Science.gov

Sample records for geothermometers

  1. Geothermometer calculations for geothermal assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, M.J.; Mariner, R.H.

    2007-01-01

    Geothermal exploration programs have relied on the calculation of geothermometers from hot spring chemistry as an early estimation of geothermal reservoir temperatures. Calibration of the geothermometers has evolved from experimental determinations of mineral solubility as a function of temperature to calibration from analyses of water chemistry from known depths and temperatures in thermal wells. Most of the geothermometers were calibrated from analyses of sodium-chloride type waters, and the application of some geothermometers should be restricted to waters of the chemical types that were used in their calibration. Chemical analyses must be determined to be reliable before they are used to calculate geothermometers. The USGS Geothermal Resource Assessment will rely on the silica geothermometer developed by Giggenbach that approximates the transition between chalcedony at 20??C and quartz at 200??C. Above 200??C, the assessment will rely on the quartz geothermometer. In addition, the assessment will also rely on the potassium-magnesium geothermometer.

  2. Chemical geothermometers and mixing models for geothermal systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.

    1977-01-01

    Qualitative chemical geothermometers utilize anomalous concentrations of various "indicator" elements in groundwaters, streams, soils, and soil gases to outline favorable places to explore for geothermal energy. Some of the qualitative methods, such as the delineation of mercury and helium anomalies in soil gases, do not require the presence of hot springs or fumaroles. However, these techniques may also outline fossil thermal areas that are now cold. Quantitative chemical geothermometers and mixing models can provide information about present probable minimum subsurface temperatures. Interpretation is easiest where several hot or warm springs are present in a given area. At this time the most widely used quantitative chemical geothermometers are silica, Na/K, and Na-K-Ca. ?? 1976.

  3. Magnesium correction to the NaKCa chemical geothermometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.; Potter, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    Equations and graphs have been devised to correct for the adverse effects of magnesium upon the Na-K-Ca chemical geothermometer. Either the equations or graphs can be used to determine appropriate temperature corrections for given waters with calculated NaKCa temperatures > 70??C and R 50 are probably derived from relatively cool aquifers with temperatures approximately equal to the measured spring temperature, irrespective of much higher calculated Na-K-Ca temperatures. ?? 1979.

  4. An empirical NaKCa geothermometer for natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1973-01-01

    An empirical method of estimating the last temperature of water-rock interaction has been devised. It is based upon molar Na, K and Ca concentrations in natural waters from temperature environments ranging from 4 to 340??C. The data for most geothermal waters cluster near a straight line when plotted as the function log ( Na K) + ?? log [ ??? (Ca) Na] vs reciprocal of absolute temperature, where ?? is either 1 3 or 4 3 depending upon whether the water equilibrated above or below 100??C. For most waters tested, the method gives better results than the Na K methods suggested by other workers. The ratio Na K should not be used to estimate temperature if ??? ( MCa) MNa is greater than 1. The Na K values of such waters generally yield calculated temperatures much higher than the actual temperature at which water interacted with the rock. A comparison of the composition of boiling hot-spring water with that obtained from a nearby well (170??C) in Yellowstone Park shows that continued water-rock reactions may occur during ascent of water even though that ascent is so rapid that little or no heat is lost to the country rock, i.e. the water cools adiabatically. As a result of such continued reaction, waters which dissolve additional Ca as they ascend from the aquifer to the surface will yield estimated aquifer temperatures that are too low. On the other hand, waters initially having enough Ca to deposit calcium carbonate during ascent may yield estimated aquifer temperatures that are too high if aqueous Na and K are prevented from further reaction with country rock owing to armoring by calcite or silica minerals. The Na-K-Ca geothermometer is of particular interest to those prospecting for geothermal energy. The method also may be of use in interpreting compositions of fluid inclusions. ?? 1973.

  5. The Use of Stable Hydrogen Isotopes as a Geothermometer in Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proskurowski, G.; Lilley, M. D.; Früh-Green, G. L.; Olson, E. J.; Kelley, D. S.

    2004-12-01

    Terrestrial geothermal work by Arnason in the 1970's demonstrated the utility of stable hydrogen isotopes as a geothermometer[1]. However, with the exception of two data points from 9°N in a study by Horibe and Craig[2], the value of this geothermometer in hydrothermal systems has never been rigorously assessed. Equilibrium fractionation factors for H2-H2O and H2-CH4 have previously been determined experimentally and theoretically over a range of temperatures and provide an expression relating alpha (fractionation) and temperature. We have measured the dD of H2(g), CH4(g) and H2O from a diverse selection of hydrothermal vent localities including Lost City, Middle Valley, Endeavour, Guaymas, Logatchev, Broken Spur, and SWIR. These samples were chosen to represent a wide range of fluid temperatures and a variety of environmental settings. We see a strong correlation between measured vent temperature and predicted vent temperature using both the hydrogen-water and the methane-hydrogen geothermometers over a temperature range of 25-400°C. In the case of the H2-H2O geothermometer, the predicted temperatures are slightly elevated with respect to the measured temperatures at the low temperature Lost City site, and are in good agreement at high temperature vent sites. The H2-CH4 geothermometer predicts temperatures that are 40-80°C elevated with respect to the measured temperature in both the low and high temperature sites. These measurements demonstrate that the hydrogen isotope geothermometer in the hydrogen-methane-water system is robust in hydrothermal systems and may be a useful tool in determining the temperature of the root zone. 1. Arnason, B., The Hydrogen-Water Isotope Thermometer Applied to Geothermal Areas In Iceland. Geothermics, 1977. 5: p. 75-80. 2. Horibe, Y. and H. Craig, D/ H fractionation in the system methane-hydrogen-water. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 1995. 59(24): p. 5209-5217.

  6. A magnesium correction for the Na-K-Ca chemical geothermometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.; Potter, Robert W.

    1978-01-01

    Graphs and equations have been devised to correct for the adverse effects of magnesium upon the Na-K-Ca geothermometer. Either the graphs or equations can be used to determine temperature corrections when given waters have Na-K-Ca calculated temperatures above 70? C and values of R less than 50, where R = {Mg/(Mg + Ca + K)} x 100 in equivalents. Waters with values of R greater than 50 probably come from relatively cool aquifers with temperatures about equal to the measured spring temperature, irrespective of much higher calculated Na-K-Ca temperatures.

  7. A CO2-Silica Geothermometer for Low Temperature Geothermal Resource Assessment, with Application to Resources in the Safford Basin, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Witcher, James C.; Stone, Claudia

    1983-11-01

    Geothermics is the study of the earth's heat energy, it's affect on subsurface temperature distribution, it's physical and chemical sources, and it's role in dynamic geologic processes. The term, geothermometry, is applied to the determination of equilibrium temperatures of natural chemical systems, including rock, mineral, and liquid phases. An assemblage of minerals or a chemical system whose phase composition is a function of temperature and pressure can be used as a geothermometer. Thus a geothermometer is useful to determine the formation temperature of rock or the last equilibrium temperature of a flowing aqueous solution such as ground water and hydrothermal fluids.

  8. An Empirical Calibration of an Al-in-olivine Geothermometer for Mantle-derived Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Hoog, J. C.

    2004-12-01

    The concentration of aluminum in olivine from mantle peridotites is variable and strongly temperature dependent, and can therefore be used as a geothermometer. A suite of fresh mantle peridotite xenoliths from the Kaalvallei kimberlite (South-Africa) was used for calibration of the thermometer. The samples contain olivine, opx, cpx, garnet ± spinel. Aluminum contents of the olivines, determined by LA-ICP-MS, range from 8-140 ppm, with a few anomalous values up to 310 ppm. Mg# lie between 91.5 and 93.3. P-T conditions for the peridotites were estimated with the Al-in-opx geobarometer and cpx-opx geothermometer [1], and plot on a conductive geotherm of ca. 40 mW/m2. The temperature range is 900-1380° C. Only samples plotting on the geotherm were considered, as the others showed disequilibrium features. The expression for the thermometer is: T{Al-in-ol }(° C) = 11390 / [ 11.88 - ln(ppm Al) ] - 273 with an average residual of 12° C. As the compositional range of mantle olivine is very small, no correction for major chemical components is necessary. In addition, no correction for Al activity of the system is necessary, as long as an Al-saturated phase such as garnet is present. Combined with the Ca-in-olivine barometer [2], the new thermometer has the potential to determine P-T conditions of single olivines. As olivine is an abundant component of heavy mineral separates from kimberlites, it could serve as a new tool for diamond exploration. Vanadium and Cr show similar temperature-dependent variations to Al, but to a lesser degree, and would therefore yield less accurate geothermometers. In addition, partitioning of these elements is sensitive to variations in oxidation state. The pressure dependence of the thermometer is the subject of future research. Considering the significant pressure effect on Ca and Ti partitioning into olivine, it is recommended that the Al-in-olivine thermometer in its current form is applied to rocks derived from comparable (cratonic

  9. Crystal size of epidotes: A potentially exploitable geothermometer in geothermal fields

    SciTech Connect

    Patrier, P.; Beaufort, D.; Touchard, G. ); Fouillac, A.M. )

    1990-11-01

    Crystal size of epidotes crystallized in quartz + epidote veins is used as the basis for a new geothermometer from the fossil geothermal field of Saint Martin (Lesser Antilles). The epidote-bearing alteration paragenesis is developed as far as 3 km from a quartz diorite pluton at temperatures of 220-350C. The length/width ratio of the epidote grains is constant for all the analyzed samples and suggests isotropic growth environments. However, the length and width of the grains vary exponentially with temperature. The obtained results offer new perspectives for simple grain-size geothermomentry but must be extended to other geologic environments to clarify the influence of different rock types.

  10. Application of selected geothermometers to exploration of low-enthalpy thermal water: the Sudetic Geothermal Region in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Porowski; Jan, Dowgiałło

    2009-10-01

    The most important intakes of thermal waters within the Sudetic Geothermal Region occur in three separate hydrogeothermal systems: (1) Lądek, (2) Duszniki and (3) Cieplice. All these waters are of meteoric origin and circulate in crystalline rocks to different depths. Their outflow temperatures are between less than 20°C and to about 87°C. To evaluate the geothermal fields in the light of their prospectiveness, to further exploration of thermal energy resources, we took an effort to apply selected isotopic and chemical geothermometers to assess the maximum possible temperatures, which may be found in the reservoirs. The only chemical geothermometers which give a reliable range of reservoir temperatures are SiO2 (chalcedony), Na-Ka-Ca and partly Na-K ones. The oxygen isotopic geothermometer in the SO4-H2O system gives a real range of estimated reservoir temperatures only for deeply circulating waters in the Cieplice area. On the other hand, in the case of CO2 rich waters in the Duszniki area, where outflow temperatures do not exceed 30°C, application of chemical or isotopic temperature indicators always leads to erroneous results due to the lack of equilibrium in the thermodynamic system of water-rock interaction.

  11. Assessment of mantle geothermometers based on well-equilibrated natural samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimis, Paolo; Grütter, Herman

    2010-05-01

    Assessment of geothermometers for ultramafic mantle rocks can be made using independent constraints derived from either experimental or natural samples. Previous assessments using natural samples have generally been made by testing for consistency with petrological constraints (diamond-graphite and phlogopite stability fields), by measuring the scatter of P-T points around calculated geotherms, or by comparing T estimates with those derived from assumed "best" methods. This type of assessment requires strong assumptions on the degree of mineral equilibration and largely relies on the proper selection of the reference thermometer and barometer. A further major limitation of all previous evaluations based on experiments or real rocks has been the relatively small number of control data, which invariably covered a restricted range of P-T conditions and compositions compared with the large natural variability of ultramafic mantle rocks. To overcome these drawbacks, we have integrated previous experimental tests using data from experiments in highly sodic NCMAS systems (Bulatov et al. 2002). Our evaluation indicated the Taylor (1998; TA98) two-pyroxene and the Nimis and Taylor (2000; NT00) single-Cpx thermometers as the most robust reference thermometers for applications to natural compositions. Cross-validation of major-element geothermometers for garnet peridotites and pyroxenites was then carried out using published and some unpublished compositions of minerals for ca. 1800 Grt-Cpx-Opx(±Ol±Spl)-bearing mantle xenoliths from both cratonic (mostly kimberlites) and non-cratonic (mostly minette or alkali basalts) environments. The database was screened for mineral equilibrium by comparing T estimates obtained using independent pyroxene solvus and Fe-Mg exchange thermometers. About 750 xenoliths were selected, which showed strong, albeit non-linear, correlations between independent estimates, reflecting good equilibrium among pyroxenes and garnet down to T as low as 700

  12. Toward a new < 250 °C pyrrhotite-magnetite geothermometer for claystones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubourg, Charles; Pozzi, Jean-Pierre

    2010-05-01

    . We interpret this trend as the appearance of magnetite. We derive a parameter PM from the warming curve of a saturated isothermal remanent magnetization acquired at 10 K (ZFC). We report on a consistent evolution of PM with temperature in the range of 40 °C to 250 °C, including natural samples, heated samples at 95 °C, and burial-like heated samples. PM first increases between ˜ 40 °C up to ˜ 85 °C, implying that pyrrhotite gradually dominates the magnetic assemblage at low temperature. For temperatures above 85 °C, PM decreases up to 250 °C, implying that the formation of magnetite gradually overshadows the magnetic input of pyrrhotite. PM values obtained from mature to overmature claystones from the Chartreuse are lower than the PM values obtained from the burial-like heated Opalinus claystones, suggesting that the formation of magnetite is driven by kinetics. The continuous trend of the PM parameter suggests that the magnetic properties of pyrrhotite-magnetite claystones can be used to infer paleo-temperatures and we propose to name this geothermometer MagEval.

  13. Seismic heating signatures in the Japan Trench subduction plate-boundary fault zone: evidence from a preliminary rock magnetic `geothermometer'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Dekkers, Mark J.; Zhang, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Frictional heating during earthquake rupture reveals important information on earthquake mechanisms and energy dissipation. The amount of annealing varies widely and is, as yet, poorly constrained. Here we use magnetic susceptibility versus temperature measurements during cycling to increasingly elevated temperatures to constrain the maximum temperature a slip zone has experienced. The case study comprises sheared clay cored from the Japan Trench subduction plate-boundary fault zone (décollement), which accommodated the large slip of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake. The décollement was cored during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 343, the Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project (JFAST). Heating signatures with estimated maximum temperatures ranging from ˜300 to over 500 °C are determined close to the multiple slip surfaces within the décollement. Since it is impossible to tie a specific slip surface to a certain earthquake, thermal evidence for the cumulative effect of several earthquakes is unveiled. This as yet preliminary rock magnetic `geothermometer' would be a useful tool to detect seismic heating along faults that experienced medium temperature rise, a range which is difficult to assess with other approaches.

  14. First application of the revised Ti-in-zircon geothermometer to Paleoproterozoic ultrahigh-temperature granulites of Tuguiwula, Inner Mongolia, North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. J.; Li, J. H.; Santosh, M.

    2010-02-01

    The revised titanium-in-zircon geothermometer was applied to Paleoproterozoic ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) granulites at Tuguiwula, Inner Mongolia, North China Craton. The Tuguiwula granulites contain diagnostic UHT mineral assemblages such as sapphirine + quartz and high alumina orthopyroxene + sillimanite + quartz, suggesting formation under temperatures of ca. 1,000°C and pressures of up to 10 kbar. Here, we report detailed petrographic studies and ICP-MS data on titanium concentration in zircons associated with the UHT assemblages. The zircons associated with sapphirine-spinel-sillimanite-magnetite assemblages have the highest Ti concentration of up to 57 ppm, yielding a temperature of 941°C, and suggesting that the growth of zircons occurred under ultrahigh-temperature conditions. The maximum temperatures obtained by the revised Ti-in-zircon geothermometer is lower than the equilibrium temperature of sapphirine + quartz, indicating an interval of cooling history of the granulites from UHT condition to ca. 940°C. Many of the zircons have Ti concentrations ranging from 10 to 33 ppm, indicating their growth or recrystallization under lower temperatures of ca. 745-870°C. These zircons are interpreted to have recrystallized during the retrograde stage indicated by microstructures such as cordierite rim or corona between spinel and quartz, and orthopyroxene-cordierite symplectite around garnet. Previous geochronological study on the zircons of the Tuguiwula UHT granulites gave a mean U-Pb SHRIMP age of 1.92 Ga. However, based on the Ti-in-zircon geothermometer results reported in this work, and considering the relatively slow thermal relaxation of these rocks, we infer that the timing of peak UHT metamorphism in the Tuguiwula area could be slightly older than 1.92 Ga.

  15. CO/sub 2/-silica geothermometer for low temperature geothermal resource assessment, with application to resources in the Safford Basin, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Witcher, J.C.; Stone, C.

    1983-11-01

    This study investigates silica-water reactions in low-temperature geothermal water in areas near Safford, southeastern Arizona, and derives a pCO2 correction for conductive silica geothermometers. Use and limitations of the technique are also discussed. Data collection, interpretation approach, and basic geochemistry, as it applies to this study, are outlined. In addition, the geology, thermal regime, geohydrology, and gross geochemistry of the Safford area are reviewed. Finally, geothermal potential, as indicated by this study and previous studies is discussed.

  16. Comparison of circulation times of thermal waters discharging from the Idaho batholith based on geothermometer temperatures, helium concentrations, and 14C measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mariner, R.H.; Evans, William C.; Young, H.W.

    2006-01-01

    Circulation times of waters in geothermal systems are poorly known. In this study, we examine the thermal waters of the Idaho batholith to verify whether maximum system temperatures, helium concentrations, and 14C values are related to water age in these low-to-moderate temperature geothermal systems. He/N2 values of gas collected from thermal waters that circulate solely through distinct units of the Idaho batholith correlate linearly with Na-K-(4/3)Ca geothermometer temperatures, showing that both variables are excellent indicators of relative water age. Thermal waters that circulate in early Tertiary (45-50 Ma) granite of the Sawtooth batholith have 3.5 times more helium than thermal waters of the same aquifer temperature that circulate through the main Cretaceous granite (average 91 Ma). Hot spring waters circulating in hydrothermally altered parts of the batholith have very little dissolved helium and no correlation between He/N2 values and geothermometer temperatures. Thermal waters discharging from the Idaho batholith are more depleted in deuterium than modern precipitation in the area. Recharge to these geothermal systems occurred from at least 10,000 BP for the cooler systems up to about 33,000 BP for the hotter systems.

  17. The determination of deep temperatures by means of the CO-CO2-H2-H2O geothermometer: an example using fumaroles in the Campi Flegrei, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedesco, D.; Sabroux, J. C.

    1987-02-01

    Chromatographic analyses of fumarolic gases, collected in sampling bottles containing an alkaline solution, have been carried out using a thermal conductivity detector and a flame ionization detector, after catalytic conversion of CO and CH4. The latter method enables the concentration of carbon monoxide to be measured with sufficient accuracy for use in a CO-CO2-H2-H2O geothermometer. Application of this geothermometer to fumaroles in the crater of Solfatara in the Campi Flegrei, Italy, indicates that they are fed from a steam reservoir at 250±15 °C and at 10-36±2atm of oxygen. On the other hand, the CH4-CO2-H2-H2O geothermobarometer seems to re-equilibrate at superficial temperatures and cannot be used for infering thermodynamic conditions at depth. Regular sampling of these fumaroles together with a geothermometric interpretation of the gas analyses provides a means of monitoring, with comparative accuracy, the chemical and thermal evolution of the hydrothermal reservoir below the Solfatara crater. Such monitoring would probably detect an increase in temperature at depth and the injection of magmatic gas into the reservoir.

  18. Use of mean residence time of water, flowrate, and equilibrium temperature indicated by water geothermometers to rank geothermal resources. Application to the thermal water circuits of Northern Calabria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollaro, Carmine; Vespasiano, Giovanni; Muto, Francesco; De Rosa, Rosanna; Barca, Donatella; Marini, Luigi

    2016-12-01

    A new hydro-geochemical survey was carried out on the thermal sites of Northern Calabria. By use of new and historical data, it was possible to improve the knowledge on the deep systems of interest. First, thermal waters were characterized by means of a classical approach, including water classifications, use of the triangular diagram of Cl-Li-B, and geothermometry through suitably selected functions. Then, the tritium-based mean residence time and flowrate of the thermal waters of Northern Calabria were used to evaluate the volume of the geothermal reservoir and its component terms. Based on these results, the heat stored in the geothermal reservoir was computed by means of the volume method. Their natural heat discharge was also calculated. These parameters as well as the reservoir temperature indicated by water geothermometers were used to rank the geothermal resources of Northern Calabria. Sambiase resulted to be the thermal circuit of highest geothermal potential.

  19. The fractionation of nickel between olivine and augite as a geothermometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hakli, T.A.; Wright, T.L.

    1967-01-01

    The coexisting olivine, clinopyroxene and glass of five samples collected from the Makaopuhi lava lake in Hawaii, at temperatures ranging from 1050 to 1160??C were analysed for nickel with an electron probe microanalyser. The results strongly suggest that the distribution of nickel between these three phase pairs well obeys the thermodynamic partition law, and that under favourable conditions, the distribution coefficients permit the estimation of the crystallisation temperature within an accuracy of 10-20??C. It is concluded that the application of the Makaopuhi data to plutonic and to other volcanic rocks should be carried out with caution because the effect of pressure and the changing composition of the phases upon the numerical values of the distribution coefficients is not known quantitatively. ?? 1967.

  20. Qrtzgeotherm: An ActiveX component for the quartz solubility geothermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Mahendra P.

    2008-12-01

    An ActiveX component, QrtzGeotherm, to calculate temperature and vapor fraction in a geothermal reservoir using quartz solubility geothermometry was written in Visual Basic 6.0. Four quartz solubility equations along the liquid-vapor saturation curve: (i) a quadratic equation of 1/ T and pressure, (ii) a linear equation relating log SiO 2 to the inverse of absolute temperature ( T), (iii) a polynomial of T including logarithmic terms and (iv) temperature as a polynomial of SiO 2 including logarithmic terms are programmed. The QrtzGeotherm has input parameters: (i) HRes—the reservoir enthalpy (kJ/kg), (ii) SiO2TD—silica concentration in total discharge (ppm), (iii) GeoEq—number of quartz solubility equation and (iv) TempGuess—a guess value of the reservoir temperature (°C). The reservoir enthalpy Hres is assumed to be the same as the total discharge enthalpy HR. The output parameters are (i) TempRes—reservoir temperature (°C) and (ii) VapRes—reservoir vapor fraction. The first step is to calculate the total discharge concentration of silica SiO2TD from the concentration of silica SiO2Col of separated water, sampled after N-separations of vapor and water. To use QrtzGeotherm in MS-Excel, three functions SiO2TD, GeoResTemp and GeoResVap for an N-stage separation of geothermal reservoir fluid are written in Visual Basic for Application (VBA). Similarly, a demonstration program, QrtzGeothrm, is written in Visual Basic 6.0.

  1. Calibration of the calcite-water oxygen-isotope geothermometer at Devils Hole, Nevada, a natural laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.

    2007-01-01

    The ??18O of ground water (-13.54 ?? 0.05 ???) and inorganically precipitated Holocene vein calcite (+14.56 ?? 0.03 ???) from Devils Hole cave #2 in southcentral Nevada yield an oxygen isotopic fractionation factor between calcite and water at 33.7 ??C of 1.02849 ?? 0.00013 (1000 ln ??calcite-water = 28.09 ?? 0.13). Using the commonly accepted value of ???(??calcite-water)/???T of -0.00020 K-1, this corresponds to a 1000 ln ??calcite-water value at 25 ??C of 29.80, which differs substantially from the current accepted value of 28.3. Use of previously published oxygen isotopic fractionation factors would yield a calcite precipitation temperature in Devils Hole that is 8 ??C lower than the measured ground water temperature. Alternatively, previously published fractionation factors would yield a ??18O of water, from which the calcite precipitated, that is too negative by 1.5 ??? using a temperature of 33.7 ??C. Several lines of evidence indicate that the geochemical environment of Devils Hole has been remarkably constant for at least 10 ka. Accordingly, a re-evaluation of calcite-water oxygen isotopic fractionation factor may be in order. Assuming the Devils Hole oxygen isotopic value of ??calcite-water represents thermodynamic equilibrium, many marine carbonates are precipitated with a ??18O value that is too low, apparently due to a kinetic isotopic fractionation that preferentially enriches 16O in the solid carbonate over 18O, feigning oxygen isotopic equilibrium.

  2. Mixing models and ionic geothermometers applied to warm (up to 60°C) springs: Jordan Rift Valley, Israel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazor, E.; Levitte, D.; Truesdell, A.H.; Healy, J.; Nissenbaum, A.

    1980-01-01

    No indications are available for the existence of above-boiling geothermal systems in the Jordan Rift Valley. Slightly higher than observed temperatures are concluded for a deep component at the springs of Hammat Gader (67°C), Gofra (68°C), the Russian Garden (40°C), and the Yesha well (53–65°C). These temperatures may encourage further developments for spas and bathing installations and, to a limited extent, for space heating, but are not favorable for geothermal power generation.

  3. Experimental investigation of the alluaudite + triphylite assemblage, and development of the Na-in-triphylite geothermometer: applications to natural pegmatite phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatert, Frederic; Ottolini, Luisa; Schmid-Beurmann, Peter

    2011-04-01

    In order to assess the stability of the primary alluaudite + triphylite assemblage, we performed hydrothermal experiments between 400 and 800°C, starting from the LiNa2Mn x Fe{3-/x 2+}Fe3+(PO4)4 compositions ( x = 1.054, 1.502, 1.745) that represent the ideal compositions of the alluaudite + triphylite assemblages from the Kibingo (Rwanda), Hagendorf-Süd (Germany), and Buranga (Rwanda) pegmatites, respectively. The pressure was maintained at 1 kbar, and the oxygen fugacity was controlled by the Ni-NiO buffer. The results of these experiments show that the alluaudite + triphylite assemblage crystallizes at 400 and 500°C, while the association alluaudite + triphylite + marićite appears at 600 and 700°C. The limit between these two domains, at ca. 550°C, corresponds to the maximum temperature that can be reached by the alluaudite + triphylite assemblages in granitic pegmatites, because marićite has never been observed in such geological environments. At 800°C, the formation of the X-phase + triphylite assemblage indicates a strong reduction of the bulk composition, according to the reaction 0.5LiM2+PO4 (triphylite) + 3Na2M2 2+Fe3+(PO4)3 (alluaudite) + 1.5H2O = 4.5NaM2+PO4 (marićite) + Li0.5Na1.5M5 2+(PO4)4 (X-phase) + H3PO4 + 0.75O2 (M2+ = Fe2+, Mn). Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used at our knowledge for the first time to measure Li in all the Li-bearing phosphates. A specific methodological procedure was developed with the ion microprobe to get accurate Li2O data over a wide concentration range spanning from few ppm Li up to ~11 wt%. Li2O. Our SIMS analyses of the synthesized phosphates indicate that the Li contents of alluaudites, marićites, and X-phase increase progressively with temperature, while the Li content of triphylite-type phosphates decreases due to the Li → Na substitution. The Na-exchange equilibrium between triphylite-type phosphates and alluaudite is correlated with the temperature according to the equation: ln( x {Na/Tri}/ x {Na/All}) = -7.0(7) 103/T + 5.4(9). This equation can be used to estimate the crystallization temperature of triphylite-alluaudite assemblages independently of the oxygen fugacity.

  4. Application of graphite as a geothermometer in hydrothermally altered metamorphic rocks of the Merelani-Lelatema area, Mozambique Belt, northeastern Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malisa, Elias Pausen

    1998-02-01

    Upper Precambrian pelitic and psammitic gneisses in the Mozambique Belt are usually graphite rich. The determination of crystallisation temperatures around and in the hydrothermally altered rocks of the Merelani-Lelatema mining areas, northeastern Tanzania, were made by studying the lattice parameter C of graphite. In this way, the migration of the chromophore elements giving colour to the gemstones, e.g. tanzanite, green garnet and green tourmaline in the area, can be studied. Within the hydrothermally altered zone graphite gives temperatures that range from 523°C to 880°C. These temperatures are much higher than the 390-440°C obtained through fluid inclusion studies of tanzanite, which indicates that the graphite was not hydrothermally introduced. Furthermore the hydrothermal solutions are post-metamorphic.

  5. Zircon-scale insights into the history of a Supervolcano, Bishop Tuff, Long Valley, California, with implications for the Ti-in-zircon geothermometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, M.R.; Vazquez, J.A.; Schmitt, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Zircon has the outstanding capacity to record chronological, thermal, and chemical information, including the storage history of zoned silicic magma reservoirs like the one responsible for the Bishop Tuff of eastern California, USA. Our novel ion microprobe approach reveals that Bishop zircon rims with diverse chemical characteristics surround intermediate domains with broadly similar compositions. The highest Y, REE, U, and Th concentrations tend to accompany the largest excesses in Y + REE3+:P beyond what can be explained by xenotime substitution in zircon. Apparent Ti-in-zircon temperatures of <720??C for zircon rims are distinctly lower than most of the range in eruption temperatures, as estimated from FeTi-oxide equilibria and zircon solubility at quench. While permissive of crystallization of zircon at near-solidus conditions, the low Ti-in-zircon temperatures are probably better explained by sources of inaccuracy in the temperature estimates. After apparently nucleating from different melts, zircons from across the Bishop Tuff compositional spectrum may have evolved to broadly similar chemical and thermal conditions and therefore it is possible that there was no significant thermal gradient in the magma reservoir at some stage in its evolution. There is also no compelling evidence for punctuated heat ?? chemical influxes during the intermediate stages of zircon growth. Judging by the zircon record, the main volume of the erupted magma evolved normally by secular cooling but the latest erupted portion is characterized by a reversal in chemistry that appears to indicate perfusion of the magma reservoir by-or zircon entrainment in-a less evolved melt from the one in which the zircons had previously resided. ?? 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Intensive parameters of enstatite chondrite metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogel, Robert A.; Hess, Paul C.; Rutherford, Malcolm J.

    1989-01-01

    A geothermometer based on the assemblage kamacite-quartz-enstatite-oldhamite-troilite found in enstatite chondrites is described. Data obtained with the geothermometer reveal that the EL6 meteorites experienced temperatures exceeding 1000 C. These temperatures imply a metal-sulfide melting event that may have fractionated the melt from the source region.

  7. Interpretation of Na-K-Mg relations in geothermal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.

    1990-01-01

    When using a Na-K-???Mg triangular diagram as an aid in the interpretation of a geothermal water, the estimated temperature of last water-rock equilibration may change by as much as 50??C, depending on which of the many Na/K geothermometers one assumes is correct. A particular geothermometer may work well in one place and not in another because of differences in the mineralogy of the phases that are in contact with the reservoir fluid. The position of the full equilibrium line that is used for geothermometry and for assessing degrees of departure from equilibrium also changes as the assumed K/???Mg geothermometer equation changes. The degree of ambiguity can be evaluated by utilizing the results of all the recently published Na/K geothermometers on a single Na-K-???Mg triangular plot.

  8. Comparative study of the silica and cation geothermometry of the Malawi hot springs: Potential alternative energy source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulanya, Zuze; Morales-Simfors, Nury; Sivertun, Åke

    2010-06-01

    Malawi is one of the poorest countries in the world and one of the most densely populated in south-eastern Africa. Its major power source is hydro-electricity. During the past few years, the power generation capacity has been reduced, which has impacted negatively on the socio-economic development of the country. The country holds an enormous potential to generate geothermal energy due to the country's position within the Great African Rift valley. This could contribute to economic growth, poverty reduction and technological development in Malawi. The paper presents findings of research on comparisons between silica (quartz and chalcedony) and cation geothermometers (Na-K, Na-K-Ca and K-Mg) of hot springs in the Malawi Rift, in order to deduce the temperature at depth of selected hot springs. The saturation indices of most springs have a bearing on the geology of the areas where these hot springs are found. The Na-K geothermometers are, in general, higher than the Na-K-Ca geothermometer and the K-Mg geothermometer shows temperatures that are too low to be considered. The difference in the results between the different geothermometers may indicate shallow conditions of mixing with groundwater. Results also indicate that some hot springs have sufficient heat-generating capabilities and warrant further exploration work to assess their suitability for energy generation.

  9. The ilmenite/titano-magnetite assemblage - Kinetics of re-equilibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, P. A.; Taylor, L. A.

    1982-01-01

    The petrogenesis of igneous and metamorphic rocks is a function of several parameters. Of these, temperature and pressure are of particular importance. Information concerning these two parameters is obtained through the use of mineral indicators. One such commonly used geothermometer/oxybarometer is that involving ilmenite/titano-magnetite. Anomalously low temperatures have been reported in cases in which the geothermometer/oxybarometer was employed. The studies suggest that low temperatures result from slow cooling rates which allows the Fe-Ti oxides to re-equilibrate. The current investigation is mainly concerned with the kinetics of the reduction of ilmenite-hematite solid solution, since this is the slower and, consequently, rate-controlling step in the re-equilibration process. The reaction rates determined for the reduction of ilmenites in the investigation are geologically rapid and must be considered when applying the considered geothermometer/oxybarometer.

  10. Estimation of Reservoir Geotemperatures from Multicomponent and Classical Geothermometry of the Bath Geothermal Reservoir: An Integrated Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wishart, D. N.

    2014-12-01

    An integrated approach incorporating multicomponent and classical solute geothermometry was used to evaluate its utility to estimate the temperature of the Bath geothermal reservoir, a low-enthalpy system on the island of Jamaica. Reservoir temperatures were estimated from (1) empirical geothermometric equations; (2) simulations of solute geothermometers using SolGeo software; (3) computations of saturation indices [Log(Q/K)] of reservoir minerals from full chemically-analyzed thermal water samples over a temperature range of 25-220°C in PHREEQC; and (4) the Giggenbach Na-K-Mg geothermometer. A principal component analysis (PCA) shows strong, positive correlations between Na+, K+, and Mg2+ and is regarded as significant for these ions in their reliance as useful reservoir geoindicators. However, a negative correlation exists between Na+, K+, Mg2+ and silica (SiO2). The more realistic estimates of the geothermal reservoir temperature were provided by the Na-K and Na-K-Mg geothermometers, whereas the Na-K-Ca geothermometer overestimated reservoir temperatures. Estimated geotemperatures from silica-quartz geothermometers were the lowest. The discrepancy in estimated geotemperatures may be due to processes such as boiling, degassing, dilution, rock dissolution, and mixing during the ascent of geothermal fluids. Log (Q/K) curves cluster over a range of equilibrium temperatures closest to Na-K and Na-K-Mg geothermometers at 80-102°C. Reservoir temperatures estimated for the Bath geothermal system range between 79-118°C. Comparisons of the estimated geotemperatures using the integrated approach to geothermometry show a favorable agreement. Based on the results of this investigation, the integrated geothermometric approach provided a more reliable approach to reconstruct the fluid composition at depth and estimate the geothermal reservoir temperature.

  11. Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Partial Basin and Range Heat and Zones of Critical Stress Maps

    DOE Data Explorer

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    Interpolated maps of heat flow, temperature gradient, and quartz geothermometers are included as TIF files. Zones of critical stress map is also included as a TIF file. The zones are given a 5km diameter buffer. The study area is only a part of the Basin and Range, but it does includes the Tularosa Basin.

  12. Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Water Chemistry

    DOE Data Explorer

    Adam Brandt

    2015-12-15

    This shapefile contains 409 well data points on Tularosa Basin Water Chemistry, each of which have a location (UTM), temperature, quartz and Potassium/Magnesium geothermometer; as well as concentrations of chemicals like Mn, Fe, Ba, Sr, Cs, Rb, As, NH4, HCO3, SO4, F, Cl, B, SiO2, Mg, Ca, K, Na, and Li.

  13. Thermal extraction analysis of five Los Azufres production wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Paul; Quijano, Luis

    1995-01-26

    Thermal energy extraction from five wells supplying 5-MWe wellhead generators in three zones of the Los Azufres geothermal field has been examined from production and chemical data compiled over 14-years of operation. The data, as annual means, are useful in observing small-scale changes in reservoir performance with continuous production. The chemical components are chloride for quality control and the geothermometer elements for reservoir temperatures. The flowrate and fluid enthalpy data are used to calculate the thermal extraction rates. Integration of these data provides an estimate of the total energy extracted from the zone surrounding the well. The combined production and chemical geothermometer data are used to model the produced fluid as coming from just-penetrating wells for which the annual produced mass originates from a series of concentric hemispheric shells moving out into the reservoir. Estimates are made of the drawdown distance into the reservoir and the far-field conditions.

  14. Correlation between the silica concentration and the orifice temperature in the warm springs along the jordan-dead sea rift valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levitte, D.; Eckstein, Y.

    1978-01-01

    Analysis of twenty-one thermal springs emerging along the Jordan-Dead Sea Rift Valley in Israel indicates a very good correlation between the concentration of dissolved silica and the temperature of the spring orifice. Dissolution of quartz was identified as the apparent source of the silica in the water. Application of the silica geothermometer for mixed systems suggests that the springs in the Tiberias Lake Basin are supplied with hot water from deep reservoir (or reservoirs) at a temperature of 115??C (239??F). The same temperature was postulated earlier by the application of the Na-K-Ca hydro-geothermometer to a group of thermal springs in the same basin. The temperature of the reservoir supplying hot brines to the springs emerging along the western shore of the Dead Sea is estimated at 90??C (194??F).

  15. Program and Abstracts for Clay Minerals Society 28th Annual Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that were accepted for presentation at the annual meeting. Some of the main topics covered include: (1) fundamental properties of minerals and methods of mineral analysis; (2) surface chemistry; (3) extraterrestrial clay minerals; (4) geothermometers and geochronometers; (5) smectite, vermiculite, illite, and related reactions; (6) soils and clays in environmental research; (7) kaolinite, halloysite, iron oxides, and mineral transformations; and (8) clays in lakes, basins, and reservoirs.

  16. Techniques for the conversion to carbon dioxide of oxygen from dissolved sulfate in thermal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nehring, N.L.; Bowen, P.A.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    The fractionation of oxygen isotopes between dissolved sulfate ions and water provides a useful geothermometer for geothermal waters. The oxygen isotope composition of dissolved sulfate may also be used to indicate the source of the sulfate and processes of formation. The methods described here for separation, purification and reduction of sulfate to prepare carbon dioxide for mass spectrometric analysis are modifications of methods by Rafter (1967), Mizutani (1971), Sakai and Krouse (1971), and Mizutani and Rafter (1969). ?? 1976.

  17. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope geochemistry of zeolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, Haraldur R.; Clayton, Robert N.

    1990-01-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios for natural samples of the zeolites analcime, chabazite, clinoptilolite, laumontite, mordenite, and natrolite have been obtained. The zeolite samples were classified into sedimentary, hydrothermal, and igneous groups. The ratios for each species of zeolite are reported. The results are used to discuss the origin of channel water, the role of zeolites in water-rock interaction, and the possibility that a calibrated zeolite could be used as a low-temperature geothermometer.

  18. Fe-Mg Interdiffusion Coefficients in Clinopyroxene: Experimental Determinations Using Nanoscale thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, S.; Dohmen, R.; Mueller, T.; Becker, H. W.; Ter Heege, J.

    2008-12-01

    Temperature dependent partitioning of Fe and Mg between various ferromagnesian silicates and melts constitutes the basis of the most common and well calibrated geothermometers. Of these, the geothermometers involving clinopyroxene (e.g. Cpx with Grt, Opx or melt) are some of the most sensitive and widely used. However, widespread compositional zoning found in clinopyroxenes implies diffusion rates are sluggish and for proper application of geothermometers as well as geospeedometers to meteorites, ultramafic mantle rocks, various volcanic and plutonic igneous rocks and metamorphic rocks from the granulite facies, diffusion coefficients need to be known. We report here preliminary Fe-Mg interdiffusion coefficients in clinopyroxene (Cpx) (diopside rich crystals of composition Di95He5). Diffusion couples were prepared by depositing a thin film (~ 20-100 nm) of olivine source material (Fo30) by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) onto an oriented, polished and pre- heated surface of a diopside crystal under vacuum. Samples were annealed for 10 to 400 hours at 800 to 1000°C, 1 atmosphere total pressure under a controlled oxygen fugacity of about 10-16 bar. Film thickness and compositional profiles were measured using Rutherford backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) on reference and annealed samples. Concentration-depth profiles of Fe (up to 300 nm) were extracted from the RBS spectra and fitted numerically. At the lowest temperature studied by us (800°C), Fe-Mg interdiffusion coefficient in this clinopyroxene is found to be 2.2 x 10-22 m2/s (log D = -21.66). The diffusion coefficients found in this study are consistently about a half an order of magnitude slower than the corresponding rates found in orthopyroxenes (ter Heege et al., Fall AGU 2007). Taken together with data from the literature, this indicates that DFe-Mg decreases in the order olivine > garnet > orthopyroxene > clinopyroxene. Consequently, the closure of various geothermometers involving clinopyroxene will be

  19. Characterization of Organic Materials in the Xenolithic Clasts in Sharps (H3.4) Meteorite Using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.; Bodnar, R. J.; Kebukawa, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Graphitization of carbon is an irreversible process which alters the structure of graphitic materials in response to the increase in metamorphic grade (temperature and/or pressure). Carbonaceous materials offer a reliable geothermometer as their Raman spectra change systematically with increasing metamorphic grade. In this study, we identified carbonaceous materials in the xenolithic clasts in Sharps and interpreted their metamorphic history by revealing the structural organization (order) of the polyaromatic organic phases using micro-Raman spectroscopy.

  20. Characterization of Organic Materials in the Xenolithic Clasts in Sharps (H3.4) Meteorite Using Microraman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.; Bodnar, R. J.; Kebukawa, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Graphitization of carbon is an irreversible process which alters the structure of graphitic materials in response to the increase in metamorphic grade (temperature and/or pressure). Carbonaceous materials offer a reliable geothermometer as their Raman spectra change systematically with increasing metamorphic grade [1-3]. In this study, we identified carbonaceous materials in the xenolithic clasts in Sharps and interpreted their metamorphic history by revealing the structural organization (order) of the polyaromatic organic phases using µ-Raman spectroscopy.

  1. SE Great Basin Play Fairway Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    This submission includes a Na/K geothermometer probability greater than 200 deg C map, as well as two play fairway analysis (PFA) models. The probability map acts as a composite risk segment for the PFA models. The PFA models differ in their application of magnetotelluric conductors as composite risk segments. These PFA models map out the geothermal potential in the region of SE Great Basin, Utah.

  2. Sulphur isotope applications in two Philippine geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bayon, F.E.B.

    1996-12-31

    A general and very preliminary study of sulphur isotope geochemistry is presented in this paper. Data from the Mt. Apo and Palinpinon geothermal fields are used to demonstrate the use of sulphur isotopes in geothermometry and correlation of sulphur species. Sulphur and oxygen isotope geothermometers applied to Mt. Apo data show very good agreement with temperatures estimated using other established geothermometers, as well as bore measured temperatures. This signifies that sulphur isotopes in S-species in fluids of the Mt. Apo hydrothermal system are in equilibrium at drilled depths. In Palinpinon, on the other hand, temperature estimates from fluid and mineral sulphur isotope geothermometry calculations do not agree with, and are commonly higher than, well measured temperatures and temperatures estimated from other geothermometers. Sulphur isotopes in the presently-exploited Palinpinon fluid are not in equilibrium, and sulphur isotope geothermometry may be reflective of isotopic equilibrium of the deeper portions of the hydrothermal system. Dissolved sulphate in both the Palinpinon and Mt. Apo geothermal fluids appear to originate from the disproportionation of magmatic SO{sub 2} at temperatures below 400{degrees}C. Hydrogen sulphide in well discharge fluids are dominantly directly derived from the magma, with a minor amount coming from SO{sub 2} disproportionation.

  3. Evaluation of the solute geothermometry of thermal springs and drilled wells of La Primavera (Cerritos Colorados) geothermal field, Mexico: A geochemometrics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandarinath, Kailasa; Domínguez-Domínguez, Humberto

    2015-10-01

    A detailed study on the solute geothermometry of thermal water (18 springs and 8 drilled wells) of La Primavera geothermal field (LPGF) in Mexico has been carried out by employing a geochemical database compiled from the literature and by applying all the available solute geothermometers. The performance of these geothermometers in predicting the reservoir temperatures has been evaluated by applying a geochemometrics (geochemical and statistical) method. The springs of the LPGF are of bicarbonate type and the majority have attained partial-equilibrium chemical conditions and the remaining have shown non-equilibrium conditions. In the case of geothermal wells, water is dominantly of chloride-type and, among the studied eight geothermal wells, four have shown full-equilibrium chemical conditions and another four have indicated partial-equilibrium conditions. All springs of HCO3-​ type water have provided unreliable reservoir temperatures, whereas the only one available spring of SO42- type water has provided the reservoir temperature nearer to the average BHT of the wells. Contrary to the general expected behavior, spring water of non-equilibrium and geothermal well water of partial-equilibrium chemical conditions have indicated more reliable reservoir temperatures than those of partially-equilibrated and fully-equilibrated water, respectively. Among the chemical concentration data, Li and SiO2 of two springs, SO42- and Mg of four springs, and HCO3 and Na concentrations of two geothermal wells were identified as outliers and this has been reflected in very low reservoir temperatures predicted by the geothermometers associated with them (Li-Mg, Na-Li, Na-K-Mg, SiO2 etc.). Identification of the outlier data points may be useful in differentiating the chemical characteristics, lithology and the physico-chemical and geological processes at the sample locations of the study area. In general, the solute geothermometry of the spring waters of LPGF indicated a dominantly

  4. Geothermometry and kinetics in a two-spinel peridotite nodule, Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.; Roden, M.F.

    1981-03-01

    Compositions and zoning of minerals in a two-spinel peridotite from minette in the Navajo volcanic field on the Colorado Plateau provide unusual opportunities to compare geothermometers at low mantle temperature and to study equilibration rates. The xenolith contains pleonaste (Mg/sub .55/Fe/sub .45/Al/sub 1.62/Fe/sub .10/Cr/sub .28/O/sub 4/) and magnetite (Mg/sub. 16/Fe/sub .89/Mn/sub .01/Al/sub .18/Fe/sub 1.38/Cr/sub .32/Ti/sub .06/O/sub 4/) related by granule exsolution, together with olivine (Foyv), orthopyroxene (3.5% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/), and clinopyroxene. Both two-spinel equilibria and several olivine-pleonaste geothermometers indicate equilibration near or below 700/sup 0/C, confirming the general accuracy and continued equilibration of these geothermometers at low temperatures. Calculated olivine-magnetite temperatures are much too high. Two-pyroxene temperatures are near 800/sup 0/C. Olivine is zoned in Ca, Fe, and Mg within 50 ..mu..m of spinel by exchange with local grain boundary melts. Gradients at pleonaste-magnetite contacts were caused by multicomponent diffusion after heating by minette; effects include slight uphill diffusion of Cr. Effective binary diffusion coefficients near 1100/sup 0/C, estimated by comparison with gradients in olivine, are near 10kaa cm/sup 2//sec for Al in magnetite and 10kab cm/sup 2//sec for Al in pleonaste; an average Mg value is in the same range. The time interval between plucking of the inclusion and minette solidification is calculated as about 60 hours, consistent with ascent times calculated assuming Newtonian viscosity for the minette magmas.

  5. Thermal waters along the Konocti Bay fault zone, Lake County, California: a re-evaluation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, J.M.; Mariner, R.H.; White, L.D.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, William C.

    1992-01-01

    The Konocti Bay fault zone (KBFZ), initially regarded by some as a promising target for liquid-dominated geothermal systems, has been a disappointment. At least five exploratory wells were drilled in the vicinity of the KBFZ, but none were successful. Although the Na-K-Ca and Na-Li geothermometers indicate that the thermal waters discharging in the vicinity of Howard and Seigler Springs may have equilibrated at temperatures greater than 200??C, the spring temperatures and fluid discharges are low. Most thermal waters along the KBFZ contain >100 mg/l Mg. High concentrations of dissolved magnesium are usually indicative of relatively cool hydrothermal systems. Dissolution of serpentine at shallow depths may contribute dissolved silica and magnesium to rising thermal waters. Most thermal waters are saturated with respect to amorphous silica at the measured spring temperature. Silica geothermometers and mixing models are useless because the dissolved silica concentration is not controlled by the solubility of either quartz or chalcedony. Cation geothermometry indicates the possibility of a high-temperature fluid (> 200??C) only in the vicinity of Howard and Seigler Springs. However, even if the fluid temperature is as high as that indicated by the geothermometers, the permeability may be low. Deuterium and oxygen-18 values of the thermal waters indicate that they recharged locally and became enriched in oxygen-18 by exchange with rock. Diluting meteoric water and the thermal water appear to have the same deuterium value. Lack of tritium in the diluted spring waters suggest that the diluting water is old. ?? 1992.

  6. Hydrology and geochemistry of thermal ground water in southwestern Idaho and north-central Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Young, H.W.; Lewis, R.E.

    1980-12-01

    The study area occupies about 14,500 square miles in southwestern Idaho and north-central Nevada. Thermal ground water occurs under artesian conditions, in discontinuous or compartmented zones, in igneous or sedimentary rocks of Tertiary age. Ground-water movement is generally northward. Temperatures of the ground water range from about 30/sup 0/ to more than 80/sup 0/C. Chemical analyses of water from 12 wells and 9 springs indicate that nonthermal waters are a calcium bicarbonate type; thermal waters are a sodium bicarbonate type. Chemical geothermometers indicate probable maximum reservoir temperatures are near 100/sup 0/C. Concentration of tritium in the thermal water water is near zero.

  7. AMPHCAL: A quickbasic program for determining the amphibole name from electron microprobe analysis using the IMA rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, F.

    1996-03-01

    The program AMPHCAL enables the user data entry, recalculation of chemical analyses from the electron microprobe analyses into amphibole structural formulae, determination of prefix, and classification of calculated results with specific names according to the current IMA guidelines. The program also permits the user four Al-in-hornblende geobarometers and amphibole-plagioclase geothermometer for certain types of calcic amphiboles. This program, written in QUICKBASIC, is menu-driven and easy to use on any IBM compatible microcomputers with VGA card. The compiled form of AMPHCAL is approximately 506 kilobytes.

  8. Comparison of early exploration at Platanares (Honduras) and Wairakei (New Zealand)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truesdell, A.H.; Glover, R.B.; Janik, C.J.; Brown, K.L.; Goff, F.

    1989-01-01

    Early exploration at Wairakei, New Zealand, is compared with the present state of exploration of Platanares, Honduras. In retrospect, geothermometer temperatures favor Platanares (e.g., 220 vs. 190??C for Na-K-Ca), but two 600-m drill holes encountered lower temperatures (160??C). Wairakei, explored before the advent of chemical geothermometry, also had disappointing early drilling results (but better than Platanares; one of the first six holes hit T > 180??C). The Wairakei drilling program was nevertheless continued at full speed and by well 20 a successful drilling strategy was discovered.

  9. The olivine-ilmenite thermometer. [partitioning effect of temperature on iron ions and magnesium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, D. J.; Lindsley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    It is noted that the partitioning of Fe(2+) and Mg between olivine and ilmenite is temperature-dependent and can serve as a geothermometer if the activity-composition relations are determined. The paper reports on the study of the partitioning from 700-980 C at 1 kbar and 800-900 C at 13 kbar, and develops a solution model to account for the nonideality of olivine in the binary system fosterite-fayalite and for ilmenite in the ternary system ilmenite-geikielite-hematite. A comparison with crystallization experiments shows that this thermometer may be safely extrapolated to temperatures higher than those of the exchange experiments.

  10. CHEMISTRY OF LOW-TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL WATERS AT KLAMATH FALLS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janik, C.J.; Truesdell, A.H.; Sammel, E.A.; White, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic analyses of well discharges indicate that in the aquifer mixing occurs between shallow cold groundwater containing 2. 0 TU tritium and a deeper tritium-free thermal groundwaer at 100 to 120 degree C. This deeper water apparently results from the mixing of old, tritium-free cold groundwater and deep thermal groundwater at about 190 degree C and 120 mg/kg Cl. The temperature and chlorinity of the deep thermal water are based on SO//4-isotope and silica geothermometers and chloride and silica mixing models.

  11. Drilling investigation of a young magmatic intrusion beneath Inyo Dome, Long Valley Caldera, California. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    Progress to date indicates: (1) the conduit and lava flow at Obsidian Dome consist of two magma types; (2) the more mafic magma occurs at the base of Obsidian Dome and at the margins of the conduit and was emplaced first; (3) the more silicic magma occurs in the center of the conduit and in the dike; (4) the ilmenite-magnetite and orthopyroxene-augite geothermometers have not reequilibrated in the conduit or dike; (5) the more mafic magma's emplacement temperature was 974/sup 0/C compared to the silicic magma's 951/sup 0/C; and (6) trace elements are characteristic of each magma type. (ACR)

  12. Gas Geothermometry for Drilhole Fluids from Vapor Dominated and Hot Water Geothermal Fields

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amore, Franco; Truesdall, Alfred H.

    1980-12-16

    The compositions of steam from the vapor-dominated geothermal systems of Larderello, Italy and The Geysers, California have been shown by previous investigators to vary with position in the field. The most conspicuous chemical patterns observed in the Larderello and The Geysers vapor-dominated geotherrnal are strong increases or decreases from the center to the edges of constituents carried in the steam. The pattern of these parameters in vapor-dominated systems seem to be controlled mainly by a process of lateral steam movement and condensation. The condensation process, at constant temperature and total pressure increases the partial pressure of CO{sub 2} at the same rate as the gas/steam ratio, strongly affecting the composition of the total gas (including steam). The condensation effect should increase contents of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} in the residual steam to about the same degree because their solubilities are similar. However, the general trend observed is almost constant ratios of H{sub 2}S, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} to H{sub 2}O as the CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O ratio increases in Larderello about 5-6 times from the center to the edges at constant temperature. This means that the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}S/CO{sub 2} ratios decrease with increasing CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O ratios. Apparently the only rnechanism that can explain this behavior is reaction of these three gases with other gases and with reservoir minerals so that the partial pressures of these gases are buffered by temperature-dependent reactions with water and rock minerals. A system of appropriate equations involving H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}. CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}S were set up. The geothermometers have been tested on data from the Italian fields of Larderello, Travale, Bagnore, Piancastagnaio and from The Geysers, U.S.A. The gas geothermometers have been applied t o steam samples from wells FBN and ALR in order to define changes in both well and reservoir

  13. Estimation of deepwater temperature and hydrogeochemistry of springs in the Takab geothermal field, West Azerbaijan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Reza; Moore, Farid; Mohammadi, Zargham; Keshavarzi, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Chemical analyses of water samples from 19 hot and cold springs are used to characterize Takab geothermal field, west of Iran. The springs are divided into two main groups based on temperature, host rock, total dissolved solids (TDS), and major and minor elements. TDS, electrical conductivity (EC), Cl(-), and SO4 (2-) concentrations of hot springs are all higher than in cold springs. Higher TDS in hot springs probably reflect longer circulation and residence time. The high Si, B, and Sr contents in thermal waters are probably the result of extended water-rock interaction and reflect flow paths and residence time. Binary, ternary, and Giggenbach diagrams were used to understand the deeper mixing conditions and locations of springs in the model system. It is believed that the springs are heated either by mixing of deep geothermal fluid with cold groundwater or low conductive heat flow. Mixing ratios are evaluated using Cl, Na, and B concentrations and a mass balance approach. Calculated quartz and chalcedony geothermometer give lower reservoir temperatures than cation geothermometers. The silica-enthalpy mixing model predicts a subsurface reservoir temperature between 62 and 90 °C. The δ(18)O and δD (δ(2)H) are used to trace and determine the origin and movement of water. Both hot and cold waters plot close to the local meteoric line, indicating local meteoric origin.

  14. 9519 biotite granodiorite reacted in a temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, R.W.; Bayhurst, G.K.

    1980-10-01

    A biotite granodiorite from the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal system was reacted in a controlled temperature gradient with initially distilled water for 60d. Polished rock prisms were located in the gradient at 72, 119, 161, 209, 270, and 310/sup 0/C. Scanning electron microscope and microprobe analyses show the appearance of secondary phases: Ca-montmorillonite at 72/sup 0/C and 119/sup 0/C; zeolite, either stilbite or heulandite, at 161/sup 0/C; and another zeolite, thomsonite, at higher temperatures. Solution analyses show a steady state equilibrium exists between solution and overgrowths after about 2 weeks of reaction. The chemographic relations for the system are explored in some detail indicating the divariant assemblages may be placed in a reasonable sequence in intensive variable space. These relations predict high and low temperature effects not directly observed experimentally as well as relevant univariant equilibria. Solution chemistry indicates the Na-Ca-K geothermometer more adequately predicts temperature in this system than does the silica geothermometer.

  15. Chemistry of thermal and nonthermal springs in the vicinity of Lassen Volcanic National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Meaningful applications of water geothermometry to thermal springs in and around Lassen Volcanic National Park (LVNP) are limited to Growler Hot Spring and Morgan Hot Springs. Most hot springs located within LVNP are low-chloride, acid-sulfate waters associated with nearby steam vents. This type of hot-spring activity is characteristically found above vapor-dominated hydrothermal systems. These acid-sulfate waters are not generally useful for liquid chemical geothermometry, however, because their chemical compositions result from water-rock interaction at relatively shallow depths. Thermal waters at Drakesbad and in Little Hot Springs Valley have neutral-pH, low-Cl concentrations and have estimated Na-K-Ca and Na-Li geothermometer temperatures close to measured spring temperatures of 65 to 95??C. Hot-spring waters located south of LVNP at Growler Hot Spring, Morgan Hot Springs, and in the south-central part of LVNP in the Walker "O" No. 1 well at Terminal Geyser are rich in chloride and yield calculated geothermometer temperatures between 220 and 230??C. These thermal waters probably originate within a zone of upflow of high-enthalpy fluid inside LVNP and cool conductively during lateral flow to the south and southeast. ?? 1985.

  16. An Integrated Chemical Geothermometry System for Geothermal Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spycher, N. F.; Sonnenthal, E. L.; Kennedy, B. M.

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a reliable and improved methodology to predict geothermal reservoir temperatures from full and integrated chemical analyses of spring and shallow well water samples, to see through near surface processes, such as dilution, gas loss, etc., that mask or hide the chemical signatures of deep reservoir fluids in near surface waters. The system builds on a multicomponent chemical geothermometry method developed previously for single point sources relying on computed saturation indices of multiple minerals. Taking advantage of recent advances in optimization and geochemical/reactive transport modeling, the system integrates the multicomponent geothermometry method into an optimization system that allows simultaneous processing of multiple water analyses to estimate reservoir temperatures. In doing so, the system will also be able to solve for amounts and compositions of potential mixing end-members diluting the reservoir fluids and/or composition and amounts of gas phase lost as deep geothermal fluids ascend to ground surface. This integrated approach is expected to allow estimations of reservoir temperatures with better reliability and consistency than currently possible using standard chemical geothermometers. The proposed approach is being implemented and tested using an extensive set of water and gas compositions from springs and wells at the geothermal system in Dixie Valley, Nevada, where standard chemical geothermometers yield temperatures inconsistent with measured reservoir temperatures.

  17. Fluid/mineral equilibrium calculations for geothermal fluids and chemical geothermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tole, M.P. . School of Environmental Studies); Armannsson, H. ); Pang Zhonghe . Lab. for Geothermal); Arnorsson, S. . Science Inst.)

    1993-02-01

    Aquifer temperatures of 13 geothermal wells in Iceland whose measured reservoir temperatures range from 47 to 325 C have been estimated from the chemical composition of the discharged fluid by considering simultaneously temperature dependent equilibria between many mineral phases and the solution. This approach to chemical geothermometry was initially proposed by Reed and Spycher. Its advantage over individual solute geothermometers such as the silica and the Na-K and Na-K-Ca geothermometers is that it allows a distinction to be made between equilibrated and non-equilibrated waters. However, care should be taken in interpreting the results of multi-mineral/solute equilibria as the results depend on both the thermodynamic data base used for mineral solubilities and the activities of end-member minerals in solid solutions. When using old analytical data attention has to be paid to analytical methods, especially in the case of important constituents present at low concentrations in the fluid, such as aluminium, for which analytical results obtained by two methods yielded very different equilibrium temperatures. The results for selected wells in Iceland, presented here, indicate that the geothermometry results are with few exceptions within 20 C of measured aquifer temperatures, and within 10 C for about half the wells considered. The method responds rapidly to changes such as cooling or mixing.

  18. Geothermobarometry of Precambrian metamorphic rocks from the Tobacco Root Mountains of southwestern Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Friberg, L.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-04-01

    Upper amphibolite facies metamorphic rocks of Precambrian age, located in the Spuhler Peak area of the Tobacco Root Mountains of southwestern Montana, provide the basis for comparative geothermobarometry. Twenty three samples were chosen for microprobe analyses from a stratified sequence of metapelites interlayered with amphibole schists and gneisses exposed in a cirque headwall (less than one square mile sampling area). The garnet-biotite geothermometry of Indares and Martignole (1985), for three metapelite samples, indicates an average temperature 710 [+-] 35 C at a pressure of 6,530 bars (one sample) using the modified GASP geobarometer of Newton and Haselton (1981). Geothermobarometry on the amphibole schist and gneiss samples using the hornblende-plagioclase geothermometer of Blundy and Holland (1990), for twenty samples, indicates an average temperature of 751 [+-] 47 C. The hornblende-garnet geothermometer of Graham and Powell (1984), for fifteen samples, indicates an average temperature of 628 [+-] 59 C. The total aluminum content of hornblendes from nineteen samples indicates an average pressure of 4,826 [+-] 682 bars (Johnson and Rutherford, 1988) and 6,182 [+-] 793 bars (Blundy and Holland, 1990). Variation of temperature and pressure may be explained by closure temperatures for element exchange between the minerals used in the various geothermobarometers.

  19. Dating thermal events at Cerro Prieto using fission-track annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, S.J.; Elders, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    The duration of heating in the Cerro Prieto reservoir was estimated by relating the fading of spontaneous fission tracks in detrital apatite to observed temperatures. The rate of fading is a function of both time and temperature. The apparent fission track age of the detrital apatites then, is a function of both their source age and their time-temperature history. Data from laboratory experiments and geologic fading studies were compiled from published sources to produce lines of iso-annealing for apatite in time-temperature space. Fission track ages were calculated for samples from two wells at Cerro Prieto, one with an apparently simple and one with an apparently complex thermal history. Temperatures were estimated by empirical vitrinite reflectance geothermometry, fluid inclusion homogenization and oxygen isotope equilibrium. These estimates were compared with logs of measured borehole temperatures. The temperature in well T-366, where complete annealing first occurs, was estimated to be between 160 and 180{sup 0}C. Complete annealing at these temperatures requires 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 3} years, respectively. Well M-94 has an apparently complex thermal history. Geothermometers in this well indicate temperatures some 50 to 100{sup 0}C higher than those measured directly in the borehole. Fission tracks are partially preserved in M-94 where paleotemperatures were as high as 200{sup 0}C and are erased where geothermometers indicate temperatures of 250{sup 0}C. This implies a thermal event less than 10{sup 1} years and greater than 10{sup 0} years in duration.

  20. ADVANCES IN HYDROGEOCHEMICAL INDICATORS FOR THE DISCOVERY OF NEW GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN THE GREAT BASIN, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Stuart F; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric; Dobson, Patrick

    2013-05-20

    This report summarizes the results of Phase I work for a go/no go decision on Phase II funding. In the first objective, we assessed the extent to which fluid-mineral equilibria controlled deep water compositions in geothermal systems across the Great Basin. Six systems were evaluated: Beowawe; Desert Peak; Dixie Valley; Mammoth; Raft River; Roosevelt. These represent a geographic spread of geothermal resources, in different geological settings and with a wide range of fluid compositions. The results were used for calibration/reformulation of chemical geothermometers that reflect the reservoir temperatures in producing reservoirs. In the second objective, we developed a reactive -transport model of the Desert Peak hydrothermal system to evaluate the processes that affect reservoir fluid geochemistry and its effect on solute geothermometry. This included testing geothermometry on “reacted” thermal water originating from different lithologies and from near-surface locations where the temperature is known from the simulation. The integrated multi-component geothermometer (GeoT, relying on computed mineral saturation indices) was tested against the model results and also on the systems studied in the first objective.

  1. Constraining chemical geothermometry with reactive transport models: An example study of the Dixie Valley geothermal area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanner, C.; Peiffer, L.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E. L.; Iovenitti, J. L.; Kennedy, B. M.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, 1D and 2D reactive transport simulations of the Dixie Valley geothermal area (Nevada, USA) were performed using Toughreact [1] to evaluate the fluid flow pathways and rates of equilibration of hydrothermal fluids. Modeling studies were combined with new multicomponent geothermometry, which is being used to estimate the temperature of geothermal reservoirs based on chemical analysis of geothermal springs. The concept is based on the assumption of chemical equilibrium between the thermal fluid and minerals of the reservoir rock [2]. If re-equilibration occurs between the reservoir at depth and the surface, then the 'deep' chemical signature of the fluid is lost and the obtained reservoir temperature is underestimated. The simulations were run for a vertical cross-section that has been structurally and geologically characterized. Model calibration was performed using available site information such as chemical analysis of geothermal springs, isotherms inferred from geothermal wells and results of a previous flow simulation study [3]. Model runs included the simulation of typical near-surface processes such as dilution, mixing and salt leaching occurring at the Dixie Valley geothermal area. Each reactive transport model produced 'synthetic' waters that were processed using the multicomponent chemical geothermometer code GeoT [4]. This code computes the saturation indices of reservoir minerals as a function of the temperature. Reservoir temperature is inferred when mineral saturation indices all cluster around zero. GeoT results were also compared with classical solute geothermometers (silica, Na-K-(Ca), K-Mg) [5]. Simulation results reveal that a minimum vertical fluid velocity on the order of a meter per day is needed to preserve the geochemical signature of a geothermal reservoir and to predict its temperature. The simulations also show that deep geochemical signatures are well preserved if fracture surfaces are partially coated by secondary minerals

  2. Laboratory and Natural Constraints on the Temperature Limit for Preservation of the Dolomite Clumped Isotope Thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, M. K.; Eiler, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Kinetic barriers generally inhibit intercrystalline equilibration of cations and isotopic compositions at temperatures below ~350˚C, greatly limiting the geothermometers available to study the upper 10-15 km of the crust. Calcite 'clumped' isotopes commonly appear to record homogeneous equilibrium during crystallization at surface temperatures, but kinetic models predict that reordering due to solid-state exchange among nearby carbonate groups modifies primary compositions at temperatures above ~115˚C on timescales of 10^6 - 10^8 years and fully re-equilibrates above 200˚C in most geological environments1. Slowly cooled dolomitic marbles commonly preserve apparent temperatures of ~300˚C, indicating that dolomite may have slower reordering kinetics and thus greater preservation of primary crystallization temperatures. If so, dolomite clumped isotope thermometry may be a useful geothermometer in much of the the shallow crust. We measured the kinetics of clumped isotope reordering in dolomite with heating experiments at 400-800˚C in a TZM cold seal apparatus pressurized with CO2. Results predict that no detectable reordering occurs in dolomite held at temperatures less than ~250˚C over timescales of up to 10^8 years, demonstrating the viability of the system as a shallow crustal geothermometer. The non-first order behavior observed in calcite1,2,3is exhibited by dolomite as well, albeit at higher temperatures. To test these predictions, we measured the clumped isotopic compositions of coexisting calcite and dolomite in marbles from the Notch Peak aureole, UT. Dolomite clumped isotope temperatures in the outer aureole match peak conditions predicted by thermal models up to ~275˚C, indicating that the system resisted reordering below this grade. Calcite clumped isotope temperatures are never greater than ~150˚C at all grades in the aureole; this is consistent with the ambient burial temperature in the section and indicates that all metamorphic calcite was fully

  3. Multicomponent geothermometry applied to a medium-low enthalpy carbonate-evaporite geothermal reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battistel, Maria; Barbieri, Maurizio; Hurwitz, Shaul; Eavans, William; Chiodini, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    In order to improve the knowledge of the thermal state of medium to low-enthalpy thermal systems hosted in carbonate-evaporite rocks, a mineral-solution equilibrium model was compared to other theoretical geothermoters. We use the GeoT code (Spycher et al., 2014) which calculates reservoir temperatures based on a statistical evaluation of mineral saturation indices. The calculations were applied to study the medium and low enthalpy geothermal systems in the Tyrrhenian-Apennine area (central Italy). The study area is mainly characterized by Paleozoic metamorphic basement and a Mesozoic carbonate-evaporite sequence overlain by Oligocene-Mid Miocene flysch formations and Quaternary volcanic complexes associated with crustal extension in the Tyrrhenian area. A regional aquifer is hosted in the carbonate-evaporate formations, and smaller aquifers are hosted in the volcanic rocks. For reservoir temperature calculations the chemical composition of 58 springs and wells with a temperature between 22° and 65°C was taken into account. The waters are classified as Ca-HCO3 waters with low TDS, Ca-SO4 waters with high TDS and few HCO3-NaK type waters. The calculated reservoir temperatures of the medium-low enthalpy hydrothermal systems in Tyrrhenian-Apennine area range between 40 and 100°C. As expected, cation geothermometers provide unrealistic values of equilibrium temperature. Calculations based on the chalcedony geothermeter provide more realistic temperatures than the quartz geothermometers because silica solubility at temperatures <180°C is controlled by amorphous silica or chalcedony. GeoT simulation results show that all the considered mineral phases are either near saturation or oversaturated and the equilibrium temperatures range between 48° and 116°C. The statistical approach of "best clustering minerals", used in this model, solves the problems related to cation or single component geothermometers. For these cases, multicomponent geothermometry coupled with

  4. GeoT User’s Guide, A Computer Program for Multicomponent Geothermometry and Geochemical Speciation, Version 2.1

    SciTech Connect

    Spycher, Nicolas; Peiffer, Loic; Finsterle, Stefan; Sonnenthal, Eric

    2016-06-06

    GeoT implements the multicomponent geothermometry method developed by Reed and Spycher (1984, Geochim. Cosmichim. Acta 46 513–528) into a stand-alone computer program, to ease the application of this method and to improve the prediction of geothermal reservoir temperatures using full and integrated chemical analyses of geothermal fluids. Reservoir temperatures are estimated from statistical analyses of mineral saturation indices computed as a function of temperature. The reconstruction of the deep geothermal fluid compositions, and geothermometry computations, are all implemented into the same computer program, allowing unknown or poorly constrained input parameters to be estimated by numerical optimization using existing parameter estimation software, such as iTOUGH2, PEST, or UCODE. This integrated geothermometry approach presents advantages over classical geothermometers for fluids that have not fully equilibrated with reservoir minerals and/or that have been subject to processes such as dilution and gas loss.

  5. Gas Geochemistry of the Dogger Geothermal Aquifer (Paris Basin, France)

    SciTech Connect

    Criaud, A.; Fouillac, C.; Marty, B.; Brach, M.; Wei, H.F.

    1987-01-20

    The low enthalpy program developed in the Paris Basin provides the opportunity for studying the gas geochemistry of the calcareous aquifer of the Dogger. Hydrocarbons and CO{sub 2} are mainly biogenic, He displays high concentrations. He, Ar and N{sub 2} have multiple origins (radioactive decay, atmospheric migration, biochemical processes). The distribution of the gases in the zones of the basin varies in relation to the general chemistry, sedimentology and hydrodynamics. The gas geothermometers do not apply to this environment but useful estimations of the redox potential of the fluid can be derived from CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}/NH{sub 4}{sup +} ratios. H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S are involved in corrosion processes and scaling in the pipes. 12 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Do the trace element compositions of detrital zircons require Hadean continental crust?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coogan, Laurence A.; Hinton, Richard W.

    2006-08-01

    The trace element compositions of Hadean zircons have been used in two ways to argue for the existence of Hadean continental crust. One argument is based on low crystallization temperatures of Hadean zircons that have been determined using a novel geothermometer based on the Ti content of zircons in equilibrium with rutile. The second argument is based on using the trace element abundances in zircons to calculate their parental melt compositions, especially the rare earth elements. Here we demonstrate that zircons that grow from a melt formed by basalt differentiation at modern mid-ocean ridges cannot be unambiguously distinguished from Hadean zircons on either of these grounds. Thus, we conclude that the trace element compositions of Hadean zircons are permissive of models that do not include the generation of continental crust in the Hadean.

  7. Chemistry and isotopes of deep geothermal saline fluids in the Upper Rhine Graben: Origin of compounds and water-rock interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauwels, Hélène; Fouillac, Christian; Fouillac, Anne-Marie

    1993-06-01

    Deep boreholes (⩽870 m) in the Upper Rhine Graben produce medium-temperature (120-150°C) saline fluids that circulate through the granitic basement and/or the overlying sedimentary rocks. The salinity of these deep fluids, sampled from both the granite and the sedimentary rock, can be explained by a three-step model: (1) evaporation of seawater which produces a primary brine; li(2) mixing between a dilute fluid and the primary brine; and (3) dissolution of halite by the later fluid. The thermal waters sampled at shallower depths are the result of mixing of the deep saline fluid and surface water. Geothermometer calculations indicate that some of the deep fluids did reach high temperatures (up to 220-260°C). During cooliug, reactions between fluid and rock took place, but the fluids did not have enough time to reach complete equilibrium with the surrounding rock.

  8. Colorado's hydrothermal resource base: an assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Pearl, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    As part of its effort to more accurately describe the nations geothrmal resource potential, the US Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy contracted with the Colorado Geological survey to appraise the hydrothermal (hot water) geothermal resources of Colorado. Part of this effort required that the amount of energy that could possibly be contained in the various hydrothermal systems in Colorado be estimated. The findings of that assessment are presented. To make these estimates the geothermometer reservoir temperatures estimated by Barrett and Pearl (1978) were used. In addition, the possible reservoir size and extent were estimated and used. This assessment shows that the total energy content of the thermal systems in Colorado could range from 4.872 x 10{sup 15} BTU's to 13.2386 x 10{sup 15} BTU's.

  9. WEN-1: first successful well in the Wendel-Amedee KGRA

    SciTech Connect

    Juncal, R.W.; Gertsch, W.D.; Johnson, K.R.

    1982-10-01

    Field exploration activities initiated by GeoProducts Corp. in 1977 culminated in the successful completion of a deep production well in Sept. 1981. The well was drilled to a depth of 5823' and completed in a fractured, dominantly granodiorite lithology. A broad fault zone with associated fracturing occurs at approximately 5300'-5335' and serves as the main production zone. Well testing has indicated a highly productive well with no immediate boundaries. Long term testing was conducted at a constant artesian flow rate of 670 gpm with a maximum downhole temperature during flow of 251 F. The thermal fluid is a Na-SO/sub 4/-Cl type of low salinity. Various geothermometers suggest that the fluid originates from a reservoir in the 275-310 F range. Further study and refinement of the system model is ongoing in preparation for future deep drilling.

  10. An evaluation of the geothermal potential of the Tecuamburro Volcano area of Guatemala

    SciTech Connect

    Heiken, G.; Duffield, W.

    1990-09-01

    Radiometric ages indicate that the Tecuamburro Volcano and three adjacent lava domes grew during the last 38,300 years, and that a 360-m-wide phreatic crater, Laguna Ixpaco, was formed near the base of these domes about 2900 years ago. Laguna Ixpaco is located within the Chupadero crater, from which pyroxene pumice deposits were erupted 38,300 years ago. Thus, the likelihood is great for a partly molten or solid-but-still-hot near-surface intrusion beneath the area. Fumaroles and hot springs issue locally from the Tecuamburro volcanic complex and near Laguna Ixpaco. Analyses of gas and fluid samples from these and other nearby thermal manifestations yield chemical-geothermometer temperatures of about 150{degree} to 300{degree}C, with the highest temperatures at Ixpaco. The existence of a commercial-grade geothermal reservoir beneath the Ixpaco area seems likely. 84 refs., 70 figs., 12 tabs.

  11. Metamorphic conditions in the Ashe Metamorphic Suite, North Carolina Blue Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    McSween, H.Y. Jr. ); Abbott, R.N.; Raymond, L.A. )

    1989-12-01

    Taconian metamorphism of mafic rocks in the Ashe Metamorphic Suite can be characterized by reference to an isograd corresponding to the reaction bio + epi = hbl + gar, which separates rocks into two zones of low-variance assemblages. Temperatures and pressures estimated from mineral exchange geothermometers and a barometer suggest that this reaction occurred at approximately 600-650C and 7.5 kbar. Phase equilibria between biotite and hornblende, as well as the sharpness of the mapped isograd, indicate that the reaction is discontinuous. Inferred differences in metamorphic grade between Ashe amphibolites and mafic dikes in the underlying basement suggest that these units are in faulted contact. Isograd patterns in pelitic rocks suggest an elongated domal uplift that developed after metamorphism and thrusting, the core of which is exposed in the adjacent Grandfather Mountain window.

  12. Chemical and isotopic prediction of aquifer temperatures in the geothermal system at Long Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.; Sorey, M.L.; Mariner, R.H.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1979-01-01

    Temperatures of aquifers feeding thermal springs and wells in Long Valley, California, estimated using silica and Na-K-Ca geothermometers and warm spring mixing models, range from 160/dg to about 220??C. This information was used to construct a diagram showing enthalpy-chloride relations for the various thermal waters in the Long Valley region. The enthalpy-chloride information suggests that a 282 ?? 10??C aquifer with water containing about 375 mg chloride per kilogram of water is present somewhere deep in the system. That deep water would be related to ??? 220??C Casa Diablo water by mixing with cold water, and to Hot Creek water by first boiling with steam loss and then mixing with cold water. Oxygen and deuterium isotopic data are consistent with that interpretation. An aquifer at 282??C with 375 mg/kg chloride implies a convective heat flow in Long Valley of 6.6 ?? 107 cal/s. ?? 1979.

  13. KONOCTI BAY FAULT ZONE, LAKE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA: A REEVALUATION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, J. Michael

    1984-01-01

    The Konocti Bay Fault Zone (KBFZ), initially regarded by some as a promising liquid-dominated hydrothermal system, has been a disappointment as a geothermal prospect. Five exploratory wells have been drilled in the vicinity of the KBFZ, but none of them are producing thermal fluids; in fact, three have been abandoned. This may be because hydrothermal fluid discharges along the KBFZ are low. The Na-K-Ca and Na-Li geothermometers indicate that the waters discharging around Howard and Seigler Springs may have equilibrated at temperatures above 200 degree C. If boiling has occurred or is occurring, a chloride-enthalpy diagram may be appropriate. Such a diagram for the KBFZ shows that a water in excess of 250 degree C existed or may exist in the area. However, because currently measured temperatures rarely exceed 50 degree C and magnesium concentration in the water is high, very little deep high temperature water may be present. Refs.

  14. SELECTED CHEMICAL ANALYSES AND GEOTHERMOMETRY OF HOT SPRING WATERS FROM THE CALABOZOS CALDERA, CENTRAL CHILE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, J.M.; Grunder, A.L.; Hildreth, Wes

    1983-01-01

    Hot springs discharging from the active hydrothermal system associated with the Calabozos caldera, Chile, have measured orifice temperatures as high as 98. 5 degree C and calculated geothermometer temperatures as high as 250 degree C. Three types of spring waters can be identified from the chemical analyses: a Na-Cl type, a Na-HCO//3 type and a Na-mixed anion type. Chloride-enthalpy relations indicate that the hydrothermal reservoir water may attain temperatures near 342 degree C and that most spring waters are mixed with cold meteoric water. Despite the proximity of Mesozoic marine gypsum deposits, the Cl/Br weight ratio of the Calabozos spring waters does not appear to indicate that these waters have a significant 'marine' signature. Refs.

  15. Isotopic studies of epigenetic features in metalliferous sediment, Atlantis II Deep, Red Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zierenberg, Robert A.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    1988-01-01

    The unique depositional environment of the Atlantis II Deep brine pool in the Red Sea produces a stratiform metalliferous deposit of greater areal extent than deposits formed by buoyant-plume systems typical of the midocean ridges because of much more efficient metal entrapment. Isotopic analyses of strontium, sulfur, carbon, and oxygen from the metalliferous sediments indicate that three major sources contribute dissolved components to the hydrothermal system: seawater, Miocene evaporites, and rift-zone basalt. An areally restricted magnetite-hematite-pyroxene assemblage formed at high temperatures, possibly in response to hydrothermal convection initiated by intrusion of basalt into the metalliferous sediment. A correlation between smectite Fe/(Fe+Mg) ratios and oxygen isotope temperatures suggests that smectite is a potentially important chemical geothermometer, and confirms geochemical calculations indicating that Mg-rich smectite is more stable than Fe-rich smectite at elevated temperatures.

  16. The timing and mechanism of depletion in Lewisian granulites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, A. S.; Onions, R. K.; Ohara, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    Large Ion Lithophile (LIL) depletion in Lewisian granulites is discussed. Severe depletions in U, Th, and other LIL have been well documented in Lewisan mafic and felsic gneisses, but new Pb isotopic analyses show little or no depletion in lithologies with high solidus temperatures, such as peridotite. This suggests that LIL transport in this terrane took place by removal of partial melts rather than by pervasive flooding with externally derived CO2. The Pb and Nd isotopic data gathered on these rocks show that the depletion and granulite metamorphism are distinct events about 250 Ma apart. Both fluid inclusions and cation exchange geothermometers date from the later metamorphic event and therefore have little bearing on the depletion event, suggesting a note of caution for interpretations of other granulite terranes.

  17. Studies of quaternary saline lakes-I. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in saline minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matsuo, S.; Friedman, I.; Smith, G.I.

    1972-01-01

    Borax, gaylussite, nahcolite and trona were synthesized in aqueous solution at temperatures ranging from 8?? to 35??C. Except for borax, deuterium was always depleted in these hydrated minerals relative to the solutions from which they were crystallized. In borax, no significant fractionation was found. The fractionation factor of D H for the trona-water system exhibited a marked temperature dependence. By combining the deuterium contents of trona and the solution from which trona was crystallized, the following thermometer scale was obtained: In ( D H) trona ( D H)water = 1.420 ?? 104 T2 + 23.56 T (1). An attempt to establish a geothermometer based on C13 C12 fractionation between carbonate minerals and carbonate ions in aqueous solution was not successful. ?? 1972.

  18. Isotopic and chemical composition of parbati valley geothermal discharges, North-West Himalaya, India

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giggenbach, W.F.; Gonfiantini, R.; Jangi, B.L.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    The isotopic compositions of the waters discharged from Parbati Valley geothermal areas indicate a higher altitude meteoric origin, with discharge temperatures reflecting variations in the depth of penetration of the waters to levels heated by the existence of a 'normal' geothermal gradient. On the basis of mixing models involving silica, tritium, discharge temperatures and chloride contents, deep equilibration temperatures of 120-140??C were obtained for Manikaran, possibly reaching 160??C at even greater depth. Geothermometers based on sulfate-water 18O exchange and gas reactions point to similar temperatures. Exceptionally high helium contents of the discharges correspond to apparent crustal residence times of the waters in the order of 10-100 Ma; relative nitrogen-argon contents support a largely meteoric origin of the waters with a possible fossil brine, but no detectable magmatic component. ?? 1983.

  19. Not so hot "hot spots" in the oceanic mantle.

    PubMed

    Bonath, E

    1990-10-05

    Excess volcanism and crustal swelling associated with hot spots are generally attributed to thermal plumes upwelling from the mantle. This concept has been tested in the portion of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 34 degrees and 45 degrees (Azores hot spot). Peridotite and basalt data indicate that the upper mantle in the hot spot has undergone a high degree of melting relative to the mantle elsewhere in the North Atlantic. However, application of various geothermometers suggests that the temperature of equilibration of peridotites in the mantle was lower, or at least not higher, in the hot spot than elsewhere. The presence of H(2)O-rich metasomatized mantle domains, inferred from peridotite and basalt data, would lower the melting temperature of the hot spot mantle and thereby reconcile its high degree ofmelting with the lack of a mantle temperature anomaly. Thus, some so-called hot spots might be melting anomalies unrelated to abnormally high mantle temperature or thermal plumes.

  20. Conditions of origin of natural diamonds of peridotite affinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, F. R.; Finnerty, A. A.

    1980-01-01

    Studies of mineral inclusions in natural diamonds and rare diamondiferous xenoliths from kimberlites show that most diamonds are associated with a dunite or harzburgite paragenesis. The diamondiferous periodites and dunites have predominantly coarse or tabular textures that suggest low-temperature (less than 1100 C) equilibration. Application of the K(D) Fe/Mg(Ga/Ol) geothermometer of O'Neill and Wood to analytical data for the minerals in these rocks shows that most have equilibrated below 1100 C. Application of this thermometer to pairs of olivine and garnet crystals included in individual diamonds indicates that the diamonds have crystallized in the range 900-1300 C, with a majority of estimated equilibration temperatures falling in the range below 1150 C. Comparison of these estimates of equilibration temperature with the zone of invariant vapor composition solidus for kimberlite and garnet lherzolite determined by Eggler and Wendlandt (1979) suggests that many diamonds may have formed in subsolidus events.

  1. The Geyser Bight geothermal area, Umnak Island, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Motyka, R.J. ); Nye, C.J. Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK . Geophysical Inst.); Turner, D.L. . Geophysical Inst.); Liss, S.A. )

    1993-08-01

    The Geyser Bight geothermal area contains one of the hottest and most extensive areas of thermal springs in Alaska, and is the only site in the state with geysers. Heat for the geothermal system is derived from crustal magma associated with Mt. Recheshnoi volcano. Successive injections of magma have probably heated the crust to near its minimum melting point and produced the only high-SiO[sub 2] rhyolites in the oceanic part of the Aleutian arc. At least two hydrothermal reservoirs are postulated to underlie the geothermal area and have temperatures of 165 and 200 C, respectively, as estimated by geothermometry. Sulfate-water isotope geothermometers suggest a deeper reservoir with a temperature of 265 C. The thermal spring waters have relatively low concentrations of Cl (600 ppm) but are rich in B (60 ppm) and As (6 ppm). The As/Cl ratio is among the highest reported for geothermal waters. 41 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

  2. Hydrologic model based on deep test data from the Walker O No. 1 well, Terminal Geyser, California

    SciTech Connect

    Beall, J.J.

    1981-10-01

    The Shasta Forest No. 1 Well (renamed Walker O No. 1) at Terminal Geyser, California, was reentered and deepened from 1258 to 4008 feet. Temperature logs indicate the well penetrated a laterally flowing thermal aquifer between 1400 and 2200 feet. Large amounts of drilling fluids were lost in that zone. Maximum temperature in the well (10 months after drilling) was 348/sup 0/F at 2000 feet. A large reversed temperature gradient zone occurs below 2400 feet. Bottom hole temperature is 256/sup 0/F. After completion, the well was flowed for about five hours with nitrogen injection at 2000 feet. Samples taken throughout the flow indicate that fluids lost during drilling were not completely recovered. Salinity increased steadily during the flow period. Ratios of Na, K, and Ca were nearly constant, however, and application of Na-K and Na-K-Ca geothermometers indicate these fluids were in equilibrium with rocks at a temperature of 448-449/sup 0/F.

  3. Chemistry and geothermometry of brine produced from the Salton Sea Scientific drill hole, Imperial Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, J.M.; Fournier, R.O.

    1988-01-01

    The December 29-30, 1985, flow test of the State 2-14 well, also known as the Salton Sea Scientific drill hole, produced fluid from a depth of 1865-1877 m at a reservoir temperature of 305????5??C. Samples were collected at five different flashing pressures. The brines are Na-Ca-K-Cl-type waters with very high metal and low SO4 and HCO3 contents. Compositions of the flashed brines were normalized relative to the 25??C densities of the solutions, and an ionic charge balance was achieved by adjusting the Na concentration. Calculated Na/K geothermometer temperatures, using equations suggested by different investigators, range from 326?? to 364??C. The Mg/K2 method gives a temperature of about 350??C, Mg/Li2 about 282??, and Na/Li 395??-418??C. -from Authors

  4. Boundary Creek thermal areas of Yellowstone National Park: II, thermal water analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.M.; Hutchinson, R.A.

    1980-09-01

    Water samples from 28 thermal springs, 2 non-thermal springs, and 2 creeks from the Boundary Creek Thermal Areas (BCTA) in the southwestern corner of Yellowstone National Park were analyzed to help establish a chemical water-quality base line prior to possible geothermal exploitation of the Island Park Geothermal Area (IPGA). The springs, situated at the southwestern end of the Madison Plateau, are the Yellowstone Park thermal waters nearest to the IPGA and might respond to geothermal exploitation in the IPGA. Water temperatures ranging from 50/sup 0/ to 90/sup 0/C and low Cl concentrations (< 110 mgL/sup -1/) characterize spring waters in the BCTA. They are chemically distinct from the major geysers and hot springs in Yellowstone Park. The Na-K-Ca and silica geothermometers are in general agreement, usually within 10/sup 0/C, and indicate reservoir temperatures of 150 to 170/sup 0/C.

  5. A Review of Methods Applied by the U.S. Geological Survey in the Assessment of Identified Geothermal Resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Colin F.; Reed, Marshall J.; Mariner, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting an updated assessment of geothermal resources in the United States. The primary method applied in assessments of identified geothermal systems by the USGS and other organizations is the volume method, in which the recoverable heat is estimated from the thermal energy available in a reservoir. An important focus in the assessment project is on the development of geothermal resource models consistent with the production histories and observed characteristics of exploited geothermal fields. The new assessment will incorporate some changes in the models for temperature and depth ranges for electric power production, preferred chemical geothermometers for estimates of reservoir temperatures, estimates of reservoir volumes, and geothermal energy recovery factors. Monte Carlo simulations are used to characterize uncertainties in the estimates of electric power generation. These new models for the recovery of heat from heterogeneous, fractured reservoirs provide a physically realistic basis for evaluating the production potential of natural geothermal reservoirs.

  6. Improved Geothermometry Through Multivariate Reaction-path Modeling and Evaluation of Geomicrobiological Influences on Geochemical Temperature Indicators: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mattson, Earl; Smith, Robert; Fujita, Yoshiko; McLing, Travis; Neupane, Ghanashyam; Palmer, Carl; Reed, David; Thompson, Vicki

    2015-03-01

    The project was aimed at demonstrating that the geothermometric predictions can be improved through the application of multi-element reaction path modeling that accounts for lithologic and tectonic settings, while also accounting for biological influences on geochemical temperature indicators. The limited utilization of chemical signatures by individual traditional geothermometer in the development of reservoir temperature estimates may have been constraining their reliability for evaluation of potential geothermal resources. This project, however, was intended to build a geothermometry tool which can integrate multi-component reaction path modeling with process-optimization capability that can be applied to dilute, low-temperature water samples to consistently predict reservoir temperature within ±30 °C. The project was also intended to evaluate the extent to which microbiological processes can modulate the geochemical signals in some thermal waters and influence the geothermometric predictions.

  7. Preliminary evaluation of thermal and nonthermal waters at selected sites in Panama, Central America. Evaluacion preliminar de aguas termales y no termales de sitios seleccionados en Panama, Centroamerica

    SciTech Connect

    Shevenell, L.

    1989-11-01

    Thirty-one thermal and nonthermal water samples were collected in Panama by the Instituto de Recursos Hidraulicos y Electrificacion and analyzed by the Earth and Space Sciences Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory to evaluate the geothermal potential of four different areas. Chemical and isotopic analyses were performed on each sample. Because samples from several areas were submitted, the chemistry of the samples is varied, with total dissolved solids of thermal fluids ranging from 900 to nearly 10,000 mg/{ell}. All water samples studied are meteoric in origin, and none of the thermal waters exhibit an {sup 18}O enrichment, which is characteristic of high-temperature isotopic, exchange between water and rock. At all four areas, calculated geothermometer temperatures within a reservoir of less than 160{degrees}C. 4 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Assessment of geothermal resources at Newcastle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blackett, Robert E.; Shubat, Michael A.; Chapman, David S.; Forster, Craig B.; Schlinger, Charles M.

    1989-01-01

    Integrated geology, geophysics, and geochemistry studies in the Newcastle area of southwest Utah are used to develop a conceptual geologic model of a blind, moderate-temperature hydrothermal system. Studies using 12 existing and 12 new, thermal gradient test holes, in addition to geologic mapping, gravity surveys, and other investigations have helped define the thermal regime. Preliminary results indicate that the up-flow region is located near the west-facing escarpment of an adjacent mountain range, probably related to the bounding range-front fault. Chemical geothermometers suggest equilibration temperatures ranging from 140??C to 170??C. The highest temperature recorded in the system is 130??C from an exploration well drilled by the Unocal Corporation.

  9. Recent geothermal investigations in Honduras: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    William Laughlin, A.; Goff, Sue J.

    1991-03-01

    Since 1985, the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the U.S. Geological Survey have worked with the Empresa Nacional de Energia Electrica of Honduras to perform a geothermal assessment of six areas in Honduras. A combination of reconnaissance and detailed techniques was used to eliminate from consideration the sites of lower potential. Detailed geophysical investigations were performed at two high-potential sites and three geothermal gradient coreholes were drilled at the highest potential site, Platanares. High-temperature fluids were encountered in two of these coreholes, while one hole was non-flowing. Evaluation of all the data collected suggests that there are two levels to the geothermal reservoir at Platanares. A shallow (< 700 m) level contains 160-165°C fluids while a deeper (> 1.2 km) reservoir at a temperature of 225° is indicated by fluid geothermometers.

  10. Kerogen maturation and incipient graphitization of hydrocarbon source rocks in the Arkoma Basin, Oklahoma and Arkansas: A combined petrographic and Raman spectrometric study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spotl, C.; Houseknecht, D.W.; Jaques, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    Dispersed kerogen of the Woodford-Chattanooga and Atoka Formations from the subsurface of the Arkoma Basin show a wide range of thermal maturities (0.38 to 6.1% R(o)) indicating thermal conditions ranging from diagenesis to incipient rock metamorphism. Raman spectral analysis reveals systematic changes of both the first- and second-order spectrum with increasing thermal maturity. These changes include a pronounced increase in the D/O peak height ratio accompanied by a narrowing of the D peak, a gradual decrease in the D/O peak width ratio, and a shift of both peaks toward higher wave numbers. Second-order Raman peaks, though less intensive, also show systematic peak shifting as a function of R(o). These empirical results underscore the high potential of Raman spectrometry as a fast and reliable geothermometer of mature to supermature hydrocarbon source rocks, and as an indicator of thermal maturity levels within the anchizone.Dispersed kerogen of the Woodford-Chattanooga and Atoka Formations from the subsurface of the Arkoma Basin show a wide range of thermal maturities (0.38 to 6.1% Ro) indicating thermal conditions ranging from diagenesis to incipient rock metamorphism. Raman spectral analysis reveals systematic changes of both the first- and second-order spectrum with increasing thermal maturity. These changes include a pronounced increase in the D/O peak height ratio accompanied by a narrowing of the D peak, a gradual decrease in the D/O peak width ratio, and a shift of both peaks toward higher wave numbers. Second-order Raman peaks, though less intensive, also show systematic peak shifting as a function of Ro. These empirical results underscore the high potential of Raman spectrometry as a fast and reliable geothermometer of mature to supermature hydrocarbon source rocks, and as an indicator of thermal maturity levels within the anchizone.

  11. A thermodynamic model for di-trioctahedral chlorite from experimental and natural data in the system MgO-FeO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O: applications to P- T sections and geothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanari, Pierre; Wagner, Thomas; Vidal, Olivier

    2014-02-01

    We present a new thermodynamic activity-composition model for di-trioctahedral chlorite in the system FeO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O that is based on the Holland-Powell internally consistent thermodynamic data set. The model is formulated in terms of four linearly independent end-members, which are amesite, clinochlore, daphnite and sudoite. These account for the most important crystal-chemical substitutions in chlorite, the Fe-Mg, Tschermak and di-trioctahedral substitution. The ideal part of end-member activities is modeled with a mixing-on-site formalism, and non-ideality is described by a macroscopic symmetric (regular) formalism. The symmetric interaction parameters were calibrated using a set of 271 published chlorite analyses for which robust independent temperature estimates are available. In addition, adjustment of the standard state thermodynamic properties of sudoite was required to accurately reproduce experimental brackets involving sudoite. This new model was tested by calculating representative P- T sections for metasediments at low temperatures (<400 °C), in particular sudoite and chlorite bearing metapelites from Crete. Comparison between the calculated mineral assemblages and field data shows that the new model is able to predict the coexistence of chlorite and sudoite at low metamorphic temperatures. The predicted lower limit of the chloritoid stability field is also in better agreement with petrological observations. For practical applications to metamorphic and hydrothermal environments, two new semi-empirical chlorite geothermometers named Chl(1) and Chl(2) were calibrated based on the chlorite + quartz + water equilibrium (2 clinochlore + 3 sudoite = 4 amesite + 4 H2O + 7 quartz). The Chl(1) thermometer requires knowledge of the (Fe3+/ΣFe) ratio in chlorite and predicts correct temperatures for a range of redox conditions. The Chl(2) geothermometer which assumes that all iron in chlorite is ferrous has been applied to partially recrystallized

  12. Multicomponent Equilibrium Models for Testing Geothermometry Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, D. Craig; Palmer, Carl D.; Smith, Robert W.; McLing, Travis L.

    2013-02-01

    Geothermometry is an important tool for estimating deep reservoir temperature from the geochemical composition of shallower and cooler waters. The underlying assumption of geothermometry is that the waters collected from shallow wells and seeps maintain a chemical signature that reflects equilibrium in the deeper reservoir. Many of the geothermometers used in practice are based on correlation between water temperatures and composition or using thermodynamic calculations based a subset (typically silica, cations or cation ratios) of the dissolved constituents. An alternative approach is to use complete water compositions and equilibrium geochemical modeling to calculate the degree of disequilibrium (saturation index) for large number of potential reservoir minerals as a function of temperature. We have constructed several “forward” geochemical models using The Geochemist’s Workbench to simulate the change in chemical composition of reservoir fluids as they migrate toward the surface. These models explicitly account for the formation (mass and composition) of a steam phase and equilibrium partitioning of volatile components (e.g., CO2, H2S, and H2) into the steam as a result of pressure decreases associated with upward fluid migration from depth. We use the synthetic data generated from these simulations to determine the advantages and limitations of various geothermometry and optimization approaches for estimating the likely conditions (e.g., temperature, pCO2) to which the water was exposed in the deep subsurface. We demonstrate the magnitude of errors that can result from boiling, loss of volatiles, and analytical error from sampling and instrumental analysis. The estimated reservoir temperatures for these scenarios are also compared to conventional geothermometers. These results can help improve estimation of geothermal resource temperature during exploration and early development.

  13. Examination of chloritization of biotite as a tool for reconstructing the physicochemical parameters of mineralization and associated alteration in the Zafarghand porphyry copper system, Ardestan, Central Iran: mineral-chemistry and stable isotope analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminroayaei Yamini, Maryam; Tutti, Faramarz; Aminoroayaei Yamini, Mohammad Reza; Ahmadian, Jamshid; Wan, Bo

    2016-12-01

    The chloritization of biotite and stable isotopes of silicate have been studied for the Zafarghand porphyry copper deposit, Ardestan, Iran. The studied area, in the central part of the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic belt, contains porphyry-style Cu mineralization and associated hydrothermal alteration within the Miocene (19-26 Ma, Zircon U-Pb age) granodioritc stock and adjacent andesitic to rhyodacitic volcanic rocks (ca. 56 Ma, zircon U-Pb age). The primary and secondary biotite that formed during potassic alteration in this porphyry and these volcanic host rocks are variably chloritized. Chloritization of biotite pseudomorphically is characterized by an increase in MgO, FeOt, and MnO, with decreasing in SiO2, K2O, and TiO2. Based on the Ti-in-biotite geothermometer of Henry et al. (Am Mineral 90:316-328, 2005) and Al-in-chlorite geothermometer of Cathelineau (Clay Miner 23:417-485, 1988), crystallization temperatures of primary biotite representative of magmatic conditions and later chloritization temperature range from 617° to 675 °C ± 24 °C and 177° to 346 °C, respectively. Calculated isotopic compositions of fluids that chloritized primary and secondary biotite display isotopic compositions of 1.1 to 1.7 per mil for δ18O and -19.9 to -20.5 per mil for δD consistent with meteoric water. Sericite, barren, and A-type-quartz veins from phyllic alteration were produced by mixed magmatic and meteoric water with δ18O values from -2.8 to 2.5 and δD values of ˜ -23 per mil; the narrow range of δD values of the propylitic epidote may be due to a meteoric water with δ18O values from 0.8 to 1.6 and δD values from -14.6 to -16.9 per mil.

  14. Chemical and mineralogical data and processing methods management system prototype with application to study of the North Caucasus Blybsky Metamorphic Complexes metamorphism PT-condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Stanislav; Kamzolkin, Vladimir; Konilov, Aleksandr; Aleshin, Igor

    2014-05-01

    There are many various methods of assessing the conditions of rocks formation based on determining the composition of the constituent minerals. Our objective was to create a universal tool for processing mineral's chemical analysis results and solving geothermobarometry problems by creating a database of existing sensors and providing a user-friendly standard interface. Similar computer assisted tools are based upon large collection of sensors (geothermometers and geobarometers) are known, for example, the project TPF (Konilov A.N., 1999) - text-based sensor collection tool written in PASCAL. The application contained more than 350 different sensors and has been used widely in petrochemical studies (see A.N. Konilov , A.A. Grafchikov, V.I. Fonarev 2010 for review). Our prototype uses the TPF project concept and is designed with modern application development techniques, which allows better flexibility. Main components of the designed system are 3 connected datasets: sensors collection (geothermometers, geobarometers, oxygen geobarometers, etc.), petrochemical data and modeling results. All data is maintained by special management and visualization tools and resides in sql database. System utilities allow user to import and export data in various file formats, edit records and plot graphs. Sensors database contains up to date collections of known methods. New sensors may be added by user. Measured database should be filled in by researcher. User friendly interface allows access to all available data and sensors, automates routine work, reduces the risk of common user mistakes and simplifies information exchange between research groups. We use prototype to evaluate peak pressure during the formation of garnet-amphibolite apoeclogites, gneisses and schists Blybsky metamorphic complex of the Front Range of the Northern Caucasus. In particular, our estimation of formation pressure range (18 ± 4 kbar) agrees on independent research results. The reported study was

  15. Mineralogy and geothermometry of high-temperature rhyolites from the central and western Snake River Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honjo, N.; Bonnichsen, B.; Leeman, W.P.; Stormer, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    Voluminous mid-Miocene rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs and lava flows are exposed along the northern and southern margins of the central and western Snake River Plain. These rhyolites are essentially anhydrous with the general mineral assemblage of plagioclase ??sanidine ?? quartz + augite + pigeonite ?? hypersthene ?? fayalitic olivine + Fe-Ti oxides + apatite + zircon which provides an opportunity to compare feldspar, pyroxene, and Fe-Ti oxide equilibration temperatures for the same rocks. Estimated pyroxene equilibration temperatures (based on the geothermometers of Lindsley and coworkers) range from 850 to 1000??C, and these are well correlated with whole-rock compositions. With the exception of one sample, agreement between the two-pyroxene thermometers tested is well within 50??C. Fe-Ti oxide geothermometers applied to fresh magnetite and ilmenite generally yield temperatures about 50 to 100??C lower than the pyroxene temperatures, and erratic results are obtained if these minerals exhibit effects of subsolidus oxidation and exsolution. Results of feldspar thermometry are more complicated, and reflect uncertainties in the thermometer calibrations as well as in the degree of attainment of equilibrium between plagioclase and sanidine. In general, temperatures obtained using the Ghiorso (1984) and Green and Usdansky (1986) feldspar thermometers agree with the pyroxene temperatures within the respective uncertainties. However, uncertainties in the feldspar temperatures are the larger of the two (and exceed ??60??C for many samples). The feldspar thermometer of Fuhrman and Lindsley (1988) produces systematically lower temperatures for many of the samples studied. The estimated pyroxene temperatures are considered most representative of actual magmatic temperatures for these rhyolites. This range of temperatures is significantly higher than those for rhyolites from many other suites, and is consistent with the hypothesis that the Snake River Plain rhyolitic magmas formed

  16. Delineating Spatial Patterns in the Yellowstone Hydrothermal System using Geothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J.; Hurwitz, S.; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Yellowstone National Park is unmatched with regard to its quantity of active hydrothermal features. Origins of thermal waters in its geyser basins have been traced to mixing of a deep parent water with meteoric waters in shallow local reservoirs (Fournier, 1989). A mineral-solution equilibrium model was developed to calculate water-rock chemical re-equilibration temperatures in these shallow reservoirs. We use the GeoT program, which uses water composition data as input to calculate saturation indices of selected minerals; the "best-clustering" minerals are then statistically determined to infer reservoir temperatures (Spycher et al., 2013). We develop the method using water composition data from Heart Lake Geyser Basin (HLGB), for which both chemical and isotopic geothermometers predict a reservoir water temperature of 205°C ± 10°C (Lowenstern et al., 2012), and minerals found in drill cores in Yellowstone's geyser basins. We test the model for sensitivity to major element composition, pH, Total Inorganic Carbon (TIC) and selected minerals to optimize model parameters. Calculated temperatures are most accurate at pH values below 9.0, and closely match the equilibrium saturation indices of quartz, stilbite, microcline, and albite. The model is optimized with a TIC concentration that is consistent with the mass of diffuse CO2 flux in HLGB (Lowenstern et al., 2012). We then use water compositions from other thermal basins in Yellowstone in search of spatial variations in reservoir temperatures. We then compare the calculated temperatures with various SiO2 and cation geothermometers.

  17. Microcrystals of Th-rich monazite (La) with a negative Ce anomaly in metadiorite and their role for documenting Cretaceous metamorphism in the Slavonian Mountains (Croatia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starijaš Mayer, Biljana; Krenn, Erwin; Finger, Fritz

    2014-04-01

    Microcrystals (1-15 μm) of unusual monazite (La) with 41-47 mol% cheralite [ThCa(PO4)2] component and a strong negative Ce anomaly are described from a metadiorite from the SW Slavonian Mountains, Psunj, Croatia. The dioritic host rock still shows a relictic igneous fabric on macroscopic scale. However, metamorphic reaction textures can be recognized in thin section. These include partial recrystallization of igneous plagioclase to albite coupled with the formation of epidote. Furthermore, partial replacement of igneous hornblende by a fine-grained orthoamphibole-chamosite-epidote paragenesis can be observed and replacement of ilmenite by titanite. The compositions of the metamorphic minerals indicate upper greenschist facies conditions (460-500 °C according to two-feldspar geothermometry) under a high oxygen fugacity. Microstructures show that the monazite crystals belong to the metamorphic paragenesis and formed at the expense of magmatic allanite. Their negative Ce anomalies reflect the oxidizing conditions of metamorphism. Application of the xenotime in monazite solvus geothermometer provides unrealistically high temperatures of ~500-660 °C which disagree with the greenschist facies metamorphic paragenesis. We interpret that the presence of cheralite has a profound effect on the nature of the monazite-xenotime solvus curve and hence the existing calibrations of this geothermometer may be generally unsuitable for cheralite-rich monazite. An important geological result is that the Th-U-total Pb ages of the monazite grains are uniformingly Upper Cretaceous. Our data thus suggest that the imprint of the Alpine orogeny on the Slavonian Mountains was stronger than presumed until now.

  18. Geothermometry of Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helz, R.T.; Thornber, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Data on the variation of temperature with time and in space are essential to a complete understanding of the crystallization history of basaltic magma in Kilauea Iki lava lake. Methods used to determine temperatures in the lake have included direct, downhole thermocouple measurements and Fe-Ti oxide geothermometry. In addition, the temperature variations of MgO and CaO contents of glasses, as determined in melting experiments on appropriate Kilauean samples, have been calibrated for use as purely empirical geothermometers and are directly applicable to interstitial glasses in olivine-bearing core from Kilauea Iki. The uncertainty in inferred quenching temperatures is ??8-10?? C. Comparison of the three methods shows that (1) oxide and glass geothermometry give results that are consistent with each other and consistent with the petrography and relative position of samples, (2) downhole thermo-couple measurements are low in all but the earliest, shallowest holes because the deeper holes never completely recover to predrilling temperatures, (3) glass geothermometry provides the greatest detail on temperature profiles in the partially molten zone, much of which is otherwise inaccessible, and (4) all three methods are necessary to construct a complete temperature profile for any given drill hole. Application of glass-based geothermometry to partially molten drill core recovered in 1975-1981 reveals in great detail the variation of temperature, in both time and space, within the partially molten zone of Kilauea Iki lava lake. The geothermometers developed here are also potentially applicable to glassy samples from other Kilauea lava lakes and to rapidly quenched lava samples from eruptions of Kilauea and Mauna Loa. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  19. Geochemistry of thermal/mineral waters in the Clear Lake region, California, and implications for hot dry rock geothermal development

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Mansfield, J.

    1993-02-01

    Thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region are broadly classified as thermal meteoric and connote types based on chemical and isotopic criteria. Ratios of conservative components such as B/Cl are extremely different among all thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region except for clusters of waters emerging from specific areas such as the Wilbur Springs district and the Agricultural Park area south of Mt. Konocti. In contrast, ratios of conservative components in large, homogeneous geothermal reservoirs are constant. Stable isotope values of Clear Lake region waters show a mixing trend between thermal meteoric and connote end-members. The latter end-member has enriched [delta]D as well as enriched d[sup l8]O, very different from typical high-temperature geothermal reservoir waters. Tritium data and modeling of ages indicate most Clear Lake region waters are 500 to > 10,000 yr., although mixing of old and young components is implied by the data. The age of end-member connate water is probably > 10,000 yr. Subsurface equilibration temperature of most thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region is [le] 150[degrees]C based on chemical geothermometers but it is recognized that Clear Lake region waters are not typical geothermal fluids and that they violate rules of application of many geothermometers. The combined data indicate that no large geothermal reservoir underlies the Clear Lake region and that small localized reservoirs have equilibration temperatures [le] 150[degrees]C (except for Sulphur Bank Mine). Hot dry rock technologies are the best way to commercially exploit the known high temperatures existing beneath the Clear Lake region, particularly within the main Clear Lake volcanic field.

  20. Hydrogeochemical evaluation of conventional and hot dry rock geothermal resource potential in the Clear Lake region, California

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.

    1993-05-01

    Chemistry, stable isotope, and tritium contents of thermal/mineral waters in the Clear Lake region were used to evaluate conventional and hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal potential for electrical generation. Thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region are broadly classified as thermal meteoric and connate types based on chemical and isotopic criteria. Ratios of conservative components such as B/Cl are extremely different among all thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region except for clusters of waters emerging from specific areas such as the Wilbur Springs district and the Agricultural Park area south of Mt. Konocti. In contrast ratios of conservative components in large, homogeneous geothermal reservoirs are constant. Stable isotope values of Clear Lake region waters show a mixing trend between thermal meteoric and connate (generic) end-members. The latter end-member has enriched {delta}D as well as enriched {delta}{sup 18}O, from typical high-temperature geothermal reservoir waters. Tritium data indicate most Clear Lake region waters are mixtures of old and young fluid components. Subsurface equilibration temperature of most thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region is {le}150{degree}C based on chemical geothermometers but it is recognized that Clear Lake region waters are not typical geothermal fluids and that they violate rules of application of many geothermometers. The combined data indicate that no large geothermal reservoir underlies the Clear Lake region and that small localized reservoirs have equilibration temperatures {le}150{degree}C (except for Sulphur Bank mine). HDR technologies are probably the best way to commercially exploit the known high-temperatures existing beneath the Clear Lake region particularly within and near the main Clear Lake volcanic field.

  1. Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes in the Raft River geothermal system, Cassia County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Nathenson, M.; Urban, T.C.; Diment, W.H.; Nehring, N.L.

    1980-01-01

    The Raft River area of Idaho contains a geothermal system of intermediate temperatures (approx. = 150/sup 0/C) at depths of about 1.5 km. Outside of the geothermal area, temperature measurements in three intermediate-depth drill holes (200 to 400 m) and one deep well (1500 m) indicate that the regional conductive heat flow is about 2.5 ..mu..cal/cm/sup 2/ sec or slightly higher and that temperature gradients range from 50/sup 0/ to 60/sup 0/C/km in the sediments, tuffs, and volcanic debris that fill the valley. Within and close to the geothermal system, temperature gradients in intermediate-depth drill holes (100 to 350 m) range from 120/sup 0/ to more than 600/sup 0/C/km, the latter value found close to an artesian hot well that was once a hot spring. Temperatures measured in three deep wells (1 to 2 km) within the geothermal area indicate that two wells are in or near an active upflow zone, whereas one well shows a temperature reversal. Assuming that the upflow is fault controlled, the flow is estimated to be 6 liter/sec per kilometer of fault length. From shut-in pressure data and the estimated flow, the permeability times thickness of the fault is calculated to be 2.4 darcy m. Chemical analyses of water samples from old flowing wells, recently completed intermediate-depth drill holes, and deep wells show a confused pattern. Geothermometer temperatures of shallow samples suggest significant re-equilibration at temperatures below those found in the deep wells. Silica geothermometer temperatures of water samples from the deep wells are in reasonable agreement with measured temperatures, whereas Na-K-Ca temperatures are significantly higher than measured temperatures. The chemical characteristics of the water, as indicated by chloride concentration, are extremely variable in shallow and deep samples. Chloride concentrations of the deep samples range from 580 to 2200 mg/kg.

  2. Geochemical Characterization and Geothermometry of the Geothermal Springs of Northwest India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamudio, K. D.; Klemperer, S. L.; Sastry, S. R.; Harinarayana, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Himalayan collision zone between India and Asia hosts an active geothermal province that spans the border from India into Tibet. Despite significant exploration, commercial development thus far in India is limited to modest use of hot water for heating greenhouses. We sampled nine hot springs in Northwest India, from the Karakoram Fault, across the Indus-Yarlung Suture Zone, to the Main Central Thrust. We analyzed major cation and anion chemistry using ICP-OES. Calcium ranges from 1-220 ppm, potassium from 4-110 ppm, magnesium from 0-60 ppm and sodium from 70-440 ppm. These values are similar to samples analyzed by the Geological Survey of India in previous decades. Preliminary reservoir temperatures calculated using the Fournier & Potter Na-K-Ca-Mg geothermometer range from 100-260°C. No correlations with geologic structure or location across the Himalayan orogen are apparent, and springs located within a few tens of km of each other have apparent temperatures differing by a factor of two. However, these classical geothermometers are subject to large uncertainty in cases where gas has been lost or where there has been dilution of the waters from depth with surface waters. We will use Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's multicomponent geothermometry code, GeoT, to improve the temperature estimation for each geothermal site. Even if reservoir temperatures are not high enough for electricity generation, these springs have the potential to provide cheap heating and cooling for the local communities. We plan to collect additional water samples in neighboring Tibet in the future.

  3. Assessment of the geothermal resources of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, T.; Tien, Phan Cu; Schochert, D.; Quy, Hoang Huu

    1997-12-31

    More than 125 thermal springs, with temperatures greater than 30{degrees}C have been identified and catalogued by the General Department of Geology of Vietnam. Subsurface data are limited and fewer than 10 areas have been identified, on the basis of chemical geothermometers, as capable of supporting electric power production. Six sites in south-central Vietnam have recently been selected for exploration to determine their development potential for electrical power generation. Selected criteria included surface features, chemical geothermometers, proximity to regional faults trends, and regional requirements for electric power. Site visits were conducted to a total of eight areas in south central Vietnam where collateral economic developments suggest the need for a local, reliable source of electricity. Physical and visual information on geothermal springs and wells in Vietnam was compared to Nevada`s geothermal resources. Surface geothermal manifestations in Vietnam appear remarkably similar to those in Nevada. Outcrops adjacent to the geothermal areas indicate that Mesozoic-age granites are the most likely basement rocks. Quaternary basalts mapped throughout the study area may be responsible for the thermal anomaly. Initial exploration efforts will focus on three of the six sites, which together may be able to produce 40 to 60 MWe. A cooperative research program with selected Vietnamese governmental agencies includes geologic mapping, surface geophysical and geochemical surveys, and a graduated schedule of drilling programs, ranging in depth from 100 to 1,000 m. Results will be used to define a detailed, deep drilling and testing program at the three prime sites. Development of geothermal power in this region will boost local economic recovery and add stability to the national electric grid.

  4. Geochemical study of the Sakalol-Harralol geothermal field (Republic of Djibouti): Evidences of a low enthalpy aquifer between Manda-Inakir and Asal rift settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awaleh, Mohamed Osman; Boschetti, Tiziano; Soubaneh, Youssouf Djibril; Baudron, Paul; Kawalieh, Ali Dirir; Dabar, Omar Assowe; Ahmed, Moussa Mahdi; Ahmed, Samaleh Idriss; Daoud, Mohamed Ahmed; Egueh, Nima Moussa; Mohamed, Jalludin

    2017-02-01

    Eighty-six sodium bicarbonate to sodium chloride hot springs and four water wells in the Tadjourah Region of Djibouti were investigated for major, minor (B, Br, F, Sr, Li) chemistry and isotope composition of water and dissolved components (87Sr/86Sr, 11B/10B, 13C/12C and 14C of DIC, 34S/32S and 18O/16O of sulfate). The deep saline Na-Cl reservoir at 143 °C shows affinity with the shallow geothermal water from the "active" Asal rift. Asal water is a diluted and recycled seawater component with the major cation composition obliterated by equilibration with Stratoid basalt. Locally, the deep reservoir is differentiated in term of recharge, and re-equilibration with rocks and mixing. In particular, two spring groups reveal contributions from evaporites typical of the "passive" graben setting of the Afar. A model on 34S/32S and 18O/16O demonstrates the isotope imprint of magmatic SO2 disproportionation on dissolved and solid sulfate, whose values probably persists in a sedimentary environment without trace of seawater. On the other hand a seawater signature, modified by mixing and secondary fractionation effects, is partially maintained according to the boron isotope composition (up to + 27.4‰). Temperature estimation in low-enthalpy geothermal reservoirs is notoriously difficult, especially where mixing with fluids of differing genesis and/or conduction cooling take place. From a geothermometric point of view, the multi-method approach followed in this study (up-to-date theoretical and thermodynamic equations, ad-hoc silica geothermometers inferred from local rocks, checking of the results on a 18Oαsulfate-water vs. temperature diagram) provides some insights and perspectives on how to tackle the problem. Table S2. Sampling locations, T, pH, EC, TDS and hydrochemical types of the sampled waters. Table S3. Chemical analyses of thermal and cold waters from Sakalaol-Haralol geothermal field. Table S4. Mineral saturation indices of SHGF hot springs waters calculated

  5. Model for origin and evolution of water at volcanoes in São Miguel, Azores (Portugal), based on geochemical and isotopic data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woitischek, Julia; Dietzel, Martin; Virgílio Cruz, J.; Inguaggiato, Salvatore; Leis, Albrecht; Böttcher, Michael E.

    2016-04-01

    A conceptual model is presented to better constrain the origin and evolution of discharges at Sete Cidades, Fogo and Furnas Volcano, using geochemical and isotopic analyses of rock and water as well as recalculated gas composition. The evolution of thermal water clearly reveals that Na-HCO3 and Na-SO4 type of springs have their origin in meteoric water as isotope data are close to the local meteoric water line (δ 18OH2O =-3 ± 1 ‰ V-SMOW; δ DH2O= -13 ± 7 ‰ V-SMOW) with exception of a Na-Cl spring named Ferraria, Sete Cidades area (δ 18OH2O = 0.45 ‰ V-SMOW ; δ DH2O= 4.18 ‰ V-SMOW). Analysed solutions are chemical evolved by evaporation, uptake of volcanic gas, leaching of local basaltic rocks, precipitation of solids, partly admixture of sea water and/or biological activity. Following the individual concentrations supports this model e.g.: HCO3 concentration and the recalculated isotopic composition of gaseous CO2 (δ 13CCO_2 = -4 ± 2.5 ‰ V-PDB) reflect evolved magmatic CO2 uptake and the subsequent leaching progress; High SO42- concentration of up to 16.5 mmol L-1 with δ 34SSO4 = 0.35 ± 0.3 ‰ (V-CDT) reflects magmatic origin which mainly control water chemistry of boiling pools of both Fogo and Furnas lake; δ 18OSO4 = 10.5 ‰ (V-SMOW) suggests organic origin and fits together with the observation of stromatolitic structures in the related precipitates; Molar Mg/Caratio (≈ 0.77) of all thermal discharges reflects leaching of analysed local basalt (Mg/Ca≈ 0.78). Furthermore, shallow and evolved outgassing effects can be distinguished. Equilibrium temperatures for various minerals given in SI vs. T plots and further geothermometers (e.g. Na-K, Na-K-Ca geothermometers) were discussed to estimate temperatures of reservoirs.

  6. Accessory Mineral U-Pb Ti-Zr Thermochronology of the Deep Crust of Zealandia: Rift, Breakup and Drift from 90-20 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beinlich, A.; Palin, J.; Cooper, A. F.

    2006-12-01

    Cenozoic alkaline mafic volcanics of eastern Otago were made famous in classic petrology and petrography texts coauthored by Francis Turner. Several locales have yielded mantle and crustal xenoliths including the Pigroot "mafic phonolite". Here, among abundant spinel lherzolite xenoliths, we discovered an undeformed cumulate gabbro composed of intermediate plagioclase and pargasitic amphibole with augite, ilmenite, magnetite, titanite (sphene) and accessory zircon and apatite. Major and trace elements indicate the rock crystallised from primitive alkaline magma, whereas the mineral assemblage indicates equilibration under amphibolite facies conditions at 5-9 kbar. Accessory mineral U-Pb Ti-Zr thermochronology by LA-ICP-MS on grain separates and in thin section reveals a T-t path that began with zircon crystallisation at 90±2 Ma (^{208}Pb-corrected 206Pb/238U, n=37, mswd=9.9) and 710±20°C (Ti-zircon geothermometer of Watson et al. 2006). Titanite dates (207Pb-corrected 206Pb/238U, n=49) and temperatures (Zr-titanite geothermometer of Hayden et al. 2006 at 7 kbar) form a linear array (r2=0.6) extending from 85 Ma, 830°C to 34 Ma, 760°C. The slope of this T-t array is inconsistent with diffusive loss of Pb and Zr from titanite (Cherniak, pers.comm.) and, together with REE data and reaction textures, indicates prolonged growth at the expense of plagioclase and ilmenite. Apatite U-Pb isotope data projected from the measured 207Pb/206Pb in plagioclase give a lower intercept age of 20±3 Ma (n=17, mswd=1.5) which overlaps the K-Ar age of the phonotephrite host lava (Coombs, pers.comm.). This remarkable xenolith records 1) crystallisation of alkaline mafic magma in the deep crust during early rifting of Zealandia from Gondwana around 90 Ma, 2) heating during continued lithospheric thinning 90-85 Ma, 3) slow cooling (≤2°C/my) for 50 my following continental breakup at 85 Ma, and 4) transport to the surface and thermal quenching at 20 Ma. Slow cooling of the deep

  7. Chemistry and Geothermometry of Brine Produced From the Salton Sea Scientific Drill Hole, Imperial Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. M.; Fournier, R. O.

    1988-11-01

    The December 29-30, 1985, flow test of the State 2-14 well, also known as the Salton Sea Scientific drill hole, produced fluid from a depth of 1865-1877 m at a reservoir temperature of 305° ± 5°C. Another flow test at a depth of 3170 m produced brine contaminated by drilling fluid and diesel oil. Therefore we focus on the first flow test. Samples were collected at five different flashing pressures. The brines are Na-Ca-K-Cl-type waters with very high metal and low SO4 and HCO3 contents. Compositions of the flashed brines were normalized relative to the 25°C densities of the solutions, and an ionic charge balance was achieved by adjusting the Na concentration. The composition of the preflashed reservoir fluid was calculated using enthalpy-chloride relations applied to the normalized and charge-balanced brines. The calculated total dissolved solids in the preflashed reservoir fluid ranges from about 24.8 wt %, assuming insignificant thermal losses from the erupting fluid before sampling, to 26.0 wt %, assuming a 10% enthalpy loss by conduction of thermal energy through casing and surface piping. The preferred total dissolved solids of the reservoir fluid is 25.05 wt %. The calculated specific density of the preflashed reservoir fluid at 305°C and 1870 m depth ranges from 0.9980 (no thermal loss prior to sampling) to 1.0107 ± 0.0023 g cm-3 (10% thermal loss). Of the various cation geothermometers that are now in common use, the Na-K-Ca method gives a temperature (310°C) closest to the measured temperature (305°C) in the production horizon. Calculated Na/K geothermometer temperatures, using equations suggested by different investigators, range from 326° to 364°C. The Mg/K2 method gives a temperature of about 350°C, Mg/Li2 about 282°, and Na/Li 395°-418°C.

  8. Hydrology, geochemistry and geothermal aspects of the thermal waters from Switzerland and adjacent alpine regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuataz, François-David

    1983-11-01

    Waters of 19 thermal areas in Switzerland and adjacent alpine regions were studied to acquire a better knowledge of their deep thermal circulation, geochemistry and low-temperature geothermal potential. A systematic multisampling and multitracing program was executed over a complete hydrologic cycle for each of the 19 thermal areas. Pertinent physical, chemical and isotopic parameters were measured and analyzed on thermal and nonthermal waters during nine sampling periods. Thermal water occurrences are generally related either to Triassic evaporites or to the weathered and fractured zone between crystalline basements (or ranges) and their sedimentary cover. Emergence areas are located in faulted or overthrust zones. Sulfate and calcium are the two principal ions responsible for the mineralization of most thermal waters. Actually, gypsum and anhydrite are more often encountered in Triassic evaporites than halite. Many variations of the water geochemistry, caused by seasonal changes, have been recorded during the hydrologic cycle. From mineralization, temperature and discharge variations, it has been possible to distinguish fast or delayed responses to rain or snow-melt events and mixing between deep-thermal and shallow-cold waters. Chemical geothermometers were tested on these warm waters. The chalcedony and Na-K-Ca geothermometers seem to be the only ones which display calculated temperatures in reasonable agreement with known local geothermal gradients or bottom-hole temperatures. The majority of inferred reservoir temperatures ranges from 40° to 60°C. Oxygen-18 and deuterium results show that most thermal waters fit along the meteoric water line, with some exceptions due to Mediterranean precipitation, possible water-rock isotopic exchange or mixing with connate waters. A regional oxygen-18 gradient has been established with altitude in order to locate and determine the elevation of intake areas. Tritium is very useful in the detection of mixing between deep

  9. The Hydrogeochemistry of Qingshui Geothermal Field, Northeastern Taiwan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu-Wen, Chen; Cheng-Kuo, Lin; Wayne, Lin; Yu-Te, Chang; Pei-Shan, Hsieh

    2015-04-01

    The Qingshui geothermal field is located at the upstream valley of Lanyang Creek, northeastern Taiwan. It is renowned as a geothermal field. The previous studies demonstrated a higher geothermal gradient, 100oC/km warmer than a normal geotherm. However, Qingshui geothermal field has not been well developed due to the higher mining costs. In the recent years, the Taiwan government has been focusing on developing alternative and renewable energy and initiated a 10 year project, Nation Energy Program. This study is part of this project In general, it is very difficult to collect deep downhole samples without considerable change of hydro- and gas- chemistry of water under high temperature and pressure. A new sampling tool, GTF Sampler, was designed by the research team, Green Energy and Environment Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute. This tool can simultaneously collect high quality geothermal water and gas sample and moreover, the sampling depth can reach up to 800 meters. Accordingly, a more accurate measurements can be conducted in the laboratory. In this study, 10 geothermal samples were collected and measured. The results demonstrate that geothermal water samples are characterized with Na(K)-HCO3 water type and located at the mature water area in Giggenbach Na-K-Mg diagram. Several geothermometers, including silica and cation geothermometry, were used to estimate potential temperature in the geothermal reservoir systems. In general, the geothermoters of Na-K and Na-K-Ca obtain reservoir temperatures between 120-190oC and 130-210oC, respectively, but the silica geothermometer indicates a lower reservoir temperature between 90 and 170oC. There is no big difference among them. It is worth to note that all calculated temperatures are lower than those of in-situ downhole measurements; therefore, more detailed and advanced researches would be needed for the inconsistency. To examine the argument about igneous heat source in the previous studies, rare

  10. A geochemical reconnaissance of the Alid volcanic center and geothermal system, Danakil depression, Eritrea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowenstern, J. B.; Janik, C.J.; Fournier, R.O.; Tesfai, T.; Duffield, W.A.; Clynne, M.A.; Smith, James G.; Woldegiorgis, L.; Weldemariam, K.; Kahsai, G.

    1999-01-01

    Geological and geochemical studies indicate that a high-temperature geothermal system underlies the Alid volcanic center in the northern Danakil depression of Eritrea. Alid is a very late-Pleistocene structural dome formed by shallow intrusion of rhyolitic magma, some of which vented as lavas and pyroclastic flows. Fumaroles and boiling pools distributed widely over an area of ~10 km2 on the northern half of Alid suggest that an active hydrothermal system underlies much of that part of the mountain. Geothermometers indicate that the fumarolic gases are derived from a geothermal system with temperatures >225??C. The isotopic composition of condensed fumarolic steam is consistent with these temperatures and implies that the source water is derived primarily from either lowland meteoric waters or fossil Red Sea water, or both. Some gases vented from the system (CO2, H2S and He) are largely magmatic in origin. Permeability beneath the volcanic center may be high, given the amount of intrusion-related deformation and the active normal faulting within the Danakil depression.Geological and geochemical studies indicate that a high-temperature geothermal system underlies the Alid volcanic center in the northern Danakil depression of Eritrea. Alid is a very late-Pleistocene structural dome formed by shallow intrusion of rhyolitic magma, some of which vented as lavas and pyroclastic flows. Fumaroles and boiling pools distributed widely over an area of approx. 10 km2 on the northern half of Alid suggest that an active hydrothermal system underlies much of that part of the mountain. Geothermometers indicate that the fumarolic gases are derived from a geothermal system with temperatures >225??C. The isotopic composition of condensed fumarolic steam is consistent with these temperatures and implies that the source water is derived primarily from either lowland meteoric waters or fossil Red Sea water, or both. Some gases vented from the system (CO2, H2S and He) are largely

  11. Peak temperature in intracratonic basins constrained by magnetic studies:Example of the Illinois Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uz, E.; Ferre, E. C.; Rimmer, S.; Morse, D. G.; Crockett, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Deciphering the thermal evolution of a package of sedimentary rocks through time constitutes an essential element in exploration for oil and gas. Classic geothermometers based on illite crystallinity, vitrinite reflectance, the Rock-Eval method or conodont coloration index are limited to rocks containing sufficient amounts of one of the index materials. Magnetic approaches to geothermometry have intrinsic advantages due to the quasi-ubiquitous presence of magnetically remanent grains in sedimentary environments. Previous attempts to correlate burial temperature with magnetic properties focused on the low-field bulk magnetic susceptibility Km (Hrouda et al., 2003) or on the low-temperature magnetic parameter PM in pyrrhotite-magnetite assemblages (MagEval method of Aubourg and Pozzi, 2010). We simultaneously investigate the variation of an array of magnetic parameters with temperature. These parameters include low-field magnetic susceptibility, saturation isothermal magnetic remanence, saturation magnetization, coercitive force and coercivity of magnetic remanence. Tracking multiple magnetic parameters offers the advantage of being sensitive not only to heating-induced mineralogical changes but also to heating-induced magnetic domain changes. This multi-parameter method also has the benefit of being applicable to a broad range of sedimentary lithologies. To demonstrate the principles of this method we begin examining intracontinental basins because they are broadly undeformed and their thermal histories remain, in general, relatively simple. Igneous intrusions and basinal hydrothermal fluids may, however, complicate matters. The Illinois Basin, an oil- and gas-producing basin, provides an accessible test area for the geothermometric tests. The Mount Simon Sandstone constitutes the first lithological unit investigated because it sits at the deepest level in the basin and is therefore likely to have recorded the highest burial temperatures. The proposed method

  12. Alteration processes in igneous rocks of the michilla mining area, coastal range, northern chile, and their relation with copper mineralisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveros, V.; Aguirre, L.; Townley, B.

    2003-04-01

    A 10 km thick homoclinal sequence of intermediate volcanic and sedimentary Jurassic rocks crops out in the Michilla mining area, Coastal Range, northern Chile (22-22°45S, 70-70°15W). Cretaceous plutons, intermediate to acid in composition, intrude this sequence together with numerous small basic to acid dykes and stocks. Main deposits are stratabound Cu-(Ag) with the ore minerals emplaced at the porous tops of the volcanic flows. However, some discordant orebodies, e.g. hydrothermal breccias, exist within the manto-type deposits. The volcanic sequence, and a minor part of the plutonic rocks, have been affected by three different alteration processes, each of them with their distinct mineral assemblages reflecting that every process was developed under different physicochemical conditions. The volcanic rocks far from the mining area are affected by a regional scale alteration process, basically isochemical. Its products are typical of a low-grade event: chl + ep +qtz + ttn (+- ab +- cal) with no ore minerals associated. The temperature interval, estimated by the chlorite geothermometer, ranges between 250 and 350°C. This alteration is either due to very low grade burial metamorphism or to hydrothermalism related to the Late Jurassic - Cretaceous plutonism. Inside the mining district the volcanic rocks are affected by a local scale alteration process originated by the intrusion of small stocks and dykes. This event is characterized by strong sodic metasomatism and minor Mg mobility. Two stages probably occurred as suggested by the two main mineral assemblages present, a propylitic (ab + ep + chl + act + ttn + qtz) and a quartz-sericitic one (ab + ser + qtz + tnn). They would reflect the changes in temperature, water/rock ratio and pH conditions during the whole process. Ore minerals related to this alteration are chalcopyrite, chalcocite and minor bornite and native silver. A temperature interval of 200-300°C is indicated by the chlorite geothermometer for the

  13. Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

    2005-10-31

    The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500’ deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400’ encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105’ but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all

  14. Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

    2006-01-01

    The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500’ deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400’ encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105’ but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all

  15. Stress and Temperature Dependence of Calcite Twinning: New Experimental and Field Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybacki, E.; Janssen, C.; Dresen, G.; Evans, B.

    2009-04-01

    In low-grade metamorphic terrains at temperatures < 300˚ C e-twinning of calcite is common. The amount and width of e-twins have been suggested to indicate stress and temperature representing robust paleopiezometers and geothermometers. To evaluate the stress- and temperature dependence of e-twins in calcite we have performed a series of deformation experiments on specimens of Carrara marble in the semibrittle field. 14 experiments were performed at 100-400 MPa confining pressure and T < 350˚ C in a Paterson-type gas deformation apparatus. 7 samples were deformed in axial compression test at strain rates from 10-4 -10-6s-1. 7 samples were deformed in torsion tests to shear strains γg 1.8. After testing, thin sections of all samples were prepared for optical inspection of twin density and twin width. Calculations of shear stress based on the percentage of twinned grains (Jamison and Spang, 1976) significantly underestimate the applied stress, whereas below 170 MPa the twin density piezometer suggested by Rowe and Rutter (1990) yields too high stresses. Based on measured twin density (between ?10 and 800 twins/mm at stresses up to 450 MPa) we propose an empirical paleopiezometer for which the square root of twin density increases linearly with applied stress. This correlation is likely associated with the development of dislocation cells in response to twin nucleation and growth. The piezometer is independent of strain for γ < 1.8 at temperatures up to 350˚ C. To infer paleotemperature from the width and morphology of twins (Burkhard, 1993; Ferrill et al., 2004) we also measured twin width using a U-stage. Preliminary results show that the amount of thin twins (? 1 m) decreases continuously with increasing temperature, whereas thick twins (> 1 m) increases with temperature. This may indicate that strain incompatibility at grain boundaries is less for high temperature and low strain rate, respectively. The experimentally deformed samples were compared

  16. Untangling the History of Oceanic Peridotites Using Spinel Oxybarometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birner, S.; Warren, J. M.; Cottrell, E.; Davis, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of the oxygen fugacity of the upper mantle is critical to understanding the processes associated with melt production, interaction, and extraction. Thus, it is important to understand how fO2 changes during a peridotite's thermal and petrologic history in the asthenospheric and lithospheric mantle, as metamorphic subsolidus reequilibration can result in changes to recorded fO2. A case study of Tongan forearc peridotites highlights the heterogeneity seen in mantle peridotites. We analyzed two dredges located 250 km apart along the trench: one dredge ranges in fO2 from 0.5 to 1 log unit above the QFM buffer, similar to analyses of supra-subduction zone xenoliths (e.g. Brandon and Draper, 1996; Wood and Virgo, 1989) while the other dredge ranges from QFM-0.75 to QFM+0.25 and exhibits high spinel Cr# (ranging from 0.45 to 0.75). Systematics between fO2, Ti concentration, olivine forsterite content, and Cr# within each dredge allow us to differentiate between the effects of melt extraction, melt interaction, and cooling. Because the spinel oxybarometry equation is dependent on temperature, it is important to be able to accurately determine the temperature recorded by peridotites. Though many geothermometers are available for mantle rocks, we assert that geothermometers based on Fe-Mg exchange between olivine and spinel are the most applicable to fO2 calculations, because the oxygen fugacity recorded by a mantle assemblage is primarily controlled by this exchange. Additionally, preliminary analyses of diffusion profiles across olivine-spinel grain boundaries provide insight into the cooling of peridotite in the oceanic lithosphere and its effects on oxygen fugacity. Mg-Fe exchange between olivine and spinel is controlled by the distribution coefficient, KD, which is dependent on both temperature and the proportion of Cr to other trivalent cations in spinel. We see an increase in olivine forsterite content towards the olivine-spinel interface

  17. iGeoT v1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Spycher, Nicolas; Finsterle, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    iGeoT v1.0 automates into a stand-alone computer program the multicomponent chemical geothermometry code GeoT v2.1 and the numerical optimization engine of iTOUGH2. iGeoT allows for optimizations of GeoT runs using multiple water chemical analyses. The underlying geothermometry method is that previously developed by Reed and Spycher (1984) using the computed saturation indices of multiple minerals. GeoT automatically reconstitutes deep fluid compositions and estimates reservoir temperature from statistical evaluation of computed mineral saturation indices. The output include estimated temperatures following various statistical methods and their range of uncertainty. The computer program also outputs temperatures predicted using classical geothermometers. Input parameters include water composition and, optionally, gas composition, fraction of gas discharge, dilution/evaporation factor (in case of boiling or mixing with dilute waters), and end-member water composition (in case of mixing with other non-dilute waters). The dilution/evaporation factor, fraction of gas discharge, and concentration of various aqueous and gas species can be automatically estimated by numerical optimization. This program was designed for geothermal applications.

  18. Geothermal resources of the Western Arm of the Black Rock Desert, northwestern Nevada; Part II, Aqueous geochemistry and hydrology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, A.H.; Preissler, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    The western arm of the Black Rock Desert, Nevada, includes several distinct hydrothermal systems, some of which exceed 150 C and may exceed 200 C at depth, determined on the basis of chemical geothermometry. The cation composition of the thermal water appears to be controlled by aluminosilicate minerals that are common in other active geothermal systems. Estimates of the equilibrium temperatures at which some mineral pairs are stable, when compared with the more commonly applied geothermometer estimates, indicate that thermodynamic data may be useful for estimating deep aquifer temperatures. Thermal water at Great Boiling and Mud Springs, which has a chloride concentration of about 2,000 mg/L and a total dissolved-solids concentration of 4 ,500 mg/L, appears to have been affected by shallow evapotranspiration in an adjacent playa prior to deep circulation. This model of recharge within the basin floor is distinctly different from models proposed for most other geothermal systems in the northern Great Basin. (USGS)

  19. Thermal springs in the Boise River basin, south-central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, R.E.; Young, H.W.

    1982-01-01

    The Boise River Basin, characterized by steep, rugged mountains and narrow river valleys, drains an area of about 2,680 square miles in south-central Idaho. Granitic rocks of the Idaho batholith predominate in the basin. Temperature of waters from thermal springs in the basin range from 33 degrees to 87 degrees Celsius, are sodium carbonate type and are slightly alkaline. Dissolved-solids concentrations are less than 280 milligrams per liter. Estimated reservoir temperatures determined by the silica and sodium-potassium-calcium geothermometers range from 50 degrees to 98 degrees Celsius. Tritium concentrations in sampled thermal springs are near zero and indicate these waters were recharged prior to 1954. Stable-isotope data are not conclusive insofar as indicating a source area of recharge for the thermal springs in the basin. Thermal springs discharged at least 4,900 acre-feet of water in 1981, and the associated convective heat flux is 11,000,000 calories per second. (USGS)

  20. Hydrology and geochemistry of thermal ground water in southwestern Idaho and north-central Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Young, H.W.; Lewis, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Chemical analyses of water from 12 wells and 9 springs indicate that nonthermal waters are a calcium bicarbonate type; thermal waters are a sodium carbonate or bicarbonate type. Chemical geothermometers indicate probable maximum reservoir temperatures are near 100/sup 0/ Celsius. Concentration of tritium in the thermal water is near zero. Depletion of stable isotopes in the hot waters relative to present-day meteoric waters indicates recharge to the system probably occurred when the climate averaged 3/sup 0/ to 5/sup 0/ Celsius colder than at present. Temperatures about 3.5/sup 0/ Celsius colder than at present occurred during periods of recorded Holocene glacial advances and indicate a residence time of water in the system of at least several thousand years. Residence time calculated on the basis of reservoir volume and thermal-water discharge is 3400 to 6800 years for an effective reservoir porosity of 0.05 and 0.10, respectively. Preliminary analyses of carbon-14 determinations indicate an age of the hot waters of about 18,000 to 25,000 years. The proposed conceptual model for the area is one of an old system, where water has circulated for thousands, even tens of thousands, of years. Within constraints imposed by the model described, reservoir thermal energy for the geothermal system in southwestern Idaho and north-central Nevada is about 130 x 10/sup 18/ calories.

  1. Thermal springs in the Salmon River basin, central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, H.W.; Lewis, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The Salmon River basin drains approximately 13,000 square miles in central Idaho underlain by the Idaho batholith. Geologic units in the basin include igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks and granitic rocks predominate. Water from thermal springs ranges in temperature from 20.5 degrees to 94.0 degrees Celsius. The waters are slightly alkaline and are generally a sodium carbonate or bicarbonate type. Dissolved-solids concentrations are variable and range from 103 to 839 milligrams per liter. Estimated reservoir temperatures determined from the silicic acid-corrected silica, sodium-potassium-calcium, and sulfate-water isotope geothermometers range from 30 degrees to 184 degrees Celsius. Tritium concentrations in sampled thermal waters are near zero and indicate the waters are at least 100 years old and may be considerably older. Stable-isotope data indicate it is unlikely that a single area of recharge or a single hot-water reservoir supplies all hot springs in the basin. Thermal springs discharged at least 15,800 acre-feet of water in 1980. Associated convective heat flux is 27 million calories per second. (USGS)

  2. Thermal springs in the Salmon River basin, central Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Young, H.W.; Lewis, R.E.

    1982-02-01

    The Salmon River basin within the study area occupies an area of approximately 13,000 square miles in central Idaho. Geologic units in the basin are igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; however, granitic rocks of the Idaho batholith are predominant. Water from thermal springs ranges in temperature from 20.5/sup 0/ to 94.0/sup 0/ Celsius. The waters are slightly alkaline and are generally a sodium carbonate or bicarbonate type. Dissolved-solids concentrations are variable and range from 103 to 839 milligrams per liter. Estimated reservoir temperatures determined from the silicic acid-corrected silica, sodium-potassium-calcium, and sulfate-water isotope geothermometers range from 30/sup 0/ to 184/sup 0/ Celsius. Tritium concentrations in sampled thermal waters are near zero and indicate the waters are at least 100 years old. Stable-isotope data indicate it is unlikely that a single hot-water reservoir supplies hot springs in the basin. Thermal springs discharged at least 15,800 acre-feet of water in 1980. Associated convective heat flux is 2.7 x 10/sup 7/ calories per second.

  3. Sub-continental lithospheric mantle structure beneath the Adamawa plateau inferred from the petrology of ultramafic xenoliths from Ngaoundéré (Adamawa plateau, Cameroon, Central Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nkouandou, Oumarou F.; Bardintzeff, Jacques-Marie; Fagny, Aminatou M.

    2015-11-01

    Ultramafic xenoliths (lherzolite, harzburgite and olivine websterite) have been discovered in basanites close to Ngaoundéré in Adamawa plateau. Xenoliths exhibit protogranular texture (lherzolite and olivine websterite) or porphyroclastic texture (harzburgite). They are composed of olivine Fo89-90, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and spinel. According to geothermometers, lherzolites have been equilibrated at 880-1060 °C; equilibrium temperatures of harzburgite are rather higher (880-1160 °C), while those of olivine websterite are bracketed between 820 and 1010 °C. The corresponding pressures are 1.8-1.9 GPa, 0.8-1.0 GPa and 1.9-2.5 GPa, respectively, which suggests that xenoliths have been sampled respectively at depths of 59-63 km, 26-33 km and 63-83 km. Texture and chemical compositional variations of xenoliths with temperature, pressure and depth on regional scale may be ascribed to the complex history undergone by the sub-continental mantle beneath the Adamawa plateau during its evolution. This may involve a limited asthenosphere uprise, concomitantly with plastic deformation and partial melting due to adiabatic decompression processes. Chemical compositional heterogeneities are also proposed in the sub-continental lithospheric mantle under the Adamawa plateau, as previously suggested for the whole Cameroon Volcanic Line.

  4. Hydrogeochemistry and preliminary reservoir model of the Platanares Geothermal System, Honduras, Central America

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.; Shevenell, L.; Janik, C.J.; Truesdell, A.H.; Grigsby, C.O.; Paredes, R.

    1986-01-01

    A detailed hydrogeochemical investigation has been performed at Platanares, Honduras in preparation for shallow geothermal exploration drilling. Platanares is not associated with any Quaternary volcanism but lies in a tectonic zone of late Tertiary to Quaternary extension. Thermal fluids are characterized by pH between 7 and 10, Cl < 40 mg/l, HCO/sub 3/ > SO/sub 4/ > Cl, B less than or equal to 17 mg/l, Li less than or equal to 4 mg/l and As less than or equal to 1.25 mg/l. Various geochemical indicators show that mixing of hot and cold end-member fluids is an important hydrologic process at this site. Geothermometers indicate the geothermal system equilibrated at roughly 225/sup 0/C while trace element chemistry indicates the reservoir resides in Cretaceous red beds of the Valle de Angeles Group. Based on the discharge rates of thermal features, the minimum power output of the Platanares geothermal site is about 45 MW (thermal).

  5. Do the trace element compositions of Hadean zircons require Hadean continental crust?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coogan, L. A.; Hinton, R. W.

    2006-12-01

    The trace element composition of Hadean zircons have been used to argue for the existence of Hadean "continental crust". One argument is based on the low Ti content of Hadean zircons that, based a novel geothermometer that assumes equilibrium with rutile (Watson and Harrison, 2005), suggests a low crystallization temperature. The second argument is based on using the trace element abundances in zircons to calculate their parental melt compositions, especially the rare earth elements. We have undertaken an empirical study to determine if these approaches can unambiguously distinguish Hadean zircons from zircons grown from the late stage differentiates produced by basalt fractionation. We analysed the compositions of zircons in samples from the plutonic section of the oceanic crust collected from both fast- and slow-spreading ridges. This tectonic setting ensures that there was no contamination by continental material and thus these zircons should be broadly compositionally similar to zircons grown from the differentiation products of basaltic melt in the Hadean. The Ti-derived temperatures, and REE patterns, are similar to those of Hadean zircons. Thus we conclude that the trace element composition of Hadean zircons are permissive of models that do not include the generation of continental crust in the Hadean. Watson EB, Harrison TM (2005) Zircon thermometer reveals minimum melting conditions on Earliest Earth. Science 308:841-844

  6. Assessment of the origin and geothermal potential of the thermal waters by hydro-isotope geochemistry: Eskisehir province, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yuce, Galip; Italiano, Francesco; Yasin, Didem; Taskiran, Lutfi; Gulbay, Ahmet Hilmi

    2017-05-01

    The thermal fluids vented over Eskisehir province have been investigated for their origin and to estimate the geothermal potential of the area. Thermal waters as well as bubbling and dissolved gases were collected and analysed for their chemical and isotopic features. Their isotopic composition varies in the range from -11.5 to -7.7 ‰ for δ(18)O, -84 and -57 ‰ for δ(2)H, and 0-7.2 TU for tritium. The gases (bubbling and dissolved) are mostly N2-dominated with a significant amount of CO2. The helium isotopic ratios are in the range of 0.2-0.66 R/Rac, indicate remarkable mantle-He contribution ranging between 2 and 10 % in the whole study area. Considering the estimated geothermal gradient about three times higher than the normal gradient, and the reservoir temperatures estimated to be between 50 and 100 °C using quartz and chalcedony geothermometers, a circulation model was built where possible mixing with shallow waters cool down the uprising geothermal fluids.

  7. Correlation between gas compositions and physical phenomena affecting the reservoir fluid in Palinpinon geothermal field (Philippines)

    SciTech Connect

    D'More F.; Nuti, S.; Ruaya, J.R.; Ramos-Candelaria, M.N.; Seastres, J.S.

    1993-01-28

    Using thermodynamic gas equilibria to calculate temperature and steam fraction in the reservoir, three main physical phenomena due to exploitation of Palinpinon field are identified. 1) Pressure drawdown producing a local increase in the computed steam fraction, with the fluid maintaining high temperature values (close to 300°C). Strong decline in flow rate is observed. 2) Irreversible steam losses from the original high temperature liquid phase during its ascent through fractures in upper zones of the reservoir. Steam is generally lost at temperatures (e.g. 240°C) lower then those of the original aquifer. 3) Dilution and cooling effects due to reinjection fluid returns. These are function of the local geostructural conditions linking through fractures the injectors and production wells. The computed fraction of the recovered reinjected brine can in some case exceed 80% of the total produced fluid. At the same time the computed gas equilibration temperatures can decline from 280-300°C to as low as 215-220°C. Comparing these values with the well bottom measured temperatures, the proposed methodology based on gas chemistry gives more reliable temperature estimate than water chemistry based geothermometers for fluids with high fractions of injected brine.

  8. Fe-isotope fractionation in magmatic-hydrothermal mineral deposits: A case study from the Renison Sn-W deposit, Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawryk, Christine M.; Foden, John D.

    2015-02-01

    We present 50 new iron isotopic analyses of source granite and mineral separates from the Renison tin deposit in western Tasmania. The aim of the study is to characterise the composition of minerals within a tin deposit associated with a reduced, S-type magma. We have analysed bulk samples of granite, and separates of pyrrhotite, pyrite, arsenopyrite, magnetite, chalcopyrite and siderite by multi-collector inductively coupled mass spectrometry. The isotopic compositions of mineral separates are consistent with theoretical predictions of equilibrium fractionation based on Mössbauer spectroscopy and other parametric calculations. Mineral-mineral pairs yield temperatures of formation that are in agreement with prior detailed fluid inclusion studies, but are spatially inconsistent with declining fluid temperatures with distance from the causative intrusion, limiting the use of Fe isotopes as a potential geothermometer, at least in this case. Comparison of our data with published data from other deposits clearly demonstrates that pyrite, magnetite and chalcopyrite from the hottest ore fluids (>300-400 °C) at Renison are isotopically heavier than minerals sampled from a deposit formed at similar temperatures, but associated with a more oxidised and less differentiated intrusion.

  9. Oxygen isotope activities and concentrations in aqueous salt solutions at elevated temperatures: Consequences for isotope geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truesdell, A.H.

    1974-01-01

    Studies of the effect of dissolved salts on the oxygen isotope activity ratio of water have been extended to 275??C. Dehydrated salts were added to water of known isotope composition and the solutions were equilibrated with CO2 which was sampled for analysis. For comparison similar studies were made using pure water. Results on water nearly coincide with earlier calculations. Salt effects diminish with increasing temperature only for solutions of MgCl2 and LiCl. Other salt solutions show complex behavior due to the temperature-dependent formation of ion pairs of changing character. Equilibrium fractionations (103 ln ??) between 1 molal solutions and pure water at 25, 100, and 275??C are: NaCl 0.0, -1.5, +1.0; KCl 0.0, -1.0, +2.0; LiCl -1.0, -0.6, -0.5; CaCl2 -0.4, -1.8, +0.8; MgCl2 -1.1, -0.7, -0.3; MgSO4 -1.1, +0.1, -; NaF (0.8 m) 0.0, -1.5, -0.3; and NH4Cl (0.55 m) 0.0, -1.2, -1.3. These effects are significant in the isotope study of hot saline fluids responsible for ore deposition and of fluids found in certain geothermal systems. Minor modification of published isotope geothermometers may be required. ?? 1974.

  10. Oxygen isotope fractionation between analcime and water - An experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, Haraldur R.; Clayton, Robert N.

    1990-01-01

    The oxygen isotope fractionation between analcime and water is studied to test the feasibility of using zeolites as low-temperature thermometers. The fractionation of oxygen isotopes between natural analcime and water is determined at 300, 350, and 400 C, and at fluid pressures ranging from 1.5 to 5.0 kbar. Also, isotope ratios for the analcime framework, the channel water, and bulk water are obtained. The results suggest that the channel water is depleted in O-18 relative to bulk water by a constant value of about 5 percent, nearly independent of temperature. The analcime-water fractionation curve is presented, showing that the exchange has little effect on grain morphology and does not involve recrystallization. The exchange is faster than any other observed for a silicate. The exchange rates suggest that zeolites in active high-temperature geothermal areas are in oxygen isotopic equilibrium with ambient fluids. It is concluded that calibrated zeolites may be excellent low-temperature oxygen isotope geothermometers.

  11. Chemical and isotopic data for water from thermal springs and wells of Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Mariner, R.H.; Swanson, J.R.; Orris, G.J.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    The thermal springs of Oregon range in composition from dilute NaHCO/sub 3/ waters to moderately saline CO/sub 2/-charged NaCl-NaHCO/sub 3/ waters. Most of the thermal springs are located in southeastern or southcentral Oregon, with a few in northeastern Oregon and near the contact of the Western Cascades with the High Cascades. Thermal springs in the central and northern parts of the Cascades generally issue moderately saline NaCl waters. Farther south in the Cascades, the thermal waters are high in CO/sub 2/ as well as chloride. Most thermal springs in northeastern Oregon issue dilute NaHCO/sub 3/ waters of high pH (>8.5). These waters are similar to the thermal waters which issue from the Idaho batholith, farther east. Most of the remaining thermal waters are Na mixed-anion waters. Based on the chemical geothermometers, Mickey Srpings, Hot Borax Lake, Alvord Hot Springs, Neal Hot Springs, Vale Hot Springs, Crump Well, Hunters (Lakeview) Hot Springs, and perhaps some of the springs in the Cascades are associated with the highest temperature systems (>150/sup 0/C).

  12. Characterization of a Pleistocene thermal spring in Mozambique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbruch, Franziska; Merkel, Broder J.

    2008-12-01

    A hydrogeological study was conducted with the objective to investigate the only currently known hot spring of Sofala Province in Mozambique with respect to the origin of the water, the discharge, and its chemical composition. Field investigations comprised a general land use survey, mapping of sediment and water temperatures, discharge measurements and on-site water chemistry as well as sampling for further chemical analyses and groundwater dating. Thermal water discharge occurs along a 100 m long NE-SW zone with water temperatures ranging from 42 to 64.5°C. The thermal water is a low-mineralized sodium-chloride-sulfate water enriched in phosphate, fluorine and nickel. The silica geothermometer, the silica concentration of 43 mg/kg and the ratios of Br/Cl and I/Cl of 2.5 × 10-3, suggest that the thermal water stems from approximately 5,000 m depth and had a long residence time with silicate rocks. This points towards Gorongosa Mountain as the water source area. 14C dating suggests a groundwater age of 11,000 years.

  13. Raman spectral characteristics of magmatic-contact metamorphic coals from Huainan Coalfield, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shancheng; Wu, Dun; Liu, Guijian; Sun, Ruoyu

    2017-01-15

    Normal burial metamorphism of coal superimposed by magmatic-contact metamorphism makes the characteristics of the Raman spectrum of coal changed. Nine coal samples were chosen at a coal transect perpendicular to the intrusive dike, at the No. 3 coal seam, Zhuji Coal Mine, Huainan Coalfield, China, with different distances from dike-coal boundary (DCB). Geochemical (proximate and ultimate) analysis and mean random vitrinite reflectance (R0, %) indicate that there is a significant relationship between the values of volatile matter and R0 in metamorphosed coals. Raman spectra show that the graphite band (G band) becomes the major band but the disordered band (D band) disappears progressively, with the increase of metamorphic temperature in coals, showing that the structural organization in high-rank contact-metamorphosed coals is close to that of well-crystallized graphite. Evident relationships are observed between the calculated Raman spectral parameters and the peak metamorphic temperature, suggesting some spectral parameters have the potentials to be used as geothermometers for contact-metamorphic coals.

  14. Regional geothermal exploration in north central New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Icerman, L.

    1984-02-01

    A broad-based geothermal resource reconnaissance study covering Bernalillo, Los Alamos, Rio Arriba, San Miguel, Sandoval, Santa Fe, Taos, Torrance, and Valencia counties in north central New Mexico was conducted from June 15, 1981, through September 30, 1983. Specific activities included the compilation of actual temperature, bottom-hole temperature gradient, and geotemperature data; tabulation of water chemistry data; field collection of temperature-depth data from existing wells; and drilling of temperature gradient holes in the Ojo Caliente, San Ysidro, Rio Puerco, and Polvadera areas. The data collected were used to perform: (1) a regional analysis of the geothermal energy potential of north central New Mexico; (2) two site-specific studies of the potential relationship between groundwater constrictions and geothermal resources; (3) an evaluation of the geothermal energy potential at Santa Ana Pueblo; (4) a general analysis of the geothermal energy resources of the Rio Grande Rift, including specific data on the Valles Caldera; and (5) an evaluation of the use of geothermometers on New Mexico groundwaters. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual chapters.

  15. Validation of Multicomponent Equilibrium Geothermometry at Four Geothermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ghanashyam Neupane; Jeffrey S Baum; Earl D Mattson; Gregory L Mines; Carl D Palmer; Robert W Smith

    2001-01-01

    This paper evaluates our ability to predict geothermal reservoir temperatures using water compositions measured from surface hot springs or shallow subsurface wells at four geothermal sites prior to the startup of geothermal energy production using RTEst, a multicomponent equilibrium geothermometer we have developed and are testing. The estimated reservoir temperatures of these thermal expressions are compared to measured bottom-hole temperatures of production wells at Raft River, ID; Neal Hot Springs, OR; Roosevelt Hot Springs, UT; and Steamboat Springs, NV geothermal sites. In general, temperatures of the producing reservoir estimated from the composition of water from surface expressions/shallow wells using RTEst are similar to the measured bottom-hole temperatures. For example, estimates for the Neal Hot Springs system are within ±10 ºC of the production temperatures. However, some caution must be exercised in evaluating RTEst predictions. Estimated temperature for a shallow Raft River well (Frazier well) is found to be slightly lower (ca. 15 ºC) than the bottom-hole temperatures from the geothermal plant production wells. For the Raft River system, local geology and fluid mixing model indicate that the fluid source for this shallow well may not have originated from the production reservoir. Similarly, RTEst results for Roosevelt Hot springs and Steamboat Springs geothermal areas were found consistent with the reservoir temperatures obtained from deep wells. These results suggest that the RTEst could be a valuable tool for estimating temperatures and evaluation geothermal resources.

  16. Alabama Tin Belt. Metallogenesis and mineral resource evaluation. Final report for the 1983-1984 project year

    SciTech Connect

    Green, N.L.; Tompa, B.; Gomolka, J.; Wade, G.; Usdansky, S.I.

    1986-03-01

    The Alabama Tin Belt covers an area of approximately 180 km/sup 2/ within the Tallapoosa lithotectonic block of the Northern Alabama Piedmont. In the second year of this three year project, efforts continued towards detailing the distribution and petrogenesis of tin-bearing peraluminous granitoids in central Coosa County. In particular, mapping, structural analysis and petrographical/petrological studies have been used to examine the geologic settings, geochemical and mineralogical variations, crystallization conditions and nature of source rock(s) of selected granitic plutons and related pegmatite bodies in the vicinity of Rockford, Alabama. Thermobarometeric techniques (a ternary feldspar thermobarometer and a plagioclase-muscovite geothermometer), that could be used in conjunction with compositions of constituent minerals to yield reasonable estmates of granite crystallization and alteration temperatures, were also developed. Preliminary results provide evidence that: (1) the granitoids possess characteristics possibly derived from both sedimentary (S-type) and igneous (I-type) sources; (2) feldspars of the tin-bearing pegmatites possess extremely high Rb and Cs concentrations; (3) the peraluminous granitoids crystallized under varying oxygen fugacity conditions at temperatures of 510 to 710/sup 0/ and pressures greater than 6 kbar; and, (4) the Rockford Pluton occupies the core of a post-D/sub 1/, antiformal structure that is overturned to the northwest.

  17. Raman spectral characteristics of magmatic-contact metamorphic coals from Huainan Coalfield, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shancheng; Wu, Dun; Liu, Guijian; Sun, Ruoyu

    2017-01-01

    Normal burial metamorphism of coal superimposed by magmatic-contact metamorphism makes the characteristics of the Raman spectrum of coal changed. Nine coal samples were chosen at a coal transect perpendicular to the intrusive dike, at the No. 3 coal seam, Zhuji Coal Mine, Huainan Coalfield, China, with different distances from dike-coal boundary (DCB). Geochemical (proximate and ultimate) analysis and mean random vitrinite reflectance (R0, %) indicate that there is a significant relationship between the values of volatile matter and R0 in metamorphosed coals. Raman spectra show that the graphite band (G band) becomes the major band but the disordered band (D band) disappears progressively, with the increase of metamorphic temperature in coals, showing that the structural organization in high-rank contact-metamorphosed coals is close to that of well-crystallized graphite. Evident relationships are observed between the calculated Raman spectral parameters and the peak metamorphic temperature, suggesting some spectral parameters have the potentials to be used as geothermometers for contact-metamorphic coals.

  18. BACA Project: geothermal demonstration power plant. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    The various activities that have been conducted by Union in the Redondo Creek area while attempting to develop the resource for a 50 MW power plant are described. The results of the geologic work, drilling activities and reservoir studies are summarized. In addition, sections discussing the historical costs for Union's involvement with the project, production engineering (for anticipated surface equipment), and environmental work are included. Nineteen geothermal wells have been drilled in the Redondo Creek area of the Valles Caldera: a prominent geologic feature of the Jemez mountains consisting of Pliocene and Pleistocene age volcanics. The Redondo Creek area is within a complex longitudinal graben on the northwest flank of the resurgent structural dome of Redondo Peak and Redondo Border. The major graben faults, with associated fracturing, are geologically plausible candidates for permeable and productive zones in the reservoir. The distribution of such permeable zones is too erratic and the locations too imprecisely known to offer an attractive drilling target. Log analysis indicates there is a preferred mean fracture strike of N31W in the upper portion of Redondo Creek wells. This is approximately perpendicular to the major structure in the area, the northeast-striking Redondo Creek graben. The geothermal fluid found in the Redondo Creek reservoir is relatively benign with low brine concentrations and moderate H/sub 2/S concentrations. Geothermometer calculations indicate that the reservoir temperature generally lies between 500/sup 0/F and 600/sup 0/F, with near wellbore flashing occurring during the majority of the wells' production.

  19. Apacheta, a new geothermal prospect in Northern Chile

    SciTech Connect

    Urzua, Luis; Powell, Tom; Cumming, William B.; Dobson, Patrick

    2002-05-24

    The discovery of two high-temperature fumaroles, with gas geochemistry compatible with an economic geothermal system, established Apacheta as one of the most attractive geothermal exploration prospects in northern Chile. These remote fumaroles at 5,150 m elevation were first sampled in 1999 by ENAP and its partners, following up on the reports of a CODELCO water exploration well that flowed small amounts of dry steam at 4,540 m elevation in the valley 4.5 km east of the fumaroles. The prospect is associated with a Plio-Pleistocene volcanic complex located within a NW-trending graben along the axis of the high Andes. The regional water table is 4,200 masl. There are no hot springs, just the 88 degrees C steam well and the 109 degrees and 118 degrees C fumaroles with gas compositions that indicate reservoir temperatures of greater than or equal to 250 degrees C, using a variety of gas geothermometers. An MT-TDEM survey was completed in 2001-2002 by Geotermica del Norte (SDN), an ENAP-C ODELCO partnership, to explore the Apacheta geothermal concession. The survey results indicated that base of the low resistivity clay cap has a structural apex just west of the fumaroles, a pattern typically associated with shallow permeability within a high temperature geothermal resource. SGN plans to drill at least one exploration well in 2002-03 to characterize a possible economic resource at Apacheta.

  20. Three-Dimensional Geologic Characterization of Geothermal Systems: Astor Pass, Nevada, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Siler, Drew L; Mayhew, Brett; Faulds, James E

    2012-09-30

    Geothermal systems in the Great Basin, USA, are controlled by a variety of fault intersection and fault interaction areas. Understanding the specific geometry of the structures most conducive to geothermal circulation is crucial in order to both mitigate the costs of geothermal exploration (especially drilling) and to identify blind geothermal systems (no surface expression). Astor Pass, Nevada, one such blind geothermal system, lies near the boundary between two distinct structural domains, the Walker Lane and the Basin and Range, and exhibits characteristics of each setting. Both northwest-striking, left-stepping dextral faults of the Walker Lane and kinematically linked northerly striking normal faults associated with the Basin and Range are present at Astor Pass. Previous studies identified a blind geothermal system controlled by the intersection of northwest-striking dextral and north-northwest-striking normal faults. Wells drilled into the southwestern quadrant of the fault intersection yielded 94°C fluids, with geothermometers suggesting significantly higher maximum temperatures. Additional data, including reprocessed 2D seismic data and petrologic analysis of well cuttings, were integrated with existing and reinterpreted geologic maps and cross-sections to aid construction of a 3D geologic model. This comprehensive 3D integration of multiple data sets allows characterization of the structural setting of the Astor Pass blind geothermal system at a level of detail beyond what independent data interpretation can provide. Our analysis indicates that the blind geothermal system is controlled by two north- to northwest-plunging fault intersections.

  1. Multireaction equilibrium geothermometry: A sensitivity analysis using data from the Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Jonathan M.; Hurwitz, Shaul; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Nordstrom, D Kirk; McCleskey, R. Blaine

    2016-01-01

    A multireaction chemical equilibria geothermometry (MEG) model applicable to high-temperature geothermal systems has been developed over the past three decades. Given sufficient data, this model provides more constraint on calculated reservoir temperatures than classical chemical geothermometers that are based on either the concentration of silica (SiO2), or the ratios of cation concentrations. A set of 23 chemical analyses from Ojo Caliente Spring and 22 analyses from other thermal features in the Lower Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park are used to examine the sensitivity of calculated reservoir temperatures using the GeoT MEG code (Spycher et al. 2013, 2014) to quantify the effects of solute concentrations, degassing, and mineral assemblages on calculated reservoir temperatures. Results of our analysis demonstrate that the MEG model can resolve reservoir temperatures within approximately ±15°C, and that natural variation in fluid compositions represents a greater source of variance in calculated reservoir temperatures than variations caused by analytical uncertainty (assuming ~5% for major elements). The analysis also suggests that MEG calculations are particularly sensitive to variations in silica concentration, the concentrations of the redox species Fe(II) and H2S, and that the parameters defining steam separation and CO2 degassing from the liquid may be adequately determined by numerical optimization. Results from this study can provide guidance for future applications of MEG models, and thus provide more reliable information on geothermal energy resources during exploration.

  2. Multireaction equilibrium geothermometry: A sensitivity analysis using data from the Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jonathan M.; Hurwitz, Shaul; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; McCleskey, R. Blaine

    2016-12-01

    A multireaction chemical equilibria geothermometry (MEG) model applicable to high-temperature geothermal systems has been developed over the past three decades. Given sufficient data, this model provides more constraint on calculated reservoir temperatures than classical chemical geothermometers that are based on either the concentration of silica (SiO2), or the ratios of cation concentrations. A set of 23 chemical analyses from Ojo Caliente Spring and 22 analyses from other thermal features in the Lower Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park are used to examine the sensitivity of calculated reservoir temperatures using the GeoT MEG code (Spycher et al. 2013, 2014) to quantify the effects of solute concentrations, degassing, and mineral assemblages on calculated reservoir temperatures. Results of our analysis demonstrate that the MEG model can resolve reservoir temperatures within approximately ± 15 °C, and that natural variation in fluid compositions represents a greater source of variance in calculated reservoir temperatures than variations caused by analytical uncertainty (assuming 5% for major elements). The analysis also suggests that MEG calculations are particularly sensitive to variations in silica concentration, the concentrations of the redox species Fe(II) and H2S, and that the parameters defining steam separation and CO2 degassing from the liquid may be adequately determined by numerical optimization. Results from this study can provide guidance for future applications of MEG models, and thus provide more reliable information on geothermal energy resources during exploration.

  3. Hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in Long Valley Caldera, Mono County, California, 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrar, C.D.; Sorey, M.L.; Rojstaczer, S.A.; Janik, C.J.; Winnett, T.L.; Clark, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrologic and geochemical monitoring, to detect changes caused by magmatic and tectonic processes in the Long Valley caldera has continued through 1985. The monitoring included the collection of the following types of data: chemical and isotopic composition of water and gases from springs, wells, and steam vents; temperatures in wells, springs, and steam vents; flow rates of springs and streams; water levels in wells; and barometric pressure and precipitation at several sites. In addition, reservoir temperatures for the geothermal system were estimated from computations based on chemical geothermometers applied to fluid samples from wells and springs. Estimates of thermal water discharged from springs were made on the basis of boron and chloride fluxes in surface waters for selected sites in the Casa Diablo area and along the Mammoth-Hot Creek drainage. These data are presented in tables and graphs. The Long Valley area was relatively quiescent throughout 1985 in terms of geodetic changes and seismic activity. As a consequence , the hydrologic system varied mainly in response to seasonal influences of temperature, atmospheric pressure, and precipitation. However, spring flows near Casa Diablo were influenced by pumping at the geothermal production well field nearby. (Author 's abstract)

  4. The Domuyo volcanic system: An enormous geothermal resource in Argentine Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiodini, Giovanni; Liccioli, Caterina; Vaselli, Orlando; Calabrese, Sergio; Tassi, Franco; Caliro, Stefano; Caselli, Alberto; Agusto, Mariano; D'Alessandro, Walter

    2014-03-01

    A geochemical survey of the main thermal waters discharging in the southwestern part of the Domuyo volcanic complex (Argentina), where the latest volcanic activity dates to 0.11 Ma, has highlighted the extraordinarily high heat loss from this remote site in Patagonia. The thermal water discharges are mostly Na-Cl in composition and have TDS values up to 3.78 g L- 1 (El Humazo). A simple hydrogeochemical approach shows that 1,100 to 1,300 kg s- 1 of boiling waters, which have been affected by shallow steam separation, flow into the main drainage of the area (Rio Varvarco). A dramatic increase of the most conservative species such as Na, Cl and Li from the Rio Varvarco from upstream to downstream was observed and related solely to the contribution of hydrothermal fluids. The equilibrium temperatures of the discharging thermal fluids, calculated on the basis of the Na-K-Mg geothermometer, are between 190 °C and 230 °C. If we refer to a liquid originally at 220 °C (enthalpy = 944 J g- 1), the thermal energy release can be estimated as high as 1.1 ± 0.2 GW, a value that is much higher than the natural release of heat in other important geothermal fields worldwide, e.g., Mutnovsky (Russia), Wairakei (New Zealand) and Lassen Peak (USA). This value is the second highest measured advective heat flux from any hydrothermal system on Earth after Yellowstone.

  5. Temperature fluctuation of the Iceland mantle plume through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spice, Holly E.; Fitton, J. Godfrey; Kirstein, Linda A.

    2016-02-01

    The newly developed Al-in-olivine geothermometer was used to find the olivine-Cr-spinel crystallization temperatures of a suite of picrites spanning the spatial and temporal extent of the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP), which is widely considered to be the result of a deep-seated mantle plume. Our data confirm that start-up plumes are associated with a pulse of anomalously hot mantle over a large spatial area before becoming focused into a narrow upwelling. We find that the thermal anomaly on both sides of the province at Baffin Island/West Greenland and the British Isles at ˜61 Ma across an area ˜2000 km in diameter was uniform, with Al-in-olivine temperatures up to ˜300°C above that of average mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) primitive magma. Furthermore, by combining our results with geochemical data and existing geophysical and bathymetric observations, we present compelling evidence for long-term (>107 year) fluctuations in the temperature of the Iceland mantle plume. We show that the plume temperature fell from its initial high value during the start-up phase to a minimum at about 35 Ma, and that the mantle temperature beneath Iceland is currently increasing.

  6. Oxygen isotope thermometry of basic lavas and mantle nodules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kyser, T.K.; O'Neil, J.R.; Carmichael, I.S.E.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the oxygen isotope and chemical composition of glass and phenocrysts in lavas and coexisting minerals in mantle nodules. Temperatures of formation of these assemblages have been estimated from various chemical thermometers and range from 855?? to 1,300?? C. The permil fractionations between coexisting orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene in the lavas and nodules are all near zero. The fractionations between pyroxene and olivine vary from +1.2 to -1.4 and are a smooth function of temperature over the entire range. This function is given by T(?? C)=1151-173?? (px-d)-68??2(px-d) and has an uncertainty of ??60?? (2??). At temperatures above 1,150?? C, olivine in the nodules becomes more18O-rich than coexisting clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, and plagioclase. In combination with the experimental work of Muehlenbachs and Kushiro (1974), the olivine-pyroxene fractionations indicate that olivine also becomes substantially more18O-rich than basaltic liquids above 1,200?? C. Geothermometers based on the oxygen isotope equilibration of basaltic liquid with olivine, pyroxene, and plagioclase are presented. ?? 1981 Springer-Verlag.

  7. Hydrology and geochemistry of thermal ground water in southwestern Idaho and north-central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, H.W.; Lewis, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    In southwestern Idaho and north-central Nevada, thermal groundwater occurs under artesian conditions in igneous or sedimentary rocks of Tertiary age. Temperatures of the groundwater range from 30 degrees to more than 80 degrees Celsius. Thermal waters are a sodium carbonate or bicarbonate type; nonthermal waters are a calcium bicarbonate. Chemical geothermometers indicate maximum reservoir temperatures near 100 degrees Celsius. Stable-isotope data indicate recharge to the system occurred when climate averaged 3 degrees to 5 degrees Celsius colder than at present; such conditions existed during Holocene glacial advances 3,000 and more than 8,000 years ago. Residence time calculated on the basis of reservoir volume and thermal-water discharge is 3,400 to 6,800 years. Considering estimates of heat flux in and heat discharged by conduction and convection, about 25.0 cubic feet per second, or about 18,000 acre-feet per year, of 50 degrees Celsius water is required to transport excess heat from the system advectively in groundwater. The conceptual model is one where water has circulated thousands, even tens of thousands, of years. Within model constraints, reservoir thermal energy for this geothermal system is 130x10 to the 18th power calories. (USGS)

  8. Geothermal resources in the Banbury Hot Springs area, Twin Falls County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, R.E.; Young, H.W.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal water (30.0 to 72.0 degrees Celsius) is produced from 26 wells and 2 springs in the vicinity of Banbury Hot Springs near Buhl, Idaho. Thermal water is used for space heating of private residences, catfish and tropical fish production, greenhouse operation, swimming pools, and therapeutic baths. In 1979, 10 ,300 acre-feet of thermal water was utilized; heat discharged convectively from the geothermal system was about 1.09 x 10 to the 7th power calories per second. Decline in artesian head and discharge apparent in recorder charts from two wells may represent seasonal fluctuations or may reflect aquifer response to development of the resource. Thermal waters sampled are sodium bicarbonate in character and slightly alkaline. Mixing of a hot (72 degrees Celsius) water with local, cooler ground water can be shown from various relations between stable isotopes, chloride, and enthalpy. On the basis of concentration of trituim , age of the waters sampled is at least 100 years an perhaps more than 1,000 years. One water (33 degress Celsius) may be as young as 29 years. On the basis of silica, sodium-potassium-calcium, and sulfate-water geothermometers, best estimate of the maximum reservoir temperature for the thermal waters is between about 70 and 100 degrees Celsius. (USGS)

  9. Thermal springs in the Payette River basin, west-central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, R.E.; Young, H.W.

    1980-01-01

    The Payette River basin, characterized by steep, rugged mountains and narrow river valleys, occupies an area of about 3 ,300 square miles in west-central Idaho. Predominant rock types in the basin include granitic rocks of the Idaho batholith and basalt flows of the Columbia River Basalt Group. Waters from thermal springs in the basin, temperatures of which range from 34 to 86 degrees Celsius, are sodium bicarbonate types and are slightly alkaline. Dissolved-solids concentrations range from 173 to 470 milligrams per liter. Reservoir temperatures determined from the sodium-potassium-calcium and silicic acid-corrected silica geothermometers range from 53 to 143 degrees Celsius. Tritium, present in concentrations between 0 and 2 tritium units, indicate sampled thermal waters are at least 100 years old and possibly more than 1,000 years old. Stable isotope data indicate it is unlikely any of the nonthermal waters sampled are representative of precipitation that recharges the thermal springs in the basin. Thermal springs discharged about 5,700 acre-feet of water in 1979. Associated convective heat flux is 1.1x10 to the 7th power calories per second. (USGS)

  10. Geothermal resources in the Banbury Hot Springs area, Twin Falls County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, R.E.; Young, Harold William

    1982-01-01

    Thermal water 30.0 degrees to 72.0 degrees Celsius is produced from 26 wells and 2 springs in the vicinity of Banbury Hot Springs near Buhl, Idaho. Thermal water is used for residence heating, catfish and tropical fish production, greenhouse operation, swimming pools, and therapeutic baths. In 1979, 10,300 acre-feet of thermal water was utilized; heat discharged convectively from the geothermal system was about 1.1 x 107 calories per second. Decline in artesian head and discharge apparent in recorder charts from two wells may represent seasonal fluctuations or may reflect reservoir response to development of the resource. The thermal waters sampled are sodium carbonate or bicarbonate in character and slightly alkaline. Mixing of hot (72 degrees Celsius) water with local cooler ground water can be shown from various relations among stable isotopes, chloride, and enthalpy. On the basis of concentration of tritium, the age of most of the water sampled is at least 100 years and perhaps more than 1,000 years. Some water (33 degrees Celsius) may be as young as 29 years. On the basis of silica, sodium-potassium-calcium, and sulfate-water geothermometers, the best estimate of the maximum reservoir temperature for the thermal water is between 70 degrees and 100 degrees Celsius.

  11. Thermal Water's Isotope Geochemistry Study of Evros Area, NE Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elissavet, Dotsika; Paraskevi, Chantzi

    2016-10-01

    Thermal waters from Evros area were collected and subjected to chemical and isotopic analysis in order to understand all the physicochemical mechanisms (mixing, dilution, precipitating) that contribute to the shallow and deep geothermal water tables and determine the origin of these fluids as well as their mineralization. Physicochemical characteristics EC, T°C, pH was determined at the field. The ionic concentrations of samples indicate solutions with high salinity. Two chemical water types were arisen: Na-SO4 concerning low temperatures and shallow aquifers and Na- Cl concerning high temperatures and deeper geothermal circulation. The ratio Br/Cl definitely considered marine origin indicator is the same as the sea confirming the involvement of the seawater in the geothermal system. The marine component and water-rock interaction process under high temperatures seem to contribute to the mineralization of thermal waters. Moreover, water-rock interaction process is also responsible for the alternation of δ18O values. Geothermometers concluded to a middle enthalpy geothermal field.

  12. Water information bulletin No. 30 geothermal investigations in Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.C.; Johnson, L.L.; Anderson, J.E.; Spencer, S.G.; Sullivan, J.F.

    1980-06-01

    There are 899 thermal water occurrences known in Idaho, including 258 springs and 641 wells having temperatures ranging from 20 to 93/sup 0/C. Fifty-one cities or towns in Idaho containing 30% of the state's population are within 5 km of known geothermal springs or wells. These include several of Idaho's major cities such as Lewiston, Caldwell, Nampa, Boise, Twin Falls, Pocatello, and Idaho Falls. Fourteen sites appear to have subsurface temperatures of 140/sup 0/C or higher according to the several chemical geothermometers applied to thermal water discharges. These include Weiser, Big Creek, White Licks, Vulcan, Roystone, Bonneville, Crane Creek, Cove Creek, Indian Creek, and Deer Creek hot springs, and Raft River, Preston, and Magic Reservoir areas. These sites could be industrial sites, but several are in remote areas away from major transportation and, therefore, would probably be best utilized for electrical power generation using the binary cycle or Magma Max process. Present uses range from space heating to power generation. Six areas are known where commercial greenhouse operations are conducted for growing cut and potted flowers and vegetables. Space heating is substantial in only two places (Boise and Ketchum) although numerous individuals scattered throughout the state make use of thermal water for space heating and private swimming facilities. There are 22 operating resorts using thermal water and two commercial warm-water fish-rearing operations.

  13. Evaluation of thermobarometers for garnet peridotites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finnerty, A. A.; Boyd, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-one geothermometers and six geobarometers are evaluated for accuracy and precision for garnet lherzolites, with a suite of well-equilibrated xenoliths from kimberlites of northern Lesotho. Accuracy was tested by comparison of P-T estimates for a diamond-bearing and a graphite-bearing xenolith with the experimentally determined diamond-graphite univariant curve and by comparison of P-T estimates for phlogopite-bearing xenoliths to the high-temperature stability limit of phlogopite. Precision was evaluated by measuring the scatter of P-T estimates for each of four xenoliths from a wide range of P and T when many point analyses of the constituent minerals are used for P-T estimation. Most satisfactory is a thermobarometer composed of the uncorrected diopside-enstatite miscibility gap of Lindsley and Dixon (1976), combined with the uncorrected isopleths for aluminum in enstatite coexisting with pyrope of MacGregor (1974). The inflection observed in the northern Lesotho paleogeotherm cannot be an artifact of the method of temperature estimation.

  14. Chemical Analyses of Ground Water in the Carson Desert near Stillwater, Churchill County, Nevada, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fosbury, DeEtta; Walker, Mark; Stillings, Lisa L.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the chemical analyses of ground-water samples collected in 2005 from domestic wells located in the Stillwater area of the Carson Desert (fig. 1). These data were evaluated for evidence of mixing with nearby geothermal waters (Fosbury, 2007). That study used several methods to identify mixing zones of ground and geothermal waters using trace elements, chemical equilibria, water temperature, geothermometer estimates, and statistical techniques. In some regions, geothermal sources influence the chemical quality of ground water used for drinking water supplies. Typical geothermal contaminants include arsenic, mercury, antimony, selenium, thallium, boron, lithium, and fluoride (Webster and Nordstrom, 2003). The Environmental Protection Agency has established primary drinking water standards for these, with the exception of boron and lithium. Concentrations of some trace metals in geothermal water may exceed drinking water standards by several orders of magnitude. Geothermal influences on water quality are likely to be localized, depending on directions of ground water flow, the relative volumes of geothermal sources and ground water originating from other sources, and depth below the surface from which water is withdrawn. It is important to understand the areal extent of shallow mixing of geothermal water because it may have adverse chemical and aesthetic effects on domestic drinking water. It would be useful to understand the areal extent of these effects.

  15. New geochemical investigations in Platanares and Azacualpa geothermal sites (Honduras)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberi, Franco; Carapezza, Maria Luisa; Cioni, Roberto; Lelli, Matteo; Menichini, Matia; Ranaldi, Massimo; Ricci, Tullio; Tarchini, Luca

    2013-05-01

    Platanares and Azacualpa geothermal sites of Honduras are located in an inner part of the Caribbean Plate far from the active volcanic front of Central America. Here geology indicates that there are not the conditions for the occurrence of shallow magmatic heat sources for high-enthalpy geothermal resources. Geothermal perspectives are related to the possibility of a deep circulation of meteoric water along faults and the storage of the heated fluid in fractured permeable reservoirs. Geochemical geothermometers indicate a temperature for the deeper part of the geothermal reservoir close to 200 °C for Platanares and of 150-170 °C for Azacualpa. Calcite scaling, with subordinate silica deposition has to be expected in both sites. CO2 soil flux investigations have been carried out in both areas and reveal the presence of positive anomalies likely corresponding to the presence at depth of fractured degassing geothermal reservoirs. Compared with the geothermal areas of Central Italy whose reservoirs are hosted in carbonate rocks, e.g. Latera (Chiodini et al., 2007), the CO2 soil flux measured in Honduras is significantly lower (mean of 17 g/m2day at Platanares and of 163 g/m2day at Azacualpa) probably because of the dominant silicate nature of the deep reservoirs.

  16. Chemical, isotopic, and gas compositions of selected thermal springs in Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mariner, R.H.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, William C.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-seven thermal springs in Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah were sampled for detailed chemical and isotopic analysis. The springs issue sodium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, or sodium mixed-anion waters of near neutral (6.2) to alkaline (9.2) pH. High concentrations of fluoride, more than 8 milligrams per liter, occur in Arizona in waters from Gillard Hot Springs, Castle Hot Springs, and the unnamed spring of Eagle Creek, and in New Mexico from springs along the Gila River. Deuterium compositions of the thermal waters cover the same range as those expected for meteoric waters in the respective areas. The chemical compositions of the thermal waters indicate that Thermo Hot Springs in Utah and Gillard Hot Springs in Arizona represent hydrothermal systems which are at temperatures higher than 125 deg C. Estimates of subsurface temperature based on the quartz and Na-K-Ca geothermometer differ by up to 60 deg C for Monroe, Joseph, Red Hill, and Crater hot springs in Utah. Similar conflicting estimates of aquifer temperature occur for Verde Hot Springs, the springs near Clifton and Coolidge Dam, in Arizona; and the warm springs near San Ysidro, Radium Hot Springs, and San Francisco Hot Springs, in New Mexico. Such disparities could result from mixing, precipitation of calcium carbonate, or perhaps appreciable concentrations of magnesium. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. Geothermal resource potential of Cascade volcanic arc

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, G.R.

    1987-08-01

    The central and southern cascade volcanic arc has the following features that suggest a high potential for geothermal resources: (1) extensive Quaternary volcanism with some silicic to intermediate volcanoes, (2) hundreds of square kilometers with regional background heat flow in excess of 100 mW/m/sup 2/, (3) shallow (4-9 km) calculated depth to Curie point in the same areas that have heat flow in excess of 100 mW/m/sup 2/, (4) a thick pile of volcanic rock with moderate to low thermal conductivity, (5) hot springs with minimum reservoir temperatures of 174/sup 0/-186/sup 0/C (from the anhydrite geothermometer of Mariner, 1985), and (6) fault zones for fracture permeability. These features are the result of interactions between the North American plate (NAP), the Pacific plate (PP), and the subducted Gorda, Juan de Fuca, and Explorer plates (GJEP). Interactions between the NAP and the PP produce north-south compression and east-west extension, causing extensive development of north-south normal faults and partial melting episodes in upper mantle. Northeast-southwest convergence between the NAP and the GJEP produce subduction-related magmas and crustal deformation from northeast-southwest compression. NAP-GJEP interactions dominate in the northern part of the arc, whereas NAP-PP and NAP-GJEP interactions have combined in the central and southern part of the arc to produce rates of magmatism and heat flow higher than in the north.

  18. Implications for organic maturation studies of evidence of a geologically rapid increase and stabilization of vitrinite reflectance at peak temperature: Cerro Prieto geothermal system, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    A short-term rapid heating and cooling of the rock in well M-94 below 1300 m was caused by a pulse of hot water passing through the edge of the Cerro Prieto, Mexico, geothermal system. Below 1300 m, the peak paleotemperatures were about 225-250??C, but equilibrium well log temperatures indicate a decrease to 150-210??C at present. This hot water pulse sharply increased vitrinite reflectance to levels comparable to those measured in the central part of the system, even though studies of apatite fission-track annealing indicate that the duration of heating was only 100-101 yr in M-94, in contrast to 103-104 yr in the central part of the system. The quick change of the vitrinite reflectance geothermometer indicates that thermal maturation reactions can stabilize, after a geologically short period of heating, to a level consistent with peak temperature under moderate to high-temperature diagenesis in open, fluid-rich, geothermal systems. -from Author

  19. New evidence on the hydrothermal system in Long Valley caldera, California, from wells, fluid sampling, electrical geophysics, and age determinations of hot-spring deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorey, M.L.; Suemnicht, G.A.; Sturchio, N.C.; Nordquist, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    Data collected since 1985 from test drilling, fluid sampling, and geologic and geophysical investigations provide a clearer definition of the hydrothermal system in Long Valley caldera than was previously available. This information confirms the existence of high-temperature (> 200??C) reservoirs within the volcanic fill in parts of the west moat. These reservoirs contain fluids which are chemically similar to thermal fluids encountered in the central and eastern parts of the caldera. The roots of the present-day hydrothermal system (the source reservoir, principal zones of upflow, and the magmatic heat source) most likely occur within metamorphic basement rocks beneath the western part of the caldera. Geothermometer-temperature estimates for the source reservoir range from 214 to 248??C. Zones of upflow of hot water could exist beneath the plateau of moat rhyolite located west of the resurgent dome or beneath Mammoth Mountain. Lateral flow of thermal water away from such upflow zones through reservoirs in the Bishop Tuff and early rhyolite accounts for temperature reversals encountered in most existing wells. Dating of hot-spring deposits from active and inactive thermal areas confirms previous interpretations of the evolution of hydrothermal activity that suggest two periods of extensive hot-spring discharge, one peaking about 300 ka and another extending from about 40 ka to the present. The onset of hydrothermal activity around 40 ka coincides with the initiation of rhyolitic volcanism along the Mono-Inyo Craters volcanic chain that extends beneath the caldera's west moat. ?? 1991.

  20. Results of investigation at the Miravalles geothermal field, Costa Rica. Resultados de las investigaciones en el campo geotermico de Miravalles, Costa Rica; Parte 2, Muestreo de fluidos pozo abajo

    SciTech Connect

    Grigsby, C.O.; Goff, F.; Trujillo, P.E. Jr.; Counce, D.A.; Dennis, B.; Kolar, J.; Corrales, R.; Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad, San Jose )

    1989-10-01

    Samples of the geothermal fluids in the Miravalles, Costa Rica, geothermal system were collected from production wellbores using downhole fluid samplers, from flowing wellheads using miniseparators, and from hot springs that discharge in the area. The reservoir fluid at Miravalles is a neutral-chloride-type water, but fumaroles and acid-sulfate springs are present within the main thermal area, and there are bicarbonate-rich hot springs that are clearly related to the neutral-chloride reservoir fluids. Dissolved gases are primarily a mixture of CO{sub 2} with air, but samples collected in the fumarolic areas also contain H{sub 2}S. Water-stable isotope analyses suggest local meteoric recharge, and the reservoir fluid shows oxygen isotopic shifts of about 2.5% due to high-temperature oxygen exchange between water and rock. Chemical geothermometer temperatures are consistent with the measured downhole temperature of 220{degrees} to 255{degrees}C. This pattern of neutral-chloride reservoir fluids with acid-sulfate springs near the source region and bicarbonate-rich chloride hot springs at the periphery of the system suggests a lateral outflow type of hydrothermal system. In addition to the geochemical evidence, temperature profiles from several of the wells show temperature reversals that are characteristic of lateral outflow plumes. We find no evidence for the underlying, higher temperature (300{degrees}C) system, which has been suggested by other investigators. 24 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Vertical movements of crust, uplift of lithosphere, and isostatic unroofing: case histories from the Ozark dome and northern Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, G.M.

    1987-05-01

    Evidence of former deep burial of Ordovician to Devonian strata of the Ozark dome and northern Appalachians has been obtained from petrographic and geochemical studies of carbonates and coal-bearing rocks. In diagenetic minerals of the carbonate rocks, fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and delta/sup 18/O values indicate paleotemperatures of 100 to 200/sup 0/C. The geothermometers used also include vitrinite reflectance, level of organic metamorphism (LOM), Staplin kerogen alteration index, and conodont alteration index (CAI). Maximum depths of burial were calculated from the estimated paleotemperatures assuming a geothermal gradient of about 25/sup 0/C/km. Strata of the Silurian of the northern Appalachian basin and of the Ordovician of the Ozark dome are interpreted to have reached maximum burial depths of 5 and 4.3 km, respectively; Devonian strata in the Catskill Mountains of New York had former burial depths of about 6.5 km; Lower Ordovician carbonate sequences of the northern Appalachian basin were buried to more than 7 km; Middle Ordovician strata from the same basin had paleodepths of approximately 5 km, and Devonian strata, 4.5 to 5 km. If these strata were formerly buried much more deeply than previously thought, then unexpectedly large amounts of uplift and erosion, ranging from 4.3 to 7 km, must also have occurred to bring these strata to the present land surface. The occurrence of such large-scale vertical movements of the crust and lithosphere needs to be recognized in paleogeographic reconstructions.

  2. Diffusion of Ca and Mg in Calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, R.T.; Fisler, D.K.

    1999-02-10

    The self-diffusion of Ca and the tracer diffusion of Mg in calcite have been experimentally measured using isotopic tracers of {sup 25}Mg and {sup 44}Ca. Natural single crystals of calcite were coated with a thermally-sputtered oxide thin film and then annealed in a CO{sub 2} gas at one atmosphere total pressure and temperatures from 550 to 800 C. Diffusion coefficient values were derived from the depth profiles obtained by ion microprobe analysis. The resultant activation energies for Mg tracer diffusion and Ca self-diffusion are respectively: E{sub a}(Mg) = 284 {+-} 74 kJ/mol and E{sub a}(Ca) = 271 {+-} 80 kJ/mol. For the temperature ranges in these experiments, the diffusion of Mg is faster than Ca. The results are generally consistent in magnitude with divalent cation diffusion rates obtained in previous studies and provide a means of interpreting the thermal histories of carbonate minerals, the mechanism of dolomitization, and other diffusion-controlled processes. The results indicate that cation diffusion in calcite is relatively slow and cations are the rate-limiting diffusing species for the deformation of calcite and carbonate rocks. Application of the calcite-dolomite geothermometer to metamorphic assemblages will be constrained by cation diffusion and cooling rates. The direct measurement of Mg tracer diffusion in calcite indicates that dolomitization is unlikely to be accomplished by Mg diffusion in the solid state but by a recrystallization process.

  3. Temperature constraints on the Ginkgo flow of the Columbia River Basalt Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Anita M.; Cashman, Katharine V.

    1997-05-01

    This study provides the first quantitative estimate of heat loss for a Columbia River Basalt Group flow. A glass composition-based geothermometer was experimentally calibrated for a composition representative of the 500-km-long Ginkgo flow of the Columbia River Basalt Group to measure temperature change during transport. Melting experiments were conducted on a bulk sample at 1 atm between 1200 and 1050 °C. Natural glass was sampled from the margin of a feeder dike near Kahlotus, Washington, and from pillow basalt at distances of 120 km (Vantage, Washington), 350 km (Molalla, Oregon), and 370 km (Portland, Oregon). Ginkgo basalt was also sampled at its distal end at Yaquina Head, Oregon (500 km). Comparison of the glass MgO content, K2O in plagioclase, and measured crystallinities in the experimental charges and natural samples tightly constrains the minimum flow temperature to 1085 ± 5 °C. Glass and plagioclase compositions indicate an upper temperature of 1095 ± 5 °C; thus the maximum temperature decrease along the flow axis of the Ginkgo is 20 °C, suggesting cooling rates of 0.02 0.04 °C/km. These cooling rates, substantially lower than rates observed in active and historic flows, are inconsistent with turbulent flow models. Calculated melt temperatures and viscosities of 240 750 Pa · s allow emplacement either as a fast laminar flow under an insulating crust or as a slower, inflated flow.

  4. iGeoT v1.0: Automatic Parameter Estimation for Multicomponent Geothermometry, User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Spycher, Nicolas; Finsterle, Stefan

    2016-07-18

    GeoT implements the multicomponent geothermometry method developed by Reed and Spycher [1984] into a stand-alone computer program to ease the application of this method and to improve the prediction of geothermal reservoir temperatures using full and integrated chemical analyses of geothermal fluids. Reservoir temperatures are estimated from statistical analyses of mineral saturation indices computed as a function of temperature. The reconstruction of the deep geothermal fluid compositions, and geothermometry computations, are all implemented into the same computer program, allowing unknown or poorly constrained input parameters to be estimated by numerical optimization. This integrated geothermometry approach presents advantages over classical geothermometers for fluids that have not fully equilibrated with reservoir minerals and/or that have been subject to processes such as dilution and gas loss. This manual contains installation instructions for iGeoT, and briefly describes the input formats needed to run iGeoT in Automatic or Expert Mode. An example is also provided to demonstrate the use of iGeoT.

  5. Geothermal hydrology of Warner Valley, Oregon: a reconnaissance study

    SciTech Connect

    Sammel, E.A.; Craig, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    Warner Valley and its southern extension, Coleman Valley, are two of several high-desert valleys in the Basin and Range province of south-central Oregon that contain thermal waters. At least 20 thermal springs, defined as having temperatures of 20/sup 0/C or more, issue from Tertiary basaltic flows and tuffs in and near the valleys. Many shallow wells also produce thermal waters. The highest measured temperature is 127/sup 0/C, reported from a well known as Crump geyser, at a depth of 200 meters. The hottest spring, located near Crump geyser, has a surface temperature of 78/sup 0/C. The occurrence of these thermal waters is closely related to faults and fault intersections in the graben and horst structure of the valleys. Chemical analyses show that the thermal waters are of two types: sodium chloride and sodium bicarbonate waters. Chemical indicators show that the geothermal system is a hot-water rather than a vapor-dominated system. Conductive heat flow in areas of the valley unaffected by hydrothermal convection is probably about 75 milliwatts per square meter. The normal thermal gradient in valley-fill dpeosits in these areas may be about 40/sup 0/C per kilometer. Geothermometers and mixing models indicate that temperatures of equilibration are at least 170/sup 0/C for the thermal components of the hotter waters. The size and location of geothermal reservoirs are unknown.

  6. Improved EPMA Trace Element Accuracy Using a Matrix Iterated Quantitative Blank Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, J. J.; Wark, D. A.; Jercinovic, M. J.

    2007-12-01

    At trace element levels below several hundred PPM, accuracy is more often the limiting factor for EPMA quantification rather than precision. Modern EPMA instruments equipped with low noise detectors, counting electronics and large area analyzing crystals can now routinely achieve sensitivities for most elements in the 10 to 100 PPM levels (or even lower). But due to various sample and instrumental artifacts in the x-ray continuum, absolute accuracy is often the limiting factor for ultra trace element quantification. These artifacts have various mechanisms, but are usually attributed to sample artifacts (e.g., sample matrix absorption edges)1, detector artifacts (e.g., Ar or Xe absorption edges) 2 and analyzing crystal artifacts (extended peak tails preventing accurate determination of the true background and ¡§negative peaks¡¨ or ¡§holes¡¨ in the x-ray continuum). The latter being first described3 by Self, et al. and recently documented for the Ti kÑ in quartz geo-thermometer. 4 Ti (ka) Ti (ka) Ti (ka) Ti (ka) Ti (ka) Si () O () Total Average: -.00146 -.00031 -.00180 .00013 .00240 46.7430 53.2563 99.9983 Std Dev: .00069 .00075 .00036 .00190 .00117 .00000 .00168 .00419 The general magnitude of these artifacts can be seen in the above analyses of Ti ka in a synthetic quartz standard. The values for each spectrometer/crystal vary systematically from ¡V18 PPM to + 24 PPM. The exact mechanism for these continuum ¡§holes¡¨ is not known but may be related to secondary lattice diffraction occurring at certain Bragg angles depending on crystal mounting orientation for non-isometric analyzing crystals5. These x-ray continuum artifacts can produce systematic errors at levels up to 100 PPM or more depending on the particular analytical situation. In order to correct for these inaccuracies, a ¡§blank¡¨ correction has been developed that applies a quantitative correction to the measured x-ray intensities during the matrix iteration, by calculating the intensity

  7. An Excel-based tool for evaluating and visualizing geothermometry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, J. M.; Wörner, G.; Kronz, A.

    2012-12-01

    Most geothermometers are based on exchange of chemical components between two phases that are in equilibrium with one another. In cases where (a) pairs of minerals in mutual grain contact are difficult to find, (b) the sample has experienced multiple generations of crystal growth resulting in zoning along mutual grain contact, (c) has multiple populations of crystals that each preserve a point along a P-T-t path, or (d) exsolution is present, identification of equilibrium pairs of analyses is challenging. All of these problems are exacerbated where the element(s) of interest diffuse slowly, yet these systems are among the most useful because they have the advantage of being resistant to resetting by later thermal events. By relaxing the requirement that thermometry be done only on analyses across a mutual grain boundary, the problem changes from that of having a dearth of data to that of having large data sets that possibly include a significant proportion of meaningless pairs of analyses that need to be filtered out. We present a method using Microsoft Excel that allows large amounts of data to be handled in a compact form-factor, and provides a calculation and visualization tool that: (1) can be adapted for use with any thermometer involving two phases, (2) facilitates quick comparison of equilibrium and apparent temperature results from all possible equilibrium pairs in a sample, (3) identifies populations of mineral pairs that may have experienced similar P-T conditions in the case of an open system, and (4) shows whether resulting temperature estimations predominantly depend on observed compositional variability in one of the two phases. In contrast to a traditional data table where all samples and associated calculations are presented either in columns or rows, our approach is to array our calculations in a grid. Model inputs relating to one phase are arrayed vertically, and inputs related to the other phase are arrayed horizontally along the left and top

  8. Geochemistry and geothermometry of non-volcanic hot springs in West Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baioumy, Hassan; Nawawi, Mohd; Wagner, Karl; Arifin, Mohd Hariri

    2015-01-01

    . However, the possible mixing of the original hot waters with near surface cold water is evident from the clear disagreement between the silica and cation geothermometers as well as the disequilibrium with their associated host rocks as indicated from the plot of studied hot springs in the Na-K-Mg ternary diagram and saturation indices calculations. Quartz geothermometers gave equilibrium temperatures ranging from 93 °C in the Ayer Hangat hot spring to 154 °C in the Lojing hot spring. This requires 398 to 649 kJ/kg energy to heat the water suggesting an intermediate enthalpy. These results also pointed out that some of the studied hot springs have potential to generate adequate heat, which could be harnessed for energy generation upon further work to prove their viability.

  9. Major and trace-element composition and pressure-temperature evolution of rock-buffered fluids in low-grade accretionary-wedge metasediments, Central Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miron, George D.; Wagner, Thomas; Wälle, Markus; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2013-05-01

    The chemical composition of fluid inclusions in quartz crystals from Alpine fissure veins was determined by combination of microthermometry, Raman spectroscopy, and LA-ICPMS analysis. The veins are hosted in carbonate-bearing, organic-rich, low-grade metamorphic metapelites of the Bündnerschiefer of the eastern Central Alps (Switzerland). This strongly deformed tectonic unit is interpreted as a partly subducted accretionary wedge, on the basis of widespread carpholite assemblages that were later overprinted by lower greenschist facies metamorphism. Veins and their host rocks from two locations were studied to compare several indicators for the conditions during metamorphism, including illite crystallinity, graphite thermometry, stability of mineral assemblages, chlorite thermometry, fluid inclusion solute thermometry, and fluid inclusion isochores. Fluid inclusions are aqueous two-phase with 3.7-4.0 wt% equivalent NaCl at Thusis and 1.6-1.7 wt% at Schiers. Reproducible concentrations of Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, B, Al, Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, As, Sb, Cl, Br, and S could be determined for 97 fluid inclusion assemblages. Fluid and mineral geothermometry consistently indicate temperatures of 320 ± 20 °C for the host rocks at Thusis and of 250 ± 30 °C at Schiers. Combining fluid inclusion isochores with independent geothermometers results in pressure estimates of 2.8-3.8 kbar for Thusis, and of 3.3-3.4 kbar for Schiers. Pressure-temperature estimates are confirmed by pseudosection modeling. Fluid compositions and petrological modeling consistently demonstrate that chemical fluid-rock equilibrium was attained during vein formation, indicating that the fluids originated locally by metamorphic dehydration during near-isothermal decompression in a rock-buffered system.

  10. Trace and minor elements in sphalerite from metamorphosed sulphide deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockington, Julian A.; Cook, Nigel J.; Ciobanu, Cristiana L.

    2014-12-01

    Sphalerite is a common sulphide and is the dominant ore mineral in Zn-Pb sulphide deposits. Precise determination of minor and trace element concentrations in sulphides, including sphalerite, by Laser-Ablation Inductively-Coupled-Plasma Mass-Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is a potentially valuable petrogenetic tool. In this study, LA-ICP-MS is used to analyse 19 sphalerite samples from metamorphosed, sphalerite-bearing volcanic-associated and sedimentary exhalative massive sulphide deposits in Norway and Australia. The distributions of Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Ga, Se, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Hg, Tl, Pb and Bi are addressed with emphasis on how concentrations of these elements vary with metamorphic grade of the deposit and the extent of sulphide recrystallization. Results show that the concentrations of a group of trace elements which are believed to be present in sphalerite as micro- to nano-scale inclusions (Pb, Bi, and to some degree Cu and Ag) diminish with increasing metamorphic grade. This is interpreted as due to release of these elements during sphalerite recrystallization and subsequent remobilization to form discrete minerals elsewhere. The concentrations of lattice-bound elements (Mn, Fe, Cd, In and Hg) show no correlation with metamorphic grade. Primary metal sources, physico-chemical conditions during initial deposition, and element partitioning between sphalerite and co-existing sulphides are dominant in defining the concentrations of these elements and they appear to be readily re-incorporated into recrystallized sphalerite, offering potential insights into ore genesis. Given that sphalerite accommodates a variety of trace elements that can be precisely determined by contemporary microanalytical techniques, the mineral has considerable potential as a geothermometer, providing that element partitioning between sphalerite and coexisting minerals (galena, chalcopyrite etc.) can be quantified in samples for which the crystallization temperature can be independently

  11. New constraints on the Mae Ping core-complex NW-Thailand: Is the Mae-Ping an Indosinian (Triassic) relict?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palzer, Markus; Oesterle, Juergen; Kloetzli, Urs

    2013-04-01

    The Mae Ping fault zone is seen as one of the major strike-slip shear zones in SE-Asia and is trending NW-SE over 500 km across Thailand. Within this fault zone, a 150 km long and 5 km wide core-complex of ductile deformed amphibolite-facies rocks containing lenses of an older high-grade px-amph-pl paragenesis occurs. These so called Lan Sang Gneisses are named after the outcrops situated in the Lan Sang National Park. Despite several former investigations (Lacassin et al., 1997; Morley et al., 2012) some aspects concerning the time, regime and cause of exhumation remain unclear. Further on, the old relictic granulite-facies paragenesis has never been studied in detail. Older models constitute a restraining bend within a left-lateral regime as the origin of the exhumation of the Lan Sang Gneisses. New detailed structural, petrographical and geochronological investigations of the Lan Sang Gneisses were undertaken to develop different PTt-paths for different rock types within the Lan Sang Gneisses with special emphasis on the lenses of old high grade rocks which probably represent an older lower crust. We use detailed field investigations on a NE-SW profile following a river outcrop in Lan Sang National Park, zircon and monazite ages of three different rock types, structural and petrographical investigations on more than 100 thin sections and electron microprobe analyses and techniques such as geothermometers and -barometers. On the basis of our observations and measurements, we are able to reconstruct and quantify the different prograde and retrograde histories. First results now strongly question the model of a restraining bend and lead us to the conclusion that the origin of the amphibolite-facies deformation may lie in the late Triassic Indosinian orogeny. If this is the case, the importance of the whole Mae-Ping for the lateral Extrusion of SE-Asia during the Himalayan orogeny must be questioned.

  12. Implications of ground water chemistry and flow patterns for earthquake studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guangcai, W.; Zuochen, Z.; Min, W.; Cravotta, C.A.; Chenglong, L.

    2005-01-01

    Ground water can facilitate earthquake development and respond physically and chemically to tectonism. Thus, an understanding of ground water circulation in seismically active regions is important for earthquake prediction. To investigate the roles of ground water in the development and prediction of earthquakes, geological and hydrogeological monitoring was conducted in a seismogenic area in the Yanhuai Basin, China. This study used isotopic and hydrogeochemical methods to characterize ground water samples from six hot springs and two cold springs. The hydrochemical data and associated geological and geophysical data were used to identify possible relations between ground water circulation and seismically active structural features. The data for ??18O, ??D, tritium, and 14C indicate ground water from hot springs is of meteoric origin with subsurface residence times of 50 to 30,320 years. The reservoir temperature and circulation depths of the hot ground water are 57??C to 160??C and 1600 to 5000 m, respectively, as estimated by quartz and chalcedony geothermometers and the geothermal gradient. Various possible origins of noble gases dissolved in the ground water also were evaluated, indicating mantle and deep crust sources consistent with tectonically active segments. A hard intercalated stratum, where small to moderate earthquakes frequently originate, is present between a deep (10 to 20 km), high-electrical conductivity layer and the zone of active ground water circulation. The ground water anomalies are closely related to the structural peculiarity of each monitoring point. These results could have implications for ground water and seismic studies in other seismogenic areas. Copyright ?? 2005 National Ground Water Association.

  13. Scaling Tendency of Geothermal Waters Armutlu Peninsula, Northwestern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertekin, Can

    2015-04-01

    Prediction of scaling tendencies from geothermal waters is important for taking necessary precautions to prevent or control the scale formation. This study contains scaling tendency of geothermal outlets occurring through Armutlu Peninsula in Northwestern Turkey. The E-W trending region stretches into the Marmara Sea (ca. 117 km E-W by 45 km N-S) and is bounded to the north and the south by North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ). The two branches of NAFZ traversing the peninsula control not only active seismicity but also geothermal discharges of the region. Widespread basement rocks across the peninsula including metamorphic assemblage of granitic and volcanic rocks host geothermal fluids. The two distinctive geothermal discharges (Armutlu and Yalova) take place through lineaments appurtenant to the northern branch of NAFZ. Their discharge temperatures of 65 ° C (Yalova) and 70 ° C (Armutlu) are the highest of the region. According to their water chemical results, scaling tendency were computed by using WATCH for different temperature steps under the assumptions of single-stage adiabatic boiling and equilibrium degassing. To evaluate their scaling tendencies, mean geothermal reservoir temperatures were computed by using chemical geothermometers. Scaling tendencies were plotted for calcite, amorphous silica and quartz minerals for different temperature values including reservoir temperatures. Their scaling behavior reveals that oversaturation with calcite and quartz minerals are rapidly attained for the geothermal fluids (Yalova and Armutlu) at relatively lower temperatures. Regarding amorphous silica, they are completely undersaturated. Besides, Langelier Saturation Index (LSI) and Ryznar Stability Index (RSI) were calculated. Their results depict scale formation due to being positive LSI and less than 6.0 of RSI values.

  14. Water-rock interaction processes in the Triassic sandstone and the granitic basement of the Rhine Graben: Geochemical investigation of a geothermal reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquilina, L.; Pauwels, H.; Genter, A.; Fouillac, C.

    1997-10-01

    Saline fluids have been collected in the Rhine Graben over the last two decades, both from the Triassic sandstone aquifer and the granitic basement down to a depth of 3500m. Their salinities and location are compared in order to distinguish the respective influences of temperature and host-rock mineralogy in the water-rock interaction processes. The comparison shows that sulphates in the sedimentary formations were dissolved by the fluids, which also led to Br enrichment. Mica dissolution has strongly increased the Rb and Cs contents, which then provide an indication of the degree of water-rock interaction. The Sr isotopic ratios are used to compare the fluids with the granite minerals. Two relationships are revealed for the fluids in the sandstone and the granite, one related to widespread mica dissolution, which could have affected both the Buntsandstein and the granite, and the other to subsequent plagioclase dissolution, which is observed only in the granite. Computations showed that 12.5g of mica and 1.658 of plagioclase per liter of fluid have been dissolved. The nature of these two relationships suggests two different evolutions for the fluids and the individualization of the two reservoirs during the graben's history. The cation concentrations are mainly controlled by temperature, and are independent of the type of host rock. Equilibrium with the rock mainly caused Ca and K concentration variations, which has induced clear CaK and Ca-δ 18O, K-δ 18O correlations. Geothermometric computations indicate that with increasing depth, the cations, the silica and the δ 18O(SO 4) geothermometers evolve towards a value close to 230δC. This demonstrates the existence of a hot reservoir in the granite of the graben, at a depth estimated at 4.5-5 km.

  15. New geochemical and isotopic insights to evaluate the geothermal resource of the hydrothermal system of Rosario de la Frontera (Salta, northern Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiodi, A.; Tassi, F.; Báez, W.; Maffucci, R.; Invernizzi, C.; Giordano, G.; Corrado, S.; Bicocchi, G.; Vaselli, O.; Viramonte, J. G.; Pierantoni, P. P.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the chemical and isotopic composition of thermo-mineral springs from the Rosario de la Frontera hydrothermal system was used to construct a conceptual model describing the source regions the thermal fluids and the chemical-physical processes controlling the chemistry of waters and dissolved gases during their underground circulation. The main hydrothermal reservoir, hosted within the Cretaceous Pirgua Subgroup deposits, is fed by meteoric water and shows a Na-HCO3 composition produced by water-rock interactions involving sedimentary formations mostly consisting of conglomerates and sandstones, which are interbedded with alkaline volcanic rocks and shales and limestone deposits. This aquifer also receives significant contributions of crustal CO2 and He from mantle degassing, the latter being likely favored by the regional tectonic assessment that is characterized by a deep detachment (at about 10 km depth) in the basement of the Santa Bárbara thick-skinned thrust system and a thinned lithosphere. The uprising thermal fluids mix with a relatively high salinity Na-Cl dominated aquifer produced by the interaction of meteoric water with the Tertiary Anta Formation evaporite. The temperatures of the hydrothermal reservoir, estimated with water geothermometers, are up to 130 °C, which are consistent with the thickness of the hydrothermal circuit (2700-3000 m) and the relatively high local geothermal gradient (~ 40 °C/km). These results suggest that the heat stored in the fluid phase of RFHS is up to ~ 1 × 1018 J, a value significantly higher (20%) than that previously estimated assuming an average reservoir temperature of 90 °C.

  16. Springs on and in the vicinity of Mount Hood volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, Manuel

    2004-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic data are presented for nonthermal, thermal, and slightly thermal springs and drill holes and fumaroles on Mount Hood, Oregon. Temperatures of nonthermal springs on Mount Hood decrease with elevation and are similar to air temperatures from nearby weather stations. Dissolved constituents in nonthermal springs generally increase with spring temperatures and reflect weathering of volcanic rock from the action of dissolved carbon dioxide. Isotopic contents of nonthermal springs follow a local meteoric water line and generally become lighter with elevation. Some nonthermal springs at low-elevation have light values of isotopes indicating a high-elevation source for the water. Three hydrothermal systems have been identified on Mount Hood. Swim Warm Springs is interpreted to have a source water that boiled from 187?C, re-equilibrated at 96?C, and then mixed with nonthermal water to produce the range of compositions found in various springs. The Meadows Spring is interpreted to have a source water that boiled from 223?C, re-equilibrated at 94?C, and then mixed with nonthermal water to produce the range of compositions found in the spring over several years. Both systems contain water that originated as precipitation at higher elevation. The summit fumaroles have gas geothermometer temperatures generally over 300?C, indicating that they are not the steam discharge from the Swim and Meadows hydrothermal systems. Representative values of thermal discharge for the three hydrothermal systems are 10 MWt for the fumaroles, 2.2 MWt for Swim, and 1.9 MWt for the Meadows and Cascade springs.

  17. High-grade contact metamorphism in the Reykjanes geothermal system: Implications for fluid-rock interactions at mid-oceanic ridge spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Naomi; Schiffman, Peter; Zierenberg, Robert A.

    2011-08-01

    Granoblastic hornfels identified in cuttings from the Reykjanes seawater-dominated hydrothermal system contains secondary pyroxene, anorthite, and hornblendic amphibole in locally equilibrated assemblages. Granoblastic assemblages containing secondary orthopyroxene, olivine, and, locally, cordierite and spinel occur within groups of cuttings that show dominantly greenschist facies hydrothermal alteration. Granoblastic plagioclase ranges continuously in composition from An54 to An96, in contrast with relict igneous plagioclase that ranges from An42 to An80. Typical hydrothermal clinopyroxene compositions range from Wo49En3Fs48 to Wo53En30Fo17; clinopyroxene from the granoblastic grains is less calcic with an average composition of Wo48En27Fs25. The hornfels is interpreted to form during contact metamorphism in response to dike emplacement, resulting in local recrystallization of previously hydrothermally altered basalts. Temperatures of granoblastic recrystallization estimated from the 2-pyroxene geothermometer range from 927°C to 967°C. Redox estimates based on the 2-oxide oxybarometer range from log fO2 of -13.4 to -15.9. Granoblastic hornfels comprised of clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, and calcic plagioclase have been described in a number of ancient hydrothermal systems from the conductive boundary layer between the hydrothermal system and the underlying magma source, most notably in Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Hole 1256D, Ocean Drilling Program Hole 504B, and in the Troodos and Oman ophiolites. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of high-grade contact metamorphism from an active geothermal system and the first description of equilibrated amphibole-absent pyroxene hornfels facies contact metamorphism in any mid-ocean ridge (MOR) hydrothermal system. This contribution describes how these assemblages develop through metamorphic reactions and allows us to predict that higher-temperature assemblages may also be present in MOR systems.

  18. Equilibrium Iron Isotope Fractionation Factors of Minerals: Reevaluation from the Data of Nuclear Inelastic Resonant X-ray Scattering and Mossbauer Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, Dr. V. B.; Clayton, R. N.; Horita, Juske; Mineev, S. D.

    2007-01-01

    We have critically reevaluated equilibrium iron isotope fractionation factors for oxide and sulfide minerals using recently acquired data obtained by Moessbauer spectroscopy and inelastic nuclear resonant X-ray scattering (INRXS) synchrotron radiation. Good agreement was observed in the iron {beta}-factors of metallic iron ({alpha}-Fe) and hematite calculated using both Moessbauer- and INRXS-derived data, which supports the validity and reliability of the calculations. Based on this excellent agreement, we suggest the use of the present data on the iron {beta}-factors of hematite as a reference. The previous Moessbauer-derived iron {beta}-factor for magnetite has been modified significantly based on the Fe-sublattice density of states obtained from the INRXS experiments. This resolves the disagreement between naturally observed iron isotope fractionation factors for mineral pairs involving magnetite and those obtained from the calculated {beta}-factors. The correctness of iron {beta}-factor for pyrite has been corroborated by the good agreement with experimental data of sulfur isotope geothermometers of pyrite-galena and pyrite-sphalerite. A good correlation between the potential energy of the cation site, the oxidation state of iron and the iron {beta}-factor value has been established. Specifically, ferric compounds, which have a higher potential energy of iron than ferrous compounds, have higher {beta}-factors. A similar dependence of b-factors on the oxidation state and potential energy could be extended to other transition metals. Extremely low values of INRXS-derived iron {beta}-factors for troilite and Fe{sub 3}S significantly widen the range of iron b-factors for covalently bonded compounds.

  19. Petrology, geochemistry, and petrogenesis of ultramafic xenoliths from 1800-1801 Kaupulehu flow, Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    The 1800-1801 Kaupulehu alkalic flow on Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii, contains abundant xenoliths of dunite, wehrlite, and olivine-clinopyroxenite with minor gabbro, troctolite, anorthosite, and websterite. The petrography and mineral chemistry of forty-six dunite, wehrlite, and olivine-clinopyroxenite xenoliths have been studied; eight were selected for determination of trace element concentrations and isotopic ratios of separated clinopyroxenes. Temperatures of equilibrium obtained from both olivine-spinel and pyroxene geo-thermometers range from 1000 C to 1200 C for these ultramafic xenoliths. A depth of 8-25 km is suggested for the formation of these ultramafic xenoliths. The rarity of othopyroxene, presence of clinopyroxene, Fe-rich olivine and clinopyroxene compositions, and high TiO content in spinel and clinopyroxene indicate that these xenoliths have a cumulate origin and are not residues from partial melting. Sr and Nd isotopic ratios from clinopyroxene are different from those of most Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts. Rare earth element (REE) concentrations in liquid that equilibrated with xenolith clinopyroxenes have light rare earth element (LREE) enriched patterns with (Ce/Yb)n between 4 and 10. Similar olivine, spinel, and clinopyroxene compositions in xenoliths and Hawaiian basalts as well as good agreement of their Sr and Nd isotopic ratios suggests a genetic relationship between Hualalai ultramafic xenoliths and Hawaiian basalts. Some xenoliths possibly are cumulates from alkalic or tholeiitic basalts. However, Hualalai tholeiitic basalts are excluded due to their different /sup 3/He//sup 4/He values and REE patterns. The magmas that crystallized the Mg-rich (>Fo/sub 87/) dunites with high REE contents are similar in Sr and Nd isotopic values to Hualalai 1800-1801 alkalic basalts but have higher REE and Sr contents.

  20. Solving petrological problems through machine learning: the study case of tectonic discrimination using geochemical and isotopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrelli, Maurizio; Perugini, Diego

    2016-10-01

    Machine-learning methods are evaluated to study the intriguing and debated topic of discrimination among different tectonic environments using geochemical and isotopic data. Volcanic rocks characterized by a whole geochemical signature of major elements (SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3T, CaO, MgO, Na2O, K2O), selected trace elements (Sr, Ba, Rb, Zr, Nb, La, Ce, Nd, Hf, Sm, Gd, Y, Yb, Lu, Ta, Th) and isotopes (206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, 208Pb/204Pb, 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd) have been extracted from open-access and comprehensive petrological databases (i.e., PetDB and GEOROC). The obtained dataset has been analyzed using support vector machines, a set of supervised machine-learning methods, which are considered particularly powerful in classification problems. Results from the application of the machine-learning methods show that the combined use of major, trace elements and isotopes allows associating the geochemical composition of rocks to the relative tectonic setting with high classification scores (93 %, on average). The lowest scores are recorded from volcanic rocks deriving from back-arc basins (65 %). All the other tectonic settings display higher classification scores, with oceanic islands reaching values up to 99 %. Results of this study could have a significant impact in other petrological studies potentially opening new perspectives for petrologists and geochemists. Other examples of applications include the development of more robust geothermometers and geobarometers and the recognition of volcanic sources for tephra layers in tephro-chronological studies.

  1. 3-Dimensional Geologic Modeling Applied to the Structural Characterization of Geothermal Systems: Astor Pass, Nevada, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Siler, Drew L; Faulds, James E; Mayhew, Brett

    2013-04-16

    Geothermal systems in the Great Basin, USA, are controlled by a variety of fault intersection and fault interaction areas. Understanding the specific geometry of the structures most conducive to broad-scale geothermal circulation is crucial to both the mitigation of the costs of geothermal exploration (especially drilling) and to the identification of geothermal systems that have no surface expression (blind systems). 3-dimensional geologic modeling is a tool that can elucidate the specific stratigraphic intervals and structural geometries that host geothermal reservoirs. Astor Pass, NV USA lies just beyond the northern extent of the dextral Pyramid Lake fault zone near the boundary between two distinct structural domains, the Walker Lane and the Basin and Range, and exhibits characteristics of each setting. Both northwest-striking, left-stepping dextral faults of the Walker Lane and kinematically linked northerly striking normal faults associated with the Basin and Range are present. Previous studies at Astor Pass identified a blind geothermal system controlled by the intersection of west-northwest and north-northwest striking dextral-normal faults. Wells drilled into the southwestern quadrant of the fault intersection yielded 94°C fluids, with geothermometers suggesting a maximum reservoir temperature of 130°C. A 3-dimensional model was constructed based on detailed geologic maps and cross-sections, 2-dimensional seismic data, and petrologic analysis of the cuttings from three wells in order to further constrain the structural setting. The model reveals the specific geometry of the fault interaction area at a level of detail beyond what geologic maps and cross-sections can provide.

  2. Insights into Andean slope hydrology: reservoir characteristics of the thermal Pica spring system, Pampa del Tamarugal, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheihing, Konstantin W.; Moya, Claudio E.; Tröger, Uwe

    2017-03-01

    The thermal Pica springs, at ˜1,400 m above sea level (asl) in the Pampa del Tamarugal (Chile), represent a low-saline spring system at the eastern margin of the hyper-arid Atacama Desert, where groundwater resources are scarce. This study investigates the hydrogeological and geothermal characteristics of their feed reservoir, fostered by the interpretation of a 20-km east-west-heading reflection-seismic line in the transition zone from the Andean Precordillera to the Pampa del Tamarugal. Additional hydrochemical, isotope and hydrologic time-series data support the integrated analysis. One of the main factors that enabled the development of the spring-related vertical fracture system at Pica, is a disruption zone in the Mesozoic Basement caused by intrusive formations. This destabilized the younger Oligocene units under the given tectonic stress conditions; thus, the respective groundwater reservoir is made up of fractured Oligocene units of low to moderate permeability. Groundwater recharge takes place in the Precordillera at ˜3,800 m asl. From there groundwater flow covers a height difference of ˜3,000 m with a maximum circulation depth of ˜800-950 m, where the waters obtain their geothermal imprint. The maximal expected reservoir temperature, as confirmed by geothermometers, is ˜55 °C. Corrected mean residence times of spring water and groundwater plot at 1,200-4,300 years uc(BP) and yield average interstitial velocities of 6.5-22 m/year. At the same time, the hydraulic head signal, as induced by recharge events in the Precordillera, is transmitted within 20-24 months over a distance of ˜32 km towards the Andean foothills at Pica and Puquio Nunez.

  3. Geospeedometry and the metamorphic history of the Late Cretaceous Chiwaukum Schist, west central Washington state

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, D.A. . Div. of Geological and Planetary Sciences); Lasaga, A.C.; Ague, J.J.; Brandon, M.T. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-04-01

    The Chiwaukum Schist on the NE side of the Late Cretaceous Mount Stuart batholith (MSB) shows evidence of a low-P contact metamorphism, followed by a higher-P amphibolite-facies regional metamorphism (Evans and Berti, 1986). Samples were collected from this contact zone in order to quantify the time-temperature history of the schist using the geospeedometry method of Lasaga (1983). Pseudomorphic textures and garnet-aluminosilicate-plagioclase (GASP) geobarometry within some samples show an increase in pressure during crystal growth, consistent with the interpretation of Evans and Berti (1986), that regional metamorphism followed intrusion of the MSB. Geospeedometry exploits the kinetics of diffusion associated with the thermo-barometric exchange reactions in order to determine the retrograde cooling history of a metamorphic rock. This technique was applied using Fe-Mg diffusion between garnet and biotite as defined by that geothermometer. Modeling results indicate that the region was exhumed and cooled from about 22 km and 610 C to about 8 km and 525 C, in a period of about 2.5 Myr. The average exhumation rate is 5.6 km/Myr. These results are consistent with existing isotopic ages, which indicate that the northeast MSB was intruded at about 95 Ma (K/Ar hornblende and U/Pb zircon) and that the Chiwaukum Schist cooled through temperatures of about 350 C at 86 to 83 Ma (K/Ar muscovite). Rapid unroofing appears to follow shortly after the climax of crustal thickening within the Cascade metamorphic core and may be related to erosional and/or tectonic denudation within a mountainous collisional orogen.

  4. Two-feldspar geothermometry: a review and revision for slowly cooled rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Herbert; Evangelakakis, Christos; Voll, Gerhard

    1993-09-01

    Recent improvements in the experimental and thermodynamic basis of two-feldspar geothermometry allow one to recover temperatures of coexistence more reliably. Some problems, however, persist: (1) the experimental solvi by Seck (1971a) and Elkins and Grove (1990) differ from each other; (2) it is not known to what extent Na-K-Ca exchange equilibrium is approached; (3) both solvi are probably metastable with regard to Al, Si order; (4) it is difficult to judge how closely high-temperature natural feldspars compare to this situation; (5) the thermodynamic treatment neglects phase transformations; (6) the temperature dependence of the Margules parameters used to model non-ideal mixing behaviour may not be linear; (7) it is not clear which expressions should be used to describe ideal activities. With these caveats in mind we treat the problem of retrograde resetting in high-grade metamorphic rocks that were slowly cooled under essentially dry conditions. Coexisting feldspars from such rocks commonly do not plot on a common isotherm. Thus temperatures derived from such pairs using any of the proposed two-feldspar geothermometers will necessarily be in error. We suggest that the non-equilibrium compositions result from retrograde intercrystalline K-Na exchange. This exchange continues after the plagioclase and alkali feldspar have already become essentially closed systems with respect to Al-Si exchange, which is a prerequisite for (Na,K)-Ca exchange. We use a modified version of the Fuhrman and Lindsley (1988) programme to reverse the K-Na exchange and derive concordant temperatures.

  5. Geochemical signatures of metasedimentary rocks of high-pressure granulite facies and their relation with partial melting: Carvalhos Klippe, Southern Brasília Belt, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioffi, Caue Rodrigues; Campos Neto, Mario da Costa; da Rocha, Brenda Chung; Moraes, Renato; Henrique-Pinto, Renato

    2012-12-01

    High-grade metasedimentary rocks can preserve geochemical signatures of their sedimentary protolith if significant melt extraction did not occur. Retrograde reaction textures provide the main evidence for trapped melt in the rock fabrics. Carvalhos Klippe rocks in Southern Brasília Orogen, Brazil, present a typical high-pressure granulite assemblage with evidence of mica breakdown partial melting (Ky + Grt + Kfs ± Bt ± Rt). The metamorphic peak temperatures obtained by Zr-in-Rt and ternary feldspar geothermometers are between 850 °C and 900 °C. The GASP baric peak pressure obtained using grossular rich garnet core is 16 kbar. Retrograde reaction textures in which the garnet crystals are partially to totally replaced by Bt + Qtz ± Fsp intergrowths are very common in the Carvalhos Klippe rocks. These reactions are interpreted as a result of interactions between residual phases and trapped melt during the retrograde path. In the present study the geochemical signatures of three groups of Carvalhos Klippe metasedimentary rocks are analysed. Despite the high metamorphic grade these three groups show well-defined geochemical features and their REE patterns are similar to average compositions of post-Archean sedimentary rocks (PAAS, NASC). The high-pressure granulite facies Grt-Bt-Pl gneisses with immature arenite (wacke, arkose or lithic-arenite) geochemical signatures present in the Carvalhos Klippe are compared to similar rocks in amphibolite facies from the same tectonic framework (Andrelândia Nappe System). The similar geochemical signatures between Grt-Bt-Pl gneisses metamorphosed in high-pressure granulite facies and Grt-Bt-Pl-Qtz schists from the Andrelândia and Liberdade Nappes, with minimal to absent melting conditions, are suggestive of low rates of melt extraction in these high-grade rocks. The rocks with pelitic compositions most likely had higher melt extraction and even under such circumstances nevertheless tend to show REE patterns similar to

  6. Occurrence of Tourmaline in Metasedimentary Rocks of the Isua Supracrustal Belt, Greenland: Implications for Ribose Stabilization in Hadean Marine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishima, Shinpei; Ohtomo, Yoko; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Abiotic formation of RNA was important for the emergence of terrestrial life, but the acknowledged difficulties of generating and stabilizing ribose have often raised questions regarding how the first RNA might have formed. Previous researchers have proposed that borate could have stabilized ribose; however, the availability of borate on the early Earth has been the subject of intense debate. In order to examine whether borate was available on the early Earth, this study examined metasedimentary rocks from the Isua Supracrustal Belt. Garnet, biotite, and quartz comprise the major constituents of the examined rocks. Field relationships and the chemical compositions of the examined rocks suggest sedimentary origin. The present study found that garnet crystals contain a number of inclusions of tourmaline (a type of borosilicate mineral). All tourmaline crystals are Fe-rich and categorized as schorl. Both garnet and tourmaline often contain graphite inclusions and this close association of tourmaline with garnet and graphite has not been recognized previously. Garnet-biotite and graphite geothermometers suggest that the tourmaline in garnet experienced peak metamorphic conditions (~500 °C and 5 kbar). The mineralogical characteristics of the tourmaline and the whole rock composition indicate that the tourmaline formed authigenically in the sediment during diagenesis and/or early metamorphism. Clay minerals in modern sediments have the capability to adsorb and concentrate borate, which could lead to boron enrichment during diagenesis, followed by tourmaline formation under metamorphic conditions. Clay minerals, deposited on the early Archean seafloor, were the precursors of the garnet and biotite in the examined samples. The studied tourmaline crystals were most likely formed in the same way as modern tourmaline in marine sediments. Therefore, boron enrichment by clays must have been possible even during the early Archean. Thus, similar enrichment could have been

  7. Thermally induced cation redistribution in Fe-bearing oxy-dravite and potential geothermometric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosi, Ferdinando; Skogby, Henrik; Hålenius, Ulf

    2016-05-01

    Iron-bearing oxy-dravite was thermally treated in air and hydrogen atmosphere at 800 °C to study potential changes in Fe, Mg and Al ordering over the octahedrally coordinated Y and Z sites and to explore possible applications to intersite geothermometry based on tourmaline. Overall, the experimental data (structural refinement, Mössbauer, infrared and optical absorption spectroscopy) show that heating Fe-bearing tourmalines results in disordering of Fe over Y and Z balanced by ordering of Mg at Y, whereas Al does not change appreciably. The Fe disorder depends on temperature, but less on redox conditions. The degree of Fe3+-Fe2+ reduction is limited despite strongly reducing conditions, indicating that the f O2 conditions do not exclusively control the Fe oxidation state at the present experimental conditions. Untreated and treated samples have similar short- and long-range crystal structures, which are explained by stable Al-extended clusters around the O1 and O3 sites. In contrast to the stable Al clusters that preclude any temperature-dependent Mg-Al order-disorder, there occurs Mg diffusion linked to temperature-dependent exchange with Fe. Ferric iron mainly resides around O2- at O1 rather than (OH)-, but its intersite disorder induced by thermal treatment indicates that Fe redistribution is the driving force for Mg-Fe exchange and that its diffusion rates are significant at these temperatures. With increasing temperature, Fe progressively disorders over Y and Z, whereas Mg orders at Y according to the order-disorder reaction: YFe + ZMg → ZFe + YMg. The presented findings are important for interpretation of the post-crystallization history of both tourmaline and tourmaline host rocks and imply that successful tourmaline geothermometers may be developed by thermal calibration of the Mg-Fe order-disorder reaction, whereas any thermometers based on Mg-Al disorder will be insensitive and involve large uncertainties.

  8. Hidrogeochemistry of Maguarichi's thermal waters, Chihuahua, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos-Aragon, A.; Rascon-Oaxaca, E.; Espejel-Garcia, V. V.

    2012-12-01

    The surface expression of the Piedras de Lumbre Geothermal Zone comprises hot springs and steaming fumaroles, which occur in the vicinity of fractures within the rhyolites related to the Sierra Madre Occidental. Waters from hot springs and fumaroles were sampled in order to classify their temperature, hydrogeochemical behavior and origin. Maguarichi, is located in the southwestern part of the mexican state of Chihuahua, in the high Sierra Tarahumara, 350 km southwest from Chihuahua City. Previous work characterized the water as having a sulfate-chloride and sodium-chloride composition, and a temperature (calculated with geothermometers) of 130°C. In 2001, after close to ten years of geological, geochemical and geophysical work made by the Mexican Federal Electrical Commission (CFE), a small geothermal power plant was installed at a cost of US$1.3 million. This small (300 kW) binary-cycle unit supplied energy to the nearby Maguarichi village, 6 kilometers away. The unit was dismantled in 2007 when the electric grid reached the village. In 2012, after a visit by the Mexican president, a plan to develop this area as a touristic attraction is under way. In order to determine the hydrogeochemistry of the thermal waters, two sampling expeditions (October 2011 and May 2012) were performed and the preliminary results show that samples have temperatures ranging from 80°C to 98°C, with major ion and heavy element concentrations below the maximum permissible levels for human consumption waters (NOM-127-SSA1-1994). Sulfate values range from 198 to 222 mg/l, while arsenic ranges from 0.009 to 0.015mg/l. By using H and O stable isotopes we expect to determine the origin of this waters (meteoric or magmatic).

  9. Water geochemistry of the Lucero Uplift, New Mexico: geothermal investigation of low-temperature mineralized fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.; McCormick, T.; Gardner, J.N.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Vidale, R.; Charles, R.

    1983-04-01

    A detailed geochemical investigation of 27 waters of the Lucero uplift, central New Mexico, was performed to determine if the fluids originate from a high-temperature geothermal system along the Rio Grande rift. Two types of mineralized water issue from the Lucero region: a relatively saline (high-Cl, high-SO/sub 4/) type and a relatively dilute (low-Cl, high-SO/sub 4/) type. Emergence temperatures of both types range from 12 to 26/sup 0/C. Chemical data and thermodynamic and geothermometer calculations all indicate that both water types are in equilibrium with carbonate and evaporite minerals found in local Colorado Plateau rocks at surface temperatures or slightly higher. Stable isotope data do not indicate high-temperature rock-water interaction. Although evidence is seen for mixing between mineralized waters and dilute surface waters, no evidence for mixing of a deep hot fluid and surface waters is seen. Dilute mineral waters, which issue from a large area of Chinle Formation on the west side of the Lucero uplift, may be useful for low-temperature geothermal applications with appropriate design of equipment. Saline mineral waters, which leak from a zone of faulted and folded rocks along the Comanche fault zone, do not appear to have much, if any, geothermal potential due to their low-temperature, restricted distribution, and high concentration of dissolved solids. No evidence that saline mineral waters are associated with Quaternary faults of the Rio Grande rift or Quaternary basaltic volcanism within the immediate area is seen.

  10. Apatite: A new redox proxy for silicic magmas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, A. J.; Graham, C. M.; Hawkesworth, C. J.; Gillespie, M. R.; Hinton, R. W.; Bromiley, G. D.

    2014-05-01

    The oxidation states of magmas provide valuable information about the release and speciation of volatile elements during volcanic eruptions, metallogenesis, source rock compositions, open system magmatic processes, tectonic settings and potentially titanium (Ti) activity in chemical systems used for Ti-dependent geothermometers and geobarometers. In this paper we explore the use of Mn in apatite as an oxybarometer in intermediate and silicic igneous rocks. Increased Mn concentrations in apatite in granitic rocks from the zoned Criffell granitic pluton (southern Scotland) correlate with decreasing Fe2O3 (Fe3+) and Mn in the whole-rock and likely reflect increased Mn2+/Mn3+ and greater compatibility of Mn2+ relative to Mn3+ in apatite under reduced conditions. Fe3+/Fe2+ ratios in biotites have previously been used to calculate oxygen fugacities (fO2) in the outer zone granodiorites and inner zone granites where redox conditions have been shown to change from close to the magnetite-hematite buffer to close to the nickel-nickel oxide buffer respectively (Stephens et al., 1985). This trend is apparent in apatite Mn concentrations from a range of intermediate to silicic volcanic rocks that exhibit varying redox states and are shown to vary linearly and negatively with log fO2, such that logfO=-0.0022(±0.0003)Mn(ppm)-9.75(±0.46) Variations in the Mn concentration of apatites appear to be largely independent of differences in the Mn concentration of the melt. Apatite Mn concentrations may therefore provide an independent oxybarometer that is amenable to experimental calibration, with major relevance to studies on detrital mineral suites, particularly those containing a record of early Earth redox conditions, and on the climatic impact of historic volcanic eruptions.

  11. Raman spectra of carbonaceous materials in a fault zone in the Longmenshan thrust belt, China; comparisons with those of sedimentary and metamorphic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouketsu, Yui; Shimizu, Ichiko; Wang, Yu; Yao, Lu; Ma, Shengli; Shimamoto, Toshihiko

    2017-03-01

    We analyzed micro-Raman spectra of carbonaceous materials (CM) in natural and experimentally deformed fault rocks from Longmenshan fault zone that caused the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, to characterize degree of disordering of CM in a fault zone. Raman spectral parameters for 12 samples from a fault zone in Shenxigou, Sichuan, China, all show low-grade structures with no graphite. Low crystallinity and δ13C values (-24‰ to -25‰) suggest that CM in fault zone originated from host rocks (Late Triassic Xujiahe Formation). Full width at half maximum values of main spectral bands (D1 and D2), and relative intensities of two subbands (D3 and D4) of CM were variable with sample locations. However, Raman parameters of measured fault rocks fall on established trends of graphitization in sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. An empirical geothermometer gives temperatures of 160-230 °C for fault rocks in Shenxigou, and these temperatures were lower for highly sheared gouge than those for less deformed fault breccia at inner parts of the fault zone. The lower temperature and less crystallinity of CM in gouge might have been caused by the mechanical destruction of CM by severe shearing deformation, or may be due to mixing of host rocks on the footwall. CM in gouge deformed in high-velocity experiments exhibits slight changes towards graphitization characterized by reduction of D3 and D4 intensities. Thus low crystallinity of CM in natural gouge cannot be explained by our experimental results. Graphite formation during seismic fault motion is extremely local or did not occur in the study area, and the CM crystallinity from shallow to deep fault zones may be predicted as a first approximation from the graphitization trend in sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. If that case, graphite may lower the friction of shear zones at temperatures above 300 °C, deeper than the lower part of seismogenic zone.

  12. Geochemical features of the geothermal fluids from the Mapamyum non-volcanic geothermal system (Western Tibet, China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Chen, Xiaohong; Shen, Licheng; Wu, Kunyu; Huang, Mingzhi; Xiao, Qiong

    2016-06-01

    Mapamyum geothermal field (MGF) in western Tibet is one of largest geothermal areas characterized by the occurrence of hydrothermal explosions on the Tibetan Plateau. The geochemical properties of hydrothermal water in the MGF system were investigated to trace the origin of the solutes and to determine the equilibrium temperatures of the feeding reservoir. The study results show that the geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in the MGF system is mainly of the Na-HCO3 type. The chemical components of hydrothermal waters are mainly derived from the minerals in the host rocks (e.g., K-feldspar, albite, Ca-montmorillonite, and Mg-montmorillonite). The hydrothermal waters are slightly supersaturated or undersaturated with respect to aragonite, calcite, dolomite, chalcedony and quartz (saturation indices close to 0), but are highly undersaturated with respect to gypsum and anhydrite (saturation indices < 0). Mixing models and Na-K-Mg ternary diagrams show that strong mixing between cold meteoric water and deeply-seated thermal fluids occurred during the upward flowing process. δD and δ18O data confirm that the meteoric water acts as the water source of the geothermal waters. An 220 °C equilibrated reservoir temperature of hydrothermal spring waters was calculated via both the Na-K-Mg ternary diagrams and the cationic chemical geothermometers. The logpCO2 of hydrothermal waters in the MGF system ranges from - 2.59 to - 0.57 and δ13C of the total dissolved inorganic carbon ranges from - 5.53‰ to - 0.94‰, suggesting that the carrier CO2 in hydrothermal water are mainly of a magmatic or metamorphic CO2 origin.

  13. Post-Eocene volcanics of the Abazar district, Qazvin, Iran: Mineralogical and geochemical evidence for a complex magmatic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asiabanha, A.; Bardintzeff, J. M.; Kananian, A.; Rahimi, G.

    2012-02-01

    The style of volcanism of post-Eocene volcanism in the Alborz zone of northern Iran is different to that of Eocene volcanism (Karaj Formation). Indeed, the volcanic succession of the Abazar district, located in a narrow volcanic strip within the Alborz magmatic assemblage, is characterized by distinct mineralogical and chemical compositions linked to a complex magmatic evolution. The succession was produced by explosive eruptions followed by effusive eruptions. Two main volcanic events are recognized: (1) a thin rhyolitic ignimbritic sheet underlain by a thicker lithic breccia, and (2) lava flows including shoshonite, latite, and andesite that overlie the first event across a reddish soil horizon. Plagioclase in shoshonite (An 48-92) shows normal zoning, whereas plagioclase in latite and andesite (An 48-75) has a similar composition but shows reverse and oscillatory zoning. QUILF temperature calculations for shoshonites and andesites yield temperatures of 1035 °C and 1029 °C, respectively. The geothermometers proposed by Ridolfi et al. (2010) and Holland and Blundy (1994) yield temperatures of 960 °C and 944 °C for latitic lava, respectively. The samples of volcanic rock show a typical geochemical signature of the continental arc regime, but the andesites clearly differ from the shoshonites, the latites and the rhyolites. The mineralogical and chemical characteristics of these rocks are explained by the following petrogenesis: (1) intrusion of a hot, mantle-depth mafic (shoshonitic) magma, which differentiated in the magma chamber to produce a latitic and then a rhyolitic liquid; (2) rhyolitic ignimbritic eruptions from the top of the magma chamber, following by shoshonitic and then latitic extrusions; (3) magma mingling between the latitic and andesitic magmas, as indicated by the occurrence of andesite clasts within the latite; and (4) andesitic effusions. The youngest volcanic events in the Alborz zone show a close chemical relationship with continental arc

  14. Hydrothermal heat discharge in the Cascade Range, northwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Mariner, R.H.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrothermal heat discharge in the Cascade Range includes the heat discharged by thermal springs, by "slightly thermal" springs that are only a few degrees warmer than ambient temperature, and by fumaroles. Thermal-spring heat discharge is calculated on the basis of chloride-flux measurements and geothermometer temperatures and totals ~ 240 MW in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range, excluding the transient post-1980 discharge at Mount St. Helens (~80 MW as of 2004-5). Heat discharge from "slightly thermal" springs is based on the degree of geothermal warming (after correction for gravitational potential energy effects) and totals ~. 660. MW. Fumarolic heat discharge is calculated by a variety of indirect and direct methods and totals ~160 MW, excluding the transient mid-1970s discharge at Mount Baker (~80 MW) and transient post-1980 discharge at Mount St. Helens (>. 230. MW as of 2005). Other than the pronounced transients at Mount St. Helens and Mount Baker, hydrothermal heat discharge in the Cascade Range appears to be fairly steady over a ~25-year period of measurement. Of the total of ~. 1050. MW of "steady" hydrothermal heat discharge identified in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range, less than 50. MW occurs north of latitude 45??15' N (~0.1 MW per km arc length from 45??15' to 49??N). Much greater rates of hydrothermal heat discharge south of 45??15'N (~1.7 MW per km arc length from 40?? to 45??15'N) may reflect the influence of Basin and Range-style extensional tectonics (faulting) that impinges on the Cascades as far north as Mount Jefferson but is not evident farther north. ?? 2010.

  15. Influence of vegetation type and site-to-site variability on soil carbonate clumped isotope records, Andean piedmont of Central Argentina (32-34°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringham, Mallory C.; Hoke, Gregory D.; Huntington, Katharine W.; Aranibar, Julieta N.

    2016-04-01

    The clumped isotope geothermometer estimates the formation temperature (T (Δ47)) of carbonates and has great potential to enhance the extraction of environmental data from pedogenic (soil) carbonate in the geologic record. However, the influence of vegetation type and site-specific conditions on carbonate formation processes and T (Δ47) records remains poorly understood. This study examines the potential for variability in T (Δ47) data between nearby, same elevation sites with different C3/C4 biomass. Pedogenic carbonates (undercoatings and nodules) were collected from five modern soil pits in the semi-arid eastern Andean piedmont of Argentina under a summer precipitation regime. Three pits were instrumented with temperature and moisture sensors to 1 m depth, and a fourth was instrumented with additional soil CO2 and atmospheric (temperature, relative humidity, insolation, and rainfall) sensors. T (Δ47) values (mean: 30 ± 6 °C (±1SE)) are invariant with depth and are statistically indistinguishable between the four instrumented sites, though a 10 °C difference between our T (Δ47) values and those of a nearby Peters et al. (2013, EPSL) study suggests the potential for significant site-to-site variability, likely due to local soil hydrology. The results of this study suggest that deeper (≥40 cm) T (Δ47) values are consistent with carbonate formation during the early part of soil drying immediately after large mid-summer rainstorms. Carbonate formation ≤ 40 cm depth may be biased to soil drying after small, frequent precipitation events occurring throughout the spring, summer, and fall months, averaging to shallow summer T (Δ47) values and resulting in a near-isothermal T (Δ47) profile.

  16. Chemical and stable-radiogenic isotope compositions of Polatlı-Haymana thermal waters (Ankara, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akilli, Hafize; Mutlu, Halim

    2016-04-01

    Complex tectono-magmatic evolution of the Anatolian land resulted in development of numerous geothermal areas through Turkey. The Ankara region in central Anatolia is surrounded by several basins which are filled with upper Cretaceous-Tertiary sediments. Overlying Miocene volcanics and step faulting along the margins of these basins played a significant role in formation of a number of low-enthalpy thermal waters. In this study, chemical and isotopic compositions of Polatlı and Haymana geothermal waters in the Ankara region are investigated. The Polatlı-Haymana waters with a temperature range of 24 to 43 °C are represented by Ca-(Na)-HCO3 composition implying derivation from carbonate type reservoir rocks. Oxygen-hydrogen isotope values of the waters are conformable with the Global Meteoric Water Line and point to a meteoric origin. The carbon isotopic composition in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of the studied waters is between -21.8 and -1.34 permil (vs. VPDB). Marine carbonates and organic rocks are the main sources of carbon. There is a high correlation between oxygen (3.7 to 15.0 permil; VSMOW) and sulfur (-9.2 to 19.5 permil; VCDT) isotope compositions of sulfate in waters. The mixing of sulfate from dissolution of marine carbonates and terrestrial evaporite units is the chief process behind the observed sulfate isotope systematics of the samples. 87Sr/86Sr ratios of waters varying from 0.705883 to 0.707827 are consistent with those of reservoir rocks. The temperatures calculated by SO4-H2O isotope geothermometry are between 81 and 138 °C nearly doubling the estimates from chemical geothermometers.

  17. Contribution of long-term hydrothermal experiments for understanding the smectite-to-chlorite conversion in geological environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosser-Ruck, Régine; Pignatelli, Isabella; Bourdelle, Franck; Abdelmoula, Mustapha; Barres, Odile; Guillaume, Damien; Charpentier, Delphine; Rousset, Davy; Cathelineau, Michel; Michau, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    The smectite-to-chlorite conversion is investigated through long-duration experiments (up to 9 years) conducted at 300 °C. The starting products were the Wyoming bentonite MX80 (79 % smectite), metallic iron and magnetite in contact with a Na-Ca chloride solution. The predominant minerals in the run products were an iron-rich chlorite (chamosite like) and interstratified clays interpreted to be chlorite/smectite and/or corrensite/smectite, accompanied by euhedral crystals of quartz, albite and zeolite. The formation of pure corrensite was not observed in the long-duration experiments. The conversion of smectite into chlorite over time appears to take place in several steps and through several successive mechanisms: a solid-state transformation, significant dissolution of the smectite and direct precipitation from the solution, which is over-saturated with respect to chlorite, allowing the formation of a chamosite-like mineral. The reaction mechanisms are confirmed by X-ray patterns and data obtained on the experimental solutions (pH, contents of Si, Mg, Na and Ca). Because of the availability of some nutrients in the solution, total dissolution of the starting smectite does not lead to 100 % crystallization of chlorite but to a mixture of two dominant clays: chamosite and interstratified chlorite/smectite and/or corrensite/smectite poor in smectite. The role of Fe/(Fe + Mg) in the experimental medium is highlighted by chemical data obtained on newly formed clay particles alongside previously published data. The newly formed iron-rich chlorite has the same composition as that predicted by the geothermometer for diagenetic to low-grade metamorphic conditions, and the quartz + Fe-chlorite + albite experimental assemblage in the 9-year experiment is close to that fixed by water-rock equilibrium.

  18. Exploration drilling and reservoir model of the Platanares geothermal system, Honduras, Central America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goff, F.; Goff, S.J.; Kelkar, S.; Shevenell, L.; Truesdell, A.H.; Musgrave, J.; Rufenacht, H.; Flores, W.

    1991-01-01

    Results of drilling, logging, and testing of three exploration core holes, combined with results of geologic and hydrogeochemical investigations, have been used to present a reservoir model of the Platanares geothermal system, Honduras. Geothermal fluids circulate at depths ??? 1.5 km in a region of active tectonism devoid of Quaternary volcanism. Large, artesian water entries of 160 to 165??C geothermal fluid in two core holes at 625 to 644 m and 460 to 635 m depth have maximum flow rates of roughly 355 and 560 l/min, respectively, which are equivalent to power outputs of about 3.1 and 5.1 MW(thermal). Dilute, alkali-chloride reservoir fluids (TDS ??? 1200 mg/kg) are produced from fractured Miocene andesite and Cretaceous to Eocene redbeds that are hydrothermally altered. Fracture permeabillity in producing horizons is locally greater than 1500 and bulk porosity is ??? 6%. A simple, fracture-dominated, volume-impedance model assuming turbulent flow indicates that the calculated reservoir storage capacity of each flowing hole is approximately 9.7 ?? 106 l/(kg cm-2), Tritium data indicate a mean residence time of 450 yr for water in the reservoir. Multiplying the natural fluid discharge rate by the mean residence time gives an estimated water volume of the Platanares system of ??? 0.78 km3. Downward continuation of a 139??C/km "conductive" gradient at a depth of 400 m in a third core hole implies that the depth to a 225??C source reservoir (predicted from chemical geothermometers) is at least 1.5 km. Uranium-thorium disequilibrium ages on calcite veins at the surface and in the core holes indicate that the present Platanares hydrothermal system has been active for the last 0.25 m.y. ?? 1991.

  19. Evidences for disruption of a crystallizing front in a magma chamber during caldera collapse: an example from the Breccia Museo unit (Campanian Ignimbrite eruption, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulignati, P.; Marianelli, P.; Proto, M.; Sbrana, A.

    2004-05-01

    This work is focused on juvenile components and some cognate xenoliths of the Breccia Museo (BM) unit. The BM is a coarse-grained proximal unit of the caldera-forming phase of the Ignimbrite Campana (IC) eruption, southern Italy. The BM products show some peculiar characteristics that distinguish them from the other IC deposits. In particular, different types of pumice fragments constitute the juvenile fraction and their crystal contents are remarkably higher than the other IC units. Slightly porphyritic and highly porphyritic trachytic to phonolitic pumices were distinguished in each sample and investigated separately for mineralogy, matrix glass composition, melt and fluid inclusion studies. Most feldspar crystals may have formed at the margins of the magma chamber and the crystal content of both types of pumice fragments can be ascribed to variable entrainment of these crystals (from the solidification front) by the melt. Variably porphyritic (<5 to 30 vol% phenocrysts) pumice and completely crystallized nodules may represent samples of progressively crystallized magma at the chamber walls. Crystallization temperatures of magmas and xenoliths were estimated using two independent methods: a two-feldspar geothermometer and the homogenization temperatures of melt and fluid inclusions in clinopyroxene and K-feldspar. The decrease in the estimated crystallization temperatures from the melt (980-850°C) to the nodules (840-820°C) is consistent with a model of decreasing temperature at a magma chamber solidification front. The study of xenoliths revealed that exsolution of a hypersaline aqueous fluid phase occurred at the peripheral parts of the magma chamber.

  20. On the Future of Thermochemical Databases, the Development of Solution Models and the Practical Use of Computational Thermodynamics in Volcanology, Geochemistry and Petrology: Can Innovations of Modern Data Science Democratize an Oligarchy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiorso, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Computational thermodynamics (CT) has now become an essential tool of petrologic and geochemical research. CT is the basis for the construction of phase diagrams, the application of geothermometers and geobarometers, the equilibrium speciation of solutions, the construction of pseudosections, calculations of mass transfer between minerals, melts and fluids, and, it provides a means of estimating materials properties for the evaluation of constitutive relations in fluid dynamical simulations. The practical application of CT to Earth science problems requires data. Data on the thermochemical properties and the equation of state of relevant materials, and data on the relative stability and partitioning of chemical elements between phases as a function of temperature and pressure. These data must be evaluated and synthesized into a self consistent collection of theoretical models and model parameters that is colloquially known as a thermodynamic database. Quantitative outcomes derived from CT reply on the existence, maintenance and integrity of thermodynamic databases. Unfortunately, the community is reliant on too few such databases, developed by a small number of research groups, and mostly under circumstances where refinement and updates to the database lag behind or are unresponsive to need. Given the increasing level of reliance on CT calculations, what is required is a paradigm shift in the way thermodynamic databases are developed, maintained and disseminated. They must become community resources, with flexible and assessable software interfaces that permit easy modification, while at the same time maintaining theoretical integrity and fidelity to the underlying experimental observations. Advances in computational and data science give us the tools and resources to address this problem, allowing CT results to be obtained at the speed of thought, and permitting geochemical and petrological intuition to play a key role in model development and calibration.

  1. Comments on Evaluation of thermobarometers for garnet peridotites' by A. A. Finnerty and F. R. Boyd

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, J. )

    1992-02-01

    In order to evaluate the accuracy of a given combination of thermo-barometer, Finnerty and Boyd (1984) calculated the P-T conditions of two control samples of garnet lherzolite xenoliths, namely BD 2125 and PHN 1569. The importance of the samples lies in the fact that BD 2125 is diamond bearing, whereas PHN 1569 is graphite bearing. The alumina solubility in orthopyroxene (OPx) coexisting with garnet (Gt) is sensitive to both pressure and temperature changes and has thus been used widely, in combination with various geothermometers, for the thermo-barometry of garnet lherzolite xenoliths. Finnerty and Boyd (1984) concluded that the experimental calibrations of alumina solubility in OPx by Akella (1976) and Lane and Ganguly (1980) are as precise as, but probably less accurate than MC74 barometer,' where MC74 referred to the experimental calibration of alumina solubility in OPx by McGregor (1974) in the system MgSiO{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} (MAS) based on synthesis experiments from glass of appropriate compositions. This conclusion on the accuracy of the above barometers was based on their observation that the use of only MC74 placed the calculated P-T conditions of the control samples in the right field with respect to the diamond-graphite equilibrium boundary, while those of Akella (1976; AK76) and Lane and Ganguly (1980; LG80) yielded P-T conditions that did not exactly satisfy the latter constraint, but were within 2 kb of the phase boundary. While it is clear from thermodynamic considerations that an unambiguous test of the accuracy of the calibrations cannot be carried out without making corrections for the effects of the additional components which are present in the natural samples but not in the experimental charges, the calculations of Finnerty and Boyd (1984) using LG80 are grossly erroneous.

  2. Using High Pressure Thermal Vessel For Mineral Solubility Experiments in Geothermal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. L.; Huang, Y. H.; Chen, H. F.; Song, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the serious scaling problems of the production in pipeline, Qingshui geothermal power plants closed after 12 years in the past. Because the pressure reduced in the process of upwelling, the hot spring from the reservoir will scaling CaCO3 immediately by large CO2 escape. This result will cause the space of pipeline reduced. On the other hand, as the temperature decreases, the SiO2 scaled in the part of heat exchanger. This study chose the Hongchailin and Qingshui IC-21 well as objects to simulate, and the Szeleng sandstone and the Lushan slate are the target layer of drilling well, respectively. We use pure water and saturated water pressure in our experiments. Besides, the previous studies showed that temperature of reservoir in Qingshui site was not over 300℃, so we set 300℃ as the upper limit temperature. The pressure was less than 800 bar by calculated the rock density of target layer. The original rock sample were placed in first autoclave, and added pure water in the second autoclave. Then we heat the first autoclave to reach the target temperature, and make the pressure saturated over water vapor pressure. After 72 hours the saturated water were leaked into the second autoclave. As the temperature cooling down, we removed the water from second autoclave and diluted the water. Finally, the Na+, K+, Mg+2, Ca+2 ions were analyzed by ICP. We want to get the maximum solubility of calcite and amorphous silica in equilibrium with sandstone and slate, and then check whether the method of geothermometer calculated is reasonable or not by calculated the concentration of Na+, K+, Si+4 in hot spring.

  3. Implications of ground water chemistry and flow patterns for earthquake studies.

    PubMed

    Guangcai, Wang; Zuochen, Zhang; Min, Wang; Cravotta, Charles A; Chenglong, Liu

    2005-01-01

    Ground water can facilitate earthquake development and respond physically and chemically to tectonism. Thus, an understanding of ground water circulation in seismically active regions is important for earthquake prediction. To investigate the roles of ground water in the development and prediction of earthquakes, geological and hydrogeological monitoring was conducted in a seismogenic area in the Yanhuai Basin, China. This study used isotopic and hydrogeochemical methods to characterize ground water samples from six hot springs and two cold springs. The hydrochemical data and associated geological and geophysical data were used to identify possible relations between ground water circulation and seismically active structural features. The data for delta18O, deltaD, tritium, and 14C indicate ground water from hot springs is of meteoric origin with subsurface residence times of 50 to 30,320 years. The reservoir temperature and circulation depths of the hot ground water are 57 degrees C to 160 degrees C and 1600 to 5000 m, respectively, as estimated by quartz and chalcedony geothermometers and the geothermal gradient. Various possible origins of noble gases dissolved in the ground water also were evaluated, indicating mantle and deep crust sources consistent with tectonically active segments. A hard intercalated stratum, where small to moderate earthquakes frequently originate, is present between a deep (10 to 20 km), high-electrical conductivity layer and the zone of active ground water circulation. The ground water anomalies are closely related to the structural peculiarity of each monitoring point. These results could have implications for ground water and seismic studies in other seismogenic areas.

  4. Trace element distribution between clinopyroxene and garnet in gabbroic rocks of the deep crust: An ion microprobe study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzucchelli, Maurizio; Rivalenti, Giorgio; Vannucci, Riccardo; Bottazzi, Plero; Ottolini, Luisa; Hofmann, Albrecht W.; Sinigol, Silvano; Demarchin, Gabriella

    1992-06-01

    Clinopyroxenes and garnets from gabbroic rocks of the Ivrea Verbano mafic complex have been analyzed by electron microprobe for major elements and by ion microprobe for REE, Sc, Cr, Ti, V, Zr, Na, and Sr content. The samples represent two petrographic types: in the first, garnet is formed by subsolidus reaction and occurs in coronas (c-type); in the other, garnet occurs as large porphyroblasts (p-type) and may have been a phase on the liquidus. Clinopyroxenes and garnets are unzoned (with one exception) for major and trace elements, suggesting that, in general, equilibrium has been attained under granulite facies conditions as indicated by the geothermometers. Clinopyroxene, although affected in its HREE and Sc content by the coexistence with garnet, has REE patterns which vary, along with the bulk rock patterns, stratigraphically upwards from LREE-depleted to LREE-enriched. Trace element distribution coefficients ( D) between clinopyroxene and garnet, as measured in the p-type assemblages, vary systematically with major-element compositional parameters such as FeO, MgO, FeO/MgO, Al 2O 3, Na 2O, and apparent equilibration temperature. In addition, the overall pattern of REE partitioning, D(Ce) to D(Yb), is significantly steeper than those found in previously published estimates, except when these were determined on exceptionally carefully prepared mineral separates. The D values determined on c-type assemblages are comparatively erratic and appear to depend on the modal gnt/cpx ratio. This feature is tentatively attributed to failure to achieve complete equilibrium during slow cooling when the corona structures were formed. Subsolidus reequilibration between phases has generally obliterated the igneous phase chemistry of the rocks sufficiently so that the composition of the parent liquid cannot be determined from those of the constituent minerals even when these represent original "phenocrysts."

  5. A systematic evaluation of the Zr-in-rutile thermometer in ultra-high temperature (UHT) rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape, Jonas; Mezger, Klaus; Robyr, Martin

    2016-05-01

    The Zr-in-rutile geothermometer is potentially a widely applicable tool to estimate peak metamorphic temperatures in rocks from diverse geological settings. In order to evaluate its usefulness and reliability to record and preserve high temperatures in granulite facies rocks, rutile from UHT rocks was investigated to assess different mechanisms of Zr (re-)distribution following cooling from high temperature. Granulite facies paragneisses from the lowermost part of the Ivrea Zone, Italy, incorporated as thin sheets into the extensive basaltic body of the Mafic Complex were selected for this study. The results show that Zr-in-rutile thermometry, if properly applied, is well suited to identify and study UHT terranes as it preserves a record of temperatures up to 1190 °C, although the thermometer is susceptible to partial post-peak metamorphic resetting by Zr diffusion. Texturally homogeneous rutile grains preserve Zr concentrations corresponding to temperatures of prograde rutile growth. Diverse rutile textures and relationships between some rutile host grains and included or adjacent Zr-bearing phases bear testimony to varying mechanisms of partial redistribution and resetting of Zr in rutile during cooling and link Zr-in-rutile temperatures to different steps of the metamorphic evolution. Rutile grains that equilibrated their Zr concentrations at temperatures above 1070 °C (i.e. 1.1 wt% Zr) could not retain all Zr in the rutile structure during cooling and exsolved baddeleyite (ZrO2). By subsequent reaction of baddeleyite exsolution lamellae with SiO2, zircon needles formed before the system finally closed at 650-700 °C without significant net loss of Zr from the whole host rutile grain. By reintegration of zircon exsolution needles, peak metamorphic temperatures of up to 1190 °C are derived for the studied rocks, which demonstrates the suitability of this solution thermometer to record UHT conditions and also confirms the extraordinary geological setting of the

  6. Thermal maturation of carbonaceous material from Mbuji-Mayi Supergroup (Kasai, Democratic Republic of Congo).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baludikay, Blaise K.; Storme, Jean-Yves; Baudet, Daniel; François, Camille; Javaux, Emmanuelle

    2016-04-01

    The Mbuji-Mayi Supergroup is a sedimentary sequence in DRC unaffected by regional metamorphism. It consists of two distinct successions: a lower, ~500 m thick siliciclastic sequence of the BI Group and an upper, ~1000 m thick carbonate sequence with stromatolitic build-ups and black shales of the BII Group directly overlain by basaltic lavas [1]. Radiometric data suggest a Latest Meso- to Early Neoproterozoic age [2, 3, 4, and 5]. A well preserved and diversified microfossil assemblage is reported including 54 taxa belonging to 32 genera. The potential Late Mesoproterozoic-Tonian index fossil Trachyhystrichosphaera aimika, is reported for the first time in central Africa, and co-occurs with other eukaryotes and prokaryotes [6]. Thermal maturation calculated on macerate residues, using geothermometer for low-grade metamorphism [7] reveals thermal palaeoenvironments of organic matter, ranging from 180 to 279° C (average = 249 ± 37 °C). The range of thermal maturity is similar, in both microfossils and amorphous organic matter. Raman reflectance (RmcRo %), which is also an index indicative of maturity [8], ranges from 1.05 to 2.55 % (average = 2.01 ± 0.42 %). So, organic matter from Mbuji-Mayi is likely into a maturation stage corresponding to oil window. References: [1] Raucq (1957) Ann. MRAC, série 8, Sc. géol. 18, 427. [2] Cahen & Snelling (1966) Publ. C., Amsterdam. [3] Cahen et al. (1984) Clarendon Press, Oxford. [4] Delpomdor et al. (2013) Pal.3 389, 4-34. [5] François et al. (in preparation). [6] Baludikay et al. (in review) Prec. Res. [7] Kouketsu et al. (2014) Island Arc 23, 33-50. [8] Liu et al. (2013) Geochemistry, Chi. Sc. Bul. 58 (11), 1285-1298.

  7. Occurrence of Tourmaline in Metasedimentary Rocks of the Isua Supracrustal Belt, Greenland: Implications for Ribose Stabilization in Hadean Marine Sediments.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Shinpei; Ohtomo, Yoko; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Abiotic formation of RNA was important for the emergence of terrestrial life, but the acknowledged difficulties of generating and stabilizing ribose have often raised questions regarding how the first RNA might have formed. Previous researchers have proposed that borate could have stabilized ribose; however, the availability of borate on the early Earth has been the subject of intense debate. In order to examine whether borate was available on the early Earth, this study examined metasedimentary rocks from the Isua Supracrustal Belt. Garnet, biotite, and quartz comprise the major constituents of the examined rocks. Field relationships and the chemical compositions of the examined rocks suggest sedimentary origin. The present study found that garnet crystals contain a number of inclusions of tourmaline (a type of borosilicate mineral). All tourmaline crystals are Fe-rich and categorized as schorl. Both garnet and tourmaline often contain graphite inclusions and this close association of tourmaline with garnet and graphite has not been recognized previously. Garnet-biotite and graphite geothermometers suggest that the tourmaline in garnet experienced peak metamorphic conditions (~500 °C and 5 kbar). The mineralogical characteristics of the tourmaline and the whole rock composition indicate that the tourmaline formed authigenically in the sediment during diagenesis and/or early metamorphism. Clay minerals in modern sediments have the capability to adsorb and concentrate borate, which could lead to boron enrichment during diagenesis, followed by tourmaline formation under metamorphic conditions. Clay minerals, deposited on the early Archean seafloor, were the precursors of the garnet and biotite in the examined samples. The studied tourmaline crystals were most likely formed in the same way as modern tourmaline in marine sediments. Therefore, boron enrichment by clays must have been possible even during the early Archean. Thus, similar enrichment could have been

  8. Deciphering the thermal and mixing history of the Pleistocene rhyolite magma chamber at Augustine Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, P. A.; Webster, J. D.; Mandeville, C. W.; Monteleone, B.; Shimizu, N.; Goldoff, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent activity at Augustine Volcano, located in Cook Inlet, Alaska, has been dominated by intermediate composition lavas and relatively small explosions. Earlier in Augustine's history, however, a thick (~30 m) rhyolite fall was erupted ca. 25 ka, containing at least three distinct rhyolite lithologies. Numerous studies have documented evidence of magma mixing in the more recently-erupted material. Here we attempt to evaluate similar mixing events that may have affected the 25 ka rhyolitic magma prior to its eruption. Basaltic to basaltic-andesitic deposits are found interbedded with the rhyolite at Augustine, so at least two magmas were present in Augustine's plumbing system at the same or nearly the same time. Hints at interactions between two or more magmas are also evident on a smaller scale. Xenocrysts of olivine and clinopyroxene are present in the rhyolite, each with mafic melt inclusions. Additionally, two of the three rhyolitic lithologies studied contain high-aluminum amphiboles that are compositionally similar to amphiboles from mafic enclaves entrained during the 2006 eruption and thus may be xenocrystic. To further investigate possible heating by secondary melts and the history of mixing, we use the titanium-in-quartz geothermometer (TitaniQ) on chemical zonation in quartz phenocrysts. We find that most quartz has a distinct 3-zone pattern, though one lithology also contains some complex zoning patterns in phenocryst cores, perhaps suggesting a xenocrystic origin. Additionally, we examine relationships between trace elements in the silicate melt inclusions from a variety of phenocryst types to determine if there is evidence for input of additional magma of different compositions. Finally, we apply results of a preliminary investigation of the mineralogy of a high-phosphorus dacite that stratigraphically overlies the rhyolite to assess their similarity and the degree of mixing, if any, that may have led to the transition from rhyolitic to dacitic magma.

  9. A geochemical model of the Platanares geothermal system, Honduras

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janik, C.J.; Truesdell, A.H.; Goff, F.; Shevenell, L.; Stallard, M.L.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.

    1991-01-01

    Results of exploration drilling combined with results of geologic, geophysical, and hydrogeochemical investigations have been used to construct a geochemical model of the Platanares geothermal system, Honduras. Three coreholes were drilled, two of which produced fluids from fractured Miocene andesite and altered Cretaceous to Eocene conglomerate at 450 to 680 m depth. Large volume artesian flows of 160-165??C, predominantly bicarbonate water are chemically similar to, but slightly less saline than widespread boiling hot-spring waters. The chemistry of the produced fluid is dominated by equilibrium reactions in sedimentary rocks at greater depths and higher temperatures than those measured in the wells. Chemical, isotope, and gas geothermometers indicate a deep fluid temperature of 200-245??C and reflect a relatively short residence time in the fractures feeding the wells. Chloride-enthalpy relations as well as isotopic and chemical compositions of well discharges, thermal springs, and local cold waters support a conceptual model of ascending high-temperature (minimum 225??C) parent fluid that has cooled conductively to form the 160-165??C shallow (to 680 m) fluid encountered by the wells. The hot-spring waters are formed by boiling and steam loss from more or less conductively cooled parent fluid. The more dilute boiling spring waters (Cl = ???32 mg/kg) have cooled from > 225??C to about 160??C by conduction and from 160??C to 98??C by boiling. The most concentrated boiling spring waters (Cl = 37 mg/kg) have cooled from > 225??C to about 200??C by conduction and from 200??C to 98??C by boiling. Intermediate concentrations reflect mixed cooling paths. ?? 1991.

  10. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry as a potential minerals exploration tool: Case studies from Creede, CO, Jerritt Canyon, NV, Coeur d'Alene district, ID and MT, southern Alaska mesothermal veins, and mid-continent MVT's

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landis, G.P.; Hofstra, A.H.

    1991-01-01

    Recent advances in instrumentation now permit quantitative analysis of gas species from individual fluid inclusions. Fluid inclusion gas data can be applied to minerals exploration empirically to establish chemical (gas composition) signatures of the ore fluids, and conceptually through the development of genetic models of ore formation from a framework of integrated geologic, geochemical, and isotopic investigations. Case studies of fluid inclusion gas chemistry from ore deposits representing a spectrum of ore-forming processes and environments are presented to illustrate both the empirical and conceptual approaches. We consider epithermal silver-gold deposits of Creede, Colorado, Carlin-type sediment-hosted disseminated gold deposits of Jerritt Canyon, Nevada, metamorphic silver-base-metal veins of the Coeur d'Alene district, Idaho and Montana, gold-quartz veins in accreted terranes of southern Alaska, and the mid-continent base-metal sulfide deposits of Mississippi Valley-Type (MVT's). Variations in gas chemistry determine the redox state of the ore fluids, provide compositional input for gas geothermometers, characterize ore fluid chemistry (e.g., CH4CO2, H2SSO2, CO2/H2S, organic-rich fluids, gas-rich and gas-poor fluids), identify magmatic, meteoric, metamorphic, shallow and deep basin fluids in ore systems, locate upwelling plumes of magmatic-derived volatiles, zones of boiling and volatile separation, interfaces between contrasting fluids, and important zones of fluid mixing. Present techniques are immediately applicable to exploration programsas empirical studies that monitor fluid inclusion gas threshold concentration levels, presence or absence of certain gases, or changes in gas ratios. We suggest that the greater contribution of fluid inclusion gas analysis is in the integrated and comprehensive chemical dimension that gas data impart to genetic models, and in the exploration concepts based on processes and environments of ore formation derived from

  11. Hydrogeochemical characterization of the thermal springs in northeastern of Los Cabos Block, Baja California Sur, México.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Morales, Pablo; Wurl, Jobst

    2016-11-19

    The existence of hot springs in the northeastern part of Los Cabos Baja California Sur (BCS), is known from pre-Hispanic times, but their hydrochemical composition had not been previously described. Several springs are located within the watershed of Santiago, and the objective of this study was to define the hydrogeochemical composition of the thermal springs and to characterize the geothermal reservoir. A total of 16 water samples were taken in 11 geothermal manifestations under dry (June 2014) and humid (March 2015) conditions. A geothermal system of low enthalpy and low mineralization was found along the San José del Cabo Fault (FSJC), with an average salinity (TDS) of 261 mg/L and an alkaline pH (8.5-9.5). The hydrogeochemical composition corresponds to the sodium-bicarbonate type, and geothermometers (silica and Na-K) indicate temperatures ranging from 70 to 115 °C for the deep thermal reservoir in conditions of equilibrium. The thermal springs with these hydrogeochemical characteristics differ in respect to the hydrochemical composition of the springs, formally described on several sites of BCS. Br/Cl and B/Cl ratios as well as the enrichment factor (EF) indicate that rainwater with a seawater component represents the source of the thermal spring water. In the springs, a mixture between thermal water and surface water is observed, combined with a relatively deep water circulation, allowing a calcium-sodium exchange, according to the host rock geochemistry. The higher temperatures found at some hot springs are related to the main trace of the San José del Cabo Fault.

  12. Magmatic-hydrothermal fluid interaction and mineralization in alkali-syenite nodules from the Breccia Museo pyroclastic deposit, Naples, Italy: Chapter 7 in Volcanism in the Campania Plain — Vesuvius, Campi Flegrei and Ignimbrites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fedele, Luca; Tarzia, Maurizio; Belkin, Harvey E.; De Vivo, Benedetto; Lima, Annamaria; Lowenstern, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    The Breccia Museo, a pyroclastic flow that crops out in the Campi Flegrei volcanic complex (Naples, Italy), contains alkali-syenite (trachyte) nodules with enrichment in Cl and incompatible elements (e.g., U, Zr, Th, and rare-earth elements). Zircon was dated at ≈52 ka, by U-Th isotope systematics using a SHRIMP. Scanning electron microscope and electron microprobe analysis of the constituent phases have documented the mineralogical and textural evolution of the nodules of feldspar and mafic accumulations on the magma chamber margins. Detailed electron microprobe data are given for alkali and plagioclase feldspar, salite to ferrosalite clinopyroxene, pargasite, ferrogargasite, magnesio-hastingsite hornblende amphibole, biotite mica, Cl-rich scapolite, and a member (probable davyne-type) of the cancrinite group. Detailed whole rock, major and minor element data are also presented for selected nodules. A wide variety of common and uncommon accessory minerals were identified such as zircon, baddeleyite, zirconolite, pollucite, sodalite, titanite, monazite, cheralite, apatite, titanomagnetite and its alteration products, scheelite, ferberite, uraninite/thorianite, uranpyrochlore, thorite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, and galena. Scanning electron microscope analysis of opened fluid inclusions identified halite, sylvite, anhydrite, tungstates, carbonates, silicates, sulfides, and phosphates; most are probably daughter minerals. Microthermometric determinations on secondary fluid inclusions hosted by alkali feldspar define a temperature regime dominated by hypersaline aqueous fluids. Fluid-inclusion temperature data and mineral-pair geothermometers for coexisting feldspars and hornblende and plagioclase were used to construct a pressure-temperature scenario for the development and evolution of the nodules. We have compared the environment of porphyry copper formation and the petrogenetic environment constructed for the studied nodules. The suite of ore minerals observed in

  13. Reconstruction and geochemical modelling of the diagenetic history of the middle Jurassic Oseberg sandstone reservoir, Oseberg Field, Norwegian North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Girard, J.P.; Sanjuan, B.; Fouillac, C.

    1995-08-01

    A detailed multidisciplinary integrated study of the Middle Jurassic Oseberg reservoir in 13 wells of the Oseberg field, Norwegian North Sea, was carried out in order to (1) reconstruct precisely the timing, conditions and spatial variation of diagenetic transformations (2) characterize the nature and origin of the diagenetic fluids, and (3) develop a geochemical model of the observed diagenesis. The 20-60 in thick Oseberg Formation occurs at depths of 2.5 to 3.2 km, and at present temperatures ranging from 100 to 125{degrees}C. The detrital assemblage is mainly composed of quartz, K-feldspar, albrite, muscovite and lithic clay clasts, and is very homogeneous throughout the study area. The chronological sequence of diagenetic phases established from petrographic observations includes: minor siderite and pyrite, K-feldspar overgrowths, ankerite, feldspar dissolution, vermiform, kaolinite, quartz overgrowths, poikilotopic Fe-rich calcite, dickite. Diagenetic temperatures were determined from fluid inclusions in ankerite, quarts and calcite. Combination with modelled burial/thermal history permitted to constrain approximate ages and duration of major diagenetic events. Isotopic compositions of diagenetic cements indicate that meteoric water was (and still is) a major constituant of diagenetic fluids. Present formation waters are fairly similar chemically and isotopically at reservoir scale and represent mixing of three endmembers: seawater, meteoric water and primary evaporative brine. Stability diagrams and chemical geothermometers suggest that formation fluids are close to equilibrium with the host sandstone at present reservoir temperatures. Geochemical modelling of the diagenetic evolution of water-reservoir interactions was carried out using the EQ3/6 code and the Allan{sup TM}/Neptunix integrated simulator system. Results emphasize the importance of circulations of large volumes of fluid within the reservoir throughout the diagenetic history.

  14. Geothermal GIS coverage of the Great Basin, USA: Defining regional controls and favorable exploration terrains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coolbaugh, M.F.; Sawatzky, D.L.; Oppliger, G.L.; Minor, T.B.; Raines, G.L.; Shevenell, L.; Blewitt, G.; Louie, J.N.

    2003-01-01

    A geographic information system (GIS) of geothermal resources, built last year for the state of Nevada, is being expanded to cover the Great Basin, USA. Data from that GIS is being made available to industry, other researchers, and the public via a web site at the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, Reno, Nevada. That web site features a search engine, supports ArcExplorer?? for on-line map construction, and provides downloadable data layers in several formats. Though data collection continues, preliminary analysis has begun. Contour maps of geothermal temperatures, constructed using geothermometer temperatures calculated from a Great Basin geochemical database compiled by the Geo-Heat Center, reveal distinctive trends and patterns. As expected, magmatic-type and extensional-type geothermal systems have profoundly different associations, with magmatic-type systems following major tectonic boundaries, and extensional-type systems associating with regionally high heat flow, thin crust, active faulting, and high extensional strain rates. As described by earlier researchers, including Rowen and Wetlaufer (1981) and Koenig and McNitt (1983), high-temperature (> 100??C) geothermal systems appear to follow regional northeast trends, most conspicuously including the Humboldt structural zone in Nevada, the "Black Rock-Alvord Desert" trend in Oregon and Nevada, and the "Newcastle-Roosevelt" trend in Utah and Nevada. Weights-of-evidence analyses confirm a preference of high-temperature geothermal systems for young northeast-trending faults, but the distribution of geothermal systems correlates even better with high rates of crustal extension, as measured from global positioning system (GPS) stations in Nevada. A predictive map of geothermal potential based only on areas of high extensional strain rates and high heat flux does an excellent job of regionally predicting the location of most known geothermal systems in Nevada, and may prove useful in identifying blind

  15. Generation and evolution of hydrothermal fluids at Yellowstone: Insights from the Heart Lake Geyser Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowenstern, J. B.; Bergfeld, D.; Evans, William C.; Hurwitz, S.

    2012-01-01

    We sampled fumaroles and hot springs from the Heart Lake Geyser Basin (HLGB), measured water and gas discharge, and estimated heat and mass flux from this geothermal area in 2009. The combined data set reveals that diverse fluids share an origin by mixing of deep solute-rich parent water with dilute heated meteoric water, accompanied by subsequent boiling. A variety of chemical and isotopic geothermometers are consistent with a parent water that equilibrates with rocks at 205°C ± 10°C and then undergoes 21% ± 2% adiabatic boiling. Measured diffuse CO2 flux and fumarole compositions are consistent with an initial dissolved CO2 concentration of 21 ± 7 mmol upon arrival at the caldera boundary and prior to southeast flow, boiling, and discharge along the Witch Creek drainage. The calculated advective flow from the basin is 78 ± 16 L s−1 of parent thermal water, corresponding to 68 ± 14 MW, or –1% of the estimated thermal flux from Yellowstone. Helium and carbon isotopes reveal minor addition of locally derived crustal, biogenic, and meteoric gases as this fluid boils and degasses, reducing the He isotope ratio (Rc/Ra) from 2.91 to 1.09. The HLGB is one of the few thermal areas at Yellowstone that approaches a closed system, where a series of progressively boiled waters can be sampled along with related steam and noncondensable gas. At other Yellowstone locations, steam and gas are found without associated neutral Cl waters (e.g., Hot Spring Basin) or Cl-rich waters emerge without significant associated steam and gas (Upper Geyser Basin).

  16. Prefeasibility geothermal assessment of Platanares, Department of Copan, Honduras

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, S.; Goff, F.; Heiken, G.; Duffield, W.A.; Truesdell, A.H.; Laughlin, A.W.; Flores, W.

    1989-01-01

    The Platanares geothermal system is located in a region of active Quaternary tectonism in western Honduras. Although the geothermal area is partially blanketed by Miocene ignimbrites (14.5 m.y.), there are no nearby Quaternary volcanic rocks to act as a young magmatic heat source. No acid-sulfate waters, indicative of vapor-dominated conditions, exist in the area. Hot spring activity is most vigorous along a 2 km stretch of the Quebrada del Agua Caliente fault zone. Natural discharge is high (/approximately/3300 l/min), temperatures range from 35 to 100/degree/C, pH ranges from 7 to 9, and totally dissolved solids are low (/approximately/1100 mg/kg). Chemical geothermometers indicate a subsurface reservoir temperature of about 225/degree/C. Three exploration core holes (7.8 cm diameter) have been drilled to a maximum depth of 680 m and maximum temperature of 165/degree/C. Two holes produce copious amounts of water under artesian conditions (/approximately/500 l/min max; 5 bars flowing) from fractured red beds of Cretaceous to Eocene age (Valle de Angeles Group). Maximum power output is /approximately/4.5 MW (thermal) but CO/sub 2/ released during flashing formed some aragonite scale in one hole. The third core hole has an ''apparent'' conductive gradient of 139/degree/C/km at 400 m. Downward continuation of this gradient implies that the minimum depth to the geothermal resource (225/degree/C) is 1.5 to 2.0 km. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Petrology of Philippine geothermal systems and the application of alteration mineralogy to their assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Agnes G.

    1990-10-01

    Philippine geothermal systems occur in the vicinity of large Holocene calc-alkaline volcanic complexes. Wells drilled in these areas encountered multiple intrusions; the latest dikes are the subsurface manifestations of the youngest heat source. Commonly, at least two hydrothermal regimes are juxtaposed in a single area, with the latest being in equilibrium with the present temperature and chemical regime. Alteration by neutral-pH water is pervasive and abundant. A contact-metamorphic aureole also occurs near intrusives. Alteration due to acid-sulfate fluids is generally confined to permeable structures. Neutral-pH alteration is divided into four zones on the basis of key clay minerals, and two subzones are defined by calc-silicates. These are the smectite (ambient to 180°C), transition (180-230°C), illite (230-320°C) and biotite (270-340°C) zones. Subzones are defined by epidote (250-340°C) and amphibole (280-340°C). The four main zones of acid alteration are: kaolinite (ambient to 120°C), dickite ± kaolinite (120-200°C), dickite ± pyrophyllite (200-250°C), and pyrophyllite ± illite (230-320°C). Where relict high-temperature alteration reaches the surface, the area being drilled is usually the outflow zone of the present system. These hydrothermal mineral assemblages are used: (1) as geothermometers; (2) to assist in determining the depth at which the production casing will be set during drilling; (3) to estimate fluid pH and other chemical parameters; (4) to predict possible corrosion and scaling tendencies of the fluids; (5) as a measure of permeability and possible cold water influx into wells; (6) as a guide to field hydrology; and (7) to estimate roughly the thickness of the eroded overburden.

  18. Physical characteristics and quality of water from selected springs and wells in the Lincoln Point-Bird Island area, Utah Lake, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baskin, R.L.; Spangler, L.E.; Holmes, W.F.

    1994-01-01

    From February 1991 to October 1992, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Central Utah Water Conservancy District, investigated the hydrology of the Lincoln Point - Bird Island area in the southeast part of Utah Lake, Utah. The investigation included measurements of the discharge of selected springs and measurements of the physical and chemical characteristics of water from selected springs and wells in the LincolnPoint - Bird Island area. This report contains data for twenty-one distinct springs in the study area including two springs beneath the surface of Utah Lake at Bird Island. Data from this study, combined with data from previous studies, indicate that the location of springs in the Lincoln Point - Bird Island area probably is controlled by fractures that are the result of faulting. Measured discharge of springs in the Lincoln Point - Bird Island area ranged from less than 0.01 cubic foot per second to 0.84 cubic foot per second. Total discharge in the study area, including known unmeasured springs and seeps, is estimated to be about 5 cubic feet per second. Reported and measured temperatures of water from springs and wells in the Lincoln Point - Bird Island area ranged from 16.0 degrees Celsius to 36.5 degrees Celsius. Dissolved-solids con-centrations ranged from 444 milligrams per liter to 7,932 milligrams per liter, and pH ranged from 6.3 to 8.1. Physical and chemical characteristics of spring and well water from the west side of Lincoln Point were virtually identical to the physical and chemical characteristics of water from the submerged Bird Island springs, indicating a similar source for the water. Water chemistry, isotope analyses, and geothermometer calculations indicate deep circulation of water discharging from the springs and indicate that the source of recharge for the springs at Lincoln Point and Bird Island does not appear to be localized in the LincolnPoint - Bird Island area.

  19. Zirconium in rutile speedometry: New constraints on lower crustal cooling rates and residence temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, Terrence; Shimizu, Nobumichi; Bowring, Samuel A.; Schoene, Blair; Mahan, Kevin H.

    2012-02-01

    The incorporation of zirconium into the mineral rutile (TiO2) has been both empirically and experimentally calibrated as a measure of rutile crystallization temperatures (Watson et al., 2006). This temperature sensitive system has been employed as a geothermometer with applications to a number of different geologic settings and rock types. Experimentally measured kinetics for Zr diffusion in rutile (Cherniak et al., 2007) indicate that Zr can be lost to temperature dependent diffusion, warranting further investigation of the geologic significance of calculated temperatures. Coupling diffusion kinetics with numerical solutions to the diffusion equation provides a means to forward model the time and temperature dependency of the system. Modeled results indicate a strong dependency of Zr concentration in rutile on both: 1) initial cooling rate following high-temperature metamorphism/crystallization and 2) temperature and duration of long-term geologic residence. Zr concentrations measured in rutile from lower crustal xenoliths that resided at 25-45 km depths for 2000 My, reveal Zr concentrations in the approximate grain center that are consistent with temperatures measured by independent thermometers. Forward models for Zr diffusion show that preserving a Zr record of these initial temperatures in the center of a rutile crystal with a 50 μm radius requires rapid cooling (> 300 °C/Ma) from magmatic/metamorphic temperatures followed by a long-term residence (2000 My) at temperatures < 550 °C. This provides a new way to determine cooling rates between 900 and 500 °C and for constraining the temperature of the deep crust. Modeled temperature-time paths using combined rutile Zr and U-Pb geochronological data permit evaluation/refinement of published diffusion kinetics. Properly quantified, this system can be utilized as a high temperature geo-speedometer: a powerful tool for evaluating heat transfer rates at these very high and often unconstrained temperatures.

  20. Water-rock interaction processes in the Triassic sandstone and the granitic basement of the Rhine Graben: Geochemical investigation of a geothermal reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Aquilina, L.; Pauwels, H.; Genter, A.; Fouillac, C.

    1997-10-01

    Saline fluids have been collected in the Rhine Graben over the last two decades, both from the Triassic sandstone aquifer and the granitic basement down to a depth of 3500m. Their salinities and location are compared in order to distinguish the respective influences of temperature and host-rock mineralogy in the water-rock interaction processes. The comparison shows that sulphates in the sedimentary formations were dissolved by the fluids, which also led to Br enrichment. Mica dissolution has strongly increased the Rb and Cs contents, which then provide an indication of the degree of water-rock interaction. The Sr isotopic ratios are used to compare the fluids with the granite minerals. Two relationships are revealed for the fluids in the sandstone and the granite, one related to widespread mica dissolution, which could have affected both the Buntsandstein and the granite, and the other to subsequent plagioclase dissolution, which is observed only in the granite. Computations showed that 12.5g of mica and 1.65g of plagioclase per liter of fluid have been dissolved. The nature of these two relationships suggests two different evolutions for the fluids and the individualization of the two reservoirs during the graben`s history. The cation concentrations are mainly controlled by temperature, and are independent of the type of host rock. Equilibrium with the rock mainly caused Ca and K concentration variations, which has induced clear Ca-K and Ca-{delta}{sup 18}O, K-{delta}{sup 18}O correlations. Geothermometric computations indicate that with increasing depth, the cations, the silica and the {delta}{sup 18}O (SO{sub 4}) geothermometers evolve towards a value close to 230{degrees}C. This demonstrates the existence of a hot reservoir in the granite of the graben, at a depth estimated at 4.5-5 km. 59 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Favorable Geochemistry from Springs and Wells in COlorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno Nevada Originator: United States Geological Survey (USGS) Originator: Colorado Geological Survey Publication Date: 2012 Title: Favorable Geochemistry Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: This layer contains favorable geochemistry for high-temperature geothermal systems, as interpreted by Richard "Rick" Zehner. The data is compiled from the data obtained from the USGS. The original data set combines 15,622 samples collected in the State of Colorado from several sources including 1) the original Geotherm geochemical database, 2) USGS NWIS (National Water Information System), 3) Colorado Geological Survey geothermal sample data, and 4) original samples collected by R. Zehner at various sites during the 2011 field season. These samples are also available in a separate shapefile FlintWaterSamples.shp. Data from all samples were reportedly collected using standard water sampling protocols (filtering through 0.45 micron filter, etc.) Sample information was standardized to ppm (micrograms/liter) in spreadsheet columns. Commonly-used cation and silica geothermometer temperature estimates are included. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4515595.841032 m Left: 149699.513964 m Right: 757959.309388 m Bottom: 4104156.435530 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Contact Person: Richard “Rick” Zehner Address: 3740 Barron Way City: Reno State: NV Postal Code: 89511 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 775-737-7806 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich

  2. Evaluation of low-temperature geothermal potential in Cache Valley, Utah. Report of investigation No. 174

    SciTech Connect

    de Vries, J.L.

    1982-11-01

    Field work consisted of locating 90 wells and springs throughout the study area, collecting water samples for later laboratory analyses, and field measurement of pH, temperature, bicarbonate alkalinity, and electrical conductivity. Na/sup +/, K/sup +/, Ca/sup +2/, Mg/sup +2/, SiO/sub 2/, Fe, SO/sub 4//sup -2/, Cl/sup -/, F/sup -/, and total dissolved solids were determined in the laboratory. Temperature profiles were measured in 12 additional, unused walls. Thermal gradients calculated from the profiles were approximately the same as the average for the Basin and Range province, about 35/sup 0/C/km. One well produced a gradient of 297/sup 0/C/km, most probably as a result of a near-surface occurrence of warm water. Possible warm water reservoir temperatures were calculated using both the silica and the Na-K-Ca geothermometers, with the results averaging about 50 to 100/sup 0/C. If mixing calculations were applied, taking into account the temperatures and silica contents of both warm springs or wells and the cold groundwater, reservoir temperatures up to about 200/sup 0/C were indicated. Considering measured surface water temperatures, calculated reservoir temperatures, thermal gradients, and the local geology, most of the Cache Valley, Utah area is unsuited for geothermal development. However, the areas of North Logan, Benson, and Trenton were found to have anomalously warm groundwater in comparison to the background temperature of 13.0/sup 0/C for the study area. The warm water has potential for isolated energy development but is not warm enough for major commercial development.

  3. Hydrogeochemistry and environmental impact of geothermal waters from Yangyi of Tibet, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qinghai; Wang, Yanxin; Liu, Wei

    2009-02-01

    The Yangyi geothermal field, located 72 km northwest to Lhasa City, capital of Tibet, has a high reservoir temperature up to at least 207.2 °C. The geothermal waters from both geothermal wells and hot springs belong to the HCO 3 (+CO 3)-Na type. Factor analysis of all the chemical constituents shows that they can be divided into two factors: F 1 factor receives the contributions of SO 42-, Cl -, SiO 2, As, B, Na +, K +, and Li +; whereas F 2 factor is explained by HCO 3-, F -, CO 32-, Ca 2+, and Sr 2+. The F 1 factor can be regarded as an indicator of the reservoir temperature distribution at Yangyi, but its variable correlation with the results of different geothermometers (Na-K, quartz and K-Mg) does not allow one to draw further inferences. Different from F 1, the F 2 factor is an indicator of a group of hydrogeochemical processes resulting from the CO 2 pressure decrease in geothermal water during its ascent from the deep underground, including transformation of HCO 3- to CO 32-, precipitation of Ca 2+ and Sr 2+, and release of F - from some fluoride-bearing minerals of reservoir rocks. The plot of enthalpy vs. chloride, prepared on the basis of Na-K equilibrium temperatures, suggests that a parent geothermal liquid (PGL) with Cl - concentration of 185 mg/L (that of sample YYT-8) and enthalpy of 1020 J/g (corresponding to a temperature of 236-237 °C, i.e., somewhat higher than that of sample YYT-6) is present in the geothermal reservoir of the Yangyi area, below both the Qialagai valley and the Bujiemu valley, although the samples less affected by mixing and cooling (YYT-6 and YYT-7) come from the second site. The discharge of geothermal waters with high contents of toxic elements such as B, As and F into the Luolang River, the only drinking water source for local residents, has caused slight pollution of the river water. Great care should therefore be taken in the geothermal water resource management at Yangyi.

  4. Spinel + quartz assemblage in granulites from the Achankovil Shear Zone, southern India: Implications for ultrahigh-temperature metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Hisako; Tsunogae, Toshiaki; Santosh, M.

    2009-09-01

    We report the finding of equilibrium spinel + quartz assemblage enclosed within garnet in garnet-orthopyroxene-cordierite granulites from Pakkandom within the Achankovil Shear Zone, a region which is considered as the trace of an accretionary suture in recent tectonic models on southern India. The spinel + quartz bearing granulites are composed of poikiloblastic garnet and subidioblastic orthopyroxene in the matrix of quartz, plagioclase, biotite, cordierite, and Fe-Ti oxides. Garnet contains numerous inclusions of sillimanite and biotite as well as spinel and quartz. The spinel in direct contact with quartz has moderate XMg (= Mg/(Fe 2+ + Mg) = 0.44-0.47), and is Zn and Fe 3+ poor ( XZn = Zn/(Fe 2+ + Mg + Zn) = 0.027-0.036, Fe 3+/(Fe 2+ + Fe 3+) = 0.12-0.17). Spinel is also present in the matrix surrounded by magnetite, but the matrix spinel contains more Zn( XZn = 0.067-0.072) and does not show any contact relationship with quartz. Such Zn- and Fe 3+-poor spinel in direct contact with quartz has been regarded as a diagnostic evidence of ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) metamorphism. The high-temperature stability of the spinel + quartz is also supported by the results of geothermobarometric calculation of garnet-orthopyroxene assemblages that provides robust evidence for peak UHT metamorphism at 920-980 °C and 8-10 kbar, which was further confirmed by Al-in-Opx and magnetite-ilmenite geothermometers (900-950 °C and ˜1000 °C, respectively). The peak UHT event was followed by decompression down to 4.0-4.2 kbar and 640-670 °C toward the stability of cordierite along a clockwise P-T path. Similar spinel + quartz assemblage enclosed in poikiloblastic garnet has also been reported from the Palghat-Cauvery Shear Zone system, the trace of a major suture zone within the Gondwana amalgam with evidence for prograde high-pressure ( P up to 20 kbar) metamorphism followed by UHT event. The fine-grained spinel + quartz may thus indicate decompression from higher pressure

  5. Morphological ripening of fluid inclusions and coupled zone-refining in quartz crystals revealed by cathodoluminescence imaging: Implications for CL-petrography, fluid inclusion analysis and trace-element geothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrecht, Glenn; Diamond, Larryn William

    2014-09-01

    not associated with dark-CL zone-refined patches. This new understanding has implications for the interpretation of solids within fluid inclusions (e.g., Ti- and Al-minerals) and for the elemental analysis of hydrothermal and metamorphic quartz and its fluid inclusions by microbeam methods such as LA-ICPMS and SIMS. As Ti is a common trace element in quartz, its sequestration by fluid inclusions and its depletion in zone-refined patches impacts on applications of the Ti-in-quartz geothermometer.

  6. Geochemical assessment of hydrocarbon migration phenomena: Case studies from the south-western margin of the Dead Sea Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokol, Ella; Kozmenko, Olga; Smirnov, Sergey; Sokol, Ivan; Novikova, Sofya; Tomilenko, Anatoliy; Kokh, Svetlana; Ryazanova, Tatyana; Reutsky, Vadim; Bul'bak, Taras; Vapnik, Yevgeny; Deyak, Michail

    2014-10-01

    Calcite veins with fluid and solid bitumen inclusions have been discovered in the south-western shoulder of the Dead Sea rift within the Masada-Zohar block, where hydrocarbons exist in small commercial gas fields and non-commercial fields of heavy and light oils. The gas-liquid inclusions in calcite are dominated either by methane or CO2, and aqueous inclusions sometimes bear minor dissolved hydrocarbons. The enclosed flake-like solid bitumen matter is a residue of degraded oil, which may be interpreted as “dead carbon”. About 2/3 of this matter is soot-like amorphous carbon and 1/3 consists of n-C8sbnd C18 carboxylic acids and traces of n-alkanes, light dicarboxylic acids, and higher molecular weight (>C20) branched and/or cyclic carboxylic acids. Both bitumen and the host calcites show genetic relationship with mature Maastrichtian chalky source rocks (MCSRs) evident in isotopic compositions (δ13C, δ34S, and δ18O) and in REE + Y patterns. The bitumen precursor may have been heavy sulfur-rich oil which was generated during the burial compaction of the MCSR strata within the subsided blocks of the Dead Sea graben. The δ18O and δ13C values and REE + Y signatures in calcites indicate mixing of deep buried fluids equilibrated with post-mature sediments and meteoric waters. The temperatures of fluid generation according to Mg-Li-geothermometer data range from 55 °С to 90 °С corresponding to the 2.5-4.0 km depths, and largely overlap with the oil window range (60-90 °С) in the Dead Sea rift (Hunt, 1996; Gvirtzman and Stanislavsky, 2000; Buryakovsky et al., 2005). The bitumen-rich vein calcites originated in the course of Late Cenozoic rifting and related deformation, when tectonic stress triggers damaged small hydrocarbon reservoirs in the area, produced pathways, and caused hydrocarbon-bearing fluids to rise to the subsurface; the fluids filled open fractures and crystallized to calcite with entrapped bitumen. The reported results are in good agreement

  7. Chemical indicators of subsurface temperature applied to hot spring waters of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1970-01-01

    Under favorable conditions the chemistry of hot springs may give reliable indications of subsurface temperatures and circulation patterns. These chemical indicators can be classified by the type of process involved: {A table is presented}. All these indicators have certain limitations. The silica geothermometer gives results independent of the local mineral suite and gas partial pressures, but may be affected by dilution. Alkali ratios are strongly affected by the local mineral suite and the formation of complex ions. Carbonate-chloride ratios are strongly affected by subsurface PCO2. The relative concentration of volatiles can be very misleading in high-pressure liquid systems. In Yellowstone National Park most thermal waters issue from hot, shallow aquifers with pressures in excess of hydrostatic by 2 to 6 bars and with large flows (the flow of hot spring water from the Park is greater than 4000 liters per second). These conditions should be ideal for the use of chemical indicators to estimate aquifer temperatures. In five drill holes aquifer temperatures were within 2??C of that predicted from the silica content of nearby hot springs; the temperature level off at a lower value than predicted in only one hole, and in four other holes drilling was terminated before the predicted aquifer temperature was reached. The temperature-Na/K ratio relationship does not follow any published experimental or empirical curve for water-feldspar or water-clay reactions. We suspect that ion exchange reactions involving zeolites in the Yellowstone rocks result in higher Na/K ratios at given temperatures than result from feldspar or clay reactions. Comparison of SiO2 and Cl/(HCO3 + CO3) suggest that because of higher subsurface PCO2 in Upper Geyser Basin a given Cl/(HCO3 + CO3) ratio there means a higher temperature than in Lower Geyser Basin. No correlation was found in Yellowstone Park between the subsurface regions of highest temperature and the relative concentration of volatile

  8. Taking the Temperature of Supervolcanoes: Thermal Evolution of the Miocene Yellowstone Hotspot.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, B. P.; Cathey, H.

    2006-12-01

    The rhyolitic tuffs and lavas of the Miocene Bruneau-Jarbidge eruptive center of the Yellowstone hotspot are characterized by high eruptive temperatures (900-1000°C), large eruptive volumes (100-1000 km3) and a frequency of major eruptions ~3 times greater than that of the Quaternary Yellowstone Plateau. Many of the ten units of the Cougar Point Tuff (12.7-10.5 Ma) are compositionally heterogeneous, displaying multiple discrete populations of pyroxene and glass that suggest simultaneous eruption from a contemporaneous ensemble of discrete magma volumes. Polymodal suites of glass and pyroxene appear in some tuffs that are indistinguishable from those in preceding eruptive units, suggesting the possibility of magma storage at high temperatures for intervals of 105-106 yrs. The Ti-in-quartz thermometer has been employed to extract thermal histories from quartz phenocrysts in order to test this hypothesis and investigate the replication of identical magma compositions and temperatures from one eruption to the next. Several grains per unit were selected for core-to-rim analyses by EPMA, yielding a total range of titanium concentrations from 85-265 ppm and temperatures of 820-995°C (activity TiO2 = 0.5). Quartz temperatures in individual ashflow units agree well with those determined from other geothermometers, notably those obtained from pyroxene equilibria, and reproduce previously observed patterns of variation within and among units. Most crystals (~70%) sized ~100-1000 μm display internal temperature variations of 1-20°C; exceptions include one crystal (200 μm) with core temperatures of 840-870°C, interior temperatures of 940-980°C and a rim temperature of 960°C. Regardless of Ti content, individual quartz grains less than 200 μm in diameter are nearly homogeneous in Ti (ΔTi < 15 ppm). Remaining crystals display internal variations of ~20-60°C at temperatures > 900°C. Temperatures consistent with crystal growth near magma solidii are extremely rare

  9. CARBONACEOUS MATTER PRECURSORS AND METAMORPHIC CONDITIONS IN THERMALLY PROCESSED CHONDRITES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirico, E.; Montagnac, G.; Rouzaud, J.; Bonal, L.; Bourot-Denise, M.; Duber, S.; Reynard, B.

    2009-12-01

    Unravelling the origin of carbonaceous matter in pristine chondrites requires the understanding of the effect of post-accretion processes. In chondrites of petrologic type 3, thermal metamorphism modified to various extents the composition and structure of carbonaceous matter. Interestingly, this process controls the degree of structural order of carbonaceous matter, and clues on the thermal history of the parent body may be recovered from the physico-chemical study of carbonaceous matter. Following this framework, geothermometers based on Raman spectrometry of carbonaceous matter and covering a wide range of temperatures (100-650 °C) have been developed over recent years, both on terrestrial rocks and chondrites. While Raman data have been largely interpreted in terms of temperature, they are also the fingerprint of certain metamorphic conditions, especially in the low temperature range relevant to poorly ordered carbonaceous matter. This study investigates the Raman spectra of two series of chondritic carbonaceous matter and coal samples formed from different precursors and under different metamorphic conditions. The Raman spectra of Polyaromatic Carbonaceous Matter (PCM) from 42 chondrites and 27 coal samples, measured with visible (514 nm) and ultra-violet (244 nm) excitation wavelengths, are analyzed. The Raman spectra of low rank coals and chondrites of petrologic types 1 and 2, which contain the more disordered PCM, reflect the distinct carbon structures of their precursors. The 514 nm Raman spectra of high rank coals and chondrites of petrologic type 3 exhibit continuous and systematic spectral differences reflecting different carbon structures present during the metamorphism event. They result from differences in the chemical structures of the precursors concerning for instance the reticulation of polyaromatic units or an abundance of ether functional groups, or possibly from a lack of carbonization processes to efficiently expel oxygen heteroatoms, due

  10. The Pan-African high-K calc-alkaline peraluminous Elat granite from southern Israel: geology, geochemistry and petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyal, M.; Litvinovsky, B. A.; Katzir, Y.; Zanvilevich, A. N.

    2004-10-01

    Calc-alkaline leucocratic granites that were emplaced at the late post-collision stage of the Pan-African orogeny are abundant in the northern half of the Arabian-Nubian Shield. Commonly, they are referred to as the Younger Granite II suite. In southern Israel such rocks are known as Elat granite. Studies of these rocks enable to recognize two types of granites: coarse-grained, massive Elat granite (EG), and fine- to medium-grained Shahmon gneissic granite (SGG). Both granite types are high-K and peraluminous ( ASI ranges from 1.03 to 1.16). They are similar in modal composition, mineral and whole-rock chemistry. Within the EG, a noticeable distinction in whole-rock chemistry and mineral composition is observed between rocks making up different plutons. In particular, the granite of Wadi Shelomo, as compared to the Rehavam pluton, is enriched in SiO 2, FeO∗, K 2O, Ba, Zr, Th, LREE and impoverished in MgO, Na 2O, Sr, and HREE. The Eu/Eu∗ values in the granite are low, up to 0.44. Mass-balance calculations suggest that chemical and mineralogical variations were caused by fractionation of ˜16 wt.% plagioclase from the parental Rehavam granite magma at temperature of 760-800 °C (muscovite-biotite geothermometer). The Rb-Sr isochrons yielded a date of 623 ± 24 Ma for the EG, although high value of age-error does not allow to constrain time of emplacement properly. The Rb-Sr date for SGG is 640 ± 9 Ma; however, it is likely that this date points to the time of metamorphism. A survey of the literature shows that peraluminous, high-K granites, similar to the EG, are abundant among the Younger Granite II plutons in the Sinai Peninsula and Eastern Desert, Egypt. They were emplaced at the end of the batholithic (late post-collision) stage. The most appropriate model for the generation of the peraluminous granitic magma is partial melting of metapelite and metagreywacke.

  11. Igneous phenocrystic origin of K-feldspar megacrysts in granitic rocks from the Sierra Nevada batholith

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Sisson, T.W.

    2008-01-01

    Study of four K-feldspar megacrystic granitic plutons and related dikes in the Sierra Nevada composite batholith indicates that the megacrysts are phenocrysts that grew in contact with granitic melt. Growth to megacrystic sizes was due to repeated replenishment of the magma bodies by fresh granitic melt that maintained temperatures above the solidus for extended time periods and that provided components necessary for K-feldspar growth. These intrusions cooled 89-83 Ma, are the youngest in the range, and represent the culminating magmatic phase of the Sierra Nevada batholith. They are the granodiorite of Topaz Lake, the Cathedral Peak Granodiorite, the Mono Creek Granite, the Whitney Granodiorite, the Johnson Granite Porphyry, and the Golden Bear Dike. Megacrysts in these igneous bodies attain 4-10 cm in length. All have sawtooth oscillatory zoning marked by varying concentration of BaO ranging generally from 3.5 to 0.5 wt%. Some of the more pronounced zones begin with resorption and channeling of the underlying zone. Layers of mineral inclusions, principally plagioclase, but also biotite, quartz, hornblende, titanite, and accessory minerals, are parallel to the BaO-delineated zones, are sorted by size along the boundaries, and have their long axes preferentially aligned parallel to the boundaries. These features indicate that the K-feldspar megacrysts grew while surrounded by melt, allowing the inclusion minerals to periodically attach themselves to the faces of the growing crystals. The temperature of growth of titanite included within the K-feldspar megacrysts is estimated by use of a Zr-in-titanite geothermometer. Megacryst-hosted titanite grains all yield temperatures typical of felsic magmas, mainly 735-760 ??C. Titanite grains in the granodiorite hosts marginal to the megacrysts range to lower growth temperatures, in some instances into the subsolidus. The limited range and igneous values of growth temperatures for megacryst-hosted titanite grains support the

  12. Mantle Evolution Associated With the Rio Grande Rift: Geochemistry of Upper Mantle Xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kil, Y.; Wendlandt, R. F.

    2001-12-01

    Upper mantle xenoliths from three locales associated with the southern Rio Grande Rift have been investigated to determine lithosphere composition, chemical processes, and pre-eruptive pressure and temperature conditions. Sample locations, Potrillo and Elephant Butte within the rift axis and Adam's Diggings, located 50 km west of the rift axis, were specifically selected to evaluate spatial differences in mantle evolution. Xenolith suites from all locations included spinel lherzolites, harzburgites, and pyroxenites hosted in basanite and alkali basalt. Thin section, electron microprobe, and LA-ICPMS analyses were used to obtain detailed textural information, mineral compositions, and whole rock geochemistry. Xenoliths are classified as protogranular, porphyroclastic, or equigranular texture types. Equigranular texture types occur in the off-axis site. Recrystallized olivine grains are larger in xenoliths from sites along the rift axis than from the rift shoulder. Geothermal gradients based on mineral compositions, utilizing two-pyroxene and olivine-spinel geothermometers and the Ca-in olivine geothermobarometer, indicate temperatures off the rift axis at Adam's Diggings that are 75o-100oC cooler for a given pressure than under the rift axis. Whole rock chemical data and mineral modes support an early depletion event affecting xenoliths from all locations: Al2O3, CaO, Na2O, TiO2, V, Sc, Yb, and clinopyroxene content decrease with increasing MgO. The average (La/Yb)n of clinopyroxenes are 12.37, 0.95, and 1.14 for Adam's Diggings, Elephant Butte, and Potrillo xenoliths, respectively. This LREE enrichment and the occurrence of phlogopite that is interpreted to be primary in xenoliths from the off-axis site indicate both cryptic and modal metasomatic events. Both LREE-enriched and -depleted lherzolites are present at rift axis sites. Differences in recrystallized olivine size, xenolith textures, composition, and pre-eruptive pressure-temperature conditions between rift

  13. Calcium self-diffusion in natural diopside single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimanov, Alexandre; Jaoul, Olivier; Sautter, Violaine

    1996-11-01

    plastic deformation and cation exchanges. For instance, Ca self-diffusion controls CaMg exchanges between pyroxenes. Then, our results could be helpful to better understand the closure behaviour (Dodson, 1973, 1976) of the Clinopyroxene-Orthopyroxene geothermometer.

  14. Temporal Evolution of Volcanic and Plutonic Magmas Related to Porphyry Copper Ores Based on Zircon Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilles, J. H.; Lee, R. G.; Wooden, J. L.; Koleszar, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Porphyry Cu (Mo-Au) and epithermal Au-Ag ores are globally associated with shallow hydrous, strongly oxidized, and sulfur-rich arc intrusions. In many localities, long-lived magmatism includes evolution from early andesitic volcanic (v) and plutonic (p) rocks to later dacitic or rhyolitic compositions dominated by plutons. We compare zircon compositions from three igneous suites with different time spans: Yerington, USA (1 m.y., p>v), El Salvador, Chile (4 m.y., p>v), and Yanacocha, Peru (6 m.y., v>p). At Yerington granite dikes and ores formed in one event, at ES in 2 to 3 events spanning 3 m.y., and at Yanacocha in 6 events spanning 5 m.y. At both ES and Yanacocha, high-Al amphiboles likely crystallized at high temperature in the mid-crust and attest to deep magmas that periodically recharged the shallow chambers. At Yanacocha, these amphiboles contain anhydrite inclusions that require magmas were sulfur-rich and strongly oxidized (~NNO+2). The Ti-in-zircon geothermometer provides estimates of 920º to 620º C for zircon crystallization, and records both core to rim cooling and locally high temperature rim overgrowths. Ore-related silicic porphyries yield near-solidus crystallization temperatures of 750-650°C consistent with low zircon saturation temperatures. The latter zircons have large positive Ce/Ce* and small negative Eu/Eu*≥0.4 anomalies attesting to strongly oxidized conditions (Ballard et al., 2001), which we propose result from crystallization and SO2 loss to the magmatic-hydrothermal ore fluid (Dilles et al., 2015). The Hf, REE, Y, U, and Th contents of zircons are diverse in the magma suites, and Th/U vs Yb/Gd plots suggest a dominant role of crystal fractionation with lesser roles for both crustal contamination and mixing with high temperature deep-sourced mafic magma. Ce/Sm vs Yb/Gd plots suggest that magma REE contents at <900°C are dominated by early crystallization of hornblende and apatite, and late crystallization (~<780°C) of titanite

  15. Oxygen isotope variations in granulite-grade iron formations: constraints on oxygen diffusion and retrograde isotopic exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Z. D.; O'Neil, J. R.; Essene, E. J.

    1988-04-01

    The oxygen isotope ratios of various minerals were measured in a granulite-grade iron formation in the Wind River Range, Wyoming. Estimates of temperature and pressure for the terrane using well calibrated geothermometers and geobarometers are 730±50° C and 5.5±0.5 kbar. The mineral constraints on fluid compositions in the iron formation during retrogression require either very CO2-rich fluids or no fluid at all. In the iron formation, isotopic temperature estimates from quartz-magnetite fractionations are controlled by the proximity to the enclosing granitic gneiss, and range from 500° C ( Δ qz - mt=10.0‰) within 2 3 meters of the orthogneiss contact to 600° C ( Δ qz - mt=8.0‰) farther from the contact. Temperature estimates from other isotopic thermometers are in good agreement with those derived from the quartz-magnetite fractionations. During prograde metamorphism, the isotopic composition of the iron formation was lowered by the infiltration of an external fluid. Equilibrium was achieved over tens of meters. Closed-system retrograde exchange is consistent with the nearly constant whole-rock δ 18Owr value of 8.0±0.6‰. The greater Δ qz-mt values in the iron formation near the orthogneiss contact are most likely due to a lower oxygen blocking temperature related to greater exchange-ability of deformed minerals at the contact. Cooling rates required to preserve the quartz-magnetite fractionations in the central portion of the iron formation are unreasonably high (˜800° C/Ma). In order to preserve the 600° C isotopic temperature, the diffusion coefficient D (for α-quartz) should be two orders of magnitude lower than the experimentally determined value of 2.5×10-16 cm2/s at 833 K. There are no values for the activation energy ( Q) and pre-exponential diffusion coefficient ( D 0), consistent with the experimentally determined values, that will result in reasonable cooling rates for the Wind River iron formation. The discrepancy between the

  16. Applicability of the RSCM geothermometry approach in a complex tectono-metamorphic context: The Jebilet massif case study (Variscan Belt, Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delchini, Sylvain; Lahfid, Abdeltif; Plunder, Alexis; Michard, André

    2016-07-01

    triggered by overprinted metamorphism. Therefore, the RSCM method is suitable to investigate the peak temperature within a polymetamorphic context. We also note the accuracy of the RSCM geothermometer to delimit the metamorphic area due to hidden intrusions. Concerning the specific case of the Jebilet massif, we emphasize the occurrence of the mineral assemblage Garnet-Staurolite likely developed during the regional metamorphism, which compares with the evolution of the Rehamna massif farther in the north.

  17. The temperature of primary melts and mantle sources of komatiites, OIBs, MORBs and LIPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    There is general agreement that the convecting mantle, although mostly peridotitic in composition, is compositionally and thermally heterogeneous on different spatial scales. The amount, sizes, temperatures and compositions of these heterogeneities significantly affect mantle dynamics because they may diverge greatly from dominant peridotites in their density and fusibility. Differences in potential temperature and composition of mantle domains affect magma production and cannot be easily distinguished from each other. This has led to radically different interpretations of the melting anomalies that produce ocean-island basalts, large igneous provinces and komatiites: most scientists believe that they originate as hot, deep-sourced mantle plumes; but a small though influential group (e.g. Anderson 2005, Foulger, 2010) propose that they derive from high proportions of easily fusible recycled or delaminated crust, or in the case of komatiites contain large amount of H2O (e.g. Grove & Parman, 2004). The way to resolve this ambiguity is an independent estimation of temperature and composition of mantle sources of various types of magma. In this paper I report application of newly developed olivine-spinel-melt geothermometers based on partition of Al, Cr, Sc and Y for different primitive lavas from mid-ocean ridges, ocean-island basalts, large igneous provinces and komatiites. The results suggest significant variations of crystallization temperature for the same Fo of high magnesium olivines of different types of mantle-derived magmas: from the lowest (down to 1220 degree C) for MORB to the highest (up to over 1500 degree C) for komatiites and Siberian meimechites. These results match predictions from Fe-Mg olivine-melt equilibrium and confirm the relatively low temperature of the mantle source of MORB and higher temperatures in the mantle plumes that produce the OIB of Iceland, Hawaii, Gorgona, Archean komatiites and several LIPs (e.g Siberian and NAMP). The

  18. Geochemistry of thermal fluids in NW Honduras: New perspectives for exploitation of geothermal areas in the southern Sula graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaccioni, Bruno; Franco, Tassi; Alberto, Renzulli; Orlando, Vaselli; Marco, Menichetti; Salvatore, Inguaggiato

    2014-06-01

    The results of a geochemical survey on thermal waters and, for the first time for this site, gas discharges in five geothermal sites (Azacualpa "La Cueva", Río Ulua, Río Gualcarque, El Olivar and Laguna de Agua Caliente) in NW Honduras are here presented and discussed. El Olivar and Laguna de Agua Caliente, in the southern part of the Sula graben are very close to a Quaternary basaltic field, whereas Azacualpa "La Cueva", Río Ulua and Río Gualcarque, located to the southwest of the Yojoa Lake, direcly emerge from the Cretaceous limestone deposits. The measured temperatures range between 37.5 and 104.8 °C. "Mature", alkaline, Na-SO4 thermal waters discharge from Azacualpa "La Cueva", while those from El Olivar and Laguna de Agua Caliente are "immature" and show a Na-HCO3 composition. Chemical equilibria of waters and gases from the Azacualpa "La Cueva" thermal springs indicate temperatures ranging from 150 to 200 °C. Conversely, gas discharges from El Olivar and Laguna de Agua Caliente have attained a partial chemical equilibrium in the liquid phase at slightly higher temperatures (200-250 °C), although gas-gas faster reactions involving CO seem to be adjusted in an isothermally separated vapor phase. Unlike Azacualpa, SiO2 geothermometer at El Olivar and Laguna de Agua Caliente indicates equilibrium temperatures for the liquid phase much lower than those calculated for the gas phase (≤ 120 °C). We conclude that thermal waters from the Azacualpa area likely represent the direct emergence of a water dominated reservoir having temperatures ≤ 150-200 °C. By contrast, at El Olivar and Laguna de Agua Caliente hot springs are supplied by a boiling shallow aquifer fed by a vapor phase rising from a steam-dominated zone. The above geochemical model is consistent with a geothermal reservoir hosted within the Cretaceous carbonate sequences of the Yojoa Group in the whole investigated sites. The reservoir extensively crops out in the Azacualpa area whereas the

  19. Tectonic Evolution of the Cretaceous Sava-Klepa Massif, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, based on field observations and microstructural analysis - Towards a new geodynamic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmeyer, Tobias; Peternell, Mark; Prelević, Dejan; Köpping, Jonas

    2016-04-01

    the deformation history, i.e. the switch from compressive to extensional, rift forming, regime. REFERENCES Ferrill, D.A. et al. (2004). Calcite twin morphology: a low-temperature deformation geothermometer. Journal of Structural Geology 26: 1521-1529. Peternell, M. et al. (2010). Evaluating quartz crystallographic preferred orientations and the role of deformation partitioning using EBSD and fabric analyser techniques. Journal of Structural Geology 32: 803-817. Robertson, A.H.F. & Karamata, S. (1994). The role of subduction-accretion processes in the tectonic evolution of the Mesozoic Tethys in Serbia. Tectonophysics, 234:73-94. Schmid, S.M. et al. (2008). The Alpine-Carpathian-Dinaridic orogenic system: correlation and evolution of tectonic units. Swiss Journal of Geoscience, 101:139-183.

  20. The origin of a zoned ignimbrite: insights into the Campanian Ignimbrite magma chamber (Campi Flegrei, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forni, Francesca; Bachmann, Olivier; Mollo, Silvio; De Astis, Gianfilippo

    2016-04-01

    The Campanian Ignimbrite (CI; Campi Flegrei, Italy), dated at 39 ka, is a widespread pyroclastic sequence emplaced during a cataclysmic caldera-forming eruption fed by trachytic to phonolitic magmas. The CI pyroclastic sequence is famous for its remarkable geochemical gradients,attributed to the presence of a vertically zoned magma chamber. Combining bulk-rock data with detailed phenocrysts and matrix glass analyses from well characterized stratigraphic units, we investigate the relatioships between such chemical zoning and the crystallinity variations observed along the CI pyroclastic sequence. Using geothermometers and hygrometers specifically calibrated for alkaline magmas, we reconstruct the reservoir storage conditions, revealing the presence of gradients in temperature and magma water content. In particular, we observe an increase in crystallinity and temperature and a decrease in magma evolution and water content from the bottom to the top of the sequence. We interpret these features as the result of protracted fractional crystallization leading to the formation of a cumulate crystal mush at the base of the eruptible reservoir, from which highly evolved, crystal-poor, water-rich and relatively cold melts were separated. The extracted melts, forming a buoyant, easily eruptible cap at the top of the magma chamber, fed the initial phases of the eruption, until caldera collapse and eruption of the deeper, more crystalline part of the system. This late-erupted, crystal-rich material, represents remobilized portions of the cumulate crystal mush, rejuvenated after mafic recharge. Our interpretation is supported by: 1) the bulk-rock positive Eu anomalies and the high Ba and Sr contents observed in the crystal-rich units, implying feldspar accumulation; 2) the positive Eu anomalies in the matrix glass of the crystal-rich units, testifying to the presence of liquid derived from partial melting of low temperature mineral phases within the crystal mush (feldspars and

  1. A reconnaissance geochemical study of La Primavera geothermal area, Jalisco, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahood, G.A.; Truesdell, A.H.; Templos, M.L.A.

    1983-01-01

    The Sierra La Primavera, a late Pleistocene rhyolitic caldera complex in Jalisco, Me??xico, contains fumaroles and large-discharge 65??C hot springs that are associated with faults related to caldera collapse and to later magma insurgence. The nearly-neutral, sodium bicarbonate, hot springs occur at low elevations at the margins of the complex, whereas the water-rich fumaroles are high and central. The Comisio??n Federal de Electricidad de Me??xico (CFE) has recently drilled two deep holes at the center of the Sierra (PR-1 and Pr-2) and one deep hole at the western margin. Temperatures as high as 285??C were encountered at 1160 m in PR-1, which produced fluids with 820 to 865 mg/kg chloride after flashing to one atmosphere. Nearby, PR-2 encountered temperatures to 307??C at 2000 m and yielded fluids with chloride contents fluctuating between 1100 and 1560 mg/kg after flashing. Neither of the high-temperature wells produced steam in commercial quantities. The well at the western margin of the Sierra produced fluids similar to those from the hot springs. The temperature reached a maximum of 100??C near the surface and decreased to 80??C at 2000 m. Various geothermometers (quartz conductive, Na/K, Na-K-Ca, ??18O(SO4-H2O) and D/H (steam-water) all yield temperatures of 170 ?? 20??C when applied to the hot spring waters, suggesting that these spring waters flow from a large shallow reservoir at this temperature. Because the hot springs are much less saline than the fluids recovered in PR-1 and PR-2, the mixed fluid in the shallow reservoir can contain no more than 10-20% deep fluid. This requires that most of the heat is transferred by steam. There is probably a thin vapor-dominated zone in the central part of the Sierra, through which steam and gases are transferred to the overlying shallow reservoir. Fluids from this reservoir cool from ???170??C to 65??C by conduction during the 5-7 km of lateral flow to the hot springs. ?? 1983.

  2. Insight into the upper mantle beneath an active extensional zone: the spinel-peridotite xenoliths from San Quintin (Baja California, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanes, N.; Mercier, J.-C. C.

    1988-11-01

    Many of the peridotite xenoliths included in the San Quintin (Baja California Norte, Mexico) quaternary alkali-basalts have undergone a very intense shear deformation (deviatoric stresses up to 0.1 GPa), hence a first-order classification into coarse-grained lherzolites and deformed peridotites (porphyroclastic and mosaic textures) has been applied. All of these rocks show a very limited compositional variability in the Mg/(Mg+Fe2+) ratios (olivine: 0.894 0.905±0.005; orthopyroxene: 0.899 0.9105±0.005), and the observed trends in the Cr/(Cr+Al) spinel ratios (from 0.1 to 0.6) can be interpreted as resulting from gradual partial melting followed by homogenization of the bulk phases. A later and less accentuated melting event is also evidenced by internal core-rim variations in the spinels from a few samples and ascribed to the thermal effect of the host lava. Simultaneous application of exchange geothermometers which give the latest equilibrium temperatures (i.e. at the time of eruption: Fe-Mg exchange between olivine and spinel) and of pyroxene transfer thermobarometers yields two distinct behaviours: the porphyroclastic and mosaic peridotites record an event of deformation and recrystallization and were equilibrated at 800° 950° C and P≲-1 GPa at the time of eruption, but have also retained evidence of higher temperatures (1000° 1050° C) and pressures; the coarsegrained lherzolites, which yield conditions of 1000° 1050° C and P<-2 GPa at the time of eruption, were originally equilibrated at higher temperature and pressure conditions and were subsequently re-equilibrated to 1000° 1050° C by solid-state bulk diffusion, without exsolution. Clinopyroxenite veins provide evidence of magma injection into the host-peridotite, before deformation but after the major melting event. To explain the simultaneous sampling of both groups of peridotites by the San Quintin alkali basalts, we suggest that the ascending magma reached the critical limit for hydraulic

  3. Seismic valve as the main mechanism for sedimentary fluid entrapment within extensional basin: example of the Lodève Permian Basin (Hérault, South of France).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, D.; Lopez, M.; Chauvet, A.; Imbert, P.; Sauvage, A. C.; Martine, B.; Thomas, M.

    2014-12-01

    During syn-sedimentary burial in basin, interstitial fluids initially trapped within the sedimentary pile are easily moving under overpressure gradient. Indeed, they have a significant role on deformation during basin evolution, particularly on fault reactivation. The Lodève Permian Basin (Hérault, France) is an exhumed half graben with exceptional outcrop conditions providing access to barite-sulfides mineralized systems and hydrocarbon trapped into rollover faults of the basin. Architectural studies shows a cyclic infilling of fault zone and associated S0-parallel veins according to three main fluid events during dextral/normal faulting. Contrasting fluid entrapment conditions are deduced from textural analysis, fluid inclusion microthermometry and sulfide isotope geothermometer: (i) the first stage is characterized by an implosion breccia cemented by silicifications and barite during abrupt pressure drop within fault zone; (ii) the second stage consists in succession of barite ribbons precipitated under overpressure fluctuations, derived from fault-valve action, with reactivation planes formed by sulphide-rich micro-shearing structures showing normal movement; and (iii) the third stage is associated to the formation of dextral strike-slip pull-apart infilling by large barite crystals and contemporary hydrocarbons under suprahydrostatic pressure values. Microthermometry, sulfide and strontium isotopic compositions of the barite-sulfides veins indicate that all stages were formed by mixing between deep basinal fluids at 230°C, derived from cinerite dewatering, and formation water from overlying sedimentary cover channelized trough fault planes. We conclude to a polyphase history of fluid trapping during Permian synrift formation of the basin: (i) a first event, associated with the dextral strike-slip motion on faults, leads to a first sealing of the fault zone; (ii) periodic reactivations of fault planes and bedding-controlled shearing form the main mineralized

  4. Apatite: a new redox proxy for silicic magmas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Andrew; Graham, Colin; Hawkesworth, Chris; Gillespie, Martin; Bromiley, Geoff; Hinton, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The oxidation states of magmas provide valuable information about the release and speciation of volatile elements during volcanic eruptions, metallogenesis, source rock compositions, open system magmatic processes, tectonic settings and potentially titanium (Ti) activity in chemical systems used for Ti-dependent geothermometers and geobarometers. In this presentation we explore the use of Mn in apatite as an oxybarometer in intermediate and silicic igneous rocks. Increased Mn concentrations in apatite in granitic rocks from the zoned Criffell granitic pluton (southern Scotland) correlate with decreasing Fe2O3 (Fe3+) and Mn in the whole-rock and likely reflect increased Mn2+/Mn3+and greater compatibility of Mn2+ relative to Mn3+ in apatite under reduced conditions. Fe3+/Fe2+ ratios in biotites have previously been used to calculate oxygen fugacities (fO2) in the outer zone granodiorites and inner zone granites where redox conditions have been shown to change from close to the magnetite-hematite buffer to close to the nickel-nickel oxide buffer respectively[1]. This trend is apparent in apatite Mn concentrations from a range of intermediate to silicic volcanic rocks that exhibit varying redox states and are shown to vary linearly and negatively with log fO2, such that logfO2=-0.0022(±0.0003)Mn(ppm)-9.75(±0.46) Variations in the Mn concentration of apatites appear to be largely independent of differences in the Mn concentration of the melt. Apatite Mn concentrations may therefore provide an independent oxybarometer that is amenable to experimental calibration, with major relevance to studies on detrital mineral suites, particularly those containing a record of early Earth redox conditions, and on the climatic impact of historic volcanic eruptions[2]. [1] Stephens, W. E., Whitley, J. E., Thirlwall, M. F. and Halliday, A. N. (1985) The Criffell zoned pluton: correlated behaviour of rare earth element abundances with isotopic systems. Contributions to Mineralogy and

  5. Hydrogeochemistry of geothermal waters in the Magumsan and Bugok area, southern part of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Yun, S.; So, C.; Chae, G.; Koh, Y.

    2001-12-01

    South Korea. The application of silica and various cation geothermometers as well as multi-component geochemical modeling suggests the temperatures of a deep thermal reservoir of up to about 120 to 130 degree in centigrade. Accordingly, a potential geothermal anomaly (40-85 mW/square meters) is expected to exist beneath the Magumsan and Bugok area.

  6. Gas geothermometry for typical and atypical hydrothermal gases: A case study of Mount Mageik and Trident Volcanoes, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taryn, Lopez; Tassi, Franco; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Chiodini, Giovanni; Fiebig, Jens; Rizzo, Andrea; Caliro, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    of 220-260°C for the Mount Mageik gases, whereas the Trident's gas composition corresponds with unreliable temperatures. Considering the presence of what appears to be consolidated organic material (e.g. coal?) in the substrate beneath Trident, we test a new geothermometer based on redox reactions between CO2 and graphite, in an effort to constrain hydrothermal reservoir temperatures at Trident volcano. Preliminary results and interpretations are presented, and suggestions for improvement are welcome.

  7. Application of the TitaniQ Geothermobarometer to metamorphic rocks of the Santa Rosa Mylonite Zone in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canada, T.; Behr, W. M.; Stockli, L.; Stockli, D. F.

    2014-12-01

    In order to study the behavior of the crust in different regions and over time, it remains important to be able to quantify the pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions of metamorphism in exhumed rocks. The recently developed technique, known as "Titanium-in-quartz" (TitaniQ) shows particular promise as both a geothermometer and geobarometer, because it focuses on one of the most abundant minerals on Earth—quartz—and it can thus be applied to a very wide range of rock types. Despite the potential of TitaniQ, two aspects of the technique remain poorly understood. Firstly, the two most recently developed calibrations predict Ti concentrations that differ by close to a factor of three at the same temperature. Secondly, the effect of deformation on Ti re-equilibration at temperatures where static diffusion is sluggish is debated. We address these aspects of the TitaniQ thermobarometer by applying the technique to a suite of rocks in the Santa Rosa mylonite zone of eastern California that were deformed and metamorphosed at known P-T conditions. The Santa Rosa mylonite zone is a 100-km-long Cretaceous ductile thrust system that juxtaposes deformed metasedimentary rocks (P = 3-5 kbar, T = 600-800 C) known as the Palm Canyon Series in the hanging wall against mylonitized granodiorites (P 4-5 kbar, T = 400-550) of the Peninsular Ranges Batholith in the footwall. The Palm Canyon series includes quartzites, amphibolites and garnet-mica schists, most of which contain titanite as the primary Ti-bearing phase. We measure Ti concentrations in several samples from this unit to see whether they are consistent among different rock types and whether calibrations of the TitaniQ thermobarometer match the P-T conditions constrained by mineral assemblages. The granodiorites show a distinct strain gradient developed over approximately one kilometer as they are incorporated into the Santa Rosa mylonite zone; they range from weakly deformed at the shear zone margin to ultramylonitic

  8. A new LA-ICP-MS method for Ti-in-Quartz: Implications and application to HP rutile-quartz veins from the Czech Erzgebirge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Uribe, A. M.; Mertz-Kraus, R.; Zack, T.; Feineman, M. D.; Woods, G.

    2014-12-01

    Experimental determination of the pressure and temperature controls on Ti solubility in quartz provide a calibration of the Ti-in-quartz (TitaniQ) geothermometer applicable to geologic conditions up to ~20 kbar (Thomas et al. (2010) Contrib Mineral Petrol 160, 743-759). One of the greatest limitations to analyzing Ti in metamorphic quartz by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is the lack of a suitable matrix-matched reference material. Typically LA-ICP-MS analyses of Ti in minerals use 49Ti as a normalizing mass because of an isobaric interference from 48Ca, which is present in most well characterized reference glasses, on 48Ti. The benefit of using a matrix-matched reference material to analyze Ti in quartz is the opportunity to use 48Ti (73.8 % abundance) as a normalizing mass, which results in an order of magnitude increase in signal strength compared to the less abundant isotope 49Ti (5.5 % abundance), thereby increasing the analytical precision. Here we characterize Ti-bearing SiO2 glasses from Heraeus Quarzglas and natural quartz grains from the Bishop Tuff by cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and LA-ICP-MS, in order to determine their viability as reference materials for Ti in quartz. Titanium contents in low-CL rims in the Bishop Tuff quartz grains were determined to be homogenous by EPMA (41 ± 2 µg/g Ti, 2σ), and are a potential natural reference material. We present a new method for determining 48Ti concentrations in quartz by LA-ICP-MS at the 1 µg/g level, relevant to quartz in HP-LT terranes. We suggest that natural quartz such as the homogeneous low-CL rims of the Bishop Tuff quartz are more suitable than NIST reference glasses as an in-house reference material for low Ti concentrations because matrix effects are limited and Ca isobaric interferences are avoided, thus allowing for the use of 48Ti as a normalizing mass. Titanium concentration from 33 analyses of low

  9. A reconnaissance geochemical study of La Primavera geothermal area, Jalisco, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahood, Gail A.; Truesdell, Alfred H.; Templos M, Luis A.

    1983-05-01

    The Sierra La Primavera, a late Pleistocene rhyolitic caldera complex in Jalisco, México, contains fumaroles and large-discharge 65°C hot springs that are associated with faults related to caldera collapse and to later magma insurgence. The nearly-neutral, sodium bicarbonate, hot springs occur at low elevations at the margins of the complex, whereas the water-rich fumaroles are high and central. The Comisión Federal de Electricidad de México (CFE) has recently drilled two deep holes at the center of the Sierra (PR-1 and Pr-2) and one deep hole at the western margin. Temperatures as high as 285°C were encountered at 1160 m in PR-1, which produced fluids with 820 to 865 mg/kg chloride after flashing to one atmosphere. Nearby, PR-2 encountered temperatures to 307°C at 2000 m and yielded fluids with chloride contents fluctuating between 1100 and 1560 mg/kg after flashing. Neither of the high-temperature wells produced steam in commercial quantities. The well at the western margin of the Sierra produced fluids similar to those from the hot springs. The temperature reached a maximum of 100°C near the surface and decreased to 80°C at 2000 m. Various geothermometers (quartz conductive, Na/K, Na-K-Ca, δ 18O(SO 4-H 2O) and D/H (steam-water) all yield temperatures of 170 ± 20° C when applied to the hot spring waters, suggesting that these spring waters flow from a large shallow reservoir at this temperature. Because the hot springs are much less saline than the fluids recovered in PR-1 and PR-2, the mixed fluid in the shallow reservoir can contain no more than 10-20% deep fluid. This requires that most of the heat is transferred by steam. There is probably a thin vapor-dominated zone in the central part of the Sierra, through which steam and gases are transferred to the overlying shallow reservoir. Fluids from this reservoir cool from ˜170°C to 65°C by conduction during the 5-7 km of lateral flow to the hot springs.

  10. Oxygen isotope variations in granulite-grade iron formations: constraints on oxygen diffusion and retrograde isotopic exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, Z.D.; O'Neil, J.R.; Essene, E.J.

    1988-01-01

    The oxygen isotope ratios of various minerals were measured in a granulite-grade iron formation in the Wind River Range, Wyoming. Estimates of temperature and pressure for the terrane using well calibrated geothermometers and geobarometers are 730??50?? C and 5.5??0.5 kbar. The mineral constraints on fluid compositions in the iron formation during retrogression require either very CO2-rich fluids or no fluid at all. In the iron formation, isotopic temperature estimates from quartz-magnetite fractionations are controlled by the proximity to the enclosing granitic gneiss, and range from 500?? C (??qz - mt=10.0???) within 2-3 meters of the orthogneiss contact to 600?? C (??qz - mt=8.0???) farther from the contact. Temperature estimates from other isotopic thermometers are in good agreement with those derived from the quartz-magnetite fractionations. During prograde metamorphism, the isotopic composition of the iron formation was lowered by the infiltration of an external fluid. Equilibrium was achieved over tens of meters. Closed-system retrograde exchange is consistent with the nearly constant whole-rock ??18Owr value of 8.0??0.6???. The greater ??qz-mt values in the iron formation near the orthogneiss contact are most likely due to a lower oxygen blocking temperature related to greater exchange-ability of deformed minerals at the contact. Cooling rates required to preserve the quartz-magnetite fractionations in the central portion of the iron formation are unreasonably high (???800?? C/Ma). In order to preserve the 600?? C isotopic temperature, the diffusion coefficient D (for ??-quartz) should be two orders of magnitude lower than the experimentally determined value of 2.5??10-16 cm2/s at 833 K. There are no values for the activation energy (Q) and pre-exponential diffusion coefficient (D0), consistent with the experimentally determined values, that will result in reasonable cooling rates for the Wind River iron formation. The discrepancy between the diffusion

  11. Trace element composition and cathodoluminescence of kyanite and its petrogenetic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Axel; van den Kerkhof, Alfons M.; Selbekk, Rune S.; Broekmans, Maarten A. T. M.

    2016-09-01

    Kyanite crystals from fourteen localities worldwide were analysed for their abundances of the trace elements Na, Mg, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, and Fe and cathodoluminescence (CL) properties. Based on protolith type, metamorphic setting, and distinctive trace element fingerprints, a genetic classification of kyanite-bearing rocks is suggested: (A) Al-rich metasediments which commonly contain coarse-grained quartz-kyanite segregations; (B) metamorphosed granitic rocks, specifically granulites; (C) metamorphosed argillic alteration zones hosted originally in felsic igneous rocks; (D) metamorphosed argillic alteration zones hosted originally in mafic igneous rocks; and (E) metamorphosed mafic to ultramafic rocks, specifically eclogites. Vanadium and Cr concentrations reflect both protolith and host rock compositions and therefore may provide a geochemical fingerprint for the nature of the protolith. The incorporation of Fe into kyanite is largely controlled by oxygen fugacity during kyanite formation, and therefore, in most cases, its concentration cannot be related to that of the protolith. From our results, Ti concentration appears to be related to metamorphic grade, particularly formation temperature. If proven by further studies, Ti-in-kyanite may provide a useful geothermometer. Correlation of trace element abundances with CL spectra confirms that common red CL, which is composed of the spectral bands centred at 1.69 eV (734 nm), 1.75 eV (708 nm), and 1.80 eV (689 nm), is related to Cr3+ defects. CL spectra of most kyanites show in addition a low-intensity blue emission centred at 2.56 eV (485 nm). Correlation of the intensity of the blue emission with Ti suggests that it is related to or sensitized by Ti4+ or Ti3+ defects. Kyanites with >3200 µgg-1 Fe show generally no detectable CL due to the CL-quenching effect of Fe2+. Our findings provide new criteria in the exploration for and quality assessment of new kyanite deposits. The Ti content, one of the critical

  12. Mineral thermobarometry and fluid inclusion studies on the Closepet granite, Eastern Dharwar Craton, south India: Implications to emplacement and evolution of late-stage fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sourabh; Panigrahi, Mruganka K.; Jayananda, M.

    2014-09-01

    The Closepet granite (CPG), a spectacularly exposed magmatic body along with other intrusive bodies (to the east of it) typifies the late Archean granitic activity in the Eastern Dharwar Craton (EDC), south India. In the present study, the P-T-fO2 conditions of emplacement and physico-chemical environment of the associated magmatic-hydrothermal regime of CPG have been retrieved on the basis of mineral chemical and fluid inclusion studies. Amphibole-plagioclase Ti-in-amphibole and Ti-in-biotite geothermometers along with Al-in-amphibole geobarometer have been used to reconstruct the emplacement temperature and pressure conditions in the majority of the pluton. Estimated temperatures of emplacement of CPG vary from to 740 to 540 °C. A variation of pressure from 4.8 to 4.1 kilo bars corresponding to this temperature range was obtained. While there is a faint south to north negative gradient in temperature, the variation of pressure does not seem to follow this trend and indicates more or less same crustal level of emplacement for the body between Ramanagaram-Kalyandurga segment extending for about 230 km. Mineral chemistry of biotite indicates crystallization of CPG under high oxygen fugacity conditions (mostly above QFM buffer) with no clear spatial variation in the fugacity of halogen species in the late-stage magmatic fluid. It may be surmised that barring the southernmost part of CPG, there is no perceptible variation in the physicochemical environment of emplacement. Fluid Inclusion studies in the granitic matrix quartz and pegmatite/vein quartz show dominance of H2O and H2O-CO2 fluids respectively in them. The difference in the fluid characteristics is interpreted in terms of the initial loss of CO2 rich fluid from granitic magma and aqueous-rich nature during the later stages of crystallization of quartz. The exsolved CO2-rich fluid was responsible in formation of the later quartz and pegmatitic veins at different crustal levels and also possibly was

  13. Hydrogeochemical and isotopic characteristics of Kavak (Seydişehir-Konya) geothermal field, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozdağ, Ayla

    2016-09-01

    The Kavak geothermal field is located 13 km north of Seydişehir town, about 90 km southwest of Konya Province in the Central Anatolia, Turkey. This study was carried out to determine the origin, chemical characteristics, and isotopic composition of Kavak thermal waters. The measured temperatures of thermal and mineral waters range from 21.5 to 26 °C with a discharge of 0.8 l/s in springs, and from 30 to 45.8 °C with a discharge of 185 l/s in wells. Thermal and/or mineralized spring and well waters are of Casbnd Nasbnd HCO3 types with electrical conductivity ranging from 2530 to 4150 μS/cm while cold groundwater is mainly of Casbnd HCO3 and Casbnd Mgsbnd HCO3 types with electrical conductivity ranging from 446 to 668 μS/cm. Kavak thermal waters have not reached complete chemical re-equilibrium possibly as a result of mixing with cold water during upward flow. Assessments from quartz geothermometers and fluid-mineral equilibria calculations suggest that reservoir temperature of Kavak geothermal field ranges from 68 to 105 °C. Thermal waters are oversaturated at discharge temperatures for calcite, dolomite, and aragonite minerals corresponding to travertine precipitation in the discharge area. Gypsum and anhydrite minerals are undersaturated in all the thermal waters. The δ18O and δ2H compositions of Kavak thermal and cold waters point to a meteoric origin. Meteoric waters infiltrate the reservoir rocks along faults and fracture zones. After being heated at depth with the high geothermal gradient, they move up to the surface along faults and fractures that act as pathways. Additionally, δ18O and δ2H values suggest that thermal waters are recharged from higher elevations in comparison with cold waters. Long-term circulation of meteoric waters within the basement rocks is indicated by low tritium (<2 TU) values in the thermal waters, although the fluids do not achieve thermodynamic equilibrium. Based on the δ13C values, carbon in thermal waters is considered

  14. Precursory signals preceding by a few months a major Vrancea earthquake: their possible role in devising a risk-preparedness strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghelache, M. A.; Chitea, F.; Marin, C.; Tudorache, A.; Mitrofan, H.

    2010-05-01

    Early warning systems for earthquakes, based on the P wave's arrival at the surface, are very useful in reducing the industrial facilities vulnerability - specifically by turning off gas and electrical power supplies. Early warning systems may also save human lives, if the population was formerly subject to a coherent program of education and training. However, as far as economic losses or social disruption are concerned, this type of very short-term warning systems remains poorly efficient. The present paper investigates what pre-event actions could be efficiently taken, provided that some longer in advance information was gained about the possibility of an extreme event occurrence in a particular area. In Vrancea seismic region (Romania), where 2-3 catastrophic (M≥7) earthquakes are known to occur each century, there is currently investigated the possibility of taking advantage of the hydrochemical precursory signals detected at some specific saline springs, which proved to be of deep-origin and to be suitable for chemical geothermometry diagnoses. Such anomalous Na-K-Mg geothermometer signatures have been continuously recorded for more than one year, prior to a significant (M=6) Vrancea seismic event. There seemed, in particular, that the concerned experimental data-points approached the transition between the pre- and post-earthquake regimes progressively, over a period of a few months. This circumstance could prove to be outstandingly favorable for launching - within a reasonable time-window before the anticipated large earthquake - appropriate sets of protection actions. The considered protection actions include mainly checking and improving the reaction-systems, with special emphasis on the reaction ability of the medical systems and verifying the infrastructure systems, especially in order to prevent critical contingencies like bottle-necks. A full collaboration between the earthquake-response professionals and the building occupants is necessary in order

  15. Coronitic textures in mafic xenoliths from Puy Beaunit (French Massif Central): Evidence for pyrometamorphism on cumulate rocks from a deep layered complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, J.; Femenias, O.; Demaiffe, D.

    2003-04-01

    -T crystallisation conditions of 7kb and 1000-1100°C respectively. Opx-cpx geothermometer gives sub-solidus recrystallisation temperature (700-900°C). Composition of pyroxenes in the coronas yields high T° (>1000°C at less than 5kb), interpreted, in a closed system, as the effect of the late pyrometamorphic event that occurred during the uptake of the xenoliths by the quaternary lava.

  16. Oceanic crust within the paleozoic Granjeno Schist, northeastern Mexico. Remnants of the Rheic and paleo-Pacific Ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Sanchez, Sonia Alejandra; Augustsson, Carita; Rafael Barboza Gudiño, Jose; Jenchen, Uwe; Torres Sanchez, Dario; Aleman Gallardo, Eduardo; Abratis, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Late Paleozoic metamorphic rocks in Mexico are related to the Laurentia-Gondwana collision in Carboniferous time, during Pangaea amalgamation. Vestiges of the Mexican Paleozoic continental configuration are present in the Granjeno Schist, the metamorphic basement of the Sierra Madre Oriental. Field work and petrographic analysis reveal that the Granjeno Schist comprises metamorphic rocks with both sedimentary (psammite, pelite, turbidite, conglomerate, black shale) and igneous (tuff, lava flows, pillow lava and ultramafic bodies) protoliths. The chlorite geothermometer and the presence of phengite in the metasedimentary units as well as 40Ar/39Ar ages on metavolcanic and metaultramafic rocks indicate that the Granjeno Schist was metamorphosed under sub-greenschist to greenschist facies with temperatures ranging from 250-345°C with 2.5 kbar during Carboniferous time (330±30 Ma). The presence of metabasalt, metacumulate, serpentinite and talc bodies suggests an oceanic tectonic setting for the evolution of the Granjeno Schist. Serpetinite rocks have mesh, granular and ribbon textures which indicate recrystallization and metasomatic events. The serpentinite rocks are enriched in the very large incompatible elements Cs, U, and Zr and depleted in Ba, Sr, Pb, Zr and Ce. Normalized REE patterns (LaN/YbN = 0.51 - 19.95 and LaN/SmN = 0.72 - 9.08) of the serpentinite and talc/soapstone are characteristic of peridotite from both suprasubduction and mid-ocean ridge zones. Serpentinite from the Granjeno Schist have spinel content which can reveal different stages of evolution in host serpentinite. The composition of chromite indicates that they belong to podiform chromite that may have crystallized from mid-ocean ridge magma. Al-chromite in the serpentinite is characterized by #Cr 0.48 to 0.55, which indicates a depleted mantle source affected by 17 to 18% of partial melting. The ferritchromite has #Cr values of 0.93 to 1.00 which indicates a metamorphic origin. Our study

  17. Socio-economic constraints of groundwater in Capital La Rioja, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, S. E.; Carrillo-Rivera, J. J.

    2006-03-01

    dry” and “boreholes are getting saline water”. The aquifer (granular Tertiary and Quaternary material) thickness (≈750m) was defined with the aid of the geological framework, geothermometers and Modflow modelling. The aquifer extent extends far beyond the limits of the study area. Several economic activities were found to be feasible with available groundwater resources and without bordening the environment (fish farming, bottled-water marketing, SPA activities and farming of endangered species).

  18. Stress and Temperature Dependence of Calcite Twinning: New Experimental and Field Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybacki, E.; Janssen, C.; Dresen, G.

    2008-12-01

    In low-grade metamorphic terrains at temperatures < 300° C e-twinning of calcite is common. The width and density of e-twins have been suggested to indicate stress and temperature representing robust paleopiezometers and geothermometers. To evaluate the stress- and temperature dependence of e-twins in calcite we have performed a series of deformation experiments on specimens of Carrara marble. 14 experiments were performed at 100-400 MPa confining pressure and T < 350° C in a Paterson-type gas deformation apparatus. Seven samples were deformed in axial compression test at strain rates from 10-4 -10-6s-1. Seven samples were deformed in torsion tests to shear strains γ < 1.8. After testing, thin sections of all samples were prepared for optical inspection of twin density and twin width. Twin density varied between 10 and 500 [twins/mm] at stresses up to 280 MPa. At given conditions and with increasing strain twin density increased significantly. No clear dependence of twin density on temperatures up to 300° C was found in experiments. The experimentally deformed samples were compared to naturally-deformed low-grade calcite rocks from different fault zones. From optical thin sections of 20 samples deformation temperatures were estimated based on twin width and fluid inclusion data. These samples were subsequently used for optical measurements of twin density. Twin density varied between 10 and 100 [twins/mm] up to temperatures of 300° C. Using published calcite piezometers (Rowe and Rutter 1990) we estimated paleostresses. From our experiments and field data we did not observe a clear relation between twin width and temperature up to 250° C. Above 250° C, temperatures estimated from calcite twin widths in naturally deformed calcite samples do correspond to temperatures estimated using other methods (e.g. fluid inclusion analysis, vitrinite reflection, conodont colour alteration index). Using the existing paleopiezometres, differential stresses inferred from

  19. Hydrogeochemical exploration of geothermal prospects in the Tecuamburro Volcano region, Guatemala

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janik, C.J.; Goff, F.; Fahlquist, L.; Adams, A.I.; Alfredo, Roldan M.; Chipera, S.J.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.

    1992-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic analyses of thermal and nonthermal waters and of gases from springs and fumaroles are used to evaluate the geothermal potential of the Tecuamburro Volcano region, Guatemala. Chemically distinct geothermal surface manifestations generally occur in separate hydrogeologic areas within this 400 km2 region: low-pressure fumaroles with temperatures near local boiling occur at 1470 m elevation in a sulfur mine near the summit of Tecuamburro Volcano; non-boiling acid-sulfate hot springs and mud pots are restricted to the Laguna Ixpaco area, about 5 km NNW of the sulfur mine and 350-400 m lower in elevation; steam-heated and thermal-meteoric waters are found on the flanks of Tecuamburro Volcano and several kilometers to the north in the andesitic highland, where the Infernitos fumarole (97??C at 1180 m) is the primary feature; neutral-chloride hot springs discharge along Rio Los Esclavos, principally near Colmenares at 490 m elevation, about 8-10 km SE of Infernitos. Maximum geothermometer temperatures calculated from Colmenares neutral-chloride spring compositions are ???180??C, whereas maximum subsurface temperatures based on Laguna Ixpaco gas compositions are ???310??C. An exploration core hole drilled to a depth of 808 m about 0.3 km south of Laguna Ixpaco had a bottom-hole temperature of 238??C but did not produce sufficient fluids to confirm or chemically characterize a geothermal reservoir. Hydrogeochemical data combined with regional geologic interpretations indicate that there are probably two hydrothermal-convection systems, which are separated by a major NW-trending structural boundary, the Ixpaco fault. One system with reservoir temperatures near 300??C lies beneath Tecuamburro Volcano and consists of a large vapor zone that feeds steam to the Laguna Ixpaco area, with underlying hot water that flows laterally to feed a small group of warm, chloriderich springs SE of Tecuamburro Volcano. The other system is located beneath the Infernitos

  20. Mixing effects on geothermometric calculations of the Newdale geothermal area in the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Ghanashayam Neupane; Earl D. Mattson; Travis L. McLing; Cody J. Cannon; Thomas R. Wood; Trevor A. Atkinson; Patrick F. Dobson; Mark E. Conrad

    2016-02-01

    The Newdale geothermal area in Madison and Fremont Counties in Idaho is a known geothermal resource area whose thermal anomaly is expressed by high thermal gradients and numerous wells producing warm water (up to 51 °C). Geologically, the Newdale geothermal area is located within the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) that has a time-transgressive history of sustained volcanic activities associated with the passage of Yellowstone Hotspot from the southwestern part of Idaho to its current position underneath Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. Locally, the Newdale geothermal area is located within an area that was subjected to several overlapping and nested caldera complexes. The Tertiary caldera forming volcanic activities and associated rocks have been buried underneath Quaternary flood basalts and felsic volcanic rocks. Two southeast dipping young faults (Teton dam fault and an unnamed fault) in the area provide the structural control for this localized thermal anomaly zone. Geochemically, water samples from numerous wells in the area can be divided into two broad groups – Na-HCO3 and Ca-(Mg)-HCO3 type waters and are considered to be the product of water-rhyolite and water-basalt interactions, respectively. Each type of water can further be subdivided into two groups depending on their degree of mixing with other water types or interaction with other rocks. For example, some bivariate plots indicate that some Ca-(Mg)-HCO3 water samples have interacted only with basalts whereas some samples of this water type also show limited interaction with rhyolite or mixing with Na-HCO3 type water. Traditional geothermometers [e.g., silica variants, Na-K-Ca (Mg-corrected)] indicate lower temperatures for this area; however, a traditional silica-enthalpy mixing model results in higher reservoir temperatures. We applied a new multicomponent equilibrium geothermometry tool (e.g., Reservoir Temperature Estimator, RTEst) that is based on inverse geochemical modeling which

  1. The origin of a zoned ignimbrite: Insights into the Campanian Ignimbrite magma chamber (Campi Flegrei, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forni, Francesca; Bachmann, Olivier; Mollo, Silvio; De Astis, Gianfilippo; Gelman, Sarah E.; Ellis, Ben S.

    2016-09-01

    Caldera-forming eruptions, during which large volumes of magma are explosively evacuated into the atmosphere from shallow crustal reservoirs, are one of the most hazardous natural events on Earth. The Campanian Ignimbrite (CI; Campi Flegrei, Italy) represents a classical example of such events, producing a voluminous pyroclastic sequence of trachytic to phonolitic magma that covered several thousands of squared kilometers in the south-central Italy around 39 ka ago. The CI deposits are known for their remarkable geochemical gradients, attributed to eruption from a vertically zoned magma chamber. We investigate the relationships between such chemical zoning and the crystallinity variations observed within the CI pyroclastic sequence by combining bulk-rock data with detailed analyses of crystals and matrix glass from well-characterized stratigraphic units. Using geothermometers and hygrometers specifically calibrated for alkaline magmas, we reconstruct the reservoir storage conditions, revealing the presence of gradients in temperature and magma water content. In particular, we observe a decrease in crystallinity and temperature and an increase in magma evolution and water content from the bottom to the top of the magma chamber. We interpret these features as the result of protracted fractional crystallization leading to the formation of a cumulate crystal mush at the base of the eruptible reservoir, from which highly evolved, crystal-poor, water-rich and relatively cold melts were separated. The extracted melts, forming a buoyant, easily eruptible cap at the top of the magma chamber, fed the initial phases of the eruption, until caldera collapse and eruption of the deeper more crystalline part of the system. This late-erupted, crystal-rich material represents remobilized portions of the cumulate crystal mush, partly melted following hotter recharge. Our interpretation is supported by: 1) the positive bulk-rock Eu anomalies and the high Ba and Sr contents observed in

  2. Volatile emissions and gas geochemistry of Hot Spring Basin, Yellowstone National Park, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner, C.; Hurwitz, S.; Evans, William C.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Bergfeld, D.; Heasler, H.; Jaworowski, C.; Hunt, A.

    2008-01-01

    We characterize and quantify volatile emissions at Hot Spring Basin (HSB), a large acid-sulfate region that lies just outside the northeastern edge of the 640??ka Yellowstone Caldera. Relative to other thermal areas in Yellowstone, HSB gases are rich in He and H2, and mildly enriched in CH4 and H2S. Gas compositions are consistent with boiling directly off a deep geothermal liquid at depth as it migrates toward the surface. This fluid, and the gases evolved from it, carries geochemical signatures of magmatic volatiles and water-rock reactions with multiple crustal sources, including limestones or quartz-rich sediments with low K/U (or 40*Ar/4*He). Variations in gas chemistry across the region reflect reservoir heterogeneity and variable degrees of boiling. Gas-geothermometer temperatures approach 300????C and suggest that the reservoir feeding HSB is one of the hottest at Yellowstone. Diffuse CO2 flux in the western basin of HSB, as measured by accumulation-chamber methods, is similar in magnitude to other acid-sulfate areas of Yellowstone and is well correlated to shallow soil temperatures. The extrapolation of diffuse CO2 fluxes across all the thermal/altered area suggests that 410 ?? 140??t d- 1 CO2 are emitted at HSB (vent emissions not included). Diffuse fluxes of H2S were measured in Yellowstone for the first time and likely exceed 2.4??t d- 1 at HSB. Comparing estimates of the total estimated diffuse H2S emission to the amount of sulfur as SO42- in streams indicates ~ 50% of the original H2S in the gas emission is lost into shallow groundwater, precipitated as native sulfur, or vented through fumaroles. We estimate the heat output of HSB as ~ 140-370??MW using CO2 as a tracer for steam condensate, but not including the contribution from fumaroles and hydrothermal vents. Overall, the diffuse heat and volatile fluxes of HSB are as great as some active volcanoes, but they are a small fraction (1-3% for CO2, 2-8% for heat) of that estimated for the entire

  3. Final Report: Phase II Geothermal Exploration and Geothermal Power Plant Update for Ascension Island, South Atlantic Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, D.L.; Sibbett, B.S.; Shane, M.K.; Whitbeck, J.F.

    1984-07-01

    The Phase I study of the geothermal potential of Ascension Island concluded that the possibility of a geothermal resource existing under the island was excellent. This conclusion was based on the presence of young volcanic rocks (a heat source close to the surface), an ample supply of water from the sea, and high permeability of many of the rocks which make up the island. The assumption was made that the resource would be similar to geothermal systems in the Azores or Japan, and a conceptual design of a power plant to utilize the resource was prepared upon which cost estimates and an economic analysis were subsequently performed. The results of the economic analysis were very favorable, and the Air Force decided to proceed into Phase II of the project. Under Phase II, an exploration program was designed and carried out. The purpose of the program was to ascertain whether or not a geothermal resource existed beneath Ascension island and, to the extent possible, to evaluate the quality of that resource. The exploration involved a detailed aeromagnetic survey of the island, reconnaissance and detailed electrical resistivity surveys, and drilling of holes for the measurement of temperatures. These methods have confirmed the existence of geothermal activity beneath Ascension. Measured temperature gradients and bottom hole temperatures as well as chemical geothermometers indicate temperatures sufficient for the generation of electricity within reasonable drilling depths. This report documents those conclusions and the supporting data. This report also documents the results of the power plant update with new data supplied from the Phase II exploration activities on the island. The power plant scenario has been changed to reflect the fact that the resource temperature may not be as high as that originally assumed in the Phase I study, the location of the production wells will in all likelihood be farther from the existing Air Force facilities--either north of Grazing

  4. The South Tibetan Detachment System: Thermal and mechanical transition from deeper to upper structural levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montomoli, Chiara; Rodolfo, Carosi; Visonà, Dario

    2013-04-01

    The South Tibetan Detachment System (STDS) is a primary tectonic feature of the Himalayan chain, cropping out for more than 2000 km along the belt. It separates the low-grade-metamorphic rocks of the Tibetan Sedimentary Sequence (TSS) in the hanging-wall, from the high-grade-metamorphic rocks of the High Himalayan Crystallines (HHC) in the footwall. The architecture of the STDS is made up by a lower ductile shear zone affecting high -grade metamorphic rocks of the HHC and the lower portion of the TSS, deformed under amphibolite facies conditions (i.e. Checka Formation, Everest series, Haimanta Group). An upper low-angle normal fault divides the high-grade metamorphic rocks from the very-low-grade rocks of the TSS. Several competing tectonic models, regarding the exhumation and extrusion of the high-grade metamorphic rocks of the HHC are nowadays objects of debates. In these models the STDS, joined with the partly coeval lower Main Central Thrust played a crucial role. The knowledge of the thermal and structural activity of the STDS can give a fundamental contribution to discriminate among the different proposed tectonic models. By the way most of the structural and thermal studies focused on the kinematic and thermal profiles of the footwall rocks and only few studies have been concentrated on the hanging-wall rocks. During this work we focused on two sections of the STDS cropping out east of the Ama Drime range (Dingyee area, Southern Tibet) and west of the Annapurna massif (Kaligandaki valley, Central Nepal). Here we concentrated on the hanging-wall rocks of the STDS represented by Ordovician limestone in the first transect and by impure marbles and quartzites in the second one. Meso and microstructural studies have been accompanied by illite crystallinity analyses, calcite-dolomite geothermometer and stable isotope analyses on selected samples. Microfabric analysis of calcite shows shape and lattice preferred orientations as well as grain size reduction within

  5. Hydrochemical water evolution in the Aral Sea Basin. Part II: Confined groundwater of the Amu Darya Delta - Evolution from the headwaters to the delta and SiO2 geothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schettler, Georg; Oberhänsli, Hedi; Stulina, Galina; Djumanov, Jamoljon H.

    2013-07-01

    of organically bound Br. The silica concentrations in low-salinity AWs southeast of the Aral Sea (eastern basin) are close to quartz saturation and define a chemical Si-geothermometer.

  6. Back arc basalts from Patagonia: sediment input in a distal subduction domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesse, A.; Mandeville, C.; Varekamp, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    Cinder cones and lava flows from the Loncopue graben in N Patagonia (37 S) were sampled over a 180 km N-S transect. These mainly basaltic and trachybasaltic lava flows carry olivine with Cr-Al-rich spinel inclusions, while some more evolved flows carry clinopyroxene and plagioclase. Most of these rocks have between 5-8 percent MgO, and show highly variable K and LIL trace element concentrations. The rocks have up to 180 ppm Ni and 250 ppm Cr. Relative trace element abundance diagrams show negative Ta-Nb anomalies in most rocks, although their depths vary strongly. The REE patterns show LREE enrichment and most rocks have no Eu anomalies, indicating the absence of significant plagioclase fractionation. The basalts have constant U/Th values (~0.25) that are similar to those found in the nearby Copahue-Caviahue arc volcanics. Microprobe analyses of the main phases show olivine with Mg # of 80-87 and up to 2600 ppm Ni. Simulations with the Melts-pMelts programs and application of mineral-melt geothermometers suggest that most olivine phenocrysts crystallized at ~8-10 kbar pressure at temperatures of 1170-1220 oC and with 1-3 percent H2O in the melt. The Sr isotope compositions of 9 samples show a range from 0.7033 - 0.7043, which are negatively correlated with Nd isotope ratios (0.51273- 0.51292). Surprisingly, the most MgO-rich basalt has the most radiogenic Sr isotope ratio. The Pb isotope ratios, well outside the DMM range, correlate very poorly with either Sr isotope ratios or in Pb-Pb isotope graphs. The lack of correlation between degree of evolution and Sr isotope ratios as well as the primitive nature of the rocks and crystals suggest that crustal assimilation was not a major process impacting the composition of these small magma volumes. Incompatible trace element patterns of several samples resemble those of detrital sediment samples from the Pacific, which together with the isotopic data suggest that these magmas may carry a subducted sediment component

  7. The silica heat flow interpretation technique: application to continental Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirlo, M. C.

    2002-06-01

    The silica heat flow interpretation technique [Swanberg, C.A. and Morgan, P., J. Geophys. Res. 117 (1979) 227-241; J. Geophys. Res. 85 (1980) 7206-7214] has been applied and tested in mainland Australia, using a database of approximately 41 000 Australian groundwater analyses. The silica geotemperature of the groundwaters was obtained by substituting the dissolved silica content of a groundwater into the quartz geothermometer equation of Truesdell [(1976) Proceedings of the Second United Nations Symposium on the Development and Use of Geothermal Resources. San Francisco, CA, USA, 20-29 May, 1975, Vol. 1]. The average silica geotemperature value for 1×1° (latitude×longitude) grid cells has been calculated and the results plotted against published traditional heat flow values for those grid cells [Cull, J.P. (1982) BMR J. Aust. Geol. Geophys. 7, 11-21], to form silica heat flow estimation models. Data exclusion criteria, based upon data quantity and statistical spread have been applied to both the groundwater data and the traditional heat flow data. This was done in order to exclude areas that were poorly categorized in terms of data quality and quantity. For the remaining data, a significant linear relationship between the groundwater geotemperature estimates and traditional heat flow measurements has been identified for four of the models with a t-test on the correlation coefficient. Estimates of regional heat flow were then made by applying the calibration models in areas with no traditional heat flow measurements but adequate groundwater data. A silica heat flow map has been constructed using one of the models and the differences between it and the traditional heat flow map evaluated. Good correlations exist between the silica heat flow map and the traditional heat flow map, except for the northwest Yilgarn, of WA, Australia, where silica heat flow data give significantly higher values than traditional data. The silica heat flow map identifies areas of high

  8. Potential Temperatures of Sources of MORB, OIB and LIPs Based on AL Partitioning Between Olivine and Spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, A. V.; Batanova, V. G.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Borisov, A.; Arndt, N.; Kuzmin, D.; Krivolutskaya, N.; Sushevskaya, N.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of potential temperatures of convecting mantle is required for the understanding the global processes on the Earth [1]. The common way to estimate these is the reconstruction of primary melt compositions and liquidus temperatures based on the Fe-Mg partitioning between olivine and melt. This approach requires knowledge of the compositions of primitive melts in equilibrium with olivine alone as well as composition of olivine equilibrium with primary melts. This information is in most cases unavailable or of questionable quality. Here we report a new approach to obtain crystallization temperatures of primary melts based on the olivine-spinel Al-Cr geothermometer [2]. The advantages of this approach are: (1) low rate of diffusion of Al in the olivine, which promises to preserve high magmatic temperatures and (2) common presence of spinel in assemblage with high-Mg olivine. In order to decipher influence of elevated Ti concentrations in spinel we have run several experiments at high temperatures (1400-1200 degree C), atmospheric pressure and controled oxygen fugacity. We also analysed over two thousand spinel inclusions and high-Mg host olivines from different MORB, OIB, LIP and Archean komatiites on the JXA-8230 EPMA at ISTerre, Grenoble, France. Concentrations of Al, Ti, Na, P, Zn, Cr, Mn, Ca, Co, Ni were determined with a precision of 10 ppm (2 standard errors) using a newly developed protocol [3]. When available, we also analysed matrix glass and glass inclusions in olivine and found that temperature estimations from olivine-spinel (Al-Cr) and olivine-melt (Fe-Mg) [4] equilibrium match within (+/-30 degree C). The results show contrasting crystallization temperatures of Mg-rich olivine of the same Fo content from different types of mantle-derived magmas, from the lowest (down to 1220 degree C) for MORB to the highest (up to 1550 degree C) for komatiites and Siberian meimechites. These results match predictions from Fe-Mg olivine-melt equilibrium and

  9. Fluid Geochemistry of the Capelinhos Vent Site. A Key to Understand the Lucky Strike Hydrothermal Vent Field (37°N, MAR).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leleu, T.; Chavagnac, V.; Cannat, M.; Ceuleneer, G.; Castillo, A.; Menjot, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Lucky Strike hydrothermal field is situated at the mid-Atlantic ridge, south of the Azores, on top of a central volcano within the axial valley. The volcano is composed of a fossil lava lake surrounded by three volcanic cones. An Axial Magma Chamber (AMC) is reported 3.4km below the seafloor. The active venting sites are situated around the fossil lava lake and are directly linked to the heat supplied by the AMC. High temperature fluids from the Lucky Strike field were sampled in 2013, 2014 and 2015 in order to document the depth of the reaction zone, subsurface mixing, geographical control and magmatic degassing. A new active site named Capelinhos was discovered approximately 1.5km eastward from the lava lake, during exploration by ROV Victor6000 - MoMARsat cruise, 2013. It is composed of 10m-high chimneys discharging black smoker-type fluid. Fluid temperatures were 328°C in 2013 and decreased to 318°C in 2014 and 2015. Capelinhos fluids are Cl-depleted by 55% compared to seawater indicating phase separation at depth. In comparison, the other sites range from 6% enrichment (2608/Y3 site) to 22% depletion (Eiffel tower site). Si geothermobarometry of Y3 site estimates quartz equilibration at P=300 bars and T=360-380°C, coherent with Fe/Mn geothermometer (T=370±10°C). For Capelinhos, Fe/Mn suggests 398°C (±10°C) which is close to the critical point of seawater (P=300 bars and T=407°C). Other geothermobarometer uses Si/Cl vapor-like fluid to constrain depth of the top of reaction zone and predicts significant bias due to mixing along the up-flow zone. Application gives P=~370 bars, T=~435°C at Capelinhos and P=~390 bars, T=~440°C at Eiffel tower. This is further sustained by end-member 87Sr/86Sr=0.7038, which indicates little interaction of Capelinhos vent fluids with seawater-derived fluid, compared to other vapor-like sites with 87Sr/86Sr=0.7043. Because of its external location, Capelinhos site isn't influenced by the complex tectonic context of the

  10. Omphacite microstructures as time-temperature indicators of blueschist- and eclogite-facies metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Michael A.

    1982-03-01

    Omphacites from a wide range of geological environments have been examined by transmission electron-microscopy. Their microstructures are sufficiently variable as to be potential indicators of thermal history for blueschist and eclogite metamorphism. In particular, the average size of equiaxed antiphase domains (APD's) arising from cation ordering appears to be a characteristic feature of each environment and increases in the sequence: Franciscan, blueschist (1) ≈ Turkey, blueschist (2) < Guatemala, jadeitic blocks in serpentinite (3) < Syros, blueschist (9) ≈ Red Wine Complex, Canada, amphibolite (1) < Maksyutov Complex, Urals, blueschist (3) ≈ Zermatt-Saas, blueschist (5) ≈ Allalin, metagabbro (4) < Tauern, eclogite (1) ≈ Franciscan, eclogite (5) < Nybö, Norway, eclogite (2) (numbers in brackets indicate the number of hand specimens for which omphacite microstuctures are known). A relationship between APD size, annealing time and temperature has been derived by analogy with the known APD coarsening behaviour in other systems where: (APD size)n 410_2004_Article_BF00375206_TeX2GIFE1.gif ({text{APD size)}}^{text{n}} ∝ {text{e}}^{{text{(}} - {text{Q/RT)}}} \\cdot {text{ }}time{text{.}} . Most omphacites fit into a self-consistent scheme with n=8±2 if the activation energy ( Q) is assumed to be that of cation disordering (75 kcal mole-1), available estimates of peak metamorphic temperature ( T) are used, and a reasonable geological time-scale is taken as 104 108 years. According to this model, APD sizes are set in a relatively short interval of the total history of a rock when its temperature is close to its peak value. APD sizes are much more sensitive to temperature than to time and may be used as a geothermometer which has the advantage of not being reset by re-equilibration at low temperatures. Petrological implications arising from the model are that Allalin metagabbros were metamorphosed at a similar peak temperature to Zermatt-Saas blueschists

  11. Geochemistry, geothermics and relationship to active tectonics of Gujarat and Rajasthan thermal discharges, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minissale, A.; Chandrasekharam, D.; Vaselli, O.; Magro, G.; Tassi, F.; Pansini, G. L.; Bhramhabut, A.

    2003-09-01

    Most thermal spring discharges of Rajasthan and Gujarat in northwestern India have been sampled and analysed for major and trace elements in both the liquid and associated gas phase, and for 18O/ 16O, D/H (in water), 3He/ 4He and 13C/ 12C in CO 2 (in gas) isotopic ratios. Most thermal springs in Rajasthan are tightly associated to the several regional NE-SW strike-slip faults bordering NE-SW ridges formed by Archaean rocks at the contact with Quaternary alluvial and aeolian sedimentary deposits of the Rajasthan desert. Their Ca-HCO 3 immature character and isotopic composition reveals: (1) meteoric origin, (2) relatively shallow circulation inside the crystalline Archaean formations, (3) very fast rise along faults, and (4) deep storage temperatures of the same order of magnitude as discharging temperatures (50-90°C). Thermal spring discharges in Gujarat are spread over a larger area than in Rajasthan and are associated both with the NNW-SSE fault systems bordering the Cambay basin and the ENE-WSW strike-slip fault systems in the Saurashtra province, west of the Cambay basin. Chemical and isotopic compositions of springs in both areas suggest a meteoric origin of deep thermal waters. They mix with fresh or fossil seawater entering the thermal paths of the spring systems through both the fault systems bordering the Cambay basin, as well as faults and fractures occurring inside the permeable Deccan Basalt Trap in the Saurashtra province. The associated gas phase, at all sampled sites, shows similar features: (1) it is dominated by the presence of atmospheric components (N 2 and Ar), (2) it has high crustal 4He enrichment, (3) it shows crustal 3He/ 4He signature, (4) it has low CO 2 concentration, and (5) the only analysed sample for 13C/ 12C isotopic ratio in CO 2 suggests that CO 2 has a strong, isotopically light organic imprint. All these features and chemical geothermometer estimates of spring waters suggest that any active deep hydrothermal system at the base

  12. Estimation of the geothermal potential of the Caldara di Manziana site in the Mts Sabatini Volcanic District (Central Italy) by integrating geochemical data and 3D-GIS modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranaldi, Massimo; Lelli, Matteo; Tarchini, Luca; Carapezza, Maria Luisa; Patera, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    High-enthalpy geothermal fields of Central Italy are hosted in deeply fractured carbonate reservoirs occurring in thermally anomalous and seismically active zones. However, the Mts. Sabatini volcanic district, located north of Rome, has an interesting deep temperatures (T), but it is characterized by low to very low seismicity and permeability in the reservoir rocks (mostly because of hydrothermal self-sealing processes). Low PCO2 facilitates the complete sealing of the reservoir fractures, preventing hot fluids rising and, determining a low CO2 flux at the surface. Conversely, high CO2 flux generally reflects a high pressure of CO2, suggesting that an active geothermal reservoir is present at depth. In Mts. Sabatini district, the Caldara of Manziana (CM) is the only zone characterized by a very high CO2 flux (188 tons/day) from a surface of 0.15 km2) considering both the diffuse and viscous CO2 emission. This suggests the likely presence of an actively degassing geothermal reservoir at depth. Emitted gas is dominated by CO2 (>97 vol.%). Triangular irregular networks (TINs) have been used to represent the morphology of the bottom of the surficial volcanic deposits, the thickness of the impervious formation and the top of the geothermal reservoir. The TINs, integrated by T-gradient and deep well data, allowed to estimate the depth and the temperature of the top of the geothermal reservoir, respectively to ~-1000 m from the surface and to ~130°C. These estimations are fairly in agreement with those obtained by gas chemistry (818Geothermometers and the GIS model indicated a temperature range between

  13. Reconstruction of in situ composition of sedimentary formation waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palandri, James L.; Reed, Mark H.

    2001-06-01

    exceeding 150°C, where there are shale units containing smectite undergoing the smectite to illite reaction. Deviation in silica activity from equilibrium with chalcedony or quartz is small for most of the fluids, and may result from precipitation of silica as polymers or amorphous solids upon cooling, and either removal of precipitates upon filtering before analysis, or nonreactivity of the precipitates in the analytical method used. Four fluids containing significant iron and having apparently degassed significant CO 2 also show substantial apparent silica loss, and therefore, silica loss most probably results from the precipitation of amorphous Fe-silicate caused by pH increase due to degassing, and by cooling. The methods used here can be applied as a geothermometer to predict formation temperatures, and, when applied to Kettleman North Dome, yield a thermal gradient of 37.1°C/km. Formation temperature data for the Texas waters are in agreement with equilibrium temperatures predicted by the calculations.

  14. Spatial and Seasonal Variability of Extreme Soil Temperature in Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sviličić, Petra; Vučetić, Višnja

    2015-04-01

    In terms of taking the temperature of the Earth in Croatia, first measurements began in 1898 in Križevci, but systematic measurements of soil temperature started in 1951. Today, the measurements are performed at 55 meteorological stations. The process of setting up, calibration, measurement, input, control and data processing is done entirely within the Meteorological and Hydrological Service. Due to the lack of funds, but also as a consequence of the Homeland War, network density in some areas is very rare, leading to aggravating circumstances during analysis. Also, certain temperature series are incomplete or are interrupted and therefore the number of long-term temperature series is very small. This particularly presents problems in coastal area, which is geographically diversified and is very difficult to do a thorough analysis of the area. Using mercury angle geothermometer daily at 7, 14 and 21 h CET, thermal state of soil is measured at 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, 50 and 100 cm depth. Thermometers are placed on the bare ground within the meteorological circle and facing north to reduce the direct impact of solar radiation. Lack of term measurements is noticed in the analysis of extreme soil temperatures, which are not real extreme values, but derived from three observational times. On the basis of fifty year series (1961-2010) at 23 stations, the analysis of trends of the surface maximal and minimal soil temperature, as well as the appearance of freezing is presented. Trends were determined by Sen's slope estimator, and statistical significance on 5% level was determined using the Mann-Kendall test. It was observed that the variability of the surface maximal soil temperature on an annual and seasonal level is much higher than those for surface minimal soil temperature. Trends in the recent period show a statistically significant increase in the maximal soil temperature in the eastern and the coastal regions, especially in the spring and summer season. Also, the

  15. Magma mixing and mingling processes inferred from the ejecta in the Shinmoedake 2011 eruption: Its implications for the transient behavior of eruption styles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshide, T.; Toramaru, A.; Miyamoto, T.; Iriyama, Y.; Ikehata, K.; Matsushima, T.

    2012-04-01

    The Shinmoedake 2011 eruption which started on 26th January 2011 showed a characteristic transition of eruption styles. Two sub-plinian eruptions from 3 p.m. on 26th and from midnight of 27th produced a pumice deposit of 6 cm in thickness at 8 km from the vent. After the sub-plinian phase, the eruption style shifts to the phase of vulcanian eruptions which majorly produced volcanic ash since an eruption at 3 p.m. on 27th Jan. We obtained samples from the pumice deposit of the 3 times sub-plinian eruptions on 26-27th Jan and the breadcrust bomb (1 m in size) of the vulcanian eruption at 7:54 a.m. on 1st Feb. In the presentation, we discuss the depth of magma chamber and the mechanisms of magma mixing and mingling on the observation and chemical analyses of these ejectas. Pumices show white, gray, brown and black-colored. Banded pumices (white and gray) can be often found. White pumices (SiO2= 64 wt%) contain Ca-poor Pl (An75-50), Opx, Cpx and Mag as phenocrysts and the matrix is composed of freshed glass (SiO2= 76 wt%). Gray pumices (SiO2= 58.6 wt%) contain Ca-poor (An75-50) and Ca-rich Pl (An90), Opx, Cpx, Mag and Ol as phenocrysts. Ca-poor Pl shows reverse zoning in rim and often has a sieve-texture. Gray pumices contain 2 types of glomerphenocrysts; Ca-poor Pl-Opx-Cpx-Mag and Ca-rich Pl-Ol assemblages. The vesicularity of gray pumices varies about from 50% to 80% and the number density of plagioclase microlite increases with decreasing its vesicularity. Assemblage and character of phenocrysts in bombs are same as gray pumices. Basaltic inclusion, which contains Ca-rich Pl and Ol phenocrysts, can be found in the bomb. On the basis of the zoning of phenocrystic plagioclase and the mineral assemblage of glomerphenocryst, it is highly likely that both gray pumices and bombs originate from the mixed magma formed by mixing between dacitic magma and basaltic magma (Hoshide et al., 2011, JpGU Meeting). We obtained 887-903 ° C by application of pyroxene geothermometer

  16. Metamorphic mineral assemblages of slightly calcic pelitic rocks in and around the Taconic Allochthon, southwestern Massachusetts and adjacent Connecticut and New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zen, E-an

    1981-01-01

    The mineral assemblages from metamorphosed slightly calcic pelitic rocks of the Taconic Range in southwestern Massachusetts and adjacent areas of Connecticut and New York were studied petrographically and chemically. These rocks vary in metamorphic grade from those below the chloritoid zone through the chloritoid and garnet zones into the kyanite-staurolite zone. Microprobe data on the ferromagnesian minerals show that the sequence of increasing Fe/ (Fe+Mg) value is, from the lowest, chlorite, biotite, hornblende, chloritoid, staurolite, garnet. Hornblende, epidote, garnet, and plagioclase are the most common minerals that carry significant calcium. Biotite is persistently deficient in alkali but is abnormally rich in octahedral aluminum to such an extent that the overall charge balance can be ascribed to an AI=K+ (Fe,Mg) diadochy. Muscovite contains small though persistent amounts of iron and magnesium in octahedral positions but has a variable K/Na ratio, which is potentially useful as a geothermometer. One low-grade muscovite is highly phengitic, but the white micas in rocks from metamorphic grades higher than chloritoid zone do not contain significant phengite components. Chlorite is persistently high in aluminum and so its ratio of divalent ions to aluminum is approximately that of garnet. Many garnets show pronounced zoning in manganese and less pronounced zoning in calcium. Garnet coexisting with hornblende contains a high proportion of the grossularitic component. The calcium content is significant in all the analyzed garnets, except those from a cummingtonite-bearing sample that is free of muscovite. This suggests that in slightly calcic pelitic rocks, calcium-free garnet cannot coexist with muscovite. Most of the mineral assemblages formed in the presence of excess quartz and muscovite. The phase-petrologic analysis, made with the aid of an eight-phase multisystematic model, shows the following major points: 1. Chloritoid and staurolite coexist in a

  17. The "tectonic" Nature of the Eastern Margin of the Barotiya Group, Rajasthan India: a Reappraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Nilanjan; Ghosh, Tamoghno; Rakshit, Nibedita

    2014-05-01

    a plane whose orientation is 63o / 57o SE. Equal area projection of the e-twins measured shows a vertical conical distribution with a semi-apical angle of 45o. The twin plane thicknesses were measured and twin intensity was calculated from which a moderate-temperature high-stress deformation is postulated. References cited: Dasgupta, N., Mukhopadhyay, D., & Bhattacharyya, T. (2012). Analysis of superposed strain: A case study from Barr Conglomerate in the South Delhi Fold Belt, Rajasthan, India. Journal of Structural Geology, 34, 30-42. Ferrill, D. A., Morris, A. P., Evans, M. A., Burkhard, M., Groshong, R. H., & Onasch, C. M. (2004). Calcite twin morphology: a low-temperature deformation geothermometer. Journal of Structural Geology, 26(8), 1521-1529. Gupta P., 2004, Ancient Orogens of Aravalli Region; Geological Survey of India Sp. Publication, 84 150-205

  18. Variations in Melt Generation and Migration along the Aleutian Arc (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, T. A.; Van Keken, P. E.

    2013-12-01

    The generation and ascent of mantle melt beneath volcanic arcs sets the course for how magmas differentiate to form the continental crust and erupt explosively from volcanoes. Although the basic framework of melting at subduction zones is understood to involve the convective influx of hot mantle (Tp ≥ 1300°C) and advective transport of water-rich fluids from the subducting slab, the P-T paths that melts follow during melt generation and migration are still not well known. The Aleutian Arc provides an opportunity to explore the conditions of mantle melting in the context of volcanoes that span an unusually large range in the depth to the slab, from Seguam island, with among the shallowest depths to the slab worldwide (~65 km, [1]) to Bogoslof island, behind the main volcanic front and twice the depth to the slab (~130 km). Here we combine thermal models tuned to Aleutian subduction parameters [after 2] with petrological estimates of the T and P of mantle-melt equilibration, using a major element geothermometer [3] and estimates of H2O and fO2 from olivine-hosted melt inclusion measurements [4] for basaltic magmas from 6 volcanoes in the central Aleutians (Korovin, Seguam, Bogoslof, Pakushin, Akutan, Shishaldin). We find mantle-melt equilibration conditions to vary systematically as a function of the depth to the slab, from 30 km and 1220°C (for Seguam) to 60 km and 1300°C (for Bogoslof). Such shallow depths, which extend up to the Moho, define a region perched well above the hot core of the mantle wedge predicted from thermal models, even considering the shallow depths of slab-mantle coupling (< 60 km) required to supply hot mantle beneath Seguam. Thus, even though the greatest melt production will occur in the hot core of the wedge (50-100 km depth), melts apparently ascend and re-equilibrate in the shallowest mantle. Volcanoes that overlie the greatest depth to the slab, and lie furthest from the wedge corner, stall at greater depths (~60 km), at the base of

  19. Formation of a paleothermal anomaly and disseminated gold deposits associated with the Bingham Canyon porphyry Cu-Au-Mo system, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, C.G.; Austin, G.W.; Naeser, C.W.; Rye, R.O.; Ballantyne, G.H.; Stamm, R.G.; Barker, C.E.

    2004-01-01

    The thermal history of the Oquirrh Mountains, Utah, indicates that hydrothermal fluids associated with emplacement of the 37 Ma Bingham Canyon porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit extended at least 10 km north of the Bingham pit. An associated paleothermal anomaly enclosed the Barneys Canyon and Melco disseminated gold deposits and several smaller gold deposits between them. Previous studies have shown the Barneys Canyon deposit is near the outer limit of an irregular distal Au-As geochemical halo, about 3 km beyond an intermediate Pb-Zn halo, and 7 km beyond a proximal pyrite halo centered on the Bingham porphyry copper deposit. The Melco deposit also lies near the outer limit of the Au-As halo. Analysis of several geothermometers from samples collected tip to 22 km north of the Bingham Canyon porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit indicate that most sedimentary rocks of the Oquirrh Mountains, including those at the gold deposits, have not been regionally heated beyond the "oil window" (less than about 150??C). For geologically reasonable heating durations, the maximum sustained temperature at Melco, 6 km north of the Bingham pit, and at Barneys Canyon, 7.5 km north of the pit, was between 100??C and 140??C, as indicated by combinations of conodont color alteration indices of 1.5 to 2, mean random solid bitumen reflectance of about 1.0 percent, lack of annealing of zircon fission tracks, and partial to complete annealing of apatite fission tracks. The pattern of reset apatite fission-track ages indicates that the gold deposits are located approximately on the 120??C isotherm of the 37 Ma paleothermal anomaly assuming a heating duration of about 106 years. The conodont data further constrain the duration of heating to between 5 ?? 104 and 106 years at approximately 120??C. The ??18O of quartzite host rocks generally increases from about 12.6 per mil at the porphyry to about 15.8 per mil approximately 11 km from the Bingham deposit. This change reflects interaction of interstitial clays in

  20. Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic metamorphic events in the Orekhov-Pavlograd compressional zone, Ukrainian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, A. V.

    2012-04-01

    The Orekhov-Pavlograd zone (OPZ) is located between the Mesoarchaean-Neoarchaean Middle Dnieper Province and the Mesoarchaean-Palaeoproterozoic Azov Province in the eastern Ukrainian Shield. The OPZ consists of Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic high-grade metamorphic rocks. According U-Pb isotope analyses Archaean methaigneous rocks have age of 3.5-3.3 Ga, and latest AR events dated form both individual grains and metamorphic rims in the tonalite and the granitic vein occurred at about 2.88 Ga ego. Paleoproterozoic zircons from a hornblende granulite have a concordia age of 2.08 Ga [1]. P-T conditions of the 3.5-3.3 Ga processes calculated from the Ti content in zircon are of 730-760°C. Metamorphic event dated as 2.88 Ga is more preserved and detected in some amphibolites after mafic dykes. According to different methods of hornblende-plagioclase geothermometry along with Al- and Ti-geobarometry of hornblende, the amphibolites have formed at temperature of 735-749 °C and pressure of 5.2 to 7.8 kbar. P-T conditions of Paleoproterozoic metamorphic processes have been calculated for a Paleoproterozoic high-Al paragneiss and mafic rocks. On the base of the computer software THERIAK-DOMINO [2], near-isothermal decompression from ca. 8.5 to 6.0 kbar at 650 °C and then to 5.8 kbar at 740 °C has been determined for small irregular garnet grains (grs 4-7% and XMg 0.36-0.37) associated with the same biotite and plagioclase. P-T conditions obtained by means of the P-T pseudosection calculation are identical within errors to those defined by the Grt + Bt + Pl + Ozt geothermometer by [3] and the geobarometer by [4], T = 675 °C and P = 5.6 kbar. Temperature and pressure calculated for assemblage Grt-Pl-Opx-Amph-Ilm-Ru (mafic rock) by using the TWEEQU method shows: 1) high values of pressure and temperature (ca. 7 kbar and 800 °C) are linked with the first metamorphic event with Opx-Cpx assemblage, 2) moderate values (ca. 5 kbar and ca. 600 °C) are referred to the second

  1. Experimental Determination of Fe-Mg Interdiffusion Coefficients in Orthopyroxene Using Pulsed Laser Ablation and Nanoscale Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter Heege, J. H.; Dohmen, R.; Becker, H.; Chakraborty, S.

    2006-12-01

    Fe-Mg interdiffusion in silicate minerals is of interest in petrological studies for determining the closure temperature of geothermometers and for determining cooling rates from compositional profiles. It is also relevant for studies of the physical properties of silicates, such as rheology or electrical conductivity, because knowledge of its dependence on oxygen fugacity can aid in the understanding of point defect chemistry. Compositionally zoned orthopyroxenes are common in meteorites, mantle rocks, lower crustal rocks and a variety of plutonic and volcanic igneous rocks. However, experimental difficulties have precluded direct determination of Fe-Mg diffusion rates in orthopyroxenes so far and the available information comes from (1) Mg tracer diffusion coefficients obtained from isotope tracer studies using enriched ^{25}MgO films [1], (2) calculations of interdiffusion rates based on the (diffusion-controlled) order-disorder kinetics measured in orthopyroxene [2], and (3) indirect estimates from the comparison of diffusion widths in coexisting garnets and olivines, in which Fe-Mg diffusion rates are relatively well known [e.g., 3]. We have directly measured Fe-Mg interdiffusion coefficients parallel to the [001] direction in two natural orthopyroxene single crystals (approximately En95Fs5 and En90Fs10) using diffusion couples consisting of an olivine thin film (Fo30Fa70, typically 20 - 50 nm thick) deposited under vacuum on pre-heated, polished and oriented pyroxene single crystals using a pulsed laser ablation deposition technique. Samples were annealed for 4 - 337 hours at 800 - 1100 °C under atmospheric pressure in a continuous flow of CO + CO2 to control the oxygen fugacity between 10-16 and 10^{-12} bar within the stability field of pyroxene. Film thickness and compositional profiles were measured using Rutherford backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) on reference and annealed samples, and Fe concentration depth profiles were extracted from the RBS spectra

  2. A new garnet-orthopyroxene thermometer developed: method, results and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivotos, Spyros-Christos; Kostopoulos, Dimitrios

    2014-05-01

    The Fe-Mg exchange reaction between garnet and orthopyroxene is a robust geothermometer that has extensively been used to retrieve metamorphic temperatures from granulitic and peridotitic/pyroxenitic lithologies with important implications on the thermal state of the continental lithosphere. More than 800 experimental mineral pairs from both simple and complex systems were gleaned from the literature covering the P-T range 0.5-15 GPa / 800-1800°C. Grt was treated as a senary (Py, Alm, Grs, Sps, Kno and Uv), whereas Opx as a septenary (En, Fs, Di, Hd, FeTs, MgTs and MgCrTs) solid solution. For Opx, Al in the M1 site was calculated following Carswell (1991) and Fe/Mg equipartitioning between sites was assumed. A mixing on sites model was employed to calculate mole fractions of components for both minerals. With regard to the excess free energy of solution and activity coefficients the formalism of Mukhopadhyay et al. (1993) was adopted treating both minerals as symmetric regular solutions. Calibration was achieved in multiple steps; in each step ΔS was allowed to vary until the standard deviation of the differences between experimental and calculated temperature for all experiments was minimised. The experiment with the largest absolute relative deviation in temperature was then eliminated and the process was repeated. The new thermometer reproduces the experimental data to within 50°C and is independent of P-T-X variations within the bounds of the calibrant data set. Application of our new calibration to metamorphosed crustal and mantle rocks that occur both as massifs and xenoliths in volcanics suggested the following results. Granulite terranes have recorded differences in temperature between peak and re-equilibration conditions in the range 100-340°C, primarily depending on the mechanism and rate of exhumation. Several provinces retain memory of discrete cooling pulses (e.g. Palni Hills, South Harris, Adirondacks, E. Antarctic Belt, Aldan Shield) whereas

  3. Volatile budget of the Nornahraun eruption of the Bárðarbunga system, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, Eniko; Sigmarsson, Olgeir; Jakobsson, Sigurdur; Gunnarsson, Haraldur

    2015-04-01

    Following two weeks of an intensive earthquake swarm coupled with approximately 60 cm E-W extension across the volcanic zone north of Vatnajökull glacier, a fissure eruption started on 29th of August 2014 in the Bárðarbunga volcanic system. The continuing eruption produced lava fountains and a lava field associated with minor tephra fallout. The lava is an almost aphyric, olivine tholeiite, containing 1 to 3 vol% of plagioclase and minor olivine and clinopyroxene phenocrysts (Gudfinnsson et al., this session). Fast cooled tephra was collected on 31st of August and 4th and 8th of September from the vicinity of the fissure. Phenocryst phases as well as groundmass glass have been handpicked and doubly polished and analysed for H2O and CO2 with FTIR-spectroscopy. The phenocrysts contain glassy silicate melt inclusions with or without a fluid bubble and some phenocrysts also contain free fluid inclusions. The fluid phase and the individual fluid inclusions were analysed by Raman Spectroscopy and the abundance of other volatiles (S, F, Cl) has been determined by electron microprobe from exposed inclusions and groundmass glass. The H2O content of melt inclusions varies between 0.1 and 0.5 wt% whereas the CO2 contents are between 900 ppm and detection limit indicating various entrapment conditions of the melt inclusions after fluid saturation. S contents in melt inclusions are as high as 1600 ppm whereas F and Cl contents in the same inclusions are low (~300 and ~90 ppm, respectively). Groundmass glass contains 0.1 wt% of H2O, ~400 ppm S and no CO2. F and Cl in groundmass glass is similar to those measured in the melt inclusions. Based on the Raman analyses individual fluid inclusions are pure CO2. The highest determined CO2 density was 0.642 g/cm3 (using the method by Kawakami et al., 2003). At a temperature of 1180 °C, which is assumed to be the equilibrium temperature of the basalt based on various geothermometers (Haddadi et al., this session), this CO2 density

  4. Goechemical and Hydrogeochemical Properties of Cappadocia Geothermal Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furkan Sener, Mehmet; Sener, Mehmet; Uysal, Tonguc

    2016-04-01

    In order to determine the geothermal resource potential of Niǧde, Nevşehir and Aksaray provinces in Central Anatolian Volcanic Province (CAVP), geothermal fluids, surface water, and alteration rock samples from the Cappadocia volcanic zone in Turkey were investigated for their geochemical and stable isotopic characteristics in light of published geological and tectonic studies. Accordingly, the Cappadocia Geothermal Province (CGP) has two different geothermal systems located along tectonic zones including five active and two potential geothermal fields, which are located between Tuzgölü Fault Zone and Keçiboyduran-Melendiz Fault and north of Keçiboyduran-Melendiz Fault. Based on water chemistry and isotope compositions, samples from the first area are characterized by Ca-Mg-HCO3 ve Ca-HCO3 type mineral poor waters and Ca-Na-SO4 and Ca-Mg-SO4 type for the cold waters and the hot waters, respectively, whereas hot waters from the second area are Na-Cl-HCO3 and Ca-Na-HCO3 type mineral poor waters. According to δ18O and δ2H isotope studies, the geothermal waters are fed from meteoric waters. Results of silica geothermometer indicate that the reservoir temperature of Dertalan, Melendiz Mount, Keçiboyduran Mount, Hasan Mount (Keçikalesi), Ziga, Acıgöl, and Derinkuyu geothermal waters are 150-173 oC, 88-117 oC, 91-120 oC, 94-122 oC, 131-156 oC, 157-179 oC; 152-174 oC and 102-130 oC, respectively. The REE composition of geothermal fluids, surface water, and mineral precipitates indicate that temperature has a strong effect on REE fractionation of the sampled fluids. Eu- and Ce- anomalies (Eu/Eu*, Ce/Ce*) are visible in several samples, which are related to the inheritance from the host reservoir rocks and redox-controlled fractionation of these elements during water-rock interactions. REE and Yttrium geochemistry results of altered rock samples and water samples, which were taken from same locations exhibited quite similar features in each system. Hence, it was

  5. Mantle temperatures, and tests of experimentally calibrated olivine-melt equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putirka, K. D.

    2005-12-01

    Because the ratio Mgol/Mgliq (Kd(Mg)) is sensitive to T, olivine-liquid Kd's have long been used as geothermometers, and more recently, maximum Fo contents from volcanic rocks have been used to estimate mantle potential temperatures. Such estimates by Putirka (2005, G3) indicate higher mantle equilibration temperatures at Hawaii, compared to temperatures derived from earlier calibrations. Several published models were thus tested for their ability to reproduce T for 862 experimental data. The Putirka (2005) models did not include P corrections, which are added here: lnKd(Mg)=-1.88 + 30.85P(GPa)/T(C) - 0.04[H2O]liq + 0.068[Na2O+K2O]liq + 3629.7/T(C) + 0.0087[SiO2]liq - 0.015[CaO]liq lnKd(Fe)= -2.92 - 0.05[H2O]liq + 0.0264[Na2O+K2O]liq + 2976.13/T(C) + 0.01847[SiO2]liq + 0.0171[Al2O3]liq - 0.039[CaO]liq + 33.17P(GPa)/T(C) In these expressions, Kd(Mg) and Kd(Fe) are the partition coefficients for Mg and Fe between olivine and liquid, expressed as cation fractions; compositional corrections are in weight percent. The models are calibrated from 785 experimental data (P = 0.0001-15.5 GPa; 1213-2353 K). In the tests, the expressions of Beattie (1993) performed exceptionally well for dry systems with MgOliq < 17 wt. %, with a standard error of estimate of 35 K, compared to an SEE of 59 K for Ford et al. (1983) and an SEE of 51 K for the inversion of the Kd(Mg) model above. Recalibration of the Beattie (1993) model over this composition range thus appears unnecessary. But Beattie (1993), Ford et al. (1983), and other models overestimate T for hydrous systems, and for compositions with MgOliq > 17 wt. %; new models are therefore needed. Over the greater compositional range, model 1 above can be inverted to yield T with a SEE of 56 K, and an average mean (systematic) error of +3 K for 856 experimental data; this compares to a systematic error of -26 K for Beattie (1993) and -36 K for Ford et al. (1983). For use in equation (1) of Putirka (2005), the models above are also more

  6. Geological, mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of the Radzimowice Au As Cu deposit from the Kaczawa Mountains (Western Sudetes, Poland): an example of the transition of porphyry and epithermal style

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulski, Stanislaw Z.

    2005-03-01

    C along the arsenopyrite pyrite buffer. Non-refractory gold associated with base-metal sulfides and with Bi Te Ag Pb S mineral assemblages has an average fineness of about 685, and is represented by electrum of two generations, and minor maldonite (Au2Bi). Fluid inclusions from various quartz generations co-genetic with base-metal sulfides and associated with carbonates, tellurides and non-refractory gold indicate fluids with moderate salinity (9 15 wt% NaCl equiv.) and a temperature and pressure drop from 350 to 190°C and 1.2 to 0.8 kbar, respectively. According to the result of the sulfur isotope fractionation geothermometer the temperature of base-metal crystallization was in the range from 322 to 289°C. Preliminary results of oxygen isotope studies of quartz from veins indicate a gradual increase in the proportion of meteoric water in the epithermal stage. The gold to silver ratio in ore samples with >3 ppm Au is about 1:5 (geometric mean). Hydrothermal alteration started with sericitization, pyritization, and kaolinitization in vein selvages followed by alkaline hydrothermal alteration of propylitic character (illitization and chloritization), albitization and carbonatization. The mineralization of the Radzimowice deposit is considered as related to alkaline magmatism and is characterized by the superposition of low-sulfidation epithermal mineralization on higher-temperature and deeper-seated mesothermal/porphyry style.

  7. Petrogenetic implications from ultramafic rocks and pyroxenites in ophiolitic occurrences of East Othris, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsovitis, P.; Magganas, A.

    2012-04-01

    .25-91.78) but also enstatites (Mg#=88.37-91.47). Spinels have been analysed in pyroxenites from Aerino and Velestino (TiO2=0.79-1.07 wt%, Al2O3=10.88-18.46 wt% Cr#=60.74-70.78), indicating SSZ settings. Application of the olivine-spinel[6], olivine-augite[7], Cpx-Opx[8,9] geothermometers, yield equilibration temperatures of 961-1075 oC for lherzolites, 895-1084 oC for harzburgites and 990-1011 oC for pyroxenites. Our data indicate that the ophiolitic occurrences of Vrinena, Aerino and Velestino include ultramafic rocks and pyroxenites related to SSZ processes, while the other ophiolitic occurrences embrace ultramafic rocks which originated from a MORB-like setting, similar to west Othris ophiolites. It should be noted that even lherzolites have Cr and Y values similar to those of a highly depleted mantle source. A supra-subduction zone origin of the east Othris ophiolites, possibly with a slab rollback in the Pindos oceanic basin, may explain the different geotectonic environment affinities of the studied rocks.

  8. Detailed thermal fingerprinting of obduction-related processes: insights from Northern New Caledonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale Brovarone, A.; Agard, P.; Monié, P.; Chauvet, A.

    2012-04-01

    ): geodynamic implications. Tectonophysics 340 (1-2), 23-59. [2] Ulrich, M., Picard C., Guillot S., Chauvel C., Cluzel D., Meffre S. (2010) The New Caledonia Ophiolite : multiple Stage of melting and refertilisation process as indicators of ridge to subduction formation. Lithos. doi 10.1016/j.lithos.2009.12.011. [3] Brothers, R. N. & Blake, M. C., 1972. Tertiary plate tectonics and high-pressure metamorphism in New Caledonia. Tectonophysics, 17, 359-391. [4] Fitzherbert, J. A., Clarke, G. L. & Powell, R., 2003. Lawsonite- omphacite bearing metabasites of the Pam Peninsula, NE New Caledonia: Evidence for disrupted blueschist to eclogite facies conditions. Journal of Petrology, 44, 1805-1831. [5] Spandler, C., & Hermann, J., 2006. High-pressure veins in eclogite from New Caledonia and their significance for fluid migration in subduction zones. Lithos, 89 (1-2). pp. 135-153. ISSN 1872-6143 [6] Beyssac, O., Goffé, B., Chopin, C. & Rouzaud, J.N., 2002. Raman spectra of carbonaceous material in metasediments: a new geothermometer. J. Metamorph. Geol., 20, 859-871. [7] Lahfid, A., Beyssac, O., Deville, E., Negro, F., Chopin, C. & Goffé, B., 2010. Evolution of the Raman spectrum of carbonaceous material in low-grade metasediments of the Glarus Alps (Switzerland). Terra Nova, 22: 354-360. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-3121.2010.00956.x

  9. Phase relations in peralkaline Cl- and F-rich phonolitic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giehl, C.; Marks, M.; Nowak, M.

    2013-12-01

    from 800 to 650 °C. These ratios may have the potential for geothermometers, rarely available for peralkaline phase assemblages: log Kd (Mn, Eud/Cpx) = 0.376 * T - 3.858 (n = 7, R2 = 0.94) log Kd (Mn, Ae/Cpx) = 0.292 * T - 2.715 (n = 6, R2 = 0.87) where T = 10000/T (K) and n is the number of experiments used for the fit. References: Giehl C, Marks M, Nowak M (2013) Contrib Mineral Petr 165: 283-304 Marks M, Markl G (2003) Mineral Mag 67: 893-919 Fig. 1: Experimental products at 100 MPa, 700 °C, hydrated starting glass (backscattered electron image): clinopyroxene (Cpx), aenigmatite (Ae), eudialyte (Eud), alkali feldspar (Afs) and residual glass (Gl).

  10. The Pinkie Unit of the Southwestern Svalbard Caledonian Province and its bearing on distribution of the Torellian-Timanian basement in the High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kośmińska, Karolina; Majka, Jarosław; Manecki, Maciej

    2015-04-01

    (post-950Ma; Kośmińska, unpublished data). If this is a case, the Pinkie Unit will provide another evidence of the Torellian-Timanian (late Neoproterozoic, e.g. Majka et al. 2008) tectonothermal event within the Svalbard's Caledonides. In turn, it can bear important implications for Arctic tectonic reconstructions. This project is financed by NCN research project No 2013/11/N/ST10/00357. References: Holdaway M.J., 2001. Recalibration of the GASP geobarometer in light of recent garnet and plagioclase activity models and versions of the garnet-biotite geothermometer. American Mineralogist, 86, 1117-1129. Majka J., Mazur S., Czerny J., Manecki M., Holm D.K., 2008. Late Neoproterozoic amphibolite facies metamorphism of a pre-Caledonian basement block in southwest Wedel Jarlsberg Land, Spitsbergen: new evidence from U-Th-Pb dating of monazite. Geological Magazine, 145, 822-830. Wu C. M., 2014. Revised empirical garnet-biotite-muscovite-plagioclase (GBMP) geobarometer in metapelites. Journal of Metamorphic Geology. doi: 10.1111/jmg.12115

  11. Petrography and petrology of the Nornahraun eruption of the Bárðarbunga volcanic system, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guðfinnsson, Guðmundur H.; Halldórsson, Sæmundur Ari; Bali, Enikő; Jakobsson, Sigurður; Sverrisdóttir, Guðrún; Höskuldssson, Ármann; Riishuus, Morten S.; Þórðarson, Þorvaldur; The 2014 Nornahraun Eruption Team

    2015-04-01

    The on-going fissure eruption north of Dyngjujökull is becoming the largest of its kind in Iceland since the 1783-84 Laki eruption. The erupted lava is olivine tholeiite, containing up to 5% normative olivine. It is relatively macrocryst-poor, initially containing less than 1% phenocrysts by volume, increasing to over 1% as the eruption has progressed. Plagioclase is the dominant macrocryst phase but olivine and augite are also present. In most of the samples, crystallization of the groundmass is substantial, with plagioclase and augite as the key groundmass minerals and minor olivine. It features subophitic texture, typical for olivine tholeiites, where the interstitial glass contains dendritic Fe-Ti oxide. During the first two months of the eruption, magma composition has been constant, displaying uniform major and trace element composition and nearly uniform isotopic compositions (Halldórsson et al. (a), this session). The major and trace element contents, in addition to the isotope ratios of lead, are indistinguishable from basalts in the Bárðarbunga volcanic system (Halldórsson et al. (b), this session). The compositional trends are consistent with crystallization along the ol-plag-cpx cotectic. Crystallization depth estimates, based on the pressure dependence of the cotectic (Yang et al., 1996), indicate that the magma equilibrated at a minimum depth between 6-9 km, consistent with depth estimates derived from CO2-bearing fluid inclusions trapped in plagioclase phenocrysts (Bali et al., this session). The bulk of the earthquakes associated with this volcano-tectonic episode are also in this range (e.g., Sigmundsson et al., 2015). Calculations with several different magma geothermometers suggest that the temperature of the magma as it rises to the surface is about 1170-1180°C, in good agreement with on-site measurements by thermal imaging cameras. The eruption has been characterized by steady, high emission of SO2. The sulfur-rich nature of the lava is

  12. Low grade metamorphism fluid circulation in a sedimentary environment thrust fault zone: properties and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trincal, Vincent; Lacroix, Brice; Buatier, Martine D.; Charpentier, Delphine; Labaume, Pierre; Lahfid, Abdeltif

    2014-05-01

    analyses were conducted in order to compare the green phyllonites from the fault core zone with the red pelites from the damage zone. Quartz, muscovite 2M1, chlorite (clinochlore), calcite and rutile are present in all samples. Hematite occurs in the damage zone but is absent in the core zone. Synkinematic chlorites are abundant in the core and damage zones and are mainly located in veins, sometimes in association with quartz. The temperature of formation of these newly-formed chlorites is 300-350° C according to Inoue (2009) geothermometer. Mössbauer spectroscopic analyses were performed on bulk rock samples. In the damage zone, Fe3+/Fetotal vary between 0.7 and 0.8, whereas in the core zone Fe3+/Fetotal is about 0.35. This decrease in Fe3+ from the damage zone to the core zone can be related to the dissolution of hematite. In contrast, Fe3+/Fetotal in phyllosilicates is clearly related to the chlorite content relative to mica, as Fe2+ increases with chlorite content. All these data allow us to propose a model of fluid circulation in relation with the Pic de Port Vieux thrust activity. The origin of the fluid, its interactions with host-rock and the consequences on fault zone mineralizations will be discussed. Inoue, A., Meunier, A., Patrier-Mas, P., Rigault, C., Beaufort, D., Vieillard, P., 2009. Application of chemical geothermometry to low-temperature trioctahedral chlorites. Clay Clay Min. 57, 371-382.

  13. Wet, dry, Dopants and Defects - an Integrated View of Diffusion in Olivine as a Prototypical Silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohmen, R.; Costa, F.; Chakraborty, S.

    2008-12-01

    Knowledge of diffusion coefficients of different species in minerals is a necessary pre-requisite for understanding and modeling the compositional evolution of rocks. Their use to determine time scales of various geological processes, to understand the reaction mechanisms and rheological behavior of rocks and minerals, and to evaluate the significance of dates and temperatures obtained from geochronometers and geothermometers, is becoming routine. However, many aspects of diffusion behavior of minerals remain enigmatic. Two of these are: (1) Do the presence of small amounts of impurities ("dopants") affect diffusion rates, and if yes, how? (2) Water is known to enhance transport rates, but exactly at what conditions and how does the wet to dry transition occur? Can it be predicted? These questions can be approached by developing an appropriate description of the diffusion process in terms of point defect thermodynamics. The large body of systematic diffusion data and natural observations in olivine makes it the mineral of choice to explore this avenue. Diffusion coefficients for various cations as well as O are known typically as a function of temperature, and often as a function of other variables such as pressure, oxygen fugacity or water fugacity. We developed a quantitative point defect model that allows the role of trace elements (i.e. dopants in the terminology of material science) in controlling transport properties to be quantified [1]. In addition we explored the nature of wet to dry transition of these transport properties in olivine [2]. We have now combined these approaches to develop an integrated scheme for describing point defect chemistry and transport properties of olivine containing arbitrary trace elements, in the presence or absence of water. The approach is perfectly general and can be extended to any other mineral provided enough data are available. Oxygen fugacity is known to affect transport rates of Fe-bearing silicates but the extent of

  14. Ore-bearing hydrothermal metasomatic processes in the Elbrus volcanic center, the northern Caucasus, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurbanov, A. G.; Bogatikov, O. A.; Dokuchaev, A. Ya.; Gazeev, V. M.; Abramov, S. S.; Groznova, E. O.; Shevchenko, A. V.

    2008-06-01

    Precaldera, caldera, and postcaldera cycles are recognized in the geological evolution of the Pleistocene-Holocene Elbrus volcanic center (EVC). During the caldera cycle, the magmatic activity was not intense, whereas hydrothermal metasomatic alteration of rocks was vigorous and extensive. The Kyukyurtli and Irik ore-magmatic systems have been revealed in the EVC, with the former being regarded as the more promising one. The ore mineralization in rocks of the caldera cycle comprises occurrences of magnetite, ilmenite, pyrite and pyrrhotite (including Ni-Co varieties), arsenopyrite, chalcopyrite, millerite, galena, and finely dispersed particles of native copper. Pyrite and pyrrhotite from volcanics of the caldera cycle and dacite of the Kyukyurtli extrusion are similar in composition and differ from these minerals of the postcaldera cycle, where pyrite and pyrrhotite are often enriched in Cu, Co, and Ni and millerite is noted as well. The composition of ore minerals indicates that the hydrothermal metasomatic alteration related to the evolution of the Kyukyurtli hydrothermal system was superimposed on rocks of the caldera cycle, whereas the late mineralization in rocks of the postcaldera cycle developed autonomously. The homogenization temperature of fluid inclusions in quartz and carbonate from crosscutting veinlets in the apical portion of the Kyukyurtli extrusion is 140-170°C and in quartz from geyserite, 120-150°C. The temperature of formation of the chalcopyrite-pyrite-pyrrhotite assemblage calculated using mineral geothermometers is 156 and 275°C in dacite from the middle and lower portions of the Malka lava flow and 190°C in dacite of the Kyukyurtli extrusion. The hydrothermal solutions that participated in metasomatic alteration of rocks pertaining to the Kyukyurtli ore-magmatic system (KOMS) and formed both secondary quartzite and geyserite were enriched in fluorine, as evidenced from the occurrence of F-bearing minerals-zharchikhite, ralstonite,

  15. Phase 2 and 3 Slim Hole Drilling and Testing at the Lake City, California Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Dick Benoit; David Blackwell; Joe Moore; Colin Goranson

    2005-10-27

    During Phases 2 and 3 of the Lake City GRED II project two slim holes were cored to depths of 1728 and 4727 ft. Injection and production tests with temperature and pressure logging were performed on the OH-1 and LCSH-5 core holes. OH-1 was permanently modified by cementing an NQ tubing string in place below a depth of 947 ft. The LCSH-1a hole was drilled in Quaternary blue clay to a depth of 1727 ft and reached a temperature of 193 oF at a depth of 1649 ft. This hole failed to find evidence of a shallow geothermal system east of the Mud Volcano but the conductive temperature profile indicates temperatures near 325 oF could be present below depth of 4000 ft. The LCSH-5 hole was drilled to a depth of 4727 ft and encountered a significant shallow permeability between depths of 1443 and 1923 ft and below 3955 ft. LCSH-5 drilled impermeable Quaternary fanglomerate to a depth of 1270 ft. Below 1270 ft the rocks consist primarily of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The most significant formation deep in LCSH-5 appears to be a series of poikoilitic mafic lava flows below a depth of 4244 ft that host the major deep permeable fracture encountered. The maximum static temperature deep in LCSH-5 is 323 oF and the maximum flowing temperature is 329 oF. This hole extended the known length of the geothermal system by ¾ of a mile toward the north and is located over ½ mile north of the northernmost hot spring. The OH-1 hole was briefly flow tested prior to cementing the NQ rods in place. This flow test confirmed the zone at 947 ft is the dominant permeability in the hole. The waters produced during testing of OH-1 and LCSH-5 are generally intermediate in character between the deep geothermal water produced by the Phipps #2 well and the thermal springs. Geothermometers applied to deeper fluids tend to predict higher subsurface temperatures with the maximum being 382 oF from the Phipps #2 well. The Lake City geothermal system can be viewed as having shallow (elevation > 4000 ft and

  16. Thermodynamic modeling of non-ideal mineral-fluid equilibria in the system Si-Al-Fe-Mg-Ca-Na-K-H-O-Cl at elevated temperatures and pressures: Implications for hydrothermal mass transfer in granitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolejš, David; Wagner, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of thermodynamic modeling of fluid-rock interaction in the system Si-Al-Fe-Mg-Ca-Na-H-O-Cl using the GEM-Selektor Gibbs free energy minimization code. Combination of non-ideal mixing properties in solids with multicomponent aqueous fluids represents a substantial improvement and it provides increased accuracy over existing modeling strategies. Application to the 10-component system allows us to link fluid composition and speciation with whole-rock mineralogy, mass and volume changes. We have simulated granite-fluid interaction over a wide range of conditions (200-600 °C, 100 MPa, 0-5 m Cl and fluid/rock ratios of 10-2-104) in order to explore composition of magmatic fluids of variable salinity, temperature effects on fluid composition and speciation and to simulate several paths of alteration zoning. At low fluid/rock ratios (f/r) the fluid composition is buffered by the silicate-oxide assemblage and remains close to invariant. This behavior extends to a f/r of 0.1 which exceeds the amount of exsolved magmatic fluids controlled by water solubility in silicate melts. With increasing peraluminosity of the parental granite, the Na-, K- and Fe-bearing fluids become more acidic and the oxidation state increases as a consequence of hydrogen and ferrous iron transfer to the fluid. With decreasing temperature, saline fluids become more Ca- and Na-rich, change from weakly acidic to alkaline, and become significantly more oxidizing. Large variations in Ca/Fe and Ca/Mg ratios in the fluid are a potential geothermometer. The mineral assemblage changes from cordierite-biotite granites through two-mica granites to chlorite-, epidote- and zeolite-bearing rocks. We have carried out three rock-titration simulations: (1) reaction with the 2 m NaCl fluid leads to albitization, chloritization and desilication, reproducing essential features observed in episyenites, (2) infiltration of a high-temperature fluid into the granite at 400 °C leads to hydrolytic

  17. Kyanite-garnet gneisses of the Kåfjord Nappe - North Norwegian Caledonides: P-T conditions and monazite Th-U-Pb dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemniak, Grzegorz; Kośmińska, Karolina; Majka, Jarosław; Janák, Marian; Manecki, Maciej

    2016-04-01

    monazite. This work is partially funded by AGH research grant no 11.11.140.319. References: Dangla, P., Damange, J. C., Ploquin, A., Quarnadel, J. M., Sonet, J., 1978. Donn'es geochronlogiques sur les Caledonides Scandinaves septentrionates (Troms, Norway du Nord). C. r. Acad. Sci. Paris, 286 D, 1653-1656. Holdaway, M. J., 2001. Recalibration of the GASP geobarometer in light of recent garnet and plagioclase activity models and versions of the garnet-biotite geothermometer. American Mineralogist, 86(10), 1117-1129. Wu, C. M., 2015. Revised empirical garnet-biotite-muscovite-plagioclase geobarometer in metapelites. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 33(2), 167-176.

  18. Cordon Caulle: an active volcanic-geothermal extensional system of Southern Andes of Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepulveda, F.

    2013-05-01

    Cordon Caulle (CC; 40.5° S) is an active volcanic-geothermal system of the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ; 37°-44°S). Morphologically, the CC system is a 6 km x 13 km volcanic plateau bordered by NW-trending structures, limited by Puyehue Volcano to the SE and by Caldera Nevada Caldera to the NW. While the SVZ is dominantly basaltic, CC is unique in that it has produced a wide compositional spectrum from basalt to rhyolite. The most recent volcanic activity of Puyehue-CC (last 70 ky) is dominantly silicic, including two historic fissure eruptions (1921-1922; 1960) and a recent central eruption from Puyehue Volcano (2011). Abnormally silicic volcanism was formerly attributed to a localized compression and long-term magma residence and differentiation, resulting from the NW orientation of underlying CC structures with respect to a NE-oriented σ1 (linked to regional strike-slip stress state). However, later studies, including examination of morpho-tectonic features; detailed structural analysis of the 1960 eruption (triggered by Mw 9.5 1960 Chilean Earthquake); InSAR deformation and gravity surveys, point to both historic and long-term extension at CC with σhmax oriented NNW to NW. The pre-2011 (i.e. Puyehue Volcano eruption) geothermal features of CC included boiling hot springs and geysers (Caldera Nevada) and fumaroles (CC and Puyehue Volcano). Both water and gas chemistry surveys were undertaken to assess the source fluid composition and equilibrium temperature. The combination of water and gas geothermometers led to a conceptual model of a stratified geothermal reservoir, with shallow, low-chloride, steam-heated aquifers equilibrated at temperatures between 150°-180°C, overlying a deeper, possibly dominated reservoir with temperatures in excess of 280°C. Gas chemistry also produced the highest He ratios of the SVZ, in agreement with a relatively pure, undiluted magmatic signature and heat source fueling the geothermal system. Other indicators such as N2/Ar

  19. Behavior of iron-group elements, oxybarometry, and genesis of unique chromite deposits in the Kempirsai massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashchukhin, I. S.; Votyakov, S. L.

    2009-04-01

    and ores of the southeastern and western blocks (the Almaz-Zhemchuzhina and Geophysical XII deposits). The degree of iron oxidation in the samples varies from 8 to 33%. In most cases, a difference in degree of iron oxidation is established in stoichiometric approximation and from Mössbauer data. In other words, the integral stoichiometry of ferrous and ferric ions is disturbed. Such a disturbance may be related not only to partial inversion of the Cr-spinel structure but also to local heterogeneity of the mineral at the micro- and nanolevels with clustering of cations and formation of their associates. An empirical correction of the olivine-Cr-spinel geothermometer and oxybarometer has been performed. The inverse correlation between oxygen fugacity and degree of depletion of ultramafic rocks indicates that these rocks were formed in a closed system with participation of a water-methane fluid. Along with stratification of ultramafics, this correlation testifies to a powerful asthenospheric source of reduced fluids. The retention of low oxygen fugacity in central portions of orebodies does not rule out that after a break this source participated in the formation of unique chromite deposits in the Kempirsai massif.

  20. Garnet as a reactant during and recorder of mid-crustal metamorphism: Sawtooth Metamorphic Complex, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutrow, B. L.; Henry, D.; Fukai, I.; Metz, K.

    2013-12-01

    supplemented by whole-rock phase diagram calculations (pseudosections) that restrict the observed assemblage (cpx + qtz + tr + ttn × K-fsp × phl × cal) to 660-625°C and X(CO2) to 0-0.2 at an assumed 7 kbar (Perple_X). Although outside of the range of calibration, the Ti-in-biotite thermometer provides Ts consistent with other geothermometers. A later stage mylonitic deformation is recorded in calc-silicates at Ts near 300-400oC at 3-4 kbar. These data indicate that the SMC is composed of tectonic slices that record multiple metamorphic events consistent with a collisional tectonic setting and represents a distinct, significant portion of middle-to-lower crust with uncertain affinity to nearby crustal provinces.

  1. Mineral chemistry and magnetic petrology of the Archean Planalto Suite, Carajás Province - Amazonian Craton: Implications for the evolution of ferroan Archean granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, Ingrid Roberta Viana da; Dall'Agnol, Roberto; Feio, Gilmara Regina Lima

    2016-04-01

    The Planalto Suite is located in the Canaã dos Carajás subdomain of the Carajás Province in the southeastern part of the Amazonian Craton. The suite is of Neoarchean age (∼2.73 Ga), ferroan character, and A-type affinity. Magnetic petrology studies allowed for the distinction of two groups: (1) ilmenite granites showing low magnetic susceptibility (MS) values between 0.6247×10-3 and 0.0102 × 10-3 SI and (2) magnetite-ilmenite-bearing granites with comparatively higher but still moderate MS values between 15.700×10-3 and 0.8036 × 10-3 SI. Textural evidence indicates that amphibole, ilmenite, titanite, and, in the rocks of Group 2, magnetite also formed during magmatic crystallization. However, compositional zoning suggests that titanite was partially re-equilibrated by subsolidus processes. The amphibole varies from potassian-hastingsite to chloro-potassian-hastingsite and shows Fe/(Fe + Mg) > 0.8. Biotite also shows high Fe/(Fe + Mg) ratios and is classified as annite. Plagioclase porphyroclasts are oligoclase (An25-10), and the grains of the recrystallized matrix show a similar composition or are albitic (An9-2). The dominant Group 1 granites of the Planalto Suite were formed under reduced conditions below the FMQ buffer. The Group 2 granites crystallized under more oxidizing conditions on or slightly above the FMQ buffer. Pressures of 900-700 MPa for the origin and of 500-300 MPa for the emplacement were estimated for the Planalto magmas. Geothermometers suggest initial crystallization temperatures between 900 °C and 830 °C, and the water content in the magma is estimated to be higher than 4 wt%. The Neoarchean Planalto Suite and the Estrela Granite of the Carajás Province reveal strong mineralogical analogies, and their amphibole and biotite compositions have high total Al contents. The latter characteristic is also observed in the same minerals of the Neoarchean Matok Pluton of the Limpopo Belt but not in those of the Proterozoic rapakivi A

  2. P-T conditions of Stor Jougdan garnet pyroxenite and phengite-bearing eclogite: further evidence of UHP metamorphism in the Seve Nappe Complex of northern Jämtland (Swedish Caledonides)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klonowska, Iwona; Janák, Marian; Majka, Jarosław; Kośmińska, Karolina

    2014-05-01

    The most recent comprehensive petrological studies of high grade rocks within the Seve Nappe Complex (SNC) in the Scandinavian Caledonides have resulted in new discoveries of ultrahigh pressure metamorphism (UHPM) probably of Late Ordovician age. The first evidence was documented in the kyanite-bearing eclogite dyke within the garnet peridotite at the lake Friningen locality (Janák et al. 2013) in northern Jämtland, Sweden (Gee et al. 2013). A peak pressure assemblage yielded metamorphic conditions within the coesite stability field (~30 kbar and 800°C). About 25 km to the southeast, the Tjeliken eclogite records P-T conditions of 25-26 kbar and 650-700°C (Majka et al. 2013). The study presented here, concerns P-T conditions of garnet pyroxenite and newly discovered, phengite-bearing eclogite located in the SNC about 4 km SE of Tjeliken Mt. on the northern side of lake Stor Jougdan. The investigated garnet pyroxenite, found as small veins within the garnet peridotite body, is composed essentially of Mg-garnet, -orthopyroxene, -clinopyroxene and -olivine, minor constituents include Cr-spinel, amphibole and phlogopite. The main mineral assemblage of phengite eclogite consists of garnet, omphacite, amphibole and minor phengite, plagioclase-diopside symplectites, rutile, titanite, zoisite and quartz (possibly former coesite). Garnet peridotite occurring by the Stor Jougdan lake was studied by Van Roermund (1989) who estimated the temperatures of c. 720-800°C using Fe-Mg geothermometer (Harley 1984a) and the pressures of 14-18 kbar using Al2O3 contents of the orthopyroxene (Harley 1984b) to constrain the P-T conditions of Caledonian metamorphism (M2 garnet with prograde growth zoning and M2 orthopyroxene according to Van Roermund 1989). In the present work, we have used garnet-orthopyroxene (Harley 1984b) and Ca in orthopyroxene (Brey & Koehler 1990) geothermometry in combination with Al in orthopyroxene geothermobarometry (Brey & Koehler 1990) and obtained the

  3. The Origin of Carbon-bearing Volatiles in Surprise Valley Hot Springs in the Great Basin: Carbon Isotope and Water Chemistry Characterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.; Romanek, Christopher; Datta, Saugata; Darnell, Mike; Bissada, Adry K.

    2013-01-01

    estimated by both dissolved SiO2 and Na-K-Ca geothermometers are in the range of 125.0 to 135.4 C, and higher than the values measured at orifices (77.3 to 90.0 C). CO2 and homologs of straight chain alkanes (C1-C5) were identified in gas samples. Carbon isotope values of alkanes increase with carbon numbers. The C-13 fractionation between CO2 and dissolved inorganic carbon suggests they are out of carbon isotope equilibrium. The hypothesis regarding the formation of carbon-bearing compounds in SVHS may involve two processes: 1) Under high heat flow conditions which are caused by regional faulting and crustal extension, original high molecular weight organic compounds (kerogens) in clay-rich rocks decomposed to generate methane and other alkane homologs. 2) The SVHS area is associated with outflow structures, and distant from the heat source. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate at shallow depth (< 90 C) is suggested as being responsible for the generation of CO2 in SVHS.

  4. The Origin of Carbon-bearing Volatiles in Surprise Valley Hot Springs in the Great Basin: Carbon Isotope aud Water Chemistry Characterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.; Romanek, Christopher; Datta, Saugata; Darnell, Mike; Bissada, Adry K.

    2013-01-01

    by both dissolved SiO2 and Na-K-Ca geothermometers are in the range of 125.0 to 135.4 oC, and higher than the values measured at orifices (77.3 to 90.0 oC). CO2 and homologs of straight chain alkanes (C1-C5) were identified in gas samples. Carbon isotope values of alkanes increase with carbon numbers. The 13C fractionation between CO2 and dissolved inorganic carbon suggests they are out of carbon isotope equilibrium. The hypothesis regarding the formation of carbon-bearing compounds in SVHS may involve two processes: 1) Under high heat flow conditions which are caused by regional faulting and crustal extension, original high molecular weight organic compounds (kerogens) in clay-rich rocks decomposed to generate methane and other alkane homologs. 2) The SVHS area is associated with outflow structures, and distant from the heat source. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate at shallow depth (< 90 oC) is suggested as being responsible for the generation of CO2 in SVHS.

  5. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope fractionation between brucite and aqueous NaCl solutions from 250 to 450°C

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saccocia, Peter J.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    1998-01-01

    -brucite pairs could be used as a geothermometer and that these coexisting phases should display the following order of 18O enrichment: talc > serpentine > brucite.

  6. Tectonic history of the central Sanandaj-Sirjan zone, Iran: Potentially Permian to Mesozoic polymetamorphism and implications for tectonics of the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakerardakani, Farzaneh; Neubauer, Franz; Genser, Johann; Masoudi, Fariborz; Mehrabi, Behzad; Monfaredi, Behzad; Friedl, Gertrude

    2015-04-01

    of 316 ± 1 Ma are interpreted as the cooling through appropriate Ar retention temperature (ca. 500 - 550 °C) after crystallization of amphibole in a magma. Interestingly, the amphibole porphyroclasts in the metagabbro from the Ampholite-Metagabbro unit give temperatures ranging from 540-610 °C and 3.1-5.0 in the core to 650-720 °C 5.9-8.5 kbar in the rim indicating a prograde part of the P-T path. In addition, two lenses of metapelite were investigated: First, a garnet-muscovite-biotite schist gives a P-T estimate of a garnet cores and rims of 640-655 °C at 6.2 to 7 kbar and 660-690 °C at 7.2-8.2 kbar, respectively. Ar-Ar experiments on white mica yield staircase patterns from 36 ± 12 Ma to 170 ± 2 Ma, implying polymetamorphism with a minimum Jurassic cooling through the Ar retention temperature of ca. 425 ± 25 °C and a Cenozoic low-grade metamorphic overprint. Second, a garnet-biotite schist yield lower P-T conditions, which vary from 600 to 620 °C and 5 to 6.5 kbar in garnet cores to 585-600 °C and 4.5-6 kbar for garnet rims. Ar-Ar experiments on white mica yield a staircase pattern from 52 ± 7 Ma to 131 ± 4 Ma. We interpret therefore, amphibolite-grade metamorphism predate 170 Ma and an overprint at around 50-32 Ma during emplacement of the Amphibolite-Metagabbro unit over the June complex and Galeh-Doz orthogneiss. All three units are overprinted by late-stage retrogressive chlorite, which gave temperatures ranging mainly from 240 to 350 °C according to the chlorite-geothermometer of Cathelineau (1988), the talc-bearing greenschists of the June complex bear two groups of temperatures, 225-270 °C and 330-385 °C. The amphibolite facies grade metamorphism is associated with ductile fabrics including a prominent ca. E-W trending stretching lineation oblique the strike of the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone. This implies pre-Middle Jurassic transpression. In summary, the new data demonstrate pre-Middle Jurassic amphibolite-grade metamorphism in both Galeh

  7. Determination of Uniaxial Compressive Strength of Ankara Agglomerate Considering Fractal Geometry of Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coskun, Aycan; Sonmez, Harun; Ercin Kasapoglu, K.; Ozge Dinc, S.; Celal Tunusluoglu, M.

    2010-05-01

    of granular materials. Engineering Geology 48, 231-244. Kahraman, S., Alber, M., Fener, M. and Gunaydin, O. 2008. Evaluating the geomechanical properties of Misis fault breccia (Turkey). Int. J. Rock Mech. Min. Sci, 45, (8), 1469-1479. Kolay, E., Kayabali, K., 2006. Investigation of the effect of aggregate shape and surface roughness on the slake durability index using the fractal dimension approach. Engineering Geology 86, 271-294. Kruhl, J.H., Nega, M., 1996. The fractal shape of sutured quartz grain boundaries: application as a geothermometer. Geologische Rundschau 85, 38-43. Lindquist E.S. 1994. The strength, deformation properties of melange. PhD thesis, University of California, Berkeley, 1994. 264p. Lindquist E.S. and Goodman R.E. 1994. The strength and deformation properties of the physical model m!elange. In: Nelson PP, Laubach SE, editors. Proceedings of the First North American Rock Mechanics Conference (NARMS), Austin, Texas. Rotterdam: AA Balkema; 1994. Pardini, G., 2003. Fractal scaling of surface roughness in artificially weathered smectite rich soil regoliths. Geoderma 117, 157-167. Sezer E., 2009. A computer program for fractal dimension (FRACEK) with application on type of mass movement characterization. Computers and Geosciences (doi:10.1016/j.cageo.2009.04.006). Sonmez H, Tuncay E, and Gokceoglu C., 2004. Models to predict the uniaxial compressive strength and the modulus of elasticity for Ankara Agglomerate. Int. J. Rock Mech. Min. Sci., 41 (5), 717-729. Sonmez, H., Gokceoglu, C., Medley, E.W., Tuncay, E., and Nefeslioglu, H.A., 2006. Estimating the uniaxial compressive strength of a volcanic bimrock. Int. J. Rock Mech. Min. Sci., 43 (4), 554-561. Zorlu K., 2008. Description of the weathering states of building stones by fractal geometry and fuzzy inference system in the Olba ancient city (Southern Turkey). Engineering Geology 101 (2008) 124-133.

  8. Hydrogeologic framework and occurrence, movement, and chemical characterization of groundwater in Dixie Valley, west-central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huntington, Jena M.; Garcia, C. Amanda; Rosen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    generally can be characterized as a sodium bicarbonate type, with greater proportions of chloride north of the Dixie Valley playa, and greater proportions of sulfate south of the playa. Analysis of major ion water chemistry data sampled during the study period indicates that groundwater north and south of Township 22N differ chemically. Dixie Valley groundwater quality is marginal when compared with national primary and secondary drinking-water standards. Arsenic and fluoride concentrations exceed primary drinking water standards, and total dissolved solids and manganese concentrations exceed secondary drinking water standards in samples collected during this study. High concentrations of boron and tungsten also were observed. Chemical comparisons between basin-fill and geothermal aquifer water indicate that most basin-fill groundwater sampled could contain 10–20 percent geothermal water. Geothermal indicators such as high temperature, lithium, boron, chloride, and silica suggest that mixing occurs in many wells that tap the basin-fill aquifer, particularly on the north, south, and west sides of the basin. Magnesium-lithium geothermometers indicate that some basin-fill aquifer water sampled for the current study likely originates from water that was heated above background mountain-block recharge temperatures (between 3 and 15 degrees Celsius), highlighting the influence of mixing with warm water that was possibly derived from geothermal sources.

  9. Temperature data from wells in Long Valley Caldera, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrar, Christopher; DeAngelo, Jacob; Williams, Colin; Grubb, Frederick; Hurwitz, Shaul

    2010-01-01

    thermal equilibrium. The maximum reservoir temperature for LVC is estimated to be about 220?C on the basis of chemical geothermometers (Fournier and Truesdell, 1973) using analytical results from water samples collected from a large number of wells and springs across the caldera and around its periphery (Lewis, 1974; Mariner and Wiley, 1976; Farrar and others, 1985, 1987, 1989, White and Peterson, 1991). The deepest well in LVC (~3 km) is the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVEW) drilled in the 1990?s with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy to investigate the potential for near-magmatic-temperature energy extraction and the occurrence of magma under the central part of the resurgent dome (Finger and Eichelberger, 1990; Finger and Jacobsen, 1999; Sackett and others, 1999). However, temperatures beneath the resurgent dome have proved disappointingly low and in LVEW reach a maximum of only 102 degrees C in a long isothermal section (2,100 to 3,000 m) in Mesozoic basement rocks (Farrar and others, 2003). Temperature data from well logs and geothermometry reveal that the highest temperatures in LVC are beneath the western moat. The hottest temperatures measured in LVC exceed 200 degrees C in two wells (44-16 and RDO-8) located in the western moat. Well 44-16 was drilled through the entire thickness of post-caldera volcanic fill and bottomed in Mesozoic basement. Well RDO-8 was drilled through post-caldera volcanic rocks and 305 m into the Bishop Tuff (Wollenberg and others, 1986). Temperatures in the hydrothermal system decrease toward the east by processes of conduction and dilution from cold groundwater recharge that occurs mostly around the caldera margin and beneath the resurgent dome. Reservoir temperatures at Casa Diablo (fig.1) are about 170?C (for example, MBP-3 and Mammoth-1), decreasing to about 100 degrees C in wells near Hot Creek Gorge (for example, MW-4 and CH-10B), and are generally less than 50?C in thermal springs near Lake

  10. Thermochronological modeling of the age of Vologda crystalline basement of the Russian platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, V. Yu.; Petrov, D. B.; Lebedev, V. A.

    2010-05-01

    The results of the complex petrological and isotope-geochronological study of the crystalline rock from the deep drilling hall of the south of Vologda segment are presented in this work. The crystalline basement of the platform in Vologda region lie in a depth 2.5 km and represented by high alumina mica schist. The thick sedimentary cover consists of vendian and phanerozoic sediments. Upper level covered by quaternary glacial deposits up to 50 m. A core sample from the borehole of Fedotovo village was obtained from the depth 2600 m. It is fine-medium grained metamorphic mica schist with sillimanite. The mineral assemblage represented by association: Pl-Bt-Ms-Sil-Qtz-Mag +Zrn +Mnz. The metamorphic schist of the crystalline basement contains several radio isotope sensors. There are two rock forming potassium reach mica, - biotite (Bt) and muscovite (Ms) and accessories monazite (Mnz), - the phosphate of REE enriched by Th and U. It was a reason why traditional K-Ar isotope dating method in the combination with electron microprobe U-Th-Pb dating method CHIME [Suzuki et al. 1991] was used for Vologda metapelite rocks dating. In addition to geochronology, the detailed petrological investigation using electron microprobe allowed also to determine thermodynamic parameters of metamorphic system with a help of the mineral thermobarometry and finally estimate the age of the metamorphic thermal event using experimental diffusion data of Ar and Pb in minerals [Gerasimov et al. 2004]. The temperature of the regional metamorphism was estimated using Bt+Mag+Qtz and Bt+Ms geothermometers [Glassley 1983, Hoisch 1989]. Taking into account the field of the sillimanite P-T stability it is possible to conclude that the peak of metamorphism was reached at temperature about ТоС=550+/-30° C and pressure Р=4+/-1 kbar. Isotope thermochronology of the sample demonstrate nearly Svecofenian age 1.7-1.8 Ga of Vologda crystalline basement. K-Ar isotope dating of black and white mica