Science.gov

Sample records for geriatric nursing

  1. Enhancing geriatric nursing scholarship: specialization versus generalization.

    PubMed

    Mezey, M; Fulmer, T; Fairchild, S

    2000-07-01

    This article explores the relative merits of encouraging preparation of more nurses with specialization in geriatrics as compared to encouraging geriatric preparation among nurses whose major field of study is outside geriatrics. The article explores two approaches to examining capacity for geriatric nursing scholarship among nurse scholars not involved in geriatrics, and in schools of nursing with strength in research but with little geriatric research. The findings show an ongoing need to strengthen geriatric nursing as an area of specialization. Faculty prepared in geriatric nursing are underrepresented in schools of nursing, and only a small number of doctoral students specialize in geriatric nursing. Academic nursing programs with strength in geriatric nursing need ongoing support to maintain and expand current geriatric programs. Data support that encouraging individual non-geriatric nurse faculty and doctoral candidates to focus their work on areas of concern to geriatric nursing, and strengthening geriatrics in research-intensive schools of nursing that have not heavily invested in geriatric scholarship are viable options for strengthening academic geriatric nursing. Establishing mechanisms to attract nurse scholars working outside the scope of geriatric nursing to address clinical issues of concern to older adults offers promise in rapidly attracting new scholars to geriatric nursing.

  2. Geriatric nursing in acute settings.

    PubMed

    Fulmer, T; Ashley, J; Reilly, C

    1986-01-01

    In conclusion, it is important to reiterate the interdependent nature of the functional health patterns as they relate to the geriatric patient in the acute care setting. Further, the combination of the primary nursing model with the functional health pattern approach that leads to subsequent nursing diagnoses provides a comprehensive care approach, which is so important for the elderly patient. As elders live longer, become frailer, and are subject to increasingly frequent hospitalizations, it will become more and more important to provide care in a manner that decreases fragmentation, increases individualization, and makes provisions for comprehensive and wholistic continuing care.

  3. Enhancing Geriatric Curriculum in Nursing School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    People are living longer. The average age of the population is increasing, and is expected to keep growing. Any person age 65 and older is now considered "geriatric." However, although growing, this population is not receiving adequate nursing care, and results in increased pain, falls, and even death. Geriatric curriculum is becoming…

  4. Enhancing Geriatric Curriculum in Nursing School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    People are living longer. The average age of the population is increasing, and is expected to keep growing. Any person age 65 and older is now considered "geriatric." However, although growing, this population is not receiving adequate nursing care, and results in increased pain, falls, and even death. Geriatric curriculum is becoming…

  5. The Filipino Nursing Students' Dilemmas in Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Cruz, Andrei Angelo R.; Cruz, Angela Laurice G.; Cruz, Robert Edward D.; Cuarto, Jose Mari Nino L.

    2009-01-01

    The continually rising percentage of the elderly population and the demand for geriatric nursing care are dramatically related. While it is true that most undergraduate programs prepare nurses for the care of geriatric patients, most receive limited academic preparation in the nursing curriculum (Williams & Mezey, 2000). This is particularly…

  6. The Filipino Nursing Students' Dilemmas in Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Cruz, Andrei Angelo R.; Cruz, Angela Laurice G.; Cruz, Robert Edward D.; Cuarto, Jose Mari Nino L.

    2009-01-01

    The continually rising percentage of the elderly population and the demand for geriatric nursing care are dramatically related. While it is true that most undergraduate programs prepare nurses for the care of geriatric patients, most receive limited academic preparation in the nursing curriculum (Williams & Mezey, 2000). This is particularly…

  7. Improving the quality of geriatric nursing care: enduring outcomes from the geriatric nursing education consortium.

    PubMed

    Gray-Miceli, Deanna; Wilson, Laurie Dodge; Stanley, Joan; Watman, Rachael; Shire, Amy; Sofaer, Shoshanna; Mezey, Mathy

    2014-01-01

    The nation's aging demography, few nursing faculty with gerontological nursing expertise, and insufficient geriatric content in nursing programs have created a national imperative to increase the supply of nurses qualified to provide care for older adults. Geriatric Nursing Education Consortium (GNEC), a collaborative program of the John A. Hartford Foundation, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and the New York University (NYU) Nursing Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing, was initiated to provide faculty with the necessary skills, knowledge, and competency to implement sustainable curricular innovations in care of older adults. This article describes the background, step-by-step process approach to the development of GNEC evidence-based curricular materials, and the dissemination of these materials through 6-, 2-, and a half-day national Faculty Development Institutes (FDIs). Eight hundred eight faculty, representing 418 schools of nursing, attended. A total of 479 individuals responded to an evaluation conducted by Baruch College that showed faculty feasibility to incorporate GNEC content into courses, confidence in teaching and incorporating content, and overall high rating of the GNEC materials. The impact of GNEC is discussed along with effects on faculty participants over 2 years. Administrative- and faculty-level recommendations to sustain and expand GNEC are highlighted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Geriatric Training Needs of Nursing-Home Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubart, Emily; Segal, Refael; Rosenfeld, Vera; Madjar, Jack; Kakuriev, Michael; Leibovitz, Arthur

    2009-01-01

    Medical care in nursing homes is not provided by board-licensed geriatricians; it mainly comes from physicians in need of educational programs in the field of geriatrics. Such programs, based on curriculum guidelines, should be developed. The purpose of this study was to seek input from nursing home physicians on their perceived needs for training…

  9. Geriatric Training Needs of Nursing-Home Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubart, Emily; Segal, Refael; Rosenfeld, Vera; Madjar, Jack; Kakuriev, Michael; Leibovitz, Arthur

    2009-01-01

    Medical care in nursing homes is not provided by board-licensed geriatricians; it mainly comes from physicians in need of educational programs in the field of geriatrics. Such programs, based on curriculum guidelines, should be developed. The purpose of this study was to seek input from nursing home physicians on their perceived needs for training…

  10. Family Perceptions of Geriatric Foster Family and Nursing Home Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Kathryn L.; Rose, Charles L.

    1987-01-01

    Relatives (N=62) of matched pairs of patients in geriatric foster homes and nursing homes rated care provided to their relatives. Significantly more foster family patients had positive pre-placement attitudes than did nursing home patients. Upon follow-up, relatives of foster patients reported seeing more patient improvement, satisfaction,…

  11. The Success and Struggles of Filipino Geriatric Nurses in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Coronel, Rona Denise V.; Chua, Kannerin O.; Constantino, Mariz G.; Cordova, Ericsann James C.

    2009-01-01

    Geriatric nursing is a physically and emotionally demanding job in healthcare. It is a neglected field despite the growing population of the elderly, and the experiences of geriatric nurses are one of the unrecognized aspects of this field. This qualitative study purports to explore the successes and struggles of the lived experiences of a select…

  12. The Success and Struggles of Filipino Geriatric Nurses in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Coronel, Rona Denise V.; Chua, Kannerin O.; Constantino, Mariz G.; Cordova, Ericsann James C.

    2009-01-01

    Geriatric nursing is a physically and emotionally demanding job in healthcare. It is a neglected field despite the growing population of the elderly, and the experiences of geriatric nurses are one of the unrecognized aspects of this field. This qualitative study purports to explore the successes and struggles of the lived experiences of a select…

  13. Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders – a model for optimising the geriatric nursing practice environment

    PubMed Central

    Capezuti, Elizabeth; Boltz, Marie; Cline, Daniel; Dickson, Victoria Vaughn; Rosenberg, Marie-Claire; Wagner, Laura; Shuluk, Joseph; Nigolian, Cindy

    2012-01-01

    Aims and objectives To explain the relationship between a positive nurse practice environment (NPE) and implementation of evidence-based practices. To describe the components of NICHE (Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders) programmes that contribute to a positive geriatric nursing practice environment. Background The NPE is a system-level intervention for promoting quality and patient safety; however, there are population-specific factors that influence the nurses’ perception of their practice and its’ relationship with patient outcomes. Favourable perceptions of the geriatric-specific NPE are associated with better perceptions of geriatric care quality. Designs Discursive paper. Method In this selective critical analysis of the descriptive and empirical literature, we present the implementation of geriatric models in relation to the NPE and components of the NICHE programme that support hospitals’ systemic capacity to effectively integrate and sustain evidence-based geriatric knowledge into practice. Results Although there are several geriatric models and chronic care models available, NICHE has been the most successful in recruiting hospital membership as well as contributing to the depth of geriatric hospital programming. Conclusions Although all geriatric care models require significant nursing input, only NICHE focuses on the nursing staff’s perception of the care environment for geriatric practice. Studies in NICHE hospitals demonstrate that quality geriatric care requires a NPE in which the structure and processes of hospital services focus on specific patient care needs. Relevance to clinical practice The implementation of evidence-based models addressing the unique needs of hospitalised older adults requires programmes such as NICHE that serve as technical resources centre and a catalyst for networking among facilities committed to quality geriatric care. Unprecedented international growth in the ageing population compels us to examine how

  14. [The mobile geriatric team of Bretonneau Hospital and nursing home professionals].

    PubMed

    Braga, Charlotte; Chansiaux, Christine; Raynaud-Simon, Agathe

    2015-01-01

    In the wake of an experimental project, external mobile geriatric teams have been working in nursing homes in order to train the nursing teams in caring for geriatric pathologies. The mobile teams also give diagnostic and therapeutic recommendations in order to direct where necessary these dependent elderly people, often with multiple pathologies, towards geriatric care.

  15. Nurses' Perspectives on the Geriatric Nursing Practice Environment and the Quality of Older People's Care in Ontario Acute Care Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Fox, Mary T; Sidani, Souraya; Butler, Jeffrey I; Tregunno, Deborah

    2017-06-01

    Background Cultivating hospital environments that support older people's care is a national priority. Evidence on geriatric nursing practice environments, obtained from studies of registered nurses (RNs) in American teaching hospitals, may have limited applicability to Canada, where RNs and registered practical nurses (RPNs) care for older people in predominantly nonteaching hospitals. Purpose This study describes nurses' perceptions of the overall quality of care for older people and the geriatric nursing practice environment (geriatric resources, interprofessional collaboration, and organizational value of older people's care) and examines if these perceptions differ by professional designation and hospital teaching status. Methods A cross-sectional survey, using Dillman's tailored design, that included Geriatric Institutional Assessment Profile subscales, was completed by 2005 Ontario RNs and registered practical nurses to assess their perceptions of the quality of care and geriatric nursing practice environment. Results Scores on the Geriatric Institutional Assessment Profile subscales averaged slightly above the midpoint except for geriatric resources which was slightly below. Registered practical nurses rated the quality of care and geriatric nursing practice environment higher than RNs; no significant differences were found by hospital teaching status. Conclusions Nurses' perceptions of older people's care and the geriatric nursing practice environment differ by professional designation but not hospital teaching status. Teaching and nonteaching hospitals should both be targeted for geriatric nursing practice environment improvement initiatives.

  16. An Innovative Continuing Nursing Education Program Targeting Key Geriatric Conditions for Hospitalized Older People in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Shen, Jun; Wu, Haifeng; Ding, Fu; He, Xizhen; Zhu, Yueping

    2013-01-01

    A lack of knowledge in registered nurses about geriatric conditions is one of the major factors that contribute to these conditions being overlooked in hospitalized older people. In China, an innovative geriatric continuing nursing education program aimed at developing registered nurses' understanding of the complex care needs of hospitalized…

  17. An Innovative Continuing Nursing Education Program Targeting Key Geriatric Conditions for Hospitalized Older People in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Shen, Jun; Wu, Haifeng; Ding, Fu; He, Xizhen; Zhu, Yueping

    2013-01-01

    A lack of knowledge in registered nurses about geriatric conditions is one of the major factors that contribute to these conditions being overlooked in hospitalized older people. In China, an innovative geriatric continuing nursing education program aimed at developing registered nurses' understanding of the complex care needs of hospitalized…

  18. How Many Sides Does a Coin Have? A Phenomenology of Filipino Nurses' Motivation and Attitudes toward Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Dangoy, Reena-Jane D.; David, Kathleen Christian V.; Dayo, Ken Jarrett H.; de Claro, Keisha A.; de Guzman, Giorgio von Gerri G.; de Jesus, Gerald Ian D.

    2009-01-01

    Nurses play a significant role in geriatric care. However, as the aging population and demand for geriatric nurses increase worldwide, shortages of nurses seem to arise. This creates the need to assess and address the motivation and attitudes of nurses toward geriatric care. The intent of this qualitative study is to surface the essence or the…

  19. How Many Sides Does a Coin Have? A Phenomenology of Filipino Nurses' Motivation and Attitudes toward Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Dangoy, Reena-Jane D.; David, Kathleen Christian V.; Dayo, Ken Jarrett H.; de Claro, Keisha A.; de Guzman, Giorgio von Gerri G.; de Jesus, Gerald Ian D.

    2009-01-01

    Nurses play a significant role in geriatric care. However, as the aging population and demand for geriatric nurses increase worldwide, shortages of nurses seem to arise. This creates the need to assess and address the motivation and attitudes of nurses toward geriatric care. The intent of this qualitative study is to surface the essence or the…

  20. Cooperative learning strategies to teach nutrition to geriatric nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Marta; Rocandio, Ana Ma; Ansotegui, Laura; Pascual, Estíbaliz; Martínez de la Pera, Concepción

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that cooperative learning strategies will help to increase nutrition knowledge of nurses and nursing assistants caring for the elderly in different institutional communities of the Basque Country, Spain. The target population was a sample of volunteers, 16 nurses and 28 nursing assistants. Training consisted of 12 nutrition education sessions using cooperative strategies conducted over a period of 3 consecutive weeks. The assessment instruments included two pretest and two posttest questionnaires with questions selected in multiple-choice format. The first questionnaire was about general knowledge of applied nutrition (0-88 point scale) and the second one on geriatric nutrition knowledge (0-18 point scale). Data were analyzed using SPSS vs. 11.0. The outcomes indicated a significant increase in general nutrition knowledge (difference between the pre- and post-test mean score: 14.5+/-10.1; P<0.001) and in geriatric nutrition knowledge for all participants (difference between the pre- and post-test mean score: 4.6+/-4.6; P<0.001). So the results indicated that cooperative learning strategies could improve the nutrition knowledge of nursing staff. Additionally, the results of this study provide direction to continuing nutrition education program planners regarding appropriate content and methodology for programs.

  1. Geriatric pain competencies and knowledge assessment for nurses in long term care settings

    PubMed Central

    Swafford, Kristen L.; Miller, Lois L.; Herr, Keela; Forcucci, Chris; Kelly, Anne Marie L.; Bakerjian, Debra

    2015-01-01

    Pain in older adults is a prevalent problem that affects quality of life and challenges nurses, particularly those caring for older adults living in long term care settings. Despite the national priority of pain management, insufficient knowledge of nurses about geriatric pain is a documented barrier to effective geriatric pain management in all long term care settings. To address this knowledge gap, a website (GeriatricPain.org) was developed by the National Geriatric Pain Collaborative with a grant from the MayDay Fund to provide a single site for evidenced-based, easy-to-use, downloadable resources on pain management. This paper describes the development of the most recent addition to the website, a set of evidence-based core geriatric pain management competencies and a geriatric pain knowledge assessment, and discusses their potential uses in improving pain care for older adults. Geriatric Pain Competencies and Knowledge Assessment for Nurses in Long Term Care Settings. PMID:25037079

  2. [Nursing care and essential oils in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Lobstein, Annelise; Marinier, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Aromatherapy is a valuable complementary therapeutic tool which is increasingly being used in hospitals. Essential oils help to improve patients' quality of life. They can be used for well-being purposes as well in specific nursing procedures. Some services offer aromatherapy through diffusion, inhalation, massages or aromatic baths. The benefits for healthcare teams as well as for patients are undeniable. There is also a significant reduction in the consumption of certain drugs.

  3. [Geriatric nursing staff retention. Opportunities, potentials, and strategies].

    PubMed

    Joost, A

    2013-08-01

    Retaining geriatric nurses in their line of work could be an important strategy to prevent the shortage of skilled staff in the future. A prerequisite for this is detailed knowledge of the length and structure of professional careers. The IWAK ( Institut für Wirtschaft, Arbeit und Kultur) evaluated data from the German Social Insurance and carried out a structural analysis of the professional careers of geriatric nurses. Results showed that the average duration of professional careers is 20 years, of which 11.7 years constitute the period of employment and 7.8 years account for periods of inactivity. According to these findings, there is a considerable potential in extending professional careers and reducing the periods of inactivity to make better use of the existing skilled staff and to reduce staff shortage in this area. Concrete measures could involve improvement of working conditions (with the aim of avoiding long periods of inactivity and illness-related premature career endings as well as of increasing job satisfaction), creating better conditions for a good balance between work and family life, as well as setting up individual strategies to expand weekly working hours. Key players are businesses but also local authorities and politicians.

  4. Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity: results after the first 10 years and implications for the future.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Patricia D; Archbold, Patricia G; Fagin, Claire M; Galik, Elizabeth; Siegel, Elena; Sofaer, Shoshanna; Firminger, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    In 2000, the John A. Hartford Foundation launched a multi-million dollar investment in Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity (BAGNC) at the American Academy of Nursing (AAN). After a decade of focused support to increase scholarship, research, leadership, and institutional collaboration, is there evidence this program is successful in achieving its goals? Equally important, as the need for quality geriatric nursing care increases with the expanding aging population and associated complex health conditions, how does the experience and outcomes of this program inform nursing's future? To address both questions, the authors first provide an overview of geriatric nursing prior to and up to the time the BAGNC program began, then review results of an external evaluation of the BAGNC program, and finally propose goals and strategies for the next 20 years of academic geriatric nursing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigating pharmacy students' attitudes toward nursing facility patients after a geriatric rotation.

    PubMed

    Gavaza, Paul; Hodges, Ethan; Adkins, Donna

    2013-08-01

    To investigate pharmacy students' attitudes toward nursing facility patients and nursing facilities after completing a geriatric rotation. A cross-sectional post-test 20-item survey. An academic institution and two nursing facilities. Nursing facility patients and second-year Appalachian College of Pharmacy students. Students in Early Pharmacy Practice Experience 2 geriatric course. Students' attitudes toward nursing facility patients and nursing facilities (14 items). Of 138 students, 91.4% completed the survey following their geriatric rotation. Most students had positive attitudes toward nursing facility patients and nursing facilities on all 14 items. For example, students thought, "most older people are pleasant to be with" (mean = 3.88 ± 1.1). About 98% of students had adequate knowledge of geriatrics. Age, gender, marital status, and relationship with grandparents were not associated with students' attitudes (P ≯ 0.05). Pharmacy students had positive attitudes toward elderly patients and nursing facilities and adequate knowledge of geriatrics after completing the geriatric rotation.

  6. Expanding palliative care nursing education in California: the ELNEC Geriatric project.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kathe; Thrane, Susan; Virani, Rose; Malloy, Pam; Ferrell, Betty

    2011-04-01

    In the past decade, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's 2002 report Means to a Better End: A Report on Dying in America Today and other studies brought attention to deficiencies in care of the dying in the USA. Palliative care's mandate is to promote a 'good death' through expert symptom management and compassionate care that addresses the psychosocial needs and dignity of persons at the end of life. The End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) Geriatric 'train-the-trainer' project was launched in 2007 to increase the knowledge and educational skills of nurses and unlicensed staff providing end-of-life care for older adults in nursing homes, skilled nursing facilities, long-term care, and hospices. From 2007 through 2009, 351 California-based nurses and nursing home staff attended one of four ELNEC Geriatric courses. This paper describes programme development, implementation, follow-up evaluations, and examples of participants' use of the ELNEC Geriatric curriculum.

  7. Geriatric Training Academy: innovative education for certified nurse aides and charge nurses.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Barbara; Marshall-Gray, Paula; Laurence, Ann; Green, Alexia; Valadez, Ana; Scott-Tilley, Donna; Merritt, Pearl

    2007-03-01

    Quality care for the rapidly growing number of older Americans is a major challenge facing the health care industry today. With the baby-boom generation "coming of age"--older age-the need for quality long-term care workers is on the rise. It is estimated that the number of persons needing assisted or alternative living arrangements will increase from 15 million in 2000 to 27 million in 2050 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services [HHS], 2003). In response to the rising demand for quality long-term care workers, the Geriatric Education and Training Academy (the Academy) was created at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) to provide advanced geriatric education and training for certified nurse aides (CNA), licensed vocational nurses (LVN) and registered nurses (RN) who work in long-term care facilities. This article describes how the Academy is addressing the need for the recruitment, education, and retention of long-term care workers for the expanding geriatric population in West Texas.

  8. [Regional geriatric team--a model for cooperation between nursing homes and hospitals].

    PubMed

    Sellaeg, Wenche Frogn

    2005-04-21

    Few studies describe and evaluate the use of ambulatory geriatric teams in nursing homes. This article gives an account of a model in which a multidisciplinary group from the local hospital has been visiting 17 communities in Norway twice a year for 11 years. The ambulatory geriatric team includes a geriatrician, a geriatric nurse, a physiotherapist and an occupational therapist. Their aim is to raise the quality of geriatric assessment and care and to enhance the cooperation between the hospital and the nursing homes in the communities. The team members are doing a comprehensive geriatric assessment of some of the patients; they assess cases for further referral, and examine patients with declining functioning with a view to rehabilitation. The team provides instruction in various aspects of geriatrics to community care professionals. Much time is devoted to discussions on problems raised by the staff, such as management of patients with dementia-related behavioural problems, and to provide feedback to staff-members. The team liaise between hospitals, nursing homes and community care services in the communities in order to enhance communication between the professionals involved. An evaluation of the team was done on behalf of the National Institute of Health through a postal questionnaire which was returned by 223 doctors, nurses and allied health care professionals. The results indicate that visits by the ambulatory team improve the knowledge of doctors and allied professionals about diseases in the elderly; 92% reported that they now felt they were doing a better job.

  9. Secondary individual prevention of hand dermatitis in geriatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Schürer, Nanna Y; Klippel, Ulrike; Schwanitz, Hans J

    2005-03-01

    The incidence of occupational skin disease (OSD) in geriatric nurses (GNs) is increasing in Germany. A prospective controlled study of secondary individual prevention (SIP) of OSD in GNs was conducted. Two hundred and nine participants completed questionnaires prior to the start of the program and 3 months after its conclusion. One hundred and two GNs participated in an interventional program (intervention group, IG). Severity of OSD was classified upon each visit. Delta-TEWL values were measured at regular intervals. Findings were compared with those for 107 control group (CG) participants consulting a dermatologist on demand. SIP was not offered to CG participants. Upon entry, 89% of IG and 90% CG complained of OSD (NS). Dermatologic examination revealed skin changes in 90% of IG at first consultation. Upon study completion, 59% of IG was free of OSD. Questionnaires 3 months after study completion revealed skin lesions in 53% of IG and 82% of CG (p<0.01). Delta-TEWL measurements reflected significant improvement of the epidermal barrier during SIP in IG (median 6.9-3.0 g/m(2)/h, p<0.001). Three months after study completion, 96% of IG and 86% of CG were still employed. Objective dermatologic and skin physiologic data reveal that SIP in GNs is effective in the secondary prevention of OSD. Further, IG was superior to CG in terms of health maintenance and employment.

  10. Filipino Nursing Students' Behavioral Intentions toward Geriatric Care: A Structural Equation Model (SEM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Jimenez, Benito Christian B.; Jocson, Kathlyn P.; Junio, Aileen R.; Junio, Drazen E.; Jurado, Jasper Benjamin N.; Justiniano, Angela Bianca F.

    2013-01-01

    Anchored on the key constucts of Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior (1985), this paper seeks to test a model that explores the influence of knowledge, attitude, and caring behavior on nursing students' behavioral intention toward geriatric care. A five-part survey-questionnaire was administered to 839 third and fourth year nursing students from a…

  11. Filipino Nursing Students' Behavioral Intentions toward Geriatric Care: A Structural Equation Model (SEM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Jimenez, Benito Christian B.; Jocson, Kathlyn P.; Junio, Aileen R.; Junio, Drazen E.; Jurado, Jasper Benjamin N.; Justiniano, Angela Bianca F.

    2013-01-01

    Anchored on the key constucts of Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior (1985), this paper seeks to test a model that explores the influence of knowledge, attitude, and caring behavior on nursing students' behavioral intention toward geriatric care. A five-part survey-questionnaire was administered to 839 third and fourth year nursing students from a…

  12. Sustaining the Geriatric Resource Nurse Model at the University of Virginia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Virginia K; Fletcher, Kathleen R

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the continued evolution of the Geriatric Resource Nurse Model at the University of Virginia, one of the original NICHE (Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders) sites established in 1994. The model developed slowly, unit by unit, a few nurses at a time, and has evolved with a multidisciplinary focus. Flexibility, mentoring relationships, a core curriculum, additional stimulating educational offerings, and a strong leadership team have been key influences on sustainability and growth.

  13. Filling the void in geriatric mental health: the Geropsychiatric Nursing Collaborative as a model for change.

    PubMed

    Beck, Cornelia; Buckwalter, Kathleen C; Dudzik, Pamela M; Evans, Lois K

    2011-01-01

    Mental health for older adults is a looming public health problem. Yet, geriatric mental health specialists are a scarce commodity, and few generalists have had formal education in either geriatrics or mental health. A multilevel collaboration using a diffusion of innovation model served to achieve change nationally in preparing entry-and advanced practice-level nurses to improve the mental health of older Americans. The John A. Hartford Foundation Geropsychiatric Nursing Collaborative at the American Academy of Nursing is the exemplar described here. The Geropsychiatric Nursing Collaborative developed and infused mental health competency enhancements for generalist and specialist nurses; identified and disseminated teaching-learning strategies to convey related key concepts using the POGOe (Portal of Geriatric Online Education) website; raised awareness through multiple presentations and publications; and notified deans of every school of nursing about these new resources. Fully embracing diffusion of innovation principles, the Geropsychiatric Nursing Collaborative is achieving change in this critical area of nursing practice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Developing future nursing home medical directors: a curriculum for geriatric medicine fellows.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Masaya; Wen, Aida; Masaki, Kamal

    2013-03-01

    Long term care facilities are important sites of care for elderly adults. Despite a growing need and interest in medical direction in nursing homes, there have been limited educational opportunities in this area for geriatric medicine fellows. This article describes a novel medical director's curriculum for first-year geriatric medicine fellows to prepare them for the role of nursing home medical director. This novel curriculum has been integrated into the Department of Geriatric Medicine's Fellowship training program at the John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii. The curriculum consists of seven seminars that have been integrated into the didactic sessions during the first year of fellowship. Core content areas include: (1) roles and responsibilities of the medical director, (2) infection control, (3) physician documentation, (4) federal regulations and state surveys, (5) quality improvement, (6) culture change in nursing homes, and (7) transitions in care. All topics were discussed using the framework described by the American Medical Directors Association's position statement on the roles and responsibilities of the nursing home medical director. To our knowledge, this is the first curriculum in the medical literature that is designed to prepare geriatric medicine fellows for roles as medical directors in nursing homes. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Gerontology found me: gaining understanding of advanced practice nurses in geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Detrixhe, Dia D; Grassley, Jane S; Zeigler, Vicki L

    2013-10-01

    Examining the meanings of the experiences of advanced practice nurses (APNs) who chose to work with older adults and why they continue to work with this population was the focus of this hermeneutic qualitative research study. Twelve geriatric APNs currently practicing in two South Central states were interviewed using an open-ended interview guide. Using Gadamerian hermeneutics, the researchers identified Gerontology Found Me as the significant expression that reflected the fundamental meaning of the experience as a whole. Four themes emerged that further described the meanings of the participants' personal, educational, and professional experiences: Becoming a Gerontology Nurse, Being a Gerontology Nurse, Belonging to Gerontology, and Bringing Others to Gerontology. This study concluded that APNs' personal and professional experiences were more influential than educational experiences to become geriatric nurses, and having these personal and professional experiences of being in relationship with older individuals further contributed to their choice of gerontology.

  16. Preventing elder abuse and neglect in geriatric institutions: Solutions from nursing care providers.

    PubMed

    Wangmo, Tenzin; Nordström, Karin; Kressig, Reto W

    2017-01-27

    This study explores how and why abuse and neglect occurs in geriatric institutions and presents practical prevention measures. Exploratory qualitative interviews were carried out with purposive sample of 23 nursing staff members. They were recruited from different institutions caring for older patients in the north-western region of Switzerland. These interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis. Participating nursing staff members reported several factors pertaining to the care provider, the older patient, and the institution that precipitated abuse and neglect. They mentioned different solutions that could help them address their responsibilities in a reasonable manner. The solutions included, for example, ensuring proper education and training, better management nursing care provider's responsibilities and timely intervention to address abuse and neglect, as well as rotating care provider. Implementing these suggestions will allow geriatric institutions, its managers, and nursing care providers to improve quality of care and reduce such negative occurrences in these settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Nursing home research: the first International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics (IAGG) research conference.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Yves; Resnick, Barbara; Katz, Paul R; Little, Milta O; Ouslander, Joseph G; Bonner, Alice; Geary, Carol R; Schumacher, Karen L; Thompson, Sarah; Martin, Finbarr C; Wilbers, Joachim; Zúñiga, Franziska; Ausserhofer, D; Schwendimann, R; Schüssler, S; Dassen, Theo; Lohrmann, Christa; Levy, Cari; Whitfield, Emily; de Souto Barreto, Philipe; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; Dilles, Tinne; Azermai, Majda; Bourgeois, Jolyce; Orrell, Martin; Grossberg, George T; Kergoat, Hélène; Thomas, David R; Visschedijk, Jan; Taylor, Stephanie J C; Handajani, Yvonne S; Widjaja, Nelly T; Turana, Yuda; Rantz, Marilyn J; Skubic, Marjorie; Morley, John E

    2014-05-01

    The International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics held its first conference on nursing home research in St Louis, MO, in November 2013. This article provides a summary of the presentations. Copyright © 2014 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Stability of Geriatric Syndromes in Hospitalized Medicare Beneficiaries Discharged to Skilled Nursing Facilities.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Sandra F; Bell, Susan; Saraf, Avantika A; Coelho, Chris S; Long, Emily A; Jacobsen, J M L; Schnelle, John F; Vasilevskis, Eduard E

    2016-10-01

    To assess multiple geriatric syndromes in a sample of older hospitalized adults discharged to skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) and subsequently to home to determine the prevalence and stability of each geriatric syndrome at the point of these care transitions. Descriptive, prospective study. One large university-affiliated hospital and four area SNFs. Fifty-eight hospitalized Medicare beneficiaries discharged to SNFs (N = 58). Research personnel conducted standardized assessments of the following geriatric syndromes at hospital discharge and 2 weeks after SNF discharge to home: cognitive impairment, depression, incontinence, unintentional weight loss, loss of appetite, pain, pressure ulcers, history of falls, mobility impairment, and polypharmacy. The average number of geriatric syndromes per participant was 4.4 ± 1.2 at hospital discharge and 3.8 ± 1.5 after SNF discharge. There was low to moderate stability for most syndromes. On average, participants had 2.9 syndromes that persisted across both care settings, 1.4 syndromes that resolved, and 0.7 new syndromes that developed between hospital and SNF discharge. Geriatric syndromes were prevalent at the point of each care transition but also reflected significant within-individual variability. These findings suggest that multiple geriatric syndromes present during a hospital stay are not transient and that most syndromes are not resolved before SNF discharge. These results underscore the importance of conducting standardized screening assessments at the point of each care transition and effectively communicating this information to the next provider to support the management of geriatric conditions. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Evaluation of one-year mortality after geriatric ankle fractures in patients admitted to nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Kadakia, Rishin J; Hsu, Raymond Y; Hayda, Roman; Lee, Yoojin; Bariteau, Jason T

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of geriatric ankle fractures will undoubtedly increase as the population continues to grow. Many geriatric patients struggle to function independently after such injury and often require placement into nursing homes. The morbidity and mortality associated with nursing homes is well documented within the field of orthopaedic surgery. However, there is currently no study examining the mortality associated with nursing home placement following hospitalization for an ankle fracture. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if geriatric patients admitted to nursing homes following an ankle fracture experience elevated mortality rates. Patients were identified using diagnosis codes for ankle fractures from all 2008 part A Medicare claims, and those admitted to nursing homes were identified using a Minimum Data Set (MDS). The Medicare database was also analyzed for specific variables including over-all one year mortality, length of stay, age distribution, certain demographical characteristics, incidence of medical and surgical complications within 90 days, and the presence of comorbidities. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine if patients admitted to nursing homes had elevated mortality rates. 19,648 patients with ankle fractures were identified, and 11,625 (59.0%) of these patients went to a nursing home after hospitalization. Patients who went to a nursing home had higher Elixhauser and Deyo-Charlson comorbidity scores (p<0.0001). Nursing home patients also had significantly increased rates of postoperative medical and surgical complications. One year mortality was 6.9% for patients who did not go to a nursing home and 15.4% for patients who were admitted to a nursing home (p<0.0001). However, multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated no significant difference in one year mortality between patients admitted to nursing homes and those who were not (OR=1.1; 95% CI 0.99-1.24, p>0.05). Although admission to

  20. Innovative interprofessional geriatric education for medical and nursing students: focus on transitions in care.

    PubMed

    Balogun, S A; Rose, K; Thomas, S; Owen, J; Brashers, V

    2015-06-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is crucial in fostering effective collaboration and optimal team-based patient care, all of which improve patient care and outcomes. Appropriate interprofessional communication is especially important in geriatrics where patients are vulnerable to adverse effects across the care continuum. Transitions in geriatric care are complex, involving several disciplines and requiring careful coordination. As part of the University of Virginia's initiative on IPE, we developed and implemented an interprofessional geriatric education workshop for nursing and medical students with a focus on transitions in care. A total of 254 students (144 medical students, 107 nursing students and 3 unknown) participated in a 90-min interactive, case-based workshop. Nursing and medical faculty facilitated the monthly workshops with small groups of medical and nursing students over 1 year. Self-perceived competencies in IPE skills and attitudes toward interprofessional teamwork were measured through post-workshop surveys. Data were analyzed using descriptive and nonparametric statistics, excluding the three unknown students. Over 90% of students were better able to describe the necessary interprofessional communication needed to develop a patient-centered care plan in transitioning patients between clinical sites. Four out of five students reported an enhanced appreciation of interprofessional teamwork. They were also able to identify legal, financial and social implications in transitions of care (75%). Nursing students consistently rated the workshop more highly than medical students across most domains (P < 0.05). Students improved and demonstrated their knowledge of interprofessional communication and teamwork skills required in transitions of geriatric care. Introducing these concepts in medical and nursing training may help in fostering effective interprofessional communication and collaboration. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press

  1. Advancing nursing home practice: the International Association of Geriatrics and Gerontology Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Tolson, Debbie; Morley, John E; Rolland, Yves; Vellas, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of the urgent need to improve the provision of long-term care, as well as the known variations in standards of nursing home care around the world, prompted the International Association of Geriatrics and Gerontology (IAGG), in association with the World Health Organization (WHO), to form a task force. This task force was charged with the identification of the key concerns, research priorities, and actions that would enhance the care provided to older people in nursing homes. Nurses are equipped with the knowledge to take a leadership role in the IAGG/WHO initiative, and the task force eagerly seeks their input.

  2. End-of-life care of the geriatric patient and nurses' moral distress.

    PubMed

    Piers, Ruth D; Van den Eynde, Magali; Steeman, Els; Vlerick, Peter; Benoit, Dominique D; Van Den Noortgate, Nele J

    2012-01-01

    Moral distress (MD) occurs when the health care provider feels certain of the ethical course of action but is constrained from taking that action. The purpose was to examine MD in geriatric nursing care and to identify factors related to MD. Cross-sectional survey. Twenty nursing homes and 3 acute geriatric wards in Flanders (Belgium). Participants were 222 nurses providing geriatric care. Moral distress was assessed with an 18-item questionnaire, adapted from the Moral Distress Scale. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to identify key factors (situational, work, and personal factors) related to MD. The response rate was 57%. The frequency score of MD was 1.1 (mean, range 0-4) and the intensity score of MD was 2.3 (mean, range 0-4). Nurses identified situations involving unjustifiable life support (mean product score MPS 4.8), unnecessary tests and treatments (MPS 4.4), and working with incompetent colleagues (MPS 4.3) as causing the most MD. Responding to requests for euthanasia (MPS 0.8) and increasing morphine in an unconscious patient believed to hasten death (MPS 1.2) were least likely to cause MD. The total MD score (sum of the 18 product scores) was significantly higher in nurses with intentional or actual job-leave (mean difference = 15.1, t = -3.5, P = .001). After adjusting for demographic factors, the following factors were independently associated with elevated MD: working in an acute geriatric care setting (as compared with the chronic geriatric care setting), a lack of involvement in end-of-life decisions, a lack of ethical debate, and specific measures of burnout (emotional exhaustion and personal accomplishment). Providing futile and inadequate care contributes to moral distress more than euthanasia and believing to hasten an unconscious patient's death by increasing morphine in geriatric end-of-life care. Nurses' moral distress is related to situational and work characteristics as well as to burnout and job-leave. Copyright © 2012

  3. Geriatric oncology in the Netherlands: a survey of medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists.

    PubMed

    Jonker, J M; Smorenburg, C H; Schiphorst, A H; van Rixtel, B; Portielje, J E A; Hamaker, M E

    2014-11-01

    To identify ways to improve cancer care for older patients, we set out to examine how older patients in the Netherlands are currently being evaluated prior to oncological treatment and to explore the potential obstacles in the incorporation of a geriatric evaluation, using a web-based survey sent to Dutch medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists. The response rate was 34% (183 out of 544). Two-thirds of respondents reported that a geriatric evaluation was being used, although primarily on an ad hoc basis only. Most respondents expressed a desire for a routine evaluation or more intensive collaboration with the geriatrician and 86% of respondents who were not using a geriatric evaluation expressed their interest to do so. The most important obstacles were a lack of time or personnel and insufficient availability of a geriatrician to perform the assessment. Thus, over 30% of oncology professionals in the Netherlands express an interest in geriatric oncology. Important obstacles to a routine implementation of a geriatric evaluation are a lack of time, or insufficient availability of geriatricians; this could be overcome with policies that acknowledge that quality cancer care for older patients requires the investment of time and personnel.

  4. Geriatric nursing: an idea whose time has gone? A polemic.

    PubMed

    Nolan, M

    1994-12-01

    The future role of the nursing profession in providing health care for older people is considered. It is argued that, despite claims to holism, nursing has maintained a narrow focus, concentrating mainly on acute hospital care. The concepts of professional protectionism and professional reductionism are used to explain the manifest failure of nursing and other professions working with older people and their carers to place the needs of their clients at the top of their agendas. A reorientation of nursing practice is advocated in order that the profession fulfils its potential with respect to older people.

  5. Geriatric assessment in daily oncology practice for nurses and allied health care professionals: Opinion paper of the Nursing and Allied Health Interest Group of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG).

    PubMed

    Burhenn, Peggy S; McCarthy, Alexandra L; Begue, Aaron; Nightingale, Ginah; Cheng, Karis; Kenis, Cindy

    2016-09-01

    The management of older persons with cancer has become a major public health concern in developed countries because of the aging of the population and the steady increase in cancer incidence with advancing age. Nurses and allied health care professionals are challenged to address the needs of this growing population. The International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) Nursing and Allied Health (NAH) Interest Group described key issues that nurses and allied health care professionals face when caring for older persons with cancer. The domains of the Geriatric Assessment (GA) are used as a guiding framework. The following geriatric domains are described: demographic data and social support, functional status, cognition, mental health, nutritional status, fatigue, comorbidities, polypharmacy, and other geriatric syndromes (e.g. falls, delirium). In addition to these geriatric domains, quality of life (QoL) is described based on the overall importance in this particular population. Advice for integration of assessment of these geriatric domains into daily oncology practice is made. Research has mainly focused on the role of treating physicians but the involvement of nurses and allied health care professionals is crucial in the care of older persons with cancer through the GA process. The ability of nurses and allied health care professionals to perform this assessment requires specialized training and education beyond standard oncology knowledge.

  6. Clustering excellence to exert transformative change: the Hartford Geriatric Nursing Initiative (HGNI).

    PubMed

    McBride, Angela Barron; Watman, Rachael; Escobedo, Marcus; Beilenson, John

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes how the John A. Hartford Foundation sought to maximize the influence of its various geriatric nursing projects by organizing and managing them collectively as the Hartford Geriatric Nursing Initiative (HGNI). This initiative aimed to develop a shared identity, encouraged cross-pollination of efforts, convened project leaders to address opportunities and problems, launched across-project collaborations, and created tools and resources to support overall efforts. This paper ends with some reflections on the processes implemented to maximize HGNI effectiveness, particularly the importance of forging a common identity in order to encourage expanded solutions. The HGNI can serve as an example of how intersecting interests can fuel new ideas, thus helping others think more strategically about change efforts in the future. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Educational innovation on the practices for the subjects of community nursing, mental health nursing and geriatric nursing].

    PubMed

    Heierle Valero, Cristina; Cano-Caballero Gálvez, María Dolores; Guillamet Lloveras, Ana; Celma Vicente, Matilde; Garach Mirasol, José Ignacio

    2010-11-01

    The new European space for higher education requires changes in education manners as well as execution. One of the main challenges is for the students to acquire competence in their professional life. For that purpose they require knowledge, but also skills and a proactive attitude towards learning. In this paper we tell the experience of the Virgen de las Nieves School of Nursing in Granada, with regards to the integration of the practices for the subjects of Community Nursing III, Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, and Geriatric Nursing, which are taken in the third year of the Diplomatura en Enfermería degree. Said practices, which were previously being offered separately within different contexts, will be merged in the same program whose scope will be Primary Care. We believe that the experience has been very positive by looking both at the results and the satisfaction of the students and the professional lecturers. It has been achieved an increase in the number of community care practice hours, and students have managed to acquire more autonomy in their learning and to incorporate critical reasoning in their education. In the methodology used, they have been the main evaluators and protagonists in their learning process, seeking the implication of professionals and teaching tutors in this change. The consensus on the objectives and methods, along with the obstacles which had to be overcome, constitutes one of the most interesting aspects of this experience.

  8. Emotional competencies in geriatric nursing: empirical evidence from a computer based large scale assessment calibration study.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Roman; Hartig, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    The care of older people was described as involving substantial emotion-related affordances. Scholars in vocational training and nursing disagree whether emotion-related skills could be conceptualized and assessed as a professional competence. Studies on emotion work and empathy regularly neglect the multidimensionality of these phenomena and their relation to the care process, and are rarely conclusive with respect to nursing behavior in practice. To test the status of emotion-related skills as a facet of client-directed geriatric nursing competence, 402 final-year nursing students from 24 German schools responded to a 62-item computer-based test. 14 items were developed to represent emotion-related affordances. Multi-dimensional IRT modeling was employed to assess a potential subdomain structure. Emotion-related test items did not form a separate subdomain, and were found to be discriminating across the whole competence continuum. Tasks concerning emotion work and empathy are reliable indicators for various levels of client-directed nursing competence. Claims for a distinct emotion-related competence in geriatric nursing, however, appear excessive with a process-oriented perspective.

  9. The Role of the Advanced Practice Nurse in Geriatric Oncology Care.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Brianna; Tarbi, Elise

    2016-02-01

    To describe how the Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) is uniquely suited to meet the needs of older adults throughout the continuum of cancer, to explore the progress that APNs have made in gero-oncology care, and make suggestions for future directions. Google Scholar, PubMed, and CINAHL. Search terms included: "gero-oncology," "geriatric oncology," "Advanced Practice Nurse," "Nurse Practitioner," "older adult," "elderly," and "cancer." Over the last decade, APNs have made advances in caring for older adults with cancer by playing a role in prevention, screening, and diagnosis; through evidence-based gero-oncology care during cancer treatment; and in designing tailored survivorship care models. APNs must combat ageism in treatment choice for older adults, standardize comprehensive geriatric assessments, and focus on providing person-centered care, specifically during care transitions. APNs are well-positioned to help understand the complex relationship between risk factors, geriatric syndromes, and frailty and translate research into practice. Palliative care must expand beyond specialty providers and shift toward APNs with a focus on early advanced care planning. Finally, APNs should continue to establish multidisciplinary survivorship models across care settings, with a focus on primary care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Twitter discussions about the predicaments of robots in geriatric nursing: forecast of nursing robotics in aged care.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Henrik; Salzmann-Erikson, Martin

    2017-08-17

    People use social media to express perceptions, attitudes and a wide range of concerns regarding human life. This study aims at analysing the ongoing discussions on the internet microblog Twitter and offers some coming predicaments regarding developments in geriatric nursing regarding nursing robots. Data were retrospectively collected from Twitter. 1322 mentions were included in the final analyses, where principles of interpreting data by using netnography were utilized. Many ideas are presented expressing functional, psychological and social aspects of robots in nursing care. Most postings come from metropolitan cities around the globe. The discussion focuses on market-driven, science fiction solutions for aged care. Twitter users overall seem to be positive using various nursing robots in aged care. These discussions offer a window into the attitudes and ideas of this group of users. We suggest that monitoring Twitter discussions on social media can provide valuable insights into current attitudes as well as forecast coming trends.

  11. [Interdisciplinary geriatric intervention among nursing home residents with hip fracture reduces mortality].

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Merete; Zintchouk, Dmitri; Hougaard, Kjeld; Krogshede, Anna; Almasi, Faranak; Holm-Petersen, Inge Østergaard; Damsgaard, Else Marie

    2010-06-21

    Nursing home residents represent the majority of hip fracture hospitalisation cases. Quick discharge to nursing homes after surgery is common practice. A previous study indicates an increased risk of death immediately after discharge. A total of 211 residents, hospitalised from nursing homes for hip fracture surgery, were selected for a retrospective follow-up study. The orthopaedic ward's geriatric team (GO-team) visited the residents no later than one day after discharge. The number of visits depended on the need for treatment and rehabilitation. Intervention was, among others, focussed on: nutrition, fluid therapy and blood transfusion. Intensive geriatric intervention reduced the 30-day mortality (odds ratio (OR) = 0.08; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.01; 0.52) and reduced 3-month mortality (OR = 0.03; 95% CI: 0.003; 0.25). Fluid therapy and nutritional support were associated with reduced probability of death (OR = 0.12; 95% CI: 0.02; 0.67)/(OR = 0.23; 95% CI: 0.07; 0.79). Non-elective readmissions were reduced (OR = 0.20; 95% CI: 0.04; 0.91). Post-surgical blood transfusion was associated with improved functional ability (beta = 8.22; 95% CI: 1.44; 15.0). Geriatric interdisciplinary intervention among residents in nursing homes has a positive effect and improves survival and reduces non-elective readmission within three months. Still, there is uncertainty about the effect of fluid therapy and blood transfusions and further investigations are needed.

  12. Medications associated with geriatric syndromes and their prevalence in older hospitalized adults discharged to skilled nursing facilities.

    PubMed

    Saraf, Avantika A; Petersen, Alec W; Simmons, Sandra F; Schnelle, John F; Bell, Susan P; Kripalani, Sunil; Myers, Amy P; Mixon, Amanda S; Long, Emily A; Jacobsen, J Mary Lou; Vasilevskis, Eduard E

    2016-10-01

    More than half of the hospitalized older adults discharged to skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) have more than 3 geriatric syndromes. Pharmacotherapy may be contributing to geriatric syndromes in this population. Develop a list of medications associated with geriatric syndromes and describe their prevalence in patients discharged from acute care to SNFs. Literature review and multidisciplinary expert panel discussion, followed by cross-sectional analysis. Academic medical center in the United States PARTICIPANTS: One hundred fifty-four hospitalized Medicare beneficiaries discharged to SNFs. Development of a list of medications that are associated with 6 geriatric syndromes. Prevalence of the medications associated with geriatric syndromes was examined in the hospital discharge sample. A list of 513 medications was developed as potentially contributing to 6 geriatric syndromes: cognitive impairment, delirium, falls, reduced appetite or weight loss, urinary incontinence, and depression. Medications included 18 categories. Antiepileptics were associated with all syndromes, whereas antipsychotics, antidepressants, antiparkinsonism, and opioid agonists were associated with 5 geriatric syndromes. In the prevalence sample, patients were discharged to SNFs with an overall average of 14.0 (±4.7) medications, including an average of 5.9 (±2.2) medications that could contribute to geriatric syndromes, with falls having the most associated medications at discharge at 5.5 (±2.2). Many commonly prescribed medications are associated with geriatric syndromes. Over 40% of all medications ordered upon discharge to SNFs were associated with geriatric syndromes and could be contributing to the high prevalence of geriatric syndromes experienced by this population. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:694-700. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  13. [Preventive measures for the prophylaxis of contractures in geriatric nursing. A systematic review].

    PubMed

    Scheffel, Sonja; Hantikainen, Virpi

    2011-06-01

    Contractures constitute a health problem in mobility-restricted geriatric patients. Contractures are clinically important due to their impact on functional outcome. Prophylactic interventions seem to be indispensable. We performed a systematic review studying the interventions used to prevent immobility-related contractures in the geriatric long-term care. The efficacy and safety of preventive methods was assessed. Electronic literature searches covered the databases PubMed, PEDro, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library (May 2010). Eligibility criteria for studies were: Investigation of an intervention aimed to prevent contractures, conducted in a geriatric and long-term care setting, inclusion of participants aged>65 years. The primary search focused on RCTs, systematic reviews und meta-analysis published between 1990 and May 2010 in English or German. The included studies were analysed and evaluated by one author while a second author checked the results. Methodological quality was critically evaluated using internationally accepted criteria. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria. Prophylactic interventions comprise mobility-encouraging and position-supportive interventions. Mobility-encouraging interventions aim to prevent contractures and immobility, for example offering range-of-motion exercises. Position-supportive interventions are transformations of motion and position, which are conducted with nurses' support. Due to limited methodological quality of these studies, the efficacy of certain measures remains unclear. Further studies on contracture prophylaxis investigating patient-relevant outcomes, interventions' adverse effects and costs are required.

  14. Emotional intelligence and coping styles: An intervention in geriatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Sarabia-Cobo, Carmen María; Suárez, Soraya González; Menéndez Crispín, Ernesto J; Sarabia Cobo, A Belén; Pérez, Victoria; de Lorena, Pablo; Rodríguez Rodríguez, Cristina; Sanlúcar Gross, Laura

    2017-06-01

    Current research indicates a relationship between EI, stress, coping strategies, well-being and mental health. Emotional intelligence skills and knowledge, and coping strategies can be increased with training. The aims of this study were to use a controlled design to test the impact of theoretically based training on the different components of EI and coping styles in a sample of nurses working with older adults. A group of 92 professionals (RN and CAN) who attended a workshop on EI were included in the study. They completed a self-reported measure of EI and coping styles on three occasions: pre- and post-workshop and at one year follow-up. The EI workshop consisted of four 4-h sessions conducted over a four-week period. Each session was held at the one-week interval. This interval allowed participants to apply what was taught during the session to their daily life. The instruments to measure the EI and coping were the Trait Meta-Mood Scale and the CAE test. There were significant differences between the pre- and post-workshop measures both at the end of the workshop and up to one year for both the Trait Meta-Mood Scale scores and the CAE test. There was a significant increase in the EI and coping styles after the workshop and one year thereafter. The workshop was useful for developing EI in the professionals. The immediate impact of the emotional consciousness of individuals was particularly significant for all participants. The long-term impact was notable for the significant increase in EI and most coping styles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Optimal older adult emergency care: introducing multidisciplinary geriatric emergency department guidelines from the American College of Emergency Physicians, American Geriatrics Society, Emergency Nurses Association, and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Christopher R; Bromley, Marilyn; Caterino, Jeffrey M; Chun, Audrey; Gerson, Lowell W; Greenspan, Jason; Hwang, Ula; John, David P; Lyons, William L; Platts-Mills, Timothy F; Mortensen, Betty; Ragsdale, Luna; Rosenberg, Mark; Wilber, Scott

    2014-07-01

    In the United States and around the world, effective, efficient, and reliable strategies to provide emergency care to aging adults is challenging crowded emergency departments (EDs) and strained healthcare systems. In response, geriatric emergency medicine clinicians, educators, and researchers collaborated with the American College of Emergency Physicians, American Geriatrics Society, Emergency Nurses Association, and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine to develop guidelines intended to improve ED geriatric care by enhancing expertise, educational, and quality improvement expectations, equipment, policies, and protocols. These Geriatric Emergency Department Guidelines represent the first formal society-led attempt to characterize the essential attributes of the geriatric ED and received formal approval from the boards of directors of each of the four societies in 2013 and 2014. This article is intended to introduce emergency medicine and geriatric healthcare providers to the guidelines while providing recommendations for continued refinement of these proposals through educational dissemination, formal effectiveness evaluations, cost-effectiveness studies, and eventually institutional credentialing.

  16. Optimal older adult emergency care: introducing multidisciplinary geriatric emergency department guidelines from the American College of Emergency Physicians, American Geriatrics Society, Emergency Nurses Association, and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Christopher R; Bromley, Marilyn; Caterino, Jeffrey M; Chun, Audrey; Gerson, Lowell W; Greenspan, Jason; Hwang, Ula; John, David P; Lyons, William L; Platts-Mills, Timothy F; Mortensen, Betty; Ragsdale, Luna; Rosenberg, Mark; Wilber, Scott

    2014-07-01

    In the United States and around the world, effective, efficient, and reliable strategies to provide emergency care to aging adults is challenging crowded emergency departments (EDs) and a strained health care system. In response, geriatric emergency medicine (EM) clinicians, educators, and researchers collaborated with the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), American Geriatrics Society (AGS), Emergency Nurses Association (ENA), and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) to develop guidelines intended to improve ED geriatric care by enhancing expertise, educational, and quality improvement expectations; equipment; policies; and protocols. These "Geriatric Emergency Department Guidelines" represent the first formal society-led attempt to characterize the essential attribute of the geriatric ED and received formal approval from the boards of directors for each of the four societies in 2013 and 2014. This article is intended to introduce EM and geriatric health care providers to the guidelines, while providing proposals for educational dissemination, refinement via formal effectiveness evaluations and cost-effectiveness studies, and institutional credentialing.

  17. PRN Medication Administration in a Geriatric Psychiatric Hospital: Chart Review and Nursing Perspective.

    PubMed

    Harper, Lori; Reddon, John R; Hunt, Courtney J; Royan, Heather

    2017-03-24

    To improve patient care/outcome, an evaluation was conducted of nursing procedures and protocols for pro re nata (PRN) medications. A 14-day chart review was conducted for 27 patients with mood and thought disorders (MTD) and for 24 patients with organic disorders (OD) at a geriatric psychiatric hospital, and a questionnaire was completed by 20 nurses. 377 PRNs were administered to patients in the MTD and OD units (240 and 137, respectively). The majority of PRNs were administered during the evening shifts on the MTD unit and during the day shifts on the OD unit. Chart notes indicated the behavior requiring PRN administration was not always specifically described and therapeutic interventions were not often attempted before PRN administration. Inconsistency between chart notes and medication record books was noted in the majority of cases. It was often not known whether the PRN was initiated by the staff, patient, or family. PRNs were reported to be not effective in the majority of cases. Documentation was suboptimal and effectiveness was poor. It would be worthwhile to train all staff in a patient-centered or ecopsychosocial (i.e., non-pharmacological) model of care, which would provide staff alternatives to PRNs. In that context, it would be important to implement standards of practice into geriatric psychiatry inpatient settings for PRN administration and documentation.

  18. Validation of the Staff Attitudes to Nutritional Nursing Care Geriatric scale in Italian.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Loris; Bagnasco, Annamaria; Aleo, Giuseppe; Sasso, Loredana

    2013-09-01

    To validate the Staff Attitudes to Nutritional Nursing Care Geriatric scale in Italian, a tool created in Sweden to measure nurses' attitudes towards nutritional care in older people. Malnutrition in institutionalized older people is a serious problem having negative impact on patient outcomes. It is reported in the literature that nurses have negative attitudes towards nutritional care. Forward and back-translation were carried out to build the Italian version of the tool. Content and face validity were then examined by pilot study. Test-retest reliability with Spearman's rho (rs) correlation, intraclass correlation (ICC) and internal consistency reliability with Cronbach's α were assessed. Differences between test-rest were assessed by t-test. Linguistic and semantic adaptation of the tool into Italian was successful. Thirty-three nurses skilled in caring for older patients did pilot testing and 46 test-retesting. SANN-G GITA-scale achieved good content and face validity, good internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's α = 0.85) and acceptable stability [rs = 0.75, P = 0.001; ICC = 0.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.63-0.86; P = 0.001]. The t-test showed no significant difference between test and retest results, confirming stability of the tool (t(64) = -0.98; P = 0.33). The process of adaptation of the scale from Swedish to Italian language was successful. Thus, the SANN-GITA scale can be useful to assess attitudes of nursing staff to nutritional care in the Italian context. This tool will allow the identification of areas where Italian nurses have negative attitudes and where to implement strategies to improve overall nutritional care. © 2013 International Council of Nurses.

  19. A comparison of depressive mood of older adults in a community, nursing homes, and a geriatric hospital: factor analysis of Geriatric Depression Scale.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Joji; Suzuki, Yusuke; Umegaki, Hiroyuki; Endo, Hidetoshi; Kawamura, Takashi; Iguchi, Akihisa

    2006-03-01

    The Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS)-15 was used in 607 adults aged 65+ years living in a community, nursing homes, and a general hospital to explore characteristics of depressive mood in different care settings. Factor analysis of GDS-15 extracted 4 factors labeled unhappiness, apathy and anxiety, loss of hope and morale, and energy loss. The scale scores labeled unhappiness, apathy and anxiety, and loss of hope and morale were negatively correlated with the Barthel Index and the Mini-Mental State Examination scores. The results classified the depressive patterns into 2 types, one fitting the nursing home residents and the other fitting the hospital patients. The dominant factors of the nursing-home type were unhappiness and loss of hope and morale, and the hospital type was highly related with apathy and anxiety. The results indicate an extended utility of the GDS-15 for a deeper understanding of depressive mood in various care settings.

  20. Development of The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing Adult/Geriatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Program in HIV Prevention, Treatment, and Care.

    PubMed

    Farley, Jason E; Stewart, Jennifer; Kub, Joan; Cumpsty-Fowler, Carolyn; Lowensen, Kelly; Becker, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    In response to the call to create an AIDS Education and Training Center for Nurse Practitioner Education by the Health Resources and Services Administration, The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing embarked on a transformative curriculum overhaul to integrate HIV prevention, treatment, and care into the Adult/Geriatric Nurse Practitioner Program. A six-step process outlined in the Curriculum Development for Medical Education was followed. A pilot cohort of Adult/Geriatric Nurse Practitioner students were enrolled, including 50% primary care setting and 50% HIV-focused primary care through a 12-month HIV continuity clinic experience. Through this pilot, substantive changes to the program were adopted. Programmatic outcomes were not compromised with the modification in clinical hours. The model of a 12-month HIV continuity clinical experience reduced the number of required preceptors. This model has important implications for the HIV workforce by demonstrating successful integration of HIV and primary care training for nurse practitioners.

  1. The Effect of Nurse Practitioner Co-Management on the Care of Geriatric Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Reuben, David B.; Ganz, David A.; Roth, Carol P.; McCreath, Heather E.; Ramirez, Karina D.; Wenger, Neil S.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objectives The quality of care for geriatric conditions remains poor. The Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE)-2 model (case finding, delegation of data collection, structured visit notes, physician and patient education, and linkage to community resources) improves the quality of care for geriatric conditions when implemented by primary care physicians (PCPs) or by nurse practitioners (NPs) co-managing care with an academic geriatrician. However, it is unclear whether community-based PCP-NP co-management can achieve similar results. Design Case study. Setting Two community-based primary care practices. Participants Patients > 75 years who screened positive for at least one condition: falls, urinary incontinence (UI), dementia, and depression. Intervention The ACOVE-2 model augmented by NP co-management of conditions. Measurements Quality of care by medical record review using ACOVE-3 quality indicators (QIs). Patients receiving co-management were compared with those who received PCP care alone in the same practices. Results Of 1084 screened patients, 658 (61%) screened positive for > 1 condition; 485 of these patients were randomly selected for chart review and triggered a mean of 7 QIs. A NP saw approximately half (49%) for co-management. Overall, patients received 57% of recommended care. Quality scores for all conditions (falls: 80% versus 34%; UI: 66% versus 19%; dementia: 59% versus 38%) except depression (63% versus 60%) were higher for patients seen by a NP. In analyses adjusted for gender, age of patient, number of conditions, site, and a NP estimate of medical management style, NP co-management remained significantly associated with receiving recommended care (p<0.001), as did the NP estimate of medical management style (p=0.02). Conclusion Compared to usual care using the ACOVE-2 model, NP co-management is associated with better quality of care for geriatric conditions in community-based primary care. PMID:23772723

  2. Combining Quality Improvement and Geriatrics Training: The Nursing Home Polypharmacy Outcomes Project

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Gotaro; Bell, Christina L.; Tamura, Bruce; Davis, James; Inaba, Michiko; Lorenzo, Pia; Blanchette, Patricia Lanoie; Iwasaki, Wendy; Masaki, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    To examine sustained effects of an educational intervention, we repeated a successful quality improvement (QI) project on medication safety and cost-effectiveness. In October 2007 and August 2008, facility leadership and geriatrics faculty identified all patients receiving ≥9 medications (polypharmacy cohort) in a 170-bed teaching nursing home and taught Geriatric Medicine fellows (n=12 in 2007, 11 in 2008) to: 1) systematically collect medication data; 2) generate medication recommendations (stop, taper, or continue) based on expert criteria (Beers Criteria) or drug-drug interaction programs; 3) discuss recommendations with patients’ attending physicians; and 4) implement approved recommendations. Over the two projects, the polypharmacy cohorts demonstrated decreased potentially inappropriate medications (odds ratio (OR) 0.78, 95% confidence interval (95%CI)0.69–0.88, p<0.001), contraindicated medications (OR=0.63, 95%CI=0.47–0.85, p=0.002) and medication costs (OR=0.97, 95%CI=0.96–0.99, p<0.001). Our findings suggest that programs planning educational QI projects for trainees may benefit from a multi-year approach to maximize both clinical and educational benefits. PMID:24829040

  3. Animal assisted therapy and perception of loneliness in geriatric nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Vrbanac, Zoran; Zecević, Iva; Ljubić, Marijana; Belić, Maja; Stanin, Damir; Bottegaro, Nika Brkljaca; Jurkić, Gabrijela; Skrlin, Branimir; Bedrica, Ljiljana; Zubcić, Damir

    2013-09-01

    Use of animals for therapeutic purposes, animal assisted therapy or AAT is a method for improving quality of life for long-term inpatients. The object of this paper was to evaluate dog companionship as a form of AAT and its effects on perception of loneliness in geriatric nursing home residents. The participants were involved in a six-month program of dog companionship three times weekly for 90 minutes. There were 21 residents included in the program, with a mean age of 80 years. Loneliness was measured by the short version of the UCLA Scale of loneliness. Comparison of test results before and after participation in the program showed that dog companionship reduces the perception of loneliness.

  4. Attitudes of nurses towards the use of physical restraints in geriatric care: a systematic review of qualitative and quantitative studies.

    PubMed

    Möhler, Ralph; Meyer, Gabriele

    2014-02-01

    To examine nurses' attitudes towards the use of physical restraints in geriatric care. Systematic review and synthesis of qualitative and quantitative studies. The following databases were searched: Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, Psyndex, PsychInfo, Social SciSearch, SciSearch, Forum Qualitative Social Research (1/1990 to 8/2013). We performed backward and forward citation tracking to all of the included studies. We included in the present review all qualitative and quantitative studies in English and German that investigated nurses' attitudes towards the use of physical restraints in geriatric care. Two independent reviewers selected the studies for inclusion and assessed the study quality. We performed a thematic synthesis for the qualitative studies and a content analysis of the questionnaires' items as well as a narrative synthesis for the quantitative surveys. We included 31 publications in the review: 20 quantitative surveys, 10 qualitative and 1 mixed-method study. In the qualitative studies, nurses' attitudes towards the use of physical restraints in geriatric care were predominately characterised by negative feelings towards the use of restraints; however, the nurses also described a perceived need for using restraints in clinical practice. This discrepancy led to moral conflicts, and nurses described several strategies for coping with these conflicts when restraints were used. When nurses were in doubt regarding the use of restraints, they decided predominantly in favour of using restraints. The results of the quantitative surveys were inconsistent regarding nurses' feelings towards the use of restraints in geriatric care. Prevention of falls was identified as a primary reason for using restraints. However, the items of the questionnaires focussed primarily on the reasons for the use of restraints rather than on the attitudes of nurses. Despite the lack of evidence regarding the benefits of restraints and the evidence on the adverse effects, nurses often

  5. General practitioners adherence to recommendations from geriatric assessments made during teleconsultations for the elderly living in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Georgeton, E; Aubert, L; Pierrard, N; Gaborieau, G; Berrut, G; de Decker, L

    2015-10-01

    To determine the factors associated with general practitioners adherence to recommendations from geriatric assessments made during teleconsultations for the elderly living in nursing homes. Prospective cohort study in three nursing homes in Vendee, France, with access to teleconsultations from Challans Hospital. Teleconsultations with geriatric assessment for which recommendations were made by a geriatrician (n=69). Participants were separated into two groups based on the evidence of general practitioners adherence to recommendations 30 days after teleconsultation. Their adherence has been defined by the application by themselves supporting the elderly of prescription or organization of all recommendations made by the geriatrician during the teleconsultation. The type of recommendations was pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments, and expert medical advice. The recorded data included the main reason of teleconsultation's request, age, sex, dementia diagnosis, multimorbidities scale, body mass index, Activities of Daily Living Scale, 4-items Geriatric Depression Scale, existence of a fall, and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Logistic regressions were performed to examine the factors associated with general practitioners adherence to recommendations from the geriatric assessment. General practitioners adherence to recommendations was made for 58 teleconsultations (86.3%). A fully adjusted logistic regression showed that general practitioners adherence to recommendations was associated with risk of depressive syndrome (OR=8.00, P=0.040) and expert medical advice's recommendations (OR=17.97, P=0.040). General practitioners adherence to recommendations from the geriatric assessment made during teleconsultations for elderly living in nursing homes is associated with the risk of depressive syndrome's existence and the expert medical advice recommendations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Learnt and perceived professional roles of a new type of nurse specialized in Gerontology and Geriatrics, a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Huizenga, Petra; Finnema, Evelyn; Roodbol, Petrie

    2016-07-01

    To gain insight into a new type of nurse specialized in gerontology and geriatrics, how they find meaning in the care of older persons and how this relates to the seven professional roles derived from the CanMEDS theoretical framework. To promote the quality of care for older persons in the Netherlands, one of the measures taken is the training and deployment of Registered Nurses specialized in Gerontology and Geriatrics. We focus on their professional roles in this study, to gain insight into the extent to which they fulfil their professional standards. A qualitative study, consisting of seven focus group interviews. The study population included 67 Registered Nurses. Data were collected between October 2011-May 2013. Nurses work in all seven CanMEDS roles, but not with all competences associated with these seven roles. The more distant the role is from patient activities, the less frequently competences such as social networks; design; research; innovation of care; legal, financial and organizational frameworks; professional ethics and professional innovation are mentioned. Nurses engage in activities consistent with nursing care for older people; however, despite their training, they are mainly focused on direct-patient care. Their limited awareness of the complete range of professional competences risks the stagnation of their development in professional roles such as health advocate, scholar and professional, which will not lead to an improvement in the care for older persons. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The role of geriatric assessment tests and anthropometric measurements in identifying the risk of falls in elderly nursing home residents

    PubMed Central

    Yardimci, Bulent; Aran, Sinan N.; Ozkaya, Ismail; Aksoy, Sevki M.; Demir, Tarik; Tezcan, Gulsen; Kaptanoglu, Aysegul Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the relation among the risk of falls, geriatric assessment, and anthropometric measurements, including the mini mental state examination, geriatric depression scale, handgrip test, and key pinch test. Methods: This prospective study included 89 residents hospitalized between May 2014 and September 2015 in the geriatric care unit of the Istanbul Balikli Rum Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey. Patients were followed-up for one year, and their falls were recorded. Medical records of the included patients were retrieved and analyzed. Results: A total of 89 patients, comprising 37 men and 52 women with an average age of 75.8 ± 8.2 years were included in the study. The residents’ annual falling averages were 1.0 ± 1.5. The most significant factors were identified to be predicted muscle mass, skeletal muscle index, whole body bioimpedance, dominant arm muscle strength, dominant arm bioimpedance, and free fat mass. Conclusions: The mini mental test, geriatric depression scale and lawton-brody scale combined with the handgrip, 6-meters walking, and bioimpedance tests are favorable for detecting the risk of falls and recurrent falls in vulnerable elderly nursing home residents. PMID:27652361

  8. IMPACT OF THE GERIATRIC MEDICATION GAME® ON NURSING STUDENTS EMPATHY AND ATTITUDES TOWARD OLDER ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Kiersma, Mary E.; Yehle, Karen S.; Plake, Kimberly S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Nurses should be well-prepared to improve and address health-related needs of older adults, but students may have difficulty understanding and empathizing, as they may not yet have personally experienced aging-related challenges. Simulation games can be used to help students understand the experiences of others, but limited information is available on the impact of simulation experiences on student empathy. Objective The objective of this study was to examine the impact of participation in an aging simulation game on nursing students’ empathy and attitudes toward older adults as well as their understanding of patients’ experiences in the healthcare system. Design This study used a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design. Setting A school of nursing in the Midwestern United States. Participants The convenience sample included 58 sophomore-level baccalaureate nursing students. Methods Students played the role of an older adult during a 3-hour laboratory aging simulation game, the Geriatric Medication Game® (GMG). Students completed the (1) Kiersma-Chen Empathy Scale (KCES, 15 items, 7-point Likert-type), (2) Jefferson Scale of Empathy – Health Professions Students (JSE-HPS, 20 items, 7-point Likert-type), and (3) Aging Simulation Experience Survey (13 items, 7-point Likert-type) pre- and post-game to assess study objectives. Descriptive statistics and paired t-tests (were performed in SPSS v.21.0, as the data were normally distributed. Results Students’ empathy (N=58) toward older adults significantly improved overall (KCES p=0.015, JSE-HPS p<0.001). Improvements also were seen on seven out of 13 questions related to attitudes and healthcare understanding (p<0.05). In the post-test, students agreed that they experienced frustration and impatience during the GMG. Conclusions Students may not be aware of older adults’ feelings and experiences prior to experiencing aging-related changes themselves. Simulation activities, such as the GMG, can be

  9. Caring for people with dementia and challenging behaviors in nursing homes: A needs assessment geriatric nursing.

    PubMed

    Daly, Jeanette M; Bay, Camden P; Levy, Barcey T; Carnahan, Ryan M

    2015-01-01

    An estimated 50% of nursing home residents have a dementia diagnosis. The purpose of this research was to conduct a needs assessment of directors of nursing (DON) in Iowa nursing homes in relation to caring for patients with Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia. DON responses were linked to Online Survey Certification and Reporting/Certification and Survey Provider Enhanced Reporting (OSCAR/CASPER) data to examine how facility characteristics may be associated with use of and confidence in non-drug management strategies. From 431 questionnaires mailed to DONs, 160 (37%) were returned. Regression analysis showed that those who were more confident in managing challenging behavior were more likely to have satisfaction with current training on managing challenging behaviors and had a psychiatrist available to visit the facility. Facilities with a larger proportion of patients with challenging behaviors being treated with non-drug approaches instead of antipsychotics had DONs who were more likely to be confident in non-drug management strategies and have knowledge about the FDA antipsychotic medications risks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Facilitated Learning to Advance Geriatrics: Increasing the Capacity of Nurse Faculty to Teach Students About Caring for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Krichbaum, Kathleen; Kaas, Merrie J; Wyman, Jean F; Van Son, Catherine R

    2015-06-01

    The Facilitated Learning to Advance Geriatrics program (FLAG) was designed to increase the numbers of nurse faculty in prelicensure programs with basic knowledge about aging and teaching effectiveness to prepare students to provide safe, high quality care for older adults. Using a framework to improve transfer of learning, FLAG was designed to include: (a) a workshop to increase basic knowledge of aging and common geriatric syndromes, and effective use of evidence-based teaching/learning strategies; (b) a year-long mentoring program to support application of workshop learning and leading change in participants' schools to ensure that geriatrics is a priority. Both formative and summative evaluation methods were used, and included self-assessment of objectives, program satisfaction, and teaching self-efficacy. FLAG achieved its overall purpose by enrolling 152 participants from 19 states including 23 faculty from associate degree programs and 102 from baccalaureate programs. Self-rated teaching effectiveness improved significantly from pre- to post-workshop each year. Achievement of learning objectives was rated highly as was satisfaction. Transfer of learning was evidenced by implementation of educational projects in home schools supported by mentoring. The FLAG program provided opportunities for nurse educators to learn to teach geriatrics more effectively and to transfer learning to their work environment. Future FLAG programs will be offered in a shortened format, incorporating online content and strategies, adding other health professionals to the audience with the same goal of increasing the knowledge and abilities of educators to prepare learners to provide competent care for older adults. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Population-focused care: a new rubric in the role definition for geriatric nurse practitioners in primary care practice?

    PubMed

    Kauffman, K S; Barlow, A R

    1999-03-01

    Traditionally, geriatric nurse practitioners (GNPs) provide care to individual older adults and their families in a primary care practice. Although the goal is to provide high-quality, cost-effective care, GNPs may be providing ineffective care by narrowly focusing on individuals and their families. Given today's health care climate, it is essential that GNPs practice with a wider perspective. This is done by noting health issue trends among the specific older adult population that are targeted for care and planning that care with a population focus delineated by either health issues or characteristics of the older adult population.

  12. Accumulation of geriatric conditions is associated with poor nutritional status in dependent older people living in the community and in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Takahisa; Hasegawa, Jun; Izawa, Sachiko; Enoki, Hiromi; Suzuki, Yuske; Kuzuya, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    To clarify the association between nutritional status and the prevalence of geriatric conditions in dependent older adults. A cross-sectional observational study of dependent older adults aged 65years or older who were living either in the community (n = 511, mean age 81.2years) or in nursing homes (n = 587, mean age 85.2years) was carried out. Data included the participants' demographic characteristics, basic activities of daily living, Charlson Comorbidity Index and the prevalence of eight geriatric conditions (visual impairment, hearing impairment, falls, bladder control problems, cognitive impairment, impaired mobility, swallowing disturbance and loss of appetite). Nutritional status was assessed by the Mini Nutritional Assessment short form (MNA-SF). Of 1098 participants, 21.4% (n = 235) were categorized as "malnourished", according to the MNA-SF classification. Participants in the "malnourished" group had a greater number of geriatric conditions than those in the other two groups. A higher prevalence of all the geriatric conditions except for falls was detected in the group with poorer nutritional status. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that malnutrition was associated with the number of geriatric conditions, but not with that of comorbidities, even after controlling for confounders. Malnutrition was confirmed to have significant associations with geriatric conditions in dependent older adults. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  13. International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics: a global agenda for clinical research and quality of care in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Tolson, Debbie; Rolland, Yves; Andrieu, Sandrine; Aquino, Jean-Pierre; Beard, John; Benetos, Athanase; Berrut, Gilles; Coll-Planas, Laura; Dong, Birong; Forette, Françoise; Franco, Alain; Franzoni, Simone; Salvà, Antoni; Swagerty, Daniel; Trabucchi, Marco; Vellas, Bruno; Volicer, Ladislav; Morley, John E

    2011-03-01

    A workshop charged with identifying the main clinical concerns and quality of care issues within nursing homes was convened by the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics, with input from the World Health Organization. The workshop met in Toulouse, France, during June 2010. Drawing on the latest evidence and mindful of the international development agenda and specific regional challenges, consensus was sought on priority actions and future research. The impetus for this work was the known variation in the quality of nursing home care experiences of older people around the world. The resulting Task Force recommendations include instigation of sustainable strategies designed to enhance confidence among older people and their relatives that the care provided within nursing homes is safe, mindful of their preferences, clinically appropriate, and delivered with respect and compassion by appropriately prepared expert doctors, registered nurses, administrators, and other staff. The proposals extend across 4 domains (Reputational Enhancement and Leadership, Clinical Essentials and Care Quality Indicators, Practitioner Education, and Research) that, in concert, will enhance the reputation and status of nursing home careers among practitioners, promote effective evidence-informed quality improvements, and develop practice leadership and research capabilities.

  14. National Database of Geriatrics

    PubMed Central

    Kannegaard, Pia Nimann; Vinding, Kirsten L; Hare-Bruun, Helle

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the National Database of Geriatrics is to monitor the quality of interdisciplinary diagnostics and treatment of patients admitted to a geriatric hospital unit. Study population The database population consists of patients who were admitted to a geriatric hospital unit. Geriatric patients cannot be defined by specific diagnoses. A geriatric patient is typically a frail multimorbid elderly patient with decreasing functional ability and social challenges. The database includes 14–15,000 admissions per year, and the database completeness has been stable at 90% during the past 5 years. Main variables An important part of the geriatric approach is the interdisciplinary collaboration. Indicators, therefore, reflect the combined efforts directed toward the geriatric patient. The indicators include Barthel index, body mass index, de Morton Mobility Index, Chair Stand, percentage of discharges with a rehabilitation plan, and the part of cases where an interdisciplinary conference has taken place. Data are recorded by doctors, nurses, and therapists in a database and linked to the Danish National Patient Register. Descriptive data Descriptive patient-related data include information about home, mobility aid, need of fall and/or cognitive diagnosing, and categorization of cause (general geriatric, orthogeriatric, or neurogeriatric). Conclusion The National Database of Geriatrics covers ∼90% of geriatric admissions in Danish hospitals and provides valuable information about a large and increasing patient population in the health care system. PMID:27822120

  15. National Database of Geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Kannegaard, Pia Nimann; Vinding, Kirsten L; Hare-Bruun, Helle

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the National Database of Geriatrics is to monitor the quality of interdisciplinary diagnostics and treatment of patients admitted to a geriatric hospital unit. The database population consists of patients who were admitted to a geriatric hospital unit. Geriatric patients cannot be defined by specific diagnoses. A geriatric patient is typically a frail multimorbid elderly patient with decreasing functional ability and social challenges. The database includes 14-15,000 admissions per year, and the database completeness has been stable at 90% during the past 5 years. An important part of the geriatric approach is the interdisciplinary collaboration. Indicators, therefore, reflect the combined efforts directed toward the geriatric patient. The indicators include Barthel index, body mass index, de Morton Mobility Index, Chair Stand, percentage of discharges with a rehabilitation plan, and the part of cases where an interdisciplinary conference has taken place. Data are recorded by doctors, nurses, and therapists in a database and linked to the Danish National Patient Register. Descriptive patient-related data include information about home, mobility aid, need of fall and/or cognitive diagnosing, and categorization of cause (general geriatric, orthogeriatric, or neurogeriatric). The National Database of Geriatrics covers ∼90% of geriatric admissions in Danish hospitals and provides valuable information about a large and increasing patient population in the health care system.

  16. Doreen Norton OBE, MSc, SRN, FRCN (1922-2007): Pioneer who revolutionised pressure sore management and geriatric nursing to international acclaim.

    PubMed

    Denham, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Doreen Norton was a delightful, widely respected nurse who devoted her life to improving the care of elderly people. She researched the neglected problem of pressure sores, revolutionised their nursing care, and thus achieved international fame. Her Pressure Sore Scale was established as a management tool and is still used today. She was a key member of the design team that produced the 'King's Fund Bed', researched equipment required on geriatric wards, assessed all geriatric long stay units in Scotland and established research as a valuable nursing tool within her profession and health authorities. She lectured extensively and her publications attracted worldwide acclamation. After her retirement, she was subsequently appointed to the world's first Chair of Gerontological Nursing in Cleveland, Ohio.

  17. Use of a mobile device by nursing home residents for long-term care comprehensive geriatric self-assessment: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fanpin; Chang, Polun; Hou, I-Ching; Tu, Ming-Hsiang; Lan, Chung-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Long-term-care comprehensive geriatric assessments, such as the Minimum Data Set 3.0, are used to evaluate the clinical, psychological, and personal status of residents in long-term-care nursing facilities. Nursing staff conducts assessment interviews, thereby increasing the workload of nurses and the cost of patient care. This study explored the ability of nursing home residents to use two different mobile devices for a geriatric self-assessment. Study participants were residents of long-term-care nursing homes. A modified Minimum Data Set 3.0 was converted to a format for use with a 6-inch mobile pad and a 3.7-inch mobile smartphone. The survey completion rate and the response time were measured. A Technology Assessment Model questionnaire analyzed the participants' experience. All participants were able to use a 6-inch pad, with an average completion rate of 92.9% and an average time for completion of 21 minutes. Only 20% of the participants could complete the assessment with the 3.7-inch smartphone. The participants found the 6-inch pad easier to use than the 3.7-inch smartphone. This exploratory study suggests that nursing home residents are able to use a mobile device to perform a geriatric self-assessment and delineates the importance of the ergonomics of the device.

  18. [Geriatrics for internists in primary care].

    PubMed

    Swoboda, W; Hermens, T

    2011-08-01

    Internal medicine specialists involved in primary care will have a leading part in the treatment of geriatric patients with complex healthcare needs in the future. Approved models like specialized geriatric practices, ambulant or mobile geriatric rehabilitation and special geriatric services for nursing homes are available. Essential is a geriatric qualification that fits with the tasks of an internist in primary care. An incentive payment system has to be created for this purpose to improve the treatment of elderly patients.

  19. Using an Interdisciplinary Team for Geriatric Education in a Nursing Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Robert F.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    In response to concerns about continuity of care, nurse practitioners and faculty members from medicine, pharmacy, and nursing developed an interdisciplinary curriculum for clinical experience in a nursing home, an educational and medical experience significantly different from those in hospital or ambulatory settings. (MSE)

  20. Practical Nursing Curriculum Advisory Committee Report Including Suggested Philosophy, Suggested Competencies, Geriatric Care Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Coll. of Education.

    A study was made of the current and future role of practical nurses and the curricula used to prepare these nurses in the 16 programs in Iowa. A statewide committee of 14 persons involved in hiring, employing, and controlling practical nurse practice was formed. Between Fall 1987 and Spring 1989, the committee gathered and analyzed information and…

  1. A literature review of the application of the Geriatric Depression Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist to community nursing cohorts.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jacqui; Annells, Merilyn

    2009-04-01

    To explore through literature review the appropriateness of three common tools for use by community nurses to screen war veteran and war widow(er) clients for depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. War veterans and, to a lesser extent, war widow(er)s, are prone to mental health challenges, especially depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. Community nurses do not accurately identify such people with depression and related disorders although they are well positioned to do so. The use of valid and reliable self-report tools is one method of improving nurses' identification of people with actual or potential mental health difficulties for referral to a general practitioner or mental health practitioner for diagnostic assessment and treatment. The Geriatric Depression Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist are frequently recommended for mental health screening but the appropriateness of using the tools for screening war veteran and war widow(er) community nursing clients who are often aged and have functional impairment, is unknown. Systematic review. Current literature informs that the Geriatric Depression Scale accurately predicts a diagnosis of depression in community nursing cohorts. The three Depression Anxiety Stress Scales subscales of depression, anxiety and stress are valid; however, no studies were identified that compared the performance of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales in predicting diagnoses of depression or anxiety. The Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist predicts post-traumatic stress disorder in community cohorts although no studies meeting the selection criteria included male participants. This review provides recommendations for the use of the Geriatric Depression Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales and The Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist based on examination of the published evidence for the application of these screening tools in samples

  2. Development of a Geriatric Team: A Staff Development Educational Process in a Nursing Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitkala, Kaisu H.; Niemi, Monica; Suomivuori, Lisbeth

    2003-01-01

    A Finnish nursing home's team development process included brainstorming on the characteristics of good teams, profiling of team members' nursing skills, analysis of tasks, and identification of ways to improve work quality and information flow to residents. Team building required clarification of work structures, determination of the…

  3. Developing positive attitudes toward geriatric nursing among Millennials and Generation Xers.

    PubMed

    Heise, Barbara A; Johnsen, Vickie; Himes, Deborah; Wing, Debra

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increase of the older adult population, there exists a shortage of health care professionals trained to help this population remain independent as long as possible. Ageism, common among younger adults, affects the capacity building of health care for older adults. Research has indicated that increased knowledge about older adults, as well as exposure to the elderly, may alter nursing students' attitudes regarding careers in gerontological nursing. However, questions remain as to what are the most effective ways to provide gerontological content in nursing programs and enhance attitudes toward older adults.With the understanding that younger adults see a need to balance work and play, a baccalaureate nursing program provides examples of ways to accomplish this through integration of courses, simulations, positive images of aging, and learning activities that enhance empathy for both frail and healthy older adults.

  4. Geriatric nursing education in community health: CareLink--partnering for excellence.

    PubMed

    Clemmens, Donna; Goldstein, Jill M; Clarke, Kitty; Moriarty, Mari; Soberman, Rhonda Karp; Gardner, Daniel S

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate how participation in the CareLink program influenced the community health knowledge and skill of baccalaureate nursing students regarding the care of community-dwelling older adults. Students were assigned three to four clients each during their 14-week clinical placement with a home care agency, situated in a naturally occurring retirement community or senior center. Students contracted with their clients to set goals and provided standardized health assessments and teaching. Students completed pretest and posttest surveys, and attended focus groups to address their learning. Students' public health nursing and cultural competence improved significantly. The CareLink program provides a meaningful learning experience for baccalaureate nursing students. Attitudes toward older adults and community health nursing in general shifted to acknowledge that older adults have strengths and resilience not previously acknowledged.

  5. Impact of the Geriatric Medication Game® on nursing students' empathy and attitudes toward older adults.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aleda M H; Kiersma, Mary E; Yehle, Karen S; Plake, Kimberly S

    2015-01-01

    Nurses should be well-prepared to improve and address health-related needs of older adults, but students may have difficulty understanding and empathizing, as they may not yet have personally experienced aging-related challenges. Simulation games can be used to help students understand the experiences of others, but limited information is available on the impact of simulation experiences on student empathy. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of participation in an aging simulation game on nursing students' empathy and attitudes toward older adults as well as their understanding of patients' experiences in the healthcare system. This study used a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design. A school of nursing in the Midwestern United States. The convenience sample included 58 sophomore-level baccalaureate nursing students. Students played the role of an older adult during a 3-hour laboratory aging simulation game, the Geriatric Medication Game® (GMG). Students completed the (1) Kiersma-Chen Empathy Scale (KCES, 15 items, 7-point Likert-type), (2) Jefferson Scale of Empathy-Health Professions Students (JSE-HPS, 20 items, 7-point Likert-type), and (3) Aging Simulation Experience Survey (13 items, 7-point Likert-type) pre- and post-game to assess study objectives. Descriptive statistics and paired t-tests were performed in SPSS v.21.0, as the data were normally distributed. Students' empathy (N=58) toward older adults significantly improved overall (KCES p=0.015, JSE-HPS p<0.001). Improvements also were seen on seven out of 13 questions related to attitudes and healthcare understanding (p<0.05). In the post-test, students agreed that they experienced frustration and impatience during the GMG. Students may not be aware of older adults' feelings and experiences prior to experiencing aging-related changes themselves. Simulation activities, such as the GMG, can be a useful mechanism for addressing empathy and caring during student education. Copyright

  6. Emotional Competencies in Geriatric Nursing: Empirical Evidence from a Computer Based Large Scale Assessment Calibration Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaspar, Roman; Hartig, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The care of older people was described as involving substantial emotion-related affordances. Scholars in vocational training and nursing disagree whether emotion-related skills could be conceptualized and assessed as a professional competence. Studies on emotion work and empathy regularly neglect the multidimensionality of these phenomena and…

  7. Emotional Competencies in Geriatric Nursing: Empirical Evidence from a Computer Based Large Scale Assessment Calibration Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaspar, Roman; Hartig, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The care of older people was described as involving substantial emotion-related affordances. Scholars in vocational training and nursing disagree whether emotion-related skills could be conceptualized and assessed as a professional competence. Studies on emotion work and empathy regularly neglect the multidimensionality of these phenomena and…

  8. Correlates of Geriatric Loneliness in Philippine Nursing Homes: A Multiple Regression Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Maravilla, Katrina N.; Maravilla, Veniza Anne M.; Marfil, Jomille D. V.; Marinas, Janine Angelica R.; Marquez, Jorelle Michael B.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted worldwide about loneliness in older adults living in nursing homes and the factors associated with it. However, only a few studies have focused on social factors that may predispose these older adults to experience loneliness. The purpose of this study was to examine the interplay between and among loneliness,…

  9. Correlates of Geriatric Loneliness in Philippine Nursing Homes: A Multiple Regression Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Maravilla, Katrina N.; Maravilla, Veniza Anne M.; Marfil, Jomille D. V.; Marinas, Janine Angelica R.; Marquez, Jorelle Michael B.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted worldwide about loneliness in older adults living in nursing homes and the factors associated with it. However, only a few studies have focused on social factors that may predispose these older adults to experience loneliness. The purpose of this study was to examine the interplay between and among loneliness,…

  10. Nursing Home Social Workers and Allied Professionals: Enhancing Geriatric Mental Health Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonifas, Robin P.

    2011-01-01

    Research has highlighted the challenges social services professionals face in providing quality psychosocial care to persons living in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs). A primary area of difficulty is addressing the needs of persons with mental health conditions, including problematic behaviors associated with dementia. This study evaluated the…

  11. Nursing Home Social Workers and Allied Professionals: Enhancing Geriatric Mental Health Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonifas, Robin P.

    2011-01-01

    Research has highlighted the challenges social services professionals face in providing quality psychosocial care to persons living in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs). A primary area of difficulty is addressing the needs of persons with mental health conditions, including problematic behaviors associated with dementia. This study evaluated the…

  12. [Reducing work stress in geriatric care: a training program for nursing team and administrators].

    PubMed

    Zimber, A; Rudolf, A; Teufel, S

    2001-10-01

    Caregivers of the residents in nursing homes are exposed to a high degree of physical and mental stress. The purpose of this study was to develop and to test the effects of skill training aimed at reducing occupational stress. The training consisting of 12 sessions of 90 minutes each was designed for nursing assistants and for care supervisors, respectively. Contents of the program are communicating with the demented, coping with job stress and cooperating with colleagues and subordinates, respectively. Eleven homes for the elderly and nursing homes were involved in the pilot study; 88 caregivers participated in the training, 34 of them were supervisors and 54 nursing assistants. The participants mainly appreciated the contents of the training. A controlled study design was applied to evaluate the training effects. 56 participants assessed their competencies, their job conditions and their health status at the beginning, at the end of the training as well as 12 weeks after the intervention had been finished. 56 persons completed the questionnaire receiving no training. Among the training participants, particularly the self-care skills improved. In addition, occupational stress could be reduced and the climate with the residents improved significantly, whereas the frequency of health problems did not change. Compared to the changes also observed in the control group, statistically significant effects were confined to the improvement of the climate with the residents. Care supervisors in general reported a higher benefit from the training than did nursing assistants. The results of the pilot study were used to adapt the training to the caregivers' needs.

  13. [Geriatric psychiatry and dementia].

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Behavioural disorders linked to dementia are common. The intertwining of psychiatric and neurodegenerative pathologies means caregivers are faced with complex situations on a daily basis. The expertise of the geriatric psychiatry teams helps to guide the clinical reasoning and to find the best nursing approach in order to understand the symptom and support the patient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. A Comparison of Two Teaching Strategies on Nursing Students' Knowledge and Self-Efficacy Regarding Their Geriatric Nursing Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diggle-Fox, B. Suzy

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the most frequently utilized teaching strategy of lecturing followed by discussion and to compare it with lecturing followed by role playing to determine how to best prepare nursing students both in terms of knowledge and self-efficacy. The primary goal of the study was to learn how to…

  15. A Comparison of Two Teaching Strategies on Nursing Students' Knowledge and Self-Efficacy Regarding Their Geriatric Nursing Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diggle-Fox, B. Suzy

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the most frequently utilized teaching strategy of lecturing followed by discussion and to compare it with lecturing followed by role playing to determine how to best prepare nursing students both in terms of knowledge and self-efficacy. The primary goal of the study was to learn how to…

  16. A person-centered care intervention for geriatric certified nursing assistants.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Carissa K; Medvene, Louis J; Van Haitsma, Kimberly

    2013-08-01

    To pilot test a multicomponent intervention to increase certified nursing assistants' (CNAs) awareness of person-centered care. To establish the feasibility of implementing an intervention involving videotaped biographies of residents and videotapes of resident/CNA caregiving interactions. A training program was provided at two nursing homes (NHs) using a wait-list control design. Levels of dyadic relationship closeness and satisfaction were compared prepost. Video recordings of CNA/resident interactions were coded for person-centered care using two observational instruments. Based on data from 19 resident/aide dyads, the findings were that resident's perceptions of relationship closeness increased significantly posttraining at both NHs, NH1, z = -1.89, p < .05, and the NH2, z = -1.95, p < .05. Effects were also seen with the CNA's perceptions of satisfaction and closeness, and resident satisfaction. The findings suggest that this type of intervention is feasible and warrants further research.

  17. Development and Pilot Testing of Computerized Order Entry Algorithms for Geriatric Problems in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.; Schmader, Kenneth E.; Twersky, Jack; Kuchibhatla, Maragantha; Kellum, Sally; Weinberger, Morris

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Computerized order entry algorithms can improve the quality of care; but are rarely used in nursing homes (NHs). We conducted a pilot study to: (1) develop order entry algorithms for 5 common NH problems, and (2) test their acceptance, use, and preliminary impact on quality indicators and resource utilization. Design Pre-post, quasi-experimental study. Setting: 2 Veterans Affairs NHs. Participants Randomly selected residents (n=265) with one or more target conditions, and 42 nursing home providers. Intervention Expert panels developed computerized order entry algorithms based on clinical practice guidelines. Each was displayed on a single screen and included an array of diagnostic and treatment options, and means to communicate with the interdisciplinary team. Medical records were abstracted for the 6 months preceding and following deployment. Results Despite positive provider attitudes toward the computerized order entry algorithms, their use was infrequent and varied by condition: Falls (73%), Fever (9%), Pneumonia (8%), UTI (7%), and Osteoporosis (3%). In subjects with falls, we observed trends for improvements in quality measures for the 6/9 measures, including measuring orthostatic blood pressure (17.5% to 30%, p=0.29), reducing neuroleptics (53.8% to 75%, p=0.27), reducing sedative-hypnotics (16.7% to 50.0%, p=0.50), prescription of calcium (22.5% to 32.5%, p=0.45), vitamin D (20.0 to 35.0%, p=0.21), and external hip protectors (25.0 to 47.5%, p=0.06). Little improvement was observed in the other conditions. There was no change in resource utilization. Conclusion Computerized order entry algorithms were used infrequently, except for falls. Further study may determine whether their use leads to improved care. PMID:19682123

  18. [Falls in nursing homes and institutions: update by the Osteoporosis, Falls and Fractures Working Group of the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology (GCOF-SEGG)].

    PubMed

    González Ramírez, Alfonso; Calvo Aguirre, Juan José; Lekuona Ancizar, Pilar; González Oliveras, Juan Luis; Marcellán Benavente, Teresa; Ruiz de Gordoa Armendia, Ana; Salvá Casanovas, Antoni; Alcalde Tirado, Pablo; González Alonso, Teresa; Padilla Clemente, Reyes; Clerencia Sierra, Mercedes; Ubis Diez, Elena

    2013-01-01

    The Workshop on Osteoporosis, Falls and Fractures (GCOF) of The Spanish Geriatrics and Gerontology Society (SEGG) formed a committee in order to review the state of the art on the detection, risk factors and assessment tools for falls, and intervention protocols when falls occurs in nursing homes, long-term hospitals or medium-stay units. The different patient profiles are described in order to make a comprehensive approach to this heterogeneous topic and population, offering a risk classification and specific advice according to these categories.

  19. The benefit of a geriatric nurse practitioner in a multidisciplinary diagnostic service for people with cognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Ament, Bart H L; Wolfs, Claire A G; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M; Ambergen, Ton; Verhey, Frans R J; De Vugt, Marjolein E

    2015-06-04

    The aim of the study was to evaluate whether adding a geriatric nurse practitioner (GNP) to an outpatient diagnostic multidisciplinary facility for patients with cognitive disorders (Diagnostic Observation Center for PsychoGeriatry, DOC-PG) could improve quality of care. DOC-PG combines hospital diagnostics and care assessment from a community mental health team and provides the general practitioner (GP) with advice for treatment and management. In a previous study, we found that 28.7% of the advice made by this service was not followed up on by the GP. Two cohorts were studied: a group of patients with added GNP (n = 114) and a historical reference sample (n = 137). Both groups followed the same diagnostic protocol and care approach, but, in the GNP group, a care coordinator was added in order to communicate the advice from the DOC-PG to the GP. The primary outcome was the concordance rate of GPs regarding the advice. At the patient level, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was assessed. Self-Rated Burden and care-related quality of life were measured at the informal caregiver level. Measures were conducted immediately after DOC-PG diagnosis and after 6 and 12 months. Univariate analyses, logistic regression analyses, and mixed model multilevel analyses were used to test differences between both groups. Total concordance rates were significantly higher in the GNP group compared to the reference sample (82.1 and 71.3%, respectively; p < 0.001). No improvement in patient HRQoL was identified. Among the informal caregivers, a significant reduction of Self-Rated Burden was found in the GNP group at 12 months (adjusted mean difference -1.724, 95% CI -2.582 to -0.866; p < 0.001). Adding a GNP to an outpatient diagnostic multidisciplinary facility for patients with cognitive disorders may improve the GP concordance rate of the advice from the DOC-PG and reduce subjective burden of the informal caregiver.

  20. [Nurses in geriatrics and Alzheimer's disease: knowledge, image, and common practice-results from a survey in a French area (Alsace)].

    PubMed

    Grosclaude, Michèle

    2007-06-01

    From the data of a multicentric investigation, performed in a French area (Alsace) using questionnaires filled by 800 geriatrics nurses, the author analyses their current knowledge and representations of Alzheimer's disease, their attitudes and practice concerning the disclosure of the diagnosis to the patients, and the influence of these data for the patients care. The results show three principal common aspects: first very important gaps, difficulties and contradictions concerning Alzheimer's disease knowledge; then heavy feelings of incompetence, loneliness, and therapeutic inanity with regard to the problems of their practice; last of all, their requests insisting on their need of information, formation, and aid, all missing for them. The nurses' language was devoid of specific and professional contents. It was similar to the general public, mediatic, and societal speeches, loaded with aprioristic assertions, reducing Alzheimer's disease to an organic process of humanity decline. This alarming picture calls to question its ground, mechanisms and solutions concerning the needs conveyed by the nurses, and the pertinency of the common concept of Alzheimer's disease. It enjoins to reconsider the nurses formation and a transdisciplinar further reflection about the notion of Alzheimer's disease and the messages which are transmitted by it.

  1. Developing Leadership in Geriatric Education: An Annual Faculty Institute. Proceedings of the Summer Geriatric Institute (4th, Lexington, Kentucky, July 24-27, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Davis L., Ed.; Hoekelman, Margaret C., Ed.

    This document presents the proceedings of a conference on geriatric education. These papers are included: Promoting Healthy Aging: A Leadership Role for Geriatric Education; National Research Priorities in Aging; Aging with a Disability; Recent Advances in Clinical Strategies in Geriatric Education: The Role of the Geriatric Nurse in the Acute…

  2. Geriatric Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Mavis

    1980-01-01

    After an introduction which defines the scope of geriatric nutrition, the current literature dealing with the subject is reviewed. Nutrition is seen as an important aspect of aging and health. The role of the practicing physician in the area of geriatric nutrition is discussed. The author relates personal experiences in this area. The concluding principle is that proper nutrition is an important tool in preventive medicine in the elderly in which the practicing physician can play a vital role. Imagesp803-a PMID:7401189

  3. Geriatric Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seton Hill Coll., Greensburg, PA.

    This curriculum for training geriatric technicians is geared toward developing an understanding of, as well as the skills to assist with, the visually or hearing impaired older adult. The curriculum is organized in four modules. Each module is assigned a time frame and a credit unit base. The modules are divided into four major areas: knowledge,…

  4. Geriatrics (Geriatrician)

    MedlinePlus

    ... team also focuses on health concerns common in older people such as incontinence, falls, memory problems, and managing multiple chronic conditions and medications. The geriatrics team: Evaluates the patient’s social supports and living situation Considers the person’s ability to ...

  5. Geriatric nutrition.

    PubMed

    Markham, R W; Hodgkins, E M

    1989-01-01

    In recent decades, veterinary medicine has become more successful in prolonging the healthy, useful lives of pets. As a result, the practitioner spends a greater part of each practice day caring for the geriatric animal, both healthy and unhealthy. Because of their longevity, older pets are typically regular family members, with owners who seek the finest health care possible for their pets. The practice of geriatric medicine most properly should begin not when the dog or cat reaches some specific "golden" age, but rather when the wiggly, robust puppy or kitten receives its first examination. Like all parts of a sound preventive program, geriatric nutrition best follows from a well-considered juvenile and adult nutrition program. Furthermore, once it becomes senior, the "well" geriatric is as much a candidate for a diet designed especially to accommodate old age changes as is his unhealthy contemporary. In fact, evidence suggests that appropriate dietary management of the healthy, but often subclinical, patient may help postpone the signs of dysfunction and increase quality and length of life. A knowledge of the most significant nutrients and the impact of each on aging systems is now, and will become increasingly more, important to the progressive, skillful veterinarian.

  6. Competencies in Geriatric Nursing: Empirical Evidence from a Computer-Based Large-Scale Assessment Calibration Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaspar, Roman; Döring, Ottmar; Wittmann, Eveline; Hartig, Johannes; Weyland, Ulrike; Nauerth, Annette; Möllers, Michaela; Rechenbach, Simone; Simon, Julia; Worofka, Iberé

    2016-01-01

    Valid and reliable standardized assessment of nursing competencies is needed to monitor the quality of vocational education and training (VET) in nursing and evaluate learning outcomes for care work trainees with increasingly heterogeneous learning backgrounds. To date, however, the modeling of professional competencies has not yet evolved into…

  7. Competencies in Geriatric Nursing: Empirical Evidence from a Computer-Based Large-Scale Assessment Calibration Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaspar, Roman; Döring, Ottmar; Wittmann, Eveline; Hartig, Johannes; Weyland, Ulrike; Nauerth, Annette; Möllers, Michaela; Rechenbach, Simone; Simon, Julia; Worofka, Iberé

    2016-01-01

    Valid and reliable standardized assessment of nursing competencies is needed to monitor the quality of vocational education and training (VET) in nursing and evaluate learning outcomes for care work trainees with increasingly heterogeneous learning backgrounds. To date, however, the modeling of professional competencies has not yet evolved into…

  8. Geriatric suicide: the preventable death.

    PubMed

    Boxwell, A O

    1988-06-01

    Suicide is the ninth-leading cause of death of the elderly, yet it is the leading cause of preventable death in this population. White males over the age of 65 are at special risk for suicide, with a suicide rate twice the national rate for all ages and six times the rate for women over age 65. The nurse practitioner is in a unique position to intervene in geriatric suicide because suicidal geriatrics typically will not seek help from mental health professionals. Rather, they will seek help from the primary caregiver. Strategies for assessment of suicide risk are presented, in addition to strategies for intervention in a suicide-related crisis.

  9. Reptile geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Paré, Jean A; Lentini, Andrew M

    2010-01-01

    Although basic notions, such as life expectancy, and thus what constitutes old age, remain to be determined in the vast majority of reptile species, there is a tendency at least for captive reptiles to live longer now than in the past. Clinicians are expected to recognize signs of senescence or old age in reptile patients, to acquire a heightened index of suspicion for diseases likely to affect older individuals of a given species or taxon, and to provide sound advice on geriatric care of such patients. Reptiles are stoic and show few signs of aging, but subtle changes in behavior, mobility, reproduction, weight, or appetite may all signal the onset of senescence to the vigilant caregiver. Serial, for example, yearly or biannual physical examination, blood sampling, and imaging initiated at maturity or earlier are probably the most powerful tools in diagnosing, monitoring, and managing geriatric issues.

  10. Beside the Geriatric Depression Scale: the WHO-Five Well-being Index as a valid screening tool for depression in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Allgaier, Antje-Kathrin; Kramer, Dietmar; Saravo, Barbara; Mergl, Roland; Fejtkova, Sabina; Hegerl, Ulrich

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to compare criterion validities of the WHO-Five Well-being Index (WHO-5) and the Geriatric Depression Scale 15-item version (GDS-15) and 4-item version (GDS-4) as screening instruments for depression in nursing home residents. Data from 92 residents aged 65-97 years without severe cognitive impairment (Mini Mental State Examination ≥15) were analysed. Criterion validities of the WHO-5, the GDS-15 and the GDS-4 were assessed against diagnoses of major and minor depression provided by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Subanalyses were performed for major and minor depression. Areas under the receiver operating curve (AUCs) as well as sensitivities and specificities at optimal cut-off points were computed. Prevalence of depressive disorder was 28.3%. The AUC value of the WHO-5 (0.90) was similar to that of the GDS-15 (0.82). Sensitivity of the WHO-5 (0.92) at its optimal cut-off of ≤12 was significantly higher than that of the GDS-15 (0.69) at its optimal cut-off of ≥7. The WHO-5 was equally sensitive for the subgroups of major and minor depression (0.92), whereas the GDS-15 was sensitive only for major depression (0.85), but not for minor depression (0.54). For specificity, there was no significant difference between WHO-5 (0.79) and GDS-15 (0.88), but both instruments outperformed the GDS-4 (0.53). The WHO-5 demonstrated high sensitivity for major and minor depression. Being shorter than the GDS-15 and superior to the GDS-4, the WHO-5 is a promising screening tool that could help physicians improve low recognition rates of depression in nursing home residents. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. [Nursing as a situative activity. A realistic concept for the assurance of quality and efficiency in geriatric care].

    PubMed

    Böhle, F; Brater, M; Maurus, A

    1997-02-01

    In institutional care for the elderly effective and efficient professional action is needed as well as in acute care settings. That means rational-systematic acting. This includes the establishment of goals, systematic planning and realization of these plans, deductive-logical thinking, objective perception and gaining an unbiased objective relationship towards the work to be done. However, an explorative investigation of the ways, how successful and experienced nurses do their job-being viewed by their colleagues as qualitatively effective and efficient concerning their time budget-provides the following results. In direct care procedures which go beyond rational-systematic action prove to be more economic and successful. This type of action is characterized by interactive procedures of dialogical nature, the patterns of rationality tend to be associative, the perception of the elderly to be taken care of can be considered as intuitive-subjective and the relationship towards them as personal-empathic. Those patterns of professional action we refer to as "subjectifying" or "situative" patterns of action. They can also be found in the process of an artist's work. The consequences of this change of paradigma concerning training and cost-effective nursing are discussed in this paper.

  12. Rural geriatric glue: a nurse practitioner-led model of care for enhancing primary care for frail older adults within an ecosystem approach.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sadhana; Dunn, Wendy; Hillier, Loretta M; McAiney, Carrie A; Warren, Rex; Rutherford, Paul

    2014-09-01

    This article describes the implementation of the Care for Seniors model of care, an innovative approach to improving care coordination and integration, and provides preliminary evidence of effective use of specialist resources and acute care services. Retrospective. Primary care; cross-sector. Older adults living in a rural area in southwestern Ontario, Canada. Number of new geriatrician referrals and follow-up visits before and after the launch of the Care for Seniors program, number of Nurse Practitioner visits in a primary care setting, in-home, retirement home and hospital, number of discharges home from hospital and length of hospital stay between. In the 2 years before the launch of the program, the total number of visits to the geriatrician for individuals from this FHT was relatively low, 21 and 15, respectively for 2005-06 and 2006-07, increasing to 73 for the 2011-12 year. Although the absolute number of individuals supported by the NP-Geri has remained relatively the same, the numbers seen in the primary care office or in the senior's clinic has declined over time, and the number of home visits has increased, as have visits in the retirement homes. The percentage of individuals discharged home increased from 19% in 2008-09 to 31% in 2009-10 and 26% in 2011-12 and the average length of stay decreased over time. This model of care represents a promising collaboration between primary care and specialist care for improving care to frail older adults living in rural communities, potentially improving timely access to health care and crisis intervention. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  13. Integrating geriatric resources into the classroom: a virtual tour example.

    PubMed

    Bonnel, Wanda; Fletcher, Kathy; Wingate, Anita

    2007-01-01

    As the older adult population increases, nursing students at all levels need geriatric content and access to geriatric resources. The Virtual Tour (VT) assignment, a combination of Web-based geriatric resources and applied learning activities, provides a simple way to integrate Web-based resources into classroom learning. VTs provide students a guide or "road map" to practical Web-based resources for client care. Evaluation data support that students like VTs and gain useful information for practice. VTs provide an easy way to expand geriatric resources available to students and to complement classroom content.

  14. [Contribution of psychoanalysis to geriatric care for institutionalized patients].

    PubMed

    Charazac, Pierre-Marie

    2014-06-01

    The contribution of psychoanalysis to geriatric care in nursing home is discussed in three directions: its conception of care, specially on its negative sides; its implication in geriatric units, in their conception and in the analysis of their management of care; the holding of care-givers and nurses by making clear what we call transference and conter-transference and their reflection on their function.

  15. Training Internal Medicine Residents in Geriatrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf-Klein, Gisele P.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    A four-week geriatric rotation in a nursing home that emphasized rehabilitation for stroke victims, patients with fractured hips, and amputees, and the team approach in care for the elderly is described. Student response was very positive, student sensitivity was improved, and all students felt the team approach could be applied to later practice.…

  16. Family members' experiences of the quality of geriatric care.

    PubMed

    Isola, Arja; Backman, Kaisa; Voutilainen, Päivi; Rautsiala, Tarja

    2003-12-01

    The quality of institutional geriatric care is a topical issue in Finland. The study to be described here is part of a Finnish project on the quality assessment and development of long-term geriatric care provided by the City of Helsinki. The health care division of the City of Helsinki authorized an outside survey of long-term geriatric care in the hospitals providing such care in 1998. Based on the results, recommendations concerning the development of geriatric care were issued. In the years 1999-2000, a further education programme was arranged for ward nurses, chief nurses and heads of profit centres concerning leadership in long-term geriatric nursing. A re-survey was conducted in 2001, using the same criteria of quality assessment. The purpose of this paper is to report on the quality of institutional geriatric nursing as evaluated by family members in 2001 and to compare the responses to those obtained in 1998. The results are presented as frequency and percentage distributions, means and medians and cross-tabulations. The responding family members were generally content with the care of their elderly relatives: 92% said they were very satisfied or satisfied with the care, and the average of the marks given for geriatric care was 8.3 (range 4-10). Family members were more content now than in 1998, when the corresponding figures were 86% and 7.3 (range 4-10). Nevertheless, the results still highlight certain aspects that should be improved and developed.

  17. [Gerodontics and geriatric psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Richard, J

    1991-01-01

    Some of the important points in geriatric psychology and geriatric psychiatry (such as vocabulary and base line concepts, old myths in geriatrics, reference models, principle of action, therapeutic procedures, nasalgraphy, pluri, inter and transdisciplinarity) will be developed for the dentist practicing geriatric dentistry. Knowledge of these concepts should provide the basis for an effective association with the psychiatrist, in order to enhance better care for the elderly. Two types of approaches of the elderly, well known of the geriatric psychiatrist will be developed. The cognitive and motory approaches will be set as examples capable of helping the exchange between the two specialties.

  18. Geriatric veterinary pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Kukanich, Butch

    2012-07-01

    Geriatric dogs and cats are an important group of patients in veterinary medicine. Healthy geriatric patients have similar physiology and presumably pharmacology as healthy adult animals. Geriatric patients with subclinical organ dysfunction are overtly healthy but have some organ dysfunction that may alter the clinical pharmacology of some drugs. Geriatric patients with an overt disease are expected to have altered drug pharmacology for some drugs based on the underlying disease. Diseases including cardiovascular, renal, hepatic, osteoarthritis, neurologic, and neoplastic are expected in the geriatric population and discussed, including the effects of the underlying disease and potential drug-drug interactions.

  19. Emerging geriatric challenge.

    PubMed

    Dhar, H L

    2005-10-01

    India is a vast country with diversity, both physical and cultural. 72% of World's second largest population live in rural experiencing varying degrees of socioeconomic change. However, there is no nationwide registry of older people and exact statistics about elderly population is not available. Community-based data on morbidity and disability are also not available. India is one of the few countries in the world where men out number women at all ages till about 70 years and only in very old age (80+) there are more women than men. One of the main social effect of extension of life in later years is the extended period of widowhood for women mainly due to cultural practice of men marrying younger women and widow marriage as well as divorce are uncommon. Much progress has been made in the health care services in the last 50 years giving much emphasis to mother and child programme with special emphasis on controlling population. But elderly population has been neglected, there is no separate ward for elderly in hospitals, no specialized courses in the Universities for training doctors and nurses for elderly care. Recently, Indian Medical Association has organized an ambitious project for rural elderly with emphasis on Geriatric care. Still recently, emphasis has been given for developing infrastructural facilities including creating training, courses on Geriatric Medicine and integrating with alternative system for better care of elderly. However, due to increasing awareness of policy makers to multiple issues related to aging, some progress has been made like old age pension scheme, income tax rebate for elderly, old homes and day care centers and law to help retired citizens in evicting tenants etc. but environment is not as elderly-friendly as in European countries, as the State is not likely to have adequate resources in the presence of other priorities in the country.

  20. Time for geriatric jurisprudence.

    PubMed

    Doron, Israel; Meenan, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Geriatrics and law may not be natural bedfellows. Moreover, law and lawyers were not part of the professions that were the 'founding fathers' of the field of geriatrics. In this short viewpoint we invite the readers to consider a new inter-disciplinary research approach that attempts to combine jurisprudence with geriatrics. Geriatric jurisprudence is a special and timely opportunity for doctors and lawyers to come together in a new, different and more united way to jointly conceptualize a medico-legal theory of aging to better serve our shared community: older and aging persons. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Hypernatremia in the geriatric population

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Maulin K; Workeneh, Biruh; Taffet, George E

    2014-01-01

    Hypernatremia in the geriatric population is a common disorder associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Older people are predisposed to developing hypernatremia because of age-related physiologic changes such as decreased thirst drive, impaired urinary concentrating ability, and reduced total body water. Medications may exacerbate this predisposition. Hypernatremia and dehydration occurring in nursing homes are considered indicators of neglect that warrant reporting, but there are other nonavoidable causes of hypernatremia, and consideration at time of presentation is essential to prevent delay in diagnosis and management. We describe a case illustrating the importance of the consideration of alternate explanations for hypernatremia in a nursing home resident, followed by a review of hypernatremia in the elderly population, to underscore that neglect is the etiology of exclusion after alternatives have been considered. PMID:25429210

  2. Hypernatremia in the geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Shah, Maulin K; Workeneh, Biruh; Taffet, George E

    2014-01-01

    Hypernatremia in the geriatric population is a common disorder associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Older people are predisposed to developing hypernatremia because of age-related physiologic changes such as decreased thirst drive, impaired urinary concentrating ability, and reduced total body water. Medications may exacerbate this predisposition. Hypernatremia and dehydration occurring in nursing homes are considered indicators of neglect that warrant reporting, but there are other nonavoidable causes of hypernatremia, and consideration at time of presentation is essential to prevent delay in diagnosis and management. We describe a case illustrating the importance of the consideration of alternate explanations for hypernatremia in a nursing home resident, followed by a review of hypernatremia in the elderly population, to underscore that neglect is the etiology of exclusion after alternatives have been considered.

  3. Is patient-grouping on basis of condition on admission indicative for discharge destination in geriatric stroke patients after rehabilitation in skilled nursing facilities? The results of a cluster analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Geriatric stroke patients are generally frail, have an advanced age and co-morbidity. It is yet unclear whether specific groups of patients might benefit differently from structured multidisciplinary rehabilitation programs. Therefore, the aims of our study are 1) to determine relevant patient characteristics to distinguish groups of patients based on their admission scores in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), and (2) to study the course of these particular patient-groups in relation to their discharge destination. Methods This is a longitudinal, multicenter, observational study. We collected data on patient characteristics, balance, walking ability, arm function, co-morbidity, activities of daily living (ADL), neuropsychiatric symptoms, and depressive complaints of 127 geriatric stroke patients admitted to skilled nursing facilities with specific units for geriatric rehabilitation after stroke. Results Cluster analyses revealed two groups: cluster 1 included patients in poor condition upon admission (n = 52), and cluster 2 included patients in fair/good condition upon admission (n = 75). Patients in both groups improved in balance, walking abilities, and arm function. Patients in cluster 1 also improved in ADL. Depressive complaints decreased significantly in patients in cluster 1 who were discharged to an independent- or assisted-living situation. Compared to 80% of the patients in cluster 2, a lower proportion (46%) of the patients in cluster 1 were discharged to an independent- or assisted-living situation. Conclusion Stroke patients referred for rehabilitation to SNFs could be clustered on the basis of their condition upon admission. Although patients in poor condition on admission were more likely to be referred to a facility for long-term care, this was certainly not the case in all patients. Almost half of them could be discharged to an independent or assisted living situation, which implied that also in patients in poor condition on

  4. [Geriatrics - an interdisciplinary challenge].

    PubMed

    Nau, Roland; Djukic, Marija; Wappler, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    The care of elderly patients will continue to challenge the healthcare system over the next decades. As a rule geriatric patients suffer from multimorbidities with complex disease patterns, and the ability to cope with everyday life is severely reduced. Treatment is provided by a multiprofessional geriatric team, and the primary goal is improvement of functional status, quality of life in the social environment and autonomy by employing a holistic approach. In Germany geriatric care is provided by physicians from various medical specialties (e.g. general practitioners, internists, neurologists and psychiatrists). In the training for the subspecialty clinical geriatrics, these specialties enjoy equal rights. Recent efforts to establish a qualification as physician for internal medicine and geriatrics have initiated a discussion to make the suitability for qualification as a geriatrician dependent on the medical specialty. Geriatric patients benefit from multidisciplinary cooperation. Neurologists possess great expertise in the treatment of patients with dementia, depression, delirium, consequences of degenerative spinal cord diseases and vertebral bone fractures, stroke, Parkinson's syndrome, epileptic seizures, vertigo and dizziness, neuropathies, lesions of peripheral nerves and in the multimodal therapy of pain. To function in a position of responsibility in a geriatric department, neurologists need skills in general internal medicine. These are acquired either on a geriatric ward or during specialization as a neurologist by full time secondment to large neurological or interdisciplinary intensive care units.

  5. [Geriatric assessment tools in Spanish Geriatric Departments].

    PubMed

    Flores Ruano, Teresa; Cruz Jentoft, Alfonso J; González Montalvo, Juan Ignacio; López Soto, Alfonso; Abizanda Soler, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) is the main measurement tool used by Geriatricians. A 2000 survey demonstrated great variability in the tools used for CGA among Spanish Geriatric Departments. A new survey to detect 13-year trends in the use of CGA tools in our country is presented. Descriptive study using a structured questionnaire on the use of CGA tools in different levels of care sent to the Heads of 39 Spanish Geriatric Departments or Services (27 with postgraduate teaching in Geriatrics) during the first three months of 2013. The response rate was 97.4%. It was found that 78.4% (29 centers) used different tools depending on the level of care. Barthel and Lawton index were the most used functional assessment tools in all Departments and across all geriatric levels, although gait speed and Tinetti scale were frequently used in Day Hospital and Outpatient clinics. The Mini Mental State Exam and its Spanish version Mini Examen Cognoscitivo were the most used mental scales (97.4%), followed by tools for assessing depression-behavior (86.8%) and severity of cognitive impairment tools (84.2%). CGA tools were used in 43.2% of the emergency departments of the hospitals surveyed, being the most frequent. More than two-thirds (69.4%) of the Departments reported that their affiliated Primary Care centers used CGA tools, with the Barthel and Lawton again being indexes the most used. Most of the responding Departments considered that the main domains of CGA are functional, mental and social status. Nutrition, comorbidity, falls and pressure ulcers are other important domains. There is still a great variability in the CGA tools being used in Spanish Geriatric Departments, although there is a trend towards a greater use of Barthel index, greater adaptation of tools to each level of care, and increasing assessment of new domains like frailty, nutrition or comorbidity. Copyright © 2014 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. [The need for training in gerontology and geriatrics among the staff providing services at a geriatric care institution].

    PubMed

    Baerga Duperoy, Rachel; Castro Rojas, Nydia; Orta Rodríguez, Brenda; González Caraballo, Enid; Cruz González, Angel; Vázquez Fernández, José; Oliver Vázquez, Marlén

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore and identify the basic training needs of nursing home staff, in terms of attitudes, knowledge and skills required to work effectively with geriatric patients. Three focus groups were performed, two groups of employees, and a group of elderly residents of the institution, in order to explore issues pertaining to the following topics: personal attributes required to work with geriatric patients, basic knowledge and skills needed to provide effective services. Group discussions were transcribed and themes were extracted through consensus reached by the investigators. Results indicated that the interviewed staff lack of formal preparation or continuing education in gerontology or geriatrics. Needs identified were the following: the aging process, caring behaviors, management of common health conditions, administration of medications, transference and mobility of residents, among others. Finding were use to design an educational program aimed in assisting nursing home staff in providing an effective service to their geriatric patients.

  7. A Survey of Knowledge and Attitudes of Nurses About Pain Management in End-Stage Liver Disease in a Geriatric Palliative Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Perri, Giulia-Anna; Yeung, Herman; Green, Yoel; Bezant, Abby; Lee, Carman; Berall, Anna; Karuza, Jurgis; Khosravani, Houman

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care is often initiated late for patients with end stage liver disease (ESLD) with pain being a common morbidity that is under-treated throughout the disease trajectory. When admitted to a palliative care unit (PCU), nurses play a pivotal role and must be highly informed to ensure effective pain management. The aim of this study is to determine the baseline level of knowledge and attitudes of PCU nurses regarding pain management in patients with ESLD. A descriptive, cross-sectional self-administered survey design was used for this study. The sample comprised 35 PCU nurses working at a continuing chronic care facility in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Data on the knowledge and attitudes of the nurses regarding pain management in patients with ESLD, was obtained using a modified version of the "Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain" (NKASRP) tool. Thirty-one PCU nurses were included for the analysis, giving a response rate of 89%. The mean total percentage score for the nurses on the modified version of the NKASRP was 72%. Only 26% of the nurse participants obtained a passing score of 80% or greater. There were no significant differences in mean total scores by age, gender, years of nursing experience or education level. The findings of this study provide important information about the inadequate knowledge and attitude in nurses regarding pain management for patients with ESLD. It is suggested that targeted educational programs and quality improvement initiatives in pain management for patients with ESLD could improve knowledge and attitudes for PCU nurses.

  8. At the End of the Rainbow, Is There Always a Pot of Gold?: Understanding the Labor and Fervor of Filipino Geriatric Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Ching, Maria Ivana D.; Chiong, Edwin Mark L.; Chua, Charlene C.; Chua, Jason Eimer P.; Dumalasa, Michelle C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Registered nurses (RNs) with specific knowledge and skills in the care of the aged are an important component in the delivery of quality health-care (Venturato, Kellet, & Windsor, 2006). These nurses experience both fervors of being in service and labor that challenge them, but which contribute to their provision of quality health…

  9. At the End of the Rainbow, Is There Always a Pot of Gold?: Understanding the Labor and Fervor of Filipino Geriatric Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Ching, Maria Ivana D.; Chiong, Edwin Mark L.; Chua, Charlene C.; Chua, Jason Eimer P.; Dumalasa, Michelle C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Registered nurses (RNs) with specific knowledge and skills in the care of the aged are an important component in the delivery of quality health-care (Venturato, Kellet, & Windsor, 2006). These nurses experience both fervors of being in service and labor that challenge them, but which contribute to their provision of quality health…

  10. In defense of a department of geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Cassel, C K

    2000-08-15

    Departmental status for geriatrics offers many advantages, all of which are related to strengthening academic and clinical programs in aging. The training programs and the content of medical school curriculum in geriatrics remain inadequate under the current structures. A department of geriatrics can provide a stronger faculty base and allow effective interaction with other departments (including but not limited to internal medicine) that need geriatric training. A department of geriatrics also focuses on a model of care that involves working closely with other disciplines, such as nursing and social work. This interdisciplinary model helps expert providers work efficiently throughout the spectrum of care, strengthening continuity. The department can include other medical specialists, such as family practitioners, psychiatrists, and physiatrists, who work with caregivers and patients throughout a course of treatment to manage chronic illness and help maintain and enhance function and independence as long as possible. Comprehensive care and proper care management also substantially benefit institutions by expanding the patient population, reducing length of stay, and avoiding unnecessary hospitalization of older patients through effective discharge planning and transitional care. This requires strong relationships with long-term care providers, a characteristic strength of geriatricians. Although not all research in aging needs to be housed in a department of geriatric medicine, the presence of a critical mass of basic and clinical researchers creates an environment that can stimulate new initiatives and attract external funding. Additional research bridging basic translational and clinical phases relevant to the elderly population is best encouraged by maintaining relationships with other basic science and clinical departments.

  11. Geriatric syndromes and geriatric assessment for the generalist.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Charlotte; Merel, Susan E; Yukawa, Michi

    2015-03-01

    Geriatric assessment is an increasingly important area of outpatient medicine, given the unprecedented aging of the US population. Screening and evaluation for geriatric syndromes, particularly falls, urinary incontinence, frailty, and cognitive impairment, are crucial aspects of outpatient geriatric assessment. Innovative models of care are emerging to improve quality of care and enhance cost savings for the geriatric patient. High-value features of geriatric care systems include providing increased 24/7 access to care, a multidisciplinary team-based approach to care, performing medication reconciliation and comprehensive geriatric assessments, and integrating palliative care into treatment planning.

  12. A National Survey on the Current Status of Family Practice Residency Education in Geriatric Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ina; Arenson, Christine; Warshaw, Gregg; Bragg, Elizabeth; Shaull, Ruth; Counsell, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of family practice residency directors found that 92 percent have a required geriatrics curriculum; nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and home care are the predominant training sites; the mean number of geriatrics faculty is 2.6 per program; and conflicting time demands with other curricula was ranked as the most significant…

  13. Geriatric syndromes: medical misnomer or progress in geriatrics?

    PubMed

    Olde Rikkert, M G M; Rigaud, A S; van Hoeyweghen, R J; de Graaf, J

    2003-03-01

    Both in geriatric and internal medicine journals, and in medical textbooks certain (aggregates of) symptoms are labelled as 'geriatric syndromes'. In frail elderly patients a large number of diseases present with well-known and highly prevalent atypical symptoms (e.g. immobility, instability, impaired cognition and incontinence), which are referred to as geriatric syndromes. While classically the term syndrome is used for grouping together multiple symptoms with a single pathogenetic pathway, geriatric syndrome primarily refers to one symptom or a complex of symptoms with high prevalence in geriatrics, resulting from multiple diseases and multiple risk factors. The geriatric workup should therefore consist of both a search for and treatment of the aetiologically related diseases and a risk factor assessment and reduction. Effectiveness and efficiency of this specific geriatric syndrome workup has been demonstrated predominantly for combinations of geriatric syndromes that often serve as targeting criteria for geriatric interventions, and for some specific geriatric syndromes. Therefore, we argue that the concept of geriatric syndromes is valuable as a theoretical frame, a directive for diagnostic analysis and as an educational tool in teaching geriatrics to medical students and trainees. Added to this, explaining the heterogeneous way 'syndrome' is used in current clinical practice, as opposed to 'disease', will also substantially improve clinical reasoning both in geriatrics and general internal medicine.

  14. [Activating therapeutic care in geriatrics : Evaluation of a practice concept].

    PubMed

    Acklau, Stefanie; Gödecker, Lisa; Kaden, Andrea; Jahn, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    The special feature of the concept of activating therapeutic care in geriatrics (ATP-G) is based on the focus of nursing and therapeutic elements specifically related to the elderly. Further significance lies in the bottom-up development of this concept, which shows a close proximity to the nursing practice. The research project targeted the characteristics of ATP-G from a nursing point of view. Furthermore, the resulting elements of professional nursing care understanding for inpatient geriatric rehabilitation were used to build a scientific and theoretical foundation of the ATP-G concept. In this study 12 semi-structured interviews with professional caregivers were realized. The data collection was undertaken in three different facilities of inpatient geriatric (early) rehabilitation, chosen by lot. The data analysis was based on the methodology of qualitative content analysis according to Mayring. The research project showed that the basic elements described in the ATP-G concept are consistent with the view of nursing practitioners and therefore reflect the characteristic features of routine daily practice; nonetheless, some new aspects were found, primarily the importance of interdisciplinary teamwork in geriatric settings. There were also difficulties related to the ATP-G concept which were experienced as restraints by the questioned professionals. Further research should therefore investigate the structures for optimal implementation of the ATP-G concept into standard practice.

  15. The Practice of Geriatrics: Specialized Geriatric Programs and Home Visits

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Home visits have a long history in geriatrics. In this narrative review, the literature on home visits performed by specialists in geriatric medicine (or psychiatry) and/or specialized programs in geriatric medicine (or psychiatry) published between January 1988 and December 2008 was examined. The papers reviewed were few and inconsistent in their message. The lessons that can be derived from them are limited. Draft recommendations about the role of home visiting by specialized geriatric programs in Canada are presented. PMID:23251306

  16. [Social geriatric examination].

    PubMed

    Sipsma, D H

    1983-12-01

    The method of social-geriatric examination is described. This type of examination by an ambulatory team takes place at the patient's home. The examination is firstly directed to the interactions in the human-environmental system. By means of a scheme as an aid the interactions can be analyzed. This analysis, how people are dealing with each other and with need for care and with care, precedes the analysis of the chain of interacting unfavourable conditions of social, mental and physical nature, which are responsible for the disturbance of the balance of the system. This disturbance is signaled by way of the primary health care system to the geriatric examination circuit of which the social-geriatric team functions as first receiver of those signals.

  17. [Nutritional guidelines and standards in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Volkert, D

    2011-04-01

    Nutritional problems and deficiencies are widespread in geriatric institutions. On the other hand, benefits of different interventions to improve the nutritional situation of elderly people--from amelioration of mealtime ambience to the use of artificial nutrition--have been shown in many studies. In recent years, several guidelines and standards have been developed to facilitate the transfer of this scientific knowledge into practice. These are in particular the medical Guidelines for Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition in Geriatrics (DGEM/DGG and ESPEN), the DNQP Expert Standard for qualified nurses, the DGE Quality Standards for dietetic personnel, and the interdisciplinary BUKO-QS Standard. These guidelines and standards provide recommendations for adequate nutritional care and assistance for the institutionalized elderly person based on the scientific state of the art. They should be used as the basis for the development of local instructions for the management of nutritional problems and malnutrition. Elderly people will only profit, if these guidelines are used in daily routine.

  18. Geriatric Medical Education in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibovitz, Arthur; Baumoehl, Yehuda; Habot, Beni

    2004-01-01

    In this article we will focus on geriatric medical education in Israel and will review our experience in this field. A coordinated effort of the Ministry of Health and the Israeli Medical Association led to the establishment of a modern geriatric system and to the recognition of geriatrics as a medical specialty in the early 1980s. All four…

  19. Geriatric prosthodontic care.

    PubMed

    Partida, Mary Norma

    2014-01-01

    The geriatric population (age 65 and older) is the fastest growing segment nationally and globally. The large population will continue to increase because of baby boomers that have recently turned 65 years old. Within this cohort, there is much diversity in health, socioeconomic levels, education, and health beliefs. There is a decline in edentulism yet still there are oral health conditions that persist with age, such as caries, tooth loss, and increased needs for prosthodontic dental treatment. Several factors should be taken into account in geriatric prosthodontic care, including quality of life and psychosocial needs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The portal of geriatrics online education: a 21st-century resource for teaching geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Ravishankar; Leipzig, Rosanne M; Howe, Carol L; Sauvigne, Karen; Usiak, Craig; Soriano, Rainier P

    2015-02-01

    The way students are taught and evaluated is changing, with greater emphasis on flexible, individualized, learner-centered education, including the use of technology. The goal of assessment is also shifting from what students know to how they perform in practice settings. Developing educational materials for teaching in these ways is time-consuming and can be expensive. The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education (POGOe) was developed to aid educators in meeting these needs and become quicker, better-prepared teachers of geriatrics. POGOe contains more than 950 geriatrics educational materials that faculty at 45% of allopathic and 7% of osteopathic U.S. medical schools and the Centers for Geriatric Nursing Excellence have created. These materials include various instructional and assessment methodologies, including virtual and standardized patients, games, tutorials, case-based teaching, self-directed learning, and traditional lectures. Materials with common goals and resource types are available as selected educational series. Learner assessments comprise approximately 10% of the educational materials. POGOe also includes libraries of videos, images, and questions extracted from its educational materials to encourage educators to repurpose content components to create new resources and to align their teaching better with their learners' needs. Web-Geriatric Education Modules, a peer-reviewed online modular curriculum for medical students, is a prime example of this repurposing. The existence of a robust compendium of instructional and assessment materials allows educators to concentrate more on improving learner performance in practice and not simply on knowledge acquisition. It also makes it easier for nongeriatricians to teach the care of older adults in their respective disciplines. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  1. Geriatric Knowledge and Educational Needs among Rural Health Care Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goins, R. Turner; Gainor, Sara Jane; Pollard, Cecil; Spencer, S. Melinda

    2003-01-01

    In a needs assessment of 84 rural health care professionals (44.1% physicians, 15.5% pharmacists, 14.3% nurses, 26.1% other), 39% considered their geriatrics knowledge above average. They were interested in learning more about Alzheimer's/dementia, medication use, and adverse effects. Preferred methods were videotapes, CD-ROM, and an…

  2. [A partnership for the benefit of patients in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Jacquin-Mourain, Nicole

    2015-02-01

    In geriatrics, with the longer life expectancy and the growing number of neurodegenerative diseases, the need for care is increasing and working together is fundamental. The nurse/healthcare assistant partnership is the guarantor of improving patients' quality of care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. [Geriatric multimorbidity in claims data - part 1. Analysis of hospital data and long-term care insurance data].

    PubMed

    Lübke, N; Meinck, M

    2012-08-01

    In Germany, typical geriatric multimorbidity is--next to age itself--of special significance for the identification of target groups for specific geriatric care offers. The present article primarily focuses on typical geriatric multimorbidity in the claims data of statutory health insurance and long-term care insurance in Germany. Using the definition of "the geriatric patient" that is agreed on by providers of services as well as by cost bearers, geriatric multimorbidity is defined as the coexistence of at least 2 of 15 typical geriatric conditions. A suggestion made by the German Geriatric Association was to assign ICD-10-GM codes to each of these 15 conditions. Thus, it becomes possible to identify the corresponding geriatric conditions in claims data. The article investigates the frequency of geriatric conditions and, thus, of geriatric multimorbidity of patients aged ≥ 60 years admitted to a hospital with a geriatric ward. Patients treated in a geriatric ward were compared with those who did not receive geriatric care. In anticipation of a high correlation between typical geriatric conditions and specific features that are preconditions for receiving long-term care insurance benefits (such as care levels and status of a nursing home resident), claims data of the long-term care insurance were included for external validation. The analyses showed a distinctly higher proportion of insured people with typical geriatric multimorbidity or rather a certain care level among the geriatrically treated cases than among those patients not receiving geriatric treatment (68.5%/67.9% versus 24.2%/33.4%). The different proportions of typical geriatric multimorbidity coded among the patients with features of a certain care level in the two given groups give rise to the suspicion that typical geriatric multimorbidity is not always statistically recorded--especially in cases of treatment without provision of geriatric care. The frequency of cases of typical geriatric

  4. Geriatric Service Worker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seton Hill Coll., Greensburg, PA.

    This curriculum for training geriatric service workers is designed to incorporate additional communication and group skills along with the basic knowledge and skills necessary to work with older adults. The curriculum is organized in four modules. Each module is assigned a time frame and a credit unit base. The modules are divided into four major…

  5. Update in geriatric medicine.

    PubMed

    Cayea, Danelle; Eckstrom, Elizabeth; Christmas, Colleen

    2012-03-01

    With an aging population, internists will provide care to a growing number of older adults, a population at risk of developing multiple chronic medical conditions and geriatric syndromes. For this update in geriatric medicine, we highlight recent key articles focused on preventive strategies and lifestyle changes that reduce the burden of disease and functional decline in older adults. We identified English-language articles published between March 1, 2010 and March 31, 2011 by review of the contents of major geriatrics/general medicine journals and journal watch services including: New England Journal of Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, Journal of the American Medical Association, Lancet, Archives of Internal Medicine, British Medical Journal, Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, and the Journals of Gerontology. We also reviewed updates to the Cochrane database of systematic reviews and articles highlighted by the ACP Journal Club and Journal Watch. Inclusion criteria included (1) randomized controlled trials, (2) conditions exclusive or common to older adults, and (3) commonly seen in generalist practices. After abstract review, each author selected five articles, and these were reviewed again by all authors. Through multiple discussions, consensus was reached on the final articles selected for inclusion based on their quality and potential to improve the health of older patients cared for by generalists.

  6. Nascher's Geriatrics at 100.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Andrew B

    2014-12-01

    Ignatz Nascher's Geriatrics—the first American medical textbook on aging—turns 100 this year. This essay is a reappraisal, on its centennial, of Nascher's landmark work. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  7. Geriatric Service and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, W. Dean, Comp.

    Written by experts in the field of geriatrics, this book is composed of a group of papers. Among the subjects covered in the papers are the news media, the values of the later years, the sciences and aging, and a history of the Home. Several of the articles are written by ministers connected with the religiously oriented facility. Additional…

  8. The Infant Geriatrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gratton, Brian

    1984-01-01

    Reviews recent histories of geriatrics which suggest that early physicians contributed to the degradation of old age by labeling it a disease. Records of the Boston Almshouse Hospital indicated that assessments of the elderly's morbidity were prompted as much by doctors' desires for self-advancement as by the elderly's needs. (JAC)

  9. Nutraceuticals for geriatrics

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Charu; Prakash, Dhan

    2014-01-01

    Geriatrics is a medical practice that addresses the complex needs of older patients and emphasizes maintaining functional independence even in the presence of chronic disease. Treatment of geriatric patients requires a different strategy and is very complex. Geriatric medicines aim to promote health by preventing and treating diseases and disabilities in older adults. Development of effective dietary interventions for promoting healthy aging is an active but challenging area of research because aging is associated with an increased risk of chronic disease, disability, and death. Aging populations are a global phenomenon. The most widespread conditions affecting older people are hypertension, congestive heart failure, dementia, osteoporosis, breathing problems, cataract, and diabetes to name a few. Decreased immunity is also partially responsible for the increased morbidity and mortality resulting from infectious agents in the elderly. Nutritional status is one of the chief variables that explains differences in both the incidence and pathology of infection. Elderly people are at increased risk for micronutrient deficiencies due to a variety of factors including social, physical, economic, and emotional obstacles to eating. Thus there is an urgent need to shift priorities to increase our attention on ways to prevent chronic illnesses associated with aging. Individually, people must put increased efforts into establishing healthy lifestyle practices, including consuming a more healthful diet. The present review thus focuses on the phytochemicals of nutraceutical importance for the geriatric population. PMID:26151003

  10. Sustainability of a proactive geriatric trauma consultation service

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Camilla L.; Al Atia, Raghda; McFarlan, Amanda; Lee, Holly Y.; Valiaveettil, Christina; Haas, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Background Proactive geriatric trauma consultation service (GTCS) models have been associated with better delivery of geriatric care and functional outcomes. Whether such collaborative models can be improved and sustained remains uncertain. We describe the sustainability and process improvements of an inpatient GTCS. Methods We assessed workflow using interviews and surveys to identify opportunities to optimize the referral process for the GTCS. Sustainability of the service was assessed via a prospective case series (July 2012–December 2013). Study data were derived from a review of the medical record and trauma registry database. Metrics to determine sustainability included volume of cases, staffing levels, rate of adherence to recommendations, geriatric-specific clinical outcomes, trauma quality indicators, consultation requests and discharge destination. Results Through process changes, we were able to ensure every eligible patient was referred for a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Compared with the implementation phase, volume of assessments increased and recommendation adherence rates were maintained. Delirium and/or dementia were the most common geriatric issue addressed. The rate of adherence to recommendations made by the GTCS team was 88.2%. Only 1.4% of patients were discharged to a nursing home. Conclusion Workflow assessment is a useful means to optimize the referral process for comprehensive geriatric assessment. Sustainability of a GTCS was shown by volume, staffing and recommendation adherence. PMID:27669402

  11. Sustainability of a proactive geriatric trauma consultation service.

    PubMed

    Wong, Camilla L; AlAtia, Raghda; McFarlan, Amanda; Lee, Holly Y; Valiaveettil, Christina; Haas, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    Proactive geriatric trauma consultation service (GTCS) models have been associated with better delivery of geriatric care and functional outcomes. Whether such collaborative models can be improved and sustained remains uncertain. We describe the sustainability and process improvements of an inpatient GTCS. We assessed workflow using interviews and surveys to identify opportunities to optimize the referral process for the GTCS. Sustainability of the service was assessed via a prospective case series (July 2012-December 2013). Study data were derived from a review of the medical record and trauma registry database. Metrics to determine sustainability included volume of cases, staffing levels, rate of adherence to recommendations, geriatric-specific clinical outcomes, trauma quality indicators, consultation requests and discharge destination. Through process changes, we were able to ensure every eligible patient was referred for a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Compared with the implementation phase, volume of assessments increased and recommendation adherence rates were maintained. Delirium and/or dementia were the most common geriatric issue addressed. The rate of adherence to recommendations made by the GTCS team was 88.2%. Only 1.4% of patients were discharged to a nursing home. Workflow assessment is a useful means to optimize the referral process for comprehensive geriatric assessment. Sustainability of a GTCS was demonstrated by volume, staffing and recommendation adherence.

  12. Sustainability of a proactive geriatric trauma consultation service.

    PubMed

    Wong, Camilla L; Al Atia, Raghda; McFarlan, Amanda; Lee, Holly Y; Valiaveettil, Christina; Haas, Barbara

    2017-02-01

    Proactive geriatric trauma consultation service (GTCS) models have been associated with better delivery of geriatric care and functional outcomes. Whether such collaborative models can be improved and sustained remains uncertain. We describe the sustainability and process improvements of an inpatient GTCS. We assessed workflow using interviews and surveys to identify opportunities to optimize the referral process for the GTCS. Sustainability of the service was assessed via a prospective case series (July 2012-December 2013). Study data were derived from a review of the medical record and trauma registry database. Metrics to determine sustainability included volume of cases, staffing levels, rate of adherence to recommendations, geriatric-specific clinical outcomes, trauma quality indicators, consultation requests and discharge destination. Through process changes, we were able to ensure every eligible patient was referred for a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Compared with the implementation phase, volume of assessments increased and recommendation adherence rates were maintained. Delirium and/or dementia were the most common geriatric issue addressed. The rate of adherence to recommendations made by the GTCS team was 88.2%. Only 1.4% of patients were discharged to a nursing home. Workflow assessment is a useful means to optimize the referral process for comprehensive geriatric assessment. Sustainability of a GTCS was shown by volume, staffing and recommendation adherence.

  13. EMS Attitudes Towards Geriatric Prehospital Care And Continuing Medical Education in Geriatrics

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Lars-Kristofer N.; Fairbanks, Rollin J.; Hettinger, Aaron Z.; Shah, Manish N.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To understand the opinions of emergency medical service (EMS) providers regarding their ability to care for older adults, the domains of geriatric medicine in which they need more training, and the modality through which continuing education could be best delivered. Design Qualitative study using key informant interviews. Setting Prehospital EMS system in Rochester, New York. Participants EMS providers, EMS instructors and administrators, emergency physicians, and geriatricians. Outcome Measures Semi-structured interviews were conducted using an interview guide that addressed the following domains: 1)knowledge and skill deficiencies; 2)recommendations for improvement of geriatrics continuing education; 3)delivery methods of education. Results Participant responses were generally congruous despite the diverse backgrounds, and redundancy was achieved rapidly. All participants perceived a deficit in EMS education on the care of older adults, particularly related to communications with patients and skilled nursing facility staff. All desired more geriatric continuing education for EMS providers, especially in communications and psychosocial issues. Education was desired in various modalities. Conclusion Further geriatrics continuing education for EMS providers is needed. Some specific topics relate to medical issues, but a large proportion involve communications and psychosocial issues. Education should be delivered in a variety of modalities to meet the needs of the EMS community. Emerging online video technologies may bridge the gap between learners preferring classroom based modailities and those preferring self-study modules. PMID:19170777

  14. Defining the Domain of Geriatric Medicine in an Urban Public Health System Affiliated with an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Christopher M.; Weiner, Michael; Counsell, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    The American Geriatrics Society has recommended a reexamination of the roles and deployment of providers with expertise in geriatric medicine. Healthcare systems use a variety of strategies to maximize their geriatric expertise. In general, these health systems tend to focus geriatric medicine resources on a group of older adults that are locally defined as the most in need. This article describes a model of care within an academic urban public health system and describes how local characteristics interact to define the domain of geriatric medicine. This domain is defined using 4 years of data from an electronic medical record combined with data collected from clinical trials. From January 2002 to December 2005, 31,443 adults aged 65 and older were seen at any clinical site within this healthcare system. The mean age was 75 (range 65–105); 61% were women; 35% African American, and 2% Hispanic. The payer mix was 80% Medicare and 17% Medicaid. The local geriatric medicine program includes sites of care in inpatient, ambulatory, nursing home, and home-based settings. By design, this geriatric medicine clinical practice complements the care provided to older adults by the primary care practice. Primary care physicians tend to cede care to geriatric medicine for older adults with advanced disability or geriatric syndromes. This is most apparent for older adults in nursing facilities or those requiring home-based care. There is a dynamic interplay between design features, reputation, and capacity that modulates volume, location, and type of patients seen by geriatrics. PMID:18795983

  15. [Medical short stay unit for geriatric patients in the emergency department: clinical and healthcare benefits].

    PubMed

    Pareja, Teresa; Hornillos, Mercedes; Rodríguez, Miriam; Martínez, Javier; Madrigal, María; Mauleón, Coro; Alvarez, Bárbara

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of comprehensive geriatric assessment and management of high-risk elders in a medical short stay unit located in the emergency department of a general hospital. We performed a descriptive, prospective study of patients admitted to the medical short stay unit for geriatric patients of the emergency department in 2006. A total of 749 patients were evaluated, with a mean (standard deviation) stay in the unit of 37 (16) h. The mean age was 86 (7) years; 57% were women, and 50% had moderate-severe physical impairment and dementia. Thirty-five percent lived in a nursing home. The most frequent reason for admission was exacerbation of chronic cardiopulmonary disease. Multiple geriatric syndromes were identified. The most frequent were immobility, pressure sores and behavioral disorders related to dementia. Seventy percent of the patients were discharged to home after being stabilized and were followed-up by the geriatric clinic and day hospital (39%), the home care medical team (11%), or the nursing home or primary care physician (20%). During the month after discharge, 17% were readmitted and 7.7% died, especially patients with more advanced age or functional impairment. After the unit was opened, admissions to the acute geriatric unit fell by 18.2%. Medical short stay units for geriatric patients in emergency departments may be useful for geriatric assessment and treatment of exacerbations of chronic diseases. These units can help to reduce the number of admissions and optimize the care provided in other ambulatory and domiciliary geriatric settings.

  16. [Teaching of geriatrics and gerontology at medical schools].

    PubMed

    Kalvach, Z; Masková, B; Stĕpán, P

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of goals and approaches in teaching geriatrics and gerontology for undergraduate medical students according to literature and personal 6 years experience. A proposal of "two module model" with introductory module of general gerontology in first years of studium (stress on communication, reflection of the elderly as human beings, their limitations, risks, and needs, lectures for medical students as well as for students of nursing, occupational therapy and so on to support team approach). Advanced module of "proper medical geriatrics" in late clinical years of studium (to stress atypical character of diseases, investigation, differential diagnosis and importance of acute care for elders units).

  17. Geriatric assessment teams.

    PubMed

    Campbell, L J; Cole, K D

    1987-02-01

    In geriatric care, a form of teamwork is the recommended modality because of the complex biopsychosocial needs of the patient. The goal of geriatric assessment programs is to establish an intensive assessment of older adults which requires the competencies of several coordinated disciplines. Not only do teams have the capacity to assess patients in much greater depth but also patients share different information with different providers. The composition of the team is dictated by the needs of the patient population in accordance with resources available. Next, one must identify a method of team practice in order for interactions to take place. The method of functioning determines what kind of team it is, ranging from independent functioning with minimal formal interfacing to interdependent activity interspersed with formal and informal interactions. In initiating a geriatric assessment program, one needs to determine which tasks demand interdisciplinary collaboration, which require interdisciplinary consultation, and which can be performed using a matrix or extended team model. In this model, the core team is supplemented by other disciplines as determined by the team, predicated on patient problems. Teams can profit from training, which can help with choosing an appropriate model, establishing a manual of procedure, and managing interactive issues and problems. This can occur early in the team's formation, or when a team takes on new members. The minimal level of team development would include establishing program goals, delineating professional responsibilities and roles, and implementing a system for exchanging and documenting information about patient plans. Saving input to share only in team meeting is inefficient, so health care teams need to recognize the importance of informal interchanges. It is still a matter of conjecture about what team works best with which patients under what circumstances or conditions. Multiple randomized clinical trials with teams

  18. Geriatric Medicine Is Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steel, Knight

    1984-01-01

    Reviews the present status of geriatrics in academic medicine and suggests that an understanding of academic medicine is needed in order to secure the institutionalization of geriatric medicine. Offers some predictions on the future of geriatric medicine. (JAC)

  19. Research agenda for geriatric rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Hoenig, Helen; Siebens, Hilary

    2004-11-01

    The Research Agenda Setting Process is a joint endeavor by the American Geriatrics Society and the Hartford Foundation to increase geriatric expertise in the surgical and related specialties. This article provides the results of the Research Agenda Setting Process project on research needs in geriatric rehabilitation, which included a systematic review of the literature and a group consensus process. Explicit research questions and methodologies were developed for three cross-cutting research needs in geriatric rehabilitation and for the rehabilitation of eight specific conditions affecting older individuals.

  20. [Urosepsis in Geriatric Patients].

    PubMed

    Heppner, H J; Yapan, F; Wiedemann, A

    2016-02-01

    Due to the demographic shift, increasing numbers of geriatric patients are admitted to acute care hospitals of all levels of care. This means that special challenges must be met in the medical care and management of these patients.Immunosenescence and multimorbidity make elderly patients vulnerable to infectious diseases. Urinary tract infections range from "simple" cystitis to pyelonephritis and urosepsis and, at 25%, are the second most common form of infection in geriatric patients. It is often difficult to make a diagnosis because typical symptoms do not always occur. Urosepsis, a hyperactive and uncontrolled immune response of the organism due to exogenous damage, is based on bacterial infection of the urogenital tract. Urinary retention, immunosuppressive medication, malignancy, diabetes mellitus and renal or prostatic processes promote the risk for urosepsis. Complicated urosepsis additionally comprises a structural or functional abnormality, including ureteral obstruction. Risk factors for urosepsis are urinary incontinence, an indwelling urinary catheter, hydronephrosis or ureteral calculi. Patients suffering from diabetes mellitus are also at a higher risk for urosepsis. When diagnosing elderly patients, one has to consider that the classic symptoms can be masked by multimorbidity, or septic encephalopathy and acute confusion (delirium) may be the only symptoms. Body temperature is lower in elderly patients and does not necessarily rise to 38°C or more in the acute phase. In patients older than 75 years who are suspicious for sepsis, temperatures as low as 37.4°C should be rated as fever. Treatment of urosepsis basically includes clearing the focus, antimicrobial treatment, stabilisation of circulation and replacement of failed organ functions. Initial empiric antibiotic treatment, depending on local resistance, should be done with acylaminopenicilline and beta-lactamase inhibitors (e. g. piperacillin/combactam or tazobactam or group 3 cephalosporins

  1. Medical student perspectives on geriatrics and geriatric education.

    PubMed

    Bagri, Anita S; Tiberius, Richard

    2010-10-01

    To ascertain medical students' perspectives on geriatrics. Interpretative phenomenological analysis. An allopathic, Liaison Committee on Medical Education-accredited, former Donald W. Reynolds Foundation grant recipient, U.S. medical school. Thirty fourth-year medical students who completed geriatric educational activities in all 4 years of medical school. Two researchers independently reviewed verbatim transcripts from five focus groups and identified themes using the constant comparative method. Seventeen themes that elaborate on students' perspectives on geriatrics were identified. Students reported not feeling appropriately engaged in geriatrics, despaired at the futility of care, were depressed by the decline and death of their patients, were frustrated by low reimbursement rates and low prestige despite fellowship training, were concerned about patients' unrealistic expectations and opportunities for litigation, felt unsure how to handle ethical dilemmas, and found communicating with older adults to be enjoyable but time consuming and challenging. They felt they had too much exposure to geriatrics in medical school. Current attitude scales fail to capture some of the dimensions uncovered in this study, whereas students did not mention other dimensions commonly included in attitude scales. Regarding curriculum development, students may find an integrated preclinical geriatric curriculum to be more relevant to their careers than a stand-alone curriculum. Clinical clerkships might be in a better position to emphasize the positive aspects of geriatrics and develop strategies to address students' negative attitudes. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2010, The American Geriatrics Society.

  2. Juxtapositioning Geriatrics and Art: The Essence of Caring, Carer, and Cared-For in Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Carungcong, Bobbie Jo H.; Castillo, Jasper Q.; Castillo, Joyce Anne A.; Castro, Jenelyn S.

    2009-01-01

    The need to revolutionize geriatric nursing is dawning. However, there is a negative view regarding this nursing field. The dearth of literature on the use of theatrical films to surface universal realities in a care-driven profession has led to this attempt of bringing to reality the essences of caring, carer, and cared-for and their interactions…

  3. The Consortium of E-Learning in Geriatrics Instruction.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Jorge G; Teasdale, Thomas A; Hajjar, Ihab; Shaughnessy, Marianne; Mintzer, Michael J

    2007-03-01

    This paper describes the activities of the Consortium of E-Learning in Geriatrics Instruction (CELGI), a group dedicated to creating, using, and evaluating e-learning to enhance geriatrics education. E-learning provides a relatively new approach to addressing geriatrics educators' concerns, such as the shortage of professionals trained to care for older people, overcrowded medical curricula, the move to transfer teaching venues to community settings, and the switch to competency-based education models. However, this innovative education technology is facing a number of challenges as its use and influence grow, including proof of effectiveness and efficiency. CELGI was created in response to these challenges, with the goal of facilitating the development and portability of e-learning materials for geriatrics educators. Members represent medical and nursing schools, the Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare system, long-term care facilities, and other institutions that rely on continuing streams of quality health education. CELGI concentrates on providing a coordinated approach to formulating and adapting specifications, standards, and guidelines; developing education and training in e-learning competencies; developing e-learning products; evaluating the effect of e-learning materials; and disseminating these materials. The vision of consortium members is that e-learning for geriatric education will become the benchmark for valid and successful e-learning throughout medical education.

  4. Rest break organization in geriatric care and turnover: a multimethod cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Wendsche, Johannes; Hacker, Winfried; Wegge, Jürgen; Schrod, Nadine; Roitzsch, Katharina; Tomaschek, Anne; Kliegel, Matthias

    2014-09-01

    Various determinants of nurses' work motivation and turnover behavior have been examined in previous studies. In this research, we extend this work by investigating the impact of care setting (nursing homes vs. home care services) and the important role of rest break organization. We aimed to identify direct and indirect linkages between geriatric care setting, rest break organization, and registered nurses' turnover assessed over a period of one year. We designed a multimethod cross-sectional study. 80 nursing units (n=45 nursing homes, n=35 home care) in 51 German geriatric care services employing 597 registered nurses. We gathered documentary, interview, and observational data about the organization of rest breaks, registered nurses' turnover, and additional organizational characteristics (type of ownership, location, nursing staff, clients, and client-to-staff-ratio). The findings show that the rest break system in geriatric nursing home units is more regularly as well as collectively organized and causes less unauthorized rest breaks than in home care units. Moreover, the feasibility of collective rest breaks was, as predicted, negatively associated with registered nurses' turnover and affected indirectly the relation between care setting and registered nurses' turnover. Care setting, however, had no direct impact on turnover. Furthermore, registered nurses' turnover was higher in for-profit care units than in public or non-profit units. This study reveals significant differences in rest break organization as a function of geriatric care setting and highlights the role of collective rest breaks for nursing staff retention. Our study underlines the integration of organizational context variables and features of rest break organization for the analysis of nursing turnover. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Do Geriatricians Stay in Geriatrics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Uday; Aung, Myo; Chan, Susanna; Wolfklein, Gisele

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate whether formally trained geriatricians remain in the field of Geriatrics, and to determine their job satisfaction and perceived quality of life, we surveyed the 107 fellows trained over the last 25 years in one accredited geriatric program. Of the 88 physicians who consented to participate, 75% devoted at least half of their practice…

  6. Do Geriatricians Stay in Geriatrics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Uday; Aung, Myo; Chan, Susanna; Wolfklein, Gisele

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate whether formally trained geriatricians remain in the field of Geriatrics, and to determine their job satisfaction and perceived quality of life, we surveyed the 107 fellows trained over the last 25 years in one accredited geriatric program. Of the 88 physicians who consented to participate, 75% devoted at least half of their practice…

  7. Geriatric Cardiology: An Emerging Discipline

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, John A.; Matlock, Daniel D.; Forman, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    Given changing demographics, patients with cardiovascular (CV) disease in developed countries are now older and more complex than even a decade ago. This trend is expected to continue into the foreseeable future; accordingly, cardiologists in practice are encountering patients with a greater number of comorbid illnesses as well as “geriatric conditions” such as cognitive impairment and frailty which complicate management and influence outcomes. Simultaneously, technological advances have widened the therapeutic options available for patients, including those with the most advanced CV disease. In the setting of these changes, geriatric cardiology has recently emerged as a discipline that aims to adapt principles from geriatric medicine into everyday cardiology practice. Accordingly, the tasks of a “geriatric cardiologist” may include both traditional evidence-based CV management plus comprehensive geriatric assessment, medication reduction, team-based coordination of care, and explicit incorporation of patient goals into management. Given that the field is still in its relative infancy, the training pathways and structure of clinical programs in geriatric cardiology are still being delineated. In this review we highlight the rationale behind geriatric cardiology as a discipline, several current approaches by geriatric cardiology programs, and future directions for the field. PMID:27476988

  8. Geriatric Cardiology: An Emerging Discipline.

    PubMed

    Dodson, John A; Matlock, Daniel D; Forman, Daniel E

    2016-09-01

    Given changing demographics, patients with cardiovascular (CV) disease in developed countries are now older and more complex than even a decade ago. This trend is expected to continue into the foreseeable future; accordingly, cardiologists are encountering patients with a greater number of comorbid illnesses as well as "geriatric conditions," such as cognitive impairment and frailty, which complicate management and influence outcomes. Simultaneously, technological advances have widened the therapeutic options available for patients, including those with the most advanced CV disease. In the setting of these changes, geriatric cardiology has recently emerged as a discipline that aims to adapt principles from geriatric medicine to everyday cardiology practice. Accordingly, the tasks of a "geriatric cardiologist" may include both traditional evidence-based CV management plus comprehensive geriatric assessment, medication reduction, team-based coordination of care, and explicit incorporation of patient goals into management. Given that the field is still in its relative infancy, the training pathways and structure of clinical programs in geriatric cardiology are still being delineated. In this review, we highlight the rationale behind geriatric cardiology as a discipline, several current approaches by geriatric cardiology programs, and future directions for the field. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Antipsychotics in geriatric institutions].

    PubMed

    Szulik, Judith

    2007-01-01

    The present paper approaches the use of antipsychotics in elder people in general, and particularly in geriatric institutions. During the last few years, prescription of antipsychotics in geriatric institutions increased, especially because of the availability of the atypicals, and their use was extended beyond the indications these drugs had been approved for. In dementia they are suggested for treatment of behavioral symptoms, despite having been approved only for cases of aggressiveness and risk of damage. There is a common tendency of perpetuating antipsychotic medication in elder people, with its consequent collateral effects as well. Few years ago, the increase of both risk of cerebrovascular events and of mortality in dementia patients treated with atypical agents was noticed. This generated controversy regarding their use in those kind of patients. Diverse factors associated to caregivers affect the decision of prescribing an antipsychotic in elder people. Non-pharmacological interventions are the first choice when treating behavioral symptoms; pharmacological interventions must take place with the lowest doses possible, with limited durations.

  10. Role of geriatric hospitals for dementia care in the community.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Hideyuki

    2012-06-01

    In dementia care, behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia and physical illness in patients with dementia impose a marked care burden and require medical intervention. Therefore, it is important for patients and their families to select appropriate medical institutions and facilities with nursing units specializing in the care of behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, such as geriatric hospitals, which are required to deal with various aspects of dementia. Geriatric hospitals should offer two treatment approaches: a care unit for patients with behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia or dementia with physical illness, and a multidisciplinary team approach involving physicians, nurses, psychologists, and social workers who provide coping strategies for dementia patients. © 2012 The Author. Psychogeriatrics © 2012 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  11. An international definition for "nursing home".

    PubMed

    Sanford, Angela M; Orrell, Martin; Tolson, Debbie; Abbatecola, Angela Marie; Arai, Hidenori; Bauer, Juergen M; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J; Dong, Birong; Ga, Hyuk; Goel, Ashish; Hajjar, Ramzi; Holmerova, Iva; Katz, Paul R; Koopmans, Raymond T C M; Rolland, Yves; Visvanathan, Renuka; Woo, Jean; Morley, John E; Vellas, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    There is much ambiguity regarding the term "nursing home" in the international literature. The definition of a nursing home and the type of assistance provided in a nursing home is quite varied by country. The International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics and AMDA foundation developed a survey to assist with an international consensus on the definition of "nursing home."

  12. [Geriatric dentistry in dental education].

    PubMed

    van Waas, M A

    1998-10-01

    Geriatric patients have both special medical problems (problems with aging and general health problems) and specific dental problems. This requires special skills of dentists who are treating these patients. The medical problems require a dentist with a wide medical education and a friendly attitude towards his patients. The dental problems require a dentist who is more problem orientated on his way of treatment. Both aspects are present in the theoretical teaching in most of the dental schools. For treatment of institutionalized geriatric patients it is advocated to train specialists in geriatric dentistry taking into account the need for a multidisciplinary and specific approach.

  13. New Frontiers in Geriatric Education

    PubMed Central

    Klapecki, Karyn C.

    1990-01-01

    The author describes a 1-month rotation in geriatric medicine for family practice residents. Residents work at a geriatric center with day patients, residents in a home for the aged, and acute and chronic-care hospital patients, under the supervision of geriatricians, family physicians, and specialists. They then work in the office of a family physician or in an outpatient miniclinic within a senior citizen housing complex. All residents reported increased comfort with elderly patients, and many have chosen to include geriatrics in their practices. Imagesp2039-ap2041-a PMID:21233948

  14. Service Learning With a Geriatric Population: Changing Attitudes and Improving Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Beauvais, Audrey; Foito, Kim; Pearlin, Nina; Yost, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    Relatively few nursing students choose to specialize in geriatric nursing. While increased clinical exposure and improved knowledge of the elderly have been proposed to manage this staffing dilemma, successful strategies have not been identified. This study examined nursing students' attitudes and knowledge about the elderly, before and after service learning experiences in Senior Citizen Centers. Through these interventions, students had significantly improved attitudes and knowledge about the elderly.

  15. [The Tijdschrift voor Gerontologie en Geriatrie: a practice-oriented journal of gerontology and geriatrics for the Dutch-speaking scientific community].

    PubMed

    Diesfeldt, H F A

    2008-02-01

    In 2008 the Dutch-language journal of gerontology and geriatrics goes into its 39th year of publication. Most of the scientific papers published by the Journal in 2007 serve a practical purpose. The Journal is oriented towards the scientific community of Dutch speaking geriatricians, nursing home physicians, psychologists, sociologists and other scientific professionals. Besides theory-driven empirical studies in gerontology and geriatrics, the Journal publishes comments and criticism on government policy on geriatric care and services for the elderly.

  16. Home geriatric physiological measurements.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Toshiyo

    2012-10-01

    In an ageing society, the elderly can be monitored with numerous physiological, physical and passive devices. Sensors can be installed in the home for continuous mobility assistance and unobtrusive disease prevention. This review presents several modern sensors, which improve the quality of life and assist the elderly, disabled people and their caregivers. The main concept of geriatric sensors is that they are capable of providing assistance without limiting or disturbing the subject's daily routine, giving him or her greater comfort, pleasure and well-being. Furthermore, this review includes associated technologies of wearable/implantable monitoring systems and the 'smart-house' project. This review concludes by discussing future challenges of the future aged society.

  17. A strategy to address the nursing faculty shortage.

    PubMed

    Ganley, Barbara J; Sheets, Ingrid

    2009-07-01

    This article describes one university's experience in creating a master's geriatric clinical nurse specialist-nurse educator program to address the nursing faculty shortage and the need for geriatric clinical nurse specialists. The successes and challenges are outlined, and curricular ideas that may be beneficial to other nursing programs also are presented. This program has enhanced the university's pool of clinical instructors, increased its ability to provide services to older adults, and allowed faculty to instruct and focus undergraduates in the distinctions of geriatric nursing care. The biggest challenges faced were marketing and recruitment of nurses; these challenges were addressed, and possible solutions are offered. The most immediate benefit of this program was the generation of geriatric clinical nurse specialists.

  18. Improving Rural Geriatric Care Through Education: A Scalable, Collaborative Project.

    PubMed

    Buck, Harleah G; Kolanowski, Ann; Fick, Donna; Baronner, Lawrence

    2016-07-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ISSUE Instructions: 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded after you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. In order to obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Improving Rural Geriatric Care Through Education: A Scalable, Collaborative Project," found on pages 306-313, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name, contact information, and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until June 30, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. OBJECTIVES Describe the unique nursing challenges that occur in caring for older adults in rural areas. Discuss the

  19. Teaching Programs in Geriatric Optometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbloom, Albert A.

    1985-01-01

    Results of a survey of U.S. and Canadian optometry programs concerning curriculum design, clinical and residency training programs, continuing education, and research projects planned or under way in geriatric optometry are presented and discussed. (MSE)

  20. Factors That Impact Registered Nurses' Decisions to Continue Providing Care to Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosfield, Saundra

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if there is a significant difference in the following: (a) nurses' likelihood to remain in geriatrics between age groups (those over 40 years of age and those under 40 years of age); (b) nurses' likelihood to remain in geriatrics and personality traits; (c) nurses' likelihood to remain in geriatrics…

  1. GRAMPS: An Automated Ambulatory Geriatric Record

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Kenric W.; King, Carol A.; Date, Vishvanath V.; Prather, Robert J.; Loo, Lawrence; Siddiqui, Khwaja

    1988-01-01

    GRAMPS (Geriatric Record and Multidisciplinary Planning System) is an interactive MUMPS system developed for VA outpatient use. It allows physicians to effectively document care in problem-oriented format with structured narrative and free text, eliminating handwritten input. We evaluated the system in a one-year controlled cohort study. When the computer, was used, appointment times averaged 8.2 minutes longer (32.6 vs. 24.4 minutes) compared to control visits with the same physicians. Computer use was associated with better quality of care as measured in the management of a common problem, hypertension, as well as decreased overall costs of care. When a faster computer was installed, data entry times improved, suggesting that slower processing had accounted for a substantial portion of the observed difference in appointment lengths. The GRAMPS system was well-accepted by providers. The modular design used in GRAMPS has been extended to medical-care applications in Nursing and Mental Health.

  2. Comprehensive geriatric assessment during emergency admission.

    PubMed

    James, Jo

    2016-03-01

    This is the first in a short series that presents case study examples of the use of comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) in different clinical settings. CGA is a holistic assessment model, which is designed to determine a frail older person's medical and mental health status, as well as functional, social and environmental issues. When applied by nurses, it can enable individualised planning for older people's health, safety and wellbeing. This article presents the case of a patient who had been admitted to hospital as an emergency for a suspected exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and subsequently developed a severe episode of delirium. It explores how the use of CGA at the point of her admission would have provided the patient with a higher standard of care and may have prevented her delirium.

  3. Reducing falls among geriatric rehabilitation patients: a controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Edgar Ramos; Berean, Colleen; Paches, Debra; Caveny, Penny; Yuen, Doris; Ballash, Lauralee; Freund-Heritage, Rosalie

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention programme to reduce falls among geriatric rehabilitation patients. Pre/post-test design with independent pre-test and matched post-test samples. Inpatient geriatric wards in a rehabilitation hospital. Seventy-six matched pairs (n = 152) of geriatric rehabilitation patients from one control and one intervention ward participated in the study, and 36 nursing staff surveys were completed. The intervention programme was developed based on interviews and systematic reviews. Educational materials were distributed to patients and families, and preventive measures were implemented. The rates of falls before and after the intervention both within and between the wards were compared, and surveys were completed. The matched patients presented no significant differences on age, gender or medical conditions. The falls rates, proportion of fallers and length of stay was higher among those in the control ward (P< 0.043). The percentage of fallers and the rate of falls/1000 patient days were lower on the intervention ward after implementation: odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = -2.9 (-6.6, -1.2) and -1.8 (-6.0, 0.5). Thirty of 36 respondents considered the tool to be helpful and beneficial for use on other wards. The intervention programme was effective in reducing falls among geriatric rehabilitation patients.

  4. An interprofessionally developed geriatric oncology curriculum for hematology-oncology fellows.

    PubMed

    Eid, Ahmed; Hughes, Caren; Karuturi, Meghan; Reyes, Connie; Yorio, Jeffrey; Holmes, Holly

    2015-03-01

    Because the cancer population is aging, interprofessional education incorporating geriatric principles is essential to providing adequate training for oncology fellows. We report the targeted needs assessment, content, and evaluation tools for our geriatric oncology curriculum at MD Anderson Cancer Center. A team comprising a geriatrician, a medical oncologist, an oncology PharmD, an oncology advanced nurse practitioner, and two oncology chief fellows developed the geriatric oncology curriculum. First, a general needs assessment was conducted by reviewing the literature and medical societies' publications and by consulting experts. A targeted needs assessment was then conducted by reviewing the fellows' evaluations of the geriatric oncology rotation and by interviewing fellows and recently graduated oncology faculty. Geriatric assessment, pharmacology, and psychosocial knowledge skills were the three identified areas of educational need. Curriculum objectives and an evaluation checklist were developed to evaluate learners in the three identified areas. The checklist content was validated by consulting experts in the field. Online materials, including a curriculum, a geriatric pharmacology job aid, and pharmacology cases, were also developed and delivered as part of the curriculum. An interprofessional team approach was a successful method for identifying areas of learners' educational needs, which in turn helped us develop an integrated geriatric oncology curriculum. The curriculum is currently being piloted and evaluated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. An interprofessionally developed geriatric oncology curriculum for hematology–oncology fellows

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Ahmed; Hughes, Caren; Karuturi, Meghan; Reyes, Connie; Yorio, Jeffrey; Holmes, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Objective Because the cancer population is aging, interprofessional education incorporating geriatric principles is essential to providing adequate training for oncology fellows. We report the targeted needs assessment, content, and evaluation tools for our geriatric oncology curriculum at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Methods A team comprising a geriatrician, a medical oncologist, an oncology PharmD, an oncology advanced nurse practitioner, and two oncology chief fellows developed the geriatric oncology curriculum. First, a general needs assessment was conducted by reviewing the literature and medical societies’ publications and by consulting experts. A targeted needs assessment was then conducted by reviewing the fellows’ evaluations of the geriatric oncology rotation and by interviewing fellows and recently graduated oncology faculty. Results Geriatric assessment, pharmacology, and psychosocial knowledge skills were the three identified areas of educational need. Curriculum objectives and an evaluation checklist were developed to evaluate learners in the three identified areas. The checklist content was validated by consulting experts in the field. Online materials, including a curriculum, a geriatric pharmacology job aid, and pharmacology cases, were also developed and delivered as part of the curriculum. Conclusion An interprofessional team approach was a successful method for identifying areas of learners’ educational needs, which in turn helped us develop an integrated geriatric oncology curriculum. The curriculum is currently being piloted and evaluated. PMID:25487037

  6. Development and implementation of a proactive geriatrics consultation model in collaboration with hospitalists.

    PubMed

    Sennour, Youcef; Counsell, Steven R; Jones, Jerrlyn; Weiner, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Acutely ill hospitalized older adults often experience a decline in function that may be preventable using a proactive, interdisciplinary, patient-centered approach. Hospitalists are treating an increasing number of these patients. A collaborative geriatrics consultation model to prevent functional decline and improve care for older patients with geriatrics syndromes was developed and implemented in partnership with a large hospitalist group in a community teaching hospital. A team of a geriatrician and a geriatrics nurse practitioner led the new consultation service. The team assisted with identifying cases, provided consultation early in the hospital stay, focused its evaluation on functional and psychosocial issues, and assisted in clinical management to optimize implementation of recommendations. In the first 4 years, the consultation service conducted 1,538 consultations in patients with a mean age of 81 (range 56-103). The most frequent geriatrics diagnoses were gait instability, delirium, and depression; recommendations usually included consulting physical therapy, increasing activity, and changing medications. The number of referrals and referring physicians grew steadily each year. Twenty-eight of 34 (82%) of the referring hospitalists completed a Web-based satisfaction questionnaire. All responding hospitalists agreed that proactive geriatrics consultation helped them provide better care; 96% rated the service as excellent. Analysis of hospital administrative data revealed a lower length of stay index and lower hospital costs in patients receiving a geriatrics consultation. The Proactive Geriatrics Consultation Service represents a promising model of collaboration between hospitalists and geriatricians for improving care of hospitalized older adults.

  7. Depression in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Abbas Asghar-Ali, A; Braun, U K

    2009-02-01

    While the most serious of depressive illnesses in the elderly is major depressive disorder, patients' quality of life can be significantly impacted by dysthmic disorder, sub-threshold depression (minor depression), or a depressive disorder due to a general medical condition, all of which have been shown to be more prevalent than major depression in the community dwelling population of older adults. Older adults are also more likely to develop grief reaction and frequently deal with issues of bereavement. This review will discuss the diagnoses of all relevant depressive diagnoses that primary care physicians are likely to encounter. Among the many different assessment tools that screen for depression the briefest instruments are a two-question screening tool recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and, specifically developed for older adults, the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) that is available in a short 15- Yes/No-question version. Many medical illnesses are associated with depressive symptoms. The focus in this review is on dementing illnesses/cerebrovascular disease, dementia of the Alzheimer's type, and Parkinson disease. First-line pharmacological therapy of depression includes selective serotonin inhibitors (SSRIs), and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). Side effects of particular drugs can often be geared towards achieving additional benefits, e.g. weight gain associated with the use of some SSRISs may be helpful for patients with dementia.

  8. Geriatric education for the physicians of tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Barry D; Fain, Mindy J

    2009-12-01

    The world's population is aging and there is need for more geriatricians. Current training programs, however, are not producing a sufficient number of geriatricians to meet that need, largely because students and residents lack interest in a career in geriatrics. A variety of reasons have been suggested to explain that lack of interest, and several changes in geriatrics training might increase the number of medical trainees who choose a career in geriatrics. These changes include recruiting medical students who are predisposed to geriatrics, loan forgiveness programs for those who enter careers in geriatrics, increased reimbursement for geriatric care, providing geriatric education to physicians in all specialties throughout their training, and refocusing geriatrics training so it includes the care of healthy vigorous older adults, rather than an exclusive focus on those with debility and chronic or fatal illnesses.

  9. Geriatric assessment for oncologists

    PubMed Central

    Korc-Grodzicki, Beatriz; Holmes, Holly M.; Shahrokni, Armin

    2015-01-01

    The world is experiencing aging of its population. Age-specific incidence rates of cancer are higher and cancer is now recognized as a part of aging. Treating older patients can be challenging. The clinical behavior of some tumors changes with age and the aging process itself brings physiological changes leading to decline in the function of organs. It is essential to identify those patients with longer life expectancy, potentially more likely to benefit from aggressive treatment vs. those that are more vulnerable to adverse outcomes. A primary determination when considering therapy for an older cancer patient is a patient’s physiologic, rather than chronologic age. In order to differentiate amongst patients of the same age, it is useful to determine if a patient is fit or frail. Frail older adults have multiple chronic conditions and difficulties maintaining independence. They may be more vulnerable to therapy toxicities, and may not have substantial lasting benefits from therapy. Geriatric assessment (GA) may be used as a tool to determine reversible deficits and devise treatment strategies to mitigate such deficits. GA is also used in treatment decision making by clinicians, helping to risk stratify patients prior to potentially high-risk therapy. An important practical aspect of GA is the feasibility of incorporating it into a busy oncology practice. Key considerations in performing the GA include: available resources, patient population, GA tools to use, and who will be responsible for using the GA results and develop care plans. Challenges in implementing GA in clinical practice will be discussed. PMID:26779363

  10. FUNCTIONAL NEUROIMAGING IN GERIATRIC DEPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Gunning, Faith M.; Smith, Gwenn S.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Abnormalities in specific cerebral networks likely confer vulnerability that increases the susceptibility for development of geriatric depression and impact the course of symptoms. Functional neuroimaging enables the in vivo identification of alterations in cerebral function that not only characterize disease vulnerability, but also may contribute to variability in depressive symptoms and antidepressant response. Judicious use of functional neuroimaging tools can advance pathophysiological models of geriatric depression. Furthermore, due to the age-related vulnerability of specific brain systems that have been implicated in mood disorders, geriatric depression provides a logical context within which to study the role of specific functional abnormalities in both antidepressant response and key behavioral and cognitive abnormalities of mood disorders. PMID:21536165

  11. Understanding implementation of comprehensive geriatric care programs: a multiple perspective approach is preferred.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Annemarie; Cramm, Jane-Murray; van Wijngaarden, Jeroen D H; Bakker, Ton J E M; Mackenbach, Johan P; Nieboer, Anna P

    2016-09-29

    The Prevention and Reactivation Care Program (PReCaP) provides a novel approach targeting hospital-related functional decline among elderly patients. Despite the high expectations, the PReCaP was not effective in preventing functional decline (ADL and iADL) among older patients. Although elderly PReCaP patients demonstrated slightly better cognitive functioning (Mini Mental State Examination; 0.4 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.2-0.6]), lower depression (Geriatric Depression Scale 15; -0.9 [95% -1.1 to -0.6]), and higher perceived health (Short-form 20; 5.6 [95% CI 2.8-8.4]) 1 year after admission than control patients, the clinical relevance was limited. Therefore, this study aims to identify factors impacting on the effectiveness of the implementation of the PReCaPand geriatric care 'as usual'. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 34 professionals working with elderly patients in three hospitals, selected for their comparable patient case mix and different levels of geriatric care. Five non-participatory observations were undertaken during multidisciplinary meetings. Patient files (n = 42), hospital protocols, and care plans were screened for elements of geriatric care. Clinical process data were analysed for PReCaP components. The establishment of a geriatric unit and employment of geriatricians demonstrates commitment to geriatric care in hospital A. Although admission processes are comparable, early identification of frail elderly patients only takes place in hosptial A. Furthermore, nursing care in the hospital A geriatric unit excels with regard to maximizing patient independency, an important predictor for hospital-related functional decline. Transfer nurses play a key role in arranging post-discharge geriatric follow-up care. Geriatric consultations are performed by geriatricians, geriatric nurses, and PReCaP case managers in hospital A. Yet hospital B consultative psychiatric nurses provide similar consultation services. The combination of

  12. Geriatric Dentistry in the Predoctoral Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moshman, Jack; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A survey of U.S. dental schools to determine the status of geriatric dentistry in the curriculum is discussed. Evidence of growing commitment is shown by deans who plan to give geriatric dentistry increasing priority in the future and by the fact that all schools now teach geriatric dentistry in some way. (MLW)

  13. A New Model of Delirium Care in the Acute Geriatric Setting: Geriatric Monitoring Unit

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Delirium is a common and serious condition, which affects many of our older hospitalised patients. It is an indicator of severe underlying illness and requires early diagnosis and prompt treatment, associated with poor survival, functional outcomes with increased risk of institutionalisation following the delirium episode in the acute care setting. We describe a new model of delirium care in the acute care setting, titled Geriatric Monitoring Unit (GMU) where the important concepts of delirium prevention and management are integrated. We hypothesize that patients with delirium admitted to the GMU would have better clinical outcomes with less need for physical and psychotropic restraints compared to usual care. Methods/Design GMU models after the Delirium Room with adoption of core interventions from Hospital Elder Life Program and use of evening bright light therapy to consolidate circadian rhythm and improve sleep in the elderly patients. The novelty of this approach lies in the amalgamation of these interventions in a multi-faceted approach in acute delirium management. GMU development thus consists of key considerations for room design and resource planning, program specific interventions and daily core interventions. Assessments undertaken include baseline demographics, comorbidity scoring, duration and severity of delirium, cognitive, functional measures at baseline, 6 months and 12 months later. Additionally we also analysed the pre and post-GMU implementation knowledge and attitude on delirium care among staff members in the geriatric wards (nurses, doctors) and undertook satisfaction surveys for caregivers of patients treated in GMU. Discussion This study protocol describes the conceptualization and implementation of a specialized unit for delirium management. We hypothesize that such a model of care will not only result in better clinical outcomes for the elderly patient with delirium compared to usual geriatric care, but also improved staff

  14. Neuromodulation therapies for geriatric depression.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, Verònica; Ho, Kerrie-Anne; Alonzo, Angelo; Martin, Donel; George, Duncan; Loo, Colleen K

    2015-07-01

    Depression is frequent in old age and its prognosis is poorer than in younger populations. The use of pharmacological treatments in geriatric depression is limited by specific pharmacodynamic age-related factors that can diminish tolerability and increase the risk of drug interactions. The possibility of modulating cerebral activity using brain stimulation techniques could result in treating geriatric depression more effectively while reducing systemic side effects and medication interactions. This may subsequently improve treatment adherence and overall prognosis in the older patient. Among clinically available neuromodulatory techniques, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) remains the gold standard for the treatment of severe depression in the elderly. Studies have proven that ECT is more effective and has a faster onset of action than antidepressants in the treatment of severe, unipolar, geriatric depression and that older age is a predictor of rapid ECT response and remission. The application of novel and more tolerable forms of ECT for geriatric depression is currently being examined. Preliminary results suggest that right unilateral ultrabrief ECT (RUL-UB ECT) is a promising intervention, with similar efficacy to brief-pulse ECT and fewer adverse cognitive effects. Overall findings in repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) suggest that it is a safe intervention in geriatric depression. Higher rTMS stimulation intensity and more treatments may need to be given in the elderly to achieve optimal results. There is no specific data on vagus nerve stimulation in the elderly. Transcranial direct current stimulation, magnetic seizure therapy and deep brain stimulation are currently experimental, and more data from geriatric samples is needed.

  15. [Gerodontology consultation in geriatric facilities: general health status (I)].

    PubMed

    Katsoulis, Joannis; Huber, Sandra; Mericske-Stern, Regina

    2009-01-01

    Dental undertreatment is often seen in the older population. This is particularly true for the elderly living in nursing homes and geriatric hospitals. The progression of chronic diseases results in loss of their independence. They rely on daily support and care due to physical or mental impairment. The visit of a dentist in private praxis becomes difficult or impossible and is a logistic problem. These elderly patients are often not aware of oral and dental problems or these are not addressed. The geriatric hospital Bern, Ziegler, has integrated dental care in the concept of physical rehabilitation of geriatric patients. A total of 139 patients received dental treatment in the years 2005/2006. Their mean age was 83 years, but the segment with > 85 years of age amounted to 46%. The general health examinations reveald multiple and complex disorders. The ASA classification (American Society of Anesthesiologists, Physical Status Classification System) was applied and resulted in 15% = P2 (mild systemic disease, no functional limitation), 47% = P3 (severe systemic disease, definite functional limitations) and 38% = P4 (severe systemic disease, constant threat to life). Eighty-seven of the patients exhibited 3 or more chronic diseases with a prevalence of cardiovascular diseases, musculoskelettal disorders and dementia. Overall the differences between men and women were small, but broncho-pulmonary dieseases were significantly more frequent in women, while men were more often diagnosed with dementia and depression. Verbal communication was limited or not possible with 60% of the patients due to cognitive impairment or aphasia after a stroke. Although the objective treatment need is high, providing dentistry for frail and geriatric patients is characterized by risks due to poor general health conditions, difficulties in communication, limitations in feasibility and lack of adequate aftercare. In order to prevent the problem of undertreatment, elderly independently living

  16. Effects of a Geriatrics Interdisciplinary Experience on Learners' Knowledge and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, James T.; Williams, Brent C.; Halter, Jeffrey B.; Remington, Tami L.; Foulk, Mariko A.; Persky, Neal W.; Shay, Barbara R.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the impact of an interdisciplinary training program on knowledge and attitudes of learners from four health care programs: medicine, pharmacy, social work, and nursing. Sixty-two learners participated in a 4-day educational program (one day each week for 4 weeks) focusing on interdisciplinary geriatric care. After completing…

  17. Geriatric Foot Care: A Model Educational Program for Mid-Level Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suggs, Patricia K.; Krissak, Ruth; Caruso, Frank; Teasdall, Robert

    2002-01-01

    An educational program on geriatric foot care was completed by 59 nurse practitioners, 12 physicians' assistants, and 1 physician. The 3 1/2 day program included interactive sessions, observation, and hands-on patient care. Posttest results and 6-month follow-up showed significant knowledge increases and incorporation of learning into practice.…

  18. Effects of a Geriatrics Interdisciplinary Experience on Learners' Knowledge and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, James T.; Williams, Brent C.; Halter, Jeffrey B.; Remington, Tami L.; Foulk, Mariko A.; Persky, Neal W.; Shay, Barbara R.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the impact of an interdisciplinary training program on knowledge and attitudes of learners from four health care programs: medicine, pharmacy, social work, and nursing. Sixty-two learners participated in a 4-day educational program (one day each week for 4 weeks) focusing on interdisciplinary geriatric care. After completing…

  19. [Geriatric Authority of Holyoke Workplace Literacy Project.] Final Report. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Career Development Inst., Springfield.

    This final report documents the development of a workplace literacy program for 100 employees of the Geriatric Authority of Holyoke, Massachusetts (GAH), a major nonprofit nursing home and rehabilitation facility. It describes how GAH employees received instruction in English as a Second Language, adult basic education, and General Educational…

  20. [Benzodiazepines in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, W

    2013-12-01

    About 10 % of community dwelling elderly people are chronically consuming benzodiazepines. This proportion rises to 30 % in nursing homes or hospitals. Particularly in older patients, this usage leads to a higher risk of adverse drug reactions. Exposure contributes to delirium and falls with subsequent femoral neck fractures. The WHO has classified the risk potential of the new z-drugs to be the same as that associated with benzodiazepines. It is recommended that benzodiazepines should be discontinued step by step under supervision of a doctor or the dosage should be reduced.

  1. American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry

    MedlinePlus

    ... participate in AAGP's annual meeting. I really enjoyed learning about geriatric psychiatry as well as meeting such a warm and caring group of doctors and students. I could see that a lot of work went into the scholars program and I am ...

  2. Virtual Patients in Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Zaldy S.; Mulhausen, Paul L.; Smith, Stephen R.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2010-01-01

    The virtual patient is a case-based computer program that combines textual information with multimedia elements such as audio, graphics, and animation. It is increasingly being utilized as a teaching modality by medical educators in various fields of instruction. The inherent complexity of older patients and the shortage of geriatrics educators…

  3. Virtual Patients in Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Zaldy S.; Mulhausen, Paul L.; Smith, Stephen R.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2010-01-01

    The virtual patient is a case-based computer program that combines textual information with multimedia elements such as audio, graphics, and animation. It is increasingly being utilized as a teaching modality by medical educators in various fields of instruction. The inherent complexity of older patients and the shortage of geriatrics educators…

  4. Geriatric Optometry Programs of Promise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verma, Satya B.

    1985-01-01

    The curriculum design, philosophy, and innovation of four programs in geriatric optometry are described: the Pennsylvania College of Optometry and the colleges of Optometry at the State University of New York, University of Alabama at Birmingham, and University of Houston. (MSE)

  5. Supervisory Skills for Geriatric Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Frank W.

    Designed for training supervisors in nursing centers, this publication presents three units of study: (1) getting along with people in nursing centers, (2) supervision in nursing centers, and (3) communication in nursing centers. Each unit contains five types of material on separate, removable sheets: (1) sheets with unit objectives and suggested…

  6. Nurses' Learning Experiences with the Kinaesthetics Care Concept Training in a Nursing Home: A Qualitative Descriptive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fringer, André; Huth, Martina; Hantikainen, Virpi

    2015-01-01

    In geriatric care, movement support skills of nurses are often limited, resulting in unnecessary functional decline of older adult residents and physical strain of nurses. Kinaesthetics training aims to improve movement competences of nurses and residents. The aim of this qualitative descriptive study is to describe nursing teams' experience with…

  7. Nurses' Learning Experiences with the Kinaesthetics Care Concept Training in a Nursing Home: A Qualitative Descriptive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fringer, André; Huth, Martina; Hantikainen, Virpi

    2015-01-01

    In geriatric care, movement support skills of nurses are often limited, resulting in unnecessary functional decline of older adult residents and physical strain of nurses. Kinaesthetics training aims to improve movement competences of nurses and residents. The aim of this qualitative descriptive study is to describe nursing teams' experience with…

  8. How Much is Geriatric Caregivers Burnout Caring-Specific? Questions from a Questionnaire Survey

    PubMed Central

    Cocco, Ennio

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Background and Aims: Research dealing with occupational strain and burnout in geriatric care is generally focused on the behavioral problems of the patient and/or the psychological traits or attitudes of the carers rather than on organizational functionality. This paper describes data from a survey of all geriatric professions, using the Stressful Events Questionnaire (SEQ), a tool that takes into account multiple dimensions that can affect the genesis of burnout, including the patient, the geriatric health care professional, and the health care organization. The aim of this study is to compare patterns of answers among different roles in geriatric care. Method: Patterns of SEQ answers are described for the entire sample as well as for workers experiencing burnout and for each caring profession investigated: certified nursing assistants (CNAs), registered nurses and physicians/psychologists. Results; In general, carers refer more often as stressful the facility-related events; the only exception is that CNAs working in general hospital geriatric wards refer most often as stressful the patient-related events. The self-related events area seems to have a great importance for all professions. Discussion: The specificity of gerontological burnout has to be discussed, to better define the role played by caring problems, including psychological attitudes of carers versus the role played by the institution and by the social situation of each worker. For CNAs, the interaction between educational background and the length of time spent as a CNA seems to be a critical topic. PMID:20835358

  9. Hartford Gerontological Nursing Leaders: From Funding Initiative to National Organization.

    PubMed

    Van Cleave, Janet H; Szanton, Sarah L; Shillam, Casey; Rose, Karen; Rao, Aditi D; Perez, Adriana; O'Connor, Melissa; Walker, Rachel; Buron, Bill; Boltz, Marie; Bellot, Jennifer; Batchelor-Murphy, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    In 2000, the John A. Hartford Foundation established the Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Program initiative, acknowledging nursing's key role in the care of the growing population of older adults. This program has supported 249 nurse scientists with pre- and postdoctoral awards. As a result of the program's success, several Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Program awardees formed an alumni organization to continue to advance the quality care of older adults. This group of Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Program awardees joined others receiving support from the John A. Hartford Foundation nursing initiatives to grow a formal organization, the Hartford Gerontological Nursing Leaders (HGNL). The purpose of this article is to present the development, accomplishments, and challenges of the HGNL, informing other professional nursing organizations that are experiencing similar accomplishments and challenges. This article also demonstrates the power of a funding initiative to grow an organization dedicated to impact gerontological health and health care through research, practice, education, and policy.

  10. A Graduate Nursing Curriculum for the Evaluation and Management of Urinary Incontinence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogalski, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Geriatric nurse practitioners should be educated in the evaluation and treatment of common geriatric syndromes like urinary incontinence. However, many advanced-practice nursing programs do not place an educational emphasis on urinary incontinence management. The purpose of this project is to provide information that supports the need for…

  11. A Graduate Nursing Curriculum for the Evaluation and Management of Urinary Incontinence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogalski, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Geriatric nurse practitioners should be educated in the evaluation and treatment of common geriatric syndromes like urinary incontinence. However, many advanced-practice nursing programs do not place an educational emphasis on urinary incontinence management. The purpose of this project is to provide information that supports the need for…

  12. Developing a multidisciplinary geriatric oncology program in a community cancer center.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Mary Pat; Marcone, Dana; Kagan, Sarah H

    2007-12-01

    Cancer is a disease of older adults, and with unprecedented growth in the number of people entering late adulthood, an increasing need exists for specialized services and programs to address the needs of older adults with cancer. Few examples in the literature detail development of a geriatric oncology program. This article describes a pilot project undertaken by a community cancer center to develop a specialized program for older adults with cancer by identifying local demographics and population needs. It also describes a replicable plan for the development of a geriatric oncology program, which demonstrates how nursing can benefit from collaboration with other disciplines such as social work and psychology in service provision.

  13. [Chronic pain in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Kennes, B

    2001-06-01

    Pain is frequent in communicative or no-communicative, ambulatory, institutionalized or hospitalized veterans. It is associated with severe comorbidity so much more than chronic pain could be neglected and expressed of atypical manner or masked by the absence of classical symptoms in particular in case of dementia or of sensory disorders. Pain detection by clinic examination or by pain assessment's methods and adequate approach by pharmacological and non pharmacological therapies are essential for correct pain management. On pharmacological plan, the strategy of the O.M.S. landings is applicable owing to a more particular attention to secondary effects and drugs interactions. AINS must be manipulated with prudence. There are no reasons to exclude opioides from the therapeutic arsenal but with a reduction of the starting doses, a regular adaptation and a very attentive survey. In drugs of landing 2, tramadol reveals itself as efficient and better tolerated as the codeine and dextropropoxyphene has to be to avoid. The obtaining of a satisfactory result depends on a regular assessment of the pain in a context of polydisciplinar approach (physicians, nurses, paramedicals, other care givers).

  14. [Telematics in geriatrics--potentials, problems and application experiences].

    PubMed

    Mix, S; Borchelt, M; Nieczaj, R; Trilhof, G; Steinhagen-Thiessen, E

    2000-06-01

    Modern telecommunication technology (telematics) has the potential to improve the quality of life for elders with physical and mental impairments as well as for their care giving relatives. Videophones, internet resources, and multimedia computers can be used for networking them together with social workers, nurse practitioners, physicians and therapeutic staff in service-centers. This can be viewed as a unique opportunity to establish and maintain instant and personalized access to various medical services in a situation where increasing needs are opposed to decreasing resources. However, it is not yet clear whether telematics is adequate, efficient, and effective in supporting care for geriatric patients. Some studies already showed its applicability and feasibility, but there are still no larger trials showing that maintenance or enhancement of autonomy can be achieved effectively by using new technologies. This article reviews the literature on telematics in geriatrics and presents data of a tele-rehabilitation project ("TeleReha", conducted at the Berlin Geriatric Center) which comprised mobility-impaired patients (N = 13, mean age 72 yrs), care giving relatives (N = 8), and geriatric professionals. Networking was established using ISDN technology with videophones or PC-based videoconferencing systems. Results showed that participants regard telecommunication devices as a valuable resource for their informational and communicational needs. Use of telecommunication systems was inversely related to physical mobility. Having access to professional service and counselling was rated highly important but also the opportunity to establish reliable contacts with non-professionals (relatives, other participants). Despite experienced technical problems, use of telecommunication systems was evaluated more positively in the post-test as compared to the pre-test. In summary, current experience suggests that telematics can be used efficiently by geriatric patients and by

  15. Psychosocial risk factors for musculoskeletal symptoms among women working in geriatric care.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsdottir, Holmfridur K; Rafnsdottir, Gudbjoerg L; Helgadottir, Berglind; Tomasson, Kristinn

    2003-12-01

    Nursing is a stressful, physically demanding occupation and a rush setting for musculoskeletal problems. The aim of this study is to explore the extent of the association between psychosocial work characteristics and musculoskeletal symptoms among women working in geriatric care. The participants were female employees of all geriatric nursing homes and geriatric hospital wards in Iceland having a staff of 10 or more. A total of 1,886 questionnaires were distributed. The response rate was 80%. Finding the job mentally difficult, mental exhaustion after one's shift, dissatisfaction with supervisors or the flow of information, insufficient influence at work, dissatisfaction with the hierarchy, intense time pressure, lack of solidarity, dissatisfaction with the job, harassment, violence or threats at work; all of the aforementioned gave crude odds ratios (OR) two or above for one or more musculoskeletal symptoms. Mental exhaustion and harassment, violence, and threats were the factors connected with symptoms from all the body regions studied. The extent of the association of work-related psychosocial factors and musculoskeletal symptoms among the geriatric female nursing staff is substantial and needs to be taken into account by occupational health services and others involved in preventive work. Am. J. Ind. Med. 44:679-684, 2003. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Dental disease in geriatric horses.

    PubMed

    Lowder, M Q; Mueller, P O

    1998-08-01

    The dental management of geriatric horses can be a rewarding challenge to the practitioner. Owners become dissatisfied when their expectations are unrealistic. Consequently, communication between the owner and the practitioner is essential prior to the start of any dental procedure in a geriatric horse. Owners often expect the practitioner to correct what has been neglected for years. It is critical that the owner understand the possible complications associated with dental procedures and that some procedures (e.g., trephination) may necessitate protracted care. Often, when a tooth has been removed, there is a need for more frequent masticatory examinations to curtail any potential problems (i.e., development of step mouth). The owner needs to be aware of the extra dental maintenance costs that must be included in the upkeep of the horse.

  17. [Geriatrics and gerontology in Senegal].

    PubMed

    Coumé, Mamadou; Touré, Kamadore; Faye, Atoumane; Moreira, Therese Diop

    2013-01-01

    Senegal is dealing positively with its demographic transition. On September 1st 2006, the Senegalese government introduced the "Plan Sesame", a national free health care program for elderly people aged 60 years and over. The University of Dakar academic authorities support the Sesame plan through an innovative training program in geriatrics and gerontology. Such programs aim to address the challenge of ageing in a developing country.

  18. Profile of Your Geriatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Longhurst, Mark F.; Slade, Debra

    1990-01-01

    The family doctor cares for many geriatric patients. Many of these patients enter the family practice for the first time, having either recently moved to the area or to a nearby long-term care facility. Obtaining a meaningful patient profile is essential to the physicians' care, allowing future medical decisions to be made in the best interest of that person. Patients' beliefs motivate their functioning in a system. Any system has its own history, structure, and function. PMID:21234029

  19. Geriatric heart diseases in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hamlin, Robert L

    2005-05-01

    A discussion of the diagnosis and therapy of heart disease in an aged pet does not differ significantly from that in a pet of any age. Mitral regurgitation constitutes by far the most important geriatric heart disease, and the selection of drugs to treat heart disease of aging pets is based on identification of specific pathologic features (eg, atrial fibrillation, left atrial enlargement) for which each aspect of treatment (eg, diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, spironolactone) is specific.

  20. Geriatrics and the Legal System.

    PubMed

    Yarnell, Stephanie C; Kirwin, Paul D; Zonana, Howard V

    2017-06-01

    Correctional systems, already struggling to meet the basic and functional requirements of older prisoners, will be further challenged by the increasing medical and psychiatric needs of this population. Mental health and general medical care for older adults requires specific on-site or consultation expertise in geriatric medicine and psychiatry, as well as potential changes in infrastructure, both of which may be prohibitively expensive. However, compassionate and effective treatment of older prisoners requires that prison and legal systems facilitate this expert care. To address this situation, strategic revisions of the criminal justice system are needed to alleviate prison overcrowding and consequent inadequate medical care for inmates, especially the elder ones. The unique, age-related demands of this older population predict an increased need for forensic psychiatrists with a thorough knowledge and expertise in geriatrics, as more forensic psychiatric evaluations will be needed before trial in both civil and criminal cases, during incarceration, and at the time of parole. In this article, we review the current state of elder inmates in correctional institutions and advocate for increased geriatric training for forensic psychiatrists in anticipation of this growing need. © 2017 American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.

  1. An international model for geriatrics program development in China: the Johns Hopkins-Peking Union Medical College experience.

    PubMed

    Leng, Sean X; Tian, Xinping; Liu, Xiaohong; Lazarus, Gerald; Bellantoni, Michele; Greenough, William; Fried, Linda P; Shen, Ti; Durso, Samuel C

    2010-07-01

    China has the world's largest and most rapidly growing older adult population. Recent dramatic socioeconomic changes, including a large number of migrating workers leaving their elderly parents and grandparents behind and the 4:2:1 family structure caused by the one-child policy, have greatly compromised the traditional Chinese family support for older adults. These demographic and socioeconomic factors, the improved living standards, and the quest for higher quality of life are creating human economic pressures. The plight of senior citizens is leading to an unprecedented need for geriatrics expertise in China. To begin to address this need, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (JHU) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC) have developed a joint international project aimed at establishing a leadership program at the PUMC Hospital that will promote quality geriatrics care, education, and aging research for China. Important components of this initiative include geriatrics competency training for PUMC physicians and nurses in the Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology at JHU, establishing a geriatrics demonstration ward at the PUMC Hospital, faculty exchange between JHU and PUMC, and on-site consultation by JHU geriatrics faculty. This article describes the context and history of this ongoing collaboration and important components, progress, challenges, and future prospects, focusing on the JHU experience. Specific and practical recommendations are made for those who plan such international joint ventures. With such unique experiences, it is hoped that this will serve as a useful model for international geriatrics program development for colleagues in the United States and abroad.

  2. [Preventive geriatrics vs anti-aging medicine].

    PubMed

    Ilnitski, A N; Prashchayeu, K I; Trofimova, S V; Birjukova, I V

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the main modern ideas of the new interdisciplinary direction at the junction of aesthetic medicine, geriatrics and valeology - preventive geriatrics, or the anti-aging medicine. Describes its purpose, namely effective individual programs of prevention of the development and progression of chronic diseases and age-related conditions; the overview of the diagnostic methods used in preventive geriatrics, individualized prevention programs with proven efficacy is given. Substantiates the importance of preventive geriatrics (anti-aging medicine) as a discipline with its own scientific methodological tools, points of application, and presents prospects of scientific study.

  3. Effective teaching methods for geriatric competencies.

    PubMed

    Strano-Paul, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses how effective classroom sessions are at teaching geriatric competencies to medical students. At Stony Brook Medical School, most geriatric competencies are taught in the Ambulatory Care Clerkship during small-group educational sessions. Clinical exposure to reinforce these specialized skills varies with preceptor assignment. A student's ability to perform geriatric assessments was evaluated by scores on an Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE) with a geriatric patient. Scores from students who received additional clinical practice of these skills were compared with scores from students who did not. No significant difference in OSCE scores were seen between the two groups.

  4. Interdisciplinary geriatric and palliative care team narratives: collaboration practices and barriers.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Joy; Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Rodriguez, Dariela; Sanchez-Reilly, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Despite the development and implementation of team training models in geriatrics and palliative care, little attention has been paid to the nature and process of teamwork. Geriatrics and palliative care in the clinical setting offer an interdisciplinary approach structured to meet the comprehensive needs of a patient and his or her family. Fellowship members of an interdisciplinary geriatric and palliative care team participated in semistructured interviews. Team members represented social work, chaplaincy, psychology, nursing, and medicine. A functional narrative analysis revealed four themes: voice of the lifeworld, caregiver teamwork, alone on a team, and storying disciplinary communication. The content-ordering function of narratives revealed a divergence in team members' conceptualization of teamwork and team effectiveness, and group ordering of narratives documented the collaborative nature of teams. The study findings demonstrate the potential for narratives as a pedagogical tool in team training, highlighting the benefits of reflective practice for improving teamwork and sustainability.

  5. Factor structure of the geriatric care environment scale.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hongsoo; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Boltz, Marie; Fairchild, Susan; Fulmer, Terry; Mezey, Mathy

    2007-01-01

    Older adults comprise approximately 60% of all adult, nonobstetric hospital admissions. Nurses Improving Care for Health System Elders (NICHE) is a national program aimed at system improvement to achieve patient-centered care for older adults. The NICHE hospitals use the Geriatric Institutional Assessment Profile (GIAP) to assess their institutional readiness to provide quality care to older adults and to document improvement in geriatric care delivery. To explore the factorial structure of the 28-item Geriatric Care Environment Scale (GCES) of the GIAP, test its validity with a sample of staff registered nurses (RNs), and evaluate its invariance across 4 groups of RNs who worked at 4 different types of hospitals. Staff RNs (N = 9,400) at 71 acute hospitals, who responded to the GIAP from 1999 to 2004, were split randomly into 2 groups for cross-validation. A 3-step data analysis was completed. The a priori factor structure was developed using exploratory factor analysis. The obtained factor model was validated, and its invariance by types of hospitals was examined by confirmatory factor analyses. The GCES is internally consistent (Cronbach's alpha = .93) and accounts for approximately 55% of the total variance. The 4 factors extracted from the exploratory factor analysis are Aging-Sensitive Care Delivery, Resource Availability, Institutional Values Regarding Older Adults and Staff, and Capacity for Collaboration. The 4-factor structured model is validated in a half-randomly selected sample (normed fit index [NFI] = .931, nonnormed fit index [NNFI] = .933, comparative fit index [CFI] = .939, root-mean-square error of approximation [RMSEA] = .058) and does not vary significantly across the 4 groups of RNs who worked at the 4 different types of hospitals (NFI = .969, NNFI = .975, CFI = .976, RMSEA = .027). The GCES is a reliable measure of RN perception of how care provided to older adults reflects age-sensitive principles and the organizational practice environment

  6. Reliability of an Online Geriatric Assessment Procedure Using the interRAI Acute Care Assessment System.

    PubMed

    Martin-Khan, Melinda G; Edwards, Helen; Wootton, Richard; Counsell, Steven R; Varghese, Paul; Lim, Wen Kwang; Darzins, Peteris; Dakin, Lucy; Klein, Kerenaftali; Gray, Leonard C

    2017-09-01

    To determine whether geriatric triage decisions made using a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) performed online are less reliable than face-to-face (FTF) decisions. Multisite noninferiority prospective cohort study. Two specialist geriatricians assessed individuals sequentially referred for an acute care geriatric consultation. Participants were allocated to one FTF assessment and an additional assessment (FTF or online (OL)), creating two groups-two FTF (FTF-FTF, n = 81) or online and FTF (OL-FTF, n = 85). Three acute care public hospitals in two Australian states. Admitted individuals referred for CGA. Nurse-administered CGA, based on the interRAI Acute Care assessment system accessed online and other online clinical data such as pathology results and imaging enabling geriatricians to review participants' information and provide input into their care from a distance. The primary decision subjected to this analysis was referral for permanent residential care. Geriatricians also recorded recommendations for referrals and variations for medication management and judgment regarding prognosis at discharge and after 3 months. Overall percentage agreement was 88% (n = 71) for the FTF-FTF group and 91% (n = 77) for the OL-FTF group. The difference in agreement between the FTF-FTF and OL-FTF groups was -3%, indicating that there was no difference between the methods of assessment. Judgements made regarding diagnoses of geriatric syndromes, medication management, and prognosis (with regard to hospital outcome and location at 3 months) were found to be equally reliable in each mode of consultation. Geriatric assessment performed online using a nurse-administered structured CGA system was no less reliable than conventional assessment in making clinical triage decisions. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  7. A Typology of Interprofessional Teamwork in Acute Geriatric Care: A Study in 55 units in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Piers, Ruth D; Versluys, Karen J J; Devoghel, Johan; Lambrecht, Sophie; Vyt, André; Van Den Noortgate, Nele J

    2017-09-01

    To explore the quality of interprofessional teamwork in acute geriatric care and to build a model of team types. Cross-sectional multicenter study. Acute geriatric units in Belgium. Team members of different professional backgrounds. Perceptions of interprofessional teamwork among team members of 55 acute geriatric units in Belgium were measured using a survey covering collaborative practice and experience, managerial coaching and open team culture, shared reflection and decision-making, patient files facilitating teamwork, members' belief in the power of teamwork, and members' comfort in reporting incidents. Cluster analysis was used to determine types of interprofessional teamwork. Professions and clusters were compared using analysis of variance. The overall response rate was 60%. Of the 890 respondents, 71% were nursing professionals, 20% other allied health professionals, 5% physicians, and 4% logistic and administrative staff. More than 70% of respondents scored highly on interprofessional teamwork competencies, consultation, experiences, meetings, management, and results. Fewer than 55% scored highly on items about shared reflection and decision-making, reporting incidents from a colleague, and patient files facilitating interprofessional teamwork. Nurses in this study rated shared reflection and decision-making lower than physicians on the same acute geriatric units (P < .001). Using the mean score on each of the six areas, four clusters that differed significantly in all areas were identified using hierarchical cluster analysis and scree plot analysis (P < .001). Interprofessional teamwork in acute geriatric units is satisfactory, but shared reflection and decision-making needs improvement. Four types of interprofessional teamwork are identified and can be used to benchmark the teamwork of individual teams. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  8. Infusing gerontological nursing content into advanced practice nursing education.

    PubMed

    Kohlenberg, Eileen; Kennedy-Malone, Laurie; Crane, Patricia; Letvak, Susan

    2007-01-01

    The inclusion of gerontology content in the nursing curriculum is paramount as our population of older adults grows. As one of 10 recipients of the John A. Hartford Foundation/AACN awards for Enhancing Gerontological and Geriatric Nursing Education for Advanced Practice Nursing Programs, we successfully integrated gerontological/ geriatric content throughout core courses for all concentrations taught at the master's level. The Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Nurse Specialist Competencies for Older Adult Care were used as a guide to integrate gerontological nursing content across the core courses. We present examples of content, strategies, and evaluation methods that demonstrate infusion of gerontology in a nursing theory course, research course, and healthcare law and policy course. Twenty-two of the competencies are addressed in these core courses and provide a foundation for further development in the support and specialty courses for the nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, nursing administrator, nurse educator, and nurse anesthetist. We also present helpful Web-based resources for older adult care.

  9. Incorporating Geriatric Assessment into a Nephrology Clinic: Preliminary Data from Two Models of Care.

    PubMed

    Hall, Rasheeda K; Haines, Carol; Gorbatkin, Steven M; Schlanger, Lynn; Shaban, Hesham; Schell, Jane O; Gurley, Susan B; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S; Bowling, C Barrett

    2016-10-01

    Older adults with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience functional impairment that can complicate CKD management. Failure to recognize functional impairment may put these individuals at risk of further functional decline, nursing home placement, and missed opportunities for timely goals-of-care conversations. Routine geriatric assessment could be a useful tool for identifying older adults with CKD who are at risk of functional decline and provide contextual information to guide clinical decision-making. Two innovative programs were implemented in the Veterans Health Administration that incorporate geriatric assessment into a nephrology visit. In one program, a geriatrician embedded in a nephrology clinic used standardized geriatric assessment tools with individuals with CKD aged 70 and older (Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment for CKD) (CGA-4-CKD). In the second program, a nephrology clinic used comprehensive appointments for individuals aged 75 and older to conduct geriatric assessments and CKD care (Renal Silver). Data on 68 veterans who had geriatric assessments through these programs between November 2013 and May 2015 are reported. In CGA-4-CKD, difficulty with one or more activities of daily living (ADLs), history of falls, and cognitive impairment were each found in 27.3% of participants. ADL difficulty was found in 65.7%, falls in 28.6%, and cognitive impairment in 51.6% of participants in Renal Silver. Geriatric assessment guided care processes in 45.4% (n = 15) of veterans in the CGA-4-CKD program and 37.1% (n = 13) of those in Renal Silver. Findings suggest there is a significant burden of functional impairment in older adults with CKD. Knowledge of this impairment is applicable to CKD management.

  10. 28 CFR 2.78 - Geriatric parole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Geriatric parole. 2.78 Section 2.78 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS... Geriatric parole. (a) Upon receipt of a report from the institution in which the prisoner is confined that...

  11. 28 CFR 2.78 - Geriatric parole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Geriatric parole. 2.78 Section 2.78 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS... Geriatric parole. (a) Upon receipt of a report from the institution in which the prisoner is confined that...

  12. 28 CFR 2.78 - Geriatric parole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Geriatric parole. 2.78 Section 2.78 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS... Geriatric parole. (a) Upon receipt of a report from the institution in which the prisoner is confined that...

  13. Geriatric psychopharmacology: evolution of a discipline.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Barnett S; Jeste, Dilip V

    2010-11-01

    The development of geriatric psychopharmacology was built on advances in geriatric psychiatry nosology and clinical pharmacology and on increased investment in aging research by the National Institute of Mental Health and by academic institutions. Application of the US Food and Drug Administration's geriatric labeling rule provided further impetus. Developments in the knowledge about 3 principal classes of medications (antidepressants, antipsychotics, and treatments for Alzheimer's disease) illustrate the trajectory of geriatric psychopharmacology research. Nonetheless, the loss of information about age effects that has resulted from applying age exclusion criteria in studies limited to either younger adults or geriatric patients is regrettable. Antidepressant trials have moved from studying younger and medically well "geriatric" samples to focusing on "older old" persons and those with significant medical comorbidity including coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease, and dementia. Increased specificity is reflected in studies of relationships between specific neuropsychological deficits, specific brain abnormalities, and antidepressant responsiveness. Clinical trials in older adults have demonstrated that the efficacy of antipsychotic medications continues across the lifespan, but that sensitivity to specific side effects changes in older age, with poor tolerability frequently mitigating the benefits of treatment. Treatments for Alzheimer's disease have fallen within the purview of geriatric psychopharmacology. The research focus is increasingly shifting from treatments to slow the course of cognitive decline to studies of early diagnosis and of interventions designed to prevent the development of deficits in vulnerable individuals. The importance of geriatric psychopharmacology will grow further as the average lifespan increases all over the world.

  14. Trends in Predoctoral Education in Geriatric Dentistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Ralph H.; Yellowitz, Janet A.; Dolan, Teresa A.; Smith, Barbara J.

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 46 United States and Canadian dental schools examined curriculum trends and assessed the effectiveness of educational initiatives and the value of American Association of Dental Schools and Administration on Aging geriatric dental curricular materials. An increasing number reported geriatric didactic courses, clinical rotations, and…

  15. Effective Teaching Methods for Geriatric Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strano-Paul, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses how effective classroom sessions are at teaching geriatric competencies to medical students. At Stony Brook Medical School, most geriatric competencies are taught in the Ambulatory Care Clerkship during small-group educational sessions. Clinical exposure to reinforce these specialized skills varies with preceptor assignment. A…

  16. Depression in Geriatric and Adult Medical Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magni, Guido; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Administered two scales for the evaluation of depression to two groups of medical inpatients: adults (N=201) and geriatric subjects (N=178). Results confirmed a high presence of depressive symptoms among patients with medical problems, particularly among geriatric subjects. Factors most predictive of depressive symptoms are identified. (JAC)

  17. Advancing geriatrics education: an efficient faculty development program for academic hospitalists increases geriatric teaching.

    PubMed

    Mazotti, Lindsay; Moylan, Adam; Murphy, Elizabeth; Harper, G Michael; Johnston, C Bree; Hauer, Karen E

    2010-01-01

    Hospitalists care for an increasing number of older patients. As teachers, they are uniquely positioned to teach geriatric skills to residents. Faculty development programs focused on geriatrics teaching skills are often expensive and time-intensive, and may not enhance trainee learning. To evaluate a train-the-trainer (TTT) model designed to equip hospitalists with knowledge and skills to teach geriatric topics to residents in a time-constrained, resource-limited environment. Cross-sectional survey. Academic tertiary hospital. A 10-hour geriatric curriculum, the Reynolds Program for Advancing Geriatrics Education (PAGE), cotaught by geriatricians and hospitalists at preexisting noon conferences over 1 year that consisted of exportable teaching modules. Session leaders' and faculty participants' satisfaction, hospitalist geriatrics teaching self-efficacy, residents' self-report of frequency of geriatric teaching received, and frequency of geriatric skill use. The curriculum was highly rated by session leaders and hospitalist faculty. Hospitalists perceived improvement in geriatric teaching skills, indicating (1: "unlikely" to 5: "highly likely") that they are likely to use these teaching tools in the future (M = 4.61, standard deviation [SD] = 0.53). Residents reported both significantly more geriatrics teaching by hospitalists (P < 0.05) and a borderline significant increase in their practice of geriatric clinical skills (P = 0.05). A time-efficient geriatric faculty development program for hospitalists suggests improvement in the amount and quality of geriatrics teaching and skill practice among faculty and residents at an academic medical center. Concise faculty development programs within preexisting faculty meetings may be a feasible, successful method to increase geriatric skill development in the hospital setting. Copyright © 2010 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  18. Laminitis in the geriatric horse.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Robert J

    2002-12-01

    There are few diseases that instill a comparable sense of doom in the mind of a treating veterinarian as laminitis. There is a feeling of cautious optimism when a horse with laminitis responds favorably to treatment. Although this optimism all too often proves false when treating laminitic patients, management of the patient afflicted with chronic laminitis can be rewarding. Through diligent and careful client communication and instruction, many geriatric patients with chronic laminitis can be maintained for years as comfortable companions, for light riding use, or as productive breeding animals.

  19. [Nutritional management in geriatric traumatology].

    PubMed

    Singler, K; Goisser, S; Volkert, D

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of malnutrition or the risk of malnourishment is high among orthogeriatric patients and a poor nutritional status is associated with a negative outcome. A comprehensive management of preoperative and postoperative nutritional and fluid intake in these patients can help to improve the situation. The management includes identification of patients affected, a thorough assessment of the nutritional status, work-up of possible underlying causes, documentation of nutritional and fluid intake and, most importantly, procedures to improve the preoperative and postoperative nutritional situation. This article gives an overview of the recently updated recommendations on nutritional management in orthogeriatric patients as published by the orthogeriatric working group of the German Geriatric Society.

  20. [Heparin use in geriatrics and risk profiles of treated patients. A survey in France].

    PubMed

    Belmin, J; Medjahed, S; Trivalle, C; Lutzler, P

    2001-01-27

    Nursing home residents and geriatric ward patients have a high risk of venous thromboembolism. Prevention is a major challenge. We conducted a one-day audit to ascertain heparin use patterns in a large sample of geriatric facilities in France. This one-day audit was made with a questionnaire mailed to 150 geriatric centers in France. Items were the number of subjects receiving heparin on the day of the survey, and for each of these subjects, the reason for the prescription, risk factors for venous thromboembolism and date of treatment onset. Ninety-six centers (63%) participated. These centers had 14,208 beds the day of the survey (short-term hospitalization, day-care hospitalization, nursing homes, retirement homes). These centers reported 1,312 subjects (9.2%) receiving heparin on the day of the survey. Their mean age was 83.4 days. Among the hospital centers, heparin had been prescribed in 33.4% of the short-term hospitalization patients, 27.3% of the day-care patients, and 5.6% of the nursing home patients. Heparin was prescribed for prophylaxis in 1,143 patients (87%)--basically low-molecular-weight heparin. These patients had on the average 3.33 risk factors. The duration of preventive treatment was more than 30 days in 481 subjects (50%) and 161 (17%) had received heparin for 6 months or more. Prevention of venous thromboembolism is a major concern in geriatric centers in France. Although the preventive efficacy has not been clearly demonstrated in geriatric medical patients, low-molecular weight heparin is widely used for this purpose with, in a large number of cases, very long treatment durations.

  1. Developing osteopathic competencies in geriatrics for medical students.

    PubMed

    Noll, Donald R; Channell, Millicent King; Basehore, Pamela M; Pomerantz, Sherry C; Ciesielski, Janice; Eigbe, Patrick Arekhandia; Chopra, Anita

    2013-04-01

    Minimum core competencies for allopathic medical students in the specialty area of geriatrics have been developed, comprising 26 competencies divided into 8 topical domains. These competencies are appropriate for osteopathic medical students, but they do not include competencies relating to osteopathic principles and practice (OPP) in geriatrics. There remains a need within the osteopathic profession to develop specialty-specific competencies specific to OPP. To develop more specific and comprehensive minimum competencies in OPP for osteopathic medical students in the field of geriatric medicine. The Delphi technique (a structured communication technique that uses a panel of experts to reach consensus) was adapted to generate new core competencies relating to OPP. Osteopathic geriatricians and members of the Educational Council on Osteopathic Principles (ECOP) of the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine participated in a breakout session and 2 rounds of surveys. Proposed competencies with 80% of the participants ranking it as "very important and should be added as a competency" were retained. Participants were also asked if they agreed that competencies in OPP should include specific types of osteopathic manipulative treatment techniques for the elderly. Responses were received from 26 osteopathic physician experts: 17 ECOP members and 9 geriatricians. Fourteen proposed competencies were developed: 7 related to the existing topic domains, and 7 were placed into a new domain of osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM). Six proposed competencies were retained, all of which were in the new OMM domain. These competencies related to using OMM for gait and balance assessment, knowing adverse events and contraindications of OMM, using OMM for pain relief and end-of-life care, using OMM in the hospital and nursing home setting, adapting OMM to fit an elderly individual, and using OMM to address limited range of motion and ability to perform activities of

  2. [Relationship of the community in National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology].

    PubMed

    Endo, Hidetoshi

    2005-05-01

    Acute hospital has to have a good community relationship because of looking for a services and settings after discharge for elderly patients. In particular, physicians should have good relations with other physicians, visiting nurses, and care managers, because elderly patients had to go to facilities or nursing homes instead of their own homes. We must obtain information concerning care services and build networks between hospitals and the community in order to provide good services. To enable this we established a good discharge support team. We also have to educate the staff and care managers to take good care of patients. A comprehensive geriatrics and team approach is important for geriatric medicine in the community through care conference. So geriatricians must take part in care conferences and take a leadership role in networks for people with care needs. Finally our national center for geriatrics and gerontology has to take a role of the future achievement in geriatric field and provide information related research and clinical activity for the elderly.

  3. Implementation of geriatric acute care best practices: initial results of the NICHE SITE self-evaluation.

    PubMed

    Boltz, Marie; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Shuluk, Joseph; Brouwer, Julianna; Carolan, Deirdre; Conway, Shirley; DeRosa, Sue; LaReau, Rita; Lyons, Denise; Nickoley, Sue; Smith, Tyleen; Galvin, James E

    2013-12-01

    Nurses Improving Care of Healthsystem Elders (NICHE) provides hospitals with tools and resources to implement an initiative to improve health outcomes in older adults and their families. Beginning in 2011, members have engaged in a process of program self-evaluation, designed to evaluate internal progress toward developing, sustaining, and disseminating NICHE. This manuscript describes the NICHE Site Self-evaluation and reports the inaugural self-evaluation data in 180 North American hospitals. NICHE members evaluate their program utilizing the following dimensions of a geriatric acute care program: guiding principles, organizational structures, leadership, geriatric staff competence, interdisciplinary resources and processes, patient- and family-centered approaches, environment of care, and quality metrics. The majority of NICHE sites were at the progressive implementation level (n = 100, 55.6%), having implemented interdisciplinary geriatric education and the geriatric resource nurse (GRN) model on at least one unit; 29% have implemented the GRN model on multiple units, including specialty areas. Bed size, teaching status, and Magnet status were not associated with level of implementation, suggesting that NICHE implementation can be successful in a variety of settings and communities. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Influenza vaccine coverage for healthcare workers in geriatric settings in France.

    PubMed

    Rothan-Tondeur, Monique; de Wazieres, Benoit; Lejeune, Benoist; Gavazzi, Gaëtan

    2006-12-01

    Because of a relative lack of efficiency of influenza vaccine in the elderly population, influenza outbreaks in geriatric healthcare settings are probable, despite high influenza vaccination rates in patients. Nosocomial influenza outbreaks, more probably related to healthcare workers, have also been reported. Therefore, vaccination of healthcare workers is considered to be an important preventive policy, to decrease the in-hospital influenza burden during the viral circulation period. This multicenter study measured influenza vaccine coverage of Health Care Worker in 102 geriatric healthcare settings (acute care, rehabilitation care, long-term care) by a first questionnaire. A second questionnaire assessed main factors associated with vaccine acceptance. 102 geriatric healthcare settings (20%) answered the first questionnaire. Vaccine coverage for physicians (n=187), nurses (n=631) and nurse assistants (n=1487) were 48.4%, 30.5% and 27.9%, respectively. Vaccination rates were correlated between occupational categories according to healthcare settings. Vaccination rates were significantly lower in acute care settings compared with rehabilitation and long-term care settings. Local recommendations was reported for 29.9%, but was not correlated with vaccine coverage. The second questionnaire showed that lack of motivation and knowledge, and organizational problems were the three main reasons for reluctance to be vaccinated. In French geriatric settings, influenza vaccine coverage of healthcare workers is low and highly variable, according to the type of healthcare setting. A group effect was found between occupational categories. However, the reasons for non-acceptance need further evaluation to improve HCW influenza vaccine coverage.

  5. Job Openings Projected in Nursing Home Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maust, Ann Parker

    1977-01-01

    Most nurses employed in nursing homes today have little or no training in geriatrics and the special needs of the chronically ill patient. Community colleges can play a vital role in upgrading presently employed personnel and in producing a supply of trained manpower to meet the future projected demand. (DC)

  6. Psychosocial work load and stress in the geriatric care.

    PubMed

    Nübling, Matthias; Vomstein, Martin; Schmidt, Sascha G; Gregersen, Sabine; Dulon, Madeleine; Nienhaus, Albert

    2010-07-21

    Due to the decrease in informal care by family members and the demographic development, the importance of professional geriatric care will rise considerably. Aim of this study was to investigate the psychosocial workplace situation for employees in this profession. The German version of the COPSOQ (Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire) was used for the assessment of psychosocial factors at work. The instrument includes 22 scales and 3 single items concerning demands, control, stress, support, and strain.Results between two study groups of geriatric care were compared to each other as well as to employees in general hospital care and a general population mean (COPSOQ database).Statistical analysis included t-tests, ANOVA and multiple comparisons of means. Statistical significance (p < 0.01, two-tailed) and a difference of at least 5 points in mean values were defined as the relevant threshold. In total 889 respondents from 36 institutions took part in the study. 412 worked in Home Care (HC), 313 in Geriatric Nursing Homes (GNH), 164 in other professions (e.g. administration).Comparison between HC and GNH showed more favourable values for the first group for the most scales, e.g. lower quantitative and emotional demands and less work-privacy conflict, better possibilities for development etc. Compared to external values from the German COPSOQ database for general hospital care (N = 1.195) and the total mean across all professions, COPSOQ-total (N = 11.168), the results are again positive for HC workers on most of the scales concerning demands and social support. The only negative finding is the very low amount of social relations at work due to the obligation to work alone most of the time. Employees in GNH rate predictability, quality of leadership and feedback higher when compared to general hospital care and show some further favourable mean values compared to the COPSOQ mean value for all professions. A disadvantage for GNH is the high rating for job insecurity

  7. Institutional Staff Training and Management: A Review of the Literature and a Model for Geriatric, Long-Term-Care Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgio, Louis D.; Burgio, Kathryn L.

    1990-01-01

    Asserts that, if long-term care is to progress from custodial model to therapeutic model of rehabilitation, role of nursing assistants must be redesigned. Reviews current methods of institutional staff training and management and proposes model for geriatric, long-term care facilities. Discusses organizational resistance and offers suggestions for…

  8. Building Psychosocial Programming in Geriatrics Fellowships: A Consortium Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Ronald D.; Ansell, Pamela; Breckman, Risa; Snow, Caitlin E.; Ehrlich, Amy R.; Greene, Michele G.; Greenberg, Debra F.; Raik, Barrie L.; Raymond, Joshua J.; Clabby, John F.; Fields, Suzanne D.; Breznay, Jennifer B.

    2011-01-01

    Geriatric psychosocial problems are prevalent and significantly affect the physical health and overall well-being of older adults. Geriatrics fellows require psychosocial education, and yet to date, geriatrics fellowship programs have not developed a comprehensive geriatric psychosocial curriculum. Fellowship programs in the New York tristate area…

  9. Building Psychosocial Programming in Geriatrics Fellowships: A Consortium Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Ronald D.; Ansell, Pamela; Breckman, Risa; Snow, Caitlin E.; Ehrlich, Amy R.; Greene, Michele G.; Greenberg, Debra F.; Raik, Barrie L.; Raymond, Joshua J.; Clabby, John F.; Fields, Suzanne D.; Breznay, Jennifer B.

    2011-01-01

    Geriatric psychosocial problems are prevalent and significantly affect the physical health and overall well-being of older adults. Geriatrics fellows require psychosocial education, and yet to date, geriatrics fellowship programs have not developed a comprehensive geriatric psychosocial curriculum. Fellowship programs in the New York tristate area…

  10. Are internal medicine residency programs adequately preparing physicians to care for the baby boomers? A national survey from the Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs Status of Geriatrics Workforce Study.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, Gregg A; Bragg, Elizabeth J; Thomas, David C; Ho, Mona L; Brewer, David E

    2006-10-01

    Patients aged 65 and older account for 39% of ambulatory visits to internal medicine physicians. This article describes the progress made in training internal medicine residents to care for older Americans. Program directors in internal medicine residency programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education were surveyed in the spring of 2005. Findings from this survey were compared with those from a similar 2002 survey to determine whether any changes had occurred. A 60% response rate was achieved (n=235). In these 3-year residency training programs, 20 programs (9%) required less than 2 weeks of clinical instruction that was specifically structured to teach geriatric care principles, 48 (21%) at least 2 weeks but less than 4 weeks, 144 (62%) at least 4 weeks but less than 6 weeks, and 21 (9%) required 6 or more weeks. As in 2002, internal medicine residency programs continue to depend on nursing home facilities, geriatric preceptors in nongeriatric clinical ambulatory settings, and outpatient geriatric assessment centers for their geriatrics training. Training was most often offered in a block format. The mean number of physician faculty per residency program dedicated to teaching geriatric medicine was 3.5 full-time equivalents (FTEs) (range 0-50), compared with a mean of 2.2 FTE faculty in 2002 (Pgeriatric medicine to care for older adults.

  11. Geriatric dentistry, teaching and future directions.

    PubMed

    Slack-Smith, L M; Hearn, L; Wilson, D F; Wright, Fac

    2015-03-01

    Many nations are facing a demographic shift in the age profile of their population, leading the World Health Organization to a 'Call for Public Health Action' on the oral health of older people. A search of the literature relevant to geriatric dentistry teaching was undertaken using MEDLINE, Web of Science, Eric and Psychlit. A search of dental professional school websites in Australia and policy and international practice documents was undertaken. The international literature describes requirements for geriatric dentistry courses and various approaches to teaching, including didactic teaching, practical experiences and external placements. Challenges are identified in the area of geriatric dental education. Educational institutions (with others) have an obligation to lead change, yet there appears to be little formal recognition in Australian dental curricula of the need to develop quality education and research programmes in geriatric dentistry. Internationally, the inclusion of geriatrics within dental curricula has been the subject of consideration since the 1970s. The current evidence indicates that geriatrics/gerodontology is not a significant component of dental curricula. Given the projected age distribution in many countries, the need for implementation of dental curriculum content in the area of geriatrics/gerodontology is evident. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  12. Perspectives on the future of geriatric medicine.

    PubMed

    Elon, Rebecca D

    2006-03-01

    The following comments were presented to the 20th anniversary celebration of the geriatric medicine fellowship training program at the Baylor College of Medicine in the Texas Medical Center, Houston, Texas, on June 24, 2005. The author, who was the first graduate of the geriatric medicine training program at Baylor, proposes that geriatrics is at a critical juncture and that the voice and identity of geriatric medicine should be that of advocacy for our patients, and that in such a role geriatric medicine is well suited to become the "soul of medicine." She encourages all geriatricians to read the report of the Task Force on the Future of Geriatric Medicine and to look for opportunities to personally be involved in implementing the recommendations. She suggests that since our visions of the future are often only caricatures of our past, we must be creative and dream big dreams of what the future may hold. She challenges each of us to get involved in actively creating the future of geriatric medicine.

  13. What is a geriatrician? American Geriatrics Society and Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs end-of-training entrustable professional activities for geriatric medicine.

    PubMed

    Leipzig, Rosanne M; Sauvigné, Karen; Granville, Lisa J; Harper, G Michael; Kirk, Lynne M; Levine, Sharon A; Mosqueda, Laura; Parks, Susan Mockus; Fernandez, Helen M; Busby-Whitehead, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Entrustable professional activities (EPAs) describe the core work that constitutes a discipline's specific expertise and provide the framework for faculty to perform meaningful assessment of geriatric fellows. This article describes the collaborative process of developing the end-of-training American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs (ADGAP) EPAs for Geriatric Medicine (AGS/ADGAP EPAs). The geriatrics EPAs describes a geriatrician's fundamental expertise and how geriatricians differ from general internists and family practitioners who care for older adults. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  14. Competency profile for registered nurses: NIC in gerontological nursing.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    A number of RNs provide both direct care and leadership in geriatric-care facilities. In this specialized area of care, the contributions of the RN are not well recognized. In this issue, we focus on gerontological nursing and how NIC can be used to describe and communicate this highly specialized role.

  15. Academic detailing to teach aging and geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Duckett, Ashley; Cuoco, Theresa; Pride, Pamela; Wiley, Kathy; Iverson, Patty J; Marsden, Justin; Moran, William; Caton, Cathryn

    2015-01-01

    Geriatric education is a required component of internal medicine training. Work hour rules and hectic schedules have challenged residency training programs to develop and utilize innovative teaching methods. In this study, the authors examined the use of academic detailing as a teaching intervention in their residents' clinic and on the general medicine inpatient wards to improve clinical knowledge and skills in geriatric care. The authors found that this teaching method enables efficient, directed education without disrupting patient care. We were able to show improvements in medical knowledge as well as self-efficacy across multiple geriatric topics.

  16. Geriatric medicine and cultural gerontology.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Desmond

    2015-05-01

    T.S. Eliot once proposed that there were two sorts of problems in life. One prompted the question, 'What are we going to do about it?' and the other provoked the questions, 'What does it mean? How does one relate to it?' Geriatric medicine, an eminently practical specialty, has concentrated with good effect on the former but with notable exceptions has yet to devote significant time to the latter. Into this breach has developed an innovative and exciting movement in gerontology to provide a deeper and more comprehensive insight into the meaning of ageing. Largely encompassed by the terms of cultural, humanistic and narrative gerontology, their intent and methodologies in many ways mirror the relationship between the medical humanities, narrative medicine and medicine.

  17. Asthma in the geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Madeo, Jennifer; Li, Zhenhong; Frieri, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in the geriatric population. Despite the rising incidence of asthma in people >65 years of age, the diagnosis is frequently missed in this population. Factors that contribute to this include respiratory changes caused by aging, immunosenescence, lack of symptoms, polypharmacy, clinician unawareness, and lack of evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis and management that target this population. This literature review addresses the current state of research in this area. Age-related changes influence the pathophysiology and role of allergy in elderly asthmatic patients. Specific obstacles encountered in caring for these patients are discussed. Asthma in the elderly and younger population are compared. We conclude with a broad set of goals to guide future management driven by a multidiscipline approach.

  18. Dermatologic therapy in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kratzsch, Dorothea; Treudler, Regina

    2014-08-01

    Demographic changes in our society will lead to an increasing proportion of elderly people. Age-associated multimorbidity often results in polypharmacy and elevates the risk of adverse drug reactions. Decisive alterations in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are detectable in old age, primarily a decrease in total body water, an altered ratio of muscle mass to fatty tissue, and decreased renal function. Changes in gastrointestinal transit, plasma protein binding, hepatic drug metabolism, and an increased susceptibility to drug-induced cognitive decompensation have also been reported. All these alterations should be considered in geriatric dermatotherapy to minimize drug-related complications caused by over- or underdosage and drug interactions. © 2014 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Vascular aging and geriatric patient.

    PubMed

    Nicita-Mauro, V; Maltese, G; Nicita-Mauro, C; Basile, G

    2007-08-01

    Advancing age is associated with changes in structure and function of different segments of the vascular system and is the dominant risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The oxidative stress represents a key event of vascular aging, mainly characterized by endothelium dysfunction and reduced arterial elasticity. Age-related changes include intimal and medial thickening, arterial calcification, increased deposition of matrix substances, thus leading to a reduced compliance and increased wall stiffness, that significantly contributes to an increase in systolic blood pressure. Frail elderly patients, because of their complex clinical presentations and needs, require a special approach: the comprehensive geriatric assessment, a multidimensional process intended to determine medical, psychosocial and functional capabilities and problems in order to develop a plan for treatment and continued care. All physicians, and geriatricians in particular, must, therefore, educate their patients to healthy lifestyle to prevent or delay vascular aging, cardiovascular diseases, and to maintain a good quality of life and increase life expectancy.

  20. A review of geriatric education in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Koh, Gerald C H

    2007-08-01

    The United Nations has identified the training and education of healthcare professionals and care providers involved in the care of older persons as a global priority. Singapore is no exception as it faces a rapidly ageing population. Older people have many medical needs of varying dimensions and their care requires a multidisciplinary healthcare team. The current status of geriatric education of health professionals involved in elderly care in Singapore is discussed in this paper. Important issues raised include the disparity between professions in the stages of development of geriatric education, questions on the adequacy of numbers and training of healthcare professionals providing geriatric care, as well as the need for geriatric education of caregivers.

  1. [Palliative care and geriatrics - similarities and opposites].

    PubMed

    Kunz, Roland

    2012-02-01

    Palliative care and geriatrics share many ideas and concepts: both intend to imporve quality of life, both focus on more than the physical domain, and both work in a multiprofessional team. More and more the elderly person attracts notice by palliative care. In multimorbid geriatric patients intentions to cure and to care go alongside sometimes over years in a fragile equilibrium and with uncertain prognosis. Therefore principals of palliative care and geriatrics meet at its best in these patients: improving function plays a major role in any symptom management; how to deal with cognitively impaired patients can be learned from geriatrics; various approaches from curative, palliative and rehabilitative often go hand in hand; decision making is a permanent and sophisticated task in all patients due to prognosis and multimorbidity.

  2. Guidelines for Graduate Medical Education in Geriatrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Alan S.; Beck, John C.

    1982-01-01

    Performance objectives, core content, training experiences, and clinical exposure and program evaluations are described for geriatric fellows and house staff members in internal medicine, family practice, neurology, and psychiatry. A modified Delphi study was used. (Author/MLW)

  3. [Definition and outline on geriatric oncology].

    PubMed

    Terret, C; Droz, J-P

    2009-11-01

    Geriatric oncology is the concept for management of elderly cancer patients. It is an equal approach of the health status problems and of cancer in a patient considered as a whole. Therefore it is not a subspecialty but a practice which can be translated in the elderly cancer patient's care. The treatment of cancer is based on the same principles than this of younger patients; recommendations used are those of the scientific oncological societies. Health problems of elderly patients are screened by specific tools. Patients without major health problems are managed by the oncological team in the routine; those for whom screening have demonstrated problems are first evaluated in the geriatrics setting and then oncological decisions are adapted to the patient situation. Decisions are made in specific geriatric oncology conferences. Specific clinical trials are required to build an Evidence Based Medicine background. Geriatric oncology teaching programs are warranted.

  4. Guidelines for Graduate Medical Education in Geriatrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Alan S.; Beck, John C.

    1982-01-01

    Performance objectives, core content, training experiences, and clinical exposure and program evaluations are described for geriatric fellows and house staff members in internal medicine, family practice, neurology, and psychiatry. A modified Delphi study was used. (Author/MLW)

  5. A Proposed Curriculum Model for Geriatric Optometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbloom, Albert A.

    1985-01-01

    A model for a geriatric optometry curriculum that defines key content areas and addresses the values essential for effective practice and basic therapeutic modalities used in treatment regimens with older adults is outlined. (MSE)

  6. Geriatric simulation: practicing management and leadership in care of the older adult.

    PubMed

    Miller, Sally; Overstreet, Maria

    2015-06-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, patients age 65 and older account for 43% of hospital days. The complexity of caring for older adults affords nursing students opportunities to assess, prioritize, intervene, advocate, and experience being a member of an interdisciplinary health care team. However, these multifaceted hospital experiences are not consistently available for all students. Nursing clinical simulation (NCS) can augment or replace specific clinical hours and provide clinically relevant experiences to practice management and leadership skills while caring for older adults. This article describes a geriatric management and leadership NCS.

  7. Psychiatric emergencies in the geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Borja, Ben; Borja, Czarina Santos; Gade, Swami

    2007-05-01

    Failure to recognize psychiatric conditions in any age group particularly in the elderly could lead to a very complicated clinical picture and may lead to increased health expenditures. Psychiatric emergencies can be secondary to numerous factors: geriatric depression and suicide, behavioral disturbance secondary to underlying organic conditions, substance abuse, elder abuse, and medication-induced adverse events. This article discusses mainly geriatric depression, elder abuse, and conditions emanating from iatrogenic causes.

  8. Nocturnal bruxing events in healthy geriatric subjects.

    PubMed

    Okeson, J P; Phillips, B A; Berry, D T; Cook, Y; Paesani, D; Galante, J

    1990-09-01

    Thirty healthy geriatric subjects were studied during a single night of sleep in a sleep laboratory. Unilateral masseter muscle activity was recorded in addition to the standard polysomnographic study. The geriatric subjects in this study exhibited fewer bruxing events than other subjects reported in the literature. Certain conditions that have not been previously investigated, such as sleep position, type of bruxing event, and relationship to the state of the dentition, are reported.

  9. Student nurses' motivation to choose gerontological nursing as a career in China: a survey study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Min; Cheng, Cheng; Tian, Yan; Fan, Xiuzhen

    2015-07-01

    The world's population is aging, and the need for nurses is increasing. Working with older adults, however, has always been an unpopular career choice among student nurses. It is important to understand student nurses' motivation for choosing gerontological nursing as a career. The purpose of this study was to examine the motivation for choosing gerontological nursing as a career and to identify the associated factors among student nurses. Cross-sectional survey. Participants were last-semester student nurses from 7 universities offering nursing undergraduate programs in Shandong, China. Of the 1290 student nurses, 916 completed the survey (a response rate of 71.0%). The outcome variable was the motivation to choose gerontological nursing as a career. This was measured using a motivation questionnaire that included expectancy and value subscales. Other instruments included the Chinese version of the Facts on Aging Quiz I, the Geriatrics Attitudes Scale, the Anxiety about Aging Scale, a clinical practice environment questionnaire and a self-administered general information questionnaire. Student nurses' expectancy and value aspects of motivation for choosing gerontological nursing as a career were both at a moderate level; the highest value they held was of personal interest. Clinical practice environment, anxiety about aging and the attitudes about geriatrics were the main factors influencing student nurses' motivation to choose gerontological nursing as a career in China. It is imperative for nurse educators to improve the gerontological nursing clinical practice environment for student nurses. Moreover, cultivating student nurses' positive attitudes about geriatrics and relieving anxiety about aging could be beneficial. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Attitudes of Nursing Facilities' Staff Toward Pharmacy Students' Interaction with its Residents.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Donna; Gavaza, Paul; Deel, Sharon

    2017-06-01

    All Appalachian College of Pharmacy second-year students undertake the longitudinal geriatric early pharmacy practice experiences (EPPE) 2 course, which involves interacting with geriatric residents in two nursing facilities over two semesters. The study investigated the nursing staff's perceptions about the rotation and the pharmacy students' interaction with nursing facility residents. Cross-sectional study. Academic setting. 63 nursing facility staff. A 10-item attitude survey administered to nursing staff. Nursing staff attitude toward pharmacy students' interaction with geriatric residents during the course. Sixty-three responses were received (84% response rate). Most respondents were female (95.2%), who occasionally interacted with pharmacy students (54.8%) and had worked at the facilities for an average of 6.8 years (standard deviation [SD] = 6.7) years. Staff reported that pharmacy students practiced interacting with geriatric residents and nursing facility staff, learned about different medications taken by residents as well as their life as a nursing facility resident. In addition, the student visits improved the mood of residents and staff's understanding of medicines, among others. Staff suggested that students spend more time with their residents in the facility as well as ask more questions of staff. The nursing facility staff generally had favorable attitudes about pharmacy students' visits in their nursing facility. Nursing facility staff noted that the geriatric rotation was a great learning experience for the pharmacy students.

  11. A research agenda for geriatric emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Wilber, Scott T; Gerson, Lowell W

    2003-03-01

    The Research Agenda Setting Process (RASP), part of the American Geriatric Society's (AGS's) project "Increasing Geriatric Expertise in Surgical and Related Medical Specialties," was designed to define a research agenda for the geriatrics aspects of participating specialties. This paper presents a summary of the research agenda for emergency medicine. The RASP was developed by the AGS in conjunction with experts from the participating specialty organizations. A "content expert" (CE) for each specialty developed a Medline search strategy in conjunction with RAND Health librarians. The CE reviewed the search to identify papers that were germane to research in the emergency care of older patients. The CE and a senior writing group member drafted a paper that synthesized the current literature and suggested areas for further research. A panel consisting of AGS members and emergency physicians with geriatrics expertise reviewed this paper. The research agenda was further refined at a two-day retreat. Two senior geriatricians reviewed the resulting paper. The Medline search for emergency medicine resulted in a list of 3,348 articles; 299 articles were pertinent and reviewed. The search for trauma resulted in a list of 1,838 articles; 133 were reviewed. Research agenda items were defined for multiple topics within geriatric emergency medicine and trauma. A research agenda for geriatric emergency medicine has been developed, using a combination of review of current literature and expert opinion.

  12. Socio-demographic Factors of Geriatric Depression

    PubMed Central

    Barua, Ankur; Ghosh, M. K.; Kar, N.; Basilio, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Depression is a common mental health problem in geriatric population and the overall prevalence rate of depression in this age group varies between 10 and 20%. Objective: To study the socio-demographic factors associated with depression in geriatric population. Materials and Methods: A systematic review was done on 74 community-based mental health surveys on depression in geriatric population, which were conducted in the continents of Asia, Europe, Australia, North America, and South America. All the studies were conducted between 1955 and 2005. The researchers had included only community-based cross-sectional surveys and some prospective studies that had not excluded depression on baseline. These studies were conducted on homogenous community of geriatric population in the world, who were selected by simple random sampling technique. A qualitative analysis was conducted to study the socio-demographic factors of depression. Results and Conclusion: The two non-modifiable risk factors found to be significantly associated with depression in geriatric population were “older age group” and “female gender”. However, the potentially modifiable risk factors for depression in the geriatric population were identified as low socioeconomic status, loss of spouse, living alone, chronic co-morbidities, cognitive impairment, bereavement and restricted activities of daily living (ADL). PMID:21716860

  13. Socio-demographic Factors of Geriatric Depression.

    PubMed

    Barua, Ankur; Ghosh, M K; Kar, N; Basilio, M A

    2010-07-01

    Depression is a common mental health problem in geriatric population and the overall prevalence rate of depression in this age group varies between 10 and 20%. To study the socio-demographic factors associated with depression in geriatric population. A systematic review was done on 74 community-based mental health surveys on depression in geriatric population, which were conducted in the continents of Asia, Europe, Australia, North America, and South America. All the studies were conducted between 1955 and 2005. The researchers had included only community-based cross-sectional surveys and some prospective studies that had not excluded depression on baseline. These studies were conducted on homogenous community of geriatric population in the world, who were selected by simple random sampling technique. A qualitative analysis was conducted to study the socio-demographic factors of depression. The two non-modifiable risk factors found to be significantly associated with depression in geriatric population were "older age group" and "female gender". However, the potentially modifiable risk factors for depression in the geriatric population were identified as low socioeconomic status, loss of spouse, living alone, chronic co-morbidities, cognitive impairment, bereavement and restricted activities of daily living (ADL).

  14. Treatment of dementia patients with fracture of the proximal femur in a specialized geriatric care unit compared to conventional geriatric care.

    PubMed

    Rösler, A; von Renteln-Kruse, W; Mühlhan, C; Frilling, B

    2012-07-01

    To prove the efficiency of a specialized geriatric ward (cognitive geriatric unit, CGU) for patients with a fracture of the proximal femur and additional dementia, we conducted a matched-pair analysis comparing 96 patients with fracture of the proximal femur and additional dementia matched for age, sex, surgical treatment and the degree of cognitive impairment by MMSE score. A total of 48 patients were treated in the CGU, offering extended geriatric assessment, special education of staff, and architecture appropriate for patients with cognitive decline. Target criteria were a gain in the Barthel index and Tinetti score, the length of stay, new admissions to nursing home, the frequency of neuroleptic, antidepressant, and antidementive medication, and the number of specified clinical diagnoses for the dementia syndrome. Length of stay was significantly longer in the CGU. The increase of the Tinetti score was significantly higher in the patients in the CGU, regardless of the length of stay (analysis of covariance: treatment (CGU/non-CGU): F(1/93) = 9.421, p = 0.003; covariate (length of stay): F(1/93) = 3.452, p = 0.066, η(2) = 3.6%). In the intervention group, the number of definite diagnoses concerning the dementia syndrome was also higher. Comparison of drug treatment and the percentage of new admission to a nursing home did not differ between groups. Treatment in a specialized, "cognitive geriatric unit" seems to result in better mobility of demented patients with proximal fractures of the femur.

  15. Positioning Medical Students for the Geriatric Imperative: Using Geriatrics to Effectively Teach Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Annie L.; Duthie, Elizabeth A.; Denson, Kathryn M.; Franco, Jose; Duthie, Edmund H.

    2013-01-01

    Medical schools must consider innovative ways to ensure that graduates are prepared to care for the aging population. One way is to offer a geriatrics clerkship as an option for the fulfillment of a medical school's internal medicine rotation requirement. The authors' purpose was to evaluate the geriatrics clerkship's impact on internal medicine…

  16. Positioning Medical Students for the Geriatric Imperative: Using Geriatrics to Effectively Teach Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Annie L.; Duthie, Elizabeth A.; Denson, Kathryn M.; Franco, Jose; Duthie, Edmund H.

    2013-01-01

    Medical schools must consider innovative ways to ensure that graduates are prepared to care for the aging population. One way is to offer a geriatrics clerkship as an option for the fulfillment of a medical school's internal medicine rotation requirement. The authors' purpose was to evaluate the geriatrics clerkship's impact on internal medicine…

  17. [Health services research in geriatrics and geriatric rehabilitation from the national and international viewpoint].

    PubMed

    Pientka, L

    2001-05-01

    In Germany, health services research geriatric problems is not of major scientific and political importance. Focusing on geriatrics, it is essential to produce good data concerning efficacy, effectiveness and costs of the interventions. Otherwise, the discussion about the allocation of resources in the German health care system will take place without good arguments for special geriatric interventions. Prerequisite for this goal is the definition of adequate endpoints targeting functional deficits and the operationalization of multi- and comorbidity. Another problem is research focused on the "black box" of specific geriatric interventions. A special German situation is the distinction between acute and rehabilitative geriatric settings where very similar patients are treated. For this reason, it is essential for the geriatrician in the German context to focus more on health services research to demonstrate with scientific evidence their important contribution for the care of the elderly.

  18. Senile anorexia in different geriatric settings in Italy.

    PubMed

    Donini, L M; Dominguez, L J; Barbagallo, M; Savina, C; Castellaneta, E; Cucinotta, D; Fiorito, A; Inelmen, E M; Sergi, G; Enzi, G; Cannella, C

    2011-11-01

    Anorexia is the most frequent modification of eating habits in old age, which may lead to malnutrition and consequent morbidity and mortality in older adults. We aimed to estimate the prevalence and factors associated to anorexia in a sample of Italian older persons living in different settings. Our secondary aim was to evaluate the impact of senile anorexia on nutritional status and on eating habits, as well as on functional status. Observational study in nursing homes, in rehabilitation and acute geriatric wards, and in the community in four Italian regions (Lazio, Sicily, Emilia-Romagna, and Veneto). 526 over 65 years old participants were recruited; 218 free-living subjects, 213 from nursing homes, and 96 patients from rehabilitation and acute geriatric wards in the context of a National Research Project (PRIN) from the Italian Ministry of Instruction, University and Research (2005-067913 "Cause e Prevalenza dell'Anoressia senile"). Anthropometric and nutritional evaluation, olfactory, chewing, and swallowing capacity, food preferences, cognitive function, functional status, depression, quality of life, social aspects, prescribed drugs, and evaluation of gastrointestinal symptoms and pain. Laboratory parameters included prealbumin, albumin, transferrin, C-reactive protein, mucoprotein, lymphocyte count, as well as neurotransmitters leptin, and ghrelin. Anorexia was considered as ≥50% reduction in food intake vs. a standard meal (using 3-day "Club Francophone de Gériatrie et Nutrition" form), in absence of oral disorders preventing mastication. The overall prevalence of anorexia was 21.2% with higher values among hospitalized patients (34.1% women and 27.2% men in long-term facilities; 33.3% women and 26.7% men in rehabilitation and geriatric wards; 3.3% women and 11.3% men living in the community) and in the oldest persons. Anorexic subjects were significantly less self-sufficient and presented more often a compromised nutritional and cognitive status. Diet

  19. Nutritional screening and perceived health in a group of geriatric rehabilitation patients.

    PubMed

    Söderhamn, Ulrika; Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta; Ek, Anna-Christina

    2007-11-01

    (i) To perform a nutritional screening using the Nutritional Form For the Elderly and relate the results to perceived health in a group of geriatric rehabilitation patients; and (ii) to compare the screening results and nurses' nutritional notes in the nursing documentation. Undernutrition is an under-recognized problem among older patients. Using a screening instrument is a way to detect patients at risk for undernutrition. A cross-sectional study conducted in Sweden. A sample of 147 geriatric rehabilitation patients was consecutively included and was interviewed with the screening instrument, questions about background variables, perceived health and health-related issues. Higher screening scores indicate higher risk for undernutrition. Parametric and nonparametric statistical tests were used. When nurses' nutritional notes in the nursing documentation were corresponding to the content in any of the response alternatives for each screening item, the notes were marked as existent. The screening results showed that 55% of the patients were at medium risk and 14% at high risk for undernutrition. Patients in perceived ill health had higher screening scores than those in perceived good health. Associations were also found between receiving help, perceiving helplessness, not being active and not feeling satisfied and higher screening scores. The content of nine of 15 items in the instrument was mentioned in a number of nursing records. The prevalence of older patients at medium or high risk for undernutrition was high. To be at high risk for undernutrition was associated with perceived ill health. Nurses' nutritional notes in the nursing documentation showed deficiencies, indicating that all patients at medium or high risk for undernutrition were not identified. The results suggest that nurses need a screening instrument to highlight older nutritional at-risk patients in need of further awareness and investigation.

  20. Evaluation of geriatric changes in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pati, Soumyaranjan; Panda, S K; Acharya, A P; Senapati, S; Behera, M; Behera, S S

    2015-03-01

    The present study has been envisaged to ascertain the old age for critical management of geriatric dogs considering the parameters of externally visible changes, haemato-biochemical alterations and urine analysis in geriatric dogs approaching senility. The study was undertaken in the Department of Veterinary Pathology in collaboration with Teaching Veterinary Clinic complex spanning a period of 1 year. For screening of geriatric dogs, standard geriatric age chart of different breeds was followed. The external characteristics such as hair coat texture, dental wear and tear, skin texture and glaucoma were taken as a marker of old age. Haematology, serum biochemistry and urine analysis were also included in the study. External visible changes like greying of hair, dull appearance of hair coat, glaucoma, osteoarthritis, dental wear and tear were commonly encountered in the aged dogs. The haemoglobin, total erythrocyte count and packed cell volume showed a decreasing trend in the geriatric groups. Biochemical values like total protein, albumin, calcium level showed a decreasing trend while urea level with an increasing trend in geriatric dogs without any much alteration in serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminse, serum glutamic-pyruvate transaminase, cholesterol and creatinine. Physical examination of urine revealed yellow, amber, red, deep red color with turbidity and higher specific gravity. Chemical examination revealed presence of protein, glucose, ketone bodies, blood and bilirubin on some cases. The culture and sensitivity test of the urine samples revealed presence of bacteria with sensitive and resistance to some antibiotics. External visible changes are still the golden standard of determining the old age in dogs. Haemato-biochemical evaluation can be useful for correlating with the pathophysiological status of the animal. Biochemical analysis of urine can be employed rightly as kidney dysfunction is being major geriatric problem. Anaemia, jaundice, nephritis

  1. Evaluation of geriatric changes in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Pati, Soumyaranjan; Panda, S. K.; Acharya, A. P.; Senapati, S.; Behera, M.; Behera, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study has been envisaged to ascertain the old age for critical management of geriatric dogs considering the parameters of externally visible changes, haemato-biochemical alterations and urine analysis in geriatric dogs approaching senility. Materials and Methods: The study was undertaken in the Department of Veterinary Pathology in collaboration with Teaching Veterinary Clinic complex spanning a period of 1 year. For screening of geriatric dogs, standard geriatric age chart of different breeds was followed. The external characteristics such as hair coat texture, dental wear and tear, skin texture and glaucoma were taken as a marker of old age. Haematology, serum biochemistry and urine analysis were also included in the study. Results: External visible changes like greying of hair, dull appearance of hair coat, glaucoma, osteoarthritis, dental wear and tear were commonly encountered in the aged dogs. The haemoglobin, total erythrocyte count and packed cell volume showed a decreasing trend in the geriatric groups. Biochemical values like total protein, albumin, calcium level showed a decreasing trend while urea level with an increasing trend in geriatric dogs without any much alteration in serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminse, serum glutamic-pyruvate transaminase, cholesterol and creatinine. Physical examination of urine revealed yellow, amber, red, deep red color with turbidity and higher specific gravity. Chemical examination revealed presence of protein, glucose, ketone bodies, blood and bilirubin on some cases. The culture and sensitivity test of the urine samples revealed presence of bacteria with sensitive and resistance to some antibiotics. Conclusion: External visible changes are still the golden standard of determining the old age in dogs. Haemato-biochemical evaluation can be useful for correlating with the pathophysiological status of the animal. Biochemical analysis of urine can be employed rightly as kidney dysfunction is being major

  2. Academic career development in geriatric fellowship training.

    PubMed

    Medina-Walpole, Annette; Fonzi, Judith; Katz, Paul R

    2007-12-01

    Career development is rarely formalized in the curricula of geriatric fellowship programs, and the training of new generations of academic leaders is challenging in the 1 year of fellowship training. To effectively prepare fellows for academic leadership, the University of Rochester's Division of Geriatrics, in collaboration with the Warner School of Graduate Education, created a yearlong course to achieve excellence in teaching and career development during the 1-year geriatric fellowship. Nine interdisciplinary geriatric medicine, dentistry, and psychiatry fellows completed the course in its initial year (2005/06). As participants, fellows gained the knowledge and experience to successfully develop and implement educational initiatives in various formats. Fellows acquired teaching and leadership skills necessary to succeed as clinician-educators in an academic setting and to communicate effectively with patients, families, and colleagues. Fellows completed a series of individual and group education projects, including academic portfolio development, curriculum vitae revision, abstract submission and poster presentation at national meetings, lay lecture series development, and geriatric grand rounds presentation. One hundred percent of fellows reported that the course positively affected their career development, with six of nine fellows choosing academic careers. The course provided opportunities to teach and assess all six of the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education core competencies. This academic career development course was intended to prepare geriatric fellows as the next generation of academic leaders as clinician-teacher-scholars. It could set a new standard for academic development during fellowship training and provide a model for national dissemination in other geriatric and subspecialty fellowship programs.

  3. The inflammation hypothesis in geriatric depression.

    PubMed

    Alexopoulos, George S; Morimoto, Sarah Shizuko

    2011-11-01

    A large body of research has focused on "mediating mechanisms" and predisposing brain abnormalities to geriatric depression, but little is known about its etiology. This paper examines whether age-related and comorbid disease-related immune deregulation is an etiologic contributor to geriatric depression. This article reviews findings on neuroinflammation during the aging process and depression as well as studies of anti-inflammatory actions of classical antidepressants and antidepressant actions of anti-inflammatory agents. Aging results in increased peripheral immune responses, impaired peripheral-CNS immune communication, and a shift of the CNS into a pro-inflammatory state. These exaggerated and prolonged immune responses may lead to changes in the function of emotional and cognitive networks pertinent to geriatric depression and to behavioral changes reminiscent of the depressive and cognitive symptoms of geriatric depression. Some antidepressants may reduce the expression of inflammation markers. Limited data suggest that some anti-inflammatory agents may have antidepressant properties. A synthesis of available findings suggests that aging-related and comorbid disease-related inflammatory processes may promote changes in the neural systems predisposing to geriatric depression or facilitating metabolic changes that mediate depressive syndromes. The "inflammation hypothesis" in geriatric depression cannot be tested in its entirety, but it can lead to testable hypotheses and data on mechanisms by which inflammatory processes promote geriatric depression. The significance of such an effort is that it may lead to a novel treatment development model bringing to bear recent advances of anti-inflammatory pharmacology to the treatment of depressed elderly patients. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. THE INFLAMMATION HYPOTHESIS IN GERIATRIC DEPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Alexopoulos, George S.; Morimoto, Sarah Shizuko

    2011-01-01

    Background A large body of research has focused on “mediating mechanisms” and predisposing brain abnormalities to geriatric depression, but little is known about its etiology. This paper examines whether age-related and comorbid disease-related immune deregulation is an etiologic contributor to geriatric depression. Methods This article reviews findings on neuroinflammation during the aging process and depression as well as studies of anti-inflammatory actions of classical antidepressants and antidepressant actions of anti-inflammatory agents. Results Aging results in increased peripheral immune responses, impaired peripheral-CNS immune communication, and a shift of the CNS into a pro-inflammatory state. These exaggerated and prolonged immune responses may lead to changes in the function of emotional and cognitive networks pertinent to geriatric depression and to behavioral changes reminiscent of the depressive and cognitive symptoms of geriatric depression. Some antidepressants may reduce the expression of inflammation markers. Limited data suggest that some anti-inflammatory agents may have antidepressant properties. Conclusions A synthesis of available findings suggests that aging-related and comorbid disease-related inflammatory processes may promote changes in the neural systems predisposing to geriatric depression or facilitating metabolic changes that mediate depressive syndromes. The “inflammation hypothesis” in geriatric depression cannot be tested in its entirety, but it can lead to testable hypotheses and data on mechanisms by which inflammatory processes promote geriatric depression. The significance of such an effort is that it may lead to a novel treatment development model bringing to bear recent advances of anti-inflammatory pharmacology to the treatment of depressed elderly patients. PMID:21370276

  5. Attitudes of nursing staff working with older people towards nutritional nursing care.

    PubMed

    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta; Jensen, Sara; Lundin, Rickard; Christensson, Lennart

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine attitudes of the nursing staff in geriatric care towards factors of importance for nutritional nursing care. Studies show that nutritional risk assessment is seldom performed on older patients as routine and very few patients have a nutritional care plan. Patients in long-term care who are easy to feed are also found to be looked upon more positively than those with high feeding needs. A total of 252 registered nurses and nurse aids working at geriatric rehabilitation and medical care clinics and resident homes participated in the study. Attitudes were examined using the Staff Attitudes to Nutritional Nursing Care Geriatric scale. The scale includes 18 items and was designed as a one to five-point Lickert-type scale. It gives a total score and five subscales representing the dimensions 'Norms', 'Habits', 'Assessment', 'Intervention' and 'Individualization'. A higher score indicates a more positive attitude. Of all nursing staff, 53% displayed a positive attitude towards factors of importance for nutritional nursing care and the rest displayed a neutral or negative attitude. The 'Intervention' dimension, dealing with nutritional problems and how to manage them, reflected the highest level of positive attitudes, which represents 71% of the nursing staff. The 'Norms' dimension had the lowest relative frequency of positive attitudes, 27%. The registered nurses held significantly more positive attitudes than the nurse aids did. Nutritional issues comprise an important and time-consuming responsibility in geriatric care; however, nursing staff do not show an unequivocal positive attitude regarding this responsibility. The consequences this entails for the older patient need to be examined further. Relevance to clinical practice. Nursing staff play an important role in caring for patients who are malnourished or at risk for malnutrition. Positive attitudes might hinder the development of undernourishment or the further worsening of an

  6. Geriatrics education is associated with positive attitudes toward older people in internal medicine residents: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Tufan, Fatih; Yuruyen, Mehmet; Kizilarslanoglu, Muhammet Cemal; Akpinar, Timur; Emiksiye, Sirhan; Yesil, Yusuf; Ozturk, Zeynel Abidin; Bozbulut, Utku Burak; Bolayir, Basak; Tasar, Pinar Tosun; Yavuzer, Hakan; Sahin, Sevnaz; Ulger, Zekeriya; Ozturk, Gulistan Bahat; Halil, Meltem; Akcicek, Fehmi; Doventas, Alper; Kepekci, Yalcin; Ince, Nurhan; Karan, Mehmet Akif

    2015-01-01

    The number of older people is growing fast in Turkey. In this context, internal medicine residents and specialists contact older people more frequently. Thus, healthcare providers' knowledge and attitudes toward older people is becoming more important. Studies that specifically investigate internal medicine residents' attitudes toward the elderly are scarce. We aimed to investigate the attitudes of internal medicine residents toward older people. This cross-sectional multicenter study was undertaken in the internal medicine clinics of six university state hospitals that provide education in geriatric care. All internal medicine residents working in these hospitals were invited to participate in this questionnaire study between March 2013 and December 2013. We recorded the participants' age, sex, duration of internal medicine residency, existence of relatives older than 65 years, history of geriatrics course in medical school, geriatrics rotation in internal medicine residency, and nursing home visits. A total of 274 (82.3%) of the residents participated in this study, and 83.6% of them had positive attitudes toward older people. A geriatrics rotation during internal medicine residency was the only independent factor associated with positive attitudes toward the elderly in this multivariate analysis. A geriatrics course during medical school was associated with positive attitudes in the univariate analysis, but only tended to be so in the multivariate analysis. Geriatrics rotation during internal medicine residency was independently associated with positive attitudes toward older people. Generalization of geriatrics education in developing countries may translate into a better understanding and improved care for older patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Department of Veterans Affairs Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Centers: translating aging research into clinical geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Supiano, Mark A; Alessi, Cathy; Chernoff, Ronni; Goldberg, Andrew; Morley, John E; Schmader, Kenneth E; Shay, Kenneth

    2012-07-01

    Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Centers (GRECCs) originated in 1975 in response to the rapidly aging veteran population. Since its inception, the GRECC program has made major contributions to the advancement of aging research, geriatric training, and clinical care within and outside the VA. GRECCs were created to conduct translational research to enhance the clinical care of future aging generations. GRECC training programs also provide leadership in educating healthcare providers about the special needs of older persons. GRECC programs are also instrumental in establishing robust clinical geriatric and aging research programs at their affiliated university schools of medicine. This report identifies how the GRECC program has successfully adapted to changes that have occurred in VA since 1994, when the program's influence on U.S. geriatrics was last reported, focusing on its effect on advancing clinical geriatrics in the last 10 years. This evidence supports the conclusion that, after more than 30 years, the GRECC program remains a vibrant "jewel in the crown of the VA" and is poised to make contributions to aging research and clinical geriatrics well into the future. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  8. Client services for geriatric pets.

    PubMed

    Hancock, G; Yates, J

    1989-01-01

    Some veterinarians have been reluctant to discuss the prospect of the death of a pet because of a sense of discomfort and a lack of understanding about how to respond to the client's grief reaction. It is essential to take the time for this important communication and help clients deal with fears about the process, any feelings of guilt and helplessness, and judgments about the medical aspects of a case. Clients must be encouraged to express grief over the loss of a pet, particularly a geriatric pet that has lived with them many years and to which they are deeply bonded. Veterinarians need to counsel clients about obtaining additional pets or another pet. The phrase "replacement pet" must be stricken from the veterinarian's vocabulary. One does not "replace" a deceased spouse, mother, father, or child. It is possible to have another child or find another spouse, but it is not possible to replace a person. Neither can a pet be "replaced," because each pet is a unique living being. It is disrespectful to the memory of deceased pets to belittle their uniqueness by suggesting that they can be replaced. Instead, the veterinarian has the capability and responsibility to help pet owners maintain fond and happy memories of an irreplacable pet, while finding room in their hearts for another new pet to create happiness for the future. Once the grief is resolved, clients will be thankful for having had the privilege of sharing their life with an animal and experiencing the joy of the bond between two unique individuals.

  9. Co-creation by the ABIM Geriatric Medicine Board and the AGS - Helping Move Geriatrics Forward.

    PubMed

    Leff, Bruce; Lundjeberg, Nancy E; Brangman, Sharon A; Dubow, Joyce; Levine, Sharon; Morgan-Gouveia, Melissa; Schlaudecker, Jeffrey; Lynn, Lorna; McDonald, Furman S

    2017-09-07

    The American board of internal medicine (ABIM) establishes standards for physicians. The American geriatrics society (AGS) is a not-for-profit membership organization of nearly 6,000 health professionals devoted to improving the health, independence, and quality of life of all older people. Beginning in 2013, ABIM redesigned its governance structure, including the role of the specialty boards. Specialty boards are charged with responsibilities for oversight in four main areas: (1) the assessments used in initial certification and maintenance of certification (MOC); (2) medical knowledge self-assessment and practice assessment in the specialty; (3) building relationships with relevant professional societies and other organizational stakeholders; and (4) issues related to training requirements for initial certification eligibility within the specialty. The aim of this paper is to inform the geriatrics community regarding the function of geriatric medicine board (GMB) of the ABIM, and to invite the geriatrics community to fully engage with and leverage the GMB as a partner to: (1) develop better certification examinations and processes, identifying better knowledge and practice assessments, and in establishing appropriate training and MOC requirements for geriatric medicine; (2) leverage ABIM assets to conduct applied research to guide the field in the areas of training and certification and workforce development in geriatric medicine; (3) make MOC relevant for practicing geriatricians. Active engagement of the geriatrics community with ABIM and the GMB will ensure that certification in geriatric medicine provides the greatest possible value and meaning to physicians, patients, and the public. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  10. Long Term Outcomes of a Geriatric Liaison Intervention in Frail Elderly Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hempenius, Liesbeth; Slaets, Joris P. J.; van Asselt, Dieneke; de Bock, Truuske H.; Wiggers, Theo; van Leeuwen, Barbara L.

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the long term effects after discharge of a hospital-based geriatric liaison intervention to prevent postoperative delirium in frail elderly cancer patients treated with an elective surgical procedure for a solid tumour. In addition, the effect of a postoperative delirium on long term outcomes was examined. Methods A three month follow-up was performed in participants of the Liaison Intervention in Frail Elderly study, a multicentre, prospective, randomized, controlled trial. Patients were randomized to standard treatment or a geriatric liaison intervention. The intervention consisted of a preoperative geriatric consultation, an individual treatment plan targeted at risk factors for delirium and daily visits by a geriatric nurse during the hospital stay. The long term outcomes included: mortality, rehospitalisation, Activities of Daily Living (ADL) functioning, return to the independent pre-operative living situation, use of supportive care, cognitive functioning and health related quality of life. Results Data of 260 patients (intervention n = 127, Control n = 133) were analysed. There were no differences between the intervention group and usual-care group for any of the outcomes three months after discharge. The presence of postoperative delirium was associated with: an increased risk of decline in ADL functioning (OR: 2.65, 95% CI: 1.02–6.88), an increased use of supportive assistance (OR: 2.45, 95% CI: 1.02–5.87) and a decreased chance to return to the independent preoperative living situation (OR: 0.18, 95% CI: 0.07–0.49). Conclusions A hospital-based geriatric liaison intervention for the prevention of postoperative delirium in frail elderly cancer patients undergoing elective surgery for a solid tumour did not improve outcomes 3 months after discharge from hospital. The negative effect of a postoperative delirium on late outcome was confirmed. Trial Registration Nederlands Trial Register, Trial ID NTR 823

  11. Development and validation of a patient safety culture questionnaire in acute geriatric units.

    PubMed

    Steyrer, Johannes; Latzke, Markus; Pils, Katharina; Vetter, Elisabeth; Strunk, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Older patients (≥65 years) are exposed to more harm resulting from adverse events in hospitals than younger patients. Theoretical considerations and empirical findings suggest that safety culture is the key to improving the quality of health care. To describe the development of a German-language instrument for assessing patient safety culture (PSC) and its reliability and validity; to verify criterion validity by means of a cross-sectional analysis of the impact of PSC on clinical quality that compares acute geriatric units with a sample from intensive care, surgery and trauma surgery departments, and to report variations in the PSC profile between these groups. Using a review of existing safety culture surveys, multidimensional scaling procedures and expert interviews, we tested the content and convergent validity of a 158-item questionnaire completed by 508 physicians and nurses from 31 acute geriatric units and 7 comparison departments. Criterion validity was verified by various regression models with a self-reported measure of adverse events. Differences in PSC profiles were analyzed using a one-factorial ANOVA and regression models. We identified 7 constructs of PSC and demonstrated substantial convergent and criterion validity. In the acute geriatric units, higher levels of 'management commitment to patient safety' and lower levels of 'error fatalism' were associated with a reduced incidence of medical errors. In the comparison group, only the variable 'active learning from mistakes' was relevant for safety performance. Our results also indicate that acute geriatric units display higher standards than the comparison group in all the aspects of patient safety examined. It is possible to measure salient features of PSC using a valid and reliable survey. Some aspects of PSC are more closely related to safety events than others. In acute geriatric units, patient safety appears to be influenced mainly by management's determination of how things are done whereas

  12. Coding Geriatric syndromes: How good are we?

    PubMed Central

    Ugboma, Ike; Syddall, Holly E; Cox, Vanessa; Cooper, Cyrus; Briggs, Roger; Sayer, Avan Aihie

    2008-01-01

    High quality coding of hospital activity is important because the data is used for resource allocation and measuring performance. There is little information on the quality of coding of admissions of frail older people who have multiple diagnoses, co-morbidities and functional impairment. Presence or absence of four geriatric syndromes and eight medical conditions was noted on case note review (CNR). Discharge summaries (DS) and hospital coding (HC) were reviewed and compared with the CNR. Forty patients had at least one geriatric syndrome noted in the DS; 16 (40.0%) were captured by the HC. Of 57 patients with at least one medical condition noted in the DS, 52 (91.2%) were captured by the HC (p<0.0001 for difference in HC capture rates). We have demonstrated poor capture of information on geriatric syndromes compared to medical conditions in discharge summaries and hospital coding and propose a problem list bookmark approach to improve this. PMID:22003315

  13. Coding Geriatric syndromes: How good are we?

    PubMed

    Ugboma, Ike; Syddall, Holly E; Cox, Vanessa; Cooper, Cyrus; Briggs, Roger; Sayer, Avan Aihie

    2008-01-01

    High quality coding of hospital activity is important because the data is used for resource allocation and measuring performance. There is little information on the quality of coding of admissions of frail older people who have multiple diagnoses, co-morbidities and functional impairment. Presence or absence of four geriatric syndromes and eight medical conditions was noted on case note review (CNR). Discharge summaries (DS) and hospital coding (HC) were reviewed and compared with the CNR. Forty patients had at least one geriatric syndrome noted in the DS; 16 (40.0%) were captured by the HC. Of 57 patients with at least one medical condition noted in the DS, 52 (91.2%) were captured by the HC (p<0.0001 for difference in HC capture rates). We have demonstrated poor capture of information on geriatric syndromes compared to medical conditions in discharge summaries and hospital coding and propose a problem list bookmark approach to improve this.

  14. Associations of Various Health-Ratings with Geriatric Giants, Mortality and Life Satisfaction in Older People.

    PubMed

    Puvill, Thomas; Lindenberg, Jolanda; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; de Craen, Anton J M; Slaets, Joris P J; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    Self-rated health is routinely used in research and practise among general populations. Older people, however, seem to change their health perceptions. To accurately understand these changed perceptions we therefore need to study the correlates of older people's self-ratings. We examined self-rated, nurse-rated and physician-rated health's association with common disabilities in older people (the geriatric giants), mortality hazard and life satisfaction. For this, we used an age-representative population of 501 participant aged 85 from a middle-sized city in the Netherlands: the Leiden 85-plus Study. Participants with severe cognitive dysfunction were excluded. Participants themselves provided health ratings, as well as a visiting physician and a research nurse. Visual acuity, hearing loss, mobility, stability, urinal and faecal incontinence, cognitive function and mood (depressive symptoms) were included as geriatric giants. Participants provided a score for life satisfaction and were followed up for vital status. Concordance of self-rated health with physician-rated (k = .3 [.0]) and nurse-rated health (k = .2 [.0]) was low. All three ratings were associated with the geriatric giants except for hearing loss (all p < 0.001). Associations were equal in strength, except for depressive symptoms, which showed a stronger association with self-rated health (.8 [.1] versus .4 [.1]). Self-rated health predicted mortality less well than the other ratings. Self-rated health related stronger to life satisfaction than physician's and nurse's ratings. We conclude that professionals' health ratings are more reflective of physical health whereas self-rated health reflects more the older person's mental health, but all three health ratings are useful in research.

  15. Geriatrics Educational Outreach: A Tale of Three GRECCs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Elizabeth; Fitzgerald, James T.; Griffith, Jennifer; Weir, Charlene

    2011-01-01

    Current geriatrics workforce projections indicate that clinicians who care for adults will need basic geriatrics knowledge and skills to address the geriatric syndromes and issues that limit functional independence and complicate medical management. This is most evident for the clinicians caring for veterans in the Department of Veterans Affairs…

  16. When Patients Teach Their Doctors: A Curriculum for Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomkowiak, John; Gunderson, Anne

    2004-01-01

    In response to aging patient demographics and a call for increased formal geriatric training in medical schools, a community volunteer geriatric mentor program, Bridging Generations, was developed to shape attitudes of medical students caring for the elderly. The geriatric mentor experience provided students with unique insight into the challenges…

  17. Undergraduate Teaching in Geriatric Medicine: The Role of National Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blundell, Adrian; Gordon, Adam; Gladman, John; Masud, Tahir

    2009-01-01

    There has been recent international concern that the teaching of geriatrics may be in decline. Research has suggested that support for geriatrics in national undergraduate curricula is the key to effective delivery of teaching in the specialty. We set out to determine the geriatric medicine content in the U.K. generic curriculum, reviewing this in…

  18. Undergraduate Teaching in Geriatric Medicine: The Role of National Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blundell, Adrian; Gordon, Adam; Gladman, John; Masud, Tahir

    2009-01-01

    There has been recent international concern that the teaching of geriatrics may be in decline. Research has suggested that support for geriatrics in national undergraduate curricula is the key to effective delivery of teaching in the specialty. We set out to determine the geriatric medicine content in the U.K. generic curriculum, reviewing this in…

  19. Geriatrics Educational Outreach: A Tale of Three GRECCs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Elizabeth; Fitzgerald, James T.; Griffith, Jennifer; Weir, Charlene

    2011-01-01

    Current geriatrics workforce projections indicate that clinicians who care for adults will need basic geriatrics knowledge and skills to address the geriatric syndromes and issues that limit functional independence and complicate medical management. This is most evident for the clinicians caring for veterans in the Department of Veterans Affairs…

  20. [Theories of Social Work and Geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Aner, Kirsten

    2017-06-23

    Medical practitioners commonly do not have much knowledge of the professional side of social workers, even those that work together in a geriatric team. The current article aims to further this knowledge and to show that the potentials of social work support may exceed administration, as well as in the consultation of patients by so-called social workers in hospitals. These potentials are not empirically reasoned, instead social pedagogic theories are used for support of this argument. Three theories will be introduced as examples and furthermore, the possible meaning this has for geriatric medicine will be explained by means of a case example.

  1. Research Ethics Issues in Geriatric Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Laura B.; Misra, Sahana

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis With an aging population, and the prevalence of psychiatric illness in the older population expected to rise dramatically in coming decades, advances in geriatric psychiatry research are urgently needed. Ethical issues in the design, conduct, and monitoring of research involving older adults parallel these same issues related to human subjects research generally. Yet a number of special issues relevant to geriatric psychiatry research merit further discussion. These special issues include the assessment of capacity in populations where cognitive disorders are more prevalent, the role of surrogate decision makers, the legal status of surrogate consent, the use of advanced directives for research participation, and research involving suicidal individuals. PMID:19486821

  2. Individually prescribed diet is fundamental to optimize nutritional treatment in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Hedman, S; Nydahl, M; Faxén-Irving, G

    2016-06-01

    Malnutrition is a well-recognized problem in geriatric patients. Individually prescribed diet is fundamental to optimize nutritional treatment in geriatric patients. The objective of this study was to investigate routines regarding dietary prescriptions and monitoring of food intake in geriatric patients and to see how well the prescribed diet conforms to the patients' nutritional status and ability to eat. A further aim was to identify the most common reasons and factors interacting with patients not finishing a complete meal. This study combines two methods using both qualitative and quantitative analysis. Patients (n = 43; 82.5 ± 7.5 yrs; 60% females) at four geriatric wards performed a two-day dietary record, assisted by a dietician. Nurses and assistant nurses at each ward participated in a semi-structured interview regarding prescription of diets and portion size for the patients. The prescribed diet differed significantly (P < 0.01) from a diet based upon the patient's nutritional status and ability to eat. Only 30% of the patients were prescribed an energy-enriched diet in contrast to 60% that was in need of it. The most common reason for not finishing the meal was lack of appetite. Diet prescription for the patient was based upon information about eating difficulties identified in the Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form (MNA-SF) at admission and the type of diet that was prescribed on a previous ward. Monitoring of the patients' food intake was described as a continuous process discussed daily between the staff. Patients' nutritional status and to what extent they were able to eat a complete meal was not routinely considered when prescribing food and monitoring food intake in this study. By making use of this information the diet could be tailored to the patients' needs, thereby improving their nutritional treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  3. Geriatric-focused educational offerings in the Department of Veterans Affairs from 1999 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Thielke, Stephen; Tumosa, Nina; Lindenfeld, Rivkah; Shay, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The scope of geriatrics-related educational offerings in large health care systems, in either the target audiences or topics covered, has not previously been analyzed or reported in the professional literature. The authors reviewed the geriatrics-related educational sessions that were provided between 1999 and 2009 by the Geriatrics Research, Education, and Clinical Centers (GRECCs) and the Employee Education System (EES) of the United States' largest integrated health care system, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Using records of attendance and content at local training events and regional and national conferences, the authors estimated the number of attendees in different health disciplines and the number and types of lectures. During the past 11 years, GRECCs and EES provided geriatric-related educational sessions to about one third of a million attendees, most of them nurses and physicians, in about 15,000 lectures. About three-fourths of the educational events occurred through local, rather than regional or national, events. Lectures covered a wide variety of topics, with a particular emphasis on dementia and other mental health topics. A comparison of the number of potential learners in VHA with the number of geriatric-related educational presentations over this time period yields an average of one offering per VHA provider every 3 years; most providers likely never received any. Since 1999 the GRECCs have been the dominant source for geriatrics-related education for VHA health professionals, but given that about one half of VHA patients are older than age 65, there is still a large unmet need to provide geriatric education to VHA providers. Examination of the GRECC resources that have been put to use in the past to develop and deliver the face-to-face education experiences described sheds light on the magnitude of resources that might be required to address remaining unmet need in the future, and supports the prediction that there will need to be

  4. [Nutritional status of Cuban elders in three different geriatric scenarios: community, geriatrics service, nursery home].

    PubMed

    González Hernández, Alina; Cuyá Lantigua, Magdalena; González Escudero, Hilda; Sánchez Gutiérrez, Ramón; Cortina Martínez, Rafael; Barreto Penié, Jesús; Santana Porbén, Sergio; Rojas Pérez, Alberto

    2007-09-01

    The undernutrition rates observed in Cuban elders surveyed in three different geriatric scenarios: Community: coastal town of Cojímar (City of Havana); Geriatrics Service ("Hermanos Ameijeiras" Hospital, City of Havana); and Nursery Home (city of Cárdenas, province of Matanzas) by means of the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) of the Elderly are presented. Undernutrition rates were 2.7% among elders surveyed in the coastal community of Cojímar, but increased to become 91.6% among those admitted to the hospital Geriatrics Service, and 95.3% for those institutionalized in the Nursery Home, respectively. The occurrence of undernutrition can be low among elders living freely in the community, but it might affect a vast number of those seeking medical assistance at the public health institutions. Extent of undernutrition among elders in geriatric assistance scenarios should lead to the adoption of the required measures for early identification, and timely treatment, of this health problem.

  5. Changes in geriatric rehabilitation: a national programme to improve quality of care. The Synergy and Innovation in Geriatric Rehabilitation study.

    PubMed

    Holstege, Marije S; Caljouw, Monique A A; Zekveld, Ineke G; van Balen, Romke; de Groot, Aafke J; van Haastregt, Jolanda C M; Schols, Jos M G A; Hertogh, Cees M P M; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Achterberg, Wilco P

    2015-01-01

    To describe changes in the health service delivery process experienced by professionals, patients and informal caregivers during implementation of a national programme to improve quality of care of geriatric rehabilitation by improving integration of health service delivery processes. Sixteen skilled nursing facilities. Prospective study, comparing three consecutive cohorts. Professionals (elderly care physicians, physiotherapists and nursing staff) rated four domains of health service delivery at admission and at discharge of 1075 patients. In addition, these patients [median age 79 (Interquartile range 71-85) years, 63% females] and their informal caregivers rated their experiences on these domains 4 weeks after discharge. During the three consecutive cohorts, professionals reported improvement on the domain team cooperation, including assessment for intensive treatment and information transfer among professionals. Fewer improvements were reported within the domains alignment with patients' needs, care coordination and care quality. Between the cohorts, according to patients (n = 521) and informal caregivers (n = 319) there were no changes in the four domains of health service delivery. This national programme resulted in small improvements in team cooperation as reported by the professionals. No effects were found on patients' and informal caregivers' perceptions of health service delivery.

  6. [Gerontology and nursing care].

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, H

    2001-04-01

    This paper focuses on questions of the philosophy of science and the scientific development of gerontology and nursing science. First, some aspects of the scientific development in gerontology and nursing science (autonomy, inter- and multidisciplinarity as well as the theory debates) are summarized. In gerontology, problems of the philosophy of science are often neglected. The main focus is on empirical research and the establishment of an scientific infrastructure. In nursing science are questions of the philosophy of science, especially debates about the discipline, are significant. In Germany nursing research and the establishment of a scientific infrastructure are still in the initial stages. Second, on the basis of a content analysis the relevance and status of "nursing/need of care/frailty" in two leading journals ("Zeitschrift für Gerontologie und Geriatrie" and the "Pflege") is shown. Main result is that in nursing science publications regarding the status of the discipline, studies of the motivation, attitudes and behavior of nurses as well as investigations of the professionalization are dominant. In gerontology, the main emphasis is on studies of the changing health service structure, geriatric assessment and qualification. Finally chances of an interdisciplinary exchange between gerontology and nursing science are discussed.

  7. Geriatric Education in the Health Professions: Are We Making Progress?

    PubMed Central

    Bardach, Shoshana H.; Rowles, Graham D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Relative to the overall population, older adults consume a disproportionally large percentage of health care resources. Despite advocacy and efforts initiated more than 30 years ago, the number of providers with specialized training in geriatrics is still not commensurate with the growing population of older adults. This contribution provides a contemporary update on the status of geriatric education and explores how geriatric coverage is valued, how geriatric competence is defined, and how students are evaluated for geriatric competencies. Design and Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with curriculum representatives from 7 health profession disciplines in a case study of one academic medical center. Findings: Geriatric training varies across health professions’ disciplines. Although participants recognized the unique needs of older patients and valued geriatric coverage, they identified shortage of time in packed curricula, lack of geriatrics-trained educators, absence of financial incentive, and low student demand (resulting from limited exposure to older adults and gerontological stereotyping) as barriers to improving geriatric training. Implications: Progress in including geriatric training within curricula across the health professions continues to lag behind need as a result of the continuing presence of barriers identified several decades ago. There remains an urgent need for institutional commitment to enhance geriatric education as a component of health professions curricula. PMID:22394495

  8. Consultant pharmacists, advanced practice nurses, and the interdisciplinary team.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Barbara

    2014-03-01

    Although in geriatrics we are better than many other clinical disciplines in terms of providing interdisciplinary care to older adults, I hope that we will continue to recognize how much more could actually be done. Before addressing the relationship between advanced practice nurses (APNs) and consultant pharmacists in real world settings, I want to review teamwork in geriatrics in general. It is critical to define what we mean by team, what type of team, and what the goals are of this teamwork.

  9. Positioning medical students for the geriatric imperative: using geriatrics to effectively teach medicine.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Annie L; Duthie, Elizabeth A; Denson, Kathryn M; Franco, Jose; Duthie, Edmund H

    2013-01-01

    Medical schools must consider innovative ways to ensure that graduates are prepared to care for the aging population. One way is to offer a geriatrics clerkship as an option for the fulfillment of a medical school's internal medicine rotation requirement. The authors' purpose was to evaluate the geriatrics clerkship's impact on internal medicine knowledge and medical student attitudes toward older adults. Mean National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) internal medicine subject exam scores from geriatrics and internal medicine students who matriculated from 2005 to 2011 were compared using student's t-tests. Academic performance was controlled for using the United States Medical Licensing Exam Step 1 exam scores. Focus groups were conducted to explore student attitudes. Geriatrics students performed just as well on the NBME exam as their internal medicine colleagues, but reported greater comfort with elder care. Geriatrics students also reported more positive attitudes toward older adults. Completing an internal medicine requirement using a geriatrics clerkship is an innovation for medical school curriculum structure.

  10. Why geriatrics? Academic geriatricians' perceptions of the positive, attractive aspects of geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Cravens, D D; Campbell, J D; Mehr, D R

    2000-01-01

    Recruitment of geriatrics trainees has been poor, and the current shortage of academic geriatricians is expected to worsen. Although barriers to entering geriatrics practice have been identified, a review of the literature found few studies about why people choose to enter geriatrics. We used qualitative methods to investigate the positive, attractive aspects of geriatrics. Long interviews with six academic geriatricians were taped and transcribed. Transcripts were entered into a textual database computer program and reviewed independently by two investigators. Six themes emerged: 1) traditional learning experiences, 2) value on personal relationships, 3) a perception of distinctive differences, 4) a desire to feel needed personally and societally, 5) prefer democracy versus autocracy, and 6) desire intellectual challenges. Academic geriatrics, therefore, is particularly attractive to people who value enduring relationships, see challenges in complexity, practice social responsibility, prefer working within a multidisciplinary team, and derive satisfaction from making seemingly small but nonetheless important changes in peoples' lives. If further studies validate these findings, they could promote geriatrics as a career, by, for example, identifying students and family practice and internal medicine residents who share these values, beliefs, and attitudes and encouraging them to consider this important field.

  11. Geriatric Syndromes: Clinical, Research and Policy Implications of a Core Geriatric Concept

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, Sharon K.; Studenski, Stephanie; Tinetti, Mary E.; Kuchel, George A.

    2008-01-01

    Geriatricians have embraced the term “geriatric syndrome”, using it extensively to highlight the unique features of common health conditions in the elderly. Geriatric syndromes, such as delirium, falls, incontinence and frailty, are highly prevalent, multifactorial, and associated with substantial morbidity and poor outcomes. Nevertheless, this central geriatric concept has remained poorly defined. This article reviews criteria for defining geriatric syndromes, and proposes a balanced approach of developing preliminary criteria based on peer-reviewed evidence. Based on a review of the literature, four shared risk factors—older age, baseline cognitive impairment, baseline functional impairment, and impaired mobility—were identified across five common geriatric syndromes (pressure ulcers, incontinence, falls, functional decline, and delirium). Understanding basic mechanisms involved in geriatric syndromes will be critical to advancing research and developing targeted therapeutic options. However, given the complexity of these multifactorial conditions, attempts to define relevant mechanisms will need to incorporate more complex models, including a focus on synergistic interactions between different risk factors. Finally, major barriers have been identified in translating research advances, such as preventive strategies of proven effectiveness for delirium and falls, into clinical practice and policy initiatives. National strategic initiatives are required to overcome barriers and to achieve clinical, research, and policy advances that will improve quality of life for older persons. PMID:17493201

  12. Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment in the Office

    PubMed Central

    Pereles, Laurie R.M.; Boyle, Neil G.H.

    1991-01-01

    Because of their increased incidence of illness and disability, geriatric patients require extra time and diligence to assess and track medical problems. This article describes a comprehensive geriatirc assessment, organized on a one-page, easily updated checklist, that can be used to generate a medical and functional problem list and a risk assessment. Imagesp2190-a PMID:21229091

  13. Geriatric Staff Training for Patient Independence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, Tom

    The project investigated the effectiveness of an evironmental therapy training program for geriatric mental health workers when used in two different institutional settings. Site A was a State-operated facility for psychiatric in-patient care, accommodating 2,000 patients, with emphasis on maintenance and general patient welfare. Site B, a former…

  14. Directory of Curriculum Guidelines for Geriatric Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Health Professions.

    This directory contains information on the nature and availability of curriculum guidelines for education and training programs in geriatrics and gerontology. The curriculum guidelines or model curricula were prepared by professional associations or with federal support, most notably through the Administration on Aging or the Health Resources and…

  15. Distortion product otoacoustic emissions in geriatric dogs.

    PubMed

    Strain, G M; Rosado Martinez, A J; McGee, K A; McMillan, C L

    2016-10-01

    Recordings of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) were taken from 28 geriatric dogs aged 12.2 ± 2.2 years and 15 control dogs aged 5.9 ± 3.0 years (mean ± standard deviation) to demonstrate frequency-specific changes in cochlear responses. Recordings were performed for primary frequencies of 2-12 kHz in 2 kHz increments. Brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) recordings were also made from geriatric dogs for comparison with DPOAE responses. Significant decreases in DPOAE response amplitudes were observed at frequencies of 6-12 kHz in geriatric dogs compared to control dogs, reflecting loss of cochlear outer hair cells along the length of the cochlea. Significant decreases in response amplitudes were not seen at frequencies of 2 or 4 kHz. Decreases in BAER response amplitudes subjectively paralleled the depressed DPOAE amplitudes. No significant linear regression relationships were found for DPOAE response amplitude vs. age despite the progressive nature of age-related hearing loss. The reductions in response at all frequencies starting at the age where dogs are considered geriatric indicate that age-related hearing loss begins earlier in the life span. DPOAE recordings provide a means to assess cochlear function across different portions of the auditory spectrum for assessing hearing loss associated with aging, and potentially for losses from other causes of decreased auditory function.

  16. Progress in Geriatrics: A Clinical Care Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchette, Patricia Lanoie; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This issue includes 18 theme articles that examine clinical care, conditions, and practice as they relate to older adults. It contains articles on the following: men's and women's health, depression, dementia, hypertension, incontinence, bone pain, infections, preventive medicine, geriatric medicine, health care delivery, managed care, long-term…

  17. Progress in Geriatrics: A Clinical Care Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchette, Patricia Lanoie; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This issue includes 18 theme articles that examine clinical care, conditions, and practice as they relate to older adults. It contains articles on the following: men's and women's health, depression, dementia, hypertension, incontinence, bone pain, infections, preventive medicine, geriatric medicine, health care delivery, managed care, long-term…

  18. [Prescription for proton pump inhibitors in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Schonheit, Claire; Le Petitcorps, Hélène; Pautas, Éric

    2015-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors are widely prescribed, notably for the over 65s, despite there being significant side effects in the geriatric population. It is therefore important that doctors, caregivers and patients are fully aware of the recognised indications of PPIs and on the less well-known problems inherent to their prescription. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Depression and cognitive deficits in geriatric schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, Emily; Serper, Mark R

    2012-01-01

    Past reports have found patients with comorbid depression and schizophrenia spectrum disorders exhibit greater deficits in memory and attention compared to schizophrenia spectrum disorder patients without depressive symptoms. However, in contrast to younger schizophrenia patients, the few past studies using cognitive screens to examine the relationship between depression and cognition in inpatient geriatric schizophrenia have found that depressive symptomatology was associated with relatively enhanced cognitive performance. In the current study we examined the relationship between depressive symptoms and cognitive deficits in geriatric schizophrenia spectrum disorder patients (n=71; mean age=63.7) on an acute psychiatric inpatient service. Patients completed a battery of cognitive tests assessing memory, attention and global cognition. Symptom severity was assessed via the PANSS and Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia. Results revealed that geriatric patients' depression severity predicted enhancement of their attentional and verbal memory performance. Patients' global cognitive functioning and adaptive functioning were not associated with their depression severity. Contrary to patterns typically seen in younger patients and non-patient groups, increasing depression severity is associated with enhancement of memory and attention in geriatric schizophrenia spectrum disorder patients. Also, diverging from younger samples, depression severity was unassociated with patients adaptive and global cognitive functioning. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Faculty Preparedness in Geriatric Optometry Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mancil, Gary L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A survey of chief academic officers and faculty (n=27) in 16 schools of optometry found that, since 1986, there has been a 75% increase in institutions requiring coursework in geriatric optometry and an 83% increase in those offering continuing professional education in this field. However, 67% of faculty report no formal training. Three faculty…

  1. Hierachy of needs of geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Majercsik, E

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study is to contribute to the improvement of the quality of care of geriatric patients. In order to be able to improve the geriatric care we have to know clearly the needs of the elderly patients. The hierarchy of needs of geriatric patients in clinical circumstances had to be assessed by a psychometric technique based on a motivational approach. The process was based on the method of paired comparisons, and a duly composed questionnaire was administered to the geriatric patients who were proven to have consistent thinking and surpassed a pre-established threshold in the Mini Mental State Examination. The evaluation of the responds leads to a numerical derivation (on an interval scale) of the hierarchy of needs. The received hierarchy of needs proved to oppose the general hypothesis of Maslow's motivation theory. This may induce a necessary shift in the approach to the care of the elderly, and accentuate the self-actualization and esteem needs beside the overtly emphasized physiological care. Copyright (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel

  2. Teaching of geriatric health in India: Mapping the terrain.

    PubMed

    Pati, Sanghamitra; Sharma, Anjali; Pati, Sandipana; Zodpey, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    India is currently undergoing a rapid demographic transition along with a dramatic upsurge in the number of elderly adults. Creating a cadre of specialized health care professionals in geriatric medicine is clearly vital to address the health care needs of this growing population. The authors undertook a mapping of the available academic programs in geriatric health in India and examined their content, duration, architecture, and student intake. A total of 20 programs were identified in geriatric health, thus highlighting a paucity of training options in this field. Compared to Western countries, relatively few programs are offered in clinical and public health geriatrics in India. This is further compounded by an insignificant thrust of geriatrics in undergraduate health professional curricula. Our results underscore the need for a national-level curricular initiative to strengthen and mainstream the teaching of geriatric health in the country. Alternative educational strategies such as blended learning and interprofessional education should be explored to enhance geriatric health workforce competence.

  3. Portuguese nurses' knowledge of and attitudes toward hospitalized older adults.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Tavares, João Paulo; da Silva, Alcione Leite; Sá-Couto, Pedro; Boltz, Marie; Capezuti, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Portugal is impacted by the rapid growth of the aging population, which has significant implications for its health care system. However, nurses have received little education focusing on the unique and complex care needs of older adults. This gap in the nurses' education has an enormous impact in their knowledge and attitudes and affects the quality of nursing care provided to older adults. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1068 Portuguese nurses in five hospitals (northern and central region) with the following purposes: (i) explore the knowledge and attitudes of nurses about four common geriatric syndromes (pressure ulcer, incontinence, restraint use and sleep disturbance) in Portuguese hospitals; and (ii) evaluate the influence of demographic, professional and nurses' perception about hospital educational support, geriatric knowledge, and burden of caring for older adults upon geriatric nursing knowledge and attitudes. The mean knowledge and attitudes scores were 0.41 ± 0.15 and 0.40 ± 0.21, respectively (the maximum score was 1). Knowledge of nurses in Portuguese hospitals about the four geriatric syndromes (pressure ulcers, sleep disturbance, urinary incontinence and restraint use) was found inadequate. The nurses' attitudes towards caring for hospitalized older adults were generally negative. Nurses who work in academic hospitals demonstrated significantly more knowledge than nurses in hospital centers. The attitudes of nurses were significantly associated with the hospital and unit type, region, hospital educational support, staff knowledge, and perceived burden of caring for older adults. The study findings support the need for improving nurses' knowledge and attitudes towards hospitalized older adults and implementing evidence-based guidelines in their practice.

  4. [Backup territorial coordination, nursing roles and skills].

    PubMed

    Benyahia, Amina; Abraham, Éliane

    2016-06-01

    Backup territorial coordination provides accompaniment and support for professionals who work with the fragile elderly people in an area. It aligns the sanitary, medical-social and social approaches, and mobilizes useful resources to optimize the treatment pathway. It has been implemented in the Nancy urban area by an operational team including nurses and a geriatric physician.

  5. One-Year Outcome of Geriatric Hip-Fracture Patients following Prolonged ICU Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Eschbach, Daphne; Bliemel, Christopher; Oberkircher, Ludwig; Aigner, Rene; Hack, Juliana; Bockmann, Benjamin; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Buecking, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Incidence of geriatric fractures is increasing. Knowledge of outcome data for hip-fracture patients undergoing intensive-care unit (ICU) treatment, including invasive ventilatory management (IVM) and hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF), is sparse. Methods. Single-center prospective observational study including 402 geriatric hip-fracture patients. Age, gender, the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification, and the Barthel index (BI) were documented. Underlying reasons for prolonged ICU stay were registered, as well as assessed procedures like IVM and CVVHDF. Outcome parameters were in-hospital, 6-month, and 1-year mortality and need for nursing care. Results. 15% were treated > 3 days and 68% < 3 days in ICU. Both cohorts had similar ASA, BI, and age. In-hospital, 6-month, and 12-month mortality of ICU > 3d cohort were significantly increased (p = 0.001). Most frequent indications were cardiocirculatory pathology followed by respiratory failure, renal impairment, and infection. 18% of patients needed CVVHDF and 41% IVM. In these cohorts, 6-month mortality ranged > 80% and 12-month mortality > 90%. 100% needed nursing care after 6 and 12 months. Conclusions. ICU treatment > 3 days showed considerable difference in mortality and nursing care needed after 6 and 12 months. Particularly, patients requiring CVVHDF or IVM had disastrous long-term results. Our study may add one further element in complex decision making serving this vulnerable patient cohort. PMID:26881228

  6. Organizational relationships between nursing homes and hospitals and quality of care during hospital-nursing home patient transfers.

    PubMed

    Boockvar, Kenneth S; Burack, Orah R

    2007-07-01

    To identify organizational factors and hospital and nursing home organizational relationships associated with more-effective processes of care during hospital-nursing home patient transfer. Mailed survey. Medicare- or Medicaid-certified nursing homes in New York State. Nursing home administrators, with input from other nursing home staff. Key predictor variables were travel time between the hospital and the nursing home, affiliation with the same health system, same corporate owner, trainees from the same institution, pharmacy or laboratory agreements, continuous physician care, number of beds in the hospital, teaching status, and frequency of geriatrics specialty care in the hospital. Key dependent variables were hospital-to-nursing home communication, continuous adherence to healthcare goals, and patient and family satisfaction with hospital care. Of 647 questionnaires sent, 229 were returned (35.4%). There was no relationship between hospital-nursing home interorganizational relationships and communication, healthcare goal adherence, and satisfaction measures. Geriatrics specialty care in the hospital (r=0.157; P=.04) and fewer hospital beds (r=-0.194; P=.01) were each associated with nursing homes more often receiving all information needed to care for patients transferred from the hospital. Teaching status (r=0.230; P=.001) and geriatrics specialty care (r=0.185; P=.01) were associated with hospital care more often consistent with healthcare goals established in the nursing home. No management-level organizational relationship between nursing home and hospital was associated with better hospital-to-nursing home transfer process of care. Geriatrics specialty care and characteristics of the hospital were associated with better hospital-to-nursing home transfer processes.

  7. The fusion of gerontology and technology in nursing education: History and demonstration of the Gerontological Informatics Reasoning Project--GRIP.

    PubMed

    Dreher, H Michael; Cornelius, Fran; Draper, Judy; Pitkar, Harshad; Manco, Janet; Song, Il-Yeol

    2006-01-01

    Phase I of our Gerontological Reasoning Informatics Project (GRIP) began in the summer of 2002 when all 37 senior undergraduate nursing students in our accelerated BSN nursing program were given PDAs. These students were oriented to use a digitalized geriatric nursing assessment tool embedded into their PDA in a variety of geriatric clinical agencies. This informatics project was developed to make geriatric nursing more technology oriented and focused on seven modules of geriatric assessment: intellect (I), nutrition (N), self-concept (S), physical activity (P), interpersonal functioning (I), restful sleep (R), and elimination (E)--INSPIRE. Through phase II and now phase III, the GRIP Project has become a major collaboration between the College of Nursing & Health Professions and College of Information Science and Technology at Drexel University. The digitalized geriatric nursing health assessment tool has undergone a second round of reliability and validity testing and is now used to conduct a 20 minute comprehensive geriatric health assessment on the PDA, making our undergraduate gerontology course the most high tech clinical course in our nursing curriculum.

  8. End-of-Life Care and Quality of Dying in 23 Acute Geriatric Hospital Wards in Flanders, Belgium.

    PubMed

    Verhofstede, Rebecca; Smets, Tinne; Cohen, Joachim; Eecloo, Kim; Costantini, Massimo; Van Den Noortgate, Nele; Deliens, Luc

    2017-04-01

    To describe the nursing and medical interventions performed in the last 48 hours of life and the quality of dying of patients dying in acute geriatric hospital wards. Cross-sectional descriptive study between October 1, 2012 and September 30, 2013. Twenty-three acute geriatric wards in 13 hospitals in Flanders, Belgium. Patients hospitalized for more than 48 hours before dying in the participating wards. Structured after-death questionnaires, filled out by the nurse, the physician, and the family carer most involved in end-of-life care. Main outcome measures were several nursing and medical interventions reported to be performed in the last 48 hours of life and the quality of dying. Of 993 patients, we included 338 (mean age 85.7 years; 173 women). Almost 58% had dementia and nearly half were unable to communicate in the last 48 hours of their life. The most frequently continued or started nursing and medical interventions in the last 48 hours of life were measuring temperature (91.6%), repositioning (83.3%), washing (89.5%), oxygen therapy (49.7%), and intravenous fluids and nutrition (30%). Shortness of breath, lack of serenity, lack of peace, and lack of calm were symptoms reported most frequently by nurses and family carers. Many nursing and medical interventions are continued or started in the last hours of a patient's life, which may not always be in their best interests. Furthermore, patients dying in acute geriatric wards are often affected by several symptoms. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of a geriatrics interdisciplinary experience on learners' knowledge and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, James T; Williams, Brent C; Halter, Jeffrey B; Remington, Tami L; Foulk, Mariko A; Persky, Neal W; Shay, Barbara R

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the impact of an interdisciplinary training program on knowledge and attitudes of learners from four health care programs: medicine, pharmacy, social work, and nursing. Sixty-two learners participated in a 4-day educational program (one day each week for 4 weeks) focusing on interdisciplinary geriatric care. After completing the program, learner scores improved on a knowledge test and two attitudinal subscales, and they reported a positive training experience. A short-term interdisciplinary educational intervention can have an impact on learners' knowledge of and attitudes toward older adults, and improve their understanding and confidence in participating in an interdisciplinary collaborative care team.

  10. Administering the "AHSP Questionnaire" (appetite, hunger, sensory perception) in a geriatric rehabilitation care.

    PubMed

    Savina, C; Donini, L M; Anzivino, R; De Felice, M R; De Bernardini, L; Cannella, C

    2003-01-01

    Frail elderly people, living in nursing homes, usually show a malnutrition state caused by an increased need of energy or an inadequate food intake. Among the causes leading to reduction of food intake in elderly people and consequently to malnutrition, is the loss of appetite, often marker of depression and alterations of taste and smell perception. The aim of this research is to verify the application of the AHSP Questionnaire and relate its score to nutritional state of a frail elderly population hospitalized in a geriatric rehabilitation care. All patients of the "3rd Rehabilitation Department" of the Istituto Geriatrico "Villa delle Querce" Nemi (Rome-Italy). Informations, number and type of medical conditions, prescribed drugs, other parameters that can affect taste, smell, hunger and nutritional status, mood, cognitive and nutritional status have been collected from the clinical folders. To assess appetite, hunger smell and taste perception had been submitted the AHSP Questionnaire. The AHSP Questionnaire had been administered only to 44 of the 103 patients present at the survey because of the high prevalence of cognitive impairment. AHSP score is lower in presence of malnutrition assessed with MNA (Mini Nutritional Assessment). MNA, expressed as proportional score, seems to present a clear correlation with AHSP's (r=0.59; p=0.000). The results achieved show the scarce adaptability of the AHSP Questionnaire to frail elderly people living in geriatric rehabilitation care. MNA is at the moment the most reliable tool to single out dietary deficiency on geriatrics population.

  11. [Social work in geriatric clinics--between autonomy and functional organization].

    PubMed

    Thierau, D

    1998-10-01

    Geriatric therapy is defined through interdisciplinarity, teamwork, and multiprofessionality. Besides questions of medical therapy, psychosocial dimensions of elderly are highly relevant. Social work is mostly described as an important profession in the process of geriatric therapy. This work refers to the presentation and discussion of the results of an interdisciplinary study to the role of social work in German geriatric hospitals. It shows that the role of social work is determined by the various perceptions of the professions. Another influence on it is by the structures of the hospital. Social workers defines their activities through the relationship to the client; the other professions recognize the tasks of social work in a very diffusely way, mostly reduced in connection with the management of dismission of the patient from hospital. The professional education of social workers is not well known by the nurses and doctors. The fact that social workers are mostly acting under the responsibility of doctors, leads to a definition of problems and aims from a medical point of view. In many of the hospitals there are distinct problems of communication and cooperation between the professions. If the profession of social workers wants to contribute to the reduction of these impediments of communication and cooperation, they must actively and constructively communicate with the other professions and become more clear about their own professional way of acting.

  12. Evaluation of geriatric suicides in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Özer, Erdal; Gümüş, Burak; Balandiz, Hüseyin; Kırcı, Güven Seçkin; Aydoğdu, Halil İlhan; Tetikçok, Ramazan

    2016-11-01

    Suicide is defined as an individual taking action towards themselves with the intention of terminating their own life. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), 800,000 deaths per year worldwide are due to suicide. In 2012, suicide cases constituted 1.4% of all the deaths worldwide. In most countries throughout the world, the suicide rates of the elderly are higher than those of other age groups. Epidemiological studies have concluded that suicide rates increase with advancing age in all societies, this increase accelerates after the age of 65 years and the highest rates are reached after the age of 75 years. The aim of this study was to evaluate the demographic features, suicide methods and reasons for suicide in geriatric suicide cases between 2009 and 2013 using the data of the Turkish Statistics Institute (TUIK). A retrospective evaluation was made of the TUIK data related to proven suicide cases aged 65 years and older in the 5-year period of 2009-2013. A total of 1723 geriatric suicides were determined in Turkey between 2009 and 2013. These comprised 1284 (74.5%) males and 439 (25.5%) females, showing a rate of males approximately 3 times higher than that of females. An increase of approximately 10% was seen in the deaths by suicide in 2013 compared to 2009. The highest rate of geriatric suicides within total geriatric deaths was observed to be in 2012 (15.2%) and the lowest rate was in 2010 (12.4%). The most common method of suicide in both genders was hanging. In the majority of cases of geriatric suicide of both genders, the reason could not be determined. In those cases where the reason was known, the most common reason was illness. It has been reported that the most significant factors in suicide prevention are friends and family. As there continues to be an extensive family structure and family connections are strong in Turkey, this can be considered to be one of the reasons for lower rates of geriatric suicide compared to other countries. As

  13. International Society of Geriatric Oncology Consensus on Geriatric Assessment in Older Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wildiers, Hans; Heeren, Pieter; Puts, Martine; Topinkova, Eva; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L.G.; Extermann, Martine; Falandry, Claire; Artz, Andrew; Brain, Etienne; Colloca, Giuseppe; Flamaing, Johan; Karnakis, Theodora; Kenis, Cindy; Audisio, Riccardo A.; Mohile, Supriya; Repetto, Lazzaro; Van Leeuwen, Barbara; Milisen, Koen; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To update the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) 2005 recommendations on geriatric assessment (GA) in older patients with cancer. Methods SIOG composed a panel with expertise in geriatric oncology to develop consensus statements after literature review of key evidence on the following topics: rationale for performing GA; findings from a GA performed in geriatric oncology patients; ability of GA to predict oncology treatment–related complications; association between GA findings and overall survival (OS); impact of GA findings on oncology treatment decisions; composition of a GA, including domains and tools; and methods for implementing GA in clinical care. Results GA can be valuable in oncology practice for following reasons: detection of impairment not identified in routine history or physical examination, ability to predict severe treatment-related toxicity, ability to predict OS in a variety of tumors and treatment settings, and ability to influence treatment choice and intensity. The panel recommended that the following domains be evaluated in a GA: functional status, comorbidity, cognition, mental health status, fatigue, social status and support, nutrition, and presence of geriatric syndromes. Although several combinations of tools and various models are available for implementation of GA in oncology practice, the expert panel could not endorse one over another. Conclusion There is mounting data regarding the utility of GA in oncology practice; however, additional research is needed to continue to strengthen the evidence base. PMID:25071125

  14. Recognition of geriatric popular song repertoire: a comparison of geriatric clients and music therapy students.

    PubMed

    VanWeelden, Kimberly; Cevasco, Andrea M

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of the current study were to determine geriatric clients' recognition of 32 popular songs and songs from musicals by asking whether they: (a) had heard the songs before; (b) could "name the tune" of each song; and (c) list the decade that each song was composed. Additionally, comparisons were made between the geriatric clients' recognition of these songs and by music therapy students' recognition of the same, songs, based on data from an earlier study (VanWeelden, Juchniewicz, & Cevasco, 2008). Results found 90% or more of the geriatric clients had heard 28 of the 32 songs, 80% or more of the graduate students had heard 20 songs, and 80% of the undergraduates had heard 18 songs. The geriatric clients correctly identified 3 songs with 80% or more accuracy, which the graduate students also correctly identified, while the undergraduates identified 2 of the 3 same songs. Geriatric clients identified the decades of 3 songs with 50% or greater accuracy. Neither the undergraduate nor graduate students identified any songs by the correct decade with over 50% accuracy. Further results are discussed.

  15. Why geriatric medicine? A survey of UK specialist trainees in geriatric medicine.

    PubMed

    Fisher, James Michael; Garside, Mark J; Brock, Peter; Gibson, Vicky; Hunt, Kelly; Briggs, Sally; Gordon, Adam Lee

    2017-02-06

    there is concern that there are insufficient numbers of geriatricians to meet the needs of the ageing population. A 2005 survey described factors that influenced why UK geriatricians had chosen to specialise in the field-in the decade since, UK postgraduate training has undergone a fundamental restructure. to explore whether the reasons for choosing a career in geriatric medicine in the UK had changed over time, with the goal of using this knowledge to inform recruitment and training initiatives. an online survey was sent to all UK higher medical trainees in geriatric medicine. survey questions that produced categorical data were analysed with simple descriptive statistics. For the survey questions that produced free-text responses, an inductive, iterative approach to analysis, in keeping with the principles of framework analysis, was employed. two hundred and sixty-nine responses were received out of 641 eligible respondents. Compared with the previous survey, a substantially larger number of respondents regarded geriatric medicine to be their first-choice specialty and a smaller number regretted their career decision. A greater number chose geriatric medicine early in their medical careers. Commitments to the general medical rota and the burden of service provision were considered important downsides to the specialty. there are reasons to be optimistic about recruitment to geriatric medicine. Future attempts to drive up recruitment might legitimately focus on the role of the medical registrar and perceptions that geriatricians shoulder a disproportionate burden of service commitments and obligations to the acute medical take.

  16. Use of Narrative Nursing Records for Nursing Research

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Cho, InSook; Ahn, Hee-Jung

    2012-01-01

    To explore the usefulness of narrative nursing records documented using a standardized terminology-based electronic nursing records system, we conducted three different studies on (1) the gaps between the required nursing care time and the actual nursing care time, (2) the practice variations in pressure ulcer care, and (3) the surveillance of adverse drug events. The narrative nursing notes, documented at the point of care using standardized nursing statements, were extracted from the clinical data repository at a teaching hospital in Korea and analyzed. Our findings were: the pediatric and geriatric units showed relatively high staffing needs; overall incidence rate of pressure ulcer among the intensive-care patients was 15.0% and the nursing interventions provided for pressure-ulcer care varied depending on nursing units; and at least one adverse drug event was noted in 53.0% of the cancer patients who were treated with cisplatin. A standardized nursing terminology-based electronic nursing record system allowed us to explore answers to different various research questions. PMID:24199111

  17. Toward the realization of a better aged society: messages from gerontology and geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Arai, Hidenori; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Yokode, Masayuki; Ito, Hideki; Uematsu, Hiroshi; Eto, Fumio; Oshima, Shinichi; Ota, Kikuko; Saito, Yasushi; Sasaki, Hidetada; Tsubota, Kazuo; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Honda, Yoshihito; Iguchi, Akihisa; Toba, Kenji; Hosoi, Takayuki; Kita, Toru

    2012-01-01

    . (2) Fostering medical specialists for aging Older people often suffer from many diseases, together with geriatric syndromes with multiple etiologies. Signs and symptoms vary according to each individual, and are often atypical; therefore, the patients visit different hospitals and receive many screening tests and prescriptions at the same time. To solve this problem, an effective screening system carried out by a primary-care doctor, and privacy-preserving medical data sharing among hospitals and clinics are needed. In a geriatric clinical setting, health-care professionals should be aware of the physical traits of older people who often develop not only dementia, but also geriatric syndromes, such as depression, falls and urinary incontinence, so that a holistic approach with consideration of nursing care is required. However, the existing Japanese medical education system is not prepared for medical professionals enabled to respond to the aforementioned requirements. Thus, the fostering of medical professionals who can provide comprehensive care - especially for the oldest-old - such as geriatric specialists and medical professionals who understand the principles of elderly care, is urgently needed. (3) Diagnosis of elderly-specific diseases and reform of medical-care services In Japan, the diagnostic system for elderly-specific diseases, including dementia, and reform of medical care services are markedly delayed. The current status concerning diagnosis, care and nursing should be investigated to collect academic data. In order to accumulate evidence for providing safe elderly care and nursing, the promotion of clinical research and a marked expansion of geriatric medical centers with high-level medical services are eagerly awaited. (4) Promotion of home-based care and multidisciplinary care To reduce the length of stay in acute hospitals, to reduce the physical burden of health-care professionals working at acute hospitals and to meet the demand of older people

  18. Geriatric gambling disorder: challenges in clinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mara; Hategan, Ana; Bourgeois, James A

    2017-09-13

    To the Editor: The gaming industry is growing rapidly, as is the proportion of older adults aged 65 years or older who participate in gambling (Tse et al., 2012). With casinos tailoring their venues and providing incentives to attract older adults, and with the increasing popularity of "pleasure trips" to casinos organized by retirement homes, plus active promotion of government-operated lotteries in many countries, this trend is likely to continue. Gambling disorder (GD) or "pathological" or "problem" gambling presents a public health concern in the geriatric population. However, ascertainment of its prevalence and diagnostic accuracy have proven challenging. This is largely due to the absence of diagnostic criteria specific to the geriatric age and rating scales validated for use in this population.

  19. Using Facebook Within a Geriatric Pharmacotherapy Course

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate using an Internet-based social networking site within an elective geriatric pharmacotherapy course. Design Thirty pharmacy students enrolled in a geriatric pharmacotherapy elective course were invited to join a closed Facebook (Facebook Inc, Palo Alto, CA) group to enhance communication among students and faculty members within the course. Creating a discussion board was the primary activity in the course. Each week, 3 students were assigned to post a healthy aging topic, and other students in the class were expected to post their comments and reactions. The healthy aging topics also were discussed during class. Assessment Students wrote reflections about their experiences using Facebook for the activities within this course. A survey instrument also measured students' opinions about using Facebook for educational purposes. Conclusion Using Facebook allowed students to discuss topics more openly and encouraged classroom discussions of healthy aging topics. PMID:21179256

  20. Orthopedic problems in geriatric dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Beale, Brian S

    2005-05-01

    Senior dogs and cats with orthopedic injuries and diseases often require a treatment plan that differs from that of younger patients. Injured bone and soft tissues tend to heal more slowly in the geriatric patient. The older animal is likely to have a less competent immune system and may have compromised metabolic and endocrine function. Pre-existing musculoskeletal problems may make ambulation difficult for an animal convalescing from a new orthopedic problem. Special attention is often needed when treating these patients for fractures, joint instability, infection, and neoplasia. In general, issues that should be addressed in the geriatric patient include reducing intraoperative and anesthesia time, enhancing bone and soft tissue healing, return to early function, control of postoperative pain, physical therapy, and proper nutrition.

  1. The Geriatric Headache: A Unique Clinical Ailment

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Donald F.; Purdy, R. Allan

    1986-01-01

    The “geriatric headache” may be a unique clinical ailment. A change in a chronic headache pattern or a new onset headache should raise suspicion immediately in an elderly patient. Temporal arteritis occurs almost exclusively in the elderly population. Because of its grave prognosis and ease of treatment, this condition should always be considered a possibility in the elderly patient with headache. A throbbing non-migranous headache may indicate an impending cerebrovascular event. Other causes of headache, such as mass lesions (tumours, subdural hematomas), drugs (nitrates, estrogens) and depression, take on greater significance in the elderly. While migraine and cluster headaches are more common in young adults, they may begin in older persons; indeed, transient migraine accompaniments are “TIA mimics”. The authors hope that this overview of the “geriatric headache” will facilitate early recognition of this ailment which often leads to diagnostic confusion. PMID:20469461

  2. Predicting hospital discharge disposition in geriatric trauma patients: is frailty the answer?

    PubMed

    Joseph, Bellal; Pandit, Viraj; Rhee, Peter; Aziz, Hassan; Sadoun, Moutamn; Wynne, Julie; Tang, Andrew; Kulvatunyou, Narong; O'Keeffe, Terence; Fain, Mindy J; Friese, Randall S

    2014-01-01

    The frailty index (FI) has been shown to predict outcomes in geriatric patients. However, FI has never been applied as a prognostic measure after trauma. The aim of our study was to identify hospital admission factors predicting discharge disposition in geriatric trauma patients. We performed a 1-year prospective study at our Level 1 trauma center. All trauma patients 65 years or older were enrolled. FI was calculated using 50 preadmission variables. Patient's discharge disposition was dichotomized as favorable outcome (discharge home, rehabilitation) or unfavorable outcomes (discharge to skilled nursing facility, death). Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify factors that predict unfavorable outcome. A total of 100 patients were enrolled, with a mean (SD) age of 76.51 (8.5) years, 59% being males, median Injury Severity Score (ISS) of 14 (range, 9-18), median head Abbreviated Injury Scale (h-AIS) score of 2 (2-3), and median Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 13 (12-15). Of the patients, 69% had favorable outcome, and 31% had unfavorable outcome. On univariate analysis, FI was found to be a significant predictor for unfavorable outcome (odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.3). After adjusting for age, ISS, and GCS score in a multivariate regression model, FI remained a strong predictor for unfavorable discharge disposition (odds ratio, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-1.8). The concept of frailty can be implemented in geriatric trauma patients with similar results as those of nontrauma and nonsurgical patients. FI is a significant predictor of unfavorable discharge disposition and should be an integral part of the assessment tools to determine discharge disposition for geriatric trauma patients. Prognostic study, level II.

  3. [History of the Czech gerontology and geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Pacovský, V

    2006-01-01

    Development of Czech gerontology and geriatrics can be associated with the Prague gerontology, namely with the First Faculty of Medicine (formally the Faculty of General Medicine). Prague school of gerontology was established. The decisive events related to the subject are described. Paper is based on the already published information on the history of the specialization and on the personal memorials of personal observers in the last fifty years. Reflections on the origin and establishment of a new medical specialization conclude the paper.

  4. Geriatric surgery is about disease, not age

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Stephen D; Southall, Ashley RD; Nel, Mark; Das, Saroj K

    2008-01-01

    Summary Maintaining life span and quality of life remains a valid aim of surgery in elderly people. Surgery can be an effective way of restoring both length and quality of life to older people. Minimally invasive techniques and surgery under local anaesthesia make fewer demands on geriatric physiology; given that co-morbidity is a stronger predictor of outcome from surgery than age, this is a significant consideration. PMID:18687864

  5. Postoperative Delirium in the Geriatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Schenning, Katie J.; Deiner, Stacie G.

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Postoperative delirium, a common complication in older surgical patients, is independently associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Patients over the age of 65 years receive greater than 1/3 of the over 40 million anesthetics delivered yearly in the United States. This number is expected to increase with the aging of the population. Thus, it is increasingly important that perioperative clinicians who care for geriatric patients have an understanding of the complex syndrome of postoperative delirium. PMID:26315635

  6. Impaired nutritional status in geriatric trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Müller, F S; Meyer, O W; Chocano-Bedoya, P; Schietzel, S; Gagesch, M; Freystaetter, G; Neuhaus, V; Simmen, H-P; Langhans, W; Bischoff-Ferrari, H A

    2017-05-01

    Malnutrition is an established risk factor for adverse clinical outcomes. Our aim was to assess nutritional status among geriatric trauma patients. We enrolled 169 consecutive patients (⩾70 years) admitted to the Geriatric Traumatology Centre (University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland). On admission to acute care, nutritional status was assessed with the mini nutritional assessment (score<17=malnourished (M), ⩽23.5=at risk of malnutrition (ARM), >23.5=normal). At the same examination, we assessed mental (Geriatric Depression Scale; GDS) and cognitive function (Mini-Mental State Examination; MMSE), frailty status (Fried Scale), and number of comorbidities and medications. Further, discharge destination was documented. All analyses were adjusted for age and gender. A total of 7.1% of patients were malnourished and 49.1% were ARM. Patients with reduced mental health (GDS⩾5: 30.5 vs 11.5%; P=0.004), impaired cognitive function (MMSE⩽26: 23.6±0.5 vs 26.0±0.6; P=0.004), prevalent frailty (32.5 vs 8%; P<0.001), more comorbidities (2.3±0.1 vs 1.3±0.2; P<0.0001) and medications (5.6±0.3 vs 3.4±0.4; P<0.0001) were more likely to have an impaired nutritional status (M+ARM). Further, M+ARM patients were twice as likely to be discharged to destinations different to home (odds ratio=2.08; confidence interval 1.07-4.05). In this consecutive sample of geriatric trauma patients, 56.2% had an M+ARM upon admission to acute care, which was associated with indicators of worse physical, mental and cognitive health and predicted a more than twofold greater odds of being discharged to a destination other than home.

  7. Preparing Tomorrow’s Nursing Home Nurses: The Wisconsin-Long Term Care Clinical Scholars Program

    PubMed Central

    Nolet, Kim; Roberts, Tonya; Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea; Roiland, Rachel; Gullickson, Colleen; Ryther, Brenda; Bowers, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to care for the growing population of older adults has become a national priority. The demand for long term care services is expected to double between 2000 and 2040, yet the field remains stigmatized as an undesirable place for highly-skilled nurses to work. Recent efforts to increase student preparation in geriatrics have been shown to improve student attitudes toward working with older adults and increase knowledge, but long term care settings remain unattractive to students. This paper reports on development, implementation and evaluation of The Wisconsin Long Term Care Clinical Scholars Program, a nursing home internship for baccalaureate nursing students. The program couples a paid nursing home work experience with an evidence-based long term care nursing curriculum. The program increased student preparation and interest in working with older adults and in nursing homes, while concurrently increasing the capacity of nursing homes to provide a positive student experience. PMID:25162659

  8. Improving gerontology content in baccalaureate nursing education through knowledge transfer to nurse educators.

    PubMed

    McCleary, Lynn; McGilton, Katherine; Boscart, Veronique; Oudshoorn, Abram

    2009-01-01

    Across practice settings, most nursing care is provided to older adults. Yet most nurses receive limited education to care for older adults, especially those with complex needs. A Knowledge Exchange Institute for Geriatric Nursing Education brought together 31 Canadian nursing faculty members and nursing doctoral students and provided them with tools and resources to enhance teaching and curriculum in baccalaureate nursing programs. Guided by the Knowledge-to-Action Process model, participants received usable summaries of the best research evidence about care for older adults and tools to increase the likelihood of successful integration of these resources in their teaching and curriculum. Feedback from participants indicates that their personal goals and the goals of the Knowledge Exchange were met. Through a public interactive wiki, participants and others will continue the process of knowledge exchange to improve nursing education and nursing care for older persons.

  9. Understanding sarcopenia as a geriatric syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J; Landi, Francesco; Topinková, Eva; Michel, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Highly prevalent in the population older than 65 years and leading to poor outcomes (functional decline and its related consequences), sarcopenia does not benefit yet either of a clear understanding of its pathophysiology or of precise clinical or biological markers allowing its identification. The new scientific definition of 'geriatric syndromes' challenges the authors to review the current sarcopenia literature, allowing them to affirm that sarcopenia cannot be considered as an age-related disease but as a true 'geriatric syndrome'. More than 50% of the population older than 80 years suffer from this medical condition, which is linked to multiple causations: the ageing process itself, genetic susceptibility, certain life habits, changes in living conditions and a number of chronic diseases. Moreover, sarcopenia favours poor outcomes such as mobility disorders, disability, poor quality of life and death. Considering sarcopenia as a geriatric syndrome allows us to request its recognition and assess its multiple risk factors, to implement a clinical and public health approach to the management of sarcopenic patients and population at risk and to disentangle the links among sarcopenia, frailty, disability and mortality.

  10. New horizons in comprehensive geriatric assessment.

    PubMed

    Parker, S G; McLeod, A; McCue, P; Phelps, K; Bardsley, M; Roberts, H C; Conroy, S P

    2017-09-01

    In this article, we discuss the emergence of new models for delivery of comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) in the acute hospital setting. CGA is the core technology of Geriatric Medicine and for hospital inpatients it improves key outcomes such as survival, time spent at home and institutionalisation. Traditionally It is delivered by specialised multidisciplinary teams, often in dedicated wards, but in recent years has begun to be taken up and developed quite early in the admission process (at the 'front door'), across traditional ward boundaries and in specialty settings such as surgical and pre-operative care, and oncology. We have scanned recent literature, including observational studies of service evaluations, and service descriptions presented as abstracts of conference presentations to provide an overview of an emerging landscape of innovation and development in CGA services for hospital inpatients. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Geriatric nephrology: responding to a growing challenge.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Mitchell; Abdel-Rahman, Emaad; Williams, Mark E

    2010-05-01

    Changing demographics of the global population predict that the number of people age 65 years or greater will triple over the coming decades. Because the incidence and prevalence of kidney disease increase with advancing age, nephrologists will be increasingly confronted with a population of patients who are elderly and have a large number of comorbid conditions requiring ongoing care. Furthermore, it is increasingly understood that aging leads to its own unique aspects of nephrologic diagnosis and treatment. Although it is known that elderly patients constitute a group with special needs and present unique challenges to the nephrologist, traditional nephrology fellowship training has not included a focus on the geriatric population. In response to this need for greater education and awareness, the American Society of Nephrology has initiated a program of educational activities in geriatric nephrology and has chartered a specific advisory council. The priority being given to geriatric nephrology is a hopeful sign that issues such as treatment options, the efficacy of treatments, and their effect on quality of life for the elderly patient with kidney disease will be improved in the coming years.

  12. Gerontology and geriatrics in Dutch medical education.

    PubMed

    Tersmette, W; van Bodegom, D; van Heemst, D; Stott, D; Westendorp, R

    2013-01-01

    The world population is ageing and healthcare services require trained staff who can address the needs of older patients. In this study we determined how current medical education prepares Dutch students of medicine in the field of Gerontology and Geriatrics (G&G). Using a checklist of the essentials of G&G, we assessed Dutch medical education on three levels. On the national level we analysed the latest National Blueprint for higher medical education (Raamplan artsopleiding 2009). On the faculty level we reviewed medical curricula on the basis of interviews with program directors and inspection of course materials. On the student level we assessed the topics addressed in the questions of the cross-institutional progress test (CIPT). The National Bluepr int contains few specific G&G objectives. Obligatory G&G courses in medical schools on average amount to 2.2% of the total curriculum measured as European Credit Transfer System units (ECTS). Only two out of eight medical schools have practical training during the Master phase in the form of a clerkship in G&G. In the CIPT, on average 1.5% of questions cover G&G. Geriatric education in the Netherlands does not seem to be in line with current demographic trends. The National Blueprint falls short of providing sufficiently detailed objectives for education on the care of older people. The geriatric content offered by medical schools is varied and incomplete, and students are only marginally tested on their knowledge of G&G in the CIPT.

  13. Measuring pharmacogenetics in special groups: geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Seripa, Davide; Panza, Francesco; Daragjati, Julia; Paroni, Giulia; Pilotto, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes oxidize about 80% of the most commonly used drugs. Older patients form a very interesting clinical group in which an increased prevalence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and therapeutic failures (TFs) is observed. Might CYP drug metabolism change with age, and justify the differences in drug response observed in a geriatric setting? A complete overview of the CYP pharmacogenetics with a focus on the epigenetic CYP gene regulation by DNA methylation in the context of advancing age, in which DNA methylation might change. Responder phenotypes consist of a continuum spanning from ADRs to TFs, with the best responders at the midpoint. CYP genetics is the basis of this continuum on which environmental and physiological factors act, modeling the phenotype observed in clinical practice. Physiological age-related changes in DNA methylation, the main epigenetic mechanisms regulating gene expression in humans, results in a physiological decrease in CYP gene expression with advancing age. This may be one of the physiological changes that, together with increased drug use, contributed to the higher prevalence of ADRs and TFs observed in the geriatric setting, thus, making geriatrics a special group for pharmacogenetics.

  14. Strategies to improve nurse knowledge of delirium: a call to the adult-gerontology clinical nurse specialist.

    PubMed

    Middle, Beverly; Miklancie, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the role of the adult-gerontology clinical nurse specialist in addressing the problem of delirium in hospitalized older adults through strategies to improve nurse knowledge. Delirium is a significant issue in hospitalized older adults. This acute confusional state can adversely impact older adults in various ways. Delirium has been implicated in (1) poor physical, cognitive, and psychological outcomes, (2) prolonged hospitalizations, (3) increased costs of care, (4) need for continued postacute care, and (5) patient and provider stress. To prevent delirium, nurses must possess the knowledge to identify risk factors and institute preventive strategies. Once a change in mental status occurs, it is critical that nurses recognize delirium and the steps necessary to provide safe, effective care. Nurses are the major providers of bedside care; however, multiple studies have identified a lack of nurse knowledge regarding delirium. The adult-gerontology clinical nurse specialist can be instrumental in fostering knowledge on this important issue. Multiple interventions can be conducted by the adult-gerontology clinical nurse specialist with acute care nurses to increase delirium knowledge. A review of the literature revealed strategies that might be used in the hospital setting. Before educational endeavors, it is crucial to assess baseline nurse knowledge of delirium. Educational strategies can then include use of standardized delirium assessment tools, implementation of the Geriatric Resource Nurse model, fostering geriatric case studies and simulations, conducting geriatric grand rounds, and development of structured delirium educational programs. Exploring the patient experience, post delirium, can provide an invaluable, first-hand account of the acute confusional state. This information can impact nurse knowledge as well as patient safety and well-being. Geriatric certification and professional organizational involvement can be

  15. Building psychosocial programming in geriatrics fellowships: a consortium model.

    PubMed

    Adelman, Ronald D; Ansell, Pamela; Breckman, Risa; Snow, Caitlin E; Ehrlich, Amy R; Greene, Michele G; Greenberg, Debra F; Raik, Barrie L; Raymond, Joshua J; Clabby, John F; Fields, Suzanne D; Breznay, Jennifer B

    2011-01-01

    Geriatric psychosocial problems are prevalent and significantly affect the physical health and overall well-being of older adults. Geriatrics fellows require psychosocial education, and yet to date, geriatrics fellowship programs have not developed a comprehensive geriatric psychosocial curriculum. Fellowship programs in the New York tristate area collaboratively created the New York Metropolitan Area Consortium to Strengthen Psychosocial Programming in Geriatrics Fellowships in 2007 to address this shortfall. The goal of the Consortium is to develop model educational programs for geriatrics fellows that highlight psychosocial issues affecting elder care, share interinstitutional resources, and energize fellowship program directors and faculty. In 2008, 2009, and 2010, Consortium faculty collaboratively designed and implemented a psychosocial educational conference for geriatrics fellows. Cumulative participation at the conferences included 146 geriatrics fellows from 20 academic institutions taught by interdisciplinary Consortium faculty. Formal evaluations from the participants indicated that the conference: a) positively affected fellows' knowledge of, interest in, and comfort with psychosocial issues; b) would have a positive impact on the quality of care provided to older patients; and c) encouraged valuable interactions with fellows and faculty from other institutions. The Consortium, as an educational model for psychosocial learning, has a positive impact on geriatrics fellowship training and may be replicable in other localities.

  16. Delirium in the elderly: current problems with increasing geriatric age

    PubMed Central

    Kukreja, Deepti; Günther, Ulf; Popp, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Delirium is an acute disorder of attention and cognition seen relatively commonly in people aged 65 yr or older. The prevalence is estimated to be between 11 and 42 per cent for elderly patients on medical wards. The prevalence is also high in nursing homes and long term care (LTC) facilities. The consequences of delirium could be significant such as an increase in mortality in the hospital, long-term cognitive decline, loss of autonomy and increased risk to be institutionalized. Despite being a common condition, it remains under-recognised, poorly understood and not adequately managed. Advanced age and dementia are the most important risk factors. Pain, dehydration, infections, stroke and metabolic disturbances, and surgery are the most common triggering factors. Delirium is preventable in a large proportion of cases and therefore, it is also important from a public health perspective for interventions to reduce further complications and the substantial costs associated with these. Since the aetiology is, in most cases, multfactorial, it is important to consider a multi-component approach to management, both pharmacological and non-pharmacological. Detection and treatment of triggering causes must have high priority in case of delirium. The aim of this review is to highlight the importance of delirium in the elderly population, given the increasing numbers of ageing people as well as increasing geriatric age. PMID:26831414

  17. [The risk of contagious epidemics in geriatric facilities].

    PubMed

    Trivalle, Christophe

    2002-10-05

    THE RISKS OF EPIDEMICS IN INSTITUTIONAL SETTINGS: An epidemic must be suspected when an increase in the number of cases of a same type of infection is observed. Numerous microorganisms are responsible for epidemics in geriatric facilities: viruses, bacteria and parasites. In the case of an epidemic, a certain number of specific measures must be taken in order to prevent the transmission of infection and eradicate the epidemic. IN THE CASE OF INFLUENZA: Other than the vaccination of elderly institutional residents, that of the nursing staff appears essential. If a severe epidemic occurs, specific antivirals can be used, three of which are already available. IN THE CASE OF PNEUMOCOCCI: Examples of epidemics of pneumococcal infections in elderly institutional residents in the United States underlines the interest of pneumococcal vaccines, particularly since the strain responsible corresponded to a serotype contained in the 23 valence vaccine. WITH REGARD TO SCABIES: All the patients and all the staff must be treated on the same day and at the same time their clothing and bed linen. All persons in contact with the patient, the families and friends of the staff, their clothes and the environement must be treated.

  18. Delirium in the elderly: Current problems with increasing geriatric age.

    PubMed

    Kukreja, Deepti; Günther, Ulf; Popp, Julius

    2015-12-01

    Delirium is an acute disorder of attention and cognition seen relatively commonly in people aged 65 yr or older. The prevalence is estimated to be between 11 and 42 per cent for elderly patients on medical wards. The prevalence is also high in nursing homes and long term care (LTC) facilities. The consequences of delirium could be significant such as an increase in mortality in the hospital, long-term cognitive decline, loss of autonomy and increased risk to be institutionalized. Despite being a common condition, it remains under-recognised, poorly understood and not adequately managed. Advanced age and dementia are the most important risk factors. Pain, dehydration, infections, stroke and metabolic disturbances, and surgery are the most common triggering factors. Delirium is preventable in a large proportion of cases and therefore, it is also important from a public health perspective for interventions to reduce further complications and the substantial costs associated with these. Since the aetiology is, in most cases, multifactorial, it is important to consider a multi-component approach to management, both pharmacological and non-pharmacological. Detection and treatment of triggering causes must have high priority in case of delirium. The aim of this review is to highlight the importance of delirium in the elderly population, given the increasing numbers of ageing people as well as increasing geriatric age.

  19. Disciplinary split: a threat to geriatrics interdisciplinary team training.

    PubMed

    Reuben, David B; Levy-Storms, Lené; Yee, Misty N; Lee, Ming; Cole, Kenneth; Waite, Martha; Nichols, Linda; Frank, Janet C

    2004-06-01

    In 1995, the John A. Hartford Foundation launched an initiative to strengthen geriatric interdisciplinary team training (GITT) for advanced practice nursing and masters-level social work students and residents in internal medicine and family practice. As part of the national evaluation of the initiative, case-study and cross-case designs were employed using quantitative and qualitative data to examine the influence of cultures, regulations, and attitudes of individual disciplines on interdisciplinary training efforts at the first eight GITT programs. This evaluation found that attitudinal and cultural traditions of the different health professions faculty and students (disciplinary split) remain as important obstacles to creating an optimal interdisciplinary team-training experience. In general, physician trainees participated least enthusiastically in GITT. In part, this lower level of enthusiasm may have been the result of inconsistent medicine faculty support of the program. At all but one program, physician trainees also had shorter GITT training experiences than other disciplines. In addition, the disparity in level of training by discipline of GITT participants may have contributed to attitudinal barriers to interdisciplinary training. Discipline-specific regulatory and accreditation barriers also impede interdisciplinary training. Nevertheless, GITT experiences at some clinical sites, especially home visits, appeared to promote interdisciplinary training. Some barriers to creating and implementing GITT programs may be best approached at the level of accrediting agencies and certifying organizations. Others will require local and national efforts of leaders in the different disciplines to model and support good team care.

  20. American Geriatrics Society feeding tubes in advanced dementia position statement.

    PubMed

    2014-08-01

    When eating difficulties arise, feeding tubes are not recommended for older adults with advanced dementia. Careful hand feeding should be offered because hand feeding has been shown to be as good as tube feeding for the outcomes of death, aspiration pneumonia, functional status, and comfort. Moreover, tube feeding is associated with agitation, greater use of physical and chemical restraints, healthcare use due to tube-related complications, and development of new pressure ulcers. Efforts to enhance oral feeding by altering the environment and creating patient-centered approaches to feeding should be part of usual care for older adults with advanced dementia. Tube feeding is a medical therapy that an individual's surrogate decision-maker can decline or accept in accordance with advance directives, previously stated wishes, or what it is thought the individual would want. It is the responsibility of all members of the healthcare team caring for residents in long-term care settings to understand any previously expressed wishes of the individuals (through review of advance directives and with surrogate caregivers) regarding tube feeding and to incorporate these wishes into the care plan. Institutions such as hospitals, nursing homes, and other care settings should promote choice, endorse shared and informed decision-making, and honor preferences regarding tube feeding. They should not impose obligations or exert pressure on individuals or providers to institute tube feeding. © 2014, Copyright the Author Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  1. Integration of gerontology content in nongeriatric undergraduate nursing courses.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Debbie; Helfers, Mary Jo; Cowen, Kay; Letvak, Susan; Barba, Beth E; Herrick, Charlotte; Wallace, Debra; Rossen, Eileen; Bannon, Mary

    2006-01-01

    During the last several years, a school of nursing in the southeastern United States has made concerted efforts to integrate geriatric content into every undergraduate course except obstetrics. Even the pediatric nursing course has infused content about grandparents, both as care providers for children and as extended family members. Faculty expertise and passion for teaching geriatric best practices stimulated innovative and creative student experiences without overwhelming curricular revision. This article describes how gerontology content was incorporated into each curricular area and provides examples of classroom and clinical teaching strategies that were successful at this school.

  2. Prevalence and management status of urologic diseases in geriatric hospitals in South Korea: A field research

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Heon; Suh, Jungyo; Kim, Hyung Suk; Lee, Young Ju; Lee, Sang Rim; Kim, Khae Hawn

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to investigate the current management status of urologic diseases in geriatric hospitals in South Korea. Materials and Methods Questionnaire surveys and in-depth person-to-person interviews were conducted at 13 hospitals within the Seoul and Incheon areas. Results The study was carried out from July to December 2014; 75.6% of patients (1,858/2,458) and 77.5% (779/1,031) of medical personnel responded to our survey. All surveys and interviews were performed by urology specialists, fellows, residents, or nurses. The hospitals included in the study had an average of 215.2 beds (range, 110–367), 189.1 patients (range, 90–345), and 40.2 nurses (range, 10–83). The average number of physicians was 6.2 (range, 3–11), but none of these were certified urologists. Only 4 hospitals provided consultation services for urological disorders. In total, 64% of patients had urological disorders, although only 20.7% of patients were receiving medication. Most patients were being treated using urological interventions; diapers (49.7%), indwelling catheters (19.5%), clean intermittent catheters (12.2%), and external collection urinary drainage (7.9%). However, most interventions were inadequately implemented, and only 17% of the patients had been examined by a certified urologist. Urological complications were found in 20.2% of patients, and secondary complications occurred in 18.8%. Excluding redundant cases, the total prevalence of urological complications was 39.0%. Conclusions Urologic diseases are poorly managed, and no certified urologists work in geriatric hospitals. Therefore, more designated urologists are needed in geriatric hospitals. PMID:28097271

  3. The use of story as a teaching strategy: When educating students in geriatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Overcash, Janine

    2010-07-01

    Story is a creative teaching strategy that can highlight the unique and complex needs of older adults diagnosed with cancer. Story as a means for delivering educational content can enhance recall and memory of details discussed in lecture. The purpose of this article is to describe the use of story as a teaching strategy and to offer suggestions on using story in educating undergraduate nursing students. To construct an effective story, a teaching point must be identified to be the "lesson learned." The story must be constructed around the teaching point and be relevant to the lecture material. Other suggestions for effective use of story are to rehearse, be succinct, and to inject humor if possible. The central goal of using story is to have an impact on nursing students so they will incorporate geriatric best practices throughout their career. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Antidepressant treatment of depression in rural nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Kerber, Cindy Sullivan; Dyck, Mary J; Culp, Kennith R; Buckwalter, Kathleen

    2008-09-01

    Under-diagnosis and under-treatment of depression are major problems in nursing home residents. The purpose of this study was to determine antidepressant use among nursing home residents who were diagnosed with depression using three different methods: (1) the Geriatric Depression Scale, (2) Minimum Data Set, and (3) primary care provider assessments. As one would expect, the odds of being treated with an antidepressant were about eight times higher for those diagnosed as depressed by the primary care provider compared to the Geriatric Depression Scale or the Minimum Data Set. Men were less likely to be diagnosed and treated with antidepressants by their primary care provider than women. Depression detected by nurses through the Minimum Data Set was treated at a lower rate with antidepressants, which generates issues related to interprofessional communication, nursing staff communication, and the need for geropsychiatric role models in nursing homes.

  5. A prospective controlled trial of a geriatric consultation team in an acute-care hospital.

    PubMed

    Hogan, D B; Fox, R A

    1990-03-01

    Attempts to prove the usefulness of geriatric consultation teams (GCT) in acute-care settings have been inconclusive. We have completed a prospective, controlled trial of a GCT in an acute-care setting, aiming our interventions at a specific subgroup of elderly patients. One hundred and thirty-two out of 352 (37.5%) patients met the inclusion criteria with 66 each being assigned to the intervention and the control groups. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups. Patients in the intervention group received follow-up after discharge from hospital by the geriatric service. We found that the intervention was associated with improved 6-month survival (p less than 0.01), improved Barthel Index at 1 year (p less than 0.01), and a trend towards decreased reliance on institutional care (hospital or nursing home) during the year of follow-up. The benefits occurred principally in patients who were discharged to a nursing home. Our findings support the utility of GCT and highlight the importance of focusing the intervention and providing follow-up after discharge from hospital.

  6. A prospective controlled trial of the influence of a geriatrics home visit program on medical student knowledge, skills, and attitudes towards care of the elderly.

    PubMed

    Denton, Gerald D; Rodriguez, Rechell; Hemmer, Paul A; Harder, Justin; Short, Patricia; Hanson, Janice L

    2009-05-01

    To determine the impact of a geriatrics home visit program for third-year medical students on attitudes, skills, and knowledge. Using a mixed methods, prospective, controlled trial, volunteer control group students (n = 17) at two sites and intervention group students (n = 16) at two different sites within the same internal medicine clerkship were given Internet and CDROM-based geriatric self-study materials. Intervention group students identified a geriatrics patient from their clinical experience, performed one "home" visit (home, nursing home, or rehabilitation facility) to practice geriatric assessment skills, wrote a structured, reflective paper, and presented their findings in small-group teaching settings. Papers were qualitatively analyzed using the constant comparative method for themes. All students took a pre-test and post-test to measure changes in geriatrics knowledge and attitudes. General attitudes towards caring for the elderly improved more in the intervention group than in the control group (9.8 vs 0.5%; p = 0.04, effect size 0.78). Medical student attitudes towards their home care training in medical school (21.7 vs 3.2%; p = 0.02, effect size 0.94) improved, as did attitudes towards time and reimbursement issues surrounding home visits (10.1 vs -0.2%; p = 0.02, effect size 0.89). Knowledge of geriatrics improved in both groups (13.4 vs 15.2% improvement; p = 0.73). Students described performing a mean of seven separate geriatric assessments (range 4-13) during the home visit. Themes that emerged from the qualitative analysis of the reflective papers added depth and understanding to the quantitative data and supported results concerning attitudinal change. While all participants gained geriatrics knowledge during their internal medicine clerkship, students who performed a home visit had improved attitudes towards the elderly and described performing geriatric assessment skills. Requiring little faculty time, a geriatrics home visit program like

  7. Undergraduate teaching in geriatric medicine: mapping the British Geriatrics Society undergraduate curriculum to Tomorrow's Doctors 2009.

    PubMed

    Forrester-Paton, Calum; Forrester-Paton, Jayne; Gordon, Adam Lee; Mitchell, Hannah K; Bracewell, Nicola; Mjojo, Jocelyn; Masud, Tahir; Gladman, John R F; Blundell, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    in 2008, the British Geriatrics Society (BGS) developed the Recommended Undergraduate Curriculum in Geriatric Medicine. This was subsequently mapped to the second edition of Tomorrows' Doctors (TD2, 2003). Following the publication of the third edition of Tomorrow's Doctors in 2009 (TD3), the mapping exercise was repeated to verify the extent to which the updated General Medical Council recommendations supported teaching in ageing and geriatric medicine. we analysed TD3 and identified 48 aspects of its general guidance that were relevant to the teaching of medicine for older people. We then mapped these to the 2009 BGS curriculum. the BGS curriculum was supported in full by TD3. However, learning outcomes relating to the interpretation and conduct of research in TD3 had no corresponding outcomes in the BGS curriculum. the BGS curriculum for medical undergraduates continues to provide a specific and complete list of learning objectives, all of which could help to operationalise the general statements made in TD3 with relation to ageing and geriatric medicine. Learning outcomes in research in frail older patients have been added following this mapping exercise.

  8. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Most nursing homes have nursing aides and skilled nurses on hand 24 hours a day. Some nursing ... speech and occupational therapy. There might be a nurses' station on each floor. Other nursing homes try ...

  9. Implications for Fitness Programming---The Geriatric Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Stanley P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This article discusses the relevance of fitness programing for an aging population and provides parameters for a geriatric fitness program. Emphasized are physical activity as a preventive measure against age-related illness and management of a geriatric fitness program. (IAH)

  10. [Academic study programs in gerontology and geriatrics in Austria].

    PubMed

    Kolland, F

    2007-12-01

    This article describes the situation of academic study programs in gerontology and geriatrics in Austria. University formation in these areas is at the very beginning. Due to the lack of institutionalization of gerontology and geriatrics at the university level, the study programs were developed by non-university institutions. The studies are mostly at the post-gradual level and are practice-oriented.

  11. Elder Specialists: Psychosocial Aspects of Medical Education in Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann-Stone, Nancy; Robinson, Sherry B.; Rull, Gary; Rosher, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an Elder Specialist Program developed by one school of medicine to sensitize medical students to geriatric psychosocial issues. Elder Specialists participate in panel discussions as part of each geriatric session. As an alternative to traditional senior mentoring programs, the Elder Specialist Program provides all students a…

  12. Developing geriatric social work competencies for field education.

    PubMed

    Damron-Rodriguez, Joann; Lawrance, Frances P; Barnett, Diane; Simmons, June

    2006-01-01

    Preparing social workers to effectively practice with the growing older population requires the identification of geriatric competencies for the profession. The John A. Hartford Geriatric Social Work Initiative provided the impetus and direction for a national strategy to improve the quality of preparation of geriatric social workers. The Geriatric Social Work Practicum Partnership Program (PPP) is the project with the Hartford Initiative that emphasizes field education. The Geriatric Social Work Education Consortium (GSWEC), one of the PPP programs, initiated the development of competencies for work with older adults. GSWEC utilized Geriatric Social Work White Papers and the pioneering work of the Council on Social Work Education's (CSWE) Strengthening Aging and Gerontology Education for Social Work's (SAGE-SW) comprehensive competency list as well as conducted focus groups locally to delineate key competencies for field education. The Coordinating Center for the PPP, located at the New York Academy of Medicine, led in collaboratively developing knowledge based skill competencies for geriatric social work across all 6 demonstration sites (11 universities). The competencies adopted across sites include skills in the following five major domains: values and ethics; assessment (individuals and families, aging services, programs and policies); practice and interventions (theory and knowledge in practice, individual and family, aging services, programs and practice) interdisciplinary collaboration; and evaluation and research. The identified competencies have proven effective in evaluating students (n = 190) pre- and post PPP field education. The implications for further development of competency driven education for geriatric social work are discussed.

  13. Elder Specialists: Psychosocial Aspects of Medical Education in Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann-Stone, Nancy; Robinson, Sherry B.; Rull, Gary; Rosher, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an Elder Specialist Program developed by one school of medicine to sensitize medical students to geriatric psychosocial issues. Elder Specialists participate in panel discussions as part of each geriatric session. As an alternative to traditional senior mentoring programs, the Elder Specialist Program provides all students a…

  14. Meeting Future Demands for Educators in Geriatric Optometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumosa, Nina; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A University of Missouri-St. Louis program combines a two-year optometric residency with a master of science degree in gerontology to prepare clinicians as teachers of geriatric optometry. The interdisciplinary program's components include optometric care of elderly patients, supervised student teaching, and coursework in geriatrics. (Author/MSE)

  15. Pharmacists' Perceptions of Major Difficulties in Geriatric Pharmacy Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Clara Collette; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Pharmacists (N=233) responded to the question "What is the most difficult aspect of geriatric pharmacy practice?" Most commonly cited problems were (1) inadequate professional skills or knowledge in geriatrics; (2) patient compliance; (3) physician functioning (including overprescribing of medications); (4) communication with the elderly; (5) lack…

  16. Development of an Interview-Based Geriatric Depression Rating Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamison, Christine; Scogin, Forrest

    1992-01-01

    Developed interview-based Geriatric Depression Rating Scale (GDRS) and administered 35-item GDRS to 68 older adults with range of affective disturbance. Found scale to have internal consistency and split-half reliability comparable to those of Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and Geriatric Depression Scale. Concurrent validity, construct…

  17. Toenail onychomycosis in a Portuguese geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Dias, N; Santos, C; Portela, M; Lima, N

    2011-07-01

    Onychomycosis is a common fungal infection of the nail but few data of mycological features in geriatric Portuguese population are yet available. The aim of this study was to perform a mycological examination and characterization of fungal nail pattern of a geriatric population from the north of Portugal clinically suspected of onychomycosis. A total of 108 patients attending the Podology Service in the Centro Hospitalar do Alto Ave (Portugal) from October 2007 to January 2009 were enrolled. All were suspected of having onychomycosis by the abnormal appearance of their nails. From these, 59.3% were diabetic. Distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis was the more common clinical pattern followed by total dystrophic onychomycosis. In 21.3% cases, every nail in both feet had an abnormal appearance. In 86%, the hallux was involved in at least one foot. Fifty samples were culture positive, and fifty-four isolates were reported regardless of the questionable pathogenicity of the infectious agent. In three cases, clinical feature of the nail, direct microscopy, and culture were consistent with Scopulariopsis infection. Fusarium spp. were identified in three cases; however, only one isolate was preceded by the observation of branching septate filaments by direct microscopy. No mixed infections with dermatophytes were reported. Trichophyton rubrum was the dermatophyte most frequently isolated (83.3%) followed by Trichophyton interdigitale. In Portugal, onychomycosis is still viewed by general population as a cosmetic condition. Health risk is enhanced in geriatrics that only perceived the severity of their condition when experiencing further foot complications that include bacterial infection and pain.

  18. Financing geriatric programs in community health centers.

    PubMed Central

    Yeatts, D E; Ray, S; List, N; Duggar, B

    1991-01-01

    There are approximately 600 Community and Migrant Health Centers (C/MHCs) providing preventive and primary health care services principally to medically underserved rural and urban areas across the United States. The need to develop geriatric programs within C/MHCs is clear. Less clear is how and under what circumstances a comprehensive geriatric program can be adequately financed. The Health Resources and Services Administration of the Public Health Service contracted with La Jolla Management Corporation and Duke University Center on Aging to identify successful techniques for obtaining funding by examining 10 "good practice" C/MHC geriatric programs. The results from this study indicated that effective techniques included using a variety of funding sources, maintaining accurate cost-per-user information, developing a marketing strategy and user incentives, collaborating with the area agency on aging and other community organizations, and developing special services for the elderly. Developing cost-per-user information allowed for identifying appropriate "drawing card" services, negotiating sound reimbursement rates and contracts with other providers, and assessing the financial impact of changing service mixes. A marketing strategy was used to enhance the ability of the centers to provide a comprehensive package of services. Collaboration with the area agency on aging and other community organizations and volunteers in the aging network was found to help establish referral networks and subsequently increase the number of elderly patients served. Finally, development of special services for the elderly, such as adult day care, case management, and health education, was found to increase program visibility, opportunities to work with the network of services for the aging, and clinical utilization. PMID:1908588

  19. Teaching geriatric fellows how to teach: a needs assessment targeting geriatrics fellowship program directors.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Veronica; Yukawa, Michi; Aronson, Louise; Widera, Eric

    2014-12-01

    The entire healthcare workforce needs to be educated to better care for older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fellows are being trained to teach, to assess the attitudes of fellowship directors toward training fellows to be teachers, and to understand how to facilitate this type of training for fellows. A nine-question survey adapted from a 2001 survey issued to residency program directors inquiring about residents-as-teachers curricula was developed and administered. The survey was issued electronically and sent out three times over a 6-week period. Of 144 ACGME-accredited geriatric fellowship directors from geriatric, internal medicine, and family medicine departments who were e-mailed the survey, 101 (70%) responded; 75% had an academic affiliation, 15% had a community affiliation, and 10% did not report. Academic and community programs required their fellows to teach, but just 55% of academic and 29% of community programs offered teaching skills instruction as part of their fellowship curriculum; 67% of academic programs and 79% of community programs felt that their fellows would benefit from more teaching skill instruction. Program directors listed fellow (39%) and faculty (46%) time constraints as obstacles to creation and implementation of a teaching curriculum. The majority of fellowship directors believe that it is important for geriatric fellows to become competent educators, but only approximately half of programs currently provide formal instruction in teaching skills. A reproducible, accessible curriculum on teaching to teach that includes a rigorous evaluation component should be created for geriatrics fellowship programs. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  20. An orientation scale for geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Berg, S; Svensson, T

    1980-11-01

    An assessment scale consisting of 10 questions was constructed from an initial 20 questions. The scale encompassed orientation to time, place and person and was intended for geriatric patients and patients suffering from psychogeriatric disorders who had been institutionalized for at least 14 days. The reliability according to the Kuder-Richardson formula number KR20 was 0.83 and the test-retest reliability was 0.84. The scale differentiated between patients with senile dementia and/or cerebral arteriosclerosis and patients without such disorders.

  1. Postoperative Delirium in the Geriatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Schenning, Katie J; Deiner, Stacie G

    2015-09-01

    Postoperative delirium, a common complication in older surgical patients, is independently associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Patients older than 65 years receive greater than one-third of the more than 40 million anesthetics delivered yearly in the United States. This number is expected to increase with the aging of the population. Thus, it is increasingly important that perioperative clinicians who care for geriatric patients have an understanding of the complex syndrome of postoperative delirium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Management of epilepsy in pediatrics and geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Poon, Cathy Y; McAuley, James W

    2002-01-01

    For pediatric patients, the earlier in life epilepsy occurs, the lower are long-term mental abilities. Three rare but important conditions among infants and children--pyridoxine-deficiency seizures, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, and West syndrome--usually require multidrug therapy to control seizures. Epilepsy occurs more frequently among the elderly and therapy is complicated by treatment of other chronic medical conditions. Numerous effective antiepileptic medications for both pediatric and geriatric patients have been newly marketed in the past decade, with other promising agents in the investigational drug pipeline.

  3. [Ethics of antibiotherapy in geriatric medicine].

    PubMed

    Michel, J P; Loew, F; Brennenstuhl, P; Zelger, G; Courvoisier, B

    1994-12-10

    The high frequency of infections in the elderly, at home as well as in institutions, raises the question of the place antibiotic therapy should occupy. Too often, unfortunately, antibiotic therapy is prescribed indiscriminately in cases of infection. Between therapeutic abstention and overtreatment there is room for a more rational and adapted medical decision which is the outcome of a clinical process integrating a rigorous biomedical approach, taking due account of the environment, the functionality and the quality of life of the elderly patient. The importance of human, ecological, pharmacological and economic constraints should lead to deeper consideration of the appropriateness of antibiotic therapy in geriatric practice.

  4. Geriatrics and the Perioperative Surgical Home.

    PubMed

    Mello, Matthew T; Azocar, Ruben J; Lewis, Michael C

    2015-09-01

    An ever-changing health care system with a constantly increasing aging surgical population creates both opportunities for providing improved health care as well as significant challenges. Coordinated health care initiatives are needed if one is to adequately balance the need for evidence-based improved patient outcomes and the often-associated increased costs. In this article the authors postulate that a protocol-driven, multidisciplinary approach may be a pathway for implementing an effective triple aim to health care, especially in a frail geriatric population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Geriatric Population and Psychiatric Medication

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Sannidhya; Sareen, Himanshu; Trivedi, J.K.

    2010-01-01

    With improvement in medical services in the last few years, there has been a constant rise in the geriatric population throughout the world, more so in the developing countries. The elderly are highly prone to develop psychiatric disorders, probably because of age related changes in the brain, concomitant physical disorders, as well as increased stress in later life. Psychiatric disorders in this population may have a different presentation than in other groups and some of psychopathologies might be mistaken for normal age related changes by an unwary clinician. Therefore the need of the day is to train psychiatrists and physicians to better recognize and manage mental disorders in this age group. PMID:21327169

  6. Cerebral vascular hamartoma in a geriatric cat

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Vaquero, Paula; Moore, Sarah A; Wolk, Kendra E; Oglesbee, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    An 11-year-old castrated male domestic medium hair cat was presented with neurological signs consistent with a right thalamocortical lesion. Computed tomography (CT) images revealed a heterogeneously, hyperattenuating, poorly contrast enhancing intra-axial mass within the right lateral ventricle. The histological diagnosis at post-mortem examination was vascular hamartoma with hemorrhage and necrosis. This is the first report of a vascular hamartoma affecting the thalamocortex in a geriatric cat. Also, this is the first time that CT images of a feline cerebral vascular hamartoma have been reported. PMID:21277244

  7. Stimulating Healthy Aging with a Model Nurse-Managed Free Clinic in a Senior Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Ruth H.

    As part of a Geriatric Education and Health Management program, a model nurse-managed free clinic has been established at an urban senior center by faculty and students of the University of New Mexico College of Nursing. Funded by a 3-year grant from the Department of Health and Human Services, the weekly clinic is based on Orem's self-care theory…

  8. Stimulating Healthy Aging with a Model Nurse-Managed Free Clinic in a Senior Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Ruth H.

    As part of a Geriatric Education and Health Management program, a model nurse-managed free clinic has been established at an urban senior center by faculty and students of the University of New Mexico College of Nursing. Funded by a 3-year grant from the Department of Health and Human Services, the weekly clinic is based on Orem's self-care theory…

  9. Rethinking Teaching Nursing Homes: Potential for Improving Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mezey, Mathy D.; Mitty, Ethel L.; Burger, Sarah Green

    2008-01-01

    To meet the special needs of and provide quality health care to nursing home residents, the health care workforce must be knowledgeable about the aging process. Health professionals are minimally prepared in their academic programs to care for older adults, and few programs have required rotations in geriatrics. Teaching nursing homes (TNHs) have…

  10. Care of the Older Adult in the Emergency Department: Nurses Views of the Pressing Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boltz, Marie; Parke, Belinda; Shuluk, Joseph; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Galvin, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to describe nurses' views of the issues to be addressed to improve care of the older adult in the emergency department (ED). Design and Methods: An exploratory content analysis examined the qualitative responses of 527 registered nurses from 49U.S. hospitals who completed the Geriatric Institutional Profile.…

  11. Care of the Older Adult in the Emergency Department: Nurses Views of the Pressing Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boltz, Marie; Parke, Belinda; Shuluk, Joseph; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Galvin, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to describe nurses' views of the issues to be addressed to improve care of the older adult in the emergency department (ED). Design and Methods: An exploratory content analysis examined the qualitative responses of 527 registered nurses from 49U.S. hospitals who completed the Geriatric Institutional Profile.…

  12. A Statewide Faculty Development Program for Community College Associate Degree and Other Nursing Educators. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roush, Robert E.; And Others

    This final report describes a Texas educational improvement project designed to: (1) increase the amount of geriatric content in the curricula of community college associate degree nursing (ADN) programs; (2) further the development of baccalaureate nursing faculty in a Historically Black College/University (HBCU); and (3) facilitate other Texas…

  13. Rethinking Teaching Nursing Homes: Potential for Improving Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mezey, Mathy D.; Mitty, Ethel L.; Burger, Sarah Green

    2008-01-01

    To meet the special needs of and provide quality health care to nursing home residents, the health care workforce must be knowledgeable about the aging process. Health professionals are minimally prepared in their academic programs to care for older adults, and few programs have required rotations in geriatrics. Teaching nursing homes (TNHs) have…

  14. Lean business model and implementation of a geriatric fracture center.

    PubMed

    Kates, Stephen L

    2014-05-01

    Geriatric hip fracture is a common event associated with high costs of care and often with suboptimal outcomes for the patients. Ideally, a new care model to manage geriatric hip fractures would address both quality and safety of patient care as well as the need for reduced costs of care. The geriatric fracture center model of care is one such model reported to improve both outcomes and quality of care. It is a lean business model applied to medicine. This article describes basic lean business concepts applied to geriatric fracture care and information needed to successfully implement a geriatric fracture center. It is written to assist physicians and surgeons in their efforts to implement an improved care model for their patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The geriatric patient: use of acute geriatrics units in the emergency care of elderly patients in France.

    PubMed

    Somme, D; Lazarovici, C; Dramé, M; Blanc, P; Lang, P O; Gauvain, J B; Voisin, T; Gonthier, R; De Wazières, B; Jeandel, C; Couturier, P; Blanchard, F; Saint-Jean, O

    2011-01-01

    We studied the factors influencing the choice of admission to Geriatrics units, instead of other acute hospital units after an emergency visit. We report the results from a cohort of 1283 randomly selected patients aged >75 years hospitalized in emergency and representative of the French University hospital system. All patients underwent geriatric assessment. Baseline characteristics of patients admitted to Geriatrics and other units were compared. A center effect influencing the use of Geriatrics units during emergencies was also investigated. Admission to a Geriatrics unit during the acute care episode occurred in 499 cases (40.3%). By multivariate analysis, 4 factors were related to admission to a Geriatrics unit: cognitive disorder: odds ratio (OR)=1.79 (1.38-2.32) (95% confidence interval=95% CI); "failure to thrive" syndrome OR=1.54 (1.01-2.35), depression: OR=1.42 (1.12-1.83) or loss of Activities of Daily Living (ADL): OR=1.35 (1.04-1.75). The emergency volume of the hospital was inversely related to the use of Geriatrics units, with high variation that could be explained by other unstudied factors. In the French University Emergency Healthcare system, the "geriatrics patient" is defined by the existence of cognitive disorder, psychological symptoms or installed loss of autonomy. Nevertheless, considerable nation-wide variation was observed underlining the need to clarify and reinforce this discipline in the emergency healthcare system. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Use of the Internet in Geriatrics Education: Results of a National Survey of Medical Geriatrics Academic Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hajjar, Ihab M.; Ruiz, Jorge G.; Teasdale, Thomas A.; Mintzer, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    In order to characterize use of the Internet in medical geriatrics education programs, 130 medical education programs in the U.S. that train medical students, interns, residents, fellows and practicing physicians were asked to complete a survey developed by the Consortium of E-Learning in Geriatrics Instruction (CELGI). Sixty-eight programs…

  17. The Use of the Internet in Geriatrics Education: Results of a National Survey of Medical Geriatrics Academic Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hajjar, Ihab M.; Ruiz, Jorge G.; Teasdale, Thomas A.; Mintzer, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    In order to characterize use of the Internet in medical geriatrics education programs, 130 medical education programs in the U.S. that train medical students, interns, residents, fellows and practicing physicians were asked to complete a survey developed by the Consortium of E-Learning in Geriatrics Instruction (CELGI). Sixty-eight programs…

  18. [Geriatric vs. non-geriatric psychiatric hospitalization to the psychiatric services of a general hospital in Chile].

    PubMed

    Aedo, Igor; Santander, Jaime; Weiss, Christian; Fuentes, Ximena

    2014-01-01

    It is estimated that Chilean geriatric population (=65 years) will hit 16% in the year 2030. Psychiatric longer stays have been described for those equal 65 years vs. less than 65 years. We aim to describe the characteristics associated with lengths of stay in our psychiatric unit. Retrospective review of 3112 admissions between July 2001 and June 2010 to the general psychiatric service of the Pontific Catholic University of Chile. 5.1% (n=132) of the sample was geriatric patients. The average length of stay for this group was 12.4 days (p=0.41). Both the geriatric and non-geriatric population presented a high prevalence of affective disorders (63.7% and 55.1%, respectively). In the geriatric group, there was a higher presence of bipolar disorder (27.3 vs. 19.5%; p less than 0.05) and dementia (16.7% vs. 0.5%). In contrast, for = 65 years, there was significantly less prevalence of adaptive and anxiety disorders (3% vs. 13%; p less than 0.01). There was just one case of personality disorder and no cases of eating disorders in the geriatric group. There were no differences in the lengths of stay according to diagnosis. We did not find longer stay times, in general or associated with specific diagnoses, in geriatric patients versus non-geriatric patients.

  19. Osteoporosis Imaging in the Geriatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Heilmeier, Ursula; Youm, Jiwon; Torabi, Soheyla; Link, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Given the expected rapid growth of the geriatric world population (=individuals aged >65 years) to 1.3 billion by 2050, age-related diseases such as osteoporosis and its sequelae, osteoporotic fractures, are on the rise. Areal bone mineral density (aBMD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the current gold standard to diagnose osteoporosis, to assess osteoporotic fracture risk, and to monitor treatment-induced BMD changes. However, most fragility fractures occur in patients with normal or osteopenic aBMD, indicating that factors beyond BMD impact bone strength. Recent developments in DXA technology such as TBS, VFA, and hip geometry analysis are now available to assess some of these non-BMD parameters from the DXA image. This review will discuss the use of DXA and DXA-assisted technologies and their respective advantages and disadvantages. Special attention is given to if and how each method is indicated in the geriatric population, and the latest ISCD 2015 guidelines have been incorporated. PMID:27482472

  20. [Cost accounting of a geriatric perioperative unit].

    PubMed

    Boddaert, Jacques; Barondeau, Marie-Laure; Khiami, Frédéric; Nion, Nathalie; Frandji, Didier; Riou, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Hip fracture management in a dedicated geriatric perioperative unit improves long-term mortality. In this "we report the" health economics evaluation of this geriatric perioperative care unit (UPOG). This study was conducted in 2011. Direct expenditures were obtained from the Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris database, indirect expenditures from the hospital cost accounting,and financial incomes from the PMSI Pilot programme. Emergency department incomes and expenditures were estimated together with additional incomes related to orthopaedic surgery. We estimated expenditures related to operating room (OR) activities in the framework of several models, one with an emergency OR open 24h/24, and one with a standard OR. Lastly, we compared incomes/expenditures according to regular paramedical staff or according to the paramedical staff that would appear to be necessary to ensure patient care. 253 patients were admitted to the UPOG during the study J215 (84%) of whom underwent surgery. The income statement was positive for both an emergency OR (+741,000 Euros) and a standard OR ( +490,000 Euros) and remained positive when paramedical staff was increased (+629,000 and +156,000 Euros, respectively). The UPOG income statement shows a positive result regardless of the model used, emergency 24h/24 OR or standard OR, and even when paramedical staff is increased

  1. Geriatric management in medieval Persian medicine

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Morteza; Sadeghpour, Omid; Zarshenas, Mohammad M.

    2013-01-01

    In Iran, a large group of patients are elderly people and they intend to have natural remedies as treatment. These remedies are rooted in historical of Persian and humoral medicine with a backbone of more than 1000 years. The current study was conducted to draw together medieval pharmacological information related to geriatric medicine from some of the most often manuscripts of traditional Persian medicine. Moreover, we investigated the efficacy of medicinal plants through a search of the PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar databases. In the medieval Persian documents, digestible and a small amount of food such as chicken broth, honey, fig and plum at frequent intervals as well as body massage and morning unctioning are highly recommended. In the field of pharmacotherapy, 35 herbs related to 25 families were identified. Plants were classified as tonic, anti-aging, appetizer, memory and mood enhancer, topical analgesic and laxative as well as health improvement agents. Other than historical elucidation, this paper presents medical and pharmacological approaches that medieval Persian practitioners applied to deal with geriatric complications. PMID:24381461

  2. [Acute confusion in the geriatric patient].

    PubMed

    Zanocchi, M; Vallero, F; Norelli, L; Zaccagna, B; Spada, S; Fabris, F

    1998-05-01

    During 1996, 585 patients, aged 55 to 96, were admitted into hospital at the Geriatric Department of Ospedale Maggiore (Turin). Acute confusion was seen in 22.2% of these patients who tended to have more serious clinical condition, were more likely to have chronic cognitive impairment, were treated with a greater number of drugs and suffered more from immobility with pressure ulcer. The confusional state, manifested at admission to Geriatric department, was mostly related with the patient's clinical severity, while the one which developed during hospital stay was linked to situations of physical frailty, as pressure ulcer and low albumin values. The most frequent causes of acute confusional state were acute infectious diseases, heart failure, gastro-intestinal bleeding with secondary anaemia, stroke and dehydration. In many cases the very cause of the acute confusional state could not be identified. Falls, more than 31 days length of stay in hospital and death were more frequent in patients suffering from confusional state. Chronic cognitive impairment, functional dependence, clinical severity and treatment involving a great number of drugs, are the main contributing factors in this syndrome. Thus, a multi-dimensional evaluation which takes into account both clinical-functional and socio-economical aspects, is useful for a correct preventive and diagnostic approach of acute confusional state.

  3. Geriatric management in medieval Persian medicine.

    PubMed

    Emami, Morteza; Sadeghpour, Omid; Zarshenas, Mohammad M

    2013-10-01

    In Iran, a large group of patients are elderly people and they intend to have natural remedies as treatment. These remedies are rooted in historical of Persian and humoral medicine with a backbone of more than 1000 years. The current study was conducted to draw together medieval pharmacological information related to geriatric medicine from some of the most often manuscripts of traditional Persian medicine. Moreover, we investigated the efficacy of medicinal plants through a search of the PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar databases. In the medieval Persian documents, digestible and a small amount of food such as chicken broth, honey, fig and plum at frequent intervals as well as body massage and morning unctioning are highly recommended. In the field of pharmacotherapy, 35 herbs related to 25 families were identified. Plants were classified as tonic, anti-aging, appetizer, memory and mood enhancer, topical analgesic and laxative as well as health improvement agents. Other than historical elucidation, this paper presents medical and pharmacological approaches that medieval Persian practitioners applied to deal with geriatric complications.

  4. Role of radiology in geriatric care

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Jeremy; Baerlocher, Mark O.; Asch, Murray; Myers, Andy

    2009-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To present family physicians with the options available for diagnosing and treating a selection of common diseases in the elderly using diagnostic and interventional radiology. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE Articles providing level I or II evidence were included in our review. Most articles presented results from randomized or other case-controlled studies. MAIN MESSAGE Geriatric care has become a complicated, multidisciplinary effort, with the family physician often leading the team. The expanding cohort of patients is not only better informed than their predecessors, but also more demanding of better care through cutting-edge technology and treatment. Specifically, the role of radiology has expanded quickly in geriatric medicine. Because of complex clinical presentations and rising costs, it is essential for primary care physicians to understand the appropriate use of imaging and radiological intervention. CONCLUSION There are a number of new and innovative radiological techniques and procedures available for elderly patients. This review aims to inform primary care physicians of a selected number of these techniques. PMID:19155363

  5. The role of telenursing in the provision of geriatric outreach services to residential homes in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chan, W M; Woo, J; Hui, E; Hjelm, N M

    2001-01-01

    A residential nursing home in Hong Kong was linked to the community geriatric assessment team based in a regional hospital using videoconferencing equipment operating at 384 kbit/s. The feasibility of providing nursing services and their acceptability to users were evaluated over 12 months. There were 198 occupants of the nursing home and their mean age was 82 years (range 60-101). Services included patient education regarding the use of a metered dose inhaler, wound management and a falls prevention programme, together with assessment of clients' need for infirmary care and the risk of aspiration. The acceptability of the system to the clients and nursing home staff was also assessed. It was found that 89% of such services could be carried out via telemedicine, and only 11% required on-site visits. There was an increase in the proportion of patients correctly using inhalers as well as a reduction in the number of falls. More consultations were conducted by the nurse (an increase of 76% per month) and an additional 8.4 patients per month could be attended to by the nurse compared with 5 patients when on-site visits were used. Acceptability to clients and nursing home staff was good. The problem of lack of resources to support elderly residential care institutions makes service delivery via telemedicine appear economically attractive, as well as facilitating improvements in the quality of long-term care.

  6. Incorporating geriatrics into undergraduate medical education in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Tohme, Rania A; Hajjar, Ramzi R

    2015-01-01

    Although the proportion of older adults in Lebanon is expected to increase rapidly over the next few decades, the current healthcare workforce is unprepared to address the needs of this population. Currently, emphasis on geriatrics is lacking in medical education curricula of most universities in Lebanon, and there is a shortage of geriatricians in the country. In this paper we present specific methods of integrating geriatrics into the undergraduate medical curriculum based on the experience of medical schools in the United States. Incorporating geriatrics into the medical curriculum requires support from deans and faculty members at medical schools, as well as training of non-geriatricians to teach geriatrics within their specialty. Geriatrics training can be gradually incorporated into existing courses throughout the four years of medical school, and should consist of a holistic approach that teaches students how to diagnose, treat, and interact with older adults and their caregivers while being mindful of their psychological, physical and social wellbeing. Increasing exposure to geriatric education during medical school promises to increase interest in geriatrics, and ultimately help address the shortage of geriatricians in the country.

  7. Geriatric Syndromes in Older HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Meredith; Covinsky, Kenneth E.; Valcour, Victor; Miao, Yinghui; Madamba, Joy; Lampiris, Harry; Cenzer, Irena Stijacic; Martin, Jeffrey; Deeks, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Geriatric syndromes such as falls, frailty, and functional impairment are multifactorial conditions used to identify vulnerable older adults. Limited data exists on these conditions in older HIV-infected adults and no studies have comprehensively examined these conditions. Methods Geriatric syndromes including falls, urinary incontinence, functional impairment, frailty, sensory impairment, depression and cognitive impairment were measured in a cross-sectional study of HIV-infected adults age 50 and older who had an undetectable viral load on antiretroviral therapy (ART). We examined both HIV and non-HIV related predictors of geriatric syndromes including sociodemographics, number of co-morbidities and non-antiretroviral medications, and HIV specific variables in multivariate analyses. Results We studied 155 participants with a median age of 57 (IQR 54-62); (94%) were men. Pre-frailty (56%), difficulty with instrumental activities of daily living (46%), and cognitive impairment (47%) were the most frequent geriatric syndromes. Lower CD4 nadir (IRR 1.16, 95% CI 1.06-1.26), non-white race (IRR 1.38, 95% CI 1.10-1.74), and increasing number of comorbidities (IRR 1.09, 95%CI 1.03-1.15) were associated with increased risk of having more geriatric syndromes. Conclusions Geriatric syndromes are common in older HIV infected adults. Treatment of comorbidities and early initiation of ART may help to prevent development of these age related complications. Clinical care of older HIV-infected adults should consider incorporation of geriatric principles. PMID:26009828

  8. Vascular trauma in geriatric patients: a national trauma databank review.

    PubMed

    Konstantinidis, Agathoklis; Inaba, Kenji; Dubose, Joe; Barmparas, Galinos; Lam, Lydia; Plurad, David; Branco, Bernardino C; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2011-10-01

    The epidemiology of vascular injuries in the geriatric patient population has not been described. The purpose of this study was to examine nationwide data on vascular injuries in the geriatric patients and to compare this with the nongeriatric adult patients with respect to the incidence, injury mechanisms, and outcomes. Geriatric patients aged 65 or older with at least one traumatic vascular injury were compared with an adult cohort aged 16 years to 64 years with a vascular injury using the National Trauma Databank version 7.0. During the study period, 29,736 (1.6%) patients with a vascular injury were identified. Of those, geriatric patients accounted for 7.6% (2,268) and the nongeriatric adult patients accounted for 83.1% (n=24,703). Compared with the nongeriatric adult patients, the geriatric vascular patients had a significantly higher Injury Severity Score (26.6±17.0 vs. 21.3±16.7; p<0.001) and less frequently sustained penetrating injuries (16.1% vs. 54.1%; p<0.001). The most commonly injured vessels in the elderly were vessels of the chest (n=637, 40.2%), including the thoracic aorta and innominate and subclavian vessels. The overall incidence of thoracic aorta injuries was significantly higher in geriatric patients (33.0% vs. 13.9%; p<0.001) and increased linearly with progressing age. After adjusting for confounding factors, geriatric patients demonstrated a fourfold increase in mortality following vascular injuries (adjusted odds ratio, 3.9; 95% confidence interval, 3.32-4.58; p<0.001). Vascular trauma is rare in the geriatric patient population. These injuries are predominantly blunt, with the thoracic aorta being the most commonly injured vessel. Although vascular injuries occur less frequently than in the nongeriatric cohort, in the geriatric patient, vascular injury is associated with a fourfold increase in adjusted mortality.

  9. Everyday Excellence: A Framework for Professional Nursing Practice in Long-Term Care

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Stacie Salsbury; Specht, Janet Pringle; Karlman, Susan E.

    2009-01-01

    Registered nurses make measurable contributions to the health and wellness of persons living in nursing homes. However, most nursing homes do not employ adequate numbers of professional nurses with specialized training in the nursing care of older adults to positively impact resident outcomes. As a result, many people never receive excellent geriatric nursing while living in a long-term care facility. Nurses have introduced various professional practice models into health care institutions as tools for leading nursing practice, improving client outcomes, and achieving organizational goals. Problematically, few professional practice models have been implemented in nursing homes. This article introduces an evidence-based framework for professional nursing practice in long-term care. The Everyday Excellence framework is based upon eight guiding principles: Valuing, Envisioning, Peopling, Securing, Learning, Empowering, Leading, and Advancing Excellence. Future research will evaluate the usefulness of this framework for professional nursing practice. PMID:20077966

  10. Telemedicine: a pilot study in nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Hui, E; Woo, J; Hjelm, M; Zhang, Y T; Tsui, H T

    2001-01-01

    Telemedicine has been applied successfully in various fields of medicine. This mode of health care delivery may potentially be useful in supporting frail nursing home residents who require multidisciplinary geriatric services. To assess the feasibility of telemedicine in providing geriatric services to nursing home residents, and whether this mode of care resulted in increased productivity and savings. A local 200-bed nursing home supported by the Community Geriatric Assessment Team (CGAT) was recruited. Over a 1-year period, teleconferencing was used to replace conventional geriatric outreach services. The feasibility of telemedicine was evaluated by participating specialists. Productivity gains, consumption of hospital services and user satisfaction were measured. Telemedicine was adequate for service delivery in up to 99% of cases, depending on the specialty. A greater number of clients were served and follow-up intervals were shortened. The service was cheaper than conventional outreach or clinic activities, and acceptable to users and clients. In particular, savings were made through a 9% reduction in visits to the Accidents and Emergency Department and in 11% fewer admissions to acute hospital wards. telemedicine is a feasible means of delivering multidisciplinary care to frail nursing home residents, and may result in increased productivity and significant savings.

  11. Geriatric Assessment-Guided Care Processes for Older Adults: A Delphi Consensus of Geriatric Oncology Experts.

    PubMed

    Mohile, Supriya Gupta; Velarde, Carla; Hurria, Arti; Magnuson, Allison; Lowenstein, Lisa; Pandya, Chintan; O'Donovan, Anita; Gorawara-Bhat, Rita; Dale, William

    2015-09-01

    Structured care processes that provide a framework for how oncologists can incorporate geriatric assessment (GA) into clinical practice could improve outcomes for vulnerable older adults with cancer, a growing population at high risk of toxicity from cancer treatment. We sought to obtain consensus from an expert panel on the use of GA in clinical practice and to develop algorithms of GA-guided care processes. The Delphi technique, a well-recognized structured and reiterative process to reach consensus, was used. Participants were geriatric oncology experts who attended NIH-funded U13 or Cancer and Aging Research Group conferences. Consensus was defined as an interquartile range of 2 or more units, or 66.7% or greater, selecting a utility/helpfulness rating of 7 or greater on a 10-point Likert scale. For nominal data, consensus was defined as agreement among 66.7% or more of the group. From 33 invited, 30 participants completed all 3 rounds. Most experts (75%) used GA in clinical care, and the remainder were involved in geriatric oncology research. The panel met consensus that "all patients aged 75 years or older and those who are younger with age-related health concerns" should undergo GA and that all domains (function, physical performance, comorbidity/polypharmacy, cognition, nutrition, psychological status, and social support) should be included. Consensus was met for how GA could guide nononcologic interventions and cancer treatment decisions. Algorithms for GA-guided care processes were developed. This Delphi investigation of geriatric oncology experts demonstrated that GA should be performed for older patients with cancer to guide care processes. Copyright © 2015 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  12. Advancing Geriatrics Education Through a Faculty Development Program for Geriatrics-Oriented Clinician Educators.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Sandro O; White, Heidi K; Buhr, Gwendolen T; Elbert-Avila, Katja; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Heflin, Mitchell T

    2015-12-01

    Geriatrician and nongeriatrician faculty need instruction as teachers to provide quality training for a broader community of physicians who can care for the expanding population of older adults. Educators at Duke University designed a program to equip geriatrician and nongeriatrician faculty to develop quality educational programs and teach medical learners about geriatrics. Eighty-three faculty representing 52 institutions from across the United States participated in mini-fellowship programs (2005-09) consisting of workshops and 1-year follow-up mentoring by Duke faculty. Participants attended 1-week on-campus sessions on curriculum development and teaching skills and designed and implemented a curriculum in their home institution. Participant specialties included general medicine (nearly 50%), family medicine, surgery, psychiatry, rehabilitation medicine, and emergency medicine. Pre- and postprogram self-efficacy surveys, program evaluation surveys, and 6- and 12-month progress reports on scholars' educational projects were used to assess the effect of the Duke mini-fellowship programs on participants' educational practices. Forty-four scholars (56%) completed the end-of-year self-efficacy survey and end-of-program evaluation. Self-efficacy results indicated significant gains (P < .001) in 12 items assessed at 1 week and 1 year. Scholars reported the largest average gains at 1 year in applying adult learning principles in the design of educational programs (1.72), writing measurable learning objectives (1.51), and identifying optimal instructional methods to deliver learning objectives (1.50). Participants described improved knowledge and skills in designing curricula, implemented new and revised geriatrics curricula, and demonstrated commitment to faculty development and improving learning experiences for medical learners. This faculty development program improved participants' self-efficacy in curriculum design and teaching and enhanced geriatrics education in

  13. [Telereha--special challenges for telemedicine in geriatric rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Mix, S; Borchelt, M; Nieczaj, R; Trilhof, G; Steinhagen-Thiessen, E

    2002-01-01

    Modern telecommunication technology has the potential to improve the quality of life for elders with physical and mental impairments as well as for their caregiving relatives. This can be viewed as an opportunity to establish and maintain instant and personalized access to various medical services in a situation where increasing needs are opposed to decreasing resources. However, it is not yet clear whether telematics is adequate, efficient, and effective in supporting care for geriatric patients. Results of a tele-rehabilitation project ("TeleReha", conducted at the Berlin Geriatric Center) which comprised mobility-impaired patients caregiving relatives and geriatric professionals, showed that participants regard telecommunicational and communicational needs.

  14. [Quality of life and pain in hospitalized geriatric patients].

    PubMed

    Pipam, W; Penz, H; Janig, H; Plank, H; Gatternig, K; Likar, R

    2008-02-01

    To determine objective and subjective indications of quality of life in hospitalized geriatric patients. Data were collected on 267 items using standardized interviews of 90 patients, including B-L and SF-36. In comparison to the control population, geriatric patients have worse SF-36 values; 91% have pain, and 63% depression and elevated B-L values. Pain therapy is usually with non-opiates and with warm/cold physical therapies. Pain therapy in the geriatric population surveyed does not reach the same standard as is usually offered to hospitalized medical and surgical patients.

  15. Telemedicine for Specialist Geriatric Care in Small Rural Hospitals: Preliminary Data.

    PubMed

    Gray, Leonard C; Fatehi, Farhad; Martin-Khan, Melinda; Peel, Nancye M; Smith, Anthony C

    2016-06-01

    Small rural hospitals admit and manage older adults who, in city hospitals, would usually be offered geriatrician-supported comprehensive geriatric assessment and coordinated subacute care if required. Distance and diseconomies of scale prohibit access to the conventional in-person approach. A telegeriatric service model involving a geriatrician consulting remotely using wireless, mobile, high-definition videoconferencing; a trained host nurse at the rural site; structured geriatric assessment configured on a web-based clinical decision support system; routine weekly virtual rounds; and support from a local multidisciplinary team was established to overcome these barriers. This was a prospective observational study to examine the feasibility and sustainability of the model. Patient characteristics were recorded using the interRAI Acute Care assessment system. Usage patterns were derived from health service data sets and a service statistics database. Patients had characteristics that are consistent with characteristics of individuals typically referred for geriatric assessment. Overall, 53% of patients had cognitive impairment, 75% had limitations with activities of daily living, and the average Frailty Index was 0.44 ± 0.12. Stable patterns of consultation occurred within 6 months of start-up and continued uninterrupted for the remainder of the 24-month observation period. The estimated overall rate of initial consultation was 1.83 cases per occupied bed per year and 2.66 review cases per occupied bed per year. The findings indicate that the model was feasible and was sustained throughout and beyond the study period. This telegeriatric service model appears suitable for use in small rural hospitals.

  16. Controlling urinary tract infections associated with intermittent bladder catheterization in geriatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Girard, R; Gaujard, S; Pergay, V; Pornon, P; Martin Gaujard, G; Vieux, C; Bourguignon, L

    2015-07-01

    Controlling urinary tract infections (UTIs) associated with intermittent catheterization in geriatric patients. After a local epidemiological study identified high rates of UTI, a multi-disciplinary working group implemented and evaluated corrective measures. In 2009, a one-month prospective study measured the incidence of UTI, controlled for risk factors and exposure, in six geriatric hospitals. In 2010, a self-administered questionnaire on practices was administered to physicians and nurses working in these geriatric units. In 2011, the working group developed a multi-modal programme to: improve understanding of micturition, measurement of bladder volume and indications for catheter drainage; limit available medical devices; and improve prescription and traceability procedures. Detailed training was provided to all personnel on all sites. The epidemiological study was repeated in 2012 to assess the impact of the programme. Over 1500 patients were included in the 2009 study. The incidence of acquired infection was 4.8%. The infection rate was higher in patients with intermittent catheters than in patients with indwelling catheters (29.7 vs 9.9 UTI per 100 patients, P = 0.1013) which contradicts the literature. In 2010, the 269 responses to the questionnaire showed that staff did not consider catheterization to place patients at risk of infection, staff had poor knowledge of the recommended indications and techniques, and the equipment varied widely between units. Following implementation of the programme, the study was repeated in 2012 with over 1500 patients. The frequency of UTI in patients with intermittent catheters fell to rates in the published literature. Multi-modal programmes are an effective means to control UTI. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Can geriatric hip fractures be managed effectively within a level 1 trauma center?

    PubMed

    Ling, Shi-Neng James; Kleimeyer, Christopher; Lynch, Genni; Burmeister, Elizabeth; Kennedy, Diana; Bell, Kate; Watkins, Leith; Cooke, Cameron

    2015-03-01

    To determine whether geriatric hip fractures can be managed effectively within a level 1 trauma center. A prospective observational cohort study with a historical control group. Level 1 trauma center. A total of 199 patients admitted under our hip fracture service were prospectively identified from 2011-2012. These were compared with 191 hip fracture patients who were admitted before the service. The hip fracture service includes coadmission under an orthopaedic and a geriatric team. A daily, consultant-led operating list was made available for hip fracture surgery. A "neck of femur" nurse was employed to coordinate patient care. Time to surgery, length of stay, discharge destination, and mortality. A cost-benefit analysis and a comparison with a lower acuity hospital were also performed. Since the hip fracture service, more patients underwent surgery within 48 hours (67% vs. 52%; P = 0.004), the length of stay significantly decreased from 26 to 22 days (P = 0.004), significantly more patients were admitted to the rehabilitation unit (58.7% vs. 3.5%; P < 0.001) and ultimately discharged to their own residence (51.6% vs. 40.5%; P = 0.034). Inpatient mortality rates did not change significantly (7.5% vs. 6.8%; P = 0.780). The estimated cost saving in 2011 was $981,040. Only minor changes are required to significantly improve the management of geriatric hip fracture patients. These patients can be managed effectively within a level 1 trauma center when an organized service prioritizing these patients is used. Therapeutic level III. See Instructions for authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  18. [Impact of Geriatric Drug Guidelines on the Quality Requirement of Elderly Patients].

    PubMed

    Fauvelle, Francis; Kabirian, Fariba; Domingues, Alison; Tubach, Florence; Gault, Nathalie; Abbas, Rachid

    2015-01-01

    Elderly with several pathologies are usually treated with many drugs, and are exposed to a majored risk of drug-induced adverse effects. A network of local nursing homes (EHPAD) in the south Seine-Saint-Denis area (France) created a geriatric drug guidelines to improve the quality of the drugs prescriptions. This study assesses the conformity of prescriptions in elderly patients prior and after the distribution of the booklet. This before and after design study focused on the drug prescriptions for patients in eight EHPAD followed for two randomly given days in 2012 (n = 503) and 2013 (n = 334). The geriatric drug guidelines included a list of medicines suitable for the elderly (conformity list) and recommendations for prescription and monitoring. Data collection was conducted from medical records and interviews with coordinators doctors and nursing staff in nursing homes. A 6 items-quality score was calculated, ranging from 0 (lowest quality) to 6 (highest quality). Median age, weight and creatinine level were respectively 88 years, 61.0 kg, and 74.9 μmol/L (prior) and 88 years, 59.6 kg, and 77.0 μmol/L (after). Median times of latest serum creatinine dosage were 112 days (prior) and 108 days (after). The median number of prescribed drugs was 8 per resident during the two period of study. The conformity rate of prescription was better prior the distribution of the guidelines, respectively 87.5% and 80.0% (p<10⁻³). The average formal quality score was better after the distribution of the booklet increasing form 4.23 to 4.40 points (p<10⁻⁴). For high risk inducing drugs, monitoring was prescribed in 34.2% (prior) and 32.4% (after). This study shows that the drug geriatric guidelines does not improve prescription conformity and monitoring for high risk drugs, but it does significantly improve the median formal quality score. © 2015 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  19. Changing the Course of Geriatrics Education: An Evaluation of the First Cohort of Reynolds Geriatrics Education Programs

    PubMed Central

    Reuben, David B.; Bachrach, Peter S.; McCreath, Heather; Simpson, Deborah; Bragg, Elizabeth J.; Warshaw, Gregg A.; Snyder, Rani; Frank, Janet C.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Purpose To describe geriatric training initiatives implemented as a result of Reynolds Foundation grants awarded in 2001 (and concluding in 2005) and evaluate the resulting structure, process, and outcome changes Methods Cross-sectional survey of program directors at 10 academic institutions augmented by review of reports and secondary analyses of existing databases to identify structural and process measures of curriculum implementation, participation rates, and students’ responses to Association of American Medical Colleges Medical School Graduation Questionnaires about geriatrics training. Results All 10 institutions reported structural changes including newly developed or revised geriatric rotations or courses for their trainees. Most used online internet educational materials, sent students to new training venues, incorporated geriatric case discussions, implemented standardized patients, and utilized digital media. On average, each institution trained over 1,000 medical students, 500 residents, 100 faculty, and 700 non-faculty community physicians during the award period. Reynolds institutions also provided geriatrics training across 22 non-primary care disciplines. Eight schools implemented formal faculty development programs. By 2005, students at Reynolds-supported schools reported higher levels of geriatrics/gerontology education and more exposure to expert geriatric care by the attending faculty compared to students at non-Reynolds schools. Innovations and products were disseminated via journal publications, conference presentations, and POGOe (Portal of Geriatric Online Education). Conclusions The investment of extramural and institutional funds in geriatrics education has substantially influenced undergraduate, graduate, and practicing physician education at Reynolds-supported schools. The full impact of these programs on care of older persons will not be known until these trainees enter practice and educational careers. PMID:19704195

  20. Gastrointestinal and other vulnerabilities for geriatric globetrotters.

    PubMed

    Gordon, M E

    1991-05-01

    An awareness of the journey's destination and the consequential events along the way will better enhance our diagnoses and in turn sustain our elder "homo turisticus," no longer an endangered species but worthy of our continued compassionate care while enjoying their longevity. All potential treacheries must be assessed by each elderly traveler. It may be the first of many trips or the last opportunity to view and relate to the sequoia's longevity, hike the Scottish highlands, view the game of the Serengeti, explore the Nordic fjords, indulge in the Patagonian scenes of the Iguazú falls, seek the habitats of the Galápagos tortoise, partake of the photograph opportunities of Papua-New Guinea, or finalize that "last" business contract in the Orient. With consideration of these many vulnerabilities and potential hazards, why then undertake the journey? Perhaps our geriatric globetrotters give credence to the age-old saying (of unknown origin) "Running water never freezes."

  1. Approaching frailty as the new geriatric syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alexa, Ioana Dana; Ilie, Adina Carmen; Moroşanu, Anca; Voica, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Ageing is inevitably associated with a decline in physiologic reserves. Frailty results from reaching a threshold of decline across multiple organ systems. By consequence, it is associated with a high vulnerability and reduced ability to maintain homeostasis. This vulnerability is not only age-related, but also related to disability and comorbidity, as illustrated by three clinical cases. Sarcopenia, which is defined as age-related loss of muscle mass, is considered to be a central manifestation of frailty. In addition to being highly prevalent in elderly population, frailty also exerts a substantial impact on quality of life. As it is extremely challenging by defying conventional medication and involving new therapeutically approaches, frailty fully qualifies as a new geriatric syndrome.

  2. The geriatric interdisciplinary team training (GITT) program.

    PubMed

    Fulmer, Terry; Flaherty, Ellen; Hyer, Kathryn

    2003-01-01

    Geriatric interdisciplinary team training (GITT) is an initiative funded by the John A. Hartford Foundation since 1995. Building from the substantial knowledge gained from the Veteran's Administration project in interdisciplinary team training and lessons from the Pew Foundation initiative, GITT was reconceived by the Foundation to address the need for teams in the care of older adults in the new era of managed care and health care cost containment. This training program has served to help us understand attitudes toward teams, how teams function, and how teams should be trained in the changing health care environment, where length of stay is dramatically different from the earlier team training projects. This introductory paper provides an overview of GITT, and the companion papers give detail of the GITT curricula, measures and lessons learned.

  3. Emergency general surgery in the geriatric patient.

    PubMed

    Desserud, K F; Veen, T; Søreide, K

    2016-01-01

    Emergency general surgery in the elderly is a particular challenge to the surgeon in charge of their care. The aim was to review contemporary aspects of managing elderly patients needing emergency general surgery and possible alterations to their pathways of care. This was a narrative review based on a PubMed/MEDLINE literature search up until 15 September 2015 for publications relevant to emergency general surgery in the geriatric patient. The number of patients presenting as an emergency with a general surgical condition increases with age. Up to one-quarter of all emergency admissions to hospital may be for general surgical conditions. Elderly patients are a particular challenge owing to added co-morbidity, use of drugs and risk of poor outcome. Frailty is an important potential risk factor, but difficult to monitor or manage in the emergency setting. Risk scores are not available universally. Outcomes are usually severalfold worse than after elective surgery, in terms of both higher morbidity and increased mortality. A care bundle including early diagnosis, resuscitation and organ system monitoring may benefit the elderly in particular. Communication with the patient and relatives throughout the care pathway is essential, as indications for surgery, level of care and likely outcomes may evolve. Ethical issues should also be addressed at every step on the pathway of care. Emergency general surgery in the geriatric patient needs a tailored approach to improve outcomes and avoid futile care. Although some high-quality studies exist in related fields, the overall evidence base informing perioperative acute care for the elderly remains limited. © 2015 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The influence of work characteristics, emotional display rules and affectivity on burnout and job satisfaction: A survey among geriatric care workers.

    PubMed

    Rouxel, Géraldine; Michinov, Estelle; Dodeler, Virginie

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that geriatric care employees are exposed to a large number of factors that can affect their levels of job satisfaction and occupational stress. Although working with elderly people is emotionally demanding, little research has been done on the role played by perceptions of emotional display rules, alongside more traditional work characteristics and individual factors, in the prediction of geriatric care employees' wellbeing. The aim of the present study was to examine the role played by work characteristics (job demands, job control, emotional display rules) and individual (affectivity) factors to predict job satisfaction and burnout among French geriatric care nurses. Questionnaires were sent to 891 employees working in 32 geriatric care centers in France. A total of 371 valid questionnaires (response rate: 41.60%) were analyzed using structural equation modeling techniques. Results revealed two main processes of burnout and job satisfaction among women geriatric care workers, namely a salutogenic process and a pathogenic process. As expected, negative affectivity, low job status, perceived negative display rules and job demands are involved in the pathogenic process; while positive affectivity, perceived positive display rules and job control are implied in the salutogenic one. More specifically, as expected, negative affectivity is a positive predictor of burnout, both directly and indirectly through its impact on perceived negative display rules and job demands. Moreover, negative affectivity was negatively related to job satisfaction. Simultaneously, positive affectivity can predict job satisfaction, both directly and indirectly through its impact on perceived positive display rules and job control. Positive affectivity is also a negative predictor of burnout. Practical implications are discussed to support intervention programs that develop healthy workplaces, and also to inform nurses about how to manage emotional display

  5. The effect of chlorhexidine in reducing oral colonisation in geriatric patients: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sharif-Abdullah, Sharifah Shafinaz Binti; Chong, Mei Chan; Surindar-Kaur, Surat Singh; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul Bahyah; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Inadequate oral care has been implicated in the development of aspiration pneumonia in frail geriatric patients and is a major cause of mortality, due to the colonisation of microbes in vulnerable patients. This type of pneumonia has been associated with an increase in respiratory pathogens in the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chlorhexidine compared to routine oral care in edentulous geriatric inpatients. METHODS A double-blind, parallel-group randomised controlled trial was carried out. The intervention group received oral care with chlorhexidine 0.2%, while the control group received routine oral care with thymol. Nurses provided oral care with assigned solutions of 20 mL once daily over seven days. Oral cavity assessment using the Brief Oral Health Status Examination form was performed before each oral care procedure. Data on medication received and the subsequent development of aspiration pneumonia was recorded. An oral swab was performed on Day 7 to obtain specimens to test for colonisation. RESULTS The final sample consisted of 35 (control) and 43 (intervention) patients. Chlorhexidine was effective in reducing oral colonisation compared to routine oral care with thymol (p < 0.001). The risk of oral bacterial colonisation was nearly three times higher in the thymol group compared to the chlorhexidine group. CONCLUSION The use of chlorhexidine 0.2% significantly reduced oral colonisation and is recommended as an easier and more cost-effective alternative for oral hygiene. PMID:27211885

  6. Shared medical appointments to screen for geriatric syndromes: preliminary data from a quality improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    May, Suepattra G; Cheng, Peter H; Tietbohl, Caroline K; Trujillo, Laurel; Reilly, Kelly; Frosch, Dominick L; Lin, Grace A

    2014-12-01

    Older adults are at greater risk of developing conditions that affect health outcomes, quality of life, and costs of care. Screening for geriatric conditions such as memory loss, fall risk, and depression may contribute to the prevention of adverse physical and mental comorbidities, unnecessary hospitalizations, and premature nursing home admissions. Because screening is not consistently performed in primary care settings, a shared medical appointment (SMA) program was developed to fill this gap in care. The goals of the program were to improve early identification of at-risk individuals and ensure appropriate follow-up for memory loss, fall risk, and depression; facilitate discussion about prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of these conditions; implement strategies to reduce risks for these conditions; and increase access to screening and expand preventive health services for older adults. Between August 2011 and May 2013, 136 individuals aged 60 and older participated in the program. Three case studies highlighting the psychosocial and physiological findings of participation in the program are presented. Preliminary data suggest that SMAs are an effective model of regularly screening at-risk older adults that augments primary care practice by facilitating early detection and referral for syndromes that may otherwise be missed or delayed. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  7. The effect of chlorhexidine in reducing oral colonisation in geriatric patients: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sharif-Abdullah, Sharifah Shafinaz Binti; Chong, Mei Chan; Surindar-Kaur, Surat Singh; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul Bahyah; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2016-05-01

    Inadequate oral care has been implicated in the development of aspiration pneumonia in frail geriatric patients and is a major cause of mortality, due to the colonisation of microbes in vulnerable patients. This type of pneumonia has been associated with an increase in respiratory pathogens in the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chlorhexidine compared to routine oral care in edentulous geriatric inpatients. A double-blind, parallel-group randomised controlled trial was carried out. The intervention group received oral care with chlorhexidine 0.2%, while the control group received routine oral care with thymol. Nurses provided oral care with assigned solutions of 20 mL once daily over seven days. Oral cavity assessment using the Brief Oral Health Status Examination form was performed before each oral care procedure. Data on medication received and the subsequent development of aspiration pneumonia was recorded. An oral swab was performed on Day 7 to obtain specimens to test for colonisation. The final sample consisted of 35 (control) and 43 (intervention) patients. Chlorhexidine was effective in reducing oral colonisation compared to routine oral care with thymol (p < 0.001). The risk of oral bacterial colonisation was nearly three times higher in the thymol group compared to the chlorhexidine group. The use of chlorhexidine 0.2% significantly reduced oral colonisation and is recommended as an easier and more cost-effective alternative for oral hygiene. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  8. [Catalogue of learning goals for pregraduate education in geriatric medicine. A recommendation of the German Geriatric Society (DGG), the German Society of Gerontology and Geriatrics (DGGG), the Austrian Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology (ÖGGG) and the Swiss Society of Geriatric Medicine (SFGG) on the basis of recommendations of the European Union of Medical Specialists Geriatric Medicine Section (UEMS-GMS) 2013].

    PubMed

    Singler, K; Stuck, A E; Masud, T; Goeldlin, A; Roller, R E

    2014-11-01

    Sound knowledge in the care and management of geriatric patients is essential for doctors in almost all medical subspecialties. Therefore, it is important that pregraduate medical education adequately covers the field of geriatric medicine. However, in most medical faculties in Europe today, learning objectives in geriatric medicine are often substandard or not even explicitly addressed. As a first step to encourage undergraduate teaching in geriatric medicine, the European Union of Medical Specialists -Geriatric Medicine Section (UEMS-GMS) recently developed a catalogue of learning goals using a modified Delphi technique in order to encourage education in this field. This catalogue of learning objectives for geriatric medicine focuses on the minimum requirements with specific learning goals in knowledge, skills and attitudes that medical students should have acquired by the end of their studies.In order to ease the implementation of this new, competence-based curriculum among the medical faculties in universities teaching in the German language, the authors translated the published English language curriculum into German and adapted it according to medical language and terms used at German-speaking medical faculties and universities of Austria, Germany and Switzerland. This article contains the final German translation of the curriculum. The Geriatric Medicine Societies of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland formally endorse the present curriculum and recommend that medical faculties adapt their curricula for undergraduate teaching based on this catalogue.

  9. Nursing staff views of barriers to physical restraint reduction in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Eun-Hi; Evans, Lois K

    2012-12-01

    There are few studies globally regarding the barriers to restraint-reduction. The purpose of this study was to describe the views of nursing staff (both nurses and geriatric care assistants) regarding the barriers to reducing physical restraint use in Korean nursing homes. Forty registered nurse and geriatric care assistant informants participated in the first round of interviews and 16 of them participated in second confirmatory interviews. All interviews were conducted on site, one-on-one and face-to-face, using semi-structured interview protocols. Qualitative descriptive method was used and qualitative content analysis was employed. Six themes were identified: (a) being too busy, (b) lack of resources, (c) beliefs and concerns, (d) lack of education, (e) differences and inconsistencies, and (f) relationship issues. The findings of this study provide a valuable basis for developing restraint reduction education programs. Korean national leaders and nursing homes should develop and employ practice guidelines regarding restraints, support nursing staff to follow the guidelines, provide more practical and professional education, employ alternative equipment, use a multidisciplinary team approach, and engage volunteers in care support as well as employ more nursing staff to achieve restraint-free care. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Geriatric syndromes in peri-operative elderly cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cicerchia, Marcella; Ceci, Moira; Locatelli, Carola; Gianni, Walter; Repetto, Lazzaro

    2010-09-01

    Due to the expanding geriatric population and the high incidence of cancer in this age group, there is an increased burden on clinical oncologists. Elderly patients suffer from one or more chronic diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases, COPD, or diabetes. Besides affecting life expectancy, comorbid conditions may complicate major surgery. Accurate prediction of surgical risk is of paramount importance. Numerous papers have documented that older patients can undergo surgery with similar cancer related survival to younger patients. It has been demonstrated that age related variables are associated with an increased risk in post-surgical complications. The term "geriatric syndrome" needs further clinical evaluation and understanding. It is used to capture those clinical conditions in older persons that do not fit into discrete disease categories. Geriatric syndromes including delirium, falls, frailty, dizziness, syncope and urinary incontinence, are among the most common conditions facing geriatricians. This article focuses on geriatric syndromes in post-surgical patients and their management.

  11. Curricular framework: core competencies in multicultural geriatric care.

    PubMed

    Xakellis, George; Brangman, Sharon A; Hinton, W Ladson; Jones, Vida Y; Masterman, Donna; Pan, Cynthia X; Rivero, Jorge; Wallhagen, Margaret; Yeo, Gwen

    2004-01-01

    Strategies to reduce the documented disparities in health and health care for the rapidly growing numbers of older patients from diverse ethnic populations include increased cultural competence of providers. To assist geriatric faculty in medical and other health professional schools develop cultural competence training for their ethnogeriatric programs, the University of California Academic Geriatric Resource Program partnered with the Ethnogeriatric Committee of the American Geriatrics Society to develop a curricular framework. The framework includes core competencies based on the format of the Core Competencies for the Care of Older Patients developed by the Education Committee of the American Geriatrics Society. Competencies in attitudes, knowledge, and skills for medical providers caring for elders from diverse populations are specified. Also included are recommended teaching strategies and resources for faculty to pursue the development of full curricula.

  12. Geriatric education in undergraduate and graduate levels in Latin America.

    PubMed

    López, Jorge H; Reyes-Ortiz, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    A recent dramatic increase in the elderly population has not been accompanied by a parallel increase in specialized health care professionals in Latin America. The main purpose of this work was to determine the stage of geriatrics teaching for undergraduate and graduate medical levels in Latin America. Using a questionnaire given in person and online, the authors surveyed geriatricians from 16 countries: eight from South America and eight from Central America. Among 308 medical schools, 35% taught undergraduate geriatrics, ranging from none in Uruguay, Venezuela, and Guatemala to 82% in Mexico. The authors identified 36 programs in 12 countries with graduate medical education in geriatrics, ranging from 2 to 5 years of training. The authors conclude that although the population is aging rapidly in Latin American countries, there has been a slow development of geriatrics teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate levels in the region.

  13. Electroconvulsive Therapy in the Elderly: New Findings in Geriatric Depression.

    PubMed

    Geduldig, Emma T; Kellner, Charles H

    2016-04-01

    This paper reviews recent research on the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in elderly depressed patients. The PubMed database was searched for literature published within the past 4 years, using the search terms: "electroconvulsive elderly," "electroconvulsive geriatric," "ECT and elderly," and "ECT elderly cognition." The studies in this review indicate excellent efficacy for ECT in geriatric patients. Adverse cognitive effects of ECT in this population are usually transient and not typically severe. In addition, continuation/maintenance ECT (C/M-ECT) may be a favorable strategy for relapse prevention in the elderly after a successful acute course of ECT. ECT is an important treatment option for depressed geriatric patients with severe and/or treatment-resistant illness. New data add to the evidence demonstrating that ECT is a highly effective, safe, and well-tolerated antidepressant treatment option for geriatric patients.

  14. Humanities and Geriatric Education: a Strategy for Recruitment?

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Christopher; Martin, Ruth Elwood

    2015-01-01

    Ageing is a common subject in arts and literature as it is a universal experience. The use of the humanities in medical education may have a positive effect on trainees’ attitude to caring for seniors and on geriatrics as a career choice. This paper summarizes the role of humanities in medical education and provides some examples and thoughts on how humanities curriculum can be used in geriatric teaching. PMID:25825611

  15. The Relative Value Unit in academic geriatrics: incentive or impediment?

    PubMed

    Resnick, Neil M; Radulovich, Nichole

    2014-03-01

    Although the number of older adults is rapidly expanding, the number of healthcare professionals trained in geriatrics is small and declining. The reasons are multifaceted, but because responsibility for training such professionals resides largely in academic health centers (AHCs), their support for geriatrics is critical. As AHCs face increasing financial pressure, many are seeking metrics to measure productivity and the Relative Value Unit (RVU) may be the one most commonly selected. Yet little is known about the RVU's effect on geriatric programs. Review of the literature and a survey of the leaders of the Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs suggest that the advantages of an RVU-based metric are likely eclipsed by its negative impact on the care of older adults, the ability of academic geriatrics to accomplish its mission, and even the survival of geriatrics. If the RVU is to continue to be used as the index of productivity, it should be modified--by reweighting its codes (or by adding new ones)--and complemented by interventions to ensure patient access, care quality, and efficiency. Because an alternative metric, such as a Patient-based Value Unit may be preferable, this article describes the principles on which one might be based. Regardless, urgent action is required by all stakeholders to address this issue. Without it, the future of academic geriatrics--and with it the innovative care models, research, and training the nation needs to improve care and bend the cost curve--will be difficult if not impossible to sustain. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. Geriatric conditions develop in middle-aged adults with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cigolle, Christine T; Lee, Pearl G; Langa, Kenneth M; Lee, Yuo-Yu; Tian, Zhiyi; Blaum, Caroline S

    2011-03-01

    Geriatric conditions, collections of symptoms common in older adults and not necessarily associated with a specific disease, increase in prevalence with advancing age. These conditions are important contributors to the complex health status of older adults. Diabetes mellitus is known to co-occur with geriatric conditions in older adults and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of some conditions. To investigate the prevalence and incidence of geriatric conditions in middle-aged and older-aged adults with diabetes. Secondary analysis of nationally-representative, longitudinal health interview survey data (Health and Retirement Study waves 2004 and 2006). Respondents 51 years and older in 2004 (n=18,908). Diabetes mellitus. Eight geriatric conditions: cognitive impairment, falls, incontinence, low body mass index, dizziness, vision impairment, hearing impairment, pain. Adults with diabetes, compared to those without, had increased prevalence and increased incidence of geriatric conditions across the age spectrum (p< 0.01 for each age group from 51-54 years old to 75-79 years old). Differences between adults with and without diabetes were most marked in middle-age. Diabetes was associated with the two-year cumulative incidence of acquiring new geriatric conditions (odds ratio, 95% confidence interval: 1.8, 1.6-2.0). A diabetes-age interaction was discovered: as age increased, the association of diabetes with new geriatric conditions decreased. Middle-aged, as well as older-aged, adults with diabetes are at increased risk for the development of geriatric conditions, which contribute substantially to their morbidity and functional impairment. Our findings suggest that adults with diabetes should be monitored for the development of these conditions beginning at a younger age than previously thought.

  17. [The locations of mobile geriatric teams in France].

    PubMed

    Salles, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Mobile geriatric teams fulfil several missions in healthcare facilities. They work within and outside hospitals. A nationwide study was carried out in 2011 and a task force was created within the French geriatric and gerontology society (SFGG) to standardise the practices of these teams in France and emphasise their place at the heart of the health care pathway of the elderly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. [Antibiotic prescription usage and assessment in geriatric patients].

    PubMed

    Dinh, Aurélien; Davido, Benjamin; Salomon, Jérôme; Le Quintrec, Jean-Laurent; Teillet, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Due to the high risk of infection, the geriatric population is regularly subjected to antibiotics. Faced with bacterial resistance, particularly among elderly dependent patients, it is essential to promote proper use and correct prescription of antibiotics. A study evaluated antibiotic prescription in a geriatric hospital with 598 beds and highlighted the importance of collaboration between geriatricians and infectious disease specialists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Geriatrics for juniors: tomorrow's geriatricians or another lost tribe?

    PubMed

    Fisher, J M; Hunt, K; Garside, M J

    2014-01-01

    To meet the needs of the ageing population, more geriatric medicine doctors are required. We aimed to determine: (i) career preferences of junior doctors with an interest in geriatric medicine, (ii) factors influencing the likelihood of junior doctors undertaking a career in geriatric medicine and (iii) whether a geriatric medicine conference for junior doctors influenced their views on the specialty and their likelihood of choosing it as a career option. All delegates who registered to attend the 'Geriatrics for Juniors' conference (G4J) were invited to complete both a pre- and post-conference survey online. Delegates' free-text responses were subjected to thematic analysis. Differences between paired ordinal data from pre- and post-conference surveys were determined using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. A total of 108 delegates attended G4J. Pre- and post-conference survey response rates were 67% and 51% respectively. Commonly reported deterrents to a career in geriatric medicine included 'being the medical registrar' (27.1% of respondents) and 'second-class specialty' (20.6%). There was a statistically significant difference between pre- and post-conference responses, with a tendency towards less agreement with the statement 'the prospect of being the medical registrar puts me off applying for higher specialty training in geriatric medicine' (Z=-2.512; p=0.012). The perceived unattractive nature of the medical registrar role may deter some junior doctors from a career in geriatric medicine. A lack of clarity regarding the nature of the specialty still exists. Targeted educational interventions, such as G4J, may positively influence junior doctors' perceptions of the specialty and the role of the medical registrar.

  20. Establishing a Geriatric Psychiatric Consultation in a VA Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Baker, F M; Chrismer, Brady

    1995-01-01

    The authors describe the establishment of a Geriatric Psychiatry Consultation-Liaison Team (GPCLT) at a Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC) that previously had no organized geriatric psychiatric service. Geriatric psychiatric consultation was required by three intermediate-care units treating older, chronically medically ill veterans with psychiatric symptoms or disorders. The GPCLT comprised a black, female geriatric psychiatrist and a white, male social worker. This combination of disciplines maximized skills, and the ethnic-gender differences of team members addressed questions of racial tension and gender issues between patients and VAMC staff members. The compliance with recommendations of the GPCLT, ranging from 89% to 98% across the three units, its selection as a clinical site for a university-affiliated Geriatric Psychiatry Fellowship Program, and the increase in the total hours of social work time assigned to the GPCLT documented the positive perception of the team by both the VAMC and the affiliated university. Specific recommendations are presented for consideration by other, similar settings. Copyright © 1995 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Health Policy 2016 – Implications for Geriatric Urology

    PubMed Central

    Suskind, Anne M.; Clemens, J. Quentin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review The U.S. healthcare system is undergoing fundamental changes in an effort to improve access to care, curtail healthcare spending, and improve quality of care. These efforts largely focused on Medicare, and therefore will have a fundamental impact on the care of geriatric patients. This article reviews contemporary health policy issues, with a focus on how these issues may impact the care of geriatric urology patients. Recent Findings The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has broadened the scope of Medicare coverage. Future Medicare reimbursement will be increasingly tied to care coordination, quality reporting, and demonstration of appropriate outcomes. Additional research is needed to better define the comparative effectiveness of urologic therapies in geriatric patients. Workforce projections indicate that there is a shortage of urologists in many areas of the country, and that this shortage will worsen over time unless a new funding model is instituted for graduate medical education. Summary Medicare spending drives many health policy decisions. Therefore, few health policy topics are unique to geriatrics or geriatric urology. However, certain health policy topics (e.g., care coordination, risk-stratification) are particularly germaine to the elderly patients. Urologists with a particular interest in geriatric urology should be familiar with these issues. PMID:26765043

  2. [Quality assurance in geriatric rehabilitation--approaches and methods].

    PubMed

    Deckenbach, B; Borchelt, M; Steinhagen-Thiessen, E

    1997-08-01

    It did not take the provisions of the 5th Book of the Social Code for quality assurance issues to gain significance in the field of geriatric rehabilitation as well. While in the surgical specialties, experience in particular with external quality assurance have already been gathered over several years now, suitable concepts and methods for the new Geriatric Rehabilitation specialty are still in the initial stages of development. Proven methods from the industrial and service sectors, such as auditing, monitoring and quality circles, can in principle be drawn on for devising geriatric rehabilitation quality assurance schemes; these in particular need to take into account the multiple factors influencing the course and outcome of rehabilitation entailed by multimorbidity and multi-drug use; the eminent role of the social environment; therapeutic interventions by a multidisciplinary team; as well as the multi-dimensional nature of rehabilitation outcomes. Moreover, the specific conditions of geriatric rehabilitation require development not only of quality standards unique to this domain but also of quality assurance procedures specific to geriatrics. Along with a number of other methods, standardized geriatric assessment will play a crucial role in this respect.

  3. Review of efficacy and safety of laxatives use in geriatrics

    PubMed Central

    Izzy, Manhal; Malieckal, Anju; Little, Erin; Anand, Sury

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the efficacy and safety of pharmacological treatment of constipation in geriatrics. METHODS: PubMed, MEDLINE, google scholar, and Ovid were searched to identify human studies performed on the use of laxatives in elderly with constipation, which were conducted between January 1990 and January 2013 using the specified keywords. Controlled studies that enrolled geriatric patients with a diagnosis of constipation and addressed the efficacy and/or the safety of pharmacological treatments were included. Studies were excluded from this review if they were non-controlled trials, case series, or case reports. RESULTS: Out of twenty three studies we initially retrieved in our search, only nine studies met the eligibility criteria of being controlled trials within geriatrics. The laxatives examined in the nine studies were senna, lactulose, sorbital, polyethylene glycol (PEG), lubiprostone, linaclotide, and prucalopride. In those studies, senna combinations had a higher efficacy than sorbitol or lactulose as well as, a very good adverse effect profile. PEG was also shown to be safe and effective in geriatric population. Furthermore, it has been shown that PEG is as safe in geriatrics as in general population. New agents like lubiprostone and prucalopride show promising results but the data about these agents in geriatrics are still limited which warrants further investigation. CONCLUSION: Senna combinations and PEG appear to have a more favorable profile over the other traditionally used laxatives in elderly patients with constipation. PMID:27158549

  4. Effectiveness of Acute Geriatric Unit Care Using Acute Care for Elders Components: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Mary T; Persaud, Malini; Maimets, Ilo; O'Brien, Kelly; Brooks, Dina; Tregunno, Deborah; Schraa, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To compare the effectiveness of acute geriatric unit care, based on all or part of the Acute Care for Elders (ACE) model and introduced in the acute phase of illness or injury, with that of usual care. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of 13 randomized controlled and quasi-experimental trials with parallel comparison groups retrieved from multiple sources. Setting Acute care geriatric and nongeriatric hospital units. Participants Acutely ill or injured adults (N = 6,839) with an average age of 81. Interventions Acute geriatric unit care characterized by one or more ACE components: patient-centered care, frequent medical review, early rehabilitation, early discharge planning, prepared environment. Measurements Falls, pressure ulcers, delirium, functional decline at discharge from baseline 2-week prehospital and hospital admission statuses, length of hospital stay, discharge destination (home or nursing home), mortality, costs, and hospital readmissions. Results Acute geriatric unit care was associated with fewer falls (risk ratio (RR) = 0.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.29–0.88), less delirium (RR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.61–0.88), less functional decline at discharge from baseline 2-week prehospital admission status (RR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.78–0.97), shorter length of hospital stay (weighted mean difference (WMD) = −0.61, 95% CI = −1.16 to −0.05), fewer discharges to a nursing home (RR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.68–0.99), lower costs (WMD = −$245.80, 95% CI = −$446.23 to −$45.38), and more discharges to home (RR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.01–1.10). A nonsignificant trend toward fewer pressure ulcers was observed. No differences were found in functional decline between baseline hospital admission status and discharge, mortality, or hospital readmissions. Conclusion Acute geriatric unit care, based on all or part of the ACE model and introduced during the acute phase of older adults' illness or injury, improves patient- and system

  5. Lessons learned from narrative feedback of students on a geriatric training program.

    PubMed

    van de Pol, Marjolein H J; Lagro, Joep; Koopman, Elise L; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M; Fluit, Cornelia R M G; Lagro-Janssen, Antoine L M

    2016-02-17

    Geriatrics continues to draw insufficient numbers of medical students today. Currently, little is known regarding how education can motivate students to choose geriatrics. The authors' aim was to examine geriatrics from the students' perspective to identify elements that can be useful in education and improving attitudes toward, interest in, and knowledge about geriatrics. The authors analyzed narrative reflection essays of 36 students and clarified the themes from the essays during focus group sessions. Four overarching themes that influenced students' perspective on geriatrics were identified: professional identity, perception of geriatrics, geriatric-specific problems, and learning environment. Students have an inaccurate image of clinical practice and the medical professional identity, which has a negative impact on their attitude toward, interest in, and knowledge of geriatrics. Furthermore, this study yielded the important role of the hidden curriculum on professional identity, the novelty of geriatric-specific problems to students, and the importance of educational approach and good role models.

  6. Inter-professional clinical placements as a recruitment strategy in geriatrics: survey of students' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Grymonpre, Ruby; van Ineveld, Cornelia; Nelson, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Inter-professional (IP) education and clinical placements have been identified as educational recruitment strategies to address the health workforce shortage. The research question in this secondary analysis study was, "What are students' attitudes toward working in geriatric environments and as part of inter-professional collaborative teams?" A five-item survey was administered to 47 pre-licensure learners from five different health professional programs (medicine, nursing, pharmacy, occupational therapy and physical therapy). Findings suggest that students want to practise on IP teams, which may influence their graduate first choice of employment. Although stronger evidence is required, offering IP clinical placements may be an important recruitment strategy, especially for those sites traditionally deemed less desirable. Copyright © 2013 Longwoods Publishing.

  7. The Wisconsin Approach to Faculty Development in Geriatric Dentistry and the Duke Approach to Faculty Development in Geriatric Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shay, Kenneth; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Shay, Simpson, and Biernat describe geriatric dentistry training that included mentorship and shared experiences with physician trainees. Cohen and Lyles describe a fellowship program in which physicians care for older patients in unique settings and conduct research projects. (SK)

  8. Everyday excellence. A framework for professional nursing practice in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Stacie Salsbury; Specht, Janet P; Karlman, Susan E; Maas, Meridean L

    2008-07-01

    RNs make measurable contributions to the health and wellness of individuals living in nursing homes. However, most nursing homes do not employ adequate numbers of professional nurses with specialized training in the nursing care of older adults to positively affect resident outcomes. As a result, many people never receive excellent geriatric nursing while living in a long-term care facility. Nurses have introduced various professional practice models into health care institutions as tools for leading nursing practice, improving client outcomes, and achieving organizational goals. Problematically, few professional practice models have been implemented in nursing homes. This article introduces an evidence-based framework for professional nursing practice in long-term care. The Everyday Excellence framework is based on eight guiding principles: Valuing, Envisioning, Peopling, Securing, Learning, Empowering, Leading, and Advancing Excellence. Future research will evaluate the usefulness of this framework for professional nursing practice. Copyright 2009, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Interprofessional meetings in geriatric assessment units: a matter of care organization.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Bernard-Simon; Presse, Nancy; Bolduc, Aline; Dutilleul, Aurore; Couturier, Yves; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne

    2013-11-01

    Inpatient geriatric assessment units (GAUs) exist in Quebec, Canada, to deliver comprehensive, integrated care to older vulnerable patients. Most cases should be discussed at interprofessional meetings (IMs), but research has shown this not to be so for 39% of GAU patients. Consequently, a study was undertaken to (1) describe GAU team composition and (2) identify GAU and patient characteristics associated with case discussion at IMs at least once during a patient's stay. To this end, 877 hospitalization records from 44 GAUs were reviewed. Results showed most teams were composed of attending physicians, nurses, physical and occupational therapists, dietitians and social workers; 66% included clinical pharmacists and 43% liaison nurses. Multilevel modeling showed longer length of stay to be the strongest predictor of case discussion at an IM. Case discussion was also more likely for patients admitted via in- or inter-hospital transfer rather than via the emergency department, if the GAU included a liaison nurse, and if the GAU was not located in an urban area. In summary, case discussion at an IM depended more on how and where a patient was admitted than on the patient characteristics per se, suggesting that this is a matter of care organization.

  10. Q&A: Annette Totten on a geriatrics framework for home care: A quality improvement approach.

    PubMed

    Totten, Annette

    2009-01-01

    Annette Totten, PhD MPA, is director of the Geriatrics Framework Project at the Center for Home Care Policy and Research of the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, New York, NY. She has held a variety of policy, research, and project management positions in government, private foundations, and university-based research centers including the Ohio House of Representatives, the John A. Hartford Foundation, the New York State Department of Health, the New York University Department of Nursing, the Columbia University School of Nursing, the State Health Data Assistance Center (SHADAC) at the University of Minnesota, and the Veterans Administration. Before joining the Center for Home Care Policy & and Research, Annette was the Director of the Center for the Study of Aging and an Assistant Research Professor at Boise State University. She earned her doctorate in health services research from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health and also holds a Masters of Public Administration from the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at New York University. Her research interests include the organization, financing, and quality of care for chronic conditions and long-term care. She co-authored the book, Meeting the Challenge of Chronic Illness (The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2005) and has developed and taught graduate course on aging, health, and social policy; chronic disease epidemiology; and research methods.

  11. Ability of a computerized geriatric assessment to predict need for change in living status among elderly living at home.

    PubMed

    DeVore, P A

    1994-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the ability of a software program used in a primary care physician's office to predict the need for alternate living arrangement in a cohort of community-dwelling elderly. An analysis was conducted involving 124 consecutive patients between February 10, 1990, and December 20, 1991, in my private medical practice. These patients, all older than 65 years, underwent a computer-assisted geriatric assessment. Two scales--the Geriatric Functional Rating Scale (GFRS) and the Functional Assessment Screening Questionnaire (FASQ)--were compared for their accuracy at predicting change in living status during the 12- to 24-month period following the assessment. Similar analysis of the Tinetti gait and balance test was also performed. Ten and one-half percent of subjects (n = 13) required a change in living status during the study period. Ten went to nursing homes and three joined relatives' households. The GFRS was 62% accurate (8/13) and the FASQ was 54% (7/13) accurate in predicting this change. Abnormality in both gait and balance was predictive 77% (10/13) of the time. Combining all three parameters raised the successful prediction rate to 85% (11/13). Neither GFRS, FASQ, nor gait/balance testing was predictive of death. A computer software program designed to facilitate performance of geriatric assessments in primary care physicians' offices has a high rate of predictive capability relative to future need for change in living status among community-dwelling elderly. Further studies comparing this software program with traditional geriatric assessment protocols are suggested.

  12. [Investigation of an outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis in a geriatric hospital].

    PubMed

    Odelin, M-F; Ruel, N; Berthelot, P; Diana, M-C; Blanchon, M-A; Omar, S; Bourlet, T; Kohli, E; Gonthier, R; Pothier, P; Pozzetto, B

    2006-01-01

    In aged-care facilities, gastroenteritis outbreaks are responsible for big trouble in the management of cares to the elderly. In November 2002, a gastroenteritis outbreak was observed in 5 of the 6 wards of the geriatric hospital La Charité, University Hospital of Saint-Etienne, France, with an attack rate of 38.5% in the elderly (70 infected from 182 patients) and of 26.0% in the nursing staff (40 infected from 154 agents). The outbreak lasted 30 days with a peak corresponding to 79.8% of the cases between the 11(th) and the 20(th) of November. The first cases were observed in the two short-term-care wards; then, the outbreak spread rapidly to 3 of the 4 long-term care units. Health care workers were contaminated later than the elderly (P < 0.001 by Kruskal-Wallis test). A self-administered questionnaire was documented by most of the nursing staff; the most frequently observed clinical symptoms in this population were nausea (82.5%), abdominal pain (80.0%), diarrhoea (70.5%), asthenia (67.5%) and vomiting (62.5%). Thirty-five percent of the health care workers ceased their work. The causative agent of the gastroenteritis was identified by RT-PCR in the stools of 5 aged persons as a norovirus close to the Lordsdale strain (genogroup II). These findings illustrate the respective role of elderly and health care workers in the spread of the gastroenteritis outbreak inside the geriatric hospital.

  13. Geriatrics Education Team Model Results in Sustained Geriatrics Training in 15 Residency and Fellowship Programs and Scholarship.

    PubMed

    Denson, Steven; Simpson, Deborah; Denson, Kathryn; Brown, Diane; Manzi, Gabriel; Rehm, Judith; Wessel, Bambi; Duthie, Edmund H

    2016-04-01

    Caring for the growing elderly population will require specialty and subspecialty physicians who have not completed geriatric medicine fellowship training to participate actively in patient care. To meet this workforce demand, a sustainable approach to integrating geriatrics into specialty and subspecialty graduate medical education training is needed. This article describes the use of a geriatrics education team (GET) model to develop, implement, and sustain specialty-specific geriatrics curricula using a systematic process of team formation and needs assessment through evaluation, with a unique focus on developing curricular interventions that are meaningful to each specialty and satisfy training, scholarship, and regulatory requirements. The GET model and associated results from 15 specialty residency and fellowship training programs over a 4-year period include 93% curriculum sustainability after initial implementation, more than half of the programs introducing additional geriatrics education, and more than 80% of specialty GETs fulfilling their scholarship requirements through their curriculum dissemination. Win-wins and barriers encountered in using the GET model, along with the model's efficacy in curriculum development, sustainability, and dissemination, are summarized. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  14. Tubeless versus standard PCNL in geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, H

    2015-10-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is a standard, safe, and efficient method for large-volume renal calculi for all age groups. Nephrostomy tube constitutes an invaluable part of the nephrolithotomy operation. However, the nephrostomy tube has been recently replaced with ureteral catheter or double J-stent thanks to advances in urotechnology and operation equipment. The aim of the current article was to evaluate the safety and reliability of tubeless percutaneous nephrolithotomy in the geriatric population. Between January 2009 and September 2013, a total of 52 patients aged 65 years or elder with renal calculi bigger than 2cm underwent PCNL operation. The first group of 25 patients (48%) with a mean age of 70.0 years (std:±3,8) underwent tubeless PCNL whereas the second group consisting of 27 (52%) patients with a mean age of 71.3 years (std: ±4,0) underwent standard PCNL. The patients were randomly compared retrospectively in terms of burden of calculus, analgesic requirement, creatinine value, renal parenchymal thickness, Body-mass index (BMI), clavien score, length of hospitalization, and being calculus-free. The groups were found to be similar in age, BMI, and gender (P>.05). Burden of calculus, duration of operation, and rate of narcotic analgesic use were found to be statistically significantly higher in the group of Standard PCNL group than in the Tubeless PCNL group (P<.05). Length of hospital stay was 1.7 days in the group of tubeless PCNL and 2.6 days in the standard PCNL group (P<.05). No significant difference was found between the groups in terms of fall in hemoglobin, creatinine, values of parenchymal thickness, and clavien score, preoperative blood transfusion, previous SWL, location of calculi, number of access, and rate of success (P>.05). Burden of calculus was 900 mm2 (304-4232) in the standard PCNL group and 600mm(2) (220-2660) in the tubeless PCNL group with the difference being statistically significant (P=.014). Overall success was

  15. Financial gerontology and the rehabilitation nurse.

    PubMed

    Mauk, Kristen L; Mauk, James M

    2006-01-01

    Rehabilitation nurses, particularly those who work in geriatrics, recognize that the elderly have become increasingly heterogeneous, with many remaining active well into their 80s and beyond. As the baby boomers enter older adulthood, the senior healthcare market will be greatly affected. The areas of finance, economics, and marketing are seeing new trends that combine the expertise of financial planners with healthcare advisors and advocates for seniors. One emerging specialty area is financial gerontology. This article defines financial gerontology, presents emerging trends and certifications related to the field, and discusses implications for the rehabilitation nurse.

  16. Learning to care for older patients: hospitals and nursing homes as learning environments.

    PubMed

    Huls, Marije; de Rooij, Sophia E; Diepstraten, Annemie; Koopmans, Raymond; Helmich, Esther

    2015-03-01

    A significant challenge facing health care is the ageing of the population, which calls for a major response in medical education. Most clinical learning takes place within hospitals, but nursing homes may also represent suitable learning environments in which students can gain competencies in geriatric medicine. This study explores what students perceive as the main learning outcomes of a geriatric medicine clerkship in a hospital or a nursing home, and explicitly addresses factors that may stimulate or hamper the learning process. This qualitative study falls within a constructivist paradigm: it draws on socio-cultural learning theory and is guided by the principles of constructivist grounded theory. There were two phases of data collection. Firstly, a maximum variation sample of 68 students completed a worksheet, giving brief written answers on questions regarding their geriatric medicine clerkships. Secondly, focus group discussions were conducted with 19 purposively sampled students. We used template analysis, iteratively cycling between data collection and analysis, using a constant comparative process. Students described a broad range of learning outcomes and formative experiences that were largely distinct from their learning in previous clerkships with regard to specific geriatric knowledge, deliberate decision making, end-of-life care, interprofessional collaboration and communication. According to students, the nursing home differed from the hospital in three aspects: interprofessional collaboration was more prominent; the lower resources available in nursing homes stimulated students to be creative, and students reported having greater autonomy in nursing homes compared with the more extensive educational guidance provided in hospitals. In both hospitals and nursing homes, students not only learn to care for older patients, but also describe various broader learning outcomes necessary to become good doctors. The results of our study, in particular the

  17. Nursing: Registered Nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... in hospitals, physicians’ offices, home healthcare services, and nursing care facilities. Others work in correctional facilities or ... of three education paths: a bachelor’s degree in nursing, an associate’s degree in nursing, or a diploma ...

  18. Caring for older Americans: the future of geriatric medicine.

    PubMed

    Besdine, Richard; Boult, Chad; Brangman, Sharon; Coleman, Eric A; Fried, Linda P; Gerety, Meghan; Johnson, Jerry C; Katz, Paul R; Potter, Jane F; Reuben, David B; Sloane, Philip D; Studenski, Stephanie; Warshaw, Gregg

    2005-06-01

    In response to the needs and demands of an aging population, geriatric medicine has grown rapidly during the past 3 decades. The discipline has defined its core values as well as the knowledge base and clinical skills needed to improve the health, functioning, and well-being of older persons and to provide appropriate palliative care. Geriatric medicine has developed new models of care, advanced the treatment of common geriatric conditions, and advocated for the health and health care of older persons. Nevertheless, at the beginning of the 21st century, the health care of older persons is at a crossroads. Despite the substantial progress that geriatric medicine has made, much more remains to be done to meet the healthcare needs of our aging population. The clinical, educational, and research approaches of the 20th century are unable to keep pace and require major revisions. Maintaining the status quo will mean falling further and further behind. The healthcare delivery and financing systems need fundamental redesign to improve quality and eliminate waste. The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Task Force on the Future of Geriatric Medicine has identified five goals aimed at optimizing the health of older persons: To ensure that every older person receives high-quality, patient-centered health care; To expand the geriatrics knowledge base; To increase the number of healthcare professionals who employ the principles of geriatric medicine in caring for older persons; To recruit physicians and other healthcare professionals into careers in geriatric medicine; To unite professional and lay groups in the effort to influence public policy to continually improve the health and health care of seniors. Geriatric medicine cannot accomplish these goals alone. Accordingly, the Task Force has articulated a set of recommendations primarily aimed at the government, organizations, agencies, foundations, and other partners whose collaboration will be essential in accomplishing these

  19. Excess mortality for operated geriatric hip fracture in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Man, L P; Ho, A Wh; Wong, S H

    2016-02-01

    Geriatric hip fracture places an increasing burden to health care systems around the world. We studied the latest epidemiology trend of geriatric hip fracture in Hong Kong, as well as the excess mortality for patients who had undergone surgery for hip fracture. This descriptive epidemiology study was conducted in the public hospitals in Hong Kong. All patients who underwent surgery for geriatric hip fracture in public hospitals from January 2000 to December 2011 were studied. They were retrieved from the Clinical Management System of the Hospital Authority of Hong Kong. Relevant data were collected using the Clinical Data Analysis and Reporting System of the Hospital Authority. The actual and projected population size, and the age- and sex-specific mortality rates were obtained from the Census and Statistics Department of Hong Kong. The 30-day, 1-year and 5-year mortality, and excess mortality following surgery for geriatric hip fracture were calculated. There was a steady increase in the incidence of geriatric hip fracture in Hong Kong. The annual risk of geriatric hip fracture was decreasing in both sexes. Female patients aged 65 to 69 years had the lowest 1-year and 5-year mortality of 6.91% and 23.80%, respectively. Advancing age and male sex were associated with an increase in mortality and a higher excess mortality rate following surgery. The incidence of geriatric hip fracture is expected to increase in the future. The exact reason for a higher excess mortality rate in male patients remains unclear and should be the direction for future studies.

  20. Geriatric Syndromes in Older HIV-Infected Adults.

    PubMed

    Greene, Meredith; Covinsky, Kenneth E; Valcour, Victor; Miao, Yinghui; Madamba, Joy; Lampiris, Harry; Cenzer, Irena Stijacic; Martin, Jeffrey; Deeks, Steven G

    2015-06-01

    Geriatric syndromes such as falls, frailty, and functional impairment are multifactorial conditions used to identify vulnerable older adults. Limited data exist on these conditions in older HIV-infected adults, and no studies have comprehensively examined these conditions. Geriatric syndromes including falls, urinary incontinence, functional impairment, frailty, sensory impairment, depression, and cognitive impairment were measured in a cross-sectional study of HIV-infected adults aged 50 years and older who had an undetectable viral load on antiretroviral therapy. We examined both HIV and non-HIV-related predictors of geriatric syndromes including sociodemographics, number of comorbidities and nonantiretroviral medications, and HIV-specific variables in multivariate analyses. We studied 155 participants with a median age of 57 (interquartile range: 54-62) and 94% were men. Prefrailty (56%), difficulty with instrumental activities of daily living (46%), and cognitive impairment (47%) were the most frequent geriatric syndromes. Lower CD4 nadir incidence rate ratio [IRR: 1.16, 95% (confidence interval) CI: 1.06 to 1.26], non-white race (IRR: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.10 to 1.74), and increasing number of comorbidities (IRR: 1.09, 95% CI: 1.03 to 1.15) were associated with increased risk of having more geriatric syndromes. Geriatric syndromes are common in older HIV-infected adults. Treatment of comorbidities and early initiation of antiretroviral therapy may help to prevent development of these age-related complications. Clinical care of older HIV-infected adults should consider incorporation of geriatric principles.

  1. Understanding frailty in the geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Wick, Jeannette Y

    2011-09-01

    Clinicians who work with the frail elderly know what frailty looks like, but until recently, they have had no science-based definition of this condition. Frailty is classified as a medical syndrome, and Fried et al. were among the first to standardize the definition of frailty as a distinct syndrome with biologic underpinnings. Their definition describes a clinical phenotype of decreased reserve and resistance to stressors, with clinical manifestations of a mutually exacerbating cycle of negative energy balance, sarcopenia, diminished strength, and exertion intolerance. Age is no longer considered a defining characteristic, although frailty is still considered primarily a geriatric problem. Approximately two-thirds of affected individuals enter frailty in a slow, progressive way, while one-third become frail cataclysmically. Weakness is a common early sign, and exhaustion and weight loss are often late manifestations. Observing early behavioral changes before frailty develops could provide insight into its development and suggest early interventions. Since frailty is clearly associated with adverse outcomes, a healthy, active lifestyle is the cornerstone of prevention, and many researchers suggest that resistance training can reverse some muscle loss and improve functioning. When the health care team proposes any change in care, including a new medication, it should be prepared to describe how the intervention may affect cognition, memory, energy, or function.

  2. [Periprosthetic acetabular fractures in geriatric patients].

    PubMed

    Herath, S C; Rollmann, M F R; Histing, T; Holstein, J H; Pohlemann, T

    2017-02-01

    Periprosthetic acetabular fractures in geriatric patients are rare injuries; however, the incidence is increasing because of the current demographic developments. For diagnosis of periprosthetic acetabular fractures, conventional X‑ray images are regularly complemented by computed tomography (CT). For exclusion of loosening of the prosthesis more advanced techniques, such as single photon emission CT (SPECT/CT) are applied. In addition to classification of periprosthetic acetabular fractures by the traditional system of Letournel there are several other classification systems, which take into account the etiology of the fracture and the stability of the prosthesis. While, under certain circumstances conservative treatment of periprosthetic acetabular fractures is possible, operative treatment often requires extensive surgical procedures to restore the stability of the acetabulum as a support for the cup of the prosthesis. Besides the traditional techniques of acetabular osteosynthesis, special revision systems, augmentations and allografts are used for the reconstruction of periprosthetic acetabular fractures. To determine a therapeutic regimen patient-specific preconditions as well as fracture pattern and type of prosthesis need to be taken into account. In the literature there are several algorithms, which are aimed at supporting the attending physician in making the correct decision for the treatment of periprosthetic acetabular fractures. In cases of periprosthetic acetabular fractures even experienced surgeons are faced with great challenges. Thus, treatment should be carried out in specialized centers.

  3. Geriatric Nutrition Workshop for the Dietetic Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This workshop guide is a unit of study for teaching dietetic assistants to work with elderly persons. The objective of the unit is to enable the students to apply knowledge of the physiological and psychological effects of aging in providing nutritional care to the elderly in independent living and nursing home situations. Following the unit…

  4. Geriatric Nutrition Workshop for the Dietetic Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This workshop guide is a unit of study for teaching dietetic assistants to work with elderly persons. The objective of the unit is to enable the students to apply knowledge of the physiological and psychological effects of aging in providing nutritional care to the elderly in independent living and nursing home situations. Following the unit…

  5. Nursing Supplies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Nursing Supplies Page Content Article Body Throughout most of ... budget. (Nursing equipment also makes wonderful baby gifts.) Nursing Bras A well-made nursing bra that comfortably ...

  6. The uniqueness of elderly care: registered nurses' experience as preceptors during clinical practice in nursing homes and home-based care.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Elisabeth; Bengtsson, Mariette

    2014-04-01

    The expected shortage of registered nurses with an advanced degree as specialists in geriatric care or gerontology is imminent. Previous studies report that clinical practice where student nurses are supervised by registered nurses has a direct impact on how students perceive nursing as a profession and future career choice. Considering the anticipated need for well-educated and specialised nurses it is therefore, relevant as well as necessary to describe clinical learning with a focus on preceptorship in geriatric nursing care. This paper is a report of a study describing registered nurses' experience of precepting undergraduate student nurses during clinical practice in nursing homes and home-based care. A qualitative design, based on seven focus group interviews, was employed with 30 registered nurses with preceptor experience from nursing homes and home-based care for the elderly. Our findings present three precepting strategies that are unique to elderly care: preparing students for end of life care, facilitating a respectful approach to the older person and promoting creativity and independent work. The findings are discussed using a socio-cultural perspective and illustrate how communities of elderly practice can be valuable learning environments. © 2013.

  7. The ELDER Project: educational model and three-year outcomes of a community-based geriatric education initiative.

    PubMed

    Lange, Jean W; Mager, Diana; Greiner, Philip A; Saracino, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the ELDER (Expanded Learning and Dedication to Elders in the Region) Project was to address the needs of underserved older adults by providing worksite education to individuals who provide nursing care to older adults in community health centers, home health agencies, and long-term care facilities. Four agencies located in a Health Professional Shortage and Medically Underserved Area participated. Project staff conducted separate focus groups with administrators and staff at each agency to determine educational needs and preferences. Curricula from the Hartford Institute, End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium, and Geriatric Education Centers were adapted to design unique curricula for each agency and level of personnel (licensed nurse or unlicensed caregiver). Activities included focus group meetings to tailor content to the needs of each agency, on-site educational sessions, and identification of an agency champion to sustain the program after the funding ended. A case-based simulation-learning approach was used in the final year to validate application of knowledge and to facilitate teamwork and interprofessional communication. Over 100 nurses and nursing assistants and eight administrators and allied health professionals participated over the three-year period of the project. Retention over this period, independent evaluations, and simulations demonstrated participants' ability to integrate best practices into typical clinical scenarios and revealed improved communication among care providers. Tailored on-site education incorporating simulation was an effective model for translating gerontological knowledge into practice and improving the care of older adults in these multiple settings.

  8. Is there a difference in mad honey poisoning between geriatric and non-geriatric patient groups?

    PubMed

    Yaylacı, S; Ayyıldız, O; Aydın, E; Osken, A; Karahalil, F; Varım, C; Demir, M V; Genç, A B; Sahinkus, S; Can, Y; Kocayigit, İ; Bilir, C

    2015-12-01

    /sinus bradycardia, 12 (14.6%) patients had a 1st degree atrioventricular block, 3 (3.7%) patients had nodal rhythm, 1 (1.2%) patient had atrial fibrillation and 1 (1.2%) patient had preexcitation. There were no significant pathological findings in the routine laboratory examinations of patients. It was found that all patients achieved normal sinus rhythm and normal blood pressure values after medical treatment, and were discharged approximately 5.65 hours after observation and follow-up. In our study, prolonged intensive-care need, pacemaker need and mortality caused by mad honey intoxication were not found. In the comparison of data of all patients above and below 65 years of age, there was a statistically significant finding that the geriatric patients consume mad honey mostly for hypotensive purposes and gastrointestinal complaints; in addition, the symptoms were starting early and the recovery period was longer in geriatric patients. The mad honey poisoning should be considered in previously healthy patients with unexplained symptoms of bradycardia, hypotension, and atrioventricular block. Therefore, diet history should carefully be obtained from the patients admitted with bradycardia and hypotension. And, in addition to the primary cardiac, neurological and metabolic disorders, mad honey intoxication should also be considered in the differential diagnosis. In geriatric patients admitted due to mad honey intoxication, the mad honey is usually consumed to reduce blood pressure and resolve gastrointestinal problems; and, their symptoms begin early, and last longer after mad honey consumption. In terms of other parameters, the geriatric age group has similar characteristics to non-geriatric age group.

  9. [Management of malnutrition in geriatric hospital units in Germany].

    PubMed

    Smoliner, C; Volkert, D; Wirth, R

    2013-01-01

    Elderly hospitalized patients have a high risk for developing malnutrition. The causes for an impaired nutritional status in old age are various and the impact is far-reaching. Malnutrition is a comorbidity that is well treatable and various studies show the favorable effect of nutrition therapy on nutritional status and prognosis. In the past few years, several guidelines have been developed to improve nutritional management and to ensure standardized procedures to identify patients at nutritional risk who will benefit from nutrition therapy. However, it is still not clear to what extent nutrition management has been implemented in geriatric wards in Germany. This survey is intended to give an overview on the situation of the current diagnosis and therapy of malnutrition and nutritional management in geriatric hospital units for acute and rehabilitative care. In 2011, the task force of the German Geriatric Society ("Deutsche Gesellschaft für Geriatrie", DGG) developed a questionnaire which was sent out to 272 directors of geriatric hospital and rehabilitational units. Included were questions regarding the size and staffing of the hospital and wards, food provision, diagnosis and therapy of malnutrition, as well as communication of malnutrition and nutrition therapy in the doctor's letter. A total of 38% of the questioned units answered. The following information was compiled: 31% of the geriatric facilities employed a doctor with training in clinical nutrition, 42% employ dieticians or nutritional scientists, and 90% speech and language pathologists. In 36% of the wards, a so-called geriatric menu is offered (small portions, rich in energy and/or protein, easy to chew). In 89% of the wards, snacks are available between meals. Diagnosis of malnutrition is mainly done by evaluation of weight and BMI. Validated and established screening tools are only used in 40% of the geriatric wards. Food records are carried out in 64% of the units when needed. Diagnosed

  10. Establishing in-hospital geriatrics services in Africa: Insights from the University of Benin Teaching Hospital geriatrics project.

    PubMed

    Akoria, Obehi Aituaje

    2016-01-01

    Unawareness of the peculiar healthcare needs of the elderly and resource constraints may be some reasons why until recently, Nigerian hospitals have not been equipped with the human and infrastructural resources required to meet older adults' special healthcare needs. There is paucity of specialized health services for the elderly in Africa. Nigeria, with a population of over 170 million, did not have any healthcare facility with dedicated services for the elderly until 2012. The University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH) in Nigeria was established in 1973 and created its geriatrics unit in October 2013. A prepared environment and trained interdisciplinary teams are pivotal in providing effective healthcare services for the elderly. The ongoing UBTH geriatrics project aims to provide specialized interdisciplinary health services to older adults and to provide training and continuing professional development in geriatrics for healthcare staff. In developing our inpatient services, we adopted the acute care for elders (ACE) model and worked in tandem with the "ABCs" of implementing ACE units. In the face of limited resources, it was possible to establish a functional geriatrics unit with a trained interdisciplinary team. Family participation is central in our practice. Since October 2013, residents and house officers in internal medicine have been undertaking 4- and 12-weekly rotations, respectively. There is also a robust academic program, which includes once-weekly geriatric pharmacotherapy seminars, once-weekly interdisciplinary seminars, and 2-weekly journal club meetings alternating with seminars on geriatric assessment tools. It is possible to establish geriatric services and achieve best practices in resource-limited settings by investing on improving available human resources and infrastructure. We also make recommendations for setting up similar services in other parts of Africa.

  11. Establishing in-hospital geriatrics services in Africa: Insights from the University of Benin Teaching Hospital geriatrics project

    PubMed Central

    Akoria, Obehi Aituaje

    2016-01-01

    Background: Unawareness of the peculiar healthcare needs of the elderly and resource constraints may be some reasons why until recently, Nigerian hospitals have not been equipped with the human and infrastructural resources required to meet older adults’ special healthcare needs. There is paucity of specialized health services for the elderly in Africa. Nigeria, with a population of over 170 million, did not have any healthcare facility with dedicated services for the elderly until 2012. The University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH) in Nigeria was established in 1973 and created its geriatrics unit in October 2013. A prepared environment and trained interdisciplinary teams are pivotal in providing effective healthcare services for the elderly. The ongoing UBTH geriatrics project aims to provide specialized interdisciplinary health services to older adults and to provide training and continuing professional development in geriatrics for healthcare staff. In developing our inpatient services, we adopted the acute care for elders (ACE) model and worked in tandem with the “ABCs” of implementing ACE units. Results: In the face of limited resources, it was possible to establish a functional geriatrics unit with a trained interdisciplinary team. Family participation is central in our practice. Since October 2013, residents and house officers in internal medicine have been undertaking 4- and 12-weekly rotations, respectively. There is also a robust academic program, which includes once-weekly geriatric pharmacotherapy seminars, once-weekly interdisciplinary seminars, and 2-weekly journal club meetings alternating with seminars on geriatric assessment tools. Conclusions: It is possible to establish geriatric services and achieve best practices in resource-limited settings by investing on improving available human resources and infrastructure. We also make recommendations for setting up similar services in other parts of Africa. PMID:27549420

  12. Geriatric problems correlated with cognitive decline using a screening test named "Dr. SUPERMAN" for comprehensive geriatric assessment in elderly inpatients.

    PubMed

    Namioka, Nayuta; Sakurai, Hirofumi; Terayama, Hideyuki; Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Fujihira, Teruaki; Tsugehara, Hiromi; Tsuchida, Akihiko; Hanyu, Haruo

    2016-08-04

    We have recently developed and validated a screening test for comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA). We investigated the prevalence of geriatric problems in elderly inpatients using CGA, and determined the relationship between geriatric problems and cognitive decline. We enrolled consecutive elderly inpatients aged >65 years who were admitted to all of the hospital departments at Tokyo Medical University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan, between July and December 2013. We investigated the prevalence of specific geriatric problems or situations in elderly inpatients using a screening test for CGA named "Dr. SUPERMAN." We examined 3969 elderly inpatients (2211 men and 1758 women; mean age 75.5 ± 6.7 years) using CGA. Inpatients were divided into three groups by age, namely, 65-74 years, 75-84 years and ≥85 years. Inpatients were divided into the two groups of "internal medicine" and "other departments." Geriatric problems were more frequently found in patients who were aged ≥85 years and admitted to "internal medicine" departments. Furthermore, multiple regression analysis found cognitive decline significantly correlated with ADL decline, age, poor medication adherence, upper and lower extremity function disorder, visual/auditory disorder, and urinary disorder. In particular, cognitive decline strongly correlated with a decline in activities of daily living. CGA should be considered for the treatment of elderly inpatients, particularly those with cognitive decline and admitted to "internal medicine" departments. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; ••: ••-••. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  13. Geriatric care: ways and means of providing comfort.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Patricia Cruz Pontifice Sousa Valente; Marques, Rita Margarida Dourado; Ribeiro, Marta Pontifice

    2017-01-01

    To know the ways and means of comfort perceived by the older adults hospitalized in a medical service. Ethnographic study with a qualitative approach. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 22 older adults and participant observation of care situations. The ways and means of providing comfort are centered on strategies for promoting care mobilized by nurses and recognized by patients(clarifying/informing, positive interaction/communication, music therapy, touch, smile, unconditional presence, empathy/proximity relationship, integrating the older adult or the family as partner in the care, relief of discomfort through massage/mobilization/therapy) and on particular moments of comfort (the first contact, the moment of personal hygiene, and the visit of the family), which constitute the foundation of care/comfort. Geriatric care is built on the relationship that is established and complete with meaning, and is based on the meeting/interaction between the actors under the influence of the context in which they are inserted. The different ways and means of providing comfort aim to facilitate/increase care, relieve discomfort and/or invest in potential comfort. Conhecer os modos e formas de confortar percecionadas pelos idosos hospitalizados num serviço de medicina. Estudo etnográfico com abordagem qualitativa. Realizamos entrevistas semiestruturadas com 22 doentes idosos e observação participante nas situações de cuidados. Os modos e formas de confortar centram-se em estratégias promotoras de conforto mobilizadas pelo enfermeiro e reconhecidas pelos doentes (informação/esclarecimento, interação/comunicação positiva, toque, sorriso, presença incondicional, integração do idoso/família nos cuidados e o alívio de desconfortos através da massagem/mobilização/terapêutica) e em momentos particulares de conforto (contato inaugural, visita da família., cuidados de higiene e arranjo pessoal), que se constituem como alicerces do cuidar

  14. Identifying landmark articles for advancing the practice of geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Camille P; Fowler, Rachel; Goodman, Richard A; Graves, Taylor R; Flacker, Jonathan M; Johnson, Theodore M

    2014-11-01

    Landmark articles from the peer-reviewed literature can be used to teach the fundamental principles of geriatric medicine. Three approaches were used in sequential combination to identify landmark articles as a resource for geriatricians and other healthcare practitioners. Candidate articles were identified first through a literature review and expert opinion survey of geriatric medicine faculty. Candidate articles in a winnowed list (n = 30) were then included in a bibliometric analysis that incorporated the journal impact factor and average monthly citation index. Finally, a consensus panel reviewed articles to assess each manuscript's clinical relevance. For each article, a final score was determined by averaging, with equal weight, the opinion survey, bibliometric analysis, and consensus panel review. This process ultimately resulted in the identification of 27 landmark articles. Overall, there was weak correlation between articles that the expert opinion survey and bibliometric analysis both rated highly. This process demonstrates a feasible method combining subjective and objective measures that can be used to identify landmark papers in geriatric medicine for the enhancement of geriatrics education and practice. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  15. An introprofessional geriatric medication activity within a senior mentor program.

    PubMed

    Shrader, Sarah; Hummel, Heather; Byrd, Lauren; Wiley, Kathy

    2013-02-12

    Objective. To determine whether a required interprofessional geriatric medication activity within a senior mentor program changed pharmacy and medical students' attitudes regarding interprofessional collaboration.Design. Interprofessional teams, consisting of 1 third-year pharmacy student and 2 second-year medical students, conducted an in-home interview and medication history with a senior mentor (geriatric patient). The team members then collaboratively analyzed and discussed the patient's medication use and wrote an essay in which they identified the patient's medication problems and reflected on the interprofessional experience.Assessment. Students completed a validated survey instrument to measure pharmacist-physician attitudes about interprofessional collaboration before and after the experience. Pharmacy and medical students' already generally positive attitudes regarding interprofessional relationships were maintained and, in some instances, significantly improved. Students found the activity enhanced their geriatric training and increased their understanding of an interprofessional team.Conclusion. Incorporation of a geriatric medication activity within a senior mentor program maintained or improved pharmacy and medical students' positive attitudes about interprofessional collaboration and enhanced geriatric training within the curriculum.

  16. POLYPHARMACY AND POTENTIALLY INAPPROPRIATE MEDICATION USE IN GERIATRIC ONCOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manvi; Loh, Kah Poh; Nightingale, Ginah; Mohile, Supriya G.; Holmes, Holly M.

    2016-01-01

    Polypharmacy is a highly prevalent problem in older persons, and is challenging to assess and improve due to variations in definitions of the problem and the heterogeneous methods of medication review and reduction. The purpose of this review is to summarize evidence regarding the prevalence and impact of polypharmacy in geriatric oncology patients and to provide recommendations for assessment and management. Polypharmacy has somewhat variably been incorporated into geriatric assessment studies in geriatric oncology, and polypharmacy has not been consistently evaluated as a predictor of negative outcomes in patients with cancer. Once screened, interventions for polypharmacy are even more uncertain. There is a great need to create standardized interventions to improve polypharmacy in geriatrics, and particularly in geriatric oncology. The process of deprescribing is aimed at reducing medications for which real or potential harm outweighs benefit, and there are numerous methods to determine which medications are candidates for deprescribing. However, deprescribing approaches have not been evaluated in older patients with cancer. Ultimately, methods to identify polypharmacy will need to be clearly defined and validated, and interventions to improve medication use will need to be based on clearly defined and standardized methods. PMID:27498305

  17. Geriatric hip fracture management: keys to providing a successful program.

    PubMed

    Basu, N; Natour, M; Mounasamy, V; Kates, S L

    2016-10-01

    Hip fractures are a common event in older adults and are associated with significant morbidity, mortality and costs. This review examines the necessary elements required to implement a successful geriatric fracture program and identifies some of the barriers faced when implementing a successful program. The Geriatric Fracture Center (GFC) is a treatment model that standardizes the approach to the geriatric fracture patient. It is based on five principles: surgical fracture management; early operative intervention; medical co-management with geriatricians; patient-centered, standard order sets to employ best practices; and early discharge planning with a focus on early functional rehabilitation. Implementing a geriatric fracture program begins with an assessment of the hospital's data on hip fractures and standard care metrics such as length of stay, complications, time to surgery, readmission rates and costs. Business planning is essential along with the medical planning process. To successfully develop and implement such a program, strong physician leadership is necessary to articulate both a short- and long-term plan for implementation. Good communication is essential-those organizing a geriatric fracture program must be able to implement standardized plans of care working with all members of the healthcare team and must also be able to foster relationships both within the hospital and with other institutions in the community. Finally, a program of continual quality improvement must be undertaken to ensure that performance outcomes are improving patient care.

  18. Altered Synchronizations among Neural Networks in Geriatric Depression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Chou, Ying-Hui; Potter, Guy G; Steffens, David C

    2015-01-01

    Although major depression has been considered as a manifestation of discoordinated activity between affective and cognitive neural networks, only a few studies have examined the relationships among neural networks directly. Because of the known disconnection theory, geriatric depression could be a useful model in studying the interactions among different networks. In the present study, using independent component analysis to identify intrinsically connected neural networks, we investigated the alterations in synchronizations among neural networks in geriatric depression to better understand the underlying neural mechanisms. Resting-state fMRI data was collected from thirty-two patients with geriatric depression and thirty-two age-matched never-depressed controls. We compared the resting-state activities between the two groups in the default-mode, central executive, attention, salience, and affective networks as well as correlations among these networks. The depression group showed stronger activity than the controls in an affective network, specifically within the orbitofrontal region. However, unlike the never-depressed controls, geriatric depression group lacked synchronized/antisynchronized activity between the affective network and the other networks. Those depressed patients with lower executive function has greater synchronization between the salience network with the executive and affective networks. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of the between-network analyses in examining neural models for geriatric depression.

  19. Geriatric psychiatry in the psychiatry clerkship: a survey of current education practices.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Susan W; Blazek, Mary C; Popeo, Dennis M

    2015-06-01

    The aging of the US population and shortage of geriatric psychiatrists mean that all medical students must be prepared to evaluate psychiatric symptoms in older patients. The authors sought to describe current geriatric psychiatry teaching practices during the psychiatry clerkship. Psychiatry clerkship directors at 110 American medical schools were surveyed about didactic and clinical experiences of geriatric psychiatry. Sixty-two (56 %) of programs responded. One fifth of programs lacked specific instruction in geriatric psychiatry. Programs were more likely to include instruction on dementia than late-life depression. Increased geriatric psychiatry educational offerings were associated with the following: number of geriatric psychiatrists on faculty, presence of a geriatric psychiatrist on the medical education committee, and inclusion of geriatric psychiatry specific items in clerkship learning objectives. Current practices in some clerkships are inadequate to prepare medical students to care for older patients with psychiatric symptoms.

  20. Evaluation of the Master's curriculum for elderly nursing: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Fatemeh; Dehghan-Nayeri, Nahid; Navabi, Nasrin; Seylani, Khatereh

    2016-01-01

    Improving the quality of health care and rehabilitation for the elderly is one of the most important priorities of the health care system. Given the importance of evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of any program after its implementation, this study was conducted to identify the advantages and weaknesses of a geriatric nursing program at Tehran University of Medical Sciences. This was a qualitative study, and the study population comprised students, graduates, and professors of geriatric nursing at the Master of Science level. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews and focus groups. Sixteen interviews were conducted. The interview guide was used as a research tool. Interviews continued until data saturation was reached. Conventional content analysis was used to analyze the data. Three main themes including "motivation to enter geriatric nursing", "lack of employment groundwork", and "lack of practical implementation of the curriculum" were the main findings of the study. Efforts to restructure the administrative system and employment can deter geriatric nursing students from simply earning a degree and actually encourage them to learn the required content. Appraisal and improvement of education facilities for student recruitment can guarantee the practical implementation of the curriculum. Drafting policies to attract graduates in clinical environments, opening up employment opportunities, providing organizational positions for the recruitment of this group, as well as dedicating some wards for elderly special care and providing nursing care to elderly people only can increase students' motivation to learn and their hopes of good job prospects.

  1. American Nurses Association Nursing World

    MedlinePlus

    ... ANA » My ANA » Shop » ANA Nursing Knowledge Center Nursing Insider News 09/28/17 ANA Enterprise CEO ... Wake of Police Abuse of Registered Nurse More Nursing Insider News Upcoming Events 10/17/2017 - 10/ ...

  2. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... nurses, or APNs) have a master's degree in nursing (MS or MSN) and board certification in their ... Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) and through local hospitals or nursing schools. Also, many doctors share office space with ...

  3. Knowledge and Attitudes of Nursing Staff Towards Malnutrition Care in Nursing Homes: A Multicentre Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Bauer, S; Halfens, R J G; Lohrmann, C

    2015-08-01

    The international literature shows that there are considerable deficits in nutritional care provision in nursing homes. Limited knowledge and negative attitudes can contribute to these deficits but international studies on knowledge and attitudes among nursing staff are rare. The study aimed to assess the knowledge and attitudes of registered nurses and nurse aides towards malnutrition care in nursing homes. This study followed a multicentre, cross sectional design. The study was performed in 66 Austrian nursing homes with 1152 participants. The validated Knowledge of Malnutrition-Geriatric (KoM-G) questionnaire and the Staff Attitudes to Nutritional Nursing Care Geriatric (SANN-G) scale were used for data collection. On average, 60.6% of the respondents answered the questions correctly, whereas registered nurses knew significantly more (65.6%) than nurse aides (57.3%). The question that was answered correctly by most dealt with the factors that positively affect oral nutritional intake (87.2%) while the question which was incorrectly answered by most was on the professions involved in malnutrition treatment (26.1%). 39.2% of respondents had positive attitudes towards nutritional care. Registered nurses displayed more positive attitudes (48.1%) than nurse aides (33.6%). The most positive attitudes were shown in the 'Intervention' subscale while the least positive attitudes were indicated in the 'Norms' subscale. A medium positive correlation between knowledge and attitudes was found (r=.423, p<0.000). This study identified specific knowledge deficits and areas of negative attitudes in registered nurses and nurse aides, which will enable tailored training programmes to be developed.

  4. Content Validity and Psychometric Characteristics of the "Knowledge about Older Patients Quiz" for Nurses Using Item Response Theory.

    PubMed

    Dikken, Jeroen; Hoogerduijn, Jita G; Kruitwagen, Cas; Schuurmans, Marieke J

    2016-11-01

    To assess the content validity and psychometric characteristics of the Knowledge about Older Patients Quiz (KOP-Q), which measures nurses' knowledge regarding older hospitalized adults and their certainty regarding this knowledge. Cross-sectional. Content validity: general hospitals. Psychometric characteristics: nursing school and general hospitals in the Netherlands. Content validity: 12 nurse specialists in geriatrics. Psychometric characteristics: 107 first-year and 78 final-year bachelor of nursing students, 148 registered nurses, and 20 nurse specialists in geriatrics. Content validity: The nurse specialists rated each item of the initial KOP-Q (52 items) on relevance. Ratings were used to calculate Item-Content Validity Index and average Scale-Content Validity Index (S-CVI/ave) scores. Items with insufficient content validity were removed. Psychometric characteristics: Ratings of students, nurses, and nurse specialists were used to test for different item functioning (DIF) and unidimensionality before item characteristics (discrimination and difficulty) were examined using Item Response Theory. Finally, norm references were calculated and nomological validity was assessed. Content validity: Forty-three items remained after assessing content validity (S-CVI/ave = 0.90). Psychometric characteristics: Of the 43 items, two demonstrating ceiling effects and 11 distorting ability estimates (DIF) were subsequently excluded. Item characteristics were assessed for the remaining 30 items, all of which demonstrated good discrimination and difficulty parameters. Knowledge was positively correlated with certainty about this knowledge. The final 30-item KOP-Q is a valid, psychometrically sound, comprehensive instrument that can be used to assess the knowledge of nursing students, hospital nurses, and nurse specialists in geriatrics regarding older hospitalized adults. It can identify knowledge and certainty deficits for research purposes or serve as a tool in educational

  5. [Nursing development at the Solothurn hospitals. Towards clinically oriented nursing expertise and practice development].

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Ursi Barandun; Hirsbrunner, Therese; Jäger, Susanne; Näf, Ernst; Römmich, Sabine; Horlacher, Kathrin

    2011-02-01

    At the Solothurn Hospitals (soH), 13 academically educated nurses are responsible for the development of nursing care with the goal to improve patient-oriented, effective, appropriate, and economic care. The strategy contains three priorities: a) expert care of single patients in demanding situations, b) sustained application of organisational methods such as primary nursing, nursing process, and skill/grade mix, and c) design and management of practice development projects related to specific patient groups. A first evaluation with qualitative and quantitative methods showed that the exemplary care of single patients by expert nurses was evaluated as positive for the patients as well as for the teams on two wards by nurses who were interviewed. After the introduction of primary nursing, the application rate was 81 to 90 % and the introduction of fall prevention methods in geriatric rehabilitation decreased the fall rate from 8.2 to 5.5 per 1000 patient days. A comparision with the literature shows that the expert nurses of soH perform both, working at the bedside and being responsible for practice development projects, as specialised Advanced Practice Nurses (APNs). APNs at the Solothurn Hospitals work also as generalists when organisational methods need to be consolidated. Their successes depend from their integration into the hierarchy and both, into the nursing as well as into the interprofessional teams. Competencies in Transformational Leadership also are essential at all management levels.

  6. [Neurosurgery in the elderly patient: Geriatric neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    González-Bonet, Luis Germán; Tarazona-Santabalbina, Francisco-José; Lizán Tudela, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Between 2000 and 2050, the proportion of the world's population over 60 years will double, and the number of people aged 80 and older will quadruple. Health professional training does not include instructions about specific care for older people. The World Health Organization maintains that all health providers should be trained on ageing issues. Thus, it is proposed to analyse the effect of ageing on Neurosurgery in our country. A retrospective historical cohort study was performed on individuals age 70 years or older admitted to the Neurosurgery or the Intensive Care Unit of our hospital, with neurosurgical disease, between two periods: 1999-2000 and 2010-2011. An analysis was made on variables such as: age, pathology, length of stay, comorbidity, performance status, re-admissions and mortality. Similar numbers of patients were admitted during the two periods: 409 and 413. However, there was an increase of 77.5% in patients older than 70 years: 80 versus 142. Statistically significant differences were observed in the Charlson Comorbidity Index, the admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, length of stay, and re-admissions. Comorbidity and admission GCS score were particularly worse in the second period. Nevertheless, the mean length of stay was lower in that period, but showing more hospital re-admissions. After multivariate analysis, it was observed that re-admissions were associated with comorbidity, but not with early hospital discharge. No differences were found in performance status or mortality. A very considerable increase in percentage of patients older than 70 years old was found. There were no differences in performance status or mortality, which was probably due to the multidisciplinary management of these patients. The results of this study support the development of an interdisciplinary work group dedicated to Geriatric Neurosurgery. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. Economic viability of geriatric hip fracture centers.

    PubMed

    Clement, R Carter; Ahn, Jaimo; Mehta, Samir; Bernstein, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Management of geriatric hip fractures in a protocol-driven center can improve outcomes and reduce costs. Nonetheless, this approach has not spread as broadly as the effectiveness data would imply. One possible explanation is that operating such a center is not perceived as financially worthwhile. To assess the economic viability of dedicated hip fracture centers, the authors built a financial model to estimate profit as a function of costs, reimbursement, and patient volume in 3 settings: an average US hip fracture program, a highly efficient center, and an academic hospital without a specific hip fracture program. Results were tested with sensitivity analysis. A local market analysis was conducted to assess the feasibility of supporting profitable hip fracture centers. The results demonstrate that hip fracture treatment only becomes profitable when the annual caseload exceeds approximately 72, assuming costs characteristic of a typical US hip fracture program. The threshold of profitability is 49 cases per year for high-efficiency hip fracture centers and 151 for the urban academic hospital under review. The largest determinant of profit is reimbursement, followed by costs and volume. In the authors’ home market, 168 hospitals offer hip fracture care, yet 85% fall below the 72-case threshold. Hip fracture centers can be highly profitable through low costs and, especially, high revenues. However, most hospitals likely lose money by offering hip fracture care due to inadequate volume. Thus, both large and small facilities would benefit financially from the consolidation of hip fracture care at dedicated hip fracture centers. Typical US cities have adequate volume to support several such centers.

  8. Compassion fatigue among nurses working with older adults.

    PubMed

    Kolthoff, Kay L; Hickman, Susan E

    Nurses who care for older patients are exposed to significant suffering and loss that can lead to the development of compassion fatigue and burnout. An exploratory descriptive study was conducted to assess compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction in a group of 42 nurses who worked on a geriatric medicine unit using the Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL) compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue 5 scale. Nurses reported average levels of compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction. However, new nurses reported higher levels of compassion fatigue (p < .01) and burnout (p = .02) than experienced nurses. Findings suggest the need to purposely build a supportive environment that focuses on new nurses to reduce compassion fatigue and burnout while enhancing compassion satisfaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. What to Expect from the Evolving Field of Geriatric Cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Susan P.; Orr, Nicole M.; Dodson, John A.; Rich, Michael W.; Wenger, Nanette K.; Blum, Kay; Harold, John Gordon; Tinetti, Mary; Maurer, Mathew S.; Forman, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    The population of older adults is expanding rapidly and aging predisposes to cardiovascular disease. The principle of patient-centered care must respond to the preponderance of cardiac disease that now occurs in combination with complexities of old age. Geriatric cardiology melds cardiovascular perspectives with multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty, cognitive decline, and other clinical, social, financial, and psychological dimensions of aging. While some assume a cardiologist may instinctively cultivate some of these skills over the course of a career, we assert that the volume and complexity of older cardiovascular patients in contemporary practice warrants a more direct approach to achieve suitable training and a more reliable process of care. We present a rationale and vision for geriatric cardiology as a melding of primary cardiovascular and geriatrics skills, and thereby infusing cardiology practice with expanded proficiencies in diagnosis, risks, care coordination, communications, end-of-life, and other competences required to best manage older cardiovascular patients. PMID:26361161

  10. Patient centric formulations for paediatrics and geriatrics: Similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Hanning, Sara M; Lopez, Felipe L; Wong, Ian C K; Ernest, Terry B; Tuleu, Catherine; Orlu Gul, Mine

    2016-10-30

    Paediatrics and geriatrics both represent highly heterogenous populations and require special consideration when developing appropriate dosage forms. This paper discusses similarities, differences and considerations with respect to the development of appropriate medicine formulations for paediatrics and geriatrics. Arguably the most significant compliance challenge in older people is polypharmacy, whereas for children the largest barrier is taste. Pharmaceutical technology has progressed rapidly and technologies including FDCs, multi-particulates and orodispersible dosage forms provide unprecedented opportunities to develop novel and appropriate formulations for both old and new drugs. However, it is important for the formulation scientists to work closely with patients, carers and clinicians to develop such formulations for both the paediatric and geriatric population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Pedogogy meets practice: service-learning in gerontology and geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Karasik, Rona J

    2007-06-01

    More and more students and community partners in the areas of gerontology and geriatrics are participating in service-learning experiences. The types of service-learning projects are wide-ranging, as are the potential benefits to students and community agencies. Harvesting such benefits, however, requires careful consideration and participation both from the academic institution and the community agencies. Effective collaborations begin with a shared understanding of the approach, open discussion of the expected outcomes, and a willingness to address potential challenges. In addition, special considerations (eg, working with older adults, HIPAA) need to be taken into account when developing and maintaining service-learning in gerontology and geriatrics. The following examines essential elements in each of these areas, with the goal of promoting positive service-learning outcomes in gerontology and geriatrics. Particular attention is paid to service-learning in long-term care and similar settings.

  12. Geriatric epilepsy: research and clinical directions for the future.

    PubMed

    Roberson, Erik D; Hope, Omotola A; Martin, Roy C; Schmidt, Dieter

    2011-09-01

    There is a growing awareness of the need for improved treatment and care of older adults with epilepsy. The present review article highlights key clinical and research issues in the emerging field of geriatric epilepsy. Drs. Martin and Schmidt explore the scope of the problems in the field, outline topic areas including cognitive health/dementia, and diagnostic challenges, and also present important research questions that should be considered for the future. As part of this presentation, we will highlight the work of two promising young investigators whose work holds great promise for the field of geriatric epilepsy. Dr. Roberson will discuss his work focusing on the relationship of epilepsy and cognitive impairment, particularly as it relates to Alzheimer's disease pathology including tau and its role in epileptiform activity. Dr. Hope will outline key issues, as well as her work, relating to defining and measuring quality care in geriatric epilepsy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. What to Expect From the Evolving Field of Geriatric Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Bell, Susan P; Orr, Nicole M; Dodson, John A; Rich, Michael W; Wenger, Nanette K; Blum, Kay; Harold, John Gordon; Tinetti, Mary E; Maurer, Mathew S; Forman, Daniel E

    2015-09-15

    The population of older adults is expanding rapidly, and aging predisposes to cardiovascular disease. The principle of patient-centered care must respond to the preponderance of cardiac disease that now occurs in combination with the complexities of old age. Geriatric cardiology melds cardiovascular perspectives with multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty, cognitive decline, and other clinical, social, financial, and psychological dimensions of aging. Although some assume that a cardiologist may instinctively cultivate some of these skills over the course of a career, we assert that the volume and complexity of older cardiovascular patients in contemporary practice warrants a more direct approach to achieve suitable training and a more reliable process of care. We present a rationale and vision for geriatric cardiology as a melding of primary cardiovascular and geriatrics skills, thereby infusing cardiology practice with expanded proficiencies in diagnosis, risks, care coordination, communications, end-of-life, and other competences required to best manage older cardiovascular patients.

  14. Nursing home staffing and training recommendations for promoting older adults' quality of care and life: Part 2. Increasing nurse staffing and training.

    PubMed

    Maas, Meridean L; Specht, Janet P; Buckwalter, Kathleen C; Gittler, Josephine; Bechen, Kate

    2008-04-01

    In the second article of this two-part series, research supporting the need for more RNs and assisting staff (licensed practical nurses [LPNs] and certified nursing assistants [CNAs]) with gerontological nursing training in nursing homes is reviewed. Using the literature, time studies, the judgments of experts, and the expected quality and quantity of care older adults should rightfully receive, recommended standards are set forth for RN and assisting staff hours per resident day, their training, and compensation. Leadership training is recommended for RNs and increased gerontological nursing training is recommended for RNs and assisting staff. Finally, to address the shortage of RNs with gerontological nursing and leadership training in nursing homes, a program to prepare RNs as geriatric nursing long-term care specialists is proposed.

  15. Wholistic orthopedics: Is this the right way to treat geriatric orthopedic patients?

    PubMed Central

    Ebnezar, John; Bali, Yogita; John, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    Geriatric orthopedic problems poses different challenges in their management. Conventional treatment methods like drugs, physiotherapy and surgeries are inadequate. A Geriatric orthopedic patient suffers as a whole and not in isolation. This article highlights the importance of managing geriatric orthopedic patients as a whole and outlines the various steps of wholistic management. PMID:28149067

  16. Fieldwork Rotation: A Model for Educating Social Work Students for Geriatric Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivry, Joann; Lawrance, Frances P.; Damron-Rodriguez, JoAnn; Robbins, Virginia Cooke

    2005-01-01

    The Geriatric Social Work Practicum Partnership Program was funded to attract graduate students to the field of aging and to strengthen field education in geriatric social work. Rotation was selected to achieve the program's goals to provide students with exposure to the spectrum of care in geriatric social work services. This paper describes the…

  17. Fieldwork Rotation: A Model for Educating Social Work Students for Geriatric Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivry, Joann; Lawrance, Frances P.; Damron-Rodriguez, JoAnn; Robbins, Virginia Cooke

    2005-01-01

    The Geriatric Social Work Practicum Partnership Program was funded to attract graduate students to the field of aging and to strengthen field education in geriatric social work. Rotation was selected to achieve the program's goals to provide students with exposure to the spectrum of care in geriatric social work services. This paper describes the…

  18. Three Strategies for Delivering Continuing Medical Education in Geriatrics to General Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rikkert, Marcel G. M.; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2004-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) need advanced skills in geriatric assessment to be competent to treat the increasing number of elderly patients. Continuing medical education in geriatrics for GPs is heterogeneous, and not assessed for effectiveness. In this study we compared the educational effects of three geriatric post-graduate training methods on…

  19. Geriatric Pharmacy Curriculum in U.S. Pharmacy Schools: A Nationwide Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, William; Pratt, Clara Collette

    1982-01-01

    A survey of 72 pharmacy schools shows 22 percent of the schools had no geriatric coursework, 35 percent offered only courses in which the geriatric content averaged under 12 percent of course content, and 43 percent offered courses that focused primarily on geriatrics, most including a major clinical component. (Author/MSE)

  20. Geriatric-Focused Educational Offerings in the Department of Veterans Affairs from 1999 to 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thielke, Stephen; Tumosa, Nina; Lindenfeld, Rivkah; Shay, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The scope of geriatrics-related educational offerings in large health care systems, in either the target audiences or topics covered, has not previously been analyzed or reported in the professional literature. The authors reviewed the geriatrics-related educational sessions that were provided between 1999 and 2009 by the Geriatrics Research,…