with varied potential uses introduces many challenges. Texas A&M University (TAMU) currently has over 310 laser units that are registered with the Texas Department of State Health Services (TDSHS). One primary task in maintaining the laser registration is to have a program that identifies the regulatory responsibilities of the registrant. The Radiological Safety Staff, a part of Environmental Health and Safety (EHS), administers the use of both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. The Radiological Safety Officer (RSO)/Laser Safety Officer (LSO) maintains the laser registration. This article outlines key elements that were put forth in the development and implementation of the laser safety program at TAMU.

  5. Dynamic impacts of socio-economic development in rural Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, C.S.

    1985-01-01

    Several development policies and programs have been enacted to improve the economic vitality, social well-being, and quality of life in rural communities. Predominant among these is the attempt by many rural communities to attract or expand industry to promote economic growth. The main objective of this study is to develop a dynamic interactive model that accommodates the projection of socio economic growth and the impact of additional employment from a new plant in a rural community. The economic account contains projections of business activities, income and employment by sector. A local input-output model is constructed by using the location quotient technique. The Leontief dynamic input-output framework is used to project the output levels by economic sector while considering capital replacement and expansion requirements as well as current consumption. The demographic account uses an age-sex cohort survival method to project population. The annual local labor force is estimated by labor participation rates for each age and sex cohort, and is used to determine the migration activities required to match employment requirements. The public service account is projected by the average standards method, and includes age-specific usage coefficients for local areas. The projections encompass education, medical, housing, criminal justice, fire protection, water supply, water treatment, sewage treatment, solid waste disposal, and transportation requirements.

  6. Geothermal energy impact in Brazoria County. Final report, 15 July 1978-November 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Horine, B.

    1980-06-01

    All activities performed by Alvin Community College and the University of Texas at Austin in association with the development of Geopressured-Geothermal energy are contained in this report. A discussion of the progress of the Test Well is also contained herein. Public seminars and workshops were presented to the local community. A summer institute in energy was also presented to local public school teachers. A compaign to publicize the development of the new energy resource was also waged. An overall evaluation of the project is also attached.

  7. Mission design software development at the University of Texas at Austin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, Wallace T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the development process, the contents, the update process, and the various uses of a space mission planning FORTRAN subroutine library. This document is written by graduate (and undergraduate) students at the University of Texas at Austin and is used by students in several courses, primarily design courses. The library has been made available to faculty and students at several schools and was provided to students at the 1991 International Space University in Toulouse, France. This paper describes the mission library, its creation, its checking, its update procedure, and the teaching philosophy and procedures involved in its use.

  8. Providing Elementary Teachers in South Texas with Professional Development to Improve Earth Science Instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrego, H.; Ellins, K. K.

    2011-12-01

    Through three years of participation in the TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution, an NSF-sponsored teacher professional development program, my knowledge of earth science, new pedagogical approaches, and confidence has improved dramatically. I have also received instructional materials and learned how to access high quality online resources and use a variety of web-based tools. In this session, I will share my experiences and report on how I used my own learning to help both teachers and students to become more earth science literate individuals. Earth Science test scores at the elementary level throughout South Texas are consistently low in comparison to other regions in the state. The majority of the teachers lack the content-knowledge, confidence, or experience to teach Earth Sciences. My TXESS Revolution experience helped me to understand the needs of these teachers and to identify teaching resources that would be useful to them. Particularly noteworthy are TERC's EarthLabs: Earth System Science and GLOBE activities. Although these Earthlab investigations are designed for high schools students, I demonstrated how they could be adapted for elementary students. As a result, I have provided professional development in the Earth Sciences to about 300 South Texas elementary teachers. TXESS Revolution has also equipped me to empower the students I teach. My students this past year presented their challenge Legacy Cycle Project to the community. The TXESS Revolution teamed up with the Texas Water Development Board to deliver training on the implementation of a new online challenged-based curriculum called the Water Exploration Legacy Cycles. This training gave me the tools to guide my students learning through authentic scientific research. To carry out their challenge, students researched an area of interest, read literature, consulted with experts in the field, consider different prospective, and presented their final products via PowerPoint, poster

  9. Spatial Air Quality Impacts of Increased Natural Gas Development and Use in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, D.; Pacsi, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    Compared to coal-fired power plants on a per MWh basis, natural-gas electricity generators in the grid of the Electricity Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) emit substantially less nitrogen oxides (NOx) and sulfur dioxide (SO2), which are precursors for the formation of ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). In addition, several life-cycle assessments have concluded that the development and use of shale gas resources will likely lead to air quality benefits, despite emissions associated with natural gas production, due to changes in fuel utilization in the electricity generation sector. The formation of ozone and PM2.5 is non-linear, however, and depends on spatial and temporal patterns associated with the precursor emissions. This study used Texas as a case-study for the changes in regional ozone and PM2.5 concentrations associated with natural gas production and use in electricity generation in the state. Texas makes a compelling case study since it was among the first states with large-scale shale gas production with horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies, since it has a self-contained electric grid (ERCOT), and since it includes several regions which do not currently meet Federal standards for ozone. This study utilized an optimal power flow model for electricity generation in ERCOT, coupled with a regional photochemical model to estimate the ozone and PM2.5 impacts of changes to natural gas production and use in the state. The utilization of natural gas is highly dependent on the relative price of natural gas compared to coal. Thus, the amount of natural gas consumed in power generation in ERCOT was estimated for a range of prices from 1.89-7.74, which have occurred in Texas since 2006. Sensitivity scenarios in which natural gas production emissions in the Barnett Shale were raised or lowered depending on demand for the fuel in the electricity generation sector were also examined. Overall results indicate that regional ozone and

  10. TXESS Revolution: Utilizing TERC's EarthLabs Cryosphere Module to Support Professional Development of Texas Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odell, M.; Ellins, K. K.; Polito, E. J.; Castillo Comer, C. A.; Stocks, E.; Manganella, K.; Ledley, T. S.

    2010-12-01

    TERC’s EarthLabs project provides rigorous and engaging Earth and environmental science labs. Four existing modules illustrate sequences for learning science concepts through data analysis activities and hands-on experiments. A fifth module, developed with NSF, comprises a series of linked inquiry based activities focused on the cryosphere to help students understand concepts around change over time on multiple and embedded time scales. Teachers recruited from the NSF-OEDG-sponsored Texas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution teacher professional development program conducted a pedagogical review of the Cryosphere EarthLabs module and provided feedback on how well the materials matched high school needs in Texas and were aligned with state and national standards. Five TXESS Revolution teachers field tested the materials in their classrooms and then trained other TXESS Revolution teachers on their implementation during spring and summer 2010. Here we report on the results of PD delivery during the summer 2010 TXESS Revolution summer institute as determined by (1) a set of evaluation instruments that included a pre-post concept map activity to assess changes in workshop teachers’ understanding of the concepts presented, a pre-post test content knowledge test, and a pre-post survey of teachers’ comfort in teaching the Texas Earth and Space Science standards addressed by the module; (2) teacher reflections; and (3) focus group responses. The findings reveal that the teachers liked the module activities and felt they could use them to teach Environmental and Earth Science. They appreciated that the sequence of activities contributed to a deeper understanding and observed that the variety of methods used to present the information accommodates different learning styles. Information about the cryosphere was new to all the teachers. The content knowledge tests reveal that although teachers made appreciable gains, their understanding of cryosphere, how it changes

  11. Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Strategic Plan for Improving Physical Plant Management at Southwest Texas Junior College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Box, Wilford Winston

    A study was conducted at Southwest Texas Junior College (STJC) to assess current management practices used by the physical plant maintenance department (PPMD) and to develop a strategic plan for physical plant management. Procedures included an analysis of current management practices and systems that affect physical resources, and periodic and…

  12. Community College Professional Development: Sharing What Works. Proceedings of a National Conference (San Antonio, Texas, October 18-19, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkner, Susan L.; And Others

    This document contains 30 papers on professional development in community colleges. The following papers are included: "Effective Leadership Strategies for Planning and Implementing Tech Prep" (Bragg, Huffman); "Small Business Management-Tech Prep" (Harvey); "Educational Reform and the New Mission" (Hoerner); "Tech Prep in Texas: An Implementation…

  13. Develop data management system for assistance in conducting area of reviews in Texas: Quarterly technical report- 10th quarter, January 1-March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Wrotenbery, L.; Burgess, D. F.; Weitzel, L.; Williams, D.; Morgan, H.; Matthews, J.

    1997-04-15

    The following technical report provides a detailed status report of the DOE grant project entitled `Develop Data Management System for Assistance in Conducting Area of Reviews (AORS) in Texas.` The grant funding allocated is for the purpose of providing the Railroad Commission of Texas (Commission or RRC) with resources and capabilities to conduct AOR and AOR variance analysis statewide.

  14. Estimating aquifer recharge in Mission River watershed, Texas: model development and calibration using genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddameri, V.; Kuchanur, M.

    2007-01-01

    Soil moisture balance studies provide a convenient approach to estimate aquifer recharge when only limited site-specific data are available. A monthly mass-balance approach has been utilized in this study to estimate recharge in a small watershed in the coastal bend of South Texas. The developed lumped parameter model employs four adjustable parameters to calibrate model predicted stream runoff to observations at a gaging station. A new procedure was developed to correctly capture the intermittent nature of rainfall. The total monthly rainfall was assigned to a single-equivalent storm whose duration was obtained via calibration. A total of four calibrations were carried out using an evolutionary computing technique called genetic algorithms as well as the conventional gradient descent (GD) technique. Ordinary least squares and the heteroscedastic maximum likelihood error (HMLE) based objective functions were evaluated as part of this study as well. While the genetic algorithm based calibrations were relatively better in capturing the peak runoff events, the GD based calibration did slightly better in capturing the low flow events. Treating the Box-Cox exponent in the HMLE function as a calibration parameter did not yield better estimates and the study corroborates the suggestion made in the literature of fixing this exponent at 0.3. The model outputs were compared against available information and results indicate that the developed modeling approach provides a conservative estimate of recharge.

  15. Effects of urban development on stormwater runoff characteristics for the Houston, Texas, metropolitan area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liscum, Fred

    2001-01-01

    A study was done to estimate the effects of urban development in the Houston, Texas, metropolitan area on nine stormwater runoff characteristics. Three of the nine characteristics define the magnitude of stormwater runoff, and the remaining six characteristics describe the shape and duration of a storm hydrograph. Multiple linear regression was used to develop equations to estimate the nine stormwater runoff characteristics from basin and rainfall characteristics. Five basin characteristics and five rainfall characteristics were tested in the regressions to determine which basin and rainfall characteristics significantly affect stormwater runoff characteristics. Basin development factor was found to be significant in equations for eight of the nine stormwater runoff characteristics. Two sets of equations were developed, one for each of two regions based on soil type, from a database containing 1,089 storm discharge hydrographs for 42 sites compiled during 1964?89. The effects of urban development on the eight stormwater runoff characteristics were quantified by varying basin development factor in the equations and recomputing the stormwater runoff characteristics. The largest observed increase in basin development factor for region 1 (north of Buffalo Bayou) during the study resulted in corresponding increases in the characteristics that define magnitude of stormwater runoff ranging from about 40 percent (for direct runoff) to 235 percent (for peak yield); and corresponding decreases in the characteristics that describe hydrograph shape and duration ranging from about 22 percent (for direct runoff duration) to about 58 percent (for basin lag). The largest observed increase in basin development factor for region 2 (south of Buffalo Bayou) during the study resulted in corresponding increases in the characteristics that define magnitude of stormwater runoff ranging from about 33 percent (for direct runoff) to about 210 percent (for both peak flow and peak yield); and

  16. Development of a comprehensive air quality modeling framework for a coastal urban airshed in south Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooqui, Mohmmed Zuber

    Tropospheric ozone is one of the major air pollution problems affecting urban areas of United States as well as other countries in the world. Analysis of surface observed ozone levels in south and central Texas revealed several days exceeding 8-hour average ozone National Ambient of Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) over the past decade. Two major high ozone episodes were identified during September of 1999 and 2002. A photochemical modeling framework for the high ozone episodes in 1999 and 2002 were developed for the Corpus Christi urban airshed. The photochemical model was evaluated as per U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommended statistical methods and the models performed within the limits set by EPA. An emission impact assessment of various sources within the urban airshed was conducted using the modeling framework. It was noted that by nudging MM5 with surface observed meteorological parameters and sea-surface temperature, the coastal meteorological predictions improved. Consequently, refined meteorology helped the photochemical model to better predict peak ozone levels in urban airsheds along the coastal margins of Texas including in Corpus Christi. The emissions assessment analysis revealed that Austin and San Antonio areas were significantly affected by on-road mobile emissions from light-duty gasoline and heavy-duty diesel vehicles. The urban areas of San Antonio, Austin, and Victoria areas were estimated to be NOx sensitive. Victoria was heavily influenced by point sources in the region while Corpus Christi was influenced by both point and non-road mobile sources and was identified to be sensitive to VOC emissions. A rise in atmospheric temperature due to climate change potentially increase ozone exceedances and the peak ozone levels within the study region and this will be a major concern for air quality planners. This study noted that any future increase in ambient temperature would result in a significant increase in the urban and regional

  17. Using Wavelet Decomposition to Assess the Development of Padre Island National Seashore, Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernette, P. A.; Weymer, B. A.; Houser, C.; Bishop, M. P.; Everett, M. E.; Reece, R.

    2015-12-01

    This study examines the relationship between modern barrier island morphology and offshore bathymetry to better understand the development history of Padre Island National Seashore (PAIS), Texas, USA. The widely accepted hypothesis for the development of PAIS is that the dunes on the mainland were partially submerged during the Holocene transgression, resulting in distinct islands that eventually coalesced by sediment transported alongshore; however, this hypothesis does not follow the development history of other barrier islands throughout the Gulf of Mexico. This study uses electromagnetic inductance (EMI) surveys, bathymetric contours, and island morphometrics to better understand the development of PAIS. A 100km long EMI survey was conducted to aid in identifying infilled subsurface paleochannels that dissect the island. Bathymetric contours were extracted from NOAA digital elevation models (DEMs) up to 7km offshore by offsetting the shoreline east in 1km intervals. Island width and volume, beach width and volume, and dune height and volume were extracted from a 100 km LiDAR-derived digital elevation model (DEM) using an automated approach. Apparent conductivity at all three frequencies (from the EMI survey), bathymetric contours, and island morphometrics were subsequently decomposed using a continuous wavelet transformation (CWT). Beach width, dune height, and dune volume exhibit a very similar waveform that coincides spatially with an inflection point in the waveform for the offshore bathymetric contours. Portions of the island proximal to the infilled paleochannels tend to have a wider beach and taller/higher volume dunes. The high degree of similarity between the subsurface paleochannels, offshore bathymetry, and island morphometrics support a new theory of development for PAIS. We argue that PAIS is not a series of partially submerged relict dunes, as previously proposed, rather that framework geology is an important factor affecting modern island

  18. Reservoir development in Brahaney northwest and Patricia fields, northern Midland basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzullo, L.J.

    1990-02-01

    Porous pay zones in the Silurian-Devonian section of the northern Midland basin, Texas, vary stratigraphically, as well as structurally, with their locations beneath the pre-Woodford unconformity. These variations are related to at least two major periods of widespread pre-Woodford tectonism and erosion. A major unconformable surface, present at the top of the Lower Silurian Fusselman formation, was later modified by tectonism and erosion immediately preceding deposition of the Woodford Shale. In places where the Fusselman subcrops beneath the Woodford, its capacity for reservoir development is dependent upon the severity of geologic events that affected the formation during the two major tectonic/erosional events. Where the Wristen and Thirtyone formations subcrop, their reservoir capacity depends upon the extent of structuring and subsequent erosion immediately prior to Woodford deposition. Two pre-Woodford oil fields in the northern Midland basin illustrate geologic complexity that bears on the successful application of subsurface mapping in defining potential pay zones. Brahaney Northwest field in Yoakum County is productive from fractured, coarse crystalline Silurian-Devonian dolomites on subtle, fault-bounded structures. These structures, defined seismically on the base of the Woodford, do not reveal the more complex structural and stratigraphic variations within the reservoir itself. Patricia field in Dawson County is productive from Fusselman carbonates where upper Fusselman structural and topographic relief coincides with post-Woodford faulting and low-relief anticlinal closure as defined at the base of the Woodford.

  19. Development of the benethic nepheloid layer on the south Texas continental shelf, western Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shideler, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    A monitoring study of suspended sediment on the South Texas Continental Shelf indicates that a turbid benthic nepheloid layer is regionally persistent. A sequence of quasi-synoptic measurements of the water column obtained during six cruises in an 18-month period indicates substantial spatial and temporal variability in nepheloidlayer characteristics. Regionally, the thickness of the shelf nepheloid layer increases both seaward and in a convergent alongshelf direction. Greatest thicknesses occur over a muddy substrate, indicating a causal relationship; maximum observed local thickness is 35 m which occurs along the southern shelf break. Analyses of suspended particulate matter in shelf bottom waters indicate mean concentrations ranging from 49 ?? 104 to 111 ?? 104 particle counts/cc; concentrations persistently increase shoreward throughout the region. Bottom particulate matter is predominantly composed of inorganic detritus. Admixtures of organic skeletal particles, primarily diatoms, are generally present but average less than 10% of the total particulate composition. Texturally, the particulate matter in bottom waters is predominantly poorly sorted sediment composed of very fine silt (3.9-7.8 ??m). The variability in nepheloid-layer characteristics indicates a highly dynamic shelf feature. The relationship of nepheloid-layer characteristics to hydrographic and substrate conditions suggests a conceptual model whereby nepheloid-layer development and maintenance are the results of the resuspension of sea-floor sediment. Bottom turbulence is attributed primarily to vertical shear and shoaling progressive internal waves generated by migrating shelf-water masses, especially oceanic frontal systems, and secondarily to shoaling surface gravity waves. ?? 1981.

  20. The development of sirolimus: The University of Texas-Houston experience.

    PubMed

    Kahan, B D; Stepkowski, S M; Napoli, K L; Katz, S M; Knight, R J; Van Buren, C

    2000-01-01

    The transplant team at The University of Texas-Houston has studied sirolimus from preclinical through pivotal Phase III trials to single-center Phase IV trials as we continue to refine algorithms for sirolimus therapy. The sirolimus/CsA combination produces a marked reduction in the occurrence and severity of acute allograft rejection episodes. A recently completed post hoc median effect analysis of drug blood concentrations displayed by patients in the 2 pivotal Phase III trials documented that the combination displays synergistic interactions. Patients in the sirolimus/CsA arms did not display an increased incidence of infectious or malignant complications. However, they did experience a range of nonimmune toxicities, including potentiation of putatively CsA-related adverse reactions, such as renal dysfunction and hypercholesterolemia, which appear to be mitigated by reduction or elimination of CsA. However, thrombocytopenia and to a lesser extent leukopenia and anemia appear to be sirolimus-related side effects. The occurrence and severity of these adverse reactions seem to be avoided or ameliorated in most patients by optimizing sirolimus exposure at concentrations (15 ng/mL or by dose reduction. Sirolimus thus appears to be a potent and unique agent for developing new immunosuppressive strategies in organ transplantation.

  1. Regional ozone impacts of increased natural gas use in the Texas power sector and development in the Eagle Ford shale.

    PubMed

    Pacsi, Adam P; Kimura, Yosuke; McGaughey, Gary; McDonald-Buller, Elena C; Allen, David T

    2015-03-17

    The combined emissions and air quality impacts of electricity generation in the Texas grid and natural gas production in the Eagle Ford shale were estimated at various natural gas price points for the power sector. The increased use of natural gas in the power sector, in place of coal-fired power generation, drove reductions in average daily maximum 8 h ozone concentration of 0.6-1.3 ppb in northeastern Texas for a high ozone episode used in air quality planning. The associated increase in Eagle Ford upstream oil and gas production nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions caused an estimated local increase, in south Texas, of 0.3-0.7 ppb in the same ozone metric. In addition, the potential ozone impacts of Eagle Ford emissions on nearby urban areas were estimated. On the basis of evidence from this work and a previous study on the Barnett shale, the combined ozone impact of increased natural gas development and use in the power sector is likely to vary regionally and must be analyzed on a case by case basis.

  2. Regional ozone impacts of increased natural gas use in the Texas power sector and development in the Eagle Ford shale.

    PubMed

    Pacsi, Adam P; Kimura, Yosuke; McGaughey, Gary; McDonald-Buller, Elena C; Allen, David T

    2015-03-17

    The combined emissions and air quality impacts of electricity generation in the Texas grid and natural gas production in the Eagle Ford shale were estimated at various natural gas price points for the power sector. The increased use of natural gas in the power sector, in place of coal-fired power generation, drove reductions in average daily maximum 8 h ozone concentration of 0.6-1.3 ppb in northeastern Texas for a high ozone episode used in air quality planning. The associated increase in Eagle Ford upstream oil and gas production nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions caused an estimated local increase, in south Texas, of 0.3-0.7 ppb in the same ozone metric. In addition, the potential ozone impacts of Eagle Ford emissions on nearby urban areas were estimated. On the basis of evidence from this work and a previous study on the Barnett shale, the combined ozone impact of increased natural gas development and use in the power sector is likely to vary regionally and must be analyzed on a case by case basis. PMID:25723953

  3. Community Development in Rural Texas: A Case Study of Balmorhea Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewees, Sarah; Velazquez, Jose A.

    2000-01-01

    In a West Texas community that is 70% Hispanic, school-based community services build solidarity and contribute to well-being. The school provides social services, a community clinic, and service learning opportunities for students. This model is successful because it is self-initiated and self-organized. (Contains 43 references.) (SK)

  4. Education or Indoctrination? The Development of Social Studies Standards in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchette, Sue

    2010-01-01

    In Texas, the members of the State Board of Education (SBOE) are elected in a partisan election. One of the duties of the State Board of Education is overseeing the writing of curriculum standards for the various content areas. A call went out to educators across the state, asking for volunteers to write the standards. Committees were formed for…

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF EXTENSION EDUCATION AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS, 1909-1952.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SHELBY, THOMAS HALL

    UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS EXTENSION WORK BEGAN WITH THREE DIVISIONS OF WORK--FACULTY LECTURES, CORRESPONDENCE TEACHING, CIRCULATION OF READING MATERIAL ON SPECIAL TOPICS (THE BEGINNING OF THE PACKAGE LIBRARY SERVICE)--AND EMPHASIZED PUBLIC AND SOCIAL WELFARE, NUTRITION AND HEALTH EDUCATION, PARENT EDUCATION, AND PUBLIC LECTURES AND DEBATES. STUDY GROUPS…

  6. Summary of dimensionless Texas hyetographs and distribution of storm depth developed for Texas Department of Transportation research project 0–4194

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Roussel, Meghan C.; Thompson, David B.; Cleveland, Theodore G.; Fang, Xing

    2005-01-01

    Hyetographs and storm depth distributions are important elements of hydraulic design by Texas Department of Transportation engineers. Design hyetographs are used in conjunction with unit hydrographs to obtain peak discharge and hydrograph shape for hydraulic design. Storm-depth distributions can be used to assess the probability of a total rainfall depth for a storm. A research project from 2000–2004 has been conducted to (1) determine if existing Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) dimensionless hyetographs are representative of storms in Texas, (2) provide new procedures for dimensionless hyetograph estimation if the NRCS hyetographs are not representative, and (3) provide a procedure to estimate the distribution of storm depth for Texas. This report summarizes the research activities and results of the research project. The report documents several functional models of dimensionless hyetographs and provides curves and tabulated ordinates of empirical (nonfunctional) dimensionless hyetographs for a database of runoff-producing storms in Texas. The dimensionless hyetographs are compared to the NRCS dimensionless hyetographs. The distribution of storm depth is documented for seven values of minimum interevent time through dimensionless frequency curves and tables of mean storm depth for each county in Texas. Conclusions regarding application of the research results are included in the report.

  7. An ecosystem analysis of oil and gas development on the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf. Biological services program

    SciTech Connect

    Gallaway, B.J.

    1981-08-01

    The Texas-Louisiana shelf ecosystem in the Gulf of Mexico is described in terms of its physiographic, oceanographic, and biological characteristics and as a recipient of oil and gas development activities and effluents. The northeast sector of the ecosystem is influenced by Mississippi River discharge, whereas high-salinity Caribbean water affects the southwest sector. Soft-bottom communities are prominent, characterized by economically valuable penaeid shrimps. The coral reef communities are more important than would normally be assumed. Pelagic communities are little known and harbor only a few commercially valuable species. Observed effects of oil and gas development activities and effluents are described.

  8. Development of a transport system for the copper source of the Texas Intense Positron Source facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doron, O.; Biegalski, S. R.; O'Kelly, S.; Hurst, B. J.

    2006-01-01

    The transport system design and construction for The Texas Intense Positron Source (TIPS) facility has been completed. This facility is located on beam port 1 of The University of Texas at Austin TRIGA Mark II 1.1 MW research reactor. The TIPS will provide a high intensity, variable energy positron beam for use in material studies. The natural copper source is transported into beam port 1 of the reactor where it is irradiated at close proximity to the reactor core. The transport system is an L-shaped aluminum channel that utilizes pulleys to drive a source cart. The copper source is transported on the cart into and out of the beam port for irradiation. After removal from the beam port, the activated copper positron source will be placed into a vacuum chamber where the positrons are moderated with annealed tungsten foil and electrostatically extracted.

  9. Poverty and Problems of Development in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael V.

    Bounded on the west and south by Mexico and to the east by the Gulf, the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas is separated from the nearest U.S. urban center of any size by miles of flat and arid brushland. Its total population of approximately 335,000 is essentially composed of 2 groups--Mexican Americans and Anglos. Although the region is one of the…

  10. Latest developments in Texas Instruments DLP near-infrared spectrometers enable the next generation of embedded compact, portable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruett, Eric

    2015-06-01

    Designing the next generation of embedded compact, portable near-infrared (NIR) spectrometers while meeting aggressive cost and form factor targets requires novel technologies and creative system designs. New miniature spectrometer architectures are enabled by Texas Instruments DLP® technology. The ability to provide programmable spectral filters using high speed, accurate light modulation with a micro-electro mechanical systems (MEMS) based architecture enables systems with features and sampling techniques that were previously not possible. System design considerations and the latest developments in DLP spectrometer architectures will be presented.

  11. The Spatial and Temporal Consumptive Water Use Impacts of Rapid Shale Gas Development and Use in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacsi, A. P.; Allen, D.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past several years, the development of shale gas resources has proceeded rapidly in many areas of the United States, and this shale gas development requires the use of millions of gallons of water, per well, for hydraulic fracturing. Recent life cycle assessments of natural gas from shale formations have calculated the potential for water use reduction when water use is integrated along the entire natural gas supply chain, if the shale gas is used in natural-gas power plants to displace coal-fired electricity generation. Actual grid operation, however, is more complicated and would require both that sufficient unused natural gas generation capacity exists for the displacement of coal-fired power generation and that the natural gas price is low enough that the switching is financially feasible. In addition, water savings, which would occur mainly from a reduction in the cooling water demand at coal-fired power plants, may occur in different regions and at different times than water used in natural gas production. Thus, consumptive water impacts may be spatial and temporally disparate, which is not a consideration in current life-cycle literature. The development of shale gas resources in Texas in August 2008 through December 2009 was chosen as a case study for characterizing this phenomenon since Texas accounted for two-thirds of the shale gas produced in the United States during this period and since the price of natural gas for electricity generation dropped significantly over the episode. Changes to the Texas self-contained electric grid (ERCOT) for a scenario with actual natural gas production and prices was estimated using a constrained grid model, rather than assuming that natural gas generation would displace coal-fired power plant usage. The actual development scenario was compared to an alternative development scenario in which natural gas prices remained elevated throughout the episode. Upstream changes in water consumption from lignite (coal

  12. Development of Ground Water in the Houston District, Texas, 1970-1974

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gabrysch, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    Total withdrawals of ground water in the Houston district increased 9 percent from about 488 million gallons per day (21.4 cubic meters per second) in 1970 to about 532 million gallons per day (23.3 cubic meters per second) in 1974. The average annual rate of increase from 1960 to 1969 was about 6.3 percent. During 1970-74, increases in pumpage occurred in the Houston, Katy, and NASA areas; decreases occurred in the Pasadena and Alta Lorna areas; and the pumpage in the Baytown-La Porte and Texas City areas remained almost constant.

  13. Development of ground water in the Houston District, Texas, 1970-74

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gabrysch, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    Total withdrawals of ground water in the Houston district, Texas , increased 9 percent from about 488 million gallons per day in 1970 to about 532 million gallons per day in 1974. The average annual rate of increase from 1960 to 1969 was about 6.3 percent. During 1970-74, increases in pumpage occurred in the Houston, Katy, and NASA areas; decreases occurred in the Pasadena and Alta Loma areas; and the pumpage in the Baytown-La Porte and Texas City areas remained almost constant. Water levels continued to decline throughout the district during 1970-74, but the rate of decline generally was not as great as in previous years. The greatest declines in the past several years were in the Houston area, but the center of decline is still in the Pasadena and Baytown-La Porte areas. The decrease in the rate of decline suggests that the aquifers in the Houston district could support the amount of pumping during 1970-74 with little, if any , further decline. Although saltwater encroachment has probably occurred in the district, particularly in Galveston County, no large increases in chloride were measured at the monitoring points. (Woodard-USGS)

  14. Development and application of operational techniques for the inventory and monitoring of resources and uses for the Texas coastal zone. Volume 1: Text

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwood, P. (Principal Investigator); Finley, R.; Mcculloch, S.; Malin, P. A.; Schell, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Image interpretation and computer-assisted techniques were developed to analyze LANDSAT scenes in support of resource inventory and monitoring requirements for the Texas coastal region. Land cover and land use maps, at a scale of 1:125,000 for the image interpretation product and 1:24,000 for the computer-assisted product, were generated covering four Texas coastal test sites. Classification schemes which parallel national systems were developed for each procedure, including 23 classes for image interpretation technique and 13 classes for the computer-assisted technique. Results indicate that LANDSAT-derived land cover and land use maps can be successfully applied to a variety of planning and management activities on the Texas coast. Computer-derived land/water maps can be used with tide gage data to assess shoreline boundaries for management purposes.

  15. Texas A & I University Child Development Associate Training Materials: Book C. Competency C: Building Positive Self-Concept and Individual Strength in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and I Univ., Kingsville.

    This volume, the fourth in a series of seven, contains the two learning modules which focus on the third Child Development Associate (CDA) competency, building positive self-concept and individual strength in young children, in the performance based curriculum of the Texas A & I Bilingual Bicultural Child Development Associate Training Program.…

  16. CBTE: The Ayes of Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, W. Robert; Howsam, Robert B.

    1974-01-01

    A heated controversy occurred when the Texas State Board of Education mandated competency based teacher education (CBTE) for all of the State's 66 teacher preparatory institutions. This is an account of developments in Texas by two major proponents of CBTE. (Author/JF)

  17. Overview: Research Funding in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining more federal funds is the expressed research goal in "Closing the Gaps by 2015." It states: By 2015, increase the level of federal science and engineering research and development obligations to Texas institutions to 6.5 percent of obligations to higher education institutions across the nation. In 2006, Texas institutions of higher…

  18. Tech Prep Consortia in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opp, Ronald D.

    The Tech Prep (TP) program is designed to provide a seamless transition for students between the high school, community college, and four-year college levels so that students can make an easier transition from school to work. In Texas, TP has developed differently from the programs of other states. Texas policy makers created a tri-agency…

  19. Texas Real Estate Curriculum Workshop Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, Robert

    The Texas Real Estate Research Center-Texas Education Agency (TRERC-TEA) curriculum workshop was attended by over 40 participants representing 26 Texas community colleges. These participants divided into eight small groups by real estate specialty area and developed curriculum outlines and learning objectives for the following real estate courses:…

  20. The Texas Connection: Transferring professional development workshops for astronomy, teachers and student field experiences to distance learning technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, S.; Hemenway, M. K.; Wetzel, M.; Mace, K.; Yarbrough, B.

    2008-06-01

    Texas is a big state! It measures 1244 km from east to west and 1289 km from north to south. It is as large as all of New England, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana combined and slightly larger than France. As the state's only professional observatory, our goal is to reach as many K-12 teachers and students as possible in Texas with astronomy activities that align with the state's teaching standards, Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS).

  1. Texas Greenup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    June 2007 was one of the wettest Junes on record for the state of Texas. Starting in late May, a string of low-pressure systems settled in over the U.S. Southern Plains and unleashed weeks of heavy to torrential rain. During the final week of June, much of Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas received more than 330 percent of their average rainfall, said the National Climatic Data Center. The widespread heavy rain brought deadly floods to the entire region. On July 6, the Associated Press reported that every major river basin in Texas was at flood stage, an event that had not occurred since 1957. In addition to causing floods, the rains stimulated plant growth. The grassy, often arid, plains and plateaus of northern Mexico (bottom left), Texas (center), and New Mexico (top, left of center) burst to life with dense vegetation as this vegetation anomaly image shows. Regions where plants were growing more quickly or fuller than average are green, while areas where growth is below average are brown. Most of Texas is green, with a concentrated deep green, almost black, spot where vegetation growth was greatest. This area of western Texas is where the Pecos River flows out of New Mexico and heads southeast to the Rio Grande. In the darkest areas, vegetation was more than 100 percent above average. The brown spots in northeastern Texas and Oklahoma (top, right of center) may be areas where persistent clouds or water on the ground are hiding the plants from the satellite's view. Plants may also be growing less than average if swamped by too much rain. The image was made with data collected by the SPOT satellite between June 11 and June 20, 2007. NASA imagery created by Jesse Allen, Earth Observatory, using SPOT data provided courtesy of the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service and processed by Jennifer Small and Assaf Anyamba of the GIMMS Group at NASA GSFC.

  2. Development of visible/infrared/microwave agriculture classification and biomass estimation algorithms, volume 2. [Oklahoma and Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, W. D.; Mcfarland, M. J.; Theis, S. W.; Jones, C. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Agricultural crop classification models using two or more spectral regions (visible through microwave) were developed and tested and biomass was estimated by including microwave with visible and infrared data. The study was conducted at Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas utilizing aircraft multispectral data and ground truth soil moisture and biomass information. Results indicate that inclusion of C, L, and P band active microwave data from look angles greater than 35 deg from nadir with visible and infrared data improved crop discrimination and biomass estimates compared to results using only visible and infrared data. The active microwave frequencies were sensitive to different biomass levels. In addition, two indices, one using only active microwave data and the other using data from the middle and near infrared bands, were well correlated to total biomass.

  3. Assessing the Learning Needs of Student Teachers in Texas regarding Management of the Agricultural Mechanics Laboratory: Implications for the Professional Development of Early Career Teachers in Agricultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saucier, P. Ryan; McKim, Billy R.

    2011-01-01

    Skills needed to manage a laboratory are essential knowledge for all school-based, agriculture teachers who instruct agricultural mechanics curriculum (Saucier, Terry, & Schumacher, 2009). This research investigated the professional development needs of Texas agricultural education student teachers regarding agricultural mechanics laboratory…

  4. Two Texas Colleges Buy into the Big Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Business Week, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Revenues from oil/gas royalties on University of Texas (Austin) and Texas A&M go into a fund which is used to hire faculty and develop programs, particularly in the sciences. However, Texas legislators are considering a bill that would spread the oil money to other campuses in the Texas university system. (JN)

  5. The Woodlands, Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHaney, Larry J.; Bernhardt, Jerry

    1988-01-01

    The authors describe the "central project" concept for implementing technology education while addressing education reform. The central project is a topic around which students, teachers, administrators, and the community focus their energies as a team. At McCullough High School (Texas), the central project involved design and development of a…

  6. Wind powering America - Texas

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dell, K.

    2000-04-13

    This fact sheet contains a description of the wind energy resources in the state of Texas and the state's efforts to develop wind energy production, green power, and net metering programs. The fact sheet also includes a list of contacts for those interested in obtaining more information.

  7. Climatic-eustatic control of Holocene nearshore parasequence development, southeastern Texas coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Robert A.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Flocks, James G.; Stewart, Laura B.

    1999-01-01

    Sediment cores, seismic profiles, radiocarbon dates, and faunal assemblages were used to interpret the depositional setting and geological evolution of the southeastern Texas coast during the last glacio-eustatic cycle. Discrete lithofacies and biofacies zones in the ebb-dominated Sabine Lake estuary and adjacent chenier plain record alternating periods of rapid marine flooding and gradual shoaling related to linked climatic/eustatic fluctuations. Monospecific zones of the mollusks Rangia cuneata and Crassostrea virginica, respectively, indicate high fresh water outflow followed by invasion of marine water, whereas intervening organic-rich zones record bayhead delta deposition. High-frequency parasequence stacking patterns within the valley fill and across the adjacent interfluve reflect an initial rapid rise in sea level about 9 ka that flooded abandoned alluvial terraces and caused onlap of Holocene marsh in the incised valley. The rapid rise was followed by slowly rising and oscillating sea level that filled the deepest portions of the incised valleys with fluvially dominated estuarine deposits, and then a maximum highstand (+1 m msl) about 5 ka that flooded the former subaerial coastal plain between the incised valleys and constructed the highest beach ridges. Between 3.5 and 1.5 ka, sea level oscillated and gradually fell, causing a forced regression and rapid progradation of both the chenier plain and accretionary barrier islands. The only significant sands in the valley fill are (1) falling-stage and lowstand-fluvial sediments between the basal sequence boundary and transgressive surface unconformity, and (2) highstand beach-ridge sediments of the chenier plain.

  8. Solvent extraction of methane from simulated geopressured-geothermal fluids: sub-pilot test results

    SciTech Connect

    Quong, R.; Otsuki, H.H.; Locke, F.E.

    1982-01-14

    The extraction of methane dissolved in 15 wt % sodium chloride solution at 150/sup 0/C and 1000 psi has been demonstrated using n-hexadecane as the solvent in a sub-pilot scale extraction column operated in a continuous, countercurrent flow mode. Greater than 90% recovery of methane was obtained with solvent/brine mass flow ratios in the range of .040 to .045. The height of an ideal stage in this experimental Elgin-type spray column is estimated to be 1.5 ft. Application of this process on actual geopressured fluids is technically feasible, and when combined with direct drive injection disposal is economically attractive. Design and operation of a methane saturated-brine supply system to provide simulated geopressured fluid continuously at 150/sup 0/C and 1000 psi are also described.

  9. DRAFT LANDSAT DATA MOSAIC: MONTGOMERY COUNTY, TEXAS; HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS; FORT BEND COUNTY, TEXAS; BRAZORIA COUNTY, TEXAS; GALVESTON COUNTY, TEXAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a draft Landsat Data Mosaic, which contains remote sensing information for Montgomery County, Texas Harris County, Texas Fort Bend County, Texas Brazoria County, Texas Galveston County, and Texas Imagery dates on the following dates: October 6, 1999 and September 29, 200...

  10. Empirical, dimensionless, cumulative-rainfall hyetographs developed from 1959-86 storm data for selected small watersheds in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams-Sether, Tara; Asquith, William H.; Thompson, David B.; Cleveland, Theodore G.; Fang, Xing

    2004-01-01

    A database of incremental cumulative-rainfall values for storms that occurred in small urban and rural watersheds in north and south central Texas during the period from 1959 to 1986 was used to develop empirical, dimensionless, cumulative-rainfall hyetographs. Storm-quartile classifications were determined from the cumulative-rainfall values, which were divided into data groups on the basis of storm-quartile classification (first, second, third, fourth, and first through fourth combined), storm duration (0 to 6, 6 to 12, 12 to 24, 24 to 72, and 0 to 72 hours), and rainfall amount (1 inch or more). Removal of long leading tails, in effect, shortened the storm duration and, in some cases, affected the storm-quartile classification. Therefore, two storm groups, untrimmed and trimmed, were used for analysis. The trimmed storms generally are preferred for interpretation. For a 12-hour or less trimmed storm duration, approximately 49 percent of the storms are first quartile. For trimmed storm durations of 12 to 24 and 24 to 72 hours, 47 and 38 percent, respectively, of the storms are first quartile. For a trimmed storm duration of 0 to 72 hours, the first-, second-, third-, and fourth-quartile storms accounted for 46, 21, 20, and 13 percent of all storms, respectively. The 90th-percentile curve for first-quartile storms indicated about 90 percent of the cumulative rainfall occurs during the first 20 percent of the storm duration. The 10th-percentile curve for first-quartile storms indicated about 30 percent of the cumulative rainfall occurs during the first 20 percent of the storm duration. The 90th-percentile curve for fourth-quartile storms indicated about 33 percent of the cumulative rainfall occurs during the first 20 percent of the storm duration. The 10th-percentile curve for fourth-quartile storms indicated less than 5 percent of the cumulative rainfall occurs during the first 20 percent of the storm duration. Statistics for the empirical, dimensionless

  11. Development of the Wink Sink in west Texas, U.S.A., due to salt dissolution and collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kenneth S.

    1989-09-01

    The Wink Sink, in Winkler County, Texas, is a collapse feature that formed in June 1980 when an underground dissolution cavity migrated upward by successive roof failures until it breached the land surface. The original cavity developed in the Permian Salado Formation salt beds more than 400 m (1,300 ft) below ground level. Natural dissolution of salt occurred in the vicinity of the Wink Sink in several episodes that began as early as Salado time and recurred in later Permian, Triassic, and Cenozoic times. Although natural dissolution occurred in the past below the Wink Sink, it appears likely that the dissolution cavity and resultant collapse described in this report were influenced by petroleum-production activity in the immediate area. Drilling, completion, and plugging procedures used on an abandoned oil well at the site of the sink appear to have created a conduit that enabled water to circulate down the borehole and dissolve the salt. When the dissolution cavity became large enough, the roof failed and the overlying rocks collapsed into the cavity. Similar collapse features exist where underground salt beds have been intentionally dissolved during solution mining or accidentally dissolved as a result of petroleum-production activity.

  12. Temporal variation in groundwater quality in the Permian Basin of Texas, a region of increasing unconventional oil and gas development.

    PubMed

    Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Carlton, Doug D; Fontenot, Brian E; Meik, Jesse M; Walton, Jayme L; Thacker, Jonathan B; Korlie, Stephanie; Shelor, C Phillip; Kadjo, Akinde F; Clark, Adelaide; Usenko, Sascha; Hamilton, Jason S; Mach, Phillip M; Verbeck, Guido F; Hudak, Paul; Schug, Kevin A

    2016-08-15

    The recent expansion of natural gas and oil extraction using unconventional oil and gas development (UD) practices such as horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing has raised questions about the potential for environmental impacts. Prior research has focused on evaluations of air and water quality in particular regions without explicitly considering temporal variation; thus, little is known about the potential effects of UD activity on the environment over longer periods of time. Here, we present an assessment of private well water quality in an area of increasing UD activity over a period of 13months. We analyzed samples from 42 private water wells located in three contiguous counties on the Eastern Shelf of the Permian Basin in Texas. This area has experienced a rise in UD activity in the last few years, and we analyzed samples in four separate time points to assess variation in groundwater quality over time as UD activities increased. We monitored general water quality parameters as well as several compounds used in UD activities. We found that some constituents remained stable over time, but others experienced significant variation over the period of study. Notable findings include significant changes in total organic carbon and pH along with ephemeral detections of ethanol, bromide, and dichloromethane after the initial sampling phase. These data provide insight into the potentially transient nature of compounds associated with groundwater contamination in areas experiencing UD activity.

  13. Temporal variation in groundwater quality in the Permian Basin of Texas, a region of increasing unconventional oil and gas development.

    PubMed

    Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Carlton, Doug D; Fontenot, Brian E; Meik, Jesse M; Walton, Jayme L; Thacker, Jonathan B; Korlie, Stephanie; Shelor, C Phillip; Kadjo, Akinde F; Clark, Adelaide; Usenko, Sascha; Hamilton, Jason S; Mach, Phillip M; Verbeck, Guido F; Hudak, Paul; Schug, Kevin A

    2016-08-15

    The recent expansion of natural gas and oil extraction using unconventional oil and gas development (UD) practices such as horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing has raised questions about the potential for environmental impacts. Prior research has focused on evaluations of air and water quality in particular regions without explicitly considering temporal variation; thus, little is known about the potential effects of UD activity on the environment over longer periods of time. Here, we present an assessment of private well water quality in an area of increasing UD activity over a period of 13months. We analyzed samples from 42 private water wells located in three contiguous counties on the Eastern Shelf of the Permian Basin in Texas. This area has experienced a rise in UD activity in the last few years, and we analyzed samples in four separate time points to assess variation in groundwater quality over time as UD activities increased. We monitored general water quality parameters as well as several compounds used in UD activities. We found that some constituents remained stable over time, but others experienced significant variation over the period of study. Notable findings include significant changes in total organic carbon and pH along with ephemeral detections of ethanol, bromide, and dichloromethane after the initial sampling phase. These data provide insight into the potentially transient nature of compounds associated with groundwater contamination in areas experiencing UD activity. PMID:27125684

  14. Opening Pandora's Box: Texas Elementary Campus Administrators use of Educational Policy And Highly Qualified Classroom Teachers Professional Development through Data-informed Decisions for Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Linda Lou

    Federal educational policy, No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, focused attention on America's education with conspicuous results. One aspect, highly qualified classroom teacher and principal (HQ), was taxing since states established individual accountability structures. The HQ impact and use of data-informed decision-making (DIDM) for Texas elementary science education monitoring by campus administrators, Campus Instruction Leader (CILs), provides crucial relationships to 5th grade students' learning and achievement. Forty years research determined improved student results when sustained, supported, and focused professional development (PD) for teachers is available. Using mixed methods research, this study applied quantitative and qualitative analysis from two, electronic, on-line surveys: Texas Elementary, Intermediate or Middle School Teacher Survey(c) and the Texas Elementary Campus Administrator Survey(c) with results from 22.3% Texas school districts representing 487 elementary campuses surveyed. Participants selected in random, stratified sampling of 5th grade teachers who attended local Texas Regional Collaboratives science professional development (PD) programs between 2003-2008. Survey information compared statistically to campus-level average passing rate scores on the 5th grade science TAKS using Statistical Process Software (SPSS). Written comments from both surveys analyzed with Qualitative Survey Research (NVivo) software. Due to the level of uncertainty of variables within a large statewide study, Mauchly's Test of Sphericity statistical test used to validate repeated measures factor ANOVAs. Although few individual results were statistically significant, when jointly analyzed, striking constructs were revealed regarding the impact of HQ policy applications and elementary CILs use of data-informed decisions on improving 5th grade students' achievement and teachers' PD learning science content. Some constructs included the use of data

  15. A summary of the occurrence and development of ground water in the southern High Plains of Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, J.G.; Myers, B.N.

    1964-01-01

    The Southern High Plains of Texas occupies an area of about 22,000 square miles in n'Orthwest Texas, extending fr'Om the Canadian River southward. about 250 miles and fr'Om the New Mexico line eastward an average distance of about 120 miles. The economy of the area is dependent largely upon irrigated agriculture, and in 1958 about 44,000 irrigation wells were in operation. The economy of the area is also dependent upon the oil industry either in the f'Orm of oil and gas production or in the form of industries based on the producti'On of petroleum. The Southern High Plains of Tems is characterized. 'by a nearly flat land surface sloping gently toward. the southeast at an average of 8 to 10 feet per mile. Shallow undrained depressions or playas are characteristic of the plains surface, and during periods of heavy rainfall, runoff collects in the depressions to form temporary ponds or lakes. Stream drainage 'On the plains surface is poorly developed; water discharges over the eastern escarpment off the plains only during periods of excessive rainfall. The climate of the area is semiarid; the average annual precipitation is about 20 inches. About 70 percent of the precipitation falls during the growing season from April to September. Rocks of Permian age underlie the entire area and consist chiefly of red sandstone and shale containing nUmerous beds of gypsum and dolomite. The Permian rocks are not a source of water in the Southern High Plains, and any water in these rocks would probably be saline. The Triassic rocks underlying the 'S'Outhern Hi'gh Plains consist of three formations of the Dockum group: the Tecovas formation, the Santa Rosa sandstone. and the Chinle formation equivalent. The Tecovas and Chinle formation equivalent both consist chiefly of shale and sandy shale; however, the Santa Rosa sandstone consists mainly of medium to coarse conglomeratic sandstone containing some shale. Tbe formations of the Dockum group are capable of yielding small to moderate

  16. Measurements of ammonia emissions from oak and pine forests and development of a non-industrial ammonia emissions inventory in texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, Golam; Corsi, Richard L.; Kinney, Kerry A.; Banks, Joel A.; Torres, Vince M.; Schmidt, Chuck

    Estimates of non-industrial source ammonia emissions in Texas were developed through the use of published emission factors and activity data for those sources. A total of 64 non-industrial source emission sub-categories were addressed, each falling into one of seven major source categories: animal husbandry, fertilizer applications, on-road vehicles, non-road sources, municipal wastewater disposal, domestic sources, and natural soil and vegetation. Annual statewide ammonia emissions were initially estimated to be 921,000 metric tons, with greater than 50% originating from natural soil and vegetation. However, estimates for pine and oak forests were characterized as having a great deal of uncertainty. A series of field sampling events were conducted to determine ammonia fluxes from pine and oak forest floors in east Texas. Both dynamic and static chamber methods were used. The ammonia flux averaged 0.09 kg km -2 month -1 for pine forests and 0.13 kg km -2 month -1 for oak forests. These values are significantly lower than those previously measured and cited in the published literature. However, the ammonia fluxes measured in east Texas forests are reasonably consistent with those predicted using mechanistic models for evergreen pine and deciduous broadleaf forests in Alabama, California, Colorado, and Tennessee. Statewide annual ammonia emissions estimates, revised using the newly developed ammonia fluxes for oak and pine forests in Texas, dropped from 921,000 to 467,000 metric tons. The relative contribution of ammonia emissions from pine and oak forests dropped from 49% to less than 1%. Animal husbandry was predicted to be the dominant non-industrial source, accounting for approximately 77% of non-industrial source ammonia emissions.

  17. Coordination of Organic Curriculum Development in the Public Schools in Houston, Texas. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pace, Arthur L.

    Between May 1967 and June 1970, the Houston Independent School District in consortium with 14 others contracted with USOE to coordinate the development of an organic curriculum. The project's purpose was to create a climate for change, while interpreting for Houston secondary schools the objectives of a plan that would be: relevant, based on…

  18. The role of sediment-transport evaluations for development of modeled instream flows: policy and approach in Texas.

    PubMed

    Heitmuller, Franklin T; Raphelt, Nolan

    2012-07-15

    Instream-flow scientists embrace streamflow as the master variable driving aquatic and riparian ecosystems, and that natural flow variability is imperative for river conservation and restoration efforts. Sediment transport, which is critical for maintenance of physical habitats in rivers and floodplains, has received less direct attention from instream-flow practitioners. This article serves to highlight the roles of sediment-transport evaluations in modifying or verifying instream-flow prescriptions based on hydrology alone. Two examples of sediment-transport evaluations are discussed in relation to the Texas Senate Bill 3 Environmental Flows allocation process, a mandate to "develop environmental flow analyses and a recommended flow regime" that "maintain(s) the viability of the state's streams, rivers, and bay and estuary systems" using "reasonably available science". The first example provides an evaluation of effective discharge of suspended-sediment load of the lower Brazos River. The magnitude and frequency of effective discharge occurs between typical high-flow pulses and overbank flows, indicating that hydrologic and physical processes are not optimally coupled in some flow-regime models. The second example utilizes the Hydrology-Based Environmental Flow Regime (HEFR) model to prescribe instream flows for the lower Sabine River, and compares modeled bed-material loads for observed and HEFR-prescribed flow regimes. Results indicate that annual water and sediment yields are greatly reduced for the modeled flow regime. It should be noted, however, that different input variables to the HEFR model would have resulted in different computations of water and sediment yields, reinforcing that instream-flow practitioners should exercise great caution when applying rule-of-thumb procedures to generate flow prescriptions. PMID:22425877

  19. The role of sediment-transport evaluations for development of modeled instream flows: policy and approach in Texas.

    PubMed

    Heitmuller, Franklin T; Raphelt, Nolan

    2012-07-15

    Instream-flow scientists embrace streamflow as the master variable driving aquatic and riparian ecosystems, and that natural flow variability is imperative for river conservation and restoration efforts. Sediment transport, which is critical for maintenance of physical habitats in rivers and floodplains, has received less direct attention from instream-flow practitioners. This article serves to highlight the roles of sediment-transport evaluations in modifying or verifying instream-flow prescriptions based on hydrology alone. Two examples of sediment-transport evaluations are discussed in relation to the Texas Senate Bill 3 Environmental Flows allocation process, a mandate to "develop environmental flow analyses and a recommended flow regime" that "maintain(s) the viability of the state's streams, rivers, and bay and estuary systems" using "reasonably available science". The first example provides an evaluation of effective discharge of suspended-sediment load of the lower Brazos River. The magnitude and frequency of effective discharge occurs between typical high-flow pulses and overbank flows, indicating that hydrologic and physical processes are not optimally coupled in some flow-regime models. The second example utilizes the Hydrology-Based Environmental Flow Regime (HEFR) model to prescribe instream flows for the lower Sabine River, and compares modeled bed-material loads for observed and HEFR-prescribed flow regimes. Results indicate that annual water and sediment yields are greatly reduced for the modeled flow regime. It should be noted, however, that different input variables to the HEFR model would have resulted in different computations of water and sediment yields, reinforcing that instream-flow practitioners should exercise great caution when applying rule-of-thumb procedures to generate flow prescriptions.

  20. South Texas: where mesquite and estuaries challenge drilling rigs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    The development of oil and gas drilling in South Texas has been a difficult process because of the unyielding resistance of the brush country. Hydrocarbons have been associated with South Texas for as long as there have been recorded accounts of the region. A brief history of exploration and development of the Texas Gulf Coast is presented.

  1. Reliability of third molar development for age estimation in a Texas Hispanic population: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Kathleen A; Austin, Dana; Kvanli, Alan H; Rios, Tara R; Senn, David R

    2009-05-01

    Evaluating third molars from 950 Hispanic individuals aged 12-22 years using Demirjian's schematic for crown and root formation found that Hispanic third molar development was 8-18 months faster than American Caucasians as reported by Mincer, Harris and Berryman in 1993. This represents a statistically significant increase. Earlier development was more apparent in the later stages F through H. Hispanic males reach developmental stages faster than Hispanic females and maxillary third molars reach developmental stages faster than mandibular third molars in both sexes. The earliest age observed for stages B-H (e.g., Stage H first observed at age 13.92 years in females) and the oldest age observed for Stages B-G were developed to facilitate age prediction of unknown individuals. Prediction tables for minimum and maximum age for an observed stage (e.g., if a female maxillary third molar is stage F it means she is older than 13 years) for each sex-jaw group were calculated.

  2. An Investigation into the Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of Online Learning Programs for Small Rural Public Schools in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabor, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated the experiences of 10 superintendents in Pre-K-8, 1A, and small 2A schools located in rural areas of Texas, who have implemented an online learning program or programs. Narrative techniques were used to explore the challenges that they faced in the pre-planning, planning, implementation and evaluation of their…

  3. The Development and Testing of a New Method to Evaluate the Operational Cloud-Seeding Programs in Texas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodley, William L.; Rosenfeld, Daniel

    2004-02-01

    A method for the objective evaluation of short-term, nonrandomized operational convective cloud-seeding projects on a floating-target-area basis has been developed and tested in the context of the operational cloud-seeding projects of Texas. The computer-based method makes use of the Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) mosaic radar data to define fields of circular (25-km radius) floating-target analysis units with lifetimes from the first echo to the disappearance of all echoes and then superimposes the track and seeding actions of the project seeder aircraft onto the unit fields to define seeded (S) and nonseeded (NS) analysis units. Objective criteria (quantified herein) are used to identify “control” (C) matches for each of the seed units from the archive of NS units. To minimize potential contamination by seeding, no matching is allowed for any control unit if its perimeter came within 25 km of the perimeter of a seed unit during its lifetime. The methodology was used to evaluate seeding effects in the High Plains Underground Water Conservation District (HP) and Edwards Aquifer Authority (EA) programs during the 1999, 2000, and 2001 (EA only) seasons. Objective unit matches were selected from within and outside each operational target within 12, 6, 3, and 2 h of the time on a given day that seeding of a particular unit took place. These were done to determine whether selection biases and the diurnal convective cycle confounded the results. Matches were also drawn from within and outside each target using the entire archive of days on which seeding was done. Although the results of all analyses are subjected to statistical testing, the resulting probability (P) values were used solely to determine the relative strength of the various findings. In the absence of treatment, randomization P values cannot be used as proof of seeding efficacy. The apparent effect of seeding in both programs was large—even after determining the effect of selection biases and the

  4. Overview: Texas College and Career Readiness Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Texas College and Career Readiness Standards define what students should know and be able to accomplish in order to succeed in entry-level college courses or skilled workforce opportunities upon graduation from high school. This paper answers the following questions: (1) Who developed the Texas College and Career Readiness Standards?; (2) What…

  5. Texas Effectiveness Study: Adult Outcome Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Deborah; Schumacker, Randall E.

    The Texas Effectiveness Study is an evaluation of the effectiveness of special education programs and services in developing life skills related to the transition planning process for Texas special education. One of the three components of the Texas Effectiveness Study is a study of adult outcomes. This component was implemented in the summer of…

  6. Using Workforce Information for Degree Program Planning in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Charles A.; Butterfield, Lindsay; Lavery, Diana; Miller, Trey; Daugherty, Lindsay; Beleche, Trinidad; Han, Bing

    2015-01-01

    In May 2013, the Texas Legislature passed House Bill 1296, requiring a report on Texas's future workforce needs that would help inform decisions to develop or expand postsecondary education programs. Educators and policymakers in Texas and elsewhere have a wide variety of quantitative and qualitative workforce information available for planning…

  7. Equipment Only - Solar Resources Measurements at the University of Texas at Austin, TX: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-222

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, T.

    2013-01-01

    Faculty and staff at the University of Texas at Austin collected solar resource measurements at their campus using equipment on loan from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The equipment was used to train students on the operation and maintenance of solar radiometers and was returned to NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory upon completion of the CRADA. The resulting data augment the solar resource climatology information required for solar resource characterizations in the U.S. The cooperative agreement was also consistent with NREL's goal of developing an educated workforce to advance renewable energy technologies.

  8. Chagas Disease Risk in Texas

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Sahotra; Strutz, Stavana E.; Frank, David M.; Rivaldi, Chissa–Louise; Sissel, Blake; Sánchez–Cordero, Victor

    2010-01-01

    is concentrated in south Texas. 3. The ecological and incidence–based risks were analyzed together in a multi–criteria dominance analysis of all counties and those counties in which there were as yet no reports of parasite incidence. Both analyses picked out counties in south Texas as those at highest risk. 4. As an alternative to the multi–criteria analysis, the ecological and incidence–based risks were compounded in a multiplicative composite risk model. Counties in south Texas emerged as those with the highest risk. 5. Risk as the relative expected exposure rate was computed using a multiplicative model for the composite risk and a scaled population county map for Texas. Counties with highest risk were those in south Texas and a few counties with high human populations in north, east, and central Texas showing that, though Chagas disease risk is concentrated in south Texas, it is not restricted to it. Conclusions For all of Texas, Chagas disease should be designated as reportable, as it is in Arizona and Massachusetts. At least for south Texas, lower than N, blood donor screening should be mandatory, and the serological profiles of human and canine populations should be established. It is also recommended that a joint initiative be undertaken by the United States and México to combat Chagas disease in the trans–border region. The methodology developed for this analysis can be easily exported to other geographical and disease contexts in which risk assessment is of potential value. PMID:20957148

  9. Treasured Texas Theaters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Dallas artist Jon Flaming's deep love of Texas is evident in his paintings and sculpture. Although he has created one sculptural Texas theater, his work primarily showcases old Texas barbershops, vacant homes, and gas stations. In this article, the author describes how her students, inspired by Flaming's works, created three-dimensional historical…

  10. East Texas Storytellers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Brandi, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Written and published by the students at Gary High School, Gary, Texas, "Loblolly Magazine" is published twice a year. Issues are frequently devoted to a distant theme. The theme of this issue, "East Texas Storytellers," attempts to capture some of the local color and regional history of eastern Texas. The first article, "Timothy Griffith, Master…

  11. A modeling study of the physical processes affecting the development of seasonal hypoxia over the inner Louisiana-Texas shelf: Circulation and stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lixia; Justić, Dubravko

    2009-06-01

    The physical processes affecting the development of seasonal hypoxia over the Louisiana-Texas shelf were examined using a high-resolution, three-dimensional, unstructured-grid, Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM). The model was forced with the observed freshwater fluxes from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers, surface winds, heat fluxes, tides and offshore conditions. The simulations were carried out over a six-month period, from April to September 2002, and the model performance was evaluated against several independent series of observations that included tidal gauge data, Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, shipboard measurements of temperature and salinity, vertical salinity and sigma-t profiles, and satellite imagery. The model accurately described the offshore circulation mode generated over the Louisiana-Texas shelf by the westerly winds during summer months, as well as the prevalent westward flow along the coast caused by the easterly winds during the rest of the study period. The seasonal cycle of stratification also was well represented by the model. During 2002, the stratification was initiated in early spring and subsequently enhanced by the intensity and phasing of riverine freshwater discharges. Strong stratification persisted throughout the summer and was finally broken down in September by tropical storms. The model simulations also revealed a quasi-permanent anticyclonic gyre in the Louisiana Bight region formed by the rotational transformation of the Mississippi River plume, whose existence during 2002 was supported by the satellite imagery and ADCP current measurements. Model simulations support the conclusion that local wind forcing and buoyancy flux resulting from riverine freshwater discharges were the dominant mechanisms affecting the circulation and stratification over the inner Louisiana-Texas shelf.

  12. Statewide summary for Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Handley, Lawrence R.; Spear, Kathryn A.; Gibeaut, Jim; Thatcher, Cindy

    2014-01-01

    Seafood landed at Texas ports valued $240 million in 2011, and recreational saltwater fishing alone provided nearly 17,000 jobs (Texas GLO, 2013). Fishes directly dependent upon wetland habitats include multiple shrimp species, blue crab, eastern oyster, black drum, flounder, sheepshead, and snapper. Texas has the highest number of hunters, anglers, and hunting expenditures in the nation (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 2012). Hunting yields $2.3 billion for the state, and recreational fishing yields $3.2 billion. Texas is the top birding destination in the Nation. Tourism in Texas generates $7.5 billion for the state, and wildlife viewing generates $2.9 billion.

  13. Read Across Texas! 2002 Texas Reading Club Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgmon, Missy; Ferate-Soto, Paolo; Foley, Lelana; Hager, Tina; Heard, Adriana; Ingham, Donna; Lopez, Nohemi; McMahon, Dorothy; Meyer, Sally; Parrish, Leila; Rodriguez-Gibbs, Josefina; Moreyra-Torres, Maricela; Travis, Gayle; Welch, Willy

    The goal of the Texas Reading Club is to encourage the children of Texas to become library users and lifelong readers. This manual was created for the 2002 Texas Reading Club, a program of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. The theme, "Read Across Texas!" invites children to explore the history, geography, and culture of Texas…

  14. Development and application of operational techniques for the inventory and monitoring of resources and uses for the Texas coastal zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwood, P. (Principal Investigator); Malin, P.; Finley, R.; Mcculloch, S.; Murphy, D.; Hupp, B.; Schell, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Four LANDSAT scenes were analyzed for the Harbor Island area test sites to produce land cover and land use maps using both image interpretation and computer-assisted techniques. When evaluated against aerial photography, the mean accuracy for three scenes was 84% for the image interpretation product and 62% for the computer-assisted classification maps. Analysis of the fourth scene was not completed using the image interpretation technique, because of poor quality, false color composite, but was available from the computer technique. Preliminary results indicate that these LANDSAT products can be applied to a variety of planning and management activities in the Texas coastal zone.

  15. Development of visible/infrared/microwave agriculture classification and biomass estimation algorithms. [Guyton, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, W. D.; Mcfarland, M. J.; Theis, S. W.; Jones, C. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Agricultural crop classification models using two or more spectral regions (visible through microwave) are considered in an effort to estimate biomass at Guymon, Oklahoma Dalhart, Texas. Both grounds truth and aerial data were used. Results indicate that inclusion of C, L, and P band active microwave data, from look angles greater than 35 deg from nadir, with visible and infrared data improve crop discrimination and biomass estimates compared to results using only visible and infrared data. The microwave frequencies were sensitive to different biomass levels. The K and C band were sensitive to differences at low biomass levels, while P band was sensitive to differences at high biomass levels. Two indices, one using only active microwave data and the other using data from the middle and near infrared bands, were well correlated to total biomass. It is implied that inclusion of active microwave sensors with visible and infrared sensors on future satellites could aid in crop discrimination and biomass estimation.

  16. Indigenous human cutaneous anthrax in Texas.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J P; Dimmitt, D C; Ezzell, J W; Whitford, H

    1993-01-01

    In December 1988 an indigenous case of cutaneous anthrax was identified in Texas. The patient, a 63-year-old male Hispanic from southwest Texas, was a sheep shearer and had a recent history of dissecting sheep that had died suddenly. He experienced an illness characterized by left arm pain and edema. A necrotic lesion developed on his left forearm, with cellulitis and lymphadenopathy. After treatment with oral and intravenous penicillins, the patient fully recovered. Western blot testing revealed a fourfold or greater rise in antibody titer to Bacillus anthracis protective antigen and lethal factor. This represents the first case of indigenous anthrax in Texas in more than 20 years. PMID:8420007

  17. Texas Heart Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2016 Resources Texas Heart Institute Journal Scientific Publications Library & Learning Resources Resources for Physicians Fellowships & Residencies School of Perfusion Technology Please contact our Webmaster with ...

  18. Proceedings of the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age (CELDA) (Fort Worth, Texas, October 22-24, 2013)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Demetrios G., Ed.; Spector, J. Michael, Ed.; Ifenthaler, Dirk, Ed.; Isaias, Pedro, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers of the IADIS International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age (CELDA 2013), October 22-24, 2013, which has been organized by the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS), co-organized by The University of North Texas (UNT), sponsored by the…

  19. Proceedings of a Meeting of the Head Start Planning Committee with the Staff of the Child Development Evaluation-Research Center (Southwest) (University of Texas, Austin, March 29, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce-Jones, John; And Others

    This document is a transcript of the proceedings of a one-day meeting held in Austin, Texas on March 29, 1967. Participants included representatives of the national Head Start Planning Committee, the Head Start Research and Evaluation Division in Washington, D. C., and the staff and study directors of the regional Child Development Evaluation and…

  20. User-Driven Workflow for Modeling, Monitoring, Product Development, and Flood Map Delivery Using Satellites for Daily Coverage Over Texas May-June 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, D. S.; Frye, S. W.; Wells, G. L.; Adler, R. F.; Brakenridge, R.; Bolten, J. D.; Murray, J. J.; Slayback, D. A.; Kirschbaum, D.; Wu, H.; Cappelaere, P. G.; Schumann, G.; Howard, T.; Flamig, Z.; Clark, R. A.; Stough, T.; Chini, M.; Matgen, P.

    2015-12-01

    Intense rainfall during late April and early May 2015 in Texas and Oklahoma led to widespread flooding in several river basins in that region. Texas state agencies were activated for the May-June floods and severe weather event that ensued for six weeks from May 8 until June 19 following Tropical Storm Bill. This poster depicts a case study where modeling flood potential informed decision making authorities for user-driven high resolution satellite acquisitions over the most critical areas and how experimental flood mapping techniques provided the capability for daily on-going monitoring of these events through the use of increased automation. Recent improvements in flood models resulting from higher frequency updates, better spatial resolution, and increased accuracy of now cast and forecast precipitation products coupled with advanced technology to improve situational awareness for decision makers. These advances enabled satellites to be tasked, data products to be developed and distributed, and feedback loops between the emergency authorities, satellite operators, and mapping researchers to deliver a daily stream of relevant products that informed deployment of emergency resources and improved management of the large-scale event across the local, state, and national levels. This collaboration was made possible through inter-agency cooperation on an international scale through the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites Flood Pilot activity that is supported in the USA by NASA, NOAA, and USGS and includes numerous civilian space agency assets from the European Space Agency along with national agencies from Italy, France, Germany, Japan, and others. The poster describes the inter-linking technology infrastructure, the development and delivery of mapping products, and the lessons learned for product improvement in the future.

  1. Fireball Over Texas

    NASA Video Gallery

    Video of the fireball seen over Texas this morning (12/7/12); it was taken by a NASA camera located near Mayhill, New Mexico. It is very unusual for us to see a meteor all the way across Texas. The...

  2. Technical support for geopressured-geothermal activities in Louisiana. Final geological report, 1 November 1981-31 October 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Pilger, R.H.

    1984-06-25

    This report contains the component Site-Specific Studies-Geophysics, Diagenesis, Geochemistry. Work for Site-Specific Studies is finished, and the results presented in this report are final. Individual studies have been entered separately into the data base. (ACR)

  3. Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells. Final report, Tenneco Fee N No. 1 Well Terrebonne Paris, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, R.J.; Hartsock, J.H.; McCoy, R.L.; Rodgers, J.A.

    1980-09-01

    The reservoir conditions that led to the choice of this well as the fifth well of opportunity are described as well as the attempts to complete the well for high-volume brine production. Individual opinions concerning underlying and conributing causes for the liner failure which aborted the completion attempt are included. (MHR)

  4. Furthering Medical Education in Texas.

    PubMed

    Varma, Surendra K; Jennings, John

    2016-02-01

    Medical education in Texas is moving in the right direction. The Texas Medical Association has been a major partner in advancing medical education initiatives. This special symposium issue on medical education examines residency training costs, the Next Accreditation System, graduate medical education in rural Texas, Texas' physician workforce needs, the current state of education reform, and efforts to retain medical graduates in Texas. PMID:26859372

  5. Floods on small streams in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruggles, Frederick H.

    1966-01-01

    The first streamflow station in Texas was established on the Rio Grande at El Paso on May 10, 1889. Sip,ce that time the systematic collection of streamflow data. has expanded. In 1915 the Texas Board of Water Engineers (now the Texas Water Development Board) entered into a cooperative agreement with the U. S. Geological Survey for the purpose of expanding the network of stream-gaging stations in Texas. Sites were selected for stream-gaging stations to obtain hydrologic data for water supply and flood control. Therefore, the stream-gaging stations were located principally on major streams. Today, after three-quarters of a century.of hydrologic data collection, peak discharge data on small streams are still deficient in Texas. The Geological Survey and the Texas Highway Department, therefore, have entered into a cooperative program to collect peak discharge data on small streams for the purpose of deriving flood-frequency data needed for the economical design of culverts and small bridges.

  6. Paleokarst, karst related diagenesis and reservoir development: Examples from Ordovician-Devonian age strata of west Texas and the Mid-continent

    SciTech Connect

    Candelaria, M.P.; Reed, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    This publication served as a guidebook for a Permian Basin Section-SEPM field trip to examine exposures of paleokarst in lower Paleozoic platform carbonates of West Texas and New Mexico. Included are road logs for the field trips and a collection of eighteen papers and abstracts that focus on various aspects of paleokarst in shallow-water carbonates including: (1) recognition and classification of karst-related textures in outcrop and the subsurface; (2) sequence stratigraphic analysis of karsted platforms; (3) diagenetic products of karstification; and (4) production characteristics of karst reservoirs. Collectively, these papers provide excellent documentation of sedimentary fabrics and diagenetic products associated with paleokarst development resulting from regional exposure of Cambro-Ordovician and Siluro-Devonian carbonates of the Great American Bank.'' The major value of this volume lies in the integration of a variety of approaches for examining processes and products related to karstification. These include the use of core, outcrop, well logs, and computer modeling to better understand paleokarst development and preservation. Some of the more interesting articles are highlighted below.

  7. Summary of LOGDEX data base

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, T.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1981-08-01

    A summary of LOGDEX, the digitized well log data base maintained by the Center for Energy Studies at The University of Texas at Austin is presented. These well logs were obtained from various oil companies and then converted from paper well logs to numeric information on magnetic computer tapes for input into the well log data base. This data base serves as a resource for application programs in the study of geopressured geothermal energy resources, for well logging research, and for geological research. Currently the location and scope of well log data that may be found within the LOGDEX data base are limited to wells along the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast that are known to have a potential as a geopressured geothermal energy resource. Additionally the location of these wells in that area is highly localized into areas that have been defined by Department of Energy researchers as having a high potential for geopressured geothermal energy. The LOGDEX data base currently contains data from more than 350 wells, representing more than 1600 logs and 16,600,000 curve feet of data. For quick reference to a given log, the summary listing has been indexed into seven divisions: well classification, location by county or parish, curve type, log type, operators, location by state, and well names. These indexes are arranged alphabetically and cross-referenced by page number.

  8. Rising Above the Storm: DIG TEXAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellins, K. K.; Miller, K. C.; Bednarz, S. W.; Mosher, S.

    2011-12-01

    For a decade Texas educators, scientists and citizens have shown a commitment to earth science education through planning at the national and state levels, involvement in earth science curriculum and teacher professional development projects, and the creation of a model senior level capstone Earth and Space Science course first offered in 2010 - 2011. The Texas state standards for Earth and Space Science demonstrate a shift to rigorous content, career relevant skills and use of 21st century technology. Earth and Space Science standards also align with the Earth Science, Climate and Ocean Literacy framework documents. In spite of a decade of progress K-12 earth science education in Texas is in crisis. Many school districts do not offer Earth and Space Science, or are using the course as a contingency for students who fail core science subjects. The State Board for Educator Certification eliminated Texas' secondary earth science teacher certification in 2009, following the adoption of the new Earth and Space Science standards. This makes teachers with a composite teacher certification (biology, physics and chemistry) eligible to teach Earth and Space Science, as well other earth science courses (e.g., Aquatic Science, Environmental Systems/Science) even if they lack earth science content knowledge. Teaching materials recently adopted by the State Board of Education do not include Earth and Space Science resources. In July 2011 following significant budget cuts at the 20 Education Service Centers across Texas, the Texas Education Agency eliminated key staff positions in its curriculum division, including science. This "perfect storm" has created a unique opportunity for a university-based approach to confront the crisis in earth science education in Texas which the Diversity and Innovation in the Geosciences (DIG) TEXAS alliance aims to fulfill. Led by the Texas A&M University College of Geosciences and The University of Texas Jackson School of Geosciences, with

  9. Diagenesis and late-stage porosity development in the pennsylvanian strawn formation, val verde basin, Texas, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    David, Newell K.; Goldstein, R.H.; Burdick, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    The Middle Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Strawn Formation in the Trans-Pecos area of Texas was deposited during relative tectonic quiescence that prevailed before rapid infilling of the Val Verde Basin. It represents one of a series of backstepping carbonate ramps formed on the craton side of this foreland basin. Strawn Formation carbonate rocks in three cores - Conoco Anna McClung #3-1, Alex Mitchell S2-1R, and Creek Ranch #10-1 - show several shallowing-up ward sequences, each a few meters thick. The Creek Ranch core displays the deepest-water characteristics of the three cores; the lower part of this core is dominated by graded bedding. The Mitchell and McClung cores contain skeletal-rich carbonates. Both of these cores display characteristics of shallow-water bank or lagoonal environments. All three cores have approximately the same diagenetic history. Primary fluid inclusions indicate early porosity-occluding interparticle and mold-filling calcite precipitated from water with a narrow range of salinities. Modal salinities are that of seawater, but slightly lesser salinities (indicating mixing of seawater and meteoric water) and slightly greater salinities (indicating evaporative concentration of seawater) are also indicated. The influence of meteoric groundwater can be detected by stable-isotope analyses of the early cements at stratigraphic levels that correlate to the tops of the major shallowing-upward depositional sequences. However, subaerial exposure surfaces are not demonstrated in these cores but were likely to be present updip. Most porosity is cement-reduced vugs, dissolution-enlarged (and cement-reduced) molds (> 1/16 mm, < 4 mm), and fractures. Minor intraparticle, intercrystalline, and shelter porosity is also present. Reservoir porosity is caused by fracturing and a late-stage dissolution event. Dissolution in the Creek Ranch core is not as pronounced as in the other cores because of a dearth of skeletal material. Porous zones in the McClung and

  10. NARSTO Texas Final Report

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-06

    Final Report for the Texas PM2.5 Sampling and Analysis Study (March 11, 1997, through March 12, 1998) ... files: Section 1: Introduction and Section 2: Sampling Network (PDF) Section 3: Data Base Structure (PDF) ...

  11. TTIP: Texas Teacher Internship Program: 1995 Curriculum Implementation Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walenta, Brian T., Ed.

    In 1989 the Texas Alliance for Science, Technology and Mathematics Education began placing teachers of all levels at industry sites as part of its Texas Teacher Internship Program. In 1995, 15 teachers interned at 11 sites. Each teacher was required to develop a curriculum implementation plan which was to illustrate how they would translate the…

  12. The Texas Bluebonnet Award: Planting the Seeds for Lifelong Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesesne, Teri S.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the Texas Bluebonnet Award (TBA), a program designed and implemented in Texas to encourage children to read more, explore a variety of current books, develop powers of discrimination, and identify their favorite books (www.txla.org/groups/tba/about.html). TBA began in 1979 through the effort of Dr. Janelle…

  13. South Texas Community College Fact Book, 2002-2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Jessie, Ed.

    This 2002-2003 Fact Book for South Texas Community College (STCC) is divided into the following sections: (1) College Profile; (2) Access; (3) Completion; (4) Transfer Rate and Success; (5) Employment; (7) Student Development; (8) TASP (Texas Academic Skills Program) Test; (9) Academic Progress of All Students; (10) Stakeholder Satisfaction; (11)…

  14. Animal Antics. Program Guide for the Texas Reading Club, 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Jeanette

    Developed for the Texas Reading Club, a program sponsored cooperatively by local libraries and the Texas State Library and designed to encourage children and their parents to read and to use the library, this guide is intended to inspire program ideas, including activities, crafts, books, and audiovisuals, appropriate to the Reading Club's 1987…

  15. Labor Productivity Standards in Texas School Foodservice Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherrin, A. Rachelle; Bednar, Carolyn; Kwon, Junehee

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Purpose of this research was to investigate utilization of labor productivity standards and variables that affect productivity in Texas school foodservice operations. Methods: A questionnaire was developed, validated, and pilot tested, then mailed to 200 randomly selected Texas school foodservice directors. Descriptive statistics for…

  16. Report on the Texas Geography Fund Program, Fiscal Year 2004.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2004

    2004-01-01

    House Bill 3590, passed by the 77th Texas Legislature, established the Texas Fund for Geography Education. The legislation permits the Board to enter into an agreement with the National Geographic Society to develop and operate an endowment fund, the earnings of which will be available for competitive grants to fund partnerships which enhance…

  17. Attrition Rates in Texas Public High Schools Still High.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Roy

    1999-01-01

    The percentage of students of all races and ethnicities lost from public school enrollment has worsened in Texas in recent years. This paper presents major findings from a recent attrition study by the Intercultural Development Research Association (IDRA). It also restates recommendations from the IDRA policy brief, "Missing Texas Youth --Dropout…

  18. A water resource assessment of the playa lakes of the Texas High Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) staff are studying the water-resource potential of playa lakes in the Texas High Plains in partnership with the U. S. Department of Agriculture— Agricultural Research Service and Texas Tech University. Phase 1 of the research seeks to measure the volume of water ...

  19. Texas Schools, Inc.: A Case Study of the Transfer of Technology at a Pilot Bilingual Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Vangie L.

    Texas Schools, Inc. (TSI) developed a pilot program in bilingual education for Mexican-American vocational workers in the Department of Diesel Mechanics at Texas Tech University. This study assesses the transfer of technology in that environment using quantitative and qualitative measures. TSI, a technical and vocational school in Lubbock, Texas,…

  20. Regional Plan for Texas Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This report was developed in response to Texas Education Code 61.051(i), requiring the Coordinating Board to develop a long-range plan for higher education, by region. A wide variety of factors, including educational attainment of the current population, existing degree programs, programs where significant unmet need may exist, programs provided…

  1. Influence of structural evolution on reservoir development and distribution in the Silurian Fusselman: Vermejo-Moore Hopper field, Loving and Ward Counties, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Colleary, W.M.; Hulme, J.R. ); Crafton, J.W. Gas Research Institute, Chicago, IL )

    1992-04-01

    The Vermejo-Moore Hooper field lies in the deep Delaware basin adjacent to the Pecos River in Loving and Ward counties, Texas. Discovered in 1973, the field produces dry gas from the Fusselman and Ellenburger formations. The Fusselman reservoir has produced over 400 bcf of gas from depths between 18,500 and 19,200 ft. The field primarily is a structural trap, but the distribution of reserves in the reservoir suggests a strong stratigraphic component. The reservoir is composed of fractured dolomites and cherts of the Silurian Fusselman and overlying Wristen formations. Unconformities and their accompanying diagenetic processes play a major role in the reservoir. The occurrence of pervasive dolomitization and nodular cherts are interpreted to indicate diagenesis associated with subaerial exposure and karsting. Thick sections also may be absent due to erosion over paleostructures, and preserved in flanking positions. Detailed paleostructural interpretation of the Vermejo-Moore Hooper field reveals a history of recurrent movement of the basement and demonstrates the influence of structural growth on the development and distribution of porosity and permeability in the Fusselman reservoir. Early structural growth can influence the distribution of both depositional facies and erosional processes. Paleostructure maps in the Silurian-Devonian indicate that a series of northwest-southeast-trending, low-relief structures existed during the Silurian. Growth of these structures through the Devonian can be documented and the presence of fault-bounded basement blocks can be inferred. The influence of this structural growth on the development of the reservoir is also demonstrated.

  2. Relationship of Ordovician and Silurian reservoir development to unconformities at Midland farms and Inez fields, Andrews County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Mear, C.E.; Becher, J.W.

    1986-03-01

    Hydrocarbons are being produced at Midland Farms and Inez fields from Ellenburger dolomites and Fusselman limestones. Reservoirs developed there during Ordovician and Silurian periods of minor folding and faulting, followed by regional uplift and subaerial exposure of the carbonates. Vuggy, cavernous, and solution-enlarged fracture porosity was developed in the Lower Ordovician Ellenburger dolomites prior to deposition of the overlying Middle Ordovician shales of the Simpson Group. Vuggy and cavernous porosity developed in the Lower Silurian Fusselman crinoid-ostracod-pellet packstones and grainstones before deposition of the overlying Silurian Wristen shales. Montoya siliceous limestones of Late Ordovician age were truncated during a period of pre-Silurian erosion, but porosity development is not indicated in Montoya rock cuttings. Only minor amounts of porosity developed in the Lower to Middle Devonian Thirty-one packstones and wackestones as a result of uplift and erosion in the Middle Devonian. Regional compression during the post-Mississippian enhanced doubly plunging anticlines now having up to 91 m (300 ft) of closure at the Ellenburger through Thirty-one formations at Midland Farms and Inez fields. Fractures may have developed in Paleozoic limestones during this period of folding, but reservoir enhancement appears to have resulted only in the Ellenburger dolomites. Representative porosity measurements of the Ellenburger and Fusselman pay zones cannot be made from wireline log calculations, due to the fractured, vuggy, and cavernous nature of the porosity.

  3. 77 FR 26534 - Texas Eastern Transmission, LP; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Texas Eastern Transmission, LP; Notice of Application Take notice that on April 19, 2012, Texas Eastern Transmission, LP (Texas Eastern), 5400 Westheimer Court, Houston, Texas... associated ancillary facilities in Montgomery County, Texas. Specifically, Texas Eastern proposes to...

  4. Karst development in the Tobosa basin (Ordovician-Devonian) strata in the El Paso border region of west Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Lemone, D.V. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-02-01

    Karst development within the Tobosa basin strata in the El Paso border region is best displayed during two time intervals: Middle Ordovician (27 Ma) developed on the Lower Ordovician El Paso Group and Middle Silurian to Middle Devonian (40 Ma) karst developed on the Lower-Middle Fusselman Formation. These major exposure intervals are recognized in regional outcrops as well as in the subsurface of the Permian Basin where they form major reservoirs. Minor local karsting is noted also within and upon the Upper Ordovician (Montoya Group) and within the shoaling upward members of overlying the Fusselman Formation. Middle Ordovician karsting with major cavern development extends down into McKellingon Canyon Formation approximately 1,000 feet below the top of the Lower Ordovician El Paso Group. The McKellingon is overlain by the cavern roof-forming early diagenetic dolomites, lower Scenic Drive Formation which in turn is overlain by the locally karsted upper Scenic Drive and Florida Mountains formations. Collapse of the overlying Montoya Group into El Paso Group rocks is observed. The Fusselman Formation rests disconformably on the Montoya Group. It is a massive, vuggy, fine- to coarsely-crystalline, whitish dolomite. Extensive karsting has developed on the top of the Fusselman. The middle Devonian Canutillo Formation with a basal flooding deposit overlies this karst surface. Minor karsting following fracture systems extends from the major karst of the El Paso Group up into the major karst in the Fusselman. The karst seems to be following and developing along the same linear fracture systems. If so, it is not unreasonable to interpret these fracture systems as being inherited from the earlier Precambrian structures underlying them.

  5. Evaluating the Mathematics Achievement Levels of Students Participating in the Texas FFA Agricultural Mechanics Career Development Event

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edney, Kirk Clowe

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a mathematics enrichment activity used to improve the mathematics performance of students relative to participation in the State Agricultural Mechanics Career Development Event (CDE) and in mandated assessments. The treatment group (13 schools, 43 students) participated in a…

  6. Academy of Human Resource Development International Research Conference Proceedings (Austin, Texas, March 3-7, 2004). Volume 1 and 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Toby Marshall, Ed.; Morris, Michael Lane, Ed.; Inbakumar, Vinod, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This document contains 162 papers and innovative sessions, two poster sessions presented at a conference on human resource development (HRD). A program overview, author index, and a keyword index are also included. The papers are grouped by the conference's 56 symposia, which were devoted to the following topics: HRD with International and…

  7. Quest for Quality. Proceedings of National Research Conference on Human Resource Development (College Station, Texas, April 22-24, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathis, Laura, Ed.; Mizer, Kaye, Ed.

    Papers on the theme of quality in human resource development include the following: "Missing Link to Quality: An Examination of the Use of Steven Covey's '7 Habits of Highly Effective People' in State Agencies" (Adair et al.); "Executive Women in Business in the United States" (Bierema); "Extent and Nature of Employee Initiated Learning in the…

  8. Transforming Developmental Education in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Developmental Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, with support from the Texas Legislature, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board has funded various developmental education initiatives, including research and evaluation efforts, to help Texas public institutions of higher education provide more effective programs and services to underprepared students. Based on evaluation…

  9. The Texas Ranger of Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zlatos, Bill

    1996-01-01

    Texas takes test security seriously. Joe Lucio, the Texas Ranger of testing, investigates security breaches of the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills--a mandatory, high-stakes examination. Students cheat mainly on the test required for graduation. Educators cheat by helping test-takers. Lucio's low-key, persistent investigative style usually…

  10. Texas Almanac, 2002-2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos, Mary G., Ed.

    The 61st edition of the "Texas Almanac" has a reputation as the definitive source for Texas information since 1857. It contains details of the Census 2000 official population count, including statewide, county and town counts, plus an analysis of the numbers by experts at Texas's State Data Center. It includes information about politics,…

  11. Reserve and production data for the Andector Field area, Central Basin Platform, West Texas: Data for model constraint and development

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, K.R.; Hoak, T.E. |; Ortoleva, P.

    1998-12-31

    The integrated model under development will ultimately predict reservoir properties, volumes, fluid content, and fluid composition (water, oil, and gas). Oil properties are presented here for use in subsequent flow models. To further constrain and verify these predictions, production history data, reservoir geometry, and well test data are used to map the initial potential, remaining reserves, and maximum non allowable limited production rates of the Andector Field. Historic bottom hole pressure data illustrate early production interference and boundary effects.

  12. Developing and Applying a Multi-scale Framework to Study the Relationship between Landscapes and Coastal Waters in the Texas Gulf Coast in a Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z. L.; McClelland, J. W.; Su, H.; Cai, X.; Lin, P.; Tavakoly, A. A.; Griffin, C. G.; Turner, E.; Maidment, D. R.; Montagna, P.

    2014-12-01

    This study seeks to improve our understanding of how upland landscapes and coastal waters, which are connected by watersheds, respond to changes in hydrological and biogeochemical cycles resulting from changes in climate, local weather patterns, and land use. This paper will report our progress in the following areas. (1) The Noah-MP land surface model is augmented to include the soil nitrogen leaching and plants fixation and uptake of nitrogen. (2) We have evaluated temperature, precipitation and runoff change (2039-2048 relative to 1989-1998) patterns in Texas under the A2 emission scenario using the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) product. (3) We have linked a GIS-based river routing model (RAPID) and a GIS-based nitrogen input dataset (TX-ANB). The modeling framework was conducted for total nitrogen (TN) load estimation in the San Antonio and Guadalupe basins. (4) Beginning in July 2011, the Colorado, Guadalupe, San Antonio, and Nueces rivers have been sampled on a monthly basis. Sampling continued until November 2013. We also have established an on-going citizen science sampling program. We have contacted the Lower Colorado River Authority and the Texas Stream Team at Texas State University to solicit participation in our program. (5) We have tested multiple scenarios of nutrient contribution to South Texas bays. We are modeling the behavior of these systems under stress due to climate change such as less overall freshwater inflow, increased inorganic nutrient loading, and more frequent large storms.

  13. Minority Leadership Development in Technical and Vocational Education for Community Colleges and Technical Institutes: An Imperative for the State of Texas. A Report of the Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, La Verne H.; And Others

    In 1988, the Minority Leadership Project was undertaken at Texas A and M to: (1) identify potential minority leaders within technical and vocational education and recruit them for leadership training; (2) identify methods to train participants; and (3) design a leadership training program to move identified individuals into positions of greater…

  14. Developing a model for effects of climate change on human health and health-environment interactions: Heat stress in Austin, Texas presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods In December, 2010, a consortium of EPA, Centers for Disease Control, and state and local health officials convened in Austin, Texas for a “participatory modeling workshop” on climate change effects on human health and health-environment int...

  15. Developing a model for effects of climate change on human health and health-environment interactions: Heat stress in Austin, Texas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods In December, 2010, a consortium of EPA, Centers for Disease Control, and state and local health officials convened in Austin, Texas for a “participatory modeling workshop” on climate change effects on human health and health-environment interactions. ...

  16. Arsenic and Associated Trace Metals in Texas Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, L.; Herbert, B. E.

    2002-12-01

    The value of groundwater has increased substantially worldwide due to expanding human consumption. Both the quantity and quality of groundwater are important considerations when constructing policies on natural resource conservation. This study is focused on evaluating groundwater quality in the state of Texas. Historical data from the Texas Water Development Board and the National Uranium Resource Evaluation were collected into a GIS database for spatial and temporal analyses. Specific attentions were placed on arsenic and other trace metals in groundwater. Recent studies in the United States have focused on isolated incidences of high arsenic occurrence, ignoring possible connections between arsenic and other trace metals. Descriptive statistics revealed strong correlations in groundwater between arsenic and other oxyanions including vanadium, selenium and molybdenum. Arsenic and associated trace metals were clustered at three physiographic hotspots, the Southern High Plains, the Gulf Coastal Plains of Texas, and West Texas. A geologic survey showed that arsenic and other trace metals in Texas groundwater follow local geologic trends. Uranium deposits and associated mineralization were found to occur in the same physiographic locations. Uranium mineralization may be a significant natural source of arsenic and other trace metals in Texas groundwater. Recharge, evaporative concentration, and aquifer characteristics were also contributing factors to the occurrence of trace metals in Texas groundwater. Spatial statistics were used to delineate natural sources from anthropogenic inputs. Similarly, the natural background was estimated from the spatial distribution of trace metal observations in Texas groundwater.

  17. Texas Scholars: Successful Partnerships and Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, William L.; Randolph, Joe; Devilbiss, Charles; Johnson, Annabel M.

    The Texas Scholars Program uses business and community involvement to motivate middle- and lower-ranked high school students to take and complete a rigorous academic curriculum to prepare them for the labor market or postsecondary education. The paper examines variables such as staff development, community involvement, support from the central…

  18. Online Retrieval Systems Users Survey from Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Phillip M.

    Based on a survey of 160 Texas college and university libraries, this study reports on their access to and usage of 3 online information retrieval systems: Bibliographic Retrieval Services (BRS), Lockheed's DIALOG Information Services, and System Development Corporation's ORBIT Information Retrieval System. The study finds that 24 percent of all…

  19. Marine Occupations in the Texas Coastal Zone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinnerney, Beryl; Clark, Donald L.

    Marine career information is provided, intended for use by high school students, counselors, teachers, and curriculum developers. Material was gathered from a review of occupational publications, including extended use of the "Dictionary of Occupational Titles" (D.O.T.), and from interviews of persons employed in marine occupations in Texas.…

  20. Competencies for Texas Industrial Arts Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozak, Michael R.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes a project conducted by the Texas Education Agency to (1) develop a catalog of industrial arts and technical competencies needed by a teacher to teach all areas of industrial arts given in the approved curriculum and to (2) define and recommend guidelines for the implementation of competency testing for industrial arts. (JOW)

  1. The Texas Commitment to Instructional Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Patricia F.

    1978-01-01

    The article describes Texas's four vocational instructional materials centers, all located in universities, and the development and dissemination of curriculum materials in distributive education, industrial arts, agriculture, home economics, teaching the disadvantaged, and others. Purchase information for the materials is included. (MF)

  2. Texas Hunter Education Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Steve

    This handbook serves as a reference for the mandatory hunter education course in Texas. The "Introduction" explains hunter education's goal to produce safe, knowledgeable, responsible, and informed hunters. It also gives information related to hunting opportunities, administration, and management. Chapter 2, "Our Hunting Heritage," gives a…

  3. Library Laws of Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getz, Richard E., Comp.

    Compiled to provide a central reference point for all legislative information pertaining to libraries in the State of Texas, this publication includes all pertinent legislation as amended through the 71st Legislature, 1989, Regular Session. This update of the 1980 edition has been expanded to include statutes pertaining to the school and academic…

  4. Library Laws of Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidenberg, Ed, Ed.

    Compiled to provide a central reference point for all legislative information pertaining to libraries in the state of Texas, this publication includes all pertinent legislation as amended through the 66th Legislature, Regular Session, 1979. It contains articles dealing specifically with archives, buildings and property, city libraries, non-profit…

  5. Texas and SREB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with Texas and 15 other member states to improve education at every level--from pre-K to postdoctoral study--through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead" Goals for Education, which call for the region to lead the…

  6. Tornado from Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Kathleen

    1996-01-01

    Santa Fe School Superintendent Yvonne Gonzales, the "Texas Tornado," was hired to fix a 40% student-dropout rate and a white/Hispanic gap in achievement test scores. Gonzales is an avid integrationist; relies on humor, appeasement, and persuasion tactics; and has alienated some school employees by increasing central office administrators. (MLH)

  7. Outdoor Education in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Ray H.

    In Dallas in 1970, high school outdoor education began as a cocurricular woods and waters boys' club sponsored by a community sportsman. Within one year, it grew into a fully accredited, coeducational, academic course with a curriculum devoted to the study of wildlife in Texas, ecology, conservation, hunting, firearm safety, fishing, boating and…

  8. Trouble at Texas Southern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asquith, Christina

    2006-01-01

    On the night of December 4, 2004, a Texas Southern University (TSU) student named Ashley Sloan was gunned down near campus, struck in the temple by a bullet after leaving a party with her friends. The murder prompted an outpouring of accusations concerning poor campus security. For many Houstonians, the shooting raised old fears of the…

  9. East Texas Quilts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteside, Karen, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Patchwork quilting is an original folk art in the United States. Pilgrims first used worn out scraps of cloth to make bed covers in an age of scarcity. Featured here are stories on East Texas Quilts, their origins, the love and hard work which goes into the making of a quilt (Ira Barr and others). The techniques needed to construct a quilt are…

  10. Texas-Oklahoma

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Texas-Oklahoma Border     ... important resources for farming, ranching, public drinking water, hydroelectric power, and recreation. Both originate in New Mexico and ... NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. The MISR data were obtained from the NASA Langley Research Center Atmospheric Science ...

  11. Texas Irrigation Situation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The irrigation situation in Texas is an interaction between hydrology and water policies. In 2012, according to National Agricultural Statistical Service (NASS) four High Plains counties, Gainesville, Yoakum, Terry and Cochran, accounted for approximately 60% of the 150,000 acres of peanut productio...

  12. Evolution of abandoned underground hardrock mine closures by the Texas abandoned mine land reclamation program

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.J.

    1997-12-31

    The Texas Abandoned Mine Land (AML) Reclamation program began investigating, designing and implementing hard rock abandoned underground mine closures, after a young boy fell to his death in an abandoned mine opening in 1982. This paper discusses the evolution of abandoned hard rock mine closures in west Texas, by the Texas AML program in response to the development of abandoned underground mine resource information. Case histories are presented of the Texas AML program`s efforts in west Texas including: mine history summaries; site characterization, environmental assessment; design and construction planning considerations, and construction cost information.

  13. Computed discharges at five sites in lower Laguna Madre near Port Isabel, Texas, June 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    East, Jeffrey W.; Solis, R.S.; Ockerman, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Texas Water Development Board (TWDB), Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD), and Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) are charged by the Texas Legislature with determining freshwater inflows required to maintain the ecological health of streams, bays, and estuaries in Texas. To determine required inflows, the three agencies collect data and conduct studies on the needs for freshwater inflows to estuaries. The TWDB uses estuarine hydrodynamic and conservativetransport computer models to predict the effects of altering freshwater inflows on estuarine circulation and salinity. To calibrate these models, a variety of water-quality and discharge data are needed.

  14. Catalogue of Texas spiders

    PubMed Central

    Dean, David Allen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This catalogue lists 1,084 species of spiders (three identified to genus only) in 311 genera from 53 families currently recorded from Texas and is based on the “Bibliography of Texas Spiders” published by Bea Vogel in 1970. The online list of species can be found at http://pecanspiders.tamu.edu/spidersoftexas.htm. Many taxonomic revisions have since been published, particularly in the families Araneidae, Gnaphosidae and Leptonetidae. Many genera in other families have been revised. The Anyphaenidae, Ctenidae, Hahniidae, Nesticidae, Sicariidae and Tetragnathidae were also revised. Several families have been added and others split up. Several genera of Corinnidae were transferred to Phrurolithidae and Trachelidae. Two genera from Miturgidae were transferred to Eutichuridae. Zoridae was synonymized under Miturgidae. A single species formerly in Amaurobiidae is now in the Family Amphinectidae. Some trapdoor spiders in the family Ctenizidae have been transferred to Euctenizidae. Gertsch and Mulaik started a list of Texas spiders in 1940. In a letter from Willis J. Gertsch dated October 20, 1982, he stated “Years ago a first listing of the Texas fauna was published by me based largely on Stanley Mulaik material, but it had to be abandoned because of other tasks.” This paper is a compendium of the spiders of Texas with distribution, habitat, collecting method and other data available from revisions and collections. This includes many records and unpublished data (including data from three unpublished studies). One of these studies included 16,000 adult spiders belonging to 177 species in 29 families. All specimens in that study were measured and results are in the appendix. Hidalgo County has 340 species recorded with Brazos County at 323 and Travis County at 314 species. These reflect the amount of collecting in the area. PMID:27103878

  15. Catalogue of Texas spiders.

    PubMed

    Dean, David Allen

    2016-01-01

    This catalogue lists 1,084 species of spiders (three identified to genus only) in 311 genera from 53 families currently recorded from Texas and is based on the "Bibliography of Texas Spiders" published by Bea Vogel in 1970. The online list of species can be found at http://pecanspiders.tamu.edu/spidersoftexas.htm. Many taxonomic revisions have since been published, particularly in the families Araneidae, Gnaphosidae and Leptonetidae. Many genera in other families have been revised. The Anyphaenidae, Ctenidae, Hahniidae, Nesticidae, Sicariidae and Tetragnathidae were also revised. Several families have been added and others split up. Several genera of Corinnidae were transferred to Phrurolithidae and Trachelidae. Two genera from Miturgidae were transferred to Eutichuridae. Zoridae was synonymized under Miturgidae. A single species formerly in Amaurobiidae is now in the Family Amphinectidae. Some trapdoor spiders in the family Ctenizidae have been transferred to Euctenizidae. Gertsch and Mulaik started a list of Texas spiders in 1940. In a letter from Willis J. Gertsch dated October 20, 1982, he stated "Years ago a first listing of the Texas fauna was published by me based largely on Stanley Mulaik material, but it had to be abandoned because of other tasks." This paper is a compendium of the spiders of Texas with distribution, habitat, collecting method and other data available from revisions and collections. This includes many records and unpublished data (including data from three unpublished studies). One of these studies included 16,000 adult spiders belonging to 177 species in 29 families. All specimens in that study were measured and results are in the appendix. Hidalgo County has 340 species recorded with Brazos County at 323 and Travis County at 314 species. These reflect the amount of collecting in the area. PMID:27103878

  16. Investigation of land use, development, and parking policies to support the use of high-occupancy vehicles in Texas. Final research report, September 1993-August 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Turnbull, K.F.; Turner, P.A.; Lindquist, N.F.

    1995-11-01

    The research study examined the factors that influence commuting behavior, the reaction of commuters to various strategies and techniques to encourage alternative commute modes, and the use of different programs by public agencies and businesses in Texas. This was accomplished through a state-of-the-art literature review; discussion groups with representatives from the public and private sectors in Dallas, Houston, and Austin; an evaluation of the Houston Employer Trip Reduction Plans; and surveys of bus riders, carpoolers, and motorists on HOV lanes and freeways in Dallas and Houston. The research results identify the strategies that appear most appropriate for further application in Texas and potential implementation techniques. The results indicate that voluntary efforts are favored over mandatory programs. Further, support was strongest for transit services and support facilities, ridesharing, employee incentives, and on-site amenities. Less support was voiced for pricing strategies, including congestion pricing, increasing parking rates, and raising the tax on gasoline.

  17. Development of a spatially targeted field sampling technique for the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, by mapping white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus, habitat in South Texas.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Pamela L; Welch, John B; Kramer, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The objective of our study was to determine whether satellite remote sensed data could be used to identify white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmerman) (Artiodactyla: Cervidae), habitat and target locations for sampling free-living larvae of the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Canestrini) (Ixodida: Ixodidae) in South Texas. Two methods for mapping white-tailed deer habitat were used, an object-oriented method to identify closed canopies and waterways for deer movement and two vegetation indices: the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index and the Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index to identify forage for deer. These two data sets of favorable white-tailed deer habitat were combined within a geographic information system to identify locations for sampling ticks. Larvae of R. (B.) microplus, were sampled in Zapata County, Texas, by walking transects with attached flannel panels to jeans. Although the data set and sampling period were limited, data analysis demonstrated that sampling of free-living larvae of R. (B.) microplus can be conducted in South Texas, and larvae were most abundant in areas that harbored O. virginianus. Spatial analysis of satellite imagery to classify white-tailed deer/southern cattle tick habitat proved efficacious and may be useful in directing sampling activities in the field. PMID:25368044

  18. Development of a Spatially Targeted Field Sampling Technique for the Southern Cattle Tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, by Mapping Whitetailed Deer, Odocoileus virginianus, Habitat in South Texas

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Pamela L.; Welch, John B.; Kramer, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The objective of our study was to determine whether satellite remote sensed data could be used to identify white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmerman) (Artiodactyla: Cervidae), habitat and target locations for sampling free-living larvae of the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Canestrini) (Ixodida: Ixodidae) in South Texas. Two methods for mapping white-tailed deer habitat were used, an object-oriented method to identify closed canopies and waterways for deer movement and two vegetation indices: the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index and the Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index to identify forage for deer. These two data sets of favorable white-tailed deer habitat were combined within a geographic information system to identify locations for sampling ticks. Larvae of R. (B.) microplus, were sampled in Zapata County, Texas, by walking transects with attached flannel panels to jeans. Although the data set and sampling period were limited, data analysis demonstrated that sampling of free-living larvae of R. (B.) microplus can be conducted in South Texas, and larvae were most abundant in areas that harbored O. virginianus. Spatial analysis of satellite imagery to classify white-tailed deer/southern cattle tick habitat proved efficacious and may be useful in directing sampling activities in the field. PMID:25368044

  19. Development of a spatially targeted field sampling technique for the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, by mapping white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus, habitat in South Texas.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Pamela L; Welch, John B; Kramer, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The objective of our study was to determine whether satellite remote sensed data could be used to identify white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmerman) (Artiodactyla: Cervidae), habitat and target locations for sampling free-living larvae of the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Canestrini) (Ixodida: Ixodidae) in South Texas. Two methods for mapping white-tailed deer habitat were used, an object-oriented method to identify closed canopies and waterways for deer movement and two vegetation indices: the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index and the Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index to identify forage for deer. These two data sets of favorable white-tailed deer habitat were combined within a geographic information system to identify locations for sampling ticks. Larvae of R. (B.) microplus, were sampled in Zapata County, Texas, by walking transects with attached flannel panels to jeans. Although the data set and sampling period were limited, data analysis demonstrated that sampling of free-living larvae of R. (B.) microplus can be conducted in South Texas, and larvae were most abundant in areas that harbored O. virginianus. Spatial analysis of satellite imagery to classify white-tailed deer/southern cattle tick habitat proved efficacious and may be useful in directing sampling activities in the field.

  20. An overview of the facilities, activities, and developments at the University of North Texas Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Rout, Bibhudutta; Dhoubhadel, Mangal S.; Poudel, Prakash R.; Kummari, Venkata C.; Pandey, Bimal; Deoli, Naresh T.; Lakshantha, Wickramaarachchige J.; Mulware, Stephen J.; Baxley, Jacob; Manuel, Jack E.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Szilasi, Szabolcs; Weathers, Duncan L.; Reinert, Tilo; Glass, Gary A.; Duggan, Jerry L.; McDaniel, Floyd D.

    2013-07-03

    The Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL) at the University of North Texas includes several accelerator facilities with capabilities of producing a variety of ion beams from tens of keV to several MeV in energy. The four accelerators are used for research, graduate and undergraduate education, and industrial applications. The NEC 3MV Pelletron tandem accelerator has three ion sources for negative ions: He Alphatross and two different SNICS-type sputter ion sources. Presently, the tandem accelerator has four high-energy beam transport lines and one low-energy beam transport line directly taken from the negative ion sources for different research experiments. For the low-energy beam line, the ion energy can be varied from {approx}20 to 80 keV for ion implantation/modification of materials. The four post-acceleration beam lines include a heavy-ion nuclear microprobe; multi-purpose PIXE, RBS, ERD, NRA, and broad-beam single-event upset; high-energy ion implantation line; and trace-element accelerator mass spectrometry. The NEC 3MV single-ended Pelletron accelerator has an RF ion source mainly for hydrogen, helium and heavier inert gases. We recently installed a capacitive liner to the terminal potential stabilization system for high terminal voltage stability and high-resolution microprobe analysis. The accelerator serves a beam line for standard RBS and RBS/C. Another beamline for high energy focused ion beam application using a magnetic quadrupole lens system is currently under construction. This beam line will also serve for developmental work on an electrostatic lens system. The third accelerator is a 200 kV Cockcroft-Walton accelerator with an RF ion source. The fourth accelerator is a 2.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which was in operation for last several decades is currently planned to be used mainly for educational purpose. Research projects that will be briefly discussed include materials synthesis/modification for photonic, electronic, and

  1. Quaternary faults of west Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.W.; Raney, J.A. . Bureau of Economic Geology)

    1993-04-01

    North- and northwest-striking intermontane basins and associated normal faults in West Texas and adjacent Chihuahua, Mexico, formed in response to Basin and Range tectonism that began about 24 Ma ago. Data on the precise ages of faulted and unfaulted Quaternary deposits are sparse. However, age estimates made on the basis of field stratigraphic relationships and the degree of calcic soil development have helped determine that many of the faults that bound the basin margins ruptured since the middle Pleistocene and that some faults probably ruptured during the Holocene. Average recurrence intervals between surface ruptures since the middle Pleistocene appear to be relatively long, about 10,000 to 100,000 yr. Maximum throw during single rupture events have been between 1 and 3 m. Historic seismicity in West Texas is low compared to seismicity in many parts of the Basin and Range province. The largest historic earthquake, the 1931 Valentine earthquake in Ryan Flat/Lobo Valley, had a magnitude of 6.4 and no reported surface rupture. The most active Quaternary faults occur within the 120-km-long Hueco Bolson, the 70-km-long Red Light Bolson, and the > 200-km-long Salt Basins/Wild Horse Flat/Lobo Valley/Ryan Flat.

  2. Corpus Christi, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This near vertical view of the south Texas coast shows the city of Corpus Christi (28.0N, 97.0W) and Corpus Christi Bay. Mustang Island and the Gulf of Mexico are seen in the Southeast corner of the view. The Nueces River flows into the bay from the west. The light toned squiggly lines in Corpus Christi Bay are mud trails caused by shrimp boats dragging their nets along the shallow bottom of the bay.

  3. San Antonio, Texas, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This sharp, cloud free view of San Antonio, Texas (29.5N, 98.5W) illustrates the classic pattern of western cities. The city has a late nineteenth century Anglo grid pattern overlaid onto an earlier, less regular Hispanic settlement. A well marked central business district having streets laid out north/south and east/west is surrounded by blocks of suburban homes and small businesses set between the older colonial radial transportation routes.

  4. Human lead absorption -- Texas.

    PubMed

    1997-09-19

    In December 1971, the City-County Health Department in El Paso, Texas, discovered that an ore smelter in El Paso was discharging large quantities of lead and other metallic wastes into the air. Between 1969 and 1971, this smelter had released 1,116 tons of lead, 560 tons of zinc, 12 tons of cadmium, and 1.2 tons of arsenic into the atmosphere through its stacks.

  5. Libraries in Texas: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/texas.html Libraries in Texas To use the sharing features on ... Amarillo Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Harrington Library of the Health Sciences 1400 Wallace Boulevard Amarillo, ...

  6. Thunderstorm, Texas Gulf Coast, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This thunderstorm along the Texas Gulf Coast (29.0N, 95.0W), USA is seen as the trailing edge of a large cloud mass formed along the leading edge of a spring frontal system stretching northwest to southeast across the Texas Gulf Coast. This system brought extensive severe weather and flooding to parts of Texas and surrounding states. Muddy water discharging from coastal streams can be seen in the shallow Gulf of Mexico as far south as Lavaca Bay.

  7. Abandoned Texas oil fields

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    Data for Texas abandoned oil fields were primarily derived from two sources: (1) Texas Railroad Commission (TRRC), and (2) Dwight's ENERGYDATA. For purposes of this report, abandoned oil fields are defined as those fields that had no production during 1977. The TRRC OILMASTER computer tapes were used to identify these abandoned oil fields. The tapes also provided data on formation depth, gravity of oil production, location (both district and county), discovery date, and the cumulative production of the field since its discovery. In all, the computer tapes identified 9211 abandoned fields, most of which had less than 250,000 barrel cumulative production. This report focuses on the 676 abandoned onshore Texas oil fields that had cumulative production of over 250,000 barrels. The Dwight's ENERGYDATA computer tapes provided production histories for approximately two-thirds of the larger fields abandoned in 1966 and thereafter. Fields which ceased production prior to 1966 will show no production history nor abandonment date in this report. The Department of Energy hopes the general availability of these data will catalyze the private sector recovery of this unproduced resource.

  8. Development of species-based, regional emission capacities for simulation of biogenic volatile organic compound emissions in land-surface models: An example from Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulden, Lindsey E.; Yang, Zong-Liang

    This paper introduces a method to incorporate species-based variation of the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) into regional climate and weather models. We convert a species-based land-cover database for Texas into a database compatible with the community land model (CLM) and a database compatible with the Noah land-surface model (LSM). We link the LSM-compatible land-cover databases to the original species-based data set as a means to derive region-specific BVOC emission capacities for each plant functional type (in the CLM database) and for each land-cover type (in the Noah database). The spatial distribution of inherent BVOC flux (defined as the product of the BVOC emission capacity and the leaf biomass density) derived using the Texas-specific BVOC emission capacities is well correlated with the spatial distribution of inherent BVOC flux calculated using the original species data ( r=0.89). The mean absolute error for the emission-capacity-derived inherent flux distribution is an order of magnitude lower than the statewide range of inherent fluxes. The ground-referenced land-cover databases derived here are likely more accurate than their satellite-derived counterparts; they can be used for a variety of regional model simulations in Texas. The inherent BVOC flux distributions derived using region-specific BVOC emission capacities are more consistent with observations than the BVOC flux distribution derived using the CLM3 standard BVOC emission capacities, which are top-down estimates based on the literature. When used in conjunction with detailed land-cover data sets, region-specific BVOC emission capacities produce reasonably accurate inherent BVOC fluxes.

  9. Development of a geodatabase for springs within and surrounding outcrops of the Trinity aquifer in northern Bexar County, Texas, 2010-11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Pedraza, Diane E.

    2013-01-01

    Data for 141 springs within and surrounding the Trinity aquifer outcrops in northern Bexar County were compiled from existing reports and databases. These data were augmented with selected data collected onsite, including the location, discharge, and water-quality characteristics of selected springs, and were entered into the geodatabase. The Trinity aquifer in central Texas is commonly divided into the upper, middle, and lower Trinity aquifers; all of the information that was compiled pertaining to the aquifer is for the upper and middle Trinity aquifers.

  10. Solar Hot Water for Motor Inn--Texas City, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Final report describes solar domestic-hot-water heater installation at LaQuinta Motor Inn, Texas City, Texas which furnished 63% of total hot-water load of new 98-unit inn. Report presents a description of system, drawings and photographs of collectors, operations and maintenance instructions, manufacturers' specifications for pumps, and an engineer's report on performance.

  11. SECURES: Austin, Texas demonstration results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Glynn; Shaw, Scott; Scharf, Peter; Stellingworth, Bob

    2003-09-01

    The Law Enforcement technology development community has a growing interest in the technologies associated with gunshot detection and localization. These interests revolve around community-oriented policing. Technologies of interest include those associated with muzzle blast and bullet shockwave detection and the inter-netting of these acoustic sensors with electro-optic sensors. To date, no one sensor technology has proven totally effective for a complete solution. PSI has a muzzle blast detection and localization product which is wireless, highly mobile and reconfigurable, with a user-friendly laptop processor and display unit, which completed a one-year demonstration in Austin, Texas on July 6, 2002. This demonstration was conducted under a Cooperative Agreement with the National Institute of Justice and in cooperation with the Austin Police Department. This paper will discuss the details of the demonstrations, provide a summarized evaluation, elucidate the lessons learned, make recommendations for future deployments and discuss the developmental directions indicated for the future.

  12. Texas' Youngest Children: Texas Household Survey of Families with Children Under Six.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Anita, Ed.; McKee, Diann, Ed.

    This booklet presents a summary of the results of a survey of 1,000 Texan families with children under 6 years of age. The survey (commissioned by the Texas Department of Community Affairs in 1973) was conducted to gather data on families (e.g., age, income level, and education of parents), the health and development of children, and child care…

  13. Texas Education Miracle No Mirage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Jay P.

    2000-01-01

    Defends the significant increases seen in Texas student achievement during the 1990s, addressing attacks on the validity of these improvements. Supports the governor's emphasis on accountability testing because of its positive results, concluding that the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills holds students and schools accountable and provides…

  14. Texas Coastal Cleanup Report, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hara, Kathryn; And Others

    During the 1986 Coastweek, a national event dedicated to improvement of the marine environment, a large beach cleanup was organized on the Texas coast. The goals of the cleanup were to create public awareness of the problems caused by marine debris, and to collect data on the types and quantities of debris found on the Texas coastline. The…

  15. The Texas We Create: State of Texas Children 2012--Texas KIDS COUNT Annual Data Book

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deviney, Frances; Hattemer, Kori

    2012-01-01

    The 2012 data book explores how our kids have fared during the last decade--some outcomes are positive, some negative. But positive or negative outcomes for kids don't just happen. They are the inevitable results of effective or failed policy choices. The State of Texas Children 2012 combines data and policy to tell the story of Texas kids. It's…

  16. Charter Schools in Texas: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Francisco; Slate, John R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we analyzed the literature regarding charter schools in the State of Texas. We specifically examined the evolution of the charter school movement in Texas. Moreover, data regarding the effectiveness/ineffectiveness of charter schools in Texas were discussed. Our overview of Texas charter schools, given their widespread presence in…

  17. Water supply and needs for West Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This presentation focused on the water supplies and needs of West Texas, Texas High Plains. Groundwater is the most commonly used water resources on the Texas High Plains, with withdrawals from the Ogallala Aquifer dominating. The saturation thickness of the Ogallala Aquifer in Texas is such that t...

  18. 77 FR 58025 - Texas Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 943 Texas Regulatory Program AGENCY... the Texas regulatory program (Texas program) under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA or the Act). Texas proposed revisions to its regulations regarding annual permit...

  19. Texas Affordable Baccalaureate Program: A Collaboration between the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, South Texas College, and Texas A&M University-Commerce. CBE Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein-Collins, Rebecca; Glancey, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    This case study is part of a series on newer competency-based degree programs that have been emerging in recent years. In January 2014, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB), South Texas College (STC), and Texas A&M University-Commerce (A&M Commerce) launched the Texas Affordable Baccalaureate Program, the state's first…

  20. Predicting Student Success on the Texas Chemistry STAAR Test: A Logistic Regression Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, William L.; Johnson, Annabel M.; Johnson, Jared

    2012-01-01

    Background: The context is the new Texas STAAR end-of-course testing program. Purpose: The authors developed a logistic regression model to predict who would pass-or-fail the new Texas chemistry STAAR end-of-course exam. Setting: Robert E. Lee High School (5A) with an enrollment of 2700 students, Tyler, Texas. Date of the study was the 2011-2012…

  1. Stream monitoring and educational program in the Red River Basin, Texas, 1996-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldys, Stanley; Phillips, D. Grant

    1998-01-01

    This fact sheet presents the 1996–97 stream monitoring and outreach activities of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Red River Authority of Texas, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the City of Wichita Falls, the Wichita County Water Improvement District No. 2, and the Texas Water Development Board. The fact sheet was prepared by the USGS in cooperation with the Red River Authority of Texas.

  2. The National Energy Strategy - The role of geothermal technology development: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Each year the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an in-depth review of its entire geothermal R D program. The conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal industry. Topics in this year's conference included Hydrothermal Energy Conversion Technology, Hydrothermal Reservoir Technology, Hydrothermal Hard Rock Penetration Technology, Hot Dry Rock Technology, Geopressured-Geothermal Technology and Magma Energy Technology. Each individual paper has been cataloged separately.

  3. Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Development through High-Resolution 3C3D Seismic and Horizontal Drilling: Eva South Marrow Sand Unit, Texas County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler,David M.; Miller, William A.; Wilson, Travis C.

    2002-03-11

    The Eva South Morrow Sand Unit is located in western Texas County, Oklahoma. The field produces from an upper Morrow sandstone, termed the Eva sandstone, deposited in a transgressive valley-fill sequence. The field is defined as a combination structural stratigraphic trap; the reservoir lies in a convex up -dip bend in the valley and is truncated on the west side by the Teepee Creek fault. Although the field has been a successful waterflood since 1993, reservoir heterogeneity and compartmentalization has impeded overall sweep efficiency. A 4.25 square mile high-resolution, three component three-dimensional (3C3D) seismic survey was acquired in order to improve reservoir characterization and pinpoint the optimal location of a new horizontal producing well, the ESU 13-H.

  4. A potential risk assessment of a dengue outbreak in north central Texas, USA. (Part 2 of 2): Development of a practical prevention strategy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon-Hak; Stahl, Matt; Sawlis, Scott; Suzuki, Sumi

    2009-06-01

    In response to three dengue cases in north central Texas in 2005, the authors assessed the potential risk of a dengue outbreak in Dallas County in 2006. As a part of the assessment, habitat factors for dengue vector mosquitoes were quantified and associated with their abundances. In addition, percent population originated from endemic countries (Hispanic origin in the Census data) was associated with vector abundances and habitat factors of the vectors. Percent population data were obtained from publicly accessible databases. The areas with higher Hispanic populations had more Aedes aegypti and container numbers and also appeared to have more shade, which is attractive to this species. The methodology of this study may help to devise a practical strategy to reduce the risk of dengue outbreak in areas where dengue vector activity is present and a potential source of infection.

  5. Texas floods of 1940

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breeding, Seth D.

    1948-01-01

    Floods occurred in Texas during, June, July, and November 1940 that exceeded known stages on many small streams and at a few places on the larger streams. Stages at several stream-gaging stations exceeded the maximum known at those places since the collection of daily records began. A storm, haying its axis generally on a north-south line from Cameron to Victoria and extending across the Brazos, Colorado, Lavaca, and Guadalupe River Basins, caused heavy rainfall over a large part of south-central Texas. The maximum recorded rain of 22.7 inches for the 2-day period June 29-30 occurred at Engle. Of this amount, 17.5 inches fell in the 12-hour period between 8 p.m. June 29, and 8 a.m. June 30. Light rains fell at a number of places on June 28, and additional light rains fell at many places within the area from July 1 to 4. During the period June 28 to July 4 more than 20 inches of rain fell over an area of 300 square miles, more than 15 inches over 1,920 square miles, and more than 10 inches over 5,100 square miles. The average annual rainfall for the area experiencing the heaviest rainfall during this storm is about 35 inches. Farming is largely confined to the fertile flood plains in much of the area subjected to the record-breaking floods in June and July. Therefore these floods, coming at the height of the growing season, caused severe losses to crops. Much damage was done also to highways and railways. The city of Hallettsville suffered the greatest damage of any urban area. The Lavaca River at that place reached a stage 8 feet higher than ever known before, drowned several people, destroyed many homes, and submerged almost the entire business district. The maximum discharge there was 93,100 second-feet from a drainage area of 101 square miles. Dry Creek near Smithville produced a maximum discharge of 1,879 second-feet from an area of 1.48 square miles and a runoff of 11.3 inches in a 2-day period from a rainfall of 19.5 inches. The area in the Colorado River

  6. Conceptual Framework and Basic Competencies for Vocational Home Economics Education in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This document was developed for the purposes of (1) outlining the competencies and subcompetencies to be developed in vocational home economics classes in Texas; (2) providing guidance to teachers for local program planning; and (3) serving as a means of communicating the scope and content of vocational home economics education in Texas to others.…

  7. Assessing the Potential to Expand Community College Baccalaureate Programs in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Lindsay; Goldman, Charles A.; Butterfield, Lindsay; Miller, Trey

    2014-01-01

    Many workforce-development needs, particularly those requiring baccalaureate degrees, remain unmet in some areas of Texas. Employers and students are calling for additional programs to develop workplace skills and to provide opportunities for career advancement. On May 22, 2013, the Texas Legislature approved a bill mandating a study on whether…

  8. Evaluation of high-occupancy vehicle lanes in Texas, 1996. Research report, September 1996-August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Stockton, B.; Daniels, G.; Hall, K.; Christiansen, D.L.

    1997-11-01

    The Texas Department of Transportation sponsored this report. The principal objectives of this effort are to collect, analyze, and interpret data to assess the performance and effectiveness of the committed freeway HOV lanes now being implemented in Texas. This report presents data relating to the six operating HOV lanes now being implemented in Texas. This report presents data relating to the six operating HOV lanes in Texas and focuses on data collected during calendar year 1996. The results of this research have helped the implementing agencies learn from the early experience with HOV lanes in order to allow future projects to be developed more effectively.

  9. Commercial Space Port Planning in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, L.; Looke, B.

    2002-01-01

    The Texas Legislature is providing funding to support research and planning activities aimed at creating a commercial spaceport in the state. These monies have been allocated to regional Spaceport Development Corporations that have been established in three countries containing candidate site locations: Willacy County (in South Texas); Brazoria County (East Texas); and Pecos County (West Texas). This program is being sponsored and coordinated by the Texas Aerospace Commission (TAC). The Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA) at the University of Houston is providing research, planning and design support to TAC and is a member of each of the three regional development teams. Planning must carefully consider special support requirements and operational characteristics of all prospective launch systems along with geographic, infrastructure and environmental factors at each site. Two of the candidate sites are in coastal areas; a priority for certain launch service providers; whereas the third inland site is more attractive to others. Candidate launch systems include winged horizontal takeoff air-launch vehicles, vertical multi-stage reusable launch vehicles, and expendable sub-orbital surrounding rockets. Important research and planning activities include environmental impact assessments, analyses of overflight hazards, investigations of economic impacts and business plan development. The results of these activities will guide master plan development for each site, including: a physical plan (site layout, infrastructure improvements and facility construction); and a strategic plan (user agreements, licenses, finance sources and participants). Commercial spaceport development demands compliance with stringent FAA regulations established by the Office of Commercial Space Transportation (OCST) which exceed minimum standards allowed for U.S. Government spaceport facilities. Key among these requirements are 15,000 ft. radius on-site clear zones

  10. State Agency Applications of EOS Data in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, G. L.

    2001-05-01

    Texas offers a good model for the introduction of remotely sensed data products into the daily operations of state agencies by virtue of its large size and population. The diversity of the Texas landscape coupled with the long distances traveled to perform site inspections place special burdens on the land resource agencies responsible for monitoring crop conditions, water availability, environmental hazards and other natural resource issues. To assist these agencies, the Texas Synergy team has adopted a two-phase approach that incorporates framework geospatial data products designed for the broad user community with remote sensing applications developed for user-specific analyses. A key element to the success of the effort is the development of remote sensing products within a Texas Reference Frame that corresponds to the components of the high-resolution National Spatial Data Infrastructure developed by the state, such as 1-meter CIR digital orthophotographs, digital elevation models, and vector layers for hypsography, hydrography, soils, transportation and boundaries. Users accustomed to working with NSDI products can easily begin to include recently-collected EOS data presented within the same reference frame. Examples of statewide data products made available through the Texas Synergy project are AVHRR NDVI and MODIS imagery, Landsat 7 ETM+ scenes and SPOT 10-meter panchromatic image tiles. Delivery of the products involves a number of mechanisms from CD distribution to Internet FTP downloads, but increasingly relies upon Internet map services, such as ESRI's ArcIMS. Beyond release of the base imagery products, the Texas Synergy team has worked with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Texas Soil and Water Conservation Board, Texas Department of Agriculture, Texas Water Development Board, National Park Service and USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service on a wide range of data applications. Throughout 1999-2000, the magnitude of drought conditions was

  11. Dalhart Texas 1972-2011

    NASA Video Gallery

    A water-rich polka dot pattern takes over the traditional rectangular patchwork of fields in this 40 year sequence of Landsat images of the dry Texas panhandle near the town of Dalhart. In this ser...

  12. Upper Texas Gulf Coast, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The upper Texas Gulf Coast (29.0N, 95.5W), though mostly cloud covered in this view, is still readily identifiable because of the distinctive features of the Texas Gulf Coast. Galveston Island, Galveston Bay and the coastal prairie are in the clear. Most of the city of Houston is cloud covered but the Gulf Freeeway connecting Houston and Galveston can be traced for most of it's route.

  13. Upper Texas Gulf Coast, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Upper Texas Gulf Coast (29.0N, 95.5W) is clearly represented in this view from space. The area covered stretches almost 300 miles from Aransas Pass, on the Texas coast in the south to Cameron, Louisiana in the north. The sharp detail of both the natural and cultural features throughout the scene is especially evident in the Houston area where highways, major streets, airport runways and even some neighborhood lanes can be easily seen.

  14. Enhanced surveillance of maternal mortality in Texas.

    PubMed

    Estes, Larissa J; Lloyd, Linda E; Selwyn, Beatrice J

    2012-12-01

    Maternal mortality is often used to measure health and well-being for women. Improved surveillance efforts can improve maternal mortality estimates and inform the development of strategies to address the needs of maternal and child health populations. The purpose of this study was to provide better estimates of maternal mortality in Texas by using enhanced surveillance methods. Results from our analyses of fetal death and live birth records in Texas from 2000 through 2006 were then linked to pregnancy-related death records and death records of women of childbearing age (15-44 years) in Texas from 2001 through 2006. Enhanced surveillance identified almost 3.5 times as many deaths that might be associated with pregnancy than do current methods and confirmed a persistent race/ethnicity trend in maternal mortality. The leading cause of these 2001-2006 pregnancy-associated deaths was accidents. Enhanced surveillance allows the identification of additional deaths possibly associated with pregnancy and provides a stable foundation to investigate trends further and to review maternal mortality cases systematically.

  15. Compilation of historical water-quality data for selected springs in Texas, by ecoregion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Williams, Iona P.

    2006-01-01

    Springs are important hydrologic features in Texas. A database of about 2,000 historically documented springs and available spring-flow measurements previously has been compiled and published, but water-quality data remain scattered in published sources. This report by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, documents the compilation of data for 232 springs in Texas on the basis of a set of criteria and the development of a water-quality database for the selected springs. The selection of springs for compilation of historical water-quality data in Texas was made using existing digital and hard-copy data, responses to mailed surveys, selection criteria established by various stakeholders, geographic information systems, and digital database queries. Most springs were selected by computing the highest mean spring flows for each Texas level III ecoregion. A brief assessment of the water-quality data for springs in Texas shows that few data are available in the Arizona/New Mexico Mountains, High Plains, East Central Texas Plains, Western Gulf Coastal Plain, and South Central Plains ecoregions. Water-quality data are more abundant for the Chihuahuan Deserts, Edwards Plateau, and Texas Blackland Prairies ecoregions. Selected constituent concentrations in Texas springs, including silica, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, strontium, sulfate, chloride, fluoride, nitrate (nitrogen), dissolved solids, and hardness (as calcium carbonate) are comparatively high in the Chihuahuan Deserts, Southwestern Tablelands, Central Great Plains, and Cross Timbers ecoregions, mostly as a result of subsurface geology. Comparatively low concentrations of selected constituents in Texas springs are associated with the Arizona/New Mexico Mountains, Southern Texas Plains, East Central Texas Plains, and South Central Plains ecoregions.

  16. State of Texas Master Plan for Educational Technology, 2000-2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    This document presents the Texas master plan for educational technology developed by the Education Technology Coordinating Council (ETCC). An executive summary lists ETCC goals and recommendations. The first section of this report provides an overview of educational technology in Texas, including: background; the charge, implementation, guiding…

  17. 78 FR 48318 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; Victoria County, 1997 8...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... AIRS on a monthly basis. The Victoria County monitoring network consists of two ambient air monitors... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; Victoria... County, Texas, developed to ensure continued attainment of the 1997 8-hour National Ambient Air...

  18. Nutrient and biological conditions of selected small streams in the Edwards Plateau, central Texas, 2005-06, and implications for development of nutrient criteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mabe, Jeffrey A.

    2007-01-01

    During the summers of 2005 and 2006 the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, evaluated nutrient and biological conditions in small streams in parts of the Edwards Plateau of Central Texas. Land-cover analysis was used to select 15 small streams that represented a gradient of conditions with the potential to affect nutrient concentrations across the study area, which comprises two of four subregions of the Edwards Plateau ecoregion. All 15 streams were sampled for water properties, nutrients, algae, benthic invertebrates, and fish in summer 2005, and eight streams were resampled in summer 2006. Streams that did not receive wastewater effluent had relatively low nutrient concentrations and were classified as oligotrophic; streams receiving wastewater effluent had relatively high nutrient concentrations and were classified as eutrophic. Nutrient concentrations measured in the least-disturbed streams closely matched the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency nutrient criteria recommendations based on estimated reference concentrations. Nitrogen/phosphorus ratios indicated streams not affected by wastewater effluent might be limited by phosphorus concentrations. Algal indicators of nutrient condition were closely related to dissolved nitrogen concentrations and streamflow conditions. Ambient dissolved nitrogen concentrations (nitrite plus nitrate) were positively correlated with benthic algal chlorophyll-a concentrations. The correlation of benthic algal chlorophyll-a with instantaneous nitrite plus nitrate load was stronger than correlations with ambient nutrients. Increased nutrient concentrations were associated with increased macroalgae cover, wider diel dissolved oxygen ranges, and reduced diel dissolved oxygen minimums. Benthic invertebrate aquatic life use scores generally were classified as High to Exceptional in study streams despite the influence of urbanization or wastewater effluent. Reductions in aquatic

  19. The Texas Supernova Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quimby, Robert

    2006-12-01

    Supernovae (SNe) are popular tools to explore the cosmological expansion of the Universe owing to their bright peak magnitudes and reasonably high rates; however, even the relatively homogeneous Type Ia supernovae are not perfect standard candles intrinsically. Their absolute peak brightness must be established by corrections that have been largely empirical. Hundreds of SNe are now found every year, shrinking the statistical errors in the cosmological terms, but most of these distant discoveries do little to further the physical understanding of SNe, which may illuminate unknown systematics. This talk will describe recent results from the The Texas Supernova Search, a campaign designed to discover not the most SNe nor the most distant SNe, but instead to amass a small collection of well-observed nearby SNe with detailed, multi-epoch spectral observations beginning at the earliest possible phases. For the past two years, we have pointed ROTSE-IIIb's 1.85 x 1.85 degree field of view at nearby galaxy clusters and searched thousands of galaxies, covering hundreds of square degrees on the sky, for supernovae. With ToO time on the neighboring 9.2m Hobby-Eberly Telescope, we have captured SNe spectra at some of the earliest phases ever. I will discuss the implications of these data on the physics of SNe explosions, including the propagation of the burning front and the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae.

  20. Paleohydrology of Southwestern Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochel, R. Craig; Baker, Victor R.; Patton, Peter C.

    1982-08-01

    Current statistical methods may be unable to accurately predict recurrence intervals of rare, large-magnitude floods, especially in semiarid regions having positively skewed annual flood distributions, great hydrologic variability, and widely spaced gaging stations. Current approaches rely on historical data, but catastrophic floods may have recurrence intervals far greater than the length of historical records. In the lower Pecos and Devils Rivers of southwestern Texas, paleoflood discharge and frequency estimates are extended over 10,000 years by the study of slack-water flood sediments. Slack-water deposits are typically fine-grained sand and silt that accumulate during floods in areas where current velocity is reduced, i.e., in back-flooded tributary mouths, channel expansions, downstream from bedrock spurs and/or slump blocks, and in shallow caves along bedrock walls. Radiocarbon dating of organic detritus in slack-water deposits establishes the flood chronology while paleoflood discharges can be estimated by slope-area techniques. Paleoflood information extracted from slack-water sediments can greatly extend flood records. These floods may be weighted like historical data in log Pearson type 3 calculations of flood frequency. Our morphostratigraphic approach combines recorded data with geomorphic evidence to derive estimates of flood frequency. This technique offers an inexpensive and rapid way to assess catastrophic flood risk.

  1. 75 FR 68398 - Texas, Oklahoma & Eastern Railroad, LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Texas, Oklahoma...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... Surface Transportation Board Texas, Oklahoma & Eastern Railroad, LLC--Acquisition and Operation Exemption--Texas, Oklahoma & Eastern Railroad Company Texas, Oklahoma & Eastern Railroad, LLC (TOE), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to acquire from Texas,...

  2. Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In-Situ Recovery Mines, South Texas Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Susan

    2009-01-01

    This talk was presented by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) geologist Susan Hall on May 11, 2009, at the Uranium 2009 conference in Keystone, Colorado, and on May 12, 2009, as part of an underground injection control track presentation at the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) Environmental Trade Fair and Conference in Austin, Texas. Texas has been the location of the greatest number of uranium in-situ recovery (ISR) mines in the United States and was the incubator for the development of alkaline leach technology in this country. For that reason, the author chose to focus on the effectiveness of restoration at ISR mines by examining legacy mines developed in Texas. The best source for accurate information about restoration at Texas ISR mines is housed at the TCEQ offices in Austin. The bulk of this research is an analysis of those records.

  3. Solar domestic hot water system installed at Texas City, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This is the final technical report of the solar energy system located at LaQuinta Motor Inn, Texas City, Texas. The system was designed to supply 63 percent of the total hot water load for a new 98 unit motor inn. The solar energy system consists of a 2100 square feet Raypack liquid flat plate collector subsystem and a 2500 gallon storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 3.67 x 10 to the 8th power Btu/year. Abstracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation, and maintenance instructions are included.

  4. Solar domestic hot water system installed at Texas City, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-12-01

    This is the final technical report of the solar energy system located at LaQuinta Motor Inn, Texas City, Texas. The system was designed to supply 63 percent of the total hot water load for a new 98 unit motor inn. The solar energy system consists of a 2100 square feet Raypack liquid flat plate collector subsystem and a 2500 gallon storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 3.67 x 10 to the 8th power Btu/year. Abstracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation, and maintenance instructions are included.

  5. The Demographics of Corporal Punishment in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examined the student discipline policies of 1,025 Texas school districts, as well as data from the Texas Education Agency's Academic Excellence Indicator System in order to identify demographic patterns regarding corporal punishment policies in Texas schools. The study also studied the relationship between a district's…

  6. Overview of the Texas Youth Fitness Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, James R., Jr.; Martin, Scott B.; Welk, Gregory J.; Zhu, Weimo; Meredith, Marilu D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the historical and legislative backgrounds leading to statewide testing of health-related physical fitness in Texas children grades 3-12 as mandated by Texas Senate Bill 530. The rationale and goals for an associated research project (the Texas Youth Fitness Study, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation) to evaluate…

  7. Master Plan for Texas Higher Education 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin.

    This 5-year plan for Texas higher education, designed to present a "road-map" for all participants in Texas higher education to use in their fulfillment of the higher education mission as established by the Texas Charter for Public Higher Education, is organized around six principles established by the charter. Following an overview on Texas…

  8. Administrative Expenditures in Texas Public Universities, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin.

    This document presents text and graphs to provide an overview of administrative expenditures in institutions of higher education in Texas. Administrative expenditure indicators at Texas public senior universities are compared with each other, with national averages, and with averages of the 10 states nearest Texas in population. In constant…

  9. 21 CFR 808.93 - Texas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Texas. 808.93 Section 808.93 Food and Drugs FOOD... EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.93 Texas. (a) The following Texas medical device requirement is...

  10. 21 CFR 808.93 - Texas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Texas. 808.93 Section 808.93 Food and Drugs FOOD... EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.93 Texas. (a) The following Texas medical device requirement is...

  11. 21 CFR 808.93 - Texas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Texas. 808.93 Section 808.93 Food and Drugs FOOD... EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.93 Texas. (a) The following Texas medical device requirement is...

  12. 21 CFR 808.93 - Texas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Texas. 808.93 Section 808.93 Food and Drugs FOOD... EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.93 Texas. (a) The following Texas medical device requirement is...

  13. 21 CFR 808.93 - Texas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Texas. 808.93 Section 808.93 Food and Drugs FOOD... EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.93 Texas. (a) The following Texas medical device requirement is...

  14. 76 FR 15358 - Texas Disaster #TX-00371

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00371 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 03/14/2011. Incident: Texas Panhandle Wildfires. Incident Period: 02/27/2011 through 02/28/2011. Effective Date:...

  15. 75 FR 48384 - Texas Disaster #TX-00361

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00361 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Texas (FEMA-1931-DR... Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): Texas: Brooks, Crockett, Dimmit Duval, Edwards, Kenedy, Kinney...

  16. 77 FR 6620 - Texas Disaster #TX-00385

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00385 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 01/30/2012... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Harris. Contiguous Counties: Texas: Brazoria,...

  17. 76 FR 28841 - Texas Disaster # TX-00376

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION Disaster Declaration 12564 and 12565 Texas Disaster TX-00376 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business... State of Texas dated 05/09/2011. Incident: Wichita County Complex Wildfires. Incident Period: 04/15/2011.... Contiguous Counties: Texas: Archer, Baylor, Clay, Wilbarger, Oklahoma: Cotton, Tillman. The Interest...

  18. 75 FR 1421 - Texas Disaster # TX-00354

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00354 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 01/04/2010... the disaster: Primary Counties: Angelina. Contiguous Counties: Texas: Cherokee, Houston,...

  19. 76 FR 40765 - Texas Disaster #TX-00378

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00378 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 07/05/2011... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Grimes. Contiguous Counties: Texas: Brazos,...

  20. 76 FR 58329 - Texas Disaster #TX-00381

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12815 and 12816 Texas Disaster TX-00381 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business... the State of Texas (FEMA-4029-DR), dated 09/09/2011. Incident: Wildfires. Incident Period: 08/30/2011... Loans Only): Texas: Caldwell, Fayette, Lee, Travis, Williamson. The Interest Rates are: ] Percent...

  1. 76 FR 24555 - Texas Disaster #TX-00375

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00375 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas. Dated 04/26/2011. Incident... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Jeff Davis. Contiguous Counties: Texas,...

  2. 78 FR 27468 - Texas Disaster # TX-00401

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00401 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated May 2, 2013... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Mclennan. Contiguous Counties: Texas: Bell;...

  3. Research on Texas Water and Recreation Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Texas Agricultural Experiment Station.

    The need for research pertaining to the best use of water and recreation resources in Texas is emphasized in these four papers presented at the 1968 Experiment Station Conference, College Station, Texas. "Parameters of Water Resources in Texas" identifies and elaborates upon the important elements presently constituting the water resources…

  4. Ready Texas: Stakeholder Convening. Proceedings Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intercultural Development Research Association, 2016

    2016-01-01

    With the adoption of substantial changes to Texas high school curricula in 2013 (HB5), a central question for Texas policymakers, education and business leaders, families, and students is whether and how HB5 implementation impacts the state of college readiness and success in Texas. Comprehensive research is needed to understand the implications…

  5. Texas Migrant Labor. Annual Report, 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good Neighbor Commission of Texas, Austin.

    Among the responsibilities of the Good Neighbor Commission of Texas are (1) a survey of conditions and (2) a study of problems related to migrant labor in Texas. This annual report of the 1969 migrant scene shows the results of that survey and study. Beginning with an overview of Texas migrant labor, which goes back several years and includes a…

  6. Geologic Map Database of Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoeser, Douglas B.; Shock, Nancy; Green, Gregory N.; Dumonceaux, Gayle M.; Heran, William D.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to release a digital geologic map database for the State of Texas. This database was compiled for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Program, National Surveys and Analysis Project, whose goal is a nationwide assemblage of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and other data. This release makes the geologic data from the Geologic Map of Texas available in digital format. Original clear film positives provided by the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology were photographically enlarged onto Mylar film. These films were scanned, georeferenced, digitized, and attributed by Geologic Data Systems (GDS), Inc., Denver, Colorado. Project oversight and quality control was the responsibility of the U.S. Geological Survey. ESRI ArcInfo coverages, AMLs, and shapefiles are provided.

  7. Tri-county pilot study. [Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, C. A. (Principal Investigator); Austin, T. W.; Kerber, A. G.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An area inventory was performed for three southeast Texas counties (Montgomery, Walker, and San Jacinto) totaling 0.65 million hectares. The inventory was performed using a two level hierarchy. Level 1 was divided into forestland, rangeland, and other land. Forestland was separated into Level 2 categories: pine, hardwood, and mixed; rangeland was not separated further. Results consisted of area statistics for each county and for the entire study site for pine, hardwood, mixed, rangeland, and other land. Color coded county classification maps were produced for the May data set, and procedures were developed and tested.

  8. Latest Guadalupian (Middle Permian) conodonts and foraminifers from West Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lambert, L.L.; Wardlaw, B.R.; Nestell, M.K.; Nestell, G.P.

    2002-01-01

    Clarkina, which characterizes Upper Permian (Lopingian Series) strata, evolved from Jinogondolella altudaensis in the Delaware basin of West Texas as demonstrated by transitional continuity. The West Texas section is significantly more complete in the uppermost Guadalupian interval than that of the probable GSSP reference section in South China, and clarifies the phylogenetic relationships among other conodont taxa as well. Jinogondolella granti clearly evolved into J. artafrons new species, both characterized by Pa elements with a distinctive fused carina. Representatives of Jinogondolella crofti are limited to the uppermost part of the altudaensis zone, and are interpreted as terminal paedomorphs. The associated foraminifer (non-fusulinid) fauna has some species in common with Zechstein faunas, possibly presaging the evaporitic basin that would develop following this latest Guadalupian marine deposition in West Texas.

  9. Suspended sediment yield in Texas watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coonrod, Julia Ellen Allred

    The Texas Water Development Board collected suspended sediment samples across the state of Texas for approximately 60 years. Until this research, no comprehensive analysis of the data had been conducted. This study compiles the suspended sediment data along with corresponding streamflow and rainfall. GIS programs are developed which characterize watersheds corresponding to the sediment gauging stations. The watersheds are characterized according to topography, climate, soils, and land use. All of the data is combined to form several SAS data sets which can subsequently be analyzed using regression. Annual data for all of the stations across the state are classified temporally and spatially to determine trends in the sediment yield. In general, the suspended sediment load increases with increasing runoff but no correlation exists with rainfall. However, the annual average rainfall can be used to classify the watersheds according to climate, which improves the correlation between sediment load and runoff. The watersheds with no dams have higher sediment loads than watersheds with dams. Dams in the drier parts of Texas reduce the sediment load more than dams in the wetter part of the state. Sediment rating curves are developed separately for each basin in Texas. All but one of the curves fall into a band which varies by about two orders of magnitude. The study analyzes daily time series data for the Lavaca River near Edna station. USGS data are used to improve the sediment rating curve by the addition of physically related variables and interaction terms. The model can explain an additional 41% of the variability in sediment concentration compared to a simple bivariate regression of sediment load and flow. The TWDB daily data for the Lavaca River near Edna station are used to quantify temporal trends. There is a high correlation between sediment load and flowrate for the Lavaca River. The correlation can be improved by considering a flow-squared term and by

  10. The State of Texas Children: 2003. Texas Kids Count.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Center for Public Policy Priorities.

    This Kids Count report details trends in the well-being of children in Texas. The statistical portrait is based on indicators in the areas of: (1) family and community population; (2) economic resources, security, and opportunity; (3) early care and education; (4) school success; (5) teens at risk; (6) physical, social, and emotional health; (7)…

  11. Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal project, Magma Gulf-Technadril/DOE Amoco fee. Volume III. Final report. Annual report, February 1982-March 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, C.O. Jr.; O'Brien, F.D.; Rodgers, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the results of the testing of Sand 3 (15,245 to 15,280 feet in depth) which occurred from November 1983 to March 1984 and evaluates these new data in comparison to results from the testing of Sand 5 (15,385 to 15,415 feet in depth) which occurred from June 1981 to February 1982. It also describes the reworking of the production and salt water disposal wells preparatory to the Sand 3 testing as well as the plug and abandon procedures requested to terminate the project. The volume contains two parts: Part 1 includes the text and accompanying plates, figures and tables; Part 2 consists of the appendixes including auxiliary reports and tabulations.

  12. Geopressured-geothermal drilling and testing plan: Magma Gulf/Technadril-Dept. of Energy MGT-DOE AMOCO Fee No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Lousiana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    The following topics are covered: generalized site activities, occupational health and safety, drilling operations, production testing, environmental assessment and monitoring plan, permits, program management, reporting, and schedule. (MHR)

  13. Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells. Final report: Beulah Simon No. 2 Well, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana. Volume II. Analytical data

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, R.J.; Hartsock, J.H.; McCoy, R.L.; Rodgers, J.A.

    1980-07-01

    A compilation of the test data and computer printouts of the various reservoir calculations for the reentry of the Beulah Simon No. 2 well are presented. The data include: bottomhole and surface pressure data, geothermal field test data, pressure buildup model analysis, recombination of produced brine, chemical analyses of brine and gas, and chemical analyses performed by Champion Chemicals, Inc. (MHR)

  14. Sweet Lake Geopressured-geothermal Project, Magma Gulf-Technadril/DOE Amoco Fee. Volume II. Surface installations reservoir testing. Annual report, February 28, 1981-February 10, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, K.S.

    1984-01-01

    The Magma Gulf-Technadril/Department of Energy Amoco Fee No. 1 (production) and salt water disposal wells were drilled in the period from August, 1980 to February 1981. Surface facilities were designed and constructed during March-June 1981. Flow testing began in June 1981 and continued until February, 1982. The Miogypsinoides interval contains seven discrete sands in the test well. These sands have been numbered 1 to 7, beginning at the top of the sequence. Data from wireline logs and core samples suggested that the first zone to be perforated should be Sand 5. Because of its high porosity and permeability, Sand 5 was thought to contain almost 50% of the total hydraulic capacity of the well. Flow testing of Sand 5 was performed in three stages, each of which is fully described in this report. Phase I was designed as an initial clean-up flow and a reservoir confirmation test. Phase II consisted of the reservoir limit determination test and lasted 17 days. Boundaries were confirmed which suggest that the Sweet Lake reservoir is fairly narrow, with boundaries on three sides, but is open in one direction with no closure for at least 4-1/4 miles. These boundaries approximate the shape of the graben in which the test well was drilled, but may or may not be directly related to the major faults forming the graben. Phase III testing was planned to be a long-term test at commercial design rates. Although Sand 5 alone would not support such rates, long-term production was demonstrated. Additional research not supported by DOE funding was also performed during the period covered by this report. This research, consisting of mud logging, micropaleontology, organic geochemistry, core analysis, and rock mechanics, is summarized in this report.

  15. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report P. R. Girouard Well No. 1, Lafayette Parish, Louisiana. Volume II. Well test data

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The following data from the reopening of an abandoned well are presented: reservoir pressure drawdown and buildup data, Institute of Gas Technology test data, Insitute of Gas Technology sample log, reservoir fluid analysis, produced gas/water ratio, chemical analysis procedures, surface flow data, third party sampling and reports, sand detectors charts, and Horner-type buildup data. (MHR)

  16. US hydropower resource assessment for Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the hydropower development potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The HES measures the potential hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a dBASE menu-driven software application that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the state of Texas.

  17. Energy and water in the Western and Texas interconnects.

    SciTech Connect

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll

    2010-08-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Electricity has initiated a $60M program to assist the electric industry in interconnection-level analysis and planning. The objective of this effort is to facilitate the development or strengthening of capabilities in each of the three interconnections serving the lower 48 states of the United States, to prepare analyses of transmission requirements under a broad range of alternative futures and develop long-term interconnection-wide transmission expansion plans. The interconnections are the Western Interconnection, the Eastern Interconnection, and the Texas Interconnection. One element of this program address the support and development of an integrated energy-water Decision Support System (DSS) that will enable planners in the Western and Texas Interconnections to analyze the potential implications of water stress for transmission and resource planning (the Eastern Interconnection is not participating in this element). Specific objectives include: (1) Develop an integrated Energy-Water Decision Support System (DSS) that will enable planners in the Western and Texas Interconnections to analyze the potential implications of water stress for transmission and resource planning. (2) Pursue the formulation and development of the Energy-Water DSS through a strongly collaborative process between members of this proposal team and the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC), Western Governors Association (WGA), the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) and their associated stakeholder teams. (3) Exercise the Energy-Water DSS to investigate water stress implications of the transmission planning scenarios put forward by WECC, WGA, and ERCOT. The goals of this project are: (1) Develop an integrated Energy-Water Decision Support System (DSS) that will enable planners to analyze the potential implications of water stress for transmission and resource planning. (2) Pursue the formulation and development of the Energy

  18. Sweetwater, Texas Large N Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumy, D. F.; Woodward, R.; Barklage, M.; Hollis, D.; Spriggs, N.; Gridley, J. M.; Parker, T.

    2015-12-01

    From 7 March to 30 April 2014, NodalSeismic, Nanometrics, and IRIS PASSCAL conducted a collaborative, spatially-dense seismic survey with several thousand nodal short-period geophones complemented by a backbone array of broadband sensors near Sweetwater, Texas. This pilot project demonstrates the efficacy of industry and academic partnerships, and leveraged a larger, commercial 3D survey to collect passive source seismic recordings to image the subsurface. This innovative deployment of a large-N mixed-mode array allows industry to explore array geometries and investigate the value of broadband recordings, while affording academics a dense wavefield imaging capability and an operational model for high volume instrument deployment. The broadband array consists of 25 continuously-recording stations from IRIS PASSCAL and Nanometrics, with an array design that maximized recording of horizontal-traveling seismic energy for surface wave analysis over the primary target area with sufficient offset for imaging objectives at depth. In addition, 2639 FairfieldNodal Zland nodes from NodalSeismic were deployed in three sub-arrays: the outlier, backbone, and active source arrays. The backbone array consisted of 292 nodes that covered the entire survey area, while the outlier array consisted of 25 continuously-recording nodes distributed at a ~3 km distance away from the survey perimeter. Both the backbone and outlier array provide valuable constraints for the passive source portion of the analysis. This project serves as a learning platform to develop best practices in the support of large-N arrays with joint industry and academic expertise. Here we investigate lessons learned from a facility perspective, and present examples of data from the various sensors and array geometries. We will explore first-order results from local and teleseismic earthquakes, and show visualizations of the data across the array. Data are archived at the IRIS DMC under stations codes XB and 1B.

  19. Texas Intense Positron Source (TIPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Kelly, D.

    2003-03-01

    The Texas Intense Positron Source (TIPS) is a state of the art variable energy positron beam under construction at the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL). Projected intensities on the order of the order of 10^7 e+/second using ^64Cu as the positron source are expected. Owing to is short half-life (t1/2 12.8 hrs), plans are to produce the ^64Cu isotope on-site using beam port 1 of NETL TRIGA Mark II reactor. Following tungsten moderation, the positrons will be electrostatically focused and accelerated from few 10's of eV up to 30 keV. This intensity and energy range should allow routine performance of several analytical techniques of interest to surface scientists (PALS, PADB and perhaps PAES and LEPD.) The TIPS project is being developed in parallel phases. Phase I of the project entails construction of the vacuum system, source chamber, main beam line, electrostatic/magnetic focusing and transport system as well as moderator design. Initial construction, testing and characterization of moderator and beam transport elements are underway and will use a commercially available 10 mCi ^22Na radioisotope as a source of positrons. Phase II of the project is concerned primarily with the Cu source geometry and thermal properties as well as production and physical handling of the radioisotope. Additional instrument optimizing based upon experience gained during Phase I will be incorporated in the final design. Current progress of both phases will be presented along with motivations and future directions.

  20. Texas Education Computer Cooperative (TECC) Products and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Designed to broaden awareness of the Texas Education Computer Cooperative (TECC) and its efforts to develop products and services which can be most useful to schools, this publication provides an outline of the need, purpose, organization, and funding of TECC and descriptions of 19 projects. The project descriptions are organized by fiscal year in…

  1. Guidelines for Fitness for Health Programs in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin.

    This publication presents approved guidelines for Texas institutions of higher and postsecondary education in the academic preparation of practitioners in the field of fitness for health. Developed in response to the rapid growth of this field, the guidelines identify and recommend the knowledge and expertise required in career preparation, and…

  2. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Texas. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater, and…

  3. TTIP: Texas Teacher Internship Program 1994 Curriculum Implementation Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walenta, Brian T., Ed.

    The Texas Teacher Internship Program (TTIP) is a competitive program for science, technology and mathematics teachers who serve as summer interns at industry and university sites in order to experience real world applications of the subjects they teach. This document contains curriculum implementation plans developed by the teachers to illustrate…

  4. Spanish-Surname Farm Operators in Southern Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Economic Research Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    The Economic Research Service has used 1964 census data to develop information on the characteristics of Spanish-surname farmers in 14 Texas counties. Selected characteristics were examined for this population and for non-Spanish-surnamed farm operators in the same counties. It was found, for example, that Mexican American farm-operator families…

  5. Texas Public School Attrition Study, 2013-14. IDRA Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Roy L.; Montes, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Since 1986, Intercultural Development Research Association (IDRA) has conducted an annual attrition study to track the number and percent of students in Texas who are lost from public secondary school enrollment prior to graduation. The study builds on the series of studies that began when IDRA conducted the first comprehensive study of school…

  6. Texas Agricultural Science Teachers' Attitudes toward Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Ryan; Williams, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The researchers sought to find the Agricultural Science teachers' attitude toward five innovations (Computer-Aided Design, Record Books, E-Mail Career Development Event Registration, and World Wide Web) of information technology. The population for this study consisted of all 333 secondary Agricultural science teachers from Texas FFA Areas V and…

  7. Groundwater modeling of the Texas High Plains using MODFLOW

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to develop and calibrate a groundwater model for a four county area in the Texas High Plains of the Ogallala Aquifer Region. This study is a major component of a comprehensive regional analysis of groundwater depletion in the Ogallala Aquifer Region with the purpose o...

  8. Consumer Education for Texas Industrial Arts. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Glenn E.; And Others

    A project was undertaken to identify, develop, and test the effectiveness of a limited number of self-contained, individual learning modules about consumer topics that are especially appropriate to a variety of industrial arts courses given in secondary schools in Texas. Included among the project activities were the following: (1) identification…

  9. Attitudes about Environmental Issues among Secondary Agriscience Students in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Tina Farris; Herring, Don R.

    A Texas study examined the attitudes of 379 secondary agriscience students about environmental issues (76% response rate). The Spring 1993 survey questionnaire was developed from a literature review. A Likert-type scale was used for response measurement in sections 1-4; Section 5 consisted of statements related to personal and demographic…

  10. Financing Public School Facilities in Texas: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawn, Lisa

    A case study is presented of a Texas educational facilities program that was developed to provide long-term state assistance to school districts for the construction or renovation of their facilities by providing equal access to revenue for the specific purpose of repaying debt issued to finance instructional facilities. This report presents a…

  11. Texas Public University Cost Study, FY 2002 and FY 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2004

    2004-01-01

    More than two years ago, the Coordinating Board directed its University Formula Advisory Committee to renew efforts to conduct a cost study to validate the relative weights contained in the matrix. This report provides a summary of the results of the study. The methodology was developed and presented to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating…

  12. A Big LEAP for Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Loraine; Roach, David; Williamson, Celia

    2014-01-01

    In Texas, educators working to coordinate the efforts of fifty community colleges, thirty-eight universities, and six university systems are bringing the resources of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) Liberal Education and America's Promise (LEAP) initiative to bear in order to ensure that the state's nearly 1.5…

  13. How Texas Rewrote Your Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Wayne A.

    1985-01-01

    Reviews issues and events related to adopting high school biology textbooks in Texas. Specific reference is given to the viewpoints of Mel and Norma Gabler. It is argued that factors controlling textbook content should not result from past market forces, but from a permanent science constituency and an informed public. (DH)

  14. Texas Endangered Species Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Kathleen Marie; Campbell, Linda

    This publication is the result of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Division's (TPWD's) commitment to education and the fertile partnerships formed between TPWD biologists and educators. This activity book brings together the expertise and practical knowledge of a classroom teacher with the technical knowledge and skills of a TPWD biologist and artist.…

  15. Texas Adult Education Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Extension Instruction and Materials Center.

    This guide was created to provide Texas adult educators with a state-of-the-art resource for practical information about adult education materials and methods for their own growth and that of their students. The guide is organized in four parts. Part I provides preparatory information on the following topics: related resources; characteristics of…

  16. Don't NOx Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Mathis, J.D.; Lachowicz, Y.

    2005-07-01

    Modifications to boiler combustion systems allow Fayette Power Projects units 1 and 2 to meet new NOx emissions limits east of La Grange in Eastern Texas. The article describes modifications executed by Alstom in 2004 which attained an overall reduction in NOx emissions of almost 69%. 4 figs., 1 tab., 1 photo.

  17. "Fisher v. Texas": Strictly Disappointing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieli, Russell K.

    2013-01-01

    Russell K. Nieli writes in this opinion paper that as far as the ability of state colleges and universities to use race as a criteria for admission goes, "Fisher v. Texas" was a big disappointment, and failed in the most basic way. Nieli states that although some affirmative action opponents have tried to put a more positive spin on the…

  18. Texas Higher Education in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Coll. and Univ. System, Austin. Coordinating Board.

    The status of higher education in Texas is examined in this major report of changes in higher education over the past decade. Information on enrollment, cost, financial aid, job opportunities, and facilities in higher education institutions is given for private higher education, professional higher education, community colleges, and state colleges…

  19. Texas A&M University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osters, Sandi

    2009-01-01

    Texas A&M University is a research extensive institution located in College Station. More than 45,000 students attend the university (about 20% are graduate or professional students). Academically, the university is known for its engineering, business, and agricultural and veterinary medicine programs, although there are more than 150 programs of…

  20. Texas Hydrogen Education Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hitchcock, David; Bullock, Dan

    2011-06-30

    The Texas Hydrogen Education project builds on past interest in hydrogen and fuel cells to help create better informed leaders and stakeholders and thereby improve decision making and planning for inclusion of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies as energy alternatives in Texas. In past years in Texas, there was considerable interest and activities about hydrogen and fuel cells (2000-­2004). During that time, the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) created a fuel cell consortium and a fuel cell testing lab. Prior to 2008, interest and activities had declined substantially. In 2008, in cooperation with the Texas H2 Coalition and the State Energy Conservation Office, HARC conducted a planning process to create the Texas Hydrogen Roadmap. It was apparent from analysis conducted during the course of this process that while Texas has hydrogen and fuel cell advantages, there was little program and project activity as compared with other key states. Outreach and education through the provision of informational materials and organizing meetings was seen as an effective way of reaching decision makers in Texas. Previous hydrogen projects in Texas had identified the five major urban regions for program and project development. This geographic targeting approach was adopted for this project. The project successfully conducted the five proposed workshops in four of the target metropolitan areas: San Antonio, Houston, Austin, and the Dallas-­Ft. Worth area. In addition, eight outreach events were included to further inform state and local government leaders on the basics of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. The project achieved its primary objectives of developing communication with target audiences and assembling credible and consistent outreach and education materials. The major lessons learned include: (1) DOE’s Clean Cities programs are a key conduit to target transportation audiences, (2) real-­world fuel cell applications (fuel cell buses, fuel cell fork lifts

  1. Red Tide off Texas Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Red tides (algae) bloomed late this summer along a 300-mile stretch of Texas' Gulf Coast, killing millions of fish and shellfish as well as making some people sick. State officials are calling this the worst red tide bloom in 14 years. The algae produces a poison that paralyzes fish and prevents them from breathing. There is concern that the deadly algae could impact or even wipe out this year's oyster harvest in Texas, which usually peaks during the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. The red tides were first observed off the Texas coast in mid-August and have been growing steadily in size ever since. Red tides tend to bloom and subside rapidly, depending upon changes in wind speed and direction, water temperature, salinity, and rainfall patterns (as the algae doesn't do as well in fresher water). This true-color image of the Texas Gulf Coast was acquired on September 29, 2000, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The red tide can be seen as the dark reddish discoloration in the ocean running southwest to northeast along the coast. In this scene, the bloom appears to be concentrated north and east of Corpus Christi, just off Matagorda Island. The image was made at 500-meter resolution using a combination of MODIS' visible bands 1 (red), 4 (green), and 3 (blue). The city of Houston can be seen clearly as the large, greyish cluster of pixels to the north and west of Galveston Bay, which is about mid-way up the coastline in this image. Also visible in this image are plumes of smoke, perhaps wildfires, both to the north and northeast of Houston. For more information about red tides, refer to the Texas Red Tide Web site. Image courtesy Andrey Savtchenko, MODIS Data Support Team, and the MODIS Ocean Team, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

  2. Texas Quality Workforce Planning: 1993 Key Industries and Targeted Occupations for Texas' 24 Quality Work Force Planning Regions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Dept. of Commerce, Austin.

    In 1993, Texas' 24 quality work force planning committees used a state-developed targeted occupations planning methodology to identify key industries and targeted occupations with the greatest potential for job openings in their respective regions. Between 11 and 20 key industries (13.5 on average) were identified for each region. The following 10…

  3. High energy physics program at Texas A M University

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The Texas A M high energy physics program has achieved significant mile-stones in each of its research initiatives. We are participating in two major operating experiments, CDF and MACRO; the development of two new detector technologies, liquid scintillating fiber calorimetry and knife-edge chambers; and two SSC detector proposals, SDC and TEXAS/EMPACT. We have developed prototypes of a liquid-scintillator fiber calorimeter system, in which internally reflecting channels are imbedded in a lead matrix and filled with liquid scintillator. This approach combines the performance features of fiber calorimetry and the radiation hardness of liquid scintillator, and is being developed for forward calorimetry in TEXAS/EMPACT. A new element in this program is the inclusion of a theoretical high energy physics research program being carried out by D. Nanopoulos and C. Pope. D. Nanopoulos has succeeded in building a string-derived model that unifies all known interactions: flipped SU(5), which is the leading candidate for a TOE. The impact of this work on string phenomenology certainly has far reaching consequences. C. Pope is currently working on some generalizations of the symmetries of string theory, known as W algebras. These are expected to have applications in two- dimensional conformal field theory, two-dimensional extensions of gravity and topological gravity, and W-string theory. The following report presents details of the accomplishments of the Texas A M program over the past year and the proposed plan of research for the coming year.

  4. 76 FR 49760 - Texas Eastern Transmission, LP; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Texas Eastern Transmission, LP; Notice of Application Take notice that on July 29, 2011, Texas Eastern Transmission, LP (Texas Eastern), 5400 Westheimer Court, Houston, Texas... Uniontown Compressor Station located in Fayette County, Pennsylvania. Texas Eastern states that there...

  5. 75 FR 45611 - Texas Eastern Transmission LP; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Texas Eastern Transmission LP; Notice of Application July 27, 2010. Take notice that on July 15, 2010, Texas Eastern Transmission (Texas Eastern), P.O. Box 1642, Houston, Texas... enable Texas Eastern to provide up to 112,000 dekatherms per day (Dth/d) of firm lateral...

  6. 76 FR 7833 - Texas Eastern Transmission, LP; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Texas Eastern Transmission, LP; Notice of Application Take notice that on January 25, 2011, Texas Eastern Transmission, LP (Texas Eastern), 5400 Westheimer Court, Houston, Texas... Gas Act (NGA) for its proposed TEAM 2012 Project. Specifically, Texas Eastern requests:...

  7. 76 FR 38381 - Texas Eastern Transmission, LP; Notice of Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Texas Eastern Transmission, LP; Notice of Amendment Take notice that on June 13, 2011, Texas Eastern Transmission, LP (Texas Eastern), 5400 Westheimer Court, Houston, Texas 77056... proposed TEAM 2012 Project. Specifically, Texas Eastern's original application is amended to reduce...

  8. 76 FR 18210 - Texas Eastern Transmission, LP; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Texas Eastern Transmission, LP; Notice of Application On March 15, 2011, Texas Eastern Transmission Corporation (Texas Eastern), 5400 Westheimer Court, Houston, Texas 77056-5310... & Certificates, Texas Eastern Transmission, LP, P.O. Box 1642, Houston, TX 77251-1642, at (713) 627-4488...

  9. Closing the Gaps in Texas: The Critical Role of Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bricker, Laurie

    2008-01-01

    This chapter examines the role of community college governance in a P-16 environment. The discussion focuses on development of the initiative, opportunities, and challenges faced in Texas and other states that have P-16 or P-20 systems.

  10. Application of Faith Development Theory for Understanding Students' Transformational Learning as a Result of Bonfire at Texas A&M University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Brent Russell

    2012-01-01

    Considerable attention by scholars for the last two decades has focused on issues of spirituality and higher education. Literature in the field of college student affairs suggest that, in order promote the development of the whole student, practitioners in the field should consider adopting theories of faith and spiritual development. This study…

  11. Episodic karstification, Edwards Plateau, central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kastning, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Edwards Plateau and Llano Basin of central Texas form one of the largest contiguous regions of karst in North America (>80,000 km/sup 2/). Solutional phenomena show that several major episodes of karstification are documentable from late Cambrian to Holocene. Relict landforms representing intervals of solutional activity correlate well with the accepted geomorphic chronology for central Texas. Secondary porosity are vertically controlled by lithology, topographic incision of streams, position of the potentiometric surface, and attitude of bedding. Areally, development of karst is strongly influenced by the extent, density, and orientation of fractures and by hydrodynamic characteristics such as points of recharge and discharge, degree of integration of groundwater flow paths, and hydraulic gradients. Early episodes of karstification correspond to intervals of subaerial exposure of carbonate rocks during marine regression or following regional uplift. Paleokarst is prevalent in the Paleozoic and Mesozoic sequences. Infilled dolines and solution-collapse breccias have been exhumed by extensive regional denudation during the Cenozoic Era. Subaerial conditions during the middle Cretaceous account for infilled solutional cavities within lower Cretaceous carbonate beds. The most extensive karstification began with regional uplift in the early Miocene. Enhanced relief along the Balcones escarpment promoted incision of streams, lowering of water tables, steepened hydraulic gradients, and increases in discharge. Caves at various-elevations attest to sequential dissection of the plateau during the late Quaternary.

  12. Evaluation of long-term (1960-2010) groundwater fluoride contamination in Texas.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Sriroop; Ale, Srinivasulu

    2014-07-01

    Groundwater quality degradation is a major threat to sustainable development in Texas. The aim of this study was to elucidate spatiotemporal patterns of groundwater fluoride (F) contamination in different water use classes in 16 groundwater management areas in Texas between 1960 and 2010. Groundwater F concentration data were obtained from the Texas Water Development Board and aggregated over a decadal scale. Our results indicate that observations exceeding the drinking water quality threshold of World Health Organization (1.5 mg F L) and secondary maximum contaminant level (SMCL) (2 mg F L) of the USEPA increased from 26 and 19% in the 1960s to 37 and 23%, respectively, in the 2000s. In the 2000s, F observations > SMCL among different water use classes followed the order: irrigation (39%) > domestic (20%) > public supply (17%). Extent and mode of interaction between F and other water quality parameters varied regionally. In western Texas, high F concentrations were prevalent at shallower depths (<50 m) and were positively correlated with bicarbonate (HCO) and sulfate anions. In contrast, in southern and southeastern Texas, higher F concentrations occurred at greater depths (>50 m) and were correlated with HCO and chloride anions. A spatial pattern has become apparent marked by "excess" F in western Texas groundwaters as compared with "inadequate" F contents in rest of the state. Groundwater F contamination in western Texas was largely influenced by groundwater mixing and evaporative enrichment as compared with water-rock interaction and mineral dissolution in the rest of the state.

  13. Curriculum Reform in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koballa, Thomas R., Jr.; Crawley, Frank E.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a curriculum development project that took place in the San Benito Consolidated Independent School District. Explains what a curriculum guide is and provides a six-step approach to developing guides. (PR)

  14. 33 CFR 165.804 - Snake Island, Texas City, Texas; mooring and fleeting of vessels-safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Snake Island, Texas City, Texas... Guard District § 165.804 Snake Island, Texas City, Texas; mooring and fleeting of vessels—safety zone... Turning Basin west of Snake Island; (3) The area of Texas City Channel from the north end of the...

  15. 33 CFR 165.804 - Snake Island, Texas City, Texas; mooring and fleeting of vessels-safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Snake Island, Texas City, Texas... Guard District § 165.804 Snake Island, Texas City, Texas; mooring and fleeting of vessels—safety zone... Turning Basin west of Snake Island; (3) The area of Texas City Channel from the north end of the...

  16. 33 CFR 165.804 - Snake Island, Texas City, Texas; mooring and fleeting of vessels-safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Snake Island, Texas City, Texas... Guard District § 165.804 Snake Island, Texas City, Texas; mooring and fleeting of vessels—safety zone... Turning Basin west of Snake Island; (3) The area of Texas City Channel from the north end of the...

  17. 33 CFR 165.804 - Snake Island, Texas City, Texas; mooring and fleeting of vessels-safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Snake Island, Texas City, Texas... Guard District § 165.804 Snake Island, Texas City, Texas; mooring and fleeting of vessels—safety zone... Turning Basin west of Snake Island; (3) The area of Texas City Channel from the north end of the...

  18. Solar Resource Measurements in El Paso, Texas (Equipment CRADA Only): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-273

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas, A.

    2013-11-01

    Site-specific, long-term, continuous, and high-resolution measurements of solar irradiance are important for developing renewable resource data. These data are used for several research and development activities consistent with the NREL mission: establish a national 30-year climatological database of measured solar irradiances; provide high quality ground-truth data for satellite remote sensing validation; support development of radiative transfer models for estimating solar irradiance from available meteorological observations; provide solar resource information needed for technology deployment and operations.

  19. Texas STaR Chart: A Tool for Planning and Assessing School Technology and Readiness Aligned with the Texas Long-Range Plan for Technology. Educational Technology Advisory Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Educational Technology Div.

    This document presents the Texas STaR (School Technology and Readiness) Chart, designed to help school districts determine their progress toward meeting the goals of the Texas Long-Range Plan for Technology. The chart provides indicators for four levels of progress (i.e., early, developing, advanced, or target technology) in the following focus…

  20. Texas innovates production data retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Schieck, D.E.; Cisco, S.L.

    1998-10-26

    The Railroad Commission of Texas now offers an Internet web-based system that provides access to Texas oil and gas production data in an interactive query format. With this system, both the public and state agency personnel can access and customize the available information. The ACTI (Advanced Computational Technology Initiative) data base contains well production information that is a crucial component for evaluating the feasibility of many exploration, acquisition, and operation decisions. The RRC has always provided public access to oil and gas production data and related well information, but access mechanisms were limited because the data resided in multiple storage formats, including paper, microforms, and mainframe data bases. For both internal and external users, the ACTI production query system eliminates time-consuming research with paper and film-based records and costly special programming requests. Internet-based access to RRC production data is increasing daily, and ACTI is the most popular information available on RRC`s web site.

  1. Freshwater withdrawals in Texas, 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lurry, Dee L.; Barber, Nancy L.

    1990-01-01

    Since 1950, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has estimated water use in the United States at 5-year intervals.  Resulting reports tabulate water use by State and by water-resources region (major river basins) for a number of categories, such as irrigation, water supply, and industrial.  In 1977, the USGS began the National Water-Use Information Program, designed to be a National source of accurate, consistent water-use data.  The water-use project in Texas is part of the National Water-Use Information Program.  The Texas District of the USGS compiles water-use information by county and by hydrologic unit using data collected by States agencies.  A hydrologic unit is a geographic area representing part or all of a surface drainage basin, a combination of drainage basins, or a distinct hydrologic feature.

  2. Summary of proceedings: Oklahoma and Texas wind energy forum, April 2-3, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S. C.; Ball, D. E.

    1981-06-01

    The Wind Energy Forum for Oklahoma and Texas was held at the Amarillo Quality Inn in Amarillo, Texas on April 2-3, 1981. Its purpose was to bring together the diverse groups involved in wind energy development in the Oklahoma and Texas region to explore the future commercial potential and current barriers to achieving this potential. Major topics of discussion included utility interconnection of wind machines and the buy-back rate for excess power, wind system reliability and maintenance concerns, machine performance standards, and state governmental incentives. A short summary of each presentation is included.

  3. Database of historically documented springs and spring flow measurements in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Reece, Brian D.

    2003-01-01

    Springs are naturally occurring features that convey excess ground water to the land surface; they represent a transition from ground water to surface water. Water issues through one opening, multiple openings, or numerous seeps in the rock or soil. The database of this report provides information about springs and spring flow in Texas including spring names, identification numbers, location, and, if available, water source and use. This database does not include every spring in Texas, but is limited to an aggregation of selected digital and hard-copy data of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB), and Capitol Environmental Services.

  4. Irrigation Management in the Texas High Plains: Present Status, Challenges, and Opportunities (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowda, P. H.

    2013-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is an essential component of the water balance and a major consumptive use of irrigation water and precipitation on cropland. Any attempt to improve water use efficiency must be based on reliable estimates of ET for irrigation scheduling purposes. In the Texas High Plains, irrigation scheduling is implemented using lysimeter-based crop coefficients and reference ET data from the Texas High Plains ET Network. This presentation will discuss the current state of irrigation management in the Texas High Plains, knowledge gaps, ongoing developments, and role of remote sensing based regional ET mapping algorithms with respect to irrigated agriculture.

  5. Houston/Galveston, Texas, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    In this view of Houston/Galveston, Texas, USA (29.5N, 95.5W), heavy spring rains emphasize the several bodies of water in the area. Even though partially cloud covered, the progressive nature of the Houston highway and freeway system can easily be observed in this highly detailed view. To the south, the NASA, Clear Lake area just off of Galveston Bay can easily be seen. In the center, is the downtown business district.

  6. Houston/Galveston, Texas, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    In this view of Houston/Galveston, Texas, USA (29.5N, 95.5W), heavy spring rains emphasize the several bodies of water in the area. The progressive nature of the Houston highway and freeway system can easily be observed in this highly detailed view. Houston Intercontiental Airport can be seen to the north and to the south, the NASA, Clear Lake area just off of Galveston Bay can easily be seen. In the center, is the downtown business district.

  7. Solar Resource Measurements in Canyon, Texas - Equipment Only Loan: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-233

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas, A.

    2014-07-01

    Site-specific, long-term, continuous, and high-resolution measurements of solar irradiance are important for developing renewable resource data. These data are used for several research and development activities consistent with the NREL mission: establish a national 30-year climatological database of measured solar irradiances; provide high-quality ground-truth data for satellite remote sensing validation; support development of radiative transfer models for estimating solar irradiance from available meteorological observations; and provide solar resource information needed for technology deployment and operations. Data acquired under this agreement will be available to the public through NREL's Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center (MIDC) or the Renewable Resource Data Center (RReDC). The MIDC offers a variety of standard data display, access, and analysis tools designed to address the needs of a wide user audience (e.g., industry, academia, and government interests).

  8. Louisiana, Texas fabrication yards on busy upswing

    SciTech Connect

    Pagano, S.S. )

    1994-04-01

    Responding to the continued push to produce natural gas reserves, Texas and Louisiana fabrication yards anticipate a busy 1994 season. Sixty-five oil and gas production platforms are under construction for major companies and independents; total platforms built in 1994 could approach 100. While oil prices are still volatile, most projects are focusing on shallow-water fields. Advanced technology has helped fabricators improve designs by making structures lighter and more cost-effective. PC-Based software helps yards perform more thorough analyses of a structure, which means towers and fixed platforms can be more economically built. Software also enables yards to design cost-effective structures to develop fields with a marginal level of reserves. Several projects currently under development or recently completed are described.

  9. Guadalupian studies in West Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, R.E.; Wardlaw, B.R.; Rohr, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    Murchison established the Permian System in the Ural Mountains of Russia in 1841. The first North American Permian fossils were discovered by Hall (1856) about 15 years later. The fossils, which were collected in New York State, were initially described as Carboniferous (Hall, 1856) but were subsequently recognized as Permian by Girty (1902). Benjamin F. Shumard (1858), however, was the first to place an unequivocal Permian designation on some North American fossils, which has been collected by his brother George G. Shumard from the Guadalupe Mountains in Texas. A half a century passed before Girty (1908) made known an extensive Guadalupian fauna, although his field work in Texas and his study of this fauna already lead him to propose a Guadalupian "period" (Girty, 1902). Girty's suggestion was accepted only when it was formalized as the Guadalupe Series by Adams et al. (1939). The "Guadalupian fauna" was based upon fossils that Girty collected in 1901 on an expedition headed by Robert T. Hill, a revered figure in Texas geology.

  10. 76 FR 7187 - East Texas Electric Cooperative, Inc., Texas; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission East Texas Electric Cooperative, Inc., Texas; Notice of Availability of... reviewed East Texas Electric Cooperative, Inc.'s (the Cooperative's) application for license for the Lake...'' link. Enter the docket number excluding the last three digits in the docket number field to access...

  11. 2000 Comprehensive Biennial Report on Texas Public Schools. A Report to the 77th Texas Legislature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    This comprehensive report on Texas schools indicates that more than 80 percent of students pass the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TASS) test, and students continue to show impressive gains on math and reading tests. Chapter 1, "Student Performance," provides data on student performance on the Spring 2000 Texas Assessment of Academic Skills…

  12. Hydrogeology of Webb County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lambert, Rebecca B.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Webb County, in semiarid South Texas on the U.S.-Mexico border, is a region confronted by increasing stresses on natural resources. Laredo (fig. 1), the largest city in Webb County (population 193,000 in 2000), was one of the 10 fastest-growing metropolitan areas in the country during 1990-2000 (Perry and Mackun, 2001). Commercial and industrial activities have expanded throughout the region to support the maquiladora industry (manufacturing plants in Mexico) along the border and other growth as a result of the passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement. The Rio Grande currently (2002) is the primary source of public water supply for Laredo and other cities along the border in Webb County (fig. 1). Other cities, such as Bruni and Mirando City in the southeastern part of the county, rely on ground-water supplies to meet municipal demands. Increased water demand associated with development and population growth in the region has increased the need for the City of Laredo and Webb County to evaluate alternative water sources to meet future demand. Possible options include (1) supplementing the surface-water supply with ground water, and (2) applying artificial storage and recovery (ASR) technology to recharge local aquifers. These options raise issues regarding the hydraulic capability of the aquifers to store economically substantial quantities of water, current or potential uses of the resource, and possible effects on the quality of water resulting from mixing ground water with alternative source waters. To address some of these issues, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Laredo, began a study in 1996 to assess the ground-water resources of Webb County. A hydrogeologic study was conducted to review and analyze available information on the hydrogeologic units (aquifers and confining units) in Webb County, to locate available wells in the region with water-level and water-quality information from the aquifers, and

  13. Teacher-Developed Curriculum Modules from Selected Regions of Texas: Combining Basic Learner Outcomes for Career Education and Existing Curriculum in Grades 9 through 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partners in Career Education, Arlington, TX.

    Generated in teacher workshops as part of a project in the development of a career education learning system by the school districts of the Fort Worth-Dallas area, each of these 22 learning modules describes student activities based on a small segment of existing high school curriculum and on one of nine career education learner outcomes. The…

  14. Developing a web-based decision support system for forecasting Juniperus ashei, Juniperus monosperma, Juniperus scopulorum, and Juniperus pinchotii pollen outbursts in New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budge, A.; Hudspeth, W. B.

    2012-12-01

    Changes in our environment can have serious implications for managing and monitoring public health, both locally and globally. By understanding changes in environmental conditions and how they impact public health, we can apply this knowledge to develop early warning and forecasting systems to alert health care professionals of an impending event. New Mexico's Environmental Public Health Tracking System (NMEPHTS), funded by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN), aims to improve health awareness and services by linking health effects data with levels and frequency of environmental exposure. As a component of a larger NASA-funded project on Integration of Airborne Dust Prediction Systems and Vegetation Phenology to Track Pollen for Asthma Alerts in Public Health Decision Support Systems, the Earth Data Analysis Center (EDAC) at the University of New Mexico, is developing a web-based decision support system for forecasting pollen concentration data. Designed to meet requirements of NMEPHTS, the system includes state-of-the-art statistical analysis tools; geospatial visualization tools; data discovery, extraction, and delivery tools; and environmental/public health linkage information. Earth science data obtained from Earth observatories are ingested into the Pollen Regional Atmospheric Model (PREAM) by team members at the University of Arizona. EDAC receives output files from the model which then are run through a post-processing routine to develop products that are made available to NMEPHTS via web mapping and web coverage services. This presentation describes the details and infrastructure for developing the pollen decision support system.

  15. Creatively Exploring the Future. Proceedings of the Annual National Research Conference on Human Resource Development (2nd, College Station, Texas, March 25-26, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Dept. of Educational Human Resource Development.

    This document contains 21 papers: "Benchmarking Training--The Road to Continuous Improvement" (Bolin); "Systematic Mentoring: A Crucial Addition to Leadership Development" [abstract only] (Brennan, Pevoto); "Monkey Wrenches in the Team Clockwork" (Daman); "Multiculturalism: Curriculum and Practice" (Dean et al.); "Personal Computer Training…

  16. State Criminal Justice Telecommunications (STACOM). Final Report. Volume III: Requirements Analysis and Design of Texas Criminal Justice Telecommunications Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielding, J. E.; And Others

    Requirements analysis and design for the Texas Criminal Justice Telecommunications Network are provided in this report on the application in the state of Texas of techniques developed by the STACOM project. These techniques focus on identification of user requirements and network designs for criminal justice information on a state-wide basis.…

  17. Supply/Demand Information System for Vocational Education in Texas. (A Subsystem of the Human Resources Information System).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Office of Information Services, Austin.

    To help develop a conceptual design and determine resources necessary to establish a Human Resources Information System (HRIS) in Texas, a task force investigated factors influencing the balance between individuals in training and demand for trained people. State data forms and federal forms used to collect data in Texas are reviewed. HRIS systems…

  18. Llano Grande Center's Oral History Project Sparks Cultural and Economic Renewal in Texas's Rio Grande Valley. Rural Trust Featured Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Null, Elizabeth Higgins

    The Llano Grande Center for Research and Development started as an oral history experiment in two of Texas's poorest school districts. Since the 1920s, when this arid region in the southernmost tip of Texas was first transformed into the orchards and farmlands of the "Magic Valley," workers of Mexican descent have worked the land. Over time,…

  19. Validation Study III: Alignment of the Texas College and Career Readiness Standards with Courses in Two Career Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conley, David T.; McGaughy, Charis; Brown, Derek; van der Valk, Adrienne; Young, Brittney

    2009-01-01

    This is the fourth report in a series of five reports resulting from the Texas College and Career Readiness Initiative (TCCRI) established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) under contract with the Educational Policy Improvement Center (EPIC). The purpose of the TCCRI is the Facilitation of the Development and Implementation…

  20. Validation Study III: Alignment of the Texas College and Career Readiness Standards with Courses in Two Career Pathways. [Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conley, David T.; McGaughy, Charis; Brown, Derek; van der Valk, Adrienne; Young, Brittney

    2009-01-01

    This is the fourth report in a series of five reports resulting from the Texas College and Career Readiness Initiative (TCCRI) established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) under contract with the Educational Policy Improvement Center (EPIC). The purpose of the TCCRI is the Facilitation of the Development and Implementation…

  1. Panola NGL (natural gas liquid) line laid in east Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-11-01

    Construction is complete on the Panola Products Pipeline Co. 8-in. NGL line in E. Texas. The 60-mile pipeline, which traverses rolling timber country, lightly developed commercial areas, and low-lying wetlands, will ultimately gather liquids from gas plants in E. Texas. Initially, this system is designed to transport natural gas liquids mix from the Carthage Plant, operated by Champlin Petroleum Co., to Gulf Pipeline Co.'s injection station at Lufkin, Texas. Final delivery will be made to various petrochemical facilities in the Mont Belvieu, Texas area. To minimize right-of-way problems, the line was routed parallel to an existing United Gas 22-in. pipeline for a distance of 36 miles from Carthage to near Nacogdoches. The pipeline has a design pressure of 1,480 psi. A back pressure of approx. 450 psi will be maintained on the line at all times to keep the mix in a liquid state. The predominant pipe used along the route is API 5LX-52 with a wall thickness of 0.219-in. Heavier wall thickness pipe, up to 0.375-in., is used for road, railroad, and major water crossings.

  2. Texas Occurrence of Lyme Disease and Its Neurological Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Dandashi, Jad A; Nizamutdinov, Damir; Dayawansa, Samantha; Fonkem, Ekokobe; Huang, Jason H

    2016-01-01

    Today, Lyme disease is the most commonly reported tick-borne disease in the United States and Europe. The culprits behind Lyme disease are the Borrelia species of bacteria. In the USA, Borrelia burgdorferi causes the majority of cases, while in Europe and Asia Borrelia afzelii and Borrelia garinii carry the greatest burden of disease. The clinical manifestations of Lyme disease have been identified as early localized, early disseminated, and late chronic. The neurological effects of Lyme disease include both peripheral and central nervous systems involvement, including focal nerve abnormalities, cranial neuropathies, painful radiculoneuritis, meningitis, and/or toxic metabolic encephalopathy, known as Lyme encephalopathy. Given the geographic predominance of Lyme disease in the Northeast and Midwest of the USA, no major studies have been conducted regarding Southern states. Between 2005 and 2014, the Center for Disease Control has reported 582 confirmed cases of Lyme disease in Texas. Because of the potential for increased incidence and prevalence in Texas, it has become essential for research and clinical efforts to be diverted to the region. The Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Lyme Lab has been investigating the ecology of Lyme disease in Texas and developing a pan-specific serological test for Lyme diagnosis. This report aimed to exposure materials and raise awareness of Lyme disease to healthcare providers. PMID:27478852

  3. Texas coastal ocean observation network: data access and archive software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffress, Gary A.; Duff, J. Scott

    2011-06-01

    The Conrad Blucher Institute for Surveying and Science (CBI) at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi operates the Texas Coastal Ocean Observation Network (TCOON.) The network collects near real-time physical oceanographic data at 31 coastal stations along the Texas coast. The data includes water level, wind speed & direction, barometric pressure, water temperature, and air temperature from stations placed in bays and estuaries along the Texas coast. TCOON provides this critical data to many users, including those in the commercial shipping industry, marine construction, legal water-land boundaries, recreational boaters, and those responsible for marine safety and emergency evacuation in the event of a hurricane. Data sets are available in near real time via the Internet and some sets are accessible via voice over the telephone. All data collected since 1991 is available online along with data search tools. TCOON sponsors and developers believe that the more users and uses the system supports, the more valuable the data becomes. The highest scientific standards are used in collection the data as the data often ends up in litigation in the courts. Database software and the online tools used for data downloads are also open source.

  4. Machine-readable files developed for the High Plains Regional Aquifer-System analysis in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferrigno, C.F.

    1986-01-01

    Machine-readable files were developed for the High Plains Regional Aquifer-System Analysis project are stored on two magnetic tapes available from the U.S. Geological Survey. The first tape contains computer programs that were used to prepare, store, retrieve, organize, and preserve the areal interpretive data collected by the project staff. The second tape contains 134 data files that can be divided into five general classes: (1) Aquifer geometry data, (2) aquifer and water characteristics , (3) water levels, (4) climatological data, and (5) land use and water use data. (Author 's abstract)

  5. Recent (2008-10) concentrations and isotopic compositions of nitrate and concentrations of wastewater compounds in the Barton Springs zone, south-central Texas, and their potential relation to urban development in the contributing zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, Barbara J.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Herrington, Chris; Sample, Thomas L.

    2011-01-01

    During 2008–10, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Austin, the City of Dripping Springs, the Barton Springs/Edwards Aquifer Conservation District, the Lower Colorado River Authority, Hays County, and Travis County, collected and analyzed water samples from five streams (Barton, Williamson, Slaughter, Bear, and Onion Creeks), two groundwater wells (Marbridge well [YD–58–50–704] and Buda well [LR–58–58–403]), and the main orifice of Barton Springs in Austin, Texas, with the objective of characterizing concentrations and isotopic compositions of nitrate and concentrations of wastewater compounds in the Barton Springs zone. The Barton Springs zone is in south-central Texas, an area undergoing rapid growth in population and in land area affected by development, with associated increases in wastewater generation. Over a period of 17 months, during which the hydrologic conditions transitioned from dry to wet, samples were collected routinely from the streams, wells, and spring and, in response to storms, from the streams and spring; some or all samples were analyzed for nitrate, nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate, and waste­water compounds. The median nitrate concentrations in routine samples from all sites were higher in samples collected during the wet period than in samples collected during the dry period, with the greatest difference for stream samples (0.05 milligram per liter during the dry period to 0.96 milligram per liter for the wet period). Nitrate concentrations in recent (2008–10) samples were elevated relative to concentrations in historical (1990–2008) samples from streams and from Barton Springs under medium- and high-flow conditions. Recent nitrate concentrations were higher than historical concentrations at the Marbridge well but the reverse was true at the Buda well. The elevated concentrations likely are related to the cessation of dry conditions coupled with increased nitrogen loading in the

  6. Applications of MODIS satellite data and products for monitoring air quality in the state of Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, Keith D.

    The Center for Space Research (CSR), in conjunction with the Monitoring Operations Division (MOD) of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), is evaluating the use of remotely sensed satellite data to assist in monitoring and predicting air quality in Texas. The challenges of meeting air quality standards established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) are impacted by the transport of pollution into Texas that originates from outside our borders and are cumulative with those generated by local sources. In an attempt to quantify the concentrations of all pollution sources, MOD has installed ground-based monitoring stations in rural regions along the Texas geographic boundaries including the Gulf coast, as well as urban regions that are the predominant sources of domestic pollution. However, analysis of time-lapse GOES satellite imagery at MOD, clearly demonstrates the shortcomings of using only ground-based observations for monitoring air quality across Texas. These shortcomings include the vastness of State borders, that can only be monitored with a large number of ground-based sensors, and gradients in pollution concentration that depend upon the location of the point source, the meteorology governing its transport to Texas, and its diffusion across the region. With the launch of NASA's MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the transport of aerosol-borne pollutants can now be monitored over land and ocean surfaces. Thus, CSR and MOD personnel have applied MODIS data to several classes of pollution that routinely impact Texas air quality. Results demonstrate MODIS data and products can detect and track the migration of pollutants. This paper presents one case study in which continental haze from the northeast moved into the region and subsequently required health advisories to be issued for 150 counties in Texas. It is concluded that MODIS provides the basis for developing advanced data products that will, when used in

  7. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Solana, Amy E.; Warwick, William M.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Parker, Kyle R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Manning, Anathea

    2011-11-14

    This report presents the results of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) follow-on renewable energy (RE) assessment of Fort Hood. Fort Hood receives many solicitations from renewable energy vendors who are interested in doing projects on site. Based on specific requests from Fort Hood staff so they can better understand these proposals, and the results of PNNL's 2008 RE assessment of Fort Hood, the following resources were examined in this assessment: (1) Municipal solid waste (MSW) for waste-to-energy (WTE); (2) Wind; (3) Landfill gas; (4) Solar photovoltaics (PV); and (5) Shale gas. This report also examines the regulatory issues, development options, and environmental impacts for the promising RE resources, and includes a review of the RE market in Texas.

  8. The Legacy of the Texas Tower Sniper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavergne, Gary

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author relates the incident that happened at the University of Texas to the tragedy that took place at Virginia Tech. On August 1, 1966, Charles Joseph Whitman ascended the University of Texas Tower, in Austin, and in 96 minutes fired 150 high-powered rounds of ammunition down upon an unsuspecting university family. The…

  9. An Analysis of Laboratory Safety in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Edward J.; Picucci, Ali Callicoatte; Collins, James W.; Swann, Philip

    This paper reports on a survey to discover the types of laboratory accidents that occur in Texas public schools, the factors associated with such accidents, and the practices of schools with regard to current laboratory safety requirements. The purpose of the survey is to better understand safety conditions in Texas public schools and to help…

  10. Texas Almanac Teacher's Guide, 1998-99.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dallas Morning News, TX.

    This teacher's guide utilizes the subject matter in the 1998-99 Texas Almanac in a variety of interdisciplinary student activities for grades 3-8. The guide includes a grade-by-grade curriculum chart detailing which lessons correspond to specific Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) objectives and Essential Element requirements. The 45…

  11. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Texas, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Texas for 2010. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Texas showed across-the-board gains--improvements in reading and math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for all racial/ethnic subgroups, low-income students, and…

  12. Texas Migrant Labor. Annual Report, 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good Neighbor Commission of Texas, Austin.

    The Good Neighbor Commission of Texas, organized under a Federal grant in 1943 and later constituted as an agency of state government by legislative mandate, is charged under its basic law to coordinate the work of the Federal, State, and local government units endeavoring to improve the travel and working conditions of Texas migrant farm workers.…

  13. School Finance Policy Issues in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparkman, William E.; Carpenter, Clint

    Just 1 day before a court-imposed deadline of June 1, 1993, Texas Governor Ann Richards signed into law Senate Bill 7 (S.B. 7), the newest version of the Texas school finance system. This paper describes the state's new school finance system with regard to the following: (1) its constitutionality; (2) the provision of a system that equalizes…

  14. Summary of Student Financial Aid in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Coll. and Univ. System, Austin. Coordinating Board.

    Data on student financial aid in Texas are presented. Tables cover financial aid resources for students in Texas postsecondary institutions by program for 1982-1983, 1984-1985 and 1985-1986. For 17 state aid programs and 6 federal programs, the amount of funding is indicated for the state as a whole and for the following categories of colleges:…

  15. 50 CFR 32.63 - Texas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Texas. 32.63 Section 32.63 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.63 Texas. The following refuge units have...

  16. 50 CFR 32.63 - Texas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Texas. 32.63 Section 32.63 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.63 Texas. The following refuge units have...

  17. 50 CFR 32.63 - Texas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Texas. 32.63 Section 32.63 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.63 Texas. The following refuge units have...

  18. 50 CFR 32.63 - Texas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Texas. 32.63 Section 32.63 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.63 Texas. The following refuge units have...

  19. Texas Almanac Teacher's Guide, 2002-2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barringer, Betty; Ferguson, Sharon; Haynes, Beverly; Jacobs, Margaret; Jameson, Eugenia E.; Massey, Linda; Moran, Rebecca; Wilson, Ann

    This interdisciplinary guide utilizes the subject matter in the 2002-2003 "Texas Almanac" to help classroom educators teach students in grades three to eight about the social, economic, cultural, and historical background of Texas. The guide has questions, puzzles, and activities that teachers can use to inform their students about the Lone Star…

  20. 76 FR 35260 - Texas Disaster # TX-00375

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00375 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of TEXAS dated 04/26... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  1. 78 FR 39822 - Texas Disaster #TX-00409

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00409 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 06/25/2013... CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street...

  2. 75 FR 70763 - Texas Disaster #TX-00363

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00363 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 11/09/2010... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  3. Texas Migrant Labor, 1974 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good Neighbor Commission of Texas, Austin.

    Organized under a 1943 Federal grant and later funded by legislative appropriations, the Good Neighbor Commission of Texas coordinates the work of Federal, State, and local government units endeavoring to improve the travel, living, and working conditions of Texas migrant farmworkers and their families. The 1974 annual report chronicles the facts,…

  4. Texas Migrant Labor. 1975 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good Neighbor Commission of Texas, Austin.

    The Good Neighbor Commission of Texas coordinates the work of the Federal, State, and local government toward the improvement of travel and living and working conditions of Texas migrant laborers and their families. Covering the full spectrum of migrant labor activity directly related to the improvement of the well-being of migrant and seasonal…

  5. 77 FR 24756 - Texas Disaster #TX-00387

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00387 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 04/17/2012... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Dallas, Kaufman, Tarrant. Contiguous Counties:...

  6. 75 FR 48384 - Texas Disaster #TX-00362

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00362 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... State of TEXAS (FEMA-1931- DR), dated 08/03/2010. Incident: Hurricane Alex. Incident Period:...

  7. 40 CFR 81.429 - Texas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Texas. 81.429 Section 81.429 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.429 Texas. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal...

  8. 40 CFR 81.429 - Texas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Texas. 81.429 Section 81.429 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.429 Texas. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal...

  9. 78 FR 33464 - Texas Disaster #TX-00405

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00405 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 05/29/2013... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Ellis, Hood, Johnson. Contiguous Counties:...

  10. 75 FR 62437 - Texas Disaster #TX-00364

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00364 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 09/29/2010... determined to be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Nueces, Contiguous Counties:...

  11. Hispanic Faculty Members in Texas Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Anthony; Joyner, Sheila; Slate, John

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which Hispanic faculty members employed at all Texas community colleges had changed from 2000 to 2008 is examined. Both the number and percentage of Hispanic faculty members employed full-time at Texas community colleges had increased from 2000 to the 2008 school year. Though a statistically significant increase was present, the…

  12. 40 CFR 81.429 - Texas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Texas. 81.429 Section 81.429 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.429 Texas. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal...

  13. 40 CFR 81.429 - Texas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Texas. 81.429 Section 81.429 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.429 Texas. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal...

  14. 78 FR 72140 - Texas Disaster # TX-00417

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... ADMINISTRATION Texas Disaster TX-00417 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration ACTION: Notice SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 11/22/2013... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Caldwell, Hays, Travis. Contiguous Counties:...

  15. The Texas Head Start Metro Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Mary Tom, Ed.; Flores, Alfredo R., Ed.

    The Texas Metro Network (TMN) is an informal group of Head Start Directors and Executive Directors organized for the purposes of improving the delivery of training and technical assistance and for assisting communication between large scale Head Start programs in the metropolitan areas of Texas. In pursuit of these aims, each member unit of the…

  16. Computers in Schools of Southeast Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renfrow, Raylene; Henderson, David L.

    This study determined the prominent brands of microcomputers presently in use in Southeast Texas schools, the reasons for their selection, and computer use and brands in relation to grade level. Questionnaires related to microcomputer use were sent to 115 school districts in southeast Texas in 1985. The return rate was 83 percent. A total of 8,258…

  17. 40 CFR 81.429 - Texas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Texas. 81.429 Section 81.429 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.429 Texas. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal...

  18. Texas High School Free Enterprise Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketcham, Allen F.; Rossman, Joseph E., Jr.

    The 66th and 67th Texas legislatures mandated that an economics course with an emphasis on the free enterprise system and its benefits be a required course for all students graduating from Texas high schools. This paper presents an analysis of the 1982-1988 textbooks adopted for that course. The key concepts evaluated were: definition of…

  19. Research, Publishing, and Tenure among Texas Biologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salehi, Faiz

    2007-01-01

    This study examined opinions toward research among biology faculty in Texas institutions of higher learning. The objectives of the study were to determine what the viewpoints of Texas biology faculty were toward research according to faculty rank and institutional type. Mailed questionnaire approach was used in this study to collect data.…

  20. [Sybil Scott and East Texas Baseball Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodfin, Samantha, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This issue of "Loblolly Magazine" is dedicated to Sybil Scott, born in 1910 and still going at the age of 85. She shares some interesting tales of what it was like growing up in the '10's and '20's in Texas, including her school years. She remembers, very vividly, her childhood and teenage years in East Texas. Among the many interesting stories…

  1. A feasibility study for an emergency medical services system to serve the Permian basin in the state of Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The development of an Emergency Medical Services System grant application for the Permian Basin Region of West Texas is described along with the application of NASA-developed technology. Conclusions and recommendations are included.

  2. Houston, Galveston Bay, Texas, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Less than an hour before this photo was taken, a large explosion and fire occurred at a petrochemical plant in Mount Belvieu, just to the east of Houston, Texas (29.5N, 95.0W). The fire has just started and the smoke plume is fairly small but by the end of the day, smoke obscured most of the area east of Houston. The spider-web network of highways radiating from the center of Houston is easily seen as well as the Astrodome and other features.

  3. Texas Solar Collaboration Action Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Winland, Chris

    2013-02-14

    Texas Solar Collaboration Permitting and Interconenction Process Improvement Action Plan. San Antonio-specific; Investigate feasibility of using electronic signatures; Investigate feasibility of enabling other online permitting processes (e.g., commercial); Assess need for future document management and workflow/notification IT improvements; Update Information Bulletin 153 regarding City requirements and processes for PV; Educate contractors and public on CPS Energy’s new 2013 solar program processes; Continue to discuss “downtown grid” interconnection issues and identify potential solutions; Consider renaming Distributed Energy Resources (DER); and Continue to participate in collaborative actions.

  4. The Del Rio ataxite, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, E. P.; King, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    Basic data are presented on the Del Rio, Nordheim, and Monahans ataxites found in Texas. Results are reported for bulk-chemistry analysis, metallographic observations, and electron-microprobe analysis of the Del Rio meteorite. It is shown that Del Rio is distinctly different from the other two ataxites in terms of nickel, phosphorous, and carbon content, and is composed of at least three coarse grains in different crystallographic orientations. All the kamacite in Del Rio is found to have transformation structures that are probable shock products, and minor inclusions of daubreelite, schreibersite, and troilite are observed. It is concluded that Del Rio was apparently mildly shocked prior to its fall.

  5. Regression model development and computational procedures to support estimation of real-time concentrations and loads of selected constituents in two tributaries to Lake Houston near Houston, Texas, 2005-9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Michael T.; Asquith, William H.; Oden, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    In December 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Houston, Texas, began collecting discrete water-quality samples for nutrients, total organic carbon, bacteria (Escherichia coli and total coliform), atrazine, and suspended sediment at two USGS streamflow-gaging stations that represent watersheds contributing to Lake Houston (08068500 Spring Creek near Spring, Tex., and 08070200 East Fork San Jacinto River near New Caney, Tex.). Data from the discrete water-quality samples collected during 2005–9, in conjunction with continuously monitored real-time data that included streamflow and other physical water-quality properties (specific conductance, pH, water temperature, turbidity, and dissolved oxygen), were used to develop regression models for the estimation of concentrations of water-quality constituents of substantial source watersheds to Lake Houston. The potential explanatory variables included discharge (streamflow), specific conductance, pH, water temperature, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, and time (to account for seasonal variations inherent in some water-quality data). The response variables (the selected constituents) at each site were nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen, total phosphorus, total organic carbon, E. coli, atrazine, and suspended sediment. The explanatory variables provide easily measured quantities to serve as potential surrogate variables to estimate concentrations of the selected constituents through statistical regression. Statistical regression also facilitates accompanying estimates of uncertainty in the form of prediction intervals. Each regression model potentially can be used to estimate concentrations of a given constituent in real time. Among other regression diagnostics, the diagnostics used as indicators of general model reliability and reported herein include the adjusted R-squared, the residual standard error, residual plots, and p-values. Adjusted R-squared values for the Spring Creek models ranged

  6. Texas State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    The Texas State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactivee waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Texas. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Texas. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Texas.

  7. Season-ahead Drought Forecast Models for the Lower Colorado River Authority in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, P. J.; Zimmerman, B.; Grzegorzewski, M.; Watkins, D. W., Jr.; Anderson, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) in Austin, Texas, manages the Highland Lakes reservoir system in Central Texas, a series of six lakes on the Lower Colorado River. This system provides water to approximately 1.1 million people in Central Texas, supplies hydropower to a 55-county area, supports rice farming along the Texas Gulf Coast, and sustains in-stream flows in the Lower Colorado River and freshwater inflows to Matagorda Bay. The current, prolonged drought conditions are severely taxing the LCRA's system, making allocation and management decisions exceptionally challenging, and affecting the ability of constituents to conduct proper planning. In this work, we further develop and evaluate season-ahead statistical streamflow and precipitation forecast models for integration into LCRA decision support models. Optimal forecast lead time, predictive skill, form, and communication are all considered.

  8. Water Marketing as a Reallocative Institution in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chan; Griffin, Ronald C.

    1992-03-01

    Policy selection for guiding the allocation of water resources has long been debated among economists and policymakers. Economists have been prone to recommend water marketing on theoretical grounds, but the appraisal of realistic opportunities for employing market institutions requires analysis of actual markets. Twenty years of market activity in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas are reviewed along with the historical development of water law in Texas and procedural requirements for transferring water rights. Developed data indicate active water marketing practices with significant volumes of agricultural water having been sold to municipalities. For transactions involving representative cities, estimated municipal benefits from water marketing are determined to far exceed the agricultural costs of the transfer. Attention to the unique circumstances of this region is required prior to extending results to other areas.

  9. Methodology of quality improvement projects for the Texas Medicare population.

    PubMed

    Pendergrass, P W; Abel, R L; Bing, M; Vaughn, R; McCauley, C

    1998-07-01

    The Texas Medical Foundation, the quality improvement organization for the state of Texas, develops local quality improvement projects for the Medicare population. These projects are developed as part of the Health Care Quality Improvement Program undertaken by the Health Care Financing Administration. The goal of a local quality improvement project is to collaborate with providers to identify and reduce the incidence of unintentional variations in the delivery of care that negatively impact outcomes. Two factors are critical to the success of a quality improvement project. First, as opposed to peer review that is based on implicit criteria, quality improvement must be based on explicit criteria. These criteria represent key steps in the delivery of care that have been shown to improve outcomes for a specific disease. Second, quality improvement must be performed in partnership with the health care community. As such, the health care community must play an integral role in the design and evaluation of a quality improvement project and in the design and implementation of the resulting quality improvement plan. Specifically, this article provides a historical perspective for the transition from peer review to quality improvement. It discusses key steps used in developing and implementing local quality improvement projects including topic selection, quality indicator development, collaborator recruitment, and measurement of performance/improvement. Two Texas Medical Foundation projects are described to highlight the current methodology and to illustrate the impact of quality improvement projects.

  10. Burst propagation in Texas Helimak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, F. A. C.; Toufen, D. L.; Guimarães-Filho, Z. O.; Caldas, I. L.; Gentle, K. W.

    2016-05-01

    We present investigations of extreme events (bursts) propagating in the Texas Helimak, a toroidal plasma device in which the radial electric field can be changed by application of bias. In the experiments analyzed, a large grid of Langmuir probes measuring ion saturation current fluctuations is used to study the burst propagation and its dependence on the applied bias voltage. We confirm previous results reported on the turbulence intermittency in the Texas Helimak, extending them to a larger radial interval with a density ranging from a uniform decay to an almost uniform value. For our analysis, we introduce an improved procedure, based on a multiprobe bidimensional conditional averaging method, to assure precise determination of burst statistical properties and their spatial profiles. We verify that intermittent bursts have properties that vary in the radial direction. The number of bursts depends on the radial position and on the applied bias voltage. On the other hand, the burst characteristic time and size do not depend on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage modifies the vertical and radial burst velocity profiles differently. The burst velocity is smaller than the turbulence phase velocity in almost all the analyzed region.

  11. 78 FR 36178 - Texas Gas Transmission, LLC; Notice Of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Texas Gas Transmission, LLC; Notice Of Application Take notice that on May 29, 2013, Texas Gas Transmission, LLC (Texas Gas), 9 Greenway Plaza, Suite 2800, Houston, Texas 77046, filed in Docket No. CP13-485-000, pursuant to section 7(b) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) this...

  12. 78 FR 26340 - Texas Gas Transmission, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Texas Gas Transmission, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on April 15, 2013, Texas Gas Transmission, LLC (Texas Gas), 9 Greenway Plaza, Suite 2800, Houston, Texas 77046, filed in Docket No. CP13-166-000 an application pursuant to section 7(b) of the Natural Gas Act...

  13. 27 CFR 9.155 - Texas Davis Mountains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Texas Davis Mountains. 9... Texas Davis Mountains. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Texas Davis Mountains.” (b) Approved map. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Texas...

  14. 27 CFR 9.155 - Texas Davis Mountains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Texas Davis Mountains. 9... Texas Davis Mountains. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Texas Davis Mountains.” (b) Approved map. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Texas...

  15. 27 CFR 9.155 - Texas Davis Mountains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Texas Davis Mountains. 9... Texas Davis Mountains. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Texas Davis Mountains.” (b) Approved map. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Texas...

  16. 27 CFR 9.155 - Texas Davis Mountains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Texas Davis Mountains. 9... Texas Davis Mountains. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Texas Davis Mountains.” (b) Approved map. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Texas...

  17. 27 CFR 9.155 - Texas Davis Mountains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Texas Davis Mountains. 9... Texas Davis Mountains. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Texas Davis Mountains.” (b) Approved map. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Texas...

  18. 27 CFR 9.136 - Texas Hill Country.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Texas Hill Country. 9.136... Texas Hill Country. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Texas Hill Country.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the “Texas...

  19. 77 FR 12045 - Texas Eastern Transmission, LP; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-28

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Texas Eastern Transmission, LP; Notice of Application Take notice that on February 16, 2012, Texas Eastern Transmission, LP (Texas Eastern), PO Box 1642, Houston, Texas 77056 filed... appurtenances located in federal waters offshore in the Gulf of Mexico near Louisiana. Specifically,...

  20. 27 CFR 9.136 - Texas Hill Country.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Texas Hill Country. 9.136... Texas Hill Country. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Texas Hill Country.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the “Texas...

  1. 27 CFR 9.144 - Texas High Plains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Texas High Plains. 9.144... Texas High Plains. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Texas High Plains.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Texas High...

  2. 27 CFR 9.136 - Texas Hill Country.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Texas Hill Country. 9.136... Texas Hill Country. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Texas Hill Country.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the “Texas...

  3. 27 CFR 9.136 - Texas Hill Country.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Texas Hill Country. 9.136... Texas Hill Country. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Texas Hill Country.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the “Texas...

  4. 27 CFR 9.144 - Texas High Plains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Texas High Plains. 9.144... Texas High Plains. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Texas High Plains.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Texas High...

  5. 27 CFR 9.144 - Texas High Plains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Texas High Plains. 9.144... Texas High Plains. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Texas High Plains.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Texas High...

  6. 78 FR 43874 - Texas Eastern Transmission, LP; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Texas Eastern Transmission, LP; Notice of Application On July 2, 2013, Texas Eastern Transmission, LP (Texas Eastern) filed with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission... more fully in the Application, Texas Eastern states that it lacks the documentation to confirm...

  7. 75 FR 61461 - Texas Gas Transmission, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Texas Gas Transmission, LLC; Notice of Application September 28, 2010. Take notice that on September 22, 2010, Texas Gas Transmission, LLC (Texas Gas), 3800 Frederica Street... Act and Part 157 of the Commission's Regulations. Specifically, Texas Gas requests authorization...

  8. 27 CFR 9.144 - Texas High Plains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Texas High Plains. 9.144... Texas High Plains. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Texas High Plains.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Texas High...

  9. 78 FR 79687 - Texas Eastern Transmission, LP; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Texas Eastern Transmission, LP; Notice of Application Take notice that on December 10, 2013 Texas Eastern Transmission, LP (Texas Eastern), at 5400 Westheimer Court, Houston, Texas 77056, filed an application in...

  10. 27 CFR 9.136 - Texas Hill Country.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Austin, Texas, 1954 (revised 1974); (5) Del Rio, Texas, 1958 (revised 1969); (6) San Antonio, Texas, 1954... is the intersection of Interstate Highway 35 and State highway 29 to the north of the city of Austin, on the Austin Texas, U.S.G.S. map; (2) From the beginning point, the boundary follows State...

  11. 27 CFR 9.144 - Texas High Plains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Texas High Plains. 9.144... Texas High Plains. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Texas High Plains.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Texas High...

  12. Texas Public School Technology Survey, 1988. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Jon; Davis, Trina; Strader, Arlen; Jessup, George

    The Texas Association of School Administrators (TASA) with technical support from the South Central Regional Technology in Education Consortia-Texas (SCR*TEC-TX) conducted a survey of the technology infrastructure in all public schools in Texas. This document provides the final report of the 1998 Texas Public School Technology Survey. Following…

  13. Development of a geodatabase and conceptual model of the hydrogeologic units beneath air force plant 4 and Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base Carswell Field, Fort Worth, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shah, Sachin D.

    2004-01-01

    Air Force Plant 4 and adjacent Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base Carswell Field at Fort Worth, Texas, constitute a government-owned, contractor-operated facility that has been in operation since 1942. Contaminants from AFP4, primarily volatile organic compounds and metals, have entered the ground-water-flow system through leakage from waste-disposal sites and from manufacturing processes. The U.S. Geological Survey developed a comprehensive geodatabase of temporal and spatial environmental information associated with the hydrogeologic units (alluvial aquifer, Goodland-Walnut confining unit, and Paluxy aquifer) beneath the facility and a three-dimensional conceptual model of the hydrogeologic units integrally linked to the geodatabase. The geodatabase design uses a thematic layer approach to create layers of feature data using a geographic information system. The various features are separated into relational tables in the geodatabase on the basis of how they interact and correspond to one another. Using the geodatabase, geographic data at the site are manipulated to produce maps, allow interactive queries, and perform spatial analyses. The conceptual model for the study area comprises computer-generated, three-dimensional block diagrams of the hydrogeologic units. The conceptual model provides a platform for visualization of hydrogeologic-unit sections and surfaces and for subsurface environmental analyses. The conceptual model is based on three structural surfaces and two thickness configurations of the study area. The three structural surfaces depict the altitudes of the tops of the three hydrogeologic units. The two thickness configurations are those of the alluvial aquifer and the Goodland-Walnut confining unit. The surface of the alluvial aquifer was created using a U.S. Geological Survey 10-meter digital elevation model. The 2,130 point altitudes of the top of the Goodland-Walnut unit were compiled from lithologic logs from existing wells, available soil

  14. The renewables portfolio standard in Texas: An early assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan H.; Langniss, Ole

    2001-11-01

    Texas has rapidly emerged as one of the leading wind power markets in the United States. This development can be largely traced to a well-designed and carefully implemented renewables portfolio standard (RPS). The RPS is a new policy mechanism that has received increasing attention as an attractive approach to support renewable power generation. Though replacing existing renewable energy policies with an as-of-yet largely untested approach in the RPS is risky, early experience from Texas suggests that an RPS can effectively spur renewables development and encourage competition among renewable energy producers. Initial RPS targets in Texas will be far exceeded by the end of 2001, with as much as 930 MW of wind slated for installation this year. RPS compliance costs appear negligible, with new wind projects reportedly contracted for under 3(US)/242/kWh, in part as a result of a 1.7(US)/242/kWh production tax credit, an outstanding wind resource, and an RPS that is sizable enough to drive project economies of scale. Obliged retail suppliers have been willing to enter into long-term contracts with renewable generators, reducing important risks for both the developer and the retail supplier. Finally, the country's first comprehensive renewable energy certificate program has been put into place to monitor and track RPS compliance.

  15. 33 CFR 165.804 - Snake Island, Texas City, Texas; mooring and fleeting of vessels-safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Snake Island, Texas City, Texas... Guard District § 165.804 Snake Island, Texas City, Texas; mooring and fleeting of vessels—safety zone. (a) The following is a safety zone: (1) The west and northwest shores of Snake Island; (2)...

  16. Technology tackles low-permeability sand in South Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, T.E.; Mladenka, P.

    1997-09-29

    Through aggressive applications of advanced technology, Swift Energy Co. increased its natural gas and oil production from the AWP Olmos field in South Texas by more than fivefold in less than 2 1/2 years. At the same time, it substantially reduced per unit development and production costs. Gross daily production was more than 67 MMcf equivalent by mid-1997, compared to about 12 MMcf equivalent in early 1994. The AWP field in McMullen County, Texas, is a low-permeability, depletion-drive reservoir (the Olmos sand) that releases its vast quantities of hydrocarbons only after being artificially stimulated. The paper describes hydraulic fracturing, remote fracture monitoring, velocity strings, slim-hole drilling, single-stage cementing, monitoring production, gathering system, vapor recovery, and field performance.

  17. Aerobiology of Juniperus Pollen in Oklahoma, Texas, and New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levetin, Estelle; Bunderson, Landon; VandeWater, Pete; Luvall, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Pollen from members of the Cupressaceae are major aeroallergens in many parts of the world. In the south central and southwest United States, Juniperus pollen is the most important member of this family with J. ashei (JA) responsible for severe winter allergy symptoms in Texas and Oklahoma. In New Mexico, pollen from J. monosperma (JM) and other Juniperus species are important contributors to spring allergies, while J. pinchotii (JP) pollinates in the fall affecting sensitive individuals in west Texas, southwest Oklahoma and eastern New Mexico. Throughout this region, JA, JM, and JP occur in dense woodland populations. Generally monitoring for airborne allergens is conducted in urban areas, although the source for tree pollen may be forested areas distant from the sampling sites. Improved pollen forecasts require a better understanding of pollen production at the source. The current study was undertaken to examine the aerobiology of several Juniperus species at their source areas for the development of new pollen forecasting initiatives.

  18. Characterization of a Taura syndrome virus isolate originating from the 2004 Texas epizootic in cultured shrimp.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Arun K; Lakshman, Dilip K; Amundsen, Keenan; Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio; Kaizer, Krista N; Roy, Sribash; Hasson, Kenneth W; Allnutt, F C Thomas

    2010-03-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the Taura syndrome virus (TSV) isolate that caused epizootics in shrimp farms in Texas in 2004 (Texas isolate) revealed that this virus was more virulent in laboratory bioassays than the TSV reference isolate, Hawaii 1994, causing severe symptom development and rapid mortality. Histopathology of moribund animals demonstrated epithelial necrosis within the stomach, appendages, general body cuticle and gills, and the surviving animals demonstrated moderate to numerous lymphoid organ spheroids. Purified virions showed icosahedral morphology, with a diameter of 31 nm. Comparative genome analysis showed that the Texas isolate is more closely related to TSV isolates from Thailand and China than to the Hawaii isolate. The predicted tertiary structures of the inhibition of apoptosis protein (IAP) and protease domains of the Texas isolate are very similar to those of the Hawaii isolate. However, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of the Texas isolate has significant structural differences from the Hawaii isolate due to point mutation(s) in the RdRp gene. Changes in the RdRp tertiary structure might contribute to the replication fidelity, virulence and ecological adaptability of the Texas isolate.

  19. 2YC3-Texas Style

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Ann

    1998-07-01

    When I first became a department chair, I discovered 2YC3 (Two-Year College Chemistry Consortium) and travel money at the same time. I attended a meeting in Denver, Colorado, and it changed my professional life. I heard new ideas and met exciting, committed chemistry teachers. When I returned from the meeting, I wondered why we couldn't have similar meetings on a local level. There are numerous two-year colleges in the southeast region of Texas, where I teach, and, in fact, there was already a Gulf Coast Consortium of Two-Year Colleges in place for deans to meet and discuss topics, such as common numbering systems for courses. In the spring of 1987, we came up with a list of chemistry teachers in two-year colleges and invited them to a meeting on our campus, San Jacinto College Central, in the Houston area. The topic for that first meeting was safety.

  20. 77 FR 25949 - Texas Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ...: Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION: Proposed rule; public comment period and opportunity for public hearing on proposed amendment. SUMMARY: We, the Office of Surface... Act). Texas proposes revisions to its regulations regarding: definitions; review of...

  1. 77 FR 66574 - Texas Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ...: Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION: Proposed rule; public comment period and opportunity for public hearing on proposed amendment. SUMMARY: We, the Office of Surface... Act). Texas proposes revisions to its regulations regarding: definitions; review of...

  2. Applications of remote sensing surveys in Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The grant project continues to introduce remote sensing technology to users in Texas and other regions in the South through presentation of papers and briefings at technical and professional meetings.

  3. Mapping evapotranspiration in the Texas Panhandle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agriculture in the Texas High Plains accounts for approximately 92% of groundwater withdrawals. Because groundwater levels are declining in the region, efficient agricultural water use is imperative for sustainability and regional economic viability. Accurate regional evapotranspiration (ET) maps ...

  4. Regional equations for estimation of peak-streamflow frequency for natural basins in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Slade, Raymond M.

    1997-01-01

    Peak-streamflow frequency for 559 Texas stations with natural (unregulated and rural or nonurbanized) basins was estimated with annual peak-streamflow data through 1993. The peak-streamflow frequency and drainage-basin characteristics for the Texas stations were used to develop 16 sets of equations to estimate peak-streamflow frequency for ungaged natural stream sites in each of 11 regions in Texas. The relation between peak-streamflow frequency and contributing drainage area for 5 of the 11 regions is curvilinear, requiring that one set of equations be developed for drainage areas less than 32 square miles and another set be developed for drainage areas greater than 32 square miles. These equations, developed through multiple-regression analysis using weighted least squares, are based on the relation between peak-streamflow frequency and basin characteristics for streamflow-gaging stations. The regions represent areas with similar flood characteristics. The use and limitations of the regression equations also are discussed. Additionally, procedures are presented to compute the 50-, 67-, and 90-percent confidence limits for any estimation from the equations. Also, supplemental peak-streamflow frequency and basin characteristics for 105 selected stations bordering Texas are included in the report. This supplemental information will aid in interpretation of flood characteristics for sites near the state borders of Texas.

  5. Wetlands production: a balancing of concerns. [Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Cluck, A.

    1983-01-01

    Oil and gas operations along the Texas Gulf Coast require, not only special technical and operational considerations, but also special attention to environmental concerns. A Texas Gulf Coast oil and gas operator must work his way through a complex and sometimes contradictory maze of federal, state and city regulations in order to obtain appropriate permits to drill a well, lay a pipeline or install a production facility.

  6. Saline-water resources of Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winslow, Allen George; Kister, Lester Ray

    1956-01-01

    Most of the aquifers in Texas contain saline water in some parts, and a few are capable of producing large quantities of saline water. Of the early Paleozoic formations, the Hickory sandstone member of the Riley formation of Cambrian age and the Ellenburger group of Ordovician age are potential sources of small to moderate supplies of saline water in parts of central and west-central Texas.

  7. Parasites of the collared peccary from Texas.

    PubMed

    Samuel, W M; Low, W A

    1970-01-01

    Results of a survey of the parasites of the collared peccary (Dicotyles tajacu angulatus) in Texas are presented. Three ectoparasites, Amblyomma cajennense, Dermacentor variabilis, and Pulex porcinus were very common on peccaries from south Texas, but less common or absent in arid west Texas. Sucking lice, Pecaroecus javalii, were common on peccaries from west Texas, but were not found in south Texas. The known range of this louse in Texas is extended into the Big Bend area. Two ticks, Amnblyomma inornatumn and Haemaphysalis leporis-palustris, were found infrequently. Five of nine species of endoparasites found in this survey (Dirofilaria acutiuscula, Parabronema pecatriae, Parostertagia heterospiculum, Physocephalus sp., and Texicospirura turki) were prevalent. Three species, D. acutiuscula, Gongylonema baylisi, and Fascioloides magna, are reported from North American peccaries for the first time. The geographic distribution of the large American liver fluke, F. magna, coincided with an area where the parasite is enzootic in white-tailed deer. It is concluded that parasitism was of little importance in population control of peccaries during the period of the study.

  8. Health hazards among working children in Texas.

    PubMed

    Cooper, S P; Rothstein, M A

    1995-05-01

    This report represents the first attempt to assemble existing data from a variety of sources regarding children less than 18 years of age in the work force in Texas. These data include the frequency of detected violations of child labor laws, reports of injuries to the Texas Workers' Compensation Commission, and work-related deaths as ascertained from death certificates. More than 1,000 minors were detected as being illegally employed in Texas each year since 1986 and nearly 1,100 work-related injuries in children 18 years of age and younger were reported to the Texas Workers' Compensation Commission in 1991. A review of Texas death certificates from 1980 to 1990 revealed 125 work-related fatalities among children. The leading cause of death was motor vehicle injuries, followed by injuries from machinery (usually agricultural machinery). The magnitude and severity of occupational illnesses in working children are unknown. Because of physiologic differences in size, metabolism, and absorption, children may be especially susceptible to work-related injury and illness. Health and safety data on working children in Texas, as in most other places, are fragmented and incomplete. These data are needed to identify children at high risk of injuries and illnesses, to target prevention programs, and to identify areas for additional legislation. More rigorous enforcement of current legislation is also needed.

  9. Uncooled thermal imaging at Texas Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Charles M.; Beratan, Howard; Owen, Robert A.; Corbin, Mac; McKenney, S.

    1992-12-01

    Texas Instruments has developed a new thermal imaging technology based upon focal plane arrays (FPAs) using the pyroelectric effect in ceramic barium-strontium titanate (BST). These devices operate near the paraelectric-ferroelectric phase transition, which, for the selected composition of BST, is near room temperature. The detector elements operate in the voltage mode with a bias voltage applied to maintain and optimize the pyroelectric effect near the phase transition. The BST array attaches via bump-bonding to a CMOS readout circuit that filters, buffers and multiplexes the output signals. These FPAs have facilitated the development of a system technology capable of satisfying a wide variety of applications, including surveillance devices, weapons sights, missile seekers and driver's aids. Resulting systems are performance-competitive with scanned FLIRs in these applications, and they are smaller in size, lighter in weight, and require less power than scanned FLIRs. Simplicity and compactness of the system designs will result in production costs competitive with image intensification devices.

  10. Passive-solar homes for Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, M. L.

    1982-06-01

    Acceptance of passive solar technologies has been slow within the conventional building trades in Texas because it is a common misconception that solar is expensive, and data on local applications is severely limited or nonexistent. It is the purpose of this solar development to move passive solar design into the mainstream of public acceptance by helping to overcome and eliminate these barriers. Specifically, the goal is to develop a set of regional climatic building standards to help guide the conventional building trade toward the utilization of soft energy systems which will reduce overall consumption at a price and convenience most Texans can afford. To meet this objective, eight sample passive design structures are presented. These designs represent state of the art regional applications of passive solar space conditioning. The methodology used in the passive solar design process included: analysis of regional climatic data; analysis of historical regional building prototypes; determination of regional climatic design priorities and assets; prototypical design models for the discretionary housing market; quantitative thermal analysis of prototypical designs; and construction drawings of building prototypes.

  11. 78 FR 26301 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; Approval of Texas Low...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ...EPA is proposing approval of a revision to the Texas State Implementation Plan (SIP) concerning the Texas Low Emission Diesel (TxLED) Fuel rules. The revisions clarify existing definitions and provisions, revise the approval procedures for alternative diesel fuel formulations, add new registration requirements, and update the rule to reflect the current program status because the rule is now......

  12. Profile of Texas Teachers: A Study of the Characteristics of Texas Teachers in 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, David L.; And Others

    In an attempt to describe a typical Texas teacher, a study was conducted to establish baseline data in conjunction with the Texas State Teachers Association. In May 1990, a questionnaire with 78 discrete questions, 3 continuous data questions, and 1 open-ended question was sent to 560 teachers. The return rate was 40 percent. The results include a…

  13. Hispanic Children in Texas: A Special Report of the Texas Kids Count Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Kids Count Project, Austin.

    This report presents information on the status of Hispanic children in Texas, with special emphasis on the comparative status of Hispanic children in counties along the Texas-Mexico border. Information was gathered from a literature review, state agencies, the 1990 decennial U.S. census, focus groups, and interviews. A demographic overview shows…

  14. Child Violent Death in Texas. A Special Report for Children's Trust Fund of Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. School of Social Work.

    This Kids Count report presents a brief demographic analysis of preventable child deaths in Texas. The analysis integrates quantitative and qualitative information on accidents, homicides, and suicides, with data on deaths from disease and other causes to compare different age groupings, ethnic groups, and time periods. Texas Department of Health…

  15. The Texas Public Education Challenge. Texas Trilogy on Public Education and Taxes. Policy Brief No. 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCown, F. Scott

    2006-01-01

    This is the first in a trilogy of policy briefs discussing public education and taxes. This brief discusses the challenge facing Texas in funding public education. It also explains why the Texas Supreme Court's recent decision in "West Orange-Cove II" requires increased state appropriations for public education.

  16. Short-term water consumption dynamics in El Paso, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, Thomas M.; ElíAs, Arturo

    2004-08-01

    Time series analysis of water consumption patterns has been the subject of increasing attention in recent years. For many municipalities such efforts offer a means for developing potentially useful planning tools. Because data requirements are not extensive, model development is feasible for markets where information is limited. The work at hand examines the applicability of such a tool in El Paso, Texas, a growing metropolitan economy located in a semiarid region. Sample data are from January 1994 through December 2002. In addition to estimating a linear transfer function equation of water consumption in this city the model is subjected to a series of simulation benchmark tests.

  17. Trailer siting issues: BP Texas City.

    PubMed

    Kaszniak, Mark; Holmstrom, Donald

    2008-11-15

    On 23 March, 2005, a series of explosions and fires occurred at the BP Texas City refinery during the startup of an isomerization (ISOM) process unit. Fifteen workers were killed and about 180 others were injured. All of the fatalities were contract workers; the deaths and most of the serious injuries occurred in and around temporary office trailers that had been sited near a blowdown drum and stack open to the atmosphere as part of ongoing turnaround activities in an adjacent unit. Due to problems that developed during the ISOM startup, flammable hydrocarbon liquid overfilled the blowdown drum and stack which resulted in a geyser-like release out the top into the atmosphere. The flammable hydrocarbons fell to the ground releasing vapors that were likely ignited from a nearby idling diesel pickup truck. A total of 44 trailers were damaged by the blast pressure wave that propagated through the refinery when the vapor cloud exploded. Thirteen trailers were totally destroyed and workers were injured in trailers as far as 479ft away from the release. The focus of this paper will be on trailer siting issues, including: need for work/office trailers within process units, adequacy of risk analysis methods in API RP 752, and minimum safe distance requirements

  18. Trailer siting issues: BP Texas City.

    PubMed

    Kaszniak, Mark; Holmstrom, Donald

    2008-11-15

    On 23 March, 2005, a series of explosions and fires occurred at the BP Texas City refinery during the startup of an isomerization (ISOM) process unit. Fifteen workers were killed and about 180 others were injured. All of the fatalities were contract workers; the deaths and most of the serious injuries occurred in and around temporary office trailers that had been sited near a blowdown drum and stack open to the atmosphere as part of ongoing turnaround activities in an adjacent unit. Due to problems that developed during the ISOM startup, flammable hydrocarbon liquid overfilled the blowdown drum and stack which resulted in a geyser-like release out the top into the atmosphere. The flammable hydrocarbons fell to the ground releasing vapors that were likely ignited from a nearby idling diesel pickup truck. A total of 44 trailers were damaged by the blast pressure wave that propagated through the refinery when the vapor cloud exploded. Thirteen trailers were totally destroyed and workers were injured in trailers as far as 479ft away from the release. The focus of this paper will be on trailer siting issues, including: need for work/office trailers within process units, adequacy of risk analysis methods in API RP 752, and minimum safe distance requirements PMID:18294765

  19. USGS Zebra Mussel Monitoring Program for north Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Churchill, Christopher J.; Baldys, Stanley

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Zebra Mussel Monitoring Program for north Texas provides early detection and monitoring of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) by using a holistic suite of detection methods. The program is designed to assess zebra mussel occurrence, distribution, and densities in north Texas waters by using four approaches: (1) SCUBA diving, (2) water-sample collection with plankton tow nets (followed by laboratory analyses), (3) artificial substrates, and (4) water-quality sampling. Data collected during this type of monitoring can assist rapid response efforts and can be used to quantify the economic and ecological effects of zebra mussels in the north Texas area. Monitoring under this program began in April 2010. The presence of large zebra mussel populations often causes undesirable economic and ecological effects, including damage to water-processing infrastructure and hydroelectric powerplants (with an estimated 10-year cost of $3.1 billion), displacement of native mussels, increases in concentrations of certain species of cyanobacteria, and increases in concentrations of geosmin (an organic compound that results in taste and odor issues in water). Since no large-scale, environmentally safe eradication method has been developed for zebra mussels, it is difficult to remove established populations. Broad physicochemical adaptability, prolific reproductive capacity, and rapid dispersal methods have enabled zebra mussels, within a period of about 20 years, to establish populations under differing environmental conditions across much of the eastern part of the United States. In Texas, the presence of zebra mussels was first confirmed in April 2009 in Lake Texoma in the Red River Basin along the Texas-Oklahoma border. They were most likely introduced into Lake Texoma through overland transport from an infested water body. Since then, the presence of zebra mussels has been reported in both the Red River and Washita River arms of Lake Texoma, in

  20. Proceedings: International Ex-Students' Conference on Energy (Austin, Texas, April 26-30, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fergusson, Charles, Ed.

    This document contains the speeches, and subsequent discussion, presented at the International Ex-Student Conference on Energy held at the University of Texas at Austin, April 26-30, 1976. Speakers included technical experts and representatives from an oil exporting country and from developed and developing oil importing countries. Energy sources,…