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Sample records for germcode gcr event-based

  1. Overview of the Graphical User Interface for the GERMcode (GCR Event-Based Risk Model)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    The descriptions of biophysical events from heavy ions are of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy, and space exploration. The biophysical description of the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials is best described by a stochastic approach that includes both ion track structure and nuclear interactions. A new computer model called the GCR Event-based Risk Model (GERM) code was developed for the description of biophysical events from heavy ion beams at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The GERMcode calculates basic physical and biophysical quantities of high-energy protons and heavy ions that have been studied at NSRL for the purpose of simulating space radiobiological effects. For mono-energetic beams, the code evaluates the linear-energy transfer (LET), range (R), and absorption in tissue equivalent material for a given Charge (Z), Mass Number (A) and kinetic energy (E) of an ion. In addition, a set of biophysical properties are evaluated such as the Poisson distribution of ion or delta-ray hits for a specified cellular area, cell survival curves, and mutation and tumor probabilities. The GERMcode also calculates the radiation transport of the beam line for either a fixed number of user-specified depths or at multiple positions along the Bragg curve of the particle. The contributions from primary ion and nuclear secondaries are evaluated. The GERMcode accounts for the major nuclear interaction processes of importance for describing heavy ion beams, including nuclear fragmentation, elastic scattering, and knockout-cascade processes by using the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation (QMSFRG) model. The QMSFRG model has been shown to be in excellent agreement with available experimental data for nuclear fragmentation cross sections, and has been used by the GERMcode for application to thick target experiments. The GERMcode provides scientists participating in NSRL experiments with the data needed for the interpretation of their

  2. Development of a GCR Event-based Risk Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Plante, Ianik; Carra, Claudio; Kim, Myung-Hee

    2009-01-01

    A goal at NASA is to develop event-based systems biology models of space radiation risks that will replace the current dose-based empirical models. Complex and varied biochemical signaling processes transmit the initial DNA and oxidative damage from space radiation into cellular and tissue responses. Mis-repaired damage or aberrant signals can lead to genomic instability, persistent oxidative stress or inflammation, which are causative of cancer and CNS risks. Protective signaling through adaptive responses or cell repopulation is also possible. We are developing a computational simulation approach to galactic cosmic ray (GCR) effects that is based on biological events rather than average quantities such as dose, fluence, or dose equivalent. The goal of the GCR Event-based Risk Model (GERMcode) is to provide a simulation tool to describe and integrate physical and biological events into stochastic models of space radiation risks. We used the quantum multiple scattering model of heavy ion fragmentation (QMSFRG) and well known energy loss processes to develop a stochastic Monte-Carlo based model of GCR transport in spacecraft shielding and tissue. We validated the accuracy of the model by comparing to physical data from the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Our simulation approach allows us to time-tag each GCR proton or heavy ion interaction in tissue including correlated secondary ions often of high multiplicity. Conventional space radiation risk assessment employs average quantities, and assumes linearity and additivity of responses over the complete range of GCR charge and energies. To investigate possible deviations from these assumptions, we studied several biological response pathway models of varying induction and relaxation times including the ATM, TGF -Smad, and WNT signaling pathways. We then considered small volumes of interacting cells and the time-dependent biophysical events that the GCR would produce within these tissue volumes to estimate how

  3. GERMcode: A Stochastic Model for Space Radiation Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2012-01-01

    A new computer model, the GCR Event-based Risk Model code (GERMcode), was developed to describe biophysical events from high-energy protons and high charge and energy (HZE) particles that have been studied at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) for the purpose of simulating space radiation biological effects. In the GERMcode, the biophysical description of the passage of HZE particles in tissue and shielding materials is made with a stochastic approach that includes both particle track structure and nuclear interactions. The GERMcode accounts for the major nuclear interaction processes of importance for describing heavy ion beams, including nuclear fragmentation, elastic scattering, and knockout-cascade processes by using the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation (QMSFRG) model. The QMSFRG model has been shown to be in excellent agreement with available experimental data for nuclear fragmentation cross sections. For NSRL applications, the GERMcode evaluates a set of biophysical properties, such as the Poisson distribution of particles or delta-ray hits for a given cellular area and particle dose, the radial dose on tissue, and the frequency distribution of energy deposition in a DNA volume. By utilizing the ProE/Fishbowl ray-tracing analysis, the GERMcode will be used as a bi-directional radiation transport model for future spacecraft shielding analysis in support of Mars mission risk assessments. Recent radiobiological experiments suggest the need for new approaches to risk assessment that include time-dependent biological events due to the signaling times for activation and relaxation of biological processes in cells and tissue. Thus, the tracking of the temporal and spatial distribution of events in tissue is a major goal of the GERMcode in support of the simulation of biological processes important in GCR risk assessments. In order to validate our approach, basic radiobiological responses such as cell survival curves, mutation, chromosomal

  4. Mixed-field GCR Simulations for Radiobiological Research Using Ground Based Accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2014-01-01

    Space radiation is comprised of a large number of particle types and energies, which have differential ionization power from high energy protons to high charge and energy (HZE) particles and secondary neutrons produced by galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Ground based accelerators such as the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are used to simulate space radiation for radiobiology research and dosimetry, electronics parts, and shielding testing using mono-energetic beams for single ion species. As a tool to support research on new risk assessment models, we have developed a stochastic model of heavy ion beams and space radiation effects, the GCR Event-based Risk Model computer code (GERMcode). For radiobiological research on mixed-field space radiation, a new GCR simulator at NSRL is proposed. The NSRL-GCR simulator, which implements the rapid switching mode and the higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, can integrate multiple ions into a single simulation to create GCR Z-spectrum in major energy bins. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, a GCR reference field is proposed after extensive simulation studies using the GERMcode. The GCR reference field is shown to reproduce the Z and LET spectra of GCR behind shielding within 20% accuracy compared to simulated full GCR environments behind shielding. A major challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3-years in relation to simulations with cell and animal models of human risks. We discuss possible approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation with extended exposure of up to a few weeks and fractionation approaches at a GCR simulator.

  5. Mixed-field GCR Simulations for Radiobiological Research using Ground Based Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis

    Space radiation is comprised of a large number of particle types and energies, which have differential ionization power from high energy protons to high charge and energy (HZE) particles and secondary neutrons produced by galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Ground based accelerators such as the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are used to simulate space radiation for radiobiology research and dosimetry, electronics parts, and shielding testing using mono-energetic beams for single ion species. As a tool to support research on new risk assessment models, we have developed a stochastic model of heavy ion beams and space radiation effects, the GCR Event-based Risk Model computer code (GERMcode). For radiobiological research on mixed-field space radiation, a new GCR simulator at NSRL is proposed. The NSRL-GCR simulator, which implements the rapid switching mode and the higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, can integrate multiple ions into a single simulation to create GCR Z-spectrum in major energy bins. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, a GCR reference field is proposed after extensive simulation studies using the GERMcode. The GCR reference field is shown to reproduce the Z and LET spectra of GCR behind shielding within 20 percents accuracy compared to simulated full GCR environments behind shielding. A major challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3-years in relation to simulations with cell and animal models of human risks. We discuss possible approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation with extended exposure of up to a few weeks and fractionation approaches at a GCR simulator.

  6. Overview of the Graphical User Interface for the GERM Code (GCR Event-Based Risk Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    The descriptions of biophysical events from heavy ions are of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy, and space exploration. The biophysical description of the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials is best described by a stochastic approach that includes both ion track structure and nuclear interactions. A new computer model called the GCR Event-based Risk Model (GERM) code was developed for the description of biophysical events from heavy ion beams at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The GERM code calculates basic physical and biophysical quantities of high-energy protons and heavy ions that have been studied at NSRL for the purpose of simulating space radiobiological effects. For mono-energetic beams, the code evaluates the linear-energy transfer (LET), range (R), and absorption in tissue equivalent material for a given Charge (Z), Mass Number (A) and kinetic energy (E) of an ion. In addition, a set of biophysical properties are evaluated such as the Poisson distribution of ion or delta-ray hits for a specified cellular area, cell survival curves, and mutation and tumor probabilities. The GERM code also calculates the radiation transport of the beam line for either a fixed number of user-specified depths or at multiple positions along the Bragg curve of the particle. The contributions from primary ion and nuclear secondaries are evaluated. The GERM code accounts for the major nuclear interaction processes of importance for describing heavy ion beams, including nuclear fragmentation, elastic scattering, and knockout-cascade processes by using the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation (QMSFRG) model. The QMSFRG model has been shown to be in excellent agreement with available experimental data for nuclear fragmentation cross sections, and has been used by the GERM code for application to thick target experiments. The GERM code provides scientists participating in NSRL experiments with the data needed for the interpretation of their

  7. GCR environmental models II: Uncertainty propagation methods for GCR environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2014-04-01

    In order to assess the astronaut exposure received within vehicles or habitats, accurate models of the ambient galactic cosmic ray (GCR) environment are required. Many models have been developed and compared to measurements, with uncertainty estimates often stated to be within 15%. However, intercode comparisons can lead to differences in effective dose exceeding 50%. This is the second of three papers focused on resolving this discrepancy. The first paper showed that GCR heavy ions with boundary energies below 500 MeV/n induce less than 5% of the total effective dose behind shielding. Yet, due to limitations on available data, model development and validation are heavily influenced by comparisons to measurements taken below 500 MeV/n. In the current work, the focus is on developing an efficient method for propagating uncertainties in the ambient GCR environment to effective dose values behind shielding. A simple approach utilizing sensitivity results from the first paper is described and shown to be equivalent to a computationally expensive Monte Carlo uncertainty propagation. The simple approach allows a full uncertainty propagation to be performed once GCR uncertainty distributions are established. This rapid analysis capability may be integrated into broader probabilistic radiation shielding analysis and also allows error bars (representing boundary condition uncertainty) to be placed around point estimates of effective dose.

  8. GCR Environmental Models I: Sensitivity Analysis for GCR Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate galactic cosmic ray (GCR) models are required to assess crew exposure during long-duration missions to the Moon or Mars. Many of these models have been developed and compared to available measurements, with uncertainty estimates usually stated to be less than 15%. However, when the models are evaluated over a common epoch and propagated through to effective dose, relative differences exceeding 50% are observed. This indicates that the metrics used to communicate GCR model uncertainty can be better tied to exposure quantities of interest for shielding applications. This is the first of three papers focused on addressing this need. In this work, the focus is on quantifying the extent to which each GCR ion and energy group, prior to entering any shielding material or body tissue, contributes to effective dose behind shielding. Results can be used to more accurately calibrate model-free parameters and provide a mechanism for refocusing validation efforts on measurements taken over important energy regions. Results can also be used as references to guide future nuclear cross-section measurements and radiobiology experiments. It is found that GCR with Z>2 and boundary energies below 500 MeV/n induce less than 5% of the total effective dose behind shielding. This finding is important given that most of the GCR models are developed and validated against Advanced Composition Explorer/Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (ACE/CRIS) measurements taken below 500 MeV/n. It is therefore possible for two models to very accurately reproduce the ACE/CRIS data while inducing very different effective dose values behind shielding.

  9. Specialized Rap1p/Gcr1p Transcriptional Activation through Gcr1p DNA Contacts Requires Gcr2p, as Does Hyperphosphorylation of Gcr1p

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, X.; Deminoff, S. J.; Santangelo, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    The multifunctional regulatory factor Rap1p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae accomplishes one of its tasks, transcriptional activation, by complexing with Gcr1p. An unusual feature of this heteromeric complex is its apparent capacity to contact simultaneously two adjacent DNA elements (UAS(RPG) and the CT box, bound specifically by Rap1p and Gcr1p, respectively). The complex can activate transcription through isolated UAS(RPG) but not CT elements. In promoters that contain both DNA signals its activity is enhanced, provided the helical spacing between the two elements is appropriate; this suggests that at least transient DNA loop formation is involved. We show here that this CT box-dependent augmentation of Rap1p/Gcr1p activation requires the presence of a third protein Gcr2p; the Gcr2(-) growth defect appears to result from a genome-wide loss of the CT box effect. Interestingly, a hyperphosphorylated form of Gcr1p disappears in Δgcr2 cells but reappears if they harbor a doubly point-mutated GCR1 allele that bypasses the Gcr2(-) growth defect. Gcr2p therefore appears to induce a conformation change in Gcr1p and/or stimulate its hyperphosphorylation; one or both of these effects can be mimicked in the absence of GCR2 by mutation of GCR1. This improved view of Rap1p/Gcr1p/Gcr2p function reveals a new aspect of eukaryotic gene regulation: modification of an upstream activator, accompanied by at least transient DNA loop formation, mediates its improved capacity to activate transcription. PMID:9335588

  10. Nuclear interactions in heavy ion transport and event-based risk models.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, Francis A; Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L; Kim, Myung-Hee Y

    2011-02-01

    The physical description of the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials is of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy and space exploration, including a human mission to Mars. Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) consist of a large number of ion types and energies. Energy loss processes occur continuously along the path of heavy ions and are well described by the linear energy transfer (LET), straggling and multiple scattering algorithms. Nuclear interactions lead to much larger energy deposition than atomic-molecular collisions and alter the composition of heavy ion beams while producing secondary nuclei often in high multiplicity events. The major nuclear interaction processes of importance for describing heavy ion beams was reviewed, including nuclear fragmentation, elastic scattering and knockout-cascade processes. The quantum multiple scattering fragmentation model is shown to be in excellent agreement with available experimental data for nuclear fragmentation cross sections and is studied for application to thick target experiments. A new computer model, which was developed for the description of biophysical events from heavy ion beams at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), called the GCR Event Risk-Based Model (GERMcode) is described.

  11. Nuclear interactions in heavy ion transport and event-based risk models.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, Francis A; Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L; Kim, Myung-Hee Y

    2011-02-01

    The physical description of the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials is of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy and space exploration, including a human mission to Mars. Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) consist of a large number of ion types and energies. Energy loss processes occur continuously along the path of heavy ions and are well described by the linear energy transfer (LET), straggling and multiple scattering algorithms. Nuclear interactions lead to much larger energy deposition than atomic-molecular collisions and alter the composition of heavy ion beams while producing secondary nuclei often in high multiplicity events. The major nuclear interaction processes of importance for describing heavy ion beams was reviewed, including nuclear fragmentation, elastic scattering and knockout-cascade processes. The quantum multiple scattering fragmentation model is shown to be in excellent agreement with available experimental data for nuclear fragmentation cross sections and is studied for application to thick target experiments. A new computer model, which was developed for the description of biophysical events from heavy ion beams at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), called the GCR Event Risk-Based Model (GERMcode) is described. PMID:21242169

  12. Event-Based Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    1992-01-01

    Suggests that an event-based science curriculum can provide the framework for deciding what to retain in an overloaded science curriculum. Provides examples of current events and the science concepts explored related to the event. (MDH)

  13. Isotopic Dependence of GCR Fluence behind Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Saganti, Premkumar; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cleghorn, Timothy; Zeitlin, Cary; Tripathi, Ram K.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we consider the effects of the isotopic composition of the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR), nuclear fragmentation cross-sections, and isotopic-grid on the solution to transport models used for shielding studies. Satellite measurements are used to describe the isotopic composition of the GCR. For the nuclear interaction data-base and transport solution, we use the quantum multiple-scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) and high-charge and energy (HZETRN) transport code, respectively. The QMSFRG model is shown to accurately describe existing fragmentation data including proper description of the odd-even effects as function of the iso-spin dependence on the projectile nucleus. The principle finding of this study is that large errors (+/-100%) will occur in the mass-fluence spectra when comparing transport models that use a complete isotopic-grid (approx.170 ions) to ones that use a reduced isotopic-grid, for example the 59 ion-grid used in the HZETRN code in the past, however less significant errors (<+/-20%) occur in the elemental-fluence spectra. Because a complete isotopic-grid is readily handled on small computer workstations and is needed for several applications studying GCR propagation and scattering, it is recommended that they be used for future GCR studies.

  14. GCR and SPE Radiation Effects in Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess; Rojdev, Kristina; Nichols, Charles

    2016-01-01

    This Year 3 project provides risk reduction data to assess galactic cosmic ray (GCR) and solar particle event (SPE) space radiation damage in materials used in manned low-earth orbit, lunar, interplanetary, and Martian surface missions. Long duration (up to 50 years) space radiation damage is being quantified for materials used in inflatable structures (1st priority), and space suit and habitable composite materials (2nd priority). The data collected has relevance for nonmetallic materials (polymers and composites) used in NASA missions where long duration reliability is needed in continuous or intermittent space radiation fluxes.

  15. Isotopic Effects in Nuclear Fragmentation and GCR Transport Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2002-01-01

    Improving the accuracy of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) environment and transport models is an important goal in preparing for studies of the projected risks and the efficiency of potential mitigations methods for space exploration. In this paper we consider the effects of the isotopic composition of the primary cosmic rays and the isotopic dependence of nuclear fragmentation cross sections on GCR transport models. Measurements are used to describe the isotopic composition of the GCR including their modulation throughout the solar cycle. The quantum multiple-scattering approach to nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) is used as the data base generator in order to accurately describe the odd-even effect in fragment production. Using the Badhwar and O'Neill GCR model, the QMSFRG model and the HZETRN transport code, the effects of the isotopic dependence of the primary GCR composition and on fragment production for transport problems is described for a complete GCR isotopic-grid. The principle finding of this study is that large errors ( 100%) will occur in the mass-flux spectra when comparing the complete isotopic-grid (141 ions) to a reduced isotopic-grid (59 ions), however less significant errors 30%) occur in the elemental-flux spectra. Because the full isotopic-grid is readily handled on small computer work-stations, it is recommended that they be used for future GCR studies.

  16. Impact of AMS-02 Measurements on Reducing GCR Model Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, T. C.; O'Neill, P. M.; Golge, S.; Norbury, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    For vehicle design, shield optimization, mission planning, and astronaut risk assessment, the exposure from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) poses a significant and complex problem both in low Earth orbit and in deep space. To address this problem, various computational tools have been developed to quantify the exposure and risk in a wide range of scenarios. Generally, the tool used to describe the ambient GCR environment provides the input into subsequent computational tools and is therefore a critical component of end-to-end procedures. Over the past few years, several researchers have independently and very carefully compared some of the widely used GCR models to more rigorously characterize model differences and quantify uncertainties. All of the GCR models studied rely heavily on calibrating to available near-Earth measurements of GCR particle energy spectra, typically over restricted energy regions and short time periods. In this work, we first review recent sensitivity studies quantifying the ions and energies in the ambient GCR environment of greatest importance to exposure quantities behind shielding. Currently available measurements used to calibrate and validate GCR models are also summarized within this context. It is shown that the AMS-II measurements will fill a critically important gap in the measurement database. The emergence of AMS-II measurements also provides a unique opportunity to validate existing models against measurements that were not used to calibrate free parameters in the empirical descriptions. Discussion is given regarding rigorous approaches to implement the independent validation efforts, followed by recalibration of empirical parameters.

  17. A Stochastic Model of Space Radiation Transport as a Tool in the Development of Time-Dependent Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Nounu, Hatem N.; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    A new computer model, the GCR Event-based Risk Model code (GERMcode), was developed to describe biophysical events from high-energy protons and heavy ions that have been studied at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) [1] for the purpose of simulating space radiation biological effects. In the GERMcode, the biophysical description of the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials is made with a stochastic approach that includes both ion track structure and nuclear interactions. The GERMcode accounts for the major nuclear interaction processes of importance for describing heavy ion beams, including nuclear fragmentation, elastic scattering, and knockout-cascade processes by using the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation (QMSFRG) model [2]. The QMSFRG model has been shown to be in excellent agreement with available experimental data for nuclear fragmentation cross sections

  18. Influence of low glycolytic activities in gcr1 and gcr2 mutants on the expression of other metabolic pathway genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hiromi; Uemura, Hiroshi

    2005-01-30

    A complex of the transcription factors Gcr1p and Gcr2p coordinately regulates the expression of glycolytic genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To understand the effects of gcr mutations on other metabolic pathways, genome-wide gene expression profiles in gcr1 and gcr2 mutants were examined. The biggest effects of gcr1 and gcr2 mutations were observed on the glycolytic genes and the expressions of most of the glycolytic genes were substantially decreased compared to those in the wild-type strain in both glucose and glycerol+lactate growth conditions. On the other hand, the expressions of genes encoding the TCA cycle and respiration were increased in gcr mutants when the cells were grown in glucose. RT-PCR analyses revealed that the expression of SIP4 and HAP5, which are known to affect the expression of some of the gluconeogenic, TCA cycle and respiratory genes, were also increased under this condition. The growth of gcr mutants on glucose was impaired by adding respiration inhibitor antimycin A, whereas the growth of the wild-type strain was not. The conversion of glucose to biomass was higher and, to the contrary, ethanol yield was lower in the gcr2 mutant compared to those in the wild-type strain. These results suggest the possibility that the gcr mutants, in which glycolytic activities are low, changed their metabolic patterns under glucose growth condition to enhance the expression of TCA cycle and respiratory genes to produce more energy.

  19. GCR Simulator Development Status at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, T. C.; Norbury, J. W.; Blattnig, S. R.

    2015-01-01

    There are large uncertainties connected to the biological response for exposure to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) on long duration deep space missions. In order to reduce the uncertainties and gain understanding about the basic mechanisms through which space radiation initiates cancer and other endpoints, radiobiology experiments are performed with mono-energetic ions beams. Some of the accelerator facilities supporting such experiments have matured to a point where simulating the broad range of particles and energies characteristic of the GCR environment in a single experiment is feasible from a technology, usage, and cost perspective. In this work, several aspects of simulating the GCR environment at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) are discussed. First, comparisons are made between direct simulation of the external, free space GCR field, and simulation of the induced tissue field behind shielding. It is found that upper energy constraints at NSRL limit the ability to simulate the external, free space field directly (i.e. shielding placed in the beam line in front of a biological target and exposed to a free space spectrum). Second, a reference environment for the GCR simulator and suitable for deep space missions is identified and described in terms of fluence and integrated dosimetric quantities. Analysis results are given to justify the use of a single reference field over a range of shielding conditions and solar activities. Third, an approach for simulating the reference field at NSRL is presented. The approach directly considers the hydrogen and helium energy spectra, and the heavier ions are collectively represented by considering the linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum. While many more aspects of the experimental setup need to be considered before final implementation of the GCR simulator, this preliminary study provides useful information that should aid the final design. Possible drawbacks of the proposed methodology are discussed and weighed

  20. Host Event Based Network Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan Chugg

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of INL’s research on this project is to demonstrate the feasibility of a host event based network monitoring tool and the effects on host performance. Current host based network monitoring tools work on polling which can miss activity if it occurs between polls. Instead of polling, a tool could be developed that makes use of event APIs in the operating system to receive asynchronous notifications of network activity. Analysis and logging of these events will allow the tool to construct the complete real-time and historical network configuration of the host while the tool is running. This research focused on three major operating systems commonly used by SCADA systems: Linux, WindowsXP, and Windows7. Windows 7 offers two paths that have minimal impact on the system and should be seriously considered. First is the new Windows Event Logging API, and, second, Windows 7 offers the ALE API within WFP. Any future work should focus on these methods.

  1. Model Estimated GCR Particle Flux Variation - Assessment with CRIS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saganti, Premkumar

    We present model calculated particle flux as a function of time during the current solar cycle along with the comparisons from the ACE/CRIS data and the Mars/MARIE data. In our model calculations we make use of the NASA's HZETRN (High Z and Energy Transport) code along with the nuclear fragmentation cross sections that are described by the quantum multiple scattering (QMSFRG) model. The time dependant variation of the GCR environment is derived making use of the solar modulation potential, phi. For the past ten years, Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) has been in orbit at the Sun- Earth libration point (L1). Data from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) instrument onboard the ACE spacecraft has been available from 1997 through the present time. Our model calculated particle flux showed high degree of correlation during the earlier phase of the current solar cycle (2003) in the lower Z region within 15

  2. Asynchronous event-based hebbian epipolar geometry.

    PubMed

    Benosman, Ryad; Ieng, Sio-Hoï; Rogister, Paul; Posch, Christoph

    2011-11-01

    Epipolar geometry, the cornerstone of perspective stereo vision, has been studied extensively since the advent of computer vision. Establishing such a geometric constraint is of primary importance, as it allows the recovery of the 3-D structure of scenes. Estimating the epipolar constraints of nonperspective stereo is difficult, they can no longer be defined because of the complexity of the sensor geometry. This paper will show that these limitations are, to some extent, a consequence of the static image frames commonly used in vision. The conventional frame-based approach suffers from a lack of the dynamics present in natural scenes. We introduce the use of neuromorphic event-based--rather than frame-based--vision sensors for perspective stereo vision. This type of sensor uses the dimension of time as the main conveyor of information. In this paper, we present a model for asynchronous event-based vision, which is then used to derive a general new concept of epipolar geometry linked to the temporal activation of pixels. Practical experiments demonstrate the validity of the approach, solving the problem of estimating the fundamental matrix applied, in a first stage, to classic perspective vision and then to more general cameras. Furthermore, this paper shows that the properties of event-based vision sensors allow the exploration of not-yet-defined geometric relationships, finally, we provide a definition of general epipolar geometry deployable to almost any visual sensor. PMID:21954205

  3. Asynchronous event-based hebbian epipolar geometry.

    PubMed

    Benosman, Ryad; Ieng, Sio-Hoï; Rogister, Paul; Posch, Christoph

    2011-11-01

    Epipolar geometry, the cornerstone of perspective stereo vision, has been studied extensively since the advent of computer vision. Establishing such a geometric constraint is of primary importance, as it allows the recovery of the 3-D structure of scenes. Estimating the epipolar constraints of nonperspective stereo is difficult, they can no longer be defined because of the complexity of the sensor geometry. This paper will show that these limitations are, to some extent, a consequence of the static image frames commonly used in vision. The conventional frame-based approach suffers from a lack of the dynamics present in natural scenes. We introduce the use of neuromorphic event-based--rather than frame-based--vision sensors for perspective stereo vision. This type of sensor uses the dimension of time as the main conveyor of information. In this paper, we present a model for asynchronous event-based vision, which is then used to derive a general new concept of epipolar geometry linked to the temporal activation of pixels. Practical experiments demonstrate the validity of the approach, solving the problem of estimating the fundamental matrix applied, in a first stage, to classic perspective vision and then to more general cameras. Furthermore, this paper shows that the properties of event-based vision sensors allow the exploration of not-yet-defined geometric relationships, finally, we provide a definition of general epipolar geometry deployable to almost any visual sensor.

  4. Asynchronous event-based binocular stereo matching.

    PubMed

    Rogister, Paul; Benosman, Ryad; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Lichtsteiner, Patrick; Delbruck, Tobi

    2012-02-01

    We present a novel event-based stereo matching algorithm that exploits the asynchronous visual events from a pair of silicon retinas. Unlike conventional frame-based cameras, recent artificial retinas transmit their outputs as a continuous stream of asynchronous temporal events, in a manner similar to the output cells of the biological retina. Our algorithm uses the timing information carried by this representation in addressing the stereo-matching problem on moving objects. Using the high temporal resolution of the acquired data stream for the dynamic vision sensor, we show that matching on the timing of the visual events provides a new solution to the real-time computation of 3-D objects when combined with geometric constraints using the distance to the epipolar lines. The proposed algorithm is able to filter out incorrect matches and to accurately reconstruct the depth of moving objects despite the low spatial resolution of the sensor. This brief sets up the principles for further event-based vision processing and demonstrates the importance of dynamic information and spike timing in processing asynchronous streams of visual events. PMID:24808513

  5. Effect of Implantation Sequence on Tribological Behavior of GCr15 Steel by PBII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Le; Zhou, Hui; Cao, Guojian; Tang, Guangze; Ma, Xinxin; Wang, Liqin

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, the effect of implantation sequence on tribological behavior of GCr15 steel treated by plasma-based ion implantation of carbon and nitrogen has been investigated. The treated GCr15 steels were characterized for microstructure and abrasive wear performance through combination of Raman spectroscopy, nano-indentation, and wear tests. Raman spectroscopy indicated that diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were formed after implantation of carbon with or without implantation of nitrogen, and the implantation of nitrogen after the implantation of carbon destroyed the graphite structure of the DLC films. The nano-indentation and wear tests showed that nanohardness as well as wear resistance of the GCr15 steel treated with the implantation sequence of nitrogen-carbon was better than those with the implantation sequence of carbon-nitrogen. Meanwhile, the properties were improved with increasing of carbon ion fluence.

  6. GCR1, a transcriptional activator in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, complexes with RAP1 and can function without its DNA binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Tornow, J; Zeng, X; Gao, W; Santangelo, G M

    1993-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, efficient expression of glycolytic and translational component genes requires two DNA binding proteins, RAP1 (which binds to UASRPG) and GCR1 (which binds to the CT box). We generated deletions in GCR1 to test the validity of several different models for GCR1 function. We report here that the C-terminal half of GCR1, which includes the domain required for DNA binding to the CT box in vitro, can be removed without affecting GCR1-dependent transcription of either the glycolytic gene ADH1 or the translational component genes TEF1 and TEF2. We have also identified an activation domain within a segment of the GCR1 protein (the N-terminal third) that is essential for in vivo function. RAP1 and GCR1 can be co-immunoprecipitated from whole cell extracts, suggesting that they form a complex in vivo. The data are most consistent with a model in which GCR1 is attracted to DNA through contact with RAP1. Images PMID:8508768

  7. GCR Simulator Reference Field and a Spectral Approach for Laboratory Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norbury, John W.; Rusek, Adam; La Tessa, Chiara; Walker, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    The galactic cosmic ray (GCR) simulator at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) is intended to deliver the broad spectrum of particles and energies encountered in deep space to biological targets in a controlled laboratory setting. In this work, certain aspects of simulating the GCR environment in the laboratory are discussed. Reference field specification and beam selection strategies at NSRL are the main focus, but the analysis presented herein may be modified for other facilities. First, comparisons are made between direct simulation of the external, free space GCR field and simulation of the induced tissue field behind shielding. It is found that upper energy constraints at NSRL limit the ability to simulate the external, free space field directly (i.e. shielding placed in the beam line in front of a biological target and exposed to a free space spectrum). Second, variation in the induced tissue field associated with shielding configuration and solar activity is addressed. It is found that the observed variation is likely within the uncertainty associated with representing any GCR reference field with discrete ion beams in the laboratory, given current facility constraints. A single reference field for deep space missions is subsequently identified. Third, an approach for selecting beams at NSRL to simulate the designated reference field is presented. Drawbacks of the proposed methodology are discussed and weighed against alternative simulation strategies. The neutron component and track structure characteristics of the simulated field are discussed in this context.

  8. Reference field specification and preliminary beam selection strategy for accelerator-based GCR simulation.

    PubMed

    Slaba, Tony C; Blattnig, Steve R; Norbury, John W; Rusek, Adam; La Tessa, Chiara

    2016-02-01

    The galactic cosmic ray (GCR) simulator at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) is intended to deliver the broad spectrum of particles and energies encountered in deep space to biological targets in a controlled laboratory setting. In this work, certain aspects of simulating the GCR environment in the laboratory are discussed. Reference field specification and beam selection strategies at NSRL are the main focus, but the analysis presented herein may be modified for other facilities and possible biological considerations. First, comparisons are made between direct simulation of the external, free space GCR field and simulation of the induced tissue field behind shielding. It is found that upper energy constraints at NSRL limit the ability to simulate the external, free space field directly (i.e. shielding placed in the beam line in front of a biological target and exposed to a free space spectrum). Second, variation in the induced tissue field associated with shielding configuration and solar activity is addressed. It is found that the observed variation is likely within the uncertainty associated with representing any GCR reference field with discrete ion beams in the laboratory, given current facility constraints. A single reference field for deep space missions is subsequently identified. Third, a preliminary approach for selecting beams at NSRL to simulate the designated reference field is presented. This approach is not a final design for the GCR simulator, but rather a single step within a broader design strategy. It is shown that the beam selection methodology is tied directly to the reference environment, allows facility constraints to be incorporated, and may be adjusted to account for additional constraints imposed by biological or animal care considerations. The major biology questions are not addressed herein but are discussed in a companion paper published in the present issue of this journal. Drawbacks of the proposed methodology are discussed

  9. Reference field specification and preliminary beam selection strategy for accelerator-based GCR simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norbury, John W.; Rusek, Adam; La Tessa, Chiara

    2016-02-01

    The galactic cosmic ray (GCR) simulator at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) is intended to deliver the broad spectrum of particles and energies encountered in deep space to biological targets in a controlled laboratory setting. In this work, certain aspects of simulating the GCR environment in the laboratory are discussed. Reference field specification and beam selection strategies at NSRL are the main focus, but the analysis presented herein may be modified for other facilities and possible biological considerations. First, comparisons are made between direct simulation of the external, free space GCR field and simulation of the induced tissue field behind shielding. It is found that upper energy constraints at NSRL limit the ability to simulate the external, free space field directly (i.e. shielding placed in the beam line in front of a biological target and exposed to a free space spectrum). Second, variation in the induced tissue field associated with shielding configuration and solar activity is addressed. It is found that the observed variation is likely within the uncertainty associated with representing any GCR reference field with discrete ion beams in the laboratory, given current facility constraints. A single reference field for deep space missions is subsequently identified. Third, a preliminary approach for selecting beams at NSRL to simulate the designated reference field is presented. This approach is not a final design for the GCR simulator, but rather a single step within a broader design strategy. It is shown that the beam selection methodology is tied directly to the reference environment, allows facility constraints to be incorporated, and may be adjusted to account for additional constraints imposed by biological or animal care considerations. The major biology questions are not addressed herein but are discussed in a companion paper published in the present issue of this journal. Drawbacks of the proposed methodology are discussed

  10. Multi-field coupled numerical simulation of hot reversible rolling process of GCr15 steel rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Sendong; Zhang, Liwen; Ruan, Jinhua; Mei, Hongyu; Zhen, Yu; Shi, Xinhua

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, based on rolling technology of hot reversible rolling mill, a multi-filed coupled finite element (FE) model of hot reversible rolling process of large dimension cross-section GCr15 steel rod is established. Thermal, mechanical and microstructural phenomena during the rolling process are coupled in the model. By employing grain growth experiment, double and single hit hot compression experiments, the austenite grain size growth mathematical model and recrystallization behavior mathematical models are determined. And a designed subprogram is coupled in the FE model. Actual hot reversible rolling process of GCr15 steel is simulated using the model and the distribution and evolution of different filed-variables, such as temperature, effective strain and austenite grain size are obtained. To verify the model predictions, hot rolling experiments are carried out and the temperature and microstructure of the rolling metal are compared with the predicted results. The comparison between the two sets of data shows a good agreement.

  11. A Reference Field for GCR Simulation and an LET-Based Implementation at NSRL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Walker, Steven A.; Norbury, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) on long duration deep space missions presents a serious health risk to astronauts, with large uncertainties connected to the biological response. In order to reduce the uncertainties and gain understanding about the basic mechanisms through which space radiation initiates cancer and other endpoints, radiobiology experiments are performed. Some of the accelerator facilities supporting such experiments have matured to a point where simulating the broad range of particles and energies characteristic of the GCR environment in a single experiment is feasible from a technology, usage, and cost perspective. In this work, several aspects of simulating the GCR environment in the laboratory are discussed. First, comparisons are made between direct simulation of the external, free space GCR field and simulation of the induced tissue field behind shielding. It is found that upper energy constraints at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) limit the ability to simulate the external, free space field directly (i.e. shielding placed in the beam line in front of a biological target and exposed to a free space spectrum). Second, variation in the induced tissue field associated with shielding configuration and solar activity is addressed. It is found that the observed variation is within physical uncertainties, allowing a single reference field for deep space missions to be defined. Third, an approach for simulating the reference field at NSRL is presented. The approach allows for the linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum of the reference field to be approximately represented with discrete ion and energy beams and implicitly maintains a reasonably accurate charge spectrum (or, average quality factor). Drawbacks of the proposed methodology are discussed and weighed against alternative simulation strategies. The neutron component and track structure characteristics of the proposed strategy are discussed in this context.

  12. Badhwar-O'Neil 2007 Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) Model Using Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) Measurements for Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeill, P. M.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite measurements of the galactic cosmic ray flux and correlation with the Climax Neutron Monitor count over Solar Cycle 23 are used to update the Badhwar O'Neill Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) model.

  13. Characterization of the DNA-binding activity of GCR1: in vivo evidence for two GCR1-binding sites in the upstream activating sequence of TPI of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Huie, M A; Scott, E W; Drazinic, C M; Lopez, M C; Hornstra, I K; Yang, T P; Baker, H V

    1992-01-01

    GCR1 gene function is required for high-level glycolytic gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Recently, we suggested that the CTTCC sequence motif found in front of many genes encoding glycolytic enzymes lay at the core of the GCR1-binding site. Here we mapped the DNA-binding domain of GCR1 to the carboxy-terminal 154 amino acids of the polypeptide. DNase I protection studies showed that a hybrid MBP-GCR1 fusion protein protected a region of the upstream activating sequence of TPI (UASTPI), which harbored the CTTCC sequence motif, and suggested that the fusion protein might also interact with a region of the UAS that contained the related sequence CATCC. A series of in vivo G methylation protection experiments of the native TPI promoter were carried out with wild-type and gcr1 deletion mutant strains. The G doublets that correspond to the C doublets in each site were protected in the wild-type strain but not in the gcr1 mutant strain. These data demonstrate that the UAS of TPI contains two GCR1-binding sites which are occupied in vivo. Furthermore, adjacent RAP1/GRF1/TUF- and REB1/GRF2/QBP/Y-binding sites in UASTPI were occupied in the backgrounds of both strains. In addition, DNA band-shift assays were used to show that the MBP-GCR1 fusion protein was able to form nucleoprotein complexes with oligonucleotides that contained CTTCC sequence elements found in front of other glycolytic genes, namely, PGK, ENO1, PYK, and ADH1, all of which are dependent on GCR1 gene function for full expression. However, we were unable to detect specific interactions with CTTCC sequence elements found in front of the translational component genes TEF1, TEF2, and CRY1. Taken together, these experiments have allowed us to propose a consensus GCR1-binding site which is 5'-(T/A)N(T/C)N(G/A)NC(T/A)TCC(T/A)N(T/A)(T/A)(T/G)-3'. Images PMID:1588965

  14. Asynchronous visual event-based time-to-contact.

    PubMed

    Clady, Xavier; Clercq, Charles; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Houseini, Fouzhan; Randazzo, Marco; Natale, Lorenzo; Bartolozzi, Chiara; Benosman, Ryad

    2014-01-01

    Reliable and fast sensing of the environment is a fundamental requirement for autonomous mobile robotic platforms. Unfortunately, the frame-based acquisition paradigm at the basis of main stream artificial perceptive systems is limited by low temporal dynamics and redundant data flow, leading to high computational costs. Hence, conventional sensing and relative computation are obviously incompatible with the design of high speed sensor-based reactive control for mobile applications, that pose strict limits on energy consumption and computational load. This paper introduces a fast obstacle avoidance method based on the output of an asynchronous event-based time encoded imaging sensor. The proposed method relies on an event-based Time To Contact (TTC) computation based on visual event-based motion flows. The approach is event-based in the sense that every incoming event adds to the computation process thus allowing fast avoidance responses. The method is validated indoor on a mobile robot, comparing the event-based TTC with a laser range finder TTC, showing that event-based sensing offers new perspectives for mobile robotics sensing. PMID:24570652

  15. Asynchronous visual event-based time-to-contact.

    PubMed

    Clady, Xavier; Clercq, Charles; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Houseini, Fouzhan; Randazzo, Marco; Natale, Lorenzo; Bartolozzi, Chiara; Benosman, Ryad

    2014-01-01

    Reliable and fast sensing of the environment is a fundamental requirement for autonomous mobile robotic platforms. Unfortunately, the frame-based acquisition paradigm at the basis of main stream artificial perceptive systems is limited by low temporal dynamics and redundant data flow, leading to high computational costs. Hence, conventional sensing and relative computation are obviously incompatible with the design of high speed sensor-based reactive control for mobile applications, that pose strict limits on energy consumption and computational load. This paper introduces a fast obstacle avoidance method based on the output of an asynchronous event-based time encoded imaging sensor. The proposed method relies on an event-based Time To Contact (TTC) computation based on visual event-based motion flows. The approach is event-based in the sense that every incoming event adds to the computation process thus allowing fast avoidance responses. The method is validated indoor on a mobile robot, comparing the event-based TTC with a laser range finder TTC, showing that event-based sensing offers new perspectives for mobile robotics sensing.

  16. Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) Model of Titan and Formation of HCNO Exobiological Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sittler, Edward C.; Cooper, J. F.

    2014-01-01

    Saturn as a system has two very exotic moons Titan and Enceladus. Space radiation effects at both moons, and as coupled by the Saturn magnetosphere, could lead to the evolution of exobiological models at Titan composed of HCNO molecules. At Titan Cassini discovered that 1) keV oxygen ions, evidently from Enceladus, are bombarding Titan’s upper atmosphere (Hartle et al., 2006a,b) and 2) heavy positive and negative ions exist in significant abundances within Titan’s upper atmosphere (Coates et al., 2007). Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and fullerenes could form in Titan’s ionosphere. Laboratory measurements indicate that fullerenes, which are hollow carbon shells, can trap the keV oxygen ions. Clustering of the fullerenes with PAHs and the dominant nitrogen molecules could form larger aerosols enriched in trapped oxygen. Aerosol precipitation could then convey these chemically complex structures deeper into the atmosphere and to the moon surface. We estimate that GCR irradiation should dominate the chemical processing of the aerosols on the surface into more complex organic forms such as tholins and amino acids. To further quantify our results, we have developed an advanced model of GCR interaction with Titan’s atmosphere, surface and sub-surface. The model shows dose rates ~ 8x10-6 ergs/cm2/s at the surface which is ~ 4.2x10-9 erg/gm/s for tholin mass density ~ 1.8 gm/cm3. The GCR are found to penetrate ~ 50-100 m below the surface and may therefore also reach the bottom of Titan’s methane-ethane lakes. Reggie Hudson et al. (2008) showed that G-factor ~ 0.001 for Glycine. They used pure Acetonitrile CH3CN ices with very small water levels ~ 0.01% for O. So using G ~ 0.001 and GCR surface energy flux noted above at Titan’s surface we estimate abundance levels ~ 2-10 ppb of amino acids such as Glycine over 450 Myr period. Therefore, we conclude that this synergy of Saturn system, exogenic irradiation, and molecular processes provide a potential

  17. 27-day variation of the GCR intensity based on corrected and uncorrected for geomagnetic disturbances data of neutron monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alania, M. V.; Modzelewska, R.; Wawrzynczak, A.; Sdobnov, V. E.; Kravtsova, M. V.

    2015-08-01

    We study 27-day variations of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity for 2005-2008 period of the solar cycle #23. We use neutron monitors (NMs) data corrected and uncorrected for geomagnetic disturbances. Besides the limited time intervals when the 27-day variations are clearly established, always exist some feeble 27-day variations in the GCR intensity related to the constantly present weak heliolongitudinal asymmetry in the heliosphere. We calculate the amplitudes of the 27-day variation of the GCR intensity based on the NMs data corrected and uncorrected for geomagnetic disturbances. We show that these amplitudes do not differ for NMs with cut-off rigidities smaller than 4-5 GV comparing with NMs of higher cut-off rigidities. Rigidity spectrum of the 27-day variation of the GCR intensity found in the uncorrected data is soft while it is hard in the case of the corrected data. For both cases exists definite tendency of softening the temporal changes of the 27-day variation's rigidity spectrum in period of 2005 to 2008 approaching the minimum of solar activity. We believe that a study of the 27-day variation of the GCR intensity based on the data uncorrected for geomagnetic disturbances should be carried out by NMs with cut-off rigidities smaller than 4-5 GV.

  18. Miniaturized Hollow-Waveguide Gas Correlation Radiometer (GCR) for Trace Gas Detection in the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Emily L.; Georgieva, E. M.; Melroy, H. R.

    2012-01-01

    Gas correlation radiometry (GCR) has been shown to be a sensitive and versatile method for detecting trace gases in Earth's atmosphere. Here, we present a miniaturized and simplified version of this instrument capable of mapping multiple trace gases and identifying active regions on the Mars surface. Reduction of the size and mass of the GCR instrument has been achieved by implementing a lightweight, 1 mm inner diameter hollow-core optical fiber (hollow waveguide) for the gas correlation cell. Based on a comparison with an Earth orbiting CO2 gas correlation instrument, replacement of the 10 meter mUltipass cell with hollow waveguide of equivalent pathlength reduces the cell mass from approx 150 kg to approx 0.5 kg, and reduces the volume from 1.9 m x 1.3 m x 0.86 m to a small bundle of fiber coils approximately I meter in diameter by 0.05 m in height (mass and volume reductions of >99%). This modular instrument technique can be expanded to include measurements of additional species of interest including nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methanol (CH3OH), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) for a simultaneous measure of mass balance.

  19. Comparison of Transport Codes, HZETRN, HETC and FLUKA, Using 1977 GCR Solar Minimum Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, John H.; Slaba, Tony C.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norbury, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Handler, Thomas; Gabriel, Tony A.; Pinsky, Lawrence S.; Reddell, Brandon; Aumann, Aric R.

    2009-01-01

    The HZETRN deterministic radiation transport code is one of several tools developed to analyze the effects of harmful galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) on mission planning, astronaut shielding and instrumentation. This paper is a comparison study involving the two Monte Carlo transport codes, HETC-HEDS and FLUKA, and the deterministic transport code, HZETRN. Each code is used to transport ions from the 1977 solar minimum GCR spectrum impinging upon a 20 g/cm2 Aluminum slab followed by a 30 g/cm2 water slab. This research is part of a systematic effort of verification and validation to quantify the accuracy of HZETRN and determine areas where it can be improved. Comparisons of dose and dose equivalent values at various depths in the water slab are presented in this report. This is followed by a comparison of the proton fluxes, and the forward, backward and total neutron fluxes at various depths in the water slab. Comparisons of the secondary light ion 2H, 3H, 3He and 4He fluxes are also examined.

  20. GCR-induced Photon Luminescence of the Moon: The Moon as a CR Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Lee, Kerry; Andersen, Vic

    2007-01-01

    We report on the results of a preliminary study of the GCR-induced photon luminescence of the Moon using the Monte Carlo program FLUKA. The model of the lunar surface is taken to be the chemical composition of soils found at various landing sites during the Apollo and Luna programs, averaged over all such sites to define a generic regolith for the present analysis. This then becomes the target that is bombarded by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) in FLUKA to determine the photon fluence when there is no sunshine or Earthshine. From the photon fluence we derive the energy spectrum which can be utilized to design an orbiting optical instrument for measuring the GCR-induced luminescence. This is to be distinguished from the gamma-ray spectrum produced by the radioactive decay of its radiogenic constituents lying in the surface and interior. Also, we investigate transient optical flashes from high-energy CRs impacting the lunar surface (boulders and regolith). The goal is to determine to what extent the Moon could be used as a rudimentary CR detector. Meteor impacts on the Moon have been observed for centuries to generate such flashes, so why not CRs?

  1. Elemental GCR Observations during the 2009-2010 Solar Minimum Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lave, K. A.; Israel, M. H.; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; deNolfo, G. A.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), we present new measurements of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) elemental composition and energy spectra for the species B through Ni in the energy range approx. 50-550 MeV/nucleon during the record setting 2009-2010 solar minimum period. These data are compared with our observations from the 1997-1998 solar minimum period, when solar modulation in the heliosphere was somewhat higher. For these species, we find that the intensities during the 2009-2010 solar minimum were approx. 20% higher than those in the previous solar minimum, and in fact were the highest GCR intensities recorded during the space age. Relative abundances for these species during the two solar minimum periods differed by small but statistically significant amounts, which are attributed to the combination of spectral shape differences between primary and secondary GCRs in the interstellar medium and differences between the levels of solar modulation in the two solar minima. We also present the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe for both solar minimum periods, and demonstrate that these ratios are reasonably well fit by a simple "leaky-box" galactic transport model that is combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model.

  2. A Multinomial Model of Event-Based Prospective Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rebekah E.; Bayen, Ute J.

    2004-01-01

    Prospective memory is remembering to perform an action in the future. The authors introduce the 1st formal model of event-based prospective memory, namely, a multinomial model that includes 2 separate parameters related to prospective memory processes. The 1st measures preparatory attentional processes, and the 2nd measures retrospective memory…

  3. Secondary Cosmic Ray Particles Due to GCR Interactions in the Earth's Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Battistoni, G.; Cerutti, F.; Fasso, A.; Ferrari, A.; Garzelli, M.V.; Lantz, M.; Muraro, S. Pinsky, L.S.; Ranft, J.; Roesler, S.; Sala, P.R.; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2009-06-16

    Primary GCR interact with the Earth's atmosphere originating atmospheric showers, thus giving rise to fluxes of secondary particles in the atmosphere. Electromagnetic and hadronic interactions interplay in the production of these particles, whose detection is performed by means of complementary techniques in different energy ranges and at different depths in the atmosphere, down to the Earth's surface. Monte Carlo codes are essential calculation tools which can describe the complexity of the physics of these phenomena, thus allowing the analysis of experimental data. However, these codes are affected by important uncertainties, concerning, in particular, hadronic physics at high energy. In this paper we shall report some results concerning inclusive particle fluxes and atmospheric shower properties as obtained using the FLUKA transport and interaction code. Some emphasis will also be given to the validation of the physics models of FLUKA involved in these calculations.

  4. Nuclear fragmentation of GCR-like ions: comparisons between data and PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitlin, Cary; Guetersloh, Stephen; Heilbronn, Lawrence; Miller, Jack; Sihver, Lembit; Mancusi, Davide; Fukumura, Aki; Iwata, Yoshi; Murakami, Takeshi

    We present a summary of results from recent work in which we have compared nuclear fragmentation cross section data to predictions of the PHITS Monte Carlo simulation. The studies used beams of 12 C, 35 Cl, 40 Ar, 48 Ti, and 56 Fe at energies ranging from 290 MeV/nucleon to 1000 MeV/nucleon. Some of the data were obtained at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, others at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan. These energies and ion species are representative of the heavy ion component of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR), which contribute significantly to the dose and dose equivalent that will be received by astronauts on deep-space missions. A critical need for NASA is the ability to accurately model the transport of GCR heavy ions through matter, including spacecraft walls, equipment racks, and other shielding materials, as well as through tissue. Nuclear interaction cross sections are of primary importance in the GCR transport problem. These interactions generally cause the incoming ion to break up (fragment) into one or more lighter ions, which continue approximately along the initial trajectory and with approximately the same velocity the incoming ion had prior to the interaction. Since the radiation dose delivered by a particle is proportional to the square of the quantity (charge/velocity), i.e., to (Z/β)2 , fragmentation reduces the dose (and, typically, dose equivalent) delivered by incident ions. The other mechanism by which dose can be reduced is ionization energy loss, which can lead to some particles stopping in the shielding. This is the conventional notion of shielding, but it is not applicable to human spaceflight, since the particles in the GCR tend to be highly energetic and because shielding must be relatively thin in order to keep overall mass as low as possible, keeping launch costs within reason. To support these goals, our group has systematically measured a large number of nuclear cross sections, intended to be used as either

  5. Microstructure of warm rolling and pearlitic transformation of ultrafine-grained GCr15 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jun-Jie; Lian, Fu-Liang; Liu, Hong-Ji; Jiang, Tao; Guo, Sheng-Wu; Du, Lin-Xiu; Liu, Yong-Ning

    2014-09-15

    Pearlitic transformation mechanisms have been investigated in ultra-fine grained GCr15 steel. The ultrafine-grained steel, whose grain size was less than 1 μm, was prepared by thermo-mechanical treatment at 873 K and then annealing at 923 K for 2 h. Pearlitic transformation was conducted by reheating the ultra-fine grained samples at 1073 K and 1123 K for different periods of time and then cooling in air. Scanning electron microscope observation shows that normal lamellar pearlite, instead of granular cementite and ferrite, cannot be formed when the grain size is approximately less than 4(± 0.6) μm, which yields a critical grain size for normal lamellar pearlitic transformations in this chromium alloyed steel. The result confirms that grain size has a great influence on pearlitic transformation by increasing the diffusion rate of carbon atoms in the ultra-fine grained steel, and the addition of chromium element doesn't change this pearlitic phase transformation rule. Meanwhile, the grain growth rate is reduced by chromium alloying, which is beneficial to form fine grains during austenitizing, thus it facilitating pearlitic transformation by divorced eutectoid transformation. Moreover, chromium element can form a relatively high gradient in the frontier of the undissolved carbide, which promotes carbide formation in the frontier of the undissolved carbide, i.e., chromium promotes divorced eutectoid transformation. - Highlights: • Ultrafine-grained GCr15 steel was obtained by warm rolling and annealing technology. • Reduction of grain size makes pearlite morphology from lamellar to granular. • Adding Cr does not change normal pearlitic phase transformation rule in UFG steel. • Cr carbide resists grain growth and facilitates pearlitic transformation by DET.

  6. Mars Science Laboratory; A Model for Event-Based EPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Louis; Lewis, E.; Cline, T.; Stephenson, B.; Erickson, K.; Ng, C.

    2012-10-01

    The NASA Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and its Curiosity Rover, a part of NASA's Mars Exploration Program, represent the most ambitious undertaking to date to explore the red planet. MSL/Curiosity was designed primarily to determine whether Mars ever had an environment capable of supporting microbial life. NASA's MSL education program was designed to take advantage of existing, highly successful event based education programs to communicate Mars science and education themes to worldwide audiences through live webcasts, video interviews with scientists, TV broadcasts, professional development for teachers, and the latest social media frameworks. We report here on the success of the MSL education program and discuss how this methodological framework can be used to enhance other event based education programs.

  7. GCR Transport in the Brain: Assessment of Self-Shielding, Columnar Damage, and Nuclear Reactions on Cell Inactivation Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shavers, M. R.; Atwell, W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Badhwar, G. D. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Radiation shield design is driven by the need to limit radiation risks while optimizing risk reduction with launch mass/expense penalties. Both limitation and optimization objectives require the development of accurate and complete means for evaluating the effectiveness of various shield materials and body-self shielding. For galactic cosmic rays (GCR), biophysical response models indicate that track structure effects lead to substantially different assessments of shielding effectiveness relative to assessments based on LET-dependent quality factors. Methods for assessing risk to the central nervous system (CNS) from heavy ions are poorly understood at this time. High-energy and charge (HZE) ion can produce tissue events resulting in damage to clusters of cells in a columnar fashion, especially for stopping heavy ions. Grahn (1973) and Todd (1986) have discussed a microlesion concept or model of stochastic tissue events in analyzing damage from HZE's. Some tissues, including the CNS, maybe sensitive to microlesion's or stochastic tissue events in a manner not illuminated by either conventional dosimetry or fluence-based risk factors. HZE ions may also produce important lateral damage to adjacent cells. Fluences of high-energy proton and alpha particles in the GCR are many times higher than HZE ions. Behind spacecraft and body self-shielding the ratio of protons, alpha particles, and neutrons to HZE ions increases several-fold from free-space values. Models of GCR damage behind shielding have placed large concern on the role of target fragments produced from tissue atoms. The self-shielding of the brain reduces the number of heavy ions reaching the interior regions by a large amount and the remaining light particle environment (protons, neutrons, deuterons. and alpha particles) may be the greatest concern. Tracks of high-energy proton produce nuclear reactions in tissue, which can deposit doses of more than 1 Gv within 5 - 10 cell layers. Information on rates of

  8. Event-based processing of neutron scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Peter F.; Campbell, Stuart I.; Reuter, Michael A.; Taylor, Russell J.; Zikovsky, Janik

    2015-12-01

    Many of the world's time-of-flight spallation neutrons sources are migrating to recording individual neutron events. This provides for new opportunities in data processing, the least of which is to filter the events based on correlating them with logs of sample environment and other ancillary equipment. This paper will describe techniques for processing neutron scattering data acquired in event mode which preserve event information all the way to a final spectrum, including any necessary corrections or normalizations. This results in smaller final uncertainties compared to traditional methods, while significantly reducing processing time and memory requirements in typical experiments. Results with traditional histogramming techniques will be shown for comparison.

  9. Event-Based Processing of Neutron Scattering Data

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Peter F.; Campbell, Stuart I.; Reuter, Michael A.; Taylor, Russell J.; Zikovsky, Janik L.

    2015-09-16

    Many of the world's time-of-flight spallation neutrons sources are migrating to the recording of individual neutron events. This provides for new opportunities in data processing, the least of which is to filter the events based on correlating them with logs of sample environment and other ancillary equipment. This paper will describe techniques for processing neutron scattering data acquired in event mode that preserve event information all the way to a final spectrum, including any necessary corrections or normalizations. This results in smaller final errors, while significantly reducing processing time and memory requirements in typical experiments. Results with traditional histogramming techniques will be shown for comparison.

  10. Assessment and requirements of nuclear reaction databases for GCR transport in the atmosphere and structures.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, F A; Wilson, J W; Shinn, J L; Tripathi, R K

    1998-01-01

    The transport properties of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in the atmosphere, material structures, and human body (self-shielding) are of interest in risk assessment for supersonic and subsonic aircraft and for space travel in low-Earth orbit and on interplanetary missions. Nuclear reactions, such as knockout and fragmentation, present large modifications of particle type and energies of the galactic cosmic rays in penetrating materials. We make an assessment of the current nuclear reaction models and improvements in these model for developing required transport code data bases. A new fragmentation data base (QMSFRG) based on microscopic models is compared to the NUCFRG2 model and implications for shield assessment made using the HZETRN radiation transport code. For deep penetration problems, the build-up of light particles, such as nucleons, light clusters and mesons from nuclear reactions in conjunction with the absorption of the heavy ions, leads to the dominance of the charge Z = 0, 1, and 2 hadrons in the exposures at large penetration depths. Light particles are produced through nuclear or cluster knockout and in evaporation events with characteristically distinct spectra which play unique roles in the build-up of secondary radiation's in shielding. We describe models of light particle production in nucleon and heavy ion induced reactions and make an assessment of the importance of light particle multiplicity and spectral parameters in these exposures.

  11. Assessment and Requirements of Nuclear Reaction Databases for GCR Transport in the Atmosphere and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Tripathi, R. K.

    1998-01-01

    The transport properties of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in the atmosphere, material structures, and human body (self-shielding) am of interest in risk assessment for supersonic and subsonic aircraft and for space travel in low-Earth orbit and on interplanetary missions. Nuclear reactions, such as knockout and fragmentation, present large modifications of particle type and energies of the galactic cosmic rays in penetrating materials. We make an assessment of the current nuclear reaction models and improvements in these model for developing required transport code data bases. A new fragmentation data base (QMSFRG) based on microscopic models is compared to the NUCFRG2 model and implications for shield assessment made using the HZETRN radiation transport code. For deep penetration problems, the build-up of light particles, such as nucleons, light clusters and mesons from nuclear reactions in conjunction with the absorption of the heavy ions, leads to the dominance of the charge Z = 0, 1, and 2 hadrons in the exposures at large penetration depths. Light particles are produced through nuclear or cluster knockout and in evaporation events with characteristically distinct spectra which play unique roles in the build-up of secondary radiation's in shielding. We describe models of light particle production in nucleon and heavy ion induced reactions and make an assessment of the importance of light particle multiplicity and spectral parameters in these exposures.

  12. Model Calculations with Excited Nuclear Fragmentations and Implications of Current GCR Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saganti, Premkumar

    As a result of the fragmentation process in nuclei, energy from the excited states may also contribute to the radiation damage on the cell structure. Radiation induced damage to the human body from the excited states of oxygen and several other nuclei and its fragments are of a concern in the context of the measured abundance of the current galactic cosmic rays (GCR) environment. Nuclear Shell model based calculations of the Selective-Core (Saganti-Cucinotta) approach are being expanded for O-16 nuclei fragments into N-15 with a proton knockout and O-15 with a neutron knockout are very promising. In our on going expansions of these nuclear fragmentation model calculations and assessments, we present some of the prominent nuclei interactions from a total of 190 isotopes that were identified for the current model expansion based on the Quantum Multiple Scattering Fragmentation Model (QMSFRG) of Cucinotta. Radiation transport model calculations with the implementation of these energy level spectral characteristics are expected to enhance the understanding of radiation damage at the cellular level. Implications of these excited energy spectral calculations in the assessment of radiation damage to the human body may provide enhanced understanding of the space radiation risk assessment.

  13. MHD compressor---expander conversion system integrated with GCR inside a deployable reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Tuninetti, G. . Research Div.); Botta, E.; Criscuolo, C.; Riscossa, P. . Nuclear Div.); Giammanco, F. . Dipt. di Fisica); Rosa-Clot, M. . Dipt. di Fisica)

    1989-04-20

    This work originates from the proposal MHD Compressor-Expander Conversion System Integrated with a GCR Inside a Deployable Reflector''. The proposal concerned an innovative concept of nuclear, closed-cycle MHD converter for power generation on space-based systems in the multi-megawatt range. The basic element of this converter is the Power Conversion Unit (PCU) consisting of a gas core reactor directly coupled to an MHD expansion channel. Integrated with the PCU, a deployable reflector provides reactivity control. The working fluid could be either uranium hexafluoride or a mixture of uranium hexafluoride and helium, added to enhance the heat transfer properties. The original Statement of Work, which concerned the whole conversion system, was subsequently redirected and focused on the basic mechanisms of neutronics, reactivity control, ionization and electrical conductivity in the PCU. Furthermore, the study was required to be inherently generic such that the study was required to be inherently generic such that the analysis an results can be applied to various nuclear reactor and/or MHD channel designs''.

  14. SALT spectroscopic classification of PS16eho (= SN 2016gcr) as a type-Ia supernova after maximum light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, S. W.; Dettman, K.; Pan, Y.-C.; Foley, R. J.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.; Kotze, M.

    2016-09-01

    We obtained SALT (+RSS) spectroscopy of PS16eho (= SN 2016gcr) on 2016 Sep 12.0 UT, covering the wavelength range 350-930 nm. The spectrum is significantly contaminated with host galaxy light, and we confirm the redshift of the host galaxy 2MASX J22321713-2342106 z = 0.065 (Colless et al. 2003, 2dFGRS, arXiv:astroph/0306581; via NED) with numerous absorption and emission lines.

  15. Event-Based Processing of Neutron Scattering Data

    DOE PAGES

    Peterson, Peter F.; Campbell, Stuart I.; Reuter, Michael A.; Taylor, Russell J.; Zikovsky, Janik L.

    2015-09-16

    Many of the world's time-of-flight spallation neutrons sources are migrating to the recording of individual neutron events. This provides for new opportunities in data processing, the least of which is to filter the events based on correlating them with logs of sample environment and other ancillary equipment. This paper will describe techniques for processing neutron scattering data acquired in event mode that preserve event information all the way to a final spectrum, including any necessary corrections or normalizations. This results in smaller final errors, while significantly reducing processing time and memory requirements in typical experiments. Results with traditional histogramming techniquesmore » will be shown for comparison.« less

  16. Event-based exponential synchronization of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Liao, Xiaofeng; Huang, Tingwen

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we consider exponential synchronization of complex networks. The information diffusions between nodes are driven by properly defined events. By employing the M-matrix theory, algebraic graph theory and the Lyapunov method, two kinds of distributed event-triggering laws are designed, which avoid continuous communications between nodes. Then, several criteria that ensure the event-based exponential synchronization are presented, and the exponential convergence rates are obtained as well. Furthermore, we prove that Zeno behavior of the event-triggering laws can be excluded before synchronization being achieved, that is, the lower bounds of inter-event times are strictly positive. Finally, a simulation example is provided to illustrate the effectiveness of theoretical analysis.

  17. Event-based exponential synchronization of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Liao, Xiaofeng; Huang, Tingwen

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we consider exponential synchronization of complex networks. The information diffusions between nodes are driven by properly defined events. By employing the M-matrix theory, algebraic graph theory and the Lyapunov method, two kinds of distributed event-triggering laws are designed, which avoid continuous communications between nodes. Then, several criteria that ensure the event-based exponential synchronization are presented, and the exponential convergence rates are obtained as well. Furthermore, we prove that Zeno behavior of the event-triggering laws can be excluded before synchronization being achieved, that is, the lower bounds of inter-event times are strictly positive. Finally, a simulation example is provided to illustrate the effectiveness of theoretical analysis. PMID:27668021

  18. Determining the Magnitude of Neutron and Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) Fluxes at the Moon using the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector during the Historic Space-Age Era of High GCR Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, G.; Sagdeev, R.; Boynton, W. V.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Milikh, G. M.; Su, J. J.; Livengood, T. A.; McClanahan, T. P.; Evans, L.; Starr, R. D.; litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) was launched June 18, 2009 during an historic space-age era of minimum solar activity [1]. The lack of solar sunspot activity signaled a complex set of heliospheric phenomena [2,3,4] that also gave rise to a period of unprecedentedly high Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) flux [5]. These events coincided with the primary mission of the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND, [6]), onboard LRO in a nominal 50-km circular orbit of the Moon [7]. Methods to calculate the emergent neutron albedo population using Monte Carlo techniques [8] rely on an estimate of the GCR flux and spectra calibrated at differing periods of solar activity [9,10,11]. Estimating the actual GCR flux at the Moon during the LEND's initial period of operation requires a correction using a model-dependent heliospheric transport modulation parameter [12] to adjust the GCR flux appropriate to this unique solar cycle. These corrections have inherent uncertainties depending on model details [13]. Precisely determining the absolute neutron and GCR fluxes is especially important in understanding the emergent lunar neutrons measured by LEND and subsequently in estimating the hydrogen/water content in the lunar regolith [6]. LEND is constructed with a set of neutron detectors to meet differing purposes [6]. Specifically there are two sets of detector systems that measure the flux of epithermal neutrons: a) the uncollimated Sensor for Epi-Thermal Neutrons (SETN) and b) the Collimated Sensor for Epi-Thermal Neutrons (CSETN). LEND SETN and CSETN observations form a complementary set of simultaneous measurements that determine the absolute scale of emergent lunar neutron flux in an unambiguous fashion and without the need for correcting to differing solar-cycle conditions. LEND measurements are combined with a detailed understanding of the sources of instrumental back-ground, and the performance of CSETN and SETN. This comparison allows us to calculate a constant scale factor

  19. DNA binding of the cell cycle transcriptional regulator GcrA depends on N6-adenosine methylation in Caulobacter crescentus and other Alphaproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Fumeaux, Coralie; Mohapatra, Saswat S; Bompard, Coralie; Brilli, Matteo; Frandi, Antonio; Castric, Vincent; Villeret, Vincent; Viollier, Patrick H; Biondi, Emanuele G

    2013-05-01

    Several regulators are involved in the control of cell cycle progression in the bacterial model system Caulobacter crescentus, which divides asymmetrically into a vegetative G1-phase (swarmer) cell and a replicative S-phase (stalked) cell. Here we report a novel functional interaction between the enigmatic cell cycle regulator GcrA and the N6-adenosine methyltransferase CcrM, both highly conserved proteins among Alphaproteobacteria, that are activated early and at the end of S-phase, respectively. As no direct biochemical and regulatory relationship between GcrA and CcrM were known, we used a combination of ChIP (chromatin-immunoprecipitation), biochemical and biophysical experimentation, and genetics to show that GcrA is a dimeric DNA-binding protein that preferentially targets promoters harbouring CcrM methylation sites. After tracing CcrM-dependent N6-methyl-adenosine promoter marks at a genome-wide scale, we show that these marks recruit GcrA in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we found that, in the presence of a methylated target, GcrA recruits the RNA polymerase to the promoter, consistent with its role in transcriptional activation. Since methylation-dependent DNA binding is also observed with GcrA orthologs from other Alphaproteobacteria, we conclude that GcrA is the founding member of a new and conserved class of transcriptional regulators that function as molecular effectors of a methylation-dependent (non-heritable) epigenetic switch that regulates gene expression during the cell cycle.

  20. Neuromorphic Event-Based 3D Pose Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Reverter Valeiras, David; Orchard, Garrick; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Benosman, Ryad B.

    2016-01-01

    Pose estimation is a fundamental step in many artificial vision tasks. It consists of estimating the 3D pose of an object with respect to a camera from the object's 2D projection. Current state of the art implementations operate on images. These implementations are computationally expensive, especially for real-time applications. Scenes with fast dynamics exceeding 30–60 Hz can rarely be processed in real-time using conventional hardware. This paper presents a new method for event-based 3D object pose estimation, making full use of the high temporal resolution (1 μs) of asynchronous visual events output from a single neuromorphic camera. Given an initial estimate of the pose, each incoming event is used to update the pose by combining both 3D and 2D criteria. We show that the asynchronous high temporal resolution of the neuromorphic camera allows us to solve the problem in an incremental manner, achieving real-time performance at an update rate of several hundreds kHz on a conventional laptop. We show that the high temporal resolution of neuromorphic cameras is a key feature for performing accurate pose estimation. Experiments are provided showing the performance of the algorithm on real data, including fast moving objects, occlusions, and cases where the neuromorphic camera and the object are both in motion. PMID:26834547

  1. Event-Based User Classification in Weibo Media

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wendong; Cheng, Shiduan; Que, Xirong

    2014-01-01

    Weibo media, known as the real-time microblogging services, has attracted massive attention and support from social network users. Weibo platform offers an opportunity for people to access information and changes the way people acquire and disseminate information significantly. Meanwhile, it enables people to respond to the social events in a more convenient way. Much of the information in Weibo media is related to some events. Users who post different contents, and exert different behavior or attitude may lead to different contribution to the specific event. Therefore, classifying the large amount of uncategorized social circles generated in Weibo media automatically from the perspective of events has been a promising task. Under this circumstance, in order to effectively organize and manage the huge amounts of users, thereby further managing their contents, we address the task of user classification in a more granular, event-based approach in this paper. By analyzing real data collected from Sina Weibo, we investigate the Weibo properties and utilize both content information and social network information to classify the numerous users into four primary groups: celebrities, organizations/media accounts, grassroots stars, and ordinary individuals. The experiments results show that our method identifies the user categories accurately. PMID:25133235

  2. Neuromorphic Event-Based 3D Pose Estimation.

    PubMed

    Reverter Valeiras, David; Orchard, Garrick; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Benosman, Ryad B

    2015-01-01

    Pose estimation is a fundamental step in many artificial vision tasks. It consists of estimating the 3D pose of an object with respect to a camera from the object's 2D projection. Current state of the art implementations operate on images. These implementations are computationally expensive, especially for real-time applications. Scenes with fast dynamics exceeding 30-60 Hz can rarely be processed in real-time using conventional hardware. This paper presents a new method for event-based 3D object pose estimation, making full use of the high temporal resolution (1 μs) of asynchronous visual events output from a single neuromorphic camera. Given an initial estimate of the pose, each incoming event is used to update the pose by combining both 3D and 2D criteria. We show that the asynchronous high temporal resolution of the neuromorphic camera allows us to solve the problem in an incremental manner, achieving real-time performance at an update rate of several hundreds kHz on a conventional laptop. We show that the high temporal resolution of neuromorphic cameras is a key feature for performing accurate pose estimation. Experiments are provided showing the performance of the algorithm on real data, including fast moving objects, occlusions, and cases where the neuromorphic camera and the object are both in motion.

  3. Neuromorphic Event-Based 3D Pose Estimation.

    PubMed

    Reverter Valeiras, David; Orchard, Garrick; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Benosman, Ryad B

    2015-01-01

    Pose estimation is a fundamental step in many artificial vision tasks. It consists of estimating the 3D pose of an object with respect to a camera from the object's 2D projection. Current state of the art implementations operate on images. These implementations are computationally expensive, especially for real-time applications. Scenes with fast dynamics exceeding 30-60 Hz can rarely be processed in real-time using conventional hardware. This paper presents a new method for event-based 3D object pose estimation, making full use of the high temporal resolution (1 μs) of asynchronous visual events output from a single neuromorphic camera. Given an initial estimate of the pose, each incoming event is used to update the pose by combining both 3D and 2D criteria. We show that the asynchronous high temporal resolution of the neuromorphic camera allows us to solve the problem in an incremental manner, achieving real-time performance at an update rate of several hundreds kHz on a conventional laptop. We show that the high temporal resolution of neuromorphic cameras is a key feature for performing accurate pose estimation. Experiments are provided showing the performance of the algorithm on real data, including fast moving objects, occlusions, and cases where the neuromorphic camera and the object are both in motion. PMID:26834547

  4. Event-based internet biosurveillance: relation to epidemiological observation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) collects and publishes surveillance data and statistics for select diseases, but traditional methods of gathering such data are time and labor intensive. Event-based biosurveillance, which utilizes a variety of Internet sources, complements traditional surveillance. In this study we assess the reliability of Internet biosurveillance and evaluate disease-specific alert criteria against epidemiological data. Methods We reviewed and compared WHO epidemiological data and Argus biosurveillance system data for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (April 2009 – January 2010) from 8 regions and 122 countries to: identify reliable alert criteria among 15 Argus-defined categories; determine the degree of data correlation for disease progression; and assess timeliness of Internet information. Results Argus generated a total of 1,580 unique alerts; 5 alert categories generated statistically significant (p < 0.05) correlations with WHO case count data; the sum of these 5 categories was highly correlated with WHO case data (r = 0.81, p < 0.0001), with expected differences observed among the 8 regions. Argus reported first confirmed cases on the same day as WHO for 21 of the first 64 countries reporting cases, and 1 to 16 days (average 1.5 days) ahead of WHO for 42 of those countries. Conclusion Confirmed pandemic (H1N1) 2009 cases collected by Argus and WHO methods returned consistent results and confirmed the reliability and timeliness of Internet information. Disease-specific alert criteria provide situational awareness and may serve as proxy indicators to event progression and escalation in lieu of traditional surveillance data; alerts may identify early-warning indicators to another pandemic, preparing the public health community for disease events. PMID:22709988

  5. Event based climatology of extreme precipitation in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen, Katrin M.; Becker, Nico; Ulbrich, Uwe

    2015-04-01

    An event based detection algorithm to identify extreme precipitation events in gridded data sets is introduced and applied to the observational E-OBS data set. The algorithm identifies all grid boxes in which the rainfall exceeds a threshold, which depends on the location and the aggregation period. The aggregation periods taken into account in this study range from a single time step up to 72 hours. The local 50-year return level is calculated for all aggregation periods and used as a threshold. All identified grid boxes which are located within the same continuous rain area (i.e. which are not separated by rain free grid boxes) are considered as belonging to the same event and form a cluster. The centre of mass is calculated for each cluster. The clusters are then tracked in time using a nearest neighbor approach. Thus, each detected event can consist of several grid boxes and can last for several time steps. A precipitation severity index (PSI) is assigned to the events. The severity index takes the affected area and the amount of precipitation accumulated over the duration of the event into account. It is normalized by the long-term mean annual precipitation sum expected for the grid box. The severity index can be used to compare the strength of the identified events. The detection algorithm also stores additional information for each event, such as the date, location, affected area, duration, severity and maximum precipitation. Comparing all events detected in the E-OBS data set, which exceeded the local 50-year return levels, the highest severity index was calculated for an event affecting Spain, which took place in November 1997. It had a severity index of 49.9 and was also described in the literature. In comparison, the average PSI for the extreme precipitation events over Europe is 2.4. Overall, the most active season for extreme precipitation in Europe is summer. The longest duration of an event in the data set was 11 days. It occurred over Estonia in

  6. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 6: Appendix GCR Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-31

    The Geological Characterization Report (GCR) for the WIPP site presents, in one document, a compilation of geologic information available to August, 1978, which is judged to be relevant to studies for the WIPP. The Geological Characterization Report for the WIPP site is neither a preliminary safety analysis report nor an environmental impact statement; these documents, when prepared, should be consulted for appropriate discussion of safety analysis and environmental impact. The Geological Characterization Report of the WIPP site is a unique document and at this time is not required by regulatory process. An overview is presented of the purpose of the WIPP, the purpose of the Geological Characterization Report, the site selection criteria, the events leading to studies in New Mexico, status of studies, and the techniques employed during geological characterization.

  7. Volcano!: An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Geology Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  8. Blackout!: An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Electricity and Solar Activity Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school earth science or physical science teachers to help their students learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event- based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork,…

  9. Blackout!: An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Electricity and Solar Activity Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  10. Oil Spill!: An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Oceanography Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school earth science or general science teachers to help their students learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event- based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork,…

  11. Oil Spill! An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Oceanography Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  12. Hurricane! An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Meteorology Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  13. Blight! An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Plants and Plant Diseases Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  14. Asteroid! An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Astronomy Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school earth science or general science teachers to help their students learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event- based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork,…

  15. Asteroid! An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Astronomy Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  16. Thrill Ride! An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Force and Motion Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  17. Hurricane!: An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Meteorology Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school earth science teachers to help their students learn about problems with hurricanes and scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning,…

  18. Flood!: An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Stream Dynamics Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school earth science teachers to help their students learn about problems with floods and scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning,…

  19. Gold Rush!: An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Geology Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school earth science or general science teachers to help their students learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event- based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork,…

  20. Toxic Leak!: An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Groundwater Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school earth science teachers to help their students learn about problems with toxic leaking and scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative…

  1. Tornado! An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Meteorology Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school earth science teachers to help their students learn about problems with tornadoes and scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning,…

  2. Tornado! An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Meteorology Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  3. Earthquake!: An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Earth Science Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  4. Earthquake!: An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Earth Science Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school earth science teachers to help their students learn about earthquakes and scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event- based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork,…

  5. Gold Rush!: An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Rocks and Minerals Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  6. Fire!: An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Chemistry and Fire Ecology Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  7. Fire!: An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Chemistry and Fire Ecology Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school earth science or physical science teachers to help their students learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event- based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork,…

  8. Blight! An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Plants and Plant Diseases Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school life science or physical science teachers to help their students learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event- based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork,…

  9. Outbreak!: An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Disease and Immunity Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school life science or physical science teachers to help their students learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event- based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork,…

  10. First Flight!: An Event-Based Science Module Teacher's Guide. Physics Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school life science or physical science teachers to help their students learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event- based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork,…

  11. Thrill Ride! An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Force and Motion Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school life science or physical science teachers to help their students learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event- based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork,…

  12. Fraud! An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Chemistry Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school life science or physical science teachers to help their students learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork,…

  13. Survive?: An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Animals and Adaptation Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  14. Survive? An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Animals and Adaptation Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school earth science teachers to help their students learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research,…

  15. Toxic Leak!: An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Groundwater Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for the middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  16. Volcano!: An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Geology Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school earth science teachers to help their students learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research,…

  17. First Flight!: An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Physics Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  18. Gold Medal! An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Physiology Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  19. Gold Medal!: An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Physiology Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school life science or physical science teachers to help their students learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event- based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork,…

  20. Spatial gradients of GCR protons in the inner heliosphere derived from Ulysses COSPIN/KET and PAMELA measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gieseler, J.; Heber, B.

    2016-05-01

    Context. During the transition from solar cycle 23 to 24 from 2006 to 2009, the Sun was in an unusual solar minimum with very low activity over a long period. These exceptional conditions included a very low interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) strength and a high tilt angle, which both play an important role in the modulation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in the heliosphere. Thus, the radial and latitudinal gradients of GCRs are very much expected to depend not only on the solar magnetic epoch, but also on the overall modulation level. Aims: We determine the non-local radial and the latitudinal gradients of protons in the rigidity range from ~0.45 to 2 GV. Methods: This was accomplished by using data from the satellite-borne experiment Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) at Earth and the Kiel Electron Telescope (KET) onboard Ulysses on its highly inclined Keplerian orbit around the Sun with the aphelion at Jupiter's orbit. Results: In comparison to the previous A> 0 solar magnetic epoch, we find that the absolute value of the latitudinal gradient is lower at higher and higher at lower rigidities. This energy dependence is therefore a crucial test for models that describe the cosmic ray transport in the inner heliosphere.

  1. Efficiency of event-based sampling according to error energy criterion.

    PubMed

    Miskowicz, Marek

    2010-01-01

    The paper belongs to the studies that deal with the effectiveness of the particular event-based sampling scheme compared to the conventional periodic sampling as a reference. In the present study, the event-based sampling according to a constant energy of sampling error is analyzed. This criterion is suitable for applications where the energy of sampling error should be bounded (i.e., in building automation, or in greenhouse climate monitoring and control). Compared to the integral sampling criteria, the error energy criterion gives more weight to extreme sampling error values. The proposed sampling principle extends a range of event-based sampling schemes and makes the choice of particular sampling criterion more flexible to application requirements. In the paper, it is proved analytically that the proposed event-based sampling criterion is more effective than the periodic sampling by a factor defined by the ratio of the maximum to the mean of the cubic root of the signal time-derivative square in the analyzed time interval. Furthermore, it is shown that the sampling according to energy criterion is less effective than the send-on-delta scheme but more effective than the sampling according to integral criterion. On the other hand, it is indicated that higher effectiveness in sampling according to the selected event-based criterion is obtained at the cost of increasing the total sampling error defined as the sum of errors for all the samples taken.

  2. Efficiency of Event-Based Sampling According to Error Energy Criterion

    PubMed Central

    Miskowicz, Marek

    2010-01-01

    The paper belongs to the studies that deal with the effectiveness of the particular event-based sampling scheme compared to the conventional periodic sampling as a reference. In the present study, the event-based sampling according to a constant energy of sampling error is analyzed. This criterion is suitable for applications where the energy of sampling error should be bounded (i.e., in building automation, or in greenhouse climate monitoring and control). Compared to the integral sampling criteria, the error energy criterion gives more weight to extreme sampling error values. The proposed sampling principle extends a range of event-based sampling schemes and makes the choice of particular sampling criterion more flexible to application requirements. In the paper, it is proved analytically that the proposed event-based sampling criterion is more effective than the periodic sampling by a factor defined by the ratio of the maximum to the mean of the cubic root of the signal time-derivative square in the analyzed time interval. Furthermore, it is shown that the sampling according to energy criterion is less effective than the send-on-delta scheme but more effective than the sampling according to integral criterion. On the other hand, it is indicated that higher effectiveness in sampling according to the selected event-based criterion is obtained at the cost of increasing the total sampling error defined as the sum of errors for all the samples taken. PMID:22294925

  3. An Event-Based Approach to Distributed Diagnosis of Continuous Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew; Roychoudhurry, Indranil; Biswas, Gautam; Koutsoukos, Xenofon

    2010-01-01

    Distributed fault diagnosis solutions are becoming necessary due to the complexity of modern engineering systems, and the advent of smart sensors and computing elements. This paper presents a novel event-based approach for distributed diagnosis of abrupt parametric faults in continuous systems, based on a qualitative abstraction of measurement deviations from the nominal behavior. We systematically derive dynamic fault signatures expressed as event-based fault models. We develop a distributed diagnoser design algorithm that uses these models for designing local event-based diagnosers based on global diagnosability analysis. The local diagnosers each generate globally correct diagnosis results locally, without a centralized coordinator, and by communicating a minimal number of measurements between themselves. The proposed approach is applied to a multi-tank system, and results demonstrate a marked improvement in scalability compared to a centralized approach.

  4. Event-Based Tone Mapping for Asynchronous Time-Based Image Sensor.

    PubMed

    Simon Chane, Camille; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Posch, Christoph; Benosman, Ryad B

    2016-01-01

    The asynchronous time-based neuromorphic image sensor ATIS is an array of autonomously operating pixels able to encode luminance information with an exceptionally high dynamic range (>143 dB). This paper introduces an event-based methodology to display data from this type of event-based imagers, taking into account the large dynamic range and high temporal accuracy that go beyond available mainstream display technologies. We introduce an event-based tone mapping methodology for asynchronously acquired time encoded gray-level data. A global and a local tone mapping operator are proposed. Both are designed to operate on a stream of incoming events rather than on time frame windows. Experimental results on real outdoor scenes are presented to evaluate the performance of the tone mapping operators in terms of quality, temporal stability, adaptation capability, and computational time. PMID:27642275

  5. Event-Based Tone Mapping for Asynchronous Time-Based Image Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Simon Chane, Camille; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Posch, Christoph; Benosman, Ryad B.

    2016-01-01

    The asynchronous time-based neuromorphic image sensor ATIS is an array of autonomously operating pixels able to encode luminance information with an exceptionally high dynamic range (>143 dB). This paper introduces an event-based methodology to display data from this type of event-based imagers, taking into account the large dynamic range and high temporal accuracy that go beyond available mainstream display technologies. We introduce an event-based tone mapping methodology for asynchronously acquired time encoded gray-level data. A global and a local tone mapping operator are proposed. Both are designed to operate on a stream of incoming events rather than on time frame windows. Experimental results on real outdoor scenes are presented to evaluate the performance of the tone mapping operators in terms of quality, temporal stability, adaptation capability, and computational time.

  6. Event-Based Tone Mapping for Asynchronous Time-Based Image Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Simon Chane, Camille; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Posch, Christoph; Benosman, Ryad B.

    2016-01-01

    The asynchronous time-based neuromorphic image sensor ATIS is an array of autonomously operating pixels able to encode luminance information with an exceptionally high dynamic range (>143 dB). This paper introduces an event-based methodology to display data from this type of event-based imagers, taking into account the large dynamic range and high temporal accuracy that go beyond available mainstream display technologies. We introduce an event-based tone mapping methodology for asynchronously acquired time encoded gray-level data. A global and a local tone mapping operator are proposed. Both are designed to operate on a stream of incoming events rather than on time frame windows. Experimental results on real outdoor scenes are presented to evaluate the performance of the tone mapping operators in terms of quality, temporal stability, adaptation capability, and computational time. PMID:27642275

  7. DEVS representation of dynamical systems - Event-based intelligent control. [Discrete Event System Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, Bernard P.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown how systems can be advantageously represented as discrete-event models by using DEVS (discrete-event system specification), a set-theoretic formalism. Such DEVS models provide a basis for the design of event-based logic control. In this control paradigm, the controller expects to receive confirming sensor responses to its control commands within definite time windows determined by its DEVS model of the system under control. The event-based contral paradigm is applied in advanced robotic and intelligent automation, showing how classical process control can be readily interfaced with rule-based symbolic reasoning systems.

  8. NASA Space Radiation Program Integrative Risk Model Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Hu, Shaowen; Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Sandridge, Chris

    2015-01-01

    NASA Space Radiation Program Element scientists have been actively involved in development of an integrative risk models toolkit that includes models for acute radiation risk and organ dose projection (ARRBOD), NASA space radiation cancer risk projection (NSCR), hemocyte dose estimation (HemoDose), GCR event-based risk model code (GERMcode), and relativistic ion tracks (RITRACKS), NASA radiation track image (NASARTI), and the On-Line Tool for the Assessment of Radiation in Space (OLTARIS). This session will introduce the components of the risk toolkit with opportunity for hands on demonstrations. The brief descriptions of each tools are: ARRBOD for Organ dose projection and acute radiation risk calculation from exposure to solar particle event; NSCR for Projection of cancer risk from exposure to space radiation; HemoDose for retrospective dose estimation by using multi-type blood cell counts; GERMcode for basic physical and biophysical properties for an ion beam, and biophysical and radiobiological properties for a beam transport to the target in the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory beam line; RITRACKS for simulation of heavy ion and delta-ray track structure, radiation chemistry, DNA structure and DNA damage at the molecular scale; NASARTI for modeling of the effects of space radiation on human cells and tissue by incorporating a physical model of tracks, cell nucleus, and DNA damage foci with image segmentation for the automated count; and OLTARIS, an integrated tool set utilizing HZETRN (High Charge and Energy Transport) intended to help scientists and engineers study the effects of space radiation on shielding materials, electronics, and biological systems.

  9. Disentangling the effect of event-based cues on children's time-based prospective memory performance.

    PubMed

    Redshaw, Jonathan; Henry, Julie D; Suddendorf, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Previous time-based prospective memory research, both with children and with other groups, has measured the ability to perform an action with the arrival of a time-dependent yet still event-based cue (e.g., the occurrence of a specific clock pattern) while also engaged in an ongoing activity. Here we introduce a novel means of operationalizing time-based prospective memory and assess children's growing capacities when the availability of an event-based cue is varied. Preschoolers aged 3, 4, and 5years (N=72) were required to ring a bell when a familiar 1-min sand timer had completed a cycle under four conditions. In a 2×2 within-participants design, the timer was either visible or hidden and was either presented in the context of a single task or embedded within a dual picture-naming task. Children were more likely to ring the bell before 2min had elapsed in the visible-timer and single-task conditions, with performance improving with age across all conditions. These results suggest a divergence in the development of time-based prospective memory in the presence versus absence of event-based cues, and they also suggest that performance on typical time-based tasks may be partly driven by event-based prospective memory. PMID:27295204

  10. Disentangling the effect of event-based cues on children's time-based prospective memory performance.

    PubMed

    Redshaw, Jonathan; Henry, Julie D; Suddendorf, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Previous time-based prospective memory research, both with children and with other groups, has measured the ability to perform an action with the arrival of a time-dependent yet still event-based cue (e.g., the occurrence of a specific clock pattern) while also engaged in an ongoing activity. Here we introduce a novel means of operationalizing time-based prospective memory and assess children's growing capacities when the availability of an event-based cue is varied. Preschoolers aged 3, 4, and 5years (N=72) were required to ring a bell when a familiar 1-min sand timer had completed a cycle under four conditions. In a 2×2 within-participants design, the timer was either visible or hidden and was either presented in the context of a single task or embedded within a dual picture-naming task. Children were more likely to ring the bell before 2min had elapsed in the visible-timer and single-task conditions, with performance improving with age across all conditions. These results suggest a divergence in the development of time-based prospective memory in the presence versus absence of event-based cues, and they also suggest that performance on typical time-based tasks may be partly driven by event-based prospective memory.

  11. The role of musical training in emergent and event-based timing

    PubMed Central

    Baer, L. H.; Thibodeau, J. L. N.; Gralnick, T. M.; Li, K. Z. H.; Penhune, V. B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Musical performance is thought to rely predominantly on event-based timing involving a clock-like neural process and an explicit internal representation of the time interval. Some aspects of musical performance may rely on emergent timing, which is established through the optimization of movement kinematics, and can be maintained without reference to any explicit representation of the time interval. We predicted that musical training would have its largest effect on event-based timing, supporting the dissociability of these timing processes and the dominance of event-based timing in musical performance. Materials and Methods: We compared 22 musicians and 17 non-musicians on the prototypical event-based timing task of finger tapping and on the typically emergently timed task of circle drawing. For each task, participants first responded in synchrony with a metronome (Paced) and then responded at the same rate without the metronome (Unpaced). Results: Analyses of the Unpaced phase revealed that non-musicians were more variable in their inter-response intervals for finger tapping compared to circle drawing. Musicians did not differ between the two tasks. Between groups, non-musicians were more variable than musicians for tapping but not for drawing. We were able to show that the differences were due to less timer variability in musicians on the tapping task. Correlational analyses of movement jerk and inter-response interval variability revealed a negative association for tapping and a positive association for drawing in non-musicians only. Discussion: These results suggest that musical training affects temporal variability in tapping but not drawing. Additionally, musicians and non-musicians may be employing different movement strategies to maintain accurate timing in the two tasks. These findings add to our understanding of how musical training affects timing and support the dissociability of event-based and emergent timing modes. PMID:23717275

  12. Electrophysiological correlates of strategic monitoring in event-based and time-based prospective memory.

    PubMed

    Cona, Giorgia; Arcara, Giorgio; Tarantino, Vincenza; Bisiacchi, Patrizia Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Prospective memory (PM) is the ability to remember to accomplish an action when a particular event occurs (i.e., event-based PM), or at a specific time (i.e., time-based PM) while performing an ongoing activity. Strategic Monitoring is one of the basic cognitive functions supporting PM tasks, and involves two mechanisms: a retrieval mode, which consists of maintaining active the intention in memory; and target checking, engaged for verifying the presence of the PM cue in the environment. The present study is aimed at providing the first evidence of event-related potentials (ERPs) associated with time-based PM, and at examining differences and commonalities in the ERPs related to Strategic Monitoring mechanisms between event- and time-based PM tasks.The addition of an event-based or a time-based PM task to an ongoing activity led to a similar sustained positive modulation of the ERPs in the ongoing trials, mainly expressed over prefrontal and frontal regions. This modulation might index the retrieval mode mechanism, similarly engaged in the two PM tasks. On the other hand, two further ERP modulations were shown specifically in an event-based PM task. An increased positivity was shown at 400-600 ms post-stimulus over occipital and parietal regions, and might be related to target checking. Moreover, an early modulation at 130-180 ms post-stimulus seems to reflect the recruitment of attentional resources for being ready to respond to the event-based PM cue. This latter modulation suggests the existence of a third mechanism specific for the event-based PM; that is, the "readiness mode".

  13. Event-Based Control Strategy for Mobile Robots in Wireless Environments.

    PubMed

    Socas, Rafael; Dormido, Sebastián; Dormido, Raquel; Fabregas, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new event-based control strategy for mobile robots is presented. It has been designed to work in wireless environments where a centralized controller has to interchange information with the robots over an RF (radio frequency) interface. The event-based architectures have been developed for differential wheeled robots, although they can be applied to other kinds of robots in a simple way. The solution has been checked over classical navigation algorithms, like wall following and obstacle avoidance, using scenarios with a unique or multiple robots. A comparison between the proposed architectures and the classical discrete-time strategy is also carried out. The experimental results shows that the proposed solution has a higher efficiency in communication resource usage than the classical discrete-time strategy with the same accuracy. PMID:26633412

  14. Event-Based Control Strategy for Mobile Robots in Wireless Environments.

    PubMed

    Socas, Rafael; Dormido, Sebastián; Dormido, Raquel; Fabregas, Ernesto

    2015-12-02

    In this paper, a new event-based control strategy for mobile robots is presented. It has been designed to work in wireless environments where a centralized controller has to interchange information with the robots over an RF (radio frequency) interface. The event-based architectures have been developed for differential wheeled robots, although they can be applied to other kinds of robots in a simple way. The solution has been checked over classical navigation algorithms, like wall following and obstacle avoidance, using scenarios with a unique or multiple robots. A comparison between the proposed architectures and the classical discrete-time strategy is also carried out. The experimental results shows that the proposed solution has a higher efficiency in communication resource usage than the classical discrete-time strategy with the same accuracy.

  15. Event-Based Control Strategy for Mobile Robots in Wireless Environments

    PubMed Central

    Socas, Rafael; Dormido, Sebastián; Dormido, Raquel; Fabregas, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new event-based control strategy for mobile robots is presented. It has been designed to work in wireless environments where a centralized controller has to interchange information with the robots over an RF (radio frequency) interface. The event-based architectures have been developed for differential wheeled robots, although they can be applied to other kinds of robots in a simple way. The solution has been checked over classical navigation algorithms, like wall following and obstacle avoidance, using scenarios with a unique or multiple robots. A comparison between the proposed architectures and the classical discrete-time strategy is also carried out. The experimental results shows that the proposed solution has a higher efficiency in communication resource usage than the classical discrete-time strategy with the same accuracy. PMID:26633412

  16. An Event-Based Solution to the Perspective-n-Point Problem.

    PubMed

    Reverter Valeiras, David; Kime, Sihem; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Benosman, Ryad Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the Perspective-n-Point problem (PnP) is to find the relative pose between an object and a camera from a set of n pairings between 3D points and their corresponding 2D projections on the focal plane. Current state of the art solutions, designed to operate on images, rely on computationally expensive minimization techniques. For the first time, this work introduces an event-based PnP algorithm designed to work on the output of a neuromorphic event-based vision sensor. The problem is formulated here as a least-squares minimization problem, where the error function is updated with every incoming event. The optimal translation is then computed in closed form, while the desired rotation is given by the evolution of a virtual mechanical system whose energy is proven to be equal to the error function. This allows for a simple yet robust solution of the problem, showing how event-based vision can simplify computer vision tasks. The approach takes full advantage of the high temporal resolution of the sensor, as the estimated pose is incrementally updated with every incoming event. Two approaches are proposed: the Full and the Efficient methods. These two methods are compared against a state of the art PnP algorithm both on synthetic and on real data, producing similar accuracy in addition of being faster. PMID:27242412

  17. An efficient causative event-based approach for deriving the annual flood frequency distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Thyer, Mark; Lambert, Martin; Kuczera, George; Metcalfe, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    In ungauged catchments or catchments without sufficient streamflow data, derived flood frequency methods are often applied to provide the basis for flood risk assessment. The most commonly used event-based methods, such as design storm and joint probability approaches are able to give fast estimation, but can also lead to prediction bias and uncertainties due to the limitations of inherent assumptions and difficulties in obtaining input information (rainfall and catchment wetness) related to events that cause extreme floods. An alternative method is a long continuous simulation which produces more accurate predictions, but at the cost of massive computational time. In this study a hybrid method was developed to make the best use of both event-based and continuous approaches. The method uses a short continuous simulation to provide inputs for a rainfall-runoff model running in an event-based fashion. The total probability theorem is then combined with the peak over threshold method to estimate annual flood distribution. A synthetic case study demonstrates the efficacy of this procedure compared with existing methods of estimating annual flood distribution. The main advantage of the hybrid method is that it provides estimates of the flood frequency distribution with an accuracy similar to the continuous simulation approach, but with dramatically reduced computation time. This paper presents the method at the proof-of-concept stage of development and future work is required to extend the method to more realistic catchments.

  18. Forgetting at short term: when do event-based interference and temporal factors have an effect?

    PubMed

    Barrouillet, Pierre; Plancher, Gaën; Guida, Alessandro; Camos, Valérie

    2013-02-01

    Memory tasks combining storage and distracting tasks performed at either encoding or retrieval have provided divergent results pointing towards accounts of forgetting in terms of either temporal decay or event-based interference respectively. The aim of this study was to shed light on the possible sources of such a divergence that could rely on methodological aspects or deeper differences in the memory traces elicited by the different paradigms used. Methodological issues were explored in a first series of experiments by introducing at retrieval computer-paced distracting tasks that involved articulatory suppression, attentional demand, or both. A second series of experiments that used a similar design was intended to induce differences in the nature of memory traces by increasing the time allowed for encoding the to-be-remembered items. Although the introduction of computer-paced distracting tasks allowed for a strict control of temporal parameters, the first series of experiments replicated the effects usually attributed to event-based interference. However, deeper encoding abolished these effects while time-related effects remained unchanged. These findings suggest that the interplay between temporal factors and event-based interference in forgetting at short term is more complex than expected and could depend on the nature of memory traces. PMID:23337080

  19. Networked Estimation for Event-Based Sampling Systems with Packet Dropouts

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Vinh Hao; Suh, Young Soo

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a networked estimation problem in which sensor data are transmitted over the network. In the event-based sampling scheme known as level-crossing or send-on-delta (SOD), sensor data are transmitted to the estimator node if the difference between the current sensor value and the last transmitted one is greater than a given threshold. Event-based sampling has been shown to be more efficient than the time-triggered one in some situations, especially in network bandwidth improvement. However, it cannot detect packet dropout situations because data transmission and reception do not use a periodical time-stamp mechanism as found in time-triggered sampling systems. Motivated by this issue, we propose a modified event-based sampling scheme called modified SOD in which sensor data are sent when either the change of sensor output exceeds a given threshold or the time elapses more than a given interval. Through simulation results, we show that the proposed modified SOD sampling significantly improves estimation performance when packet dropouts happen. PMID:22574063

  20. Asymptotic Effectiveness of the Event-Based Sampling according to the Integral Criterion

    PubMed Central

    Miskowicz, Marek

    2007-01-01

    A rapid progress in intelligent sensing technology creates new interest in a development of analysis and design of non-conventional sampling schemes. The investigation of the event-based sampling according to the integral criterion is presented in this paper. The investigated sampling scheme is an extension of the pure linear send-on-delta/level-crossing algorithm utilized for reporting the state of objects monitored by intelligent sensors. The motivation of using the event-based integral sampling is outlined. The related works in adaptive sampling are summarized. The analytical closed-form formulas for the evaluation of the mean rate of event-based traffic, and the asymptotic integral sampling effectiveness, are derived. The simulation results verifying the analytical formulas are reported. The effectiveness of the integral sampling is compared with the related linear send-on-delta/level-crossing scheme. The calculation of the asymptotic effectiveness for common signals, which model the state evolution of dynamic systems in time, is exemplified.

  1. An Event-Based Solution to the Perspective-n-Point Problem

    PubMed Central

    Reverter Valeiras, David; Kime, Sihem; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Benosman, Ryad Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the Perspective-n-Point problem (PnP) is to find the relative pose between an object and a camera from a set of n pairings between 3D points and their corresponding 2D projections on the focal plane. Current state of the art solutions, designed to operate on images, rely on computationally expensive minimization techniques. For the first time, this work introduces an event-based PnP algorithm designed to work on the output of a neuromorphic event-based vision sensor. The problem is formulated here as a least-squares minimization problem, where the error function is updated with every incoming event. The optimal translation is then computed in closed form, while the desired rotation is given by the evolution of a virtual mechanical system whose energy is proven to be equal to the error function. This allows for a simple yet robust solution of the problem, showing how event-based vision can simplify computer vision tasks. The approach takes full advantage of the high temporal resolution of the sensor, as the estimated pose is incrementally updated with every incoming event. Two approaches are proposed: the Full and the Efficient methods. These two methods are compared against a state of the art PnP algorithm both on synthetic and on real data, producing similar accuracy in addition of being faster. PMID:27242412

  2. Music, clicks, and their imaginations favor differently the event-based timing component for rhythmic movements.

    PubMed

    Bravi, Riccardo; Quarta, Eros; Del Tongo, Claudia; Carbonaro, Nicola; Tognetti, Alessandro; Minciacchi, Diego

    2015-06-01

    The involvement or noninvolvement of a clock-like neural process, an effector-independent representation of the time intervals to produce, is described as the essential difference between event-based and emergent timing. In a previous work (Bravi et al. in Exp Brain Res 232:1663-1675, 2014a. doi: 10.1007/s00221-014-3845-9 ), we studied repetitive isochronous wrist's flexion-extensions (IWFEs), performed while minimizing visual and tactile information, to clarify whether non-temporal and temporal characteristics of paced auditory stimuli affect the precision and accuracy of the rhythmic motor performance. Here, with the inclusion of new recordings, we expand the examination of the dataset described in our previous study to investigate whether simple and complex paced auditory stimuli (clicks and music) and their imaginations influence in a different way the timing mechanisms for repetitive IWFEs. Sets of IWFEs were analyzed by the windowed (lag one) autocorrelation-wγ(1), a statistical method recently introduced for the distinction between event-based and emergent timing. Our findings provide evidence that paced auditory information and its imagination favor the engagement of a clock-like neural process, and specifically that music, unlike clicks, lacks the power to elicit event-based timing, not counteracting the natural shift of wγ(1) toward positive values as frequency of movements increase.

  3. Measuring pesticides in surface waters - continuous versus event-based sampling design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyring, J.; Bach, M.; Frede, H.-G.

    2009-04-01

    Monitoring pesticides in surface waters is still a work- and cost-intensive procedure. Therefore, studies are normally carried out with a low monitoring frequency or with only a small selection of substances to be analyzed. In this case, it is not possible to picture the high temporal variability of pesticide concentrations, depending on application dates, weather conditions, cropping seasons and other factors. In 2007 the Institute of Landscape Ecology and Resource Management at Giessen University implemented a monitoring program during two pesticide application periods aiming to produce a detailed dataset of pesticide concentration for a wide range of substances, and which would also be suitable for the evaluation of catchment-scale pesticide exposure models. The Weida catchment in Thuringia (Eastern Germany) was selected as study area due to the availability of detailed pesticide application data for this region. The samples were taken from the river Weida at the gauge Zeulenroda, where it flows into a drinking water reservoir. The catchment area is 102 km². 67% of the area are in agricultural use, the main crops being winter wheat, maize, winter barley and winter rape. Dominant soil texture classes are loamy sand and loamy silt. About one third of the agricultural area is drained. The sampling was carried out in cooperation with the water supply agency of Thuringia (Fernwasserversorgung Thueringen). The sample analysis was done by the Institute of Environmental Research at Dortmund University. Two sampling schemes were carried out using two automatic samplers: continuous sampling with composite samples bottled two times per week and event-based sampling triggered by a discharge threshold. 53 samples from continuous sampling were collected. 19 discharge events were sampled with 45 individual samples (one to six per event). 34 pesticides and two metabolites were analyzed. 21 compounds were detected, nine of which having concentrations above the drinking water

  4. Fast vision through frameless event-based sensing and convolutional processing: application to texture recognition.

    PubMed

    Perez-Carrasco, Jose Antonio; Acha, Begona; Serrano, Carmen; Camunas-Mesa, Luis; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Linares-Barranco, Bernabe

    2010-04-01

    Address-event representation (AER) is an emergent hardware technology which shows a high potential for providing in the near future a solid technological substrate for emulating brain-like processing structures. When used for vision, AER sensors and processors are not restricted to capturing and processing still image frames, as in commercial frame-based video technology, but sense and process visual information in a pixel-level event-based frameless manner. As a result, vision processing is practically simultaneous to vision sensing, since there is no need to wait for sensing full frames. Also, only meaningful information is sensed, communicated, and processed. Of special interest for brain-like vision processing are some already reported AER convolutional chips, which have revealed a very high computational throughput as well as the possibility of assembling large convolutional neural networks in a modular fashion. It is expected that in a near future we may witness the appearance of large scale convolutional neural networks with hundreds or thousands of individual modules. In the meantime, some research is needed to investigate how to assemble and configure such large scale convolutional networks for specific applications. In this paper, we analyze AER spiking convolutional neural networks for texture recognition hardware applications. Based on the performance figures of already available individual AER convolution chips, we emulate large scale networks using a custom made event-based behavioral simulator. We have developed a new event-based processing architecture that emulates with AER hardware Manjunath's frame-based feature recognition software algorithm, and have analyzed its performance using our behavioral simulator. Recognition rate performance is not degraded. However, regarding speed, we show that recognition can be achieved before an equivalent frame is fully sensed and transmitted.

  5. Lessons Learned from Real-Time, Event-Based Internet Science Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, T.; Myszka, E.; Gallagher, D. L.; Adams, M. L.; Koczor, R. J.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For the last several years the Science Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center has carried out a diverse program of Internet-based science communication. The Directorate's Science Roundtable includes active researchers, NASA public relations, educators, and administrators. The Science@NASA award-winning family of Web sites features science, mathematics, and space news. The program includes extended stories about NASA science, a curriculum resource for teachers tied to national education standards, on-line activities for students, and webcasts of real-time events. The focus of sharing science activities in real-time has been to involve and excite students and the public about science. Events have involved meteor showers, solar eclipses, natural very low frequency radio emissions, and amateur balloon flights. In some cases, broadcasts accommodate active feedback and questions from Internet participants. Through these projects a pattern has emerged in the level of interest or popularity with the public. The pattern differentiates projects that include science from those that do not, All real-time, event-based Internet activities have captured public interest at a level not achieved through science stories or educator resource material exclusively. The worst event-based activity attracted more interest than the best written science story. One truly rewarding lesson learned through these projects is that the public recognizes the importance and excitement of being part of scientific discovery. Flying a camera to 100,000 feet altitude isn't as interesting to the public as searching for viable life-forms at these oxygen-poor altitudes. The details of these real-time, event-based projects and lessons learned will be discussed.

  6. Event-Based Parareal: A data-flow based implementation of parareal

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Lee A; Elwasif, Wael R; Reynolds-Barredo, J.; Samaddar, D.; Sanchez, R.; Newman, David E; Chen, J.

    2012-01-01

    Parareal is an iterative algorithm that, in effect, achieves temporal decomposition for a time-dependent system of differential or partial differential equations. A solution is obtained in a shorter wall-clock time, but at the expense of increased compute cycles. The algorithm combines a fine solver that solves the system to acceptable accuracy with an approximate coarse solver. The critical task for the successful implementation of parareal on any system is the development of a coarse solver that leads to convergence in a small number of iterations compared to the number of time slices in the full time interval, and is, at the same time, much faster than the fine solver. Fast coarse solvers may not lead to sufficiently rapid convergence, and slow coarse solvers may not lead to significant gains even if the number of iterations to convergence is satisfactory. We find that the difficulty of meeting these conflicting demands can be substantially eased by using a data-driven, event-based implementation of parareal instead of the conventional algorithm where solver tasks are executed sequentially. For given convergence properties, the event-based approach relaxes the speed requirements on the coarse solver by a factor of , where is the number of iterations required for a converged solution. This may, for many problems, lead to an efficient parareal implementation that would otherwise not be possible or would require substantial coarse solver development.

  7. The link between alcohol use and aggression toward sexual minorities: an event-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Dominic J; Gallagher, Kathryn E; Vincent, Wilson; Bakeman, Roger

    2010-09-01

    The current study used an event-based assessment approach to examine the day-to-day relationship between heterosexual men's alcohol consumption and perpetration of aggression toward sexual minorities. Participants were 199 heterosexual drinking men between the ages of 18-30 who completed (1) separate timeline followback interviews to assess alcohol use and aggression toward sexual minorities during the past year, and (2) written self-report measures of risk factors for aggression toward sexual minorities. Results indicated that aggression toward sexual minorities was twice as likely on a day when drinking was reported than on nondrinking days, with over 80% of alcohol-related aggressive acts perpetrated within the group context. Patterns of alcohol use (i.e., number of drinking days, mean drinks per drinking day, number of heavy drinking days) were not associated with perpetration after controlling for demographic variables and pertinent risk factors. Results suggest that it is the acute effects of alcohol, and not men's patterns of alcohol consumption, that facilitate aggression toward sexual minorities. More importantly, these data are the first to support an event-based link between alcohol use and aggression toward sexual minorities (or any minority group), and provide the impetus for future research to examine risk factors and mechanisms for intoxicated aggression toward sexual minorities and other stigmatized groups.

  8. Event-based and Multi Agent Control of an Innovative Wheelchair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diomin, U.; Witczak, P.; Stetter, R.

    2015-11-01

    Due to the aging population more and more people require mobility assistance in form of a wheelchair. Generally it would be desirable that such wheelchairs would be easy to use and would allow their users the possibility to move in any direction at any time. Concepts which allow such movements are existing since many years but have for several reasons not found their way to the market. Additionally for semi-autonomous (assisted) operation and fully autonomous operation (e. g. an empty wheelchair driving to its charging station) the control task is much less challenging for such drive system, because no complex manoeuvres needs to be considered and planned. In an ongoing research a drive system for a wheelchair was developed which offers such possibilities employing a relatively simple mechanical design. This drive system is based on a certain steering principle which is based on torque differences between different wheels. This allows a relatively simple mechanical design but poses challenges on the control of the vehicle. This paper describes two possible approaches to address this challenge - the use of an event based control and the application of multiple software agents. Both approaches can solve the control problem individually but can also complement each other for better system performance. The paper stars with a description of the wheelchair drive system. Then the asynchronous event based control software is described as well the multi agent based approach. The next sections report the results of the experiments and discuss the further improvements.

  9. ALLUVSIM: A program for event-based stochastic modeling of fluvial depositional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrcz, M. J.; Boisvert, J. B.; Deutsch, C. V.

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for the construction of event-based fluvial models. The event-based approach may be applied to construct stochastic pseudo-process-based fluvial models for a variety of fluvial styles with conditioning to sparse well data (1-5 wells) and areal and vertical trends. The initial models are generated by placing large-scale features, such as channels and crevasse splays, into the model as geometric objects. These large-scale features are controlled by geometric input parameters provided by the user and are placed into the model to roughly honor well data through a rejection and updating method. Yet, some model to well data mismatch may still occur due to inconsistency in the size and positioning of complicated features relative to the well data. An image processing algorithm is used to post-process realizations to exactly honor all well data. The final, cell-based models, have no data mismatch and contain geologically realistic fluvial features that would be difficult to obtain with other pixel-based methods and precise conditioning that is difficult to obtain with object-based methods.

  10. Event-based Plausibility Immediately Influences On-line Language Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Matsuki, Kazunaga; Chow, Tracy; Hare, Mary; Elman, Jeffrey L.; Scheepers, Christoph; McRae, Ken

    2011-01-01

    In some theories of sentence comprehension, linguistically-relevant lexical knowledge such as selectional restrictions is privileged in terms of the time-course of its access and influence. We examined whether event knowledge computed by combining multiple concepts can rapidly influence language understanding even in the absence of selectional restriction violations. Specifically, we investigated whether instruments can combine with actions to influence comprehension of ensuing patients. Instrument-verb-patient triplets were created in a norming study designed to tap directly into event knowledge. In self-paced reading (Experiment 1), participants were faster to read patient nouns such as hair when they were typical of the instrument-action pair (Donna used the shampoo to wash vs. the hose to wash). Experiment 2 showed that these results were not due to direct instrument-patient relations. Experiment 3 replicated Experiment 1 using eyetracking, with effects of event typicality observed in first fixation and gaze durations on the patient noun. This research demonstrates that conceptual event-based expectations are computed and used rapidly and dynamically during on-line language comprehension. We discuss relationships among plausibility and predictability, as well as their implications. We conclude that selectional restrictions may be best considered as event-based conceptual knowledge, rather than lexical-grammatical knowledge. PMID:21517222

  11. An efficient hybrid causative event-based approach for deriving the annual flood frequency distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyer, Mark; Li, Jing; Lambert, Martin; Kuczera, George; Metcalfe, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Flood extremes are driven by highly variable and complex climatic and hydrological processes. Derived flood frequency methods are often used to predict the flood frequency distribution (FFD) because they can provide predictions in ungauged catchments and evaluate the impact of land-use or climate change. This study presents recent work on development of a new derived flood frequency method called the hybrid causative events (HCE) approach. The advantage of the HCE approach is that it combines the accuracy of the continuous simulation approach with the computational efficiency of the event-based approaches. Derived flood frequency methods, can be divided into two classes. Event-based approaches provide fast estimation, but can also lead to prediction bias due to limitations of inherent assumptions required for obtaining input information (rainfall and catchment wetness) for events that cause large floods. Continuous simulation produces more accurate predictions, however, at the cost of massive computational time. The HCE method uses a short continuous simulation to provide inputs for a rainfall-runoff model running in an event-based fashion. A proof-of-concept pilot study that the HCE produces estimates of the flood frequency distribution with similar accuracy as the continuous simulation, but with dramatically reduced computation time. Recent work incorporated seasonality into the HCE approach and evaluated with a more realistic set of eight sites from a wide range of climate zones, typical of Australia, using a virtual catchment approach. The seasonal hybrid-CE provided accurate predictions of the FFD for all sites. Comparison with the existing non-seasonal hybrid-CE showed that for some sites the non-seasonal hybrid-CE significantly over-predicted the FFD. Analysis of the underlying cause of whether a site had a high, low or no need to use seasonality found it was based on a combination of reasons, that were difficult to predict apriori. Hence it is recommended

  12. Event-Based Study of the Effect of Execution Environments on Parallel Program Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarukkai, Sekhar R.; Yan, Jerry C.; Craw, James (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we seek to demonstrate the importance of studying the effect of changes in execution environment parameters, on parallel applications executed on state-of-the-art multiprocessors. A comprehensive methodology for event-based analysis of program behavior is introduced. This methodology is used to study the performance significance of various system parameters such as processor speed, message-buffer size, buffer copy speed, network bandwidth, communication latency, interrupt overheads and other system parameters. With the help cf a few CFD examples, we illustrate the use of our technique in determining suitable parameter values of the execution environment for three applications. We also demonstrate how this approach can be used to predict performance across architectures and illustrate the use of visual and profile-like feedback to expose the effect of system parameters changes on the performance of specific applications module.

  13. Event based self-supervised temporal integration for multimodal sensor data.

    PubMed

    Barakova, Emilia I; Lourens, Tino

    2005-06-01

    A method for synergistic integration of multimodal sensor data is proposed in this paper. This method is based on two aspects of the integration process: (1) achieving synergistic integration of two or more sensory modalities, and (2) fusing the various information streams at particular moments during processing. Inspired by psychophysical experiments, we propose a self-supervised learning method for achieving synergy with combined representations. Evidence from temporal registration and binding experiments indicates that different cues are processed individually at specific time intervals. Therefore, an event-based temporal co-occurrence principle is proposed for the integration process. This integration method was applied to a mobile robot exploring unfamiliar environments. Simulations showed that integration enhanced route recognition with many perceptual similarities; moreover, they indicate that a perceptual hierarchy of knowledge about instant movement contributes significantly to short-term navigation, but that visual perceptions have bigger impact over longer intervals.

  14. Pinning cluster synchronization in an array of coupled neural networks under event-based mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Lulu; Ho, Daniel W C; Cao, Jinde; Lu, Jianquan

    2016-04-01

    Cluster synchronization is a typical collective behavior in coupled dynamical systems, where the synchronization occurs within one group, while there is no synchronization among different groups. In this paper, under event-based mechanism, pinning cluster synchronization in an array of coupled neural networks is studied. A new event-triggered sampled-data transmission strategy, where only local and event-triggering states are utilized to update the broadcasting state of each agent, is proposed to realize cluster synchronization of the coupled neural networks. Furthermore, a self-triggered pinning cluster synchronization algorithm is proposed, and a set of iterative procedures is given to compute the event-triggered time instants. Hence, this will reduce the computational load significantly. Finally, an example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  15. Qualitative Event-Based Diagnosis: Case Study on the Second International Diagnostic Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew; Roychoudhury, Indranil

    2010-01-01

    We describe a diagnosis algorithm entered into the Second International Diagnostic Competition. We focus on the first diagnostic problem of the industrial track of the competition in which a diagnosis algorithm must detect, isolate, and identify faults in an electrical power distribution testbed and provide corresponding recovery recommendations. The diagnosis algorithm embodies a model-based approach, centered around qualitative event-based fault isolation. Faults produce deviations in measured values from model-predicted values. The sequence of these deviations is matched to those predicted by the model in order to isolate faults. We augment this approach with model-based fault identification, which determines fault parameters and helps to further isolate faults. We describe the diagnosis approach, provide diagnosis results from running the algorithm on provided example scenarios, and discuss the issues faced, and lessons learned, from implementing the approach

  16. Comparing Event-Based Storage across Tropical Land-Cover Gradients in the Panama Canal Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litt, G.; Gardner, C.; Ogden, F. L.; Lyons, W. B.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying watershed storage is a difficult undertaking, yet serves as a critical state variable for understanding catchment runoff processes and modeling applications. Hydrograph recession rates have traditionally been used to characterize relative watershed storage characteristics, but may neglect the different flowpaths taken during recession periods. Separating event-based hydrograph recession into 'old' and 'new' water can help distinguish between different catchment storages (Stewart, 2015). By coupling geochemical tracer-based hydrograph separation with post-storm recession rates in humid tropical catchments (<185 ha), we test the hypothesis that both 'old' and 'new' water stores are greater in forested areas relative to disturbed land covers. Stewart, M. K. (2015), Promising new baseflow separation and recession analysis methods applied to streamflow at Glendhu Catchment, New Zealand. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 19(6), 2587-2603.

  17. Event based self-supervised temporal integration for multimodal sensor data.

    PubMed

    Barakova, Emilia I; Lourens, Tino

    2005-06-01

    A method for synergistic integration of multimodal sensor data is proposed in this paper. This method is based on two aspects of the integration process: (1) achieving synergistic integration of two or more sensory modalities, and (2) fusing the various information streams at particular moments during processing. Inspired by psychophysical experiments, we propose a self-supervised learning method for achieving synergy with combined representations. Evidence from temporal registration and binding experiments indicates that different cues are processed individually at specific time intervals. Therefore, an event-based temporal co-occurrence principle is proposed for the integration process. This integration method was applied to a mobile robot exploring unfamiliar environments. Simulations showed that integration enhanced route recognition with many perceptual similarities; moreover, they indicate that a perceptual hierarchy of knowledge about instant movement contributes significantly to short-term navigation, but that visual perceptions have bigger impact over longer intervals. PMID:15988800

  18. SINUDYM - an event-based water quality model for ungauged catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hong Quan; Meon, Guenter

    2013-04-01

    SINUDYM - an event-based water quality model for ungauged catchments Hong Quan Nguyen, Günter Meon Water quality assessment of surface flow especially in ungauged catchments requires a proper tool. In this paper, the development, testing and application of the SINUDYM (Simplified Nutrient Dynamics Model) model to cope with practical issues (e.g. limited data, error propagation) in a robust way is presented. A simplified model structure and limited model parameters are the most appealing features of the model. With the model, event-based water balance and nutrient transport as well as relevant water quality parameters of the river system can be simulated. All model components are coupled and controlled within one file for use as an operational tool. Here, the Geomorphology Instantaneous Unit Hydrograph (GIUH), a simplified process erosion and sedimentation component, the loading function and the river routing from different existing modeling systems had been adopted and linked together. Furthermore, an add-in Monte - Carlo simulation tool is implemented providing an uncertainty analysis tool for the users. SINUDYM was, among others, applied successfully within a joint German-Vietnamese research project to simulate nutrient dynamics at a small catchment scale during flood events in southern Vietnam. The success of the developed model has proven the importance of selecting suitable model components and a model complexity being adapted to the data availability. For application to catchments with a poor database or to ungauged catchments, only the dominant processes of the nutrient transport should be captured in the model, whereas minor processes may be neglected or treated in a less complex manner. Key words: SINUDYM, water quality model, nutrient transport, ungauged catchment, uncertainty analysis, Vietnam.

  19. Models and Monte Carlo simulations of GCR and SPE organ doses with different shielding, based on the FLUKA code coupled with anthropomorphic phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, F.; Fluka-Phantoms Team

    Astronauts' exposure to space radiation is of major concern for long-term missions, especially for those in deep space such as a possible mission to Mars. Shielding optimization is therefore a crucial issue, and simulations based on radiation transport codes coupled with anthropomorphic model phantoms can be of great help. In this work, carried out with the FLUKA MC code and two anthropomorphic phantoms (a mathematical model and a "voxel" model), distributions of physical (i.e. absorbed), equivalent and "biological" dose in the various tissues and organs were calculated in different shielding conditions for solar minimum and solar maximum GCR spectra, as well as for the August 1972 Solar Particle Event. The biological dose was modeled as the average number of "Complex Lesions" (CL) per cell in a given organ. CLs are clustered DNA breaks previously calculated with "event-by-event" track structure simulations and integrated in the condensed-history FLUKA code. This approach is peculiar in that it is an example of a mechanistically-based quantification of the ionizing radiation action in biological targets; indeed CLs have been shown to play a fundamental role in chromosome aberration induction. The contributions of primary particles and secondary hadrons were calculated separately, thus allowing quantification of the role of nuclear reactions in the shield and in the human body. As expected, the doses calculated for the 1972 SPE decrease dramatically with increasing the Al shielding; nuclear reactions were found to be of minor importance, although their role is higher for internal organs and large shielding. An Al shield thickness of 10 g/cm2 appears sufficient to respect the 30-day deterministic limits recommended by NCRP for missions in Low Earth Orbit. In contrast with the results obtained for SPE, GCR doses to internal organs are not significantly lower than skin doses. However, the relative contribution of secondary hadrons was found to be more important for

  20. On-Board Event-Based State Estimation for Trajectory Approaching and Tracking of a Vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Rey, Miguel; Espinosa, Felipe; Gardel, Alfredo; Santos, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    For the problem of pose estimation of an autonomous vehicle using networked external sensors, the processing capacity and battery consumption of these sensors, as well as the communication channel load should be optimized. Here, we report an event-based state estimator (EBSE) consisting of an unscented Kalman filter that uses a triggering mechanism based on the estimation error covariance matrix to request measurements from the external sensors. This EBSE generates the events of the estimator module on-board the vehicle and, thus, allows the sensors to remain in stand-by mode until an event is generated. The proposed algorithm requests a measurement every time the estimation distance root mean squared error (DRMS) value, obtained from the estimator's covariance matrix, exceeds a threshold value. This triggering threshold can be adapted to the vehicle's working conditions rendering the estimator even more efficient. An example of the use of the proposed EBSE is given, where the autonomous vehicle must approach and follow a reference trajectory. By making the threshold a function of the distance to the reference location, the estimator can halve the use of the sensors with a negligible deterioration in the performance of the approaching maneuver. PMID:26102489

  1. Event-Based Surveillance During EXPO Milan 2015: Rationale, Tools, Procedures, and Initial Results

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Martina Del; Caporali, Maria Grazia; Napoli, Christian; Linge, Jens P.; Mantica, Eleonora; Verile, Marco; Piatti, Alessandra; Pompa, Maria Grazia; Vellucci, Loredana; Costanzo, Virgilio; Bastiampillai, Anan Judina; Gabrielli, Eugenia; Gramegna, Maria; Declich, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    More than 21 million participants attended EXPO Milan from May to October 2015, making it one of the largest protracted mass gathering events in Europe. Given the expected national and international population movement and health security issues associated with this event, Italy fully implemented, for the first time, an event-based surveillance (EBS) system focusing on naturally occurring infectious diseases and the monitoring of biological agents with potential for intentional release. The system started its pilot phase in March 2015 and was fully operational between April and November 2015. In order to set the specific objectives of the EBS system, and its complementary role to indicator-based surveillance, we defined a list of priority diseases and conditions. This list was designed on the basis of the probability and possible public health impact of infectious disease transmission, existing statutory surveillance systems in place, and any surveillance enhancements during the mass gathering event. This article reports the methodology used to design the EBS system for EXPO Milan and the results of 8 months of surveillance. PMID:27314656

  2. An event-based approach for examining the effects of wildland fire decisions on communities.

    PubMed

    McCool, Stephen F; Burchfield, James A; Williams, Daniel R; Carroll, Matthew S

    2006-04-01

    Public concern over the consequences of forest fire to wildland interface communities has led to increased resources devoted to fire suppression, fuel treatment, and management of fire events. The social consequences of the decisions involved in these and other fire-related actions are largely unknown, except in an anecdotal sense, but do occur at a variety of temporal and social organizational scales. These consequences are not limited to the fire event itself. Preparation for the possibility of a fire, actions that suppression agencies take during a fire, and postfire decisions all have consequences, if unknown currently. This article presents an "event-based" approach that can be useful for constructing and systematic discussion about the consequences of wildland fire to human communities. For each of the three major periods within this approach, agencies, communities, and individuals make decisions and take actions that have consequences. The article presents an integrated, temporally based process for examining these consequences, which is similar to others developed in the natural hazards and disaster management literature.

  3. Hydrologic Modeling in the Kenai River Watershed using Event Based Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, B.; Toniolo, H. A.; Stuefer, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding hydrologic changes is key for preparing for possible future scenarios. On the Kenai Peninsula in Alaska the yearly salmon runs provide a valuable stimulus to the economy. It is the focus of a large commercial fishing fleet, but also a prime tourist attraction. Modeling of anadromous waters provides a tool that assists in the prediction of future salmon run size. Beaver Creek, in Kenai, Alaska, is a lowlands stream that has been modeled using the Army Corps of Engineers event based modeling package HEC-HMS. With the use of historic precipitation and discharge data, the model was calibrated to observed discharge values. The hydrologic parameters were measured in the field or calculated, while soil parameters were estimated and adjusted during the calibration. With the calibrated parameter for HEC-HMS, discharge estimates can be used by other researches studying the area and help guide communities and officials to make better-educated decisions regarding the changing hydrology in the area and the tied economic drivers.

  4. Selection of intense rainfall events based on intensity thresholds and lightning data in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaál, L.; Molnar, P.; Szolgay, J.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a method to identify intense warm season storms with convective character based on intensity thresholds and the presence of lightning, and analyzes their statistical properties. Long records of precipitation and lightning data at 4 stations and 10 min resolution in different climatological regions in Switzerland are used. Our premise is that thunderstorms associated with lightning generate bursts of high rainfall intensity. We divided all recorded storms into those accompanied by lightning and those without lightning and found the threshold I* that separates intense events based on peak 10 min intensity Ip ≥ I* for a chosen misclassification rate α. The performance and robustness of the selection method was tested by investigating the inter-annual variability of I* and its relation to the frequency of lightning strikes. The probability distributions of the main storm properties (rainfall depth R, event duration D, average storm intensity Ia and peak 10 min intensity Ip) for the intense storm subsets show that the event average and peak intensities are significantly different between the stations. Non-parametric correlations between the main storm properties were estimated for intense storms and all storms including stratiform rain. The differences in the correlations between storm subsets are greater than those between stations, which indicates that care must be exercised not to mix events of different origin when they are sampled for multivariate analysis, for example, copula fitting to rainfall data.

  5. Selection of intense rainfall events based on intensity thresholds and lightning data in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaal, L.; Molnar, P.; Szolgay, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a method to identify intense warm season storms of convective character based on intensity thresholds and lightning, and analyzes their statistical properties. Long records of precipitation and lightning data at 4 stations and 10 min resolution in different climatological regions in Switzerland are used. Our premise is that thunderstorms associated with lightning generate bursts of high rainfall intensity. We divided all storms into those accompanied by lightning and those without lightning and found the threshold I* that separates intense events based on peak 10 min intensity Ip ≥ I* for a chosen misclassification rate α. The performance and robustness of the selection method was tested by investigating the inter-annual variability of I* and its relation to the frequency of lightning strikes. The probability distributions of the main storm properties (rainfall depth R, event duration D, average storm intensity Ia and peak 10 min intensity Ip) for the intense storm subsets show that the event average and peak intensities are significantly different between the stations, and highest in Lugano in southern Switzerland. Non-parametric correlations between the main storm properties were estimated for the subsets of intense storms and all storms including stratiform rain. The differences in the correlations between storm subsets are greater than those between stations, which indicates that care must be exercised not to mix events when they are sampled for multivariate analysis, e.g. copula fitting to rainfall data.

  6. Assessing the Continuum of Event-Based Biosurveillance Through an Operational Lens

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Courtney D.; Lancaster, Mary J.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Chung, James S.; Walters, Ronald A.; Arthur, Ray; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Dowling, Glenn; Hartley, David M.; Kennedy, Shaun; Kircher, Amy; Klucking, Sara; Lee, Eva K.; McKenzie, Taylor K.; Nelson, Noele P.; Olsen, Jennifer; Pancerella, Carmen M.; Quitugua, Teresa N.; Reed, Jeremy T.; Thomas, Carla S.

    2012-03-28

    This research follows the Updated Guidelines for Evaluating Public Health Surveillance Systems, Recommendations from the Guidelines Working Group, published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention nearly a decade ago. Since then, models have been developed and complex systems have evolved with a breadth of disparate data to detect or forecast chemical, biological, and radiological events that have significant impact in the One Health landscape. How the attributes identified in 2001 relate to the new range of event-based biosurveillance (EBB) technologies is unclear. This manuscript frames the continuum of EBB methods, models, and constructs through an operational lens (i.e., aspects and attributes associated with operational considerations in the development, testing, and validation of the EBB methods and models and their use in an operational environment). A 2-day subject matter expert workshop was held to scientifically identify, develop, and vet a set of attributes for the broad range of such operational considerations. Workshop participants identified and described comprehensive attributes for the characterization of EBB. The identified attributes are: (1) event, (2) readiness, (3) operational aspects, (4) geographic coverage, (5) population coverage, (6) input data, (7) output, and (8) cost. Ultimately, the analyses herein discuss the broad scope, complexity, and relevant issues germane to EBB useful in an operational environment.

  7. Assessment of Community Event-Based Surveillance for Ebola Virus Disease, Sierra Leone, 2015.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, Ruwan; Crowe, Samuel J; Jasperse, Joseph; Privette, Grayson; Stone, Erin; Miller, Laura; Hertz, Darren; Fu, Clementine; Maenner, Matthew J; Jambai, Amara; Morgan, Oliver

    2016-08-01

    In 2015, community event-based surveillance (CEBS) was implemented in Sierra Leone to assist with the detection of Ebola virus disease (EVD) cases. We assessed the sensitivity of CEBS for finding EVD cases during a 7-month period, and in a 6-week subanalysis, we assessed the timeliness of reporting cases with no known epidemiologic links at time of detection. Of the 12,126 CEBS reports, 287 (2%) met the suspected case definition, and 16 were confirmed positive. CEBS detected 30% (16/53) of the EVD cases identified during the study period. During the subanalysis, CEBS staff identified 4 of 6 cases with no epidemiologic links. These CEBS-detected cases were identified more rapidly than those detected by the national surveillance system; however, too few cases were detected to determine system timeliness. Although CEBS detected EVD cases, it largely generated false alerts. Future versions of community-based surveillance could improve case detection through increased staff training and community engagement. PMID:27434608

  8. On-Board Event-Based State Estimation for Trajectory Approaching and Tracking of a Vehicle.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rey, Miguel; Espinosa, Felipe; Gardel, Alfredo; Santos, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    For the problem of pose estimation of an autonomous vehicle using networked external sensors, the processing capacity and battery consumption of these sensors, as well as the communication channel load should be optimized. Here, we report an event-based state estimator (EBSE) consisting of an unscented Kalman filter that uses a triggering mechanism based on the estimation error covariance matrix to request measurements from the external sensors. This EBSE generates the events of the estimator module on-board the vehicle and, thus, allows the sensors to remain in stand-by mode until an event is generated. The proposed algorithm requests a measurement every time the estimation distance root mean squared error (DRMS) value, obtained from the estimator's covariance matrix, exceeds a threshold value. This triggering threshold can be adapted to the vehicle's working conditions rendering the estimator even more efficient. An example of the use of the proposed EBSE is given, where the autonomous vehicle must approach and follow a reference trajectory. By making the threshold a function of the distance to the reference location, the estimator can halve the use of the sensors with a negligible deterioration in the performance of the approaching maneuver. PMID:26102489

  9. A coupled model of TiN inclusion growth in GCr15SiMn during solidification in the electroslag remelting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liang; Cheng, Guo-guang; Li, Shi-jian; Zhao, Min; Feng, Gui-ping; Li, Tao

    2015-12-01

    TiN inclusions observed in an ingot produced by electroslag remelting (ESR) are extremely harmful to GCr15SiMn steel. Therefore, accurate predictions of the growth size of these inclusions during steel solidification are significant for clean ESR ingot production. On the basis of our previous work, a coupled model of solute microsegregation and TiN inclusion growth during solidification has been established. The results demonstrate that compared to a non-coupled model, the coupled model predictions of the size of TiN inclusions are in good agreement with experimental results using scanning electron microscopy with energy disperse spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). Because of high cooling rate, the sizes of TiN inclusions in the edge area of the ingots are relatively small compared to the sizes in the center area. During the ESR process, controlling the content of Ti in the steel is a feasible and effective method of decreasing the sizes of TiN inclusions.

  10. Advanced Science/Event-based Data Service Framework at GES DISC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shie, C. L.; Shen, S.; Kempler, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Service Center (GES DISC) has provided numerous Earth science data, information, and services to various research communities and general publics for decades. To maintain an overall fine service including improving serving our users with advanced data services has been our primary goal. We are developing an advanced science/event-based data service framework. The framework aims to effectively provide users with a sophisticatedly integrated data package via user-friendly discovering and selecting a system-preset science/event topic (e.g., hurricane, volcano, etc.) from an in-developing knowledge database of the framework. A data recipe page related to the Hurricane topic has been developed to demo the concept. More showcases of various subjects such as Volcano, Dust Storm, and Forest Fire are also under development. This framework is in developing on top of existing data services at GES DISC, such as Mirador (data search engine), Giovanni (visualization), OPeNDAP, and data recipes. It also involves other data tools, such as Panoply, GrADS, IDL, etc. The Hurricane Sandy (Oct 22-31 2012) event is used here for a sample description. As Hurricane Sandy being selected as a user case, a table containing nine system-preset data variables (i.e., precipitation, winds, sea surface temperature, sea level pressure, air temperature, relative humidity, aerosols, soil moisture and surface runoff, and trace gases) linked to the respective data products with fine temporal and spatial resolutions from various in-house sources is provided. The "bundled" variable data can thus be readily downloaded through Mirador. The in-house Giovanni is accessible for users to acquire quick views of Level 3 (gridded) variables. For Level 2 (swath) or the Giovanni-unavailable Level 3 data, the system provides a link to data recipes that give a how-to guide to read and visualize the data using offline tools, such as Panoply, GrADS, or IDL.

  11. Modulation of a Fronto-Parietal Network in Event-Based Prospective Memory: An rTMS Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisiacchi, P. S.; Cona, G.; Schiff, S.; Basso, D.

    2011-01-01

    Event-based prospective memory (PM) is a multi-component process that requires remembering the delayed execution of an intended action in response to a pre-specified PM cue, while being actively engaged in an ongoing task. Some neuroimaging studies have suggested that both prefrontal and parietal areas are involved in the maintenance and…

  12. Event-Based Sedimentation in a Flood Bypass: Examples From the Sacramento Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, M. B.; Aalto, R.; Dunne, T.; Nittrouer, J.; Nittrouer, C. A.

    2003-12-01

    Flood bypasses are miniature, anthropogenic analogs of flood basins, which abutted many lowland rivers before the advent of major flood control engineering. Whereas natural lowland floodplains are frequently inundated by diffuse overbank flow or localized crevasse splays, an engineered bypass is only activated when passive weirs near the main channel are overtopped during large floods. Consequently, a bypass represents a focused pathway for the transport of water and sediment that may reflect a legacy of event-based sediment accumulation, compared with the more chronic, diffuse sedimentation across natural flood basins. Our investigations suggest that bypasses are net receivers of suspended sediment from the main channel, with recent sediment accumulation patterns that reflect the dimensions, flow history, and frequency of over-weir sediment delivery. Our preliminary field observations and laboratory measurements indicate that sedimentation in Colusa and Yolo Bypasses may be dominated by a few large sedimentation events (of order ˜1 m of deposition per event). However, little is known about how sediment accumulation occurs in bypasses during floods. This study commences a detailed investigation of the links between hydrology and sedimentation in the flood bypasses of the Sacramento Valley. Our strategy is to 1) model the over-weir conveyance and intra-bypass accumulation of fine sediment during floods, and 2) sample, describe, and date these sediment deposits to verify the numerical model. We modeled the influence of the 1964-1965 hydrologic event on sedimentation in the Colusa-Sutter-Yolo Bypass system by combining hydrologic records with empirical models of suspended-sediment concentration and suspendibility calculations. We used records of flood discharge for the event period into and through Colusa, Sutter, and Yolo Bypasses to compute sediment concentration entering the system based on discharge-concentration relationships and simplified hydraulics within the

  13. Event-based approach of downstream Rhône River flood regimes variability since 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénaff, Quentin; Arnaud-Fassetta, Gilles; Beltrando, Gérard

    2015-04-01

    Numerous downstream Rhône River floods have been recorded as catastrophic by French inter-ministerial order since the creation of natural disaster state recognition in 1982. Downstream Rhône River flood regimes, influenced by Mediterranean climate, are fundamentally affected by the spatio-temporal variability of rainfall events, especially in case of widespread flooding. Event-based analysis of cumulative rainfall data should allow us to characterise downstream Rhône River flood regimes variability by applying data mining methods to a spatio-temporal hydro-meteorological database. The first objective of this study is to determine if extreme rainfall events could be considered as geographical events, in other words if rainfall distribution is related to spatial processes. The proposed method is based on the measure of rainfall distribution spatial auto-correlation through the calculation of (i) Global Moran's index and (ii) the significance evaluation of that index with a z-score statistical test and its associated p-value. Secondly, cumulative rainfall data are integrated into a geo-event two-dimensional matrix: (i) cumulative rainfall per sub-catchment in row (spatial base unit) and (ii) cumulative rainfall per catastrophic event in column (temporal base unit). This matrix was co-clustered which allows simultaneous clustering of the rows (sub-catchment) and columns (events) by hierarchical clustering on principal components (HCPC) using Ward's method applying Euclidean Distance as similarity measure. Computing the Global Moran's index demonstrated a spatial aggregation tendency of rainfall distribution and the associated statistical test (z-core and p-value) noted the improbability of statistical evidence of random spatial pattern. Spatial variability of rainfall distribution is the result of two factors: rainfall event structure and rainfall event scale. The co-clustering geo-event matrix provided two co-clustering maps on two different cumulative rainfall

  14. Observer Agreement for Timed-Event Sequential Data: A Comparison of Time-Based and Event-Based Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Bakeman, Roger; Quera, Vicenç; Gnisci, Augusto

    2009-01-01

    Observer agreement is often regarded as the sine qua non of observational research. Cohen’s kappa is a widely-used index and is appropriate when discrete entities, such as a turn-of-talk or a demarcated time-interval, are presented to pairs of observers to code. Kappa-like statistics and agreement matrixes are also used for the timed-event sequential data produced when observers first segment and then code events detected in the stream of behavior, noting onset and offset times. Such kappas are of two kinds, time-based and event-based. Available for download is a computer program (OASTES, Observer Agreement for Simulated Timed Event Sequences) that simulates the coding of observers of a stated accuracy, and then computes agreement statistics for two time-based kappas (with and without tolerance) and three event-based kappas (one implemented in The Observer, one in INTERACT, and one in GSEQ). Based on simulation results presented here, and due to the somewhat different information provide by each, reporting of both a time-based and an event-based kappa is recommended. PMID:19182133

  15. Concentration of electrostatic solitary waves around magnetic nulls within magnetic reconnection diffusion region: single-event-based statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shiyou; Zhang, Shifeng; Cai, Hong; Yu, Sufang

    2014-12-01

    It is important to study the `concentrated' electrostatic solitary waves/structures (ESWs) associated with the magnetic reconnection. In the literature published as regards this topic, very few studies have reported the observation of such a large number of ESWs in a single magnetic reconnection event. In this work, we report our observation of a large number of ESWs around the magnetic null-pairs within the magnetic reconnection ion diffusion region of Earth's magnetosphere on 10 September 2001. With more than 9,600 cases of ESWs observed around magnetic null-pairs and more than 97,600 cases observed during the ion diffusion region crossing time span, the observation of such a large number of ESWs in the diffusion region has not been reported often in published works. We further perform single-event-based statistical analysis of the characteristics of the ESWs around magnetic null-pairs. Based on the statistical result, we speculate that the two-stream instability originating from the magnetic null and traveling outward along the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) is the candidate mechanism of the large number of observed ESWs. Our observation and analysis in this work suggests that even with the presence of a complex magnetic structure around a magnetic null-pair in the three-dimensional regime, concentrated ESWs can be observed. This single-reconnection-event-based statistical result of ESWs around the magnetic null-pairs can aid in understanding the microdynamics associated with three-dimensional (3D) magnetic reconnection.

  16. Breaking the millisecond barrier on SpiNNaker: implementing asynchronous event-based plastic models with microsecond resolution.

    PubMed

    Lagorce, Xavier; Stromatias, Evangelos; Galluppi, Francesco; Plana, Luis A; Liu, Shih-Chii; Furber, Steve B; Benosman, Ryad B

    2015-01-01

    Spike-based neuromorphic sensors such as retinas and cochleas, change the way in which the world is sampled. Instead of producing data sampled at a constant rate, these sensors output spikes that are asynchronous and event driven. The event-based nature of neuromorphic sensors implies a complete paradigm shift in current perception algorithms toward those that emphasize the importance of precise timing. The spikes produced by these sensors usually have a time resolution in the order of microseconds. This high temporal resolution is a crucial factor in learning tasks. It is also widely used in the field of biological neural networks. Sound localization for instance relies on detecting time lags between the two ears which, in the barn owl, reaches a temporal resolution of 5 μs. Current available neuromorphic computation platforms such as SpiNNaker often limit their users to a time resolution in the order of milliseconds that is not compatible with the asynchronous outputs of neuromorphic sensors. To overcome these limitations and allow for the exploration of new types of neuromorphic computing architectures, we introduce a novel software framework on the SpiNNaker platform. This framework allows for simulations of spiking networks and plasticity mechanisms using a completely asynchronous and event-based scheme running with a microsecond time resolution. Results on two example networks using this new implementation are presented. PMID:26106288

  17. Event-based prospective memory and everyday forgetting in healthy older adults and individuals with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Tam, Joyce W; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    An event-based nonfocal task was used to evaluate prospective memory (PM) and the relationship between PM, neuropsychological testing data, and everyday forgetting. Twenty-four participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 24 age- and education-matched cognitively healthy adults responded to a nonfocal PM cue, while completing an ongoing working memory task. Neuropsychological testing data and self- and informant-report of frequency of forgetting were also gathered. Compared to healthy adults, the MCI participants exhibited significantly poorer prospective remembering and ongoing task performance, despite similar self-reported effort directed to the PM task. Both self- and informant-report indicated that the MCI group was experiencing a higher frequency of everyday forgetting than the healthy adult group. Self-report of everyday forgetting was correlated with PM task performance for the healthy adults, but not for the MCI participants. For the healthy adults, correlational analyses also showed significant relationships between PM accuracy and tests of memory and executive functioning, suggesting that both spontaneous retrieval processes and effortful, strategic monitoring may be important in supporting prospective remembering for this nonfocal PM task. The stronger relationships between PM accuracy and memory and language tests for the MCI group suggest that their poorer event-based prospective remembering might be linked to impaired spontaneous retrieval processes, which are thought to be supported by medial temporal structures. PMID:23419059

  18. Event-based criteria in GT-STAF information indices: theory, exploratory diversity analysis and QSPR applications.

    PubMed

    Barigye, S J; Marrero-Ponce, Y; Martínez López, Y; Martínez Santiago, O; Torrens, F; García Domenech, R; Galvez, J

    2013-01-01

    Versatile event-based approaches for the definition of novel information theory-based indices (IFIs) are presented. An event in this context is the criterion followed in the "discovery" of molecular substructures, which in turn serve as basis for the construction of the generalized incidence and relations frequency matrices, Q and F, respectively. From the resultant F, Shannon's, mutual, conditional and joint entropy-based IFIs are computed. In previous reports, an event named connected subgraphs was presented. The present study is an extension of this notion, in which we introduce other events, namely: terminal paths, vertex path incidence, quantum subgraphs, walks of length k, Sach's subgraphs, MACCs, E-state and substructure fingerprints and, finally, Ghose and Crippen atom-types for hydrophobicity and refractivity. Moreover, we define magnitude-based IFIs, introducing the use of the magnitude criterion in the definition of mutual, conditional and joint entropy-based IFIs. We also discuss the use of information-theoretic parameters as a measure of the dissimilarity of codified structural information of molecules. Finally, a comparison of the statistics for QSPR models obtained with the proposed IFIs and DRAGON's molecular descriptors for two physicochemical properties log P and log K of 34 derivatives of 2-furylethylenes demonstrates similar to better predictive ability than the latter.

  19. Infectious diseases prioritisation for event-based surveillance at the European Union level for the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

    PubMed

    Economopoulou, A; Kinross, P; Domanovic, D; Coulombier, D

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, London hosted the Olympic and Paralympic Games (the Games), with events occurring throughout the United Kingdom (UK) between 27 July and 9 September 2012. Public health surveillance was performed by the Health Protection Agency (HPA). Collaboration between the HPA and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) was established for the detection and assessment of significant infectious disease events (SIDEs) occurring outside the UK during the time of the Games. Additionally, ECDC undertook an internal prioritisation exercise to facilitate ECDC’s decisions on which SIDEs should have preferentially enhanced monitoring through epidemic intelligence activities for detection and reporting in daily surveillance in the European Union (EU). A team of ECDC experts evaluated potential public health risks to the Games, selecting and prioritising SIDEs for event-based surveillance with regard to their potential for importation to the Games, occurrence during the Games or export to the EU/European Economic Area from the Games. The team opted for a multilevel approach including comprehensive disease selection, development and use of a qualitative matrix scoring system and a Delphi method for disease prioritisation. The experts selected 71 infectious diseases to enter the prioritisation exercise of which 27 were considered as priority for epidemic intelligence activities by ECDC for the EU for the Games. PMID:24762663

  20. Infectious diseases prioritisation for event-based surveillance at the European Union level for the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

    PubMed

    Economopoulou, A; Kinross, P; Domanovic, D; Coulombier, D

    2014-04-17

    In 2012, London hosted the Olympic and Paralympic Games (the Games), with events occurring throughout the United Kingdom (UK) between 27 July and 9 September 2012. Public health surveillance was performed by the Health Protection Agency (HPA). Collaboration between the HPA and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) was established for the detection and assessment of significant infectious disease events (SIDEs) occurring outside the UK during the time of the Games. Additionally, ECDC undertook an internal prioritisation exercise to facilitate ECDC’s decisions on which SIDEs should have preferentially enhanced monitoring through epidemic intelligence activities for detection and reporting in daily surveillance in the European Union (EU). A team of ECDC experts evaluated potential public health risks to the Games, selecting and prioritising SIDEs for event-based surveillance with regard to their potential for importation to the Games, occurrence during the Games or export to the EU/European Economic Area from the Games. The team opted for a multilevel approach including comprehensive disease selection, development and use of a qualitative matrix scoring system and a Delphi method for disease prioritisation. The experts selected 71 infectious diseases to enter the prioritisation exercise of which 27 were considered as priority for epidemic intelligence activities by ECDC for the EU for the Games.

  1. Event-based minimum-time control of oscillatory neuron models: phase randomization, maximal spike rate increase, and desynchronization.

    PubMed

    Danzl, Per; Hespanha, João; Moehlis, Jeff

    2009-12-01

    We present an event-based feedback control method for randomizing the asymptotic phase of oscillatory neurons. Phase randomization is achieved by driving the neuron's state to its phaseless set, a point at which its phase is undefined and is extremely sensitive to background noise. We consider the biologically relevant case of a fixed magnitude constraint on the stimulus signal, and show how the control objective can be accomplished in minimum time. The control synthesis problem is addressed using the minimum-time-optimal Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman framework, which is quite general and can be applied to any spiking neuron model in the conductance-based Hodgkin-Huxley formalism. We also use this methodology to compute a feedback control protocol for optimal spike rate increase. This framework provides a straightforward means of visualizing isochrons, without actually calculating them in the traditional way. Finally, we present an extension of the phase randomizing control scheme that is applied at the population level, to a network of globally coupled neurons that are firing in synchrony. The applied control signal desynchronizes the population in a demand-controlled way. PMID:19911192

  2. Continuous and event-based time series analysis of observed floodplain groundwater flow under contrasting land-use types.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Elliott; Hubbart, Jason A

    2016-10-01

    There is an ongoing need to improve quantitative understanding of land-use impacts on floodplain groundwater flow regimes. A study was implemented in Hinkson Creek Watershed, Missouri, USA, including equidistant grids of nine piezometers, equipped with pressure transducers, which were installed at two floodplain study sites: a remnant bottomland hardwood forest (BHF) and a historical agricultural field (Ag). Data were logged at thirty minute intervals for the duration of the 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014 water years (October 1, 2010-September 30, 2014). Results show significant (p<0.001) differences between Darcy-estimated groundwater flow at the two study sites. Although median flow values at the two sites were similar (0.009 and 0.010mday(-1) for the Ag and BHF sites, respectively), the BHF displayed a more dynamic flow regime compared to the Ag site. Maximum flow values were 0.020 and 0.049mday(-1) for the Ag and BHF sites, respectively. Minimum flow values were -0.018 and -0.029mday(-1) for the Ag and BHF sites, respectively. The BHF showed greater magnitude, longer duration, and more frequent negative flows, relative to the Ag site. Event-based analyses indicated a more seasonally responsive flow regime at the BHF, with higher flows than the Ag site during the wet season and lower flows than the Ag site during the dry season. Notably, the seasonal pattern of relative site flow differences was consistent across a wide range of precipitation event magnitudes (i.e. 8-45mm). Results are by majority attributable to greater rates of plant water use by woody vegetation and preferential subsurface flow at the BHF site. Collectively, results suggest greater flood attenuation capacity and streamwater buffering potential by the BHF floodplain, relative to the Ag, and highlight the value of floodplain forests as a land and water resource management tool. PMID:27232970

  3. Continuous and event-based time series analysis of observed floodplain groundwater flow under contrasting land-use types.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Elliott; Hubbart, Jason A

    2016-10-01

    There is an ongoing need to improve quantitative understanding of land-use impacts on floodplain groundwater flow regimes. A study was implemented in Hinkson Creek Watershed, Missouri, USA, including equidistant grids of nine piezometers, equipped with pressure transducers, which were installed at two floodplain study sites: a remnant bottomland hardwood forest (BHF) and a historical agricultural field (Ag). Data were logged at thirty minute intervals for the duration of the 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014 water years (October 1, 2010-September 30, 2014). Results show significant (p<0.001) differences between Darcy-estimated groundwater flow at the two study sites. Although median flow values at the two sites were similar (0.009 and 0.010mday(-1) for the Ag and BHF sites, respectively), the BHF displayed a more dynamic flow regime compared to the Ag site. Maximum flow values were 0.020 and 0.049mday(-1) for the Ag and BHF sites, respectively. Minimum flow values were -0.018 and -0.029mday(-1) for the Ag and BHF sites, respectively. The BHF showed greater magnitude, longer duration, and more frequent negative flows, relative to the Ag site. Event-based analyses indicated a more seasonally responsive flow regime at the BHF, with higher flows than the Ag site during the wet season and lower flows than the Ag site during the dry season. Notably, the seasonal pattern of relative site flow differences was consistent across a wide range of precipitation event magnitudes (i.e. 8-45mm). Results are by majority attributable to greater rates of plant water use by woody vegetation and preferential subsurface flow at the BHF site. Collectively, results suggest greater flood attenuation capacity and streamwater buffering potential by the BHF floodplain, relative to the Ag, and highlight the value of floodplain forests as a land and water resource management tool.

  4. Comparison of Patients with Parkinson's Disease or Cerebellar Lesions in the Production of Periodic Movements Involving Event-Based or Emergent Timing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, R.M.C.; Ivry, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    We have hypothesized a distinction between the processes required to control the timing of different classes of periodic movements. In one class, salient events mark successive cycles. For these movements, we hypothesize that the temporal goal is a requisite component of the task representation, what we refer to as event-based timing. In the other…

  5. Time-Based and Event-Based Prospective Memory in Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Roles of Executive Function and Theory of Mind, and Time-Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, David; Boucher, Jill; Lind, Sophie; Jarrold, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Prospective memory (remembering to carry out an action in the future) has been studied relatively little in ASD. We explored time-based (carry out an action at a pre-specified time) and event-based (carry out an action upon the occurrence of a pre-specified event) prospective memory, as well as possible cognitive correlates, among 21…

  6. An event-based approach to understanding the hydrological impacts of different land uses in semi-arid catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shengping; Zhang, Zhiqiang; McVicar, Tim R.; Zhang, Jianjun; Zhu, Jinzhao; Guo, Junting

    2012-01-01

    SummaryIn semi-arid catchments around the world re-vegetation is often implemented to reduce quick surface runoff, combat severe soil erosion, restore degraded ecosystem functionality, and, ultimately, improve ecosystem productivity. However, to date, in these water stressed regions, the event-based hydrological impact of different land uses induced by re-vegetation activities is not fully understood at the watershed scale. Traditional hillslope plot experiments and paired watershed experiments have proved difficult to up-scale to a watershed level. In 2006 and 2007, we used broad-crested weirs to measure event streamflow from six catchments within the Caijiachuan watershed (area = 40.1 km 2), located in the Loess Plateau, a semi-arid region in China. The six catchments have different land use compositions with functional combinations of crop, grassland, shrubland, secondary forest, and plantations. Over the same period, event rainfall was measured by a network of rainfall gauges deployed over the study site. We examined the difference in hydrological properties between the catchments using the non-parametric Firedman test, and differentiated the role of each land use in governing watershed hydrology using a numerical analysis technique. Our results showed important differences between the six catchments with respect to event runoff coefficients, normalized peak flow, and event duration. Each land use played a different role in catchment hydrology, as shown by the different mean runoff coefficients ( rc) and mean representative surface flow velocities ( V). Compared to secondary forest ( rc = 0.017 and V = 0.07 m s -1), plantations ( rc = 0.001 and V = 0.18 m s -1) provide a greater potential for increasing shearing force and had a larger impact on runoff reduction. Although shrubland ( rc = 0.096 and V = 0.20 m s -1) and grassland ( rc = 0.127 and V = 0.02 m s -1) have similar magnitude of mean runoff coefficients, grassland seems more capable of trapping sediment

  7. Time-based and event-based prospective memory in autism spectrum disorder: the roles of executive function and theory of mind, and time-estimation.

    PubMed

    Williams, David; Boucher, Jill; Lind, Sophie; Jarrold, Christopher

    2013-07-01

    Prospective memory (remembering to carry out an action in the future) has been studied relatively little in ASD. We explored time-based (carry out an action at a pre-specified time) and event-based (carry out an action upon the occurrence of a pre-specified event) prospective memory, as well as possible cognitive correlates, among 21 intellectually high-functioning children with ASD, and 21 age- and IQ-matched neurotypical comparison children. We found impaired time-based, but undiminished event-based, prospective memory among children with ASD. In the ASD group, time-based prospective memory performance was associated significantly with diminished theory of mind, but not with diminished cognitive flexibility. There was no evidence that time-estimation ability contributed to time-based prospective memory impairment in ASD.

  8. The Cognitive Processes Underlying Event-Based Prospective Memory In School Age Children and Young Adults: A Formal Model-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rebekah E.; Bayen, Ute Johanna; Martin, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Fifty 7-year-olds (29 female), 53 10-year-olds (29 female), and 36 young adults (19 female), performed a computerized event-based prospective memory task. All three groups differed significantly in prospective memory performance with adults showing the best performance and 7-year-olds the poorest performance. We used a formal multinomial process tree model of event-based prospective memory to decompose age differences in cognitive processes that jointly contribute to prospective memory performance. The formal modeling results demonstrated that adults differed significantly from the 7-year-olds and 10-year-olds on both the prospective component and the retrospective component of the task. The 7-year-olds and 10-year-olds differed only in the ability to recognize prospective memory target events. The prospective memory task imposed a cost to ongoing activities in all three age groups. PMID:20053020

  9. Issues for Simulation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Exposures for Radiobiological Research at Ground-Based Accelerators.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2015-01-01

    For radiobiology research on the health risks of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) ground-based accelerators have been used with mono-energetic beams of single high charge, Z and energy, E (HZE) particles. In this paper, we consider the pros and cons of a GCR reference field at a particle accelerator. At the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), we have proposed a GCR simulator, which implements a new rapid switching mode and higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, in order to integrate multiple ions into a single simulation within hours or longer for chronic exposures. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, we performed extensive simulation studies using the stochastic transport code, GERMcode (GCR Event Risk Model) to define a GCR reference field using 9 HZE particle beam-energy combinations each with a unique absorber thickness to provide fragmentation and 10 or more energies of proton and (4)He beams. The reference field is shown to well represent the charge dependence of GCR dose in several energy bins behind shielding compared to a simulated GCR environment. However, a more significant challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3 years in relation to simulations with animal models of human risks. We discuss issues in approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation, with extended exposure of up to a few weeks using chronic or fractionation exposures. A kinetics model of HZE particle hit probabilities suggests that experimental simulations of several weeks will be needed to avoid high fluence rate artifacts, which places limitations on the experiments to be performed. Ultimately risk estimates are limited by theoretical understanding, and focus on improving knowledge of mechanisms and development of experimental models to improve this understanding should remain the highest priority for space radiobiology research.

  10. Issues for Simulation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Exposures for Radiobiological Research at Ground-Based Accelerators

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2015-01-01

    For radiobiology research on the health risks of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) ground-based accelerators have been used with mono-energetic beams of single high charge, Z and energy, E (HZE) particles. In this paper, we consider the pros and cons of a GCR reference field at a particle accelerator. At the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), we have proposed a GCR simulator, which implements a new rapid switching mode and higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, in order to integrate multiple ions into a single simulation within hours or longer for chronic exposures. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, we performed extensive simulation studies using the stochastic transport code, GERMcode (GCR Event Risk Model) to define a GCR reference field using 9 HZE particle beam–energy combinations each with a unique absorber thickness to provide fragmentation and 10 or more energies of proton and 4He beams. The reference field is shown to well represent the charge dependence of GCR dose in several energy bins behind shielding compared to a simulated GCR environment. However, a more significant challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3 years in relation to simulations with animal models of human risks. We discuss issues in approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation, with extended exposure of up to a few weeks using chronic or fractionation exposures. A kinetics model of HZE particle hit probabilities suggests that experimental simulations of several weeks will be needed to avoid high fluence rate artifacts, which places limitations on the experiments to be performed. Ultimately risk estimates are limited by theoretical understanding, and focus on improving knowledge of mechanisms and development of experimental models to improve this understanding should remain the highest priority for space radiobiology research. PMID:26090339

  11. Influence of intra-event-based flood regime on sediment flow behavior from a typical agro-catchment of the Chinese Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Le-Tao; Li, Zhan-Bin; Wang, He; Xiao, Jun-Bo

    2016-07-01

    The pluvial erosion process is significantly affected by tempo-spatial patterns of flood flows. However, despite their importance, only a few studies have investigated the sediment flow behavior that is driven by different flood regimes. The study aims to investigate the effect of intra-event-based flood regimes on the dynamics of sediment exports at Tuanshangou catchment, a typical agricultural catchment (unmanaged) in the hilly loess region on the Chinese Loess Plateau. Measurements of 193 flood events and 158 sediment-producing events were collected from Tuanshangou station between 1961 and 1969. The combined methods of hierarchical clustering approach, discriminant analysis and One-Way ANOVA were used to classify the flood events in terms of their event-based flood characteristics, including flood duration, peak discharge, and event flood runoff depth. The 193 flood events were classified into five regimes, and the mean statistical features of each regime significantly differed. Regime A includes flood events with the shortest duration (76 min), minimum flood crest (0.045 m s-1), least runoff depth (0.2 mm), and highest frequency. Regime B includes flood events with a medium duration (274 min), medium flood crest (0.206 m s-1), and minor runoff depth (0.7 mm). Regime C includes flood events with the longest duration (822 min), medium flood crest (0.236 m s-1), and medium runoff depth (1.7 mm). Regime D includes flood events with a medium duration (239 min), large flood crest (4.21 m s-1), and large runoff depth (10 mm). Regime E includes flood events with a medium duration (304 min), maximum flood crest (8.62 m s-1), and largest runoff depth (25.9 mm). The sediment yield by different flood regimes is ranked as follows: Regime E > Regime D > Regime B > Regime C > Regime A. In terms of event-based average and maximum suspended sediment concentration, these regimes are ordered as follows: Regime E > Regime D > Regime C > Regime B > Regime A. Regimes D and E

  12. Event-Based Runoff Across Changing Land Covers in the Panama Canal Watershed: A Synthesis of Hydrophysical Measurements and Hydrochemical Tracers Using Hydrograph Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litt, G.; Gardner, C.; Ogden, F. L.; Lyons, W. B.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical hydrology is understudied relative to its temperate counterparts and thus presents challenges for understanding catchment runoff behavior undergoing land use change. Combining hydrometric and hydrochemical observations can shed light on potential differences in runoff processes under changing land covers. We compare event-based dual member hydrograph separations across humid tropical lowland forest (142 ha), mixed land use (176 ha) and pasture (36 ha) catchments following two years of monitoring during the seasonal dry to wet season transition. Stable water isotope and electrical conductivity tracer event water fraction estimations agree well during small runoff events, but exhibit different results during a large runoff event with a greater runoff coefficient. Geochemical tracers exhibit event water fraction maximums during hydrograph recessions and a seasonal transition in runoff behavior among all land uses. From these results we identify potential runoff mechanisms in these steep humid tropical catchments under varying land uses.

  13. Preserved Intention Maintenance and Impaired Execution of Prospective Memory Responses in Schizophrenia: Evidence from an Event-based Prospective Memory Study

    PubMed Central

    Demeter, Gyula; Szendi, István; Domján, Nóra; Juhász, Marianna; Greminger, Nóra; Szőllősi, Ágnes; Racsmány, Mihály

    2016-01-01

    Executive system dysfunction and impaired prospective memory (PM) are widely documented in schizophrenia. However, it is not yet clarified which components of PM function are impaired in this disorder. Two plausible target components are the maintenance of delayed intentions and the execution of PM responses. Furthermore, it is debated whether the impaired performance on frequently used executive tasks is associated with deficit in PM functions. The aim of our study was twofold. First, we aimed to investigate the specific processes involved in event-based PM function, mainly focusing on difference between maintenance of intention and execution of PM responses. Second, we aimed to unfold the possible connections between executive functions, clinical symptoms, and PM performance. An event-based PM paradigm was applied with three main conditions: baseline (with no expectation of PM stimuli, and without PM stimuli), expectation condition (participants were told that PM stimuli might occur, though none actually did), and execution condition (participants were told that PM stimuli might occur, and PM stimuli did occur). This procedure allowed us to separately investigate performances associated with intention maintenance and execution of PM responses. We assessed working memory and set-shifting executive functions by memory span tasks and by the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), respectively. Twenty patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and 20 healthy control subjects (matched according to age and education) took part in the study. It was hypothesized that patients would manifest different levels of performance in the expectation and execution conditions of the PM task. Our results confirmed that the difference between baseline performance and performance in the execution condition (execution cost) was significantly larger for participants diagnosed with schizophrenia in comparison with matched healthy control group. However, this difference was not observed in the

  14. Task Importance Affects Event-based Prospective Memory Performance in Adults with HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders and HIV-infected Young Adults with Problematic Substance Use

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Steven Paul; Doyle, Katie L.; Morgan, Erin E.; Naar-King, Sylvie; Outlaw, Angulique Y.; Nichols, Sharon L.; Loft, Shayne

    2014-01-01

    Objective Two experiments were conducted to examine the effects of task importance on event-based prospective memory (PM) in separate samples of adults with HIV-associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND) and HIV-infected young adults with Substance Use Disorders (SUD). Method All participants completed three conditions of an ongoing lexical decision task: 1) without PM task requirements; 2) with PM task requirements that emphasized the importance of the ongoing task; and 3) with PM task requirements that emphasized the importance of the PM task. Results In both experiments, all HIV+ groups showed the expected increase in response costs to the ongoing task when the PM task’s importance was emphasized. In Experiment 1, individuals with HAND showed significantly lower PM accuracy as compared to HIV+ subjects without HAND when the importance of the ongoing task was emphasized, but improved significantly and no longer differed from HIV+ subjects without HAND when the PM task was emphasized. A similar pattern of findings emerged in Experiment 2, whereby HIV+ young adults with SUD (especially cannabis) showed significant improvements in PM accuracy when the PM task was emphasized. Conclusions Findings suggest that both HAND and SUD may increase the amount of cognitive attentional resources that need to be allocated to support PM performance in persons living with HIV infection. PMID:24834469

  15. Flood-event based metal distribution patterns in water as approach for source apportionment of pollution on catchment scale: Examples from the River Elbe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baborowski, Martina; Einax, Jürgen W.

    2016-04-01

    With the implementation of European Water Frame Work Directive (EU-WFD), the pollution sources in the River Elbe were assessed by the River Basin Community Elbe (RBC Elbe). Contaminated old sediments played the most significant role for inorganic and organic pollution. In terms of further improvement of the water quality in the river system, a prioritization of the known pollution sources is necessary, with respect to the expected effect in the case of their remediation. This requires information on mobility of contaminated sediments. To create a tool that allows the assessment of pollution trends in the catchment area, event based flood investigations were carried out at a sampling site in the Middle Elbe. The investigations were based on a comparable, discharge related sampling strategy. Four campaigns were performed between 1995 and 2006. The majority of the investigated 16 elements (>80%) studied more intensively in 2006 reached its maximum concentration during the first five days of the event. Only the concentrations of B, Cl-, and U declined with increasing discharge during the flood. The aim of the study was to verify that each flood event is characterized by an internal structure of the water quality. This structure is formed by the appearance of maximum values of water quality parameters at different times during the event. It could be detected by descriptive and multivariate statistical methods. As a result, internal structure of the water quality during the flood was influenced primarily by the source of the metals in the catchment area and its distance from the sampling point. The transport of metals in dissolved, colloidal or particulate form and changes of their ratios during the flood were however, not decisive for the formation of the structure. Our results show that the comparison of the structures obtained from events in different years is indicative of the pollution trend in the catchment area. Exemplarily the trend of the metal pollution in the

  16. Modeller subjectivity and calibration impacts on hydrological model applications: an event-based comparison for a road-adjacent catchment in south-east Norway.

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Zahra; Lyon, Steve W; Jansson, Per-Erik; Stolte, Jannes; French, Helen K; Folkeson, Lennart; Sassner, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Identifying a 'best' performing hydrologic model in a practical sense is difficult due to the potential influences of modeller subjectivity on, for example, calibration procedure and parameter selection. This is especially true for model applications at the event scale where the prevailing catchment conditions can have a strong impact on apparent model performance and suitability. In this study, two lumped models (CoupModel and HBV) and two physically-based distributed models (LISEM and MIKE SHE) were applied to a small catchment upstream of a road in south-eastern Norway. All models were calibrated to a single event representing typical winter conditions in the region and then applied to various other winter events to investigate the potential impact of calibration period and methodology on model performance. Peak flow and event-based hydrographs were simulated differently by all models leading to differences in apparent model performance under this application. In this case-study, the lumped models appeared to be better suited for hydrological events that differed from the calibration event (i.e., events when runoff was generated from rain on non-frozen soils rather than from rain and snowmelt on frozen soil) while the more physical-based approaches appeared better suited during snowmelt and frozen soil conditions more consistent with the event-specific calibration. This was due to the combination of variations in subsurface conditions over the eight events considered, the subsequent ability of the models to represent the impact of the conditions (particularly when subsurface conditions varied greatly from the calibration event), and the different approaches adopted to calibrate the models. These results indicate that hydrologic models may not only need to be selected on a case-by-case basis but also have their performance evaluated on an application-by-application basis since how a model is applied can be equally important as inherent model structure.

  17. Comparison of event-based analysis of glaucoma progression assessed subjectively on visual fields and retinal nerve fibre layer attenuation measured by optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Sushmita; Mulkutkar, Samyak; Pandav, Surinder Singh; Verma, Neelam; Gupta, Amod

    2015-02-01

    The purpose is to study the ability of an event-based analysis of retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) attenuation measured by Stratus(®) optical coherence tomography (OCT) and to detect progression across the spectrum of glaucoma. Adult glaucoma suspects, ocular hypertensives and glaucoma patients who had undergone baseline RNFL thickness measurement on Stratus OCT and reliable automated visual field examination by Humphrey's visual field analyser prior to March 2007 and had 5-year follow-up data were recruited. Progression on OCT was defined by two criteria: decrease in average RNFL thickness from baseline by at least 10 and 20 µ. Visual field progression was defined by the modified Hodapp-Parrish-Anderson criteria. Absolute and percentage change in RNFL thickness from baseline was compared in progressors and non-progressors on visual fields. Concordance between structural and functional progression was analysed. 318 eyes of 162 patients were analysed. 35 eyes (11 %) progressed by visual fields, 8 (2.5 %) progressed using the 20 µ loss criterion, while 30 eyes (9.4 %) progressed using the 10 µ loss criterion. In glaucoma suspects, mean absolute RNFL attenuation was 8.6 µ (12.1 % of baseline) in those who progressed to glaucoma by visual fields. OCT was more useful to detect progression in early glaucoma, but performed poorly in advanced glaucoma. The 10 µ criterion appears to be closer to visual field progression. However, the ability to detect progression varies considerably between functional and structural tools depending upon the severity of the disease. PMID:25502985

  18. Modeling rates of bank erosion in sinuous tidal channel derived from event-based terrestrial lidar surveys in the Mont Saint Michel Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, J.; Lague, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Mont-Saint-Michel (MSM) bay is characterized by a semi-diurnal regime with a tidal range of 14 meter. Understanding river bank migration of tidal channels in such mega tidal salt marshes requires a precise quantification of the relative contribution of frequent and infrequent bank erosion events to the longer term dynamics. We use terrestrial lidar scanner (TLS) which overcomes the limitations of traditional bank measurement approaches (e.g. aerial photography, GPS measurements) with high resolution and high precision topographic data. We use 30 TLS measurements and traditional data sources to quantify the annual and daily dynamics of bank erosion for a sinuous salt marsh channel near the island of the MSM. We present the results of a 2 years study that begun in September 2010. We compare annual bank retreat with daily surveys focused on spring tides in order to calculate "event-based" volume of bank erosion. For active steep banks, the volume of sediment eroded is computed between 2 set of point cloud that are classified by the CANUPO algorithm to remove vegetation (Brodu and Lague, 2012). A new algorithm allows a direct comparison of point clouds in 3D based on surface normal computation and measurement of mean surface change along the normal direction. On a 5 centimeter resolution grid, the changes between 2 banks point cloud is computed and used to calculate volume of eroded bank. Measured rates of bank retreat varied between no detectable change to 2 m/tide, which correspond roughly to 100 cubic meters/tide. We also document a non-homothetic pattern of bank erosion during spring tides : erosion is focused in narrow zones of the meander and shifts spatially at daily timescales. To relate bank erosion to hydraulic characteristics of the channel, an ADCP was used to measure flow velocity during tides. The measurements highlights two main points that only occurs when tides overcomes the salt marsh: (i) the ebb flow is stronger than flood flow with velocities

  19. Production of neutrons from interactions of GCR-like particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilbronn, L.; Frankel, K.; Holabird, K.; Zeitlin, C.; McMahan, M. A.; Rathbun, W.; Cronqvist, M.; Gong, W.; Madey, R.; Htun, M.; Elaasar, M.; Anderson, B. D.; Baldwin, A. R.; Jiang, J.; Keane, D.; Scott, A.; Shao, Y.; Watson, J. W.; Zhang, W. M.; Galonsky, A.; Ronningen, R.; Zecher, P.; Kruse, J.; Wang, J.; Miller, J. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    In order to help assess the risk to astronauts due to the long-term exposure to the natural radiation environment in space, an understanding of how the primary radiation field is changed when passing through shielding and tissue materials must be obtained. One important aspect of the change in the primary radiation field after passing through shielding materials is the production of secondary particles from the breakup of the primary. Neutrons are an important component of the secondary particle field due to their relatively high biological weighting factors, and due to their relative abundance, especially behind thick shielding scenarios. Because of the complexity of the problem, the estimation of the risk from exposure to the secondary neutron field must be handled using calculational techniques. However, those calculations will need an extensive set of neutron cross section and thicktarget neutron yield data in order to make an accurate assessment of the risk. In this paper we briefly survey the existing neutron-production data sets that are applicable to the space radiation transport problem, and we point out how neutron production from protons is different than neutron production from heavy ions. We also make comparisons of one the heavy-ion data sets with Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) calculations.

  20. GCR-Induced Photon Luminescence of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. T.; Wilson, T. L.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that the Moon has a ubiquitous photon luminescence induced by Galactic cosmic-rays (GCRs), using the Monte Carlo particle-physics program FLUKA. Both the fluence and the flux of the radiation can be determined by this method, but only the fluence will be presented here. This is in addition to thermal radiation emitted due to the Moon s internal temperature and radioactivity. This study is a follow-up to an earlier discussion [1] that addressed several misconceptions regarding Moonshine in the Earth-Moon system (Figure 1) and predicted this effect. There also exists a related x-ray fluorescence induced by solar energetic particles (SEPs, <350 MeV) and solar photons at lower x-ray energies, although this latter fluorescence was studied on Apollo 15 and 16 [2- 5], Lunar Prospector [6], and even EGRET [7].

  1. An event-based account of conformity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Diana; Hommel, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    People often change their behavior and beliefs when confronted with deviating behavior and beliefs of others, but the mechanisms underlying such phenomena of conformity are not well understood. Here we suggest that people cognitively represent their own actions and others' actions in comparable ways (theory of event coding), so that they may fail to distinguish these two categories of actions. If so, other people's actions that have no social meaning should induce conformity effects, especially if those actions are similar to one's own actions. We found that female participants adjusted their manual judgments of the beauty of female faces in the direction consistent with distracting information without any social meaning (numbers falling within the range of the judgment scale) and that this effect was enhanced when the distracting information was presented in movies showing the actual manual decision-making acts. These results confirm that similarity between an observed action and one's own action matters. We also found that the magnitude of the standard conformity effect was statistically equivalent to the movie-induced effect.

  2. Characterizing intra and inter annual variability of storm events based on very high frequency monitoring of hydrological and chemical variables: what can we learn about hot spots and hot moments from continuous hydro-chemical sensors ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fovet, O.; Thelusma, G.; Humbert, G.; Dupas, R.; Jaffrezic, A.; Grimaldi, C.; Faucheux, M.; Gilliet, N.; Hamon, Y.; Gruau, G.

    2015-12-01

    storm events based on the descriptors.

  3. Event-based total suspended sediment particle size distribution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Jennifer; Sattar, Ahmed M. A.; Gharabaghi, Bahram; Warner, Richard C.

    2016-05-01

    One of the most challenging modelling tasks in hydrology is prediction of the total suspended sediment particle size distribution (TSS-PSD) in stormwater runoff generated from exposed soil surfaces at active construction sites and surface mining operations. The main objective of this study is to employ gene expression programming (GEP) and artificial neural networks (ANN) to develop a new model with the ability to more accurately predict the TSS-PSD by taking advantage of both event-specific and site-specific factors in the model. To compile the data for this study, laboratory scale experiments using rainfall simulators were conducted on fourteen different soils to obtain TSS-PSD. This data is supplemented with field data from three construction sites in Ontario over a period of two years to capture the effect of transport and deposition within the site. The combined data sets provide a wide range of key overlooked site-specific and storm event-specific factors. Both parent soil and TSS-PSD in runoff are quantified by fitting each to a lognormal distribution. Compared to existing regression models, the developed model more accurately predicted the TSS-PSD using a more comprehensive list of key model input parameters. Employment of the new model will increase the efficiency of deployment of required best management practices, designed based on TSS-PSD, to minimize potential adverse effects of construction site runoff on aquatic life in the receiving watercourses.

  4. Event-based text mining for biology and functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Ananiadou, Sophia; Thompson, Paul; Nawaz, Raheel; McNaught, John; Kell, Douglas B

    2015-05-01

    The assessment of genome function requires a mapping between genome-derived entities and biochemical reactions, and the biomedical literature represents a rich source of information about reactions between biological components. However, the increasingly rapid growth in the volume of literature provides both a challenge and an opportunity for researchers to isolate information about reactions of interest in a timely and efficient manner. In response, recent text mining research in the biology domain has been largely focused on the identification and extraction of 'events', i.e. categorised, structured representations of relationships between biochemical entities, from the literature. Functional genomics analyses necessarily encompass events as so defined. Automatic event extraction systems facilitate the development of sophisticated semantic search applications, allowing researchers to formulate structured queries over extracted events, so as to specify the exact types of reactions to be retrieved. This article provides an overview of recent research into event extraction. We cover annotated corpora on which systems are trained, systems that achieve state-of-the-art performance and details of the community shared tasks that have been instrumental in increasing the quality, coverage and scalability of recent systems. Finally, several concrete applications of event extraction are covered, together with emerging directions of research.

  5. An event-based architecture for solving constraint satisfaction problems

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, Hesham; Müller, Lorenz K.; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Constraint satisfaction problems are ubiquitous in many domains. They are typically solved using conventional digital computing architectures that do not reflect the distributed nature of many of these problems, and are thus ill-suited for solving them. Here we present a parallel analogue/digital hardware architecture specifically designed to solve such problems. We cast constraint satisfaction problems as networks of stereotyped nodes that communicate using digital pulses, or events. Each node contains an oscillator implemented using analogue circuits. The non-repeating phase relations among the oscillators drive the exploration of the solution space. We show that this hardware architecture can yield state-of-the-art performance on random SAT problems under reasonable assumptions on the implementation. We present measurements from a prototype electronic chip to demonstrate that a physical implementation of the proposed architecture is robust to practical non-idealities and to validate the theory proposed. PMID:26642827

  6. Visualization of Sedentary Behavior Using an Event-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loudon, David; Granat, Malcolm H.

    2015-01-01

    Visualization is commonly used in the interpretation of physical behavior (PB) data, either in conjunction with or as precursor to formal analysis. Effective representations of the data can enable the identification of patterns of behavior, and how they relate to the temporal context in a single day, or across multiple days. An understanding of…

  7. Locating Acoustic Events Based on Large-Scale Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yungeun; Ahn, Junho; Cha, Hojung

    2009-01-01

    Research on acoustic source localization is actively being conducted to enhance accuracy and coverage. However, the performance is inherently limited due to the use of expensive sensor nodes and inefficient communication methods. This paper proposes an acoustic source localization algorithm for a large area that uses low-cost sensor nodes. The proposed mechanism efficiently handles multiple acoustic sources by removing false-positive errors that arise from the different propagation ranges of radio and sound. Extensive outdoor experiments with real hardware validated that the proposed mechanism could localize four acoustic sources within a 3 m error in a 60 m by 60 m area, where conventional systems could hardly achieve similar performance. PMID:22303155

  8. Event-based stormwater management pond runoff temperature model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabouri, F.; Gharabaghi, B.; Sattar, A. M. A.; Thompson, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Stormwater management wet ponds are generally very shallow and hence can significantly increase (about 5.4 °C on average in this study) runoff temperatures in summer months, which adversely affects receiving urban stream ecosystems. This study uses gene expression programming (GEP) and artificial neural networks (ANN) modeling techniques to advance our knowledge of the key factors governing thermal enrichment effects of stormwater ponds. The models developed in this study build upon and compliment the ANN model developed by Sabouri et al. (2013) that predicts the catchment event mean runoff temperature entering the pond as a function of event climatic and catchment characteristic parameters. The key factors that control pond outlet runoff temperature, include: (1) Upland Catchment Parameters (catchment drainage area and event mean runoff temperature inflow to the pond); (2) Climatic Parameters (rainfall depth, event mean air temperature, and pond initial water temperature); and (3) Pond Design Parameters (pond length-to-width ratio, pond surface area, pond average depth, and pond outlet depth). We used monitoring data for three summers from 2009 to 2011 in four stormwater management ponds, located in the cities of Guelph and Kitchener, Ontario, Canada to develop the models. The prediction uncertainties of the developed ANN and GEP models for the case study sites are around 0.4% and 1.7% of the median value. Sensitivity analysis of the trained models indicates that the thermal enrichment of the pond outlet runoff is inversely proportional to pond length-to-width ratio, pond outlet depth, and directly proportional to event runoff volume, event mean pond inflow runoff temperature, and pond initial water temperature.

  9. Galactic Cosmic Ray Event-Based Risk Model (GERM) Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.

    2013-01-01

    This software describes the transport and energy deposition of the passage of galactic cosmic rays in astronaut tissues during space travel, or heavy ion beams in patients in cancer therapy. Space radiation risk is a probability distribution, and time-dependent biological events must be accounted for physical description of space radiation transport in tissues and cells. A stochastic model can calculate the probability density directly without unverified assumptions about shape of probability density function. The prior art of transport codes calculates the average flux and dose of particles behind spacecraft and tissue shielding. Because of the signaling times for activation and relaxation in the cell and tissue, transport code must describe temporal and microspatial density of functions to correlate DNA and oxidative damage with non-targeted effects of signals, bystander, etc. These are absolutely ignored or impossible in the prior art. The GERM code provides scientists data interpretation of experiments; modeling of beam line, shielding of target samples, and sample holders; and estimation of basic physical and biological outputs of their experiments. For mono-energetic ion beams, basic physical and biological properties are calculated for a selected ion type, such as kinetic energy, mass, charge number, absorbed dose, or fluence. Evaluated quantities are linear energy transfer (LET), range (R), absorption and fragmentation cross-sections, and the probability of nuclear interactions after 1 or 5 cm of water equivalent material. In addition, a set of biophysical properties is evaluated, such as the Poisson distribution for a specified cellular area, cell survival curves, and DNA damage yields per cell. Also, the GERM code calculates the radiation transport of the beam line for either a fixed number of user-specified depths or at multiple positions along the Bragg curve of the particle in a selected material. The GERM code makes the numerical estimates of basic physical and biophysical quantities of high-energy protons and heavy ions that have been studied at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) for the purpose of simulating space radiation biological effects. In the first option, properties of monoenergetic beams are treated. In the second option, the transport of beams in different materials is treated. Similar biophysical properties as in the first option are evaluated for the primary ion and its secondary particles. Additional properties related to the nuclear fragmentation of the beam are evaluated. The GERM code is a computationally efficient Monte-Carlo heavy-ion-beam model. It includes accurate models of LET, range, residual energy, and straggling, and the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation (QMSGRG) nuclear database.

  10. An event-based model of superspreading in epidemics

    PubMed Central

    James, Alex; Pitchford, Jonathan W; Plank, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    Many recent disease outbreaks (e.g. SARS, foot-and-mouth disease) exhibit superspreading, where relatively few individuals cause a large number of secondary cases. Epidemic models have previously treated this as a demographic phenomenon where each individual has an infectivity allocated at random from some distribution. Here, it is shown that superspreading can also be regarded as being caused by environmental variability, where superspreading events (SSEs) occur as a stochastic consequence of the complex network of interactions made by individuals. This interpretation based on SSEs is compared with data and its efficacy in evaluating epidemic control strategies is discussed. PMID:17255000

  11. An event-based architecture for solving constraint satisfaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Hesham; Müller, Lorenz K.; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2015-12-01

    Constraint satisfaction problems are ubiquitous in many domains. They are typically solved using conventional digital computing architectures that do not reflect the distributed nature of many of these problems, and are thus ill-suited for solving them. Here we present a parallel analogue/digital hardware architecture specifically designed to solve such problems. We cast constraint satisfaction problems as networks of stereotyped nodes that communicate using digital pulses, or events. Each node contains an oscillator implemented using analogue circuits. The non-repeating phase relations among the oscillators drive the exploration of the solution space. We show that this hardware architecture can yield state-of-the-art performance on random SAT problems under reasonable assumptions on the implementation. We present measurements from a prototype electronic chip to demonstrate that a physical implementation of the proposed architecture is robust to practical non-idealities and to validate the theory proposed.

  12. An event-based hydrologic simulation model for bioretention systems.

    PubMed

    Roy-Poirier, A; Filion, Y; Champagne, P

    2015-01-01

    Bioretention systems are designed to treat stormwater and provide attenuated drainage between storms. Bioretention has shown great potential at reducing the volume and improving the quality of stormwater. This study introduces the bioretention hydrologic model (BHM), a one-dimensional model that simulates the hydrologic response of a bioretention system over the duration of a storm event. BHM is based on the RECARGA model, but has been adapted for improved accuracy and integration of pollutant transport models. BHM contains four completely-mixed layers and accounts for evapotranspiration, overflow, exfiltration to native soils and underdrain discharge. Model results were evaluated against field data collected over 10 storm events. Simulated flows were particularly sensitive to antecedent water content and drainage parameters of bioretention soils, which were calibrated through an optimisation algorithm. Temporal disparity was observed between simulated and measured flows, which was attributed to preferential flow paths formed within the soil matrix of the field system. Modelling results suggest that soil water storage is the most important short-term hydrologic process in bioretention, with exfiltration having the potential to be significant in native soils with sufficient permeability. PMID:26524443

  13. Solar modulation of GCR electrons over the 23rd solar minimum with PAMELA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munini, R.; Di Felice, V.; Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; De Donato, C.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Formato, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Merge, M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Potgieter, M. S.; Vos, E. E.

    2015-08-01

    The satellite-borne PAMELA experiment has been continuously collecting data since 15th June 2006, when it was launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome to detect the charged component of cosmic rays over a wide energy range and with unprecedented statistics. The apparatus design is particularly suited for particle and antiparticle identification. The PAMELA experiment has measured the electron spectrum at Earth in great detail, extending up to about 100 GeV and down to about 200 MeV. The galactic cosmic ray electron spectra for 2007 and 2009, i.e. measured during the A<0 solar minimum of solar cycle 23, are presented. These fluxes provide important information for the study of charge dependent solar modulation effects.

  14. No-migration variance petition: Draft. Volume 4, Appendices DIF, GAS, GCR (Volume 1)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-31

    The Department of Energy is responsible for the disposition of transuranic (TRU) waste generated by national defense-related activities. Approximately 2.6 million cubic feet of the se waste have been generated and are stored at various facilities across the country. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), was sited and constructed to meet stringent disposal requirements. In order to permanently dispose of TRU waste, the DOE has elected to petition the US EPA for a variance from the Land Disposal Restrictions of RCRA. This document fulfills the reporting requirements for the petition. This report is volume 4 of the petition which presents details about the transport characteristics across drum filter vents and polymer bags; gas generation reactions and rates during long-term WIPP operation; and geological characterization of the WIPP site.

  15. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of hot-rolled GCr15 bearing steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Junwei

    2016-04-01

    Microstructure, corrosion behavior and evolution of hot-rolled high-carbon-chromium bearing steel were investigated using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The results show that corrosion initiates adjacent to the network carbide, which is the initial austenite grain boundary. With the further increase in corrosion time, corrosion fraction is increased and extended into the grains. Finally, the whole grain near the network carbide is etched off and the grain boundary is detached from the sample, which forms the corroded holes. Based on the EDS analyses, it is confirmed that this corrosion behavior is resulted from the depletion of Cr as solid solute at the grain boundary. The depletion of Cr is the result of the formation of Cr carbide near the grain boundary.

  16. Single-track effects and new directions in GCR risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Curtis, S B

    1994-01-01

    Light flashes in the eye as recorded by astronauts on missions outside the geomagnetosphere are presumably caused by single particle traversals of galactic cosmic rays traversing the retina. Although these flashes are not considered to have deleterious short- or long-term effects on vision, they are testimony that the body can detect single particle traversals. The frequencies of the flashes implicate ions in the charge range of 6 to 8 (i.e., carbon and/or oxygen ions). Other particles with higher charge and causing more ionization are present at lower frequencies. The possibility of the importance of such single-track effects in radiation carcinogenesis and other late effects suggest that a risk assessment system based on particle fluence rather than absorbed dose might be useful for assessing risk on long-term space missions. Such a system based on the concept of a risk cross section is described. Human cancer risk cross sections obtained from recently compiled A-bomb survival data are presented, and problems involving the determination of the LET-dependence of such cross sections are discussed. PMID:11538039

  17. SCR and GCR exposure ages of plagioclase grains from lunar soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etique, P.; Baur, H.; Signer, P.; Wieler, R.

    1986-01-01

    The concentrations of solar wind implanted Ar-36 in mineral grains extracted from lunar soils show that they were exposed to the solar wind on the lunar surface for an integrated time of 10E4 to 10E5 years. From the bulk soil 61501 plagioclase separates of 8 grain size ranges was prepared. The depletion of the implanted gases was achieved by etching aliquot samples of 4 grain sizes to various degrees. The experimental results pertinent to the present discussion are: The spallogenic Ne is, as in most plagioclases from lunar soils, affected by diffusive losses and of no use. The Ar-36 of solar wind origin amounts to (2030 + or - 100) x 10E-8 ccSTP/g in the 150 to 200 mm size fraction and shows that these grains were exposed to the solar wind for at least 10,000 years. The Ne-21/Ne-22 ratio of the spallogenic Ne is 0.75 + or - 0.01 and in very good agreement with the value of this ratio in a plagioclase separate from rock 76535. This rock has had a simple exposure history and its plagioclases have a chemical composition quite similar to those studied. In addition to the noble gases, the heavy particle tracks in an aliquot of the 150 to 200 mm plagioclase separate were investigated and found 92% of the grains to contain more than 10E8 tracks/sq cm. This corresponds to a mean track density of (5 + or - 1) x 10E8 tracks/sq cm. The exploration of the exposure history of the plagioclase separates from the soil 61501 do not contradict the model for the regolith dynamics but also fail to prove it.

  18. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 7: Appendix GCR Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-31

    This report contains the second part of the geological characterization report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Both hydrology and geochemistry are evaluated. The following aspects of hydrology are discussed: surface hydrology; ground water hydrology; and hydrology drilling and testing. Hydrologic studies at the site and adjacent site areas have concentrated on defining the hydrogeology and associated salt dissolution phenomena. The geochemical aspects include a description of chemical properties of geologic media presently found in the surface and subsurface environments of southeastern New Mexico in general, and of the proposed WIPP withdrawal area in particular. The characterization does not consider any aspect of artificially-introduced material, temperature, pressure, or any other physico-chemical condition not native to the rocks of southeastern New Mexico.

  19. Probabilistic forecasting of extreme weather events based on extreme value theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van De Vyver, Hans; Van Schaeybroeck, Bert

    2016-04-01

    Extreme events in weather and climate such as high wind gusts, heavy precipitation or extreme temperatures are commonly associated with high impacts on both environment and society. Forecasting extreme weather events is difficult, and very high-resolution models are needed to describe explicitly extreme weather phenomena. A prediction system for such events should therefore preferably be probabilistic in nature. Probabilistic forecasts and state estimations are nowadays common in the numerical weather prediction community. In this work, we develop a new probabilistic framework based on extreme value theory that aims to provide early warnings up to several days in advance. We consider the combined events when an observation variable Y (for instance wind speed) exceeds a high threshold y and its corresponding deterministic forecasts X also exceeds a high forecast threshold y. More specifically two problems are addressed:} We consider pairs (X,Y) of extreme events where X represents a deterministic forecast, and Y the observation variable (for instance wind speed). More specifically two problems are addressed: Given a high forecast X=x_0, what is the probability that Y>y? In other words: provide inference on the conditional probability: [ Pr{Y>y|X=x_0}. ] Given a probabilistic model for Problem 1, what is the impact on the verification analysis of extreme events. These problems can be solved with bivariate extremes (Coles, 2001), and the verification analysis in (Ferro, 2007). We apply the Ramos and Ledford (2009) parametric model for bivariate tail estimation of the pair (X,Y). The model accommodates different types of extremal dependence and asymmetry within a parsimonious representation. Results are presented using the ensemble reforecast system of the European Centre of Weather Forecasts (Hagedorn, 2008). Coles, S. (2001) An Introduction to Statistical modelling of Extreme Values. Springer-Verlag.Ferro, C.A.T. (2007) A probability model for verifying deterministic forecasts of extreme events. Wea. Forecasting {22}, 1089-1100.Hagedorn, R. (2008) Using the ECMWF reforecast dataset to calibrate EPS forecasts. ECMWF Newsletter, {117}, 8-13.Ramos, A., Ledford, A. (2009) A new class of models for bivariate joint tails. J.R. Statist. Soc. B {71}, 219-241.

  20. Event Completion: Event Based Inferences Distort Memory in a Matter of Seconds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, Brent; Keil, Frank

    2011-01-01

    We present novel evidence that implicit causal inferences distort memory for events only seconds after viewing. Adults watched videos of someone launching (or throwing) an object. However, the videos omitted the moment of contact (or release). Subjects falsely reported seeing the moment of contact when it was implied by subsequent footage but did…

  1. Event-Based Monitoring of Sediment Flux Following Removal of Oregon's Marmot Dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, J. J.; O'Connor, J. E.; Spicer, K. R.; Bragg, H. M.; Wallick, J. R.; Kittleson, R. L.; Lee, K. K.; Cushman, D.; Piatt, D.; Tanner, D. Q.; Hale, T.; Uhrich, M. A.; Rhode, A.

    2008-12-01

    Breaching of Oregon's Marmot Dam in October 2007 allowed the 80-km-long Sandy River to flow freely from Mount Hood to the Columbia River for the first time in nearly 100 years. When breached, the dam was brimful with sediment. As part of an analysis examining the redistribution of ~730,000 m3 of stored sediment following the dam removal, we measured suspended-sediment load and bedload at sites 10 km upstream and 0.5 to 18 km downstream of the dam before, during and after breaching, and during five subsequent high-water events. Prior to breaching of the dam, suspended-sediment and bedload mass fluxes along the Sandy River both upstream and downstream of the dam were of the order of a few to a few tens of kg/s. Suspended sediment upstream was composed chiefly of sand in contrast to mostly silt and clay passing measurement sites 0.5 and 18 km below the dam. In all reaches bedload consisted chiefly (>90%) of sand. Breaching of the dam released a pulse of turbid water having an instantaneous suspended-sediment flux of 5200 kg/s. The initial sediment pulse consisted predominantly of silt and clay, presumably eroded from thin, fine-grained topset beds at the downstream end of the reservoir. However, the suspended load coarsened rapidly as the Sandy River incised into the stored sand and gravel that filled the former reservoir. Following the initial peak value, median fluxes of sandy suspended sediment 0.5 km below the dam site hovered around several tens to hundreds of kg/s for at least 24 hours, whereas the median suspended- sediment flux remained about 30 kg/s both 10 km upstream and 18 km downstream. Bedload transport also increased following breaching, but its response was slower than for suspended sediment. Bedload flux 0.5 km below the dam site increased from ~1 kg/s before breaching to 60 kg/s by 6 hours and to about 70 kg/s by 18 hours after breaching, in contrast to the steady, low (<10 kg/s) flux of sandy bedload passing upstream and farther downstream before and after breaching. Initially, the near-field bedload consisted predominantly of sand transported in large dunes. Significant gravel transport did not begin until 18 to 20 hours after breaching, in conjunction with rapid bed aggradation and downstream propagation of mid- channel gravel bars. This enhanced sediment transport occurred under a median flow just 30% greater than the river's mean annual flow at Marmot Dam. Within 3 months of breaching, the near-field high-flow-driven bedload flux remained significantly elevated above both upstream and downstream fluxes, but the suspended-sediment flux had declined substantially. Near-field bedload flux was persistently 10 to 100 times greater than that upstream and farther downstream, and remained gravel-rich compared to the sandy bedload passing stations upstream and 18 km distant. In contrast, near-field suspended-sediment concentrations declined approximately logarithmically, and by January 2008 the associated sandy suspended-sediment flux was comparable in both composition and magnitude to the suspended-sediment flux 18 km distant. The newly energetic Sandy River thus rapidly flushed sandy suspended-sediment downstream. Gravel-rich bedload continues to disperse downstream, but has yet to reach distal reaches of the river system. The majority of gravel transported thus far is stored chiefly along the 2-km-long channel reach below the dam site and within the Sandy River gorge 2-8 km downstream from the dam site.

  2. Prediction problem for target events based on the inter-event waiting time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapoval, A.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we address the problem of forecasting the target events of a time series given the distribution ξ of time gaps between target events. Strong earthquakes and stock market crashes are the two types of such events that we are focusing on. In the series of earthquakes, as McCann et al. show [W.R. Mc Cann, S.P. Nishenko, L.R. Sykes, J. Krause, Seismic gaps and plate tectonics: seismic potential for major boundaries, Pure and Applied Geophysics 117 (1979) 1082-1147], there are well-defined gaps (called seismic gaps) between strong earthquakes. On the other hand, usually there are no regular gaps in the series of stock market crashes [M. Raberto, E. Scalas, F. Mainardi, Waiting-times and returns in high-frequency financial data: an empirical study, Physica A 314 (2002) 749-755]. For the case of seismic gaps, we analytically derive an upper bound of prediction efficiency given the coefficient of variation of the distribution ξ. For the case of stock market crashes, we develop an algorithm that predicts the next crash within a certain time interval after the previous one. We show that this algorithm outperforms random prediction. The efficiency of our algorithm sets up a lower bound of efficiency for effective prediction of stock market crashes.

  3. Some implications of an event-based definition of exposure to the risk of road accident.

    PubMed

    Elvik, Rune

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes a new definition of exposure to the risk of road accident as any event, limited in space and time, representing a potential for an accident to occur by bringing road users close to each other in time or space of by requiring a road user to take action to avoid leaving the roadway. A typology of events representing a potential for an accident is proposed. Each event can be interpreted as a trial as defined in probability theory. Risk is the proportion of events that result in an accident. Defining exposure as events demanding the attention of road users implies that road users will learn from repeated exposure to these events, which in turn implies that there will normally be a negative relationship between exposure and risk. Four hypotheses regarding the relationship between exposure and risk are proposed. Preliminary tests support these hypotheses. Advantages and disadvantages of defining exposure as specific events are discussed. It is argued that developments in vehicle technology are likely to make events both observable and countable, thus ensuring that exposure is an operational concept.

  4. Bonsai: an event-based framework for processing and controlling data streams

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Gonçalo; Bonacchi, Niccolò; Frazão, João; Neto, Joana P.; Atallah, Bassam V.; Soares, Sofia; Moreira, Luís; Matias, Sara; Itskov, Pavel M.; Correia, Patrícia A.; Medina, Roberto E.; Calcaterra, Lorenza; Dreosti, Elena; Paton, Joseph J.; Kampff, Adam R.

    2015-01-01

    The design of modern scientific experiments requires the control and monitoring of many different data streams. However, the serial execution of programming instructions in a computer makes it a challenge to develop software that can deal with the asynchronous, parallel nature of scientific data. Here we present Bonsai, a modular, high-performance, open-source visual programming framework for the acquisition and online processing of data streams. We describe Bonsai's core principles and architecture and demonstrate how it allows for the rapid and flexible prototyping of integrated experimental designs in neuroscience. We specifically highlight some applications that require the combination of many different hardware and software components, including video tracking of behavior, electrophysiology and closed-loop control of stimulation. PMID:25904861

  5. Loss Modeling with a Data-Driven Approach in Event-Based Rainfall-Runoff Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, L. H. C.

    2012-04-01

    Mathematical models require the estimation of rainfall abstractions for accurate predictions of runoff. Although loss models such as the constant loss and exponential loss models are commonly used, these methods are based on simplified assumptions of the physical process. A new approach based on the data driven paradigm to estimate rainfall abstractions is proposed in this paper. The proposed data driven model, based on the artificial neural network (ANN) does not make any assumptions on the loss behavior. The estimated discharge from a physically-based model, obtained from the kinematic wave (KW) model assuming zero losses, was used as the only input to the ANN. The output is the measured discharge. Thus, the ANN functions as a black-box loss model. Two sets of data were analyzed for this study. The first dataset consists of rainfall and runoff data, measured from an artificial catchment (area = 25 m2) comprising two overland planes (slope = 11%), 25m long, transversely inclined towards a rectangular channel (slope = 2%) which conveyed the flow, recorded using calibrated weigh tanks, to the outlet. Two rain gauges, each placed 6.25 m from either ends of the channel, were used to record rainfall. Data for six storm events over the period between October 2002 and December 2002 were analyzed. The second dataset was obtained from the Upper Bukit Timah catchment (area = 6.4 km2) instrumented with two rain gauges and a flow measuring station. A total of six events recorded between November 1987 and July 1988 were selected for this study. The runoff predicted by the ANN was compared with the measured runoff. In addition, results from KW models developed for both the catchments were used as a benchmark. The KW models were calibrated assuming the loss rate for an average event for each of the datasets. The results from both the ANN and KW models agreed well with the runoff measured from the artificial catchment. The KW model is expected to perform well since the catchment is completely impervious and the losses are small. Thus, the good agreement of results between the ANN with the KW model results demonstrates the applicability of the ANN model in modeling the loss rate. Comparing the modeled runoff with the measured runoff for the Upper Bukit Timah catchment, it was found that the KW model was not able to produce the runoff from the catchment accurately due to the improper prescription of the loss rate. This is because the loss rate varies over a wide range of values in a real catchment and using the loss rate for an average event did not provide truly representative values for the catchment. Although the same dataset was used in the training of the ANN model, the ANN model was able to produce hydrographs with significantly higher Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients compared to the KW model. This analysis demonstrates that the ANN model is better able to model the highly variable loss rate during storm events, especially if the data used for calibration is limited. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT Funding received from the DHI-NTU Water & Environment Research Centre and Education Hub is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Event-based stormwater quality and quantity loadings from elevated urban infrastructure affected by transportation.

    PubMed

    Sansalone, John J; Hird, Jonathan P; Cartledge, Frank K; Tittlebaum, Marty E

    2005-01-01

    Urban-rainfall runoff affected by transportation is a complex matrix of a very wide gradation of particulate matter (< 1 to > 10 000 microm) and dissolved inorganic and organic constituents. Particulate matter transported by rainfall runoff can be a significant vector for many reactive particulate-bound constituents, particularly metal elements. The water quality and hydrology of nine events from a representative elevated section of Interstate 10 (I-10) (eastbound average daily traffic load of 70 400 vehicles) in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, were characterized and compared with respect to the passage of each hydrograph. Residence time on the paved concrete surface was less than 30 minutes for all events. Results indicate that event-mean concentrations (EMCs) of particulate matter as total-suspended solids (TSS) (138 to 561 mg/L) and chemical-oxygen demand (COD) (128 to 1440 mg/L) were greater than those found in untreated municipal wastewater from the same service area. Particulate-matter dissolution and COD partitioned as a function of pH, pavement residence time, and organic content. In general, delivery of mass for aggregate indices, such as particulate matter (measured as TSS) and COD mass, were driven by the hydrology of the event, while concentrations of aggregate-constituent measurements, such as total-dissolved solids (TDS), illustrated an exponential-type decline during the rising limb of the hydrograph. Despite the short residence times, wide solids gradation, partitioning, and complexity of the rainfall-runoff chemistry, conductivity and dissolved solids were strongly correlated. Characterization of the transport and loads of constituents in urban-rainfall runoff, as a function of hydrology, is a necessary first step when considering treatability, structural or nonstructural controls, and mass trading for discharges from paved infrastructure. PMID:16121503

  7. Event-Based Computation of Motion Flow on a Neuromorphic Analog Neural Platform

    PubMed Central

    Giulioni, Massimiliano; Lagorce, Xavier; Galluppi, Francesco; Benosman, Ryad B.

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the speed and direction of moving objects is a crucial component of agents behaving in a dynamic world. Biological organisms perform this task by means of the neural connections originating from their retinal ganglion cells. In artificial systems the optic flow is usually extracted by comparing activity of two or more frames captured with a vision sensor. Designing artificial motion flow detectors which are as fast, robust, and efficient as the ones found in biological systems is however a challenging task. Inspired by the architecture proposed by Barlow and Levick in 1965 to explain the spiking activity of the direction-selective ganglion cells in the rabbit's retina, we introduce an architecture for robust optical flow extraction with an analog neuromorphic multi-chip system. The task is performed by a feed-forward network of analog integrate-and-fire neurons whose inputs are provided by contrast-sensitive photoreceptors. Computation is supported by the precise time of spike emission, and the extraction of the optical flow is based on time lag in the activation of nearby retinal neurons. Mimicking ganglion cells our neuromorphic detectors encode the amplitude and the direction of the apparent visual motion in their output spiking pattern. Hereby we describe the architectural aspects, discuss its latency, scalability, and robustness properties and demonstrate that a network of mismatched delicate analog elements can reliably extract the optical flow from a simple visual scene. This work shows how precise time of spike emission used as a computational basis, biological inspiration, and neuromorphic systems can be used together for solving specific tasks. PMID:26909015

  8. Suspended solids transport: an analysis based on turbidity measurements and event based fully calibrated hydrodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Langeveld, J G; Veldkamp, R G; Clemens, F

    2005-01-01

    Modelling suspended solids transport is a key issue for predicting the pollution load discharged by CSOs. Nonetheless, there is still much debate on the main drivers for suspended solids transport and on the modelling approach to be adopted. Current sewer models provide suspended solids transport models. These models, however, rely upon erosion-deposition criteria developed in fluvial environments, therewith oversimplifying the sewer sediment characteristics. Consequently, the performance of these models is poor from a theoretical point of view. To get an improved understanding of the temporal and spatial variations in suspended solids transport, a measuring network was installed in the sewer system of Loenen in conjunction with a hydraulic measuring network from June through December 2001. During the measuring period, 15 storm events rendered high-quality data on both the hydraulics and the turbidity. For each storm event, a hydrodynamic model was calibrated using the Clemens' method. The conclusion of the paper is that modelling of suspended solids transport has been and will be one of the challenges in the field of urban drainage modelling. A direct relation of either shear stress or flow velocity with turbidity could not be found, likely because of the time varying characteristics of the suspended solids.

  9. An event-based approach to understanding decadal fluctuations in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Lesley; Hawkins, Ed; Woollings, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Many previous studies have shown that unforced climate model simulations exhibit decadal-scale fluctuations in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), and that this variability can have impacts on surface climate fields. However, the robustness of these surface fingerprints across different models is less clear. Furthermore, with the potential for coupled feedbacks that may amplify or damp the response, it is not known whether the associated climate signals are linearly related to the strength of the AMOC changes, or if the fluctuation events exhibit nonlinear behaviour with respect to their strength or polarity. To explore these questions, we introduce an objective and flexible method for identifying the largest natural AMOC fluctuation events in multicentennial/multimillennial simulations of a variety of coupled climate models. The characteristics of the events are explored, including their magnitude, meridional coherence and spatial structure, as well as links with ocean heat transport and the horizontal circulation. The surface fingerprints in ocean temperature and salinity are examined, and compared with the results of linear regression analysis. It is found that the regressions generally provide a good indication of the surface changes associated with the largest AMOC events. However, there are some exceptions, including a nonlinear change in the atmospheric pressure signal, particularly at high latitudes, in HadCM3. Some asymmetries are also found between the changes associated with positive and negative AMOC events in the same model. Composite analysis suggests that there are signals that are robust across the largest AMOC events in each model, which provides reassurance that the surface changes associated with one particular event will be similar to those expected from regression analysis. However, large differences are found between the AMOC fingerprints in different models, which may hinder the prediction and attribution of such events in reality.

  10. An event-based approach to understanding decadal fluctuations in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Lesley; Hawkins, Ed; Woollings, Tim

    2014-09-01

    Many previous studies have shown that unforced climate model simulations exhibit decadal-scale fluctuations in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), and that this variability can have impacts on surface climate fields. However, the robustness of these surface fingerprints across different models is less clear. Furthermore, with the potential for coupled feedbacks that may amplify or damp the response, it is not known whether the associated climate signals are linearly related to the strength of the AMOC changes, or if the fluctuation events exhibit nonlinear behaviour with respect to their strength or polarity. To explore these questions, we introduce an objective and flexible method for identifying the largest natural AMOC fluctuation events in multicentennial/multimillennial simulations of a variety of coupled climate models. The characteristics of the events are explored, including their magnitude, meridional coherence and spatial structure, as well as links with ocean heat transport and the horizontal circulation. The surface fingerprints in ocean temperature and salinity are examined, and compared with the results of linear regression analysis. It is found that the regressions generally provide a good indication of the surface changes associated with the largest AMOC events. However, there are some exceptions, including a nonlinear change in the atmospheric pressure signal, particularly at high latitudes, in HadCM3. Some asymmetries are also found between the changes associated with positive and negative AMOC events in the same model. Composite analysis suggests that there are signals that are robust across the largest AMOC events in each model, which provides reassurance that the surface changes associated with one particular event will be similar to those expected from regression analysis. However, large differences are found between the AMOC fingerprints in different models, which may hinder the prediction and attribution of such events in reality.

  11. Tsunami Source Identification on the 1867 Tsunami Event Based on the Impact Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, T. R.

    2014-12-01

    The 1867 Keelung tsunami event has drawn significant attention from people in Taiwan. Not only because the location was very close to the 3 nuclear power plants which are only about 20km away from the Taipei city but also because of the ambiguous on the tsunami sources. This event is unique in terms of many aspects. First, it was documented on many literatures with many languages and with similar descriptions. Second, the tsunami deposit was discovered recently. Based on the literatures, earthquake, 7-meter tsunami height, volcanic smoke, and oceanic smoke were observed. Previous studies concluded that this tsunami was generated by an earthquake with a magnitude around Mw7.0 along the Shanchiao Fault. However, numerical results showed that even a Mw 8.0 earthquake was not able to generate a 7-meter tsunami. Considering the steep bathymetry and intense volcanic activities along the Keelung coast, one reasonable hypothesis is that different types of tsunami sources were existed, such as the submarine landslide or volcanic eruption. In order to confirm this scenario, last year we proposed the Tsunami Reverse Tracing Method (TRTM) to find the possible locations of the tsunami sources. This method helped us ruling out the impossible far-field tsunami sources. However, the near-field sources are still remain unclear. This year, we further developed a new method named 'Impact Intensity Analysis' (IIA). In the IIA method, the study area is divided into a sequence of tsunami sources, and the numerical simulations of each source is conducted by COMCOT (Cornell Multi-grid Coupled Tsunami Model) tsunami model. After that, the resulting wave height from each source to the study site is collected and plotted. This method successfully helped us to identify the impact factor from the near-field potential sources. The IIA result (Fig. 1) shows that the 1867 tsunami event was a multi-source event. A mild tsunami was trigged by a Mw7.0 earthquake, and then followed by the submarine landslide or volcanic events. A near-field submarine landslide and landslide at Mien-Hwa Canyon were the most possible scenarios. As for the volcano scenarios, the volcanic eruption located about 10 km away from Keelung with 2.5x108 m3 disturbed water volume might be a candidate. The detailed scenario results will be presented in the full paper.

  12. Historical Chronology of ENSO Events Based Upon Documentary Data From South America: Strengths and Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luc, O.

    2007-05-01

    The first reconstructions of past El Niño occurrences were proposed by W. Quinn twenty years ago. They were based on documentary evidence of anomalous rainfall episodes, destructive floods and other possible impacts of El Niño conditions in Peru and other South-American countries. It has been shown, later, that the El Niño chronological sequence covering the last four and a half centuries produced by Quinn needed a thorough revision since many so-called EN events had not occurred while some others had been overlooked. Beside the classical methodological problems met in historical climatology studies (reliability of data, confidence in the sources, primary and secondary information), the reconstruction of former EN events faces specific difficulties dealing with the significance of the indicators and their spatial location. For instance, strong precipitation anomalies during summer in Southern Ecuador and northern Peru and precipitation excess recorded in the preceding winter in central Chile constitute quite reliable proxies of El Niño conditions, in modern times. However this observed teleconnection pattern, which is useful to reinforce the interpretation of past EN occurrences, seems to have been inoperative before the early nineteenth century. It is interpreted that atmospheric circulation features during the Little Ice Age interfered with the teleconnection system linking the EN impacts in northern Peru and central Chile. As a consequence, how should be evaluated the significance of documented winter precipitation excess in central Chile in years during which there is drought evidence in northern Peru, during the sixteenth to eighteenth century? And vice versa, are former evidences for precipitation excess in northern Peru (prior to the nineteenth century) quite reliable indicators for EN conditions, even if the preceding winter was dry in the Valparaiso-Santiago region? Other specific problems met in the building-up of a consolidated EN chronological sequence deal with the non-homogeneity of the documentary records, the reconstruction of the paleo-events strength and the difficulty to cross check documentary data with other annually resolved records (corals, tree-rings and ice-core data). In spite of all these limitations, the documentation of former EN occurrences based upon written archives from colonial South-America remains an unavoidable and powerful tool to reconstruct a solid El Niño chronology for the last half millennium and to better understand the interplay of the different modes (at the interannual, decadal, multidecadal and centennial scales) of climate variations in this part of the world.

  13. Extraction of spatio-temporal information of earthquake event based on semantic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Hong; Guo, Dan; Li, Huaiyuan

    2015-12-01

    In this paper a web information extraction method is presented which identifies a variety of thematic events utilizing the event knowledge framework derived from text training, and then further uses the syntactic analysis to extract the event key information. The method which combines the text semantic information and domain knowledge of the event makes the extraction of information people interested more accurate. In this paper, web based earthquake news extraction is taken as an example. The paper firstly briefs the overall approaches, and then details the key algorithm and experiments of seismic events extraction. Finally, this paper conducts accuracy analysis and evaluation experiments which demonstrate that the proposed method is a promising way of hot events mining.

  14. A 1-year long event-based isotopic composition of precipitation in Bolivia: observations and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vimeux, Francoise; Tremoy, Guillaume; Risi, Camille

    2010-05-01

    Over the last years, an increasing number of studies combining both observations and modelling works has been carried out to determine and to decipher the different climate controls on the isotopic composition of tropical precipitation. Most of those studies have dealt with seasonal to interannual timescales. We present here the isotopic composition of precipitation collected on an event basis from September 1999 to August 2000 in the Zongo Valley (16 degrees S, 67 degrees W) from 945 to 4750 m. The delta records are fairly similar from one station to another and clearly show an intra-month variability superimposed on the seasonal cycle. Conversely, precipitation distribution and occurrence of extremes largely differ from one station to another, revealing that local precipitation has no control on delta. We thus explore potential regional controls (origin of airmasses, precipitation history along trajectories) using back-trajectories calculations. Deuterium excess available from one station is also examined as a proxy of water vapor recycling. Based on a simulation zoomed over South America (60km resolution) and nudged by reanalyzed winds performed with the LMDZ-iso model, which is able to reproduce well the observations in the Zongo Valley, we examine in deeper details the climate controls that could explain the strong intra-seasonal variations in the isotopic composition of precipitation.

  15. Sentiment Diffusion of Public Opinions about Hot Events: Based on Complex Network

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xiaoqing; An, Haizhong; Zhang, Lijia; Li, Huajiao; Wei, Guannan

    2015-01-01

    To study the sentiment diffusion of online public opinions about hot events, we collected people’s posts through web data mining techniques. We calculated the sentiment value of each post based on a sentiment dictionary. Next, we divided those posts into five different orientations of sentiments: strongly positive (P), weakly positive (p), neutral (o), weakly negative (n), and strongly negative (N). These sentiments are combined into modes through coarse graining. We constructed sentiment mode complex network of online public opinions (SMCOP) with modes as nodes and the conversion relation in chronological order between different types of modes as edges. We calculated the strength, k-plex clique, clustering coefficient and betweenness centrality of the SMCOP. The results show that the strength distribution obeys power law. Most posts’ sentiments are weakly positive and neutral, whereas few are strongly negative. There are weakly positive subgroups and neutral subgroups with ppppp and ooooo as the core mode, respectively. Few modes have larger betweenness centrality values and most modes convert to each other with these higher betweenness centrality modes as mediums. Therefore, the relevant person or institutes can take measures to lead people’s sentiments regarding online hot events according to the sentiment diffusion mechanism. PMID:26462230

  16. An investigation into the resource requirements of event-based prospective memory.

    PubMed

    Loft, Shayne; Yeo, Gillian

    2007-03-01

    The multiprocess view proposes that both strategic and automatic processes can support prospective memory. In three experiments, we embedded a prospective memory task in a lexical decision task; cues were either highly associated with response words or had no relation. Analyses of RTs on ongoing task trials indicated that (1) prospective memory was more dependent on the allocation of resources immediately prior to cue presentation under conditions of low association in comparison with high association and (2) processes engaged on cue trials were more resource demanding under conditions of low association in comparison with high association. These data support the claim of the multiprocess view that prospective memory can be more resource demanding under some task conditions in comparison with others. However, the prospective memory performance data were less supportive, with declines in prospective memory due to task-importance and cue-frequency manipulations comparable across the low- and high-association conditions. Taken together, these results have implications for two prominent theories of prospective memory.

  17. A mobile robots experimental environment with event-based wireless communication.

    PubMed

    Guinaldo, María; Fábregas, Ernesto; Farias, Gonzalo; Dormido-Canto, Sebastián; Chaos, Dictino; Sánchez, José; Dormido, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    An experimental platform to communicate between a set of mobile robots through a wireless network has been developed. The mobile robots get their position through a camera which performs as sensor. The video images are processed in a PC and a Waspmote card sends the corresponding position to each robot using the ZigBee standard. A distributed control algorithm based on event-triggered communications has been designed and implemented to bring the robots into the desired formation. Each robot communicates to its neighbors only at event times. Furthermore, a simulation tool has been developed to design and perform experiments with the system. An example of usage is presented. PMID:23881139

  18. Event-Based Plausibility Immediately Influences On-Line Language Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsuki, Kazunaga; Chow, Tracy; Hare, Mary; Elman, Jeffrey L.; Scheepers, Christoph; McRae, Ken

    2011-01-01

    In some theories of sentence comprehension, linguistically relevant lexical knowledge, such as selectional restrictions, is privileged in terms of the time-course of its access and influence. We examined whether event knowledge computed by combining multiple concepts can rapidly influence language understanding even in the absence of selectional…

  19. The relationship between event-based prospective memory and ongoing task performance in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Evans, Theodore A; Perdue, Bonnie; Beran, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Prospective memory is remembering to do something at a future time. A growing body of research supports that prospective memory may exist in nonhuman animals, but the methods used to test nonhuman prospective memory differ from those used with humans. The current work tests prospective memory in chimpanzees using a method that closely approximates a typical human paradigm. In these experiments, the prospective memory cue was embedded within an ongoing task. Tokens representing food items could be used in one of two ways: in a matching task with pictures of items (the ongoing task) or to request a food item hidden in a different location at the beginning of the trial. Chimpanzees had to disengage from the ongoing task in order to use the appropriate token to obtain a higher preference food item. In Experiment 1, chimpanzees effectively matched tokens to pictures, when appropriate, and disengaged from the ongoing task when the token matched the hidden item. In Experiment 2, performance did not differ when the target item was either hidden or visible. This suggested no effect of cognitive load on either the prospective memory task or the ongoing task, but performance was near ceiling, which may have contributed to this outcome. In Experiment 3, we created a more challenging version of the task. More errors on the matching task occurred before the prospective memory had been carried out, and this difference seemed to be limited to the hidden condition. This finding parallels results from human studies and suggests that working memory load and prospective memory may have a similar relationship in nonhuman primates. PMID:25372809

  20. The value of manual, event-based sediment sampling in local-scale sediment budget studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, J.; Watson, F.; Hager, J.; Anderson, T.; Newman, W.; Kozlowski, D.; Rocha, A.; Cole, W.; Larson, J.; Feikert, B.; Oakins, A.; Pierce, L.; Curry, B.

    2001-12-01

    Many contemporary sediment-budget studies lack two things: a first-hand understanding of the behavior of the system, and high-frequency data during storm events. In a study designed to understand sediment source areas, we have approach these deficiencies through manual sampling, almost exclusively during storm events. Manual sampling leads to better understanding. Frequently, the researcher finds oneself standing in streams observing phenomenon that contradict their a priori, desktop, or textbook-based perception of system behaviour. The case study we present reflects this in its observations of very high percolation rates, differing levels of land-stream connectivity under different sized events, and landowner intervention in water and sediment flux. In drier regions with episodic rainfall, event sampling is essential. During one season, we sampled 13 sites in a 316 km2 watershed about 50 times each. The sampling times were targeted to observe the start of the rising stage, many points immediately around the hydrograph peak, once or twice during the falling stage, and once after the return to pre-event conditions. The same number of samples spread over the year at regular intervals would lead to a grossly inaccurate representation of the system by the data. For example, event sampling permitted a reasonably accurate characterization of total annual load at each site. A simple, static model was then used to apportion total loads to different land use sources, and in-channel sources.

  1. A Mobile Robots Experimental Environment with Event-Based Wireless Communication

    PubMed Central

    Guinaldo, María; Fábregas, Ernesto; Farias, Gonzalo; Dormido-Canto, Sebastián; Chaos, Dictino; Sánchez, José; Dormido, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    An experimental platform to communicate between a set of mobile robots through a wireless network has been developed. The mobile robots get their position through a camera which performs as sensor. The video images are processed in a PC and a Waspmote card sends the corresponding position to each robot using the ZigBee standard. A distributed control algorithm based on event-triggered communications has been designed and implemented to bring the robots into the desired formation. Each robot communicates to its neighbors only at event times. Furthermore, a simulation tool has been developed to design and perform experiments with the system. An example of usage is presented. PMID:23881139

  2. TADSim: Discrete Event-based Performance Prediction for Temperature Accelerated Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mniszewski, Susan M.; Junghans, Christoph; Voter, Arthur F.; Perez, Danny; Eidenbenz, Stephan J.

    2015-04-16

    Next-generation high-performance computing will require more scalable and flexible performance prediction tools to evaluate software--hardware co-design choices relevant to scientific applications and hardware architectures. Here, we present a new class of tools called application simulators—parameterized fast-running proxies of large-scale scientific applications using parallel discrete event simulation. Parameterized choices for the algorithmic method and hardware options provide a rich space for design exploration and allow us to quickly find well-performing software--hardware combinations. We demonstrate our approach with a TADSim simulator that models the temperature-accelerated dynamics (TAD) method, an algorithmically complex and parameter-rich member of the accelerated molecular dynamics (AMD) family of molecular dynamics methods. The essence of the TAD application is captured without the computational expense and resource usage of the full code. We accomplish this by identifying the time-intensive elements, quantifying algorithm steps in terms of those elements, abstracting them out, and replacing them by the passage of time. We use TADSim to quickly characterize the runtime performance and algorithmic behavior for the otherwise long-running simulation code. We extend TADSim to model algorithm extensions, such as speculative spawning of the compute-bound stages, and predict performance improvements without having to implement such a method. Validation against the actual TAD code shows close agreement for the evolution of an example physical system, a silver surface. Finally, focused parameter scans have allowed us to study algorithm parameter choices over far more scenarios than would be possible with the actual simulation. This has led to interesting performance-related insights and suggested extensions.

  3. TADSim: Discrete Event-based Performance Prediction for Temperature Accelerated Dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Mniszewski, Susan M.; Junghans, Christoph; Voter, Arthur F.; Perez, Danny; Eidenbenz, Stephan J.

    2015-04-16

    Next-generation high-performance computing will require more scalable and flexible performance prediction tools to evaluate software--hardware co-design choices relevant to scientific applications and hardware architectures. Here, we present a new class of tools called application simulators—parameterized fast-running proxies of large-scale scientific applications using parallel discrete event simulation. Parameterized choices for the algorithmic method and hardware options provide a rich space for design exploration and allow us to quickly find well-performing software--hardware combinations. We demonstrate our approach with a TADSim simulator that models the temperature-accelerated dynamics (TAD) method, an algorithmically complex and parameter-rich member of the accelerated molecular dynamics (AMD) family ofmore » molecular dynamics methods. The essence of the TAD application is captured without the computational expense and resource usage of the full code. We accomplish this by identifying the time-intensive elements, quantifying algorithm steps in terms of those elements, abstracting them out, and replacing them by the passage of time. We use TADSim to quickly characterize the runtime performance and algorithmic behavior for the otherwise long-running simulation code. We extend TADSim to model algorithm extensions, such as speculative spawning of the compute-bound stages, and predict performance improvements without having to implement such a method. Validation against the actual TAD code shows close agreement for the evolution of an example physical system, a silver surface. Finally, focused parameter scans have allowed us to study algorithm parameter choices over far more scenarios than would be possible with the actual simulation. This has led to interesting performance-related insights and suggested extensions.« less

  4. Team-teaching a current events-based biology course for nonmajors.

    PubMed

    Bondos, Sarah E; Phillips, Dereth

    2008-01-01

    Rice University has created a team-taught interactive biology course for nonmajors with a focus on cutting edge biology in the news-advances in biotechnology, medicine, and science policy, along with the biological principles and methodology upon which these advances are based. The challenges inherent to teaching current topics were minimized by team-teaching the course, providing knowledgeable and enthusiastic lecturers for every topic while distributing the effort required to update material. Postdoctoral associates and advanced graduate students served as lecturers, providing an opportunity for them to develop their teaching skills and learn to communicate effectively with nonscientists on newsworthy topics related to their research. Laboratory tours, in-class demonstrations, and mock-ups helped lecturers convey surprisingly advanced ideas with students who lacked a strong theoretical or practical science background. A faculty member and co-coordinator administer the class, organize class activities, and mentor the speakers on teaching techniques and lecture design. Course design, lecture topics, hands-on activities, and approaches to successfully solve the difficulties inherent to team teaching are discussed. Course evaluations reflect student involvement in, and enjoyment of, the class.

  5. Team-Teaching a Current Events-Based Biology Course for Nonmajors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bondos, Sarah E.; Phillips, Dereth

    2008-01-01

    Rice University has created a team-taught interactive biology course for nonmajors with a focus on cutting edge biology in the news--advances in biotechnology, medicine, and science policy, along with the biological principles and methodology upon which these advances are based. The challenges inherent to teaching current topics were minimized by…

  6. Folk Theorems on the Correspondence between State-Based and Event-Based Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reniers, Michel A.; Willemse, Tim A. C.

    Kripke Structures and Labelled Transition Systems are the two most prominent semantic models used in concurrency theory. Both models are commonly believed to be equi-expressive. One can find many ad-hoc embeddings of one of these models into the other. We build upon the seminal work of De Nicola and Vaandrager that firmly established the correspondence between stuttering equivalence in Kripke Structures and divergence-sensitive branching bisimulation in Labelled Transition Systems. We show that their embeddings can also be used for a range of other equivalences of interest, such as strong bisimilarity, simulation equivalence, and trace equivalence. Furthermore, we extend the results by De Nicola and Vaandrager by showing that there are additional translations that allow one to use minimisation techniques in one semantic domain to obtain minimal representatives in the other semantic domain for these equivalences.

  7. Send-On-Delta Concept: An Event-Based Data Reporting Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Miskowicz, Marek

    2006-01-01

    The paper addresses the issue of the send-on-delta data collecting strategy to capture information from the environment. Send-on-delta concept is the signal-dependent temporal sampling scheme, where the sampling is triggered if the signal deviates by delta defined as the significant change of its value. It is an attractive scheme for wireless sensor networking due to effective energy consumption. The quantitative evaluations of send-on-delta scheme for a general type continuous-time bandlimited signal are presented in the paper. The bounds on the mean traffic of reports for a given signal, and assumed sampling resolution, are evaluated. Furthermore, the send-on-delta effectiveness, defined as the reduction of the mean rate of reports in comparison to the periodic sampling for a given resolution, is derived. It is shown that the lower bound of the send-on-delta effectiveness (i.e. the guaranteed reduction) is independent of the sampling resolution, and constitutes the built-in feature of the input signal. The calculation of the effectiveness for standard signals, that model the state evolution of dynamic environment in time, is exemplified. Finally, the example of send-on-delta programming is shown.

  8. Event-Based Computation of Motion Flow on a Neuromorphic Analog Neural Platform.

    PubMed

    Giulioni, Massimiliano; Lagorce, Xavier; Galluppi, Francesco; Benosman, Ryad B

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the speed and direction of moving objects is a crucial component of agents behaving in a dynamic world. Biological organisms perform this task by means of the neural connections originating from their retinal ganglion cells. In artificial systems the optic flow is usually extracted by comparing activity of two or more frames captured with a vision sensor. Designing artificial motion flow detectors which are as fast, robust, and efficient as the ones found in biological systems is however a challenging task. Inspired by the architecture proposed by Barlow and Levick in 1965 to explain the spiking activity of the direction-selective ganglion cells in the rabbit's retina, we introduce an architecture for robust optical flow extraction with an analog neuromorphic multi-chip system. The task is performed by a feed-forward network of analog integrate-and-fire neurons whose inputs are provided by contrast-sensitive photoreceptors. Computation is supported by the precise time of spike emission, and the extraction of the optical flow is based on time lag in the activation of nearby retinal neurons. Mimicking ganglion cells our neuromorphic detectors encode the amplitude and the direction of the apparent visual motion in their output spiking pattern. Hereby we describe the architectural aspects, discuss its latency, scalability, and robustness properties and demonstrate that a network of mismatched delicate analog elements can reliably extract the optical flow from a simple visual scene. This work shows how precise time of spike emission used as a computational basis, biological inspiration, and neuromorphic systems can be used together for solving specific tasks. PMID:26909015

  9. Iterative and Event-Based Frameworks for University and School District Technology Professional Development Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winslow, Joseph; Dickerson, Jeremy; Weaver, Carmen; Josey, Fair

    2016-01-01

    Forming technology partnerships between universities and public schools in an era of competition and economic difficulty is a challenge. However, when these partnerships are formed and sustained, the benefits for both are extremely valuable. For a university instructional technology graduate program and school partnership to be successful, the…

  10. Issues in Informal Education: Event-Based Science Communication Involving Planetaria and the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Gallagher, D. L.; Whitt, A.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For the last several years the Science Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center has carried out a diverse program of Internet-based science communication. The program includes extended stories about NASA science, a curriculum resource for teachers tied to national education standards, on-line activities for students, and webcasts of real-time events. The focus of sharing real-time science related events has been to involve and excite students and the public about science. Events have involved meteor showers, solar eclipses, natural very low frequency radio emissions, and amateur balloon flights. In some cases broadcasts accommodate active feedback and questions from Internet participants. Panel participation will be used to communicate the problems and lessons learned from these activities over the last three years.

  11. Issues in Informal Education: Event-Based Science Communication Involving Planetaria and the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M.; Gallagher, D. L.; Whitt, A.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    For the past four years the Science Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center has carried out a diverse program of science communication through the web resources on the Internet. The program includes extended stories about NAS.4 science, a curriculum resource for teachers tied to national education standards, on-line activities for students, and webcasts of real-time events. Events have involved meteor showers, solar eclipses, natural very low frequency radio emissions, and amateur balloon flights. In some cases broadcasts accommodate active feedback and questions from Internet participants. We give here, examples of events, problems, and lessons learned from these activities.

  12. Bonsai: an event-based framework for processing and controlling data streams.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Gonçalo; Bonacchi, Niccolò; Frazão, João; Neto, Joana P; Atallah, Bassam V; Soares, Sofia; Moreira, Luís; Matias, Sara; Itskov, Pavel M; Correia, Patrícia A; Medina, Roberto E; Calcaterra, Lorenza; Dreosti, Elena; Paton, Joseph J; Kampff, Adam R

    2015-01-01

    The design of modern scientific experiments requires the control and monitoring of many different data streams. However, the serial execution of programming instructions in a computer makes it a challenge to develop software that can deal with the asynchronous, parallel nature of scientific data. Here we present Bonsai, a modular, high-performance, open-source visual programming framework for the acquisition and online processing of data streams. We describe Bonsai's core principles and architecture and demonstrate how it allows for the rapid and flexible prototyping of integrated experimental designs in neuroscience. We specifically highlight some applications that require the combination of many different hardware and software components, including video tracking of behavior, electrophysiology and closed-loop control of stimulation. PMID:25904861

  13. An event-based neural network architecture with an asynchronous programmable synaptic memory.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Saber; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2014-02-01

    We present a hybrid analog/digital very large scale integration (VLSI) implementation of a spiking neural network with programmable synaptic weights. The synaptic weight values are stored in an asynchronous Static Random Access Memory (SRAM) module, which is interfaced to a fast current-mode event-driven DAC for producing synaptic currents with the appropriate amplitude values. These currents are further integrated by current-mode integrator synapses to produce biophysically realistic temporal dynamics. The synapse output currents are then integrated by compact and efficient integrate and fire silicon neuron circuits with spike-frequency adaptation and adjustable refractory period and spike-reset voltage settings. The fabricated chip comprises a total of 32 × 32 SRAM cells, 4 × 32 synapse circuits and 32 × 1 silicon neurons. It acts as a transceiver, receiving asynchronous events in input, performing neural computation with hybrid analog/digital circuits on the input spikes, and eventually producing digital asynchronous events in output. Input, output, and synaptic weight values are transmitted to/from the chip using a common communication protocol based on the Address Event Representation (AER). Using this representation it is possible to interface the device to a workstation or a micro-controller and explore the effect of different types of Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity (STDP) learning algorithms for updating the synaptic weights values in the SRAM module. We present experimental results demonstrating the correct operation of all the circuits present on the chip.

  14. An event-based model of braided river system aquifers heterogeneity based on Multiple Points Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, P.; Pirot, G.

    2012-12-01

    Braided-rivers are common in mountainous regions like the Swiss Alps. These dynamic systems generate highly heterogeneous deposits and form an important part of alluvial aquifers which are tapped for agriculture and drinking water supply. In this presentation, we propose to integrate large scale and high resolution LIDAR data in a pseudo genetic approach embedding Multiple Points Statistics (MPS) to model the heterogeneity of such aquifers. A way to build 3D sedimentary models is to use descriptive methods, which translate data into conceptual facies models but do not offer uncertainty quantification. Another possibility is the use of stochastic models but most of them do not include strong geological knowledge and their degree of realism can be rather weak. Another approach is to use process-based methods. In this work, we imitate the processes occurring during flood events, by building successive topographies with the Direct Sampling (DS) multiple point statistics algorithm. Each successive topography is conditioned by the previous one. All those steps are constrained by a series of LIDAR data sets allowing to train the algorithm. This is different from classical MPS models, since we do not directly use MPS to model the lithofacies directly, but instead to simulate the processes that lead to the heterogeneity in order to ensure that higher statistics that can be inferred from field data are accurately reproduced. The use of the DS is motivated by the fact that it an MPS technique allowing to co-simulate continuous variables. It is easy to condition to field data and offers a high degree of realism in the simulations. The underlying erosion-deposition process leaves some records of each event in the form of remaining layers, which are populated with facies of different granulometry, according to some predefined rules function of the geobody's shape and dimensions. Input parameters allow controlling the aggradation/degradation intensity.

  15. Event-based aquifer-to-atmosphere modeling over the European CORDEX domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keune, J.; Goergen, K.; Sulis, M.; Shrestha, P.; Springer, A.; Kusche, J.; Ohlwein, C.; Kollet, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the fact that recent studies focus on the impact of soil moisture on climate and especially land-energy feedbacks, groundwater dynamics are often neglected or conceptual groundwater flow models are used. In particular, in the context of climate change and the occurrence of droughts and floods, a better understanding and an improved simulation of the physical processes involving groundwater on continental scales is necessary. This requires the implementation of a physically consistent terrestrial modeling system, which explicitly incorporates groundwater dynamics and the connection with shallow soil moisture. Such a physics-based system enables simulations and monitoring of groundwater storage and enhanced representations of the terrestrial energy and hydrologic cycles over long time periods. On shorter timescales, the prediction of groundwater-related extremes, such as floods and droughts, are expected to improve, because of the improved simulation of components of the hydrological cycle. In this study, we present a fully coupled aquifer-to-atmosphere modeling system over the European CORDEX domain. The integrated Terrestrial Systems Modeling Platform, TerrSysMP, consisting of the three-dimensional subsurface model ParFlow, the Community Land Model CLM3.5 and the numerical weather prediction model COSMO of the German Weather Service, is used. The system is set up with a spatial resolution of 0.11° (12.5km) and closes the terrestrial water and energy cycles from aquifers into the atmosphere. Here, simulations of the fully coupled system are performed over events, such as the 2013 flood in Central Europe and the 2003 European heat wave, and over extended time periods on the order of 10 years. State and flux variables of the terrestrial hydrologic and energy cycle are analyzed and compared to both in situ (e.g. stream and water level gauge networks, FLUXNET) and remotely sensed observations (e.g. GRACE, ESA ICC ECV soil moisture and SMOS). Additionally, the presented modeling system may be useful in the assessment of groundwater-related uncertainties in virtual reality and scenario simulations.

  16. Motion Entropy Feature and Its Applications to Event-Based Segmentation of Sports Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen-Yu; Wang, Jia-Ching; Wang, Jhing-Fa; Hu, Yu-Hen

    2008-12-01

    An entropy-based criterion is proposed to characterize the pattern and intensity of object motion in a video sequence as a function of time. By applying a homoscedastic error model-based time series change point detection algorithm to this motion entropy curve, one is able to segment the corresponding video sequence into individual sections, each consisting of a semantically relevant event. The proposed method is tested on six hours of sports videos including basketball, soccer, and tennis. Excellent experimental results are observed.

  17. A study of preservice elementary teachers enrolled in a discrepant-event-based physical science class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilly, James Edward

    This research evaluated the POWERFUL IDEAS IN PHYSICAL SCIENCE (PIiPS) curriculum model used to develop a physical science course taken by preservice elementary teachers. The focus was on the evaluation of discrepant events used to induce conceptual change in relation to students' ideas concerning heat, temperature, and specific heat. Both quantitative and qualitative methodologies were used for the analysis. Data was collected during the 1998 Fall semester using two classes of physical science for elementary school teachers. The traditionally taught class served as the control group and the class using the PIiPS curriculum model was the experimental group. The PIiPS curriculum model was evaluated quantitatively for its influence on students' attitude toward science, anxiety towards teaching science, self efficacy toward teaching science, and content knowledge. An analysis of covariance was performed on the quantitative data to test for significant differences between the means of the posttests for the control and experimental groups while controlling for pretest. It was found that there were no significant differences between the means of the control and experimental groups with respect to changes in their attitude toward science, anxiety toward teaching science and self efficacy toward teaching science. A significant difference between the means of the content examination was found (F(1,28) = 14.202 and p = 0.001), however, the result is questionable. The heat and energy module was the target for qualitative scrutiny. Coding for discrepant events was adapted from Appleton's 1996 work on student's responses to discrepant event science lessons. The following qualitative questions were posed for the investigation: (1) what were the ideas of the preservice elementary students prior to entering the classroom regarding heat and energy, (2) how effective were the discrepant events as presented in the PIiPS heat and energy module, and (3) how much does the "risk taking factor" associated with not telling the students the answer right away, affect the learning of the material. It was found that preservice elementary teachers harbor similar preconceptions as the general population according to the literature. The discrepant events used in this module of the PIiPS curriculum model met with varied results. It appeared that those students who had not successfully confronted their preconceptions were less likely to accept the new concepts that were to be developed using the discrepant events. Lastly, students had shown great improvement in content understanding and developed the ability to ask deep and probing questions.

  18. Distributed estimation in networked systems under periodic and event-based communication policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millán, Pablo; Orihuela, Luis; Jurado, Isabel; Vivas, Carlos; Rubio, Francisco R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper's aim is to present a novel design technique for distributed estimation in networked systems. The problem assumes a network of interconnected agents each one having partial access to measurements from a linear plant and broadcasting their estimations to their neighbours. The objective is to reach a reliable estimation of the plant state from every agent location. The observer's structure implemented in each agent is based on local Luenberger-like observers in combination with consensus strategies. The paper focuses on the following network related issues: delays, packet dropouts and communication policy (time and event-driven). The design problem is solved via linear matrix inequalities and stability proofs are provided. The technique is of application for sensor networks and large scale systems where centralized estimation schemes are not advisable and energy-aware implementations are of interest. Simulation examples are provided to show the performance of the proposed methodologies.

  19. Simulation of the ATIC-2 Silicon Matrix for Protons and Helium GCR Primaries at 0.3, 10, and 25 TeV/Nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, J.; Adams, J. H.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Batkov, K. E.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunasingha R. M.; Guzik, T. G.

    2005-01-01

    The energy deposition distribution for protons and helium galactic cosmic ray primaries at 0.3, 10, and 25 TeV/nucleon in the ATIC-2 silicon matrix detector are simulated with GEANT4. The GEANT3 geometrical model of ATIC developed by the University of Maryland was combined with a GEANT4 application developed for the Deep Space Test Bed (DSTB) detector package. The new code included relatively minor modifications to completely describe the ATIC materials and a more detailed model of the Silicon Matrix detector. For this analysis all particles were started as a unidirectional beam at a single point near the center of the Silicon Matrix front surface. The point was selected such that each primary passed through at least two of the overlapping silicon pixels.

  20. Controls of event-based pesticide leaching in natural soils: A systematic study based on replicated field scale irrigation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, Julian; Zehe, Erwin; Elsner, Martin; Palm, Juliane; Schneider, Dorothee; Schröder, Boris; Steinbeiss, Sibylle; van Schaik, Loes; West, Stephanie

    2014-05-01

    Tile drains strongly influence the water cycle in agricultural catchment in terms of water quantity and quality. The connectivity of preferential flow to tile drains can create shortcuts for rapid transport of solutes into surface waters. The leaching of pesticides can be linked to a set of main factors including, rainfall characteristics, soil moisture, chemical properties of the pesticides, soil properties, and preferential flow paths. The connectivity of the macropore system to the tile drain is crucial for pesticide leaching. Concurring influences of the main factors, threshold responses and the role of flow paths are still poorly understood. The objective of this study is to investigate these influences by a replica series of three irrigation experiments on a tile drain field site using natural and artificial tracers together with applied pesticides. We found a clear threshold behavior in the initialization of pesticide transport that was different between the replica experiments. Pre-event soil water contributed significantly to the tile drain flow, and creates a flow path for stored pesticides from the soil matrix to the tile drain. This threshold is controlled by antecedent soil moisture and precipitation characteristics, and the interaction between the soil matrix and preferential flow system. Fast transport of pesticides without retardation and the remobilization could be attributed to this threshold and the interaction between the soil matrix and the preferential flow system. Thus, understanding of the detailed preferential flow processes clearly enhances the understanding of pesticide leaching on event and long term scale, and can further improve risk assessment and modeling approaches.

  1. Event-based surveillance of food- and waterborne diseases in Europe: urgent inquiries (outbreak alerts) during 2008 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Gossner, C M; de Jong, B; Hoebe, C J; Coulombier, D

    2015-01-01

    During 2008 to 2013, 215 outbreak alerts, also known as 'urgent inquiries' (UI), for food- and waterborne diseases were launched in Europe, the majority of them (135; 63%) being related to salmonellosis. For 110 (51%) UI, a potential food vehicle of infection was identified, with vegetables being the most reported category (34;31%). A total of 28% (n = 60) of the outbreaks reported had an international dimension, involving at least two countries (mean: 4; standard deviation: 2; range:2–14). Participating countries posted 2,343 messages(initial posts and replies, excluding updates), with a median of 11 messages per urgent inquiry (range:1–28). Of 60 multicountry UI, 50 involved between two and four countries. The UI allowed early detection of multicountry outbreaks, facilitated the identification of the suspected vehicles and consequently contributed to the timely implementation of control measures. The introduction of an epidemic intelligence information system platform in 2010 has strengthened the role of the Food- and Waterborne Diseases and Zoonoses network in facilitating timely exchange of information between public health authorities of the participating countries. PMID:26132769

  2. An event-based comparison of two types of automated-recording, weighing bucket rain gauges 1890

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multi-year, multi-gage comparison of two types of automated-recording weighing-bucket raingages was conducted using precipitation data collected at the United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service’s Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in Southeast Arizona. The compariso...

  3. The identification and analysis of risk for sudden accidental water pollution events based on the water resources monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiannan

    2016-04-01

    There are always various types of sudden accidental Water Pollution Events under the development of modern Chinese economy society, leading to serious economic losses and casualties. Water resources monitoring system, a real-time monitoring system, was built to monitor water quantity and quality of the important rivers and lakes over the country. Based on the system, we had brought up an idea to calculate the possibility of pollution and the risk of pollution in the watershed, and to deal with the threat of water pollution incidents effectively. It was proposed to build the greatest possible contamination with the most serious pollution values over the past years, and similarity test was carried on over the real-time monitoring of possible contamination value and the calculated value. In our study, taking Taihu River Basin as an example, we detailed the application progress of this method in water pollution incidents, the result shows that the method has a certain timeliness for the early warning of sudden water pollution incidents.

  4. Sulfated polysaccharides from marine sponges (Porifera): an ancestor cell-cell adhesion event based on the carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, Eduardo; Coutinho, Cristiano C; Mourão, Paulo A S

    2009-08-01

    Marine sponges (Porifera) are ancient and simple eumetazoans. They constitute key organisms in the evolution from unicellular to multicellular animals. We now demonstrated that pure sulfated polysaccharides from marine sponges are responsible for the species-specific cell-cell interaction in these invertebrates. This conclusion was based on the following observations: (1) each species of marine sponge has a single population of sulfated polysaccharide, which differ among the species in their sugar composition and sulfate content; (2) sulfated polysaccharides from sponge interact with each other in a species-specific way, as indicated by an affinity chromatography assay, and this interaction requires calcium; (3) homologous, but not heterologous, sulfated polysaccharide inhibits aggregation of dissociated sponge cells; (4) we also observed a parallel between synthesis of the sulfated polysaccharide and formation of large aggregates of sponge cells, known as primmorphs. Once aggregation reached a plateau, the demand for the de novo synthesis of sulfated polysaccharides ceased. Heparin can mimic the homologous sulfated polysaccharide on the in vitro interaction and also as an inhibitor of aggregation of the dissociated sponge cells. However, this observation is not relevant for the biology of the sponge since heparin is not found in the invertebrate. In conclusion, marine sponges display an ancestor event of cell-cell adhesion, based on the calcium-dependent carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction.

  5. Robotic goalie with 3 ms reaction time at 4% CPU load using event-based dynamic vision sensor.

    PubMed

    Delbruck, Tobi; Lang, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Conventional vision-based robotic systems that must operate quickly require high video frame rates and consequently high computational costs. Visual response latencies are lower-bound by the frame period, e.g., 20 ms for 50 Hz frame rate. This paper shows how an asynchronous neuromorphic dynamic vision sensor (DVS) silicon retina is used to build a fast self-calibrating robotic goalie, which offers high update rates and low latency at low CPU load. Independent and asynchronous per pixel illumination change events from the DVS signify moving objects and are used in software to track multiple balls. Motor actions to block the most "threatening" ball are based on measured ball positions and velocities. The goalie also sees its single-axis goalie arm and calibrates the motor output map during idle periods so that it can plan open-loop arm movements to desired visual locations. Blocking capability is about 80% for balls shot from 1 m from the goal even with the fastest-shots, and approaches 100% accuracy when the ball does not beat the limits of the servo motor to move the arm to the necessary position in time. Running with standard USB buses under a standard preemptive multitasking operating system (Windows), the goalie robot achieves median update rates of 550 Hz, with latencies of 2.2 ± 2 ms from ball movement to motor command at a peak CPU load of less than 4%. Practical observations and measurements of USB device latency are provided. PMID:24311999

  6. Event-based prospective memory in patients with Parkinson’s disease: the effect of emotional valence

    PubMed Central

    Mioni, G.; Meligrana, L.; Rendell, P. G.; Bartolomei, L.; Perini, F.; Stablum, F.

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of Parkinson’s disease (PD) on prospective memory (PM) tasks by varying the emotional content of the PM actions. Twenty-one older adults with PD and 25 healthy older adults took part in the present study. Participants performed three virtual days in the Virtual Week task. On each virtual day, participants performed actions with positive, negative or neutral content. Immediately following each virtual day, participants completed a recognition task to assess their retrospective memory for the various PM tasks. PD patients were less accurate than the control group at both PM accuracy and recognition task accuracy. The effect of emotional valence was also evident, indicating that all participants were more accurate on positive PM tasks than both negative and neutral. This study confirmed PM impairment in PD patients and extended previous research showing how positive emotional stimuli can influence PM performance. PMID:26257636

  7. Robotic goalie with 3 ms reaction time at 4% CPU load using event-based dynamic vision sensor.

    PubMed

    Delbruck, Tobi; Lang, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Conventional vision-based robotic systems that must operate quickly require high video frame rates and consequently high computational costs. Visual response latencies are lower-bound by the frame period, e.g., 20 ms for 50 Hz frame rate. This paper shows how an asynchronous neuromorphic dynamic vision sensor (DVS) silicon retina is used to build a fast self-calibrating robotic goalie, which offers high update rates and low latency at low CPU load. Independent and asynchronous per pixel illumination change events from the DVS signify moving objects and are used in software to track multiple balls. Motor actions to block the most "threatening" ball are based on measured ball positions and velocities. The goalie also sees its single-axis goalie arm and calibrates the motor output map during idle periods so that it can plan open-loop arm movements to desired visual locations. Blocking capability is about 80% for balls shot from 1 m from the goal even with the fastest-shots, and approaches 100% accuracy when the ball does not beat the limits of the servo motor to move the arm to the necessary position in time. Running with standard USB buses under a standard preemptive multitasking operating system (Windows), the goalie robot achieves median update rates of 550 Hz, with latencies of 2.2 ± 2 ms from ball movement to motor command at a peak CPU load of less than 4%. Practical observations and measurements of USB device latency are provided.

  8. Monitoring of event based mobilization of hydrophobic pollutants in rivers: Calibration of turbidity as a proxy for particle facilitated transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rügner, Hermann; Schwientek, Marc; Grathwohl, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Transport of many pollutants in rivers is coupled to transport of suspended particles which is typically enhanced during events such as floods, snow melts etc. As the amount of total suspended solids (TSS) in rivers can be monitored by turbidity measurements this may be used as a proxy for the total concentration of particle associated pollutants in rivers such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PCBs, etc. and several heavy metals. On-line turbidity measurements (e.g. by optical backscattering sensors) then allow for an assessment of particle and pollutant flux dynamics. In this study, pronounced flood and thus turbidity events were sampled at high temporal resolution in three contrasting catchments in Southwest Germany (Rivers Ammer, Goldersbach, Steinlach) as well as in the River Neckar. Samples were analyzed for turbidity, the total amount of PAH and total suspended solids (TSS) in water. Additionally, the grain size distributions of suspended solids were determined. Discharge and turbidity were measured on-line at gauging stations in three of the catchments. Results showed that turbidity and TSS were linearly correlated over an extended turbidity range up to 2000 NTU for the flood samples (i.e. independent on grain size). This also holds for total PAH concentrations which can be reasonably well predicted based on the turbidity measurements and TSS versus PAH relationships - even for very high turbidity or TSS values (> 2000 NTU or mg l-1, respectively). From these linear regressions concentrations of PAHs on suspended particles were obtained which varied by catchment. The values comprise a robust measure of the average sediment quality in a river network and may be correlated to the degree of urbanization represented by the number of inhabitants per total flux of suspended particles. Based on long-term on-line turbidity measurements mass flow rates of particle bound pollutants over time could be calculated. Results showed that by far the largest amount of pollutant loads occur at relative high turbidities > 100 NTU which are observed only during very short time periods. Therefore it is of particular importance not to miss these pronounced but rare events.

  9. Evaluation of Event-Based Algorithms for Optical Flow with Ground-Truth from Inertial Measurement Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Rueckauer, Bodo; Delbruck, Tobi

    2016-01-01

    In this study we compare nine optical flow algorithms that locally measure the flow normal to edges according to accuracy and computation cost. In contrast to conventional, frame-based motion flow algorithms, our open-source implementations compute optical flow based on address-events from a neuromorphic Dynamic Vision Sensor (DVS). For this benchmarking we created a dataset of two synthesized and three real samples recorded from a 240 × 180 pixel Dynamic and Active-pixel Vision Sensor (DAVIS). This dataset contains events from the DVS as well as conventional frames to support testing state-of-the-art frame-based methods. We introduce a new source for the ground truth: In the special case that the perceived motion stems solely from a rotation of the vision sensor around its three camera axes, the true optical flow can be estimated using gyro data from the inertial measurement unit integrated with the DAVIS camera. This provides a ground-truth to which we can compare algorithms that measure optical flow by means of motion cues. An analysis of error sources led to the use of a refractory period, more accurate numerical derivatives and a Savitzky-Golay filter to achieve significant improvements in accuracy. Our pure Java implementations of two recently published algorithms reduce computational cost by up to 29% compared to the original implementations. Two of the algorithms introduced in this paper further speed up processing by a factor of 10 compared with the original implementations, at equal or better accuracy. On a desktop PC, they run in real-time on dense natural input recorded by a DAVIS camera. PMID:27199639

  10. Building a knowledge base of severe adverse drug events based on AERS reporting data using semantic web technologies.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guoqian; Wang, Liwei; Liu, Hongfang; Solbrig, Harold R; Chute, Christopher G

    2013-01-01

    A semantically coded knowledge base of adverse drug events (ADEs) with severity information is critical for clinical decision support systems and translational research applications. However it remains challenging to measure and identify the severity information of ADEs. The objective of the study is to develop and evaluate a semantic web based approach for building a knowledge base of severe ADEs based on the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) reporting data. We utilized a normalized AERS reporting dataset and extracted putative drug-ADE pairs and their associated outcome codes in the domain of cardiac disorders. We validated the drug-ADE associations using ADE datasets from SIDe Effect Resource (SIDER) and the UMLS. We leveraged the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Event (CTCAE) grading system and classified the ADEs into the CTCAE in the Web Ontology Language (OWL). We identified and validated 2,444 unique Drug-ADE pairs in the domain of cardiac disorders, of which 760 pairs are in Grade 5, 775 pairs in Grade 4 and 2,196 pairs in Grade 3.

  11. Event-based surveillance of food- and waterborne diseases in Europe: urgent inquiries (outbreak alerts) during 2008 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Gossner, C M; de Jong, B; Hoebe, C J; Coulombier, D

    2015-06-25

    During 2008 to 2013, 215 outbreak alerts, also known as 'urgent inquiries' (UI), for food- and waterborne diseases were launched in Europe, the majority of them (135; 63%) being related to salmonellosis. For 110 (51%) UI, a potential food vehicle of infection was identified, with vegetables being the most reported category (34;31%). A total of 28% (n = 60) of the outbreaks reported had an international dimension, involving at least two countries (mean: 4; standard deviation: 2; range:2–14). Participating countries posted 2,343 messages(initial posts and replies, excluding updates), with a median of 11 messages per urgent inquiry (range:1–28). Of 60 multicountry UI, 50 involved between two and four countries. The UI allowed early detection of multicountry outbreaks, facilitated the identification of the suspected vehicles and consequently contributed to the timely implementation of control measures. The introduction of an epidemic intelligence information system platform in 2010 has strengthened the role of the Food- and Waterborne Diseases and Zoonoses network in facilitating timely exchange of information between public health authorities of the participating countries.

  12. Evaluation of Event-Based Algorithms for Optical Flow with Ground-Truth from Inertial Measurement Sensor.

    PubMed

    Rueckauer, Bodo; Delbruck, Tobi

    2016-01-01

    In this study we compare nine optical flow algorithms that locally measure the flow normal to edges according to accuracy and computation cost. In contrast to conventional, frame-based motion flow algorithms, our open-source implementations compute optical flow based on address-events from a neuromorphic Dynamic Vision Sensor (DVS). For this benchmarking we created a dataset of two synthesized and three real samples recorded from a 240 × 180 pixel Dynamic and Active-pixel Vision Sensor (DAVIS). This dataset contains events from the DVS as well as conventional frames to support testing state-of-the-art frame-based methods. We introduce a new source for the ground truth: In the special case that the perceived motion stems solely from a rotation of the vision sensor around its three camera axes, the true optical flow can be estimated using gyro data from the inertial measurement unit integrated with the DAVIS camera. This provides a ground-truth to which we can compare algorithms that measure optical flow by means of motion cues. An analysis of error sources led to the use of a refractory period, more accurate numerical derivatives and a Savitzky-Golay filter to achieve significant improvements in accuracy. Our pure Java implementations of two recently published algorithms reduce computational cost by up to 29% compared to the original implementations. Two of the algorithms introduced in this paper further speed up processing by a factor of 10 compared with the original implementations, at equal or better accuracy. On a desktop PC, they run in real-time on dense natural input recorded by a DAVIS camera.

  13. Robotic goalie with 3 ms reaction time at 4% CPU load using event-based dynamic vision sensor

    PubMed Central

    Delbruck, Tobi; Lang, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Conventional vision-based robotic systems that must operate quickly require high video frame rates and consequently high computational costs. Visual response latencies are lower-bound by the frame period, e.g., 20 ms for 50 Hz frame rate. This paper shows how an asynchronous neuromorphic dynamic vision sensor (DVS) silicon retina is used to build a fast self-calibrating robotic goalie, which offers high update rates and low latency at low CPU load. Independent and asynchronous per pixel illumination change events from the DVS signify moving objects and are used in software to track multiple balls. Motor actions to block the most “threatening” ball are based on measured ball positions and velocities. The goalie also sees its single-axis goalie arm and calibrates the motor output map during idle periods so that it can plan open-loop arm movements to desired visual locations. Blocking capability is about 80% for balls shot from 1 m from the goal even with the fastest-shots, and approaches 100% accuracy when the ball does not beat the limits of the servo motor to move the arm to the necessary position in time. Running with standard USB buses under a standard preemptive multitasking operating system (Windows), the goalie robot achieves median update rates of 550 Hz, with latencies of 2.2 ± 2 ms from ball movement to motor command at a peak CPU load of less than 4%. Practical observations and measurements of USB device latency are provided1. PMID:24311999

  14. Event-based quantification of emerging pollutant removal for an open stormwater retention basin - loads, efficiency and importance of uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Sébastian, C; Becouze-Lareure, C; Lipeme Kouyi, G; Barraud, S

    2015-04-01

    Up to now, emerging contaminants have not been further-studied in in-situ stormwater best management practices and especially in detention basins. In this article, the efficiency of a dry stormwater detention basin was investigated regarding the removal of 7 alkylphenols and alkylphenol ethoxylates, 9 polybrominated diphenyl ethers, 45 pesticides and bisphenol A. Concentrations of contaminants were obtained by chemical analysis on dissolved and particulate phase distinctly. The removal efficiency was assessed on total, dissolved and particulate phase accounting for the global chain of uncertainty with a 95% confidence interval. Results showed that pesticides (rather hydrophilic) are not trapped in the detention basin but are released contrarily to B209 which is mostly in particulate phase. Alkylphenols and alkylphenol ethoxylates are present in both phases and the efficiency is storm event-dependent. Uncertainty consideration in efficiency determination revealed efficiency data, usually presented by raw values are not relevant to conclude on the performance of a detention basin. In this case study, efficiency data with a 95% confidence interval indicate that only 35%, 50% and 41% of campaigns showed an impact (in trapping or releasing) of the detention basin on alkylphenols and ethoxylates, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and pesticides respectively.

  15. Teaching Tacting of Private Events Based on Public Accompaniments: Effects of Contingencies, Audience Control, and Stimulus Complexity.

    PubMed

    Stocco, Corey S; Thompson, Rachel H; Hart, John M

    2014-06-01

    Our current understanding of the role of private events in the science of behavior is based largely on Skinner's natural science interpretation of private events. Skinner described public accompaniments as one source of control for a verbal community to differentially reinforce verbal behavior regarding private events. In this study, we developed an experimental analogue to study variables influencing tacting of private events. The participant had exclusive access to one set of stimuli (the private stimuli), and the experimenter attempted to teach tacts for private stimuli based on their correspondence with public stimuli accessible to both the experimenter and participant. Results of experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated that reports of private stimuli were a function of degree of public-private correspondence, reinforcement contingency, and audience control. In some cases, we encountered reports controlled exclusively by public stimuli. Results of experiment 3 showed that public control was less likely when public stimuli were more complex and the experimenter had a unique behavioral history with respect to those stimuli that was not shared by the learner. The orderly patterns of data obtained suggest that analogue arrangements might be a useful, and even necessary, starting point for experimental investigations of how private events may enter into the analysis of behavior.

  16. Event-based quantification of emerging pollutant removal for an open stormwater retention basin - loads, efficiency and importance of uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Sébastian, C; Becouze-Lareure, C; Lipeme Kouyi, G; Barraud, S

    2015-04-01

    Up to now, emerging contaminants have not been further-studied in in-situ stormwater best management practices and especially in detention basins. In this article, the efficiency of a dry stormwater detention basin was investigated regarding the removal of 7 alkylphenols and alkylphenol ethoxylates, 9 polybrominated diphenyl ethers, 45 pesticides and bisphenol A. Concentrations of contaminants were obtained by chemical analysis on dissolved and particulate phase distinctly. The removal efficiency was assessed on total, dissolved and particulate phase accounting for the global chain of uncertainty with a 95% confidence interval. Results showed that pesticides (rather hydrophilic) are not trapped in the detention basin but are released contrarily to B209 which is mostly in particulate phase. Alkylphenols and alkylphenol ethoxylates are present in both phases and the efficiency is storm event-dependent. Uncertainty consideration in efficiency determination revealed efficiency data, usually presented by raw values are not relevant to conclude on the performance of a detention basin. In this case study, efficiency data with a 95% confidence interval indicate that only 35%, 50% and 41% of campaigns showed an impact (in trapping or releasing) of the detention basin on alkylphenols and ethoxylates, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and pesticides respectively. PMID:25683631

  17. Interplanetary crew dose estimates for worst case solar particle events based on historical data for the Carrington flare of 1859.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Daniel L; Townsend, Lawrence W; Hoff, Jennifer L

    2005-01-01

    Over the past two decades, hypothetical models of "worst-case" solar particle event (SPE) spectra have been proposed in order to place an upper bound on radiation doses to critical body organs of interplanetary crews on deep space missions. These event spectra are usually formulated using hypothetical extrapolations of space measurements for previous large events. Here we take a different approach. Recently reported analyses of ice core samples indicate that the Carrington flare of 1859 is the largest event observed in the past 500 years. These ice core data yield estimates of the proton fluence for energies greater than 30 MeV, but provide no other spectrum information. Assuming that the proton energy distribution for such an event is similar to that measured for other recent, large events, interplanetary crew doses are estimated for these hypothetical worst case SPE spectra. These estimated doses are life threatening unless substantial shielding is provided. PMID:15835055

  18. Medical mitigation strategies for acute radiation exposure during spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Epelman, Slava; Hamilton, Douglas R

    2006-02-01

    The United States Government has recently refocused their space program on manned missions to the Moon by 2018 and later to Mars. While there are many potential risks associated with exploration-class missions, one of the most serious and unpredictable is the effect of acute space radiation exposure, and the space program must make every reasonable effort to mitigate this risk. The two cosmic sources of radiation that could impact a mission outside the Earth's magnetic field are solar particle events (SPE) and galactic cosmic radiation (GCR). Either can cause acute and chronic medical illness. Numerous researchers are currently examining the ability of GCR exposure to induce the development of genetic changes that lead to malignancies and other delayed effects. However, relatively little has been published on the medical management of an acute SPE event and the potential impact on the mission and crew. This review paper will provide the readers with medical management options for an acute radiation event based on recommendations from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and evidence-based critical analysis of the scientific literature. It is the goal of this paper to stimulate debate regarding the definition of safety parameters for exploration-class missions to determine the level of medical care necessary to provide for the crew that will undertake such missions.

  19. Medical mitigation strategies for acute radiation exposure during spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Epelman, Slava; Hamilton, Douglas R

    2006-02-01

    The United States Government has recently refocused their space program on manned missions to the Moon by 2018 and later to Mars. While there are many potential risks associated with exploration-class missions, one of the most serious and unpredictable is the effect of acute space radiation exposure, and the space program must make every reasonable effort to mitigate this risk. The two cosmic sources of radiation that could impact a mission outside the Earth's magnetic field are solar particle events (SPE) and galactic cosmic radiation (GCR). Either can cause acute and chronic medical illness. Numerous researchers are currently examining the ability of GCR exposure to induce the development of genetic changes that lead to malignancies and other delayed effects. However, relatively little has been published on the medical management of an acute SPE event and the potential impact on the mission and crew. This review paper will provide the readers with medical management options for an acute radiation event based on recommendations from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and evidence-based critical analysis of the scientific literature. It is the goal of this paper to stimulate debate regarding the definition of safety parameters for exploration-class missions to determine the level of medical care necessary to provide for the crew that will undertake such missions. PMID:16491581

  20. USA/FRG umbrella agreement for cooperation in GCR [Gas Cooled Reactor] development: Fuel, fission products and graphite subprogram. Part 1, Management meeting report: Part 2, Revised subprogram plan, Revision 10

    SciTech Connect

    1986-05-01

    This Subprogram Plan describes cooperative work in the areas of HTR fuel and graphite development and fission product studies that is being carried out under US/FRG/Swiss Implementing Agreement for cooperation in Gas Cooled Reactor development. Only bilateral US/FRG cooperation is included, since it is the only active work in this subprogram area at this time. The cooperation has been in progress since February 1977. A number of Project Work Statements have been developed in each of the major areas of the subprogram, and work on many of them is in progress. The following specific areas are included in the scope of this plan: fuel development; graphite development; fission product release; and fission product behavior outside the fuel elements.

  1. Event-based distributed set-membership filtering for a class of time-varying non-linear systems over sensor networks with saturation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guoliang; Liu, Shuai; Wang, Licheng; Wang, Yongxiong

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, based on the event-triggered mechanism, the problem of distributed set-membership filtering is concerned for a class of time-varying non-linear systems over sensor networks subject to saturation effects. Different from the traditional periodic sample-data approach, the filter is updated only when the predefined event is satisfied, which the event is defined according to the measurement output. For each node, the proposed novel event-triggered mechanism can reduce the unnecessary information transmission between sensors and filters. The purpose of the addressed problem is to design a series of distributed set-membership filters, for all the admissible unknown but bounded noises, non-linearities and sensor saturation, such that the set of all possible states can be determined. The desired filter parameters are obtained by solving a recursive linear matrix inequality that can be computed recursively using the available MATLAB toolbox. Finally, a simulation example is exploited to show the effectiveness of the proposed design approach in this paper.

  2. Executive and Theory-of-Mind Contributions to Event-Based Prospective Memory in Children: Exploring the Self-Projection Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Ruth M.; Driscoll, Timothy; Shum, David; Macaulay, Catrin E.

    2012-01-01

    In two studies, 4- to 6-year-olds were asked to name pictures of animals for the benefit of a watching hand puppet (the ongoing task) but to refrain from naming and to remove from view any pictures of dogs (the prospective memory [PM] task). Children also completed assessments of verbal ability, cognitive inhibition, working memory, and…

  3. Validating a mass balance accounting approach to using 7Be measurements to estimate event-based erosion rates over an extended period at the catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porto, Paolo; Walling, Des E.; Cogliandro, Vanessa; Callegari, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    Use of the fallout radionuclides cesium-137 and excess lead-210 offers important advantages over traditional methods of quantifying erosion and soil redistribution rates. However, both radionuclides provide information on longer-term (i.e., 50-100 years) average rates of soil redistribution. Beryllium-7, with its half-life of 53 days, can provide a basis for documenting short-term soil redistribution and it has been successfully employed in several studies. However, the approach commonly used introduces several important constraints related to the timing and duration of the study period. A new approach proposed by the authors that overcomes these constraints has been successfully validated using an erosion plot experiment undertaken in southern Italy. Here, a further validation exercise undertaken in a small (1.38 ha) catchment is reported. The catchment was instrumented to measure event sediment yields and beryllium-7 measurements were employed to document the net soil loss for a series of 13 events that occurred between November 2013 and June 2015. In the absence of significant sediment storage within the catchment's ephemeral channel system and of a significant contribution from channel erosion to the measured sediment yield, the estimates of net soil loss for the individual events could be directly compared with the measured sediment yields to validate the former. The close agreement of the two sets of values is seen as successfully validating the use of beryllium-7 measurements and the new approach to obtain estimates of net soil loss for a sequence of individual events occurring over an extended period at the scale of a small catchment.

  4. Monitoring of event-based mobilization of hydrophobic pollutants in rivers: calibration of turbidity as a proxy for particle facilitated transport in field and laboratory.

    PubMed

    Rügner, Hermann; Schwientek, Marc; Egner, Marius; Grathwohl, Peter

    2014-08-15

    Transport of many pollutants in rivers is coupled to mobilization of suspended particles which typically occurs during floods. Since the amount of total suspended solids (TSS) in rivers can be monitored by turbidity measurements this may be used as a proxy for the total concentration of particle associated pollutants such as PAHs, PCBs, etc. and several heavy metals. Online turbidity measurements (e.g. by optical backscattering sensors) would then also allow for an assessment of particle and pollutant flux dynamics if once calibrated against TSS and total pollutant concentrations for a given catchment. In this study, distinct flood and thus turbidity events were sampled at high temporal resolution in three contrasting sub-catchments of the River Neckar in Southwest Germany (Ammer, Goldersbach, Steinlach) as well as in the River Neckar itself and investigated for the total amount of PAHs and TSS in water; turbidity (NTU) and grain size distributions of suspended solids were determined as well. Laboratory experiments were performed with natural river bed sediments from different locations (Ammer) to investigate PAH concentrations, TSS and turbidity during sedimentation of suspended particles under controlled conditions (yielding smaller and smaller suspended particles and TSS with time). Laboratory and field results agreed very well and showed that turbidity and TSS were linearly correlated over an extended turbidity range up to 2000 NTU for the field samples and up to 8000 NTU in lab experiments. This also holds for total PAH concentrations which can be reasonably well predicted based on turbidity measurements and TSS vs. PAHs relationships - even for high turbidity values observed during flood events (>2000 NTU). Total PAH concentrations on suspended solids were independent of grain size of suspended particles. This implies that for the rivers investigated the sorption capacity of particles did not change significantly during the observed events.

  5. Characterising Seismic Hazard Input for Analysis Risk to Multi-System Infrastructures: Application to Scenario Event-Based Models and extension to Probabilistic Risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherill, G. A.; Silva, V.

    2011-12-01

    The potential human and economic cost of earthquakes to complex urban infrastructures has been demonstrated in the most emphatic manner by recent large earthquakes such as that of Haiti (February 2010), Christchurch (September 2010 and February 2011) and Tohoku (March 2011). Consideration of seismic risk for a homogenous portfolio, such as a single building typology or infrastructure, or independent analyses of separate typologies or infrastructures, are insufficient to fully characterise the potential impacts that arise from inter-connected system failure. Individual elements of each infrastructure may be adversely affected by different facets of the ground motion (e.g. short-period acceleration, long-period displacement, cumulative energy input etc.). The accuracy and efficiency of the risk analysis is dependent on the ability to characterise these multiple features of the ground motion over a spatially distributed portfolio of elements. The modelling challenges raised by this extension to multi-system analysis of risk have been a key focus of the European Project "Systemic Seismic Vulnerability and Risk Analysis for Buildings, Lifeline Networks and Infrastructures Safety Gain (SYNER-G)", and are expected to be developed further within the Global Earthquake Model (GEM). Seismic performance of a spatially distributed infrastructure during an earthquake may be assessed by means of Monte Carlo simulation, in order to incorporate the aleatory variability of the ground motion into the network analysis. Methodologies for co-simulating large numbers of spatially cross-correlated ground motion fields are appraised, and their potential impacts on a spatially distributed portfolio of mixed building typologies assessed using idealised case study scenarios from California and Europe. Potential developments to incorporate correlation and uncertainty in site amplification and geotechnical hazard are also explored. Whilst the initial application of the seismic risk analysis is directed toward seismic scenarios, this methodology can be extended to the application of probabilistic analysis of seismic hazard and risk. These applications present new challenges in terms of both the theoretical and computational implementation. They also illustrate the need for the integration of seismic hazard and risk calculations into a common software platform capable of modelling the risk analysis from end-to-end. The development of OpenQuake, the open source hazard and risk calculation platform developed as part of GEM, provides such a means of integrating state-of-the-art hazard and risk calculators. The potential direction of future developments to this software will need to take into account many of the modelling issues raised in this discussion.

  6. Reconstruction of flood events based on documentary data and transnational flood risk analysis of the Upper Rhine and its French and German tributaries since AD 1480

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himmelsbach, I.; Glaser, R.; Schoenbein, J.; Riemann, D.; Martin, B.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the long-term analysis of flood occurrence along the southern part of the Upper Rhine River system and of 14 of its tributaries in France and Germany covering the period starting from 1480 BC. Special focus is given on the temporal and spatial variations of flood events and their underlying meteorological causes over time. Examples are presented of how long-term information about flood events and knowledge about the historical aspect of flood protection in a given area can help to improve the understanding of risk analysis and therefor transnational risk management. Within this context, special focus is given to flood vulnerability while comparing selected historical and modern extreme events, establishing a common evaluation scheme. The transnational aspect becomes especially evident analyzing the tributaries: on this scale, flood protection developed impressively different on the French and German sides. We argue that comparing high technological standards of flood protection, which were initiated by the dukes of Baden on the German side starting in the early 19th century, misled people to the common belief that the mechanical means of flood protection like dams and barrages can guarantee the security from floods and their impacts. This lead to widespread settlements and the establishment of infrastructure as well as modern industries in potentially unsafe areas until today. The legal status in Alsace on the French side of the Rhine did not allow for continuous flood protection measurements, leading to a constant - and probably at last annoying - reminder that the floodplains are a potentially unsafe place to be. From a modern perspective of flood risk management, this leads to a significant lower aggregation of value in the floodplains of the small rivers in Alsace compared to those on the Baden side - an interesting fact - especially if the modern European Flood directive is taken into account.

  7. Executive and theory-of-mind contributions to event-based prospective memory in children: exploring the self-projection hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Ford, Ruth M; Driscoll, Timothy; Shum, David; Macaulay, Catrin E

    2012-03-01

    In two studies, 4- to 6-year-olds were asked to name pictures of animals for the benefit of a watching hand puppet (the ongoing task) but to refrain from naming and to remove from view any pictures of dogs (the prospective memory [PM] task). Children also completed assessments of verbal ability, cognitive inhibition, working memory, and false-belief understanding (both studies), empathy (Study 1 only), and performance on false-sign tests that matched the false-belief tests in narrative content and structure (Study 2 only). Both studies found that inhibition and false-belief performance made unique contributions to the variance in PM, although in Study 1 the influence of inhibition was evident only when children needed to withhold naming. Study 2 further demonstrated that false-belief performance was the only reliable predictor of whether children remembered to return to the researcher an object that had been loaned to them prior to the picture-naming game. Both experiments uncovered moderate relations between PM and chronological age, but such relations were rarely significant after taking account of cognitive ability. We consider the implications of the findings for (a) current views regarding frontal/executive contributions to PM development and (b) the suggestion that the same brain network underlies various forms of mental self-projection, including envisioning the future and understanding the minds of other people.

  8. Diffusion Coefficient Values Obtained at Individual Diffuse Ion Events Based on Cluster Observations: What Do We Know About the Physical Process?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kis, Arpad; Scholer, Manfred; Klecker, Berndt; Lucek, Elisabeth; Reme, Henry

    2010-05-01

    We present simultaneous multipoint observations of diffuse ions in front of the Earth's quasi-parallel bow shock. For the analysis we use data provided by the Cluster CIS-HIA particle instrument and data from FGM magnetic field instrument. Several individual diffuse ion events during various solar wind conditions are presented and analysed. The diffusion coefficients at each analysed upstream ion event present unique characteristics especially at lower diffuse ion energies (around 10 keV). We analyse in detail the reasons for the observed differences in the value of the diffusion coefficient; results are also compared with predictions of the theory and the reason for the eventual difference is explained.

  9. Review the number of accidents in Tehran over a two-year period and prediction of the number of events based on a time-series model

    PubMed Central

    Teymuri, Ghulam Heidar; Sadeghian, Marzieh; Kangavari, Mehdi; Asghari, Mehdi; Madrese, Elham; Abbasinia, Marzieh; Ahmadnezhad, Iman; Gholizadeh, Yavar

    2013-01-01

    Background: One of the significant dangers that threaten people’s lives is the increased risk of accidents. Annually, more than 1.3 million people die around the world as a result of accidents, and it has been estimated that approximately 300 deaths occur daily due to traffic accidents in the world with more than 50% of that number being people who were not even passengers in the cars. The aim of this study was to examine traffic accidents in Tehran and forecast the number of future accidents using a time-series model. Methods: The study was a cross-sectional study that was conducted in 2011. The sample population was all traffic accidents that caused death and physical injuries in Tehran in 2010 and 2011, as registered in the Tehran Emergency ward. The present study used Minitab 15 software to provide a description of accidents in Tehran for the specified time period as well as those that occurred during April 2012. Results: The results indicated that the average number of daily traffic accidents in Tehran in 2010 was 187 with a standard deviation of 83.6. In 2011, there was an average of 180 daily traffic accidents with a standard deviation of 39.5. One-way analysis of variance indicated that the average number of accidents in the city was different for different months of the year (P < 0.05). Most of the accidents occurred in March, July, August, and September. Thus, more accidents occurred in the summer than in the other seasons. The number of accidents was predicted based on an auto-regressive, moving average (ARMA) for April 2012. The number of accidents displayed a seasonal trend. The prediction of the number of accidents in the city during April of 2012 indicated that a total of 4,459 accidents would occur with mean of 149 accidents per day during these three months. Conclusion: The number of accidents in Tehran displayed a seasonal trend, and the number of accidents was different for different seasons of the year. PMID:26120405

  10. Galactic Cosmic Ray Simulator at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Rusek, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The external Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) spectrum is significantly modified when it passes through spacecraft shielding and astronauts. One approach for simulating the GCR space radiation environment is to attempt to reproduce the unmodified, external GCR spectrum at a ground based accelerator. A possibly better approach would use the modified, shielded tissue spectrum, to select accelerator beams impinging on biological targets. NASA plans for implementation of a GCR simulator at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory will be discussed.

  11. 14 CFR 399.41 - Zones of limited suspension for international cargo rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (GCR's and SCR's) in the Atlantic region, 20 percent above the standard foreign rate level. (2) For all bulk rates (GCR's and SCR's) in the Pacific region, 15 percent above the standard foreign rate level. (3) For all bulk rates (GCR's and SCR's) in the Western Hemisphere region (except Mexico and...

  12. International Collaboration for Galactic Cosmic Ray Simulation at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Rusek, Adam; Durante, Marco; Reitz, Guenther

    2015-01-01

    An international collaboration on Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) simulation is being formed to make recommendations on how to best simulate the GCR spectrum at ground based accelerators. The external GCR spectrum is significantly modified when it passes through spacecraft shielding and astronauts. One approach for simulating the GCR space radiation environment at ground based accelerators would use the modified spectrum, rather than the external spectrum, in the accelerator beams impinging on biological targets. Two recent workshops have studied such GCR simulation. The first workshop was held at NASA Langley Research Center in October 2014. The second workshop was held at the NASA Space Radiation Investigators' workshop in Galveston, Texas in January 2015. The anticipated outcome of these and other studies may be a report or journal article, written by an international collaboration, making accelerator beam recommendations for GCR simulation. This poster describes the status of GCR simulation at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory and encourages others to join the collaboration.

  13. The first intron of the human growth hormone gene contains a binding site for glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, D D; Marks, A R; Buckley, D I; Kapler, G; Payvar, F; Goodman, H M

    1985-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) protein stimulates transcription from a variety of cellular genes. We show here that GCR partially purified from rat liver binds specifically to a site within the first intron of the human growth hormone (hGH) gene, approximately 100 base pairs downstream from the start of hGH transcription. GCR binding is selectively inhibited by methylation of two short, symmetrically arranged clusters of guanine residues within this site. A cloned synthetic 24-base-pair deoxyoligonucleotide containing the predicted GCR binding sequence interacts specifically with GCR. The hGH binding site shares sequence homology with a GCR binding site upstream from the human metallothionein II gene and a subset of GCR binding sites from mouse mammary tumor virus. All of these binding sites for this eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory protein show remarkable similarity in overall geometry to the binding sites for several prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory proteins. Images PMID:2983311

  14. Characterizing seasonal variability of storm events based on very high frequency monitoring of hydrological and chemical variables: comparing patterns in hot spots and hot moments for nutrient and sediment export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fovet, Ophelie; Thelusma, Gilbert; Humbert, Guillaume; Dupas, Rémi; Faucheux, Mikael; Gilliet, Nicolas; Hamon, Yannick; Jaffrezic, Anne; Grimaldi, Catherine; Gruau, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Storm events are critical hot moments of emission for several dissolved and particulate chemical species at major stake for water quality (e.g. dissolved organic carbon DOC, suspended sediments, phosphorus). During such events, the solutes or particles are exported from heterogeneous sources through various pathways to stream leading to specific integrated signals at the outlet characterized by very short dynamics. This is merely true in headwater catchments where the total duration of such events ranges over 10h to 3 days, with very quick variations in stream flow and concentrations at the outlet occurring in a few hours. Thus for investigating properly event processes, high frequency monitoring of flow and water quality is required. We analysed 103 storm events in a 5 km2 agricultural headwater catchment, part of the AgrHys Observatory, on the basis of a 3-year-long data set which combined meterological (Rainfall), hydrological (flow and piezometry), and water quality (turbidity, conductivity, DOC and NO3 concentrations) data recorded at very high frequencies (from 1 to 20 min) thanks to dedicated sensors. We proposed a range of quantitative storm descriptors for characterizing input (rainfall), antecedent and initial conditions (groundwater levels and saturated area), and stream response in terms of level and dynamics of flow (Q), groundwater levels, and concentrations (C) but also the C-Q relationships. Three intra annual periods have been previously defined for base flow dynamic according to shallow groundwater table variations so that they correspond to different connectivity status in the catchment. The seasonal and inter-annual variability of the storm events have been analysed using the descriptors and based on these predefined periods. Results show that the hydrological flowpaths and the consequent storm chemistry were controlled by the hydrological base flow regime rather than by the rain input characteristics. This highlights that the exports of NO3, DOC and sediments during storms may be either synchronized or desynchronized depending on the season. This temporal dynamic of the ratios between species may be at major stake for the aquatic ecosystems response and structure.

  15. Galactic cosmic ray variations in the inner heliosphere from solar distances less than 0.5 AU: Measurements from the MESSENGER Neutron Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, David J.; Peplowski, Patrick N.; Feldman, William C.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Spence, Harlan E.

    2016-08-01

    The Neutron Spectrometer (NS) on board NASA's MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft is sensitive to galactic cosmic ray (GCR) protons greater than 125 MeV. During the MESSENGER orbital mission of Mercury, which lasted from March 2011 to April 2015, the NS made continual measurements of GCR variations, which represent the first long-term GCR measurements for solar distances less than 0.5 AU. These relative GCR variations are compared to GCR variations measured by the Cosmic Ray Telescope for Environmental Radiation (CRaTER) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. The two data sets are highly correlated, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.91 to 0.98 for time integrations ranging from 1 to 25 days. The MESSENGER NS and CRaTER measurements of GCR variations are used to investigate the GCR radial gradient within the inner solar system. We find that the GCR radial gradient is less than 10% per AU, which is consistent with GCR radial gradients measured for solar distances greater than 1 AU.

  16. Real Distribution of the Coronal Green Line Intensity and Modelling Study of Galactic Cosmic Ray Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gushchina, R. T.; Alania, M. V.; Gil, A.; Iskra, K.; Siluszyk, M.

    2003-07-01

    transport equation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) has been numerically solved for different qA>0 (1996) and qA<0 (1987) epochs assuming that free path of GCR scattering in the interplanetary space is controlled by the Sun's coronal green line intensity (CGLI). We found some distinctions in the distribution of the expected heliolatitudinal gradients of GCR for two and three dimensional interplanetary magnetic field. INTRODUCTION. modulation of GCR in the interplanetary space is generally determined by four processesdiffusion, convection, drift and energy change of GCR particles due to interaction with the solar wind. The joint effect of all above mentioned processes result the 11year variation of GCR. In papers [1-3] are assumed that the general reason of the 11-year variation of GCR in the energy range more than 1 GeV is different structure of the irregularities of the IMF in the maxima and minima epochs of solar activity (SA) caused the radical changes of the dependence of diffusion coefficient on the rigidity of GCR particles. EXPERIMENTAL DATA AND METHOD OF INVESTIGATION. experimental data of sunspot numbers, sunspots' areas and CGLI (λ = 5303˚) show a considerable changes during the 11-year cycle of SA, while e.g. A the changes of the solar wind velocity are not so noticeable [4, 5]. An attempt to take into account influences of the real distributions of the sunspot's areas and the Sun's CGLI on the modulation of GCR considering delay time of the phenomena in the interplanetary space with respect to the processes on the Sun have been undertaken in papers [6-8]. One of parameters of SA contentiously observed on the Earth is the Sun's CGLI. One can suppose that a modulation of GCR by some means is controlled by the changes of the CGLI; particularly there is assumed that a scattering free path of GCR transport is related with the

  17. Antimicrobial-resistant fecal bacteria from ceftiofur-treated and non-antimicrobial-treated co-mingled beef cows at a cow-calf operation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We compared the occurrences of 3rd-generation cephalosporin-resistant (3GCr ), tetracycline-resistant (TETr) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-resistant (COTr ) Escherichia coli, 3GCr Salmonella enterica, nalidixic acid-resistant (NALr) S. enterica and erythromycin-resistant (ERYr) enterococci from ...

  18. Occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica in the beef cattle production and processing continuum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Specific concerns have been raised that 3rd-generation cephalosporin-resistant (3GCr) Escherichia coli, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-resistant (COTr) E. coli, 3GCr Salmonella enterica, and nalidixic acid-resistant (NALr) S. enterica, may be present in cattle production environments, persist through...

  19. Development of a Miniaturized Hollow-Waveguide Gas Correlation Radiometer for Trace Gas Measurements in the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Emily L.; Georgieva, E. M.; Blalock, G. W.; Marx, C. T.; Heaps, W. S.

    2012-01-01

    We present preliminary results in the development of a miniaturized gas correlation radiometer (GCR) for column trace gas measurements in the Martian atmosphere. The GCR is designed as an orbiting instrument capable of mapping multiple trace gases and identifying active regions on the Mars surface.

  20. Astrophysical Li-7 as a product of big bang nucleosynthesis and galactic cosmic-ray spallation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olive, Keith A.; Schramm, David N.

    1992-01-01

    The astrophysical Li-7 abundance is considered to be largely primordial, while the Be and B abundances are thought to be due to galactic cosmic ray (GCR) spallation reactions on top of a much smaller big bang component. But GCR spallation should also produce Li-7. As a consistency check on the combination of big bang nucleosynthesis and GCR spallation, the Be and B data from a sample of hot population II stars is used to subtract from the measured Li-7 abundance an estimate of the amount generated by GCR spallation for each star in the sample, and then to add to this baseline an estimate of the metallicity-dependent augmentation of Li-7 due to spallation. The singly reduced primordial Li-7 abundance is still consistent with big bang nucleosynthesis, and a single GCR spallation model can fit the Be, B, and corrected Li-7 abundances for all the stars in the sample.

  1. Exploring the relationships of between land surface temperature, ground coverage ratio and building volume density in an urbanized environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Q.; Meng, F.; Xiao, Y.

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study is to explore and compare the relationships between urban land surface temperature (LST), ground coverage ratio (GCR) and building volume density (BVD). Landsat ETM+ data of August 2011 and August 2013 are used to estimate the LST for Wuhan, China, metropolitan area, and maps of GCR and BVD are generated using building census data of 2011 and 2013. Our analysis indicates there is a strong linear relationship between LST and GCR, and when GCR is lower, the linear correlation is more prominent, whereas the relationship between LST and BVD is not straightforward, but seems some underlying pattern. The result suggests GCR and BVD provide complementary metrics to the traditionally applied land use/land cover (LULC) for analysing LST quantitatively for surface urban heat island studies using thermal infrared remote sensing in an urbanized environment. This study is of positive significance to understand today's urban heat island issues, and contributes to the planning work of urban architectural space.

  2. Galactic cosmic ray simulation at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Norbury, John W; Schimmerling, Walter; Slaba, Tony C; Azzam, Edouard I; Badavi, Francis F; Baiocco, Giorgio; Benton, Eric; Bindi, Veronica; Blakely, Eleanor A; Blattnig, Steve R; Boothman, David A; Borak, Thomas B; Britten, Richard A; Curtis, Stan; Dingfelder, Michael; Durante, Marco; Dynan, William S; Eisch, Amelia J; Robin Elgart, S; Goodhead, Dudley T; Guida, Peter M; Heilbronn, Lawrence H; Hellweg, Christine E; Huff, Janice L; Kronenberg, Amy; La Tessa, Chiara; Lowenstein, Derek I; Miller, Jack; Morita, Takashi; Narici, Livio; Nelson, Gregory A; Norman, Ryan B; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Patel, Zarana S; Reitz, Guenther; Rusek, Adam; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Scott-Carnell, Lisa A; Semones, Edward; Shay, Jerry W; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav A; Sihver, Lembit; Simonsen, Lisa C; Story, Michael D; Turker, Mitchell S; Uchihori, Yukio; Williams, Jacqueline; Zeitlin, Cary J

    2016-02-01

    Most accelerator-based space radiation experiments have been performed with single ion beams at fixed energies. However, the space radiation environment consists of a wide variety of ion species with a continuous range of energies. Due to recent developments in beam switching technology implemented at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), it is now possible to rapidly switch ion species and energies, allowing for the possibility to more realistically simulate the actual radiation environment found in space. The present paper discusses a variety of issues related to implementation of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) simulation at NSRL, especially for experiments in radiobiology. Advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to developing a GCR simulator are presented. In addition, issues common to both GCR simulation and single beam experiments are compared to issues unique to GCR simulation studies. A set of conclusions is presented as well as a discussion of the technical implementation of GCR simulation.

  3. Three dimensional solar anisotropy of galactic cosmic rays near the recent solar minimum 23/24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modzelewska, R.; Alania, M. V.

    2015-08-01

    Three dimensional (3D) galactic cosmic ray (GCR) anisotropy has been studied for 2006-2012. The GCR anisotropy, both in the ecliptic plane and in polar direction, were obtained based on the neutron monitors (NMs) and Nagoya muon telescopes (MT) data. We analyze two dimensional (2D) GCR anisotropy in the ecliptic plane and north-south anisotropy normal to the ecliptic plane. We reveal quasi-periodicities - the annual and 27-days waves in the GCR anisotropy in 2006-2012. We investigate the relationship of the 27-day variation of the GCR anisotropy in the ecliptic plane and in the polar direction with the parameters of solar activity and solar wind.

  4. Galactic cosmic ray simulation at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Norbury, John W; Schimmerling, Walter; Slaba, Tony C; Azzam, Edouard I; Badavi, Francis F; Baiocco, Giorgio; Benton, Eric; Bindi, Veronica; Blakely, Eleanor A; Blattnig, Steve R; Boothman, David A; Borak, Thomas B; Britten, Richard A; Curtis, Stan; Dingfelder, Michael; Durante, Marco; Dynan, William S; Eisch, Amelia J; Robin Elgart, S; Goodhead, Dudley T; Guida, Peter M; Heilbronn, Lawrence H; Hellweg, Christine E; Huff, Janice L; Kronenberg, Amy; La Tessa, Chiara; Lowenstein, Derek I; Miller, Jack; Morita, Takashi; Narici, Livio; Nelson, Gregory A; Norman, Ryan B; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Patel, Zarana S; Reitz, Guenther; Rusek, Adam; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Scott-Carnell, Lisa A; Semones, Edward; Shay, Jerry W; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav A; Sihver, Lembit; Simonsen, Lisa C; Story, Michael D; Turker, Mitchell S; Uchihori, Yukio; Williams, Jacqueline; Zeitlin, Cary J

    2016-02-01

    Most accelerator-based space radiation experiments have been performed with single ion beams at fixed energies. However, the space radiation environment consists of a wide variety of ion species with a continuous range of energies. Due to recent developments in beam switching technology implemented at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), it is now possible to rapidly switch ion species and energies, allowing for the possibility to more realistically simulate the actual radiation environment found in space. The present paper discusses a variety of issues related to implementation of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) simulation at NSRL, especially for experiments in radiobiology. Advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to developing a GCR simulator are presented. In addition, issues common to both GCR simulation and single beam experiments are compared to issues unique to GCR simulation studies. A set of conclusions is presented as well as a discussion of the technical implementation of GCR simulation. PMID:26948012

  5. Galactic cosmic ray simulation at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norbury, John W.; Schimmerling, Walter; Slaba, Tony C.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Badavi, Francis F.; Baiocco, Giorgio; Benton, Eric; Bindi, Veronica; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Boothman, David A.; Borak, Thomas B.; Britten, Richard A.; Curtis, Stan; Dingfelder, Michael; Durante, Marco; Dynan, William S.; Eisch, Amelia J.; Robin Elgart, S.; Goodhead, Dudley T.; Guida, Peter M.; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Hellweg, Christine E.; Huff, Janice L.; Kronenberg, Amy; La Tessa, Chiara; Lowenstein, Derek I.; Miller, Jack; Morita, Takashi; Narici, Livio; Nelson, Gregory A.; Norman, Ryan B.; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Patel, Zarana S.; Reitz, Guenther; Rusek, Adam; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Scott-Carnell, Lisa A.; Semones, Edward; Shay, Jerry W.; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav A.; Sihver, Lembit; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Story, Michael D.; Turker, Mitchell S.; Uchihori, Yukio; Williams, Jacqueline; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2016-02-01

    Most accelerator-based space radiation experiments have been performed with single ion beams at fixed energies. However, the space radiation environment consists of a wide variety of ion species with a continuous range of energies. Due to recent developments in beam switching technology implemented at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), it is now possible to rapidly switch ion species and energies, allowing for the possibility to more realistically simulate the actual radiation environment found in space. The present paper discusses a variety of issues related to implementation of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) simulation at NSRL, especially for experiments in radiobiology. Advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to developing a GCR simulator are presented. In addition, issues common to both GCR simulation and single beam experiments are compared to issues unique to GCR simulation studies. A set of conclusions is presented as well as a discussion of the technical implementation of GCR simulation.

  6. Determining solar effects in Neptune's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Aplin, K L; Harrison, R G

    2016-01-01

    Long-duration observations of Neptune's brightness at two visible wavelengths provide a disk-averaged estimate of its atmospheric aerosol. Brightness variations were previously associated with the 11-year solar cycle, through solar-modulated mechanisms linked with either ultraviolet or galactic cosmic ray (GCR) effects on atmospheric particles. Here, we use a recently extended brightness data set (1972-2014), with physically realistic modelling to show, rather than alternatives, ultraviolet and GCR are likely to be modulating Neptune's atmosphere in combination. The importance of GCR is further supported by the response of Neptune's atmosphere to an intermittent 1.5- to 1.9-year periodicity, which occurred preferentially in GCR (not ultraviolet) during the mid-1980s. This periodicity was detected both at Earth, and in GCR measured by Voyager 2, then near Neptune. A similar coincident variability in Neptune's brightness suggests nucleation onto GCR ions. Both GCR and ultraviolet mechanisms may occur more rapidly than the subsequent atmospheric particle transport. PMID:27417301

  7. MODULATION OF GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS OBSERVED AT L1 IN SOLAR CYCLE 23

    SciTech Connect

    Fludra, A.

    2015-01-20

    We analyze a unique 15 yr record of galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) measurements made by the SOHO Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer NIS detectors, recording integrated GCR numbers with energies above 1.0 GeV between 1996 July and 2011 June. We are able to closely reproduce the main features of the SOHO/CDS GCR record using the modulation potential calculated from neutron monitor data by Usoskin et al. The GCR numbers show a clear solar cycle modulation: they decrease by 50% from the 1997 minimum to the 2000 maximum of the solar cycle, then return to the 1997 level in 2007 and continue to rise, in 2009 December reaching a level 25% higher than in 1997. This 25% increase is in contrast with the behavior of Ulysses/KET GCR protons extrapolated to 1 AU in the ecliptic plane, showing the same level in 2008-2009 as in 1997. The GCR numbers are inversely correlated with the tilt angle of the heliospheric current sheet. In particular, the continued increase of SOHO/CDS GCRs from 2007 until 2009 is correlated with the decrease of the minimum tilt angle from 30° in mid-2008 to 5° in late 2009. The GCR level then drops sharply from 2010 January, again consistent with a rapid increase of the tilt angle to over 35°. This shows that the extended 2008 solar minimum was different from the 1997 minimum in terms of the structure of the heliospheric current sheet.

  8. Modulation of Galactic Cosmic Rays Observed at L1 in Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fludra, A.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze a unique 15 yr record of galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) measurements made by the SOHO Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer NIS detectors, recording integrated GCR numbers with energies above 1.0 GeV between 1996 July and 2011 June. We are able to closely reproduce the main features of the SOHO/CDS GCR record using the modulation potential calculated from neutron monitor data by Usoskin et al. The GCR numbers show a clear solar cycle modulation: they decrease by 50% from the 1997 minimum to the 2000 maximum of the solar cycle, then return to the 1997 level in 2007 and continue to rise, in 2009 December reaching a level 25% higher than in 1997. This 25% increase is in contrast with the behavior of Ulysses/KET GCR protons extrapolated to 1 AU in the ecliptic plane, showing the same level in 2008-2009 as in 1997. The GCR numbers are inversely correlated with the tilt angle of the heliospheric current sheet. In particular, the continued increase of SOHO/CDS GCRs from 2007 until 2009 is correlated with the decrease of the minimum tilt angle from 30° in mid-2008 to 5° in late 2009. The GCR level then drops sharply from 2010 January, again consistent with a rapid increase of the tilt angle to over 35°. This shows that the extended 2008 solar minimum was different from the 1997 minimum in terms of the structure of the heliospheric current sheet.

  9. Determining solar effects in Neptune's atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Aplin, K. L.; Harrison, R. G.

    2016-01-01

    Long-duration observations of Neptune's brightness at two visible wavelengths provide a disk-averaged estimate of its atmospheric aerosol. Brightness variations were previously associated with the 11-year solar cycle, through solar-modulated mechanisms linked with either ultraviolet or galactic cosmic ray (GCR) effects on atmospheric particles. Here, we use a recently extended brightness data set (1972–2014), with physically realistic modelling to show, rather than alternatives, ultraviolet and GCR are likely to be modulating Neptune's atmosphere in combination. The importance of GCR is further supported by the response of Neptune's atmosphere to an intermittent 1.5- to 1.9-year periodicity, which occurred preferentially in GCR (not ultraviolet) during the mid-1980s. This periodicity was detected both at Earth, and in GCR measured by Voyager 2, then near Neptune. A similar coincident variability in Neptune's brightness suggests nucleation onto GCR ions. Both GCR and ultraviolet mechanisms may occur more rapidly than the subsequent atmospheric particle transport. PMID:27417301

  10. Are there persistent physical atmospheric responses to galactic cosmic rays?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benestad, Rasmus E.

    2013-09-01

    Variations in the annual mean of the galactic cosmic ray flux (GCR) are compared with annual variations in the most common meteorological variables: temperature, mean sea-level barometric pressure, and precipitation statistics. A multiple regression analysis was used to explore the potential for a GCR response on timescales longer than a year and to identify ‘fingerprint’ patterns in time and space associated with GCR as well as greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The response pattern associated with GCR consisted of a negative temperature anomaly that was limited to parts of eastern Europe, and a weak anomaly in the sea-level pressure (SLP), but coincided with higher pressure over the Norwegian Sea. It had a similarity to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) in the northern hemisphere and a wave train in the southern hemisphere. A set of Monte Carlo simulations nevertheless indicated that the weak amplitude of the global mean temperature response associated with GCR could easily be due to chance (p-value = 0.6), and there has been no trend in the GCR. Hence, there is little empirical evidence that links GCR to the recent global warming.

  11. Determining solar effects in Neptune's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, K. L.; Harrison, R. G.

    2016-07-01

    Long-duration observations of Neptune's brightness at two visible wavelengths provide a disk-averaged estimate of its atmospheric aerosol. Brightness variations were previously associated with the 11-year solar cycle, through solar-modulated mechanisms linked with either ultraviolet or galactic cosmic ray (GCR) effects on atmospheric particles. Here, we use a recently extended brightness data set (1972-2014), with physically realistic modelling to show, rather than alternatives, ultraviolet and GCR are likely to be modulating Neptune's atmosphere in combination. The importance of GCR is further supported by the response of Neptune's atmosphere to an intermittent 1.5- to 1.9-year periodicity, which occurred preferentially in GCR (not ultraviolet) during the mid-1980s. This periodicity was detected both at Earth, and in GCR measured by Voyager 2, then near Neptune. A similar coincident variability in Neptune's brightness suggests nucleation onto GCR ions. Both GCR and ultraviolet mechanisms may occur more rapidly than the subsequent atmospheric particle transport.

  12. Solar activity, the QBO, and tropospheric responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, Brian A.; Brown, Geoffrey M.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    1989-01-01

    The suggestion that galactic cosmic rays (GCR) as modulated by the solar wind are the carriers of the component of solar variability that affects weather and climate has been discussed in the literature for 30 years, and there is now a considerable body of evidence that supports it. Variations of GCR occur with the 11 year solar cycle, matching the time scale of recent results for atmospheric variations, as modulated by the quasibiennial oscillation of equatorial stratospheric winds (the QBO). Variations in GCR occur on the time scale of centuries with a well defined peak in the coldest decade of the little ice age. New evidence is presented on the meteorological responses to GCR variations on the time scale of a few days. These responses include changes in the vertical temperature profile in the troposphere and lower stratosphere in the two days following solar flare related high speed plasma streams and associated GCR decreases, and in decreases in Vorticity Area Index (VAI) following Forbush decreases of GCR. The occurrence of correlations of GCR and meteorological responses on all three time scales strengthens the hypothesis of GCR as carriers of solar variability to the lower atmosphere. Both short and long term tropospheric responses are understandable as changes in the intensity of cyclonic storms initiated by mechanisms involving cloud microphysical and cloud electrification processes, due to changes in local ion production from changes in GCR fluxes and other high energy particles in the MeV to low GeV range. The nature of these mechanisms remains undetermined. Possible stratospheric wind (particularly QBO) effects on the transport of HNO3 and other constituents incorporated in cluster ions and possible condensation and freezing nuclei are considered as relevant to the long term variations.

  13. Practical Applications of Cosmic Ray Science: Spacecraft, Aircraft, Ground-Based Computation and Control Systems, Exploration, and Human Health and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steve

    2015-01-01

    In this presentation a review of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) effects on microelectronic systems and human health and safety is given. The methods used to evaluate and mitigate unwanted cosmic ray effects in ground-based, atmospheric flight, and space flight environments are also reviewed. However not all GCR effects are undesirable. We will also briefly review how observation and analysis of GCR interactions with planetary atmospheres and surfaces and reveal important compositional and geophysical data on earth and elsewhere. About 1000 GCR particles enter every square meter of Earth’s upper atmosphere every second, roughly the same number striking every square meter of the International Space Station (ISS) and every other low- Earth orbit spacecraft. GCR particles are high energy ionized atomic nuclei (90% protons, 9% alpha particles, 1% heavier nuclei) traveling very close to the speed of light. The GCR particle flux is even higher in interplanetary space because the geomagnetic field provides some limited magnetic shielding. Collisions of GCR particles with atomic nuclei in planetary atmospheres and/or regolith as well as spacecraft materials produce nuclear reactions and energetic/highly penetrating secondary particle showers. Three twentieth century technology developments have driven an ongoing evolution of basic cosmic ray science into a set of practical engineering tools needed to design, test, and verify the safety and reliability of modern complex technological systems and assess effects on human health and safety effects. The key technology developments are: 1) high altitude commercial and military aircraft; 2) manned and unmanned spacecraft; and 3) increasingly complex and sensitive solid state micro-electronics systems. Space and geophysical exploration needs drove the development of the instruments and analytical tools needed to recover compositional and structural data from GCR induced nuclear reactions and secondary particle showers. Finally, the

  14. On the Relationship of the Energy Spectrum Indexes of the 11-Year Variation of Galactic Cosmic Rays and the Interplanetary Magnetic Field Strength Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alania, M. V.; Iskra, K.; Modzelewska, R.; Siluszyk, M.

    2003-07-01

    Data of neutron super monitors and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) have been used to find a relationship between the temporal changes of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) isotropic intensity variations energy spectrum index γ (δ D/D(R) ∝ R-γ , where R is the rigidity of GCR particles) and the exponent ( of the power spectral density (PSD) of the IMF's strength fluctuations (PSD ∝ f-ν , where f is the frequency). INTRODUCTION. The 11-year variation of GCR is generally related with the similar variation of solar activity (SA) [1-5]. Up to present it is not well established which of parameters or group of parameters of SA and of the solar wind are responsible for the 11-year variation of GCR. To answer to this question it is necessary to estimate the separate contributions of each processes — convection, diffusion, drift and energy changes of GCR due to the interaction with the solar wind. However, all above mentioned processes are interconnected and an estimation of the roles of each separate processes contains some uncertainties. Regarding contributions of all above mentioned processes in the formation of the 11-year variation of GCR the special role is ascrib ed to the varying character of the diffusion from the minima to the maxima epochs of SA. It was noted [6-8] that the exponent γ of GCR isotropic intensity variations (δ D(R)/D (R) = AR-γ , where R is the GCR particle's rigidity and A is he power) could be considered as one of the important indices for the explanation of the 11-year variation of GCR for the energy more than 1 GeV.

  15. Galactic Cosmic Ray Simulation at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Rusek, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The external Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) spectrum is significantly modified when it passes through spacecraft shielding and astronauts. One approach for simulating the GCR space radiation environment at ground based accelerators would use the modified spectrum, rather than the external spectrum, in the accelerator beams impinging on biological targets. Two recent workshops have studied such GCR simulation. The first workshop was held at NASA Langley Research Center in October 2014. The second workshop was held at the NASA Space Radiation Investigators' workshop in Galveston, Texas in January 2015. The results of these workshops will be discussed in this paper.

  16. Observations of the Li, Be, and B Isotopes and Constraints on Cosmic-ray Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deNolfo, G. A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; George, J. S.; Hink, P. L.; Israel, M. H.; Leske, R. A.; Lijowski, M.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Strong, A. W.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Yanasak, N. E.

    2007-01-01

    The abundance of Li, Be, and B isotopes in galactic cosmic rays (GCR) between E=50-200 MeV/nucleon has been observed by the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) on NASA's ACE mission since 1997 with high statistical accuracy. Precise observations of Li, Be, B can be used to constrain GCR propagation models. We find that a diffusive reacceleration model with parameters that best match CRIS results (e.g. B/C, Li/C, etc) are also consistent with other GCR observations. A approx. 15-20% overproduction of Li and Be in the model predictions is attributed to uncertainties in the production cross-section data. The latter becomes a significant limitation to the study of rare GCR species that are generated predominantly via spallation.

  17. Validation of Cosmic Ray Ionization Model CORIMIA applied for solar energetic particles and Anomalous Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asenovski, S.; Velinov, P.; Mateev, L.

    2016-02-01

    Based on the electromagnetic interaction between the cosmic ray (CR) and the atmospheric neutral constituents, CORIMIA (COsmic Ray Ionization Model) gives an estimation of the dynamical ionization condition of the lower ionosphere and middle atmosphere (about 30-120 km). Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR), modified by solar wind and later by geomagnetic and atmospheric cut offs, produce ionization in the entire atmosphere. In this paper we show the GCR ionization in periods of solar minimum and maximum. Despite the considerably lower energies than GCR, Anomalous Cosmic Rays (ACR) contribute to the ionization state mostly over the polar regions and as we present here this contribution is comparable with those of GCR. Solar energetic particles (SEP), which differ vastly from one another for different solar events, can be responsible for significant ionization over the high latitude regions. Here we compare flows of SEP caused by two of the most powerful solar proton events at February 23, 1956 and January 20, 2005.

  18. Geant4-based radiation hazard assessment for human exploration missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabeu, J.; Casanova, I.

    Human exploration missions in the Solar System will spend most of the time in deep space, without the shielding from the Earth's magnetic field and hence, directly exposed to Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE). Both GCR and SPE fluences have been used to calculate the dose deposited on a water slab phantom using MULASSIS, a program based on the Geant4 Monte Carlo particle transport code. Doses from several extreme SPE events and from a GCR model are calculated for different shielding materials and thicknesses using a planar slab geometry and compared to current dose limits for space operations. Cross-comparison of MULASSIS with HZETRN (a deterministic code) has also been performed for SPE and GCR environments showing an overall reasonable agreement between both codes.

  19. Observations of the Li, Be, and B isotopes and Constraints on Cosmic-ray Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    de Nolfo, Georgia A.; Moskalenko, I.V.; Binns, W.R.; Christian, E.R.; Cummings, A.C.; Davis, A.J.; George, J.S.; Hink, P.L.; Israel, M.H.; Leske, R.A.; Lijowski, M.; Mewaldt, R.A.; Stone, E.C.; Strong, A.W.; von Rosenvinge, T.T.; Wiedenbeck, M.E.; Yanasak, N.E.; /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /Washington U., St. Louis /NASA, Headquarters /Caltech, SRL /Aerospace Corp. /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /Caltech, JPL

    2006-11-15

    The abundance of Li, Be, and B isotopes in galactic cosmic rays (GCR) between E=50-200 MeV/nucleon has been observed by the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) on NASA's ACE mission since 1997 with high statistical accuracy. Precise observations of Li, Be, B can be used to constrain GCR propagation models. We find that a diffusive reacceleration model with parameters that best match CRIS results (e.g. B/C, Li/C, etc) are also consistent with other GCR observations. A {approx}15-20% overproduction of Li and Be in the model predictions is attributed to uncertainties in the production cross-section data. The latter becomes a significant limitation to the study of rare GCR species that are generated predominantly via spallation.

  20. Energy, water, and carbon fluxes in a loblolly pine stand: Results from uniform and gappy canopy models with comparisons to eddy flux data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Conghe; Katul, Gabriel; Oren, Ram; Band, Lawrence E.; Tague, Christina L.; Stoy, Paul C.; McCarthy, Heather R.

    2009-12-01

    This study investigates the impacts of canopy structure specification on modeling net radiation (Rn), latent heat flux (LE) and net photosynthesis (An) by coupling two contrasting radiation transfer models with a two-leaf photosynthesis model for a maturing loblolly pine stand near Durham, North Carolina, USA. The first radiation transfer model is based on a uniform canopy representation (UCR) that assumes leaves are randomly distributed within the canopy, and the second radiation transfer model is based on a gappy canopy representation (GCR) in which leaves are clumped into individual crowns, thereby forming gaps between the crowns. To isolate the effects of canopy structure on model results, we used identical model parameters taken from the literature for both models. Canopy structure has great impact on energy distribution between the canopy and the forest floor. Comparing the model results, UCR produced lower Rn, higher LE and higher An than GCR. UCR intercepted more shortwave radiation inside the canopy, thus producing less radiation absorption on the forest floor and in turn lower Rn. There is a higher degree of nonlinearity between An estimated by UCR and by GCR than for LE. Most of the difference for LE and An between UCR and GCR occurred around noon, when gaps between crowns can be seen from the direction of the incident sunbeam. Comparing with eddy-covariance measurements in the same loblolly pine stand from May to September 2001, based on several measures GCR provided more accurate estimates for Rn, LE and An than UCR. The improvements when using GCR were much clearer when comparing the daytime trend of LE and An for the growing season. Sensitivity analysis showed that UCR produces higher LE and An estimates than GCR for canopy cover ranging from 0.2 to 0.8. There is a high degree of nonlinearity in the relationship between UCR estimates for An and those of GCR, particularly when canopy cover is low, and suggests that simple scaling of UCR parameters

  1. Galactic cosmic ray radiation levels in spacecraft on interplanetary missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, J. L.; Nealy, J. E.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Wood, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    Using the Langley Research Center Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) transport computer code (HZETRN) and the Computerized Anatomical Man (CAM) model, crew radiation levels inside manned spacecraft on interplanetary missions are estimated. These radiation-level estimates include particle fluxes, LET (Linear Energy Transfer) spectra, absorbed dose, and dose equivalent within various organs of interest in GCR protection studies. Changes in these radiation levels resulting from the use of various different types of shield materials are presented.

  2. Dynamic neutronic and stability analysis of a burst mode, single cavity gas core reactor Brayton cycle space power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugan, Edward T.; Kutikkad, Kiratadas

    The conceptual, burst-mode gaseous-core reactor (GCR) space nuclear power system presently subjected to reactor-dynamics and system stability studies operates on a closed Brayton cycle, via disk MHD generator for energy conversion. While the gaseous fuel density power coefficient of reactivity is found to be capable of rapidly stabilizing the GCR system, the power of this feedback renders standard external reactivity insertions inadequate for significant power-level changes during normal operation.

  3. Activation of glucocorticoid receptors in Müller glia is protective to retinal neurons and suppresses microglial reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Gallina, Donika; Zelinka, Christopher Paul; Cebulla, Colleen; Fischer, Andy J.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive microglia and macrophages are prevalent in damaged retinas. Glucocorticoid signaling is known to suppress inflammation and the reactivity of microglia and macrophages. In the vertebrate retina, the glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) is known to be activated and localized to the nuclei of Müller glia (Gallina et al., 2014). Accordingly, we investigated how signaling through GCR influences the survival of neurons using the chick retina in vivo as a model system. We applied intraocular injections of GCR agonist or antagonist, assessed microglial reactivity, and the survival of retinal neurons following different damage paradigms. Microglial reactivity was increased in retinas from eyes that were injected with vehicle, and this reactivity was decreased by GCR-agonist dexamethasone (Dex) and increased by GCR-antagonist RU486. We found that activation of GCR suppresses the reactivity of microglia and inhibited the loss of retinal neurons resulting from excitotoxicity. We provide evidence that the protection-promoting effects of Dex were maintained when the microglia were selectively ablated. Similarly, intraocular injections of Dex protected ganglion cells from colchicine-treatment and protected photoreceptors from damage caused by retinal detachment. We conclude that activation of GCR promotes the survival of ganglion cells in colchicine-damaged retinas, promotes the survival of amacrine and bipolar cells in excitotoxin-damaged retinas, and promotes the survival of photoreceptors in detached retinas. We propose that suppression of microglial reactivity is secondary to activation of GCR in Müller glia, and this mode of signaling is an effective means to lessen the damage and vision loss resulting from different types of retinal damage. PMID:26272753

  4. Human exposure to galactic cosmic rays in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Shinn, J. L.; Wilson, J. W.

    1992-01-01

    The Langley Research Center GCR (galactic cosmic rays) code (HZETRN) and the computerized Anatomical Man (CAM) model are used to estimate astronaut exposures, from GCR particles, for missions beyond earth's magnetosphere. Conventional risk assessments in terms of total absorbed dose and dose equivalent are made for skin, ocular lens, and bone marrow. For each organ, evaluations are made of relative contributions from incident protons, iron nuclei, and their secondary reaction products.

  5. Computational and genetic reduction of a cell cycle to its simplest, primordial components.

    PubMed

    Murray, Seán M; Panis, Gaël; Fumeaux, Coralie; Viollier, Patrick H; Howard, Martin

    2013-12-01

    What are the minimal requirements to sustain an asymmetric cell cycle? Here we use mathematical modelling and forward genetics to reduce an asymmetric cell cycle to its simplest, primordial components. In the Alphaproteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, cell cycle progression is believed to be controlled by a cyclical genetic circuit comprising four essential master regulators. Unexpectedly, our in silico modelling predicted that one of these regulators, GcrA, is in fact dispensable. We confirmed this experimentally, finding that ΔgcrA cells are viable, but slow-growing and elongated, with the latter mostly due to an insufficiency of a key cell division protein. Furthermore, suppressor analysis showed that another cell cycle regulator, the methyltransferase CcrM, is similarly dispensable with simultaneous gcrA/ccrM disruption ameliorating the cytokinetic and growth defect of ΔgcrA cells. Within the Alphaproteobacteria, gcrA and ccrM are consistently present or absent together, rather than either gene being present alone, suggesting that gcrA/ccrM constitutes an independent, dispensable genetic module. Together our approaches unveil the essential elements of a primordial asymmetric cell cycle that should help illuminate more complex cell cycles.

  6. Despiking of energetic proton flux to study galactic cosmic ray modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Qin, G.; Chen, H.

    2011-12-01

    The solar influence on Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) flux can be generally described as the usually stable "background" modulation. The violent Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events associated with solar activities can cause surging particle flux. Thus, the GCR flux observation from satellites may be heavily contaminated by spurious spikes due to SEPs. And spike may also arise in the long time series count rates data provided by ground-based neutron monitors, e.g., system glitch. To obtain the "pure" background GCR flux for modulation research, the removal of multifarious spikes is necessary. In this article, we present a robust automatic despiking algorithm based on Poincare map thresholding method to "purify" time-series GCR flux. The algorithm is effective and robust for detecting various types of spikes in the GCR count rates of neutron monitors. In addition, after despiking spacecraft observations of relatively lower energy energetic proton flux using our algorithm, we get both 11-year and 27-day period cycles comparable to the much higher energy GCR count rate data from the ground-based neutron monitors.

  7. Despiking of Spacecraft Energetic Proton Flux to Study Galactic Cosmic-Ray Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, G.; Zhao, L.-L.; Chen, H.-C.

    2012-06-01

    Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) is usually assumed as a stable "background," with solar influence considered as a modulation. The violent solar energetic particle (SEP) events associated with solar activities change particle fluxes by several orders of magnitude in a few minutes. Thus, the flux observation of GCR provided by satellites may be heavily contaminated by spurious spikes due to SEPs, and that provided by ground-based neutron monitors (NMs) may be contaminated by the system error spikes and the ground level enhancement effect. To obtain the "pure" background GCR flux for modulation research, the removal of multifarious spikes is necessary. In this article, we use a robust automatic despiking algorithm based on the Poincare map thresholding method provided by Goring and Nikora for "purification" of the time-series GCR flux observations. We can show that the algorithm is good at cleaning up the heavily contaminated GCR intensity rates measured by both spacecraft and NMs without artificial parameters. In addition, using the algorithm to despike the spacecraft observations of relatively lower energetic proton flux, we get both 11 year and 27 day period cycles comparable to the much higher energy GCR flux data measured by the ground-based NMs.

  8. Near-Earth Cosmic Ray Decreases Associated with Remote Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S. R.; Owens, M. J.; Lockwood, M.; Barnard, L.; Scott, C. J.

    2015-03-01

    Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) flux is modulated by both particle drift patterns and solar wind structures on a range of timescales. Over solar cycles, GCR flux varies as a function of the total open solar magnetic flux and the latitudinal extent of the heliospheric current sheet. Over hours, drops of a few percent in near-Earth GCR flux (Forbush decreases, FDs) are well known to be associated with the near-Earth passage of solar wind structures resulting from corotating interaction regions (CIRs) and transient coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We report on four FDs seen at ground-based neutron monitors which cannot be immediately associated with significant structures in the local solar wind. Similarly, there are significant near-Earth structures which do not produce any corresponding GCR variation. Three of the FDs are during the STEREO era, enabling in situ and remote observations from three well-separated heliospheric locations. Extremely large CMEs passed the STEREO-A spacecraft, which was behind the West limb of the Sun, approximately 2-3 days before each near-Earth FD. Solar wind simulations suggest that the CMEs combined with pre-existing CIRs, enhancing the pre-existing barriers to GCR propagation. Thus these observations provide strong evidence for the modulation of GCR flux by remote solar wind structures.

  9. Monitoring Short-term Cosmic-ray Spectral Variations Using Neutron Monitor Time-delay Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffolo, D.; Sáiz, A.; Mangeard, P.-S.; Kamyan, N.; Muangha, P.; Nutaro, T.; Sumran, S.; Chaiwattana, C.; Gasiprong, N.; Channok, C.; Wuttiya, C.; Rujiwarodom, M.; Tooprakai, P.; Asavapibhop, B.; Bieber, J. W.; Clem, J.; Evenson, P.; Munakata, K.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron monitors (NMs) are ground-based detectors of cosmic-ray showers that are widely used for high-precision monitoring of changes in the Galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) flux due to solar storms and solar wind variations. In the present work, we show that a single neutron monitor station can also monitor short-term changes in the GCR spectrum, avoiding the systematic uncertainties in comparing data from different stations, by means of NM time-delay histograms. Using data for 2007-2014 from the Princess Sirindhorn Neutron Monitor, a station at Doi Inthanon, Thailand, with the world’s highest vertical geomagnetic cutoff rigidity of 16.8 GV, we have developed an analysis of time-delay histograms that removes the chance coincidences that can dominate conventional measures of multiplicity. We infer the “leader fraction” L of neutron counts that do not follow a previous neutron count in the same counter from the same atmospheric secondary, which is inversely related to the actual multiplicity and increases for increasing GCR spectral index. After correction for atmospheric pressure and water vapor, we find that L indicates substantial short-term GCR spectral hardening during some but not all Forbush decreases in GCR flux due to solar storms. Such spectral data from Doi Inthanon provide information about cosmic-ray energies beyond the Earth’s maximum geomagnetic cutoff, extending the reach of the worldwide NM network and opening a new avenue in the study of short-term GCR decreases.

  10. Effects of Cutoffs on Galactic Cosmic-Ray Interactions in Solar-System Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. J.; Reedy, R. C.; Masarik, J.

    2005-01-01

    The energetic particles in the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) induce many interactions in a variety of solar-system matter. Cosmogenic nuclides are used to study the histories of meteorites and lunar samples. Gamma rays and neutrons are used to map the compositions of planetary surfaces, such as Mars, the Moon, and asteroids. In almost all of these cases, the spectra of incident GCR particles are fairly similar, with only some modulation by the Sun over an 11-year cycle. Strong magnetic fields can seriously affect the energy spectrum of GCR particles hitting the surface of objects inside the magnetic fields. The Earth s geomagnetic field is strong enough that only GCR particles with magnetic rigidities above approx. 17 GV (a proton energy of approx. 17 GeV) reach the atmosphere over certain regions near the equator. This effect of removing lower-energy GCR particles is called a cutoff. The jovian magnetic fields are so strong that the fluxes of GCR particles hitting the 4 large Galilean satellites are similarly affected. The cutoff at Europa is estimated to be similar to or a little higher than at the Earth s equator.

  11. Heliospheric and Geomagnetic Modulation of Galactic Cosmic Ray under Quiet and disturbed interplanetary conditions during Solar cycle 20-23.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalu, F. D.

    2015-12-01

    The modulation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) within the heliosphere leads to a reduction in the GCR count rates during period of high solar activity and conversely. Data from three geomagnetic observatories and three Neutron monitors (in close proximity to the geomagnetic stations) have been studied. The monthly residuals of the geomagnetic field components with respect to quiet time conditions from these three stations have been computed and compared with the cosmic ray count rates. The modulations of the GCR during quiet and disturbed interplanetary conditions have been investigated with a view to better understand the role of the global merged interaction regions and coronal mass ejections to the GCR modulation. From first-order partial correlation, we found that removing the influence of the total IMF-B, (especially during quiet conditions), and the influence of SW dynamic pressure (during disturbed conditions) generally enhances the correlation of the residual geomagnetic field with the GCR significantly. The influence of the more subtle parameters like speed, Bz component and proton density were masked by these dominant parameters. Results from this work are important for the modeling of long term GCR variability.

  12. Heliospheric and geomagnetic modulation of galactic cosmic rays under quiet and disturbed interplanetary conditions during solar cycles 20-23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukwudi Okpala, Kingsley

    2015-08-01

    The modulation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) within the heliosphere leads to a reduction in the GCR count rates during period of high solar activity and conversely. Data from three geomagnetic observatories and three Neutron monitors (in close proximity to the geomagnetic stations) have been studied. The monthly residuals of the geomagnetic field components with respect to quiet time conditions from these three stations have been computed and compared with the cosmic ray count rates. The modulations of the GCR during quiet and disturbed interplanetary conditions have been investigated with a view to better understand the role of the global merged interaction regions and intense magnetic fields to the GCR modulation. From first-order partial correlation, we found that removing the influence of the total IMF-B, (especially during quiet conditions) and the influence of SW dynamic pressure (during disturbed conditions) generally enhances the correlation of the residual geomagnetic field with the GCR significantly. The influence of the more subtle parameters like speed, Bz component and proton density were masked by these dominant parameters. Results from this work are important for the modeling of long term GCR variability.

  13. The influence of galactic cosmic ray on all India annual rainfall and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Sutapa; Pal, Jayanti; Guhathakurta, Suchandra

    2015-02-01

    The inverse relation between galactic cosmic ray (GCR) and sunspot numbers (SSN) suggests that the increase (decrease) in GCR count is linked with low (high) solar activity. The present study attempts to reveal the influence of GCR on all India annual rainfall and temperature during the period from 1953 to 2005. The inter-annual variation depicts that during the transition from maximum to minimum count of GCR, the rainfall anomaly shows alternative variation over India. Similar variation has also been observed for maximum temperature. Implementation of Fourier analysis shows an 11 year cycle of cosmic ray and depicts an increase in GCR count in the 11 year interval during the study period. The Fourier analysis of all India annual rainfall (AIR) and temperature also shows an 11 year cycle with a decreasing trend during the 11 year interval. The inter-decadal variation shows that during high GCR count there is a possibility of decrease in rainfall and minimum temperature but an increase in maximum temperature. The seasonal correlation shows a possible proportional association between cosmic ray and rainfall during the post monsoon season. The result further depicts that the sunspot number and temperature is positively correlated during the post-monsoon season. The correlation map of rainfall and temperature shows a meager but significant correlation with cosmic ray over some parts of West and East Indian coasts.

  14. Computational and Genetic Reduction of a Cell Cycle to Its Simplest, Primordial Components

    PubMed Central

    Fumeaux, Coralie; Viollier, Patrick H.; Howard, Martin

    2013-01-01

    What are the minimal requirements to sustain an asymmetric cell cycle? Here we use mathematical modelling and forward genetics to reduce an asymmetric cell cycle to its simplest, primordial components. In the Alphaproteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, cell cycle progression is believed to be controlled by a cyclical genetic circuit comprising four essential master regulators. Unexpectedly, our in silico modelling predicted that one of these regulators, GcrA, is in fact dispensable. We confirmed this experimentally, finding that ΔgcrA cells are viable, but slow-growing and elongated, with the latter mostly due to an insufficiency of a key cell division protein. Furthermore, suppressor analysis showed that another cell cycle regulator, the methyltransferase CcrM, is similarly dispensable with simultaneous gcrA/ccrM disruption ameliorating the cytokinetic and growth defect of ΔgcrA cells. Within the Alphaproteobacteria, gcrA and ccrM are consistently present or absent together, rather than either gene being present alone, suggesting that gcrA/ccrM constitutes an independent, dispensable genetic module. Together our approaches unveil the essential elements of a primordial asymmetric cell cycle that should help illuminate more complex cell cycles. PMID:24415923

  15. NASA Galactic Cosmic Radiation Environment Model: Badhwar-O'Neill (2014)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, P. M.; Golge, S.; Slaba, T. C.

    2015-01-01

    The Badhwar-O'Neill (BON) Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) flux model is used by NASA to certify microelectronic systems and in the analysis of radiation health risks for human space flight missions. Of special interest to NASA is the kinetic energy region below 4.0 GeV/n due to the fact that exposure from GCR behind shielding (e.g., inside a space vehicle) is heavily influenced by the GCR particles from this energy domain. The BON model numerically solves the Fokker-Planck differential equation to account for particle transport in the heliosphere due to diffusion, convection, and adiabatic deceleration under the assumption of a spherically symmetric heliosphere. The model utilizes a GCR measurements database from various particle detectors to determine the boundary conditions. By using an updated GCR database and improved model fit parameters, the new BON model (BON14) is significantly improved over the previous BON models for describing the GCR radiation environment of interest to human space flight.

  16. NASA Galactic Cosmic Radiation Environment Model: Badhwar - O'Neill (2014)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golge, S.; O'Neill, P. M.; Slaba, T. C.

    2015-01-01

    The Badhwar-O'Neill (BON) Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) flux model has been used by NASA to certify microelectronic systems and in the analysis of radiation health risks for human space flight missions. Of special interest to NASA is the kinetic energy region below 4.0 GeV/n due to the fact that exposure from GCR behind shielding (e.g., inside a space vehicle) is heavily influenced by the GCR particles from this energy domain. The BON model numerically solves the Fokker-Planck differential equation to account for particle transport in the heliosphere due to diffusion, convection, and adiabatic deceleration under the assumption of a spherically symmetric heliosphere. The model utilizes a comprehensive database of GCR measurements from various particle detectors to determine boundary conditions. By using an updated GCR database and improved model fit parameters, the new BON model (BON14) is significantly improved over the previous BON models for describing the GCR radiation environment of interest to human space flight.

  17. The boron-to-beryllium ratio in halo stars - A signature of cosmic-ray nucleosynthesis in the early Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, T. P.; Steigman, G.; Schramm, D. N.; Olive, K. A.; Fields, B.

    1993-01-01

    We discuss Galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) spallation production of Li, Be, and B in the early Galaxy with particular attention to the uncertainties in the predictions of this model. The observed correlation between the Be abundance and the metallicity in metal-poor Population II stars requires that Be was synthesized in the early Galaxy. We show that the observations and such Population II GCR synthesis of Be are quantitatively consistent with the big bang nucleosynthesis production of Li-7. We find that there is a nearly model independent lower bound to B/Be of about 7 for GCR synthesis. Recent measurements of B/Be about 10 in HD 140283 are in excellent agreement with the predictions of Population II GCR nucleosynthesis. Measurements of the boron abundance in additional metal-poor halo stars is a key diagnostic of the GCR spallation mechanism. We also show that Population II GCR synthesis can produce amounts of Li-6 which may be observed in the hottest halo stars.

  18. Implementing Badhwar-O'Neill Galactic Cosmic Ray Model for the Analysis of Space Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; O'Neill, Patrick M.; Slaba, Tony C.

    2014-01-01

    For the analysis of radiation risks to astronauts and planning exploratory space missions, accurate energy spectrum of galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) is necessary. Characterization of the ionizing radiation environment is challenging because the interplanetary plasma and radiation fields are modulated by solar disturbances and the radiation doses received by astronauts in interplanetary space are likewise influenced. A model of the Badhwar-O'Neill 2011 (BO11) GCR environment, which is represented by GCR deceleration potential theta, has been derived by utilizing all of the GCR measurements from balloons, satellites, and the newer NASA Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE). In the BO11 model, the solar modulation level is derived from the mean international sunspot numbers with time-delay, which has been calibrated with actual flight instrument measurements to produce better GCR flux data fit during solar minima. GCR fluxes provided by the BO11 model were compared with various spacecraft measurements at 1 AU, and further comparisons were made for the tissue equivalent proportional counters measurements at low Earth orbits using the high-charge and energy transport (HZETRN) code and various GCR models. For the comparison of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent calculations with the measurements by Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) at Gale crater on Mars, the intensities and energies of GCR entering the heliosphere were calculated by using the BO11 model, which accounts for time-dependent attenuation of the local interstellar spectrum of each element. The BO11 model, which has emphasized for the last 24 solar minima, showed in relatively good agreement with the RAD data for the first 200 sols, but it was resulted in to be less well during near the solar maximum of solar cycle 24 due to subtleties in the changing heliospheric conditions. By performing the error analysis of the BO11 model and the optimization in reducing overall uncertainty, the resultant BO13 model

  19. Badhwar-O'Neill 2011 Galactic Cosmic Ray Model Update and Future Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Pat M.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.

    2014-01-01

    The Badhwar-O'Neill Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) Model based on actual GCR measurements is used by deep space mission planners for the certification of microelectronic systems and the analysis of radiation health risks to astronauts in space missions. The BO GCR Model provides GCR flux in deep space (outside the earth's magnetosphere) for any given time from 1645 to present. The energy spectrum from 50 MeV/n - 20 GeV/n is provided for ions from hydrogen to uranium. This work describes the most recent version of the BO GCR model (BO'11). BO'11 determined the GCR flux at a given time applying an emperical time delay function to past sunspot activity. We describe the GCR measurement data used in the BO'11 update - modern data from BESS, PAMELA, CAPRICE, and ACE emphasized more than the older balloon data used for the previous BO model (BO'10). We look at the GCR flux for the last 24 solar minima and show how much greater the flux was for the cycle 24 minimum in 2010. The BO'11 Model uses the traditional, steady-state Fokker-Planck differential equation to account for particle transport in the heliosphere due to diffusion, convection, and adiabatic deceleration. It assumes a radially symmetrical diffusion coefficient derived from magnetic disturbances caused by sunspots carried outward by a constant solar wind. A more complex differential equation is now being tested to account for particle transport in the heliosphere in the next generation BO model. This new model is time-dependent (no longer a steady state model). In the new model, the dynamics and anti-symmetrical features of the actual heliosphere are accounted for so emperical time delay functions will no longer be required. The new model will be capable of simulating the more subtle features of modulation - such as the Sun's polarity and modulation dependence on gradient and curvature drift. This improvement is expected to significantly improve the fidelity of the BO GCR model. Preliminary results of its

  20. Simulated Response of a Tissue-equivalent Proportional Counter on the Surface of Mars.

    PubMed

    Northum, Jeremy D; Guetersloh, Stephen B; Braby, Leslie A; Ford, John R

    2015-10-01

    Uncertainties persist regarding the assessment of the carcinogenic risk associated with galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposure during a mission to Mars. The GCR spectrum peaks in the range of 300(-1) MeV n to 700 MeV n(-1) and is comprised of elemental ions from H to Ni. While Fe ions represent only 0.03% of the GCR spectrum in terms of particle abundance, they are responsible for nearly 30% of the dose equivalent in free space. Because of this, radiation biology studies focusing on understanding the biological effects of GCR exposure generally use Fe ions. Acting as a thin shield, the Martian atmosphere alters the GCR spectrum in a manner that significantly reduces the importance of Fe ions. Additionally, albedo particles emanating from the regolith complicate the radiation environment. The present study uses the Monte Carlo code FLUKA to simulate the response of a tissue-equivalent proportional counter on the surface of Mars to produce dosimetry quantities and microdosimetry distributions. The dose equivalent rate on the surface of Mars was found to be 0.18 Sv y(-1) with an average quality factor of 2.9 and a dose mean lineal energy of 18.4 keV μm(-1). Additionally, albedo neutrons were found to account for 25% of the dose equivalent. It is anticipated that these data will provide relevant starting points for use in future risk assessment and mission planning studies.

  1. Movement patterns of wintering lesser scaup in Grand Calumet River - Indiana Harbor Canal, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, Christine M.; Custer, T.W.; Sparks, D.W.; Hines, Randy K.; Kochanny, C.O.

    1996-01-01

    Lesser scaup (Aythya affinis) winter in the Grand Calumet River-Indiana Harbor Canal (GCR-IHC) drainage into southern Lake Michigan, a polluted oasis in the highly urban and industrial corridor of northern Illinois and Indiana. The GCR-IHC is an important wintering area for lesser scaup in northwestern Indiana, especially after Lake Michigan freezes, because of the lack of other wildlife habitat in the area. We investigated the feeding and movement patterns of these wintering lesser scaup to better understand the ecological significance of this area to wintering waterfowl and to interpret contaminant levels in these lesser scaup. We implanted radio transmitters in 20 individuals in January 1994 and tracked them until early March 1994. Four lesser scaup disappeared and four died within the first 2 weeks after implantation; 12 lesser scaup remained in the GCR-IHC for the next 6-7 weeks. Individual radio-marked scaup (n = 12) were located in the GCR-IHC on an average of 62.2% (extreme values = 25-87%) of the searches. No radio-marked lesser scaup were located outside the GCR-IHC. Lesser scaup were feeding during 23% of the radio fixes.

  2. Search for cosmogenic Ar-42 in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cini Castagnoli, G.; Cane, D.; Taricco, C.; Bhandari, N.

    2003-04-01

    We have evidence for decreasing galactic cosmic ray (GCR) flux in the past 3 centuries by a factor about two [1]. The measurements of the activity of cosmogenic 44Ti (T1/2 = 59.2 y) produced by GCR in stony meteorites that fell during the last two centuries are in good agreement with the calculated values and validate the decreasing trend of GCR flux. The measurements were obtained by an hyperpure (372 cm3) Ge-NaI(Tl) spectrometer operating in the Monte dei Cappuccini laboratory in Torino[2]. To further improve upon statistical precision of 44Ti data and also to be able to measure the 42Ar (T1/2 = 33 y) which is produced in even smaller amounts by GCR in meteorites, we have set up in the same laboratory a larger (581 cm3) hyperpure Ge detector operating in coincidence with a 100 kg NaI(Tl) crystal assembly. This should enable us to confirm the above results about GCR variations. We wish to acknowledge our deep gratitude to professor Bonino, deceased on September 29, 2002, to whom the assemblage of the new equipment is due. [1] G. Bonino, G. Cini Castagnoli, D. Cane, C. Taricco and N. Bhandari,Proc. XXVII Intern. Cosmic Ray Conf. (Hamburg, 2001) 3769-3772. [2] Bonino G., Cini Castagnoli G., Cane D., Taricco C., Bhandari N, textit {34th COSPAR Sci. Ass. Houston 2002 (Adv. Space Res.)}, in press

  3. Galactic Cosmic-Ray Intensity Modulation by Corotating Interaction Region Stream Interfaces at 1 au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X.; Florinski, V.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new model that couples galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) propagation with magnetic turbulence transport and the MHD background evolution in the heliosphere. The model is applied to the problem of the formation of corotating interaction regions (CIRs) during the last solar minimum from the period between 2007 and 2009. The numerical model simultaneously calculates the large-scale supersonic solar wind properties and its small-scale turbulent content from 0.3 au to the termination shock. Cosmic rays are then transported through the background, and thus computed, with diffusion coefficients derived from the solar wind turbulent properties, using a stochastic Parker approach. Our results demonstrate that GCR variations depend on the ratio of diffusion coefficients in the fast and slow solar winds. Stream interfaces inside the CIRs always lead to depressions of the GCR intensity. On the other hand, heliospheric current sheet (HCS) crossings do not appreciably affect GCR intensities in the model, which is consistent with the two observations under quiet solar wind conditions. Therefore, variations in diffusion coefficients associated with CIR stream interfaces are more important for GCR propagation than the drift effects of the HCS during a negative solar minimum.

  4. Neutron yields and effective doses produced by Galactic Cosmic Ray interactions in shielded environments in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Borak, Thomas B.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Tsai, Pi-En; Burnham, Chelsea A.; McBeth, Rafe A.

    2015-11-01

    In order to define the ranges of relevant neutron energies for the purposes of measurement and dosimetry in space, we have performed a series of Monte Carlo transport model calculations that predict the neutron field created by Galactic Cosmic Ray interactions inside a variety of simple shielding configurations. These predictions indicate that a significant fraction of the neutron fluence and neutron effective dose lies in the region above 20 MeV up to several hundred MeV. These results are consistent over thicknesses of shielding that range from very thin (2.7 g/cm2) to thick (54 g/cm2), and over both shielding materials considered (aluminum and water). In addition to these results, we have also investigated whether simplified Galactic Cosmic Ray source terms can yield predictions that are equivalent to simulations run with a full GCR source term. We found that a source using a GCR proton and helium spectrum together with a scaled oxygen spectrum yielded nearly identical results to a full GCR spectrum, and that the scaling factor used for the oxygen spectrum was independent of shielding material and thickness. Good results were also obtained using a GCR proton spectrum together with a scaled helium spectrum, with the helium scaling factor also independent of shielding material and thickness. Using a proton spectrum alone was unable to reproduce the full GCR results.

  5. Simulated Response of a Tissue-equivalent Proportional Counter on the Surface of Mars.

    PubMed

    Northum, Jeremy D; Guetersloh, Stephen B; Braby, Leslie A; Ford, John R

    2015-10-01

    Uncertainties persist regarding the assessment of the carcinogenic risk associated with galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposure during a mission to Mars. The GCR spectrum peaks in the range of 300(-1) MeV n to 700 MeV n(-1) and is comprised of elemental ions from H to Ni. While Fe ions represent only 0.03% of the GCR spectrum in terms of particle abundance, they are responsible for nearly 30% of the dose equivalent in free space. Because of this, radiation biology studies focusing on understanding the biological effects of GCR exposure generally use Fe ions. Acting as a thin shield, the Martian atmosphere alters the GCR spectrum in a manner that significantly reduces the importance of Fe ions. Additionally, albedo particles emanating from the regolith complicate the radiation environment. The present study uses the Monte Carlo code FLUKA to simulate the response of a tissue-equivalent proportional counter on the surface of Mars to produce dosimetry quantities and microdosimetry distributions. The dose equivalent rate on the surface of Mars was found to be 0.18 Sv y(-1) with an average quality factor of 2.9 and a dose mean lineal energy of 18.4 keV μm(-1). Additionally, albedo neutrons were found to account for 25% of the dose equivalent. It is anticipated that these data will provide relevant starting points for use in future risk assessment and mission planning studies. PMID:26313586

  6. Time-dependent radiation dose simulations during interplanetary space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobynde, Mikhail; Shprits, Yuri; Drozdov, Alexander; Hoffman, Jeffrey; Li, Ju

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation is one of the main concerns in planning long-term interplanetary human space missions. There are two main types of hazardous radiation - Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) and Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). Their intensities and evolution depend on the solar activity. GCR activity is most enhanced during solar minimum, while the most intense SEPs usually occur during the solar maximum. SEPs are better shielded with thick shields, while GCR dose is less behind think shields. Time and thickness dependences of the intensity of these two components encourage looking for a time window of flight, when radiation intensity and dose of SEP and GCR would be minimized. In this study we combine state-of-the-art space environment models with GEANT4 simulations to determine the optimal shielding, geometry of the spacecraft, and launch time with respect to the phase of the solar cycle. The radiation environment was described by the time-dependent GCR model, and the SEP spectra that were measured during the period from 1990 to 2010. We included gamma rays, electrons, neutrons and 27 fully ionized elements from hydrogen to nickel. We calculated the astronaut's radiation doses during interplanetary flights using the Monte-Carlo code that accounts for the primary and the secondary radiation. We also performed sensitivity simulations for the assumed spacecraft size and thickness to find an optimal shielding. In conclusion, we present the dependences of the radiation dose as a function of launch date from 1990 to 2010, for flight durations of up to 3 years.

  7. Depth-dose equivalent relationship for cosmic rays at various solar minima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Cucinotta, F. A.; O'Neill, P. M.

    1993-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) pose a serious radiation hazard for long-duration missions. In designing a lunar habitat or a Mars transfer vehicle, the radiation exposure determines the GCR shielding thickness, and hence the weight of spacecraft. Using the spherically symmetric diffusion theory of the solar modulation of GCR, and data on the differential energy spectra of H, He, O, and Fe, from 1965 to 1989, it has been shown that (1) the flux is determined by the diffusion parameter which is a function of the time in the solar cycle, and (2) the fluxes in the 1954 and 1976-1977 solar minima were similar and higher than those in 1965. In this paper, we have extended the spherical solar modulation theory back to 1954. The 1954-1955 GCR flux was nearly the same as that from 1976 to 1977; the 1965 flux values were nearly the same as those in 1986. Using this theory we have obtained the GCR spectra for all the nuclei, and calculated the depth dose as a function of Al thickness. It is shown that the shielding required to stay below 0.5 Sv is 17.5 -3/+8 g/sq cm of Al, and 9 -1.5/+5 g/sq cm to stay below 0.6 Sv. The calculated dose equivalent using the ICRP 60 values for quality factors is about 15 percent higher than that calculated using the ICRP 26 value.

  8. Breast Cancer by Age at Diagnosis in the Gharbiah, Egypt, Population-Based Registry Compared to the United States Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 2004–2008

    PubMed Central

    Schlichting, Jennifer A.; Soliman, Amr S.; Schairer, Catherine; Harford, Joe B.; Hablas, Ahmed; Ramadan, Mohamed; Seifeldin, Ibrahim; Merajver, Sofia D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Although breast cancers (BCs) in young women often display more aggressive features, younger women are generally not screened for early detection. It is important to understand the characteristics of young onset breast cancer to increase awareness in this population. This analysis includes all ages, with emphasis placed on younger onset BC in Egypt as compared to the United States. Methods. BC cases in the Gharbiah cancer registry (GCR), Egypt, were compared to those in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. This analysis included 3,819 cases from the GCR and 273,019 from SEER diagnosed 2004–2008. Results. GCR cases were diagnosed at later stages, with <5% diagnosed at Stage I and 12% diagnosed at Stage IV. 48% of all SEER cases were diagnosed at Stage I, dropping to 30% among those ≤40. Significant differences in age, tumor grade, hormone receptor status, histology, and stage exist between GCR and SEER BCs. After adjustment, GCR cases were nearly 45 times more likely to be diagnosed at stage III and 16 times more likely to be diagnosed at stage IV than SEER cases. Conclusions. Future research should examine ways to increase literacy about early detection and prompt therapy in young cases. PMID:26495294

  9. Study the effect of gray component replacement level on reflectance spectra and color reproduction accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiridonov, I.; Shopova, M.; Boeva, R.

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study is investigation of gray component replacement (GCR) levels on reflectance spectrum for different overprints of the inks and color reproduction accuracy. The most commonly implemented method in practice for generation of achromatic composition is gray component replacement (GCR). The experiments in this study, have been performed in real production conditions with special test form generated by specialized software. The measuring of reflection spectrum of printed colors, gives a complete conception for the effect of different gray component replacement levels on color reproduction accuracy. For better data analyses and modeling of processes, we have calculated (converted) the CIEL*a*b* color coordinates from the reflection spectra data. The assessment of color accuracy by using different GCR amount has been made by calculation of color difference ΔE* ab. In addition for the specific printing conditions we have created ICC profiles with different GCR amounts. A comparison of the color gamuts has been performed. For a first time a methodology is implemented for examination and estimation of effect of GCR levels on color reproduction accuracy by studying a big number of colors in entire visible spectrum. Implementation in practice of the results achieved in this experiment, will lead to improved gray balance and better color accuracy. Another important effect of this research is reduction of financial costs of printing production by decreasing of ink consumption, indirect reduction of emissions during the manufacture of inks and facilitates the process of deinking during the recycling paper.

  10. Evaluating Shielding Effectiveness for Reducing Space Radiation Cancer Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Ren, Lei

    2007-01-01

    We discuss calculations of probability distribution functions (PDF) representing uncertainties in projecting fatal cancer risk from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE). The PDF s are used in significance tests of the effectiveness of potential radiation shielding approaches. Uncertainties in risk coefficients determined from epidemiology data, dose and dose-rate reduction factors, quality factors, and physics models of radiation environments are considered in models of cancer risk PDF s. Competing mortality risks and functional correlations in radiation quality factor uncertainties are treated in the calculations. We show that the cancer risk uncertainty, defined as the ratio of the 95% confidence level (CL) to the point estimate is about 4-fold for lunar and Mars mission risk projections. For short-stay lunar missions (<180 d), SPE s present the most significant risk, however one that is mitigated effectively by shielding, especially for carbon composites structures with high hydrogen content. In contrast, for long duration lunar (>180 d) or Mars missions, GCR risks may exceed radiation risk limits, with 95% CL s exceeding 10% fatal risk for males and females on a Mars mission. For reducing GCR cancer risks, shielding materials are marginally effective because of the penetrating nature of GCR and secondary radiation produced in tissue by relativistic particles. At the present time, polyethylene or carbon composite shielding can not be shown to significantly reduce risk compared to aluminum shielding based on a significance test that accounts for radiobiology uncertainties in GCR risk projection.

  11. The Decadal Variability of Cosmic Ray Flux Outside of a Grand Solar Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Simon; Owens, Mathew; Lockwood, Mike

    2016-04-01

    Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) flux is modulated by changes in the Sun's magnetic field. In the long-term, GCRs flux at Earth varies in a 22-year cycle. Observing time-series of GCR flux we see a pattern of 'flat topped' and 'spiked topped' peaks. It is thought that differing drift patterns for when the northern solar pole is predominantly positive (qA>0) to when the northern pole is negative (qA<0) cause this difference in modulation. We demonstrate a link between GCR modulation and long-term changes in the intensity and structure of the large-scale heliospheric magnetic field, particularly during the declining phase of consecutive solar cycles. Using reconstructions of the heliospheric field from geomagnetic data, we demonstrate that this cause of GCR modulation is only present in cycles during the recent Grand Solar Maximum and not during the weaker period of activity prior to it. We therefore suggest that the current decline in solar activity will result in different long-term patterns in GCR data to those observed during the space-age which would be important for the planning of space-based missions. Finally, we compare our results to ice-core data (found to display the 22-year variation) to further explore how the 22-year cycle varies between different solar activity periods.

  12. A genetic network that suppresses genome rearrangements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and contains defects in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Putnam, Christopher D.; Srivatsan, Anjana; Nene, Rahul V.; Martinez, Sandra L.; Clotfelter, Sarah P.; Bell, Sara N.; Somach, Steven B.; E.S. de Souza, Jorge; Fonseca, André F.; de Souza, Sandro J.; Kolodner, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs) play an important role in human diseases, including cancer. The identity of all Genome Instability Suppressing (GIS) genes is not currently known. Here multiple Saccharomyces cerevisiae GCR assays and query mutations were crossed into arrays of mutants to identify progeny with increased GCR rates. One hundred eighty two GIS genes were identified that suppressed GCR formation. Another 438 cooperatively acting GIS genes were identified that were not GIS genes, but suppressed the increased genome instability caused by individual query mutations. Analysis of TCGA data using the human genes predicted to act in GIS pathways revealed that a minimum of 93% of ovarian and 66% of colorectal cancer cases had defects affecting one or more predicted GIS gene. These defects included loss-of-function mutations, copy-number changes associated with reduced expression, and silencing. In contrast, acute myeloid leukaemia cases did not appear to have defects affecting the predicted GIS genes. PMID:27071721

  13. Fundamental Considerations Of Gas Core Reactor Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussard, Robert W.

    1988-04-01

    Fundamental physics and engineering limitations on gas core reactors (GCR) have been found from coupled effects of reactor neutronics with oscillatory core fuel gas flows and with overall gas dynamics. These show allowable regimes for system operation as natural re-sults of the basiciphysics of the system. Cylindrical BeO-moderated systems, such as the acoustic GCR (AGCR ), are found to be well-suited for pressure wave oscillation at 100-Hz frequencies. These result in stable oscillations of core gas electrical conductivity which may be used for direct alternating current electric power production in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) convertors. In contrast, single-cavity axial-flow spherical GCR (SGCR2) systems are inherently limited by core flow and fission energy-generation fluctuation phenomena (to continuous wave operation with mixed flows that cannot sustain high internal core gas tempera-ture gradients. Resulting low mixed-mean temperatures place upper limits on system MHD electrical performance.

  14. Experimental Plans for Subsystems of a Shock Wave Driven Gas Core Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazeminezhad, F.; Anghai, S.

    2008-01-01

    This Contractor Report proposes a number of plans for experiments on subsystems of a shock wave driven pulsed magnetic induction gas core reactor (PMI-GCR, or PMD-GCR pulsed magnet driven gas core reactor). Computer models of shock generation and collision in a large-scale PMI-GCR shock tube have been performed. Based upon the simulation results a number of issues arose that can only be addressed adequately by capturing experimental data on high pressure (approx.1 atmosphere or greater) partial plasma shock wave effects in large bore shock tubes ( 10 cm radius). There are three main subsystems that are of immediate interest (for appraisal of the concept viability). These are (1) the shock generation in a high pressure gas using either a plasma thruster or pulsed high magnetic field, (2) collision of MHD or gas dynamic shocks, their interaction time, and collision pile-up region thickness, and (3) magnetic flux compression power generation (not included here).

  15. Updated Computational Model of Cosmic Rays Near Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeill, Patrick M.

    2006-01-01

    An updated computational model of the galactic-cosmic-ray (GCR) environment in the vicinity of the Earth, Earth s Moon, and Mars has been developed, and updated software has been developed to implement the updated model. This model accounts for solar modulation of the cosmic-ray contribution for each element from hydrogen through iron by computationally propagating the local interplanetary spectrum of each element through the heliosphere. The propagation is effected by solving the Fokker-Planck diffusion, convection, energy-loss boundary-value problem. The Advanced Composition Explorer NASA satellite has provided new data on GCR energy spectra. These new data were used to update the original model and greatly improve the accuracy of prediction of interplanetary GCR.

  16. Radiation shielding requirements for manned deep space missions

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.T.; Ingersoll, D.T.

    1991-04-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and, particularly, solar flares (SF) constitute the major radiation hazards in deep space. The dose to astronauts from these radiation sources and the shielding required to mitigate its effect during a 480 day Mars mission is estimated here for a simplistic spacecraft geometry. The intent is to ball park'' the magnitude of the doses for the constant GCR background and for SF's that occur randomly during the mission. The spacecraft shielding and dose data are given only for primary GCR and SF radiation, recognizing that secondary particles produced by primary particle reactions in the spacecraft and High Z-High Energy particles will also contribute to the dose suffered by the astronauts. 22 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Solar flare neon and solar cosmic ray fluxes in the past using gas-rich meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nautiyal, C. M.; Rao, M. N.

    1986-01-01

    Methods were developed earlier to deduce the composition of solar flare neon and to determine the solar cosmic ray proton fluxes in the past using etched lunar samples and at present, these techniques are extended to gas rich meteorites. By considering high temperature Ne data points for Pantar, Fayetteville and other gas rich meteorites and by applying the three component Ne-decomposition methods, the solar cosmic ray and galactic cosmic ray produced spallation Ne components from the trapped SF-Ne was resolved. Using appropiate SCR and GCR production rates, in the case of Pantar, for example, a GCR exposure age of 2 m.y. was estimated for Pantar-Dark while Pantar-Light yielded a GCR age of approx. 3 m.y. However the SCR exposure age of Pantar-Dark is two orders of magnitude higher than the average surface exposure ages of lunar soils. The possibility of higher proton fluxes in the past is discussed.

  18. Stopping powers and cross sections due to two-photon processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Wang K.; Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    The radiation dose received from high energy galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a limiting factor in the design of long duration space flights and the building of lunar and martian habitats. It is of vital importance to have an accurate understanding of the interactions of GCR in order to assess the radiation environment that the astronauts will be exposed to. Although previous studies have concentrated on the strong interaction process in GCR, there are also very large effects due to electromagnetic (EM) interactions. In this report we describe our first efforts at understanding these EM production processes due to two-photon collisions. More specifically, we shall consider particle production processes in relativistic heavy ion collisions (RHICs) through two-photon exchange.

  19. Creating Maps of Forbush Decreases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, A.; Lara, A.; Niembro, T.

    2013-05-01

    The flux of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) to the inner Heliosphere and in particular to the Earth surroundings, is modulated by the solar activity. In a time scale of hours the GCR flux may diminish abruptly, reach a minimum value and then follow a slow recovery phase lasting one or two days.The so called Forbush Decreases (FD) are caused by large scale structures of plasma and magnetic field traveling at high speed i. e. interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). Using the new observational capability of imaging the interplanetary space (e.g. Stereo spacecraft) and assuming a direct relationship between density and magnetic field inside ICMEs, in this work we create maps of ICMEs, as GCR sinks seen by an observer at the Earth surface. The objective is to survey the observational necessities of new cosmic ray detectors in order to perform such maps.

  20. A model of galactic cosmic rays for use in calculating linear energy transfer spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.; Chenette, D.; Clark, R.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Guzik, T. G.; Pyle, K. R.; Sang, Y.; Wefel, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) contain fully stripped nuclei, from Hydrogen to beyond the Iron group, accelerated to high energies and are a major component of the background radiation encountered by satellites and interplanetary spacecraft. This paper presents a GCR model which is based upon our current understanding of the astrophysics of GCR transport through interstellar and interplanetary space. The model can be used to predict the energy spectra for all stable and long-lived radioactive species from H to Ni over an energy range from 50 to 50,000 MeV/nucleon as a function of a single parameter, the solar modulation level phi. The details of this model are summarized, phi is derived for the period 1974 to present, and results from this model during the 1990/1991 Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) mission are presented.

  1. Low-energy break in the spectrum of Galactic cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Neronov, A; Semikoz, D V; Taylor, A M

    2012-02-01

    Measurements of the low-energy spectrum of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) by detectors on or near Earth are affected by solar modulation. To overcome this difficulty, we consider nearby molecular clouds as GCR detectors outside the Solar System. Using γ-ray observations of the clouds by the Fermi telescope, we derive the spectrum of GCRs in the clouds from the observed γ-ray emission spectrum. We find that the GCR spectrum has a low-energy break with the spectral slope hardening by ΔΓ=1.1±0.3 at an energy of E=9±3  GeV. Detection of a low-energy break enables a measurement of GCR energy density in the interstellar space U=0.9±0.3  eV/cm{3}.

  2. A genetic network that suppresses genome rearrangements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and contains defects in cancers.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Christopher D; Srivatsan, Anjana; Nene, Rahul V; Martinez, Sandra L; Clotfelter, Sarah P; Bell, Sara N; Somach, Steven B; de Souza, Jorge E S; Fonseca, André F; de Souza, Sandro J; Kolodner, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs) play an important role in human diseases, including cancer. The identity of all Genome Instability Suppressing (GIS) genes is not currently known. Here multiple Saccharomyces cerevisiae GCR assays and query mutations were crossed into arrays of mutants to identify progeny with increased GCR rates. One hundred eighty two GIS genes were identified that suppressed GCR formation. Another 438 cooperatively acting GIS genes were identified that were not GIS genes, but suppressed the increased genome instability caused by individual query mutations. Analysis of TCGA data using the human genes predicted to act in GIS pathways revealed that a minimum of 93% of ovarian and 66% of colorectal cancer cases had defects affecting one or more predicted GIS gene. These defects included loss-of-function mutations, copy-number changes associated with reduced expression, and silencing. In contrast, acute myeloid leukaemia cases did not appear to have defects affecting the predicted GIS genes. PMID:27071721

  3. Cellular track model of biological damage to mammalian cell cultures from galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Katz, Robert; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Nealy, John E.; Shinn, Judy L.

    1991-01-01

    The assessment of biological damage from the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a current interest for exploratory class space missions where the highly ionizing, high-energy, high-charge ions (HZE) particles are the major concern. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values determined by ground-based experiments with HZE particles are well described by a parametric track theory of cell inactivation. Using the track model and a deterministic GCR transport code, the biological damage to mammalian cell cultures is considered for 1 year in free space at solar minimum for typical spacecraft shielding. Included are the effects of projectile and target fragmentation. The RBE values for the GCR spectrum which are fluence-dependent in the track model are found to be more severe than the quality factors identified by the International Commission on Radiological Protection publication 26 and seem to obey a simple scaling law with the duration period in free space.

  4. The Development of Materials for Structures and Radiation Shielding in Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard L.; Orwoll, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Polymeric materials on space vehicles and high-altitude aircraft win be exposed to highly penetrating radiations. These radiations come from solar flares and galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Radiation from solar flares consists primarily of protons with energies less than 1 GeV. On the other hand, GCR consist of nuclei with energies as high as 10(exp 10) GeV. Over 90% of the nuclei in GCR are protons and alpha particles, however there is a small but significant component of particles with atomic numbers greater than ten. Particles with high atomic number (Z) and high energy interact with very high specific ionization and thus represent a serious hazard for humans and electronic equipment on a spacecraft or on high-altitude commercial aircraft (most importantly for crew members who would have long exposures). Neutrons generated by reactions with the high energy particles also represent a hazard both for humans and electronic equipment.

  5. Overview of on-board measurements during solar storm periods.

    PubMed

    Beck, P; Dyer, C; Fuller, N; Hands, A; Latocha, M; Rollet, S; Spurný, F

    2009-10-01

    Radiation exposure of aircraft crew caused by cosmic radiation is regulated in Europe by the European Community Council Directive 96/29/EURATOM and implemented into law in almost every country of the European Union. While the galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) leads on average to an exposure of about 3 mSv per year, solar cosmic radiation can lead to 1 mSv per one subsonic flight during solar storm periods. Compared to GCR, solar cosmic radiation shows a much softer proton spectrum but with a larger contribution of several orders of magnitude. This is the reason for the large radiation exposure in high northern and southern geographic latitudes during solar particle events. Here an overview of active radiation in-flight measurements undertaken during solar storms is given. In particular, tissue-equivalent proportional counter on-board measurements are shown and the radiation quality during solar storm periods with that for GCR is compared.

  6. Space radiation protection issues.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Amy; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2012-11-01

    The complex charged particle environments in space pose considerable challenges with regard to potential health consequences that can impact mission design and crew selection. The lack of knowledge of the biological effects of different ions in isolation and in combination is a particular concern because the risk uncertainties are very high for both cancer and non-cancer late effects. Reducing the uncertainties is of high priority. Two principal components of space radiation each raise different concerns. Solar particle events (SPE) occur sporadically and are comprised primarily of low- to moderate-energy protons. Galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) is isotropic and relatively invariant in dose rate. GCR is also dominated by protons, but the energy range is wider than in SPE. In addition, the contribution of other light and heavy ions to the health risks from GCR must be addressed. This paper will introduce the principal issues under consideration for space radiation protection. PMID:23032885

  7. Revised Production Rates for Na-22 and Mn-54 in Meteorites Using Cross Sections Measured for Neutron-induced Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.; Kim, K. J.; Reedy, R. C.

    2004-01-01

    The interactions of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with extraterrestrial bodies produce small amounts of radionuclides and stable isotopes. The production rates of many relatively short-lived radionuclides, including 2.6-year Na-22 and 312-day Mn-54, have been measured in several meteorites collected very soon after they fell. Theoretical models used to calculate production rates for comparison with the measured values rely on input data containing good cross section measurements for all relevant reactions. Most GCR particles are protons, but secondary neutrons make most cosmogenic nuclides. Calculated production rates using only cross sections for proton-induced reactions do not agree well with measurements. One possible explanation is that the contribution to the production rate from reactions initiated by secondary neutrons produced in primary GCR interactions should be included explicitly. This, however, is difficult to do because so few of the relevant cross sections for neutron-induced reactions have been measured.

  8. Near-Earth Cosmic Ray Decreases Associated with Remote Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Simon; Owens, Mathew; Lockwood, Mike; Barnard, Luke; Scott, Chris; Owen, Chris

    2015-04-01

    Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) flux is modulated by both particle drift patterns and solar wind structures on a range of time scales. Over solar cycles, GCR flux varies as a function of the total open solar magnetic flux and the latitudinal extent of the heliospheric current sheet. Over time-scales of hours, drops of a few percent in near-Earth GCR flux (Forbush decreases, FDs) are well known to be associated with the near-Earth passage of solar wind structures resulting from corotating interaction regions (CIRs) and transient coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We present four FDs seen at ground-based neutron monitors which cannot be immediately associated with significant structures in the local solar wind. Similarly, there are significant near-Earth structures which do not produce any corresponding GCR variation. Three of the FDs are shown to be during the STEREO era, enabling in-situ and remote observations from three well-separated heliospheric locations. Extremely large CMEs passed the STEREO-A spacecraft, which was behind the West limb of the Sun, approximately 2-3 days before each near-Earth FD. Solar wind simulations suggest that the CMEs combined with pre-existing CIRs, enhancing the pre-existing barriers to GCR propagation. These events are compared to the well-documented extreme event of July 2012 as a good comparison. Our observations provide strong evidence for the modulation of GCR flux by remote solar wind structures and a potential to detect these remote structures using neutron monitor data.

  9. Assessment of galactic cosmic ray models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrigakshi, Alankrita Isha; Matthiä, Daniel; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Günther; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2012-08-01

    Among several factors involved in the development of a manned space mission concept, the astronauts' health is a major concern that needs to be considered carefully. Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), which mainly consist of high-energetic nuclei ranging from hydrogen to iron and beyond, pose a major radiation health risk in long-term space missions. It is therefore required to assess the radiation exposure of astronauts in order to estimate their radiation risks. This can be done either by performing direct measurements or by making computer based simulations from which the dose can be derived. A necessary prerequisite for an accurate estimation of the exposure using simulations is a reliable description of the GCR spectra. The aim of this work is to compare GCR models and to test their applicability for the exposure assessment of astronauts. To achieve this, commonly used models capable of describing both light and heavy GCR particle spectra were evaluated by investigating the model spectra for various particles over several decades. The updated Badhwar-O'Neill model published in the year 2010, CREME2009 which uses the International Standard model for GCR, CREME96 and the Burger-Usoskin model were examined. Hydrogen, helium, oxygen and iron nuclei spectra calculated by the different models are compared with measurements from various high-altitude balloon and space-borne experiments. During certain epochs in the last decade, there are large discrepancies between the GCR energy spectra described by the models and the measurements. All the models exhibit weaknesses in describing the increased GCR flux that was observed in 2009-2010.

  10. North-south component of galactic cosmic ray anisotropy at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    The galactic cosmic ray (GCR) solar diurnal anisotropy (SDA) may be represented by a vector (A; Ar, Aφ, Aθ) in a spherical polar coordinate system centered on the sun. We reported (elsewhere) the results of a detailed study of time variations of yearly radial (Ar) and east-west (Aφ) components recorded by the global network of the neutron monitors (NMs) with a long track record for 1963-2013, for four sunspot number (SSN) cycles (20-23) and the rising phase of cycle 24. A powerful new technique is used to compute and study time variations of the transverse component (Aθ) due to off-ecliptic GCR contributions, with the same NM data; GCR radial particle density gradient (Gr) drives all three components. The north-south anisotropy (Aθ) is computed from yearly NM data (Gϕ = 0), a flat heliospheric current sheet (HCS) model and the concept of GCR isotropic hard sphere scattering in the solar wind plasma. Relationships to SSN, rigidity and solar polarity intervals are studied. For a positive (p-) polarity the solar magnetic field in the northern hemisphere points outward and GCRs drift from polar regions toward equatorial plane and out along HCS, setting up a symmetric gradient (Gθs) pointing away from HCS (there is a local GCR density minimum on HCS); for n-polarity interval Gθs points towards HCS (there is a local GCR density maximum on HCS). Also, there exists a heliospheric asymmetric density gradient (Gθa) perpendicular to the ecliptic plane, it is the main contributor to Aθ for the period of our analysis. This is the most interesting and significant insight.

  11. Predicting cosmic ray fluxes for the interplanetary space missions needs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nymmik, Rikho

    One of the main claims for the planning forthcoming interplanetary missions is the prediction of radiation threatening that effects on both astronauts and onboard instrumentation. It is caused by the SEP and GCR particle fluxes which always present in space and depend on solar activity level. The GCR and SEP fluxes' quantitative models developed at moment in Moscow University are based on the analysis of experimental data set for the four previous solar cycles, and establish a connection between particle fluxes and solar activity (Wolf numbers) for noted radiation fields. The GCR fluxes model (see for example, International Standard ISO 15390, Space environment (natural and artificial) - Galactic cosmic ray model) establishes an accordance between GCR fluxes and smoothed (over 13 months) month-averaged Wolf numbers. For the SEP fluxes which subordinates to quite defined statistical laws, the model developed enables to calculate a total fluxes that to be occurred probably with some given probability during a long time period under any solar activity level. This report presents examples of GCR and SEP fluxes occurred under different solar activity levels as well as energy spectra calculated for various probabilities of SEP flux occurrences. The data presented shows that SEP fluxes observed and their spectra are never exceed the bounds of probabilities, set by the model input. Thus, the MSU's models of GCR and SEP fluxes allows one to take account of solar activity effect on the probable value of fluxes that formed by radiation environment particles for an interplanetary mission of any period. The accuracy of such a prediction depends above all on the solar activity's (e.g., Wolf numbers)prediction reliability.

  12. Assessment of Galactic Cosmic Ray Models and Implications on the Estimation of Radiation Exposure in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrigakshi, A. I.; Matthiä, D.; Berger, T.; Reitz, G.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2012-12-01

    Astronauts are subjected to elevated levels of high-energy ionizing radiation in space which poses a substantial risk to their health. Therefore, the assessment of the radiation exposure for long duration manned spaceflight is essential. This is done by measuring dose using various detector techniques and by performing numerical simulations utilizing radiation transport codes which allow to predict radiation exposure for future missions and for conditions where measurements are not feasible or available. A necessary prerequisite for an accurate estimation of the exposure using the latter approach is a reliable description of the radiation spectra. Accordingly, in order to estimate the exposure from the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs), which are one of the major sources of radiation exposure in space, GCR models are required. This work presents an evaluation of GCR models for dosimetry purposes and the effect of applying these models on the estimation of GCR exposure in space outside and inside the Earth's magnetosphere. To achieve this, widely used GCR models - Badhwar-O'Neill2010, Burger-Usoskin, CREME2009 and CREME96, were evaluated by comparing model spectra for light and heavy nuclei with measurements from various high-altitude balloon and space missions over several decades. Additionally a new model, based on the GCR-ISO model, developed at the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) was also investigated. The differences arising in the radiation exposure by applying these models are quantified in terms of absorbed dose and dose equivalent rates that were estimated numerically using the GEANT4 Monte-Carlo framework. During certain epochs in the last decade, there are large discrepancies between the model and the measured spectra. All models exhibit weaknesses in describing the increased GCR flux that was observed in 2009-2010. The differences in the spectra, described by the models, result in considerable differences in the estimated dose quantities.

  13. Occurrence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica in the Beef Cattle Production and Processing Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Agga, Getahun E.; Bosilevac, Joseph M.; Brichta-Harhay, Dayna M.; Shackelford, Steven D.; Wang, Rong; Wheeler, Tommy L.; Arthur, Terrance M.

    2014-01-01

    Specific concerns have been raised that third-generation cephalosporin-resistant (3GCr) Escherichia coli, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-resistant (COTr) E. coli, 3GCr Salmonella enterica, and nalidixic acid-resistant (NALr) S. enterica may be present in cattle production environments, persist through beef processing, and contaminate final products. The prevalences and concentrations of these organisms were determined in feces and hides (at feedlot and processing plant), pre-evisceration carcasses, and final carcasses from three lots of fed cattle (n = 184). The prevalences and concentrations were further determined for strip loins from 103 of the carcasses. 3GCr Salmonella was detected on 7.6% of hides during processing and was not detected on the final carcasses or strip loins. NALr S. enterica was detected on only one hide. 3GCr E. coli and COTr E. coli were detected on 100.0% of hides during processing. Concentrations of 3GCr E. coli and COTr E. coli on hides were correlated with pre-evisceration carcass contamination. 3GCr E. coli and COTr E. coli were each detected on only 0.5% of final carcasses and were not detected on strip loins. Five hundred and 42 isolates were screened for extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) virulence-associated markers. Only two COTr E. coli isolates from hides were ExPEC, indicating that fed cattle products are not a significant source of ExPEC causing human urinary tract infections. The very low prevalences of these organisms on final carcasses and their absence on strip loins demonstrate that current sanitary dressing procedures and processing interventions are effective against antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. PMID:25398858

  14. Relative contributions of galactic cosmic rays and lunar proton "albedo" to dose and dose rates near the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Harlan E.; Golightly, Michael J.; Joyce, Colin J.; Looper, Mark D.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Smith, Sonya S.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, Jody; Zeitlin, Cary

    2013-11-01

    use validated radiation transport models of the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation instrument and its response to both primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and secondary radiation, including lunar protons released through nuclear evaporation, to estimate their relative contributions to total dose rate in silicon (372 μGy/d) and dose equivalent rate at the skin (2.88 mSv/d). Near the Moon, we show that GCR accounts for ~91.4% of the total absorbed dose, with GCR protons accounting for ~42.8%, GCR alpha particles for ~18.5%, and GCR heavy ions for ~30.1%. The remaining ~8.6% of the dose at Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter altitudes (~50 km) arises from secondary lunar species, primarily "albedo" protons (3.1%) and electrons (2.2%). Other lunar nuclear evaporation species contributing to the dose rate are positrons (1.5%), gammas (1.1%), and neutrons (0.7%). Relative contributions of these same species to the total dose equivalent rate in skin, a quantity of more direct biological relevance, favor those with comparatively high quality factors. Consequently, the primary GCR heavy ion components dominate the estimated effective skin dose. Finally, we note that when considering the lunar radiation environment, although the Moon blocks approximately half of the sky, thus essentially halving the absorbed dose rate near the Moon relative to deep space, the secondary radiation created by the presence of the Moon adds back a small, but measurable, absorbed dose (~8%) that can and should be now accounted for quantitatively in radiation risk assessments at the Moon and other similar exploration targets.

  15. An Improved Analytic Model for Microdosimeter Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, Judy L.; Wilson, John W.; Xapsos, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    An analytic model used to predict energy deposition fluctuations in a microvolume by ions through direct events is improved to include indirect delta ray events. The new model can now account for the increase in flux at low lineal energy when the ions are of very high energy. Good agreement is obtained between the calculated results and available data for laboratory ion beams. Comparison of GCR (galactic cosmic ray) flux between Shuttle TEPC (tissue equivalent proportional counter) flight data and current calculations draws a different assessment of developmental work required for the GCR transport code (HZETRN) than previously concluded.

  16. Modeling and Experimental Study of Forbush Effects of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alania, Michael V.; Szabelski, J.; Wawrzynczak, A.

    2003-07-01

    temporal changes of the rigidity spectrum of the sporadic and recurrent Forbush effects of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) have been studied using neutron monitors data. An attempt to find a relationship between the rigidity spectrum exponent γ of the Forbush effects (δD/D(R) ∝ R-γ , where R is the rigidity of GCR particles) and an exponent ν of the power spectral density (PSD) of the fluctuations of the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) (PSD ∝ f-ν , where f is the frequency) has been made. EXPERIMENTAL DATA AND METHOD OF INVESTIGATION. An attempt to find a relationship between the rigidity spectrum exponent γ of the Forbush effects [1] (δ D/D(R) ∝ R-γ , where R is the rigidity of GCR particles) and an exponent ν of the PSD of the fluctuations of the strength of the IMF has been made. Data of neutron super monitors and the IMF's Bx , By , and Bz components have been used to study peculiarities of two great sporadic Forbush effects (9-23 July 1982 and 9-29 July 2000) and one recurrent Forbush effect of the 1-16 September 1996 (figures 1ab c). It is well known that one of the ma jor parameters for the characterizing of the Forbush effects of GCR is the rigidity spectrum of the GCR intensity variations, hereafter called the rigidity spectrum of Forbush effect (δ D(R)/D(R ) = A R-γ , where R is the rigidity of GCR particles and A is the power). The rigidity spectrum of the Forbush effects has been calculated using the data of neutron super monitors and the method presented, e.g. in [2,3]. There was assumed: δ D(R)/D(R) = A R-γ for R≤Rmax . And δ D(R)/D(R) = 0 for R>Rmax. Here Rmax is the upper limiting rigidity beyond which the Forbush effect of GCR intensity vanishes. Results of calculations of γ based on daily means of data for the sporadic Forbush effects, 9-23 July 1982 (14 stations), 9-29 July 2000 (11 stations) and for the recurrent Forbush effect of 1-16 September 1996 (7 stations) are presented in the figures 1def. RESULTS

  17. Badhwar-O'Neill 2011 Galactic Cosmic Ray Model Update and Future Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Pat M.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.

    2014-01-01

    The Badhwar-O'Neill Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) Model based on actual GR measurements is used by deep space mission planners for the certification of micro-electronic systems and the analysis of radiation health risks to astronauts in space missions. The BO GCR Model provides GCR flux in deep space (outside the earth's magnetosphere) for any given time from 1645 to present. The energy spectrum from 50 MeV/n-20 GeV/n is provided for ions from hydrogen to uranium. This work describes the most recent version of the BO GCR model (BO'11). BO'11 determines the GCR flux at a given time applying an empirical time delay function to past sunspot activity. We describe the GCR measurement data used in the BO'11 update - modern data from BESS, PAMELA, CAPRICE, and ACE emphasized for than the older balloon data used for the previous BO model (BO'10). We look at the GCR flux for the last 24 solar minima and show how much greater the flux was for the cycle 24 minimum in 2010. The BO'11 Model uses the traditional, steady-state Fokker-Planck differential equation to account for particle transport in the heliosphere due to diffusion, convection, and adiabatic deceleration. It assumes a radially symmetrical diffusion coefficient derived from magnetic disturbances caused by sunspots carried onward by a constant solar wind. A more complex differential equation is now being tested to account for particle transport in the heliosphere in the next generation BO model. This new model is time-dependent (no longer a steady state model). In the new model, the dynamics and anti-symmetrical features of the actual heliosphere are accounted for so empirical time delay functions will no longer be required. The new model will be capable of simulating the more subtle features of modulation - such as the Sun's polarity and modulation dependence on the gradient and curvature drift. This improvement is expected to significantly improve the fidelity of the BO GCR model. Preliminary results of its

  18. Effects of nuclear cross sections at different energies on the radiation hazard from galactic cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z W; Adams, J H

    2007-03-01

    The radiation hazard for astronauts from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a major obstacle to long-duration human space exploration. Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate the radiation environment on missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. We have studied how uncertainties in fragmentation cross sections at different energies affect the accuracy of predictions from such radiation transport calculations. We find that, in deep space, cross sections at energies between 0.3 and 0.85 GeV/nucleon have the largest effect in solar maximum GCR environments. At the International Space Station, cross sections at higher energies have the largest effect due to the geomagnetic cutoff.

  19. Twenty years of space radiation physics at the BNL AGS and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Miller, J; Zeitlin, C

    2016-06-01

    Highly ionizing atomic nuclei HZE in the GCR will be a significant source of radiation exposure for humans on extended missions outside low Earth orbit. Accelerators such as the LBNL Bevalac and the BNL AGS, designed decades ago for fundamental nuclear and particle physics research, subsequently found use as sources of GCR-like particles for ground-based physics and biology research relevant to space flight. The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at BNL was constructed specifically for space radiation research. Here we review some of the space-related physics results obtained over the first 20 years of NASA-sponsored research at Brookhaven.

  20. Accelerator experiments on the contribution of secondary particles to the production of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragovitsch, P.; Englert, P.

    1985-01-01

    Through the interaction of galactic cosmic particle radiation (GCR) a wide variety of cosmogenic nuclides is produced in meteorites. They provide historical information about the cosmic radiation and the bombarded meteorites. An important way to understand the production mechanisms of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites is to gather information about the depth and size dependence of the build-up of Galactic Rays Cosmic-secondary particles within meteorites of different sizes and chemical compositions. Simulation experiments with meteorite models offer an alternative to direct observation providing a data basis to describe the development and action of the secondary cascade induced by the GCR in meteorites.

  1. Twenty years of space radiation physics at the BNL AGS and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.

    2016-06-01

    Highly ionizing atomic nuclei HZE in the GCR will be a significant source of radiation exposure for humans on extended missions outside low Earth orbit. Accelerators such as the LBNL Bevalac and the BNL AGS, designed decades ago for fundamental nuclear and particle physics research, subsequently found use as sources of GCR-like particles for ground-based physics and biology research relevant to space flight. The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at BNL was constructed specifically for space radiation research. Here we review some of the space-related physics results obtained over the first 20 years of NASA-sponsored research at Brookhaven.

  2. Calculation of the lunar photon albedo from galactic and solar proton bombardment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    The lunar photon albedo due to cosmogenic and primordial photon sources has been calculated. The individual photon leakage spectra from prompt photons produced by galactic cosmic ray (GCR) and solar cosmic ray (SCR) induced nuclear interactions, from the decay of GCR- and SCR-induced radionuclides, and from the decay of naturally occurring radionuclides are given. An approximate estimate of the leakage from the photon-electron cascade initiated by the decay of neutral pions is also given. Monte Carlo methods have been used to determine the nucleon-meson cascade, and discrete-ordinates methods were used for the photon and low-energy neutron transport.

  3. Twenty years of space radiation physics at the BNL AGS and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Miller, J; Zeitlin, C

    2016-06-01

    Highly ionizing atomic nuclei HZE in the GCR will be a significant source of radiation exposure for humans on extended missions outside low Earth orbit. Accelerators such as the LBNL Bevalac and the BNL AGS, designed decades ago for fundamental nuclear and particle physics research, subsequently found use as sources of GCR-like particles for ground-based physics and biology research relevant to space flight. The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at BNL was constructed specifically for space radiation research. Here we review some of the space-related physics results obtained over the first 20 years of NASA-sponsored research at Brookhaven. PMID:27345198

  4. Force-field parameterization of the galactic cosmic ray spectrum: Validation for Forbush decreases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usoskin, I. G.; Kovaltsov, G. A.; Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carbone, R.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; De Donato, C.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Mergé, M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Pizzolotto, C.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Rossetto, L.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Zverev, V. G.

    2015-06-01

    A useful parametrization of the energy spectrum of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) near Earth is offered by the so-called force-field model which describes the shape of the entire spectrum with a single parameter, the modulation potential. While the usefulness of the force-field approximation has been confirmed for regular periods of solar modulation, it was not tested explicitly for disturbed periods, when GCR are locally modulated by strong interplanetary transients. Here we use direct measurements of protons and α -particles performed by the PAMELA space-borne instrument during December 2006, including a major Forbush decrease, in order to directly test the validity of the force-field parameterization. We conclude that (1) The force-field parametrization works very well in describing the energy spectra of protons and α -particles directly measured by PAMELA outside the Earths atmosphere; (2) The energy spectrum of GCR can be well parameterized by the force-field model also during a strong Forbush decrease; (3) The estimate of the GCR modulation parameter, obtained using data from the world-wide neutron monitor network, is in good agreement with the spectra directly measured by PAMELA during the studied interval. This result is obtained on the basis of a single event analysis, more events need to be analyzed.

  5. Grammatical Consciousness-Raising and the Lexicon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bland, Susan Kesner

    A role is proposed for the lexicon in the grammatical consciousness-raising (GCR) framework for second language teaching outlined by W. Rutherford and M. Sharwood Smith (1987, 1988). First, a lexical framework that offers a series of questions to help teachers discover the relevant semantic and pragmatic information associated with grammatical…

  6. ESBL Detection: Comparison of a Commercially Available Chromogenic Test for Third Generation Cephalosporine Resistance and Automated Susceptibility Testing in Enterobactericeae.

    PubMed

    El-Jade, Mohamed Ramadan; Parcina, Marijo; Schmithausen, Ricarda Maria; Stein, Christoph; Meilaender, Alina; Hoerauf, Achim; Molitor, Ernst; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Rapid detection and reporting of third generation cephalosporine resistance (3GC-R) and of extended spectrum betalactamases in Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) is a diagnostic and therapeutic priority to avoid inefficacy of the initial antibiotic regimen. In this study we evaluated a commercially available chromogenic screen for 3GC-R as a predictive and/or confirmatory test for ESBL and AmpC activity in clinical and veterinary Enterobacteriaceae isolates. The test was highly reliable in the prediction of cefotaxime and cefpodoxime resistance, but there was no correlation with ceftazidime and piperacillin/tazobactam minimal inhibitory concentrations. All human and porcine ESBL-E tested were detected with exception of one genetically positive but phenotypically negative isolate. By contrast, AmpC detection rates lay below 30%. Notably, exclusion of piperacillin/tazobactam resistant, 3GC susceptible K1+ Klebsiella isolates increased the sensitivity and specificity of the test for ESBL detection. Our data further imply that in regions with low prevalence of AmpC and K1 positive E. coli strains chromogenic testing for 3GC-R can substitute for more time consuming ESBL confirmative testing in E. coli isolates tested positive by Phoenix or VITEK2 ESBL screen. We, therefore, suggest a diagnostic algorithm that distinguishes 3GC-R screening from primary culture and species-dependent confirmatory ESBL testing by βLACTATM and discuss the implications of MIC distribution results on the choice of antibiotic regimen.

  7. Preparing nurses to use standardized nursing language in the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Müller-Staub, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Research demonstrated nurses' education needs to be able to document nursing diagnoses, interventions and patient outcomes in the EHR. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of Guided Clinical Reasoning, a learning method to foster nurses' abilities in using standardized language. In a cluster randomized experimental study, nurses from 3 wards received Guided Clinical Reasoning (GCR), a learning method to foster nurses in stating nursing diagnoses, related interventions and outcomes. Three wards, receiving Classic Case Discussions, functioned as control group. The learning effect was measured by assessing the quality of 225 nursing documentations by applying 18 Likert-type items with a 0-4 scale of the measurement instrument "Quality of Nursing Diagnoses, Interventions and Outcomes" (Q-DIO). T-tests were applied to analyze pre-post intervention scores. GCR led to significantly higher quality of nursing diagnosis documentation; to etiology-specific nursing interventions and to enhanced nursing-sensitive patient outcomes. Before GCR, the pre-intervention mean in quality of nursing documentation was = 2.69 (post-intervention = 3.70; p<.0001). Similar results were found for nursing interventions and outcomes. In the control group, the quality remained unchanged. GCR supported nurses' abilities to state accurate nursing diagnoses, to select effective nursing interventions and to reach enhanced patient outcomes. Nursing diagnoses (NANDA-I) with related interventions and patient outcomes provide a knowledgebase for nurses to use standardized language in the EHR.

  8. How safe is safe enough? Radiation risk for a human mission to Mars.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, Francis A; Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Chappell, Lori J; Huff, Janice L

    2013-01-01

    Astronauts on a mission to Mars would be exposed for up to 3 years to galactic cosmic rays (GCR)--made up of high-energy protons and high charge (Z) and energy (E) (HZE) nuclei. GCR exposure rate increases about three times as spacecraft venture out of Earth orbit into deep space where protection of the Earth's magnetosphere and solid body are lost. NASA's radiation standard limits astronaut exposures to a 3% risk of exposure induced death (REID) at the upper 95% confidence interval (CI) of the risk estimate. Fatal cancer risk has been considered the dominant risk for GCR, however recent epidemiological analysis of radiation risks for circulatory diseases allow for predictions of REID for circulatory diseases to be included with cancer risk predictions for space missions. Using NASA's models of risks and uncertainties, we predicted that central estimates for radiation induced mortality and morbidity could exceed 5% and 10% with upper 95% CI near 10% and 20%, respectively for a Mars mission. Additional risks to the central nervous system (CNS) and qualitative differences in the biological effects of GCR compared to terrestrial radiation may significantly increase these estimates, and will require new knowledge to evaluate.

  9. Comparison of CREME (cosmic-ray effects on microelectronics) model LET (linear energy transfer) spaceflight dosimetry data

    SciTech Connect

    Letaw, J.R.; Adams, J.H.

    1986-07-15

    The galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) component of space radiation is the dominant cause of single-event phenomena in microelectronic circuits when Earth's magnetic shielding is low. Spaceflights outside the magnetosphere and in high inclination orbits are examples of such circumstances. In high-inclination orbits, low-energy (high LET) particles are transmitted through the field only at extreme latitudes, but can dominate the orbit-averaged dose. GCR is an important part of the radiation dose to astronauts under the same conditions. As a test of the CREME environmental model and particle transport codes used to estimate single event upsets, we have compiled existing measurements of HZE doses were compiled where GCR is expected to be important: Apollo 16 and 17, Skylab, Apollo Soyuz Test Project, and Kosmos 782. The LET spectra, due to direct ionization from GCR, for each of these missions has been estimated. The resulting comparisons with data validate the CREME model predictions of high-LET galactic cosmic-ray fluxes to within a factor of two. Some systematic differences between the model and data are identified.

  10. How Safe Is Safe Enough? Radiation Risk for a Human Mission to Mars

    PubMed Central

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Chappell, Lori J.; Huff, Janice L.

    2013-01-01

    Astronauts on a mission to Mars would be exposed for up to 3 years to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) — made up of high-energy protons and high charge (Z) and energy (E) (HZE) nuclei. GCR exposure rate increases about three times as spacecraft venture out of Earth orbit into deep space where protection of the Earth's magnetosphere and solid body are lost. NASA's radiation standard limits astronaut exposures to a 3% risk of exposure induced death (REID) at the upper 95% confidence interval (CI) of the risk estimate. Fatal cancer risk has been considered the dominant risk for GCR, however recent epidemiological analysis of radiation risks for circulatory diseases allow for predictions of REID for circulatory diseases to be included with cancer risk predictions for space missions. Using NASA's models of risks and uncertainties, we predicted that central estimates for radiation induced mortality and morbidity could exceed 5% and 10% with upper 95% CI near 10% and 20%, respectively for a Mars mission. Additional risks to the central nervous system (CNS) and qualitative differences in the biological effects of GCR compared to terrestrial radiation may significantly increase these estimates, and will require new knowledge to evaluate. PMID:24146746

  11. ESBL Detection: Comparison of a Commercially Available Chromogenic Test for Third Generation Cephalosporine Resistance and Automated Susceptibility Testing in Enterobactericeae

    PubMed Central

    El-Jade, Mohamed Ramadan; Parcina, Marijo; Schmithausen, Ricarda Maria; Stein, Christoph; Meilaender, Alina; Hoerauf, Achim; Molitor, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    Rapid detection and reporting of third generation cephalosporine resistance (3GC-R) and of extended spectrum betalactamases in Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) is a diagnostic and therapeutic priority to avoid inefficacy of the initial antibiotic regimen. In this study we evaluated a commercially available chromogenic screen for 3GC-R as a predictive and/or confirmatory test for ESBL and AmpC activity in clinical and veterinary Enterobacteriaceae isolates. The test was highly reliable in the prediction of cefotaxime and cefpodoxime resistance, but there was no correlation with ceftazidime and piperacillin/tazobactam minimal inhibitory concentrations. All human and porcine ESBL-E tested were detected with exception of one genetically positive but phenotypically negative isolate. By contrast, AmpC detection rates lay below 30%. Notably, exclusion of piperacillin/tazobactam resistant, 3GC susceptible K1+ Klebsiella isolates increased the sensitivity and specificity of the test for ESBL detection. Our data further imply that in regions with low prevalence of AmpC and K1 positive E. coli strains chromogenic testing for 3GC-R can substitute for more time consuming ESBL confirmative testing in E. coli isolates tested positive by Phoenix or VITEK2 ESBL screen. We, therefore, suggest a diagnostic algorithm that distinguishes 3GC-R screening from primary culture and species-dependent confirmatory ESBL testing by βLACTATM and discuss the implications of MIC distribution results on the choice of antibiotic regimen. PMID:27494134

  12. Mars surface radiation exposure for solar maximum conditions and 1989 solar proton events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonsen, Lisa C.; Nealy, John E.

    1992-01-01

    The Langley heavy-ion/nucleon transport code, HZETRN, and the high-energy nucleon transport code, BRYNTRN, are used to predict the propagation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR's) and solar flare protons through the carbon dioxide atmosphere of Mars. Particle fluences and the resulting doses are estimated on the surface of Mars for GCR's during solar maximum conditions and the Aug., Sep., and Oct. 1989 solar proton events. These results extend previously calculated surface estimates for GCR's at solar minimum conditions and the Feb. 1956, Nov. 1960, and Aug. 1972 solar proton events. Surface doses are estimated with both a low-density and a high-density carbon dioxide model of the atmosphere for altitudes of 0, 4, 8, and 12 km above the surface. A solar modulation function is incorporated to estimate the GCR dose variation between solar minimum and maximum conditions over the 11-year solar cycle. By using current Mars mission scenarios, doses to the skin, eye, and blood-forming organs are predicted for short- and long-duration stay times on the Martian surface throughout the solar cycle.

  13. Do supernovae of type 1 paly a role in cosmic-ray production?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    A model of cosmic-ray origin is suggested which aims to account for some salient features of the composition. Relative to solar abundances, the Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are deficient in hydrogen and helim (H and He) by an order of magnitude when the two compositions are normalized at iron. Our conjectural model implicates supernovae of Type I (SN-I) as sources of some of the GCR. SN-I occur approximately as often as SN-II, through their genesis is thought to be different. Recent studies of nucleosynthesis in SN-I based on accreting white dwarfs, find that the elements from Si to Fe are produced copiously. On the other hand, SN-I are virtually devoid of hydrogen, and upper limits deduced for He are low. If SN-I contribute significantly to the pool of GCR by injecting energetic particles into the interstellar medium (ISM), then this could explain why the resulting GCR is relatively deficient in H and He. A test of the model is proposed, and difficulties are discussed.

  14. The Projection of Space Radiation Environments with a Solar Cycle Statistical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.

    2006-01-01

    A solar cycle statistical model has been developed to project sunspot numbers which represent the variations in the space radiation environment. The resultant projection of sunspot numbers in near future were coupled to space-related quantities of interest in radiation protection, such as the galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) deceleration potential (f) and the mean occurrence frequency of solar particle event (SPE). Future GCR fluxes have been derived from a predictive model, in which GCR temporal dependence represented by f was derived from GCR flux and ground-based Climax neutron monitor rate measurements over the last four decades. Results showed that the point dose equivalent inside a typical spacecraft in interplanetary radiation fields was influenced by solar modulation up to a factor of three. One important characteristic of sporadic SPEs is their mean frequency of occurrence, which is dependent on solar activity. Projections of future mean frequency of SPE occurrence were estimated from a power law function of sunspot number. Furthermore, the cumulative probabilities of SPE during short-period missions were defined with the continuous database of proton fluences of SPE. The analytic representation of energy spectra of SPE was constructed by the Weibull distribution for different event sizes. The representative exposure level at each event size was estimated for the guideline of protection systems for astronauts during future space exploration missions.

  15. How Galactic Cosmic Ray models affect the estimation of radiation exposure in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrigakshi, Alankrita Isha; Matthiä, Daniel; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Günther; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2013-03-01

    The radiation environment in space is a major concern for human spaceflight because of the adverse effects of high levels of radiation on astronauts' health. Therefore, it is essential to perform radiation risk assessments already during the concept studies of a manned mission. Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) have been identified to be one of the primary sources of radiation exposure in space.This work presents an evaluation of the radiation exposure caused by GCR between 1970 and 2011 in near-Earth interplanetary space and at the orbit of the International Space Station (ISS) by making numerical simulations with the Monte-Carlo framework GEANT4. Commonly used GCR models - CREME96, CREME2009 and Badhwar-O'Neill2010 are used to describe the GCR spectra and the differences arising from the application of these different models in terms of absorbed dose and dose equivalent rates are investigated. Additionally, the depth distribution of the dose quantities and the relative contribution of particles with different energies to the total exposure during solar maximum and minimum conditions are studied.The differences in the spectra, described by the models, result in considerable differences in the estimation of the radiation exposure.

  16. ESBL Detection: Comparison of a Commercially Available Chromogenic Test for Third Generation Cephalosporine Resistance and Automated Susceptibility Testing in Enterobactericeae.

    PubMed

    El-Jade, Mohamed Ramadan; Parcina, Marijo; Schmithausen, Ricarda Maria; Stein, Christoph; Meilaender, Alina; Hoerauf, Achim; Molitor, Ernst; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Rapid detection and reporting of third generation cephalosporine resistance (3GC-R) and of extended spectrum betalactamases in Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) is a diagnostic and therapeutic priority to avoid inefficacy of the initial antibiotic regimen. In this study we evaluated a commercially available chromogenic screen for 3GC-R as a predictive and/or confirmatory test for ESBL and AmpC activity in clinical and veterinary Enterobacteriaceae isolates. The test was highly reliable in the prediction of cefotaxime and cefpodoxime resistance, but there was no correlation with ceftazidime and piperacillin/tazobactam minimal inhibitory concentrations. All human and porcine ESBL-E tested were detected with exception of one genetically positive but phenotypically negative isolate. By contrast, AmpC detection rates lay below 30%. Notably, exclusion of piperacillin/tazobactam resistant, 3GC susceptible K1+ Klebsiella isolates increased the sensitivity and specificity of the test for ESBL detection. Our data further imply that in regions with low prevalence of AmpC and K1 positive E. coli strains chromogenic testing for 3GC-R can substitute for more time consuming ESBL confirmative testing in E. coli isolates tested positive by Phoenix or VITEK2 ESBL screen. We, therefore, suggest a diagnostic algorithm that distinguishes 3GC-R screening from primary culture and species-dependent confirmatory ESBL testing by βLACTATM and discuss the implications of MIC distribution results on the choice of antibiotic regimen. PMID:27494134

  17. Sex differences in operant responding and survivability following exposure to space radiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On exploratory class missions, such as a mission to Mars, astronauts will be exposed to types and doses of radiation (galactic cosmic rays [GCR]) which are not experienced in low earth orbit where the space shuttle and International Space Station operate. Despite the fact that the crew on such a mi...

  18. Initial conditions for radiation analysis: models of galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nymmik, R. A.

    During interplanetary missions the radiation conditions are determined by fluxes of Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) particles and Solar Energetic Particles (SEP). The particle fluxes of these two high-energy radiation components differ fundamentally in energy spectra and have the opposite dependence on solar activity level. One of the key issues, associated with estimating flight conditions for missions to the Moon, various asteroids and Mars, is the relative balance between GCR and SCR, depending on the level of solar activity and the distance to the Sun for both open space conditions and conditions inside the spacecraft. This task can be solved with sufficient accuracy only when using such particle flux models (of the above mentioned radiation sources), which are based on unified parameters, describing the current solar activity level. Such models, employing smoothed Wolf numbers as the initial parameter, were developed at SINP MSU. These models are - the semi-empirical model of GCR fluxes, which has currently been approved as an international standard (ISO 15390), and the probabilistic model of SEP particle fluxes, which is currently under discussion as a draft international standard (ISO DRAFT 15391). The report presents a survey of experimental data on GCR and SEP fluxes in interplanetary space at various solar activity levels, and an analysis of the reliability and completeness of data on these fluxes, provided by various calculation models.

  19. Effects of in-feed chlortetracycline prophylaxis of beef cattle on animal health and antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concerns have been raised that in-feed chlortetracycline (CTC) may increase antimicrobial resistance (AMR), specifically tetracycline-resistant (TETr) Escherichia coli, and third-generation cephalosporin-resistant (3GCr) E. coli. We evaluated the impact of a 5-day in-feed CTC prophylaxis on animal h...

  20. Commitment Predictors: Long-Distance versus Geographically Close Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pistole, M. Carole; Roberts, Amber; Mosko, Jonathan E.

    2010-01-01

    In this web-based study, the authors examined long-distance relationships (LDRs) and geographically close relationships (GCRs). Two hierarchical multiple regressions (N = 138) indicated that attachment predicted LDR and GCR commitment in Step 1. Final equations indicated that high satisfaction and investments predicted LDR commitment, whereas low…

  1. Impact of Consciousness-Raising Activities on Young English Language Learners' Grammar Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemipour, Hamidreza; Hemmati, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    Grammar Consciousness-Raising (GCR) is an approach to teaching of grammar which learners instead of being taught the given rules, experience language data. The data challenge them to rethink, restructure their existing mental grammar and construct an explicit rule to describe the grammatical feature which the data illustrate (Ellis, 2002). And…

  2. Computational trigonometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, K.

    1994-12-31

    By means of the author`s earlier theory of antieigenvalues and antieigenvectors, a new computational approach to iterative methods is presented. This enables an explicit trigonometric understanding of iterative convergence and provides new insights into the sharpness of error bounds. Direct applications to Gradient descent, Conjugate gradient, GCR(k), Orthomin, CGN, GMRES, CGS, and other matrix iterative schemes will be given.

  3. A heavy ion spectrometer system for the measurement of projectile fragmentation of relativistic heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Engelage, J.; Crawford, H.J.; Greiner, L.; Kuo, C.

    1996-06-01

    The Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) at the LBL Bevalac provided a unique facility for measuring projectile fragmentation cross sections important in deconvolving the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) source composition. The general characteristics of the apparatus specific to this application are described and the main features of the event reconstruction and analysis used in the TRANSPORT experiment are discussed.

  4. Space Radiation Transport Codes: A Comparative Study for Galactic Cosmic Rays Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Ram; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Gabriel, Tony; Pinsky, Lawrence S.; Slaba, Tony

    For long duration and/or deep space human missions, protection from severe space radiation exposure is a challenging design constraint and may be a potential limiting factor. The space radiation environment consists of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), solar particle events (SPE), trapped radiation, and includes ions of all the known elements over a very broad energy range. These ions penetrate spacecraft materials producing nuclear fragments and secondary particles that damage biological tissues, microelectronic devices, and materials. In deep space missions, where the Earth's magnetic field does not provide protection from space radiation, the GCR environment is significantly enhanced due to the absence of geomagnetic cut-off and is a major component of radiation exposure. Accurate risk assessments critically depend on the accuracy of the input information as well as radiation transport codes used, and so systematic verification of codes is necessary. In this study, comparisons are made between the deterministic code HZETRN2006 and the Monte Carlo codes HETC-HEDS and FLUKA for an aluminum shield followed by a water target exposed to the 1977 solar minimum GCR spectrum. Interaction and transport of high charge ions present in GCR radiation environment provide a more stringent constraint in the comparison of the codes. Dose, dose equivalent and flux spectra are compared; details of the comparisons will be discussed, and conclusions will be drawn for future directions.

  5. Managing Lunar and Mars Mission Radiation Risks. Part 1; Cancer Risks, Uncertainties, and Shielding Effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Ren, Lei

    2005-01-01

    This document addresses calculations of probability distribution functions (PDFs) representing uncertainties in projecting fatal cancer risk from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPEs). PDFs are used to test the effectiveness of potential radiation shielding approaches. Monte-Carlo techniques are used to propagate uncertainties in risk coefficients determined from epidemiology data, dose and dose-rate reduction factors, quality factors, and physics models of radiation environments. Competing mortality risks and functional correlations in radiation quality factor uncertainties are treated in the calculations. The cancer risk uncertainty is about four-fold for lunar and Mars mission risk projections. For short-stay lunar missins (<180 d), SPEs present the most significant risk, but one effectively mitigated by shielding. For long-duration (>180 d) lunar or Mars missions, GCR risks may exceed radiation risk limits. While shielding materials are marginally effective in reducing GCR cancer risks because of the penetrating nature of GCR and secondary radiation produced in tissue by relativisitc particles, polyethylene or carbon composite shielding cannot be shown to significantly reduce risk compared to aluminum shielding. Therefore, improving our knowledge of space radiobiology to narrow uncertainties that lead to wide PDFs is the best approach to ensure radiation protection goals are met for space exploration.

  6. How safe is safe enough? Radiation risk for a human mission to Mars.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, Francis A; Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Chappell, Lori J; Huff, Janice L

    2013-01-01

    Astronauts on a mission to Mars would be exposed for up to 3 years to galactic cosmic rays (GCR)--made up of high-energy protons and high charge (Z) and energy (E) (HZE) nuclei. GCR exposure rate increases about three times as spacecraft venture out of Earth orbit into deep space where protection of the Earth's magnetosphere and solid body are lost. NASA's radiation standard limits astronaut exposures to a 3% risk of exposure induced death (REID) at the upper 95% confidence interval (CI) of the risk estimate. Fatal cancer risk has been considered the dominant risk for GCR, however recent epidemiological analysis of radiation risks for circulatory diseases allow for predictions of REID for circulatory diseases to be included with cancer risk predictions for space missions. Using NASA's models of risks and uncertainties, we predicted that central estimates for radiation induced mortality and morbidity could exceed 5% and 10% with upper 95% CI near 10% and 20%, respectively for a Mars mission. Additional risks to the central nervous system (CNS) and qualitative differences in the biological effects of GCR compared to terrestrial radiation may significantly increase these estimates, and will require new knowledge to evaluate. PMID:24146746

  7. Functional characterization of transcriptional regulatory elements in the upstream region of the yeast GLK1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, P; Flores, L; de la Cera, T; Moreno, F

    1999-01-01

    The glucokinase gene GLK1 of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is transcriptionally regulated in response to the carbon source of the growth medium. Northern-blot analysis shows that the GLK1 gene is expressed at a basal level in the presence of glucose, de-repressed more than 6-fold under conditions of sugar limitation and more than 25-fold under conditions of ethanol induction. lacZ fusions of the GLK1 gene promoter were constructed and a deletion analysis was performed in order to identify the cis-acting regulatory elements of the promoter that controls GLK1 gene expression. First, the expression seemed to be mediated mainly by one GCR1 and three stress-responsive element (STRE) activating elements. Secondly, an ethanol repression autoregulation (ERA)/twelve-fold TA repeat (TAB) repressor element was identified within the promoter region of the GLK1 gene. A specific and differential protein binding to the STRE was observed with extracts from de-repressed and repressed cells. No differential binding to the GCR1 or ERA/TAB elements was observed with extracts from de-repressed and repressed cells, but, in both cases, the binding was competed for by an excess of the unlabelled GLK1(GCR1) and GLK1(ERA) sequence. The transcription factors Msn2 and Msn4, which bind to the GLK1 upstream region through the STRE, contribute to inductive activation. The transcription factor Gcr1, which binds through the GCR1 element, contributes to constitutive activation. In order to achieve the severe glucose repression of GLK1, constitutive repressor factors acting through the ERA/TAB element must counteract constitutive activation generated by Gcr1 binding to the GCR1 element. Full expression of the GLK1 gene is produced by inductive activation of three STRE when Msn2 and Msn4 proteins are translocated to the nucleus by covalent modification. The combinatorial effect of the entire region leads to the regulated transcription of GLK1, i.e., silent in media with glucose and other

  8. Ionizing Radiation Environments and Exposure Risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M. H. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Space radiation environments for historically large solar particle events (SPE) and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are simulated to characterize exposures to radio-sensitive organs for missions to low-Earth orbit (LEO), moon, near-Earth asteroid, and Mars. Primary and secondary particles for SPE and GCR are transported through the respective atmospheres of Earth or Mars, space vehicle, and astronaut's body tissues using NASA's HZETRN/QMSFRG computer code. Space radiation protection methods, which are derived largely from ground-based methods recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) or International Commission on Radiological Protections (ICRP), are built on the principles of risk justification, limitation, and ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable). However, because of the large uncertainties in high charge and energy (HZE) particle radiobiology and the small population of space crews, NASA develops distinct methods to implement a space radiation protection program. For the fatal cancer risks, which have been considered the dominant risk for GCR, the NASA Space Cancer Risk (NSCR) model has been developed from recommendations by NCRP; and undergone external review by the National Research Council (NRC), NCRP, and through peer-review publications. The NSCR model uses GCR environmental models, particle transport codes describing the GCR modification by atomic and nuclear interactions in atmospheric shielding coupled with spacecraft and tissue shielding, and NASA-defined quality factors for solid cancer and leukemia risk estimates for HZE particles. By implementing the NSCR model, the exposure risks from various heliospheric conditions are assessed for the radiation environments for various-class mission types to understand architectures and strategies of human exploration missions and ultimately to contribute to the optimization of radiation safety and well-being of space crewmembers participating in long-term space missions.

  9. Radiation effects in space: The Clementine I mission

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, T. G.; Clayton, E.; Wefel, J. P.

    1994-12-20

    The space radiation environment for the CLEMENTINE I mission was investigated using a new calculational model, CHIME, which includes the effects of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), anomalous component (AC) species and solar energetic particle (SEP) events and their variations as a function of time. Unlike most previous radiation environment models, CHIME is based upon physical theory and is {open_quotes}calibrated{close_quotes} with energetic particle measurements made over the last two decades. Thus, CHIME provides an advance in the accuracy of estimating the interplanetary radiation environment. Using this model we have calculated particle energy spectra, fluences and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra for all three major components of the CLEMENTINE I mission during 1994: (1) the spacecraft in lunar orbit, (2) the spacecraft during asteroid flyby, and (3) the interstate adapter USA in Earth orbit. Our investigations indicate that during 1994 the level of solar modulation, which dominates the variation in the GCR and AC flux as a function of time, will be decreasing toward solar minimum levels. Consequently the GCR and AC flux will be increasing during Y, the year and, potentially, will rise to levels seen during previous solar minimums. The estimated radiation environment also indicates that the AC will dominate the energetic particle spectra for energies below 30-50 MeV/nucleon, while the GCR have a peak flux at {approximately}300 MeV/nucleon and maintain a relatively high flux level up to >1000 MeV/nucleon. The AC significantly enhances the integrated flux for LET in the range 1 to 10 MeV/(mg/cm{sup 2}), but due to the steep energy spectra of the AC a relatively small amount of material ({approximately}50 mils of Al) can effectively shield against this component. The GCR are seen to be highly penetrating and require massive amounts of shielding before there is any appreciable decrease in the LET flux.

  10. Radiation effects in space: The Clementine 1 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzik, T. Gregory; Clayton, Edmund; Wefel, John P.

    1994-12-01

    The space radiation environment for the Clementine 1 mission was investigated using a new calculational model, CHIME, which includes the effects of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), anomalous component (AC) species and solar energetic particle (SEP) events and their variations as a function of time. Unlike most previous radiation environment models, CHIME is based upon physical theory and is 'calibrated' with energetic particle measurements made over the last two decades. Thus, CHIME provides an advance in the accuracy of estimating the interplanetary radiation environment. Using this model we have calculated particle energy spectra, fluences and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra for all three major components of the Clementine 1 mission during 1994: (1) the spacecraft in lunar orbit, (2) the spacecraft during asteroid flyby, and (3) the interstage adapter (ISA) in earth orbit. Our investigations indicate that during 1994 the level of solar modulation, which dominates the variation in the GCR and AC flux as a function of time, will be decreasing toward solar minimum levels. Consequently the GCR and AC flux will be increasing during the year and, potentially, will rise to levels seen during previous solar minimums. The estimated radiation environment also indicates that the AC will dominate the energetic particle spectra for energies below 30-50 MeV/nucleon, while the GCR have a peak flux at approximately 300 MeV/nucleon and maintain a relatively high flux level up to greater than 1000 MeV/nucleon. The AC significantly enhances the integrated flux for LET in the range 1 to 10 MeV/(mg/sq cm), but due to the steep energy spectra of the AC a relatively small amount of material (approximately 50 mils of Al) can effectively shield against this component. The GCR are seen to be highly penetrating and require massive amounts of shielding before there is any appreciable decrease in the LET flux.

  11. Corotating Solar Wind Structures and Recurrent Trains of Enhanced Diurnal Variation in Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeeram, T.; Ruffolo, D.; Sáiz, A.; Kamyan, N.; Nutaro, T.

    2014-04-01

    Data from the Princess Sirindhorn Neutron Monitor at Doi Inthanon, Thailand, with a vertical cutoff rigidity of 16.8 GV, were utilized to determine the diurnal anisotropy (DA) of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) near Earth during solar minimum conditions between 2007 November and 2010 November. We identified trains of enhanced DA over several days, which often recur after a solar rotation period (~27 days). By investigating solar coronal holes as identified from synoptic maps and solar wind parameters, we found that the intensity and anisotropy of cosmic rays are associated with the high-speed streams (HSSs) in the solar wind, which are in turn related to the structure and evolution of coronal holes. An enhanced DA was observed after the onset of some, but not all, HSSs. During time periods of recurrent trains, the DA was often enhanced or suppressed according to the sign of the interplanetary magnetic field B, which suggests a contribution from a mechanism involving a southward gradient in the GCR density, n, and a gradient anisotropy along B × ∇n. In one non-recurrent and one recurrent sequence, an HSS from an equatorial coronal hole was merged with that from a trailing mid-latitude extension of a polar coronal hole, and the slanted HSS structure in space with suppressed GCR density can account for the southward GCR gradient. We conclude that the gradient anisotropy is a source of temporary changes in the GCR DA under solar minimum conditions, and that the latitudinal GCR gradient can sometimes be explained by the coronal hole morphology.

  12. Physics of the Isotopic Dependence of Galactic Cosmic Ray Fluence Behind Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Saganti, Premkumar B.; Hu, Xiao-Dong; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cleghorn, Timothy F.; Wilson, John W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2003-01-01

    For over 25 years, NASA has supported the development of space radiation transport models for shielding applications. The NASA space radiation transport model now predicts dose and dose equivalent in Earth and Mars orbit to an accuracy of plus or minus 20%. However, because larger errors may occur in particle fluence predictions, there is interest in further assessments and improvements in NASA's space radiation transport model. In this paper, we consider the effects of the isotopic composition of the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and the isotopic dependence of nuclear fragmentation cross-sections on the solution to transport models used for shielding studies. Satellite measurements are used to describe the isotopic composition of the GCR. Using NASA's quantum multiple-scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) and high-charge and energy (HZETRN) transport code, we study the effect of the isotopic dependence of the primary GCR composition and secondary nuclei on shielding calculations. The QMSFRG is shown to accurately describe the iso-spin dependence of nuclear fragmentation. The principal finding of this study is that large errors (plus or minus 100%) will occur in the mass-fluence spectra when comparing transport models that use a complete isotope grid (approximately 170 ions) to ones that use a reduced isotope grid, for example the 59 ion-grid used in the HZETRN code in the past, however less significant errors (less than 20%) occur in the elemental-fluence spectra. Because a complete isotope grid is readily handled on small computer workstations and is needed for several applications studying GCR propagation and scattering, it is recommended that they be used for future GCR studies.

  13. Corotating solar wind structures and recurrent trains of enhanced diurnal variation in galactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Yeeram, T.; Ruffolo, D.; Sáiz, A.; Kamyan, N.; Nutaro, T. E-mail: david.ruf@mahidol.ac.th E-mail: p_chang24@hotmail.com

    2014-04-01

    Data from the Princess Sirindhorn Neutron Monitor at Doi Inthanon, Thailand, with a vertical cutoff rigidity of 16.8 GV, were utilized to determine the diurnal anisotropy (DA) of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) near Earth during solar minimum conditions between 2007 November and 2010 November. We identified trains of enhanced DA over several days, which often recur after a solar rotation period (∼27 days). By investigating solar coronal holes as identified from synoptic maps and solar wind parameters, we found that the intensity and anisotropy of cosmic rays are associated with the high-speed streams (HSSs) in the solar wind, which are in turn related to the structure and evolution of coronal holes. An enhanced DA was observed after the onset of some, but not all, HSSs. During time periods of recurrent trains, the DA was often enhanced or suppressed according to the sign of the interplanetary magnetic field B, which suggests a contribution from a mechanism involving a southward gradient in the GCR density, n, and a gradient anisotropy along B × ∇n. In one non-recurrent and one recurrent sequence, an HSS from an equatorial coronal hole was merged with that from a trailing mid-latitude extension of a polar coronal hole, and the slanted HSS structure in space with suppressed GCR density can account for the southward GCR gradient. We conclude that the gradient anisotropy is a source of temporary changes in the GCR DA under solar minimum conditions, and that the latitudinal GCR gradient can sometimes be explained by the coronal hole morphology.

  14. May 2005 Halo CMEs and Galactic Cosmic Ray Flux Changes at Earth's Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.; Alania, M. V.; Wawrzynczak, A.; Ygbuhay, R. C.; Fikani, M. M.

    2014-05-01

    The pressure corrected hourly data from the global network of cosmic ray detectors, measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) intensity ( B) at Earth's orbit and its components B x , B y , B z (in the geocentric solar ecliptic coordinates) are used to conduct a comprehensive study of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity fluctuations caused by the halo coronal mass ejection of 13 May 2005. Distinct differences exist in GCR timelines recorded by neutron monitors (NMs) and multidirectional muon telescopes (MTs), the latter respond to the high rigidity portion of the GCR differential rigidity spectrum. The Forbush decrease (FD) onset in MTs is delayed (˜5 h) with respect to the onset of a geomagnetic storm sudden commencement (SSC) and a large pre-increase is present in MT data before, during, and after the SSC onset, of unknown origin. The rigidity spectrum, for a range of GCR rigidities (≤200 GV), is a power law in rigidity (R) with a negative exponent ( γ=-1.05) at GCR minimum intensity, leading us to infer that the quasi-linear theory of modulation is inconsistent with observations at high rigidities (>1 GV); the results support the force field theory of modulation. At present, we do not have a comprehensive model for the FD explaining quantitatively all the observational features but we present a preliminary model listing physical processes that may contribute to a FD timeline. We explored the connections between different phases of the FD and the power spectra of IMF components but did not find a sustained relationship.

  15. Average Spatial Distribution of Cosmic Rays behind the Interplanetary Shock—Global Muon Detector Network Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, M.; Munakata, K.; Kato, C.; Kuwabara, T.; Rockenbach, M.; Dal Lago, A.; Schuch, N. J.; Braga, C. R.; Mendonça, R. R. S.; Jassar, H. K. Al; Sharma, M. M.; Duldig, M. L.; Humble, J. E.; Evenson, P.; Sabbah, I.; Tokumaru, M.

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) density and its spatial gradient in Forbush Decreases (FDs) observed with the Global Muon Detector Network (GMDN) and neutron monitors (NMs). By superposing the GCR density and density gradient observed in FDs following 45 interplanetary shocks (IP-shocks), each associated with an identified eruption on the Sun, we infer the average spatial distribution of GCRs behind IP-shocks. We find two distinct modulations of GCR density in FDs, one in the magnetic sheath and the other in the coronal mass ejection (CME) behind the sheath. The density modulation in the sheath is dominant in the western flank of the shock, while the modulation in the CME ejecta stands out in the eastern flank. This east-west asymmetry is more prominent in GMDN data responding to ˜60 GV GCRs than in NM data responding to ˜10 GV GCRs, because of the softer rigidity spectrum of the modulation in the CME ejecta than in the sheath. The geocentric solar ecliptic-y component of the density gradient, G y , shows a negative (positive) enhancement in FDs caused by the eastern (western) eruptions, while G z shows a negative (positive) enhancement in FDs caused by the northern (southern) eruptions. This implies that the GCR density minimum is located behind the central flank of IP-shocks and propagating radially outward from the location of the solar eruption. We also confirmed that the average G z changes its sign above and below the heliospheric current sheet, in accord with the prediction of the drift model for the large-scale GCR transport in the heliosphere.

  16. Simulation and Comparison of Martian Surface Ionization Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Zeitlin, Cary; Hassler, Donald M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2013-01-01

    The spectrum of energetic particle radiation and corresponding doses at the surface of Mars is being characterized by the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), one of ten science instruments on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity Rover. The time series of dose rate for the first 300 Sols after landing on Mars on August 6, 2012 is presented here. For the comparison to RAD measurements of dose rate, Martian surface ionization radiation is simulated by utilizing observed space quantities. The GCR primary radiation spectrum is calculated by using the Badhwar-O'Neill 2011 (BO11) galactic cosmic ray (GCR) model, which has been developed by utilizing all balloon and satellite GCR measurements since 1955 and the newer 1997-2012 Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) measurements. In the BO11 model, solar modulation of the GCR primary radiation spectrum is described in terms of the international smoothed sunspot number and a time delay function. For the transport of the impingent GCR primary radiation through Mars atmosphere, a vertical distribution of atmospheric thickness at each elevation is calculated using the vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature and pressure made by Mars Global Surveyor measurements. At Gale Crater in the southern hemisphere, the seasonal variation of atmospheric thickness is accounted for the daily atmospheric pressure measurements of the MSL Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) by using low- and high-density models for cool- and warm-season, respectively. The spherically distributed atmospheric distance is traced along the slant path, and the resultant directional shielding by Martian atmosphere is coupled with Curiosity vehicle for dose estimates. We present predictions of dose rate and comparison to the RAD measurements. The simulation agrees to within +/- 20% with the RAD measurements showing clearly the variation of dose rate by heliospheric conditions, and presenting the sensitivity of dose rate by atmospheric pressure

  17. A field assessment of long-term laboratory sediment toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Wang, Ning; Hayward, Jeannie M. R.; Jones, John R.; Jones, Susan B.; Ireland, D. Scott

    2005-01-01

    Response of the amphipod Hyalella azteca exposed to contaminated sediments for 10 to 42 d in laboratory toxicity tests was compared to responses observed in controlled three-month invertebrate colonization exposures conducted in a pond. Sediments evaluated included a sediment spiked with dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD) or dilutions of a field sediment collected from the Grand Calumet River (GCR) in Indiana (USA) (contaminated with organic compounds and metals). Consistent effects were observed at the highest exposure concentrations (400 ??g DDD/goc [DDD concentrations normalized to grams of organic carbon (goc) in sedimentl or 4% GCR sediment) on survival, length, and reproduction of amphipods in the laboratory and on abundance of invertebrates colonizing sediments in the field. Effect concentrations for DDD observed for 10-d length and 42-d reproduction of amphipods (e.g., chronic value [ChV] of 66 ??g DDD/goc and 25% inhibition concentration [IC25] of 68 ??g DDD/goc for reproduction) were similar to the lowest effect concentrations for DDD measured on invertebrates colonizing sediment the field. Effect concentrations for GCR sediment on 28-d survival and length and 42-d reproduction and length of amphipods (i.e., ChVs of 0.20-0.66% GCR sediment) provided more conservative effect concentrations compared to 10-d survival or length of amphipods in the laboratory or the response of invertebrates colonizing sediment in the field (e.g., ChVs of 2.2% GCR sediment). Results of this study indicate that use of chronic laboratory toxicity tests with H. azteca and benthic colonization studies should be used to provide conservative estimates of impacts on benthic communities exposed to contaminated sediments. Bioaccumulation of DDD by oligochaetes colonizing the DDD-spiked sediment was similar to results of laboratory sediment tests previously conducted with the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegates, confirming that laboratory exposures can be used to estimate

  18. Numerical simulation of the radiation environment on Martian surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.

    2015-12-01

    The radiation environment on the Martian surface is significantly different from that on earth. Existing observation and studies reveal that the radiation environment on the Martian surface is highly variable regarding to both short- and long-term time scales. For example, its dose rate presents diurnal and seasonal variations associated with atmospheric pressure changes. Moreover, dose rate is also strongly influenced by the modulation from GCR flux. Numerical simulation and theoretical explanations are required to understand the mechanisms behind these features, and to predict the time variation of radiation environment on the Martian surface if aircraft is supposed to land on it in near future. The high energy galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) which are ubiquitous throughout the solar system are highly penetrating and extremely difficult to shield against beyond the Earth's protective atmosphere and magnetosphere. The goal of this article is to evaluate the long term radiation risk on the Martian surface. Therefore, we need to develop a realistic time-dependent GCR model, which will be integrated with Geant4 transport code subsequently to reproduce the observed variation of surface dose rate associated with the changing heliospheric conditions. In general, the propagation of cosmic rays in the interplanetary medium can be described by a Fokker-Planck equation (or Parker equation). In last decade,we witnessed a fast development of GCR transport models within the heliosphere based on accurate gas-dynamic and MHD backgrounds from global models of the heliosphere. The global MHD simulation produces a more realistic pattern of the 3-D heliospheric structure, as well as the interface between the solar system and the surrounding interstellar space. As a consequence, integrating plasma background obtained from global-dependent 3-D MHD simulation and stochastic Parker transport simulation, we expect to produce an accurate global physical-based GCR modulation model. Combined

  19. Atmospheric changes caused by galactic cosmic rays over the period 1960-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackman, C. H.; Marsh, D. R.; Kinnison, D. E.; Mertens, C. J.; Fleming, E. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Specified Dynamics version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (SD-WACCM) and the Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional (GSFC 2-D) models are used to investigate the effect of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) on the atmosphere over the 1960-2010 time period. The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) computation of the GCR-caused ionization rates are used in these simulations. GCR-caused maximum NOx increases of 4-15 % are computed in the Southern polar troposphere with associated ozone increases of 1-2 %. NOx increases of ∼ 1-6 % are calculated for the lower stratosphere with associated ozone decreases of 0.2-1 %. The primary impact of GCRs on ozone was due to their production of NOx. The impact of GCRs varies with the atmospheric chlorine loading, sulfate aerosol loading, and solar cycle variation. Because of the interference between the NOx and ClOx ozone loss cycles (e.g., the ClO + NO2 + M → ClONO2 + M reaction) and the change in the importance of ClOx in the ozone budget, GCRs cause larger atmospheric impacts with less chlorine loading. GCRs also cause larger atmospheric impacts with less sulfate aerosol loading and for years closer to solar minimum. GCR-caused decreases of annual average global total ozone (AAGTO) were computed to be 0.2 % or less with GCR-caused tropospheric column ozone increases of 0.08 % or less and GCR-caused stratospheric column ozone decreases of 0.23 % or less. Although these computed ozone impacts are small, GCRs provide a natural influence on ozone and need to be quantified over long time periods.

  20. Voyager 1 and 2 Measurements of Galactic and Anomalous Cosmic Ray Intensities and Anisotropies in and Beyond the Heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, M. E.; Decker, R. B.; Hamilton, D. C.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Voyager 1 (V1) exited the nominal heliosheath in August 2012, clearly demarcated by an extreme drop in heliospheric particle intensities known as the heliocliff. Whether it entered the interstellar medium proper or some other radically different region is still subject to debate, but observationally the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensities and anisotropies are still varying, apparently responding to heliospheric perturbations, and the region is certainly bearing little resemblance to the expected quiescent interstellar medium. Voyager 2 (V2) continues to push towards the outer boundary of the heliosheath, being in a region heavily influenced by the interstellar interaction, as evidenced by dramatically diverted plasma flows, measuring on average greater than 60 degrees from the radial. We have studied the anomalous cosmic ray (ACR) and GCR particle behavior using V1 and V2 Low Energy Charge Particle observations, beyond the termination shock, and report the largest measured ~3% second-order GCR anisotropy at V1 after the heliocliff crossing and the order-of-magnitude variations in ACR and GCR intensities at V2 (e.g., from 2007-2012). These V2 observations are dissonant with the steady intensity profiles seen at V1 during the same period in the heliosheath and are seemingly related to the proximity to the magnetically sectored heliosheath, which arises from the increasingly compressed heliospheric current sheet (HCS) folds. We extend our earlier post-heliocliff, V1 GCR anisotropy work to the entire the heliosheath (V1 and V2) and report on the relationship between particle intensities and newly released V2 magnetometer data, particularly in regard to the HCS location.

  1. Cosmogenic helium and neon in individual chondrules from Allende and Murchison: Implications for the precompaction exposure history of chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, A. S. G.; Baur, H.; Heber, V. S.; Reusser, E.; Wieler, R.

    2011-07-01

    We analyzed cosmogenic He and Ne in more than 60 individual chondrules separated from small chips from the carbonaceous chondrites Allende and Murchison. The goal of this work is to search for evidence of an exposure of chondrules to energetic particles—either solar or galactic—prior to final compaction of their host chondrites and prior to the exposure of the meteoroids to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) on their way to Earth. Production rates of GCR-produced He and Ne are calculated for each chondrule based on major element composition and a physical model of cosmogenic nuclide production in carbonaceous chondrites (Leya and Masarik 2009). All studied chondrules in Allende show nominal exposure ages identical to each other within uncertainties of a few hundred thousand years. Allende chondrules therefore show no signs of a precompaction exposure. The majority of the Murchison chondrules (the "normal" chondrules) also have nominal exposure ages identical within a few hundred thousand years. However, roughly 20% of the studied Murchison chondrules (the "pre-exposed" chondrules) contain considerably or even much higher concentrations of cosmogenic noble gases than the normal chondrules, equivalent to exposure ages to GCR at present-day fluxes in a 4π irradiation of up to about 30 Myr. The data do not allow to firmly conclude whether these excesses were acquired by an exposure of the pre-exposed chondrules to an early intense flux of solar energetic particles (solar cosmic rays) or rather by an exposure to GCR in the regolith of the Murchison parent asteroid. However, we prefer the latter explanation. Two major reasons are the GCR-like isotopic composition of the excess Ne and the distribution of solar flare tracks in Murchison samples.

  2. Large Galactic Cosmic Ray Anisotropies in the Heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, M. E.; Decker, R. B.; Hamilton, D. C.; Brown, L. E.; Krimigis, S. M.; Roelof, E. C.

    2013-12-01

    The angular distribution of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensities had been observed to be nearly isotropic throughout the space age, with even the largest anisotropies falling well short of 1%. Voyager 1, after the initial GCR intensity enhancement in May 2012 and upon sustainably entering a region depleted of hot plasma on 25 August 2012 (Burlaga et al. 2013; Krimigis et al. 2013; Stone et al. 2013; Webber & McDonald 2013), has uncovered a new regime where large GCR anisotropies prevail. We recently reported on the largest GCR anisotropies observed (Krimigis et al., 2013; Hill et al., 2013), with the second order anisotropy of >200 MeV GCRs reaching ~3.5%. We developed a new technique to extract bi-directional intensities from a double-ended particle telescope that has asymmetric viewing geometry (i.e., the geometric factor for particle detection with one end is unequal to the geometric factor of the other end). Applying this technique we report here on the variation of GCR anisotropies at Voyager 1 and 2 in the depletion region, in the hot heliosheath, and upstream of the termination shock. Burlaga, L.F. et al, 2013, Science 341, 147-150, DOI: 10.1126/science.1235451. Hill, M.E. et al, 2013, presented at the 12th Ann. Inter. Astrophys. Conf., Myrtle Beach, SC, 15-19 April 2013. Krimigis, S.M. et al., 2013, Science 341, 144-147, DOI: 10.1126/science.1235721. Stone, E.C. et al., 2013, Science 341, 150-153, DOI: 10.1126/science.1236408. Webber & McDonald, 2013, Geophys. Res. Let. 40, 1665-1668, DOI: 10.1002/grl.50383.

  3. The Average Quality Factors by TEPC for Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Nikjoo, Hooshang; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2004-01-01

    The quality factor used in radiation protection is defined as a function of LET, Q(sub ave)(LET). However, tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) measure the average quality factors as a function of lineal energy (y), Q(sub ave)(Y). A model of the TEPC response for charged particles considers energy deposition as a function of impact parameter from the ion s path to the volume, and describes the escape of energy out of sensitive volume by delta-rays and the entry of delta rays from the high-density wall into the low-density gas-volume. A common goal for operational detectors is to measure the average radiation quality to within accuracy of 25%. Using our TEPC response model and the NASA space radiation transport model we show that this accuracy is obtained by a properly calibrated TEPC. However, when the individual contributions from trapped protons and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are considered; the average quality factor obtained by TEPC is overestimated for trapped protons and underestimated for GCR by about 30%, i.e., a compensating error. Using TEPC's values for trapped protons for Q(sub ave)(y), we obtained average quality factors in the 2.07-2.32 range. However, Q(sub ave)(LET) ranges from 1.5-1.65 as spacecraft shielding depth increases. The average quality factors for trapped protons on STS-89 demonstrate that the model of the TEPC response is in good agreement with flight TEPC data for Q(sub ave)(y), and thus Q(sub ave)(LET) for trapped protons is overestimated by TEPC. Preliminary comparisons for the complete GCR spectra show that Q(sub ave)(LET) for GCR is approximately 3.2-4.1, while TEPC measures 2.9-3.4 for QQ(sub ave)(y), indicating that QQ(sub ave)(LET) for GCR is underestimated by TEPC.

  4. Validity of the Aluminum Equivalent Approximation in Space Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Adams, Daniel O.; Wilson, John W.

    2009-01-01

    The origin of the aluminum equivalent shield approximation in space radiation analysis can be traced back to its roots in the early years of the NASA space programs (Mercury, Gemini and Apollo) wherein the primary radiobiological concern was the intense sources of ionizing radiation causing short term effects which was thought to jeopardize the safety of the crew and hence the mission. Herein, it is shown that the aluminum equivalent shield approximation, although reasonably well suited for that time period and to the application for which it was developed, is of questionable usefulness to the radiobiological concerns of routine space operations of the 21 st century which will include long stays onboard the International Space Station (ISS) and perhaps the moon. This is especially true for a risk based protection system, as appears imminent for deep space exploration where the long-term effects of Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) exposure is of primary concern. The present analysis demonstrates that sufficiently large errors in the interior particle environment of a spacecraft result from the use of the aluminum equivalent approximation, and such approximations should be avoided in future astronaut risk estimates. In this study, the aluminum equivalent approximation is evaluated as a means for estimating the particle environment within a spacecraft structure induced by the GCR radiation field. For comparison, the two extremes of the GCR environment, the 1977 solar minimum and the 2001 solar maximum, are considered. These environments are coupled to the Langley Research Center (LaRC) deterministic ionized particle transport code High charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport (HZETRN), which propagates the GCR spectra for elements with charges (Z) in the range I <= Z <= 28 (H -- Ni) and secondary neutrons through selected target materials. The coupling of the GCR extremes to HZETRN allows for the examination of the induced environment within the interior' of an idealized spacecraft

  5. Time-dependent radiation hazard estimations during space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobynde, Mikhail; Shprits, Yuri; Drozdov, Alexander

    Cosmic particle radiation is a limiting factor for the out of magnetosphere crewed flights. The cosmic radiation uncrewed flights inside heliosphere and crewed flights inside of magnetosphere tend to become a routine procedure, whereas there have been only few shot time flights out of it (Apollo missions 1969-1972) with maximum duration less than a month. Long term crewed missions set much higher requirements to the radiation shielding, primarily because of long exposition term. Inside the helosphere there are two main sources of cosmic radiation: galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and coronal mass ejections (CME). GCR come from the outside of heliosphere forming a background of overall radiation that affects the spacecraft. The intensity of GCR is varied according to solar activity, increasing with solar activity decrease and backward, with the modulation time (time between nearest maxima) of 11 yeas. CME are shot term events, comparing to GCR modulation time, but are much more energetic. The probability of CME increases with the increase of solar activity. Time dependences of the intensity of these two components encourage looking for a time window of flight, when intensity and affection of CME and GCR would be minimized. Applying time dependent models of GCR spectra [1] and estimations of CME we show the time dependence of the radiation dose in a realistic human phantom [2] inside the shielding capsule. We pay attention to the shielding capsule design, looking for an optimal geometry parameters and materials. Different types of particles affect differently on the human providing more or less harm to the tissues. Incident particles provide a large amount of secondary particles while propagating through the shielding capsule. We make an attempt to find an optimal combination of shielding capsule parameters, namely material and thickness, that will effectively decrease the incident particle energy, at the same time minimizing flow of secondary induced particles and

  6. On the validity of the aluminum equivalent approximation in space radiation shielding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Adams, Daniel O.; Wilson, John W.

    2010-09-01

    The origin of the aluminum equivalent shield approximation in space radiation analysis can be traced back to its roots in the early years of the NASA space programs (Mercury, Gemini and Apollo) wherein the primary radiobiological concern was the intense sources of ionizing radiation causing short term effects which was thought to jeopardize the safety of the crew and hence the mission. Herein, it is shown that the aluminum equivalent shield approximation, although reasonably well suited for that time period and to the application for which it was developed, is of questionable usefulness to the radiobiological concerns of routine space operations of the 21st century which will include long stays onboard the International Space Station (ISS) and perhaps the moon. This is especially true for a risk based protection system, as appears imminent for deep space exploration where the long-term effects of Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) exposure is of primary concern. The present analysis demonstrates that sufficiently large errors in the interior particle environment of a spacecraft result from the use of the aluminum equivalent approximation, and such approximations should be avoided in future astronaut risk estimates. In this study, the aluminum equivalent approximation is evaluated as a means for estimating the particle environment within a spacecraft structure induced by the GCR radiation field. For comparison, the two extremes of the GCR environment, the 1977 solar minimum and the 2001 solar maximum, are considered. These environments are coupled to the Langley Research Center (LaRC) deterministic ionized particle transport code High charge ( Z) and Energy TRaNsport (HZETRN), which propagates the GCR spectra for elements with charges ( Z) in the range 1 ⩽ Z ⩽ 28 (H-Ni) and secondary neutrons through selected target materials. The coupling of the GCR extremes to HZETRN allows for the examination of the induced environment within the interior of an idealized spacecraft as

  7. Radiation characteristics in the spherical tissue-equivalent phantom on the ISS during solar activity minimum according to the data from Liulin-5 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkova, J.; Koleva, R.; Maltchev, St.; Bankov, N.; Benghin, V.; Chernykh, I.; Shurshakov, V.; Petrov, V.

    2013-07-01

    The Liulin-5 charged particle telescope observes the radiation characteristics in the spherical tissue-equivalent phantom of MATROSHKA-R international project on the International Space Station (ISS). Liulin-5 measures time resolved deposited energy spectra, linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum, flux and absorbed dose rates for electrons, protons and the biologically relevant heavy ion components of the cosmic radiation at three depths along the phantom's radius. We present some new results of Liulin-5 experiment obtained from June 2007 to March 2010. The average quality factor for different time intervals is between 2.7 and 4.4. Due to the heavy ions in LET spectrum of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR), the GCR quality factor is bigger than that of the trapped protons. The absorbed dose rates measured at depths in the phantom corresponding to the depths of blood forming organs in human body are 7.75-9.6 μGy/h and the dose equivalent rates are 24.6-36.7 μSv/h. Usually the trapped protons contribute about 60% of the total absorbed dose at 40 mm depth in the phantom and about 40% at 165 mm depth. The rest of the dose comes from GCR. Space Shuttle docking and the change of ISS attitude preformed for that purpose lead to a decrease in the total doses and to decreasing the trapped protons contributions. The doses from GCR are not affected neither by the depth of measurement not by Shuttle docking. At 165 mm depth in the phantom the largest fluxes along the ISS orbit are obtained from the trapped protons in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) at L values 1.26-1.27, B∼0.198 Gs, geographical longitude ∼-51° to -55°, latitude ∼-28° to -29° and altitudes 361-363 km. Minimal values about 0.1 particles/cm2s were recorded at L∼1 from GCR, at L≥4 the GCR flux reaches 2.1 particles/cm2s.

  8. Full Mission Astronaut Radiation Exposure Assessments for Long Duration Lunar Surface Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, Anne M.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Qualls, Garry D.; Blattnig, Steve B.; Lee, Kerry T.; Fry, Dan J.; Stoffle, Nicholas N.; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Slaba, Tony C.; Walker, Steven A.; Zapp, Edward N.

    2010-01-01

    Risk to astronauts due to ionizing radiation exposure is a primary concern for missions beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and will drive mission architecture requirements, mission timelines, and operational practices. Both galactic cosmic ray (GCR) and solar particle event (SPE) environments pose a risk to astronauts for missions beyond LEO. The GCR environment, which is made up of protons and heavier ions covering a broad energy spectrum, is ever present but varies in intensity with the solar cycle, while SPEs are sporadic events, consisting primarily of protons moving outward through the solar system from the sun. The GCR environment is more penetrating and is more difficult to shield than SPE environments, but lacks the intensity to induce acute effects. Large SPEs are rare, but they could result in a lethal dose, if adequate shielding is not provided. For short missions, radiation risk is dominated by the possibility of a large SPE. Longer missions also require planning for large SPEs; adequate shielding must be provided and operational constraints must allow astronauts to move quickly to shielded locations. The dominant risk for longer missions, however, is GCR exposure, which accumulates over time and can lead to late effects such as cancer. SPE exposure, even low level SPE exposure received in heavily shielded locations, will increase this risk. In addition to GCR and SPE environments, the lunar neutron albedo resulting mainly from the interaction of GCRs with regolith will also contribute to astronaut risk. Full mission exposure assessments were performed for proposed long duration lunar surface mission scenarios. In order to accomplish these assessments, radiation shielding models were developed for a proposed lunar habitat and rover. End-to-End mission exposure assessments were performed by first calculating exposure rates for locations in the habitat, rover, and during extra-vehicular activities (EVA). Subsequently, total mission exposures were evaluated for

  9. An analytical model for the prediction of a micro-dosimeter response function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badavi, Francis; Michael, Michael; Wilson, John W.

    A rapid analytical procedure for the prediction of a micro-dosimeter response function in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), correlated with the Space Transportation System (STS, shuttle) Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) measurements is presented. The analytical model takes into consideration the energy loss straggling and chord length distribution of the detector, and is capable of predicting energy deposition fluctuations in a cylindrical micro-volume of arbitrary aspect ratio (height/diameter) by incoming ions through both direct and indirect (δ rays) events. At any designated (ray traced) target point within the vehicle, the model as input accepts the differential flux spectrum of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and/or trapped protons at LEO. On a desktop PC, the response function of TEPC for each ion in the GCR/trapped field is computed at the average rate of 30 seconds/ion. The ionizing radiation environment at LEO is represented by O'Neill's GCR model (2004), covering charge particles in the 1≤Z≤28 range. O'Neill's free space GCR model is coupled with the Langley Research Center (LaRC) cutoff model with angular dependency compensation to compute the transmission coefficient at LEO. The trapped proton environment is represented by a LaRC developed time dependent procedure which couples the AP8min/AP8max, Deep River Neutron Monitor (DRNM) and F10.7 solar radio frequency measurements. The albedo neutron environment is represented by the extrapolation of the Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) measurements. The charged particle transport calculations correlated with STS 56, 51, 110 and 114 flights are accomplished by using the most recent version (2005) of LaRC's deterministic ionized particle transport code High charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport (HZETRN). Herein, we present the correlations between the TEPC model predictions (response function) and TEPC measured differential/integral spectra in the lineal energy (y) domain for both GCR and trapped protons, with

  10. An Analytical Model for the Prediction of a Micro-Dosimeter Response Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Xapsos, Mike

    2008-01-01

    A rapid analytical procedure for the prediction of a micro-dosimeter response function in low Earth orbit (LEO), correlated with the Space Transportation System (STS, shuttle) Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) measurements is presented. The analytical model takes into consideration the energy loss straggling and chord length distribution of the detector, and is capable of predicting energy deposition fluctuations in a cylindrical micro-volume of arbitrary aspect ratio (height/diameter) by incoming ions through both direct and indirect (ray) events. At any designated (ray traced) target point within the vehicle, the model accepts the differential flux spectrum of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and/or trapped protons at LEO as input. On a desktop PC, the response function of TEPC for each ion in the GCR/trapped field is computed at the average rate of 30 seconds/ion. The ionizing radiation environment at LEO is represented by O'Neill fs GCR model (2004), covering charged particles in the 1 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 28. O'Neill's free space GCR model is coupled with the Langley Research Center (LaRC) angular dependent geomagnetic cutoff model to compute the transmission coefficient in LEO. The trapped proton environment is represented by a LaRC developed time dependent procedure which couples the AP8MIN/AP8MAX, Deep River Neutron Monitor (DRNM) and F10.7 solar radio frequency measurements. The albedo neutron environment is represented by the extrapolation of the Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) measurements. The charged particle transport calculations correlated with STS 51 and 114 flights are accomplished by using the most recent version (2005) of the LaRC deterministic High charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport (HZETRN) code. We present the correlations between the TEPC model predictions (response function) and TEPC measured differential/integral spectra in the lineal energy (y) domain for both GCR and trapped protons, with the conclusion

  11. Early Energetic Particle Irradiation of the HED Parent Body Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Rao, M. N.

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that many individual grains within the dark phase of the Kapoeta howardite were irradiated with energetic particles while residing on the surface of the early HED regolith. Particle tracks in these grains vary in density by more than an order of magnitude and undoubtedly were formed by energetic heavy (Fe) ions associated with early solar flares. Early Irradiation of HED Regolith: Concentrations of excess Ne alone are not sufficient to decide between competing galactic and solar irradiation models. However, from recent studies of depth samples of oriented lunar rocks, we have shown that the cosmogenic 21-Ne/22-Ne ratio produced in feldspar differs substantially between Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) and solar protons, and that this difference is exactly that predicted from cross-section data. Using Ne literature data and new isotopic data we obtained on acid-etched, separated feldspar from both the light and dark phases of Kapoeta, we derive 21-Ne/22-Ne = 0.80 for the recent GCR irradiation and 21-Ne/22-Ne = 0.68 for the early regolith irradiation. This derived ratio indicates that the early Ne production in the regolith occurred by both galactic and solar protons. If we adopt a likely one-component regolith model in which all grains were exposed to galactic protons but individual grains had variable exposure to solar protons, we estimate that this early GCR irradiation lasted for about 3-6 m.y. More complex two-component regolith models involving separate solar and galactic irradiation would permit this GCR age to be longer. Higher-energy solar protons would permit the GCR to be longer. Higher-energy solar protons would permit the GCR age to be shorter. Further, cosmogenic 126(Xe) in Kapoeta dark is no more than a factor of about 2 higher than that observed in Kapoeta light. Because 126(Xe) can only be formed by galactic protons and not solar protons, these data support a short GCR irradiation for the HED regolith. This would also be

  12. A space radiation shielding model of the Martian radiation environment experiment (MARIE).

    PubMed

    Atwell, W; Saganti, P; Cucinotta, F A; Zeitlin, C J

    2004-01-01

    The 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft was launched towards Mars on April 7, 2001. Onboard the spacecraft is the Martian radiation environment experiment (MARIE), which is designed to measure the background radiation environment due to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar protons in the 20-500 MeV/n energy range. We present an approach for developing a space radiation-shielding model of the spacecraft that includes the MARIE instrument in the current mapping phase orientation. A discussion is presented describing the development and methodology used to construct the shielding model. For a given GCR model environment, using the current MARIE shielding model and the high-energy particle transport codes, dose rate values are compared with MARIE measurements during the early mapping phase in Mars orbit. The results show good agreement between the model calculations and the MARIE measurements as presented for the March 2002 dataset.

  13. MARIE: Current Status and Results from 20 Months of Observations at Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, C.; Andersen, V.; Atwell, W.; Cleghorn, T. F.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Lee, K. T.; Pinsky, L.; Saganti, P.

    2004-01-01

    The MARIE instrument aboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft detects energetic charged particles in the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) and during solar particle events (SPE) [1]. As of this writing (January 2004), MARIE has been turned off, after losing communication with the spacecraft during the large SPE of October 28, 2003. However, during the prior 20 months, MARIE collected data almost continuously, observing several solar events and the nearly-constant GCR. There is still a possibility the instrument can be recovered, and troubleshooting efforts are scheduled to begin in May 2004, following the completion of the primary missions of MER-A (Spirit) and MER-B (Opportunity). At present, Odyssey is acting as a telecommunications relay for the rovers and only routine science operations are permitted in this mode.

  14. Radiation Physics for Space and High Altitude Air Travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Goldhagen, P.; Saganti, P.; Shavers, M. R.; McKay, Gordon A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are of extra-solar origin consisting of high-energy hydrogen, helium, and heavy ions. The GCR are modified by physical processes as they traverse through the solar system, spacecraft shielding, atmospheres, and tissues producing copious amounts of secondary radiation including fragmentation products, neutrons, mesons, and muons. We discuss physical models and measurements relevant for estimating biological risks in space and high-altitude air travel. Ambient and internal spacecraft computational models for the International Space Station and a Mars mission are discussed. Risk assessment is traditionally based on linear addition of components. We discuss alternative models that include stochastic treatments of columnar damage by heavy ion tracks and multi-cellular damage following nuclear fragmentation in tissue.

  15. Effects of Nuclear Cross Sections at Different Energies on the Radiation Hazard from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Z. W.; Adams, J. H., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The radiation hazard for astronauts from galactic cosmic rays is a major obstacle in long duration human space explorations. Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation environment on missions to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We have studied how uncertainties in fragmentation cross sections at different energies affect the accuracy of predictions from such radiation transport. We find that, in deep space, cross sections between 0.3 and 0.85 GeV/u usually have the largest effect on dose-equivalent behind shielding in solar minimum GCR environments, and cross sections between 0.85 and 1.2 GeV/u have the largest effect in solar maximum GCR environments. At the International Space Station, cross sections at higher energies have the largest effect due to the geomagnetic cutoff.

  16. Cosmic Rays and Total Ozone at Higher Middle Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lastovicka, J.; Krizan, P.

    Various external factors of solar origin like solar activity (solar cycle, 27-day variation etc.), geomagnetic storms and other solar wind-related phenomena, and changes of fluxes of high-energy particles can potentially affect the ozone layer. Here we examine the effects of Forbush decreases and other decreases of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) on the columnar ozone content (= total ozone) at higher middle latitudes near 50o N. The Forbush decreases usually occur together with geomagnetic storms and relatively often together with solar proton events (SPEs). Then it is difficult, if not impossible, to distinguish between the effects of geomagnetic storms, SPEs and Forbush decreases and other decreases of the GCR flux. Therefore we present here the results of investigations of the effects of Forbush decreases and other substantial decreases of GCRs on total ozone for events when there was no geomagnetic storm. Some effects our found, which depend principally on other conditions (season, solar activity level, QBO phase etc.).

  17. Galactic Cosmic Rays in the Outer Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florinski, V.; Washimi, H.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Adams, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    We report a next generation model of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) transport in the three dimensional heliosphere. Our model is based on an accurate three-dimensional representation of the heliospheric interface. This representation is obtained by taking into account the interaction between partially ionized, magnetized plasma flows of the solar wind and the local interstellar medium. Our model reveals that after entering the heliosphere GCRs are stored in the heliosheath for several years. The preferred GCR entry locations are near the nose of the heliopause and at high latitudes. Low-energy (hundreds of MeV) galactic ions observed in the heliosheath have spent, on average, a longer time in the solar wind than those observed in the inner heliosphere, which would explain their cooled-off spectra at these energies. We also discuss radial gradients in the heliosheath and the implications for future Voyager observations

  18. Cosmic Ray Modulation in the Outer Heliosphere During the Minimum of Solar Cycle 23/24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Florinski, V.; Washimi, H.; Pogorelov, N. V.

    2011-01-01

    We report a next generation model of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) transport in the three dimensional heliosphere. Our model is based on an accurate three-dimensional representation of the heliospheric interface. This representation is obtained by taking into account the interaction between partially ionized, magnetized plasma flows of the solar wind and the local interstellar medium. Our model reveals that after entering the heliosphere GCRs are stored in the heliosheath for several years. The preferred GCR entry locations are near the nose of the heliopause and at high latitudes. Low-energy (hundreds of MeV) galactic ions observed in the heliosheath have spent, on average, a longer time in the solar wind than those observed in the inner heliosphere, which would explain their cooled-off spectra at these energies. We also discuss radial gradients in the heliosheath and the implications for future Voyager observations.

  19. Badhwar - O'Neill 2014 Galactic Cosmic Ray Flux Model Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, P. M.; Golge, S.; Slaba, T. C.

    2014-01-01

    The Badhwar-O'Neill (BON) Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) model is based on GCR measurements from particle detectors. The model has mainly been used by NASA to certify microelectronic systems and the analysis of radiation health risks to astronauts in space missions. The BON14 model numerically solves the Fokker-Planck differential equation to account for particle transport in the heliosphere due to diffusion, convection, and adiabatic deceleration under the assumption of a spherically symmetric heliosphere. The model also incorporates an empirical time delay function to account for the lag of the solar activity to reach the boundary of the heliosphere. This technical paper describes the most recent improvements in parameter fits to the BON model (BON14). Using a comprehensive measurement database, it is shown that BON14 is significantly improved over the previous version, BON11.

  20. Preliminary Design of a Galactic Cosmic Ray Shielding Materials Testbed for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Berkebile, Stephen; Sechkar, Edward A.; Panko, Scott R.

    2012-01-01

    The preliminary design of a testbed to evaluate the effectiveness of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) shielding materials, the MISSE Radiation Shielding Testbed (MRSMAT) is presented. The intent is to mount the testbed on the Materials International Space Station Experiment-X (MISSE-X) which is to be mounted on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2016. A key feature is the ability to simultaneously test nine samples, including standards, which are 5.25 cm thick. This thickness will enable most samples to have an areal density greater than 5 g/sq cm. It features a novel and compact GCR telescope which will be able to distinguish which cosmic rays have penetrated which shielding material, and will be able to evaluate the dose transmitted through the shield. The testbed could play a pivotal role in the development and qualification of new cosmic ray shielding technologies.

  1. The Heavy Nuclei eXplorer (HNX) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Adams, J. H.; Barbier, L. M.; Craig, N.; Cummings, A. C.; Cummings, J. R.; Doke, T.; Hasebe, N.; Hayashi, T.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The primary scientific objectives of HNX, which was recently selected by NASA for a Small Explorer (SMEX) Mission Concept Study, are to measure the age of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) since nucleosynthesis, determine the injection mechanism for the GCR accelerator (Volatility or FIP), and study the mix of nucleosynthetic processes that contribute to the source of GCRs. The experimental goal of HNX is to measure the elemental abundances of all individual stable nuclei from neon through the actinides and possibly beyond. HNX is composed of two instruments: ECCO, which measures elemental abundances of nuclei with Z greater than or equal to 72, and ENTICE. which measures elemental abundances of nuclei with Z between 10 and 82. We describe the mission and the science that can be addressed by HNX.

  2. Galactic cosmic ray decreases associated with non-interacting magnetic clouds in the 23 rd solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masías-Meza, J. J.; Dasso, S.

    2014-01-01

    Sudden Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) intensity decreases are related to the passage of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). These phenomena are also known as Forbush Decreases (FDs). The deepest FDs are associated with the passage of Magnetic Clouds (MCs). In this preliminary study we select ``non-interacting'' MCs associated with FDs observed from ground Neutron Monitors in the period 1996-2009, with the aim of reducing the complexity and the number of parameters involved in the GCR-MC interactions. We introduce a method to determine properties of the ``ejecta component'' of the FD. We analyze properties of the ejecta component in combination with properties of MCs. From the resulting selection of events, we find that those FDs containing ejecta components show stronger correlations with MC parameters than our total sample of events.

  3. Emerging Radiation Health-Risk Mitigation Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Schimmerling, W.

    2004-02-01

    Past space missions beyond the confines of the Earth's protective magnetic field have been of short duration and protection from the effects of solar particle events was of primary concern. The extension of operational infrastructure beyond low-Earth orbit to enable routine access to more interesting regions of space will require protection from the hazards of the accumulated exposures of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). There are significant challenges in providing protection from the long-duration exposure to GCR: the human risks to the exposures are highly uncertain and safety requirements places unreasonable demands in supplying sufficient shielding materials in the design. A vigorous approach to future radiation health-risk mitigation requires a triage of techniques (using biological and technical factors) and reduction of the uncertainty in radiation risk models. The present paper discusses the triage of factors for risk mitigation with associated materials issues and engineering design methods.

  4. Optimized shielding for space radiation protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Kim, M. H.; Schimmerling, W.

    2001-01-01

    Future deep space mission and International Space Station exposures will be dominated by the high-charge and -energy (HZE) ions of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). A few mammalian systems have been extensively tested over a broad range of ion types and energies. For example, C3H10T1/2 cells, V79 cells, and Harderian gland tumors have been described by various track-structure dependent response models. The attenuation of GCR induced biological effects depends strongly on the biological endpoint, response model used, and material composition. Optimization of space shielding is then driven by the nature of the response model and the transmission characteristics of the given material.

  5. Optimized Shielding for Space Radiation Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Kim, M.-H. Y.; Schimmerling, W.

    2000-01-01

    Abstract. Future deep space mission and International Space Station exposures will be dominated by the high-charge and -energy (HZE) ions of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). A few mammalian systems have been extensively tested over a broad range of ion types and energies. For example, C3H10T1/2 cells, V79 cells, and Harderian gland tumors have been described by various track-structure dependent response models. The attenuation of GCR induced biological effects depends strongly on the biological endpoint, response model used, and material composition. Optimization of space shielding is then driven by the nature of the response model and the transmission characteristics of the given material.

  6. Solar Particle Events Observed by the Odyssey MARIE Instrument at Mars: Dose and Model Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleghorn, T. F.; Saganti, P. B.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2003-01-01

    One of the primary concerns prior to human exploration of Mars is the need to accurately characterize the charged particle radiation environment both for the surface stay, and for the transit period to and from the planet. The Odyssey spacecraft, currently in Mars orbit includes a charged particle radiation detector, MARIE, which can measure particle fluxes with energies above approx. 30 MeV and charges between 1 and 10. Two classes of particles are of particular interest: the Galactic Cosmic Rays, (GCR), and those charged particles associated with Solar Particle Events, (SPE). The GCR are present continuously throughout the solar activity cycle, and their numbers vary inversely with the level of solar activity. They are characteristically more energetic than those particles originating from solar activity, and hence less influences by the solar magnetic field.

  7. Cosmic-ray record in solar system matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Arnold, J. R.; Lal, D.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar cosmic rays (SCR) with bodies in the solar system is discussed, and what the record of that interaction reveals about the history of the solar system is considered. The influence of the energy, charge, and mass of the particles on the interaction is addressed, showing long-term average fluxes of solar protons, predicted production rates for heavy-nuclei tracks and various radionuclides as a function of depth in lunar rock, and integral fluxes of protons emitted by solar flares. The variation of the earth's magnetic field, the gardening of the lunar surface, and the source of meteorites and cosmic dust are studied using the cosmic ray record. The time variation of GCR, SCR, and VH and VVH nuclei is discussed for both the short and the long term.

  8. Effects of the lunar environment on optical telescopes and instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Charles L.; Dietz, Kurtis L.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of the hostile lunar environment are assessed, and potential techniques for adverse-effect mitigation are developed. The environmental concerns addressed include Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) effects on telescope electronics, lunar dust obscuration and damage to optical surfaces, and micrometeor cratering of the optics and support structure. The feasibility of shielding the electronics from the GCR flux and associated secondaries is investigated as one option for noise reduction. An alternative approach to noise reduction uses shorter integration ties and multiple images for background subtraction. Dust abatement techniques such as stabilizing the lunar soil at the launch and telescope sites and covering the optics during high contamination-risk times are evaluated. The micrometeorite flux and associated surface cratering are assessed for their impact on the lifetime and integrity of the telescope.

  9. Effects of nuclear cross sections at different energies on the radiation hazard from galactic cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z W; Adams, J H

    2007-03-01

    The radiation hazard for astronauts from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a major obstacle to long-duration human space exploration. Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate the radiation environment on missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. We have studied how uncertainties in fragmentation cross sections at different energies affect the accuracy of predictions from such radiation transport calculations. We find that, in deep space, cross sections at energies between 0.3 and 0.85 GeV/nucleon have the largest effect in solar maximum GCR environments. At the International Space Station, cross sections at higher energies have the largest effect due to the geomagnetic cutoff. PMID:17316078

  10. Emerging Radiation Health-Risk Mitigation Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.W.; Cucinotta, F.A.; Schimmerling, W.

    2004-02-04

    Past space missions beyond the confines of the Earth's protective magnetic field have been of short duration and protection from the effects of solar particle events was of primary concern. The extension of operational infrastructure beyond low-Earth orbit to enable routine access to more interesting regions of space will require protection from the hazards of the accumulated exposures of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). There are significant challenges in providing protection from the long-duration exposure to GCR: the human risks to the exposures are highly uncertain and safety requirements places unreasonable demands in supplying sufficient shielding materials in the design. A vigorous approach to future radiation health-risk mitigation requires a triage of techniques (using biological and technical factors) and reduction of the uncertainty in radiation risk models. The present paper discusses the triage of factors for risk mitigation with associated materials issues and engineering design methods.

  11. Physical conditions and molecular chemistry of the Central Molecular Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Nemesio J.

    2006-12-01

    We discuss the physical conditions of the different kineniatical components of the Central Molecular Zone. In particular we compare the properties of the clouds moving with in elongated orbits along the Galactic bar with those of the well-known Galactic center ring (GCR) clouds (Sgr A, Sgr B2,...). We show that all the components contain dense clouds that can withstand the tidal shear. The SiO abundance in the clouds with non-circular velocities is high (~ 10-8), in perfect agreement with that of the GCR clouds. We discuss the role of the UV radiation and C-shocks in the heating of the neutral gas and the high abundances of some molecules like SiO. The SiO emission in the clouds moving in elongated trajectories is probably due to the cloud collisions expected in the inner regions of a bar.

  12. Energy spectrum of the recurrent cosmic rays variation during the solar minimum 23/24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Agnieszka; Alania, Michael

    2016-07-01

    We study temporal changes of the power-law energy/ rigidity spectrum of the first three harmonics of the recurrent variation of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) intensity during the unusual solar minimum 23/24 and compare with four previous minima. We show that the energy spectrum of the amplitudes of the recurrent variation is soft in the minimum 23/24. Moreover, while the energy spectrum of the amplitudes of the first harmonic of the recurrent variation of the GCR intensity practically behaves as during earlier four minima, the energy spectrum of the amplitudes of the second and the third harmonics demonstrate a valuable softening. We attribute this phenomenon to the decrease of an extension of heliosphere caused by the drop of the solar wind dynamic pressure during the solar minimum 23/24.

  13. Effects of radiobiological uncertainty on vehicle and habitat shield design for missions to the moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Nealy, John E.; Schimmerling, Walter; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wood, James S.

    1993-01-01

    Some consequences of uncertainties in radiobiological risk due to galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposure are analyzed for their effect on engineering designs for the first lunar outpost and a mission to explore Mars. This report presents the plausible effect of biological uncertainties, the design changes necessary to reduce the uncertainties to acceptable levels for a safe mission, and an evaluation of the mission redesign cost. Estimates of the amount of shield mass required to compensate for radiobiological uncertainty are given for a simplified vehicle and habitat. The additional amount of shield mass required to provide a safety factor for uncertainty compensation is calculated from the expected response to GCR exposure. The amount of shield mass greatly increases in the estimated range of biological uncertainty, thus, escalating the estimated cost of the mission. The estimates are used as a quantitative example for the cost-effectiveness of research in radiation biophysics and radiation physics.

  14. Radiation quality of cosmic ray nuclei studied with Geant4-based simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burigo, Lucas N.; Pshenichnov, Igor A.; Mishustin, Igor N.; Bleicher, Marcus

    2014-04-01

    In future missions in deep space a space craft will be exposed to a non-negligible flux of high charge and energy (HZE) particles present in the galactic cosmic rays (GCR). One of the major concerns of manned missions is the impact on humans of complex radiation fields which result from the interactions of HZE particles with the spacecraft materials. The radiation quality of several ions representing GCR is investigated by calculating microdosimetry spectra. A Geant4-based Monte Carlo model for Heavy Ion Therapy (MCHIT) is used to simulate microdosimetry data for HZE particles in extended media where fragmentation reactions play a certain role. Our model is able to reproduce measured microdosimetry spectra for H, He, Li, C and Si in the energy range of 150-490 MeV/u. The effect of nuclear fragmentation on the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of He, Li and C is estimated and found to be below 10%.

  15. Solar modulation of the neutron component of the radiation background observed simultaneously in different space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, Maxim; Mitrofanov, Igor; Nuzhdin, Igor; Sanin, Anton; Fedosov, Fedor; Golovin, Dmitry

    2016-04-01

    We have studied variability of neutron component of radiation environment at Earth, Moon and Mars vicinities over a long period of time produced by the solar modulation of the GCR flux in the 23rd and 24th solar cycles. The global behavior of the neutron flux is in relatively good agreement with different observations performed simultaneously onboard various space missions, including instruments HEND onboard Mars Odyssey orbiter, BTN onboard International Space Station and LEND onboard Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter as well as with the modeled behavior of the GCR flux derived from a global network of neutron monitors on the Earth. The local differences in the time history and character of different observations have been also evaluated. The joint analysis of different data sets, where some of them are gathered far away from the Earth, reveals a multi-dimensional view and new patterns of the solar modulation of GCRs within current unusual solar cycle.

  16. Numerical Study of the Generation of Linear Energy Transfer Spectra for Space Radiation Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Wilson, John W.; Hunter, Abigail

    2005-01-01

    In analyzing charged particle spectra in space due to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE), the conversion of particle energy spectra into linear energy transfer (LET) distributions is a convenient guide in assessing biologically significant components of these spectra. The mapping of LET to energy is triple valued and can be defined only on open energy subintervals where the derivative of LET with respect to energy is not zero. Presented here is a well-defined numerical procedure which allows for the generation of LET spectra on the open energy subintervals that are integrable in spite of their singular nature. The efficiency and accuracy of the numerical procedures is demonstrated by providing examples of computed differential and integral LET spectra and their equilibrium components for historically large SPEs and 1977 solar minimum GCR environments. Due to the biological significance of tissue, all simulations are done with tissue as the target material.

  17. Study - Radiation Shielding Effectiveness of the Prototyped High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) 'Artificial' Magnetosphere for Deep Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denkins, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    The high temperature superconductor (HTS) is being used to develop the magnets for the Variable Specific Impulse Magneto-plasma Rocket (VASIMR ) propulsion system and may provide lightweight magnetic radiation shielding to protect spacecraft crews from radiation caused by GCR and SPEs on missions to Mars. A study is being planned to assess the radiation shielding effectiveness of the artificial magnetosphere produced by the HTS magnet. VASIMR is an advanced technology propulsion engine which is being touted as enabling one way transit to Mars in 90 days or less. This is extremely important to NASA. This technology would enable a significant reduction in the number of days in transit to and from Mars and significantly reduce the astronauts exposure to a major threat - high energy particles from solar storms and GCR during long term deep space missions. This paper summarizes the plans for the study and the subsequent testing of the VASIMR technology onboard the ISS slated for 2013.

  18. Quiet-Time Spectra and Abundances of Energetic Particles During the 1996 Solar Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1998-01-01

    This report concerns the energy spectra and abundances of ions with atomic number, Z, in the interval 2 greater than or equal to Z and Z less than or equal to 36 and energies approximately 3-20 MeV/amu for solar and interplanetary quiet periods between November 1994 and April 1998 as measured by the large-geometry LEMT telescope on the Wind spacecraft near Earth. The energy spectra show the presence of galactic (GCR) and 'anomalous' cosmic ray (ACR) components, depending on the element. ACR components are reported for Mg and Si for the first time at 1 AU and the previous observation of S and Ar is confirmed. However, only GCR components are clearly apparent for the elements Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, as well as for C. New limits are placed on a possible ACR contribution for other elements, including Kr.

  19. Quiet-Time Spectra and Abundances of Energetic Particles During the 1996 Solar Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1999-01-01

    We report the energy spectra and abundances of ions with atomic number, Z, in the interval Z is greater than or equal to 2 and Z is less than or equal to 36 and energies approximately 3-20 MeV/amu for solar and interplanetary quiet periods between 1994 November and 1998 April as measured by the large-geometry Low Energy Matrix Telescope (LEMT) telescope on the Wind spacecraft near Earth. The energy spectra show the presence of galactic (GCR) and "anomalous" cosmic ray (ACR) components, depending on the element. ACR components are reported for Mg and Si for the first time at 1 AU and the previous observation of S and Ar is confirmed. However, only GCR components are clearly apparent for the elements Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, as well as for C. New limits are placed on a possible ACR contribution for other elements, including Kr.

  20. Galactic cosmic ray abundances and spectra behind defined shielding.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, W; Benton, E V; Wiegel, B; Zens, R; Rusch, G

    1994-10-01

    LET spectra have been measured for lunar missions and for several near Earth orbits ranging from 28 degrees to 83 degrees inclination. In some of the experiments the flux of GCR was determined separately from contributions caused by interactions in the detector material. Results of these experiments are compared to model calculations. The general agreement justifies the use of the model to calculate GCR fluxes. The magnitude of variations caused by solar modulation, geomagnetic shielding, and shielding by matter determined from calculated LET spectra is generally in agreement with experimental data. However, more detailed investigations show that there are some weak points in modeling solar modulation and shielding by material. These points are discussed in more detail. PMID:11540030

  1. Solar cosmic ray produced neon in lunar soils and their implication for gas-rich meteorite studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nautiyal, C. M.; Rao, M. N.

    1984-01-01

    Characteristic neon isotopic ratios, produced due to solar cosmic ray spallation (SCR) in lunar soils, are useful in deciphering and estimating the relative contributions of SCR and GCR spallation. To delineate these features, etched mineral grains from mature and immature lunar soils (14148 and 61221 respectively) were analyzed using mass spectrometry. The SF-Ne composition deduced in this work agrees with that obtained from earlier etched lunar pyroxene studies. The data points for mature soil 14148 define a line which significantly deviates from the 61221 tie line. This deviation is attributed to the presence of SCR spallation component. In this context, neon isotopic compositions (step-wise heating) in Pantar and Leighton dark portions were studied and compared with that of Fayetteville. The meteorite data points deviate significantly from the tie line joining SF-Ne and GCR (pyroxene) end points. This deviation is attributed to SCR-spallation in gas-rich chondrites.

  2. Space Radiation and Exploration - Information for the Augustine Committee Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis; Semones, Edward; Kim, Myung-Hee; Jackson, Lori

    2009-01-01

    Space radiation presents significant health risks including mortality for Exploration missions: a) Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) heavy ions are distinct from radiation that occurs on Earth leading to different biological impacts. b) Large uncertainties in GCR risk projections impact ability to design and assess mitigation approaches and select crew. c) Solar Proton Events (SPEs) require new operational and shielding approaches and new biological data on risks. Risk estimates are changing as new scientific knowledge is gained: a) Research on biological effects of space radiation show qualitative and quantitative differences with X- or gamma-rays. b) Expert recommendations and regulatory policy are changing. c) New knowledge leads to changes in estimates for the number of days in space to stay below Permissible Exposure Limits (PELS).

  3. Cermet coating tribological behavior in high temperature helium

    SciTech Connect

    CACHON, Lionel; ALBALADEJO, Serge; TARAUD, Pascal; LAFFONT, G.

    2006-07-01

    As the CEA is highly involved in the Generation IV Forum, a comprehensive research and development program has been conducted for several years, in order to establish the feasibility of Gas Cooled Reactor (GCR) technology projects using helium as a cooling fluid. Within this framework, a tribology program was launched in order to select and qualify coatings and materials, and to provide recommendations for the sliding components operating in GCRs. The purpose of this paper is to describe the CEA Helium tribology study on several GCR components (thermal barriers, control rod drive mechanisms, reactor internals, ..) requiring protection against wear and bonding. Tests in helium atmosphere are necessary to be fully representative of tribological environments and to assess the material or coating candidates which can provide a reliable answer to these situations. This paper focuses on the tribology tests performed on CERMET (Cr{sub 3}C-2- NiCr) coatings within a temperature range of between 800 and 1000 deg C.

  4. The stochastic modeling of the short-time variations of the galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzynczak, A.; Modzelewska, R.

    2016-08-01

    We present the stochastic model of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles transport in the heliosphere. The model is created based on the numerical solution of the Parker transport equation (PTE) describing the non-stationary transport of charged particles in the turbulent medium. We present the numerical schemes for the strong order integration of the set of the stochastic differential equations (SDEs) corresponding to the non-stationary PTE. Among the employed methods are the strong order Euler-Maruyama, Milstein and stochastic Runge- Kutta methods. We perform the selection of the method resulting in the highest agreement of the model of the 27-day variation of the GCR intensity with the experimental observations.

  5. Effects of radiobiological uncertainty on vehicle and habitat shield design for missions to the moon and Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.W.; Nealy, J.E.; Schimmerling, W.; Cucinotta, F.A.; Wood, J.S.

    1993-08-01

    Some consequences of uncertainties in radiobiological risk due to galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposure are analyzed for their effect on engineering designs for the first lunar outpost and a mission to explore Mars. This report presents the plausible effect of biological uncertainties, the design changes necessary to reduce the uncertainties to acceptable levels for a safe mission, and an evaluation of the mission redesign cost. Estimates of the amount of shield mass required to compensate for radiobiological uncertainty are given for a simplified vehicle and habitat. The additional amount of shield mass required to provide a safety factor for uncertainty compensation is calculated from the expected response to GCR exposure. The amount of shield mass greatly increases in the estimated range of biological uncertainty, thus, escalating the estimated cost of the mission. The estimates are used as a quantitative example for the cost-effectiveness of research in radiation biophysics and radiation physics.

  6. Radiation Measured with Different Dosimeters for ISS-Expedition 18-19/ULF2 on Board International Space Station during Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dazhuang

    Radiation field of particles in low Earth orbit (LEO) is mainly composed of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), solar energetic particles and particles in SAA (South Atlantic Anomaly). GCR are modulated by solar activity, at the period of solar minimum activity, GCR intensity is at maximum and the main contributor for space radiation is GCR. At present for space radiation measurements conducted by JSC (Johnson Space Center) -SRAG (Space Radiation Analysis Group), the preferred active dosimeter sensitive to all LET (Linear Energy Transfer) is the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC); the preferred passive dosimeters are thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) sensitive to low LET as well as CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) sensitive to high LET. For the method using passive dosimeters, radiation quantities for all LET can be obtained by combining radiation results measured with TLDs/OSLDs and CR-39 PNTDs. TEPC, TLDs/OSLDs and CR-39 detectors were used to measure the radiation field for the ISS (International Space Station) -Expedition 18-19/ULF2 space mission which was conducted from 15 November 2008 to 31 July 2009 -near the period of the recent solar minimum activity. LET spectra (differential and integral fluence, absorbed dose and dose equivalent) and radiation quantities were measured for positions TEPC, TESS (Temporary Sleeping Station, inside the polyethylene lined sleep station), SM-P 327 and 442 (Service Module -Panel 327 and 442). This paper presents radiation LET spectra measured with TEPC and CR-39 PNTDs and radiation dose measured with TLDs/OSLDs as well as the radiation quantities combined from results measured with passive dosimeters.

  7. Geometrically centered region: a "wet" model of protein binding hot spots not excluding water molecules.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhua; Li, Jinyan

    2010-12-01

    A protein interface can be as "wet" as a protein surface in terms of the number of immobilized water molecules. This important water information has not been explicitly taken by computational methods to model and identify protein binding hot spots, overlooking the water role in forming interface hydrogen bonds and in filing cavities. Hot spot residues are usually clustered at the core of the protein binding interfaces. However, traditional machine learning methods often identify the hot spot residues individually, breaking the cooperativity of the energetic contribution. Our idea in this work is to explore the role of immobilized water and meanwhile to capture two essential properties of hot spots: the compactness in contact and the far distance from bulk solvent. Our model is named geometrically centered region (GCR). The detection of GCRs is based on novel tripartite graphs, and atom burial levels which are a concept more intuitive than SASA. Applying to a data set containing 355 mutations, we achieved an F measure of 0.6414 when ΔΔG ≥ 1.0 kcal/mol was used to define hot spots. This performance is better than Robetta, a benchmark method in the field. We found that all but only one of the GCRs contain water to a certain degree, and most of the outstanding hot spot residues have water-mediated contacts. If the water is excluded, the burial level values are poorly related to the ΔΔG, and the model loses its performance remarkably. We also presented a definition for the O-ring of a GCR as the set of immediate neighbors of the residues in the GCR. Comparative analysis between the O-rings and GCRs reveals that the newly defined O-ring is indeed energetically less important than the GCR hot spot, confirming a long-standing hypothesis. PMID:20818601

  8. An Algorithm for the Transport of Anisotropic Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweed, J.

    2005-01-01

    One major obstacle to human space exploration is the possible limitations imposed by the adverse effect of long-term exposure to the space environment. Even before human spaceflight began, the potentially brief exposure of astronauts to the very intense random solar particle events (SPE) were of great concern. A new challenge appears in deep space exploration from exposure to the low-intensity heavy-ion flux of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) since the missions are of long duration and the accumulated GCR exposures can be high. Because cancer induction rates increase behind low to rather large thicknesses of aluminum shielding, according to available biological data on mammalian exposures to GCR like ions, the shield requirements for a Mars mission are prohibitively expensive in terms of mission launch costs. Therefore, a critical issue in the Human Exploration and Development of Space enterprise is cost effective mitigation of risk associated with ionizing radiation exposure. In order to estimate astronaut risk to GCR exposure and associated cancer risks and health hazards, it is necessary to do shield material studies. To determine an optimum radiation shield material it is necessary to understand nuclear interaction processes such as fragmentation and secondary particle production which is a function of energy dependent cross sections. This requires knowledge of material transmission characteristics either through laboratory testing or improved theoretical modeling. Here ion beam transport theory is of importance in that testing of materials in the laboratory environment generated by particle accelerators is a necessary step in materials development and evaluation for space use. The approximations used in solving the Boltzmann transport equation for the space setting are often not sufficient for laboratory work and those issues are a major emphasis of the present work.

  9. MCNP6 Cosmic-Source Option

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, Gregg W; Armstrong, Hirotatsu; James, Michael R; Clem, John; Goldhagen, Paul

    2012-06-19

    MCNP is a Monte Carlo radiation transport code that has been under development for over half a century. Over the last decade, the development team of a high-energy offshoot of MCNP, called MCNPX, has implemented several physics and algorithm improvements important for modeling galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) interactions with matter. In this presentation, we discuss the latest of these improvements, a new Cosmic-Source option, that has been implemented in MCNP6.

  10. Galactic Cosmic Ray Modulation near the Heliospheric Current Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S. R.; Owens, M. J.; Lockwood, M.; Scott, C. J.

    2014-07-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) are modulated by the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) both over decadal time scales (due to long-term, global HMF variations), and over time scales of a few hours (associated with solar wind structures such as coronal mass ejections or the heliospheric current sheet, HCS). Due to the close association between the HCS, the streamer belt, and the band of slow solar wind, HCS crossings are often associated with corotating interaction regions where fast solar wind catches up and compresses slow solar wind ahead of it. However, not all HCS crossings are associated with strong compressions. In this study we categorize HCS crossings in two ways: Firstly, using the change in magnetic polarity, as either away-to-toward (AT) or toward-to-away (TA) magnetic field directions relative to the Sun and, secondly, using the strength of the associated solar wind compression, determined from the observed plasma density enhancement. For each category, we use superposed epoch analyses to show differences in both solar wind parameters and GCR flux inferred from neutron monitors. For strong-compression HCS crossings, we observe a peak in neutron counts preceding the HCS crossing, followed by a large drop after the crossing, attributable to the so-called `snow-plough' effect. For weak-compression HCS crossings, where magnetic field polarity effects are more readily observable, we instead observe that the neutron counts have a tendency to peak in the away magnetic field sector. By splitting the data by the dominant polarity at each solar polar region, we find that the increase in GCR flux prior to the HCS crossing is primarily from strong compressions in cycles with negative north polar fields due to GCR drift effects. Finally, we report on unexpected differences in GCR behavior between TA weak compressions during opposing polarity cycles.

  11. Space Radiation Hazards on Human Missions to the Moon and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, L.

    2004-12-01

    One of the most significant health risks for humans exploring Earth's moon and Mars is exposure to the harsh space radiation environment. Crews on these exploration missions will be exposed to a complex mixture of very energetic particles. Chronic exposures to the ever-present background galactic cosmic ray (GCR) spectrum consisting of various fluxes of all naturally - occurring chemical elements are combined with infrequent, possibly acute exposures to large fluxes of solar energetic particles, consisting of protons and heavier particles. The GCR environment is primarily a concern for stochastic effects, such as the induction of cancer, with subsequent mortality in many cases, and late deterministic effects, such as cataracts and possible damage to the central nervous system. An acute radiation syndrome response ("radiation sickness") is not possible from the GCR environment since the organ doses are well below levels of concern. Unfortunately, the actual risks of cancer induction and mortality for the very important high-energy heavy ion component of the GCR spectrum are essentially unknown. The sporadic occurrence of extremely large solar energetic particle events, usually associated with intense solar activity, is also a major concern for Lunar and Mars missions because of the possible manifestation of acute effects from the accompanying high doses of such radiations, especially acute radiation syndrome effects such as nausea, emesis, hemorrhaging or possibly even death. Large solar energetic particle events can also contribute significantly to crew risks from cancer mortality. In this presentation an overview of current estimates of critical organ doses and equivalent doses for crews of Lunar and Mars bases and on those on transits between Earth and Mars is presented. Possible methods of mitigating these radiation exposures by shielding, thereby reducing the associated health risks to crews, are also described.

  12. Fabrication of Regolith-Derived Radiation Shield Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, Nancy; Mantovani, James G.; Townsend, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Mars and asteroids have little or no atmosphere, and do not possess a magnetosphere that can protect humans, mechanisms and electronics from damaging Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) as does the Earth. These types of space radiation present one of the highest risks to a human crew during interplanetary journeys and to onboard electronics. This project aims to evaluate the effectiveness of carbonaceous asteroid materials as a potential radiation shielding material.

  13. Comparisons of Integrated Radiation Transport Models with Microdosimetry Data in Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Nikjoo, H.; Kim, M. Y.; Hu, X.; Dicello, J. F.; Pisacane, V. L.

    2006-01-01

    Astronauts are exposed to galactic cosmic rays (GCR), trapped protons, and possible solar particle events (SPE) during spaceflight. For such complicated mixtures of radiation types and kinetic energies, tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPC's) represent a simple time-dependent approach for radiation monitoring. Of interest in radiation protection is the average quality factor of a radiation field defined as a function of linear energy transfer, LET, Q(sub ave)(LET). However TEPC's measure the average quality factors as a function of lineal energy (y), Q(sub ave)(y) defined as the average energy deposition in a volume divided by the average chord length of the volume. Lineal energy, y deviates from LET due to energy straggling, delta-ray escape or entry, and nuclear fragments produced in the detector. Using integrated space radiation models that includes the transport code HZETRN/BRYNTRN, the quantum nuclear interaction model, QMSFRG, and results from Monte-Carlo track simulations of TEPC's response to ions, we consider comparisons of model calculations to TEPC results from NASA missions in low Earth orbit and make predictions for lunar and Mars missions. Good agreement between the model and measured spectra from past NASA missions is found. A finding of this work is that TEPC's values for trapped or solar protons of Q(sub ave)(y) range from 1.9-2.5, overestimating Q(sub ave)(LET), which ranges from 1.4-1.6 with both quantities increasing with shielding depth due to nuclear secondaries Comparisons for the complete GCR spectra show that Q(sub ave)(LET) for GCR is approximately 3.5-4.5, while TEPC's measure 2.9-3.4 for Q(sub ave)(y) with the GCR values decreasing with depth as heavy ions are absorbed in shielding material. Our results support the use of TEPC's for space radiation environmental monitoring when computational analysis is used for proper data interpretation.

  14. Cosmic Ray Modulation Observed by the Princess Sirindhorn Neutron Monitor at High Rigidity Cutoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Pyle, Roger; Evenson, Paul; Ruffolo, David; Saiz, Alejandro; Clem, John; Madlee, Suttiwat; Nutaro, Tanin

    2016-07-01

    Neutron monitors (NMs) are the premier instruments for precisely tracking time variations in the Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) flux at the GV-range. For more than 60 years, the worldwide NM network has provided continuous measurements of the solar induced variations of the GCR flux impinging Earth and the data cover about six 11-year solar cycles. The recent rise of space exploration, with PAMELA and AMS-02 spacecraft, brings new energy sensitive measurements of GCR fluxes. Moreover since late 2007, the range of sensitivity of the worldwide NM network has been increased with the installation of the Princess Sirindhorn Neutron Monitor (PSNM), at the summit of Doi Inthanon, Thailand's highest mountain (2565 m altitude). PSNM records the GCR flux with the world's highest vertical rigidity cutoff for a fixed station, 16.8 GV. PSNM data now cover the period from the last solar minimum to the recent solar maximum and give us the opportunity to study the effect of the solar modulation at such high rigidity for the first time. We present here the observations of PSNM since 2007. The observed solar modulation is much weaker than predicted by the force field model with φ inferred from NM data at low cutoff. We compare measurements with those from NMs located at low rigidity cutoff and with spacecraft data. We discuss the solar modulation at high rigidity. Partially supported by a postdoctoral fellowship from Mahidol University, the Thailand Research Fund (BRG 5880009), the Science Achievement Scholarship of Thailand, and US National Science Foundation awards PLR-1341562, PLR-1245939, and their predecessors.

  15. Radiation Transport Properties of Potential In Situ-Developed Regolith-Epoxy Materials for Martian Habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jack; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Zeitlin, Cary J.; Wilson, John W.; Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Thibeault, Sheila Ann

    2003-01-01

    Mission crews in space outside the Earth s magnetic field will be exposed to high energy heavy charged particles in the galactic cosmic radiation (GCR). These highly ionizing particles will be a source of radiation risk to crews on extended missions to the Moon and Mars, and the biological effects of and countermeasures to the GCR have to be investigated as part of the planning of exploration-class missions. While it is impractical to shield spacecraft and planetary habitats against the entire GCR spectrum, biological and physical studies indicate that relatively modest amounts of shielding are effective at reducing the radiation dose. However, nuclear fragmentation in the shielding materials produces highly penetrating secondary particles, which complicates the problem: in some cases, some shielding is worse than none at all. Therefore the radiation transport properties of potential shielding materials need to be carefully investigated. One intriguing option for a Mars mission is the use of material from the Martian surface, in combination with chemicals carried from Earth and/or fabricated from elements found in the Martian atmosphere, to construct crew habitats. We have measured the transmission properties of epoxy-Martian regolith composites with respect to heavy charged particles characteristic of the GCR ions which bombard the Martian surface. The composites were prepared at NASA Langley Research Center using simulated Martian regolith, in the process also evaluating fabrication methods which could lead to technologies for in situ fabrication on Mars. Initial evaluation of the radiation shielding properties is made using radiation transport models developed at NASA-LaRC, and the results of these calculations are used to select the composites with the most favorable radiation transmission properties. These candidates are then evaluated at particle accelerators which produce beams of heavy charged particles representative in energy and charge of the radiation

  16. Polymeric Materials With Additives for Durability and Radiation Shielding in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Polymeric materials are attractive for use in space structures because of their light weight and high strength In addition, polymers are made of elements with low atomic numbers (Z), primarily carbon (C), hydrogen (H), oxygen (0), and nitrogen (N) which provide the best shielding from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) (ref. 1). Galactic cosmic rays are composed primarily of nuclei (i.e., fully ionized atoms) plus a contribution of about 2% from electrons and positrons. There is a small but significant component of GCR particles with high charge (Z > 10) and high energy (E >100 GeV) (ref. 2). These so-called HZE particles comprise only 1 to 2% of the cosmic ray fluence but they interact with very high specific ionization and contribute 50% of the long- term dose to humans. The best shield for this radiation would be liquid hydrogen, which is not feasible. For this reason, hydrogen-containing polymers make the most effective practical shields. Moreover, neutrons are formed in the interactions of GCR particles with materials. Neutrons can only lose energy by collisions or reactions with a nucleus since they are uncharged. This is a process that is much less probable than the Coulombic interactions of charged particles. Thus, neutrons migrate far from the site of the reaction in which they were formed. This increases the probability of neutrons reaching humans or electronic equipment. Fast neutrons (> 1 MeV) can interact with silicon chips in electronic equipment resulting in the production of recoil ions which can cause single event upsets (SEU) in sensitive components (ref. 3). Neutrons lose energy most effectively by elastic collisions with light atoms, particularly hydrogen atoms. Therefore, hydrogen-containing polymers are not only effective in interacting with GCR particles; they are also effective in reducing the energy of the neutrons formed in the interactions.

  17. Sunspot activity and cosmic ray modulation at 1 a.u. for 1900-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.

    2014-10-01

    The descent of sunspot cycle 23 to an unprecedented minimum of long duration in 2006-2009 led to a prolonged galactic cosmic ray (GCR) recovery to the highest level observed in the instrumental era for a variety of energetic charged particle species on Earth, over a wide range of rigidities. The remarkable GCR increase measured by several ground-based, balloon-borne, and detectors on a satellite is described and discussed. It is accompanied by a decrease in solar wind velocity and interplanetary magnetic field at 1 a.u., reaching the lowest values since measurements of the solar wind began in October 1963; the solar polar field strength (μT) measured at the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) is also significantly reduced compared to prior cycles since the start of the program in 1976, the polar field in the northern hemisphere reversed in June 2012 and again in February 2014, that in the southern hemisphere reversed in July 2013. If updates of WSO data confirm the second reversal in northern solar hemisphere, it would pose a serious challenge to the Dynamo Theory. The long-term change in solar behavior may have begun in 1992, perhaps earlier. The physical underpinnings of these solar changes need to be understood and their effect on GCR modulation processes clarified. The study discusses the recent phenomena in the context of GCR modulation since 1900. These happenings affected our empirical predictions for the key parameters for the next two sunspot cycles (they may be progressively less active than sunspot cycle 24) but it enhanced support for our prediction that solar activity is descending into a Dalton-like grand minimum in the middle of the twentyfirst century, reducing the frequency of the coronal mass ejections; they determine the space weather affecting the quality of life on Earth, radiation dose for hardware and human activities in space as well as the frequency of large Forbush decreases at 1 a.u.

  18. The 22-Year Hale Cycle in Cosmic Ray Flux - Evidence for Direct Heliospheric Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S. R.; Owens, M. J.; Lockwood, M.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to predict times of greater galactic cosmic ray (GCR) fluxes is important for reducing the hazards caused by these particles to satellite communications, aviation, or astronauts. The 11-year solar-cycle variation in cosmic rays is highly correlated with the strength of the heliospheric magnetic field. Differences in GCR flux during alternate solar cycles yield a 22-year cycle, known as the Hale Cycle, which is thought to be due to different particle drift patterns when the northern solar pole has predominantly positive (denoted as qA>0 cycle) or negative ( qA<0) polarities. This results in the onset of the peak cosmic-ray flux at Earth occurring earlier during qA>0 cycles than for qA<0 cycles, which in turn causes the peak to be more dome-shaped for qA>0 and more sharply peaked for qA<0. In this study, we demonstrate that properties of the large-scale heliospheric magnetic field are different during the declining phase of the qA<0 and qA>0 solar cycles, when the difference in GCR flux is most apparent. This suggests that particle drifts may not be the sole mechanism responsible for the Hale Cycle in GCR flux at Earth. However, we also demonstrate that these polarity-dependent heliospheric differences are evident during the space-age but are much less clear in earlier data: using geomagnetic reconstructions, we show that for the period of 1905 - 1965, alternate polarities do not give as significant a difference during the declining phase of the solar cycle. Thus we suggest that the 22-year cycle in cosmic-ray flux is at least partly the result of direct modulation by the heliospheric magnetic field and that this effect may be primarily limited to the grand solar maximum of the space-age.

  19. Minimizing Astronauts' Risk from Space Radiation during Future Lunar Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Hayat, Mathew; Nounu, Hatem N.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the risk factors from space radiation for astronauts on future lunar missions. Two types of radiation are discussed, Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) and Solar Particle events (SPE). Distributions of Dose from 1972 SPE at 4 DLOCs inside Spacecraft are shown. A chart with the organ dose quantities is also given. Designs of the exploration class spacecraft and the planned lunar rover are shown to exhibit radiation protections features of those vehicles.

  20. A comparison of clinician-rated neuropsychological and self-rated cognitive assessments in patients with asthma and rheumatologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Frol, Alan B; Vasquez, Aracely; Getahun, Yonatan; Pacheco, Maria; Khan, David A; Brown, E Sherwood

    2013-01-01

    Although data are mixed, asthma and rheumatologic conditions may be associated with cognitive impairment. Medications may play a role because corticosteroids are associated with memory impairment. Therefore, an easily administered assessment of cognition would be useful in these patients. We assessed relationships between self-rated and clinician-rated cognitive performance and mood in patients with asthma and rheumatologic diseases. Participants included 31adults treated for asthma or rheumatologic disorders (17 receiving chronic prednisone therapy, and 14 not receiving prednisone). An objective assessment of a variety of cognitive domains was administered through clinician and patient-rated assessments of cognition. Composite scores for the objective (Global Clinical Rating [GCR]) and subjective (Neuropsychological Impairment Scale: Global Measure of Impairment [GMI]) measures of cognition were derived. Depression was assessed with the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD-17). A linear regression was conducted with GMI scores as dependent variable and GCR, HRSD-17 scores, and prednisone-use status, as independent variables. Significant differences between prednisone-treated patients and other patients were observed on the GCR, GMI, and HRSD-17. In the regression analysis, HRSD-17 scores, but not GCR scores, significantly predicted GMI scores. Prednisone-treated patients had higher levels of depressive symptoms and subjective and objective cognitive deficits than those not taking prednisone. In the combined patient groups, subjective cognitive assessment was more strongly related to depressive symptoms than objective cognition. Findings suggest physicians should be aware of the potential for cognitive deficits in patients taking corticosteroids and, when appropriate, should consider the use of objective neurocognitive tests or neuropsychology consultation to better characterize its presence and severity.

  1. Radiation Measured with Different Dosimeters for ISS-Expedition 18-19/ULF2 on Board International Space Station during Solar Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Dazhuang; Gaza, R.; Roed, Y.; Semones, E.; Lee, K.; Steenburgh, R.; Johnson, S.; Flanders, J.; Zapp, N.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation field of particles in low Earth orbit (LEO) is mainly composed of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), solar energetic particles and particles in SAA (South Atlantic Anomaly). GCR are modulated by solar activity, at the period of solar minimum activity, GCR intensity is at maximum and the main contributor for space radiation is GCR. At present for space radiation measurements conducted by JSC (Johnson Space Center) SRAG (Space Radiation Analysis Group), the preferred active dosimeter sensitive to all LET (Linear Energy Transfer) is the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC); the preferred passive dosimeters are thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) sensitive to low LET as well as CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) sensitive to high LET. For the method using passive dosimeters, radiation quantities for all LET can be obtained by combining radiation results measured with TLDs/OSLDs and CR-39 PNTDs. TEPC, TLDs/OSLDs and CR-39 detectors were used to measure the radiation field for the ISS (International Space Station) - Expedition 18-19/ULF2 space mission which was conducted from 15 November 2008 to 31 July 2009 - near the period of the recent solar minimum activity. LET spectra (differential and integral fluence, absorbed dose and dose equivalent) and radiation quantities were measured for positions TEPC, TESS (Temporary Sleeping Station, inside the polyethylene lined sleep station), SM-P 327 and 442 (Service Module - Panel 327 and 442). This paper presents radiation LET spectra measured with TEPC and CR-39 PNTDs and radiation dose measured with TLDs/OSLDs as well as the radiation quantities combined from results measured with passive dosimeters.

  2. Radiological health risks for exploratory class missions in space.

    PubMed

    Nachtwey, D S; Yang, T C

    1991-01-01

    Crewmembers on missions to the Moon or Mars will be unavoidably exposed to ionizing radiation as they pass through the Van Allen belts and the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) flux. There is the possibility for exposure to proton radiation from Solar Particle Events (SPE). Using absorbed doses and ICRP 26, Linear Energy Transfer (LET) -dependent quality factors, the following dose-equivalents are estimated: In a spacecraft with 0.75 cm aluminum walls (2 g/cm2) at solar minimum, the lunar round trip dose-equivalent is less than 0.05 Sv. During a Mars mission the estimated dose-equivalents are: outbound (Van Allen Belts) <0.02 Sv; Earth to Mars (205 days exposure to free space GCR) 0.32 Sv; 30 days on the Martian surface (GCR) 0.023 Sv; Mars to Earth (225 days exposure to free space) 0.35 Sv; and through the Van Allen Belts 0.02 Sv. Conventionally, the total of 0.73 Sv over 460 days could be expected to increase the risk of cancer mortality in a 35-year old male astronaut by about one percent. However three-fourths of the dose-equivalent in free space is contributed by high LET heavy ions (Z > or = 3) and target fragments with average quality factors of 10.3 and 20 respectively. The biological effectiveness of these radiations is poorly understood; so the quality factors are set at conservatively very high values. The entire concept of absorbed dose/quality factor/dose-equivalent as applied to GCR must be reconsidered.

  3. Radiation risk predictions for Space Station Freedom orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Atwell, William; Weyland, Mark; Hardy, Alva C.; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Shinn, Judy L.; Katz, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Risk assessment calculations are presented for the preliminary proposed solar minimum and solar maximum orbits for Space Station Freedom (SSF). Integral linear energy transfer (LET) fluence spectra are calculated for the trapped proton and GCR environments. Organ dose calculations are discussed using the computerized anatomical man model. The cellular track model of Katz is applied to calculate cell survival, transformation, and mutation rates for various aluminum shields. Comparisons between relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and quality factor (QF) values for SSF orbits are made.

  4. Status of experimental data base development relevant to spaceradiation transport and protection

    SciTech Connect

    Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Guetersloh, Stephen; Zeitlin, Cary; Miller, Jack

    2004-04-01

    This report describes the highlights and progress made in aprogram of measurements studying radiation transport through materials ofinterest to NASA. All measurements were preformed at acceleratorfacilities, primarily using GCR-like heavy-ion beams incident uponvarious elemental and composite targets. Both primary and secondaryparticles exiting the target were measured. The secondary particlesinclude both charged particles and neutrons. These measurements serve asuseful benchmarks and input to transport model calculations.

  5. Multi-Scale Model of Galactic Cosmic Ray Effects on the Hippocampus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucinotta, Francis

    An important concern for risk assessment from galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposures is impacts to the central nervous systems including changes in cognition, and associations with increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). AD, which affects about 50 percent of the population above age 80-yr, is a degenerative disease that worsens with time after initial onset leading to death, and has no known cure. AD is difficult to detect at early stages, and the small number of epidemiology studies that have considered the possibility have not identified an association with low dose radiation. However, experimental studies in transgenic mice suggest the possibility exits. We discuss modeling approaches to consider mechanisms whereby GCR would accelerate the occurrence of AD to earlier ages. Biomarkers of AD include Amyloid beta plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) made up of aggregates of the hyper-phosphorylated form of the micro-tubule associated, tau protein. Related markers include synaptic degeneration, dendritic spine loss, and neuronal cell loss through apoptosis. GCR may affect these processes by causing oxidative stress, aberrant signaling following DNA damage, and chronic neuro-inflammation. Cell types considered in multi-scale models are neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. We developed biochemical and cell kinetics models of DNA damage signaling related to glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta and neuro-inflammation, and considered approaches to develop computer simulations of GCR induced cell interactions and their relationships to Amyloid beta plaques and NFTs. Comparison of model results to experimental data for the age specific development of plaques in transgenic mice and predictions of space radiation effects will be discussed.

  6. Anomalous and Galactic Cosmic Rays at 1 AU During the Cycle 23/24 Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leske, R. A.; Cummings, A. C.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.

    2013-06-01

    Anomalous cosmic ray (ACR) intensities at 1 AU at solar minimum generally track galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensities such as those measured by neutron monitors, albeit with differences between solar polarity cycles. The unusual cycle 23/24 solar minimum was long-lasting with very low sunspot numbers and significantly reduced interplanetary magnetic field strength and solar wind dynamic pressure and turbulence, but also featured a heliospheric current sheet tilt that remained high for an extended period. Peak ACR intensities did not recover to the maximum values reached during the last two A>0 solar minima and just barely reached the last A<0 levels. However, GCR intensities in 2009 (neutron monitor rates and also at ˜200 MeV/nucleon) were the highest recorded during the last 50 years, indicating their intensities were not as heavily modulated during their transport from the outer heliosphere. This unexpected difference in the behavior of ACRs and GCRs remains unexplained, but suggests that either the ACR source intensity may have weakened since the last A<0 epoch, or perhaps that ACR intensities at 1 AU in the ecliptic may be more sensitive than GCRs to the higher tilt angle. This seems plausible if the ACR source intensity is greater at low latitudes during A<0 cycles, while the GCR distribution at the heliospheric boundary is more uniform in latitude. Shortly after an abrupt increase in the current sheet tilt angle in late 2009, both ACR and GCR intensities showed dramatic decreases, marking the end of solar minimum modulation conditions for this cycle.

  7. Application of real-time radiation dosimetry using a new silicon LET sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doke, T.; Hayashi, T.; Kikuchi, J.; Nagaoka, S.; Nakano, T.; Sakaguchi, T.; Terasawa, K.; Badhwar, G. D.

    1999-01-01

    A new type of real-time radiation monitoring device, RRMD-III, consisting of three double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSDs), has been developed and tested on-board the Space Shuttle mission STS-84. The test succeeded in measuring the linear energy transfer (LET) distribution over the range of 0.2 keV/micrometer to 600 keV/micrometer for 178 h. The Shuttle cruised at an altitude of 300 to 400 km and an inclination angle of 51.6 degrees for 221.3 h, which is equivalent to the International Space Station orbit. The LET distribution obtained for particles was investigated by separating it into galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles and trapped particles in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region. The result shows that the contribution in dose-equivalent due to GCR particles is almost equal to that from trapped particles. The total absorbed dose rate during the mission was 0.611 mGy/day; the effective quality factor, 1.64; and the dose equivalent rate, 0.998 mSv/day. The average absorbed dose rates are 0.158 mGy/min for GCR particles and 3.67 mGy/min for trapped particles. The effective quality factors are 2.48 for GCR particles and 1.19 for trapped particles. The absorbed doses obtained by the RRMD-III and a conventional method using TLD (Mg(2)SiO(4)), which was placed around the RRMD-III were compared. It was found that the TLDs showed a lower efficiency, just 58% of absorbed dose registered by the RRMD-III.

  8. A comparison of clinician-rated neuropsychological and self-rated cognitive assessments in patients with asthma and rheumatologic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Frol, Alan B.; Vasquez, Aracely; Getahun, Yonatan; Pacheco, Maria; Khan, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Although data are mixed, asthma and rheumatologic conditions may be associated with cognitive impairment. Medications may play a role because corticosteroids are associated with memory impairment. Therefore, an easily administered assessment of cognition would be useful in these patients. We assessed relationships between self-rated and clinician-rated cognitive performance and mood in patients with asthma and rheumatologic diseases. Participants included 31adults treated for asthma or rheumatologic disorders (17 receiving chronic prednisone therapy, and 14 not receiving prednisone). An objective assessment of a variety of cognitive domains was administered through clinician and patient-rated assessments of cognition. Composite scores for the objective (Global Clinical Rating [GCR]) and subjective (Neuropsychological Impairment Scale: Global Measure of Impairment [GMI]) measures of cognition were derived. Depression was assessed with the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD-17). A linear regression was conducted with GMI scores as dependent variable and GCR, HRSD-17 scores, and prednisone-use status, as independent variables. Significant differences between prednisone-treated patients and other patients were observed on the GCR, GMI, and HRSD-17. In the regression analysis, HRSD-17 scores, but not GCR scores, significantly predicted GMI scores. Prednisone-treated patients had higher levels of depressive symptoms and subjective and objective cognitive deficits than those not taking prednisone. In the combined patient groups, subjective cognitive assessment was more strongly related to depressive symptoms than objective cognition. Findings suggest physicians should be aware of the potential for cognitive deficits in patients taking corticosteroids and, when appropriate, should consider the use of objective neurocognitive tests or neuropsychology consultation to better characterize its presence and severity. PMID:23484893

  9. Electromagnetic Dissociation and Spacecraft Electronics Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    2016-01-01

    When protons or heavy ions from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) or solar particle events (SPE) interact with target nuclei in spacecraft, there can be two different types of interactions. The more familiar strong nuclear interaction often dominates and is responsible for nuclear fragmentation in either the GCR or SPE projectile nucleus or the spacecraft target nucleus. (Of course, the proton does not break up, except possibly to produce pions or other hadrons.) The less familiar, second type of interaction is due to the very strong electromagnetic fields that exist when two charged nuclei pass very close to each other. This process is called electromagnetic dissociation (EMD) and primarily results in the emission of neutrons, protons and light ions (isotopes of hydrogen and helium). The cross section for particle production is approximately defined as the number of particles produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions or other types of reactions. (There are various kinematic and other factors which multiply the particle number to arrive at the cross section.) Strong, nuclear interactions usually dominate the nuclear reactions of most interest that occur between GCR and target nuclei. However, for heavy nuclei (near Fe and beyond) at high energy the EMD cross section can be much larger than the strong nuclear interaction cross section. This paper poses a question: Are there projectile or target nuclei combinations in the interaction of GCR or SPE where the EMD reaction cross section plays a dominant role? If the answer is affirmative, then EMD mechanisms should be an integral part of codes that are used to predict damage to spacecraft electronics. The question can become more fine-tuned and one can ask about total reaction cross sections as compared to double differential cross sections. These issues will be addressed in the present paper.

  10. ISOLATED WOLF-RAYET STARS AND O SUPERGIANTS IN THE GALACTIC CENTER REGION IDENTIFIED VIA PASCHEN-{alpha} EXCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Mauerhan, J. C.; Stolovy, S. R.; Cotera, A.; Dong, H.; Wang, Q. D.; Morris, M. R.; Lang, C.

    2010-12-10

    We report the discovery of 19 hot, evolved, massive stars near the Galactic center region (GCR). These objects were selected for spectroscopy owing to their detection as strong sources of Paschen-{alpha} (P{alpha}) emission-line excess, following a narrowband imaging survey of the central 0.{sup 0}65 x 0.{sup 0}25 (l, b) around Sgr A* with the Hubble Space Telescope. Discoveries include six carbon-type (WC) and five nitrogen-type (WN) Wolf-Rayet stars, six O supergiants, and two B supergiants. Two of the O supergiants have X-ray counterparts having properties consistent with solitary O stars and colliding-wind binaries. The infrared photometry of 17 stars is consistent with the Galactic center distance, but 2 of them are located in the foreground. Several WC stars exhibit a relatively large infrared excess, which is possibly thermal emission from hot dust. Most of the stars appear scattered throughout the GCR, with no relation to the three known massive young clusters; several others lie near the Arches and Quintuplet clusters and may have originated within one of these systems. The results of this work bring the total sample of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in the GCR to 88. All sources of strong P{alpha} excess have been identified in the area surveyed with HST, which implies that the sample of WN stars in this region is near completion, and is dominated by late (WNL) types. The current WC sample, although probably not complete, is almost exclusively dominated by late (WCL) types. The observed WR subtype distribution in the GCR is a reflection of the intrinsic rarity of early subtypes (WNE and WCE) in the inner Galaxy, an effect that is driven by metallicity.

  11. Radiation risk predictions for Space Station Freedom orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Atwell, William; Weyland, Mark; Hardy, Alva C.; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Shinn, Judy L.; Katz, Robert

    1991-06-01

    Risk assessment calculations are presented for the preliminary proposed solar minimum and solar maximum orbits for Space Station Freedom (SSF). Integral linear energy transfer (LET) fluence spectra are calculated for the trapped proton and GCR environments. Organ dose calculations are discussed using the computerized anatomical man model. The cellular track model of Katz is applied to calculate cell survival, transformation, and mutation rates for various aluminum shields. Comparisons between relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and quality factor (QF) values for SSF orbits are made.

  12. Radiological health risks for exploratory class missions in space.

    PubMed

    Nachtwey, D S; Yang, T C

    1991-01-01

    Crewmembers on missions to the Moon or Mars will be unavoidably exposed to ionizing radiation as they pass through the Van Allen belts and the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) flux. There is the possibility for exposure to proton radiation from Solar Particle Events (SPE). Using absorbed doses and ICRP 26, Linear Energy Transfer (LET) -dependent quality factors, the following dose-equivalents are estimated: In a spacecraft with 0.75 cm aluminum walls (2 g/cm2) at solar minimum, the lunar round trip dose-equivalent is less than 0.05 Sv. During a Mars mission the estimated dose-equivalents are: outbound (Van Allen Belts) <0.02 Sv; Earth to Mars (205 days exposure to free space GCR) 0.32 Sv; 30 days on the Martian surface (GCR) 0.023 Sv; Mars to Earth (225 days exposure to free space) 0.35 Sv; and through the Van Allen Belts 0.02 Sv. Conventionally, the total of 0.73 Sv over 460 days could be expected to increase the risk of cancer mortality in a 35-year old male astronaut by about one percent. However three-fourths of the dose-equivalent in free space is contributed by high LET heavy ions (Z > or = 3) and target fragments with average quality factors of 10.3 and 20 respectively. The biological effectiveness of these radiations is poorly understood; so the quality factors are set at conservatively very high values. The entire concept of absorbed dose/quality factor/dose-equivalent as applied to GCR must be reconsidered. PMID:11537128

  13. An analysis of the SEU rate of microcircuits exposed by the various components of space radiation.

    PubMed

    Bashkirov, V F; Kuznetsov, N V; Nymmik, R A

    1999-06-01

    In the present paper the experimental and calculated data of SEU rate in microcircuits operating onboard spacecraft are compared. The main features of models and the calculation methods, which are incorporated in the SEREIS software package, are considered. The main features of models, and the calculation methods are considered. The contribution of the different space radiation components (ERB Protons; GCR particles and SEPs) to the SEU rate is discussed with an allowance for the shielding thickness.

  14. Energy Spectrum of the Recurrent Variation of Galactic Cosmic Rays During the Solar Minimum of Cycles 23/24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Agnieszka; Alania, Michael V.

    2016-08-01

    The Sun during the recent epoch of solar activity operated in a different way than during the last 60 years, being less active. We study temporal changes of the energy spectrum of the first three harmonics of the 27-day variation of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) intensity during the unusual, recent solar minimum, between Solar Cycles 23 and 24 (SC 23/24) and compare with four previous minima. We show that the energy spectrum of the amplitudes of the recurrent variation of the GCR intensity is hard in the maximum epochs and is soft in the minimum epochs during Solar Cycles 20 - 24, but with peculiarities during the Solar Minimum 23/24. In particular, while the energy/rigidity spectrum of the amplitudes of the first harmonic of the recurrent variation of the GCR intensity behaves practically the same as for previous epochs, the energy/rigidity spectrum of the amplitudes of the second and the third harmonics demonstrates a pronounced softening. We attribute this phenomenon to the decrease of the extension of the heliosphere caused by the decrease of the solar-wind dynamic pressure during the unusual Solar Minimum 23/24.

  15. Galactic-cosmic-ray-produced 3He in a ferromanganese crust: any supernova 60Fe excess on earth?

    PubMed

    Basu, S; Stuart, F M; Schnabel, C; Klemm, V

    2007-04-01

    An excess of 60Fe in 2.4-3.2 x 10(6) year old ferromanganese crust (237 KD) from the deep Pacific Ocean has been considered as evidence for the delivery of debris from a nearby supernova explosion to Earth. Extremely high ;{3}He/;{4}He (up to 6.12 x 10(-3)) and 3He concentrations (up to 8 x 10(9) atoms/g) measured in 237 KD cannot be supernova-derived. The helium is produced by galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and delivered in micrometeorites that have survived atmospheric entry to be trapped by the crust. 60Fe is produced by GCR reactions on Ni in extraterrestrial material. The maximum (3)He/(60)Fe of 237 KD (80-850) is comparable to the GCR (3)He/(60)Fe production ratio (400-500) predicted for Ni-bearing minerals in iron meteorites. The excess 60Fe can be plausibly explained by the presence of micrometeorites trapped by the crust, rather than injection from a supernova source.

  16. Initiation-promotion model of tumor prevalence in mice from space radiation exposures.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, F A; Wilson, J W

    1995-08-01

    Exposures in space consist of low-level background components from galactic cosmic rays (GCR), occasional intense-energetic solar-particle events, periodic passes through geomagnetic-trapped radiation, and exposure from possible onboard nuclear-propulsion engines. Risk models for astronaut exposure from such diverse components and modalities must be developed to assure adequate protection in future NASA missions. The low-level background exposures (GCR), including relativistic heavy ions (HZE), will be the ultimate limiting factor for astronaut career exposure. We consider herein a two-mutation, initiation-promotion, radiation-carcinogenesis model in mice in which the initiation stage is represented by a linear kinetics model of cellular repair/misrepair, including the track-structure model for heavy ion action cross-sections. The model is validated by comparison with the harderian gland tumor experiments of Alpen et al. for various ion beams. We apply the initiation-promotion model to exposures from galactic cosmic rays, using models of the cosmic-ray environment and heavy ion transport, and consider the effects of the age of the mice prior to and after the exposure and of the length of time in space on predictions of relative risk. Our results indicate that biophysical models of age-dependent radiation hazard will provide a better understanding of GCR risk than models that rely strictly on estimates of the initial slopes of these radiations.

  17. Active dosimetry on recent space flights.

    PubMed

    Beaujean, R; Kopp, J; Reitz, G

    1999-01-01

    The radiation exposure inside the spacecraft in low earth orbit was investigated with a telescope based on two silicon planar detectors during three NASA shuttle-to-MIR missions (inclination 51.6 deg, altitude about 380 km). Count and dose rate profiles were measured, as well as separate linear energy transfer (LET) spectra, for the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and the trapped radiation encountered in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Effective quality factors are deduced from the converted LET spectra (in water) in the range 0.1-120 keV micrometer-1 according to ICRP 60. Measured mission averaged dose rates in silicon are in the range 98-108 microGy d-1 and 137-178 microGy d-1 for the GCR and SAA contributions, respectively. The deduced effective quality factors are 2.95-3.29 (GCR) and 1.18-1.25 (SAA), resulting in mission averaged dose equivalent rates of 631-716 microSv d-1 for the comparable three missions.

  18. Galactic Cosmic Rays and Lunar Secondary Particles from Solar Minimum to Maximum: CRaTER Observations and Geant4 Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Blake, J. B.; Spence, H. E.; Schwadron, N.; Golightly, M. J.; Case, A. W.; Kasper, J. C.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mission was launched in 2009 during the recent deep and extended solar minimum, with the highest galactic cosmic ray (GCR) fluxes observed since the beginning of the space era. Its Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) instrument was designed to measure the spectra of energy deposits in silicon detectors shielded behind pieces of tissue equivalent plastic, simulating the self-shielding provided by an astronaut's body around radiation-sensitive organs. The CRaTER data set now covers the evolution of the GCR environment near the moon during the first five years of development of the present solar cycle. We will present these observations, along with Geant4 modeling to illustrate the varying particle contributions to the energy-deposit spectra. CRaTER has also measured protons traveling up from the lunar surface after their creation during GCR interactions with surface material, and we will report observations and modeling of the energy and angular distributions of these "albedo" protons.

  19. A model for predicting the radiation exposure for mission planning aboard the international space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Jaby, Samy; Lewis, Brent J.; Tomi, Leena

    2014-04-01

    The International Space Station Cosmic Radiation Exposure Model (ISSCREM) has been developed as a possible tool for use in radiation mission planning as based on operational data collected with a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) aboard the ISS since 2000. It is able to reproduce the observed trapped radiation and galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) contributions to the total dose equivalent to within ±20% and ±10%, respectively, as would be measured by the onboard TEPC at the Zvezda Service Module panel 327 (SM-327). Furthermore, when these contributions are combined, the total dose equivalent that would be measured at this location is estimated to within ±10%. The models incorporated into ISSCREM correlate the GCR dose equivalent rate to the cutoff rigidity magnetic shielding parameter and the trapped radiation dose equivalent rate to atmospheric density inside the South Atlantic Anomaly. The GCR dose equivalent rate is found to vary minimally with altitude and TEPC module location however, due to the statistics and data available, the trapped radiation model could only be developed for the TEPC located at SM-327. Evidence of the variation in trapped radiation dose with detector orientation and the East-West asymmetry were observed at this location.

  20. The role of tribo-pairs in modifying the tribological behavior of the MoS2/Ti composite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Zhang, Guangan; Wang, Liping

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical contact conditions and the shear strength of the interface are the two independent factors that control the friction behavior of the MoS2 coating. Although ZrO2 and GCr15 had similar mechanical contact conditions, they showed rather different friction behaviors. Therefore, the shear strength of the interface was prominent in determining the friction behavior of the MoS2/Ti composite coating, particularly in the initial stage of friction. The strong interfacial shear strength between GCr15, WC and MoS2/Ti resulted in the high friction coefficient in air and short wear life in vacuum. Furthermore, we found that the interfacial shear strength was affected by the Ti content in the MoS2/Ti coatings, and the adhesive behavior of Ti and GCr15 was responsible for the high friction coefficient and high wear rate. The shear strength between the two sliding materials was amplified with the increase in the vacuum degree. These results benefit us to tailor or select the MoS2-based composite coatings and the corresponding tribo-pairs for vacuum operating conditions.

  1. A temporal forecast of radiation environments for future space exploration missions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Cucinotta, Francis A; Wilson, John W

    2007-06-01

    The understanding of future space radiation environments is an important goal for space mission operations, design, and risk assessment. We have developed a solar cycle statistical model in which sunspot number is coupled to space-related quantities, such as the galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) deceleration potential (phi) and the mean occurrence frequency of solar particle events (SPEs). Future GCR fluxes were derived from a predictive model, in which the temporal dependence represented by phi was derived from GCR flux and ground-based Climax neutron monitor rate measurements over the last four decades. These results showed that the point dose equivalent inside a typical spacecraft in interplanetary space was influenced by solar modulation by up to a factor of three. It also has been shown that a strong relationship exists between large SPE occurrences and phi. For future space exploration missions, cumulative probabilities of SPEs at various integral fluence levels during short-period missions were defined using a database of proton fluences of past SPEs. Analytic energy spectra of SPEs at different ranks of the integral fluences for energies greater than 30 MeV were constructed over broad energy ranges extending out to GeV for the analysis of representative exposure levels at those fluences. Results will guide the design of protection systems for astronauts during future space exploration missions.

  2. Distinguishing Solar Cycle Effects in Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, K. L.; Harrison, R. G.

    2008-12-01

    As solar radiation decreases with distance from the Sun, other sources of energy, such as ionization from galactic cosmic rays (GCR), assume a greater relative importance than at the terrestrial planets. Charged particle effects could therefore be more relevant to the formation of clouds and haze at the outer planets. The long-term solar modulation of Neptune's albedo is thought to be caused by either ion-induced nucleation of cloud-forming particles, or ultraviolet (UV) radiation effects on the colour of the clouds. On the basis of the 11 year solar cycle, the statistical evidence was slightly in favour of the UV mechanism, however distinguishing unambiguously between the two mechanisms will require more than the solar cycle variation alone. A 1.68 year quasi-periodicity, uniquely present at some times from heliospheric modulation of GCR, has previously been used to discriminate between solar UV and GCR effects in terrestrial data. The cosmic ray proton monitor data from both the Voyager spacecraft show this 1.68 year modulation during the 1980s when the spacecraft were close to the outer planets, indicating the possibility for applying a similar technique as far out as Neptune.

  3. Radiation exposure predictions for short-duration stay Mars missions.

    PubMed

    Striepe, S A; Nealy, J E; Simonsen, L C

    1992-01-01

    The human radiation environment for several short-duration stay manned Mars missions is predicted using the Mission Radiation Calculation (MIRACAL) program, which was developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This program provides dose estimates for galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and large and ordinary solar proton flare events for various amounts of effective spacecraft shielding (both operational and storm shelter thicknesses) and a given time history of the spacecraft's heliocentric position. The results of this study show that most of the missions can survive the most recent large flares (if they were to occur at the missions' perihelion) if a 25 g/cm2 storm shelter is assumed. The dose predictions show that missions during solar minima (when solar flare activity is the lowest) are not necessarily the minimum dose cases, due to increased GCR contribution during this time period. The direct transfer mission studied has slightly lower doses than the outbound Venus swingby mission [on the order of 10-20 centi-Sieverts (cSv) lower], with the greatest dose differences for the assumed worst case scenario (when the large flares occur at perihelion). The GCR dose for a mission can be reduced by having the crew spend some fraction of its day nominally in the storm shelter (other than during flare events).

  4. Effects of Nuclear Cross Sections at Different Energies on Space Radiation Exposure from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zi-Wei; Adams, James H., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Space radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a major hazard to space crews, especially in long duration human space explorations. For this reason, they will be protected by radiation shielding that fragments the GCR heavy ions. Here we investigate how sensitive the crew's radiation exposure is to nuclear fragmentation cross sections at different energies. We find that in deep space cross sections between about 0.2 and 1.2 GeV/u have the strongest effect on dose equivalent behind shielding in solar minimum GCR environments, and cross sections between about 0.6 and 1.7 GeV/u are the most important at solar maximum'. On the other hand, at the location of the International Space Station, cross sections at_higher -energies, between about 0.6 and 1.7 GeV /u at solar minimum and between about 1.7 and 3.4 GeV/u'at,solar maximum, are the most important This is. due-to the average geomagnetic cutoff for the ISS orbit. We also show the effect of uncertainties in the fragmentation cross sections on the elemental energy spectra behind shielding. These results help to focus the studies of fragmentation cross sections on the proper energy range in order to improve our predictions of crew exposures.

  5. Cosmic rays and total ozone at higher middle latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Las̆tovic̆ka, J.; Kriz̆an, P.; Kudela, K.

    2003-05-01

    Various external factors of solar origin like solar activity (solar cycle, 27-day variation etc.), geomagnetic storms and other solar wind-related phenomena, and changes of fluxes of high-energy particles can potentially affect the ozone layer. Here we examine the effects of Forbush decreases and other decreases of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) flux on the columnar ozone content (= total ozone) at higher middle latitudes near 50°N. The Forbush decreases usually occur together with geomagnetic storms and relatively often together with solar proton events (SPEs). Then it is difficult, if not impossible, to distinguish between the effects of geomagnetic storms, SPEs and Forbush decreases and other decreases of the GCR flux. Therefore we present here the results of investigations of the effects of Forbush decreases and other substantial decreases of the GCR flux on the total ozone for events when there was no geomagnetic storm. Due to the dominance of summertime events in the selected data set, very weak if any effect is found. There is evidently no effect in zonal mean values of total ozone.

  6. Short-term and Long-term Variations of Dose Rate measured by MSL/RAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jingnan; Zeitlin, Cary; Rafkin, Scot; Boettcher, Stephan; Reitz, Guenther; Koehler, Jan; Ehresmann, Bent; Martin, Cesar; Burmeister, Soenke; Posner, Arik; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Hassler, Donald M.; Brinza, David; Boehm, Henning Eckart; Lohf, Henning; Appel, Jan

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), onboard Mars Science Laboratory’s (MSL) rover Curiosity, measures the spectra of both energetic charged and neutral particles along with radiation dose rate at the surface of Mars. Several effects have been observed for the first time to influence the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR)-driven particle radiation on the surface: [a] short-term diurnal variations of the Martian atmospheric pressure caused by daily thermal tides [Rafkin 2014]; [b] long-term seasonal pressure changes in the Martian atmosphere; and [c] the modulation of the primary GCR fluxes by the heliospheric magnetic field, which correlates with long-term solar activities and heliospheric rotation. These concurrent factors affect the dose rate variations measured by RAD on the Martian surface. RAD also recorded the dose rate during the 253-day cruise phase of MSL from the Earth to Mars. The variations of the GCR-induced dose rates during quiet time period without the direct detection of Solar Particle Events (SPE) were solely driven by the changes of heliospheric conditions (i.e. [c]). The RAD cruise and surface dose measurements, along with the surface pressure data and the solar modulation factor, are analysed in order to understand how the long-term influences ([b] and [c]) individually correlate with the measured dose rates.

  7. [Galactic heavy charged particles damaging effect on biological structures].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ev, A I; Krasavin, E A; Ostrovskiĭ, M A

    2013-03-01

    A concept of the radiation risk of the manned interplanetary flights is proposed and substantiated. Heavy charged particles that are a component of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) have a high damaging effect on the biological structures as great amount of energy is deposited in heavy particle tracks. The high biological effectiveness of heavy ions is observed in their action on cell genetic structures and the whole organism, including the brain structures. The hippocampus is the part of the central nervous system that is the most sensitive to radiation--first of all, to heavy charged particles. Irradiation of animals with accelerated iron ions at doses corresponding to the real fluxes of GCR heavy nuclei, to which Mars mission crews can be exposed, leads to marked behavioral function disorders in the post-irradiation period. To evaluate the radiation risk for the interplanetary flight crews, the concept of successful mission accomplishment is introduced. In these conditions, the central nervous system structures can be the critical target of GCR heavy nuclei. Their damage can modify the higher integrative functions of the brain and cause disorders in the crew members' operator performances.

  8. A Monte Carlo-based radiation safety assessment for astronauts in an environment with confined magnetic field shielding.

    PubMed

    Geng, Changran; Tang, Xiaobin; Gong, Chunhui; Guan, Fada; Johns, Jesse; Shu, Diyun; Chen, Da

    2015-12-01

    The active shielding technique has great potential for radiation protection in space exploration because it has the advantage of a significant mass saving compared with the passive shielding technique. This paper demonstrates a Monte Carlo-based approach to evaluating the shielding effectiveness of the active shielding technique using confined magnetic fields (CMFs). The International Commission on Radiological Protection reference anthropomorphic phantom, as well as the toroidal CMF, was modeled using the Monte Carlo toolkit Geant4. The penetrating primary particle fluence, organ-specific dose equivalent, and male effective dose were calculated for particles in galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) and solar particle events (SPEs). Results show that the SPE protons can be easily shielded against, even almost completely deflected, by the toroidal magnetic field. GCR particles can also be more effectively shielded against by increasing the magnetic field strength. Our results also show that the introduction of a structural Al wall in the CMF did not provide additional shielding for GCR; in fact it can weaken the total shielding effect of the CMF. This study demonstrated the feasibility of accurately determining the radiation field inside the environment and evaluating the organ dose equivalents for astronauts under active shielding using the CMF.

  9. MCNPX Cosmic Ray Shielding Calculations with the NORMAN Phantom Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Michael R.; Durkee, Joe W.; McKinney, Gregg; Singleterry Robert

    2008-01-01

    The United States is planning manned lunar and interplanetary missions in the coming years. Shielding from cosmic rays is a critical aspect of manned spaceflight. These ventures will present exposure issues involving the interplanetary Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) environment. GCRs are comprised primarily of protons (approx.84.5%) and alpha-particles (approx.14.7%), while the remainder is comprised of massive, highly energetic nuclei. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) has commissioned a joint study with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to investigate the interaction of the GCR environment with humans using high-fidelity, state-of-the-art computer simulations. The simulations involve shielding and dose calculations in order to assess radiation effects in various organs. The simulations are being conducted using high-resolution voxel-phantom models and the MCNPX[1] Monte Carlo radiation-transport code. Recent advances in MCNPX physics packages now enable simulated transport over 2200 types of ions of widely varying energies in large, intricate geometries. We report here initial results obtained using a GCR spectrum and a NORMAN[3] phantom.

  10. Galactic Cosmic Ray Intensity Response to Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections/Magnetic Clouds in 1995-2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2011-01-01

    We summarize the response of the galactic cosmic ray (CGR) intensity to the passage of the more than 300 interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and their associated shocks that passed the Earth during 1995-2009, a period that encompasses the whole of Solar Cycle 23. In approx.80% of cases, the GCR intensity decreased during the passage of these structures, i.e., a "Forbush decrease" occurred, while in approx.10% there was no significant change. In the remaining cases, the GCR intensity increased. Where there was an intensity decrease, minimum intensity was observed inside the ICME in approx.90% of these events. The observations confirm the role of both post-shock regions and ICMEs in the generation of these decreases, consistent with many previous studies, but contrary to the conclusion of Reames, Kahler, and Tylka (Astrophys. 1. Lett. 700, L199, 2009) who, from examining a subset of ICMEs with flux-rope-like magnetic fields (magnetic clouds) argued that these are "open structures" that allow free access of particles including GCRs to their interior. In fact, we find that magnetic clouds are more likely to participate in the deepest GCR decreases than ICMEs that are not magnetic clouds.

  11. Cosmogenic nuclides in the Martian surface: Constraints for sample recovery and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, Peter A. J.

    1988-01-01

    Stable and radioactive cosmogenic nuclides and radiation damage effects such as cosmic ray tracks can provide information on the surface history of Mars. A recent overview on developments in cosmogenic nuclide research for historical studies of predominantly extraterrestrial materials was published previously. The information content of cosmogenic nuclides and radiation damage effects produced in the Martian surface is based on the different ways of interaction of the primary galactic and solar cosmic radiation (GCR, SCR) and the secondary particle cascade. Generally the kind and extent of interactions as seen in the products depend on the following factors: (1) composition, energy and intensity of the primary SCR and GCR; (2) composition, energy and intensity of the GCR-induced cascade of secondary particles; (3) the target geometry, i.e., the spatial parameters of Martian surface features with respect to the primary radiation source; (4) the target chemistry, i.e., the chemical composition of the Martian surface at the sampling location down to the minor element level or lower; and (5) duration of the exposure. These factors are not independent of each other and have a major influence on sample taking strategies and techniques.

  12. [Results of statistical analysis of the dynamics of ionizing radiation dose fields in the service module of the International Space Station in 2000-2012].

    PubMed

    Mitrikas, V G

    2014-01-01

    The on-going 24th solar cycle (SC) is distinguished from the previous ones by low activity. On the contrary, levels of proton fluxes from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are high, which increases the proton flow striking the Earth's radiation belts (ERB). Therefore, at present the absorbed dose from ERB protons should be calculated with consideration of the tangible increase of protons intensity built into the model descriptions based on experimental measurements during the minimum between cycles 19 and 20, and the cycle 21 maximum. The absorbed dose from GCR and ERB protons copies galactic protons dynamics, while the ERB electrons dose copies SC dynamics. The major factors that determine the absorbed dose value are SC phase, ISS orbital altitude and shielding of the dosimeter readings of which are used in analysis. The paper presents the results of dynamic analysis of absorbed doses measured by a variety of dosimeters, namely, R-16 (2 ionization chambers), DB8-1, DB8-2, DB8-3, DB8-4 as a function of ISS orbit altitude and SC phase. The existence of annual variation in the absorbed dose dynamics has been confirmed; several additional variations with the periods of 17 and 52 months have been detected. Modulation of absorbed dose variations by the SC and GCR amplitudes has been demonstrated.

  13. The role of the ejecta magnetic flux on the two-step Forbush decreases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masías Meza, Jimmy; Dasso, Sergio

    A Forbush Decrease (FD) is a depression in the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) background intensity, and are usually associated to the passage of an Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME). Magnetic Clouds (MCs) are a subset of ICMEs that are well studied, and are known to cause the deepest FDs. Usually, FDs present two steps in the depression profile, one associated to the shock arrival, and a steeper one restricted to the duration of the ejecta passage. There is a wide variety of processes responsible for the GCR depressions. For instance: the enhanced solar wind (SW) convection, reduced diffusion coefficients, enhanced adiabatic cooling, increase of the coherent magnetic field, etc. Our aim is to make a selection of FD events filtering those associated to well studied magnetic structures, such as Magnetic Clouds (MCs), in order to minimize the mixing processes involved in the ICME-GCR interactions in the resulting sample, and to study statistical properties. We determine the parameters of each FD profile and look for correlations with the associated MC parameters. We propose a method to decompose the FD profile into shock and ejecta components, and investigate correlations with the associated amplitudes of the ejecta components. We introduce the parameter, ``magnetic flux per unit length F/L'', and investigate its importance in the context of a simple ``diffusive barrier'' model. According to the correlations found, the two-step events are better represented by the ``diffusive barrier'' model, and the flux F/L is the parameter that better correlates with these events.

  14. A Monte Carlo-based radiation safety assessment for astronauts in an environment with confined magnetic field shielding.

    PubMed

    Geng, Changran; Tang, Xiaobin; Gong, Chunhui; Guan, Fada; Johns, Jesse; Shu, Diyun; Chen, Da

    2015-12-01

    The active shielding technique has great potential for radiation protection in space exploration because it has the advantage of a significant mass saving compared with the passive shielding technique. This paper demonstrates a Monte Carlo-based approach to evaluating the shielding effectiveness of the active shielding technique using confined magnetic fields (CMFs). The International Commission on Radiological Protection reference anthropomorphic phantom, as well as the toroidal CMF, was modeled using the Monte Carlo toolkit Geant4. The penetrating primary particle fluence, organ-specific dose equivalent, and male effective dose were calculated for particles in galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) and solar particle events (SPEs). Results show that the SPE protons can be easily shielded against, even almost completely deflected, by the toroidal magnetic field. GCR particles can also be more effectively shielded against by increasing the magnetic field strength. Our results also show that the introduction of a structural Al wall in the CMF did not provide additional shielding for GCR; in fact it can weaken the total shielding effect of the CMF. This study demonstrated the feasibility of accurately determining the radiation field inside the environment and evaluating the organ dose equivalents for astronauts under active shielding using the CMF. PMID:26484984

  15. Initiation-promotion model of tumor prevalence in mice from space radiation exposures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    Exposures in space consist of low-level background components from galactic cosmic rays (GCR), occasional intense-energetic solar-particle events, periodic passes through geomagnetic-trapped radiation, and exposure from possible onboard nuclear-propulsion engines. Risk models for astronaut exposure from such diverse components and modalities must be developed to assure adequate protection in future NASA missions. The low-level background exposures (GCR), including relativistic heavy ions (HZE), will be the ultimate limiting factor for astronaut career exposure. We consider herein a two-mutation, initiation-promotion, radiation-carcinogenesis model in mice in which the initiation stage is represented by a linear kinetics model of cellular repair/misrepair, including the track-structure model for heavy ion action cross-sections. The model is validated by comparison with the harderian gland tumor experiments of Alpen et al. for various ion beams. We apply the initiation-promotion model to exposures from galactic cosmic rays, using models of the cosmic-ray environment and heavy ion transport, and consider the effects of the age of the mice prior to and after the exposure and of the length of time in space on predictions of relative risk. Our results indicate that biophysical models of age-dependent radiation hazard will provide a better understanding of GCR risk than models that rely strictly on estimates of the initial slopes of these radiations.

  16. Polyethylene as a Radiation Shielding Standard in SimulatedCosmic-Ray Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Guetersloh, Stephen B.; Zeitlin, Cary; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Miller, Jack; Komiyama, Tatsudo; Fukumura, A.; Iwata, Y.; Murakami, T.; Bhattacharya M.

    2006-08-19

    Radiation risk management for human space missions dependson accurate modeling of high-energy heavy ion transport in matter. Theprocess of nuclear fragmentation can play a key role in reducing both thephysical dose and the biological effectiveness of the radiationencountered in deep space. Hydrogenous materials and light elements areexpected to be more effective shields against the deleterious effects ofGalactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) than aluminum, which is used in currentspacecraft hulls. NASA has chosen polyethylene, CH2, as the referencematerial for accelerator-based radiation testing of multi-functioncomposites that are currently being developed. A detailed discussion ofthe shielding properties of polyethylene under a variety of relevantexperimental conditions is presented, along with Monte Carlo simulationsof the experiments and other Monte Carlo calculations in which the entireGCR flux is simulated. The Monte Carlo results are compared to theaccelerator data and we assess the usefulness of 1 GeV/amu 56Fe as aproxy for GCR heavy ions. We conclude that additional accelerator-basedmeasurements with higher beam energies would be useful.

  17. Monte Carlo transport model comparison with 1A GeV accelerated iron experiment: heavy-ion shielding evaluation of NASA space flight-crew foodstuff.

    PubMed

    Stephens, D L; Townsend, L W; Miller, J; Zeitlin, C; Heilbronn, L

    2002-01-01

    Deep-space manned flight as a reality depends on a viable solution to the radiation problem. Both acute and chronic radiation health threats are known to exist, with solar particle events as an example of the former and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) of the latter. In this experiment Iron ions of 1A GeV are used to simulate GCR and to determine the secondary radiation field created as the GCR-like particles interact with a thick target. A NASA prepared food pantry locker was subjected to the iron beam and the secondary fluence recorded. A modified version of the Monte Carlo heavy ion transport code developed by Zeitlin at LBNL is compared with experimental fluence. The foodstuff is modeled as mixed nuts as defined by the 71st edition of the Chemical Rubber Company (CRC) Handbook of Physics and Chemistry. The results indicate a good agreement between the experimental data and the model. The agreement between model and experiment is determined using a linear fit to ordered pairs of data. The intercept is forced to zero. The slope fit is 0.825 and the R2 value is 0.429 over the resolved fluence region. The removal of an outlier, Z=14, gives values of 0.888 and 0.705 for slope and R2 respectively. PMID:12539754

  18. A computational model for an open-cycle gas core nuclear rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, D.I.; Kammash, T.

    1996-01-01

    A computational model of an open-cycle gas core nuclear rocket (GCR) is developed. The solution is divided into two distinct areas--thermal hydraulics and neutronics. To obtain the thermal-hydraulic solution, a computer code is written that solves the Navier-Stokes, energy, and species diffusion equations. The two-dimensional transport code TWODANT is used to obtain the neutronics solution. The thermal-hydraulic and neutronic models are coupled, and the solution proceeds in an iterative manner until a consistent power density profile is obtained. Various open-cycle GCR designs are evaluated. First, it is assumed that the fuel and propellant do not mix. In this ideal case, it is found that the limiting factor in determining thrust and specific impulse is the maximum allowable wall heat flux. Following this simplified study, the results from a complete thermal-hydraulic/neutronic solution are presented, and the use of alternate fuels and propellants is considered. Next, a parametric design study is conducted that examine the rocket performance of the open-cycle GCR as a function of various design and operational parameters. It is found that fuel containment is very adversely affected by high reactor power or rocket acceleration. Finally, some concepts are discussed that could help improve fuel containment.

  19. The Orbiting Astrophysical Spectrometer In Space (OASIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    The Orbiting Astrophysical Spectrometer In Space (OASIS) is an Advanced Concept currently understudy at NASA as a mission for the next decade. The goal of the OASIS mission is to identify a local site or sites where galactic cosmic rays (GCR) originate and are accelerated. The mission will allow GCR data to be used to investigate how elements are made and distributed in the galaxy and to improve our understanding of supernovae and the nucleosynthesis of the heavy elements needed for life. OASIS consists of two instruments that provide complementary data on the location and nature of the source(s) through investigating the composition of ultraheavy nuclei and the energy spectrum of electrons. OASIS will measure the relative abundances in the actinide group to determine the age of the r-process material in GCRs. The presence of young r-process material would indicate that GCRs are a sample of the interstellar medium in OB associations. OASIS will follow the electron spectrum to its high-energy end. The energy where this spectrum ends will tell us the distance to the nearest GCR source(s). OASIS will look for spectral features and anisotropy in the high energy electron spectrum that are expected to appear when only a few of the nearest sources can contribute the electron flux. Possibly these measurements will lead to the identification of the nearest cosmic ray electron source.

  20. Designing Spacecraft and Mission Operations Plans to Meet Flight Crew Radiation Dose Requirements: Why is this an "Epic Challenge" for Long-Term Manned Interplanetary Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Outline of presentation: (1) Radiation Shielding Concepts and Performance - Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) (1a) Some general considerations (1b) Galactic Cosmic Rays (2)GCR Shielding I: What material should I use and how much do I need? (2a) GCR shielding materials design and verification (2b) Spacecraft materials point dose cosmic ray shielding performance - hydrogen content and atomic number (2c) Accelerator point dose materials testing (2d) Material ranking and selection guidelines (2e) Development directions and return on investment (point dose metric) (2f) Secondary particle showers in the human body (2f-1) limited return of investment for low-Z, high-hydrogen content materials (3) GCR shielding II: How much will it cost? (3a) Spacecraft design and verification for mission radiation dose to the crew (3b) Habitat volume, shielding areal density, total weight, and launch cost for two habitat volumes (3c) It's All about the Money - Historical NASA budgets and budget limits (4) So, what can I do about all this? (4a) Program Design Architecture Trade Space (4b) The Vehicle Design Trade Space (4c) Some Near Term Recommendations