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Sample records for german shepherd dogs

  1. Comparison between cranial thoracic intervertebral disc herniations in German Shepherd dogs and other large breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Gaitero, Luis; Nykamp, Stephanie; Daniel, Rob; Monteith, Gabrielle

    2013-01-01

    Cranial thoracic intervertebral disc herniations have been reported to be rare in dogs due to the presence of the intercapital ligament, however some studies have proposed they may not be uncommon in German Shepherd dogs. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare cranial thoracic intervertebral disc herniations in German Shepherd dogs and other large breed dogs (control group). Medical records at the Ontario Veterinary College were searched for German Shepherd dogs and other large breed dogs that had magnetic resonance imaging studies including the T1-T9 region. For each dog and each disc space from T1-T9, three variables (compression, disc degeneration, and herniation) were recorded and graded based on review of sagittal T2-weighted images. Twenty-three German Shepherd dogs and 47 other large breed dogs met inclusion criteria. The German Shepherd dog group had higher scores than the control group for compression (P = 0.0099) and herniation (P < 0.001), but not disc degeneration (P = 0.97). In the German Shepherd dog group, intervertebral discs T2-T3 and T4-T5 had an increased risk for compression and T3-T4 had an increased risk for compression and herniation. Findings from this study indicated that German Shepherd dogs may be more likely than other large breed dogs to have spinal cord compression due to cranial thoracic disc herniations. Imaging of the cranial thoracic spine, including T2-T3, is recommended for German Shepherd dogs with T3-L3 neurological signs. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  2. Primary splenic haemangiopericytoma in a German shepherd dog.

    PubMed

    Obwolo, M J

    1986-05-01

    A large splenic haemangiopericytoma is described in an 11-year-old German Shepherd Dog. No skin lesions were found. There was no clinical evidence of the presence of tumour elsewhere in the body and so the spleen was considered to be the primary site. The dog was clinically normal 6 months after splenectomy.

  3. Multifocal Aspergillus terreus discospondylitis in two German shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Berry, W L; Leisewitz, A L

    1996-12-01

    Multifocal fungal (Aspergillus terreus) discospondylitis was diagnosed in 2 German shepherd dogs. In one dog, the aetiology was established by means of fluoroscopic-guided disc aspiration, cytology and culture of disc material and urine. Disseminated aspergillosis was confirmed at necropsy and A. terreus cultured from numerous organs in this dog. The aetiology in the other dog was not established until therapeutic failure forced surgical curettage of disc material from which the fungus was cultured. Ketoconazole therapy failed to effect an improvement, and at necropsy, disease was localised to the spinal column, with A. terreus cultured from the affected discs and associated vertebrae. Immunodeficiency was suspected in both cases. In the case of disseminated disease a reduced lymphocyte blastogenic response was demonstrated. Reduced IgA was shown in both cases. The German shepherd breed seems to be predisposed to Aspergillus infections and IgA deficiency.

  4. Combined pituitary hormone deficiency in german shepherd dogs with dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Kooistra, H S; Voorhout, G; Mol, J A; Rijnberk, A

    2000-10-01

    In German shepherd dogs pituitary dwarfism is known as an autosomal recessive inherited abnormality. To investigate whether the function of cells other than the somatotropes may also be impaired in this disease, the secretory capacity of the pituitary anterior lobe (AL) cells was studied by a combined pituitary AL stimulation test with four releasing hormones (4RH test) in four male and four female German shepherd dwarfs. In addition, the morphology of the pituitary was investigated by computed tomography. The physical features of the eight German shepherd dwarfs were primarily characterized by growth retardation and stagnant development of the hair coat. The results of the 4RH test confirmed the presence of hyposomatotropism. The basal plasma TSH and prolactin concentrations were also low and did not change upon stimulation. Basal plasma concentrations of LH were relatively low and responded only slightly to suprapituitary stimulation. With respect to the plasma FSH levels there was a clear gender difference. In the males plasma FSH concentrations remained below the detection limit throughout the 4RH test, whereas in the females the basal plasma FSH levels were slightly lower and there was only a small increase following suprapituitary stimulation, compared with the values in age-matched controls. In contrast, basal and stimulated plasma ACTH concentrations did not differ between the dwarfs and the controls. Computed tomography of the pituitary fossa revealed a normal sized pituitary with cysts in five dogs, an enlarged pituitary with cysts in two dogs, and a small pituitary gland without cysts in the remaining dog. The results of this study demonstrate that German shepherd dwarfs have a combined deficiency of GH, TSH, and prolactin together with impaired release of gonadotropins, whereas ACTH secretion is preserved. The combined pituitary hormone deficiency is associated with cyst formation and pituitary hypoplasia.

  5. Temporary remission of disseminated paecilomycosis in a German shepherd dog treated with ketoconazole.

    PubMed

    Booth, M J; van der Lugt, J J; van Heerden, A; Picard, J A

    2001-06-01

    Disseminated mycosis caused by Paecilomyces varioti in a female German shepherd dog presented with chronic forelimb lameness is described. Radiographs of the swollen carpal joint revealed geographic lysis of the radial epiphysis. Diagnosis was based on cytological demonstration of fungal hyphae and chlamydiospores, as well as fungal culture of fluid obtained by arthrocentesis. Temporary remission was characterised by markedly improved clinical signs and laboratory parameters, following treatment with ketoconazole. The dog was euthanased 9 months after the initial diagnosis, following the diagnosis of multifocal discospondylitis. This appears to be the longest described period of temporary remission obtained with treatment in dogs with paecilomycosis. Clinical, clinicopathological and necropsy findings of this disease in another German shepherd dog are briefly described.

  6. Ileocecocolic volvulus in a German shepherd dog

    PubMed Central

    Javard, Romain; Specchi, Swan; Benamou, Jérôme; Lapointe, Catherine; Deffontaines, Jean-Baptiste; Planté, Jérôme; d’Anjou, Marc-André

    2014-01-01

    This report describes an ileocecocolic volvulus in a German shepherd dog with risk factors of previous abdominal surgeries and concurrent chronic enteropathy. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) with multiplanar reformatting was more sensitive than abdominal radiographs or ultrasound to obtain a diagnosis, because of the presence of a “whirl-sign” on CT. A combination of colopexy and cecopexy was succesfully used to treat the patient’s condition. PMID:25392556

  7. Facet joint geometry and intervertebral disk degeneration in the L5-S1 region of the vertebral column in German Shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Gabriela S; Häni, Hansjürg; Busato, André R; Lang, Johann

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the possible association between facet joint geometry and intervertebral disk degeneration in German Shepherd Dogs. 25 German Shepherd Dogs and 11 control dogs of similar body weight and condition. Facet joint angles in the caudal portion of the lumbar region of the vertebral column (L5-S1) were measured by use of computed tomography, and the intervertebral discs were evaluated microscopically. The relationship between facet joint geometry and disk degeneration was evaluated by use of statistical methods. German Shepherd Dogs had significantly more facet joint tropism than control dogs, but an association with disk degeneration was not found. However, German Shepherd Dogs had a different facet joint conformation, with more sagittally oriented facet joints at L5-L6 and L6-L7 and a larger angle difference between the lumbar and lumbosacral facet joints, compared with control dogs. A large difference between facet joint angles at L6-L7 and L7-S1 in German Shepherd Dogs may be associated with the frequent occurrence of lumbosacral disk degeneration in this breed.

  8. Characterization of the dog agouti gene and a nonagouti mutation in german shepherd dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Julie A.; Newton, J.; Berryere, Tom G.

    The interaction between two genes, Agouti and Melanocortin-1 receptor (Mc1r), produces diverse pigment patterns in mammals by regulating the type, amount, and distribution pattern of the two pigment types found in mammalian hair: eumelanin (brown/black) and pheomelanin (yellow/red). In domestic dogs (Canis familiaris), there is a tremendous variation in coat color patterns between and within breeds; however, previous studies suggest that the molecular genetics of pigment-type switching in dogs may differ from that of other mammals. Here we report the identification and characterization of the Agouti gene from domestic dogs, predicted to encode a 131-amino-acid secreted protein 98 percent identicalmore » to the fox homolog, and which maps to chromosome CFA24 in a region of conserved linkage. Comparative analysis of the Doberman Pinscher Agouti cDNA, the fox cDNA, and 180 kb of Doberman Pinscher genomic DNA suggests that, as with laboratory mice, different pigment-type-switching patterns in the canine family are controlled by alternative usage of different promoters and untranslated first exons. A small survey of Labrador Retrievers, Greyhounds, Australian Shepherds, and German Shepherd Dogs did not uncover any polymorphisms, but we identified a single nucleotide variant in black German Shepherd Dogs predicted to cause an Arg-to-Cys substitution at codon 96, which is likely to account for recessive inheritance of a uniform black coat.« less

  9. Delayed growth in two German shepherd dog littermates with normal serum concentrations of growth hormone, thyroxine, and cortisol.

    PubMed

    Randolph, J F; Miller, C L; Cummings, J F; Lothrop, C D

    1990-01-01

    Four German Shepherd Dogs from a litter of 10 were evaluated because of postnatal onset of proportionate growth stunting that clinically resembled well-documented hypopituitary dwarfism in that breed. Although 2 pups had histologic evidence of hypopituitarism, the remaining 2 pups had normal serum growth hormone concentration and adrenocorticotropin secretory capability, and normal adrenal function test and thyroid function study results. Furthermore, the initially stunted German Shepherd Dogs grew at a steady rate until at 1 year, body weight and shoulder height approximated normal measurements. Seemingly, delayed growth in these pups may represent one end of a clinical spectrum associated with hypopituitarism in German Shepherd Dogs.

  10. The leukemia inhibitory factor receptor gene is not involved in the etiology of pituitary dwarfism in German shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Hanson, J M; Mol, J A; Leegwater, P A J; Kooistra, H S; Meij, B P

    2006-12-01

    Pituitary dwarfism in German shepherd dogs is characterized by combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD) and intrapituitary cyst formation. Activation of the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-LIF receptor (LIFR) signal transduction pathway results in a similar phenotype in (transgenic) mice. We therefore assessed the role of the LIFR in the etiology of pituitary dwarfism in German shepherd dogs. A polymorphic microsatellite marker (UULIFR) was used to analyze the segregation of the LIFR gene in 22 German shepherd dogs from 4 pedigrees, each including one dwarf. There was no allelic association between UULIFR and the dwarfism phenotype. Based on our findings LIFR was excluded as a candidate gene for CPHD.

  11. Visualization of Genome Diversity in German Shepherd Dogs.

    PubMed

    Mortlock, Sally-Anne; Booth, Rachel; Mazrier, Hamutal; Khatkar, Mehar S; Williamson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A loss of genetic diversity may lead to increased disease risks in subpopulations of dogs. The canine breed structure has contributed to relatively small effective population size in many breeds and can limit the options for selective breeding strategies to maintain diversity. With the completion of the canine genome sequencing project, and the subsequent reduction in the cost of genotyping on a genomic scale, evaluating diversity in dogs has become much more accurate and accessible. This provides a potential tool for advising dog breeders and developing breeding programs within a breed. A challenge in doing this is to present complex relationship data in a form that can be readily utilized. Here, we demonstrate the use of a pipeline, known as NetView, to visualize the network of relationships in a subpopulation of German Shepherd Dogs.

  12. Concurrent central diabetes insipidus and panhypopituitarism in a German shepherd dog.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, I K; Dennis, R; Herrtage, M E

    1999-06-01

    This report describes a German shepherd dog that was presented with proportionate dwarfism and coat changes typical of hypopituitarism but that was also profoundly polydipsic and polyuric. Investigations established a diagnosis of concurrent central diabetes insipidus. Treatment with desmopressin was successful in managing the polyuria and polydipsia.

  13. Computed tomographic method for measurement of inclination angles and motion of the sacroiliac joints in German Shepherd Dogs and Greyhounds.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Fritha C; Cave, Nick J; Hartman, Karl M; Gee, Erica K; Worth, Andrew J; Bridges, Janis P; Hartman, Angela C

    2013-09-01

    To develop an in vivo CT method to measure inclination angles and motion of the sacroiliac joints in dogs of performance breeds. 10 German Shepherd Dogs and 12 Greyhounds without signs of lumbosacral region pain or neurologic problems. CT of the ilium and sacrum was performed in flexed, neutral, and extended hind limb positions. Lines were drawn on volume-rendered images acquired in the flexed and extended positions to measure motion of the ilia relative to the sacra. Inclination angles of the synovial and ligamentous components of the sacroiliac joints were measured on transverse-plane CT images acquired at cranial and caudal locations. Coefficients of variance of measurements were calculated to determine intraobserver variability. Coefficients of variance of measurements ranged from 0.17% to 2.45%. A significantly higher amount of sacroiliac joint rotational motion was detected for German Shepherd Dogs versus Greyhounds. The cranial synovial joint component had a significantly more sagittal orientation in German Shepherd Dogs versus Greyhounds. No significant differences were detected between breeds for x- or y-axis translational motion or caudal synovial or ligamentous joint component inclination angles. The small amounts of sacroiliac joint motion detected in this study may buffer high-frequency vibrations during movement of dogs. Differences detected between breeds may be associated with the predisposition of German Shepherd Dogs to develop lumbosacral region signs of pain, although the biological importance of this finding was not determined. Future studies are warranted to compare sacroiliac joint variables between German Shepherd Dogs with and without lumbosacral region signs of pain.

  14. Ureteral obstruction secondary to disseminated penicilliosis in a German shepherd dog

    PubMed Central

    Acierno, Michelle M.; Ober, Christopher P.; Goupil, Brad A.; Olson, Erik J.

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal ultrasonographic evaluation of a 2-year-old male German shepherd dog evaluated for weight loss demonstrated a right ureteral mass with ipsilateral hydronephrosis, hypoechoic splenic nodules, and hypoechoic and rounded lymph nodes. A fungal mat extending from the renal pelvis into the ureter secondary to disseminated Penicillium was confirmed at necropsy. PMID:27928169

  15. Disseminated Geosmithia argillacea infection in a German shepherd dog.

    PubMed

    Grant, David C; Sutton, Deanna A; Sandberg, Christina A; Tyler, Ronald D; Thompson, Elizabeth H; Romanelli, Anna M; Wickes, Brian L

    2009-03-01

    We report a systemic mycosis in a German Shepherd dog caused by Geosmithia argillacea. Although this etiologic agent microscopically resembles a Penicillium species, and is histopathologically compatible with members of the genus Aspergillus, morphologic features and molecular characterization clearly separate it from these genera. This appears to be the first report of disseminated disease by this species in humans or animals. In vitro antifungal susceptibility testing suggests resistance to amphotericin B and voriconazole and susceptibility to caspofungin, itraconazole, and posaconazole.

  16. Immunohistochemical evidence for expression of fast-twitch type sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA1) in German shepherd dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy myocardium.

    PubMed

    Summerfield, Nuala; Peters, Mary E; Hercock, Carol A; Mobasheri, Ali; Young, Iain S

    2010-04-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is one of the most common acquired canine heart diseases. It is particularly common in large and giant breed dogs. Although a great deal is known about the clinical progression and manifestations of the disease, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. One widely held belief is that calcium-handling abnormalities are critically involved in the disease process. This study investigates the changes in expression of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) isoforms in DCM myocardium from German shepherd dogs. Affected tissue samples were obtained from German shepherd dogs with DCM, euthanized for intractable congestive heart failure while normal myocardial tissue samples were obtained from German shepherd dogs, euthanized for non-cardiovascular reasons. Tissue microarrays containing normal and DCM myocardium samples were prepared, immunostained with SERCA1 and SERCA2 antibodies and analyzed. We were able to demonstrate, for the first time, that while there is little change in the expression of the cardiac isoform (SERCA2), there is clear expression of the fast-twitch skeletal muscle isoform SERCA1 in the myocardium of dogs diagnosed with DCM. We propose that SERCA1 expression is evidence of a natural adaptive response to the impaired Ca2+ handling thought to occur in German shepherd dogs with DCM and heart failure. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Determination of reference values and frequency of occurrence of patella alta in German shepherd dogs: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Łojszczyk-Szczepaniak, Anna; Silmanowicz, Piotr; Komsta, Renata; Osiński, Zbigniew

    2017-05-31

    Patella alta and patella baja are important conditions underlying a predisposition to many joint diseases, including patellar luxation and patellar chondromalacia of the articular cartilage. The frequencies of patella alta and patella baja have not yet been determined. The objectives of this study were to determine the frequency of patella alta and to determine reference values to the position of the vertical patella according to two modified techniques of the Insall-Salvati method in a group of 65 German shepherd dogs (115 stifle joints). The upper limits of reference values for the normal vertical position of the patella were 1.79 and 2.13, depending on the method of measurement. A high prevalence of patella alta was observed in the group of German shepherd dogs. A correlation was demonstrated between the classification of dogs' joints in the patella alta group and the multiplied risk of canine hip dysplasia (CHD) through the estimation of odds ratios. Dogs with patella alta were healthy dogs that did not exhibit orthopaedic problems in the stifle joints. The results revealed that the risk of CHD is twice as high in dogs with higher patellar ligament length to patella length ratio.

  18. Torsion and volvulus of the transverse and descending colon in a German shepherd dog.

    PubMed

    Halfacree, Z J; Beck, A L; Lee, K C L; Lipscomb, V J

    2006-08-01

    A German shepherd dog was presented two months after surgery for correction of acute gastric dilatation volvulus. The dog had been diagnosed with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Radiographs revealed marked gaseous distension of one loop of intestine with a generalised increase in intestinal gas content. A 360 degrees anticlockwise rotation of the descending and transverse colon, around the longitudinal axis of the mesocolon, was diagnosed at exploratory coeliotomy. The transverse and descending colon appeared uniformly necrotic and an end-to-end colo-colic resection and anastomosis was performed. The dog initially made satisfactory postoperative progress but was euthanased on the third postoperative day after it developed an intestinal intussusception.

  19. Cloning, characterization, and physical mapping of the canine Prop-1 gene (PROP1): exclusion as a candidate for combined pituitary hormone deficiency in German shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Lantinga-van Leeuwen, I S; Kooistra, H S; Mol, J A; Renier, C; Breen, M; van Oost, B A

    2000-01-01

    Abnormalities in the genes encoding Pit-1 and Prop-1 have been reported to cause combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD) in mice and humans. In dogs, a similar phenotype has been described in the German shepherd breed. We have previously reported that the Pit-1 gene (POU1F1) is not mutated in affected German shepherd dogs. In this study, we report the isolation and mapping of the canine Prop-1 gene (PROP1), and we assessed the involvement of PROP1 in German shepherd dog dwarfism. The canine PROP1 gene was found to contain three exons, encoding a 226 amino acid protein. The deduced amino acid sequence was 79% and 84% homologous with the mouse and human Prop-1 protein, respectively. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, PROP1 was mapped to canine chromosome 11. Further mapping with a canine radiation hybrid panel showed co-localization with the polymorphic DNA marker AHT137. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA from dwarf German shepherd dogs revealed no alterations in the PROP1 gene. Moreover, linkage analysis of AHT137 revealed no co-segregation between the PROP1 locus and the CPHD phenotype, excluding this gene as candidate for canine CPHD and providing a new spontaneous model of hypopituitarism. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  20. Characterization of naturally developing small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in 16 German shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Willard, M D; Simpson, R B; Fossum, T W; Cohen, N D; Delles, E K; Kolp, D L; Carey, D P; Reinhart, G A

    1994-04-15

    Sixteen German Shepherd Dogs were found, via quantitative microbial culture of intestinal fluid samples, to have small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (IBO) over an 11-month period. All dogs were deficient in serum IgA. Consistent clinical signs suggestive of an alimentary tract disorder were not observed. Serum cobalamin determinations were not helpful in detecting IBO. Serum folate concentrations had variable sensitivity and specificity for detecting dogs from which we could culture > or = 1 x 10(5) bacterial/ml from intestinal fluid samples in the nonfed state. Histologic and intestinal mucosal cytologic examinations were not useful in detecting IBO. Substantial within-dog and between-dog variation was found in the numbers and species of bacteria in the intestines. The difficulty in diagnosing IBO, the variability in organisms found in individual dogs on repeated sampling, the likelihood that intestinal fluid microbial cultures failed to diagnose IBO in some dogs, and the potential of IBO to be clinically inapparent were the most important findings in this study.

  1. Alternative classification and screening protocol for transitional lumbosacral vertebra in German shepherd dogs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lumbosacral transitional vertebra (LTV) is a common congenital and hereditary anomaly in many dog breeds. It predisposes to premature degeneration of the lumbosacral junction, and is a frequent cause of cauda equina syndrome, especially in German shepherd dogs. Ventrodorsal hip radiographs are most often used in diagnosis of LTV in screening programs. In this study, value of laterolateral lumbar spine radiographs as additions to ventrodorsal radiographs in diagnosis of LTV, and characteristics of LTV and the eighth lumbar vertebra (L8) in laterolateral radiographs were studied. Additionally, computed tomography (CT) features of different types of LTV were elucidated. Methods The ventrodorsal pelvic and laterolateral lumbar spine radiographs of 228 German shepherd dogs were evaluated for existence and type of LTV. Morphology of transverse processes was used in classification of LTV in ventrodorsal radiographs. The relative length of sixth (L6) and seventh (L7) vertebrae (L6/L7) was used in characterization of these vertebrae in laterolateral radiographs. CT studies were available for 16 dogs, and they were used for more detailed characterization of different types of LTV. Non-parametric χ2 statistics, generalized logit model for multinomial data, and one-way analysis of variance was used for statistical analyses. Results In all, 92 (40%) dogs had a LTV, the most common type being separation of first spinous process from the median crest of the sacrum in 62 dogs (67% of LTV). Eight dogs had eight lumbar vertebrae. Those dogs with LTV had longer L7 in relation to L6 than dogs with normal lumbosacral junctions. When L6/L7 decreased by 0.1 units, the proportion of dogs belonging to the group with L8 was 14-fold higher than in the group with normal lumbosacral junctions. L8 resembled first sacral vertebra (S1) in length and position and was therefore classified as one type of LTV. With CT it was shown that categorizing LTV, based on shape and visibility of

  2. 3D visualization of Thoraco-Lumbar Spinal Lesions in German Shepherd Dog

    SciTech Connect

    Azpiroz, J.; Krafft, J.; Cadena, M.

    2006-09-08

    Computed tomography (CT) has been found to be an excellent imaging modality due to its sensitivity to characterize the morphology of the spine in dogs. This technique is considered to be particularly helpful for diagnosing spinal cord atrophy and spinal stenosis. The three-dimensional visualization of organs and bones can significantly improve the diagnosis of certain diseases in dogs. CT images were acquired of a German shepherd's dog spinal cord to generate stacks and digitally process them to arrange them in a volume image. All imaging experiments were acquired using standard clinical protocols on a clinical CT scanner. The three-dimensional visualizationmore » allowed us to observe anatomical structures that otherwise are not possible to observe with two-dimensional images. The combination of an imaging modality like CT together with imaging processing techniques can be a powerful tool for the diagnosis of a number of animal diseases.« less

  3. 3D visualization of Thoraco-Lumbar Spinal Lesions in German Shepherd Dog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azpiroz, J.; Krafft, J.; Cadena, M.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2006-09-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been found to be an excellent imaging modality due to its sensitivity to characterize the morphology of the spine in dogs. This technique is considered to be particularly helpful for diagnosing spinal cord atrophy and spinal stenosis. The three-dimensional visualization of organs and bones can significantly improve the diagnosis of certain diseases in dogs. CT images were acquired of a German shepherd's dog spinal cord to generate stacks and digitally process them to arrange them in a volume image. All imaging experiments were acquired using standard clinical protocols on a clinical CT scanner. The three-dimensional visualization allowed us to observe anatomical structures that otherwise are not possible to observe with two-dimensional images. The combination of an imaging modality like CT together with imaging processing techniques can be a powerful tool for the diagnosis of a number of animal diseases.

  4. Heritability and phenotypic variation of canine hip dysplasia radiographic traits in a cohort of Australian German shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Bethany J; Nicholas, Frank W; James, John W; Wade, Claire M; Tammen, Imke; Raadsma, Herman W; Castle, Kao; Thomson, Peter C

    2012-01-01

    Canine Hip Dysplasia (CHD) is a common, painful and debilitating orthopaedic disorder of dogs with a partly genetic, multifactorial aetiology. Worldwide, potential breeding dogs are evaluated for CHD using radiographically based screening schemes such as the nine ordinally-scored British Veterinary Association Hip Traits (BVAHTs). The effectiveness of selective breeding based on screening results requires that a significant proportion of the phenotypic variation is caused by the presence of favourable alleles segregating in the population. This proportion, heritability, was measured in a cohort of 13,124 Australian German Shepherd Dogs born between 1976 and 2005, displaying phenotypic variation for BVAHTs, using ordinal, linear and binary mixed models fitted by a Restricted Maximum Likelihood method. Heritability estimates for the nine BVAHTs ranged from 0.14-0.24 (ordinal models), 0.14-0.25 (linear models) and 0.12-0.40 (binary models). Heritability for the summed BVAHT phenotype was 0.30 ± 0.02. The presence of heritable variation demonstrates that selection based on BVAHTs has the potential to improve BVAHT scores in the population. Assuming a genetic correlation between BVAHT scores and CHD-related pain and dysfunction, the welfare of Australian German Shepherds can be improved by continuing to consider BVAHT scores in the selection of breeding dogs, but that as heritability values are only moderate in magnitude the accuracy, and effectiveness, of selection could be improved by the use of Estimated Breeding Values in preference to solely phenotype based selection of breeding animals.

  5. Sternal Cleft Associated with Cantrell's Pentalogy in a German Shepherd Dog.

    PubMed

    Benlloch-Gonzalez, Manuel; Poncet, Cyrill

    2015-01-01

    A 5 mo old male German shepherd dog weighing 15.5 kg was presented with an abdominal wall hernia and exercise intolerance. Physical examination showed a grade II/VI systolic heart murmur and an area of cutaneous atrophy overlying a midline supraumbilical wall defect. Thoracic radiography, computed tomography, and ultrasound examination revealed a congenital caudal sternal cleft, a supraumbilical diastasis rectus, and a patent ductus arteriosus. Exploratory surgery confirmed defects of the pars sternalis of the diaphragm and caudoventral pericardium and a persistent left cranial vena cava. Those findings were compatible with Cantrell's pentalogy. Surgical treatment included ligation of the patent ductus arteriosus through the sternal cleft, diaphragmatic reconstruction with paracostal extension of the diaphragmatic defect, pericardial and linea alba appositional reconstruction, and primary approximation of the sternal halves. Growth and exercise activity were normal 10 mo after surgery. The discovery of a midline cranial abdominal wall, pericardial, diaphragmatic, or sternal defect should prompt a thorough examination to rule out any possible associated syndrome. Cantrell's pentalogy presents various degrees of expression and is rare in dogs. Management involves early surgical repair of congenital anomalies to protect the visceral structures. The prognosis in dogs with mild forms of the syndrome is encouraging.

  6. Cortisol and Secretory Immunoglobulin A Response to Stress in German Shepherd Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Svobodová, Ivona; Chaloupková, Helena; Končel, Roman; Bartoš, Luděk; Hradecká, Lenka; Jebavý, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether cortisol and secretory Immunoglobulin A (sIgA) could be used as an indicator of acute stress in both young and adult dogs. Seventeen German shepherd puppies were exposed to the Puppy test (challenge test) at the age of seven weeks. This test has been routinely used to assess the future working ability of potential police dogs. In addition, ten adult females were subjected to 4 minutes of defense training under stressful conditions. Saliva was collected from the puppies and adult females before testing and 20 minutes after the start of testing, using a cotton swab held for 1–2 minutes in each dog's mouth. Cortisol concentrations increased after the test compared to the control sample both in puppies and the adult females. However adult females showed a significant decrease in sIgA after defense training while puppies showed a tendency of increase in sIgA. We propose that salivary cortisol could be used as an indicator of stress in puppies during early ontogeny. It is not yet clear whether sIgA could be used as a useful indicator of short-term stress in dogs. PMID:24637917

  7. Performance of Pugs, German Shepherds, and Greyhounds (Canis lupus familiaris) on an odor-discrimination task.

    PubMed

    Hall, Nathaniel J; Glenn, Kelsey; Smith, David W; Wynne, Clive D L

    2015-08-01

    Public opinion and the scientific literature alike reflect a widespread assumption that there are differences in behavior between dog breeds. Direct empirical behavioral assessments of such differences, however, are rare and have produced mixed results. One area where breed differences are often assumed is olfaction, where German Shepherds, hounds, and Labradors are commonly used for odor-detection work, whereas toy breeds and brachycephalic dogs, such as Pugs, are not. Choice of breed for scent detection work, however, may be driven more by historical choices than data. In this article we directly assessed the ability of German Shepherds, Pugs, and Greyhounds to acquire a simple olfactory discrimination, and their ability to maintain performance when the target odorant was diluted. Our results show that contrary to expectations, Pugs significantly outperformed the German Shepherds in acquiring the odor discrimination and maintaining performance when the odorant concentration was decreased. Nine of 10 Greyhounds did not complete acquisition training because they failed a motivation criterion. These results indicate that Pugs outperformed German Shepherds in the dimensions of olfaction assessed. Greyhounds showed a general failure to participate. Overall, our results highlight the importance of direct behavioral measurement of assumed behavioral breed differences. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Emergency visits and occupational hazards in German Shepherd police dogs (2008-2010).

    PubMed

    Parr, Joanna R; Otto, Cynthia M

    2013-01-01

    To describe the most common reasons for emergency medical visits in working police dogs. Retrospective case control study. Two hundred three German Shepherd dogs (GSDs); 138 police dog visits by 74 dogs and 138 pet (control) dog visits by 129 dogs. Medical records of all GSDs seen in the emergency service (ES) at the University of Pennsylvania Veterinary Hospital from July 2008 to July 2010 were reviewed. The recorded diagnoses from police GSD ES visits (defined as a new problem or new episode of a recurrent problem) were compared to those of randomly chosen pet GSD ES visits. There were significantly more intact male police GSDs than pet GSDs. Police GSDs were significantly younger than pet GSDs. The most common presenting complaint in both groups was gastrointestinal disease (eg, vomiting, diarrhea, gastric dilatation and volvulus). Pet GSDs were significantly more likely to present for geriatric conditions (eg, central nervous system disease, cardiovascular disease, and neoplastic conditions). Orthopedic issues were significantly more common in police GSDs. Police GSDs are more likely to present for orthopedic injuries and less likely to present for geriatric diseases. Gastrointestinal disease is not unique to the working GSD and was equally represented in both populations. Preventative measures for all GSDs should focus on minimizing gastrointestinal disease. Preventive strategies focusing on physical fitness and conditioning as well as selective breeding programs may help reduce orthopedic injuries in police GSDs. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2013.

  9. Concurrent gall bladder, liver lobe torsion, and bile peritonitis in a German shepherd dog 2 months after gastric dilatation/volvulus gastropexy and splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Tubby, Kurtis G

    2013-08-01

    Postmortem examination of a 7-year-old German shepherd dog which had gastric dilatation/volvulus and splenectomy 2 months earlier revealed that the right middle and quadrate liver lobes were diffusely congested and torsed. The gall bladder was grossly distended and torsed along its long axis and there was evidence of bile peritonitis.

  10. A de novo mutation in KIT causes white spotting in a subpopulation of German Shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Wong, A K; Ruhe, A L; Robertson, K R; Loew, E R; Williams, D C; Neff, M W

    2013-06-01

    Although variation in the KIT gene is a common cause of white spotting among domesticated animals, KIT has not been implicated in the diverse white spotting observed in the dog. Here, we show that a loss-of-function mutation in KIT recapitulates the coat color phenotypes observed in other species. A spontaneous white spotting observed in a pedigree of German Shepherd dogs was mapped by linkage analysis to a single locus on CFA13 containing KIT (pairwise LOD = 15). DNA sequence analysis identified a novel 1-bp insertion in the second exon that co-segregated with the phenotype. The expected frameshift and resulting premature stop codons predicted a severely truncated c-Kit receptor with presumably abolished activity. No dogs homozygous for the mutation were recovered from multiple intercrosses (P = 0.01), suggesting the mutation is recessively embryonic lethal. These observations are consistent with the effects of null alleles of KIT in other species. © 2012 The Authors, Animal Genetics © 2012 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  11. Concurrent gall bladder, liver lobe torsion, and bile peritonitis in a German shepherd dog 2 months after gastric dilatation/volvulus gastropexy and splenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tubby, Kurtis G.

    2013-01-01

    Postmortem examination of a 7-year-old German shepherd dog which had gastric dilatation/volvulus and splenectomy 2 months earlier revealed that the right middle and quadrate liver lobes were diffusely congested and torsed. The gall bladder was grossly distended and torsed along its long axis and there was evidence of bile peritonitis. PMID:24155480

  12. Degenerative myelopathy in German Shepherd Dog: comparison of two molecular assays for the identification of the SOD1:c.118G>A mutation.

    PubMed

    Capucchio, Maria Teresa; Spalenza, Veronica; Biasibetti, Elena; Bottero, Maria Teresa; Rasero, Roberto; Dalmasso, Alessandra; Sacchi, Paola

    2014-02-01

    Degenerative myelopathy (DM) is a late-onset, slowly progressive degeneration of spinal cord white matter which is reported primarily in large breed dogs. The missense mutation SOD1:c.118G>A is associated with this pathology in several dog breeds, including the German Shepherd Dog (GSD). The aims of the present study were to develop a tool for the rapid screening of the SOD1 mutation site in dogs and to evaluate the association of the polymorphism with DM in the German Shepherd breed. Two different techniques were compared: a minisequencing test and a real-time pcr allelic discrimination assay. Both approaches resulted effective and efficient. A sample of 47 dogs were examined. Ten subjects presented the symptoms of the illness; for one of them the diagnosis was confirmed by postmortem investigations and it resulted to be an A/A homozygote. In another clinically suspected dog, heterozygote A/G, the histopathological examination of the medulla showed moderate axon and myelin degenerative changes. GSD shows a frequency of the mutant allele equal to 0.17, quite high being a high-risk allele. Because canine DM has a late onset in adulthood and homozygous mutant dogs are likely as fertile as other genotypes, the natural selection is mild and the mutant allele may reach high frequencies. A diagnostic test, easy to implement, may contribute to control the gene diffusion in populations. The SOD1:c.118G>A mutation could be a useful marker for breeding strategies intending to reduce the incidence of DM.

  13. Estimated breeding values for canine hip dysplasia radiographic traits in a cohort of Australian German Shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Bethany J; Nicholas, Frank W; James, John W; Wade, Claire M; Thomson, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Canine hip dysplasia (CHD) is a serious and common musculoskeletal disease of pedigree dogs and therefore represents both an important welfare concern and an imperative breeding priority. The typical heritability estimates for radiographic CHD traits suggest that the accuracy of breeding dog selection could be substantially improved by the use of estimated breeding values (EBVs) in place of selection based on phenotypes of individuals. The British Veterinary Association/Kennel Club scoring method is a complex measure composed of nine bilateral ordinal traits, intended to evaluate both early and late dysplastic changes. However, the ordinal nature of the traits may represent a technical challenge for calculation of EBVs using linear methods. The purpose of the current study was to calculate EBVs of British Veterinary Association/Kennel Club traits in the Australian population of German Shepherd Dogs, using linear (both as individual traits and a summed phenotype), binary and ordinal methods to determine the optimal method for EBV calculation. Ordinal EBVs correlated well with linear EBVs (r = 0.90-0.99) and somewhat well with EBVs for the sum of the individual traits (r = 0.58-0.92). Correlation of ordinal and binary EBVs varied widely (r = 0.24-0.99) depending on the trait and cut-point considered. The ordinal EBVs have increased accuracy (0.48-0.69) of selection compared with accuracies from individual phenotype-based selection (0.40-0.52). Despite the high correlations between linear and ordinal EBVs, the underlying relationship between EBVs calculated by the two methods was not always linear, leading us to suggest that ordinal models should be used wherever possible. As the population of German Shepherd Dogs which was studied was purportedly under selection for the traits studied, we examined the EBVs for evidence of a genetic trend in these traits and found substantial genetic improvement over time. This study suggests the use of ordinal EBVs could increase the

  14. Bilateral epididymal sperm granulomas following urethrostomy in a German shepherd dog.

    PubMed

    Batista-Arteaga, M; Santana, M; Lozano, O; Niño, T; Alamo, D; Rodríguez, F

    2011-08-01

    Bilateral enlargement of both epididymes was observed in a 6-year-old German shepherd dog following a pre-scrotal urethrostomy. Testicular parenchyma showed regular structure, and the spermatogenesis and the steroidogenic functions were not modified. However, macroscopic examination of the tail and the body of both epididymes exhibited multiple white and well-delimited foci. Histopathological study of the epididymes confirmed the development of granulomas associated with extravasated spermatozoa. Urethrostomy caused a severe stenosis of the penile urethra, favouring the retention of urine at the urinary bladder. The retrograde pressure exerted by the distension of the urinary bladder could have allowed the urine to reach the prostatic urethra and the deferent ducts and, finally, the epididymes, causing irritation and rupture of the mucous layer of the epididymal duct, the consequent sperm extravasation and the development of sperm granulomas. We speculate that the inadequate surgical resolution of the urethral calculi caused the bladder distension, the subsequent retrograde flow of urine and the development of the lesions. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Genome-wide association studies for multiple diseases of the German Shepherd Dog

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Kate L.; Noorai, Rooksana E.; Starr-Moss, Alison N.; Quignon, Pascale; Rinz, Caitlin J.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Steiner, Jörg M.; Murphy, Keith E.

    2012-01-01

    The German Shepherd Dog (GSD) is a popular working and companion breed for which over 50 hereditary diseases have been documented. Herein, SNP profiles for 197 GSDs were generated using the Affymetrix v2 canine SNP array for a genome-wide association study to identify loci associated with four diseases: pituitary dwarfism, degenerative myelopathy (DM), congenital megaesophagus (ME), and pancreatic acinar atrophy (PAA). A locus on Chr 9 is strongly associated with pituitary dwarfism and is proximal to a plausible candidate gene, LHX3. Results for DM confirm a major locus encompassing SOD1, in which an associated point mutation was previously identified, but do not suggest modifier loci. Several SNPs on Chr 12 are associated with ME and a 4.7 Mb haplotype block is present in affected dogs. Analysis of additional ME cases for a SNP within the haplotype provides further support for this association. Results for PAA indicate more complex genetic underpinnings. Several regions on multiple chromosomes reach genome-wide significance. However, no major locus is apparent and only two associated haplotype blocks, on Chrs 7 and 12 are observed. These data suggest that PAA may be governed by multiple loci with small effects, or it may be a heterogeneous disorder. PMID:22105877

  16. Hair cortisol varies with season and lifestyle and relates to human interactions in German shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Roth, Lina S V; Faresjö, Åshild; Theodorsson, Elvar; Jensen, Per

    2016-01-21

    It is challenging to measure long-term endocrine stress responses in animals. We investigated whether cortisol extracted from dog hair reflected the levels of activity and stress long-term, during weeks and months. Hair samples from in total 59 German shepherds were analysed. Samples for measuring cortisol concentrations were collected at three occasions and we complemented the data with individual scores from the Canine Behavioural Assessment and Research Questionnaire (C-BARQ). Generalised linear mixed model (GLMM) results showed that hair cortisol varied with season and lifestyle: competition dogs had higher levels than companion, and professional working dogs, and levels were higher in January than in May and September. In addition, a positive correlation was found between the cortisol levels and the C-BARQ score for stranger-directed aggression (r = 0.31, P = 0.036). Interestingly, the factor "playing often with the dog" (r = -0.34, P = 0.019) and "reward with a treat/toy when the dog behaves correctly" (r = -0.37, P = 0.010) correlated negatively with cortisol levels, suggesting that positive human interactions reduce stress. In conclusion, hair cortisol is a promising method for revealing the activity of the HPA-axis over a longer period of time, and human interactions influence the cortisol level in dogs.

  17. A follow-up study of neurologic and radiographic findings in working German Shepherd Dogs with and without degenerative lumbosacral stenosis.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Frank; Hunold, Katharina; Scharf, Gernot; Roos, Malgorzata; Flückiger, Mark

    2007-11-15

    To identify radiographic abnormalities associated with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS) in German Shepherd Dogs (GSDs) and determine whether specific radiographic abnormalities could be used to identify dogs at risk of developing DLSS. Cohort study. 33 GSDs working as police dogs. Results of physical, neurologic, and orthopedic examinations were used to identify dogs with DLSS. Survey radiography of the lumbosacral junction was performed, and radiographs were compared with radiographs obtained 3 years earlier. DLSS was diagnosed in 15 of the 33 (45%) dogs. Thirteen of the 15 dogs with DLSS and 14 of the 18 dogs without DLSS had radiographic abnormalities of the lumbosacral junction. Twenty-two (67%) dogs were able to perform unrestricted duties, including 3 dogs with suspected DLSS. Six (18%) dogs had been excluded from active duty during the period of surveillance because of DLSS. Significant progression in specific clinical and radiographic signs was detected, but multiple logistic regression analysis did not identify any radiographic signs that could be used to predict the development of DLSS. Results suggested that survey radiography cannot be used to predict development of DLSS in working GSDs.

  18. Hair cortisol varies with season and lifestyle and relates to human interactions in German shepherd dogs

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Lina S. V.; Faresjö, Åshild; Theodorsson, Elvar; Jensen, Per

    2016-01-01

    It is challenging to measure long-term endocrine stress responses in animals. We investigated whether cortisol extracted from dog hair reflected the levels of activity and stress long-term, during weeks and months. Hair samples from in total 59 German shepherds were analysed. Samples for measuring cortisol concentrations were collected at three occasions and we complemented the data with individual scores from the Canine Behavioural Assessment and Research Questionnaire (C-BARQ). Generalised linear mixed model (GLMM) results showed that hair cortisol varied with season and lifestyle: competition dogs had higher levels than companion, and professional working dogs, and levels were higher in January than in May and September. In addition, a positive correlation was found between the cortisol levels and the C-BARQ score for stranger-directed aggression (r = 0.31, P = 0.036). Interestingly, the factor “playing often with the dog” (r = −0.34, P = 0.019) and “reward with a treat/toy when the dog behaves correctly” (r = −0.37, P = 0.010) correlated negatively with cortisol levels, suggesting that positive human interactions reduce stress. In conclusion, hair cortisol is a promising method for revealing the activity of the HPA-axis over a longer period of time, and human interactions influence the cortisol level in dogs. PMID:26791276

  19. Disentangling factors that shape the gut microbiota in German Shepherd dogs

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Ziad; Li, Qinghong; Hedhammar, Åke; Reynolds, Arleigh; Spears, Julie; Labuda, Jeff; Pelker, Robyn; Björkstén, Bengt; Dicksved, Johan; Hansson-Hamlin, Helene

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the development of the gut microbiota in 168 German Shepherd dogs (30 litters) from 7 weeks to 18 months of age and furthermore, to study the effect of relatedness, maternal microbiota composition and living environment in a large and well-defined population of dogs. Using 454 pyrosequencing, we assessed the effects of pre- and postnatal probiotic supplementation (Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC533 (La1)) and analysed whether administration of the probiotic strain influenced fecal microbiota composition in a placebo controlled double-blinded study. The bitches were treated with probiotics or placebo during last trimester of pregnancy and until their puppies were 8 weeks old, the puppies received the same treatment as their mothers between 3–12 weeks of age. Samples from bitches were collected at pregnancy day 42, partum, 4 weeks postpartum and 7 weeks postpartum and from puppies at the age 4 weeks, 7 weeks, 12–13 months and 15–18 months. Serum IgA, total serum IgE, fecal IgA and IgG antibody responses against canine distemper virus were analysed by ELISA in order to detect any immune stimulating effects of the probiotic strain. Analysis of the fecal microbiota composition showed that the predominant phyla were the same in 7 weeks old puppies as in pregnant and lactating bitches (Firmicutes, Fusobacteria, Bacteroidetes). Proportions among different bacteria as well as diversity varied from 7 weeks old puppies up to 15–18 months of age. Litter mates had a more similar fecal microbiota compared to unrelated dogs and 7 weeks old puppies were more similar to their mothers than to unrelated bitches at 7 weeks postpartum but not at partum. We observed a change in the relative abundance of different bacteria during lactation, and an increase in diversity from pregnancy to end of lactation. The microbial diversity was affected by living area where dogs living in big cities had higher diversity compared to dogs living at the

  20. A case of disseminated mycosis in a German shepherd dog due to Penicillium purpurogenum.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, R; Miniscalco, B; Guarro, J; Gené, J; Capucchio, M T; Gallo, M G; Mikulicich, B; Peano, A

    2006-02-01

    The genus Penicillium is among the most common contaminant fungi in the environment. Around 15 species are known to cause opportunistic human mycoses, in immunocompromised patients. Until now, Penicillium purpurogenum has been involved in only three human cases of pulmonary diseases but no infections in animals have been reported. Most disseminated mycoses in dogs are caused by members of the genus Aspergillus, with the predisposing factors in these cases being difficult to define. The case reported here involved a 4-year-old female German shepherd dog (GSD) with forelimb instability and back pain. Clinical examination showed hyperthermia, generalized lymphadenomegaly and kyphosis. Radiological findings of the spine revealed areas of discospondilitis involving thoracic and lumbar vertebrae. Microscopic observations of fine needle aspiration biopsies (FNAB) of lymph-nodes showed regular, septate, branching fungal hyphae. Itraconazole therapy was started but the subject died six days later. Disseminated necrotic areas were detected in enlarged lymph-nodes, liver and spleen. Vertebral granulomas within lytic areas in T10-T11 and L2-L3, were observed. Cultures inoculated with samples obtained from lymph-node FNAB and bioptic material from necropsied organs revealed the presence of pure cultures of Penicillium, subsequently identified as P. purpurogenum. Apart from female GSD's suspected predisposition to disseminated mycoses described in literature, no other predisposing factors were ascertained in this case.

  1. Evaluation of the rostral projection of the sacral lamina as a component of degenerative lumbosacral stenosis in German shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Harvey; Worth, Andrew J; Bridges, Janis P; Hartman, Angela

    2018-05-20

    To determine the association between a greater rostral projection of the sacral lamina and clinical signs of cauda equina syndrome (CES) in German shepherd dogs (GSD) with presumptive degenerative lumbosacral disease (DLSS). Retrospective cohort study. One hundred forty-three GSD (125 police dogs and 18 pet dogs) presenting for either CES or prebreeding evaluation. Fifty-five were classified as affected by CES and diagnosed with DLSS, and 88 were classified as unaffected on the basis of clinical and imaging findings. The position of the rostral edge of the sacral lamina was measured from radiographs and/or computed tomography (CT) scans. This position was compared between affected and unaffected dogs. In dogs that underwent both radiography and CT scanning, the agreement between sacral lamina localization using each imaging modality was determined. Owners/handlers were contacted to determine whether dogs subsequently developed clinical signs compatible with CES at a mean of 29 months (unaffected). The sacral lamina did not extend as far rostrally in affected dogs, compared to unaffected dogs (P = .04). Among the 88 dogs unaffected by CES at initial evaluation, 2 developed clinical signs consistent with CES at follow-up. Rostral projection of the sacral lamina, previously proposed as a potential risk factor in dogs with CES due to lumbosacral degeneration, was not associated with a diagnosis of DLSS in this study; the opposite was true. Rostral projection of the sacral lamina may not be a predisposing factor in the development of CES due to DLSS in GSD. © 2018 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  2. Demography and disorders of German Shepherd Dogs under primary veterinary care in the UK.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Dan G; Coulson, Noel R; Church, David B; Brodbelt, Dave C

    2017-01-01

    The German Shepherd Dog (GSD) has been widely used for a variety of working roles. However, concerns for the health and welfare of the GSD have been widely aired and there is evidence that breed numbers are now in decline in the UK. Accurate demographic and disorder data could assist with breeding and clinical prioritisation. The VetCompass TM Programme collects clinical data on dogs under primary veterinary care in the UK. This study included all VetCompass TM dogs under veterinary care during 2013. Demographic, mortality and clinical diagnosis data on GSDs were extracted and reported. GSDs dropped from 3.5% of the annual birth cohort in 2005 to 2.2% in 2013. The median longevity of GSDs was 10.3 years (IQR 8.0-12.1, range 0.2-17.0). The most common causes of death were musculoskeletal disorder (16.3%) and inability to stand (14.9%). The most prevalent disorders recorded were otitis externa ( n  = 131, 7.89, 95% CI: 6.64-9.29), osteoarthritis (92, 5.54%, 95% CI: 4.49-6.75), diarrhoea (87, 5.24%, 95% CI: 4.22-6.42), overweight/obesity (86, 5.18%, 95% CI: 4.16-6.36) and aggression (79, 4.76%, 95% CI: 3.79-5.90). This study identified that GSDs have been reducing in numbers in the UK in recent years. The most frequent disorders in GSDs were otitis externa, osteoarthritis, diarrhoea, overweight/obesity and aggression, whilst the most common causes of death were musculoskeletal disorders and inability to stand. Aggression was more prevalent in males than in females. These results may assist veterinarians to offer evidence-based advice at a breed level and help to identify priorities for GSD health that can improve the breed's health and welfare.

  3. Age-related changes in the articular cartilage of the stifle joint in non-working and working German Shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Francuski, J V; Radovanović, A; Andrić, N; Krstić, V; Bogdanović, D; Hadzić, V; Todorović, V; Lazarević Macanović, M; Sourice Petit, S; Beck-Cormier, S; Guicheux, J; Gauthier, O; Kovacević Filipović, M

    2014-11-01

    The aims of this study were to define age-related histological changes in the articular cartilage of the stifle joint in non-chondrodystrophic dogs and to determine whether physical activity has a positive impact on preservation of cartilage structure during ageing. Twenty-eight German shepherd dogs were included in the study. These dogs had no evidence of joint inflammation as defined by clinical assessment, radiology and synovial fluid analysis (specifically absence of synovial fluid serum amyloid A). The dogs were grouped as young working (n ¼ 4), young non-working (n ¼ 5), aged working (n ¼ 13) and aged non-working (n ¼ 6) animals. Gross changes in the stifle joints were recorded and biopsy samples of femoral and tibial articular cartilage were evaluated for thickness; chondrocyte number, density, surface area and morphology; isogenous group morphology; tidemark integrity; subchondral bone structure; presence of proteoglycans/ glycosaminoglycans; and expression of type I, II and X collagens. The major age-related changes, not related to type of physical activity, included elevated chondrocyte density and thinning of tibial cartilage and increased chondrocyte surface area in the superficial and intermediate zone of the femoral cartilage. There was also expression of type X collagen in the femoral and tibial calcified and non-calcified cartilage; however, type X collagen was not detected in the superficial zone of old working dogs. Therefore, ageing, with or without physical activity, leads to slight cartilage degeneration, while physical activity modulates the synthesis of type X collagen in the superficial cartilage zone, partially preserving the structure of hyaline cartilage. 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of shepherds and dogs on livestock depredation by leopards (Panthera pardus) in north-eastern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Soofi, Mahmood; Soufi, Mobin; Hamidi, Amirhossein Khaleghi; Ghoddousi, Arash; Waltert, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Human-carnivore conflicts over livestock depredation are increasingly common, yet little is understood about the role of husbandry in conflict mitigation. As shepherds and guarding dogs are most commonly used to curb carnivore attacks on grazing livestock, evaluation and improvement of these practices becomes an important task. We addressed this issue by studying individual leopard (Panthera pardus) attacks on sheep and goats in 34 villages near Golestan National Park, Iran. We obtained and analyzed data on 39 attacks, which included a total loss of 31 sheep and 36 goats in 17 villages. We applied non-parametric testing, Poisson Generalized Linear Modelling (GLM) and model selection to assess how numbers of sheep and goats killed per attack are associated with the presence and absence of shepherds and dogs during attacks, depredation in previous years, villages, seasons, ethnic groups, numbers of sheep and goats kept in villages, and distances from villages to the nearest protected areas. We found that 95.5% of losses were inflicted in forests when sheep and goats were accompanied by shepherds (92.5% of losses) and dogs (77.6%). Leopards tended to kill more sheep and goats per attack (surplus killing) when dogs were absent in villages distant from protected areas, but still inflicted most losses when dogs were present, mainly in villages near protected areas. No other variables affected numbers of sheep and goats killed per attack. These results indicate that local husbandry practices are ineffectual and the mere presence of shepherds and guarding dogs is not enough to secure protection. Shepherds witnessed leopard attacks, but could not deter them while dogs did not exhibit guarding behavior and were sometimes killed by leopards. In an attempt to make practical, low-cost and socially acceptable improvements in local husbandry, we suggest that dogs are raised to create a strong social bond with livestock, shepherds use only best available dogs, small flocks are

  5. Effects of shepherds and dogs on livestock depredation by leopards (Panthera pardus) in north-eastern Iran.

    PubMed

    Khorozyan, Igor; Soofi, Mahmood; Soufi, Mobin; Hamidi, Amirhossein Khaleghi; Ghoddousi, Arash; Waltert, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Human-carnivore conflicts over livestock depredation are increasingly common, yet little is understood about the role of husbandry in conflict mitigation. As shepherds and guarding dogs are most commonly used to curb carnivore attacks on grazing livestock, evaluation and improvement of these practices becomes an important task. We addressed this issue by studying individual leopard ( Panthera pardus ) attacks on sheep and goats in 34 villages near Golestan National Park, Iran. We obtained and analyzed data on 39 attacks, which included a total loss of 31 sheep and 36 goats in 17 villages. We applied non-parametric testing, Poisson Generalized Linear Modelling (GLM) and model selection to assess how numbers of sheep and goats killed per attack are associated with the presence and absence of shepherds and dogs during attacks, depredation in previous years, villages, seasons, ethnic groups, numbers of sheep and goats kept in villages, and distances from villages to the nearest protected areas. We found that 95.5% of losses were inflicted in forests when sheep and goats were accompanied by shepherds (92.5% of losses) and dogs (77.6%). Leopards tended to kill more sheep and goats per attack (surplus killing) when dogs were absent in villages distant from protected areas, but still inflicted most losses when dogs were present, mainly in villages near protected areas. No other variables affected numbers of sheep and goats killed per attack. These results indicate that local husbandry practices are ineffectual and the mere presence of shepherds and guarding dogs is not enough to secure protection. Shepherds witnessed leopard attacks, but could not deter them while dogs did not exhibit guarding behavior and were sometimes killed by leopards. In an attempt to make practical, low-cost and socially acceptable improvements in local husbandry, we suggest that dogs are raised to create a strong social bond with livestock, shepherds use only best available dogs, small flocks are

  6. Genetic characterization of four native Italian shepherd dog breeds and analysis of their relationship to cosmopolitan dog breeds using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Bigi, D; Marelli, S P; Randi, E; Polli, M

    2015-12-01

    Very little research into genetic diversity of Italian native dog breeds has been carried out so far. In this study we aimed to estimate and compare the genetic diversity of four native Italian shepherd dog breeds: the Maremma, Bergamasco, Lupino del Gigante and Oropa shepherds. Therefore, some cosmopolitan dog breeds, which have been widely raised in Italy for a long time past, have also been considered to check possible influence of these dog populations on the Italian autochthonous breeds considered here. A total of 212 individuals, belonging to 10 different dog breeds, were sampled and genotyped using 18 autosomal microsatellite loci. We analyzed the genetic diversity of these breeds, within breed diversity, breed relationship and population structure. The 10 breeds considered in this study were clearly genetically differentiated from each other, regardless of current population sizes and the onset of separate breeding history. The level of genetic diversity explained 20% of the total genetic variation. The level of H E found here is in agreement with that found by other studies. The native Italian breeds showed generally higher genetic diversity compared with the long established, well-defined cosmopolitan dog breeds. As the Border Collie seems closer to the Italian breeds than the other cosmopolitan shepherd dogs considered here, a possible utilization of this breed to improve working performance in Italian traditional working shepherd dogs cannot be ignored. The data and information found here can be utilized in the organization of conservation programs planned to reduce inbreeding and to minimize loss of genetic variability.

  7. The Shepherds' Tale: A Genome-Wide Study across 9 Dog Breeds Implicates Two Loci in the Regulation of Fructosamine Serum Concentration in Belgian Shepherds.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Simon K G; Kierczak, Marcin; Ljungvall, Ingrid; Merveille, Anne-Christine; Gouni, Vassiliki; Wiberg, Maria; Lundgren Willesen, Jakob; Hanås, Sofia; Lequarré, Anne-Sophie; Mejer Sørensen, Louise; Tiret, Laurent; McEntee, Kathleen; Seppälä, Eija; Koch, Jørgen; Battaille, Géraldine; Lohi, Hannes; Fredholm, Merete; Chetboul, Valerie; Häggström, Jens; Carlborg, Örjan; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Höglund, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious health problem in both dogs and humans. Certain dog breeds show high prevalence of the disease, whereas other breeds are at low risk. Fructosamine and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) are two major biomarkers of glycaemia, where serum concentrations reflect glucose turnover over the past few weeks to months. In this study, we searched for genetic factors influencing variation in serum fructosamine concentration in healthy dogs using data from nine dog breeds. Considering all breeds together, we did not find any genome-wide significant associations to fructosamine serum concentration. However, by performing breed-specific analyses we revealed an association on chromosome 3 (pcorrected ≈ 1:68 × 10-6) in Belgian shepherd dogs of the Malinois subtype. The associated region and its close neighbourhood harbours interesting candidate genes such as LETM1 and GAPDH that are important in glucose metabolism and have previously been implicated in the aetiology of diabetes mellitus. To further explore the genetics of this breed specificity, we screened the genome for reduced heterozygosity stretches private to the Belgian shepherd breed. This revealed a region with reduced heterozygosity that shows a statistically significant interaction (p = 0.025) with the association region on chromosome 3. This region also harbours some interesting candidate genes and regulatory regions but the exact mechanisms underlying the interaction are still unknown. Nevertheless, this finding provides a plausible explanation for breed-specific genetic effects for complex traits in dogs. Shepherd breeds are at low risk of developing diabetes mellitus. The findings in Belgian shepherds could be connected to a protective mechanism against the disease. Further insight into the regulation of glucose metabolism could improve diagnostic and therapeutic methods for diabetes mellitus.

  8. Disseminated opportunistic fungal disease in dogs: 10 cases (1982-1990).

    PubMed

    Watt, P R; Robins, G M; Galloway, A M; O'Boyle, D A

    1995-07-01

    Medical records of 10 dogs in which fungal infection was diagnosed between 1982 and 1990 were reviewed. In each dog, infection was determined to be caused by a single species of fungus, either Aspergillus terreus, Penicillium sp, Paecilomyces sp, Chrysosporium sp, or Pseudallescheria boydii. Nine dogs were German Shepherd Dogs; 1 was a German Shepherd Dog cross, and 9 were females. The most common clinical signs were signs of neck or back pain (9 dogs), weight loss (7 dogs), anorexia (6 dogs), pyrexia (6 dogs), paresis (3 dogs), and paralysis (3 dogs). All 10 dogs had evidence of multiple sites of diskospondylitis. Urine sediment was examined in 6 dogs, and all 6 had fungal hyphae. Urine samples from these dogs produced a medium to heavy pure growth of fungi when placed on Sabaraud's medium. Predisposing causes were not identified in any of the dogs. Four dogs were euthanatized immediately after diagnosis because of paralysis or paresis. The other 6 dogs were treated, and 4 of the 6 received itraconazole. One dog was euthanatized for an unrelated problem after 21 months of treatment; 1 dog was still alive after 4 years of continuous treatment with itraconazole. The other 4 dogs were euthanatized because of eventual paralysis or paresis. Our results suggest that German Shepherd Dogs are predisposed to infection with opportunistic fungi, possibly because of a specific inability to mount an effective response. This predisposition needs to be further studied.

  9. Measurement of messenger RNA encoding the alpha-chain, polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, and J-chain in duodenal mucosa from dogs with and without chronic diarrhea by use of quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays.

    PubMed

    Peters, Iain R; Helps, Chris R; Calvert, Emma L; Hall, Edward J; Day, Michael J

    2005-01-01

    To examine the difference in expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts for polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (plgR), alpha-chain, and J-chain determined by use of quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR) assays in duodenal biopsy specimens obtained from dogs with and without chronic diarrhea. Biopsy specimens of the proximal portion of the duodenum were obtained endoscopically from 39 dogs evaluated because of chronic diarrhea (12 German Shepherd Dogs and 27 non-German Shepherd Dog breeds); specimens were also obtained from a control group of 7 dogs evaluated because of other gastrointestinal tract diseases and 2 dogs that were euthanatized as a result of nongastrointestinal tract disease. Dogs were anesthetized, and multiple mucosal biopsy specimens were obtained endoscopically at the level of the caudal duodenal flexure by use of biopsy forceps; in 2 control dogs, samples were obtained from the descending duodenum within 5 minutes of euthanasia. One-step QRT-PCR was used to quantify the level of expression of transcripts for the housekeeper gene glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, plgR, alpha-chain, and J-chain in duodenal mucosal tissue. There was no significant difference in the level of expression of any transcript among non-German Shepherd Dog breeds without diarrhea (control group), non-German Shepherd Dog breeds with chronic diarrhea, and German Shepherd Dogs with chronic diarrhea. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Results indicated that the susceptibility of German Shepherd Dogs to chronic diarrhea is not a result of simple failure of transcription of the key genes that encode molecules involved in mucosal IgA secretion.

  10. A review of official data obtained from dog control records generated by the dog control service of county cork, Ireland during 2007

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There are no peer reviewed data on dog control records from an official agency in Ireland. In order to address this, a total of 2,669 official dog control service records generated during 2007 by Cork County Council dog control service were reviewed. Results Over 70 percent of records related to unwanted dogs and dogs not under their owners control. Stray dogs were collected by the service regularly throughout the year but with notable increase in voluntary surrenders by owners from January through to April. The majority of dogs collected or surrendered were male (2:1 ratio), of medium size, described as having a friendly temperament and were not wearing a neck collar. The Crossbreed and Greyhound breeds were more frequently collected as strays, while Greyhounds and German Shepherds were more frequently voluntarily surrendered by their owner. Restricted breeds such as Pit Bull terriers, German Shepherds and Rottweilers were more frequently reported by members of the public for aggressive behaviour while the only restricted breed reported for biting or snapping was the German Shepherd. Conclusions Routine recording of dog control services in County Cork provide data on responsible dog ownership including the licensing of breeds, and surrender of owned dogs and the collection of stray dogs. Data capture and utilisation of dog control services by local authorities has potential to inform policy on responsible dog ownership and education programmes. PMID:22681751

  11. Analysis of NOD1, NOD2, TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, TLR6 and TLR9 genes in anal furunculosis of German shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    House, A K; Binns, M M; Gregory, S P; Catchpole, B

    2009-03-01

    Anal furunculosis (AF) primarily affects German shepherd dogs (GSD) and is characterised by inflammation and ulceration of the perianal tissues with development of cutaneous sinuses or rectocutaneous fistulae. Investigation of pattern recognition receptor (PRR) function has suggested that defective responses might occur in AF-affected GSD. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether canine PRR genes are involved in determining susceptibility to AF in this breed. Chromosomal location and coding sequences for NOD1, NOD2, TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, TLR6 and TLR9 were determined and microsatellite markers identified for each gene. Microsatellite genotyping of 100 control GSD and 47 AF-affected GSD showed restricted allelic variation for AHT H91 (associated with TLR5) and REN216 NO5 (associated with both TLR1 and TLR6) compared with non-GSD dogs. Genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms identified in canine TLR1, TLR5, TLR6 and NOD2 genes failed to show any significant associations between PRR polymorphisms and AF. The highly restricted PRR genotypes seen in GSD are likely to have resulted from selective breeding and might influence innate immune responses in this breed.

  12. Evaluation of serum cobalamin concentrations in dogs of 164 dog breeds (2006-2010).

    PubMed

    Grützner, Niels; Cranford, Shannon M; Norby, Bo; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2012-11-01

    Altered serum cobalamin concentrations have been observed in dogs with gastrointestinal disorders such as exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) or gastrointestinal inflammation. The aims of the current study were 1) to identify breeds with a higher proportion of dogs with a decreased serum cobalamin concentration, 2) to determine whether dogs with such decreased concentrations tend to have serum canine trypsin-like immunoreactivity (cTLI) concentrations diagnostic for EPI, and 3) to compare the number of submissions for serum cobalamin analysis by breed to the American Kennel Club (AKC) breed ranking list of 2009. In this retrospective study, results of 28,675 cobalamin tests were reviewed. Akitas, Chinese Shar-Peis, German Shepherd Dogs, Greyhounds, and Labrador Retrievers had increased proportions of serum cobalamin concentrations below the lower limit of the reference interval (<251 ng/l; all P < 0.0001). Akitas, Chinese Shar-Peis, German Shepherd Dogs, and Border Collies had increased proportions of serum cobalamin concentrations below the detection limit of the assay (<150 ng/l; all P < 0.0001). Akitas, Border Collies, and German Shepherd Dogs with serum cobalamin concentrations <150 ng/l were more likely to have a serum cTLI concentration considered diagnostic for EPI (≤2.5 µg/l; all P ≤ 0.001). The breed with the highest proportion of samples submitted for serum cobalamin analysis in comparison with the AKC ranking list was the Greyhound (odds ratio: 84.6; P < 0.0001). In Akitas and Border Collies, further investigations are warranted to clarify if a potentially breed-specific gastrointestinal disorder is responsible for the increased frequency of decreased serum cobalamin and cTLI concentrations.

  13. Gastroesophageal junction of Anatolian shepherd dog; a study by topographic anatomy, scanning electron and light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Alsafy, M A M; El-Gendy, S A A

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to cast a spotlight on the topography and to point out the clinical importance of the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) in Anatolian Shepherd dogs. Nine Anatolian Shepherd dogs were used to study the morphology of the GEJ. The esophagus was appeared has a portion within the thoracic cavity while no portion of the esophagus presented within the abdominal cavity that documented the absence of the intra-abdominal portion in all studied dogs. The topographic anatomy, scanning electron and light microscopic examinations revealed that the gastroesophageal junction was located at the level of the phrenico-esophageal ligament (PEL) inside the esophageal hiatus. Our results were distinguished the morphology of the esophageal and gastric cardiac mucosa at the level of the gastroesophageal junction by the scanning electron micrographs. The light microscopical examination was explained the PEL attached to the esophageal side in one dog and to the gastric cardiac side in three dogs.

  14. Intraocular osteosarcoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    van de Sandt, R R O M; Boevé, M H; Stades, F C; Kik, M J L; Kirpensteijn, J

    2004-07-01

    A 10-year-old German shepherd dog was presented with unilateral uveitis and hyphaema. Treatment was unsuccessful and the eye was enucleated. Intraocular osteosarcoma was diagnosed by histological examination.

  15. Comparison of cellular location and expression of Plakophilin-2 in epidermal cells from nonlesional atopic skin and healthy skin in German shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Ardesjö-Lundgren, Brita; Tengvall, Katarina; Bergvall, Kerstin; Farias, Fabiana H G; Wang, Liya; Hedhammar, Åke; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Andersson, Göran

    2017-08-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) is an inflammatory and pruritic allergic skin disease caused by interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Previously, a genome-wide significant risk locus on canine chromosome 27 for CAD was identified in German shepherd dogs (GSDs) and Plakophilin-2 (PKP2) was defined as the top candidate gene. PKP2 constitutes a crucial component of desmosomes and also is important in signalling, metabolic and transcriptional activities. The main objective was to evaluate the role of PKP2 in CAD by investigating PKP2 expression and desmosome structure in nonlesional skin from CAD-affected (carrying the top GWAS SNP risk allele) and healthy GSDs. We also aimed at defining the cell types in the skin that express PKP2 and its intracellular location. Skin biopsies were collected from nine CAD-affected and five control GSDs. The biopsies were frozen for immunofluorescence and fixed for electron microscopy immunolabelling and morphology. We observed the novel finding of PKP2 expression in dendritic cells and T cells in dog skin. Moreover, we detected that PKP2 was more evenly expressed within keratinocytes compared to its desmosomal binding-partner plakoglobin. PKP2 protein was located in the nucleus and on keratin filaments attached to desmosomes. No difference in PKP2 abundance between CAD cases and controls was observed. Plakophilin-2 protein in dog skin is expressed in both epithelial and immune cells; based on its subcellular location its functional role is implicated in both nuclear and structural processes. © 2017 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the ESVD and ACVD.

  16. Inheritance of coat colour in the Anatolian shepherd dog.

    PubMed

    Robinson, R

    1989-01-01

    The predominant colour of the Anatolian Shepherd dog varies from a dark fawn to light red, with a variable black muzzle and face (mask). Evidence is presented that the colour is due to the dominant yellow allele (Ay) of the agouti locus. Two other frequent colours are white spotting, due to the piebald allele (sp), and the chinchilla allele (ch). Two rarer colours are the agouti wolf-grey wild type (A+) and a light fawn with a blue facial mask, due to the dilution allele (d).

  17. Dog sperm head morphometry: its diversity and evolution.

    PubMed

    Soler, Carles; Alambiaga, Ana; Martí, Maria A; García-Molina, Almudena; Valverde, Anthony; Contell, Jesús; Campos, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    Dogs have been under strong artificial selection as a consequence of their relationship with man. Differences between breeds are evident that could be reflected in seminal characteristics. The present study was to evaluate differences in sperm head morphometry between seven well-defined breeds of dog: the British Bulldog, Chihuahua, German Shepherd, Labrador Retriever, Spanish Mastiff, Staffordshire Terrier, and Valencian Rat Hunting dog. Semen samples were obtained by masturbation and smears stained with Diff-Quik. Morphometric analysis (CASA-Morph) produced four size and four shape parameters. Length, Ellipticity, and Elongation showed higher differences between breeds. MANOVA revealed differences among all breeds. Considering the whole dataset, principal component analysis (PCA) showed that PC1 was related to head shape and PC2 to size. Procluster analysis showed the British Bulldog to be the most isolated breed, followed by the German Shepherd. The PCA breed by breed showed the Chihuahua, Labrador Retriever, Spanish Mastiff, and Staffordshire Terrier to have PC1 related to shape and PC2 to size, whereas the British Bulldog, Valencia Rat Hunting dog, and German Shepherd had PC1 related to size and PC2 to shape. The dendrogram for cluster groupings and the distance between them showed the British Bulldog to be separated from the rest of the breeds. Future work on dog semen must take into account the large differences in the breeds' sperm characteristics. The results provide a base for future work on phylogenetic and evolutionary studies of dogs, based on their seminal characteristics.

  18. Dog sperm head morphometry: its diversity and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Carles; Alambiaga, Ana; Martí, Maria A; García-Molina, Almudena; Valverde, Anthony; Contell, Jesús; Campos, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    Dogs have been under strong artificial selection as a consequence of their relationship with man. Differences between breeds are evident that could be reflected in seminal characteristics. The present study was to evaluate differences in sperm head morphometry between seven well-defined breeds of dog: the British Bulldog, Chihuahua, German Shepherd, Labrador Retriever, Spanish Mastiff, Staffordshire Terrier, and Valencian Rat Hunting dog. Semen samples were obtained by masturbation and smears stained with Diff-Quik. Morphometric analysis (CASA-Morph) produced four size and four shape parameters. Length, Ellipticity, and Elongation showed higher differences between breeds. MANOVA revealed differences among all breeds. Considering the whole dataset, principal component analysis (PCA) showed that PC1 was related to head shape and PC2 to size. Procluster analysis showed the British Bulldog to be the most isolated breed, followed by the German Shepherd. The PCA breed by breed showed the Chihuahua, Labrador Retriever, Spanish Mastiff, and Staffordshire Terrier to have PC1 related to shape and PC2 to size, whereas the British Bulldog, Valencia Rat Hunting dog, and German Shepherd had PC1 related to size and PC2 to shape. The dendrogram for cluster groupings and the distance between them showed the British Bulldog to be separated from the rest of the breeds. Future work on dog semen must take into account the large differences in the breeds’ sperm characteristics. The results provide a base for future work on phylogenetic and evolutionary studies of dogs, based on their seminal characteristics. PMID:27751991

  19. A contracted DNA repeat in LHX3 intron 5 is associated with aberrant splicing and pituitary dwarfism in German shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Voorbij, Annemarie M W Y; van Steenbeek, Frank G; Vos-Loohuis, Manon; Martens, Ellen E C P; Hanson-Nilsson, Jeanette M; van Oost, Bernard A; Kooistra, Hans S; Leegwater, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Dwarfism in German shepherd dogs is due to combined pituitary hormone deficiency of unknown genetic cause. We localized the recessively inherited defect by a genome wide approach to a region on chromosome 9 with a lod score of 9.8. The region contains LHX3, which codes for a transcription factor essential for pituitary development. Dwarfs have a deletion of one of six 7 bp repeats in intron 5 of LHX3, reducing the intron size to 68 bp. One dwarf was compound heterozygous for the deletion and an insertion of an asparagine residue in the DNA-binding homeodomain of LHX3, suggesting involvement of the gene in the disorder. An exon trapping assay indicated that the shortened intron is not spliced efficiently, probably because it is too small. We applied bisulfite conversion of cytosine to uracil in RNA followed by RT-PCR to analyze the splicing products. The aberrantly spliced RNA molecules resulted from either skipping of exon 5 or retention of intron 5. The same splicing defects were observed in cDNA derived from the pituitary of dwarfs. A survey of similarly mutated introns suggests that there is a minimal distance requirement between the splice donor and branch site of 50 nucleotides. In conclusion, a contraction of a DNA repeat in intron 5 of canine LHX3 leads to deficient splicing and is associated with pituitary dwarfism.

  20. A Contracted DNA Repeat in LHX3 Intron 5 Is Associated with Aberrant Splicing and Pituitary Dwarfism in German Shepherd Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Voorbij, Annemarie M. W. Y.; van Steenbeek, Frank G.; Vos-Loohuis, Manon; Martens, Ellen E. C. P.; Hanson-Nilsson, Jeanette M.; van Oost, Bernard A.; Kooistra, Hans S.; Leegwater, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Dwarfism in German shepherd dogs is due to combined pituitary hormone deficiency of unknown genetic cause. We localized the recessively inherited defect by a genome wide approach to a region on chromosome 9 with a lod score of 9.8. The region contains LHX3, which codes for a transcription factor essential for pituitary development. Dwarfs have a deletion of one of six 7 bp repeats in intron 5 of LHX3, reducing the intron size to 68 bp. One dwarf was compound heterozygous for the deletion and an insertion of an asparagine residue in the DNA-binding homeodomain of LHX3, suggesting involvement of the gene in the disorder. An exon trapping assay indicated that the shortened intron is not spliced efficiently, probably because it is too small. We applied bisulfite conversion of cytosine to uracil in RNA followed by RT-PCR to analyze the splicing products. The aberrantly spliced RNA molecules resulted from either skipping of exon 5 or retention of intron 5. The same splicing defects were observed in cDNA derived from the pituitary of dwarfs. A survey of similarly mutated introns suggests that there is a minimal distance requirement between the splice donor and branch site of 50 nucleotides. In conclusion, a contraction of a DNA repeat in intron 5 of canine LHX3 leads to deficient splicing and is associated with pituitary dwarfism. PMID:22132174

  1. Unusual injury pattern in a case of postmortem animal depredation by a domestic German shepherd.

    PubMed

    Tsokos, M; Schulz, F; Püschel, K

    1999-09-01

    A case is presented of a 38-year-old woman with skeletization of the head, neck, and collar region and a circumscribed 26-cm x 19-cm defect on the left chest with sole removal of the heart through the opened pericardium but undamaged mediastinum and lungs. The injuries showed V-shaped puncture wounds and superficial claw-induced scratches adjacent to the wound margins that have been described as typical for postmortem animal depredation of carnivore origin and derived from postmortem animal damage by the woman's domestic German shepherd. The circumscribed destruction of the left chest with unusual opening of the pericardium is explained by the physiognomy of the muzzle of the German shepherd and differs from previous reports. Any case presented as postmortem animal mutilation should be viewed with skepticism and undergo a full autopsy.

  2. A genealogical survey of Australian registered dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Shariflou, Mohammad R; James, John W; Nicholas, Frank W; Wade, Claire M

    2011-08-01

    Breeding practices were analysed for 32 registered dog breeds representing very small registries (120 Central Asian shepherd dogs) through to very large registries (252,521 German shepherd dogs) in Australia. The vast majority (91%) of registered kennels in Australia that were sampled did not regularly employ either close breeding or popular sire usage in their kennels and the weighted mean inbreeding coefficient of Australian pedigree dogs was <5%. Australian breed mean inbreeding coefficients ranged from 0% (Central Asian shepherd dog) to 10.1% (Bichon Frise). Breed effective population sizes ranged from 26 (Ibizan hound) to 1090 (Golden retriever), comparable with other species of domesticated animals. The relatively low levels of inbreeding suggest that pedigree dog disorders are unlikely to arise frequently from the use of popular sires or close breeding in Australian registered dog breeds. It is possible that deleterious allele fixation might be driven by founder effects, genetic drift or adverse selection practices, which were not assessed in this analysis. European popular sire definitions should be revisited for rare breeds. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Comparison of selected endocrine parameters during luteal phase and pregnancy in German Shepherd dogs and Beagles.

    PubMed

    Günzel-Apel, A R; Beste, N; Nottorf, S; Eschricht, F; Hoppen, H O; Dieleman, S; Einspanier, A

    2009-07-01

    Concentrations of progesterone, prolactin and relaxin in serum at predetermined intervals after ovulation (day 0) in non-pregnant and pregnant normocyclic Beagles were assayed and results compared with those observed in German Shepherd dogs (GSD) in a previous study. The goal was to determine possible reproductive hormone specificities related to the GSD breed. Furthermore, the effects of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA)-treatment in non-pregnant Beagles and of progesterone supplementation in pregnant Beagles on the hormone concentrations were examined. Mean concentrations of progesterone and prolactin were not different in the non-pregnant Beagles compared with those seen in non-pregnant GSD, except at days 50-60, when progesterone concentrations were found to be higher in Beagles (p < 0.05). Mean progesterone concentrations in pregnant Beagles at days 50-60 after ovulation (day 0) were higher (p < 0.05) than in GSD at that time, but not at earlier time periods. Prolactin concentrations were higher (p < 0.05) in Beagles throughout pregnancy compared with those in the GSD. Mean relaxin concentrations were numerically but not significantly lower in GSD than in Beagles throughout pregnancy. A 10-day oral MPA treatment did not affect progesterone or prolactin secretion in normocyclic non-pregnant Beagles. Medroxyprogesterone acetate serum concentrations were approximately 3.9 ng/ml during treatment and decreased to 0.42 and 0.021 ng/ml within 5 and 15 days after end of treatment, respectively. Intramuscular progesterone supplementation from days 30 to 40 in pregnant Beagles resulted in higher concentrations of progesterone in the 36- to 45-day time periods; prolactin and relaxin concentrations were not significantly affected during or after treatment compared with administration of placebo. The results suggest a tendency towards deficient luteal function in the short-cycle GSD bitches previously studied, which in pregnancy may reflect the observed decreased prolactin

  4. Polymorphisms in the TLR4 and TLR5 gene are significantly associated with inflammatory bowel disease in German shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Kathrani, Aarti; House, Arthur; Catchpole, Brian; Murphy, Angela; German, Alex; Werling, Dirk; Allenspach, Karin

    2010-12-23

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is considered to be the most common cause of vomiting and diarrhoea in dogs, and the German shepherd dog (GSD) is particularly susceptible. The exact aetiology of IBD is unknown, however associations have been identified between specific single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and human IBD. However, to date, no genetic studies have been undertaken in canine IBD. The aim of this study was to investigate whether polymorphisms in canine TLR 2, 4 and 5 genes are associated with IBD in GSDs. Mutational analysis of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR5 was performed in 10 unrelated GSDs with IBD. Four non-synonymous SNPs (T23C, G1039A, A1571T and G1807A) were identified in the TLR4 gene, and three non-synonymous SNPs (G22A, C100T and T1844C) were identified in the TLR5 gene. The non-synonymous SNPs identified in TLR4 and TLR5 were evaluated further in a case-control study using a SNaPSHOT multiplex reaction. Sequencing information from 55 unrelated GSDs with IBD were compared to a control group consisting of 61 unrelated GSDs. The G22A SNP in TLR5 was significantly associated with IBD in GSDs, whereas the remaining two SNPs were found to be significantly protective for IBD. Furthermore, the two SNPs in TLR4 (A1571T and G1807A) were in complete linkage disequilibrium, and were also significantly associated with IBD. The TLR5 risk haplotype (ACC) without the two associated TLR4 SNP alleles was significantly associated with IBD, however the presence of the two TLR4 SNP risk alleles without the TLR5 risk haplotype was not statistically associated with IBD. Our study suggests that the three TLR5 SNPs and two TLR4 SNPs; A1571T and G1807A could play a role in the pathogenesis of IBD in GSDs. Further studies are required to confirm the functional importance of these polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  5. Microsatellite loci analysis for the genetic variability and the parentage test of five dog breeds in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Byeong-Teck; Kim, Kyung-Seok; Min, Mi-Sook; Chae, Young-Jin; Kang, Jung-Won; Yoon, Junghee; Choi, Jihye; Seong, Je-Kyung; Park, Han-Chan; An, Junghwa; Lee, Mun-Han; Park, Hee-Myung; Lee, Hang

    2009-06-01

    To investigate the population structure of five dog breeds in South Korea and to validate polymorphic microsatellite markers for the parentage test, microsatellite loci analyses were conducted for two Korean native dog breeds, Poongsan and Jindo, and three imported dog breeds, German Shepherd, Beagle and Greyhound. Overall genetic diversity was high across all dog breeds (expected heterozygosity range: 0.71 to 0.85), although breeds differed in deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). Significant reduction of heterozygosity in the Poongsan and Greyhound breeds was caused by non-random mating and population substructure within these breeds (the Wahlund effects). The close relationship and high degree of genetic diversity for two Korean native dog breeds were substantial. The mean polymorphism information content value was highest in Jindos (0.82) and Poongsans (0.81), followed by Beagles (0.74), Greyhounds (0.72), and German Shepherds (0.66). Accumulated exclusion power values, as an indication of marker validity for parentage tests, were varied but very high across breeds, 0.9999 for Jindos, Poongsans, and Beagles, 0.9997 for Greyhounds, and 0.9995 for German Shepherds. Taken together, the microsatellite loci investigated in this study can serve as suitable markers for the parentage test and as individual identification to establish a reliable pedigree verification system of dog breeds in South Korea. This study also stresses that the population subdivision within breeds can become an important cause of deviation from HWE in dog breeds.

  6. Hypospadias Is Not Rare in Dogs: Five New Cases, a Retrospective Study, and a Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Switonski, Marek; Dzimira, Stanislaw; Aleksiewicz, Roman; Szczerbal, Izabela; Nowacka-Woszuk, Joanna; Krzeminska, Paulina; Deska, Tomasz; Nizanski, Wojciech

    2018-06-13

    Hypospadias, the abnormal position of the urethral orifice, is considered a rare congenital malformation of the reproductive organs in male dogs. We present 5 new cases of hypospadias - 2 of the penile type in German Shepherd Dogs and 3 perineal types in a Bavarian Mountain Hound, a French Bulldog, and an American Staffordshire Terrier. Other abnormalities (rudimentary or underdeveloped penis, incompletely formed preputial sheath, and bilateral cryptorchidism) were also observed. Molecular analysis of all cases revealed the presence of Y-linked genes (SRY and ZFY). Cytogenetic and histological analysis could be performed for only 2 cases: a normal male sex chromosome complement (78,XY) and spermatogenetically inactive testicles were observed. A retrospective search for hypospadias in 19,950 medical records of male dogs from a single veterinary clinic in Poland (2006-2017) was also performed. Altogether, 10 reports of penile hypospadias were found (0.05%). The majority of the reports concerned German Shepherd Dogs (8 cases among 1,511 male dogs of this breed), and thus, the estimated incidence of hypospadias in this breed was 0.5%. Moreover, we performed a review of 26 cases of canine hypospadias reported in the years 2004-2017. Our study and the review of the literature suggest that hypospadias is not rare in dogs and that some breeds (such as German Shepherd Dog and Boston Terrier) may be prone to this disorder. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Malignant anterior uveal melanoma with diffuse metastasis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Minami, T; Patnaik, A K

    1992-12-15

    Enucleation was performed in 10-year-old sexually intact female mixed-breed German Shepherd Dog. Histologic examination revealed that the dog had an uveal amelanotic melanoma of the eye. The tumor consisted of anaplastic cells with a high mitotic index, indicating malignancy. On examination 3 months after enucleation, the dog had difficulty breathing and nasal discharge. Radiography revealed pulmonary metastasis. The dog was euthanatized. Necropsy revealed diffuse metastasis involving various organs.

  8. Bile peritonitis associated with gastric dilation-volvulus in a dog.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Saundra A; Brisson, Brigitte A; Holmberg, David L

    2005-03-01

    This report describes a case of septic peritonitis and gall bladder rupture in German shepherd dog that developed 7 d after surgical treatment for gastric dilation-volvulus. Histological examination confirmed gall bladder necrosis, secondary to an acute ischemic event. Postoperative acute necrotizing cholecystitis has not been a previously reported complication in dogs.

  9. Cystine-containing urinary calculi in dogs: 102 cases (1981-1989).

    PubMed

    Case, L C; Ling, G V; Franti, C E; Ruby, A L; Stevens, F; Johnson, D L

    1992-07-01

    One hundred and seven cystine-containing urinary calculi from 1 female and 101 male dogs were analyzed. Cystine-containing calculi accounted for 2% (107 of 5,375) of all canine urinary calculi submitted to the urinary stone analysis laboratory from July 1981 through December 1989. Male dogs that formed cystine calculi were compared with 3 other canine populations to determine whether certain breeds were apparently at increased or decreased risk for cystine calculus formation. In one or more of 3 population comparisons, significantly increased risk of cystine calculus formation was found in Mastiffs, Australian Cattle Dogs, English Bulldogs, Chihuahuas, Bullmastiffs, Newfoundlands, Dachshunds, Basenjis, Australian Shepherd Dogs, Scottish Deerhounds, Staffordshire Terriers, Miniature Pinschers, pitbull terriers, Welsh Corgis, Silky Terriers, and Bichon Frises. Significantly low risk of cystine calculus formation was found in German Shepherd Dogs, Poodles, Schnauzers, and mixed-breed dogs.

  10. Bile peritonitis associated with gastric dilation-volvulus in a dog

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract This report describes a case of septic peritonitis and gall bladder rupture in German shepherd dog that developed 7 d after surgical treatment for gastric dilation-volvulus. Histological examination confirmed gall bladder necrosis, secondary to an acute ischemic event. Postoperative acute necrotizing cholecystitis has not been a previously reported complication in dogs. PMID:15884650

  11. Polymorphisms in the Tlr4 and Tlr5 Gene Are Significantly Associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in German Shepherd Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Kathrani, Aarti; House, Arthur; Catchpole, Brian; Murphy, Angela; German, Alex; Werling, Dirk; Allenspach, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is considered to be the most common cause of vomiting and diarrhoea in dogs, and the German shepherd dog (GSD) is particularly susceptible. The exact aetiology of IBD is unknown, however associations have been identified between specific single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and human IBD. However, to date, no genetic studies have been undertaken in canine IBD. The aim of this study was to investigate whether polymorphisms in canine TLR 2, 4 and 5 genes are associated with IBD in GSDs. Mutational analysis of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR5 was performed in 10 unrelated GSDs with IBD. Four non-synonymous SNPs (T23C, G1039A, A1571T and G1807A) were identified in the TLR4 gene, and three non-synonymous SNPs (G22A, C100T and T1844C) were identified in the TLR5 gene. The non-synonymous SNPs identified in TLR4 and TLR5 were evaluated further in a case-control study using a SNaPSHOT multiplex reaction. Sequencing information from 55 unrelated GSDs with IBD were compared to a control group consisting of 61 unrelated GSDs. The G22A SNP in TLR5 was significantly associated with IBD in GSDs, whereas the remaining two SNPs were found to be significantly protective for IBD. Furthermore, the two SNPs in TLR4 (A1571T and G1807A) were in complete linkage disequilibrium, and were also significantly associated with IBD. The TLR5 risk haplotype (ACC) without the two associated TLR4 SNP alleles was significantly associated with IBD, however the presence of the two TLR4 SNP risk alleles without the TLR5 risk haplotype was not statistically associated with IBD. Our study suggests that the three TLR5 SNPs and two TLR4 SNPs; A1571T and G1807A could play a role in the pathogenesis of IBD in GSDs. Further studies are required to confirm the functional importance of these polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:21203467

  12. Surgical management of 2 different presentations of ear canal atresia in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Béraud, Romain

    2012-01-01

    A 6-year-old French spaniel and a 14-month-old German shepherd dog were diagnosed with ear canal atresia. Based on presentation, computed tomography, and auditory function evaluation, the first dog underwent excision of the horizontal ear canal and bulla curettage, and the second underwent re-anastomosis of the vertical canal to the external meatus. Both dogs had successful outcomes. PMID:23024390

  13. High prevalence of Hepatozoon-infection among shepherd dogs in a region considered to be free of Rhipicephalus sanguineus.

    PubMed

    Hornok, Sándor; Tánczos, Balázs; Fernández de Mera, Isabel G; de la Fuente, José; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Farkas, Róbert

    2013-09-01

    Blood samples and ticks were collected from 100 shepherd dogs, 12 hunting dogs and 14 stray dogs in southern Hungary, in order to screen them for the presence of Hepatozoon spp. by PCR. Out of 126 blood samples, 33 were positive (26%). Significantly more shepherd dogs (31%) were infected, than hunting (8%) and stray dogs (7%). Three genotypes of Hepatozoon canis were identified by sequencing, differing from each other in up to six nucleotides in the amplified portion of their 18S rRNA gene. In Dermacentor marginatus larvae/nymphs and Dermacentor reticulatus nymphs, H. canis was present only if they had been collected from PCR-positive dogs, and the genotypes were identical in the ticks and their hosts. However, two Haemaphysalis concinna nymphs removed from a PCR-negative dog were found positive for H. canis, and the genotype detected in specimens of this tick species differed from that in the blood of their respective hosts. These results indicate that canine hepatozoonosis may be highly prevalent in regions where Rhipicephalus sanguineus is considered to be non-endemic. In addition, H. canis was identified for the first time in Hungary, as well as in D. marginatus, D. reticulatus and Ha. concinna ticks. Canine hepatozoonosis was significantly more prevalent west of the Danube river (where higher densities of red fox and golden jackal populations occur), suggesting a role of wild carnivores in its epidemiology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Thoracolumbar vertebral osteochondroma in a young dog.

    PubMed

    Santen, D R; Payne, J T; Pace, L W; Kroll, R A; Johnson, G C

    1991-10-15

    Osteosarcoma was diagnosed in a 7-month-old female German Shepherd Dog with hind limb paresis. Radiography revealed a circumscribed calcified mass in the dorsal vertebral lamina at T13-L1 resulting in extradural compression of the spinal cord. Surgical excision of the mass resulted in gradual return to normal neurologic function. Four weeks after surgery, the dog became severely atactic after rolling onto its back. A chip fracture of T13 was identified, and the dog was euthanatized at the owners' request.

  15. Congenital adenohypophyseal hypoplasia associated with secondary hypothyroidism in a 2-week-old Portuguese water dog.

    PubMed

    Gal, Arnon; Raetzman, Lori T; Singh, Kuldeep

    2012-06-01

    This report describes the histomorphological changes of central hypothyroidism (pituitary dependent) in several target organs of thyroid hormones of a Portuguese water dog, and contrasts those with the reported features of central hypothyroidism in German shepherd dogs, in which central hypothyroidism is a part of a combined pituitary hormonal deficiency.

  16. Oxytocin and Opioid Receptor Gene Polymorphisms Associated with Greeting Behavior in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Kubinyi, Enikő; Bence, Melinda; Koller, Dora; Wan, Michele; Pergel, Eniko; Ronai, Zsolt; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Miklósi, Ádám

    2017-01-01

    Meeting humans is an everyday experience for most companion dogs, and their behavior in these situations and its genetic background is of major interest. Previous research in our laboratory reported that in German shepherd dogs the lack of G allele, and in Border collies the lack of A allele, of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) 19208A/G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was linked to increased friendliness, which suggests that although broad traits are affected by genetic variability, the specific links between alleles and behavioral variables might be breed-specific. In the current study, we found that Siberian huskies with the A allele approached a friendly unfamiliar woman less frequently in a greeting test, which indicates that certain polymorphisms are related to human directed behavior, but that the relationship patterns between polymorphisms and behavioral phenotypes differ between populations. This finding was further supported by our next investigation. According to primate studies, endogenous opioid peptide (e.g., endorphins) receptor genes have also been implicated in social relationships. Therefore, we examined the rs21912990 of the OPRM1 gene. Firstly, we found that the allele frequencies of Siberian huskies and gray wolves were similar, but differed from that of Border collies and German shepherd dogs, which might reflect their genetic relationship. Secondly, we detected significant associations between the OPRM1 SNP and greeting behavior among German shepherd dogs and a trend in Border collies, but we could not detect an association in Siberian huskies. Although our results with OXTR and OPRM1 gene variants should be regarded as preliminary due to the relatively low sample size, they suggest that (1) OXTR and OPRM1 gene variants in dogs affect human-directed social behavior and (2) their effects differ between breeds.

  17. Oxytocin and Opioid Receptor Gene Polymorphisms Associated with Greeting Behavior in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Kubinyi, Enikő; Bence, Melinda; Koller, Dora; Wan, Michele; Pergel, Eniko; Ronai, Zsolt; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Miklósi, Ádám

    2017-01-01

    Meeting humans is an everyday experience for most companion dogs, and their behavior in these situations and its genetic background is of major interest. Previous research in our laboratory reported that in German shepherd dogs the lack of G allele, and in Border collies the lack of A allele, of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) 19208A/G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was linked to increased friendliness, which suggests that although broad traits are affected by genetic variability, the specific links between alleles and behavioral variables might be breed-specific. In the current study, we found that Siberian huskies with the A allele approached a friendly unfamiliar woman less frequently in a greeting test, which indicates that certain polymorphisms are related to human directed behavior, but that the relationship patterns between polymorphisms and behavioral phenotypes differ between populations. This finding was further supported by our next investigation. According to primate studies, endogenous opioid peptide (e.g., endorphins) receptor genes have also been implicated in social relationships. Therefore, we examined the rs21912990 of the OPRM1 gene. Firstly, we found that the allele frequencies of Siberian huskies and gray wolves were similar, but differed from that of Border collies and German shepherd dogs, which might reflect their genetic relationship. Secondly, we detected significant associations between the OPRM1 SNP and greeting behavior among German shepherd dogs and a trend in Border collies, but we could not detect an association in Siberian huskies. Although our results with OXTR and OPRM1 gene variants should be regarded as preliminary due to the relatively low sample size, they suggest that (1) OXTR and OPRM1 gene variants in dogs affect human-directed social behavior and (2) their effects differ between breeds. PMID:28936190

  18. Congenital adenohypophyseal hypoplasia associated with secondary hypothyroidism in a 2-week-old Portuguese water dog

    PubMed Central

    Gal, Arnon; Raetzman, Lori T.; Singh, Kuldeep

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the histomorphological changes of central hypothyroidism (pituitary dependent) in several target organs of thyroid hormones of a Portuguese water dog, and contrasts those with the reported features of central hypothyroidism in German shepherd dogs, in which central hypothyroidism is a part of a combined pituitary hormonal deficiency. PMID:23204587

  19. From Wolves to Dogs, and Back: Genetic Composition of the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog.

    PubMed

    Smetanová, Milena; Černá Bolfíková, Barbora; Randi, Ettore; Caniglia, Romolo; Fabbri, Elena; Galaverni, Marco; Kutal, Miroslav; Hulva, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is a unique dog breed that originated from hybridization between German Shepherds and wild Carpathian wolves in the 1950s as a military experiment. This breed was used for guarding the Czechoslovakian borders during the cold war and is currently kept by civilian breeders all round the world. The aim of our study was to characterize, for the first time, the genetic composition of this breed in relation to its known source populations. We sequenced the hypervariable part of the mtDNA control region and genotyped the Amelogenin gene, four sex-linked microsatellites and 39 autosomal microsatellites in 79 Czechoslovakian Wolfdogs, 20 German Shepherds and 28 Carpathian wolves. We performed a range of population genetic analyses based on both empirical and simulated data. Only two mtDNA and two Y-linked haplotypes were found in Czechoslovakian Wolfdogs. Both mtDNA haplotypes were of domestic origin, while only one of the Y-haplotypes was shared with German Shepherds and the other was unique to Czechoslovakian Wolfdogs. The observed inbreeding coefficient was low despite the small effective population size of the breed, possibly due to heterozygote advantages determined by introgression of wolf alleles. Moreover, Czechoslovakian Wolfdog genotypes were distinct from both parental populations, indicating the role of founder effect, drift and/or genetic hitchhiking. The results revealed the peculiar genetic composition of the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog, showing a limited introgression of wolf alleles within a higher proportion of the dog genome, consistent with the reiterated backcrossing used in the pedigree. Artificial selection aiming to keep wolf-like phenotypes but dog-like behavior resulted in a distinctive genetic composition of Czechoslovakian Wolfdogs, which provides a unique example to study the interactions between dog and wolf genomes.

  20. Relationship between cobalamin-dependent metabolites and both serum albumin and alpha1 -proteinase inhibitor concentrations in hypocobalaminemic dogs of 7 different breeds.

    PubMed

    Grützner, Niels; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2014-12-01

    Increased serum concentrations of homocysteine (HCY) and methylmalonic acid (MMA), the 2 main cobalamin-dependent metabolites, as well as decreased serum albumin and canine alpha1 -proteinase inhibitor (cα1 -PI) concentrations have previously been described in hypocobalaminemic dogs with gastrointestinal disease. However, no studies have been conducted to evaluate potential relationships between these serum biomarkers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between HCY and MMA, 2 cobalamin-dependent metabolites, and both serum albumin and cα1 -PI concentrations in hypocobalaminemic dogs. Serum samples from 285 dogs including 7 different breeds (Beagle, Boxer, Cocker Spaniel, German Shepherd, Labrador Retriever, Chinese Shar-Pei, and Yorkshire Terrier) with hypocobalaminemia were used. Serum HCY, MMA, albumin, and cα1 -PI concentrations were determined. There was a significant correlation between serum HCY and albumin concentrations, as well as serum HCY and cα1 -PI concentrations (ρ = 0.62 and ρ = 0.37, respectively; P < .0001). No correlations were observed between serum MMA and albumin concentrations, or cα1 -PI concentrations (ρ = 0.01 and ρ = 0.08, respectively; P > .05). In addition, significant breed-specific correlations were observed between serum MMA and albumin concentrations in German Shepherds, and serum HCY and MMA concentrations in Chinese Shar-Peis with hypocobalaminemia. This study shows a correlation between serum albumin and cα1 -PI and HCY concentrations, but not with serum MMA concentration in dogs with hypocobalaminemia. In addition, significant breed-specific correlations were observed between serum MMA and albumin concentrations in German Shepherds, as well as serum HCY and MMA concentrations in Chinese Shar-Peis, emphasizing the unique metabolic interactions in those dog breeds affected by hypocobalaminemia. © 2014 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  1. Trends in the phenotypic hip status of selected breeds of dog as measured by the New Zealand Veterinary Association Hip Dysplasia scheme (1990-2008).

    PubMed

    Worth, A J; Bridges, J P; Jones, G

    2011-03-01

    To determine whether there has been improvement in the phenotypic hip dysplasia status in four susceptible dog breeds as measured by the New Zealand Veterinary Association (NZVA) Canine Hip Dysplasia (CHD) scheme. A retrospective analysis of the NZVA CHD database was performed using records of all German Shepherd dogs, Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers and Rottweilers that had undergone evaluation for hip dysplasia between 1990 and 2008. The effect of date of birth on the total hip score was analysed using linear regression, including the covariates of age and gender. When a significant effect of date of birth on total score was noted, ordinal logistic regression was performed to determine the probability of different grades of the Norberg angle and subluxation scores by year of birth; these categories being most indicative of laxity of the coxofemoral joint. Given the known heritability of hip phenotype, determined using radiological measurements, the hypothesis was that if sufficient selection pressure has been applied there would have been a trend towards a lower total score over time. For Labrador Retrievers (n=1,451), Golden Retrievers (n=896) and Rottweilers (n=313), there was no effect of date of birth on total score over the period of the study (p>0.1). For German Shepherd dogs (n=1,087), there was a significant trend to a lower total score over time (p=0.0003). However the actual size of the effect was small. Ordinal logistic regression on the Norberg angle and subluxation scores for German Shepherd dogs demonstrated a significant lowering of grade in both of these measures of hip laxity. This study failed to show significant improvement in the phenotypic hip status of three out of the four most populous large-dog breeds in the NZVA CHD database. Even in the German Shepherd dog, the trend towards a lower total score did not represent a substantial change. Lack of evidence of phenotypic improvement may be due to insufficient selection pressure over the

  2. Focal metatarsal fistulae syndrome affecting a greyhound dog successfully treated with topical 0.1% tacrolimus ointment.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Fiona M; Muse, Russell; Burrows, Amanda K

    2015-12-01

    Metatarsal fistulation is an uncommon cutaneous condition reported almost exclusively in German shepherd dogs and their cross-breeds. To the best of the authors' knowledge this is the first reported case of focal metatarsal fistulae syndrome affecting a greyhound. Remission was obtained within 6 weeks of commencing treatment using compounded 0.1% tacrolimus ointment twice daily and the dog remained stable for another 6 months with twice weekly application before treatment was discontinued. The dog remained in remission at the time of writing, which is 1 year after treatment withdrawal. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  3. Estimated frequency of the canine hyperuricosuria mutation in different dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Karmi, N; Brown, E A; Hughes, S S; McLaughlin, B; Mellersh, C S; Biourge, V; Bannasch, D L

    2010-01-01

    Hyperuricosuria is a condition that predisposes dogs to urate urolithiasis. A mutation that causes canine hyperuricosuria was previously identified in 3 unrelated dog breeds. The occurrence of the mutation in additional breeds was not determined. Identify additional breeds that have the hyperuricosuria mutation and estimate the mutant allele frequency in those breeds. Three thousand five hundred and thirty dogs from 127 different breeds were screened for the hyperuricosuria mutation. DNA samples were genotyped by pyrosequencing and allele-specific polymerase chain reaction methods. Mutant allele frequencies that range from 0.001 to 0.15 were identified in the American Staffordshire Terrier, Australian Shepherd, German Shepherd Dog, Giant Schnauzer, Parson (Jack) Russell Terrier, Labrador Retriever, Large Munsterlander, Pomeranian, South African Boerboel, and Weimaraner breeds. The hyperuricosuria mutation has been identified in several unrelated dog breeds. The mutant allele frequencies vary among breeds and can be used to determine an appropriate breeding plan for each breed. A DNA test is available and may be used by breeders to decrease the mutant allele frequency in breeds that carry the mutation. In addition, veterinarians may use the test as a diagnostic tool to identify the cause of urate urolithiasis. Copyright © 2010 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  4. [The German Ophthalmological Society (DOG) during the Period of National Socialism].

    PubMed

    Rohrbach, J M

    2006-11-01

    Sixty-one years after the end of the Hitler dictatorship, the history of the German Ophthalmological Society (DOG) has still hardly been investigated. According to different sources, especially the reports of the DOG congresses 1934, 1936, 1938, and 1940, the following picture can be drawn: 1. The seizure of power ("Machtergreifung") of Adolf Hitler was appreciated by most of the DOG members. 2. After a change of the constitution the DOG came under the control of the "Reichsinnenministerium". However, it escaped the egalitarianism ("Gleichschaltung") and remained relatively independent. 3. Approximately 40 % of the heads of the German university eye clinics who were the most influential DOG representatives were members of the national socialistic German working party (NSDAP). Almost all of these joined the party in 1933 or later. 4. Up to the last congress in Dresden, 1940, the DOG activities were quite extensive. After that time the activities strongly declined. 5. The "Law for the prevention of genetically disabled offspring" ("Gesetz zur Verhütung erbkranken Nachwuchses") from January 1st 1934 was intensely discussed by the DOG. Some prominent ophthalmologists and DOG members were at least in part responsible for the sterilisations because of "congenital blindness". However, as far as it is known, the DOG itself did not intervene directly concerning the practice of sterilisation. 6. Between 1932 and 1940, the DOG lost approximately 12 % of its members. Many of these stemmed from foreign countries, and many were German Jews. The latter left the DOG, as Walther Löhlein stated after the end of the war, "voluntarily". However, a main reason for leaving the DOG was very likely the feeling of being unwanted. The national socialism had several disastrous effects on ophthalmology. Although single DOG members participated in the excesses, the DOG as an organization was not directly involved. However, taking into consideration that more than 10 % of the members of the

  5. IMAGING DIAGNOSIS-ULTRASONOGRAPHIC APPEARANCE OF SKELETAL MUSCLE METASTASES IN A DOG WITH HEMANGIOSARCOMA.

    PubMed

    Fabbi, Martina; Di Palma, Stefano; Manfredi, Sabrina; Gnudi, Giacomo; Miduri, Francesca; Daga, Eleonora; Melis, Gabriele Costantino; Bianchi, Ezio; Voccia, Simone; Volta, Antonella

    2017-11-01

    A 13-year-old spayed female German shepherd dog was presented for acute onset of lethargy, anorexia, and disseminated erythematous skin lesions. Thoracic radiographs and abdominal ultrasonographic findings were consistent with metastatic hemangiosarcoma. Multiple, ill-defined, irregularly shaped hypoechoic nodules were also detected within the thoracic and abdominal wall. Hemangiosarcoma metastases to the skeletal muscle were confirmed based on histopathological examination. Multivisceral involvement was also confirmed by necropsy. Metastatic neoplasia should be considered as a differential diagnosis for dogs with ill-defined, irregular, hypoechoic, intramuscular nodules. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  6. Artificial selection on brain-expressed genes during the domestication of dog.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Vonholdt, Bridgett M; Reynolds, Andy; Boyko, Adam R; Wayne, Robert K; Wu, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2013-08-01

    Domesticated dogs have many unique behaviors not found in gray wolves that have augmented their interaction and communication with humans. The genetic basis of such unique behaviors in dogs remains poorly understood. We found that genes within regions highly differentiated between outbred Chinese native dogs (CNs) and wolves show high bias for expression localized to brain tissues, particularly the prefrontal cortex, a specific region responsible for complex cognitive behaviors. In contrast, candidate genes showing high population differentiation between CNs and German Shepherd dogs (GSs) did not demonstrate significant expression bias. These observations indicate that these candidate genes highly expressed in the brain have rapidly evolved. This rapid evolution was probably driven by artificial selection during the primary transition from wolves to ancient dogs and was consistent with the evolution of dog-specific characteristics, such as behavior transformation, for thousands of years.

  7. Cloning of the canine gene encoding transcription factor Pit-1 and its exclusion as candidate gene in a canine model of pituitary dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Lantinga-van Leeuwen, I S; Mol, J A; Kooistra, H S; Rijnberk, A; Breen, M; Renier, C; van Oost, B A

    2000-01-01

    Combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD) is an autosomal recessive inherited disease of German shepherd dogs characterized primarily by dwarfism. In mice and humans a similar genetic disorder has been described that results from an alteration in the gene encoding the transcription factor Pit-1. In this study we characterized the canine Pit-1 gene, determined the chromosomal localization of the Pit-1 gene, and screened dwarf German shepherd dogs for the presence of mutations in this gene. The full-length canine Pit-1 cDNA contained an open reading frame encoding 291 amino acids, 92 bp of 5'-untranslated region, and 1959 bp of 3'-untranslated region. The deduced amino acid sequence was highly homologous with Pit-1 of other mammalian species. Using a Pit-1 BAC clone as probe, the Pit-1 gene was mapped by FISH to canine Chromosome (Chr) 31. In dwarf German shepherd dogs a C to A transversion was detected, causing a Phe (TTC) to Leu (TTA) substitution at codon 81. This alteration was present neither in other canine breeds analyzed nor in other mammalian species. However, healthy German shepherd dogs were also homozygous for the mutant allele, indicating that it is not the primary disease-causing mutation. In addition, linkage analysis of polymorphic DNA markers flanking the Pit-1 gene, 41K19 and 52L05, revealed no co-segregation between the Pit-1 locus and the CPHD phenotype. These findings suggest that a gene other than Pit-1 is responsible for the pituitary anomaly in dwarf German shepherd dogs.

  8. A Missense Variant in KCNJ10 in Belgian Shepherd Dogs Affected by Spongy Degeneration with Cerebellar Ataxia (SDCA1).

    PubMed

    Mauri, Nico; Kleiter, Miriam; Leschnik, Michael; Högler, Sandra; Dietschi, Elisabeth; Wiedmer, Michaela; Dietrich, Joëlle; Henke, Diana; Steffen, Frank; Schuller, Simone; Gurtner, Corinne; Stokar-Regenscheit, Nadine; O'Toole, Donal; Bilzer, Thomas; Herden, Christiane; Oevermann, Anna; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Leeb, Tosso

    2017-02-09

    Spongy degeneration with cerebellar ataxia (SDCA) is a severe neurodegenerative disease with monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance in Malinois dogs, one of the four varieties of the Belgian Shepherd breed. We performed a genetic investigation in six families and seven isolated cases of Malinois dogs with signs of cerebellar dysfunction. Linkage analysis revealed an unexpected genetic heterogeneity within the studied cases. The affected dogs from four families and one isolated case shared a ∼1.4 Mb common homozygous haplotype segment on chromosome 38. Whole genome sequence analysis of three affected and 140 control dogs revealed a missense variant in the KCNJ10 gene encoding a potassium channel (c.986T>C; p.Leu329Pro). Pathogenic variants in KCNJ10 were reported previously in humans, mice, and dogs with neurological phenotypes. Therefore, we consider KCNJ10 :c.986T>C the most likely candidate causative variant for one subtype of SDCA in Malinois dogs, which we propose to term spongy degeneration with cerebellar ataxia 1 (SDCA1). However, our study also comprised samples from 12 Malinois dogs with cerebellar dysfunction which were not homozygous for this variant, suggesting a different genetic basis in these dogs. A retrospective detailed clinical and histopathological analysis revealed subtle neuropathological differences with respect to SDCA1-affected dogs. Thus, our study highlights the genetic and phenotypic complexity underlying cerebellar dysfunction in Malinois dogs and provides the basis for a genetic test to eradicate one specific neurodegenerative disease from the breeding population. These dogs represent an animal model for the human EAST syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Mauri et al.

  9. Laparoscopic single-port ovariectomy and gastropexy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Gandini, M; Giusto, G

    2016-11-01

    In this study single-port percutaneous laparoscopic gastropexy in dogs using barbed suture material in combination with ovariectomy is described. A single port preventive gastropexy was performed in 6 female German shepherds in combination with ovariectomy using a laparoscope. Surgery time, intraoperative, postoperative and follow up complications were recorded. In this study median surgery time in clinical cases was 73 minutes (range 66-79). The only difficulty reported was visualization of a proper site for gastropexy on the stomach. No complications and/or episodes of gastric volvulus were detected at a 3-month minimum follow-up. The proposed technique provides an effective and minimally invasive approach to ovariectomy and preventive gastropexy in dogs.

  10. Dog breed stereotype and exposure to negative behavior: effects on perceptions of adoptability.

    PubMed

    Wright, John C; Smith, Alison; Daniel, Katie; Adkins, Karen

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if brief exposure to a dog behaving badly or in a friendly manner affects subsequent perceptions of the target dog's and other dogs' adoptability. Participants viewed a videotape of an adoptable German shepherd behaving either aggressively or prosocially and were then asked to rate the characteristics and adoptability of the same and different dogs. The results showed that people who saw the aggressive behavioral schema perceived only the target dog and a dog of the same breed to be significantly less adoptable than dogs of other breeds (p<.01). Results of a principal components analysis showed participants perceived the adoptability of dogs to be related to "sociability": Adoptable dogs were more approachable, friendly, intelligent, and less dangerous and aggressive (p<.01). Brief exposure to a misbehaving dog prior to making a decision to adopt may unfairly penalize other dogs perceived to be similar to the misbehaving dog.

  11. Nonsense variant in COL7A1 causes recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa in Central Asian Shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, Julia; Dillard, Kati; Arumilli, Meharji; Salmela, Elina; Anttila, Marjukka; Lohi, Hannes; Hytönen, Marjo K

    2017-01-01

    A rare hereditary mechanobullous disorder called epidermolysis bullosa (EB) causes blistering in the skin and the mucosal membranes. To date, nineteen EB-related genes have been discovered in human and other species. We describe here a novel EB variant in dogs. Two newborn littermates of Central Asian Shepherd dogs with severe signs of skin blistering were brought to a veterinary clinic and euthanized due to poor prognosis. In post-mortem examination, the puppies were shown to have findings in the skin and the mucosal membranes characteristic of EB. A whole-genome sequencing of one of the affected puppies was performed to identify the genetic cause. The resequencing data were filtered under a recessive model against variants from 31 other dog genomes, revealing a homozygous case-specific nonsense variant in one of the known EB-causing genes, COL7A1 (c.4579C>T, p.R1527*). The variant results in a premature stop codon and likely absence of the functional protein in the basement membrane of the skin in the affected dogs. This was confirmed by immunohistochemistry using a COL7A1 antibody. Additional screening of the variant indicated full penetrance and breed specificity at ~28% carrier frequency. In summary, this study reveals a novel COL7A1 variant causing recessive dystrophic EB and provides a genetic test for the eradication of the disease from the breed.

  12. The dog as a genetic model for immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency: identification of several breeds with low serum IgA concentrations.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Mia; Frankowiack, Marcel; Tengvall, Katarina; Roosje, Petra; Fall, Tove; Ivansson, Emma; Bergvall, Kerstin; Hansson-Hamlin, Helene; Sundberg, Katarina; Hedhammar, Ake; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Hammarström, Lennart

    2014-08-15

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) serves as the basis of the secretory immune system by protecting the lining of mucosal sites from pathogens. In both humans and dogs, IgA deficiency (IgAD) is associated with recurrent infections of mucosal sites and immune-mediated diseases. Low concentrations of serum IgA have previously been reported to occur in a number of dog breeds but no generally accepted cut-off value has been established for canine IgAD. The current study represents the largest screening to date of IgA in dogs in terms of both number of dogs (n=1267) and number of breeds studied (n=22). Serum IgA concentrations were quantified by using capture ELISA and were found to vary widely between breeds. We also found IgA to be positively correlated with age (p<0.0001). Apart from the two breeds previously reported as predisposed to low IgA (Shar-Pei and German shepherd), we identified six additional breeds in which ≥ 10% of all tested dogs had very low (<0.07 g/l) IgA concentrations (Hovawart, Norwegian elkhound, Nova Scotia duck tolling retriever, Bullterrier, Golden retriever and Labrador retriever). In addition, we discovered low IgA concentrations to be significantly associated with canine atopic dermatitis (CAD, p<0.0001) and pancreatic acinar atrophy (PAA, p=0.04) in German shepherds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Breed distribution of the ABCB1-1Delta (multidrug sensitivity) polymorphism among dogs undergoing ABCB1 genotyping.

    PubMed

    Mealey, Katrina L; Meurs, Kathryn M

    2008-09-15

    To evaluate the breed distribution of the ABCB1-1Delta polymorphism in a large number of dogs in North America, including dogs of several herding breeds in which this polymorphism has been detected and other breeds in which this polymorphism has not yet been identified. Cross-sectional study. 5,368 dogs from which buccal swab samples were collected for purposes of ABCB1 genotyping. From May 1, 2004, to September 30, 2007, DNA specimens derived from buccal swab samples collected from 5,368 dogs underwent ABCB1 genotyping. These data were reviewed, and results for each dog were recorded in a spreadsheet, along with the dog's breed. The genotypes for each breed were tallied by use of a sorting function. The ABCB1-1Delta allele was identified in 9 breeds of dogs and in many mixed-breed dogs. Breeds that had the ABCB1-1Delta allele included Collie, Longhaired Whippet, Australian Shepherd (standard and miniature), Shetland Sheepdog, Old English Sheepdog, Border Collie, Silken Windhound, and German Shepherd Dog (a breed in which this mutation had not been detected previously). The ABCB1-1Delta polymorphism is associated with increased susceptibility to many adverse drug reactions and with suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and is present in many herding breeds of dog. Veterinarians should be familiar with the breeds that have the ABCB1-1Delta polymorphism to make appropriate pharmacologic choices for these patients.

  14. Neutrophilic dermatosis resembling pyoderma gangrenosum in a dog with polyarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bardagí, M; Lloret, A; Fondati, A; Ferrer, L

    2007-04-01

    This report describes a case of neutrophilic dermatosis in a dog, with a number of clinical and pathological similarities to human pyoderma gangrenosum. A seven-year-old, female German shepherd dog with a history of non-erosive idiopathic polyarthritis was presented with severe facial swelling, bilateral erosivoulcerative lesions on the muzzle and multiple, eroded, dermal-subcutaneous nodules on the cranial trunk. Histopathological examination of skin biopsies revealed a necrotising neutrophilic dermatitis. No infectious agents could be detected using specific stains, immunohistochemistry, serology and bacterial aerobic, anaerobic or fungal cultures. A sterile neutrophilic dermatosis resembling human pyoderma gangrenosum was presumptively diagnosed, and the patient showed an excellent response to treatment with prednisone and ciclosporin.

  15. The first evidence for vertical transmission of Babesia canis in a litter of Central Asian Shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Mierzejewska, Ewa J; Welc-Falęciak, Renata; Bednarska, Małgorzata; Rodo, Anna; Bajer, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Tick-borne infections constitute an increasing health problem in dogs and may lead to death, especially in young or elderly individuals. Canine babesiosis constitutes a serious health problem in dogs worldwide. The aim of the study was to verify the probability of vertical transmission of Babesia canis between the bitch and the pups. In Autumn 2011, cases of babesiosis were diagnosed in a litter of 6-week-old puppies of a Central Asian Shepherd dog. Immediately following the first case of infection, blood samples were collected from all the pups in the litter (n=10) and from the female. Detection of Babesia infection was performed by molecular and microscopical techniques. The presence of B. canis DNA was detected using PCR in three pups, presenting at the time or 24-48 hours later with babesiosis symptoms, and in their asymptomatic mother. The isolates derived from the pups and the female - 520 bp 18S rRNA gene fragment - were compared and analyzed. All isolates from the pups and their mother were identical and showed 100% homology with B. canis group B (EU622793), supporting the same source of infection. Additionally, the USG of the peritoneal cavity was performed in the female, presenting evidence for splenomegaly. On the basis of (1) the same timing of three pup cases; (2) the identical B. canis sequences derived from all positive dogs; (3) evident splenomegaly in the asymptomatic female, this provides the first evidence of the vertical transmission of this piroplasm in dogs.

  16. Comparison of the large muscle group widths of the pelvic limb in seven breeds of dogs.

    PubMed

    Sabanci, Seyyid Said; Ocal, Mehmet Kamil

    2018-05-14

    Orthopaedic diseases are common in the pelvic limbs of dogs, and reference values for large muscle groups of the pelvic limb may aid in diagnosis such diseases. As such, the objective of this study was to compare the large muscle groups of the pelvic limb in seven breeds of dogs. A total of 126 dogs from different breeds were included, and the widths of the quadriceps, hamstring and gastrocnemius muscles were measured from images of the lateral radiographies. The width of the quadriceps was not different between the breeds, but the widths of the hamstring and gastrocnemius muscles were significantly different between the breeds. The widest hamstring and gastrocnemius muscles were seen in the Rottweilers and the Boxers, respectively. The narrowest hamstring and gastrocnemius muscles were seen in the Belgian Malinois and the Golden retrievers, respectively. All ratios between the measured muscles differed significantly between the breeds. Doberman pinschers and Belgian Malinois had the highest ratio of gastrocnemius width:hamstring width. Doberman pinschers had also the highest ratio of quadriceps width:hamstring width. German shepherds had the highest ratio of gastrocnemius width:quadriceps width. The lowest ratios of quadriceps width:hamstring width were determined in the German shepherds. The ratios of the muscle widths may be used as reference values to assess muscular atrophy or hypertrophy in cases of bilateral or unilateral orthopaedic diseases of the pelvic limbs. Further studies are required to determine the widths and ratios of the large muscle groups of the pelvic limbs in other dog breeds. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. Retrobulbar anaplastic astrocytoma in a dog: clinicopathological and ultrasonographic features.

    PubMed

    Martín, E; Pérez, J; Mozos, E; López, R; Molleda, J M

    2000-08-01

    An 11-year-old entire female German shepherd dog was presented with a progressive non-painful exophthalmos of the right eye. Ultrasonographic examination revealed a solid and well-defined orbital mass compressing the globe. Thoracic radiography revealed multiple pulmonary metastases of different sizes. The histopathological and immunohistochemical features of both the retrobulbar tumour and pulmonary metastases were consistent with an anaplastic astrocytoma. This represents an unusual case of an extracranial astrocytoma with multiple pulmonary metastases. The clinical features and the ultrasonographic, histopathological and immunohistochemical findings are described.

  18. Heritabilities and genetic trends for elbow score as recorded by the New Zealand Veterinary Association Elbow Dysplasia Scheme (1992-2013) in four breeds of dog.

    PubMed

    Soo, M; Lopez-Villalobos, N; Worth, A J

    2018-05-01

    To estimate the heritability of the New Zealand Veterinary Association (NZVA) elbow phenotype, obtain estimated breeding values (EBV) for the worst-elbow score and estimate the genetic trends for this trait in four populous breeds of dogs, using the records from the NZVA Canine Elbow Dysplasia Scheme database (1992-2013). Overall, 4,070 elbow records from a pedigree of 11,311 dogs were available for animals scored between 1992 and 2013. The worst elbow score between the left and right elbows was identified for each dog and used for EBV analysis. Estimates of heritability and EBV for the elbow score of dogs from German Shepherd dog, Labrador Retriever, Golden Retriever and Rottweiler breeds were obtained using restricted maximum likelihood procedures with a within-breed linear animal model. The model included the fixed effects of sex and birth year, with age at scoring as a covariable, and the random effect of animal. Genetic trends for the worst-elbow score were calculated as the regression coefficient of the EBV, weighted by reliabilities, on year of birth. The estimates of heritability for worst-elbow score were 0.25 (SE 0.06) in German Shepherd dogs, 0.46 (SE 0.06) in Labrador Retrievers, 0.18 (SE 0.07) in Golden Retrievers and 0.29 (SE 0.11) in Rottweilers. The genetic trend for German Shepherd dogs was -0.0082 (SE 0.0015), for Labrador Retrievers was -0.0016 (SE 0.0016), for Golden Retrievers was -0.0033 (SE 0.0010) and for Rottweilers was -0.0070 (SE 0.0023) units per annum, which were different from zero (p<0.01) in all breeds except Labrador Retrievers. A small but favourable response to selection was achieved by three of the four breeds in the study period; during which selection for elbow traits has been largely voluntary. While the magnitude of genetic change in terms of elbow units per annum may appear small, it must be remembered that elbow scoring grades only range from 0-3. Greater improvement may be possible if compulsory screening was a requirement

  19. Primary hypoparathyroidism in dogs: a retrospective study of 17 cases.

    PubMed

    Russell, N J; Bond, K A; Robertson, I D; Parry, B W; Irwin, P J

    2006-08-01

    To evaluate the clinico-pathological findings, response to treatment and prevalence of complications in dogs with primary hypoparathyroidism. Retrospective study of 17 dogs presenting to the University of Melbourne Veterinary Clinical Centre and Murdoch University Veterinary Hospital over a 15 year period (1990 to 2004). Case records were evaluated for signalment, body weight, diet type, historical and clinical findings, serum total calcium, phosphate, albumin and parathyroid hormone concentrations, urinary fractional excretion ratios of calcium and phosphate, electrocardiogram (ECG) results, treatments administered, outcome and period of follow-up. The most common breeds identified were St Bernard (three dogs), Chihuahua (two dogs), German Shepherd (two dogs) and Jack Russell Terrier (two dogs). Three dogs were cross bred. Seizures, muscle tremors and fasciculations, stiff gait, tetany, muscle cramping, behavioural change and hyperventilation were the most common clinical signs. Vomiting, inappetence, diarrhoea, abdominal pain, hyperthermia, facial pruritus, ataxia, weakness, cataracts, and circling also occurred with less frequency. The mean duration of observed clinical signs preceding diagnosis was 33 days (median 13 days, range 1 to 173 days). All dogs had marked hypocalcaemia with normal or mildly increased serum albumin concentrations. Mean phosphate concentrations were significantly higher in inappetent dogs (P = 0.049). Mean serum calcium concentrations were significantly lower in dogs with cataracts compared to those without (P = 0.046). There were no other significant relationships between serum calcium or phosphate concentrations and the clinical presentation or outcome. No significant correlations were identified between the presence of a particular clinical sign and the duration of clinical signs. ECGs were obtained in four dogs and all exhibited QT interval prolongation due to a ST-segment prolongation. Sixteen of 17 dogs were treated successfully

  20. Primary central corneal hemangiosarcoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Haeussler, David J; Rodríguez, Laura Muñoz; Wilkie, David A; Premanandan, Chris

    2011-03-01

    To report a case of primary central corneal hemangiosarcoma in the dog. An 11-year-old, neutered, female, German shepherd mixed breed dog was referred to the Hospital Veterinario Sierra de Madrid (Spain) for evaluation of an enlarging corneal mass of the left eye (OS). The dog was predominantly housed outdoors and was diagnosed with a history of chronic superficial keratitis of both eyes (OU) by the referring veterinarian. The corneal mass was resected by routine superficial keratectomy and submitted for histopathology and Factor VIII immunohistochemical staining. The mass was diagnosed as a corneal hemangiosarcoma with complete excision. Postoperatively, the keratectomy site healed without complication and there was no evidence of recurrence three and a half months postoperatively. Complete systemic evaluation, including abdominal ultrasound and CT scan of the head and thorax, indicated no other detectable neoplasia in the dog. Outdoor housing and ultraviolet exposure, breed, and chronic superficial keratitis were all suspected as contributing factors to the development of a primary corneal hemangiosarcoma. Surgical removal and postoperative treatment for chronic superficial keratitis provided effective therapy. © 2011 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  1. Fatal dog attacks, 1989-1994.

    PubMed

    Sacks, J J; Lockwood, R; Hornreich, J; Sattin, R W

    1996-06-01

    To update data on fatal dog bites and see if past trends have continued. To merge data from vital records, the Humane Society of the United States, and searches of electronic news files. United States. U.S. residents dying in the U.S. from 1989 through 1994 from dog bites. We identified 109 dog bite-related fatalities, of which 57% were less than 10 years of age. The death rate for neonates was two orders of magnitude higher than for adults and the rate for children one order of magnitude higher. Of classifiable deaths, 22% involved an unrestrained dog off the owner's property, 18% involved a restrained dog on the owner's property, and 59% involved an unrestrained dog on the owner's property. Eleven attacks involved a sleeping infant; 19 dogs involved in fatal attacks had a prior history of aggression; and 19 of 20 classifiable deaths involved an unneutered dog. Pit bulls, the most commonly reported breed, were involved in 24 deaths; the next most commonly reported breeds were rottweilers (16) and German shepherds (10). The dog bite problem should be reconceptualized as a largely preventable epidemic. Breed-specific approaches to the control of dog bites do not address the issue that many breeds are involved in the problem and that most of the factors contributing to dog bites are related to the level of responsibility exercised by dog owners. To prevent dog bite-related deaths and injuries, we recommend public education about responsible dog ownership and dog bite prevention, stronger animal control laws, better resources for enforcement of these laws, and better reporting of bites. Anticipatory guidance by pediatric health care providers should address dog bite prevention.

  2. Population structure and genetic differentiation of livestock guard dog breeds from the Western Balkans.

    PubMed

    Ceh, E; Dovc, P

    2014-08-01

    Livestock guard dog (LGD) breeds from the Western Balkans are a good example of how complex genetic diversity pattern observed in dog breeds has been shaped by transition in dog breeding practices. Despite their common geographical origin and relatively recent formal recognition as separate breeds, the Karst Shepherd, Sarplaninac and Tornjak show distinct population dynamics, assessed by pedigree, microsatellite and mtDNA data. We genotyped 493 dogs belonging to five dog breeds using a set of 18 microsatellite markers and sequenced mtDNA from 94 dogs from these breeds. Different demographic histories of the Karst Shepherd and Tornjak breeds are reflected in the pedigree data with the former breed having more unbalanced contributions of major ancestors and a realized effective population size of less than 20 animals. The highest allelic richness was found in Sarplaninac (5.94), followed by Tornjak (5.72), whereas Karst Shepherd dogs exhibited the lowest allelic richness (3.33). Similarly, the highest mtDNA haplotype diversity was found in Sarplaninac, followed by Tornjak and Karst Shepherd, where only one haplotype was found. Based on FST differentiation values and high percentages of animals correctly assigned, all breeds can be considered genetically distinct. However, using microsatellite data, common ancestry between the Karst Shepherd and Sarplaninac could not be reconstructed, despite pedigree and mtDNA evidence of their historical admixture. Using neighbour-joining, STRUCTURE or DAPC methods, Sarplaninac and Caucasian Shepherd breeds could not be separated and additionally showed close proximity in the NeighborNet tree. STRUCTURE analysis of the Tornjak breed demonstrated substructuring, which needs further investigation. Altogether, results of this study show that the official separation of these dog breeds strongly affected the resolution of genetic differentiation and thus suggest that the relationships between breeds are not only determined by breed

  3. Pituitary dwarfism in Saarloos and Czechoslovakian wolfdogs is associated with a mutation in LHX3.

    PubMed

    Voorbij, A M W Y; Leegwater, P A; Kooistra, H S

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary dwarfism in German Shepherd Dogs is associated with autosomal recessive inheritance and a mutation in LHX3, resulting in combined pituitary hormone deficiency. Congenital dwarfism also is encountered in breeds related to German Shepherd Dogs, such as Saarloos and Czechoslovakian wolfdogs. To investigate whether Saarloos and Czechoslovakian wolfdog dwarfs have the same LHX3 mutation as do Germans Shepherd Dog dwarfs. A specific aim was to determine the carrier frequency among Saarloos and Czechoslovakian wolfdogs used for breeding. Two client-owned Saarloos wolfdogs and 4 client-owned Czechoslovakian wolfdogs with pituitary dwarfism, 239 clinically healthy client-owned Saarloos wolfdogs, and 200 client-owned clinically healthy Czechoslovakian wolfdogs. Genomic DNA was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the Saarloos and Czechoslovakian wolfdog dwarfs, PCR products were analyzed by sequencing. DNA fragment length analysis was performed on the samples from the clinically healthy dogs. Saarloos and Czechoslovakian wolfdog dwarfs have the same 7 bp deletion in intron 5 of LHX3 as do German Shepherd Dog dwarfs. The frequency of carriers of this mutation among clinically healthy Saarloos and Czechoslovakian wolfdogs used for breeding was 31% and 21%, respectively. An LHX3 mutation is associated with pituitary dwarfism in Saarloos and Czechoslovakian wolfdogs. The rather high frequency of carriers of the mutated gene in the 2 breeds emphasizes the need for screening before breeding. If all breeding animals were genetically tested for the presence of the LHX3 mutation and a correct breeding policy would be implemented, this disease could be eradicated completely. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  4. Surgical correction of severe strabismus and enophthalmos secondary to zygomatic arch fracture in a dog.

    PubMed

    Konrade, Kricket A; Clode, Alison B; Michau, Tammy M; Roe, Simon C; Trumpatori, Brian J; Krug, William V; Gilger, Brian C

    2009-01-01

    A grossly displaced segmental zygomatic arch fracture with marked ventro-lateral deviation of the left globe was diagnosed in a 3-month-old male German Shepherd dog following a bite injury. The fracture was approached via a modified lateral orbitotomy and a fragment of the lacrimal bone removed. The rostral portion of the fracture was stabilized with a 5-hole 2.0 dynamic compression plate bone plate. The surgical correction achieved sufficient skeletal fixation for proper anatomical reduction of the globe and excellent cosmetic and functional outcomes.

  5. Factors affecting gestation duration in the bitch.

    PubMed

    Eilts, Bruce E; Davidson, Autumn P; Hosgood, Giselle; Paccamonti, Dale L; Baker, David G

    2005-07-15

    A retrospective analysis was performed to determine the effects of age, breed, parity, and litter size on the duration of gestation in the bitch. Bitches at two locations were monitored from breeding to whelping. A total of 764 litters whelped from 308 bitches (36 large hounds, 34 Golden Retrievers, 23 German Shepherd Dogs (GSD), and 215 Labrador Retrievers). By breed, the number of whelpings was 152, 72, 58, and 482 for the hounds, Golden Retrievers, German Shepherd Dogs, and Labrador Retrievers, respectively. Whelping was predicted to be 57 d from the first day of cytologic diestrus in the hounds or 65 d from the initial progesterone rise in the other breeds. The average gestation duration (calculated as 8 d prior to Day 1 of cytologic diestrus in hounds or measured from the initial progesterone rise in other breeds) by breed (days +/- S.D.) was 66.0 +/- 2.8, 64.7 +/- 1.5, 63.6 +/- 2.1, and 62.9 +/- 1.3 for the hounds, Golden Retrievers, German Shepherd Dogs, and Labrador Retrievers, respectively. The relationship of age, breed, parity, and litter size with the difference in gestation duration was evaluated using log linear modeling. Age or parity had no effect on gestation duration. Compared to Labrador Retrievers, the German Shepherd Dogs, Golden Retrievers and hounds were more likely to have a longer gestation duration; three, four and nearly eight times as likely, respectively. Bitches whelping four or fewer pups were significantly more likely to have a longer gestation duration than those whelping five or more pups; the prolongation averaging 1 d.

  6. Left coronary aneurysmal dilation and subaortic stenosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Juan L; Bélanger, Marie-Claude; Benoit-Biancamano, Marie-Odile; Girard, Christiane; Pibarot, Philippe

    2008-06-01

    A 6-month-old German shepherd dog was referred for evaluation of a cardiac murmur. Upon physical examination, the auscultated heart rate was 120 beats/min, and a grade IV/VI systolic heart murmur with a point of maximal intensity over the left heart base radiating up the neck was heard. The standard echocardiographic examination showed subaortic stenosis and an anechoic tubular structure extending from the sinus of Valsalva to the left ventricular posterior wall. Aneurysmal left coronary artery (CA) was confirmed by angiography. The dog was euthanized and post-mortem examination showed severe dilatation of the proximal left CA and confirmed the subaortic stenosis. Histopathology did not demonstrate abnormalities in the walls of the CA, aorta or pulmonary artery. The exact cause of the CA aneurysmal dilation remains unknown. Subaortic stenosis, elevated coronary vascular resistance or a congenital anomaly may have contributed to the dilation. To our knowledge, coronary aneurysmal dilation has never been described in dogs. Standard echocardiography provides reliable information on coronary anatomy.

  7. A clinical trial of the effect of a mouth-rinse prepared with Lippia sidoides Cham essential oil in dogs with mild gingival disease.

    PubMed

    Girão, V C C; Nunes-Pinheiro, D C S; Morais, S M; Sequeira, J L; Gioso, M A

    2003-05-30

    We evaluated the effect of a mouth-rinse prepared using Lippia sidoides essential oil (EO) in dogs with marginal gingivitis. German Shepherd dogs were distributed in two groups: control (control mouth-rinse) and EO (EO mouth-rinse). Both mouth-rinses were applied on the dogs' teeth every 2 days for 2 weeks. At day 0 and day 15, the scores for plaque-bacteria (P), calculus (C), gingivitis (G) and the inflammatory infiltrate (INF) were evaluated blindly. The results were analyzed by the Wilcoxon signed-rank and Mann-Whitney tests (P

  8. Characterization of human-dog social interaction using owner report.

    PubMed

    Lit, Lisa; Schweitzer, Julie B; Oberbauer, Anita M

    2010-07-01

    Dog owners were surveyed for observations of social behaviors in their dogs, using questions adapted from the human Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) pre-verbal module. Using 939 responses for purebred and mixed-breed dogs, three factors were identified: initiation of reciprocal social behaviors (INIT), response to social interactions (RSPNS), and communication (COMM). There were small or no effects of sex, age, breed group or training. For six breeds with more than 35 responses (Border Collie, Rough Collie, German Shepherd, Golden Retriever, Labrador Retriever, Standard Poodle), the behaviors eye contact with humans, enjoyment in interactions with human interaction, and name recognition demonstrated little variability across breeds, while asking for objects, giving/showing objects to humans, and attempts to direct humans' attention showed higher variability across these breeds. Breeds with genetically similar backgrounds had similar response distributions for owner reports of dog response to pointing. When considering these breeds according to the broad categories of "herders" and "retrievers," owners reported that the "herders" used more eye contact and vocalization, while the "retrievers" used more body contact. Information regarding social cognitive abilities in dogs provided by owner report suggest that there is variability across many social cognitive abilities in dogs and offers direction for further experimental investigations. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Breed distribution of the nt230(del4) MDR1 mutation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Gramer, Irina; Leidolf, Regina; Döring, Barbara; Klintzsch, Stefanie; Krämer, Eva-Maria; Yalcin, Ebru; Petzinger, Ernst; Geyer, Joachim

    2011-07-01

    A 4-bp deletion mutation associated with multiple drug sensitivity exists in the canine multidrug resistance (MDR1) gene. This mutation has been detected in more than 10 purebred dog breeds as well as in mixed breed dogs. To evaluate the breed distribution of this mutation in Germany, 7378 dogs were screened, including 6999 purebred and 379 mixed breed dogs. The study included dog breeds that show close genetic relationship or share breeding history with one of the predisposed breeds but in which the occurrence of the MDR1 mutation has not been reported. The breeds comprised Bearded Collies, Anatolian Shepherd Dog, Greyhound, Belgian Tervuren, Kelpie, Borzoi, Australian Cattle Dog and the Irish Wolfhound. The MDR1 mutation was not detected is any of these breeds, although it was found as expected in the Collie, Longhaired Whippet, Shetland Sheepdog, Miniature Australian Shepherd, Australian Shepherd, Wäller, White Swiss Shepherd, Old English Sheepdog and Border Collie with varying allelic frequencies for the mutant MDR1 allele of 59%, 45%, 30%, 24%, 22%, 17%, 14%, 4% and 1%, respectively. Allelic frequencies of 8% and 2% were determined in herding breed mixes and unclassified mixed breeds, respectively. Because of its widespread breed distribution and occurrence in many mixed breed dogs, it is difficult for veterinarians and dog owners to recognise whether MDR1-related drug sensitivity is relevant for an individual animal. This study provides a comprehensive overview of all affected dog breeds and many dog breeds that are probably unaffected on the basis of ∼15,000 worldwide MDR1 genotyping data. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Increased mitral valve regurgitation and myocardial hypertrophy in two dogs with long-term pimobendan therapy.

    PubMed

    Tissier, R; Chetboul, V; Moraillon, R; Nicolle, A; Carlos, C; Enriquez, B; Pouchelon, J-L

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe original adverse effects in two dogs chronically treated with the inodilator pimobendan. We report a German shepherd (i.e., dog 1) and a poodle (i.e., dog 2) that were referred to our cardiology unit after receiving pimobendan for 10 and 5 mo, respectively. In both dogs, conventional echo-Doppler examination demonstrated mitral valve regurgitation and myocardial hypertrophy. Tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) was performed in the first case and revealed an abnormal relaxation phase. After the first examination, pimobendan administration was stopped in both cases and dogs were re-examined 3 and 1 mo later, respectively. Mitral valve regurgitation assessed by echocardiography decreased in both dogs, and the systolic heart murmur disappeared in dog 1. Importantly, most echocardiographic and TDI parameters tended to normalize in dog 1, suggesting, at least partial reversal of both myocardial hypertrophy and relaxation abnormality produced during inodilator therapy. This is the first report to describe an increase in mitral regurgitation under clinical conditions in dogs treated with pimobendan. We also suggest that pimobendan may induce ventricular hypertrophy. However, prospective studies are needed to confirm this observation.

  11. Identification of a Novel Idiopathic Epilepsy Locus in Belgian Shepherd Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Seppälä, Eija H.; Koskinen, Lotta L. E.; Gulløv, Christina H.; Jokinen, Päivi; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Bergamasco, Luciana; Baranowska Körberg, Izabella; Cizinauskas, Sigitas; Oberbauer, Anita M.; Berendt, Mette; Fredholm, Merete; Lohi, Hannes

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder in dogs, with an incidence ranging from 0.5% to up to 20% in particular breeds. Canine epilepsy can be etiologically defined as idiopathic or symptomatic. Epileptic seizures may be classified as focal with or without secondary generalization, or as primary generalized. Nine genes have been identified for symptomatic (storage diseases) and one for idiopathic epilepsy in different breeds. However, the genetic background of common canine epilepsies remains unknown. We have studied the clinical and genetic background of epilepsy in Belgian Shepherds. We collected 159 cases and 148 controls and confirmed the presence of epilepsy through epilepsy questionnaires and clinical examinations. The MRI was normal while interictal EEG revealed abnormalities and variable foci in the clinically examined affected dogs. A genome-wide association study using Affymetrix 50K SNP arrays in 40 cases and 44 controls mapped the epilepsy locus on CFA37, which was replicated in an independent cohort (81 cases and 88 controls; combined p = 9.70×10−10, OR = 3.3). Fine mapping study defined a ∼1 Mb region including 12 genes of which none are known epilepsy genes or encode ion channels. Exonic sequencing was performed for two candidate genes, KLF7 and ADAM23. No variation was found in KLF7 but a highly-associated non-synonymous variant, G1203A (R387H) was present in the ADAM23 gene (p = 3.7×10−8, OR = 3.9 for homozygosity). Homozygosity for a two-SNP haplotype within the ADAM23 gene conferred the highest risk for epilepsy (p = 6.28×10−11, OR = 7.4). ADAM23 interacts with known epilepsy proteins LGI1 and LGI2. However, our data suggests that the ADAM23 variant is a polymorphism and we have initiated a targeted re-sequencing study across the locus to identify the causative mutation. It would establish the affected breed as a novel therapeutic model, help to develop a DNA test for breeding purposes and introduce a

  12. Retrospective study of congenital heart defects in 151 dogs.

    PubMed

    Tidholm, A

    1997-03-01

    The case records of 151 dogs diagnosed with congenital heart disease were reviewed retrospectively. The most common defect was aortic stenosis, accounting for 35 per cent of all cases, followed by pulmonic stenosis (20 per cent), ventricular septal defect (12 per cent), patent ductus arteriosus (11 per cent), mitral valve dysplasia (8 per cent), tricuspid valve dysplasia (7 per cent), endocardial fibroelastosis (1.9 per cent) and tetralogy of Fallot (0.6 per cent). Fifty-one breeds were represented, with golden retrievers, German shepherd dogs and boxers predominating. No overall sex predilection was obvious. Seventy-five per cent of the dogs were asymptomatic at presentation. The defects most often associated with presenting symptoms, such as dyspnoea, syncope, ascites, failure to grow and depression, were mitral valve dysplasia, atrial septal defect, tricuspid valve dysplasia and endocardial fibroelastosis. The latter presented with the most severe signs of heart failure. In some cases of aortic stenosis and pulmonic stenosis, where the defect could not be accurately visualised with two-dimensional echocardiography, Doppler echocardiographic examination was needed for definitive diagnosis.

  13. Risk factors associated with parvovirus enteritis in dogs: 283 cases (1982-1991).

    PubMed

    Houston, D M; Ribble, C S; Head, L L

    1996-02-15

    To determine breed, sex, and seasonal predisposition for development of canine parvovirus (CPV) enteritis in dogs. Retrospective case-control study. Medical records from 283 dogs with confirmed CPV enteritis and from 834 age-matched control dogs that were healthy or had been admitted with nonenteric illness. Effects of season, breed, sex, and neutering on the risk of developing CPV enteritis were examined by calculation of unadjusted odds ratios and performance of multivariate analysis. Stratified and contingency table analyses were performed to identify interactions and confounding among variables. Rottweilers, American Pit Bull Terriers, Doberman Pinschers, and German Shepherd Dogs were at increased risk and Toy Poodles and Cocker Spaniels were at decreased risk for developing CPV enteritis, compared with that for mixed-breed dogs. For dogs more than 6 months old, sexually intact males were twice as likely as intact females to develop CPV enteritis. Dogs were 3 times more likely to be admitted with CPV enteritis in July, August, and September, compared with the rest of the year. Dogs were 12.7 times more likely to be admitted with CPV enteritis if they had not been currently vaccinated. Lack of vaccination is a significant risk factor for development of CPV enteritis. Seasonal, sex, and breed predispositions for the development of CPV enteritis also exist.

  14. Levels of maternal care in dogs affect adult offspring temperament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foyer, Pernilla; Wilsson, Erik; Jensen, Per

    2016-01-01

    Dog puppies are born in a state of large neural immaturity; therefore, the nervous system is sensitive to environmental influences early in life. In primates and rodents, early experiences, such as maternal care, have been shown to have profound and lasting effects on the later behaviour and physiology of offspring. We hypothesised that this would also be the case for dogs with important implications for the breeding of working dogs. In the present study, variation in the mother-offspring interactions of German Shepherd dogs within the Swedish breeding program for military working dogs was studied by video recording 22 mothers with their litters during the first three weeks postpartum. The aim was to classify mothers with respect to their level of maternal care and to investigate the effect of this care on pup behaviour in a standardised temperament test carried out at approximately 18 months of age. The results show that females differed consistently in their level of maternal care, which significantly affected the adult behaviour of the offspring, mainly with respect to behaviours classified as Physical and Social Engagement, as well as Aggression. Taking maternal quality into account in breeding programs may therefore improve the process of selecting working dogs.

  15. Porcupine quill injuries in dogs: A retrospective of 296 cases (1998–2002)

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew D.; Magnusson, Kristenn D.; Shmon, Cindy L.; Waldner, Cheryl

    2006-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this retrospective study was to identify factors associated with quill injury in dogs. A second objective was to determine the risk of complications and any factors that would predict the likelihood of complications. Hospital records of 296 porcupine quill injuries in dogs from 1998 to 2002 were studied. There was an increased occurrence of porcupine encounters in the spring and fall months; Siberian huskies, rottweilers, and German shepherd crosses were significantly overrepresented for quill injuries. There was no association between risk of complications and either number of quills or antimicrobial use. Increasing time between quill injury and presentation was associated with an increased risk of complications. Because of the increased frequency of complication with a longer interval until presentation, clients should be strongly encouraged to bring the dog in as soon as the quill injury is discovered. Patients presented after 24 hours should be monitored closely during the first 3 weeks after injury, as most complications occurred during this time. PMID:16898110

  16. A comparison of problem-solving and spatial orientation in the wolf (Canis lupus) and dog (Canis familiaris).

    PubMed

    Hiestand, Laurie

    2011-11-01

    In this study I tested Benson Ginsburg's theory that dogs should show diminished ability, compared to wolves, in orienting in three-dimensional space and manipulating objects sequentially. Dogs of all ages and juvenile wolves should do poorly on these measures, but at some time before sexual maturity, the juvenile wolves should begin improving to the level of adult wolves. Two adult and seven juvenile wolves were compared with 40 adult German shepherds. The initial task was to pull a single rope suspended from the ceiling; complexity was increased by the addition of ropes and by changing spatial configurations. Adult wolf performance was consistently successful across all tests and requirements. Juvenile wolves had little difficulty with one and two rope tests, but did more poorly in the three rope tests. The behavior of the dogs grouped into four profiles (# of dogs): non-responders (6), one rope (15), two rope (14), and three rope responders (5).

  17. Intrabreed Stratification Related to Divergent Selection Regimes in Purebred Dogs May Affect the Interpretation of Genetic Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Melanie L.; Yokoyama, Jennifer S.; Branson, Nick; Dyer, Donna J.; Hitte, Christophe; Overall, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    Until recently, canine genetic research has not focused on population structure within breeds, which may confound the results of case–control studies by introducing spurious correlations between phenotype and genotype that reflect population history. Intrabreed structure may exist when geographical origin or divergent selection regimes influence the choices of potential mates for breeding dogs. We present evidence for intrabreed stratification from a genome-wide marker survey in a sample of unrelated dogs. We genotyped 76 Border Collies, 49 Australian Shepherds, 17 German Shepherd Dogs, and 17 Portuguese Water Dogs for our primary analyses using Affymetrix Canine v2.0 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. Subsets of autosomal markers were examined using clustering algorithms to facilitate assignment of individuals to populations and estimation of the number of populations represented in the sample. SNPs passing stringent quality control filters were employed for explicitly phylogenetic analyses reconstructing relationships between individuals using maximum parsimony and Bayesian methods. We used simulation studies to explore the possible effects of intrabreed stratification on genome-wide association studies. These analyses demonstrate significant stratification in at least one of our primary breeds of interest, the Border Collie. Demographic and pedigree data suggest that this population substructure may result from geographic isolation or divergent selection regimes practiced by breeders with different breeding program goals. Simulation studies indicate that such stratification could result in false discovery rates significant enough to confound genome-wide association analyses. Intrabreed stratification should be accounted for when designing and interpreting the results of case–control association studies using purebred dogs.

  18. Gastric ulceration subsequent to partial invagination of the stomach in a dog with gastric dilatation-volvulus.

    PubMed

    Parton, Amanda T; Volk, Susan W; Weisse, Chick

    2006-06-15

    CASE DESCRIPTION-An 8-year-old castrated male German Shepherd Dog was evaluated because of abdominal distension, retching, and vomiting. CLINICAL FINDINGS-Gastric dilatation-volvulus was suspected on the basis of the dog's signalment, history, clinical signs, and results of clinicopathologic analyses and abdominal radiography. Celiotomy was performed, and gastric dilatation-volvulus was confirmed along with splenomegaly. Gastric invagination was performed over an area of gastric necrosis. The dog was reevaluated 21 days later after an episode of collapse. Findings of physical examination and clinicopathologic analyses were suggestive of internal hemorrhage. Abdominal ultrasonography and subsequent celiotomy revealed severe gastric ulceration at the gastric invagination site, splenic torsion, and a focal splenic infarct. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME-Splenectomy and gastrectomy of the necrotic tissue were performed. The dog was discharged from the hospital, and the owner was instructed to administer gastroprotectants and feed the dog a bland diet. The dog was reported to be healthy 3.25 years after surgery. CLINICAL RELEVANCE-Findings suggest that complications associated with the gastric invagination procedure include severe gastric ulceration that may require subsequent surgery. Prolonged treatment with gastroprotectants following gastric invagination surgery may be necessary to avoid gastric ulceration in dogs.

  19. A PCR survey of vector-borne pathogens in different dog populations from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huanping; Sevinc, Ferda; Ceylan, Onur; Sevinc, Mutlu; Ince, Ege; Gao, Yang; Moumouni, Paul Franck Adjou; Liu, Mingming; Efstratiou, Artemis; Wang, Guanbo; Cao, Shinuo; Zhou, Mo; Jirapattharasate, Charoonluk; Ringo, Aaron Edmond; Zheng, Weiqing; Xuan, Xuenan

    2017-09-26

    In the present study, a total of 192 blood samples were collected from pet dogs, kennel dogs and shepherd dogs in Konya district, Turkey, and tested by specific PCR for the presence of vector-borne pathogens. Several pathogens were identified, most of which can cause substantial morbidity in dogs. PCR results revealed that 54 (28.1%) dogs were infected with one or more pathogens. Positive results were obtained for Babesia spp. in 4 dogs (2.1%), Hepatozoon spp. in 8 dogs (4.2%) and Mycoplasma spp. in 46 dogs (24%). Three dogs (1.6%) were infected with two or three pathogens. The sequence analysis of the positive DNA samples revealed the presence of Babesia canis vogeli, Hepatozoon canis, Hepatozoon sp. MF, Mycoplasma haemocanis and Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum. Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys were not detected. Regardless of ownership status, vector-borne diseases were common in these dog populations. There was significant difference of pathogen prevalence among the different dog populations. Mycoplasma spp. was more frequent in the kennel dogs (31.9%) than in the pet (21.4%) and shepherd dogs (13.8%). Additionally, the frequency of Babesia spp. and Hepatozoon spp. was higher in the shepherd dogs which account for three quarters and half of the total number of Babesia spp. and Hepatozoon spp., respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Mycoplasma infection in dogs in Turkey. The results of the present study provide a foundation for understanding the epidemiology of canine vector-borne diseases (CVBDs), and for strategies to control these diseases in Turkey.

  20. Intranasal melanoma treated with radiation therapy in three dogs.

    PubMed

    Davies, Owen; Spencer, Sarah; Necova, Slavomira; Holmes, Emma; Taylor, Angela; Blackwood, Laura; Lara-Garcia, Ana

    2017-12-01

    Three dogs were investigated for chronic unilateral nasal discharge. In all cases CT imaging showed an intranasal mass causing turbinate lysis and no evidence of metastasis. Cytology in cases 1 (a 14-year-old neutered male crossbreed dog) and 2 (a five-year-old neutered male German Shepherd dog) demonstrated a pleomorphic cell population with variable intracellular pigment suspicious of melanocytic neoplasia. Histopathology with immunohistochemistry (Melan-A and vimentin, plus PNL-2 in one case) confirmed the diagnosis of melanoma in all dogs. All dogs were treated with megavoltage radiotherapy using linear accelerators. Cases 1 and 3 (a nine-year-old neutered female beagle dog) received a hypofractionated (4 × 8 Gy) protocol and case 2 received a definitive (12 × 4 Gy) protocol. Complete remission was demonstrated on repeat CT scan five months after diagnosis in case 1 and seven months in case 2. Stable disease was documented on CT at four months for case 3; however, clinical signs in this dog remained controlled for 10 months in total. Case 1 died of unrelated causes five months after diagnosis, case 2 was euthanased due to the development of seizures 13 months after diagnosis, and case 3 was lost to follow-up 12 months after diagnosis. Melanoma should be considered as a rare differential diagnosis for primary nasal neoplasia in the dog and radiation therapy can be used as effective local therapy.

  1. OCA2 splice site variant in German Spitz dogs with oculocutaneous albinism.

    PubMed

    Caduff, Madleina; Bauer, Anina; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Leeb, Tosso

    2017-01-01

    We investigated a German Spitz family where the mating of a black male to a white female had yielded three puppies with an unexpected light brown coat color, lightly pigmented lips and noses, and blue eyes. Combined linkage and homozygosity analysis based on a fully penetrant monogenic autosomal recessive mode of inheritance identified a critical interval of 15 Mb on chromosome 3. We obtained whole genome sequence data from one affected dog, three wolves, and 188 control dogs. Filtering for private variants revealed a single variant with predicted high impact in the critical interval in LOC100855460 (XM_005618224.1:c.377+2T>G LT844587.1:c.-45+2T>G). The variant perfectly co-segregated with the phenotype in the family. We genotyped 181 control dogs with normal pigmentation from diverse breeds including 22 unrelated German Spitz dogs, which were all homozygous wildtype. Comparative sequence analyses revealed that LOC100855460 actually represents the 5'-end of the canine OCA2 gene. The CanFam 3.1 reference genome assembly is incorrect and separates the first two exons from the remaining exons of the OCA2 gene. We amplified a canine OCA2 cDNA fragment by RT-PCR and determined the correct full-length mRNA sequence (LT844587.1). Variants in the OCA2 gene cause oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (OCA2) in humans, pink-eyed dilution in mice, and similar phenotypes in corn snakes, medaka and Mexican cave tetra fish. We therefore conclude that the observed oculocutaneous albinism in German Spitz is most likely caused by the identified variant in the 5'-splice site of the first intron of the canine OCA2 gene.

  2. Maniac Talk - Dr. Marshall Shepherd

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-14

    Marshall Shepherd Maniac Lecture, July 14, 2015 Dr. Marshall Shepherd, professor, University of Georgia, also the host of Sunday's talk show Weather Geeks, presented a Maniac lecture entitled "Zombies, Sports, and Cola: Implications for Communicating Weather and Climate." Believe it or not, Dr. Shepherd ties zombies, sports, and cola together to provide a compelling look at how we communicate (miscommunicate) weather and climate.

  3. Atlanto-axial malformation and instability in dogs with pituitary dwarfism due to an LHX3 mutation.

    PubMed

    Voorbij, A M W Y; Meij, B P; van Bruggen, L W L; Grinwis, G C M; Stassen, Q E M; Kooistra, H S

    2015-01-01

    Canine pituitary dwarfism or combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD) in shepherd dogs is associated with an LHX3 mutation and can lead to a wide range of clinical manifestations. Some dogs with CPHD have neurological signs that are localized to the cervical spine. In human CPHD, caused by an LHX3 mutation, anatomical abnormalities in the atlanto-axial (C1-C2) joint have been described. To evaluate the presence of atlanto-axial malformations in dogs with pituitary dwarfism associated with an LHX3 mutation and to investigate the degree of similarity between the atlanto-axial anomalies found in canine and human CPHD patients with an LHX3 mutation. Three client-owned Czechoslovakian wolfdogs and 1 client-owned German shepherd dog, previously diagnosed with pituitary dwarfism caused by an LHX3 mutation, with neurological signs indicating a cervical spinal disorder. Radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging of the cranial neck and skull, necropsy, and histology. Diagnostic imaging identified abnormal positioning of the dens axis and incomplete ossification of the suture lines between the ossification centers of the atlas with concurrent atlanto-axial instability and dynamic compression of the spinal cord by the dens axis. The malformations and aberrant motion at C1-C2 were confirmed at necropsy and histology. The atlanto-axial abnormalities of the dwarf dogs resemble those encountered in human CPHD patients with an LHX3 mutation. These findings suggest an association between the LHX3 mutation in dogs with CPHD and atlanto-axial malformations. Consequently, pituitary dwarfs should be monitored closely for neurological signs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  4. Dioctophyma renale in a dog: clinical diagnosis and surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Vivian Lindmayer; Medeiros, Fábio Pestana; July, José Roberto; Raso, Tânia Freitas

    2010-02-26

    This study reports a case of parasitism by the giant kidney worm, Dioctophyma renale, diagnosed in the right kidney of a domestic dog. An adult female German Shepherd was attended with clinical history of prostration and hyporexia. The hemogram showed changes compatible with an inflammatory process, for that reason, an abdominal ultrasound was requested. Ultrasound image suggested the presence of D. renale in the right kidney. The diagnosis was confirmed after urinalysis due to the presence of dioctophymas ova in the urinary sediment. Surgical treatment was made and the animal had an excellent recovery after the nephrectomy was performed. Generally, in almost all cases, parasitism by D. renale in domestic dogs is a necropsy finding, nevertheless imaging techniques as sonography and laboratorial exams as urinalysis have been proven to be important tools to achieve diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to report a case of parasitism by D. renale where diagnosis and treatment were made in time to allow the patient's recovery.

  5. Primary splenic torsion in dogs: 102 cases (1992-2014).

    PubMed

    DeGroot, Whitney; Giuffrida, Michelle A; Rubin, Jacob; Runge, Jeffrey J; Zide, Amy; Mayhew, Philipp D; Culp, William T N; Mankin, Kelley Thieman; Amsellem, Pierre M; Petrukovich, Brandi; Ringwood, P Brendon; Case, J Brad; Singh, Ameet

    2016-03-15

    To determine the percentage of dogs surviving to hospital discharge and identify factors associated with death prior to hospital discharge among dogs undergoing surgery because of primary splenic torsion (PST). Retrospective case series. 102 client-owned dogs. Medical records of dogs with a confirmed diagnosis of PST that underwent surgery between August 1992 and May 2014 were reviewed. History, signalment, results of physical examination and preoperative bloodwork, method of splenectomy, concurrent surgical procedures, perioperative complications, duration of hospital stay, splenic histopathologic findings, and details of follow-up were recorded. Best-fit multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify perioperative factors associated with survival to hospital discharge. 93 of the 102 (91.2%) dogs survived to hospital discharge. German Shepherd Dogs (24/102 [23.5%]), Great Danes (15/102 [14.7%]), and English Bulldogs (12/102 [11.8%]) accounted for 50% of cases. Risk factors significantly associated with death prior to hospital discharge included septic peritonitis at initial examination (OR, 32.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.1 to 502.0), intraoperative hemorrhage (OR, 22.6; 95% CI, 1.8 to 289.8), and postoperative development of respiratory distress (OR, 35.7; 95% CI, 2.7 to 466.0). Histopathologic evidence of splenic neoplasia was not found in any case. Results suggested that the prognosis for dogs undergoing splenectomy because of PST was favorable. Several risk factors for death prior to discharge were identified, including preexisting septic peritonitis, intraoperative hemorrhage, and postoperative development of respiratory distress.

  6. Organophosphate ester flame retardant-induced acute intoxications in dogs.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Andreas F; Samsing, Francisca; Rumbeiha, Wilson K

    2010-12-01

    Flame retardants have wide industrial applications and are incorporated into articles found in automobiles and home environments, including seat cushions. These compounds differ widely chemically and in their toxic potential. We report here two cases involving dogs following ingestion of car seat cushions impregnated with organophosphate ester fire retardants. Two case reports are presented. Two adult American Pit Bull dogs were presented at an emergency clinic with acute signs of central nervous system excitation including seizures. The most severely affected dog died 15 min after presentation, while the less affected dog fully recovered following treatment. In the second case, both a German Shepherd and a Rottweiler were found dead in the morning after they were left in a car overnight. A comprehensive toxicological analysis of samples from both cases revealed the presence of significant amounts (>2 ppm) of tris(2-chloroethyl)phosphate (TCEP) in stomach contents. This compound is a known inducer of epileptic seizures. Some other structurally related organophosphate ester compounds were found, and their role in the acute intoxications reported here is not known and remains to be determined. This is the first report linking acute deaths in dogs to the ingestion of car seat cushions found to contain large amounts of TCEP, an organophosphate ester compound. It is highly likely that this compound caused death through its known seizure-inducing activity.

  7. Vaginal rupture and evisceration in a dog.

    PubMed

    Prassinos, Nikitas N; Adamama-Moraitou, Katerina K; Ververidis, Haralabos N; Anagnostou, Tilemachos L; Kladakis, Stefanos E

    2010-09-01

    A 1.5-year-old German Shepherd mixed breed dog was admitted with mild haemorrhage from the vulva and a perineal mass of 24-hour duration, which had been first observed immediately after parturition. Parturition had occurred at low ambient temperature, and only one puppy survived out of the seven oversized fetuses. The dog was in poor body condition, dehydrated, hypothermic, depressed, non-ambulatory and in a state of shock. Intestinal loops, the urinary bladder and the uterine horns and body were protruding from the vulva. A true vaginal prolapse was also observed. The abdominal viscera were flushed with warm sterile saline solution, protected and maintained wet. The laboratory findings included moderate anaemia, leukocytosis, hypoalbuminaemia, azotaemia and elevated liver enzyme activities. Stabilisation of the dog's general condition was attempted before surgery. Antimicrobial and analgesic drugs were also administered. After exploratory laparotomy the protruding organs, which were in good condition, were reduced. A recent rupture in the vaginal wall, approximately 6 cm long, was observed. Ovariohysterectomy and partial vaginectomy were performed. The preoperative course of therapy was continued, but the bitch died 12 hours later. The probable cause of vaginal rupture and evisceration in this bitch was tenesmus and/or trauma due to the oversized fetuses.

  8. Clinical presentation and outcome of dogs treated medically or surgically for thoracolumbar intervertebral disc protrusion.

    PubMed

    Crawford, A H; De Decker, S

    2017-06-10

    To date, few studies have investigated the clinical characteristics of thoracolumbar intervertebral disc protrusion (IVDP). The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the presentation and outcome of dogs receiving medical or surgical treatment for thoracolumbar IVDP. Eighty-four dogs were included, with a median age of 9.4 years. German shepherd dogs and Staffordshire bull terriers were the most common breeds. Significantly more surgically treated dogs (n=53) had neurological deficits and were non-ambulatory, compared with medically treated (n=31). Outcome data were available for 27 of 31 medically managed dogs; 11 initially improved, 7 remained stable and 9 deteriorated. Of 18 dogs that initially improved or stabilised, 10 (55.6 per cent) demonstrated recurrence of clinical signs within 12 months of diagnosis. Outcome data were available for 45 of 50 surgically treated dogs that survived to hospital discharge; 34 improved, 9 remained stable and 2 deteriorated following surgery. Of 43 dogs that improved or stabilised with surgical treatment, 11 (25.6 per cent) demonstrated recurrence of clinical signs within 12 months of surgery. Overall, significantly more surgically treated dogs (71.1 per cent) had a successful outcome, consisting of sustained clinical improvement of more than 12 months duration, compared with medically treated dogs (29.6 per cent). British Veterinary Association.

  9. Vocal tract length and acoustics of vocalization in the domestic dog (Canis familiaris).

    PubMed

    Riede, T; Fitch, T

    1999-10-01

    The physical nature of the vocal tract results in the production of formants during vocalisation. In some animals (including humans), receivers can derive information (such as body size) about sender characteristics on the basis of formant characteristics. Domestication and selective breeding have resulted in a high variability in head size and shape in the dog (Canis familiaris), suggesting that there might be large differences in the vocal tract length, which could cause formant behaviour to affect interbreed communication. Lateral radiographs were made of dogs from several breeds ranging in size from a Yorkshire terrier (2.5 kg) to a German shepherd (50 kg) and were used to measure vocal tract length. In addition, we recorded an acoustic signal (growling) from some dogs. Significant correlations were found between vocal tract length, body mass and formant dispersion, suggesting that formant dispersion can deliver information about the body size of the vocalizer. Because of the low correlation between vocal tract length and the first formant, we predict a non-uniform vocal tract shape.

  10. Molecular characterization of trichomonads from feces of dogs with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Gookin, Jody L; Birkenheuer, Adam J; St John, Victoria; Spector, Michelle; Levy, Michael G

    2005-08-01

    Trichomonads are occasionally observed in the feces of dogs with diarrhea. On the basis of superficial morphological appearance, these infections have been attributed to opportunistic overgrowth of the commensal, Pentatrichomonas hominis. However, molecular characterization of canine trichomonads has never been reported. This study was performed to determine, by means of rRNA gene sequence analysis, the identity of trichomonads observed in feces from dogs with diarrhea. Total DNA was isolated from fecal samples obtained from a 3-mo-old mixed breed dog and litter of German Shepherd puppies having profuse liquid diarrhea containing numerous trichomonads. Total DNA was subject to PCR amplification of partial 18S rRNA gene or 5.8S, ITS1, ITS2, and partial 18S and 28S rRNA genes using species-specific and universal primers, respectively. Products of 642 and 1864 base-pair length were amplified and cloned. On the basis of rRNA gene sequence, the trichomonads observed in the single dog and the litter of puppies shared 100% identity with Tritrichomonas foetus and P. hominis, respectively. The present study is the first to establish the molecular identity of trichomonads infecting dogs with diarrhea. These studies validate the longstanding assumption that canine trichomoniasis may be attributed to P. hominis. Importantly, these studies additionally recognize that canine trichomoniasis may also be caused by infection with T. foetus.

  11. Injuries and illnesses in working dogs used during the disaster response after the bombing in Oklahoma City.

    PubMed

    Duhaime, R A; Norden, D; Corso, B; Mallonee, S; Salman, M D

    1998-04-15

    To determine characteristics of working dogs used during the disaster response after the bombing in Oklahoma City and risk factors for injuries and illnesses of those dogs, and to document recommendations for future disaster responses. Survey. Information for 74 working dogs used at the bombing site. Dog handlers were identified and asked to complete a questionnaire. Questions were asked about the training and use of each dog, use of paw protection, injuries and illnesses incurred, possible effects after completion of duty at Oklahoma City, and handler's experience. Data were obtained for all 74 dogs used at the site. Handlers of 69 of 74 (93%) dogs responded. The dogs had been extensively trained and were used 491 dog-days at the site, with 46 dogs used in search, 14 in patrol, 12 in explosive-detection duty, and 2 in search/patrol. Fifteen (22%) dogs became ill. Nineteen (28%) dogs incurred 20 injuries. Footpad injuries constituted 18 of the injuries. Only 16 of 69 (23%) dogs were provided with paw protection. Dogs were more likely to be injured when they were used in a search capacity, were used during the first 2 days after the bombing, were German Shepherd Dogs, or were older. Although working in a high-risk environment, injuries to dogs were few, and most were minor. Specific recommendations could facilitate use of dogs in disaster situations and improve safety for those dogs.

  12. Investigating the population structure and genetic differentiation of livestock guard dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Bigi, D; Marelli, S P; Liotta, L; Frattini, S; Talenti, A; Pagnacco, G; Polli, M; Crepaldi, P

    2018-01-14

    Livestock guarding dogs are a valuable adjunct to the pastoral community. Having been traditionally selected for their working ability, they fulfil their function with minimal interaction or command from their human owners. In this study, the population structure and the genetic differentiation of three Italian livestock guardian breeds (Sila's Dog, Maremma and Abruzzese Sheepdog and Mannara's Dog) and three functionally and physically similar breeds (Cane Corso, Central Asian Shepherd Dog and Caucasian Shepherd Dog), totalling 179 dogs unrelated at the second generation, were investigated with 18 autosomal microsatellite markers. Values for the number of alleles per locus, observed and expected heterozygosity, Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium, F stats, Nei's and Reynold's genetic distances, clustering and sub-population formation abilities and individual genetic structures were calculated. Our results show clear breed differentiation, whereby all the considered breeds show reasonable genetic variability despite small population sizes and variable selection schemes. These results provide meaningful data to stakeholders in specific breed and environmental conservation programmes.

  13. Retrospective analysis of co-occurrence of congenital aortic stenosis and pulmonary artery stenosis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kander, M; Pasławska, U; Staszczyk, M; Cepiel, A; Pasławski, R; Mazur, G; Noszczyk-Nowak, A

    2015-01-01

    The study has focused on the retrospective analysis of cases of coexisting congenital aortic stenosis (AS) and pulmonary artery stenosis (PS) in dogs. The research included 5463 dogs which were referred for cardiological examination (including clinical examination, ECG and echocardiography) between 2004 and 2014. Aortic stenosis and PS stenosis were detected in 31 dogs. This complex defect was the most commonly diagnosed in Boxers - 7 dogs, other breeds were represented by: 4 cross-breed dogs, 2 Bichon Maltais, 3 Miniature Pinschers, 2 Bernese Mountain Dogs, 2 French Bulldogs, and individuals of following breeds: Bichon Frise, Bull Terrier, Czech Wolfdog, German Shepherd, Hairless Chinese Crested Dog, Miniature Schnauzer, Pug, Rottweiler, Samoyed, West Highland White Terrier and Yorkshire Terrier. In all the dogs, the murmurs could be heard, graded from 2 to 5 (on a scale of 1-6). Besides, in 9 cases other congenital defects were diagnosed: patent ductus arteriosus, mitral valve dysplasia, pulmonary or aortic valve regurgitation, tricuspid valve dysplasia, ventricular or atrial septal defect. The majority of the dogs suffered from pulmonary valvular stenosis (1 dog had supravalvular pulmonary artery stenosis) and subvalvular aortic stenosis (2 dogs had valvular aortic stenosis). Conclusions and clinical relevance - co-occurrence of AS and PS is the most common complex congenital heart defect. Boxer breed was predisposed to this complex defect. It was found that coexisting AS and PS is more common in male dogs and the degree of PS and AS was mostly similar.

  14. Povidone iodine sclerotherapy for treatment of idiopathic renal hematuria in two dogs.

    PubMed

    Adelman, Lauren B; Bartges, Joseph; Whittemore, Jacqueline C

    2017-01-15

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 6-year-old spayed female Great Pyrenees (dog 1) and a 2-year-old spayed female German Shepherd Dog (dog 2) were evaluated because of gross hematuria of 5 and 2 months' duration, respectively. CLINICAL FINDINGS In both dogs, coagulation times were within reference limits, results of aerobic bacterial culture of urine samples were negative, echogenic debris could be seen within the urinary bladder ultrasonographically, and hematuric urine could be seen exiting the right ureterovesicular junction, with grossly normal urine exiting the left ureterovesicular junction, during cystoscopy. A diagnosis of idiopathic renal hematuria was made in both dogs. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Both dogs underwent retrograde ureteropyelography, unilateral povidone iodine sclerotherapy, and ureteral stent placement. The right ureter was occluded with a ureteropelvic junction balloon catheter, and a 5% povidone iodine solution was infused into the renal pelvis 3 times. A double-pigtail ureteral stent was then placed. Both dogs recovered without complications, with cessation of gross hematuria within 12 hours. Cystoscopic removal of the ureteral stent was performed in dog 1 after 4 months; at that time, the urine sediment contained 5 to 10 RBCs/hpf. In dog 2, urine sediment contained 50 to 75 RBCs/hpf 2 weeks after sclerotherapy, with continued resolution of gross hematuria 8 weeks after sclerotherapy. The owners declined removal of the stent in dog 2. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Findings suggested that povidone iodine sclerotherapy may be an effective renal-sparing treatment for idiopathic renal hematuria in dogs. Further evaluation with longer follow-up times is warranted.

  15. Frequency of DEA 1 antigen in 1037 mongrel and PUREBREED dogs in ITALY.

    PubMed

    Carli, E; Carminato, A; Ravagnan, S; Capello, K; Antognoni, M T; Miglio, A; Furlanello, T; Proverbio, D; Spada, E; Stefani, A; Mutinelli, F; Vascellari, M

    2017-11-29

    The prevalence of dog erythrocyte antigen (DEA 1) in canine population is approximately 40-60%. Often data are limited to a small number of breeds and/or dogs. The aims of this study were to evaluate frequency of DEA 1 in a large population of purebred and mongrel dogs including Italian native breeds and to recognize a possible association between DEA 1 and breed, sex, and genetic and phenotypical/functional classifications of breeds. Frequencies of DEA 1 blood group collected from screened/enrolled blood donors and from healthy and sick dogs were retrospectively evaluated. The breed and the sex were recorded when available. DEA 1 blood typing was assessed by immunocromatographic test on K3EDTA blood samples. The prevalence of DEA 1 antigen was statistically related to breed, gender, Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) and genotypic grouping. Sixty-two per cent dogs resulted DEA 1+ and 38% DEA 1-. DEA 1- was statistically associated with Dogo Argentino, Dobermann, German Shepherd, Boxer, Corso dogs, the molossian dogs, the FCI group 1, 2 and 3 and the genetic groups "working dogs" and "mastiff". DEA 1+ was statistically associated with Rottweiler, Briquet Griffon Vendéen, Bernese mountain dog, Golden Retriever, the hunting breeds, the FCI group 4, 6, 7 and 8 and the genetic groups "scent hounds" and "retrievers". No gender association was observed. Data obtained by this work may be clinically useful to drive blood donor enrollment and selection among different breeds.

  16. Angioleiomyosarcoma in the Nasal Vestibule of a Dog: Surgical Excision via a Modified Lateral Approach.

    PubMed

    McGhie, Jayne A; FitzGerald, Louise; Hosgood, Giselle

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes an 11 yr old spayed female German shepherd dog weighing 42 kg that presented with intermittent epistaxis from the left nostril. A nonulcerated pale irregular polypoid mass was visualized within the left nares. Computed tomography revealed a pedunculated mass arising from the ventrolateral nasal mucosal of the left nasal cavity with no evidence of involvement or invasion of adjacent soft tissues or bony structures. Histological and immunohistochemical examination of rhinoscopic biopsies returned a diagnosis of an angioleiomyosarcoma. The mass was excised using a modified lateral approach to the nasal cavity. Fulguration of the wound bed was performed. Clean surgical margins were identified on histopathology. The dog remained clinically free of recurrence 28 mo postsurgically. Angioleiomyosarcomas are rare tumors originating from the smooth muscle cells of blood vessel walls and are included in the spectrum of perivascular wall tumor, a subgroup of soft-tissue sarcomas.

  17. Gene flow between wolf and shepherd dog populations in Georgia (Caucasus).

    PubMed

    Kopaliani, Natia; Shakarashvili, Maia; Gurielidze, Zurab; Qurkhuli, Tamar; Tarkhnishvili, David

    2014-01-01

    We studied the distribution of the mitochondrial DNA haplotypes and microsatellite genotypes at 8 loci in 102 gray wolves, 57 livestock guarding dogs, and 9 mongrel dogs from Georgia (Caucasus). Most of the studied dogs had mitochondrial haplotypes clustered with presumably East Asian dog lineages, and most of the studied wolves had the haplotypes clustered with European wolves, but 20% of wolves and 37% of dogs shared the same mitochondrial haplotypes. Bayesian inference with STRUCTURE software suggested that more than 13% of the studied wolves had detectable dog ancestry and more than 10% of the dogs had detectable wolf ancestry. About 2-3% of the sampled wolves and dogs were identified, with a high probability, as first-generation hybrids. These results were supported by the relatedness analysis, which showed that 10% of wolves and 20% of dogs had closest relatives from an opposite group. The results of the study suggest that wolf-dog hybridization is a common event in the areas where large livestock guarding dogs are held in a traditional way, and that gene flow between dogs and gray wolves was an important force influencing gene pool of dogs for millennia since early domestication events. This process may have been terminated 1) in areas outside the natural range of gray wolves and 2) since very recent time, when humans started to more tightly control contacts of purebred dogs.

  18. Prevalence of adverse food reactions in 130 dogs in Italy with dermatological signs: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Proverbio, D; Perego, R; Spada, E; Ferro, E

    2010-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of adverse food reactions (AFRs) in dogs with dermatological signs presented to the referral dermatological clinic of the University of Milan. The medical records of dogs with dermatological signs were reviewed. Prevalence of AFRs was calculated. Owner and clinician pruritus scores were compared. Breed, sex and age predisposition were statistically tested, as was the association between AFR and selected clinical features. The prevalence of AFRs in dogs with dermatological signs was 12% (16 of 130). AFR was diagnosed in 26% of dogs with allergic disease and 48% of those subjected to a dietary trial. There was a significant association between AFRs and early onset of clinical signs (< 1 year) (OR=3.8; P=0.0221, 95% CI=1.27 to 11.16). There was a significant association between AFRs and both otitis externa (OR=5.9; P=0.0015, 95% CI=2 to 17.9) and perianal fistula (OR=26.1; P=0.0058, 95% CI=2.52 to 269.4), although all dogs with perianal fistulas were German shepherd dogs. The prevalence of AFRs in the study population was higher than most reported values. Further studies are warranted to investigate the true prevalence of AFR and its possible association with perianal fistula and other potential markers.

  19. Mucocutaneous lupus erythematosus in dogs (21 cases).

    PubMed

    Olivry, Thierry; Rossi, Michael A; Banovic, Frane; Linder, Keith E

    2015-08-01

    The diagnosis of dogs with chronic juxtamucosal erosive lesions and histopathology typical of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) is unclear. We report herein 21 dogs with mucocutaneous erosive lesions and lupus-specific histopathology that we propose to be affected with mucocutaneous lupus erythematosus (MCLE), another variant of chronic CLE. Inclusion criteria were the presence of the following: (i) a >2 month history of chronic or recurrent skin lesions; (ii) erosions or ulcers predominating at mucosae or mucocutaneous junctions; (iii) microscopic lesions of CLE (i.e. a lymphocyte-rich interface dermatitis with basal keratinocyte damage); and (iv) a lack of complete remission following antimicrobials. Clinical questionnaires and skin biopsies were reviewed. Direct immunofluorescence and antinuclear antibody serology were performed whenever possible. More than half of the 21 dogs were German shepherds or their crosses. The disease affected mostly dogs in their mid-adulthood and there was an over-representation of females. Erosions and ulcers predominated at genital/perigenital and anal/perianal areas, with a lower frequency of involvement of periocular, perioral and perinasal regions. In these dogs, there were no clinical signs suggestive of an associated systemic lupus erythematosus. Microscopic lesions were specific for CLE, but they were patchy and often infected with bacteria. The most common immunological finding was focal IgG deposition at the basement membrane zone. Lesions responded to varying interventions, but oral glucocorticoids led to a shorter time to complete remission. Relapses were common upon treatment tapering. These observations support MCLE being another variant of canine CLE. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  20. Refractory hypoglycaemia in a dog infected with Trypanosoma congolense

    PubMed Central

    Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Desquesnes, Marc; Dorso, Laetitia; Ravel, Sophie; Bossard, Géraldine; Charbonneau, Morgane; Garand, Annabelle; Roux, Françoise A.

    2016-01-01

    A 20 kg German shepherd dog was presented to a French veterinary teaching hospital for seizures and hyperthermia. The dog had returned 1 month previously from a six-month stay in Senegal and sub-Saharan Africa. Biochemistry and haematology showed severe hypoglycaemia (0.12 g/L), anaemia and thrombocytopenia. Despite administration of large amounts of glucose (30 mL of 30% glucose IV and 10 mL of 70% sucrose by gavage tube hourly), 26 consecutive blood glucose measurements were below 0.25 g/L (except one). Routine cytological examination of blood smears revealed numerous free extracytoplasmic protozoa consistent with Trypanosoma congolense. PCR confirmed a Trypanosoma congolense forest-type infection. Treatment consisted of six injections of pentamidine at 48-hour intervals. Trypanosomes had disappeared from the blood smears four days following the first injection. Clinical improvement was correlated with the normalization of laboratory values. The infection relapsed twice and the dog was treated again; clinical signs and parasites disappeared and the dog was considered cured; however, 6 years after this incident, serological examination by ELISA T. congolense was positive. The status of this dog (infected or non-infected) remains unclear. Hypoglycaemia was the most notable clinical feature in this case. It was spectacular in its severity and in its refractory nature; glucose administration seemed only to feed the trypanosomes, indicating that treatment of hypoglycaemia may in fact have been detrimental. PMID:26795063

  1. An International Genetic Survey of Breed-Specific Diseases in Working Dogs from the United States, Israel, and Poland.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Lisa G; Ramirez, Christina J; Phelps, Patricia; Aviram, Maya; Walczak, Marta; Bar-Gal, Gila Kahila; Ballif, Blake C

    2017-01-01

    Genetic diseases occur in breeds used for law enforcement. As important team members, dogs are expected to operate at peak performance for several years and are significant investments for both the initial purchase and extensive, specialized training. Previous studies have not focused on causes for retirement or euthanasia as genetic (inherited) versus acquired (environmental). We performed direct mutational analysis for breed-specific conditions on samples from 304 dogs including 267 law enforcement (122 US, 87 Israeli, and 58 Polish) and 37 search and rescue dogs. Genetic testing identified 29% (n = 89) of the dogs tested to be carriers of a genetic mutation and 6% (n = 19) to be at risk for a debilitating inherited condition that may eventually impair the dog's ability to work. At-risk dogs included Labrador Retrievers (n = 4) with exercise-induced collapse, Bloodhounds (n = 2) with degenerative myelopathy (DM), and German Shepherd dogs with DM (n = 12) or leukocyte adhesion deficiency, type III (n = 1). A substantial number of working dogs were shown to be at risk for genetic conditions that may shorten the dog's career. The loss of dogs, due to early retirement or euthanasia, as a result of preventable genetic conditions has an emotional cost to handlers and financial cost to service organizations that can be avoided with genetic screening prior to breeding, buying, or training. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Canine Mesenchymal Stem Cell Potential and the Importance of Dog Breed: Implication for Cell-Based Therapies.

    PubMed

    Bertolo, Alessandro; Steffen, Frank; Malonzo-Marty, Cherry; Stoyanov, Jivko

    2015-01-01

    The study of canine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has a prominent position in veterinary cell-based applications. Yet the plethora of breeds, their different life spans, and interbreed variations provide unclearness on what can be achieved specifically by such therapies. In this study, we compared a set of morphological, physiological, and genetic markers of MSCs derived from large dog breeds, namely, Border collie, German shepherd, Labrador, Malinois, Golden retriever, and Hovawart. We compared colony-forming units (CFUs) assay, population doubling time (PDT), senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity, telomere length, and gene expression of MSCs, as well as the ability of cells to differentiate to osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic phenotypes. The influence of the culture media α-MEM, low-glucose DMEM, and high-glucose DMEM, used in cell isolation and expansion, was investigated in the presence and absence of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Initial cell yield was not affected by culturing medium, but MSCs expanded best in α-MEM supplemented with bFGF. After isolation, the number of MSCs was similar among breeds--as shown by equivalent CFUs--except in the Hovawart samples, which had fivefold less CFU. Telomere lengths were similar among breeds. MSCs divided actively only for 4 weeks in culture (PDT = ∼50 h/division), except Border collie cells divided for a longer time than cells from other groups. The percentage of senescent cells increased linearly in all breeds with time, with a faster rate in German shepherd, Labrador, and Golden retriever. Border collie cells underwent efficient osteogenic differentiation, Hovawart cells performed the best in chondrogenic differentiation, and Labrador cells in both, while German shepherd cells had the lower differentiation potential. MSCs from all breeds preserved the same adipogenic differentiation potential. In conclusion, despite variations, isolated MSCs can be

  3. Hypertrophic osteopathy associated with renal pelvis transitional cell carcinoma in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Grillo, Thais P.; Brandão, Cláudia V.S.; Mamprim, Maria J.; de Jesus, Carlos M.N.; Santos, Taizha C.; Minto, Bruno W.

    2007-01-01

    A 6-year-old male, Belgian shepherd dog was presented with lethargy, oliguria, hematuria, and reluctance to move. The dog developed hypertrophic osteopathy secondary to renal pelvis transitional cell carcinoma. A nephrectomy was performed and after a year, the dog was completely asymptomatic, and no evidence of metastatic disease was present. PMID:17824162

  4. Evaluation of mortality rate and predictors of outcome in dogs receiving outpatient treatment for parvoviral enteritis.

    PubMed

    Sarpong, Kathryn J; Lukowski, Jennifer M; Knapp, Cassandra G

    2017-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine mortality rates and prognostic factors for dogs with parvoviral enteritis receiving outpatient treatment. DESIGN Retrospective case series and case-control study. ANIMALS 130 client-owned dogs with a diagnosis of parvoviral enteritis between August 1, 2012, and January 31, 2015, that were treated with outpatient care. PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed and data extracted regarding dog age, body weight, breed, and vaccination history; treatments administered; and short-term (≥ 3 day) outcome (determined via telephone call with owner). Treatments were administered according to clinician preference. Mortality rates were calculated overall and for various signalment and treatment groupings and compared. RESULTS 97 (75%) dogs survived and 33 (25%) dogs failed to survive for ≥ 3 days after initial diagnosis of parvoviral enteritis. Compared with distributions in the general hospital population, Chihuahuas, German Shepherd Dogs, pit bull-type dogs, and males were overrepresented. No significant difference was identified between survivors and nonsurvivors regarding age, body weight, or sex. Dogs prescribed a caloric supplement fed every 2 to 4 hours had a mortality rate of 19% (16/85). Most of these dogs had also received fluids administered SC, an antiemetic, and antimicrobials. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Clinicians should note the 25% mortality rate of the dogs with parvoviral enteritis that received outpatient care in this study setting when discussing treatment options with owners of affected dogs who are financially unable to pursue hospitalization.

  5. Two Shepherds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-21

    Although their gravitational effects on nearby ring material look quite different, Prometheus and Pan are both shepherd moons, holding back nearby ring edges in this image captured by NASA Cassini spacecraft.

  6. Genetic evaluation of the total hip score of four populous breeds of dog, as recorded by the New Zealand Veterinary Association Hip Dysplasia Scheme (1991-2011).

    PubMed

    Soo, M; Sneddon, N W; Lopez-Villalobos, N; Worth, A J

    2015-03-01

    To use estimated breeding value (EBV) analysis to investigate the genetic trend of the total hip score (to assess canine hip dysplasia) in four populous breeds of dogs using the records from the New Zealand Veterinary Association (NZVA) Canine Hip Dysplasia Scheme database (1991 to 2011). Estimates of heritability and EBV for the NZVA total hip score of individual dogs from the German Shepherd, Labrador Retriever, Golden Retriever and Rottweiler breeds were obtained using restricted maximum likelihood procedures with a within-breed linear animal model. The model included the fixed effects of gender, birth year, birth season, age at scoring and the random effect of animal. The pedigree file included animals recorded between 1990 and 2011. A total of 2,983 NZVA hip score records, from a pedigree of 3,172 animals, were available for genetic evaluation. Genetic trends of the NZVA total hip score were calculated as the regression coefficient of the EBV (weighted by reliabilities) on year of birth. The estimates of heritability for hip score were 0.32 (SE 0.08) in German Shepherd, 0.37 (SE 0.08) in Labrador Retriever, 0.29 (SE 0.08) in Golden Retriever and 0.52 (SE 0.18) in Rottweiler breeds. Genetic trend analysis revealed that only the German Shepherd breed exhibited a genetic trend towards better hip conformation over time, with a decline of 0.13 (SE 0.04) NZVA total hip score units per year (p<0.001). The genetic trends of total hip score for the remaining three breeds were not significantly different from zero (p>0.1). Despite moderate heritability of the NZVA total hip score, there has not been substantial improvement of this trait for the four breeds analysed in the study period. Greater improvement in reducing the prevalence of canine hip dysplasia may be possible if screening were to be compulsory as a requirement for registration of pedigree breeding stock, greater selection pressure were to be applied and selection of breeding stock made on the basis on an

  7. Children's Behavior toward and Understanding of Robotic and Living Dogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melson, Gail F.; Kahn, Peter H., Jr.; Beck, Alan; Friedman, Batya; Roberts, Trace; Garrett, Erik; Gill, Brian T.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated children's reasoning about and behavioral interactions with a computationally sophisticated robotic dog (Sony's AIBO) compared to a live dog (an Australian Shepherd). Seventy-two children from three age groups (7-9 years, 10-12 years, and 13-15 years) participated in this study. Results showed that more children…

  8. Femoral compartment syndrome due to haemangiosarcoma in the semimembranosus muscle in a dog.

    PubMed

    Bar-Am, Y; Anug, A Maria; Shahar, R

    2006-05-01

    A five-year-old, entire male German shepherd dog was presented to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital-Koret School of Veterinary Medicine because of an acute, painful swelling of the right thigh and severe lameness of two-weeks duration. On physical examination, a firm and painful mass was detected in the hamstring region. Radiography and ultrasonography revealed a soft tissue mass, with a 250 cc fluid accumulation craniomedial to it. Intracompartmental pressure measurement with a Wick catheter demonstrated significantly elevated pressure within the right caudal femoral compartment (25 to 28 mmHg compared with 5 to 7 mmHg in the unaffected leg). Surgical exploration of the area was undertaken, fasciotomy and mass excision were performed, and resolution of the clinical signs was achieved. The mass was identified by histopathology results as haemangiosarcoma. Two and a half months after surgery, which was followed by adjunct chemotherapy (doxorubicin), the dog was readmitted with a subcutaneous mass in the same area, although he was not lame at this time. Radiographs of the thoracic cavity demonstrated widely disseminated metastases in the lungs. At that point, the owner elected to have the dog euthanased.

  9. Assistance Dogs: Historic Patterns and Roles of Dogs Placed by ADI or IGDF Accredited Facilities and by Non-Accredited U.S. Facilities.

    PubMed

    Walther, Sandra; Yamamoto, Mariko; Thigpen, Abigail Paige; Garcia, Anaissa; Willits, Neil H; Hart, Lynette A

    2017-01-01

    Dogs' roles to support people with disabilities are increasing. Existing U.S. laws and regulations pertaining to the use of dogs for people with disabilities are only minimally enforced. Pushback legislation against some aspects of uses of assistance dogs currently is being passed or proposed in several states. Further, the U.S. Department of the Army and the Veterans' Administration support only dogs trained by an Assistance Dogs International (ADI) or International Guide Dog Federation (IGDF) accredited facility. Lacking a mandatory national process for screening the selection, training, and placement of assistance dogs with persons who have disabilities, the U.S. offers a creative but confusing opportunity for people to train their own dogs for any disability. While no U.S. surveillance system monitors assistance dogs, other countries generally have a legislated or regulatory process for approving assistance dogs or a cultural convention for obtaining dogs from accredited facilities. We conducted an online survey investigating current demographics of assistance dogs placed in 2013 and 2014 with persons who have disabilities, by facilities worldwide that are associated with ADI or IGDF and by some non-accredited U.S. facilities. Placement data from ADI and IGDF facilities revealed that in most countries aside from the U.S., guide dogs were by far the main type of assistance dog placed. In the U.S., there were about equal numbers of mobility and guide dogs placed, including many placed by large older facilities, along with smaller numbers of other types of assistance dogs. In non-accredited U.S. facilities, psychiatric dogs accounted for most placements. Dogs for families with an autistic child were increasing in all regions around the world. Of dog breeds placed, accredited facilities usually mentioned Labrador Retrievers and Golden Retrievers, and sometimes, German Shepherd Dogs. The facilities bred their dogs in-house, or acquired them from certain breeders

  10. Assistance Dogs: Historic Patterns and Roles of Dogs Placed by ADI or IGDF Accredited Facilities and by Non-Accredited U.S. Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Sandra; Yamamoto, Mariko; Thigpen, Abigail Paige; Garcia, Anaissa; Willits, Neil H.; Hart, Lynette A.

    2017-01-01

    Dogs’ roles to support people with disabilities are increasing. Existing U.S. laws and regulations pertaining to the use of dogs for people with disabilities are only minimally enforced. Pushback legislation against some aspects of uses of assistance dogs currently is being passed or proposed in several states. Further, the U.S. Department of the Army and the Veterans’ Administration support only dogs trained by an Assistance Dogs International (ADI) or International Guide Dog Federation (IGDF) accredited facility. Lacking a mandatory national process for screening the selection, training, and placement of assistance dogs with persons who have disabilities, the U.S. offers a creative but confusing opportunity for people to train their own dogs for any disability. While no U.S. surveillance system monitors assistance dogs, other countries generally have a legislated or regulatory process for approving assistance dogs or a cultural convention for obtaining dogs from accredited facilities. We conducted an online survey investigating current demographics of assistance dogs placed in 2013 and 2014 with persons who have disabilities, by facilities worldwide that are associated with ADI or IGDF and by some non-accredited U.S. facilities. Placement data from ADI and IGDF facilities revealed that in most countries aside from the U.S., guide dogs were by far the main type of assistance dog placed. In the U.S., there were about equal numbers of mobility and guide dogs placed, including many placed by large older facilities, along with smaller numbers of other types of assistance dogs. In non-accredited U.S. facilities, psychiatric dogs accounted for most placements. Dogs for families with an autistic child were increasing in all regions around the world. Of dog breeds placed, accredited facilities usually mentioned Labrador Retrievers and Golden Retrievers, and sometimes, German Shepherd Dogs. The facilities bred their dogs in-house, or acquired them from certain breeders

  11. Review and retrospective analysis of degenerative lumbosacral stenosis in 156 dogs treated by dorsal laminectomy.

    PubMed

    Suwankong, N; Meij, B P; Voorhout, G; de Boer, A H; Hazewinkel, H A W

    2008-01-01

    The medical records of 156 dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLS) that underwent decompressive surgery were reviewed for signalment, history, clinical signs, imaging and surgical findings. The German Shepherd Dog (GSD) was most commonly affected (40/156, 25.6%). Pelvic limb lameness, caudal lumbar pain and pain evoked by lumbosacral pressure were the most frequent clinical findings. Radiography showed lumbosacral step formation in 78.8% (93/118) of the dogs which was associated with elongation of the sacral lamina in 18.6% (22/118). Compression of the cauda equina was diagnosed by imaging (epidurography, CT, or MRI) in 94.2% (147/156) of the dogs. Loss of the bright nucleus pulposus signal of the L7-S1 disc was found on T2-weighted MR images in 73.5% (25/34) of the dogs. The facet joint angle at L7-S1 was significantly smaller, and the tropism greater in GSD than in the other dog breeds. The smaller facet joint angle and higher incidence of tropism seen in the GSD may predispose this breed to DLS. Epidurography, CT, and MRI allow adequate visualization of cauda equina compression. During surgery, disc protrusion was found in 70.5% (110/156) of the dogs. Overall improvement after surgery was recorded in the medical records in 79.0% (83/105) of the dogs. Of the 38 owners that responded to questionnaires up to five years after surgery, 29 (76%) perceived an improvement.

  12. PCR detection and molecular characterization of Pentatrichomonas hominis from feces of dogs with diarrhea in the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Ah; Kim, Hye-Youn; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Cheun, Hyeong-Il; Yu, Jae-Ran; Lee, Sang-Eun

    2010-03-01

    Pentatrichomonas hominis is considered a commensal protozoan in the large intestine of a number of mammalian hosts, such as cats, dogs, and non-human primates. The resulting infections, which can induce diarrhea, have been attributed to opportunistic overgrowth of P. hominis. This study was performed to confirm the P. hominis infection and its molecular characterization from the feces of puppies with diarrhea. Fecal samples were obtained from 14 German shepherd puppies with diarrhea over 1 week (7 females and 7 males, 2-9 months of age) residing on a dog farm in August 2007. Species-specific PCR assay identified P. hominis 18S rRNA genes in 3 of the 14 puppies (1 female and 2 males; 1 aged 2 months and 2 aged 9 months). This phylogenetic analysis established that P. hominis belonged to the 1st clade, which is comprised of Bos taurus and Felines.

  13. Allelic combinations of promoter and exon 2 in DQB1 in dogs and wolves.

    PubMed

    Berggren, Karin T; Seddon, Jennifer M

    2008-07-01

    Polymorphism of PBRs of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes is well recognized, but the polymorphism also extends to proximal promoter regions. Examining DQB1 variability in dogs and wolves, we identified 7 promoter variants and 13 exon 2 alleles among 89 dogs, including a previously unknown DQB1 exon 2 allele, and 8 promoter variants and 9 exon 2 alleles among 85 wolves. As expected from previous studies and from a close chromosomal location, strong linkage disequilibrium was demonstrated in both wolves and dogs by having significantly fewer promoter/exon 2 combinations than expected from simulations of randomized data sets. Interestingly, we noticed weaker haplotypic associations in dogs than in wolves. Dogs had twice as many promoter/exon 2 combinations as wolves and an almost 2-fold difference in the number of exon 2 alleles per promoter variant. This difference was not caused by an admixture of breeds in our group of dogs because the high ratio of observed to expected number of haplotypes persisted within a single dog breed, the German Shepherd. Ewens-Watterson tests indicated that both the promoter and exon 2 are under the balancing selection, and both regions appear to be more recently derived in the dog than in the wolf. Hence, although reasons for the differences are unknown, they may relate to altered selection pressure on patterns of expression. Deviations from normal MHC expression patterns have been associated with autoimmune diseases, which occur frequently in several dog breeds. Further knowledge about these deviations may help us understand the source of such diseases.

  14. Association of DNA methylation and monoamine oxidase A gene expression in the brains of different dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Eo, JungWoo; Lee, Hee-Eun; Nam, Gyu-Hwi; Kwon, Yun-Jeong; Choi, Yuri; Choi, Bong-Hwan; Huh, Jae-Won; Kim, Minkyu; Lee, Sang-Eun; Seo, Bohyun; Kim, Heui-Soo

    2016-04-15

    The monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene is an important candidate gene for human behavior that encodes an enzyme regulating the metabolism of key neurotransmitters. The regulatory mechanisms of the MAOA gene in dogs are yet to be elucidated. We measured MAOA gene transcription and analyzed the VNTR genotype and methylation status of the gene promoter region in different dog breeds to determine whether MAOA expression is correlated with the MAOA genotype or epigenetic modification in dogs. We found brain-specific expression of the MAOA gene and different transcription levels in different dog breeds including Beagle, Sapsaree, and German shepherd, and also a robust association of the DNA methylation of the gene promoter with mRNA levels. However, the 90 bp tandem repeats that we observed near the transcription start site were not variable, indicating no correlation with canine MAOA activity. These results show that differential DNA methylation in the MAOA promoter region may affect gene expression by modulating promoter activity. Moreover, the distinctive patterns of MAOA expression and DNA methylation may be involved in breed-specific or individual behavioral characteristics, such as aggression, because behavioral phenotypes are related to different physiological and neuroendocrine responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A case of primary hypothyroidism causing central nervous system atherosclerosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Blois, Shauna L; Poma, Roberto; Stalker, Margaret J; Allen, Dana G

    2008-08-01

    A 2-year-old, castrated male, Australian shepherd was presented with a history of chronic mild ataxia, obesity, and lethargy. The dog was treated with levothyroxine, but the ataxia worsened. Cranial nerve abnormalities developed and the dog was euthanized. Postmortem examination revealed marked thyroid gland atrophy and widespread, severe central nervous system atherosclerosis.

  16. Immune modulation following immunization with polyvalent vaccines in dogs.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Alois; May, Bettina; Teltscher, Andrea; Wistrela, Eva; Niedermüller, Hans

    2003-08-15

    A decline in T-cell-mediated immunity and transient state of immunosuppression after immunization has been reported in dogs. Nevertheless, dogs are still routinely vaccinated with polyvalent live vaccines and severe disease does not generally occur. In order to investigate these effects on the canine immune system and to elucidate possible mechanisms we determined the following immune parameters in the blood of 33 clinically sound German shepherd dogs before and after standard vaccination with a polyvalent vaccine against distemper, parvovirus, viral hepatitis, leptospirosis, kennel cough and rabies: white and differential blood cell count, the serum concentrations and/or activities of IL-1, IL-2, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, neopterin and IgG, natural killer (NK) cell activity, bactericidal activity and complement hemolytic activity, lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT) and nitroblue tetrazolium test (NBT). Our major findings were that significant postvaccinal decreases in T-cell mitogenic response to PHA and in neutrophil function and neopterin serum concentration were accompanied by simultaneous increase in plasma IgG and hemolytic complement activity. This suggests a transient shift in the balance between cell-mediated and humoral (T(H)1/T(H)2) immunity rather than immunosuppression. These results do not imply that dogs should not receive live vaccines, as the response to vaccines just seems to create a state of altered homeostasis when immunization elicits protection by humoral and cell-mediated immunity. However, these recognized compromises of immune function should be considered and vaccines still be applied only in healthy animals and strictly according to the rules and regulations given by the manufacturer.

  17. A case of primary hypothyroidism causing central nervous system atherosclerosis in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Blois, Shauna L.; Poma, Roberto; Stalker, Margaret J.; Allen, Dana G.

    2008-01-01

    A 2-year-old, castrated male, Australian shepherd was presented with a history of chronic mild ataxia, obesity, and lethargy. The dog was treated with levothyroxine, but the ataxia worsened. Cranial nerve abnormalities developed and the dog was euthanized. Postmortem examination revealed marked thyroid gland atrophy and widespread, severe central nervous system atherosclerosis. PMID:18978973

  18. Prevalence and risk factors for mast cell tumours in dogs in England.

    PubMed

    Shoop, Stephanie Jw; Marlow, Stephanie; Church, David B; English, Kate; McGreevy, Paul D; Stell, Anneliese J; Thomson, Peter C; O'Neill, Dan G; Brodbelt, David C

    2015-01-01

    Mast cell tumour (MCT) appears to be a frequent tumour type in dogs, though there is little published in relation to its frequency in dogs in the UK. The current study aimed to investigate prevalence and risk factors for MCTs in dogs attending English primary-care veterinary practices. Electronic patient records from practices participating in the VetCompass animal surveillance project between July 2007 and June 2013 were searched for MCT diagnosis. Various search terms and standard diagnostic terms (VeNom codes) identified records containing MCT diagnoses, which were evaluated against clinical criteria for inclusion to the study. MCT prevalence for the entire dataset and specific breed types were calculated. Descriptive statistics characterised MCT cases and multivariable logistic regression methods evaluated risk factors for association with MCT (P < 0.05). Within a population of 168,636 dogs, 453 had MCT, yielding a prevalence of 0.27% (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.24% - 0.29%). The highest breed type specific prevalences were for the Boxer at 1.95% (95% CI 1.40% - 2.51%), Golden Retriever at 1.39% (0.98% - 1.81%) and Weimaraner at 0.85% (95% CI 0.17% to 1.53%). Age, insurance status, neuter status, weight and breed type were associated with MCT diagnosis. Of dogs of specific breed type, the Boxer, Pug and Staffordshire Bull Terrier showed greater odds of MCT diagnosis compared with crossbred dogs. Conversely, the German Shepherd Dog, Border Collie, West Highland White Terrier, Springer Spaniel and Cocker Spaniel had reduced odds of MCT diagnosis compared with crossbred dogs. No association was found between MCT diagnosis and sex. This study highlights a clinically significant prevalence of MCT and identifies specific breed types with predisposition to MCT, potentially aiding veterinarian awareness and facilitating diagnosis.

  19. Environmental and Physiological Factors Associated With Stamina in Dogs Exercising in High Ambient Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Patrick J.; Ramos, Meghan T.; Zanghi, Brian M.; Otto, Cynthia M.

    2017-01-01

    This IACUC approved study was performed to evaluate the environmental, physiological, and hematological components that contribute to stamina following successive bouts of exercise that included searching (5-min), agility (5-min), and ball retrieve (<10-min). Regularly exercised dogs (N = 12) were evaluated on five separate occasions. The population consisted of eight males and four females ranging in age from 8 to 23 months, which included six Labrador retrievers, three German shepherds, and one each English springer spaniel, German wirehaired pointer, and Dutch shepherd. The exercise period was up to 30 min with 5 min of intermittent rest between the exercise bouts or until a designated trainer determined that the dog appeared fatigued (e.g., curled tongue while panting, seeking shade, or voluntary reluctance to retrieve). At the end of the exercise period, pulse rate (PR), core temperature, blood lactate, and venous blood gas were collected. The median outdoor temperature was 28.9°C (84°F) (IQR; 27.2–30°C/81–86°F) and median humidity was 47% (IQR; 40–57%). Median duration of exercise was 27 min (IQR; 25–29). No dog showed signs of heat stress that required medical intervention. The components used to measure stamina in this study were total activity, post-exercise core body temperature (CBT), and increase in CBT. When controlling for breed, total activity, as measured by omnidirectional accelerometer device, could be predicted from a linear combination of the independent variables: pre-exercise activity (p = 0.008), post-exercise activity (p < 0.001), outdoor temperature (p = 0.005), reduction in base excess in extracellular fluid compartment (BEecf) (p = 0.044), and decrease in TCO2 (p = 0.005). When controlling for breed and sex, increase in CBT could be predicted from a linear combination of the independent variables: study day (p = 0.005), increase in PR (p < 0.001), increase in lactate (p = 0

  20. Environmental and Physiological Factors Associated With Stamina in Dogs Exercising in High Ambient Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Patrick J; Ramos, Meghan T; Zanghi, Brian M; Otto, Cynthia M

    2017-01-01

    This IACUC approved study was performed to evaluate the environmental, physiological, and hematological components that contribute to stamina following successive bouts of exercise that included searching (5-min), agility (5-min), and ball retrieve (<10-min). Regularly exercised dogs ( N  = 12) were evaluated on five separate occasions. The population consisted of eight males and four females ranging in age from 8 to 23 months, which included six Labrador retrievers, three German shepherds, and one each English springer spaniel, German wirehaired pointer, and Dutch shepherd. The exercise period was up to 30 min with 5 min of intermittent rest between the exercise bouts or until a designated trainer determined that the dog appeared fatigued (e.g., curled tongue while panting, seeking shade, or voluntary reluctance to retrieve). At the end of the exercise period, pulse rate (PR), core temperature, blood lactate, and venous blood gas were collected. The median outdoor temperature was 28.9°C (84°F) (IQR; 27.2-30°C/81-86°F) and median humidity was 47% (IQR; 40-57%). Median duration of exercise was 27 min (IQR; 25-29). No dog showed signs of heat stress that required medical intervention. The components used to measure stamina in this study were total activity, post-exercise core body temperature (CBT), and increase in CBT. When controlling for breed, total activity, as measured by omnidirectional accelerometer device, could be predicted from a linear combination of the independent variables: pre-exercise activity ( p  = 0.008), post-exercise activity ( p  < 0.001), outdoor temperature ( p  = 0.005), reduction in base excess in extracellular fluid compartment (BEecf) ( p  = 0.044), and decrease in TCO 2 ( p  = 0.005). When controlling for breed and sex, increase in CBT could be predicted from a linear combination of the independent variables: study day ( p  = 0.005), increase in PR ( p  < 0.001), increase in lactate ( p  = 0

  1. Clinical and histopathologic features of dorsally located furunculosis in dogs following water immersion or exposure to grooming products: 22 cases (2005-2013).

    PubMed

    Cain, Christine L; Mauldin, Elizabeth A

    2015-03-01

    To describe clinical and histopathologic features of furunculosis in dogs following water immersion or exposure to grooming products. Retrospective case series. 22 dogs with skin lesions consistent with furunculosis and a history of water immersion or grooming prior to onset. Procedures-Information collected from the medical records of affected dogs included signalment, clinical signs, bathing or grooming procedure, diagnostic tests, treatment, and outcome. German Shepherd Dogs (4/22 [18%]) and Labrador Retrievers (4/22 [18%]) were most commonly affected. Skin lesions, particularly hemorrhagic pustules and crusts, were dorsally located in all dogs and occurred a median of 2 days (range, 1 to 7 days) following water immersion or exposure to grooming products. Twenty (91%) dogs were bathed at home or at a commercial grooming facility prior to lesion onset; 1 dog developed skin lesions following hydrotherapy on an underwater treadmill, and 1 dog developed peri-incisional skin lesions after surgery. Lethargy, signs of neck or back pain, and fever were common clinical signs. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most common bacterial isolate from dogs with bacteriologic culture performed on skin samples (10/14). The main histologic feature was acute follicular rupture in the superficial dermis with suppurative inflammation and dermal hemorrhage. Systemic antimicrobial treatment, particularly oral administration of fluoroquinolones, resulted in excellent clinical response in 16 of 22 (73%) dogs. Acute-onset furunculosis with characteristic clinical and histopathologic features in dogs following water immersion or exposure to grooming products was described. Knowledge of the historical and clinical features of this syndrome is essential for accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment of affected dogs.

  2. Osteomyelitis associated with Nocardiopsis composta in a dog.

    PubMed

    Salas, Elisa N; Royal, Debra; Kurz, Lance; Loy, J Dustin

    2015-05-01

    We report the first detection of Nocardiopsis composta in association with osteomyelitis in a young male miniature Australian shepherd dog. Findings included suppurative osteomyelitis containing intralesional Fite's acid fast bacilli, aerobic culture of branching Gram-positive rods, and positive identification via phenotypic analysis and 16S rDNA sequencing.

  3. Oxytocin receptor gene polymorphisms are associated with human directed social behavior in dogs (Canis familiaris).

    PubMed

    Kis, Anna; Bence, Melinda; Lakatos, Gabriella; Pergel, Enikő; Turcsán, Borbála; Pluijmakers, Jolanda; Vas, Judit; Elek, Zsuzsanna; Brúder, Ildikó; Földi, Levente; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Miklósi, Adám; Rónai, Zsolt; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2014-01-01

    The oxytocin system has a crucial role in human sociality; several results prove that polymorphisms of the oxytocin receptor gene are related to complex social behaviors in humans. Dogs' parallel evolution with humans and their adaptation to the human environment has made them a useful species to model human social interactions. Previous research indicates that dogs are eligible models for behavioral genetic research, as well. Based on these previous findings, our research investigated associations between human directed social behaviors and two newly described (-212AG, 19131AG) and one known (rs8679684) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the regulatory regions (5' and 3' UTR) of the oxytocin receptor gene in German Shepherd (N = 104) and Border Collie (N = 103) dogs. Dogs' behavior traits have been estimated in a newly developed test series consisting of five episodes: Greeting by a stranger, Separation from the owner, Problem solving, Threatening approach, Hiding of the owner. Buccal samples were collected and DNA was isolated using standard protocols. SNPs in the 3' and 5' UTR regions were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction based techniques followed by subsequent electrophoresis analysis. The gene-behavior association analysis suggests that oxytocin receptor gene polymorphisms have an impact in both breeds on (i) proximity seeking towards an unfamiliar person, as well as their owner, and on (ii) how friendly dogs behave towards strangers, although the mediating molecular regulatory mechanisms are yet unknown. Based on these results, we conclude that similarly to humans, the social behavior of dogs towards humans is influenced by the oxytocin system.

  4. Osteomyelitis associated with Nocardiopsis composta in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Elisa N.; Royal, Debra; Kurz, Lance; Loy, J. Dustin

    2015-01-01

    We report the first detection of Nocardiopsis composta in association with osteomyelitis in a young male miniature Australian shepherd dog. Findings included suppurative osteomyelitis containing intralesional Fite’s acid fast bacilli, aerobic culture of branching Gram-positive rods, and positive identification via phenotypic analysis and 16S rDNA sequencing. PMID:25969577

  5. Malformation of the canine mitral valve complex.

    PubMed

    Litu, S K; Tilley, L P

    1975-09-15

    Twenty-nine dogs, including 13 Great Danes and 5 German Shepherd Dogs and averaging 7.3 months age, were diagnosed clinically and radiographically as having mitral regurgitation. Alterations of the mitral valve complex included enlarged anulus; short thick leaflets, with an occasional cleft; short and stout or long and thin chordae tendineae; upward malposition of atrophic or hypertrophic papillary muscles; insertion of one papillary muscle directly into one or both leaflets; and diffuse endocardial fibrosis, occasionally with jet lesions in te left atrium. Other cardiac anomalies included dysplasia of the tricuspid valve (5 dogs), patent ductus afteriosus (2 dogs), aortic stenosis (2 dogs), and ventricular septal defect (1 dog).

  6. Dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction secondary to hypovolemia in a German Shepard dog with splenic hemangiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Takuma; Sunahara, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Keisuke; Ito, Tetsuro; Kanai, Eiichi; Neo, Sakurako; Fujii, Yoko; Wakao, Yoshito

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (DLVOTO) is a common condition in cats and humans. In this case report, a dog is described with DLVOTO secondary to severe intra-abdominal hemorrhage caused by a hemangiosarcoma. The dog was a 9-year-old, 35.7-kg, spayed female German Shepard dog that presented with a history of tachypnea and collapse. A Levine II/VI systolic murmur was present at the heart base. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a splenic mass and a large amount of ascites. Echocardiography showed a reduced left ventricular diameter and an increased aortic velocity caused by systolic anterior motion (SAM) of the mitral valve apparatus. The heart murmur and the SAM were resolved after treatment including a splenectomy and a blood transfusion.

  7. Oxytocin Receptor Gene Polymorphisms Are Associated with Human Directed Social Behavior in Dogs (Canis familiaris)

    PubMed Central

    Lakatos, Gabriella; Pergel, Enikő; Turcsán, Borbála; Pluijmakers, Jolanda; Vas, Judit; Elek, Zsuzsanna; Brúder, Ildikó; Földi, Levente; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Miklósi, Ádám; Rónai, Zsolt; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2014-01-01

    The oxytocin system has a crucial role in human sociality; several results prove that polymorphisms of the oxytocin receptor gene are related to complex social behaviors in humans. Dogs' parallel evolution with humans and their adaptation to the human environment has made them a useful species to model human social interactions. Previous research indicates that dogs are eligible models for behavioral genetic research, as well. Based on these previous findings, our research investigated associations between human directed social behaviors and two newly described (−212AG, 19131AG) and one known (rs8679684) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the regulatory regions (5′ and 3′ UTR) of the oxytocin receptor gene in German Shepherd (N = 104) and Border Collie (N = 103) dogs. Dogs' behavior traits have been estimated in a newly developed test series consisting of five episodes: Greeting by a stranger, Separation from the owner, Problem solving, Threatening approach, Hiding of the owner. Buccal samples were collected and DNA was isolated using standard protocols. SNPs in the 3′ and 5′ UTR regions were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction based techniques followed by subsequent electrophoresis analysis. The gene–behavior association analysis suggests that oxytocin receptor gene polymorphisms have an impact in both breeds on (i) proximity seeking towards an unfamiliar person, as well as their owner, and on (ii) how friendly dogs behave towards strangers, although the mediating molecular regulatory mechanisms are yet unknown. Based on these results, we conclude that similarly to humans, the social behavior of dogs towards humans is influenced by the oxytocin system. PMID:24454713

  8. Erythrocyte Osmotic Fragility Testing and the Prediction of Canine Malignant Hyperthermia Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Cribb, Peter H.; Olfert, Ernest A.; Reynolds, F. Barry

    1986-01-01

    A Doberman-German Shepherd cross-bred male dog, previously diagnosed as malignant hyperthermia susceptible, was mated to an unrelated nonsusceptible German Shepherd cross-bred female. The resultant litter was subjected to hematological, biochemical and erythrocyte osmotic fragility testing in an endeavor to predict the susceptibility of individuals to malignant hyperthermia. Laboratory evaluations were repeated at one year of age and the litter subjected to the halothane challenge test. No significant difference in erythrocyte osmotic fragility was found between malignant hyperthermia susceptible and nonsusceptible siblings at six weeks or at one year of age. Erythrocyte osmotic fragility, in both malignant hyperthermia susceptible and nonsusceptible animals, increased between six weeks and one year of age. Dantrolene sodium was an effective treatment for malignant hyperthermia in the dog when administered early in an episode and in adequate dosage. The initial sign of a malignant hyperthermia episode was a very rapid increase in end tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide. This finding reinforces the value of capnographic monitoring in anesthesia. PMID:17422730

  9. A survey of canine and feline skin disorders seen in a university practice: Small Animal Clinic, University of Montréal, Saint-Hyacinthe, Québec (1987-1988)

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Danny W.; Paradis, Manon

    1990-01-01

    Dermatological disorders accounted for 18.8% and 15.2%, respectively, of all the dogs and cats examined at the Small Animal Clinic, University of Montreal, Saint-Hyacinthe, during a one-year period. In dogs, the most common groups of dermatological disorders encountered were bacterial folliculitis and furunculosis, allergic dermatitis, endocrinopathy, neoplasia, ectoparasitism, and immune-mediated dermatitis. The most common primary final diagnoses were bacterial folliculitis and furunculosis, atopy, food hypersensitivity, flea bite hypersensitivity, hyperadrenocorticism, and hypothyroidism. Breed predispositions were found for several canine dermatoses: bacterial folliculitis and furunculosis (collie, German shepherd, golden retriever, Newfoundland), atopy (boxer, golden retriever), food hypersensitivity (boxer, German shepherd), hyperadrenocorticism (miniature poodle), hypothyroidism (Doberman pinscher, Gordon setter), castration-responsive alopecia (chow chow), demodicosis (Old English sheepdog), and idiopathic pruritus (pit bull terrier). In cats, the most common dermatoses were abscesses, otodectic mange, cheyletiellosis, flea bite hypersensitivity, atopy, flea infestation, neoplasia, and food hypersensitivity. Himalayan and Persian cats accounted for 50% of the cases of cheyletiellosis and 75% of the cases of dermatophytosis, respectively. Hereditary primary seborrhea oleosa was seen only in Persian cats. PMID:17423707

  10. A de novo variant in the ASPRV1 gene in a dog with ichthyosis.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Anina; Waluk, Dominik P; Galichet, Arnaud; Timm, Katrin; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Sayar, Beyza S; Wiener, Dominique J; Dietschi, Elisabeth; Müller, Eliane J; Roosje, Petra; Welle, Monika M; Leeb, Tosso

    2017-03-01

    Ichthyoses are a heterogeneous group of inherited cornification disorders characterized by generalized dry skin, scaling and/or hyperkeratosis. Ichthyosis vulgaris is the most common form of ichthyosis in humans and caused by genetic variants in the FLG gene encoding filaggrin. Filaggrin is a key player in the formation of the stratum corneum, the uppermost layer of the epidermis and therefore crucial for barrier function. During terminal differentiation of keratinocytes, the precursor profilaggrin is cleaved by several proteases into filaggrin monomers and eventually processed into free amino acids contributing to the hydration of the cornified layer. We studied a German Shepherd dog with a novel form of ichthyosis. Comparing the genome sequence of the affected dog with 288 genomes from genetically diverse non-affected dogs we identified a private heterozygous variant in the ASPRV1 gene encoding "aspartic peptidase, retroviral-like 1", which is also known as skin aspartic protease (SASPase). The variant was absent in both parents and therefore due to a de novo mutation event. It was a missense variant, c.1052T>C, affecting a conserved residue close to an autoprocessing cleavage site, p.(Leu351Pro). ASPRV1 encodes a retroviral-like protease involved in profilaggrin-to-filaggrin processing. By immunofluorescence staining we showed that the filaggrin expression pattern was altered in the affected dog. Thus, our findings provide strong evidence that the identified de novo variant is causative for the ichthyosis in the affected dog and that ASPRV1 plays an essential role in skin barrier formation. ASPRV1 is thus a novel candidate gene for unexplained human forms of ichthyoses.

  11. Acute undifferentiated leukaemia in a dog.

    PubMed

    Miglio, A; Antognoni, M T; Miniscalco, B; Caivano, D; Lepri, E; Birettoni, F; Mangili, V

    2014-12-01

    Acute undifferentiated leukaemia (AUL) is considered a separate entity in the context of acute leukaemias. AUL is extremely rare in both humans and dogs, has a rapid clinical course and does not respond to treatment. It is characterised by the presence of blast cells within the bone marrow and/or peripheral blood at levels ≥ 20% and even up to 100% of all nucleated cells. Blast cells are unable to be differentiated on morphological, cytochemical and phenotypic criteria into myeloid or lymphoid lineages because of their immaturity and/or atypia. An 8-year-old German Shepherd dog was referred for depression, asthenia, mild anaemia, thrombocytopenia and marked leucocytosis. Abdominal ultrasound showed hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, bilateral nephromegaly and enlargement of mesenteric lymph nodes. Echocardiography revealed biventricular hypertrophy with abnormal tissue density of the myocardium. Blood and bone marrow smears were composed of 95% unclassifiable and/or atypical blast cells and signs of dysplasia of the erythroid and thrombocytic/megakaryocytic lineages were present. Blast cells were negative for all cytochemical stains used and flow cytometry of peripheral blood revealed 85% of total leucocytes consisting of small-to-medium-sized cells, negative for all lymphoid and myeloid markers except CD45 and CD34. After necropsy, cytology and histology revealed that blast cells had diffusely infiltrated all tissues examined. Both erythroid and megakaryocytic extramedullary haemopoiesis was also detected in the spleen, lymph nodes and liver. All immunohistochemical stains used were negative. On the basis of all the results, a diagnosis of acute leukaemia involving a very primitive haematopoietic precursor was made. © 2014 Australian Veterinary Association.

  12. Selection of Breeding Stock among Australian Purebred Dog Breeders, with Particular Emphasis on the Dam.

    PubMed

    Czerwinski, Veronika; McArthur, Michelle; Smith, Bradley; Hynd, Philip; Hazel, Susan

    2016-11-16

    Every year, thousands of purebred domestic dogs are bred by registered dog breeders. Yet, little is known about the rearing environment of these dogs, or the attitudes and priorities surrounding breeding practices of these dog breeders. The objective of this study was to explore some of the factors that dog breeders consider important for stock selection, with a particular emphasis on issues relating to the dam. Two-hundred and seventy-four Australian purebred dog breeders, covering 91 breeds across all Australian National Kennel Club breed groups, completed an online survey relating to breeding practices. Most breeders surveyed (76%) reported specialising in one breed of dog, the median number of dogs and bitches per breeder was two and three respectively, and most breeders bred two litters or less a year. We identified four components, relating to the dam, that were considered important to breeders. These were defined as Maternal Care, Offspring Potential, Dam Temperament, and Dam Genetics and Health. Overall, differences were observed in attitudes and beliefs across these components, showing that there is variation according to breed/breed groups. In particular, the importance of Maternal Care varied according to dog breed group. Breeders of brachycephalic breeds tended to differ the most in relation to Offspring Potential and Dam Genetics and Health. The number of breeding dogs/bitches influenced breeding priority, especially in relation to Dam Temperament, however no effect was found relating to the number of puppies bred each year. Only 24% of breeders used their own sire for breeding. The finding that some breeders did not test for diseases relevant to their breed, such as hip dysplasia in Labrador Retrievers and German Shepherds, provides important information on the need to educate some breeders, and also buyers of purebred puppies, that screening for significant diseases should occur. Further research into the selection of breeding dams and sires will

  13. Characterisation of the main drivers of intra- and inter- breed variability in the plasma metabolome of dogs.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Amanda J; Beckmann, Manfred; Tailliart, Kathleen; Brown, Wendy Y; Draper, John; Allaway, David

    Dog breeds are a consequence of artificial selection for specific attributes. These closed genetic populations have metabolic and physiological characteristics that may be revealed by metabolomic analysis. To identify and characterise the drivers of metabolic differences in the fasted plasma metabolome and then determine metabolites differentiating breeds. Fasted plasma samples were collected from dogs maintained under two environmental conditions (controlled and client-owned at home). The former (n = 33) consisted of three breeds (Labrador Retriever, Cocker Spaniel and Miniature Schnauzer) fed a single diet batch, the latter (n = 96), client-owned dogs consisted of 9 breeds (Beagle, Chihuahua, Cocker Spaniel, Dachshund, Golden Retriever, Greyhound, German Shepherd, Labrador Retriever and Maltese) consuming various diets under differing feeding regimens. Triplicate samples were taken from Beagle (n = 10) and Labrador Retriever (n = 9) over 3 months. Non-targeted metabolite fingerprinting was performed using flow infusion electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry which was coupled with multivariate data analysis. Metadata factors including age, gender, sexual status, weight, diet and breed were investigated. Breed differences were identified in the plasma metabolome of dogs housed in a controlled environment. Triplicate samples from two breeds identified intra-individual variability, yet breed separation was still observed. The main drivers of variance in dogs maintained in the home environment were associated with breed and gender. Furthermore, metabolite signals were identified that discriminated between Labrador Retriever and Cocker Spaniels in both environments. Metabolite fingerprinting of plasma samples can be used to investigate breed differences in client-owned dogs, despite added variance of diet, sexual status and environment.

  14. Epidemiological Study of Mammary Tumors in Female Dogs Diagnosed during the Period 2002-2012: A Growing Animal Health Problem

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Yaritza; Márquez, Adelys; Diaz, Daniel; Romero, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies enable us to analyze disease behavior, define risk factors and establish fundamental prognostic criteria, with the purpose of studying different types of diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the epidemiological characteristics of canine mammary tumors diagnosed during the period 2002-2012. The study was based on a retrospective study consisting of 1,917 biopsies of intact dogs that presented mammary gland lesions. Biopsies were sent to the Department of Pathology FMVZ-UNAM diagnostic service. The annual incidence of mammary tumors was 16.8%: 47.7% (benign) and 47.5% (malignant). The highest number of cases was epithelial, followed by mixed tumors. The most commonly diagnosed tumors were tubular adenoma, papillary adenoma, tubular carcinoma, papillary carcinoma, solid carcinoma, complex carcinoma and carcinosarcoma. Pure breeds accounted for 80% of submissions, and the Poodle, Cocker Spaniel and German Shepherd were consistently affected. Adult female dogs (9 to 12 years old) were most frequently involved, followed by 5- to 8-year-old females. Some association between breeds with histological types of malignant tumors was observed, but no association was found between breeds and BN. Mammary tumors in intact dogs had a high incidence. Benign and malignant tumors had similar frequencies, with an increase in malignant tumors in the past four years of the study. Epithelial tumors were more common, and the most affected were old adult females, purebreds and small-sized dogs. Mammary tumors in dogs are an important animal health problem that needs to be solved by improving veterinary oncology services in Mexico. PMID:25992997

  15. Epidemiological Study of Mammary Tumors in Female Dogs Diagnosed during the Period 2002-2012: A Growing Animal Health Problem.

    PubMed

    Salas, Yaritza; Márquez, Adelys; Diaz, Daniel; Romero, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies enable us to analyze disease behavior, define risk factors and establish fundamental prognostic criteria, with the purpose of studying different types of diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the epidemiological characteristics of canine mammary tumors diagnosed during the period 2002-2012. The study was based on a retrospective study consisting of 1,917 biopsies of intact dogs that presented mammary gland lesions. Biopsies were sent to the Department of Pathology FMVZ-UNAM diagnostic service. The annual incidence of mammary tumors was 16.8%: 47.7% (benign) and 47.5% (malignant). The highest number of cases was epithelial, followed by mixed tumors. The most commonly diagnosed tumors were tubular adenoma, papillary adenoma, tubular carcinoma, papillary carcinoma, solid carcinoma, complex carcinoma and carcinosarcoma. Pure breeds accounted for 80% of submissions, and the Poodle, Cocker Spaniel and German Shepherd were consistently affected. Adult female dogs (9 to 12 years old) were most frequently involved, followed by 5- to 8-year-old females. Some association between breeds with histological types of malignant tumors was observed, but no association was found between breeds and BN. Mammary tumors in intact dogs had a high incidence. Benign and malignant tumors had similar frequencies, with an increase in malignant tumors in the past four years of the study. Epithelial tumors were more common, and the most affected were old adult females, purebreds and small-sized dogs. Mammary tumors in dogs are an important animal health problem that needs to be solved by improving veterinary oncology services in Mexico.

  16. Emergency canine surgery in a deployed forward surgical team: a case report.

    PubMed

    Beitler, Alan L; Jeanette, Joseph P; McGraw, Andrew L; Butera, Jennifer R; Vanfosson, Christopher A; Seery, Jason M

    2011-04-01

    Forward surgical teams (FSTs) perform a variety of non-doctrinal functions. During their deployment to Afghanistan, the 541st FST (Airborne) performed emergency surgery on a German shepherd military working dog (MWD). Retrospective examination of a case of veterinary surgery in a deployed FST. A 5 1/2-year-old German shepherd MWD presented with extreme lethargy, tachycardia, excessive drooling, and a firm, distended abdomen. These conditions resulted from gastric dilatation with volvulus. Since evacuation to a veterinarian was untenable, emergency laparotomy was performed in the FST. The gastric dilatation with volvulus was treated by detorsion and gastropexy, and the canine patient fully recovered. Canine surgery can be safely performed in an FST. Based on the number of MWDs deployed throughout the theater, FSTs may be called upon to care for them in the absence of available veterinary care.

  17. Evaluation of lidocaine treatment and risk factors for death associated with gastric dilatation and volvulus in dogs: 112 cases (1997-2005).

    PubMed

    Buber, Tali; Saragusty, Joseph; Ranen, Eyal; Epstein, Ana; Bdolah-Abram, Tali; Bruchim, Yaron

    2007-05-01

    To determine clinical features, outcome, risk factors for death, and efficacy of IV administration of lidocaine as a prophylactic treatment for ischemic reperfusion injury in gastric dilatation and volvulus (GDV) in dogs. Retrospective case series. 112 dogs with GDV. Data pertaining to breed; time lag to admission; clinical, clinicopathologic, and surgical findings; lidocaine treatment; and postoperative complications were assessed for association with outcome. German Shepherd Dogs (28.6%) and Great Danes (17%) were significantly over-represented. Risk factors for death included time lag (> or = 5 hours vs < 5 hours) from onset of clinical signs to admission (46.0% vs 11.3%), rectal temperature (< or = 38 degrees C vs > 38 degrees C [< 100.4 degrees F vs > 100.4 degrees F]) at admission (40.0% vs 14.9%), presence or absence of ARF (67.0% vs 23.3%), presence or absence of suspected gastric wall necrosis (59.3% vs 16.0%), and untreated gastric wall necrosis, compared with treated gastric wall necrosis (100% vs 47.6%). Overall mortality rate was 26.8%; no significant differences were detected in mortality rate or postoperative complications between dogs that received lidocaine IV prior to surgical intervention (52.0%) and dogs that did not (48.0%). Mean +/- SD hospitalization time was longer in the lidocaine treatment group (3.5 +/- 1.9 days vs 2.5 +/- 1.4 days). Presence of the identified risk factors should warrant aggressive treatment. Lidocaine treatment was not associated with mortality rate or postoperative complications, but was associated with prolonged hospitalization time.

  18. German-English-Speaking Children's Mixed NPs with "Correct" Agreement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorschick, Liane; Quick, Antje Endesfelder; Glasser, Dana; Lieven, Elena; Tomasello, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has reported that bilingual children sometimes produce mixed noun phrases with "correct" gender agreement--as in "der dog" ("der" being a masculine determiner in German and the German word for "dog", "hund", being masculine as well). However, these could obviously be due to chance or to the indiscriminate use of a default…

  19. Posttraumatic stress disorder in a World War II concentration camp survivor caused by the attack of two German shepherd dogs: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Aleksandar A; Ivković, Maja; Gašić, Miroslava Jašović

    2011-05-20

    A 79-year-old woman suffered from acute posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and a loco typico, non-displaced fracture of her right distal radius due to an incident involving the assault of two unleashed owned dogs, which suddenly ran into her and aggressively jumped on her chest and knocked her down to the ground. Recovery for her damage claim concerning pain and disability due to her right forearm fracture caused by the incident, was not the issue in the litigation concerned. However, the issue of delayed impact of her previous Holocaust experience placed a significant challenge on M.N., as a plaintiff, in establishing a causal link between the posttraumatic stress disorder concerned and the alleged harmful action of the defendants, the owners of the two dogs. The case reported here proved interesting and instructive not only in the sense of addressing main issues relevant to litigation for psychological damage related to reactivated PTSD and delayed PTSD, but also in the sense of pointing at the clinical relevance of dog assaults on humans which, even without dog bite injuries, may result in a severe traumatization and eventual civil lawsuit. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The prevalence of ABCB1:c.227_230delATAG mutation in affected dog breeds from European countries.

    PubMed

    Firdova, Zuzana; Turnova, Evelina; Bielikova, Marcela; Turna, Jan; Dudas, Andrej

    2016-06-01

    Deletion of 4-base pairs in the canine ABCB1 (MDR1) gene, responsible for encoding P-glycoprotein, leads to nonsense frame-shift mutation, which causes hypersensitivity to macrocyclic lactones drugs (e.g. ivermectin). To date, at least 12 purebred dog breeds have been found to be affected by this mutation. The aim of this study was to update information about the prevalence of ABCB1 mutation (c.227_230delATAG) in predisposed breeds in multiple European countries. This large scale survey also includes countries which were not involved in previous studies. The samples were collected in the period from 2012 to 2014. The overview is based on genotyping data of 4729 individuals. The observed mutant allele frequencies were 58.5% (Smooth Collie), 48.3% (Rough Collie), 35% (Australian Shepherd), 30.3% (Shetland Sheepdog), 28.1% (Silken Windhound), 26.1% (Miniature Australian Shepherd), 24.3% (Longhaired Whippet), 16.2% (White Swiss Shepherd) and 0% (Border Collie). The possible presence of an ABCB1 mutant allele in Akita-Inu breed has been investigated with negative results. This information could be helpful for breeders in optimization of their breeding strategy and for veterinarians when prescribing drug therapy for dogs of predisposed breeds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Abundance, zoonotic potential and risk factors of intestinal parasitism amongst dog and cat populations: The scenario of Crete, Greece.

    PubMed

    Kostopoulou, Despoina; Claerebout, Edwin; Arvanitis, Dimitrios; Ligda, Panagiota; Voutzourakis, Nikolaos; Casaert, Stijn; Sotiraki, Smaragda

    2017-01-25

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prevalence and infection intensity of intestinal parasites in different dog and cat populations in Crete, Greece, estimate the zoonotic risk and identify risk factors. Faecal samples from shelter, household and shepherd dogs and shelter and household cats were analyzed using sedimentation/flotation techniques. Giardia and Cryptosporidium were detected by a quantitative direct immunofluorescence assay (IFA). PCR and sequencing was performed to evaluate the zoonotic potential of Giardia and Cryptosporidium positive samples. Totals of 879 dog and 264 cat faecal samples were examined. In dogs, the overall prevalence was 25.2% (CI: 22.4-28.1) for Giardia spp.; 9.2% (CI: 7.3-11.1) for Ancylostoma/Uncinaria spp.; 7.6% (CI: 5.9-9.4) for Toxocara spp.; 5.9% (CI: 4.4-7.5) for Cryptosporidium spp.; 4.6% (CI: 3.2-5.9) for Cystoisospora spp.; 2.7% (CI: 1.7-3.8) for Toxascaris leonina; 1.7% (CI: 0.9-2.6) for Capillaria spp.; 0.8% (CI: 0.2-1.4) for taeniid eggs; 0.2% (CI: 0-0.5) for Dipylidium caninum; and 0.1% (CI: 0-0.3) for Strongyloides stercoralis. In cats, the prevalence was 20.5% (CI: 15.6-25.3) for Giardia spp.; 9.5% (CI: 5.9-13.0) for Cystoisospora spp.; 8.3% (CI: 5.0-11.7) for Toxocara spp.; 7.6% (CI: 4.4-10.8) for Ancylostoma/Uncinaria spp.; 6.8% (CI: 3.8-9.9) for Cryptosporidium spp.; 4.2% (CI: 1.8-6.6) for Capillaria spp.; 0.8% (CI: 0-1.8) for taeniid eggs; and 0.4% (CI: 0-1.1) for Hammondia/Toxoplasma. Concerning the risk factors evaluated, there was a negative association between age and Giardia infection and between age and T. leonina infection intensity for dogs. Sequencing results revealed the presence of mainly animal-specific G. duodenalis assemblages C and D in dogs and assemblages F, C and BIV-like in cats, with only a limited number of (co-)infections with assemblage A. As for Cryptosporidium, the dog-specific C. canis and the pig-specific C. scrofarum were detected in dogs and the cat-specific C. felis was

  2. The Shepherd's Crook Sign: A New Neuroimaging Pareidolia in Joubert Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Manley, Andrew T; Maertens, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    By pareidolically recognizing specific patterns indicative of particular diseases, neuroimagers reinforce their mnemonic strategies and improve their neuroimaging diagnostic skills. Joubert Syndrome (JS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized clinically by mental retardation, episodes of abnormal deep and rapid breathing, abnormal eye movements, and ataxia. Many neuroimaging signs characteristic of JS have been reported. In retrospective case study, two consanguineous neonates diagnosed with JS were evaluated with brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and neurosonography. Both cranial ultrasound and MRI of the brain showed the characteristic molar tooth sign. There was a shepherd's crook in the sagittal views of the posterior fossa where the shaft of the crook is made by the brainstem and the pons. The arc of the crook is made by the abnormal superior cerebellar peduncle and cerebellar hemisphere. By ultrasound, the shepherd's crook sign was seen through the posterior fontanelle only. CT imaging also showed the shepherd's crook sign. Neuroimaging diagnosis of JS, which already involves the pareidolical recognition of specific patterns indicative of the disease, can be improved by recognition of the shepherd's crook sign on MRI, CT, and cranial ultrasound. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  3. An exploration of attitudes towards pedigree dogs and their disorders as expressed by a sample of companion animal veterinarians in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Farrow, T; Keown, A J; Farnworth, M J

    2014-09-01

    To explore veterinary perceptions of inherited disorders in pedigree dogs within New Zealand and how these affect animal health and welfare. An online questionnaire was distributed to the 647 members of the Companion Animal Society of the New Zealand Veterinary Association using an online survey system. The questionnaire collected details of practitioners, pedigree dog breeds and disorders most often encountered in practice, and responses to questions and statements regarding inherited disorders and pedigree dogs. Of the 216 respondents, 194 (89.8%) believed inherited disorders in dogs were a significant issue. The most commonly identified breeds presenting with inherited disorders were Boxer, Bulldog and German Shepherd dog. The most commonly reported inherited disorders were hip dysplasia, brachycephalic syndromes and elbow dysplasia. Of 207 respondents, 100 (48.3%) had advised clients against purchasing a pedigree dog due to common inherited disorders and 183 (85.6%) considered the health and welfare of some breeds to be too compromised to continue breeding. Of 199 respondents, 132 (66.3%) reported seeing no change in prevalence of inherited conditions, 103/204 (50.5%) reported seeing a positive change in attitudes towards inherited disorders among dog owners, and 81/207 (39.1%) thought legislative support would help decrease inherited disorders in pedigree dogs. Attitudes were not associated with time since graduation or ownership of a New Zealand Kennel Club registered breed of dog. The most common suggestions to decrease prevalence of inherited disorders were to alter breed standards, educate public or buyers and compulsory genetic testing. Among respondents, veterinarians considered inherited disorders as significant issues in a number of pedigree breeds. Veterinarians were concerned about inherited disorders in pedigree dogs, felt they had an obligation to treat such animals and were supportive of measures to make genetic testing for inheritable disorders a

  4. Relevance of sodium/glucose cotransporter-1 (SGLT1) to diabetes mellitus and obesity in dogs.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, D J; German, A J; Shirazi-Beechey, S P

    2013-04-01

    Glucose transport across the enterocyte brush border membrane by sodium/glucose cotransporter-1 (SGLT1, coded by Slc5a1) is the rate-limiting step for intestinal glucose transport. The relevance of SGLT1 expression in predisposition to diabetes mellitus and to obesity was investigated in dogs. Cultured Caco-2/TC7 cells were shown to express SGLT1 in vitro. A 2-kbp fragment of the Slc5a1 5' flanking region was cloned from canine genomic DNA, ligated into reporter gene plasmids, and shown to drive reporter gene expression in these cells above control (P < 0.001). To determine the effect of the 3 known SNPs in this region on promoter function, new promoter/reporter constructs (all permutations of these 3 SNPs) were created by site-directed mutagenesis. No significant differences in promoter function were seen, suggesting that these SNPs do not have a significant effect on the constitutive transcription of SGLT1 mRNA in dogs. A search for novel SNPs in this region in dogs was made in 2 breeds predisposed to diabetes mellitus (Samoyed and cairn terrier), 2 breeds that rarely develop diabetes (boxer and German shepherd), and 2 breeds predisposed to obesity (Labrador retriever and cocker spaniel). The Slc5a1 5' flanking region was amplified from 10 healthy individuals of each of these breeds by high-fidelity PCR with the use of breed-labeled primers and sequenced by pyrosequencing. The sequence of the Slc5a1 5' flanking region in all individuals of all breeds tested was identical. On this evidence, variations in Slc5a1 promoter sequence between dogs do not influence the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus or obesity in these breeds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The use of infrared thermography to detect the stages of estrus cycle and ovulation time in anatolian shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Olğaç, Kemal Tuna; Akçay, Ergun; Çil, Beste; Uçar, Burak Mehmet; Daşkın, Ali

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of thermographic monitoring, using the temperature changes of perianal and perivulvar areas for the determination of estrus in Anatolian Shepherd bitches. Fifteen bitches were used in the study. Blood and vaginal smear samples were collected and thermographic monitoring of perianal and perivulvar areas were carried out starting from proestrus to early diestrus. Also, external signs of estrus were investigated. Smear samples were evaluated by light microscopy after Diff-Quik staining method and superficial and keratinized superficial cells were determined as percentage (S + KS%). Progesterone and luteinizing hormone measurements were done by radioimmunoassay. The difference in temperature between perianal and perivulvar areas was evaluated through thermographic images by FLIR ResearchIR Software. According to the results obtained from the study, differences between progesterone and S + KS% were statistically significant ( P  < 0,05). Although temperature showed increase and decrease with progesterone and S + KS%, the differences were not important statistically ( P  > 0,05). Serum luteinizing hormone levels did not sign any difference ( P  > 0,05). As a result, thermographic monitoring alone is not enough for estrus detection in Anatolian Shepherd bitches. However, it can be used to assist the actual estrus detection technique in terms of providing some foreknowledge by evaluating the differences in temperature.

  6. Expedition One CDR Shepherd with IMAX camera

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-02-11

    STS98-E-5164 (11 February 2001) --- Astronaut William M. (Bill) Shepherd documents activity onboard the newly attached Destiny laboratory using an IMAX motion picture camera. The crews of Atlantis and the International Space Station on February 11 opened the Destiny laboratory and spent the first full day of what are planned to be years of work ahead inside the orbiting science and command center. Shepherd opened the Destiny hatch, and he and Shuttle commander Kenneth D. Cockrell ventured inside at 8:38 a.m. (CST). Members of both crews went to work quickly inside the new module, activating air systems, fire extinguishers, alarm systems, computers and internal communications. The crew also continued equipment transfers from the shuttle to the station and filmed several scenes onboard the station using an IMAX camera. This scene was recorded with a digital still camera.

  7. STS-52 MS Shepherd during camera equipment training on JSC's Bldg 1 rooftop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-52 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Mission Specialist (MS) William M. Shepherd aims a 35mm camera at a distant subject from his vantage point atop the roof of JSC's nine-story Project Management Building Bldg 1. The training session familiarized Shepherd with camera equipment to be used in Earth observation documentation during STS-52.

  8. Increased resistance to sudden noise by audio stimulation during early ontogeny in German shepherd puppies.

    PubMed

    Chaloupková, Helena; Svobodová, Ivona; Vápeník, Pavel; Bartoš, Luděk

    2018-01-01

    The period of early ontogeny constitutes a time when the physical immaturity of an organism is highly susceptible to external stimuli. Thus, early development plays a major role in shaping later adult behavior. The aim of the study was to check whether stimulating puppies at this early stage in life with sound would improve their responsiveness towards unfamiliar noises during the selection process of the police behavioral test for puppies. The cohort comprised 37 puppies from the litters of three mothers. At the commencement of the experiment the dogs were aged 16 days, rising to the age of 32 days at its close. The mothers and litters of the treatment group were either exposed to radio broadcasts, (see below; three litters totaling 19 puppies), while the control group was not exposed to any radio programs (eight litters totaling 18 puppies). All three mothers had previously experienced both auditory circumstances, as described herein. Ordinary radio broadcasts were played to the puppies in the treatment group three times a day for 20 minute periods, always during feeding time. The cohort was subjected to the so-called Puppy Test, i.e. analysis of the potential of each animal, once the dogs had reached the age of 7 weeks. Such tests included exposure to a sudden noise caused by a shovel (100 dB), noise when alone in a room, and response to loud distracting stimuli (the latter two at 70 dB). Said tasks were rated by the same analyst on a scale of 0-5 points; the better the response of the dog, the higher the score given. The differences between the treatment and control groups were analyzed via Mixed Models (PROC MIXED) in SAS. The animals comprising the treatment group responded with a higher score to the sudden noise caused by the shovel than the control dogs (P<0.01). Interestingly, gender was seen to affect response, with the males scoring more than the females (P<0.1). In conclusion, the results suggested that audio stimulation early in life improved the

  9. Increased resistance to sudden noise by audio stimulation during early ontogeny in German shepherd puppies

    PubMed Central

    Svobodová, Ivona; Vápeník, Pavel

    2018-01-01

    The period of early ontogeny constitutes a time when the physical immaturity of an organism is highly susceptible to external stimuli. Thus, early development plays a major role in shaping later adult behavior. The aim of the study was to check whether stimulating puppies at this early stage in life with sound would improve their responsiveness towards unfamiliar noises during the selection process of the police behavioral test for puppies. The cohort comprised 37 puppies from the litters of three mothers. At the commencement of the experiment the dogs were aged 16 days, rising to the age of 32 days at its close. The mothers and litters of the treatment group were either exposed to radio broadcasts, (see below; three litters totaling 19 puppies), while the control group was not exposed to any radio programs (eight litters totaling 18 puppies). All three mothers had previously experienced both auditory circumstances, as described herein. Ordinary radio broadcasts were played to the puppies in the treatment group three times a day for 20 minute periods, always during feeding time. The cohort was subjected to the so-called Puppy Test, i.e. analysis of the potential of each animal, once the dogs had reached the age of 7 weeks. Such tests included exposure to a sudden noise caused by a shovel (100 dB), noise when alone in a room, and response to loud distracting stimuli (the latter two at 70 dB). Said tasks were rated by the same analyst on a scale of 0–5 points; the better the response of the dog, the higher the score given. The differences between the treatment and control groups were analyzed via Mixed Models (PROC MIXED) in SAS. The animals comprising the treatment group responded with a higher score to the sudden noise caused by the shovel than the control dogs (P<0.01). Interestingly, gender was seen to affect response, with the males scoring more than the females (P<0.1). In conclusion, the results suggested that audio stimulation early in life improved the

  10. Shepherds' local knowledge and scientific data on the scavenging ecosystem service: Insights for conservation.

    PubMed

    Morales-Reyes, Zebensui; Martín-López, Berta; Moleón, Marcos; Mateo-Tomás, Patricia; Olea, Pedro P; Arrondo, Eneko; Donázar, José A; Sánchez-Zapata, José A

    2018-05-05

    Integrating indigenous and local knowledge (ILK) and scientific knowledge (SK) in the evaluation of ecosystem services has been recommended by the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services. We examined the similarities and contradictions between shepherds' ILK and SK on the scavenging service provided by vertebrates in Spain. We conducted 73 face-to-face surveys with shepherds to evaluate their ILK. We collected scientific information on 20 scavenger species by monitoring the consumption of 45 livestock carcasses with camera traps. We found a high consistency between ILK and SK regarding the provision of the scavenging service by vertebrates, which was also consistent over the range of shepherd ages and experience. Our findings support the importance of ILK held by shepherds to better understand and to collect information on the scavenging service, particularly at the species level. The integration of ILK and SK into the management strategies of scavengers can benefit the conservation of globally endangered scavengers and the ecosystem services they provide.

  11. Astronauts Cockrell, Shepherd and Polansky during hatch opening

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-02-11

    STS98-E-5130 (11 February 2001) --- The crews of Atlantis and the International Space Station open the Destiny laboratory on February 11 in this digital still camera view. From the left are astronauts Kenneth D. Cockrell, STS-98 commander; William M. (Bill) Shepherd, Expedition One commander; and Mark L. Polansky, STS-98 pilot. Later, the astronauts and cosmonauts spent the first full day of what are planned to be years of work ahead inside the orbiting science and command center. After Shepherd opened the Destiny hatch, he and Cockrell ventured inside at 8:38 a.m. (CST). As depicted in subsequent digital images in this series, members of both crews went to work quickly inside the new module, activating air systems, fire extinguishers, alarm systems, computers and internal communications. The crew also continued equipment transfers from the shuttle to the station.

  12. Astronauts Cockrell, Shepherd and Polansky during hatch opening

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-02-11

    STS98-E-5131 (11 February 2001) --- The crews of Atlantis and the International Space Station open the Destiny laboratory on February 11 in this digital still camera view. From the left are astronauts Kenneth D. Cockrell, STS-98 commander; William M. (Bill) Shepherd, Expedition One commander; and Mark L. Polansky, STS-98 pilot. Later, the astronauts and cosmonauts spent the first full day of what are planned to be years of work ahead inside the orbiting science and command center. After Shepherd opened the Destiny hatch, he and Cockrell ventured inside at 8:38 a.m. (CST). As depicted in subsequent digital images in this series, members of both crews went to work quickly inside the new module, activating air systems, fire extinguishers, alarm systems, computers and internal communications. The crew also continued equipment transfers from the shuttle to the station.

  13. Astronauts Cockrell, Shepherd and Polansky during hatch opening

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-02-11

    STS98-E-5133 (11 February 2001) --- The crew commanders of Atlantis and the International Space Station shake hands following the opening of the Destiny laboratory on February 11 in this digital still camera view. From the left are astronauts Kenneth D. Cockrell, STS-98 commander; William M. (Bill) Shepherd, Expedition One commander; and Mark L. Polansky, STS-98 pilot. Later, the astronauts and cosmonauts spent the first full day of what are planned to be years of work ahead inside the orbiting science and command center. After Shepherd opened the Destiny hatch, he and Cockrell ventured inside at 8:38 a.m. (CST). As depicted in subsequent digital images in this series, members of both crews went to work quickly inside the new module, activating air systems, fire extinguishers, alarm systems, computers and internal communications. The crew also continued equipment transfers from the shuttle to the station.

  14. MS Ivins and Astronaut Shepherd at work in Destiny module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-02-11

    STS98-E-5143 (11 February 2001) --- Astronauts Marsha S. Ivins (from the left), STS-98 mission specialist, Kenneth D. Cockrell, STS-98 mission commander; and William M. Shepherd, Expedition One mission commander, discuss the organizational "game plan" onboard the newly opened Destiny laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS). After Shepherd opened the Destiny hatch, he and Cockrell ventured inside at 8:38 a.m. (CST), February 11, 2001. As depicted in subsequent digital images in this series, members of both crews went to work quickly inside the new module, activating air systems, fire extinguishers, alarm systems, computers and internal communications. The crew also took some photos and continued equipment transfers from the shuttle to the station.

  15. STS-41 MS Shepherd uses DTO 1206 portable computer on OV-103's middeck

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-10-10

    STS-41 Mission Specialist (MS) William M. Shepherd uses Detailed Test Objective (DTO) Space Station Cursor Control Device Evaluation MACINTOSH portable computer on the middeck of Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. The computer is velcroed to forward lockers MF71C and MF71E. Surrounding Shepherd are checklists, the field sequential (FS) crew cabin camera, and a lighting fixture.

  16. Selection of Breeding Stock among Australian Purebred Dog Breeders, with Particular Emphasis on the Dam

    PubMed Central

    Czerwinski, Veronika; McArthur, Michelle; Smith, Bradley; Hynd, Philip; Hazel, Susan

    2016-01-01

    breed/breed groups. In particular, the importance of Maternal Care varied according to dog breed group. Breeders of brachycephalic breeds tended to differ the most in relation to Offspring Potential and Dam Genetics and Health. The number of breeding dogs/bitches influenced breeding priority, especially in relation to Dam Temperament, however no effect was found relating to the number of puppies bred each year. Only 24% of breeders used their own sire for breeding. The finding that some breeders did not test for diseases relevant to their breed, such as hip dysplasia in Labrador Retrievers and German Shepherds, provides important information on the need to educate some breeders, and also buyers of purebred puppies, that screening for significant diseases should occur. Further research into the selection of breeding dams and sires will inform future strategies to improve the health and behaviour of our best friend. PMID:27854338

  17. Treatment of MDR1 Mutant Dogs with Macrocyclic Lactones

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, Joachim; Janko, Christina

    2012-01-01

    P-glycoprotein, encoded by the multidrug resistance gene MDR1, is an ATP-driven drug efflux pump which is highly expressed at the blood-brain barrier of vertebrates. Drug efflux of macrocyclic lactones by P-glycoprotein is highly relevant for the therapeutic safety of macrocyclic lactones, as thereby GABA-gated chloride channels, which are confined to the central nervous system in vertebrates, are protected from high drug concentrations that otherwise would induce neurological toxicity. A 4-bp deletion mutation exists in the MDR1 gene of many dog breeds such as the Collie and the Australian Shepherd, which results in the expression of a non-functional P-glycoprotein and is associated with multiple drug sensitivity. Accordingly, dogs with homozygous MDR1 mutation are in general prone to neurotoxicity by macrocyclic lactones due to their increased brain penetration. Nevertheless, treatment of these dogs with macrocyclic lactones does not inevitably result in neurological symptoms, since, the safety of treatment highly depends on the treatment indication, dosage, route of application, and the individual compound used as outlined in this review. Whereas all available macrocyclic lactones can safely be administered to MDR1 mutant dogs at doses usually used for heartworm prevention, these dogs will experience neurological toxicity following a high dose regimen which is common for mange treatment in dogs. Here, we review and discuss the neurotoxicological potential of different macrocyclic lactones as well as their treatment options in MDR1 mutant dogs. PMID:22039792

  18. Influence of dietary protein content and source on colonic fermentative activity in dogs differing in body size and digestive tolerance.

    PubMed

    Nery, J; Goudez, R; Biourge, V; Tournier, C; Leray, V; Martin, L; Thorin, C; Nguyen, P; Dumon, H

    2012-08-01

    Low-consistency, high-moisture feces have been observed in large dogs (Canis lupus familiaris), compared with small dogs, and particularly in sensitive breeds (e.g., German Shepherd dogs). The aim of this work was to determine if greater colonic protein fermentation is responsible for poorer fecal quality in large sensitive dogs. Twenty-seven bitches were allotted to 4 groups based on size and digestive sensitivity: small, medium, large tolerant, and large sensitive. Five experimental diets varying in protein source [highly digestible wheat gluten (WG) vs. medium digestible poultry meal (PM), and protein concentration from 21.4 to 21.6 (LP) to 38.2 to 39.2% CP (HP)] were tested. Diets were fed for 14 d and followed by a 12-d transition period. Digestive fermentation by-products were investigated in fresh stools [ammonia, phenol, indole, and short chain fatty acids including acetate, propionate, and butyrate (C2 to C4 SCFA), branched-chain fatty acids (BCFA), and valerate] and in urine (phenol and indole). Bacterial populations in feces were identified. The PM diets resulted in greater fecal concentrations of ammonia, BCFA, valerate, indole, and C2 to C4 SCFA than WG diets (P = 0.002, P < 0.001, P = 0.039, P = 0.003, and P = 0.012, respectively). Greater concentrations of ammonia, BCFA, and valerate were found in the feces of dogs fed HP compared with LP diets (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, and P = 0.012, respectively). The concentrations of ammonia, valerate, phenol, and indole in feces of large sensitive dogs were greater (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P = 0.002, and P = 0.019, respectively) compared with the other groups. The Enterococcus populations were greater in feces of dogs fed with PMHP rather than WGLP diets (P = 0.006). Urinary phenol and indole excretion was greater when dogs were fed PM than WG diets (P < 0.001 and P = 0.038, respectively) and HP than LP diets (P = 0.001 and P = 0.087, respectively). Large sensitive dogs were prone to excrete a greater quantity of

  19. Autonomous Shepherding Behaviors of Multiple Target Steering Robots.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonki; Kim, DaeEun

    2017-11-25

    This paper presents a distributed coordination methodology for multi-robot systems, based on nearest-neighbor interactions. Among many interesting tasks that may be performed using swarm robots, we propose a biologically-inspired control law for a shepherding task, whereby a group of external agents drives another group of agents to a desired location. First, we generated sheep-like robots that act like a flock. We assume that each agent is capable of measuring the relative location and velocity to each of its neighbors within a limited sensing area. Then, we designed a control strategy for shepherd-like robots that have information regarding where to go and a steering ability to control the flock, according to the robots' position relative to the flock. We define several independent behavior rules; each agent calculates to what extent it will move by summarizing each rule. The flocking sheep agents detect the steering agents and try to avoid them; this tendency leads to movement of the flock. Each steering agent only needs to focus on guiding the nearest flocking agent to the desired location. Without centralized coordination, multiple steering agents produce an arc formation to control the flock effectively. In addition, we propose a new rule for collecting behavior, whereby a scattered flock or multiple flocks are consolidated. From simulation results with multiple robots, we show that each robot performs actions for the shepherding behavior, and only a few steering agents are needed to control the whole flock. The results are displayed in maps that trace the paths of the flock and steering robots. Performance is evaluated via time cost and path accuracy to demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach.

  20. Autonomous Shepherding Behaviors of Multiple Target Steering Robots

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonki; Kim, DaeEun

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a distributed coordination methodology for multi-robot systems, based on nearest-neighbor interactions. Among many interesting tasks that may be performed using swarm robots, we propose a biologically-inspired control law for a shepherding task, whereby a group of external agents drives another group of agents to a desired location. First, we generated sheep-like robots that act like a flock. We assume that each agent is capable of measuring the relative location and velocity to each of its neighbors within a limited sensing area. Then, we designed a control strategy for shepherd-like robots that have information regarding where to go and a steering ability to control the flock, according to the robots’ position relative to the flock. We define several independent behavior rules; each agent calculates to what extent it will move by summarizing each rule. The flocking sheep agents detect the steering agents and try to avoid them; this tendency leads to movement of the flock. Each steering agent only needs to focus on guiding the nearest flocking agent to the desired location. Without centralized coordination, multiple steering agents produce an arc formation to control the flock effectively. In addition, we propose a new rule for collecting behavior, whereby a scattered flock or multiple flocks are consolidated. From simulation results with multiple robots, we show that each robot performs actions for the shepherding behavior, and only a few steering agents are needed to control the whole flock. The results are displayed in maps that trace the paths of the flock and steering robots. Performance is evaluated via time cost and path accuracy to demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. PMID:29186836

  1. An unusual case of relay pentobarbital toxicosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Karyn; Jaeger, Robin; Ebel, Joseph G

    2011-09-01

    Sodium pentobarbital and phenytoin are common constituents of veterinary euthanasia solutions in the United States. Relay, or secondary, barbiturate toxicosis has been reported in carnivorous animals that have fed from the carcasses of euthanized livestock. This case report presents barbiturate toxicosis in a dog. A 2-year-old female spayed Australian shepherd presented comatose 2 h after ingesting an unknown substance on the beach. The material was retrieved from the stomach by gastric lavage and visually identified as fish or other animal tissue. The dog recovered with symptomatic and supportive therapy and was released on the third day of hospitalization. Tissue found on the beach near where the dog walked and a urine sample from the dog were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Both samples were positive for pentobarbital and phenytoin. The tissue was consistent with mammalian blubber based on gross and histological examination. Three weeks previously, a juvenile humpback whale had stranded on the beach where the dog had ingested the unknown substance. The whale had been euthanized with a barbiturate solution, necropsied, and removed from the beach. It was not definitively determined that the pentobarbital-containing blubber ingested by the dog was from the euthanized whale, but that was the most likely source. Although attempts were made to remove the whale's remains from the beach, practical considerations made complete removal challenging, if not impossible.

  2. Naturally occurring melanomas in dogs as models for non-UV pathways of human melanomas.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Marc; Cadieu, Edouard; De Brito, Clotilde; Abadie, Jérôme; Vergier, Béatrice; Devauchelle, Patrick; Degorce, Frédérique; Dréano, Stephane; Primot, Aline; Dorso, Laetitia; Lagadic, Marie; Galibert, Francis; Hédan, Benoit; Galibert, Marie-Dominique; André, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneously occurring melanomas are frequent in dogs. They appear at the same localizations as in humans, i.e. skin, mucosal sites, nail matrix and eyes. They display variable behaviors: tumors at oral localizations are more frequent and aggressive than at other anatomical sites. Interestingly, dog melanomas are associated with strong breed predispositions and overrepresentation of black-coated dogs. Epidemiological analysis of 2350 affected dogs showed that poodles are at high risk of developing oral melanoma, while schnauzers or Beauce shepherds mostly developped cutaneous melanoma. Clinical and histopathological analyses were performed on a cohort of 153 cases with a 4-yr follow-up. Histopathological characterization showed that most canine tumors are intradermal and homologous to human rare morphological melanomas types - 'nevocytoid type' and 'animal type'-. Tumor cDNA sequencing data, obtained from 95 dogs for six genes, relevant to human melanoma classification, detected somatic mutations in oral melanoma, in NRAS and PTEN genes, at human hotspot sites, but not in BRAF. Altogether, these findings support the relevance of the dog model for comparative oncology of melanomas, especially for the elucidation of non-UV induced pathways. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Ghrelin-stimulation test in the diagnosis of canine pituitary dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, S F M; De Vliegher, S P; Mol, J A; Van Ham, L M L; Kooistra, H S

    2006-08-01

    This study investigated whether ghrelin, a potent releaser of growth hormone (GH) secretion, is a valuable tool in the diagnosis of canine pituitary dwarfism. The effect of intravenous administration of ghrelin on the release of GH and other adenohypophyseal hormones was investigated in German shepherd dogs with congenital combined pituitary hormone deficiency and in healthy Beagles. Analysis of the maximal increment (i.e. difference between pre- and maximal post-ghrelin plasma hormone concentration) indicated that the GH response was significantly lower in the dwarf dogs compared with the healthy dogs. In none of the pituitary dwarfs, the ghrelin-induced plasma GH concentration exceeded 5 microg/l at any time. However, this was also true for 3 healthy dogs. In all dogs, ghrelin administration did not affect the plasma concentrations of ACTH, cortisol, TSH, LH and PRL . Thus, while a ghrelin-induced plasma GH concentration above 5 microg/l excludes GH deficiency, false-negative results may occur.

  4. Canine sterile nodular panniculitis: a retrospective study of 39 dogs.

    PubMed

    Contreary, Caitlin L; Outerbridge, Catherine A; Affolter, Verena K; Kass, Philip H; White, Stephen D

    2015-12-01

    Canine sterile nodular panniculitis (SNP) is an inflammatory disease of the panniculus that is typically managed with immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive treatments. It has been reported to be a cutaneous marker of an underlying systemic disease. To assess the presence or absence of concurrent systemic diseases associated with canine SNP and to document breed predispositions. Thirty nine dogs presented to a veterinary teaching hospital from 1990 to 2012 which met inclusion criteria. Inclusion in this retrospective study required a diagnosis of SNP via histopathological analysis and negative special stains for infectious organisms. Breed distributions of affected dogs were compared to all other dogs examined at this hospital during the study period. Correlations between the histological pattern of panniculitis and the histological presence of dermatitis, clinical presentation of lesions, dog breed and therapeutic outcomes were assessed. Australian shepherd dogs, Brittany spaniels, Dalmatians, Pomeranians and Chihuahuas were significantly over-represented, but correlations between inflammatory patterns of panniculitis and other histological and clinical factors were not identified. Based on the information available in medical records, 32 dogs (82.1%) had no concurrent systemic diseases identified. Four dogs had concurrent polyarthritis, which may be related to SNP through unknown mechanisms. This study identified several novel breed predilections for SNP; it failed to find any clear correlations with associated systemic diseases other than polyarthritis. The histological inflammatory pattern of SNP does not predict therapeutic outcome. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  5. Effects of diets supplemented by fish oil on sex ratio of pups in bitch.

    PubMed

    Gharagozlou, Faramarz; Youssefi, Reza; Akbarinejad, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of fish oil supplementation prior to mating on secondary sex ratio of pups (the proportion of males at birth) in bitches. Sixty five bitches (German Shepherd, n = 35; Husky, n = 30) were enrolled in the study. Bitches (140-150 days post-estrus) were given 2% per dry matter intake palm oil and fish oil in the control (n = 33) and treatment (n = 32) groups, respectively. To induce estrus, bitches were received equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) administration (50 IU kg(-1)) 30 days after nutritional supplementation followed by human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration (500 IU per dog) seven days later. Bitches were introduced to dogs of the same breed after hCG administration. The weight of bitches was increased over time (p < 0.05), but their weight change was not different between two groups (p > 0.05). The mating rate, pregnancy rate and litter size were not influenced by treatment and breed. Secondary sex ratio was higher in the treatment (105/164; 64.00%) than in the control (68/147; 46.30%) group (p < 0.05; adjusted odds ratio = 2.068). Moreover, secondary sex ratio was higher in Husky bitches (88/141; 62.40%) compared to German Shepherd (85/170; 50.00%; p < 0.05; adjusted odds ratio = 1.661). In conclusion, the present study showed that inclusion of fish oil in the diet of bitches prior to mating could increase the proportion of male pups at birth. In addition, it appears that there might be variation among dog breeds with regard to the sex ratio of offspring.

  6. Effects of diets supplemented by fish oil on sex ratio of pups in bitch

    PubMed Central

    Gharagozlou, Faramarz; Youssefi, Reza; Akbarinejad, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of fish oil supplementation prior to mating on secondary sex ratio of pups (the proportion of males at birth) in bitches. Sixty five bitches (German Shepherd, n = 35; Husky, n = 30) were enrolled in the study. Bitches (140-150 days post-estrus) were given 2% per dry matter intake palm oil and fish oil in the control (n = 33) and treatment (n = 32) groups, respectively. To induce estrus, bitches were received equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) administration (50 IU kg-1) 30 days after nutritional supplementation followed by human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration (500 IU per dog) seven days later. Bitches were introduced to dogs of the same breed after hCG administration. The weight of bitches was increased over time (p < 0.05), but their weight change was not different between two groups (p > 0.05). The mating rate, pregnancy rate and litter size were not influenced by treatment and breed. Secondary sex ratio was higher in the treatment (105/164; 64.00%) than in the control (68/147; 46.30%) group (p < 0.05; adjusted odds ratio = 2.068). Moreover, secondary sex ratio was higher in Husky bitches (88/141; 62.40%) compared to German Shepherd (85/170; 50.00%; p < 0.05; adjusted odds ratio = 1.661). In conclusion, the present study showed that inclusion of fish oil in the diet of bitches prior to mating could increase the proportion of male pups at birth. In addition, it appears that there might be variation among dog breeds with regard to the sex ratio of offspring. PMID:27482354

  7. Exfoliative cutaneous lupus erythematosus in German shorthaired pointer dogs: disease development, progression and evaluation of three immunomodulatory drugs (ciclosporin, hydroxychloroquine, and adalimumab) in a controlled environment

    PubMed Central

    Mauldin, Elizabeth A.; Morris, Daniel O.; Brown, Dorothy C.; Casal, Margret L.

    2011-01-01

    Six German shorthaired pointer dogs (two females, four males) with exfoliative cutaneous lupus erythematosus (ECLE) were studied in a controlled setting until disease progression necessitated euthanasia. During investigations into the heredity of disease, five dogs received immunomodulatory drugs to alleviate clinical signs (lameness, erythema, scaling, erosions/ulcers). One dog served as a control and received only baths and oral fatty acids. Four dogs received ciclosporin (5–10 mg/kg once daily) for 4.5 months to 2 years. Ciclosporin decreased erythema and arthralgia, but did not halt worsening of lesions. Three dogs received hydroxychloroquine (5–10 mg/kg once daily) for 8 weeks, 7 months, and 9 months, respectively, with no side effects. Hydroxychloroquine appeared to slow clinical progression in two dogs on extended treatment and normalized globulin levels in all three dogs while receiving the drug. Four dogs, including the control dog, were euthanized between 1 and 4.5 years of age. Two remaining male dogs received a tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α antagonist, adalimumab, at 0.5 mg/kg every 2 weeks for 8 weeks then weekly for 8 weeks. Serum TNF-α levels were not significantly altered nor were quantifiable changes seen in skin lesions or lameness. Subsequently, the dogs were maintained on hydroxychloroquine for another year. This is the first study to evaluate the use of a TNF-α inhibitor for canine lupus and the first to address the safety of long-term administration of hydroxychloroquine, albeit in a small number of dogs. The study documents the progression of ECLE and generally poor response to therapy. PMID:20374572

  8. Spacecraft-plasma-debris interaction in an ion beam shepherd mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cichocki, Filippo; Merino, Mario; Ahedo, Eduardo

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a study of the interaction between a spacecraft, a plasma thruster plume and a free floating object, in the context of an active space debris removal mission based on the ion beam shepherd concept. The analysis is performed with the EP2PLUS hybrid code and includes the evaluation of the transferred force and torque to the target debris, its surface sputtering due to the impinging hypersonic ions, and the equivalent electric circuit of the spacecraft-plasma-debris interaction. The electric potential difference that builds up between the spacecraft and the debris, the ion backscattering and the backsputtering contamination of the shepherd satellite are evaluated for a nominal scenario. A sensitivity analysis is carried out to evaluate quantitatively the effects of electron thermodynamics, ambient plasma, heavy species collisions, and debris position.

  9. Astronauts Cockrell, Shepherd and Polansky prior to opening hatch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-02-11

    STS98-E-5123 (11 February 2001) --- This digital still camera shot shows STS-98 mission commander Kenneth D. Cockrell (from left), Expedition One commander William M. (Bill) Shepherd and STS-98 pilot Mark L. Polansky pausing at Unity's closed hatch to the newly attached Destiny laboratory. The crews of Atlantis and the International Space Station opened the laboratory shortly after this photo was made on Feb. 11; and the astronauts and cosmonauts spent the first full day of what are planned to be years of work ahead inside the orbiting science and command center. Shepherd opened the Destiny hatch, and he and shuttle commander Cockrell ventured inside at 8:38 a.m. (CST), Feb. 11. As depicted in subsequent digital images in this series, members of both crews went to work quickly inside the new module, activating air systems, fire extinguishers, alarm systems, computers and internal communications. The crew also continued equipment transfers from the shuttle to the station.

  10. Dogs' (Canis familiaris) attention to human perception: Influence of breed groups and life experiences.

    PubMed

    Heberlein, Marianne T E; Turner, Dennis C; Manser, Marta B

    2017-02-01

    Attending to the perception of others may help individuals gaining information from conspecifics, or help in competitive situations. Dogs (Canis familiaris) are attentive to humans' signals and their attentional state. We investigated whether dogs of different breed groups differ in their ability to pay attention to human's perception, first according to the genetic relatedness between dog breeds, and second according to working style differences. Once dogs had learned to leave forbidden food on the floor, they were confronted with 2 food items to which only they had unrestricted visual access. The owners saw either none or 1 food item through a transparent barrier. Our results showed that dogs pay attention to the perception of humans, whereby differences between breed groups became obvious. Within different genetic groups, ancient and hunting type dogs performed similarly, they were more attentive to their owners' perception than shepherd and the mastiff type dogs. When comparing dogs classified according to their working style, independent workers and family dogs were attentive to the owner's perception, while cooperative workers seemed not. The dogs' choice could not be explained by a general or training induced preference for eating behind an opaque screen, or by an influence of the owner's possible intention to prevent the dog from taking the food item he could see. Our study confirms that dogs are attentive/sensitive to human's perception, but genetic and working style differences among the breeds, as well as dog sport experiences explain part of the variation seen in their performance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Expedition One CDR Shepherd in Node 1/Unity module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-02-16

    STS98-E-5287 (16 February 2001) --- Astronaut William M. (Bill) Shepherd, Expedition One commander, participates in a parting chat with some astronaut visitors (out of frame), about to conclude their time on the outpost. The scene was recorded with a digital still camera during farewells in the Unity node.

  12. Individual differences in social and non-social behaviors in domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) during the acquisition, extinction and reacquisition of a problem solving task.

    PubMed

    Shimabukuro, Carolina; Putrino, Natalia; Helbling, Julia; Tognetti, Sandra; Bentosela, Mariana

    2015-04-01

    Dogs are able to solve different problems by trial and error learning, but it seems that they cannot understand the means-end connection. Some studies suggest that dogs' performance is influenced by their breed and by the level of familiarity with the person they interact with. In our study, we assess individual differences in both social and non-social responses in a problem-solving task during the acquisition, extinction, and reacquisition phases. In order to investigate the effect of familiarity, in the first experiment, the human present during the task was either a familiar (the dog's owner) or unfamiliar person. In the second experiment, we compared breeds (Retrievers and Shepherds) that had previously shown differences in a communicative task. The results revealed that all groups learned the task and became more efficient in the acquisition trials. These non-social responses diminished during extinction, where an increase in social responses was observed. With regard to individual differences, dogs were more persistent in searching the reward during the second extinction trial when the owner was present (in contrast with a stranger), and also looked longer at the unfamiliar person at the beginning of the acquisition trial. On the other hand, Retrievers showed greater social motivation during reacquisition and Shepherds picked up more bones during the third acquisition trial, thus suggesting a more persistent search of the reward. These findings highlight the relevance of studying different learning schedules as well as individual differences in problem-solving ability so as to improve selection and training techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A genetic dissection of breed composition and performance enhancement in the Alaskan sled dog

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Alaskan sled dog offers a rare opportunity to investigate the development of a dog breed based solely on performance, rather than appearance, thus setting the breed apart from most others. Several established breeds, many of which are recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC), have been introduced into the sled dog population to enhance racing performance. We have used molecular methods to ascertain the constitutive breeds used to develop successful sled dog lines, and in doing so, determined the breed origins of specific performance-related behaviors. One hundred and ninety-nine Alaskan sled dogs were genotyped using 96 microsatellite markers that span the canine genome. These data were compared to that from 141 similarly genotyped purebred dog breeds. Sled dogs were evaluated for breed composition based on a variety of performance phenotypes including speed, endurance and work ethic, and the data stratified based on population structure. Results We observe that the Alaskan sled dog has a unique molecular signature and that the genetic profile is sufficient for identifying dogs bred for sprint versus distance. When evaluating contributions of existing breeds we find that the Alaskan Malamute and Siberian Husky contributions are associated with enhanced endurance; Pointer and Saluki are associated with enhanced speed and the Anatolian Shepherd demonstrates a positive influence on work ethic. Conclusion We have established a genetic breed profile for the Alaskan sled dog, identified profile variance between sprint and distance dogs, and established breeds associated with enhanced performance attributes. These data set the stage for mapping studies aimed at finding genes that are associated with athletic attributes integral to the high performing Alaskan sled dog. PMID:20649949

  14. Oral traditional knowledge on medicinal plants in jeopardy among Gaddi shepherds in hills of northwestern Himalaya, J&K, India.

    PubMed

    Dutt, Harish Chander; Bhagat, Nisha; Pandita, Shevita

    2015-06-20

    The Gaddi community has been known for its shepherd profession from time immemorial. At least one family member or 4-5 people from a village adopt a nomadic lifestyle with their sheep flocks in between the hills of north western Himalaya. In Jammu and Kashmir, India, law enforcement has banned the collection of the medicinal plants from the wild except for the Gaddi, Gujjar and Bakerwal tribes who are permitted to collect the species for their personal use only. As a consequence, knowledge of medicinal plants lies with these tribes only. This study has been undertaken to assess the status of Oral Traditional Knowledge (OTK) on medicinal plant usage in one of these tribes, known as the Gaddi. The study has focused specifically on the Gaddi Shepherds as their nomadic lifestyle means that they are closely associated with nature and dependent on natural resources for their livelihood including treatment of various ailments. Data on indigenous knowledge has been collected through direct interviews of 53 shepherds of the Gaddi tribe and analyzed for quantitative parameters such as use-value and factor informant consensus. A total of 190 plant species belonging to 70 families, growing along the migratory route of the Gaddi Shepherds are used to treat more than 80 different ailments and disorders. Leaves are the most common plant parts used by the Gaddi Shepherds. The older shepherds are much more aware about the traditional knowledge on medicinal plant usage than the younger ones. 56 plant species are used to treat a range of gastrointestinal and liver disorders, however, diabetic conditions and stings/bites by snakes/scorpions are treated using only two plant species each. Mentha longifolia with UV = 0.26 is the species most commonly used by the informants for medicinal purposes. The low UV (below 1) and low Fic (near 0) is a common observation in the present study. The UV and Fic, analysis reveals that OTK on the medicinal plants is dwindling among the Gaddi Shepherds

  15. Vaginal prolapse with urinary bladder incarceration and consecutive irreducible rectal prolapse in a dog.

    PubMed

    Ober, Ciprian-Andrei; Peștean, Cosmin Petru; Bel, Lucia Victoria; Taulescu, Marian; Cătoi, Cornel; Bogdan, Sidonia; Milgram, Joshua; Schwarz, Guenter; Oana, Liviu Ioan

    2016-09-22

    True vaginal prolapse is a rare condition in dogs and it is occasionally observed in animals with constipation, dystocia, or forced separation during breeding. If a true prolapse occurs, the bladder, the uterine body and/or distal part of the colon, may be present in the prolapse. A 2-year-old intact non pregnant Central Asian Shepherd dog in moderate condition, was presented for a true vaginal and rectal prolapse. The prolapses were confirmed by physical examination and ultrasonography. Herniation of the urinary bladder was identified within the vaginal prolapse. The necrotic vaginal wall was resected, the urinary bladder was reduced surgically and fixed to the right abdominal wall to prevent recurrence. Rectal resection and anastomosis was necessary to correct the rectal prolapse. Recurrence of the prolapses was not observed and the dog recovered completely after the surgical treatment. In our opinion, extreme tenesmus arising from constipation may have predisposed to the vaginal prolapse with bladder incarceration and secondarily to rectal prolapse. In the young female dog, true vaginal prolapse with secondary involvement of the urinary bladder and irreducible rectal prolapse is an exceptionally rare condition.

  16. Is your dog empathic? Developing a Dog Emotional Reactivity Survey.

    PubMed

    Szánthó, Flóra; Miklósi, Ádám; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2017-01-01

    Dogs' seemingly empathic behaviour attracts general and scientific attention alike. Behaviour tests are usually not sufficiently realistic to evoke empathic-like behaviour; therefore we decided to ask owners about their experiences with their dogs in emotionally loaded situations. Owners from Hungary (N = 591) and from Germany (N = 2283) were asked to rate their level of agreement on a 1-5 Likert scale with statements about the reactivity of their dogs to their emotions and to other dogs' behaviour. We created two scales with satisfactory internal reliability: reactivity to the owner's emotion and reactivity to other dogs' behaviour. Based on an owner-dog personality matching theory, we hypothesised that the owner's empathy, as measured by the subscale on the cooperativeness character factor of the human personality, will correlate with their dog's emotional reactivity in emotionally loaded situations. In addition we also examined how anthropomorphism, contagious yawning, attitude toward the dog are related to emotional reactivity in dogs as perceived by the owner. In addition we examined how owners rate dog pictures. We found that the scale scores were largely independent from demographic and environmental variables like breed, sex, age, age at acquiring, keeping practices, training experiences and owner's age. However, anthropomorphic and emotional attitude of the owners probably biased the responses. In the German sample more empathic owners reported to have more emotionally reactive dog, as expected by the personality matching theory. More empathic owners reported to have fewer problems with their dogs and they rated a puppy picture as more cute in both countries. 62% of owners from Hungary and 36% of owner from Germany agreed with the statement "My dog is more important for me than any human being". In Germany, more empathic owners agreed less with this statement and indicated that their dogs have a tendency for contagious yawning. Owners whose attitudes

  17. Seroprevalence of Neospora caninum-specific antibodies in German breeding bitches.

    PubMed

    Villagra-Blanco, Rodolfo; Angelova, Lora; Conze, Theresa; Schares, Gereon; Bärwald, Andrea; Taubert, Anja; Hermosilla, Carlos; Wehrend, Axel

    2018-02-17

    Neospora caninum is an intracellular obligate apicomplexan parasite responsible for multisystemic lesions in dogs. Being definitive hosts and reservoirs, dogs excrete environmentally resistant oocysts. Breeding bitches represent a susceptible dog group and infected bitches may spread this parasite through transplacental transmission. A total of 218 serum samples of German breeding bitches were collected to determine the presence of N. caninum. Antibodies were detected in 16 (7.33%) bitches using a commercial indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Immunoblotting analysis confirmed all seropositive samples detected by ELISA, proving that the animals were infected with N. caninum. The owners were interviewed regarding breed, age, environment, type, vaccine status, feeding habits and the presence of reproductive disorders. Seropositive animals were between the ages of two to seven years; three of them were kept in kennels while the others were household dogs, one of which was additionally a hunting dog. Owners of four seropositive bitches reported one gestation, while multiple pregnancies had been recorded for the other twelve bitches. Fourteen bitches were regularly vaccinated and six were fed with fresh raw meat. Although the results confirmed a low incidence of N. caninum seropositive German breeding bitches, further epidemiological and surveillance studies are required to complement our findings regarding the current situation of neosporosis in this specific canine population of Germany.

  18. CDR Shepherd looks in hatch at U.S. Laboratory / Destiny module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-02-11

    STS98-E-5121 (11 February 2001) --- This digital still camera shot shows Expedition One commander William M. (Bill) Shepherd looking through the observation port on Unity's closed hatch to the newly attached Destiny laboratory. Astronauts Kenneth D. Cockrell and Mark L. Polansky appear at the left and right edges, respectively. The crews of Atlantis and the International Space Station opened the laboratory shortly after this photo was made on Feb. 11, and the astronauts and cosmonauts spent the first full day of what are planned to be years of work ahead inside the orbiting science and command center. Shepherd opened the Destiny hatch, and he and shuttle commander Cockrell ventured inside at 8:38 a.m. (CST), Feb. 11. As depicted in subsequent digital images in this series, members of both crews went to work quickly inside the new module, activating air systems, fire extinguishers, alarm systems, computers and internal communications. The crew also continued equipment transfers from the shuttle to the station.

  19. Dog and owner demographic characteristics and dog personality trait associations.

    PubMed

    Kubinyi, Eniko; Turcsán, Borbála; Miklósi, Adám

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the relationships between four personality traits (calmness, trainability, dog sociability and boldness) of dogs (Canis familiaris) and dog and owner demographics on a large sample size with 14,004 individuals. German speaking dog owners could characterize their dog by filling out a form on the Internet. There were five demographic variables for dogs and nine for owners. Two statistical methods were used for investigating the associations between personality and demographic traits: the more traditional general linear methods and regression trees that are ideal for analyzing non-linear relationships in the structure of the data. The results showed that calmness is influenced primarily by the dog's age, the neutered status, the number of different types of professional training courses (e.g. obedience, agility) the dog had experienced and the age of acquisition. The least calm dogs were less than 2.5 years old, neutered and acquired after the first 12 weeks of age, while the calmest dogs were older than 6.9 years. Trainability was affected primarily by the training experiences, the dog's age, and the purpose of keeping the dog. The least trainable dogs had not received professional training at all and were older than 3 years. The most trainable dogs were those who participated in three or more types of professional training. Sociability toward conspecifics was mainly determined by the age, sex, training experience and time spent together. The least sociable dogs were older than 4.8 years and the owners spent less than 3h with the dog daily. The most sociable dogs were less than 1.5 years old. Males were less sociable toward their conspecifics than females. Boldness was affected by the sex and age of the dog and the age of acquisition. The least bold were females acquired after the age of 1 year or bred by the owner. The boldest dogs were males, acquired before the age of 12 weeks, and were younger than 2 years old. Other variables

  20. Successful treatment of small intestinal volvulus in two cats.

    PubMed

    Knell, Sebastian C; Andreoni, Angelo A; Dennler, Matthias; Venzin, Claudio M

    2010-11-01

    Mesenteric volvulus describes a torsion of the small intestine around the mesenteric root, which can be partial or complete. In dogs, it is an uncommon condition, with German shepherd dogs showing a predisposition. Chronic mesenteric volvulus has also been described. In cats, previous reports have documented two cases of small intestinal volvulus, both diagnosed at necropsy, and a further case of volvulus of the colon in a patient that died after surgery. This report describes two cats with mesenteric volvulus that were successfully treated. To the authors' knowledge, no reports of antemortem diagnosis or treatment of small intestinal volvulus in cats have previously been published. On the basis of the cases presented, it appears that the diagnosis of intestinal volvulus may be more difficult in cats than in dogs, but that the prognosis may not be as poor. Therefore, it is suggested that owners be encouraged to pursue surgery. Copyright © 2010 ISFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Do dogs sense hypoglycaemia?

    PubMed

    Weber, K S; Roden, M; Müssig, K

    2016-07-01

    To summarize the current knowledge on the phenomenon of dogs, both trained and untrained, sensing hypoglycaemia and alerting their owners to it. Electronic databases were searched for all types of articles reporting on untrained or trained 'diabetes alert' dogs. Articles published up until December 2014 in the English or German language were included. Several case reports and observational studies provide evidence that animals can perform at a level above that attributable to chance, and may reliably detect low diurnal as well as nocturnal hypoglycaemic episodes. Behavioural changes in untrained dogs were reported during 38-100% of hypoglycaemic events experienced by their owners. The sensitivity and specificity of the performance of trained diabetes alert dogs sensing hypoglycaemia ranged from 22 to 100% and 71 to 90%, respectively. Additionally, 75-81% of patients with diabetes who owned a trained dog reported a subsequent improvement in their quality of life. Nevertheless, the available data are limited and heterogeneous because they rely on low patient numbers and survey-based studies prone to recall bias. Further research is needed to confirm the preliminary data on the reliability and mechanism underlying the dogs' abilities to detect hypoglycaemia, and its impact on patient outcomes. © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  2. Canine gastric dilatation/volvulus syndrome in a veterinary critical care unit: 295 cases (1986-1992).

    PubMed

    Brockman, D J; Washabau, R J; Drobatz, K J

    1995-08-15

    Two hundred ninety-five case records were included in an analysis of dogs treated by a standardized protocol for gastric dilatation/volvulus syndrome between 1986 and 1992. A breed predisposition was demonstrated for Great Danes, German Shepherd Dogs, large mixed-breed dogs, and Standard Poodles. One hundred and ninety-three dogs had gastric dilatation and volvulus (GDV) confirmed at surgery, 66 had simple gastric dilatation (GD), and 36 others had gastric dilatation but volvulus could not be proved or disproved (GD +/- V). Among dogs with GDV, the fatality rate was 15% (29/193). Twenty-six (13.5%) dogs with GDV underwent partial gastrectomy, and 8 (31%) died or were subsequently euthanatized. In comparing the group of dogs with GDV that survived to those that died, there were no statistical differences in the age of dog, time between onset of clinical signs and admission, time from admission to surgery, or duration of anesthesia. Cardiac arrhythmias were detected in 40% (78/193) of the dogs with GDV. There also was no statistical correlation between development of a cardiac arrhythmia and outcome in dogs with GDV. The causes of death in dogs with GDV were multiple and varied; presumed gastric necrosis was a common reason for intraoperative euthanasia (11 dogs). Among dogs with GD or GD +/- V, the fatality rate was 0.9% (1/102).

  3. Pulse Shepherding in Nonlinear Fiber Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, C.; Bergman, L.

    1996-01-01

    In a wavelength division multiplexed fiber system, where pulses on different wavelength beams may co-propagate in a single mode fiber, the cross-phase-modulation (CPM) effects caused by the nonlinearity of the optical fiber are unavoidable. In other words, pulses on different wavelength beams can interact with and affect each other through the intensity dependence of the refractive index of the fiber. Although CPM will not cause energy to be exchanged among the beams, the pulse shapes and locations on these beams can be altered significantly. This phenomenon makes possible the manipulation and control of pulses co-propagating on different wavelength beams through the introduction of a shepherd pulse at a separate wavelength. How this can be accomplished is demonstrated in this paper.

  4. Modified rib pivot lateral thoracotomy: a case series.

    PubMed

    Appelgrein, C; Hosgood, G

    2018-01-01

    To describe a modified rib pivot thoracotomy and its clinical application in client-owned dogs and cats. Case series of 24 dogs and 1 cat requiring a thoracotomy. A lateral thoracic incision over the required thoracic segment was made. The latissimus dorsi muscle was reflected dorsally. The predetermined rib was identified and the periosteum overlying the rib was elevated circumferentially, avoiding the intercostal neurovascular structures. Holes were pre-placed above and below the proposed osteotomy site. The rib was osteotomised and pivoted cranially. The pleura was incised and the required intrathoracic procedure was then performed. The thoracic cavity was closed by pre-placement of a suture through the pre-placed holes within the osteotomised rib. The pleura and intercostal musculature were closed, avoiding the intercostal neurovascular structures. The rib was re-apposed and the lateral approach was closed. The cases included were reviewed for both the rib pivoted as per the procedure required and postoperative complications. The study group comprised 8 Staffordshire Bull Terriers, 2 Poodles, 2 German Shepherd Dogs, 1 each of Basset Hound, Rhodesian Ridgeback, Golden Retriever, Australian Shepherd, Vizsla, Bull Mastiff, Schnauzer, Jack Russell Terrier, Bulldog, Deerhound, Labrador Retriever and Australian Terrier, and 1 cat. A modified rib pivot thoracotomy was performed for lung lobectomy (n = 11), oesophagectomy (7), subtotal pericardectomy (5), patent ductus arteriosus ligation (1) and thoracic duct ligation (1). Follow-up ranged from 2 to 40 weeks postoperatively. Postoperative complications included seroma formation in two dogs. A modified rib pivot thoracotomy should be considered as an alternative lateral thoracic approach with good exposure, minimal complications and low morbidity. © 2018 Australian Veterinary Association.

  5. Is your dog empathic? Developing a Dog Emotional Reactivity Survey

    PubMed Central

    Szánthó, Flóra; Miklósi, Ádám; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2017-01-01

    Dogs' seemingly empathic behaviour attracts general and scientific attention alike. Behaviour tests are usually not sufficiently realistic to evoke empathic-like behaviour; therefore we decided to ask owners about their experiences with their dogs in emotionally loaded situations. Owners from Hungary (N = 591) and from Germany (N = 2283) were asked to rate their level of agreement on a 1–5 Likert scale with statements about the reactivity of their dogs to their emotions and to other dogs’ behaviour. We created two scales with satisfactory internal reliability: reactivity to the owner’s emotion and reactivity to other dogs’ behaviour. Based on an owner-dog personality matching theory, we hypothesised that the owner’s empathy, as measured by the subscale on the cooperativeness character factor of the human personality, will correlate with their dog’s emotional reactivity in emotionally loaded situations. In addition we also examined how anthropomorphism, contagious yawning, attitude toward the dog are related to emotional reactivity in dogs as perceived by the owner. In addition we examined how owners rate dog pictures. We found that the scale scores were largely independent from demographic and environmental variables like breed, sex, age, age at acquiring, keeping practices, training experiences and owner's age. However, anthropomorphic and emotional attitude of the owners probably biased the responses. In the German sample more empathic owners reported to have more emotionally reactive dog, as expected by the personality matching theory. More empathic owners reported to have fewer problems with their dogs and they rated a puppy picture as more cute in both countries. 62% of owners from Hungary and 36% of owner from Germany agreed with the statement “My dog is more important for me than any human being”. In Germany, more empathic owners agreed less with this statement and indicated that their dogs have a tendency for contagious yawning. Owners whose

  6. Astronaut Shepherd looks in hatch at U.S. Laboratory / Destiny module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-02-11

    STS98-E-5120 (11 February 2001) --- This digital still camera shot shows Expedition One commander William M. (Bill) Shepherd looking through the portal on Unity's closed hatch to the newly attached Destiny laboratory. (Note: Astronauts Kenneth D. Cockrell and Mark L. Polansky appear at the left and right edges, respectively, but could possibly be cropped out in some views). The crews of Atlantis and the International Space Station opened the laboratory shortly after this photo was made on February 11; and the astronauts and cosmonauts spent the first full day of what are planned to be years of work ahead inside the orbiting science and command center. Shepherd opened the Destiny hatch, and he and shuttle commander Cockrell ventured inside at 8:38 a.m. (CST), Feb. 11. As depicted in subsequent digital images in this series, members of both crews went to work quickly inside the new module, activating air systems, fire extinguishers, alarm systems, computers and internal communications. The crew also continued equipment transfers from the shuttle to the station.

  7. Genetic characterization, at the mitochondrial and nuclear DNA levels, of five Canary Island dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Suárez, N M; Betancor, E; Fregel, R; Pestano, J

    2013-08-01

    Many studies presenting genetic analysis of dog breeds have been conducted without the inclusion of island dog breeds, although isolation can be one of the main factors in their origin. Here we report the genetic analysis at the nuclear and mitochondrial DNA levels of five Canary Island dog breeds (Canarian Warren Hound, Canary Island Mastiff, Garafiano Shepherd, La Palma Rat-Hunter and El Hierro Wolfhound) to fill this gap and, at the same time, genetically characterize these breeds. We identified 168 alleles in autosomal microsatellites and 16 mitochondrial haplotypes. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.556 to 0.783 and from 0.737 to 0.943 respectively. Furthermore, three haplotypes were newly described and exclusive to a particular breed (A17+ in the Canary Island Mastiff; A33+ in the Canarian Warren Hound; Bi in the La Palma Rat-Hunter). The outcome of our analyses also revealed different breed histories consistent with historical documents and hypothetical origin designations. Although mtDNA haplotypes showed poor breed discriminating power, autosomal markers allowed a clear clustering of each single population. We expect that our results, together with further analyses, will help to make the population histories of island dog breeds clearer. © 2013 The Authors, Animal Genetics © 2013 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  8. The role of domestic dogs in the transmission of zoonotic helminthes in a rural area of Mekong river basin.

    PubMed

    Otake Sato, Marcello; Sato, Megumi; Yoonuan, Tippayarat; Pongvongsa, Tiengkham; Sanguankiat, Surapol; Kounnavong, Sengchanh; Maipanich, Wanna; Chigusa, Yuichi; Moji, Kazuhiko; Waikagul, Jitra

    2017-06-01

    Dogs have been bred since ancient times for companionship, hunting, protection, shepherding and other human activities. Some canine helminth parasites can cause significant clinical diseases in humans as Opisthorchis viverrini causing cholangiocarcinoma in Southeast Asian Countries. In this study, socio-cultural questionnaire, canine parasitological analysis, necropsy, parasite molecular confirmation and dog roaming data were evaluated in Savannakhet, Lao-PDR, a typical Mekong Basin area. Dog owners comprised 48.8% of the studied population, with 61.2% owning one dog, 25.1% 2 dogs, 8.5% 3 dogs and 1.8% owning more than 4 dogs. Data from GPS logger attached to dogs showed they walked from 1.4 to 13.3 km per day, covering an area of 3356.38m2 average, with a routine of accessing water sources. Thirteen zoonotic helminth species were observed. Causative agents of visceral and cutaneous larva migrans occurred in 44.1% and 70% of the samples respectively. Spirometra erinaceieuropaei was detected in 44.1% of samples. Importantly, O. viverrini was found in 8.8% of samples. Besides the known importance of dogs in the transmission of Ancylostoma spp., Toxocara spp. and S. erinaceieuropaei, the observed roaming pattern of dogs confirmed it as an important host perpetuating O. viverrini in endemic areas; their routine access to waterbodies may spread O. viverrini eggs in a favorable environment for the fluke development, facilitating the infection of fishes, and consequently infecting humans living in the same ecosystem. Therefore, parasitic NTDs control programs in humans should be done in parallel with parasite control in animals, especially dogs, in the Mekong River basin area.

  9. Experimental evaluation of ileal patch in delayed primary repair of penetrating colon injuries: An animal study.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Hamid Reza; Bolandparvaz, Shahram; Yarmohammadi, Hooman; Geramizadeh, Bita; Tanideh, Nader; Paydar, Shahram; Hosseini, Seyed Vahid

    2006-10-01

    Primary repair of traumatic colonic perforation is progressively gaining acceptance as the best method of management. However, when delayed, the risk of infection-related complications may increase. Here, we present a new method of repairing colon perforation in the presence of peritonitis. Acute colon injury was simulated in 22 German shepherd dogs. The dogs were randomly divided into two groups of 11 and after 24 hours they were operated on. The perforations were repaired by subserosal suture technique. In the first group (group A), ileal patch was used. In the other group (group B), the colon was closed by debridement and anastomosis. After 6 weeks, the repairs were assessed on the basis of survival, gross and histological assessments. Nine (82%) dogs in group A and six (56%) in group B survived. Ileal patch utilization significantly decreased the mortality rate (p < 0.05). The cause of death in two group A dogs and five group B dogs was peritonitis and intra-abdominal abscess formation. None of the surviving dogs showed evidence of anastomotic leakage or breakdown. Small bowel patch used in primary repair of colon injury in the presence of peritonitis may decrease the risk of postoperative infection-related complications and the mortality rate.

  10. Lethal distemper in badgers (Meles meles) following epidemic in dogs and wolves.

    PubMed

    Di Sabatino, Daria; Di Francesco, Gabriella; Zaccaria, Guendalina; Malatesta, Daniela; Brugnola, Luca; Marcacci, Maurilia; Portanti, Ottavio; De Massis, Fabrizio; Savini, Giovanni; Teodori, Liana; Ruggieri, Enzo; Mangone, Iolanda; Badagliacca, Pietro; Lorusso, Alessio

    2016-12-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) represents an important conservation threat to many wild carnivores. A large distemper epidemic sustained by an Arctic-lineage strain occurred in Italy in 2013, mainly in the Abruzzi region, causing overt disease in domestic and shepherd dogs, Apennine wolves (Canis lupus) and other wild carnivores. Two badgers were collected by the end of September 2015 in a rural area of the Abruzzi region and were demonstrated to be CDV-positive by real time RT-PCR and IHC in several tissues. The genome of CDV isolates from badgers showed Y549H substitution in the mature H protein. By employing all publicly available Arctic-lineage H protein encoding gene sequences, six amino acid changes in recent Italian strains with respect to Italian strains of dogs from 2000 to 2008, were observed. A CDV strain belonging to the European-wildlife lineage was also identified in a fox found dead in the same region in 2016, proving co-circulation of an additional CDV lineage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The endoparasites of sheep and goats, and shepherd in North Sinai Governorate, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Mazyad, Said A M; el-Nemr, Hossam I

    2002-04-01

    Examination of sheep and goats in four areas in North Sinai revealed an overall infection of 12.70% with Fasciola species, 11.8% with Paramphistomum cerve, 12.80% with Moniezia expansa, 47.11% with Trichostrongylus colubriformis, 4.59% Trichuris ovis and 44.85% Coccidia. The highly infected sheep and goats were diagnosed in El Hassanah center (90.49%), followed by Al Arish city (87.31%), then Rafah city (74.39%), and lastly Bir Al Abd (54.71%). The elevation of the overall percent of infection in the four areas was due to Coccidia infection. This parasite was a concomitant infection in nearly all animals. On the other hand, examination of fifteen of the shepherds revealed Ascaris lumbricoides in four, T. colubriformis in three, Fasciala in one, Giardia lamblia in ten and Coccidia in three. Double and rarely, triple infection was seen. The correlation between parasitic infections in sheep and goats, and their shepherd was discussed.

  12. a Geo-Visual Analytics Approach to Biological Shepherding: Modelling Animal Movements and Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benke, K. K.; Sheth, F.; Betteridge, K.; Pettit, C. J.; Aurambout, J.-P.

    2012-07-01

    The lamb industry in Victoria is a significant component of the state economy with annual exports in the vicinity of 1 billion. GPS and visualisation tools can be used to monitor grazing animal movements at the farm scale and observe interactions with the environment. Modelling the spatial-temporal movements of grazing animals in response to environmental conditions provides input for the design of paddocks with the aim of improving management procedures, animal performance and animal welfare. The term "biological shepherding" is associated with the re-design of environmental conditions and the analysis of responses from grazing animals. The combination of biological shepherding with geo-visual analytics (geo-spatial data analysis with visualisation) provides a framework for improving landscape design and supports research in grazing behaviour in variable landscapes, heat stress avoidance behaviour during summer months, and modelling excreta distributions (with respect to nitrogen emissions and nitrogen return for fertilising the paddock). Nitrogen losses due to excreta are mainly in the form of gaseous emissions to the atmosphere and leaching into the groundwater. In this study, background and context are provided in the case of biological shepherding and tracking animal movements. Examples are provided of recent applications in regional Australia and New Zealand. Based on experimental data and computer simulation, and using data visualisation and feature extraction, it was demonstrated that livestock excreta are not always randomly located, but concentrated around localised gathering points, sometimes separated by the nature of the excretion. Farmers require information on the nitrogen losses in order to reduce emissions to meet local and international nitrogen leaching and greenhouse gas targets and to improve the efficiency of nutrient management.

  13. Identification of Sarcosine as a Target Molecule for the Canine Olfactory Detection of Prostate Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pacik, Dalibor; Plevova, Mariana; Urbanova, Lucie; Lackova, Zuzana; Strmiska, Vladislav; Necas, Alois; Heger, Zbynek; Adam, Vojtech

    2018-03-21

    The hypothesis that dogs can detect malignant tumours through the identification of specific molecules is nearly 30 years old. To date, several reports have described the successful detection of distinct types of cancer. However, is still a lack of data regarding the specific molecules that can be recognized by a dog's olfactory apparatus. Hence, we performed a study with artificially prepared, well-characterized urinary specimens that were enriched with sarcosine, a widely reported urinary biomarker for prostate cancer (PCa). For the purposes of the study, a German shepherd dog was utilized for analyses of 60 positive and 120 negative samples. Our study provides the first evidence that a sniffer dog specially trained for the olfactory detection of PCa can recognize sarcosine in artificial urine with a performance [sensitivity of 90%, specificity of 95%, and precision of 90% for the highest amount of sarcosine (10 µmol/L)] that is comparable to the identification of PCa-diagnosed subjects (sensitivity of 93.5% and specificity of 91.6%). This study casts light on the unrevealed phenomenon of PCa olfactory detection and opens the door for further studies with canine olfactory detection and cancer diagnostics.

  14. An Online High School "Shepherding" Program: Teacher Roles and Experiences Mentoring Online Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drysdale, Jeffery S.; Graham, Charles R.; Borup, Jered

    2014-01-01

    Several online programs use on-site facilitators to create a stronger sense of community and reduce student dropout. However, very little research addresses how programs that are fully online can provide their students with comparable support. Using K-12 online research, this case study analyzed a "shepherding program" at Mountain…

  15. Cross-Cultural Learning and Mentoring: Autoethnographical Narrative Inquiry with Dr. Malcolm Shepherd Knowles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Pi-Chi; Henschke, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Malcolm Shepherd Knowles popularized andragogy as the theory of adult learning and was referred to as the Father of Adult Education in the United States (US). As his doctoral students, the authors had extensive personal contacts with him. This paper utilizes the method of autoethnography to explore how cross-cultural learning and…

  16. Interbreed variation in serum serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) concentration in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Höglund, K; Häggström, J; Hanås, S; Merveille, A-C; Gouni, V; Wiberg, M; Lundgren Willesen, J; Entee, K Mc; Mejer Sørensen, L; Tiret, L; Seppälä, E H; Lohi, H; Chetboul, V; Fredholm, M; Lequarré, A-S; Ljungvall, I

    2018-06-16

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) has several biological functions. In different species, excessive 5-HT has been linked to valvular lesions, similar to those seen in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease. Previous studies suggest higher 5-HT in healthy Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCSs), a breed highly affected by myxomatous mitral valve disease, compared to other breeds. To investigate potential interbreed variation in serum 5-HT in healthy dogs. 483 healthy dogs of nine breeds aged 1-7 years. Dogs were examined at five European centers. Absence of cardiovascular, organ-related, or systemic diseases was ensured by thorough clinical investigations including echocardiography. Serum was frozen and later analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Median 5-HT concentration was 252.5 (interquartile range = 145.5-390.6) ng/mL. Overall breed difference was found (p<0.0001), and 42% of pairwise breed comparisons were significant. Univariate regression analysis showed association between serum 5-HT concentration and breed, center of examination, storage time, and sex, with higher 5-HT in females. In multiple regression analysis, the final model had an adjusted R 2 of 0.27 with breed (p<0.0001), center (p<0.0001), and storage time (p=0.014) remaining significant. Within centers, overall breed differences were found at 3/5 centers (p≤0.028), and pairwise comparisons within those centers showed breed differences in 42% of comparisons. Among the included breeds, Newfoundlands, Belgian Shepherds and CKCSs had highest 5-HT concentrations. Interbreed variation in serum 5-HT concentration was found in healthy dogs aged 1-7 years. These differences should be taken into account when designing clinical studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. An Electric Propulsion "Shepherd" for Active Debris Removal that Utilizes Ambient Gas as Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing consensus among the space debris technical community that limiting the long ]term growth of debris in Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) requires that space users limit the accumulation of mass in orbit. This is partially accomplished by mitigation measures for current and future LEO systems, but there is now interest in removing mass that has already accumulated in LEO from more than 50 years of space activity (termed "Active Debris Removal", or ADR). Many ADR proposals face complex technical issues of how to grapple with uncooperative targets. Some researchers have suggested the use of conventional ion thrusters to gently "blow" on objects to gradually change their orbits, without ever having to come into physical contact with the target. The chief drawback with these methods is the cost per object removed. Typically, a space "tug" or an ion-drive "shepherd" can only remove a few objects per mission due to limited propellant. Unless a costeffective way that removes tens of objects per mission can be found, it is not clear that any of the ideas so far proposed will be economically viable. In this paper, a modified version of the ion-drive "shepherd" is proposed that uses ambient atmospheric gases in LEO as propellant for the ion drives. This method has the potential to greatly extend the operational lifetime of an ADR mission, as the only mission limit is the lifetime of the components of the satellite itself, not on its fuel supply. An ambient-gas ion-drive "shepherd" would the local atmospheric drag on an object by ionizing and accelerating the ambient gas the target would have encountered anyway, thereby hastening its decay. Also, the "shepherd" satellite itself has a great deal of flexibility to maneuver back to high altitude and rendezvous with its next target using the ion drive not limited by fuel supply. However, the amount of available ambient gas is closely tied to the altitude of the spacecraft. It may be possible to use a "hybrid" approach that

  18. An Electric Propulsion "Shepherd" for Active Debris Removal that Utilizes Ambient Gas as Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing consensus among the space debris technical community that limiting the long-term growth of debris in Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) requires that space users limit the accumulation of mass in orbit. This is partially accomplished by mitigation measures for current and future LEO systems, but there is now interest in removing mass that has already accumulated in LEO from more than 50 years of space activity (termed "Active Debris Removal", or ADR). Many ADR proposals face complex technical issues of how to grapple with uncooperative targets. Some researchers have suggested the use of conventional ion thrusters to gently "blow" on objects to gradually change their orbits, without ever having to come into physical contact with the target. The chief drawback with these methods is the cost per object removed. Typically, a space "tug" or an ion-drive "shepherd" can only remove a few objects per mission due to limited propellant. Unless a cost-effective way that removes tens of objects per mission can be found, it is not clear that any of the ideas so far proposed will be economically viable. In this paper, a modified version of the ion-drive "shepherd" is proposed that uses ambient atmospheric gases in LEO as propellant for the ion drives. This method has the potential to greatly extend the operational lifetime of an ADR mission, as the only mission limit is the lifetime of the components of the satellite itself, not on its fuel supply. An ambient-gas ion-drive "shepherd" would enhance the local atmospheric drag on an object by ionizing and accelerating the ambient gas the target would have encountered anyway, thereby hastening its decay. Also, the "shepherd" satellite itself has a great deal of flexibility to maneuver back to high altitude and rendezvous with its next target using the ion drive not limited by fuel supply. However, the amount of available ambient gas is closely tied to the altitude of the spacecraft. It may be possible to use a "hybrid

  19. A case of two different tumors in the heart of a dog.

    PubMed

    Grieco, Valeria; Locatelli, Chiara; Riccardi, Elena; Brambilla, Paola

    2008-05-01

    A 9-year-old, spayed, female Maremmano shepherd had a bilateral mastectomy for multiple mammary adenocarcinomas 2 years previous and was referred to the Cardiology Service of the School of Veterinary Medicine of Milan after an acute episode of cardiogenic collapse. Because of severe cardiovascular symptoms and poor prognosis, the dog was euthanized. Necropsy examination revealed the presence of multiple firm grayish neoplastic nodules in the myocardium of the left ventricle and scattered in the pulmonary parenchyma. Neoplastic nodules were also detected in the spleen, pancreas, liver, kidneys, and omentum. Histological examination revealed the coexistence of tubular adenocarcinoma and an undifferentiated sarcoma in the myocardium. Immunohistochemical staining of the sarcoma cells was negative for cytokeratin, desmin, and smooth muscle myosin, thus excluding their epithelial or myoepithelial origin, as well as an origin from smooth muscles cells. These findings, together with the coexpression of vimentin and alpha-smooth muscle actin, suggested that the sarcoma was derived from myofibroblasts. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report describing cardiac sarcoma of presumptive myofibroblastic origin in a dog with simultaneous occurrence of cardiac metastasis of mammary gland adenocarcinoma.

  20. Expedition One CDR Shepherd in U.S. Laboratory / Destiny module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-02-11

    STS98-E-5160 (11 February 2001) --- Astronaut William M. (Bill) Shepherd, Expedition One commander, surveys the interior of the newly attached Destiny laboratory onboard the International Space Station (ISS). After the Destiny hatch was opened early in the day, members of both crews went to work quickly inside the new module, activating air systems, fire extinguishers, alarm systems, computers and internal communications. The crews also took some photos and continued equipment transfers from the shuttle to the station. The scene was taken with a digital still camera.

  1. Some prognostic and epidemiologic factors in canine osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Misdorp, W; Hart, A A

    1979-03-01

    Naturally occurring skeletal osteosarcomas in a series of 144 untreated dogs were found especially to involve the ends of the long bones of the forelimbs and affected predominantly older male dogs of giant and large breeds. Most tumors were large and partially necrotic and had extended into soft tissues. Of 12 host and tumor characteristics tested in the first part of the study, tumor diameter and volume were significantly associated with the presence of pulmonary metastases at autopsy. The second part of the study revealed that extension of the tumor into the soft tissues and localization of the tumor in the hind legs were associated with a poor prognosis, whereas the fibrosarcomatous type of tumor was associated, as in man, with a favorable prognosis. An association between the 12 characteristics tested was found in 11 of 78 combinations at the 5% level and in 5 combinations at the 1% level. Affected giant dogs were generally younger than affected small and medium-sized dogs. Especially in giant dogs, the osteosarcomas involved the long bones and were of relatively large diameters. The sarcomas in female dogs were larger in volume than those in males. Pure osteoblastic osteosarcomas were generally smaller than combined (chondroblastic and fibroblastic) osteosarcomas. Peritumorous lymphocytes and plasma cells were present in 50% of the dogs, especially in small and young dogs. When compared with a reference population, great Danes, rottweilers, German shepherds, and boxers were found to be overrepresented in the osteosarcoma group.

  2. Zoonoses research in the German National Cohort : feasibility of parallel sampling of pets and owners.

    PubMed

    Hille, Katja; Möbius, Nadine; Akmatov, Manas K; Verspohl, Jutta; Rabold, Denise; Hartmann, Maria; Günther, Kathrin; Obi, Nadia; Kreienbrock, Lothar

    2014-11-01

    Cats and dogs live in more than 20 % of German households and the contact between these pets and their owners can be very close. Therefore, a transmission of zoonotic pathogens may occur. To investigate whether zoonotic research questions can be examined in the context of population-based studies like the German National Cohort (GNC), two studies on different study populations were conducted as part of the feasibility tests of the GNC. The aim of the first study was to quantify the actual exposure of participants of the GNC to cats and dogs. In the second study summarised here the feasibility of the sampling of cats and dogs by their owners was tested. To quantify the exposure of participants of the GNC to cats and dogs 744 study participants of the Pretests of the GNC were asked whether they had contact with animals. Currently 10 % have a dog and 14 % have a cat in their household. These figures confirm that a large proportion of the German population has contact with pets and that there is a need for further zoonoses research. To establish the collection of biological samples from cats and dogs in the context of large-scale population-based studies feasible methods are needed. Therefore, a study was conducted to test whether pet owners can take samples from their cats and dogs and whether the quality of these samples is comparable to samples taken by a qualified veterinarian. A total of 82 dog and 18 cat owners were recruited in two veterinary practices in Hannover and the Clinic for Small Animals at the University of Veterinary Medicine in Hannover. Sampling instructions and sample material for nasal and buccal swabs, faecal samples and, in the case of cat owners, a brush for fur samples, were given to the pet owners. The pet owners were asked to take the samples from their pets at home and to send the samples by surface mail. Swab samples were cultured and bacterial growth was quantified independent of bacterial species. The growth of Gram-positive and

  3. Report on Sabbatical activities - Dr. Ronnie Shepherd - 05/25/2014 to 08/21/2014

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, Ronnie

    2014-10-09

    The sabbatical performed by Dr. Ronnie Shepherd from 05/25/2014 to 08/21/2014 had two central goals: 1) write three proposals for future collaborative experiments at Ecole Polytechnique (and possibly LLNL) 2) if laser time was granted (based on the proposal), perform a preliminary experiment in preparation for the campaign of laser time based on proposal submission.

  4. Understanding Human-Animal Relations in the Context of Primate Conservation: A Multispecies Ethnographic Approach in North Morocco.

    PubMed

    Waters, Siân; Bell, Sandra; Setchell, Joanna M

    2018-01-01

    Strategies for conserving species threatened with extinction are often driven by ecological data. However, in anthropogenic landscapes, understanding and incorporating local people's perceptions may enhance species conservation. We examine the relationships shepherds, living on the periphery of the mixed oak forest of Bouhachem in northern Morocco, have with animals in the context of a conservation project for Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus). We analyse ethnographic data to provide insights into shepherds' conceptions of Barbary macaques and the species which bring the shepherds into the forest - goats (Capra hircus), domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris), and the African wolf (Canis lupus lupaster). We interpret these data within the framework of boundary theory. Our multispecies ethnographic approach illuminates the different and, in the case of the domestic dog and the Barbary macaque, complex ways shepherds perceive each species. Some shepherds show intrinsic interest in the macaques, revealing potential recruits to conservation activities. As with any ethnographic study, our interpretations of human-animal relations in Bouhachem may not extrapolate to other areas of the Barbary macaque's distribution because of the unique nature of both people and the place. We recommend that conservationists examine complex place-based relations between humans and animals to improve wildlife conservation efforts. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Efficacy of vaccination at 4 and 6 weeks in the control of canine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    De Cramer, K G M; Stylianides, E; van Vuuren, M

    2011-04-21

    Seroconversion after early vaccination at four weeks against canine parvovirus (CPV) using a high antigen titre vaccine was evaluated in 121 puppies from three breeds of dogs housed in kennels representative of the private practitioner's environment. The trial included 52 German shepherd pups, 25 Rottweiler pups and 44 Boerboel pups. From each group 11, 4, and 18 puppies acted as control dogs, respectively. Depending on the different groups, puppies were vaccinated at 4, 6, 9 and 12 weeks. The experimental group differed from the control group in that they received the high titre vaccine at 4 weeks of age, whereas the control group was not vaccinated at 4 weeks. Blood was collected from all pups prior to vaccination to measure maternally derived colostral antibody. The results indicated that vaccination at 4 weeks of age in pups with high maternally derived antibody levels, results in seroconversion rates that may lead to a reduction in the window of susceptibility with respect to CPV infection. The implications of the findings with respect to dogs in heavily contaminated environments are discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Intentional fatal metallic phosphide poisoning in a dog--a case report.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Andras-Laszlo; Bolfa, Pompei; Mihaiu, Marian; Catoi, Cornel; Oros, Adrian; Taulescu, Marian; Tabaran, Flaviu

    2015-07-23

    Metallic phosphides are extremely toxic pesticides that are regulated in their usage. Information concerning the impact of metallic phosphides on human health is abundant. Data regarding the clinical pathology of phosphide poisoning in humans or domestic and wild animals is largely incomplete with only a few cases of metallic phosphide poisoning being reported every year, especially in humans. For the majority of cases reported in dogs the data are vague or incomplete. Here we report a complete and detailed description of pathological changes in a case of intentional metallic phosphide poisoning in a dog including an exhaustive examination of the brain. A 1 year old, male, Belgian Shepherd crossbreed dog with a clean medical history and no observed clinical signs prior to death, was submitted for post mortem examination. The dog was found dead by the owner. Near the body a suspect mix of bread, fat and a blackish powder was found. The owner announced the authorities and submitted the animal and the possible bait for forensic examination. At necropsy, multisystemic necrotic and degenerative lesions were observed. Histological exam confirmed the presence of necrotic and degenerative lesions of variable severity in all of the examined organs. The toxicological forensic examination revealed the presence of the phosphine gas in the gastric content and the bait. Metallic phosphide poisoning is a rarely reported entity, since the diagnosis of intentional poisoning with these compounds is a great challenge for forensic pathologists and toxicologists. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing the lesions completely in veterinary forensic toxicology. We assume that the toxic shows systemic endotheliotropism and damage of the endothelial cells responsible for the hemorrhagic lesions and for the secondary ischemic necrosis in various organs. This report will contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis in cases of acute metallic phosphide exposure in

  7. 76 FR 44455 - Importation of Shepherd's Purse With Roots From the Republic of Korea Into the United States

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... requirements for importation of commercial consignments, pest-free place of production, removal of soil, and... protocol must be preapproved by APHIS. (b) The shepherd's purse with roots must be free from soil. (c) The...

  8. Successful medical treatment of an orbital osteoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Grozdanic, Sinisa; Riedesel, Elizabeth A; Ackermann, Mark R

    2013-03-01

    A 6-year-old neutered male German Shepherd-mixed breed with a 2-month history of bilateral conjunctival hyperemia, epiphora, and a firm, slowly progressive swelling of the medial canthal region of the left eye (OS) was examined. Ophthalmic examination OS revealed a firm and smooth mass, extending from the medial canthus toward the medial orbital wall. Indirect ophthalmoscopy revealed indentation of the nasal part OS, which corresponded to the position of the orbital mass. Orbital neoplastic diseases were the main differential considerations. Computerized tomography revealed a bony smooth orbital mass without bone destructive features. Biopsy was performed, and histologic features were suggestive of osteoma. Systemic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) drugs resulted in complete mass regression and absence of clinical signs for 5 years following initial diagnosis. This report describes the first case of canine orbital osteoma, which was responsive to NSAIDs. © 2012 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  9. Risk factors for acquired myasthenia gravis in dogs: 1,154 cases (1991-1995).

    PubMed

    Shelton, G D; Schule, A; Kass, P H

    1997-12-01

    To determine frequency of initial clinical signs and risk factors for acquired myasthenia gravis (MG) in dogs. Retrospective study. 1,154 dogs residing within the United States from 1991 to 1995 with a confirmed diagnosis of acquired MG and 7,176 dogs with other neuromuscular disorders, including generalized weakness, megaesophagus, and dysphagia (control group). Records were retrieved from a database containing results of serum samples tested for acetylcholine receptor antibodies. Signalment, breed, age, state of origin, and month of onset of clinical signs were obtained. An antibody titer > 0.6 nmol/L was diagnostic for acquired MG. Unconditional logistic regression was used for statistical analysis. In comparison with mixed-breed dogs, dogs with the highest risk of acquired MG were Akitas, terrier group, Scottish Terriers, German Shorthaired Pointers, and Chihuahuas. Rottweilers, Doberman Pinschers, Dalmatians, and Jack Russell Terriers had low relative risks. Sexually intact males and dogs less than 1 year old had some protection from risk. Generalized weakness with megaesophagus and megaesophagus alone were the most common initial clinical signs. Breed predispositions for acquired MG were demonstrated. Age and sex were contributing factors. Although most dogs had generalized clinical signs, a substantial proportion of dogs had focal signs.

  10. Frequency of canine nt230(del4) MDR1 mutation in prone pure breeds, their crosses and mongrels in Israel - insights from a worldwide comparative perspective.

    PubMed

    Dekel, Yaron; Machluf, Yossy; Stoler, Aviad; Aderet, Arava; Baumel, Daniel; Kellerman, Efrat; Plotsky, Yoram; Noked Partouche, Oshrat; Elhalal, Gal; Ben-Shlomo, Izhar; Bercovich, Dani

    2017-11-13

    Sensitivity to macrocyclic lactones, which are commonly used in veterinary clinics, was first found in Rough Collies, and was attributed in 2001 to a 4 bp deletion in the MDR1 gene. The list of affected breeds currently includes 13 breeds. Researchers from different countries and continents examined the allelic frequencies of the nt230(del4) MDR1 mutation, emphasizing the clinical importance of this test not only to mutation-prone dogs, but also to their crosses and mongrels, since treatment of a deletion carrier with these compounds may lead to its death. In this study, the allelic frequencies of nt230(del4) MDR1 mutation in affected breeds, their crosses, unrelated pure breeds and mongrels are reported for the state of Israel (n = 1416 dogs). The Israeli data were compared with reports from the US, Europe, UK, Australia and Japan. The allelic frequencies of nt230(del4) MDR1 mutation in Israel for Australian, Swiss and German Shepherds (31%, 17% and 2.4%, respectively) are similar to the corresponding frequencies worldwide, much higher for Border Collies (4.8%), twice lower for Rough Collies (28%, compared to 55% or more elsewhere), and ~1% for mongrels. The frequencies for crosses of Australian Shepherd and Border Collies in Israel are 4 and 1.6 times lower, respectively, compared to the frequencies for the respective pure breeds. This work, that for the first time presents the frequency of nt230(del4) MDR1 mutation in Israel, along with a worldwide survey, has implications for clinicians, owners and breeders of sheepdogs and their crosses and supports the need for extra care in treatment and in future breeding. Of note, the relative proportion of affected breeds, in the overall tested dogs, might be higher than their actual proportion in Israel due to directed samples collection by veterinarians for clinical purposes, as these are mainly limited to certain affected breeds or dogs that resemble them.

  11. Chronic cystitis with ossification of the bladder wall in a 6-month-old German shepherd dog

    PubMed Central

    Zotti, Alessandro; Fant, Pierluigi; De Zan, Gabrita; Mollo, Antonio; Busetto, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Ossification of the bladder wall, detected radiographically as a nonhomogeneous radiopaque area in the cranioventral part of the bladder in a puppy, is reported. We speculate that chronic inflammation due to the presence of uroliths in the lumen may have stimulated a metaplastic transformation of the cells. PMID:17966335

  12. Maximizing the Impact of Telepractice through a Multifaceted Service Delivery Model at The Shepherd Centre, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Aleisha; Hopkins, Tracy; Abrahams, Yetta

    2012-01-01

    The Shepherd Centre is a nonprofit early intervention program in New South Wales, Australia, providing listening and spoken language services through an interdisciplinary team approach to children with hearing loss and their families. The program has been providing distance services to families in rural and remote areas of Australia and in other…

  13. Proportion of litters of purebred dogs born by caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Evans, Katy M; Adams, Vicki J

    2010-02-01

    To describe the frequency of caesarean sections in a large sample of pedigree dogs in the UK. Data on the numbers of litters born in the previous 10 years were available from a cross-sectional study of dogs belonging to breed club members (2004 Kennel Club/BSAVA Scientific Committee Purebred Dog Health Survey). In this survey 151 breeds were represented with data for households that had reported on at least 10 litters (range 10-14,15): this represented 13,141 bitches which had whelped 22,005 litters. The frequency of caesarean sections was estimated as the percentage of litters that were reported to be born by caesarean section (caesarean rates) and are reported by breed. The dogs were categorised into brachycephalic, mesocephalic and dolicocephalic breeds. The 10 breeds with the highest caesarean rates were the Boston terrier, bulldog, French bulldog, mastiff, Scottish terrier, miniature bull terrier, German wirehaired pointer, Clumber spaniel, Pekingese and Dandie Dinmont terrier. In the Boston terrier, bulldog and French bulldog, the rate was > 80%. These data provide evidence for the need to monitor caesarean rates in certain breeds of dog.

  14. Polymorphisms within the canine MLPH gene are associated with dilute coat color in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Philipp, Ute; Hamann, Henning; Mecklenburg, Lars; Nishino, Seiji; Mignot, Emmanuel; Günzel-Apel, Anne-Rose; Schmutz, Sheila M; Leeb, Tosso

    2005-01-01

    Background Pinschers and other dogs with coat color dilution show a characteristic pigmentation phenotype. The fur colors are a lighter shade, e.g. silvery grey (blue) instead of black and a sandy color (Isabella fawn) instead of red or brown. In some dogs the coat color dilution is sometimes accompanied by hair loss and recurrent skin inflammation, the so called color dilution alopecia (CDA) or black hair follicular dysplasia (BHFD). In humans and mice a comparable pigmentation phenotype without any documented hair loss is caused by mutations within the melanophilin gene (MLPH). Results We sequenced the canine MLPH gene and performed a mutation analysis of the MLPH exons in 6 Doberman Pinschers and 5 German Pinschers. A total of 48 sequence variations was identified within and between the breeds. Three families of dogs showed co-segregation for at least one polymorphism in an MLPH exon and the dilute phenotype. No single polymorphism was identified in the coding sequences or at splice sites that is likely to be causative for the dilute phenotype of all dogs examined. In 18 German Pinschers a mutation in exon 7 (R199H) was consistently associated with the dilute phenotype. However, as this mutation was present in homozygous state in four dogs of other breeds with wildtype pigmentation, it seems unlikely that this mutation is truly causative for coat color dilution. In Doberman Pinschers as well as in Large Munsterlanders with BHFD, a set of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) around exon 2 was identified that show a highly significant association to the dilute phenotype. Conclusion This study provides evidence that coat color dilution is caused by one or more mutations within or near the MLPH gene in several dog breeds. The data on polymorphisms that are strongly associated with the dilute phenotype will allow the genetic testing of Pinschers to facilitate the breeding of dogs with defined coat colors and to select against Large Munsterlanders carrying BHFD

  15. Polymorphisms within the canine MLPH gene are associated with dilute coat color in dogs.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Ute; Hamann, Henning; Mecklenburg, Lars; Nishino, Seiji; Mignot, Emmanuel; Günzel-Apel, Anne-Rose; Schmutz, Sheila M; Leeb, Tosso

    2005-06-16

    Pinschers and other dogs with coat color dilution show a characteristic pigmentation phenotype. The fur colors are a lighter shade, e.g. silvery grey (blue) instead of black and a sandy color (Isabella fawn) instead of red or brown. In some dogs the coat color dilution is sometimes accompanied by hair loss and recurrent skin inflammation, the so called color dilution alopecia (CDA) or black hair follicular dysplasia (BHFD). In humans and mice a comparable pigmentation phenotype without any documented hair loss is caused by mutations within the melanophilin gene (MLPH). We sequenced the canine MLPH gene and performed a mutation analysis of the MLPH exons in 6 Doberman Pinschers and 5 German Pinschers. A total of 48 sequence variations was identified within and between the breeds. Three families of dogs showed co-segregation for at least one polymorphism in an MLPH exon and the dilute phenotype. No single polymorphism was identified in the coding sequences or at splice sites that is likely to be causative for the dilute phenotype of all dogs examined. In 18 German Pinschers a mutation in exon 7 (R199H) was consistently associated with the dilute phenotype. However, as this mutation was present in homozygous state in four dogs of other breeds with wildtype pigmentation, it seems unlikely that this mutation is truly causative for coat color dilution. In Doberman Pinschers as well as in Large Munsterlanders with BHFD, a set of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) around exon 2 was identified that show a highly significant association to the dilute phenotype. This study provides evidence that coat color dilution is caused by one or more mutations within or near the MLPH gene in several dog breeds. The data on polymorphisms that are strongly associated with the dilute phenotype will allow the genetic testing of Pinschers to facilitate the breeding of dogs with defined coat colors and to select against Large Munsterlanders carrying BHFD.

  16. [German ophthalmologists and NSDAP

    PubMed

    Rohrbach, Jens Martin

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 40-45 % of all German physicians joined the National Socialist German Workers Party (NSDAP) until 1945. Reasons for party membership are manifold and still a matter of debate. Very likely, the extraordinary high representation of medical doctors in the NSDAP was rather a result of active entry than recruitment by the party. There are only few data concerning the willingness of ophthalmologists to become a party member ("Parteigenosse", "Pg"). According to the list of University teachers in Germany ("Hochschullehrerkarte"; Federal Archive, Berlin), the list of the members of the German Ophthalmological Society (DOG) of 1934 and especially the list of NSDAP-members (Federal Archive, Berlin) the following conclusions can be drawn: 1. Directors of German University eye hospitals (chairmen) were members of the NSDAP with a frequency of 23% in 1933 and 48% in 1938 as well as in 1943. The motivation for joining the party was most likely the perspective of acceleration of the academic career. 2. "Only" 30% of the ophthalmologists working in private praxis were "Pg" (until 1945). 3. Both chairmen and ophthalmologists in private praxis were equally hindered to join the NSDAP between May 1st 1933 and May 1st 1937 when the party temporarily stopped registration. 4. The majority of ophthalmologists who joined the NSDAP were born between 1880 and 1900 and thus had taken part in World War I as soldiers or had experienced the times of need after WW I. Only few ophthalmologists succeeded in the NS-hierarchy and probably only one ophthalmologist, Walther Löhlein from Berlin, came in personal contact with Adolf Hitler who was constantly in fear for his sight after his eye injury in October 1918. The "Law for the prevention of genetically disabled offsprings" ("Gesetz zur Verhütung erbkranken Nachwuchses") from July 14th, 1933 separated ophthalmologists into two parties: those advocating sterilization to a high degree and those recommending sterilization only

  17. Teacher and Student Perspectives on Facilitating a Sense of Community through an Online High School's "Shepherding" Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drysdale, Jeffery; Graham, Charles; Borup, Jered

    2016-01-01

    Student disconnectedness remains a serious concern in K-12 online learning--especially in programs where students take most or all of their coursework online. In this research we examined a "shepherding program" designed to encourage a sense of community among teachers and students at an online charter school. Every online teacher served…

  18. Multiple Removal of Spent Rocket Upper Stages with an Ion Beam Shepherd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombardelli, C.; Herrera-Montojo, J.; Gonzalo, J. L.

    2013-08-01

    Among the many advantages of the recently proposed ion beam shepherd (IBS) debris removal technique is the capability to deal with multiple targets in a single mission. A preliminary analysis is here conducted in order to estimate the cost in terms of spacecraft mass and total mission time to remove multiple large-size upper stages of the Zenit family. Zenit-2 upper stages are clustered at 71 degrees inclination around 850 km altitude in low Earth orbit. It is found that a removal of two targets per year is feasible with a modest size spacecraft. The most favorable combinations of targets are outlined.

  19. Clinical, histopathological and immunological characteristics of exfoliative cutaneous lupus erythematosus in 25 German short-haired pointers.

    PubMed

    Bryden, Sharon L; White, Stephen D; Dunston, Stanley M; Burrows, Amanda K; Olivry, Thierry

    2005-08-01

    Clinical, histopathological and immunological features of exfoliative cutaneous lupus erythematosus, an uncommon generalized exfoliative dermatitis occurring exclusively in German short-haired pointers, were characterized in 25 dogs. The disease affects young adult dogs and its familial incidence strongly suggests a hereditary origin. Lesions were characterized by scaling and alopecia affecting 100 (25/25) and 76% (19/25) of dogs, respectively. Follicular casts were present in 28% (7/25) of dogs. The muzzle, pinnae and dorsum were typically affected. Generalized skin lesions were described in 52% (13/25) of dogs. Systemic signs of pain and lameness affected several dogs. Anaemia and thrombocytopenia were detected in several dogs with a more severe clinical phenotype. The most common histopathological features were hyperkeratosis and a lymphocytic interface dermatitis. Direct immunostaining revealed IgG deposition in the epidermal and follicular basement membrane of 100 (19/19) and 41% (7/17) of dogs, respectively. Circulating antifollicular and antisebaceous gland IgG antibodies were demonstrated by indirect immunostaining in 57% (4/7) of dogs. This disease usually responds poorly to immunosuppressive therapy and it has a guarded prognosis. Where outcome was recorded, 85% (10/12) of dogs were euthanased due to either a failure to respond to, or complications associated with, immunomodulatory therapy. Two affected dogs are in remission and maintained on immunomodulatory dosages of prednisolone. This study demonstrates the existence of a cellular and humoral immune response directed against the epidermal basement membrane of dogs with exfoliative cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Additional studies are required to further characterize the immunological pathogenesis of this disease.

  20. Porcupine quill migration in the thoracic cavity of a German shorthaired pointer.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Jose L; Holmes, Elaine S; Reetz, Jennifer; Holt, David E

    2015-01-01

    A 7 yr old German shorthaired pointer presented with progressive respiratory distress and lethargy. Two weeks prior to presentation, the dog had porcupine quills removed from the left forepaw, muzzle, and sternal area. At the time of presentation, the dog had bounding pulses and friction rubs in the right dorsal lung field. Harsh lung sounds and decreased lung sounds were ausculted in multiple lung fields. Radiographs revealed a pneumothorax and rounding of the cardiac silhouette suggestive of pericardial effusion. Computed tomographic imaging was performed and revealed multiple porcupine quills in the thoracic cavity. Surgery was performed and quills were found in multiple lung lobes and the heart. Following surgery the dog remained hypotensive. A post-operative echocardiogram revealed multiple curvilinear soft-tissue opacities in the heart. Given the grave prognosis the dog was subsequently euthanized and a postmortem examination was performed. A single porcupine quill was discovered in the left atrium above the mitral valve annulus. The quill extended across the aortic root, impinging on the coronary artery below the level of the aortic valve. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first known report of porcupine quill migration through the heart.

  1. Prevalence of serum thyroid hormone autoantibodies in dogs with clinical signs of hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Nachreiner, Raymond F; Refsal, Kent R; Graham, Peter A; Bowman, Mark M

    2002-02-15

    To determine prevalence of thyroid hormone autoantibodies (THAA) in serum of dogs with clinical signs of hypothyroidism. Cohort study. 287,948 serum samples from dogs with clinical signs consistent with hypothyroidism. Serum THAA were detected by use of a radiometric assay. Correlation and chi2 analyses were used to determine whether prevalence varied with breed, age, sex, or body weight. Only breeds for which > or = 50 samples had been submitted were used for analysis of breed prevalence. Thyroid hormone autoantibodies were detected in 18,135 (6.3%) samples. The 10 breeds with the highest prevalence of THAA were the Pointer, English Setter, English Pointer, Skye Terrier, German Wirehaired Pointer, Old English Sheepdog, Boxer, Maltese, Kuvasz, and Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen. Prevalence was significantly correlated with body weight and was highest in dogs between 2 and 4 years old. Females were significantly more likely to have THAA than were males. Thyroid hormone autoantibodies may falsely increase measured triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) concentrations in dogs; results suggest that T3 concentration may be falsely increased in approximately 57 of 1,000 dogs with hypothyroidism and that T4 concentration may be falsely increased in approximately 17 of 1,000 dogs with hypothyroidism. Results also suggested that dogs of certain breeds were significantly more or less likely to have THAA than were dogs in general.

  2. First report of transmission of canine leishmaniosis through bite wounds from a naturally infected dog in Germany.

    PubMed

    Naucke, Torsten J; Amelung, Silke; Lorentz, Susanne

    2016-05-10

    Canine leishmaniosis (CanL) is an important zoonosis caused by Leishmania (L.) infantum. Transmission of L. infantum to dogs (and humans) is mainly through the bite of infected sandflies, but the parasite can also be transmitted vertically, venereally and through blood transfusions of infected donors. Additionally, the direct dog-to-dog transmission through bites or wounds is suspected. In December 2015, a female eight-year-old Jack-Russell-Terrier was tested positive for CanL in Germany (ELISA 74, IFAT 1:4.000). The dog had never been in an endemic area, had never received a blood transfusion and had never been used for breeding. Another female Jack-Russell-Terrier (born 2009 in Spain) was kept in the same household between 2011 and 2012. That dog was imported to Germany in 2011 and was tested positive for leishmaniosis in 2012. The Spanish-born dog had received several bite wounds, i.a. in the neck, during fights with the German-born Terrier. This may be the first report of transmission of L. infantum through bite wounds from a naturally infected dog in Germany.

  3. Toxicity associated with ingestion of a polyacrylic acid hydrogel dog pad.

    PubMed

    Dorman, David C; Foster, Melanie L; Olesnevich, Brooke; Bolon, Brad; Castel, Aude; Sokolsky-Papkov, Marina; Mariani, Christopher L

    2018-06-01

    Superabsorbent sodium polyacrylate polymeric hydrogels that retain large amounts of liquids are used in disposable diapers, sanitary napkins, and other applications. These polymers are generally considered "nontoxic" with acute oral median lethal doses (LD 50 ) >5 g/kg. Despite this favorable toxicity profile, we identified a novel toxic syndrome in dogs and rats following the ingestion of a commercial dog pad composed primarily of a polyacrylic acid hydrogel. Inappropriate mentation, cerebellar ataxia, vomiting, and intention tremors were observed within 24 h after the ingestion of up to 15.7 g/kg of the hydrogel by an adult, castrated male Australian Shepherd mix. These observations prompted an experimental study in rats to further characterize the toxicity of the hydrogel. Adult, female Sprague Dawley rats ( n = 9) were assessed before and after hydrogel ingestion (2.6-19.2 g/kg over 4 h) using a functional observation battery and spontaneous motor activity. Clinical signs consistent with neurotoxicity emerged in rats as early as 2 h after the end of hydrogel exposure, including decreased activity in an open field, hunched posture, gait changes, reduced reaction to handling, decreased muscle tone, and abnormal surface righting. Hydrogel-exposed rats also had reduced motor activity when compared with pre-exposure baseline data. Rats that ingested the hydrogel did not develop nervous system lesions. These findings support the conclusion that some pet pad hydrogel products can induce acute neurotoxicity in animals under high-dose exposure conditions.

  4. [Patent ductus arteriosus in the dog: a retrospective study of clinical presentation, diagnostics and comparison of interventional techniques in 102 dogs (2003-2011)].

    PubMed

    Meijer, M; Beijerink, N J

    2012-06-01

    A left-to-right shunting patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is a common congenital heart defect in dogs. If it is left uncorrected, life expectancy in most cases is decreased due to the development of left-sided congestive heart failure. The aim of this study was to describe the dogs diagnosed with PDA in the Utrecht University Companion Animal Clinic from 2003 to 2011. The medical records of 102 patients were retrieved, and the clinical presentation and outcome of PDA closure by surgical ligation or transarterial catheter occlusion (TCO) were reviewed. In the TCO group, the result of coiling was compared with the placement of an Amplatz Canine Duct Occluder (ACDO). A predisposition to PDA was found in the German Brak, Stabyhoun, and Schapendoes. Dogs treated with surgical ligation were significantly older and heavier than those treated with TCO; within the TCO group, dogs treated with ACDO were significantly older and heavier The initial success rate (complete disappearance of the audible murmur in a patient that survived the procedure) was not significantly different between the different treatment modalities. Major complications were more common with surgical ligation, but the incidence of minor complications was not significantly different. There was no diference in survival between dogs treated with surgical ligation and dogs treated with TCO. This study shows a previously unreported predisposition to PDA in certain breeds. Both surgical ligation and TCO are suitable techniques for PDA closure, although major complications were more common with surgical ligation. ACDO appears to be the method with the least complications and thus can be considered the safest method.

  5. Metabolizable energy intake of client-owned adult dogs.

    PubMed

    Thes, M; Koeber, N; Fritz, J; Wendel, F; Dillitzer, N; Dobenecker, B; Kienzle, E

    2016-10-01

    A post hoc analysis of the metabolizable energy (ME) intake of privately owned pet dogs from the authors' nutrition consultation practice (Years 2007-2011) was carried out to identify if current ME recommendations are suitable for pet dogs. Data on 586 adult dogs were available (median age 5.5, median deviation from ideal weight 0.0), 55 of them were healthy; the others had various diseases. For ration calculation, a standardized questionnaire and the software diet-check Munich(™) was used. ME was predicted according to NRC (2006). Data were evaluated for the factors disease, breed, size, age, gender and type of feeding. The mean ME intake of all adult dogs amounted to 0.410 ± 0.121 MJ/kg metabolic body weight (BW(0.75) ) (n = 586). There was no effect of size and disease. Overweight dogs ate 0.360 ± 0.121 MJ/kg BW(0.75) , and underweight dogs ate 0.494 ± 0.159 MJ/kg BW(0.75) . Older dogs (>7 years, n = 149, 0.389 ± 0.105 MJ/kg BW(0.75) ) had a lower ME intake than younger ones (n = 313, 0.419 ± 0.121 MJ/kg BW(0.75) ), and intact males had a higher ME intake than the others (p < 0.001). Some breeds were above average: Jack Russell Terrier, Dalmatian, small Munsterlander and Magyar Viszla, Bearded Collies, Sight Hounds, German Boxers, English foxhounds, Rhodesian Ridgebacks and Flat-Coated Retrievers with a mean ME intake of 0.473 ± 0.121 MJ/kg BW(0.75) . The following breeds were below average: Dachshunds, Bichons, West highland White Terrier, Collies except Bearded Collies, Airedale Terriers, American Staffordshire terriers and Golden Retrievers with a mean ME intake of 0.343 ± 0.096 MJ/kg BW(0.75) . The mean maintenance energy requirements of pet dogs are similar to that of kennel dogs which do not exercise very much. These results suggest that opportunity and stimulus to exercise provided for pet dogs are lower than for kennel dogs. Lower activity in pet dogs may reduce part of potential effects of breed, medical history and age

  6. Genomic deletion of CNGB3 is identical by descent in multiple canine breeds and causes achromatopsia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Achromatopsia is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by the loss of cone photoreceptor function that results in day-blindness, total colorblindness, and decreased central visual acuity. The most common causes for the disease are mutations in the CNGB3 gene, coding for the beta subunit of the cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in cones. CNGB3-achromatopsia, or cone degeneration (cd), is also known to occur in two canine breeds, the Alaskan malamute (AM) and the German shorthaired pointer. Results Here we report an in-depth characterization of the achromatopsia phenotype in a new canine breed, the miniature Australian shepherd (MAS). Genotyping revealed that the dog was homozygous for a complete genomic deletion of the CNGB3 gene, as has been previously observed in the AM. Identical breakpoints on chromosome 29 were identified in both the affected AM and MAS with a resulting deletion of 404,820 bp. Pooled DNA samples of unrelated purebred Australian shepherd, MAS, Siberian husky, Samoyed and Alaskan sled dogs were screened for the presence of the affected allele; one Siberian husky and three Alaskan sled dogs were identified as carriers. The affected chromosomes from the AM, MAS, and Siberian husky were genotyped for 147 SNPs in a 3.93 Mb interval within the cd locus. An identical shared affected haplotype, 0.5 Mb long, was observed in all three breeds and defined the minimal linkage disequilibrium (LD) across breeds. This supports the idea that the mutated allele was identical by descent (IBD). Conclusion We report the occurrence of CNGB3-achromatopsia in a new canine breed, the MAS. The CNGB3-deletion allele previously described in the AM was also observed in a homozygous state in the affected MAS, as well as in a heterozygous carrier state in a Siberian husky and Alaskan sled dogs. All affected alleles were shown to be IBD, strongly suggesting an affected founder effect. Since the MAS is not known to be genetically related to the AM, other

  7. First North American case of Hemoglobin Shepherds Bush (β 74[E18] Gly → Asp) in a central Pennsylvania family

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hemoglobin Shepherds Bush (Human Genome Variation Society name: HBB:c.224G > A) is an unstable hemoglobin variant resulting from a β 74 GGC to GAC mutation (Gly to Asp) that manifests clinically as hemolytic anemia or gall bladder disease due to chronic subclinical hemolysis. Case presentation We report a Pennsylvania family of English descent with this condition, first noticed in a 6-year-old female. The proband presented with splenomegaly, fatigue, dark urine and an elevated indirect bilirubin. Hemoglobin identification studies and subsequent genetic testing performed according to a systematic algorithm elucidated the diagnosis of Hb Shepherds Bush. Conclusions This is the first case of this rare hemoglobin variant identified in North America to our knowledge. It was identified using a systematic algorithm of diagnostic tests that should be followed whenever considering a rare hemoglobinopathy as part of the differential diagnosis. PMID:24428873

  8. Implementing Artificial Intelligence Behaviors in a Virtual World

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisler, Brian; Thome, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we will present a look at the current state of the art in human-computer interface technologies, including intelligent interactive agents, natural speech interaction and gestural based interfaces. We describe our use of these technologies to implement a cost effective, immersive experience on a public region in Second Life. We provision our Artificial Agents as a German Shepherd Dog avatar with an external rules engine controlling the behavior and movement. To interact with the avatar, we implemented a natural language and gesture system allowing the human avatars to use speech and physical gestures rather than interacting via a keyboard and mouse. The result is a system that allows multiple humans to interact naturally with AI avatars by playing games such as fetch with a flying disk and even practicing obedience exercises using voice and gesture, a natural seeming day in the park.

  9. Mortality and morbidity due to gastric dilatation-volvulus syndrome in pedigree dogs in the UK.

    PubMed

    Evans, Katy M; Adams, Vicki J

    2010-07-01

    To estimate breed-specific risk of death due to, and prevalence of, gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) in UK pedigree dogs. Data were available on the reported cause of and age at death and occurrence of and age at diagnosis of disease from the 2004 purebred dog health survey. A total of 15,881 dogs of 165 breeds had died in the previous 10 years; GDV was the cause of death in 65 breeds. There were 36,006 live dogs of 169 breeds of which 48 breeds had experienced > or =1 episodes of GDV. Prevalence ratios were used to estimate breed-specific GDV mortality and morbidity risks. Gastric dilatation-volvulus was the cause of death for 389 dogs, representing 2.5% (95% CI: 2.2-2.7) of all deaths reported and the median age at death was 7.92 years. There were 253 episodes in 238 live dogs. The median age at first diagnosis was five years. Breeds at greatest risk of GDV mortality were the bloodhound, Grand Bleu de Gascogne, German longhaired pointer and Neapolitan mastiff. Breeds at greatest risk of GDV morbidity were the Grand Bleu de Gascogne, bloodhound, otterhound, Irish setter and Weimaraner. These results suggest that 16 breeds, mainly large/giant, are at increased risk of morbidity/mortality due to GDV.

  10. [Phenotypic trends and breeding values for canine congenital sensorineural deafness in Dalmatian dogs].

    PubMed

    Blum, Meike; Distl, Ottmar

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, breeding values for canine congenital sensorineural deafness, the presence of blue eyes and patches have been predicted using multivariate animal models to test the reliability of the breeding values for planned matings. The dataset consisted of 6669 German Dalmatian dogs born between 1988 and 2009. Data were provided by the Dalmatian kennel clubs which are members of the German Association for Dog Breeding and Husbandry (VDH). The hearing status for all dogs was evaluated using brainstem auditory evoked potentials. The reliability using the prediction error variance of breeding values and the realized reliability of the prediction of the phenotype of future progeny born in each one year between 2006 and 2009 were used as parameters to evaluate the goodness of prediction through breeding values. All animals from the previous birth years were used for prediction of the breeding values of the progeny in each of the up-coming birth years. The breeding values based on pedigree records achieved an average reliability of 0.19 for the future 1951 progeny. The predictive accuracy (R2) for the hearing status of single future progeny was at 1.3%. Combining breeding values for littermates increased the predictive accuracy to 3.5%. Corresponding values for maternal and paternal half-sib groups were at 3.2 and 7.3%. The use of breeding values for planned matings increases the phenotypic selection response over mass selection. The breeding values of sires may be used for planned matings because reliabilities and predictive accuracies for future paternal progeny groups were highest.

  11. Epidemiological study of canine parvovirus infection in and around Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Behera, Monalisa; Panda, S K; Sahoo, P K; Acharya, A P; Patra, R C; Das, Sweta; Pati, S

    2015-01-01

    An epidemiological study of canine parvovirus infection in dogs in and around Bhubaneswar, Odisha was conducted between December 2012 to March 2013 and prevalence rate was studied on the basis of age, breed, and sex. A total of 71 fecal samples from suspected diarrheic dogs were collected in sterile phosphate buffer saline (10% W/V) and examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of canine parvo virus infection, followed by epidemiological study in relation to age, breed, and sex. Of 71 samples analyzed, 29 (40.85%) were found to be positive by PCR assay. The infection was higher in Deshi/local breeds (34.48%), followed by German shepherd (17.24%), equal incidences in mixed and Labrador retriever (10.34%), Rottweiler and German spitz showed 6.90% each and finally lower incidences in four breeds (3.45%) such as Dalmatians, Nea politan mastiff, Pug and Great Dane. Age-wise prevalence study revealed the infection being more in the age group of 3-6 months (41.37%), followed by equal incidences of 27.59% in 1-3 months and 6-12 months age group, and a low incidence in age groups above 12 months (3.45%). The incidence was predominantly higher in males (86.21%) than females (13.79%). The epidemiological analysis revealed that the breed wise prevalence was found to be more in Deshi breeds as compared to others, age groups below 6 months were found to be more prone to parvovirus infection and males were mostly infected.

  12. Public Perceptions of Service Dogs, Emotional Support Dogs, and Therapy Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina; Hellyer, Peter; Cheung, Louana; Kogan, Lori

    2017-01-01

    As service dogs, emotional support dogs, and therapy dogs have become more prevalent in the USA, so too has the controversy surrounding their legitimacy. Yet, there is a lack of objective data regarding the public’s understanding of the role played by each of these types of animals, as well as their perceptions regarding the legitimacy of their integration. An anonymous, online survey was distributed to examine the perceptions of US adults who do not own any type of assistance animal. A total of 505 individuals responded to the online survey, yielding 284 usable responses. Results suggest widespread misconceptions about definitions, rules, regulations, and rights associated with each type of assistance dog. In general, service dogs are more likely to be perceived as helping with a legitimate need, and their access to public spaces is viewed favorably. While there are some concerns about the legitimacy and necessary access rights for emotional support dogs, members of the public correctly identified the roles and rights of therapy dogs. Despite the media’s focus on abuses and false representation of these dogs, most participants reported feeling the majority of people are not taking advantage of the system. PMID:28617350

  13. Public Perceptions of Service Dogs, Emotional Support Dogs, and Therapy Dogs.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina; Hellyer, Peter; Cheung, Louana; Kogan, Lori

    2017-06-15

    As service dogs, emotional support dogs, and therapy dogs have become more prevalent in the USA, so too has the controversy surrounding their legitimacy. Yet, there is a lack of objective data regarding the public's understanding of the role played by each of these types of animals, as well as their perceptions regarding the legitimacy of their integration. An anonymous, online survey was distributed to examine the perceptions of US adults who do not own any type of assistance animal. A total of 505 individuals responded to the online survey, yielding 284 usable responses. Results suggest widespread misconceptions about definitions, rules, regulations, and rights associated with each type of assistance dog. In general, service dogs are more likely to be perceived as helping with a legitimate need, and their access to public spaces is viewed favorably. While there are some concerns about the legitimacy and necessary access rights for emotional support dogs, members of the public correctly identified the roles and rights of therapy dogs. Despite the media's focus on abuses and false representation of these dogs, most participants reported feeling the majority of people are not taking advantage of the system.

  14. SNP genetic polymorphisms of MDR-1, CYP1A2 and CYPB11 genes in four canine breeds upon toxicological evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Gagliardi, Rosa; Llambí, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The fields of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics have become increasingly promising regarding the clinical application of genetic data to aid in prevention of adverse reactions. Specific screening tests can predict which animals express modified proteins or genetic sequences responsible for adverse effects associated with a drug. Among the genetic variations that have been investigated in dogs, the multidrug resistance gene (MDR) is the best studied. However, other genes such as CYP1A2 and CYP2B11 control the protein syntheses involved in the metabolism of many drugs. In the present study, the MDR-1, CYP1A2 and CYP2B11 genes were examined to identify SNP polymorphisms associated with these genes in the following four canine breeds: Uruguayan Cimarron, Border Collie, Labrador Retriever and German Shepherd. The results revealed that several SNPs of the CYP1A2 and CYP2B11 genes are potential targets for drug sensitivity investigations. PMID:25797294

  15. SNP genetic polymorphisms of MDR-1, CYP1A2 and CYPB11 genes in four canine breeds upon toxicological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Rosa; Llambí, Silvia; Arruga, M Victoria

    2015-01-01

    The fields of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics have become increasingly promising regarding the clinical application of genetic data to aid in prevention of adverse reactions. Specific screening tests can predict which animals express modified proteins or genetic sequences responsible for adverse effects associated with a drug. Among the genetic variations that have been investigated in dogs, the multidrug resistance gene (MDR) is the best studied. However, other genes such as CYP1A2 and CYP2B11 control the protein syntheses involved in the metabolism of many drugs. In the present study, the MDR-1, CYP1A2 and CYP2B11 genes were examined to identify SNP polymorphisms associated with these genes in the following four canine breeds: Uruguayan Cimarron, Border Collie, Labrador Retriever and German Shepherd. The results revealed that several SNPs of the CYP1A2 and CYP2B11 genes are potential targets for drug sensitivity investigations.

  16. High detection rate of dog circovirus in diarrheal dogs.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Han-Siang; Lin, Ting-Han; Wu, Hung-Yi; Lin, Lee-Shuan; Chung, Cheng-Shu; Chiou, Ming-Tang; Lin, Chao-Nan

    2016-06-17

    Diarrhea is one of the most common clinical symptoms reported in companion animal clinics. Dog circovirus (DogCV) is a new mammalian circovirus that is considered to be a cause of alimentary syndromes such as diarrhea, vomiting and hemorrhagic enteritis. DogCV has previously only been identified in the United States, Italy, Germany (GeneBank accession number: KF887949) and China (GeneBank accession number: KT946839). Therefore, the aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of DogCV in Taiwan and to explore the correlation between diarrhea and DogCV infection. Clinical specimens were collected between 2012 and 2014 from 207 dogs suffering from diarrhea and 160 healthy dogs. In this study, we developed a sensitive and specific SYBR Green-based real-time PCR assays to detected DogCV in naturally infected animals. Of the analyzed fecal samples from diarrheal dogs and health dogs, 58 (28.0 %) and 19 (11.9 %), respectively, were DogCV positive. The difference in DogCV prevalence was highly significant (P = 0.0002755) in diarrheal dogs. This is the first study to reveal that DogCV is currently circulating in domestic dogs in Taiwan and to demonstrate its high detection rate in dogs with diarrhea.

  17. German Studies in America. German Studies Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Volkmar; Osterle, Heinz D.

    This volume contains two papers, "German Studies in America," by Volkmar Sander, and "Historicism, Marxism, Structuralism: Ideas for German Culture Courses," by Heinz D. Osterle. The first paper discusses the position of German studies in the United States today. The greatest challenge comes from low enrollments; therefore,…

  18. Further spreading of canine oriental eyeworm in Europe: first report of Thelazia callipaeda in Romania.

    PubMed

    Mihalca, Andrei Daniel; D'Amico, Gianluca; Scurtu, Iuliu; Chirilă, Ramona; Matei, Ioana Adriana; Ionică, Angela Monica

    2015-01-27

    Despite the increasing number of reports of autochthonous cases of ocular thelaziosis in dogs in several European countries, and the evident emergence of human cases, the distribution and spreading potential of this parasite is far for being fully known. In Romania, despite intensive surveillance performed over recent years on the typical hosts of T. callipaeda, the parasite has not been found until now. In October 2014 a German Shepherd was presented for consultation to a private veterinary practice from western Romania with a history of unilateral chronic conjunctivitis. Following a close examination of the affected eye, nematodes were noticed in the conjunctival sac. The specimens collected were used for morphological examination (light microscopy) and molecular analysis (amplification of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene, followed by sequencing). Thirteen nematodes were collected, all identified morphologically as T. callipaeda. The history of the dog revealed no travel outside Romania, and during the last year, not even outside the home locality. The BLAST analysis of our sequence showed a 100% similarity T. callipaeda haplotype h1. This is the first report of T. callipaeda in Romania, which we consider to be with autochthonous transmission. These findings confirm the spreading trend of T callipaeda and the increased risk of emerging vector-borne zoonoses.

  19. [Prevalence of Dog circovirus in healthy and diarrhoeic dogs].

    PubMed

    Gentil, Michaela; Gruber, Achim D; Müller, Elisabeth

    2017-04-19

    In 2012, a Dog circovirus (DogCV) was discovered in the USA, which was followed by further descriptions of the virus in the USA, Italy and Germany. The present study is the first to examine the prevalence of DogCV in faeces of dogs from Germany and other European countries. Faecal samples from 184 dogs with diarrhoea and from 82 clinically healthy dogs (control group) were analysed for the presence of DogCV by PCR. Furthermore, the detection of parvovirus, coronavirus, Giardia and Cryptosporidium was performed in all samples. In the group of dogs with diarrhoea the prevalence of DogCV was 20.1% (37/184), in the healthy control group it was 7.3% (6/82). Therefore, the virus could be detected significantly more frequently in dogs with diarrhoea. The detection frequency of DogCV is comparable with those of the other tested pathogens. In approximately 50% of the DogCV-positive dogs, infections with other enteropathogenic organisms were diagnosed. The role of co-infection in the pathogenesis of the disease remains unclear, but there appears to be an association between co-infection and disease severity. Evidence of DogCV in clinically healthy dogs appears important for the epidemiology and raises questions about its pathogenicity. Further studies are needed to clarify questions regarding the pathogenesis, causal relevance and possible interference by other diarrhoeal pathogens. Nevertheless, the results of this study are an important indication that DogCV should be considered as a differential diagnosis in dogs with diarrhoea.

  20. Dogs recognize dog and human emotions.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Natalia; Guo, Kun; Wilkinson, Anna; Savalli, Carine; Otta, Emma; Mills, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The perception of emotional expressions allows animals to evaluate the social intentions and motivations of each other. This usually takes place within species; however, in the case of domestic dogs, it might be advantageous to recognize the emotions of humans as well as other dogs. In this sense, the combination of visual and auditory cues to categorize others' emotions facilitates the information processing and indicates high-level cognitive representations. Using a cross-modal preferential looking paradigm, we presented dogs with either human or dog faces with different emotional valences (happy/playful versus angry/aggressive) paired with a single vocalization from the same individual with either a positive or negative valence or Brownian noise. Dogs looked significantly longer at the face whose expression was congruent to the valence of vocalization, for both conspecifics and heterospecifics, an ability previously known only in humans. These results demonstrate that dogs can extract and integrate bimodal sensory emotional information, and discriminate between positive and negative emotions from both humans and dogs. © 2016 The Author(s).

  1. CO(2), CO, and Hg emissions from the Truman Shepherd and Ruth Mullins coal fires, eastern Kentucky, USA.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Jennifer M K; Henke, Kevin R; Hower, James C; Engle, Mark A; Stracher, Glenn B; Stucker, J D; Drew, Jordan W; Staggs, Wayne D; Murray, Tiffany M; Hammond, Maxwell L; Adkins, Kenneth D; Mullins, Bailey J; Lemley, Edward W

    2010-03-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO(2)), carbon monoxide (CO), and mercury (Hg) emissions were quantified for two eastern Kentucky coal-seam fires, the Truman Shepherd fire in Floyd County and the Ruth Mullins fire in Perry County. This study is one of the first to estimate gas emissions from coal fires using field measurements at gas vents. The Truman Shepherd fire emissions are nearly 1400t CO(2)/yr and 16kg Hg/yr resulting from a coal combustion rate of 450-550t/yr. The sum of CO(2) emissions from seven vents at the Ruth Mullins fire is 726+/-72t/yr, suggesting that the fire is consuming about 250-280t coal/yr. Total Ruth Mullins fire CO and Hg emissions are estimated at 21+/-1.8t/yr and >840+/-170g/yr, respectively. The CO(2) emissions are environmentally significant, but low compared to coal-fired power plants; for example, 3.9x10(6)t CO(2)/yr for a 514-MW boiler in Kentucky. Using simple calculations, CO(2) and Hg emissions from coal-fires in the U.S. are estimated at 1.4x10(7)-2.9x10(8)t/yr and 0.58-11.5t/yr, respectively. This initial work indicates that coal fires may be an important source of CO(2), CO, Hg and other atmospheric constituents.

  2. … but You Are Not German." -- Afro-German Culture and Literature in the German Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenker, Theresa; Munro, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Units and classes dedicated to multiculturalism in Germany have predominantly focused on Turkish-German literature and culture. Afro-Germans have been a minority whose culture and literature have only marginally been included in German classes, even though Afro-Germans have been a part of Germany for centuries and have undergone efforts at…

  3. Marlene Dietrich in the German Classroom: A German Film Project--Humanities through the Golden Age of German Cinema.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flippo, Hyde

    1993-01-01

    Marlene Dietrich and other classic performers of German cinema can serve to open up a whole new realm for students of German, at secondary and postsecondary levels. By researching and viewing German and American film classics, students have opportunity to learn more about German language and an important element of German culture that has had…

  4. The effects of dog breed development on genetic diversity and the relative influences of performance and conformation breeding.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, N; Liu, H; Theilen, G; Sacks, B

    2013-06-01

    Genetic diversity was compared among eight dog breeds selected primarily for conformation (Standard Poodle, Italian Greyhound and show English Setter), conformation and performance (Brittany), predominantly performance (German Shorthaired and Wirehaired Pointers) or solely performance (field English Setter and Red Setter). Modern village dogs, which better reflect ancestral genetic diversity, were used as the standard. Four to seven maternal and one to two Y haplotypes were found per breed, with one usually dominant. Diversity of maternal haplotypes was greatest in village dogs, intermediate in performance breeds and lowest in conformation breeds. Maternal haplotype sharing occurred across all breeds, while Y haplotypes were more breed specific. Almost all paternal haplotypes were identified among village dogs, with the exception of the dominant Y haplotype in Brittanys, which has not been identified heretofore. The highest heterozygosity based on 24 autosomal microsatellites was found in village dogs and the lowest in conformation (show) breeds. Principal coordinate analysis indicated that conformation-type breeds were distinct from breeds heavily used for performance, the latter clustering more closely with village dogs. The Brittany, a well-established dual show and field breed, was also genetically intermediate between the conformation and performance breeds. The number of DLA-DRB1 alleles varied from 3 to 10 per breed with extensive sharing. SNPs across the wider DLA region were more frequently homozygous in all pure breeds than in village dogs. Compared with their village dog relatives, all modern breed dogs exhibit reduced genetic diversity. Genetic diversity was even more reduced among breeds under selection for show/conformation. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding cystic echinococcosis and sheep herding in Peru: a mixed-methods approach.

    PubMed

    Merino, Veronika; Westgard, Christopher M; Bayer, Angela M; García, Patricia J

    2017-07-06

    The parasitic disease, cystic echinococcosis (CE), is prevalent in low-income, livestock-raising communities and 2000 new people will be diagnosed this year in South America alone. The disease usually passes from livestock to dogs to humans, making it a zoonotic disease and part of the One Health Initiative. Control of CE has been infamously difficult; no endemic areas of South America have succeeded in maintaining sustainable eradication of the parasite. For the current study, we aimed to gain a better understanding of the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of rural sheep farmers and other community leaders regarding their sheep herding practices and perspectives about a control program for CE. We also hope to identify potential barriers and opportunities that could occur in a control program. The authors conducted Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) surveys and semi-structured interviews in rural communities in the highlands of Peru. The KAP surveys were administered to 51 local shepherds, and the semi-structured interviews were administered to 40 individuals, including shepherds, community leaders, and health care providers. We found that the shepherds already deworm their sheep at a median of 2 times per year (N = 49, range 2-4) and have a mean willingness-to-pay of U.S. $ 0.60 for dog dewormer medication (N = 20, range = 0.00- $2.00 USD). We were not able to learn the deworming agent or agents that were being used, for neither sheep nor dogs. Additionally, 90% of shepherds slaughter their own sheep (N = 49). We also learned that the main barriers to an effective control program include: lack of education about the cause and control options for CE, accessibility to the distant communities and sparse grazing pastures, and a lack of economic incentive. Findings suggest it may be feasible to develop an effective CE control program which can be used to create an improved protocol to control CE in the region.

  6. Prevalence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium species in dog park attending dogs compared to non-dog park attending dogs in one region of Colorado.

    PubMed

    Wang, Andrea; Ruch-Gallie, Rebecca; Scorza, Valeria; Lin, Philip; Lappin, Michael R

    2012-03-23

    Dog parks are very popular in urban areas, but there are no current studies attempting to correlate visits to dog parks and risk of colonization by enteric parasites. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dog park visitation is associated with an increased prevalence of enteric parasites or an increase in prevalence of gastrointestinal signs in dogs in northern Colorado. Feces from dogs owned by veterinary students or Veterinary Teaching Hospital staff members were submitted with a completed survey form detailing dog park attendance rates, fecal character scores, and other clinical information. Feces were examined microscopically for parasites after sugar centrifugation, for Giardia spp. cysts and Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts by a commercially available immunofluorescence assay (FA) and the FA positive samples were genotyped after PCR amplification. The Giardia assemblages were determined using the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) β-giardin and triose phosphate isomerase (TPI) genes and the Cryptosporidium species were determined using the heat shock protein-70 gene. A total of 129 fecal samples were assayed; 66 were from dog park attending dogs and 63 were from non-dog park-attending dogs. The overall parasite prevalence rate was 7.0% (9 of 129 samples). Dog park attending dogs were more likely to be positive for Giardia or Cryptosporidium than non-dog park-attending dogs (p=0.0279), but there was no association of gastrointestinal signs with dog park attendance or with fecal flotation or FA results. The five Giardia isolates were assemblage C and/or D and the one Cryptosporidium isolate was Ctenocephalides canis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Affective behavioural responses by dogs to tactile human-dog interactions].

    PubMed

    Kuhne, Franziska; Hössler, Johanna C; Struwe, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The communication of dogs is based on complex, subtle body postures and facial expressions. Some social interaction between dogs includes physical contact. Humans generally use both verbal and tactile signals to communicate with dogs. Hence, interaction between humans and dogs might lead to conflicts because the behavioural responses of dogs to human-dog interaction may be misinterpreted and wrongly assessed. The behavioural responses of dogs to tactile human-dog interactions and human gestures are the focus of this study. The participating dogs (n = 47) were privately owned pets.They were of varying breed and gender.The test consisted of nine randomised test sequences (e. g. petting the dog's head or chest). A test sequence was performed for a period of 30 seconds. The inter-trial interval was set at 60 seconds and the test-retest interval was set at 10 minutes. The frequency and duration of the dogs'behavioural responses were recorded using INTERACT. To examine the behavioural responses of the dogs, a two-way analysis of variance within the linear mixed models procedure of IBM SPSS Statistics 19 was conducted. A significant influence of the test-sequenc order on the dogs' behaviour could be analysed for appeasement gestures (F8,137 = 2.42; p = 0.018), redirected behaviour (F8,161 = 6.31; p = 0.012) and socio-positive behaviour (F8,148 = 6.28; p = 0.012). The behavioural responses of the dogs, which were considered as displacement activities (F8,109 = 2.5; p = 0.014) differed significantly among the test sequences. The response of the dogs, measured as gestures of appeasement, redirected behaviours, and displacement activities, was most obvious during petting around the head and near the paws.The results of this study conspicuously indicate that dogs respond to tactile human-dog interactions with gestures of appeasement and displacement activities. Redirected behaviours, socio-positive behaviours as well displacement activities are behavioural responses which dogs

  8. Basal and glucagon-stimulated plasma C-peptide concentrations in healthy dogs, dogs with diabetes mellitus, and dogs with hyperadrenocorticism.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, T M; Nelson, R W; Feldman, E C; Robertson, K; Polonsky, K S

    1996-01-01

    Serum glucose and plasma C-peptide response to i.v. glucagon administration was evaluated in 24 healthy dogs, 12 dogs with untreated diabetes mellitus, 30 dogs with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus, and 8 dogs with naturally acquired hyperadrenocorticism. Serum insulin response also was evaluated in all dogs, except 20 insulin-treated diabetic dogs. Blood samples for serum glucose, serum insulin, and plasma C-peptide determinations were collected immediately before and 5, 10, 20, 30, and (for healthy dogs) 60 minutes after i.v. administration of 1 mg glucagon per dog. In healthy dogs, the patterns of glucagon-stimulated changes in plasma C-peptide and serum insulin concentrations were identical, with single peaks in plasma C-peptide and serum insulin concentrations observed approximately 15 minutes after i.v. glucagon administration. Mean plasma C-peptide and serum insulin concentrations in untreated diabetic dogs, and mean plasma C-peptide concentration in insulin-treated diabetic dogs did not increase significantly after i.v. glucagon administration. The validity of serum insulin concentration results was questionable in 10 insulin-treated diabetic dogs, possibly because of anti-insulin antibody interference with the insulin radioimmunoassay. Plasma C-peptide and serum insulin concentrations were significantly increased (P < .001) at all blood sampling times after glucagon administration in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism, compared with healthy dogs, and untreated and insulin-treated diabetic dogs. Five-minute C-peptide increment, C-peptide peak response, total C-peptide secretion, and, for untreated diabetic dogs, insulin peak response and total insulin secretion were significantly lower (P < .00l) in diabetic dogs, compared with healthy dogs, whereas these same parameters were significantly increased (P < .01) in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism, compared with healthy dogs, and untreated and insulin-treated diabetic dogs. Although not statistically significant

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction in myocardium obtained from clinically normal dogs, clinically normal anesthetized dogs, and dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sleeper, Meg M; Rosato, Bradley P; Bansal, Seema; Avadhani, Narayan G

    2012-11-01

    To compare mitochondrial complex I and complex IV activity in myocardial mitochondria of clinically normal dogs, clinically normal dogs exposed to inhalation anesthesia, and dogs affected with dilated cardiomyopathy. Myocardial samples obtained from 21 euthanized dogs (6 clinically normal [control] dogs, 5 clinically normal dogs subjected to inhalation anesthesia with isoflurane prior to euthanasia, 5 dogs with juvenile-onset dilated cardiomyopathy, and 5 dogs with adult-onset dilated cardiomyopathy). Activity of mitochondrial complex I and complex IV was assayed spectrophotometrically in isolated mitochondria from left ventricular tissue obtained from the 4 groups of dogs. Activity of complex I and complex IV was significantly decreased in anesthetized dogs, compared with activities in the control dogs and dogs with juvenile-onset or adult-onset dilated cardiomyopathy. Inhalation anesthesia disrupted the electron transport chain in the dogs, which potentially led to an outburst of reactive oxygen species that caused mitochondrial dysfunction. Inhalation anesthesia depressed mitochondrial function in dogs, similar to results reported in other species. This effect is important to consider when anesthetizing animals with myocardial disease and suggested that antioxidant treatments may be beneficial in some animals. Additionally, this effect should be considered when designing studies in which mitochondrial enzyme activity will be measured. Additional studies that include a larger number of animals are warranted.

  10. Geant4 simulation of ion chambers response to 60Co spectrum of LNMRI/IRD Shepherd 81-14D Radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiroz Filho, P. P.; Da Silva, C. N. M.

    2018-03-01

    The National Ionizing Radiation Metrology Laboratory of the Radioprotection and Dosimetry Institute (LNMRI / IRD) has recently acquired a Shepherd 81-14D Radiator. In this work we simulate, using Geant4, the behavior with the inverse square law radiation for 3 models of PTW spherical chambers used in radioprotection, a relevant information to planning the measurements. We did the corrections for the attenuation and scattering in the air for each distance, where we used the 60Co spectrum simulated previously.

  11. Upper Airway Injury in Dogs Secondary to Trauma: 10 Dogs (2000-2011).

    PubMed

    Basdani, Eleni; Papazoglou, Lysimachos G; Patsikas, Michail N; Kazakos, Georgios M; Adamama-Moraitou, Katerina K; Tsokataridis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Ten dogs that presented with trauma-induced upper airway rupture or stenosis were reviewed. Tracheal rupture was seen in seven dogs, tracheal stenosis in one dog, and laryngeal rupture in two dogs. Clinical abnormalities included respiratory distress in five dogs, subcutaneous emphysema in eight, air leakage through the cervical wound in seven, stridor in three dogs, pneumomediastinum in four and pneumothorax in one dog. Reconstruction with simple interrupted sutures was performed in four dogs, tracheal resection and end-to-end anastomosis in five dogs, and one dog was euthanized intraoperatively. Complications were seen in three dogs including aspiration pneumonia in one and vocalization alterations in two dogs.

  12. Large Scale Visual Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    mammal jelly fungus living thing man s animal orangutan mammal cougar mammal mammal German shepherd hyena red fox Flat Ours sailboat catamaran...snow leopard feline o er living thing conch en y wheelbarrow carnivore orangutan mammal meerkat mammal carnivore polar bear lynx lion Flat

  13. The use of dogs as second species in regulatory testing of pesticides. Part II: Subacute, subchronic and chronic studies in the dog.

    PubMed

    Spielmann, H; Gerbracht, U

    2001-03-01

    Data on 172 pesticides (fungicides, herbicides, insecticides and other pesticides) submitted for regulatory purposes during the past 40 years to the German Federal Institute for the Health Protection of Consumers and Veterinary Medicine (BgVV) were analysed to determine whether chronic studies in dogs (52/104 weeks) provide essential additional specific toxicological compared with subchronic (13 weeks) or subacute (4 weeks) studies in the same species. Comparison of the lowest observed effect levels (LOELs) in dogs revealed no significant differences between subchronic and chronic studies but a significant difference between subacute studies and subchronic or chronic studies. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between the LOELs determined in subchronic studies and those determined in chronic studies in dogs (r = 0.78-0.84). The distribution of target organ toxicity determined in chronic studies in dogs was not significantly different from the distribution determined in subchronic studies, except for effects on the spleen in studies on herbicides which were only observed in chronic studies and in combined subchronic/chronic studies, but never in subchronic studies. Organ-specific effects that were observed in chronic studies but not in subchronic studies were found in 30 of 55 studies on fungicides, in 25 of 44 on herbicides, in 17 of 38 on insecticides and in 10 of 16 on other pesticides. Compared with 26-week studies, additional organ-specific toxic effects were found in three of five, in three of four, in one of three and in one of one 52/104-week studies on fungicides, of herbicides, of insecticides and other pesticides, respectively. The organ-specific effects that were seen only in the chronic dog studies were evaluated according to their severity, e.g. significant damage to organs versus changes in enzyme activities that do not affect organ function or histology. Such effects were not considered to be specific for dogs in chronic studies if similar

  14. Job-Related Stress in Forensic Interviewers of Children with Use of Therapy Dogs Compared with Facility Dogs or No Dogs.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Diane; Yamamoto, Mariko; Willits, Neil H; Hart, Lynette A

    2018-01-01

    Sexually abused children providing essential testimony regarding crimes in forensic interviews now sometimes are provided facility dogs or therapy dogs for comfort. Facility dogs are extensively trained to work with forensic interviewers; when using therapy dogs in interviews, volunteers are the dog handlers. Interviews can impact child welfare workers' mental health causing secondary traumatic stress (STS). To investigate this stress, first data were gathered on stress retrospectively for when interviewers initially started the job prior to working with a dog, and then currently, from forensic interviewers using a facility dog, a therapy or pet dog, or no dog. These retrospective and secondary traumatic stress scale (STSS) data compared job stress among interviewers of children using: a certified, workplace facility dog ( n  = 16), a volunteer's trained therapy dog or the interviewer's pet dog ( n  = 13/3), or no dog ( n  = 198). Retrospective scores of therapy dog and no dog interviewers' stress were highest for the first interviewing year 1 and then declined. Extremely or very stressful retrospective scores differed among the three groups in year 1 ( p  < 0.038), and were significantly elevated for the therapy dog group as compared with the facility dog group ( p  < 0.035). All interviewing groups had elevated STSS scores; when compared with other healthcare groups that have been studied, sub-scores were especially high for Avoidance: a psychological coping mechanism to avoid dealing with a stressor. STSS scores differed among groups ( p  < 0.016), primarily due to Avoidance sub-scores ( p  < 0.009), reflecting higher Avoidance scores for therapy dog users than no dog users ( p  < 0.009). Facility dog users more consistently used dogs during interviews and conducted more interviews than therapy/pet dog users; both groups favored using dogs. Interviewers currently working with therapy dogs accompanied by their volunteers reported

  15. Job-Related Stress in Forensic Interviewers of Children with Use of Therapy Dogs Compared with Facility Dogs or No Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Diane; Yamamoto, Mariko; Willits, Neil H.; Hart, Lynette A.

    2018-01-01

    Sexually abused children providing essential testimony regarding crimes in forensic interviews now sometimes are provided facility dogs or therapy dogs for comfort. Facility dogs are extensively trained to work with forensic interviewers; when using therapy dogs in interviews, volunteers are the dog handlers. Interviews can impact child welfare workers’ mental health causing secondary traumatic stress (STS). To investigate this stress, first data were gathered on stress retrospectively for when interviewers initially started the job prior to working with a dog, and then currently, from forensic interviewers using a facility dog, a therapy or pet dog, or no dog. These retrospective and secondary traumatic stress scale (STSS) data compared job stress among interviewers of children using: a certified, workplace facility dog (n = 16), a volunteer’s trained therapy dog or the interviewer’s pet dog (n = 13/3), or no dog (n = 198). Retrospective scores of therapy dog and no dog interviewers’ stress were highest for the first interviewing year 1 and then declined. Extremely or very stressful retrospective scores differed among the three groups in year 1 (p < 0.038), and were significantly elevated for the therapy dog group as compared with the facility dog group (p < 0.035). All interviewing groups had elevated STSS scores; when compared with other healthcare groups that have been studied, sub-scores were especially high for Avoidance: a psychological coping mechanism to avoid dealing with a stressor. STSS scores differed among groups (p < 0.016), primarily due to Avoidance sub-scores (p < 0.009), reflecting higher Avoidance scores for therapy dog users than no dog users (p < 0.009). Facility dog users more consistently used dogs during interviews and conducted more interviews than therapy/pet dog users; both groups favored using dogs. Interviewers currently working with therapy dogs accompanied by their volunteers reported they had

  16. Clostridium difficile in faeces from healthy dogs and dogs with diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to evaluate the faecal occurrence and characterization of Clostridium difficile in clinically healthy dogs (N = 50) and in dogs with diarrhea (N = 20) in the Stockholm-Uppsala region of Sweden. Findings Clostridium difficile was isolated from 2/50 healthy dogs and from 2/20 diarrheic dogs. Isolates from healthy dogs were negative for toxin A and B and for the tcdA and tcdB genes. Both isolates from diarrheic dogs were positive for toxin B and for the tcdA and tcdB genes. The C. difficile isolates from healthy dogs had PCR ribotype 009 (SE-type 6) and 010 (SE-type 3) whereas both isolates from dogs with diarrhoea had the toxigenic ribotype 014 (SE-type 21). One of the isolates from healthy dogs was initially resistant to metronidazole. Conclusions This study revealed presence of toxigenic C. difficile in faecal samples of diarrheic dogs and low number of non- toxigenic isolates in healthy dogs from Uppsala-Stockholm region in Sweden. However, more comprehensive studies are warranted to investigate the role of C. difficile in gastrointestinal disease in dogs. PMID:23497714

  17. Clostridium difficile in faeces from healthy dogs and dogs with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Wetterwik, Karl-Johan; Trowald-Wigh, Gunilla; Fernström, Lise-Lotte; Krovacek, Karel

    2013-03-12

    This study was conducted to evaluate the faecal occurrence and characterization of Clostridium difficile in clinically healthy dogs (N = 50) and in dogs with diarrhea (N = 20) in the Stockholm-Uppsala region of Sweden. Clostridium difficile was isolated from 2/50 healthy dogs and from 2/20 diarrheic dogs. Isolates from healthy dogs were negative for toxin A and B and for the tcdA and tcdB genes. Both isolates from diarrheic dogs were positive for toxin B and for the tcdA and tcdB genes. The C. difficile isolates from healthy dogs had PCR ribotype 009 (SE-type 6) and 010 (SE-type 3) whereas both isolates from dogs with diarrhoea had the toxigenic ribotype 014 (SE-type 21). One of the isolates from healthy dogs was initially resistant to metronidazole. This study revealed presence of toxigenic C. difficile in faecal samples of diarrheic dogs and low number of non- toxigenic isolates in healthy dogs from Uppsala-Stockholm region in Sweden. However, more comprehensive studies are warranted to investigate the role of C. difficile in gastrointestinal disease in dogs.

  18. CO2, CO, and Hg emissions from the Truman Shepherd and Ruth Mullins coal fires, eastern Kentucky, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Keefe, Jennifer M.K.; Henke, Kevin R.; Hower, James C.; Engle, Mark A.; Stracher, Glenn B.; Stucker, J.D.; Drew, Jordan W.; Staggs, Wayne D.; Murray, Tiffany M.; Hammond, Maxwell L.; Adkins, Kenneth D.; Mullins, Bailey J.; Lemley, Edward W.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and mercury (Hg) emissions were quantified for two eastern Kentucky coal-seam fires, the Truman Shepherd fire in Floyd County and the Ruth Mullins fire in Perry County. This study is one of the first to estimate gas emissions from coal fires using field measurements at gas vents. The Truman Shepherd fire emissions are nearly 1400 t CO2/yr and 16 kg Hg/yr resulting from a coal combustion rate of 450–550 t/yr. The sum of CO2 emissions from seven vents at the Ruth Mullins fire is 726 ± 72 t/yr, suggesting that the fire is consuming about 250–280 t coal/yr. Total Ruth Mullins fire CO and Hg emissions are estimated at 21 ± 1.8 t/yr and > 840 ± 170 g/yr, respectively. The CO2emissions are environmentally significant, but low compared to coal-fired power plants; for example, 3.9 × 106 t CO2/yr for a 514-MW boiler in Kentucky. Using simple calculations, CO2 and Hg emissions from coal-fires in the U.S. are estimated at 1.4 × 107–2.9 × 108 t/yr and 0.58–11.5 t/yr, respectively. This initial work indicates that coal fires may be an important source of CO2, CO, Hg and other atmospheric constituents.

  19. Canine oral mucosa evaluation as a potential autograft tissue for the treatment of unresponsive keratoconjunctivitis sicca.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Rose L; Smith, Jodi D; Ben-Shlomo, Gil

    2018-01-01

    Labial mucosa transplantation for the treatment of canine keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) has been reported recently. Postoperative alleviation of clinical signs was noted and assumed to be the result of labial salivary glands providing lubrication to the ocular tissue. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of minor salivary glands (MSG) in the canine oral mucosa. Oral mucosal biopsies were collected from six dogs that died (n = 1) or were euthanized (n = 5) for reasons unrelated to this study. The breeds included were two Doberman Pinschers, one Labrador Retriever, one Portuguese Water Dog, one German Shepherd Dog, and one mixed canine. Three were spayed females, and three were castrated males with the median age of 9 years (range, 6-13 years). Samples were obtained by an 8-mm punch biopsy at the following locations of the canine oral cavity: upper rostral labial mucosa at midline, lower rostral labial mucosa at midline, upper labial mucosa near the commissure, lower labial mucosa near the commissure, and buccal mucosa approximately 1 cm caudal to the commissure. Samples were routinely processed with hematoxylin and eosin, and periodic acid-Schiff stains. Samples were evaluated by light microscopy. At the selected locations, no MSG or other secreting cells were detected. Minor salivary glands are not associated with alleviation of canine KCS symptoms following labial mucosa transplantation. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanism leading to the transient improvement of KCS symptoms in canine patients following labial mucosa transplantation. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  20. The German Economy and U.S.-German Economic Relations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-30

    exporting than domestic investment and consumption. With few exceptions, German governments have generally been reluctant to advance what many economists... German economy, as well as policy approaches adopted by the government , are not only of bilateral and regional importance, but also of global...as a leading exporter and to support government -funded programs aimed at reducing economic disparities within their society. In turn, German

  1. BigDog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Playter, R.; Buehler, M.; Raibert, M.

    2006-05-01

    BigDog's goal is to be the world's most advanced quadruped robot for outdoor applications. BigDog is aimed at the mission of a mechanical mule - a category with few competitors to date: power autonomous quadrupeds capable of carrying significant payloads, operating outdoors, with static and dynamic mobility, and fully integrated sensing. BigDog is about 1 m tall, 1 m long and 0.3 m wide, and weighs about 90 kg. BigDog has demonstrated walking and trotting gaits, as well as standing up and sitting down. Since its creation in the fall of 2004, BigDog has logged tens of hours of walking, climbing and running time. It has walked up and down 25 & 35 degree inclines and trotted at speeds up to 1.8 m/s. BigDog has walked at 0.7 m/s over loose rock beds and carried over 50 kg of payload. We are currently working to expand BigDog's rough terrain mobility through the creation of robust locomotion strategies and terrain sensing capabilities.

  2. [Lens luxation in dogs: a retrospective study of 134 dogs (2000-2011)].

    PubMed

    Betschart; Hässig; Spiess

    2014-03-01

    This retrospective study evaluated cases of lens luxation in dogs that were documented at the University of Zurich Veterinary Teaching Hospital between 2000 and 2011. A total 134 dogs were included in the study. This population of dogs with lens luxation represents 0.41 % of all dogs presented to the Zurich Veterinary Teaching Hospital (32'523) and 3.02 % of all dogs presented to the ophthalmology service during the same time period. The 134 dogs represented over 40 different breeds, including mixed breeds. 63 of the dogs were male, 71 were female. The 134 dogs were divided in primary lens luxation (86 of the 134 dogs, 64 %) and secondary lens luxation (48 dogs, 36 %). The most frequent causes for secondary lens luxation were glaucoma (58 %), cataract (19 %) and trauma (17 %). This study shows the predisposition for primary lens luxations in terrier breeds, Chinese Crested dogs, Pinscher and Spitz. In contrast, Siberian Huskies, Basset Hounds, Bearded Collies, Cairn Terriers, mixed breed dogs, Bolonka Zwetna, Boston Terriers, Borzoi, Doberman, Eurasian, Leonberg, Luzerner Niederlaufhund and Weimaraner suffered significantly more often from secondary lens luxation. There was no sex predilection for primary or secondary lens luxation. Dogs with primary lens luxation were on average 7.39 ± 3.02 years old, which is significantly younger than the dogs with secondary lens luxation (9.12 ± 3.38 years). Dogs with primary lens luxation showed a significantly higher rate of a bilateral development than those with secondary lens luxation (85.5 % of the dogs with primary lens luxation and only 14.5 % of the dogs with secondary lens luxation showed it in both their eyes).

  3. A Nonsense Variant in the ACADVL Gene in German Hunting Terriers with Exercise Induced Metabolic Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Lepori, Vincent; Mühlhause, Franziska; Sewell, Adrian C; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Janzen, Nils; Rosati, Marco; Alves de Sousa, Filipe Miguel Maximiano; Tschopp, Aurélie; Schüpbach, Gertraud; Matiasek, Kaspar; Tipold, Andrea; Leeb, Tosso; Kornberg, Marion

    2018-05-04

    Several enzymes are involved in fatty acid oxidation, which is a key process in mitochondrial energy production. Inherited defects affecting any step of fatty acid oxidation can result in clinical disease. We present here an extended family of German Hunting Terriers with 10 dogs affected by clinical signs of exercise induced weakness, muscle pain, and suspected rhabdomyolysis. The combination of clinical signs, muscle histopathology and acylcarnitine analysis with an elevated tetradecenoylcarnitine (C14:1) peak suggested a possible diagnosis of acyl-CoA dehydrogenase very long chain deficiency (ACADVLD). Whole genome sequence analysis of one affected dog and 191 controls revealed a nonsense variant in the ACADVL gene encoding acyl-CoA dehydrogenase very long chain, c.1728C>A or p.(Tyr576*). The variant showed perfect association with the phenotype in the 10 affected and more than 500 control dogs of various breeds. Pathogenic variants in the ACADVL gene have been reported in humans with similar myopathic phenotypes. We therefore considered the detected variant to be the most likely candidate causative variant for the observed exercise induced myopathy. To our knowledge, this is the first description of this disease in dogs, which we propose to name exercise induced metabolic myopathy (EIMM), and the identification of the first canine pathogenic ACADVL variant. Our findings provide a large animal model for a known human disease and will enable genetic testing to avoid the unintentional breeding of affected offspring. Copyright © 2018 Lepori et al.

  4. Comparison of P-wave dispersion in healthy dogs, dogs with chronic valvular disease and dogs with disturbances of supraventricular conduction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background P-wave dispersion (Pd) is a new ECG index used in human cardiology and veterinary medicine. It is defined as the difference between the maximum and the minimum P-wave duration recorded from multiple different ECG leads. So far no studies were performed assessing the importance of P-wave dispersion in dogs. Methods The current study was aimed at determining proper value of Pd in healthy dogs (group I), dogs with chronic valvular disease (group II) and dogs with disturbances of supraventricular conduction (group III). The tests were carried out in 53 healthy dogs, 23 dogs with chronic valvular disease and 12 dogs with disturbances of supraventricular conduction of various breeds, sexes and body weight from 1,5 to 80 kg, aged between 0,5 and 17 years, submitted to the ECG examination. ECG was acquired in dogs in a standing position with BTL SD-8 electrocardiographic device and analyzed once the recording was enlarged. P-wave duration was calculated in 9 ECG leads (I, II, III, aVR, aVL, aVF, V1, V2, V4) from 5 cardiac cycles. Results The proper P-wave dispersion in healthy dogs was determined at up to 24 ms. P-wave dispersion was statistically significant increased (p < 0.01) in dogs with chronic valvular disease and dogs with disturbances of supraventricular conduction. In dogs with the atrial enlargement the P-wave dispersion is also higher than in healthy dogs, although no significant correlation between the size of left atria and Pd was noticed (p = 0.1, r = 0,17). Conclusions The P-wave dispersion is a constant index in healthy dogs, that is why it can be used for evaluating P wave change in dogs with chronic valvular disease and in dogs with disturbances of supraventricular conduction. PMID:21396110

  5. Comparison of P-wave dispersion in healthy dogs, dogs with chronic valvular disease and dogs with disturbances of supraventricular conduction.

    PubMed

    Noszczyk-Nowak, Agnieszka; Szałas, Anna; Pasławska, Urszula; Nicpoń, Józef

    2011-03-11

    P-wave dispersion (Pd) is a new ECG index used in human cardiology and veterinary medicine. It is defined as the difference between the maximum and the minimum P-wave duration recorded from multiple different ECG leads. So far no studies were performed assessing the importance of P-wave dispersion in dogs. The current study was aimed at determining proper value of Pd in healthy dogs (group I), dogs with chronic valvular disease (group II) and dogs with disturbances of supraventricular conduction (group III). The tests were carried out in 53 healthy dogs, 23 dogs with chronic valvular disease and 12 dogs with disturbances of supraventricular conduction of various breeds, sexes and body weight from 1,5 to 80 kg, aged between 0,5 and 17 years, submitted to the ECG examination. ECG was acquired in dogs in a standing position with BTL SD-8 electrocardiographic device and analyzed once the recording was enlarged. P-wave duration was calculated in 9 ECG leads (I, II, III, aVR, aVL, aVF, V1, V2, V4) from 5 cardiac cycles. The proper P-wave dispersion in healthy dogs was determined at up to 24 ms. P-wave dispersion was statistically significant increased (p<0.01) in dogs with chronic valvular disease and dogs with disturbances of supraventricular conduction. In dogs with the atrial enlargement the P-wave dispersion is also higher than in healthy dogs, although no significant correlation between the size of left atria and Pd was noticed (p=0.1, r=0,17). The P-wave dispersion is a constant index in healthy dogs, that is why it can be used for evaluating P wave change in dogs with chronic valvular disease and in dogs with disturbances of supraventricular conduction.

  6. Radiographic liver size in Pekingese dogs versus other dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jihye; Keh, Seoyeon; Kim, Hyunwook; Kim, Junyoung; Yoon, Junghee

    2013-01-01

    Differential diagnoses for canine liver disease are commonly based on radiographic estimates of liver size, however little has been published on breed variations. Aims of this study were to describe normal radiographic liver size in Pekingese dogs and to compare normal measurements for this breed with other dog breeds and Pekingese dogs with liver disease. Liver measurements were compared for clinically normal Pekingese (n = 61), normal non-Pekingese brachycephalic (n = 45), normal nonbrachycephalic (n = 71), and Pekingese breed dogs with liver disease (n = 22). For each dog, body weight, liver length, T11 vertebral length, thoracic depth, and thoracic width were measured on right lateral and ventrodorsal abdominal radiographs. Liver volume was calculated using a formula and ratios of liver length/T11 vertebral length and liver volume/body weight ratio were determined. Normal Pekingese dogs had a significantly smaller liver volume/body weight ratio (16.73 ± 5.67, P < 0.05) than normal non-Pekingese brachycephalic breed dogs (19.54 ± 5.03) and normal nonbrachycephalic breed dogs (18.72 ± 6.52). The liver length/T11 vertebral length ratio in normal Pekingese (4.64 ± 0.65) was significantly smaller than normal non-Pekingese brachycephalic breed dogs (5.16 ± 0.74) and normal nonbrachycephalic breed dogs (5.40 ± 0.74). Ratios of liver volume/body weight and liver length/T11 vertebral length in normal Pekingese were significantly different from Pekingese with liver diseases (P < 0.05). Findings supported our hypothesis that Pekingese dogs have a smaller normal radiographic liver size than other breeds. We recommend using 4.64× the length of the T11 vertebra as a radiographic criterion for normal liver length in Pekingese dogs. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  7. Dog-walking behaviours affect gastrointestinal parasitism in park-attending dogs.

    PubMed

    Smith, Anya F; Semeniuk, Christina A D; Kutz, Susan J; Massolo, Alessandro

    2014-09-04

    In urban parks, dogs, wildlife and humans can be sympatric, introducing the potential for inter- and intra-specific transmission of pathogens among hosts. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of zoonotic and non-zoonotic gastrointestinal parasites in dogs in Calgary city parks, and assess if dog-walking behaviour, park management, history of veterinary care, and dog demographics were associated with parasitism in dogs From June to September 2010, 645 questionnaires were administered to dog owners in nine city parks to determine behavioural and demographic factors, and corresponding feces from 355 dogs were collected. Dog feces were analyzed for helminth and some protozoan species using a modified sugar flotation technique and microscopic examination, a subsample was analyzed for Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. using a direct immunofluorescence assay. Descriptive and multivariate statistics were conducted to determine associations among behaviours, demographics, and parasite prevalence and infection intensities Parasite prevalence was 50.2%. Giardia spp. (24.7%), Cryptosporidium spp. (14.7%), and Cystoisospora spp. (16.8%) were the most prevalent parasites. Helminth prevalence was low (4.1%). Presence of Giardia spp. was more likely in intact and young dogs; and infection with any parasite and Giardia spp. intensity were both positively associated with dogs visiting multiple parks coupled with a high frequency of park use and off-leash activity, and with being intact and young. Cryptosporidium spp. intensity was associated with being intact and young, and having visited the veterinarian within the previous year Our results indicate a higher overall prevalence of protozoa in dogs than previously found in Calgary. The zoonotic potential of some parasites found in park-attending dogs may be of interest for public health. These results are relevant for informing park managers, the public health sector, and veterinarians.

  8. Single Stage Treatment of Non - Union of Transcervical Neck Femur Fracture with Shepherd Crook Deformity of Proximal Femur in A Case of Fibrous Dysplasia using Dynamic Hip Screw Fixation.

    PubMed

    Vk, Kandhari; Ss, Bava; Mm, Desai; Rn, Wade

    2015-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia is a rare benign disorder of the skeletal system characterized by fibro osseous proliferation with intervening areas of normal or immature bone in the intramedullary region. It can either be a monostotic (involves one bone) or a polyostotic (involves more than one bone) presentation and usually occurs equally in males and females. Deformities like scoliosis and shepherd's crook deformity are frequently encountered in the polyostotic form. We report a rare managed case of bilateral non-union of the pathological fracture of femur neck with shepherd's crook deformity of the proximal femur in a case of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia. A 16 years old female case of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia had bilateral Shepherd's crook deformity of the proximal femur with bilateral non - union of pathological fracture of neck femur. We managed each side in one stage with two osteotomies. On the right side, first oblique osteotomy was done from just distal to the greater trochanter up to the level of the neck and the second; lateral closing wedge abduction osteotomy was done at the subtrochanteric level. 2 months later on the left side double lateral closing wedge abduction osteotomies were performed both at the subtrochanteric level. Fixation of both the sides was done using a 135° Dynamic Richard's screw with a long side plate to span the osteotomy sites and the lesion. Post - operatively we achieved a neck shaft angle of 135° on right side and 133° on the left side. Follow up imaging showed union at both the osteotomy sites bilaterally and also at the site of the pathological fracture of neck femur. Presently, at 18 months post - operatively, patient is walking full weight bearing without support and there are no signs of recurrence of lesions of fibrous dysplasia or the deformity. Double osteotomy is an easy and effective method to correct the shepherd's crook deformity and achieve correct mechanical alignment. Dynamic hip screw with long side plate is a

  9. Dog owners show experience-based viewing behaviour in judging dog face approachability.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Carla Jade; Houghton, Sarah; Guo, Kun

    2017-01-01

    Our prior visual experience plays a critical role in face perception. We show superior perceptual performance for differentiating conspecific (vs non-conspecific), own-race (vs other-race) and familiar (vs unfamiliar) faces. However, it remains unclear whether our experience with faces of other species would influence our gaze allocation for extracting salient facial information. In this eye-tracking study, we asked both dog owners and non-owners to judge the approachability of human, monkey and dog faces, and systematically compared their behavioural performance and gaze pattern associated with the task. Compared to non-owners, dog owners assessed dog faces with shorter time and fewer fixations, but gave higher approachability ratings. The gaze allocation within local facial features was also modulated by the ownership. The averaged proportion of the fixations and viewing time directed at the dog mouth region were significantly less for the dog owners, and more experienced dog owners tended to look more at the dog eyes, suggesting the adoption of a prior experience-based viewing behaviour for assessing dog approachability. No differences in behavioural performance and gaze pattern were observed between dog owners and non-owners when judging human and monkey faces, implying that the dog owner's experience-based gaze strategy for viewing dog faces was not transferable across faces of other species.

  10. Co-adaptation of seed dormancy and flowering time in the arable weed Capsella bursa-pastoris (shepherd's purse)

    PubMed Central

    Toorop, Peter E.; Campos Cuerva, Rafael; Begg, Graham S.; Locardi, Bruna; Squire, Geoff R.; Iannetta, Pietro P. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims The duration of the plant life cycle is an important attribute that determines fitness and coexistence of weeds in arable fields. It depends on the timing of two key life-history traits: time from seed dispersal to germination and time from germination to flowering. These traits are components of the time to reproduction. Dormancy results in reduced and delayed germination, thus increasing time to reproduction. Genotypes in the arable seedbank predominantly have short time to flowering. Synergy between reduced seed dormancy and reduced flowering time would create stronger contrasts between genotypes, offering greater adaptation in-field. Therefore, we studied differences in seed dormancy between in-field flowering time genotypes of shepherd's purse. Methods Genotypes with early, intermediate or late flowering time were grown in a glasshouse to provide seed stock for germination tests. Secondary dormancy was assessed by comparing germination before and after dark-incubation. Dormancy was characterized separately for seed myxospermy heteromorphs, observed in each genotype. Seed carbon and nitrogen content and seed mass were determined as indicators of seed filling and resource partitioning associated with dormancy. Key Results Although no differences were observed in primary dormancy, secondary dormancy was weaker among the seeds of early-flowering genotypes. On average, myxospermous seeds showed stronger secondary dormancy than non-myxospermous seeds in all genotypes. Seed filling was similar between the genotypes, but nitrogen partitioning was higher in early-flowering genotypes and in non-myxospermous seeds. Conclusions In shepherd's purse, early flowering and reduced seed dormancy coincide and appear to be linked. The seed heteromorphism contributes to variation in dormancy. Three functional groups of seed dormancy were identified, varying in dormancy depth and nitrate response. One of these groups (FG-III) was distinct for early

  11. Heart rate turbulence in healthy dogs and dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Noszczyk-Nowak, A

    2012-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is modulated by the baroreceptor reflex and it was suggested that it could be used as a measure of autonomic dysfunction. Impaired HRT is of a significant prognostic value in humans after myocardial infarction, suffering from dilated cardiomyopathy and patients with heart failure. So far no studies were performed assessing the importance of HRT in dogs. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the HRT turbulence onset (TO) and the turbulence slope (TS) in healthy dogs and in dogs with DCM and to compare the HRT in dogs with DCM that died during the first 30 days of observation and dogs with DCM that survived the first 30 days after the HRT analysis. The current study was aimed at determining reference value of the TO and TS of HRT in healthy dogs (control group) and dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM group). The tests were carried out on 30 healthy dogs and 30 dogs with DCM composed of Boxers, Doberman pinschers and Great Danes, of different sexes and body weights from 22 to 72 kg, aged between 1.5 and 11.5 years, submitted to the 24-hour Holter monitoring. HRT parameters were calculated using an HolCard software algorithm. TO is a percentage difference between the heart rate immediately following ventricular premature complex (VPC) and the heart rate immediately preceding VPC. TS corresponds to the steepest slope of the linear regression line for each sequence of five consecutive normal intervals in the local tachogram. The average TO in healthy dogs was determined as -13.55 +/- 11.12%, TS was 21.33 +/- 9.66 ms/RR. TO in dogs with DCM was determined as - 2.61 +/- 2.1% and TS was 6.15 +/- 3.86 ms/RR. Parameters of HRT were statistically significantly decreased (p < 0.01) in dogs with DCM. HRT TO and TS were statistically significantly decreased in dogs with DCM. Dogs with DCM that survived more than 30 days of observation had HRT statistically significantly decreased in comparison to dogs with DCM that died after the 30'th

  12. "I'm Just a'-Walking the Dog" correlates of regular dog walking.

    PubMed

    Christian nee Cutt, Hayley; Giles-Corti, Billie; Knuiman, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Intrapersonal and environmental factors associated with dog walking (N = 483) were examined. A greater proportion of regular (80%) than irregular (59%) dog walkers met the recommended 150 minutes of physical activity per week. Owners who perceived greater social support and motivation from their dogs to walk, and who had access to a dog-supportive park within their neighborhood, were more likely to regularly walk with their dogs, even after adjustment for other well-known correlates of physical activity. The higher level of physical activity of regular dog walkers can be attributed to the additional walking these owners perform with their dogs.

  13. Relationship Between Scarring and Dog Aggression in Pit Bull-Type Dogs Involved in Organized Dogfighting.

    PubMed

    Miller, Katherine A; Touroo, Rachel; Spain, C Victor; Jones, Kelly; Reid, Pamela; Lockwood, Randall

    2016-11-15

    When pit bull-type dogs are seized in an investigation of organized dogfighting, heavily scarred dogs are often assumed to be highly dog aggressive due to a history of fighting. These dogs may be deemed dangerous and euthanized based on scarring alone. We analyzed our existing data on dogs seized from four dogfighting investigations, examining the relationship between the dogs' scars with aggression towards other dogs. Scar and wound data were tallied in three body zones where dogfighting injuries tend to be concentrated. Dog aggression was assessed using a model dog and a friendly stimulus dog in a standardized behavior evaluation. Scarring and dog aggression were significantly related, more strongly among male (Fisher's Exact p < 0.001) than female dogs (Fisher's Exact p = 0.05). Ten or more scars in the three body zones was a reasonable threshold with which to classify a dog as high risk for dog aggression: 82% of males and 60% of females with such scarring displayed dog aggression. However, because many unscarred dogs were dog aggressive while some highly scarred dogs were not, we recommend collecting behavioral information to supplement scar counts when making disposition decisions about dogs seized in dogfighting investigations.

  14. Do Dog Behavioral Characteristics Predict the Quality of the Relationship between Dogs and Their Owners?

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Christy L; Chen, Pan; Serpell, James A; Jacobson, Kristen C

    This paper explores whether dog behavioral characteristics predict the quality of the relationship between dogs and their owners (i.e., owner attachment to dog), and whether relations between dog behavior and owner attachment are moderated by demographic characteristics. In this study, N = 92 children and N = 60 adults from 60 dog-owning families completed questionnaires about their attachment to their pet dog, their level of responsibility for that dog, and their general attitudes toward pets. They also rated their dogs on observable behavioral characteristics. Individuals who held positive attitudes about pets and who provided much of their dog's care reported stronger attachments to their dogs. The strength of owners' attachments to their dogs was associated with dog trainability and separation problems. Relationships between owner attachment and both dog excitability and attention-seeking behavior were further moderated by demographic characteristics: for Caucasians but not for non-Caucasians, dog excitability was negatively associated with owner attachment to dog; and for adults, dog attention-seeking behavior was positively associated with owner attachment, but children tended to be highly attached to their dogs, regardless of their dogs' attention-seeking behaviors. This study demonstrates that certain dog behavioral traits are indeed associated with the strength of owners' attachments to their dogs.

  15. Re-emergence of animal rabies in northern Greece and subsequent human exposure, October 2012 - March 2013.

    PubMed

    Tsiodras, S; Dougas, G; Baka, A; Billinis, C; Doudounakis, S; Balaska, A; Georgakopoulou, T; Rigakos, G; Kontos, V; Tasioudi, K E; Tzani, M; Tsarouxa, P; Iliadou, P; Mangana-Vougiouka, O; Iliopoulos, D; Sapounas, S; Efstathiou, P; Tsakris, A; Hadjichristodoulou, C; Kremastinou, J

    2013-05-02

    Greece has been rabies-free since 1987 with no human cases since 1970. During 2012 to 2013, rabies has re-emerged in wild and domestic animals in northern Greece. By end March 2013, rabies was diagnosed in 17 animals including 14 red foxes, two shepherd dogs and one cat; 104 subsequent human exposures required post-exposure prophylaxis according to the World Health Organization criteria. Human exposures occurred within 50 km radius of a confirmed rabies case in a wild or domestic animal, and most frequently stray dogs were involved.

  16. Relationship Between Scarring and Dog Aggression in Pit Bull-Type Dogs Involved in Organized Dogfighting

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Katherine A.; Touroo, Rachel; Spain, C. Victor; Jones, Kelly; Reid, Pamela; Lockwood, Randall

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Organizations responsible for placing dogs seized from dogfighting investigations often must determine if a particular dog should be euthanized because it is too dangerous or if it is safe to place the dog in an adoptive home. In this study, we examine whether the extent of scarring from dog fighting is a reliable predictor of aggression towards other dogs and therefore could be used to help make that decision. We found that dogs with 10 or more scars in the three body zones where dogfighting injuries tend to be concentrated were more likely, on average, to show aggression to other dogs. The relationship is imperfect, however. Many unscarred dogs were dog aggressive while some highly scarred dogs were not. Therefore, we recommend also assessing a dog’s behavior before making decisions about its disposition. Abstract When pit bull-type dogs are seized in an investigation of organized dogfighting, heavily scarred dogs are often assumed to be highly dog aggressive due to a history of fighting. These dogs may be deemed dangerous and euthanized based on scarring alone. We analyzed our existing data on dogs seized from four dogfighting investigations, examining the relationship between the dogs’ scars with aggression towards other dogs. Scar and wound data were tallied in three body zones where dogfighting injuries tend to be concentrated. Dog aggression was assessed using a model dog and a friendly stimulus dog in a standardized behavior evaluation. Scarring and dog aggression were significantly related, more strongly among male (Fisher’s Exact p < 0.001) than female dogs (Fisher’s Exact p = 0.05). Ten or more scars in the three body zones was a reasonable threshold with which to classify a dog as high risk for dog aggression: 82% of males and 60% of females with such scarring displayed dog aggression. However, because many unscarred dogs were dog aggressive while some highly scarred dogs were not, we recommend collecting behavioral information to

  17. [The boycott against German scientists and the German language after World War I].

    PubMed

    Reinbothe, R

    2013-12-01

    After the First World War, the Allied academies of sciences staged a boycott against German scientists and the German language. The objective of the boycott was to prevent the re-establishment of the prewar dominance of German scientists, the German language and German publications in the area of international scientific cooperation. Therefore the Allies excluded German scientists and the German language from international associations, congresses and publications, while they created new international scientific organizations under their leadership. Medical associations and congresses were also affected, e. g. congresses on surgery, ophthalmology and tuberculosis. Allied physicians replaced the "International Anti-Tuberculosis Association" founded in Berlin in 1902 with the "Union Internationale contre la Tuberculose"/"International Union against Tuberculosis", founded in Paris in 1920. Only French and English were used as the official languages of the new scientific organizations, just as in the League of Nations. The boycott was based on the fact that the German scientists had denied German war guilt and war crimes and glorified German militarism in a manifesto "To The Civilized World!" in 1914. The boycott first started in 1919 and had to be abolished in 1926, when Germany became a member of the League of Nations. Many German and foreign physicians as well as other scientists protested against the boycott. Some German scientists and institutions even staged a counter-boycott impeding the resumption of international collaboration. The boycott entailed an enduring decline of German as an international scientific language. After the Second World War scientists of the victorious Western Powers implemented a complete reorganization of the international scientific arena, based on the same organizational structures and language restrictions they had built up in 1919/1920. At the same time scientists from the U.S.A. staged an active language and publication policy, in

  18. Incidence and impact of dog attacks on guide dogs in the UK: an update.

    PubMed

    Moxon, R; Whiteside, H; England, G C W

    2016-04-09

    Data on dog attacks on Guide Dogs' stock were reviewed to investigate the characteristics of the attacks. An average of 11.2 attacks occurred each month. Nearly all of the attacks occurred in public areas, 68.4 per cent of victim dogs were qualified guide dogs and 55.5 per cent of victim dogs were working in harness when they were attacked. Guide Dogs' stock were injured in 43.2 per cent of attacks and veterinary costs for attacks were estimated at £34,514.30. Over 40 per cent of qualified guide dogs' working ability was affected and >20 per cent of qualified guide dogs required some time off from working after a dog attack. Twenty dogs were permanently withdrawn from the Guide Dogs' programme as a result of dog attacks, 13 of which were qualified and working with guide dog owners at the time of the withdrawal; this resulted in a financial cost of >£600,000 to the charity. More importantly perhaps, temporary and permanent withdrawals have a significant impact upon the mobility and independence of guide dog owners and in many cases significantly impacted their emotional well-being. British Veterinary Association.

  19. Impacts of Encouraging Dog Walking on Returns of Newly Adopted Dogs to a Shelter.

    PubMed

    Gunter, Lisa; Protopopova, Alexandra; Hooker, Steven P; Der Ananian, Cheryl; Wynne, Clive D L

    2017-01-01

    This study involved examining the ability of a postadoption intervention to reduce returns of newly adopted dogs to shelters by encouraging physical activity between adopters and their dogs. Guardians in the intervention group received emails with dog behavior and human activity advice as well as invitations to join weekly dog walks. Both the intervention and control groups completed surveys regarding outdoor activity with their dogs, their dog-walking habits, and perceptions of their dogs' behaviors. Adopter-dog pairs in the intervention group were not significantly more active than those in the control group, nor did they show a reduced incidence of returning their dogs. Guardians in both groups who reported higher obligation and self-efficacy in their dog walking were more active regardless of experimental condition; however, obligation, dog-walking self-efficacy, and perceptions about their dogs' on-leash behaviors did not predict rates of return to the shelter. These findings add to the understanding of shelter dog re-relinquishment and the effective utilization of resources postadoption, and they indicate further research is needed to address the complexities of this newly forming human-dog relationship.

  20. Incidence and impact of dog attacks on guide dogs in the UK.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A; Moxon, R; England, G C W

    2010-06-19

    In a retrospective survey, researchers identified 100 incidents of attacks on guide dogs by other dogs. These were reviewed in order to determine the number, severity and impact on the handler and dog, and the characteristics of the aggressors and victims. During the study period there were more than three attacks reported each month, with 61 per cent of the attacks being upon dogs that were in harness and working with an owner or trainer. The majority of the dogs that were attacked were male (62 per cent), and the breeds that were over-represented (relative to their prevalence in the general guide dog population) were the labrador and the golden retriever x flat-coated retriever crossbreed. Most of the attacks occurred in public places between 09.00 and 15.00 and the majority (61 per cent) of the attacking dogs were off the lead at the time of the attack. Thirty-eight per cent of the attacking dogs were of bull breeds, which were over-represented among attackers compared with the proportion of this breed type in the general dog population. Veterinary attention was sought after 41 per cent of the attacks, and in 19 per cent of instances there was injury to the handler or to a member of the public. The attacks were reported to have affected the working performance and behaviour of the victim dog in 45 per cent of the instances, and two dogs had to be subsequently withdrawn from working as guide dogs.

  1. Dietary hyperthyroidism in dogs.

    PubMed

    Köhler, B; Stengel, C; Neiger, R

    2012-03-01

    Evaluation of dogs with elevated plasma thyroxine concentration fed raw food before and after changing the diet. Between 2006 and 2011 all dogs presented with an elevated plasma thyroxine concentration and a dietary history of feeding raw food were included. Thyroxine (reference interval: 19·3 to 51·5 nmol/L) and in many cases also thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations (reference interval: <0·30 ng/mL) were measured initially and after changing the diet. Twelve dogs were presented with a median age of five years. The median plasma thyroxine concentration was 156·1 (range of 79·7 to 391·9) nmol/L; in six dogs, thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration was measured and was <0·03 ng/mL in five dogs and 0·05 ng/mL in one dog. Six dogs showed clinical signs such as weight loss, aggressiveness, tachycardia, panting and restlessness while six dogs had no clinical signs. After changing the diet eight dogs were examined: thyroxine concentration normalised in all dogs and clinical signs resolved. Dietary hyperthyroidism can be seen in dogs on a raw meat diet or fed fresh or dried gullets. Increased plasma thyroxine concentration in a dog, either with or without signs of hyperthyroidism, should prompt the veterinarian to obtain a thorough dietary history. © 2012 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  2. Complex population structure in African village dogs and its implications for inferring dog domestication history

    PubMed Central

    Boyko, Adam R.; Boyko, Ryan H.; Boyko, Corin M.; Parker, Heidi G.; Castelhano, Marta; Corey, Liz; Degenhardt, Jeremiah D.; Auton, Adam; Hedimbi, Marius; Kityo, Robert; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Schoenebeck, Jeffrey; Todhunter, Rory J.; Jones, Paul; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2009-01-01

    High genetic diversity of East Asian village dogs has recently been used to argue for an East Asian origin of the domestic dog. However, global village dog genetic diversity and the extent to which semiferal village dogs represent distinct, indigenous populations instead of admixtures of various dog breeds has not been quantified. Understanding these issues is critical to properly reconstructing the timing, number, and locations of dog domestication. To address these questions, we sampled 318 village dogs from 7 regions in Egypt, Uganda, and Namibia, measuring genetic diversity >680 bp of the mitochondrial D-loop, 300 SNPs, and 89 microsatellite markers. We also analyzed breed dogs, including putatively African breeds (Afghan hounds, Basenjis, Pharaoh hounds, Rhodesian ridgebacks, and Salukis), Puerto Rican street dogs, and mixed breed dogs from the United States. Village dogs from most African regions appear genetically distinct from non-native breed and mixed-breed dogs, although some individuals cluster genetically with Puerto Rican dogs or United States breed mixes instead of with neighboring village dogs. Thus, African village dogs are a mosaic of indigenous dogs descended from early migrants to Africa, and non-native, breed-admixed individuals. Among putatively African breeds, Pharaoh hounds, and Rhodesian ridgebacks clustered with non-native rather than indigenous African dogs, suggesting they have predominantly non-African origins. Surprisingly, we find similar mtDNA haplotype diversity in African and East Asian village dogs, potentially calling into question the hypothesis of an East Asian origin for dog domestication. PMID:19666600

  3. Complex population structure in African village dogs and its implications for inferring dog domestication history.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Adam R; Boyko, Ryan H; Boyko, Corin M; Parker, Heidi G; Castelhano, Marta; Corey, Liz; Degenhardt, Jeremiah D; Auton, Adam; Hedimbi, Marius; Kityo, Robert; Ostrander, Elaine A; Schoenebeck, Jeffrey; Todhunter, Rory J; Jones, Paul; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2009-08-18

    High genetic diversity of East Asian village dogs has recently been used to argue for an East Asian origin of the domestic dog. However, global village dog genetic diversity and the extent to which semiferal village dogs represent distinct, indigenous populations instead of admixtures of various dog breeds has not been quantified. Understanding these issues is critical to properly reconstructing the timing, number, and locations of dog domestication. To address these questions, we sampled 318 village dogs from 7 regions in Egypt, Uganda, and Namibia, measuring genetic diversity >680 bp of the mitochondrial D-loop, 300 SNPs, and 89 microsatellite markers. We also analyzed breed dogs, including putatively African breeds (Afghan hounds, Basenjis, Pharaoh hounds, Rhodesian ridgebacks, and Salukis), Puerto Rican street dogs, and mixed breed dogs from the United States. Village dogs from most African regions appear genetically distinct from non-native breed and mixed-breed dogs, although some individuals cluster genetically with Puerto Rican dogs or United States breed mixes instead of with neighboring village dogs. Thus, African village dogs are a mosaic of indigenous dogs descended from early migrants to Africa, and non-native, breed-admixed individuals. Among putatively African breeds, Pharaoh hounds, and Rhodesian ridgebacks clustered with non-native rather than indigenous African dogs, suggesting they have predominantly non-African origins. Surprisingly, we find similar mtDNA haplotype diversity in African and East Asian village dogs, potentially calling into question the hypothesis of an East Asian origin for dog domestication.

  4. Urban dogs in rural areas: Human-mediated movement defines dog populations in southern Chile.

    PubMed

    Villatoro, Federico J; Sepúlveda, Maximiliano A; Stowhas, Paulina; Silva-Rodríguez, Eduardo A

    2016-12-01

    Management strategies for dog populations and their diseases include reproductive control, euthanasia and vaccination, among others. However, the effectiveness of these strategies can be severely affected by human-mediated dog movement. If immigration is important, then the location of origin of dogs imported by humans will be fundamental to define the spatial scales over which population management and research should apply. In this context, the main objective of our study was to determine the spatial extent of dog demographic processes in rural areas and the proportion of dogs that could be labeled as immigrants at multiple spatial scales. To address our objective we conducted surveys in households located in a rural landscape in southern Chile. Interviews allowed us to obtain information on the demographic characteristics of dogs in these rural settings, human influence on dog mortality and births, the localities of origin of dogs living in rural areas, and the spatial extent of human-mediated dog movement. We found that most rural dogs (64.1%) were either urban dogs that had been brought to rural areas (40.0%), or adopted dogs that had been previously abandoned in rural roads (24.1%). Some dogs were brought from areas located as far as ∼700km away from the study area. Human-mediated movement of dogs, especially from urban areas, seems to play a fundamental role in the population dynamics of dogs in rural areas. Consequently, local scale efforts to manage dog populations or their diseases are unlikely to succeed if implemented in isolation, simply because dogs can be brought from surrounding urban areas or even distant locations. We suggest that efforts to manage or study dog populations and related diseases should be implemented using a multi-scale approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Use of capecitabine after renal allograft transplantation in dog erythrocyte antigen-matched dogs.

    PubMed

    Schmiedt, Chad; Penzo, Chiara; Schwab, Michelle; Dubielzig, Richard; McAnulty, Jonathan

    2006-02-01

    To investigate the use of a capecitabine (CAP)-based regimen after renal transplantation in dogs. Prospective, pilot study. Healthy, unrelated, dog erythrocyte antigen (DEA)-matched, adult beagles. Standard heterotopic renal transplantation with native nephrectomy was performed in 7 dogs. Dogs received oral, twice daily, CAP (250 mg/m2), cyclosporine-A (CsA) (4 mg/kg), ketoconazole (5 mg/kg), and prednisolone (0.25 mg/kg). After 90 days the surviving dogs were euthanatized and complete necropsy was performed. Seven transplants were performed. All dogs survived surgery. Six dogs had acute neurotoxicity, which resulted in death or euthanasia of 2 dogs within 2 days of surgery. In the remaining dogs, toxicity resolved rapidly with cessation of drug administration. Thereafter, modification of the regimen minimized toxicity. The 5 remaining dogs survived to study end; 4 dogs had no evidence of graft rejection. Necropsy examination was mostly unremarkable in all dogs. There were no major changes in CBC or biochemical values, except for a significant increase in serum calcium. CAP appeared well tolerated in most dogs. Toxicity occurred but abated with modification of the drug regimen. Efficacy for postoperative immunosuppression cannot be determined by this study, although results are promising. CAP-CsA-prednisolone is an effective, oral immunosuppressive regimen for prevention of acute allograft rejection in DEA-matched beagles. Further studies on dose, toxicity, and efficacy compared with current immunosuppressive regimens are needed before use in clinical practice.

  6. Aflatoxicosis in nine dogs after exposure to contaminated commercial dog food.

    PubMed

    Newman, Shelley Joy; Smith, Joanne R; Stenske, Kate A; Newman, Leslie B; Dunlap, John R; Imerman, Paula M; Kirk, Claudia A

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize light and electron microscopic findings from 9 dogs that had consumed aflatoxin-contaminated commercial dog food from recalled batches. Four dogs died and 5 were euthanized after signs of liver failure. Analysis of feed and liver samples confirmed exposure to aflatoxin. Of the 9 dogs, 8 had classic signs of liver failure, and 1 had signs of liver failure. Enlarged, pale yellow livers were seen macroscopically at necropsy in the dogs with subacute hepatopathy, and cirrhosis was noted in the dog with chronic hepatopathy. Histopathologic findings included hepatic lipidosis, portal fibroplasia, and biliary hyperplasia, which supported a diagnosis of subacute toxic hepatopathy in the 8 symptomatic animals. Marked lobular atrophy, bridging portal fibrosis, and regenerative hepatocellular nodules characterized the dog with chronic hepatopathy. Electron microscopy revealed marked hepatocellular lipid vacuolation and early fibroplasia in the dogs with acute hepatopathy and marked fibrosis and regeneration in the dog with chronic hepatopathy. Analysis of feed for aflatoxin consistently revealed high levels of aflatoxin B1 (range of 223-579 ppb), and hepatic tissue contained elevated levels of aflatoxin B1 metabolite M1 (0.6-4.4 ppb). Although dogs are not commonly affected by aflatoxicosis, they are highly susceptible and can present with classic signs of acute or chronic hepatopathy. Characteristic gross, histologic, and electron microscopic changes help pathologists determine a presumptive toxic insult. Detecting aflatoxins or their metabolites in feed or liver specimens can help confirm the diagnosis of aflatoxicosis.

  7. Assisting Handlers Following Attacks on Dog Guides: Implications for Dog Guide Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godley, Cheryl A.; Gillard, Marc A.

    2011-01-01

    Attacks by dogs on dog guides are traumatic for dog guide teams. One variable that affects a team's recovery is how handlers cope with emotional responses to the attack. This article presents a three-stage model for assisting handlers that is useful for handlers and dog guide instructors.

  8. Prevalence of Enteropathogens in Dogs Attending 3 Regional Dog Parks in Northern California.

    PubMed

    Hascall, K L; Kass, P H; Saksen, J; Ahlmann, A; Scorza, A V; Lappin, M R; Marks, S L

    2016-11-01

    The prevalence and risk factors for infection with enteropathogens in dogs frequenting dog parks have been poorly documented, and infected dogs can pose a potential zoonotic risk for owners. To determine the prevalence and risk factors of infection with enteropathogens and zoonotic Giardia strains in dogs attending dog parks in Northern California and to compare results of fecal flotation procedures performed at a commercial and university parasitology laboratory. Three-hundred dogs attending 3 regional dog parks in Northern California. Prospective study. Fresh fecal specimens were collected from all dogs, scored for consistency, and owners completed a questionnaire. Specimens were analyzed by fecal centrifugation flotation, DFA, and PCR for detection of 11 enteropathogens. Giardia genotyping was performed for assemblage determination. Enteropathogens were detected in 114/300 dogs (38%), of which 62 (54%) did not have diarrhea. Frequency of dog park attendance correlated significantly with fecal consistency (P = .0039), but did not correlate with enteropathogen detection. Twenty-seven dogs (9%) were infected with Giardia, and genotyping revealed nonzoonotic assemblages C and D. The frequency of Giardia detection on fecal flotation was significantly lower at the commercial laboratory versus the university laboratory (P = .013), and PCR for Giardia was negative in 11/27 dogs (41%) that were positive on fecal flotation or DFA. Enteropathogens were commonly detected in dogs frequenting dog parks, and infection with Giardia correlated with fecal consistency. PCR detection of Giardia had limited diagnostic utility, and detection of Giardia cysts by microscopic technique can vary among laboratories. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  9. Signalment, clinical signs, and prognostic indicators associated with high-grade second- or third-degree atrioventricular block in dogs: 124 cases (January 1, 1997-December 31, 1997).

    PubMed

    Schrope, Donald P; Kelch, William J

    2006-06-01

    To evaluate signalment, clinical signs, and prognosis associated with high-grade second- or third-degree atrioventricular block (AVB) in dogs. Retrospective case series. 124 dogs. Data were gathered from ECGs, veterinarian questionnaires, echocardiograms, and radiographs submitted for review; compared with data from a large control group; and examined for association between variables and duration of survival. A new classification system for AVB was evaluated. Afghan, Catahoula Leopard Dog, Chow Chow, Cocker Spaniel, German Wirehaired Pointer, and Labrador Retriever breeds were predisposed to high-grade second- or third-degree AVB. Heavier, older, and sexually intact female dogs were overrepresented in the study group. Weakness, lethargy, exercise intolerance, and syncope were the most common clinical signs. The presence of clinical signs was not associated with duration of survival. Dogs with high-grade second-degree AVB had a duration of survival similar to that of dogs with third-degree AVB. Dogs with high-grade second- or third-degree AVB were at high risk for sudden death in the first 6 months after diagnosis. High ventricular escape rhythm rate and narrow escape-complex QRS width were negatively associated with duration of survival. Pacemaker implantation had a significant positive association with survival. Pacemaker implantation should be strongly considered in all dogs with high-grade second- or third-degree AVB regardless of whether clinical signs are evident. If medical treatment is warranted, vagolytic medications may be the best choice. A new classification system for AVB may merit further investigation.

  10. Dog ownership, dog walking, and leisure-time walking among Taiwanese metropolitan and nonmetropolitan older adults.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yung; Huang, Pin-Hsuan; Chen, Yi-Ling; Hsueh, Ming-Chun; Chang, Shao-Hsi

    2018-04-04

    This study examined the prevalence of dog ownership and dog walking and its association with leisure-time walking among metropolitan and nonmetropolitan older adults. A telephone-based cross-sectional survey targeting Taiwanese older adults was conducted in November 2016. Data related to dog ownership, time spent dog walking (categorized as non-dog owner, non-dog walkers, and dog walkers), and sociodemographic variables were obtained from 1074 older adults. Adjusted binary logistic regression was then performed. In this sample, 12% of Taiwanese older adults owned a dog and 31% of them walked their dogs for an average of 232.13 min over 5.9 days/week (standard deviation = 2.03). Older adults living in nonmetropolitan areas were more likely to own a dog (14.7% vs. 9.1%) but less likely to walk their dog (25.9% vs. 39.6%) than were those living in metropolitan areas. Compared with non-dog owners, only older adults living in nonmetropolitan areas who were dog walkers achieved 150 min of leisure-time walking (odds ratio: 3.03, 95% confidence interval: 1.05-8.77), after adjustment for potential confounders. Older Taiwanese adults living in nonmetropolitan areas who owned and walked their dogs were more likely to achieve health-enhancing levels of leisure-time walking. Tailored physical activity interventions for promoting dog walking should be developed for older adults who are dog owners living in nonmetropolitan areas and who do not engage in dog walking.

  11. 'Who's a good boy?!' Dogs prefer naturalistic dog-directed speech.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Alex; Slocombe, Katie

    2018-05-01

    Infant-directed speech (IDS) is a special speech register thought to aid language acquisition and improve affiliation in human infants. Although IDS shares some of its properties with dog-directed speech (DDS), it is unclear whether the production of DDS is functional, or simply an overgeneralisation of IDS within Western cultures. One recent study found that, while puppies attended more to a script read with DDS compared with adult-directed speech (ADS), adult dogs displayed no preference. In contrast, using naturalistic speech and a more ecologically valid set-up, we found that adult dogs attended to and showed more affiliative behaviour towards a speaker of DDS than of ADS. To explore whether this preference for DDS was modulated by the dog-specific words typically used in DDS, the acoustic features (prosody) of DDS or a combination of the two, we conducted a second experiment. Here the stimuli from experiment 1 were produced with reversed prosody, meaning the prosody and content of ADS and DDS were mismatched. The results revealed no significant effect of speech type, or content, suggesting that it is maybe the combination of the acoustic properties and the dog-related content of DDS that modulates the preference shown for naturalistic DDS. Overall, the results of this study suggest that naturalistic DDS, comprising of both dog-directed prosody and dog-relevant content words, improves dogs' attention and may strengthen the affiliative bond between humans and their pets.

  12. Electrotransfer of the full-length dog dystrophin into mouse and dystrophic dog muscles.

    PubMed

    Pichavant, Christophe; Chapdelaine, Pierre; Cerri, Daniel G; Bizario, Joao C S; Tremblay, Jacques P

    2010-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disease characterized by the absence of dystrophin (427 kDa). An approach to eventually restore this protein in patients with DMD is to introduce into their muscles a plasmid encoding dystrophin cDNA. Because the phenotype of the dystrophic dog is closer to the human phenotype than is the mdx mouse phenotype, we have studied the electrotransfer of a plasmid carrying the full-length dog dystrophin (FLDYS(dog)) in dystrophic dog muscle. To achieve this nonviral delivery, the FLDYS(dog) cDNA was cloned in two plasmids containing either a cytomegalovirus or a muscle creatine kinase promoter. In both cases, our results showed that the electrotransfer of these large plasmids (∼17 kb) into mouse muscle allowed FLDYS(dog) expression in the treated muscle. The electrotransfer of pCMV.FLDYS(dog) in a dystrophic dog muscle also led to the expression of dystrophin. In conclusion, introduction of the full-length dog dystrophin cDNA by electrotransfer into dystrophic dog muscle is a potential approach to restore dystrophin in patients with DMD. However, the electrotransfer procedure should be improved before applying it to humans.

  13. Breed-Specific Ancestry Studies and Genome-Wide Association Analysis Highlight an Association Between the MYH9 Gene and Heat Tolerance in Alaskan Sprint Racing Sled Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Huson, Heather J.; vonHoldt, Bridgett M.; Rimbault, Maud; Byers, Alexandra M.; Runstadler, Jonathan A.; Parker, Heidi G.; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2012-01-01

    Alaskan sled dogs are a genetically distinct population shaped by generations of selective interbreeding with purebred dogs to create a group of high performance athletes. As a result of selective breeding strategies, sled dogs present a unique opportunity to employ admixture-mapping techniques to investigate how breed composition and trait selection impact genomic structure. We used admixture mapping to investigate genetic ancestry across the genomes of two classes of sled dogs, sprint and long distance racers, and combined that with genome wide association studies (GWAS) to identify regions correlating with performance enhancing traits. The sled dog genome is enhanced by differential contributions from four non-admixed breeds (Alaskan Malamute, Siberian Husky, German Shorthaired Pointer, and Borzoi). A principle components analysis (PCA) of 115,000 genome-wide SNPs clearly resolved the sprint and distance populations as distinct genetic groups, with longer blocks of linkage disequilibrium (LD) observed in the distance versus sprint dogs (7.5–10 and 2.5–3.75 kb, respectively). Further, we identified eight regions with the genomic signal either from a selective sweep or an association analysis, corroborated by an excess of ancestry when comparing sprint and distance dogs. A comparison of elite and poor performing sled dogs identified a single region significantly association with heat tolerance. Within the region we identified seven SNPs within the myosin heavy chain 9 gene (MYH9) that were significantly associated with heat tolerance in sprint dogs, two of which correspond to conserved promoter and enhancer regions in the human ortholog. PMID:22105876

  14. Breed-specific ancestry studies and genome-wide association analysis highlight an association between the MYH9 gene and heat tolerance in Alaskan sprint racing sled dogs.

    PubMed

    Huson, Heather J; vonHoldt, Bridgett M; Rimbault, Maud; Byers, Alexandra M; Runstadler, Jonathan A; Parker, Heidi G; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2012-02-01

    Alaskan sled dogs are a genetically distinct population shaped by generations of selective interbreeding with purebred dogs to create a group of high-performance athletes. As a result of selective breeding strategies, sled dogs present a unique opportunity to employ admixture-mapping techniques to investigate how breed composition and trait selection impact genomic structure. We used admixture mapping to investigate genetic ancestry across the genomes of two classes of sled dogs, sprint and long-distance racers, and combined that with genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify regions that correlate with performance-enhancing traits. The sled dog genome is enhanced by differential contributions from four non-admixed breeds (Alaskan Malamute, Siberian Husky, German Shorthaired Pointer, and Borzoi). A principal components analysis (PCA) of 115,000 genome-wide SNPs clearly resolved the sprint and distance populations as distinct genetic groups, with longer blocks of linkage disequilibrium (LD) observed in the distance versus sprint dogs (7.5-10 and 2.5-3.75 kb, respectively). Furthermore, we identified eight regions with the genomic signal from either a selective sweep or an association analysis, corroborated by an excess of ancestry when comparing sprint and distance dogs. A comparison of elite and poor-performing sled dogs identified a single region significantly associated with heat tolerance. Within the region we identified seven SNPs within the myosin heavy chain 9 gene (MYH9) that were significantly associated with heat tolerance in sprint dogs, two of which correspond to conserved promoter and enhancer regions in the human ortholog.

  15. Cat and Dog Bites

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wellness Staying Healthy Pets and Animals Cat and Dog Bites Cat and Dog Bites Share Print Cat and dog bites are common injuries. A family pet or ... bites. Path to safety If a cat or dog bites you, you should: Wash the wound gently ...

  16. “She’s a dog at the end of the day”: Guide dog owners’ perspectives on the behaviour of their guide dog

    PubMed Central

    Craigon, Peter J.; Hobson- West, Pru; England, Gary C. W.; Whelan, Chantelle; Lethbridge, Emma; Asher, Lucy

    2017-01-01

    A guide dog is a domestic dog (Canis familiaris) that is specifically educated to provide mobility support to a blind or visually impaired owner. Current dog suitability assessments focus on behavioural traits, including: trainability, reactivity or attention to environmental stimuli, low aggressiveness, fearfulness and stress behaviour, energy levels, and attachment behaviour. The aim of this study was to find out which aspects of guide dog behaviour are of key importance to guide dog owners themselves. Sixty-three semi-structured interview surveys were carried out with guide dog owners. Topics included the behaviour of their guide dog both within and outside their working role, and also focused on examples of behaviour which might be considered outside a guide dog owner’s typical expectations. Both positive and negative examples and situations were covered. This allowed for the discovery of new perspectives and emerging themes on living and working with a guide dog. Thematic analysis of the results reveals that a dog’s safe behaviour in the face of traffic was the most important positive aspect of a guide dog’s behaviour and pulling or high tension on the lead and /or harness was the most discussed negative aspect. Other aspects of guide dog behaviour were highlighted as particularly pleasing or disappointing by owners including attentiveness to the task, work, environment and owner; confidence in work and decision making (with confident dogs resulting in confident owners) obedience and control; calmness and locating objectives. The results reveal important areas of behaviour that are not currently considered priorities in guide dog assessments; these key areas were consistency of behaviour, the dog’s maturity and the dog’s behaviour in relation to children. The survey revealed a large range in what owners considered problematic or pleasing behaviours and this highlights the heterogeneity in guide dog owners and the potential multifarious roles of the

  17. Dog-directed speech: why do we use it and do dogs pay attention to it?

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Aderet, Tobey; Gallego-Abenza, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Pet-directed speech is strikingly similar to infant-directed speech, a peculiar speaking pattern with higher pitch and slower tempo known to engage infants' attention and promote language learning. Here, we report the first investigation of potential factors modulating the use of dog-directed speech, as well as its immediate impact on dogs' behaviour. We recorded adult participants speaking in front of pictures of puppies, adult and old dogs, and analysed the quality of their speech. We then performed playback experiments to assess dogs' reaction to dog-directed speech compared with normal speech. We found that human speakers used dog-directed speech with dogs of all ages and that the acoustic structure of dog-directed speech was mostly independent of dog age, except for sound pitch which was relatively higher when communicating with puppies. Playback demonstrated that, in the absence of other non-auditory cues, puppies were highly reactive to dog-directed speech, and that the pitch was a key factor modulating their behaviour, suggesting that this specific speech register has a functional value in young dogs. Conversely, older dogs did not react differentially to dog-directed speech compared with normal speech. The fact that speakers continue to use dog-directed with older dogs therefore suggests that this speech pattern may mainly be a spontaneous attempt to facilitate interactions with non-verbal listeners. PMID:28077769

  18. Dog-directed speech: why do we use it and do dogs pay attention to it?

    PubMed

    Ben-Aderet, Tobey; Gallego-Abenza, Mario; Reby, David; Mathevon, Nicolas

    2017-01-11

    Pet-directed speech is strikingly similar to infant-directed speech, a peculiar speaking pattern with higher pitch and slower tempo known to engage infants' attention and promote language learning. Here, we report the first investigation of potential factors modulating the use of dog-directed speech, as well as its immediate impact on dogs' behaviour. We recorded adult participants speaking in front of pictures of puppies, adult and old dogs, and analysed the quality of their speech. We then performed playback experiments to assess dogs' reaction to dog-directed speech compared with normal speech. We found that human speakers used dog-directed speech with dogs of all ages and that the acoustic structure of dog-directed speech was mostly independent of dog age, except for sound pitch which was relatively higher when communicating with puppies. Playback demonstrated that, in the absence of other non-auditory cues, puppies were highly reactive to dog-directed speech, and that the pitch was a key factor modulating their behaviour, suggesting that this specific speech register has a functional value in young dogs. Conversely, older dogs did not react differentially to dog-directed speech compared with normal speech. The fact that speakers continue to use dog-directed with older dogs therefore suggests that this speech pattern may mainly be a spontaneous attempt to facilitate interactions with non-verbal listeners. © 2017 The Author(s).

  19. Dog Experts' Brains Distinguish Socially Relevant Body Postures Similarly in Dogs and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Kujala, Miiamaaria V.; Kujala, Jan; Carlson, Synnöve; Hari, Riitta

    2012-01-01

    We read conspecifics' social cues effortlessly, but little is known about our abilities to understand social gestures of other species. To investigate the neural underpinnings of such skills, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study the brain activity of experts and non-experts of dog behavior while they observed humans or dogs either interacting with, or facing away from a conspecific. The posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) of both subject groups dissociated humans facing toward each other from humans facing away, and in dog experts, a distinction also occurred for dogs facing toward vs. away in a bilateral area extending from the pSTS to the inferior temporo-occipital cortex: the dissociation of dog behavior was significantly stronger in expert than control group. Furthermore, the control group had stronger pSTS responses to humans than dogs facing toward a conspecific, whereas in dog experts, the responses were of similar magnitude. These findings suggest that dog experts' brains distinguish socially relevant body postures similarly in dogs and humans. PMID:22720054

  20. Dog experts' brains distinguish socially relevant body postures similarly in dogs and humans.

    PubMed

    Kujala, Miiamaaria V; Kujala, Jan; Carlson, Synnöve; Hari, Riitta

    2012-01-01

    We read conspecifics' social cues effortlessly, but little is known about our abilities to understand social gestures of other species. To investigate the neural underpinnings of such skills, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study the brain activity of experts and non-experts of dog behavior while they observed humans or dogs either interacting with, or facing away from a conspecific. The posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) of both subject groups dissociated humans facing toward each other from humans facing away, and in dog experts, a distinction also occurred for dogs facing toward vs. away in a bilateral area extending from the pSTS to the inferior temporo-occipital cortex: the dissociation of dog behavior was significantly stronger in expert than control group. Furthermore, the control group had stronger pSTS responses to humans than dogs facing toward a conspecific, whereas in dog experts, the responses were of similar magnitude. These findings suggest that dog experts' brains distinguish socially relevant body postures similarly in dogs and humans.

  1. Dog Ownership, Dog Walking, and Children's and Parents' Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Jo; Timperio, Anna; Chu, Binh; Veitch, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine cross-sectional associations of dog ownership, dog walking, and physical activity (PA) among children and their parents. Objective measures of PA were obtained for children ages 5-6 and 10-12 years from 19 primary schools across Melbourne, Australia. Parents self-reported their PA, dog ownership, and frequency of dog…

  2. Bacterial microbiome of the nose of healthy dogs and dogs with nasal disease

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Elisabeth S.; Suchodolski, Jan S.; Nisar, Tariq; Ravindran, Prajesh; Weber, Karin; Hartmann, Katrin; Schulz, Bianka S.

    2017-01-01

    The role of bacterial communities in canine nasal disease has not been studied so far using next generation sequencing methods. Sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes has revealed that the canine upper respiratory tract harbors a diverse microbial community; however, changes in the composition of nasal bacterial communities in dogs with nasal disease have not been described so far. Aim of the study was to characterize the nasal microbiome of healthy dogs and compare it to that of dogs with histologically confirmed nasal neoplasia and chronic rhinitis. Nasal swabs were collected from healthy dogs (n = 23), dogs with malignant nasal neoplasia (n = 16), and dogs with chronic rhinitis (n = 8). Bacterial DNA was extracted and sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene was performed. Data were analyzed using Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology (QIIME). A total of 376 Operational Taxonomic Units out of 26 bacterial phyla were detected. In healthy dogs, Moraxella spp. was the most common species, followed by Phyllobacterium spp., Cardiobacteriaceae, and Staphylococcus spp. While Moraxella spp. were significantly decreased in diseased compared to healthy dogs (p = 0.005), Pasteurellaceae were significantly increased (p = 0.001). Analysis of similarities used on the unweighted UniFrac distance metric (p = 0.027) was significantly different when nasal microbial communities of healthy dogs were compared to those of dogs with nasal disease. The study showed that the canine nasal cavity is inhabited by a highly species-rich bacterial community, and suggests significant differences between the nasal microbiome of healthy dogs and dogs with nasal disease. PMID:28459886

  3. Bacterial microbiome of the nose of healthy dogs and dogs with nasal disease.

    PubMed

    Tress, Barbara; Dorn, Elisabeth S; Suchodolski, Jan S; Nisar, Tariq; Ravindran, Prajesh; Weber, Karin; Hartmann, Katrin; Schulz, Bianka S

    2017-01-01

    The role of bacterial communities in canine nasal disease has not been studied so far using next generation sequencing methods. Sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes has revealed that the canine upper respiratory tract harbors a diverse microbial community; however, changes in the composition of nasal bacterial communities in dogs with nasal disease have not been described so far. Aim of the study was to characterize the nasal microbiome of healthy dogs and compare it to that of dogs with histologically confirmed nasal neoplasia and chronic rhinitis. Nasal swabs were collected from healthy dogs (n = 23), dogs with malignant nasal neoplasia (n = 16), and dogs with chronic rhinitis (n = 8). Bacterial DNA was extracted and sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene was performed. Data were analyzed using Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology (QIIME). A total of 376 Operational Taxonomic Units out of 26 bacterial phyla were detected. In healthy dogs, Moraxella spp. was the most common species, followed by Phyllobacterium spp., Cardiobacteriaceae, and Staphylococcus spp. While Moraxella spp. were significantly decreased in diseased compared to healthy dogs (p = 0.005), Pasteurellaceae were significantly increased (p = 0.001). Analysis of similarities used on the unweighted UniFrac distance metric (p = 0.027) was significantly different when nasal microbial communities of healthy dogs were compared to those of dogs with nasal disease. The study showed that the canine nasal cavity is inhabited by a highly species-rich bacterial community, and suggests significant differences between the nasal microbiome of healthy dogs and dogs with nasal disease.

  4. Pet dogs and child physical activity: the role of child-dog attachment.

    PubMed

    Gadomski, A M; Scribani, M B; Krupa, N; Jenkins, P

    2017-10-01

    Dog ownership has been associated with increased physical activity in children which in turn may mitigate childhood obesity. To measure the association between child-dog attachment and child physical activity and screen time. Cross-sectional study including 370 children (ages 4-10) who had pet dogs in the home. Parents completed the DartScreen, a web-based screener, before a well-child visit. Screener domains included child body mass index (BMI), physical activity, screen time and dog-related questions. The Companion Animal Bonding Scale (CABS) was used to measure child attachment to the dog. Clinic nurses weighed and measured the children. Associations between CABS, BMI z-score, screen time and physical activity were estimated. CABS was strongly associated with time spent being active with the dog (F = 22.81, p < 0.0001), but not with BMI z-score or screen time. A higher level of child attachment to a pet dog is associated with increased child physical activity. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  5. Do Dogs Provide Information Helpfully?

    PubMed

    Piotti, Patrizia; Kaminski, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Dogs are particularly skilful during communicative interactions with humans. Dogs' abilities to use human communicative cues in cooperative contexts outcompete those of other species, and might be the result of selection pressures during domestication. Dogs also produce signals to direct the attention of humans towards outside entities, a behaviour often referred to as showing behaviour. This showing behaviour in dogs is thought to be something dogs use intentionally and referentially. However, there is currently no evidence that dogs communicate helpfully, i.e. to inform an ignorant human about a target that is of interest to the human but not to the dog. Communicating with a helpful motive is particularly interesting because it might suggest that dogs understand the human's goals and need for information. In study 1, we assessed whether dogs would abandon an object that they find interesting in favour of an object useful for their human partner, a random novel distractor, or an empty container. Results showed that it was mainly self-interest that was driving the dogs' behaviour. The dogs mainly directed their behaviour towards the object they had an interest in, but dogs were more persistent when showing the object relevant to the human, suggesting that to some extent they took the humans interest into account. Another possibility is that dogs' behaviour was driven by an egocentric motivation to interact with novel targets and that the dogs' neophila might have masked their helpful tendencies. Therefore, in study 2 the dogs had initial access to both objects, and were expected to indicate only one (relevant or distractor). The human partner interacted with the dog using vocal communication in half of the trials, and remaining silent in the other half. Dogs from both experimental groups, i.e. indicating the relevant object or indicating the distractor, established joint attention with the human. However, the human's vocal communication and the presence of the

  6. Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus schleiferi from healthy dogs and dogs with otitis, pyoderma or both.

    PubMed

    May, Elizabeth R; Kinyon, Joann M; Noxon, James O

    2012-12-07

    In veterinary medicine, Staphylococcus schleiferi was previously assumed to be an inhabitant of carnivore skin, however, more recently, it has been repeatedly documented in the literature as both an inhabitant and as a pathogen. In order to determine the frequency of nasal carriage, and the methicillin susceptibility pattern of S. schleiferi from healthy dogs as well as dogs with otitis and/or pyoderma, a prospective study including 24 dogs with healthy ears and skin, 27 dogs with healthy ears and pyoderma, 15 dogs with otitis without pyoderma and 20 dogs with both otitis and pyoderma was performed. Specimens were obtained and cultured and isolates were identified as S. schleiferi based on growth and biochemical characteristics. S. schleiferi was isolated from the nares of 1 healthy dog, 3 dogs with recurrent pyoderma, 2 dogs with recurrent otitis, and 1 dog with both recurrent otitis and pyoderma. One of the S. schleiferi isolates was methicillin resistant. Nasal carriage of S. schleiferi does occur in healthy dogs as well as dogs with otitis and pyoderma. Methicillin resistant and sensitive S. schleiferi can be found in the nares of dogs with diseased ears and skin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. How might we increase physical activity through dog walking?: A comprehensive review of dog walking correlates.

    PubMed

    Westgarth, Carri; Christley, Robert M; Christian, Hayley E

    2014-08-20

    Physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour are major threats to population health. A considerable proportion of people own dogs, and there is good evidence that dog ownership is associated with higher levels of physical activity. However not all owners walk their dogs regularly. This paper comprehensively reviews the evidence for correlates of dog walking so that effective interventions may be designed to increase the physical activity of dog owners. Published findings from 1990-2012 in both the human and veterinary literature were collated and reviewed for evidence of factors associated with objective and self-reported measures of dog walking behaviour, or reported perceptions about dog walking. Study designs included cross-sectional observational, trials and qualitative interviews. There is good evidence that the strength of the dog-owner relationship, through a sense of obligation to walk the dog, and the perceived support and motivation a dog provides for walking, is strongly associated with increased walking. The perceived exercise requirements of the dog may also be a modifiable point for intervention. In addition, access to suitable walking areas with dog supportive features that fulfil dog needs such as off-leash exercise, and that also encourage human social interaction, may be incentivising. Current evidence suggests that dog walking may be most effectively encouraged through targeting the dog-owner relationship and by providing dog-supportive physical environments. More research is required to investigate the influence of individual owner and dog factors on 'intention' to walk the dog as well as the influence of human social interaction whilst walking a dog. The effects of policy and cultural practices relating to dog ownership and walking should also be investigated. Future studies must be of a higher quality methodological design, including accounting for the effects of confounding between variables, and longitudinal designs and testing of

  8. Tularaemia in Norwegian dogs.

    PubMed

    Nordstoga, Anne; Handeland, Kjell; Johansen, Tone Bjordal; Iversen, Lena; Gavier-Widén, Dolores; Mattsson, Roland; Wik-Larssen, Kjersti; Afset, Jan Egil; Næverdal, Rune; Lund, Arve

    2014-10-10

    We describe tularaemia in a Norwegian dog caused by Francisella tularensis subspecies holarctica. A Hamilton Hound and his owner developed tulaeremia after hunting an infected mountain hare (Lepus timidus). The dog showed signs of lethargy, anorexia and fever during a period two to four days after hunting and thereafter fully recovered. Its antibody titers increased 32-fold from one to three weeks post exposure. Thereafter, the titer declined and leveled off at moderate positive values up to one year after exposure (end of study). This is believed to be the first case report of clinical F. tularensis subspecies holarctica infection in a European dog. In 2011, enormous numbers of Norway lemmings (Lemmus lemmus) occurred in Finnmark, the northernmost county of Norway and many dogs caught and swallowed lemmings. Some of these dogs developed non-specific signs of disease and the owners consulted a veterinary surgeon, who suspected tularaemia. In order to investigate this hypothesis, serum samples from 33 dogs were examined for antibodies to F. tularensis. The dogs were allocated into three groups: Dogs from Finnmark that became sick (Group 1) or remained healthy following contact with lemmings (Group 2), and healthy control dogs from Oslo without known contact with lemmings (Group 3). All the serum samples were analyzed with a tube agglutination assay. Among dogs exposed to lemmings, 10/11 and 3/12 were antibody positive in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively, whereas none of the control dogs (n=10) were positive for antibodies against F. tularensis. These results strongly indicate that the non-specific disease seen in the dogs in Finnmark was linked to F. tularensis infection acquired through contact with lemmings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Business German: The Use of Simulations in a Total Immersion German Business Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Ellen

    At Concordia College's Institute of German Studies (Minnesota), an immersion program, a 1-month course entitled "German in the Business World" concentrates on development of written and oral communication skills needed in firms dealing with German-speakers. As part of its emphasis on banking, insurance, and business, the course includes…

  10. Discrimination of human and dog faces and inversion responses in domestic dogs (Canis familiaris).

    PubMed

    Racca, Anaïs; Amadei, Eleonora; Ligout, Séverine; Guo, Kun; Meints, Kerstin; Mills, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Although domestic dogs can respond to many facial cues displayed by other dogs and humans, it remains unclear whether they can differentiate individual dogs or humans based on facial cues alone and, if so, whether they would demonstrate the face inversion effect, a behavioural hallmark commonly used in primates to differentiate face processing from object processing. In this study, we first established the applicability of the visual paired comparison (VPC or preferential looking) procedure for dogs using a simple object discrimination task with 2D pictures. The animals demonstrated a clear looking preference for novel objects when simultaneously presented with prior-exposed familiar objects. We then adopted this VPC procedure to assess their face discrimination and inversion responses. Dogs showed a deviation from random behaviour, indicating discrimination capability when inspecting upright dog faces, human faces and object images; but the pattern of viewing preference was dependent upon image category. They directed longer viewing time at novel (vs. familiar) human faces and objects, but not at dog faces, instead, a longer viewing time at familiar (vs. novel) dog faces was observed. No significant looking preference was detected for inverted images regardless of image category. Our results indicate that domestic dogs can use facial cues alone to differentiate individual dogs and humans and that they exhibit a non-specific inversion response. In addition, the discrimination response by dogs of human and dog faces appears to differ with the type of face involved.

  11. Comparison of clinical findings between dogs with suspected anaphylaxis and dogs with confirmed sepsis.

    PubMed

    Walters, Andrea M; O'Brien, Mauria A; Selmic, Laura E; McMichael, Maureen A

    2017-09-15

    OBJECTIVE To compare clinical signs, laboratory test results, and imaging findings between dogs with suspected anaphylaxis and dogs with sepsis. DESIGN Retrospective case-case study. ANIMALS 10 dogs with suspected anaphylaxis and 22 dogs with confirmed sepsis that met the criteria for systemic inflammatory response syndrome. PROCEDURES Medical records for dogs in each group were reviewed and data extracted regarding signalment; reason for hospital admission; physical examination findings; results of CBC, serum biochemical analysis, coagulation testing, cytologic examination, and microbial culture; and imaging reports. RESULTS All dogs in the anaphylaxis group fulfilled the criteria for systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Dogs in both groups had gastrointestinal signs, lethargy, mentation change, and bleeding abnormalities. Dogs with suspected anaphylaxis had a significantly higher eosinophil count and serum alanine aminotransferase activity and lower blood pH than dogs with sepsis. Dogs with sepsis had a significantly higher band neutrophil count, serum globulins concentration, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity and lower serum glucose concentration. Dogs in both groups had intracavitary free fluid and ultrasonographic findings of thickened intestines, gas or fluid-filled intestines, and a thickened gallbladder wall. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Clinical signs, laboratory values, and imaging findings may be similar in dogs with sepsis or anaphylaxis. Given the marked difference in prognosis and treatment, early differentiation is important. Anaphylaxis should be considered if a septic nidus cannot be identified, and supportive care should be considered for such patients.

  12. Care of dogs and attitudes of dog owners in Port-au-Prince, the Republic of Haiti.

    PubMed

    Fielding, William J; Gall, Melanie; Green, Dick; Eller, Warren S

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the first known study on dogs in Port-au-Prince. Interviews with 1,290 residents provided information on 1,804 dogs. More than 57.7% of homes kept dogs. Not all the dogs received vaccinations for rabies (41.6%), even though 28.2% of households had had a household member bitten by a dog. Although the "owned" dog population had decreased as a result of the earthquake in January 2010, the number of roaming dogs appeared to have been uninfluenced by the disaster. Given that 64.8% of dogs probably had access to the street and only 6.0% of the females were spayed, to humanely contain the dog population will require both confinement and neutering. Although roaming dogs were considered a nuisance by 63.3% of respondents, 42.6% of households fed dogs they did not own.

  13. What motivates arrangements of dog visits in nursing homes? Experiences by dog handlers and nurses.

    PubMed

    Gundersen, Ellen Dahl; Johannessen, Berit

    2018-05-01

    Dog visits to nursing homes are used as a structured approach for enhancing residents' well-being. Few studies have emphasized the perspectives of the organizers. The purpose of the present study was to gain insight into the experiences of volunteer dog handlers and nurses involved in dog visits to nursing homes, focusing on what motivated them to contribute and identifying possible factors to successful dog visits. Individual, in-depth interviews with eight dog handlers and group interviews with 10 nurses from four nursing homes. Feelings of meaningfulness and joy motivated both the dog handlers and nurses to arrange dog visits to nursing homes. Successful visits depended on shared information and collaboration. Both groups were motivated by the positive impact of dog visits on nursing home residents. Dog visits may be health-promoting not only for residents, but for the volunteer dog handlers as well. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Explanatory models of addictive behaviour among native German, Russian-German, and Turkish youth.

    PubMed

    Penka, S; Heimann, H; Heinz, A; Schouler-Ocak, M

    2008-01-01

    In Germany, the public system of addiction treatment is used less by migrants with addictive disorders than by their non-migrant counterparts. To date, the literature has focused primarily on language, sociocultural factors, and residence status when discussing access barriers to this part of the health care system. However, little attention has been paid to cultural differences in explanatory models of addictive behaviour. This is surprising when we consider the important role played by popular knowledge in a population's perceptions of and responses to illnesses, including their causes, symptoms, and treatment. In the present study, we examined explanatory models of addictive behaviour and of mental disorders in 124 native German und Russian-German youth and compared these models to those observed in an earlier study of 144 German and Turkish youth. We employed the free listing technique German and to compile the terms that participating subjects used to describe addictive behaviour. Subsequently, we examined how a subset of our study population assigned these terms to the respective disorders by means of the pile sort method. Although the explanatory models used by the German and Russian-German youth in our study were surprisingly similar, those employed by Turkish youth did not make any fundamental distinction between illegal and legal drugs (e.g. alcohol and nicotine). German and Russian-German youth regarded eating disorders as "embarrassing" or "disgraceful", but Turkish youth did not. Unlike our German and Russian-German subjects, the Turkish youth did not classify eating disorders as being addictive in nature. Moreover, medical concepts crucial to a proper understanding of dependence disorders (e.g. the term "physical dependence") were characterised by almost half of our Turkish subjects as useless in describing addictions. These findings show that it is impossible to translate medical or everyday concepts of disease and treatment properly into a different

  15. Splenitis in 33 Dogs.

    PubMed

    Ferri, F; Zini, E; Auriemma, E; Castagnaro, M; Coppola, L M; Peano, A; Martella, V; Decaro, N; Kuhnert, P; Ferro, S

    2017-01-01

    Splenitis is uncommonly reported in dogs. Herein, the authors describe its prevalence, clinical findings and outcomes, histologic patterns, and causes. Splenic samples of dogs diagnosed with splenitis between 2005 and 2013 were collected and stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Gram, green-Gram, Giemsa, periodic acid-Schiff, and Ziehl-Neelsen. Samples were processed for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect bacteria, fungi, and protozoa ( Leishmania infantum, Hepatozoon canis). Thirty-three of 660 splenic samples (5%) had splenitis. Clinical findings and outcomes were available in 19 dogs (58%); 49% had weakness, 33% had fever, and 84% survived. The most frequent inflammatory patterns included purulent splenitis (27%), pyogranulomatous splenitis (24%), and neutrophilic perisplenitis (15%). One dog had a putative diagnosis of primary splenitis; in 8 dogs, microorganisms were identified histologically or by PCR in the spleen without obvious comorbidities. Twenty-four dogs (73%) had concurrent diseases; a permissive role in the development of splenitis was suspected in 21 of these cases. Histologic examination identified the cause of splenitis in 10 dogs. Bacteria were identified by PCR in 23 cases, but the bacteria were confirmed histologically in only 6 of these. Leishmania was detected with PCR in 6 dogs. Leishmania was identified in 1 dog and H. canis in another histologically, but both were PCR negative. Fungi were identified in 8 spleens by PCR and in 1 by histology. This study suggests that splenitis is uncommon in dogs and is frequently associated with systemic diseases. Prognosis is favorable in most cases. Identification of bacteria, fungi, and protozoa in the spleens of affected dogs with PCR should be interpreted cautiously, because the findings are not confirmed histologically in many cases.

  16. Owned and unowned dog population estimation, dog management and dog bites to inform rabies prevention and response on Lombok Island, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Mustiana, Ana; Toribio, Jenny-Ann; Abdurrahman, Muktasam; Suadnya, I Wayan; Hernandez-Jover, Marta; Putra, Anak Agung Gde; Ward, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Although Indonesia has been rabies-infected since at least the 1880s, some islands remain rabies-free, such as Lombok. However, due to its adjacency to rabies-infected islands such as Bali and Flores, there is considerable risk of a rabies incursion. As part of a rabies risk assessment project, surveys were conducted to estimate the size of the dog population and to describe dog management practices of households belonging to different ethnic groups. A photographic-recapture method was employed and the number of unowned dogs was estimated. A total of 400 dog owning households were interviewed, 300 at an urban site and 100 at a rural site. The majority of the interviewed households belonged to the Balinese ethnic group. Owned dogs were more likely male, and non-pedigree or local breed. These households kept their dogs either fully restricted, semi-free roaming or free-roaming but full restriction was reported only at the urban site. Dog bite cases were reported to be higher at the urban site, and commonly affected children/young adults to 20 years old and males. A higher number of unowned dogs was observed at the urban site than at the rural site. Data generated within these surveys can inform rabies risk assessment models to quantify the probability of rabies being released into Lombok and resulting in the infection of the local dog population. The information gained is critical for efforts to educate dog owners about rabies, as a component of preparedness to prevent the establishment of rabies should an incursion occur.

  17. Owned and Unowned Dog Population Estimation, Dog Management and Dog Bites to Inform Rabies Prevention and Response on Lombok Island, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Mustiana, Ana; Toribio, Jenny-Ann; Abdurrahman, Muktasam; Suadnya, I. Wayan; Hernandez-Jover, Marta; Putra, Anak Agung Gde; Ward, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Although Indonesia has been rabies-infected since at least the 1880s, some islands remain rabies-free, such as Lombok. However, due to its adjacency to rabies-infected islands such as Bali and Flores, there is considerable risk of a rabies incursion. As part of a rabies risk assessment project, surveys were conducted to estimate the size of the dog population and to describe dog management practices of households belonging to different ethnic groups. A photographic-recapture method was employed and the number of unowned dogs was estimated. A total of 400 dog owning households were interviewed, 300 at an urban site and 100 at a rural site. The majority of the interviewed households belonged to the Balinese ethnic group. Owned dogs were more likely male, and non-pedigree or local breed. These households kept their dogs either fully restricted, semi-free roaming or free-roaming but full restriction was reported only at the urban site. Dog bite cases were reported to be higher at the urban site, and commonly affected children/young adults to 20 years old and males. A higher number of unowned dogs was observed at the urban site than at the rural site. Data generated within these surveys can inform rabies risk assessment models to quantify the probability of rabies being released into Lombok and resulting in the infection of the local dog population. The information gained is critical for efforts to educate dog owners about rabies, as a component of preparedness to prevent the establishment of rabies should an incursion occur. PMID:25932916

  18. Chromatographic analysis of lipid fractions in healthy dogs and dogs with obesity or hyperadrenocorticism.

    PubMed

    Jericó, Márcia Marques; De Camargo Chiquito, Fernanda; Kajihara, Kazuo; Moreira, Márcio Antonio Bastistela; Gonzales, Rodrigo; Machado, Fabricio Lorenzini Aranha; Nunes, Valéria Sutti; Catanozi, Sergio; Nakandakare, Edna Regina

    2009-03-01

    Obesity and endogenous hyperadrenocorticism (HAC) are common clinical conditions in veterinary practice, and both conditions have clinical and laboratory similarities, such as weight gain and dyslipidemia. The objective of the present study was to characterize and compare the lipid profiles and plasma lipoprotein fractions in healthy dogs (n = 10), in obese dogs (n = 10), and in dogs with HAC (n = 6). All of the dogs were client owned. The lipoproteins were separated by fast protein liquid chromatography, and the plasma concentrations of total cholesterol and total triacylglycerol (TAG) were determined by enzymatic methods. When compared with the healthy and obese groups, dogs with HAC had a significant increase (P < 0.01) in the total concentrations of TAGs and cholesterol (CHOL), with higher distribution in the very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-CHOL fractions. In addition, the distributions of the high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-CHOL and HDL-TAG fractions were significantly lower (P < 0.01) in dogs with HAC than in healthy dogs. Considering the animals in this study, it was determined that the dogs with HAC differed significantly from the healthy and obese dogs regarding the metabolism of CHOL and TAG, as well as their VLDL and HDL fractions. Similar laboratory findings could allow veterinarians to distinguish obese dogs from those with HAC. In addition, dogs with HAC may be at higher risk for developing metabolic and atherosclerotic complications.

  19. Associations between Domestic-Dog Morphology and Behaviour Scores in the Dog Mentality Assessment.

    PubMed

    Stone, Holly R; McGreevy, Paul D; Starling, Melissa J; Forkman, Bjorn

    2016-01-01

    The domestic dog shows a wide range of morphologies, that humans have selected for in the process of creating unique breeds. Recent studies have revealed correlations between changes in morphology and behaviour as reported by owners. For example, as height and weight decrease, many undesirable behaviours (non-social fear, hyperactivity and attention seeking) become more apparent. The current study aimed to explore more of these correlations, but this time used reports from trained observers. Phenotypic measurements were recorded from a range of common dog breeds (n = 45) and included cephalic index (CI: the ratio of skull width to skull length), bodyweight, height and sex. These data were then correlated with results from the Dog Mentality Assessment (DMA), which involves trained observers scoring a dog's reaction to stimuli presented over 10 standardised subtests. Each subtest is designed to evoke a behavioural response. Backward elimination and weighted step-wise regression revealed that shorter dogs demonstrated more aggressive tendencies, reacting defensively toward both assistants dressed as ghosts (p = 0.045), and to a dummy (p = 0.008). Taller dogs were more affectionate when greeting and being handled by humans (p = 0.007, p = <0.001, respectively). Taller dogs were also more cooperative (p = <0.001), and playful (p = 0.001) with humans than shorter dogs. Heavier dogs were more inquisitive toward a dummy (p = 0.011), to the source of a metallic noise (p = 0.010) and to an assistant (p = 0.003). Heavier dogs were also more attentive to the ghosts (p = 0.013). In comparison, lighter dogs were cautious of a dummy (p = <0.001) and fearful of the sound of a gunshot (p = <0.001). Lighter dogs were also cautious of, and demonstrated prolonged fearfulness toward, the source of metallic noise (p = <0.001, p = <0.034, respectively). With a far larger sample and the advantage of third-party reporting (which overcomes potential owner bias), the current findings build

  20. Communication between domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) and humans: dogs are good learners.

    PubMed

    Elgier, Angel M; Jakovcevic, Adriana; Barrera, Gabriela; Mustaca, Alba E; Bentosela, Mariana

    2009-07-01

    Communication involves a wide range of behaviours that animals emit in their daily lives and can take place between different species, as is the case of domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) and humans. Dogs have shown to be successful at following human cues to solve the object choice task. The question is what are the mechanisms involved in these communicative abilities. This article presents a review of studies about the communicative capacities of domestic dogs emphasizing the ones that considered the effect of associative learning upon these skills. In addition, evidence about differences in dogs' performance in following physical or social cues is summarized and two studies where both signals compete are presented here. The obtained results suggest that the training of a colour cue reverses the dogs' preference for the social one. These results are discussed in light of the findings that gave importance to the learning effect, concluding that the dogs fundamentally follow those cues that allowed them to obtain reinforcers in their previous learning history.

  1. [German influences on Romanian medical terminology].

    PubMed

    Răcilă, R G; Răileanu, Irena; Rusu, V

    2008-01-01

    The medical terminology plays a key part both in the study of medicine as well as in its practice. Moreover, understanding the medical terms is important not only for the doctor but also for the patients who want to learn more about their condition. For these reasons we believe that the study of medical terminology is one of great interest. The aim of our paper was to evaluate the German linguistic and medical influences on the evolution of the Romanian medical terminology. Since the Romanian-German cultural contacts date back to the 12th century we had reasons to believe that the number of German medical words in Romanian would be significant. To our surprise, the Romanian language has very few German words and even less medical terms of German origin. However, when we searched the list of diseases coined after famous medical personalities, we found out that 26 % of them bore the names of German doctors and scientists. Taken together this proves that the German medical school played an important role on the evolution of Romanian medicine despite the fact that the Romanian vocabulary was slightly influenced by the German language. We explain this fact on the structural differences between the Romanian and German languages, which make it hard for German loans to be integrated in the Romanian lexis. In conclusion we state that the German influence on the Romanian medical terminology is weak despite the important contribution of the German medical school to the development of medical education and healthcare in Romania. Key

  2. Dangerous dogs: culprits or victims?

    PubMed

    Mills, Georgina

    2014-12-06

    Dangerous dogs and dog bite incidents are rarely out of the news and are a matter of great public interest, but what can be done to tackle this issue and are the dogs really to blame? A debate at the BVA Congress at the London Vet Show discussed the complexities surrounding dog bites and dog behaviour, and looked at possible ways of preventing future incidents. Georgina Mills reports. British Veterinary Association.

  3. Spontaneously obese dogs exhibit greater postprandial glucose, triglyceride, and insulin concentrations than lean dogs.

    PubMed

    Verkest, K R; Rand, J S; Fleeman, L M; Morton, J M

    2012-02-01

    Dogs do not appear to progress from obesity-induced insulin resistance to type 2 diabetes mellitus. Both postprandial hyperglycemia and postprandial hypertriglyceridemia have been proposed to cause or maintain beta cell failure and progression to type 2 diabetes mellitus in other species. Postprandial glucose, triglyceride, and insulin concentrations have not been compared in lean and obese dogs. We measured serum glucose, triglyceride, and insulin concentrations in nine naturally occurring obese and nine age- and gender-matched lean dogs. After a 24-h fast, dogs were fed half their calculated daily energy requirement of a standardized diet that provided 37% and 40% of metabolizable energy as carbohydrate and fat, respectively. Fasting and postprandial glucose and triglyceride concentrations were greater in the obese dogs (P < 0.001), although the mean insulin concentration for this group was five times greater than that of the lean group (P < 0.001). Most of the 0.6 mM (11 mg/dL) difference in mean postprandial glucose concentrations between lean and obese dogs was attributable to a subset of persistently hyperglycemic obese dogs with mean postprandial glucose concentrations 1.0 mM (18 mg/dL) greater than that in lean dogs. Persistently hyperglycemic obese dogs had lower triglyceride (P = 0.02 to 0.04) and insulin (P < 0.02) concentrations than other obese dogs. None of the dogs developed clinical signs of diabetes mellitus during follow-up for a median of 2.6 yr. We conclude that pancreatic beta cells in dogs are either not sensitive to toxicity because of mild hyperglycemia or lack another component of the pathophysiology of beta cell failure in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Human Perception of Fear in Dogs Varies According to Experience with Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Michele; Bolger, Niall; Champagne, Frances A.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the role of experience in humans’ perception of emotion using canine visual signals, we asked adults with various levels of dog experience to interpret the emotions of dogs displayed in videos. The video stimuli had been pre-categorized by an expert panel of dog behavior professionals as showing examples of happy or fearful dog behavior. In a sample of 2,163 participants, the level of dog experience strongly predicted identification of fearful, but not of happy, emotional examples. The probability of selecting the “fearful” category to describe fearful examples increased with experience and ranged from.30 among those who had never lived with a dog to greater than.70 among dog professionals. In contrast, the probability of selecting the “happy” category to describe happy emotional examples varied little by experience, ranging from.90 to.93. In addition, the number of physical features of the dog that participants reported using for emotional interpretations increased with experience, and in particular, more-experienced respondents were more likely to attend to the ears. Lastly, more-experienced respondents provided lower difficulty and higher accuracy self-ratings than less-experienced respondents when interpreting both happy and fearful emotional examples. The human perception of emotion in other humans has previously been shown to be sensitive to individual differences in social experience, and the results of the current study extend the notion of experience-dependent processes from the intraspecific to the interspecific domain. PMID:23284765

  5. Dogs and their human companions: the effect of familiarity on dog-human interactions.

    PubMed

    Kerepesi, Andrea; Dóka, Antal; Miklósi, Ádám

    2015-01-01

    There are few quantitative examinations of the extent to which dogs discriminate between familiar and unfamiliar persons. In our study we have investigated whether dogs show differential behaviour towards humans of different degrees of familiarity (owner, familiar person, unfamiliar person). Dogs and humans were observed in eight test situations: (1) Three-way strange situation test, (2) Calling in from food, (3) Obedience test, (4) Walking away, (5) Threatening approach, (6) Playful interaction, (7) Food inhibition test and (8) Manipulation of the dog's body. Dogs distinguished between the owner and the two other test partners in those tests which involved separation from the owner (Test 1, 4), were aversive for the dog (Test 5) or involved playing interaction (Test 6). Our results revealed that the owner cannot be replaced by a familiar person in situations provoking elevated anxiety and fear. In contrasts, dogs did not discriminate between the owner and the familiar person in those tests that were based on obedient behaviour or behaviour towards an assertive person (Tests 2, 3, 7 and 8). Dogs' former training experience reduced the difference between their behaviour towards the owner and the familiar person in situations requiring obedience but it did not mask it totally. The dogs' behaviour towards each of the humans participating in the tests was consistent all over the test series. In summary, dogs discriminated between their owner and the unfamiliar person and always preferred the owner to the unfamiliar person. However, the discrimination between the owner and the familiar person is context-specific. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Canine Behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Review on dog rabies vaccination coverage in Africa: a question of dog accessibility or cost recovery?

    PubMed

    Jibat, Tariku; Hogeveen, Henk; Mourits, Monique C M

    2015-02-01

    Rabies still poses a significant human health problem throughout most of Africa, where the majority of the human cases results from dog bites. Mass dog vaccination is considered to be the most effective method to prevent rabies in humans. Our objective was to systematically review research articles on dog rabies parenteral vaccination coverage in Africa in relation to dog accessibility and vaccination cost recovery arrangement (i.e.free of charge or owner charged). A systematic literature search was made in the databases of CAB abstracts (EBSCOhost and OvidSP), Scopus, Web of Science, PubMed, Medline (EBSCOhost and OvidSP) and AJOL (African Journal Online) for peer reviewed articles on 1) rabies control, 2) dog rabies vaccination coverage and 3) dog demography in Africa. Identified articles were subsequently screened and selected using predefined selection criteria like year of publication (viz. ≥ 1990), type of study (cross sectional), objective(s) of the study (i.e. vaccination coverage rates, dog demographics and financial arrangements of vaccination costs), language of publication (English) and geographical focus (Africa). The selection process resulted in sixteen peer reviewed articles which were used to review dog demography and dog ownership status, and dog rabies vaccination coverage throughout Africa. The main review findings indicate that 1) the majority (up to 98.1%) of dogs in African countries are owned (and as such accessible), 2) puppies younger than 3 months of age constitute a considerable proportion (up to 30%) of the dog population and 3) male dogs are dominating in numbers (up to 3.6 times the female dog population). Dog rabies parenteral vaccination coverage was compared between "free of charge" and "owner charged" vaccination schemes by the technique of Meta-analysis. Results indicate that the rabies vaccination coverage following a free of charge vaccination scheme (68%) is closer to the World Health Organization recommended coverage rate

  7. [Sample German LAPS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Bianca

    Four learning activity packages (LAPS) for use in secondary school German programs contain instructional materials which enable students to improve their basic linguistic skills. The units include: (1) "Grusse," (2) "Ich Heisse...Namen," (3) "Tune into Your Career: Business Correspondence 'Auf Deutch'," and (4) "Understanding German Culture."…

  8. Use of capecitabine to prevent acute renal allograft rejection in dog erythrocyte antigen-mismatched mongrel dogs.

    PubMed

    Milovancev, Milan; Schmiedt, Chad W; Bentley, Ellison; Schwab, Michelle; Dubielzig, Richard R; Gendron-Fitzpatrick, Annette P; McAnulty, Jonathan F

    2007-01-01

    To assess efficacy and toxicity of a capecitabine (CAP)-based regimen for preventing rejection of renal allografts in dog erythrocyte antigen (DEA)-mismatched mongrel dogs. Prospective, pilot study. Eight healthy, unrelated, DEA mismatched, adult mongrel dogs. All dogs received CAP, starting at 50 mg/m2 PO b.i.d. 4 days preoperatively, increasing to 200 mg/m2 PO b.i.d. by the day of surgery. All dogs received cyclosporine-A (CsA) and prednisolone starting 2 days preoperatively. Standard heterotopic renal transplantation with native nephrectomy was performed. After 90 days, surviving dogs were euthanatized and histopathologic examination was performed. Two of 8 dogs developed acute neurotoxicity leading to death or euthanasia within 5 days of surgery. For the 6 remaining dogs, there were no statistically significant changes in complete blood count or serum biochemical values. No opportunistic infections developed during the study period. Five of 6 dogs had no to minimal evidence of graft rejection. Two of 6 dogs developed superficial and pigmentary keratitis. Significant histopathologic findings in all dogs included mild lymphoplasmacytic gastroenteritis, steroid hepatopathy, and corneal epithelial thinning. One dog had moderate interstitial nephritis and pyelitis. In this experimental model, a CAP-CsA-prednisolone immunosuppressive regimen was effective in preventing rejection of allografts in DEA-mismatched dogs. Severe, unpredictable neurotoxicity and variable ocular toxicity significantly limit clinical applications at this time. A CAP-CsA-prednisolone protocol is an effective, oral immunosuppressive regimen for prevention of allograft rejection in DEA-mismatched mongrel dogs. For clinical application, identification of patients susceptible to toxic side effects would be necessary.

  9. Social behaviour of domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) in a public off-leash dog park.

    PubMed

    Howse, Melissa S; Anderson, Rita E; Walsh, Carolyn J

    2018-03-13

    This study examines the activity budgets and social behaviours initiated and received by 69 focal dogs in an off-leash dog park for 400 s after entry, a time of high activity about which little is known. Using motivationally-neutral labels for social behaviour categories, we describe the frequency of behaviours, and correlations among them. We then examine these relationships in the context of proposed functions for some behaviours in dogs, in terms of information gathering and communication, including visual and tactile signalling. Time spent with other dogs decreased rapidly over the visit, and much of this early interaction involved greeting the park newcomer. Snout-muzzle contact behaviours were ubiquitous, while other behaviours were rarely observed, including aggressive behaviours. Correlations among certain non-contact behaviours initiated and received by focal dogs are consistent with their function as visual signals that may influence the continuation and form of social interactions, and their possible role in social mimicry (i.e., play bow and pull-rear away). Age, sex, and number of dogs present in the park influenced specific aspects of dogs' activity budgets, and a few behaviours. This ethological study provides fundamental data on dog social behaviour in dog parks, about which surprisingly little has been published. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Dogs with macroadenomas have lower body temperature and heart rate than dogs with microadenomas.

    PubMed

    Benchekroun, Ghita; Desquilbet, Loic; Herrtage, Michael E; Jeffery, Nick D; Rosenberg, Dan; Granger, Nicolas

    2017-09-01

    Pituitary macroadenomas compress the hypothalamus, which partly regulates heart rate and body temperature. The aim of this study was to investigate whether heart rate and/or body temperature could aid in clinically differentiating dogs with macroadenomas from dogs with microadenomas (i.e. small non-compressive pituitary mass). Two groups of dogs diagnosed with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (i.e. Cushing's disease) were included. Heart rate and body temperature were collected on initial presentation before any procedure. Dogs with macroadenoma had a significantly lower heart rate and body temperature (P<0.01) compared to dogs with microadenoma. We suggest that the combined cut-off values of 84 beats per minutes and 38.3°C in dogs with Cushing's disease, especially with vague neurological signs (nine of 12 dogs=75%), might help to suspect the presence of a macroadenoma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Accent, Intelligibility, and the Role of the Listener: Perceptions of English-Accented German by Native German Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes-Harb, Rachel; Watzinger-Tharp, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    We explore the relationship between accentedness and intelligibility, and investigate how listeners' beliefs about nonnative speech interact with their accentedness and intelligibility judgments. Native German speakers and native English learners of German produced German sentences, which were presented to 12 native German speakers in accentedness…

  12. Transthoracic lung ultrasound in normal dogs and dogs with cardiogenic pulmonary edema: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rademacher, Nathalie; Pariaut, Romain; Pate, Julie; Saelinger, Carley; Kearney, Michael T; Gaschen, Lorrie

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary edema is the most common complication of left-sided heart failure in dogs and early detection is important for effective clinical management. In people, pulmonary edema is commonly diagnosed based on transthoracic ultrasonography and detection of B line artifacts (vertical, narrow-based, well-defined hyperechoic rays arising from the pleural surface). The purpose of this study was to determine whether B line artifacts could also be useful diagnostic predictors for cardiogenic pulmonary edema in dogs. Thirty-one normal dogs and nine dogs with cardiogenic pulmonary edema were prospectively recruited. For each dog, presence or absence of cardiogenic pulmonary edema was based on physical examination, heartworm testing, thoracic radiographs, and echocardiography. A single observer performed transthoracic ultrasonography in all dogs and recorded video clips and still images for each of four quadrants in each hemithorax. Distribution, sonographic characteristics, and number of B lines per thoracic quadrant were determined and compared between groups. B lines were detected in 31% of normal dogs (mean 0.9 ± 0.3 SD per dog) and 100% of dogs with cardiogenic pulmonary edema (mean 6.2 ± 3.8 SD per dog). Artifacts were more numerous and widely distributed in dogs with congestive heart failure (P < 0.0001). In severe cases, B lines increased in number and became confluent. The locations of B line artifacts appeared consistent with locations of edema on radiographs. Findings from the current study supported the use of thoracic ultrasonography and detection of B lines as techniques for diagnosing cardiogenic pulmonary edema in dogs. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  13. Comparison of the nutrient composition of commercial dog milk replacers with that of dog milk

    PubMed Central

    Heinze, Cailin R.; Freeman, Lisa M.; Martin, Camilia R.; Power, Michael L.; Fascetti, Andrea J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the nutrient composition of commercially available dog milk replacers with that of dog milk. Design Prospective, cross-sectional study. Sample 5 dog milk samples and 15 samples of commercial dog milk replacers. Procedures Dog milk and milk replacers were analyzed for concentrations of total protein, essential amino acids, sugars, total fat, essential fatty acids, calcium, and phosphorus. Energy density was calculated. Results from milk replacers were compared with the range of the concentration of each nutrient in milk samples from mature dogs as well as the National Research Council (NRC) recommendations for puppy growth. Results Milk replacers varied widely in caloric density and concentration of nutrients such as calcium, protein, and fat. Calcium concentration was lower in 14 of 15 milk replacers than in the dog milk samples. Docosahexaenoic acid was undetectable in 12 of 15 milk replacers but present in all dog milk samples. All milk replacers had numerous essential nutrients outside of the range of the dog milk samples, and many had concentrations of amino acids, essential fatty acids, calcium, and phosphorus less than the NRC minimal requirement or recommended allowance. Compared with NRC recommendations, some dog milk samples had concentrations of total protein, linoleic acid, calcium, or phosphorus less than the recommended allowance. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Results suggested that there was substantial variation in nutrient composition of 15 dog milk replacers and that some products were closer approximations of dog milk than others. Nearly all products would benefit from more appropriate calcium, amino acids, and essential fatty acids concentrations and better feeding directions. PMID:24871064

  14. Use of the dog as non-rodent test species in the safety testing schedule associated with the registration of crop and plant protection products (pesticides): present status.

    PubMed

    Box, Rainer J; Spielmann, Horst

    2005-11-01

    The results from a survey of the expert information that is publicly accessible on the use of the dog as test species during the regulatory evaluation of agricultural chemicals and pesticides are reported. Methods that are being used or considered in order to reduce the number of dogs used for this purpose are described. Regulatory evaluation aims at establishing threshold values for safe human exposure; it is based on no-observed-adverse-effect levels (NOELs) determined in animal studies. Current regulations require testing in two species, a rodent species (usually rat or mouse), and a non-rodent species (usually the dog). Subchronic (90-day) and chronic (12-month) repeated-dose feeding studies must be routinely conducted in dogs. This report first focuses on the results from a retrospective study analysing data on 216 pesticides kept on record by the Bundesinstitut für Risikobewertung, BfR (German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment), the competent regulatory authority in Germany. The study was sponsored and coordinated by SET, the German Foundation for the Promotion of Research on Replacement and Complementary Methods to Reduce Animal Testing (Stiftung zur Förderung der Erforschung von Ersatz-und Ergänzungsmethoden zur Einschränkung von Tierversuchen, Mainz) and conducted by the BfR. Since the data submitted for registration of a product is the property of the manufacturer, the study could only proceed with the collaboration of the German Association of Manufacturers of Agricultural Chemicals (Industrieverband Agrar, IVA). To ensure confidentiality, designated codes were used instead of the compounds' proper names when the study was published. The results support two major conclusions. The use of the dog for the testing of pesticides is indeed necessary because the dog has proved to be the most sensitive species for about 15% of the compounds examined. However, chronic studies are only of limited value since they only provide essential information that

  15. Lessons learned from cloning dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, M J; Oh, H J; Kim, G A; Park, J E; Park, E J; Jang, G; Ra, J C; Kang, S K; Lee, B C

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this article is to review dog cloning research and to suggest its applications based on a discussion about the normality of cloned dogs. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was successfully used for production of viable cloned puppies despite limited understanding of in vitro dog embryo production. Cloned dogs have similar growth characteristics to those born from natural fertilization, with no evidence of serious adverse effects. The offspring of cloned dogs also have similar growth performance and health to those of naturally bred puppies. Therefore, cloning in domestic dogs can be applied as an assisted reproductive technique to conserve endangered species, to treat sterile canids or aged dogs, to improve reproductive performance of valuable individuals and to generate disease model animals. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Phylogenetic distinctiveness of Middle Eastern and Southeast Asian village dog Y chromosomes illuminates dog origins.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sarah K; Pedersen, Niels C; Jafarishorijeh, Sardar; Bannasch, Danika L; Ahrens, Kristen D; Wu, Jui-Te; Okon, Michaella; Sacks, Benjamin N

    2011-01-01

    Modern genetic samples are commonly used to trace dog origins, which entails untested assumptions that village dogs reflect indigenous ancestry or that breed origins can be reliably traced to particular regions. We used high-resolution Y chromosome markers (SNP and STR) and mitochondrial DNA to analyze 495 village dogs/dingoes from the Middle East and Southeast Asia, along with 138 dogs from >35 modern breeds to 1) assess genetic divergence between Middle Eastern and Southeast Asian village dogs and their phylogenetic affinities to Australian dingoes and gray wolves (Canis lupus) and 2) compare the genetic affinities of modern breeds to regional indigenous village dog populations. The Y chromosome markers indicated that village dogs in the two regions corresponded to reciprocally monophyletic clades, reflecting several to many thousand years divergence, predating the Neolithic ages, and indicating long-indigenous roots to those regions. As expected, breeds of the Middle East and East Asia clustered within the respective regional village dog clade. Australian dingoes also clustered in the Southeast Asian clade. However, the European and American breeds clustered almost entirely within the Southeast Asian clade, even sharing many haplotypes, suggesting a substantial and recent influence of East Asian dogs in the creation of European breeds. Comparison to 818 published breed dog Y STR haplotypes confirmed this conclusion and indicated that some African breeds reflect another distinct patrilineal origin. The lower-resolution mtDNA marker consistently supported Y-chromosome results. Both marker types confirmed previous findings of higher genetic diversity in dogs from Southeast Asia than the Middle East. Our findings demonstrate the importance of village dogs as windows into the past and provide a reference against which ancient DNA can be used to further elucidate origins and spread of the domestic dog.

  17. Phylogenetic Distinctiveness of Middle Eastern and Southeast Asian Village Dog Y Chromosomes Illuminates Dog Origins

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Sarah K.; Pedersen, Niels C.; Jafarishorijeh, Sardar; Bannasch, Danika L.; Ahrens, Kristen D.; Wu, Jui-Te; Okon, Michaella; Sacks, Benjamin N.

    2011-01-01

    Modern genetic samples are commonly used to trace dog origins, which entails untested assumptions that village dogs reflect indigenous ancestry or that breed origins can be reliably traced to particular regions. We used high-resolution Y chromosome markers (SNP and STR) and mitochondrial DNA to analyze 495 village dogs/dingoes from the Middle East and Southeast Asia, along with 138 dogs from >35 modern breeds to 1) assess genetic divergence between Middle Eastern and Southeast Asian village dogs and their phylogenetic affinities to Australian dingoes and gray wolves (Canis lupus) and 2) compare the genetic affinities of modern breeds to regional indigenous village dog populations. The Y chromosome markers indicated that village dogs in the two regions corresponded to reciprocally monophyletic clades, reflecting several to many thousand years divergence, predating the Neolithic ages, and indicating long-indigenous roots to those regions. As expected, breeds of the Middle East and East Asia clustered within the respective regional village dog clade. Australian dingoes also clustered in the Southeast Asian clade. However, the European and American breeds clustered almost entirely within the Southeast Asian clade, even sharing many haplotypes, suggesting a substantial and recent influence of East Asian dogs in the creation of European breeds. Comparison to 818 published breed dog Y STR haplotypes confirmed this conclusion and indicated that some African breeds reflect another distinct patrilineal origin. The lower-resolution mtDNA marker consistently supported Y-chromosome results. Both marker types confirmed previous findings of higher genetic diversity in dogs from Southeast Asia than the Middle East. Our findings demonstrate the importance of village dogs as windows into the past and provide a reference against which ancient DNA can be used to further elucidate origins and spread of the domestic dog. PMID:22194840

  18. Food engorgement in 35 dogs (2009-2013) compared with 36 dogs with gastric dilation and volvulus.

    PubMed

    Smart, Lisa; Reese, Shona; Hosgood, Giselle

    2017-11-25

    The clinical features and management of food engorgement (FE) in dogs have not been previously described. This retrospective observational study describes characteristics and outcome of 35 dogs with FE, and compares features on presentation to 36 dogs with gastric dilation and volvulus (GDV). Cases were retrospectively reviewed for history, clinical findings and outcome. Gastric distension was measured by caudal gastric margin (CGM), level with lumbar vertebrae, on a lateral abdominal radiograph. Frequent characteristics of dogs with FE included tachycardia, tachypnoea, hyperproteinaemia, increased base excess (BE), mild hypernatraemia and hyperlactataemia. There was overlap in CGM between dogs with GDV (CGM range L3 to >L6) and dogs with FE (CGM range dogs with GDV, lactate concentration in dogs with FE was not associated with CGM or BE. Dogs with FE mostly received medical intervention consisting of fluid therapy and analgesia, and all dogs survived to discharge. In conclusion, dogs with FE frequently presented with acid-base and electrolyte derangements, including hyperlactataemia. While dogs with FE can have gastric distension as severe as that seen with GDV, outcome with supportive care only is excellent. © British Veterinary Association (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Associations between Domestic-Dog Morphology and Behaviour Scores in the Dog Mentality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Holly R.; McGreevy, Paul D.; Starling, Melissa J.; Forkman, Bjorn

    2016-01-01

    The domestic dog shows a wide range of morphologies, that humans have selected for in the process of creating unique breeds. Recent studies have revealed correlations between changes in morphology and behaviour as reported by owners. For example, as height and weight decrease, many undesirable behaviours (non-social fear, hyperactivity and attention seeking) become more apparent. The current study aimed to explore more of these correlations, but this time used reports from trained observers. Phenotypic measurements were recorded from a range of common dog breeds (n = 45) and included cephalic index (CI: the ratio of skull width to skull length), bodyweight, height and sex. These data were then correlated with results from the Dog Mentality Assessment (DMA), which involves trained observers scoring a dog’s reaction to stimuli presented over 10 standardised subtests. Each subtest is designed to evoke a behavioural response. Backward elimination and weighted step-wise regression revealed that shorter dogs demonstrated more aggressive tendencies, reacting defensively toward both assistants dressed as ghosts (p = 0.045), and to a dummy (p = 0.008). Taller dogs were more affectionate when greeting and being handled by humans (p = 0.007, p = <0.001, respectively). Taller dogs were also more cooperative (p = <0.001), and playful (p = 0.001) with humans than shorter dogs. Heavier dogs were more inquisitive toward a dummy (p = 0.011), to the source of a metallic noise (p = 0.010) and to an assistant (p = 0.003). Heavier dogs were also more attentive to the ghosts (p = 0.013). In comparison, lighter dogs were cautious of a dummy (p = <0.001) and fearful of the sound of a gunshot (p = <0.001). Lighter dogs were also cautious of, and demonstrated prolonged fearfulness toward, the source of metallic noise (p = <0.001, p = <0.034, respectively). With a far larger sample and the advantage of third-party reporting (which overcomes potential owner bias), the current findings build

  20. SALMONELLOSIS IN DOGS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    On the basis of examinations of dogs for salmonellosis , during three years in Prague and its environs, in vivo (from faeces) as well as post mortem...than those given by a majority of foreign authors. The most frequent agents of salmonellosis in dogs are the typical zooanthropo-pathogenic types, such...of transmission of salmonellosis from dog to man, as well as a source of infection in proved toxic infections of men with salmonellae.

  1. Primary nodal hemangiosarcoma in four dogs.

    PubMed

    Chan, Catherine M; Zwahlen, Courtney H; de Lorimier, Louis-Philippe; Yeomans, Stephen M; Hoffmann, Karon L; Moore, Antony S

    2016-11-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION 4 dogs with a slow-growing mass in the cervical region were evaluated. CLINICAL FINDINGS All dogs had no clinical signs at the time of the evaluation. There was no apparent evidence of visceral metastases or other primary tumor based on available CT or MRI data for any dog. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME For each dog, surgery to remove the mass was performed. Histologic examination of the excised tissue revealed a completely excised grade 1 or 2 lymph node hemangiosarcoma. All dogs received adjuvant chemotherapy; 2 dogs underwent curative intent chemotherapy, 1 dog underwent metronomic treatment with cyclophosphamide, and 1 dog underwent metronomic treatment with chlorambucil. The survival time was 259 days in 1 dog; 3 dogs were still alive 615, 399, and 365 days after surgery. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Primary nodal hemangiosarcoma in dogs is a rare and, to the authors' knowledge, previously undescribed disease that appears to develop in the cervical lymph nodes as a slow-growing mass or masses. Surgical excision and adjunct treatment resulted in long survival times for 3 of the 4 dogs of the present report. Given the aggressive biologic behavior of hemangiosarcomas in other body locations, adjunct chemotherapy should be considered for affected dogs, although its role in the cases described in this report was unclear. Additional clinical information is required to further characterize the biologic behavior of this tumor type and determine the expected survival times and associated risk factors in dogs.

  2. Mitral stenosis in 15 dogs.

    PubMed

    Lehmkuhl, L B; Ware, W A; Bonagura, J D

    1994-01-01

    Mitral stenosis was diagnosed in 15 young to middle-aged dogs. There were 5 Newfoundlands and 4 bull terriers affected, suggesting a breed predisposition for this disorder. Clinical signs included cough, dyspnea, exercise intolerance, and syncope. Soft left apical diastolic murmurs were heard only in 4 dogs, whereas 8 dogs had systolic murmurs characteristic of mitral regurgitation. Left atrial enlargement was the most prominent radiographic feature. Left-sided congestive heart failure was detected by radiographs in 11 dogs within 1 year of diagnosis. Electrocardiographic abnormalities varied among dogs and included atrial and ventricular enlargement, as well as atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Abnormalities on M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiograms included abnormal diastolic motion of the mitral valve characterized by decreased leaflet separation, valve doming, concordant motion of the parietal mitral valve leaflet, and a decreased E-to-F slope. Increased mitral valve inflow velocities and prolonged pressure half-times were detected by Doppler echocardiography. Cardiac catheterization, performed in 8 dogs, documented a diastolic pressure gradient between the left atrial, pulmonary capillary wedge, or pulmonary artery diastolic pressures and the left ventricular diastolic pressure. Necropsy showed mitral stenosis caused by thickened, fused mitral valve leaflets in 5 dogs and a supramitral ring in another dog. The outcome in affected dogs was poor; 9 of 15 dogs were euthanatized or died by 2 1/2 years of age.

  3. Lymphocytic hypophysitis in a dog with diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Meij, B P; Voorhout, G; Gerritsen, R J; Grinwis, G C M; Ijzer, J

    2012-11-01

    An 8-year-old male German longhaired pointer was referred for diabetes insipidus responsive to treatment with desmopressin. The dog had polyuria and polydipsia, exercise intolerance and a dull hair coat. Plasma concentrations of thyroid-stimulating hormone, thyroxine, growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 were decreased; plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) was slightly elevated and plasma α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) was within the reference range. Computed tomography revealed a heterogeneously contrast-enhancing pituitary mass compressing the hypothalamus. Transsphenoidal hypophysectomy was performed and microscopical examination of the surgical biopsy samples revealed hypophysitis without evidence of pituitary adenoma. The hypophysitis was characterized by marked lymphocytic infiltration of the adenohypophysis that contained a mixed population of neuroendocrine cells expressing GH, ACTH or α-MSH. The lymphocytes were identified as T cells, resulting in a final diagnosis of lymphocytic hypophysitis strongly resembling human primary lymphocytic hypophysitis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Factors associated with daily walking of dogs.

    PubMed

    Westgarth, Carri; Christian, Hayley E; Christley, Robert M

    2015-05-19

    Regular physical activity is beneficial to the health of both people and animals. The role of regular exercise undertaken together, such as dog walking, is a public health interest of mutual benefit. Exploration of barriers and incentives to regular dog walking by owners is now required so that effective interventions to promote it can be designed. This study explored a well-characterised cross-sectional dataset of 276 dogs and owners from Cheshire, UK, for evidence of factors associated with the dog being walked once or more per day. Factors independently associated with daily walking included: number of dogs owned (multiple (vs. single) dogs negatively associated); size (medium and possibly large dogs (vs. small) positively associated); and number of people in the household (more people negatively associated). Furthermore, a number of factors related to the dog-owner relationship and the dog's behaviour were associated with daily walking, including: having acquired the dog for a hobby (positively associated); dog lying on furniture (positively associated); dog lying on laps (negatively associated); growling at household members (negatively associated); and playing chase games with the dog (negatively associated). These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the strength and nature of the human-dog relationship incentivises dog walking, and that behavioural and demographic factors may affect dog walking via this mechanism. Future studies need to investigate how dog demographic and behavioural factors, plus owner behavioural factors and perceptions of the dog, influence the dog-human relationship in respect to the perceived support and motivation a dog can provide for walking.

  5. VARIABILITY IN THE ULTRASONOGRAPHIC APPEARANCE OF THE PANCREAS IN HEALTHY DOGS COMPARED TO DOGS WITH HYPERADRENOCORTICISM.

    PubMed

    Granger, L Abbigail; Hilferty, Michael; Francis, Taylor; Steiner, Jörg M; Gaschen, Lorrie

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotally, an unusually hyperechoic pancreas can be found in seemingly healthy dogs on ultrasound examination and the prevalence and clinical significance of this finding is unknown. The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of a hyperechoic and/or heterogenous pancreas in healthy dogs and correlate these findings to weight, age, and body condition score (BCS). An additional objective was to describe the prevalence of a hyperechoic and/or heterogenous pancreas in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism and compare this to the healthy dogs. Pancreata of 74 healthy dogs were evaluated prospectively and pancreatic echogenicity and echotexture were graded. Each dog's age, BCS, and weight were recorded. Dogs were screened for health by physical examination, serum chemistry panel, urine specific gravity, and a canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity assay. Pancreatic images for 92 dogs having hyperadrenocorticism were also reviewed and pancreatic echogenicity and echotexture were recorded. The prevalence of pancreatic hyperechogenicity in normal dogs was 7% (5 of 74) and heterogeneity was 40% (30 of 74). No correlation existed between pancreatic echogenicity and weight, age, or BCS (P > 0.1 for all sets). A statistically significant increase in the proportion of dogs having a hyperechoic pancreas was found in the hyperadrenocorticism sample of dogs (40%, 37 of 92, P < 0.0001). The underlying cause of pancreatic variability in the few healthy dogs and in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism is unknown and the varying appearance of the pancreas in these samples confounds interpretation of diseases such as chronic pancreatitis. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  6. Review on Dog Rabies Vaccination Coverage in Africa: A Question of Dog Accessibility or Cost Recovery?

    PubMed Central

    Jibat, Tariku; Hogeveen, Henk; Mourits, Monique C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rabies still poses a significant human health problem throughout most of Africa, where the majority of the human cases results from dog bites. Mass dog vaccination is considered to be the most effective method to prevent rabies in humans. Our objective was to systematically review research articles on dog rabies parenteral vaccination coverage in Africa in relation to dog accessibility and vaccination cost recovery arrangement (i.e.free of charge or owner charged). Methodology/Principal Findings A systematic literature search was made in the databases of CAB abstracts (EBSCOhost and OvidSP), Scopus, Web of Science, PubMed, Medline (EBSCOhost and OvidSP) and AJOL (African Journal Online) for peer reviewed articles on 1) rabies control, 2) dog rabies vaccination coverage and 3) dog demography in Africa. Identified articles were subsequently screened and selected using predefined selection criteria like year of publication (viz. ≥ 1990), type of study (cross sectional), objective(s) of the study (i.e. vaccination coverage rates, dog demographics and financial arrangements of vaccination costs), language of publication (English) and geographical focus (Africa). The selection process resulted in sixteen peer reviewed articles which were used to review dog demography and dog ownership status, and dog rabies vaccination coverage throughout Africa. The main review findings indicate that 1) the majority (up to 98.1%) of dogs in African countries are owned (and as such accessible), 2) puppies younger than 3 months of age constitute a considerable proportion (up to 30%) of the dog population and 3) male dogs are dominating in numbers (up to 3.6 times the female dog population). Dog rabies parenteral vaccination coverage was compared between “free of charge” and “owner charged” vaccination schemes by the technique of Meta-analysis. Results indicate that the rabies vaccination coverage following a free of charge vaccination scheme (68%) is closer to the

  7. Biological effects of {sup 137}CsCl injected in beagle dogs of different dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Nikula, K.J.; Boecker, B.B.; Griffith, W.C.

    The toxicity of {sup 137}Cs in the beagle dog was investigated at the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) as part of programs to evaluate the biological effects of both radionuclides in atomic bomb fallout and internally deposited fission-product radionuclides. In the ITRI study, young adult dogs were exposed once by intravenous injection to a range of {sup 137}Cs concentrations; the results have recently been published. The purpose of the present report is to summarize the ANL study and to compare the results of the two studies. At ANL, 63 dogs in three age groups (15more » juveniles, 142-151 days old; 38 young adults, 388-427 days old; and 10 middle-aged dogs, 1387-2060 days old) were given {sup 137}Cs intravenously at levels (61-162f MBq/kg) near those expected to be lethal within 30 days after injection. There were 17 control dogs from the same colony. Twenty-three of the dogs injected with {sup 137}Cs, including all middle-aged dogs, died within 52 days after injection due to hematopoietic cell damage resulting in severe pancytopenia that led to fatal hemorrhage and/or septicemia. The other significant early effect was damage to the germinal epithelium of the seminiferous tubules. The design of the ANL study revealed an age- and gender-related differential radiosensitivity for early effects. The middle-aged dogs died significantly earlier due to complications of hematological dyscrasia compared to the juvenile and young adult dogs, and the middle-aged females died significantly earlier than the middle-aged males. The most significant non-neoplastic late effects in the {sup 137}Cs-injected dogs from ANL and ITRI were atrophy of the germinal epithelium of seminiferous tubules with azoospermia, and a significant dose-dependent decrease in survival. The survival of the ANL dogs was decreased more than that of the ITRI dogs at similar radiation doses from {sup 137}Cs. 19 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.« less

  8. Dog ownership and dog walking to promote physical activity and health in patients.

    PubMed

    Epping, Jacqueline N

    2011-07-01

    Lack of physical activity is a significant risk factor for many chronic diseases and conditions and is associated with significant medical costs. Approximately half of adults and more than a third of adolescents and youth in the United States do not achieve recommended levels of physical activity. Effective population-level strategies are needed to promote activities that are practical, accessible, and sustainable and that can reach a large proportion of the population. Dog walking may be such a strategy. Walking is popular, easy, and sustainable and has a low risk of injury. Owning dogs confers many health benefits, and dog walking, in particular, can help promote physical activity and improve health. Physicians and other health care providers can play a unique and integral role in promoting physical activity among patients by recommending dog walking both to dog owners and to non-dog owners as a purposeful, enjoyable, and sustainable form of regular physical activity.

  9. 78 FR 62307 - German-American Day, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-16

    ...-American Day, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Since the first German... opportunity on our shores. On German-American Day, we celebrate the vibrant threads of German heritage woven..., 2013, as German-American Day. I encourage all Americans to learn more about the history of German...

  10. An Introduction to Business German.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambacher, Robert

    At Millersville University (Pennsylvania), business German is taught in the German section in a two-semester introduction at the sophomore level, a junior-level advanced course, and a senior-level translation course. These four courses are augmented by introductions to business and economics, both taught in English outside the German section.…

  11. Do Dogs Provide Information Helpfully?

    PubMed Central

    Piotti, Patrizia; Kaminski, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Dogs are particularly skilful during communicative interactions with humans. Dogs’ abilities to use human communicative cues in cooperative contexts outcompete those of other species, and might be the result of selection pressures during domestication. Dogs also produce signals to direct the attention of humans towards outside entities, a behaviour often referred to as showing behaviour. This showing behaviour in dogs is thought to be something dogs use intentionally and referentially. However, there is currently no evidence that dogs communicate helpfully, i.e. to inform an ignorant human about a target that is of interest to the human but not to the dog. Communicating with a helpful motive is particularly interesting because it might suggest that dogs understand the human’s goals and need for information. In study 1, we assessed whether dogs would abandon an object that they find interesting in favour of an object useful for their human partner, a random novel distractor, or an empty container. Results showed that it was mainly self-interest that was driving the dogs’ behaviour. The dogs mainly directed their behaviour towards the object they had an interest in, but dogs were more persistent when showing the object relevant to the human, suggesting that to some extent they took the humans interest into account. Another possibility is that dogs’ behaviour was driven by an egocentric motivation to interact with novel targets and that the dogs’ neophila might have masked their helpful tendencies. Therefore, in study 2 the dogs had initial access to both objects, and were expected to indicate only one (relevant or distractor). The human partner interacted with the dog using vocal communication in half of the trials, and remaining silent in the other half. Dogs from both experimental groups, i.e. indicating the relevant object or indicating the distractor, established joint attention with the human. However, the human’s vocal communication and the presence

  12. Creating Germans Abroad: White Education and the Colonial Condition in German Southwest Africa, 1894-1914

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walther, Daniel Joseph

    2013-01-01

    From the perspective of German colonial supporters and authorities, appropriate white education in the settler colony of Southwest Africa (SWA) was essential for maintaining German hegemony in the territory. In order to reach this objective, the German colonial administration in SWA, with assistance from pedagogues and institutions in Germany,…

  13. Beware of the dog? An observational study of dog-related musculoskeletal injury in the UK.

    PubMed

    Willmott, H; Greenheld, N; Goddard, R

    2012-05-01

    Although owning a dog confers numerous health benefits, dogs can cause falls resulting in musculoskeletal injury and fractures. We conducted a prospective observational study over a two-month period to investigate the incidence and epidemiology of dog-related musculoskeletal injury. All patients attending the Emergency Department, trauma ward or fracture clinic were asked whether their injury was caused by a dog. Thirty-seven patients were identified. There were 26 fractures, 10 soft-tissue injuries and one head injury. Seventeen patients were admitted to the hospital and sixteen cases required an operation. Older people were statistically more likely to sustain a fracture (p=0.0003) or require hospital admission (p=0.02). Mechanisms of injury are discussed and can be classified into direct or indirectly caused by the dog. The most common injury mechanism was being pulled over by a dog on a lead. Injury avoidance strategies are discussed. We conclude that dogs are a potential hazard, particularly to the elderly and the morbidity associated with these injuries may offset the health benefits conferred by dog ownership. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Size and demography pattern of the domestic dog population in Bhutan: Implications for dog population management and disease control.

    PubMed

    Rinzin, Karma; Tenzin, Tenzin; Robertson, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the demography of domestic dogs is essential to plan the dog population management and rabies control program. In this study, we estimated the owned and stray dog population and the proportion of owned dogs that are free-roaming in Bhutan. For this, a cross-sectional household surveys were conducted in six districts (both urban and rural areas) and two border towns in southern Bhutan. The population estimation was done by extrapolation of the mean number of dogs per household and dogs per person, whilst mark-resight survey was conducted to estimate the proportion of owned dogs that were free-roaming. A total of 1,301 (rural:585; urban:716) respondents (one per household) were interviewed of which 173 households (24.4%) in urban areas owned 237 dogs whilst 238 households (40.8%) in rural areas owned 353 dogs. The mean number of dogs per dog owning household was estimated to be 1.44 (urban:1.37 dogs; rural:1.48 dogs) and dogs per household was estimated to be 0.45 (urban:0.33; rural:0.60). The dog: human ratio was 1:16.30 (0.06 dogs per person) in urban areas and 1:8.43 (0.12 dogs per person) in rural areas. The total owned dog population based on the mean number of dogs per household and dogs per person were estimated to be 65,312 and 71,245 in the country, respectively. The male: female ratio of the owned dog was 1.31:1 in urban areas and 2.05:1 in rural areas. Majority of the dogs were local non-descript breeds in both urban (60.8%) and rural (78%) areas, and the most common source was acquisition from friends or family (44.7%). The stray dog population in Bhutan was estimated to be 48,379 (urban:22,772; rural:25,607). Of the total estimated owned dog population in the two border towns, the proportion that were found free-roaming was estimated to be 31%. The different dog population estimation methods were compared and discussed in this paper. This study generated baseline data on the demographic patterns of the owned and stray dogs in Bhutan which

  15. Rabies Vaccination Targets for Stray Dog Populations

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Tiffany; Davis, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    The role of stray dogs in the persistence of domestic dog rabies, and whether removal of such dogs is beneficial, remains contentious issues for control programs seeking to eliminate rabies. While a community might reach the WHO vaccination target of 70% for dogs that can be handled, the stray or neighborhood dogs that are too wary of humans to be held are a more problematic population to vaccinate. Here, we present a method to estimate vaccination targets for stray dogs when the dog population is made up of stray, free-roaming, and confined dogs, where the latter two types are considered to have an identifiable owner. The control effort required for stray dogs is determined by the type-reproduction number, T1, the number of stray dogs infected by one rabid stray dog either directly or via any chain of infection involving owned dogs. Like the basic reproduction number R0 for single host populations, T1 determines the vaccination effort required to control the spread of disease when control is targeted at one host type, and there is a mix of host types. The application of T1 to rabies in mixed populations of stray and owned dogs is novel. We show that the outcome is sensitive to the vaccination coverage in the owned dog population, such that if vaccination rates of owned dogs were too low then no control effort targeting stray dogs is able to control or eliminate rabies. The required vaccination level also depends on the composition of the dog population, where a high proportion of either stray or free-roaming dogs implies unrealistically high vaccination levels are required to prevent rabies. We find that the required control effort is less sensitive to continuous culling that increases the death rate of stray dogs than to changes in the carrying capacity of the stray dog population. PMID:28451589

  16. Highly Educated Men Establish Strong Emotional Links with Their Dogs: A Study with Monash Dog Owner Relationship Scale (MDORS) in Committed Spanish Dog Owners

    PubMed Central

    Bulbena, Antoni; Tobeña, Adolf

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of the human-animal bond may be influenced by both owner-related and dog-related factors. A study was designed to explore the existence of different dog ownership patterns and their related factors. We created an on line questionnaire that included demographic questions about the dog and the owner, a Spanish version of the Monash Dog Owner Relationship Scale (MDORS) and a validated measure of satisfaction with life (Cantril’s ladder). We collected 1140 valid responses from adult dog owners, who were recruited using the client databases of Spanish veterinary practices. We explored the presence of groups within the population using Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of the MDORS variables combined with Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA). Two groups were found; Group I having a higher level of emotional involvement with their dogs compared with Group II. Binary logistic regression was used to explore demographic factors that influenced group membership. Four variables were significantly associated with membership of Group I (p<0.0001); male gender of the owner (OR = 32.36), high school level of maximum educational attainment (OR = 0.052), university level of maximum educational attainment (OR = 8.652), and owner Cantril’s score (OR = 0.807). The results obtained from this convenience sample demonstrate that different patterns of dog-ownership may be present within a population of owner-dog dyads, and that certain owner characteristics are associated with the type of owner-dog relationship. Future research could apply a similar approach to different types of sample population in order to identify specific patterns of dog-ownership. PMID:28033397

  17. Highly Educated Men Establish Strong Emotional Links with Their Dogs: A Study with Monash Dog Owner Relationship Scale (MDORS) in Committed Spanish Dog Owners.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Paula; Bowen, Jonathan; Bulbena, Antoni; Tobeña, Adolf; Fatjó, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of the human-animal bond may be influenced by both owner-related and dog-related factors. A study was designed to explore the existence of different dog ownership patterns and their related factors. We created an on line questionnaire that included demographic questions about the dog and the owner, a Spanish version of the Monash Dog Owner Relationship Scale (MDORS) and a validated measure of satisfaction with life (Cantril's ladder). We collected 1140 valid responses from adult dog owners, who were recruited using the client databases of Spanish veterinary practices. We explored the presence of groups within the population using Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of the MDORS variables combined with Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA). Two groups were found; Group I having a higher level of emotional involvement with their dogs compared with Group II. Binary logistic regression was used to explore demographic factors that influenced group membership. Four variables were significantly associated with membership of Group I (p<0.0001); male gender of the owner (OR = 32.36), high school level of maximum educational attainment (OR = 0.052), university level of maximum educational attainment (OR = 8.652), and owner Cantril's score (OR = 0.807). The results obtained from this convenience sample demonstrate that different patterns of dog-ownership may be present within a population of owner-dog dyads, and that certain owner characteristics are associated with the type of owner-dog relationship. Future research could apply a similar approach to different types of sample population in order to identify specific patterns of dog-ownership.

  18. Naturally Occurring Adrenocortical Insufficiency--An Epidemiological Study Based on a Swedish-Insured Dog Population of 525,028 Dogs.

    PubMed

    Hanson, J M; Tengvall, K; Bonnett, B N; Hedhammar, Å

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring adrenocortical insufficiency (NOAI) in dogs is considered an uncommon disease with good prognosis with hormonal replacement treatment. However, there are no epidemiological studies with estimates for the general dog population. To investigate the epidemiological characteristics of NOAI in a large population of insured dogs. Data were derived from 525,028 client-owned dogs insured by a Swedish insurance company representing 2,364,652 dog-years at risk (DYAR) during the period between 1995-2006. Retrospective cohort study. Incidence rates, prevalences, and relative risks for dogs with NOAI (AI with no previous claim for hypercortisolism), were calculated for the whole dog population, and for subgroups divided by breed and sex. Mortality rates were calculated and compared in dogs with NOAI and the remaining dogs overall. In total 534 dogs were identified with NOAI. The overall incidence was 2.3 cases per 10,000 DYAR. The relative risk of disease was significantly higher in the Portuguese Water Dog, Standard Poodle, Bearded Collie, Cairn Terrier, and Cocker Spaniel compared with other breeds combined. Female dogs overall were at higher risk of developing AI than male dogs (RR 1.85; 95% CI, 1.55-2.22; P < .001). The relative risk of death was 1.9 times higher in dogs with NOAI than in dogs overall. The data supports the existence of breed-specific differences in incidence rates of NOAI in dogs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  19. Mitral annulus motion as determined by M-mode echocardiography in normal dogs and dogs with cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Schober, K E; Fuentes, V L

    2001-01-01

    M-mode echocardiography was used to assess apical mitral annulus motion (MAM) in 103 normal dogs and 101 dogs with cardiac disease, to obtain information on systolic left ventricular long axis function. In normal dogs, a close relationship was found between MAM and body weight (r = 0.80, P < 0.001). There was a weak correlation between MAM and heart rate (r = -0.25, P < 0.05), but no correlation between MAM and age or left ventricular shortening fraction (P > 0.05). Mean MAM (95% confidence intervals) were established for normal dogs of differing body weight, and were 0.70 cm (0.65 to 0.75) in dogs < 15 kg, 1.08 cm (1.03 to 1.13) in dogs weighing 15 to 40 kg, and 1.51 cm (1.21 to 1.81) in dogs > 40 kg. "Cut-off" values to define decreased MAM for normal dogs of differing body weight were 0.45 cm (dogs < 15 kg), 0.80 cm (dogs 15-40 kg), and 1.20 cm (dogs > 40 kg). In dogs with cardiac disease, median MAM was normal in mitral valve endocardiosis or aortic stenosis, but significantly decreased (P < 0.05) in dilated cardiomyopathy. All dogs with mitral valve endocardiosis (n = 54) or aortic stenosis (n = 26) had MAM above the above-mentioned "cut-off" values, suggesting normal or increased left ventricular longitudinal systolic shortening, whereas 81% (17/21) of dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy had MAM below the "cut-off" value, indicating decreased long axis systolic function. It is concluded that MAM may be used to evaluate systolic left ventricular long axis performance in dogs and may add useful information on global left ventricular contraction dynamics.

  20. Effects of gender and parental status on knowledge and attitudes of dog owners regarding dog aggression toward children.

    PubMed

    Reisner, Ilana R; Shofer, Frances S

    2008-11-01

    To assess the effects of gender and parental status of dog owners on knowledge of and attitudes toward factors associated with dog aggression directed toward children. Prevalence survey. 804 dog owners. A questionnaire was distributed to owners of all dogs examined at a university veterinary hospital between January and April 2007. Respondents were asked to indicate whether they agreed or disagreed with 37 statements regarding dog behavior and safety practices for dog-child interactions. Responses were compared between women and men and between parents and nonparents. Of 804 questionnaires that were completed, 421 (52%) were completed by parents and 598 (74%) were completed by women. There was a general lack of knowledge regarding dog behavior and safety practices for dog-child interactions. Women were more knowledgeable than men, regardless of parental status. Mothers were more knowledgeable than fathers and female nonparents regarding interactions with young children and had greater awareness than female nonparents and males (regardless of parental status) regarding interactions with infants and toddlers. Results suggested that dog owners frequently had only limited knowledge of dog behavior and often were unaware of factors that increased the risk of dog bites to children. The veterinary examination presents an important opportunity for education of dog owners regarding dog behavior, including body language, social signals, resource-guarding, and self-defense, and the risks of dog bites to infants and young children.

  1. Die Deutschen in Wisconsin (Germans in Wisconsin).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

    The following curriculum units comprise this course book: (1) Germans in a New Home, (2) Contributions of the Germans in Wisconsin, (3) A Letter to Germany, (4) Germans Come to Kingston, (5) First a Soldier, Then a Man of the Church (about Heinrich von Rohr), (6) A Visiting German, and (7) Germans and Music. Each unit begins with a reading of…

  2. How do German bilingual schoolchildren process German prepositions? - A study on language-motor interactions.

    PubMed

    Ahlberg, Daniela Katharina; Bischoff, Heike; Strozyk, Jessica Vanessa; Bryant, Doreen; Kaup, Barbara

    2018-01-01

    While much support is found for embodied language processing in a first language (L1), evidence for embodiment in second language (L2) processing is rather sparse. In a recent study, we found support for L2 embodiment, but also an influence of L1 on L2 processing in adult learners. In the present study, we compared bilingual schoolchildren who speak German as one of their languages with monolingual German schoolchildren. We presented the German prepositions auf (on), über (above), and unter (under) in a Stroop-like task. Upward or downward responses were made depending on the font colour, resulting in compatible and incompatible trials. We found compatibility effects for all children, but in contrast to the adult sample, there were no processing differences between the children depending on the nature of their other language, suggesting that the processing of German prepositions of bilingual children is embodied in a similar way as in monolingual German children.

  3. Collection Development "Dog Care & Training": The Well-Behaved Dog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpi, Kristine M.; Sherman, Barbara L.

    2008-01-01

    Dogs are indeed people's best friends. A majority of owners report that their dog is a "member of the family," and that acceptable canine behavior and optimal care are high priorities for them. The human-animal bond, the close connection between people and their pets, is forged by positive interactions, but unacceptable canine behaviors that…

  4. Evaluation of pulsatile plasma concentrations of growth hormone in healthy dogs and dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Beijerink, Niek J; Lee, Wei M; Stokhof, Arnold A; Voorhout, George; Mol, Jan A; Kooistra, Hans S

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate plasma concentrations of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in healthy dogs and large-breed dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). 8 dogs with DCM and 8 healthy control dogs of comparable age and body weight. Blood samples for determination of the pulsatile plasma GH profile were collected from all dogs at 10-minute intervals between 8:00 am and 8:00 pm. Plasma IGF-I concentration was determined in the blood sample collected at 8:00 am. No significant differences in plasma IGF-I concentrations, basal plasma GH concentration, GH pulse frequency, area under the curve above the zero line and above the baseline for GH, and GH pulse amplitude were found between dogs with DCM and control dogs. Results did not provide evidence for an association between DCM in dogs and a reduction in plasma concentrations of GH or IGF-I. Therefore, reported positive effects of GH administration are most likely attributable to local effects in the heart.

  5. An investigation of the association between socio-demographic factors, dog-exercise requirements, and the amount of walking dogs receive.

    PubMed

    Degeling, Chris; Burton, Lindsay; McCormack, Gavin R

    2012-07-01

    Risk factors associated with canine obesity include the amount of walking a dog receives. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between canine exercise requirements, socio-demographic factors, and dog-walking behaviors in winter in Calgary. Dog owners, from a cross-sectional study which included a random sample of adults, were asked their household income, domicile type, gender, age, education level, number and breed(s) of dog(s) owned, and frequency and time spent dog-walking in a usual week. Canine exercise requirements were found to be significantly (P < 0.05) positively associated with the minutes pet dogs were walked, as was the owner being a female. Moreover, dog walking frequency, but not minutes of dog walking, was significantly associated with residing in attached housing (i.e., apartments). Different types of dogs have different exercise requirements to maintain optimal health. Understanding the role of socio-demographic factors and dog-related characteristics such as exercise requirements on dog-walking behaviors is essential for helping veterinarians and owners develop effective strategies to prevent and manage canine obesity. Furthermore, encouraging regular dog-walking has the potential to improve the health of pet dogs, and that of their owners.

  6. The Blue Dog: evaluation of an interactive software program to teach young children how to interact safely with dogs.

    PubMed

    Schwebel, David C; Morrongiello, Barbara A; Davis, Aaron L; Stewart, Julia; Bell, Melissa

    2012-04-01

    Pre-post-randomized design evaluated The Blue Dog, a dog safety software program. 76 children aged 3.5-6 years completed 3 tasks to evaluate dog safety pre- and postintervention: (a) pictures (recognition of safe/risky behavior), (b) dollhouse (recall of safe behavior via simulated dollhouse scenarios), and (c) live dog (actual behavior with unfamiliar live dog). Following preintervention evaluation, children were randomly assigned to dog or fire safety conditions, each involving 3 weeks of home computer software use. Children using Blue Dog had greater change in recognition of risky dog situations than children learning fire safety. No between-group differences emerged in recall (dollhouse) or engagement (live-dog) in risky behavior. Families enjoyed using the software. Blue Dog taught children knowledge about safe engagement with dogs, but did not influence recall or implementation of safe behaviors. Dog bites represent a significant pediatric injury concern and continued development of effective interventions is needed.

  7. 9 CFR 93.600 - Importation of dogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Importation of dogs. 93.600 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Dogs § 93.600 Importation of dogs. (a) All dogs. Dogs from Angola... applicable requirements of this part: (1) Dogs must be accompanied by a certificate signed by a full-time...

  8. 9 CFR 93.600 - Importation of dogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Importation of dogs. 93.600 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Dogs § 93.600 Importation of dogs. (a) All dogs. Dogs from Angola... applicable requirements of this part: (1) Dogs must be accompanied by a certificate signed by a full-time...

  9. 9 CFR 93.600 - Importation of dogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Importation of dogs. 93.600 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Dogs § 93.600 Importation of dogs. (a) All dogs. Dogs from Angola... applicable requirements of this part: (1) Dogs must be accompanied by a certificate signed by a full-time...

  10. Jealousy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Harris, Christine R; Prouvost, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that jealousy is unique to humans, partially because of the complex cognitions often involved in this emotion. However, from a functional perspective, one might expect that an emotion that evolved to protect social bonds from interlopers might exist in other social species, particularly one as cognitively sophisticated as the dog. The current experiment adapted a paradigm from human infant studies to examine jealousy in domestic dogs. We found that dogs exhibited significantly more jealous behaviors (e.g., snapping, getting between the owner and object, pushing/touching the object/owner) when their owners displayed affectionate behaviors towards what appeared to be another dog as compared to nonsocial objects. These results lend support to the hypothesis that jealousy has some "primordial" form that exists in human infants and in at least one other social species besides humans.

  11. Jealousy in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Christine R.; Prouvost, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that jealousy is unique to humans, partially because of the complex cognitions often involved in this emotion. However, from a functional perspective, one might expect that an emotion that evolved to protect social bonds from interlopers might exist in other social species, particularly one as cognitively sophisticated as the dog. The current experiment adapted a paradigm from human infant studies to examine jealousy in domestic dogs. We found that dogs exhibited significantly more jealous behaviors (e.g., snapping, getting between the owner and object, pushing/touching the object/owner) when their owners displayed affectionate behaviors towards what appeared to be another dog as compared to nonsocial objects. These results lend support to the hypothesis that jealousy has some “primordial” form that exists in human infants and in at least one other social species besides humans. PMID:25054800

  12. Evaluation of the Dogs, Physical Activity, and Walking (Dogs PAW) Intervention: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Richards, Elizabeth A; Ogata, Niwako; Cheng, Ching-Wei

    2016-01-01

    To facilitate physical activity (PA) adoption and maintenance, promotion of innovative population-level strategies that focus on incorporating moderate-intensity lifestyle PAs are needed. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the Dogs, Physical Activity, and Walking intervention, a 3-month, social cognitive theory (SCT), e-mail-based PA intervention. In a longitudinal, repeated-measures design, 49 dog owners were randomly assigned to a control (n = 25) or intervention group (n = 24). The intervention group received e-mail messages (twice weekly for 4 weeks and weekly for 8 weeks) designed to influence SCT constructs of self-efficacy, self-regulation, outcome expectations and expectancies, and social support. At baseline and every 3 months through 1 year, participants completed self-reported questionnaires of individual, interpersonal, and PA variables. Linear mixed models were used to assess for significant differences in weekly minutes of dog walking and theoretical constructs between groups (intervention and control) across time. To test self-efficacy as a mediator of social support for dog walking, tests for mediation were conducted using the bootstrapping technique. With the exception of Month 9, participants in the intervention group accumulated significantly more weekly minutes of dog walking than the control group. On average, the intervention group accumulated 58.4 more minutes (SD = 18.1) of weekly dog walking than the control group (p < .05). Self-efficacy partially mediated the effect of social support variables on dog walking. Results indicate that a simple SCT-based e-mail intervention is effective in increasing and maintaining an increase in dog walking among dog owners at 12-month follow-up. In light of these findings, it may be advantageous to design dog walking interventions that focus on increasing self-efficacy for dog walking by fostering social support.

  13. Dog Owners' Interaction Styles: Their Components and Associations with Reactions of Pet Dogs to a Social Threat.

    PubMed

    Cimarelli, Giulia; Turcsán, Borbála; Bánlaki, Zsófia; Range, Friederike; Virányi, Zsófia

    2016-01-01

    The bond dogs develop with their owner received increased attention in the last years but no study aimed at characterizing the way in which owners interact with their dogs in their daily life and how this might influence dog behavior. In order to examine how dog owners interact with their dogs, we first analyzed the behavior of 220 dog owners in 8 different standardized situations involving the owner-dog dyad. We extracted 3 behavioral factors related to " Owner Warmth ," " Owner Social Support ," and " Owner Control ." Further, we investigated whether owner personality, gender and age are associated with these three factors. Results indicated that older owners scored lower in " Owner Warmth " and in " Owner Social Support " and higher in " Owner Control " than younger owners. Furthermore, owners scoring high in " Owner Control " scored lower in the personality trait Openness and owners scoring high in " Owner Social Support " scored lower in the personality trait Conscientiousness. Finally, we also analyzed whether the dogs' reaction to an unfamiliar woman's threatening approach was associated with the owners' interaction styles. Results showed that dogs that searched for proximity of their owners during the threatening situation had owners scoring higher in " Owner Warmth ," as compared to dogs that reacted more autonomously, approaching the unfamiliar experimenter. Analogies between dog-owner interaction styles and human parenting styles are discussed considering the implications of the present findings for human social psychology as well as the practical relevance for dog welfare and human safety.

  14. [Comparison of fluoride concentrations in human, dog, fox and raccoon dog bones from northwestern Poland].

    PubMed

    Palczewska-Komsa, Mirona

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the XXth there has been a constant increase in fluoride (F-) emissions into the environment, mainly due to the development of industry, the fluoridation of drinking water, and the widespread use of toothpaste containing fluoride. All these factors have resulted in an intensive accumulation of F- in the bodies of vertebrates, mainly in their bones. It is therefore reasonable to estimate the F- concentration in humans and other long-lived mammals. Accordingly, ecotoxicologists worldwide have looked for mammalian species that may serve as good bioindicators of environmental fluoride pollution. In contrast to ungulates, long-lived domestic mammals and wild carnivores have rarely been used for this purpose (including the dog, fox and raccoon dog). The main aims of this study were to: 1) investigate F- concentrations in bones obtained from humans, dog, fox and raccoon dog from northwestern Poland, 2) perform intra- and inter-specific comparisons of F- concentrations in the studied mammalian bones against the background of environmental and living conditions, 3) examine the relationship between concentrations of F- in bones and the age or age category of the studied mammals. The study material comprised bones of the hip joint obtained from 36 patients who underwent hip replacement in Szczecin, 43 dogs from Szczecin veterinary clinics, 32 foxes and 18 raccoon dogs provided by hunters, with the whole test material consisting of 129 samples. The indications of F- (using potentiometry with Thermo Orion ion-selective electrodes) were performed in triplicate. The F- concentration was expressed on a dry weight basis. Interspecific analysis showed that the largest number of differences in the concentrations of F- were between the fox and raccoon, and then between the dog and fox, and then between the dog and the wild canids (foxes and raccoon dogs together). Close statistically significant differences were also found between the samples from humans and the

  15. 9 CFR 93.600 - Importation of dogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Importation of dogs. 93.600 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Dogs § 93.600 Importation of dogs. (a) All dogs. Dogs from any region of...) Dogs must be accompanied by a certificate signed by a full-time salaried veterinary official of the...

  16. 9 CFR 93.600 - Importation of dogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Importation of dogs. 93.600 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Dogs § 93.600 Importation of dogs. (a) All dogs. Dogs from any region of...) Dogs must be accompanied by a certificate signed by a full-time salaried veterinary official of the...

  17. [German Urological Associations under National Socialism].

    PubMed

    Krischel, M; Moll, F; Fangerau, H

    2011-09-01

    The Deutsche Gesellschaft für Urologie (German Urological Association), established in 1907, was a German-Austrian medical society in which Jewish physicians held important positions. When the Nazis seized power in 1933, the Austrian Hans Rubritius was president of the society. The non-German presidency and the exclusion of Jewish colleagues from the professional society and medical practice led to a halt of the society's activities. At the same time in the mid 1930s, German urologists founded the Gesellschaft Reichsdeutscher Urologen (Association of Reichs-German Urologists) whose members aligned themselves with Nazi health policies and in turn received professional and personal benefits.

  18. German Teaching: The German Journal of the Association for Language Learning, 1994-1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brien, Alistair, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This journal focuses on teaching and learning German as a foreign language. Selected articles include the following: "Give Students Autonomy!" German in Great Britain"; "Open Access and Listening Skills"; "Communication with Computers"; "The Quest for Fluency and Accuracy"; "Binational Problem…

  19. Gross and histologic evaluation of hepatogastric ligaments in clinically normal dogs and dogs with gastric dilatation-volvulus.

    PubMed

    Hall, J A; Willer, R L; Seim, H B; Powers, B E

    1995-12-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate any potential structural differences in hepatogastric ligaments between clinically normal dogs and dogs with gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV). DESIGN--Case-control study. ANIMALS--Hepatogastric ligaments were examined in 13 large-breed control dogs and in 13 large-breed dogs referred for surgical treatment of GDV. PROCEDURE--Measurements and biopsies of hepatogastric ligaments were performed at the time of surgery, circumcostal gastropexy, for correction of GDV. Serial sections from each ligament were stained with H&E, Masson's trichrome, and elastin stains to assess morphology, including smooth muscle, collagen, and elastic fiber contents. RESULTS--There were no differences observed by light microscopy in incidence or degree of histopathologic alterations between the 2 groups of dogs. The lengths of hepatogastric ligaments in GDV-affected dogs, however, were significantly longer than those of control dogs (GDV-affected dogs, 7.0 [5.0 to 9.5] cm median [range]; control dogs, 5.0 [3.0 to 7.5] cm median [range]; P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS--Causality can not be inferred from this study. It is not known whether the ligaments were lengthened as a result of GDV or whether the lengthened ligaments predisposed dogs to GDV. CLINICAL RELEVANCE--This finding may reflect increased laxity of the supporting hepatogastric ligament in the right quadrant of the abdomen. An elongated ligament may permit increased stomach mobility and predispose dogs to partial or complete gastric volvulus.

  20. German for physicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Ben

    2009-04-01

    "German is the language of science" I remember my father telling me as a boy growing up in the Bronx in New York during the 1970s. As I watched astronomy programmes on TV with my father and older brothers, I imagined having to speak ceaselessly in fluent German if I was ever to become a scientist as a grown-up. But when I started my studies at university in New York in the 1980s, I realized my father's advice - sought from weekly trips to the neighbourhood public library - was way out of date. Not only did my physics professors present their research in English at conferences all around the world, but they also published in English-language journals - thus seemingly not needing a single word of German.

  1. Factors associated with canine resource guarding behaviour in the presence of dogs: A cross-sectional survey of dog owners.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jacquelyn A; Coe, Jason B; Pearl, David L; Widowski, Tina M; Niel, Lee

    2017-02-20

    Resource guarding (RG) involves the use of specific behaviour patterns to control access to an item of potential "value" (as perceived by the dog), and can be expressed in the presence of various animals, including other dogs. The current study aimed to identify factors associated with RG patterns expressed around other dogs. Dog owners (n=3068) were recruited through social media to answer questions regarding dog- and household-related factors, as well as their dog's current and past behaviour around resources in the presence of other dogs. Participants were screened for their ability to identify different forms of resource guarding from video, and were removed from the study if they incorrectly identified any of the videos provided. This resulted in a final sample of 2207 participants (n=3589 dogs). Multiple multi-level logistic regression models were developed to determine the association between independent variables of interest and RG patterns (i.e., RG aggression, avoidance, and rapid ingestion) when in the presence of other dogs. Namely, dogs living in multi-dog households were more likely to display RG aggression, avoidance, and rapid ingestion (p<0.01) compared to dogs that live without other dogs. Dogs with higher levels of impulsivity and fear were more likely to display RG aggression (p<0.001). Neutered males (p<0.01) were more likely to be RG aggressive compared to dogs of other sexes and neuter statuses. Teaching dogs to reliably "drop" items when requested was associated with a reduced likelihood of biting RG aggression (p<0.05). Distinct associative relationships between the patterns of RG in the presence of other dogs were identified. Dogs that express RG aggression were less likely to express RG avoidance or RG rapid ingestion; however, the latter two types were likely to co-occur, perhaps dependent on the type of resource involved. This suggests that dogs may be relatively more fixed in their action around items in the presence of dogs. However

  2. Prevalence of naturally occurring antibodies against dog erythrocyte antigen 7 in a population of dog erythrocyte antigen 7-negative dogs from Spain and Italy.

    PubMed

    Spada, Eva; Proverbio, Daniela; Viñals Flórez, Luis Miguel; Del Rosario Perlado Chamizo, Maria; Serra Y Gómez de la Serna, Blanca; Perego, Roberta; Baggiani, Luciana

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of naturally occurring anti-dog erythrocyte antigen (DEA) 7 antibodies in DEA 7-negative dogs from Spain and Italy. ANIMALS 252 DEA 7-negative dogs from a population of 312 dogs that were previously tested for DEA 1, DEA 4, and DEA 7. PROCEDURES A plasma sample was obtained from each dog and evaluated for anti-DEA 7 antibodies by the use of gel column agglutination. Each plasma sample underwent major crossmatching with RBCs from DEA 7-positive dogs. Samples that resulted in agglutination were then crossmatched with RBCs from DEA 1-negative, DEA 4-positive, and DEA 7-negative dogs to confirm the presence of anti-DEA 7 antibodies. Results were then used to calculate the risk for a delayed transfusion reaction in a DEA 7-negative dog with anti-DEA 7 antibodies after a transfusion with blood that was not crossmatched or typed for DEA 7. RESULTS 96 of 252 (38.1%) plasma samples contained anti-DEA 7 antibodies. A DEA 7-negative dog with anti-DEA 7 antibodies had a 5.9% chance of developing a delayed hemolytic reaction after transfusion with blood not crossmatched or typed for DEA 7. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that canine blood used for transfusion should be crossmatched with the blood or plasma of the intended recipient prior to transfusion to minimize the likelihood that the recipient will develop a hemolytic reaction associated with anti-DEA 7 antibodies. Ideal canine blood donors should be negative for both DEA 1 and DEA 7.

  3. Dog Owners' Interaction Styles: Their Components and Associations with Reactions of Pet Dogs to a Social Threat

    PubMed Central

    Cimarelli, Giulia; Turcsán, Borbála; Bánlaki, Zsófia; Range, Friederike; Virányi, Zsófia

    2016-01-01

    The bond dogs develop with their owner received increased attention in the last years but no study aimed at characterizing the way in which owners interact with their dogs in their daily life and how this might influence dog behavior. In order to examine how dog owners interact with their dogs, we first analyzed the behavior of 220 dog owners in 8 different standardized situations involving the owner-dog dyad. We extracted 3 behavioral factors related to “Owner Warmth,” “Owner Social Support,” and “Owner Control.” Further, we investigated whether owner personality, gender and age are associated with these three factors. Results indicated that older owners scored lower in “Owner Warmth” and in “Owner Social Support” and higher in “Owner Control” than younger owners. Furthermore, owners scoring high in “Owner Control” scored lower in the personality trait Openness and owners scoring high in “Owner Social Support” scored lower in the personality trait Conscientiousness. Finally, we also analyzed whether the dogs' reaction to an unfamiliar woman's threatening approach was associated with the owners' interaction styles. Results showed that dogs that searched for proximity of their owners during the threatening situation had owners scoring higher in “Owner Warmth,” as compared to dogs that reacted more autonomously, approaching the unfamiliar experimenter. Analogies between dog-owner interaction styles and human parenting styles are discussed considering the implications of the present findings for human social psychology as well as the practical relevance for dog welfare and human safety. PMID:28066298

  4. Recombinant rabies virus expressing dog GM-CSF is an efficacious oral rabies vaccine for dogs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Songqin; Wang, Zhao; Ruan, Juncheng; Tang, Lijun; Jia, Ziming; Cui, Min; Zhao, Ling; Fu, Zhen F

    2015-11-17

    Developing efficacious oral rabies vaccines is an important step to increase immunization coverage for stray dogs, which are not accessible for parenteral vaccination. Our previous studies have demonstrated that recombinant rabies virus (RABV) expressing cytokines/chemokines induces robust protective immune responses after oral immunization in mice by recruiting and activating dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells. To develop an effective oral rabies vaccine for dogs, a recombinant attenuated RABV expressing dog GM-CSF, designated as LBNSE-dGM-CSF was constructed and used for oral vaccination in a dog model. Significantly more DCs or B cells were activated in the peripheral blood of dogs vaccinated orally with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than those vaccinated with the parent virus LBNSE, particularly at 3 days post immunization (dpi). As a result, significantly higher levels of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNAs) were detected in dogs immunized with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than with the parent virus. All the immunized dogs were protected against a lethal challenge with 4500 MICLD50 of wild-type RABV SXTYD01. LBNSE-dGM-CSF was found to replicate mainly in the tonsils after oral vaccination as detected by nested RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Taken together, our results indicate that LBNSE-dGM-CSF could be a promising oral rabies vaccine candidate for dogs.

  5. Using dogs for tiger conservation and research.

    PubMed

    Kerley, Linda L

    2010-12-01

    This paper is a review of the history, development and efficacy of using dogs in wildlife studies and considers the use of dogs in the research and conservation of wild tigers (Panthera tigris Linnaeus, 1758). Using scat detection dogs, scent-matching dogs, law enforcement detection dogs and protection dogs are proven methods that can be effectively used on tigers. These methods all take advantage of the dog's extremely evolved sense of smell that allows them to detect animals or animal byproducts (often the focus of tiger studies). Dogs can be trained to communicate this information to their handlers. © 2010 ISZS, Blackwell Publishing and IOZ/CAS.

  6. Contact with domestic dogs increases pathogen exposure in endangered African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus).

    PubMed

    Woodroffe, Rosie; Prager, Katherine C; Munson, Linda; Conrad, Patricia A; Dubovi, Edward J; Mazet, Jonna A K

    2012-01-01

    Infectious diseases have contributed to the decline and local extinction of several wildlife species, including African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus). Mitigating such disease threats is challenging, partly because uncertainty about disease dynamics makes it difficult to identify the best management approaches. Serious impacts on susceptible populations most frequently occur when generalist pathogens are maintained within populations of abundant (often domestic) "reservoir" hosts, and spill over into less abundant host species. If this is the case, disease control directed at the reservoir host might be most appropriate. However, pathogen transmission within threatened host populations may also be important, and may not be controllable by managing another host species. We investigated interspecific and intraspecific transmission routes, by comparing African wild dogs' exposure to six canine pathogens with behavioural measures of their opportunities for contact with domestic dogs and with other wild dogs. Domestic dog contact was associated with exposure to canine parvovirus, Ehrlichia canis, Neospora caninum and perhaps rabies virus, but not with exposure to canine distemper virus or canine coronavirus. Contact with other wild dogs appeared not to increase the risk of exposure to any of the pathogens. These findings, combined with other data, suggest that management directed at domestic dogs might help to protect wild dog populations from rabies virus, but not from canine distemper virus. However, further analyses are needed to determine the management approaches--including no intervention--which are most appropriate for each pathogen.

  7. Contact with Domestic Dogs Increases Pathogen Exposure in Endangered African Wild Dogs (Lycaon pictus)

    PubMed Central

    Woodroffe, Rosie; Prager, Katherine C.; Conrad, Patricia A.; Dubovi, Edward J.; Mazet, Jonna A. K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases have contributed to the decline and local extinction of several wildlife species, including African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus). Mitigating such disease threats is challenging, partly because uncertainty about disease dynamics makes it difficult to identify the best management approaches. Serious impacts on susceptible populations most frequently occur when generalist pathogens are maintained within populations of abundant (often domestic) “reservoir” hosts, and spill over into less abundant host species. If this is the case, disease control directed at the reservoir host might be most appropriate. However, pathogen transmission within threatened host populations may also be important, and may not be controllable by managing another host species. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated interspecific and intraspecific transmission routes, by comparing African wild dogs' exposure to six canine pathogens with behavioural measures of their opportunities for contact with domestic dogs and with other wild dogs. Domestic dog contact was associated with exposure to canine parvovirus, Ehrlichia canis, Neospora caninum and perhaps rabies virus, but not with exposure to canine distemper virus or canine coronavirus. Contact with other wild dogs appeared not to increase the risk of exposure to any of the pathogens. Conclusions/Significance These findings, combined with other data, suggest that management directed at domestic dogs might help to protect wild dog populations from rabies virus, but not from canine distemper virus. However, further analyses are needed to determine the management approaches – including no intervention – which are most appropriate for each pathogen. PMID:22238695

  8. Juvenile cellulitis in dogs: 15 cases (1979-1988).

    PubMed

    White, S D; Rosychuk, R A; Stewart, L J; Cape, L; Hughes, B J

    1989-12-01

    The records of 15 dogs diagnosed as having juvenile cellulitis (juvenile pyoderma, puppy strangles) were evaluated for clinical, laboratory, and therapeutic results. Mandibular lymphadenopathy was observed in 14 dogs, and was not associated with skin lesions in 5 dogs. Edema, pustules, papules, or crusts were noticed periorally, periocularly, on the chin or muzzle, or in the ears of those dogs with skin lesions. Eight dogs were lethargic; fever and anorexia were inconsistent findings. Four dogs had signs of pain on manipulation of their joints. Complete blood counts revealed leukocytosis with neutrophilia in 4 dogs, and normocytic, normochromic anemia in 6 dogs. Three dogs had suppurative lymphadenitis with many neutrophils. Cytology of the aspirate of pustules or abscesses in 6 dogs revealed many neutrophils without bacteria. Coagulase-positive Staphylococcus spp were isolated from draining lesions in 2 dogs. Intact abscesses and lymph nodes were negative for bacterial growth in 4 dogs. Three of these dogs were being administered antibiotics at the time of bacterial culturing. Cytology of the aspirates of joints in 3 of the 4 dogs with joint pain revealed suppurative arthritis with no bacteria, and the aspirates were negative for bacterial growth on culturing, although all 3 dogs were being administered antibiotics at the time of culturing. Of 12 dogs initially treated with antibiotics, only 4 (33%) responded favorably; the other 8 dogs were then given antibiotics and corticosteroids. Three dogs were initially given antibiotics and corticosteroids. All dogs treated concurrently with antibiotics and corticosteroids responded favorably. One of these dogs had a relapse after treatment was discontinued. The concurrent arthritis in 4 of the dogs resolved with treatment of the juvenile cellulitis and did not redevelop once the medication was discontinued. Concurrent treatment with antibiotics (cephalosporins) and prednisone (2.2 mg/kg of body weight/day) was the most

  9. Evolutionary genomics of dog domestication.

    PubMed

    Wayne, Robert K; vonHoldt, Bridgett M

    2012-02-01

    We review the underlying principles and tools used in genomic studies of domestic dogs aimed at understanding the genetic changes that have occurred during domestication. We show that there are two principle modes of evolution within dogs. One primary mode that accounts for much of the remarkable diversity of dog breeds is the fixation of discrete mutations of large effect in individual lineages that are then crossed to various breed groupings. This transfer of mutations across the dog evolutionary tree leads to the appearance of high phenotypic diversity that in actuality reflects a small number of major genes. A second mechanism causing diversification involves the selective breeding of dogs within distinct phenotypic or functional groups, which enhances specific group attributes such as heading or tracking. Such progressive selection leads to a distinct genetic structure in evolutionary trees such that functional and phenotypic groups cluster genetically. We trace the origin of the nuclear genome in dogs based on haplotype-sharing analyses between dogs and gray wolves and show that contrary to previous mtDNA analyses, the nuclear genome of dogs derives primarily from Middle Eastern or European wolves, a result more consistent with the archeological record. Sequencing analysis of the IGF1 gene, which has been the target of size selection in small breeds, further supports this conclusion. Finally, we discuss how a black coat color mutation that evolved in dogs has transformed North American gray wolf populations, providing a first example of a mutation that appeared under domestication and selectively swept through a wild relative.

  10. Service Dogs in the Perioperative Setting.

    PubMed

    Levey, Janet A; Chappy, Sharon L

    2017-04-01

    Service dogs are critical for the independence of individuals with disabilities because they assist with daily living activities and help these individuals navigate society. Perioperative nurses need a working knowledge of disability laws pertaining to service dogs to provide patient-centered care for individuals using service dogs. This article provides information on the Americans With Disabilities Act regulations regarding service dogs, makes recommendations for the care of patients with service dogs across the perioperative continuum, and offers policy directives to ensure that safe, high-quality care is delivered to patients using service dogs. Copyright © 2017 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Retrobulbar chondrosarcoma in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Ralić, M.; Vasić, J.; Jovanović, M.; Cameron, B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a review of a dog, with a retrobulbar chondrosarcoma, which was admitted for surgery for visible changes in his eye during inspection. Orbital neoplasia in dogs may be primary and secondary. Sixty percent of orbital neoplasia in dogs are primary, ninety percent of which are malignant. Retrobulbar neoplasms are rare and in their early stage represent a diagnostic challenge. Chondrosarcoma of the skull is a slow-progressing malignant disease which occurs locally, aggressive with invasion into the surrounding tissues. Dogs with chondrosarcoma of the skull have life expectancy between 210 and 580 days - in our case it was 180 days - after the first alterations on the eye of the dog occurred. PMID:26623338

  12. Retrobulbar chondrosarcoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Ralić, M; Vasić, J; Jovanović, M; Cameron, B

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a review of a dog, with a retrobulbar chondrosarcoma, which was admitted for surgery for visible changes in his eye during inspection. Orbital neoplasia in dogs may be primary and secondary. Sixty percent of orbital neoplasia in dogs are primary, ninety percent of which are malignant. Retrobulbar neoplasms are rare and in their early stage represent a diagnostic challenge. Chondrosarcoma of the skull is a slow-progressing malignant disease which occurs locally, aggressive with invasion into the surrounding tissues. Dogs with chondrosarcoma of the skull have life expectancy between 210 and 580 days - in our case it was 180 days - after the first alterations on the eye of the dog occurred.

  13. I Walk My Dog Because It Makes Me Happy: A Qualitative Study to Understand Why Dogs Motivate Walking and Improved Health.

    PubMed

    Westgarth, Carri; Christley, Robert M; Marvin, Garry; Perkins, Elizabeth

    2017-08-19

    Dog walking is a popular everyday physical activity. Dog owners are generally more active than non-owners, but some rarely walk with their dog. The strength of the dog-owner relationship is known to be correlated with dog walking, and this qualitative study investigates why. Twenty-six interviews were combined with autoethnography of dog walking experiences. Dog walking was constructed as "for the dog", however, owners represented their dog's needs in a way which aligned with their own. Central to the construction of need was perceptions of dog personality and behaviour. Owners reported deriving positive outcomes from dog walking, most notably, feelings of "happiness", but these were "contingent" on the perception that their dogs were enjoying the experience. Owner physical activity and social interaction were secondary bonuses but rarely motivating. Perceptions and beliefs of owners about dog walking were continually negotiated, depending on how the needs of the owner and dog were constructed at that time. Complex social interactions with the "significant other" of a pet can strongly motivate human health behaviour. Potential interventions to promote dog walking need to account for this complexity and the effect of the dog-owner relationship on owner mental wellbeing.

  14. Behavioral and physiological reactions in dogs to a veterinary examination: Owner-dog interactions improve canine well-being.

    PubMed

    Csoltova, Erika; Martineau, Michaël; Boissy, Alain; Gilbert, Caroline

    2017-08-01

    In order to improve well-being of dogs during veterinary visits, we aimed to investigate the effect of human social interactions on behavior and physiology during routine examination. Firstly, we assessed the impact of a standardized veterinary examination on behavioral and physiological indicators of stress in dogs. Secondly, we examined whether the owner's tactile and verbal interactions with the dog influenced behavioral and physiological stress-associated parameters. A randomized within-subjects crossover design was used to examine behavior (n=33), rectal temperature (n=33), heart rate (HR) (n=18), maximal ocular surface temperature (max OST) (n=13) and salivary cortisol concentrations (n=10) in healthy privately owned pet dogs. The study consisted of two experimental conditions: a) "contact" - owner petting and talking to the dog during the examination; b) "non-contact" - owner present during the examination but not allowed to interact with the dog. Our findings showed that the veterinary examinations produced acute stress responses in dogs during both "contact" and "non-contact" conditions, with significant increases in lip licking, HR, and max OST. A significant decrease in attempts to jump off the examination table (p=0.002) was observed during the examination in the "contact" compared to the "non-contact" condition. In addition, interactions of owners showed an attenuating effect on HR (p=0.018) and max OST (p=0.011) in their dogs. The testing order (first vs. second visit) had no impact on behavioral and physiological parameters, suggesting that dogs did not habituate or sensitize to the examination procedure. Moreover, the duration of the owner-dog interactions had no significant impact on the behavioral and physiological responses of their dogs. This study demonstrates that owner-dog interactions improve the well-being of dogs during a veterinary examination. Future research may assist in further understanding the mechanisms associated with reducing

  15. Schrödinger's dog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrique Alves Monteiro, Luiz

    2009-09-01

    As I am sure everyone will know, a hot dog is a popular snack consisting of a cooked sausage in a soft bun. The name of this sandwich originates from the fact that in the 18th century some people suspected that sausages were made of dog meat. This may sound strange, but as I have learned, the true nature of the humble hot dog may be stranger still.

  16. How do German bilingual schoolchildren process German prepositions? – A study on language-motor interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bischoff, Heike; Strozyk, Jessica Vanessa; Bryant, Doreen; Kaup, Barbara

    2018-01-01

    While much support is found for embodied language processing in a first language (L1), evidence for embodiment in second language (L2) processing is rather sparse. In a recent study, we found support for L2 embodiment, but also an influence of L1 on L2 processing in adult learners. In the present study, we compared bilingual schoolchildren who speak German as one of their languages with monolingual German schoolchildren. We presented the German prepositions auf (on), über (above), and unter (under) in a Stroop-like task. Upward or downward responses were made depending on the font colour, resulting in compatible and incompatible trials. We found compatibility effects for all children, but in contrast to the adult sample, there were no processing differences between the children depending on the nature of their other language, suggesting that the processing of German prepositions of bilingual children is embodied in a similar way as in monolingual German children. PMID:29538404

  17. Acceptance of Dog Guides and Daily Stress Levels of Dog Guide Users and Nonusers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsunaka, Kumiko; Koda, Naoko

    2008-01-01

    The degree of acceptance of dog guides at public facilities, which is required by law in Japan, was investigated, and evidence of rejection was found. Japanese people with visual impairments who used dog guides reported higher daily stress levels than did those who did not use dog guides. (Contains 3 tables and 1 figure.)

  18. 76 FR 35162 - Service Dogs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN51 Service Dogs AGENCY: Department of... its regulations concerning veterans in need of service dogs. Under current regulations, VA provides benefits to veterans with guide dogs, and this rulemaking would broaden and clarify those benefits. This...

  19. Detection of Hepatozoon canis in the Brown Dog Tick and Domestic Dogs in Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Batah Kunalan; Low, Van Lun; Tan, Tiong Kai; Vinnie-Siow, Wei Yin; Lim, Yvonne Ai-Lian; Morvarid, Akhavan Rezaei; Azman, Adzzie Shazleen; Yeong, Yze Shiuan; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Sofian-Azirun, Mohd

    2018-05-17

    Hepatozoon canis has been widely reported in dogs. Its prevalence in ticks, however, has not been well-established. Here we determine the occurrence of Hepatozoon DNA in the brown dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille) (Acari: Ixodidae) sensu lato (s.l.) and domestic dogs from Peninsular Malaysia using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay based on amplification of the 18S ribosomal RNA coding sequence. Our results revealed a relatively low prevalence of H. canis DNA in both R. sanguineus s.l. (0.7%) and dogs (3.33%). This study represents the first report of H. canis DNA in R. sanguineus s.l. in Malaysia, highlighting the risk of this infection in dogs.

  20. Service dogs in the province of Quebec: sociodemographic profile of users and the dogs' impact on functional ability.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Claude; Gagnon, Dany; Routhier, François; Leblond, Jean; Boucher, Pascale; Blanchet, Marie; Martin-Lemoyne, Valérie

    2015-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to (1) describe the sociodemographic profile of service dog users, their physical disabilities, main occupations, living environment, and use of technical aids in daily life and (2) evaluate the impact of service dogs on wheelchair travel and picking up objects. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected and various mobility tests were conducted in the service dog users' home environment (n = 199). The service dog users had injuries to the central or peripheral nervous system (55%), spinal cord (33%), or musculoskeletal or orthopedic system (12%). In the wheelchair travel on flat terrain test (n = 67), users travelled a longer distance in a shorter time, improving their average speed to 1.28 m/s with the service dog compared to 0.75 m/s without (p < 0.001). In a wheelchair propelling up a slope, 42% improved with the service dog (n = 60). Mounting a threshold/curb in a wheelchair, 41% improved with the service dog (n = 39). In a test where walkers and wheelchair users picked up three objects off the ground, 44% improved with the service dog (n = 164). Service dogs significantly improved wheelchair travel speed and distance on flat and ascending terrain, mounting a threshold/curb and picking up objects off the ground. Implications for Rehabilitation For people with motor impairments: Service dogs are most often used as a technical aid to pick up objects (96%), open doors (36%) and pull the wheelchair during travel (34%). Clients' performance in significant travel in a wheelchair (on flat terrain, on an upslope, mounting a threshold) improved with the service dog compared to their own performance without the dog. Clients' grasping performance (picking up three significant objects off the ground) improved with the service dog compared to their own performance without the dog.

  1. Nerve growth factor concentrations in the synovial fluid from healthy dogs and dogs with secondary osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Isola, M; Ferrari, V; Miolo, A; Stabile, F; Bernardini, D; Carnier, P; Busetto, R

    2011-01-01

    To measure the concentrations of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the synovial fluid from normal dogs and dogs with osteoarthritis (OA) secondary to common joint disorders. Nerve growth factor synovial concentrations were measured by ELISA assay in 50 dogs divided into three groups: 12 healthy, 16 affected by acute lameness within seven days before enrolment, and 22 with chronic lameness persisting by more than one month before enrolment and accompanied by radiological signs of OA. Both acute and chronic lameness were secondary to orthopaedic diseases involving the shoulder, elbow and stifle joints. Nerve growth factor synovial concentrations were compared between means for healthy and acute groups and between the three groups using an F-test. Significance level was set at p <0.05. Nerve growth factor was detected in all canine synovial fluid samples. However, the mean synovial NGF concentration of healthy dogs (3.65 ± 2.18 pg/ml) was not significantly different from the mean value in dogs with acute lameness (6.45 ± 2.45 pg/ml) (p = 0.79). Conversely, the mean synovial NGF concentration in dogs with chronic lameness (20.19 ± 17.51 pg/ml) was found to be significantly higher than that found in healthy dogs (p <0.01). This study demonstrates for the first time the presence of NGF in canine synovial fluid and its increased concentrations in dogs with chronic lameness compared to healthy dogs and dogs with acute lameness. The association between chronic lameness and raised synovial concentrations may suggest an involvement of NGF in OA inflammation and chronic pain.

  2. Cross-linguistic vowel variation in trilingual speakers of Saterland Frisian, Low German, and High German.

    PubMed

    Peters, Jörg; Heeringa, Wilbert J; Schoormann, Heike E

    2017-08-01

    The present study compares the acoustic realization of Saterland Frisian, Low German, and High German vowels by trilingual speakers in the Saterland. The Saterland is a rural municipality in northwestern Germany. It offers the unique opportunity to study trilingualism with languages that differ both by their vowel inventories and by external factors, such as their social status and the autonomy of their speech communities. The objective of the study was to examine whether the trilingual speakers differ in their acoustic realizations of vowel categories shared by the three languages and whether those differences can be interpreted as effects of either the differences in the vowel systems or of external factors. Monophthongs produced in a /hVt/ frame revealed that High German vowels show the most divergent realizations in terms of vowel duration and formant frequencies, whereas Saterland Frisian and Low German vowels show small differences. These findings suggest that vowels of different languages are likely to share the same phonological space when the speech communities largely overlap, as is the case with Saterland Frisian and Low German, but may resist convergence if at least one language is shared with a larger, monolingual speech community, as is the case with High German.

  3. Comparison of myocardial damage among dogs at different stages of clinical leishmaniasis and dogs with idiopathic chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Hernández, L; Casamian-Sorrosal, D; Barrera-Chacón, R; Cuesta-Gerveno, J M; Belinchón-Lorenzo, S; Gómez Nieto, L C; Duque-Carrasco, F J

    2017-03-01

    Canine leishmaniasis (CanL) is a systemic disease caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania infantum. Myocarditis in CanL has been described previously in CanL by histopathological analysis of post-mortem specimens and by evaluation of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) levels. However, the degree of myocardial damage at different stages of CanL and the role that concurrent azotaemia plays in this myocardial injury are unknown. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate and compare the presence of myocardial injury in dogs at different stages of clinical CanL and in dogs with severe idiopathic chronic kidney disease (CKD) by measuring cTnI. Forty-eight dogs were included in the study, divided into four groups: (1) group A (10 healthy dogs); (2) group B (17 dogs with CanL without renal azotaemia, classified as mild to severe in the LeishVet scheme); (3) group C (11 dogs with CanL and renal azotaemia, classified as very severe in the LeishVet scheme); and (4) group D (10 dogs with idiopathic CKD). Dogs in group C had significantly higher cTnI than dogs in groups B and D, although cTnI was also elevated in these groups. Dogs in group A had normal cTnI values. Dogs in groups D and C had similar renal IRIS classification scorers. Severe lymphoplasmocytic myocarditis and a positive real time PCR of L. infantum DNA were observed in all dogs in group C. Dogs with very severe CanL exhibit more myocardial injury than dogs with milder CanL or dogs with idiopathic CKD. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Mandatory desexing of dogs: one step in the right direction to reduce the risk of dog bite? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    D'Onise, Katina; Hazel, Susan; Caraguel, Charles

    2017-06-01

    Preventing dog bites is an intractable problem given the complex dog bite injury environment. Desexing of dogs has the opportunity of creating a safer injury environment, given the potential links between desexing and behaviour change in dogs. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to examine the evidence for desexing of dogs to reduce dog bite risk within a population health paradigm. Medline and CAB Abstracts were searched for studies that reported data on the association of dog neuter status with the risk of dog bite. All definitions of dog bite were included and all empirical studies were included in the review, limited to those published in English. Quality appraisal and data extraction were based on the 2013 evidence-based practice and critical appraisal tool from the University of Auckland. Five out of six observational studies, from four study populations found evidence that intact dogs were associated with an increased risk of dog bite compared with desexed dogs. The effect sizes ranged across the studies and given the heterogeneity of the studies no single effect size on the association between desexing and dog bite risk could be estimated. There is consistent evidence that desexing dogs is associated with a reduced risk of dog bite, although the studies reflect association and may not be causal. Although recent publications have suggested desexing is associated with health and behavioural costs in some breeds, population level evidence supports desexed dogs having a longer lifespan, and being less likely to wander with the added benefit of reducing unwanted litters. Thus, mandatory desexing presents a possible opportunity for prevention of dog bites expanding dog bite prevention beyond an education-only approach. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. The German Statutory Health Insurance Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stassen, Manfred

    1993-01-01

    Describes the German health insurance system which is mandatory for nearly all German citizens. Explains that, along with pension, accident, and unemployment insurance, health insurance is one of four pillars of the German national social security system. Asserts that controlling costs while maintaining high health care standards is a national…

  6. Excessive Profits of German Defense Contractors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    its business unit Thyssen Krupp Marine Systems, is a German defense contractor. (2) Tognom AG Tognum AG owned the MTU Friedrichshafen GmbH before... Friedrichshafen provided engines for many ships of the German Navy and for German battle tanks, such as the Leopard I and Leopard II. MTU refers to the

  7. A service dog in group.

    PubMed

    Rothberg, Brian; Collins, Emily

    2015-04-01

    Service dogs are sanctioned by the Americans with Disabilities Act as having protected rights allowing them to assist owners with disabilities. These dogs are appearing with increasing frequency in healthcare settings, and it is important for healthcare providers to understand the rules and regulations given to service animals and owners. We discuss processes that transpired when a service dog was brought into a psychodynamic psychotherapy group. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the unintended consequences of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 2010 as it concerns service dogs and the impact on the group process. Problems resulting from the introduction of service dogs into therapy groups should be anticipated and explicitly discussed in the course of the group's transactions.

  8. The genomics of selection in dogs and the parallel evolution between dogs and humans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-dong; Zhai, Weiwei; Yang, He-chuan; Fan, Ruo-xi; Cao, Xue; Zhong, Li; Wang, Lu; Liu, Fei; Wu, Hong; Cheng, Lu-guang; Poyarkov, Andrei D; Poyarkov, Nikolai A; Tang, Shu-sheng; Zhao, Wen-ming; Gao, Yun; Lv, Xue-mei; Irwin, David M; Savolainen, Peter; Wu, Chung-I; Zhang, Ya-ping

    2013-01-01

    The genetic bases of demographic changes and artificial selection underlying domestication are of great interest in evolutionary biology. Here we perform whole-genome sequencing of multiple grey wolves, Chinese indigenous dogs and dogs of diverse breeds. Demographic analysis show that the split between wolves and Chinese indigenous dogs occurred 32,000 years ago and that the subsequent bottlenecks were mild. Therefore, dogs may have been under human selection over a much longer time than previously concluded, based on molecular data, perhaps by initially scavenging with humans. Population genetic analysis identifies a list of genes under positive selection during domestication, which overlaps extensively with the corresponding list of positively selected genes in humans. Parallel evolution is most apparent in genes for digestion and metabolism, neurological process and cancer. Our study, for the first time, draws together humans and dogs in their recent genomic evolution.

  9. Enriching the Curriculum with Pennsylvania German

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meindl, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    The German classroom should prepare students for the linguistic diversity of the target culture, including regional varieties and German spoken outside of the D-A-CH region. Because textbooks do not often include materials on regional varieties, this article presents a model to incorporate Pennsylvania German (PG) into the curriculum. The model…

  10. Volvulus of the colon in four dogs.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Adrienne M; O'Toole, Therese E; Kowaleski, Michael P; Casale, Sue A; McCarthy, Robert J

    2005-07-15

    Four dogs were examined because of vomiting of 7 to 48 hours' duration. Gas-distended segments of intestine were identified radiographically in all dogs