Science.gov

Sample records for georgia agricultural experiment

  1. Research from the Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton, Georgia, to minimize contamination in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scientists with the United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service and scientists with the University of Georgia located at the Coastal Plain Experiment Station in Tifton, Georgia have been conducting research on aflatoxin contamination of peanut since the early 1960's. Ear...

  2. An Evaluation of Georgia's Agriculture in the Classroom Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herren, Ray V.; Oakley, Pam

    1995-01-01

    In Georgia 16 classes of second graders and 12 of fourth graders were divided into 2 groups. The treatment group was taught the Agriculture in the Classroom curriculum. Compared to controls' test scores, the experimental group effectively learned agriculture concepts regardless of whether they were in rural or urban areas, grouped randomly or by…

  3. Agricultural exposure history among African-American farmers in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Hoppin, J A; Guzman, J D; Tolbert, P E; Flagg, E W

    2001-06-22

    Agricultural exposures differ across the United States by region, calendar time period, and agricultural practice, but most of the published literature focuses on white men in the Midwest. A pilot study was conducted to explore the breadth and diversity of farming practices over time among African-American farmers in Georgia whose exposures may differ in important ways. Using a comprehensive life events calendar questionnaire, 17 male African-American farmers aged 36 to 86 yr residing in southeastern Georgia were interviewed regarding their agricultural history in July 1997. Most men (15/17) reported working on multiple farms in their lifetime; 3 men worked on 5 different farms during their lifetime. These farmers reported using more chemicals during their lifetime than farmers in the Midwest. Used motor oil was the most frequently reported insecticide applied to animals; this apparently common practice has not been described in the literature and should be better understood since its use may result in dermal exposure to polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Better characterization of regionally specific farming history and individual farming practices will facilitate studies of the health effects of farming.

  4. Revisiting Supervised Agricultural Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, William G.; Clarke, Ariane; Fallon, Maureen

    2000-01-01

    A Delphi panel of 40 agricultural educators unanimously agreed that supervised agricultural experience should remain an integral component of the curriculum; a name change is not currently warranted. Categories recommended were agribusiness entrepreneurship, placement, production, research, directed school lab, communications, exploration, and…

  5. Energy in Agriculture: Proceedings of a Conference-Workshop, Atlanta, Georgia, October 1-3, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    This publication is the proceedings of a conference-workshop held in Atlanta, Georgia in October 1975. At this conference 13 papers were presented on various aspects of energy use in agriculture. Also included are the final reports of the extension, the teaching, and the research workshop groups. Title of papers include Energy in Agriculture and…

  6. CFD validation experiments at the Lockheed-Georgia Company

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, John B.; Thomas, Andrew S. W.

    1987-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation experiments at the Lockheed-Georgia Company. Topics covered include validation experiments on a generic fighter configuration, a transport configuration, and a generic hypersonic vehicle configuration; computational procedures; surface and pressure measurements on wings; laser velocimeter measurements of a multi-element airfoil system; the flowfield around a stiffened airfoil; laser velocimeter surveys of a circulation control wing; circulation control for high lift; and high angle of attack aerodynamic evaluations.

  7. Identifying Technical Content Training Needs of Georgia Agriculture Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peake, Jason B.; Duncan, Dennis W.; Ricketts, John C.

    2007-01-01

    The continuing trend toward increasing diversity of curriculum offered within secondary agricultural education programs is driving a change in pre-service and in-service technical training for agriculture teachers. This study looks at agriculture teachers' perceived importance of, and competence in, traditional technical competencies such as…

  8. Georgia Teachers in Academic Laboratories: Research Experiences in the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, D.

    2005-12-01

    The Georgia Intern-Fellowships for Teachers (GIFT) is a collaborative effort designed to enhance mathematics and science experiences of Georgia teachers and their students through summer research internships for teachers. By offering business, industry, public science institute and research summer fellowships to teachers, GIFT provides educators with first-hand exposure to the skills and knowledge necessary for the preparation of our future workforce. Since 1991, GIFT has placed middle and high school mathematics, science and technology teachers in over 1000 positions throughout the state. In these fellowships, teachers are involved in cutting edge scientific and engineering research, data analysis, curriculum development and real-world inquiry and problem solving, and create Action Plans to assist them in translating the experience into changed classroom practice. Since 2004, an increasing number of high school students have worked with their teachers in research laboratories. The GIFT program places an average of 75 teachers per summer into internship positions. In the summer of 2005, 83 teachers worked in corporate and research environments throughout the state of Georgia and six of these positions involved authentic research in geoscience related departments at the Georgia Institute of Technology, including aerospace engineering and the earth and atmospheric sciences laboratories. This presentation will review the history and the structure of the program including the support system for teachers and mentors as well as the emphasis on inquiry based learning strategies. The focus of the presentation will be a comparison of two placement models of the teachers placed in geoscience research laboratories: middle school earth science teachers placed in a 6 week research experience and high school teachers placed in 7 week internships with teams of 3 high school students. The presentation will include interviews with faculty to determine the value of these experiences

  9. A Failed Experiment: Georgia's Tax Credit Scholarships for Private Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Education Foundation, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Georgia is one of seven states that currently allow tax credits for scholarships to private schools. Georgia's law was enacted in May 2008 in order to assist low income students to transfer out of low performing public schools. Operations under the new act began in late 2008. The law permits taxpayers in Georgia to reduce their annual state taxes…

  10. Estimated risk of death among employees in agriculture and agriculture-related industries in Georgia, 1985-1994.

    PubMed

    Tedders, Stuart H; Jobin, Tracy L; Vogel, Robert L; Dever, G E A

    2003-01-01

    Farming has an enormous impact on the economy of Georgia, with as many as one in six Georgians working in agriculture. The purpose of this study was to compare the risk of death of white and black farmers to non-farmers in Georgia. Mortality data stratified by age and aggregated by race were retrieved from the Georgia Office of Vital Statistics for the years 1985-1994. The classification system used to code occupation on the death certificate was W473-489, which includes farmers and most all other agricultural occupations. For each cause of death, the Breslow-Day Test was used to determine homogeneity of risk across all age strata (alpha=0.05). A common odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for all homogeneous causes of death using the Mantel-Haenzel procedure. Among white farmers, the risk of death was significantly high for tuberculosis [OR=1.64 (1.01, 2.65)], fires [OR=1.60 (1.15, 2.22)], and accidental drowning [OR=1.52 (1.01, 2.28)]. The leading causes of death among black farmers were accidental drowning [OR=1.53 (1.03, 2.26)], cerebrovascular disease [OR=1.27 (1.18, 1.38)], and ischemic heart disease [OR=1.21 (1.14, 1.29)]. Causes of death reported to be significantly low were also investigated. The findings of this study are varied, but trends related to risk of death appear to be similar to observed national trends.

  11. Survival dynamics of fecal bacteria in ponds in agricultural watersheds of the Piedmont and Coastal Plain of Georgia.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Michael B; Endale, Dinku M; Fisher, Dwight S; Adams, M Paige; Lowrance, Richard; Newton, G Larry; Vellidis, George

    2012-01-01

    Animal agriculture in watersheds produces manure bacteria that may contaminate surface waters and put public health at risk. We measured fecal indicator bacteria (commensal Escherichia coli and fecal enterococci) and manure pathogens (Salmonella and E. coli 0157:H7), and physical-chemical parameters in pond inflow, within pond, pond outflow, and pond sediments in three ponds in agricultural watersheds. Bishop Pond with perennial inflow and outflow is located in the Piedmont, and Ponds A and C with ephemeral inflow and outflow in the Coastal Plain of Georgia. Bromide and chloride tracer experiments at Bishop Pond reflected a residence time much greater than that estimated by two models, and indicated that complete mixing within Bishop Pond was never obtained. The long residence time meant that fecal bacteria were exposed to solar UV-radiation and microbial predation. At Bishop Pond outflow concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria were significantly less than inflow concentrations; such was not observed at Ponds A and C. Both Salmonella and E. coli 0157:H7 were measured when concomitant concentrations of commensal E. coli were below the criterion for surface water impairment indicating problems with the effectiveness of indicator organisms. Bishop Pond improved down stream water quality; whereas, Ponds A and C with ephemeral inflow and outflow and possibly greater nutrient concentrations within the two ponds appeared to be less effective in improving down stream water quality.

  12. A preliminary appraisal of the impact of agriculture on ground-water availability in Southwest Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollard, L.D.; Grantham, R.G.; Blanchard, H.E.

    1978-01-01

    Irrigated acreage in the 20-county study area in southwest Georgia increased from 130,000 acres in 1976 to 261,000 in 1977. Acreage irrigated entirely by ground water increased 85 percent for the same period. The largest quantity of ground water used for irrigation was in the Dougherty Plain district, where 92 percent of supplemental irrigation water comes from wells. The total amount of water pumped for irrigation in the Dougherty Plain in 1977 was more than 42 billion gallons, 30 billion gallons more than in 1976. There were no detectable concentrations of selected organic compounds and trace metals used in agricultural chemicals above the recommended limits for public consumption in 19 wells sampled for chemical analyses. Although nitrate concentrations were not above the recommended limits for drinking water, the presence of nitrate in amounts ranging from 0.3 to 7.8 milligrams per liter in wells in the Dougherty Plain possibly indicate the downward movement of soluble nitrate, a byproduct of fertilizer, into the ground-water reservoir. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. Definitive design of the solar total energy large-scale experiment at Shenandoah, Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunke, R. W.; Leonard, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Construction of a Solar Total Energy Large Scale Experiment at Shenandoah, Georgia, is described. The Solar Total Energy System (STES) is designed with capacity to supply electricity and thermal energy to a knitwear plant at the Shenandoah site. The system will provide 400 kilowatts electrical and 3.5 megawatts thermal energy. The STES is a cascaded total energy system configuration. It uses parabolic disch collectors and a steam turbine-generator. The electrical system will be grid connected to the Georgia Power Company system.

  14. Using Laboratory Experiments for Policymaking: An Example from the Georgia Irrigation Reduction Auction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Ronald G.; Holt, Charles A.; Laury, Susan K.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, interest has been growing in policy applications of different auction systems. This paper reports a series of experiments that were used to design and implement an auction in a unique policymaking environment. In April 2000, the Georgia legislature passed a law that mandated that the state hold an auction in drought years to pay…

  15. Shedding More Light and Less Heat on the Results of School Integration. The Georgia Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christison, Milton; Sida, Donald

    One hundred and eighty-eight Georgia school system superintendents were polled in the Spring of 1976 as to their perceptions and experiences concerning the effects of school integration. This paper presents the results of this investigation. Three broad areas were selected for analysis: (1) integration outcomes affecting the public schools, (2)…

  16. Pesticides in surface water from three agricultural basins in south-central Georgia, 1993-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatzell, H.H.

    1996-01-01

    Twenty-two of 43 pesticides analyzed were detected in 128 water samples collected from Tucsawhatchee Creek, the Little River, and the Withlacoochee River. These streams drain agricultural basins in south-central Georgia and were sampled from March 1993 through June 1995. Herbicides were detected more frequently than insecticides. The most frequently detected herbicides were atrazineand metolachlor and the most frequently detected insecticide was carbaryl. Pesticide concentrations in the three streams were low and did not exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standards. The maximum pesticide concentration was 2.6 ug/L (micrograms per liter) for propargite, a miticide detected in only one sample. The maximum concentrations of the remaining 21 pesticides were less than 0.25 ug/L. The median concentrations were equal to the method detection limit for all pesticides except atrazine (0.008 ug/L) and metolachlor (0.012 ug/L). The ratio of herbicidedetections to nondetections was largest in the planting season, smaller in the harvest season and smallest in the fallow season for the three basins.The same pattern existed for the insecticide ratios in the Little River and the Withlacoochee River. Pairwise correlations between concentrations of atrazine and metolachlor and four parameters (discharge, and concentrations of dissolved organiccarbon, suspended organic carbon, and suspended fine sediment) were evaluated for each stream. The strongest correlations existed between metolachlor and mean daily discharge and metolachlor and fine sediment in the Withlacoochee River. The only significant correlation for the Little River was between atrazine and suspended fine sediment.

  17. Shallow ground-water quality in selected agricultural areas of south-central Georgia, 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crandall, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    The Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain National Water-Quality Assessment Program began an agricultural land-use study in March 1994. The study area is located in the upper Suwannee River basin in Tift, Turner, Worth, Irwin, Wilcox, and Crisp Counties, Ga. Twenty-three shallow monitoring wells were installed in a 1,335-square- mile area characterized by intensive row-crop agriculture (peanuts, corn, cotton, and soybeans). The study focused on recently recharged shallow ground water in surficial aquifers to assess the relation between land-use activities and ground- water quality. All wells were sampled in March and April (spring) 1994, and 14 of these wells were resampled in August (summer) 1994. Shallow ground water in the study area is characterized by oxic and acidic conditions, low bicarbonate, and low dissolved-solids concentrations. The median pH of shallow ground water was 4.7 and the median bicarbonate concentration was 1.7 mg/L (milligrams per liter). Dissolved oxygen concentrations ranged from 3.0 to 8.0 mg/L. The median dissolved-solids concentration in samples collected in the spring was 86 mg/L. Major inorganic ion composition was generally mixed with no dominant cation; nitrate was the dominant anion (greater than 60 percent of the anion composition) in 14 of 23 samples. Only concentrations of bicarbonate, dissolved organic carbon, and nitrate had significant differences in concentrations between samples collected in the spring and the background samples. However, median concentrations of some of the major ingredients in fertilizer (including magnesium, chloride, nitrate, iron, and manganese) were higher in water samples from agricultural wells than in background samples. The median concentration of dissolved solids in ground-water samples collected in the spring (86 mg/L) was more than double the median concentration (41 mg/L) of the background samples. The median nitrate as nitrogen concentration of 6.7 mg/L in the spring samples reflects the effects of

  18. Charting the history of agricultural experiments.

    PubMed

    Parolini, Giuditta

    2015-09-01

    Agricultural experimentation is a world in constant evolution, spanning multiple scientific domains and affecting society at large. Even though the questions underpinning agricultural experiments remain largely the same, the instruments and practices for answering them have changed constantly during the twentieth century with the advent of new disciplines like molecular biology, genomics, statistics, and computing. Charting this evolving reality requires a mapping of the affinities and antinomies at work within the realm of agricultural research, and a consideration of the practices, tools and social and political structures in which agricultural experiments are grounded. Three main questions will be addressed to provide an overview of the complex world of agricultural research investigated by the special issue: What is an agricultural experiment? Who is an experimenter in agriculture? Where do agricultural experiments take place? It will become apparent that agricultural experiments have a wide relevance for human development as they touch upon concerns related to human health and nutrition, contribute to policy discussions, and can affect the social and political structures in which farming is embedded. PMID:26205202

  19. Exploring Principals' Perceptions of Supervised Agricultural Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayfield, John; Wilson, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of principals at high schools with agricultural education programs in regard to Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE). There is evidence that suggests that high school principals' attitudes may both directly and indirectly affect factors that influence school climate and student achievement. In this study,…

  20. A Failed Experiment: Georgia's Tax Credit Scholarships for Private Schools. Special Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Education Foundation, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Georgia is one of seven states that currently allow tax credits for scholarships to private schools. The law permits individual taxpayers in Georgia to reduce annual state taxes up to $2,500 for joint returns when they divert funds to a student scholarship organization (SSO). Georgia's law providing tax credits for private school tuition grants or…

  1. Feeding Preferences of the Larval Southern Two-Lined Salamander, Eurycea Cirrigera, in an Impacted Agricultural Area, Southwest Georgia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muenz, T. K.; Golladay, S. W.; Smith, L. L.; Vellidis, G.

    2005-05-01

    Feeding preference of the stream-dwelling Southern Two-lined Salamander, Eurycea cirrigera, was examined in streams affected by agricultural practices in southwest Georgia. Larvae were collected within bimonthly benthic macroinvertebrate samples from February 2002 to February 2003. Five stream reaches were sampled, two of which were fenced from cattle and three allowed cattle access. Forty larvae were recovered from the invertebrate collections, with significantly higher captures at fenced sites than unfenced sites. The entire digestive tract was removed from larvae and stomach contents were examined to better understand prey selection in streams with differing intensities of adjacent agricultural land-use. Invertebrates were enumerated in 34 salamander stomachs, with Chironomidae comprising the largest percentage of individuals found, both in stomach contents and habitat collections. Electivity values showed a wide range of variability among individual salamanders, however, overall indices suggest slight positive selection for a subfamily of the Chironomidae, the Tanypodinae. It appears that E.cirrigera larvae select for Tanypodinae, however, this invertebrate group was found at all stream sites, suggesting factors other than prey abundance, such as stream habitat quality, may also influence larval salamander abundance.

  2. Stream buffer effectiveness in an agriculturally influenced area, southwestern Georgia: responses of water quality, macroinvertebrates, and amphibians.

    PubMed

    Muenz, Tara K; Golladay, Stephen W; Vellidis, George; Smith, Lora L

    2006-01-01

    To determine useful metrics for assessing stream water quality in the Southeastern Coastal Plain, we examined differences among two buffered and three unbuffered streams in an agricultural landscape in southwestern Georgia. Potential indicators included amphibian diversity and abundance, aquatic macroinvertebrate populations, riparian vegetative structure, water quality, and stream physical parameters. Variability among sites and treatments (buffered vs. unbuffered) existed, with sites in the same treatment as most similar, and disturbances from a nearby eroding gully strongly affecting one unbuffered site. Of the invertebrate metrics examined, percentages of clingers, Ephemeroptera-Plecoptera-Trichoptera (EPT), Elmidae (Coleoptera), Crustacea (Decapoda and Amphipoda), and dipterans were found to be possible indicators of stream health for perennial streams within this region. Overall, buffered sites showed higher percentages of sensitive invertebrate groups and showed lower and more stable concentrations of nitrate N, suspended solids, and fecal coliforms (FCs). Percent canopy cover was similar among sites; however, riparian vegetative coverage and percent leaf litter were greatest at buffered sites. No differences in amphibian abundance, presence, and absence within the riparian area were apparent between sites; however, instream larval salamanders were more abundant at buffered streams. In this study, stream buffers appeared to decrease nutrient and sediment loads to adjacent streams, enhancing overall water quality. Selected benthic macroinvertebrate metrics and amphibian abundance also appeared sensitive to agricultural influences. Amphibians show potential as indicator candidates, however further information is needed on their responses and tolerances to disturbances from the microhabitat to landscape levels.

  3. The South Georgia Wave Experiment (SG-WEX) - Preliminary Satellite and Modelling Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, C.; Mitchell, N. J.

    2014-12-01

    Internal gravity waves, and the energy and momentum they transport, are a key process governing the dynamics and structure of the middle and upper atmosphere, but are significantly underconstrained in current weather and climate models due to their small physical scale relative to typical model grids. In particular, the simulation of such waves is believed to underlie a major momentum deficit in the high-latitude southern hemisphere, due to underestimation of the gravity wave drag provided by waves generated by sub-gridscale island sources. The South Georgia Wave Experiment (SG-WEX) is a coordinated programme to investigate the most important such small island source, South Georgia Island. This will be carried out via the deployment of a mesospheric-sensing meteor radar, stratospheric satellite measurements, and two month-long tropospheric radiosonde campaigns, backed up by detailed high-resolution modelling of the region at all altitudes. The ultimate goal of the project is to significantly enhance our geophysical understanding of wave dynamics in the region and, more directly, to provide a basis for a dramatic improvement in the parameterisation of the wave momentum flux generated by such small-island sources, with consequent effects on the skill of global weather and climate models both in this region and globally. Here, we present preliminary results from the satellite and modelling components of the project. In particular, we use combined measurements from the HIRDLS, SABER, AIRS and COSMIC satellite instruments and analyses from the HadGEM GCM to produce a detailed temporal and spatial climatology of wave fluxes in the region, due both to South Georgia and to the nearby Andes and Antarctic Peninsula. We also briefly look ahead to the deployment of the meteor radar and first radiosonde campaign in January 2015, and discuss how these are expected to enhance our understanding of the dynamics of the region.

  4. Water Quality Response to Changes in Agricultural Land Use Practices at Headwater Streams in Georgia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Poorly managed agricultural watersheds may be one of the most important contributors to high levels of bacterial and sediment loadings in surface waters. We investigated two cattle farms with differing management schemes to compare how physicochemical and meteorological parameter...

  5. Little River Experimental Watershed, Georgia: National Institute of Food and Agriculture - Conservation Effects Assessment Project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In September 2007, USDA’s Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES), now the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) jointly funded two integrated research and outreach grants to conduct a synthesis of resul...

  6. Proceedings of the Annual National Agricultural Education Research Meeting (12th, Atlanta, Georgia, December 6, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Association, Arlington, VA. Agricultural Education Div.

    These proceedings include the following papers: "An Assessment of the National FFA Public Service Announcement Program" (Sutphin, Dillon, and Rush); "Educational Objectives and Administrative Criteria for the National FFA Contest Program" (Smith and Kahler); "A National Profile of Agricultural Teacher Educators and State Supervisors of Vocational…

  7. The Lived Experience of Low-Income Minority Students Who Receive State Merit Aid at a Georgia Postsecondary Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how junior level students at a Georgia postsecondary institution perceived their college experiences were impacted by the meritbased aid they received. The study employed a phenomenological method and was based on Tinto's psycho-social-economic-organizational model, from "Theories of college student…

  8. Effects of Medicaid disease management programs on medical expenditures: Evidence from a natural experiment in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Kranker, Keith

    2016-03-01

    In recent decades, most states' Medicaid programs have introduced disease management programs for chronically ill beneficiaries. Interventions assist beneficiaries and their health care providers to appropriately manage chronic health condition(s) according to established clinical guidelines. Cost containment has been a key justification for the creation of these programs despite mixed evidence they actually save money. This study evaluates the effects of a disease management program in Georgia by exploiting a natural experiment that delayed the introduction of high-intensity services for several thousand beneficiaries. Expenditures for medical claims decreased an average of $89 per person per month for the high- and moderate-risk groups, but those savings were not large enough to offset the total costs of the program. Impacts varied by the intensity of interventions, over time, and across disease groups. Heterogeneous treatment effect analysis indicates that decreases in medical expenditures were largest at the most expensive tail of the distribution.

  9. Agricultural Experiment Stations and Branch Stations in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Calvin H.; Atucha, Amaya

    2015-01-01

    In 1887, Congress passed the Hatch Act, which formally established and provided a funding mechanism for agricultural experiment stations in each state and territory in the United States. The main purpose of agricultural experiment stations is to conduct agricultural research to meet the needs of the citizens of the United States. The objective of…

  10. Career Development, Supervised Agricultural Experience, and FFA. The Connecticut Vocational Agriculture Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannebach, Alfred J.; And Others

    This curriculum guide was developed to help teachers and administrators in Connecticut Regional Vocational Agriculture Centers to update and upgrade their vocational agriculture curriculum in the areas of career development, supervised agricultural experience (SAE), and Future Farmers of America (FFA). The curriculum incorporates the competencies…

  11. Training Health Care Professionals to Manage Overweight Adolescents: Experience in Rural Georgia Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, David A.; Yin, Zenong; Kibbe, Debra; Burns, Susan; Trowbridge, Frederick

    2008-01-01

    Context: The obesity epidemic threatens the present and future health of adolescents in the United States. Yet, health care providers lack specific training for pediatric obesity assessment and management. Purpose: This study examined the adherence of rural Georgia primary care practitioners to an overweight adolescent management protocol. The…

  12. Citizen Scientists: Student Experiences in the GTP Georgia/Russian Exchange Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunkerly-Kolb, Susan; Hassard, Jack

    1997-01-01

    Describes the results of the Global Thinking Project which facilitated student and educator exchanges among 10 schools in Georgia (USA) and Russia during the 1995-96 school year. The student's activity is described as that of a citizen scientist--one who combines the process of science with public policy decision making. (Author/DKM)

  13. The Ambulatory Experience for Junior Medical Students at the Medical College of Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fincher, Ruth-Marie E.; Albritton, T. Andrew

    1993-01-01

    The Medical College of Georgia's third-year medicine clerkship includes a one-month ambulatory care block rotation in internal medicine, medicine, and dermatology. Students present topics and participate in case discussions in daily and weekly conferences. Program success is resulting in expansion. (MSE)

  14. Exploring the Paradox of Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs in Agricultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Elizabeth B.; Moore, Gary E.

    2007-01-01

    Agricultural teachers in North Carolina were surveyed to assess their attitudes toward Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) and to identify barriers to implementation of SAE in their schools. The teachers gave the politically correct answers about why SAE was important. The teachers indicated that SAE was important (8.46 on a 10 point scale)…

  15. Supervised Agricultural Experience: An Examination of Student Knowledge and Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Lauren J.; Rayfield, John; Moore, Lori L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate student Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) knowledge and participation. This descriptive study was conducted in 120 randomly selected agricultural education programs throughout four purposively selected states representative of the National FFA regions. Students completed a questionnaire assessing…

  16. Benefits of Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs: A Synthesis of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, David L.; Dyer, James E.

    1997-01-01

    A review of literature from 1964 to 1993 identified the benefits of supervised agricultural experience (SAE) programs, including agriculture knowledge and positive work attitudes. Classroom, SAE, and Future Farmers of America complemented each other. The research base is state specific and fragmented and lacks cohesiveness. (SK)

  17. Human Nutrition Research Conducted at State Agricultural Experiment Stations and 1890/Tuskegee Agricultural Research Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driskell, Judy A.; Myers, John R.

    1989-01-01

    Cooperative State Research Service-administered and state-appropriated State Agriculture Experiment Station funds for human nutrition research increased about two-fold from FY70-FY86, while the percentage of budget expended for this research decreased. (JOW)

  18. Survival dynamics of fecal bacteria in ponds in agricultural watersheds of the Piedmont and Coastal Plain of Georgia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal agriculture in watersheds can be a source of manure bacteria that can contaminate surface waters and put public health at risk. Because of the expanding urban-agriculture interface preventing surface water contamination with manure pathogens is important for sustaining surface water quality. ...

  19. Farmer Experience of Pluralistic Agricultural Extension, Malawi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chowa, Clodina; Garforth, Chris; Cardey, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Malawi's current extension policy supports pluralism and advocates responsiveness to farmer demand. We investigate whether smallholder farmers' experience supports the assumption that access to multiple service providers leads to extension and advisory services that respond to the needs of farmers. Design/methodology/approach: Within a…

  20. RECORDS OF SUPERVISED OCCUPATIONAL EXPERIENCE AND TRAINING IN VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BURCROFF, WALTER; AND OTHERS

    HIGH SCHOOL VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE STUDENTS MAY KEEP RECORDS OF THEIR SUPERVISED OCCUPATIONAL EXPERIENCE IN THIS RECORD BOOK. DEVELOPED BY A NATIONAL COMMITTEE OF TEACHERS, SUPERVISORS, AND TEACHER EDUCATORS, IT PROVIDES SPACE FOR RECORDING ESSENTIAL PLANS, PLACEMENT AGREEMENTS, MONTHLY WORK EXPERIENCES, FINANCIAL SUMMARIES, ACTIVITIES, AND…

  1. The utility of ERTS-1 data for applications in agriculture and forestry. [Montana, Nebraska, Iowa, Georgia, California, and Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erb, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    A comprehensive study has been undertaken to determine the extent to which ERTS-1 data could be used to detect, identify (classify), locate and measure features of applications interest in the disciplines of Agriculture and Forestry. The study areas included: six counties in five states in which were located examples of the most important crops and practices of American agriculture; and a portion of the Sam Houston National Forest, a typical Gulf coastal plain pine forest. The investigation utilized conventional image interpretation and computer-aided (spectral pattern recognition) analysis using both image products and computer compatible tapes. The emphasis was generally upon the computer-aided techniques. It was concluded that ERTS-1 data can be used to detect, identify, locate and measure a wide array of features of interest in agriculture and forestry.

  2. Stable isotope analysis of larval mosquito diets in agricultural wetlands in the coastal plain of Georgia, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Young, Gina Botello; Golladay, Stephen; Covich, Alan; Blackmore, Mark

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have used C and N isotope ratios to investigate the use of different food resources such as plant and animal detritus by container-breeding mosquitoes. This study is the first to report on the potential food resources assimilated by larval mosquitoes in agricultural and reference wetlands. Larval mosquitoes (Diptera: Culcidae) were sampled, along with their potential food resources, from agricultural and reference wetland habitats throughout a seasonal hydroperiod. IsoSource mixing model results indicated that food resources had greater δ(15) N isotope values in agricultural wetlands compared with cypress-gum swamps. In February, Aedes vexans (Meigen) and Culex territans Walker larvae fed primarily on lower quality food resources (coarse particulate organic matter and sediment) based on C:N. In contrast, higher quality food resources (fine particulate organic matter) were utilized by Anopheles spp. throughout the study and by Psorophora columbiae (Dyer and Knab) in May. This research contributes to a more comprehensive understanding of the food resources available and assimilated by larval mosquitoes in agricultural wetlands.

  3. Maintaining Relevancy in Programs of Agriculture. Proceedings: Southern Regional Meeting, Land Grant College and University Presidents and Administrators of Agriculture (Atlanta, Georgia, April 20-21, 1972).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA. Inst. for Higher Educational Opportunity.

    Recommendations for maintaining relevant programs which resulted from this meeting of college and university presidents and administrators are applicable to all colleges and universities offering programs of agriculture in the region. Given in this report are two major presentations entitled "The Integration of Knowledge in a Specialized Society"…

  4. Relationship of Supervised Agricultural Experience Program Participation and Student Achievement in Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Jimmy G.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Data from 537 high school students demonstrated the positive effect of participation in supervised agricultural experience (SAE) and Future Farmers of America (FFA) on agriscience achievement. FFA involvement and the scope of SAE were highly correlated. Student interest, socioeconomic status, and years of agriscience were related to achievement…

  5. Supervision of Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs: A Synthesis of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, James E.; Williams, David L.

    1997-01-01

    A review of literature from 1964 to 1993 found that supervised agricultural experience (SAE) teachers, students, parents, and employers value the teachers' supervisory role. Implementation practices vary widely and there are no cumulative data to guide policies and standards for SAE supervision. (SK)

  6. Facilitators and barriers to cervical cancer screening, diagnosis, and enrollment in Medicaid: experiences of Georgia's Women's Health Medicaid Program enrollees.

    PubMed

    Blake, Sarah C; Andes, Karen; Hilb, Laura; Gaska, Karie; Chien, Linien; Flowers, Lisa; Adams, E Kathleen

    2015-03-01

    Although cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates have declined in the USA, African American women have a higher incidence rate of cervical cancer and a higher percentage of late-stage diagnosis than white women. Previous analyses by the authors showed that, even after adjusting for age, provider location, and availability, African American women were almost half as likely as white women to be diagnosed or enter Medicaid while at an early stage of their cervical cancer. To understand why these differences exist, we undertook a qualitative examination of the cervical cancer experiences of women enrolled in Georgia's Women's Health Medicaid Program (WHMP). Life history interviews were conducted with 24 WHMP enrollees to understand what factors shaped their cervical cancer experiences, from screening through enrollment in Medicaid. We also examined whether these factors differed by race in order to identify opportunities for increasing awareness of cervical cancer screening among underserved women. Results suggest that many women, especially African Americans, lacked understanding and recognition of early symptoms of cervical cancer, which prevented them from receiving a timely diagnosis. Additionally, participants responded positively to provider support and good communication but wished that their doctors explained their diagnosis more clearly. Finally, women were able to enroll in Medicaid without difficulty due largely to the assistance of clinical staff. These findings support the need to strengthen provider education and public health efforts to reach low-income and minority communities for screening and early detection of cervical cancer.

  7. Children's Growth and Classroom Experiences in Georgia's Pre-K Program: Findings from the 2011-2012 Evaluation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peisner-Feinberg, Ellen; Schaaf, Jennifer; LaForett, Dore

    2013-01-01

    Georgia has one of the few state-funded universal pre-kindergarten programs in the United States, with the aim of providing pre-k services to all 4-year-olds whose families want their children to participate in the program, regardless of family income level. In the 2011-2012 school year, Georgia's Pre-K Program served a total of over 94,000…

  8. Georgia Prisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.

    Findings from a study of Georgia's 16 adult penal institutions indicate that the State's prison system is plagued by many problems. For example, inadequate funds are allocated to maintain facilities and services for its prisoners. As a result, many of the prisons are antiquated, overcrowded and understaffed. In addition, minorities are not hired…

  9. Perception of Teachers of Agriculture about Supervised Agricultural Experience Programmes (SAEP) in Secondary Schools in Ekiti and Ondo States Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Famiwole, Remi O.; Kolawole, E. B.

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated the perception of teachers of agriculture about Supervised Agricultural Experience Programmes (SAEP) in secondary schools in Ekiti and Ondo States. The population used for the study consisted of 520 teachers of agricultural science in all the secondary schools in Ekiti and Ondo States. The sample used for this study was 136…

  10. Regional assessment of nonforestry related biomass resources: Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This document is a collection of spreadsheets detailing in a county by county manner the agricultural crop, agricultural wastes, municipal wastes, and industrial wastes in Georgia that are potential biomass energy sources.

  11. Rural Schooling in Georgia: The Experiences of a Minority Community Service Organization Involved in Local School Decision-Making Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Cynthia Louise Altman

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation study was a descriptive case study of a minority community service organization whose members were actively involved in local school decision-making and activities in a rural Northeast Georgia community. Rural schools face unique challenges in light of current educational trends. To address the challenges, rural schools must…

  12. Economic Yearbook from Georgia Trend Magazine, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, John

    Based on information from "Georgia Trend" magazine examining economic conditions across Georgia, Gainesville College (GC) is expected to experience an expanding base of students over the next 5 years. With respect to Hall County and the nine contiguous counties that make up GC's service area, data indicate a population growth in the region, growth…

  13. Perceptions Regarding Planning Activities and Supervision Strategies for Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swortzel, Kirk A.

    1996-01-01

    Responses from 71% of 150 Tennessee agriculture teachers surveyed indicated that those teaching in multiple departments, subscribing to "Agricultural Education Magazine," and including supervised agricultural experiences (SAE) in grading were more positive about planning. Those not having agricultural education in high school, including SAE in…

  14. A Needs Assessment to Determine Knowledge and Ability of Egyptian Agricultural Technical School Teachers Related to Supervised Agricultural Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrick, R. Kirby; Roberts, T. Grady; Samy, M. M.; Thoron, Andrew C.; Easterly, R. G., III

    2011-01-01

    This research was conducted approximately one year after Egyptian Agricultural Technical School (ATS) instructors attended workshops on integrating placement Supervised Agricultural Experience as an instructional tool in their programs. Following a year of implementation, the purpose of this study was to determine ATS teacher knowledge and ability…

  15. Value and Expectations of Supervised Agricultural Experiences as Expressed by Agriculture Instructors in Oklahoma Who Were Alternatively Certified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, J. Shane; Haynes, J. Chris

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to determine the value and expectations for student participation in supervised agricultural experience (SAE) programs, as expressed by first-year, agricultural education teachers in Oklahoma who were alternatively certified. This study revealed that teachers in this study value the fact that…

  16. Searsville Sediment Experiment: What is the ideal agricultural soil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, J.; Lo, D.; Patel, N.; Gu, S.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to decide whether or not the sediment located within Searsville Dam at the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve is well suited for agricultural soil. By utilizing various combinations of sediment, farm soil, compost, and horse manure to grow basil plants, we underwent an exploratory study in order to better understand what type of materials and nutrients plants can best thrive within. Our general experiment protocol includes watering the crops with irrigation every day while young, and then limiting that water exposure to only Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays as they become more established. The basil is growing in pots filled with the different amounts of material, and are arranged randomly to prevent certain plants from getting more sunlight than others. The whole experiment plot is covered with a thin white fabric and secured with bricks and wood to keep out pests in the garden. In order to observe trends in the basil development, plant height and leaf number is recorded once every week. During the third week of the study we performed soil texture tests, and within the fourth week we calculated pH data. We discovered that the sediment our project focuses upon is 10-18% clay and 50% sand which categorizes it as loam, and the Stanford farm soil that serves as our control group contains 20-26% clay and 30% sand so it is a silt loam material. The pH tests also showed an average of 7.45 for sediment, 7.3 for farm soil, 7.85 for compost, and 7.65 for horse manure. By looking at all of the data recorded over the five-week time period, we have so far noticed that the 50% sediment and 50% horse manure combination consistently has the best height increase as well as leaf size and content. The 50% sediment and 50% compost mixture has also performed well in those terms, and is therefore a possibility for the best agricultural soil. However, future lab work conducted by Stanford students to examine the nutrient content of the basil tissue, along

  17. Extension and magmatism across the Suwanee Suture and South Georgia Basin from the SUGAR seismic refraction experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shillington, D. J.; Lizarralde, D.; Harder, S. H.; Marzen, R.; Kaip, G.; Accardo, N. J.; Gibson, J. C.; Nauer, A.

    2015-12-01

    The South Georgia Basin was at the center of the most recent sequence of continental collision and rifting events to shape eastern North America. It is the largest of the failed Mesozoic rift basins that formed during the breakup of Pangea, and it straddles the Suwannee Suture, the only well-defined remnant of the Alleghenian suture that joined North America and Gondwana. The South Georgia Basin also lies at the center of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP). It is thus an excellent location to examine the importance of magmatism and pre-existing structures on continental extension. Here we present preliminary results from the SUwanee Suture and GA Rift basin (SUGAR) project, an active-source seismic refraction project to image the crustal structure across these features. In March 2014, we acquired data along SUGAR Line 1, a ~325-km-long, NW-SE oriented profile that crossed the Suwanee Suture and western part of South Georgia Basin. The profile was densely instrumented with 1193 single-channel RekTek 125A seismographs ("Texans") spaced at ~250 m. The sources were 100 to 1800 lb shots spaced at ~20-50 km. In August 2015, we will acquire data along SUGAR Lines 2 and 3. SUGAR Line 2 is a ~450-km-long profile spanning the eastern part of the South Georgia Basin and two possible locations for the Suwanee Suture. We will deploy 1983 "Texans" spaced at 250 m and detonate seventeen 400 to 1600 lb shots spaced at ~16-50 km. SUGAR Line 3 targets the Brunswick magnetic anomaly; we plan to instrument a 100-km-long profile with 700 Texans spaced at 150 m and eleven 200 lb shots spaced at ~10 km. Over 68 students participated in field work for SUGAR. Preliminary models of SUGAR Line 1 indicate that the crust thins to ~33 km beneath the South Georgia Basin. Anomalously high lower crustal velocities occur beneath the basin in the area of the greatest crustal thinning and may represent mafic intrusions from CAMP/synrift magmatism. We will present initial velocity models of

  18. Landslide Hazard in Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaprindashvili, G.; Tsereteli, E.; Gaprindashvili, M.

    2013-12-01

    In the last decades of the XX century, protect the population from geological hazards, to maintain land and safe operation of the engineering facilities has become the most important social - economic, demographic, political and environmental problems for the whole world. Georgia, with its scales of origination of the natural-catastrophic processes (landslide, mudflow, rockfall, erosion and etc.), their re-occurrence and with the negative results inflicted by these processes to the population, agricultural lands and engineering objects, is one of the most complex mountainous region. The extremely sensitive conditions were conditioned by: 1. Activation of highly intense earthquakes; 2. Activation of the negative meteorological events provoking the disaster processes on the background of global climatic changes and their abnormally frequent occurrence (mostly increased atmospheric precipitations, temperature and humidity); 3. Large-scale Human impact on the environment. Following the problem urgency, a number of departmental and research institutions have made their operations more intense in the given direction within the limits of their competence. First of all, the activity of the Department of Geology of Georgia (which is at present included in the National Environmental Agency of the Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Protection), which mapped, identified and cataloged the hazardous processes on the territory of the country and identified the spatial limits and developmental regularities of these processes for tens of years. The increased risk of Geological catastrophes in Georgia first of all is caused by insufficient information between society and responsible persons toward this event. The existed situation needs the base assessment of natural disasters level, the identification of events, to determine their caused reasons, to develop special maps in GIS system, and continuous functioning of geo monitoring researches for develop safety early

  19. Landslide Hazard in Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaprindashvili, George; Tsereteli, Emil; Gaprindashvili, Merab

    2014-05-01

    In the last decades of the XX century, protect the population from geological hazards, to maintain land and safe operation of the engineering facilities has become the most important social - economic, demographic, political and environmental problems for the whole world. Georgia, with its scales of origination of the natural-catastrophic processes (landslide, mudflow, rockfall, erosion and etc.), their re-occurrence and with the negative results inflicted by these processes to the population, agricultural lands and engineering objects, is one of the most complex mountainous region. The extremely sensitive conditions were conditioned by: 1. Activation of highly intense earthquakes; 2. Activation of the negative meteorological events provoking the disaster processes on the background of global climatic changes and their abnormally frequent occurrence (mostly increased atmospheric precipitations, temperature and humidity); 3. Large-scale Human impact on the environment. Following the problem urgency, a number of departmental and research institutions have made their operations more intense in the given direction within the limits of their competence. First of all, the activity of the Department of Geology of Georgia (which is at present included in the National Environmental Agency of the Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Protection), which mapped, identified and cataloged the hazardous processes on the territory of the country and identified the spatial limits and developmental regularities of these processes for tens of years. The increased risk of Geological catastrophes in Georgia first of all is caused by insufficient information between society and responsible persons toward this event. The existed situation needs the base assessment of natural disasters level, the identification of events, to determine their caused reasons, to develop special maps in GIS system, and continuous functioning of geo monitoring researches for develop safety early

  20. Agricultural Modernization and Economic Inequality: The Indian Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michie, Aruna Nayyar

    1978-01-01

    Argues that agriculture production in developing nations should be organized to ensure economic viability. Government policy must emphasize participants' productive capacities and integrate agricultural workers into the new organization of production. (Author/DB)

  1. Droughts in Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber, Nancy L.; Stamey, Timothy C.

    2000-01-01

    Droughts do not have the immediate effects of floods, but sustained droughts can cause economic stress throughout the State. The word 'drought' has various meanings, depending on a person's perspective. To a farmer, a drought is a period of moisture deficiency that affects the crops under cultivation - even two weeks without rainfall can stress many crops during certain periods of the growing cycle. To a meteorologist, a drought is a prolonged period when precipitation is less than normal. To a water manager, a drought is a deficiency in water supply that affects water availability and water quality. To a hydrologist, a drought is an extended period of decreased precipitation and streamflow. Droughts in Georgia have severely affected municipal and industrial water supplies, agriculture, stream water quality, recreation at major reservoirs, hydropower generation, navigation, and forest resources. In Georgia, droughts have been documented at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow gaging stations since the 1890's. From 1910 to 1940, about 20 streamflow gaging stations were in operation. Since the early 1950's through the late 1980's, about 100 streamflow gaging stations were in operation. Currently (2000), the USGS streamflow gaging network consists of more than 135 continuous-recording gages. Ground-water levels are currently monitored at 165 wells equipped with continuous recorders.

  2. Georgia: Okefenokee Swamp

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Okefenokee Swamp Fire, Georgia     View Larger ... Blackjack complex fire in southeastern Georgia's Okefenokee Swamp on May 8, 2002. Smoke from the fires, (which contributed to hazy skies ...

  3. 76 FR 27919 - Vidalia Onions Grown in Georgia; Change in Late Payment and Interest Requirements on Past Due...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 955 Vidalia Onions Grown in Georgia... delinquent assessment requirements in effect under the marketing order for Vidalia onions grown in Georgia (order). The order regulates the handling of Vidalia onions grown in Georgia and is administered...

  4. 78 FR 28118 - Vidalia Onions Grown in Georgia; Change in Reporting and Assessment Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 955 Vidalia Onions Grown in Georgia; Change in Reporting and... the marketing order for Vidalia onions grown in Georgia (order). The order regulates the handling of Vidalia onions grown in Georgia and is administered locally by the Vidalia Onion Committee...

  5. Agricultural Instruction in Secondary Schools: Papers Read at the Third Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Agricultural Teaching, Atlanta, Georgia November 12 1912. Bulletin, 1913, No. 14. Whole Number 522

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United States Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior, 1913

    1913-01-01

    Interest in agricultural education continues to increase. The attempt to teach agriculture is no longer confined to the agricultural college and special agricultural school. Methods of teaching the most important facts and the elementary principles of agriculture are discussed in the meetings of most of our educational associations. There is a…

  6. What Does an Inventory of Recent Innovation Experiences Tell Us about Agricultural Innovation in Africa?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triomphe, Bernard; Floquet, Anne; Kamau, Geoffrey; Letty, Brigid; Vodouhe, Simplice Davo; Ng'ang'a, Teresiah; Stevens, Joe; van den Berg, Jolanda; Selemna, Nour; Bridier, Bernard; Crane, Todd; Almekinders, Cornelia; Waters-Bayer, Ann; Hocde, Henri

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Within the context of the European-funded JOLISAA project (JOint Learning in and about Innovation Systems in African Agriculture), an inventory of agricultural innovation experiences was made in Benin, Kenya and South Africa. The objective was to assess multi-stakeholder agricultural innovation processes involving smallholders. Approach:…

  7. Agricultural Education Early Field Experience through the Lens of the EFE Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smalley, Scott W.; Retallick, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this national study was to describe agricultural teacher education early field experience (EFE) practices using the EFE model. The population for this study was all agricultural education teacher preparation programs (N = 83) listed in the AAAE Directory of University Faculty in Agricultural Education. Data were collected via an…

  8. Engineering and agronomy aspects of a long-term precision agriculture field experiment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Much research has been conducted on specific precision agriculture tools and implementation strategies, but little has been reported on long-term evaluation of integrated precision agriculture field experiments. In 2004 our research team developed and initiated a multi-faceted “precision agriculture...

  9. Agricultural Production Experiences at School for the Urban Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, Allen J.

    1980-01-01

    In vocational agriculture at Sycamore High School in Illinois, urban students start their vocational education with a basic understanding of production, which is the foundation for all agricultural industry. Future Farmers of America chapter-operated and school-owned facilities provide the resources to make these experiential programs possible.…

  10. Summary of the Georgia Agricultural Water Conservation and Metering Program and evaluation of methods used to collect and analyze irrigation data in the middle and lower Chattahoochee and Flint River basins, 2004-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torak, Lynn J.; Painter, Jaime A.

    2011-01-01

    Since receiving jurisdiction from the State Legislature in June 2003 to implement the Georgia Agricultural Water Conservation and Metering Program, the Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission (Commission) by year-end 2010 installed more than 10,000 annually read water meters and nearly 200 daily reporting, satellite-transmitted, telemetry sites on irrigation systems located primarily in southern Georgia. More than 3,000 annually reported meters and 50 telemetry sites were installed during 2010 alone. The Commission monitored rates and volumes of agricultural irrigation supplied by groundwater, surface-water, and well-to-pond sources to inform water managers on the patterns and amounts of such water use and to determine effective and efficient resource utilization. Summary analyses of 4 complete years of irrigation data collected from annually read water meters in the middle and lower Chattahoochee and Flint River basins during 2007-2010 indicated that groundwater-supplied fields received slightly more irrigation depth per acre than surface-water-supplied fields. Year 2007 yielded the largest disparity between irrigation depth supplied by groundwater and surface-water sources as farmers responded to severe-to-exceptional drought conditions with increased irrigation. Groundwater sources (wells and well-to-pond systems) outnumbered surface-water sources by a factor of five; each groundwater source applied a third more irrigation volume than surface water; and, total irrigation volume from groundwater exceeded that of surface water by a factor of 6.7. Metered irrigation volume indicated a pattern of low-to-high water use from northwest to southeast that could point to relations between agricultural water use, water-resource potential and availability, soil type, and crop patterns. Normalizing metered irrigation-volume data by factoring out irrigated acres allowed irrigation water use to be expressed as an irrigation depth and nearly eliminated the disparity

  11. Initial constraints on crustal structure across the Suwanee Suture and South Georgia Basin from the SUGAR seismic refraction experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shillington, D. J.; Lizarralde, D.; Harder, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    Some of the most important unresolved questions in plate tectonics concern the formation and rupture of continents. How does the accretion of terranes contribute to the construction of continental lithosphere, and what processes enable continental lithosphere to rupture? The South Georgia Basin was at the center of the most recent sequence of continental collision and rifting events to shape eastern North America. It is the largest of the failed Mesozoic rift basins that formed during the breakup of Pangea. It straddles the Suwannee Suture, the only well-defined remnant of the Alleghenian suture that joined North America and Gondwana, forming Pangea. The South Georgia Basin also lies at the center of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP). Here we present initial results from the first phase of the SUwanee Suture and GA Rift basin (SUGAR) project, an active-source seismic refraction project to image the crustal structure across these features. During March 2014, we acquired data along a ~325-km-long, NW-SE oriented profile that crossed the Suwanne Suture and western part of South Georgia Basin, extending from north of Columbus, GA to northernmost Florida east of Jasper, FL. The profile was densely instrumented with single-channel RekTek 125A seismometers ("Texans") spaced at ~250 m and deployed along state and country roads, yielding a total of 1193 seismometers along the profile. Thirty-three students and young scientists were involved in the deployment and recovery. The sources were 100 to 1800 lb shots spaced at ~20-50 km. The data are of exceptionally high quality. On nearly all shots, we observe arrivals out to the largest shot-receiver offsets. Within the basin, refractions through the sedimentary section with apparent velocities of ~3-4 km/s are observed to maximum offsets of 7 km. Crustal refractions are observed at a wide-range of offsets with apparent velocities increasing from ~5.5 km/s to as high as ~7.25 km/s. At offsets greater than 150-180 km

  12. Supervised Occupational Experience Record Book for Agricultural Resource Conservation, Environmental Management and Forestry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickles, Tom

    The record book was designed to meet the occupational experience recordkeeping requirements of vocational agriculture students enrolled in forestry, environmental management, or agriculture resource conservation programs in Ohio. It provides guidelines and forms for recording on-the-job, in-the-school lab, and occupational experience project data.…

  13. Barriers to Successful Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs in Semi-Rural and Urban High School Agricultural Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whaley, David C.; Lucero, Dan

    1993-01-01

    Interviews with educators and students examined the value of and identified barriers to effective use of supervised agricultural experiences (SAE) in a Los Angeles high school and a semirural Colorado high school. Both programs overcame diverse challenges to develop valuable experiential learning through SAEs. Recommendations provide strategies…

  14. Effect of Leadership Experience on Agricultural Education Student Teacher Self-Efficacy in Classroom Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Kattlyn J.; Foster, Daniel D.; Birkenholz, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Beginning agriculture teachers often cite classroom management as the most important problem they face in their careers. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of leadership experience on self-perceived teacher efficacy among agricultural education student teachers. The three dimensions of teacher efficacy addressed in this study…

  15. Supervised Occupational Experience Record Book for Agricultural Resources Conservation, Environmental Management and Forestry: Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickles, Tom

    The guide is designed to aid the instructor in implementing the student guide entitled "Supervised Occupational Experience Record Book For Agricultural Resource Conservation, Environmental Management and Forestry". Intended for use in the secondary level vocational agriculture curriculum, general concepts, student record-keeping skills, and…

  16. Health Experiences, Concerns, and Interactions with Effectiveness of Secondary Agriculture Teachers in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jasper S.; Westrom, Lyle E.

    This publication summarizes the findings of several initiatives in studying the health aspects of secondary agriculture teachers in the United States. The study was specifically conducted to determine the health experiences of secondary agriculture teachers, the health problems that cause them to miss work, their health care concerns, personal…

  17. An Experiment in Teaching Agricultural Occupations Information to High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shontz, David Frank

    To compare the educational effectiveness of three methods of teaching agricultural occupations information associated with land use and conservation to Grade 9 and 10 students of vocational agriculture, 424 students in 24 schools in western and central Pennsylvania were selected for an 18-hour instructional experiment. Eight schools were randomly…

  18. An Assessment of Students' Perceptions toward Factors Influencing Supervised Agricultural Experience Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Lauren J.; Rayfield, John; Moore, Lori L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate student perceptions toward factors influencing Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) participation. This descriptive study was conducted in 120 randomly selected agricultural education programs throughout four purposively selected states representative of the National FFA regions. Within each state…

  19. Analysis of the Continuing Decline in Use of Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) in New York State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Roger

    1997-01-01

    When responses from 135 of 222 New York secondary agriculture teachers were compared with a 1983 study, a 10% decrease in supervised agricultural experience (SAE) was found. Barriers were low level of summer employment, limited release time, less funding for transportation, and scheduling problems. A comprehensive overhaul of the concept and…

  20. Georgia Mediagraphy. Second Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta. Office of Instructional Services.

    This document is a guide to print and nonprint materials about Georgia and Georgians. Entries are arranged under the subject headings used in "Essential Skills for Georgia Schools." Criteria for inclusion were appropriateness for K-12 students and commercial availability of the item. Six books containing pictorial and photographic studies of…

  1. Teaching Georgia Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Edwin L.

    1989-01-01

    Offers strategies for teaching eighth grade Georgia geography in accordance with the Georgia Quality Core Curriculum mandate of 1988. Describes the value of combining teachers from the earth sciences, mathematics, and language arts. Gives an example of team teaching at work, including student activities and answer key. (RW)

  2. Entry-Level Technical Skills that Agricultural Industry Experts Expected Students to Learn through Their Supervised Agricultural Experiences: A Modified Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, Jon W.; Edwards, M. Craig

    2011-01-01

    The National Research Council's (NRC) Report (1988), Understanding Agriculture: New Directions for Education, called on secondary agricultural education to shift its scope and purpose, including students' supervised agricultural experiences (SAEs). The NRC asserted that this shift should create opportunities for students to acquire supervised…

  3. Perceptions of North Carolina High School Agricultural Educators regarding Students with Special Needs Participating in Supervised Agricultural Experience and FFA Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lendy; Wilson, Elizabeth; Flowers, Jim; Croom, Barry

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of North Carolina high school agricultural educators toward including students with special needs when implementing Supervised Agricultural Experience and participating in FFA activities. The population was all high school agricultural educators in North Carolina with 12 month employment (N…

  4. Relationship of Length of Vocational Agriculture Teacher Contract to Supervised Occupational Experience Program Scope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrington, Larry R.; McCracken, J. David

    1983-01-01

    The primary purpose of the study was to ascertain if the extent to which vocational agriculture teachers are employed on a 12-month basis is related to the scope of supervised occupational experience programs conducted by students. (SSH)

  5. Theme: The Role of the Teacher in Conducting Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agricultural Education Magazine, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Contains 13 theme articles on the role of teachers in supervised agricultural experience (SAE) programs that offer suggestions, ideas, and practices to advance the implementation of SAE programs. (JOW)

  6. Children's Growth and Classroom Experiences in Georgia's Pre-K Program: Findings from the 2011-2012 Evaluation Study. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peisner-Feinberg, Ellen; Schaaf, Jennifer; LaForett, Dore

    2013-01-01

    Georgia has one of the few state-funded universal pre-kindergarten programs in the United States, with the aim of providing pre-k services to all 4-year-olds whose families want their children to participate in the program, regardless of family income level. In the 2011-2012 school year, Georgia's Pre-K Program served a total of over 94,000…

  7. Resolving the agriculture-petroleum conflict: the experience of cacao smallholders in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Scherr, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    In 1972, PEMEX, the Mexican national oil company, discovered huge reserves of oil and natural gas along the Gulf Coast, and began intensive exploitation in Tabasco and northern Chiapas states. Severe conflict between PEMEX and the agricultural economy of Tabasco seemed certain. But despite problems of labor scarcity, inflation, migration, pollution, agricultural production 1974 to 1979 increased for the state's major products - cacao, coconut, beef, and bananas. This study analyzes how agriculture-petroleum conflicts have been resolved in Tabasco, and how relevant its experience is to other agricultural areas undergoing rapid large-scale industrial development. Cacao farming was chosen as a case study. Detailed farm budget, family employment, and technical production data were used to document farm production strategies. Research results suggest that resolution of agriculture-petroleum conflicts depends on: demographic conditions, employment conditions, agricultural prices, petroleum company flexibility, government development policy, and farmer political strength. Support for the campesino sector is critical.

  8. Developing a Model for Supervised Agricultural Experience Program Quality: A Synthesis of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, James E.; Osborne, Edward W.

    1996-01-01

    A literature review revealed the following: (1) there are no standard criteria to measure the quality of supervised agricultural experience (SAE) programs; (2) teacher attitudes and past SAE experiences strongly influence quality; (3) the number of teachers with SAE experience is declining; and (4) school laboratory facilities are essential for…

  9. Lessons from the Georgia floods.

    PubMed Central

    Clinton, J J; Hagebak, B R; Sirmons, J G; Brennan, J A

    1995-01-01

    In July 1994, tropical storm Alberto brought heavy rains to parts of Alabama, Florida, and Georgia. In South Georgia, rivers rose 44 feet above flood stage, muddy water covered 10,000 square miles, and 31 lives were lost. In implementing the Health and Medical Services portion of the FEMA Federal Response Plan, the Public Health Service learned lessons from this experience that can be applied to planning for other natural disasters. Continuous reassessment to assure the best utilization of resources in rapidly changing conditions, cross-training in the content of emergency plans at all levels, and on-going face-to-face liaison among response managers will improve response efforts. Populations with special medical needs must become part of any response design. The effects that any response activity may have on the community as a whole should be carefully considered before action is taken. Images p685-a p687-a PMID:8570818

  10. An Economic Valuation of Biotic Pollination Services in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Barfield, Ashley S; Bergstrom, John C; Ferreira, Susana; Covich, Alan P; Delaplane, Keith S

    2015-04-01

    As agriculture faces documented decline in bees and other insect pollinators, empirical assessments of potential economic losses are critical for contextualizing the impacts of this decline and for prioritizing research needs. For the state of Georgia, we show that the annual economic value of biotic pollinators is substantial--US$367 million, equivalent to 13 percent of the total production value of crops studied and 3 percent of the total production value of Georgia's agricultural sector. Our unique Geographic Information Systems analysis reveals an irregular pattern of vulnerability. While the Georgia counties displaying the highest economic values of pollination are clustered in southern Georgia, those with the highest dependency on pollinators in terms of their contribution to crop production value are more dispersed throughout the state. PMID:26470149

  11. An Economic Valuation of Biotic Pollination Services in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Barfield, Ashley S; Bergstrom, John C; Ferreira, Susana; Covich, Alan P; Delaplane, Keith S

    2015-04-01

    As agriculture faces documented decline in bees and other insect pollinators, empirical assessments of potential economic losses are critical for contextualizing the impacts of this decline and for prioritizing research needs. For the state of Georgia, we show that the annual economic value of biotic pollinators is substantial--US$367 million, equivalent to 13 percent of the total production value of crops studied and 3 percent of the total production value of Georgia's agricultural sector. Our unique Geographic Information Systems analysis reveals an irregular pattern of vulnerability. While the Georgia counties displaying the highest economic values of pollination are clustered in southern Georgia, those with the highest dependency on pollinators in terms of their contribution to crop production value are more dispersed throughout the state.

  12. Study Guide for TCT in Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sailors, Robert A.

    This study guide was specifically designed for individuals preparing to take the Georgia Teacher Certification Test (TCT) in agriculture. The agriculture test was developed by the National Evaluation Systems, Inc. and educators in Georgia. The test covers 13 subareas: (1) plant science; (2) crop management; (3) animal science; (4) livestock and…

  13. Challenges and Opportunities for Developing Capacity in Earth Observations for Agricultural Monitoring: The GEOGLAM Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitcraft, A. K.; Di Bella, C. M.; Becker Reshef, I.; Deshayes, M.; Justice, C. O.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2011, the Group on Earth Observations Global Agricultural Monitoring (GEOGLAM) Initiative has been working to strengthen the international community's capacity to use Earth observation (EO) data to derive timely, accurate, and transparent information on agriculture, with the goals of reducing market volatility and promoting food security. GEOGLAM aims to develop capacity for EO-based agricultural monitoring at multiple scales, from national to regional to global. This is accomplished through training workshops, developing and transferring of best-practices, establishing networks of broad and sustainable institutional support, and designing or adapting tools and methodologies to fit localized contexts. Over the past four years, capacity development activities in the context of GEOGLAM have spanned all agriculture-containing continents, with much more work to be done, particularly in the domains of promoting access to large, computationally-costly datasets. This talk will detail GEOGLAM's experiences, challenges, and opportunities surrounding building international collaboration, ensuring institutional buy-in, and developing sustainable programs.

  14. An examination of the potential applications of automatic classification techniques to Georgia management problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rado, B. Q.

    1975-01-01

    Automatic classification techniques are described in relation to future information and natural resource planning systems with emphasis on application to Georgia resource management problems. The concept, design, and purpose of Georgia's statewide Resource AS Assessment Program is reviewed along with participation in a workshop at the Earth Resources Laboratory. Potential areas of application discussed include: agriculture, forestry, water resources, environmental planning, and geology.

  15. The Search for Energy Alternatives: Responses Received by State Agricultural Experiment Stations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, William M.

    Directors of the 51 agricultural experiment stations in the United States (including Guam) were mailed questionnaires inquiring as to the extent of requests which had been received for information about wind, solar, and other energy alternatives such as wood and gasahol. There was a total response of 88% with three mailings. The returned…

  16. Guidelines and Procedures: Directed Work-Experience Programs in Vocational Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushman, Harold R.; And Others

    The growing demand for increased diversification of programs and greater specialization in work experience for students of vocational agriculture has created a need for sound teacher guidelines for initiating, establishing, and administering a vocational education program that combines the benefits of school instruction, on-the-job training, and…

  17. Conservation and protection of Georgia's freshwater wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.J.J.

    1989-01-01

    Georgia's freshwater wetlands are a valuable natural resource. Despite this fact, they are vanishing at an alarming rate. One objective of the research presented in this dissertation was to try to determine why freshwater wetlands have been so little esteemed historically that their destruction has until lately drawn little attention. In addition, it was hoped that this research would lead to conclusions about the extent of Georgia's freshwater wetlands and the status of their conservation and protection. A further goal of the study was to generate ideas about how better to protect this resource, and to examine policy issues that must be addressed in association with the problem. Interest in freshwater wetlands is part of a continuum of interests and events associated with environmental awareness that has its roots in the late 1800's and early 1900's. An understanding of the history of the environmental movement and the maturation of environmental philosophy provides needed background against which the issues associated with preservation of freshwater wetlands must be viewed. The first two chapters are thus devoted to an exploration of the history of environmental awareness and activism. In the third chapter, historical material about freshwater wetlands in the, US is presented. The final section is dedicated to a discussion of freshwater wetlands in Georgia. Georgia's boundaries encompass five physiographic provinces. Freshwater wetlands are found in all of these regions, but the type of wetland varies among them. In the northern part of the state, freshwater wetlands are scarce, but in the southern half of the state they are so common as to be considered a dominant feature of the landscape. Among the threats to Georgia's wetlands are urban development, agricultural conversion, impoundment, and pollution.

  18. Georgia's Teacher Performance Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton, Anne Marie; Wetherington, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Like most states, Georgia until recently depended on an assessment of content knowledge to award teaching licenses, along with a licensure recommendation from candidates' educator preparation programs. While the content assessment reflected candidates' grasp of subject matter, licensure decisions did not hinge on direct, statewide assessment of…

  19. The Georgia Centenarian Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Leonard W.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents theoretical rationale, hypotheses, models, and methods and procedures of Georgia Centenarian Study, interdisciplinary study of oldest-old which began in 1988 to investigate adaptational characteristics of long-lived individuals. Introduces other articles in journal issue: first four reports of study, summarizing data collected in first…

  20. Georgia and SREB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with Georgia and 15 other member states to improve education at every level--from pre-K to postdoctoral study--through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead" Goals for Education, which call for the region to lead the nation in…

  1. Georgia's Unusual "Electoral College"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Andrea L.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports a unique partnership between Kennesaw State University and the Georgia state government involving the participation of computer experts in the deployment or electronic voting machines. The effort has received attention in Washington as scientists and government officials search for ways to reform election procedures across the…

  2. Bright Fireball Over Georgia

    NASA Video Gallery

    A camera in Cartersville, Ga., captured this view of a bright fireball over Georgia on the night of Mar. 7, 2012, at approx. 10:19:11 EST. The meteor was first recorded at an altitude of 51.5 miles...

  3. South Georgia Autograph Parties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Womack, Geneva H.

    1978-01-01

    The manager of the South Georgia College Bookstore describes several autograph parties used as a sales promotion technique. The planning process, including initial contacts with the guest authors, are discussed, and the schedules and events of the authors' visits are reviewed. (JMD)

  4. Amphibians and agrochemicals: Dermal contact and pesticide uptake from irrigated croplands in SW Georgia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods Although isolated wetlands comprise a significant portion of amphibian breeding habitats throughout the United States, they are not protected under the Clean Water Act. In SW Georgia where agriculture is dominant within the landscape, many isolated ...

  5. Georgia's Workforce Development Pipeline: One District's Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Melissa H.; Hufstetler, Tammy L.

    2011-01-01

    Launched in 2006, the Georgia Work Ready initiative seeks to improve the job training and marketability of Georgia's workforce and drive the state's economic growth. Georgia Work Ready is a partnership between the state and the Georgia Chamber of Commerce. Comprised of three components, Georgia's initiative focuses on job profiling, skills…

  6. Farm-level irrigation and the marginal cost of water use: evidence from Georgia.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Alvarez, Yassert; Keeler, Andrew G; Mullen, Jeffrey D

    2006-09-01

    We create a proxy for the cost of irrigation water in Georgia from a sample of Georgia irrigators by investigating the marginal cost of pumping groundwater. We then combine this proxy with agronomic and climatic variables to estimate the response of agricultural water use to differences in the marginal cost of irrigation. The results show that pumping costs are a significant determinant of water use, and imply that agricultural water use would be moderately affected by institutional changes that would explicitly price water.

  7. Measuring the Interest of German Students in Agriculture: the Role of Knowledge, Nature Experience, Disgust, and Gender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickel, Malte; Strack, Micha; Bögeholz, Susanne

    2015-06-01

    Modern knowledge-based societies, especially their younger members, have largely lost their bonds to farming. However, learning about agriculture and its interrelations with environmental issues may be facilitated by students' individual interests in agriculture. To date, an adequate instrument to investigate agricultural interests has been lacking. Research has infrequently considered students' interest in agricultural content areas as well as influencing factors on students' agricultural interests. In this study, a factorial design of agricultural interests was developed combining five agricultural content areas and four components of individual interest. The instrument was validated with German fifth and sixth graders ( N = 1,085) using a variance decomposition confirmatory factor analysis model. The results demonstrated a second-order factor of general agricultural interest, with animal husbandry, arable farming, vegetable and fruit cropping, primary food processing, and agricultural engineering as discrete content areas of agricultural interest. Multiple regression analyses demonstrated that prior knowledge, garden experience, and disgust sensitivity are predictors of general agricultural interest. In addition, gender influenced interest in four of the five agricultural content areas. Implications are directed at researchers, teachers, and environmental educators concerning how to trigger and develop pupils' agricultural interests.

  8. Safety in High School Supervised Agricultural Experiences: Teachers' Training and Students' Injury Awareness.

    PubMed

    Pate, M L; Lawver, R G; Sorensen, T J

    2016-01-01

    This research study sought to gather evidence of school-based agriculture teachers' hazard perceptions, safety practices, training experiences, and awareness of student injuries related to supervised agricultural experience (SAE) programs. Teachers agreed that students should follow safety guidelines developed by the National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Safety and Health during SAE work. Approximately 66% (f = 153) of teachers reported having general training in first aid, CPR, and AED. Twenty participants (8.6%) indicated having no safety certifications or training. Abrasions, lacerations, bites/stings, and burns accounted for a majority of the student SAE-related injuries that were reported. There were 82 participants (35.5%) who stated that no injuries had been reported or they were not aware of any injuries that occurred. The majority of teachers (66%) had received some form offirst aid or first response training, but fewer teachers had received safety training for ATVs (f = 25, 10.8%), tractors (f = 48, 20.7%), and livestock (f = 39, 16.8%). Results indicated a disparity between required safe work habits and the types of hazardous tasks students should be allowed to complete alone while participating in SAE activities. It appears most responding teachers in this study agreed to allow students to operate equipment and machinery alone. Recommendations for teachers include attending professional development training specific to SAE safety and keeping records of any risk assessments conducted during SAE supervision. Further development of best practices for SAE supervision and safety are needed to assist agricultural education professionals in protecting and shaping our future leaders in agriculture.

  9. 78 FR 45898 - Vidalia Onions Grown in Georgia; Continuance Referendum

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ...; Continuance Referendum AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Referendum order. SUMMARY: This document directs that a referendum be conducted among eligible producers of Vidalia onions grown in Georgia... Vidalia onions produced in the production area. DATES: The referendum will be conducted from September...

  10. Use of UAS to Support Management in Precision Agriculture: The AggieAir Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, M.; Torres-Rua, A. F.; ELarab, M.; Hassan Esfahani, L.; Jensen, A.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing applications for precision agriculture depend on acquiring actionable information at high spatial resolution and at a temporal frequency appropriate for timely responses. Unmanned aerial systems (UAS) are capable of providing such imagery for use in various applications for precision agriculture (yield estimation, evapotranspiration, etc.). AggieAirTM, a UAS platform and sensory array, was designed and developed at Utah State University to acquire high-resolution imagery (0.15m -0.6 m) in the visual, near infrared, red edge, and thermal infrared spectra. Spectral data obtained from AggieAir are used to develop soil moisture, plant chlorophyll, leaf nitrogen and actual evapotranspiration estimates to support management in precision agriculture. This presentation will focus on experience in using the AggieAir system to provide information products of possible interest in precision agriculture. The discussion will include information about the direction and rate of development of UAS technology and the current and anticipated future state of the regulatory environment for use of these systems in the U.S.

  11. Vegetation Water Content Mapping in a Diverse Agricultural Landscape: National Airborne Field Experiment 2006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosh, Michael H.; Jing Tao; Jackson, Thomas J.; McKee, Lynn; O'Neill, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    Mapping land cover and vegetation characteristics on a regional scale is critical to soil moisture retrieval using microwave remote sensing. In aircraft-based experiments such as the National Airborne Field Experiment 2006 (NAFE 06), it is challenging to provide accurate high resolution vegetation information, especially on a daily basis. A technique proposed in previous studies was adapted here to the heterogenous conditions encountered in NAFE 06, which included a hydrologically complex landscape consisting of both irrigated and dryland agriculture. Using field vegetation sampling and ground-based reflectance measurements, the knowledge base for relating the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) and the vegetation water content was extended to a greater diversity of agricultural crops, which included dryland and irrigated wheat, alfalfa, and canola. Critical to the generation of vegetation water content maps, the land cover for this region was determined from satellite visible/infrared imagery and ground surveys with an accuracy of 95.5% and a kappa coefficient of 0.95. The vegetation water content was estimated with a root mean square error of 0.33 kg/sq m. The results of this investigation contribute to a more robust database of global vegetation water content observations and demonstrate that the approach can be applied with high accuracy. Keywords: Vegetation, field experimentation, thematic mapper, NDWI, agriculture.

  12. Energy integrated farm system: North Dakota State University Agricultural Experiment Station

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    North Dakota State University Agricultural Experiment Station, a dairy farm with wheat, barley, sugar beet, and soybean crops, is designed to conserve energy through energy integrated concepts including wind break and solar energy for heating buildings, methane digestion, and energy conservation crop practices. The integrated energy concepts to be demonstrated are: generation of methane from manure; use of a milk-to-water heat exchanger and rock-bed heat storage in dairy operations; use of a solar collector energy system for space heat in the dairy barn (calf warming); efficient solid-liquid separation in manure collection system; use of digester effluent as bedding and fertilizer; and energy conservation by improved agriculture practices, such as conservation tillage, pest management, and soil testing for efficient use of fertilizer.

  13. Water - Essential Resource of the Southern Flint River Basin, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, Debbie; Norton, Virgil

    2004-01-01

    Introduction Abundant water resources of the Flint River Basin have played a major role in the history and development of southwestern Georgia. The Flint River-along with its tributaries, wetlands, and swamps-and the productive aquifers of the river basin are essential components of the area's diverse ecosystems. These resources also are necessary for sustained agricultural, industrial, and municipal activities. Increasing, and in some cases conflicting, demand for water makes careful monitoring and wise planning and management of southwestern Georgia's water resources critical to the ecological and economic future of the area. This poster presents the major issues associated with increasing competition for water resources in the southern Flint River Basin.

  14. Contextualising Teaching and Learning in Rural Primary Schools: Using Agricultural Experience. Volume 1 [and] Volume 2. Education Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Peter; Mulhall, Abigail

    This research project examined the potential role of agricultural experiences as a vehicle for meeting the diverse learning needs of rural primary students in developing countries. Volume 1 of the project report represents a literature review that investigated a "new role" for agriculture as a key element for developing rural students' basic…

  15. Entry-Level Technical Skills That Teachers Expected Students to Learn through Supervised Agricultural Experiences (SAEs): A Modified Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, Jon W.; Edwards, M. Craig

    2012-01-01

    Supervised experiences are designed to provide opportunities for the hands-on learning of skills and practices that lead to successful personal growth and future employment in an agricultural career (Talbert, Vaughn, Croom, & Lee, 2007). In the Annual Report for Agricultural Education (2005-2006), it was stated that 91% of the respondents (i.e.,…

  16. Project Georgia High School/High Tech

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Georgia High School/High Tech has been developing a suggested curriculum for use in its programs. The purpose of this instructional material is to provide a basic curriculum format for teachers of High School/High Tech students. The curriculum is designed to implement QCC classroom instruction that encourages career development in technological fields through post-secondary education, paid summer internships, and exposure to experiences in high technology.

  17. Youth Organization and Supervised Agricultural Experience Participation as Predictors of the Career Maturity of Agricultural Education Students. Summary of Research 72.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakar, Ab. Rahim; McCracken, J. David

    A study examined relationships between career maturity and participation in the Future Farmers of America (FFA) and between career maturity and participation in supervised agricultural experience (SAE). The primary hypothesis was that career maturity is positively related to participation in FFA and SAE. A cluster random sample was used with the…

  18. 76 FR 37618 - Vidalia Onions Grown in Georgia; Change in Late Payment and Interest Requirements on Past Due...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... FR 27919). Copies of the rule were mailed or sent via facsimile to all Committee members and Vidalia... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 955 Vidalia Onions Grown in Georgia; Change in Late Payment and... order for Vidalia onions grown in Georgia (order). The order regulates the handling of Vidalia...

  19. A career in government: my experiences working for the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agricultural sector provides highly diverse career opportunities that include private companies, academic institutions, non-government organizations, and government agencies. One possible career path is with the Federal government which is one of the largest employers of scientists and engineers...

  20. CHATTAHOOCHEE ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Arthur E.; Welsh, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey indicates that the Chattahoochee Roadless Area, Georgia, offers little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources even though gold, mica, sillimanite, soapstone, dunite, chromite, and nickel have been mined nearby, and source rocks for these commodities are present in the roadless area. Granite gneiss, gneiss, schist, and metasandstone in the roadless area are suitable for stone, crushed rock, or aggregate; however, other sources for these materials are available outside the roadless area, closer to present markets. The potential for the occurrence of hydrocarbons (probably gas) beneath the thick regional thrust sheets in this area cannot be adequately evaluated from available data.

  1. Agricultural soil moisture experiment, Colby, Kansas 1978: Measured and predicted hydrological properties of the soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, L. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Predictive procedures for developing soil hydrologic properties (i.e., relationships of soil water pressure and hydraulic conductivity to soil water content) are presented. Three models of the soil water pressure-water content relationship and one model of the hydraulic conductivity-water content relationship are discussed. Input requirements for the models are indicated, and computational procedures are outlined. Computed hydrologic properties for Keith silt loam, a soil typer near Colby, Kansas, on which the 1978 Agricultural Soil Moisture Experiment was conducted, are presented. A comparison of computed results with experimental data in the dry range shows that analytical models utilizing a few basic hydrophysical parameters can produce satisfactory data for large-scale applications.

  2. TEACHER'S GUIDE FOR THE EFFECTIVE USE OF "RECORDS OF SUPERVISED OCCUPATIONAL EXPERIENCE AND TRAINING IN VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MARTIN, W. HOWARD; AND OTHERS

    A NATIONAL COMMITTEE OF TEACHERS, TEACHER EDUCATORS, AND SUPERVISORS DEVELOPED THIS TEACHER'S GUIDE TO THE "RECORDS OF SUPERVISED OCCUPATIONAL EXPERIENCE AND TRAINING IN VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE" (VT 001 592). THE FEATURES, STUDENTS, PRINCIPLES, AND PROCEDURES OF THE EXPERIENCE PROGRAM ARE DISCUSSED. SPECIFIC DIRECTIONS AND SAMPLE ENTRIES FOR USING…

  3. The Joint Experiment for Crop Assessment and Monitoring (JECAM) Initiative: Developing methods and best practices for global agricultural monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagne, C.; Jarvis, I.; Defourny, P.; Davidson, A.

    2014-12-01

    Agricultural systems differ significantly throughout the world, making a 'one size fits all' approach to remote sensing and monitoring of agricultural landscapes problematic. The Joint Experiment for Crop Assessment and Monitoring (JECAM) was established in 2009 to bring together the global scientific community to work towards a set of best practices and recommendations for using earth observation data to map, monitor and report on agricultural productivity globally across an array of diverse agricultural systems. These methods form the research and development component of the Group on Earth Observation Global Agricultural Monitoring (GEOGLAM) initiative to harmonize global monitoring efforts and increase market transparency. The JECAM initiative brings together researchers from a large number of globally distributed, well monitored agricultural test sites that cover a range of crop types, cropping systems and climate regimes. Each test site works independently as well as together across multiple sites to test methods, sensors and field data collection techniques to derive key agricultural parameters, including crop type, crop condition, crop yield and soil moisture. The outcome of this project will be a set of best practices that cover the range of remote sensing monitoring and reporting needs, including satellite data acquisition, pre-processing techniques, information retrieval and ground data validation. These outcomes provide the research and development foundation for GEOGLAM and will help to inform the development of the GEOGLAM "system of systems" for global agricultural monitoring. The outcomes of the 2014 JECAM science meeting will be discussed as well as examples of methods being developed by JECAM scientists.

  4. DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON AND DISSOLVED CARBON DIOXIDE CONCENTRATIONS AND EXPORT IN GEORGIA PIEDMONT HEADWATER STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The South Fork Broad River (SFBR) drains about 550 km2 of the Georgia Piedmont. The SFBR watershed is primarily rural and undeveloped although the human population increased by about 25% between 1990 and 2000. Forestry and agriculture are the main land uses. Agriculture consis...

  5. NUTRIENT CONCENTRATIONS IN FLOWING WATERS OF THE SOUTH FORK BROAD RIVER, GEORGIA WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    The South Fork Broad River (SFBR) drains about 635 km2 of the Georgia Piedmont. The SFBR watershed is primarily rural and undeveloped although the human population increased by about 25% between 1990 and 2000. Forestry and agriculture are the main land uses. Agriculture consis...

  6. Relations between Education and Technical Progress in Agriculture: Training of Specialists: The Sudanese Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutelman, Michel; And Others

    Focusing on the training of agricultural specialists (supervisors and operational technicians) in Sudan, this study identifies issues in the general agricultural situation and the type of agricultural development practiced there, the education system's output of technicians, and the degree of harmony between education and national needs. The…

  7. Nastran's Application in Agricultural Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanwicklen, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    Finite element analysis has been recognized as a valuable solution method by agricultural engineers. NASTRAN has been obtained by the Agricultural Engineering Department at the University of Georgia. The NASTRAN Thermal Analyzer has been used in the teaching program for an undergraduate course in heat transfer and will be used for a new graduate course in finite element analysis. The NASTRAN Thermal Analyzer has also been applied to several research problems in the Agricultural Engineering Department.

  8. USE OF TRACER INJECTION EXPERIMENTS TO QUANTIFY NITRATE LOSS IN TWO ADJACENT WETLAND STREAMS DRAINING AN AGRICULTURAL FIELD IN THE GEORGIA PIEDMONT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigated the extent to which nitrate was removed from and/or stored in a small wetland depression downgradient of a 10-ha cattle rotational grazing pasture and a 2.5-ha cropped catchment at the USDA-ARS J. Phil Campbell Sr. Natural Resource Conservation Center in W...

  9. Agricultural Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehigh County Area Vocational-Technical School, Schnecksville, PA.

    This brochure describes the philosophy and scope of a secondary-level course in agricultural production. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: careers in agriculture and agribusiness, animal science and livestock production, agronomy, agricultural mechanics, supervised occupational experience programs, and the…

  10. Long-Term Network Experiments and Interdisciplinary Campaigns Conducted by the USDA-Agricultural Research Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, D. C.; Kustas, W. P.; Cosh, M. H.; Moran, S. M.; Marks, D. G.; Jackson, T. J.; Bosch, D. D.; Rango, A.; Seyfried, M. S.; Scott, R. L.; Prueger, J. H.; Starks, P. J.; Walbridge, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    The USDA-Agricultural Research Service has led, or been integrally involved in, a myriad of interdisciplinary field campaigns in a wide range of locations both nationally and internationally. Many of the shorter campaigns were anchored over the existing national network of ARS Experimental Watersheds and Rangelands. These long-term outdoor laboratories provided a critical knowledge base for designing the campaigns as well as historical data, hydrologic and meteorological infrastructure coupled with shop, laboratory, and visiting scientist facilities. This strong outdoor laboratory base enabled cost-efficient campaigns informed by historical context, local knowledge, and detailed existing watershed characterization. These long-term experimental facilities have also enabled much longer term lower intensity experiments, observing and building an understanding of both seasonal and inter-annual biosphere-hydrosphere-atmosphere interactions across a wide range of conditions. A sampling of these experiments include MONSOON'90, SGP97, SGP99, Washita'92, Washita'94, SMEX02-05 and JORNEX series of experiments, SALSA, CLASIC and longer-term efforts over the ARS Little Washita, Walnut Gulch, Little River, Reynolds Creek, and OPE3 Experimental Watersheds. This presentation will review some of the highlights and key findings of these campaigns and long-term efforts including the inclusion of many of the experimental watersheds and ranges in the Long-Term Agro-ecosystems Research (LTAR) network. The LTAR network also contains several locations that are also part of other observational networks including the CZO, LTER, and NEON networks. Lessons learned will also be provided for scientists initiating their participation in large-scale, multi-site interdisciplinary science.

  11. On-Demand Lectures Create an Effective Distributed Education Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsey, Stanley D.

    2003-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his experience teaching senior-level structural engineering courses at the Georgia Institute of Technology's Georgia Tech Regional Engineering Program. The program is a unique partnership of four universities--Georgia Tech, Savannah State University, Armstrong Atlantic State University, and Georgia Southern…

  12. A Profile of Secondary Teachers and Schools in North Dakota: Implications for the Student Teaching Experience in Agricultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, R. Brent; Edwards, M. Craig

    2011-01-01

    This study was an inquiry of secondary teachers' perceptions of the agricultural education student teaching experience in North Dakota. The sampling frame (N = 89) included all secondary teachers in the state; the final return rate was 74%. The instrument included 16 items identifying selected characteristics of secondary teachers and their…

  13. MyAgRecord: An Online Career Portfolio Management Tool for High School Students Conducting Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emis, Larry; Dillingham, John

    Texas's online career portfolio management tool for high school students participating in supervised agricultural experience programs (SAEPs) was developed in 1998 by a committee of Texas high school teachers of agriscience and Texas Education Agency personnel. The career portfolio management tool reflects General Accepted Accounting Principles…

  14. Determining Perceptions of Vocational Agriculture Teachers toward Supervised Occupational Experience Programs in Tennessee. Research Report Series No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamberth, Edwin E.

    A study investigated perceptions of high school vocational agriculture teachers of supervised occupational experience programs (SOEPs) in Tennessee. Specific objectives were to determine school policies related to SOEPs, number of students and types of SOEPs, and perceptions of various aspects of SOEPs. Mailed surveys were completed by 84 of 214…

  15. Supervised Agricultural Experience Programmes (SAEP) and Work Linked Education (WLE): Panacea for Empowering Youths and Preventing Joblessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Famiwole, Remigius O.

    2015-01-01

    Youths from Nigerian schools and tertiary institutions are usually unemployable after schooling because they are not empowered with the required saleable skills to earn them a job or with which to establish as entrepreneurs. This paper examines the relevance of Supervised Agricultural Experience Programme (SAEP) and Work Linked Education (WLE) as…

  16. Financing Public Elementary and Secondary Education in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, C. Thomas; Dayton, John

    1997-01-01

    Outlines state of educational funding in Georgia as of 1997, based on 1986 Quality Basic Education (QBE) Act, sources of local revenue, special grants based on sparsity and technology training, and special adjustments for training and experience, changing pupil counts, and consolidation. Discusses impact of capital outlay, optional local sales…

  17. Enhancing the Undergraduate Experience: The Role of a Student Organization for Preservice Agricultural Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, T. Grady; Harlin, Julie F.; Murphrey, Theresa P.; Dooley, Kim E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a need exists to establish an organization specifically for preservice agricultural science teachers and if so, the attributes of such an organization. Selected peer preservice agricultural education programs were examined and focus groups were conducted with preservice and inservice teachers. Results…

  18. Locally Generated Printed Materials in Agriculture: Experience from Uganda and Ghana. Education Research Paper. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Isabel

    The needs of grassroots farmers in Uganda and Ghana for locally developed print materials were examined through a postal survey of nearly 200 organizations and examinations of 75 autonomous farmer groups and 95 organizations sharing agricultural information in both countries. Both printed agricultural information relevant to grassroots farmers and…

  19. Fires in Southern Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Several large fires were burning in southern Georgia on April 29, 2007, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead and captured this image. Places where MODIS detected actively burning fires are outlined in red. The Roundabout Fire sprang up on April 27, according to the U.S. Southern Area Coordination Center, and was about 3,500 acres as of April 30. That fire was threatening homes in the community of Kirkland. Meanwhile, south of Waycross, two large blazes were burning next to each other in the northern part of Okefenokee Swamp. The Sweat Farm Road Fire threatened the town of Waycross in previous weeks, but at the end of April, activity had moved to the southeastern perimeter. The fire had affected more than 50,000 acres of timber (including pine tree plantations) and swamps. Scores of residences scattered throughout the rural area are threatened. The Big Turnaround Complex is burning to the east. The 26,000-acre fire was extremely active over the weekend, with flame lengths more than 60 feet (just over 18 meters) in places. The two blazes appeared to overlap in fire perimeter maps available from the U.S. Geospatial Multi-Agency Coordination Team. According to the Southern Area Coordination Center morning report on April 30, the Sweat Farm Road Fire 'will be a long term fire. Containment and control will depend on significant rainfall, due to the inaccessible swamp terrain.' No expected containment date was available for the Big Turnaround Complex Fire, either. Describing that fire, the report stated, 'Heavy fuel loading, high fire danger, and difficulty of access continue to hamper suppression efforts.' The large image provided above has a spatial resolution (level of detail) of 250 meters per pixel. The MODIS Rapid Response Team provides twice-daily images of the region in additional resolutions. They also provide a version of the image that shows smoke plumes stretching out across the Atlantic Ocean.

  20. Effectiveness of a Science Agricultural Summer Experience (SASE) in Recruiting Students to Natural Resources Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Edward; Lindline, Jennifer; Petronis, Michael S.; Pilotti, Maura

    2012-12-01

    The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects an increase in Natural Resource Management (NRM) jobs within the next 10 years due to baby-boomer retirements and a 12% increase in demand for these occupations. Despite this trend, college enrollment in NRM disciplines has declined. Even more critical is the fact that the soon-to-be-majority Hispanic population is underrepresented in NRM disciplines. The goal of the present study was to determine if an in-residence, two-week, summer science program for underrepresented minorities would not only increase interest in science, actual science knowledge, and perceived science knowledge, but also have an overall impact on underrepresented minority students' decisions to attend college, major in a scientific discipline and pursue a career in science. During a four-year period, 76 high school students participated in a Science Agricultural Summer Experience (SASE) in Northern New Mexico. A pre/post science-knowledge exam and satisfaction survey were administered to participants. We demonstrate that participants improved significantly ( p < .05) in all areas measured. In particular, comfort with science field and lab activities, science knowledge and perceived science knowledge were enhanced after exposure to the program. Students not only found science exciting and approachable after participation, but also exhibited increased interest in pursuing a degree and career in science. Of the 76 SASE participants within graduation age ( n = 44), all graduated from high school; and 86% enrolled in college. These findings suggest that the implemented SASE initiative was effective in recruiting and increasing the confidence and abilities of underrepresented minority students in science.

  1. Soil apparent conductivity measurements for planning and analysis of agricultural experiments: A case study from Western-Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Sebastian; Wongleecharoen, Chalermchart; Lark, Richard Murray; Marchant, Ben Paul; Garré, Sarah; Herbst, Michael; Vereecken, Harry; Weihermueller, Lutz

    2016-04-01

    In agricultural experiments the success or failure of a potential improvement is generally evaluated based on the plant response, using proper experimental designs with sufficient statistical power. Because within-site variability can negatively affect statistical power, improvements in the experimental design can be achieved if this variation is well understood and incorporated into the experimental design, or if some surrogate variable is used as a covariate in the analysis. Apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa), measured by electromagnetic induction (EMI) may be one source of this information. The objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of EMI-derived ECa measurements for planning and analysis of agricultural experiments. ECa and plant height measurements of maize (the response variable) were taken from an agricultural experiment in Western Thailand. A statistical model of these variables was used to simulate experiments with different designs and treatment effects. The simulated data were used to quantify the statistical power when testing three orthogonal contrasts. The following experimental designs were considered: a simple random design (SR), a complete randomized block design (CRB), and a complete randomized block design with spatially adjusted blocks on plot means of ECa (CRBECa). According to an analysis of variance (ANOVA) the smallest effect sizes could be detected using the CRBECa design, which suggests that ECa survey measurements could be used in the planning phase of an experiment to achieve efficiencies by better blocking. Also, analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) showed that larger power improvements could be achieved when ECa was used as a covariate in the analysis. We therefore recommend that ECa measurements should be used to describe subsurface variability and to support the statistical analysis of agricultural experiments.

  2. Developing Programs of Supervised Agricultural Experience. Developing an SAE Program Using the Missouri Agricultural Record Book for Secondary Students. Analyzing the SAE Program Using the Missouri Farm Business Record Book. Instructor's Guide. Volume 21, Number 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Admire, Myron

    This curriculum guide to the Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) program contains four units of insturctor's materials as follows: Unit 1: Developing an SAE Program; Unit 2: Using the Missouri Agricultural Record Book for Secondary Students; Unit 3: Analyzing the SAE Program; and Unit 4: Using the Missouri Farm Business Record Book. The…

  3. Georgiaites: Tektites in Central Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albin, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    Information is provided about the origin, the features, and the availability of tektites which are odd and very rare types of transparent glass theorized to be from a common, yet unknown, origin. The basis for this article is the Howard collection of tektites found in a small region of central Georgia. (seven references) (JJK)

  4. [Georgia's Special Instructional Assistance Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta.

    Information about Georgia's Special Instructional Assistance Program (SIA) is presented. The program is designed to serve children in kindergarten through grade five who are functioning below the normal expectations for their age range, usually as a result of deficient language and cognitive development. The vast majority of SIA teaching and…

  5. Fighting Corruption in Georgia's Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janashia, Natia

    2004-01-01

    In the Republic of Georgia, about 240 institutions of higher education serve a population of 5 million. On the surface, these numbers suggest a prosperous, highly educated society. Behind this facade, however, lies a reality of degraded standards, crumbling infrastructure, rampant academic fraud, and deteriorating educational quality. At the…

  6. Advocacy Strategies--Georgia-Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambill, Matthew; Wilson, Lynne; Carter, Amy

    2012-01-01

    This November, CTE professionals from all over the country will assemble in the beautiful state of Georgia for CareerTech VISION 2012. With the total redesign of this event, this opportunity will no doubt prove to be one of the greatest professional development opportunities ever offered by the Association for Career and Technical Education…

  7. The Impact of Curriculum Changes and Implementation of Secondary Mathematics Georgia Performance Standards on Teacher Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, John Phillip

    2012-01-01

    Teachers generally experience a decline in self-efficacy levels during a curriculum change, and Georgia converted from a Quality Core Curriculum (QCC) to Georgia Performance Standards (GPS) the last several years. Middle and high school math teachers experienced an annual tiered rollout of the mathematics curriculum, and this qualitative study was…

  8. Altamaha River Delta, Georgia Sea Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The history of sea islands in the Altamaha River delta on the coast of Georgia is revealed in this image produced from data acquired by the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR), developed and operated by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The outlines of long-lost plantation rice fields, canals, dikes and other inlets are clearly defined. Salt marshes are shown in red, while dense cypress and live oak tree canopies are seen in yellow-greens.

    Agricultural development of the Altamaha delta began soon after the founding of the Georgia Colony in 1733. About 25 plantations were located on the low-lying islands and shores by the 19th century, taking advantage of the rich alluvial flow and annual inundation of water required by some crops. The first major crop was indigo; when demand for that faded, rice and cotton took its place. A major storm in 1824 destroyed much of the town of Darien (upper right) and put many of the islands under 20 feet of water. The Civil War ended the plantation system, and many of the island plantations disappeared under heavy brush and new growth pine forests. Some were used as tree farms for paper and pulp industries, while the Butler Island (center left) plantation became a wildlife conservation site growing wild sea rice for migrating ducks and other waterfowl. Margaret Mitchell is reputed to have used the former owner of the Butler Plantation as a basis for the Rhett Butler character in her novel 'Gone With The Wind,' taking the first name from Rhett's Island (lower right).

    These data were obtained during a 1994-95 campaign along the Georgia coast. AIRSAR's ability to detect vegetation canopy density, hydrological features and other topographic characteristics is a useful tool in landscape archaeology. AIRSAR flies aboard a NASA DC-8 based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The analysis on the data shown was accomplished by Dr. Gary Mckay, Department of Archaeology and Geography, and Ian

  9. Overview of engineering and agricultural design considerations of the Raft River soil-warming and heat-dissipation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, N.E.; Engen, I.A.; Yrene, C.S.

    1982-04-01

    The engineering and agricultural considerations of the Raft River soil-warming and heat-dissipation experiment are presented. The experiment is designed to investigate the thermal characteristics of a subsurface pipe network for cooling power-plant condenser effluent, and crop responses to soil warming in an open-field plot. The subsurface soil-warming system is designed to dissipate approximately 100 kW of heat from circulating, 38/sup 0/C geothermal water. Summer operating conditions in the Raft River area, located on the Intermountain Plateau are emphasized. Design is based on the thermal characteristics of the local soil, the climate of the Raft River Valley, management practices for normal agriculture, and the need for an unheated control plot. The resultant design calls for 38-mm polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe in a grid composed of parallel loops, for dissipating heat into a 0.8-hectare experimental plot.

  10. Embrapa's experience in the production and development of agriculture reference materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, A. R. A.; Souza, G. B.; Bossu, C. M.; Bianchi, S. R.; Verhalen, T. R.; Silva, P. T.; Peixoto, A. A. J.; Silva, C. S.

    2016-07-01

    The main challenge of Embrapa is to develop a model of genuine Brazilian tropical agriculture and livestock. To get this task, the quality of laboratories results is mandatory, increasing the demand for reference materials. Projects were proposed to produce reference materials to support the national agriculture laboratories and consolidate a network able to perform reliable and reproducible analytical testing laboratory within the internationally standards required. Reference materials were produced and available to interested laboratories and collaborative tests were conducted to obtain consensus values. The results and statistical evaluations were performed with the use of software developed by Embrapa Pecuaria Sudeste.

  11. An Evaluation of a Welding Fumes Exhaust System. Agricultural Experiment Station Research Report 284.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, C. O.

    A study evaluated the feasibility of introducing unheated outside air into the airstream of a cross-flow welding exhaust system to reduce heating energy costs of a school welding laboratory. The physical facility used was the agricultural mechanics laboratory at the University of Arizona, which is similar to facilities in which instruction in…

  12. Perceptions of Teaching Ability during the Student Teaching Experience in Agricultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krysher, Sheyenne; Robinson, J. Shane; Montgomery, Diane; Edwards, M. Craig

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the views student teachers in agricultural education at Oklahoma State University had regarding their 12-week student teaching internship. Using Q-methodology as a research approach, 28 interns rank-ordered a Q-set of 36 statements describing various aspects teacher responsibilities and performance. The…

  13. Changing Horses: Shifting Agricultural Experiment Station Publications from Paper to Electronic Format.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodenbaugh, Eric; Holcombe, Gloria; Hartman, Amy

    2003-01-01

    The Agricultural Experimental Station at Kansas State University switched from paper publication to compact discs. The change resulted in savings of more than $20,000 in 1 year and allowed for a searchable, comprehensive package of information rather than a single publication. (Contains 10 references.) (JOW)

  14. VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Research Coordinating Unit.

    TO ASSIST THOSE WHO MAKE DECISIONS RELATING TO EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS IN AGRICULTURE, RECENT RESEARCH IN VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE IS SUMMARIZED. A 1963 STUDY TREATS THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN WORK EXPERIENCE AND STUDENT CHARACTERISTICS, PLANS, AND ASPIRATIONS. STUDIES ON POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION CONCERN GUIDELINES FOR TECHNICIAN PROGRAMS, JUSTIFICATION…

  15. Recovery of thermophilic Campylobacter by three sampling methods from classified river sites in Northeast Georgia, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is not clear how best to sample streams for the detection of Campylobacter which may be introduced from agricultural or community land use. Fifteen sites in the watershed of the South Fork of the Broad River (SFBR) in Northeastern Georgia, USA, were sampled in three seasons. Seven sites were cl...

  16. Water quality of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint and Ocmulgee river basins related to flooding from Tropical Storm Alberto; pesticides in urban and agricultural watersheds, and nitrate and pesticides in ground water, Georgia, Alabama, and Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hippe, D.J.; Wangsness, D.J.; Frick, E.A.; Garrett, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents preliminary water-quality information from three studies that are part of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River basin and the adjacent Ocmulgee River basin. During the period July 3-7, 1994, heavy rainfall from tropical storm Alberto caused record flooding on the Ocmulgee and Flint Rivers and several of their tributaries. Much of the nitrogen load transported during the flooding was as organic nitrogen generally derived from organic detritus, rather than nitrate derived from other sources, such as fertilizer. More than half the mean annual loads of total phosphorus and organic nitrogen were trans- ported in the Flint and Ocmulgee Rivers during the flood. Fourteen herbicides, five insecticides, and one fungicide were detected in floodwaters of the Ocmulgee, Flint, and Apalachicola Rivers. In a second study, water samples were collected at nearly weekly intervals from March 1993 through April 1994 from one urban and two agricultural watersheds in the ACF River basin, and analyzed for 84 commonly used pesticides. More pesticides were detected and at generally higher concentrations in water from the urban watershed than the agricultural water- sheds, and a greater number of pesticides were persistent throughout much of the year in the urban watershed. Simazine exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) drinking-water standards in one of 57 samples from the urban watershed. In a third study, 38 wells were installed in surficial aquifers adjacent to and downgradient of farm fields within agricultural areas in the southern ACF River basin. Even though regional aquifers are generally used for irrigation and domestic- and public-water supplies, degradation of water quality in the surficial aquifers serves as an early warning of potential contamination of regional aquifers. Nitrate concentrations were less than 3 mg/L as N (indicating minimal effect of human activities) in water

  17. Georgia Tech sonic boom simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, Krish K.

    1992-01-01

    To examine the building and human response to sonic boom in the range 3 Hz to 30 Hz, Georgia Institute of Technology is building a special acoustic driver system to simulate sonic boom. To support the NASA LaRC program on building and human response, this simulator's capability has been extended to an upper frequency of 4 KHz. A residential test house was made available by Georgia Tech for these tests. At the time of preparation of this document, most of the acoustic drivers and the associated electronics have been built and assembled. The system has, however, not been fully tested. The following pages provide an overview of the progress to date. The acoustic driver systems, and the principle of their operation together with the test house are described. Future plans are also summarized.

  18. Theme--Teaming Up: Agricultural Education and Cooperative Extension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamon, Julia A.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Includes "Similarities and Differences" (Gamon); "Preparing Agriculture Teachers and Extension Agents" (Seevers); "Teaching and Extension" (Graham); "Cooperation between 4-H and FFA" (Hink); "Team Approach to Agricultural and Extension Education in Georgia" (Iverson, Rohs); "Agricultural Education and Cooperative Extension" (Nelson, Cvancara); "A…

  19. Linked Data for Fighting Global Hunger:Experiences in setting standards for Agricultural Information Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Thomas; Keizer, Johannes

    FAO, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN, has the global goal to defeat hunger and eliminate poverty. One of its core functions is the generation, dissemination and application of information and knowledge. Since 2000, the Agricultural InformationManagement Standards (AIMS) activity in FAO's Knowledge Exchange and Capacity Building Division has promoted the use of Semantic Web standards to improve information sharing within a global network of research institutes and related partner organizations. The strategy emphasizes the use of simple descriptive metadata, thesauri, and ontologies for integrating access to information from a wide range of sources for both scientific and non-expert audiences. An early adopter of Semantic Web technology, the AIMS strategy is evolving to help information providers in nineteen language areas use modern Linked Data methods to improve the quality of life in developing rural areas, home to seventy percent of the world's poor and hungry people.

  20. Epic Flooding in Georgia, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gotvald, Anthony J.; McCallum, Brian E.

    2010-01-01

    Metropolitan Atlanta-September 2009 Floods * The epic floods experienced in the Atlanta area in September 2009 were extremely rare. Eighteen streamgages in the Metropolitan Atlanta area had flood magnitudes much greater than the estimated 0.2-percent (500-year) annual exceedance probability. * The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) reported that 23 counties in Georgia were declared disaster areas due to this flood and that 16,981 homes and 3,482 businesses were affected by floodwaters. Ten lives were lost in the flood. The total estimated damages exceed $193 million (H.E. Longenecker, Federal Emergency Management Agency, written commun., November 2009). * On Sweetwater Creek near Austell, Ga., just north of Interstate 20, the peak stage was more than 6 feet higher than the estimated peak stage of the 0.2-percent (500-year) flood. Flood magnitudes in Cobb County on Sweetwater, Butler, and Powder Springs Creeks greatly exceeded the estimated 0.2-percent (500-year) floods for these streams. * In Douglas County, the Dog River at Ga. Highway 5 near Fairplay had a peak stage nearly 20 feet higher than the estimated peak stage of the 0.2-percent (500-year) flood. * On the Chattahoochee River, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) gage at Vinings reached the highest level recorded in the past 81 years. Gwinnett, De Kalb, Fulton, and Rockdale Counties also had record flooding. South Georgia March and April 2009 Floods * The March and April 2009 floods in South Georgia were smaller in magnitude than the September floods but still caused significant damage. * No lives were lost in this flood. Approximately $60 million in public infrastructure damage occurred to roads, culverts, bridges and a water treatment facility (Joseph T. McKinney, Federal Emergency Management Agency, written commun., July 2009). * Flow at the Satilla River near Waycross, exceeded the 0.5-percent (200-year) flood. Flows at seven other stations in South Georgia exceeded the 1-percent (100-year) flood.

  1. Agricultural communication and the African non-literate farmer: the Nigerian experience.

    PubMed

    Soola, E O

    1988-01-01

    In Nigeria, there lies a relatively untapped potential for great agricultural growth. Since the 1960's, Nigeria's "days of agricultural glory," there has been great obstacles in the exchange of information between scientists and Nigerian farmers. There has been a great trend in rural-urban migration and a rise in unemployment; crime and school drop outs have ensued. The Nigerian non-literate farmer is in a neglected class who has suffered the scrutiny and non-support of government and financial institutions. His growth has been limited because he is considered a poor credit risk. Because of his illiteracy, he is limited to traditional methods of farming. However, the Nigerian farmer is not uneducable. He is information-conscious and can be instructed if a communicator is sensitive to the farmer's culture, tradition and farming practices. An agriculture extension agent must not only assess the farmer's needs but also convey relevant information in a manner that is amenable to the farmer's framework of communication. Working with opinion leaders, the mass media, a regional library, audio tapes and by portraying new information and farming practices through festivals and ceremonies are methods available to the extension agent or communicator in his work with the non-literate Nigerian farmer.

  2. Death and disability from agricultural injuries in Wisconsin: a 12-year experience with 739 patients.

    PubMed

    Cogbill, T H; Steenlage, E S; Landercasper, J; Strutt, P J

    1991-12-01

    During a 12-year period, 739 patients were admitted to a referral trauma center as the result of injuries incurred while farming. There were 608 (82%) male patients and 131 female patients. Ages ranged from 1 to 89 years including 160 patients (22%) less than 16 years old and 78 patients (11%) more than 65 years old. The injury mechanism was a farm animal in 225 (30%), farm machinery in 168 (23%), a tractor in 120 (16%), a fall in 77 (10%), a power take-off in 47 (7%), a cornpicker in 42 (6%), and miscellaneous in 60 (8%). There were 16 (2%) deaths attributable to the agricultural accident. Tractors were involved in eight of these deaths, falls in four, power take-offs in three, and farm machinery in one. Furthermore, 159 (22%) patients were left with significant permanent disability including orthopedic problems in 131 patients, neurologic deficits in 22, and pulmonary disability in 6. Agricultural trauma is frequent and diverse with unique injury mechanisms. Life-threatening injuries are often seen and permanent disability is common. Effective injury prevention must focus on farmer education, additional mandatory safety features on agricultural equipment, and appropriate design of rural trauma systems. PMID:1749035

  3. An Examination of the Opinions and Supervised Occupational Experience Programs of Selected Vocational Agricultural Instructors in the U.S. Staff Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobbitt, Frank

    A study was made of the opinions and programs of a selected group of 77 vocational agriculture instructors to determine the status of supervised occupational experience (SOE) programs among secondary agricultural instructors who had been identified as some of the best in the states surveyed. Of particular interest was the relative role that the…

  4. Sediment transported by Georgia streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, Vance C.

    1964-01-01

    A reconnaissance investigation of the sediment transported by selected Georgia streams during the period December 1957 to June 1959 was made to provide a general understanding of the physical quality of stream water in Georgia and to supply facts needed in planning more detailed work. The investigation was made by studying the variation of sediment concentration and sediment load with stream discharge at 33 sites and by relating the available data to topographic, geologic, climatic, and soil conditions in the State. In the Blue Ridge Mountains area of northern Georgia the great relief, moderately heavy precipitation, fast runoff, and loamy soils cause sediment concentrations and sediment loads which are above average for the State. During periods of moderate to low streamflow, the concentration of suspended sediment ranges from 1 to 25 ppm (parts per million). After heavy rainfall, sediment concentration increases rapidly as water discharge rises, and occasionally exceeds 1,000 ppm before decreasing again. The concentration may reach a maximum and decrease before the discharge peak is reached. A major part of the annual sediment load can be carried during a short period of time because of the great increase in both water discharge and sediment concentration during floods. The lower Coastal Plain differs from the mountainous areas in several respects. The topography is gently rolling to almost level, precipitation and runoff are less than average for the State, and topsoils generally consist of hard and loamy sand. Concentration of suspended sediment in streamflow commonly ranges from 1 to 20 ppm during periods of low to moderate discharge and increases to 15 to 60 ppm at high discharge. Because of the small increase in concentration with increasing stream discharge, the sediment load varies approximately in proportion to the discharge. The sediment characteristics of streams in the Piedmont, the Valley and Ridge area. and the upper Coastal Plain are intermediate

  5. Effects of agricultural fungicides on microorganisms associated with floral nectar: susceptibility assays and field experiments.

    PubMed

    Bartlewicz, Jacek; Pozo, María I; Honnay, Olivier; Lievens, Bart; Jacquemyn, Hans

    2016-10-01

    Pesticides have become an inseparable element of agricultural intensification. While the direct impact of pesticides on non-target organisms, such as pollinators, has recently received much attention, less consideration has been given to the microorganisms that are associated with them. Specialist yeasts and bacteria are known to commonly inhabit floral nectar and change its chemical characteristics in numerous ways, possibly influencing pollinator attraction. In this study, we investigated the in vitro susceptibility of nectar yeasts Metschnikowia gruessi, Metschnikowia reukaufii, and Candida bombi to six widely used agricultural fungicides (prothioconazole, tebuconazole, azoxystrobin, fenamidone, boscalid, and fluopyram). Next, a commercial antifungal mixture containing tebuconazole and trifloxystrobin was applied to natural populations of the plant Linaria vulgaris and the occurrence, abundance, and diversity of nectar-inhabiting yeasts and bacteria was compared between treated and untreated plants. The results showed that prothioconazole and tebuconazole were highly toxic to nectar yeasts, inhibiting their growth at concentrations varying between 0.06 and 0.5 mg/L. Azoxystrobin, fenamidone, boscalid, and fluopyram on the other hand exhibited considerably lower toxicity, inhibiting yeast growth at concentrations between 1 and 32 mg/L or in many cases not inhibiting microbial growth at all. The application of the antifungal mixture in natural plant populations resulted in a significant decrease in the occurrence and abundance of yeasts in individual flowers, but this did not translate into noticeable changes in bacterial incidence and abundance. Yeast and bacterial species richness and distribution did not also differ between treated and untreated plants. We conclude that the application of fungicides may have negative effects on the abundance of nectar yeasts in floral nectar. The consequences of these effects on plant pollination processes in agricultural

  6. Cedar Creek at Cedartown, Georgia, floodflow characteristics from West Girard Avenue to the Georgia Avenue Relocation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, McGlone

    1981-01-01

    In cooperation with the Highway Division, Georgia Department of Transportation, the U.S. Geological Survey determined the backwater effects of existing bridges and dikes on Cedar Creek at Cedartown, Georgia, for the reach from West Girard Avenue to the Georgia Avenue relocation. The maximum backwater effect for the bridges was 1.7 feet in the upstream approach at the Seaboard Coastline Railroad bridge as a combined result of the Georgia Highway 278 bridge and the Seaboard Coastline Railroad bridge. The maximum effect from the existing dikes was 0.7 foot at the approach section of Georgia Highway 278.

  7. Experience from use of GMOs in Argentinian agriculture, economy and environment.

    PubMed

    Burachik, Moisés

    2010-11-30

    Argentina is the second largest grower of genetically modified (GM) crops. This high level of adoption of this new agricultural technology is the result of a complex combination of circumstances. We can identify four main causes that led to this: political support (from agriculture officials), ability to solve prevalent farmers' needs, economic and environmental factors and an early implementation of effective regulations. The political willingness to study this new technology and crops as well as the recruitment of sound professionals and scientists to perform the task was crucial. These professionals, with very diverse backgrounds, created the necessary regulatory framework to work with these new crops. Farmers played a decisive role, as adopting this new technology solved some of their agronomic problems, helped them perform more sustainable agronomic practices and provided economic benefits. Nonetheless, all these advancements had not been possible without a rational, science-based and flexible regulatory framework that would make sure that the GM crops were safe for food, feed and processing.

  8. Vocational Agriculture I Basic Core. Section C--Supervised Experience Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide contains five units teaching preservice vocational teachers to conduct supervised experience programs. Each unit contains an objective (e.g., "After completing this unit, the student should be able to choose and plan supervised occupational experience programs"); specific objectives (e.g., "State reasons for having a…

  9. The Georgia Centenarian Study: Comments from Friends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Ilene C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Discusses five issues related to the Georgia Centenarian Study: recruitment of centenarians, birth cohort effects, the changing age structure of the population, religion, and cognition and survival. Concludes that Georgia Centenarian Study provides critically needed baseline data so characteristics of centenarians of the twenty-first century can…

  10. 76 FR 59177 - Georgia Disaster #GA-00036

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... ADMINISTRATION Georgia Disaster GA-00036 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of GEORGIA dated 09/13..., Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street, SW., Suite...

  11. The University System of Georgia's GALILEO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penson, Merryll

    1998-01-01

    The University System of Georgia and the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) built the innovative electronic library GALILEO (GeorgiA LIbrary LEarning Online system). This article describes the cooperation, leadership, and technology that made GALILEO possible; the proposal; planning and implementation; governance; current status; and future…

  12. Georgia History Plan Stirs Civil War Fuss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manzo, Kathleen Kennedy

    2004-01-01

    Nearly 140 years have not erased Georgia's memory of the trail of destruction by General William T. Sherman and Union troops as they burned their way from Atlanta to Savannah during a critical campaign of the Civil War. Those weeks in late 1864 have left a lasting influence on the state's history and culture. This article deals with Georgia's…

  13. Field experiments to evaluate nitrate-leaching from drained agriculturally used areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednorz, Denise; Tauchnitz, Nadine; Christen, Olaf; Rupp, Holger; Meissner, Ralph

    2016-04-01

    Agricultural land use is one of the main sources for diffuse nitrogen (N) inputs into surface- and groundwater. To fulfill the objectives of the European water protection policy it is mandatory to optimize agricultural management and to adopt it to site specific conditions. N present in soil is dominated by organic N, and after mineralization inorganic plant available N, obtaining the components ammonia and nitrate (NO3-N). In the environment, NO3-N occurs as the negatively charged ion NO3- which is generally solved. Thus, NO3-N is the major N-species in waters, whereas its transport is directly influenced by the flow regime. In dependence of soil type and meteorological conditions, subsurface drainage was often installed to prevent water logged zones as a requirement for agricultural use. But drainage systems were often discussed as one of the main sources for NO3-N inputs into surface water due to temporary high discharge rates and short residence time of soil water resulting in limited conditions for NO3-N degradation via denitrification. In the study presented herein, two adjacent tile-drained agriculturally used areas with adjusted agronomic conditions but different soil properties were investigated regarding their flow regime and their N-kinetic from 11/1/2013 until 10/31/2015. Both fields obtained the same size and drainage network (drain depth 0.8 m, gab distance 10 m). Field I was influenced by confined groundwater conditions due to an alternating strata of sandy and loamy layers. Field II was impermeable from a depth of one meter, showing a backwater influenced flow regime. The temporal course of soil moisture (35, 60 and 85 cm depth), drain rate as well as ground- and backwater head was registered continuously at both sites. Furthermore NH4-N- and NO3-N-concentrations (cNO3-N) in each compartment were measured. The experimental results showed that field I revealed significantly lower discharged drain rates and NO3-N-loads (17.1 mm and 2.5 kg N

  14. Remote sensing experiment in West Africa. [drought effects on desert agriculture and vegetation in Niger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macleod, N. H.

    1974-01-01

    There are substantial needs of the Sahelien Zone to detail the state of regional agricultural resources in the face of a sixth year of serious drought conditions. While most of the work has been done in the Republic of Niger, the principles which have emerged from the analysis seem to be applicable to much of the Sahel. The discussion relates to quite specific rehabilitation and development initiations under consideration in Niger which are based in part upon direct analysis of ERTS imagery of the country, in part on field surveys and on discussions with Nigerian officials and technicians. Again, because the entire Sahelien Zone (including Niger) has large zones of similar ecologic characteristics, modificiations of the approaches suggested for Niger are applicable to the solution of rehabilitation of the desert, the savannah and the woodlands of West Africa in general.

  15. Interdependence of soil and agricultural practice in a two - year phytoremediation in situ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwaichi, Eucharia; Onyeike, Eugene; Frac, Magdalena; Iwo, Godknows

    2016-04-01

    A two - year plant - based soil clean - up was carried out at a crude oil spill agricultural site in a Niger Delta community in Nigeria to access further clean - up potentials of Cymbopogon citratus. Applied diagnostic ratios identified mixed petrogenic and pyrogenic sources as the main contributors of PAHs. Up to 90.8% sequestration was obtained for carcinogenic PAHs especially Benz (a) pyrene in a 2 - phase manner. A community level approach for assessing patterns of sole carbon source utilization by mixed microbial samples was employed to differentiate spatial and temporal changes in the soil microbial communities. In relation to pollution, soil conditioning notably decreased the lag times and showed mixed effects for colour development rates, maximum absorbance and the overall community pattern. For rate and utilization of different carbon substrates in BIOLOG wells, after day 3, in comparison to control soil communities, contamination with hydrocarbons and associated types increased amines and amides consumption. Consumption of carbohydrates in all polluted and unamended regimes decreased markedlyin comparison to those cultivated with C. citratus. We found a direct relationship between cellulose breakdown, measurable with B-glucosidase activity, organic matter content and CO2 realease within all soils in the present study. Organic amendment rendered most studied contaminants unavailable for uptake in preference to inorganic fertilizer in both study years. Generally, phytoremediation improved significantly the microbial community activity and thus would promote ecosystem restoration in relation to most patronised techniques. Supplementation with required nutrients, in a long - term design would present many ecological benefits. Keywords: Agricultural soils; Recovery; Hydrocarbon pollution; Ecology; Management practice.

  16. BLOOD MOUNTAIN ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koeppen, Robert P.; Armstrong, Michelle K.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey of the Blood Mountain Roadless Area, Georgia, indicates that there is little promise for the occurrence of mineral and energy resources. Natural gas may be present at great depth, perhaps 5 mi down and below the overthrust sheets of the Blue Ridge Mountains, but presently available information is not adequate to evaluate the resource potential of this commodity. Further seismic studies and exploratory drilling are needed to evaluate the gas potential of this part of the Eastern Overthrust Belt.

  17. Complex evaluation of climate-change--an example from Georgia's landscapes.

    PubMed

    Nikolaishvili, Dali; Trapaidze, Vazha; Kalandadze, Besik; Mamukashvili, Tamar; Sharashenidze, Manana

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop spatial-temporal model of Georgia's landscapes, which gives a chance to determine the current tendencies of landscape changes in different landscapes, such as humidity/aridity, increase/decrease of bio-productivity, etc. The model used gives possibility to reveal causes of mosaic changes, associated with global climate change. The studywas based on the conception of spatial-temporal analysis and synthesis of landscapes. It was carried out in different landscapes across Georgia. The daily geo-conditions and annual dynamics of landscapes was determined by analyzing some long-term data collected from meteorological stations. As a complex value, daily geo-conditions of landscapes were analyzed. On the bases of inventory of landscapes, GIS-technology and thematic mapping, main tendencies in the landscapes were developed. Arid, Semiarid, Semi-humid landscapes occupied a great area, which formed approximately 1/3 part of the whole territory of Georgia. These include 8 types, 11 sub-types of landscapes and 24 genera. The main share of these landscapes was concentrated in East Georgia, but some semi-humid areas were spread in West Georgia. The influence of climate change was evaluated considering several parameters, such as change of forest area, share of agricultural land in the total area of landscape, degree of fragmentation of landscapes and productivity of vegetation. PMID:26591881

  18. Complex evaluation of climate-change--an example from Georgia's landscapes.

    PubMed

    Nikolaishvili, Dali; Trapaidze, Vazha; Kalandadze, Besik; Mamukashvili, Tamar; Sharashenidze, Manana

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop spatial-temporal model of Georgia's landscapes, which gives a chance to determine the current tendencies of landscape changes in different landscapes, such as humidity/aridity, increase/decrease of bio-productivity, etc. The model used gives possibility to reveal causes of mosaic changes, associated with global climate change. The studywas based on the conception of spatial-temporal analysis and synthesis of landscapes. It was carried out in different landscapes across Georgia. The daily geo-conditions and annual dynamics of landscapes was determined by analyzing some long-term data collected from meteorological stations. As a complex value, daily geo-conditions of landscapes were analyzed. On the bases of inventory of landscapes, GIS-technology and thematic mapping, main tendencies in the landscapes were developed. Arid, Semiarid, Semi-humid landscapes occupied a great area, which formed approximately 1/3 part of the whole territory of Georgia. These include 8 types, 11 sub-types of landscapes and 24 genera. The main share of these landscapes was concentrated in East Georgia, but some semi-humid areas were spread in West Georgia. The influence of climate change was evaluated considering several parameters, such as change of forest area, share of agricultural land in the total area of landscape, degree of fragmentation of landscapes and productivity of vegetation.

  19. 77 FR 67639 - Liberty Energy (Georgia) Corp.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Liberty Energy (Georgia) Corp.; Notice of Application Take notice that on October 25, Liberty Energy (Georgia) Corp. (Liberty Georgia), 2845 Bristol Circle, Oakville, Ontario... Gas Act (NGA) requesting the determination of a service area within which Liberty Georgia may,...

  20. Fundamental Experiment to Determine Escape Countermeasures for Frogs Falling into Agricultural Canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watabe, Keiji; Mori, Atsushi; Koizumi, Noriyuki; Takemura, Takeshi

    Frogs often drown in agricultural canals with deep concrete walls, which are installed commonly in paddy fields after land improvement projects in Japan, because they cannot escape after falling into the canal. Therefore, countermeasures that enable frogs to escape from canals are required in some rural areas. An experimental canal with partially sloped walls was used as an escape countermeasure to investigate the preferable angle of slope for the walls, water depth and flow velocity that enables Tokyo Daruma Pond Frogs (Rana porosa porosa), which have no adhesive discs, to easily escape. Walls with slopes of 30-45 degrees allowed 50-60% of frogs to escape from the experimental canals, frogs especially easily climbed the 30 degree sloped walls. When the water depth was 5 cm or flow velocity was greater than 20 cm/s, approximately 80% of the frogs moved downstream and reached the sloped walls because the frogs' toes did not reach the bottom of the canal. However, if the depth was 2 cm and the flow velocity was 5 cm/s, only 4% of the frogs climbed the sloped walls because they could move freely. The frogs appeared to not be good at long-distance swimming and could not remain a long-time under running water. Therefore, walls sloped less than 30 degrees and control of both water depth and flow velocity appears important for enabling frogs to easily escape from canals.

  1. Improving water use in agriculture. Experiences in the Middle East and North Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Tuijl, W.V.

    1993-08-01

    As water becomes more scarce, many countries are under pressure to conserve water, especially in the agricultural sector. This paper examines strategies that save water in river basins, irrigation projects, and on farms throughout the Middle East and North Africa. Countries elsewhere can use these suggestions in their own water conservation strategies. Improved surface irrigation techniques and micro-irrigation systems are evaluated. These systems use sprinkler, drip/trickle, or micro-spray methods. The author reviews the preliminary work that is needed to install modern irrigation technologies. He describes the role that governments must play to improve the infrastructure and institutions that affect water use. He also provides detailed case studies of efficient irrigation practices in Cyprus, Israel, and Jordan. These case studies describe the conditions that made better irrigation technology a necessity. They look at ways to plan for development, management, and utilization of water in the face of growing demand. Key topics include how to oversee water rights, adopt essential land reforms, and install a graduated system of water pricing and allocation. The study also recommends projects in water conservation and research.

  2. A Teaching Experiment in the Use of Greenhouse Facilities in Vocational Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drawbaugh, Charles Calvin

    Major purposes were to measure the comparative effectiveness of school greenhouses, community greenhouses, and classroom windowsills and a laboratory manual, functional experience, and teacher's own method for learning plant science principles relative to the environmental factors of light, temperature, moisture, aeration, and nutrients. Minor…

  3. Planning an integrated agriculture and health program and designing its evaluation: Experience from Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Donald C.; Levin, Carol; Loechl, Cornelia; Thiele, Graham; Grant, Frederick; Girard, Aimee Webb; Sindi, Kirimi; Low, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Multi-sectoral programs that involve stakeholders in agriculture, nutrition and health care are essential for responding to nutrition problems such as vitamin A deficiency among pregnant and lactating women and their infants in many poor areas of lower income countries. Yet planning such multi-sectoral programs and designing appropriate evaluations, to respond to different disciplinary cultures of evidence, remain a challenge. We describe the context, program development process, and evaluation design of the Mama SASHA project (Sweetpotato Action for Security and Health in Africa) which promoted production and consumption of a bio-fortified, orange-fleshed sweetpotato (OFSP). In planning the program we drew upon information from needs assessments, stakeholder consultations, and a first round of the implementation evaluation of a pilot project. The multi-disciplinary team worked with partner organizations to develop a program theory of change and an impact pathway which identified aspects of the program that would be monitored and established evaluation methods. Responding to the growing demand for greater rigour in impact evaluations, we carried out quasi-experimental allocation by health facility catchment area, repeat village surveys for assessment of change in intervention and control areas, and longitudinal tracking of individual mother-child pairs. Mid-course corrections in program implementation were informed by program monitoring, regular feedback from implementers and partners’ meetings. To assess economic efficiency and provide evidence for scaling we collected data on resources used and project expenses. Managing the multi-sectoral program and the mixed methods evaluation involved bargaining and trade-offs that were deemed essential to respond to the array of stakeholders, program funders and disciplines involved. PMID:27003730

  4. Seasonal fluctuations of bacterial community diversity in agricultural soil and experimental validation by laboratory disturbance experiments.

    PubMed

    Meier, Christoph; Wehrli, Bernhard; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2008-08-01

    Natural fluctuations in soil microbial communities are poorly documented because of the inherent difficulty to perform a simultaneous analysis of the relative abundances of multiple populations over a long time period. Yet, it is important to understand the magnitudes of community composition variability as a function of natural influences (e.g., temperature, plant growth, or rainfall) because this forms the reference or baseline against which external disturbances (e.g., anthropogenic emissions) can be judged. Second, definition of baseline fluctuations in complex microbial communities may help to understand at which point the systems become unbalanced and cannot return to their original composition. In this paper, we examined the seasonal fluctuations in the bacterial community of an agricultural soil used for regular plant crop production by using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiling (T-RFLP) of the amplified 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene diversity. Cluster and statistical analysis of T-RFLP data showed that soil bacterial communities fluctuated very little during the seasons (similarity indices between 0.835 and 0.997) with insignificant variations in 16S rRNA gene richness and diversity indices. Despite overall insignificant fluctuations, between 8 and 30% of all terminal restriction fragments changed their relative intensity in a significant manner among consecutive time samples. To determine the magnitude of community variations induced by external factors, soil samples were subjected to either inoculation with a pure bacterial culture, addition of the herbicide mecoprop, or addition of nutrients. All treatments resulted in statistically measurable changes of T-RFLP profiles of the communities. Addition of nutrients or bacteria plus mecoprop resulted in bacteria composition, which did not return to the original profile within 14 days. We propose that at less than 70% similarity in T-RFLP, the bacterial communities risk to

  5. Planning an integrated agriculture and health program and designing its evaluation: Experience from Western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Cole, Donald C; Levin, Carol; Loechl, Cornelia; Thiele, Graham; Grant, Frederick; Girard, Aimee Webb; Sindi, Kirimi; Low, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Multi-sectoral programs that involve stakeholders in agriculture, nutrition and health care are essential for responding to nutrition problems such as vitamin A deficiency among pregnant and lactating women and their infants in many poor areas of lower income countries. Yet planning such multi-sectoral programs and designing appropriate evaluations, to respond to different disciplinary cultures of evidence, remain a challenge. We describe the context, program development process, and evaluation design of the Mama SASHA project (Sweetpotato Action for Security and Health in Africa) which promoted production and consumption of a bio-fortified, orange-fleshed sweetpotato (OFSP). In planning the program we drew upon information from needs assessments, stakeholder consultations, and a first round of the implementation evaluation of a pilot project. The multi-disciplinary team worked with partner organizations to develop a program theory of change and an impact pathway which identified aspects of the program that would be monitored and established evaluation methods. Responding to the growing demand for greater rigour in impact evaluations, we carried out quasi-experimental allocation by health facility catchment area, repeat village surveys for assessment of change in intervention and control areas, and longitudinal tracking of individual mother-child pairs. Mid-course corrections in program implementation were informed by program monitoring, regular feedback from implementers and partners' meetings. To assess economic efficiency and provide evidence for scaling we collected data on resources used and project expenses. Managing the multi-sectoral program and the mixed methods evaluation involved bargaining and trade-offs that were deemed essential to respond to the array of stakeholders, program funders and disciplines involved. PMID:27003730

  6. Planning an integrated agriculture and health program and designing its evaluation: Experience from Western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Cole, Donald C; Levin, Carol; Loechl, Cornelia; Thiele, Graham; Grant, Frederick; Girard, Aimee Webb; Sindi, Kirimi; Low, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Multi-sectoral programs that involve stakeholders in agriculture, nutrition and health care are essential for responding to nutrition problems such as vitamin A deficiency among pregnant and lactating women and their infants in many poor areas of lower income countries. Yet planning such multi-sectoral programs and designing appropriate evaluations, to respond to different disciplinary cultures of evidence, remain a challenge. We describe the context, program development process, and evaluation design of the Mama SASHA project (Sweetpotato Action for Security and Health in Africa) which promoted production and consumption of a bio-fortified, orange-fleshed sweetpotato (OFSP). In planning the program we drew upon information from needs assessments, stakeholder consultations, and a first round of the implementation evaluation of a pilot project. The multi-disciplinary team worked with partner organizations to develop a program theory of change and an impact pathway which identified aspects of the program that would be monitored and established evaluation methods. Responding to the growing demand for greater rigour in impact evaluations, we carried out quasi-experimental allocation by health facility catchment area, repeat village surveys for assessment of change in intervention and control areas, and longitudinal tracking of individual mother-child pairs. Mid-course corrections in program implementation were informed by program monitoring, regular feedback from implementers and partners' meetings. To assess economic efficiency and provide evidence for scaling we collected data on resources used and project expenses. Managing the multi-sectoral program and the mixed methods evaluation involved bargaining and trade-offs that were deemed essential to respond to the array of stakeholders, program funders and disciplines involved.

  7. Soil erosion in river basins of Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogichaishvili, G. P.

    2016-06-01

    The area of cultivated lands in western and eastern Georgia comprises 28-40 and 29-33% of the total catchment areas, respectively. Eroded arable soils in Georgia occupy 205700 ha, i.e. 30.5% of the total plowland area, including 110500 ha (16.4%) of slightly eroded soils, 74400 ha (11%) of moderately eroded soils, and 20800 ha (3.1%) of strongly eroded soils. The maximum denudation rate in catchments of western Georgia reaches 1.0 mm/yr. The minimum denudation (0.01 mm/yr.) is typical of river catchments in southern Georgia. The mean annual soil loss from plowed fields in western Georgia reaches 17.4 t/ha and exceeds the soil loss tolerance by nearly four times. In eastern Georgia, it is equal to 10.46 t/ha and exceeds the soil loss tolerance by 2.5 times. In southern Georgia, the mean annual soil loss from plowed fields is as low as 3.08 t per ha, i.e., much lower than the soil loss tolerance.

  8. Nutrient uptake by agricultural crops from biochar-amended soils: results from two field experiments in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karer, Jasmin; Zehetner, Franz; Kloss, Stefanie; Wimmer, Bernhard; Soja, Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    The use of biochar as soil amendment is considered as a promising agricultural soil management technique, combining carbon sequestration and soil fertility improvements. These expectations are largely founded on positive experiences with biochar applications to impoverished or degraded tropical soils. The validity of these results for soils in temperate climates needs confirmation from field experiments with typical soils representative for intensive agricultural production areas. Frequently biochar is mixed with other organic additives like compost. As these two materials interact with each other and each one may vary considerably in its basic characteristics, it is difficult to attribute the effects of the combined additive to one of its components and to a specific physico-chemical parameter. Therefore investigations of the amendment efficacy require the study of the pure components to characterize their specific behavior in soil. This is especially important for adsorption behavior of biochar for macro- and micronutrients because in soil there are multiple nutrient sinks that compete with plant roots for vital elements. Therefore this contribution presents results from a field amendment study with pure biochar that had the objective to characterize the macro- and microelement uptake of crops from different soils in two typical Austrian areas of agricultural production. At two locations in North and South-East Austria, two identical field experiments on different soils (Chernozem and Cambisol) were installed in 2011 with varying biochar additions (0, 30 and 90 t/ha) and two nitrogen levels. The biochar was a product from slow pyrolysis of wood (SC Romchar SRL). During the installation of the experiments, the biochar fraction of <2 mm was mixed with surface soil to a depth of 15 cm in plots of 33 m2 each (n=4). Barley (at the Chernozem soil) and maize (at the Cambisol) were cultivated according to standard agricultural practices. The highest crop yields at both

  9. TRAY MOUNTAIN ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Arthur E.; Chatman, Mark L.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey indicates that the Tray Mountain Roadless Area, Georgia has little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources. Rocks underlying the Tray Mountain Roadless Area are suitable for crushed rock or aggregate; however, other sources for these materials are available closer to present markets. There is a possibility for the occurrence of hydrocarbon resources underlying the area at great depth, but no hydrocarbon potential was identified. Detailed studies are needed to establish the presence or absence and mineral-resource potential of olivine, nickel, cobalt, and chrome in the two mafic-ultramafic bodies in the Hayesville thrust sheet. The cause of the lead anomaly in pan concentrate samples taken from the southwest part of the roadless area has not been established; the mineral residence and source of the anomaly remain to be determined.

  10. 76 FR 27138 - Georgia Disaster # GA-00033

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... State of Georgia (FEMA-- 1973--DR), dated 04/29/2011. Incident: Severe storms, tornadoes, straight-line winds, and associated flooding Incident Period: 04/27/2011 through 04/28/2011 Effective Date:...

  11. Virtual health care center in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Thomas; Kldiashvili, Ekaterina

    2008-01-01

    Application of telemedicine systems to cover distant geographical areas has increased recently. However, the potential usefulness of similar systems for creation of national networks does not seem to be widely appreciated. The article describes the "Virtual Health Care Knowledge Center in Georgia" project. Its aim was the set up of an online integrated web-based platform to provide remote medical consultations and eLearning cycles. The project "Virtual Health Care Knowledge Center in Georgia" was the NATO Networking Infrastructure Grant dedicated for development of telemedicine in non-NATO countries. The project implemented a pilot to organize the creation of national eHealth network in Georgia and to promote the use of innovative telemedicine and eLearning services in the Georgian healthcare system. In June 2007 it was continued under the NATO Networking Infrastructure Grant "ePathology--Virtual Pathology Center in Georgia as the Continuation of Virtual Health Care Center". PMID:18673518

  12. Measuring the Interest of German Students in Agriculture: The Role of Knowledge, Nature Experience, Disgust, and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickel, Malte; Strack, Micha; Bögeholz, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Modern knowledge-based societies, especially their younger members, have largely lost their bonds to farming. However, learning about agriculture and its interrelations with environmental issues may be facilitated by students' individual interests in agriculture. To date, an adequate instrument to investigate agricultural interests has been…

  13. CWEX (Crop/Wind-Energy Experiment): Measurements of the interaction between crop agriculture and wind power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajewski, Daniel Andrew

    The current expansion of wind farms in the U.S. Midwest promotes an alternative renewable energy portfolio to conventional energy sources derived from fossil fuels. The construction of wind turbines and large wind farms within several millions of cropland acres creates a unique interaction between two unlike energy sources: electric generation by wind and bio-fuel production derived from crop grain and plant tissues. Wind turbines produce power by extracting mean wind speed and converting a portion of the flow to turbulence downstream of each rotor. Turbine-scale turbulence modifies fluxes of momentum, heat, moisture, and other gaseous constituents (e.g. carbon dioxide) between the crop canopy and the atmospheric boundary layer. Conversely, crop surfaces and tillage elements produce drag on the hub-height wind resource, and the release of sensible and latent heat flux from the canopy or soil influences the wind speed profile. The Crop-Wind Energy Experiment (CWEX) measured momentum, energy, and CO2 fluxes at several locations within the leading line of turbines in a large operational wind farm, and overall turbines promote canopy mixing of wind speed, temperature, moisture, and carbon dioxide in both the day and night. Turbine-generated perturbations of these fluxes are dependent on several factors influencing the turbine operation (e.g. wind speed, wind direction, stability, orientation of surrounding turbines within a wind park) and the cropland surface (e.g. crop type and cultivar, planting density, chemical application, and soil composition and drainage qualities). Additional strategies are proposed for optimizing the synergy between crop and wind power.

  14. Project Georgia High School/High Tech

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The High School/High Tech initiative of the President's Committee on Employment of Disabilities, Georgia's application of the collaborative "Georgia Model" and NASA's commitment of funding have shown that opportunities for High School/High Tech students are unlimited. In Georgia, the partnership approach to meeting the needs of this program has opened doors previously closed. As the program grows and develops, reflecting the needs of our students and the marketplace, more opportunities will be available. Our collaboratives are there to provide these opportunities and meet the challenge of matching our students with appropriate education and career goals. Summing up the activities and outcomes of Project Georgia High School/High Tech is not difficult. Significant outcomes have already occurred in the Savannah area as a result of NASA's grant. The support of NASA has enabled Georgia Committee to "grow" High School/High Tech throughout the region-and, by example, the state. The success of the Columbus pilot project has fostered the proliferation of projects, resulting in more than 30 Georgia High School High Tech programs-with eight in the Savannah area.

  15. Predation by carabid beetles on the invasive slug Arion vulgaris in an agricultural semi-field experiment.

    PubMed

    Pianezzola, E; Roth, S; Hatteland, B A

    2013-04-01

    Arion vulgaris Moquin-Tandon 1855 is one of the most important invasive species in Europe, affecting both biodiversity and agriculture. The species is spreading in many parts of Europe, inflicting severe damage to horticultural plants and cultivated crops partly due to a lack of satisfactory and effective management solutions. Molluscicides have traditionally been used to manage slug densities, although the effects are variable and some have severe side-effects on other biota. Thus, there is a need to explore potential alternatives such as biological control. The nematode Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita is the only biological agent that has been applied commercially so far. However, other biological control agents such as carabid beetles have also been found to be promising. In addition, some carabid species have been shown to feed on A. vulgaris in the field as well as in the laboratory. Two species in particular have been found to be important predators of A. vulgaris, and these species are also common in agricultural environments: Pterostichus melanarius and Carabus nemoralis. This study is the first to use semi-field experiments in a strawberry field, manipulating densities, to investigate how P. melanarius and C. nemoralis affect densities of A. vulgaris eggs and juveniles, respectively. Gut contents of C. nemoralis were analysed using multiplex PCR methods to detect DNA of juvenile slugs. Results show that both P. melanarius and C. nemoralis significantly affect densities of slug eggs and juvenile slugs under semi-field conditions and that C. nemoralis seems to prefer slugs smaller than one gram. Carabus nemoralis seems to be especially promising in reducing densities of A. vulgaris, and future studies should investigate the potential of using this species as a biological control agent.

  16. Exposure to a heat wave under food limitation makes an agricultural insecticide lethal: a mechanistic laboratory experiment.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Khuong V; Janssens, Lizanne; Stoks, Robby

    2016-10-01

    Extreme temperatures and exposure to agricultural pesticides are becoming more frequent and intense under global change. Their combination may be especially problematic when animals suffer food limitation. We exposed Coenagrion puella damselfly larvae to a simulated heat wave combined with food limitation and subsequently to a widespread agricultural pesticide (chlorpyrifos) in an indoor laboratory experiment designed to obtain mechanistic insights in the direct effects of these stressors in isolation and when combined. The heat wave reduced immune function (activity of phenoloxidase, PO) and metabolic rate (activity of the electron transport system, ETS). Starvation had both immediate and delayed negative sublethal effects on growth rate and physiology (reductions in Hsp70 levels, total fat content, and activity levels of PO and ETS). Exposure to chlorpyrifos negatively affected all response variables. While the immediate effects of the heat wave were subtle, our results indicate the importance of delayed effects in shaping the total fitness impact of a heat wave when followed by pesticide exposure. Firstly, the combination of delayed negative effects of the heat wave and starvation, and the immediate negative effect of chlorpyrifos considerably (71%) reduced larval growth rate. Secondly and more strikingly, chlorpyrifos only caused considerable (ca. 48%) mortality in larvae that were previously exposed to the combination of the heat wave and starvation. This strong delayed synergism for mortality could be explained by the cumulative metabolic depression caused by each of these stressors. Further studies with increased realism are needed to evaluate the consequences of the here-identified delayed synergisms at the level of populations and communities. This is especially important as this synergism provides a novel explanation for the poorly understood potential of heat waves and of sublethal pesticide concentrations to cause mass mortality.

  17. Exposure to a heat wave under food limitation makes an agricultural insecticide lethal: a mechanistic laboratory experiment.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Khuong V; Janssens, Lizanne; Stoks, Robby

    2016-10-01

    Extreme temperatures and exposure to agricultural pesticides are becoming more frequent and intense under global change. Their combination may be especially problematic when animals suffer food limitation. We exposed Coenagrion puella damselfly larvae to a simulated heat wave combined with food limitation and subsequently to a widespread agricultural pesticide (chlorpyrifos) in an indoor laboratory experiment designed to obtain mechanistic insights in the direct effects of these stressors in isolation and when combined. The heat wave reduced immune function (activity of phenoloxidase, PO) and metabolic rate (activity of the electron transport system, ETS). Starvation had both immediate and delayed negative sublethal effects on growth rate and physiology (reductions in Hsp70 levels, total fat content, and activity levels of PO and ETS). Exposure to chlorpyrifos negatively affected all response variables. While the immediate effects of the heat wave were subtle, our results indicate the importance of delayed effects in shaping the total fitness impact of a heat wave when followed by pesticide exposure. Firstly, the combination of delayed negative effects of the heat wave and starvation, and the immediate negative effect of chlorpyrifos considerably (71%) reduced larval growth rate. Secondly and more strikingly, chlorpyrifos only caused considerable (ca. 48%) mortality in larvae that were previously exposed to the combination of the heat wave and starvation. This strong delayed synergism for mortality could be explained by the cumulative metabolic depression caused by each of these stressors. Further studies with increased realism are needed to evaluate the consequences of the here-identified delayed synergisms at the level of populations and communities. This is especially important as this synergism provides a novel explanation for the poorly understood potential of heat waves and of sublethal pesticide concentrations to cause mass mortality. PMID:27390895

  18. Soil fertility management on natural pastures in Eastern Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghambashidze, Giorgi; Jolokhava, Tamar; Kenchiashvili, Naira; Tarkhnishvili, Maia

    2015-04-01

    The development of livestock production in Georgia is mainly based on productivity of natural common pasturelands as it is the cheapest way to keep animals. Therefore it is crucial to manage those pastures in order to supply domestic animals with adequate amount of green grass during whole grazing season. The problems associated with poor grassland management is especially evident under limited rainfall conditions. Usually farmers do not consider suitability of existing stocking rates with pasture productivity leading to overutilization of pastureland causing reduction of palatable plant species and total grass cover stimulating soil erosion processes, which deflates soil nutrients and soil organic matter. Intensification of negative processes may result in loss of soil fertility and poor grass regrowth capacities. Current study aims to evaluate existing grazing system on a selected plots from common pasturelands in Eastern Georgia and to develop a proper soil fertility management plan accepted in organic agriculture taking into account local soil-climatic conditions, pasture vegetation stand and its richness with palatable plant species.

  19. Theme: Delivering Agricultural Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Warren D.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Eight articles in this theme issue deal with the nationwide implementation of agricultural literacy programs--discovering how to do it. Discussed are experiences in planning and conducting agricultural literacy programs at state and local levels. (JOW)

  20. Time factor in soils of Georgia-mirror or memory of landscapes?

    PubMed

    Matchavariani, Lia

    2012-04-01

    The geographic pattern of soils in mountainous region of Georgia is presented. Time is considered as one of the most important factors of soil formation in mountain areas. The age of soil cover in the areas above 1000-1200 m a.s.l. is less than 10,000-12,000 yr b.p. These soils are considered as young component of landscape. In the landscapes below this level soils do not correspond to modern ecological conditions. We can confirm that in Georgia higher than 1000-1200 m asl soils correspond to ecological conditions and they are mirror of landscapes, as one of the most important postulates of soil science. In other case, we can talk about soils memory-distorted mirror of landscapes. For diagnosing of relic features (pedogenic and lithogenic) in soils of Georgia the micromorphological method is used. The majority of landscapes in Georgia are heavily used for agriculture and suffer from high instability. These landscapes are very fragile today, characterized by high soil erosion and strong pollution with heavy metalsand radionuclides.

  1. Soil-plant transfer of Cs-137 and Sr-90 in digestate amended agricultural soils- a lysimeter scale experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, Khalid; Berns, Anne E.; Pütz, Thomas; Burauel, Peter; Vereecken, Harry; Zoriy, Myroslav; Flucht, Reinhold; Opitz, Thorsten; Hofmann, Diana

    2014-05-01

    Radiocesium and radiostrontium are among the most problematic soil contaminants following nuclear fallout due to their long half-lives and high fission yields. Their chemical resemblance to potassium, ammonium and calcium facilitates their plant uptake and thus enhances their chance to reach humans through the food-chain dramatically. The plant uptake of both radionuclides is affected by the type of soil, the amount of organic matter and the concentration of competitive ions. In the present lysimeter scale experiment, soil-plant transfer of Cs-137 and Sr-90 was investigated in an agricultural silty soil amended with digestate, a residue from a biogas plant. The liquid fraction of the digestate, liquor, was used to have higher nutrient competition. Digestate application was done in accordance with the field practice with an application rate of 34 Mg/ha and mixing it in top 5 cm soil, yielding a final concentration of 38 g digestate/Kg soil. The top 5 cm soil of the non-amended reference soil was also submitted to the same mixing procedure to account for the physical disturbance of the top soil layer. Six months after the amendment of the soil, the soil contamination was done with water-soluble chloride salts of both radionuclides, resulting in a contamination density of 66 MBq/m2 for Cs-137 and 18 MBq/m2 for Sr-90 in separate experiments. Our results show that digestate application led to a detectable difference in soil-plant transfer of the investigated radionuclides, effect was more pronounced for Cs-137. A clear difference was observed in plant uptake of different plants. Pest plants displayed higher uptake of both radionuclides compared to wheat. Furthermore, lower activity values were recorded in ears compared to stems for both radionuclides.

  2. Mapping Atlantic coastal marshlands, Maryland, Georgia, using ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. R.; Carter, V. L.; Mcginness, J. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Eastern coastal marshes are the most extensive and productive in the United States. A relatively low cost, moderately accurate method is needed to map these areas for management and protection. Groundbased and low-altitude aircraft methods for mapping are time-consuming and quite expensive. The launch of NASA's Earth Resources Technology Satellite has provided an opportunity to test the feasibility of mapping wetlands using small scale imagery. The test sites selected were in Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, and Ossabaw Island, Georgia. Results of the investigation indicate that the following may be ascertained from ERTS imagery, enlarged to 1:250,000: (1) upper wetland boundary; (2) drainage pattern in the wetland; (3) plant communities; (4) ditching activities associated with agriculture; and (5) lagooning for water-side home development. Conclusions are that ERTS will be an excellent tool for many types of coastal wetland mapping.

  3. Quality, Evolution, and Positional Change of University Students' Argumentation Patterns about Organic Agriculture during an Argument-Critique-Argument Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Shu-Mey; Yore, Larry D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the quality, evolution, and position of university students' argumentation about organic agriculture over a 4-week argument-critique-argument e-learning experience embedded in a first year university biology course. The participants (N = 43) were classified into three groups based on their…

  4. The Cultural Adaptation Process of Agricultural and Life Sciences Students on Short-Term Study Abroad Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, Nathan William

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how undergraduate students in a college of agricultural and life sciences experienced cultural adaptation during short-term study abroad programs. The specific objectives of this study were to describe how undergraduate students in the college of agricultural and life sciences experienced culture throughout…

  5. Implications of the results of colonization experiments for designing riparian restoration projects adjacent to agricultural headwater streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many headwater streams and their riparian habitats in the Midwestern United States have been modified for agricultural drainage. Agricultural drainage often results in reductions of physical habitat diversity, shifts from woody to herbaceous riparian vegetation, and the loss of riparian habitat. T...

  6. Military vehicle trafficking impacts vegetation and soil bulk density at Fort Benning, Georgia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potential increases in wind erosion that might be brought about by military vehicles travelling off-road during training are of concern to the United States military. Field studies were conducted in the summer of 2012 at Fort Benning, Georgia. The objective of the experiment was to assess the traffi...

  7. Military vehicle trafficking impacts on vegetation and soil bulk density at Fort Benning, Georgia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potential increases in wind erosion that might be brought about by military vehicles travelling on off-road sites during training are of concern to the Military establishment. Field studies were conducted in the summer of 2012 at Fort Benning, Georgia. The objective of the experiment was to assess t...

  8. Minorities in Mathematics: Georgia State University Atlanta Metropolitan College Partnership Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Najee-ullah, Deborah; And Others

    Historically minorities, especially African-Americans, have been underrepresented in the mathematics and science fields. In order to attract more minorities as mathematics majors, these students must first experience success in the pre-calculus sequence and enroll in higher-level mathematics courses. The Georgia State University (GSU) Atlanta…

  9. Georgia and the United States Constitution 1787-1789.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, J. David

    This pamphlet on revolutionary Georgia is one of a series designed for use in the state's public schools. The objective is to present a clear, concise picture of Georgia's history during the American Revolution. The first and major part of the text presents an historical summary. It describes how Georgia was an early and strong supporter of the…

  10. Georgia Basin-Puget Sound Airshed Characterization Report 2014

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Georgia Basin - Puget Sound Airshed Characterization Report, 2012 was undertaken to characterize the air quality within the Georgia Basin/Puget Sound region,a vibrant, rapidly growing, urbanized area of the Pacific Northwest. The Georgia Basin - Puget Sound Airshed Characteri...

  11. Ground-water data for Georgia, 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matthews, S.E.; Hester, Willis G.; O'Byrne, M. P.

    1981-01-01

    More than 2,000 water-level measurements made in Georgia in 1980 provided the basic data for this report. Daily mean water-level fluctuations and trends are shown in hydrographs for the previous year and fluctuations of the monthly mean water level are shown for the previous 10 years in selected observation wells in Georgia. Monitoring ground-water levels is essential to the understanding of storage changes in a ground-water reservoir or aquifer. Fluctuations and long-term trends in water levels occur as a result of recharge to and discharge from the reservoir. Mean annual water levels across Georgia were from 1.92 feet higher to 12.61 feet lower in 1980 than in 1979, and in some areas were the lowest on record. (USGS)

  12. DVD Database Astronomical Manuscripts in Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonia, I.; Simonia, Ts.; Abuladze, T.; Chkhikvadze, N.; Samkurashvili, L.; Pataridze, K.

    2016-06-01

    Little known and unknown Georgian, Persian, and Arabic astronomical manuscripts of IX-XIX centuries are kept in the centers, archives, and libraries of Georgia. These manuscripts has a form of treaties, handbooks, texts, tables, fragments, and comprises various theories, cosmological models, star catalogs, calendars, methods of observations. We investigated this large material and published DVD database Astronomical Manuscripts in Georgia. This unique database contains information about astronomical manuscripts as original works. It contains also descriptions of Georgian translations of Byzantine, Arabic and other sources. The present paper is dedicated to description of obtained results and DVD database. Copies of published DVD database are kept in collections of the libraries of: Ilia State University, Georgia; Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, UK; Congress of the USA, and in other centers.

  13. Ground-water conditions in Georgia, 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cressler, A.M.; Blackburn, D.K.; McSwain, K.B.

    2001-01-01

    Ground-water conditions in Georgia during 1999 and for the period of record were evaluated using data from U.S. Geological Survey ground-water-level and ground-water-quality monitoring networks. Data for 1999 included in this report are from continuous water-level records from 130 wells and chloride analyses from 14 wells. Data from one well is incomplete because data collection was discontinued. Chloride concentration in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer in most of coastal Georgia was within drinking-water standards established by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In the Savannah area, chloride concentration has not changed appreciably with time. However, chloride concentration in water from some wells that tap the Floridan aquifer system in the Brunswick area exceeds the drinking-water standards.

  14. Ground-water conditions in Georgia, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cressler, Alan M.

    1999-01-01

    Ground-water conditions in Georgia during 1998 and for the period of record were evaluated using data from U.S. Geological Survey ground-water-level and ground-water-quality monitoring networks. Data for 1998 included in this report are from continuous water-level records from 130 wells and chloride analyses from 14 wells. Data from one well is incomplete because data collection was discontinued. Chloride concentration in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer in most of coastal Georgia was within drinking-water standards established by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In the Savannah area, chloride concentration has not changed appreciably with time. However, chloride concentration in water from some wells that tap the Floridan aquifer system in the Brunswick area exceeds the drinking-water standards.

  15. Annotated checklist of Georgia birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaton, G.; Sykes, P.W.; Parrish, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    This edition of the checklist includes 446 species, of which 407 are on the Regular Species List, 8 on the Provisional, and 31 on the Hypothetical. This new publication has been greatly expanded and much revised over the previous checklist (GOS Occasional Publ. No. 10, 1986, 48 pp., 6x9 inches) to a 7x10-inch format with an extensive Literature Cited section added, 22 species added to the Regular List, 2 to the Provisional List, and 9 to the Hypothetical List. Each species account is much more comprehensive over all previous editions of the checklist. Among some of the new features are citations for sources of most information used, high counts of individuals for each species on the Regular List, extreme dates of occurrence within physiographic regions, a list of abbreviations and acronyms, and for each species the highest form of verifiable documentation given with its repository institution with a catalog number. This checklist is helpful for anyone working with birds in the Southeastern United States or birding in that region. Sykes' contribution to this fifth edition of the Annotated Checklist of Georgia Birds includes: suggestion of the large format and spiral binding, use of Richard A. Parks' painting of the Barn Owl on the front cover, use of literature citations throughout, and inclusion of high counts for each species. Sykes helped plan all phases of the publication, wrote about 90% of the Introduction and 84 species accounts (Osprey through Red Phalarope), designed the four maps in the introduction section and format for the Literature Cited, and with Giff Beaton designed the layout of the title page.

  16. Effects of agricultural tillage practise on green house gas balance of an arable soil in a long term field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munch, Jean Charles; Schilling, Rolf; Ruth, Bernhard; Fuss, Roland

    2010-05-01

    Soils are an important part of the global carbon cycle. A large proportion of global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions is released from soils, though carbon sequestration occurs. Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions of soils are also believed to contribute significantly to the green house effect as well as the stratospheric ozone depletion. An important source of N2O emissions is denitrification of nitrate from nitrogen fertilized soils. Although it is desirable to minimize these emissions while maintaining high crop yields it is still poorly understood how green house gas emissions may be steered by agricultural management practise, i.e. tillage and fertilization systems . In an ongoing long term field experiment at the research farm Scheyern, Bavaria, a arable field with one homogenous soil formation was transformed into plots in a randomized design 14 years ago. Since then, they are managed using conventional tillage (CT) and no tillage (NT) as well as low and high fertilization. A conventional crop rotation is maintained on the field. Starting 2007, CO2 and N2O emissions were monitored continuously for 2.5 years. Furthermore water content, temperature and redox potential were measured in-situ as they are major factors on microbial activity and denitrification. Soil was sampled from the Ap horizons of the plots about twice a month and extracts from these soil samples were analyzed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), ammonium, nitrate/nitrite, and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON). According to the results soil density and hydrology are clearly affected by tillage practise. DOC is more affected by tillage while concentration of nitrogen species is controlled mainly by fertilization. There are distinct differences in redox potential between CT and NT plots with CT plots having more anaerobic periods. CO2 and N2O emissions exhibit a clear seasonal pattern and are affected by both tillage system and fertilization

  17. Georgia's Surface-Water Resources and Streamflow Monitoring Network, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2008-01-01

    Surface water provides 5 billion gallons per day, or 78 percent, of the total freshwater used (including thermoelectric) in Georgia (Fanning, 2003). Climate, geology, and landforms control the natural distribution of Georgia's water resources. Georgia is a 'headwaters' State, with most of the rivers beginning in northern Georgia and increasing in size downstream (see map at right for major watersheds). Surface water is the primary source of water in the northern one-half of the State, including the Atlanta metropolitan area, where limited ground-water resources are difficult to obtain. In Georgia, periodic droughts exacerbate competition for surface-water supplies. Many areas of Georgia also face a threat of flooding because of spring frontal thunderstorms and the potential for hurricanes from both the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. As the population of Georgia increases, these flood risks will increase with development in flood-risk zones, particularly in the coastal region.

  18. 86th Annual Georgia Public Health Association Meeting & Conference Report

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Selina A.; Abbott, Regina; Sims, Christy

    2015-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The 86th annual meeting of the Georgia Public Health Association (GPHA) and joint conference with the Southern Health Association was held in Atlanta, Georgia, on April 13–14, 2015, with pre-conference (April 12th) and post-conference (April 14th) Executive Board meetings. As Georgia’s leading forum for public health researchers, practitioners, and students, the annual meeting of the GPHA brings together participants from across the state to explore recent developments in the field and to exchange techniques, tools, and experiences. Historically, the GPHA conference has been held in Savannah (n=24); Jekyll Island (n=20); Atlanta (n=16); Augusta (n=4); and Gainesville (n=1). There was no annual meeting during the early years (1929–1936); during World War II (1941–1943 and 1945); and for four years during the 1980s. Between 2006 and 2010, GPHA held one-day annual meetings and business sessions with educational workshops. Several new initiatives were highlighted as part of this year’s conference. These included a “move and groove” physical activity lounge, registration scholarships for students with a dedicated meet-and-greet reception, an expanded exhibit hall, presentation and approval of three resolutions (related to healthy foods at official activities and events; weapons at official activities and events; and memorials), and approval of the 2015 legislative policy positions and amended association bylaws. The theme for the conference was Advocacy in Action for Public Health. Specifically, the program addressed ensuring access to care; protecting funding for core programs, services, and infrastructure; eliminating health disparities; and addressing key public health issues important to the state of Georgia. One hundred and nine (109) abstracts were submitted for peer review; 36 were accepted for poster and 40 for workshop presentations. Four plenary sessions with keynote speakers covered the intersection between advocacy and policy

  19. School-Based Businesses in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatewood, Elizabeth J.; DeLargy, Paul F.

    A school-based business program in Georgia is attempting to broaden the education of high school students by making them more aware of the role of small business in the United States economy and the economic possibilities offered by entrepreneurship. Goals of school-based businesses are to create profit-making enterprises that meet unfilled needs…

  20. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Georgia has made some changes in its testing program in recent years. As a result, trend data were only available for reading in grades 4 and 8 from 2006 through 2009, and only at the proficient and advanced levels. In math, data were only available for the high school level from 2004 through 2009. Achievement data for low income students were…

  1. State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Georgia edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher quality…

  2. MODELING MERCURY FATE IN SEVEN GEORGIA WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field and modeling studies were conducted in support of total maximum daily loads (TMDLs)for mercury in six south Georgia rivers and the Savannah River. Mercury is introduced to these rivers primarily by atmospheric deposition, with minor point source loadings. To produce mercu...

  3. Health Clinic Environments in Georgia Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Susan Rogers

    2005-01-01

    Schools seem to be the logical place to serve the health needs of students, since children spend a majority of their time there. Design standards were not available for health clinics in Georgia elementary schools; therefore, this study examined key characteristics of an elementary school clinic in order to determine the importance of each design…

  4. 77 FR 51099 - Georgia Disaster #GA-00046

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Georgia Disaster GA-00046 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY...: 05/14/2013. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business...

  5. Physical Education Curricula in Georgia Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Margaret A.; And Others

    An analysis of 634 responses from Georgia public schools regarding physical education-related activities taught is presented. Information is provided on school background, facilities, curricula, teacher preparation, activity and curriculum training of teachers, and comparisons regarding classrooms and physical education teachers. Over 130 charts…

  6. Sixty Years of Creationism in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saladin, Kenneth S.

    1983-01-01

    Examines sociopolitical conditions that allowed pro-creationist and anti-evolutionist movements to thrive in Georgia and other southern States. Describes efforts by leading citizens to influence legislation toward propagation of the creationist philosophy, especially in education. Stresses the need for scientists and educators to oppose…

  7. Georgia Kids Count Factbook, 1998-99.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgians for Children, Atlanta, GA.

    This Kids Count factbook presents statistical data and examines trends for 10 indicators of children's well-being in Georgia. The indicators are: (1) low birthweight babies; (2) infant mortality; (3) child deaths; (4) teen deaths by accident, homicide, and suicide; (5) juvenile arrests; (6) reading and math scores on the Iowa Test of Basic Skills;…

  8. Georgia Kids Count Factbook, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dopkins, Laurie B.; Carter, John; Beavers, Barbara

    This Kids Count factbook examines statewide and county trends in the well-being of Georgia's children. The statistical portrait is based on indicators in five domains: family and community, economic well-being, health, education, and safety and security. The 21 indicators of well-being are: (1) child population; (2) public school enrollment; (3)…

  9. Evaluating the Georgia Master Naturalist Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildreth, Lauren; Mengak, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the Georgia Master Naturalist Program using an online survey. Survey participation was voluntary, and the survey addressed areas such as satisfaction, volunteerism, and future training. The program received high scores from survey respondents. They appreciated training on native plants, environmental awareness, and ecological…

  10. Making Cultural Diversity Work in Suburban Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahon, J. Patrick

    1997-01-01

    Captures the cooperative spirit of a suburban Georgia high school with 2,000 highly mobile students from 60 countries and speaking over 30 different languages. Staff work to counter stereotypical assumptions and use diversity as a positive resource for learning and promotion of individual excellence. Diversity-management strategies related to…

  11. Georgia Turns to the West for Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemtsova, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Georgia, along with a number of other former Soviet countries, is rapidly reforming its higher-education system. Russian is being replaced by English in classrooms and textbooks. Western-trained professors are flooding campuses with new methods of teaching and liberal-arts courses are replacing vocational training. This change is part of broader…

  12. Loss of Accreditation Rocks Georgia District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Linda

    2008-01-01

    In the end, six months of management reforms and the hiring of an experienced urban superintendent failed to keep the Clayton County, Georgia, school district from becoming the nation's first district in nearly four decades to have its accreditation stripped. Last week's decision by the Atlanta-based Southern Association of Colleges and Schools…

  13. The Georgia Indian Frontier, 1773-1783.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, James H.

    One of a series of pamphlets about the American Revolution in Georgia, this document examines the relationship between Indians and Colonials in pre-revolutionary times. It can be used as supplementary reading or a two-week unit for junior or senior high school students. A brief teacher's guide is included. The main part of the document relates the…

  14. 40 CFR 81.311 - Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.311 Georgia... Telfair County X Terrell County X Thomas County X Tift County X Toombs County X Towns County X Treutlen... Telfair County X Terrell County X Thomas County X Tift County X Toombs County X Towns County X...

  15. 40 CFR 81.311 - Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.311 Georgia... Telfair County X Terrell County X Thomas County X Tift County X Toombs County X Towns County X Treutlen... Telfair County X Terrell County X Thomas County X Tift County X Toombs County X Towns County X...

  16. 40 CFR 81.311 - Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.311 Georgia... Telfair County X Terrell County X Thomas County X Tift County X Toombs County X Towns County X Treutlen... Telfair County X Terrell County X Thomas County X Tift County X Toombs County X Towns County X...

  17. 40 CFR 81.311 - Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.311 Georgia... Telfair County X Terrell County X Thomas County X Tift County X Toombs County X Towns County X Treutlen... Telfair County X Terrell County X Thomas County X Tift County X Toombs County X Towns County X...

  18. 40 CFR 81.311 - Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.311 Georgia... Telfair County X Terrell County X Thomas County X Tift County X Toombs County X Towns County X Treutlen... County X Toombs County X Towns County X Treutlen County X Troup County X Turner County X Twiggs County...

  19. GSCA (Georgia School Counselors Association) Journal, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullis, Fran, Ed.; McCarthy, Susan, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    The articles presented in this journal issue include contributions that help meet the needs of all students. Six of the articles are based on programs presented at the Georgia School Counselor Association 2000 Fall Conference. The articles include: (1) "Effects of Group Counseling on Third Grade Students' Self-Esteem and Academic Achievement"…

  20. Automation at the University of Georgia Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christoffersson, John G.

    1979-01-01

    Presents the design procedures, bibliographic system, file structures, acquisitions and circulation systems, functional implementation, and future development of the Managing Resources for University Libraries (MARVEL) data base at the University of Georgia Libraries, which accepts MARC input from OCLC and Library of Congress (LC) MARC tapes. (CWM)

  1. Progressive Education in Georgia: Tradition or Reality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopaliani, Bella; Harnisch, Delwyn L.; Doliashvili, Nana; Guetterman, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Despite differences among progressive educators, they share the conviction that democracy means active participation by all citizens in the social, political, and economic decisions of their countries. The aim of this paper is to explore how Georgia is meeting goals and perspectives of progressive education by widely implementing civic education…

  2. Milkweed, stink bugs, and Georgia cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In peanut-cotton farmscapes in Georgia, stink bugs, i.e., Nezara viridula (L.)(Say) and Chinavia hilaris (Say), develop in peanut and then disperse at the crop-to-crop interface to feed on fruit in cotton. The main objective of this study was to examine the influence of a habitat of tropical milkwe...

  3. Human cutaneous anthrax, Georgia 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Kracalik, Ian; Malania, Lile; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Manvelyan, Julietta; Bakanidze, Lela; Imnadze, Paata; Tsanava, Shota; Blackburn, Jason K

    2014-02-01

    We assessed the occurrence of human cutaneous anthrax in Georgia during 2010--2012 by examining demographic and spatial characteristics of reported cases. Reporting increased substantially, as did clustering of cases near urban centers. Control efforts, including education about anthrax and livestock vaccination, can be directed at areas of high risk.

  4. Community Types and Mortality in Georgia Counties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Frank W.

    2012-01-01

    Using an "ecological regional analysis" methodology for defining types of communities and their associated mortality rates, this study of Georgia's 159 counties finds that the suburban and town centered counties have low mortality while the city-centered type predicts low mortality for the whites. The military-centered counties do not predict. The…

  5. School transportation modes--Georgia, 2000.

    PubMed

    2002-08-16

    Moderate physical activity (e.g., walking or bicycling) offers substantial health benefits. Physical activity is especially important for young persons not only because of its immediate benefits but also because participation in healthy behaviors early in life might lead to healthier lifestyles in adulthood. Persons aged > 2 years should engage in > or = 30 minutes of moderately intense physical activity on all or most days of the week. However, sedentary after-school activities (e.g., watching television or using computers), decreased participation in physical education, and fewer students walking or riding their bicycles to school might contribute to the high rate of childhood obesity. Walking to school provides a convenient opportunity for children to be physically active. To examine modes of transportation to school for Georgia children, the Georgia Division of Public Health analyzed data from the Georgia Asthma Survey conducted during May-August 2000. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which indicate that < 19% of Georgia school-aged children who live < or = 1 mile from school walk to school the majority of days of the week. Statewide surveillance data of school transportation modes should be collected to monitor prevalence of walking to school. PMID:12206285

  6. Student Enrollment Forecasting in Georgia: Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Tak Cheung; Pool, Harbison; Davidson, Ronald

    2002-01-01

    Study of school district enrollment forecasting in Georgia finds, for example, differences in forecasting accuracy between large and small school districts, the widespread use of the Cohort Survival Technique, a lag in small school districts' use of sophisticated, computer-based enrollment forecasting models. (Contains 34 references.) (PKP)

  7. Can Georgia growers replace methyl bromide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The price and availability of methyl bromide is limiting its use on Georgia farms; the need for an alternative is essential for sustainable vegetable production in GA. Three alternatives were evaluated in on-farm trials in the spring 2007 in Tift, Colquitt and Echols Counties. Treatments were replic...

  8. Comparative analysis of Multiple risks in the Western part of Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsereteli, N.; Chelidze, T.; Varazanashvili, O.; Amiranashvili, A.

    2009-04-01

    Georgia is prone to catastrophes. In the last two decades, there have occurred the following natural disasters: (a) Avalanches in Svaneti and Khevsureti, (b) landslides in the mountainous Achara, floods, (c) hurricane and drought in West and East Georgia, (d) Racha earthquake of 1991 and (e) the Tbilisi Earthquake of 2002. These phenomena are very special both from ecological and from social-economical points of view. By the disaster risk index obtained by the UNDP, Georgia is similar to countries with medium and high level risk. Therefore, natural disasters in Georgia are considered as a negative factor in the development process of the country. This implies the necessity of more active actions by all possible means to reduce the risk of natural disasters at each level and maintain the sustainable economic development of the country, including good education at the universities and schools for real understanding of natural hazards. The main goal of the work here is the assessment of 12 widespread natural disasters and multiple risks for political districts in West Georgia. These natural disasters include earthquakes, landslides, avalanches, floods, mudflows, droughts, hurricanes, lightning, hail, glaze, freezes, mists. The research was based on the following steps: (a) Creation of electronic detailed databases of natural disasters that occurred in Georgia. These databases consist of the parameters of such hazardous phenomena class that caused natural disasters. (b) Quantitative investigation of energetic and spatial-time regularities of 12 natural disasters for the territory of Georgia. Estimation of people and environment (technosphere) vulnerability. (c) Elaboration of mathematical models and algorithms of disasters multiple risks taking into account the concrete conditions: (i) Sharing and generalization of gathered experience in the world. This allows more proper and wide comparison of the multiple risks of Caucasus countries; (ii) Taking into account the

  9. Obstetric Provider Maldistribution: Georgia, USA, 2011.

    PubMed

    Spelke, Bridget; Zertuche, Adrienne D; Rochat, Roger

    2016-07-01

    Objectives In 2010, Georgia had the nation's highest maternal mortality rate, sixteenth highest infant mortality rate, and a waning obstetrician/gynecologist (ob/gyn) workforce. Statewide ob/gyn workforce data, however, masked obstetric-specific care shortages and regional variation in obstetric services. The Georgia Maternal and Infant Health Research Group thereby assessed each Georgia region's obstetric provider workforce to identify service-deficient areas. Methods We identified 63 birthing facilities in the 82 Primary Care Service Areas (PCSAs) outside metropolitan Atlanta and interviewed nurse managers and others to assess the age, sex, and expected departure year of each delivering professional. Using accepted annual delivery rates of 155 per obstetrician (OB), 100 per certified nurse midwife (CNM), and 70 per family medicine physician (FP) we converted obstetric providers into "OB equivalents" to standardize obstetric services available in any given area. Using facility births and computed OB equivalents (contemporary and 2020 estimates), we calculated current and projected average annual births per provider (AABP) for each PCSA, categorizing its obstetric provider workforce as "adequate" (AABP < 144), "at risk" (144 ≤ AABP ≤ 166), or "deficient" (AABP > 166). We mapped results using ArcGIS. Results Of 82 surveyed PCSAs, 52 % (43) were deficient in obstetric care; 16 % (13) had a shortage and 37 % (30) lacked obstetric providers entirely. There were no delivering FPs in 89 % (73) of PCSAs and no CNMs in 70 % (56). If Georgia fails to recruit delivering providers, 72 % (58/77) of PCSAs will have deficient or no obstetric care by 2020. Conclusions Obstetric provider shortages in Georgia hinder access to prenatal and delivery services. Care-deficient areas will expand if recruitment and retention of delivering professionals does not improve.

  10. Fresh Groundwater Resources in Georgia and Management Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaprindashvili, George; Gaprindashvili, Merab

    2015-04-01

    Fresh water represents conditioned factor for human body's life. That's why the superiority of drinking water is recognized as human body's priority according to the international declarations. World is experiencing deficit of quality water. Natural Disasters caused by the pollution of the fresh groundwater is also very painful and acute, because it needed more time, more material and financial means for the liquidation of their results, and what the most important practically is, it is impossible to renew the initial natural conditions completely. All these conditions that the rational use of fresh groundwater passed by the interests of separate countries and became worldwide, international problem - fresh water became as considerable raw material for the worlds import and export. The fresh groundwater place the important role among the water recourses of Georgia. Their existing is considerably connected to the development of industry and agriculture, also with water supply issue of populated area. Groundwater management requires precise knowledge of sources (aquifers). Monitoring of Georgia's most important aquifers started many years ago and has provided large amount of data. This was interrupted at the beginning of the 1990s. It could be noted that fresh water existing in the country is distinguished with high quality. According to the mineralization and temperature parameters groundwater is generally divided into the following groups: 1) Fresh drinking waters (mineralization not exceeding 1.0 g/l); 2) Mineral waters (mineralization over 1.0 g/l); 3) Thermal waters -- healing (20˚C - 35˚C), Geothermal (40˚C - 108˚C). Below we present briefly review about the situation of fresh groundwater resources, started recovery of groundwater monitoring network and the analysis of the management problems.

  11. Incidence and Pathogenicity of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes Associated with Blueberry (Vaccinium spp.) Replant Disease in Georgia and North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Jagdale, Ganpati B.; Holladay, Ted; Brannen, P. M.; Cline, W. O.; Agudelo, P.; Nyczepir, A. P.; Noe, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Blueberry replant disease (BRD) is an emerging threat to continued blueberry (Vaccinium spp.) production in Georgia and North Carolina. Since high populations of ring nematode Mesocriconema ornatum were found to be associated with commercially grown blueberries in Georgia, we hypothesized that M. ornatum may be responsible for predisposing blueberry to BRD. We therefore tested the pathogenicity of M. ornatum on 10-wk-old Rabbiteye blueberries (Vaccinium virgatum) by inoculating with initial populations (Pi) of 0 (water control), 10, 100, 1,000. and 10,000 mixed stages of M. ornatum/pot under both greenhouse (25 ± 2°C) and field microplot conditions. Nematode soil population densities and reproduction rates were assessed 75, 150, 225, and 255, and 75, 150, 225, and 375 d after inoculation (DAI) in both the greenhouse and field experiments, respectively. Plant growth parameters were recorded in the greenhouse and field microplot experiments at 255 and 375 DAI, respectively. The highest M. ornatum population density occurred with the highest Pi level, at 75 and 150 DAI under both greenhouse (P < 0.01) and field (P < 0.01) conditions. However, M. ornatum rate of reproduction increased significantly in pots receiving the lowest Pi level of 10 nematodes/plant compared with the pots receiving Pi levels of 100, 1,000, and 10,000 nematodes 75 DAI. Plant-parasitic nematode populations were determined in commercial blueberry replant sites in Georgia and North Carolina during the 2010 growing season. Mesocriconema ornatum and Dolichodorus spp. were the predominant plant-parasitic nematodes in Georgia and North Carolina, respectively, with M. ornatum occurring in nearly half the blueberry fields sampled in Georgia. Other nematode genera detected in both states included Tylenchorhynchus spp., Hoplolaimus spp., Hemicycliophora spp., and Xiphinema spp. Paratrichodorus spp. was also found only in Georgia. In Georgia, our results indicate that blueberry is a host for M. ornatum

  12. A resurrection experiment finds evidence of both reduced genetic diversity and potential adaptive evolution in the agricultural weed Ipomoea purpurea.

    PubMed

    Kuester, Adam; Wilson, Ariana; Chang, Shu-Mei; Baucom, Regina S

    2016-09-01

    Despite the negative economic and ecological impact of weeds, relatively little is known about the evolutionary mechanisms that influence their persistence in agricultural fields. Here, we use a resurrection approach to examine the potential for genotypic and phenotypic evolution in Ipomoea purpurea, an agricultural weed that is resistant to glyphosate, the most widely used herbicide in current-day agriculture. We found striking reductions in allelic diversity between cohorts sampled nine years apart (2003 vs. 2012), suggesting that populations of this species sampled from agricultural fields have experienced genetic bottleneck events that have led to lower neutral genetic diversity. Heterozygosity excess tests indicate that these bottlenecks may have occurred prior to 2003. A greenhouse assay of individuals sampled from the field as seed found that populations of this species, on average, exhibited modest increases in herbicide resistance over time. However, populations differed significantly between sampling years for resistance: some populations maintained high resistance between the sampling years whereas others exhibited increased or decreased resistance. Our results show that populations of this noxious weed, capable of adapting to strong selection imparted by herbicide application, may lose genetic variation as a result of this or other environmental factors. We probably uncovered only modest increases in resistance on average between sampling cohorts due to a strong and previously identified fitness cost of resistance in this species, along with the potential that nonresistant migrants germinate from the seed bank.

  13. A resurrection experiment finds evidence of both reduced genetic diversity and potential adaptive evolution in the agricultural weed Ipomoea purpurea.

    PubMed

    Kuester, Adam; Wilson, Ariana; Chang, Shu-Mei; Baucom, Regina S

    2016-09-01

    Despite the negative economic and ecological impact of weeds, relatively little is known about the evolutionary mechanisms that influence their persistence in agricultural fields. Here, we use a resurrection approach to examine the potential for genotypic and phenotypic evolution in Ipomoea purpurea, an agricultural weed that is resistant to glyphosate, the most widely used herbicide in current-day agriculture. We found striking reductions in allelic diversity between cohorts sampled nine years apart (2003 vs. 2012), suggesting that populations of this species sampled from agricultural fields have experienced genetic bottleneck events that have led to lower neutral genetic diversity. Heterozygosity excess tests indicate that these bottlenecks may have occurred prior to 2003. A greenhouse assay of individuals sampled from the field as seed found that populations of this species, on average, exhibited modest increases in herbicide resistance over time. However, populations differed significantly between sampling years for resistance: some populations maintained high resistance between the sampling years whereas others exhibited increased or decreased resistance. Our results show that populations of this noxious weed, capable of adapting to strong selection imparted by herbicide application, may lose genetic variation as a result of this or other environmental factors. We probably uncovered only modest increases in resistance on average between sampling cohorts due to a strong and previously identified fitness cost of resistance in this species, along with the potential that nonresistant migrants germinate from the seed bank. PMID:27357067

  14. Just How Much Can School Pupils Learn from School Gardening? A Study of Two Supervised Agricultural Experience Approaches in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okiror, John James; Matsiko, Biryabaho Frank; Oonyu, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    School systems in Africa are short of skills that link well with rural communities, yet arguments to vocationalize curricula remain mixed and school agriculture lacks the supervised practical component. This study, conducted in eight primary (elementary) schools in Uganda, sought to compare the learning achievement of pupils taught using…

  15. The Impact of Invisibility on the Health of Migrant Farmworkers in the Southeastern United States: A Case Study from Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Bail, Kari M.; Foster, Jennifer; Dalmida, Safiya George; Kelly, Ursula; Howett, Maeve; Ferranti, Erin P.; Wold, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Migrant farmworkers represent one of the most marginalized and underserved populations in the United States. Acculturation theory cannot be easily mapped onto the transnational experience of migrant farmworkers, who navigate multiple physical and cultural spaces yearly, and who are not recognized by the state they constitute, “the Citizen's Other” (Kerber, 2009). This paper utilizes narrative analysis of a case study to illustrate, through the relationship of the narrator to migrant farmworkers and years of participant observation by the coauthors, how isolation from family and community, as well as invisibility within institutions, affect the health and well-being of migrant farmworkers in southeastern Georgia. Invisibility of farmworkers within institutions, such as health care, the educational system, social services, domestic violence shelters, and churches contribute to illness among farmworkers. The dominant American discourse surrounding immigration policy addresses the strain immigrants put on the social systems, educational system, and the health care system. Nurses who work with farmworkers are well positioned to bring the subjective experience of farmworkers to light, especially for those engaged with socially just policies. Those who contribute to the abundant agricultural produce that feeds Americans deserve the recognition upon which social integration depends. PMID:22830007

  16. The impact of invisibility on the health of migrant farmworkers in the southeastern United States: a case study from georgia.

    PubMed

    Bail, Kari M; Foster, Jennifer; Dalmida, Safiya George; Kelly, Ursula; Howett, Maeve; Ferranti, Erin P; Wold, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Migrant farmworkers represent one of the most marginalized and underserved populations in the United States. Acculturation theory cannot be easily mapped onto the transnational experience of migrant farmworkers, who navigate multiple physical and cultural spaces yearly, and who are not recognized by the state they constitute, "the Citizen's Other" (Kerber, 2009). This paper utilizes narrative analysis of a case study to illustrate, through the relationship of the narrator to migrant farmworkers and years of participant observation by the coauthors, how isolation from family and community, as well as invisibility within institutions, affect the health and well-being of migrant farmworkers in southeastern Georgia. Invisibility of farmworkers within institutions, such as health care, the educational system, social services, domestic violence shelters, and churches contribute to illness among farmworkers. The dominant American discourse surrounding immigration policy addresses the strain immigrants put on the social systems, educational system, and the health care system. Nurses who work with farmworkers are well positioned to bring the subjective experience of farmworkers to light, especially for those engaged with socially just policies. Those who contribute to the abundant agricultural produce that feeds Americans deserve the recognition upon which social integration depends.

  17. FARMS: The Flexible Agricultural Robotics Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul S.

    1991-01-01

    A technology utilization project was established with the Marshall Space Flight Center and the University of Georgia to develop an Earth-based, robotic end effector to process live plant (geranium) material which will improve productivity and efficiency in agricultural systems such as commercial nurseries and greenhouse systems. The aim is to apply this technology to NASA's presence in space, including permanently manned space stations and manned planetary communities requiring large scale food production needs.

  18. STEM Career Cluster Engineering and Technology Education pathway in Georgia: Perceptions of Georgia engineering and technology education high school teachers and CTAE administrators as measured by the Characteristics of Engineering and Technology Education survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crenshaw, Mark VanBuren

    This study examined the perceptions held by Georgia Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Career Cluster Engineering and Technology Education (ETE) high school pathway teachers and Georgia's Career, Technical and Agriculture Education (CTAE) administrators regarding the ETE pathway and its effect on implementation within their district and schools. It provides strategies for ETE teaching methods, curriculum content, STEM integration, and how to improve the ETE pathway program of study. Current teaching and curricular trends were examined in ETE as well as the role ETE should play as related to STEM education. The study, using the Characteristics of Engineering and Technology Education Survey, was conducted to answer the following research questions: (a) Is there a significant difference in the perception of ETE teaching methodology between Georgia ETE high school teachers and CTAE administrators as measured by the Characteristics of Engineering and Technology Education Survey? (b) Is there a significant difference in the perception of ETE curriculum content between Georgia ETE high school teachers and CTAE administrators as measured by the Characteristics of Engineering and Technology Education Survey? (c) Is there a significant difference in the perception of STEM integration in the ETE high school pathway between Georgia ETE high school teachers and CTAE administrators as measured by the Characteristics of Engineering and Technology Education Survey? and (d) Is there a significant difference in the perception of how to improve the ETE high school pathway between Georgia ETE high school teachers and CTAE administrators as measured by the Characteristics of Engineering and Technology Education Survey? Suggestions for further research also were offered.

  19. Preservice Agricultural Education Teachers' Sense of Teaching Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stripling, Christopher; Ricketts, John C.; Roberts, T. Grady; Harlin, Julie F.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a longitudinal examination of the teaching self-efficacy of preservice agricultural education teachers. Data were collected for two years at The University of Georgia and Texas A&M University during the Fall 2004 and Spring 2005 and the Fall 2005 and Spring 2006 semesters (N = 102). Data were collected at…

  20. Agricultural Water Conservation via Conservation Tillage and Thermal Infrared

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Georgia water conservation is an issue that involves all citizens. Within the agricultural row crop community, water is a very important part of producing a harvestable and profitable product. Although irrigation is used only as a supplement to natural rainfall, it can greatly affect crop yield...

  1. Thermal Infrared Imagery for Better Water Conservation in Agricultural Fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water conservation is an issue that involves all citizens in Georgia. Within the agricultural row crop community, water is a very important part of producing a harvestable and profitable product. Although irrigation is used only as a supplement to natural rainfall, it can greatly affect crop yield...

  2. Research Proposal for the Design and Engineering Phase of a Solar Heating and Cooling System Experiment at the Warner Robins Public Library, Warner Robins, Georgia. Submitted to the United States Energy Research and Development Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Warren H.; And Others

    A number of reasons are advanced to include a solar heating and cooling experiment in a library building. The unique aspects of the experiment are to be a seasonally adjustable collector tilt and testing of a new generation of absorption air conditioners. After a brief description of the proposed experiment, the proposal contains forms filed by…

  3. Astronomy in Georgia - Present Status and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todua, M.

    2016-09-01

    Astronomy in Georgia is generally represented in Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory found in 1932. It is one of the leading scientific institutes in the country. Main fields of research are solar system bodies (including near-Earth asteroids), various aspects of solar physics, stellar astronomy (including binary stars and open clusters), extragalactic objects (AGNs), theoretical astrophysics, cosmology, atmospheric and solar-terrestrial physics. Several telescopes are operational today, as well as the instruments for atmospheric studies. In 2007 the Observatory was integrated with Ilia State University, merging scientific research and education which facilitated the growth of a new generation of researchers. There are groups of astronomers and astrophysicists in other Georgian universities and institutions as well. Georgian scientists collaborate with research centers and universities worldwide. Research groups participate in various international scientific projects. The interest in astronomy in Georgia has been growing, which increases future perspectives of its development in the country.

  4. Biogeochemical cycling in the Strait of Georgia.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, S C; Macdonald, R W; Burd, B; van Roodselaar, A

    2008-12-01

    The papers in this special issue present the results of a five-year project to study sedimentary biogeochemical processes in the Strait of Georgia, with special emphasis on the near-field of a large municipal outfall. Included in this special issue are overviews of the sedimentology, benthic biology, status of siliceous sponge reefs and distribution of organic carbon in the water column. Other papers address the cycling of contaminants (PCBs, PBDEs) and redox metals in the sediment, a method to map the extent of the influence of municipal effluent from staining on benthic bivalves, and the relationships among geochemical conditions and benthic abundance and diversity. The latter set of papers addresses the role of municipal effluent as a pathway of organic carbon and other contaminants into the Strait of Georgia and the effect of the effluent on benthic geochemistry and biology. PMID:19022498

  5. Ground-water conditions in Georgia, 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joiner, C.N.; Cressler, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    Ground-water conditions during 1993 and recent ground-water level and quality trends in Georgia were evaluated using data from precipitation, ground-water, and ground-water quality monitoring networks. Data for 1993 included in this report are from precipitation records from 10 National Weather Service stations, continuous water-level records from 72 wells, and chloride analyses from 13 wells. Annual mean ground-water levels in Georgia in 1993 ranged from about 3.2 feet higher to about 9.6 feet lower than in 1992. Of the 72 wells summarized in this report, 30 wells had annual mean water levels that were higher and 42 wells had annual mean water levels that were lower in 1993 than in 1992. Record-high daily mean water levels were recorded in one well tapping the surficial aquifer, one well tapping the Upper Floridan aquifer, one well tapping the Claiborne aquifer, and one well tapping the crystalline- rock aquifers. These record highs were from about 0.1 to 0.7 feet higher than previous record highs. Record-low daily mean water levels were recorded in one well tapping the surficial aquifer, two wells tapping the Upper Floridan aquifer, four wells tapping the Cretaceous aquifer, one well tapping the Dublin-Midville aquifer system, and one well tapping the crystalline-rock aquifers. These record lows were from about 0.1 foot to 7.2 feet lower than the previous record lows. Chloride concentration in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer in most of coastal Georgia was below drinking water standards established by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and has not changed appreciably with time. However, chloride concentration in water from some wells that tap the Floridan aquifer system in the Brunswick area exceeds the drinking water standards.

  6. Ground-Water Data for Georgia, 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joiner, Charles N.; Peck, Michael F.; Reynolds, Mark S.; Stayton, Welby L.

    1989-01-01

    Continuous water-level records from 144 wells and water-level measurements from an additional 617 wells in Georgia during 1988 provide the basic data for this report. Daily mean water-level hydrographs for selected wells illustrate the effects that changes ln recharge and discharge have had on the ground-water reservoirs in the State during 1988. Monthly mean water levels are shown for the 10-year period 1979-88. Maps showing the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer for Hay 1988 and the Claiborne and Clayton aquifers for October 1988 also are presented. Annual mean water levels in Georgia generally were below those measured in 1987; water levels ranged from 6.9 feet higher to 7.3 feet lower. Record-low water levels were measured during the last half of 1988 in 18 wells tapping the crystalline rock aquifer, the Cretaceous rock aquifer system, the Midville aquifer system, and the Clayton, Upper Floridan, and upper Brunswick aquifers. These record lows were from 0.1 to 1.4 feet lower than the previous record lows. A prolonged drought resulted in decreased recharge to the aquifers and increased ground-water pumping, which caused water levels to decline. Water-quality samples collected periodically throughout Georgia are analyzed as part of areal and regional ground-water studies. Maps showing chloride concentrations in the Upper Floridan aquifer in October 1988 in coastal Georgia and in the Savannah and Brunswick areas are presented. Periodic monitoring of water quality in the Savannah and Brunswick areas indicates that chloride concentrations in the Upper Floridan generally have remained stable.

  7. The Continental Margins Program in Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cocker, M.D.; Shapiro, E.A.

    1999-01-01

    From 1984 to 1993, the Georgia Geologic Survey (GGS) participated in the Minerals Management Service-funded Continental Margins Program. Geological and geophysical data acquisition focused on offshore stratigraphic framework studies, phosphate-bearing Miocene-age strata, distribution of heavy minerals, near-surface alternative sources of groundwater, and development of a PC-based Coastal Geographic Information System (GIS). Seven GGS publications document results of those investigations. In addition to those publications, direct benefits of the GGS's participation include an impetus to the GGS's investigations of economic minerals on the Georgia coast, establishment of a GIS that includes computer hardware and software, and seeds for additional investigations through the information and training acquired as a result of the Continental Margins Program. These addtional investigations are quite varied in scope, and many were made possible because of GIS expertise gained as a result of the Continental Margins Program. Future investigations will also reap the benefits of the Continental Margins Program.From 1984 to 1993, the Georgia Geologic Survey (GGS) participated in the Minerals Management Service-funded Continental Margins Program. Geological and geophysical data acquisition focused on offshore stratigraphic framework studies, phosphate-bearing Miocene-age strata, distribution of heavy minerals, near-surface alternative sources of groundwater, and development of a PC-based Coastal Geographic Information System (GIS). Seven GGS publications document results of those investigations. In addition to those publications, direct benefits of the GGS's participation include an impetus to the GGS's investigations of economic minerals on the Georgia coast, establishment of a GIS that includes computer hardware and software, and seeds for additional investigations through the information and training acquired as a result of the Continental Margins Program. These additional

  8. Utilizing NASA Earth Observations to Monitor Sinkhole Development and Identify Risk Areas in Dougherty County, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahalan, M. D.; Berry, K.; Amin, M.; Xu, W.; Hu, T.; Milewski, A.

    2015-12-01

    Located in southwest Georgia, Dougherty County has a growing populace in an agricultural region that relies heavily on groundwater resources. Partly due to escalated groundwater extraction, this area has experienced an increase in sinkhole development over the last decade. Sinkholes pose a threat to infrastructure development, groundwater pollution, and land use operations. The NASA DEVELOP Georgia Disasters and Water Resources team partnered with the City of Albany and Dougherty County Planning and Development Services (PDS) and the Southwest Georgia Water Resources Task Force (SGWRTF) to assess past sinkhole development and identify areas susceptible to future sinkhole formation. Sinkhole mapping was completed utilizing a time-series of elevation data (1999 - 2011) from NASA's SRTM and ASTER missions, as well as European Remote-Sensing (ERS-1 and 2) satellite-derived elevation data. The sinkhole inventory maps and spatial statistical techniques (i.e., geographically-weighted regression) were employed to quantify the factors most influential in sinkhole development. With those results, the susceptibility of every area within Dougherty County to future sinkhole formation was identified. The results of this applied science project will enable the PDS and SGWRTF to make informed decisions on current and future land use, safe infrastructure development, and sustainable water resource management.

  9. Normal streamflows and water levels continue—Summary of hydrologic conditions in Georgia, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knaak, Andrew E.; Ankcorn, Paul D.; Peck, Michael F.

    2016-03-31

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) South Atlantic Water Science Center (SAWSC) Georgia office, in cooperation with local, State, and other Federal agencies, maintains a long-term hydrologic monitoring network of more than 350 real-time, continuous-record, streamflow-gaging stations (streamgages). The network includes 14 real-time lake-level monitoring stations, 72 real-time surface-water-quality monitors, and several water-quality sampling programs. Additionally, the SAWSC Georgia office operates more than 204 groundwater monitoring wells, 39 of which are real-time. The wide-ranging coverage of streamflow, reservoir, and groundwater monitoring sites allows for a comprehensive view of hydrologic conditions across the State. One of the many benefits this monitoring network provides is a spatially distributed overview of the hydrologic conditions of creeks, rivers, reservoirs, and aquifers in Georgia.Streamflow and groundwater data are verified throughout the year by USGS hydrographers and made available to water-resource managers, recreationists, and Federal, State, and local agencies. Hydrologic conditions are determined by comparing the statistical analyses of data collected during the current water year to historical data. Changing hydrologic conditions underscore the need for accurate, timely data to allow informed decisions about the management and conservation of Georgia’s water resources for agricultural, recreational, ecological, and water-supply needs and in protecting life and property.

  10. Cesium-137 levels detected in Georgia otters

    SciTech Connect

    Halbrook, R.S.; Jenkins, J.H.

    1988-11-01

    Beginning in the 1940's and continuing through the 50's and early 60's, nuclear devices were tested by aerial detonation in the United States and other countries around the world. Cesium-137 (/sup 137/Cs) is one of the most important radionuclide by-products due to its abundance and slow decay (30-year half-life). The uptake of /sup 137/Cs in animal tissue is the result of its similarity to potassium. The somatic and genetic effects of /sup 137/Cs, along with its effect on reproductive cells, can pose great hazards to wildlife species. A reported buildup of /sup 137/Cs in white-tailed deer in the lower coastal plain of Georgia during the 1960's was followed by a gradual decline during the 1970's. Although numerous studies have involved terrestrial mammals of Georgia, few have involved aquatic mammals such as the river otter. With continued atmospheric testing by some foreign countries and the increased use of nuclear power as an energy source, there is a need for continued monitoring of radionuclides in wildlife to ascertain the quality of the environment. This study was initiated as part of an overall study of environmental pollutants in the river otter of Georgia and deals with analysis of the /sup 137/Cs accumulations in this species.

  11. Water resources activities, Georgia District, 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casteel, Carolyn A.; Ballew, Mary D.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, through its Water Resources Division , investigates the occurrence, quantity, quality, distribution, and movement of the surface and underground water that composes the Nation 's water resources. Much of the work is a cooperative effort in which planning and financial support are shared by state and local governments and other federal agencies. This report contains a brief description of the water-resources investigations in Georgia in which the Geological Survey participates, and a list of selected references. Water-resources data for the 1985 water year for Georgia consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and groundwater levels. These data include discharge records for 108 gaging stations; water quality for 43 continuous stations, 109 periodic stations, and miscellaneous sites; peak stage and discharge only for 130 crest-stage partial-record stations and 44 miscellaneous sites; and water levels of 27 observation wells. Nineteen Georgia District projects are summarized. (Lantz-PTT)

  12. Flood-flow characteristics of Nancy Creek at Georgia Highway 400 extension near Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, McGlone; Hess, Glen W.

    1987-01-01

    The Highway Division, Georgia Department of Transportation, plans the extension of Georgia Highway 400 from Interstate 285 southward to Interstate 85. As part of this extension, the Highway Division plans construction of a bridge crossing Nancy Creek near Atlanta, Georgia. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Highway Division, determined the flood flow characteristics of Nancy Creek near the bridge crossing. The flood frequency, elevation discharge relation, flood profiles, floodway, and flood flow effects were determined. The maximum backwater effect for the proposed bridge and relocated channel was 0.2 ft for the 100-yr flood. The relocated channel will drastically shorten flow length near the proposed State Highway 400 extension and reduce the 100-yr flood elevation between one and two ft from existing conditions between the proposed site and Windsor Parkway. (Author 's abstract)

  13. Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Combination Smokestack, Water Tank & Privies, Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  14. Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Brick Storage Vaults under Jones Street, Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  15. Field experiments of Controlled Drainage of agricultural clay soils show positive effects on water quantity (retention, runoff) and water quality (nitrate leaching).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    schipper, peter; stuyt, lodewijk; straat, van der, andre; schans, van der, martin

    2014-05-01

    Despite best management practices, agriculture is still facing major challenges to reduce nutrients leaching to the aquatic environment. In deltas, most of total nutrient losses from artificially drained agricultural soils are discharged via drains. Controlled drainage is a promising measure to prevent drainage of valuable nutrients, improve water quality and agricultural yield and adapt to climate change (reduce peak runoff, manage water scarcity and drought). In The Netherlands, this technique has attracted much attention by water managers and farmers alike, yet field studies to determine the expected (positive) effects for Dutch conditions were scarce. Recently, a field experiment was set up on clay soils. Research questions were: how does controlled, subsurface drainage perform on clay soils? Will deeper tile drains function just as well? What are the effects on drain water quality (especially with respect to nitrogen and salt) and crop yield? An agricultural field on clay soils was used to test different tile drainage configurations. Four types of tile drainage systems were installed, all in duplicate: eight plots in total. Each plot has its own outlet to a control box, where equipment was installed to control drain discharge and to measure the flow, concentrations of macro-ions, pH, nitrogen, N-isotopes and heavy metals. In each plot, groundwater observation wells and suction cups are installed in the saturated and vadose zones, at different depths, and crop yield is determined. Four plots discharge into a hydrologic isolated ditch, enabling the determination of water- and nutrient balances. Automatic drain water samplers and innovative nitrate sensors were installed in four plots. These enable identification and unravelling so-called first flush effects (changes in concentrations after a storm event). Water-, chloride- and nitrogen balances have been set up, and the interaction between groundwater and surface water has been quantified. The hydrological

  16. Managing soil nutrients with compost in organic farms of East Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghambashidze, Giorgi

    2013-04-01

    Soil Fertility management in organic farming relies on a long-term integrated approach rather than the more short-term very targeted solutions common in conventional agriculture. Increasing soil organic matter content through the addition of organic amendments has proven to be a valuable practice for maintaining or restoring soil quality. Organic agriculture relies greatly on building soil organic matter with compost typically replacing inorganic fertilizers and animal manure as the fertility source of choice. In Georgia, more and more attention is paid to the development of organic farming, occupying less than 1% of total agricultural land of the country. Due to increased interest towards organic production the question about soil amendments is arising with special focus on organic fertilizers as basic nutrient supply sources under organic management practice. In the frame of current research two different types of compost was prepared and their nutritional value was studied. The one was prepared from organic fraction municipal solid waste and another one using fruit processing residues. In addition to main nutritional properties both composts were tested on heavy metals content, as one of the main quality parameter. The results have shown that concentration of main nutrient is higher in municipal solid waste compost, but it contains also more heavy metals, which is not allowed in organic farming system. Fruit processing residue compost also has lower pH value and is lower in total salt content being is more acceptable for soil in lowlands of East Georgia, mainly characterised by alkaline reaction. .

  17. Relighting demonstration project Robins Air Force Base, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, L.L.; Purcell, C.W.; McKay, H.; Harris, L.

    1994-09-01

    Significant energy savings are available through relighting with modern, energy efficient systems. As a demonstration, a relighting project was recently completed at Robins Air Force Base, Warner-Robins, Georgia. The project was designed to overcome a reluctance to pursue large scale relighting of the entire facility due to prior unfavorable experiences and an unusually large non-office working environment. The project followed contemporary lighting design practices, with the added dimension of involving building occupants in the process. Involving building occupants promoted their acceptance of the project and provided needed critical feedback. Their involvement helped secure their assistance in resolving special design concerns involving radio frequency interference and glare. Although often cited as simple, relighting projects are commonly confronted with problems. This document describes problems, foreseen and unforeseen, encountered by this relighting demonstration, and their solutions.

  18. Surface complexation model of uranyl sorption on Georgia kaolinite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payne, T.E.; Davis, J.A.; Lumpkin, G.R.; Chisari, R.; Waite, T.D.

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption of uranyl on standard Georgia kaolinites (KGa-1 and KGa-1B) was studied as a function of pH (3-10), total U (1 and 10 ??mol/l), and mass loading of clay (4 and 40 g/l). The uptake of uranyl in air-equilibrated systems increased with pH and reached a maximum in the near-neutral pH range. At higher pH values, the sorption decreased due to the presence of aqueous uranyl carbonate complexes. One kaolinite sample was examined after the uranyl uptake experiments by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to determine the U content. It was found that uranium was preferentially adsorbed by Ti-rich impurity phases (predominantly anatase), which are present in the kaolinite samples. Uranyl sorption on the Georgia kaolinites was simulated with U sorption reactions on both titanol and aluminol sites, using a simple non-electrostatic surface complexation model (SCM). The relative amounts of U-binding >TiOH and >AlOH sites were estimated from the TEM/EDS results. A ternary uranyl carbonate complex on the titanol site improved the fit to the experimental data in the higher pH range. The final model contained only three optimised log K values, and was able to simulate adsorption data across a wide range of experimental conditions. The >TiOH (anatase) sites appear to play an important role in retaining U at low uranyl concentrations. As kaolinite often contains trace TiO2, its presence may need to be taken into account when modelling the results of sorption experiments with radionuclides or trace metals on kaolinite. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Nationwide Assessment of Seismic Hazard for Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsereteli, N. S.; Varazanashvili, O.; Mumladze, T.

    2014-12-01

    The work presents a framework for assessment of seismic hazards on national level for the Georgia. Based on a historical review of the compilation of seismic hazard zoning maps for the Georgia became evident that there were gaps in seismic hazard assessment and the present normative seismic hazard map needed a careful recalculation. The methodology for the probabilistic assessment of seismic hazard used here includes the following steps: produce comprehensive catalogue of historical earthquakes (up to 1900) and the period of instrumental observations with uniform scale of magnitudes; produce models of seismic source zones (SSZ) and their parameterization; develop appropriate ground motion prediction equation (GMPE) models; develop seismic hazard curves for spectral amplitudes at each period and maps in digital format. Firstly, the new seismic catalog of Georgia was created, with 1700 eqs from ancient times on 2012, Mw³4.0. Secondly, were allocated seismic source zones (SSZ). The identification of area SSZ was obtained on the bases of structural geology, parameters of seismicity and seismotectonics. In constructing the SSZ, the slope of the appropriate active fault plane, the width of the dynamic influence of the fault, power of seismoactive layer are taken into account. Finally each SSZ was defined with the parameters: the geometry, the percentage of focal mechanism, predominant azimuth and dip angle values, activity rates, maximum magnitude, hypocenter depth distribution, lower and upper seismogenic depth values. Thirdly, seismic hazard maps were calculated based on modern approach of selecting and ranking global and regional ground motion prediction equation for region. Finally, probabilistic seismic hazard assessment in terms of ground acceleration were calculated for the territory of Georgia. On the basis of obtained area seismic sources probabilistic seismic hazard maps were calculated showing peak ground acceleration (PGA) and spectral accelerations (SA) at

  20. Ground-water conditions in Georgia, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cressler, Alan M.

    2000-01-01

    Ground-water conditions in Georgia during 1999 and for the period of record were evaluated using data from U.S. Geological Survey ground-water-level and ground-water-quality monitoring networks. Data for 1999 included in this report are from continuous water-level records from 130 wells and chloride analyses from 14 wells. Data from one well is incomplete because data collection was discontinued. Chloride concentration in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer in most of coastal Georgia was within drinking-water standards established by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In the Savannah area, chloride concentration has not changed appreciably with time. However, chloride concentration in water from some wells that tap the Floridan aquifer system in the Brunswick area exceeds the drinking-water standards. Ground-water-level and ground-water-quality data are essential for water assessment and management. Ground-water-level fluctuations and trends can be used to estimate changes in aquifer storage resulting from the effects of ground-water withdrawal and recharge from precipitation. These data can be used to address water-management needs and to evaluate the effects of management and conservation programs. As part of the ground-water investigations conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the State of Georgia and city and county governments, a Statewide water-level-measurement program was started in 1938. Initially, this program consisted of an observation-well network in the coastal area of Georgia to monitor variations in ground-water storage and quality. Additional wells were later included in areas where data could be used to aid in water resources development and management. During 1999, periodic water-level measurements were made in 46 wells, and continuous water-level measurements were obtained from 165 wells. Continuous water-level records were obtained using analog (pen and chart

  1. [ETHIOLOGY OF LEPTOSPIROSIS IN GEORGIA].

    PubMed

    Mamuchishvili, N; Kuchuloria, T; Mchedlishvili, I; Imnadze, P; Mirzashvili, D

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of leptospirosis was initiated in 1950s, when the first cases in humans were detected in Gudauta rayon. Serology test confirmed the diagnose. High level of antibodies to serogroup Pomona was revealed in all cases. Later on the infection encountered as sporadic cases, the exception was 1986, when a large outbreak was reported in Sukhumi. At present leptospirosis is widely spread in the country, especially in Ajara region, where indicators of morbidity recently reached 11.4 per 100 thousand population. It is likely that warm humid climate creates exceptionally favorite conditions for spreading of Leptospira. In order to determine the true magnitude of the infection in the country a seroprevalence study was carried out in 50-60-ies of the past century in humans, agricultural animals and rodents. It was found that serotgroups Pomona, Icteroheamorrhagiae and Grippothypos prevailed in humans, Serogroup L. Pomona - dominated in animals, while in rodents the dominated serotgrouo was L. Icteroheamorrhagiae. Similar study, conducted by us in 1990-2005 showed that L.Pomona and L. Icteroheamorrhagiae prevailed in humans and rodents while L. Icteroheamorrhagiae was the only serogroup isolated in gray rats, trapped in Tbilisi. Infectivity of rodants composed 70%. Currently lesptosirosis is caused by a new serogroups of Leptospira - L. Sejroe, namely by serotypes Wolfii and Hardjo, L. Australis (serotype Bratislava) and L. Autumnalis along with the previously occurring serogroups L. Icteroheamorrhagiae, L. Bataviae, L. Hebdomadis. In our opinion the recent increase in leptospirosis in the country is attributable to the improvements in diagnostics of the infection as well as to the emergence of new serogroups of Leptospira, which in turn is a result of intensive migration processes in the country. PMID:26177144

  2. Theme: In-Agriculture Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Jack, Ed.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Seven theme articles review the history and philosophy of vocational agriculture, its relationship to the national goals for education, the place of sustainable agriculture and supervised experience in the curriculum, diversifying the curriculum, and fisheries education programs in Alaska. (SK)

  3. Theme: Urban Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellibee, Margaret; And Others

    1990-01-01

    On the theme of secondary agricultural education in urban areas, this issue includes articles on opportunities, future directions, and implications for the profession; creative supervised experiences for horticulture students; floral marketing, multicultural education; and cultural diversity in urban agricultural education. (JOW)

  4. Exploring the Role of Elementary Parent Involvement Coordinators in a North Georgia Title I Charter School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elrod, Philip

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the role of elementary parent involvement coordinators (EPIC) in a Northeast Georgia Title I Charter School District. EPICs were charged with facilitating programs designed to build social capital and network closure for families. This nested case study explored the experiences of five EPICs, each located in one of the five…

  5. Survey of intersex largemouth bass from impoundments in Georgia USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellock, Kristen A.; Trushel, Brittany E.; Ely, Patrick C.; Jennings, Cecil A.; Bringolf, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Intersex fish are increasingly being reported worldwide, primarily in rivers that receive treated wastewater, but few studies have investigated intersex in waters that do not receive wastewater. In a recent reconnaissance survey of intersex fish in North America, a high rate of intersex was reported for Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides in some southeastern U.S. rivers; however, the occurrence of intersex in impoundments has not been well described, especially on a statewide scale. Therefore, our objective for this project was to survey the occurrence of intersex Largemouth Bass in a variety of impoundment habitats across Georgia. Largemouth Bass were collected from 11 impoundments without direct municipal or agricultural wastewater inputs. Gonads from all male Largemouth Bass were evaluated for the incidence and severity of the intersex condition based on presence and arrangement of testicular oocytes. Overall 48% of male Largemouth Bass collected from impoundments were intersex, which was found in 9 of the 11 impoundments. Among impoundments, incidence of intersex ranged from 0 to 82% of the males sampled and surface area of the impoundment was a significant predictor of intersex incidence. Intersex fish were smaller than normal males, but population-level effects of intersex and causative factors of endocrine disruption in the impoundments remain unknown. The high incidence of intersex males in small impoundments demonstrates that the condition is not confined to rivers and suggests that factors other than those previously associated with intersex (i.e., municipal wastewater) may be involved.

  6. Microbial water quality of recreational lakes near Tbilisi, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Jaiani, Ekaterine; Kokashvili, Tamar; Mitaishvili, Nino; Elbakidze, Tinantin; Janelidze, Nino; Lashkhi, Nino; Kalandadze, Rusudan; Mikashavidze, Eteri; Natroshvili, Gulnara; Whitehouse, Chris A; Huq, Anwar; Tediashvili, Marina

    2013-06-01

    Microbial safety of recreational water is one of the major human public health issues in developing countries. Three water bodies, the Tbilisi Sea, Kumisi and Lisi lakes, in the South Caucasus region near Tbilisi, Georgia, were monitored in 2006-2009 to determine microbiological quality using standard methods. Microbial pollution indicators were determined in parallel with phytoplankton abundance and measurement of a number of physical-chemical parameters. Kumisi Lake, a brackish water body in an active agricultural area, appeared to be the most polluted, whereas the Tbilisi Sea, a freshwater reservoir was the least polluted. High values for fecal indicators in all three lakes in summer and early autumn were revealed. In our study, total enterococci counts (TEC) appeared to be a better indicator than either fecal or total coliform counts for the evaluation of fresh and brackish microbial water quality. We found significant correlation between total Vibrio counts and TEC for all three water bodies. Prevalence of somatic coliphages and V. cholerae-specific phages as additional water pollution indicator significantly correlated with abundance of the host bacteria. Particular phytoplankton groups in the lakes responded to the changes of fecal indicators; however, no correlation was observed between dominant zooplankton taxonomic groups and microbial parameters. PMID:23708580

  7. Dual Enrollment in Georgia's High Schools and Technical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Richard; Hill, Frieda

    2008-01-01

    Georgia conducted a multiphase, mixed methods study over three years (2003-2006) to determine whether credit-based transition programs facilitate college access and success for students who participate in them. The study, conducted in collaboration with, and funding from, the Technical College System of Georgia (TCSG) and with cooperation from the…

  8. Running around in Circles: Quality Assurance Reforms in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jibladze, Elene

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the implementation of a quality assurance system in Georgia as a particular case of "Bologna transplant" in a transitioning country. In particular, the article discusses to what extent new concepts, institutions and models framed as "European" have been institutionalised in Georgia. Based on an outcome…

  9. The College Program in the Georgia State Prison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Paul S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes the development and operation of the associate degree program conducted by South Georgia College at the Georgia State Prison, a large maximum security prison, and compares it with a similar program conducted by Tallahassee Community College at the Federal Correction Institution in Florida, a small minimum security prison. (JP)

  10. 33 CFR 110.72b - St. Simons Island, Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false St. Simons Island, Georgia. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.72b St. Simons Island, Georgia. The area beginning at a point southwest of Frederica River Bridge, St. Simons Island Causeway at latitude 31°09′58″...

  11. 33 CFR 110.72b - St. Simons Island, Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false St. Simons Island, Georgia. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.72b St. Simons Island, Georgia. The area beginning at a point southwest of Frederica River Bridge, St. Simons Island Causeway at latitude 31°09′58″...

  12. 33 CFR 110.72b - St. Simons Island, Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false St. Simons Island, Georgia. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.72b St. Simons Island, Georgia. The area beginning at a point southwest of Frederica River Bridge, St. Simons Island Causeway at latitude 31°09′58″...

  13. 33 CFR 110.72b - St. Simons Island, Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false St. Simons Island, Georgia. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.72b St. Simons Island, Georgia. The area beginning at a point southwest of Frederica River Bridge, St. Simons Island Causeway at latitude 31°09′58″...

  14. 33 CFR 110.72b - St. Simons Island, Georgia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false St. Simons Island, Georgia. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.72b St. Simons Island, Georgia. The area beginning at a point southwest of Frederica River Bridge, St. Simons Island Causeway at latitude 31°09′58″...

  15. 30 CFR 910.700 - Georgia Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... not require approval by the Office of Management and Budget under 44 U.S.C. 3507 because there are..., Enviromental Protection Division, pertaining to solid waste management. (5) Georgia Seed Laws and Rules and Regulations containing the Noxious Weed List. (f) The following are Georgia laws that interfere with...

  16. Georgia's Health Professions: A Decade of Change, 1985-1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Libby V.; Little, Catherine J.

    This report examines the supply of and demand for health care professionals in the state of Georgia, including information on education, demographics, and workforce changes. Supply data analyzed included licensure and certification records; a survey of Georgia's major health care institutions provided demand data. Additionally, institutions of…

  17. The Stamp Act in Georgia, 1765-1766.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, James F.

    Effects of the Stamp Act in the Colony of Georgia in 1765 are explored. The pamphlet is one in a series of materials about the American Revolution in Georgia. Designed for junior and senior high school students, it can be used as supplementary reading or a short unit. A teacher's guide is included. The Stamp Act was levied by Britain to force the…

  18. Focus on the Future of Georgia 1970-1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schabacker, William H., Ed.; And Others

    As part of the Georgia Assessment Project (GAP), initiated in January 1969 to provide statewide measurement of the impact of educational programs, services, and resources on children and youth, 19 position papers were prepared by specialists to assist the Advisory Commission on Education Goals. The papers, some with critiques, concern Georgia's…

  19. Georgia Reading Excellence Act Demonstration Sites (GA READS). Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta.

    This executive summary of Georgia Reading Excellence Act Demonstration Sites (GA READS) includes the Reading Excellence overview; Georgia's plan and goals; state activities; a timeline; local activities; and a budget. The overview states that the Reading Excellence Act was authorized to carry out the following purposes: teach every child to read…

  20. 75 FR 67950 - The University of Georgia (UGA), et al.;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... Kingdom. Intended Use: See notice at 75 FR 57738, September 22, 2010. Comments: None received. Decision... International Trade Administration The University of Georgia (UGA), et al.; Notice of Decision on Applications...: 10-054. Applicant: The University of Georgia (UGA), Athens, GA 30602-7229. Instrument: HV...

  1. Perceived Effectiveness of Clinical E-Learning for Georgia Midwives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Adrienne

    2014-01-01

    In the state of Georgia, approximately nine out of every 1,000 babies die during birth and approximately 18.6 out of every 1,000 women die from a pregnancy-related cause (Georgia Department of Public Health, 2011). Continuing to build capacities for the continuing education of midwives--specifically Certified Nurse Midwives (CNMs)--can ensure they…

  2. National Observatory Report on Vocational Education and Training in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glonti, Kote; Ejibadze, A.; Nanobashvili, K.; Mickaia, L.; Natsvlishvili, E.; Imedashvili, M.; Mikeladze, A.

    The state of vocational education and training (VET) in the Georgia Republic in 1999-2000 was examined. The study focused on the following topics: (1) the socioeconomic context of VET; (2) Georgia's labor market (the current labor market situation, employment, unemployment); (3) management of VET (legislation and policy, responsible bodies,…

  3. Corruption Risks of Private Tutoring: Case of Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobakhidze, Magda Nutsa

    2014-01-01

    The paper focuses on teacher-supplied private tutoring in the context of post-Soviet Georgia, and elucidates the ways in which teacher-supplied private tutoring can be related to educational corruption. The paper draws on data from in-depth interviews of 18 school teachers in different parts of Georgia in 2013. The findings of the qualitative…

  4. Organization of School Systems in Georgia. A Survey Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George Peabody Coll. for Teachers, Nashville, TN. Div. of Surveys and Field Services.

    In compliance with a Georgia legislative directive to search for efficient and economical methods of providing quality education for children in Georgia, a study of the organization of existing school systems was conducted. The purposes of the study were to develop criteria (1) for the evaluation of elementary and secondary schools and (2) for…

  5. Georgia's Quality Core Curriculum. Raising Expectations. [Grades] 6-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta.

    Georgia's Quality Core Curriculum (QCC) originated in 1984 with a recommendation for review every 5 years. In 1996, teachers, administrators, parents, and business leaders throughout Georgia reviewed and analyzed the existing QCC in an effort to update the curriculum, reflect technological advances, and create a more effective base for teaching.…

  6. Georgia's Quality Core Curriculum. Raising Expectations. [Grades] K-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta.

    Georgia's Quality Core Curriculum (QCC) originated in 1984 with a recommendation for review every 5 years. In 1996, teachers, administrators, parents, and business leaders throughout Georgia reviewed and analyzed the existing QCC in an effort to update the curriculum, reflect technological advances, and create a more effective base for teaching.…

  7. Georgia's Quality Core Curriculum. Raising Expectations. [Grades] 9-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta.

    Georgia's Quality Core Curriculum (QCC) originated in 1984 with a recommendation for review every 5 years. In 1996, teachers, administrators, parents, and business leaders throughout Georgia reviewed and analyzed the existing QCC in an effort to update the curriculum, reflect technological advances, and create a more effective base for teaching.…

  8. Rape, race, and the death penalty in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Wolfgang, M E; Riedel, M

    1975-07-01

    Following the 1972 Supreme Court decision on capital punishment, the Georgia legislature enacted a death penalty statute that attempts to avoid constitutional objections by establishing discretionary death sentencing for 361 rape cases in Georgia, comparing legal and nonlegal variables. Results indicate that blacks convicted of raping whites were disproportionately sentenced to death.

  9. Georgia's Balancing Act: Using, Protecting, and Legislating Student Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickman, Dana

    2016-01-01

    By combining an overall vision for the use of data, a commitment to protecting student privacy and data integrity, and supportive legislation, Georgia emerged as a leader in the effective use of student data. But it easily could have gone another way. None of the three elements could be taken for granted when Georgia set out to develop its state…

  10. The Georgia Psychoeducational Network (GPN) Research Report, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, William W., Ed.; Brown, Carvin L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This collection of papers includes five articles on the education of students with emotional and/or behavioral disorders participating in the Georgia Psychoeducational Network Program (GPN). "Training Needs of Fully Certified BD Teachers in the Georgia Psychoeducational Network" (Robert J. Stansberry) found, in a survey of 203 certified teachers…

  11. Regional Child Care Trends: Comparing Georgia to Its Neighbors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waits, Lauren; Monaco, Malina; Beck, Lisa; Edwards, Jennifer

    As child care becomes an increasingly important public policy issue on the national level, there is emerging concern about Georgia's readiness to meet the needs of its children in care. This study documented the state of child care in Georgia in comparison to other states, to national averages, and to national standards. A group of 12 comparison…

  12. Environmental radionuclide distribution in Georgia after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Mosulishvili, L.M.; Shoniya, N.I.; Katamadze, N.M.

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric Chernobyl-released radioactivity, assessed at about 2 x 10{sup 18} Bq, caused global environmental contamination. Contaminated air masses appeared in the Transcaucasian region in early May, 1986. Rains that month promoted intense radionuclide deposition all over Georgia. The contamination level of western Georgia considerably exceeded the contamination level of eastern Georgia. The Black Sea coast of Georgia suffered from the Chernobyl accident as much as did strongly contaminated areas of the Ukraine and Belarus`. Unfortunately, governmental decrees on countermeasures against the consequences of the Chernobyl accident at that time did not even refer to the coast of Georgia. The authors observed the first increase in radioactivity background in rainfall samples collected on May 2, 1986, in Tbilisi. {gamma}-Spectrometric measurements of aerosol filters, vegetation, food stuffs, and other objects, in addition to rainfall, persistently confirmed the occurrence of short-lived radionuclides, including {sup 131}I. At first, this fact seemed unbelievable, because the Chernobyl accident had occurred only 4-5 days earlier and far from Georgia. However, these arguments proved to be faulty. Soon, environmental monitoring of radiation in Georgia became urgent. Environmental radionuclide distribution in Georgia shortly after the Chernobyl accident, as well as the methods of analysis, are reported in this paper.

  13. 30 CFR 910.700 - Georgia Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....700 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA § 910.700 Georgia Federal program. (a) This part contains all rules that are applicable to surface coal mining operations in...

  14. Integrating Engineering Design into Technology Education: Georgia's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denson, Cameron D.; Kelley, Todd R.; Wicklein, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    This descriptive research study reported on Georgia's secondary level (grades 6-12) technology education programs capability to incorporate engineering concepts and/or engineering design into their curriculum. Participants were middle school and high school teachers in the state of Georgia who currently teach technology education. Participants…

  15. The Evolution of the Georgia Tech Library Circulation Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Karen

    2006-01-01

    The author reviews the evolution of the Circulation Department at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) Library and Information Center from 2001 to the present. It is shown how a traditional circulation department with poor customer relations transformed itself by adopting innovative policies and services leading to improved customer…

  16. Georgia Framework for Learning Mathematics and Science. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Initiative In Mathematics and Science, Athens.

    The Georgia Learning Framework is a collaborative effort among community-based partners and professional educators to produce a vision of mathematics and science that will prepare all Georgia students for the 21st century. It identifies habits of mind, skills and knowledge, and dispositions that all students must possess to be productive citizens.…

  17. Uncharted Territory: An Examination of Restructuring Under NCLB in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffrin, Elizabeth; Scott, Caitlin; Kober, Nancy, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    When the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) went into effect in 2002, Georgia's statewide accountability system was already well underway. As a result, some schools faced the federal law's most serious consequences as early as 2004. That left Georgia policymakers with a dilemma on which there remains little federal guidance: what to do with…

  18. Dissipation of chlorothalonil, chlorpyrifos, and profenofos in a Malaysian agricultural soil: a comparison between the field experiment and simulation by the PERSIST model.

    PubMed

    Ismail, B S; Ngan, C K

    2005-01-01

    A comparison of dissipation of chlorothalonil, chlorpyrifos, and profenofos in a Malaysian agricultural soil between the field experiment and simulation by the PERSIST model was studied. A plot of sweet pea (Pisum sativum) from a farm in the Cameron Highlands was selected for the field experiment. The plot was treated with chlorothalonil, chlorpyrifos, and profenofos. Core soil collection was conducted according to the sampling schedule. Residues of the three pesticides were analyzed in the laboratory. Simulations of the three pesticides' persistency were also conducted using a computer-run software PERSIST. Generally, predicted data obtained using PERSIST were found to be high for the three pesticides except for one field measurement of chlorpyrifos. The predicted data for profenofos, which is the most mobile of the three pesticides tested, was not well matched with the observed data compared to chlorothalonil and chlorpyrifos. PMID:15825685

  19. Ground-water conditions in Georgia, 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cressler, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    Ground-water conditions in Georgia during 1997 and for the period of record were evaluated using data from ground-water-level and ground-water-quality monitoring networks. Data for 1997 included in this report are from continuous water-level records from 71 wells and chloride analyses from 14 wells. In 1997, annual mean ground-water levels in Georgia ranged from 6.2 feet (ft) lower to 5.6 ft higher than in 1996. Of the 71 wells summarized in this report, 23 wells had annual mean water levels that were higher, 35 wells had annual mean water levels that were lower, and 11 wells had annual mean water levels that were about the same in 1997 as during 1996. Data for two wells are incomplete because data collection was discontinued at one well, and the equipment was vandalized at one well. Record-low daily mean water levels were recorded in six wells tapping the Upper Floridan aquifer, one well tapping the Caliborne aquifer, two wells tapping the Clayton aquifer, and three wells tapping Cretaceous aquifers. These record lows were from 0.2 to 5.6 ft lower than previous record lows. Chloride concentration in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer in most of coastal Georgia was within drinking-water standards established by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In the Savannah area, chloride concentration has not changed appreciably with time. However, chloride concentration in water from some wells that tap the Floridan aquifer system in the Brunswick area exceeds the drinking-water standard. Ground-water-level and ground-water-quality data are essential for water assessment and management. Ground-water-level fluctuations and trends can be used to estimate changes in aquifer storage resulting from the effects of ground-water withdrawal and recharge from precipitation. These data can be used to address water-management needs and to evaluate the effects of management and conservation programs. As part of the ground

  20. Desertification risk in Kakheti Region, East Georgia.

    PubMed

    Basialashvili, Tsisana; Matchavariani, Lia; Lagidze, Lamzira

    2015-01-01

    Desertification or land degradation in drylands is caused by various factors. The most important of these is climate change, a significant global ecological problem. Desertification, like erosion, as an environmental process of ecosystem degradation, is often caused by human activity. It is a common misconception that droughts cause desertification. Well-managed lands can recover from drought if the rains return. These practices help to control erosion and maintain productivity during periods when moisture is available. Traditionally, the most vulnerable territories considered under the threat of desertification in Georgia is Kakheti region (East Georgia), which has been selected as one of the priority investigation area. In Eastern Georgia, intervals of atmospheric precipitation do not coincide with the phases of water demand of plants. In recent decades as a result of more frequent droughts in Kakheti, the region has already lost hundreds, thousands of hectares of fertile land. Based on the contemporary climate warming projections, the temperature is expected to increase and precipitation to decrease. This will lead to an increase in evaporation and reduction of river flow. Under such conditions the danger of desertification is evident. To mitigate the negative effects of desertification, it is recommended to put forward set of adaptation activities through rehabilitation of water use systems, prevention of loss of water, reconstruction and expansion of irrigation canals, accumulation of unused autumn-winter river water and spring floods in reservoirs, developing an optimal scheme of distributing water resources among water users, device windbreaks and work on breeding of drought resistant varieties, preparation of water volume forecasts of rivers and their role in planning of water use; application of apply drip and sprinkler irrigation, using artificial precipitation following increase as a result of active influence on clouds. All these activities will provide

  1. Desertification risk in Kakheti Region, East Georgia.

    PubMed

    Basialashvili, Tsisana; Matchavariani, Lia; Lagidze, Lamzira

    2015-01-01

    Desertification or land degradation in drylands is caused by various factors. The most important of these is climate change, a significant global ecological problem. Desertification, like erosion, as an environmental process of ecosystem degradation, is often caused by human activity. It is a common misconception that droughts cause desertification. Well-managed lands can recover from drought if the rains return. These practices help to control erosion and maintain productivity during periods when moisture is available. Traditionally, the most vulnerable territories considered under the threat of desertification in Georgia is Kakheti region (East Georgia), which has been selected as one of the priority investigation area. In Eastern Georgia, intervals of atmospheric precipitation do not coincide with the phases of water demand of plants. In recent decades as a result of more frequent droughts in Kakheti, the region has already lost hundreds, thousands of hectares of fertile land. Based on the contemporary climate warming projections, the temperature is expected to increase and precipitation to decrease. This will lead to an increase in evaporation and reduction of river flow. Under such conditions the danger of desertification is evident. To mitigate the negative effects of desertification, it is recommended to put forward set of adaptation activities through rehabilitation of water use systems, prevention of loss of water, reconstruction and expansion of irrigation canals, accumulation of unused autumn-winter river water and spring floods in reservoirs, developing an optimal scheme of distributing water resources among water users, device windbreaks and work on breeding of drought resistant varieties, preparation of water volume forecasts of rivers and their role in planning of water use; application of apply drip and sprinkler irrigation, using artificial precipitation following increase as a result of active influence on clouds. All these activities will provide

  2. Georgia, country of ancient medical traditions.

    PubMed

    Shengelia, R

    2000-06-01

    Georgian medicine as well as the whole culture of Georgia, is one of the oldest in the world. In more than the 500 medical manuscripts preserved and since described, there are traces of Sumerian medicine. Examples of Chinese, Indian and especially Arabic medicine are also clearly seen. At the same time close relationships with Graeco-Roman medical traditions are beyond doubt. Nursing homes established by Georgian healers, many of whom were canonized by the Orthodox Church are to be found in many churches and monasteries all over the world. They gave fruitful scientific research and practical help. PMID:11624591

  3. Handbook for Georgia Legislators, 6th Edition [And] Classroom Activities to Use with Handbook for Georgia Legislators, 6th Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Edwin L.

    This document contains a handbook and a booklet of classroom activities to use with the handbook. The handbook is a compilation of the law, procedures, and practices which govern the legislative process in Georgia. It addresses the practical problems faced by members of the Georgia legislature. Chapter one discusses the General Assembly, its…

  4. A Study of an Intensive Educational Program Conducted in Six Georgia Counties by the Georgia Cooperative Extension Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sell, William Horace

    Based on surveys in 1957 and 1960 in six Georgia counties, this study evaluated an intensive educational program by the University of Georgia, and investigated attitudes and other factors related to farmers' use of fertilizers. Respondents were ranked by amounts of plant nutrients applied per acre in 1957 and by fertility per farm. Findings…

  5. Report of a Planning Conference for Solar Technology Information Transfer in Georgia (Atlanta, Georgia, July 24-25, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldridge, Mark C., Ed.

    A summary of the deliberations of the Georgia planning conference of the Solar Technology Transfer Program is presented in this report. Topic areas include background information on the Georgia conference and a summary of the discussions and recommendations dealing with solar information transfer within state systems and the need for greater…

  6. The Potential of a Multimedia Open Educational Resource Module in Enhancing Effective Teaching and Learning in a Postgraduate Agricultural Program: Experience From AgShare Project Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassen, Jemal Yousuf

    2013-01-01

    Graduate programs in agriculture in developing countries such as in Ethiopia are often designed in cognizance of the need for skilled manpower for agricultural development. In Ethiopia, the contribution of graduates of agricultural graduate programs to the attempt to transform smallholder agriculture has become a matter of urgency in the face of…

  7. Under the trees: the Georgia peach and the quest for labor in the twentieth century.

    PubMed

    Okie, Tom

    2011-01-01

    The Georgia peach boom around the turn of the twentieth century was often hailed as a successful experiment in diversification. Peach growers, the story went, threw off the tyranny of King Cotton by pledging their allegiance to the "Queen of Fruits." This portrayal is partly true; unlike other proposed alternatives to cotton, peaches flourished in many places. But the history of the "labor problem" in the Georgia peach belt makes it clear that peach production depended on the cotton economy. Peaches required large amounts of labor only at harvest time, which came during a lull in the cotton season. Thus, for many years, growers found a ready labor supply in a rural population otherwise at loose ends. As this population relocated to cities, and as cotton farmers mechanized their operations, peach growers turned increasingly to the federal government to help shore up their workforces. PMID:21319439

  8. Under the trees: the Georgia peach and the quest for labor in the twentieth century.

    PubMed

    Okie, Tom

    2011-01-01

    The Georgia peach boom around the turn of the twentieth century was often hailed as a successful experiment in diversification. Peach growers, the story went, threw off the tyranny of King Cotton by pledging their allegiance to the "Queen of Fruits." This portrayal is partly true; unlike other proposed alternatives to cotton, peaches flourished in many places. But the history of the "labor problem" in the Georgia peach belt makes it clear that peach production depended on the cotton economy. Peaches required large amounts of labor only at harvest time, which came during a lull in the cotton season. Thus, for many years, growers found a ready labor supply in a rural population otherwise at loose ends. As this population relocated to cities, and as cotton farmers mechanized their operations, peach growers turned increasingly to the federal government to help shore up their workforces.

  9. Grassland agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agriculture in grassland environments is facing multiple stresses from: shifting demographics, declining and fragmented agricultural landscapes, declining environmental quality, variable and changing climate, volatile and increasing energy costs, marginal economic returns, and globalization. Degrad...

  10. MOBILIZATION AND TRANSPORT OF SOIL PARTICLES DURING INFILTRATION EXPERIMENTS IN AN AGRICULTURAL FIELD, SHENANDOAH VALLEY, VIRGINIA. (R824772)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evidence that fine particles mobilized and transported in
    soils and aquifers can have a profound influence on
    contaminant migration has spawned much interest recently
    in understanding colloid transport in natural materials.
    Repeated infiltration experiments on an i...

  11. Reality of Risk of Natural Disasters in Georgia and a Management Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaprindashvili, George; Tsereteli, Emil; Gobejishvili, Ramin; King, Lorenz; Gaprindashvili, Merab

    2013-04-01

    In the last decades of the 20th century, the protection of the population from natural disasters, the preservation of land resources and the safe operation of a complex infrastructure and costly engineering facilities have become the primary socio-economic, demographic, political and environmental problems worldwide. This problem has become more acute in recent years when the natural cataclysms in terms of a population increase, progressive urbanization and use of vulnerable technologies have acquired even larger scales. This holds true especially for mountainous countries as Georgia, too. Natural-catastrophic processes as landslides, mudflows, rockfalls and erosion, and their frequent reoccurrence with harmful impacts to population, agricultural lands and engineering objects form a demanding challenge for the responsible authorities. Thousands of settlements, roads, oil and gas pipelines, high-voltage power transmission lines and other infrastructure may be severely damaged. Respective studies prove that the origin and activation of landslide-gravitational and mudflow processes increase year by year, and this holds true for almost all landscapes and geomorphological zones of Georgia. Catastrophic events may be triggered by (1) intense earthquakes, (2) extreme hydro-meteorological events, probably on the background of global climatic changes (3) large-scale human impacts on the environment. Societies with a low level of preparedness concerning these hazards are especially hit hard. In view of this urgent task, many departmental and research institutions have increased their efforts within the limits of their competence. First of all, it is the activity of the Geological Survey of Georgia (at present included in the National Environmental Agency of the Ministry of Environment Protection of Georgia) which mapped, identified and catalogued the hazardous processes on the territory of the country and identified the spatial limits and occurrences of hazardous processes

  12. Georgia fishery study: implications for dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Turcotte, M.D.S.

    1983-03-28

    Fish consumption will contribute a major portion of the estimated individual and population doses from L-Reactor liquid releases and Cs-137 remobilization in Steel Creek. It is therefore important that the values for fish consumption used in dose calculations be as realistic as possible. Since publication of the L-Reactor Environmental Information Document (EID), data have become available on sport fishing in the Savannah River. These data provide SRP with site-specific sport fish harvest and consumption values for use in dose calculations. The Georgia fishery data support the total population fish consumption and calculated dose reported in the EID. The data indicate, however, that both the EID average and maximum individual fish consumption have been underestimated, although each to a different degree. The average fish consumption value used in the EID is approximately 3% below the lower limit of the fish consumption range calculated using the Georgia data. A fish consumption value of 11.3 kg/yr should be used to recalculate dose to the average individual from L-Reactor restart. Maximum fish consumption in the EID has been underestimated by approximately 60%, and doses to the maximum individual should also be recalculated. Future dose calculations should utilize an average fish consumption value of 11.3 kg/yr, and a maximum fish consumption value of 34 kg/yr.

  13. Georgia tech catalog of gravitational waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jani, Karan; Healy, James; Clark, James A.; London, Lionel; Laguna, Pablo; Shoemaker, Deirdre

    2016-10-01

    This paper introduces a catalog of gravitational waveforms from the bank of simulations by the numerical relativity effort at Georgia Tech. Currently, the catalog consists of 452 distinct waveforms from more than 600 binary black hole simulations: 128 of the waveforms are from binaries with black hole spins aligned with the orbital angular momentum, and 324 are from precessing binary black hole systems. The waveforms from binaries with non-spinning black holes have mass-ratios q = m 1/m 2 ≤ 15, and those with precessing, spinning black holes have q ≤ 8. The waveforms expand a moderate number of orbits in the late inspiral, the burst during coalescence, and the ring-down of the final black hole. Examples of waveforms in the catalog matched against the widely used approximate models are presented. In addition, predictions of the mass and spin of the final black hole by phenomenological fits are tested against the results from the simulation bank. The role of the catalog in interpreting the GW150914 event and future massive binary black-hole search in LIGO is discussed. The Georgia Tech catalog is publicly available at einstein.gatech.edu/catalog.

  14. Local public health cost study in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Carol L; Feldman, Lynne; Toomey, Kathleen E

    2004-01-01

    Development of a uniform cost study methodology for local health department services in Georgia began with a desire to negotiate cost-based reimbursement from Medicaid. Managed care and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act requirements for common coding standards added impetus to Georgia's efforts to document the cost of local public health. With a determination that the result was achievable, the Division of Public Health contracted with a medical practice management firm. What followed included a major team effort with active working groups of county, district, and state representatives. A template was developed by the consultants to compile the cost report and automated applications were installed. Statewide training engaged the local public health workforce and led to a successful pilot project. This article describes the interactive process that led ultimately to the ability of every county in the state to produce a valid cost report. The cost of direct services provided for individuals by county health departments can now be calculated with a cost per relative value unit. The cost report also includes the cost of environmental health, dental health, population-based services and all other local public health services. A brief description of the methodology is presented.

  15. Potentials of RapidEye time series for improved classification of crop rotations in heterogeneous agricultural landscapes: experiences from irrigation systems in Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Christopher; Machwitz, Miriam; Schorcht, Gunther; Löw, Fabian; Fritsch, Sebastian; Dech, Stefan

    2011-11-01

    In Central Asia, more than eight Million ha of agricultural land are under irrigation. But severe degradation problems and unreliable water distribution have caused declining yields during the past decades. Reliable and area-wide information about crops can be seen as important step to elaborate options for sustainable land and water management. Experiences from RapidEye classifications of crop in Central Asia are exemplarily shown during a classification of eight crop classes including three rotations with winter wheat, cotton, rice, and fallow land in the Khorezm region of Uzbekistan covering 230,000 ha of irrigated land. A random forest generated by using 1215 field samples was applied to multitemporal RapidEye data acquired during the vegetation period 2010. But RapidEye coverage varied and did not allow for generating temporally consistent mosaics covering the entire region. To classify all 55,188 agricultural parcels in the region three classification zones were classified separately. The zoning allowed for including at least three observation periods into classification. Overall accuracy exceeded 85 % for all classification zones. Highest accuracies of 87.4 % were achieved by including five spatiotemporal composites of RapidEye. Class-wise accuracy assessments showed the usefulness of selecting time steps which represent relevant phenological phases of the vegetation period. The presented approach can support regional crop inventory. Accurate classification results in early stages of the cropping season permit recalculation of crop water demands and reallocation of irrigation water. The high temporal and spatial resolution of RapidEye can be concluded highly beneficial for agricultural land use classifications in entire Central Asia.

  16. Upper-crustal structure beneath the strait of Georgia, Southwest British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dash, R.K.; Spence, G.D.; Riedel, M.; Hyndman, R.D.; Brocher, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    We present a new three-dimensional (3-D) P-wave velocity model for the upper-crustal structure beneath the Strait of Georgia, southwestern British Columbia based on non-linear tomographic inversion of wide-angle seismic refraction data. Our study, part of the Georgia Basin Geohazards Initiative (GBGI) is primarily aimed at mapping the depth of the Cenozoic sedimentary basin and delineating the near-surface crustal faults associated with recent seismic activities (e.g. M = 4.6 in 1997 and M = 5.0 in 1975) in the region. Joint inversion of first-arrival traveltimes from the 1998 Seismic Hazards Investigation in Puget Sound (SHIPS) and the 2002 Georgia Basin experiment provides a high-resolution velocity model of the subsurface to a depth of ???7 km. In the southcentral Georgia Basin, sedimentary rocks of the Cretaceous Nanaimo Group and early Tertiary rocks have seismic velocities between 3.0 and 5.5 km s-1. The basin thickness increases from north to south with a maximum thickness of 7 (??1) km (depth to velocities of 5.5 km s-1) at the southeast end of the strait. The underlying basement rocks, probably representing the Wrangellia terrane, have velocities of 5.5-6.5 km-1 with considerable lateral variation. Our tomographic model reveals that the Strait of Georgia is underlain by a fault-bounded block within the central Georgia Basin. It also shows a correlation between microearthquakes and areas of rapid change in basin thickness. The 1997/1975 earthquakes are located near a northeast-trending hinge line where the thicknesses of sedimentary rocks increase rapidly to the southeast. Given its association with instrumentally recorded, moderate sized earthquakes, we infer that the hinge region is cored by an active fault that we informally name the Gabriola Island fault. A northwest-trending, southwest dipping velocity discontinuity along the eastern side of Vancouver Island correlates spatially with the surface expression of the Outer Island fault. The Outer Island

  17. Ground-water conditions and studies in Georgia, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leeth, David C.; Clarke, John S.; Craigg, Steven D.; Wipperfurth, Caryl J.

    2003-01-01

    the Upper Floridan aquifer. Ground-water quality in the Upper Floridan aquifer is monitored in the cities of Albany, Savannah, and Brunswick and in Camden County; and monitored in the Lower Floridan aquifer in the Savannah and Brunswick areas. In the Albany area since 1998, nitrate concentrations in the Upper Floridan aquifer have increased in 4 of the 11 wells monitored, and in 1 well, concentrations were above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) 10 milligrams per liter (mg/L) drinking-water standard. In the Savannah area, chloride concentration in water from four wells in the Upper Floridan aquifer showed no appreciable change during 2001, remaining within the USEPA 250 mg/L drinking-water standard; in seven wells completed in the Lower Floridan aquifer and in underlying zones, the chloride concentration remained above the drinking-water standard, with one well showing an increase over previous years. In the Brunswick area, water samples from 66 wells completed in the Upper or Lower Floridan aquifers were collected during June 2001 and analyzed for chloride. A map showing chloride concentrations in the Upper Floridan aquifer during June 2001 indicates that concentrations remained above USEPA drinking-water standards across a 2-square-mile area. In the north Brunswick area, chloride concentrations in the Upper Floridan aquifer continued to increase, whereas in the south Brunswick area, concentrations continued to decrease. In the Camden County area, chloride concentrations in six wells completed in the Upper Floridan aquifer remained within drinking-water standards. With the exception of one well, concentrations remained the same and were below 40 mg/L. In one well, concentrations showed a sharp decline during 2001, but remained above 130 mg/L. Ongoing studies during 2001 include evaluation of agricultural chemicals in shallow ground water in southwestern Georgia; evaluation of saltwater intrusion and water-level and water-quality m

  18. Bugaboo Fire Rages in Georgia and Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Subtropical Storm Andrea apparently did little to quench numerous large wildfires burning in the U.S. Southeast in early May 2007. On May 11, 2007, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Terra satellite captured this image, the remnants of the storm had dwindled to a small ball of clouds in the Atlantic Ocean, and huge plumes of smoke snaked across Georgia, Florida, and the Gulf of Mexico. Areas where MODIS detected actively burning fires are outlined in red. A huge fire is burning in and near the Okefenokee Swamp, which straddles the state line between Georgia and Florida. For logistical purposes, fire officials are calling the part of the fire in Florida the Florida Bugaboo Fire and the part in Georgia the Bugaboo Scrub Fire. The distinction is simply administrative, however; in reality, it is single, continuous swath of burning timber, swamp land, grass, and scrubland. The blaze was more than 133,000 thousand acres as of May 11, and it appeared to be spreading on virtually all perimeters at the time of the image, with active fire locations detected in a circle that surrounds an already burned (or partially burned) area. According to reports form the Southern Area Coordination Center, the fire grew by at least 20,000 acres on May 10. Numerous communities were threatened and hundreds of people were evacuated, while parts of Interstate 10 were closed to all but emergency vehicles. To the northeast of the Bugaboo Fire, other large wildfires were burning in Georgia as well. The Floyds Prairie Fire, to the immediate north, was threatening endangered species and their habitat, while farther north the 116,000-plus-acre Sweat Farm Road/Big Turnaround Complex Fire was still burning in the area south of the city of Waycross, nearly a month after the fires first started in mid-April. Southern Georgia and Florida are in the grip of moderate to extreme drought. The state line area where the Bugaboo Fire is burning is one of the areas in extreme drought. The

  19. Recovery based on plot experiments is a poor predictor of landscape-level population impacts of agricultural pesticides.

    PubMed

    Topping, Christopher John; Kjaer, Lene Jung; Hommen, Udo; Høye, Toke Thomas; Preuss, Thomas G; Sibly, Richard M; van Vliet, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Current European Union regulatory risk assessment allows application of pesticides provided that recovery of nontarget arthropods in-crop occurs within a year. Despite the long-established theory of source-sink dynamics, risk assessment ignores depletion of surrounding populations and typical field trials are restricted to plot-scale experiments. In the present study, the authors used agent-based modeling of 2 contrasting invertebrates, a spider and a beetle, to assess how the area of pesticide application and environmental half-life affect the assessment of recovery at the plot scale and impact the population at the landscape scale. Small-scale plot experiments were simulated for pesticides with different application rates and environmental half-lives. The same pesticides were then evaluated at the landscape scale (10 km × 10 km) assuming continuous year-on-year usage. The authors' results show that recovery time estimated from plot experiments is a poor indicator of long-term population impact at the landscape level and that the spatial scale of pesticide application strongly determines population-level impact. This raises serious doubts as to the utility of plot-recovery experiments in pesticide regulatory risk assessment for population-level protection. Predictions from the model are supported by empirical evidence from a series of studies carried out in the decade starting in 1988. The issues raised then can now be addressed using simulation. Prediction of impacts at landscape scales should be more widely used in assessing the risks posed by environmental stressors.

  20. "More drop per crop" when moving from gravitational to drip irrigated agriculture? Experiences from a North Moroccan case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltz, N.; Gaspart, F.; Vanclooster, M.

    2015-12-01

    In order to save agricultural water, the famous FAO's "more crop per drop" has been taken literally in many arid or semi-arid places around the world and policies that aim improving "efficiencies" (irrigation efficiency…) have been implemented, often leading to the promotion of water saving technologies. In 1865, studying coal consumption, W.S. Jevons highlighted that improving coal use efficiency could, as a paradox, lead to higher global coal use. Many economists later extended this idea to resource saving technologies in general, showing that, due to the "rebound effect", the adoption of more efficient technologies, in terms of use of resources, could lead to a higher global consumption of this resource if this adoption didn't go with adjustment measures. Regarding these considerations, the emerging question is to which extent water saving technologies (i.e. that aim improving water related efficiencies) are appropriate to save water at large scale. Our study addresses this question through the analysis of the conversion from surface to drip irrigation in Triffa's irrigated perimeter (Morocco). We aim addressing this question using the detailed analysis of two data sets. First, available data were collected for every farm within the study area from the local administrations. Second, interviews were conducted with farmers to complete the dataset and to characterize their behavior. This allowed assessing water related efficiencies at farm scale. Subsequently, models were implemented to link efficiencies with general attributes and thereby identify the main drivers of water related efficiencies in the study area. Finally, these models were used to upscale farm-scale assessment to the perimeter scale. Our results show that, under current conditions, moving from surface to drip irrigation leads to higher global water withdrawal. However, the aforementioned "rebound effect" does not allow explaining the higher pressure because of contextual specificities. Deeper

  1. Agricultural Waste.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ling; Zhang, Panpan; Shu, Huajie; Chang, Chein-Chi; Wang, Renqing; Zhang, Shuping

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, the quantity of agricultural waste has been rising rapidly all over the world. As a result, the environmental problems and negative impacts of agricultural waste are drawn more and more attention. Therefore, there is a need to adopt proper approaches to reduce and reuse agricultural waste. This review presented about 200 literatures published in 2015 relating to the topic of agricultural waste. The review examined research on agricultural waste in 2015 from the following four aspects: the characterization, reuse, treatment, and management. Researchers highlighted the importance to reuse agricultural waste and investigated the potential to utilize it as biofertilizers, cultivation material, soil amendments, adsorbent, material, energy recycling, enzyme and catalyst etc. The treatment of agricultural waste included carbonization, biodegradation, composting hydrolysis and pyrolysis. Moreover, this review analyzed the differences of the research progress in 2015 from 2014. It may help to reveal the new findings and new trends in this field in 2015 comparing to 2014. PMID:27620093

  2. Agricultural Waste.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ling; Zhang, Panpan; Shu, Huajie; Chang, Chein-Chi; Wang, Renqing; Zhang, Shuping

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, the quantity of agricultural waste has been rising rapidly all over the world. As a result, the environmental problems and negative impacts of agricultural waste are drawn more and more attention. Therefore, there is a need to adopt proper approaches to reduce and reuse agricultural waste. This review presented about 200 literatures published in 2015 relating to the topic of agricultural waste. The review examined research on agricultural waste in 2015 from the following four aspects: the characterization, reuse, treatment, and management. Researchers highlighted the importance to reuse agricultural waste and investigated the potential to utilize it as biofertilizers, cultivation material, soil amendments, adsorbent, material, energy recycling, enzyme and catalyst etc. The treatment of agricultural waste included carbonization, biodegradation, composting hydrolysis and pyrolysis. Moreover, this review analyzed the differences of the research progress in 2015 from 2014. It may help to reveal the new findings and new trends in this field in 2015 comparing to 2014.

  3. Vineyard weeds control practices impact on surface water transfers: using numerical tracer experiment coupled to a distributed hydrological model to manage agricultural practices spatial arrangements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, F.; Moussa, R.

    2009-04-01

    In rural basins, agricultural landscape management highly influences water and pollutants transfers. Landuse, agricultural practices and their spatial arrangements are at issue. Hydrological model are widely used to explore impacts of anthropogenic influences on experimental catchments. But planning all spatial arrangements leads to a possible cases count which cannot be considered. On the basis of the recent « numerical experiment » approach, we propose a « numerical tracer function » which had to be coupled to a distributed rainfall-runoff model. This function simulate the transfer of a virtual tracer successively spread on each distributed unit inside the catchment. It allows to rank hydrological spatial units according to their hydrological contribution to the surface flows, particularly at the catchment outlet. It was used with the distributed model MHYDAS in an agricultural context. The case study concerns the experimental Roujan vine-growing catchment (1km², south of France) studied since 1992. In this Mediterranean context, we focus on the soil hydraulic conductivity distributed parameter because it highly depends on weed control practices (chemical weeding induces a lot more runoff than mechanical weeding). We checked model sensitivity analysis to soil hydraulic conductivity spatial arrangement on runoff coefficient, peak discharge and catchment lag-time. Results show (i) the use of the tracer function is more efficient than a random approach to improve sensitivity to spatial arrangements from point of view of simulated discharge range, (ii) the first factor explaining hydrological simulations variability was practices area ratio, (iii) variability induced by practices spatial arrangements was significant on runoff coefficient and peak discharge for balanced practices area ratio and on lag-time for low area ratio of chemical weeding practices. From the actual situation on the experimental Roujan catchment (40% of tilled and 60% of non tilled vineyard

  4. COHUTTA WILDERNESS, GEORGIA AND TENNESSEE AND HEMP TOP ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gair, Jacob E.; Gazdik, Gertrude C.

    1984-01-01

    A survey has found little or no promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral-resources in the Cohutta Wilderness and the adjacent Hemp Top Roadless Area. The Cohutta Wilderness is located mainly in northern Georgia and extends a small distance into southeastern Tennessee; the Hemp Top Roadless Area borders part of the Cohutta Wilderness on the east and extends southward from the Georgia-Tennessee line. The study area is underlain by slightly metamorphosed folded and faulted sedimentary rocks of late Precambrian age. Detailed sampling in the vicinity of the known gold-bearing and tin-bearing samples might outline small areas of low-grade mineralization. The sedimentary rocks which are buried many thousands of feet beneath the surface of the Cohutta area have an unknown potential for oil and gas - probably gas at the inferred depth of burial and temperatures implicit at such depth. This potential could only be verified by a program of deep drilling.

  5. Theme: Innovative Curriculum Ideas and Practices in Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agricultural Education Magazine, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Fourteen theme articles discuss the following: curriculum ideas and innovations in agricultural education, agricultural literacy, Supervised Agricultural Experience, active learning, locating agricultural education resources, distance and web-based instruction, principles of forest management, professional development, and service learning. (JOW)

  6. Georgia-Armenia Transboarder seismicity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoladze, T.; Tvaradze, N.; Javakishvili, Z.; Elashvili, M.; Durgaryan, R.; Arakelyan, A.; Gevorgyan, M.

    2012-12-01

    In the presented study we performed Comprehensive seismic analyses for the Armenian-Georgian transboarder active seismic fault starting on Armenian territory, cutting the state boarder and having possibly northern termination on Adjara-Triealeti frontal structure in Georgia. In the scope of International projects: ISTC A-1418 "Open network of scientific Centers for mitigation risk of natural hazards in the Southern Caucasus and Central Asia" and NATO SfP- 983284 Project "Caucasus Seismic Emergency Response" in Akhalkalaki (Georgia) seismic center, Regional Summer school trainings and intensive filed investigations were conducted. Main goal was multidisciplinary study of the Javakheti fault structure and better understanding seismicity of the area. Young scientists from Turkey, Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia were participated in the deployment of temporal seismic network in order to monitor seisimity on the Javakheti highland and particularly delineate fault scarf and identify active seismic structures. In the scope of international collaboration the common seismic database has been created in the southern Caucasus and collected data from the field works is available now online. Javakheti highland, which is located in the central part of the Caucasus, belongs to the structure of the lesser Caucasus and represents a history of neotectonic volcanism existed in the area. Jasvakheti highland is seismicalu active region devastating from several severe earthquakes(1088, 1283, 1899…). Hypocenters located during analogue network were highly scattered and did not describe real pattern of seismicity of the highland. We relocated hypocenters of the region and improved local velocity model. The hypocenters derived from recently deployed local seismic network in the Javakheti highland, clearly identified seismically active structures. Fault plane solutions of analogue data of the Soviet times have been carefully analyzed and examined. Moment tensor inversion were preformed

  7. Energy integrated dairy farm system in Georgia: Technical manual, Mathis/P and M Dairy Farm, Social Circle, Georgia. [Cogeneration using biogas; heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, J.L. Jr.; Ross, C.C.; Lamade, R.M.

    1986-09-01

    This manual describes a project sponsored to optimize energy generation and utilization in the agricultural or food processing industry. The particular project involves the Mathis/P and M Dairy Farm located in Social Circle, Georgia (about 60 miles east of Atlanta). The farm is designed for a 550 milking cow herd and produces certified raw milk for sale to a processing plant located in Atlanta. The project converted the Mathis/P and and M Dairy into an energy integrated dairy farm system (EIDFS) in which the interaction of the subsystems and components are modified such that the energy resources of the farm are optimized. This manual is a description of the system, subsystems and components composing the Mathis EIDFS and is primarily intended for farmers, extension agents, and equipment manufacturers who might be involved in future EIDFS projects. Cogeneration using biogas from manures and heat recovery from the refrigeration machinery were among the options chosen.

  8. Georgia/Alabama Regional Seismographic Network

    SciTech Connect

    Long, L.T. . School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1990-11-01

    Data from the Georgia/Alabama network have contributed to a better understanding of the seismicity in the Southeast. Based on these data, a new theory explaining intraplate earthquakes was developed. The theory predicts that a decrease in strength of the lower crust (e.g. through a change in the fluid regime) leads to weakening and deformation of the stress channel in the mid-crustal zone. The weakening and stress concentration may lead to major earthquakes. Earthquake focal mechanisms in southeastern Tennessee are consistent with such a model. Conclusions reached from this and other studies suggest that major earthquakes have happened or could happen in southeastern Tennessee. Earthquakes in the Piedmont are of a different type, being mostly shallow, consistent with failure along joints and predominantly associated with reservoir impoundment. This mechanism may leave an upper magnitude limit of 5.7. In Alabama, except near southeastern Tennessee, the seismicity is largely induced by coal mine collapses. 3 figs.

  9. OVERFLOW ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA AND NORTH CAROLINA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koeppen, Robert P.; Davis, Michael P.

    1984-01-01

    The Overflow Roadless Area in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Georgia and North Carolina is underlain by complexly folded schist and gneiss of Proterozoic age. A mineral-resource survey found little likelihood for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources in the area. Minor isolated localities of mica pegmatite and amethyst gemstone occur in the area. Gneiss and schist suitable for rock aggregate are present in large quantities, but similar rocks abound outside the area. Natural gas may possibly be present at great depth beneath the overthrust of the Blue Ridge. Further seismic studies and exploratory drilling are needed to evaluate the natural gas potential of this part of the Eastern Overthrust Belt.

  10. Groundwater conditions in Georgia, 2010–2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, Michael F.; Gordon, Debbie W.; Painter, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collects groundwater data and conducts studies to monitor hydrologic conditions, better define groundwater resources, and address problems related to water supply, water use, and water quality. In Georgia, water levels were monitored continuously at 186 wells during calendar year 2010 and at 181 wells during calendar year 2011. Because of missing data or short periods of record (less than 3 years) for several of these wells, a total of 168 wells are discussed in this report. These wells include 17 in the surficial aquifer system, 19 in the Brunswick aquifer system and equivalent sediments, 70 in the Upper Floridan aquifer, 16 in the Lower Floridan aquifer and underlying units, 10 in the Claiborne aquifer, 1 in the Gordon aquifer, 11 in the Clayton aquifer, 14 in the Cretaceous aquifer system, 2 in Paleozoic-rock aquifers, and 8 in crystalline-rock aquifers. Data from the well network indicate that water levels generally declined during the 2010 through 2011 calendar-year period, with water levels declining in 158 wells and rising in 10. Water levels declined over the period of record at 106 wells, increased at 56 wells, and remained relatively constant at 6 wells. In addition to continuous water-level data, periodic water-level measurements were collected and used to construct potentiometric-surface maps for the Upper Floridan aquifer in Camden, Charlton, and Ware Counties, Georgia, and adjacent counties in Florida during May–June 2010, and in the following areas in Georgia: the Brunswick area during August 2010 and August 2011, in the Albany–Dougherty County area during November 2010 and November 2011, and in the Augusta–Richmond County area during October 2010 and August 2011. In general, water levels in these areas were lower during 2011 than during 2010; however, the configuration of the potentiometric surfaces in each of the areas showed little change. Groundwater quality in the Floridan aquifer system is monitored in the

  11. U.S. Hydropower Resource Assessment - Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    A. M. Conner; B. N. Rinehart; J. E. Francfort

    1998-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the United States. For this purpose, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory developed a computer model called Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES). HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Georgia.

  12. SIMULATION OF FLOOD HYDROGRAPHS FOR GEORGIA STREAMS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Inman, E.J.; Armbruster, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    Flood hydrographs are needed for the design of many highway drainage structures and embankments. A method for simulating these flood hydrographs at urban and rural ungauged sites in Georgia is presented. The O'Donnell method was used to compute unit hydrographs from 355 flood events from 80 stations. An average unit hydrograph and an average lag time were computed for each station. These average unit hydrographs were transformed to unit hydrographs having durations of one-fourth, one-third, one-half, and three-fourths lag time and then reduced to dimensionless terms by dividing the time by lag time and the discharge by peak discharge. Hydrographs were simulated for these 355 flood events and their widths were compared with the widths of the observed hydrographs at 50 and 75 percent of peak flow. For simulating hydrographs at sites larger than 500 mi**2, the U. S. Geological Survey computer model CONROUT can be used.

  13. Seismicity map of the state of Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reagor, B. Glen; Stover, C.W.; Algermissen, S.T.; Long, L.T.

    1991-01-01

    This map is one of a series of seismicity maps produced by the U.S. Geological Survey that show earthquake data of individual states or groups of states at the scale of 1:1,000,000. This maps shows only those earthquakes with epicenters located within the boundaries of Georgia, even though earthquakes in nearby states or countries may have been felt or may have cause damage in Georgia. The data in table 1 were used to compile the seismicity map; these data are a corrected, expanded, and updated (through 1987) version of the data used by Algermissen (1969) for a study of seismic risk in the United States. The locations and intensities of some earthquakes were revised and intensities were assigned where none had been before. Many earthquakes were added to the original list from new data sources as well as from some old data sources that has not been previously used. The data in table 1 represent best estimates of the location of the epicenter, magnitude, and intensity of each earthquake on the basis of historical and current information. Some of the aftershocks from large earthquakes are listed, but not all, especially for earthquakes that occurred before seismic instruments were universally used. The latitude and longitude coordinates of each epicenter were rounded to the nearest tenth of a degree and sorted so that all identical locations were grouped and counted. These locations are represented on the map by a triangle. The number of earthquakes at each location is shown on the map by the Arabic number to the right of the triangle. A Roman numeral to the left of a triangle is the maximum Modified Mercoili intensity (Wood and Neumann, 1931) of all earthquakes at that geographic location, The absence of an intensity value indicates that no intensities have been assigned to earthquakes at that location. The year shown below each triangle is the latest year for which the maximum intensity was recorded.

  14. CHE At Georgia Tech: A Period of Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poehlein, Gary W.

    1980-01-01

    Presents information on the Georgia Institute of Technology. This information includes: (1) a brief history of the institute; (2) names of the faculty members of the chemistry and metallurgy divisions; (3) undergraduate program; and (4) graduate program. (HM)

  15. 253. Photocopy of photograph from Georgia Historical Society Cordray Foltz, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    253. Photocopy of photograph from Georgia Historical Society Cordray Foltz, photographer, date unknown WEST PARK AND BROAD STREETS - Savannah Victorian Historic District, Bounded by Gwinnett, East Broad, West Broad Street & Anderson Lane, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  16. View east of brick railroad viaduct central of Georgia ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View east of brick railroad viaduct - central of Georgia - spannin canal prism (now used as pedestrian walk) - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  17. Water harvesting experience in sub-Saharan Africa - lessons for sustainable intensification of rainfed agriculture and the influence of available soils and rainfall data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowin, John; Bunclark, Lisa

    2013-04-01

    Africa is seen by many as the continent with the greatest potential for agricultural growth, but land degradation and environmental change threaten the African soil resource more severely than in many other regions of the planet. Achieving future food security will depend mainly on increasing production from rainfed agriculture. The challenge of delivering the required sustainable intensification in rainfed agriculture is most acute in the drylands - the semi-arid and dry sub-humid climatic regions. There are two broad strategies for increasing yields under these circumstances: (1) capturing more rainwater and storing it (increasing water availability), and (2) using the available water more effectively by increasing the plant growth and/or reducing non-productive soil evaporation (increasing water productivity). We focus on the first of these options - water harvesting, which is defined as, "the collection and concentration of rainfall runoff, or floodwaters, for plant production". The benefits of water harvesting have been documented from small scale experimental plot studies, but evidence of successful adoption and impact is weak. As a contribution to improving the evidence base, we present results from an investigation conducted in SSA to gather information on progress with efforts to promote adoption of water harvesting. The intention was to investigate in detail the processes and outcomes on a large enough sample area to draw some common conclusions. This was not a comprehensive analysis of all that is happening in each country, nor was it a random sample; this was a purposive sample guided by available baseline information to permit comparative analysis. Water harvesting seems to have made the most progress where techniques can be adopted by individual farmers: in Burkina Faso and Niger micro- scale zaï /tassa and demi-lune systems; in Sudan and Tanzania meso-scale majaruba and teras systems. Macro-scale systems requiring social organisation may offer

  18. Agricultural Wastes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewell, W. J.; Switzenbaum, M. S.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of agricultural wastes, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the areas covered are: (1) water characteristics and impacts; (2) waste treatment; (3) reuse of agricultural wastes; and (4) nonpoint pollution sources. A list of 150 references is also presented. (HM)

  19. 78 FR 25253 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 26-Atlanta, Georgia; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; PBR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... Production Activity; PBR, Inc. d/b/a SKAPS Industries (Polypropylene Geotextiles); Athens, Georgia Georgia... the FTZ Board on behalf of PBR, Inc. d/b/a SKAPS Industries (SKAPS), located in Athens, Georgia....

  20. Solar total energy-large scale experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    The design and development of a 7 meter diameter parabolic dish solar collector are discussed. Each of the four main subsystems of the collector: (1) reflector, (2) mount and drives, (3) receiver and (4) the controls, is discussed briefly with the major emphasis on the receiver design. To minimize development risks and production costs, a dish design based on use of stamped aluminum petals (sectors) was chosen. This design is similar to the design of a communication antenna already commercially produced. The reflective surface of the petals has a total reflectance of .86 and a specularity (dispersion) of 8 mrd. This performance is obtained by mechanical polishing and chemical brightening of the petal surface, followed by application of a clear RTV silicone protective coating. Selection of the material and weather proofing coated are discussed. Results from performance tests on an engineering development dish collector are presented and compared with pretest predictions.

  1. A field experiment with variable-suction multi-compartment samplers to measure the spatio-temporal distribution of solute leaching in an agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Bloem, E; Hogervorst, F A N; de Rooij, G H

    2009-04-01

    Solutes spread out in time and space as they move downwards from the soil surface with infiltrating water. Solute monitoring in the field is often limited to observations of resident concentrations, while flux concentrations govern the movement of solutes in soils. A recently developed multi-compartment sampler is capable of measuring fluxes at a high spatial resolution with minimal disturbance of the local pressure head field. The objective of this paper is to use this sampler to quantify the spatial and temporal variation of solute leaching below the root zone in an agricultural field under natural rainfall in winter and spring. We placed two samplers at 31 and 25 cm depth in an agricultural field, leaving the soil above undisturbed. Each sampler contained 100 separate cells of 31x31 mm. Water fluxes were measured every 5 min for each cell. We monitored leaching of a chloride pulse under natural rainfall by frequently extracting the collected leachate while leaving the samplers buried in situ. This experiment was followed by a dye tracer experiment. This setting yielded information that widely surpassed the information that can be provided by separate anionic and dye tracer trials, and solute transport monitoring by coring or suction cups. The detailed information provided by the samplers showed that percolation at the sampling depth started much faster (approximately 3 h after the start of rainfall) in initially wet soil (pressure head above -65 cm) than in drier soil (more than 14 h at pressure heads below -80 cm). At any time, 25% of the drainage passed through 5-6% of the sampled area, reflecting the effect of heterogeneity on the flow paths. The amount of solute carried by individual cells varied over four orders of magnitude. The lateral concentration differences were limited though. This suggests a convective-dispersive regime despite the short vertical travel distance. On the other hand, the dilution index indicates a slight tendency towards stochastic

  2. Evaluation of the ground-water resources of coastal Georgia; preliminary report on the data available as of July 1983

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krause, Richard E.; Matthews, Sharon E.; Gill, Harold E.

    1984-01-01

    A compilation of ground-water data that have been collected for nearly 100 years in the coastal area of Georgia as part of cooperative activities between the U.S. Geological Survey and other agencies is presented in this report. The compilation of pertinent data indicates that information is available for use in the evaluation of the ground-water resources of the 13 counties of coastal Georgia. Included in this report is a fairly complete discussion of previous and ongoing investigations and monitoring networks, and an extensive list of references. Maps at 1:24,000, 1:100,000; and 1:1000,000 scales contain well locations and identifers for all wells in the Ground Water Site Inventory (GWSI) data base of the National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System (WATSTORE). Tabular summaries of selected site information from GWSI, including well identifiers and names , latitude-longitude location, depth of well, altitude of land surface, and use of water are presented. Water-use data from the National Water Use Data System, and water use for irrigation from the University of Georgia, Department of Agriculture survey , are tabulated. Also included are pertinent information on geophysical surveys and data obtained, and proposed project activities, particularly test-monitor well drilling.

  3. Three-dimenstional crustal velocity structure beneath the strait of georgia, British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zelt, B.C.; Ellis, R.M.; Zelt, C.A.; Hyndman, R.D.; Lowe, C.; Spence, G.D.; Fisher, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    The Strait of Georgia is a topographic depression straddling the boundary between the Insular and Coast belts in southwestern British Columbia. Two shallow earthquakes located within the strait (M = 4.6 in 1997 and M = 5.0 in 1975) and felt throughout the Vancouver area illustrate the seismic potential of this region. As part of the 1998 Seismic Hazards Investigation of Puget Sound (SHIPS) experiment, seismic instruments were placed in and around the Strait of Georgia to record shots from a marine source within the strait. We apply a tomographic inversion procedure to first-arrival travel-time data to derive a minimum-structure 3-D P-wave velocity model for the upper crust to about 13 km depth. We also present a 2-D velocity model for a profile orientated across the Strait of Georgia derived using a minimum-parameter traveltime inversion approach. This paper represents the first detailed look at crustal velocity variations within the major Cretaceous to Cenozoic Georgia Basin, which underlies the Strait of Georgia. The 3-D velocity model clearly delineates the structure of the Georgia Basin. Taking the 6 km s-1 isovelocity contour to represent the top of the underlying basement, the basin thickens from between 2 and 4 km in the northwestern half of the strait to between 8 and 9 km at the southeastern end of the study region. Basin velocities in the northeastern half are 4.5-6 km s-1 and primarily represent the Upper Cretaceous Nanaimo Group. Velocities to the south are lower (3-6 km s-1) because of the additional presence of the overlying Tertiary Huntingdon Formation and more recent sediments, including glacial and modern Fraser River deposits. In contrast to the relatively smoothly varying velocity structure of the basin, velocities of the basement rocks, which comprise primarily Palaeozoic to Jurassic rocks of the Wrangellia Terrane and possibly Jurassic to mid-Cretaceous granitic rocks of the Coast Belt, show significantly more structure, probably an indication

  4. Agriculture Education. Agricultural Metal Working.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuttgart Public Schools, AR.

    This curriculum guide is designed for group instruction of secondary agricultural education students enrolled in one or two semester-long courses in agricultural metal working. The guide presents units of study in the following areas: (1) oxyacetylene welding, (2) arc welding, (3) sheet metal, (4) blueprint reading for welders and (5) job…

  5. SeaWinds - South Georgia Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Winds are blocked by an island mountain barrier that produces a long 'shadow' of low winds on the downwind side of the island stretching for hundreds of kilometers (about 500 miles long) in this image produced from data from NASA's SeaWinds instrument on the QuikScat satellite.

    South Georgia Island, in the South Atlantic Ocean (approximately 1,500 kilometers, or miles, east of the Falkland/Malvinas Islands, is only 170 kilometers long (about 106 miles) and 30 kilometers (about 19 miles)wide, but contains 13 peaks exceeding 2,000 meters (more than 6,500 feet) in height. The island thus acts as a significant barrier to the surface winds in this forbidding part of the world oceans.

    Mountainous islands and steep coastal topography can modify the surface wind field for many hundreds of kilometers seaward. The detailed air-sea-land interaction processes involved are not well understood, largely because of a lack of accurate, high-resolution, extensive wind speed and direction measurements. The broad-swath, all-weather SeaWinds instrument on NASA's QuikScat satellite is providing unique measurements of ocean winds, revealing previously unknown wind patterns caused by island topography and allowing development of improved models for coastal ocean winds.

    This image shows QuikScat measurements of wind speed and direction during a single pass over South Georgia Island on September 13, 1999. The island itself is shown as black (for heights less than 750 meters(less than half a mile), green (for heights between 750 and 1,500 meters (less than half a mile to about one mile), and red (for regions greater than 1,500 meters, or about one mile in altitude). The white area surrounding the island represents the region where land contamination does not allow wind measurements to be made. The horizontal and vertical coordinates are in kilometers, with origin on the island at latitude 54.5 degrees south, longitude 30 degrees east.

    This large-scale view shows regions of

  6. Tectonics of the Georgia Basin, northwest Washington State, USA, and southwest British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polivka, Peter Michael

    GPS strain and recent neotectonic studies in northwest Washington and southwest British Columbia indicate long term north-south shortening of the Cascadia forearc extends north of recognized active faults. This study reviews seismic reflection profiles from the SHIPS 1998 and 2002 experiments in conjunction with industry data to identify active geologic structures capable of accommodating this unaccounted strain. Here a new active northeast striking thrust system in southern Strait of Georgia is identified, the fault ruptured during the 1997 earthquake near Gabriola Island and Vancouver B.C. is imaged, and the first subsurface images of the Sandy Point Fault are presented.

  7. Agricultural Microbiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brill, Winston J.

    1981-01-01

    Elucidates strategies for applying microbiological techniques to traditional agricultural practices. Discusses the manipulation of microorganisms that live with plants and also the problems involved in the introduction of new genes into crop plants by recombinant DNA methods. (CS)

  8. Agricultural Geophysics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The four geophysical methods predominantly used for agricultural purposes are resistivity, electromagnetic induction, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and time domain reflectometry (TDR). Resistivity and electromagnetic induction methods are typically employed to map lateral variations of apparent so...

  9. Tectonic architecture of central Georgia Eastern Piedmont

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, H.D. Jr.; Brueggemann, M.; Pospisil, M. . Dept. of Geography and Geology); Boland, I.; Pray, J.; Secor, D.T.; Steinke, T.; West, T. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Sacks, P. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Recent work suggests the following for the tectonic architecture of the central Georgia Eastern Piedmont. The Alleghenian-age, Modoc fault zone (MZ), first defined in S. Carolina, continues along strike (c. S60W) at least to the Ocmulgee R. (net length = 250 km), where it converges with the Ocmulgee (OF) and Goat Rock (GR) faults. Diverging to the S from the MZ is a sharp contact between migmatitic amphibolites and gneisses of the Sinclair Lake terrane (SLt) and lower grade metapelites and metapsammites of the Milledgeville terrane (Mt). Both are introduced by post-kinematic granites (likely Alleghanian). A previously undescribed, 10 km long ultramafite belt within SLt, the Shoulderbone zone (Sz), is concordantly foliated with respect to surrounding rocks--hence emplacement is considered as pre- or synkinematic. Numerous smaller ultramafite bodies exist within SLt, Metavolcanic rocks N of SLt and the intervening MZ are interpreted as Carolina slate belt (CSB) rocks extending farther SW than often depicted. Arc volcanism and plutonism, terrane amalgamation and subsequent Alleghanian plutonism, dextral shear zones (some with extensional components), and local tight folding contributed to the present architecture. Locally, accretionary wedge material may exist, but the authors find published views and maps describing the entire area as primarily an accretionary wedge thrust stack to be inappropriate.

  10. Human papillomavirus vaccination among adolescents in Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Natasha L; Weiss, Paul; Gargano, Lisa M; Seib, Katherine; Rask, Kimberly J; Morfaw, Christopher; Murray, Dennis; DiClemente, Ralph J; Hughes, James M; Sales, Jessica M

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage for adolescent females and males remains low in the United States. We conducted a 3-arm randomized controlled trial (RCT) conducted in middle and high schools in eastern Georgia from 2011–2013 to determine the effect of 2 educational interventions used to increase adolescent vaccination coverage for the 4 recommended adolescent vaccines: Tdap, MCV4, HPV and influenza. As part of this RCT, this article focuses on: 1) describing initiation and completion of HPV vaccine series among a diverse population of male and female adolescents; 2) assessing parental attitudes toward HPV vaccine; and 3) examining correlates of HPV vaccine series initiation and completion. Parental attitude score was the strongest predictor of HPV vaccine initiation among adolescents (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 2.08; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.80, 2.39). Other correlates that significantly predicted HPV series initiation were gender, study year, and intervention arm. Parental attitudes remained a significant predictor of receipt of 3 doses of HPV vaccine along with gender, race, school type and insurance type. This study demonstrates that positive parental attitudes are important predictors of HPV vaccination and critical to increasing coverage rates. Our findings suggest that more research is needed to understand how parental attitudes are developed and evolve over time. PMID:25912372

  11. Human papillomavirus vaccination among adolescents in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Natasha L; Weiss, Paul; Gargano, Lisa M; Seib, Katherine; Rask, Kimberly J; Morfaw, Christopher; Murray, Dennis; DiClemente, Ralph J; Hughes, James M; Sales, Jessica M

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage for adolescent females and males remains low in the United States. We conducted a 3-arm randomized controlled trial (RCT) conducted in middle and high schools in eastern Georgia from 2011-2013 to determine the effect of 2 educational interventions used to increase adolescent vaccination coverage for the 4 recommended adolescent vaccines: Tdap, MCV4, HPV and influenza. As part of this RCT, this article focuses on: 1) describing initiation and completion of HPV vaccine series among a diverse population of male and female adolescents; 2) assessing parental attitudes toward HPV vaccine; and 3) examining correlates of HPV vaccine series initiation and completion. Parental attitude score was the strongest predictor of HPV vaccine initiation among adolescents (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 2.08; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.80, 2.39). Other correlates that significantly predicted HPV series initiation were gender, study year, and intervention arm. Parental attitudes remained a significant predictor of receipt of 3 doses of HPV vaccine along with gender, race, school type and insurance type. This study demonstrates that positive parental attitudes are important predictors of HPV vaccination and critical to increasing coverage rates. Our findings suggest that more research is needed to understand how parental attitudes are developed and evolve over time. PMID:25912372

  12. Vertigo syndromes associated with earthquake in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Tevzadze, N; Shakarishvili, R

    2007-01-01

    Georgia experienced strong earthquake, after this event the amount of patients with vestibular symptoms increased. Study evaluates 60 outpatients (51 females, 9 males) aged from 18 to 85 years old who applied at outpatient clinics with vestibular complaints in the initial weeks following the earthquake. BPPV and PPV are the most common causes of vertigo. "Idiopathic" BPPV is the cause of BPPV in 50-70% of cases. Head trauma, vestibular neuritis, Meniere disease, migraine are the most common causes of "secondary" BPPV. (PPV) syndrome characterized by dizziness, subjective disturbance of balance and by perception of illusory body perturbations, usually triggered by perceptual stimulus. PPV frequently associated with anxiety symptoms in patients with obsessive-compulsive type personality. The study revealed "Idiopathic" BPPV in 49 cases and "secondary" types BPPV in 11 cases. 37 previously documented histories of BPPV patients had features typical for posterior semisercircular canal BPPV and 23 patients experienced subjective disturbance symptoms like BPPV, but there were no abnormal responses in their vestibular testing. It is assumed that earthquake could manifest psychogenic vertigo with panic attacks, anxiety, agoraphobia, PPV and could provoke a transition from organic vertigo to PPV. It is concluded that psychological stress play an important role in occurring "secondary" BPPV, earthquake may trigger exacerbation of "secondary" BPPV and could be provoked factor to developing psychogenic vertigo, mostly PPV.

  13. Sweat Farm Road Fire in Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Dense plumes of blue-white smoke billowed from the Sweat Farm Road Fire in southern Georgia on April 19, 2007, when the Landsat 5 satellite captured this detailed image. The fire started on April 16, when a tree fell on a power line and, fanned by strong winds, quickly exploded into a major fire. By April 19, the fire had forced officials to close several roads, including U.S. Highway 1, and to evacuate hundreds of people from the perimeter of the city of Waycross, the silver cluster along the top edge of the image. The nearness of the fire is evident in the dark brown, charred land just south of the city. The active fire front is along the south edge of the burned area, where the flames are eating into the dark green hardwood forests, pine plantations, and shrubs in Okefenokee Swamp. Because of the difficult terrain, the fire and the adjoining Big Turnaround Complex fire are expected to burn until significant rain falls, said the morning report issued by the Southern Area Coordination Center on May 4. 'In the long term, the burning of the swamp will ultimately benefit the swamp wilderness habitat, which is a fire-dependent ecosystem,' said a press release issued from the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge on May 4. Such ecosystems require fire to remain healthy. In the case of southern pine forests, many pine species need fire to remove litter from the ground and release soil nutrients so that new seedlings can grow.

  14. Industrial-type sweet potatoes: a renewable energy source for Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.R.; Smittle, D.A.

    1983-06-01

    Screening sweet potato breeding lines and cultivars for high content of fermentables was more easily accomplished when percent dry weight, rather than percent sugar and starch, was used as the measurement criterion. A regression equation was established to estimate the percent fermentables from dry weight determinations. Percent fermentables and biomass yield can then be used to estimate alcohol-production potential. Considerable variations in alcohol-production potential and biomass yield occurred among genotypes. High biomass yield should be combined with high fermentable carbohydrate content to maximize alcohol-production potential. Many of the high starch-containing industrial-type sweet potatoes meet these requirement better than the table types which were developed for human consumption. Industrial-type sweet potatoes may also be better suited than some other crops for biomass farming if alcohol production becomes a part of Georgia agriculture and if sweet potato production costs can be reduced.

  15. Erosion, sediment discharge, and channel morphology in the Upper Chattahoochee River basin, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faye, Robert E.; Carey, W.R.; Stamer, J.K.; Kleckner, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Average annual rates of sheet erosion and sediment discharge were computed for several watersheds in the Upper Chattahoochee River basin in Georgia. Erosion yields ranged from about 900 to 6,000 tons per year per square mile in nine watersheds and were greatest where land use is largely agricultural or transitional. Suspended sediment yields from the same watershed ranged from about 300 to 800 tons per year per square mile and were greatest from urban areas and least from mostly forested watersheds. The impact of suspended sediment on stream quality was evaluated for 14 watersheds. In general, 60 percent or more of the total annual discharge of trace metals and phosphorus was contributed by suspended sediment. Yields of trace metals and nutrients in suspension were consistently greater in urban watersheds. Turbidity in basin streams increased geometrically with increasing concentrations of suspended sediment. (Woodard-USGS)

  16. Mapping southern Atlantic coastal marshland, South Carolina-Georgia, using ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. R. (Principal Investigator); Carter, V. L.; Mcginness, J. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Southeastern coastal marshes are among the most extensive and productive in the United States. A relatively low cost, moderately accurate method is needed to map these areas for management and protection. Ground based and low altitude aircraft methods for mapping are time consuming and quite expensive. The launch of NASA's ERTS-1 has provided an opportunity to test the feasibility of mapping wetlands using small scale imagery. The test site selected was an area from the South Carolina border to Saint Catherine's Island, Georgia. Results of the investigation indicate that the following may be ascertained from ERTS-1 imagery: (1) upper wetland boundary; (2) drainage pattern in the wetland; (3) plant communities such as Spartina alterniflora, Spartina patens, Juncus roemerianus; (4) ditching activities associated with agriculture; (5) lagooning for water-side home development. Conclusions are that ERTS-1 will be an excellent tool for many types of coastal wetland mapping.

  17. 76 FR 28219 - Georgia Power Company; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    .... Applicant: Georgia Power Company. e. Name of Project: Wallace Pumped Storage Project. f. Location: Lake.... Applicant Contact: Susan Davis, Georgia Power Company, 125 Wallace Dam Road, Eatonton, GA 31024. ] i....

  18. Water use in Georgia by county for 2010 and water-use trends, 1985–2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Stephen J.

    2015-12-16

    About 2,225 Mgal/d of water was returned to Georgia streams and lakes in 2010 under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System program administered by the Georgia Environmental Protection Division. This am

  19. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 83-369-1672, Lockheed-Georgia Company, Marietta, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Salisbury, S.; McConnell, R.; Anger, K.

    1986-02-01

    Working conditions were evaluated in Building 84, at the Lockheed/Georgia Company, Marietta, Georgia where parts removed from C54 aircraft wings were spray-cleaned with 1,1,1-trichloroethane or a solvent blend called Turco T-1000. An authorized representative of the Aeronautical Machinists and Aerospace Workers, Lodge 709, had requested the evaluation to investigate health hazards in Building 84. Air samples taken near an exhaust-ventilation booth were analyzed for solvents. Personal air sampling detected exposures at concentrations well below NIOSH evaluation criteria: 23 parts per million (ppm) 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 350ppm limit; 5.8ppm methylene-chloride, 75ppm limit; 2.8ppm tetrachloroethylene, 50ppm limit; 1.2ppm aromatic hydrocarbons, 25ppm limit; 0.2ppm diacetone-alcohol, 50ppm limit; 0.5ppm n-butanol, 50ppm limit; and 0.2ppm xylene, 100ppm limit. Blood carboxyhemoglobin, total urinary trichloro compounds and m-methyl-hippuric-acid were within or below normal levels. The authors conclude that no solvent exposures above NIOSH recommended levels were detected during the evaluation.

  20. Sulfate reduction in the salt marshes at Sapelo Island, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, R.W.; Giblin, A.

    1983-01-01

    Sulfate reduction rates were measured in stands of Spartina alterniflora at Sapelo Island, Georgia, in November 1980 by injecting tracer amounts of /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ into cores, incubating overnight, and analyzing for the incorporation of /sup 35/S into reduced sulfur compounds. Qualitatively, sulfate reduction in the Georgia marsh is very similar to that in the Massachusetts marshes the authors have studied: FeS/sup 2/ (pyrite or marcasite) is the major end product. Lesser amounts of soluble sulfides, iron monosulfides, and elemental sulfur are also formed. The rate of sulfate reduction (determined by the same method)is significantly lower during November in Georgia than in the Great Sippewissett Marsh in Massachusetts, 0.090 vs. 0.27 moles SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/xm/sup -2/xd/sup -1/ in stands of short Spartina. The lower rates in Georgia may reflect a lower rate of organic carbon input by below ground production. Sulfate reduction appears to be the major form of respiration in the sediments of salt marshes in Georgia as well as in Massachusetts.

  1. Deposits of Claiborne and Jackson age in Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooke, Charles Wythe; Shearer, Harold Kurtz

    1919-01-01

    In 1911 the Geological Survey of Georgia published as Bulletin 26 a "Preliminary report on the geology of the Coastal Plain of Georgia," by Otto Veatch and Lloyd William Stephenson, prepared in cooperation with the United States Geological Survey under the supervision of T. Wayland Vaughan, a geologist in charge of Coastal Plain investigations, who contributed the determinations of the invertebrate fossils of the Tertiary and Quaternary formations. Although this report constituted a decided advance in our knowledge of the geology of the Coastal Plain of Georgia, it was admittedly of reconnaissance character, and corrections and additions to it were to be expected. During the last few years field work has been prosecuted vigorously in the Coastal Plain of Georgia, and the additional information thus accumulated throws light upon certain problems of stratigraphy left unsolved by Veatch and Stephenson and alters considerably some of their correlations. The object of the present paper is to present the new evidence regarding the age and correlation of the Eocene formations of Georgia and to revise in accordance with present knowledge the descriptions of the deposits of Claiborne and Jackson age.

  2. Georgia's Ground-Water Resources and Monitoring Network, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nobles, Patricia L.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) ground-water network for Georgia currently consists of 170 wells in which ground-water levels are continuously monitored. Most of the wells are locatedin the Coastal Plain in the southern part of the State where ground-water pumping stress is high. In particular, there are large concentrations of wells in coastal and southwestern Georgia areas, where there are issues related to ground-water pumping, saltwater intrusion along the coast, and diminished streamflow in southwestern Georgia due to irrigation pumping. The map at right shows the USGS ground-water monitoring network for Georgia. Ground-water levels are monitored in 170 wells statewide, of which 19 transmit data in real time via satellite and posted on the World Wide Web at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ga/nwis/current/?type=gw . A greater concentration of wells occurs in the Coastal Plain where there are several layers of aquifers and in coastal and southwestern Georgia areas, which are areas with specific ground-water issues.

  3. Implementation of telepathology in the republic of georgia.

    PubMed

    Kldiashvili, Ekaterina; Schrader, Thomas

    2009-06-01

    Telepathology in the Republic of Georgia is still evolving. Although much progress has been made around the world, especially in the field of digital imaging and virtual slides, telepathology in Georgia still revolves around static telepathology. The results of the NATO Networking Infrastructure Grant "ePathology-Virtual Pathology Center in Georgia as the continuation of Virtual Health Care Center" are presented. It is a practical implementation of telepathology in Georgia as a best practice example. Using basic methodology: idea-analysis-conception-implementation-test/deployment, the ePathology server was created for the establishment of telepathology in Georgia. Two main services were made available on the server: Simple Machines Forum (eConsultation) and Moodle (eLearning) under the premise "keep it small, safe, and simple." The ePathology server works well. By its application, introduction of the Pap-smear technique and 2001 Bethesda System for reporting cervicovaginal cytologic diagnosis has been done. The application of easily available and adaptable technology, together with the improvement of the infrastructure conditions, is the essential basis for telemedical applications. Telepathology is a very useful and applicable tool for consulting on difficult pathology cases. It has significantly increased knowledge exchange and thereby ensured a better medical service. PMID:19548828

  4. Spatial Variation in Storm Surge in the Strait of Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soontiens, N. K.; Allen, S. E.; Latornell, D.; Le Souef, K.; Machuca, I.

    2014-12-01

    The Strait of Georgia is a strongly stratified, deep body of water located between Vancouver Island and the mainland of British Columbia and is connected to the Pacific Ocean via the Strait of Juan de Fuca to the south and Johnstone Strait to the north. It is on average 220 km in length and 30 km wide and its maximum depth is 420 m. During the winter months, coastal communities in the Strait of Georgia are at risk to flooding caused by storm surges, a natural hazard that occurs when a strong wind storm with low atmospheric pressure coincides with an unusually high tide. This study presents storm surge hindcasts of significant events between 2006 and 2009 using a numerical model of the Straits of Georgia, Juan de Fuca, Johnstone and Puget Sound (together the Salish Sea). The model is based on the Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean (NEMO) in a regional configuration. Realistic stratification is produced by including input from the surrounding rivers. A discussion on the sensitivity of modelled surge amplitude to open boundary conditions and atmospheric forcing will be presented. As barotropic models have previously shown, the surge entering the domain from the Pacific Ocean contributes most significantly. Surge amplitudes are found to be greater within the Strait of Georgia than those in the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Local wind patterns cause spatial variations in the strength of the surge in the Strait of Georgia, generally leading to stronger surges on the Mainland side of the Strait.

  5. Experiences in Systemic Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Scott; Clem, Joe; Battino, Wendy; Richter, Kurt; Reigeluth, Charles; Doll, Marcelle; Moore, Julie; Hoo, Janet; Malopinsky, Larissa V.

    2006-01-01

    This section describes the systemic change experiences in Norfolk Public Schools, Chugach School District, Indianapolis Metropolitan School District of Decatur Township, Ditmas Educational Complex, Georgia Systemic Teacher Education Program, Sun Microsystems, and Azerbaijan. It provides a description of the change process and discusses the…

  6. How to Hold a Model Legislature: A Simulation of the Georgia General Assembly, Teacher's Manual [And] The Model Legislature, Student's Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Edwin L.

    The student's kit and teacher's manual provide a framework for secondary students to simulate the functionings of Georgia's General Assembly. Objectives of the simulation are to help students: (1) experience the forces and conflicts involved in lawmaking, (2) learn about the role of legislators, (3) understand and discuss issues facing citizens,…

  7. 40 CFR 81.58 - Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.58 Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama)...

  8. 40 CFR 81.58 - Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.58 Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama)...

  9. 40 CFR 81.58 - Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.58 Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama)...

  10. 40 CFR 81.58 - Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.58 Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama)...

  11. 40 CFR 81.58 - Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City... PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.58 Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama)...

  12. The Response of Local School Systems in Georgia to Fiscal and Economic Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alm, James; Sjoquist, David L.

    2009-01-01

    The 2001 recession had a major effect on Georgia's fiscal condition. We explore how economic conditions affected state and local financing of K-12 education in Georgia. We find that the magnitude of postrecession cuts in state real revenue per student varied widely across the local school systems in Georgia. We then examine whether and how cuts in…

  13. 78 FR 52219 - State of Georgia Relinquishment of Sealed Source and Device Evaluation and Approval Authority

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ... (SS&D) applications in the State of Georgia and approved the Governor of the State of Georgia's... approve SS&D applications. On June 5, 2013, the NRC received a letter from Georgia Governor Nathan Deal... and approve SS&D applications, and asking the NRC to assume regulatory authority over this...

  14. 78 FR 20091 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, Georgia, Authorization of Production Activity, Perkins Shibaura...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 26--Atlanta, Georgia, Authorization of Production Activity, Perkins Shibaura Engines, LLC (Diesel Engines), Griffin, Georgia On November 29, 2012, Georgia Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ 26,...

  15. 75 FR 41884 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Georgia Department of Transportation, Atlanta, GA; University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Georgia Department of Transportation, Atlanta, GA... and associated funerary objects in the control of the Georgia Department of Transportation, Atlanta... Environmental Services-16th Floor, One Georgia Center, 600 West Peachtree St. NW, Atlanta, GA 30308,...

  16. Nutrient mass balance and trends, Mobile River Basin, Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harned, D.A.; Atkins, J.B.; Harvill, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    A nutrient mass balance - accounting for nutrient inputs from atmospheric deposition, fertilizer, crop nitrogen fixation, and point source effluents; and nutrient outputs, including crop harvest and storage - was calculated for 18 subbasins in the Mobile River Basin, and trends (1970 to 1997) were evaluated as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Agricultural nonpoint nitrogen and phosphorus sources and urban nonpoint nitrogen sources are the most important factors associated with nutrients in this system. More than 30 percent of nitrogen yield in two basins and phosphorus yield in eight basins can be attributed to urban point source nutrient inputs. The total nitrogen yield (1.3 tons per square mile per year) for the Tombigbee River, which drains a greater percentage of agricultural (row crop) land use, was larger than the total nitrogen yield (0.99 tons per square mile per year) for the Alabama River. Decreasing trends of total nitrogen concentrations in the Tombigbee and Alabama Rivers indicate that a reduction occurred from 1975 to 1997 in the nitrogen contributions to Mobile Bay from the Mobile River. Nitrogen concentrations also decreased (1980 to 1995) in the Black Warrior River, one of the major tributaries to the Tombigbee River. Total phosphorus concentrations increased from 1970 to 1996 at three urban influenced sites on the Etowah River in Georgia. Multiple regression analysis indicates a distinct association between water quality in the streams of the Mobile River drainage basin and agricultural activities in the basin.

  17. ANALYSIS OF SOME EPIDEMIOLOGICAL RATES OF SUICIDE IN GEORGIA.

    PubMed

    Kiladze, L; Lezhava, G; Gadelia, E

    2016-06-01

    In the last few years, significant increase in the incidence of suicide is observed in Georgia, especially among teenagers. Effectiveness of suicide prevention greatly depends on adequate determination of causes of suicide. Statistics of suicidal death and attempts in Georgia are recorded in two agencies: the National Statistics Office (GeoStat) and the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Georgia (MIA). Data from both agencies - main epidemiological indicators of 2011 - 2014 have been statically processed, analyzed and compared with the WHO data. Conducted research revealed significant difference between data obtained from the GeosStat and the MIA that may be the cause of absence of complete, unified system. Besides, the data are substantially different from the WHO-recognized findings. Therefore, specification of suicide's substantive criteria and improvement of the statistical data collection methodology are necessary that require joint and coordinated actions of several agencies. PMID:27441540

  18. Outcomes of Universal Access to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Tsertsvadze, Tengiz; Chkhartishvili, Nikoloz; Sharvadze, Lali; Dvali, Natia; Chokoshvili, Otar; Gabunia, Pati; Abutidze, Akaki; Nelson, Kenrad; Dehovitz, Jack; Del Rio, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Since 2004, Georgia achieved universal access to free antiretroviral therapy (ART). A retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the outcomes of Georgia's ART program. The study included adult patients enrolled in the ART program from 2004 through 2009. Of 752 patients, 76% were men, 60% were injection drug users (IDU), 59% had a history of an AIDS-defining illness, and 53% were coinfected with hepatitis C. The median baseline CD4 cell count was 141 cells/mm(3). During followup, 152 (20%) patients died, with the majority of deaths occurring within 12 months of ART initiation. Mortality was associated with advanced immunodeficiency or the presence of incurable disease at baseline. Among patients remaining on treatment, the median CD4 gain was 216 cell/mm(3) and 86% of patients had viral load <400 copies/ml at the last clinical visit. The Georgia ART program has been successful in treating injection drug users infected with HIV.

  19. LANDSAT data for state planning. [of transportation for Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faust, N. L.; Spann, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    The results of an effort to generate and apply automated classification of LANDSAT digital data to state of Georgia problems are presented. This phase centers on an analysis of the usefulness of LANDSAT digital data to provide land-use data for transportation planning. Hall County, Georgia was chosen as a test site because it is part of a seventeen county area for which the Georgia Department of Transportation is currently designing a Transportation Planning Land-Use Simulation Model. The land-cover information derived from this study was compared to several other existing sources of land-use data for Hall County and input into this simulation. The results indicate that there is difficulty comparing LANDSAT derived land-cover information with previous land-use information since the LANDSAT data are acquired on an acre by acre grid basis while all previous land-use surveys for Hall County used land-use data on a parcel basis.

  20. Agricultural application of SWECS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, V.

    Principal applications of wind energy for agriculture are (1) farmstead power, mainly electrical, (2) building heating, (3) irrigation pumping, (4) product storage and processing, (5) hot water for residences and dairies, and (6) associated industries of agribusiness such as feedlots, fertilizer elevators, greenhouses, etc. Field experiments show that wind energy is a viable alternative, however, reliability and maintenance are still major problems. Test results of the various experiments are described.

  1. Grapevine phenology and climate change in Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cola, G.; Failla, O.; Maghradze, D.; Megrelidze, L.; Mariani, L.

    2016-10-01

    While the climate of Western Europe has been deeply affected by the abrupt climate change that took place in the late `1980s of the twentieth century, a similar signal is detected only few years later, in 1994, in Georgia. Grapevine phenology is deeply influenced by climate and this paper aimed to analyze how phenological timing changed before and after the climatic change of 1994. Availability of thermal resources in the two climatic phases for the five altitudinal belts in the 0-1250-m range was analyzed. A phenological dataset gathered in two experimental sites during the period 2012-2014, and a suitable thermal dataset was used to calibrate a phenological model based on the normal approach and able to describe BBCH phenological stages 61 (beginning of flowering), 71 (fruit set), and 81 (veraison). Calibration was performed for four relevant Georgian varieties (Mtsvane Kakhuri, Rkatsiteli, Ojaleshi, and Saperavi). The model validation was performed on an independent 3-year dataset gathered in Gorizia (Italy). Furthermore, in the case of variety Rkatsiteli, the model was applied to the 1974-2013 thermal time series in order to obtain phenological maps of the Georgian territory. Results show that after the climate change of 1994, Rkatsiteli showed an advance, more relevant at higher altitudes where the whole increase of thermal resource was effectively translated in phenological advance. For instance the average advance of veraison was 5.9 days for 250-500 m asl belt and 18.1 days for 750-1000 m asl). On the other hand, at lower altitudes, phenological advance was depleted by superoptimal temperatures. As a final result, some suggestions for the adaptation of viticultural practices to the current climatic phase are provided.

  2. Georgia's Ground-Water Resources and Monitoring Network, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2008-01-01

    Ground water is an abundant resource in Georgia, providing 1.45 billion gallons per day, or 22 percent, of the total freshwater used (including thermoelectric) in the State (Fanning, 2003). Contrasting geologic features and landforms of the physiographic provinces of Georgia affect the quantity and quality of ground water throughout the State. Most ground-water withdrawals are in the Coastal Plain in the southern one-half of the State, where aquifers are highly productive. For a more complete discussion of the State's ground-water resources, see Leeth and others (2005).

  3. Demographic manipulation in the Caucasus (with special reference to Georgia).

    PubMed

    Hewitt, B G

    1995-01-01

    The author discusses political developments in the Caucasus region since the collapse of the Soviet Union. The focus is on the events in Georgia that led to the war in South Ossetia (particularly in Abkhazia), and the author suggests that this development is the latest in a 200-year history of demographic manipulation of minority peoples by the region's two major powers, Russia and Georgia. Parallels are drawn between the Georgian war in Abkhazia and Russia's war in Chechenia. The author questions the value of the principle of territorial integrity, and suggests that alternative principles safeguarding the rights of ethnic minorities would be more appropriate in these circumstances.

  4. Privatising Agricultural Extension: Caveat Emptor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, A. D.; Lamers, J. P. A.; Ficarelli, P. P.; Hoffmann, V.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses forces promoting privatization of agricultural extension. Discusses experiences of privatization and commercialization of extension and related problems in various countries, particularly developing countries. Suggests that the state will continue to play an important role in agricultural extension in many countries and that…

  5. Agricultural Biodiversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postance, Jim

    1998-01-01

    The extinction of farm animals and crops is rarely brought up during discussions of endangered species and biodiversity; however, the loss of diversity in crops and livestock threatens the sustainability of agriculture. Presents three activities: (1) "The Colors of Diversity"; (2) "Biodiversity among Animals"; and (3) "Heirloom Plants." Discusses…

  6. AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STEVENS, GLENN Z.

    FEDERAL LEGISLATION HAS PROVIDED FOR PUBLIC PROGRAMS OF OCCUPATIONAL AGRICULTURE EDUCATION IN LAND GRANT COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES, LOCAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS, AND MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS. PROGRAM OBJECTIVES SHOULD BE TO DEVELOP KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS, PROVIDE OCCUPATIONAL GUIDANCE AND PLACEMENT, AND DEVELOP ABILITIES IN HUMAN RELATIONS AND…

  7. AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FARQUHAR, R.N.

    AUSTRALIAN AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION HAS LONG EMPHASIZED TECHNICAL ADVISORY SERVICE AT THE EXPENSE OF THE SOCIOECONOMIC ASPECTS OF FARM PRODUCTION AND FARM LIFE. ONLY IN TASMANIA HAS FARM MANAGEMENT BEEN STRESSED. DEMANDS FOR THE WHOLE-FARM APPROACH HAVE PRODUCED A TREND TOWARD GENERALISM FOR DISTRICT OFFICERS IN MOST STATES. THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT,…

  8. Tectonics of the South Georgia Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffner, David M.

    Triassic rifting of the supercontinent Pangea left behind numerous basins on what is now the eastern North American margin. The South Georgia Rift (SGR) was thought to be the best preserved of these basins having been capped by thick basalt flows of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) and later buried beneath the Cretaceous and younger Coastal Plain. Because it is buried beneath the Coastal Plain, the SGR is only known through sparse drilling and geophysical methods. Despite this limited dataset, the SGR is the only one of the eastern North American Triassic basins known to overlie the ancient Alleghanian suture between Laurentia and Gondwana, although it isn't clear what influence this lithospheric weakness played in formation of the rift. The SGR has been variably interpreted as a singular large basin or as isolated sub-basins separated by transfer zones. Transfer zones are rift-transverse structural features that link major faults of rift sub-basins and accommodate differences in extensional strain. Transfer zones have been previously hypothesized to be present in the SGR based on onshore projections of Central Atlantic fracture zones, but observations confirming their existence, such as reversal in sub-basin polarity, have been lacking. Three separate hypotheses are tested related to the SGR: 1) the J-Horizon corresponds everywhere with basalt; 2) transfer zones are an important structural component of the SGR; 3) structural features of the Central Atlantic Ocean are related to transfer zones of the SGR. Reanalysis of existing well and seismic data shows that the extent of the flood basalt in the SGR is restricted and that the J-Horizon coincides with the base of the Coastal Plain. Subsurface mapping reveals reversals in sub-basin polarity, confirming the existence of previously hypothesized transfer zones. Small circle projections of the transfer zones correlate with oceanic features, and Central Atlantic fracture zones project onshore into inferred

  9. Epidemiology of Visceral Leishmaniasis in Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Babuadze, Giorgi; Alvar, Jorge; Argaw, Daniel; de Koning, Harry P.; Iosava, Merab; Kekelidze, Merab; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Tsereteli, David; Chakhunashvili, Giorgi; Mamatsashvili, Tamar; Beria, Nino; Kalandadze, Irine; Ejov, Mikhail; Imnadze, Paata

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the transmission and prevalence of Leishmania parasite infection of humans in two foci of Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) in Georgia, the well known focus in Tbilisi in the East, and in Kutaisi, a new focus in the West of the country. The seroprevalence of canine leishmaniasis was investigated in order to understand the zoonotic transmission. Blood samples of 1575 dogs (stray and pet) and 77 wild canids were tested for VL by Kalazar Detect rK39 rapid diagnostic tests. Three districts were investigated in Tbilisi and one in Kutaisi. The highest proportions of seropositive pet dogs were present in District #2 (28.1%, 82/292) and District #1 (26.9%, 24/89) in Tbilisi, compared to 17.3% (26/150) of pet dogs in Kutaisi. The percentage of seropositive stray dogs was also twice as high in Tbilisi (16.1%, n = 670) than in Kutaisi (8%, n = 50); only 2/58 wild animals screened were seropositive (2. 6%). A total of 873 Phlebotomine sand flies were collected, with 5 different species identified in Tbilisi and 3 species in Kutaisi; 2.3% of the females were positive for Leishmania parasites. The Leishmanin Skin Test (LST) was performed on 981 human subjects in VL foci in urban areas in Tbilisi and Kutaisi. A particularly high prevalence of LST positives was observed in Tbilisi District #1 (22.2%, 37.5% and 19.5% for ages 5–9, 15–24 and 25–59, respectively); lower prevalence was observed in Kutaisi (0%, 3.2% and 5.2%, respectively; P<0.05). This study shows that Tbilisi is an active focus for leishmaniasis and that the infection prevalence is very high in dogs and in humans. Although exposure is as yet not as high in Kutaisi, this is a new VL focus. The overall situation in the country is alarming and new control measures are urgently needed. PMID:24603768

  10. Systemic Efforts in Georgia to Improve Education Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Deb

    2010-01-01

    Research points to links between school and school district leadership and student achievement. Local and national education reform has created rising expectations for student performance. Education leadership is both complex and high stakes. Key stakeholders in Georgia have developed a solution to improve factors in the work, workplace, and…

  11. The Georgia Psychoeducational Network (GPN) Research Report, 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, William W., Ed.; Brown, Carvin L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This research report contains seven papers on students with serious Emotional Disturbances (SED) and/or Severe Behavior Disorder (SBD) who participated in the Georgia Psychoeducational Network Program (GPN). "The 1982 Cohort of GPN Preschoolers--Where Are They in 1987-1988?" (Juanda Ponsell and others) reports the placement of 75 preschoolers with…

  12. Student Retention and Graduation, University System of Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University System of Georgia, Atlanta. Office of Research and Planning.

    Describing outcomes related to student retention and graduation in the University System of Georgia, this six-part report discusses definitions and assumptions pertaining to retention and compares success rates for black, white, developmental studies, and regularly-admitted freshmen students in USG senior and two-year colleges. Section 1 provides…

  13. 77 FR 64946 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Maysville, Georgia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Maysville, Georgia AGENCY: Federal Communications... Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Nazifa Sawez, Assistant Chief, Audio... proposes to amend 47 CFR part 73 as follows: PART 73--RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES 1. The authority...

  14. Nutrition Education Module Appeals to Students at Georgia State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kicklighter, Jana; Jonnalagadda, Satya S.; McClendon, Jamie; Hopkins, Barbara L.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the development and evaluation of a nutrition education module, "Nutrition Survival Skills," for freshmen students at a large urban university. Students' perceptions of the module, presented by five nutrition graduate students as part of Freshmen Learning Communities (FLCs) and Georgia State University (GSU) 1010, New…

  15. 76 FR 29285 - Georgia Disaster Number GA-00033

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... Only for the State of Georgia (FEMA-1973-DR), dated 04/29/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Associated Flooding. Incident Period: 04/27/2011 through 04/28/2011. Effective Date: 05/07/2011. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 06/28/2011. Economic Injury (EIDL)...

  16. Retention in Special Education Teachers in Georgia: A Phenomenological Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Arndra N.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study using a phenomenological approach was to identify and examine factors influencing the retention rate of special education teachers in rural and urban schools in middle Georgia. Provided in this study are factors that are related to retention in special education teachers. Semistructured interviews were used to…

  17. Per Pupil Expenditures and Academic Achievement in Georgia School Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Beurden, Krista

    2011-01-01

    Student achievement and public school funding are national concerns. Federal, state, and local funding vary across the nation and within systems in each state. In the past several years, Georgia school systems have faced austerity cuts by the state legislature and governor, and function with less money while trying to improve student achievement…

  18. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Quota System in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabatadze, Shalva; Gorgadze, Natia

    2013-01-01

    This document is the report on research which was undertaken by the Center of Civil Integration and Inter-Ethnic Relations and financed by the United Nations Association in Georgia within the project "Advanced National Integration" funded by United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The research aimed at the evaluation…

  19. Student Financial Aid Issues Hearing Report (Atlanta, Georgia,

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance, Washington, DC.

    This paper summarizes results of a hearing by the Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance in Atlanta, Georgia, on the delivery and disposition of higher education student financial assistance funds. Seventeen individuals offered testimony. They included representatives of guarantee agencies, the lending community, the financial aid…

  20. Ratings of Job Performance of Georgia Correctional Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nosin, Jerome Alan

    Expansion and modification of a 27-item Delphi derived form for assessing campus police performance resulted in a 43-item form to measure job performance of correctional officers in the Georgia Department of Corrections. The self-rating scale, with a reliability coefficient of .995 (n=120) was subjected to factor analysis and varimax rotation and…

  1. 50 CFR Figure 4 to Part 223 - Georgia TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Georgia TED 4 Figure 4 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 4 Figure 4...

  2. 50 CFR Figure 4 to Part 223 - Georgia TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Georgia TED 4 Figure 4 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 4 Figure 4...

  3. Information Digest 1987-1988. University System of Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University System of Georgia, Atlanta.

    A collections of facts and statistical data to enhance understanding of the University System of Georgia is presented, updating information from earlier editions. Information was selected on the basis of the most frequently asked questions about the system and its 34 institutions. Eight sections focus on: general information (University System of…

  4. Health Care. Georgia Core Standards for Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Occupational Studies.

    This document lists core standards and occupational knowledge and skills that have been identified/validated by industry as necessary to all Georgia students in secondary-level health care occupations programs. First, foundation skills are grouped as follows: basic skills (reading, writing, arithmetic/mathematics, listening, speaking); thinking…

  5. Child Abuse and Neglect: Handbook for Social Workers in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Inst. of Social Welfare Research, Athens, GA.

    The pamphlet provides guidelines for the social worker in reporting cases of suspected child abuse and neglect as required by Georgia law. Presented is information on the following topics: overview of the problem, understanding the parent, types of abuse and neglect, the social worker's duty to report, definition of protective services, how to…

  6. Georgia REAL Enterprises: Rural Entrepreneurship through Action Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    REAL Enterprises, Inc., Athens, GA.

    This document describes REAL Enterprises, an economic education consortium working to assist young people to research, plan, set up, own, and operate economically viable small businesses in Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. The program was developed with the following goals: (1) to help rural schools become effective business incubators…

  7. Georgia Compliance Review Self-Study FY 01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta.

    Intended for evaluation of local compliance with special education federal and state legal requirements, this compliance review document includes both the compliance requirements and the criteria by which compliance is determined during the onsite compliance review of Georgia local school systems and state-operated programs. Each legal requirement…

  8. Sex Bias in Georgia High School Economics Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Glen; Hahn, Carole L.

    1982-01-01

    Analyzes 17 secondary level economics textbooks for sex bias. All of the texts reviewed are on Georgia's approved textbook list. Without exception, each of the texts is guilty of sex bias, although to varying degrees. The method used in analyzing the texts is explained. (RM)

  9. The Antebellum Georgia Publishing Industry: A Group Portrait.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberhard, Wallace B.

    Using census data from pre-Civil War Georgia at two points in time (1850 and 1860), this paper describes the Georgian publishing industry and profiles those involved in it. Microfilm editions of handwritten documents were scanned to find the names and other data (residence, job title, age, sex, place of birth, and value of property owned) of those…

  10. A Physics Laboratory at Six Flags Over Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, George; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The Six Flags Over Georgia amusement park is the setting for a one-day laboratory exercise and evaluation of high school students' understanding of physics. The concepts and general techniques measured and the park's resources are discussed. Sample student responses are included. (JN)

  11. Georgia and the Southern Regional Education Board, December 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2014

    2014-01-01

    This report details Georgia's participation in SREB programs and services from December 2013 through November 2014. Appropriations from member states support SREB's core operations and general services. SREB leverages the long-standing commitment of member states to attract external funding for an array of targeted projects for educational…

  12. Directory of Services for the Mentally Regarded in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Public Health, Atlanta. Council on Mental Retardation.

    Services available from the following state agencies in Georgia are described: the Department of Public Health, including state hospitals and schools, public health and community services, and services for maternal and child health, crippled children, and school health; the Exceptional Child and Vocational Rehabilitation Divisions of the…

  13. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Georgia. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater,…

  14. Reading Motivation and Engagement at a Rural Georgia High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winfree, Linda

    2013-01-01

    As college and workplace success becomes increasingly dependent on reading, parents and educators have become more interested in how to engage students in reading. Teachers at a rural Georgia high school have reported that students are reluctant to engage in academic reading. Guided by previous research on the factors that promote or discourage…

  15. Home Is Where You Make It: Hmong Refugees in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duchon, D. A.

    1997-01-01

    Studies the successful adaptation of Hmong refugees in the Atlanta (Georgia) area using a sample of 81 adults and 101 children. Findings highlight prevailing economic conditions, the strategies taken by local Hmong leadership, and a high rate of conversion to Christianity. (SLD)

  16. BIOGEOCHEMICAL INDICATORS OF ORGANIC WASTE CONTAMINATION IN GEORGIA PIEDMONT STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We monitored concentrations of nitrous oxide, methane, carbon dioxide, nutrients and other parameters (T, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, pH, DOC, DON, flow rate) in 17 headwater streams (watershed sizes from 0.5 to 3.4 km2) of the South Fork Broad River, Georgia wate...

  17. [AEROPOLINOLOGIC MONITORING AND DISTRIBUTION OF ALLERGOALLERGENS IN WESTERN GEORGIA].

    PubMed

    Sepiashvili, R; Khachapuridze, D; Chikhladze, M; Gamkrelidze, S

    2015-06-01

    Climate and geographical conditions such as: air temperature, humidity and plant diversity represented in the region is of great importance for prevalence of allergic diseases. All these factors will maintain growing of allergization/sensitization of the body. It is known that allergic diseases (pollinosis, bronchial asthma), the highest percentage comes on the allergens- aeropolutants, that are represented in many plants and herbs in the form of dust (ragweed pollen, alder, birch, maple, walnut, mallow, cotton plant etc.). Thus, aeropolinologic study acquires special importance helping the clinicians to solve the following issues: which plant is common for the concrete region; what is the source of dust allergy; when are they particularly dangerous for the patient; when their dust is revealed and its concentrations in air pool or how they look. Georgia is the country with diverse flora and landscapes; the climate in Georgia varies across different parts of the country. Clinical and epidemiological studies have shown that the Western Georgia is characterized by the frequency of allergic diseases. The above raises the need to create a calendar of flowering plants in Imerety region of Georgia. 69 patients with allergic rhinitis and bronchial asthma from 7 to 60 years old (34 men and 35 women) were observed. The patients underwent allegro-diagnostic investigation. The results revealed high titers on weeds (WX2). On the basis of the conducted research annual calendar of aero-allergens spread in Imerety region was composed. PMID:26087734

  18. New Teacher Induction Programs in Georgia: Common Components and Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Andrea Marshall

    2012-01-01

    With increasing demands on teachers, retaining new teachers has become more difficult in recent decades. New teacher induction programs appear to increase retention rates significantly among new teachers. Many states, including Georgia, have implemented induction programs to support and retain beginning teachers. In response to the Race to the Top…

  19. [AEROPOLINOLOGIC MONITORING AND DISTRIBUTION OF ALLERGOALLERGENS IN WESTERN GEORGIA].

    PubMed

    Sepiashvili, R; Khachapuridze, D; Chikhladze, M; Gamkrelidze, S

    2015-06-01

    Climate and geographical conditions such as: air temperature, humidity and plant diversity represented in the region is of great importance for prevalence of allergic diseases. All these factors will maintain growing of allergization/sensitization of the body. It is known that allergic diseases (pollinosis, bronchial asthma), the highest percentage comes on the allergens- aeropolutants, that are represented in many plants and herbs in the form of dust (ragweed pollen, alder, birch, maple, walnut, mallow, cotton plant etc.). Thus, aeropolinologic study acquires special importance helping the clinicians to solve the following issues: which plant is common for the concrete region; what is the source of dust allergy; when are they particularly dangerous for the patient; when their dust is revealed and its concentrations in air pool or how they look. Georgia is the country with diverse flora and landscapes; the climate in Georgia varies across different parts of the country. Clinical and epidemiological studies have shown that the Western Georgia is characterized by the frequency of allergic diseases. The above raises the need to create a calendar of flowering plants in Imerety region of Georgia. 69 patients with allergic rhinitis and bronchial asthma from 7 to 60 years old (34 men and 35 women) were observed. The patients underwent allegro-diagnostic investigation. The results revealed high titers on weeds (WX2). On the basis of the conducted research annual calendar of aero-allergens spread in Imerety region was composed.

  20. Observational and Cult Sites in Pre-Christian Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonia, Irakli; Jijelava, Badri; Gigauri, G.; Houston, Gordon

    In this chapter, we describe ancient cult and observational sites in Georgia together with cultural traditions that have astronomical significance from various parts of the country. In particular, we present the results of an archaeoastronomical investigation of the Shaori complex, and consider its possible role as an ancient "solar station" with cult significance.

  1. The Georgia Psychoeducational Network (GPN) Research Report, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, William W., Ed.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This report presents four papers on services provided to students with severe emotional and/or behavioral disorders by the Georgia Psychoeducational Network (GPN). "Teacher Ratings of Pro-social Behaviors for Medicated ADHD Students" (Catherine P. Fortner) reports on the development of positive social skills in 111 medicated male students with…

  2. An Analysis of the Arkansas-Georgia Statewide Desegregation Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Leonard L., III, Ed.

    The state desegregation plans of Arkansas and Georgia are considered in terms of the legal mandates, the history of higher education in the two states, methodological approaches of the plans, implementing the plans, and submission of plans and monitoring. Implementation efforts included disestablishment of the structure of the dual system,…

  3. Governor James Wright in Georgia, 1760-1782.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Kenneth

    One of a series of pamphlets about the American Revolution in Georgia, this document examines the role of James Wright as British governor in the colony, and his viewpoints about revolution from 1765-1775. The pamphlet can be used as supplementary reading or as a one-week unit for junior or senior high school students. A brief teacher's guide is…

  4. Georgia State University Fact Book, 1979-1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Glynton, Ed.

    Information on subjects of interest to staff, students, faculty, and friends of the Georgia State University is presented. Twelve chapters provide: (1) general information, such as a brief history, a statement of purpose and an overview of the university system of the state; (2) administration, including an administrative organizational chart; (3)…

  5. 50 CFR Figure 4 to Part 223 - Georgia TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Georgia TED 4 Figure 4 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 4 Figure 4...

  6. 50 CFR Figure 4 to Part 223 - Georgia TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Georgia TED 4 Figure 4 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 4 Figure 4...

  7. 50 CFR Figure 4 to Part 223 - Georgia TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Georgia TED 4 Figure 4 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 4 Figure 4...

  8. Social Studies for Georgia Schools: Early Childhood and Middle Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta. Div. of Curriculum Development.

    The material in this K-8 curriculum guide is designed to help local Georgia school systems integrate objective knowledge and skills in the social studies curriculum. Two chapters cover scope and sequence and instructional strategies. In chapter 1, 4 main curriculum components (knowledge, values and attitudes, skills, and social participation) are…

  9. Georgia Folklife: A Bibliography for Teachers, Art Administrators, and Fieldworkers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holtzberg, Maggie

    This bibliography lists books, articles, and journals as well as a selection of sound recordings and videotapes to assist individuals and teachers researching the folklife of Georgia. Print resources are organized under 10 major categories including: (1) "General Folklife Studies"; (2) "Fieldwork Methodology"; (3) "Regional Folklife Studies"; (4)…

  10. Medical College of Georgia Fact Book 1978-79.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Medical Coll., Augusta.

    The third edition of the Medical College of Georgia (MCG) fact book provides a chronicle of the year 1978-1979, reflecting data and events important to the institution. Sections include: general information/Augusta; general information/MCG; administration; budget and physical plant; library/learning resources; faculty; continuing education;…

  11. EAARL topography-Potato Creek watershed, Georgia, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Fredericks, Xan; Jones, J.W.; Wright, C.W.; Brock, J.C.; Nagle, D.B.

    2011-01-01

    This DVD contains lidar-derived first-surface (FS) and bare-earth (BE) topography GIS datasets of a portion of the Potato Creek watershed in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River basin, Georgia. These datasets were acquired on February 27, 2010.

  12. Benchmark Standards for Youth Apprenticeship Programs in Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Clifton L.

    A project was conducted in Georgia to improve the quality of youth apprenticeship programs by identifying and validating a benchmarking system leading toward the establishment of a set of common, valued quality components and indicators for use by local educational agencies. Project activities were undertaken to accomplish the following: (1)…

  13. The Milliken/Georgia Tech Rising Senior Summer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrawal, Pradeep K; Sommerfeld, Jude T.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Rising Senior Program at the Georgia Institute of Technology, which is a cooperative education program designed to provide student interns with an opportunity to apply engineering principles to real problems related to the business interests of the Milliken textile manufacturing company. (TW)

  14. Haymon-Morris Middle School: Keeping the Peace in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal Leadership, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article features Haymon-Morris Middle School in Winder, Georgia. This highly successful Title I middle school is tucked behind the high school in a rural area 50 miles northeast of Atlanta. The staff is dedicated to creating a culture where it is believed that a calm, serene school setting results in less stress for both students and staff…

  15. The Writing Intensive Program at the University of Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballif, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    The University of Georgia's Writing Intensive Program began--as do many college-wide writing initiatives--with faculty concern about the quality of student writing at the university. Acknowledging that the responsibility for this quality--or lack thereof--belongs to all faculty, in all disciplines, not just to first-year composition instructors…

  16. NITROUS OXIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN SMALL STREAMS OF THE GEORGIA PIEDMONT

    EPA Science Inventory

    We are measuring the dissolved nitrous oxide concentration in 17 headwater streams in the South Fork Broad River, Georgia watershed on a monthly basis. The selected small streams drain watersheds dominated by forest, pasture, developed, or mixed land uses. Nitrous oxide concentr...

  17. Teachers' Perception on Pay-for-Performance Programs in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mighty, Nardiann Kenisha

    2013-01-01

    States are implementing performance programs to help reform compensation systems for teachers; however, little is known on teachers' perception on alternative pay plans. Accordingly, this research study examined the types of pay-for-performance programs Georgia teachers prefer by exploring their perceptions of pay for individual performance, pay…

  18. Educational Trends of the Rural and Urban Population of Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarver, James D.; Stokes, C. Shannon

    Major trends in the educational status of Georgia's population were studied. These included recent changes in school enrollment of farm and nonfarm youths, and in adult educational attainment. Trends in school enrollment were studied for statewide, county, and regional differentials; and high school dropouts. Trends in educational attainment were…

  19. Georgia's Compensation Model: A Step in the Right Direction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppong, Nicholas; de Araujo, Zandra U.; Lowe, Laura; Marshall, Anne Marie; Singletary, Laura

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses House Bill 280 as a response to the state of Georgia's drastic need to recruit and produce highly qualified mathematics teachers. The bill attempts to address the shortage of fully certified secondary mathematics and science teachers by offering additional compensation to aide recruitment. The bill also provides incentives…

  20. Alcohol use among high school students - Georgia, 2007.

    PubMed

    2009-08-21

    Excessive alcohol consumption contributes to an average of approximately 4,700 deaths among underage youths in the United States each year (e.g., from homicides, motor-vehicle crashes, and suicides) and an average of 60 years of life lost per death. Although drinking by underaged persons (<21 years) is illegal in every state, youths aged 12-20 years drink nearly 20% of all the alcohol consumed in the United States. To characterize alcohol consumption by high school students in Georgia, the Georgia Division of Public Health analyzed data from the 2007 Georgia Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS). This report summarizes the results of that survey, which indicated that 38% of Georgia high school students reported current alcohol use, and 19% reported binge drinking in the past 30 days. Among students who reported current alcohol use, 44% reported that the usual type of alcohol they consumed was liquor (e.g., bourbon, rum, scotch, vodka, or whiskey), 58% reported that their usual location of alcohol consumption was at another person's home, and 37% reported that their usual source of alcohol was someone giving it to them. These results underscore the need for further research in Georgia and other states on underage drinking behavior, motives, and access to alcohol, which could facilitate development of additional effective intervention strategies. Evidence-based interventions should be sustained and strengthened; these include enforcing the age 21 minimum legal drinking age; increasing alcohol excise taxes; limiting alcohol outlet density; and maintaining existing limits on the days when alcohol can be sold. PMID:19696717

  1. Physician Manpower in Georgia: Report of the Task Force for Physician Manpower to the Georgia Comprehensive Health Planning Council.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Public Health, Atlanta. Office of Comprehensive Health Planning.

    This report is a result of a study of the state's physician manpower by representatives of the fields of medical education and professional practice in Georgia. Contents include introduction and principal findings, recommendations, and analysis of present supply of physicians and other data. Recommendations suggest improvement of the utilization…

  2. EFFECTS OF COOPERATIVE OVERHEAD PROJECTION MASTER DEVELOPMENT. AN EXPERIMENT IN USE OF A SUMMER WORKSHOP TO STIMULATE DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF VISUAL AIDS BY VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE TEACHERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MAGISOS, JOEL H.; SLEETH, STANFORD

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS PROJECT WAS TO TEST THE EFFECTS OF INVOLVING VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURAL TEACHERS IN THE DEVELOPMENT AND EXPERIMENTAL USE OF INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS. A GROUP OF 16 TEACHERS AT A SUMMER WORKSHOP PARTICIPATED IN PLANNING THE CONTENT AND DESIGN FOR 13 OVERHEAD PROJECTION MASTERS AND MADE PLANS FOR USING THEM EXPERIMENTALLY. THE…

  3. Fate and transport of pesticides in the ground water systems of southwest Georgia, 1993-2005.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Melinda S; Frick, Elizabeth A

    2008-01-01

    Modern agricultural practices in the United States have resulted in nearly unrivaled efficiency and productivity. Unfortunately, there is also the potential for release of these compounds to the environment and consequent adverse affects on wildlife and human populations. Since 1993, the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program of the U.S. Geological Survey has evaluated water quality in agricultural areas to address these concerns. The objective of this study is to evaluate trends in pesticide concentrations from 1993-2005 in the surficial and Upper Floridan aquifers of southwest Georgia using pesticide and pesticide degradate data collected for the NAWQA program. There were six compounds-five herbicides and one degradate-that were detected in more than 20% of samples: atrazine, deethylatrazine (DEA), metolachlor, alachlor, floumeturon, and tebuthiuron. Of the 128 wells sampled during the study, only eight wells had pesticide concentrations that either increased (7) or decreased (1) on a decadal time scale. Most of the significant trends were increasing concentrations of pesticides in older water; median pesticide concentrations did not differ between the surficial and Upper Floridan aquifers from 1993 and 2005. Deethylatrazine, in the Upper Floridan aquifer, was the only compound that had a significant change (increase) in concentration during the study. The limited number of wells with increases in pesticide concentrations suggest that ground-water sources of these compounds are not increasing in concentration over the time scale represented in this study.

  4. Readership Study of an Agricultural Magazine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Ted

    Since the fall of 1957, the Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station has published a semi-scientific quarterly magazine, "Louisiana Agriculture," to present information on the station's research to Louisiana citizens, particularly public officials, members of the agribusiness sector, science-oriented farmers, agriculture and science teachers, and…

  5. Theme: Teaching Physical Science Applications in Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Edward W.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Includes "Preparing Teachers to Teach Agriscience" (Osborne); "Physical Sciences and Agriculture" (Buriak); "Using Experiments to Teach Agriculture" (Miller); "Oooh-Ahhh: So That's How It Works!" (Loschen); "Keeping Agriculture in Agriscience" (Moss); "Sharpening Twist Drills" (McHargue, Hood); and "Safety in the Agriscience Laboratory"…

  6. Engaging the Demons. Report on a Collaboration between English Faculty of Baldwin High School and Georgia College & State University, Milledgeville, Georgia: 2001-02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carriere, Peter M.; Smith, Melissa

    A collaborative project between Georgia College and State University (GC&SU) and Baldwin High School (BHS) in Milledgeville, Georgia, had as its initial goals: to provide an opportunity for two-way mentoring between the GC&SU's Arts and Sciences faculty and BHS's English faculty; to improve curriculum alignment; to establish realistic expectations…

  7. Evaluation of pesticide monitoring strategies in agricultural streams based on the toxic-unit concept--experiences from long-term measurements.

    PubMed

    Bundschuh, Mirco; Goedkoop, Willem; Kreuger, Jenny

    2014-06-15

    The European Water Framework Directive requires surface water bodies to have a good chemical and ecological status. Although relatively few pesticides are included in the list of priority pollutants, they pose, due to their intrinsic biological activity, a significant risk for the integrity of aquatic ecosystems. In this context, the pesticide (up to 128 pesticides including some transformation products) exposure pattern in four agricultural streams and two rivers was determined from 2002 to 2011 under the umbrella of the Swedish national monitoring program employing time-proportional and grab sampling strategies, respectively. After transforming the measured pesticide concentrations into toxic units, the European Uniform Principles for algae (chronic), invertebrates and fish (both acute), which are partly employed as benchmark for pesticide regulation, were only occasionally (<2%) exceeded. Moreover, this evaluation showed no long-term trends over the years. However, recent publications suggested that those thresholds are not protective for ecosystem structure and function, indicating a risk of up to 20% and 35% of the samples from the agricultural streams and the rivers, respectively. Moreover, the monitoring data show a continuous but rather low toxic potential of pesticides for all three trophic levels throughout the year, which suggests pesticides as an evolutionary force in agriculturally impacted aquatic ecosystems. However, the flow-triggered sampling, which was implemented as an additional sampling strategy in one of the agricultural streams starting in 2006, displayed an up to 7-fold underestimation of the maximum concentration in terms of toxic units for daphnids and fish during run-off events. The present study thus underpins that the optimal sampling design for pesticide monitoring strongly depends on its overall purpose. If the long-term exposure pattern is of concern a time-proportional composite sampling strategy is recommended, while for an

  8. Water storage at the Panola Mountain Research Watershed, Georgia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Aulenbach, Brent T.

    2011-01-01

    Storage is a major component of a catchment water balance particularly when the water balance components are evaluated on short time scales, that is, less than annual. We propose a method of determining the storage-discharge relation using an exponential function and daily precipitation, potential evapotranspiration (PET) and baseflow during the dormant season when evapotranspiration (ET) is low. The method was applied to the 22-year data series of the 0.41-ha forested Panola Mountain Research Watershed, Georgia. The relation of cumulative daily precipitation minus daily runoff and PET versus baseflow was highly significant (r2=0.92, p<0.0001), but the initial storage for each year varied markedly. For the 22-year study period, annual precipitation and runoff averaged 1240 and 380mm, respectively, whereas the absolute catchment storage range was ~400mm, averaging 219mm annually, which is attributed to contributions of soil water and groundwater. The soil moisture of a catchment average 1-m soil depth was evaluated and suggests that there was an active (changes in soil storage during stormflow) and passive (a longer-term seasonal cycle) soil water storage with ranges of 40-70 and 100-120mm, respectively. The active soil water storage was short term on the order of days during and immediately after rainstorms, and the passive or seasonal soil storage was highest during winter when ET was lowest and lowest during summer when ET was highest. An estimate of ET from daily changes in soil moisture (ETSM) during recessions was comparable with PET during the dormant season (1.5mmday-1) but was much lower during the growing season (June through August); monthly average SMET and PET ranged from 2.8 to 4.0mmday-1 and from 4.5 to 5.5mmday-1, respectively. The growing season difference is attributed to the overestimation of PET. ETSM estimates were comparable with those derived from hillslope water balances during sprinkling experiments. Master recession curves derived from the

  9. Pesticide Detection in Rainwater, Stemflow, and Amphibians from Agricultural Spray Drift in Southern Georgia, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Amphibians are important sentinel environmental species since they integrate stressors from both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Pesticides are well established as a significant stressor for amphibians. In order to study spray-drift contributions to amphibian habitats, pestic...

  10. Privatization and management development in the healthcare sector of Georgia.

    PubMed

    West, Daniel J; Costello, Michael; Ramirez, Bernardo

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare reforms in Georgia parallel some of the major changes made by other Central and Eastern European countries. This is especially true of efforts to privatize the health sector and secure capital investments from Western Europe. Privatization of Georgian healthcare requires an understanding of the Soviet-era healthcare system and ideological orientation. Many of the issues and problems of privatization in Georgia require new knowledge to enhance equity outcomes, improve financial performance, increase access to care and encourage healthcare competition. Training existing and future healthcare leaders in modern management theory and practice is paramount. A university based health-management education partnership model was developed and implemented between several universities in the United States and Europe, along with two Georgian universities, to address workforce demands, changing market conditions, management knowledge and leadership competencies. Health-management education concentrations were developed and implemented along with several short courses to meet market demand for trained leaders and managers.

  11. Institutionalization of Migration Policy Frameworks in Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Makaryan, Shushanik; Chobanyan, Haykanush

    2015-01-01

    This article is a comparative study of the institutionalization of the migration policy frameworks of post-Soviet states Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. All three countries share common historical legacies: a Soviet past, wars and conflicts, unemployment, high emigration, and commitment to integration into European bodies. To what extent do the migration policies of these three countries (driven by contextual forces, i.e. domestic challenges) address country-specific migration dynamics? Or are they imposed by the European Union? In which dimensions have the national policies on migration of Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia evolved, and around which issues have they converged or diverged? Have these trends led to an integration of migration policymaking at the regional level in the South Caucasus? PMID:26435548

  12. Entanglement of Antarctic fur seals at Bird Island, South Georgia.

    PubMed

    Waluda, Claire M; Staniland, Iain J

    2013-09-15

    Between November 1989 and March 2013, 1033 Antarctic fur seals Arctocephalus gazella were observed entangled in marine debris at Bird Island, South Georgia. The majority of entanglements involved plastic packaging bands (43%), synthetic line (25%) or fishing net (17%). Juvenile male seals were the most commonly entangled (44%). A piecewise regression analysis showed that a single breakpoint at 1994 gave the best description of inter-annual variability in the data, with higher levels of entanglements prior to 1994 (mean=110±28) followed by persistent lower levels (mean=28±4). Records of entanglements from other sites monitored in the Scotia Sea are also presented. Legislation imposed by the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) has, to a certain extent, been effective, but persistent low levels of seal entanglements are still a cause for concern at South Georgia. PMID:23915979

  13. Georgia's Surface-Water Resources and Streamflow Monitoring Network, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nobles, Patricia L.; ,

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) network of 223 real-time monitoring stations, the 'Georgia HydroWatch,' provides real-time water-stage data, with streamflow computed at 198 locations, and rainfall recorded at 187 stations. These sites continuously record data on 15-minute intervals and transmit the data via satellite to be incorporated into the USGS National Water Information System database. These data are automatically posted to the USGS Web site for public dissemination (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ga/nwis/nwis). The real-time capability of this network provides information to help emergency-management officials protect human life and property during floods, and mitigate the effects of prolonged drought. The map at right shows the USGS streamflow monitoring network for Georgia and major watersheds. Streamflow is monitored at 198 sites statewide, more than 80 percent of which include precipitation gages. Various Federal, State, and local agencies fund these streamflow monitoring stations.

  14. The prevalence of periodontal diseases among adult population in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Tsitaishvili, L; Margvelashvili, M; Kalandadze, M; Margvelashvili, V

    2014-09-01

    The present research was conducted to estimate the prevalence of periodontal diseases in the adult population of Georgia, to study the peculiarity of their distribution within population in different regions of the country. The survey was carried out based on cluster- stratified method derived by WHO. 2370 adults including 1289 women and 1081 men distributed in 4 age groups: I - 20-34, II - 35-44, III - 45-64, IV - 65+ the residents of the city, town and village in 9 regions of Georgia and the capital Tbilisi were examined. The assessment of periodontal status and oral hygiene was based on WHO-'s recommendation. (WHO 1997 '˜Oral Health Assessment Form') Examination was done under good natural light using a mouth mirror and a periodontal index (CPI) probe for measurements of periodontal pockets depth. Questionnaires comprised questions for revealing the following risk factors: social status and family income, existence of common diseases, people'S attitude towards oral hygiene(tooth brushing, using dental floss, mouth rinsing) acceptability of dental service, sugar consumption rate, tobacco use, consumption of dairy products. The reliable statistical data received from the study relieved high prevalence of periodontal diseases in all regions: in Achara - 71.7, Mtskheta-Mtianeti - 70.8%, Imereti - 64.9%, Qvemo Qartli - 61.6%, Tbilisi - 61.8% and Shida Qartli - 60.5%, Guria - 55.9%, Samtskhe-Javakheti - 56.0%, Kakheti - 59.1%, Samegrelo - 55.2%. Despite the variability of risk factors high prevalence of inflammatory periodontal diseases in regions of Georgia was related to more extent to the low educational medical background, less dental acceptability due to not very positive attitude towards dental service and oral hygiene skills though financial problems also played substantial role. The study confirmed that periodontal diseases represent an actual problem in Georgia and need caring out serious preventive measures to enhance peoples' referral to dental service and

  15. Trends in cancer incidence rates in Georgia, 1982–2011

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Wonsuk; Coughlin, Steven S.; Lillard, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End results (SEER)-affiliated cancer registry are accessible to the public, there is a shortage of published research describing cancer incidences for White, Black, and other residents in Georgia. The objective of this research is to provide an overview of the trends in incidence of cancer in Georgia. Methods Incidence data were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) 9 program, supported by the National Cancer Institute, spanning the years 1982 to 2011. To assess trends over time, age-adjusted cancer incidence rates relative to the 2000 Standard US population and annual percent changes (APCs) were calculated using SEER*Stat software. Results In Georgia, cancer incidence rates for women increased from 365.1 per 100,000 in 1982 to 404.2 per 100,000 in 2011, with an overall APC of 0.3% (95% confidence interval: 0.2 to 0.4), but, for men, cancer incidence rates showed a slight decline from 528.0 per 100,000 in 1982 to 513.7 per 100,000 in 2011 (APC of 0.2%, 95% CI: −0.6 to 0.1). For Black, White, and Other (Asian/Pacific Islanders/American Indians) females, there were increases in incidence in this period, with APC values of 0.6, 0.4, and 0.3, respectively. For all males and for Black and White males, there were overall decreases in incidence, with APC values of −0.2. For Other males, however, the APC value was −0.9. Conclusions In Georgia, increases in cancer incidence rates occurred during 1982–2011 among the female population and within various racial groups in this population, but there was relative stability in incidence rates among the male population, except for Other males. PMID:26336654

  16. Network and computing infrastructure for scientific applications in Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvatadze, R.; Modebadze, Z.

    2016-09-01

    Status of network and computing infrastructure and available services for research and education community of Georgia are presented. Research and Educational Networking Association - GRENA provides the following network services: Internet connectivity, network services, cyber security, technical support, etc. Computing resources used by the research teams are located at GRENA and at major state universities. GE-01-GRENA site is included in European Grid infrastructure. Paper also contains information about programs of Learning Center and research and development projects in which GRENA is participating.

  17. The prevalence of periodontal diseases among adult population in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Tsitaishvili, L; Margvelashvili, M; Kalandadze, M; Margvelashvili, V

    2014-09-01

    The present research was conducted to estimate the prevalence of periodontal diseases in the adult population of Georgia, to study the peculiarity of their distribution within population in different regions of the country. The survey was carried out based on cluster- stratified method derived by WHO. 2370 adults including 1289 women and 1081 men distributed in 4 age groups: I - 20-34, II - 35-44, III - 45-64, IV - 65+ the residents of the city, town and village in 9 regions of Georgia and the capital Tbilisi were examined. The assessment of periodontal status and oral hygiene was based on WHO-'s recommendation. (WHO 1997 '˜Oral Health Assessment Form') Examination was done under good natural light using a mouth mirror and a periodontal index (CPI) probe for measurements of periodontal pockets depth. Questionnaires comprised questions for revealing the following risk factors: social status and family income, existence of common diseases, people'S attitude towards oral hygiene(tooth brushing, using dental floss, mouth rinsing) acceptability of dental service, sugar consumption rate, tobacco use, consumption of dairy products. The reliable statistical data received from the study relieved high prevalence of periodontal diseases in all regions: in Achara - 71.7, Mtskheta-Mtianeti - 70.8%, Imereti - 64.9%, Qvemo Qartli - 61.6%, Tbilisi - 61.8% and Shida Qartli - 60.5%, Guria - 55.9%, Samtskhe-Javakheti - 56.0%, Kakheti - 59.1%, Samegrelo - 55.2%. Despite the variability of risk factors high prevalence of inflammatory periodontal diseases in regions of Georgia was related to more extent to the low educational medical background, less dental acceptability due to not very positive attitude towards dental service and oral hygiene skills though financial problems also played substantial role. The study confirmed that periodontal diseases represent an actual problem in Georgia and need caring out serious preventive measures to enhance peoples' referral to dental service and

  18. Water use in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin, Alabama, Florida, and Georgia, 2010, and water-use trends, 1985-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Stephen J.

    2016-02-25

    About 70 percent of all water withdrawals in the ACF River Basin were by self-supplied agricultural water users and public water suppliers. Agricultural withdrawals were greatest in the Flint River Basin (501 Mgal/d) with ground-water representing 84 percent of the withdrawals from that basin. Within the Flint River Basin, agricultural withdrawals were greatest in the Lower Flint River and Spring Creek subbasins. About 3.52 million people were served by public water suppliers in the ACF River Basin during 2010, and 88 percent of that population used surface water. Georgia had the largest public-supplied population, representing nearly 93 percent (3.17 million) of the public-supplied population in the ACF River Basin. Public water suppliers served 193,700 people (5.7 percent) in Alabama and 31,880 people

  19. Altitude of the freshwater-saltwater interface in a regionally extensive coastal plain aquifer of Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strickland, Donald J.; Mahon, Gary L.

    1986-01-01

    Geophysical well logs from over 150 oil test and water wells in Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia were examined and calculations of the dissolved solids concentration in ground water were made using the spontaneous potential deflection as a measure of ionic activity. The values derived from these calculations were used to prepare a map showing the altitude relative to sea level at which the concentration of dissolved solids in the groundwater reached 10,000 mg/L within a regionally extensive aquifer in Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia. A dissolved solids concentration of 10,000 mg/L is used to delineate the interface between moderately saline and saline water; 10,000 mg/L dissolved solids was designated to delineate the freshwater-saltwater interface. For a finite difference computer flow model being used this interface represents the location where horizontal flow of freshwater is greatly diminished. 10 ,000 mg/L also is the lower limit for dissolved solids concentrations for water in target zones for injection wells. This 10,000 mg/L dissolved solids line is of value as a water quality indicator; although water containing 3,000 to 10,000 mg/L or more of dissolved solids is too saline for agricultural use (upper limit approximately 3,000 mg/L), it may be useful for some industrial purposes. Waters containing dissolved solids concentrations > 10,000 mg/L have little potential for any use involving human activities. (Lantz-PTT)

  20. Distribution and ecology of campylobacters in coastal plain streams (Georgia, United States of America).

    PubMed

    Vereen, Ethell; Lowrance, R Richard; Cole, Dana J; Lipp, Erin K

    2007-03-01

    Campylobacter is the leading cause of bacterium-associated diarrhea in the United States and most developed countries. While this disease is considered a food-borne disease, many clinical cases cannot be linked to a food source. In rural and agrarian areas environmental transmission may be an important factor contributing to case loads. Here we investigated the waterborne prevalence of campylobacters in a mixed-use rural watershed in the coastal plain of southern Georgia (United States). Six sites representing various degrees of agricultural and human influence were surveyed biweekly to monthly for 1 year for the presence of culturable thermophilic campylobacters and other measures of water quality. Campylobacters were frequently present in agriculture- and sewage-impacted stretches of streams. The mean campylobacter counts and overall prevalence were highest downstream from a wastewater treatment plant that handled both human and poultry slaughterhouse waste (agriculture production, human populations, and wildlife may be at risk for contamination by campylobacters and may be an important route for human exposure.

  1. Large Temporal Variations in Air-Sea CO2 Flux off the Coast of Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caves, J. K.; Sabine, C.; Cai, W.; Alin, S.

    2008-12-01

    Though the inner shelf is a small portion of global ocean area, its air-sea CO2 flux is disproportionately high. Due to its tight links with both terrestrial and oceanic systems, the inner shelf is likely to experience significant spatial and temporal variability. We measured the fugacity of CO2 (fCO2) continuously from July 2006 to June 2008 on a moored platform in Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary on Georgia's inner shelf. The long-term, high temporal resolution data has allowed us to begin to measure interannual variations in CO2 flux along the inner Georgia shelf. From July 2006-June 2007, the inner Georgia shelf was a CO2 sink (-3.26mmol/m2/day), while during following year, the shelf switched to being a source (2.26mmol/m2/day). Choice of wind data (satellite or buoy-derived) significantly alters these estimates of annual fluxes. QuikSCAT satellite wind data indicate a much larger sink (- 6.13mmol/m2/day) during 2006-2007, and a non-existent source (0.02mmol/m2/day) during 2007- 2008. An earlier, high-resolution spatial study from January 2005-May 2006 found that the inner shelf within the South Atlantic Bight may have been a source of 0.65 to 1.20mmol/m2/day, suggesting that the inner shelf may experience dramatic swings in CO2 flux. Though sea-surface temperature (SST) is the largest influence on surface water fCO2, average monthly SST varied little between both years; instead, possible explanations for the large variation in interannual CO2 flux include decreased biological production and increased river flow (and, hence carbon export) during 2007-2008. This is the first evidence of large-scale, annual switches in air-sea CO2 flux within an inner shelf, and it holds significant implications for global estimates of air-sea CO2 flux.

  2. Effect of organic fertilizers on maize production in Eastern Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolokhava, Tamar; Kenchiashvili, Naira; Tarkhnishvili, Maia; Ghambashidze, Giorgi

    2016-04-01

    Maize remains to be the most important cereal crop in Georgia. Total area of arable land under cereal crops production equals to 184 thousands hectares (FAO statistical yearbook, 2014), from which maize takes the biggest share. Leading position of maize among other cereal crops is caused by its dual purpose as food and feed product. In Spite of a relatively high production of maize to other cereals there is still a high demand on it, especially as feed for animal husbandry. The same tendency is seen in organic production, where producers of livestock and poultry products require organically grown maize, the average yield of which is much less than those produced conventionally. Therefore, it is important to increase productivity of maize in organic farms. Current study aimed to improve maize yield using locally produced organic fertilizers and to compare them to the effect of mineral fertilizers. The study was carried out in Eastern Georgia under dry subtropical climate conditions on local hybrid of maize. This is the first attempt to use hybrid maize (developed with organic plant breeding method) in organic field trials in Georgia. The results shown, that grain yield from two different types of organic fertilizers reached 70% of the yields achieved with industrial mineral fertilizers. As on farm level differences between organic and conventional maize production are much severe, the results from the field trials seems to be promising for future improvement of organic cereal crop production.

  3. Shared vision, collective impact, and persistent challenges: the first decade of Georgia's oncology research network.

    PubMed

    Paris, Nancy M; Burke, James J; Schnell, Frederick M

    2013-11-01

    Ten years ago, Georgia was lauded for dedicating a portion of tobacco settlement funds to the Georgia Cancer Coalition (GCC). The plan championed by then-Governor Roy E. Barnes was designed to make Georgia a leader in prevention, treatment, and research. This plan called for the expansion of clinical trials to ensure Georgians had access to the highest quality care based on the most current treatments and discoveries. As a result, oncologists in the state were engaged in a planning process that resulted in a shared vision to improve the quality of cancer care through research and the formation of a new organization: the Georgia Center for Oncology Research and Education.

  4. 40 CFR 81.114 - Augusta (Georgia)-Aiken (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Orangeburg County. Note: For identification purposes, the Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region is referred to by Alabama authorities as the Alabama State...

  5. 40 CFR 81.114 - Augusta (Georgia)-Aiken (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Orangeburg County. Note: For identification purposes, the Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region is referred to by Alabama authorities as the Alabama State...

  6. 40 CFR 81.114 - Augusta (Georgia)-Aiken (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Orangeburg County. Note: For identification purposes, the Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region is referred to by Alabama authorities as the Alabama State...

  7. 40 CFR 81.114 - Augusta (Georgia)-Aiken (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Orangeburg County. Note: For identification purposes, the Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region is referred to by Alabama authorities as the Alabama State...

  8. 40 CFR 81.114 - Augusta (Georgia)-Aiken (South Carolina) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Orangeburg County. Note: For identification purposes, the Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region is referred to by Alabama authorities as the Alabama State...

  9. StreamStats in Georgia: a water-resources web application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gotvald, Anthony J.; Musser, Jonathan W.

    2015-07-31

    StreamStats is being implemented on a State-by-State basis to allow for customization of the data development and underlying datasets to address their specific needs, issues, and objectives. The USGS, in cooperation with the Georgia Environmental Protection Division and Georgia Department of Transportation, has implemented StreamStats for Georgia. The Georgia StreamStats Web site is available through the national StreamStats Web-page portal at http://streamstats.usgs.gov. Links are provided on this Web page for individual State applications, instructions for using StreamStats, definitions of basin characteristics and streamflow statistics, and other supporting information.

  10. Water Use in Georgia by County for 2005; and Water-Use Trends, 1980-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fanning, Julia L.; Trent, Victoria P.

    2009-01-01

    Water use for 2005 for each county in Georgia was estimated using data obtained from various Federal and State agencies and local sources. Total consumptive water use also was estimated for each county in Georgia for 2005. Water use is subdivided according to offstream and instream use. Offstream use is defined as water withdrawn or diverted from a ground- or surface-water source and transported to the place of use. Estimates for offstream water use include the categories of public supply, domestic, commercial, industrial, mining, irrigation, livestock, aquaculture, and thermoelectric power. Instream use is that which occurs within a stream channel for such purposes as hydroelectric-power generation, navigation, water-quality improvement, fish propagation, and recreation. The only category of instream use estimated was hydroelectric-power generation. Georgia law (the Georgia Ground-Water Use Act of 1972 and the Georgia Water Supply Act of 1978 [Georgia Department of Natural Resources, 2008a,b]) requires any water user who withdraws more than 100,000 gallons per day on a monthly average to obtain a withdrawal permit from the Georgia Environmental Protection Division. Permit holders generally must report their withdrawals by month. The Georgia Water-Use Program collects the reported information under the withdrawal permit system and the drinking-water permit system and stores the data in the Georgia Water-Use Data System.

  11. Anthelmintic resistance on goat farms in Georgia: efficacy of anthelmintics against gastrointestinal nematodes in two selected goat herds.

    PubMed

    Terrill, T H; Kaplan, R M; Larsen, M; Samples, O M; Miller, J E; Gelaye, S

    2001-06-28

    Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) parasitism is a major constraint to production of goats in the southeastern United States. The conventional method of control used by producers in this region is frequent use of anthelmintics during the warm season. Overuse of anthelmintics has led to an increase in the incidence of anthelmintic resistance in many parts of the world, but data on prevalence of anthelmintic resistance in GIN of goats in the southeastern United States are very limited. To address this issue, anthelmintic efficacy was determined in goat herds at the Fort Valley State University, Agricultural Research Station (FVSU-ARS) and the University of Georgia, College of Veterinary Medicine (UGA-CVM) using fecal egg count reduction (FECR) tests and DrenchRite((R)) larval development assays (LDA). At FVSU-ARS, 2-year-old Spanish goat does were randomly allocated to one of nine different treatment groups (n = 10): albendazole (ABZ; 20mg/kg body weight (BW)), fenbendazole (FBZ; 20mg/kg BW), ivermectin (IVM; 0.4 mg/kg BW), doramectin (DRM; 0.4 mg/kg BW), moxidectin (MOX; 0.4 mg/kg BW), levamisole (LEV; 12 mg/kg BW), morantel tartrate (MOR; 10mg/kg BW), a combination of IVM (0.4 mg/kg BW) and ABZ (20 mg/kg BW), and untreated controls. At UGA-CVM, goats were randomly allocated to one of five different treatment groups (n = 8): ABZ (20 mg/kg BW), IVM (0.4 mg/kg BW), MOX (0.4 mg/kg BW), LEV (12 mg/kg BW), and untreated controls. All drugs in both experiments were administered orally. Anthelmintic efficacy was calculated by comparing 14-day post-treatment FEC of treated and control animals, and percent reductions were interpreted using the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology guidelines for resistance. For the LDA, nematode eggs were isolated from pooled fecal samples of untreated control goats in each herd and used to perform DrenchRite((R)) assays. In the FVSU-ARS herd, MOX, LEV, the combination of IVM and ABZ, IVM, DRM, ABZ, MOR, and FBZ

  12. Downsizing of Georgia Tech's Airborne Fluorescence Spectrometer (AFS) for the Measurement of Nitrogen Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandholm, Scott

    1998-01-01

    This report addresses the Tropospheric Trace Gas and Airborne Measurements (TTGAMG) endeavors to further downsize and stabilize the Georgia Institute of Technology's Airborne Laser Induced Fluorescence Experiment (GITALIFE). It will mainly address the TTGAMG successes and failures as participants in the summer 1998 Wallops Island test flights on board the P3-B. Due to the restructuring and reorganization of the TTGAMG since the original funding of this grant, some of the objectives and time lines of the deliverables have been changed. Most of these changes have been covered in the preceding annual report. We are anticipating getting back on track with the original proposal's downsizing effort this summer, culminating in the GITALIFE no longer occupying a high bay rack and the loss of several hundred pounds.

  13. Agricultural biosecurity.

    PubMed

    Waage, J K; Mumford, J D

    2008-02-27

    The prevention and control of new pest and disease introductions is an agricultural challenge which is attracting growing public interest. This interest is in part driven by an impression that the threat is increasing, but there has been little analysis of the changing rates of biosecurity threat, and existing evidence is equivocal. Traditional biosecurity systems for animals and plants differ substantially but are beginning to converge. Bio-economic modelling of risk will be a valuable tool in guiding the allocation of limited resources for biosecurity. The future of prevention and management systems will be strongly influenced by new technology and the growing role of the private sector. Overall, today's biosecurity systems are challenged by changing national priorities regarding trade, by new concerns about environmental effects of biological invasions and by the question 'who pays?'. Tomorrow's systems may need to be quite different to be effective. We suggest three changes: an integration of plant and animal biosecurity around a common, proactive, risk-based approach; a greater focus on international cooperation to deal with threats at source; and a commitment to refocus biosecurity on building resilience to invasion into agroecosystems rather than building walls around them.

  14. Ground-water flow and water quality in the Upper Floridan aquifer, southwestern Albany area, Georgia, 1998-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, Debbie; Lawrence, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    During 1997, the Dougherty County Health Department sampled more than 700 wells completed in the Upper Floridan aquifer in Dougherty County, Georgia, and determined that nitrate as nitrogen (hereinafter called nitrate) concentrations were above 10 milligrams per liter (mg/L) in 12 percent of the wells. Ten mg/L is the Georgia primary drinking-water standard. The ground-water flow system is complex and poorly understood in this predominantly agricultural area. Therefore, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) - in cooperation with Albany Water, Gas and Light Commission - conducted a study to better define ground-water flow and water quality in the Upper Florida aquifer in the southwestern Albany area, Georgia. Ground-water levels were measured in the southwestern Albany area, Georgia, during May 1998 and March 1999 (spring), and October 1998 and September 1999 (fall). Groundwater levels measured in 75 wells open only to the Upper Floridan aquifer were used to construct potentiometric-surface maps for those four time periods. These maps show that ground water generally flows from northwest to southeast at gradients ranging from about 2 to greater than 10 feet per mile. During spring and fall 1998, ground-water levels were high and mounding of the potentiometric surface occurred in the central part of the study area, indicating a local recharge area. Water levels declined from December through February, and by March 1999 the mound in the potentiometric surface had dissipated. Of the 75 wells in the potentiometric network, 24 were selected for a water-quality network. These 24 wells and 1 spring were sampled during fall 1998 and spring 1999. Samples were analyzed for major chemical constituents, selected minor constituents, selected nutrients, and chlorofluorocarbons (CFC). Water-quality field measurements - such as water temperature, pH, specific conductance (SC), and dissolved oxygen (DO) - were taken at each well. During August 2000, a ground-water sample was collected

  15. National water quality assessment of the Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain study unit; water withdrawals and treated wastewater discharges, 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, R.L.; Fanning, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    The Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain study unit covers nearly 62,600 square miles along the southeastern United States coast in Georgia and Florida. In 1990, the estimated population of the study unit was 9.3 million, and included all or part of the cities of Atlanta, Jacksonville, Orlando, Tampa, and St. Petersburg. Estimated freshwater withdrawn in the study unit in 1990 was nearly 5,075 million gallons per day. Ground-water accounted for more than 57 percent of the water withdrawn during 1990 and the Floridan aquifer system provided nearly 91 percent of the total ground-water withdrawn. Surface-water accounted for nearly 43 percent of the water withdrawn in the study unit in 1990 with large amounts of withdrawals from the Altamaha River, Hillsborough River, the Ocmulgee River, the Oconee River, the St. Johns River, and the Suwannee River. Water withdrawn for public supply in the Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain study unit in 1990 totaled 1,139 million gallons per day, of which 83 percent was ground water and 17 percent was surface water. Self-supplied domestic withdrawals in the Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain study unit in 1990 totaled nearly 230 million gallons per day. Ground water supplied over 80 percent of the study units population for drining water purposes; nearly 5.8 million people were served by public supply and 1.8 million people were served by self-supplied systems. Water withdrawn for self-supplied domestic use in Georgia and Florida is derived almost exclusively from ground water, primarily because this source can provide the quantity and quality of water needed for drinking purposes. Nearly 1.7 million people served by public supply utilized surface water for their drinking water needs. Water withdrawn for self-supplied commercial-industrial uses in the study unit in 1990 totaled 862 million gallons per day, of which 93 percent was ground water and 7 percent was surface water. Water withdrawn for agriculture purposes in the study unit in 1990 totaled 1

  16. State of Georgia`s environmental and emergency preparedness activities for the Savannah River Site. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, G.W.

    1994-05-01

    This quarterly report discusses activities and accomplishments of the EPD as part of Georgia`s environmental and emergency preparedness activities for the Savannah River Site. The EPD has assisted the Georgia Emergency Management Authority (GEMA) in accomplishing a number of ongoing tasks such as annual reviews, training, response capability, and radiation assessment capability. The report also outlines EPD progress and activities in the area of environmental monitoring including; surface water discharges, public drinking water, ground water monitoring, air monitoring, crops and milk, and direct radiation on soil and vegetation.

  17. Secondary Agriculture Student Awareness of International Agriculture and Factors Influencing Student Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbstreit, Steven R.; Welton, Richard F.

    1992-01-01

    Responses from 1,008 of 1,398 secondary agricultural students in Kansas found (1) limited awareness of international agricultural products and policy, geography, and other cultures; and (2) awareness increased among students with higher grades, longer time in agricultural programs, or involvement in supervised occupational experience. (SK)

  18. Urban Wetlands' Filtration of Pollutants in Milledgeville, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadowski, H.; Mutiti, S.; Melvin, C.; Hazzard, S.; Berry, L. E.; GCSU Hydrogeoligists

    2011-12-01

    Wetlands provide the vital biological service of filtering contaminants and wastes. Constructed wetlands can be used to treat urban wastewater, providing additional economic value. Suspended sediments are trapped and retained by roots, microbes break down nutrients and disinfection occurs via photolysis. The primary objective of this research was to investigate the effectiveness of a structurally-unique urban wetland along the Oconee River in Milledgeville, Georgia at filtering contaminants from urban runoff. In the past two years, there have been at least two reported instances where sewer blockages occurred and raw waste spilled into the wetland and nearby streams. Contaminants of concern include pathogens, nutrients, pharmaceuticals and other chemical compounds found in runoff. The wetland is made up of a series of basins that are in places separated by covered bricks and provides the only opportunity for runoff to be filtered before entering the creek and river. To understand the processes affecting water flow within the basins, a variety of field tests (in-situ permeameter, slug, evaporation, and infiltration tests) were conducted. Soil cores were also collected for nitrate, aluminum, and phosphate transport experiments. Water samples were collected from the runoff, the basins, the creek, and discharge into the creek during and after rain events. These samples were analyzed using Hach colorimeters, spectrophotometers and a mass spectrophotometer. Interflow through a sandy layer, with a hydraulic conductivity of about 20 m/d, was observed at about 1 meter below ground surface. Evaporation and infiltration tests in the wetland yielded values of about 0.001 and 0.46 m/d. Preliminary results showed the creek to have relatively lower nutrient and iron concentrations than the input runoff and the wetland. In contrast, phosphate, iron and sulfate levels were higher in the basins than in the incoming runoff. This is probably a result of accumulation over time

  19. Programs in Animal Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, Don R.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Five topics relating to programs in animal agriculture are addressed: (1) the future of animal agriculture; (2) preparing teachers in animal agriculture; (3) how animal programs help young people; (4) a nontraditional animal agriculture program; and (5) developing competencies in animal agriculture. (LRA)

  20. The Impact of Climate Change on the Fraser River may Result in Increased Algal Blooms in the Strait of Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, S. L.; Grant, E.; VanKoughnett, H.; Marsh, S. J.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Fanslau, J.; Voss, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Fraser River is one of British Columbia's most diverse and valuable ecosystems. Water levels and temperatures along the Fraser are seasonally variable, with high flow during the spring freshet and low flow during winter months. The Fraser River is affected by urbanization and agriculture in the Fraser Valley, and mountain pine beetle and logging in other areas. Biological oxygen demand (BOD) is an indicator of water quality in freshwater environments as it measures the amount of oxygen consumed by bacteria during the decomposition of organic matter, relative to the total available dissolved oxygen (DO). We found BOD of the Fraser River at Fort Langley was higher in the summer than winter, but no relationship between BOD and nutrient concentration (NH4, NO2+NO3, PO4). There did appear to be a positive correlation between BOD and turbidity. There is increased agricultural input into the river in the summer: increasing dissolved organic matter (DOM) and coarse and fine particulate organic matter, as well, turbidity increases during the spring freshet. The Fraser River plume contributes to Strait of Georgia algal blooms. These blooms can occur as early as March and end as late as September. The algal bloom in the Georgia Strait does not correlate to nutrient levels in the river, but is more closely related to river turbidity and dissolved organic matter (DOM). It is predicted this algal bloom will become more prominent as the sediment and DOM levels increase in the Fraser River due to the loss of forests in the watershed from the Mountain pine beetle.